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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 06.08.2018 • $2.00

A METER MONEY TRUCE WHAT THE CITY GETS

$10 million for reserves, funds for liaison oicers, new tow trucks

WHAT JONES WILL GET

BY CELESTE BOTT • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ST. LOUIS • A sit-down this week between city Treasurer Tishaura Jones and Alderman Jefrey Boyd — who have been on opposite ends of a lawsuit for more than a year — has yielded a compromise: Money from St. Louis’ parking meters and lots will be used to restore cuts to neighborhood liaisons, buy new tow trucks and bolster the city’s reserves. • The agreement comes after a tense public meeting on Tuesday in which Boyd, who chairs the Board of Aldermen’s streets, traic and refuse See COMPROMISE • Page A4

Jefrey Boyd

Aldermen will not reduce her staf; no other spending limits will be set

Tishaura Jones

EDITORIAL • ALDERMAN JEFFREY BOYD IS RIGHT. ST. LOUIS TREASURER SHOULD USE PARKING REVENUE TO HELP CITY RESIDENTS. A12

REMEMBERING RED SCHOENDIENST Jef Simms, of St. Louis, kneels at the base of Red Schoendienst’s statue in front of Busch Stadium on Thursday to honor the late Cardinals legend. Schoendienst died Wednesday at age 95, and Cardinals fans showed their afection for the Baseball Hall of Famer by leaving lowers and mementos at the statue.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

IN SPORTS ONLINE SUNDAY

Schoendienst remembered by his former players as a tough, no-nonsense boss. C1 See photo galleries and videos spanning Red Schoendienst’s career as a Cardinal. STLTODAY.COM/WATCH We take an in-depth look at the life and legacy of St. Louis’ beloved “Mr. Cardinal.”

Mizzou makes $45 million in cuts, eliminates 185 jobs

Hastily called meeting on SIU System leader isn’t valid, oicial says

Suicide rates rise sharply across U.S., new report shows

BY MIKE FAULK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY MIKE FAULK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY AMY ELLIS NUTT Washington Post

The University of Missouri will cut 185 jobs and trim $45 million in costs in its budget for the upcoming school year, university oicials announced Thursday. Chancellor Alexander Cartwright said only 30 of those jobs are currently filled, while the rest were already vacant. The 30 individuals being laid of were largely staff positions. The job cuts alone are estimated to save $11 million in the fiscal year. The cuts are an efort to bridge a $49 million gap in

The leader of the Southern Illinois University System Board of Trustees says an emergency meeting called by two board members for Friday is invalid and should not be held. The meeting, announced Wednesday, was called by two trustees on the executive committee with the apparent intent to oust SIU System President Randy Dunn, who is employed by the board. On Thursday, board chairwoman Amy Sholar, who

Suicide rates rose in all but one state from 1999 to 2016, with increases seen across age, gender, race and ethnicity, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In more than half of all deaths in 27 states, the individuals had no known mental health condition when they took their own lives. Missouri’s rate rose 36.4 percent, while Illinois’ rose 22.8 percent.

See MIZZOU • Page A3

See SIU • Page A4

See SUICIDE • Page A3

TODAY

Losing a legend

92°/73° PARTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

91°/73° CHANCE OF STORMS

WEATHER C10

NOT SO FAST

Trump hints at U.S. visit for Kim •

A7

Bayer closes on deal for Monsanto

FAREWELL TOURS DON’T ALWAYS MEAN GOODBYE

Pro football league eyes St. Louis

GO! MAGAZINE

Mikolas rights ship against Marlins

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 06.08.2018 • $2.00

A METER MONEY TRUCE WHAT THE CITY GETS

$10 million for reserves, funds for liaison oicers, new tow trucks

WHAT JONES WILL GET

BY CELESTE BOTT • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ST. LOUIS • A sit-down this week between city Treasurer Tishaura Jones and Alderman Jefrey Boyd — who have been on opposite ends of a lawsuit for more than a year — has yielded a compromise: Money from St. Louis’ parking meters and lots will be used to restore cuts to neighborhood liaisons, buy new tow trucks and bolster the city’s reserves. • The agreement comes after a tense public meeting on Tuesday in which Boyd, who chairs the Board of Aldermen’s streets, traic and refuse See COMPROMISE • Page A4

Jefrey Boyd

Aldermen will not reduce her staf; no other spending limits will be set

Tishaura Jones

EDITORIAL • ALDERMAN JEFFREY BOYD IS RIGHT. ST. LOUIS TREASURER SHOULD USE PARKING REVENUE TO HELP CITY RESIDENTS. A12

REMEMBERING RED SCHOENDIENST Jef Simms, of St. Louis, kneels at the base of Red Schoendienst’s statue in front of Busch Stadium on Thursday to honor the late Cardinals legend. Schoendienst died Wednesday at age 95, and Cardinals fans showed their afection for the Baseball Hall of Famer by leaving lowers and mementos at the statue.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

IN SPORTS ONLINE SUNDAY

Schoendienst remembered by his former players as a tough, no-nonsense boss. C1 See photo galleries and videos spanning Red Schoendienst’s career as a Cardinal. STLTODAY.COM/WATCH We take an in-depth look at the life and legacy of St. Louis’ beloved “Mr. Cardinal.”

Mizzou makes $45 million in cuts, eliminates 185 jobs

Meeting on future of SIU System leader looks to be scrapped

Suicide rates rise sharply across U.S., new report shows

BY MIKE FAULK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FROM STAFF REPORTS

BY AMY ELLIS NUTT Washington Post

The University of Missouri will cut 185 jobs and trim $45 million in costs in its budget for the upcoming school year, university oicials announced Thursday. Chancellor Alexander Cartwright said only 30 of those jobs are currently filled, while the rest were already vacant. The 30 individuals being laid of were largely staff positions. The job cuts alone are estimated to save $11 million in the fiscal year. The cuts are an efort to bridge a $49 million gap in

An emergency meeting that had been called by two members of the Southern Illinois University System Board of Trustees to consider removing the system president appeared unlikely to occur by Thursday evening. The meeting of the board’s three-member executive committee was to be held on Friday with the apparent intent to oust President Randy Dunn, who is employed by the board. On Thursday, board chairwoman Amy Sholar, who

Suicide rates rose in all but one state from 1999 to 2016, with increases seen across age, gender, race and ethnicity, according to a report released Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In more than half of all deaths in 27 states, the individuals had no known mental health condition when they took their own lives. Missouri’s rate rose 36.4 percent, while Illinois’ rose 22.8 percent.

See MIZZOU • Page A3

See SIU • Page A4

See SUICIDE • Page A3

TODAY

Losing a legend

92°/73° PARTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

91°/73° CHANCE OF STORMS

WEATHER C10

NOT SO FAST

Trump hints at U.S. visit for Kim •

A7

Bayer closes on deal for Monsanto

FAREWELL TOURS DON’T ALWAYS MEAN GOODBYE

Pro football league eyes St. Louis

GO! MAGAZINE

Mikolas rights ship against Marlins

2018 S60 T5 INSCRIPTION Lease for 36 months,

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M 1 FRIDAY • 06.08.2018 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM 30 YEARS LATER

PHOTO CONTEST

UPCOMING CHATS

It’s been 30 years since 9-year-old Scott Kleeschulte vanished in St. Charles County. Revisit his case and those of other missing children. stltoday.com/crime

We had over 600 entries in our Gateway Arch photo contest. Vote for your favorite and help select the ones that will appear in our special section on July 1. stltoday.com/contests

Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday

Mizzou backer resigns from group over blufs controversy TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Connie Burkhardt isn’t angry at St. Charles County. She’s not mad at a developer trying to make a profit. She’s upset at the university she loves. Burkhardt, a retired land-use attorney, is a former president of the Board of Curators for the University of Missouri. She’s also a founding member of the Missouri 100, an influential group of donors that often informally advise the president of the university. Late last month, Burkhardt wrote university President Mun Choi and resigned from the Missouri 100. She blames the university for the development controversy involving about 400 acres of Missouri River bluff land in St. Charles County. The property, which is directly across the river from Chesterfield, has been owned by the university since 1948 when it was bought from the federal government for $1 as part of an 8,000-acre Weldon Spring tract. For decades, the land, south of the Missouri Research Park and adjacent to the Katy Trail, has been in a development tug-of-war, with the university at various times trying to sell it and the Missouri Legislature, neighbors and conservationists trying to preserve it. Count Burkhardt is solidly in the conservation camp. She and her husband, Dan, founded the Katy Land Trust in 2010 to work to preserve Missouri River properties around the trail. Burkhardt emailed Choi to resign from the Missouri 100 in protest of his decision to try to sell the Missouri Bluffs property to a developer who wants to build more than 300 homes there. “This is a unique and ecologically fragile piece of property on the Missouri River that deserves the highest levels of stewardship and best practices,” Burkhardt wrote. “Your decision to sell this property with no legal restrictions to protect this river bluf is beyond disappointing to me and to the hundreds of residents who have mobilized to oppose this destructive decision.” For the past couple of months, hundreds of St. Charles County residents, environmentalists, trail enthusiasts and others have urged the county to block the development proposed by Greg Whittaker, owner of NT Home Builders. So far, they’re winning. The St. Charles County

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

John White (right) of Zoltek Corp. listens to St. Charles County Council members speak on a proposed subdivision on the Missouri River blufs on May 21. The company’s factory is just outside the footprint of the proposed development.

Planning and Zoning Commission overwhelmingly disapproved of the rezoning petition, 8-1. In its current zoning, Whittaker, if he completes the purchase of the land from the university, could build about 30 homes on 5-acre lots. “He should just do that,” says Stephen Heitkamp, a lifelong resident of adjacent Weldon Springs Heights. Heitkamp was among the local residents opposing the development who seem perplexed that the St. Charles County Council seems intent on overturning the vote of its planning and zoning commission. The council was scheduled last month to take a vote but delayed it. Bettie Yahn-Kramer hopes the vote never takes place. For Yahn-Kramer, the battle is personal. Her family traces its roots to the area as far back as the 1800s. They were among the families bought out on what was at one point an 8,000-acre tract taken by the federal government for the war effort. Parts of the property were used during World War II for ordnance manufacture and then uranium processing. Much of the original tract has since been sold to the Missouri Department of Conservation as part of the August A. Busch Memorial Conservation Area and Weldon Spring Conservation Area. “It was for the greater good,” YahnKramer says of the land taken from her family. Once the property became part of the university system, it was still intended for the public good, she says. “This is a taxpayer-funded public university,” she says. “The way this came

about is very out of the ordinary for a public university. This was a very quiet deal.” Indeed, among the reasons Burkhardt cites for resigning from the Missouri 100 is the fact that the university didn’t follow a public bidding process, and made no attempt to sell to conservation groups who want to preserve the land. At its core, this is the concept behind groups such as the Katy Land Trust. There is a strong argument, the Burkhardts and their ilk suggest, that preserving the natural landscape around the Missouri River could be as beneficial to the long-term economic benefit of the St. Louis region than building one more subdivision where homeowners can spy two competing outlet malls in the flood plain across the river. Rather than building yet another monument to excess so somebody can make a quick profit, the university should think long term, Burkhardt says. “This development will ruin a pristine stretch of land along our namesake river, the Missouri,” she wrote. Her words recall those of a former Missouri speaker of the House, in 1976, when the Legislature blocked the university from selling about 5,000 acres of the original tract. “The federal government took the land from the people in the first place,” said Rep. Kenneth Rothman. “It ought to be given back to the people. It would be a crime, a public disgrace to sell to a private developer.” Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Talk Blues hockey, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz, 1 p.m. MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m.

PEOPLE New Prince album to be released Warner Bros. Records has announced a new Prince album on what would have been the musician’s 60th birthday. “Piano & A Microphone 1983” from Prince’s storied vault will be released on Sept. 21 on CD, vinyl and digital formats. Warner Bros. says the album features Prince working through nine tracks in a private rehearsal recording at his nowdemolished home studio in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen, Minn. Among the songs are “17 Days,” Joni Mitchell’s “A Case of You,” “Strange Relationship,” “International Lover” and “Purple Rain,” the title song of Prince’s 1984 hit movie. Prince was 57 when he died of an accidental fentanyl overdose at his Paisley Park recording complex in 2016. Giuliani says porn star has ‘no reputation’ • President Donald Trump’s attorney, Rudy Giuliani, said Stormy Daniels’ claim she had sex with Trump in 2006 wasn’t credible because she’s a porn actress with “no reputation.” “I’m sorry I don’t respect a porn star the way I respect a career woman or a woman of substance or a woman who isn’t going to sell her body for sexual exploitation,” Giuliani said at a conference in Tel Aviv. He said people could “just look” at Daniels to know she wasn’t believable. Giuliani’s comments at the “Globes” Capital Market conference Wednesday drew a heated response Thursday from Daniels’ attorney, Michael Avenatti. Avenatti said he “would put her character up against Mr. Giuliani’s any day of the week.”

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Comedian Jerry Stiller is 91. Singer Nancy Sinatra is 78. Country guitarist Tony Rice is 67. “Dilbert” cartoonist Scott Adams is 61. Actor-director Keenan Ivory Wayans is 60. Actress Julianna Margulies is 51. Rapper Kanye West is 41. From news services

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday: 23-28-41-53-56 Powerball: 14 Power play: 3 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $105 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $127 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 02-09-27-38-43 Lucky ball: 13

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 11-13-14-24-36-40 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.7 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 03-06-18-25-29 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $78,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 891 Evening: 411 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 2785 Evening: 2239

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

DIGEST UNIVERSITY CITY/ST. LOUIS > Another trolley delay • The long-delayed Loop Trolley’s latest target period for beginning operations — sometime in the late spring — won’t be met. Spring ends on June 21. Joe Edwards, who heads the trolley’s transportation development district, said Thursday that backers of the line now hope that they’ll be given the go-ahead by federal and state regulators to start service sometime in July. But he said a date has yet to be set. “Everybody is waiting on Federal Transit Administration approval” and on approval from the Missouri Department of Transportation as testing of the trolley line continues, he said. The line will run from the western end of the Delmar Loop in University City to the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park.

allowing fishing at Twin Oaks Park has been suspended until the two lakes are returned to a normal aquatic environment, oicials said Wednesday night. The city is employing a water study specialist in restoring the lakes, oicials said at the Board of Aldermen meeting. A fish kill occurred in January 2017 when chlorine from a nearby construction site escaped through a broken water main. The lakes, about 23,000 and 10,000 square feet, were left full of dead fish. Construction firms have agreed to pay for the restoration. “This has been a mess for a long time, but we’ve finally developed a plan with our engineers,” Mayor Russ Fortune said. “The lakes will be restored to standards recommended by the Missouri Department of Conservation.”

TWIN OAKS > Fishing program is on hold • The catch-and-release program

ROCK HILL > New contract lowers trash bills • Residents got some good news this

week: Their trash bills are dropping as a result of the municipality’s new contract with its trash hauler. The Board of Aldermen on Tuesday night gave initial approval to a five-year contract with Waste Connections that sets the monthly trash collection fee at $12.75. Senior citizens, with a 25 percent discount, will pay $9.56. Currently the general rate is $18.33 a month. Rates for the second year of the contract are $13.01 with seniors paying $9.75. The third-year price is $13.27, and the senior rate is $9.95. The fourth year, the rate will be $13.54 and $10.16 for seniors. In the final year of the contract the price will be $13.81 with a senior rate of $10.35. During an optional sixth year, the rate would be $14.09 while seniors would pay $10.57. Prices for an optional seventh year are $14.38 with the senior rate of $10.79. From staf and correspondent reports

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Thursday Midday: 03-12-25-30-43 Evening: 01-34-37-42-43 LOTTO Thursday: 11-12-18-26-40-42 Extra shot: 05 Estimated jackpot: $3.5 million PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 476 FB: 6 Evening: 584 FB: 0 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 9458 FB: 4 Evening: 7601 FB: 5

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

CORRECTIONS • The proposed University City develop-

ment seeking tax increment financing is at Olive Boulevard and Interstate 170. The intersection was incorrect in a story in Thursday’s main news section.

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FROM A1

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

SUICIDE RATES RISE IN ALL BUT ONE STATE U.S. suicide rate increase from 1999 to 2016 KEY Decrease 1 percent

+22.8 pct. +36.4 percent

RI CT DE MD DC

Increase 6-18 pct. Increase 19-30 pct.

Increase 31-37 pct. Increase 38-58 pct. POST-DISPATCH

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Suicide increasingly seen as public health issue SUICIDE • FROM A1

In North Dakota, the rate jumped more than 57 percent. In the most recent period studied (2014-16), the rate was highest in Montana at 29.2 per 100,000 residents, compared with the national average of 13.4 per 100,000. Only Nevada saw a decline — of 1 percent — for the overall period, though its rate remained higher than the national average. Increasingly, suicide is being seen as not just a mental health problem, but as a public health one. Nearly 45,000 suicides took place in the United States in 2016 — more than twice the number of homicides — making it the 10th leading cause of death. Among people ages 15-34, suicide is the secondleading cause of death. Overall, the most common method used was firearms. “The data are disturbing,” said Anne Schuchat, CDC principal deputy director. “The widespread nature of the increase, in every state but one, really suggests that this is a national problem hitting most communities.” It is hitting many places especially hard. In half of the states, suicide among people 10 years and older increased more than 30 percent. “At what point is it a crisis?” asked Nadine Kaslow, a past president of the American Psychological Association. “Suicide is a public health crisis when you look at the numbers, and they keep going up. It’s up everywhere. And we know that the rates are actually higher than what’s reported. But homicides still get more attention.” One factor in the rising rate, say mental health professionals as well as economists, sociologists and epidemiologists, is the Great Recession that hit 10 years ago. A 2017 study in the journal Social Science and Medicine showed evidence that a rise in the foreclosure rate during that concussive downturn was associated with an overall, though marginal, increase in suicide rates. The increase was higher for white males than any other race or gender group, however. “Research for many years and across social and health science fields has demonstrated a strong relationship between economic downturns and an increase in deaths due to suicide,” Sarah Burgard an associate professor of sociology at the University of Michigan, said in an email on Thursday.

The dramatic rise in opioid addiction also can’t be overlooked, experts say, though untangling accidental from intentional deaths by overdose can be diicult. The CDC has calculated that suicides from opioid overdoses nearly doubled between 1999 and 2014, and data from a 2014 national survey showed that individuals addicted to prescription opioids had a 40 percent to 60 percent higher risk of suicidal ideation. Habitual users of opioids were twice as likely to attempt suicide as people who did not use them.

‘VERY TROUBLESOME’ Kaslow is particularly concerned about what has emerged with suicide among women. “Historically, men had higher death rates than women,” she noted. “That’s equalizing not because men are [taking their lives] less, but women are doing it more. That is very, very troublesome.” Among the stark numbers in the CDC report was the one signaling a high number of suicides among people without a known mental health condition. In the 27 states that use the National Violent Death Reporting System, 54 percent of suicides were by individuals without a known mental illness. But Joshua Gordon, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, said that statistic must be viewed in context. “When you do a psychological autopsy and go and look carefully at medical records and talk to family members of the victims, 90 percent will have evidence of a mental health condition,” he said. That indicates a large portion weren’t diagnosed, “which suggests to me that they’re not getting the help they need,” he said. Cultural attitudes may play a part. Those without a known mental health condition, according to the report, were more likely to be male and belong to a racial or ethnic minority. “The data supports what we know about that notion,” Gordon said. “Men and Hispanics especially are less likely to seek help.” The problems most frequently associated with suicide, according to the study, are strained relationships; life stressors, often involving work or finances; and recent or impending crises. The most important takeaway, mental health professionals say, is that suicide is an issue for not only the mentally ill but for anyone struggling with serious lifestyle issues.

More scholarship money is available MIZZOU • FROM A1

the 2019 fiscal year budget, a gap largely driven by new or increased investments in certain areas, such as $8 million more for scholarships and graduate student support, bringing the total for such programs to $100 million, Vice Chancellor for Finance Rhonda Gibler said. An additional $6.2 million has been budgeted for merit- or performancebased pay increases for faculty and staf, Gibler said. The cuts are being made to areas supported by state allocations, although the Legislature this year approved a budget that makes no further cuts to the university’s allocation. The university expects $204 million from the state for the new fiscal year, which is still about $16 million less than the state appropriated three years ago. Schools seeing the biggest cuts include Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources; Education; Health Professions; Medicine; Nursing; and Veterinary Medicine. The administrative departments of provost, advancement, chancellor, human resources, campus resources, and finance are also seeing cuts of 10 percent or more, according to a document provided by university oicials. While the university expects a larger freshman class this year, overall enrollment will drop because of the size of the previous graduating class, a university spokeswoman said. The incoming freshman class is anticipated to be 14 percent more than the previous school year, but the total of 4,600 freshmen is still much lower than the record 2015 freshman class of 6,200. Mizzou saw its enrollment drop following the fall of 2015 when student civil rights protests led to the resignation of the former system president and chancellor. Other budget cuts include a “significant reduction” of travel budgets for schools and colleges; the elimination of courses with low enrollment or areas where there

is a reduced emphasis on certain academic programs; reductions in departments’ sponsorships of community and campus events; and the elimination of several print-based campus publications that will instead be online only. New investments across campus include the installation of new technology in learning spaces on campus and the expansion of wireless internet access in the Student Center; new video conference equipment to support distance-education courses; expanded clinical services in pediatric psychology, physical therapy and occupational therapy at the School of Health Professions. There also are plans in the Department of Student Affairs for the expansion of testing space for students with disabilities, and the department will also hire a new coordinator for connecting students with campus resources. In May, Mizzou announced it was cutting 12 graduate programs and forming a new interdisciplinary college for 2019. Days later, the University of Missouri System announced a 1 percent tuition increase for in-state undergraduate students, adding about $244 per year in tuition costs. Other students will see a 2.1 percent tuition increase. The MU School of Medicine students will see a 6 percent tuition increase in the fall, and in-state tuition at the MU School of Veterinary Medicine will go up 4.1 percent. The news follows budget and personnel cuts across the UM System that were made last year. In 2017, state budget cuts led to a 9 percent reduction in funds across all public campuses in the state and led to the elimination of about 500 jobs across the four UM System campuses. All of the newly announced changes go into efect July 1, when the school’s fiscal year begins. Mike Faulk • 314-340-8656 @mike_faulk on Twitter mfaulk@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

2 trustees accused of sidestepping bylaws

LOCAL

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

Family still seeks answers in man’s killing by police

SIU • FROM A1

serves on the committee, said the meeting was called without her knowledge and that the system’s bylaws don’t permit the executive committee to make such personnel decisions. Dunn was hired by a vote of the full nine-member board in 2014. Sholar accused the two trustees, J. Phil Gilbert and Joel Sambursky, of trying to work around the trustees’ bylaws by attempting to place Dunn on leave rather than through an outright termination. Friday’s agenda includes the potential for naming an interim president in Dunn’s absence. “It truly baffles me that these two trustees, both representing the Carbondale campus, would attempt to exclude the full Board from participating in this important issue,” Sholar said in a news release. The emergency meeting comes a little more than a week after the last board meeting and two weeks after it was publicly disclosed that Dunn had made disparaging remarks in emails about the leaders of the Carbondale Dunn campus. The comments sparked outrage in Carbondale and calls from two Illinois state legislators for Dunn’s resignation. Sholar said if the meeting went forward and any actions were taken, those actions would be invalid under the board’s bylaws. Sholar also said she would not be in attendance because of the short notice provided ahead of the meeting. According to the SIU System website, the executive committee has the authority “to act for the Board in all matters of an emergency nature upon which immediate decisions are necessary for the present welfare of the University.” How to interpret those powers is at the heart of the dispute between the trustees. Randy Pembrook, the chancellor of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, also challenged the reason and timing for the meeting scheduled Friday. “I think something as important as the leadership of the system should be the conversation of the entire board,” Pembrook said. Pembrook said he believes Dunn’s leadership is being threatened as a result of his support for reallocating a share of state funding from Carbondale, the system’s flagship campus, to Edwardsville. The funding fight revolves around the fact that Carbondale’s enrollment has fallen by thousands in recent years while the newer Edwardsville campus has steadily gained and may surpass Carbondale’s enrollment in a few years. Carbondale said it needs its current state allocation to reestablish itself, and that any cuts would contribute to more cuts and a decline in the quality of the university. The Carbondale campus currently gets more than 60 percent of state funding allocated to the system, although it only has about 1,000 more students than the Edwardsville campus. The debate has led to a proposal in the Illinois Legislature to separate the schools into their own systems, which would efectively let the Legislature decide which campus gets how much in funding. Asked about Pembrook’s comments Thursday, SIU Carbondale spokeswoman Rae Morrow Goldsmith only responded, “This is an issue between the board and president.” The board meeting is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Friday in Carbondale. Mike Faulk • 314-340-8656 @mike_faulk on Twitter mfaulk@post-dispatch.com

‘I THINK SOMETHING AS IMPORTANT AS THE LEADERSHIP OF THE SYSTEM SHOULD BE THE CONVERSATION OF THE ENTIRE BOARD.’ SIUE chancellor Randy Pembrook

Sons sue Sunset Hills father in murder of their mother

KSDK PHOTO

John K. McLaughlin attends a bail reduction hearing before Judge John Borbonus in 2016. BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Gina Torres and her son Angelo Mokwa, 11, listen to speakers at a protest Thursday on the steps of St. Louis City Hall. The protest marked one year since Isaiah Hammet, Torres’ son, was fatally shot by police.

Relatives want to see results of police study, DOJ to investigate BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Relatives of Isaiah M. Hammett and some activists marked the one-year anniversary of his death Thursday, denouncing police for fatally shooting Hammett in a raid on his home on South Kingshighway. They want police to reveal what their internal investigations have found, and they want the U.S. Department of Justice to conduct its own inquiry. They chanted outside police headquarters, and a few Protesters stand on the steps of City Hall in St. Louis on Thursday during got inside the headquarters a protest marking a year since SWAT oicers fatally shot Isaiah Hammet lobby before police locked during a no-knock raid at his home in St. Louis. the front doors. SWAT oicers shot and killed said. “So we believe he was un- raided their home again in October while executing a search Hammett, 21, on June 7, 2017, justly murdered.” Hammett’s family, Chasnof, warrant in a robbery investigaas they tried to serve a warrant; Hammett was suspected of be- state Rep. Bruce Franks, D-St. tion. The home is in the 5400 ing involved in the sale of illegal Louis, and protesters were block of South Kingshighway. Two men were arrested in among 35 people who met outguns and drugs. Police say that Hammett side City Hall on Thursday, then that raid, and one was later opened fire on them with an marched to police headquarters. charged with robbery and AK-47 and that there was a They held signs that said “100 armed criminal action. Torres said children were in “firefight” inside the house. shots, 1 dead, 0 warnings” and Relatives dispute that account. “One year later, where’s the in- the home when police entered. Officers used a flash-bang devestigation?” No oicers were injured. Hammett’s mother, Gina Tor- vice in a room where two boys, John Chasnoff, longtime member of the activist organi- res, said police were still trying ages 6 and 10, were sleeping, zation Coalition Against Police to keep evidence away from the Torres said. The device exCrimes and Repression, called public. “They don’t want my ploded on the corner of the bed, what police did to Hammett a son’s story out there at all on burning a hole in a blanket and “murder.” Chasnoff said the what they did to my son. They charring the mattress, she said. The children were shaken but family had hired a forensic ex- are trying to keep it quiet.” Schron Jackson, a department unhurt, she said. pert to examine the bullet holes. “Though police say he fired spokeswoman, said the investi- Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 at them, there is no evidence gation was ongoing. @Hollinshed57 on Twitter Torres also is upset that police dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com of that in the house,” Chasnof

CLAYTON • The two sons of a Sunset Hills man accused of murdering his wife and burying her body in a shallow grave three years ago have filed suit against their father, blaming him for their mother’s death and seeking damages. John C. and Christopher McLaughlin filed the lawsuit May 31 in St. Louis County Circuit Court against their father, calling his conduct “outrageous and with evil motive or reckless indiference to the rights” of their mother. John K. McLaughlin, 60, is set to stand trial in September on a charge of second-degree murder in the killing of his wife, Linda McLaughlin. She disappeared June 1, 2015, shortly after meeting her estranged husband at their business, McLaughlin Hoist & Crane, in Linda Fenton. McLaughlin Police discovered her remains in a remote area of the Mark Twain National Forest near Success, Mo., in April 2016, which led to charges against her husband. His lawyer, Scott Rosenblum, has called the case “very defensible.” The lawsuit filed May 31 claims John K. McLaughlin “intentionally caused the death of Linda through the use of physical force” and seeks unspecified damages. Linda McLaughlin had filed for divorce in December 2014. She and John K. McLaughlin, her husband of 35 years, had been scheduled to appear in court for their pending divorce three days after her disappearance. She was asking for their house and $2,000 a month to cover her living expenses. Her husband had moved out of the home. She alleged, in court papers, that he had screamed at her, threatened her and destroyed and booby-trapped items in the home. Last June, a St. Louis County judge granted a temporary restraining order sought by Linda McLaughlin’s sons, freezing John K. McLaughlin’s assets until a jury determines whether he killed her. They also filed a civil lawsuit against their father last year, seeking their mother’s assets. McLaughlin has been held at the St. Louis County Jail since he was charged. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Lawsuit over parking money is set to continue COMPROMISE • FROM A1

committee, proposed cutting five positions in Jones’ oice, including her chief of staf. City aldermen have long wanted to see more of the roughly $20 million in revenue collected annually from St. Louis’ parking meters and lots make its way into city coffers. Boyd was among the plaintiffs who sued last year to overturn state laws governing how much the treasurer can turn over to the city, and won, but Jones’ oice is appealing the decision. That larger battle will continue. But the two have reached a truce concerning this year’s parking budget. Jones said she will transfer $10 million into the city’s reserves, savings that would help St. Louis weather an economic downturn and receive higher credit ratings. (The general revenue fund, by contrast, pays for most city services.) Jones also agreed to contribute $800,000 to restore previously announced cuts to neighborhood

officers and $250,000 for new tow trucks. In return, there will be no cuts to the treasurer’s staff or additional spending restrictions on her oice in the new budget. “This agreement with the city accomplishes two things,” Jones said. “It protects my staff from petty political attacks, and it also helps the city shore up its reserve funds in order to improve its long-term fiscal health.” Boyd said “humility and civility” on both sides brought the long-feuding oicials to the table. “We took our time. We listened to one another,” said Boyd, who represents the 22nd Ward. “We had disagreements, but at the end of the day, we put the people first of the city of St. Louis. And that’s called a winwin.” Jones’ chief of staff, Jared Boyd, who is not related to Jeffrey Boyd, said the treasurer has long said she didn’t want parking money to be a quick fix for a budget shortfall. This agreement

helps with some immediate needs, but it also addresses the city’s overall financial standing, he said. “The process wasn’t ideal, but in terms of helping the city of St. Louis’ long-term fiscal health, that’s what’s important at the end of the day,” Jared Boyd said. The initial draft of the city’s fiscal 2019 budget called for cutting 12 of the city’s neighborhood stabilization oicers, plus a supervisor. The oicers, known as “NSOs,” act as liaisons between St. Louis residents and the oicials, agencies and police oicers who serve them. They give residents a person to address complaints to in each ward, in addition to the ward alderman. Top officials voted to restore the cuts amid public outcry, meaning aldermen were looking for a source of funding for them. “It’s a big step. Ten million dollars is a big deal for the city of St. Louis. And saving our NSOs, who are the eyes and ears of our wards, that’s a big deal,” Jefrey Boyd said.

In a statement commending the compromise, Aldermanic President Lewis Reed noted the city’s recent sales tax increases, lack of funding for recreation centers, dipping credit ratings and higher fees for garbage pickup. “All the while millions of dollars have been held in the Oice of the Treasurer. (This bill) begins the process of putting those funds to work for the people of St. Louis,” Reed said. With the amendments from Jones’ and Boyd’s meeting, the streets committee unanimously approved the amended parking budget. At the treasurer’s suggestion, the budget will go back to the Parking Commission for review as a courtesy, Boyd said. The full Board of Aldermen still needs to approve the bill. The budget as a whole must be passed by the Board of Aldermen and signed by the mayor by July 1. Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

2 trustees accused of sidestepping bylaws

LOCAL

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

Family still seeks answers in man’s killing by police

SIU • FROM A1

serves on the committee, said the meeting was called without her knowledge and that the system’s bylaws don’t permit the executive committee to make such personnel decisions. Later Thursday, one of the other members of the committee who’d called for the meeting, Joel Sambursky, urged its cancellation. Sholar accused Sambursky and the third executive committee member, J. Phil Gilbert, of trying to work around the trustees’ bylaws by attempting to place Dunn on leave rather than approve an outright termination. Friday’s agenda included the potential for naming an interim president in Dunn’s absence. “It truly baffles me that these two trustees, both representing the Carbondale campus, would attempt to exclude the full Board from participating in this important issue,” Sholar said in a news release. The emergency meeting was set for a little more than a week after the last board meeting and two weeks after it was publicly disclosed Dunn that Dunn had made disparaging remarks in emails about the leaders of the Carbondale campus. The comments sparked outrage in Carbondale and calls from two Illinois state legislators for Dunn’s resignation. Sholar said if the meeting went forward and any actions were taken, those actions would be invalid under the board’s bylaws. Sholar also said she would not be in attendance because of the short notice provided ahead of the meeting. According to the SIU System website, the executive committee has the authority “to act for the Board in all matters of an emergency nature upon which immediate decisions are necessary for the present welfare of the University.” How to interpret those powers is at the heart of the dispute between the trustees. In his response, Sambursky said the meeting had been called under the guidance of the university’s general counsel and that it was in line with board policy. It was called “after Chair Sholar, who is in receipt of the same concerning information that all Trustees have, decided to cancel the July board meeting with no notice or input from members of the executive committee,” Sambursky said. He said the board wasn’t set to meet again until September but that on Thursday Sholar had agreed to convene the board on June 21 and discuss Dunn’s tenure. “Therefore, I am requesting tomorrow’s executive committee meeting to be canceled and I am asking Chair Sholar to call a special meeting of the full Board to discuss and possibly take action on the same items listed for tomorrow’s executive committee meeting,” Sambursky said. He urged that the board meeting be held as soon as possible. Like Sholar, Randy Pembrook, the chancellor of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, also challenged the reason and timing for the meeting scheduled Friday. “I think something as important as the leadership of the system should be the conversation of the entire board,” Pembrook said. Pembrook said he believes Dunn’s leadership is being threatened as a result of his support for reallocating a share of state funding from Carbondale, the system’s flagship campus, to Edwardsville. The funding fight revolves around the fact that Carbondale’s enrollment has fallen by thousands in recent years while the newer Edwardsville campus has steadily gained and may surpass Carbondale’s enrollment in a few years. Carbondale said it needs its current state allocation to reestablish itself, and that any cuts would contribute to more cuts and a decline in the quality of the university.

Sons sue Sunset Hills father in murder of their mother

KSDK PHOTO

John K. McLaughlin attends a bail reduction hearing before Judge John Borbonus in 2016. BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Gina Torres and her son Angelo Mokwa, 11, listen to speakers at a protest Thursday on the steps of St. Louis City Hall. The protest marked one year since Isaiah Hammet, Torres’ son, was fatally shot by police.

Relatives want to see results of police study, DOJ to investigate BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Relatives of Isaiah M. Hammett and some activists marked the one-year anniversary of his death Thursday, denouncing police for fatally shooting Hammett in a raid on his home on South Kingshighway. They want police to reveal what their internal investigations have found, and they want the U.S. Department of Justice to conduct its own inquiry. They chanted outside police headquarters, and a few Protesters stand on the steps of City Hall in St. Louis on Thursday during got inside the headquarters a protest marking a year since SWAT oicers fatally shot Isaiah Hammet lobby before police locked during a no-knock raid at his home in St. Louis. the front doors. SWAT oicers shot and killed said. “So we believe he was un- raided their home again in October while executing a search Hammett, 21, on June 7, 2017, justly murdered.” Hammett’s family, Chasnof, warrant in a robbery investigaas they tried to serve a warrant; Hammett was suspected of be- state Rep. Bruce Franks, D-St. tion. The home is in the 5400 ing involved in the sale of illegal Louis, and protesters were block of South Kingshighway. Two men were arrested in among 35 people who met outguns and drugs. Police say that Hammett side City Hall on Thursday, then that raid, and one was later opened fire on them with an marched to police headquarters. charged with robbery and AK-47 and that there was a They held signs that said “100 armed criminal action. Torres said children were in “firefight” inside the house. shots, 1 dead, 0 warnings” and Relatives dispute that account. “One year later, where’s the in- the home when police entered. Officers used a flash-bang devestigation?” No oicers were injured. Hammett’s mother, Gina Tor- vice in a room where two boys, John Chasnoff, longtime member of the activist organi- res, said police were still trying ages 6 and 10, were sleeping, zation Coalition Against Police to keep evidence away from the Torres said. The device exCrimes and Repression, called public. “They don’t want my ploded on the corner of the bed, what police did to Hammett a son’s story out there at all on burning a hole in a blanket and “murder.” Chasnoff said the what they did to my son. They charring the mattress, she said. The children were shaken but family had hired a forensic ex- are trying to keep it quiet.” Schron Jackson, a department unhurt, she said. pert to examine the bullet holes. “Though police say he fired spokeswoman, said the investi- Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 at them, there is no evidence gation was ongoing. @Hollinshed57 on Twitter Torres also is upset that police dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com of that in the house,” Chasnof

CLAYTON • The two sons of a Sunset Hills man accused of murdering his wife and burying her body in a shallow grave three years ago have filed suit against their father, blaming him for their mother’s death and seeking damages. John C. and Christopher McLaughlin filed the lawsuit May 31 in St. Louis County Circuit Court against their father, calling his conduct “outrageous and with evil motive or reckless indiference to the rights” of their mother. John K. McLaughlin, 60, is set to stand trial in September on a charge of second-degree murder in the killing of his wife, Linda McLaughlin. She disappeared June 1, 2015, shortly after meeting her estranged husband at their business, McLaughlin Hoist & Crane, in Linda Fenton. McLaughlin Police discovered her remains in a remote area of the Mark Twain National Forest near Success, Mo., in April 2016, which led to charges against her husband. His lawyer, Scott Rosenblum, has called the case “very defensible.” The lawsuit filed May 31 claims John K. McLaughlin “intentionally caused the death of Linda through the use of physical force” and seeks unspecified damages. Linda McLaughlin had filed for divorce in December 2014. She and John K. McLaughlin, her husband of 35 years, had been scheduled to appear in court for their pending divorce three days after her disappearance. She was asking for their house and $2,000 a month to cover her living expenses. Her husband had moved out of the home. She alleged, in court papers, that he had screamed at her, threatened her and destroyed and booby-trapped items in the home. Last June, a St. Louis County judge granted a temporary restraining order sought by Linda McLaughlin’s sons, freezing John K. McLaughlin’s assets until a jury determines whether he killed her. They also filed a civil lawsuit against their father last year, seeking their mother’s assets. McLaughlin has been held at the St. Louis County Jail since he was charged. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Lawsuit over parking money is set to continue COMPROMISE • FROM A1

committee, proposed cutting five positions in Jones’ oice, including her chief of staf. City aldermen have long wanted to see more of the roughly $20 million in revenue collected annually from St. Louis’ parking meters and lots make its way into city coffers. Boyd was among the plaintiffs who sued last year to overturn state laws governing how much the treasurer can turn over to the city, and won, but Jones’ oice is appealing the decision. That larger battle will continue. But the two have reached a truce concerning this year’s parking budget. Jones said she will transfer $10 million into the city’s reserves, savings that would help St. Louis weather an economic downturn and receive higher credit ratings. (The general revenue fund, by contrast, pays for most city services.) Jones also agreed to contribute $800,000 to restore previously announced cuts to neighborhood

officers and $250,000 for new tow trucks. In return, there will be no cuts to the treasurer’s staff or additional spending restrictions on her oice in the new budget. “This agreement with the city accomplishes two things,” Jones said. “It protects my staff from petty political attacks, and it also helps the city shore up its reserve funds in order to improve its long-term fiscal health.” Boyd said “humility and civility” on both sides brought the long-feuding oicials to the table. “We took our time. We listened to one another,” said Boyd, who represents the 22nd Ward. “We had disagreements, but at the end of the day, we put the people first of the city of St. Louis. And that’s called a winwin.” Jones’ chief of staff, Jared Boyd, who is not related to Jeffrey Boyd, said the treasurer has long said she didn’t want parking money to be a quick fix for a budget shortfall. This agreement

helps with some immediate needs, but it also addresses the city’s overall financial standing, he said. “The process wasn’t ideal, but in terms of helping the city of St. Louis’ long-term fiscal health, that’s what’s important at the end of the day,” Jared Boyd said. The initial draft of the city’s fiscal 2019 budget called for cutting 12 of the city’s neighborhood stabilization oicers, plus a supervisor. The oicers, known as “NSOs,” act as liaisons between St. Louis residents and the oicials, agencies and police oicers who serve them. They give residents a person to address complaints to in each ward, in addition to the ward alderman. Top officials voted to restore the cuts amid public outcry, meaning aldermen were looking for a source of funding for them. “It’s a big step. Ten million dollars is a big deal for the city of St. Louis. And saving our NSOs, who are the eyes and ears of our wards, that’s a big deal,” Jefrey Boyd said.

In a statement commending the compromise, Aldermanic President Lewis Reed noted the city’s recent sales tax increases, lack of funding for recreation centers, dipping credit ratings and higher fees for garbage pickup. “All the while millions of dollars have been held in the Oice of the Treasurer. (This bill) begins the process of putting those funds to work for the people of St. Louis,” Reed said. With the amendments from Jones’ and Boyd’s meeting, the streets committee unanimously approved the amended parking budget. At the treasurer’s suggestion, the budget will go back to the Parking Commission for review as a courtesy, Boyd said. The full Board of Aldermen still needs to approve the bill. The budget as a whole must be passed by the Board of Aldermen and signed by the mayor by July 1. Celeste Bott • 314-340-8119 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Parson to name picks to school board next week

LAW & ORDER

Panel is required by state law to have meeting in June BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri Gov. Mike

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis ireighters Craig Cash (left) and Brandon Skaggs with Engine 29 work Thursday on putting out hot spots in the rubble of a two-alarm ire at 1430 South Vandeventer Avenue in St. Louis.

ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Former oicer charged with impersonating a cop • A former police oicer who said he was still a cop when he was stopped by a deputy for speeding this year has been charged with impersonating an oicer, authorities said. Jefrey P. Grandcolas II, 39, of Castle Ridge Drive in Troy, Ill., was charged May 22, according to St. Clair County authorities. Grandcolas had been a Brooklyn police oicer until November, authorities said. But when he was stopped on Route 15 by a St. Clair County deputy for speeding Grandcolas on Feb. 7, he said he was a Brooklyn oicer and still carried credentials. Grandcolas posted bail on the charge and was released. He was also out on bail on a felony theft charge from East St. Louis, authorities said. EAST ST. LOUIS > Man is fatally shot • A Belleville man was fatally shot Wednesday night in East St. Louis. Illinois State Police are investigating the shooting. Bruce Henley Jr., 23, was shot in the left shoulder about 8:45 p.m. in the 1400 block of North 44th Street. He was taken to Touchette Regional Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 9:40 p.m., according to St. Clair County Coroner Calvin Dye Sr. Henley lived in the 900 block of Bristow Street in Belleville, according to authorities. They asked anyone with information to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866371-8477. ST. LOUIS > Man escapes after being trapped in burning building • A vagrant called police early Thursday to say he was trapped inside a raging ire at a commercial building, then managed to get out on

his own as ire crews rolled up to ight the predawn, two-alarm blaze. Flames were coming out of every window of the sprawling, half-block brick building at 1430 South Vandeventer Avenue when ireighters arrived about 4 a.m. A police oicer said he was on the phone with a man trapped inside an adjacent storage garage. “When I got here, the cop ran up to me and said, ‘There’s somebody in there,’” said St. Louis Fire Battalion Chief Paul Weil. “I said, ‘Really? How do you know that?’ He said, ‘I just talked to him on the phone.’” But within minutes, the man appeared outside, behind the two-story building, and was talking to Weil after apparently escaping on his own. The man told Weil he had been asleep in the back of the building and woke up to see the smoke and ire. It took ireighters about an hour to bring the blaze under control, in the city’s Botanical Heights neighborhood. One ireighter became overheated, but he was not taken to a hospital. The vagrant declined medical treatment.

Brown

Holmes

ST. LOUIS > Suspects in theft ring vanish • Two of the primary suspects charged in a proliic car break-in ring police say was behind hundreds of thefts in the city are on the loose after tampering with GPS devices that are supposed to be tracking their locations. Court records show that Lamonte Brown, 34, and Jason Holmes, 38, both tampered with GPS trackers that were required as a condition of release. Neither has surrendered himself after 29 additional property damage and

theft charges were added against them May 26. “We are standing by our not guilty plea, but I am urging (Brown) to surrender on new charges,” Brown’s attorney, Joel Schwartz, said Thursday. Brown and Holmes were irst charged in April after police discovered hundreds of stolen items in several raids tracked to crimes that spanned years, crossed state lines and accounted for a signiicant portion of car break-ins in the city’s downtown neighborhoods, investigators have said. They were each initially charged with three counts of property damage and three counts of stealing. Both Brown and Holmes had their bail set at $50,000 on April 27 and each was released after posting 10 percent of that sum. GPS monitoring was later added as a condition of their bail as detectives and oicials complained about the release and criticized prosecutors. Susan Ryan, spokeswoman for the circuit attorney’s oice, said at the time that the decision for the bail conditions rested with the judge, not prosecutors. Dozens of charges were added against the men in late May, but now they can’t be found. So far, six people police believe are connected to the ring have been charged with more than 90 charges combined. ST. LOUIS > Man found fatally shot at gas station • A man was found shot to death at a St. Louis gas station early Thursday. The man, who police had not identiied, was found dead about 4 a.m. by oicers called to a reported shooting at a Gas Mart. The gas station is at 5728 West Florissant Avenue, in the Walnut Park East neighborhood west of Riverview Boulevard. Police had no information on a suspect.

Where uality Counts... Qualit Since 1977

Parson is expected to appoint at least two new members to the state school board next week in a bid to close a controversial chapter of the state’s education bureaucracy. Parson, who took over for former Gov. Eric Greitens last week, has said getting the board up and running after five months in limbo is a priority. And under state statute, the board is required to meet in June. “We are very well aware of the state school board,” Parson said after he was sworn in last week. “We aim to get that board up and running as soon as we can.” Word of the pending appointments came after a meeting Thursday between Parson and state school board President Charlie Shields. Shields, a former state senator, said he expects an announcement Tuesday or Wednesday. “I think they’ve got a couple of people in mind,” Shields told the Post-Dispatch. The board has had to cancel five of its 11 meetings scheduled for this year because it lacks enough members to meet and take action. It has just three of eight members because the Senate refused to confirm five Greitens appointees after he stacked the board in order to oust former schools commissioner Margie Vandeven last year. Parson would need to appoint at least two people for the board to have a quorum and hold its next meeting, which is set for Thursday. “We’ve been working constantly behind the scenes here just to make sure we are ready with everything that needs to go before the board the minute that they can meet,” said DESE spokesman Tyler Madsen. As a backup, the board also has scheduled June 26 for a meeting if Parson doesn’t act next week.

“We’ve had these dates circled for quite a while because we knew that by state statute we’ve got to have a meeting in June,” Madsen said. Current board members are Shields of St. Joseph, Mike Jones of St. Louis and Vic Lenz of St. Louis County. Among items facing the board is the hiring of a replacement for Vandeven, who had been in the post since 2015. Shields said making the hire is a priority, but there is no need to rush the process because the interim commissioner, Roger Dorson, is well qualified to handle the duties. The board also must decide whether to renew six charter schools, including Lafayette Preparatory Academy, Lift for Life Academy and Eagle College Prep, all in St. Louis. And, it must weigh in on whether an elected school board should regain control of St. Louis Public Schools from the appointed Special Administrative Board. “There are a lot of things that are not complicated but they have been backed up,” Shields said. An announcement on the appointees is not expected to come when Parson addresses a joint session of the House and Senate at 5 p.m. Monday. The Legislature is currently in a special session that was called to consider the impeachment of Greitens over the circumstances of an extramarital affair and his use of a charity donor list to raise money for his campaign. With the former governor now gone after his abrupt resignation, the two chambers will hear from Parson and then adjourn. If Parson were to make the picks before the Senate adjourns from its special session, the appointees would need to be confirmed by the Legislature’s upper chamber. If he waits until the session is over, the new members can be sworn in as interim appointees and begin serving immediately.

Man killed in car accidentally shot by another passenger, police say ger of the Mustang reaching for a gun. McKissic told police that’s when he heard a gunshot fired from the back of his ST. LOUIS • A series of angry text mes- own car, charges say. He said he believed sages preceded a deadly shooting one of the men in his back seat accidenWednesday in the city’s Patch neighbor- tally shot and killed Floyd, 38. The Audi and Mustang both crashed, hood, charges say. But the man killed wasn’t part of the charges say. McKissic told investigatext exchange and may have been ac- tors that after the crashes, the passencidentally shot, according to charges ger in the Mustang fired a shot at him but against a man who had sent threatening missed, then hopped into a white SUV that sped of. texts. A witness who lives in the area The shooting victim, Ronald told police he saw a man later Floyd, was found fatally shot about identified as McKissic get out of 6 a.m. Wednesday in the 500 block the blue Audi and dump a gun in a of West Davis Street. It’s not clear trash can. Police found the gun, a from charges who shot him. .40-caliber pistol. According to charges, Floyd had McKissic, 31, of the 5200 block been riding with Addrian J. McKof South Grand Boulevard, was issic and two other men in a blue McKissic charged Thursday with secondAudi when he was shot. McKissic was driving and Floyd was in the front degree murder (also called felony murpassenger seat. McKissic, Floyd and one der), armed criminal action, evidence tampering and unlawful gun possession. of the other passengers were armed. McKissic, who has a felony assault In the hours leading up to the shooting, McKissic had exchanged angry text mes- conviction from January, was barred from sages with another man over a women possessing a gun. He is charged under a who had dated both of them, charges say. law that allows someone to be charged McKissic told the man, “your so tough with second-degree murder if someone I’ma have to pop u.” He also sent a text else is killed while the defendant is comto the woman threatening the other man mitting a felony, even if the defendant didn’t directly cause the death. Police and saying, “...let’s play I live guns.” McKissic later told detectives that he said in charging documents that McKiswas driving the Audi on Davis Street sic was “committing the crime of felon in when he recognized the man with whom possession of a firearm and that Ronald he exchanged the texts riding in a red Floyd was killed as a result of the perpeMustang that pulled alongside McKissic’s tration of that felony.” McKissic’s bail was set at $200,000 car. McKissic told police he sped up when he saw what he thought was the passen- cash.

BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-dispatch

1934 plane once owned by Lindbergh to leave longtime Lambert perch BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

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A circa 1934 plane once owned by Charles Lindbergh will soon be moved from its familiar display spot at St. Louis Lambert International Airport to a storage facility to preserve it for the future. The plane, a D-145 Monocoupe, has been displayed at Lambert on loan from the Missouri Historical Society since 1979 except for an airport renovation project between 2011 and 2013. “We feel it needs a rest for a while” from public display, Leigh Albright Walters, a spokeswoman for the society, said Thursday. Katherine Van Allen, managing director of museum services, said the plane still retains its original fabric covering and is thus very rare. Storing it in a humidity- and climatecontrolled facility follows current “best practices” in collections care, she said. The plane was built by Lambert Aircraft Corp. for the federal government and later sold to Lindbergh. Lindbergh flew it regularly. For years, it was displayed at the airport a few yards from a reproduction of Lindbergh’s Spirit of St. Louis, the plane used in his historic trans-Atlantic flight in 1927.

The D-145 Monocoupe has long hung from the ceiling over the C concourse security checkpoint in Terminal 1.

That was moved in 1998 to the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park, which is operated by the historical society. The D-145, suspended from the ceiling over the C concourse security checkpoint in Terminal 1, will be taken down late Tuesday. The society did not release the location of the storage facility but said it is in the St. Louis area. Another plane owned by the historical society, a 1933 Red Monocoupe 110 Special with no connection to Lindbergh, will remain at Lambert over a checkpoint in Terminal 2. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

Asylum seekers lining up at the border Requests have tripled to hit highest level in more than 20 years BY ELLIOT SPAGAT AND NOMAAN MERCHANT Associated Press

TIJUANA, MEXICO • Undaunted by President Donald Trump’s tough talk on immigration, asylum seekers are forming unusually long lines at the Mexican border, with parents and children sleeping on cardboard in the sweltering heat and waiting for days or even weeks to present themselves to U.S. inspectors. Wait times of a few hours or longer are not uncommon at the border. But the backlogs that have developed over the past several weeks at crossings in California, Arizona and Texas — and people sleeping out in the open for days at a time — are rare. Telma Ramirez made the trip from El Salvador to seek asylum in the U.S. She arrived at the border in Tijuana with her 5-year-old son and year-old daughter, only to find a crush of others ahead of her. The 27-year-old mother kept checking in at the border crossing to see if civilian volunteers were close to calling their numbers, in a scene that resembled the host station at a crowded restaurant. Finally, on the 20th day, Ramirez made it to the front of the line. “You must come every day to see if it’s your turn. If you don’t come, you’ll lose your place in line,” Ramirez said. The exact reasons for

ASSOCIATED PRESS

People seeking political asylum in the United States line up Monday to be interviewed in Tijuana, Mexico, just across the U.S. border south of San Diego.

the bottleneck are unclear. But the U.S. has been seeing a surge in requests for asylum over the past few years. A top Homeland Security Department official told lawmakers last month that new asylum filings tripled from 2014 to 2017 to nearly 142,000, the highest level in more than 20 years. The oicial, Francis Cissna, director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, said the asylum backlog stood at 318,000 cases. U.S. Customs and Border Protection said in a statement that any waits in Mexico are expected to be temporary. It said the number of people the agency can take depends on such factors as detention space, complexity of cases, translation requirements, medical needs and traic at the crossing. Some advocates insist the administration has enough resources to avoid the delays and is drag-

ging its feet to discourage people from trying to come across. The Trump administration has declared a new “zero-tolerance” policy of prosecuting every immigrant arrested for illegal entry, a practice that is separating parents from their children. Asylum seekers who turn themselves in to border inspectors usually do not face such a fate. At the Hidalgo, Texas, border crossing, parents and children sleep on cardboard on a bridge separating the two countries waiting for U.S. authorities to signal their time has come, according to volunteers bringing them food and water. Lawyers said asylum seekers at the Nogales, Ariz., crossing are camping out for up to five days to make a claim. Across from San Diego, more than 100 asylum seekers gathered Monday in a large plaza at the Tijuana side of the nation’s

busiest border crossing, alongside pushcart vendors selling oatmeal, tamales, burritos and smoothies.

ARRESTS GROW Separately, in another indication that Trump’s hard-line actions and rhetoric have had limited effect, the administration said Wednesday that border arrests topped 50,000

for a third straight month in May. That is roughly three times what they were a year earlier and higher than the levels seen during much of the Obama administration. Under federal law and international treaties, people can obtain asylum in the U.S. if they have a well-grounded fear of persecution back home. Trump administration officials and their allies have charged that the system is rife with fraud and groundless claims and have demanded stricter standards. Senior White House aide Stephen Miller said last month that the integrity of the immigration system is “completely shattered” and legitimate asylum cases have become “a needle in a haystack.” About 8 of every 10 asylum seekers pass an initial screening and are then either held in an immigration detention center or released on bail into the U.S. while their cases wind through immigration courts, which can take years. Many asylum claims are eventually denied.

DREAMERS DEAL? Meanwhile, a leader of House moderates said Thursday that a tentative deal with conservatives has emerged to help young “Dreamer” immigrants stay in the U.S. legally. But details remained unclear and nothing has been finalized, the lawmaker said in an interview with The Associated Press. Rep. Jeff Denham, RCalif., said that under the offer from the hard-right House Freedom Caucus, young immigrants brought illegally to the U.S. as children could get a new visa that would let them stay in the country for eight years. He said he was unclear what the pathway to remaining legally after that would be. It was uncertain if the proposal represented a breakthrough in the longrunning GOP divide between moderates and conservatives on immigration, or would devolve into the latest failed attempt to bridge that gap. It came the same day that House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said party leaders would craft an attempt at compromise.

