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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SATURDAY • 06.15.2019 • $2.50

Federal judge blasts officials for failure to comply with bail order

HEADING TO THE BLUES PARADE?

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — A federal judge on Friday blasted St. Louis officials and judges for failing to comply with a court order mandating hearings for those jailed because they are simply too poor to pay bail. U.S. District Judge Audrey Fleissig said her June 11 preliminary injunction in a civil case filed by inmates was “fairly consistent” with the new rules from the Missouri Supreme Court that go into effect July 1 limiting judges’ use of cash bail and how long a defendant can be jailed without a hearing. She said she was “somewhat appalled” and “disappointed” that St. Louis judges were not better prepared. Fleissig’s order bars St. Louis jails from holding inmates simply because they can’t pay bail and gave officials a week to hold new detention hearings for current inmates. Fleissig also said that lawyers for the defendants — judges and city officials — had seen a proposed order sought by lawyers for inmates in February and had lodged no objections to their ability to implement it until Please see BAIL, Page A4

COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

St. Louis to pay police captain $1.1 million

Paul Burge hangs championship banners on light polls along the Market Street parade route on Friday in downtown St. Louis.

T

he St. Louis Blues want to introduce their new friend, Stanley, to St. Louis. Stanley Cup in hand, the team will hold a victory parade Saturday in downtown St. Louis. Afterward, players, alumni and team officials will lead a victory celebration on the grounds of the Gateway Arch.

When: Noon Saturday

BY CHRISTINE BYERS

Parade: The parade will start at 18th and Market streets and will end at North Broadway and Market Street.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The city has settled a racial discrimination lawsuit involving a black St. Louis police captain for $1.1 million. Former police Chief Sam Dotson fired Capt. Ryan Cousins in June 2016 after accusing him of ordering officers to alter a police report and ignore evidence at the scene of an at- Cousins tempted burglary in the Baden neighborhood that year. A resident there was suspected of firing a shot at someone trying to break in. Police put the resident in handcuffs after discovering he was a felon in possession of a firearm.

Celebration: Arch grounds open at 6 a.m. Enter the Arch grounds through three security points — two in Luther Ely Smith Square at Fourth and Market streets; and one at the north end of the Arch grounds. Cost: Free Weather: Events will take place rain or shine. Rain is forecast, mostly in the morning. Refreshments: Concession stands on the Arch grounds will sell soda, water and beer (cash only). Soft-sided coolers with sealed nonalcoholic beverages will be allowed on the Arch grounds. No glass.

Please see POLICE, Page A4

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Travel advice: Arrive early. Anyone heading downtown is encouraged to use MetroLink or Metro buses.

Cargo planes pass over the stage set up Friday on the grounds of the Gateway Arch for the Blues victory celebration, which will be held Saturday.

These ramps are closed: Eastbound Interstate 44/northbound Interstate 55 to Walnut Street; and westbound Poplar Street Bridge to eastbound I-44 and Walnut Street.

north-south streets that feed into Market. Those north-south roads will be closed one block north of Market and one block south of Market. Also closed will be Clark Avenue from Tucker Boulevard to 18th.

Starting at 5 a.m. Saturday until after the parade, Market Street will be closed from 18th to Memorial Drive, along with all

If you skip it: The parade and rally will be televised live on FOX Sports Midwest and streamed live on FOX Sports GO. The

Missouri preparing to launch limited bridge replacement program

parade will re-air Sunday at 8 p.m. on FOX Sports Midwest. KTVI (Channel 2), KMOV (Channel 4) and KSDK (Channel 5) also plan to carry the festivities. More info: www.stlouisblues.com and gatewayarch.com/stanleycup

BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Billions of dollars for weedkiller research, plus a pledge to reduce the company’s environmental footprint by 30% through 2030, signaled more than a research and policy change. It also signaled a shift in tone for Bayer. On its website, along with a full-page ad in Friday’s Washington Post, Bayer said, “We listened. We learned.” “As a new leader in agriculture, Bayer

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri transportation officials are on track to begin replacing 40 bridges as part of a $350 million road improvement program approved by lawmakers and signed this week into law by Gov. Mike Parson. Most of the projects are small bridges in rural areas of the state. There are no bridges in St. Charles County on the list and only one is in St. Louis County. The work includes the replacement of the Ladue Road bridge that spans Hibler Creek in Creve Coeur. Work is scheduled to begin on that one later this fall. Other nearby projects include the Missouri Highway 30 bridge over Saline Creek in Jefferson County and the Highway 79 bridge over McLean’s Branch near Winfield.

Please see BAYER, Page A5

Please see BRIDGES, Page A4

Blues coverage in Sports >>> Bud Light’s ‘Gloria Brew’ to mark Stanley Cup championship, A7

Bayer is putting $5 billion toward a new kind of weed killer BY RACHEL SIEGEL

The Washington Post

Bayer, the crop science and chemicals giant, said it would invest more than $5.6 billion in weedkiller research and trim its environmental impact — a move that follows three consecutive jury verdicts involving one of its top-selling herbicides. Bayer acquired Creve Coeur-based Monsanto, the maker of Roundup weedkiller, in a $63 billion deal last year, creating the world’s largest seed and agro-

TODAY

chemical company. But the merger has left Bayer with a market valuation of $56 billion and a sustained public relations crisis. Bayer has been entangled in litigation over claims that Roundup causes cancer, even while the company has consistently defended the safety of glyphosate and Roundup. Just last month, Bayer said that “glyphosate-based products can be used safely and that glyphosate is not carcinogenic.”

Celebration Cup

Cards post a pair of victories

82°/72° THUNDERSTORMS

TOMORROW

83°/68° STORMS

WEATHER B10

SPORTS POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

Kehoe taking over during Parson trip

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Long standoff ends with suspect dead Man gets 18 years in hammer attack ITT student loans to be forgiven

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1 M • A7 Vol. 141, No. 166 ©2019

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A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 06.15.2019 1 1 SATURDAY • 06.15.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM WE LOVE PARADES

TIME’S RUNNING OUT

BUYING BLUES STUFF

Before the Blues celebration kicks off today, take a look at some of other parades our city has seen over the years. stltoday.com/archives

If you don’t have something for the fathers in your life, we have some last-minute gift help so he’s not forgotten on his big day. stltoday.com/lifestyles

From a book chronicling the Stanley Cup season to an ornament or a bottle (wine, of course), there are plenty of ways to capture memories of the Blues’ championship. stltoday.com/lifestyles

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St. Louis butcher Chris Bolyard hopes to make television cut LIFE, LIVED: Noémi Ban survived Nazis and then escaped Soviets beJOE HOLLEMAN fore coming to St. Louis and teaching St. Louis Post-Dispatch school for 17 years. Later in life, she became a respected author and lecturer about her family’s ordeals during the Holocaust. Ms. Ban died June 7 after a short illPRIME-CUT TIME: One of STL’s preness in Bellingham, Wash. She was 96. mier meat-cutters, Chris Bolyard, will “Our hearts are broken,” the Bellappear next week on “The Butcher,” ingham Herald quoted Rabbi Joshua a new television show on the History Samuels as saying during a memorial Channel. service. “Noémi’s life was simply reIn the upcoming episode — “Raising markable. We will miss her sorely.” the Steaks,” airing at 9 p.m. WednesBorn in 1922 in Hungary, Ms. Ban and day — four butchers will break down a her family were captured by invading whole deer in a limited amount of time, Nazis in 1944 and shipped to the Aususing a traditional flint knife. chwitz concentration camp — where The carver who produces the fewher mother, grandmother, younger sisest acceptable retail cuts will be ter and baby brother were killed in the eliminated. Last slicer standing wins gas chambers. $10,000. Ms. Ban, however, was picked as a Bolyard and his wife, laborer and sent to the Buchenwald Abbie, opened Bolyard’s camp. Later, while later being forced Meat & Provisions in to march to the Bergen-Belsen camp, Maplewood in 2014. PrePHOTO BY JENNIFER SILVERBERG she was rescued by U.S. troops. She viously, he was the chef de Chris Bolyard will appear on the History returned to Hungary and married Earcuisine for Kevin Nashan Channel’s “The Butcher,” which airs 9 p.m. nest Ban, the Herald reported. at Sidney Street Café. Wednesday. Ban The couple fled Hungary when the A watch party for the Soviets occupied the country in 1956 episode, sponsored by the funds postgraduate study, research and and ended up in St. Louis the next city of Maplewood, will year. be held at Schlafly Bottle- teaching in 155 countries. Ms. Ban earned an education deScannell wants to make it easier for works, 7260 Southwest Irish speakers, without having to switch gree in 1965 and began teaching sixth Ave. to English, to go online to access spell- grade at Oakville Elementary School. In a release from the (Earnest Ban, who died in 1994, taught ing and grammar checkers, dictionarshow’s tub-thumpers, Scannell math in Bayless schools.) ies and virtual assistants like “Siri” or Bolyard said, “It’s just In 1980, Ms. Ban was named teacher “Alexa.” awesome that there is of the year of the Mehlville School “Irish is the first official language in such an interest in butchering. It was an District and was runner-up for the Ireland even though it is only spoken incredible opportunity ... to help eduMissouri honors. The couple retired in cate the public on the skills that it takes daily by about 70,000 people,’ he said 1982 and moved to Washington, where in a statement. to butcher whole animals.” one of her sons lived. Starting in 2020, Scannell will work ERIN GO ONLINE: If you speak Irish After her husband’s death in 1994, with the Academy of Irish Language — and not just the occasional “Erin go Ms. Ban began speaking about her Hobragh” or “slainte” on St. Patrick’s Day University Education in County Gal— St. Louis University’s Kevin Scannell way, where many residents use Irish as locaust experiences. In 2003, she wrote the autobiography “Sharing is Healtheir everyday language. He also will is here to help. ing.” Her life was the subject of a 2007 A computer science professor, Scan- work to develop similar resources for other Celtic languages, such as Scottish documentary, “My Name is Noémi.” nell will spend six months in Ireland next year to research and develop com- and Manx Gaelic. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 At SLU since 1998, Scannell is direc- @stlsherpa on Twitter puting resources for the Irish language. And Scannell is getting help from the tor of the graduate program for comjholleman@post-dispatch.com puter science and software engineering. Fulbright Scholarship program, which

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FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50.The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

LOTTERY Multistate games MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 19-40-47-57-65 Mega ball: 6 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: TBA POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $79 million

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.4 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 19-20-26-33-38 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $459,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 470 Evening: 731 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 5588 Evening: 2376

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 10-23-29-36-44 Evening: 15-18-19-28-41 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $4.25 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 852 FB: 7 Evening: 798 FB: 8 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 7390 FB: 6 Evening: 3968 FB: 7

Parson to hand power to Kehoe while overseas BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is taking steps to temporarily hand over power to the state’s No. 2 officeholder later this month when he travels to Europe for a trade mission and a vacation. Under a plan that is still taking shape, the Post-Dispatch has learned Parson is planning to cede his gubernatorial powers to fellow Republican Lt. Gov. Mike Kehoe during the vacation portion of his overseas trip from June 23 to July 2. The maneuver will allow Kehoe to sign legislation on Parson’s behalf, including a proposal that will transfer oversight of the Missouri Arts Council from the Department of Economic Development to the lieutenant governor’s office. He also will have the ability to create a task force on food and beverage manufacturing in Missouri and appoint members to a Route 66 centennial commission. As acting governor, Kehoe won’t have the ability to pardon prisoners, commute sentences or many of the other powers given to the chief executive, administration officials said. Parson intends to resume his duties when he and first lady Teresa Parson return, officials said. Details of their vacation were not immediately available. The governor, who was appointed to the post June 1, 2018, after the resignation of scandal-plagued former Gov. Eric Greitens, is relying on a clause in the state

constitution that allows the chief executive to grant his powers to the lieutenant governor. Under that provision, he must submit a letter to legislative leaders declaring he is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office. Such moves are not common. But, Parson and Kehoe are from the same party and Parson appointed Kehoe to the No. 2 post after Parson took over as governor. The last time the event occurred was in 2005 when then-Gov. Matt Blunt ceded power to former Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder for a short period of time. In 2016, Kinder, a Republican, sent former Gov. Jay Nixon, a Democrat, a letter demanding Nixon grant him gubernatorial powers as Nixon was preparing to leave on an overseas trade mission. Kinder said the state needed a chief executive in the wake of violence against law enforcement officers, including a Ballwin police officer. “I believe MO needs a leader with the authority to defend her,” Kinder said in a tweet at the time. Nixon cancelled the trip and did not address Kinder’s request. The rules governing who’s in charge when a governor is traveling vary from state to state. For example, a provision of North Carolina’s constitution automatically elevates the lieutenant to acting governor when the full-time chief executive is ab-

sent from the state. A similar scenario has been in California law since 1849. It says a governor must be within the state borders to have the powers of the office. Parson departs for France Saturday as part of a trade mission to Europe that includes stops in Germany and Switzerland. In what will be his first overseas trip since taking off last year, the Republican will retrace the steps taken by his predecessors during a visit to the Paris Air Show. Nixon and Blunt also attended the air show to highlight Missouri’s aerospace industry, which includes Boeing Co. and its St. Louis-made F/A-18 Super Hornet fighter jets. Greitens was scheduled to go in 2017, but canceled after he called lawmakers back to the Capitol for a special session. The air show is set to get underway on Monday. Costs of the official portion of the trip will be shared between state taxpayers and the Hawthorn Foundation, a public/ private partnership created by then-Gov. Kit Bond to help fund gubernatorial travel expenses. Parson’s vacation will not be funded by taxpayers. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

BIRTHDAYS Singer Ruby Nash Garnett of Ruby and the Romantics is 85. Guitarist Leo Nocentelli of The Meters is 73. Actor Simon Callow (“Amadeus,” “Shakespeare in Love”) Cox is 70. Singer Russell Hitchcock of Air Supply is 70. Singer Steve Walsh (Kansas) is 68. Country singer Terri Gibbs is 65. Actor Jim Belushi is 65. Actress Julie Hagerty (“Airplane”) is 64. Actress Polly Draper

(“thirtysomething”) is 64. Guitarist Brad Gillis of Night Ranger is 62. Drummer Scott Rockenfield of Queensryche is 56. Actress Helen Hunt is 56. Actress Courteney Cox (“Friends”) Ice Cube is 55. Guitarist Tony Ardoin of River Road is 55. Guitarist Michael Britt of Lonestar is 53. Drummer Rob Mitchell of Sixpence None The Richer is 53. Rapper-actor Ice Cube is 50. Actress Leah Remini (“King of Queens”) is 49.

Actor Jake Busey (“Starship Troopers”) is 48. Trombone player T-Bone Willy of Save Ferris is 47. Actor Neil Patrick Harris (“How I Met Your Mother,” “Doogie Howser, M.D.”) is 46. Actress Elizabeth Reaser (“Twilight”) is 44. Singer Dryden Mitchell of Alien Ant Farm is 43. Former child actor Christopher Castle (“Step By Step,” “Beethoven” films) is 39. Guitarist Billy Martin of Good Charlotte is 38. Guitarist Wayne Sermon of Imagine Dragons is 35. Actor Denzel Whitaker is 29. — Associated Press

CORRECTION Nancy Kistler is a deputy city counselor for the city of St. Louis. A story in Friday’s A section about a gender bias lawsuit misidentified her title.


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Championship lawn

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Zac Pyles, 34, uses field-marking spray paint on Friday to add the Stanley Cup to the Blues logo he painted on the front yard of his home on En Cino Drive in Hazelwood. Pyles has been painting the logo on his lawn for years when the Blues make the playoffs. This year, he has altered the design twice, the first time adding the word “Gloria” to it when the Blues made the Stanley Cup Final, and again on Friday adding the Stanley Cup to the NHL champion Blues logo. The season ticket holder worked on the image for eight hours and used 32 cans of spray paint. “Everybody is getting excited about it, so that’s why I do it,” Pyles says. “It’s a good way to celebrate.”

Police From A1

Cousins appealed his termination to the city’s Civil Service Commission and filed a civil lawsuit against Dotson and the city alleging that a group of predominantly white officers lied to cover up their own mistakes during an “illegal search,” and that the department failed to train, instruct, supervise, control and/or discipline its staff. Cousins also alleged that the officers failed to read the burglary victim his Miranda rights. The settlement brings the city’s total payouts for racial discrimination lawsuits involving police officers to more than $2 million since 2014. Cousins mentioned the 2014 case involving former Sgt. David Bonenberger, who is white, in his lawsuit saying, in part, that the city had been warned then about racial discrimination. Bonenberger claimed in his suit that he had been passed over for a promotion in favor of a black officer, and won an additional settlement after claiming the department retaliated against him. Cousins’ attorneys, Lynette Petruska and J.C. Pleban of Pleban and Petruska Law, also represented Bonenberger in his cases, which ended in settlements of about $800,000. In June 2017, the city settled a racial discrimination lawsuit brought by Maj. Mike Caruso, who is white, for $300,000. He argued that Dotson had promoted a black man, Ronnie Robinson, to a lieutenant colonel position even though Caruso was the more qualified of the two. An African American woman, Rochelle Jones, also sued Dotson and the city over the same promotion, saying she was the victim of gender discrimination. A judge dismissed her suit this week. Dotson signed the settlement agreement with Cousins in May. Cousins withdrew his lawsuit against the city last week. The settlement reads, in part, “The city and Dotson deny that any of their actions with respect to Cousins up to the date of this agreement were improper or unlawful or violated any of Cousins’ constitutional or statutory rights; and deny

Bail From A1

after she entered the preliminary injunction. The underlying lawsuit was filed in January on behalf of inmates who say they were jailed not because they were a danger to the community or were flight risks, but simply because they were too poor to pay bail. They complain that judges have failed to seek out alternatives to bail. The lawsuit comes amid a widespread reexamination of cash bail practices. Lawyers for city officials said in filings that they were not disputing her conclusions on the constitutional failures of past bond hearings. But they asked Fleissig

that they are liable to Cousins.” It continues: “Cousins, and the city and Dotson, in order to avoid the uncertainty, delay and expense of continuing the lawsuit or any other dispute between them have agreed to settle fully and finally all differences between them that are in existence now or that may arise in the future.” Cousins and his attorneys will be paid $1 million as miscellaneous income and emotional pain and suffering and damage to Cousins’ professional reputation. The remaining $117,201 includes back pay for May 2016 through October 2017, according to the agreement. A clause in the settlement agreement notes that the only comment to the media from any of the parties shall read,“The matter has been resolved to the parties’ satisfaction.” The settlement agreement also ends a dispute between the city and its own Civil Service Commission, which reinstated Cousins in September 2017 with a written reprimand. Cousins had spent more than a year off duty when he was reinstated. The three-member panel concluded that Cousins did tell officers to disregard a shell casing at the scene and omit from a report the fact that shots had been fired. They said he did it as “an exercise of police discretion not to arrest a crime victim in his home after a call to police for help.” Cousins’ conduct “was not serious enough to warrant dismissal,” the commission wrote. The commission also agreed with Cousins’ attorneys when they argued that his discipline was more harsh compared with that of white officers involved in unrelated internal investigations. The examples were part of a report by the Ethical Society of Police, which represents black police officers, and included in the commission’s findings on Cousins. The city hired an outside law firm to handle its appeal of the Civil Service Commission’s ruling, which slammed the Ethical Society’s report and said the commission’s decision to reinstate Cousins was “arbitrary, capricious, unreasonable and involves an abuse of discretion.” The city has dropped its appeal, per the terms of the settlement.

on Thursday to put her order on hold while they appealed, or to give them more time to comply, listing the number of defendants charged with murder, sex crimes and other offenses that would be subject to the ruling. A clearly irritated Fleissig called it a “parade of horrors” that implied that people accused of murder would be released because of her order. She also seemed surprised that defendants would have been jailed on cash bonds with no judicial findings about whether they were a danger to the community. Robert Dierker, an associate St. Louis city counselor and former longtime judge, told Fleissig that judges would typically set high bonds for those accused of mur-

J.B. FORBES JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Traffic appeared to run smoothly during rush hour in 2012, despite rain and lane closures on the Blanchette Bridge over the Missouri River on I-70. Signs direct westbound motorists onto the narrow lanes.

Bridges From A1

Money to pay for the work is coming out of a $50 million fund set aside by lawmakers this spring as they attempted to craft a transportation improvement program without the aid of additional dollars from the state’s gasoline tax. The motor fuel tax typically pays for roadwork. But, in 2018, voters rejected a phased-in increase of 10 cents in the state’s 17-cents-per-gallon tax on gas. Parson, a Republican, had backed the tax hike as a way to address a growing backlog of road repairs facing the Missouri Department of Transportation. Without that additional revenue, he convinced lawmakers to allow MoDOT to sell $301 million in bonds to pay for repairs to 220 bridges across the state. But, as part of a deal with lawmakers reluctant to take out a loan for the work, the bonds will only be used if the state is awarded federal matching funds to replace

der, and occasionally allow no bond. Those bond settings were de facto substitutes for hearings at which someone’s danger to the community or risk of flight would be assessed, he said. “I was hopeful that that was not how the system worked,” she replied. Fleissig told lawyers on both sides to work together to prioritize hearings for those who did not receive even bond hearings and postpone hearings for those accused of murder who are unlikely to be released anyway. Jacqueline Kutnik-Bauder, a lawyer with the nonprofit ArchCity Defenders, said that 11 people had been released as a result of hearings Friday, including two who had been in jail for six months. But

the 59-year-old Interstate 70 bridge over the Missouri River near Rocheport. MoDOT Director Patrick McKenna said he believes Missouri has a good chance of receiving the grant because of the amount of commercial truck traffic plying I-70. “It puts us in a hopeful position,” McKenna told the PostDispatch. The state could find out by September whether the federal dollars are coming for the estimated $350 million project. Missouri’s application calls for the state to pay $105.2 million, and Columbia and Boone County each would provide $2 million. The state also would receive a $73.1 million federal loan. “It was a very aggressive application,” McKenna said. In January, the lack of bridges targeted for work in St. Charles County triggered outcry from the county’s two state senators, Republicans Bob Onder of Lake Saint Louis and Bill Eigel of Weldon Spring. Eigel said he took his concerns

she complained that there didn’t seem to be any movement by city judges to schedule more hearings. That prompted Fleissig to strongly suggest that judges hold 30 hearings per day in the next three working days. She said she expects both sides to work together on a plan and share it with her by next Friday. Toward the end of the hearing, Fleissig pointed out that roughly 45 people will be released without hearings through an agreement between prosecutors and defense lawyers. “This is a good thing” for the city, which no longer had to bear the cost of housing them, and for the defendants and their families, she said. She stressed that she was not proposing the release of

to Parson in hopes of addressing the absence of work in one of the state’s most populous counties. In making his pitch for the brige plan, Parson said the list of projects was not politically driven, because they were chosen by regional planning boards and then approved by the state Highways and Transportation Commission. After the first round of 40 bridges get underway, others the St. Louis region expected to be replaced include the $2.7 million replacement of a bridge over Happy Sac Creek in Franklin County and a $4.4 million replacement project at the intersection of Valley Dell Drive and Gravois Road in Jefferson County. Also on tap for work are the North Broadway bridge over Interstate 44 in St. Louis and the replacement of the Missouri Highway 47 bridge over Interstate 44 in St. Clair in Franklin County. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

inmates who pose a danger to the community, but “a proper procedure that is not based solely on money” and consistent with the new Supreme Court rules. Mary Fox, head of the public defender’s office, said in an interview after the hearing that Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner had reached out to Fox to try to work out a deal for the release of defendants before hearings. Fox said all were accused of nonviolent drug or property crimes and would likely be released Monday after any crime victims are notified. Fox said deals were also worked out for about six or seven other people prior to hearings Friday. Only three of 17 people who had hearings scheduled will stay in jail, she said.


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

NEWS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A5

DIGEST ST. LOUIS — Missouri River opened, shelters closed: The Missouri River is open again for navigation from Sioux City, Iowa, to St. Louis, but commercial and recreational boaters still face significant risks, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Coast Guard advise. The recent flooding probably affected navigation channels, posing unforeseen hazards, the corps said in a news release Friday. Flooding can cause sand bars, drift and snags to develop, posing a risk to vessels, the corps said. The river remains at moderate or major flood levels, and the Coast Guard is discouraging recreational boating near communities affected by floodwater. The Coast Guard last week closed the river from mile marker 330, near St. Louis, to mile marker 750, about 18 miles north of Sioux City. It reopened the river Thursday. Meanwhile, the Red Cross is closing two shelters that had been opened in response to flooding in the St. Louis area — one shelter in south St. Louis County and one in St. Charles County. The shelters are designed to be a shortterm solution for people forced from their homes by flooding. The Kennedy Recreation Center at 6050 Wells Road in St. Louis County was converted to a shelter June 4, but it has housed only a handful of people every night, Red Cross spokeswoman Sharon Watson said. The same is true of the shelter at St. John United Church of Christ at 405 South Street in St. Charles. Both shelters closed down Friday. “For the individuals there, we’ve had caseworkers come in to help them find longer term solutions,” Watson said. Winfield High School in Lincoln County is still operating as a shelter, officials said. On Friday evening the Mississippi River at St. Louis was still having major flooding at 43.6 feet and wasn’t expected to fall to moderate flood levels until sometime Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service. MACOMB, ILL. — Western Illinois president to step down: Jack Thomas announced Friday he will step down as president of Western Illinois University at the end of June after eight years in the post. Thomas told an audience of about 200 people that Western Illinois “would best be served by new leadership” at a “pivotal time” for the school. Thomas has been under fire from alumni and others. Enrollment at the state university has dropped 35% in the past decade, although administrators say it’s because of many factors, including population trends and cuts in state support. Western Illinois says it has 10,000 students at its Macomb campus and another location in Moline. CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO. — Bar featured in motion picture to reopen: A Missouri bar that served as a set location for the movie “Gone Girl” will reopen later this month. A representative for the management company that owns The Bar and several other downtown Cape Girardeau properties say the establishment will resume serving drinks June 27. It will be open Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays but no longer will serve food. It had been closed since last fall. Formerly a catering business, the corner site was transformed into The Bar for the 2014 film “Gone Girl” starring Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike and Neil Patrick Harris. After the movie was released, the set was converted into a real restaurant and bar.

Bayer From A1

has a heightened responsibility and the unique potential to advance farming for the benefit of society and the planet,” the company said. “We are committed to living up to this responsibility.” The company said “glyphosate will continue to play an important role in agriculture and in Bayer’s portfolio.” But the chemical has been a complicating factor since Monsanto was folded into the Bayer empire. One month ago, jurors awarded $2 billion to a California couple who blamed their cancer diag-

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Police units take cover as they monitor on Friday a home in the 14800 block of Frais Drive in north St. Louis County. A 42-year-old man who fired on police was shot and killed to end a 28-hour standoff at the house.

28-hour standoff ends with suspect dead BY KIM BELL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY — A 42-year-old man died Friday after being shot by a police officer in a standoff that began when he exchanged gunfire with officers trying to arrest him the day before. The 28-hour standoff is believed to be the longest ever in St. Louis County, according to Sgt. Benjamin Granda. It started about 8:15 a.m. Thursday when U.S. marshals with a fugitives task force came to a home in the 14800 block of Frais Drive to arrest Eric Phillips, 42, on drug possession and other warrants including being a felon in possession of a weapon, police said. Police announced just after 2 p.m. Friday that Phillips had been found dead inside the home after a technical operations of-

ficer fired one shot that struck him. Phillips was found with two gunshot wounds, and it is unclear if one was self-inflicted, Granda said. Armed with a rifle, Phillips had holed up inside his home, shot an armored vehicle that police were using as cover and shot a robot that police tried to send to the house to get a closer look. Bullets also struck homes and cars in the neighborhood, Granda said. No officers were injured. The home is near Vaile Avenue in an unincorporated pocket of north St. Louis County. Negotiators using a bullhorn Thursday night repeatedly told Phillips to come to the door with his hands empty, but he answered by shooting at them, police say. The force it took for the gunfire to break the windshield of the armored vehicle convinced police that the man was using a rifle. Police said that roughly 174 calls

were made to a working phone line within the home. Police say negotiators were met with “fierce resistance.” By midday Friday a police vehicle with a battering ram drove between two homes on Verdun Estates Drive, and minutes later repeated bangs were heard up the block. Police deployed gas to try to get Phillips out. Shots were first exchanged Thursday between Phillips and law enforcement officers. Granda said the shots were exchanged before tactical officers arrived. Granda said he didn’t know how many shots were fired in the first exchange. Police were trying to coax Phillips to surrender. On Friday morning, the standoff entered its second day. The county’s tactical operations team was still there, as well as police from St. Louis city and St. Charles County. Police warned the public about

the heavy police presence there and said access to some streets was limited. Officers were shown escorting some nearby residents to their homes. Harry Maier, who lives on Frais about four or five houses away from the standoff, said before 9 a.m. Friday that he was expecting police to take more aggressive action to try to end the standoff. Maier said his wife had been away from her home on an errand earlier in the day Friday and police wouldn’t let her back onto the block. Pam Green, who lives nearby, said, “This is not worth your life. (His family) must be terrified. This is a clean neighborhood. We don’t get in trouble over here.” Rachel Rice and Robert Patrick of the PostDispatch contributed to this report. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

Last attacker in hammer killing gets 18 years BY JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The fourth man who took part in a deadly hammer beating in the Bevo Mill neighborhood in 2014 was sentenced Friday to 18 years in prison. Travis Kidd, 20, was sentenced by Circuit Judge Bryan Hettenbach, who accepted terms of a Kidd plea deal between prosecutors and Kidd’s public defenders. Kidd pleaded guilty in April to a reduced count of second-degree murder — also called felony murder — which means someone died during the commission of a felony. In this case, that felony was assault. In exchange for Kidd’s guilty plea, a prosecutor dismissed a count of armed criminal action. Kidd was 16 when he, along with two 15-year-old boys and a 17-year-old, attacked and killed Zemir Begic in the 4200 block of Itaska Street. Begic was heading home from a bar with a friend and his girlfriend about 1:15 a.m. Nov. 30, 2014, when four teens ap-

noses on Roundup. Bayer shares plummeted, as they did following two other verdicts involving Roundup. In March, a jury awarded $80 million to a California man who said Roundup gave him non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. And in August, a jury in California awarded $289 million to a former groundskeeper who blamed Roundup for his terminal cancer. (A judge later reduced that amount to $78 million.) Beyond those verdicts, Bayer potentially faces thousands of other lawsuits from people who say their farming and landscaping work led to direct and sustained contact with Monsanto’s herbicides.

Zemir Begic is pictured with his fiancée, Arijana. proached and began damaging his car. Begic got out to confront the teens, who began yelling at him and striking him with hammers. On Friday, Kidd’s lawyer Don Catlett asked for a 12-year term in light of testimony from his grandmother about Kidd’s toxic upbringing. His grandmother spoke of illegal drug use by relatives, a father and stepfather both in prison and his mother in a string of physically abusive re-

lationships. Kidd also was diagnosed with depression and other mental illnesses. Hettenbach said he understood Kidd’s stressful childhood but labeled all of those factors as explanations for Kidd’s behavior, not excuses for an “inexcusable crime.” Kidd apologized in court Friday and said the attack on Begic was a mistake. “I hope to be able to prove to

Still, the Environmental Protection Agency handed the company a regulatory victory earlier this year, saying that it continues to find “no risks to public health when glyphosate is used in accordance with its current label” and that “glyphosate is not a carcinogen.” Ken Cook, president and cofounder of the nonprofit Environmental Working Group, said that if Bayer is serious about reforming its products, it has to commit to a “fundamentally new paradigm for pesticides, which must start with a simple principle: This class of chemicals should not end up in people.” EWG has raised concerns about

glyphosate’s hazards for children’s health. On Wednesday, EWG published a report saying that Roundup had been detected in 21 cereals and snack products tested by the organization. When Bayer bought Monsanto, the company likely thought it could ride the support of the EPA and other regulators through any legal risks involving Roundup, said Anthony Johndrow, an expert on how corporations manage crises. But the company underestimated the reputational damage that came from those lawsuits, and how they damaged the company’s public perception. Friday’s announcement — “We

Zemir’s family and the state of Missouri who I really am,” Kidd said. All four teens were originally charged with first-degree murder and armed criminal action in the hammer attack, which rocked St. Louis’ Bosnian community and led to street protests. Robert Mitchell, now 21, Darrian Johner, now 20, and Juan Carlos FabianLutz, now 20, previously pleaded guilty to reduced charges. Mitchell and Johner received 18-year prison terms from Hettenbach last year. Fabian-Lutz pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in January 2017 and received a 25-year sentence as part of a program that requires biannual progress reports until his 21st birthday, when he is eligible for probation or parole. Zemir Begic and his family immigrated to the United States after the war in Bosnia, his relatives have said. He drove a moving truck in Phoenix, then moved to St. Louis to be with his girlfriend.. Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

listened. We learned.” — is one step toward showing consumers and industries wary of glyphosate that Bayer is sincerely making a change, Johndrow said. That includes Bayer making its decisions more transparent: the company published its glyphosate safety studies and said it will invite scientists, journalists and nongovernmental organizations to Europe as part of a glyphosate re-registration process. “[Bayer] knew what they were buying [with Monsanto], they knew what they were getting,” Johndrow said. “This is theirs going forward, whether they like it or not.”


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

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06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A7

M 1 SAturdAy • 06.15.2019 • A7

U.S. says $168 million ITT student loans to be forgiven

BUSINESS DIGEST Boeing wins $6.5 billion defense contract for smart bomb kit: Boeing Co. has been awarded a $6.5 billion U.S. defense contract for Joint Direct Attack Munition tail kits, spares, repairs and technical services, the Pentagon said on Friday. The kits are made at Boeing’s plant in St. Charles.

the economy reached its 10th year of expansion, tying the 1990s as the longest on record. Measures of consumer confidence, after stumbling this spring amid the ongoing U.S.-China trade war, have returned to nearly 19-year highs. The figures also lessen pressure on the Federal Reserve to cut shortterm interest rates. Other recent data, such as weak job growth in May and choppy consumer spending earlier this year, has led most economists to expect at least one or two cuts this year.

Two key advisory firms support Centene’s WellCare acquisition: Ten days ahead of the vote that decides whether healthcare giant Centene Corp.will acquire its competitor,WellCare Health Plans Inc., two key advisory firms are encouraging stockholders to vote ‘yes.’ Proxy advisory firm Glass Lewis was the latest to issue its recommendation in favor of the deal, in the same week that Clayton-based health insurer Centene announced that another firm, Institutional Shareholder Services, had given its vote of confidence. The deal announced in March still faces regulatory approval, as Glass Lewis noted in its report. “The Centene/WellCare merger would create the largest healthcare company focused on governmentsponsored programs and thus could draw the ire of regulators,” the report said. Stockholders will decide on the acquisition in a vote on June 24. The deal,valued at more than $17 billion, is expected to close in the first half of 2020. The combined company would have about 22 million members in the U.S., Centene and Tampa-based WellCare reported in March.

BY JONATHAN STEMPEL, REUTERS

Former students at ITT Technical Institute locations nationwide, including two in the St. Louis area, will not have to pay $168 million they still owe on private loans from an affiliated lender to attend the nowdefunct for-profit college, under a U.S. regulatory settlement announced on Friday. Student CU Connect CUSO, created in 2008 to fund and manage loans for ITT students, reached the settlement with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 44 states and Washington to resolve claims over its alleged shoddy business practices. The accord also requires CUSO to stop collecting on loans, ask consumer reporting agencies to effectively delete its loans from students’ credit profiles, and tell borrowers they no longer owe money on the loans. Court approval is required. CUSO did not admit wrongdoing. ITT Educational Services Inc, which ran ITT Technical Insti-

Senators introduce bill to overhaul biofuel waiver program: Two U.S. senators said Friday they had introduced a bill to reform the Environmental Protection Agency’s biofuel waiver program, which the corn industry says helps oil companies at the expense of farmers by threatening ethanol demand. The bill, introduced by Democrat Tammy Duckworth of Illinois and Republican Deb Fischer of Nebraska, would impose a June 1 deadline for refineries to apply for the waivers that exempt them from blending ethanol into gasoline, so the EPA has time to calculate the volumes waived and apply them to the next year’s blending mandates, the senators said in a statement. It would require the agency to report to lawmakers on the methodology used to decide whether a waiver is granted, and would make other elements of the largely confidential waiver process more transparent. The bill’s introduction comes after reports the Trump administration’s EPA had given waivers to facilities run by majors like Exxon Mobil and Chevron. Under the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard, refiners are required to blend increasing volumes of biofuels into their fuel each year or buy credits from those who do,creating a 15-billion-gallon annual market for ethanol. But small facilities can apply for an exemption if they prove that compliance with the RFS would cause them financial hardship, and the EPA can grant them secretly in a process they say protects confidential business information.

U.S. retail sales rose 0.5% in May, led by online shopping: Americans stepped up their retail spending last month, a sign that recent worries about cautious consumers dragging on growth may have been overdone. The Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales rose 0.5% in May, after a smaller gain of 0.3% in the previous month. April’s figure was revised up from an earlier estimate that had showed a decline. The report suggests that American consumers are still spending at a healthy pace, even as the stimulus from tax cuts fades. In June,

first issuing “temporary credits” to cover the gaps between their tuition and other federal aid. Many students thought the credits were similar to federal loans and would not become due until after they graduated. But when credits became due sooner, ITT pressured many students into taking out CUSO loans with initial fees as high as 10% and interest rates as high as 16.25%, according to authorities. By January 2017, CUSO was projecting an overall 94% default rate on its loans, authorities said. Last November, a federal bankruptcy judge in Indiana approved a separate settlement forgiving nearly $600 million of ITT student debt. ITT Tech had four campuses in Missouri — Kansas City, Springfield, Earth City and Arnold — with about 700 students in the state. Following its closure, several schools in the St. Louis area welcomed displaced ITT students, including Ranken Technical College and Webster University.

ITT Tech had four Missouri campuses

FILE PHOTO

The former Earth City campus of ITT Technical Institute in 2016. tute, closed its roughly 130 campuses and filed for bankruptcy in September 2016, amid growing regulatory scrutiny of for-profit colleges’ recruiting and financing practices. The closure affected an estimated 35,000 students and 8,000 employees. Another large chain, Corinthian Colleges, shut down in 2015. Susan Schwartz, a lawyer for CUSO, said in an email that the lender always acted properly in administering its student loan program, and “was a victim of, not an accessory to” any misconduct that many have occurred at ITT. Authorities said ITT typically targeted vulnerable students by

The Post-Dispatch contributed to this story.

Bud Light’s ‘Gloria Brew’ to mark Blues’ Cup victory FROM STAFF REPORTS

Anheuser Busch InBev, which has its U.S. headquarters in St. Louis, is toasting the St. Louis Blues’ Stanley Cup win with a special edition of Bud Light called ‘Gloria Brew.’ Gloria Brew’s blue and gold packaging will highlight signatures from players. The beer is expected to debut later this summer. The Blues adopted the song Gloria by Laura Branigan as their celebratory anthem in their march to the Stanley Cup

Final. “Gloria is already ingrained into Blues history and the city of St. Louis, so Bud Light is toasting our hometown team by doing what we do best — brewing beer,” Vice President of Marketing Andy Goeler said in a statement, adding the song “Gloria” will be played at the St. Louis brewery the next three weeks while the beer is brewed. Visitors are welcome to the brewery to witness the beer being brewed, A-B said.

“As long-time partners of the Blues, we wanted to do something special for their first championship and we thought infusing this beer with the actual sound of Blues Victory was the perfect way to congratulate the team on making history,” Goeler’s statement continued. Additionally, A-B said Friday that Bud Light will release special-edition championship aluminum bottles featuring the Blues logo, “2019 Champs” and “Gloria Gloria” in early July.

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks ended a choppy week of trading with modest losses Friday as investors look forward to getting more clues about the direction of interest rates. Technology shares drove the declines, and energy stocks also fell a day after leading the market.

Innovative Ind. Properties IIPR

G. B. Therapeutics

Close: $108.48 7.57 or 7.5% The real estate company raised its dividend by 33%.

Close: $53.98 -3.54 or -6.2% The drug developer reported positive results from a study of its potential sickle cell disease treatment.

$120

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$31.61 Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

$110.39

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25,480

Close: 26,089.61 Change: -17.16 (-0.1%)

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2,820

Close: 2,886.98 Change: -4.66 (-0.2%)

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453 896.75 538.50

+11 +8.75 +3

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DATE

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CHG

Feeder cattle

135.52 108.77 79.37 16.31 263.45

-.70 -.28 +.15

Copper

Aug 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19

-2.65

ICE

DATE

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CHG

Cotton

Jul 19 Jul 19 Sep 19

65.94 96.00 26.55

-.89 -1.35 +.11

NEW YORK

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Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

52.51 1.7325 182.94 2.387

Hogs

2,600

Milk

2,400

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NASD 1,765 1,793 1041 1875 65 80

2,883 2,967 1064 1655 124 70

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StocksRecap NYSE

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DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 26162.28 10353.07 817.55 12813.00 7819.21 2894.45 1908.98 29759.45 1535.32

LOW 25988.09 10218.81 808.50 12767.84 7778.13 2879.62 1898.01 29620.16 1522.42

CLOSE 26089.61 10305.30 815.55 12787.24 7796.66 2886.98 1899.92 29684.75 1522.50

CHG. -17.16 -42.06 +7.97 -40.27 -40.47 -4.66 -12.53 -78.85 -13.30

%CHG. WK -0.07% s -0.41% s +0.99% s -0.31% s -0.52% s -0.16% s -0.66% s -0.26% s -0.87% s

MO QTR s s t t s s s s t s s s s s s s t t

YTD +11.84% +12.38% +14.39% +12.42% +17.50% +15.16% +14.24% +15.28% +12.90%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.30 32.35 +.06 +0.2 +13.3 +6.5

2.04 General Motors

GM

Aegion Corp

AEGN

14.12

26.80 16.30

-.02 -0.1

-0.1 -36.2 21

... Home Depot

HD

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.43

1.80

-.03 -1.8

-1.5 -36.8 dd

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

70.31 61.29 +.46 +0.8

+4.6 -10.7 17

77.55 76.71 +.50 +0.7 +17.6 +40.1 27

3.48

6

1.14 Lee Enterprises 1.90 Lowes

Ameren Corp

AEE

56.97

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

64.55 106.86 84.18 -1.75 -2.0 +27.9 -10.1 21 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 75.09 101.92 88.65 +.52 +0.6 +6.8 +7.8 6 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

31.91 28.04 +.10 +0.4 +13.8

-4.4 11

0.60

Belden Inc

BDC

37.79

76.39 58.44

-1.7 11

0.20

Boeing

BA

-2.1 32

8.22

6.02

-.04 -0.7 +52.4 -21.8 dd

... 0.28

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

7.97

3.19 +.54 +20.4 +23.6 -65.5 dd -.80 -1.4 +39.9

292.47 446.01 347.16 -1.70 -0.5 3.75

9.35

+7.6

... McDonald’s

Caleres Inc.

CAL

18.33

41.09 19.93

-.17 -0.8 -28.4 -40.6 10

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.35

62.08 45.07

-.42 -0.9 -14.8 -15.2 13 1.04b

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 53.55

-.19 -0.4

... -13.8 15

...

Charter

CHTR 271.56 397.68 392.08 +2.36 +0.6 +37.6 +36.7 78

...

Cigna

CI

Citigroup

C

Olin

CBSH

53.40

72.55 59.31 +.35 +0.6

EPC

28.18

59.16 30.61

-.37 -1.2 -18.0 -36.0 16

Emerson

EMR

55.39

79.70 62.77

-.43 -0.7

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.71

65.57 42.09 -1.13 -2.6

+5.2

-3.7 15

30.56

44.14 35.66

-.36 -1.0

+6.6 -15.6 dd

1.52 5.44

1.57

5.75

2.60

-.05 -1.9 +44.4 -49.5 dd

...

1.84

3.69

2.25

-.01 -0.4

...

84.75 118.23 99.63 +1.01 +1.0 8.42

36.65

9.28

+6.6

-9.6

+7.9 +1.1 22 2.20f

-.57 -5.8 -41.3 -48.0

...

MA

171.89 269.85 260.10 -1.10 -0.4 +37.9 +31.6 60

MCD

153.13 206.39 205.29 +.80 +0.4 +15.6 +25.5 31

Peabody Energy

BTU

22.19

47.07 21.74

SKIS

3.75

+8.8 -24.1

5

-.52 -2.3 -28.7 -46.3

1.32 4.64 0.80

0.28

32.92 32.69 +.41 +1.3 +46.9 +20.0 40

...

Perficient

PRFT

20.92

POST

83.04 113.73 103.28 -1.52 -1.5 +15.9 +24.0 11

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

127.84 153.61 153.45 +1.68 +1.1

RELV SR

67.05

87.13 84.72

-.02

Stifel Financial

SF

38.39

59.93 56.59

-.91 -1.6 +36.6

TGT

60.15

90.39 87.79

-.51 -0.6 +32.8 +15.6 15 2.64f

UPS

89.89 125.09 101.62

1.96 US Bancorp -6.8 -26.2 28 1.20f US Steel +8.7 -24.9 11 0.60f Verizon

USB

43.14

5.89

55.56 52.62

-.08 -1.6 +16.1 +5.2 dd

... 2.40

Reliv

3.80

4.92

+9.4 +5.7 14

Spire Inc

+5.1 -10.5 20

... +14.4 +33.4 19

-.40 -0.4

+4.2

-3.3 18

-9.9 17

-.07 -0.1 +15.1 +5.9 13

X

11.67

38.89 13.78

VZ

47.13

61.58 58.28 +.66 +1.1

-.49 -3.4 -24.5 -61.3 +3.7 +26.6

...

1.48

8

0.20

7

2.41

36.09

58.15 40.91

-.10 -0.2

78.32 75.29

-.93 -1.2 +14.3 +32.2 21

0.32 WalMart

WMT

82.37 109.58 109.07 +.42 +0.4 +17.1 +31.7 63 2.12f

-.00 -0.5 -76.9 -75.4 dd

0.13 Walgreen Boots

WBA

49.31

86.31 52.57

WFC

43.02

59.53 45.59 +.30 +0.7

FELP FF

0.60 10.22

4.10

.81

19.31 10.63

-.12 -1.1 -33.0 -21.3 13 0.24a Wells Fargo

-.32 -0.6 -23.1 -14.5 10 -1.1 -14.7 10

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.50 5.25 5.00

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.17 2.17 2.01 1.83 1.84 1.96 2.09 2.59

-0.02 ... +0.01 -0.01 +0.02 ... ... -0.01

1.92 2.06 2.31 2.57 2.81 2.90 2.94 3.06

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS 2.38 2.13 1.88

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.57 2.61 6.12 3.48 3.35 .42

-0.02 -0.04 -0.04 -0.03 -0.04 +0.05

2.06 3.37 6.26 3.98 4.04 .81

GlobalMarkets

3.84

56.65

Foresight Energy

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note was unchanged at 2.09% on Friday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

TREASURIES

0.60

Enterprise Financial EFSC

FutureFuel

+.90 -.09 -4.70

2.37

Esco Technologies

ESE

Silver

0.56f

-.03 -0.7 -14.7 -14.0 dd

5.55

3.99

-.60 -2.7

Post Holdings

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

CHG

CLOSE

1340.10 14.78 804.70

Gold Platinum

158.09 215.43 205.77 +3.42 +1.7 +19.8 +3.4 21

Peak Resorts

0.04

.0230 .6916 .2590 1.2682 .7504 .1445 1.1279 .0144 .2777 .009230 .052225 .0155 .0673 .000845 1.0065

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

32.00 21.88

1.80

Commerce Banc.

52-WK LO HI

17.87

75.24 67.48 +.40 +0.6 +29.6 +2.4 10

Edgewell

LOW MNK

+.23 +.0126 +2.28 +.062

PREV

.0227 .6866 .2567 1.2583 .7453 .1444 1.1207 .0143 .2777 .009212 .052240 .0155 .0675 .000842 1.0008

Interestrates Interestrates

OLN

141.95 226.61 158.41 +.30 +0.2 -11.9 -10.2 15 48.42

LEE

$442.00 PE: 14.4 Yield: ...

Vol.: 617.0k (0.8x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $32.9 b

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest

J

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

22,000 21,000

A M 52-week range

ExchangeRates

DATE

Live cattle

M

$295.27

$32.16

CHICAGO BOT

Wheat

25,000

23,000

400

$20.39

Soybeans

10 DAYS

2,800

24,000

$500

Futures

S&P 500

REGN

Close: $305.24 -2.18 or -0.7% The drug developer reported positive early-stage data for a potential lymphoma treatment.