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NEWS

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

Trump dangles White House visit for Kim President drops talk of ‘maximum pressure’ on North Korea in favor of ‘friendly negotiation’ as summit nears BY ANNE GEARAN Washington Post

WA S H I N G T O N • The

United States hopes to one day normalize relations with North Korea, President Donald Trump said Thursday, adding that he would invite North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to the United States if next week’s historic summit went well. Trump signaled that a grand bargain to reverse decades of enmity was not on the table for his unprecedented meeting Tuesday in Singapore with Kim, but the president sounded upbeat as he described the North Korean leader as sincere about remaking the future for his impoverished country. “We would certainly like to see normalization, yes,” Trump said after two hours of meetings with visiting Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. That would come after what Trump described as a diplomatic process that could include an agreement to safeguard Kim from the threat of ouster at the hands of the United States. “I don’t think it will be one meeting,” Trump said. Trump derided Kim last year as “Little Rocket Man” and vowed to destroy nuclear-armed North Korea if it threatened the United States or its allies, but he has recently spoken about Kim more positively as he promotes the summit as a chance to strike a historic deal. On Thursday he confirmed rumors that an invitation to the White House could be in the ofing for Kim, the third generation of his family to hold

JABIN BOTSFORD • Washington Post

President Donald Trump listens as Shinzo Abe, prime minister of Japan, speaks at a meeting in the Oval Oice of the White House on Thursday.

absolute rule in the isolated communist nation, sometimes called the Hermit Kingdom. “I think he would look at it very favorably, so I think that could happen,” Trump said.

‘FRIENDLY NEGOTIATION’ Skeptics, including many Republicans, have worried that Trump is giving up leverage simply by meeting with Kim, because doing so implies that the North Korean leader holds equal status with the U.S. leader. An invitation to the White House, unthinkable only months ago, would go much further in conferring status as a global leader on a man who until this year had not left his own borders since taking office in 2011. The Trump administration pursued tough economic sanctions against North Korea un-

der a “maximum pressure” campaign designed to force Kim to bargain over his nuclear arsenal. Trump said Thursday that he had stopped using the “maximum pressure” phrase because “we are going into a friendly negotiation.” If he starts using that phrase again after his talks in Singapore, it will be a sign that the discussion went badly, Trump told reporters, adding that a new round of tough economic sanctions against North Korea were in abeyance while the diplomacy plays out. Warning that he was prepared to impose even harsher sanctions against North Korea if a deal could not be struck, Trump indicated that his decision to withdraw from the Iran nuclear agreement last month had already reaped benefits. “Iran is not the same country that it was a

few months ago,” he said. “They’re a much, much diferent group of leaders, and I hope at some point they’ll come to us, and we’ll sit down, and we’ll make a deal that’s good for them, and good for us, and good for everybody. ... I want it to be great for Iran.” Trump cited no evidence of changed Iranian behavior, and the White House did not respond to questions about his statement. Iran’s leadership has not changed, and Tehran said it had no intention of renegotiating the agreement. In the wake of the withdrawal announcement, it has announced plans to increase its uranium enrichment capacity.

‘IT’S ABOUT ... ATTITUDE’ Earlier Thursday, Trump proclaimed himself ready for the summit with North Korea, which is taking place with no precooked

outcome and without the usual months or years of run-up meetings among lower-level aides. The Trump administration has scheduled and planned for the session in a span of three months. “I think I’m very wellprepared,” Trump told reporters at the start of his Oval Office meeting with Abe. “I don’t think I have to prepare very much. It’s about the attitude. It’s about willingness to get things done.” That willingness to make a deal is something he will assess once he sits down with Kim, Trump suggested. “They’ve been preparing for a long time, also. So this isn’t a question of preparation, it’s a question of whether or not people want it to happen, and we’ll know that very quickly.” Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., tweeted his alarm. “ Wi t h I C B M s a n d nuclear warheads in the hands of North Korea, the situation is far too dangerous for seat of the pants negotiating,” Schumer wrote. Trump has lately been playing down expectations for the summit by no longer talking about an immediate agreement to eradicate North Korea’s nuclear arsenal. “I think it’s a process,” Trump said. “I think it’s not a one-meeting deal. It would be wonderful if it were.” At the same time, Trump promised that the session would be “much more than a photo op.” “This will be, at a minimum, we’ll start with perhaps a good relationship,”

he said. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo later told reporters that Trump “will not stand for a bad deal” and that the complete eradication of North Korea’s nuclear arsenal and weapons program “is the only outcome that we will find acceptable.” Sanctions on North Korea will stay in place until the North has verifiably given up its weapons of mass destruction, Pompeo said. Asked whether the United States had narrowed the gap between how the United States understands the goal of “denuclearization” and how Kim defines that word, Pompeo replied succinctly, “Yes.” Would he explain how? “No.” That question looms over the talks, because diplomats and others who have dealt with Kim or his father say they doubt he will ever entirely give up a program that has won him a place on the world stage that his economic or political power would not command. Pompeo, who has met with Kim twice, waxed philosophical in explaining what he said he hoped was Kim’s rationale in entering a bargain to give up his weapons. “He has indicated to me personally that he is prepared to denuclearize, that he understands the current model doesn’t work,” Pompeo said. “He understands that we can’t do it the way we’ve done it before, that this has to be big and bold and we have to agree to making major changes.”

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hope and doubt ahead of summit BY JUNG-YOON KIM associated Press

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA • The on-again, off-again meeting between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has been an emotional roller coaster for South Koreans, who now await Tuesday’s historic summit with both hope and doubt. The hope is that improved relations between Washington and Pyongyang will ease tensions and dispel the threat of war, which has hung over the region for more than a half-century. But having seen North Korea go back on its word in the past, such as when it broke a previous nuclear pact in 2002, South Koreans remain cautious about the sudden breeze of peace blowing across their divided peninsula. “North Korea’s willingness for talks seems clear now. The problem is that we are not so sure what they ultimately want,” said graduate student Kim Jae-hak. For him, the ideal outcome would be a formal declaration to the end the Korean War, followed by the complete denuclearization of North Korea. He warned, however, that high expectations can bring great disappointment, so Koreans should watch how things unfold. South Korea’s government has been careful to avoid rash comments or hasty interpretations of the seesaw developments in the lead-up to the summit in Singapore. Still, South Korean President Moon Jae-in has made negotiations with North Korea a centerpiece of his administration and has a lot riding on next week’s events. Moon took oice in May 2017 with a pledge to seek improved relations and ultimately peace with North Korea. In April, he met the North’s leader, Kim Jong Un, for talks at the Demilitarized Zone dividing their countries and the two set foot in one another’s countries, if only for a moment.

‘POLITICAL CAPITAL’ Moon’s patient, yet determined diplomacy has been key to setting up the Trump and Kim meeting. It was Moon who presented Trump with the initial offer of a summit with Kim. After Trump accepted and then canceled, Moon worked to get it back on track by holding another meeting with Kim. “It is critically important for President Moon Jae-in that the Trump-Moon summit goes well,” said John Delury, associate professor of East Asian studies at Yonsei University in Seoul. Moon has “staked a lot of political capital in getting the U.S. and North Korea to move together in a positive way just like the two Koreas have done.” The Singapore meeting would only be the start of a long process, Delury stressed. Reducing the threat of conflict is the initial goal, he said, which would be followed by cultural, humanitarian and economic steps. “A successful Singapore (meeting) gives more room for President Moon and Chairman Kim Jong Un to move forward in terms of inter-Korean reconciliation and cooperation,” he said. For now, Moon seems to have public backing, with a Gallup Korea survey last week measuring his approval rating at 75 percent. Oice worker Kim Jung-eun said the atmosphere of dialogue was welcome after North Korea’s provocative run of weapons tests in 2017 pushed animosity to new heights. “I never truly thought we were headed for another war, but there was always a lingering fear in the back of my head,” she said. “Thinking about where we were then, I am really thankful about the current atmosphere of peace.”


NEWS

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

U.S. military plans as if Guantanamo won’t close for decades Funding would provide for an aging population of prisoners at base in Cuba BY BEN FOX Associated Press

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, CUBA • A new dining hall for guards at

the Guantanamo Bay detention center has a shimmering view of the Caribbean and a lifespan of 20 years. Barracks scheduled to start getting built next year are meant to last five decades. And the Pentagon has asked Congress to approve money for a new Supermax prison unit to be designed with the understanding that prisoners will grow old and frail in custody — some perhaps still without being convicted of a crime. President Donald Trump’s order in January to keep the Guantanamo jail open, and allow the Pentagon to bring new prisoners there, is prompting military oicials to consider a future for the controversial facility that the White House under Barack Obama sought to close. Officials talked about the plans in an unusually frank manner as a small group of journalists toured the isolated base where 40 men are still held behind tall fences and coils of razor wire on the southeastern coast of Cuba. “We’ve got to plan for the long term,” Army Col. Stephen Gabavics, commander of the guard force, told reporters this week. “We ultimately have to plan for whether or not they are going to be here for the rest of their lives.” The Pentagon was investing in up-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. troops stand guard Tuesday outside Camp Delta at the Guantanamo Bay detention center, in Cuba. The Pentagon has asked Congress to approve money for a new Supermax prison on the site.

grades at the Navy base under Obama, whose push to shutter the detention center couldn’t overcome opposition in Congress. But those projects, including the $150 million barracks, were funded with the understanding that they could be used by the personnel of the Navy base that hosts the detention center. Now they are viewed as part of a broader efort to be able to operate the prison for many years to come. “Now my mission is enduring,” said Adm. John Ring, commander of the task force that runs the jail. “So I have all sorts of structures that I have been neglecting or just getting by with that now I’ve got to replace.”

The Pentagon wants at least $69 million to replace Camp 7, the Supermax unit that holds 15 men designated as “high-value detainees” who were previously in CIA custody. They include five men facing trial by military commission at Guantanamo for planning and aiding the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on the U.S. The men could get the death penalty if convicted, but the proceedings have been bogged down in pretrial proceedings for years and any conviction would likely bring years of appeals. Oicials say Camp 7 is in need of major repairs, with cracking walls and a sinking foundation, and it is not suitable

to hold men who will likely be in custody for many years to come. The new unit, which would be known as Camp 8, would have cell doors wide enough for wheelchairs and hospice beds and communal areas so elderly prisoners could help each other as they grow old. The White House has endorsed the proposal but it is not known whether Congress will approve it. “We have the responsibility for the detainees that we have here, regardless of what the political flavor is outside there,” Gabavics said. “We have the responsibility to provide for their safety, care and custody, so all that we ask is that we get the resources we need to be able do that.” The 40 detainees left at Guantanamo include five who were deemed eligible for transfer under Obama but couldn’t clear the bureaucratic and diplomatic hurdles before he left oice. Of the remainder, nine have been charged in the military commission system and are in proceedings at various stages. The remaining 26 have neither been charged nor deemed eligible for transfer. They are being held in indefinite detention under what the U.S. asserts are the international laws of war. The military allowed journalists a brief visit this week inside Camp 6, where most of the prisoners are held, as the men milled about and conducted late-afternoon prayers. Attorney David Remes, who represents four prisoners, said they are bored and frustrated. “Limbo has never been more limbo-like,” Remes said. “They are just waiting, waiting, waiting.”

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06.08.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A9

Scientists reap data from Hawaii’s rumbling Kilauea volcano

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eyed, eager to advance what’s known about volcanoes. The good news is: Volcanoes reveal secrets when they’re rumbling, which means Kilauea is producing a bonanza of information. While scientists monitored Big Island lava flows in 1955 and 1960, equipment then was far less sophisticated. Given new technology, they can now gather and study an unprecedented volume of data. “Geophysical monitoring techniques that have come online in the last 20 years have now been deployed at Kilauea,” said George Bergantz, professor of earth and space sci-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lava lows from issures near Pahoa, Hawaii, on May 19 in a photo released by the U.S. Geological Survey. Technically, Kilauea has been continuously erupting since 1983, but new activity is a departure from recent decades.

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scales of behavior both preceding and during this current volcanic crisis.” Starting May 3, Kilauea has fountained lava and flung ash and rocks from its summit, destroying hundreds of homes, closing key highways and prompting health warnings. Kilauea is one of five volcanos that form the Big Island, and is a “shield” volcano — built up over time as lava flows layer on top of layer. Technically speaking, it has been continuously erupting since 1983. But the recent combination of earthquakes shaking the ground, steam-driven explosions at the top, and lava creeping into a new area some 12 miles from the summit represents a departure from its behavior over the past 35 years, said Erik Klemetti, a volcanologist at Ohio’s Denison University.

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A NEW NORMAL? What’s happening now is a bit more like the Kilauea of nearly a century ago. In 1924, steam explosions at the summit lasted for more than two weeks. Scientists are looking into what caused the change and whether this shift in the volcano’s magma plumbing system will become the new normal. Radar allows researchers to measure the height of ash plumes shooting from the summit, even when they occur at night. Plume heights are an effect of how much heat energy is released and the explosion’s intensity. “It’s one of the key factors that dictates how far ash will be dispersed,” said Charles Mandeville, volcano hazards coordinator for the U.S. Geological Survey. The other is where the winds are blowing. Such knowledge is useful in alerting the public. Scientists can also monitor where gas is emerging, as well as determine its composition and volume. They can even measure the subtle rise and fall of the ground over a broad area and time — down to seconds — which suggests when and where magma is pooling underground. Discovering variations or correlations between past and present activity provides more clues on what’s happening. It also helps scientists understand past lava flows, anticipate what could occur next and pinpoint signs or patterns before an eruption. “You’re sort of zeroing in on finer and finer levels of detail into how the volcano works,” said Michael Poland, a U.S. Geological Survey volcanologist. “The more stuff you put on the volcano to make measurements, the more you realize there’s stuff going on that you never knew.” Volcanic eruptions happen fairly regularly — as many as 60 occur worldwide each year — but many are in isolated areas, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. PIDDLY RUMBLINGS After Kilauea’s 1924 summit explosions, the volcano entered a decade of piddly rumblings, followed by 18 years of silence. Experts say Kilauea may be heading toward years — even decades — of little or no activity. For now, volcanologists feel a “tremendous amount of responsibility” to learn as much as possible from the volcano, Poland said. Its latest activity has destroyed about 400 homes — including about 280 over the last several days — and displaced thousands of residents. Lava from Kilauea has also downed power lines and knifed across highways. “It’s coming at a great cost in terms of impact on the lives and livelihoods of so many people — we owe it to the people of Puna to make sure that we learn the lessons the volcano is teaching us,” Poland said.

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

CLASSIFIED Landscape Laborers

Garage Sales

Public Notices

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HOMESTEAD ESTATES GARAGE SALE

CITY OF ST. LOUIS

INVITATION TO BID

Public Hearing Notice and Draft Substantial Amendment and 2019 CDBG/HOME Funding Priorities Available for Review and Comment

2018/2019 GASOLINE & DIESEL FOR MUNICIPAL VEHICLES

63376

St. Clair County Housing Authority

Monthly rent Is based on 30% of household income. To apply or obtain information contact Debbie Royer at 618-277-6889. TDD 111-800-545-1833 Ext.933 The SCCHA and the CRA do not discriminate in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in programs or activities on the basis of a disability in violation of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and are SCCHA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

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Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 618-465-1444, Mon-Fri 9-5. 3113 Washington, Alton, IL

Out Of Area Property 63662, Beautiful 160 acre 95 pasture, 65 timber, cabin, barn, creek, great hunting, hwy 72 frontage. $469,000. Call Don at 314-302-5093 Secluded-10 acres. Part of history. Davis schoolhse converted -2br hse, HC3 Box 3480, Greenville, MO 63944. 573-208-3095

Mobile Home Lots 2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes off Hwy W at Mansion Road Estates AND Farmview Est. on Hwy Y. Both located between Troy & Winfield 636-566-6456

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Landscape Laborers Landscape Laborer Still hiring: 9 Openings. Temp-F/T. 4/1/18 - 12/15/18. M e y e r Tree S e r v i c e , I n c ., S t . L o u is , M O . M aintain grounds of property . Tasks: trim, plant, water, fertilize, dig, & rake. Use hand tools: shovels, rakes, pruning saws, saws, hedge or brush trimmers. Operate vehicles or powered equipment: tractors, twin-axle vehicles, chainsaws, electric clippers, or pruning saws. Prune or trim trees, shrubs, or hedges, using shears or prune r s . Gather & remove litter. $13.82/hr, O/T varies at $20.73/hr. 40 hrs, M-F, possibly Sat, 7am4 p m, hrs may fluctuate due to weather. No exp. or educ. nec. Will train. Must be able to lift 50 lbs, work in adverse weather conditions & pass post-employ ment d r u g t e s t p a id by employ er. Transportation (including meals &, to the extent necessary, lodging) to the place of employment will be provided, or its cost to workers reimbursed, if the worker completes half the employment period. Return transportation will be provided if the worker completes the employ ment period or is dismissed early by the employer. Transportation provided daily from main office to the various work locations w ithin St . Louis & St . Charles County. All work tools, supplies & equipment provided at no cost. Apply directly with the employer. Fax resume to Brad M e y e r @ (314) 426-2912 and apply at neare s t M O Wo r k f o r c e A g e n c y https://jobs.mo.gov/career-centers and refer to Job Order # 12443740.

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BUYING old whiskey! Full and sealed. 773-263-5320 WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665 WANTED Old Sealed Whiskey $ (618)581-7915

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Garage Sales 63017: 6/9/18 7am-12. Furniture, clothing, books, dvd's, 14528 Crossway Ct, Chesterfield 63021: 1311 Lombez, Manchester. Saturday, June 9th 7 am-1 pm Everything must go. 63021 Crown Pointe Estates Subdivision sale 10+ homes, off Old State. Wed 6/6 & Sat 6/9, 8-1pm 63026 - Avalon Hills Subd. Garage Sale Sat., June 9, 2018, 8:00am1:00pm Fenton area/Hwy 141 & I-44 63129:

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Sat. June 9, 2018 (off Meramec Bottom & Hawkins Fuchs Rd.)

Sponsored by Nancy Schmidt 314-603-9938 Coldwell Banker Gundaker 314-849-2880

The City of St. Louis is soliciting comments on two draft documents: (1) the Draft Substantial Amendment t o it s 2015 - 2019 Consolidated Plan/2017 Annual Action Plan and (2) the Draft 2019 CDBG/HOME Funding Priorities. The Substant ia l Amendment proposes t h e reprogramming of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding allocated and unspent in previous funding years. The 2019 Funding Priority document details the types of activities that the City proposes to fund in 2019 w ith C D B G and HOM E I nvestment Partnership (HOME) funds. Public Hearing Notice/Public Comment Period The Community Development Administration (CDA) will conduct three public hearings to solicit public comments and answer questions pertaining to the Substantial Amendment and 2019 CDBG/HOME Funding Priorities:

Thursday, June 28, 2018 Prosperity Connection 2828 Gravois (63118) 6:00pm - 8:00pm Friday, June 29, 2018 CDA Boardroom 1520 Market Street Suite 2000 (63103) 2:00pm - 4:00pm Documents Available for Review 1. The Substantial Amendment to t h e 2 0 1 5 - 2 0 1 9 C o n s o l i d a t ed Plan/2017 Annual Action Plan will be available in draft form for review by any interested citizen on J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 8 at the Central Branch of the St. Louis Public Library located at 1301 Olive Street. The Amendment will also be available for review at CDA, located at 1520 Market Street, Suite 2000. Copies of the amendment may be downloaded from the City of St. Louis website at https://www.stlouis-mo.gov/ government/departments/community-development/ d o c u me n t s / 2 0 1 8 - s u b s t a n t ia lamendment-draft.cfm. Written c o mme n t s w i l l b e a c c e p t e d until 11:00am on July 16, 2018.

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The views of citizens, public agencies, and other interested parties are strongly encouraged. Written comments or suggestions may be addressed to Ms. Alana Green, Executive Director, Community D e v e lo p me n t Ad min is t r a t ion, 1520 Market Street, Suite 2000, St. Louis, MO 63103, or via e-mail at GreenA@stlouis-mo.gov. Other Information Persons with special needs or accommodations relating to handicapped accessibility or foreign language should contact Ms. Green via e ma il at G r e e n A@ s t lo u is mo.gov or by phone at (314) 6573835 or (314) 589-6000 (TDD). Interpreting services are available upon request for persons with hearing disabilities. Interested parties should contact the Office on the Disabled at (314) 6223686/voice or (314) 622 3693/TTY.

SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE Chateau Country Club Subdivision

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Lake Saint Louis Invitation to Bid No. 01-18 Yard Drive Reconstruction Project The City of Lake Saint Louis is accepting sealed bids for Yard Drive Reconstruction Project. Plans and specifications are now available online and can be viewed, downloaded or ordered at http://p lanroom. drexeltech.com for the listed fee. Sealed bids must be received by 12:00 PM on 06/29/18.

Newspaper Notice Department of Justice Antitrust Division Take notice that the United States has filed a proposed Final Judgment in a civil antitrust case in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, United States of America v. Bayer AG and Monsanto Company, Civil Action No. 1:18-cv-1241. On May 29, 2018, the United States filed a Complaint alleging that Bay er AG’s proposed acquisition of Monsanto Company would violate Sect i o n 7 o f t h e C la y t o n Ac t , 1 5 U.S.C. § 18. The proposed Final Judgment, filed at the same time as the Complaint, requires Bayer AG to divest a substantial collection of assets relati n g t o s e e d s a n d t r a it s , c r o p protection, and digital agriculture. A Competitive Impact Statement f ile d b y the United States d e scribes the Complaint, the proposed Final Judgment, the industry, and the remedies available to private litigants who may have b e e n in ju r e d b y t h e alleged violation.

Written Comments

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday June 20, 2018 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time. PETITION 18-I William and Alissa Juelich requests a variance to permit a structure (egress window well) in a utility easement. The property is located on Lot 157 of Huntleigh Estates Plat Two as recorded in book 31 pages 213-214 more commonly known as 539 Wyatt Drive All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, Missouri 63376, 636-4776600 or 636-278-2244 extension 1670. LEGAL DESCRIPTION

Lots Of Lots

Lot 157 of Huntleigh Estates Plat Two as recorded in book 31 pages 213-214 more commonly known as 539 Wyatt Drive

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63368: Westfield Woods Subd. Garage Sale! Fri, 6/8, 4pm-7pm & Sat, 6/9, 7am - 12pm.

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The City of Hazelwood, Missouri is accepting sealed bids for Fuel for the City of Hazelwood vehicles. Bid form and specifications may be obtained at the office of Public Works at 4 1 5 Elm Grove Lane, Hazelwood, Missouri 63042 or on the city website at w w w . haz elwoodmo.org

Copies of the Complaint, proposed 2. The 2019 CDBG/HOM E Fund- Final Judgment, and Competitive ing Priorities document will be Impact Statement are available for available on June 15, 2018 in draft inspection on the Antitrust Diviform for review by any interested sion’s website at http://www.justicitizen at CDA, located at 1520 ce.gov/atr and at the Office of the Market Street, Suite 2000. Copies Clerk of the United States District of the priorities may be downloadCourt for the District of Columbia. e d f r o m t h e C it y o f S t . L o u is w ebsite at https://w w w.stlouis- Interested persons may mail commo.gov/government/departments/c ments to Kathleen S. O’Neill, ommunity -development/ d o c u Chief, Transportation, Energy & ments/2019-fundingAgriculture Section, Antitrust Divipriorities.cfm. Written comments sion, Department of Justice, 450 will be accepted until 5:00pm 5th Street, NW, Suite 8000, Washon July 2, 2018. ington DC 20530 within 60 days of the date of this notice. Such com3. The 2019 CDBG/HOM E Fund- ments, including the name of the ing Timeline will be available on submitter, and responses thereto, June 15, 2018 on the City of St. will be posted on the Antitrust DiviLouis website at https://www.stlosion’s website, filed with the Court, uis-mo.gov/ government/deparand, under certain circumstances, tments/community-development/ published in the Federal Register. documents/2019-fundingtimeline.cfm.

CDA is an equal opportunity agency (employer). Minority participation is encouraged.

Hwy 94 S. to East on Pralle Ln to R on Avignon Pkwy Sponsored by: Sandra Meranda 314-691-1320 • 636-946-7880

BID OPENING DATE: Monday, June 18, 2018 at 1:30 p.m.

Wednesday, June 27, 2018 O'Fallon Recreation Center 4343 West Florissant (63115) 6:00pm - 8:00pm

63303

June 9, 2018 7 a.m. - 1 p.m.

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Southampton Garage Sales, Saturday, June 9, 8 to 2, rain or shine. Free locator maps, 4601 Sulphur.

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The St. Clair County Housing Authority (SCCHA) is currently accepting applications for 1 and 2 bedroom units at the Cedar Ridge Apartments (CRA) in Lebanon for elderly households (headed by a person age 62 or older or having a disability regardless of age).

Sat, 6/9/18, 7am-noon.

South side of Mexico Rd just west of Mid Rivers Mall Dr. Sponsored By: Jaclyn & Carol: Real Living Now Real Estate 636-379-2378

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Landscape Laborer-Temporary/fulltime 6/1/2018-12/30/2018. 5 jobs w/ Native Landscape Solutions, Inc., St. Louis, MO & job sites in Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles & St. Louis cty/cos. Use hand/power tools/equipmt to lay sod, mow, trim, mulch, plant, water, fertilize, dig, rake. No exp reqd; will train. Lift/carry 50 lbs w h e n n e c . Random, post-accident & upon suspicion drug test reqd. 40 hr/wk 7:00 AM-3:30 PM M-F. Sat/Sun work reqd when nec. Wage is no less than $13.81/hr (OT varies @ $20.72/hr). Raise/bonus at emplr discretion. Transport (incl. meals & as nec. lodging) to place of employ provided/pd to wkrs residing outside normal commute distance by completion of 50% of job period. Return transport provided/pd to same wkrs if wkr completes job period or dismissed early. Wkrs guaranteed offer of 3/4 of work hrs each 12-wk period. Tools, supplies, equip, uniform & daily trans. to/from wksite from central loc provided at no cost. Emplr provides incidental transport btw job sites. I nterview reqd. Fax resume to (314) 544-3250 or apply at: St. Louis Cty -SLATE Job Ctr, 1520 Market St., Rm 3050, St. Louis, MO 63103, (314) 589-8000.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

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ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Maplewood City Council will hold a public hearing on 6/26/18 at 7:30 p. m. in the C ity Hall C ouncil Chambers, 7601 Manchester Rd., Maplewood, MO 6 3 1 4 3 , to hear citizen's comments on a request for a conditional use permit to operate a tattoo studio at 2801-03 Big Bend Blvd.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE @STLPD

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch

GET CONNECTED FIND ANSWERS

Maplewood City Council will hold a public hearing on 6/26/18 at 7:30 p. m. in the C ity Hall C ouncil Chambers, 7601 Manchester Rd., Maplewood, MO 6 3 1 4 3 , to hear citizen's comments on a request by MO American Water Co. to install a pole with a data collector box in the right-of-way near 7361 Zephyr Pl.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Maplewood City Council will hold a public hearing on 6/26/18 at 7 :3 0 p. m. in the C ity Hall C ouncil Chambers, 7601 Manchester Rd., Maplewood, MO 6 3 1 4 3 , to hear citizen's comments on a request to expand a single-family home at 2024 Bellevue.

STAY IN TOUCH Continued on Page C11


LOCAL

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11

PASSING THE HAT FOR FOREST PARK

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Colorful hats bloom at the annual Hat Luncheon held in the World’s Fair Pavilion in Forest Park. The sold-out event is the biggest fundraiser for the park. TOP: Laura Herring (center) laughs with her friend Laura Shaughnessy (left) who dances to the music while Karen Disabato (right) looks on. ABOVE: Gilda Baldwin (left) and Shelia Jones, of St. Louis, wait in line to have a picture taken. RIGHT (top): Jeanne Roberts Johnson talks with friends. RIGHT (bottom): Melissa Zensen (center), of St. Louis, said her head was hurting from wearing a lower pot on her head. Zensen was talking with Carol Farrell (left) and Kristine Peterson.

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAY • 06.08.2018 • A12 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Treasurer or parking attendant St. Louis treasurer should use parking revenue to help city residents.

I

f St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones focused less on her political ambitions and more on good government for the city of St. Louis, she would not be feuding and fussing with City Hall colleagues. Her squabbles with Alderman Jefrey Boyd, partly over his lawsuit questioning her parking operations, led her to pack a public meeting this week

JERRY NAUNHEIM JR. PHOTOS

St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones speaks at a forum last year.

with her intransigence with other elected officials, suggest she is not prepared to hold an office requiring cooperation and compromise. The parking money ought to go into the cash-strapped city’s general revenue fund. Instead, more than half has remained with the city’s parking division — a system created decades ago by state law and believed to be unique among the nation’s municipal governments. During her first campaign for the office in 2012, Jones said she was “running for treasurer, not parking attendant.” Since then, instead of working to change the system, Jones has expanded her office’s authority. She usurps funds that rightfully belong to the city, and puts about 40 percent of the revenue — the amount required by state law — into the city’s general fund. Jones says her office needs the money to maintain a strong credit rating and insure more than $60 million in debt from modernizing the parking meter system and building garages. When dozens of Jones’ supporters — primarily her staff from the city’s parking division — cheered and applauded after she expressed frustration with Boyd at a budget meeting on Tuesday, it was all political theater. Jones agreed Thursday to transfer $10 million into the city’s reserve funds, along with additional money for neighborhood stabilization officers and tow trucks. In return, Boyd agreed to not cut the treasurer’s staff or impose additional spending restrictions. Compromise is good, but Jones shouldn’t be able to strike her own deals with money that belongs to the broader municipal government, not to the parking division.

with cheering and applauding supporters whom Boyd had to order out of the room to conduct business. A compromise was reached Thursday, but Boyd is right: The treasurer shouldn’t operate an independent fiefdom funded by parking fees. St. Louis Circuit Judge Michael Stelzer ruled in April that the system violates the state constitution. Some aldermen have been fighting it for decades. Jones herself has said the arrangement makes little sense. But instead of following Stelzer’s ruling, she vowed to appeal it. At stake is control of roughly $20 million in Alderman revenue collected annually from Jefrey Boyd city parking operations. Jones lost the Democratic primary for mayor to Lyda Krewson by only 888 votes and has indicated she will run again. Jones and her supporters portray her as a rebel against the staid forces of City Hall. But her unwillingness to follow the law to best serve the citizens of St. Louis, coupled

Scar on the soul Human rights abuses come home.

O

In the weeks since the plight of the n Tuesday the United Nations children was revealed — the government High Commissioner for Huadmits to 658 separations from May 6 to man Rights issued a blistering May 13; other estimates are higher — the criticism of two nations for administration has refused to respond human rights abuses. One was Egypt. directly to critics. Instead it denies and lies, The other was the United States. This is falsely blaming the problem on Democrats, not good company to keep. equating scared toddlers with MS-13 Egypt was hammered for a crackdown gangbangers. Previous administrations on the rights of protesters. The U.S. was detained children who crossed the border hit for the Trump administration’s policy alone, looking for their parents. The “zero of separating migrant children from their tolerance” practice of separating even families to deter illegal immigrants and young children from their families is all those seeking political asylum in the land Trump. of the free. The practice is shameful, a Last weekend Sen. Jeff blatant violation of American Merkley, D-Ore., decided to values and arguably the biggest see for himself. He tried to get scar on the nation’s soul since into a detention facility inside police dogs and fire hoses were an abandoned Walmart store turned on civil rights protestin Brownsville, Texas. The ers. private firm that runs the facil“The use of immigration ity under government contract detention and family separarefused to let him in. Health tion as a deterrent runs counter and Human Services officials to human rights standards said Merkley hadn’t given the and principles,” the UN office required two weeks’ notice. said.“The child’s best interLocal police were called to run est should always come first, Merkley him off. including over migration manMerkley was allowed into agement objectives or other the McAllen, Texas, Border Patrol Processadministrative concerns.” The Trump administration’s response to ing Center,where undocumented migrants this criticism was predictable. UN Ambas- are taken when they first arrive. Families sador Nikki Haley basically told the human are separated here, with kids staying 72 hours in cage-like enclosures before being rights office to butt out: “Neither the United Nations nor anyone else will dictate sent to detention centers or foster homes. how the United States upholds its borders,” All that’s missing are the boxcars. For having a conscience, a White House Haley said. spokesman blamed Merkley for policies She went on to bash the human rights that “allow violent criminal aliens to flood records of some of the nations sitting on into American communities.” the UN Human Rights Council; this was This is standard Trumpian lying and correct but irrelevant. The United States blame-shifting. Using it to defend the is supposed to be better than the likes of unforgivable somehow makes it worse. Saudi Arabia and Venezuela.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Legislature works to fill Missouri’s talent pipeline

Historic trolley systems attract tourism, development

Missouri, like many states, is struggling to meet workforce needs, as outlined by the editorial “Help wanted” (May 29). There are more than 11,000 open computing jobs in Missouri, according to data from Code. org. These are good, well-paying jobs that go unfilled because of a lack of qualified applicants. We have been impressed by several efforts, including legislation to expand access to K-12 computer science education, which will help give Missouri students the skills they need to fill these jobs. The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education recommended, and the Legislature funded, a partnership between Project Lead the Way and the Missouri University of Science and Technology to promote STEM fields and provide teacher training and professional development. The department also worked with the Legislature to encourage career education programs that lead to industryrecognized credentials. State Sen. Gary Romine and state Rep. Kathryn Swan created the Career Technical Education Advisory Council to get businesses involved in helping solve the problem. They also developed the Career and Technical Education certificate for high school graduates who concentrate in a STEM-related program. State Sen. Doug Libla and state Rep. Travis Fitzwater introduced legislation to allow high school students to count a computer science course toward the credits needed for high school graduation. State Reps. Kurt Bahr and Phil Christofanelli and state Sens. John Rizzo and Jay Wasson have shown strong leadership on this issue as well. We believe these eforts — and the strong support of the Legislature — will help Missouri fill the talent pipeline. Fred Humphries • Washington, D.C. Corporate vice president, U.S. Government Afairs, Microsoft

In his thought-provoking column “Trolley vs. bikes” (May 30), Michael R. Allen praises the arrival of dockless rental bicycles that people may ride from where they find one to wherever they please. He contrasts such “open” forms of transportation with “closed systems.” His criticism of the Loop Trolley’s route and choice of “cumbersome,” “antiquestyle” cars ignores that historic fixed-track trolley systems attract tourism and development to other cities. On a recent visit to Lisbon, Portugal, I was amazed to see tourists happily endure a jolting, standingroom-only ride on a circa 1930 trolley only to disembark at its terminus and stand in line for the pleasure of a return trip. Don’t be surprised if the Loop Trolley likewise attracts many riders to experience its vintage cars. It already has attracted developers like Clayco to the neighborhood. After conceding the worthiness of the trolley’s goal to increase circulation from the Loop to Forest Park, Allen suggests another route chosen by the public might have been better. But he does not propose the process by which the public might have designed the fixed-track system. The visionaries of the Loop Trolley hope that the 2.2-mile loop from University City Hall to the Missouri History Museum is just the beginning. Expansion routes could include a loop around Forest Park or an extension eastward on Delmar Boulevard through the Central West End to Grand Boulevard. Big ideas are easier to criticize than to envision. I wonder why many who claim to dislike the trolley complain about its delayed implementation. Could it be they subconsciously crave to get on board? John S. Meyer Jr. • Olivette Member, Loop Trolley Co. Board of Directors

Muslims have nothing to fear With Ramadan 2018 well underway, Muslims find themselves back under the national microscope. During Ramadan, Muslims’ everyday lives, their religious practices, and even their views on social issues are looked at more closely. All this combined with a hostile political environment has led to many Muslims fearing that they will be the next to get harassed or attacked. However, this does not have to be the case. President Donald Trump tapped into an extremely conservative base, but that doesn’t mean that each of his nearly 63 million voters share those views. Many middle-class white Americans never truly recovered from the recession, as lost blue-collar jobs never returned, even though establishment politicians kept heralding economic growth and a reducing unemployment rate. Furthermore, the Democratic National Committee chose to focus on the minority vote, leaving many middle-class white Americans with no choice but to vote for Trump. This doesn’t mean Muslims shouldn’t be cautious of their surroundings. There is a subset of the population that has become empowered, indicated by a rise in the number of hate crimes against Muslims. But that does not mean Muslims have to be fearful. When a person gives into fear, they give away a part of their natural freedom, and they give power to the oppressor. That’s something no one should have to go through regardless of their race, religion or gender. This country and the liberties it grants are as much Muslims’ as they are anyone else’s. It’s in the Constitution. Zohaib Zahir • Valley Park

Anonymous money isn’t only corrupting influence in Missouri I thank Tony Messenger for his open letter to Missouri voters expressing his disappointment that former Gov. Eric Greitens’ promises to purge “dark money” from Missouri politics were mere hypocrisy (“Dear voters, let’s finally end the scourge of dark money,” June 3). The column reflects the frustration of voters, whose repeatedly flouted will to limit campaign contributions must be asserted again. Anonymous money is not the only corrupting influence in Missouri politics. Large sums emblazoned with megadonors’ names also compromise the independence and integrity of our legislators. How else can we comprehend the systematic, selfinflicted decimation of state revenues intended and needed for the public good, resulting in Missouri’s crumbling infrastructure, underfunded public schools and poor performance in key indicators of overall public health? Messenger concludes by challenging voters to rally to create a “truly new Missouri, free of the pernicious influence of secret power brokers.” Fortunately, within our right to vote resides all the power necessary to consign would-be power brokers to the corners where they belong. The critical first step is replacing compromised legislators with representatives who seek not to enrich themselves or impose an ideology but to serve their fellow citizens. It is heartening that a historically large number of highly qualified Democratic candidates for national, state and local offices have come forward, dedicated to fulfilling Missouri’s inspiring motto,“Let the welfare of the people be the supreme law.” Janet Kester • Wentzville Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

06.08.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1 75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

ERNIE PYLE’S WAR DISPATCHES • It takes all kinds of correspondents to report a war. Some specialize in interviews with generals and high oicials; some give accounts of great battles. And one of them, Ernie Pyle, prefers to tell about the daily life of the troops in the field. Pyle’s reports don’t read like news dispatches; they read like letters to home. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Only a healthy democracy will save us from Big Pharma By failing to invest in the public good, we’ve let drug companies set the research agenda. BY ED WEISBART

I’m a physician who volunteers in safety-net clinics in St. Louis, constantly seeing patients who can’t aford the medicines I prescribe. Even patients with insurance often can’t aford their copays and deductibles, and many treatments simply aren’t covered by their plans. Sky-high drug prices hurt us all, and voters from every political stripe are demanding change. More than half of American voters say passing legislation to bring down the price of medicines should be a “top priority” for President Donald Trump and Congress. However, less than 40 percent are confident that this administration will do anything to lower drug prices, and a huge majority (72 percent) say pharmaceutical companies have “too much influence” in Washington. Despite our differences, Americans are united in the belief that drug prices are too high, that Big Pharma is too powerful, and

that lawmakers must act. Sadly, most of us also expect President Trump and Congress to sit on the sidelines while pharmaceutical lobbyists set the agenda. What does this disconnect say about the power of the pharmaceutical industry, and ultimately, about the state of American democracy? What can we do about it? First, we need to understand how the pharmaceutical system got so far out of our control. Drug development and manufacturing used to be considered part of the American “common good.” Two key developers of insulin — Frederick Banting and John Macleod — refused to put their names on the original insulin patent. Jonas Salk, inventor of the polio vaccine, also rejected patenting for his breakthrough; it was just too important for public health to belong to any one person or company. As a nation, we have always invested heavily in medical research, because we believe that breakthroughs should

benefit everyone. In fact, the underlying research behind almost all of today’s medicines was conducted by academic or government researchers with taxpayer-funded grants. But thanks to an obscure provision of the 1980 Bayh-Dole Act, publicly funded researchers can patent their discoveries and sell them to private drug firms, who can then — as my patients know too well — set whatever price they like. Congress could easily change this law so that tax-funded breakthroughs actually benefit the American people, not just corporate bottom lines. By failing to invest in the public good of pharmaceutical research, we’ve let drug companies set the research agenda. Instead of solving major health problems like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s, private firms often just make minor tweaks to existing formulas to extend the patents — and profitability — of their products. In fact, 90 percent of newly approved drugs offer few or no

new health benefits, but still win the patents and market exclusivity that keep prices sky-high. We’ve even lost control of the Food and Drug Administration, whose job is to ensure only the safest and most effective drugs come to market. Starting in the 1990s, the FDA has been funded by corporate user fees instead of tax dollars. Not surprisingly, in the last 20 years, the FDA dramatically increased its use of the shortened approval process called “expedited review,” which requires weaker standards of evidence and raises serious safety concerns. A functioning democracy means we must invest fully in regulators that are paid to serve us, not corporate drug firms. If you don’t like President Trump’s toothless proposal for pharma reform, you’re not alone. My colleagues at Physicians for a National Health Program just published a comprehensive proposal called “Healing an ailing pharmaceutical system: prescription for reform.” We identify

seven solutions that would not only bring drug prices back to earth, but bring public health needs back to the forefront, as you would expect in a healthy democracy. While universal drug coverage would work best in a single-payer, Medicare for all system, many of these proposals could be enacted right now, if our lawmakers were willing. Lawmakers aren’t going to do this on their own; we must demand it. If you’re angry about drug prices, it’s time to get active, talk to your friends and colleagues, and call your elected officials. Fixing our broken pharmaceutical system won’t be quick and easy. To fix health care, we must simultaneously fix our democracy. Real change starts with building a movement. With this proposal, we now have a blueprint.

Dr. Ed Weisbart is a family physician in Olivette. He is the chair of the Missouri chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program.

Freight rail connections give Missouri an edge in global marketplace Rail network ofers us a distinct advantage in reaping the beneits of international trade. BY DANIEL P. MEHAN

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump and Kim Kardashian West. She urged the president to pardon Alice Marie Johnson, who is serving a life sentence without parole for a nonviolent drug ofense.

Riding out Trump’s

Storm

President’s latest discovery is how his pardon power can be a big news-cycle hit. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

The struggle over what the dominant storyline in the news should be has always been political. Good reporters and editors labor mightily to be fair-minded in their reporting of episodes and events, and I’ll defend them to my last breath. But the larger battle, captured by the phrase “winning the news cycle,” involves a fierce competition to push reports that help your own side to the top while sidelining those that serve the interests of your opponents. In the Trump Era, this clash has fundamentally changed because the president and his lieutenants have realized that lying works; shameless dissembling is now standard operating procedure for the White House. Partisan outlets go with President Donald Trump’s versions of events, even when they are demonstrably false. Mainstream outlets feel duty-bound to report them, even as they debunk the lies. Moreover, our chief executive instinctively knows what Alexander Hamilton taught long ago: that the despot’s “object is to throw things into confusion that he may ‘ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.’” If the news gets troublesome, Trump and his minions create all manner of controversies and distractions that consume a lot of media space and time. His latest discovery is how his pardon power can be a big news-cycle hit, especially when a celebrity is blended in. Thus did Trump announce on Wednesday that he was commuting the life sentence of Alice Marie Johnson, convicted in 1996 on drug possession and money laundering charges, after her cause was championed by Kim Kardashian. This followed his using the refusal of so many members of the Super Bowlwinning Philadelphia Eagles to go to a

White House victory ceremony as an excuse to launch yet another attack on kneeling NFL players, one of Trump’s favorite divisive themes. (He also issued a typically misleading statement, suggesting that Eagles players disagreed with his insistence “that they proudly stand for the national anthem,” when in fact no one on the Philly squad ever knelt last season.) And the sheer volume of corruption reports — starting with would-be Chick-fil-A spouse and Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt — means that they start to drown each other out. Then there is the challenge of balance.

In the Trump Era, this clash has fundamentally changed because the president and his lieutenants have realized that lying works; shameless dissembling is now standard operating procedure for the White House. So much of the journalism about Trump is negative because of what he does every day and because Robert Mueller’s investigation and hardworking reporters regularly turn up embarrassing facts. Therefore, journalists feel obligated to make sure that everyone knows they can be just as tough on Democrats. Looking “partisan” is a grave transgression. Trump and the Republicans try to paint this scarlet letter on the media almost daily. Lord knows, Democrats have their problems. Their own politicians regularly point them out by way of scoring points in the party’s factional wars. But with this year’s primaries nearly over, let’s at least shelve certain storylines that are simply wrong. Contrary to a popular meme, the

Democratic primary electorate is not veering sharply to the left. Left-wing candidates did not fare particularly well because rank-and-filers aren’t interested in ideological warfare and are choosing on the basis of personal qualities — it really helps to be a woman this year. Democrats cast pragmatic primary ballots in large numbers because they devoutly want to end their powerlessness. This pragmatism is what allowed Democrats to avoid catastrophe in California on Tuesday. Because of the state’s appropriately nicknamed “jungle primary,” the top two finishers in the first round compete in November, even if they are in the same party. Although a couple of races were close, it appears there will be Democratic candidates on the ballot this fall in every target district. Democratic voters successfully identified their own strongest contenders, and party-supported advertising pummeled Republican candidates who threatened to shut the Democrats out. A gang we thought couldn’t shoot straight actually hit the mark. So let’s agree on two things. First, Democrats will make enough mistakes between now and Election Day to give journalists ample opportunity to look balanced. There’s no need to keep flogging flawed talking points. And there’s nothing imbalanced about Trump’s sins dominating the news. It’s not the media’s fault that there are so many of them. Second, Trump tests both journalists and news consumers in a way they’ve never been tested before. Like would-be autocrats elsewhere, Trump is pursuing a strategy of disorienting the citizenry with a steady stream of provocations, untruths and diversions. We cannot afford to treat any of this as the usual spin or garden variety politics. E.J. Dionne ejdionne@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

As debate continues to swirl around the fate of the North American Free Trade Agreement between the U.S., Canada and Mexico, it is important to step back and take a moment to understand just how this may afect the state of Missouri and just how important international trade is to our economy. Statistics compiled by the Business Roundtable show beyond a doubt that robust international trade provides tangible benefits to Missouri businesses and consumers. From connecting our manufacturing and industrial sectors to supporting our farmers and agricultural producers, robust international trade is essential to Missouri’s future success. And a key factor positioning us to succeed in today’s global economy is our transportation network, primarily access to the North American freight rail network. More on that in a moment. First, some background statistics on the importance of trade to our region and our state: International trade supports 815,374 jobs in Missouri — meaning one in every five jobs in our state is supported by international commerce. Missouri exported $14.6 billion in goods and $8.6 billion in services in 2013 to customers in 196 different countries, led by Canada, Mexico and China. Over a 10-year period, these trade-supported jobs grew at a rate eight times faster than the state’s overall employment rate. The positive effects of trade are felt across the economy, by both small and large businesses. In fact, the Business Roundtable found that of the state’s 5,999 exporters, 85 percent are small and medium-sized companies. For consumers, imports facilitated by trade agreements mean more choices and lower prices, whether you’re shopping locally or online. For example, substantial reductions in costs for televisions, computers and toys can be traced directly to international trade, according to the Business Roundtable. Supporting all this 21st century international commerce is an American industry that has been the backbone of our economy since the mid-1800s: freight rail. A key part of Missouri’s ability to adapt and succeed in the global economy has been the continual modernization of operations, equipment, infrastructure and technology undertaken by railroads. Since 1981, railroads — the nation’s only privately funded transport mode — have invested more than $660 billion in revenues back into the nationwide rail network to provide the speed and efficiency needed to keep the customers and communities they serve competitive. Freight railroads themselves offer a unique perspective on trade’s importance to the U.S. economy. A recent report found that 50,000 rail jobs and 42 percent of rail carloads and intermodal units directly depend on international trade. Whether it’s safely and seamlessly moving containers of consumer goods from ocean vessels in California to store shelves in the heartland, or connecting northeast Missouri farmers and manufacturers to markets nationwide and worldwide, the freight rail network continues to be a key to success for our communities. With 4,800 miles of freights tracks crisscrossing Missouri — the 10th largest rail network in the nation — it is clear to see that our freight rail connections give us a distinct advantage over most other states in terms of our ability to reap the advantages of international trade, and to ensure that our communities thrive in an ever more competitive global marketplace. The administration should keep the benefits of trade in mind as NAFTA negotiations continue through the end of this month and pledge to “do no harm” to a trade deal that pays enormous dividends to our local, state and national economies. Daniel P. Mehan is president and CEO of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

OBITUARIES Armstrong, Andrew J. - St. Louis Buchta, Chester "Allyn" - Florissant, formerly of Edwardsville Davis, Lynne - St. Charles DeWoskin, Meryl - St. Louis Doder, Paul Kenneth - Rock Hill, MO

Armstrong, Andrew J. Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection Tuesday, June 5, 2018. Beloved father of E mers yn Armstrong; dear son of Chris and Lori (nee Thor) Armstrong; dear b rot h er of Ad a m a n d Austin Armstrong; dear grandson of Alan and Janet Thor; our dear nephew, cousin and friend to many. Andrew was an accomplished guitar player, singer, and songwriter with his talents enjoyed by all who knew him. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, June 11, 9:15 a.m. to St. Paul Catholic Church (Fenton) for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Valhalla Cemetery (Belleville, IL). Visitation Sunday, 4-8 p.m.

Buchta, Chester "Allyn" 6/4/18. Vis. 3-7 p.m. Sun., 6/10, Weber & Rodney F.H. in Edwardsville. Funeral Service 11 a.m., Mon. at the funeral h ome. Interment Q u ercu s Grove C e m . www.weberfuneralhome.com

Davis, Lynne (nee Rayfield) 54, on 5/26/18. Services previously held Wed. May 30 at Hutchens-Stygar Funeral Home (St. Charles) www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

DeWoskin, Meryl June 4, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Norman DeWoskin; dear mother and mother-in-law of L i n d a W a l l a c h , Ga il (Steve) Hochberg, Nancy (Benjamin) Shein and Sally (Steve) Gelfman; d ea r grandmother of L a u ra (Scott) Ressler, Alex (Janessa), Rachel and Daniel Hochberg, Samantha (fiancé Spencer Ivey) and Jason Shein, Andrew, Matthew and Katie Gelfman; dear great-grandmother of Harrison, Marisol and Ava; dear sister and sister-in-law of the late Louis Nieman. Meryl was an avid tennis player, reader and active community volunteer with Jewish Hospital and the Miriam Foundation. Services: Private family service will be held on Friday, June 8th. Memorial contributions preferred to The Foundation for Barnes-Jewish Hospital, PO Box 790369, St. Louis, MO 631799917. Visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Doder, Paul Kenneth Son of Victor and Nedra "Peck" Doder, beloved brother of Keith, Uncle, Nephew, Cousin, and friend. Private family graveside service. Contact Hal Doder (415) 924-2801.

Finnigan, Joseph T. age 73, fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church on Monday, June 4, 2018. Finnigan is survived by his wife Constance (nee Simokaitis) and three sons: Matthew (Suzanne Ryan) of Denver, CO, Brendan (Maureen Brady) of Birmingham, AL and Patrick of St. Louis, MO; six grandchildren: Megan, Brendan and Michael Finnigan of Denver, and Brady, Kathleen and Claire Finnigan of Birmingham. He is also survived by his three stepchildren: Jane and Peter Baumgartner, and Rebecca (Henry) Herrera, all of St. Louis. He was preceded in death by his father First Lieutenant Joseph Thomas Finnigan; his mother Mary Frances (nee McCarthy); his stepfather J. Gregory McFall, Sr.; his first wife and the mother of his sons Kathleen Burke Finnigan, who died June 1, 2002. Services: Memorial service will be held at Church of the Annunziata, 9305 Clayton Rd., Wed., June 27th at 11 a.m. Interment private. Donations preferred to Mercy Hospital/David C. Pratt Cancer Center, 607 S New Ballas Rd, St. Louis, MO 63141; Harris House (Frank H a n kin Fund), 8315 S. Broadway, St. Louis, MO 63111; AA Central Services, 14 Sunnen Dr., St. Louis, MO 63143. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel, www.boppchapel.com

Celebrations of Life

Finnigan, Joseph T. - St. Louis Hanlon, Michael Allen - Shelbina, MO Harris, June - St. Louis Hasty, Stephen R. - Yucca Valley, CA Hawes, Richard Bartow "Dee" - Clayton Murphy, John William - St. Louis

Hanlon, Michael Allen

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Robinson-Zull, Sharon - St. Charles Russo, Virginia Lee - St. Louis Sonnenshein, Theresa Ellen - ST. Louis Thor - see Armstrong Towers, Jackie - St. Charles Tucker, June O. - Florissant

Sonnenshein, Theresa Ellen

June 3, 2018, age 37. Services: Visitation Saturday, June 9, Baue Cave Springs, 1:00-4:00 p.m. Service to follow at 4:00 p.m. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

(nee Boyer) age 92, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on June 6, 2018. Beloved wife of the late Julian. Dear mother of Julie (Eamon) Harris, June Concagh, Theresa Sonnenschein, (nee Mayes), Tues. June 5, 2018. Marie (James) Condis, Dorthy Beloved wife of the late Charles (Morton) Small, Veronica A. H a rris ; l ovin g mot h er of (Thomas) Yaeger, Mariann Wil l ia m F. (D eb b ie) , Martin Chandler, Eugene (Carol), Henry (Susan), Charles Bryon (Judith) (Ken), John (Janis) and Joseph and J. Bradley (Karen) Harris and Sonnenschein; Grandmother of Holli K. (Darryl) Davidson; dear 16; Great grandmother of 17; she grandmother of Tiffany, Billy, was a cherished Sister, Sister-inMatthew (Keary), Brant, Brittany, law, Aunt, Great-Aunt, Cousin, Godmother and Friend. Ashley, Rehgan and Rylee; dear Theresa was a very faithful Catholic and member of St. David's great-grandmother of Kayla and Catholic Church. She served as a Eucharistic minister, Peyton; dear sister of William participated in d a il y Mass a n d volunteered for many Leroy and Adean (Nancy) Mayes. organizations over the years. Theresa had a great sense of Services: Funeral from KUTIS humor and loved to dress as a clown. She brought joy to all, and AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Monday, June 11 at will be dearly missed. 11:00 a.m. Interment St. Paul Churchyard. Visitation Services: Funeral Service at St. David's Catholic Church, 2334 Sunday 4-9 p.m. Tenbrook Rd., Arnold, MO 63010 at 11:00 a.m. on Monday, June 11, 2018. Visitation at Heiligtag-Lang-Fendler Funeral Home Sunday, June 10, 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Interment at Jefferson Hasty, Stephen R. Beloved brother of the late Roy- Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, lene (and Kenneth) Steinhaeufel, contributions in Theresa's honor may be made to loving uncle of Stephanie (Marty) Keaton Residential Center, 120 N. Mill St., Festus, MO 63028. www.heiligtagfuneralhome.com Bennet and Michael Steinhaeufel, loving great uncle to Sarah Bennet, dear cousin of Towers, Jackie Jackie Weber and her children (nee Zensen), Jackie, 66, on (5/30/18). Visit: 4-8 pm Fri. (6/8) at Renae, Sherry and Denise; our Hutchens-Stygar (St. Charles). Mass: Sat 10 am (6/9) at St. dear uncle, cousin, family and Robert Bellarmine.www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com friend. Services: Short informal visitaTucker, June O. tion and ceremony at Memorial Park Cemetery Chapel from 288 years, Wednesday, June 6, 3pm followed by internment. 2018. Beloved wife of the late Clarence "Bud" Tucker; dear mother of Sandy (late Kenneth) Goeke, Clarence "Butch" (Linda) Hawes, Richard Bartow "Dee" Tucker, Debby (Mark) Baugh; Died suddenly on Tuesday, June loving grandmother of Scott 5, 2018 at the age of 65. He is (St ep h a n ie) , Laura and Jeff survived by his wife of 31 years, (Wendy) Goeke, David and Gary Kelly Wardlaw Hawes, his sons (Amy) Tucker, Virgil (Bonnie) R i c h a r d B a r t o w H a w e s , J r. Scott, Julie (Adam) Doll, Mark (Audrey) and Smith Nicholas "Cody" (Makayla) B a u gh and Hawes (Alix). His siblings Christy great-grandmother of 18 and Hawes Bond (Richard), Felicite great-great-grandmother of 3. "Lissy" Hawes Pollnow (Fairfax) Survived by many other relatives. and Eleanor "Chachie" Hawes Services: Visitation 4-8 p.m. Sunday, June 10 at Hutchens B r e n n a n ( W i l l i a m) a n d h i s Mortuary & Cremation Center, Florissant and 9-10 a.m. Monday, b e l o v e d S k e e t e r . H e w a s June 11 at Lutheran Church of the Atonement, Florissant with preceded in death by his parents service to follow at 10 a.m. Interment Salem Lutheran Richard Simrall Hawes, III, Marie Cemetery. Memorials to Humane Society of Missouri. Christy Johnson Hawes and his sister Laura Marion Hawes. Dee was a graduate of St. Louis Country Day School, Williams Fraternal Notices College and served as Chairman of Airport Terminal Services. He was an avid fisherman, outdoorsman, a devout Catholic and dedicated to his family. LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. Services: A Memorial Mass will be celebrated at the Church of Please be advised of the death of the Annunziata in Ladue, 9305 Clayton Rd. at Cella Rd., on Bro. Charles J. Redmond Friday, June 8 at 11 a.m. Private Interment Calvary Cemetery. Supply - Retired Memorials appreciated to Catholic Charities of St. Louis, 4532 Member 30 Years Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63108, Alzheimer's Association, February 2, 2018 9370 Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO, 63132 or to Fellowship of Services were held Christian Athletes, Attn: Marylue, 8701 Leeds Rd., Kansas Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. City, MO, 64129. James C. Douglas, F.S. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Murphy, John William 54, 5-31-18. John is survived by his children, Colleen Burton, Kaitlyn Murphy, John William Murphy, Jr., and two grandchildren Brandon and Logan Burton. Private memorial TBA.