Vol.: 4.7m (2.0x avg.) PE: 11.2 Mkt. Cap: $3.2 b Yield: 2.1%

PE: ... Yield: ...

3,000

27,000

22

$63.00

Vol.: 3.0m (4.5x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $3.0 b

2,920

2,720

10 DAYS

Regeneron Pharma

LPX

Close: $25.68 0.81 or 3.3% The building products company named F. Nicholas Grasberger III, CEO of Harsco Corp., to its board of directors. $26 24

$30.15

Vol.: 513.5k (1.3x avg.) PE: 113.9 Mkt. Cap: $1.1 b Yield: 1.7%

26,280

24,680

J

Louisiana-Pacific

GBT

1.76 1.80

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2886.98 12096.40 7345.78 27118.35 5367.62 43130.65 21116.89 98040.06 16301.91 9847.61

CHG

CHG

YTD

-4.66 -72.65 -22.79 -176.36 -8.01 -352.55 +84.89 -733.63 +62.65 -14.22

-0.16% -0.60% -0.31% -0.65% -0.15% -0.81% +0.40% -0.74% +0.39% -0.14%

+15.16% +14.56% +9.18% +5.04% +13.46% +3.58% +5.51% +11.55% +13.82% +16.83%


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

NATION&WORLD MIDDLE EAST | OIL TANKERS ATTACKED

DIGEST

Small donors help Notre Dame effort PARIS — The billionaire French donors who publicly proclaimed they would give hundreds of millions to rebuild Notre Dame have not yet paid a penny toward the restoration of the French national monument, according to church and business officials. Instead, it’s mainly American and French individuals, via Notre Dame charitable foundations, that are behind the first donations paying the bills and salaries for up to 150 workers employed by the cathedral since the April 15 fire that devastated its roof and caused its masterpiece spire to collapse. This month they are handing over the first private payment for the cathedral’s reconstruction of $4 million. “The big donors haven’t paid. Not a cent,” said Andre Finot, senior press official at Notre Dame. “They want to know what exactly their money is being spent on and if they agree to it before they hand it over, and not just to pay employees’ salaries.”

Trump: ‘Iran did it’ He hopes US threats will force Islamic Republic into talks BY ROBERT BURNS AND LOLITA C. BALDOR

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Friday blamed Iran for attacks on oil tankers near the strategic Strait of Hormuz, but he also held out hope that implicit U.S. threats to use force will yield talks with the Islamic Republic as the Pentagon considers beefing up defenses in the Persian Gulf area. A day after explosions blew holes in two oil tankers just outside Iran’s territorial waters, rattling international oil markets, the

administration seemed caught between pressure to punish Iran and reassure Washington’s Gulf Arab allies without drawing the U.S. closer to war. “Iran did it,” Trump said on Fox News Channel’s “Fox & Friends.” He didn’t offer evidence, but the U.S. military released video it said showed Iran’s Revolutionary Guard removing an unexploded mine from one of the oil tankers targeted near the Strait of Hormuz, suggesting Tehran wanted to cover its tracks. By pointing the finger at Iran, Trump was keeping a public spotlight on an adversary he accuses of terrorism but also has invited to negotiate. The approach is similar to his diplomacy with North Korea, which has quieted talk of

war but not yet achieved his goal of nuclear disarmament. Iran has shown little sign of backing down, creating uncertainty about how far the Trump administration can go with its campaign of increasing pressure through sanctions. Iran denied any involvement in the attacks and accused Washington of waging an “Iranophobic campaign” of economic warfare. A U.S. Navy team on Friday was aboard one of the tankers, the Japanese-owned Kokuka Courageous, collecting forensic evidence, according to a U.S. official who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a sensitive operation. Apparently alluding to the U.S. video, Trump said Iran’s culpability had been “exposed.” He did not

say what he intended to do about it but suggested “very tough” U.S. sanctions, including efforts to strangle Iranian oil revenues, would have the desired effect. “They’ve been told in very strong terms we want to get them back to the table,” Trump said. Just a day earlier, the president took the opposite view, tweeting that it was “too soon to even think about making a deal” with Iran’s leaders. Trump last year withdrew the United States from an international agreement to limit Iran’s nuclear program that was signed in 2015 under his predecessor, President Barack Obama. He has since then re-instated economic sanctions aimed at compelling the Iranians to return to the negotiating table.

UN: Ebola outbreak not yet global crisis GENEVA — The World Health Organization on Friday said the Ebola outbreak in Congo — which spilled into Uganda this week — is an “extraordinary event” of deep concern but does not yet merit being declared a global emergency. The U.N. health agency convened its expert committee for the third time to assess the outbreak, which some experts say met the criteria to be designated an international emergency long ago. This outbreak, the seconddeadliest in history, has killed more than 1,400 people since it was declared in August. Three members of the family who brought the virus into Uganda have died after attending the burial of an infected relative, a popular pastor, in Congo. Speaking to journalists after the meeting, Dr. Preben Aavitsland, the acting chair of the committee, announced that the outbreak is “a health emergency in the Democratic Republic of the Congo” but that the situation should not be declared a global one. BRIEFLY CONWAY: President Donald Trump said Friday he won’t fire White House adviser Kellyanne Conway following a government watchdog’s recommendation she be “removed from federal service” for disparaging Democratic presidential candidates in her official capacity as a senior White House adviser. OFFICIAL RESIGNS: Mexico’s immigration chief presented his resignation Friday and the country’s prisons director was swiftly nominated to replace him, as the country embarks on a crackdown on irregular migration through its territory in response to U.S. pressure. NAVAL COLLEGE: Rear Adm. Shoshana Chatfield, a helicopter pilot who heads a military command in Guam, will be the first female leader of the U.S. Naval War College, the Navy announced Friday, days after removing the college president who came under investigation over questionable behavior. TRUMP TAXES: The Justice Department issued a legal opinion Friday finding that Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin was right to withhold President Donald Trump’s tax records from the House Ways and Means Committee, which subpoenaed six years of Trump’s tax returns in May. OPIOID LAWSUITS: Lawyers suing over the toll of opioids asked a judge Friday to allow a structure for all 25,000 municipal and county governments in the U.S. to be paid — if a settlement can be reached with companies that make and distribute powerful prescription painkillers. FIRST FAMILY: Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner took in as much as $135 million in revenue during 2018, generated from their vast real estate holdings, stocks and bonds and even a book deal, according to their financial disclosures released Friday. — Associated Press

VINCENT YU, ASSOCIATED PRESS

HONG KONG LEADER URGED TO DELAY CONTROVERSIAL EXTRADITION MEASURES Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam faced calls from both outside and within her government Friday to delay extradition legislation that has spurred massive protests. Some members of the Executive Council, Hong Kong’s Cabinet, said she should perhaps rethink plans to rush the bills’ passage. Meanwhile, a group of former senior government officials urged her not to force a confrontation by pushing ahead with the unpopular bills, which would allow Hong Kong suspects to be tried in mainland China. Many in Hong Kong fear the measures would undermine the former British colony’s legal autonomy. Above, hundreds of mothers protest Friday against amendments to the extradition law after Wednesday’s violent protest in Hong Kong.

ELECTION INTERFERENCE

President walks back statement Trump says he’d go to FBI with foreign dirt, but would look at it BY JONATHAN LEMIRE AND ZEKE MILLER

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump shifted gears Friday on election interference, saying “of course” he would go to the FBI or the attorney general if a foreign power offered him dirt about an opponent. Trump’s new stance was a walk back — to a degree — after he set off a Washington firestorm earlier in the week by asserting he

would not necessarily contact law enforcement if offered damaging material from an overseas source. But in his latest comments, the president still said he would look at the proffered information to see whether it was “incorrect.” “Of course, you have to look at it,” Trump said during a birthday appearance on “Fox and Friends.” He added: “But of course, you give it to the FBI or report it to the attorney general or somebody like that. You couldn’t have that happen with our country, and everybody understands that.” That was a step back from his comments to ABC days earlier. “OK, let’s put yourself in a position: You’re a congressman, some-

body comes up and says, ‘Hey I have information on your opponent.’ Do you call the FBI? You don’t,” Trump said in an interview that aired Wednesday.“I’ll tell you what. I’ve seen a lot of things over my life. I don’t think in my whole life I’ve ever called the FBI.” His assertion that he would be open to accepting a foreign power’s help in his 2020 campaign alarmed Democrats, who condemned it as a call for further election interference while Republicans struggled to defend his comments. Special counsel Robert Mueller painstakingly documented Russian efforts to boost Trump’s campaign and undermine that

of his Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton. Meanwhile, House Democrats are accelerating their efforts to strengthen election security ahead of the 2020 campaign. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Democrats are now pushing ahead with votes on House bills seek to secure state election systems, put stricter limits on foreign election interference and provide more oversight of the executive branch, according to aides familiar with the legislation. The House could vote as soon as next week on the first bill in the package, a series of measures to improve state election systems with paper ballots, audits and funding of grants to states.

Homan selected as NBC sets pairings for new ‘border czar’ Democratic debates Trump loyalist served as ICE acting director, but decided to retire BY COLLEEN LONG

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Friday said he was bringing a longtime lawman and enthusiastic supporter out of retirement to serve as “border czar” as his administration struggles with a worsening crisis that his hard-line immigration policies have failed to stem. Thomas Homan most recently led U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement as acting director and was nominated for the job permanently, but bowed out because he wanted to retire. He has spent the months since promoting Trump’s policies on Fox News.

“Tom Homan’s coming back,” Trump told “Fox & Friends” during a telephone interview.“He’s going to be very much involved with the border. ... He’ll be a border czar, reporting directly to me.” Meanwhile, the Trump administration is facing growing complaints from migrants about severe overcrowding, meager food and other hardships at border holding centers, with some people at an encampment in El Paso being forced to sleep on the bare ground. The Border Network for Human Rights issued a report Friday based on dozens of testimonials of immigrants over the past month and a half, providing a snapshot of cramped conditions and prolonged stays in detention amid a record surge of migrant families coming into the U.S. from Central America.

Biden, Sanders top bill on 2nd night; Warren, Booker in opener BY DAVID BAUDER

Associated Press

NEW YORK — NBC set the lineup for its two-night debate of 2020 presidential contenders this month, with a top-heavy second session that will pit former Vice President Joe Biden against 2016 Democratic runner-up, Bernie Sanders, the youthful Mayor Pete Buttigieg and California Sen. Kamala Harris. The first night, June 26 in Miami, is headlined by Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Cory Booker of New Jersey, along with former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke. Representatives of 20 campaigns gathered in a conference

room at NBC headquarters Friday to watch slips of paper with candidates’ names picked out of two boxes to set the lineups. The debate will be shown both nights in prime time, 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. Featured on June 26 will be Warren,Booker,O’Rourke,Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio. The next night’s lineup has Biden, Sanders, Harris, Buttigieg, Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, author Marianne Williamson, entrepreneur Andrew Yang and Rep. Eric Swalwell of California.


NEWS

06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

Aldermen may waive buffer zones for marijuana centers BY MARK SCHLINKMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — City aldermen on Friday gave preliminary approval to zoning rules for medical marijuana facilities, deciding against imposing a buffer zone separating them from elementary and high schools, churches and day cares. The state law approved by Missouri voters last year sets a 1,000-foot distance requirement regarding such locations but allows local governments to waive it. St. Louis zoning officials recommended doing just that because they say the city’s high density would make it very difficult to find any sites meeting the 1,000-foot standard. “It would be pretty hard to do anything anywhere,” the ordinance’s sponsor, Alderman Jack Coatar, D-7th Ward, said in an interview. “You’d be very limited.” The measure instead allows dispensaries selling marijuana products in city commercial districts if selected by state health officials, who will decide which applications will be accepted. “We create a framework that allows access to these places,” he told fellow aldermen Friday. “These are not liquor stores, these are not corner stores, these are medical facilities” for people with debilitating diseases. However, Coatar said, neighborhoods would have some input on whether dispensaries could be in some commercial districts close to residences. A public hearing and approval by a city board would be required for dispensaries in such areas. Examples include a stretch

DAVID DERMER

In this Sept. 20, 2018, file photo, an employee at an Ohio medical marijuana cultivator works on topping a marijuana plant. of Morganford Road north of Chippewa Street and segments of Hampton Avenue and South Broadway. The bill limits marijuana cultivation areas and product manufacturing to industrial areas. The measure needs another vote by aldermen to gain final passage. Aldermen on Friday also: • Gave preliminary approval to requiring candidates for city offices to show receipts or other proof that they owe no outstanding local taxes or water and refuse bills. The bill also would require the city collector of revenue to notify the Election Board after the candidate filing deadline whether any have delinquencies. • Began debate but took no action on a controversial bill to hold another citywide election on whether the number of wards and aldermen shall be cut in half. Under a city charter amendment passed by voters in 2012, the Board of Aldermen in 2021 is to cut the wards to 14 from 28. The push for a re-vote is from black members who say the reduction would result in less effective representation for African Americans. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A9

LAW AND ORDER MARYLAND HEIGHTS — Man shot by officer is charged: A man who remains hospitalized after being shot by a St. Louis County police officer Thursday has been charged with multiple assault and weapons offenses. Police said Erron Williams, 31, pointed a gun at the officer and was then shot once around 11:30 a.m. in the 2000 block of Congressional Drive. Officers had been looking for Williams since about 5:30 p.m. Wednesday after he allegedly fired at the mother of his daughter in front of at least one child and fled, said Sgt. Benjamin Granda. The St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office charged Williams on Friday with domestic assault in the first degree, armed criminal action, unlawful use of a weapon and unlawful possession of a firearm. Williams, of the 12000 block of Pattern Drive near Spanish Lake, is being held on a $200,000 cash-only bond, police said. The officer, also a 31-year-old man, was not injured. The officer has nine years of experience in law enforcement, police said. The charges against Williams are related to the domestic incident and not the officer-involved shooting, which is being investigated by the county’s Bureau of Crimes Against Persons. Charging documents say that Williams threatened the woman while armed with a gun inside a home in the 10700 block of Glen Garry Road in Glasgow Village. The altercation continued outside as Williams took the couple’s daughter and placed her in a car. As Williams returned to the house to get another gun, the woman tried to drive away with her daughter. Williams came out and fired toward the car, police said. Williams made “numerous threats” toward the woman, himself and others, including law enforcement, after the incident, Granda said.

LINCOLN COUNTY — Judge explains clerk’s suspension: The presiding judge said in a court filing Friday that he suspended the elected circuit clerk and barred her from the courthouse because of malfeasance in office. In a filing with the Missouri Supreme Court, lawyers for Presiding Circuit Judge Patrick Flynn said that Circuit Clerk Karla Allsberry “had knowingly and willfully failed to perform certain duties of her office and committed misfeasance and malfeasance.” Flynn said Allsberry failed to turn over $45,000 in municipal fines owed to four cities and established a private email account she used to access the circuit court’s bank accounts and communicate with bank staff. She also had all of the court’s financial records transferred to that account, the filing says. It also said Allsberry refused to meet with Flynn and had “created a hostile and dysfunctional atmosphere” by being “belligerent” to court staff. Flynn, accompanied by at least two sheriff’s deputies, ordered Allsberry on May 28 to leave her office and announced that he’d appointed a temporary replacement because of her “indefinite unavailability.” In a letter, he said she’d created a dysfunctional work environment through her “failure to operate in fact, truth, protocol and respect.” Flynn and Allsberry have been feuding since January over who should have the authority to hire and fire clerk’s office employees and submit a budget. She lost an appeal of a January vote by Flynn and two other judges to strip her of that power, then filed suit May 18. That suit remains pending. She also sought help in regaining office from the Missouri Supreme Court. She’s accused Flynn of trying to nullify her election. Allsberry didn’t immediately respond to a message seeking comment.

ST. LOUIS — Late officer is honored: Running into a burning building to save lives, chasing down and arresting armed criminals, and building bridges with the youth in the city’s most violent police district are among the deeds that earned Officer Katlyn Alix the title of North Patrol’s officer of the year this week — an honor that came months after police say she was killed by a fellow officer. A crowd of about 100 people, mostly police officers, Mayor Lyda Krewson, Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards and Police Chief John Hayden attended the annual North Patrol Division Officers of the Month and Year Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, where Alix and about two dozen other officers from the city’s fifth and sixth districts were honored. Alix, 24, earned Officer of the Month awards in September and October for the Sixth District. KTVI’s Katherine Hessel emceed the event and read a summary of Alix’s actions that earned her the award. Along with taking down armed suspects, she was “frequently” seen playing basketball with the kids on her beat or letting them see the inside of her patrol car. “She was the epitome of community policing, a consummate professional who was invaluable to this department,” Hessel read. The crowd rose to their feet at the conclusion of Hessel’s presentation as Capt. Perri Johnson accepted the award on her behalf. Alix was killed Jan. 24 while she was off duty and at the home of an on-duty officer, Nathaniel Hendren, 29, who frequently partnered with her after she transferred to the city’s Second District. Hendren has since been charged with involuntary manslaughter and armed criminal action after police say he and Alix were playing a Russian-roulettelike game with a gun at his home on the city’s South Side.

WILDWOOD — Home fire kills resident: A man in his 60s was found dead in his home Friday morning after a two-alarm fire at his home, and a firefighter was taken to a hospital for a minor injury after the blaze. St. Louis County police were called to the first block of Nantucket Island Court at about 8:15 for a report of smoke. Police and firefighters found the home on fire and the man dead inside, according to St. Louis County police. The Metro West Fire Protection District, Valley Park Fire Protection District, West County Fire Protection District, Monarch Fire Protection District and High Ridge Fire Protection District responded. A firefighter was taken to a hospital for treatment of a “minor injury” after the fire, according to the St. Louis County police. The fire does not appear to be suspicious and there is no apparent crime associated with the incident at this time, according to St. Louis County Sgt. Benjamin Granda. The cause and origin of the fire are under investigation, he said. The St. Louis Regional Bomb and Arson Unit, the Bureau of Crimes Against Persons and the Crime Scene Unit also were at the scene investigating. ST. LOUIS — Girl shot in arm: A 5-year-old girl was shot in the arm while riding in a vehicle at Grand and Lindell boulevards Thursday around 10 p.m. A bullet also grazed the child’s torso. The girl was taken to a hospital and was listed in stable condition, police said. A preliminary investigation indicates the vehicle the girl was riding in was not the target of the shooting. No other details were available. Four children have died from gunshot wounds in St. Louis in the past week.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1M 2 , 11 8• 7SATURDAY 8 A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.15.2019

SATURDAY • 06.15.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

Short takes

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITY

Get off the road — now Among the most vulnerable people during a severe weather alert are motorists on highways. Unless they have their radios or cellphones on, they might be oblivious to approaching dangers. Even if they do hear an alert, they might assume it’s for people somewhere much farther down the road. The results can be disastrous. We’ve seen videos of tornadoes that picked up an 18-wheeler on an interstate highway and tossed it across a corn field like a rag doll. The National Weather Service has teamed up with Adams Outdoor Advertising to set up a new alert system in Illinois using digital billboards to get out the message quickly when dangerous weather is imminent. Adams will donate nine digital billboards in central Illinois to display tornado alerts automatically when the National Weather Service sends out advisories within 20 miles of each billboard’s location. The alerts will remain the sole message on those billboards until the advisory is lifted. Adams didn’t have to take this action but did so because the company recognizes that, sometimes, public safety must take priority over the pursuit of profits. Other billboard companies should likewise embrace this spirit of public service.

Enjoying the good life No, O.J., life is not “fine.” Twenty-five years after the stabbing murder of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman, far too many unresolved issues remain for O.J. Simpson to sit back and enjoy the good life as if nothing happened. In a telephone interview with The Associated Press, Simpson, now 71, stated that he is healthy and happy living in Las Vegas, doing his best not to look back on the June 12, 1994, murder of his wife and her friend. Officially, the murder remains unsolved since Simpson was tried and found not guilty in spite of overwhelming evidence pointing toward his culpability. In a subsequent civil suit filed by the victims’ families, Simpson was RENO GAZETTE-JOURNAL ordered to pay $33.5 million for their Former NFL football star wrongful deaths. He’s not going to O.J. Simpson reacts after extraordinary efforts to pay. learning he was granted But he has plenty of money to fly to parole in 2017. Florida, hang out with his buddies and play golf. “Life is fine,” he says. After his nearly year-long murder trial, Simpson vowed, “When things have settled a bit, I will pursue as my primary goal in life the killer or killers who slaughtered Nicole and Mr. Goldman. They are out there somewhere. Whatever it takes to identify them and bring them in, I will provide somehow.” Yeah. Right.

‘Pro-life’? The Trump administration last week imposed new restrictions on the use of fetal tissue from abortions in National Institutes of Health research — a capitulation to the so-called “pro-life” movement that could ultimately cost lives. In addition to barring government scientists from conducting fetal tissue research, the new restriction mean canceling an HIV research contract with the University of California. And the Department of Health and Human Services will be imposing new ethics reviews on government-funded research at other institutions. It comes at the behest of anti-abortion activists who claim, with zero evidence and against all common sense, that fetal-tissue research provides an incentive for women to have abortions. The issue stems back to 2015 allegations that Planned Parenthood was profiting from the sale of the tissue, which was determined to be false. The real effect of this work, historically, has been lifesaving medical advancements including polio and chickenpox vaccines. Ongoing research into HIV and various degenerative diseases could be devastated, critics say.

Curing violence St. Louis city leaders are exploring the possibility of implementing a program that treats violence as a disease rather than just a law-enforcement issue. Based on the Cure Violence program that started in Chicago and has had success in cities like New York, Philadelphia and Kansas City, the idea is to address the cultural issues that feed the culture of violence, recruiting people from within afflicted neighborhoods to spearhead the effort. “Like any outbreak, violence happens in clusters,” Marcus McAllister, a Cure Violence training specialist, told the Post-Dispatch‘s Rachel Rice. The key, he said, is to “change the behavior … (and) the norms associated with that to stop the spread.” For example, organizers work with people who have committed minor violence to prevent it from going further. They visit friends and family of violence victims to prevent retaliation, a common cycle. And they talk out conflicts between residents that can flare into violence. As St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards put it: “I know we’re not going to arrest ourselves to public safety, so we have to look at alternatives to assist with crime prevention.”

A few good people The Trump administration persists in enforcing its ban on transgender people serving in the military despite public opposition and even significant objections from Republicans and military leaders. It’s a classic example of President Donald Trump taking what had been a settled issue in most minds and throwing it back into debate for the sake of stoking his base. The Obama administration approved military service for transgender people and granting them access to appropriate medical resources. Any controversy over it had long since dissipated. Trump’s reversal was brought about like so many of his policies — with a Twitter outburst that his military leaders, caught by surprise, had to suddenly implement. Those currently serving will not be expelled, but any civilian undergoing gender transition won’t be allowed to enlist. The only explanation for the policy change was a rambling comment by Trump to reporters about how the issue is “a very difficult situation” for the military. He’s the only one who seems to think so.

DAN MARTIN, POST-DISPATCH

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

MetroLink CEO talks the talk, rides the ride Regarding the letter “MetroLink’s problems would be fixed if leaders rode it” (May 27): Letter writer Martin Knoesel complains that Taulby Roach, the President and Chief Executive Officer of Bi-State Development, does not ride MetroLink. Well, Roach does ride MetroLink. In my 26 years of riding MetroLink to work downtown, I have seen Roach and his father, John Roach, on the Metrolink frequently. The Roaches were consultants to Bi-State before Taulby took this role. They use the trains for daily transportation to get to their jobs. When Taulby said the shooting was “terrifying,” he shows empathy toward the passengers. He cannot be on all of the train cars at all times. But as an almost daily passenger on MetroLink, he has personal knowledge of the system. Roach has made clear that his first priority as chief executive is security. One of his first actions was ousting the old security officials and installing new ones, but the new ones need some time to make significant changes. MetroLink is one of the best tools we have as a region to fight air pollution and climate change. The world would be a better place if more people rode the train to work instead of driving. Kathleen Henry • St. Louis

Charlottesville rioters not in fact ‘very fine people’ Regarding “Trump’s Charlottesville comments taken out of context” (June 9): Letter writer Joe Nenninger asserts that our president’s “very fine people on both sides” comment had been taken out of context. In support of this assertion, Nenninger cites only President Donald Trump’s response to a reporter’s observation that “the neo-Nazis started this thing. They showed up in Charlottesville.” To which Trump retorted, “Excuse me, they didn’t put themselves down as neo-Nazis.” Whether or not the applicant for the permit for the rally listed his group as “neo-Nazis” on the application certainly doesn’t negate who these folks were and what their purpose was in marching that day. In fact, the applicant was Jason Kessler, who stated on a radio show prior to the event that “the number one thing is I want to de-stigmatize pro-white advocacy.” The people who organized and attended this rally were white supremacists and anti-Semites. Had the United Daughters of the Confederacy or the Sons of Confederate Veterans organized the rally, perhaps a plausible argument could be made that the preservation of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s statue was the purpose of the event. But a rally organized by those in the Unite the Right movement? These are most assuredly not “very fine people.” Jack Hilton • Frontenac

Reducing carbon dioxide is folly, alternatives impractical Our climate has been warming for 12,000 years, since the last Ice Age. Climate is cyclical. And carbon dioxide is not the threat. It is a component of the air we breathe and not a pollutant. Vegetation recycles it. It’s part of our atmosphere, and I fail to see a human-caused increase as a calamity. Yet the calls for reducing the human contribution are startling. The proposals to do so are folly. Electric autos are a laugh. At best, a niche market when, after 250 miles, an overnight charge is needed. Tesla Motors will likely fail. Subsidies on wind and solar generation to save us from the carbon dioxide danger is a fabricated fear. These industries use storage batteries with no wind and sunshine, and all batteries run down. Batteries are at maximum technology and incapable of eliminating fossil fuel power

plants or automobiles. Nuclear energy is the only substitute capable to power our world perfectly. Environmentalists ignore or are ignorant of this science. Fuel cells are the only hope for electric automobiles. Currently only hydrogen fuel cells are functionally feasible, but only if we can keep hydrogen gas in a fuel tank and refill at gas stations. That is too huge of a challenge today. Environmentalists should be happy because hydrogen, oxygen and water are the products of reaction. But like lithium ion storage batteries, hydrogen is as yet impractical. Ron Jones • Alton

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, at a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Expulsions should apply to Democrats as well as GOP Regarding the “Dethroned King” item in the June 8 Short Takes editorial: It is not that often that I find myself in agreement with Post-Dispatch editorial comments. But I agreed with your stance approving the Republican Party’s refusing to seat Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King on a standing committee because of his obvious bias and bigotry. I concur with the fact that we should keep our representatives, and the political parties, accountable for their actions. However, the problem I do have with your editorial is that when a Democrat is equally as biased and bigoted, you and the Democratic Party remain silent. I am referring to Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota. On any number of occasions she has railed against both Israel and the Jewish religion. Her bias is obvious and blatant, but neither the PostDispatch nor the Democratic Party seems to provide the same outrage over her views as has been aired regarding Rep. King’s views. If we are to hold Republican’s feet to the fire, why then do we not apply the same standard to the Democrats? Ronald Neubauer • St. Peters

Police should be encouraged to march in Pride parade Regarding the editorial, “Barring all police from gay-rights parade sends exactly the wrong message” (June 11): This editorial made my blood pressure rise. As a gay man, I am incensed that my community has the gall to tell St. Louis city and county police officers that they are not welcome to march in the Pride parade. But I presume it is OK for the police to be there to protect us. This is just plain discrimination. We are discriminated against, yes, and we also know how to discriminate. Years ago, the North American Man/Boy Love Association was actually permitted to march in the New York City parade. Huh? Grown men thinking it’s beautiful to love little boys? Marching with approval in a gay pride parade? But we don’t want police to show their support for us? If the police, God bless them, are not allowed to march in the parade, even encouraged to march, I will certainly not be at the parade. This is just really sad news. Phil Kuhlman • House Springs Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


NEWS

06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A11

2nd teen charged in killing of retired officer BY JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The second of two teens was charged Friday as an adult in the killing of a retired St. Louis police sergeant in October 2018. Jalynn Garner, 17, of the 4400 block of Maffitt Avenue, was charged with first-degree murder, first-degree robbery and two counts of armed criminal action. He was 16 at the Garner time he and Justin Mathews, 16, allegedly tried to carjack retired Sgt. Ralph E. Harper on Oct. 29 in the Tower Grove South neighbohood. PoHarper lice say Garner fatally shot Harper, and Harper shot and wounded Garner in the arm during the encounter. Circuit Judge Steven Ohmer, who presided over Garner’s certification hearing June 6, has referred Garner’s case to St. Louis Circuit Court to be tried as an adult. Juvenile officer Sharon Davis testified that she didn’t think the juvenile system was appropriate for Garner, in part because he is only months away from his 18th birthday. She said she could recall only one time when the Division of Youth Services continued custody of a defendant past age 18. Davis said while there was no evidence Garner was in a gang, he is a “streetwise” teenager with access to guns and drugs. Before dropping out of Confluence Preparatory Academy in September, she said, Garner had missed dozens of school days and was late to class more than 150 times. She said he was failing all but

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A cyclist on Lackland Avenue passes through the crime scene where a retired police officer was killed during a robbery attempt in October 2018. one of his classes and had been suspended twice from school for disruptive classroom behavior. “He is not appropriate for the juvenile courts at this time,” Davis said at the hearing. “The community needs to be protected.” She also said the juvenile court system lacks the funding to house defendants into adulthood. Garner has suffered depression over the prolonged absence of his father, who was in prison for drug trafficking for most of Garner’s childhood, Davis said. In 2017, he witnessed a cousin being shot and killed at a family gathering. At the time of his arrest, he tested positive for marijuana. At Garner’s hearing, defense lawyer Greg Smith highlighted Garner’s troubled childhood and said he hoped the judge wouldn’t decide whether to certify based solely on cost and the seriousness of the alleged crime. “If the decision is based solely on cost, then we have much greater problems,” Smith said. Smith said Friday it wasn’t clear if he would be representing Garner in state court but said, “Anytime we prosecute a child as an adult, no matter what the

alleged offense is, it’s a loss.” Garner’s alleged accomplice, Justin Mathews, 16, was charged Monday as an adult. The juvenile officer assigned to his case said Mathews was also a student at Confluence Academy who had missed nearly half of the school days last year. Mathews is accused of driving the shooter to the scene of the carjacking and providing Garner with a gun, then fleeing police in a stolen car. Police say the victim, Harper, was parking his car about 7:30 a.m. when he was approached by Garner in the 3100 block of Lackland Avenue. Police said in court documents that Garner told Mathews as they drove toward Harper that he was hungry and had to “get it.” Mathews told police he gave Garner a .40-caliber pistol and dropped Garner off on Lackland. Mathews told police Garner approached Harper and pointed a gun at him. Mathews said he then heard gunshots and that Garner ran back to the car, which was parked in an alley behind Lackland. Harper had his own gun and

exchanged shots with Garner, police said. It wasn’t clear who fired first, but both were hit in the shootout. Garner was shot in the arm, police said. He got in a dark Honda Pilot SUV that police say Mathews was driving. Mathews drove Garner in the SUV to Barnes-Jewish Hospital and dropped him off before fleeing. Police later found Harper’s key fob in the alley where Mathews had waited, charges say. Harper was taken to the same hospital where he was pronounced dead. He had worked for the police department for 33 years before he retired in 2007. His family members attended Mathews’ and Garner’s certification hearings in May and June, respectively. Officers later spotted the SUV and chased it to the area of Allen and South Jefferson avenues, where it crashed into a building about 10 a.m. Mathews was arrested alongside his brother, 17-year-old Julian Mathews, who police say he picked up some time after dropping off the shooter at the hospital. At 17, Julian Mathews is considered an adult and was charged with seconddegree motor vehicle tampering and resisting arrest, misdemeanors connected to running from police before the arrest. Police found him hiding in a trash bin near the crash site, police said. The SUV had been stolen from Olivette a week earlier. Justin Mathews said he had bought the stolen Honda Pilot that morning. Charges say police found a .40-caliber pistol in the SUV and blood in the back seat. Garner will now be transferred from juvenile detention to an adult St. Louis jail. Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Community debates tearing down Columbine BY KATHLEEN FOODY

Associated Press

DENVER — Two decades after the name “Columbine” became synonymous with a school shooting, the suburban Denver community surrounding the school is debating whether it’s time to tear down a building that also became a beacon for people obsessed with the killings. School officials said the number of people trying to get close to or even inside the school reached record levels this year, the 20th anniversary of the 1999 attack that killed 13 people. People try to peek into the windows of the school library, mistaking it for the longdemolished room where most of the victims died, or ask people on campus how to take a tour.

The buses full of tourists have mostly stopped over the years, but not the visitors. This year alone, security staff contacted more than 2,400 “unauthorized” people on Columbine’s campus. Then, a few days before the anniversary, a young woman described as obsessed with the attack flew to Colorado and bought a shotgun, killing only herself yet sparking lockdowns and new fears. School security has intercepted others with a similar infatuation with the crime and its teen perpetrators — so-called Columbiners. District security chief John McDonald can rattle off some of the most frightening instances of people who came to the campus: An Ohio couple later charged with

planning a domestic terror attack; a Utah teen later arrested for a bombing plot against his school; and a Texas man apprehended at the school after he said he was filled by one of shooter’s spirits and intended to “complete his mission.” “These people, they want the building,” McDonald said. “They want to experience it, to walk the halls ... The only way we can stop that interest in the building is to move it. Otherwise they’re not going to stop coming.” But Columbine, named after Colorado’s state flower, represents more than one day to this suburban area southeast of Denver. Boisterous call-and-response chants of “We are Columbine” dominate school pep rallies and

OBITUARIES Armour, Thomas G. Sr. - St. Louis Deming, Kurt K. - formerly of St. Louis

Armour, Thomas G. Sr. died June 7, 2019, loving husband of Henrietta Armour; father of Thomas Armour, Jr. and Jada Armour; dear brother of sister Shirley Armour; stepbrother of Ralph Armour; beloved grandfather to Charlotte. He served in the U.S. Navy. He is respected among his classmates and the people of West Hermondale, MO. and abroad. He was President and Valedictorian of class of 1965 at Washington High School in Caruthersville, MO; worked at St. Louis Post-Dispatch. No funeral; cremation at St. Louis Cremation.

more solemn occasions including an April ceremony marking the anniversary. At the nearby memorial just over a crest named “Rebel Hill” for the school’s mascot, a plaque quotes an unnamed student: “You’re a Columbine Rebel for life and no one can ever take that away from you.” “It’s not just a building, it’s like a second home to us,” said Jenn Thompson, who as a 15-year-old huddled inside a science classroom during the attack. “It’s still standing 20 years later. It represents us, still standing 20 years later.” She hopes her own daughter, now 8 years old, can attend the school, home to about 1,700 students. The discussion of Columbine’s future is likely to take months.

Celebrations of Life

McGraw, Robert L. - Imperial, MO Meyer, Thom James - St. Louis

Fraternal Notices Please be advised of the death of Bro. Dustin L. Merchant Journeyman Iron Worker 6/10/19 Funeral Sat., 6/15 at Collins Cemetery, Annapolis, MO Services handled through Pitman Funeral Home, Warrenton, MO Thomas R. McNeil Jr., Business Manager William A. Brennell, President

Deming, Kurt K. passed away May 30, 2019 at age 68. Beloved husband of Wanda Deming (nee Kuchler); preceded in death by his parents, Edwin Deming and Mary Jane Deming (nee Henry); loving brother of Pamela, Michael, Denise, Ava and Susan. Dear husband, stepfather, stepgrandfather, brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. You are greatly missed! Trips to Florida have forever changed; our fisherman has gone to Heaven.

McGraw, Robert L.

Meyer, Thom James

BY JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON — A west St. Louis County woman accused of trying to stab her 5-yearold son in January with a knife is mentally unfit to stand trial, a judge has ruled. In an order signed this week, Circuit Judge Michael Jamison said he relied on a psychological exam of Syeda W. Sirajuddin to find her unfit for trial on charges of first-degree assault, two counts of child endangerment and one Sirajuddin count of armed criminal action. Prosecutors said that on Jan. 9, Sirajuddin, 35, had tried to give sleeping pills to her 9-year-old daughter and 5-year-old son before stabbing the boy in the family’s home in the 1300 block of Wickstead Road, near Queeny Park. Authorities said Sirajuddin also tried to smother her 2-year-old son with a blanket. The daughter told investigators the attack was not her mother’s fault because the devil made her do it, a law enforcement official has told the Post-Dispatch. Sirajuddin picked up the older two children from school Jan. 9 and gave them sleeping pills, telling them “we’re all going to take a nap.” She gave four pills to the 9-year-old girl, but she said she didn’t swallow them because they tasted bad. Later, the daughter heard yelling and found her mother swinging the 5-year-old boy by his neck, and then trying to stab him with a kitchen knife, authorities said. The girl was able to get the knife away from her mother and hid it under a bed. At some point, the mother called the father of the children at work and 911 to report that said she had killed the children, authorities said. Police and paramedics arrived and found Sirajuddin sitting on a chair in the living room. The judge’s commitment order filed Monday says Sirajuddin will be confined to a state mental facility and will be reevaluated within six months to determine if she is mentally fit to proceed with her case. Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

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Mother accused in attack found unfit for trial

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A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Family: Baby cut from slain Chicago woman’s womb dies BY DON BABWIN AND RICK CALLAHAN

Associated Press

CHICAGO — An infant boy who was cut from a Chicago woman’s womb with a butcher knife died Friday at a hospital where he had been in grave condition since the April attack that killed his mother, family spokeswomen said. Yovanny Jadiel Lopez died at Christ Medical Center in suburban Oak Lawn from a severe brain injury, according to a statement posted on Facebook by family spokeswoman Julie Contreras, who expressed “great sadness” in announcing the baby’s death. Family spokeswoman Cecilia Garcia confirmed the statement. The baby had been on life sup-

port since being brought to the hospital on April 23. Prosecutors say Clarisa Figueroa, 46, claimed she had given birth to the baby. She and her 24-year-old daughter, Desiree Figueroa, are charged with murder in the death of the baby’s mother, 19-year-old Marlen Ochoa-Lopez, and Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said Friday that he expects both women will now be charged with murder in the infant’s death. Prosecutors will “make a determination on additional charges” after police and the county’s medical examiner’s office complete their investigations, Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office spokeswoman Tandra Simonton said in a written statement. An

attorney for the family, Frank Avila, demanded that the office charge the two women with murder, and charge the Figueroa’s boyfriend, Piotr Bobak, with murder as well. Bobak has been charged with concealing a homicide. “The baby was murdered and we demand justice,” he said. Garcia said the family had been weighing whether to remove the baby from life support when the child died. And Avila told reporters that he was notified overnight that the baby’s condition had deteriorated, prompting him to call a Catholic priest, who came to the hospital to administer last rites at about 1 a.m. Four hours later, he said, the child died as a

result of brain injuries caused by a loss of oxygen when he was cut from his mother’s body. Christ Medical Center said in a statement that its “hearts and prayers” were with the baby’s family, and that their “courage and grace have drawn the admiration of our entire organization.” Authorities contend that not long after Clarisa Figueroa’s adult son died of natural causes, she told her family she was pregnant. They say she plotted for months to acquire a newborn, and that she posted an ultrasound and photos of a room decorated for a baby on her Facebook page. In March, she and Ochoa-Lopez connected on a Facebook page for pregnant women.

The two first met in person around April 1, when Ochoa-Lopez went to the Figueroas’ house and left unharmed, prosecutors allege. The teen returned on April 23 to accept Clarisa Figueroa’s offer of free baby clothes, and as Desiree Figueroa was showing Ochoa-Lopez a photo album of her late brother to distract her, Clarisa Figueroa sneaked up behind her and strangled her with a cord. Once Ochoa-Lopez stopped showing signs of life, Clarisa Figueroa cut the baby from her womb and she and her daughter wrapped the teen’s body in a blanket, put it in a plastic bag and dragged it outside to a garbage can, according to prosecutors.

Major oil companies commit to carbon pricing BY NICOLE WINFIELD AND FRANK JORDANS

Associated Press

VATICAN CITY — Some of the world’s major oil producers pledged Friday to support “economically meaningful” carbon pricing regimes after a personal appeal from Pope Francis to avoid “perpetrating a brutal act of injustice” against the poor and future generations. The companies, including ExxonMobil, BP, Royal Dutch Shell, Total, Chevron and Eni, said in a joint statement at the end of a Vatican climate summit that governments should set such pricing regimes at a level that encourages business and investment, while “minimizing the costs to vulnerable communities and supporting economic growth.” The CEOs, as well as leaders of major asset managers such as BlackRock and BNP Paribas, also called for companies to provide investors with clarity about the risks climate change poses to their businesses and how they plan to transition to cleaner energy sources. The joint statement was issued at the end of a closeddoor summit in the Vatican gardens,the second time the Holy See has convened the world’s petroleum leaders

AP

Activists hold up signs outside the Vatican Friday as Pope Francis meets with oil executives. for private talks on climate change, scientific research and the moral imperative to save God’s creation. Francis attended Friday’s session and told the gathering that a “radical energy transition” to clean, lowcarbon power sources was needed and that if managed well, would “generate new jobs, reduce inequality and improve the quality of life for those affected by climate change.” “Faced with a climate emergency, we must take action accordingly, in order to avoid perpetrating a brutal act of injustice to-

ward the poor and future generations,” he said. He praised the executives in particular for taking on the core issue of carbon pricing, which he said was necessary for humanity to use the resources of creation wisely and not burden the poor and future generations with the debt incurred by the rich. In their joint statement, the CEOs said “Reliable and economically meaningful carbon pricing regimes, whether based on tax, trading mechanisms or other market-based measures, should be set by govern-

ments at a level that incentivizes business practices ... while minimizing the costs to vulnerable communities and supporting economic growth.” The pledge comes ahead of a European Union summit next week at which leaders will discuss the bloc’s efforts to combat climate change including a proposal to stop adding carbon to the atmosphere by 2050. While the announcement refers to the 2015 Paris accord’s goal of “keeping global warming below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit)” by the end of the century compared to

pre-industrial times, experts say capping the rise at 2.7F would be safer. The Carbon Tracker Initiative, a London-based group that examines the impact the shift away from fossil fuels has on financial markets, welcomed the Vatican announcement. “It is important that many of the world’s largest publicly traded oil and gas companies and many of the world’s largest investors have endorsed carbon pricing regimes,” the group’s executive director, Mark Campanale, said in a statement. “Critically, asset owners with trillions of dollars under management are also calling for company disclosures of meaningful and material information on plans and investments in the energy transition,” he added. Outside the summit, around half-a-dozen protesters held up signs urging the oil executives to listen to the pope. The meeting was held under unusual secrecy even by Vatican standards, with the program and guest list initially unpublished. A few executives confirmed their presence ahead of time, including the chief executives of BP and Eni, Bob Dudley and Claudio Descalzi.

Emails: Trump official consulted global warming rejecters BY ELLEN KNICKMEYER AND SETH BORENSTEIN

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. The request from William Happer, a member of the National Security Council, is included in emails from 2018 and 2019 that were obtained by the Environmental Defense Fund under the federal Freedom of Information Act and provided to The Associated Press. That request was made this past March to policy advisers with the Heartland Institute, one of the most vocal challengers of mainstream scientific findings that emissions from burning coal, oil and gas are damaging the Earth’s atmosphere. In a March 3 email exchange, Happer and Heartland adviser Hal Doiron discuss Happer’s scientific arguments in a paper attempting to knock down climate change as well as ideas to make the work “more useful to a wider readership.” Happer writes he had already discussed the work with another Heartland adviser, Thomas Wysmuller. Academic experts denounced the administration

official’s continued involvement with groups and scientists who reject what numerous federal agencies say is the fact of climate change. “These people are endangering all of us by promoting anti-science in service of fossil fuel interests over the American interests,” said Pennsylvania State University climate scientist Michael Mann. “It’s the equivalent to formulating anti-terrorism policy by consulting with groups that deny terrorism exists,” said Northeastern University’s Matthew Nisbet, a professor of environmental communication and public policy. The National Security Council declined to make Happer available to discuss the emails. The AP and others reported earlier this year that Happer was coordinating a proposed White House panel to challenge the findings from scientists in and out of government that carbon emissions are altering the Earth’s atmosphere and climate. President Donald Trump in November rejected the warnings of a national climate change assessment by more than a dozen government agencies. “I don’t believe it,” he said. Happer, a physicist who previously taught at Princ-

eton University,has claimed that carbon dioxide, the main heat-trapping gas from the burning of coal, oil and gas, is good for humans and that carbon emissions have been demonized like “the poor Jews under Hitler.” Trump appointed him in late 2018 to the National Security Council, which advises the president on security and foreign policy issues. The emails show Happer expressing surprise that NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, a former Oklahoma congressman who once questioned mainstream climate science, has come round to accepting that science. A May 2018 email exchange between Heartland’s Wysmuller and Happer calls

the NASA chief’s change of heart on climate science “a puzzle.” The exchange calls scientifically established rises in sea levels and temperatures under climate change “part of the nonsense” and urges the NASA head — copied in — to “systematically sidestep it.” Happer at the time was not yet a security adviser, although he had advised the Trump Environmental Protection Agency on climate change. A NASA spokesman on Thursday upheld the space agency’s public statements on climate change. “We provide the data that informs policy makers around the world,” spokesman Bob Jacobs said. “Our science information contin-

ues to be published publicly as it always has.” But spokesman Jim Lakely at the Heartland Institute defended the effort, saying in an email that NASA’s public characterization of climate change as manmade and a global threat “is a disservice to taxpayers and science that it is still pushed by NASA.” After joining the agency, Happer sent a February 2019 email to NASA deputy administrator James Morhard relaying a complaint from an unidentified rejecter of man-made climate change about NASA’s website. “I’m concerned that many children are being indoctrinated by this bad science,” said the email that Happer relayed.

Dolphins dead on Gulf Coast triple usual number BY JANET MCCONNAUGHEY

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — At least 279 dolphins have stranded across much of the U.S. Gulf Coast since Feb. 1, triple the usual number, and about 98 percent of them have died, scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Friday. Scientists will investigate whether lingering effects from the 2010 BP oil spill and more immediate effects from low salinity because of freshwater flowing from high rivers and a Louisiana spillway contributed to the deaths, said Teri Rowles,coordinator for NOAA Fisheries’ Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program. BP spill effects included problems with lungs and adrenal glands, which produce stress-related hormones; blood abnormalities; and general poor condition, according to earlier reports. Those reports said the spill contributed to the Gulf of Mexico’s largest and longest dolphin die-off. “We do know some of the health conditions ... are improving, but some have been slow to improve,” Rowles said. “Reproduction in the heaviest-oiled areas continues below normal.” Erin Fougères,administrator for the marine mammal stranding program in NOAA Fisheries’ southeast region, said 23% of the dolphins stranded from Louisiana to the Florida Panhandle had sores consistent with freshwater exposure.Such lesions are “not uncommon” in the spring, according to NOAA’s website. Mississippi had 121 dolphin strandings as of Wednesday,with 89 in Louisiana, 32 in Alabama and 37 in Florida, Fougères said. Moby Solangi, director of the Institute of Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport, Mississippi, put that state’s total on Thursday at 126, and said the opening of the Bonnet Carré Spillway is at least partly to blame.

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06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A13

Premature migrant baby found at border facility BY ASTRID GALVAN AND GARANCE BURKE

Associated Press

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The teenage girl with pigtail braids was hunched over in a wheelchair and holding a bunched sweatshirt when an immigrant advocate met her at a crowded Border Patrol facility in Texas. She opened the sweatshirt and the advocate gasped. It was a tiny baby, born premature and held in detention instead of where the advocate believes the baby should have been — at a hospital neonatal unit. “You look at this baby and there is no question that this baby should be in a tube with a heart monitor,” said Hope Frye, a volunteer with an immigrant advocacy group who travels the country visiting immigration facilities with children to make sure the facilities comply with federal guidelines. Frye and other advocates said the case highlights the poor conditions immigrants are held in after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border as the government deals with an unprecedented number of families and children arriving daily. The mother, a 17-yearold from Guatemala, had an emergency cesarean section in Mexico in early May and crossed the border with the baby June 4, Frye said. She was in a wheelchair in extreme pain when legal advocates found her this week. The girl told advocates she crossed the border through the Rio Grande but needed people to carry her, and that she also needed help getting into a Border Patrol car when she was apprehended. The mother and daughter were expected to be transferred to a privately run facility for underage immigrants without parents on Thursday after outcry on social media. They were held in an overcrowded McAllen processing facility that holds

DAVID J. PHILLIP, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A U.S. Border Patrol Agent walks between vehicles outside the Central Processing Center on June 23, 2018 in McAllen, Texas. Advocates were shocked to find an underage mom and her tiny, premature newborn daughter huddled in a Border Patrol facility the second week of June 2019, in what they say was another example of the poor treatment immigrant families receive after crossing the border. hundreds of parents and children in large, fenced-in areas and gained international attention last year when it detained children separated from their parents. Advocates describe them as cages and say they are extremely cold. The converted warehouse is the same place where a flu outbreak caused authorities to shut down the facility last month. The Trump administration has faced daily criticism over conditions in migrant detention facilities. Five children have died since late last year after being detained by the Border Patrol. Immigrants have been kept outside for extended periods near a bridge in El Paso in conditions that a professor who recently visited the location told the Texas Monthly magazine was like a “human dog pound.” And an Inspector General report last month found severe overcrowding inside an El Paso processing center, with 76 migrants packed into a tiny cell designed for 12 people. Investigators saw immigrants standing on top of toilets to make room and find space to breathe because the cell was so cramped. In a letter to Congress this week, the Department of

Homeland Security’s acting secretary, Kevin K. McAleenan, and Alex Azar, who heads the Health and Human Services Department, pleaded for emergency supplemental funding. “We continue to experience a humanitarian and security crisis at the southern border of the United States, and the situation becomes more dire each day,” they wrote. Customs and Border Protection said its agents are overwhelmed and don’t have the funding or resources to handle the influx. Health and Human Services, the governmental agency in charge of caring for unaccompanied children after they’re released from Border Patrol custody, said it is past capacity with over 13,000 kids in its care at the moment. The agency plans to add new facilities for children in New Mexico, Texas and a military base in Oklahoma. Families and underage migrants who cross the border are held in Border Patrol facilities meant to be temporary and designed primarily for single adult men — not mothers, newborns and sick toddlers. Families are regularly kept in them for much longer than the allowed maximum of 72 hours.

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A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 06.15.2019 • B

ALLEN TOOK HIGH ROAD Goaltender was ‘great mentor’ for Binnington BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

He could have complained, sulked, pouted. He could have done nothing to help. It wouldn’t have been the first time someone in his situation reacted in such fashion. There were a lot of ways Jake Allen could have handled the Jordan Binnington phenomenon. He chose the high road. He didn’t have to. But he helped Binnington when he could. He stayed ready. And he enjoyed the ride, even if his view was from the back seat. “It’s not even a hockey thing,” Allen said. “It’s just about having the right mentality in the situation you’re in. If I was in that situation, I’d be hoping someone else would be doing the same for me.” Not everyone does that. “Yeah, there’s goalies that you played with that sometimes want you to do bad so they can get in the net,” he said. Allen didn’t choose that path. On Jan. 8, Allen started and took a 3-1 loss to Dallas at homer. It would Please see BLUES, Page B6

Blues’ success starts with GM Armstrong BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

With chaos all around him, he has been quiet and calm. On Wednesday, bottles of Bud Light were being emptied to his left and right as he stood near the edge of the TD Garden ice and watched, hands in his pockets, soaking it in as others sucked down suds. On Thursday, up on the deck at OB Clark’s bar in Brentwood, he raised a beer to toast the fans who had gathered below. On Friday, he arrived at the Blues team store in the Enterprise Center to buy some Stanley Cup championship gear, then stood in line to buy it like one of us. Doug Armstrong is taking time to enjoy this, even if he refuses to put himself in the middle of it. Please see FREDERICKSON, Page B6

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Jake Allen (right) congratulates fellow Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington after a playoff game against Winnipeg on April 20.

RELIVE THE HISTORIC RUN TO THE CUP

PARADE TODAY When: Noon Saturday Where: Starts at 18th and Market streets and ends at Broadway and Market Street. A rally will follow at the Gateway Arch. TV: Live on KTVI (2), KMOV (4), KSDK (5) and Fox Sports Midwest.

Special Section in today’s newspaper.

Going to the parade? What you need to know. A1

U.S. OPEN

Woodland gouges out a birdie to lead by 2 BY DOUG FERGUSON

Associated Press

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Gary Woodland was playing so well Friday in the U.S. Open that he didn’t want to give away any shots. He wound up stealing one at the end for another record at Pebble Beach and a 36-hole lead for the second time in the last four majors. Woodland kept bogeys off his card with a 15-foot par putt on the tough eighth hole. His final drive was seemingly perfect until it settled into a deep divot in the fairway, 217 yards away. One of golf’s most athletic figures gouged it out with a 7-iron onto the front of the green, then could only smile as he holed the 50-foot birdie putt. His 6-under 65 matched the U.S. Open record at Pebble Beach for the second time in two days, a testament to a course that was only slightly firmer, but still soft enough under a heavy marine layer with so much condensation it felt like a list mist. Woodland was at 9-under 133, beating by one shot the Please see OPEN, Page B3

Cards win twice in unusual way BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NEW YORK — As they stood in their dugout Friday evening ready to start an unusual night at the ballpark with the game in the bottom of the ninth inning, Cardinals leadoff hitter Matt Carpenter put a deadline on his team. “We’re going to win a game in 20 minutes,” he assured them. “I was wrong,” he admitted later. “It took 18.” With a leftover game to finish from Thursday’s rain delay and Friday’s regularly schedule game set to follow at Citi Field, the Cardinals made short work of one and late work of the other to complete a sweep of the New York Mets. Paul DeJong had the winning RBI to complete a 5-4 victory in the 10th inning of the suspended game, and DeJong homered in KATHY WILLENS, ASSOCIATED PRESS the eighth to tie Friday’s game and power The Cardinals’ Dexter Fowler leaps to celebrate with the Cardinals toward a 9-5 win. on-deck batter Kolten Wong after belting a three-run homer in the eighth inning Friday night. Please see CARDINALS, Page B5

Cardinals win a pair

Conclusion of suspended game: Cards 5, Mets 4, 10 inn. Scheduled game: Cards 9, Mets 5 Up next: 6:10 p.m. Sat. at Mets, FSM Wacha (4-2, 5.63) vs. Syndergaard (4-4, 4.45)

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B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

FOOTBALL

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 6/15 at Mets 6:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 6/16 at Mets 12:10 p.m. FSM

Monday 6/17 vs. Marlins 7:15 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 6/18 vs. Marlins 7:15 p.m. FSM

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 6/15 at Bethlehem 6 p.m.

Wednesday 6/19 U.S. Open Cup vs. Cincinnati, 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 6/22 vs. North Carolina 7:30 p.m.

Sunday 6/30 at Kansas City 4 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Tue. 6/18: vs. Florence, 6:35 p.m. Sat. 6/15: vs. Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Wed. 6/19: vs. Florence, 6:35 p.m. Sun. 6/16: vs. Windy City, 6:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR Saturday AUTO RACING 2 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: NASCAR Xfinity Series Race at Iowa, practice, FS1 4:30 p.m. NASCAR trucks: M&M’s 200, FS2 6 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: NASCAR Xfinity Series Race at Iowa, practice, FS1 7:30 p.m. NASCAR trucks: M&M’s 200, FS1 BASEBALL Noon Angels at Rays, MLB Network 1 p.m. College World Series: Michigan vs. Texas Tech, ESPN 3 p.m. Diamondbacks at Nationals, FS1 6 p.m. College World Series: Arkansas vs. Florida State, ESPN 6 p.m. Pirates at Marlins (joined in progress), MLB Network 6:10 p.m. Cardinals at Mets, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 8 p.m. Cubs at Dodgers, MLB Network BASKETBALL 7 p.m. WNBA: Atlanta at Dallas, NBA 9 p.m. WNBA: New York at Los Angeles, NBA BOXING 6 p.m. Light heavyweights: Sullivan Berrera vs. Jesse Hart, ESPN2 FOOTBALL 9 p.m. CFL: Winnipeg at BC, ESPN2 GOLF 11 a.m. U.S. Open: third round, KTVI (2) Noon U.S. Open: third round, KPLR (11) 12 p.m. LPGA Tour: Meijer Classic, third round, GOLF 3 p.m. U.S. Open: third round, KTVI (2) HOCKEY Noon Blues championship parade and rally, KTVI (2), KMOV (4), KSDK (5), FSM, NHL Network, KMOX (1120 AM), WXOS (101.1 FM) HORSE RACING 7:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Stephen Foster Handicap, NBCSN LACROSSE 4 p.m. Premier League: Whipsnakes vs. Archers, NBCSN MOTORCYCLE RACING 3 p.m. Lucas Oil Series: High Point National, NBCSN SOCCER 8 a.m. Women’s World Cup: Netherlands vs. Cameroon, FS1 10:50 a.m. U-20 World Cup: Ukraine vs. South Korea, FS1 1:50 p.m. Women’s World Cup: Canada vs. New Zealand, FS2 6:30 p.m. CONCACAF Gold Cup: Canada vs. Martinique, FS2 9 p.m. CONCACAF Gold Cup: Mexico vs. Cuba, FS2

Sunday AUTO RACING 1 p.m. NHRA: Thunder Valley Nationals, FS1 1 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: CircuitCity.com 250, FS2 4:30 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: CircuitCity.com 250, FS1 BASEBALL 12:10 p.m. Cardinals at Mets, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 12:20 p.m. Phillies at Braves, MLB Network 1 p.m. College World Series: Louisville vs. Vanderbilt, ESPN 6 p.m. Cubs at Dodgers, ESPN 6:30 p.m. College World Series: Auburn vs. Mississippi State, ESPN2 BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. WNBA: Seattle at Connecticut, KDNL (30) GOLF 1 p.m. U.S. Open, final round, KTVI (2) 1 p.m. LPGA: Meijer Classic, final round, GOLF LACROSSE 1:30 p.m. Premier Lacrosse League Chrome LC vs. Atlas LC, KSDK (5) RUGBY 3 p.m. Major League: San Diego Legion vs. Seattle Seawolves, KMOV (4) SOCCER 8 a.m. FIFA Women’s World Cup: Sweden vs. Thailand, FS1 11 a.m. FIFA Women’s World Cup: United States vs. Chile, KTVI (2) 5 p.m. CONCACAF Gold Cup: Haiti vs. Bermuda, FS2 7:30 p.m. CONCACAF Gold Cup: Costa Rica vs. Nicaragua, FS1 TRACK AND FIELD 3:30 p.m. Boston Games, KSDK (5)

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ED ANDRIESKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pat Bowlen, the Denver Broncos owner who transformed the team from also-rans into NFL champions and helped the league usher in billion-dollar TV deals, died Thursday.

Broncos owner Pat Bowlen dies before enshrinement At 75, he died just two months before entering Pro Football Hall of Fame BY ARNIE STAPLETON

Associated Press

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — John Elway thrust the Lombardi Trophy into the air and hollered, “This one’s for Pat!” on a cool night in Santa Clara, California, on Feb. 7, 2016. It came 18 years after Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen had declared, “This one’s for John!” following the franchise’s first Super Bowl championship, a 31-24 win over Green Bay in San Diego after Elway helicoptered his way into NFL immortality in his fourth shot at a title. Elway called it the greatest moment of his Hall of Fame career, and he was determined to return the favor after rejoining his beloved Broncos as Bowlen’s general manager and vice president of football operations in 2011. He finally got the chance when the Broncos beat the Carolina Panthers 24-10 in Super Bowl 50, 18 months after Alzheimer’s forced Bowlen to step down from his daily duties running the team. “I’m just glad I had the opportunity,” Elway said in the locker room that night. “I didn’t want to think about it too much because I didn’t want to jinx anything. But I was waiting for the day that I was able to do that.” Bowlen, who transformed the team from also-rans into NFL champions and helped the league usher in billion-dollar television deals, died late Thursday, just under two months before his enshrinement in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He was 75. Bowlen’s family said in a statement posted on the Broncos’ website that he died peacefully at home surrounded by loved ones. They did not specify a cause of death. Bowlen had Alzheimer’s for several years. Bowlen was the first owner in NFL history to oversee a team that won 300 games — including playoffs — in three decades. He had as many Super Bowl appearances (seven) as losing seasons, and Denver is 354-240-1 since he bought the club in 1984. The Broncos won Super Bowls in 1998, 1999 and 2016 under his stewardship. Super Bowl 50 was the Broncos’ eighth trip to the big game, the seventh under Bowlen’s watch. Bowlen’s wife, Annabel, who recently announced that she, too,

has Alzheimer’s, and their children were on hand to accept the Lombardi Trophy on his behalf in Santa Clara. Elway delivered the third Lombardi Trophy to Bowlen’s home back in Denver, and more than a million fans packed downtown for a victory parade 17 years after Elway capped his remarkable playing career by leading the Broncos to back-to-back titles. “His soul will live on through the Broncos, the city of Denver and all of our fans,” Bowlen’s family said in its statement Thursday night. “Heaven got a little bit more orange and blue tonight.” Bowlen was born in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, on Feb. 18, 1944. He earned business and law degrees at the University of Oklahoma before working in his father’s oil and gas company and embarking on a successful real estate business in Canada. He and his family purchased the Broncos in two transactions in 1984 and 1985 for $71 million. The franchise now is valued at $2.6 billion, according to the latest Forbes rankings. During 35 seasons with him as owner, Bowlen’s teams compiled a .596 winning percentage — tied for second-best in the NFL during that span. Among professional franchises in the four major North American sports, only the San Antonio Spurs, New England Patriots and Los Angeles Lakers were better, according to the Broncos. Bowlen relished working behind the scenes and shied away from the spotlight. In the words of former coach Mike Shanahan, “Pat just wanted to be one of the guys.” “That’s why I think he was so beloved by so many people, including myself,” Shanahan said. “And you also knew that he would give anything to make your football team better or at least get a chance at the Super Bowl. At that time you would say every ounce that he had — I should say every penny he had — he wanted to go into giving the football team a Super Bowl. That was his No. 1 priority. That was it. It was not trying to buy different companies and trying to make more money. His goal was winning a Super Bowl.” Bowlen served as a sounding board for NFL commissioners Pete Rozelle, Paul Tagliabue and Roger Goodell. He was crucial to the league’s growth as a member

of 15 NFL committees, including co-chairing the NFL Management Council and working on network TV contracts such as the league’s ground-breaking $18 billion deal in 1998. “Pat personified all that’s right about the NFL and is extremely deserving of this summer’s recognition as a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame,” Goodell said. Hall president & CEO David Baker said: “Pat’s leadership helped shaped the NFL into what it is today. He also transformed the Denver Broncos into one of the finest franchises in the league and gave a winning identity to an entire region. He was a man who lived life with passion, conviction and demonstrated the highest level of integrity at all times.” Bowlen had a deep appreciation for his players, whether or not they were stars, and it’s not unusual to see ex-Broncos watching practice. “When I retired, Mr. B. told me I was welcome anytime at team headquarters,” Hall of Fame tight end Shannon Sharpe said. “He said I didn’t need a pass, either: ‘Your face is your credential.’” Ownership of the franchise is held in a trust Bowlen set up more than a decade ago in hopes one of his seven children one day will run the team. Until then, Broncos president and CEO Joe Ellis, one of three trustees, is doing so in a “What would Pat do?” sort of way. Those who worked for Bowlen remember a man who put production ahead of profits, trained tirelessly for triathlons, fostered a winning atmosphere from the lobby to the locker room and always was quick with a compliment and sure to couch his criticism. Bowlen flashed his competitive streak whether on the road conducting league business, on the sideline watching his team or on the StairMaster drenched in sweat. It was evident in his dislike for Peyton Manning when the quarterback played for Indianapolis before joining the Broncos in 2012. “I get it, and I respect that,” Manning said, adding that Bowlen flew back to Denver from his offseason home in Hawaii to welcome him when he signed with the Broncos, and they were friends afterward. Bowlen is survived by his wife, Annabel, and seven children: Amie, Beth, Patrick, Johnny, Brittany, Annabel and Christianna.

Country Club. Henderson finished play late Thursday with a hole-in-one on the 15th hole, her sixth hole of the round that started seven hours late. Henderson, 21, successfully defended her Lotte Championship title in April in Hawaii for her eighth LPGA Tour victory, tying Sandra Post’s Canadian record. Brittany Altomare was second at 13 under after rounds of 66 and 65. She played 31 holes on Friday. (AP)

the Flint Monarchs in the club’s home opener. (Joe Lyons)

DIGEST East St. Louis defensive lineman picks Mizzou Another touted local prospect has committed to coach Barry Odom and the Missouri Tigers. This week, it’s East St. Louis defensive lineman Kevon Billingsley. He is rated a threestar prospect by Rivals.com and 247Sports.com and announced his pledge on Billingsley social media Friday. He said he started strongly considering Mizzou about two months ago after taking an unofficial visit to the Columbia campus. Billingsley said the staff is open to him playing defensive end or defensive tackle. He recently announced a final six of Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Louisiana State and Mizzou. Billingsley played at Lutheran North his freshman, sophomore and junior seasons and also briefly attended Parkway North.

He recently transferred to East St. Louis, where he’ll play as a senior this fall. Before he made the move, 247Sports.com rated Billingsley the No. 8 player in Missouri and No. 56 defensive tackle. Billingsley gives Mizzou eight commitments for 2020, including six from the St. Louis area. (Dave Matter)

charges, California prosecutors said. Assistant District Attorney Dan Owens said at a hearing in San Diego County Superior Court that five women who testified against Winslow at the first trial will be back at a second trial set for September. Winslow, who played for Cleveland, Tampa Bay, New England and the New York Jets, was convicted Monday of raping a 58-year-old homeless woman and two counts of lewd conduct involving two other women. A judge declared a mistrial on the remaining charges after the jury said it was hopelessly deadlocked. The remaining charges include six felonies, including the two counts of rape. (AP)

STLFC on the road: St. Louis FC (5-2-4) returns to action Saturday at 6 p.m. (St. Louis time), taking on the Bethlehem Steel FC (3-7-4) in United Soccer League Championship action in Pennsylvania. STLFC will host Major League Soccer’s FC Cincinnati on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Soccer Park in Fenton in the round of 16 of the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Henderson leads LPGA event: Cup. (Joe Lyons) Brooke Henderson opened a three-stroke lead Friday in a Winslow Jr. faces more trouble: 30-hole day at the Meijer LPGA Former pro football player Kellen Classic in Grand Rapids, Mich. Winslow Jr. will be retried after Henderson completed an 8-una jury convicted him of raping a der 64 in the rain-delayed first homeless woman but failed to round and shot another 64 in agree on eight other criminal the second round at Blythefield

NFL news: The New York Giants signed first-round draft picks defensive tackle Dexter Lawrence and cornerback DeAndre Baker. Their third first-rounder, quarterback Daniel Jones, is not yet signed. • Dallas tight end Rico Gathers has been suspended for the first game in 2019 for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy. • Detroit waived tight end Michael Roberts after trying to trade him to New England. Roberts Surge hosts Wisconsin Glo: The failed a physical with the PatriSt. Louis Surge (1-1) will be look- ots, according to a source. (AP) ing to avenge a season-opening road loss when it hosts the WisNHL news: Islanders forward consin Glo (3-0) at 4:35 p.m. Sat- Jordan Eberle, 29, agreed to terms urday at Washington University on a $27.5 million, five-year conin Global Women’s Basketball tract. Since joining the Islanders via a trade in 2017, Eberle has 44 Association action. The Surge lost at Wisconsin goals and 52 assists in 159 games. • Philadelphia Flyers acquired to open the season, but St. Louis was without three starters — in- Matt Niskanen from Washington cluding star guard Rebecca Har- for Radko Gudas in a swap of deris, who scored a game-high 35 fensemen. (AP) points in last week’s win over


GOLF

06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

U.S. OPEN

Rory McIlroy survives mini meltdown to stay close BY JOSH DUBOW

Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Gary Woodland reacts after making a birdie on the fifth hole during the second round of the U.S. Open on Friday in Pebble Beach, Calif.

Open From B1

36-hole record at Pebble Beach that Tiger Woods set in his record romp in 2000. The difference: Woods had a six-shot lead in 2000. Woodland’s margin was only two shots over Justin Rose, who had a 70. “I felt in control of my whole game,” Woodland said. Louis Oosthuizen didn’t make a par on the back nine until the final hole in his wild round of 70 and was three shots behind. The weekend remains a mystery. Rory McIlroy, who kept it together right when it looked as though his round was getting away from him, felt the course was a little faster and could really speed up on the weekend. He was among 10 players separated by five shots halfway through a U.S. Open that so far has run smoothly. That list includes two-time defending champion Brooks Koepka, who made two late birdies for another 69 and was five shots behind. “I feel great. I’m excited. I’ve got a chance. That’s all you can

ask for,” Koepka said. “I just need to make a few putts. Sometimes the hole just needs to open up. If I can get off to a good start tomorrow, have that feeling where the hole’s opening up, it could be a fun round.” The list does not include Woods. He made a 10-foot birdie on No. 11, his second hole of the round, and made nothing else the rest of the day. That birdie was the only putt he made longer than 5 feet, and he closed with backto-back bogeys for a 72 to finish nine shots behind. Rose set the target early, and at one point Friday morning, had a four-shot lead until a poor wedge to a front pin on No. 3, followed by an iron off the tee at the short, uphill fourth that peeled right over the edge and into ice plant, forcing him to take a penalty drop and led to a bogey. But he had few complaints with a super short game that has carried him for two rounds. Rose got up-and-down from the thick collar short of the green at No. 8, and with a lag putt from the bottom of the green at No. 9. “At this point, there’s not a lot to worry about,” Rose said. “If you’re one ahead, one behind, it’s

a lot of golf to be played. But it’s the perfect spot after two days.” For the second straight day, Pebble Beach was there for the taking, but only for good, smart shots. McIlroy also made a run at the lead until a bogey from the bunker on the 13th and a mess on the par-5 14th. With the ball slightly above his feet for his wedge, and knowing that anything left of the pin would go down a slope with gnarly rough, he left it out to the right and watched it roll off the green and into the fairway. Then, he dumped a shot into the bunker and walked off with double bogey. He answered with a pair of birdies. “Those were huge to get me back into the tournament,” McIlroy said. Oosthuizen, the first player to reach the early target set by Rose at 7 under, gave a shot back with a bogey on No. 8, and then another one at No. 10 that started his roller coaster along the inward nine. A birdie was followed by two bogeys, followed by two birdies and another bogey. “Seven birdies and six bogeys — I’m not a big fan of bogeys,” Oosthuizen said. “But miss these

greens, it’s so difficult around the greens at the rough. And you can’t control the ball. You basically are guessing what it’s going to do. And all those loose iron shots, I had tough chips, and end up bogeying probably all of them.” Phil Mickelson revved up the crowd with three birdies in the opening six holes and six birdies for the round. He still couldn’t stop the mistakes, however, and Mickelson had to settle for a 69. He was eight shots behind, needing to get a little closer in range to seriously think about a shot at the career Grand Slam. Even with two soft days, and slightly firmer conditions, no one expects it to be easier the rest of the way. Graeme McDowell, who won the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach in 2010 at even-par 284, ran off four straight birdies early in his round, threw in a few mistakes and was wincing over every birdie chance that burned the edge of the cup. He had to settle for a 70 and was six behind, but still hopeful. “Anything can happen on this golf course over the weekend,” he said. “You don’t have to do anything fancy tomorrow.”

U.S. OPEN RESULTS

U.S. OPEN TEE TIMES

Friday at Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach, Calif., (a-amateur) Purse: $12.5 million | Yardage: 7,075; Par 71 (35-36) | Second Round

Today at Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach, Calif., (a-amateur) 9:36 a.m. — Justin Walters 9:47 a.m. — Rhys Enoch, Patrick Reed 9:58 a.m. — Tommy Fleetwood, Tyrrell Hatton 10:09 a.m. — Shane Lowry, Martin Kaymer 10:20 a.m. — Kyle Stanley, Nick Taylor 10:31 a.m. — Adri Arnaus, Tom Hoge 10:42 a.m. — Clement Sordet, Erik Van Rooyen 10:53 a.m. — Bernd Wiesberger, Alex Prugh 11:04 a.m. — Andrew Putnam, Patrick Cantlay 11:15 a.m. — Brandt Snedeker, Rafa Cabrera Bello 11:26 a.m. — Mi. Thorbjornsen (a), Chip McDaniel 11:37 a.m. — Brian Stuard, Marcus Kinhult 11:48 a.m. — Collin Morikawa, Andy Pope 11:59 a.m. — Cameron Smith, Jason Day 12:10 p.m. — Rickie Fowler, Bryson DeChambeau 12:21 p.m. — Kevin Kisner, Marc Leishman 12:32 p.m. — Billy Horschel, Billy Hurley III 12:43 p.m. — Daniel Berger, Rory Sabbatini 12:54 p.m. — Abraham Ancer, Hideki Matsuyama 1:05 p.m. — Danny Willett, Luke Donald 1:16 p.m. — Emiliano Grillo, Chandler Eaton (a) 1:27 p.m. — Tiger Woods, Byeong Hun An 1:38 p.m. — Viktor Hovland (a), Webb Simpson 1:49 p.m. — Paul Casey, Charles Howell III 2:00 p.m. — Charlie Danielson, Phil Mickelson 2:11 p.m. — Haotong Li, Jason Dufner 2:22 p.m. — Jordan Spieth, Nate Lashley 2:33 p.m. — Harris English, Brandon Wu (a) 2:44 p.m. — Dustin Johnson, Carlos Ortiz 2:55 p.m. — Sepp Straka, Matt Fitzpatrick 3:06 p.m. — Francesco Molinari, Jim Furyk 3:17 p.m. — Xander Schauffele, Sergio Garcia 3:28 p.m. — Graeme McDowell, Zach Johnson 3:39 p.m. — Jon Rahm, Scott Piercy 3:50 p.m. — Adam Scott, Henrik Stenson 4:01 p.m. — Matt Wallace, Brooks Koepka 4:12 p.m. — Matt Kuchar, Chesson Hadley 4:23 p.m. — Chez Reavie, Rory McIlroy 4:34 p.m. — Aaron Wise, Louis Oosthuizen 4:45 p.m. — Justin Rose, Gary Woodland

Gary Woodland Justin Rose Louis Oosthuizen Aaron Wise Rory McIlroy Chez Reavie Chesson Hadley Matt Kuchar Brooks Koepka Matt Wallace Henrik Stenson Adam Scott Scott Piercy Jon Rahm Zach Johnson Gr. McDowell Sergio Garcia Xa. Schauffele Jim Furyk Fr. Molinari Ma.Fitzpatrick Sepp Straka Carlos Ortiz Dustin Johnson Brandon Wu (a) Harris English Nate Lashley Jordan Spieth Jason Dufner Li Haotong Phil Mickelson C. Danielson C. Howell III Paul Casey Webb Simpson V. Hovland (a) Byeong-Hun An Tiger Woods Chandler Eaton (a) Emiliano Grillo Luke Donald Danny Willett H. Matsuyama Abraham Ancer Rory Sabbatini Daniel Berger Billy Hurley III Billy Horschel Marc Leishman Kevin Kisner Br. DeChambeau Jason Day Rickie Fowler Cameron Smith Andy Pope

68-65 133 — -9 65-70 135 — -7 66-70 136 — -6 66-71 137 — -5 68-69 137 — -5 68-70 138 — -4 68-70 138 — -4 69-69 138 — -4 69-69 138 — -4 70-68 138 — -4 68-71 139 — -3 70-69 139 — -3 67-72 139 — -3 69-70 139 — -3 70-69 139 — -3 69-70 139 — -3 69-70 139 — -3 66-73 139 — -3 73-67 140 — -2 68-72 140 — -2 69-71 140 — -2 68-72 140 — -2 70-70 140 — -2 71-69 140 — -2 71-69 140 — -2 71-69 140 — -2 67-74 141 — -1 72-69 141 — -1 70-71 141 — -1 71-70 141 — -1 72-69 141 — -1 72-70 142 — E 72-70 142 — E 70-72 142 — E 74-68 142 — E 69-73 142 — E 70-72 142 — E 70-72 142 — E 72-70 142 — E 68-74 142 — E 72-70 142 — E 71-71 142 — E 69-73 142 — E 74-68 142 — E 72-71 143 — 1 73-70 143 — 1 73-70 143 — 1 73-70 143 — 1 69-74 143 — 1 73-70 143 — 1 69-74 143 — 1 70-73 143 — 1 66-77 143 — 1 71-72 143 — 1 72-71 143 — 1

Collin Morikawa 71-73 144 — Brian Stuard 71-73 144 — Marcus Kinhult 74-70 144 — Chip McDaniel 71-73 144 — M. Thorbjornsen (a) 71-73 144 — Ra. Cabrera Bello 70-74 144 — Brandt Snedeker 75-69 144 — Patrick Cantlay 73-71 144 — Andrew Putnam 73-71 144 — Alex Prugh 75-69 144 — B. Wiesberger 71-73 144 — Erik van Rooyen 71-73 144 — Clement Sordet 76-68 144 — Adri Arnaus 69-75 144 — Tom Hoge 71-73 144 — Nick Taylor 74-70 144 — Kyle Stanley 71-73 144 — Martin Kaymer 69-75 144 — Shane Lowry 75-69 144 — Tyrrell Hatton 70-74 144 — T. Fleetwood 71-73 144 — Patrick Reed 71-73 144 — Rhys Enoch 78-66 144 — Justin Walters 72-72 144 — Did not make the cut Spencer Tibbits (a) Nick Hardy Ollie Schniederjans Joseph Bramlett Rob Oppenheim Lee Slattery Matt Jones Lucas Glover Hayden Shieh Jovan Rebula (a) Scottie Scheffler Justin Harding Keith Mitchell Julian Etulain Justin Thomas Brendon Todd Tony Finau Branden Grace Luke List David Toms Ian Poulter Jimmy Walker Austin Eckroat (a) Chun An Yu (a) Matthieu Pavon Dean Burmester Joel Dahmen Patton Kizzire Sam Saunders

74-71 73-72 75-70 73-72 73-72 73-72 74-71 73-72 77-69 70-76 72-74 73-73 76-70 76-70 73-73 72-74 74-72 75-71 74-72 72-74 73-73 75-71 72-75 74-73 73-74 76-71 75-72 80-67 72-75

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Ryan Fox Alexander Noren Aaron Baddeley Mikumu Horikawa Callum Tarren Cody Gribble Thorbjorn Olesen Ernie Els Mike Weir Daniel Hillier (a) Luis Gagne Stewart Hagestad (a) Renato Paratore Sam Horsfield Guillermo Pereira Kiradech Aphibarnrat Keegan Bradley Jhonattan Vegas J.B. Holmes Kevin Na Shugo Imahira Kyoung-Hoon Lee Si Woo Kim 145 Connor Arendell 145 145 Luke Guthrie 145 Kevin O’Connell (a) 145 Richard H. Lee 145 Bubba Watson 145 Cameron Young (a) 145 Matt Parziale (a) 146 Anirban Lahiri 146 146 Brian Davis 146 Matt Naumec 146 Thomas Pieters 146 Ryan Sullivan 146 Chan Kim 146 Marcus Fraser 146 Brett Drewitt 146 146 C.T. Pan 146 Kodai Ichihara 146 Noah Norton (a) 146 Zac Blair 147 Lucas Bjerregaard 147 Roberto Castro 147 Andreas Halvorsen 147 147 Eric Dietrich 147 Merrick Bremner 147 Devon Bling (a)

74-73 75-72 72-75 73-75 73-75 74-74 71-77 75-73 74-74 76-73 71-78 74-75 75-74 75-74 77-72 75-74 73-76 72-77 72-77 72-77 75-75 76-74 76-74 77-73 75-75 76-74 72-78 75-75 75-76 74-77 74-77 75-76 74-78 76-76 73-79 77-75 73-79 77-76 80-73 80-74 80-75 83-72 80-75 78-77 74-82 83-75 79-79 82-80

147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 151 151 151 151 152 152 152 152 152 153 153 154 155 155 155 155 156 158 158 162

PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — Rory McIlroy is sticking around for the weekend at the U.S. Open for a change. After missing the cut the past three years, McIlroy is firmly in the mix at Pebble Beach after rebounding from a mini meltdown on the back nine Friday with back-to-back birdies that gave him his second straight round in the 60s. McIlroy shot a 2-under 69 to reach 5 under, tied for fourth place, four strokes behind leader Gary Woodland. Since winning his only U.S. Open title at Congressional in 2011, McIlroy had shot in the 60s in just two rounds over his past seven appearances, missing the cut the past three years. But he has carried the momentum from his closing-round 61 that gave him a win at the Canadian Open last week with a good start at Pebble as he seeks his fifth career major and first since 2014. “Coming off the back of a win last week and having another win this year, as well, and just the consistency that I’ve shown, it’s the best I’ve felt about my game in a while for sure,” McIlroy said. It showed with his ability to rebound on the back nine on Friday. Feeling good at 6 under through 12 holes, McIlroy took a chance to go for the back right of the green with his second shot at the par-4 instead of playing it safe for the middle. He missed in the bunker and ended up with a bogey. “I felt like I could squeeze a couple more out of the round, the last couple of holes and maybe get the lead going into the weekend,” he said. “I bogeyed that, which is fine, you’re going to make some bogeys around here.” But then things got much worse at the par-5 14th hole when he drove into the rough, then had his third shot roll back off the green when he shot it too far right trying to avoid the rough. His pitch landed short in the bunker, and he eventually two-putted for a double-bogey 7. “That didn’t go to plan,” he said. “It just sort of compounded the error with another error, which you never really want to do.” But after hitting his tee shot into the bunker on 15, McIlroy saved his day by hitting a 9-iron within 5 feet to set up the birdie. He added another on the 16th when he chipped in from just off the green. “Mentally, I’ve been pretty good this week,” he said. “I wasn’t as disciplined as I needed to be on a couple of those holes on the back nine, but I bounced back from that, which was a really good sign. And look, it’s not going to be easy over the weekend. You’re going to make bogeys, you’re going to make mistakes, it’s going to happen. And if I can keep responding to those mistakes like I did today I’ll be right there.” McIlroy then closed out his round with a pair of pars and is in good shape heading into the weekend. So instead of heading home, McIlroy was looking forward to unwinding and preparing for his final two rounds. “There’s no basketball or hockey to watch anymore. I’ve got two episodes of Billions to catch up on, so I might have to do that,” he said. “But, yeah, that’s really it. We’ve had room service like four of the last five nights so might maybe venture into Carmel and have dinner there. But that’s really it. Just sort of think about anything else but this.”

Rory McIlroy reacts after making a birdie on the 12th hole during the second round of the U.S. Open on Friday in Pebble Beach, Calif.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Philadelphia New York Washington Miami Central Milwaukee Chicago St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Colorado Arizona San Diego San Francisco

W 41 38 33 32 24 W 39 38 35 31 30 W 46 36 37 33 28

L 29 31 36 37 43 L 29 30 33 38 37 L 23 32 34 36 38

Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 5 Arizona 5, Washington 0 Colorado 9, San Diego 6

Pct .586 .551 .478 .464 .358 Pct .574 .559 .515 .449 .448 Pct .667 .529 .521 .478 .424

GB — 2½ 7½ 8½ 15½ GB — 1 4 8½ 8½ GB — 9½ 10 13 16½

WC — — 5 6 13 WC — — 2½ 7 7 WC — 1½ 2 5 8½

L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 3-7 6-4

Str W-8 L-2 L-2 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-5 W-2

Home 21-15 23-14 19-13 16-16 12-24 Home 22-13 24-11 20-13 13-18 15-16 Home 26-7 21-13 14-16 18-20 13-20

Away 20-14 15-17 14-23 16-21 12-19 Away 17-16 14-19 15-20 18-20 15-21 Away 20-16 15-19 23-18 15-16 15-18

Thursday’s results L.A. Dodgers 7, Chicago Cubs 3 St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, susp.

Friday’s results St. Louis 5, N.Y. Mets 4 (10), 1st Atlanta 9, Philadelphia 8 Washington 7, Arizona 3 San Diego at Colorado, (n) Pittsburgh 11, Miami 0 Chicago Cubs at L.A. Dodgers, (n) St. Louis 9, N.Y. Mets 5, 2nd Milwaukee at San Francisco, (n) Texas 7, Cincinnati 1 Today’s games Arizona (Clarke 1-2) at Washington (Strasburg 7-3), 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Nelson 0-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 3-6), 2:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Agrazal 0-0) at Miami (Lopez 4-5), 5:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wacha 4-2) at N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard 4-4), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Minor 5-4) at Cincinnati (Roark 4-5), 6:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Nola 6-1) at Atlanta (Newcomb 1-0), 6:20 p.m. San Diego (Lauer 5-5) at Colorado (Marquez 6-3), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Buehler 7-1), 8:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 41 42 37 25 21 W 46 35 33 25 22 W 47 37 35 34 29

L 26 27 34 44 48 L 22 33 34 41 47 L 23 32 34 36 43

Pct .612 .609 .521 .362 .304 Pct .676 .515 .493 .379 .319 Pct .671 .536 .507 .486 .403

GB — — 6 17 21 GB — 11 12½ 20 24½ GB — 9½ 11½ 13 19

WC — — 1 12 16 WC — 1½ 3 10½ 15 WC — — 2 3½ 9½

L10 3-7 6-4 5-5 4-6 3-7 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 L10 7-3 6-4 6-4 5-5 4-6

Str L-2 W-1 W-3 L-1 L-3 Str W-2 W-1 W-2 L-2 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 L-1 L-1

Home 22-13 19-17 17-17 12-22 9-26 Home 22-10 20-17 19-15 11-22 14-23 Home 26-10 24-12 18-15 19-18 13-22

Away 19-13 23-10 20-17 13-22 12-22 Away 24-12 15-16 14-19 14-19 8-24 Away 21-13 13-20 17-19 15-18 16-21

Thursday’s results Minnesota 10, Seattle 5 Boston 7, Texas 6 L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 3 Kansas City 7, Detroit 3 Toronto 12, Baltimore 3 Chi. White Sox 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Friday’s results Boston 13, Baltimore 2 Minnesota 2, Kansas City 0 Cleveland 13, Detroit 7 Chi White Sox 10, N.Y. Yankees 2 Tampa Bay 9, L.A. Angels 4 Houston 15, Toronto 2 Texas 7, Cincinnati 1 Seattle at Oakland, (n) Today’s games L.A. Angels (Suarez 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Morton 8-0), 12:10 p.m. Boston (Sale 2-7) at Baltimore (Bundy 3-7), 3:05 p.m. Toronto (Richard 0-2) at Houston (Valdez 2-2), 3:10 p.m. Cleveland (Bieber 5-2) at Detroit (TBD), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (Sparkman 1-2) at Minnesota (Odorizzi 9-2), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (TBD) at Chicago White Sox (Lopez 4-6), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Minor 5-4) at Cincinnati (Roark 4-5), 6:10 p.m. Seattle (LeBlanc 3-2) at Oakland (Montas 8-2), 8:07 p.m.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Piscotty’s melanoma removed Oakland Athletics outfielder Stephen Piscotty will be out until at least next week after he had a melanoma removed from his right ear. The 28-year-old Piscotty had surgery Thursday after the melanoma on the outer lobe of his ear was discovered during a routine spot check on May 28. A biopsy came back positive a week later. Dr. Brian Parrett performed the operation at the California Pacific Medical Campus. “From what I hear everything was pretty successful,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said Friday. “He didn’t make a big deal of it. Even with the guys he didn’t want a lot of fanfare. He didn’t want it weighing anybody down. Obviously we’re thinking about it.” Piscotty will be evaluated daily and the A’s expect him to return next week. General manager David Forst said the good news is the melanoma was discovered early. The A’s hold an annual skin check screening for the team, coaches and employees. “We believe it was caught early hopefully as a result of Stephen being vigilant,” Forst said. “This is something that we talk about all the time with players and staff, protecting yourself from the sun and having yourself checked regularly.” Piscotty’s mother, Gretchen, passed away on May 6, 2018, from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, less than a year after being diagnosed. Piscotty was playing for the St. Louis Cardinals when his mother was initially diagnosed before being traded to the A’s — a move that was done partly to allow him to be closer to her. “In his mind this is probably minor as far as that goes, which it isn’t,” Melvin said. “It’s a big deal. He just wanted to get it over with, and hopefully if it went well get back as soon as possible. That’s kind of where we are right now. We haven’t made a corresponding move. We might not have to. We’ll see where we are at the end of the weekend.” — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

1

Shohei Ohtani became the first Japanese-born player in major league history to hit for the cycle when he accomplished the feat Thursday. Ohtani also was the first Angels player to complete a cycle since Mike Trout in 2013. — MLB.com

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Bauers hits for cycle, Indians cruise ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — Cleveland’s Jake Bauers hit for the cycle, and the Indians routed the Detroit Tigers 13-4 on Friday night after scoring eight runs in the fourth inning. Bauers singled and tripled in that inning. He also hit a double in the second and a two-run homer in the eighth, becoming the first Cleveland player to hit for the cycle since Rajai Davis did it at Toronto on July 2, 2016. Leonys Martin’s threerun homer highlighted Cleveland’s eight-run fourth. The Indians sent 13 men to the plate that inning, turning a 3-2 deficit into a 10-3 advantage. The first six batters of the inning reached base. Adam Plutko allowed two earned runs and five hits in six innings for Cleveland. He walked one and struck out six. Ryan Carpenter threw 92 pitches but only lasted three-plus innings. He allowed six earned runs, eight hits and four walks. PIRATES 11, MARLINS 0: Steven Brault scattered eight hits over six innings, and Pittsburgh stopped a seven-game slide by routing host Miami. RANGERS 7, REDS 1: Rougned Odor’s fifth-in-

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Reds shortstop Jose Iglesias dives for a ground ball during the second inning Friday in Cincinnati. tinez each drove in three runs for the high-powered Boston lineup as it defeated host Baltimore. Andrew Benintendi drove in two runs but was not one of the five Red Sox batters to hit a NATIONALS 7, DIAMOND- ball out of the park. Boston BACKS 3: Max Scherzer earned seven walks. struck out 10 in seven innings, and host Washington TWINS 2, ROYALS 0: Kyle defeated Arizona. Scherzer Gibson pitched eight scoreleads the National League less innings, and Mitch with 136 strikeouts. He Garver hit a two-run home gave up two runs and three run as hostMinnesota dehits, including home runs feated Kansas City. Gibson by Carson Kelly and Nick struck out six and did not Ahmed. Anthony Ren- issue a walk. don and Howie Kendrick homered for the Nationals. BRAVES 9, PHILLIES 8: Brian McCann hit a walkRED SOX 13, ORIOLES 2: Mi- off single as host Atlanta chael Chavis and J.D. Mar- scored three runs in the ning grand slam provided all of the necessary offense as Texas picked up a victory over host Cincinnati. Four Rangers pitchers combined to allow five hits.

bottom of the ninth inning. ASTROS 15, BLUE JAYS 2: Robinson Chirinos hit a grand slam and drove in six total runs as host Houston dominated Toronto. Gerritt Cole struck out 10 batters over six innings while giving up just three hits. RAYS 9, ANGELS 4: A fiverun sixth inning and fourrun seventh provided all of the offense for host Tampa Bay as it defeated Los Angeles. WHITE SOX 10, YANKEES 2: Eloy Jimenez hit two home runs and drove in six as host Chicago defeated New York.