Robinson-Zull, Sharon Sharon Robinson-Zull, June 3, 2018. Services: Visitation at Baue Funeral & Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay, 63301, Friday, 4-9 p.m.; Memorial Mass at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, St. Charles, Saturday, 10 a.m. For more info, see www.baue.com/obit/sharon-zull.

Russo, Virginia Lee Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wednesday June 6, 2018. Loving mother of Stephen Ingerson and Sharon Kay (Donald) Ochsner; dear grandmother of Olivia and Paige Ochsner; dear great-grandmother of Andrew and Maddox; dear aunt and friend of many, especially Sandy Hartmann and Cathy Ptacek. Virginia was the last of her Russo family lineage. She retired from Monsanto after a long career. Services: Visitation Saturday, June 9th, 9:15 a.m. followed by 10:00 a.m. Funeral Mass at St. Peter Catholic Church, 243 W. Argonne, Kirkwood. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel. www.boppchapel.com

LOCAL 1 Insulators & Allied Workers Please be advised of the death of Retired Member Tim Williams Passed June 5, 2018 No services. Gerald Donovan - Business Manager

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NEWS

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

NATION DIGEST World leaders threaten rare rebuke of U.S. French President Emmanuel Macron threatened on Thursday to join with other world leaders to issue a rare rebuke of the United States at a global summit in Canada this weekend, drawing immediate and sharp replies from President Donald Trump. Macron threatened to exclude the United States from the joint statement issued every year at the end of the Group of Seven summit of industrial democracies, as part of an international opposition to Trump’s eforts to change trade rules. “The American President may not mind being isolated, but neither do we mind signing a 6 country agreement if need be,” Macron wrote on Twitter. Trump responded by accusing Macron and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of hurting the United States with unfair trade practices. Trump also said Trudeau was “being so indignant,” an unusually personal attack aimed at one of the U.S.’s closest allies. The White House later announced that Trump would leave the summit several hours early, skipping sessions on climate and the environment. Mars rover inds evidence of possible life • New Mars discoveries are advancing the case for possible life on the red planet, past or even present. Scientists reported Thursday that NASA’s Curiosity rover has found potential building blocks of life in an ancient Martian lakebed. Hints have been found before, but this is the best evidence yet. The organic molecules preserved in 3.5 billion-year-old bedrock in Gale Crater — believed to once contain a shallow lake the size of Florida’s Lake Okeechobee — suggest conditions back then may have been conducive to life. That leaves open the possibility that microorganisms once populated our planetary neighbor and still might. U.S. to release American to Syria • The administration of President Donald Trump has told a federal court that it plans to release an American citizen accused of ighting with Islamic State militants and return him to Syria, but his attorneys say that that’s a “death warrant” and that they will ask the court to intervene. The Trump administration submitted a notice Wednesday to a federal court in Washington saying it had determined it would release the man, who has been held without charge in a U.S. military detention facility in Iraq since he surrendered on the Syrian battleield in September. The man, who is not named in court ilings, has been represented by the American Civil Liberties Union. “The government has efectively admitted that it has no reason to continue detaining our client and that he does not pose a threat. But, instead of ofering a safe release, they want to dump an American citizen onto the side of the road in a war-torn country without any assurances of protection and no identiication,” ACLU attorney Jonathan Hafetz said in a statement. No evidence of collusion, Ryan says • House Speaker Paul Ryan insisted on Thursday that there was “no evidence of collusion” between the president or his campaign and Russia, just a day after dismissing Trump’s assertions that federal law enforcement oicials had planted a spy in his operation. “Let’s just make that really clear: There’s no evidence of collusion. This is about Russia and what they did and making sure they don’t do it again,” Ryan, R-Wis., told reporters, in comments excoriating federal law enforcement agencies for not being more forthcoming with documents that lawmakers had requested until Ryan personally intervened. North Carolina lawmakers move to shield hog farms • Senators in the country’s No. 2 hog-growing state want to further shield industrial-scale hog operations from lawsuits by neighbors who’ve long complained that open-air animal waste pits comparable to city sewage plants frustrate their daily lives. North Carolina’s Senate tentatively approved legislation Thursday to make it more diicult for lawsuits that claim an agricultural operation created a nuisance for current neighbors. Final legislative passage could come next week. Lawmakers acted weeks after neighbors won a $51 million jury verdict from pork giant Smithield Foods after decades of complaints about smells and other nuisances to industry-friendly politicians. From news services

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A15

WORLD DIGEST

NIGHT OF DESTINY Shiite Muslims in Tehran, iran, pray in the early hours of Friday on Laylat al-Qadr, or the night of destiny, during the holy fasting month of ramadan. Laylat al-Qadr is the night when Muslims believe the Quran was irst revealed to the Prophet Muhammad. Worshippers gather in religious ceremonies to pray, ask forgiveness and make wishes on one of the most important nights of the islamic calendar. Shiite Muslims, the vast majority of iranians, believe the night happens either on 19th, 21st or 23rd of ramadan.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

As aid dries up, Gazans are pushed deeper into poverty ‘Death is better than this life,’ grandmother of 16 says BY FARES AKRAM AND MOHAMMED DARAGHMEH associated Press

how it would deal with Hamas, which refuses to disarm or renounce violence.

GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP •

HOPING TO GET SHOT

Samia Hassan used to have enough money to feed her two dozen children and grandchildren. Now she spends much of her time worrying about food, scouring Gaza’s vegetable markets for end-of-day discounts or walking miles for a pot of free gruel from a soup kitchen. Large numbers of Gaza families have been pushed deeper into poverty in recent months by Palestinian political infighting and the freezing of U.S. aid. Life is tougher than ever for most of the 2 million Palestinians locked into tiny, blockaded Gaza, where electricity is off most hours of the day, unemployment approaches 50 percent and the Islamic militant group Hamas rules with a tight grip. “It’s a perfect storm,” said Hilary DuBose of the Catholic Relief Services, which has had to forgo emergency food distributions because the administration of President Donald Trump is withholding funds. “At the same time that the humanitarian situation in Gaza is worsening, humanitarian aid is disappearing.” Growing despair in Gaza has helped drive recent Hamasled protests against the border blockade by Israel and Egypt. The closure was imposed after Hamas, branded a terrorist group by Israel and the West, seized Gaza in 2007, driving out forces loyal to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. The escalating crisis also spotlights the lack of a coherent Gaza policy by the external players trying to shape its future. Israel and Egypt say they need the blockade to contain Hamas but have not offered a viable plan for Gaza. The international community wants the blockade lifted but hasn’t said

Hassan — who shares her unfinished cinderblock home with seven of her 12 adult children, three daughters-in-law and 16 grandchildren — said she joined the border protests repeatedly, intentionally getting close to the fence in hopes of getting shot and killed by Israeli troops. “Death is better than this life,” she said to her sons’ astonishment as the family gathered for the meal breaking the dawn-to-dusk fast of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Hassan said she only pulled back because she realized she could end up crippled rather than dead and become a burden. In the past two months, more than 115 Palestinians have been killed and close to 3,800 wounded by Israeli fire in nearweekly border protests, with some facing lifelong disabilities. Hassan, who wears the black robe and full face veil of ultraconservative Muslim women, is angry at Hamas, which has fought three cross-border wars with Israel. “It’s because of them,” she said of her family’s hard times. In the last war in 2014, the family taxi, an important source of income, was destroyed in an Israeli airstrike on a neighbor’s house. After the war’s devastation, her sons found work only sporadically and one — a father of six — is now in jail for being unable to pay his debts. The family suffered a new blow after Abbas ordered his West Bank autonomy government to curtail its regular support payments to Gaza, in hopes of pressing Hamas to hand over authority. The Hassans used to get $500 every three months from

Abbas’ Palestinian Authority but haven’t been paid since the beginning of the year, along with tens of thousands of Gaza welfare recipients, said Social Afairs Ministry oicial Khaled Barghouti. Meanwhile, some 60,000 former civil servants, paid by Abbas since 2007 to ensure their loyalty, have received only a fraction of their salaries since March. With barely any money coming in, the Hassans increasingly rely on charity.

1 MILLION ON AID Along with the Palestinian Authority, the U.N. has been instrumental in propping up Gaza’s fragile economy. About two-thirds of Gaza’s residents are eligible for health, education or welfare services from UNRWA, the agency that aids descendants of Palestinian refugees from the 1948 war over Israel’s creation. Need has grown exponentially, with some 1 million people in Gaza now receiving U.N. food aid, compared with 80,000 two decades ago, said agency spokesman Chris Gunness. At the same time, the Trump administration has blown a $305 million hole into the agency’s annual $1.2 billion budget — the result of a decision this year to suspend most aid to the Palestinians until further notice. Washington has said it’s linking future funding to UNRWA reforms. UNRWA has raised more than $200 million from other donors but is still struggling. Money for Gaza food distributions could run out in a couple of months, Gunness said. With the exception of the funds already spent this year, all U.S. assistance to the Palestinians is under review. There is no indication the review will be completed any time soon, if ever.

U.S. screens more staf in China over mystery health issues ASSOCIATED PRESS

GUANGZHOU, CHINA • A

U.S. medical team was screening more Americans who work at the consulate in southern China as the State Department confirmed evacuating a number of government employees who experienced unexplained health issues like those that have hurt U.S. personnel in Cuba. The evacuations of workers in Guangzhou followed medical testing that revealed they might have been afected. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said “a number of individuals” had been brought to the U.S. but didn’t say how many were affected or evacuated. A previous case in Guangzhou, disclosed last month, prompted the tests. Nauert also said that remaining U.S. government personnel and their families in Guangzhou would also be able to request testing if they

“noted concerning symptoms or wanted baseline screening.” The incidents have raised fears that the unexplained issues that started in Cuba in 2016 have expanded. The U.S. government has deemed those incidents “specific attacks” on American workers but hasn’t publicly identified a cause or culprit. Most of the incidents were accompanied by bizarre, unexplained sounds that initially led U.S. investigators to suspect a sonic attack. Symptoms have included dizziness, headaches and an inability to concentrate. The American government worker who previously was removed from China reported “subtle and vague, but abnormal, sensations of sound and pressure,” the Guangzhou consulate reported last month. Asked about the latest incidents, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said the U.S. had not formally raised the matter with

Beijing. “If the U.S. makes formal contact with us, China will continue necessary investigations in an earnest and responsible manner and maintain close communication and cooperation with the U.S.,” Hua said at a regularly scheduled news conference. China earlier said it had looked into the case announced last month but came up with no clues about the cause of the symptoms. A U.S. official, who wasn’t authorized to discuss the situation publicly and requested anonymity, said the evacuated American government workers were being brought from China for testing to the University of Pennsylvania. The preliminary findings of the medical reports on the 24 personnel affected in Cuba showed they had sensory and memory problems similar to the brain dysfunction seen with concussions.

Afghan leader declares cease-ire with Taliban Afghan President Ashraf Ghani announced on Thursday a unilateral, weeklong cease-ire with the Taliban, the latest move in his government’s increasingly urgent bid for peace and a relection of the Taliban’s battleield strength. Speaking in a televised address, Ghani said that local forces would halt ofensive operations against the insurgent group beginning Tuesday, close to the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, but would continue to attack the local branch of Islamic State and other hard-line militant groups. It was the irst time an Afghan leader has declared an unconditional cease-ire with the Taliban since the current war began in 2001. The Taliban had no immediate response to Ghani’s declaration. Merkel urges assertive global role for Europe • Chancellor Angela Merkel made a forceful pitch for Europe to play a more assertive role in global afairs as U.S. President Donald Trump dismantles the post-World War II order, setting the stage for a potential tense standof at the Group of Seven summit this week. The German leader again questioned the durability of transAtlantic relations by referring to eye-raising comments she made over a year ago in which she said that “the times when we could fully rely on others are to some extent over.” Those words, spoken at a beer-tent election rally, were a reaction to Trump’s hectoring European leaders at a North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit in Brussels for not spending enough on defense. Since then, more fuel has been added to the ire. “That was my takeaway from the NATO summit, and in the meantime I continue to feel conirmed by my statement,” Merkel said in Munich on Wednesday, this time to a meeting of the European People’s Party, a grouping of center-right parties in the European Parliament. In addition to the disruptive efects of the rift in NATO and Trump’s exit from the Paris global climate treaty, Merkel pointed to the fresh conlict over trade and the U.S. leader’s withdrawal from the Iran nuclear accord last month. Photos show volcano’s destruction • Before-andafter satellite photos show the destruction wrought by deadly lows of super-heated materials and debris from Sunday’s eruption of the Volcano of Fire in Guatemala. The hamlet of San Miguel Los Lotes, once a collection of modest homes with a road running alongside, was almost completely buried. Only a handful of structures on the edge of town survived. Farther up the volcano’s lanks, a luxury golf course, hotel and residential complex was also destroyed. At least 99 people have been conirmed killed by the eruption, a number that is expected to rise further with nearly 200 still missing. Russian troops to remain in Syria • Russian troops will remain in Syria as long as Moscow thinks it’s necessary, but Russia isn’t building permanent facilities in the only Middle East country where it has a military foothold, President Vladimir Putin said Thursday in his annual marathon call-in show. The troops “will stay there for as long as it is to Russia’s advantage, and to fulill our international responsibilities,” the Russian leader said during his annual televised call-in show. But, he added, “we are not building long-term installations there and if necessary can withdraw our servicemen quite quickly without any material losses.” Putin didn’t elaborate under what circumstances Russia could leave or on Moscow’s broader strategy for Syria. Russia uses leased facilities for ships at Tartus and for an air base in Hemeimeem. Smuggled artifacts return to Egypt • Egypt says it has repatriated nine illegally smuggled artifacts, including statuary and coins, from France. Thursday’s statement by the Foreign Ministry says French authorities had seized the artifacts at a train station in Paris in 2012. The Egyptian Antiquities Ministry says the artifacts include parts of ive coins, two statues of cats, a depiction of a human head made of basalt, and a pharaonic mask made of wood. Egypt has drastically stepped up eforts in recent years to stop the traicking of its antiquities. It has warned foreign museums that it will not help them mount exhibits on ancient Egyptian sites unless they return smuggled artifacts. From news services


NEWS

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 2

NATION DIGEST World leaders threaten rare rebuke of U.S. French President Emmanuel Macron threatened on Thursday to join with other world leaders to issue a rare rebuke of the United States at a global summit in Canada this weekend, drawing immediate and sharp replies from President Donald Trump. Macron threatened to exclude the United States from the joint statement issued every year at the end of the Group of Seven summit of industrial democracies, as part of an international opposition to Trump’s eforts to change trade rules. “The American President may not mind being isolated, but neither do we mind signing a 6 country agreement if need be,” Macron wrote on Twitter. Trump responded by accusing Macron and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of hurting the United States with unfair trade practices. Trump also said Trudeau was “being so indignant,” an unusually personal attack aimed at one of the U.S.’s closest allies. The White House later announced that Trump would leave the summit several hours early, skipping sessions on climate and the environment. Mars rover inds evidence of possible life • New Mars discoveries are advancing the case for possible life on the red planet, past or even present. Scientists reported Thursday that NASA’s Curiosity rover has found potential building blocks of life in an ancient Martian lakebed. Hints have been found before, but this is the best evidence yet. The organic molecules preserved in 3.5 billion-year-old bedrock in Gale Crater — believed to once contain a shallow lake the size of Florida’s Lake Okeechobee — suggest conditions back then may have been conducive to life. That leaves open the possibility that microorganisms once populated our planetary neighbor and still might. U.S. to release American to Syria • The administration of President Donald Trump has told a federal court that it plans to release an American citizen accused of ighting with Islamic State militants and return him to Syria, but his attorneys say that that’s a “death warrant” and that they will ask the court to intervene. The Trump administration submitted a notice Wednesday to a federal court in Washington saying it had determined it would release the man, who has been held without charge in a U.S. military detention facility in Iraq since he surrendered on the Syrian battleield in September. The man, who is not named in court ilings, has been represented by the American Civil Liberties Union. “The government has efectively admitted that it has no reason to continue detaining our client and that he does not pose a threat. But, instead of ofering a safe release, they want to dump an American citizen onto the side of the road in a war-torn country without any assurances of protection and no identiication,” ACLU attorney Jonathan Hafetz said in a statement. No evidence of collusion, Ryan says • House Speaker Paul Ryan insisted on Thursday that there was “no evidence of collusion” between the president or his campaign and Russia, just a day after dismissing Trump’s assertions that federal law enforcement oicials had planted a spy in his operation. “Let’s just make that really clear: There’s no evidence of collusion. This is about Russia and what they did and making sure they don’t do it again,” Ryan, R-Wis., told reporters, in comments excoriating federal law enforcement agencies for not being more forthcoming with documents that lawmakers had requested until Ryan personally intervened. North Carolina lawmakers move to shield hog farms • Senators in the country’s No. 2 hog-growing state want to further shield industrial-scale hog operations from lawsuits by neighbors who’ve long complained that open-air animal waste pits comparable to city sewage plants frustrate their daily lives. North Carolina’s Senate tentatively approved legislation Thursday to make it more diicult for lawsuits that claim an agricultural operation created a nuisance for current neighbors. Final legislative passage could come next week. Lawmakers acted weeks after neighbors won a $51 million jury verdict from pork giant Smithield Foods after decades of complaints about smells and other nuisances to industry-friendly politicians. From news services

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A15

WORLD DIGEST

NIGHT OF DESTINY Shiite Muslims in Tehran, iran, pray in the early hours of Friday on Laylat al-Qadr, or the night of destiny, during the holy fasting month of ramadan. Laylat al-Qadr is the night when Muslims believe the Quran was irst revealed to the Prophet Muhammad. Worshippers gather in religious ceremonies to pray, ask forgiveness and make wishes on one of the most important nights of the islamic calendar. Shiite Muslims, the vast majority of iranians, believe the night happens either on 19th, 21st or 23rd of ramadan.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

As aid dries up, Gazans are pushed deeper into poverty ‘Death is better than this life,’ grandmother of 16 says BY FARES AKRAM AND MOHAMMED DARAGHMEH associated Press

how it would deal with Hamas, which refuses to disarm or renounce violence.

GAZA CITY, GAZA STRIP •

HOPING TO GET SHOT

Samia Hassan used to have enough money to feed her two dozen children and grandchildren. Now she spends much of her time worrying about food, scouring Gaza’s vegetable markets for end-of-day discounts or walking miles for a pot of free gruel from a soup kitchen. Large numbers of Gaza families have been pushed deeper into poverty in recent months by Palestinian political infighting and the freezing of U.S. aid. Life is tougher than ever for most of the 2 million Palestinians locked into tiny, blockaded Gaza, where electricity is off most hours of the day, unemployment approaches 50 percent and the Islamic militant group Hamas rules with a tight grip. “It’s a perfect storm,” said Hilary DuBose of the Catholic Relief Services, which has had to forgo emergency food distributions because the administration of President Donald Trump is withholding funds. “At the same time that the humanitarian situation in Gaza is worsening, humanitarian aid is disappearing.” Growing despair in Gaza has helped drive recent Hamasled protests against the border blockade by Israel and Egypt. The closure was imposed after Hamas, branded a terrorist group by Israel and the West, seized Gaza in 2007, driving out forces loyal to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. The escalating crisis also spotlights the lack of a coherent Gaza policy by the external players trying to shape its future. Israel and Egypt say they need the blockade to contain Hamas but have not offered a viable plan for Gaza. The international community wants the blockade lifted but hasn’t said

Hassan — who shares her unfinished cinderblock home with seven of her 12 adult children, three daughters-in-law and 16 grandchildren — said she joined the border protests repeatedly, intentionally getting close to the fence in hopes of getting shot and killed by Israeli troops. “Death is better than this life,” she said to her sons’ astonishment as the family gathered for the meal breaking the dawn-to-dusk fast of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Hassan said she only pulled back because she realized she could end up crippled rather than dead and become a burden. In the past two months, more than 115 Palestinians have been killed and close to 3,800 wounded by Israeli fire in nearweekly border protests, with some facing lifelong disabilities. Hassan, who wears the black robe and full face veil of ultraconservative Muslim women, is angry at Hamas, which has fought three cross-border wars with Israel. “It’s because of them,” she said of her family’s hard times. In the last war in 2014, the family taxi, an important source of income, was destroyed in an Israeli airstrike on a neighbor’s house. After the war’s devastation, her sons found work only sporadically and one — a father of six — is now in jail for being unable to pay his debts. The family suffered a new blow after Abbas ordered his West Bank autonomy government to curtail its regular support payments to Gaza, in hopes of pressing Hamas to hand over authority. The Hassans used to get $500 every three months from

Abbas’ Palestinian Authority but haven’t been paid since the beginning of the year, along with tens of thousands of Gaza welfare recipients, said Social Afairs Ministry oicial Khaled Barghouti. Meanwhile, some 60,000 former civil servants, paid by Abbas since 2007 to ensure their loyalty, have received only a fraction of their salaries since March. With barely any money coming in, the Hassans increasingly rely on charity.

1 MILLION ON AID Along with the Palestinian Authority, the U.N. has been instrumental in propping up Gaza’s fragile economy. About two-thirds of Gaza’s residents are eligible for health, education or welfare services from UNRWA, the agency that aids descendants of Palestinian refugees from the 1948 war over Israel’s creation. Need has grown exponentially, with some 1 million people in Gaza now receiving U.N. food aid, compared with 80,000 two decades ago, said agency spokesman Chris Gunness. At the same time, the Trump administration has blown a $305 million hole into the agency’s annual $1.2 billion budget — the result of a decision this year to suspend most aid to the Palestinians until further notice. Washington has said it’s linking future funding to UNRWA reforms. UNRWA has raised more than $200 million from other donors but is still struggling. Money for Gaza food distributions could run out in a couple of months, Gunness said. With the exception of the funds already spent this year, all U.S. assistance to the Palestinians is under review. There is no indication the review will be completed any time soon, if ever.

U.S. screens more staf in China over mystery health issues ASSOCIATED PRESS

GUANGZHOU, CHINA • A

U.S. medical team was screening more Americans who work at the consulate in southern China as the State Department confirmed evacuating a number of government employees who experienced unexplained health issues like those that have hurt U.S. personnel in Cuba. The evacuations of workers in Guangzhou followed medical testing that revealed they might have been afected. State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said “a number of individuals” had been brought to the U.S. but didn’t say how many were affected or evacuated. A previous case in Guangzhou, disclosed last month, prompted the tests. Nauert also said that remaining U.S. government personnel and their families in Guangzhou would also be able to request testing if they

“noted concerning symptoms or wanted baseline screening.” The incidents have raised fears that the unexplained issues that started in Cuba in 2016 have expanded. The U.S. government has deemed those incidents “specific attacks” on American workers but hasn’t publicly identified a cause or culprit. Most of the incidents were accompanied by bizarre, unexplained sounds that initially led U.S. investigators to suspect a sonic attack. Symptoms have included dizziness, headaches and an inability to concentrate. The American government worker who previously was removed from China reported “subtle and vague, but abnormal, sensations of sound and pressure,” the Guangzhou consulate reported last month. Asked about the latest incidents, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said the U.S. had not formally raised the matter with

Beijing. “If the U.S. makes formal contact with us, China will continue necessary investigations in an earnest and responsible manner and maintain close communication and cooperation with the U.S.,” Hua said at a regularly scheduled news conference. China earlier said it had looked into the case announced last month but came up with no clues about the cause of the symptoms. A U.S. official, who wasn’t authorized to discuss the situation publicly and requested anonymity, said the evacuated American government workers were being brought from China for testing to the University of Pennsylvania. The preliminary findings of the medical reports on the 24 personnel affected in Cuba showed they had sensory and memory problems similar to the brain dysfunction seen with concussions.

Afghan leader declares cease-ire with Taliban Afghan President Ashraf Ghani announced on Thursday a unilateral, weeklong cease-ire with the Taliban, the latest move in his government’s increasingly urgent bid for peace and a relection of the Taliban’s battleield strength. Speaking in a televised address, Ghani said that local forces would halt ofensive operations against the insurgent group beginning Tuesday, close to the end of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, but would continue to attack the local branch of Islamic State and other hard-line militant groups. It was the irst time an Afghan leader has declared an unconditional cease-ire with the Taliban since the current war began in 2001. The Taliban had no immediate response to Ghani’s declaration. Ford’s brother is new Ontario premier • The new premier of Ontario is the brother of late Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, who became famous for smoking crack cocaine. Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives won the provincial election Thursday in Canada’s most populous province. Doug Ford is a populist who has been compared to U.S. President Donald Trump. Rob Ford’s tenure as mayor of the country’s largest city was marred by revelations about his illegal drug use. He died of cancer in 2016. Liberal Premier Kathleen Wynne’s party had been in power for 15 years. Merkel urges assertive global role for Europe • Chancellor Angela Merkel made a forceful pitch for Europe to play a more assertive role in global afairs as U.S. President Donald Trump dismantles the post-World War II order, setting the stage for a potential tense standof at the Group of Seven summit this week. The German leader again questioned the durability of transAtlantic relations by referring to comments she made over a year ago in which she said that “the times when we could fully rely on others are to some extent over.” Those words were a reaction to Trump’s hectoring European leaders at a North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit in Brussels for not spending enough on defense. “That was my takeaway from the NATO summit, and in the meantime I continue to feel conirmed by my statement,” Merkel said in Munich on Wednesday, this time to a group of center-right parties in the European Parliament. Merkel pointed to the fresh conlict over trade and Trump’s withdrawal from the Iran nuclear accord last month. Photos show volcano’s destruction • Before-andafter satellite photos show the destruction wrought by deadly lows from Sunday’s eruption of the Volcano of Fire in Guatemala. The hamlet of San Miguel Los Lotes was almost completely buried. Only a handful of structures on the edge of town survived. Farther up the volcano’s lanks, a luxury golf course, hotel and residential complex was also destroyed. At least 99 people have been conirmed killed by the eruption, with nearly 200 still missing. Russian troops to remain in Syria • Russian troops will remain in Syria as long as Moscow thinks it’s necessary, but Russia isn’t building permanent facilities in the only Middle East country where it has a military foothold, President Vladimir Putin said Thursday in his annual marathon call-in show. The troops “will stay there for as long as it is to Russia’s advantage, and to fulill our international responsibilities,” Putin said. But, he added, “we are not building long-term installations there and if necessary can withdraw our servicemen quite quickly without any material losses.” Putin didn’t elaborate on Moscow’s broader strategy for Syria. Russia uses leased facilities for ships at Tartus and for an air base in Hemeimeem. Smuggled artifacts return to Egypt • Egypt says it has repatriated nine illegally smuggled artifacts, including statuary and coins, from France. Thursday’s statement by the Foreign Ministry says French authorities had seized the artifacts at a train station in Paris in 2012. The Egyptian Antiquities Ministry says the artifacts include parts of ive coins, two statues of cats, a depiction of a human head made of basalt, and a pharaonic mask made of wood. Egypt has drastically stepped up eforts in recent years to stop the traicking of its antiquities. It has warned foreign museums that it will not help them mount exhibits on ancient Egyptian sites unless they return smuggled artifacts. From news services


NATION

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.08.2018

Justice Department won’t defend ACA in case brought by 20 GOP-led states

Where Quality Counts... Since 1977

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BY AMY GOLDSTEIN Washington Post

The administration of President Donald Trump said Thursday night that it will not defend the Afordable Care Act against the latest legal challenge to its constitutionality — a dramatic break from the executive branch’s tradition of arguing to uphold existing statutes and a land mine for health insurance changes the ACA brought about. In a brief iled in a Texas federal court and an accompanying letter to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., the Justice Department agrees in large part with the 20 Republican-led states who brought the suit. They contend that the ACA provision requiring most Americans to carry health insurance soon will no longer be constitutional and that, as a result, consumer insurance protections under the law are not valid either. The three-page letter to Pelosi from Attorney General Jef Sessions begins by saying that Justice adopted its position “with the approval of the President of the United States.” The letter acknowledges that the decision not to defend an existing law deviates from history but contends that it is not unprecedented. The bold swipe at the ACA, a Republican whipping post since its 2010 passage, does not immediately affect any of its provisions. But it puts the law on far more wobbly legal footing in the case, which is being heard by a GOP-appointed judge who has in other recent cases ruled against more minor aspects. The administration does not go as far as the Texas attorney general and his counterparts. In their suit, lodged in February in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas, they argue that the entire law is now invalid. By contrast, the Justice brief and letter say many other aspects of the law can survive because they can be considered legally distinct from the insurance mandate and such consumer protections as a ban on charging more or refusing coverage to people with preexisting medical conditions. A group of 17 Democratic-led states that have won standing in the case also iled a brief on Thursday night arguing for the ACA’s preservation. While the case has to play out from here, the administration’s striking position raises the possibility that major parts of the law could be struck down — a year after the Republican Congress failed at attempts to repeal core provisions. Crusading against the ACA has been a priority of Trump’s since his campaign for the White House. The case in Texas, which has attracted relatively little notice until now, emerges from the massive tax bill Congress passed late last year. In that, lawmakers decided to eliminate the tax penalty the ACA requires people to pay if they lout the insurance mandate. The enforcement of that requirement will end in January. As a result, the Texas lawsuit contends, “the country is left with an individual mandate to buy health insurance that lacks any constitutional basis. ... Once the heart of the ACA — the individual mandate — is declared unconstitutional, the remainder of the ACA must also fall.” Texas and the accompanying states have asked for a preliminary injunction that could suspend the entire law while the case plays out in court. But the administration disagrees with that position. Instead, Justice oicials argue in their brief that the ACA’s insurance requirement will not become unconstitutional until January, so that “the injury imposed by the individual mandate is not sufficiently imminent” and that the judge could issue a inal ruling in the case before then.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 06.08.2018 • B

AFTER TWO YEARS, MERGER COMPLETE Bayer’s acquisition of Monsanto still needs oicial approval

Subsidizing coal plants is a bad, expensive proposition Trump’s plan would cost tens of billions, jobs, trade group says U.S. COAL-FIRED GENERATING CAPACITY In gigawatts 300

250

200

100

150

50

0

2006

2011

2016

2021

2026

SOURCE: U.S. Energy Information Administration

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

One of the gardens at Monsanto headquarters in Creve Coeur. Monsanto has 5,400 full-time employees here and 20,000 globally. The St. Louis region will become Bayer’s North American headquarters and retain its presence as a leading hub of biotech research.

BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Nearly two years after Bayer’s acquisition of Monsanto was first announced, the financial part of the $63 billion merger was finally completed Thursday. “Today’s closing represents an important milestone toward the vision of creating a leading agricultural company, supporting growers in their eforts to be more productive and sustainable for the benefit of our planet and consumers,” said Hugh Grant, outgoing chairman and CEO of Monsanto. But amid a still-ongoing marathon to secure regulatory approval of the deal, Thursday’s closing simply marks Bayer’s purchase of the Creve Coeur-based agribusiness giant. Many details — including those about personnel changes and specific strategies of the new company — are still months away from See MONSANTO • Page B4

Monsanto employees get a beekeeping demonstration on Thursday at Monsanto headquarters in Creve Coeur. Monsanto formed a Bee Club in 2012 to promote bee health and education locally. Employees set up the bee hives on the corporate campus.

Aon relocating 200 employees from Clayton to Cortex district BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Another company with global reach is anchoring itself in St. Louis’ Cortex innovation district. Professional services firm Aon will move into a 30,000-squarefoot space in Wexford Science and Technology’s newest oice building later this year. With the new tenant comes 200 workers, adding to the thousands of employees that already work in the Cortex district. Aon will move its operations from downtown Clayton, the region’s strongest oice submarket, to Cortex, which is emerging as an attractive location for oice tenants in the city of St. Louis.

Aon, which has its global headquarters in the Chicago area, will be one of the largest tenants in the recently opened $55 million, 180,000-square-foot oice and lab facility at 4220 Duncan Avenue. That’s the same building that houses Microsoft’s regional headquarters. Other tenants in the building include the Cambridge Innovation Center, BJC Healthcare’s WellAware fitness center, Accenture, an Innovation Hall powered by Venture Café St. Louis and the Chocolate Pig, a restaurant and catering service from the same operators of the Caramel Room at Bissinger’s. See AON • Page B5

When President Barack Obama wanted to subsidize renewable energy, Republicans accused him of picking winners and losers and interfering with free markets. The same criticisms should apply to President Donald Trump’s proposal to subsidize money-losing coal and nuclear power plants to keep them open. The proposal, reported last week by Bloomberg, would order grid operators to buy electricity from plants that are at risk of closing. A draft memo, which the Energy Department has not yet acted upon, argues that the plants need to stay open for national security reasons. “This is a solution in search of a problem,” says Malcolm Woolf, senior vice president at Advanced Energy Economy, a trade group representing both producers and consumers of electricity. “The idea of somehow singling out coal and nuclear as more secure doesn’t hold up.” Coal plants are increasingly being replaced by cheaper natural gas, wind and See NICKLAUS • Page B5

Rep. Clay defends McKee Congressman says SLDC left north St. Louis ‘to languish’ BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Clay

McKee

St. Louis’ congressman lashed out at the city’s economic development arm Thursday and defended NorthSide Regeneration developer Paul McKee as “the only person willing to risk his own money to address decades of disinvestment.” In a commentary published on the St. Louis Business Journal’s website Thursday, U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, said McKee deserves the credit for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s decision to build a new $1.7 billion campus in north St. Louis and that “the city came late to the NGA party

— and then only at Paul McKee’s invitation and insistence.” Clay’s comments follow last month’s revelations during an eminent domain trial in St. Louis that McKee had received millions of dollars in Missouri tax credits for transactions the state later flagged as improper. City attorneys argued the transactions from 2011 and 2012 inflated sales prices to maximize the value of tax credits issued to the developer and that the transactions were designed so no money changed hands while still triggering the issuance of state tax credits. McKee later deeded the properties See MCKEE • Page B5

BUSINESS

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visit a branch usbank.com/intro125 800.481.4544

Now through June 25, take advantage of competitive interest rates and a 1.25% introductory Annual Percentage Yield (APY) for 12 months. Open a new U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market savings account1 and maintain a balance between $10,000 and $499,999 to receive the introductory bonus rate. Visit any of our 103 St. Louis metro area U.S. Bank branches to open an account today. The Platinum Select Money Market Savings account requires an open Platinum Checking Package.3

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1. Minimum opening deposit of $25 required to open a U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market Savings account. A U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market Savings account requires you to maintain an open U.S. Bank Platinum Checking Package with at least one common account holder on each account. The Platinum Select Money Market Savings account will be converted to a U.S. Bank Standard Savings account if the Platinum Checking Package is closed or transferred to a different non-qualifying product. If another Silver or Gold Checking Package exists, the Platinum Select Money Market Savings account will be converted to a Package Money Market Savings account. All regular account opening procedures apply. Refer to the Consumer Pricing Information brochure for a summary of fees, terms and conditions that apply. This document can be obtained by contacting a U.S. Bank branch or calling 800.872.2657. 2. Until June 25, 2018, open a new U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market Savings account and receive an introductory bonus rate of 1.25% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) for 12 months from the date of account opening. The 1.25% APY will be applied to balances in your account when you maintain a balance between $10,000 and $499,999. The following balance tiers and standard APYs are accurate as of 3/26/2018. Under $1,500: 0.05%; $1,500 to $9,999: 0.05%; $10,000 to $49,999: 0.06%; $50,000 to $99,999: 0.10%; $100,000 to $499,999: 0.10%; $500,000 and above: 0.10%. Interest rates are determined at the bank’s discretion and can change at any time. Interest will be compounded daily and credited to your savings account monthly. At the end of the 12 month period, the introductory bonus will expire and the interest rate and APY will decrease to the standard variable interest rate and APY in effect at that time. Fees could reduce earnings on the account. Offer is not valid if you have an existing U.S. Bank consumer savings account, had a U.S. Bank consumer savings account in the last six months, or received other U.S. Bank bonus offers within the past six months. Current U.S. Bank employees are not eligible. Other restrictions may apply. 3. Minimum opening deposit of $25 required to open a U.S. Bank Platinum Checking Package. Deposit products offered by U.S. Bank National Association. Member FDIC. ©2018 U.S. Bank 171856c 12/17 “World’s Most Ethical Companies” and “Ethisphere” names and marks are registered trademarks of Ethisphere LLC.


NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

KAI completes Deaconess Center for Child Well-Being in Grand Center KAI Design & Build completed the $8.5 million Deaconess Center for Child Well-Being. The 21,000-square-foot facility in the Grand Center Arts District provides meeting and oice space for child advocates, civic leaders and community organizers dedicated to enhancing the well-being of at-risk children. Kwame Building Group was the construction manager. The completed Deaconess Center provides meeting rooms, a chapel, and a large conference space as well as administrative oices for the Deaconess Foundation, Vision for Children at Risk, and Neighborhood Houses, a United Church of Christ ministry that supports low-income children and families in St. Louis. The facility’s design incorporates many elements that appeal to children, such as bright colors, eye-catching graphics and furniture, and garden spaces.

The 21,000-square-foot Deaconess Center provides meeting and oice space for child advocates, civic leaders and community organizers.

Enterprise eases dress code for management trainees

NEW 2018

359

$

THE BOTTOM LINE Only about 36 percent of teenagers will have a job this summer, down from 52 percent two decades ago. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher discuss the reasons for the decline, from changes in the economy to evolving teen priorities. stltoday.com/watch

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Lewis Rice attorney Mark C. Winings was elected as a fellow in the American College of Mortgage Attorneys.

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MISSOURI'S #1 AUtOMOtIVE GROUP IT’S BACK!

Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2017.

IT’S BACK!

* 39 mo. lease, $0 down, $0 Security Deposit, 10,000 miles per year, 12,000 and 15,000 mile available. Plus tax, license and Acquisition fees. See dealer for details. Offer expires 6/30/18.

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BUSINESS CALENDAR ST. CHARLES REGION • St. Charles Regional Investors Breakfast includes a presentation on current city projects. • 7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. networking; 8:30 a.m.-9:30 a.m. presentation; J. Scheidegger Center, Lindenwood University, 2300 West Clay Street, St. Charles • Free, registration requested. Register: https://conta.cc/2Jl47lU

Food industry veteran Rob Stevenson was hired as vice president of baking ingredient innovation at AB Mauri North America, a global yeast producer and bakery ingredients maker. In his new role, Stevenson will lead the organization’s baking ingredient innovation team and oversee the development and implementation of new prod- Stevenson ucts and ingredients. Stevenson, a 36-year industry veteran, joined ABMNA after 16 years at Gateway Products, an Australian food ingredient manufacturer, where he oversaw technical sales, marketing and research and development divisions. Stevenson will be based at the firm’s North American headquarters in the Cortex Innovation Community, home to the firm’s research bakery and fermentation science laboratory. Stevenson holds a bachelor’s of applied science degree in agriculture from Western Sydney University.

ALL WHEEL DRIVE, 3.0, SUNROOF

BY ANDREW WITHERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JUNE 15

Food industry vet Stevenson named VP at AB Mauri North America

LEASE FOR

Ties are no longer required Enterprise Rent-A-Car is planning to hire thousands for its management training and management internship programs — and for the first time, applicants who haven’t assembled a boardroom-worthy wardrobe need not worry. For men, ties will no longer always be required. For women, the company had previously relaxed its dress code to allow sleeveless dresses and blouses and open-toed shoes. The management training and management intern dress code has traditionally been business formal. “This more flexible dress code is in line with our evolving work environment and represents our commitment to our employees, whose feedback prompted this change,” Shelley Roither, Enterprise’s vice president of human resources, said in a news release Thursday announcing the changes. Clayton-based Enterprise plans to hire 8,500 college graduates nationwide for its Management Training Program and 2,000 interns for its Management Internship Program this year. Enterprise Holdings, the world’s largest rental car company, increased revenue 6.5 percent in fiscal 2017 to $22.3 billion. The company’s Management Training Program has existed for about 50 years, and its president and CEO, Pam Nicholson, started her career at Enterprise in the program.

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

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Economic development

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Retail and inancial institutions

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Purk & Associates added Lisa Pearson as an associate in the controllership department. The Starklof Disability Institute hired Sarah Schwegel as youth transition coordinator. McGrath & Associates oice manager Kimberly Witbrodt was selected as a director on the irm’s board of directors. Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale PC added Michael P. Benson as an associate in the construction industry group.

Beltservice Corp. named John Stahr as human resources generalist. Thomas Burris joined St. Louis College of Pharmacy’s Center for Clinical Pharmacology as alumni-endowed professor and president’s senior research advisor.

biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to:

MARK SCHLINKMANN Transportation and real estate

Central Trust Co. hired John Sastry as vice president and inancial planning oicer.

Powers Insurance and Risk Management hired Jacki Malone as a commercial lines account manager.

Bulletin Board and

JACOB BARKER

Esse Health added Dr. Craig Holzem to its Washington Family Medicine oice in Washington, Mo.

Delmar Gardens North Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center appointed Dr. Mary Schmidt as medical director.

Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

Kevin Green was promoted to superintendent of park maintenance for the city of Florissant.

BUSINESS BULLETIN BOARD AWARDS

MARKETING

NewGround won a marketing design from the Marketing Association of Credit Unions for its work on FirstOntario Credit Union’s lagship branch in North Oakville, Ontario.

Western Specialty Contractors was named the Oicial Stadium Restoration Supplier for the United Soccer Leagues LLC.

HELPING OUT

MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS

Rev. Jay DeBeir of Lutheran Hour Ministries joined the board of directors for Bethesda Lutheran Communities.

4M Building Solutions acquired Ad-Vance Building Services Inc., headquartered in Nashville, Tenn.

Access Academies added Anja Schmelter, director of admissions at St. Louis University High School, and Pat Erb, former director of marketing at Nestle Purina Pet Care, to its board of directors.

client roster. Nutrien was created earlier this year with the merger of Canadian-based Agrium and Potash Corp.

NEW BUSINESS William Holland opened Holland Injury Law LLC (130 South Bemiston Avenue in Clayton), focusing on motor vehicle accident litigation.

OPENINGS

MORE BUSINESS

On the Run opened a new location:

Osborn Barr added the retail division of Nutrien Ltd., the world’s largest provider of crop inputs and services, to its

• 102A Delores Drive, Fenton


MARKET WATCH

06.08.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks ended mixed Thursday as technology companies took their worst loss in six weeks, but energy companies rose along with oil prices. The moves ended a four-day winning streak for the S&P 500 index. Energy companies rallied as oil prices rose almost 2 percent.

J.M. Smucker

160

120

150

100

M

Vol.: 6.8m (6.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $11.5 b

Close: 25,241.41 Change: 95.02 (0.4%)

24,240

Close: 2,770.37 Change: -1.98 (-0.1%)

2,640

26,400

10 DAYS

CHICAGO BOT

DATE

CLOSE

Corn

Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

376.25 974.25 526.75

Wheat

2,800

24,000 D

J

F

CLOSE

CHG

146.07 108.37 78.40 15.42 326.80

-.68 +.07 +.23 +.11 +1.35

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,258 2,140 1231 1547 253 32

3,683 3,620 1540 1293 161 54

A

M

2,560

J

D

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A

M

J

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

93.72 115.70 24.95

+2.77 -2.55 -.50

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

Crude oil

Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18 Jul 18

65.95 2.1148 217.99 2.930

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 25326.09 10875.70 670.41 12826.89 7697.41 2779.90 1997.80 29008.31 1679.99

LOW 25164.48 10779.60 658.83 12750.46 7597.66 2760.16 1982.11 28789.20 1660.89

CLOSE 25241.41 10842.82 664.09 12788.50 7635.07 2770.37 1990.78 28896.84 1667.77

CHG. +95.02 +3.84 +3.55 +10.27 -54.17 -1.98 +1.22 -38.33 -8.18

%CHG. WK +0.38% s +0.04% s +0.54% t +0.08% s -0.70% s -0.07% s +0.06% s -0.13% s -0.49% s

MO QTR s s s s t t s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +2.11% +2.17% -8.19% -0.16% +10.60% +3.62% +4.75% +3.97% +8.61%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

52-WK LO HI

T

31.17

39.80 33.81 +.43 +1.3 -13.0

AEGN

19.11

28.19 26.11

-.39 -1.5

+2.7 +32.8 23

Amdocs

DOX

61.00

71.72 68.68

-.37 -0.5

+4.9 +6.7 19

1.00 Huttig Building Prod HBP

4.82

7.75

5.20

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 56.90 +.33 +0.6

-3.5 +2.7 20

1.83 Lee Ent

1.75

2.75

2.40

42.52 40.80

-2.0 +21.8

1.60 Lowes

American Railcar

ARII

34.29

ABInBev

BUD

91.70 126.50 93.96

Arch Coal

ARCH

60.13 102.61 86.66 +1.04 +1.2

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

6.17

Bank of America

BAC

22.73

33.05 30.09 +.05 +0.2

Belden Inc

BDC

53.65

87.15 57.84 +.53 +0.9 -25.0 -22.5 11

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

11.93

7.19

5

-.91 -1.0 -15.8 -15.9 23 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc -7.0 +24.4

8

-.18 -2.4 -12.3 -34.2 11 +1.9 +37.3 17

188.05 371.60 368.53 -3.03 -0.8 +25.0+102.3 39 7.25

11.35

7.45

-.05 -0.7 -19.0 -29.3 26

1.60 MasterCard ... McDonald’s

-.03

-8.0 +13.9 12

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

67.16 66.83

Edgewell

EPC

39.50

78.04 46.48 +1.53 +3.4 -21.7 -39.9 12

Emerson

EMR

57.47

74.45 73.37 +.08 +0.1

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

Enterprise Financial EFSC Esco Technologies Express Scripts

LOW

70.76 108.98 99.27 +.78 +0.8

MNK

11.65

119.89 203.29 199.54 -3.67 -1.8 +31.8 +63.0 46

MCD

146.84 178.70 169.48 +7.10 +4.4

RGA RELV SR

50.30

66.80 58.65 +.35 +0.6

-2.7 +1.7 19

0.32 Verizon

55.80

85.07 78.15 +1.62 +2.1

+4.7 +27.0 10

-.04 -1.0 -10.3 -17.0 dd -.06 -0.4

0.13 Walgreen Boots

-1.1 +0.6 17 0.24a Wells Fargo

60.09

13.77

-.26 -0.2

4.98 +.16 +3.3

...

-3.1 +24.4 13 2.00f +4.4 -39.6 dd

-.10 -0.1

-9.7

-.31 -0.5

+2.9 +44.9 19 0.48f

-1.2 19

101.45 135.53 116.19

-2.5 +12.2 20

3.64

48.49

58.50 51.83 +.06 +0.1

-3.3 +4.1 14

1.20

19.75

47.64 36.82

+4.6 +86.1 21

0.20

VZ

42.80

54.77 49.01 +.60 +1.2

-7.4 +9.3

2.36

WMT

73.13 109.98 84.95 +.39 +0.5 -14.0 +9.7 20 2.08f

7

WBA

61.56

83.89 63.60 +.45 +0.7 -12.4 -20.5 14

1.60

WFC

49.27

66.31 55.63 +.05 +0.1

1.56

-8.3 +10.3 13

BUSINESS DIGEST

Reliv names new CEO • Chesterield-based Reliv International Inc., which makes nutritional supplements, named Ryan Montgomery as its new chief executive. Montgomery, who has worked for Reliv since 1999 and has been president of the company since 2012, replaces his father, Robert Montgomery, as CEO. Robert Montgomery will continue to serve as chairman of the company, which last year reported a net loss of $697,000. He had been CEO of the company for 30 years. Illinois CEO chosen for U.S. nuclear panel • The chairman and CEO of the Illinois Commerce Commission has been tapped to serve on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee. Brien Sheahan’s appointment was announced Wednesday by Energy Secretary Rick Perry. The committee was established in 1998 to provide independent advice to the Oice of Nuclear Energy on scientiic, commercial, technical and program issues. The committee reviews the Energy Department’s nuclear energy program and ofers advice and recommendations. Ed McGinnis is principal deputy assistant secretary for nuclear energy. He says committee members are chosen based on gaining a wide variety of expert advice for

the oice “as it supports the revitalization and expansion of the U.S. nuclear energy sector.” Sheahan’s term expires in December 2019. Starbucks raises price of a brewed cofee • That Starbucks habit has gotten got a little more expensive. Starbucks said Thursday it has raised the price of a regular drip cofee by 10 cents to 20 cents in most U.S. stores, putting a small brewed cofee at $1.95 to $2.15 in most locations. The company said prices haven’t changed on drinks such as lattes and iced cofees in most stores. Overall, Starbucks Corp. says it has hiked prices by an average of 1 to 2 percent in the past year, which it said was in line with industry practices — though the increase may be higher for particular drinks. The company has also rolled out specialty drinks over the years that tend to cost more. Sara Senatore, a senior analyst who covers the restaurant industry for AB Bernstein, noted that the average annual price increase for a tall brewed cofee at Starbucks has been 1.7 percent over time. She said that is similar to overall inlation rates, meaning the price hasn’t risen in real terms. Bufett, Dimon urge end to quarterly proit forecasts • Investor Warren Bufett and JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon are encouraging public companies to stop predicting their quarterly earnings and focus on long-term goals. The two executives said on CNBC Thursday that companies that focus on hitting their quarterly numbers may do things that hurt them in the future, such as delaying investments or changing when certain gains are recorded. “When companies get where they’re sort of living by so-called ‘making the numbers,’ they do a lot of things that really are counter to the long-term interests of the business,” Bufett said. Dimon said companies might forgo investments they should make in their business, such as marketing, hiring or research, in order to hit short-term goals. Dimon said he could generate hundreds of millions of revenue for the bank by agreeing to some interest rate swaps. “It can put a company in a position where management from the CEO down feels obligated to deliver earnings, and therefore may do things that they wouldn’t otherwise have done,” Dimon said. Both men said they still want companies to release detailed quarterly and annual inancial data, so investors can evaluate them. From staf and wire reports

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.93 2.11 2.29 2.50 2.76 2.87 2.93 3.07

... -0.01 ... -0.02 -0.05 -0.05 -0.04 -0.05

.99 1.09 1.21 1.31 1.75 1.99 2.18 2.84

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

4.75 4.25 4.00

1.63 1.13 .88

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

2.05 3.35 6.35 4.00 4.02 .79

+0.04 +0.04 -0.03 +0.05 +0.05 -0.03

1.51 2.44 5.44 3.69 3.13 .38

GlobalMarkets

2.48

-.83 -0.7 -.73 -1.9

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.93 percent on Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

TREASURIES

2.25

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

Long-term mortgage rates fall • Long-term U.S. mortgage rates fell this week for the second straight week, providing a helpful jolt for potential homebuyers. Last week’s decline followed weeks of increases that pushed long-term loan rates to their highest levels in seven years. Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate on 30-year, ixed-rate mortgages was 4.54 percent, down from 4.56 percent last week. The average benchmark rate has been running at its highest levels since 2011. In contrast, the 30-year rate averaged 3.89 percent a year ago. The average rate on 15-year, ixed-rate loans dipped to 4.01 percent from 4.06 percent last week. To calculate average mortgage rates, Freddie Mac surveys lenders across the country between Monday and Wednesday each week. The average doesn’t include extra fees, known as points, which most borrowers must pay to get the lowest rates. The average fee on 30-year ixed-rate mortgages rose to 0.5 point from 0.4 point last week. The fee on 15-year mortgages was unchanged at 0.4 percent. The average rate for ive-year adjustablerate mortgages dropped to 3.74 percent from 3.80 percent last week. The fee increased to 0.4 point from 0.3 point.

+1.60 +.13 -7.30

...

82.85 67.85 68.76 61.30

ESRX

3.92

3.72

78.84 78.35 +.45 +0.6 +20.1 +47.3 14

ESE

5.12

125.91 165.12 151.09

-4.0 49

42.92

X

16.22 13.93

...

+1.0

48.56

0.44 US Steel

3.28

-.43 -1.6 +40.6 +58.8 52

SF

56.55 56.75 +.25 +0.4 +25.7 +44.9 20

... WalMart

0.28

TGT

36.65

Silver

0.60

-6.5 +19.3 dd

27.36 26.81

... ReinsGrp

... Target Corp.

5.05 +.05 +1.0

88.93 80.04 +1.28 +1.6

USB

11.32

0.80

16.70

1.16 US Bancorp

FELP

-7.6 +16.6 10

70.66

64.00 60.55 +.90 +1.5 +26.2 +16.2 21

FF

-.29 -0.9

PRFT

UPS

Foresight Energy

4.04 2.16

...

POST

1.94 UPS B

FutureFuel

-1.5 +10.0 26 +9.6 +10.5 22

47.84 46.88 +.08 +0.2 +19.1 +93.9

... Reliv

1.00

...

4.00

1.28 Spire Inc

...

MA

5.78

... ...

+6.8 +27.2 22 1.92f

22.58

0.28 Perficient

5

49.12 18.72 +.60 +3.3 -17.0 -54.8

BTU

... +19.7 +32.1 21 0.94f Stifel Financial +5.3 +28.3 28

+2.1 +23.1

SKIS

74.73 118.97 119.18 +.21 +0.2 +18.1 +56.1 19 80.70 68.45 +.22 +0.3

...

... Peak Resorts

37.06 34.87 +.20 +0.6

63.16

...

6.84 Peabody Energy

65.63 65.88 +.37 +0.6 +13.2 +17.7 32 1.04f Post Holdings

C

4.12

-.01 -0.2 -21.8 -21.2 dd

38.84 32.87

22.39

Citigroup

1.52

+3.5 +28.0 26

27.79

53.23

CNC

+7.4 +32.0 dd

OLN

CAL

CHTR 250.10 408.83 278.19 +3.10 +1.1 -17.2 -19.8 90

46.76 44.01 +.46 +1.1

33.86

0.20 Olin

CASS

Centene Corp.

LEE

CHG

CLOSE

1298.70 16.77 900.30

Gold Platinum

144.25 207.61 196.17 +2.58 +1.3

MON 114.19 127.97 127.95

Caleres Inc.

Charter

HD

0.48 Monsanto Co

Cass Info. Systems

+4.2 +32.9 16

GM

.0401 .7664 .2618 1.3409 .7724 .1566 1.1768 .0150 .2801 .009075 .049215 .0162 .0786 .000937 1.0141

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

AT&T Inc

... Home Depot

CHG

+1.22 +.0448 +5.33 +.034

PREV

.0400 .7621 .2563 1.3427 .7705 .1565 1.1809 .0148 .2809 .009115 .048700 .0160 .0768 .000932 1.0201

Interestrates Interestrates

Aegion Corp

-.22 -0.5

-8.7 13 2.00f General Motors

TKR

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

-2 -20 +7

DATE

Copper

PE: 152.1 Yield: ...

ExchangeRates

Aug 18 Jun 18 Jun 18 Jun 18 Jun 18

Milk

2,640

A M J 52-week range $37.80

Vol.: 3.7m (6.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.0 b

CHG

CHICAGO MERC

Hogs

2,720 24,800

M

$16.50

PE: 43.0 Yield: ...

Feeder cattle Live cattle

25,600

23,200

$90.83

20

A M J 52-week range $125.93

Vol.: 23.0m (3.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $41.5 b

Soybeans

2,880

27,200

M

Futures

S&P 500

CONN

Close: $31.95 6.30 or 24.6% The mainly Southern-based furniture and appliance chain had a strong first quarter and said sales improved in April. $40 30

80

A M J 52-week range $256.80

Vol.: 4.5m (1.6x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $55.4 b Yield: 1.8%

2,720

10 DAYS

M

$142.81

PE: 9.1 Yield: 3.1%

2,800

Dow Jones industrials

24,800

140

A M J 52-week range $134.12

Conn’s

NXPI

Close: $120.07 5.55 or 4.9% The Wall Street Journal reported that Chinese regulators may soon approve Qualcomm’s offer to buy NXP. $140

100 80

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

NXP Semiconductors

AGN

Close: $163.27 7.89 or 5.1% Bloomberg News reported that Carl Icahn bought stock in the company, which is facing criticism from other investors. $170

120

$96.13

25,360

Allergan

SJM

Close: $100.80 -5.72 or -5.4% The maker of Smucker’s jam and Jif peanut butter had a weak fourth quarter and gave disappointing forecasts for this year. $140

INDEX

LAST

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

2770.37 12811.05 7704.40 31512.63 5448.36 45476.57 22823.26 73851.47 16192.78 8548.33

CHG

CHG

YTD

-1.98 -19.02 -7.97 +253.53 -9.20 +294.75 +197.53 -2265.76 +8.85 +3.34

-0.07% -0.15% -0.10% +0.81% -0.17% +0.65% +0.87% -2.98% +0.05% +0.04%

+3.62% -0.83% +0.22% +5.33% +2.56% -7.86% +0.26% -3.34% -0.10% -8.88%

Indexes mixed as investors keep eyes on trade tension

CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

European Council President Donald Tusk is greeted by Canadian politician Jean-Yves Duclos (left) in Bagotville, Quebec, for the G-7 summit on Thursday. BY SINÉAD CAREW reuters

The S&P and Nasdaq fell on Thursday as the technology sector snapped a rally while investors turned to safer bets as they kept an eye on global trade tension and waited for U.S. and European central bank meetings. U.S. Treasury prices rose on Thursday, as trade disputes between the United States and its major trade partners were in focus ahead of the Group of Seven summit. Investors worried about a showdown at the meeting, set for Friday and Saturday in Charlevoix, Quebec, after President Donald Trump signaled that he would stick to his tough stance on trade after imposing tarifs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico and the European Union last week. “There’s caution associated with the G-7 meeting which historically is neutral for the market. This G-7 meeting doesn’t fit the template particularly with regard to trade,” said Quincy Krosby, chief market strategist at Prudential Financial. Canada and Mexico have retaliated against a range of U.S. exports and the EU has promised to do so as well. “Equally there’s a European Central Bank meeting and a Federal Reserve meeting next week. Both are paramount for the market’s direction,” said Krosby.