BOX SCORES Twins 2, Royals 0 Kansas City Merrifield 2b Lopez ss Gordon dh Duda 1b Cuthbert 3b Bonifacio lf Gallagher c Hamilton cf Gore ph Soler rf Totals Minnesota Kepler rf Polanco dh Garver c Rosario lf Cron 1b Sano 3b Adrianza ss Schoop 2b Gonzalez ph Buxton cf Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 28 AB 2 3 4 4 3 2 3 3 1 1 26

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Pirates 11, Marlins 0

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 0 0 .294 0 0 0 1 .210 0 0 0 1 .271 0 0 0 2 .163 0 0 0 0 .311 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 1 .174 1 0 0 0 .228 0 0 0 1 .273 0 0 0 1 .244 2 0 0 7 H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 2 0 .265 0 0 1 1 .335 1 2 0 1 .318 0 0 0 1 .263 0 0 0 2 .271 0 0 1 1 .240 2 0 0 0 .287 0 0 0 0 .248 0 0 0 0 .258 0 0 0 0 .266 4 2 4 6

Kansas City 000 000 000 Minnesota 000 000 02x

— —

0 2 1 2 4 0

E — Cuthbert (2). LOB — Kansas City 1, Minnesota 5. HR — Garver (11), off Diekman. RBIs — Garver 2 (28). CS — Kepler (4). DP — Kansas City 2; Minnesota 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Keller 7 3 0 0 3 5 3.97 Diekman, L, 0-4 1 1 2 2 1 1 4.76 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson, W, 7-3 8 2 0 0 0 6 3.70 Rogers, S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.17 HBP — Keller (Buxton). WP — Gibson. T — 2:21. Att. — 38,898

Nationals 7, Diamondbacks 3 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .277 Peralta lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Jones rf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .279 Escobar 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .293 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Ahmed ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .266 C.Kelly c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .264 Vargas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Ray p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .040 Locastro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Walker ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .248 Dyson cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .263 Totals 34 3 6 3 3 13 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 3 2 1 1 1 1 .286 Robles rf 3 0 1 2 0 0 .234 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 2 0 1 .315 Soto lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .285 Kendrick 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .323 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .228 Suzuki c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 Taylor cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .231 Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Scherzer p 1 1 0 0 0 1 .114 Totals 30 7 8 7 2 7 Arizona 001 010 010 — 3 6 1 Washington 003 002 20x — 7 8 1 E — Ray (1), Kendrick (2). LOB — Arizona 8, Washington 4. 2B — Escobar (17), C.Kelly (10), Turner (12). HR — C.Kelly (8), off Scherzer; Ahmed (5), off Scherzer; Rendon (15), off Ray; Kendrick (12), off Ray. RBIs — Escobar (57), Ahmed (27), C.Kelly (21), Kendrick (41), Soto (40), Turner (15), Rendon 2 (48), Robles 2 (28). SB — Dyson (15), Turner (10), Taylor 2 (4). SF — Rendon, Robles. S — Scherzer. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA Crichton 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 0.00 Ray, L, 5-4 6 5 5 5 1 5 3.83 2 /3 2 2 2 1 1 5.05 Andriese Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Scherzer, W, 5-5 7 3 2 2 1 10 2.81 Doolittle 1 1 0 0 1 2 3.45 2 /3 2 1 1 1 1 6.35 Suero 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 1.59 Rainey, H, 3 Inherited runners-scored — Crichton 1-0, Rainey 2-0. HBP — Scherzer (Peralta). T — 2:57. Att. — 29,853

Rangers 7, Reds 1

Indians 13, Tigers 4

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .282 DeShields cf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .228 Andrus ss 4 1 0 0 0 1 .308 Mazara rf 5 0 1 1 0 3 .264 Cabrera 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .250 Odor 2b 2 1 1 4 3 0 .182 Guzman 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Federowicz c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .313 Smyly p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Forsythe ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .275 Chavez p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Totals 34 7 8 6 7 12 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Senzel cf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .272 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Suarez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Dietrich 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Puig rf 4 0 3 0 0 1 .222 Peraza lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Casali c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Mahle p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .050 Farmer 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Barnhart ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .199 J.Iglesias ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Winker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Totals 31 1 5 1 1 12 — 7 8 1 Texas 200 041 000 Cincinnati 000 000 010 — 1 5 0 E — Federowicz (1). LOB — Texas 9, Cincinnati 5. 2B — Choo (17), Federowicz (1), Puig (7). HR — Odor (8), off Peralta; Senzel (6), off Smyly. RBIs — DeShields (13), Mazara (39), Odor 4 (34), Senzel (16). SB — Cabrera (2), Andrus (14). SF — DeShields. DP — Texas 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smyly, S, 1-1 3 3 1 1 1 5 8.06 B.Martin, W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 0 2 4.94 Springs 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.19 Chavez 3 1 0 0 0 4 3.35 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Mahle, L, 2-7 41/3 4 4 4 3 4 4.46 Duke 2 1 0 0 2 3 5.03 2 Peralta /3 2 3 3 2 2 5.96 Bowman 2 1 0 0 0 3 0.93 Peralta pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored — Peralta 2-2, Bowman 2-1. HBP — Mahle (Andrus). PB — Casali (2). T — 3:08. Att. — 30,090

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 6 1 2 1 0 0 .303 Mercado lf 6 1 2 0 0 0 .281 Santana 1b 5 2 2 0 1 1 .289 Luplow rf 5 0 1 0 1 3 .241 Ramirez 3b 5 2 2 2 1 0 .202 Kipnis 2b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .213 Freeman 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 R.Perez c 5 3 3 2 0 1 .238 Bauers dh 5 2 4 4 0 1 .222 Martin cf 4 1 1 3 1 1 .206 Totals 45 13 17 12 5 7 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 5 1 0 0 0 2 .250 Stewart lf 1 0 0 1 2 0 .241 Castellanos rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .260 Cabrera dh 3 1 1 1 0 1 .286 Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Dixon 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .288 Goodrum ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .235 Castro 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .244 Hicks c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .224 Lugo 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .232 Totals 33 4 7 4 3 10 Cleveland 020 810 020 — 13 17 1 Detroit 021 000 001 — 4 7 2 E — Lindor (4), Castro (3), Dixon (4). LOB — Cleveland 10, Detroit 6. 2B — Bauers (9), Mercado (5), R.Perez (4). 3B — Ramirez (1), Bauers (1), Goodrum (3). HR — Martin (9), off Carpenter; Bauers (8), off Hardy; Cabrera (4), off Plutko; Dixon (7), off Plutko. RBIs — Ramirez 2 (23), Bauers 4 (26), Lindor (25), R.Perez 2 (27), Martin 3 (19), Cabrera (29), Stewart (23), Castro (3), Dixon (24). SF — Stewart. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Goody 1 0 0 0 1 2 3.18 Plutko, W, 3-1 6 5 3 2 1 6 4.63 Smith 1 1 1 1 1 1 5.40 Clippard 1 1 0 0 0 1 3.50 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hardy 2 3 2 0 0 1 4.72 Torres 1 2 0 0 0 0 9.00 Farmer 2 4 3 1 1 2 4.94 Stumpf 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.00 Carpenter, L, 1-4 3 8 8 6 4 2 8.82 Carpenter pitched to 6 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored — Farmer 3-3. T — 3:08. Att. — 22,362

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Chavis 1b 5 2 2 3 1 0 .253 Benintendi lf 6 0 1 2 0 2 .264 Martinez rf 4 2 3 3 2 0 .306 Bogaerts ss 2 1 0 0 2 0 .292 Hernandez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Holt 2b 4 3 2 2 0 1 .288 Vazquez c 5 2 2 1 0 2 .289 Bradley Jr. cf 4 2 2 2 1 1 .211 E.Nunez dh 4 1 1 0 1 0 .211 Leon c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Devers 3b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .303 Totals 41 13 16 13 7 6 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Alberto 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Ruiz 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .228 R.Nunez dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Severino c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .277 Santander lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .367 Villar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Davis 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .170 Broxton cf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .183 Martin ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .179 Wilkerson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Mancini rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .305 Totals 34 2 9 2 0 6 Boston 020 452 000 — 13 16 0 Baltimore 100 000 001 — 2 9 0 LOB — Boston 10, Baltimore 7. 2B — Bradley Jr. (13), Severino (6), Santander (3). HR — Holt (1), off Ortiz; Vazquez (8), off Ortiz; Martinez (14), off Straily; Bradley Jr. (7), off Straily; Chavis (12), off Straily; Martinez (15), off Straily; Mancini (15), off Rodriguez. RBIs — Chavis 3 (34), Vazquez (23), Benintendi 2 (32), Bradley Jr. 2 (23), Holt 2 (9), Martinez 3 (38), Broxton (8), Mancini (34). S — Broxton. Nunez. LIDP — Santander. DP — Boston 1; Baltimore 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smith 1 3 1 1 0 2 6.08 Lakins 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.00 Rodriguez, W, 7-4 7 6 1 1 0 4 4.67 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Rogers 41/3 5 2 2 2 1 7.88 Ortiz, L, 0-1 31/3 4 4 4 5 3 10.80 Straily 11/3 7 7 7 0 2 9.13 Inherited runners-scored — Straily 1-1. HBP — Rodriguez (Davis), Straily (Holt), Rogers (Devers). T — 3:24. Att. — 19,383

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Newman ss 5 1 1 1 0 0 .314 Reynolds rf 5 3 4 0 0 0 .364 Marte cf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .289 Bell 1b 3 2 1 2 1 1 .321 Moran 3b 5 1 3 5 0 0 .275 Dickerson lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .226 Diaz c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Frazier 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .264 Osuna ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .211 Brault p 2 1 2 0 0 0 .200 Totals 40 11 18 11 1 3 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dean lf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .211 B.Anderson rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Castro 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .230 Ramirez cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .303 Alfaro c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 Rivera 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Richards p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .091 Riddle ph 2 0 1 0 0 0 .193 Cooper 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .295 Herrera 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Rojas ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Totals 35 0 9 0 1 9 Pittsburgh 000 140 330 — 11 18 1 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 9 2 E — Moran (7), Castro (6), Richards (2). LOB — Pittsburgh 6, Miami 10. 2B — Newman (8), Reynolds (15), Brault (1). 3B — Bell (3), Frazier (4). HR — Moran (10), off Brigham; Osuna (2), off Garcia. RBIs — Marte (34), Bell 2 (63), Osuna 2 (5), Newman (18), Moran 5 (40). SF — Marte, Bell. S — Brault. DP — Pittsburgh 2; Miami 2. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Feliz 1 0 0 0 0 2 7.31 Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 0 5.08 Holmes 1 0 0 0 1 1 4.26 Brault, W, 3-1 6 8 0 0 0 6 4.40 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Garcia 2 4 3 3 0 1 5.65 Richards, L, 3-7 5 11 5 5 0 1 3.68 Conley 1 1 0 0 0 1 7.86 Brigham 1 2 3 3 1 0 5.87 HBP — Brault (B.Anderson). WP — Garcia. T — 2:56. Att. — 8,340

Red Sox 13, Orioles 2

Braves 9, Phillies 8 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 3 1 1 0 2 0 .285 Harper rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .249 Realmuto c 5 2 1 0 0 1 .276 Hoskins 1b 3 1 1 2 2 1 .273 Bruce lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .233 Kingery cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .330 Rodriguez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .256 Hernandez 2b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .261 Pivetta p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .059 Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Totals 34 8 9 7 5 7 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna Jr. cf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .287 Swanson ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .266 Freeman 1b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .313 Donaldson 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .235 Markakis rf 3 2 0 0 2 1 .273 Riley lf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .295 McCann c 5 1 3 3 0 1 .286 Albies 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .279 Culberson ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .367 Camargo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Totals 38 9 14 9 4 9 Philadelphia 012 110 210 — 8 9 0 Atlanta 010 001 223 — 9 14 2 E — Donaldson (9), Albies (2). LOB — Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 8. 2B — Kingery (11), Riley (4), Acuna Jr. (10). 3B — Culberson (2). HR — Harper (12), off Fried; Kingery (8), off Fried; Hoskins (15), off Winkler; Donaldson (10), off Pivetta; Freeman (19), off Pivetta; McCann (6), off Pivetta. RBIs — Hoskins 2 (49), Hernandez (30), Rodriguez (5), Kingery (19), Harper 2 (48), Donaldson (28), Albies (33), Riley (30), Culberson (13), Freeman 2 (48), McCann 3 (27). SB — Realmuto (3). CS — Riley (2). SF — Hernandez. S — Rodriguez, Winkler. DP — Philadelphia 1; Atlanta 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Velasquez, H, 2 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 4.08 1 Ramos, H, 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.50 Neris, L, 1-3, BS 2/3 3 3 3 1 1 2.76 2 Pivetta 6 /3 8 4 4 2 6 5.00 2 Alvarez /3 1 2 2 1 1 4.32 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Winkler 21/3 1 2 0 1 2 4.98 Fried 42/3 7 5 5 2 4 4.11 Tomlin 1 1 1 1 0 0 4.00 Blevins, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 2 1 5.40 T — 3:30. Att. — 41,975

MLB CALENDAR June 15 — International amateur signing period closes. June 19-20 — Owners meeting, New York. June 29-30 — New York Yankees vs. Boston at London. July 2 — International amateur signing period opens. July 9 — All-Star Game at Cleveland. July 12 — Deadline for drafted players to sign, except for players who have exhausted college eligibility. July 21— Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31 — Last day during the season to trade a player. Aug. 18 — Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Cubs at Williamsport, Pa. Aug. 31 — Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster.

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1902 — Corsicana defeated Texarkana 51-3 in a Texas League game. Nig Clark of Corsicana took advantage of the small park and hit eight homers. Some telegraph operators, thinking there was a mistake, reported the score as 5-3. 1938 — Four days after pitching a no-hitter against the Boston Braves, Johnny Vander Meer of the Cincinnati Reds pitched his second straight no-hit game, defeating the Dodgers 6-0 in the first night game played in Brooklyn. 1952 — The St. Louis Cardinals, down 11-0 entering the fifth inning, came back for a 14-12 triumph over the New York Giants in the first game of a doubleheader and set a National League record for best comeback. 1963 — San Francisco’s Juan Marichal pitched a no-hitter against the Houston Colts for a 1-0 victory, the first Giants no-hitter since Carl Hubbell’s in 1929.

1976 — The Pittsburgh Pirates and Houston Astros were “rained in” at the Houston Astrodome as 10 inches of rain fell on the city. Only members of both teams were able to make it to the stadium. Umpires, fans and stadium personnel were unable to make it through the water. 1992 — Jeff Reardon broke Rollie Fingers’ career save mark of 341 when he preserved a 1-0 victory for the Boston Red Sox with one scoreless inning against the New York Yankees. 2002 — A double in the fifth inning of Texas’ 4-0 loss to Houston gave Rafael Palmeiro 1,000 career extra-base hits. He became the 25th major leaguer to reach that mark. 2016 — Miami’s Ichiro Suzuki raised his career total in the Japanese and North American major leagues to 4,257, passing Pete Rose’s record Major League Baseball

total. Suzuki had two hits for the Marlins in a 6-3 loss to the San Diego Padres, Suzuki had 1,278 hits for Orix in Japan’s Pacific League (1992-00) and has 2,979 with Seattle, the New York Yankees and Marlins. His first hit Wednesday was on a dribbler in the first. His second was a double into the right-field corner in the ninth. 2016 — Atlanta’s Freddie Freeman hit for the cycle in a 9-8, 13-inning win over Cincinnati. 2018 — The Arizona Diamondbacks beat the staggering New York Mets 7-3. The freefalling Mets dropped four consecutive, 12 of 13 and 19 of 23. After starting the season 11-1, the Mets (28-38) went from 10 games over .500 to 10 games under earlier than any team in major league history. The previous mark was held by the 2011 Marlins, who did it in their 76th game.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Atlanta Philadelphia New York Washington Miami Central Milwaukee Chicago St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Colorado Arizona San Diego San Francisco

W 41 38 33 32 24 W 39 38 35 31 30 W 47 36 37 33 29

L 29 31 36 37 43 L 30 31 33 38 37 L 23 32 34 36 38

Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 5 Arizona 5, Washington 0 Colorado 9, San Diego 6

Pct .586 .551 .478 .464 .358 Pct .565 .551 .515 .449 .448 Pct .671 .529 .521 .478 .433

GB — 2½ 7½ 8½ 15½ GB — 1 3½ 8 8 GB — 10 10½ 13½ 16½

WC — — 5 6 13 WC — — 2½ 7 7 WC — 1½ 2 5 8

L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 3-7 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 3-7 6-4

Str W-8 L-2 L-2 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-2 W-2 W-1 L-1 Str W-2 W-1 L-1 L-5 W-3

Home 21-15 23-14 19-13 16-16 12-24 Home 22-13 24-11 20-13 13-18 15-16 Home 27-7 21-13 14-16 18-20 14-20

Away 20-14 15-17 14-23 16-21 12-19 Away 17-17 14-20 15-20 18-20 15-21 Away 20-16 15-19 23-18 15-16 15-18

Thursday’s results L.A. Dodgers 7, Chicago Cubs 3 St. Louis at N.Y. Mets, susp.

Friday’s results St. Louis 5, N.Y. Mets 4 (10), 1st Atlanta 9, Philadelphia 8 Washington 7, Arizona 3 L.A. Dodgers 5, Chicago Cubs 3 Pittsburgh 11, Miami 0 San Francisco 5, Milwaukee 3 St. Louis 9, N.Y. Mets 5, 2nd San Diego at Colorado, (n) Texas 7, Cincinnati 1 Today’s games Arizona (Clarke 1-2) at Washington (Strasburg 7-3), 2:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Nelson 0-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 3-6), 2:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Agrazal 0-0) at Miami (Lopez 4-5), 5:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wacha 4-2) at N.Y. Mets (Syndergaard 4-4), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Minor 5-4) at Cincinnati (Roark 4-5), 6:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Nola 6-1) at Atlanta (Newcomb 1-0), 6:20 p.m. San Diego (Lauer 5-5) at Colorado (Marquez 6-3), 7:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Buehler 7-1), 8:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 41 42 37 25 21 W 46 35 33 25 22 W 47 37 35 34 30

L 26 27 34 44 48 L 22 33 34 41 47 L 23 32 35 36 43

Pct .612 .609 .521 .362 .304 Pct .676 .515 .493 .379 .319 Pct .671 .536 .500 .486 .411

GB — — 6 17 21 GB — 11 12½ 20 24½ GB — 9½ 12 13 18½

WC — — 1 12 16 WC — 1½ 3 10½ 15 WC — — 2½ 3½ 9

L10 3-7 6-4 5-5 4-6 3-7 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 5-5 5-5

Str L-2 W-1 W-3 L-1 L-3 Str W-2 W-1 W-2 L-2 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 W-1

Home 22-13 19-17 17-17 12-22 9-26 Home 22-10 20-17 19-15 11-22 14-23 Home 26-10 24-12 18-16 19-18 13-22

Away 19-13 23-10 20-17 13-22 12-22 Away 24-12 15-16 14-19 14-19 8-24 Away 21-13 13-20 17-19 15-18 17-21

Thursday’s results Minnesota 10, Seattle 5 Boston 7, Texas 6 L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 3 Kansas City 7, Detroit 3 Toronto 12, Baltimore 3 Chi. White Sox 5, N.Y. Yankees 4 Friday’s results Boston 13, Baltimore 2 Minnesota 2, Kansas City 0 Cleveland 13, Detroit 7 Chi White Sox 10, N.Y. Yankees 2 Tampa Bay 9, L.A. Angels 4 Houston 15, Toronto 2 Texas 7, Cincinnati 1 Seattle 9, Oakland 2 Today’s games L.A. Angels (Suarez 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Morton 8-0), 12:10 p.m. Boston (Sale 2-7) at Baltimore (Bundy 3-7), 3:05 p.m. Toronto (Richard 0-2) at Houston (Valdez 2-2), 3:10 p.m. Cleveland (Bieber 5-2) at Detroit (TBD), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (Sparkman 1-2) at Minnesota (Odorizzi 9-2), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (TBD) at Chicago White Sox (Lopez 4-6), 6:10 p.m. Texas (Minor 5-4) at Cincinnati (Roark 4-5), 6:10 p.m. Seattle (LeBlanc 3-2) at Oakland (Montas 8-2), 8:07 p.m.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Piscotty’s melanoma removed Oakland Athletics outfielder Stephen Piscotty will be out until at least next week after he had a melanoma removed from his right ear. The 28-year-old Piscotty had surgery Thursday after the melanoma on the outer lobe of his ear was discovered during a routine spot check on May 28. A biopsy came back positive a week later. Dr. Brian Parrett performed the operation at the California Pacific Medical Campus. “From what I hear everything was pretty successful,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said Friday. “He didn’t make a big deal of it. Even with the guys he didn’t want a lot of fanfare. He didn’t want it weighing anybody down. Obviously we’re thinking about it.” Piscotty will be evaluated daily and the A’s expect him to return next week. General manager David Forst said the good news is the melanoma was discovered early. The A’s hold an annual skin check screening for the team, coaches and employees. “We believe it was caught early hopefully as a result of Stephen being vigilant,” Forst said. “This is something that we talk about all the time with players and staff, protecting yourself from the sun and having yourself checked regularly.” Piscotty’s mother, Gretchen, passed away on May 6, 2018, from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, less than a year after being diagnosed. Piscotty was playing for the St. Louis Cardinals when his mother was initially diagnosed before being traded to the A’s — a move that was done partly to allow him to be closer to her. “In his mind this is probably minor as far as that goes, which it isn’t,” Melvin said. “It’s a big deal. He just wanted to get it over with, and hopefully if it went well get back as soon as possible. That’s kind of where we are right now. We haven’t made a corresponding move. We might not have to. We’ll see where we are at the end of the weekend.” — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

1

Shohei Ohtani became the first Japanese-born player in major league history to hit for the cycle when he accomplished the feat Thursday. Ohtani also was the first Angels player to complete a cycle since Mike Trout in 2013. — MLB.com

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Bauers hits for cycle, Indians cruise ASSOCIATED PRESS

DETROIT — Cleveland’s Jake Bauers hit for the cycle, and the Indians routed the Detroit Tigers 13-4 on Friday night after scoring eight runs in the fourth inning. Bauers singled and tripled in that inning. He also hit a double in the second and a two-run homer in the eighth, becoming the first Cleveland player to hit for the cycle since Rajai Davis did it at Toronto on July 2, 2016. Leonys Martin’s threerun homer highlighted Cleveland’s eight-run fourth. The Indians sent 13 men to the plate that inning, turning a 3-2 deficit into a 10-3 advantage. The first six batters of the inning reached base. Bauers hit an infield single and a triple in that fourth inning. He also hit a double in the second. His cycle came one night after Shohei Ohtani accomplished the same feat for the Los Angeles Angels. Adam Plutko allowed two earned runs and five hits in six innings for Cleveland. He walked one and struck out six. Ryan Carpenter threw 92 pitches but only lasted three-plus innings. He allowed six earned runs, eight hits and four walks.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Reds shortstop Jose Iglesias dives for a ground ball during the second inning Friday in Cincinnati.

Lucas Giolito pitched into the seventh for his ninth straight win, Eloy Jimenez hit two three-run homers and host Chicago pounded New York. Giolito gave up a solo homer in the first, then NATIONALS 7, DIAMOND- shut down the Yankees for BACKS 3: Max Scherzer his eighth consecutive win. struck out 10 in seven innings, and host Washington BRAVES 9, PHILLIES 8: Brian defeated Arizona. Scherzer McCann hit a walk-off sinleads the National League gle as host Atlanta scored with 136 strikeouts. three runs in the bottom of the ninth inning. TWINS 2, ROYALS 0: Kyle Gibson pitched eight score- ASTROS 15, BLUE JAYS 2: less innings, and Mitch Robinson Chirinos hit a Garver hit a two-run home grand slam and drove in six run as hostMinnesota de- total runs as host Houston feated Kansas City. dominated Toronto. Gerritt RANGERS 7, REDS 1: Cole struck out 10 batters Rougned Odor’s fifth-in- WHITE SOX 10, YANKEES 2: over six innings. ning grand slam provided all of the necessary offense as Texas picked up a victory over host Cincinnati. Four Rangers pitchers combined to allow five hits.

RED SOX 13, ORIOLES 2: Michael Chavis and J.D. Martinez each drove in three runs for the high-powered Boston lineup as it defeated host Baltimore. RAYS 9, ANGELS 4: Tommy Pham hit a pair of RBI singles as host Tampa Bay suddenly broke loose, overcoming another subpar start by Blake Snell and rallying past Los Angeles. PIRATES 11, MARLINS 0: Steven Brault scattered eight hits over six innings, and Pittsburgh stopped a seven-game slide by routing host Miami.

BOX SCORES Twins 2, Royals 0 Kansas City Merrifield 2b Lopez ss Gordon dh Duda 1b Cuthbert 3b Bonifacio lf Gallagher c Hamilton cf Gore ph Soler rf Totals Minnesota Kepler rf Polanco dh Garver c Rosario lf Cron 1b Sano 3b Adrianza ss Schoop 2b Gonzalez ph Buxton cf Totals

AB 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 28 AB 2 3 4 4 3 2 3 3 1 1 26

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 0 0 .294 0 0 0 1 .210 0 0 0 1 .271 0 0 0 2 .163 0 0 0 0 .311 0 0 0 0 .000 0 0 0 1 .174 1 0 0 0 .228 0 0 0 1 .273 0 0 0 1 .244 2 0 0 7 H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 2 0 .265 0 0 1 1 .335 1 2 0 1 .318 0 0 0 1 .263 0 0 0 2 .271 0 0 1 1 .240 2 0 0 0 .287 0 0 0 0 .248 0 0 0 0 .258 0 0 0 0 .266 4 2 4 6

Kansas City 000 000 000 Minnesota 000 000 02x

— —

0 2 1 2 4 0

E — Cuthbert (2). LOB — Kansas City 1, Minnesota 5. HR — Garver (11), off Diekman. RBIs — Garver 2 (28). CS — Kepler (4). DP — Kansas City 2; Minnesota 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Keller 7 3 0 0 3 5 3.97 Diekman, L, 0-4 1 1 2 2 1 1 4.76 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson, W, 7-3 8 2 0 0 0 6 3.70 Rogers, S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.17 HBP — Keller (Buxton). WP — Gibson. T — 2:21. Att. — 38,898

Nationals 7, Diamondbacks 3 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .277 Peralta lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Jones rf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .279 Escobar 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .293 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Ahmed ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .266 C.Kelly c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .264 Vargas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Ray p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .040 Locastro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Walker ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .248 Dyson cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .263 Totals 34 3 6 3 3 13 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 3 2 1 1 1 1 .286 Robles rf 3 0 1 2 0 0 .234 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 2 0 1 .315 Soto lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .285 Kendrick 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .323 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .228 Suzuki c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 Taylor cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .231 Adams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Scherzer p 1 1 0 0 0 1 .114 Totals 30 7 8 7 2 7 Arizona 001 010 010 — 3 6 1 Washington 003 002 20x — 7 8 1 E — Ray (1), Kendrick (2). LOB — Arizona 8, Washington 4. 2B — Escobar (17), C.Kelly (10), Turner (12). HR — C.Kelly (8), off Scherzer; Ahmed (5), off Scherzer; Rendon (15), off Ray; Kendrick (12), off Ray. RBIs — Escobar (57), Ahmed (27), C.Kelly (21), Kendrick (41), Soto (40), Turner (15), Rendon 2 (48), Robles 2 (28). SB — Dyson (15), Turner (10), Taylor 2 (4). SF — Rendon, Robles. S — Scherzer. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA Crichton 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 0.00 Ray, L, 5-4 6 5 5 5 1 5 3.83 2 /3 2 2 2 1 1 5.05 Andriese Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Scherzer, W, 5-5 7 3 2 2 1 10 2.81 Doolittle 1 1 0 0 1 2 3.45 2 /3 2 1 1 1 1 6.35 Suero 1 Rainey, H, 3 /3 0 0 0 0 0 1.59 Inherited runners-scored — Crichton 1-0, Rainey 2-0. HBP — Scherzer (Peralta). T — 2:57. Att. — 29,853

Pirates 11, Marlins 0 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Newman ss 5 1 1 1 0 0 .314 Reynolds rf 5 3 4 0 0 0 .364 Marte cf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .289 Bell 1b 3 2 1 2 1 1 .321 Moran 3b 5 1 3 5 0 0 .275 Dickerson lf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .226 Diaz c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .269 Frazier 2b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .264 Osuna ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .211 Brault p 2 1 2 0 0 0 .200 Totals 40 11 18 11 1 3 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dean lf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .211 B.Anderson rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .244 Castro 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .230 Ramirez cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .303 Alfaro c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 Rivera 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Richards p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .091 Riddle ph 2 0 1 0 0 0 .193 Cooper 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .295 Herrera 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Rojas ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Totals 35 0 9 0 1 9 Pittsburgh 000 140 330 — 11 18 1 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 9 2 E — Moran (7), Castro (6), Richards (2). LOB — Pittsburgh 6, Miami 10. 2B — Newman (8), Reynolds (15), Brault (1). 3B — Bell (3), Frazier (4). HR — Moran (10), off Brigham; Osuna (2), off Garcia. RBIs — Marte (34), Bell 2 (63), Osuna 2 (5), Newman (18), Moran 5 (40). SF — Marte, Bell. S — Brault. DP — Pittsburgh 2; Miami 2. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Feliz 1 0 0 0 0 2 7.31 Rodriguez 1 1 0 0 0 0 5.08 Holmes 1 0 0 0 1 1 4.26 Brault, W, 3-1 6 8 0 0 0 6 4.40 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Garcia 2 4 3 3 0 1 5.65 Richards, L, 3-7 5 11 5 5 0 1 3.68 Conley 1 1 0 0 0 1 7.86 Brigham 1 2 3 3 1 0 5.87 HBP — Brault (B.Anderson). WP — Garcia. T — 2:56. Att. — 8,340

Indians 13, Tigers 4

Astros 15, Blue Jays 2

Braves 9, Phillies 8

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 6 1 2 1 0 0 .303 Mercado lf 6 1 2 0 0 0 .281 Santana 1b 5 2 2 0 1 1 .289 Luplow rf 5 0 1 0 1 3 .241 Ramirez 3b 5 2 2 2 1 0 .202 Kipnis 2b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .213 Freeman 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 R.Perez c 5 3 3 2 0 1 .238 Bauers dh 5 2 4 4 0 1 .222 Martin cf 4 1 1 3 1 1 .206 Totals 45 13 17 12 5 7 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones cf 5 1 0 0 0 2 .250 Stewart lf 1 0 0 1 2 0 .241 Castellanos rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .260 Cabrera dh 3 1 1 1 0 1 .286 Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Dixon 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .288 Goodrum ss 4 1 2 0 0 1 .235 Castro 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .244 Hicks c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .224 Lugo 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .232 Totals 33 4 7 4 3 10 Cleveland 020 810 020 — 13 17 1 Detroit 021 000 001 — 4 7 2 E — Lindor (4), Castro (3), Dixon (4). LOB — Cleveland 10, Detroit 6. 2B — Bauers (9), Mercado (5), R.Perez (4). 3B — Ramirez (1), Bauers (1), Goodrum (3). HR — Martin (9), off Carpenter; Bauers (8), off Hardy; Cabrera (4), off Plutko; Dixon (7), off Plutko. RBIs — Ramirez 2 (23), Bauers 4 (26), Lindor (25), R.Perez 2 (27), Martin 3 (19), Cabrera (29), Stewart (23), Castro (3), Dixon (24). SF — Stewart. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Goody 1 0 0 0 1 2 3.18 Plutko, W, 3-1 6 5 3 2 1 6 4.63 Smith 1 1 1 1 1 1 5.40 Clippard 1 1 0 0 0 1 3.50 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hardy 2 3 2 0 0 1 4.72 Torres 1 2 0 0 0 0 9.00 Farmer 2 4 3 1 1 2 4.94 Stumpf 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.00 Carpenter, L, 1-4 3 8 8 6 4 2 8.82 Carpenter pitched to 6 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored — Farmer 3-3. T — 3:08. Att. — 22,362

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Biggio 2b 4 0 1 2 0 3 .184 Gurriel Jr. lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .279 Tellez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .225 Grichuk cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .218 Galvis ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .243 Drury rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Maile c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .198 Sogard 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .276 Guerrero Jr. 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Totals 32 2 5 2 2 13 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Brantley lf 3 2 0 0 2 1 .313 Gurriel 3b 3 2 1 0 1 1 .259 Alvarez dh 4 3 3 3 1 1 .385 Chirinos c 5 1 2 6 0 2 .243 Reddick rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .300 White 1b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .217 Kemp 2b 5 2 2 2 0 1 .240 Straw cf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .250 Marisnick cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .245 Mayfield ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .059 Bregman ss 3 2 1 3 1 1 .272 Totals 35 15 12 15 7 11 Toronto 000 020 000 — 2 5 0 Houston 332 200 05x — 15 12 0 LOB — Toronto 6, Houston 5. 2B — Biggio (1), White (7). HR — Bregman (19), off Sanchez; Kemp (5), off Sanchez; Alvarez (3), off Gaviglio; Chirinos (12), off Pannone. RBIs — Biggio 2 (7), Chirinos 6 (38), Kemp 2 (14), Reddick (24), Bregman 3 (47), Alvarez 3 (7). SB — Kemp (4), Reddick (4). SF — Reddick. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gaviglio 2 3 2 2 0 1 4.40 1 Mayza /3 0 4 4 4 1 4.56 Sanchez, L, 3-8 3 6 8 8 3 4 5.04 Law 2 1 0 0 0 4 5.06 2 Pannone /3 2 1 1 0 1 5.91 Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Armenteros, S, 1-1 3 2 0 0 0 3 0.00 Cole, W, 6-5 6 3 2 2 2 10 3.67 Inherited runners-scored — Pannone 3-3. HBP — Cole (Guerrero Jr.), Law (Gurriel). T — 2:54. Att. — 34,719

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 3 1 1 0 2 0 .285 Harper rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .249 Realmuto c 5 2 1 0 0 1 .276 Hoskins 1b 3 1 1 2 2 1 .273 Bruce lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .233 Kingery cf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .330 Rodriguez 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .256 Hernandez 2b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .261 Pivetta p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .059 Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Totals 34 8 9 7 5 7 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna Jr. cf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .287 Swanson ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .266 Freeman 1b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .313 Donaldson 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .235 Markakis rf 3 2 0 0 2 1 .273 Riley lf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .295 McCann c 5 1 3 3 0 1 .286 Albies 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .279 Culberson ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .367 Camargo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Totals 38 9 14 9 4 9 Philadelphia 012 110 210 — 8 9 0 Atlanta 010 001 223 — 9 14 2 E — Donaldson (9), Albies (2). LOB — Philadelphia 6, Atlanta 8. 2B — Kingery (11), Riley (4), Acuna Jr. (10). 3B — Culberson (2). HR — Harper (12), off Fried; Kingery (8), off Fried; Hoskins (15), off Winkler; Donaldson (10), off Pivetta; Freeman (19), off Pivetta; McCann (6), off Pivetta. RBIs — Hoskins 2 (49), Hernandez (30), Rodriguez (5), Kingery (19), Harper 2 (48), Donaldson (28), Albies (33), Riley (30), Culberson (13), Freeman 2 (48), McCann 3 (27). SB — Realmuto (3). CS — Riley (2). SF — Hernandez. S — Rodriguez, Winkler. DP — Philadelphia 1; Atlanta 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Velasquez, H, 2 1/3 1 0 0 0 1 4.08 1 Ramos, H, 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.50 Neris, L, 1-3, BS 2/3 3 3 3 1 1 2.76 2 Pivetta 6 /3 8 4 4 2 6 5.00 2 /3 1 2 2 1 1 4.32 Alvarez Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Winkler 21/3 1 2 0 1 2 4.98 Fried 42/3 7 5 5 2 4 4.11 Tomlin 1 1 1 1 0 0 4.00 Blevins, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 2 1 5.40 T — 3:30. Att. — 41,975

Rangers 7, Reds 1

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo lf 4 1 1 0 1 0 .282 DeShields cf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .228 Andrus ss 4 1 0 0 0 1 .308 Mazara rf 5 0 1 1 0 3 .264 Cabrera 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .250 Odor 2b 2 1 1 4 3 0 .182 Guzman 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Federowicz c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .313 Smyly p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Forsythe ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .275 Chavez p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Totals 34 7 8 6 7 12 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Senzel cf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .272 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Suarez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Dietrich 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Puig rf 4 0 3 0 0 1 .222 Peraza lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Casali c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Mahle p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .050 Farmer 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Barnhart ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .199 J.Iglesias ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Winker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Totals 31 1 5 1 1 12 Texas 200 041 000 — 7 8 1 Cincinnati 000 000 010 — 1 5 0 E — Federowicz (1). LOB — Texas 9, Cincinnati 5. 2B — Choo (17), Federowicz (1), Puig (7). HR — Odor (8), off Peralta; Senzel (6), off Smyly. RBIs — DeShields (13), Mazara (39), Odor 4 (34), Senzel (16). SB — Cabrera (2), Andrus (14). SF — DeShields. DP — Texas 1. Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smyly, S, 1-1 3 3 1 1 1 5 8.06 B.Martin, W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 0 2 4.94 Springs 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.19 Chavez 3 1 0 0 0 4 3.35 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Mahle, L, 2-7 41/3 4 4 4 3 4 4.46 Duke 2 1 0 0 2 3 5.03 2 Peralta /3 2 3 3 2 2 5.96 Bowman 2 1 0 0 0 3 0.93 Peralta pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored — Peralta 2-2, Bowman 2-1. HBP — Mahle (Andrus). PB — Casali (2). T — 3:08. Att. — 30,090

Red Sox 13, Orioles 2

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Chavis 1b 5 2 2 3 1 0 .253 Benintendi lf 6 0 1 2 0 2 .264 Martinez rf 4 2 3 3 2 0 .306 Bogaerts ss 2 1 0 0 2 0 .292 Hernandez 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Holt 2b 4 3 2 2 0 1 .288 Vazquez c 5 2 2 1 0 2 .289 Bradley Jr. cf 4 2 2 2 1 1 .211 E.Nunez dh 4 1 1 0 1 0 .211 Leon c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Devers 3b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .303 Totals 41 13 16 13 7 6 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Alberto 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Ruiz 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .228 R.Nunez dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Severino c 4 0 2 0 0 1 .277 Santander lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .367 Villar 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Davis 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .170 Broxton cf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .183 Martin ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .179 Wilkerson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Mancini rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .305 Totals 34 2 9 2 0 6 Boston 020 452 000 — 13 16 0 Baltimore 100 000 001 — 2 9 0 LOB — Boston 10, Baltimore 7. 2B — Bradley Jr. (13), Severino (6), Santander (3). HR — Holt (1), off Ortiz; Vazquez (8), off Ortiz; Martinez (14), off Straily; Bradley Jr. (7), off Straily; Chavis (12), off Straily; Martinez (15), off Straily; Mancini (15), off Rodriguez. RBIs — Chavis 3 (34), Vazquez (23), Benintendi 2 (32), Bradley Jr. 2 (23), Holt 2 (9), Martinez 3 (38), Broxton (8), Mancini (34). S — Broxton. LIDP — Santander. DP — Boston 1; Baltimore 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smith 1 3 1 1 0 2 6.08 Lakins 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.00 Rodriguez, W, 7-4 7 6 1 1 0 4 4.67 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Rogers 41/3 5 2 2 2 1 7.88 Ortiz, L, 0-1 31/3 4 4 4 5 3 10.80 Straily 11/3 7 7 7 0 2 9.13 Inherited runners-scored — Straily 1-1. HBP — Rodriguez (Davis), Straily (Holt), Rogers (Devers). T — 3:24. Att. — 19,383

Rays 9, Angels 4 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fletcher 3b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Trout cf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .286 Ohtani dh 4 1 1 1 1 1 .280 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .233 Calhoun rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Lucroy c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .234 Tovar ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .200 Rengifo 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .219 Goodwin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Puello lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .400 Totals 34 4 8 3 5 9 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia rf 4 0 1 2 1 0 .299 Pham dh 4 0 2 2 1 0 .294 Meadows lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .322 Diaz 1b 4 2 3 1 1 0 .282 Wendle 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .148 Heredia cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .250 d’Arnaud pr 1 2 1 1 0 0 .195 Choi ph 3 2 2 2 0 0 .287 Adames ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Lowe ph 2 0 1 0 1 1 .289 Robertson 3b 1 0 0 0 1 1 .205 Kiermaier ph 2 2 1 1 0 0 .256 Zunino c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .177 Totals 37 9 13 9 5 5 Los Angeles 210 100 000 — 4 8 1 Tampa Bay 000 005 40x — 9 13 1 E — Fletcher (3), Diaz (3). LOB — Los Angeles 10, Tampa Bay 10. 2B — Trout (16), Tovar 2 (3), d’Arnaud (4), Diaz (12), Meadows (12), Lowe (15). HR — Choi (8), off Allen. RBIs — Ohtani (27), Puello (12), Pujols (38), Choi 2 (27), d’Arnaud (14), Kiermaier (31), Pham 2 (30), Garcia 2 (31), Diaz (27). SB — Ohtani (2), Kiermaier (13). SF — Pujols. DP — Los Angeles 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA 2 Garcia /3 3 3 3 0 1 4.74 Robles 1 2 0 0 0 0 3.34 Heaney 5 2 1 1 3 2 4.57 Buttrey, L, 4-3, BS 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 2.14 1 Anderson /3 0 0 0 0 0 4.50 2 Allen /3 4 4 4 2 1 6.26 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Pagan, W, 2-1 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 1.42 Snell 31/3 5 4 3 4 3 3.70 Drake 11/3 1 0 0 1 2 0.71 Poche, H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8.31 2 Kolarek /3 2 0 0 0 1 4.43 Stanek 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 2.54 Inherited runners-scored — Garcia 1-1, Buttrey 2-2, Anderson 2-0, Pagan 2-0, Drake 2-1, Stanek 2-0. HBP — Drake (Lucroy), Buttrey (Heredia). WP — Kolarek. T — 3:56. Att. — 21,598

White Sox 10, Yankees 2

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 1b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .309 Voit dh 2 1 2 1 2 0 .264 Hicks cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .209 Gregorius ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .364 Torres 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .285 Frazier rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .291 Urshela 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Tauchman ph 2 0 0 0 0 1 .210 Gardner lf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Romine c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .196 G.Sanchez c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .259 Totals 32 2 6 1 5 8 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Anderson ss 5 1 2 0 0 1 .319 Abreu 1b 5 2 3 1 0 0 .257 McCann c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .321 Jimenez lf 5 3 3 6 0 0 .247 Castillo dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .194 Rondon 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .214 Y.Sanchez 2b 4 0 2 2 0 0 .254 Cordell rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .216 Tilson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .271 Garcia cf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .277 Totals 37 10 16 9 4 5 New York 100 000 001 — 2 6 2 Chicago 410 014 00x — 10 16 1 E — Torres (9), Urshela (10), Abreu (4). LOB — New York 8, Chicago 7. 2B — LeMahieu (15), McCann (14), Abreu (19), Anderson (11), Garcia (11). HR — Voit (17), off Giolito; Jimenez (10), off Sabathia; Jimenez (11), off Cessa. RBIs — Voit (45), Y.Sanchez 2 (16), Jimenez 6 (25), Abreu (53). DP — New York 4; Chicago 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Cessa 1 5 4 4 1 1 6.10 Sabathia, L, 3-4 42/3 10 6 5 3 3 4.42 Hale 21/3 1 0 0 0 1 2.20 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Giolito, W, 10-1 6 4 1 1 4 6 2.22 Minaya 12/3 2 0 0 0 2 1.96 Ruiz 1 0 1 0 1 0 4.80 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 6.00 Osich Inherited runners-scored — Cessa 2-1, Hale 1-0, Minaya 2-0, Osich 2-0. WP — Minaya, Ruiz. T — 3:02. Att. — 31,438

Mariners 9, Athletics 2 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith cf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .224 Seager 3b 3 0 0 1 1 0 .228 Santana rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .274 Narvaez c 4 3 3 2 0 0 .284 Beckham dh 4 1 0 0 0 0 .232 Crawford ss 5 0 2 3 0 1 .288 Gordon 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .278 Williamson lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .143 Moore 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Vogelbach 1b 3 1 0 0 2 0 .262 Totals 36 9 10 9 4 4 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Canha lf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Chapman 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .254 Davis dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Pinder rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .256 Olson 1b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .235 Laureano cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Profar 2b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .209 Phegley c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 33 2 7 1 4 5 Seattle 001 300 221 — 9 10 1 Oakland 011 000 000 — 2 7 1 E: Gordon (4), Semien (5). LOB: Seattle 8, Oakland 9. 2B: Crawford 2 (8), Gordon (6), Profar (10). 3B: Chapman (2). HR: Narvaez (10), off Wang; Smith (4), off Brooks. RBIs: Narvaez 2 (25), Crawford 3 (8), Seager (9), Gordon (20), Smith 2 (18), Olson (22). SB: Gordon (13). SF: Seager, Gordon. RLISP: Seattle 5 (Gordon 2, Beckham, Smith 2); Oakland 2 (Canha, Laureano). GIDP: Pinder, Phegley. DP: Seattle 2 (Crawford, Gordon, Vogelbach), (Crawford, Vogelbach). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Adams 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 4.11 Festa 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 5.25 Gonzales, W, 7-6 7 7 2 1 2 3 115 4.50 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wang 11/3 2 2 2 0 0 18 1.86 Brooks 2 3 3 3 0 0 36 5.74 Bassitt, L, 3-3 52/3 5 4 3 4 4 106 3.68 Inherited runners-scored: Wang 1-0. HBP: Brooks 2 (Narvaez,Beckham), Festa (Phegley). WP: Festa. Umpires: Home, Ed Hickox; First, Carlos Torres; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Ryan Blakney. T: 3:00. A: 21,387.

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1902 — Corsicana defeated Texarkana 51-3 in a Texas League game. Nig Clark of Corsicana took advantage of the small park and hit eight homers. Some telegraph operators, thinking there was a mistake, reported the score as 5-3. 1938 — Four days after pitching a no-hitter against the Boston Braves, Johnny Vander Meer of the Cincinnati Reds pitched his second straight no-hit game, defeating the Dodgers 6-0 in the first night game played in Brooklyn. 1952 — The St. Louis Cardinals, down 11-0 entering the fifth inning, came back for a 14-12 triumph over the New York Giants in the first game of a doubleheader and set a National League record for best comeback. 1963 — San Francisco’s Juan Marichal pitched a no-hitter against the Houston Colts for a 1-0 victory, the first Giants no-hitter since Carl Hubbell’s in 1929. 1976 — The Pittsburgh Pirates and Houston Astros were “rained in” at the Houston Astrodome as 10 inches of rain fell on the city. Only members of both teams were able to make it to the stadium. Umpires, fans and stadium personnel were unable to make it through the water. 1992 — Jeff Reardon broke Rollie Fingers’ career save mark of 341 when he preserved a 1-0 victory for the Boston Red Sox with one scoreless inning against the New York Yankees. 2002 — A double in the fifth inning of Texas’ 4-0 loss to Houston gave Rafael Palmeiro 1,000 career extra-base hits. He became the 25th major leaguer to reach that mark.


CARDINALS

06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1 CONCLUSION OF SUSPENDED GAME

Cardinals 5, Mets 4 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .220 Hicks p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --DeJong ss 5 1 2 2 0 0 .271 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Ozuna lf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .264 J.Martinez rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .265 Wong 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .240 Bader cf 4 1 3 1 0 1 .245 Gallegos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Flaherty p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .100 b-Fowler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 C.Martinez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Munoz ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .288 Totals 37 5 10 5 1 10 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .335 Conforto rf 4 1 1 2 0 3 .258 Alonso 1b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .258 Smith lf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .354 Lagares cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Frazier 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .255 Ramos c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .273 Rosario ss 3 0 0 1 0 1 .245 Gomez cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diaz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 d-Hechavarria ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .247 deGrom p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Totals 34 4 6 4 2 15 Cardinals 001 001 002 1 — 5 10 0 New York 002 002 000 0 — 4 6 0 a-struck out for Diaz in the 7th. b-grounded out for Flaherty in the 8th. c-pinch hit for C.Martinez in the 10th. d-grounded out for Davis in the 10th. LOB: Cardinals 4, New York 3. 2B: Bader 2 (8), Alonso (13). HR: DeJong (11), off deGrom; Conforto (13), off Flaherty. RBIs: Wong (29), Carpenter (23), Bader (19), DeJong 2 (31), Smith (10), Rosario (36), Conforto 2 (32). SB: Bader 2 (3), Munoz (1). SF: Rosario. RLISP: Cardinals 1 (Flaherty). GIDP: J.Martinez, Goldschmidt. DP: Cardinals 1; New York 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallegos 1 2/3 0 0 0 0 3 17 2.97 Miller 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 3.63 Flaherty 5 1/3 6 4 4 2 8 101 4.28 C.Martinez, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.72 Hicks, S, 14-15 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.47 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lugo, H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 20 2.43 Diaz, L, 1-4, BS, 3-17 2 4 3 3 1 1 36 3.58 deGrom 7 6 2 2 0 8 116 3.38 Inherited runners-scored: Gallegos 3-1. HBP: Lugo (Carpenter). Umpires: Home, Mark Ripperger; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:02. A: 31,862 (41,922).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals third Bader doubles and steals third. Carpenter singles, Bader scores. One run. Cardinals 1, Mets 0. Mets third McNeil singles. Conforto homers, McNeil scores. Two runs. Mets 2, Cardinals 1. Cardinals sixth DeJong homers. One run. Mets 2, Cardinals 2. Mets sixth Alonso hits a ground-rule double. Smith singles, Alonso scores. Frazier singles, Smith to third. Ramos walks, Frazier to second. Rosario hits into a sacrifice double play, Smith scores, Frazier out at third. Two runs. Mets 4, Cardinals 2. Cardinals ninth Ozuna walks. J.Martinez grounds out, Ozuna to second. Wong singles, Ozuna scores. Bader doubles, Wong scores, Bader out trying to advance to third. Two runs. Mets 4, Cardinals 4.

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

New lineup still work in progress BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Class AAA Memphis after a demotion, and in 10 games for the Redbirds had a 5.40 ERA and 12 strikeouts and 12 walks in 13 1/3 innings. In his first eight days with Memphis, he had five appearances and threw 6 1/3 innings in what appeared to be a schedule to get him innings right away. “I pitched quite a bit in a short amount of time,” Leone said. “That snowball kept going a little bit. I had a lot of chances to sit down and watch some video and just kind of reworked some mechanics, reworked some things in terms of what I’m trying to do on the mound. It was really kind of get back to basics. Kind of, start from scratch. Treat my time down there like it was spring training.” Leone identified a timing lag in his mechanics that was causing his arm to swing late and possibly leave his pitches adrift KATHY WILLENS, ASSOCIATED PRESS higher in the zone. He’s worked to synch his delivery to get command back of “more Paul DeJong runs out of the batter’s box on or less everything.” his 10th-inning RBI single in the completion of the suspended game Friday.

NEW YORK — When Cardinals manager Mike Shildt made the decision to uproot Paul DeJong from the No. 3 spot in the batting order, where he had thrived as one of the most productive shortstops in the National League, to No. 2 still had the view that DeJong wanted. It moved him from hitting behind Paul Goldschmidt to batting ahead of him. “Like to hit in the first inning,” he said. “Having ‘Goldie’ behind me seems lately to be working. I still need to get on base a little bit more so I can score for ‘Goldie’ and ‘Ozo’ (Marcell Ozuna) behind me. Haven’t quite clicked together as a group with me in the two-hole.” But he could be warming. DeJong’s first RBI of the day Friday was his second of the game at Citi Field as he drove the Cardinals to a 5-4 victory in the leftover suspended game from Thursday. DeJong had a two-strike homer off Jacob deGrom, the reigning Cy Young Award winner, on Thursday, and in the top of the 10th inning of the game that was delayed by AVERAGES poor weather and poorer field conditions, he had the two-strike single that brought Through Friday’s game. AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E home the winning run. DeJong’s single Batting Munoz .288 59 8 17 3 0 0 2 1 14 1 1 came off Edwin Diaz, last year’s top closer J.Martinez .286 175 22 50 8 0 4 26 15 37 1 2 in the American League before a trade to DeJong .270 252 46 68 18 1 12 32 31 54 4 3 Molina .265 204 20 54 15 0 4 33 8 21 4 1 the Mets. Then in the regularly scheduled contest, Goldschmidt .261 261 40 68 6 0 12 27 32 72 0 4 Ozuna .260 250 49 65 13 0 18 55 26 60 6 0 he homered in the eighth inning to tie the Wong .247 219 28 54 9 1 7 30 26 41 11 6 contest 5-5. That ignited an four-run out- Fowler .243 181 25 44 9 0 6 19 28 51 4 4 .240 146 21 35 8 2 6 19 22 50 3 1 burst in the inning that carried the Cardi- Bader Wieters .224 58 5 13 2 0 3 10 1 21 1 0 nals to a 9-5 victory. Carpenter .222 234 35 52 9 1 9 24 39 66 4 6 DeJong now has at least a hit in nine of Edman .167 6 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 his 11 games this month — all of them while Team .246 2275 318 559 105 5 85 299 239 573 43 35 batting in the No. 2 spot. Pitching W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO He began the year hitting third and Gant 6 0 1.66 31 0 3 38.0 19 7 7 3 9 36 thrived with a .882 OPS and almost as many Ponce de Leon 0 0 2.00 2 2 0 9.0 4 2 2 1 7 10 1 0 2.97 25 0 0 30.1 18 10 10 4 6 45 walks (29) as strikeouts (35). That sweet- Gallegos 1 3 3.09 31 0 0 35.0 24 12 12 4 13 42 ened his on-base percentage and .392 and Brebbia Hudson 5 3 3.47 14 13 1 72.2 76 36 28 9 33 51 helped influence Shildt’s decision to move Hicks 2 2 3.47 25 0 14 23.1 15 9 9 1 11 27 him up in the order. While Shildt saw the C.Martinez 1 0 3.72 10 0 1 9.2 6 5 4 1 4 9 2 2 4.03 30 0 1 22.1 21 14 10 5 11 33 Pauls “as interchangeable, candidly,” get- Miller 0 1 4.24 26 0 0 23.1 13 11 11 3 13 21 ting DeJong ahead of Goldschmidt might Webb Flaherty 4 3 4.28 14 14 0 73.2 65 36 35 13 25 81 create more RBI looks for the first baseman. Mikolas 4 7 4.83 14 14 0 78.1 81 43 42 14 15 57 “He had done a nice job hitting third Mayers 0 1 5.40 8 0 0 8.1 10 5 5 2 5 8 4 2 5.62 12 10 0 56.0 62 38 35 12 34 52 (and) he was getting his walks,” Shildt said. Wacha 0 2 6.48 2 2 0 8.1 13 9 6 2 4 5 “We were looking for a way to create more Cabrera Team 35 33 4.26 68 68 20 599.2 537 306 284 91 244 581 opportunity for Goldie to drive in runs and then also allow ‘Paulie’ to still do some damage as well in the two-hole.” Mets to add a 26th man to the active roster, and the Cardinals, their pitching depleted, LEONE RETURNS brought back reliever Dominic Leone to The suspended game wedged into Fri- serve in the role though he did not play. day’s schedule allowed the Cardinals and Leone, 27, had spent almost a month with

REYES KEPT READY

Alex Reyes’ abbreviated three-inning appearance for Class AAA Memphis on Thursday night was part of a schedule meant to manage his innings — and keep him available should the Cardinals need a starter this coming week at home. With Adam Wainwright on the injured list, the Cardinals expect to need a starter Wednesday against the Marlins, and they could turn to either Friday’s starter — Daniel Ponce de Leon — lefty Genesis Cabrera, or Reyes. Reyes raced through two strong innings Thursday before his command faltered in his third and final inning on his way to walking four batters.