The Fed is widely expected to announce an interest rate hike on Wednesday but investors are looking for clues on whether the U.S. central bank will raise rates a fourth time in 2018. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 95.02 points, or 0.38 percent, to 25,241.41, the S&P 500 lost 1.98 points, or 0.07 percent, to 2,770.37. The Nasdaq Composite dropped 54.17 points, or 0.7 percent, to 7,635.07 after registering three straight closing record highs in the previous sessions. “The Nasdaq has had an incredible run this week so it may be some profittaking,” said Bill Callahan, investment strategist at Schroders in New York. The S&P technology index fell 1.1 percent, led by heavyweights Microsoft Corp., ending 1.6 percent lower, and Facebook Inc., which fell 1.7 percent. The losses followed a six-day rally that had pushed the index to record levels. The Dow was boosted on Thursday by a 4.4 percent jump in McDonald’s Corp. shares after a report that the company was planning a new round of layofs. The S&P 500’s Energy index was the biggest gainer out of the benchmark’s 11 major sectors, with a 1.6 percent advance helped by rising oil prices. Brent crude was up almost 2 percent on concerns of a plunge in exports from Venezuela and worries OPEC may not raise production at its meeting this month.


BUSINESS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

Merger’s impact unknown but may be beneicial MONSANTO • FROM B1

any resolution, with other stages of the integration process yet to unfurl. “Bayer will then become the sole shareholder of Monsanto,” said Liam Condon, head of Bayer’s crop science division, describing the close of the acquisition on a call with reporters earlier this week. But it will still require more patience before Bayer, the German life sciences company, gets the keys to the Monsanto kingdom. Condon explained that information about the joint company’s future remained scarce because they must continue to operate independently for an approximately two-month period while Bayer sells of certain parts of its business to the chemical company BASF. During that two-month window when the companies continue to operate as competitors, the Monsanto name — which will be dropped once the companies unite — will see its final days. Only after that period lapses can Bayer finally peer under the hood at confidential information about Monsanto’s business operations. Condon said that access was needed before any changes could be assessed in earnest. Even so, some comments have painted at least broad strokes of what to expect — particularly for Monsanto’s footprint in the St. Louis area. Monsanto has 5,400 full-time employees in the St. Louis area and 20,000 globally. The St. Louis region will become Bayer’s North American headquarters and retain its presence as a leading hub of biotech research. Bayer’s crop science researchers, for instance, will join Monsanto’s research campus in Chesterfield after moving from their current home in North Carolina. The timing of that move — and the precise scope of how many employees will come and go from St. Louis-area facilities — remains uncertain, with Condon saying that it “is going to take probably a year” to unfold. “Some people will move immediately, some people will take longer,” Condon said. “This also depends on family situations — kids at school and whatever.” And while it’s not yet clear what broader personnel changes might be in store, Condon did

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

A sculpture called “Branches of Promise” by Edwina Sandys stands in the middle of the campus at Monsanto headquarters in Creve Coeur. The sculpture represents the artist’s view of the Monsanto worldwide family.

say that employment numbers would fluctuate in the short term. “There will be some fluctuation, and there will be some changes in some jobs, but over time this is going to be an innovation engine and we’re going to have to be investing,” Condon said. “A lot of that investment is going to be in R&D in the U.S. And as the company grows, there’s also a need for supporting functions. ... So over time, my assumption is that there will be more employment, as opposed to less. But, for sure, there will be some impacts that we can only detail out after this initial twomonth period.” Looking ahead to when Bayer can finally review Monsanto’s internal metrics, Condon added that he “wouldn’t expect any kind of sudden people decisions in this year.” Bayer has already identified an estimated $1.2 billion in “synergies” that it could realize from the merger within a fouryear period. Of that figure, about $200 million stems from projected sales, while roughly $1 billion is tied to overlapping “infrastructural-type costs,” according to Condon. Condon did not talk about potential overlap in terms of personnel, but cited separate real

estate and licenses for IT systems as two significant areas where the companies could save money just by teaming up. “There’s a huge opportunity to simply bring everything into one place,” he said. Speculation about the company’s new look also extends to philanthropic circles in St. Louis, where Monsanto has long been a strong corporate presence in charitable giving. Condon, though, said that Bayer would maintain — and even expand — commitments to the community. “We both feel highly committed to the communities in which we are based,” he said of the two companies. “That will continue, particularly now that the bigger footprint is going to be in St. Louis. Our ties in St. Louis are, if anything, going to be strengthened.” Though most strongly associated with its lines of pharmaceutical products, Bayer has long touted its “complementary” fit with Monsanto’s fortes in seeds and traits, crop protection and its emerging work on digital tools for farmers. Bayer hopes that combining the two companies’ expertise will unlock innovation that helps address pressing issues in agriculture, ranging from environmental challenges to meeting the needs of the world’s

snowballing population. “This is where we felt the real juice in the deal is, by bringing this all together,” Condon said. Since the deal was first announced in 2016, two of Monsanto’s marquee products — the weedkilling chemicals glyphosate and dicamba — have become the target of class action lawsuits. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, faces allegations that it is a carcinogen — claims vehemently denied by Monsanto and at odds with recent findings from some government bodies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency. Dicamba, a decades-old herbicide being called upon to fight Roundup-resistant “superweeds,” is prone to offtarget movement and has been blamed for damaging millions of acres of crops that aren’t engineered to tolerate the chemical. Bayer representatives would not comment on the controversy facing either product. A main question surrounding the merger has centered on the impact that further consolidation in the agriculture industry could have on prices and competition. “(Farmers) are concerned that the merger will result in higher seed prices, less innovation in seeds and chemicals, and fewer seed varieties,” stated a March

report from the Konkurrenz Group, a law firm specializing on competition issues, based on survey results from about 1,000 farmers nationally. “Should the merger gain approval, they are apprehensive of the increasing pressure for chemically dependent farming. As the survey and other evidence show, farmers have not benefited from prior mergers that have concentrated the seed, trait, and pesticide business in the hands of five firms. Farmers today are squeezed by higher seed prices. The higher prices for new seed varieties have not been ofset by increased productivity.” Bayer, though, dismissed those concerns. “This whole deal really only works if it’s also good for farmers, and that means that it also needs to be good for farmers’ profitability,” Condon said. The close of the transaction Thursday marked the end of Grant’s 35-year tenure with Monsanto. Other Monsanto executives will leave at varying points in time, with Robb Fraley, the company’s chief technology oicer, expected to stay on board for about six more months, according to a spokeswoman. Given the recent expansion of Monsanto’s research facilities in Chesterfield, the offices at the company’s official headquarters in Creve Coeur may face the most uncertainty moving forward. Barry Glantz, the mayor of Creve Coeur, said the merger’s finalization felt like “sort of a sad day,” noting that Monsanto has been in the community since the 1950s and its 220-acre campus makes it the largest property owner in town. “Change always makes people nervous — especially not knowing if there’s going to be change or if things are going to continue the way they are,” Glantz said. “Fortunately the Creve Coeur economy and the St. Louis region’s economy are not beholden to one particular company and one particular industry,” he added. “That said, the plant science industry is very, very important to the city of Creve Coeur and Monsanto plays a huge role in that. ... I’m cautiously optimistic that Bayer is committed to that same trajectory.” Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

Ikea pledges to use only renewable, recycled materials by 2030 BY ANNA RINGSTROM reuters

Ikea, the world’s biggest furniture retailer, plans to use only renewable and recycled materials in its products by 2030, in the latest commitment by a global store group to reduce its impact on the environment. Inter Ikea, the owner of the brand best known for its low-cost flat-pack furniture, said on Thursday it aimed to reduce the climate impact of each of its products by more than two-thirds by the end of next decade. Currently, 60 percent of the Ikea range is based on renewable materials, while nearly 10 percent contains recycled materials, an Inter Ikea spokeswoman said. “Through our size and reach we have the opportunity to inspire and enable more than 1 billion people to live better lives, within the limits of the planet,” Inter Ikea CEO Torbjörn Lööf said in a statement to accompany the company’s 2030 sustainability strategy document. “We are committed to taking the lead, working together with everyone — from

raw material suppliers all the way to our customers and partners.” Inter Ikea joins a growing list of global companies striving to make their operations more environmentally sustainable, although there are questions about whether enough are taking action and whether they should be doing more. The world’s 250 biggest listed companies account for a third of all man-made greenhouse gas emissions, but few have concrete goals to limit rising temperatures, a Thomson Reuters Financial & Risk white paper concluded in October. Raw materials account for most of Ikea’s greenhouse gas emissions and, along with extending the potential lifespan of its products, is where Ikea sees the biggest opportunities for reducing its impact on the environment. Along with phasing out nonrecycled plastic, the company will implement changes ranging from greener glue in particleboard and more vegetarian food in its restaurants to a new candle recipe, Lööf told Reuters. Inter Ikea’s plan is the first to target all Ikea stores — the bulk of which are run

by Ikea Group, but some of which are run by other companies — as well as the supply chain. In total, there are 418 Ikea stores across 49 markets. Retail sales in the year through August 2017 were a combined $45.3 billion. Ikea’s St. Louis store opened in September 2015. Inter Ikea set a so-called sciencebased target for Ikea Group to cut the climate impact of stores and other operations by 80 percent in absolute terms by 2030 compared with 2016. Global brands including H&M, CocaCola and Sony have also committed to

science-based targets, which aim to help limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius — the goal set in the 2015 Paris agreement. The Science Based Targets Initiative is a collaboration between the Carbon Disclosure Project, the World Resources Institute, the World Wide Fund for Nature, and the United Nations Global Compact. Inter Ikea also said it would remove all single-use plastic products from its range and in-store restaurants by 2020, and that Ikea Group would roll out the sale of home solar products to 29 markets by 2025.

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BUSINESS

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

NorthSide development has Two companies would reap beneits, expert suggests detractors and supporters MCKEE • FROM B1

back to the sellers. While the Missouri Department of Economic Development caught at least one such transaction and clawed back future tax credits that would have been issued to McKee, a longtime official with the agency said it did not claw back $2.5 million in tax credits in a similarly structured transaction. It’s unclear whether there were other, similar transactions that also triggered tax credits. McKee testified at the trial that there was “no process for paying it back, but I’m more than happy to sit down with the state” and discuss the transactions. The Department of Economic Development later said it was “very concerned regarding the issues raised during the trial and will be working with the necessary parties to further ensure the protection of taxpayer dollars.” St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson called for an internal investigation. An FBI agent watched much of the trial in a St. Louis courtroom last month. Clay, whose former chief of staf Darryl Piggee is a McKee lawyer working for Stone, Leyton & Gershman, wrote in his op-ed that those tax credit transactions “certainly deserve some explanation, but we shouldn’t overreact. The appropriate review will dictate the proper response.” The congressman also chastised the St. Louis Development Corp., which ultimately assembled the NGA site. A large portion of the site had already been assembled by McKee, but the SLDC had to purchase it, including some parcels the city’s land bank had originally sold to the developer. “Throughout my entire life, I have watched with dismay as the city’s development bureaucracies (now embodied in the St. Louis Development Corp.) have repeatedly turned a blind eye to their responsibility to assist responsible and sustainable economic progress for the citizens of north St. Louis,” Clay wrote. “While I appreciate and encourage any investment in our city, too often, SLDC has favored development south of an imaginary line that has left north St. Louis to languish.” Piggee, in a previous statement to the Post-Dispatch, wrote “it is not surprising that opportunists, with close ties to SLDC, would like to try to embarrass Paul McKee so that they might take (NorthSide Regeneration’s) development rights, and the hard fought development opportunities that go with them.” SLDC chief Otis Williams said he was “surprised by the congressman’s statements, but we will continue to work with the congressman and any developer who is pursuing development in north St. Louis.” Williams pointed to the SLDC’s work with Ranken Technical College’s new manufacturing incubator, Better Family Life’s plans to repair homes along Page Boulevard and Kingsway Development’s

plans in Fountain Park as examples of recent eforts SLDC has assisted with in north St. Louis. “We have continued to work with both the congressman and NorthSide Regeneration,” Williams said. “I don’t want to get into a debate with them with what they have done, what they believe. Because I do believe we all want what’s best for the city.” Residents and officials have grown frustrated at the lack of private development within McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration footprint. While the city under former Mayor Francis Slay supported McKee’s plans, the lack of private development over the years strained McKee’s relationship with City Hall. The city has had an agreement with McKee for years giving him development rights on a huge swath of north St. Louis surrounding the planned NGA campus, including the promise of tens of millions of dollars in tax increment financing assistance should development materialize. While the SLDC and the city have not indicated they plan to sever ties with McKee, Williams testified at trial that “we have others who want to redevelop and do not necessarily have the permission of Mr. McKee.” “We are evaluating all of our options and we have not made any conclusions but we will do what’s best for the city,” Williams said Thursday. McKee, meanwhile, has started at least one project. A $20 million gas station and grocery store broke ground earlier this year along Tucker Boulevard, but not before oicials questioned the price tag, the developer fee and the amount of tax credits and other subsidies required to make the financing work. Much of McKee’s land, acquired over the last 15 years, is heavily indebted, and his lender, the Bank of Washington, is now a co-signatory to many of his agreements with SLDC. Clay wrote that he was dismayed at suggestions SLDC “should attempt to interfere with Paul McKee’s redevelopment of the north side.” “This is not the time to change course with a developer that secured the anchor federal facility, a grocery store in a food desert and a hospital in a medical care desert,” Clay wrote. “... All of us, SLDC included, should be lining up behind Paul McKee, not playing a dangerous game that could derail all that he has worked so hard to build for north St. Louis.” A Krewson spokesman declined to comment on the editorial. Clay could not be immediately reached for comment. The tax credits McKee was awarded were from a state program many said was designed for only him. McKee was awarded some $43 million through the program to ofset his north St. Louis land purchases — almost all of the $47 million the Distressed Area Land Assemblage tax credit program ultimately awarded before the state Legislature allowed it to expire in 2013.

NICKLAUS • FROM B1

solar facilities. Coal generated 30 percent of the nation’s electricity last year, down from 49 percent in 2006, while nuclear held steady at about 20 percent of total production. A couple of states, including Illinois, have subsidized money-losing nuclear plants to keep them open. Part of the rationale is that nuclear plants produce no greenhouse gas emissions, and shutting them down requires an expensive decommissioning process. William O’Grady, chief market strategist at Confluence Investment Management and a longtime observer of energy markets, said he couldn’t see a similar case for subsidizing coal. “Coal really ought to be nothing more than a matter of relative cost,” he said.“It’s really difficult for coal to compete these days.” About 20 percent of coal generating capacity has been retired since 2011, and the U.S. Energy Information Administration projects that capacity will drop an additional 25 percent by 2030. This year alone, the EIA expects utilities to retire 12 gigawatts’ of coal capacity. Woolf contends that Trump’s proposal is all about helping two specific companies: Murray Energy, a coal company run by Trump backer Robert Murray, and Ohio-based FirstEnergy, a utility that is Murray Energy’s biggest customer. “This proposal is not coming from the Department of Defense, and it is not coming from the grid operators,” Woolf says.

“From all accounts this is coming from the president.” Coal isn’t inherently more reliable than natural gas or other forms of energy, he says. In fact, some recent emergencies have been coal-related: During Hurricane Harvey last year, some Texas power plants’ coal piles became so waterlogged they couldn’t be used. “All fuel sources have some vulnerabilities, and that’s why we have a diverse grid,” Woolf says. He estimates that propping up uneconomic power plants could cost tens of billions of dollars, a cost that would have to be borne by either consumers or taxpayers. The proposed subsidies would preserve some coal mining jobs, which is why they appeal to Trump. Higher electricity prices, though, would hit manufacturers and technology companies hard. If they delay or cancel new investments because of the higher costs, we’d be sacrificing the jobs of the future to protect the jobs of the past. The electricity business is complex, with state regulations to protect consumers and federal rules to ensure the integrity of the grid. In the end, though, the market should direct utilities toward the most economical sources of power. Interfering in that market on spurious national security grounds would set a very bad precedent. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

BEST OF BUILDING BLOCKS Highlights from our real estate and development blog. stltoday.com/buildingblocks Payne plans 51-home subdivision in Dardenne Prairie • Payne Family Homes is starting work on a new 51-house subdivision in Dardenne Prairie called Córdoba. Olivette-based Payne plans to begin sales in the fall. Prices start at $250,000. Córdoba is located on North Outer 364 at Bryan Road in Dardenne Prairie. The subdivision will feature a walking trail, common area, a park with a playground and a small, private lake. Payne is also behind a big mixed-use development planned in O’Fallon, Mo. The $400 million plan would add dozens of acres of retail and oice space along Highway 40 (Interstate 64) just 1.5 miles southwest of the Córdoba subdivision. (06.07) New TradePort logistics park breaks ground • Kansas City developer NorthPoint Development broke ground Thursday on its irst warehouse in a new Hazelwood industrial park north of the St. Louis Outlet Mall. The 250,000-square-foot speculative industrial building will be the irst in the

new Hazelwood TradePort and should be completed this fall. The building could be the irst of as many as eight industrial and logistics buildings on the 385-acre site. The developer has recently built out Hazelwood Logistics Center, a fully developed 150-acre business park that includes tenants such as Amazon and Bunzl Distribution. Hazelwood has approved 18 years’ of property tax abatement for the buildings, worth about $55.5 million over the life of the subsidy. The city has extended generous incentive packages for many of its business parks. The buildings will be elevated out of the 500-year lood plain along the Missouri River. Hazelwood Mayor Matthew Robinson said “we’re eager once again to work with NorthPoint on another massive industrial business park that will drive economic growth for the entire region.” NorthPoint has broken into the St. Louis market in a big way. It developed the massive 1.1 million-square-foot warehouse serving the General Motors plant in Wentzville, and is likely to be chosen to redevelop the shuttered Jamestown Mall. (06.07)

Cortex continues to attract tech companies of all sizes AON • FROM B1

Chip Lerwick, managing director of Aon’s St. Louis office, said the move was prompted by the company’s desire to tap into Cortex’s status as an innovation hub and its ability to recruit and retain top-level talent. “We believe that with future generations, it’s an attractive location for which people will want to work,” he said. Aon helps reduce risk or volatility for clients across a broad range of industries. The St. Louis office specializes in the construction, health care, energy and agribusiness sectors. “We underpin some of the biggest innovations in the world with our ability to help bring those innovations to life by helping to reduce the risk those companies may have,” Lerwick said. “Sometimes our innovation isn’t a widget, but it’s allowing the widget to be able to come to life

because we’ve taken away the risk factor that allows it to exist.” For example, Lerwick said, Aon helped Uber ofer driver injury protection, a first of its kind insurance program. Locally, Aon works with companies such as BJC, Centene and multiple construction firms. Mark Gorski, Wexford’s director of development, said tenants such as Aon and Microsoft serve as a magnet for smaller companies looking to do business with such large companies. “We’ve had discussions with other companies that just want proximity to those types of firms, so it definitely works synergistically to have a presence like Microsoft or Aon to attract,” he said. With the Aon deal, the 4220 Duncan building is approaching capacity. Gorski said a couple of deals now under negotiation that could be finalized in the next few weeks could make the building

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Construction workers were inishing work on the newest building in Cortex, located at 4220 Duncan Avenue, in April.

95 percent occupied. Meanwhile, Wexford is already working toward more development in Cortex. “We continue to make progress in master plan and design work for the new building and, if anything, this (Aon) deal accelerates those plans,” Gorski said. “I think given how quickly we’ll lease up 4220 (Duncan), what we need is to get more space teed up. Clearly, the demand is there and we need to be ready.”

Aon and Wexford’s future plans are among the latest in a string of announcements in the Cortex area. In early-May, mobile payments company Square, which already has about 300 employees in Cortex, announced plans to double its workforce in the district. Two weeks later, the Lawrence Group, the developer behind the $187 million CityFoundry STL development just east of Cortex,

announced it signed two lead office tenants: digital publishing and technology firm Multiply, which will move approximately 50 employees from its current headquarters in the Delmar Loop, and DNA tech company Orion Genomics, which will relocate its employees from its nearby Cortex oice in the CIC@ CET building. To help alleviate some congestion in the district, Cortex President and CEO Dennis Lower said previously the crews will start developing a 650-car parking garage just east of the 4220 Duncan building over the summer. Washington University and Cortex are spending $44 million to redevelop the 96,000-squarefoot Crescent building at 4340 Duncan into afordable lab space. And most recently, the Koman Group started marketing a space in a 90,000-square-foot oice building to be built on a 3 acre plot it acquired in 2016. The property could also see residential and more office space built on it in the future. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

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The Missouri PTAC is funded in part through a Cooperative Agreement with the Defense Logistics Agency


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

ADVANCING ST. LOUIS | DAVE STEWARD OF WORLD WIDE TECHNOLOGY PRODUCED BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

‘Eternal ROI’ is on Dave Steward’s mind By Jennifer Mason Marketing Content Contributor

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Steward has come a long way since living on that small farm in Clinton. Steward says his business and personal philosophies are one in the same. “I live by the golden rule,” he said. “I treat people as I would want myself and my family to be treated. Over the years, management gurus have written lofty lavor-of-the-month books on how to manage people,” Steward said. “They keep trying to come up with sophisticated management approaches. Until someone comes up with a better way to manage people, I am sticking with the golden rule.”

ver the past two decades, Dave Steward, chairman and founder of World Wide Technology (WWT) and his executive team built a small logistics/transportation audit company into a market-leading systems integrator and supply chain solutions provider. The company provides advanced technology solutions to more than 3,000 manufacturers including the commercial, government and telecom sectors. World Wide Technology started in 1990 with only a handful of employees HAS EVERYONE SETTLED INTO and a 4,000-square-foot ofice. Today, THE NEW HEADQUARTERS AT the company has more than 4,600 em- WESTPORT PLAZA? ployees, including 2,700 in the St. Lou- Yes, people are very pleased and exis region and more than two million cited. If you ever go there, you will exsquare feet of ofice space. WWT has perience a unique energy that is full of more than $10.4 billion in annual rev- innovation, collaboration and a comenue and was #30 on Forbes’ 2017 list of mitment to one another. I think that is America’s Largest Private Companies. rare to ind in many corporations. Though his company is wildly successful, Steward never forgot what it DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE took to get there. SPACE OR DESIGN CONCEPT? “I could not have done this without I like our open spaces where people our strong cultural can gather and values, as well as share their creative DAVE STEWARD the importance of thoughts and be strong collaboration open to new ideas. BORN • Chicago, Ill between employees When you walk LIVES • St. Louis and departments, through the door, AGE • 66 beginning with the you will notice our TITLE • Founder & Chairman, company’s executive design concept enWorld Wide Technology team, led by CEO capsulates our culEDUCATION • Bachelor’s degree Jim Kavanaugh,” ture and captures the in business management from Steward said. spirit of WWT in the Central Missouri State University Steward’s deterarchitecture. mination dates back to his childhood. His mother wanted WWT CONTINUES TO BE to live in a smaller town and his father NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED AS supported her request and moved from ONE OF THE BEST PLACES TO Chicago to Clinton, Missouri. There, WORK. WHAT MAKES YOUR he was brought up with small-town val- COMPANY AN EMPLOYER OF ues and a strong Christian upbringing, CHOICE YEAR AFTER YEAR? but he had to carve out his own future. It is simple. There is a favorite scripture After graduating from college in of mine that says faith is important, but 1973, he remembers how the recession faith without corresponding action is impacted his family. Steward borrowed dead. Faith is an action word. At WWT, $300 from a local bank and hitchhiked I believe that we are faith in action — to St. Louis to begin his career. and it works for us. “I accepted a marketing and sales I want to preserve the environment position with Missouri Paciic Railroad we have in our culture today. We estabCompany in ’76,” Steward said. “It was lished core values that are vitally imthe irst time the railroad had employed portant. Those core values — integrity, a person of color to sell rail services.” trust, attitude, teamwork, innovation

and diversity — matter to us. When we are long gone, hopefully people will remember the signiicance and importance of what we did in preserving the culture of the organization. It is all about the people. We also know it is important to put God irst, your family second and the business third. I want that to be around in 50 years. WHAT SETS YOUR COMPANY APART? Our secret sauce. We have an advanced technology center in St. Louis that you will not ind anywhere in the world. Our customers travel here or they visit virtually and collaborate and work with us to deine and shape the next generation of technology. That is a huge differentiator for us. We are challenging the status quo. We have the ability to be lexible, to think outside the box and to be innovative. Every 12 months, World Wide Technology evolves and changes. We have to be good listeners to understand what is going on in the marketplace.

Photo courtesy of World Wide Technology

“My role is to set an example of giving, service, faith and commitment to the community where we live and work.”

WHAT MOTIVATES YOU TO GIVE BACK AND HOW DO YOU DETERMINE WHO TO SUPPORT? My role is to set an example of giving, service, faith and commitment to the community where we live and work. My wife, Thelma, and I have been primarily focused on families and children. We spend a lot of time with United Way because it covers a wide spectrum of agencies. Thelma and I believe in the development of the mentally and physically disabled. Variety the Children’s Charity of St. Louis is really important to us. We have enjoyed watching it lourish because there has not been a lot of attention in that area. They bring a special and unique capability to the marketplace that has been underutilized. Our faith and church is also important to us; we

- Dave Steward Founder & Chairman, World Wide Technology

look at everything as a ministry. WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU? I think more today about the eternal return on investment. Every decision I make has eternity in mind. How does it live beyond me if I wasn’t physically able to be here? You will begin to see more things that are centered on that concept and it will have to do with children.

Advancing St. Louis highlights local leaders of small businesses and large corporations that are impacting the St. Louis region from a variety of industries. These leaders are Advancing St. Louis by inspiring change and starting conversations. Are you interested in having your story told? Contact Jennifer Mason, who coordinates marketing content, at jmason@stltoday.com.

Is your neighbor’s property McCarthy and other tax bill lower than yours? hometown irms build civic Property tax assessments should be equitable pride at Gateway Arch Sponsored content by

PAR RESIDENTIAL

ne of the most misunderstood and often cited property tax issues is what we call ‘my neighbors assessment.’ When property tax notices are received, many homeowners immediately look online to see how their property tax bill compares to other homes on their street. Unfortunately, comparing individual assessments in Missouri from one house to another is not a recognized appeal strategy. Step one in reviewing the property tax assessment should be an honest determination of whether or not the assessor’s estimate of value exceeds the value a homeowner could sell the property on the open market. If it’s determined the value is in fact reasonable, the second step is to look at equity in assessments. The manner in which equity or discrimination is determined in Missouri is to compare how the individual assessment relates to the overall median level of assessment of all residential properties in the county. For example, if the property is accurately valued by the assessor at $250,000, but the median level of assessment is 90 percent of market value, the homeowner would be entitled to the same 10 percent discount. After a determination of the market value has been made, PAR Residential completes sales ratio studies with the assistance of recognized experts in the ield. This strategy allows us to ind

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Visitors to the renovated museum and visitors center at the Gateway Arch will enter the monument through a custom-built glass entrance at the front of the 630-foot-tall structure.

property tax savings for homeowners. For most individual homeowners, the complexity and cost of completing a useable study and pursuing the appeal far outweighs the potential reward on their single property. Given the signiicant time and cost associated, generally the only way to participate in a true discrimination appeal is to pool resources with other taxpayers. Representing nearly 10,000 St. Louis County taxpayers gives us the ability to make the investment in these additional strategies to ensure clients pay the lowest property tax possible. PAR Residential is the largest commercial property tax consulting irm in the metropolitan area. Leave the review to an expert and pay a fair and correct amount for property taxes. For more information, please call (314) 454-0505 or visit parresidential.com.

Sponsored content by

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ike thousands of area residents, Andy Poirot has fond memories of visiting the Gateway Arch with his classmates during grade school ield trips. A few decades later, he returned to the iconic monument with a mission of inspiring future generations of students. Poirot, the project director at McCarthy Building Companies, led the construction team overseeing the expansion and renovation of the underground museum and visitors center. Poirot’s contributions may be largely hidden from view, but they’re vital to the region’s future, according to Sheila Sweeney, CEO at the St. Louis Eco-

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nomic Development Partnership. “I’m so excited about this incredible reimagining of the Arch,” she said. “It will transform our city’s front door by seamlessly integrating the Arch into downtown. When we attract new businesses here, we always lead with our exceptional amenities, and the Arch is right at the top of that list.” The July 3 opening of the new Museum at the Gateway Arch is the inal component of a $380 million plan to enhance the overall visitor experience. Improvements include more than ive miles of scenic bike and walking paths, an outdoor natural amphitheater, and an expanded park that directly connects the Arch to downtown for the irst time in its 50-year history.

Read more at STLTODAY.COM/ADVANCINGSTL


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 06.08.2018 • C

MIKOLAS RIGHTS THE SHIP Righthander exorcises two ugly losses with sparkling turn CARDINALS 4 MARLINS 1 > 6:10 p.m. Friday at Reds, FSM > Weaver (3-5, 4.12) vs. Harvey (1-4, 5.79) > Despite errors, Munoz will be fine, Matheny says. C5 > Voit becoming a formidable pinch hitter. C6

Sweet redemption in series inale

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The frustration Cardinals manager Mike Matheny shared after another loss to the Marlins, he also heard in the dugout during it. There were shouts of “this isn’t it” and a “sense,” he said, of knowing what the players were seeing on the field was not familiar and not acceptable, and so he expected Thursday a “better brand of baseball.” They got back to basics. They leaned on their pitchers. The bedrock of the Cardinals’ start to the season has been the rotation, specifically a pitcher like Miles Mikolas, a fresh face who ventilated the stench of the previous two games from Busch Stadium with seven sterling innings Thursday. The See CARDINALS • Page C5

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals starting pitcher Miles Mikolas allowed one run — unearned — through seven innings Thursday against Miami.

Manager in chief Schoendienst remembered as tough, no-nonsense boss

The Cardinals arrived at Busch Stadium on Thursday afternoon knowing they needed to play much better than they had in the previous two games against the lowly Marlins. They were on the verge of suffering an embarrassing three-game sweep against a franchise that has hardly bothered to camouflage a willingness to lose this season. Until Thursday, the guys in the wrong uniforms played in a manner more associated with a tanking club. The Cardinals See ORTIZ • Page C6

Caps inally raise their Stanley Cup First title in team’s history

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals left wing and playof MVP Alex Ovechkin hoists the Stanley Cup on Thursday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS • After 43 seasons, the Washington Capitals are finally sitting on top of hockey. Lars Eller broke a tie with 7:37 to play, and the Capitals raised the Stanley Cup for the first time in franchise history after a CAPITALS 4 4-3 victory over the Vegas Golden Knights in Game 5 KNIGHTS 3 on Thursday night. Devante Smith-Pelly > Capitals win series tied it with a goal midway 4-1 through the final period of the Capitals’ fourth consecutive victory over the Golden Knights, whose incredible expansion season finally ended in the desert. So did the Capitals’ agonizing wait for their first championship since the franchise’s debut in 1974. After so many years of postseason flops See NHL • Page C7

New football leagues explore options here One begins play in February BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch POST-DISPATCH FILE

Red Schoendienst working on Jerry Mumphrey’s hitting in March 1979. BY RICK HUMMEL • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

R

ed Schoendienst was as nice a man as you’d want to encounter, and the stories about him generally ended on a high note. But, that didn’t mean he didn’t have his tough side or that his players largely ran the team. “Tough?” said former player Mike Shannon. “I’ll tell you about tough. There was a guy about 200 pounds who tried to get on the team bus in Chicago. Red was sitting in that first seat and he grabbed him by the lapels, picked him up and set him down outside the bus and said, ‘You don’t get to come onto this bus.’”

Schoendienst, who died on Wednesday at age 95, didn’t cotton to much nonsense although he liked a good time as much as the next man. He also didn’t waste time when he managed a game. “What I liked best about him,” said meal ticket pitcher Bob Gibson, “was that he only did things when they needed to be done. He wasn’t a control freak. Let’s put it that way. He knows the game really, really well and if there was nothing to do, he didn’t do it. He didn’t try to create things.” The Cardinals largely had a set

lineup in Lou Brock, Curt Flood, Roger Maris, Orlando Cepeda, Tim McCarver, Shannon, Julian Javier, Dal Maxvill and the pitcher. “When you’ve got a team that knows the game pretty well,” said Gibson,” you don’t need to create.” There were few clubhouse meetings. “He had a meeting when it was time to have it,” said Gibson. “He didn’t have a bunch of meetings like a lot of people would have when the team would start going bad.” McCarver, tying in Schoendienst’s See RED • Page C6

> COMING SUNDAY • A deep dive into the life of Red Schoendienst.

The Rams and the NFL have been gone since the end of the 2015 season, but it’s possible pro football could return to St. Louis as early as February. Kitty Ratcliffe, president of the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, says the group — which goes by the trade name Explore St. Louis — has talked to representatives of three groups trying to form football leagues. And those groups have inquired about playing their games in the Dome at America’s Center, formerly the Edward Jones Dome. “It’s interesting to see what’s happening across the country,” Ratcliffe said. “There’s clearly going to be some competition for the NFL. They’re all in tentative, formative stages, but three diferent groups have contacted us to explore availability and interest.” The groups include the Alliance of American Football, which plans to begin play in February See FOOTBALL • Page C3

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 06.08.2018 • C

MIKOLAS RIGHTS THE SHIP Righthander exorcises two ugly losses with sparkling turn CARDINALS 4 MARLINS 1 > 6:10 p.m. Friday at Reds, FSM > Weaver (3-5, 4.12) vs. Harvey (1-4, 5.79) > Despite errors, Munoz will be fine, Matheny says. C5 > Voit becoming a formidable pinch hitter. C6

Sweet redemption in series inale

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The frustration Cardinals manager Mike Matheny shared after another loss to the Marlins, he also heard in the dugout during it. There were shouts of “this isn’t it” and a “sense,” he said, of knowing what the players were seeing on the field was not familiar and not acceptable, and so he expected Thursday a “better brand of baseball.” They got back to basics. They leaned on their pitchers. The bedrock of the Cardinals’ start to the season has been the rotation, specifically a pitcher like Miles Mikolas, a fresh face who ventilated the stench of the previous two games from Busch Stadium with seven sterling innings Thursday. The See CARDINALS • Page C5

JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals starting pitcher Miles Mikolas allowed one run — unearned — through seven innings Thursday against Miami.

Manager in chief Schoendienst remembered as tough, no-nonsense boss

The Cardinals arrived at Busch Stadium on Thursday afternoon knowing they needed to play much better than they had in the previous two games against the lowly Marlins. They were on the verge of suffering an embarrassing three-game sweep against a franchise that has hardly bothered to camouflage a willingness to lose this season. Until Thursday, the guys in the wrong uniforms played in a manner more associated with a tanking club. The Cardinals See ORTIZ • Page C6

Caps inally raise their Stanley Cup First title in team’s history

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Capitals left wing and playof MVP Alex Ovechkin hoists the Stanley Cup on Thursday night. ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS • After 43 seasons, the Washington Capitals are finally sitting on top of hockey. Lars Eller scored the tiebreaking goal with 7:37 to play, and the Capitals raised the Stanley Cup for the first time CAPITALS 4 in franchise history after a 4-3 victory over the Vegas KNIGHTS 3 Golden Knights in Game 5 on Thursday night. > Capitals win series Captain Alex Ovechkin 4-1 capped his playoff MVP campaign with a power-play goal, and Devante Smith-Pelly tied it with a goal midway through the final period of the Capitals’ fourth consecutive victory over the Golden Knights, whose incredible expansion season finally ended in the desert. See NHL • Page C7

New football leagues explore options here One begins play in February BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch POST-DISPATCH FILE

Red Schoendienst working on Jerry Mumphrey’s hitting in March 1979. BY RICK HUMMEL • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

R

ed Schoendienst was as nice a man as you’d want to encounter, and the stories about him generally ended on a high note. But, that didn’t mean he didn’t have his tough side or that his players largely ran the team. “Tough?” said former player Mike Shannon. “I’ll tell you about tough. There was a guy about 200 pounds who tried to get on the team bus in Chicago. Red was sitting in that first seat and he grabbed him by the lapels, picked him up and set him down outside the bus and said, ‘You don’t get to come onto this bus.’”

Schoendienst, who died on Wednesday at age 95, didn’t cotton to much nonsense although he liked a good time as much as the next man. He also didn’t waste time when he managed a game. “What I liked best about him,” said meal ticket pitcher Bob Gibson, “was that he only did things when they needed to be done. He wasn’t a control freak. Let’s put it that way. He knows the game really, really well and if there was nothing to do, he didn’t do it. He didn’t try to create things.” The Cardinals largely had a set

lineup in Lou Brock, Curt Flood, Roger Maris, Orlando Cepeda, Tim McCarver, Shannon, Julian Javier, Dal Maxvill and the pitcher. “When you’ve got a team that knows the game pretty well,” said Gibson,” you don’t need to create.” There were few clubhouse meetings. “He had a meeting when it was time to have it,” said Gibson. “He didn’t have a bunch of meetings like a lot of people would have when the team would start going bad.” McCarver, tying in Schoendienst’s See RED • Page C6

> COMING SUNDAY • A deep dive into the life of Red Schoendienst.

The Rams and the NFL have been gone since the end of the 2015 season, but it’s possible pro football could return to St. Louis as early as February. Kitty Ratcliffe, president of the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, says the group — which goes by the trade name Explore St. Louis — has talked to representatives of three groups trying to form football leagues. And those groups have inquired about playing their games in the Dome at America’s Center, formerly the Edward Jones Dome. “It’s interesting to see what’s happening across the country,” Ratcliffe said. “There’s clearly going to be some competition for the NFL. They’re all in tentative, formative stages, but three diferent groups have contacted us to explore availability and interest.” The groups include the Alliance of American Football, which plans to begin play in February See FOOTBALL • Page C3

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 6/8 at Reds 6:10 p.m. FSM

Saturday 6/9 at Reds 3:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 6/10 at Reds 12:10 p.m. FSM

Monday 6/11 vs. Padres 7:15 p.m. FSM

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.08.2018

MEDIA VIEWS

NBC deals with less Belmont buzz

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 6/9 at Tulsa 7:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 6/16 vs. Salt Lake City 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 6/23 at Sacramento 10 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 6/30 vs. Rio Grande Valley 7:30 p.m.

FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • HOME GAMES GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Fri. 6/8: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m. Sat. 6/9: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m.

RIVER CITY RASCALS Fri. 6/8: vs. Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Sat. 6/9: vs. Evansville, 6:35 p.m.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 8:55 a.m. Formula 1: Grand Prix of Canada, practice 1, ESPNU 10:30 a.m. NASCAR: Firekeepers Casino 400, practice 1, FS2 Noon NASCAR Xfinity Series: LTi Printing 250, practice, FS2 12:55 p.m. Formula 1: Grand Prix of Canada, practice 2, ESPNU 2 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: LTi Printing 250, final practice, FS1 3 p.m. NASCAR: FireKeepers Casino 400, qualifying, FS1 3 p.m. IndyCar: DXC Technology 600, qualifying, NBCSN 4:30 p.m. NASCAR trucks: Rattlesnake 400, qualifying, FS2 8 p.m. NASCAR trucks: Rattlesnake 400, FS1 BASEBALL 10 a.m. NCAA Tournament: Stetson vs. North Carolina, ESPN2 1 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Washington vs. Cal State Fullerton, ESPN2 1:20 p.m. Pirates at Cubs, MLB 4 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Minnesota vs. Oregon State, ESPN2 6:10 p.m. Cardinals at Reds, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6:10 p.m. Yankees at Mets, MLB 7 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Mississippi State vs. Vanderbilt, ESPN2 BASKETBALL 8 p.m. NBA finals: Warriors at Cavaliers, KDNL (30) FOOTBALL 10:30 p.m. AFL Premiership: Geelong vs. North Melbourne, FS2 GOLF 10:30 a.m. Curtis Cup, Foursomes, FS1 10:30 a.m. Web.com: Rust-Oleum Championship, second round, GOLF 12:30 p.m. LPGA: ShopRite Classic, first round, GOLF 3 p.m. PGA: FedEx St. Jude Classic, second round, GOLF 4 p.m. Curtis Cup, Four-Ball, FS1 HORSE RACING 6:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Belmont Stakes handicapping seminar with Jay Randolph and Doug Nachman, KTRS (550 AM) TENNIS 10 a.m. French Open, Men’s semifinals, NBCSN 11 a.m. French Open, Men’s semifinals, KSDK (5) 4 a.m. (Sat.) French Open, girl’s and boy’s championships, Tennis Channel TRACK AND FIELD 7:30 p.m. NCAA Men’s and Women’s Outdoor Championships, ESPN VOLLEYBALL 3:30 p.m. Men’s Nations League: Germany vs. United States, CBSSN

DIGEST Owens will skip his Hall of Fame ceremony Terrell Owens says he will not attend the induction ceremony for the Pro Football Hall of Fame in August, an unprecedented decision by an enshrinee. Owens was voted into the hall in February. In a statement released Thursday by his publicist, Owens says: “While I am incredibly appreciative of this opportunity, I have made the decision to publicly decline my invitation to attend the induction ceremony in Canton.” The hall confirmed that the former All-Pro receiver informed them he would not be on hand Aug. 4 for the enshrinements. Owens added, “After visiting Canton earlier this year, I came to the realization that I wish to celebrate what will be one of the most memorable days of my life, elsewhere. At a later date, I will announce where and when I will celebrate my induction.” Owens ranks second to Jerry Rice with 15,934 yards receiving and is third on the all-time touchdowns receiving list with 153. Owens heavily criticized the voting process when he failed to be elected in his first two years of eligibility. Among the reasons he fell short were his being considered a divisive teammate and negative presence in the locker room. (AP) Other NFL news • ESPN reported that New England receiver Julian Edelman, who missed the 2017 season after tearing his right ACL in the preseason, could be facing a four-game suspension for violating the league’s performance-enhancers policy. ... Running back Duke Johnson has reached agreement with the Browns on a three-year, $15.6 million contract extension. (AP) Mizzou’s Schweizer comes up short in 10,000 meters • Missouri’s Karissa Schweizer fell short in her attempt to win a sixth national championship in her first of two races at the NCAA outdoor track and field championships in Eugene, Ore. In the women’s 10,000 meters Thursday evening, the Mizzou senior took the lead with six laps to go, but down the stretch of the second-to-last lap, Kansas’ Sharon Lokedi went ahead and built a comfortable lead the rest of the race, winning in 32 minutes, 9.2 seconds. Schweizer finished third in 32:14.94, behind runner-up Dorcas Wasike (32:11.81) from Louisville. Each of the top six finishers in the event broke the meet record. Schweizer, a nine-time All-American, has one last chance to capture another national championship when she concludes her college career Saturday in the 5,000 meters. (Dave Matter) Bryant leads Metropolitan Open • Justin Bryant of Kirkwood shot a 1-under-par 70 and opened up a four-shot lead after the second round of the 13th Metropolitan Open Championship at The Country Club of St. Albans. Combined with his opening 62, Bryant was at 10 under overall. Four players were tied for second: Ryan Sullivan (69) of Winston Salem, N.C., David Cooke (69) of Bolingbrook, Ill., Spence Fulford (68) of Davenport, Fla., and Jordan Russell (70) of Bryan, Texas. Complete scores, C10. (From news sources) Brazil’s Neymar to play Sunday • While Neymar seems to be finishing his injury recovery and is set to play in Brazil’s last pre-World Cup friendly at Austria on Sunday, midfielder Fred left Thursday’s training in pain after a tackle. Brazil coach Tite put Neymar in his main formation during training in London and removed midfielder Fernandinho from the starting lineup. On Sunday, Neymar joined the team during the break against Croatia. He scored the first goal of the game after dribbling past two opponents and was more active than coach Tite expected at this stage of his recovery. Neymar is returning from a foot injury that sidelined him for three months. (AP)

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Trainer Bob Bafert (right) watches as Triple Crown hopeful Justify is bathed after a workout Thursday at Belmont.

But it plans to go all out as Triple Crown bid is alive DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It has been an epic three-year period in American sports. First, in 2015, American Pharoah became horse racing’s first Triple Crown winner in 37 years. In 2016, the Chicago Cubs won the World Series for the first time in 108 years. Then on Thursday the Washington Capitals won the Stanley Cup for the first time in their 43 years of playing in the National Hockey League. All those feats have generated much conversation. But what about repeat engagements? For the first time since American Pharoah’s victory, horse racing Triple Crown can be won Saturday when Justify goes for the Belmont Stakes title. And there certainly hasn’t been as much “buzz” this time as there was three years ago when the milestone was on the line. NBC (KSDK Channel 5 locally) has the telecast and some of its commentators addressed the matter on a conference call this week. Mike Tirico, who will share the hosting duties with Bob Costas, still thinks it’s a big deal. “If it happens, it’s twice in four years, that’s one thing. But to say it’s happened twice in 40 years, which would be accurate if this happens, that’s a big deal. I can’t think of many things that happened in sports only twice in a 40-year span. “So while the recent nature of Pharoah doing it is fresh in our minds and it might not feel like that unreachable star, which it tended to in the 36 years between Triple Crowns, it’s still extraordinarily rare in sport and very, very unique. I don’t think the currency of 2015 should take away from how brilliant it would be to happen in 2018. Especially considering all these guys were the experts on our air and elsewhere said the field of 3-year-olds getting to the Derby was the strongest and deepest they’ve seen in recent memory. “So I think it justifies — sorry for the pun — the interest going into this weekend for sure.” Analyst Randy Moss is realistic. “We’re probably fooling ourselves if we think it will reach that level if Justify wins,” he said. “... You can go back in the Google archives or any other newspaper archives to the 1970s, and what you’ll find is that after Secretariat in ’73 and Seattle Slew in ’77, there was talk about there not being as much buzz for the ’78 Belmont when you had Airmed and Alydar, and especially the ’79 Belmont when Spectacular Bid had a chance to sweep. “And we looked back at Affirmed and Alydar as one of the great Belmont Stakes of all time historically. So it’s still ... a tremendously historic moment anytime we can see it happen.”

OVERHEAD LOOK NBC’s telecast is to be produced by Rob Hyland, grandson of legendary St. Louis power-broker Robert Hyland, who ran KMOX (1120 AM) from 1955-1992. He plans to use an aerial camera over the full backstretch, as was done with the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes. It will be about 15 feet above the track and can move with the horses. It “will not only cover the back-

Special Schoendienst coverage is coming Tributes to iconic Cardinal and Baseball Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst are set to continue through the weekend. The Post-Dispatch plans expanded coverage of Schoendienst’s life and legacy in its Sunday editions, as well as on its STLtoday.com website. And Fox Sports Midwest is producing a program about Schoendienst, who died Wednesday at 95, that is to air several times over the weekend. The special, hosted by Scott Warmann, is to be shown first at approximately 10 p.m. Friday — after FSM’s Cardinals wrap-up show that follows its telecast of the Cardinals-Reds contest that starts at 6:10 p.m. That program also is scheduled to be repeated Saturday, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Dan Caesar

stretch of the race, but it will also provide dramatic reset shots of this vast facility that is Belmont” Park, Hyland said, adding that five more cameras will be used than in the previous Triple Crown races this year. The augmentation is designed “to really showcase all that goes into this day,” Hyland said. “We’ll have a live pointer that tracks Justify during the race that our director will insert, if needed, but the horse will be tracked for the viewers at home watching. It will have a little arrow pointing to where he is at certain points in the race. “So we basically brought out all of the tools to showcase the Triple Crown attempt, including a number of remotes that will carry live shots from Churchill Downs in Louisville where it all began five weeks ago. ... We may have a live remote shot from a YankeesMets game just a few miles away. We’re working on a couple other fun ones as well, just to showcase this day and this athletic achievement, should it happen.”

ON THE CALL The race will be announced by Larry Collmus, who is in his eighth season of calling the Triple Crown events for NBC and had a strong performance when American Pharoah won. “Having gone through it with American Pharoah, I’ll know what the sense of place is going to be at Belmont Park that day,” he said. “It was just so electric that afternoon that (Pharoah won) you just couldn’t believe, the place was shaking, it was so, so exciting. And here we are with another chance to do it with Justify.” The first two legs of the Triple Crown series were run in rainy conditions, and there is a slight chance of more wet weather this time — which would be just fine for Collmus. “As the race-caller, I’d prefer rain to sun,” he said. “Because of the conditions at Belmont Park when they turn for home with the horses at the top of the stretch, the sun sets right behind them and it changes the silk colors of the horses and makes it a little more difficult for me. So a little rain is OK. Although I think just clouds would be fine so we have a crowd that doesn’t get wet and maybe enjoys another piece of history.” The television coverage starts at 1 p.m. on NBCSN, which has some

of the Belmont Stakes undercard. It moves to NBC at 3 o’clock, with post time at 5:46 p.m. Several features are planned to air leading to the race, including: • Bob Baffert driving from Louisville, Ky., to Lexington to visit American Pharoah. He trained Pharoah and currently does so with Justify, • A piece on Justify jockey Mike Smith. • A feature on Justify’s early life.

A DIFFERENT ERA A reporter on the conference call asked an interesting question — has the decline of media coverage of horse racing since there was a string of three Triple Crown winners in the 1970s afected the cultural impact of the sport’s marquee series? “I started of in the newspaper business covering my first Kentucky Derby back in 1980,” Moss said. “Back then I know that basically every sports journalist in the print business that was anybody was always at the Kentucky Derby, from Red Smith, Dick Young, Furman Bisher, Blackie Sherrod, Ed Pope — it’s like a who’s who, murderer’s row of newspaper sports columnists every year at the Kentucky Derby. “Now it’s not quite the same. Newspapers have scaled back their travel budgets tremendously. Horse racing isn’t as much at the forefront of the sports landscape as it was 30 or 40 years ago. “So, yeah, it’s cut back on print space in the newspapers and things like that, but not as much for the Triple Crown as for your standard run-of-the-mill stakes races and big days you’ll find the rest of the year. I think you’ll see from the TV ratings and all that, especially when there is a Triple Crown on the line, that we still get a lot of interest in Thoroughbred racing over this period of time.” Added Tirico: “For the most part through the month of May, there are very few shows that match the Kentucky Derby for number of viewers. The Belmont ratings will go three or four times what it otherwise would have been because there is a Triple Crown on the line. “So the metric that we have on our end with viewership I think jumps out that these American Classics still retain their value. ... We’re a big-event country, and people still show up for the big events, especially on the TV side in terms of ratings.” AROUND THE DIAL Fox Sports has a big schedule starting next week, when it shows the U.S. Open golf tournament (Thursday-Sunday) and also kicks off a month of coverage of the World Cup soccer tourney on Thursday morning. • Jamie Erdahl will replace Allie LaForce as CBS’ sideline reporter on the lead broadcast team for its SEC football coverage. Erdahl has been in a similar role at CBS for its NFL and college basketball coverage. LaForce is expected to end up with Turner Sports, sporting news.com reported. • Sportsmediawatch.com reports that the telecast of every NASCAR Cup series race this year has declined in ratings over last season, with the percentage down by double-digits in all cases. And six of the 12 events thus far have posted their worst rating ever, it said. Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 @caesardan on Twitter dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

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SPORTS

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

CVC keeping football options open ABOUT THE LEAGUES

FOOTBALL • FROM C1

2019, and the XFL, which plans to start early in 2020. A third group, unnamed, apparently isn’t as far along. “It’s a group of former NFL players that are trying to build ownership groups in various markets, including in St. Louis,” Ratclife said. Ownership groups are not needed in the Alliance of American Football or the XFL, where teams will be owned and operated by the league. “We’re keeping our options open with all of them,” Ratclife said. “But they’re all different models, they’re all slightly diferent time frames. But none of them are directly on top of the NFL season.” It remains to be seen if St. Louis would support non-NFL football, and such leagues have had a dubious track record. But Ratcliffe said the CVC definitely is interested in having a football team as a tenant. “We’d love it,” she said. “And we loved having the Rams. We didn’t love the Rams’ lease — it was all one-sided. But we know how that happened, right? We’re not in that same position now. But we’d love to have a tenant that wants to utilize some event dates and provide some football for the people in our community.” Because it plans to begin play in eight months — just after the Super Bowl — the Alliance of American Football is on the front burner. But without much lead time, booking dates in the dome has been problematic. “I know we’ve met with them several times and we gave them availability,” Ratcliffe said. “The availability (dates) that we had for them in ‘19, I don’t think it was optimum for them.” For that reason, Ratclife wasn’t overly optimistic about the Alliance coming to St. Louis. But talks have continued this week and an Alliance team in St. Louis remains possible. “We are in ongoing discussions with representatives of the Alliance of American Football and other entities interested in St. Louis and The Dome at America’s Center,” Matthew Dewey, vice president and general manager of America’s Center, said Thursday in a statement. The eight-team league will play a 10game schedule with four going to the playofs. Games will be televised by CBS and CBS Sports Network. Film and television producer Charlie Ebersol and Bill Polian, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame as an NFL personnel man and executive, are cofounders of the Alliance, with Polian also the Head of Football. Several former NFL players, such as Pittsburgh Steelers great Troy Polamalu also are involved. Tony

St. Louis is in discussions with both the Alliance of American Football and the XFL about ielding a team in the startup leagues. ALLIANCE OF AMERICAN FOOTBALL Start date • February 2019 Format • 8 teams, 10-game schedule, 4-team playofs Co-Founder and CEO • Charlie Ebersol Co-Founder, Head of Football • Bill Polian Teams (Coaches) • Atlanta (Brad Childress), Birmingham (Tim Lewis), Memphis (Mike Singletary), Orlando (Steve Spurrier), Phoenix (Rick Neuheisel), Salt Lake City (Dennis Erickson), San Diego (Mike Martz). Features • 50-man rosters, territorial draft; games on CBS, CBS Sports Network

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

Mizzou softball begins new era under Anderson Next coach comes from Hofstra University

XFL Start date • Early 2020 Founder and Chairman • Vince McMahon Commissioner and CEO • Oliver Luck Format • 8 teams, 10-game schedule, 4-team playofs. Features • 40-man rosters, simpler rules, fewer play stoppages —Compiled by Jim Thomas

Softli, former vice president of player personnel for the St. Louis Rams, is a league executive. The Alliance already has announced seven of the eight cities that will field teams. “We will not be announcing our final Alliance city until later this month,” Tom Veit, Alliance head of business operations, said via email. “However, we can say that as a city with a rich football culture and incredibly passionate and engaging fans, St. Louis remains a candidate.” Mike Martz, the former St. Louis Rams coach, will coach the San Diego franchise. Like the Alliance, the XFL plans an eight-team league, a 10-game regular season and a four-team playof. But the XLF has yet to announce any cities. “we recently distributed our proposal to 30 markets across the U.S. and we are workign hard to select the right homes for our inaugural eight teams in 2020,” XFL commissioner and CEO Oliver Luck said in a statement to the Post-Dispatch. The XFL is the brainchild of Vince McMahon of WWE fame. McMahon’s first incarnation of the XFL lasted only one season, in 2001, before folding. Such has been the fate of every other pro football league that has come along since the old American Football League merged with the NFL in the 1960s. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

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CHRISTINA LONG • Mizzou athletics

New Missouri softball coach Larissa Anderson is introduced during Thursday’s press conference at Mizzou Softball Stadium in Columbia. BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Out of Hofstra Uni-

versity and into the Southeastern Conference, new Missouri softball coach Larissa Anderson knows the challenge that lies ahead. The last two seasons it was easier to make the field for the NCAA Tournament than the SEC tournament, something her new team experienced awkwardly this spring. But Anderson, who’s spent her entire coaching career in the Eastern Time Zone, isn’t afraid to step into the gauntlet that is SEC softball. “There’s no easy team in the conference,” she said Thursday at Mizzou Softball Stadium at her introductory press conference. “In my past experience maybe you didn’t have to play at the highest level every single weekend. But every single weekend in the SEC is playing an NCAA tournament game, which is exciting for me.” She’ll get that chance in 2019 in a league that sent all 13 of its teams to NCAA regionals the past two seasons, even though only 12 make the SEC tournament. Under interim coach Gina Fogue, Mizzou finished last in the SEC this season, failed to make the SEC tournament at its own stadium but still earned an at-large berth in an NCAA regional, marking the program’s 12th consecutive trip to the NCAA postseason. The first 11 were under former coach Ehren Earleywine, who was abruptly fired in January, two weeks before the season started. Mizzou athletics director Jim Sterk considered both head coaches and assistants for the vacancy — MU had discussions with Wisconsin coach Yvette Healy and Oklahoma assistant J.T. Gasso, a source confirmed — but in a conference as deep and talented as the SEC, Sterk aimed to hire a sitting head coach, he said. Anderson was 130-73-1 in four seasons at Hofstra, with two NCAA regional appearances, including a 41-14 mark this past year. With Anderson on staff as an associate head coach the previous 10 seasons, Hofstra won 72 percent of its games and played in eight regionals, including a stop in Columbia in 2013, when the Pride went 2-1 in two days against Mizzou, including a 10-0 rout over Earleywine’s Tigers. On May 22, two days after MU’s season ended, Sterk flew to New York to meet with Anderson in Long Island and invited her to Columbia to meet the administration and see the team’s facilities. On May 26, she accepted the job and a five-year contract that pays her a base salary of $185,000. “She has the respect of her peers,” Sterk said. “She has a drive and tenaciousness

that’s really evident in the way she coaches and the type of person she is.” In some ways, Anderson’s track record presents a stark contrast from the gruff and sometimes polarizing Earleywine, a Missouri native who grew up a Mizzou fan in Jefferson City but was an outsider in the world of women’s college softball, often absorbing criticism from the national softball community. In 2015 he was publicly reprimanded by the National Fastpitch Coaches Association ethics committee for a variety of incidents and comments. Anderson, meanwhile, is an outsider to this part of the country but very much an insider when it comes to the world of college softball, serving as the chair of that same ethics committee from 2009-13. She’s currently the vice president of the NFCA executive board, putting her in line to serve as the association’s president. But when asked about her impressions of Mizzou’s program, Anderson was drawn to the hallmarks of Earleywine’s decade-long influence on the program. “From the very first time I ever recognized Mizzou softball they were tough competitors with a never-lose mentality,” she said. “They just kept coming at you. They never backed down. They were fearless competitors. If you gave them an inch they took a mile. That’s really the reputation. Even talking to other coaches around the country when this opportunity came about, that was the No. 1 thing they said. Well coached, competed, unbelievable athletes within the program and fierce competitors.” Without mentioning Earleywine’s name, Anderson saluted the program’s past and the tradition he established. That doesn’t mean the program will go soft under her watch. “The way I’m going to run this program is tough,” she said. “And it’s going to be demanding. We have to make sure we hold people accountable. Not everybody can handle that. And that’s OK because there’s a program for everybody.” Anderson said her priority in recruiting will be landing local players from within the state, but her most important sales pitch this summer is directed toward MU’s current players, several of whom are deciding whether they’ll remain with the team or play elsewhere. She’s made contact with every returning player, and she met with several in person Thursday. The roster remains in flux. “I’m recruiting 25 people at one time,” she said. “It’s just getting them to understand this is going to be a new era but respecting the past and what they’ve done in the past and continue to build on that.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

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BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE L

Pct

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Milwaukee

37 25 .597

5-5

Chicago

35 24 .593

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8-2 W-2

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19-14

14-13

Pittsburgh

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L-1

18-15

13-16

Cincinnati

22 41 .349 15½

14½

3-7 W-1

10-21

12-20

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

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31 .500 Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home L-3

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EAST

W

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36 26

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New York

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2-8

L-6

12-19

15-13

Miami

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L-1

10-18

12-22

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Arizona

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L

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

7-3 W-1

Thursday Cardinals 4, Miami 1 Cincinnati 7, Colorado 5, 13 inn. LA Dodgers 8, Pittsburgh 7 Cubs 4, Philadelphia 3 Wednesday Washington 11, Tampa Bay 2 Cleveland 3, Milwaukee 1 Baltimore 1, NY Mets 0 San Diego 3, Atlanta 1 San Fran. 5, Arizona 4, 10 inn. Pittsburgh 11, LA Dodgers 9 Colorado 6, Cincinnati 3 Cubs 7, Philadelphia 5 Miami 11, Cardinals 3

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Detroit

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Minnesota

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Kansas City

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Chicago

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41 .339 L

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New York

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ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Rizzo leads streaking Cubs past Phillies

Cubs 4, Phillies 3

Blue Jays 5, Orioles 4

Dodgers 8, Pirates 7

Anthony Rizzo hit a solo homer and added a second RBI with a sacriice ly to lead the Chicago Cubs past the visiting Philadelphia Phillies 4-3 Thursday afternoon. The Cubs won for the ifth time in six games to move within a half-game of idle irst-place Milwaukee in the NL Central. Philadelphia has lost ive of six, wrapping up a 10-game road trip at 3-7.

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .256 Herrera cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .305 Kingery ss 5 0 1 2 0 1 .212 Santana 1b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .221 Altherr rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 Cozens lf 3 0 0 0 2 3 .222 Knapp c 2 0 1 0 2 1 .169 e-Alfaro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Crawford 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .191 a-Franco ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Pivetta p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .167 b-Valentin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .167 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 3 6 3 9 12 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Almora cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .314 La Stella 2b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .329 Bryant 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .292 Rizzo 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .253 Baez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Schwarber lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Happ rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .232 Gimenez c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Chatwood p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Duensing p 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Zobrist ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .292 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Morrow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 27 4 6 4 1 9 Philadelphia 000 012 000 — 3 6 3 Chicago 000 130 00x — 4 6 2 a-popped out for Crawford in the 5th. b-singled for Pivetta in the 6th. c-struck out for Garcia in the 7th. d-struck out for Wilson in the 7th. e-struck out for Knapp in the 9th. E: Knapp 2 (6), Pivetta (2), Bryant (8), Chatwood (1). LOB: Philadelphia 13, Chicago 3. 2B: Kingery (12), Almora (13). HR: Rizzo (10), off Pivetta. RBIs: Kingery 2 (16), Santana (35), La Stella (13), Bryant (29), Rizzo 2 (42). CS: La Stella (1). SF: Rizzo. RLISP: Philadelphia 6 (Herrera, Altherr, Cozens 2, Franco 2); Chicago 1 (Baez). GIDP: Pivetta, Rizzo. DP: Philadelphia 1 (Morgan, Hernandez, Santana); Chicago 1 (Chatwood, Baez, La Stella). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pivetta, L, 4-5 5 6 4 4 1 6 86 3.76 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.47 Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.81 Morgan 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.24 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood 42/3 4 1 1 7 6 107 3.86 Duensing, W, 2-0 1 2 2 1 0 1 23 2.29 1/ 1 8 1.95 Cishek, 3 0 0 0 0 Wilson, 1 0 0 0 1 3 17 2.45 Strop, 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.13 Morrow, S, 15-16 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 1.66 Inherited runners-scored: Duensing 3-0, Cishek 1-0. HBP: Chatwood (Altherr). WP: Chatwood. Umpires: Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 3:20. A: 40,057 .

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mancini lf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .231 Rickard lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Jones cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Machado ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .322 Valencia 3b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .277 Trumbo dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .292 Schoop 2b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .229 Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .152 Gentry rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Wynns c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .286 Totals 36 4 7 4 3 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .215 a-Pillar ph-cf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Solarte 2b-3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Hernandez lf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .253 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .248 Morales dh 5 0 2 0 0 1 .203 Maile c 3 1 0 0 2 2 .263 Diaz ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .216 Grichuk cf-rf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .146 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .156 b-Travis ph-2b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .196 Totals 38 5 12 5 5 6 Baltimore 100 000 120 0 — 4 7 0 Toronto 100 000 003 1 — 5 12 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Granderson in the 8th. b-walked for Urshela in the 9th. LOB: Baltimore 6, Toronto 9. 2B: Mancini (10), Hernandez (14), Diaz (6), Grichuk 2 (5). HR: Wynns (1), off Clippard; Valencia (6), off Axford; Trumbo (3), off Axford; Granderson (5), off Hess. RBIs: Machado (50), Valencia (15), Trumbo (9), Wynns (1), Granderson (17), Diaz (15), Grichuk 2 (12), Pillar (23). CS: Hernandez (3). SF: Machado. RLISP: Baltimore 3 (Davis 3); Toronto 3 (Solarte, Diaz, Urshela). GIDP: Granderson, Solarte. DP: Baltimore 3 (Wynns, Machado), (Schoop, Machado, Davis), (Schoop, Machado, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hess 6 5 1 1 2 4 99 3.07 Givens, 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.77 Bleier, 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.05 1/ 3 2 0 21 4.24 Brach, 3 3 3 Castro, L, 1-2 11/3 2 1 1 1 2 30 3.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garcia 6 4 1 1 3 6 91 5.57 Clippard 1 1 1 1 0 3 15 3.52 2/ 2 0 0 12 3.77 Axford 3 2 2 1/ 0 0 0 2 3.91 Loup 3 0 0 Oh 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.86 Barnes, W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.30 Hess pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Givens 1-0, Castro 2-0. WP: Garcia. Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Tom Woodring; Second, Will Little; Third, Ted Barrett. T: 3:13. A: 24,494 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson lf 5 3 3 3 0 1 .272 Muncy 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .254 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Grandal c 5 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Kemp rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .349 Bellinger 1b 4 2 3 2 1 1 .237 Taylor ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .251 Valera 2b 4 1 2 1 1 0 .208 Hernandez cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .207 Hudson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Baez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Puig ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Paredes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Forsythe ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .212 Stewart p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Turner 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Totals 38 8 13 8 4 10 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Polanco rf 2 0 0 1 0 1 .208 d-Meadows ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .367 f-Cervelli ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .275 Marte cf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .289 Bell 1b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .237 Dickerson lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .323 Moran 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .274 c-Freese ph-3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .253 Diaz c 3 1 1 4 0 0 .288 Mercer ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .254 a-Frazier ph-rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Totals 34 7 9 7 2 8 Los Angeles 100 111 220 — 8 13 1 Pittsburgh 001 002 031 — 7 9 0 a-singled for Taillon in the 5th. b-doubled for Garcia in the 6th. c-singled for Moran in the 6th. d-flied out for Glasnow in the 7th. e-walked for Goeddel in the 8th. f-homered for Feliz in the 9th. E: Muncy (4). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Pittsburgh 6. 2B: Pederson (11), Bellinger (11), Hernandez (4), Puig (10), Bell (12). HR: Pederson (5), off Taillon; Bellinger (11), off Glasnow; Pederson (6), off Feliz; Diaz (4), off Stewart; Cervelli (9), off Jansen. RBIs: Pederson 3 (25), Kemp (40), Bellinger 2 (30), Valera (4), Puig (20), Polanco (28), Bell (34), Diaz 4 (13), Cervelli (35). SB: Muncy (1), Marte (13). SF: Polanco, Diaz. S: Alexander, Taillon. RLISP: Los Angeles 6 (Muncy, Grandal 2, Taylor 2, Baez); Pittsburgh 2 (Polanco, Marte). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.84 Alexander 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 4.38 Baez, W, 3-3 2 2 1 1 0 0 22 3.34 Garcia 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 4.50 Fields 0 1 2 2 1 0 14 2.79 1/ 0 1 8 0.00 3 0 0 0 Paredes, Goeddel, 12/3 2 0 0 0 1 35 0.51 1/ Stewart 2 0 0 17 5.60 3 2 3 Jansen, S, 15-17 12/3 1 1 1 0 2 22 2.83 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, L, 3-5 5 8 3 3 1 7 92 4.08 Glasnow 2 3 3 3 1 2 37 4.89 Feliz 2 2 2 2 2 1 40 6.31 Fields pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Paredes 1-0, Goeddel 1-1. HBP: Garcia (Harrison). WP: Glasnow. Umpires: . T: 3:37. A: 19,713 .

Reds 7, Rockies 5 • Jesse Winker hit a two-run homer in the 13th inning, allowing host Cincinnati to avert a series sweep by Colorado. The Rockies have lost ive of seven, blowing saves in all ive. Dodgers 8, Pirates 7 • Joc Pederson went deep twice, Cody Bellinger hit his third home run in as many games and visiting Los Angeles used nine pitchers to hold of Pittsburgh. Pederson led of the game with a solo blast and added a two-run shot in the eighth, his second multi-home run game this week. The Dodgers returned to .500 with their 15th win in 20 games.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Twins 7, White Sox 2 • Supported by three home runs, Minnesota’s Jose Berrios pitched his second complete game this season to beat visiting Chicago. Berrios retired the irst 14 hitters he faced as the Twins received a three-run homer from Eddie Rosario, a two-run shot from Eduardo Escobar and a solo blast from Ehire Adrianza. Mariners 5, Rays 4 • Mike Leake pitched into the ninth, Mitch Haniger homered and drove in three, and AL West-leading Seattle won in Tampa. The Mariners won for the 10th time in 13 games. Tigers 7, Red Sox 2 • Leonys Martin had a two-run homer to cap a ive-run irst inning and Detroit won at Fenway. The Tigers’ victory ended a four-game win streak for Boston, which had outscored Detroit 13-1 in the irst two games of the series. Blue Jays 5, Orioles 4 • Aledmys Diaz hit a game-winning single in the 10th inning and Toronto rallied from a three-run deicit in the ninth to beat visiting Baltimore. Teoscar Hernandez doubled of Miguel Castro to begin the 10th and Justin Smoak was intentionally walked. Two strikeouts later, Diaz won it with a single to left, giving Toronto just its second win in its past 12 home games. Astros 5, Rangers 2 • Evan Gattis hit a two-run homer and an RBI single, and Gerrit Cole allowed one run over six solid innings as Houston won at Texas. Associated Press

NOTEBOOK Minor-leaguers Abad, Garner suspended Pitcher Fernando Abad, an eight-year major league veteran who inished last season with Boston, has been suspended 80 games under baseball’s minor league drug program following a positive test for the steroid Stanozolol. The suspension of the 32-year-old lefthander was announced Thursday. In addition, Cubs pitcher David Garner was banned for 100 games following a third violation for a drug of abuse. Garner, on the roster of Triple-A Iowa, was suspended 50 games on March 23 after his second violation. Abad was 2-1 with a 3.30 ERA in 48 games with the Red Sox last year, became a free agent, agreed to a minor league contract with Philadelphia and was released March 21. Astros’ Correa sits after getting good news • Houston shortstop Carlos Correa says nothing abnormal showed up during an MRI Thursday, a day after he left a game early because of discomfort on his right side. Correa was examined in Houston and rejoined the team but was not in the Astros’ lineup Thursday at Texas. “Just happy the irst diagnosis is that it’s nothing serious, and that hopefully we’ll get him back soon,” manager A.J. Hinch said. Dodgers’ Cingrani on DL • Los Angeles placed lefthanded reliever Tony Cingrani on the disabled list Thursday with discomfort in his throwing shoulder. Cingrani left Wednesday’s game after just six pitches in the eighth inning and then complained about pain in the shoulder. Cingrani is 1-2 with a 4.84 ERA in 27 appearances for the defending National League champions. Rangers GM gets extension • Texas has given general manager Jon Daniels a multiyear contract extension, the number of years were not released. Daniels’ contract had been scheduled to expire at the end of this season. In his 13th season as GM, the 40-year-old Daniels also has the title of president of baseball operations. He was baseball’s youngest GM at age 28 when he replaced Jon Hart in 2005. Rays designate Miller for assignment • Tampa Bay has designated inielder Brad Miller for assignment to clear a roster spot for 22-year-old irst baseman/outielder Jake Bauers, one of its top ofensive prospects. Miller, 28, hit .256 with ive homers and 21 RBIs in 48 games this season but struggled defensively at irst base. Twins’ May back pitching • Minnesota reinstated righthanded pitcher Trevor May from the DL and assigned him to Triple-A, a little less than 15 months after Tommy John surgery. May had the procedure March 22 last year after getting hurt in spring training. He has a 5.50 ERA in 18 innings with 12 walks and 20 strikeouts in six rehab appearances. Associated Press

Tigers 7, Red Sox 2 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones lf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .219 Castellanos rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .331 Cabrera 1b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .306 V.Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Candelario 3b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .272 Hicks c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .278 Martin cf 4 2 2 2 0 2 .259 Iglesias ss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .261 Machado 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .215 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 11 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi cf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .299 Bogaerts ss 5 0 0 1 0 1 .284 J.Martinez rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .314 Holt rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Moreland 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .303 Nunez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Travis lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Devers 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Vazquez dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .199 Swihart c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .167 Totals 33 2 7 2 5 8 Detroit 501 000 010 — 7 10 0 Boston 100 010 000 — 2 7 0 LOB: Detroit 6, Boston 9. 2B: Castellanos (21), Candelario (15), Iglesias (17), Moreland (13), Swihart (2). 3B: Martin (3). HR: Martin (8), off Beeks; Benintendi (11), off Boyd. RBIs: Candelario (27), Hicks 2 (22), Martin 2 (22), Iglesias 2 (23), Benintendi (44), Bogaerts (34). RLISP: Detroit 4 (Jones 2, Candelario 2); Boston 6 (Benintendi, Bogaerts, Nunez 2, Devers 2). GIDP: Benintendi. DP: Detroit 1 (Iglesias, Cabrera). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd, W, 4-4 61/3 4 2 2 4 6 101 3.20 2/ 0 0 0 7 4.35 Wilson 3 0 0 Jimenez 1 2 0 0 1 2 23 2.37 Greene 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.38 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beeks, L, 0-1 4 7 6 6 3 4 88 13.50 Johnson 4 3 1 1 0 5 56 4.83 Velazquez 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.99 Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 1-0. WP: Boyd 3. Umpires: Home, Jeremie Rehak; First, Mark Wegner; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Mike DiMuro. T: 2:55. A: 36,556 .

Mariners 5, Rays 4 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .292 Segura ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .341 Haniger rf 3 1 2 3 1 1 .274 Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .255 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Healy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Span lf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .247 Heredia cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Freitas c 4 1 1 0 0 3 .208 Totals 33 5 8 5 3 10 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Robertson ss 5 1 1 1 0 1 .263 Cron dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .256 Wendle 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Ramos c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .289 Duffy 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .311 Bauers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gomez rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .193 Smith cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .265 Field lf 4 0 2 3 0 1 .256 Totals 35 4 10 4 1 4 Seattle 031 010 000 — 5 8 0 Tampa Bay 001 000 003 — 4 10 1 E: Robertson (5). LOB: Seattle 5, Tampa Bay 6. 2B: Ramos (9), Field (7). 3B: Duffy (1). HR: Span (6), off Pruitt; Haniger (13), off Pruitt; Robertson (7), off Leake. RBIs: Gordon (15), Haniger 3 (46), Span (31), Robertson (18), Field 3 (14). CS: Gordon (3). SF: Gordon. RLISP: Seattle 3 (Cruz, Healy 2); Tampa Bay 3 (Robertson, Bauers, Field). GIDP: Cron, Wendle. DP: Seattle 2 (Leake, Gordon, Healy), (Seager, Segura, Healy). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake, W, 6-3 8 8 2 2 1 3 100 4.46 Colome 1 2 2 2 0 1 22 4.05 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 1 1 0 0 2 2 30 3.38 Pruitt, L, 1-3 7 7 5 5 1 6 93 4.57 Roe 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 3.63 Leake pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Colome 1-1. HBP: Colome (Gomez). Umpires: Home, Ben May; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Chris Guccione. T: 2:43. A: 10,342 .

Thursday Minnesota 7, White Sox 2 Toronto 5, Baltimore 4, 10 inn. Detroit 7, Boston 2 Seattle 5, Tampa Bay 4 Houston 5, Texas 2 Kansas City at Oakland, late Wednesday Washington 11, Tampa Bay 2 Cleveland 3, Milwaukee 1 Baltimore 1, NY Mets 0 NY Yankees 3, Toronto 0, 13 inn. Boston 7, Detroit 1 Texas 8, Oakland 2 Houston 7, Seattle 5 White Sox 5, Minnesota 2 LA Angels 4, Kansas City 3

Friday’s pitching matchups

Reds 7, Rockies 5 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 5 2 1 1 0 1 .278 Blackmon cf 6 0 2 0 0 1 .289 Arenado 3b 5 0 2 0 1 1 .327 Gonzalez rf 5 0 2 1 1 0 .268 Story ss 6 0 1 0 0 2 .242 Tauchman lf 5 2 2 0 0 3 .103 f-Desmond ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 McMahon 1b 6 1 1 1 0 2 .210 Wolters c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .169 Anderson p 2 0 0 1 0 1 .105 b-Cuevas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Parra lf 2 0 2 0 0 0 .287 Totals 47 5 13 4 3 11 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler rf 6 1 3 1 0 2 .277 Blandino ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 c-Gennett ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .344 e-Barnhart ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Floro p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Votto 1b 3 1 0 1 2 1 .304 Suarez 3b 6 0 0 1 0 1 .295 Duvall lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .185 d-Winker ph-lf 3 1 3 2 0 0 .263 Casali c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .500 Dixon 2b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .235 Mahle p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .105 a-Lorenzen ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Peraza ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Hamilton cf 4 2 0 0 1 2 .195 Totals 42 7 10 6 5 9 Colorado 101 102 000 000 0 — 5 13 0 Cincinnati 010 010 021 000 2 — 7 10 1 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for Mahle in the 5th. b-grounded out for Anderson in the 8th. c-pinch hit for Peralta in the 8th. d-singled for Duvall in the 8th. e-grounded out for Iglesias in the 10th. f-lined out for Shaw in the 12th. E: Blandino (5). LOB: Colorado 11, Cincinnati 6. 2B: LeMahieu (10), Gonzalez (6), Tauchman (1), Schebler (6), Casali (2). 3B: McMahon (1). HR: Winker (2), off Rusin. RBIs: LeMahieu (18), Gonzalez (26), McMahon (4), Anderson (1), Schebler (23), Votto (25), Suarez (45), Casali (2), Winker 2 (15). SF: LeMahieu. S: LeMahieu, Anderson, Casali. RLISP: Colorado 4 (Blackmon 2, Story, Tauchman); Cincinnati 3 (Schebler, Blandino, Mahle). FIDP: Arenado. GIDP: Arenado, Gonzalez, Blandino, Suarez, Peraza. DP: Colorado 3 (LeMahieu, Story, McMahon), (LeMahieu, Story, McMahon), (Story, LeMahieu, McMahon); Cincinnati 3 (Blandino, Dixon, Votto), (Duvall, Dixon), (Peraza, Dixon, Votto). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson 7 5 2 2 1 5 105 4.81 Dunn 0 1 2 2 2 0 14 9.00 Oberg, 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 4.08 Davis, 1 1 1 1 0 3 25 3.42 Shaw 2 1 0 0 2 0 24 6.89 Rusin, L, 0-2 11/3 1 2 2 0 1 16 7.77 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mahle 5 6 3 2 2 6 96 4.33 Garrett 2 3 2 2 0 1 24 2.34 Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.76 Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.08 Iglesias 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.08 Floro, W, 2-1 3 3 0 0 1 1 34 3.12 Dunn pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Oberg 3-2. HBP: Mahle (Wolters), Garrett (Wolters), Davis (Casali), Rusin (Votto). WP: Davis 2. Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Chad Whitson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Adrian Johnson. T: 4:15. A: 15,957 .

Twins 7, White Sox 2 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .242 Sanchez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .299 Palka rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .272 Davidson dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Narvaez c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .187 Rondon ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Tilson lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .229 Thompson cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Totals 31 2 6 2 0 10 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .247 Rosario lf 3 2 2 3 1 0 .312 Escobar 3b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Morrison 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .197 Grossman rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Garver dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 LaMarre cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .282 Adrianza ss 3 2 1 1 1 0 .236 Wilson c 2 1 1 0 1 1 .174 Totals 32 7 9 7 3 6 Chicago 000 002 000 — 2 6 0 Minnesota 210 400 00x — 7 9 0 LOB: Chicago 2, Minnesota 4. 2B: Moncada (12), Abreu (23), Narvaez (6), Rosario (16), Morrison (9), LaMarre (4). HR: Escobar (12), off Shields; Adrianza (2), off Shields; Rosario (14), off Shields. RBIs: Moncada (22), Abreu (36), Dozier (26), Rosario 3 (43), Escobar 2 (38), Adrianza (9). RLISP: Chicago 1 (Palka); Minnesota 2 (Garver, Adrianza). GIDP: Escobar. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 1-7 6 8 7 7 2 6 99 4.92 Cedeno 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 0.00 Beck 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.18 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Berrios, W, 7-5 9 6 2 2 0 10 109 3.66 Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Brian O’Nora; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 2:14. A: 21,469 .

Astros 5, Rangers 2 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .289 Bregman 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .268 Altuve 2b 4 2 3 1 0 0 .338 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Gattis dh 4 1 2 3 0 0 .234 Gonzalez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Stassi c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Kemp lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Marisnick cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .155 Totals 34 5 9 5 2 5 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo lf 4 1 2 0 1 2 .267 Profar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Mazara rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .267 Beltre dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Gallo cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .204 Kiner-Falefa 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .244 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .216 Guzman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .221 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .167 a-Chirinos ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .203 Totals 34 2 8 2 3 10 Houston 000 301 010 — 5 9 0 Texas 100 000 001 — 2 8 1 a-doubled for Perez in the 9th. E: Choo (2). LOB: Houston 4, Texas 8. 2B: Bregman (19), Kiner-Falefa (8), Chirinos (8). HR: Gattis (10), off Hamels; Bregman (7), off Hamels. RBIs: Bregman (29), Altuve (31), Gattis 3 (31), Beltre (15), Chirinos (22). SB: Altuve (9). CS: Odor (5). RLISP: Houston 2 (Gattis, Marisnick); Texas 4 (Choo, Profar, Gallo, Kiner-Falefa). GIDP: Altuve, Kemp. DP: Texas 2 (Profar, Odor, Guzman), (Guzman, Profar). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole, W, 7-1 6 3 1 1 3 8 102 2.16 2/ 0 1 14 4.71 Harris, 3 3 0 0 1/ Devenski, 0 0 2 1.88 3 0 0 0 Peacock 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.52 Giles 1 2 1 1 0 1 23 5.40 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels, L, 3-6 71/3 7 5 5 2 5 104 3.86 Chavez 12/3 2 0 0 0 0 20 3.58 Inherited runners-scored: Devenski 2-0. Umpires: Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Ryan Blakney; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T: 2:36. A: 30,236 .

NL LEADERS BATTING: Kemp, Los Angeles, .349; Gennett, Cincinnati, .344; Freeman, Atlanta, .338; Markakis, Atlanta, .328; Arenado, Colorado, .327; Crawford, San Francisco, .324; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .323; Almora, Chicago, .314; Martinez, Cardinals, .311; Belt, San Francisco, .307. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 51; Blackmon, Colorado, 48; Pham, Cardinals, 43; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 43; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 41; Arenado, Colorado, 39; Freeman, Atlanta, 39; Markakis, Atlanta, 39; Harper, Washington, 38; 3 tied at 37. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 46; Suarez, Cincinnati, 45; Gennett, Cincinnati, 44; Freeman, Atlanta, 43; Markakis, Atlanta, 42; Rizzo, Chicago, 42; Story, Colorado, 41; Harper, Washington, 40; Kemp, Los Angeles, 40; Shaw, Milwaukee, 38. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 81; Freeman, Atlanta, 80; Gennett, Cincinnati, 78; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 71; Albies, Atlanta, 70; Arenado, Colorado, 70; Castro, Miami, 70; Anderson, Miami, 69; Crawford, San Francisco, 69; 2 tied at 68. DOUBLES: Albies, Atlanta, 19; Bryant, Chicago, 18; Freeman, Atlanta, 18; Hosmer, San Diego, 18; Markakis, Atlanta, 18; McCutchen, San Francisco, 18; Polanco, Pittsburgh, 17; 8 tied at 16. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 6; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 6; Baez, Chicago, 5; Blackmon, Colorado, 4; Contreras, Chicago, 4; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 4; Nimmo, New York, 4; Story, Colorado, 4; 14 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Harper, Washington, 18; Villanueva, San Diego, 15; Albies, Atlanta, 14; Baez, Chicago, 14; Shaw, Milwaukee, 14; Adams, Washington, 13; Arenado, Colorado, 12; Blackmon, Colorado, 12; Gennett, Cincinnati, 12; 8 tied at 11. STOLEN BASES: Inciarte, Atlanta, 18; Turner, Washington, 17; MTaylor, Washington, 16; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 13; Cain, Milwaukee, 11; Dyson, Arizona, 10; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 10; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 10; Jankowski, San Diego, 10; 3 tied at 9. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.49; Scherzer, Washington, 1.95; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.27; Gonzalez, Washington, 2.27; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.31; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.35; Wacha, Cardinals, 2.41; Lester, Chicago, 2.44; Newcomb, Atlanta, 2.49; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 2.66. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 133; Corbin, Arizona, 105; deGrom, New York, 98; Strasburg, Washington, 93; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 88; Gray, Colorado, 81; Nola, Philadelphia, 80; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 79; Greinke, Arizona, 78; 2 tied at 76.

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L ERA

StL Cin

Weaver (R) Harvey (R)

6:10

3-5 4.41 1-4 5.79

Pit Chi

Kuhl (R) Montgomery (L) 1:20

4-3 3.86 1-1 3.89

SF Suarez (L) Was Strasburg (R)

6:05

2-4 4.74 6-5 3.20

Mil Phi

6:05

4-1 3.39 4-6 3.82

SD Lauer (L) Mia Smith (L)

6:10

2-3 6.82 4-6 4.03

Ari Col

Greinke (R) Marquez (R)

7:40

4-4 3.44 4-5 4.38

Atl LA

McCarthy (R) Buehler (R)

9:10

5-2 4.83 3-1 2.74

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L ERA

Bal Tor

Cashner (R) Happ (L)

6:07

2-7 5.02 7-3 4.08

Chi Covey (R) Bos Sale (L)

6:10

1-1 2.82 5-3 3.00

Sea Gonzales (L) TB Font (R)

6:10

6-3 3.37 0-2 9.78

Cle Bauer (R) Det Fulmer (R)

6:10

4-4 2.77 2-5 4.73

Hou Verlander (R) Tex Fister (R)

7:05

7-2 1.24 1-6 4.13

LA Richards (R) Min Lynn (R)

7:10

4-4 3.25 4-4 5.46

KC Junis (R) Oak Montas (R)

9:05

5-5 3.62 2-0 0.64

IL

Time W-L ERA

Chacin (R) Velasquez (R)

Pitcher

NYY Tanaka (R) NYM deGrom (R)

6:10

7-2 4.74 4-0 1.49

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AL LEADERS BATTING: Betts, Boston, .359; Segura, Seattle, .341; Altuve, Houston, .338; Castellanos, Detroit, .331; Simmons, Los Angeles, .330; Brantley, Cleveland, .325; Machado, Baltimore, .322; Martinez, Boston, .314; Rosario, Minnesota, .312; Duffy, Tampa Bay, .311. RUNS: Betts, Boston, 52; Trout, Los Angeles, 52; Springer, Houston, 47; Lindor, Cleveland, 46; Segura, Seattle, 46; Benintendi, Boston, 45; Judge, New York, 43; Ramirez, Cleveland, 43; Gardner, New York, 40; Martinez, Boston, 40. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 52; Machado, Baltimore, 50; Haniger, Seattle, 46; Benintendi, Boston, 44; KDavis, Oakland, 44; Judge, New York, 43; Ramirez, Cleveland, 43; Rosario, Minnesota, 43; Lowrie, Oakland, 42; 2 tied at 40. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 88; Segura, Seattle, 85; Castellanos, Detroit, 82; Machado, Baltimore, 76; Jay, Arizona, 73; Lindor, Cleveland, 73; Rosario, Minnesota, 73; Lowrie, Oakland, 72; Martinez, Boston, 72; Springer, Houston, 72. DOUBLES: Escobar, Minnesota, 24; Abreu, Chicago, 23; Andujar, New York, 21; Castellanos, Detroit, 21; Lindor, Cleveland, 20; Pillar, Toronto, 20; Betts, Boston, 19; Bregman, Houston, 19; Ramirez, Cleveland, 19; 2 tied at 18. TRIPLES: Sanchez, Chicago, 6; Benintendi, Boston, 5; Hernandez, Toronto, 4; Jones, Detroit, 4; Profar, Texas, 4; 8 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 20; Ramirez, Cleveland, 19; Trout, Los Angeles, 19; Machado, Baltimore, 18; Betts, Boston, 17; Gallo, Texas, 17; Judge, New York, 17; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 16; KDavis, Oakland, 15; 5 tied at 14. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 19; Merrifield, Kansas City, 14; Anderson, Chicago, 13; Betts, Boston, 13; Segura, Seattle, 13; Trout, Los Angeles, 13; DeShields, Texas, 12; RDavis, Cleveland, 11; Smith, Tampa Bay, 11; Benintendi, Boston, 10. PITCHING: Kluber, Cleveland, 9-2; Severino, New York, 9-1; Porcello, Boston, 8-2; 10 tied at 7. ERA: Verlander, Houston, 1.24; Kluber, Cleveland, 1.96; Cole, Houston, 2.16; Severino, New York, 2.20; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.36; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.77; Morton, Houston, 2.84; Paxton, Seattle, 2.95; Sale, Boston, 3.00; Boyd, Detroit, 3.20. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 124; Sale, Boston, 110; Verlander, Houston, 104; Severino, New York, 102; Paxton, Seattle, 101; Bauer, Cleveland, 97; Kluber, Cleveland, 95; Morton, Houston, 92; Bundy, Baltimore, 88; Snell, Tampa Bay, 88.

This Date In Baseball Compiled By PAUL MONTELLA June 8 1914: New York’s Iron Joe McGinnity posted his 14th straight win beating Pittsburgh 2-0. With the win moved the Giants into first place over Chicago. 1927: New York’s Tony Lazzeri hit three homers in the Yankees 12-11 11-inning win over the Chicago White Sox. Lazzeri’s first two homers come off Red Faber and his third was a two-run line drive off George Connally to tie game in the ninth inning. The Yanks were behind 11-6 going into the last inning. New York would win it in the 11th after Cedric Durst tripled Lazzeri was intentionally walked and Ray Morehart singled. 1933: Philadelphia’s Jimmie Foxx homered in his first three at bats all off Lefty Gomez as the A’s beat the New York Yankees 14-10. 1940: Harry Craft of Cincinnati connected for a home run, a triple, a double and two singles in seven at-bats to lead a 27-hit attack as the Reds pounded the Dodgers 23-2 at Brooklyn. 1950: The Boston Red Sox beat the St. Louis Browns 29-4 at Fenway Park and set major league records for runs scored; most long hits, 17 (nine doubles, one triple and seven homers); most total bases, 60; most extra bases on long hits, 32; most runs over two games, 49; most hits in two games, 51, including 28 this game. Bobby Doerr had three homers and 8 RBIs, Walt Dropo hit two homers and drove in seven runs and Ted Williams added two homers and five RBIs. 1968: Howie Bedell’s sacrifice fly in the fifth inning ended Don Drysdale’s record streak of 58 2-3 consecutive scoreless innings. The Los Angeles Dodgers beat the Philadelphia Phillies 5-3. 1986: In the longest 9-inning game by time in AL history Baltimore’s Lee Lacy went 4-for-6 with three home runs and six RBIs as the Orioles beat the New York Yankees 18-9. The game took 4:16 to complete. 1986: Montreal’s Floyd Youmans pitched a one-hitter and hit his first major league home run as the Expos rout the Phillies 12-0. Youmans walked seven and allowed an infield single to Glenn Wilson in the second for the only hit. 1996: Warren Morris hit a two-run homer with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning to give Louisiana State a 9-8 victory over Miami in the championship game of the College World Series.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE L

Pct

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Milwaukee

37 25 .597

5-5

Chicago

35 24 .593

½

8-2 W-2

17-12

18-12

Cardinals

33 27 .550

3

2

5-5 W-1

19-14

14-13

Pittsburgh

31

6

5

3-7

L-1

18-15

13-16

Cincinnati

22 41 .349 15½

14½

3-7 W-1

10-21

12-20

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

31 .500 Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home L-3

18-11

Away 19-14

EAST

W

Washington

35 25 .583

-

7-3 W-2

14-14

21-11

Atlanta

36 26

.581

-

5-5

L-1

16-12

20-14

Philadelphia 32 28

.533

3

3

3-7

L-2

19-9

13-19

New York

27 32 .458

2-8

L-6

12-19

15-13

Miami

22 40 .355

14

14

3-7

L-1

10-18

12-22

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10 Str Home

Away

Arizona

32 29

.525

— 6-4

L-1

19-13

13-16

Colorado

32 30

.516

½

4

5-5

L-1

11-16

21-14

Los Angeles

31

31 .500

5

7-3 W-1

14-17

San Francisco 31

31 .500

5 6-4 W-1

19-11

29 35 .453

8

18-21

11-14

San Diego

L

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

7-3 W-1

Thursday Cardinals 4, Miami 1 Cincinnati 7, Colorado 5, 13 inn. LA Dodgers 8, Pittsburgh 7 Cubs 4, Philadelphia 3 Wednesday Washington 11, Tampa Bay 2 Cleveland 3, Milwaukee 1 Baltimore 1, NY Mets 0 San Diego 3, Atlanta 1 San Fran. 5, Arizona 4, 10 inn. Pittsburgh 11, LA Dodgers 9 Colorado 6, Cincinnati 3 Cubs 7, Philadelphia 5 Miami 11, Cardinals 3

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Cleveland

32 28

.533

GB WCGB L10 —

Str Home

7-3 W-2

20-11

12-17 10-20

Detroit

30 34 .469

4

W-1

20-14

Minnesota

27 32 .458

5-5

W-1

16-15

11-17

Kansas City

21 42

.333 12½

17½

3-7

L-5

10-21

11-21

Chicago

20 40

.333

17 4-6

L-1

10-19

10-21

Pct

Str Home

Away

L

12

9 6-4

Away

EAST

W

New York

40

18 .690

GB WCGB L10 ½

8-2 W-2

22-9

18-9

Boston

43 20 .683

7-3

L-1

22-9

21-11

Tampa Bay

28 33 .459

14

3-7

L-7

11-14

17-19

11

3-7

W-1

13-19

14-16

18½

2-8

L-1

10-18

9-24

Str Home

Away

Toronto

27 35 .435 15½

Baltimore

19 42

.311

23

WEST

W

Pct

GB WCGB L10

L

Seattle

39 23 .629

7-3

W-1

20-12

19-11

Houston

39 25 .609

1

5-5 W-2

19-14

20-11

17-14

Los Angeles 35 28 .556

3½ 6-4 W-4

17-18

18-10

12-20

Oakland

32

6½ 4-6

W-1

16-15

16-16

Texas

27 38

L-1

13-20

14-18

31 .508

.415 13½

12½

5-5

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Rizzo leads streaking Cubs past Phillies

Cubs 4, Phillies 3

Blue Jays 5, Orioles 4

Dodgers 8, Pirates 7

Anthony Rizzo hit a solo homer and added a second RBI with a sacriice ly to lead the Chicago Cubs past the visiting Philadelphia Phillies 4-3 Thursday afternoon. The Cubs won for the ifth time in six games to move within a half-game of idle irst-place Milwaukee in the NL Central. Philadelphia has lost ive of six, wrapping up a 10-game road trip at 3-7.

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .256 Herrera cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .305 Kingery ss 5 0 1 2 0 1 .212 Santana 1b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .221 Altherr rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 Cozens lf 3 0 0 0 2 3 .222 Knapp c 2 0 1 0 2 1 .169 e-Alfaro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Crawford 3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .191 a-Franco ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Pivetta p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .167 b-Valentin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .167 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Williams ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morgan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 3 6 3 9 12 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Almora cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .314 La Stella 2b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .329 Bryant 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .292 Rizzo 1b 3 1 1 2 0 0 .253 Baez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Schwarber lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Happ rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .232 Gimenez c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Chatwood p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Duensing p 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Zobrist ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .292 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Morrow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 27 4 6 4 1 9 Philadelphia 000 012 000 — 3 6 3 Chicago 000 130 00x — 4 6 2 a-popped out for Crawford in the 5th. b-singled for Pivetta in the 6th. c-struck out for Garcia in the 7th. d-struck out for Wilson in the 7th. e-struck out for Knapp in the 9th. E: Knapp 2 (6), Pivetta (2), Bryant (8), Chatwood (1). LOB: Philadelphia 13, Chicago 3. 2B: Kingery (12), Almora (13). HR: Rizzo (10), off Pivetta. RBIs: Kingery 2 (16), Santana (35), La Stella (13), Bryant (29), Rizzo 2 (42). CS: La Stella (1). SF: Rizzo. RLISP: Philadelphia 6 (Herrera, Altherr, Cozens 2, Franco 2); Chicago 1 (Baez). GIDP: Pivetta, Rizzo. DP: Philadelphia 1 (Morgan, Hernandez, Santana); Chicago 1 (Chatwood, Baez, La Stella). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pivetta, L, 4-5 5 6 4 4 1 6 86 3.76 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.47 Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.81 Morgan 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.24 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood 42/3 4 1 1 7 6 107 3.86 Duensing, W, 2-0 1 2 2 1 0 1 23 2.29 1/ 1 8 1.95 Cishek, 3 0 0 0 0 Wilson, 1 0 0 0 1 3 17 2.45 Strop, 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.13 Morrow, S, 15-16 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 1.66 Inherited runners-scored: Duensing 3-0, Cishek 1-0. HBP: Chatwood (Altherr). WP: Chatwood. Umpires: Home, Nick Mahrley; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Jordan Baker; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 3:20. A: 40,057 .

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Mancini lf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .231 Rickard lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .245 Jones cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Machado ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .322 Valencia 3b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .277 Trumbo dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .292 Schoop 2b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .229 Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .152 Gentry rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Wynns c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .286 Totals 36 4 7 4 3 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .215 a-Pillar ph-cf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Solarte 2b-3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Hernandez lf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .253 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .248 Morales dh 5 0 2 0 0 1 .203 Maile c 3 1 0 0 2 2 .263 Diaz ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .216 Grichuk cf-rf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .146 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .156 b-Travis ph-2b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .196 Totals 38 5 12 5 5 6 Baltimore 100 000 120 0 — 4 7 0 Toronto 100 000 003 1 — 5 12 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Granderson in the 8th. b-walked for Urshela in the 9th. LOB: Baltimore 6, Toronto 9. 2B: Mancini (10), Hernandez (14), Diaz (6), Grichuk 2 (5). HR: Wynns (1), off Clippard; Valencia (6), off Axford; Trumbo (3), off Axford; Granderson (5), off Hess. RBIs: Machado (50), Valencia (15), Trumbo (9), Wynns (1), Granderson (17), Diaz (15), Grichuk 2 (12), Pillar (23). CS: Hernandez (3). SF: Machado. RLISP: Baltimore 3 (Davis 3); Toronto 3 (Solarte, Diaz, Urshela). GIDP: Granderson, Solarte. DP: Baltimore 3 (Wynns, Machado), (Schoop, Machado, Davis), (Schoop, Machado, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hess 6 5 1 1 2 4 99 3.07 Givens, 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.77 Bleier, 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.05 1/ 3 2 0 21 4.24 Brach, 3 3 3 Castro, L, 1-2 11/3 2 1 1 1 2 30 3.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garcia 6 4 1 1 3 6 91 5.57 Clippard 1 1 1 1 0 3 15 3.52 2/ 2 0 0 12 3.77 Axford 3 2 2 1/ 0 0 0 2 3.91 Loup 3 0 0 Oh 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.86 Barnes, W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.30 Hess pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Givens 1-0, Castro 2-0. WP: Garcia. Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Tom Woodring; Second, Will Little; Third, Ted Barrett. T: 3:13. A: 24,494 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pederson lf 5 3 3 3 0 1 .272 Muncy 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .254 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Grandal c 5 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Kemp rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .349 Bellinger 1b 4 2 3 2 1 1 .237 Taylor ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .251 Valera 2b 4 1 2 1 1 0 .208 Hernandez cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .207 Hudson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Baez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Puig ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .252 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Paredes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Forsythe ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .212 Stewart p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Turner 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Totals 38 8 13 8 4 10 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Polanco rf 2 0 0 1 0 1 .208 d-Meadows ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .367 f-Cervelli ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .275 Marte cf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .289 Bell 1b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .237 Dickerson lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .323 Moran 3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .274 c-Freese ph-3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .253 Diaz c 3 1 1 4 0 0 .288 Mercer ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .254 a-Frazier ph-rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Totals 34 7 9 7 2 8 Los Angeles 100 111 220 — 8 13 1 Pittsburgh 001 002 031 — 7 9 0 a-singled for Taillon in the 5th. b-doubled for Garcia in the 6th. c-singled for Moran in the 6th. d-flied out for Glasnow in the 7th. e-walked for Goeddel in the 8th. f-homered for Feliz in the 9th. E: Muncy (4). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Pittsburgh 6. 2B: Pederson (11), Bellinger (11), Hernandez (4), Puig (10), Bell (12). HR: Pederson (5), off Taillon; Bellinger (11), off Glasnow; Pederson (6), off Feliz; Diaz (4), off Stewart; Cervelli (9), off Jansen. RBIs: Pederson 3 (25), Kemp (40), Bellinger 2 (30), Valera (4), Puig (20), Polanco (28), Bell (34), Diaz 4 (13), Cervelli (35). SB: Muncy (1), Marte (13). SF: Polanco, Diaz. S: Alexander, Taillon. RLISP: Los Angeles 6 (Muncy, Grandal 2, Taylor 2, Baez); Pittsburgh 2 (Polanco, Marte). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.84 Alexander 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 4.38 Baez, W, 3-3 2 2 1 1 0 0 22 3.34 Garcia 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 4.50 Fields 0 1 2 2 1 0 14 2.79 1/ Paredes, 0 1 8 0.00 3 0 0 0 Goeddel, 12/3 2 0 0 0 1 35 0.51 1/ Stewart 2 0 0 17 5.60 3 2 3 Jansen, S, 15-17 12/3 1 1 1 0 2 22 2.83 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon, L, 3-5 5 8 3 3 1 7 92 4.08 Glasnow 2 3 3 3 1 2 37 4.89 Feliz 2 2 2 2 2 1 40 6.31 Fields pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Paredes 1-0, Goeddel 1-1. HBP: Garcia (Harrison). WP: Glasnow. Umpires: . T: 3:37. A: 19,713 .

Reds 7, Rockies 5 • Jesse Winker hit a two-run homer in the 13th inning, allowing host Cincinnati to avert a series sweep by Colorado. The Rockies have lost ive of seven, blowing saves in all ive. Dodgers 8, Pirates 7 • Joc Pederson went deep twice, Cody Bellinger hit his third home run in as many games and visiting Los Angeles used nine pitchers to hold of Pittsburgh. Pederson led of the game with a solo blast and added a two-run shot in the eighth, his second multi-home run game this week. The Dodgers returned to .500 with their 15th win in 20 games.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Twins 7, White Sox 2 • Supported by three home runs, Minnesota’s Jose Berrios pitched his second complete game this season to beat visiting Chicago. Berrios retired the irst 14 hitters he faced as the Twins received a three-run homer from Eddie Rosario, a two-run shot from Eduardo Escobar and a solo blast from Ehire Adrianza. Mariners 5, Rays 4 • Mike Leake pitched into the ninth, Mitch Haniger homered and drove in three, and AL West-leading Seattle won in Tampa. The Mariners won for the 10th time in 13 games. Tigers 7, Red Sox 2 • Leonys Martin had a two-run homer to cap a ive-run irst inning and Detroit won at Fenway. The Tigers’ victory ended a four-game win streak for Boston, which had outscored Detroit 13-1 in the irst two games of the series. Blue Jays 5, Orioles 4 • Aledmys Diaz hit a game-winning single in the 10th inning and Toronto rallied from a three-run deicit in the ninth to beat visiting Baltimore. A’s 4, Royals 1 • Paul Blackburn gave up just three hits and one run in six innings, Matt Olson hit his 13th home run, and Oakland won at home against Kansas City. Astros 5, Rangers 2 • Evan Gattis hit a two-run homer and an RBI single, and Gerrit Cole allowed one run over six solid innings as Houston won at Texas. Associated Press

NOTEBOOK Minor-leaguers Abad, Garner suspended Pitcher Fernando Abad, an eight-year major league veteran who inished last season with Boston, has been suspended 80 games under baseball’s minor league drug program following a positive test for the steroid Stanozolol. The suspension of the 32-year-old lefthander was announced Thursday. In addition, Cubs pitcher David Garner was banned for 100 games following a third violation for a drug of abuse. Garner, on the roster of Triple-A Iowa, was suspended 50 games on March 23 after his second violation. Abad was 2-1 with a 3.30 ERA in 48 games with the Red Sox last year, became a free agent, agreed to a minor league contract with Philadelphia and was released March 21. Astros’ Correa sits after getting good news • Houston shortstop Carlos Correa says nothing abnormal showed up during an MRI Thursday, a day after he left a game early because of discomfort on his right side. Correa was examined in Houston and rejoined the team but was not in the Astros’ lineup Thursday at Texas. “Just happy the irst diagnosis is that it’s nothing serious, and that hopefully we’ll get him back soon,” manager A.J. Hinch said. Dodgers’ Cingrani on DL • Los Angeles placed lefthanded reliever Tony Cingrani on the disabled list Thursday with discomfort in his throwing shoulder. Cingrani left Wednesday’s game after just six pitches in the eighth inning and then complained about pain in the shoulder. Cingrani is 1-2 with a 4.84 ERA in 27 appearances for the defending National League champions. Rangers GM gets extension • Texas has given general manager Jon Daniels a multiyear contract extension, the number of years were not released. Daniels’ contract had been scheduled to expire at the end of this season. In his 13th season as GM, the 40-year-old Daniels also has the title of president of baseball operations. He was baseball’s youngest GM at age 28 when he replaced Jon Hart in 2005. Rays designate Miller for assignment • Tampa Bay has designated inielder Brad Miller for assignment to clear a roster spot for 22-year-old irst baseman/outielder Jake Bauers, one of its top ofensive prospects. Miller, 28, hit .256 with ive homers and 21 RBIs in 48 games this season but struggled defensively at irst base. Twins’ May back pitching • Minnesota reinstated righthanded pitcher Trevor May from the DL and assigned him to Triple-A, a little less than 15 months after Tommy John surgery. May had the procedure March 22 last year after getting hurt in spring training. He has a 5.50 ERA in 18 innings with 12 walks and 20 strikeouts in six rehab appearances. Associated Press

Tigers 7, Red Sox 2 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones lf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .219 Castellanos rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .331 Cabrera 1b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .306 V.Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 1 2 .242 Candelario 3b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .272 Hicks c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .278 Martin cf 4 2 2 2 0 2 .259 Iglesias ss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .261 Machado 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .215 Totals 37 7 10 7 3 11 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi cf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .299 Bogaerts ss 5 0 0 1 0 1 .284 J.Martinez rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .314 Holt rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Moreland 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .303 Nunez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .258 Travis lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Devers 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .228 Vazquez dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .199 Swihart c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .167 Totals 33 2 7 2 5 8 Detroit 501 000 010 — 7 10 0 Boston 100 010 000 — 2 7 0 LOB: Detroit 6, Boston 9. 2B: Castellanos (21), Candelario (15), Iglesias (17), Moreland (13), Swihart (2). 3B: Martin (3). HR: Martin (8), off Beeks; Benintendi (11), off Boyd. RBIs: Candelario (27), Hicks 2 (22), Martin 2 (22), Iglesias 2 (23), Benintendi (44), Bogaerts (34). RLISP: Detroit 4 (Jones 2, Candelario 2); Boston 6 (Benintendi, Bogaerts, Nunez 2, Devers 2). GIDP: Benintendi. DP: Detroit 1 (Iglesias, Cabrera). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd, W, 4-4 61/3 4 2 2 4 6 101 3.20 2/ 0 0 0 7 4.35 Wilson 3 0 0 Jimenez 1 2 0 0 1 2 23 2.37 Greene 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.38 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beeks, L, 0-1 4 7 6 6 3 4 88 13.50 Johnson 4 3 1 1 0 5 56 4.83 Velazquez 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.99 Inherited runners-scored: Wilson 1-0. WP: Boyd 3. Umpires: Home, Jeremie Rehak; First, Mark Wegner; Second, John Tumpane; Third, Mike DiMuro. T: 2:55. A: 36,556 .

Mariners 5, Rays 4 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .292 Segura ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .341 Haniger rf 3 1 2 3 1 1 .274 Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .255 Seager 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Healy 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Span lf 3 2 1 1 1 1 .247 Heredia cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Freitas c 4 1 1 0 0 3 .208 Totals 33 5 8 5 3 10 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Robertson ss 5 1 1 1 0 1 .263 Cron dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .256 Wendle 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .281 Ramos c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .289 Duffy 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .311 Bauers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gomez rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .193 Smith cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .265 Field lf 4 0 2 3 0 1 .256 Totals 35 4 10 4 1 4 Seattle 031 010 000 — 5 8 0 Tampa Bay 001 000 003 — 4 10 1 E: Robertson (5). LOB: Seattle 5, Tampa Bay 6. 2B: Ramos (9), Field (7). 3B: Duffy (1). HR: Span (6), off Pruitt; Haniger (13), off Pruitt; Robertson (7), off Leake. RBIs: Gordon (15), Haniger 3 (46), Span (31), Robertson (18), Field 3 (14). CS: Gordon (3). SF: Gordon. RLISP: Seattle 3 (Cruz, Healy 2); Tampa Bay 3 (Robertson, Bauers, Field). GIDP: Cron, Wendle. DP: Seattle 2 (Leake, Gordon, Healy), (Seager, Segura, Healy). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake, W, 6-3 8 8 2 2 1 3 100 4.46 Colome 1 2 2 2 0 1 22 4.05 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 1 1 0 0 2 2 30 3.38 Pruitt, L, 1-3 7 7 5 5 1 6 93 4.57 Roe 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 3.63 Leake pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Colome 1-1. HBP: Colome (Gomez). Umpires: Home, Ben May; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Chris Guccione. T: 2:43. A: 10,342 .

Thursday Minnesota 7, White Sox 2 Toronto 5, Baltimore 4, 10 inn. Detroit 7, Boston 2 Seattle 5, Tampa Bay 4 Houston 5, Texas 2 Oakland 4, Kansas City 1 Wednesday Washington 11, Tampa Bay 2 Cleveland 3, Milwaukee 1 Baltimore 1, NY Mets 0 NY Yankees 3, Toronto 0, 13 inn. Boston 7, Detroit 1 Texas 8, Oakland 2 Houston 7, Seattle 5 White Sox 5, Minnesota 2 LA Angels 4, Kansas City 3

Friday’s pitching matchups

Reds 7, Rockies 5 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 5 2 1 1 0 1 .278 Blackmon cf 6 0 2 0 0 1 .289 Arenado 3b 5 0 2 0 1 1 .327 Gonzalez rf 5 0 2 1 1 0 .268 Story ss 6 0 1 0 0 2 .242 Tauchman lf 5 2 2 0 0 3 .103 f-Desmond ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 McMahon 1b 6 1 1 1 0 2 .210 Wolters c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .169 Anderson p 2 0 0 1 0 1 .105 b-Cuevas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Parra lf 2 0 2 0 0 0 .287 Totals 47 5 13 4 3 11 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler rf 6 1 3 1 0 2 .277 Blandino ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .237 c-Gennett ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .344 e-Barnhart ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Floro p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Votto 1b 3 1 0 1 2 1 .304 Suarez 3b 6 0 0 1 0 1 .295 Duvall lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .185 d-Winker ph-lf 3 1 3 2 0 0 .263 Casali c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .500 Dixon 2b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .235 Mahle p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .105 a-Lorenzen ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Peraza ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .266 Hamilton cf 4 2 0 0 1 2 .195 Totals 42 7 10 6 5 9 Colorado 101 102 000 000 0 — 5 13 0 Cincinnati 010 010 021 000 2 — 7 10 1 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for Mahle in the 5th. b-grounded out for Anderson in the 8th. c-pinch hit for Peralta in the 8th. d-singled for Duvall in the 8th. e-grounded out for Iglesias in the 10th. f-lined out for Shaw in the 12th. E: Blandino (5). LOB: Colorado 11, Cincinnati 6. 2B: LeMahieu (10), Gonzalez (6), Tauchman (1), Schebler (6), Casali (2). 3B: McMahon (1). HR: Winker (2), off Rusin. RBIs: LeMahieu (18), Gonzalez (26), McMahon (4), Anderson (1), Schebler (23), Votto (25), Suarez (45), Casali (2), Winker 2 (15). SF: LeMahieu. S: LeMahieu, Anderson, Casali. RLISP: Colorado 4 (Blackmon 2, Story, Tauchman); Cincinnati 3 (Schebler, Blandino, Mahle). FIDP: Arenado. GIDP: Arenado, Gonzalez, Blandino, Suarez, Peraza. DP: Colorado 3 (LeMahieu, Story, McMahon), (LeMahieu, Story, McMahon), (Story, LeMahieu, McMahon); Cincinnati 3 (Blandino, Dixon, Votto), (Duvall, Dixon), (Peraza, Dixon, Votto). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson 7 5 2 2 1 5 105 4.81 Dunn 0 1 2 2 2 0 14 9.00 Oberg, 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 4.08 Davis, 1 1 1 1 0 3 25 3.42 Shaw 2 1 0 0 2 0 24 6.89 Rusin, L, 0-2 11/3 1 2 2 0 1 16 7.77 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mahle 5 6 3 2 2 6 96 4.33 Garrett 2 3 2 2 0 1 24 2.34 Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.76 Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.08 Iglesias 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.08 Floro, W, 2-1 3 3 0 0 1 1 34 3.12 Dunn pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Oberg 3-2. HBP: Mahle (Wolters), Garrett (Wolters), Davis (Casali), Rusin (Votto). WP: Davis 2. Umpires: Home, Tripp Gibson; First, Chad Whitson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, Adrian Johnson. T: 4:15. A: 15,957 .