MORE PICKS SIGN The Cardinals completed and announced deals Friday with more draft picks, including power-packed righthander Logan Gragg, their eighth-round selection from Oklahoma State. The others: 14th-rounder Tyler Statler, a righthanded pitcher from Hononegah (Ill.) High; 17th-rounder Michael YaSenka, a righty from Eastern Illinois, and 26th-rounder Jeremy Randolph, the closer at Alabama. The Cardinals also agreed to terms with fifth-rounder Connor Thomas, a lefty from Georgia Tech. He received a $340,000 bonus, per MLB.com. The Cardinals have signed seven of their top 10 picks from this month’s draft.

SCHEDULED GAME

Cardinals 9, Mets 5 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 3b 2 0 1 1 2 0 .222 DeJong ss 5 1 1 1 0 3 .270 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Ozuna lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Molina c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .265 Bader cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .240 Fowler rf 3 2 1 3 1 0 .243 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 b-Wong ph 2 1 2 1 0 0 .247 a-J.Martinez ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .286 Ponce de Leon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edman 2b 3 2 1 0 0 0 .167 Gant p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 33 9 8 9 4 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .337 Conforto rf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .257 Alonso 1b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .259 Smith lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .341 Santiago p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Frazier 3b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .253 Ramos c 4 0 1 2 0 0 .273 Rosario ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .246 Lagares cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .185 Hechavarria 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Matz p 2 1 2 1 0 0 .261 Gomez cf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 36 5 9 5 4 6 Cardinals 001 030 041 — 9 8 1 New York 100 010 300 — 5 9 2 a-homered for Wong in the 5th. b-singled, advanced to 2nd for Brebbia in the 7th. c-grounded out for Familia in the 9th. E: Wong (6), Frazier (6), Gomez (1). LOB: Cardinals 3, New York 9. 2B: Edman (1), Molina (15), Carpenter (9), Alonso (14). HR: J.Martinez (4), off Matz; DeJong (12), off Familia; Fowler (6), off Familia; Wong (7), off Santiago; Matz (1), off Webb. RBIs: Wong (30), J.Martinez 3 (26), Carpenter (24), Fowler 3 (19), DeJong (32), Matz (1), Ramos 2 (37), Frazier (21), Alonso (50). SB: Carpenter (4). SF: Carpenter. S: Ponce de Leon. RLISP: Cardinals 3 (Ozuna, Goldschmidt, Carpenter); New York 3 (Ramos, Frazier, Rosario). LIDP: Goldschmidt. GIDP: Lagares. DP: Cardinals 1; New York 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ponce de Leon 4 2 1 1 4 3 71 2.00 1/ Webb 1 0 1 7 4.24 3 2 1 Brebbia 1 2/3 1 0 0 0 1 19 3.09 Miller 0 2 3 1 0 0 7 4.03 Gant, W, 6-0 3 2 0 0 0 1 36 1.66 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matz 6 3 4 3 2 6 113 3.93 Gsellman 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 4.78 Familia, L, 2-1 1 3 4 4 1 1 23 6.91 Santiago 1 1 1 1 1 0 21 6.75 Miller pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Brebbia 1-0, Gant 3-2. HBP: Miller (Gomez). Umpires: Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Brian O’Nora; Second, Chad Whitson; Third, Mark Ripperger. T: 3:05. A: 28,560 (41,922).

HOW THEY SCORED Mets first Alonso walks. Smith walks, Alonso to second. Frazier singles, Alonso scores, Smith to third. One run. Mets 1, Cardinals 0. Cardinals third Edman doubles. Ponce de Leon sacrifice bunts Edman to third. Carpenter hits a sacrifice fly, Edman scores. One run. Cardinals 1, Mets 1. Cardinals fifth Folwer walks.Edman reaches on an error, Fowler to second. J.Martinez homers, Fowler and Edman score. Three runs. Cardinals 4, Mets 1. Mets seventh Gomez hit by a pitch. McNeil singles, Gomez to second. Conforto singles, Gomez to third, McNeil to second. Alonso reaches on an error, Gomez scores, McNeil to third, Conforto to second. Frazier grounds into a force out, McNeil out at home, Conforto to third, Alonso to second. Ramos singles, Conforto and Alonso score. Three runs. Mets 5, Cardinals 4. Cardinals eighth DeJong homers One run. Mets 5, Cardinals 5. Mets fifth Matz homers. One run. Cardinals 4, Mets 2. Cardinals eighth DeJong homers. Molina doubles. Bader walks. Fowler homers, Molina and Bader score. Four runs. Cardinals 8, Mets 5. Cardinals ninth Wong homers. One run. Cardinals 9, Mets 5.

KATHY WILLENS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Jose Martinez begins to run the bases after hitting a three-run home run Friday night.

Cardinals From B1

The Cardinals hit four home runs in the full game, including key three-run homers by Jose Martinez and Dexter Fowler, the latter the go-ahead shot. DeJong mentioned how with a mostly empty ballpark to greet them for the restart of Thursday’s game, the Cardinals had to “come out with a little more energy.” That started with Carpenter’s stopwatch and continued through all nine of the innings of the planned game. The wins had more than DeJong in common as in each one the Cardinals had a deciding rally in the eighth inning or later to tie the game and then take it. The Mets blew two late-game leads on back-to-back days, but lost both of those games on Friday. “When we’ve played well, we’ve added on,” Cardinals manager Mike Shildt said. “When we’ve played well, we’ve gotten into people’s bullpens and done damage. And we’ve done a nice job of getting to the starter at a certain point, and now it’s important to put that blow on the starter and then feed on the relievers. That’s what we’ve done. That’s what we’re more than capable of doing. That’s what we need to continue doing.” The Cardinals had the lead in the full game, lost it, reclaimed it, and at each pivot there was a home run and a decision behind it. Daniel Ponce de Leon, filling in for Adam Wainwright, made his second start of the season and spent most of the game with a misbehaving curveball. He had to lean heavy on his fastball and improvise with his cutter later, prompting pitching coach Mike Maddux to compare him to a pitcher at the other end of the spectrum. He’s “like a knuckleballer — you just got

to kind of stay with him a little bit,” Shildt relayed from Maddux. Ponce de Leon walked twice as many batters (four) as he allowed hits (two), and that kept him hopscotching around trouble through four innings and vulnerable to a pinch-hitter in the bottom of the fifth. Rookie Tommy Edman, in his first career start, had a double that set up the Cardinals first run and he was one of two runners on base when Ponce de Leon was recalled from the on-deck circle. With a chance to strike — even in the middle innings — Shildt turned to Jose Martinez, whose .353 average as a pinch-hitter is the highest since 1974 of any player with at least 75 plate appearances in a pinch. “That dude can hit,” Fowler said. “He can hit, flat-out hit.” That dude hit. Against Mets starter Steven Matz, Martinez tagged a home run to right-center field to break a 1-1 tie. Ponce de Leon, initially frustrated because he had thrown 71 pitches and had at least another inning to give, called it “the decision of the game.” “I put myself in that situation,” he said. “I threw 80 pitches in four innings. I didn’t really earn that next inning. Shildt made the move, and it paid off, big time.” Andrew Miller forced the other move, in the seventh when he failed to retire any of the three batters he faced. He left the bases loaded for John Gant to solve. An error by Kolten Wong complicated the inning further, and by the time Gant (6-0) wriggled free the Mets had a 5-4 lead. It didn’t last a batter. Three strikeouts removed from his game-winning hit earlier in the day, DeJong hit his second homer in as many games to tie the game. Five batters later, with two outs, Fowler connected for the three-run homer that loosed the tie. Wong added a solo homer in the ninth. In back-to-back games against one of the league’s worst bullpens, the Cardi-

nals outscored the Mets 8-0 in the eighth inning or later. That’s how they forced Thursday’s game to Friday in the first place. Down two runs in the ninth, the Cardinals rallied to tie the game 4-4 as the infield turned to what one official called “mush.” The pouring rain and poorer field conditions forced Thursday night’s game to be suspended at 9:54 (St. Louis time) and resumed Friday at 5:10 p.m. (St. Louis time) with only the bottom of the ninth to play. The Cardinals first suspended game since 2015 and their first suspended game win since Keith Hernandez was on the team — in 1983 — had an odd feel from the start. The resumed contest started with no introduction of the lineups, no anthem, and no pregame scouting reports about the pitchers the hitters were about to face.DeJong admitted that he “didn’t even know who was pitching before he ran out there.” The Cardinals had brought Carlos Martinez into the game immediately before the official rain delay, so he “started” the suspended game. The Mets were one swing from ending the game minutes after it began. Martinez retired all three batters he faced, two on grounders, and got the game quickly to the top of the 10th inning and the bottom of the Cardinals’ lineup. Pinch-hitter Yairo Munoz poked a single, stole second then advanced on Carpenter’s two-strike groundout. That put Munoz in position to score on DeJong’s two-strike single through the infield. He said later the sprint to the finish of one game before the start of the next offered a chance to “ride momentum.” It just took longer than 18 minutes in the second game to do that. “Punch back,” Shildt said. “That’s what good teams do. They punch back, immediately.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


STANLEY CUP CHAMPIONS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Sanford’s Game 7 goal a special one groin and abdominal injuries. Meanwhile, the future of David Backes is uncertain, as are his feelings about seeing the team he captained and played for much of his career win the Cup. “It’s a swirl and a whirlwind of emotions that I haven’t fully gripped, and I don’t know if I will in the near future,” he told the Boston Globe. “I don’t know if my situation and all of the extra layers helps or hurts.” Backes has two years to go on his contract and is a prime candidate to be bought out of the deal.

BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When Zach Sanford scored for the Blues with 4:38 to go in the third period of Game 7 on Wednesday night, the goal was huge. It pretty much ended any chance of a comeback by the Boston Bruins, who now trailed 4-0. Even the most pessimistic Blues fan at that point could accept the inevitable, that the Blues were going to win the Stanley Cup. What went through Sanford’s mind was totally different: “It’s for my dad.” Sanford’s father, Michael, died suddenly shortly before the Blues’ season began. On the day after the Blues’ first exhibition game, Sanford woke to messages from his sister telling him his father had had a heart attack in his sleep. Before Sanford could get home to see him, his father had died. “He always dreamed of this for me,” Sanford said. “I wish I could share it with him. He’s definitely watching up there and definitely smiling ear to ear. . . . I think he had a lot to do with this year. It’s pretty awesome. “I just wish he could be here. But he’s definitely watching. He’s proud. He sacrificed so much over the years, along with my mom, to make me the person and player I am. They dedicated their lives to this. This is the ultimate goal — it’s nice to have it pay off, and it’s nice to have it pay off and be able to share this with them.” If Oskar Sundqvist hadn’t been suspended for Game 3, Sanford might never have gotten the chance. He hadn’t played since Game 3 of the Winnipeg series, six weeks before getting into Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Final. He did well enough there than when Sundqvist came back, Sanford stayed in and Robby Fabbri came out. Sanford had points in

DRAFT CENTRAL

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues players including Zach Sanford (12) celebrate after he scored to all-but wrap up the team’s Stanley Cupclinching victory on Wednesday night in Boston. four of the five games in which he played in the Final and was a plus5, with a goal and three assists. To make the win even more poignant, Sanford won the Stanley Cup facing the team that he grew up rooting for — he was born in Salem, Mass., and raised in New Hampshire. “It’s pretty surreal,” he said. “It’s funny how things work like this and you get to win it close to your home. . . . Our team is great. I owe it all to my teammates and coaches and family for the support and giving me the confidence to come in. I was pretty nervous at first, but they backed me up and believed in me and I owe it to them.” The Sanford family rooted for the Bruins for years, and his mother had to make a switch of

allegiances for the series. “I don’t know, but I think she’s got it right now,” he said. “That’s all that matters. I think there’s a lot of people back home who switched from Bruins to Blues fans this series, and their support has been awesome. Everyone’s been great.”

OUCH The Bruins had their locker clean-out day Friday, which is the day when everyone admits the injuries they didn’t want to mention over the previous two months. Defenseman Zdeno Chara confirmed that his jaw was fractured in multiple places in Game 4 and he would have a five- to six-week recovery period. At present, he has wires and plates holding it together. He said he wanted to come

back in that game — he sat on the bench in the third period — but deferred to doctors who said no. But he was back for the final two contests. In other pain and suffering, forward David Pastrnak aggravated a thumb injury in the second round and defenseman John Moore will need shoulder surgery. Defenseman Kevan Miller suffered a fractured kneecap at the end of the regular season and was trying to get back for the Final but had a setback during the East final and needed another operation. Forward Noel Acciari, who was dumped to the ice by Tyler Bozak in a key moment in Game 5, suffered a broken sternum in the second round. Brad Marchand had a sprained hand, aggravated in the team’s pre-Cup scrimmage, and

Blues

Frederickson

From B1

From B1

be his last home appearance until mop-up duty in Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Final — a 7-2 loss to Boston in which Binnington was pulled in the second period. So nearly five months between games at Enterprise Center. In his first NHL start, Binnington had registered a 3-0 victory in Philadelphia the night before that Dallas game. With lots of backto-backs over the remainder of the season, Allen became a road specialist. He played very well, with a 2.21 goals-against average and a .927 save percentage in 12 road starts over the rest of the regular season. But Binnington was spectacular, leading the Blues into the playoffs and eventually to the Stanley Cup. “He’s been the best goalie in the league since he took over, and he’s very deserving of everything he’s gotten so far,” Allen said at the start of the Cup Final. “For me, it’s been a pleasure to watch.” Allen always knew Binnington had the skill to be a top-flight goalie. But there are lots of good goalies in the American Hockey League just waiting for a chance. Binnington finally got his, and made the most of it. “He’s got strong confidence and belief in himself,” Allen said. “You can see that in his play. You can see that in just the way he handles himself. I think he’s matured a lot ever since I first met him as a kid. And it just translated on the ice as well.” Allen never lost his desire to be the guy in net. He’s only 28, still in his prime athletic years. He was the Blues’ primary goalie the previous three seasons. He has appeared in four playoff series himself, and with 136 regular-season wins trails only Mike Liut (151) and Curtis Joseph (137) in franchise history. “You always think about it,” Allen said. “I’d be lying if I said I never did. But I understand where I’m at. I understand my position. I bought into that a while ago, before the playoffs. “I’m a realist, and I understand the business of this game. So probably mid-March I sat back and I took my role. I understood.

“We are going into uncharted water again now,” the Blues’ president of hockey operations and general manager said after the club’s Game 7 win. “When I first got to St. Louis, I was surprised at how much anger was built up with the fan base of not winning. I remember saying that to someone. Why are we blaming this group for something that did not happen in the ‘70s, ‘80s and ‘90s? But after 11 years, you become part of that fabric. Now it’s nice not to be part of that, but part of something special.” The well-documented history of the Blues’ shortcomings is just that now. History. The same can be said for the sludge this edition of the Blues marched through. How many of those beer-drinking players on Wednesday could have been traded? How many of those celebrating fans on Thursday once thought Armstrong should be fired? How long were the lines to buy Blues gear six months ago? If it was Armstrong who got the Blues into this season’s mess, it was Armstrong who led them out. Which part will you remember, the beginning or the end? “There was a lot of white noise around our team at different times during the year,” Armstrong said. “It could have been easy to go the wrong direction. There were a lot of people questioning our whole organization. My leadership. The players’ leadership. The coaches’ leadership. I’m a little bit older now. I just want to reflect on what it means to these guys, and be a part of it.” At this time last year, Armstrong and Blues owner Tom Stillman were in the process of making a series of moves that announced championship expectations. The Blues welcomed the hype. It turned on them. After packing Ballpark Village for an ice-breaker event, the team flopped in its regular-season home opener and remained down, stumbling to a mark of 7-9-3 before Armstrong made the decision to fire Mike Yeo and promote Craig Berube to interim coach. Berube turned to rookie goalie Jordan Binnington. The Blues won 11 in a row during a stretch that defined their season. Armstrong saw a good thing rolling and let it ride. The Blues no longer are the NHL team waiting the longest for its first championship. Their worst-to-first climb deserves a movie. Armstrong was the director who wrote the script, knew when to adjust it on the fly — and perhaps most importantly, understood when it was time to stand back and watch. That’s what he did during playoff games, with the collar of his jacket turned high, often munching nervously on Swedish Fish candy. Many GMs are wishing they would have traded for Ryan O’Reilly. Too late. Armstrong prioritized the forward after the Blues were stiff-armed by free agent John Tavares. Armstrong never let the false narrative about O’Reilly — good player on a team that can’t win big — give him pause. O’Reilly became the Blues’ most consistent player. His work ethic inspired teammates. And on the biggest stage, he shined, winning the Conn Smythe Trophy despite playing with cracked ribs. (He wasn’t the only one playing hurt, per

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ Oskar Sundqvist hugs Jordan Binnington as Jake Allen looks after the Blues won the Stanley Cup on Wednesday night. I would be ready when called upon. I thought I had a really great second half of the season. It’s probably some of the best hockey I’ve ever played. But ‘Binner,’ he’s just been unbelievable. He’s the best goalie in the league. And I just bit the bullet and said: ‘All right, this is something special.’ I knew we had a good group here. It’s been amazing.” So Allen helped however he could. He tried to provide leadership. He remembers Blues veterans helping him when he first came up to the big club from the AHL, in 2012. “My mentality in the second half was to be a good person and play well every single (chance) in the net,” he said. “And I really thought I did that. So looking back on it for me, I was really proud of my second half, off the ice and on the ice. I feel like I still definitely pitched in.” Binnington was glad to get the help. “He’s been incredible,” Binnington said. “I’ve known Jake for a number of years now being in the organization. He’s always been good to me. His work ethic is really respectable, and he’s a great goaltender. I think the team is confident in either one of us. He’s a great mentor for me and goalie partner, also.” Although it wasn’t in the ideal manner, Allen at least can say he played in

a Stanley Cup Final. After Binnington gave up a fifth goal in that 7-2 defeat, Allen came in to stop the bleeding midway through the second period of Game 3. He played 24 minutes 28 seconds, with the Blues pulling the goalie for 3:20. “It was pretty cool for me,” he said. “I tried to enjoy the moment, especially the last few minutes of the game. When the game was over, I’m looking around and it’s a pretty cool feeling.” But what about next year? Will Allen ask for a trade, or be content to enter the season as Binnington’s backup? Conversely, are the Blues interested in having Allen around as a high-priced backup? He has two years left on a contract that counts $4.35 million against the salary cap both years. “I’ve never thought a thing about that,” Allen said before Game 1 of the Cup Final. “I’m enjoying this ride.” But once the Blues’ victory parade comes and goes down Market Street on Saturday and the festivities on the Arch grounds conclude, the ride officially is over. And it’s something general manager Doug Armstrong definitely will think about in the coming weeks. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

The NHL announced the order for the draft, which will begin at 7 p.m. Friday. (This is what happens when you go to the Stanley Cup Final. The offseason happens very fast.) The second through seventh rounds start Saturday at noon. The Blues sent their first-round pick to Buffalo in the Ryan O’Reilly trade, and that ended up being the last pick of the first round, No. 31. The Blues will have the last pick in each round, which means their first pick, barring a trade, will be No. 62. They have their third-round pick, No. 93, but traded their fourth-round pick, No. 124, to Toronto for Nikita Soshnikov. They’ll pick at No. 155 in the fifth round, won’t have a sixth-round pick after trading that to Anaheim for Michael Del Zotto, then will close out the draft with pick 217. General manager Doug Armstrong could try to move up in the draft. But without a firstround pick, choosing high in the first round would require them to move a significant name. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues general manager Doug Armstrong is the center of attention on the ice after Game 7 on Wednesday. Armstrong. Tarasenko and his shoulder are on that list. So is Alexander Steen.) Many GMs would have pulled the plug on the Blues by December. A vocal portion of the fans once wanted the team to, “Lose for Hughes.” The grassroots movement encouraged Armstrong to tank toward improved chances of drafting prized prospect Jack Hughes. Months later, Hughes was the guest of the league at one of the Blues’ Stanley Cup Final games. Surreal. Armstrong also resisted calls to make major moves at the trade deadline, instead deciding to let the team’s improving chemistry build. “The reality is, I never thought I was as dumb as people thought I was in December, and I’m not nearly as smart as people think we are now,” Armstrong said “‘It takes a village, and these guys all did such great work. There is so much work that goes on behind the scenes.” Armstrong nodded toward a group of front-office workers who were celebrating on the ice, Stanley Cup championship hats atop their heads. “That’s what makes me excited,” he said. Many GMs are wishing they would have given a shot to Berube. Too late. He became just the seventh coach in NHL history to take over a team during the season then win the Stanley Cup. On the fly, “Chief” changed a team’s character. It was Berube who delivered on Armstrong’s challenge for the Blues to rediscover their blue-collar brand. It was Armstrong who resisted the urge to rush a coaching search before he found out what Berube could do. He will not be slow to extend Berube. Right? “No, we’re going to let him go,” Armstrong joked. “Of course we are going to get it taken care of. We are going to have to get down to work pretty soon.” But first, the parade St. Louis has spent nearly 52 years imagining. On Saturday, Armstrong will not draw the loudest cheers, and he’s more than OK with that. Here’s something to think about as his portion of the parade floats by. Since he officially became the team’s GM before the 2010-11 season, the Blues are tied (with the Bruins, ironically) for third-most regular season wins (403). The Blues now are one of the six teams to win the Cup during that span. And with the bulk of the roster coming back, with a coach and a goalie in place, the Blues aren’t exactly going anywhere. Uncharted territory, indeed. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


06.15.2019 • SATURDAY • M 1

SPORTS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

FIFA WOMEN’S WORLD CUP NOTES

Thai goalkeeper thanks U.S.’ Lloyd PARIS — The goalkeeper who allowed 13 goals when the United States routed Thailand at the Women’s World Cup has thanked Carli Lloyd for offering words of encouragement following the defeat. Lloyd sought out Sukanya Chor Charoenying immediately following the record-breaking U.S. national team’s victory. Sukanya wasn’t even expected to start in Tuesday’s opener but got the nod over Waraporn Boonsing. “Thanks so much, Lloyd. Your words that you told me make me strong,” Sukanya posted in appreciation to Lloyd on Twitter, adding emojis including Thailand’s flag, a heart and an American flag. “Keep going for this tournament and so on. Firstly, I felt disappointment in worst situation but this is the biggest experience in my life.” The United States was criticized after the opener for running up the score and celebrating after all 13 goals. Players defended the score, pointing to the importance of goal differential in the group stage and the excitement of scoring on the sport’s biggest stage. On Friday, Lloyd said she felt empathy for the Thai team and wanted to comfort the goalkeeper but said that she wasn’t sure if Sukanya understood her comments. Lloyd said she told Sukanya to keep her chin up. “Obviously, I’m a player and this team is full of players who want to battle it out, who want to go full throttle, but we are human, and there is a human element to it. And you’ve got to feel for a goalkeeper letting in 13 goals,” Lloyd said. “If you don’t, I don’t think you have much of a heart.” The lopsided score set a World Cup record for both goals and margin of victory. — Associated Press

Taylor puts England into final 16 Japanese, Italians win, move to knockout stage ASSOCIATED PRESS

LE HAVRE, France — Jodie Taylor scored her first international goal in 14 months to send England into the second round of the Women’s World Cup in a 1-0 victory over Argentina on Friday. The Argentines, who scored their first-ever World Cup point in an opening draw against Japan, were resilient, but Taylor finally found a way past goalkeeper Vanina Correa in the 61st minute after she had repeatedly thwarted England’s attack. Correa saved a first-half penalty from Nikita Parris. Taylor sneaked into a central location unchecked by the Argentina defense and met Beth Mead’s low cross. The 2017 European Championship’s Golden Boot winner nudged the ball into the net and eded a 540-day goal drought for England. After edging Scotland 2-1 on Sunday, England has now opened a World Cup with back-to-back wins for the first time and advanced to the next round ahead of its final Group D match against Japan. Italy, France and Germany are also already through to the round of 16 with a game to spare. JAPAN 2, SCOTLAND 1: Mana Iwabuchi had an early goal and then Japan held off a late charge from Scotland for a victory. Iwabuchi, who was on the Japanese team that won the World Cup in 2011, scored in the 23rd minute to give the team its first goal of the tournament. Yuika Sugasawa converted a penalty in the 37th minute to pad the lead going into the break. Lana Clelland’s left-footed shot went into the top right corner of the net in the 87th minute as Scotland furiously worked to break through Japan’s defense. Japan played to a scoreless draw against Argentina in its opener and needed the confidence boost win with Wednesday’s final group match against England looming.

STANDINGS GROUP STAGE GROUP A W L T GF ak-France 2 0 0 6 Norway 1 1 0 4 Nigeria 1 1 0 2 South Korea 0 2 0 0

GA 1 2 3 6

Pts 6 3 3 0

GROUP B W ak-Germany 2 Spain 1 China 1 South Africa 0

L 0 1 1 2

T 0 0 0 0

GF 2 3 1 1

GA 0 2 1 4

Pts 6 3 3 0

GROUP C ak-Italy Brazil Australia Jamaica

W 2 1 1 0

L 0 1 1 2

T 0 0 0 0

GF 7 5 4 0

GA 1 3 4 8

Pts 6 3 3 0

GROUP D ak-England ak-Japan Argentina Scotland

W 2 1 0 0

L 0 0 1 2

T 0 1 1 0

GF 3 2 0 2

GA 1 1 1 4

Pts 6 4 1 0

GROUP E W Canada 1 Netherlands 1 Cameroon 0 New Zealand 0

L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0

GF 1 1 0 0

GA 0 0 1 1

Pts 3 3 0 0

GROUP F W L T GF GA Pts United States1 0 0 13 0 3 Sweden 1 0 0 2 0 3 Chile 0 1 0 0 2 0 Thailand 0 1 0 0 13 0 ak-advanced to knockout stage FRIDAY’S RESULTS Japan 2, Scotland 1 Italy 5, Jamaica 0 England 1, Argentina 0 KNOCKOUT STAGE June 22-25, single-elimination round of 16 QUARTERFINALS • June 27-29 SEMIFINALS • July 2-3 THIRD PLACE July 6 • At Nice, France, semifinal losers CHAMPIONSHIP July 7 • At Lyon, France, semifinal winners

World Cup scoring leaders

ALESSANDRA TARANTINO, ASSOCIATED PRESS

England’s Jodie Taylor celebrates after scoring the only goal during a World Cup match against Argentina on Friday in Le Havre, France. Scotland has dropped both of its matches so far in France, after opening with a 2-1 loss to England. The team will play Argentina in its group-stage final. ITALY 5, JAMAICA 0: Cristiana Girelli scored a hat trick to put Italy into the second round with a victory over Jamaica. It was Italy’s second hat trick at the World Cup, as Girelli joined Carolina Morace, who did it at the inaugural 1991 tournament. Girelli’s three goals were the third hat

trick so far this World Cup. Italy upset Australia 2-1 in its opening Group C match with a goal in stoppage time. It positioned the squad to advance out of the group stage with a victory over Jamaica. Girelli’s first goal was on a penalty kick she got two chances at making. Jamaica goalkeeper Sydney Schneider saved Girelli’s low penalty shot to the right post, but video review determined Schneider came off her line too soon. Girelli scored on her second attempt to get Italy rolling.

Five goals Alex Morgan, United States Four goals Cristiane, Brazil Three goals Cristiana Girelli, Italy

Two goals Rose Lavelle, United States Samantha Mewis, United States Aurora Galli, Italy Barbara Bonansea, Italy

UPCOMING GAMES Today

Sunday

At Valenciennes Netherlands vs. Cameroon 8 a.m.

At Nice Sweden vs. Thailand 8 a.m.

At Grenoble Canada vs. New Zealand 2 p.m.

At Paris United States vs. Chile 11 a.m.

NBA

Plenty of uncertainty awaits in the offseason BY TIM REYNOLDS

Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — NBA commissioner Adam Silver is expected to open next week’s draft by announcing that Zion Williamson is the No. 1 overall selection headed to New Orleans. And Silver will be in Toronto four months after that on opening night to help the Raptors hand out championship rings and watch them raise a banner. There are few other certainties in the NBA right now. The league has a new champion and a new landscape. Toronto has climbed to the mountaintop, defeating a Golden State team that lost All-Stars Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson to major injuries toward the end of the NBA Finals. The Warriors won’t be the overwhelming favorites to win it all next season for the first time in a half-decade. They might not even be favored to win the Western Conference. “I think true champions like we are, we should be able to adapt and keep this same kind of DNA no matter what our roster looks like next year,” Warriors guard Stephen Curry said. “And have high hopes about being back on this stage, whether it looks the same or not.” It won’t look the same. Not much will next season. The champion Raptors don’t know if they’ll be keeping NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard, who becomes a free agent in a couple weeks and one that every team with lots of spending power will want. Danny Green, who went to Toronto in the deal that brought Leonard, is a free agent. Marc Gasol, a huge midseason pickup, is a free agent. There are even reports that Raptors president Masai Ujiri may consider leaving. “I was focused on the now, and I wanted to make history here and that’s all I did,” Leonard said. “I’m still playing basketball no matter what jersey I have on.” Durant won’t be playing on opening night next season, and almost certainly not on any night next season because of his torn Achilles — though he’ll still be highly coveted if he hits the free-agent market as expected. Thompson will miss at minimum most of the regular season with his torn ACL. The Warriors may

lose DeMarcus Cousins in free agency and Shaun Livingston to retirement. The team going to San Francisco might look much different than the one that ended this season in Oakland. Longtime NBA stars like Dwyane Wade, Dirk Nowitzki and Tony Parker will be gone, enjoying retirements. Vince Carter plans to be back for a 22nd and final season. Leonard, LeBron James and Andre Iguodala — if he returns, which is expected — may be the only three players on the court to start the season with an NBA Finals MVP trophy in their possession. There will be new coaches taking over in Sacramento, Phoenix, Cleveland, Memphis and the Los Angeles Lakers. The makeups of the front-office teams in Washington and New Orleans will be different. Then there’s all the player movement, which could be seismic. Anthony Davis may be traded by the Pelicans as the soap opera there continues. Kyrie Irving, who told Boston fans before the season that he’d re-sign with the Celtics, is going to be a free agent. Durant might change teams. Thompson may as well, though that seems unlikely. Kemba Walker is dropping every hint that he wants to stay in Charlotte. “I don’t know if I’ll sign back with them,” said Walker, who is eligible for a supermax contract worth $221 million over five years. “I’m not sure. But they are my first priority. ... We’ll see when the time comes.” There’s going to be a lot of “we’ll see” over the next few months. Milwaukee had the NBA’s best regular-season record at 60-22 and likely will enter next season with the MVP — if Giannis Antetokounmpo walks away with that trophy June 24. ” Philadelphia gave Toronto all it wanted in a seven-game series, and seeing the Raptors win the title might convince the 76ers that they’re right there as far as being a championship-ready club. Everyone should stay tuned to see who wins in 2020. There are no guarantees.

FRANK GUNN, THE CANADIAN PRESS

Raptors president Masai Ujiri celebrates after the team won the championship Thursday in Oakland, Calif.

Raptors are true global champion BY TIM REYNOLDS

Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — The Canadian flag, soaked in beer and champagne, was waved in the Toronto locker room. Pascal Siakam wore the flag of Cameroon around his shoulders. Marc Gasol was yelling some happy phrase in Spanish. Every team that wins an NBA title calls itself world champions. These Toronto Raptors actually might be worthy of such a moniker. The new kings of NBA basketball are the first outside the U.S. to wear the crown. And they come from all corners of the globe. Team president Masai Ujiri was born in England and raised in Nigeria. Serge Ibaka is from the Congo. Gasol will play again for his native Spain this summer in the FIBA World Cup. Coach Nick Nurse won his first championship in Britain, where reserve OG Anunoby comes from. Even the team’s superfan, Nav Bhatia, comes from India. It’s a global game. It’s a global team. They’re the global champions. “It meant a lot, just having guys from different countries and speaking different languages,” Siakam said. “I think it kind of got us closer together. And you kind of have all those little kinds of friendship with guys that you can speak the same language with, and from Spanish to French to English, different cultures. I think kind of it represents Toronto in general, having that diversity.” He doesn’t even have the whole list.

Jeremy Lin, an Asian-American, speaks Mandarin. The assistants on Nurse’s staff have backgrounds from stints as players or coaches in France, England, Germany, Italy, Australia, Israel and more. The director of sports science is Scottish. The head trainer is from Ontario. Jamaal Magloire, who has been on the staff since his playing days ended, is a Toronto native. “It means a lot,” Magloire said as he watched champagne spray all over the locker room. “Canada and Toronto especially are very diverse places.And this team,all the diversity that we have, it served us well.” There’s a parade coming to Toronto. The red and white flag with the giant maple leaf will wave. There will be plenty of other flags there as well. And more than a few proud Americans will be on that route as well, like NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard and the longest-tenured Raptors player, Kyle Lowry. “I’m very happy for them,” Golden State coach Steve Kerr said, tipping his cap to the Raptors. “Winning a championship is the ultimate in this league, and they have got a lot of guys who have earned this. So congrats to Toronto, to their organization, to their fans. They are a worthy champion.” At NBA headquarters in New York, they truly didn’t care who won the series. That doesn’t mean they don’t realize the Raptors’ title is a good thing for the league’s future. Basketball Without Borders is the vehicle that basically helped Siakam start his journey to the

league seven or so years ago. There are NBA academies popping up in Africa and Asia. The league is helping to establish a new pro league in Africa that’s set to begin play early next year. The sport takes every opportunity it gets to promote what it bills as the Jr. NBA Global Championship, a tournament for kids. NBA commissioner Adam Silver said before the series that the league is aware of 700 million cellphones being in use in Africa, more than half of those being smartphones. The NBA wants people watching on those phones, and the infrastructure is such now in many places that it actually is possible. “It’s been revolutionary in terms of the people of Africa’s ability to watch our games in real time on hand-held devices,” Silver said. “So we see enormous growth opportunities both in terms of players and for participation and ultimately an interest for the league.” Having champions from Cameroon and the Congo, having the executive who gets credited for putting it all together being from Nigeria ... it’s not going to hurt the game in Africa one bit. The NBA champions are indeed champions of the world. “As a kid, I didn’t have the opportunity to dream about this moment,” Siakam said. “I didn’t think I could make it. I didn’t think this was possible as a kid. And I think a lot of kids don’t think that it’s possible. Just me being able to be here today and telling them that, ‘Hey, look at me, I was a little scrawny kid from Cameroon ... but here I am, as a champion.’”


MOTOR SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

NASCAR WEEKLY STOP ‘N’ GO

CHRIS GRAYTHEN FOR NASCAR

CARLOS OSORIO, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Joey Logano celebrates with a burnout Monday after winning at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Michigan.

TWO-TEAM SHOWDOWN

Joe Gibbs Racing, Team Penske dominate series

2019 wins by team

NOAH TRISTER

Team Penske: 5

Joe Gibbs Racing: 9

Associated Press

POWER RANKINGS TOP 10 Through Michigan on Monday, these Cup Series drivers have defined the 2019 season as it shakes and bakes into the summer stretch: 1. Kyle Busch: Four wins, nine top fives 2. Martin Truex Jr.: Three wins, six top fives 3. Joey Logano: Two wins, eight top fives 4. Brad Keselowski: Three wins, six top fives 5. Denny Hamlin: Two wins, six top fives 6. Chase Elliott: One win, six top fives 7. Kurt Busch: Zero wins, five top fives 8. Kevin Harvick: Zero wins, three top fives 9. Alex Bowman: Zero wins, three top fives

Hendrick Motorsports: 1

N

ASCAR’s top series has been a twoteam show. Joey Logano’s victory Monday at Michigan gave Team Penske its fifth Cup win of the season. That’s two fewer than Penske had all of last season, when Logano won the series title. Penske might be the clear choice as NASCAR’s dominant team in another year, but that’s not the case at the moment. Joe Gibbs Racing has nine victories. These two teams have combined to win 14 of the 15 races so far. “When I think of key races to win, obviously the crown jewel events that we probably all know, Brickyard, Daytona, Darlington, those type of racetracks that really stand out,” Logano said. “This one is next in line to me because of Roger Penske, this being in his backyard. You always want to win at your home track.” It’s been quite a few weeks for Penske, who won his 18th Indianapolis 500 thanks to Simon Pagenaud and now has the points leader in NASCAR with Logano. Of course Logano had to hold off two of Gibbs’ top cars — the No. 19 of Martin Truex Jr. and the No. 18 of Kyle Busch — to win Monday. Truex complained afterward that he thought Logano was too quick on an overtime restart. Logano and Brad Keselowski are first and third in the Cup standings for Penske. Busch is second, Truex is sixth and

Greg Biffle rolled to a lucrative Truck Series triumph with a $50,000 payday in his comeback race Friday night at Texas Motor Speedway, winning the first race in the Triple Truck Challenge bonus program. Biffle, Trucks champion in 2000, led just 18 of the 167 laps and guided his Kyle Busch Motorsports No. 51 Toyota into position for further bonuses over the next two races in “The Trip.” “Just excited to be here, man,” Biffle said. “I don’t even know what to say. Just so thankful for all the opportunities I’ve had to drive great trucks. This thing was really fast.” If Biffle can win at Iowa on Saturday, he’ll get an additional $150,000; and if he then would win at Gateway Motorsports Park (June 22), he’ll collect $500,000.

10. Clint Bowyer: Zero wins, five top fives — Brendan Marks

JOHN RAOUX, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyle Busch has posted four wins this season for Joe Gibbs Racing. Denny Hamlin is seventh for Gibbs. The two teams combined to take four of the top six spots in Monday’s race. “We just did the best we could with what we had,” Busch said. “Our M&M’s Camry was not great, but we just kept working on it all day. We just kept falling back or doing rounds, doing air pressure, everything we could to get improving on it and make it better. ... Overall we came with about — way better than we should have. Let’s go with that. Way better than we should have.” Five teams had victories at this point last season, and Stewart-Haas Racing and JGR had combined to win 11 of the 15 races. But eight different teams already had won through 15 races in 2017, and none of them

had more than three victories. The next four races on the schedule — Sonoma, Chicagoland, Daytona and Kentucky — are at places where Truex, Busch and Erik Jones won last year. They all drive for Gibbs at the moment, so perhaps Team Penske should feel a bit relieved after taking advantage of its opportunity at Michigan, where JGR has won only one of the past 15 races. JGR has managed to win nine races despite having no poles yet this year. Logano actually was the first driver to win from the pole all season — although all three of his career wins at MIS were as the pole winner. Just another factor that appeared to work in Penske’s favor in Michigan. “I think there’s a lot of advantages to winning the pole here in Michigan. No. 1 being the pit stall you get is the best pit stall in not only this racetrack but probably the whole sport when it comes to winning a pole here,” Logano said. “That first pit stall is really good. It’s really close to the camera line, which obviously puts you in what position you’re in when you’re leaving. The closer it is, the faster the stall. Pretty big advantage to get it here. That pays rewards throughout the whole race. “We had a fast car. We kept it out front.”

MONSTER ENERGY CUP SERIES STANDINGS Rank/Driver 1 Joey Logano 2 Kyle Busch 3 Brad Keselowski 4 Kevin Harvick 5 Chase Elliott 6 Martin Truex Jr. 7 Denny Hamlin 8 Kurt Busch 9 Ryan Blaney 10 Alex Bowman 11 Aric Almirola 12 Clint Bowyer 13 Daniel Suarez 14 William Byron 15 Kyle Larson

Points Rank/Driver 614 605 541 539 531 499 491 485 434 433 426 404 401 383 369

Points

16 Jimmie Johnson 17 Ryan Newman 18 Erik Jones 19 Paul Menard 20 R. Stenhouse Jr. 21 Austin Dillon 22 Chris Buescher 23 Ty Dillon 24 Daniel Hemric 25 Ryan Preece 26 Matt DiBenedetto 27 David Ragan 28 Corey Lajoie 29 Bubba Wallace 30 M. McDowell

364 361 357 336 326 306 304 265 234 213 204 176 170 170 161

XFINITY SERIES STANDINGS Rank/Driver 1 Tyler Reddick 2 Christopher Bell 3 Cole Custer 4 Austin Cindric 5 Justin Allgaier 6 Chase Briscoe 7 J. H. Nemechek 8 Noah Gragson 9 Michael Annett 10 Justin Haley

Points Rank/Driver 627 538 510 486 479 440 429 423 406 395

Points

11 Ryan Sieg 12 Brandon Jones 13 Gray Gaulding 14 Brandon Brown 15 Jer Clements 16 Garrett Smithley 17 Josh Williams 18 Ray Black Jr 19 BJ McLeod 20 David Starr

380 353 268 256 222 201 195 188 182 180

This week’s Xfinity Race CircuitCity.com 250 Iowa Speedway, 4:30 p.m. Sunday (FS1)

Teams extending the rule book is nothing new BRENDAN MARKS

Charlotte Observer

Nobody likes a cheater, right? But what if they actually do? That just sounds wrong. Understandably so, since most of us are taught from a young age that cheating is unethical. It’s a form of lying, stealing, or whatever other “bad” thing you want to call it. What if there’s an exception to the rule? Maybe exception isn’t the right word — bending the rules is a more tactful way to put it — but a loose interpretation of the rule book may be the best course of action for NASCAR. Take Monday’s weather-delayed finish at Michigan, for example. Joey Logano dominated for much of the race, using the 2019 rules package to his advantage like so many other drivers have this season. His car was exceptional, and Martin Truex Jr. and Kurt Busch struggled late to catch him. Then came a caution with less than five laps to go, sending the race into a two-lap overtime. What transpired next was strange. Restarts have been some of the best racing under the current aerodynamic package, which intentionally slows cars in an attempt to create closer racing. Cars went four-wide in an attempt to capitalize on them in May at Charlotte. They are the best shot at passing someone since it becomes so hard to do so once the leader gets clean air out front. But instead of a similar struggle

LARRY PAPKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin Harvick’s pit crew services his car during a race last season at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth. at Michigan, there was nothing. No tight battle, no bumping. Logano sailed back out to the front with Busch, his younger brother Kyle, and Truex left in the dust. That trio of non-winners told reporters after the race that they thought Logano had jumped the restart, meaning he went fullout before reaching the designated restart zone. It’s like a high school track race, except one runner starts on “get set” instead of “go.” Second-place finisher Kurt Busch even said he’d have done

the same thing in Logano’s position. NASCAR reviewed the restart and found nothing wrong. Logano is the winner. But the controversy at least bears mentioning, both in the short-term context and long-term standard. In the short term, Logano’s move isn’t really worth blowing up into anything bigger. It was a savvy veteran driver pushing the envelope as he knew he could then reaping the rewards of that decision. But long term, whether you

call Logano’s move cheating or not, it’s hard to say that bending the rules doesn’t fit with NASCAR’s image and reputation. The sport was founded on engineering ingenuity, mechanics tinkering and tweaking their vehicles to squeeze every drop of speed. Sometimes that means pushing the boundaries, even overstepping them. In the spirit of NASCAR, it was tolerated. NASCAR’s roots aren’t nearly as polished or structured as other major American sports. The rules constantly change,

ebbing and flowing with technological changes. When someone creates something unfairly superior, someone else pushes the envelope a little bit further. That’s the nature of innovation. That’s not to say NASCAR should let drivers and crew chiefs blatantly cut corners. As Kevin Harvick found out last season, more blatant violations will be found and dealt with accordingly. But emphasizing and exploiting the gray area of NASCAR’s rule books? Have at it.


SPORTS

06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Odds Underdog American League RAYS .....................-$205 ....................Angels Red Sox.................-$260 ................ ORIOLES ASTROS.................-$215 ................Blue Jays Indians..................-$165 ................... TIGERS TWINS ...................-$240 .................... Royals Yankees ................-$125 .............WHITE SOX ATHLETICS ............-$175 ................ Mariners National League GIANTS..................-$107 ................. Brewers NATIONALS ...........-$200 ...................Dbacks MARLINS...............-$125 ................... Pirates METS.....................-$145 ..................... Cards BRAVES.................-$107 ...................Phillies ROCKIES................-$175 ................... Padres DODGERS..............-$180 .......................Cubs Interleague REDS.....................-$115 ................. Rangers

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Recalled RHP Luis Ortiz and LHP Josh Rogers from Norfolk (IL). Optioned RHP Evan Phillips to Norfolk. Placed RHP Josh Lucas on the 10-day IL. BOSTON RED SOX: Placed RHP Heath Hembree on the 10-day IL, retroactive to June 11. Recalled LHP Josh Taylor from Pawtucket (IL). Signed RHP Ryan Zeferjahn and Brock Bell; C Jaxx Groshans; CFs Wil Dalton and Luke Bandy; and INF Alex Erro to minor league contracts. CHICAGO WHITE SOX: Agreed to terms with RHPs Karan Patel, Tyson Messer, Nate Pawelczyk, Cooper Bradford, McKinley Moore, Jeremiah Burke, Chase Solesky, Pauly Milto, Justin Friedman, Kaleb Roper, Connor Reich, Declan Cronin, Nick Silva, Allan Beer and Vlad Nunez; LHPs Dan Metzdorf, Avery Weems, Trey Jeans and Garvin Alston; Cs Ivan Gonzalez, Victor Torres, Jakob Goldfarb and Daniel Millwee; OFs James Beard, Misael Gonzalez Acosta, Cameron Simmons and Jonathan Allen; 3B DJ Gladney; SS Joshua Rivera; 2B Tom Archer; and INF Tyler Osik on minor league contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS: Recalled RHP Rogelio Armenteros from Round Rock (PCL). Signed SS Grae Kessinger and CF Colin Barber to minor league contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS: Reinstated INF J.P. Crawford from the 10-day IL. Recalled RHP Matt Festa from Tacoma (PCL). Placed RHP Brandon Brennan on the 10-day IL. Optioned INF Shed Long to Tacoma. TEXAS RANGERS: Acquired RHP Jake Petricka from Milwaukee for a player to be named or cash considerations and assigned him to Nashville (PCL). National League CINCINNATI REDS: Reinstated INF Alex Blandino from the 10-day IL and was optioned to Louisville (IL). MIAMI MARLINS: Placed INF Martín Prado on the 10-day IL, retroactive to June 13. Transferred RHP José Ureña to the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of INF Yadiel Rivera from New Orleans (PCL). American Association CLEBURNE RAILROADERS: Removed INF Jared Reaves from the inactive list. KANSAS CITY T-BONES: Signed INF Caleb Dean. ST. PAUL SAINTS: Signed RHP Karch Kowalczyk. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS: Signed RHP John McKinney and INF Adam Sasser. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS: Signed LHP Darin Downs. Placed RHP Alec Asher on the inactive list. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SACRAMENTO KINGS: Named Igor Kokoskov, Bob Beyer, Jesse Mermuys and Roy Rana assistant coaches; Bobby Jackson assistant player development coach; Jonah Herscu advance scout; and Will Scott head video coordinator and player development coach. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL: Suspended Dallas Cowboys TE Rico Gathers for the first game in 2019 for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy. BUFFALO BILLS: Signed TE Dawson Knox to a four-year contract. Claimed TE Keith Towbridge off waivers. Released TE Mik’Quan Deane. CHICAGO BEARS: Signed RB David Montgomery. DETROIT LIONS: Waived TE Michael Roberts. GREEN BAY PACKERS: Released RB Kapri Bibbs. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS: Signed LB Bobby Okereke. MIAMI DOLPHINS: Signed G Michael Deiter. NEW YORK GIANTS: Signed DT Dexter Lawrence and CB DeAndre Baker. Canadian Football League CFL: Fined Edmonton WR Greg Ellingson an undisclosed amount for failing to provide an adequate breath sample into a roadside screening device last season. Announced Ottawa DB Jonathan Rose agreed to pay a fine as part of a settlement of his grievance challenging the league’s decision to suspend him after he made contact with an official during last year’s Eastern Final in Ottawa. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES: Signed D Ilya Lyubushkin to a one-year contract. BUFFALO SABRES: Named Don Granato assistant coach and Mike Bales goalie coach. Retained assistant coach Steve Smith. NEW YORK ISLANDERS: Agreed to terms with F Jordan Eberle on a five-year contract through the 2023-24 season. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS: Acquired D Matt Niskanen from Washington for D Radko Gudas. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING: Re-signed D Cameron Gaunce to a one-year, two-way contract. Traded G Connor Ingram to Nashville for a 2021 seventh-round draft pick. WASHINGTON CAPITALS: Acquired D Radko Gudas from Philadelphia to D Matt Niskanen.