Twins 7, White Sox 2 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .242 Sanchez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .299 Palka rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .272 Davidson dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Narvaez c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .187 Rondon ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Tilson lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .229 Thompson cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Totals 31 2 6 2 0 10 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .247 Rosario lf 3 2 2 3 1 0 .312 Escobar 3b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Morrison 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .197 Grossman rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Garver dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .220 LaMarre cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .282 Adrianza ss 3 2 1 1 1 0 .236 Wilson c 2 1 1 0 1 1 .174 Totals 32 7 9 7 3 6 Chicago 000 002 000 — 2 6 0 Minnesota 210 400 00x — 7 9 0 LOB: Chicago 2, Minnesota 4. 2B: Moncada (12), Abreu (23), Narvaez (6), Rosario (16), Morrison (9), LaMarre (4). HR: Escobar (12), off Shields; Adrianza (2), off Shields; Rosario (14), off Shields. RBIs: Moncada (22), Abreu (36), Dozier (26), Rosario 3 (43), Escobar 2 (38), Adrianza (9). RLISP: Chicago 1 (Palka); Minnesota 2 (Garver, Adrianza). GIDP: Escobar. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields, L, 1-7 6 8 7 7 2 6 99 4.92 Cedeno 1 0 0 0 1 0 10 0.00 Beck 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.18 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Berrios, W, 7-5 9 6 2 2 0 10 109 3.66 Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Brian O’Nora; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 2:14. A: 21,469 .

Astros 5, Rangers 2 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .289 Bregman 3b 4 2 2 1 0 0 .268 Altuve 2b 4 2 3 1 0 0 .338 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Gattis dh 4 1 2 3 0 0 .234 Gonzalez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .238 Stassi c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .257 Kemp lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Marisnick cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .155 Totals 34 5 9 5 2 5 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo lf 4 1 2 0 1 2 .267 Profar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Mazara rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .267 Beltre dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Gallo cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .204 Kiner-Falefa 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .244 Odor 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .216 Guzman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .221 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .167 a-Chirinos ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .203 Totals 34 2 8 2 3 10 Houston 000 301 010 — 5 9 0 Texas 100 000 001 — 2 8 1 a-doubled for Perez in the 9th. E: Choo (2). LOB: Houston 4, Texas 8. 2B: Bregman (19), Kiner-Falefa (8), Chirinos (8). HR: Gattis (10), off Hamels; Bregman (7), off Hamels. RBIs: Bregman (29), Altuve (31), Gattis 3 (31), Beltre (15), Chirinos (22). SB: Altuve (9). CS: Odor (5). RLISP: Houston 2 (Gattis, Marisnick); Texas 4 (Choo, Profar, Gallo, Kiner-Falefa). GIDP: Altuve, Kemp. DP: Texas 2 (Profar, Odor, Guzman), (Guzman, Profar). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cole, W, 7-1 6 3 1 1 3 8 102 2.16 2/ Harris, 0 1 14 4.71 3 3 0 0 1/ 0 0 2 1.88 Devenski, 3 0 0 0 Peacock 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.52 Giles 1 2 1 1 0 1 23 5.40 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Hamels, L, 3-6 7 3 7 5 5 2 5 104 3.86 Chavez 12/3 2 0 0 0 0 20 3.58 Inherited runners-scored: Devenski 2-0. Umpires: Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Ryan Blakney; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Alfonso Marquez. T: 2:36. A: 30,236 .

Athletics 4, Royals 1 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .284 Orlando cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .176 Moustakas dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .272 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Soler rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Dozier 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .260 Escobar ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .229 Torres 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Totals 30 1 4 1 0 6 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Lowrie 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .294 Davis dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .242 Olson 1b 3 2 1 1 1 1 .257 Chapman 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .232 Semien ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .256 Piscotty rf 3 0 3 1 0 0 .242 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .259 Martini lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 4 9 4 1 8 Kansas City 001 000 000 — 1 4 0 Oakland 000 103 00x — 4 9 0 LOB: Kansas City 2, Oakland 5. 2B: Moustakas (16), Chapman (9). HR: Escobar (3), off Blackburn; Olson (13), off Hammel. RBIs: Escobar (17), Olson (32), Chapman (25), Semien (25), Piscotty (22). RLISP: Kansas City 1 (Perez); Oakland 2 (Lucroy, Martini). GIDP: Escobar, Semien. DP: Kansas City 1 (Escobar, Merrifield, Dozier); Oakland 1 (Semien, Lowrie, Olson). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel, L, 2-6 6 8 4 4 1 6 93 5.24 Hill 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.12 Herrera 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.76 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blackburn, W, 1-0 6 3 1 1 0 3 67 1.50 Trivino, 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 1.93 Petit, 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.46 Treinen, S, 14-16 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.92 Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Sean Barber; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Bill Welke. T: 2:18. A: 7,963 .

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L ERA

StL Cin

Weaver (R) Harvey (R)

6:10

3-5 4.41 1-4 5.79

Pit Chi

Kuhl (R) Montgomery (L) 1:20

4-3 3.86 1-1 3.89

SF Suarez (L) Was Strasburg (R)

6:05

2-4 4.74 6-5 3.20

Mil Phi

6:05

4-1 3.39 4-6 3.82

SD Lauer (L) Mia Smith (L)

6:10

2-3 6.82 4-6 4.03

Ari Col

Greinke (R) Marquez (R)

7:40

4-4 3.44 4-5 4.38

Atl LA

McCarthy (R) Buehler (R)

9:10

5-2 4.83 3-1 2.74

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L ERA

Bal Tor

Cashner (R) Happ (L)

6:07

2-7 5.02 7-3 4.08

Chi Covey (R) Bos Sale (L)

6:10

1-1 2.82 5-3 3.00

Sea Gonzales (L) TB Font (R)

6:10

6-3 3.37 0-2 9.78

Cle Bauer (R) Det Fulmer (R)

6:10

4-4 2.77 2-5 4.73

Hou Verlander (R) Tex Fister (R)

7:05

7-2 1.24 1-6 4.13

LA Richards (R) Min Lynn (R)

7:10

4-4 3.25 4-4 5.46

KC Junis (R) Oak Montas (R)

9:05

5-5 3.62 2-0 0.64

IL

Time W-L ERA

Chacin (R) Velasquez (R)

Pitcher

NYY Tanaka (R) NYM deGrom (R)

6:10

7-2 4.74 4-0 1.49

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NL LEADERS BATTING: Kemp, Los Angeles, .349; Gennett, Cincinnati, .344; Freeman, Atlanta, .338; Markakis, Atlanta, .328; Arenado, Colorado, .327; Crawford, San Francisco, .324; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .323; Almora, Chicago, .314; Martinez, Cardinals, .311; Belt, San Francisco, .307. RUNS: Albies, Atlanta, 51; Blackmon, Colorado, 48; Pham, Cardinals, 43; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 43; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 41; Arenado, Colorado, 39; Freeman, Atlanta, 39; Markakis, Atlanta, 39; Harper, Washington, 38; 3 tied at 37. RBI: Baez, Chicago, 46; Suarez, Cincinnati, 45; Gennett, Cincinnati, 44; Freeman, Atlanta, 43; Markakis, Atlanta, 42; Rizzo, Chicago, 42; Story, Colorado, 41; Harper, Washington, 40; Kemp, Los Angeles, 40; Shaw, Milwaukee, 38. HITS: Markakis, Atlanta, 81; Freeman, Atlanta, 80; Gennett, Cincinnati, 78; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 71; Albies, Atlanta, 70; Arenado, Colorado, 70; Castro, Miami, 70; Anderson, Miami, 69; Crawford, San Francisco, 69; 2 tied at 68. DOUBLES: Albies, Atlanta, 19; Bryant, Chicago, 18; Freeman, Atlanta, 18; Hosmer, San Diego, 18; Markakis, Atlanta, 18; McCutchen, San Francisco, 18; Polanco, Pittsburgh, 17; 8 tied at 16. TRIPLES: KMarte, Arizona, 6; CTaylor, Los Angeles, 6; Baez, Chicago, 5; Blackmon, Colorado, 4; Contreras, Chicago, 4; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 4; Nimmo, New York, 4; Story, Colorado, 4; 14 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Harper, Washington, 18; Villanueva, San Diego, 15; Albies, Atlanta, 14; Baez, Chicago, 14; Shaw, Milwaukee, 14; Adams, Washington, 13; Arenado, Colorado, 12; Blackmon, Colorado, 12; Gennett, Cincinnati, 12; 8 tied at 11. STOLEN BASES: Inciarte, Atlanta, 18; Turner, Washington, 17; MTaylor, Washington, 16; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 13; Cain, Milwaukee, 11; Dyson, Arizona, 10; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 10; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 10; Jankowski, San Diego, 10; 3 tied at 9. ERA: deGrom, New York, 1.49; Scherzer, Washington, 1.95; Mikolas, Cardinals, 2.27; Gonzalez, Washington, 2.27; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 2.31; Nola, Philadelphia, 2.35; Wacha, Cardinals, 2.41; Lester, Chicago, 2.44; Newcomb, Atlanta, 2.49; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 2.66. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 133; Corbin, Arizona, 105; deGrom, New York, 98; Strasburg, Washington, 93; Foltynewicz, Atlanta, 88; Gray, Colorado, 81; Nola, Philadelphia, 80; Velasquez, Philadelphia, 79; Greinke, Arizona, 78; 2 tied at 76.

AL LEADERS BATTING: Betts, Boston, .359; Segura, Seattle, .341; Altuve, Houston, .338; Castellanos, Detroit, .331; Simmons, Los Angeles, .330; Brantley, Cleveland, .325; Machado, Baltimore, .322; Martinez, Boston, .314; Rosario, Minnesota, .312; Duffy, Tampa Bay, .311. RUNS: Betts, Boston, 52; Trout, Los Angeles, 52; Springer, Houston, 47; Lindor, Cleveland, 46; Segura, Seattle, 46; Benintendi, Boston, 45; Judge, New York, 43; Ramirez, Cleveland, 43; Gardner, New York, 40; Martinez, Boston, 40. RBI: Martinez, Boston, 52; Machado, Baltimore, 50; Haniger, Seattle, 46; Benintendi, Boston, 44; KDavis, Oakland, 44; Judge, New York, 43; Ramirez, Cleveland, 43; Rosario, Minnesota, 43; Lowrie, Oakland, 42; 2 tied at 40. HITS: Altuve, Houston, 88; Segura, Seattle, 85; Castellanos, Detroit, 82; Machado, Baltimore, 76; Jay, Arizona, 73; Lindor, Cleveland, 73; Rosario, Minnesota, 73; Lowrie, Oakland, 72; Martinez, Boston, 72; Springer, Houston, 72. DOUBLES: Escobar, Minnesota, 24; Abreu, Chicago, 23; Andujar, New York, 21; Castellanos, Detroit, 21; Lindor, Cleveland, 20; Pillar, Toronto, 20; Betts, Boston, 19; Bregman, Houston, 19; Ramirez, Cleveland, 19; 2 tied at 18. TRIPLES: Sanchez, Chicago, 6; Benintendi, Boston, 5; Hernandez, Toronto, 4; Jones, Detroit, 4; Profar, Texas, 4; 8 tied at 3. HOME RUNS: Martinez, Boston, 20; Ramirez, Cleveland, 19; Trout, Los Angeles, 19; Machado, Baltimore, 18; Betts, Boston, 17; Gallo, Texas, 17; Judge, New York, 17; Encarnacion, Cleveland, 16; KDavis, Oakland, 15; 5 tied at 14. STOLEN BASES: Gordon, Seattle, 19; Merrifield, Kansas City, 14; Anderson, Chicago, 13; Betts, Boston, 13; Segura, Seattle, 13; Trout, Los Angeles, 13; DeShields, Texas, 12; RDavis, Cleveland, 11; Smith, Tampa Bay, 11; Benintendi, Boston, 10. ERA: Verlander, Houston, 1.24; Kluber, Cleveland, 1.96; Cole, Houston, 2.16; Severino, New York, 2.20; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.36; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.77; Morton, Houston, 2.84; Paxton, Seattle, 2.95; Sale, Boston, 3.00; Boyd, Detroit, 3.20. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 124; Sale, Boston, 110; Verlander, Houston, 104; Severino, New York, 102; Paxton, Seattle, 101; Bauer, Cleveland, 97; Kluber, Cleveland, 95; Morton, Houston, 92; Bundy, Baltimore, 88; Snell, Tampa Bay, 88.


CARDINALS

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1 SERIES PREVIEW: CARDINALS AT REDS SCOUTING REPORT • The Cardinals did not play well against the last-place Marlins this week. Now they are set to take on a team with an even worse record: the Reds (22-41). Second baseman Scooter Gennett is of to a hot start to the season. He’s hitting .344 with 12 home runs. Joey Votto, owner of a .419 on-base percentage, is putting together another quality season. The Mets traded Matt Harvey to the Reds in the middle of the season. The righty has a 4.44 ERA since the trade. Pitching is certainly the Reds’ weakness. They have the highest team ERA in the National League. PROJECTED STARTERS Friday, 6:10 p.m. RH Luke Weaver (3-5, 4.12 ERA) vs. RH Matt Harvey (1-4, 5.79) Saturday, 3:10 p.m. RH Michael Wacha (7-1, 2.41) vs. RH Luis Castillo (4-6, 5.64) Sunday, 12:10 p.m. RH Carlos Martinez (3-2, 1.83) vs. RH Anthony DeSclafani (0-1, 7.20) Peter Baugh

CARDINALS 4, MARLINS 1 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Castro 2b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .292 Dietrich lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .284 Bour 1b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .245 Anderson rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .297 Riddle ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .214 Brinson cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .168 Rivera 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .188 d-Rojas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Holaday c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .164 Richards p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Meyer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Shuck ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .190 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 4 1 2 8 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 3b-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Pham cf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .276 Martinez 1b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .311 Gyorko 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Ozuna lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .275 Fowler rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .182 Munoz ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .284 Wong 2b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .193 Pena c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Mikolas p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .042 a-Garcia ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254 b-Voit ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .667 Hicks p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Norris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 4 11 4 1 6 Miami 000 001 000 — 1 4 0 Cardinals 200 001 10x — 4 11 1 a-pinch hit for Mikolas in the 7th. b-homered for Garcia in the 7th. c-grounded out for Meyer in the 8th. d-grounded out for Rivera in the 9th. E: Fowler (4). LOB: Miami 6, Cardinals 7. 2B: Bour (6). HR: Martinez (6), off Richards; Voit (1), off Conley. RBIs: Bour (27), Martinez 2 (35), Ozuna (30), Voit (3). CS: Wong (3). RLISP: Miami 3 (Anderson, Riddle 2); Cardinals 3 (Carpenter, Pena 2). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richards 5 7 3 3 0 4 83 5.02 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 1 1 13 7.27 Conley 0 2 1 1 0 0 6 2.45 Meyer 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Guerrero 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 5.67 Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mikolas 7 3 1 0 1 5 99 2.27 Hicks 1 1 0 0 1 2 17 2.32 Norris 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.96 Richards pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Conley pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. W: Mikolas 7-1. L: Richards 0-3. S: Norris 12-13. H: Hicks 6. Inherited runners-scored: Ziegler 2-1, Meyer 1-0. WP: Richards. Umpires: Home, Joe West; First, Chad Fairchild; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Pat Hoberg. T: 2:42. A: 41,297 (45,538).

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

NOTEBOOK

Work continues on Munoz’s play With adjustments, Matheny says, ‘he’s going to be ine’ BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

Cardinals shortstop Yairo Munoz didn’t avert his eyes from mistakes he had made in recent starts or wonder if the next time he looked at the lineup his name wouldn’t be in it. All he wanted to see was another chance. “Never put my head down. Never,” Munoz said. “I made one error, and I want the next groundball. I know I’ll get that one. I’m never going to put my head down and miss it.” With Paul DeJong still recovering from a fractured finger, Munoz has emerged as the team’s starting shortstop in large part because of what he brings at the plate. On the field, coach Jose Oquendo and others describe the rookie as “learning” at shortstop. The curve got bumpy during this past home stand, with three errors in Wednesday’s loss and six errors in the previous seven games. In a display of confidence, manager Mike Matheny started Munoz again Thursday so that he didn’t have to sit with his three-error blip. “I’m not making any wholesale (statement), ‘This is what’s going on here,’” Matheny said. “I think he’s going to be fine. He’s obviously done a great job ofensively, and I think he made a beautiful play going up the middle to help out Jedd (Gyorko). He’s showing range. He’s got plenty of arm. I think it’s just the consistency.” To accelerate Munoz’s adjustment to the players and to the speed of the level, Oquendo has been focused on the rookie’s positioning and pre-pitching preparation. Munoz has one of the better arms, though the error on Wednesday that Matheny didn’t dispute was a poor throw. “He’s learning quick,” Oquendo said. “Once in awhile we get hiccups.”

RED TRIBUTES As soon as it can be produced, the Cardinals will begin wearing a memorial patch for Red

AVERAGES Batting Voit J. Martinez Munoz Pham Ozuna Bader Gyorko Molina Garcia Carpenter Pena Wong Fowler Team

AVG AB R H .667 3 2 2 .311 212 25 66 .284 67 6 19 .276 196 43 54 .275 218 23 60 .267 105 20 28 .265 113 11 30 .264 121 11 32 .254 67 9 17 .225 200 25 45 .215 79 7 17 .193 145 14 28 .182 176 25 32 .242 2025 256 490

Pitching C. Martinez Mikolas Hicks Wacha Norris Tuivailala Flaherty Brebbia Weaver Gomber Lyons Cecil Team

W 3 7 2 7 2 1 2 0 3 0 1 0 33

L 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 5 0 0 1 27

ERA 1.83 2.27 2.32 2.41 2.96 3.18 3.20 3.86 4.12 4.50 5.93 6.75 3.52

G 9 12 28 12 27 16 7 14 12 2 22 12 60

GS 9 12 0 12 0 0 7 0 12 0 0 0 60

2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 0 0 1 3 1 0 0 0 16 0 6 35 23 33 0 7 2 0 2 12 6 23 1 7 8 0 9 23 27 53 8 3 6 0 5 30 16 43 2 3 2 1 5 9 9 30 6 0 5 0 4 17 11 30 1 3 3 0 6 18 4 19 2 1 3 0 2 10 8 17 0 2 16 0 7 21 31 58 0 4 2 0 2 4 3 21 0 0 4 1 4 10 13 25 1 2 6 0 5 20 23 40 3 4 82 2 71 245 197 520 24 48

SV IP H 0 54.0 36 0 79.1 67 0 31.0 18 0 71.0 51 12 27.1 22 0 17.0 18 0 39.1 36 1 18.2 17 0 63.1 58 0 4.0 1 0 13.2 16 0 8.0 11 14 549.1 491

R 14 23 9 22 10 6 17 8 31 2 9 7 237

ER HR BB SO 11 1 27 52 20 6 9 58 8 0 19 20 19 4 27 61 9 3 4 38 6 0 6 17 14 5 10 42 8 2 4 19 29 7 20 57 2 1 3 2 9 3 6 15 6 1 6 6 215 53 202 500

Schoendienst, the franchise icon who died Wednesday at 95. The team hopes to have it finalized and on the jerseys by the time the team returns to Busch Stadium on Monday, if not earlier. Before Thursday’s game, the Cardinals had a moment of silence for their Hall of Fame player and former manager. The number “2” was etched behind second base. A video tribute, featuring highlights from his career, played on the scoreboard. The U.S. flag in center field flew at half-staf all day.

PFP COMING Already this season the Cardinals have departed from standard practices a bit and held bunt-defense drills on the field for pitchers, and another staple of spring training is likely to return in the coming week. Pitcher’s fielding practice is planned. Twice this week the Cardinals have had what they called “uncharacteristic” plays from the mound — once

it cost them a run and Thursday it tested the reactions of first baseman Matt Carpenter. In the eighth inning, reliever Jordan Hicks fielded a grounder and waited until the last moment to throw. He did so at full strength — unleashing one of his fastballs, which can hit 105 mph, at Carpenter. He caught the ball for the out, and he avoided injury. Hicks did not avoid conversation. “Guy’s got an electric arm and you see it when he pitches,” Carpenter said. “And you can see it at first base, too. There is not a lot of time to think.” On Tuesday, Carlos Martinez threw from a seated position on the mound when he had time to get to his feet. Matheny and pitching coach Mike Maddux discussed both plays in the dugout Thursday and agreed that some refresher courses might be needed.

SCORE CHANGES Without throwing a pitch Thursday, Luke Weaver saw his ERA drop by more than a quarter of a run. Major League Baseball reviewed the scoring decisions on two plays and reversed both, benefiting Weaver and costing Jose Martinez. The Cards’ first baseman lost a steal of home and was tagged with his seventh error of the season. On May 22, against Kansas City, Martinez was the lead part of a play that saw him take home and Marcell Ozuna steal second on a misplay by Mike Moustakas. Originally credited as a double steal — and Martinez’s first career steal of home — because Moustakas’ successful play could not be assumed, MLB thought otherwise. Both Cardinals had a stolen base subtracted from their season stats. • On May 28, at Milwaukee, Martinez had a difficult play that was originally ruled a double by pitcher Brent Suter. MLB reversed that decision and gave Martinez an error so that the two runs that followed became unearned. Weaver’s ERA dropped from 4.41 to 4.12. Players, teams, and agents can request a review of scoring decisions, and that stats are updated when oicials in the commissioner’s oice, including Joe Torre, reverse or correct the scoring.

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals irst • Pham singles to left ield. J.Martinez homers to left ield, Pham scores. Two runs. Cardinals 2, Marlins 0. Marlins sixth • Castro reaches on error to deep right ield, advances to second. Bour doubles to deep center ield, Castro scores. One run. Cardinals 2, Marlins 1. Cardinals sixth • Pham singles to center ield. J.Martinez singles to left center, Pham to third. Ozuna singles to left center, Pham scores, J.Martinez to second. One run. Cardinals 3, Marlins 1. Cardinals seventh • Voit homers to center ield. One run. Cardinals 4, Marlins 1. CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Tommy Pham rounds second as he advances to third on a single by Jose Martinez in the sixth inning against the Marlins at Busch on Thursday.

Martinez home run gets the Cardinals going CARDINALS • FROM C1

Cardinals went through a checklist of the constants — taking a lead with a home run, holding it with the starter and closing it with the relief tandem of Jordan Hicks and Bud Norris — on their way to a 4-1 victory against the Marlins. What the Cardinals needed for the end they had been missing started with Mikolas. “We always talk about how our starting pitching sets the tone,” Matheny said. “We had a bad tone the last couple of days. Sometimes you have a guy on the mound and your team says, ‘Hey, this guy is going to give us a real good chance.’ Then you have Tommy (Pham) get on and Jose Martinez jumps one over the fence and all of sudden, OK, here we go. That was the feel we had. There does need to be something that instigates it.” Or, someone. Against former Gateway Grizzlies pitcher Trevor Richards, appearing for the first time at Busch Stadium, the Cardinals capitalized for a 2-0 lead in the first inning on Jose Martinez’s two-run homer. Mikolas held that score through five innings,

and in that stretch never let a Marlins runner get as far as third base. Sweating through jerseys like Chris Carpenter did, Mikolas had spares hanging near the dugout but superstition outweighed saturation, and he said he rarely changed. “If one jersey is really working,” he said. “The sun was drying my sweat almost as fast as I could put it out.” The righthander allowed one run — unearned — through seven innings for his ninth quality start in 12 games. He burnished his All-Star bona fides and dipped his ERA down to 2.27. Only two starters in the National League have a lower ERA, and there is only one pitcher with as many wins as Mikolas’ seven and an ERA lower than 2.30: reigning Cy Young Award winner, Washington ace, and St. Louis native Max Scherzer. Matheny acknowledged that few, “including us,” could see the season their import from Japan would piece together, but Mikolas (7-1) has provided enough certainty in a dozen starts that he provided the confidence scrub the Cardinals needed after two of the most malodorous games of the sum-

mer. “You look at some of the best years we’ve had here, that I’ve been a part of, and if you go through a rough patch, you’ve got a guy like Adam (Wainwright) who is going to right the ship and you know you’ve got a chance to win,” leadof hitter Matt Carpenter said. “That’s kind of what we feel like with Miles. Things got ugly for a few days. We feel pretty good about our chances when he takes the ball.” Richards (0-3) found his feel after Martinez’s sixth home run of the season, and from the second to the fifth inning the righthander from Aviston, Ill., retired 12 consecutive batters with the help of a caught stealing. The Cardinals didn’t sneak their third run of the game until after Richards yielded to the bullpen. Those blanks from the Cardinals’ ofense smelled familiar — and were a contributing source of the dugout’s frustration in the previous two games. The Marlins arrived in St. Louis to finish a long, winding and wholly misspent three-city road trip. Miami had a winless starter, a 6.00ERA starter, and Richards, back from the minors, set to pitch in

the series, and Carpenter admitted that the players saw this spot in their schedule as a chance to gorge on wins. An 0-2 start was a whif. While errors and bullpen fissures contributed to two losses to Miami, the underpinnings of the Cardinals’ issues was the offense. They were four-four-18 (.222) with runners in scoring position, they had as many errors (five) as extra-base hits (five), and they managed one run in 8 1/3 innings against the Marlins’ bullpen. The worst bullpen in baseball. That’s how the first two games in the series slipped away from the Cardinals, and how Mikolas assured this one wouldn’t. He retired 14 consecutive Marlins, 13 after the Cardinals had their first lead. He got to an 0-2 count on eight of the first 10 batters he faced. During his bullpen session this past week, he focused on improving his curveball. It had gotten flighty and floated in recent starts. He went into Thursday intent on finding it, and once he did played that against his slider and fastball. Mikolas said he had no intention of abandoning any of the pitches. “If you’re hot, shoot,” Mikolas

said, quoting his middle school basketball coach. “If you’re not, shoot until you get hot.” A dropped fly ball in right field led to the Marlins’ lone run. The Cardinals answered with Marcell Ozuna’s RBI single in the sixth, and Luke Voit’s pinch-hit home run widened the lead in the seventh. That gave the Cardinals the gap and Mikolas provided the seven innings needed to reach the two most reliable relievers, Hicks and Norris. The closer retired the side in order for his 12th save. Mikolas came to the ballpark with a bounce that the Cardinals have come to feel is contagious. He’s an impish presence in the clubhouse, and he had shed the funk from the previous two games, so why couldn’t they? Mikolas got up early Thursday to cook breakfast for his family. He dished some eggs and made oatmeal, egg whites and orange juice for his daughter, a toddler. He explained he tries to help his pregnant wife when possible because she juggles the family during road trips. “Do my best to pick up my own slack when I’m at home,” Mikolas said. He picks up others’ at the ballpark. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CARDINALS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

Voit thriving in role of bench

Cards are better than this series

With homer hursday, career average as a pinch hitter is .342

ORTIZ • FROM C1

to add to a conversation. “He wasn’t someone who was verbose or talked just to talk, but when he had something to say, it was always valuable. “A lot of times when people look at the analytical world, it’s just a validation of their own opinion. He didn’t need that. Red was one of those guys who had so much to ofer. If you were willing to learn, he was a great guy to be around.” On the list of Cardinals Hall of Famer players, Stan Musial was gone at 92 in 2013. Schoendienst had been wearing down recently, and stayed in his bed for the first time on Wednesday, said daughter Colleen. He died later that night. It has always been Stan and Red, not necessarily Red and Stan. Red knew that Stan was the better player and would defer to him. But Mozeliak said, “Red was one of those guys who was always internally competitive. But, in the end, he always knew his place was still good. And he didn’t have to worry about it.” Reviewing the past day or so and, even the last several years, Gibson said, “You start thinking about all kinds of stuff. You think about Stan. And then Red. And then you think, ‘I’m the next oldest. Holy moly.’” At 82, Gibson is now the Cardinals’ oldest Hall of Famer, with former manager Whitey Herzog next at 86. A funeral mass is scheduled for next Friday at the Cathedral Basilica, where services were held for Musial, with more details to be announced later.

needed their stopper to step up, and that’s exactly Miles Mikolas did with seven strong innings to beat the Marlins 4-1. The calendar proves that there are no must-win games this time of year, but the series finale against the Marlins qualified as a game in which the Cardinals needed to stop embarrassing themselves. “You know when you get done with those two games, it feels good to win (the finale),” said first baseman Jose Martinez, who gave the Cardinals a 2-0 lead with a two-run home run in the first. “We’re going on the road now and you feel a bit more relaxed. We play Cincinnati well, and we’ll try to do the same thing we did today.” The Cardinals are a much better team than they showed in the series against the Marlins, who entered the series finale with the second worst winning percentage in the National League. Only the Reds had a lower winning percentage in the NL heading into Thursday. Heading into the series, there was reason for the Cardinals to believe that they could fatten up during a ninegame stretch that including consecutive three-game series against the Marlins, Reds and the NL-West doormat San Diego Padres. Yet, the Cardinals tripped all over themselves while committing a combined five errors over the first two games of the series as the Marlins outscored them 18-7. There’s no shame in losing to any major league team. Nonetheless, there should definitely be a stigma when you help to beat yourself in embarrassing fashion against a team that carried a six-game losing streak into Busch Stadium on Tuesday. The Marlins scored four runs combined while suffering a three-game sweep against the Diamondbacks before beginning the series against the Cardinals. “We looked at this stretch that we have when we took three out of four from Pittsburgh and we had Miami here for three and we go to Cincinnati for three, come back home for San Diego (and) we felt good about where you could be potentially at the end of that,” Matt Carpenter said. “Losing two of three to Miami doesn’t ruin that, but it makes it a little harder. “If we go out in Cincinnati and we pull a sweep out there we could kind of make up for something like what happened here at home. But it was good to come out here and win a game today.” Fortunately for the Cardinals, Mikolas welcomes the opportunity to be the club’s stopper when things aren’t going well. More importantly, he’s been good enough to give his teammates plenty of confidence as they head to the stadium on the days he starts. Mikolas, who appears on his way to an All-Star berth, embraces the responsibility he has shouldered in his first year back in the majors after a three-year sojourn in Japan. When asked if he took extra pride in being the stopper when things may not be going well, Mikolas didn’t hesitate. “Absolutely,” he said. “Same thing even during a game you get a big inning to get that shutdown inning or just try to get the team back on the right foot, give us a happy flight and going into a road trip with everybody feeling good about themselves.” The Cardinals also needed to clean up their defense. They improved on that front for the most part with the exception of right fielder Dexter Fowler’s error, which led to the unearned run the Marlins scored. Considering how well Michael Wacha and Mikolas have pitched and the fact that Carlos Martinez has been one of the best pitchers in baseball when healthy, the Cardinals should avoid losing streaks as long as they play clean defense and get timely hitting. Rookie shortstop Yairo Munoz bounced back with a clean defensive performance a day after committing a career-high three errors. Manager Mike Matheny put Munoz back in the lineup, and he delivered solid defense with four assists. He also was one for four at the plate. “I never dropped my head,” Munoz said. “I maintained a positive mindset. Three errors, but I said, ‘tomorrow is another day. I will do it right tomorrow.’ Thank God it turned out well today. “My teammates and I always have confidence. My teammates and coaches help me a lot.” The Cardinals finished 4-3 on the homestand. They had a reason to expect better. They cannot aford to play sloppy defense, as they did in the second game of the series, or make multiple blunders running the bases, as they did in the series opener. If they hope to catch the Brewers, they need to play more like they did Thursday. “Clean and guys making plays for the most part defensively,” Matheny said. “It was great seeing Yairo get a couple opportunities, just looked smooth. He can tell you, he’s a pretty tough kid. I knew he’d respond well there. Comes in and takes a good at-bat late in the game off a guy throwing really hard, just a nice bounce-back day for him. Just a much better rhythm all the way around. It looked much more like our club.”

Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As Miles Mikolas was rolling through the Marlins lineup on Thursday afternoon, a lot of people had their eyes on the starter’s pitch count: manager Mike Matheny, pitching coach Mike Maddux, the bullpen and potential pinch hitter Luke Voit. About the fifth inning, Voit assessed where everything stood and went into the batting cage behind the Cardinals dugout to start getting in some swings, part of what has become his preparatory practice and one that is paying big dividends. Voit came up to pinch hit for Mikolas in the seventh and homered into the left-field bullpen. It was his first home run of the season and the Cardinals’ first pinch-hit home run of the season, which served to give them a little extra breathing room on their way to a 4-1 win over the Marlins at Busch Stadium. Voit is 2 for 3 as a pinch hitter this season with a home run and a walk. In addition to his .667 batting average, he has a 1.667 slugging percentage and a .750 onbase percentage. Those numbers may reek of small sample size, but in his career, he’s hitting .342 as a pinch hitter, with 12 hits in 35 at-bats. Sure, he’d love to be playing every day, but if this is what it takes to play in the majors, that’s fine by him. “As long as it keeps me here,” he said. “I don’t want to go back to Memphis so I’ll do whatever I can to help the team.” “He’s dangerous,” said Cardinals manager Mike Matheny. “He’s a dangerous hitter that really does well in that pinchhit role. We talk about how hard it is for guys coming through the system that are used to playing everyday, how hard it is to stay sharp, and Luke Voit has been able to do that. “Luke hasn’t been getting a lot of opportunities. It’s amazing how sharp he stays with limited opportunities.” Voit has had four plate appearances spread over seven games since he was called up from Memphis on May 31 and he stays sharp by using something he learned when he was in Class AA: Take lots of swings in the batting cage. “I’ll go down there and hit of the machine until I feel my swing is right and make sure I’m staying back and through the baseball,” he said. “I just kind of constantly hit off that and hit fastballs and sliders and that always feels like it gets me on track. “That’s why I like the machine a lot. It’s a constant velocity, making sure your timing is right, your swing path’s right,

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Cardinals’ Luke Voit is greeted by teammates, including Marcell Ozuna (23) and Yairo Munoz, after leading of the seventh inning Thursday with a pinch-hit solo home run.

whatever you have to do to keep yourself in control of what it would be like to hit. We can hit diferent pitches of it. That’s how it works for me.” After learning how to stay sharp, he’s also learned the approach he needs to take at the plate. While he may be coming up in a big situation, he can do only so much. “Not trying to do too much, staying within myself,’ he said. “Kind of knowing what the pitcher’s going to do to me, attack my weaknesses in certain situations. Last year, when I first started doing it, I feel I was trying to hit a home run every time and rolling over, striking out, swinging and missing. I was trying to really learn a lot toward the end of the season, if I have to get the guy over or hit a sac fly or whatever the situation presents itself. Don’t swing out of your shoes kind of thing. Take positives out of every at-bat. It’s been good for me.” Thursday’s at-bat came about quickly. Matheny sent Greg Garcia out to hit for Mikolas to start the seventh, but then the Marlins pulled righthanded reliever Brad Ziegler in favor of lefthander Adam Conley. Conley is the Marlins’ only lefty out of the bullpen, and Voit figured if he got an at-bat, that’s who it would probably be

against. Voit came in for Garcia and homered. “I credit our video guys coming in and telling us Conley is warming up too,” the 27-year-old Lafayette High and Missouri State product said. “It was the kind of situation where we knew it could happen and it did happen. It’s just always being prepared for any situation.” Sometimes he’s prepared and isn’t needed. On Sunday, he went into the cage to get his swings, but Michael Wacha flirted with a no-hitter and was never hit for. That’s how it goes. But pinch hitting is a skill that can keep Voit in the majors, at least for now. The Cardinals are carrying five hitters at the moment, one more than they’ve had at many times this season. And while a player like Tyler O’Neill was sent down because the Cardinals want him to play every day, Voit can stay up because he’s shown he doesn’t have to play every day. It’s the diference between being in St. Louis and being in Memphis, and this is where he wants to be. “You said it right, a hundred million percent,” he said. “I love it up here.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

‘Respect was what his life was all about’ RED • FROM C1

managing career with his estimable playing career as an infielder, said, “He had his ‘say’ when his ‘say’ was warranted. Howard Pollet, who used to play with Red, was asked what made him such a good player and he said, ‘He had very good, soft hands — and a tough heart.’ “I thought that sounded like a nice way to describe him as a manager, too.” McCarver said he couldn’t think of any manager who worked the position the way Schoendienst did. “The job of managing has changed so much,” said McCarver, “and Red was as much one of a kind in his day and today. He was unto himself.” Schoendienst didn’t just write down the nine names in the lineup and tell them to come back in 2 ½ hours and let him know how the game came out. “But he was the opposite of Tony La Russa,” said Gibson. “That’s not to say Tony wasn’t a good manager but they were two different types. Tony likes to be in control. Red was the opposite, he could be in control without being in control.” Gibson and La Russa have become good friends over the years, but Gibson said he would have said what he said anyway. “If he minds, so what?” said Gibson, chuckling. Gibson, who will be 83 this year, was able to laugh a bit Thursday when telling Schoendienst stories. He admitted he was not emotionally ready to discuss Red’s passing the previous day. “It’s just that sometimes there are some really personal things that I don’t feel like sharing with the public,” Gibson said. “I just really liked him a lot. It had nothing to do with him as manager. It had to do with us as individuals.” As competitive as both were in their own way, Gibson even found something to laugh about when the San Francisco Giants were having their way with Gibson in the mid-1960s. Gibson said, “I was getting my brains beat out and Red came out to the mound, finally, after one out in the first inning and five or six runs and I said, ‘Have you been watching this game?’ He said, ‘I was watching it but I didn’t have time to warm anybody up.’” Schoendienst finally took Gibson out and the Cardinals rallied to win the game. McCarver, however, recalls a similar start to a game in Chicago, but a diferent conversation. “It was opening day in 1965 and the Cubs had scored a bunch of runs by the fourth inning and Red came to the mound. Bob said, ‘This isn’t the damned World Series,’” related McCarver. “Red said, ‘Well, look at the damned scoreboard. They’ve already scored six runs.’” Schoendienst took Gibson out this time, too. The Cardinals of the 1960s enjoyed winning championships and celebrating

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this April 1968 ile photo, Cardinals center ielder Curt Flood (left) and manager Red Schoendienst chat at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

along the way. But Gibson said Schoendienst wasn’t one to have bed checks at night although when Bob Howsam was general manager in 1965-66, he instituted the policy. Schoendienst had coach Dick Sisler do the dirty work. “Dick came one night — I was pitching the next day — and he knocked on my door about 11 o’clock at night,” said Gibson, alone in his room. “I didn’t let him in. The next morning, I confronted him and he said, ‘I came and knocked on your door and you didn’t answer.’” Gibson responded, “If you ever come and knock on my door at night, I’m going to pull you in and you’re going to have just as good a time as I’m having.” After that, Gibson said, Schoendienst “didn’t do a lot of bed checking and once Howsam was gone, we had none of it.” The overriding word to describe Schoendienst’s relationship with his players was “respect,” said McCarver. “Respect was what his life was all about. “That’s the same reason the (AnheuserBusch) brewery chose Red to manage in 1964 when they had public relations problems after Johnny Keane left to go to the Yankees. Who better to solve that problem than Red?” Schoendienst’s knowledge and popularity transcended several generations, and he was sitting in on Cardinals staff meetings into his 90s. “Red always knew what was going on,” said John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations. “This new school/old school debate on how you think about decisionmaking. .. . Red was always just full of wisdom. He always had something insightful


06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

SPORTS

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

NBA FINALS

Gronkowski is ready to run he horse, not the Patriots TE, will make U.S. debut at Belmont ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Raised in upstate New York, Chad Brown didn’t root for the Bills, the Giants or the Jets when it came to football. The 39-year-old from Mechanicville was a San Francisco 49ers fan. It was simple. He liked future Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana, although football didn’t turn out to be Brown’s sport. Brown has become one of thoroughbred racing’s top trainers, and his favorite football team now is the New England Patriots. It has nothing to do with Tom Brady. It’s all about Gronkowski, both of them. He likes tight end Rob and the 3-year-old colt named after him who will be a fan favorite Saturday in the $1.5 million Belmont Stakes. Whether Gronkowski can challenge Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Justify and prevent him from becoming the sport’s 13th Triple Crown winner remains to be seen. The name of the horse adds interest to the final jewel of the Triple Crown, of course. “It works for him,” Brown said of the name. “He is going to pick up a few extra fans and that feels good. I am happy people are rooting for him because of his name.” The Kentucky-bred colt has never raced in North America. He has had six starts in England, winning four races and finishing second once. An illness forced him to skip the Kentucky Derby. Phoenix Thoroughbred Limited, the owners of Gronkowski, decided after the Derby to move the colt out of the barn of Jeremy Noseda in mid-May. Brown has spent the last three-plus weeks getting the colt ready to run again. While Gronkowski arrived in good condition and has trained extremely well, Brown would have preferred a little more training time. “If the horse has enough foundation behind him, he is the kind of a horse that can run a mile and a half on the dirt,” Brown said Thursday after Gronkowski galloped. “Is he ready for Saturday? We’ll see.” Brown said the owners of Gronkowski gave him the option of skipping the Bel-

Down 3-0, Cavaliers superstar ‘speaks truth’

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Belmont Stakes hopeful Gronkowski plays with a groom after a workout at Belmont Park on Wednesday in Elmont, N.Y. Gronkowski missed the Kentucky Derby due to an illness. > Belmont Stakes • Post time 5:46 Saturday, KSDK (5)

mont if he felt the colt was not ready. He elected to run. Brown has an idea what will happen in the race. Gronkowski will run a little behind the leaders and grind out the first 1¼ miles. It’s the last quarter that’s a concern for a colt that has never run longer than a mile in a race. “This was a very unique situation,” Brown said. “This was a horse that was on the Derby trail and then of, and now here on short notice. It really takes a special horse to be able to catch up to speed and be able to run in a race like Saturday. Based on what I have seen so far, I do feel like he is up to it.” Rob Gronkowski, who is a part owner of the colt, is expected to attend. He’s also excited. “It’s pretty wild,” Gronkowski said Tuesday after a Patriots practice. “I heard about the horse like a year ago and I saw it, and I was like ‘that’s cool,’ you know? Then all of a sudden it’s like the horse is in the Kentucky Derby a year later. So it’s pretty wild. It’s a pretty cool scenario. Pretty cool situation. It just shows, name

the horse my name and it’s going to make it, baby.” Besides Gronkowski the horse, Brown also had another runner in his barn partially owned by three former or current Patriots. He has gotten the chance to sit down with Patriots coach Bill Belichick to discuss how their jobs are similar and how they manage elite athletes and people on their stafs. “I have asked him for advice, particularly on leadership, winning, and how to get the most out of people,” said Brown, who has 165 employees and 230 horses in his barn. “I find him to be and (have) great admiration for him now that I have had a couple of chances to really sit down with coach and pick his brain. I find him to be really brilliant, a deep thinker and very reserved and calculated about what he says or does. He has enormous experience how to get the most out of people.” For Brown, this is a week in which he will discover just how much he got out of Gronkowski. At worst, it will be a learning experience. At best, Gronk scores big and upsets Justify’s Triple Crown hopes.

STANLEY CUP FINALS * if necessary

CAPITALS DEF. GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4-1 Game 1 Golden Knights 6, Capitals 4 Game 2 Capitals 3, Golden Knights 2 Game 3 Capitals 3, Golden Knights 1 Game 4 Capitals 6, Golden Knights 2 Game 5 Capitals 4, Golden Knights 3

Capitals 4, Golden Knights 3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Center Lars Eller celebrates his goal that gave the Capitals a 4-3 lead with 7:37 to go in the third period on Thursday night in Las Vegas.

and crushing disappointment, these Capitals won their fourth consecutive closeout game with a tenacious third-period comeback. Captain Alex Ovechkin, who scored an early power-play goal and was the playof MVP, and his teammates are Washington’s first championship hockey team — and the city’s first champion in a major pro sport since the Redskins won the Super Bowl in early 1992. After Vegas won the opener, the Capitals capped their four-game surge by rallying from a third-period deficit in Game 5, banishing so many years of playoff failure with big goals and tenacious play across their lineup. Ovechkin scored his franchise-record 15th goal of the postseason in a cathartic victory for the Capitals, who had never been this close to the NHL’s ultimate prize. Braden Holtby made 28 saves, outplaying three-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury in the other net one final time. The Caps couldn’t win a title without a little weirdness, however: The game clock stopped working on the T-Mobile Arena scoreboards during the final minutes, and the Capitals angrily protested while they played on. Vegas never got close to a tying goal. Reilly Smith scored a go-ahead goal late in the second period for the Golden Knights, who won seven of their first eight home playof games before dropping the last two. Nate Schmidt and David Perron also scored in the second period, but Fleury’s 29 saves included a stopped puck that dropped underneath him where Eller, a former Blues player, swept it home for the Cup-winning goal. Washington’s Cup-clinching win was its 10th on the road in this postseason, tying the NHL playof record and illustrating the superior toughness of this team. While past editions of the Caps created their team’s reputation for postseason

flops in part by losing five playoff series in which they had three of the first four games, Ovechkin’s latest group promptly closed out all four of its series this year on the very first try. And the remarkable Golden Knights hadn’t lost four consecutive games in their entire inaugural season before the Caps rolled them. The Capitals had thousands of red-clad fans in the Vegas crowd and a building full of supporters watching back home along with countless thousands outside in the crowded D.C. streets.

VEGAS CHANGES Vegas coach Gerard Gallant shook up his lineup, to no avail. Veteran forwards Ryan Reaves and Ryan Carpenter were scratched, while William Carrier and David Perron were in uniform. Carrier hadn’t played since Game 5 of the second round against San Jose, missing 10 straight games. Perron played in the Final’s first three games before sitting out Game 4. PREGAME HIGH JINKS Ovechkin skated onto the Vegas side of the rink during pregame warmups, narrowly avoiding Fleury as the goaltender was stretching along the boards. The goaltender skated across the red line and toward the Washington superstar before retreating back to his side. Later, though, Fleury got even by slashing Ovechkin’s legs as they skated past each other. Earlier in the series, the veterans acted like kids squirting water on each other’s side of the red line. HOT, HOT, HOT Hundreds of fans braved 97-degree heat and assembled again in the plaza directly outside T-Mobile Arena several hours before Game 5. As game time approached, the crowd got larger as it swelled with fans without tickets. A majority of the crowd was wearing Golden Knights garb, but the sea of people included a large portion of red-clad Capitals fans occasionally chanting “We want the Cup!”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

LeBron James laughs at his press conference after practice Thursday.

Capitals win fourth straight to take the Cup

NHL • FROM C1

James knows Warriors are a better team

Washington 0 2 2 — 4 Vegas 0 3 0 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Miller, VGK, (interference), 11:44. Second period: 1, Washington, Vrana 3 (Kuznetsov, Wilson), 6:24. 2, Vegas, Schmidt 3 (Marchessault, Smith), 9:40. 3, Washington, Ovechkin 15 (Backstrom, Carlson), 10:14 (pp). 4, Vegas, Perron 1 (Miller, Tatar), 12:56. 5, Vegas, Smith 5 (Tuch, Theodore), 19:31 (pp). Penalties: Theodore, VGK, (tripping), 0:21; Djoos, WSH, (high sticking), 3:19; McNabb, VGK, (tripping), 9:51; Ovechkin, WSH, (tripping), 17:46; Smith, VGK, (roughing), 19:31; Orpik, WSH, (roughing), 19:31; Tuch, VGK, (roughing), 19:31; Beagle, WSH, (roughing), 19:31. Third period: 6, Washington, Smith-Pelly 7 (Orpik), 9:52. 7, Washington, Eller 7 (Burakovsky, Connolly), 12:23. Penalties: Tatar, VGK, (hooking), 5:37. Shots: Washington 9-11-13: 33. Vegas 7-13-11: 31. Power-plays: Washington 1 of 4; Vegas 1 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 15-7 (31 shots-28 saves). Vegas, Fleury 13-6 (33-29). T: 2:44. Referees: Marc Joannette, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Jonny Murray.

ALL-TIME CHAMPIONS 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01 1999-00 1998-99 1997-98 1996-97 1995-96 1994-95 1993-94 1992-93 1991-92 1990-91 1989-90 1988-89 1987-88 1986-87 1985-86 1984-85 1983-84 1982-83 1981-82 1980-81 1979-80 1978-79 1977-78 1976-77 1975-76 1974-75 1973-74 1972-73 1971-72 1970-71 1969-70 1968-69

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LeBron James was relaxed, reflective and maybe even resigned to his fate. The end of the series, season and maybe his second stint in Cleveland, are near. The Golden State Warriors have made his eighth straight NBA Finals — and their seasonal rivalry with the Cavaliers — very one-sided. Still weary and wrestling with emotions after losing Game 3 on Wednesday night, when Kevin Durant scored 43 points and shot the Warriors within one win of their third title in four years, James pointed out Thursday what has become terrifyingly obvious. The Warriors are at another level. And may be for a while. “Obviously, from a talent perspective, if you’re looking at Golden State from their top five best players to our top five players, you would say they’re stacked better than us. Let’s just speak truth,” James said before rattling off Golden State’s embarrassment of riches. “Kevin Durant,” he said. “You’ve got two guys with MVPs on their team. And then you’ve got a guy in Klay (Thompson) who could easily be on a team and carry a team, scored 40 in a quarter before. And then you have Draymond (Green), who is arguably one of the best defenders and minds we have in our game. So you have that crew. “Then you add on a Finals MVP coming of the bench (Andre Iguodala), a No. 1 pick in (Shawn) Livingston and an All-Star in David West and whatever the case may be. So they have a lot of talent.” Too much, it seems, for these Cavs. James wasn’t making excuses for Cleveland’s postseason pickle because if not for a reversed oicial’s call or J.R. Smith’s brain-lock in the closing seconds of regulation in Game 1 or Durant’s brilliance in Game 3, the Cavs could be leading the series. The three-time champion, though, was being open and honest about the Cavs’ chances to become the first team to overcome a 3-0 deficit in the playofs. To this point, 131 have tried, and 131 have failed. “We’ve been in a position where we could win two out of these three games,” said James, who had 33 points and his 10th Finals triple-double in Game 3. “So what do we have to do? Do we have to make more shots? Is it we have to have our minds into it a little bit more? Is it if there is a ball on the ground we can’t reach for it but you’ve got to dive for it?”

NOTEBOOK Colangelo out as 76ers president • Bryan Colangelo may not have authored any of the tweets himself, but he seemed to provide private information that went into them. And when his wife used those details to criticize his own players or rival colleagues, Colangelo and the Philadelphia 76ers knew he could no longer remain their top basketball executive. Colangelo resigned Thursday as president of basketball operations for the 76ers in the wake of what an investigation found was “careless and in some instances reckless” sharing of sensitive team information. Other news • New Orleans Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry has agreed to a two-year extension running through the 2020-21 season. Gentry has gone 117-138 in three seasons, including this season’s playof team. ... The New York Knicks hired former NBA coach Keith Smart and three others as assistants on David Fizdale’s coaching staf. Jud Buechler, Pat Sullivan and Royal Ivey were also added Thursday to join Fizdale, who was hired last month to replace Jef Hornacek.

NBA FINALS * if necessary | TV: KDNL-30

WARRIORS 3, CAVALIERS 0 Game 1

Warriors 124, Cavaliers 114, OT

Game 2

Warriors 122, Cavaliers 103

Game 3

Warriors 110, Cavaliers 102

Friday

8 at Cleveland

Monday 8 at Golden State* June 14

8 at Cleveland*

June 17

7 at Golden State*


06.08.2018 • Friday • M 2

SPORTS

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

NBA FINALS

Gronkowski is ready to run he horse, not the Patriots TE, will make U.S. debut at Belmont ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK • Raised in upstate New York, Chad Brown didn’t root for the Bills, the Giants or the Jets when it came to football. The 39-year-old from Mechanicville was a San Francisco 49ers fan. It was simple. He liked future Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana, although football didn’t turn out to be Brown’s sport. Brown has become one of thoroughbred racing’s top trainers, and his favorite football team now is the New England Patriots. It has nothing to do with Tom Brady. It’s all about Gronkowski, both of them. He likes tight end Rob and the 3-year-old colt named after him who will be a fan favorite Saturday in the $1.5 million Belmont Stakes. Whether Gronkowski can challenge Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Justify and prevent him from becoming the sport’s 13th Triple Crown winner remains to be seen. The name of the horse adds interest to the final jewel of the Triple Crown, of course. “It works for him,” Brown said of the name. “He is going to pick up a few extra fans and that feels good. I am happy people are rooting for him because of his name.” The Kentucky-bred colt has never raced in North America. He has had six starts in England, winning four races and finishing second once. An illness forced him to skip the Kentucky Derby. Phoenix Thoroughbred Limited, the owners of Gronkowski, decided after the Derby to move the colt out of the barn of Jeremy Noseda in mid-May. Brown has spent the last three-plus weeks getting the colt ready to run again. While Gronkowski arrived in good condition and has trained extremely well, Brown would have preferred a little more training time. “If the horse has enough foundation behind him, he is the kind of a horse that can run a mile and a half on the dirt,” Brown said Thursday after Gronkowski galloped. “Is he ready for Saturday? We’ll see.” Brown said the owners of Gronkowski gave him the option of skipping the Bel-

Down 3-0, Cavaliers superstar ‘speaks truth’

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Belmont Stakes hopeful Gronkowski plays with a groom after a workout at Belmont Park on Wednesday in Elmont, N.Y. Gronkowski missed the Kentucky Derby due to an illness. > Belmont Stakes • Post time 5:46 Saturday, KSDK (5)

mont if he felt the colt was not ready. He elected to run. Brown has an idea what will happen in the race. Gronkowski will run a little behind the leaders and grind out the first 1¼ miles. It’s the last quarter that’s a concern for a colt that has never run longer than a mile in a race. “This was a very unique situation,” Brown said. “This was a horse that was on the Derby trail and then of, and now here on short notice. It really takes a special horse to be able to catch up to speed and be able to run in a race like Saturday. Based on what I have seen so far, I do feel like he is up to it.” Rob Gronkowski, who is a part owner of the colt, is expected to attend. He’s also excited. “It’s pretty wild,” Gronkowski said Tuesday after a Patriots practice. “I heard about the horse like a year ago and I saw it, and I was like ‘that’s cool,’ you know? Then all of a sudden it’s like the horse is in the Kentucky Derby a year later. So it’s pretty wild. It’s a pretty cool scenario. Pretty cool situation. It just shows, name

the horse my name and it’s going to make it, baby.” Besides Gronkowski the horse, Brown also had another runner in his barn partially owned by three former or current Patriots. He has gotten the chance to sit down with Patriots coach Bill Belichick to discuss how their jobs are similar and how they manage elite athletes and people on their stafs. “I have asked him for advice, particularly on leadership, winning, and how to get the most out of people,” said Brown, who has 165 employees and 230 horses in his barn. “I find him to be and (have) great admiration for him now that I have had a couple of chances to really sit down with coach and pick his brain. I find him to be really brilliant, a deep thinker and very reserved and calculated about what he says or does. He has enormous experience how to get the most out of people.” For Brown, this is a week in which he will discover just how much he got out of Gronkowski. At worst, it will be a learning experience. At best, Gronk scores big and upsets Justify’s Triple Crown hopes.

STANLEY CUP FINALS * if necessary

CAPITALS DEF. GOLDEN KNIGHTS 4-1 Game 1 Golden Knights 6, Capitals 4 Game 2 Capitals 3, Golden Knights 2 Game 3 Capitals 3, Golden Knights 1 Game 4 Capitals 6, Golden Knights 2 Game 5 Capitals 4, Golden Knights 3

Capitals 4, Golden Knights 3

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Center Lars Eller celebrates his goal that gave the Capitals a 4-3 lead with 7:37 to go in the third period on Thursday night in Las Vegas.

So did the Capitals’ agonizing wait for their first championship since the franchise’s debut in 1974. After so many years of crushing disappointment for a team with a lengthy history of postseason failure, these Capitals confidently won their fourth consecutive closeout game with a tenacious third-period comeback in Vegas. Ovechkin and his teammates are Washington’s first championship hockey team — and their city’s first champion in a major pro sport since the Redskins won the Super Bowl in early 1992. “We did it,” said Ovechkin, whose 15 playoff goals set a franchise record. “That’s all that matters. Look at the smiles on my teammates. This is something you’ll never forget. This moment, I’ll remember for the rest of my life. I’m so happy. It’s unbelievable.” After Ovechkin accepted the Conn Smythe Trophy, he received the Cup from NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman. Ovechkin shouted “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!” before skating away and hoisting the prize over his head for a victory lap in front of thousands of red-clad fans. When Ovi got the Cup back, he handed it to Ted Leonsis, the Caps’ owner since 1999. “I’m so happy for the group that has gone through the misery,” said Washington coach Barry Trotz, a first-time champ in his 19th season behind an NHL bench. After Vegas won the Finals opener, the Capitals capped their four-game surge by rallying from a third-period deficit in this cathartic Game 5, banishing any memory of playoff failure with clutch goals and rugged play across their lineup. Braden Holtby made 28 saves in Game 5, outplaying three-time Stanley Cup champion Marc-Andre Fleury in the other net one final time. “When you get this close to the Cup, it’s hard,” Fleury said. “Doesn’t happen too often. It’s very disappointing.” The Caps couldn’t win a Cup without a little late weirdness, however: The game

clock stopped working on the T-Mobile Arena scoreboards during the final minutes, and the Capitals angrily protested while they played on. Vegas never got close to a tying goal, and the clock finally hit zeros, allowing the Caps to storm the ice behind their net for a frenzied celebration. Reilly Smith scored a go-ahead goal late in the second period for the Golden Knights, who won seven of their first eight home playof games before dropping the last two. The defeat ends the incredible inaugural season of the Golden Knights, who became the NHL’s 31st franchise last fall and immediately launched into arguably the greatest debut in modern pro sports history. Nate Schmidt and David Perron also scored for Vegas in the second period, but Fleury’s 29 saves included a stopped puck that dropped underneath him where Eller could sweep it home for the Cup-winning goal. “It means everything,” said Eller, who started his career with the Blues in 200910. “You couldn’t write the story better. If you’re going to win on the road, I couldn’t imagine a better place to do it.” Another former Blues player, forward T.J. Oshie spent a moment in the celebration looking up for his father, Tim, who he said was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. “He doesn’t remember a lot of stuf, but he’s going to remember this,” Oshie said. “I’ve never seen a team come together like we did here. I’ve never seen the commitment from start to finish like we had here.” Washington’s win was its 10th on the road in this postseason, tying the NHL playoff record and illustrating the superior toughness of this team. While past editions of the Caps created their team’s reputation for postseason flops in part by losing five playof series in which they had won three of the first four games, Ovechkin’s latest group promptly closed out all four of its series this year on the very first try.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

LeBron James laughs at his press conference after practice Thursday.

Capitals win fourth straight to take the Cup

NHL • FROM C1

James knows Warriors are a better team

Washington 0 2 2 — 4 Vegas 0 3 0 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Miller, VGK, (interference), 11:44. Second period: 1, Washington, Vrana 3 (Kuznetsov, Wilson), 6:24. 2, Vegas, Schmidt 3 (Marchessault, Smith), 9:40. 3, Washington, Ovechkin 15 (Backstrom, Carlson), 10:14 (pp). 4, Vegas, Perron 1 (Miller, Tatar), 12:56. 5, Vegas, Smith 5 (Tuch, Theodore), 19:31 (pp). Penalties: Theodore, VGK, (tripping), 0:21; Djoos, WSH, (high sticking), 3:19; McNabb, VGK, (tripping), 9:51; Ovechkin, WSH, (tripping), 17:46; Smith, VGK, (roughing), 19:31; Orpik, WSH, (roughing), 19:31; Tuch, VGK, (roughing), 19:31; Beagle, WSH, (roughing), 19:31. Third period: 6, Washington, Smith-Pelly 7 (Orpik), 9:52. 7, Washington, Eller 7 (Burakovsky, Connolly), 12:23. Penalties: Tatar, VGK, (hooking), 5:37. Shots: Washington 9-11-13: 33. Vegas 7-13-11: 31. Power-plays: Washington 1 of 4; Vegas 1 of 2. Goalies: Washington, Holtby 15-7 (31 shots-28 saves). Vegas, Fleury 13-6 (33-29). T: 2:44. Referees: Marc Joannette, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Jonny Murray.

ALL-TIME CHAMPIONS 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13 2011-12 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 2007-08 2006-07 2005-06 2003-04 2002-03 2001-02 2000-01 1999-00 1998-99 1997-98 1996-97 1995-96 1994-95 1993-94 1992-93 1991-92 1990-91 1989-90 1988-89 1987-88 1986-87 1985-86 1984-85 1983-84 1982-83 1981-82 1980-81 1979-80 1978-79 1977-78 1976-77 1975-76 1974-75 1973-74 1972-73 1971-72 1970-71 1969-70 1968-69

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1967-68 1966-67 1965-66 1964-65 1963-64 1962-63 1961-62 1960-61 1959-60 1958-59 1957-58 1956-57 1955-56 1954-55 1953-54 1952-53 1951-52 1950-51 1949-50 1948-49 1947-48 1946-47 1945-46 1944-45 1943-44 1942-43 1941-42 1940-41 1939-40 1938-39 1937-38 1936-37 1935-36 1934-35 1933-34 1932-33 1931-32 1930-31 1929-30 1928-29 1927-28 1926-27 1925-26 1923-24 1922-23 1921-22 1920-21 1919-20 1917-18

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LeBron James was relaxed, reflective and maybe even resigned to his fate. The end of the series, season and maybe his second stint in Cleveland, are near. The Golden State Warriors have made his eighth straight NBA Finals — and their seasonal rivalry with the Cavaliers — very one-sided. Still weary and wrestling with emotions after losing Game 3 on Wednesday night, when Kevin Durant scored 43 points and shot the Warriors within one win of their third title in four years, James pointed out Thursday what has become terrifyingly obvious. The Warriors are at another level. And may be for a while. “Obviously, from a talent perspective, if you’re looking at Golden State from their top five best players to our top five players, you would say they’re stacked better than us. Let’s just speak truth,” James said before rattling off Golden State’s embarrassment of riches. “Kevin Durant,” he said. “You’ve got two guys with MVPs on their team. And then you’ve got a guy in Klay (Thompson) who could easily be on a team and carry a team, scored 40 in a quarter before. And then you have Draymond (Green), who is arguably one of the best defenders and minds we have in our game. So you have that crew. “Then you add on a Finals MVP coming of the bench (Andre Iguodala), a No. 1 pick in (Shawn) Livingston and an All-Star in David West and whatever the case may be. So they have a lot of talent.” Too much, it seems, for these Cavs. James wasn’t making excuses for Cleveland’s postseason pickle because if not for a reversed oicial’s call or J.R. Smith’s brain-lock in the closing seconds of regulation in Game 1 or Durant’s brilliance in Game 3, the Cavs could be leading the series. The three-time champion, though, was being open and honest about the Cavs’ chances to become the first team to overcome a 3-0 deficit in the playofs. To this point, 131 have tried, and 131 have failed. “We’ve been in a position where we could win two out of these three games,” said James, who had 33 points and his 10th Finals triple-double in Game 3. “So what do we have to do? Do we have to make more shots? Is it we have to have our minds into it a little bit more? Is it if there is a ball on the ground we can’t reach for it but you’ve got to dive for it?”

NOTEBOOK Colangelo out as 76ers president • Bryan Colangelo may not have authored any of the tweets himself, but he seemed to provide private information that went into them. And when his wife used those details to criticize his own players or rival colleagues, Colangelo and the Philadelphia 76ers knew he could no longer remain their top basketball executive. Colangelo resigned Thursday as president of basketball operations for the 76ers in the wake of what an investigation found was “careless and in some instances reckless” sharing of sensitive team information. Other news • New Orleans Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry has agreed to a two-year extension running through the 2020-21 season. Gentry has gone 117-138 in three seasons, including this season’s playof team. ... The New York Knicks hired former NBA coach Keith Smart and three others as assistants on David Fizdale’s coaching staf. Jud Buechler, Pat Sullivan and Royal Ivey were also added Thursday to join Fizdale, who was hired last month to replace Jef Hornacek.

NBA FINALS * if necessary | TV: KDNL-30

WARRIORS 3, CAVALIERS 0 Game 1

Warriors 124, Cavaliers 114, OT

Game 2

Warriors 122, Cavaliers 103

Game 3

Warriors 110, Cavaliers 102

Friday

8 at Cleveland

Monday 8 at Golden State* June 14

8 at Cleveland*

June 17

7 at Golden State*


SPORTS

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

Stephens, Halep in French Open inal Nadal advances to men’s semiinals ASSOCIATED PRESS

PARIS • When the French Open final was

played a year ago, Sloane Stephens was nowhere near Roland Garros. She was in Chicago with coach Kamau Murray, working her way back from a foot injury that required surgery and sidelined her for 11 months. “Indoors on a hard court. Getting ready for grass. Barely walking. Playing tennis next to a bunch of 5- and 6-year-old screaming kids,” Murray recalled. “So to be here from there, I think, is rewarding, because those times were not easy.” The times are good now. Stephens closed in on her second Grand Slam title by beating pal Madison Keys 6-4, 6-4 on Thursday in the first all-American semifinal at the French Open since 2002. It also was a rematch of the U.S. Open final won by Stephens last September. “It’s always hard playing someone from your country and such a good friend,” Stephens said, “so I was really pleased to be able to get through that and play some good tennis.” The 10th-seeded Stephens’ opponent in Saturday’s final will be Simona Halep, who emphatically ended the impressive French Open run of 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza by defeating her 6-1, 6-4. Halep, who assured herself of retaining the No. 1 ranking with the victory, earned a fourth chance to win her first major title. She twice has lost in the final at Roland Garros — to Maria Sharapova in 2014 and

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sloane Stephens returns a shot in her 6-4, 6-4 victory against Madison Keys in the semiinals of the French Open at Roland Garros stadium in Paris.

to Jelena Ostapenko in 2017 — and was the runner-up to Caroline Wozniacki at the Australian Open in January. “I lost three times until now and no one died,” Halep said, “so it will be OK.” Stephens has been perfect in title matches on the WTA tour, going 6-0. “I mean, there is no formula. I didn’t, like, try to do it. I’m not trying to break a record. It’s just how it’s happened for me,” Stephens said, “I think once I get going

in a tournament, I’m pretty consistent, which is good. I just try to keep that going.” She had never made it past the fourth round on the red clay of Paris until now. This year, she was two points from defeat in the third round against Camila Giorgi of Italy before turning that match around. Stephens hasn’t dropped a set since. Like Halep, Stephens is an incredibly talented defensive player, and she kept

Mickelson, Stricker in Memphis mix ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEMPHIS, TENN. • Phil Mickelson got the strong finish he wanted. Steve Stricker is having too much fun to just stick to the senior circuit. Mickelson and Stricker shot 4-under 66 on Thursday in the St. Jude Classic, leaving them in an 11-player tie for second — a stroke behind Seamus Power of Ireland. Mickelson matched his best opening round in relation to par this season. “Oh, it was a great start for me,” Mickelson said. “I ended up finishing off the round. I had a nice little stretch there in the middle where I went birdie, eagle, and I was able to finish it of with some pars after some poor tee shots. “It’s a good start. It’s not like you’re trying to win the tournament on Thursday. But it’s nice not to put myself too far behind so I’m playing catch-up. So another good round tomorrow will put me right in it for the weekend.” Power birdied his final hole for the lead over Mickelson, Stricker, U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka and others. He went to No. 18 tied with seven others atop the leaderboard and took the lead himself with his second birdie over his final three holes. The 51-year-old Stricker had a long day Monday qualifying nearby for the U.S. Open. He played only six holes Tuesday and a nine-hole proam Wednesday to rest up. He turned in a bogey-free round Thursday and capped his day chipping in from 34 feet for his fourth birdie. He has two top-25 finishes in seven tournaments

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Phil Mickelson has tied for second twice at TPC Southwind.

on the PGA Tour this season, and Stricker said he wants to show he can finish of an event. “I still feel like I should play out here. I belong out here. I’m trying to stick with that,” said Stricker, a twotime winner this year on the PGA Tour Champions. Koepka is preparing for his U.S. Open title defense next week at Shinnecock Hills in New York. Second-ranked Dustin Johnson was at 67 with Retief Goosen, Scott Stallings and seven others. Two-time defending champ Daniel Berger bogeyed three of his first five holes and finished with five bogeys and five birdies for a 70. Mickelson won in March in Mexico

for his 43rd career victory, and he has tied for second at the TPC Southwind twice with a tie for third since 2013. He is looking for his first win here while tuning up his game for the U.S. Open. He matched the 4-under par 68 he opened with at the Houston Open in April with three birdies, an eagle and one bogey. This tournament at TPC Southwind will become a World Golf Championship event in 2019, and Mickelson said this course is tough for anyone to shoot really low. That makes limiting mistakes crucial. “If you don’t make any, you don’t lose too much ground and you can make it up quick,” Mickelson said. “It’s just a course that’s hard to go really low on. That’s something I’ve picked up on this golf course over the years. There’s a lot more big numbers on this course than you think. Water comes into play. There’s just some challenges. So I ended up eliminating the big numbers and fortunate enough to salvage par on No. 9 and 12 in today’s round.” Johnson hit into the water for a double-bogey on No. 9. A winner here in 2012, Johnson also had the shot of the day on the par-4 No. 12. With his ball near the water, Johnson took of his right shoe and rolled up his pant leg before stepping into the water. He chipped in from 40 feet. “It wasn’t a very easy shot, and I actually didn’t hit it very well,” Johnson said. “I just got lucky and it went in the hole.” Koepka got to 5 under with a string of four straight birdies but his second bogey cost him a share of the lead.

stretching points Thursday until Keys would err. In all, Keys made 41 unforced errors, 30 more than Stephens. “It’s really tough to get any ball by her, but especially today, she was neutralizing so well. And she was hitting so many deep, heavy balls, that I really felt like I was having to go for a lot,” said Keys, who is now 0-3 against Stephens. “There is a lot of times where I feel like she made the ball by a centimeter,” Keys continued, “and I was missing it. Just one of those days where I think she played incredibly well.” In men’s play, Rafael Nadal reach a record 11th French Open semifinal as he tries for his 11th championship at Roland Garros. His opponent Friday will be Juan Martin del Potro, who got choked up after waiting nearly a decade to return to the final four in Paris — and dealing with three wrist operations in the interim. Both men advanced by winning quarterfinals suspended the night before because of rain. The No. 1-ranked Nadal quickly announced Thursday that he was not going to be as passive as he was the day before when he dropped the first set against 11th-seeded Diego Schwartzman. Nadal seized 12 of the initial 13 points after they stepped out under a blue sky and pulled away for a 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2 victory. No. 5 del Potro got distracted by a spectator right before a key double-fault but was steady in a 7-6 (5), 5-7, 6-3, 7-5 win over No. 3 Marin Cilic in a matchup between two past U.S. Open champions. In the other men’s semifinal, No. 7 Dominic Thiem of Austria will face unseeded Italian Marco Cecchinato.

GOLF ROUNDUP Woods in power grouping for U.S. Open Tiger Woods will play the opening two rounds of the U.S. Open with Justin Thomas and Dustin Johnson, which feels like a grouping of Nos. 1-2-3 in the world ranking. Except that Woods is No. 80. The USGA released its tee times Thursday for the U.S. Open next week at Shinnecock Hills in New York, with two stacked groups for the morning and afternoon. Phil Mickelson, Jordan Spieth and Rory McIlroy tee of together in the morning of the irst round. Woods, Johnson and Thomas are together in the afternoon. This is the 10-year anniversary of the USGA irst putting together the Nos. 1-2-3 players in the world at Torrey Pines — Woods, Mickelson and Adam Scott. Woods is playing the U.S. Open for the irst time since he missed the cut at Chambers Bay in 2015. He has been out of golf for most of the past few years recovering from back surgeries, and his world ranking fell as low as No. 1,199 until returning to competition. In nine PGA Tour events, he has a pair of top 10s and missed the cut only one time. It will be the irst time Woods and Johnson have played together in a major, and their irst time in the same group since the opening two rounds of Torrey Pines in 2017 when both missed the cut. Associated Press

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STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

BASEBALL • ILLINOIS CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT PREVIEW

Hard road pays dividends for Triad Seasons of struggles pave way for Knights to earn state bid ing,” Knights second baseman Travis Heilmann said. “We’ve been together for years and years now, so we’ve got a good bond going and we’ve got a lot of confidence going into state.” Other seniors are Nick Beeler, Mack Langdon, Zach Kraabel, Chase Bertelsmann, Josh Mesenbrink, Brady Arbogast and Nate Huckla. “Three or four of them started as freshmen when we won seven games,” Triad coach Jesse Bugger said. “They’ve been through the ringer on that front. They’re hardworking kids and they’re talented kids. It’s awfully hard for freshmen to compete at that level. But at the time, they were the best we had. “We played them and we took our lumps — and they took their lumps, personally. Every kid likes to succeed and not fail. They fought through that, which I’m thankful for because it’s hard to keep your head up when you’re getting beat up every day. I think now, that’s paying dividends for us.” Beeler (9-2, 1.66 ERA), Langdon (3-2, 1.21 ERA) and Kraabel (6-3, 2.61 ERA) are the team’s top pitchers. Beeler, who threw

BY DAVID WILHELM Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

TROY, ILL. • Seniors on the Triad High baseball team have experienced dark days. Perhaps that explains their elation in current times. The eight-member class entered this season as the leaders of a team that owned a combined 3766-1 record the last three season. In the Mississippi Valley Conference, they were 7-23. Sunny days have returned. The Knights qualified Monday for the Class 3A state tournament by blanking Chatham Glenwood 8-0 in the Sauget Super-Sectional at GCS Ballpark. Their only previous appearance at state was in 2012, when they finished fourth. Triad (29-11) faces St. Ignatius College Prep (19-11), of Chicago in the semifinals at noon Friday at Route 66 Stadium in Joliet. A victory would send the Knights into the championship game at 11 a.m. Saturday against Nazareth Academy (23-13-1) or Morton (28-6), which play in Friday’s opening semifinal at 10 a.m. “We have a ton of seniors on our team start-

TIM VIZER • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Triad senior pitcher Nick Beeler is 9-2 this season with a 1.66 ERA. He is one of three strong pitchers for the Knights, who play in a Class 3A state semiinal at noon Friday against St. Ignatius at Route 66 Stadium in Joliet.

the shutout against Chatham Glenwood, also has five home runs and 29 RBI. Kraabel, also an outfielder, is batting .370. Langdon, another outfielder, is hitting .325 with four homers and 26 RBIs. Mesenbrink, a third baseman, leads Triad in average (.453), runs scored (42), doubles (17) and triples (three), and is tied with Heilmann in home runs (six) and RBIs (31). Heilmann blasted a second-inning homer Monday. “I’m on a high because

we’re going to state,” said the good-natured Beeler, a McKendree recruit who was supported by a 12hit attack, including 11 singles, against Chatham Glenwood. “We’ve turned the program around again and we’re heading back to state. That’s all I can ask for. “We’ve got two other great pitchers, our ofense is killing it right now and our defense is the best it’s been in a long time. I think we have a good shot (to win state).” What prevented the Knights from throwing in

the towel during the lean times? After all, they lost 16 consecutive games during one stretch in 2015, when they finished 7-25. In 2016, Triad dropped 11 of 13 en route to a 12-24 record. Last season, despite finishing 18-17-1, there was a 1-7 skid. “They come from good families,” said Bugger, an Edwardsville High graduate. “Their parents have instilled work ethic in them. That’s not necessarily uncommon these days, but it’s not as common as it used to be. “These boys are hard workers. They’re fighters, and they keep trying to get better all the time. They’ve been through benchings, they’ve been through struggles of not winning. They don’t complain and they’ve never made excuses. They’ve just tried to work harder and get better. To me, that’s what makes them a special group.” Losing wasn’t fun, but it did serve to galvanize the group. “We’ve lost a lot in our varsity careers,” Langdon said. “But I think this is what Coach Bugger has envisioned since our freshman year. Even though we only won seven games, he knew at some point we were going to get good. This is four years of coming full circle. “We’re really close. Our motivation throughout this whole postseason has

been with every win, we buy a couple more days as a team. ... Baseball is pretty much our lives at this point.” Kraabel agrees. “We’ve all worked hard and we’ve been together for all of it,” he said. “It’s unlike anything else we’ve ever felt before, just being able to experience it together.” Kraabel said it was a “rude awakening ” as freshmen to only win seven games. “But we knew we were going to get better,” he said. “By the time we were seniors, we knew we were going to have this shot. I can’t think of one exact point where all of a sudden we knew we were really good. We’ve been gradually getting better and better and better, and the Columbia game (a 2-1 win in the championship game of the Centralia Sectional) was a really big one for us.” Pitching depth makes the Knights a threat to win the tournament. Beeler, Langdon and Kraabel are like three aces. “We argue all the time about who the best of the three is,” Bugger said. “They fulfill their roles; they’re each a little bit different. Mack and Nick took most of our conference starts, but nine out of 10 years, Zach probably would be our ace. Definitely, our pitching depth is what’s made the team go.”

ILLINOIS STATE TOURNAMENT SCHEDULES BASEBALL At Route 66 Stadium, Joliet CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals Lake Park (24-14) vs. Huntley (32-6), 3 p.m. Sandburg (28-6) vs. Plainield North (27-7-1), 5 p.m. Placing games, Saturday Third place, 3 p.m. Championship, 5 p.m.

CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals Morton (28-6) vs. Nazareth Academy (23-13-1), 10 a.m. Triad (29-11) vs. St. Ignatius (19-11), noon Placing games, Saturday Third place, 9 a.m. Championship, 11 a.m.

SOFTBALL At Eastside Centre, East Peoria CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals York (28-12-1) vs. Rock Island (30-5), 3 p.m. Palatine (29-5) vs. Plainield North (31-5), 5:30 p.m. Placing games, Saturday Third place, 3 p.m. Championship, 5:30 p.m.

CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT Friday’s semiinals Providence (28-11) vs. Kaneland (26-9), 10 a.m. Mount Zion (30-7) vs. Montini (28-9), 12:30 p.m. Placing games, Saturday Third place, 10 a.m. Championship, 12:30 a.m.

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FOR THE RECORD

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH executive senior associate athletics director for external affairs. VANDERBILT — Named Jake Kirkendall director of football operations and Dr. Christiana Russell director of player development.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League BLUE JAYS ...............-$182 .....................Orioles RED SOX................. -$300................White Sox Indians ....................-$155 .................... TIGERS Mariners..................-$135 ........................RAYS Astros..................... -$220................ RANGERS Angels .....................-$125 ..................... TWINS A’S............................-$157 ..................... Royals National League CUBS........................-$172 .....................Pirates PHILLIES .................-$125 ...................Brewers NATIONALS ............ -$220......................Giants Cards...................... -$140....................... REDS MARLINS.................-$130 .....................Padres ROCKIES..................-$107 ................... D’backs DODGERS ................-$185 .....................Braves Interleague Yankees...................-$117........................ METS NBA Favorite Points Underdog NBA Finals Warriors..................... 5..................CAVALIERS TENNIS • French Open D. Thiem -$800......... vs. M. Cecchinato +$550 R. Nadal -$700.............. vs. J. del Potro +$500 Saturday S. Halep -$210................vs. S. Stephens +$175 Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

SOCCER Major League Soccer Friday Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.

BASKETBALL | WNBA Thursday Minnesota 88, Washington 80 Connecticut 88, New York 86 Seattle at Los Angeles, late

COLLEGE BASEBALL NCAA super regionals Best-of-3; x-if necessary Host school is home team for Game 1; visiting school is home team for Game 2; coin flip determines home team for Game 3

At Chapel Hill, N.C. Friday: North Carolina (41-18) vs. Stetson (48-11), 10 a.m. Saturday: 11 a.m. x-Sunday: 11 a.m.

At Nashville, Tenn.

TRANSACTIONS

Friday: Vanderbilt (34-25) vs. Mississippi State (35-26), 7 p.m. Saturday: 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday: 5 p.m.

BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended freeagent LHP Fernando Abad 80 games and Chicago Cubs RHP David Garner (Iowa-PCL) 100 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON — Optioned LHP Bobby Poyner to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled LHP Jalen Beeks from Pawtucket. CHICAGO — Optioned RHP Juan Minaya and LHP Aaron Bummer to Charlotte (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Xavier Cedeno from Charlotte. DETROIT — Signed RHP Jacob Turner to a minor league contract. Activated RHP Alex Wilson from the 10-day DL. Optioned 3B Ronny Rodriguez to Toledo (IL). MINNESOTA — Reinstated RHP Trevor May from the 60-day DL and optioned him to Rochester (IL). Transferred C Jason Castro to the 60-day DL. OAKLAND — Optioned C Bruce Maxwell to Nashville (PCL). Reinstated RHP Paul Blackburn from the 60-day DL. Transferred OF Boog Powell to the 60-day DL. TAMPA BAY — Designated INF Brad Miller for assignment. TEXAS — Signed president of baseball operations and general manager Jon Daniels to a multi-year contract extension. National League ARIZONA — Designated 3B Kristopher Negron for assignment. LOS ANGELES — Placed LHP Tony Cingrani on the 10-day DL. Optioned LHP Caleb Ferguson to Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled RHP Pedro Baez and LHP Edward Paredes from Oklahoma City. MIAMI — Optioned RHP Tyler Cloyd to New Orleans (PCL). Recalled RHP Trevor Richards from New Orleans. CARDINALS — Assigned C Steven Baron outright to Memphis (PCL). Designated RHP Preston Guilmet for assignment. Reinstated 2B Greg Garcia from paternity leave. Sent RHPs Greg Holland and Matt Bowman to Memphis for rehab assignments. Frontier League FLORENCE — Sold the contract of INF Jose Brizuela to the N.Y. Mets. Released UT Mike Morris. SCHAUMBURG — Signed RHP Sam Myers. BASKETBALL | NBA NEW ORLEANS — Agreed to terms with coach Alvin Gentry on a contract extension through the 2020-21 season. NEW YORK — Named Keith Smart, Jud Buechler, Pat Sullivan and Royal Ivey assistant coaches. PHILADELPHIA — Announced the resignation of president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo. FOOTBALL | National Football League CLEVELAND — Agreed to terms with RB Duke Johnson on a three-year contract extension. HOCKEY | National Hockey League CHICAGO — Agreed to terms with F Andreas Martinsen on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY — Re-signed D Daniel Walcott to a one-year, two-way contract. SOCCER | National Women’s Soccer League SKY BLUE FC — Signed D Cassidy Benintente as a national team replacement player. COLLEGE ALBANY (N.Y.) — Granted a release to junior FS TD Ierlan from the men’s lacrosse program. KANSAS STATE — Announced sophomore women’s basketball G Sarah Bates will transfer from UC Santa Barbara. UTSA — Named Katie Douglass

At Corvallis, Ore. Friday: Oregon State (47-10-1) vs. Minnesota (44-13), 4 p.m. Saturday: 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday: 8 p.m.

At Fullerton, Calif. Friday: Cal State Fullerton (35-23) vs. Washington (33-23), 1 p.m. Saturday: 5:30 p.m. x-Sunday: 8 p.m.

At Gainesville, Fla. Sat.: Florida (45-18) vs. Auburn (42-21), 11 a.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. x-Monday: 7:30 p.m.

At Fayetteville, Ark. Saturday: Arkansas (42-18) vs. South Carolina (36-24), 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 2 p.m. x-Monday: 6 p.m.

At Lubbock, Texas Saturday: Texas Tech (42-17) vs. Duke (44-16), 2 p.m. Sunday: 5 p.m. x-Monday: 3 p.m.

At Austin, Texas Saturday: Texas (40-20) vs. Tennessee Tech (52-10), 2 p.m. Sunday: 2 p.m. x-Monday: Noon

BELMONT STAKES The field for Saturday’s Belmont Stakes: PP Horse Odds 1. Justify 4-5 2. Free Drop Billy 30-1 3. Bravazo 8-1 4. Hofburg 9-2 5. Restoring Hope 30-1 6. Gronkowski 12-1 7. Tenfold 12-1 8. Vino Rosso 8-1 9. Noble Indy 30-1 10. Blended Citizen 15-1 Weights: 126 pounds. Distance: 1 1/2 miles. Purse: $1.5 million. First place: $800,000. Second place: $280,000. Third place: $150,000. Fourth place: $100,000. Fifth place: $60,000. Post time: 5:46 p.m. Saturday

GOLF Area holes in one Berry Hill • Keith Gregory, hole No. 8, 145 yards, pitching wedge. Bear Creek • John L. Seigel, hole No. 16, 157 yards. Ballwin • Lynett O’Shea, hole No. 4, 132 yards, 5-hybrid. Algonquin • Barb Jones, hole No. 8, 138 yards, 4-hybrid, June 7. Forest Hills • Mason Reynolds, hole No. 3, 109 yards, 9-iron, June 7.

BASEBALL Frontier League Thursday Washington 23, Traverse City 1 Windy City 4, Schaumburg 1 Normal 9, River City 5 Evansville 11, Gateway 5 Joliet 5, Lake Erie 4 Southern Illinois at Florence, late

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

GOLF | 13TH METROPOLITAN OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP Bryant, Justin (Kirkwood) Sullivan, Ryan (Winston Salem, N.C.) Cooke, David (Bolingbrook, Ill.) Fulford, Spence (Davenport, Fla.) Russell, Jordan (Bryan, Texas) Smith, Shane (Godfrey) Bardgett, Justin (Chesterfield) Holtz, Brandon (Bloomington, Ill.) Kelpin, Barrett (Kalamazoo, Mich.) Latimer, Nick (Singer Island, Fla.) Lilleboe, Eric (Okemos, Mich.) Lister, Andrew (College Sta., Texas) Peaper, Brant (Jupiter, Fla.) Kwon, Luke (Carollton, Texas) Long, Jace (McKinney, Texas) Neeman, Collin (Columbia, Ill.) Arman, Nick (Ellisville) Holland, Charlie (Dallas) Ajubita, Neal (Metairie, La.) Fritsch, Brad (Holly Springs, N.C.) Nagy, Michael (Manistique, Minn.) Berkshire, Jeff (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Adamonis, Brad (Coral Springs, Fla.) Crow, Warren (a) (St. Louis) Haley, Paul (Dallas) Stolpe, Patrick (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Szyhowski, Kyle (a) (St. Charles) Isabel, Craig (Winona Lake, Ind.) Rodes, Kyle (Plymouth, Mich.) Bryant, Matthew (Columbia, S.C.) Johnson, Neil (River Falls, Wisc.) Esler, Josh (Wauconda, Ill.) Kovach, Chris (a) (St. Louis) Laske, Gabe (Wildwood) Ledford, Bryce (Ooltewah, Tenn.) Slattery, Kurt (Taylor Ridge, Ill.) White, Brett (Caledonia, Mich.) Crawford, Kolton (Mansfield, Texas) Hudson, Robert (Memphis, Tenn.) Smith, Ted (Orlando, Fla.) Baker, Mark (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Cusumano, Alex (a) (St. Louis) Dickens IV, Al (Charlotte) Juszczyk, Joseph (Dearborn Heights, Mich.) Mather, Mitchell (Lebanon, Mo.) Meyers, Cameron (Edmond, Okla.) Oneal, Tim (Savannah, Ga.) Reese, Dalton (Warrenton, Ga.) Weldon, Kyle (Ballwin)

62-70-132 67-69-136 67-69-136 68-68-136 66-70-136 65-72-137 68-70-138 69-69-138 68-70-138 72-66-138 68-70-138 71-68-139 69-70-139 69-71-140 70-70-140 69-71-140 72-68-140 70-70-140 68-73-141 73-68-141 70-71-141 73-68-141 69-73-142 72-70-142 73-69-142 72-70-142 73-69-142 70-72-142 72-70-142 71-72-143 73-70-143 72-71-143 71-72-143 71-72-143 71-72-143 71-72-143 72-71-143 74-70-144 73-71-144 78-66-144 72-72-144 75-69-144 71-73-144 71-73-144 73-71-144 72-72-144 71-73-144 72-72-144 71-73-144

PGA | St Jude Classic Thursday | Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $6.6M | Yards: 7,244 | Par: 70 (35-35) First Round Seamus Power 33-32 — 65 -5 Troy Merritt 32-34 — 66 -4 Wesley Bryan 32-34 — 66 -4 Fabian Gomez 33-33 — 66 -4 Brooks Koepka 33-33 — 66 -4 Phil Mickelson 32-34 — 66 -4 Chris Kirk 35-31 — 66 -4 Michael Kim 32-34 — 66 -4 Brandon Harkins 31-35 — 66 -4 Steve Stricker 33-33 — 66 -4 Mackenzie Hughes 33-33 — 66 -4 Stuart Appleby 35-31 — 66 -4 Matt Jones 33-34 — 67 -3 C.T. Pan 33-34 — 67 -3 Byeong Hun An 34-33 — 67 -3 Chez Reavie 35-32 — 67 -3 Dustin Johnson 34-33 — 67 -3 Dominic Bozzelli 33-34 — 67 -3 Scott Stallings 34-33 — 67 -3 Retief Goosen 35-32 — 67 -3 Ryan Blaum 35-32 — 67 -3 Andrew Putnam 33-34 — 67 -3 Chad Campbell 33-35 — 68 -2 John Peterson 34-34 — 68 -2 George McNeill 35-33 — 68 -2 Charl Schwartzel 34-34 — 68 -2 Henrik Stenson 35-33 — 68 -2 William McGirt 34-34 — 68 -2 Padraig Harrington 33-35 — 68 -2 Stewart Cink 34-34 — 68 -2 Ryan Palmer 35-33 — 68 -2 Richy Werenski 34-34 — 68 -2 Denny McCarthy 35-33 — 68 -2 Grant Hirschman 33-35 — 68 -2 Corey Conners 35-33 — 68 -2 Shawn Stefani 38-31 — 69 -1 D.J. Trahan 35-34 — 69 -1 Robert Garrigus 34-35 — 69 -1 Cody Gribble 36-33 — 69 -1 Luke List 34-35 — 69 -1 Keith Mitchell 33-36 — 69 -1 Steve Wheatcroft 34-35 — 69 -1 Trey Mullinax 34-35 — 69 -1 Nate Lashley 34-35 — 69 -1

WEATHER • Low 73, High 92 • Winds SSW 5-10 mph

-10 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2

MISSED THE CUT Gielow, Brendan (Asheville, N.C.) Hallberg, Eric (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Martin, Cody (Fort Mitchell, Ky.) Nelson, Ian (Macomb, Ill.) Purser, Rustin (Edmond, Okla.) Pranger, Drew (a) (St. Louis) Schaff, Tommy (Ridgeland, S.C.) Castle, Ethan (Phoenix) Jeske, Kevin (a) (Kirkwood) Kline, Eric (Ponca City, Okla.) Kring, Kevin (Springfield, Mo.) Luth, Patrick (Medina, Ohio) Alex, Anthony (Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.) Dominick, Michael (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Gregson, Mitchell (Jacksonville, Fla.) Northcutt, Glenn (Dothan, Ala.) Regier, Justin (Chicago) Tolan, Derek (Highlands Ranch, Colo.) Ahearn, John (a) (St. Louis) Buege, Andy (Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.) Busch, Sean (Lauderdale By-The-Sea, Fla.) Hurley, John (Tomball, Texas) Taylor, Julian (Fulton, Mo.) Tyler, Nathan (Mesquite, Texas) Grant, Stephen (Plantation, Fla.) Sanchez, Marty (Santa Fe, N.M.) Schaake, Carson (Omaha, Nebraska) Siegfried, Jim (a) (St. Louis) Tucker, Jake (Cullman, Ala.) Williamson, Jay (St. Louis) Callahan, Crimson (a) (Chesterfield) Heavens, Christian (Fairview Heights) Phillips, Steven (Clarksville, Tenn.) Fortner, Alden (Dothan, Ala.) Berkmeyer, Richard (a) (Town and Country) Ferris, Christopher (a) (St. Louis) Taylor, J.T. (Conroe, Texas) Bullington, Brian (Frankfort, Ill.) Carpenter, Brad (a) (Washington, Mo.) Hoemann, Matthew (a) (Washington, Mo.) Jennings, Matthew (Prairie City, Iowa) Migdal, Sam (a) (Ballwin) Yankovich, Nathan (Blacklick, Ohio) Cornfield, Ryan (Spartanburg, S.C.) Green, Andrew (Oklahoma City) Arp, Riley (Fort Collins, Colo.) Ciaramitaro, Alex (a) (St. Peters) Hatley, Matt (a) (Belleville) Neff, Tyler (Knoxville, Tenn.) Weems, Josh (Lake Quivira, Kansas) Grubnich, Nicholas (Crown Point, Ind.) Abolt, David (Cuba, Mo.) Engel, Sam (Scottsdale, Ariz.)

Peter Uihlein Joaquin Niemann Tyler Duncan Brian Gay Austin Cook J.B. Holmes Danny Lee Abraham Ancer Cameron Beckman Bronson Burgoon Casey Wittenberg Brendon de Jonge Harold Varner III Hunter Mahan Aaron Baddeley James Hahn Tony Finau Joel Dahmen Nick Taylor Conrad Shindler J.T. Poston Ben Silverman T.J. Vogel Jonathan Byrd Daniel Chopra Billy Horschel Charles Howell III Daniel Berger Parker McLachlin Omar Uresti Sam Ryder A.J. McInerney Ricky Barnes Matt Every Brice Garnett Tim Herron Tyrone Van Aswegen Tom Hoge Cameron Tringale Jon Curran Brian Stuard Vaughn Taylor Brandt Snedeker David Lingmerth Cameron Percy Scottie Scheffler Talor Gooch Adam Schenk

35-34 33-36 36-33 36-33 34-35 36-33 33-36 33-36 34-35 34-35 36-33 33-37 36-34 36-34 35-35 34-36 33-37 35-35 35-35 37-33 34-36 34-36 35-35 37-33 35-35 35-35 33-37 37-33 35-35 34-36 34-36 38-32 35-36 36-35 37-34 36-35 35-36 37-34 38-33 35-36 39-32 38-33 35-36 35-36 35-36 36-35 36-35 37-34

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71

71-74-145 +3 73-72-145 +3 73-72-145 +3 76-69-145 +3 75-70-145 +3 74-71-145 +3 76-69-145 +3 76-70-146 +4 74-72-146 +4 73-73-146 +4 70-76-146 +4 73-73-146 +4 75-71-146 +4 74-72-146 +4 71-75-146 +4 73-73-146 +4 76-70-146 +4 75-71-146 +4 74-73-147 +5 78-69-147 +5 74-73-147 +5 75-72-147 +5 75-72-147 +5 72-75-147 +5 73-74-147 +5 71-76-147 +5 72-75-147 +5 70-77-147 +5 73-74-147 +5 73-74-147 +5 76-72-148 +6 75-73-148 +6 72-76-148 +6 74-74-148 +6 75-74-149 +7 78-71-149 +7 72-77-149 +7 79-70-149 +7 75-74-149 +7 72-77-149 +7 72-77-149 +7 76-73-149 +7 75-74-149 +7 79-71-150 +8 77-73-150 +8 73-77-150 +8 74-76-150 +8 77-73-150 +8 70-80-150 +8 72-78-150 +8 77-74-151 +9 76-76-152 +10 72-80-152 +10

Jonathan Randolph Nicholas Lindheim Zecheng Dou Zac Blair Martin Flores D.A. Points Grayson Murray Shane Lowry Robert Streb Ken Duke Johnson Wagner Stephan Jaeger Roberto Diaz Bob Estes Derek Fathauer J.J. Henry Martin Piller Kelly Kraft Peter Malnati David Hearn Kiradech Aphibarnrat John Merrick Brian Davis Scott Brown John Huh Braden Thornberry Dawson Armstrong Brett Stegmaier Zachary Olsen Dicky Pride Sam Saunders Billy Hurley III Harris English John Rollins Ben Crane Ethan Tracy Kyle Thompson Kevin Chappell Mark Wilson Blayne Barber Rob Oppenheim Tom Lovelady Robert Allenby Scott Piercy Kevin Tway Rick Lamb Andrew Yun Tommy Gainey

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

35-36 37-34 36-35 36-36 36-36 35-37 36-36 35-37 37-35 37-35 37-35 33-39 35-37 37-35 39-33 37-35 36-36 36-36 35-37 37-35 38-34 34-38 39-34 35-38 36-37 37-36 33-40 37-36 35-38 37-36 36-37 38-35 35-38 36-37 37-36 36-37 38-35 38-36 41-33 35-39 37-37 39-35 38-36 38-36 38-36 39-35 38-36 34-41

Jebavy, Matt (Murfreesboro, Tenn.) MacWhinnie, Bobby (Charlotte, N.C.) Wrozier, Justin (a) (St. Peters) Gutesha, Alex (Dallas) Holt, Logan (Dublin, Ohio) Hong, Peter (Charlotte, N.C.) Worley, Dane (Cedar Rapids, Iowa) Choate, Corey (a) (Eureka) Cooper, A.J. (Hannibal, Mo.) Nixon, Willson (St. Louis) Smith, Tyler (Oskaloosa, Iowa) Buente, Blaine (Troy, Mo.) Massey, Jordan-Tyler (Panama City, Fla.) Mickelson, Matthew (Lamoni, Iowa) Pierce, Van (a) (Naples, Fla.) Sullivan, Ryan (a) (Arnold) Eckelkamp, Ryan (a) (Washington, Mo.) Hogan, Toppie (a) (St. Louis) Dittmer, Zachary (Kansas City, Mo.) Greene, Michael (Overland Park, Kansas) Eaton, Drew (a) (Quincy, Ill.) Hauter, Jonathan (Fairview, Texas) Mitchell, Andrew (Benton, Ill.) Kim, Hongsang (a) (St. Charles) Manley, Marcus (Orlando, Fla.) Wollam, Ben (Marshalltown, Iowa) Boat, Ian (Leawood, Kansas) Weaver, Thomas (a) (St. Louis) Barbee, Nate (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Weber III, Richard (Weldon Springs) Maloney, Conrad (a) (Wildwood) Hoerstkamp, Austin (a) (Washington, Mo.) Correnti, Joseph (a) (Ellisville) McCarthy, Matthew (a) (O’Fallon, Ill.) Reinert, Christopher (Parkville, Mo.) Postal, Carson (a) (St. Louis) Proctor, Colin (Anderson, Ind.) Taylor, Robb (Scottsdale, Ariz.) McLaurin, Jordan (Ironton, Mo.) Homb, Mitchell (O’Fallon, Ill.) Alferman, Tommy (a) (Washington, Mo.) Sides, Braxton (Canyon, Texas) Ray, Bobby (a) (St. Louis) Brennan, Sean (a) (Creve Coeur) Hemings, Justin (a) (Edwardsville) Schroeder, Will (a) (Union) Skrivan, Chad (O’Fallon, Mo.) Benson, Aaron (Monroe City, Mo.) Perotti, Louie (a) (Wildwood) Coats, Jonathan (Huntsville, Ala.) Wahle, Kevin (a) (Wildwood) Cossio, Francisco (Brigantine, N.J.) Funk, Taylor (Ponte Vedra, Fla.) Bader, Patrick (a) (St. Louis)

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75

+1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5

Eric Axley Daniel Summerhays Xinjun Zhang Lanto Griffin Matt Atkins Ben Martin Charlie Beljan David Berganio, Jr. Ben Crancer Will Claxton Sung Kang Troy Matteson Johan Kok John Daly Smylie Kaufman Greg Chalmers

77-75-152 74-78-152 74-78-152 77-76-153 81-72-153 78-75-153 78-75-153 78-75-153 74-79-153 75-78-153 73-80-153 73-81-154 76-78-154 79-75-154 77-77-154 76-78-154 75-80-155 77-78-155 80-75-155 78-77-155 83-73-156 78-78-156 76-80-156 77-79-156 81-75-156 79-78-157 76-81-157 77-81-158 75-83-158 77-81-158 77-82-159 73-86-159 83-77-160 83-77-160 79-81-160 83-77-160 80-81-161 81-80-161 79-83-162 83-80-163 86-78-164 84-80-164 78-88-166 88-78-166 81-86-167 80-87-167 84-83-167 85-85-170 88-83-171 76-96-172 94-98-192 78-WD-WD WD-WD-WD 89-NS-NS

37-38 37-38 37-38 40-35 37-38 36-39 38-37 40-35 40-35 38-38 38-38 37-39 40-37 41-38 40-39 42-38

+10 +10 +10 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +12 +12 +12 +12 +12 +13 +13 +13 +13 +14 +14 +14 +14 +14 +15 +15 +16 +16 +16 +17 +17 +18 +18 +18 +18 +19 +19 +20 +21 +22 +22 +24 +24 +25 +25 +25 +28 +29 +30 +50 -

— 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 76 +6 — 76 +6 — 76 +6 — 77 +7 — 79 +9 — 79 +9 — 80 +10

Euro | Shot Clock Masters Thursday | Vienna Purse: $1.18M | Yards: 7,458 | Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Oscar Lengden, Sweden 33-33 — 66 Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland 34-33 — 67 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 36-31 — 67 Peter Hanson, Sweden 33-34 — 67 Justin Walters, South Africa 35-33 — 68 Mikko Korhonen, Finland 32-36 — 68 Anders Hansen, Denmark 34-34 — 68 Bradley Neil, Scotland 33-35 — 68 Connor Syme, Scotland 36-32 — 68 Jeppe Pape Huldahl, Denmark 33-35 — 68 Ross McGowan, England 35-34 — 69 Mikael Lundberg, Sweden 35-34 — 69 Ashun Wu, China 34-35 — 69 Austin Connolly, Canada 34-35 — 69 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 36-33 — 69 Matthias Schwab, Austria 34-35 — 69 Mark Foster, England 33-36 — 69 Sepp Straka, Austria 34-35 — 69 Oscar Stark, Sweden 34-35 — 69 Tom Lewis, England 35-34 — 69 Jeff Winther, Denmark 37-32 — 69 Oliver Farr, Wales 35-34 — 69 Steve Webster, England 33-36 — 69 Also Daniel Im, United States 31-39 — 70 Chase Koepka, United States 35-38 — 73

National Extremes High: 106° Death Valley, California

Low: 30° Leadville, Colorado

Hot conditions continue 60s

Another hot day is in store for the St. Louis area today with highs topping out in the lower 90s. Scattered storms will likely stay north and west of St. Louis until tonight. More chances for storms are forecast this weekend. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

76°

87°

91°

80°

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Few storms possible

Rain

70s 70s

T-storms

90s

90s

70s

SUNDAY

MONDAY

68 69 69 68 69 70 72 68 67 67 70 69 65

90 92 89 91 91 89 92 88 89 88 91 91 88

W

thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

73°/89° 74°/92° 74°/92°

Slight chance of storms

Few storms possible

Chicago 59 / 78

67 67 59 67 69 68 65 67 70 59 70 66

90 92 78 92 91 88 93 89 89 78 92 91

thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy

Kirksville 68 / 88

Springfield 70 / 9 2

Kansas City 72 / 9 2 St. Louis 73 / 92 Joplin 70 / 89

Flood Stage

Current Level

Carbondale 67/92 Poplar Bluff 69 / 92

+ 0.01 - 0.04 + 0.01 - 0.14 - 0.08 - 0.10 - 0.27 - 0.41 - 0.55 - 0.32

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Jun 7th Tree - 2 (low), Grass - 9 (moderate), Mold - 8,009 (moderate) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 19 Month (Total) 88 Season 431 Year Ago 337 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 12.65 Peoria 18 11.27 Beardstown 14 10.54 MERAMEC RIVER Sullivan 15 3.48 Valley Park 16 - 0.44 Arnold 24 11.31 BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.30 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 28.61 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.21 - 0.39 - 0.24 - 0.23 - 0.69 - 0.51 - 0.26

SUN & MOON

New Jun 13 Sunrise

First Jun 20

Full Jun 27

5:36 AM Sunset

Last Jul 6 8:24 PM

Moonrise 2:28 AM Moonset 2:45 PM

Saturn is the second largest planet in the solar system. It has a diameter of roughly 72,000 miles, which makes Saturn nine times larger than Earth.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

359.34 360.05 498.47 659.69 707.06 670.96 917.16 840.78 597.02 407.79 606.05 444.50

+ 0.20 - 0.03 - 0.04 - 0.01 + 0.01 - 0.20 + 0.02 + 0.30 - 0.02 - 0.04 0.00 - 0.02

- 0.96 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Clusters of showers and thunderstorms are expected from parts of the central Appalachians back to portions of the Midwest and Missouri Valley in association with a frontal boundary. Another front will bring wet weather to parts of the Pacific Northwest. Dry conditions will be in place from the Deep South back to the Desert Southwest. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 56 Albuquerque 64 Anchorage 47 Atlanta 70 Atlantic City 56 Baltimore 62 Billings 56 Biloxi, Ms. 77 Birmingham 68 Bismarck 63 Boise 61 Boston 56 Buffalo 56 Burlington, Vt. 55 Charleston, S.C. 72 Charleston, W.V. 57 Charlotte 68 Cheyenne 50 Chicago 59 Cincinnati 65 Cleveland 63 Colorado Spgs. 54 Concord, N.H. 52 Dallas 77 Daytona Beach 71 Denver 57 Des Moines 69 75 Destin, Fl. 61 Detroit 78 El Paso 69 Evansville 49 Fairbanks 59 Fargo 42 Flagstaff 72 Fort Myers 54 Great Falls 54 Green Bay 54 Hartford 73 Honolulu 74 Houston 70 Indianapolis 68 Jackson, Ms. 47 Juneau 78 Key West 75 Las Vegas 72 Little Rock 61 Los Angeles 69 Louisville

79 94 63 89 82 83 85 89 93 82 86 78 76 74 86 90 88 85 78 89 80 91 79 94 89 95 87 87 81 99 92 70 79 83 90 82 74 80 87 94 91 94 58 88 101 93 78 91

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny showers showers sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy

53 63 49 70 63 68 58 75 71 60 60 59 55 53 71 66 70 50 64 67 64 58 49 76 72 57 69 76 63 73 70 49 62 42 73 56 57 56 76 74 69 71 43 78 75 73 62 70

79 92 66 89 79 84 96 88 90 86 72 79 76 72 89 91 90 85 76 86 74 93 78 96 88 94 87 87 77 97 89 70 82 82 92 89 75 81 88 93 87 93 56 89 102 94 79 91

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers showers sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms

City

Today L H

69 Macon 79 McAllen, Tx. 72 Memphis 75 Miami 53 Milwaukee Minneapolis 65 Missoula, Mt. 52 69 Mobile Montgomery 68 67 Nashville New Orleans 74 New York City 59 Norfolk, Va. 64 Oklahoma City 73 Omaha 68 Orlando 72 Palm Springs 72 Philadelphia 62 Phoenix 76 Pittsburgh 60 Portland, Me. 54 Portland, Or. 54 Providence 54 Raleigh 66 Rapid City 59 Reno 52 Richmond, Va. 62 Sacramento 55 St. Petersburg 77 Salt Lake City 64 San Antonio 76 San Diego 61 San Francisco 54 Santa Fe 54 Savannah 71 Seattle 54 73 Shreveport 64 Sioux Falls 54 Syracuse 69 Tallahassee 75 Tampa 71 Tucson 72 Tulsa 66 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 75 71 Wichita Wilmington, De. 60 71 Yuma

90 100 94 88 66 78 79 91 92 94 93 83 83 93 90 91 103 84 108 79 78 67 79 89 85 88 87 87 87 90 96 73 69 91 88 64 94 85 77 92 87 105 91 85 87 94 83 106

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms rain sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

69 79 73 76 56 62 52 72 71 70 73 65 69 73 69 72 75 68 78 63 52 53 57 68 60 61 69 56 76 67 75 61 56 55 71 51 73 65 52 70 74 71 73 69 75 70 67 72

90 99 94 87 68 78 72 92 90 92 92 79 89 95 90 92 105 82 110 77 75 61 79 91 88 75 90 80 88 96 95 74 67 89 89 61 94 86 77 91 89 105 94 85 87 97 82 108

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny showers very hot thunderstorms partly cloudy showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy windy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms windy partly cloudy sunny windy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms very hot partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny showers very hot

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

75 61 68 85 82 77 68 56 63 49 72 52 77 54 55 63

85 73 93 112 93 85 90 84 86 61 103 81 86 68 68 81

W

partly cloudy showers mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny thunderstorms

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

59 77 67 79 66 43 64 55 50 87 56 54 48 78 54 85

77 82 81 90 89 66 92 72 75 105 82 74 62 84 71 104

W

showers thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy rain thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.33 + 0.11 + 0.09 - 0.04 - 0.20

Very unhealthy

Good

90s

Hawaii High: 86°

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER 32 15.08 Kansas City Jefferson City 23 11.21 Hermann 21 10.72 Washington 20 8.11 St. Charles 25 14.55 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 12.78 Hannibal 15 11.88 Louisiana 25 20.41 Dam 24 26 20.23 Dam 25 18 15.55 Grafton 419 416.90 M.Price, Pool 21 10.57 M.Price, Tail. 30 13.94 St Louis 27 17.09 Chester Cape Girardeau 32 22.22

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.31” 1.09” 21.24” 17.46”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

94° 74° 83° 64° 96° 48° 82° 59°

Wintry Mix

100s

City

W

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (2:45 p.m.) Low (5:13 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2011) Record Low (1944) High Last Year Low Last Year

90s 90s

Partly cloudy Slight chance of storms

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

H

Snow

100s

TUESDAY

73°/91°

L

80s

80s

100s SATURDAY

90s

70s

80s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

70s

80s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA

70s

80s

Alaska Low: 25°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

70s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

57 59 59 70 64 77 36 64 46 50 79 66 56 55 63 52

82 80 82 78 78 88 64 81 68 66 91 81 67 59 84 82

sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny


FOR THE RECORD

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH executive senior associate athletics director for external affairs. VANDERBILT — Named Jake Kirkendall director of football operations and Dr. Christiana Russell director of player development.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League BLUE JAYS ...............-$182 .....................Orioles RED SOX................. -$300................White Sox Indians ....................-$155 .................... TIGERS Mariners..................-$135 ........................RAYS Astros..................... -$220................ RANGERS Angels .....................-$125 ..................... TWINS A’S............................-$157 ..................... Royals National League CUBS........................-$172 .....................Pirates PHILLIES .................-$125 ...................Brewers NATIONALS ............ -$220......................Giants Cards...................... -$140....................... REDS MARLINS.................-$130 .....................Padres ROCKIES..................-$107 ................... D’backs DODGERS ................-$185 .....................Braves Interleague Yankees...................-$117........................ METS NBA Favorite Points Underdog NBA Finals Warriors..................... 5..................CAVALIERS TENNIS • French Open D. Thiem -$800......... vs. M. Cecchinato +$550 R. Nadal -$700.............. vs. J. del Potro +$500 Saturday S. Halep -$210................vs. S. Stephens +$175 Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

SOCCER Major League Soccer Friday Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.

BASKETBALL | WNBA Thursday Minnesota 88, Washington 80 Connecticut 88, New York 86 Seattle 88, Los Angeles 63

COLLEGE BASEBALL NCAA super regionals Best-of-3; x-if necessary Host school is home team for Game 1; visiting school is home team for Game 2; coin flip determines home team for Game 3

At Chapel Hill, N.C. Friday: North Carolina (41-18) vs. Stetson (48-11), 10 a.m. Saturday: 11 a.m. x-Sunday: 11 a.m.

At Nashville, Tenn.

TRANSACTIONS

Friday: Vanderbilt (34-25) vs. Mississippi State (35-26), 7 p.m. Saturday: 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday: 5 p.m.

BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended freeagent LHP Fernando Abad 80 games and Chicago Cubs RHP David Garner (Iowa-PCL) 100 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON — Optioned LHP Bobby Poyner to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled LHP Jalen Beeks from Pawtucket. CHICAGO — Optioned RHP Juan Minaya and LHP Aaron Bummer to Charlotte (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Xavier Cedeno from Charlotte. DETROIT — Signed RHP Jacob Turner to a minor league contract. Activated RHP Alex Wilson from the 10-day DL. Optioned 3B Ronny Rodriguez to Toledo (IL). MINNESOTA — Reinstated RHP Trevor May from the 60-day DL and optioned him to Rochester (IL). Transferred C Jason Castro to the 60-day DL. OAKLAND — Optioned C Bruce Maxwell to Nashville (PCL). Reinstated RHP Paul Blackburn from the 60-day DL. Transferred OF Boog Powell to the 60-day DL. TAMPA BAY — Designated INF Brad Miller for assignment. TEXAS — Signed president of baseball operations and general manager Jon Daniels to a multi-year contract extension. National League ARIZONA — Designated 3B Kristopher Negron for assignment. LOS ANGELES — Placed LHP Tony Cingrani on the 10-day DL. Optioned LHP Caleb Ferguson to Oklahoma City (PCL). Recalled RHP Pedro Baez and LHP Edward Paredes from Oklahoma City. MIAMI — Optioned RHP Tyler Cloyd to New Orleans (PCL). Recalled RHP Trevor Richards from New Orleans. CARDINALS — Assigned C Steven Baron outright to Memphis (PCL). Designated RHP Preston Guilmet for assignment. Reinstated 2B Greg Garcia from paternity leave. Sent RHPs Greg Holland and Matt Bowman to Memphis for rehab assignments. Frontier League FLORENCE — Sold the contract of INF Jose Brizuela to the N.Y. Mets. Released UT Mike Morris. SCHAUMBURG — Signed RHP Sam Myers. BASKETBALL | NBA NEW ORLEANS — Agreed to terms with coach Alvin Gentry on a contract extension through the 2020-21 season. NEW YORK — Named Keith Smart, Jud Buechler, Pat Sullivan and Royal Ivey assistant coaches. PHILADELPHIA — Announced the resignation of president of basketball operations Bryan Colangelo. FOOTBALL | National Football League CLEVELAND — Agreed to terms with RB Duke Johnson on a three-year contract extension. HOCKEY | National Hockey League CHICAGO — Agreed to terms with F Andreas Martinsen on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY — Re-signed D Daniel Walcott to a one-year, two-way contract. SOCCER | National Women’s Soccer League SKY BLUE FC — Signed D Cassidy Benintente as a national team replacement player. COLLEGE ALBANY (N.Y.) — Granted a release to junior FS TD Ierlan from the men’s lacrosse program. KANSAS STATE — Announced sophomore women’s basketball G Sarah Bates will transfer from UC Santa Barbara. UTSA — Named Katie Douglass

At Corvallis, Ore. Friday: Oregon State (47-10-1) vs. Minnesota (44-13), 4 p.m. Saturday: 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday: 8 p.m.