Favorite

NFL Points Underdog Open Current September 5 BEARS............ 3.5 ..............3.5 .........Packers September 8 VIKINGS ......... 4.5 ..............4.5 ......... Falcons EAGLES .......... 8.....................8 ...Washington JETS ............... 3.5 ..............3.5 ...............Bills Ravens ........... 3.5 ..............3.5 .....DOLPHINS BUCS .............. 1.5 ..............1.5 ............ 49ers Chiefs............. 5.....................5 .......JAGUARS BROWNS ........ 5.....................5 ............Titans Rams.............. 2.5 ..............2.5 .... PANTHERS CARDS............ PK ................PK .............Lions SEAHAWKS..... 7.5 ..............7.5 .........Bengals CHARGERS ..... 3.5 ..............3.5 ..............Colts COWBOYS....... 7.5 ..............7.5 ........... Giants PATRIOTS ....... 6.....................6 ........ Steelers September 9 SAINTS........... 7.5 ..............7.5 ...........Texans RAIDERS ........ 2.5 ..............2.5 ........ Broncos Note: These are preliminary opening lines and could jump in either direction pending trades and injuries in the pre-season. Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein Favorite

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park entries Saturday post time: 7:30 p.m. Party at the park FIRST: 6F, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 A P Fireball Arrieta 5-2 2 Wave the Gold Lopez 20-1 3 Lookin’ At Mike Molina 8-5 4 News Alert Ortiz 9-5 5 Sweet Circle Thurman 8-1 6 Droop’s M D B Simpson 20-1 SECOND: 6F, F&M $4,000 NW2L CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Last Surprise Molina 7-5 2 Oklahoma Carol Ortiz 9-5 3 Lion’s Wager Simpson 6-1 4 Dixieland Punkin Lopez 5-1 5 Hoossensation Arrieta 10-1 6 Arkansas Traveler Retana 15-1 THIRD: 1MILE 70YDS, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Bob’s Brass Dancer Ortiz 5-1 2 I Will Be Diego 8-1 3 Sunny Kitten Thurman 8-1 4 Boychild Lopez 9-2 5 Red On Tap Molina 3-1 6 Cheadle Simpson 7-5 FOURTH: 6F, $10,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Cee R Bee Molina 9-2 2 Tap’s Big Shot Diego 5-1 3 Cousin Dario Thurman 5-2 4 Stallone Retana 3-1 5 Tudors Charge Simpson 2-1 FIFTH: 6F, F&M MSW PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Barbiello Simpson 8-1 2 Miss Gavel Molina 15-1 3 Ghaaleb Royale Arrieta 3-1 4 Cloudy Legs Bonilla 20-1 5 Bethasa Lopez 20-1 6 Song of the Forest Retana 12-1 7 Lexi Summer Thurman 9-2 8 Swifty Cause Ortiz 4-1 9 Halo Couture Diego 5-2 SIXTH: F&M $5,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 W W Put and Take Arrieta 5-2 2 Partay Simpson 4-1 3 Country Assets Retana 5-1 4 Tour On Ortiz 6-1 5 Boohoo Sue Molina 3-1 6 Lil Bit Tipsey Diego 9-2 SEVENTH: 6F, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Forafewdollarsmore Retana 6-1 2 Morninglover Rambo Diego 12-1 3 Cornfed Molina 3-1 4 Peteizum Lopez 6-1 5 Boyfriend Brian(IRE) Thurman 15-1 6 Electric Cat Ortiz 5-1 7 Blazer Simpson 7-5

Gaby Lopez 72-73—145 +1 Christina Kim 72-73—145 +1 Peiyun Chien 72-73—145 +1 Lee-Anne Pace 70-75—145 +1 Alison Lee 70-75—145 +1 Sophia Popov 75-71—146 +2 Luna Sobron 74-72—146 +2 Jaye Marie Green 73-73—146 +2 Cheyenne Woods 71-75—146 +2 Giulia Molinaro 70-76—146 +2 Hannah Green 70-76—146 +2 Joanna Klatten 69-77—146 +2 P.K. Kongkraphan 69-77—146 +2 Pernilla Lindberg 78-69—147 +3 Eun-Hee Ji 74-73—147 +3 Linnea Strom 74-73—147 +3 Tiffany Joh 73-74—147 +3 Jacqui Concolino 72-75—147 +3 Sandra Gal 72-75—147 +3 Jackie Stoelting 75-73—148 +4 Anne van Dam 74-74—148 +4 Suzuka Yamaguchi 75-74—149 +5 Laura Diaz 73-76—149 +5 Jimin Kang 73-76—149 +5 Cheyenne Knight 80-70—150 +6 a-Stephanie Lau 76-74—150 +6 Gabrielle Shipley 73-77—150 +6 Kim Kaufman 74-77—151 +7 Lindsey Weaver 72-79—151 +7 Wichanee Meechai 78-74—152 +8 Lori Beth Adams 72-80—152 +8 Laura Davies 77-78—155 +11 Haru Nomura 71—WD Leaderboard at time of suspended play Golfer Score Thru Brooke M. Henderson -16 F Brittany Altomare -13 F Jennifer Kupcho -10 F Annie Park -9 17 Megan Khang -8 F Moriya Jutanugarn -8 F Nasa Hataoka -8 F Angela Stanford -8 F Nine tied at -7

COLLEGE ALBANY (NY): Named Kaitlin Lewis director of operations for women’s basketball. ARIZONA: Signed women’s basketball coach Adia Barnes to a contract extension through 2024. BARUCH: Named Cristy Encarnacion women’s assistant volleyball coach. CHARLESTON SOUTHERN: Named Jordan Jeffers women’s golf coach. IDAHO: Fired men’s basketball coach Don Verlin. NEBRASKA: Named Will Bolt head baseball coach. NORTHERN ILLINOIS: Named Alexis Lawrence women’s assistant basketball coach.

GOLF Area holes in one

Florissant: Bill Gebel, hole No. 8, 158 yards, 11-wood, June 13. Forest Hills: Tyler Troutman, hole No. 12 (Championship), 175 yards, 6-iron.

LPGA Tour MEIJER CLASSIC Friday At Blythefield Country Club Grand Rapids, Mich. Purse: $2 million Yardage: 6,638; Par 72 Second Round a-denotes amateur Brooke M. Henderson 64-64—128 Brittany Altomare 66-65—131 Jennifer Kupcho 67-67—134 Megan Khang 70-66—136 Moriya Jutanugarn 69-67—136 Nasa Hataoka 68-68—136 Angela Stanford 68-68—136 Danielle Kang 69-68—137 So Yeon Ryu 69-68—137 Jin Young Ko 68-69—137 Pajaree Anannarukarn 68-69—137 Nelly Korda 68-69—137 Morgan Pressel 67-70—137 Madelene Sagstrom 67-70—137 Katherine Perry 66-71—137 Chella Choi 70-68—138 Lexi Thompson 70-68—138 Su Oh 69-69—138 Maria Torres 69-69—138 Xiyu Lin 68-70—138 Sung Hyun Park 68-70—138 Shanshan Feng 68-70—138 Lydia Ko 72-67—139 Clariss Guce 70-69—139 Mariah Stackhouse 70-69—139 Karen Chung 69-70—139 Celine Boutier 69-70—139 Sakura Yokomine 69-70—139 Lauren Stephenson 69-70—139 Alena Sharp 67-72—139 Kendall Dye 67-72—139 Jenny Shin 66-73—139 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 71-69—140 Minjee Lee 71-69—140 Inbee Park 70-70—140 In Gee Chun 70-70—140 Jeongeun Lee6 70-70—140 Mina Harigae 68-72—140 Hee Young Park 68-72—140 Jing Yan 73-68—141 Mi Hyang Lee 72-69—141 Gerina Piller 71-70—141 Kris Tamulis 71-70—141 Kristen Gillman 71-70—141 Cristie Kerr 70-71—141 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 69-72—141 Laura Gonzalez Escallon 68-73—141 Louise Ridderstrom 67-74—141 Jeong Eun Lee 67-74—141 Ashleigh Buhai 65-76—141 Azahara Munoz 72-70—142 Caroline Hedwall 72-70—142 Jenny Haglund 71-71—142 Jaclyn Lee 71-71—142 Marissa Steen 71-71—142 Elizabeth Szokol 71-71—142 Brianna Do 70-72—142 Lizette Salas 68-74—142 Lee Lopez 68-74—142 Jessica Korda 76-67—143 Dani Holmqvist 75-68—143 Laetitia Beck 73-70—143 Isi Gabsa 72-71—143 Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras 72-71—143 Muni He 71-72—143 Brittany Lang 71-72—143 Lindy Duncan 70-73—143 Mel Reid 70-73—143 Haeji Kang 69-74—143 Youngin Chun 68-75—143 Jennifer Song 68-75—143 Dottie Ardina 74-70—144 Ruixin Liu 73-71—144 Yu Liu 72-72—144 Stephanie Meadow 72-72—144 Wei-Ling Hsu 72-72—144 Sarah Kemp 71-73—144 Klara Spilkova 71-73—144 Dana Finkelstein 71-73—144 Mirim Lee 71-73—144 Na Yeon Choi 70-74—144 Celine Herbin 70-74—144 Jasmine Suwannapura 73-72—145

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

-16 -13 -10 -8 -8 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E +1

Saturday Chicago at Indiana, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Dallas, 7 p.m. New York at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Connecticut, 2:30 p.m. Las Vegas at Minnesota, 6 p.m.

PRO SOCCER MLS

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 9 4 4 31 31 20 Montreal 8 7 3 27 21 28 D.C. United 7 4 6 27 23 18 Atlanta 8 5 2 26 19 11 New York 7 6 3 24 27 19 New York City FC 5 1 8 23 23 17 Toronto FC 5 6 4 19 26 25 Orlando City 5 7 3 18 22 21 Chicago 4 6 6 18 24 23 Columbus 5 9 2 17 16 24 New England 4 8 4 16 17 33 Cincinnati 3 11 2 11 14 33 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 11 1 4 37 39 13 LA Galaxy 9 6 1 28 22 19 Seattle 7 4 5 26 26 21 Houston 7 3 3 24 21 14 FC Dallas 6 6 4 22 22 22 Minnesota United 6 7 3 21 23 25 Real Salt Lake 6 8 1 19 21 27 San Jose 5 6 4 19 23 27 Vancouver 4 6 6 18 17 20 Sporting Kansas City 3 5 7 16 26 27 Colorado 4 9 3 15 25 34 Portland 4 7 2 14 19 26 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturday, June 22 LA Galaxy at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 7 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Houston at Portland, 10 p.m. Sunday, June 23 Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.

COLLEGE NCAA College World Series

BASEBALL

At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. (Double Elimination; x-if necessary) Saturday, June 15 Game 1: Michigan (45-20) vs. Texas Tech (44-18), 1 p.m. Game 2: Florida State (41-21) vs. Arkansas (46-18), 6 p.m. Sunday, June 16 Game 3: Louisville (49-16) vs. Vanderbilt (54-11), 1 p.m. Game 4: Mississippi State (51-13) vs. Auburn (38-26), 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 17 Game 5: Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 1 p.m. Game 6: Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 18 Game 7: Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 1 p.m. Game 8: Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 19 Game 9: Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 20 Game 10: Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 loser, 7 p.m. Friday, June 21 Game 11: Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 1 p.m. Game 12: Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Saturday, June 22 x-Game 13: Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 1 p.m. x-Game 14: Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, June 24: Pairings TBD, 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 25: Pairings TBD, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 26: Pairings TBD, 6 p.m.

Frontier League

East Schaumburg Lake Erie Windy City Joliet Washington West Florence Southern Illinois River City Evansville Gateway

W L Pct. 17 14 .548 16 14 .533 15 16 .484 11 20 .355 10 22 .313 W L Pct. 19 11 .633 18 12 .600 17 14 .548 17 14 .548 14 17 .452 Friday Lake Erie 5, Florence 4 Schaumburg 6, Evansville 3 Washington 12, Joliet 0 Southern Illinois 5, River City 4 Windy City 10, Gateway 2 Saturday Lake Erie at Florence, 5:05 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 6:05 p.m. River City at Southern Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Windy City at Gateway, 7:05 p.m. Sunday Washington at Joliet, 1:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Florence, 4:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Evansville, 5:05 p.m. River City at Southern Illinois, 5:05 p.m. Windy City at Gateway, 6:05 p.m.

BOXING Fight Schedule

June 15 At Arena Riga, Riga, Latvia, Mairis Briedis vs. Krzysztof Glowacki, 12, for Briedis’ WBC Diamond and Glowacki’s WBO cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Yunier Dorticos vs. Andrew Tabiti, 12, cruiserweights (World Boxing Super Series semifinals). At Kiev, Ukraine, Artem Dalakian vs. Sarawut Thawornkham, 12, for Dalakian’s WBA flyweight title. At First Direct Arena, Leeds, England, Josh Warrington vs. Kid Galahad, 12, for Warrington’s IBF featherweight title; Jason Welborn vs. JJ Metcalf, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super welterweight title; Zelfa Barrett vs. Lyon Woodstock, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super featherweight title; Andrzej Soldra vs. Lyndon Arthur, 10, light heavyweights; Edwin Palacios vs. Troy Williamson, 10, middleweights. At MGM Grand, Las Vegas, Tyson Fury vs. Tom Schwarz, 12, heavyweights; Sullivan Barrera vs. Jesse Hart, 10, light heavyweights; Andy Vences vs. Albert Bell, 10, junior lightweights. June 19 At Chiba City, Japan, Kazuto Ioka vs. Aston Palicte, 12, for the vacant WBO World super flyweight title; Hiroto Kyoguchi vs. Tanawat Nakoon, 12, for Kyoguchi’s WBA Super World light flyweight title.

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN Connecticut Chicago Indiana Washington New York Atlanta WESTERN Seattle Los Angeles Minnesota Las Vegas Phoenix Dallas

W L 7 1 3 2 4 3 4 3 2 4 1 4 W L 5 3 3 2 4 4 2 3 2 3 0 5 Friday Seattle 74, Washington 71 Connecticut 85, Minnesota 81 Los Angeles at Phoenix, late New York at Las Vegas, late

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

Pct .875 .600 .571 .571 .333 .200 Pct .625 .600 .500 .400 .400 .000

GB — 2½ 2½ 2½ 4 4½ GB — ½ 1 1½ 1½ 3½

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

TODAY

TONIGHT

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Showers and thunderstorms WIND SW 10-15 mph

Clouds, a strong t-storm WIND SW 5-10 mph

Showers and storms WIND W 10-15 mph

Chance rain and storms WIND NW 5-10 mph

Spotty showers

Cloudy with a t-storm WIND ENE 6-12 mph

82°

72°

GB — ½ 2 6 7½ GB — 1 2½ 2½ 5½

June 21 At Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Tyrone McKenna vs. Darragh Foley, 12, for the vacant WBC International super lightweight title. At WinnaVegas Casino & Resort, Sloan, Iowa (SHO), Sebastian Fundora vs. Hector Zepeda, 10, super welterweights; Rene Tellez Giron vs. Michel Rivera, 10, lightweights. At Indio, Calif., Andrew Cancio vs. Alberto Machado, 12, for Cancio’s WBA junior lightweight title; Angel Acosta vs. Elwin Soto, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title; Genaro Gamez vs. Ezequiel Aviles, 10, junior welterweights. June 22 At Wolstein Center, Cleveland (CBSSN), Dewayne Beamon vs. Froilan Saludar, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super flyweight title; Cody Crowley vs. Navid Mansouri, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super welterweight title. June 23 At Mandalay Bay Resorts & Casino, Las Vegas (FOX), Jermell Charlo, vs. Jorge Cota, 12, for junior middleweights; Guillermo Rigondeaux vs. Julio Ceja, 12, super bantamweights. At Temecula, Calif. (ESPN), Richard Commey vs. Ray Beltran, 12, for Commey’s IBF lightweight title. June 28 At Pechanga Resort & Casino, Temecula, Calif., Richard Commey vs. Raymundo Beltran, 12, for Commey’s IBF World lightweight title; Carlos Adames vs. Patrick Day, 10, junior middleweights; Saul Rodriguez vs. Miguel Angel Gonzalez, 10, junior lightweights; Junior Fa vs. Dominic Guinn, 10, heavyweights. June 29 At Providence, R.I., Demetrius Andrade vs. Maciej Sulecki, 12, for Andrade’s WBO middleweigtht title; Khalid Yafai vs. Norbelto Jimenez, 12,for Yafai’s WBA World super flyweight title. At NRG Arena, Houston (SHO), Jarmall Charlo vs. Brandon Adams, 12, for Charlo’s WBC interim middleweight title; Jean Pascal vs. Marcus Browne, 12, for the interim WBA World light heavyweight title; Erickson Lubin vs. Zakaria Attou, 12, super welterweights; Eduardo Ramirez vs. Claudio Marrero, 10, featherweights; Miguel Flores vs. Luis May, 10, super featherweights. July 6 At Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan, Nordine Oubaali vs. Arthur Villanueva, 12, for Oubaali’s WBC bantamweight title. July 12 At Edion Arena, Osaka, Japan, Robert Brant vs. Ryoya Murata, 12, for Brant’s WBA World middleweight title. At Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Hollywood, Fla., Derrieck Cuevas vs. Jesus Alberto Beltran, 10 for Cuevas’ WBA Fedelatin welterweight title. At Emerald Queen Casino, Tacoma, Wash., Jermaine Franklin vs. Jerry Forrest, 12, heavyweights; BJ Flores vs. Otto Wallin, 12, heavyweights; Giovanni Mioletti vs. Luis Porozo, 10, featherweights. July 13 At Prudential Center in Newark, N.J., Hairon Socarras vs. Shakur Stevenson, 10, featherweights; Joshua Greer Jr. vs. Nikolai Potapov, 10, bantamweights. At Dignity Health Sports Park, Carson, Calif., Rey Vargas vs. Tomoki Kameda, 12, for Vargas’ WBC junior featherweight title; Diego De La Hoya vs. Ronny Rios, 12, for the interim WBA World featherweight title; Joet Gonzalez vs. Manuel Avila, 10, featherweights; Alexis Rocha vs. Berlin Abreu, 10, welterweights. July 19 At MGM National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md., Masayoshi Nakatani vs. Teofimo Lopez, 12, lightweights; Maxim Dadashev vs. Subriel Matias, 12, super lightweights; Jason Sosa vs. Erick De Leon, 10, junior lightweights. July 20 At MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas (PPV), Keith Thurman vs. Manny Pacquiao, 12, for Thurman’s WBA welterweight title; Yordenis Ugas vs. Omar Figueroa Jr., 12, WBC welterweight eliminator; Sergey Lipinets vs. John Molina Jr., 12, welterweights; Caleb Plant vs. Mike Lee, 12, for Plant’s IBF super middleweight title. July 27 At Royal Farms Arena, Baltimore (SHO), Gervonta Davis vs. Ricardo Núñez, 12, for Davis’ WBA super featherweight title. At College Park Center, Arlington, Texas, Maurice Hooker vs. Jose Ramirez, 12, for Hooker’s WBO and Ramirez’s WBC junior welterweight titles; Murat Gasiev vs. Joey Dawejko, 10, heavyweights. Aug. 3 At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (FOX), Andre Berto vs. Miguel Cruz,12, welterweights. Aug. 24 At Nagoya, Japan, Kosei Tanaka vs. Jonathan Gonzalez, 12, for Tanaka’s WBO flyweight title. Aug. 31 At Minneapolis (FOX), Erislandy Lara vs. Ramon Alvarez, 12, junior middleweights; Caleb Truax vs. Peter Quilin, 12, super middleweights.

Warmer air will filter across the Northeast ahead of showers and thunderstorms rumbling across most of the Midwest and a part of the High Plains today. Some thunderstorms across Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and back to southeastern Colorado and the Texas Panhandle will become severe. Warmth will span the Northwest, away from the immediate coast. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND N 5-10 mph

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 77/67 77/66 Bloomington Urbana 75/67 76/67

Kirksville 80/66

Quincy 80/69

Decatur 78/69

Springfield 57 78/68 Effingham 70 55 79/69

35

Columbia 70 84/70 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 82/72 City 83/70 55 84/71 Union 84/70 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 83/69 84/71 Farmington 83/69 Cape Girardeau 87/72 Springfield 85/71 West Plains Poplar Bluff 86/71 55 84/69

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

30.14 -0.93 30.65 -0.42 31.23 -0.11 27.39 +0.14 33.83 -0.21

16 24.10 -0.63 15 23.26 -0.49 25 33.70 -0.50 26 36.44 -0.35 18 33.05 -0.52 419 432.77 -0.53 21 36.81 -0.57 30 44.07 -0.54 27 45.72 -0.18 32 45.99 -0.12 20 18 14

20.90 -0.60 21.10 -0.48 24.80 -0.54

15 16 24

3.08 -0.05 22.21 -0.57 40.64 -0.55

15

1.84 -0.06

40

48.66 360.70 366.95 500.92 659.17 737.65 684.70 917.04 864.43 602.46 409.51 621.21 447.92

-0.07 +0.37 -0.69 -2.13 +0.05 -0.08 -0.03 -0.08 -0.03 -0.18 -0.12 -0.60 -0.18

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

Average High

Average Low

San Francisco 68/56

Statistics through 5 p.m. Friday Temperature High/low 77°/55° Normal high/low 85°/67° Last year high/low 91°/67° Record high 97° (1987) Record low 48° (1942) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Fri. 0.01” Month to date (normal) 1.97” (2.12”) Year to date (normal) 28.34” (18.49”) Record for this date 3.95” (1957)

87 80

79

83 70

60

69

70

65

74

77

82 72

59

58

57

55

T

W

T

F

83

82

80

82

83

68

65

66

68

68

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Low - 37 Low - 12 Absent - 0 Moderate - 12206 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Friday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

1 113 126 325 298

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

67° 8 a.m.

79° noon

84° 4 p.m.

78° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

S

S

M

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

New York 82/68

Detroit 70/60

Washington 85/69

Kansas City 86/67

Los Angeles 74/60

Atlanta 85/71 El Paso 96/68 Houston 92/79 Chihuahua 96/67

Cold front

Warm front

Miami 87/78

Monterrey 97/71

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

82/63/s 88/61/pc 63/52/c 85/71/pc 97/75/pc 86/68/pc 88/70/pc 86/59/s 80/63/s 85/69/s 83/65/pc 84/65/s 70/59/t 76/69/t 73/63/t 91/77/pc 87/73/pc 73/53/t 84/65/t 85/75/pc 70/60/t 83/64/s 88/76/pc 92/79/pc 73/68/t 86/67/t 103/83/s 91/74/pc

77/62/sh 87/65/pc 65/53/pc 89/72/pc 95/74/c 87/69/pc 89/70/pc 88/60/pc 74/64/c 88/72/pc 85/67/t 90/71/pc 73/56/c 83/69/t 75/65/sh 89/72/t 86/73/t 77/52/t 81/59/pc 85/75/pc 73/61/sh 77/65/t 88/75/pc 91/76/t 82/68/t 83/63/c 101/78/pc 87/69/t

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

74/60/pc 82/73/c 90/76/pc 87/78/t 69/53/t 71/56/t 92/69/pc 89/72/pc 90/75/pc 82/68/s 89/70/pc 87/67/t 88/73/t 83/67/s 104/79/s 76/64/pc 77/61/s 81/56/pc 84/55/s 85/61/pc 95/75/pc 69/62/pc 68/56/pc 77/57/pc 91/74/t 100/71/s 85/69/pc 90/69/pc

74/60/pc 84/73/t 89/71/t 86/80/t 63/51/c 68/53/pc 91/71/pc 90/73/pc 92/76/pc 81/70/pc 86/66/t 83/61/pc 87/73/t 84/70/pc 105/79/s 76/66/t 71/56/c 81/57/pc 89/59/s 84/61/pc 93/74/pc 69/63/pc 71/57/s 77/58/pc 86/75/t 102/71/s 87/72/pc 84/66/t

National Extremes

Today’s Air Quality

High: 107 Needles, Calif.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

5:36 a.m. 6:56 p.m.

8:28 p.m. 4:28 a.m.

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Jun 17

Jun 25

Jul 2

Jul 9

Friday in the 48 contiguous states Low: 29 Embarrass, Minn.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

40

Chicago 70/59

Denver 73/53

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

89

69

Toronto 67/53

Minneapolis 71/56

Pollen Yesterday

100

79

Montreal 72/54

Billings 79/57

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Scattered showers and storms will occur this morning. Then a break will arrive before more thunderstorms develop in the late afternoon and evening. Another round of storms will form around daybreak Sunday.

Joplin 85/70

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

83° 68° 82° 65° 80° 66° 82° 68°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 86/67

Winnipeg 69/50

Seattle 77/57

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

67/54/t 92/73/s 115/83/s 92/79/t 90/65/pc 89/60/t 57/51/r 95/73/s 88/79/t 59/46/r 88/78/c 81/64/s 65/36/s 64/51/pc 80/54/s 108/83/s

68/54/c 92/71/pc 117/80/s 93/78/t 74/61/r 77/60/pc 61/57/r 94/73/s 88/79/t 60/49/r 87/82/r 83/66/s 67/37/s 67/54/sh 88/56/pc 111/85/s

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

76/57/t 72/54/r 68/55/sh 87/78/pc 71/55/pc 113/83/pc 70/53/t 84/70/s 80/63/pc 88/76/pc 56/31/pc 80/62/pc 65/54/pc 70/66/r 67/53/t 71/53/pc

79/59/t 73/55/pc 72/55/pc 88/78/pc 72/56/r 100/83/t 71/54/pc 83/69/s 82/62/s 88/79/pc 56/32/s 81/61/pc 61/53/sh 81/66/s 70/55/pc 72/54/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


SPORTS

06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 2

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Odds Underdog American League RAYS .....................-$205 ....................Angels Red Sox.................-$260 ................ ORIOLES ASTROS.................-$215 ................Blue Jays Indians..................-$165 ................... TIGERS TWINS ...................-$240 .................... Royals Yankees ................-$125 .............WHITE SOX ATHLETICS ............-$175 ................ Mariners National League GIANTS..................-$107 ................. Brewers NATIONALS ...........-$200 ...................Dbacks MARLINS...............-$125 ................... Pirates METS.....................-$145 ..................... Cards BRAVES.................-$107 ...................Phillies ROCKIES................-$175 ................... Padres DODGERS..............-$180 .......................Cubs Interleague REDS.....................-$115 ................. Rangers

BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Recalled RHP Luis Ortiz and LHP Josh Rogers from Norfolk (IL). Optioned RHP Evan Phillips to Norfolk. Placed RHP Josh Lucas on the 10-day IL. BOSTON RED SOX: Placed RHP Heath Hembree on the 10-day IL, retroactive to June 11. Recalled LHP Josh Taylor from Pawtucket (IL). Signed RHP Ryan Zeferjahn and Brock Bell; C Jaxx Groshans; CFs Wil Dalton and Luke Bandy; and INF Alex Erro to minor league contracts. CHICAGO WHITE SOX: Agreed to terms with RHPs Karan Patel, Tyson Messer, Nate Pawelczyk, Cooper Bradford, McKinley Moore, Jeremiah Burke, Chase Solesky, Pauly Milto, Justin Friedman, Kaleb Roper, Connor Reich, Declan Cronin, Nick Silva, Allan Beer and Vlad Nunez; LHPs Dan Metzdorf, Avery Weems, Trey Jeans and Garvin Alston; Cs Ivan Gonzalez, Victor Torres, Jakob Goldfarb and Daniel Millwee; OFs James Beard, Misael Gonzalez Acosta, Cameron Simmons and Jonathan Allen; 3B DJ Gladney; SS Joshua Rivera; 2B Tom Archer; and INF Tyler Osik on minor league contracts. HOUSTON ASTROS: Recalled RHP Rogelio Armenteros from Round Rock (PCL). Signed SS Grae Kessinger and CF Colin Barber to minor league contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS: Reinstated INF J.P. Crawford from the 10-day IL. Recalled RHP Matt Festa from Tacoma (PCL). Placed RHP Brandon Brennan on the 10-day IL. Optioned INF Shed Long to Tacoma. TEXAS RANGERS: Acquired RHP Jake Petricka from Milwaukee for a player to be named or cash considerations and assigned him to Nashville (PCL). National League CINCINNATI REDS: Reinstated INF Alex Blandino from the 10-day IL and was optioned to Louisville (IL). MIAMI MARLINS: Placed INF Martín Prado on the 10-day IL, retroactive to June 13. Transferred RHP José Ureña to the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of INF Yadiel Rivera from New Orleans (PCL). American Association CLEBURNE RAILROADERS: Removed INF Jared Reaves from the inactive list. KANSAS CITY T-BONES: Signed INF Caleb Dean. ST. PAUL SAINTS: Signed RHP Karch Kowalczyk. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS: Signed RHP John McKinney and INF Adam Sasser. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS: Signed LHP Darin Downs. Placed RHP Alec Asher on the inactive list. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SACRAMENTO KINGS: Named Igor Kokoskov, Bob Beyer, Jesse Mermuys and Roy Rana assistant coaches; Bobby Jackson assistant player development coach; Jonah Herscu advance scout; and Will Scott head video coordinator and player development coach. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL: Suspended Dallas Cowboys TE Rico Gathers for the first game in 2019 for violating the NFL’s substance abuse policy. BUFFALO BILLS: Signed TE Dawson Knox to a four-year contract. Claimed TE Keith Towbridge off waivers. Released TE Mik’Quan Deane. CHICAGO BEARS: Signed RB David Montgomery. DETROIT LIONS: Waived TE Michael Roberts. GREEN BAY PACKERS: Released RB Kapri Bibbs. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS: Signed LB Bobby Okereke. MIAMI DOLPHINS: Signed G Michael Deiter. NEW YORK GIANTS: Signed DT Dexter Lawrence and CB DeAndre Baker. Canadian Football League CFL: Fined Edmonton WR Greg Ellingson an undisclosed amount for failing to provide an adequate breath sample into a roadside screening device last season. Announced Ottawa DB Jonathan Rose agreed to pay a fine as part of a settlement of his grievance challenging the league’s decision to suspend him after he made contact with an official during last year’s Eastern Final in Ottawa. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES: Signed D Ilya Lyubushkin to a one-year contract. BUFFALO SABRES: Named Don Granato assistant coach and Mike Bales goalie coach. Retained assistant coach Steve Smith. NEW YORK ISLANDERS: Agreed to terms with F Jordan Eberle on a five-year contract through the 2023-24 season. PHILADELPHIA FLYERS: Acquired D Matt Niskanen from Washington for D Radko Gudas. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING: Re-signed D Cameron Gaunce to a one-year, two-way contract. Traded G Connor Ingram to Nashville for a 2021 seventh-round draft pick. WASHINGTON CAPITALS: Acquired D Radko Gudas from Philadelphia to D Matt Niskanen.

Favorite

NFL Points Underdog Open Current September 5 BEARS............ 3.5 ..............3.5 .........Packers September 8 VIKINGS ......... 4.5 ..............4.5 ......... Falcons EAGLES .......... 8.....................8 ...Washington JETS ............... 3.5 ..............3.5 ...............Bills Ravens ........... 3.5 ..............3.5 .....DOLPHINS BUCS .............. 1.5 ..............1.5 ............ 49ers Chiefs............. 5.....................5 .......JAGUARS BROWNS ........ 5.....................5 ............Titans Rams.............. 2.5 ..............2.5 .... PANTHERS CARDS............ PK ................PK .............Lions SEAHAWKS..... 7.5 ..............7.5 .........Bengals CHARGERS ..... 3.5 ..............3.5 ..............Colts COWBOYS....... 7.5 ..............7.5 ........... Giants PATRIOTS ....... 6.....................6 ........ Steelers September 9 SAINTS........... 7.5 ..............7.5 ...........Texans RAIDERS ........ 2.5 ..............2.5 ........ Broncos Note: These are preliminary opening lines and could jump in either direction pending trades and injuries in the pre-season. Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein Favorite

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park entries Saturday post time: 7:30 p.m. Party at the park FIRST: 6F, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 A P Fireball Arrieta 5-2 2 Wave the Gold Lopez 20-1 3 Lookin’ At Mike Molina 8-5 4 News Alert Ortiz 9-5 5 Sweet Circle Thurman 8-1 6 Droop’s M D B Simpson 20-1 SECOND: 6F, F&M $4,000 NW2L CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Last Surprise Molina 7-5 2 Oklahoma Carol Ortiz 9-5 3 Lion’s Wager Simpson 6-1 4 Dixieland Punkin Lopez 5-1 5 Hoossensation Arrieta 10-1 6 Arkansas Traveler Retana 15-1 THIRD: 1MILE 70YDS, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Bob’s Brass Dancer Ortiz 5-1 2 I Will Be Diego 8-1 3 Sunny Kitten Thurman 8-1 4 Boychild Lopez 9-2 5 Red On Tap Molina 3-1 6 Cheadle Simpson 7-5 FOURTH: 6F, $10,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Cee R Bee Molina 9-2 2 Tap’s Big Shot Diego 5-1 3 Cousin Dario Thurman 5-2 4 Stallone Retana 3-1 5 Tudors Charge Simpson 2-1 FIFTH: 6F, F&M MSW PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Barbiello Simpson 8-1 2 Miss Gavel Molina 15-1 3 Ghaaleb Royale Arrieta 3-1 4 Cloudy Legs Bonilla 20-1 5 Bethasa Lopez 20-1 6 Song of the Forest Retana 12-1 7 Lexi Summer Thurman 9-2 8 Swifty Cause Ortiz 4-1 9 Halo Couture Diego 5-2 SIXTH: F&M $5,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 W W Put and Take Arrieta 5-2 2 Partay Simpson 4-1 3 Country Assets Retana 5-1 4 Tour On Ortiz 6-1 5 Boohoo Sue Molina 3-1 6 Lil Bit Tipsey Diego 9-2 SEVENTH: 6F, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Forafewdollarsmore Retana 6-1 2 Morninglover Rambo Diego 12-1 3 Cornfed Molina 3-1 4 Peteizum Lopez 6-1 5 Boyfriend Brian(IRE) Thurman 15-1 6 Electric Cat Ortiz 5-1 7 Blazer Simpson 7-5

Gaby Lopez 72-73—145 +1 Christina Kim 72-73—145 +1 Peiyun Chien 72-73—145 +1 Lee-Anne Pace 70-75—145 +1 Alison Lee 70-75—145 +1 Sophia Popov 75-71—146 +2 Luna Sobron 74-72—146 +2 Jaye Marie Green 73-73—146 +2 Cheyenne Woods 71-75—146 +2 Giulia Molinaro 70-76—146 +2 Hannah Green 70-76—146 +2 Joanna Klatten 69-77—146 +2 P.K. Kongkraphan 69-77—146 +2 Pernilla Lindberg 78-69—147 +3 Eun-Hee Ji 74-73—147 +3 Linnea Strom 74-73—147 +3 Tiffany Joh 73-74—147 +3 Jacqui Concolino 72-75—147 +3 Sandra Gal 72-75—147 +3 Jackie Stoelting 75-73—148 +4 Anne van Dam 74-74—148 +4 Suzuka Yamaguchi 75-74—149 +5 Laura Diaz 73-76—149 +5 Jimin Kang 73-76—149 +5 Cheyenne Knight 80-70—150 +6 a-Stephanie Lau 76-74—150 +6 Gabrielle Shipley 73-77—150 +6 Kim Kaufman 74-77—151 +7 Lindsey Weaver 72-79—151 +7 Wichanee Meechai 78-74—152 +8 Lori Beth Adams 72-80—152 +8 Laura Davies 77-78—155 +11 Haru Nomura 71—WD Leaderboard at time of suspended play Golfer Score Thru Brooke M. Henderson -16 F Brittany Altomare -13 F Jennifer Kupcho -10 F Annie Park -9 17 Megan Khang -8 F Moriya Jutanugarn -8 F Nasa Hataoka -8 F Angela Stanford -8 F Nine tied at -7

COLLEGE ALBANY (NY): Named Kaitlin Lewis director of operations for women’s basketball. ARIZONA: Signed women’s basketball coach Adia Barnes to a contract extension through 2024. BARUCH: Named Cristy Encarnacion women’s assistant volleyball coach. CHARLESTON SOUTHERN: Named Jordan Jeffers women’s golf coach. IDAHO: Fired men’s basketball coach Don Verlin. NEBRASKA: Named Will Bolt head baseball coach. NORTHERN ILLINOIS: Named Alexis Lawrence women’s assistant basketball coach.

GOLF Area holes in one

Florissant: Bill Gebel, hole No. 8, 158 yards, 11-wood, June 13. Forest Hills: Tyler Troutman, hole No. 12 (Championship), 175 yards, 6-iron.

LPGA Tour MEIJER CLASSIC Friday At Blythefield Country Club Grand Rapids, Mich. Purse: $2 million Yardage: 6,638; Par 72 Second Round a-denotes amateur Brooke M. Henderson 64-64—128 Brittany Altomare 66-65—131 Jennifer Kupcho 67-67—134 Megan Khang 70-66—136 Moriya Jutanugarn 69-67—136 Nasa Hataoka 68-68—136 Angela Stanford 68-68—136 Danielle Kang 69-68—137 So Yeon Ryu 69-68—137 Jin Young Ko 68-69—137 Pajaree Anannarukarn 68-69—137 Nelly Korda 68-69—137 Morgan Pressel 67-70—137 Madelene Sagstrom 67-70—137 Katherine Perry 66-71—137 Chella Choi 70-68—138 Lexi Thompson 70-68—138 Su Oh 69-69—138 Maria Torres 69-69—138 Xiyu Lin 68-70—138 Sung Hyun Park 68-70—138 Shanshan Feng 68-70—138 Lydia Ko 72-67—139 Clariss Guce 70-69—139 Mariah Stackhouse 70-69—139 Karen Chung 69-70—139 Celine Boutier 69-70—139 Sakura Yokomine 69-70—139 Lauren Stephenson 69-70—139 Alena Sharp 67-72—139 Kendall Dye 67-72—139 Jenny Shin 66-73—139 Nanna Koerstz Madsen 71-69—140 Minjee Lee 71-69—140 Inbee Park 70-70—140 In Gee Chun 70-70—140 Jeongeun Lee6 70-70—140 Mina Harigae 68-72—140 Hee Young Park 68-72—140 Jing Yan 73-68—141 Mi Hyang Lee 72-69—141 Gerina Piller 71-70—141 Kris Tamulis 71-70—141 Kristen Gillman 71-70—141 Cristie Kerr 70-71—141 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 69-72—141 Laura Gonzalez Escallon 68-73—141 Louise Ridderstrom 67-74—141 Jeong Eun Lee 67-74—141 Ashleigh Buhai 65-76—141 Azahara Munoz 72-70—142 Caroline Hedwall 72-70—142 Jenny Haglund 71-71—142 Jaclyn Lee 71-71—142 Marissa Steen 71-71—142 Elizabeth Szokol 71-71—142 Brianna Do 70-72—142 Lizette Salas 68-74—142 Lee Lopez 68-74—142 Jessica Korda 76-67—143 Dani Holmqvist 75-68—143 Laetitia Beck 73-70—143 Isi Gabsa 72-71—143 Pannarat Thanapolboonyaras 72-71—143 Muni He 71-72—143 Brittany Lang 71-72—143 Lindy Duncan 70-73—143 Mel Reid 70-73—143 Haeji Kang 69-74—143 Youngin Chun 68-75—143 Jennifer Song 68-75—143 Dottie Ardina 74-70—144 Ruixin Liu 73-71—144 Yu Liu 72-72—144 Stephanie Meadow 72-72—144 Wei-Ling Hsu 72-72—144 Sarah Kemp 71-73—144 Klara Spilkova 71-73—144 Dana Finkelstein 71-73—144 Mirim Lee 71-73—144 Na Yeon Choi 70-74—144 Celine Herbin 70-74—144 Jasmine Suwannapura 73-72—145

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

-16 -13 -10 -8 -8 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E +1

Saturday Chicago at Indiana, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Dallas, 7 p.m. New York at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Connecticut, 2:30 p.m. Las Vegas at Minnesota, 6 p.m.

PRO SOCCER MLS

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 9 4 4 31 31 20 Montreal 8 7 3 27 21 28 D.C. United 7 4 6 27 23 18 Atlanta 8 5 2 26 19 11 New York 7 6 3 24 27 19 New York City FC 5 1 8 23 23 17 Toronto FC 5 6 4 19 26 25 Orlando City 5 7 3 18 22 21 Chicago 4 6 6 18 24 23 Columbus 5 9 2 17 16 24 New England 4 8 4 16 17 33 Cincinnati 3 11 2 11 14 33 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 11 1 4 37 39 13 LA Galaxy 9 6 1 28 22 19 Seattle 7 4 5 26 26 21 Houston 7 3 3 24 21 14 FC Dallas 6 6 4 22 22 22 Minnesota United 6 7 3 21 23 25 Real Salt Lake 6 8 1 19 21 27 San Jose 5 6 4 19 23 27 Vancouver 4 6 6 18 17 20 Sporting Kansas City 3 5 7 16 26 27 Colorado 4 9 3 15 25 34 Portland 4 7 2 14 19 26 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturday, June 22 LA Galaxy at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 7 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. Colorado at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Houston at Portland, 10 p.m. Sunday, June 23 Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.

COLLEGE NCAA College World Series

BASEBALL

At TD Ameritrade Park Omaha Omaha, Neb. (Double Elimination; x-if necessary) Saturday, June 15 Game 1: Michigan (45-20) vs. Texas Tech (44-18), 1 p.m. Game 2: Florida State (41-21) vs. Arkansas (46-18), 6 p.m. Sunday, June 16 Game 3: Louisville (49-16) vs. Vanderbilt (54-11), 1 p.m. Game 4: Mississippi State (51-13) vs. Auburn (38-26), 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 17 Game 5: Game 1 loser vs. Game 2 loser, 1 p.m. Game 6: Game 1 winner vs. Game 2 winner, 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 18 Game 7: Game 3 loser vs. Game 4 loser, 1 p.m. Game 8: Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 winner, 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 19 Game 9: Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 20 Game 10: Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 loser, 7 p.m. Friday, June 21 Game 11: Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 1 p.m. Game 12: Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Saturday, June 22 x-Game 13: Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 1 p.m. x-Game 14: Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 6 p.m. Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, June 24: Pairings TBD, 6 p.m. Tuesday, June 25: Pairings TBD, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 26: Pairings TBD, 6 p.m.

Frontier League

East Schaumburg Lake Erie Windy City Joliet Washington West Florence Southern Illinois River City Evansville Gateway

W L Pct. 17 14 .548 16 14 .533 15 16 .484 11 20 .355 10 22 .313 W L Pct. 19 11 .633 18 12 .600 17 14 .548 17 14 .548 14 17 .452 Friday Lake Erie 5, Florence 4 Schaumburg 6, Evansville 3 Washington 12, Joliet 0 Southern Illinois 5, River City 4 Windy City 10, Gateway 2 Saturday Lake Erie at Florence, 5:05 p.m. Washington at Joliet, 6:05 p.m. River City at Southern Illinois, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg at Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Windy City at Gateway, 7:05 p.m. Sunday Washington at Joliet, 1:05 p.m. Lake Erie at Florence, 4:35 p.m. Schaumburg at Evansville, 5:05 p.m. River City at Southern Illinois, 5:05 p.m. Windy City at Gateway, 6:05 p.m.

BOXING Fight Schedule

June 15 At Arena Riga, Riga, Latvia, Mairis Briedis vs. Krzysztof Glowacki, 12, for Briedis’ WBC Diamond and Glowacki’s WBO cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Yunier Dorticos vs. Andrew Tabiti, 12, cruiserweights (World Boxing Super Series semifinals). At Kiev, Ukraine, Artem Dalakian vs. Sarawut Thawornkham, 12, for Dalakian’s WBA flyweight title. At First Direct Arena, Leeds, England, Josh Warrington vs. Kid Galahad, 12, for Warrington’s IBF featherweight title; Jason Welborn vs. JJ Metcalf, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super welterweight title; Zelfa Barrett vs. Lyon Woodstock, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super featherweight title; Andrzej Soldra vs. Lyndon Arthur, 10, light heavyweights; Edwin Palacios vs. Troy Williamson, 10, middleweights. At MGM Grand, Las Vegas, Tyson Fury vs. Tom Schwarz, 12, heavyweights; Sullivan Barrera vs. Jesse Hart, 10, light heavyweights; Andy Vences vs. Albert Bell, 10, junior lightweights. June 19 At Chiba City, Japan, Kazuto Ioka vs. Aston Palicte, 12, for the vacant WBO World super flyweight title; Hiroto Kyoguchi vs. Tanawat Nakoon, 12, for Kyoguchi’s WBA Super World light flyweight title.

BASKETBALL WNBA EASTERN Connecticut Chicago Indiana Washington New York Atlanta WESTERN Los Angeles Seattle Minnesota Las Vegas Phoenix Dallas

W L Pct 7 1 .875 3 2 .600 4 3 .571 4 3 .571 2 5 .286 1 4 .200 W L Pct 4 2 .667 5 3 .625 4 4 .500 3 3 .500 2 4 .333 0 5 .000 Friday’s Games Seattle 74, Washington 71 Connecticut 85, Minnesota 81 Los Angeles 85, Phoenix 68 Las Vegas 100, New York 65

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

GB — 2½ 2½ 2½ 4½ 4½ GB — — 1 1 2 3½

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

TODAY

TONIGHT

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Showers and thunderstorms WIND SW 10-15 mph

Clouds, a strong t-storm WIND SW 5-10 mph

Showers and storms WIND W 10-15 mph

Chance rain and storms WIND NW 5-10 mph

Spotty showers

Cloudy with a t-storm WIND ENE 6-12 mph

82°

72°

GB — ½ 2 6 7½ GB — 1 2½ 2½ 5½

June 21 At Ulster Hall, Belfast, Northern Ireland, Tyrone McKenna vs. Darragh Foley, 12, for the vacant WBC International super lightweight title. At WinnaVegas Casino & Resort, Sloan, Iowa (SHO), Sebastian Fundora vs. Hector Zepeda, 10, super welterweights; Rene Tellez Giron vs. Michel Rivera, 10, lightweights. At Indio, Calif., Andrew Cancio vs. Alberto Machado, 12, for Cancio’s WBA junior lightweight title; Angel Acosta vs. Elwin Soto, 12, for Acosta’s WBO junior flyweight title; Genaro Gamez vs. Ezequiel Aviles, 10, junior welterweights. June 22 At Wolstein Center, Cleveland (CBSSN), Dewayne Beamon vs. Froilan Saludar, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super flyweight title; Cody Crowley vs. Navid Mansouri, 12, for the vacant WBC United States (USNBC) super welterweight title. June 23 At Mandalay Bay Resorts & Casino, Las Vegas (FOX), Jermell Charlo, vs. Jorge Cota, 12, for junior middleweights; Guillermo Rigondeaux vs. Julio Ceja, 12, super bantamweights. At Temecula, Calif. (ESPN), Richard Commey vs. Ray Beltran, 12, for Commey’s IBF lightweight title. June 28 At Pechanga Resort & Casino, Temecula, Calif., Richard Commey vs. Raymundo Beltran, 12, for Commey’s IBF World lightweight title; Carlos Adames vs. Patrick Day, 10, junior middleweights; Saul Rodriguez vs. Miguel Angel Gonzalez, 10, junior lightweights; Junior Fa vs. Dominic Guinn, 10, heavyweights. June 29 At Providence, R.I., Demetrius Andrade vs. Maciej Sulecki, 12, for Andrade’s WBO middleweigtht title; Khalid Yafai vs. Norbelto Jimenez, 12,for Yafai’s WBA World super flyweight title. At NRG Arena, Houston (SHO), Jarmall Charlo vs. Brandon Adams, 12, for Charlo’s WBC interim middleweight title; Jean Pascal vs. Marcus Browne, 12, for the interim WBA World light heavyweight title; Erickson Lubin vs. Zakaria Attou, 12, super welterweights; Eduardo Ramirez vs. Claudio Marrero, 10, featherweights; Miguel Flores vs. Luis May, 10, super featherweights. July 6 At Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan, Nordine Oubaali vs. Arthur Villanueva, 12, for Oubaali’s WBC bantamweight title. July 12 At Edion Arena, Osaka, Japan, Robert Brant vs. Ryoya Murata, 12, for Brant’s WBA World middleweight title. At Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, Hollywood, Fla., Derrieck Cuevas vs. Jesus Alberto Beltran, 10 for Cuevas’ WBA Fedelatin welterweight title. At Emerald Queen Casino, Tacoma, Wash., Jermaine Franklin vs. Jerry Forrest, 12, heavyweights; BJ Flores vs. Otto Wallin, 12, heavyweights; Giovanni Mioletti vs. Luis Porozo, 10, featherweights. July 13 At Prudential Center in Newark, N.J., Hairon Socarras vs. Shakur Stevenson, 10, featherweights; Joshua Greer Jr. vs. Nikolai Potapov, 10, bantamweights. At Dignity Health Sports Park, Carson, Calif., Rey Vargas vs. Tomoki Kameda, 12, for Vargas’ WBC junior featherweight title; Diego De La Hoya vs. Ronny Rios, 12, for the interim WBA World featherweight title; Joet Gonzalez vs. Manuel Avila, 10, featherweights; Alexis Rocha vs. Berlin Abreu, 10, welterweights. July 19 At MGM National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md., Masayoshi Nakatani vs. Teofimo Lopez, 12, lightweights; Maxim Dadashev vs. Subriel Matias, 12, super lightweights; Jason Sosa vs. Erick De Leon, 10, junior lightweights. July 20 At MGM Grand Garden Arena, Las Vegas (PPV), Keith Thurman vs. Manny Pacquiao, 12, for Thurman’s WBA welterweight title; Yordenis Ugas vs. Omar Figueroa Jr., 12, WBC welterweight eliminator; Sergey Lipinets vs. John Molina Jr., 12, welterweights; Caleb Plant vs. Mike Lee, 12, for Plant’s IBF super middleweight title. July 27 At Royal Farms Arena, Baltimore (SHO), Gervonta Davis vs. Ricardo Núñez, 12, for Davis’ WBA super featherweight title. At College Park Center, Arlington, Texas, Maurice Hooker vs. Jose Ramirez, 12, for Hooker’s WBO and Ramirez’s WBC junior welterweight titles; Murat Gasiev vs. Joey Dawejko, 10, heavyweights. Aug. 3 At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (FOX), Andre Berto vs. Miguel Cruz,12, welterweights. Aug. 24 At Nagoya, Japan, Kosei Tanaka vs. Jonathan Gonzalez, 12, for Tanaka’s WBO flyweight title. Aug. 31 At Minneapolis (FOX), Erislandy Lara vs. Ramon Alvarez, 12, junior middleweights; Caleb Truax vs. Peter Quilin, 12, super middleweights.

Warmer air will filter across the Northeast ahead of showers and thunderstorms rumbling across most of the Midwest and a part of the High Plains today. Some thunderstorms across Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and back to southeastern Colorado and the Texas Panhandle will become severe. Warmth will span the Northwest, away from the immediate coast. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND N 5-10 mph

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 77/67 77/66 Bloomington Urbana 75/67 76/67

Kirksville 80/66

Quincy 80/69

Decatur 78/69

Springfield 57 78/68 Effingham 70 55 79/69

35

Columbia 70 84/70 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 82/72 City 83/70 55 84/71 Union 84/70 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 83/69 84/71 Farmington 83/69 Cape Girardeau 87/72 Springfield 85/71 West Plains Poplar Bluff 86/71 55 84/69

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

30.14 -0.93 30.65 -0.42 31.23 -0.11 27.39 +0.14 33.83 -0.21

16 24.10 -0.63 15 23.26 -0.49 25 33.70 -0.50 26 36.44 -0.35 18 33.05 -0.52 419 432.77 -0.53 21 36.81 -0.57 30 44.07 -0.54 27 45.72 -0.18 32 45.99 -0.12 20 18 14

20.90 -0.60 21.10 -0.48 24.80 -0.54

15 16 24

3.08 -0.05 22.21 -0.57 40.64 -0.55

15

1.84 -0.06

40

48.66 360.70 366.95 500.92 659.17 737.65 684.70 917.04 864.43 602.46 409.51 621.21 447.92

-0.07 +0.37 -0.69 -2.13 +0.05 -0.08 -0.03 -0.08 -0.03 -0.18 -0.12 -0.60 -0.18

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

Average High

Average Low

San Francisco 68/56

Statistics through 5 p.m. Friday Temperature High/low 77°/55° Normal high/low 85°/67° Last year high/low 91°/67° Record high 97° (1987) Record low 48° (1942) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Fri. 0.01” Month to date (normal) 1.97” (2.12”) Year to date (normal) 28.34” (18.49”) Record for this date 3.95” (1957)

87 80

79

83 70

60

69

70

65

74

77

82 72

59

58

57

55

T

W

T

F

83

82

80

82

83

68

65

66

68

68

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Low - 37 Low - 12 Absent - 0 Moderate - 12206 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Friday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

1 113 126 325 298

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

67° 8 a.m.

79° noon

84° 4 p.m.

78° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

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8

9

10

11+

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S

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F

New York 82/68

Detroit 70/60

Washington 85/69

Kansas City 86/67

Los Angeles 74/60

Atlanta 85/71 El Paso 96/68 Houston 92/79 Chihuahua 96/67

Cold front

Warm front

Miami 87/78

Monterrey 97/71

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

82/63/s 88/61/pc 63/52/c 85/71/pc 97/75/pc 86/68/pc 88/70/pc 86/59/s 80/63/s 85/69/s 83/65/pc 84/65/s 70/59/t 76/69/t 73/63/t 91/77/pc 87/73/pc 73/53/t 84/65/t 85/75/pc 70/60/t 83/64/s 88/76/pc 92/79/pc 73/68/t 86/67/t 103/83/s 91/74/pc

77/62/sh 87/65/pc 65/53/pc 89/72/pc 95/74/c 87/69/pc 89/70/pc 88/60/pc 74/64/c 88/72/pc 85/67/t 90/71/pc 73/56/c 83/69/t 75/65/sh 89/72/t 86/73/t 77/52/t 81/59/pc 85/75/pc 73/61/sh 77/65/t 88/75/pc 91/76/t 82/68/t 83/63/c 101/78/pc 87/69/t

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

74/60/pc 82/73/c 90/76/pc 87/78/t 69/53/t 71/56/t 92/69/pc 89/72/pc 90/75/pc 82/68/s 89/70/pc 87/67/t 88/73/t 83/67/s 104/79/s 76/64/pc 77/61/s 81/56/pc 84/55/s 85/61/pc 95/75/pc 69/62/pc 68/56/pc 77/57/pc 91/74/t 100/71/s 85/69/pc 90/69/pc

74/60/pc 84/73/t 89/71/t 86/80/t 63/51/c 68/53/pc 91/71/pc 90/73/pc 92/76/pc 81/70/pc 86/66/t 83/61/pc 87/73/t 84/70/pc 105/79/s 76/66/t 71/56/c 81/57/pc 89/59/s 84/61/pc 93/74/pc 69/63/pc 71/57/s 77/58/pc 86/75/t 102/71/s 87/72/pc 84/66/t

National Extremes

Today’s Air Quality

High: 107 Needles, Calif.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

5:36 a.m. 6:56 p.m.

8:28 p.m. 4:28 a.m.

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Jun 17

Jun 25

Jul 2

Jul 9

Friday in the 48 contiguous states Low: 29 Embarrass, Minn.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

40

Chicago 70/59

Denver 73/53

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

89

69

Toronto 67/53

Minneapolis 71/56

Pollen Yesterday

100

79

Montreal 72/54

Billings 79/57

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Scattered showers and storms will occur this morning. Then a break will arrive before more thunderstorms develop in the late afternoon and evening. Another round of storms will form around daybreak Sunday.

Joplin 85/70

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

83° 68° 82° 65° 80° 66° 82° 68°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 86/67

Winnipeg 69/50

Seattle 77/57

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

67/54/t 92/73/s 115/83/s 92/79/t 90/65/pc 89/60/t 57/51/r 95/73/s 88/79/t 59/46/r 88/78/c 81/64/s 65/36/s 64/51/pc 80/54/s 108/83/s

68/54/c 92/71/pc 117/80/s 93/78/t 74/61/r 77/60/pc 61/57/r 94/73/s 88/79/t 60/49/r 87/82/r 83/66/s 67/37/s 67/54/sh 88/56/pc 111/85/s

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

76/57/t 72/54/r 68/55/sh 87/78/pc 71/55/pc 113/83/pc 70/53/t 84/70/s 80/63/pc 88/76/pc 56/31/pc 80/62/pc 65/54/pc 70/66/r 67/53/t 71/53/pc

79/59/t 73/55/pc 72/55/pc 88/78/pc 72/56/r 100/83/t 71/54/pc 83/69/s 82/62/s 88/79/pc 56/32/s 81/61/pc 61/53/sh 81/66/s 70/55/pc 72/54/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

ALL-METRO GIRLS SOCCER FIRST TEAM

CO-PLAYERS OF THE YEAR | JESS LARSON AND GRACE BINDBEUTEL, ST. DOMINIC

GOALKEEPER OF THE YEAR • Rylee Iorio, senior, Columbia Posted a record of 27-2-1, which included 20 shutouts, to help the Eagles soar to the Class 1A state championship. Iorio did not allow a goal during the postseason and didn’t give one up after April 15 for a .31 goals against average. GK • KATIE NASH, sophomore, Summit Nash made 81 saves and posted 14 shutouts in helping the Falcons take second place in Class 3. She only gave up 12 goals for a .57 goals allowed average and .87 save percentage. DEF • SYDNEY BEACH, senior, Triad A St. Louis University commit, Beach was the backbone of a tough Triad defense that only allowed 17 goals all season. Beach even chipped in on offense, adding two goals and two assists for the Knights, who were third in Class 2A. DEF • EMMA CHRISTANELL, senior, Nerinx Hall A SLU signee, Christanell was a mainstay in the back for the Class 4 runner-up Markers. The senior helped a Nerinx Hall squad that only allowed .96 goals per game and added three goals and an assist. DEF • EMMA MUELLER, sophomore, St. Joseph’s A steady force on the back line, Mueller helped the Angels hold their opponents to .33 goals a game. The sophomore also aided the offense by adding an assist for St. Joseph’s, which only allowed seven goals all year. MID • HALEY GLOVER, junior, Columbia On a team full of offensive talent, Glover led the way with 26 goals and 13 assists. The junior had five game-winning goals this season and added tallies in the state semifinal and Class 1A championship. MID • LYNDSEY HECKEL, junior, Nerinx Hall Heckel proved to be as versatile as she was dangerous in helping the Markers to second place in Class 4 this season. Her 17 goals and 17 assists were both team highs. She added four gamewinning goals for Nerinx Hall, including one during its postseason run. MID • ANNA WALSH, senior, Summit Walsh, who has signed to play at St. Louis University, was an integral part of the Falcons’ run to second place in Class 3 this season. Walsh scored nine goals, which included four gamewinning goals, to go along with 15 assists. F • GRACE BINDBEUTEL, freshman, St. Dominic Bindbeutel led the Crusaders in scoring with 29 goals this season as St. Dominic won the Class 3 state championship. The co-player of the year added five game-winners and 15 assists in her first high school season. F • EMILY GAEBE, sophomore, Union The area scoring champion for the second successive season, Gaebe scored 51 goals and tallied 18 assists to help the Wildcats take fourth place in state for the second year in a row. F • JESS LARSON, freshman, St. Dominic When it came to big-time goals for the Class 3 state champions, Larson, the Post-Dispatch coplayer of the year led the way. She scored 28 goals, including 12 game-winners, and scored in three of the Crusader’s six postseason games. F • OLIVIA LLAYTON, senior, Incarnate Word Layton, who will play soccer at Colorado State this fall, led the Red Knights in goals by a wide margin with 27. The senior had seven multi-goal games and led Incarnate with seven gamewinners and 10 assists. F • LILY SCHNIEDERS, senior, Summit Schnieders proved to be the quintessential finisher for Summit, which marched to second place in Class 3. The senior, who has signed to play at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, tallied 20 goals — four of which were game-winners — and added six assists. F • JAIMIE TOTTLEBEN, senior, Visitation Tottleben, an Indiana University signee, rose to the occasion for the injury-plagued Vivettes, scoring 20 goals, including five game-winners, and six assists.

GORDON RADFORD, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

High-scoring freshmen Jess Larson (left) and Grace Bindbeutel helped lead the St. Dominic girls soccer team to its first state championship in six seasons. They are the Post-Dispatch All-Metro girls soccer co-players of the year.

CHAMPIONSHIP BOND FINAL RANKINGS

High-scoring freshmen help Crusaders to first title in six years

LARGE SCHOOLS Team rank Nerinx Hall (19-4-2) 1 Triad (20-4-2) 2 St. Joseph’s (18-3) 3 Parkway West (17-2) 4 BY JIM FAASEN Lafayette (15-3) 5 STLhighschoolsports.com Francis Howell Central (15-10-1) 6 Jess Larson and Grace Bind- Pattonville (16-7-1) 7 beutel have been nearly insep- Holt (16-6-2) 8 arable from the time they first Timberland (17-5) 9 started playing soccer. Edwardsville (15-9) 10 The St. Dominic freshmen have known each other since same thing I am and Grace is,” they were in grade school Larson said. “It’s great just to at Immaculate Conception have someone to talk to and we School of Dardenne Prairie and can share our thoughts about have stayed close ever since — everything.” on and off the soccer pitch. On the pitch, that bond “We’re always hanging out, helped propel St. Dominic we’re always together,” Larson (26-3-1) to the Class 3 state said. “We’ve gone to school championship. It was the protogether since preschool. gram’s fifth state title but first Our parents have known each since 2013. Bindbeutel and Larson, the other for a while so we’ve always been really close. It’s re- Post-Dispatch All-Metro girls ally nice because we share a lot soccer co-players of the year, of the same passions in a lot of found comfort in one another different areas of our lives. We all season, knowing where the both know we have someone other was going to be on the we can talk to about anything.” field just about all of the time. Bindbeutel led the CrusadThat cohesion has formed a lasting bond, and it’s not just ers with 29 goals and 15 asabout soccer. sists while Larson was right Their similar passions in- on her heels with 28 goals and clude a love of math and sci- 15 assists. Bindbeutel broke ence classes, such as biology, the school record for goals in to animated television shows, a season and Larson tied the movies and pop and country previous record of 28, set by songs. Mackenzie Rief in 2014. “It’s real cool, because even “I think it was real cool though I’m close to my par- that we were able to accoments, I can’t talk to them about plish this much as freshmen,” some things because they Bindbeutel said. “I know we aren’t going through the exact have three years left ahead of

Small schools Team Columbia (27-2-1) St. Dominic (26-3-1) Summit (19-4-3) Visitation (18-5) Union (26-3-1) Incarnate Word (18-6-3) Althoff (21-5-1) Notre Dame (18-6-1) Duchesne (13-8) St. Charles West (17-9)

rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

us and that we can do so much more together. It’s so special to (succeed) because it shows we both worked so hard this season.” Larson edged Bindbeutel with 12 game-winning goals while her closest friend had five. Even though the duo accounted for 17 of St. Dominic’s 26 most important tallies, Bindbeutel said a cohesive team effort helped the Crusaders raise the trophy. “If we didn’t have each person on this team playing to their full potential and doing their part to help the team, we wouldn’t be where we are,” Bindbeutel said. “Jess and I certainly wouldn’t (have amassed the statistical success) and the team wouldn’t have won as many games as it did or achieved what it did.” As two of the younger players on the roster, Larson and Bindbeutel said they felt welcomed by St. Dominic’s veteran players, who helped them find their way quickly. “The girls were great,

they let us know what the high school season was going to be like before we ever played a game because I had no clue,” Larson said. “We’d get texts and messages before our first game from the older girls telling us what and who to look out for and it was so great. They made us feel right at home. They made us feel like a part of the team.” They were also a welcomed addition for St. Dominic coach Greg Koeller. “When you boil it down to its core, it’s all about scoring goals,” Koeller said. “Any coach likes a goal-laden scoring partnership and Jess and Grace are a pleasure to have on our side. Based off a longtime off-field friendship, these two have built an on-field partnership few can match. They’ve already created their folklore at St. Dominic. As long as they can remain healthy, they will continue to be prolific.” For Larson, the idea of being prolific isn’t something she’s too worried about right now. She’s focused on growing her game one step at a time with Bindbeutel by her side. “It’s almost relaxing and there is this sense of calm when we’re on the field together because I know that she’ll be where I need her to be. It’s great knowing there will be three more years of that. We know that if we continue to work hard, there is so much we can accomplish.”

THIRD TEAM

SECOND TEAM GOALKEEPER • HANNA OLIVE, junior, Union

GOALKEEPER • ERIKA ANSTINE, senior, Parkway West

DEFENDER • KALEIGH KASTBERG, senior, Parkway West

DEFENDER • HAILEE FRITSCHE, junior, Visitation

DEFENDER • TAYLOR MCCARTHY, senior, Duchesne

DEFENDER • MARIAH JOHNSON, senior, Howell Central

MIDFIELDER • FAE HARRELL, senior, Columbia

DEFENDER • PAIGE KINZINGER, junior, Waterloo

MIDFIELDER • JENNA MATHIS, senior, Howell Central

MIDFIELDER • KAELI BENEDICT, sophomore, Pattonville

MIDFIELDER • JULIA O’NEILL, sophomore, Althoff

MIDFIELDER • HAILEY CLOUD, junior, Union

MIDFIELDER • JESS PREUSSER, junior, Nerinx Hall

MIDFIELDER • ALLI FREDERKING, senior, Incarnate Word

MIDFIELDER • MADDY STEWART, senior, St. Dominic

MIDFIELDER • KAITLYN NICHOLS, sophomore, Zumwalt West

FORWARD • RYLEE HOWARD, freshman, Lafayette

MIDFIELDER • KAT VAN BOOVEN, junior, Timberland

FORWARD • LEXI LANZAFAME, senior, Notre Dame

FORWARD • CHLOE NETZEL, sophomore, Liberty

FORWARD • AUBREY MISTER, sophomore, O’Fallon

FORWARD • FAITH RACKERS, junior, Mater Dei

SPRING ALL-CONFERENCE SELECTIONS BOYS VOLLEYBALL ARCHDIOCESAN ATHLETICS ASSOCIATION Player of the year: OH Andrew Albes, sr., St. Mary’s Newcomer of the year: Nathanial Rickman, N/A, Borgia Coach of the year: Maggie Allen, St. Dominic First team OH/MH Eli Goedeker, jr., DuBourg S Eric Jankowski, jr., Borgia MB Kyle Merzweiler, jr., St. Mary’s L Adam Meyer, jr., DuBourg S Kyle Pajada, sr., St. Dominic OH Jeremy Sutterer, sr., St. Dominic Second team RS Mason Clynes, sr., St. Dominic S Mason Levitt, jr., DuBourg MB Jake Lyons, sr., St. Dominic OH Jacob Meisner, sr., Borgia MB Donavan Parker, sr., St. Mary’s OH Billy Winterbauer, sr., DuBourg GIRLS SOCCER GATEWAY ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — CENTRAL DIVISION Player of the year: F Chloe Netzel, so., Liberty First team F Belle Govero, sr., Fort Zumwalt North F Ava Tankersley, jr., Fort Zumwalt South F Kat van Booven, jr., Timberland M Mia Corrigan, sr., Timberland M Sophia Cross, so., Fort Zumwalt South M Kayley Judy, so., Fort Zumwalt North M Beth Roberts, sr., Liberty D Taylor Bauer, sr., Washington D Amaya Honore, jr., Timberland D Hannah Warnecke, sr., Fort Zumwalt South G Abby Tucker, sr., Timberland Second team F Sydney Baker, sr., Timberland F Kylie Cushing, sr., Fort Zumwalt South M Sarah Becszlko, jr., Washington M Jessie Donnelly, so., Washington M Genevieve Johnson, jr., Liberty M Jocelyn Layton, jr., Fort Zumwalt East M Jena Monehan, sr., Washington M Katie Spotanski, jr., Fort Zumwalt South D Maddy Baum, so., Fort Zumwalt South D Abby Cozzoni, sr., Timberland D Paige Eikel, jr., Liberty D Emily Piel, so., Fort Zumwalt North

— NORTH DIVISION Player of the year: M Kaitlyn Weinrich, jr., St. Charles West First team F Abbie Gilblair, sr., St. Charles West F Meagan Papin, jr., St. Charles West F Bella Roberts, fr., Warrenton F Maggie Skeen, sr., St. Charles M Emma Booker, sr., St. Charles M Kayla Hedges, jr., Orchard Farm M Brooke Schneider, sr., St. Charles D Vanessa Braune, jr., Orchard Farm D Alyssa Pavlacic, sr., St. Charles West D Courtney Schreiber, sr., St. Charles West G Courtney Bayer, jr., Warrenton Second team F Grace Fortuna, so., Orchard Farm F Maddie Lombardo, so., Warrenton F Emma Long, fr., Orchard Farm F Kayla Van Booven, sr., St. Charles West M Lily Dahl, jr., Orchard Farm M Kiley Finnegan, fr., St. Charles M Lexi Frederick, jr., Warrenton D Cassidy Head, fr., St. Charles D Olivia Lewis, fr., St. Charles D Emily Senter, so., Orchard Farm D Sally Werth, fr., St. Charles G Savannah Gilblair, sr., St. Charles West — SOUTH DIVISION Player of the year: M Kaitlyn Nichols, so., Fort Zumwalt West First team F Sydney Balducci, sr., Holt M Natalie Jackson, sr., Francis Howell M Mackenzie Jones, jr., Howell Central M Abbie Miller, sr., Howell North M Kennedy Thompson, sr., Troy D Maddie Crawford, sr., Fort Zumwalt West D Mariah Johnson, sr., Howell Central D Ashlyn Nichols, so., Fort Zumwalt West D Karen Pete, sr., Howell North D Madison Zurmuehlen, jr., Holt G Sara Sanabria, so., Holt Second team F Olivia Bunton, jr., Francis Howell F Ashlyne Hunt, jr., Fort Zumwalt West M Katie Hilke, so., Fort Zumwalt West M Julia Kristensen, so., Howell North M Jenna Mathis, sr., Howell Central M Jewel Morelan, sr., Holt M Lexi Porchia, sr., Francis Howell M Brynna Rutherford, so., Howell North

M Jay Viola, jr., Howell Central D Kelsey Kehoe, so., Francis Howell D Molly Krispin, sr., Howell Central D Gen McIntyre, so., Fort Zumwalt West D Rianna Wenzel, sr., Troy G Camielle Day, jr., Fort Zumwalt West JEFFERSON COUNTY ATHLETICS ASSOCIATION Player of the year: Leah Buerck, so., Perryville Coach of the year: Jerry Fulton, Perryville First team AJ Agers, so., St. Pius X Maddie Gillick, so., Windsor Raechel Hamilton, sr., Hillsboro Kirstin Jannin, sr., Perryville Sara Kapp, sr., St. Vincent Emma King, jr., Perryville Jordan Kolinski, so., Windsor Amy Reiser, jr., De Soto Abby Schacht, sr., Hillsboro Kalli Seabaugh, sr., St. Vincent Claire Werner, sr., Festus G Jordyn Spreck, sr., St. Pius X Second team Chloe Bergman, sr., Perryville Mollie Dulle, sr., Hillsboro Colleen Flanagan, fr., St. Pius X Genna Lipe, so., St. Vincent Sam Sabatino, sr., Windsor Anna Schwartz, fr., St. Vincent Breanna Sebaugh, sr., Hillsboro Sydney Spears, sr., Perryville Keri Voegtle, sr., Windsor Lillie Williams, fr., Festus G Adrienne Weibrecht 10 Perryville Honorable mention Molly Flanagan, jr., St. Pius X; Lauren Kuehn, sr., Hillsboro; Jaylen Strattman, jr., Perryville; MacKenzie Baker, so., Hillsboro; Camryn Baer, sr., Perryville; Cristina Miret, sr., De Soto; Megan Hennemann, sr., St. Vincent CAHOKIA CONFERENCE First team Sophia Bonaldi, sr., Columbia Tori Calvert, fr., Wesclin Allyson Fehrmann, sr., Breese Central Elena Fridley, jr., Wesclin Peyton Ganz, jr., Freeburg Haley Glover, jr., Columbia Chloe Graff, sr., Columbia Fae Harrell, sr., Columbia

Rylee Iorio, sr., Columbia Jenna Jackson, sr., Columbia Kennedy Jones, sr., Columbia Haley Kimes, jr., Freeburg Reagan Mauch, jr., Columba Abigail Norbury, jr., Wesclin Galena Stewart, jr., Wesclin Molly Twenhoefel, sr., Freeburg METRO WOMEN’S ATHLETICS ASSOCIATION First team F Maria Haro, sr., St. Joseph’s F Lyndsey Heckel, jr., Nerinx Hall F Hanna Jones, jr., Incarnate Word F Olivia Layton, sr., Incarnate Word F Megan Schimpf, jr., Ursuline F Jaimie Tottleben, sr., Visitation M Kierra Dunne, so., Ursuline M Allie Frederking, sr., Incarnate Word M Karsen Kohl, sr., St. Joseph’s M Jess Preusser, jr., Nerinx Hall M Katie Rodrigues, jr., Villa Duchesne M Kate Schoen, sr., Cor Jesu M Becca Zaber, jr., Visitation D Emma Christanell, sr., Nerinx Hall D Hailee Fritsche, jr., Visitation D Sarah Hogenkamp, sr., St. Joseph’s D Marissa Lesko, sr., Cor Jesu D Faith Montandon, jr., Incarnate Word D Lindsay Origliasso, sr., St. Joseph’s G Emily Puricelli, so., St. Joseph’s Second team F Kiley Duchardt, fr., St. Joseph’s M Maddy Allgeyer, sr., Nerinx Hall M Ally Bowers, so., Villa Duchesne M Sydney Ernst, sr., St. Joseph’s M Kate Higgins, jr., Ursuline M Jacqueline Nieters, so., Cor Jesu M Izzy Patterson, so., Incarnate Word M Sophia Schlattmann, jr., Villa Duchesne M Greta Seal, sr., St. Joseph’s M Sydney Wilson, sr., Cor Jesu D Kaitlyn Berger, so., Visitation D Mackenzie Duff, so., Nerinx Hall D Libby Eichhorn, jr., Cor Jesu D Ally Fishering, fr., Incarnate Word D Emma Mueller, so., St. Joseph’s D Carli Schieferle, sr., Incarnate Word D Maddie Schweiss, sr., Ursuline G Liz Kelly, jr., Nerinx Hall G Emma St John, sr., Villa Duchesne


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B11

CLASSIFIED Acura

BMW

Infiniti

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Audi

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'19 Infiniti Q50 3.0t LUXE, sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 16k mi., #P9984 $28,350

Mercedes Benz

GMC Trucks

'17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $34,000 #P9651

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Porsche

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Dogs

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now !

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Buick '17 Audi Q7 Prestige, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9934 $47,000

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Subaru

'18 Buick Enclave Avenir, SUV, 6 cyl., awd, auto, metallic, 31k mi., #41230A $38,350 '15 Infiniti QX80 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 97k mi., #98388A $30,000

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, #27848L $41,000

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'16 Audi S6 Prestige, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P1122 $46,963

'16 Audi S6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 32k mi., #29179A $46,000

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'18 Audi Q5 Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 9k, #27847L $41,000

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'18 Audi A5 sportback premium plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 7k mi., #27849L $41,000

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, 7K Miles, quattro, awd, clean carfax, #28209L $32,899

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T Prem Plus, quattro, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 39k mi., #P9933 $29,000

2018 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9619 $46,899

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27845L $41,000

'17 Audi Q7 Prestige, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 15k mi., #29168A $49,880

'18 Audi A6, Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, grey, #28600L $40,899

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $38,899 #28140L

'17 Audi A8 L Sport, quattro LWB Sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9999 $49,752

'17 Buick Enclave, leather, stk# 190319A $27,750 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Buick Cascada Convertible, stk# 190515A $23,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Chevrolet '15 Chevy Sonic Hatch LT, auto, stk# 190415A $13,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '05 Chevy Aveo, SV, only 51k mi., clean carfax, #44591A $3,990

'03 Chevy Corvette, loaded, very clean, clean carfax, #44452B $16,952

'15 Chevy Cruze LT, auto, loaded, clean carfax, #44369 $10,750

'11 Chevy Cruze Eco, loaded, only 60k mi., #37265A $8,750

'14 Chevy Impala LTZ 2LZ, loaded, full power, clean carfax, #44523A $17,969

'11 Chevy Impala LS, black, loaded, clean carfax, #44576B $7,450

'09 Chevy Malibu LTZ, black, loaded, #42328A $7,650

'15 Audi S4 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 50k mi., #P9687 $28,899

'13 Malibu, loaded, clean carfax, very clean, #44673A $10,990

BMW

'18 Jaguar XF 35t R-Sport, 9k mi., sedan, auto, awd, #P9821 $43,899

'18 Jeep Renegade Latitude FWD, stk# P07266 $17,250 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 30k, #P9926 $27,000

'18 Jeep Wrangler JK Unlimited Rubicon 4x4, #P4361 $35,875 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Jeep Wrangler Unlmtd Rubicon, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 50k, #97397M $31,899

'14 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4WD, stk# 181219A $23,487 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Kia Optima, stk# P07250A $9,850 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Kia Soul Plus, H/B, loaded, clean carfax, #37184A $11,250

'13 Lincoln MKZ Base, #L16281 $16,844 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $16,990 #44323A

'18 Ford Ecosport Titanium FWD, stk# P07049 $18,424 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Ford Focus SE, stk# P07231 $12,450 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'18 Hyundai Elantra SEL, stk# P07221 $13,743 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '18 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, stk# P07186 $17,941 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Infiniti Q50, 3.0t Premium, Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 12k mi., #96195L $28,899

'17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $61,899 #95548L

'15 BMW M3 4dr sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, manual, white, 29k mi., #P9684 $39,899

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'15 GMC Yukon SLT, suv, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 122k mi., #97246M $28,000

Volkswagen Toyota Trucks '18 Toyota 4Runner, loaded, clean carfax, only 22k mi., #44131A $35,590

'17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $37,899, #P9626

Corvette

Ford

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $61,000

2016 Lexus GS 350 4 door, 34k miles, clean carfax #P9588 $31,899

'18 Lexus LC 500h coupe, 6 cyl., RWD, silver, 10k mi., #P9941 $73,000

'17 Dodge Journey GT AWD, #P07271 $20,750 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Dodge Journey, stk# P07271 $20,750 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 GMC Yukon XL Denali, white, auto, 4wd, 19k mi., #79897A $54,899

Crossovers

'16 Chrysler 300S, stk# P07264 $23,525 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '19 Chrysler 300, stk# P07210 $26,970 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $28,899

'18 Toyota Camry SE, loaded, clean carfax, full power, #42629B $20,990

Lincoln

Mazda '12 Mazda 5 Grand Touring (A5) #L16311 $8,550 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '18 GMC Acadia Denali, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 21k mi., #97319A $35,000

'10 Mazda 3 Sport, loaded, clean carfax, #35606A $7,990

'14 Mazda CX-5 Touring, loaded, clean carfax, #44699A $11,990

'18 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, red, 10k mi., #35288A $39,963

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $30,899

Mercedes Benz '16 Mercedes Benz AMG C 63 S, Sedan, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, red, 15k mi., #P9961 $51,899

'09 S550 4Matic: Black, Only 55xxx Miles, #44675A, $20,950

'15 Mercedes Benz GLA 250, stk# 190322A $23,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 C300 4MATIC: #196422, $11,220 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Volvo '16 XC90 T5 Momentum: AWD, $32,820 #L1559 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo S60 T5, #L1529 $18,750 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo XC60 T5 Premier #L1634 $25,822 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 S60 T5: Drive-E Inscription Sedan, #L1603, $18,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo XC90 #L1640 $36,788 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC90: SUV $35,000, #L1566 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 XC 60 T6: SUV, #L15531, $9,550 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo XC90 SUV #L1591 $35,810 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Volvo XC60 T5, awd, inscription, #P4358 $26,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC 90 SUV: #197901, $33,822 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Chevrolet Trucks '16 CREW CAB DUALLY 4x4: Loaded, Only 37xxx Miles! #44410A, $47,450

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 High Country pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 22k mi., #80596A $39,963

'16 Chevy Colorado 4wd Z71 crew cab pickup, 6 cyl., 4wd, orange, 27k, #44245A $30,991

'16 Chevy Colorado 4wd Z71 crew cab pickup, 6 cyl., 4wd, orange, 27k, #44245A $29,996

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, crew cab, 8 cyl., 4 WD, 2k mi., $37,990 #42936A

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, 8 cyl., 4WD, a uto, bla ck, 28k mi., $28,990 #P 6784

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Craft Fairs/Flea Markets '16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $38,899 #P9665

Belleville Flea Market June 15 & 16, 2019 '11 Buick Enclave, loaded, clean carfax, only 28k mi.!#44729A $22,990

'07 CHEVY EQUINOX LS: AWD, Loaded, Only 53xxx Miles, #44685A, $7,750

'15 Chevy Equinox FWD 1LT, stk# 190639A $16,650 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 103k mi., #79492B $28,899

'19 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 25k mi., #P6867 $47,990

'17 GMC Terrain SLT, #L15981 $21,833 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Dodge Durango R/T, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 35k mi., #P9927 $30,000

'14 Honda CRV-EXL, only 52k mi., #37262A $18,990

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $40,899 #79760A

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Public Notices PUBLIC NOTICE ADMINISTRATIVE RECORD FILE AVAILABLE Paulian Place Abandoned Containers Superfund Site St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri June 2019 EPA Region 7: Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Nine Tribal Nations The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 7 has compiled the Administrative Record file for the Paulian Place Abandoned Containers Su p e r f u n d Site in St . Louis, Missouri. The Administrative Record is the official site file that contains technical documents with respect to response actions at the site. EPA has assessed the ability of the public to access the Administrative Record through an internet-based repository and has determined that the local community has this ability. The Administrative Record for this site will be available online for anyone with an internet connection. Please visit the following website: h t t p s : / / w w w .e p a .g o v /superfund/paulianplace Questions or requests for site information can be submitted to:

'10 Mazda CX-7 sport, loaded, only 77K mi., #37241A $9,990

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, s port utility, 4 cyl., FWD, a uto, white , 5k mi., #35139A $31,473

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, red, 5k mi., #35396A $32,463

'16 Chevy Silverado, 1500 LT, p/u crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 35k mi., #P6803 $30,950

'17 Mazda MX-5 Miata, RF Gra nd Touring, coupe , 4 cyl., RWD, 6 spd ma nua l, re d, 25k mi., #P 6674 $24,973

'16 Toyota Highlander XLE, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 14k mi., #P9914 $32,000

Dodge Plymouth Trucks

Mini vans

'13 Ram Sport Crew, 4x4, loaded, clean carfax, #44452B $25,969

'11 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax, #42365A, $10,990

Ford Trucks

'14 Honda Odyssey EXL, loaded, clean carfax, #44724A $17,350

'12 Ford F-150 Super Crew Cab #200641 $28,725 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Ford F150, stk# 181220A $31,850 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $40,899 #28175L

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, pu crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 4k mi., #44061A $39,990

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 51k mi., #P6797 $39,990

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Jaguar

Lexus

Dodge

'15 Toyota 4Runner Trail, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 10k mi., #P9804A $32,000

'17 GMC Acadia, stk# 190724A $32,950 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 GMC Yukon Denali, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 17k mi., #29272A $53,000

'12 Volkswagen Tiguan SE, loaded, clean carfax, #44683A $9,750

Chrysler

'15 Chevy Corvette Z51 3LT, convertible, 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd manual, 51k, #44573A $41,990

Toyota

'19 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #13014L $37,963

'18 Kia Soul, stk# P07215 $14,445 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

'17 Chevy Corvette Z06 1LZ coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, gray, 7k mi., #P1116 $66,350

'18 Subaru WRX STI Type RA, sedan, 4 cyl., awd, manual, blue, 4k mi., #P9947 $43,000

'13 Volkswagen GTI, H/B, loaded, auto, only 54K mi., #44623B $13,496

'15 Chevy Malibu, stk# 190697A $11,250 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '17 Chevy Spark, hatch, LS, auto, stk# P07222 $10,475 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Infiniti

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $38,000

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 13k mi., #P9801 $52,899

Kia

Hyundai '17 Audi A3 Cabriolet, Premium Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 30k mi., #P9986 $30,350

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 17k mi., #P9968 $51,899

Jeep '14 Chevy Cruze, stk# 190757A $16,995 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '11 Chevy Impala LT, loaded, full power, clean carfax, #44509A $7,992

'15 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S, Cabriolet, 6 cyl., RWD, 7 spd, black, 3k mi., #P9962 $94,000

GMC Trucks

Elizabeth Kramer U.S. EPA Community Engagement Specialist Email: kramer.elizabeth@epa.gov U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 7 11201 Renner Boulevard, Lenexa, KS 66219 Toll-free: 800-223-0425

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'18 GMC Yukon STL SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 26k mi., #80333B $47,200

@stltoday '16 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE double cab pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 34k mi., #P6806 $29,450 ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.


B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

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STA N LEY CU P FI NA L EDIT ION

SATURDAY • 06.15.2019 • $2.50

BLUES WIN SERIES 4-3

ROAD TO GLORY Relive the Blues’ historic championship run

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington kisses the Stanley Cup during the on-ice celebration after the team’s Game 7 victory Wednesday night against the Boston Bruins at TD Garden in Boston.

GAME 1

GAME 2

GAME 3

GAME 4

GAME 5

GAME 6

GAME 7

5/27 at Boston Bos 0 2 2 — 4 Stl 1 10 — 2 GWG: Kuraly

5/29 at Boston Stl 2 0 0 1 — 3 Bos 2 0 0 0 — 2 GWG: Gunnarsson

6/1 at Blues Bos 3 2 2 — 7 Stl 0 1 1 — 2 GWG: Kuraly

6/3 at Blues Stl 20 2 — 4 Bos 1 10 — 2 GWG: O’Reilly

6/6 at Boston Stl 0 1 1 — 2 Bos 0 0 1 — 1 GWG: Perron

6/9 at Blues Bos 104 — 5 Stl 00 1 — 1 GWG: Carlo

6/12 at Boston Stl 20 2 — 4 Bos 0 0 1 — 1 GWG: Pietrangelo

Subscribe for every cold, icy detail at STLtoday.com/subscribenow TODAY’S COMPLETE NEWSPAPER INSIDE STANLEY CUP FINAL EDITION Vol. 141, No. 166 ©2019

1 M


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Game 1: Monday, May 27 • Story published: Tuesday, May 28

4

GAME 1

BOSTON LEADS SERIES 1-0

2

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Players from both teams converge after Blues goalie Jordan Binnington lost sight of the puck that was between his legs in the first period of Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final on Monday.

BEANTOWN MELTDOWN Despite surging ahead, Blues still can’t win in Final BRUINS 4, BLUES 2

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I

Boston Blues

BOSTON

t now is 51 years and counting, but the Blues still haven’t won a game in the Stanley Cup Final. They were swept in four games in their three previous Cup Final appearances — in 1968 and 1969 against the Montreal Canadiens and in 1970 against the Boston Bruins. On Monday night it was same story, different century. The Blues looked good early, jumping to a 2-0 lead early in the second period. But with towel-waving Robert Kraft, owner of football’s New England Patriots in the house, Boston stormed back for a 4-2 victory at TD Garden in Game 1 of the best-of-seven series. It was the Bruins’ eighth straight victory in these playoffs — they have outscored their opponents 32-11 in that stretch. And it ran their postseason record to 9-0 against the Blues, including a 4-0 sweep in the 1970 Stanely Cup Final, they last time the Blues were in the title round. “We’ve been real disciplined most of the playoffs pretty much,” coach Craig Berube said. “We weren’t tonight obviously with five penalties. We gotta be better there.” Entering Monday’s contest, the Blues were the least penalized team in the playoffs this season, spending an average of 6.18 minutes in the penalty box per game. That wasn’t the case Monday, when they were whistled for five penalties compared to two for Boston. “I’m not gonna judge the calls, but they did happen,” Perron said. “We were in the box too much and that gave them the chance to get their touches and kinda get going in their game and shoot pucks on net. “The number (of shots) looked bad and a lot of it happened on the power play. And we just didn’t play good enough in the second.” No they didn’t. After taking a 2-0 lead one minute into the second period on Vladimir Tarasenko’s ninth goal of the playoffs, it was all Boston. Connor Clifton got behind the Blues’ defense for a tap-in goal on a pinpoint pass from Sean Kuraly 76 seconds after Tarasenko’s goal. Clifton beat his former teammate from the Providence Bruins, goalie Jordan Binnington, on

0 1

2 1

2 0

— —

4 2

First Period B: Schenn 3 (Schwartz, Bouwmeester), 7:23. Penalties: Kuraly, BOS, (tripping), 3:37; Perron, STL, (tripping), 13:15; Thomas, STL, (hooking), 16:45. Second Period B: Tarasenko 9 (Schenn), 1:00. Bos: Boston, Clifton 2 (Nordstrom, Kuraly), 2:16 Bos: McAvoy 2, 12:41 (pp). Penalties: Edmundson, STL, (high sticking), 5:25; Sundqvist, STL, (cross checking), 11:04.

The Bruins’ Matt Grzelcyk (left) and Blues’ Ivan Barbashev collide in the third period.

the play. Charlie McAvoy scored on the power play with 7:19 left in the period to tie the game at 2-2. And then Kuraly got the winner 5:21 into the third period getting the puck past Joel Edmundson and then Binnington during a scramble in front of the net. The Blues were outshot 18-3 in the second period and 30-12 over the final two periods. “It’s just a reflection of we didn’t have the puck down low,” the Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester said. “We just played into their hands. It’s tough to win when you take five penalties, especially against a team that has a real good power play.” It took several scrambling saves and spectacular saves by Binnington to keep the Blues in it before Brad Marchand scored an empty-net goal with 1:49 left. “When that first goal went in they got some momentum, and then a big push there,” said Binnington, who made 34 saves. “You could feel them coming and they were coming hard and the rink was buzzing.” In comparison, the Blues mustered only 20 shots and went the last 11:44 of the second and the first 4:33 of the third without a shot on goal — a total drought of 16:17. “I think we’re fine in here,” Perron said. “We know what we did is we went to the box too much. We lost our com-

posure a little bit. We were not getting to our game enough below the goal line, things like that. But I think we’re gonna be a lot better next game.” The Bruins entered the game with a scalding 34 percent success rate on the power play in the postseason, so the Blues were playing into their hands by sending out the Boston power play so many times. And the Blues weren’t always happy about the calls. Edmundson was sent off for highsticking former Blues captain David Backes 5½ minutes into the second period. Edmundson reacted as if he thought Backes was guilty of embellishment, and gave a shove to Backes in the back while the Boston forward was on the ice. The Blues killed that one off. They weren’t as fortunate 5½ minutes later when Oskar Sundqvist was sent off for hooking, at the 11:04 mark of the second. Sundqvist complained about that call as well, drawing boos from the crowd at TD Garden. That penalty led to the game-tying goal by McAvoy. “Yeah, I mean there’s a couple where we weren’t sure,” Perron said. “But it is what it is. . . . It’s a fast game out there and we just gotta make sure our sticks aren’t in there. Same with my penalty.” This is Boston’s 20th Stanley Cup Final and Monday marked its first victory in those 20 when trailing by two or

Third Period Bos: Kuraly 3 (Chara, Acciari), 5:21. Bos: Marchand 8, 18:11. Penalties: Krejci, BOS, (illegal check to head), 6:55; Blais, STL, (interference), 13:28. Shots on Goal Boston Blues

8 8

18 3

12 9

— —

38 20

Power-play Blues 0 of 2; Boston 1 of 5. Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 12-8 (37 shots-34 saves) Boston, Rask 13-5 (20-18). A: 17,565 (17,565). T—2:34. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Pierre Racicot.

more goals. But it was more than the penalties that stymied St. Louis. The Blues just couldn’t generate anything for most of the final two periods, as a quick, aggressive Boston squad kept the Blues bottled up in their own zone much of the time. “They pressure you. They come hard,” Berube said. “They’re a quick team. They get on you. They’ve got good sticks. They do a lot of good things. . . . They force you into bad situations with the puck a lot of times.” And in terms of physical play, they matched the Blues hit by hit. By game’s end Boston had 32 hits to the Blues’ 33. A hit by Torey Krug leveled Robert Thomas midway through the third period and the Blues’ rookie did not return.

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06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

STANLEY CUP FINAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • S3

The only ly place Binner would save more is at a Save A Lot store From one home team to another, we congratulate

our champions, the St. Louis Blues. Thank you! We’ve loved every minute of the journey. The Team Members at Save A Lot, your hometown grocer. #NEVERGIVEUP

savealot.com © June 2019 Moran Foods, LLC. All rights reserved.


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Game 2: Wednesday, May 29 • Story published: Thursday, May 30

3

GAME 2

SERIES TIED 1-1

2

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Boston goalie Tuukka Rask gets beat stickside on a Carl Gunnarrson shot Wednesday in overtime, a goal that evened the series heading into Saturday’s Game 3 in St. Louis.

GUNNARSSON GETS WINNER His overtime goal gives Blues first Cup Final win BLUES 3, BRUINS 2, OT

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

S

Blues Boston

BOSTON

ome call him Boom-Boom, because he doesn’t exactly have the hardest shot around. “Tonight it was hard, so I’m happy about that,” said teammate and fellow Swede Oskar Sundqvist. Defenseman Carl Gunnarsson had more than enough “boom” to silence TD Garden and give the Blues their first victory in a Stanley Cup Final in franchise history. His goal with 3 minutes 51 seconds gone in overtime gave the Blues a 3-2 victory over the Boston Bruins and send the best-of-seven series back to St. Louis tied 1-1. Game 3 is Saturday at Enterprise Center. “He’s been around for a long time,” Joel Edmundson said. “I think that was the biggest goal of his career and it couldn’t have come at a better time.” Mere minutes after the dramatic game-winner, the story behind the story leaked out. “Craig (Berube) said that he met him at the (urinal) after the third period,” Sundqvist said. “And Gunny said all I need is one more chance. So it worked out.” That it did. With just 1:57 left in regulation, Gunnarsson’s shot hit the corner of the net where the post and the crossbar meet. It came oh-so-close to going in. He made amends in overtime, shooting a one-timer from just inside the blueline through traffic and past Boston goalie Tuukka Rask. It was the first goal in 56 career playoff games. And in this memorable Blues playoff run, it ranks right up there with Jaden Schwartz’s “lucky pinball” (as Winnpeg goalie Connor Hellebuyck called it) with 15 second left to win Game 5 against the Jets. Or Pat Maroon’s double-overtime Game 7 winner against Dallas. And Robert Bortuzzo’s game-winning backhand in Game 3 against San Jose. Gunnarsson, by the way, confirmed the “restroom” conversation with Berube. “I can’t deny that,” Gunnarsson said. “That’s where it happened. That makes it even more fun I guess. It’s a good story. “I was close in the third with the post and I had a little talk in the locker room between periods there - before the OT - and I just told him I needed one more,” Gunnarsson said. The Blues bounced back from 1-0 and 2-1 deficits to tie the game at 2-2 on goals by first Bortuzzo and then Vladi-

2 2

0 0

0 0

1 0

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3 2

First Period Bos: Coyle 7 (Pastrnak, DeBrusk), 4:44 (pp) Blues: Bortuzzo 2 (Bozak, Gunnarsson), 9:37 Bos: Nordstrom 3 (Kuraly), 10:17 Blues: Tarasenko 10 (Schwartz), 14:55. Penalties: Blais, STL, (interference), 3:55; Sundqvist, STL, (boarding), 17:57. Second Period Penalties: Clifton, BOS, (interference), 3:34; Edmundson, STL, (tripping), 12:19; Clifton, BOS, major (high sticking), 15:39; Schwartz, STL, (interference), 17:56. Third Period Penalties: Schenn, STL, (slashing), 13:22. Overtime Blues: Gunnarsson 1 (Sundqvist, O’Reilly), 3:51. Shots on Goal Blues 10 14 Boston 8 6 The Blues’ Carl Gunnarsson keeps the Bruins’ Marcus Johansson away from the net during the second period of Game 2 on Wednesday night at TD Garden in Boston.

mir Tarasenko. That all happened in the first period, and that was all the scoring until Gunnarsson’s game-winner which came as Boston was about to be called for tripping Alexander Steen on his way to the net. Ryan O’Reilly, who came on the ice after goalie Jordan Binnington left on the delayed penalty, got the primary assist. The Blues controlled most of the third period, wearing down the Bruins with a season-high 50 hits. Boston also got worn down on the back end, playing two periods-plus with only five defenseman after Matt Grzelcyk was injured after absorbing a check from Sundqvist along the boards with 2:03 left in the first. According to Bruce Cassidy Grzelcyk was sent to the hospital for tests and evaluation. Sundqvist was penalized for cross-checking on the play and declined to comment on the hit after the game. But David Backes, the former Blues captain and current Bruin, wasn’t shy about offering his opinion. “I don’t think that’s a hit we want in our game,” Backes said. “It’s from behind, elevated, into his head, into the glass. If that’s a two-minute penalty, I think there’s going to be a shortage of defensemen in this series by the end of it. “That’s in somebody else’s hands. That’s something I think if I’m making that hit, I’m probably watching from the bleachers for a few (games), but we’ll see

what happens with their player.” It was one of five penalties called against the Blues on Wednesday. They have been in the box 10 times so far in this series to five for the Bruins. But the Blues overcame that. They overcame the early Boston goals by Charlie Coyle and Joakim Nordstrom, and they came out breathing fire in the overtime session controlling the puck for much of sudden death. “We still had energy,” Edmundson said. “Our team did a good job of wearing them down throughout the 60 minutes (of regulation). We knew we had more energy than them going into the overtime, so we just laid it all on the line and we stuck to our game plan.” So the bounce-back Blues struck again Wednesday. Their Stanley Cup Final demise, roundly predicted as near certainty in some corners, was put on hold. The Blues have taken away home ice advantage from the Bruins. When informed Tuesday that Game 1 losers end up losing the Cup Final series 77 percent of the time, Tarasenko told reporters: “This is on your side to tell some cool stats and everything else. But that’s not in our heads.” Well, here’s another cool stat to put in your head. Or not. Teams winning Game 2 have gone on to win the Cup 74.7 percent of the time since 1939 (when the best-of-seven format was introduced.)

9 9

4 0

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37 23

Power-play Blues 0 of 3; Boston 1 of 5. Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 13-8 (23 shots-21 saves). Boston, Rask 13-6 (37-34). A: 17,565 (17,565). T—2:53. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Cherrey.

So as Blues fans step back from the ledge once again, the Blues head home with momentum. “It’s a great sports fanbase and a great sports city,” said Binnington, who stopped 21 of 23 shots. “They deserve it. We’re happy to play for them and we’re having fun doing it, playing together. We’re happy to go home and perform in front of them with them on our side.” St. Louis was 0-13 in Cup Final games until Wednesday. They also were 0-9 all-time against the Bruins in the playoffs, dating back to that four-game Boston sweep in the 1970 Stanley Cup and had been outscored 52-17 in those games. “It’s great. We’re not done yet, but it’s obviously pretty cool,” Edmundson said. “We just excited to go back to St. Louis with a 1-1 split.” They won Wednesday without rookie Robert Thomas, scratched from the lineup with what’s believed to be a wrist injury. Coach Craig Berube said after the morning skate that Thomas’ absence was not related to the monster hit he absorbed from Torey Krug in Game 1.

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06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

STANLEY CUP FINAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • S5

Congratulations to our champions, the St. Louis Blues

Photo by Scott Rovak /St.Louis Blues

Transforming the health of the communities we serve.


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Game 3: Saturday, June 1 • Story published: Sunday, June 2

7

GAME 3

BOSTON LEADS SERIES 2-1

2

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Bruins center Charlie Coyle (bottom) fights for the puck with pressure from Blues left wing Zach Sanford (12) in a scrum of players during the second period Saturday night at Enterprise Center.

FROM FRENZY TO FRUSTRATED Blues fall flat in first Final game here since 1970 BRUINS 7, BLUES 2

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

S

Boston Blues

ome 17,924 days ago, the Blues last played host to a Stanley Cup Final game. On May 5, 1970 to be exact, the Blues lost to these same Boston Bruins 6-2 at The

Arena. Well, 49 years later, the Blues were Cup Final hosts once more. It wasn’t worth the wait. Three days after recording their firstever Stanley Cup Final victory, the Blues fell w-e-l-l short of their firstever home Cup Final win - losing 7-2 to the Bruins before 18,789 at Enterprise Center. The Bruins sure know how to spoil a party. With the city abuzz with Cup fever, and the crowd as jacked up as it’s been all season or maybe in years the eagerly-anticipated contest turned into a huge letdown. No amount of celebrities or star athletes in attendance could change the momentum Saturday. St. Louis actors Jon Hamm and Jenna Fischer were in the house. So was Olympic star Jackie Joyner-Kersee and former St. Louis Rams Isaac Bruce and Chris Long. Even Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes was in the stands, shown on the video board wearing a Blues jersey and chugging a beer. But Boston had almost as many power-play goals as the Blues had celebrity sightings. The Bruins scored four times with the man advantage on just four shots - and finished with seven Bruins scoring a goal apiece. The Blues were missing one of their top penalty-kill players in the suspended Oskar Sundqvist. But 4-for-4? “There were some deflections,” coach Craig Berube said. “Two of them. One went off of (Patrice) Bergeron with a deflection - we didn’t get his stick. One went off (Jay) Bouwmeester’s stick and in. We’ve got to be better. Penalty kill’s got to be better.” The Blues had been the least-penalized team in the playoffs entering the Cup Final, but you wouldn’t know it by what’s transpired three games into this series. The Blues have been whistled for 17 penalties in three games, and spent 14 minutes in the box on seven infractions Saturday. “Well, we do have to limit the penalties for sure,” captain Alex Pietrangelo said. “We know they have a dangerous power play and we’ve been flirting with danger here the whole series, and it burnt us tonight. But in saying that, we’ve got to do a better job of killing them tonight and we didn’t. “That’s why they won the hockey game.” Penalties or not, it wasn’t the best

3 0

2 1

2 1

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7 2

First Period Bos: Bergeron 9 (DeBrusk, Krug), 10:47 (pp). Bos: Coyle 8 (Heinen, Johansson), 17:40. Bos: Kuraly 4 (Nordstrom), 19:50. Penalties: DeBrusk, BOS, (kneeing), 1:02; Perron, STL, (interference), 10:26; Clifton, BOS, (roughing), 14:22; Barbashev, STL, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 14:22; St. Louis bench, served by Perron (delay of game), 19:50.

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Blues right wing Vladimir Tarasenko (left) is checked into the glass by Bruins defenseman Brandon Carlo during the third period of Game 3.

night for rookie goaltender sensation Jordan Binnington. He was pulled for the first time in his NHL career after allowing the first five goals. “I’ve gotta do a better job of giving us a chance to win,” Binnington said. “Three goals in the first, that’s never good.” After a quick start for the Blues Boston didn’t even have a shot on goal for the first six minutes - the Bruins scored three times in the first period, including twice in the final 2 minutes 20 seconds. After Torey Krug made it a 5-1 Boston lead with 7:48 left in the second, Binnington was replaced by Jake Allen. Krug’s goal came on the shot that deflected off Bouwmeester’s stick. “My confidence level’s really high (in Binnington),” Berube said afterwards. “Five goals he allowed, so he had seen enough. We just wanted to pull him and get him ready for the next game.” Allen had not played at home since a Jan. 8 start against the Dallas Stars. And he hadn’t played at all in nearly two months, since a 3-2 shootout loss at Chicago on April 3. Like the Blues as a whole, Binnington has shown a knack for bouncing back strong after defeats. He’ll be put to the test on that front when Game 4 rolls around on Monday. “It’s a loss,” Binnington said. “I’m not happy with that. We’re going to regroup and prepare for the next game.” “It’s not his fault at all,” David Perron said. “I’m sure he’s disappointed but it has nothing to do (with him). If there’s one reason we’re here, it’s because of him. “Games like that, we don’t want them to happen but it did tonight.

Much like the hand pass against San Jose - even though it’s a different situation - but we have to find a way to turn the page and come back way better.” So Boston is up 2-1 in the best-ofseven series, halfway home to its seventh NHL championship. Meanwhile, the Blues must win three of the final four to win their first Cup. St. Louis trailed San Jose two games to one in the Western Conference Final, and trailed Dallas three games to two in the second round, yet went on to win those series. They’ll need another series comeback to take the Cup. While Binnington struggled, Tuukka Rask was very good in goal Saturday for Boston. Former Blues captain David Backes was a constant agitator in a game that featured all kinds of scrums and skirmishes. Besides Sundqvist, who’ll return for Game 4, the Blues were also missing Robert Thomas (wrist) and Vince Dunn (mouth, head). There was tremendous energy in the building at the start of the game, and the Blues rode that wave for a while, outshooting the Bruins 5-0 over the first six minutes of play. But the Bruins gradually took control of the first period - and the game draining the life out of the building and a fan base that came ready to see history. What they saw instead was one of the Blues’ worst postseason losses ever. The seven Boston goals were the most allowed by the Blues since an 8-3 loss to Detroit in the conference semifinals in 1996. The franchise record for most goals allowed the postseason is 10 against these same Bruins in 1972. Perron bristled when asked if the buildup to this game perhaps resulted in

Second Period Bos: Pastrnak 8 (Krug, Bergeron), 0:41 (pp). Blues: Barbashev 3 (Sanford, Steen), 11:05. Bos: Krug 2 (Marchand, Bergeron), 12:12 (pp). Penalties: McAvoy, BOS, (slashing), 7:37; Maroon, STL, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 7:37; Chara, BOS, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 7:37; Parayko, STL, (high sticking), 11:41. Third Period Blues: Parayko 2 (Bozak, O’Reilly), 5:24 (pp). Bos: Acciari 2 (Nordstrom), 18:12. Bos: Johansson 4 (Clifton, Krug), 18:35 (pp). Penalties: Perron, STL, (roughing), 0:54; Clifton, BOS, (cross checking), 0:54; Carlo, BOS, (interference), 1:31; Chara, BOS, (roughing), 5:18; DeBrusk, BOS, (delay of game), 6:04; Pietrangelo, STL, (slashing), 18:12. Shots on Goal Boston 12 Blues 8

8 10

4 11

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24 29

Power play Boston 4 of 4; Blues 1 of 5. Goaltenders Boston, Rask 14-6 (29 shots-27 saves). Blues, Allen 0-0 (4-3), Binnington 13-9 (19-14). A: 18,789 (19,150). T: 2:34. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Pierre Racicot.

too much nervous energy for the Blues. “I don’t know,” he replied. “I don’t know. I wasn’t nervous.” But could the Blues have been too pumped up for one of the bigger nights in St. Louis sports history? “You can say a lot of things,” he said. “We’ll look at some video tomorrow and try to find that out.” Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


STANLEY CUP FINAL

06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • S7

Congratulations St. Louis Blues! The mission of Old Newsboys is simple — to ensure that children who are at risk in our community, because of abuse or poverty, receive adequate food, shelter, clothing, medical care and are provided equal opportunity for social development. SINCE 1957

F U N D

FO R

C H I L D R E N ’ S

C H A R I T I E S

www.oldnewsboysday.org

The Missouri Historical Society congratulates the St. Louis Blues on their historic season!

St. Louis Blues Captain Al Arbour skating with two children, Doug Pfluger (left) and Jeff Willoughby (right) from the St. Louis Hearing and Speech Center. Photograph by W.C. Runder Photo Company, Inc., ca. 1967. Missouri Historical Society Collections.

mohistory.org

Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park

225 S. Skinker Blvd. across from Forest Park

1315 Chestnut St. in downtown St. Louis


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Game 4: Monday, June 3 • Story published: Tuesday, June 4

4

GAME 4

SERIES TIED 2-2

2

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko slams the Bruins’ David Pastrnak into the boards during the third period of Game 4 on Monday night at the Enterprise Center.

ANOTHER FIRST IN CUP FINAL Blues get a home win to even up series with Bruins BLUES, 4, BRUINS 2

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues Boston

A

s usual, the Blues didn’t take the most direct route. But here they are, once again tied 2-2 in a best-of-seven series after four games. They were in the same spot against Winnipeg, Dallas and San Jose, their first three opponents in these playoffs. Luckily for the Blues, Saturday’s 7-2 drubbing at the hands of the Boston Bruins counted as only one loss. “It doesn’t matter if you lose 2-1 or 10-1,” Oskar Sundqvist said. “A loss is a loss and you need to regroup and refocus. And that’s what we did.” If the Blues have shown one thing since late January, when they began their second-half sprint to the playoffs, it’s never, ever count them out. So here they are again after Monday’s 4-2 triumph over Boston before 18,805 at Enterprise Center. Once again, it’s down to a best-of-three affair, with Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final on Thursday in Boston. “Our team responds pretty well to things,” coach Craig Berube said. “They have all playoffs. We knew what we had to do tonight - the entire team. First of all, our discipline was a lot better. And second of all - (here he paused) - we were relentless tonight. We didn’t stop for 60 minutes. That’s how I looked at the game.” The Blues’ stars turned in big games, with two goals by Ryan O’Reilly, including the game-winner with 10:38 to play in the third period. Vladimir Tarasenko stayed hot with his 11th goal of this postseason and his sixth in his last eight games. Captain Alex Pietrangelo played his best game of the postseason. He had two assists, was plus-3 and was stout on defense. He logged 29 minutes 37 seconds of ice time. Yes, he played half the game. After getting shelled for five goals in little more than 1 1/2 periods Saturday, Jordan Binnington bounced back like he almost always does in his amazing rookie season. He is now 13-2 following games in which he has suffered a loss of any kind all season, and 7-2 under those circumstances in the playoffs. And Brayden Schenn added an empty-netter to clinch the victory with 1:29 to play. It all added up to more history, this time the first Stanley Cup Final victory on home ice in franchise history. “It’s been a long time, right?” Pietrangelo said. “The city’s been waiting a long time for this. We weren’t too proud of last game. ... But you could see the buzz around the city. Driving to the game, it’s pretty fun to see. You got the Cardinals guys sitting up there (in the

2 1

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First Period Blues: O’Reilly 4 (Dunn, Sanford), 0:43. Bos: Coyle 9 (Chara), 13:14. Blues: Tarasenko 11 (Schenn, Pietrangelo), 15:30. Penalties: None. Second Period Bos: Carlo 1 (Bergeron, Marchand), 14:19 (sh). Penalties: Coyle, BOS, (high sticking), 5:47; Parayko, STL, (delay of game), 8:31; Clifton, BOS, (illegal check to head), 13:53. Third Period Blues: O’Reilly 5 (Gunnarsson, Pietrangelo), 10:38. Blues: Schenn 4, 18:31. Penalties: Heinen, BOS, (tripping), 2:08; Bouwmeester, STL, (high sticking), 6:42; Krug, BOS, (slashing), 19:34; Bouwmeester, STL, (elbowing), 19:34. Shots on Goal Blues 13 Boston 9

12 10

13 4

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38 23

Power play Boston 0 of 2; Blues 0 of 3. LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Blues left wing Jaden Schwartz, center, celebrates an empty-net goal by Brayden Schenn, right, in the third period that sealed the 4-2 victory.

stands), too. “That’s what this city’s about. Great sports city. Underrated sports city in my opinion. The fans are great. They never gave up on us all year. Didn’t give up in the playoffs. We’ve been down. They just keep on cheering, keep on supporting us. And we’ll put on the best effort we can for them.” But those fans, and the Blues, want a little more. As the players headed off the ice, chants of “We Want the Cup!” cascaded down from the rafters at Enterprise. Two more Blues victories, and they’re there. “It’s anyone’s game now,” Sundqvist said. “We have to keep doing what we did today.” What they did Monday was avoid the penalty box. After racking up 17 penalties over Games 1-3, they had only three infractions in Game 4. They stayed disciplined, were more decisive with their puck movement, and forechecked like crazy. After dominating most of the second period, the Blues gave up a shorthanded goal - by Boston defenseman Brandon Carlo - with 5 minutes 41 seconds left in the period. That tied the game at 2-2. If this were October, November or December, more likely than not the Blues would have folded like a tent after

such a score. Those Blues had trouble holding leads, closing out games. They were “fragile” in the words of the coach and some of the players. But those Blues are a distant memory. These Blues are mentally tough, physically imposing, and borrowing Berube’s word - relentless. “That was a tough one to give up for sure,” Berube said of the shorthanded goal. “But I thought our bench was fine. I didn’t feel like there was any panic. “It was unfortunate that that happened. That second period was as good as I’ve seen us play for a while.” The third period wasn’t bad, either. The Blues outshot the Bruins 13-4 in the final period. For the second time in this series, Boston played most of the game with only five defensemen. This time veteran Zdeno Chara left in the second period after taking a puck to the face and did not return. The Blues’ Vince Dunn returned Monday after missing six games after taking a puck to his face in Game 3 of the San Jose series - the infamous “Hand Pass” game. Dunn had an assist on O’Reilly’s first goal of the game, which came on a lightning quick wraparound move just 43 seconds into the contest. But wouldn’t you know it, just a couple of shifts into the game, Dunn took a

Goaltenders Boston, Rask 14-7 (37 shots-34 saves). Blues, Binnington 14-9 (23-21). A: 18,805 (19,150). T: 2:33. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Cherrey.

high stick to the mouth (the other side) that left him with a bloody lip. “It sucks,” said Dunn, who said he was still shaking after the game in the excitement of playing his first Cup Final at age 22. Boston’s Charlie Coyle scored his third goal in as many games to tie it 1-1 later in the first, then came Tarasenko’s 33rd playoff goal since the start of the 2014 postseason. Only Alex Ovechkin (34) has more in the NHL. After Carlo’s shorty, O’Reilly’s fifth goal of the playoffs came on a rebound of a Pietrangelo shot from near the right point. Boston goalie Tuukka Rask described it as a “Ladies tee shot.” Not sure what that means. But Rask left some rebounds Monday, and O’Reilly made him pay on this one. “I’m just trying to do what I can to get to that backside,” O’Reilly said. “It was just kind of a great bounce, it happens sometimes, and then I just tried throwing it to the net. Sometimes you get those bounces and I was lucky to be on that end of it.”


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

STANLEY CUP FINAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • S9


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Game 5: Thursday, June 6 • Story published: Friday, June 7

2

GAME 5

BLUES LEAD SERIES 3-2

1

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Brayden Schenn knocks down the Bruins’ Charlie McAvoy during the second period of Game 5 on Thursday night at TD Garden in Boston.

BLUES ONE AWAY FROM THE CUP Tense win at Boston is good for 3-2 series lead BLUES 2, BRUINS 1

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

Blues Boston

BOSTON

hree down, one to go. The Blues are on the doorstep of hockey history, on the brink of winning the franchise’s first Stanley Cup. It came cloaked in some controversy but Thursday’s 2-1 victory over the Boston Bruins at TD Garden gave the Blues a 3-2 lead in the best-ofseven Cup Final. They can clinch with a victory in Game 6 Sunday at Enterprise Center in St. Louis. Just one more win. “It’s obviously a lot of emotion that goes through your head and stuff like that,” Brayden Schenn said. “We’ve been battling all year, we’ve been grinding all year. We know what’s at stake ... and we’re gonna be ready for Game 6.” The Blues got goals from a suddenlyrevived Ryan O’Reilly and feisty David Perron. They got one of the best games yet from rookie goalie Jordan Binnington, who stopped 38 of 39 shots. In the process, Binnington continued his own march through playoff history. His ninth road victory established an NHL record for a rookie goaltender in one postseason. And he tied the NHL rookie record for most overall wins in one postseason at 15, a mark he now shares with four others. “He was excellent all game, and did a great job in the first period for sure,” coach Craig Berube said. “They came hard, Boston. We were tested in the first (period) for sure and ‘Binner’ stood tall. Big reason we won the game.” The Blues killed off three Boston power plays Thursday, making them 6-for-6 on the penalty kill since allowing four power-play goals in Game 3 Saturday. And they may have benefited most from a penalty that wasn’t called. Midway through the third period, with the Blues up 1-0, Tyler Bozak came at Boston’s Noel Acciari from behind. Bozak stuck out his stick and appeared to touch the puck, Acciari fell backward and the crowd at TD Garden, not to mention everyone on the Boston bench, thought it should have been a tripping penalty. But there was no call by referees Steve Kozari and Kelly Sutherland. Seconds later, Perron scored his seventh goal of the postseason but first of this series on an attempted pass that deflected off Boston goalie Tuukka Rask and into the net. “It’s not like something crazy was missed in my opinion,” Perron said of the no-call. “I don’t know.”

0 0

1 0

1 1

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2 1

First Period None. Penalties: Dunn, STL, (delay of game), 6:27; Marchand, BOS, (slashing), 17:22. Second Period Blues: O’Reilly 6 (Sanford, Pietrangelo), 0:55. Penalties: Perron, STL, (interference), 9:25. Third Period Blues: Perron 7 (Bozak, O’Reilly), 10:36. Boston: DeBrusk 4 (Krug), 13:32. Penalties: Steen, STL, (interference), 3:09. Shots on Goal Blues 8 Boston 17

6 8

7 14

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21 39

Power play Blues 0 of 1; Boston 0 of 3. The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko hugs goalie Jordan Binnington at the end of Game 5 after Binnington made 38 saves in a victory against the Bruins.

The crowd thought otherwise, showering the ice with debris. “It was a little puck battle,” Bozak said. “I went for the puck with my stick and it kinda got caught in his feet. I don’t know. And then we just got the puck back. DP (Perron) tried to pass it and it banked in off Rask and went in. So we’ll take it.” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy didn’t take it - lightly, that is - when it came to the no-call. “The narrative changed after Game 3,” Cassidy said. “There’s a complaint or whatever put forth by the opposition. It just seems to have changed everything.” That was a reference to some mild complaining by Berube following his team’s 7-2 loss in Game 3 about the amount of penalties being called against the Blues. In stark contrast to Berube after the “Hand Pass” game against San Jose, when the Blues coach said very little about that blown call in overtime, Cassidy had plenty to say about the Bozak no-call. “Their player is on his way to the box,” Cassidy said. “It’s right in front of the official. ... The spotter took (Acciari) out of the game for a possible concussion. I mean, it’s blatant. It had a big effect on the game.” Cassidy went on to say that the NHL is “getting a black-eye” with their play-

off officiating and said the no-call on Bozak was “egregious.” The NHL eventually apologized for the blown call on the hand pass by San Jose. At the start of the Cup Final, commissioner Gary Bettman said his head almost exploded when he saw that play. There were no apologies from the NHL on Thursday night. NHL senior vice president and director of officiating Stephen Walkom said this about Thursday’s no-call to a pool reporter after the game: “We don’t make comments on judgment calls within games. There are hundreds of judgment calls in every game. The official on the play, he viewed it and he didn’t view it as a penalty at the time.” So the Blues had a 2-0 lead with 9:24 to go, but not for long. With the Blues about to get whistled for a delayed penalty, Jake DeBrusk fired from the right faceoff circle and beat Binnington. With 6:28 to play it was a 2-1 game and TD Garden came alive. But the Blues weathered the storm down the stretch, continuing their road warrior ways. It was their ninth victory in 12 away games this postseason. In the history of the Stanley Cup, only five teams have won more in a single postseason. “Probably not as pretty as we’d like it to be, but we gutted it out and got

Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 15-9 (39 shots-38 saves). Boston, Rask 14-8 (21-19). A: 17,565 (17,565). T: 2:39. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Pierre Racicot.

the job done,” Schenn said. “Binner played unbelievable for us. They took it to us for most of that game. We sat back maybe a little too much, and we’re gonna have to change that for Game 6.’ Bozak agreed. “They pushed hard in the first, the second and the third,” he said. “I think Binner really held it down for us. And we got a couple late for him.” Well, actually the game’s first goal O’Reilly’s - came just 55 seconds into the second period. The line of Zach Sanford-O’ReillyPerron has been together for only 14 games - regular season and playoffs combined, but they ended Game 5 with 14 goals and 27 assists in those games with the first goal coming on a dazzling between-the-legs backhand pass from Sanford to O’Reilly. Actually, Sanford’s pass was between two sets of legs - his own and then Boston defenseman Charlie McAvoy, with O’Reilly on the receiving end in front of the net. O’Reilly’s backhand beat Rask top shelf. And helped put the Blues just one win away from hockey history.


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

STANLEY CUP FINAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • S11


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Game 6: Sunday, June 9 • Story published: Monday, June 10

5

GAME 6

SERIES TIED 3-3

1

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Bruins’ Patrice Bergeron (37) celebrates next to Blues goalie Jordan Binnington and defenseman Jay Bouwmeester after Brad Marchand scored in the first period.

BRUINS FORCE A GAME 7 Boston strong in spoiling Blues’ first bid for Cup BRUINS 5, BLUES 1 Boston St. Louis

1 0

0 0

4 1

— —

5 1

First Period Bos: Marchand 9 (Krug, Pastrnak), 8:40 (pp). Penalties: Kuraly, BOS, (delay of game), 2:42; Schenn, STL, (boarding), 7:17; O’Reilly, STL, (delay of game), 8:19; Chara, BOS, (interference), 18:21. Second Period None. Penalties: Marchand, BOS, (tripping), 9:11; McAvoy, BOS, (tripping), 13:43. Third Period Bos: Carlo 2 (DeBrusk), 2:31. Bos: Kuhlman 1 (Krejci), 10:15. Blues: O’Reilly 7 (Pietrangelo, Perron), 12:01. Bos: Pastrnak 9 (Marchand, Kuraly), 14:06. Bos: Chara 2, 17:41. Penalties: Blais, STL, (slashing), 19:38; Blais, STL, served by Sanford, (roughing), 19:38; Clifton, BOS, (roughing), 19:38; Bortuzzo, STL, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:43; Bortuzzo, STL, (cross checking), 19:43. Shots on Goal 12 Boston Blues 9

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

8 10

12 10

— —

32 29

Power play Boston 1 of 2; St. Louis 0 of 4.

Blues right wing Vladimir Tarasenko draws a tripping penalty by Bruins defenseman Charlie McAvoy during the second period.

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

he moment was there. The bright and shiny Stanley Cup in the house. Anticipation high. The 51-year wait almost over. It’s not over yet. The Boston Bruins spoiled the party Sunday night, defeating the Blues 5-1 at Enterprise Center. The Bruins were opportunistic on offense and air-tight on defense. When challenged by the Blues, goalie Tuukka Rask was up to the challenge. So this Stanley Cup Final series is now tied 3-3 with a deciding Game 7 Wednesday at TD Garden in Boston. “Listen, if you told me four months ago we were going to be in the Finals in Game 7, I think I’d take it,” coach Craig Berube said. “We’ve been a good road team. We’ve won twice up there in this series, so we’re a confident group.” Nothing has come easy for the Blues this season, and that’s certainly the case this postseason. The Blues were down two games to one in the Western Conference Final against San Jose after the Hand Pass game - and won the next three. They were down 3-2 against Dallas in Round 2 and facing elimination in Game 6 at American Airlines Center. They won the next two to close out the series. Even in Round 1 against Winnipeg they were in danger of losing their third game in row, but rallied from a 2-0 deficit in the third period for a Game 5 win and then won the series in six.

Now they must win a Game 7 in Boston to win their first Stanley Cup ever. “We’ve got a lot of work ahead of us and we’re confident,” said Ryan O’Reilly, who scored the Blues’ only goal. “We’re a great road team. That’s our story. We gotta get it done on the road.” But for the seventh time in 13 postseason home games, the Blues couldn’t get it done at Enterprise. It certainly wasn’t for lack of fan support. “It was crazy,” David Perron said. “We stayed at the hotel (near Enterprise) in the afternoon, and you could hear people honking and yelling, ‘Let’s Go Blues!’ You could see people walking up and down the street. It was a cool sighting. ...” As the final seconds ticked down on Sunday, the crowd of 18,890 chanted “Let’s Go Blues!” and “We Want the Cup!” after the team’s final home game of the season. Don’t confuse this game with the Blues’ 7-2 shellacking in Game 3 here June 1. The Blues had a good start, gave up a 5-on-3 power-play goal 8 minutes 40 seconds into play, but trailed only 1-0 entering the third period. “I thought it was an even game, really,” Berube said. “Two periods, it’s tight hockey. There’s not a lot of room out there. “I’ll credit Boston. They played well. They checked well. They didn’t give us a ton of room out there. I didn’t think we gave them much either. Can we play better? Yeah, we can play better. But I thought we handled the pressure (of the moment) pretty well.” The game - and the Cup were there for

the taking as the period began. But the Blues couldn’t take them. Just 2 1/2 minutes into the third, Bruins defenseman Brandon Carlo sent a knucklepuck toward Jordan Binnington from just inside the blueline. It took a bad hop as it approached Binnington and went in for a 2-0 lead. It was a huge goal, especially considering how well Rask and the Boston defense were playing. Binnington was testy when asked what happened on the goal. “Did you watch it?” Binnington asked a reporter. (Yes, was the reply.) “Did it bounce?” Binnington asked. (Yes, was the reply.) “Good eye,” Binnington said. Midway through the third, it became 3-0 Boston when 23-year-old Karson Kuhlman beat Binnington far side. O’Reilly gave the Blues a pulse when his fourth goal in three games trimmed the lead to 3-1. But just two minutes later, with 5:54 left to play, David Pastrnak scored the first even-strength goal of the series for the Bruins’ top line - the “Perfection Line” it’s called. And that was it for Game 6, with Zdeno Chara adding an empty-netter with 2:19 left to close out the scoring. “It obviously wasn’t good enough,” O’Reilly said of the Blues’ performance. “Obviously not the start that we wanted. Bad play by myself there to take the penalty there to take it to 5-on-3. “It took the wind out of our sails and it took too long for us to climb back in. Their second goal was a lucky bounce. Just kind

Goaltenders Boston, Rask 14-8 (29 shots-28 saves). St. Louis, Binnington 15-9 (31-27). T: 2:36. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Cherrey.

of bounced up on Binner. Not much we could do there. We just didn’t respond the right way.” Given the potent Boston power play,the Blues have stressed all series the importance of staying out of the box and avoiding silly penalties. Well, Brayden Schenn was sent to the box for boarding at the 7:17 mark of the first, and then 62 seconds later O’Reilly joined him - sending the puck over the glass for a delay of game penalty. After just 21 seconds of 5-on-3 play, the Bruins were on the board on Brad Marchand’s back-door one-timer. Special teams have been a problem for the Blues throughout this series, and Sunday was no different. The Blues went 0-for-4 on the power play, running their tally to 1-for-18 for the series. Meanwhile, the Bruins are 7-for-21 on the power play this series. Without the special teams domination, this series would be over and the Blues would be Cup champions. “We had 12 shots (on the power play),” Berube said. “We did have momentum, we had some good looks. We didn’t score. Rask made some good saves. Can it be better? Yeah, it has to be better. ... We’ve definitely got to bury a couple.”


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

STANLEY CUP FINAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • S13

THE SAINT LOUIS CHESS CLUB CONGRATULATES SAINT LOUIS & THE SAINT LOUIS BLUES ON REACHING THEIR ULTIMATE GOAL

2019

CHAMPIONS


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Game 7: Wednesday, June 12 • Story published: Thursday, June 13

4

GAME 7

BLUES WIN SERIES 4-3

1

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington stops a shot by the Bruins’ Marcus Johansson with Blues defenseman Vince Dunn helping out during the first period of Game 7.

BLUES HOIST THEIR FIRST CUP O’Reilly is MVP after 4-1 win in Game 7 vs. Bruins BLUES 4, BRUINS 1

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

S

Blues Boston

BOSTON

tanley met Gloria on Wednesday night in TD Garden, and for Blues fans everywhere it’s a match made in hockey heaven. The wait is over, the curse lifted. After 51 seasons, the Blues are Stanley Cup champions by virtue of their 4-1 victory over the Boston Bruins in Game 7. Rookie goalie Jordan Binnington kept the game from slipping away in the first period, when the Blues went more than 16 minutes without a shot on goal and the Bruins pelted him with 12 shots. Conn Smythe Trophy winner Ryan O’Reilly gave the Blues a lead they’d never lose with a tip-in goal late in the first period. Captain Alex Pietrangelo, Brayden Schenn and finally Zach Sanford followed with goals to make it a 4-0 game in the third period. The defense held firm in front of Binnington, and it was all over but the shouting. There was plenty of shouting, cheering, hugging, tears on the ice afterwards. It was mayhem, the happiest type of mayhem imaginable. There was Pat Maroon, the pride of Oakville, with son Anthony. Colton Parayko, handing the Stanley Cup to young Laila Anderson who’s battling a rare disease. The “Sasky Boys” — Saskatchewan natives Brayden Schenn and Jaden Schwartz — posing with the Cup in front of several hundred Blues fans who somehow found their way into the Garden. And Pietrangelo, pausing as he spoke to reporters on the ice to listen to chants of “Let’s Go Blues! Let’s Go Blues!” He goes down in history as the first Blues player to lift the Cup. “Heavier than I thought,” Pietrangelo joked. “My first thought was make sure Bouw (Jay Bouwmeester) gets an opportunity because that’s what you work for. You work for your teammates.” Bouwmeester, a 16-year vet who went his first 10 years in the league without playing in a single playoff game, was the first to get the Cup from Pietrangelo. And then Alexander Steen, Chris Thorburn, David Perron. ... and on it went. The Blues have the Cup. “It means the world to me,” Maroon said. “To bring it back home to St. Louis, it can’t be more better. And being from St. Louis and being with those fans when I was young. And even when I played in the National Hockey League for other teams, I still watched those Blues and how they suffered — and how those fans suffered. “Not anymore. We did it!” Yes they did. It actually happened. You can say it, shout it. The Blues are

2 0

0 0

2 1

— —

4 1

First Period Blues: O’Reilly 28 (Pietrangelo, Bouwmeester), 16:47. Blues: Pietrangelo 13 (Schwartz), 19:52. Penalties: Parayko, STL, (delay of game), 7:57. Second Period None. Penalties: None. Third Period Blues: Schenn 17 (Schwartz, Tarasenko), 11:25. Blues: Sanford 8 (Perron, O’Reilly), 15:22. Bos: Grzelcyk 3 (Krejci), 17:50. Penalties: None. Shots on Goal Blues 4 Boston 12

6 11

10 10

— —

20 33

Power plays St. Louis 0 of 0; Boston 0 of 1. Goaltenders St. Louis, Binnington 24-5-1 (33 shots-32 saves). Boston, Rask 27-13-5 (20-16). A: 17,565 (17,565). T: 2:26. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Cherrey. Blues players celebrate during the first period after Ryan O’Reilly (second from left) tips in a Jay Bouwmeester shot for the first goal of the game.

Stanley Cup champions, going from worst to first in one season. No team in the four major North American team sports (NHL, NBA, NFL, MLB) had ever been in last place overall even one-quarter into a season and gone on to make the league championship series (or in the case of the NFL, the Super Bowl). The Blues, last in points on the morning of Jan. 3, have gone one better. They’ve won the whole thing. It probably doesn’t happen without O’Reilly, who has been playing with a rib injury for much of these playoffs. That’s the reason why his faceoff wins dropped dramatically and his shot seemed to lack its usual zip. “He was the guy that kind of kept us afloat a little bit at the start of the year,” Bouwmeester said. “He was probably the one consistent guy that was playing at a high level. ... right from the start he was lights out.” There’s no doubt O’Reilly helped get them across the finish line. His firstperiod goal gave him eight points in the series (five goals, three assists), a Blues record for a Stanley Cup Final. His 22 points in the playoffs on eight goals and

14 assists set another Blues record. What a journey it’s been for O’Reilly with the Blues. As he sat at the podium with the Conn Smythe Trophy at his side, O’Reilly hearkened back to July 1 when he spoke to Blues general manager Doug Armstrong on the phone after being traded to St. Louis from Buffalo. “I’m looking at the roster, I was so amped up,” O’Reilly said. “I just said, ‘Let’s go win a Cup.’” And here they are. With just 3:13 left in the first period, he tipped in a Bouwmeester shot from near the blueline for the game’s first goal. As such he became only the third player in Stanley Cup Final history to score his team’s opening goal in four consecutive games, joining Sid Smith in 1951 and Norm Ullman in 1966. With just 7.9 seconds left in the period, the Blues struck again. Jaden Schwartz carried the puck out of the neutral zone past the blueline, eluding a would-be check to keep the play alive. Near the goal line, Schwartz passed to back to Pietrangelo, who skated in patiently on Tuukka Rask and beat the Boston goaltender with a backhand for a 2-0 lead.

It was Pietrangelo’s third goal of the postseason; he also had a secondary assist on the O’Reilly goal. So he extended his totals to 16 assists and 19 points — both Blues records for a single postseason. “Great play by Schwartzy; Schenner backs their D off and lets me drive the lane,” Pietrangelo said. “It was a big goal at the time, but those last two really pushed us over the edge.” That would the third-period goals by Schenn and Sanford to spoil the Garden party. Binnington did the rest, keeping the Blues in the game in the first period, and keeping the Bruins off the scoreboard until just 2 minutes 10 seconds remained to play. He entered the game 7-2 this postseason following a loss, with a 1.86 goals-against average and a .933 save percentage. Make that 8-2 after Wednesday. “We know he’s going to be ready,” Pietrangelo had told reporters before Game 7. “You guys have seen the way he goes about his business. I’m not too worried about him.” As things turned out there was no reason to worry. Not at all. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

STANLEY CUP FINAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • S15

MARYVILLE UNIVERSITY

SALUTES THE ST. LOUIS BLUES AND WELCOMES OUR NEWEST RESIDENT—

LORD STANLEY’S CUP!


S16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STANLEY CUP FINAL

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

We’re all about your GOALS!

CONGRATULATIONS! From your friends at Edward Jones


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Saturday • 06.15.2019 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CRYPTOQUIP

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign.

WORD GAMES

CROSSWORD

HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR SATURDAY, JUNE 15, 2019: This year, you often experience a conflict between your emotions and your intellect. You question which voice to follow. Note the end results of each path. You will know what to do. If you’re single, your allure and charisma soar this year. Do not commit until you are 100% sure you want what you have. If you’re attached, the two of you often agree to disagree. Also important to the bond will be to respect each other’s opinions. You might not always agree with SAGITTARIUS, but ultimately you want similar results. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) ★★★★★ You seem to gain new energy and enthusiasm. You could be close to unstoppable no matter what is going on. You see situations and problems from a new, unique perspective. You finally understand where others are coming from. Tonight: Try a new spot. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) ★★★★ Others have dominated the scene of late. You can expect this trend to continue; however, you might find your interactions with one specific person delightful. Your vision of possibilities might be opening up more. Tonight: Dinner for two. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) ★★★★ Defer to another person if you want to maximize the fun possible. This person cannot help but be adventurous and even more willing to try a new experience than you. How your day ends up is anyone’s call. Tonight: Let the good times roll. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) ★★★★ You might want to continue down the present path and see where it takes you. You might like the tone of newness and expansion that you experience. Something quite adventuresome might surface out of the blue. Tonight: Opt for new. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) ★★★★★ You have been rather restrained of late, yet suddenly the barriers seem to dissolve. You let go and express your gregarious personality and ability to make the most of nearly any situation. You also recognize that what

is past is just that. Tonight: In the whirlwind of living. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) ★★★★★ Understand what is holding you back. You could decide to stay close to home, where you find life predictable. Consider an option that you had nixed up to now. What is stopping you? Tonight: Have a spontaneous gathering. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) ★★★★★ Return calls in the morning. What you hear could affect your plans. Several possibilities come forward. Try to do not what is politically correct, but rather what feels right to you. Tonight: You will discover what a great time you can have. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) ★★★ You frequently make plans around friends or a loved one. At this point, finances could play a significant role in your choices. You will be able to see the trees apart from the forest as you learn that money does not determine how good a time you can have. Tonight: Use your imagination. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) ★★★★★ You cannot help but feel energized and upbeat. It would be impossible to hold you back on one of your power days, when your charisma speaks. Knowing that you can have nearly anything you want, what do you want to go for? Tonight: Let the good times rock and roll. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) ★★★ You actually might want to cocoon today. You have been extraordinarily busy and could use a time-out. Invite a favorite person to join you, and veg the day away! Intriguing conversations come up out of the blue. Tonight: Choose quiet. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) ★★★★★ An important friendship dominates your day. Stop and ask yourself if it could be more than just being pals that draws the two of you together. Be honest with yourself. Tonight: Out to the movies or head for a concert. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) ★★★★ One-on-one relating draws your attention to an older relative or important friend. You need to stop and visit this person. Some of you might also decide to put in some overtime. Tonight: Know when to call it a night. BORN TODAY Chinese leader Xi Jinping (1953), actress Leah Remini (1970), actress Helen Hunt (1963)

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com „ Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

MHIPC NROFT RHOYTN MTIRAU ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Yesterday’s

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE QUIZ • BOB JONES

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers Monday) Jumbles: SNACK GRIPE INSIST STURDY Answer: The U.S. flag was changed in 1960 because Alaska and Hawaii were — RISING STARS


06.15.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

Wife’s exposure to swinger vexes husband Dear Abby • My wife, “Libby’s,” dearest friend of 20 years, “Melanie,” has changed her lifestyle. Melanie and her husband have become “swingers.” Now when Libby meets her socially, all Melanie can talk about is her new lifestyle — complete with photos. Plus Melanie is very interested in meeting men when they are out together. I don’t like what she and her husband are doing, and I don’t like my wife being exposed to swinging and meeting men. Libby says Melanie is an old friend, and she doesn’t want to end their relationship. She says I have nothing to worry about because she isn’t interested in this lifestyle. The problem is, I still worry, and I’m not comfortable with this. — Faithful in Dallas Dear Faithful • It would be interesting to know why Melanie brings Libby along when she’s looking for men. (Is she using your wife as “bait”?) It would also be interesting to know how Libby feels when men show an

interest in her friend and she is sitting there like a third wheel. Of course, the bottom line is how this makes you feel, and do you trust your wife. If this is a regular thing, I can see how it would make you uncomfortable. Consider suggesting to Libby that rather than go out for the evening with Melanie, they meet for lunch instead. Dear Abby • My sister recently confided that her husband has about $100,000 in credit card debt. “Sis” bailed him out five years ago to the tune of $400,000, just ahead of bankruptcy. Why she didn’t divorce him then, I don’t know. She says she doesn’t love or respect him, and he does nothing for their home or for her. On top of that, he’s emotionally abusive. My sister has worked hard and lived frugally so she could retire. I suggested she divorce him two years ago. She said she wanted to but didn’t. I’m so mad at him I want to shame him publicly on Facebook

because FB is the ONLY thing he cares about besides spending money. He portrays himself on FB as a caring, compassionate guy and a true friend. Maybe his “friends” should know the truth. — Have My Sister’s Back Dear Have • I’m sorry you didn’t mention why your sister has chosen to stay with someone she doesn’t love or respect and who mistreats her. Please suggest to her that for her own protection she should make an appointment to talk with an accountant and an attorney to discuss what’s going on before her husband’s irresponsibility causes her to become indigent. Beyond that, there is nothing you can do besides give her emotional support as you have been doing. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

MISS MANNERS

TV SATURDAY

Where has that glass of beer been? Dear Miss Manners • At a casual dining restaurant (a national chain), the waitress bringing several drinks to our table — without a tray, for some reason — had carried my glass of beer under her arm. Yes, under her arm. I am still at a loss about what to have done. I didn’t want to embarrass the waitress, but I would have liked to have sent the drink back. And what do you say? “Excuse me, but my drink was under your arm”? Gentle Reader • As the captain who gratefully received a steaming hot mug of coffee from his ensign on a ship pitching in heavy weather can attest, there is a leap of faith in accepting food from the hands of others. (Said captain eventually learned that the delivering ensign took a mouthful of the coffee while in transit, which he returned to the mug before entering the bridge.)

Miss Manners does not condone the unsanitary handling of food, but she is not the health department. And she is practical enough to realize both that there can be differences in what people consider sanitary, and that, were you to return the beer, citing your reason, the server would have boundless opportunity to do something far worse out of sight. Ask for a manager and express your concern. It may or may not affect your next visit, but it will at least shield you from retaliation. Dear Miss Manners • Due to my own carelessness in not writing an entry on my calendar for a housewarming/birthday party, I forgot about it. The invitation from our friends was through social media, to which I had responded that I would attend. My most important concern is what to say to apologize without sounding like the party was of such little importance that I could

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 6/15/19

have forgotten it. A secondary concern is the medium to use to apologize: private message through a social media channel, or handwritten note sent via mail. I think that I know your answer (note via mail), but is it ever acceptable to express apologies (or thanks) electronically? Gentle Reader • Taking the time to write and post a letter, in addition to being the proper thing, will increase your chances of obtaining forgiveness. Miss Manners allows electronic correspondence for actions requiring the most minimal thanks. But as minimal apologies are not likely to sound genuine, she is hard-pressed to think of a case in which they would be either proper or effective.

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7:30

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9:00

9:30

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 06.15.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CAROLYN HAX

He takes advantage of others’ generosity FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Carolyn • My very generous and wealthy (this is relevant) friends offered to throw a dinner for me and my husband for our 10th wedding anniversary. This is a second marriage for both of us so we’re all in our 50s. They asked for the guest list and we gave it to them, including my brother-in-law. He’s the sweetest guy in the world, would do anything for you, but does have this flaw that he’s always looking to “make out” or game the system, if you know what I mean. He ended up ordering pre-dinner drinks that had to total in the hundreds (three shots of a very expensive scotch), he ordered two steaks for dinner and no sides, and he chose a bottle of wine that my friend who sat next to him later told me ran five figures. Our friends didn’t balk at the check but you could tell they were surprised at the final total since they discreetly asked the waiter to confirm the charges. I would like to address it with them and offer to pay toward my brother-in-law’s extravagance. My husband says they had to expect that sort of thing since they picked such a fancy restaurant and didn’t choose a set menu, and we’d just be embarrassing them. Which of us is right? — N Answer • How can someone be the “sweetest guy in the world” who finds ways to get other people — unwittingly — to pay for his indulgences? Howwwwww? That’s exactly what it means to “game the system.” It’s about taking advantage of someone else. Period. There is nothing sweet about it. The idea of it drives me the same kind of nuts as when people declare something a “victimless crime.” Anything that involves taking something from someone else, and that includes even faceless someone elses, even wealthy someone elses, that is not willingly given? That is a crime with a victim. To call it otherwise is to decide you’re just more important than your victim is. Nothing sweet about that, either. When you’re directly or indirectly responsible for causing someone pain, you apologize. For your spouse to declare, more or less, that your friends had it coming because they chose to be extra generous has me clutching my pearls so hard I might rip them off and use them to thwack him and his brother both. Call your friends and say you’re horrified by your brother-in-law’s behavior, of which you are only now fully aware, and offer to make them whole; either way, the next dinner or three will be on you. Also tell your brother-in-law you are upset he took advantage of your friends’ generosity, and let your spouse know you’re doing it; and, finally, when it’s up to you, don’t invite your brother-in-law for anything that involves a menu again, unless you’re ready to pick up the tab.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

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OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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6.15.19 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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6.15.19 St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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