At Fullerton, Calif. Friday: Cal State Fullerton (35-23) vs. Washington (33-23), 1 p.m. Saturday: 5:30 p.m. x-Sunday: 8 p.m.

At Gainesville, Fla. Sat.: Florida (45-18) vs. Auburn (42-21), 11 a.m. Sunday: 11 a.m. x-Monday: 7:30 p.m.

At Fayetteville, Ark. Saturday: Arkansas (42-18) vs. South Carolina (36-24), 5:30 p.m. Sunday: 2 p.m. x-Monday: 6 p.m.

At Lubbock, Texas Saturday: Texas Tech (42-17) vs. Duke (44-16), 2 p.m. Sunday: 5 p.m. x-Monday: 3 p.m.

At Austin, Texas Saturday: Texas (40-20) vs. Tennessee Tech (52-10), 2 p.m. Sunday: 2 p.m. x-Monday: Noon

BELMONT STAKES The field for Saturday’s Belmont Stakes: PP Horse Odds 1. Justify 4-5 2. Free Drop Billy 30-1 3. Bravazo 8-1 4. Hofburg 9-2 5. Restoring Hope 30-1 6. Gronkowski 12-1 7. Tenfold 12-1 8. Vino Rosso 8-1 9. Noble Indy 30-1 10. Blended Citizen 15-1 Weights: 126 pounds. Distance: 1 1/2 miles. Purse: $1.5 million. First place: $800,000. Second place: $280,000. Third place: $150,000. Fourth place: $100,000. Fifth place: $60,000. Post time: 5:46 p.m. Saturday

GOLF Area holes in one Berry Hill • Keith Gregory, hole No. 8, 145 yards, pitching wedge. Bear Creek • John L. Seigel, hole No. 16, 157 yards. Ballwin • Lynett O’Shea, hole No. 4, 132 yards, 5-hybrid. Algonquin • Barb Jones, hole No. 8, 138 yards, 4-hybrid, June 7. Forest Hills • Mason Reynolds, hole No. 3, 109 yards, 9-iron, June 7.

BASEBALL Frontier League Thursday Washington 23, Traverse City 1 Windy City 4, Schaumburg 1 Normal 9, River City 5 Evansville 11, Gateway 5 Joliet 5, Lake Erie 4 Southern Illinois 10, Florence 9, 12 inn.

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

GOLF | 13TH METROPOLITAN OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP Bryant, Justin (Kirkwood) Sullivan, Ryan (Winston Salem, N.C.) Cooke, David (Bolingbrook, Ill.) Fulford, Spence (Davenport, Fla.) Russell, Jordan (Bryan, Texas) Smith, Shane (Godfrey) Bardgett, Justin (Chesterfield) Holtz, Brandon (Bloomington, Ill.) Kelpin, Barrett (Kalamazoo, Mich.) Latimer, Nick (Singer Island, Fla.) Lilleboe, Eric (Okemos, Mich.) Lister, Andrew (College Sta., Texas) Peaper, Brant (Jupiter, Fla.) Kwon, Luke (Carollton, Texas) Long, Jace (McKinney, Texas) Neeman, Collin (Columbia, Ill.) Arman, Nick (Ellisville) Holland, Charlie (Dallas) Ajubita, Neal (Metairie, La.) Fritsch, Brad (Holly Springs, N.C.) Nagy, Michael (Manistique, Minn.) Berkshire, Jeff (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Adamonis, Brad (Coral Springs, Fla.) Crow, Warren (a) (St. Louis) Haley, Paul (Dallas) Stolpe, Patrick (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Szyhowski, Kyle (a) (St. Charles) Isabel, Craig (Winona Lake, Ind.) Rodes, Kyle (Plymouth, Mich.) Bryant, Matthew (Columbia, S.C.) Johnson, Neil (River Falls, Wisc.) Esler, Josh (Wauconda, Ill.) Kovach, Chris (a) (St. Louis) Laske, Gabe (Wildwood) Ledford, Bryce (Ooltewah, Tenn.) Slattery, Kurt (Taylor Ridge, Ill.) White, Brett (Caledonia, Mich.) Crawford, Kolton (Mansfield, Texas) Hudson, Robert (Memphis, Tenn.) Smith, Ted (Orlando, Fla.) Baker, Mark (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Cusumano, Alex (a) (St. Louis) Dickens IV, Al (Charlotte) Juszczyk, Joseph (Dearborn Heights, Mich.) Mather, Mitchell (Lebanon, Mo.) Meyers, Cameron (Edmond, Okla.) Oneal, Tim (Savannah, Ga.) Reese, Dalton (Warrenton, Ga.) Weldon, Kyle (Ballwin)

62-70-132 67-69-136 67-69-136 68-68-136 66-70-136 65-72-137 68-70-138 69-69-138 68-70-138 72-66-138 68-70-138 71-68-139 69-70-139 69-71-140 70-70-140 69-71-140 72-68-140 70-70-140 68-73-141 73-68-141 70-71-141 73-68-141 69-73-142 72-70-142 73-69-142 72-70-142 73-69-142 70-72-142 72-70-142 71-72-143 73-70-143 72-71-143 71-72-143 71-72-143 71-72-143 71-72-143 72-71-143 74-70-144 73-71-144 78-66-144 72-72-144 75-69-144 71-73-144 71-73-144 73-71-144 72-72-144 71-73-144 72-72-144 71-73-144

PGA | St Jude Classic Thursday | Memphis, Tenn. Purse: $6.6M | Yards: 7,244 | Par: 70 (35-35) First Round Seamus Power 33-32 — 65 -5 Troy Merritt 32-34 — 66 -4 Wesley Bryan 32-34 — 66 -4 Fabian Gomez 33-33 — 66 -4 Brooks Koepka 33-33 — 66 -4 Phil Mickelson 32-34 — 66 -4 Chris Kirk 35-31 — 66 -4 Michael Kim 32-34 — 66 -4 Brandon Harkins 31-35 — 66 -4 Steve Stricker 33-33 — 66 -4 Mackenzie Hughes 33-33 — 66 -4 Stuart Appleby 35-31 — 66 -4 Matt Jones 33-34 — 67 -3 C.T. Pan 33-34 — 67 -3 Byeong Hun An 34-33 — 67 -3 Chez Reavie 35-32 — 67 -3 Dustin Johnson 34-33 — 67 -3 Dominic Bozzelli 33-34 — 67 -3 Scott Stallings 34-33 — 67 -3 Retief Goosen 35-32 — 67 -3 Ryan Blaum 35-32 — 67 -3 Andrew Putnam 33-34 — 67 -3 Chad Campbell 33-35 — 68 -2 John Peterson 34-34 — 68 -2 George McNeill 35-33 — 68 -2 Charl Schwartzel 34-34 — 68 -2 Henrik Stenson 35-33 — 68 -2 William McGirt 34-34 — 68 -2 Padraig Harrington 33-35 — 68 -2 Stewart Cink 34-34 — 68 -2 Ryan Palmer 35-33 — 68 -2 Richy Werenski 34-34 — 68 -2 Denny McCarthy 35-33 — 68 -2 Grant Hirschman 33-35 — 68 -2 Corey Conners 35-33 — 68 -2 Shawn Stefani 38-31 — 69 -1 D.J. Trahan 35-34 — 69 -1 Robert Garrigus 34-35 — 69 -1 Cody Gribble 36-33 — 69 -1 Luke List 34-35 — 69 -1 Keith Mitchell 33-36 — 69 -1 Steve Wheatcroft 34-35 — 69 -1 Trey Mullinax 34-35 — 69 -1 Nate Lashley 34-35 — 69 -1

WEATHER • Low 73, High 92 • Winds SSW 5-10 mph

-10 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2

MISSED THE CUT Gielow, Brendan (Asheville, N.C.) Hallberg, Eric (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Martin, Cody (Fort Mitchell, Ky.) Nelson, Ian (Macomb, Ill.) Purser, Rustin (Edmond, Okla.) Pranger, Drew (a) (St. Louis) Schaff, Tommy (Ridgeland, S.C.) Castle, Ethan (Phoenix) Jeske, Kevin (a) (Kirkwood) Kline, Eric (Ponca City, Okla.) Kring, Kevin (Springfield, Mo.) Luth, Patrick (Medina, Ohio) Alex, Anthony (Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.) Dominick, Michael (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Gregson, Mitchell (Jacksonville, Fla.) Northcutt, Glenn (Dothan, Ala.) Regier, Justin (Chicago) Tolan, Derek (Highlands Ranch, Colo.) Ahearn, John (a) (St. Louis) Buege, Andy (Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.) Busch, Sean (Lauderdale By-The-Sea, Fla.) Hurley, John (Tomball, Texas) Taylor, Julian (Fulton, Mo.) Tyler, Nathan (Mesquite, Texas) Grant, Stephen (Plantation, Fla.) Sanchez, Marty (Santa Fe, N.M.) Schaake, Carson (Omaha, Nebraska) Siegfried, Jim (a) (St. Louis) Tucker, Jake (Cullman, Ala.) Williamson, Jay (St. Louis) Callahan, Crimson (a) (Chesterfield) Heavens, Christian (Fairview Heights) Phillips, Steven (Clarksville, Tenn.) Fortner, Alden (Dothan, Ala.) Berkmeyer, Richard (a) (Town and Country) Ferris, Christopher (a) (St. Louis) Taylor, J.T. (Conroe, Texas) Bullington, Brian (Frankfort, Ill.) Carpenter, Brad (a) (Washington, Mo.) Hoemann, Matthew (a) (Washington, Mo.) Jennings, Matthew (Prairie City, Iowa) Migdal, Sam (a) (Ballwin) Yankovich, Nathan (Blacklick, Ohio) Cornfield, Ryan (Spartanburg, S.C.) Green, Andrew (Oklahoma City) Arp, Riley (Fort Collins, Colo.) Ciaramitaro, Alex (a) (St. Peters) Hatley, Matt (a) (Belleville) Neff, Tyler (Knoxville, Tenn.) Weems, Josh (Lake Quivira, Kansas) Grubnich, Nicholas (Crown Point, Ind.) Abolt, David (Cuba, Mo.) Engel, Sam (Scottsdale, Ariz.)

Peter Uihlein Joaquin Niemann Tyler Duncan Brian Gay Austin Cook J.B. Holmes Danny Lee Abraham Ancer Cameron Beckman Bronson Burgoon Casey Wittenberg Brendon de Jonge Harold Varner III Hunter Mahan Aaron Baddeley James Hahn Tony Finau Joel Dahmen Nick Taylor Conrad Shindler J.T. Poston Ben Silverman T.J. Vogel Jonathan Byrd Daniel Chopra Billy Horschel Charles Howell III Daniel Berger Parker McLachlin Omar Uresti Sam Ryder A.J. McInerney Ricky Barnes Matt Every Brice Garnett Tim Herron Tyrone Van Aswegen Tom Hoge Cameron Tringale Jon Curran Brian Stuard Vaughn Taylor Brandt Snedeker David Lingmerth Cameron Percy Scottie Scheffler Talor Gooch Adam Schenk

35-34 33-36 36-33 36-33 34-35 36-33 33-36 33-36 34-35 34-35 36-33 33-37 36-34 36-34 35-35 34-36 33-37 35-35 35-35 37-33 34-36 34-36 35-35 37-33 35-35 35-35 33-37 37-33 35-35 34-36 34-36 38-32 35-36 36-35 37-34 36-35 35-36 37-34 38-33 35-36 39-32 38-33 35-36 35-36 35-36 36-35 36-35 37-34

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71

71-74-145 +3 73-72-145 +3 73-72-145 +3 76-69-145 +3 75-70-145 +3 74-71-145 +3 76-69-145 +3 76-70-146 +4 74-72-146 +4 73-73-146 +4 70-76-146 +4 73-73-146 +4 75-71-146 +4 74-72-146 +4 71-75-146 +4 73-73-146 +4 76-70-146 +4 75-71-146 +4 74-73-147 +5 78-69-147 +5 74-73-147 +5 75-72-147 +5 75-72-147 +5 72-75-147 +5 73-74-147 +5 71-76-147 +5 72-75-147 +5 70-77-147 +5 73-74-147 +5 73-74-147 +5 76-72-148 +6 75-73-148 +6 72-76-148 +6 74-74-148 +6 75-74-149 +7 78-71-149 +7 72-77-149 +7 79-70-149 +7 75-74-149 +7 72-77-149 +7 72-77-149 +7 76-73-149 +7 75-74-149 +7 79-71-150 +8 77-73-150 +8 73-77-150 +8 74-76-150 +8 77-73-150 +8 70-80-150 +8 72-78-150 +8 77-74-151 +9 76-76-152 +10 72-80-152 +10

Jonathan Randolph Nicholas Lindheim Zecheng Dou Zac Blair Martin Flores D.A. Points Grayson Murray Shane Lowry Robert Streb Ken Duke Johnson Wagner Stephan Jaeger Roberto Diaz Bob Estes Derek Fathauer J.J. Henry Martin Piller Kelly Kraft Peter Malnati David Hearn Kiradech Aphibarnrat John Merrick Brian Davis Scott Brown John Huh Braden Thornberry Dawson Armstrong Brett Stegmaier Zachary Olsen Dicky Pride Sam Saunders Billy Hurley III Harris English John Rollins Ben Crane Ethan Tracy Kyle Thompson Kevin Chappell Mark Wilson Blayne Barber Rob Oppenheim Tom Lovelady Robert Allenby Scott Piercy Kevin Tway Rick Lamb Andrew Yun Tommy Gainey

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

35-36 37-34 36-35 36-36 36-36 35-37 36-36 35-37 37-35 37-35 37-35 33-39 35-37 37-35 39-33 37-35 36-36 36-36 35-37 37-35 38-34 34-38 39-34 35-38 36-37 37-36 33-40 37-36 35-38 37-36 36-37 38-35 35-38 36-37 37-36 36-37 38-35 38-36 41-33 35-39 37-37 39-35 38-36 38-36 38-36 39-35 38-36 34-41

Jebavy, Matt (Murfreesboro, Tenn.) MacWhinnie, Bobby (Charlotte, N.C.) Wrozier, Justin (a) (St. Peters) Gutesha, Alex (Dallas) Holt, Logan (Dublin, Ohio) Hong, Peter (Charlotte, N.C.) Worley, Dane (Cedar Rapids, Iowa) Choate, Corey (a) (Eureka) Cooper, A.J. (Hannibal, Mo.) Nixon, Willson (St. Louis) Smith, Tyler (Oskaloosa, Iowa) Buente, Blaine (Troy, Mo.) Massey, Jordan-Tyler (Panama City, Fla.) Mickelson, Matthew (Lamoni, Iowa) Pierce, Van (a) (Naples, Fla.) Sullivan, Ryan (a) (Arnold) Eckelkamp, Ryan (a) (Washington, Mo.) Hogan, Toppie (a) (St. Louis) Dittmer, Zachary (Kansas City, Mo.) Greene, Michael (Overland Park, Kansas) Eaton, Drew (a) (Quincy, Ill.) Hauter, Jonathan (Fairview, Texas) Mitchell, Andrew (Benton, Ill.) Kim, Hongsang (a) (St. Charles) Manley, Marcus (Orlando, Fla.) Wollam, Ben (Marshalltown, Iowa) Boat, Ian (Leawood, Kansas) Weaver, Thomas (a) (St. Louis) Barbee, Nate (Scottsdale, Ariz.) Weber III, Richard (Weldon Springs) Maloney, Conrad (a) (Wildwood) Hoerstkamp, Austin (a) (Washington, Mo.) Correnti, Joseph (a) (Ellisville) McCarthy, Matthew (a) (O’Fallon, Ill.) Reinert, Christopher (Parkville, Mo.) Postal, Carson (a) (St. Louis) Proctor, Colin (Anderson, Ind.) Taylor, Robb (Scottsdale, Ariz.) McLaurin, Jordan (Ironton, Mo.) Homb, Mitchell (O’Fallon, Ill.) Alferman, Tommy (a) (Washington, Mo.) Sides, Braxton (Canyon, Texas) Ray, Bobby (a) (St. Louis) Brennan, Sean (a) (Creve Coeur) Hemings, Justin (a) (Edwardsville) Schroeder, Will (a) (Union) Skrivan, Chad (O’Fallon, Mo.) Benson, Aaron (Monroe City, Mo.) Perotti, Louie (a) (Wildwood) Coats, Jonathan (Huntsville, Ala.) Wahle, Kevin (a) (Wildwood) Cossio, Francisco (Brigantine, N.J.) Funk, Taylor (Ponte Vedra, Fla.) Bader, Patrick (a) (St. Louis)

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75

+1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5

Eric Axley Daniel Summerhays Xinjun Zhang Lanto Griffin Matt Atkins Ben Martin Charlie Beljan David Berganio, Jr. Ben Crancer Will Claxton Sung Kang Troy Matteson Johan Kok John Daly Smylie Kaufman Greg Chalmers

77-75-152 74-78-152 74-78-152 77-76-153 81-72-153 78-75-153 78-75-153 78-75-153 74-79-153 75-78-153 73-80-153 73-81-154 76-78-154 79-75-154 77-77-154 76-78-154 75-80-155 77-78-155 80-75-155 78-77-155 83-73-156 78-78-156 76-80-156 77-79-156 81-75-156 79-78-157 76-81-157 77-81-158 75-83-158 77-81-158 77-82-159 73-86-159 83-77-160 83-77-160 79-81-160 83-77-160 80-81-161 81-80-161 79-83-162 83-80-163 86-78-164 84-80-164 78-88-166 88-78-166 81-86-167 80-87-167 84-83-167 85-85-170 88-83-171 76-96-172 94-98-192 78-WD-WD WD-WD-WD 89-NS-NS

37-38 37-38 37-38 40-35 37-38 36-39 38-37 40-35 40-35 38-38 38-38 37-39 40-37 41-38 40-39 42-38

+10 +10 +10 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +11 +12 +12 +12 +12 +12 +13 +13 +13 +13 +14 +14 +14 +14 +14 +15 +15 +16 +16 +16 +17 +17 +18 +18 +18 +18 +19 +19 +20 +21 +22 +22 +24 +24 +25 +25 +25 +28 +29 +30 +50 -

— 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 75 +5 — 76 +6 — 76 +6 — 76 +6 — 77 +7 — 79 +9 — 79 +9 — 80 +10

Euro | Shot Clock Masters Thursday | Vienna Purse: $1.18M | Yards: 7,458 | Par: 72 (36-36) First Round Oscar Lengden, Sweden 33-33 — 66 Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland 34-33 — 67 Miguel Angel Jimenez, Spain 36-31 — 67 Peter Hanson, Sweden 33-34 — 67 Justin Walters, South Africa 35-33 — 68 Mikko Korhonen, Finland 32-36 — 68 Anders Hansen, Denmark 34-34 — 68 Bradley Neil, Scotland 33-35 — 68 Connor Syme, Scotland 36-32 — 68 Jeppe Pape Huldahl, Denmark 33-35 — 68 Ross McGowan, England 35-34 — 69 Mikael Lundberg, Sweden 35-34 — 69 Ashun Wu, China 34-35 — 69 Austin Connolly, Canada 34-35 — 69 Soren Kjeldsen, Denmark 36-33 — 69 Matthias Schwab, Austria 34-35 — 69 Mark Foster, England 33-36 — 69 Sepp Straka, Austria 34-35 — 69 Oscar Stark, Sweden 34-35 — 69 Tom Lewis, England 35-34 — 69 Jeff Winther, Denmark 37-32 — 69 Oliver Farr, Wales 35-34 — 69 Steve Webster, England 33-36 — 69 Also Daniel Im, United States 31-39 — 70 Chase Koepka, United States 35-38 — 73

National Extremes High: 106° Death Valley, California

Low: 30° Leadville, Colorado

Hot conditions continue 60s

Another hot day is in store for the St. Louis area today with highs topping out in the lower 90s. Scattered storms will likely stay north and west of St. Louis until tonight. More chances for storms are forecast this weekend. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

76°

87°

91°

80°

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Partly sunny

Few storms possible

Rain

70s 70s

T-storms

90s

90s

70s

SUNDAY

MONDAY

68 69 69 68 69 70 72 68 67 67 70 69 65

90 92 89 91 91 89 92 88 89 88 91 91 88

W

thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

73°/89° 74°/92° 74°/92°

Slight chance of storms

Few storms possible

Chicago 59 / 78

67 67 59 67 69 68 65 67 70 59 70 66

90 92 78 92 91 88 93 89 89 78 92 91

thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy

Kirksville 68 / 88

Springfield 70 / 9 2

Kansas City 72 / 9 2 St. Louis 73 / 92 Joplin 70 / 89

Flood Stage

Current Level

Carbondale 67/92 Poplar Bluff 69 / 92

+ 0.01 - 0.04 + 0.01 - 0.14 - 0.08 - 0.10 - 0.27 - 0.41 - 0.55 - 0.32

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, Jun 7th Tree - 2 (low), Grass - 9 (moderate), Mold - 8,009 (moderate) COOLING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 19 Month (Total) 88 Season 431 Year Ago 337 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 12.65 Peoria 18 11.27 Beardstown 14 10.54 MERAMEC RIVER Sullivan 15 3.48 Valley Park 16 - 0.44 Arnold 24 11.31 BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.30 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 28.61 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.21 - 0.39 - 0.24 - 0.23 - 0.69 - 0.51 - 0.26

SUN & MOON

New Jun 13 Sunrise

First Jun 20

Full Jun 27

5:36 AM Sunset

Last Jul 6 8:24 PM

Moonrise 2:28 AM Moonset 2:45 PM

Saturn is the second largest planet in the solar system. It has a diameter of roughly 72,000 miles, which makes Saturn nine times larger than Earth.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

359.34 360.05 498.47 659.69 707.06 670.96 917.16 840.78 597.02 407.79 606.05 444.50

+ 0.20 - 0.03 - 0.04 - 0.01 + 0.01 - 0.20 + 0.02 + 0.30 - 0.02 - 0.04 0.00 - 0.02

- 0.96 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Clusters of showers and thunderstorms are expected from parts of the central Appalachians back to portions of the Midwest and Missouri Valley in association with a frontal boundary. Another front will bring wet weather to parts of the Pacific Northwest. Dry conditions will be in place from the Deep South back to the Desert Southwest. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 56 Albuquerque 64 Anchorage 47 Atlanta 70 Atlantic City 56 Baltimore 62 Billings 56 Biloxi, Ms. 77 Birmingham 68 Bismarck 63 Boise 61 Boston 56 Buffalo 56 Burlington, Vt. 55 Charleston, S.C. 72 Charleston, W.V. 57 Charlotte 68 Cheyenne 50 Chicago 59 Cincinnati 65 Cleveland 63 Colorado Spgs. 54 Concord, N.H. 52 Dallas 77 Daytona Beach 71 Denver 57 Des Moines 69 75 Destin, Fl. 61 Detroit 78 El Paso 69 Evansville 49 Fairbanks 59 Fargo 42 Flagstaff 72 Fort Myers 54 Great Falls 54 Green Bay 54 Hartford 73 Honolulu 74 Houston 70 Indianapolis 68 Jackson, Ms. 47 Juneau 78 Key West 75 Las Vegas 72 Little Rock 61 Los Angeles 69 Louisville

79 94 63 89 82 83 85 89 93 82 86 78 76 74 86 90 88 85 78 89 80 91 79 94 89 95 87 87 81 99 92 70 79 83 90 82 74 80 87 94 91 94 58 88 101 93 78 91

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny showers showers sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy

53 63 49 70 63 68 58 75 71 60 60 59 55 53 71 66 70 50 64 67 64 58 49 76 72 57 69 76 63 73 70 49 62 42 73 56 57 56 76 74 69 71 43 78 75 73 62 70

79 92 66 89 79 84 96 88 90 86 72 79 76 72 89 91 90 85 76 86 74 93 78 96 88 94 87 87 77 97 89 70 82 82 92 89 75 81 88 93 87 93 56 89 102 94 79 91

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers showers sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms

City

Today L H

69 Macon 79 McAllen, Tx. 72 Memphis 75 Miami 53 Milwaukee Minneapolis 65 Missoula, Mt. 52 69 Mobile Montgomery 68 67 Nashville New Orleans 74 New York City 59 Norfolk, Va. 64 Oklahoma City 73 Omaha 68 Orlando 72 Palm Springs 72 Philadelphia 62 Phoenix 76 Pittsburgh 60 Portland, Me. 54 Portland, Or. 54 Providence 54 Raleigh 66 Rapid City 59 Reno 52 Richmond, Va. 62 Sacramento 55 St. Petersburg 77 Salt Lake City 64 San Antonio 76 San Diego 61 San Francisco 54 Santa Fe 54 Savannah 71 Seattle 54 73 Shreveport 64 Sioux Falls 54 Syracuse 69 Tallahassee 75 Tampa 71 Tucson 72 Tulsa 66 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 75 71 Wichita Wilmington, De. 60 71 Yuma

90 100 94 88 66 78 79 91 92 94 93 83 83 93 90 91 103 84 108 79 78 67 79 89 85 88 87 87 87 90 96 73 69 91 88 64 94 85 77 92 87 105 91 85 87 94 83 106

W

Tomorrow L H W

thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy rain partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms rain sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

69 79 73 76 56 62 52 72 71 70 73 65 69 73 69 72 75 68 78 63 52 53 57 68 60 61 69 56 76 67 75 61 56 55 71 51 73 65 52 70 74 71 73 69 75 70 67 72

90 99 94 87 68 78 72 92 90 92 92 79 89 95 90 92 105 82 110 77 75 61 79 91 88 75 90 80 88 96 95 74 67 89 89 61 94 86 77 91 89 105 94 85 87 97 82 108

thunderstorms mostly sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny showers very hot thunderstorms partly cloudy showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy windy thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms windy partly cloudy sunny windy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms very hot partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny showers very hot

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

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H

75 61 68 85 82 77 68 56 63 49 72 52 77 54 55 63

85 73 93 112 93 85 90 84 86 61 103 81 86 68 68 81

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partly cloudy showers mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny thunderstorms

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

59 77 67 79 66 43 64 55 50 87 56 54 48 78 54 85

77 82 81 90 89 66 92 72 75 105 82 74 62 84 71 104

W

showers thunderstorms sunny mostly sunny sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy rain thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

- 0.33 + 0.11 + 0.09 - 0.04 - 0.20

Very unhealthy

Good

90s

Hawaii High: 86°

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MISSOURI RIVER 32 15.08 Kansas City Jefferson City 23 11.21 Hermann 21 10.72 Washington 20 8.11 St. Charles 25 14.55 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 12.78 Hannibal 15 11.88 Louisiana 25 20.41 Dam 24 26 20.23 Dam 25 18 15.55 Grafton 419 416.90 M.Price, Pool 21 10.57 M.Price, Tail. 30 13.94 St Louis 27 17.09 Chester Cape Girardeau 32 22.22

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

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RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.31” 1.09” 21.24” 17.46”

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PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

94° 74° 83° 64° 96° 48° 82° 59°

Wintry Mix

100s

City

W

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (2:45 p.m.) Low (5:13 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (2011) Record Low (1944) High Last Year Low Last Year

90s 90s

Partly cloudy Slight chance of storms

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

H

Snow

100s

TUESDAY

73°/91°

L

80s

80s

100s SATURDAY

90s

70s

80s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

70s

80s

4-DAY FORECAST

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA

70s

80s

Alaska Low: 25°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

70s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

57 59 59 70 64 77 36 64 46 50 79 66 56 55 63 52

82 80 82 78 78 88 64 81 68 66 91 81 67 59 84 82

sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy sunny


06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C11

CLASSIFIED Public Notices Tell Us Your Story! The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Kansas City District is assessing properties formerly utilized for Military purposes for potential environmental impacts and is seeking information from people who worked or have knowledge of operations at the following locations: ——————————————— Louisiana Satellite Prisoner of War Camp Louisiana, Pike County, Missouri Th e former Louisiana Satellite Prisoner of War (POW) Camp was established from 1943 to 1946 for use as a branch camp for Weingarten and Fort Leonard Wood POW Camps during World War II. The former Louisiana Satellite POW Camp currently is utilized as a trailer park. If you worked at this location for the military, please call or email William Gray or Daniel Parker at the contact information listed below. ————————————— William Gray 410-544-3570 ext. 316 wgray@lrsfederal.com ————————— Daniel Parker 410-544-3570 ext. 313 dparker@lrsfederal.com ————————————— LRS Federal LLC, 8221 Ritchie Highway, Pasadena, MD 21122

The Jewish Federation of St. Louis is taking bids for providing and installing 6 outdoor security cameras. 2 cameras will be LPR and 4 will be post mounted. Please call 314-442-3864 to schedule a walkthrough. All bids will be due by Friday, June 15th at 4:00 pm. Any bids received after this date will not be accepted. Funding for this project are partially funded by the Department of Homeland Security.

Bids/Proposals CITY OF ST. LOUIS BOARD OF PUBLIC SERVICE R E Q U E S T F O R Q U A L I F I C AT I O N S f o r P R O F ES S IO N AL E N G I N E E R I N G A N D F I E LD SURVEY SERVICES, G P S SURVEY TO LOCATE WATER METERS, CITY OF ST. LOUIS WATER DIVISION. Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 PM CT, June 29, 2018 at Board of Pu b lic Se r v ic e , 1 2 0 0 M arket, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. R F Q may be obtained f r o m B P S w e b s i t e w w w .s t lb p s .o r g , u n d e r O n L in e Pla n Room-Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service at 314-622-3535. 25% MBE and 5% WBE participation goals.

INVITATION TO BID #18-065R RSC FINANCIAL SERVICES FOR THE ENERGY AUDIT PROJECTS (REBID) CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for financial services for energy audit project(s) a t t h e R e n a u d Sp ir it C e n t e r . Specifications are available at w w w . ofallon.m o .us under Bid Opportunities. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked “Ren a u d Spirit Center Financial Services for the Energy Audit Project(s) (Rebid)“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 10:00 A.M. CDT, June 19, 2018. Bids w ill be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

McCarthy Building Companies, Inc. will be taking bids on the Phelps County Regional Medical Center Salem Clinic Project on June 14th at 2:00 pm. Please contact Chris Nisbet, cnisbet@mccarthy.com for a c o p y o f t h e C o n t ra c t Documents, Bid Information and Bidder Qualifications.

Notice of Self Storage Sale Please take notice Red Dot Storage 59 - St . Louis located at 9651 St. Charles Rock Rd., St. Louis, MO 63114 intends to hold an auction of the goods stored in the following unit in default for non-payment of rent. The sale will occur as an online auction via www. storagetreasures.com on 6/19/2018 at 10:00am. Unless stated otherwise, the description of the contents are household g o o d s a n d f u r n is h in g s . U n it #C07; Unit #C15; Unit #C39. All property is being stored at the above self-storage facility. This sale may be withdrawn at any time without notice. Certain terms and conditions apply. See manager for details.

Bids/Proposals ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID Request for Proposal Construction Manager Agency Be nton County is seeking proposals to qualify Construction M anagers as the Construction Manager Agency for the Benton County Jail and Sheriff's Office project.

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Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Sealed Bids will be received by the City o f O ’F a llo n , Pu r c h a s in g Agent, 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, Missouri 63366, until 2:00 PM , (prevailing central time) on July 10, 2018, and will thereafter be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidders must sign, in ink, the bid form and all other documents where indicated. Unsigned bids will not be read.

Sealed Bids will be received by the City o f O ’F a llo n , Pu r c h a s in g Agent, 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, Missouri 63366, until 2:30 PM, (prevailing central time) on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 and will thereafter be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidders must sign, in ink, the bid f o r m a n d all other documents where indicated. Unsigned bids will not be read.

Sealed Bids will be received by the City o f O ’F a llo n , Pu r c h a s in g Agent, 100 North Main Street, O’Fallon, Missouri 63366, until 10:00 AM, (prevailing central time) on Wednesday, June 27, 2018 and will thereafter be publicly opened and read aloud. Bidders must sign, in ink, the bid form and all other documents where indicated. Unsigned bids will not be read.

OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University

The proposed work includes the f u r n is h in g o f ma t e r ia ls , t o ols, equipment and labor necessary to construct West Terra Watermain Extension in O’Fallon, Missouri, with Bid Number: 18-061. Work includes the construction of: Installation of 12 inch PVC w a t e r ma in by horizontal directional drill and open cut, fire hy drants, and appurtenances. Project also includes two jack and bores of casing and main at Wo o d l a w n A v e n u e a n d M a in Street (Highway k). The Contract Documents, including specifications, are on file at the office of Drexel Technolog i e s a t h t t p : / / planroom.drexeltech.com and are open for public inspection. Copies of documents may be obtained from Drexel Technologies for the fee listed online. Bids must be submitted on the appropriate bid forms provided and must be accompanied by a Bid Security in the amount equal to and not less than five percent (5%) of the base bid, payable without recourse to the City. The Security may be in the form of a certified cashier’s check or a bidder’s bond in the same amount from an Incorporated Surety licensed to do business in the State of Missouri as a guarantee that the bidder will enter into a contract and execute a one hundred percent (100%) performance bond, a one hundred percent (100%) payment bond, and guaranty forms provided within ten (10) days after notice of acceptance of bid to him. Bid checks will be returned to the unsuccessful bidders when their bids are rejected. No bidder may withdraw his bid within 90 days after the bid opening. The City of O’Fallon, Missouri retains the right to reject any or all bids submitted. The wage rates applicable to this project have been determined as required by law and are set forth in the detailed specifications. All methods, procedures, equipment, and workmanship used for the completion of this project must be in accordance with the attached Contract Documents. There is a MANDATORY pre-bid meeting that will be held at 100 N. MAIN STREET, O'FALLON, MO 63366 on June 19, 2018 at 9:00 A M to discuss the project. Any contractor potentially bidding as a general or subcontractor should attend. The meeting will primarily be used to explain the project and to answer any other questions that may arise. There is a mandatory bidder’s questionnaire (enclosed with the spec book) that is due with the bid. If the questionnaire is not received by this date and time, the general contractor will not be able to submit a bid on this project. All requests for clarifications on these bidding documents must be received no later than June 27, 2018 by 12:00 PM. The enclosed Request for Information (RFI ) form shall be used for all submittals. Questions may be directed to the Project Manager as follows: K e v i n H a m p e ; via e ma il at khampe@ ofallon.mo.us All BIDDERs must meet the MoDOT requirements as a CONTRACTOR prior to bid opening in accordance with Section 102.2 of the St . C h a r le s C o u n t y St a n d a r d Specifications for Arterial Highway Construction. The CITY reserves the right to reject any and all Bids, to waive informalities therein to determine the lowest and best bid, and to approve the bond. No Bid may be withdrawn for a period of ninety (90) days subsequent to the specified time for receipt of Bids.

The RFP document is available on the County website (www. bentoncomo.com) or may be obtained by contacting Susan Porterfield, Benton County Clerk, at (660) 4387326.

R E Q U E S T F O R QUALIFICATIONS for PR O F ESSI O N A L S E R V I C E S F O R EVA LUA TION O F T H E L A M B E R T I N T ER N A T I O N A L BOULEVA RD BRIDGE O VER COLD WATER CREEK AT ST. L O U I S L A M B E R T I N T ER N A T I O N A L A I R PO R T . Statements of Qualifications due by 5:00 PM CT, June 29, 2018 at Board of Public Service, 1200 Market, Room 301 City Hall, St. Louis, MO 63103. RFQ may be obtained from BPS website w w w.stl-bps.org, under On Line Plan Room-Plan Room, or call Board of Public Service at 314622-3535. 25% M B E and 5% WBE participation goals.

Bids/Proposals

The CITY hereby notifies all BIDDERS that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in re sponse to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award.

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The proposed work includes the f u r n is h in g o f ma t e r ia ls , t o ols, equipment and labor necessary to construct Boxwood Water Main Extension in O’Fallon, Missouri, with Bid Number: 18-062. Work includes the construction of: Construction of approximately 405 LF of 8-inch PVC water main to connect ex isting w ater mains. Work includes the 259 horizontal linear feet horizontal directional drill installation of the 8-inch water main across an unnamed tributary to Peruque Creek. The Contract Documents, including specifications, are on file at the office of Drexel Technolog i e s a t h t t p : / / planroom.drexeltech.com and are open for public inspection. Copies of documents may be obtained from Drexel Technologies for the fee listed online. Bids must be submitted on the appropriate bid forms provided and must be accompanied by a Bid Security in the amount equal to and not less than five percent (5%) of the base bid, payable without recourse to the City. The Security may be in the form of a certified cashier’s check or a bidder’s bond in the same amount from an Incorporated Surety licensed to do business in the State of Missouri as a guarantee that the bidder will enter into a contract and execute a one hundred percent (100%) performance bond, a one hundred percent (100%) payment bond, and guaranty forms provided within ten (10) days after notice of acceptance of bid to him. Bid checks will be returned to the unsuccessful bidders when their bids are rejected. No bidder may withdraw his bid within 90 days after the bid opening. The City of O’Fallon, Missouri retains the right to reject any or all bids submitted. The wage rates applicable to this project have been determined as required by law and are set forth in the detailed specifications. All methods, procedures, equipment, and workmanship used for the completion of this project must be in accordance with the attached Contract Documents. Th e r e is a M andatory pre-bid meeting that will be held at 100 NORTH MAIN STREET, O'FALLON, MO 63366 (Multi-purp o s e r o o m ) o n 6 / 1 9 / 2 0 1 8 at 1 0 : 0 0 : 0 0 A M to discuss the project. Any contractor potentially bidding as a general or subcontractor may attend. It will primarily be used to explain the project and to answer any other questions that may arise. There is a mandatory bidder’s questionnaire (enclosed with the spec book) that is due with the bid. If the questionnaire is not received by this date and time, the general contractor will not be able to submit a bid on this project. For the sake of obtaining a bid security, the engineer’s estimate for t h i s p r o j e c t i s a p p r o x ima t ely $175,000.00. This is an estimate only and may or may not reflect the complete cost of any or all alternates in the proposal. The contractor is still required to submit a bid guaranty per the requirements in this proposal. All requests for clarifications on these bidding documents must be received no later than 6/27/2018, by 12:00 PM. The enclosed Request for Information (RFI) form shall be used for all submittals. Questions may be directed to the Project Manager as follows: Kevin Hampe ; via fax at 636-9784144; via email at khampe@ofallon.mo.us.

The proposed work includes the f u r n is h in g o f ma t e r ia ls , t o ols, equipment and labor necessary to construct 2018 Asphalt Program in O’Fallon, M issouri, with Bid Number: 18-066. Work includes: Repair asphalt roads throughout the City, Repair/replace asphalt parking lot at City Hall and Sports Park. The Contract Documents, including specifications, are on file at the office of Drexel Technolog i e s a t h t t p : / / planroom.drexeltech.com and are open for public inspection. Copies of documents may be obtained from Drexel Technologies for the fee listed online. Bids must be submitted on the appropriate bid forms provided and must be accompanied by a Bid Security in the amount equal to and not less than five percent (5%) of the base bid, payable without recourse to the City. The Security may be in the form of a certified cashier’s check or a bidder’s bond in the same amount from an Incorporated Surety licensed to do business in the State of Missouri as a guarantee that the bidder will enter into a contract and execute a one hundred percent (100%) performance bond, a one hundred percent (100%) payment bond, and guaranty forms provided within ten (10) days after notice of acceptance of bid to him. Bid checks will be returned to the unsuccessful bidders when their bids are rejected. No bidder may withdraw his bid within 90 days after the bid opening. The City of O’Fallon, Missouri retains the right to reject any or all bids submitted. The wage rates applicable to this project have been determined as required by law and are set forth in the detailed specifications. All methods, procedures, equipment, and workmanship used for the completion of this project must be in accordance with the attached Contract Documents. There is a mandatory bidder’s questionnaire (enclosed with the spec book) that is due with the bid. If the questionnaire is not received by this date and time, the general contractor will not be able to submit a bid on this project. All requests for clarifications on these bidding documents must be received no later than Friday, June 22, 2018, by 10:00 AM. The enclosed Request for Information (RFI) form shall be used for all submittals. Questions may be directed to the Project Manager as follows: Anthony Friedman; via fax at ; via e m a i l at tfriedman@ofallon.mo.us. All BIDDERs must meet the MoDOT requirements as a CONTRACTOR prior to bid opening in accordance with Section 102.2 of the St . C h a r le s C o u n t y St a n d a r d Specifications for Arterial Highway Construction.

Sealed proposals for FY19 ONCALL ASBESTOS ABATEMENT will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on JUNE 21, 2018. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of Seven Thousand Five Hundred and 00/100ths Dollars ($7,500.00) shall be submitted. Contract Documents can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $50.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date proposals are due. All sets of specifications requested other than in person will be mailed at proposer's expense. Electronic sets of specifications are also available at https://plans.missouristate.edu/ Attention of proposers is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to b e observed. Proposers must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications.

Sealed bids for Replace Tunnel Utilities, Hearnes Forensic Complex, Fulton, Missouri, Project No. M 1417-05 w ill b e rec eiv ed by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 7/12/2018. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/facilities

Urban League of Metro STL Invitation for Bid For HVAC Contractors Join the Movement through our Weatherization Program The Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, Inc. Weatherization Program ( U L M SL WP) is soliciting sealed bids for the completion of Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Work (HVAC) to be completed in the city of St. Louis, MO. Contracts to provide weatherization work for residential properties (approximately fifteen per month) from July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019 with a first year renewal option of up to two additional years. For Bid Specifications: Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, Inc. 3701 Grandel Square St. Louis, MO 63108 (314) 615-3608 lmiller@urbanleague-stl.org Pre-Bid Conferences: June 13, 2018 at 10:00 AM and 6:00 PM Bid Due Date: June 20 at Noon Bid Opening: June 20 at 2:00 PM Funding on behalf of Missouri Dep a rt me n t o f Ec o n o mic Development, LIHEAP, Ameren, and Spire Gas.

The CITY reserves the right to reject any and all Bids, to waive informalities therein to determine the lowest and best bid, and to approve the bond. No Bid may be withdrawn for a period of ninety (90) days subsequent to the specified time for receipt of Bids. The CITY hereby notifies all BIDDERS that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in re sponse to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award.

The CITY reserves the right to reject any and all Bids, to waive informalities therein to determine the lowest and best bid, and to approve the bond. No Bid may be withdrawn for a period of ninety (90) days subsequent to the specified time for receipt of Bids. The CITY hereby notifies all BIDDERS that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in re sponse to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award.

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C12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

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here are many reasons to cover your windows--privacy, light control, insulation and decoration. Most of us are trying to maximize what we get out of our coverings as most need to serve more than one function. Calling a professional is key to getting just the right treatment. It also insures that you will get the correct it and installation every time. "Calling a professional doesn't always mean you’re going to spend more money. Getting a good quality product installed correctly will last you many years into the future. So you are actually saving money by doing it right the irst time." Windo Van Go comes to your home with samples and colors and works with you to pick the treatment that's right for you and for your home. This can save you countless hours trying to do and redo it yourself. (Window Treatments Continued on Page 2)

Window treatments can change the feel and warmth of any room by adding function and decoration. Choosing the right treatment is critical. -JULIE TOLMAIS, owner of Windo Van Go

Consort Homes in Wentzville Create A Cozy Sense of Community Sponsored Content and Photo by Consort Homes

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s the familiar sounds of the ice cream truck ill the air in the Consort Homes’ Wentzville community of Carlton Glen, families aren’t emerging from their homes, racing for that irst orange Dreamsicle®. They’re already outside. Some are walking their dogs, while many are simply getting in their 10,000 daily steps. For many families, the newly refreshed pool is a magnet when the mercury hits the mid-70s. This active community was designed for homeowners who enjoy the outdoors as much as they enjoy their homes. From the community pool and playground to the wooded common grounds surrounding the picturesque pond, Carlton Glen is the community ofering the convenience of Wentzville shopping and entertainment, nearby AAA-rated schools, and the serenity of the well-appointed-andmanicured green spaces. “Carlton Glen is Wentzville’s best-kept secret,” explained Bill Wannstedt, Consort Homes Vice President and General Manager. “When you irst pull into this community, you don’t realize how vast this community is,” he added. Now ending their Phase One, Carlton Glen is closing out the last of those lots, with incentives

including a free upgrade from a two-car to a three-car garage. For homes that already include a three-car garage, they’re ofering the option of a inished lower level. These traditional style homes start in the $208s, ranging from 1,518 square feet to more than 3,000 square feet. Consort Homes ofers a second community in desirable Wentzville called The Manors at Wilmer

Valley. The very last opportunities are being ofered in The Manors of Wilmer Valley now. Their display home is oicially up for sale. They have a few building lots remaining in this community, some backing to trees for added privacy. The square footage starts at 1,870 and goes as high as 3,410 square feet, situated on lots ranging from 1/3 to ½ acre, starting at $271,900 up to $369,900. Other great features within Wilmer Valley include a vast pond surrounded by green space to enjoy a family picnic plus trails to take a hike or a leisurely walk at sunset. In both communities, there are still some “Quick Move In Homes,” which enables homebuyers to move in up to 6 months sooner than if they would be starting from scratch, choosing a lot. In both communities, the homes are energy and water eicient, ensuring they are environmentally friendly and lower in monthly energy bills. The Consort Homes 1-10 Guarantee ensures the homebuyers are (A Cozy Sence of Community Continued on Page 2)

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505 UPPER RIDGEPOINTE COURT CHANDLER RIDGE LAKE ST. LOUIS, MO 12738 CHANDLER RIDGE CT $485,016 DES PERES, MO Beautiful new home ready for your family $959,416 WITH $25,589 IN SAVINGS! OPEN 11-5 or by Appointment PLUS, UP TO $5,000 IN CLOSING COST! 636-265-2646 www.KempHomes.com

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P2 WINDOW TREATMENTS

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Continued from Page 1

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Windo Van Go Current Promotions: Free sales tax (8% value) on all Eclipse® shutters and free cordless Lift & Lock™ on all Alta honeycomb shades. All promotions good until June 30, 2018. Windo Van Go is in its 27th year of covering windows in St. Louis and prides itself in offering quality, long lasting products at affordable prices.

ALTA FAUX AND WOOD BLINDS Like shutters, blinds give you the lexibility to control your light with just the tilt of the louvers. Still popular and maintenance free, they come standard with a decorative valance to inish off your window and are cost friendly.

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Arch and all of the attractions that downtown St. Louis has to ofer, as well as 20 minutes’ drive to the wineries of Augusta. Aside from the great school system, the Wentzville area ofers great shopping and entertainment. For seniors, Wentzville’s Green Lantern Senior Center is a hive of fun activities. We’re now entering into summer, when Wentzville’s Rotary Park is busy with the St. Charles County Fair and the St. Louis Renaissance Faire.

A COZY SENSE OF COMMUNITY Continued from Page 1 protected for 10 years from their homes being free of any defects due to faulty workmanship and materials. This 1-10 Guarantee is seamlessly transferable to the next homeowner, which is an added incentive for people selling their homes. Both the Carlton Glen and The Manors of Wilmer Valley communities are conveniently located just 40 minutes from the St. Louis Gateway

For more information, the sales oice for both communities, Carlton Glen and The Manors of Wilmer Valley, is located in Carlton Glen at 202 Glen Farm Drive in Wentzville. Gregory Tate is the sales manager for both communities and can be reached at (636) 327-4390.

Commemorating Shelley vs. Kraemer and the Fair Housing Act of 1968 Sponsored Content by Marc Levinson, 2018 President of St. Louis REALTORS®

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orn 1907 in Starkville, Mississippi, an African-American man named J.D. Shelley, his wife Ethel, and their children moved north to St. Louis to seek a better life for their family. After living with relatives and in rental properties for some years, Mr. Shelley purchased a two-apartment home on Labadie Avenue in 1945 — the Fairground Neighborhood of North St. Louis. The price: $5,700. At the time, Shelley knew the home was covered by a neighborhood restrictive covenant established in 1911; this covenant barred the sale of any property to non-Caucasian buyers. Regardless, Mr. Shelley persevered. Soon, a neighbor, Louis D. Kraemer, brought suit in the St. Louis Circuit Court to enforce the covenant which would prevent the Shelleys from acquiring the building title. In November of 1945, the court ruled in favor of the Shelleys. Undeterred, Kraemer appealed to the Missouri Supreme Court. On December 9, 1946, the Missouri Supreme Court reversed the trial court’s decision and ordered that the racial covenant be enforced. In response, the Shelleys appealed to the United States Supreme Court. On May 3, 1948 in a unanimous landmark decision, the justices ruled

that a federal or state court may not constitutionally enforce a restrictive covenant preventing people of a certain race from owning or occupying property, thus reinforcing the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. In 1968, the Fair Housing Act deinitively prohibited discrimination in the sale, rental, and inancing of dwellings based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status or disability. In 1990, the Shelley house was designated a National Historic Landmark, celebrated by the placement of a symbolic plaque. Unfortunately, the plaque was stolen in April of 2018. In commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the Shelley vs. Kramer Supreme Court decision, and the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act of 1968, St. Louis REALTORS® in association with Northside Community Housing, Inc. have chosen to replace the plaque. As leading advocates for homeownership, St. Louis REALTORS® believe in fair housing for all. Replacing the plaque is a small gesture of our pledge to practice and encourage fair housing within the great communities of St. Louis. This article provided through a partnership between The St. Louis Post-Dispatch and St. Louis REALTORS®.

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TIPS FOR SELECTING THE RIGHT RAILING FOR YOUR DECK Sponsored Content and photos by Brandpoint

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ailing serves an important aesthetic and structural role - adding safety and style. Here are ive tips for creating the perfect perimeter for your outdoor space. 1) Aim high and low - When choosing railing, look for high-performance, low-maintenance materials, so you’ll be able to spend more time relaxing on than maintaining your deck. Wood railing requires frequent staining and is prone to rot, glass also requires upkeep, iron is heavy and diicult to install. Aluminum and composite ofer durable, attractive options that are easy to maintain. 2) Showcase your style – here are a myriad of railing options available. To simplify things, use one of the following approaches to achieve a successful deck/railing pairing:

COORDINATE You can never go wrong by selecting railing in the same shade as your decking to create a cozy, well-coordinated look.

CONTRAST If you want to try something diferent - consider railing in a contrasting color, such as black or white. Both are classic options that complement any outdoor setting.

CUSTOMIZE For homeowners seeking a custom look, be creative. Mix colors and materials, such as combining dark aluminum railing with white composite posts, to create a distinctive design. If you prefer to eliminate guesswork from the process, Trex Company ofers a Decking & Railing Duos tool on its website, which features designer-curated railing pairings for the brand’s most popular decking colors.

3) Optimize views and privacy - If you have a view beyond your deck, optimize it with aluminum railing that ofers maximum strength with minimalist style. Trex Signature Rod Railing blends into the background, allowing your view to be the focal point. If scenic views are not the focus, opt for railing options that feature thicker posts to enhance privacy. 4) Factor-in function - One of the most popular outdoor homeowner entertainment trends is “cocktail railing.” his design uses a deck board as a top rail to create a lat surface ledge at the right height for holding drinks and plates. By using boards that match the decking, you achieve a look that complements your home’s deck, while making great use of space. 5) Light it up - Lengthen the time you can spend enjoying your beautiful deck with discrete outdoor lighting on railing posts and caps. Lighting sets the mood, and adds safety and security.


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

‘Hotel Artemis’ built on originality

Page 19

06.08.18–06.14.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

New Line stages another ofbeat show by ‘Urinetown’ duo Page 12 Nippon Tei is St. Louis’ most exciting sushi restaurant Page 28

? E Y B , E Y B , BYE URS don’t FAREWELL TO bye — take it from always mean good 15 Shania Twain and 8 other acts Page BY KEV IN C. JOH NSO N


06.08.18–06.14.18 ▼

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13

FRIDAY,OCTOBER 5

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. Elton John

BECOME A PROUD MEMBER OF THE BLUES FAMILY WITH A BE

2018-19 SEASON TICKET PLAN! FULL SEASON · HALF SEASON · 12-GAME DEPOSITS AS LOW AS $100 · STLOUISBLUES.COM/TICKETS

On Sale TODAY at 10AM!

On Sale TODAY at 10AM!

Datebook Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Joe Biden at the Peabody Opera House, “Jerome Robbins’ Broadway” at the Muny, Metro East PrideFest in downtown Belleville and the Reverend Horton Heat at the Old Rock House. Pages 4-5

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21

On Sale TODAY at 10AM!

See & Do New Line stages another oddball musical by the “Urinetown” duo. Page 12 Recently reviewed theater. Page 13 Zinzi Clemmons’ debut novel, “What We Lose,” tackles loss and coming of age. Page 14

Screens

Toni Collette reveals a sixth sense for icy terror in “Hereditary.” Page 21 The “Nelson Mandela of couture” finally gets his due in an admiring new documentary. Page 22 Recently reviewed movies. Page 23 HBO’s “Sex and the City” bent the rules for TV and women. Page 25 Don’t confuse Tituss Burgess with Titus Andromedon, his character on “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.” Page 26

Music & Clubs

TV Q&A. Page 26

Swiss singer Bastian Baker makes his U.S. touring debut with Shania Twain. Page 6

Fuel

Indigo Girls prep for another show with the SLSO before the debut of an orchestral album. Page 7

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 14

The Big Muddy Blues Festival makes the unusual decision to eliminate its main stage. Page 11

Longtime Super Jam DJ looks back at 10 years of hip-hop history. Page 8 Ticket Tracker. Page 10

Chef Nick Bognar transforms Nippon Tei into St. Louis’ most exciting sushi restaurant. Page 28 Sterling K. Brown emerges a hero from “Hotel Artemis.” Page 19 Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett and the rest of the cast are better than “Ocean’s 8.” Page 20

Recently reviewed restaurants. Page 30 After a year, J’s Pitaria adds even more reasons to visit. Page 31

ON THE COVER • Shania Twain performs in 2017 at the U.S. Open Tennis Championships. Photo by the Associated Press

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30

THURSDAY, JUNE 14

FRIDAY, JUNE 15

Visit PeabodyOperaHouse.com for the complete upcoming events schedule. EnterpriseCenter.com StLouisBlues.com PeabodyOperaHouse.com Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Peabody Opera House Group Sales: 314-499-7676 Ticketmaster: 800-745-3000

2

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.08.18-06.14.18

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ Take a look back at 20 years of favorite shows at Opera Theatre of St. Louis. stltoday.com/arts ➨ Use our interactive guide to get the scoop on nearly 40 area concert venues. stltoday.com/venues ➨ Before you head to “Romeo and Juliet,” watch our illustrated guide to the show. stltoday.com/arts ➨ Find upcoming St. Louis events — and add your own — in our new calendar. stltoday.com/events

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : H A N D O U T ( E LT O N J O H N ) ; G L O B A L R O A D E N T E R TA I N M E N T ( “ H O T E L A R T E M I S ” )

Cover story For many veteran performers, a farewell tour doesn’t necessarily mean goodbye. Page 15


Go Wild With Missouri Natives

HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK ▼

“Twangfest, although I still prefer the name Cow-Punkapalooza.” •

“An early screening of ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’” •

31 ST. LOUIS & METROEAST LOCATIONS

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com

“Seeing David Bryne on Friday night at the Peabody!” •

Hillary Levin • photo editor, 314-340-8118, hlevin@post-dispatch.com “Seeing H.E.R. at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre as part of Super Jam and the Prince DJ spin/tribute ‘That Purple Stuf’ Saturday at 2720 Cherokee.” •

Native plants require less water, less fertilizer and less work, yet reward you with luscious gardens overlowing with blossoms spring till frost. Over 2,000 varieties of plants 1011 N. Woodlawn • Kirkwood, MO 314-965-3070

Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischof • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischof@post-dispatch.com

CONTRIBUTORS

“Giving my new dog a tour of Forest Park!” •

W W W. A P E X N E T W O R K P T.C O M

Cara DeMichele • designer Brian Feldt • beer writer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Dylan Kiefer • features intern Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Judith Newmark • theater critic Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • arts writer

www.sugarcreekgardens.com “It’s been decades since I’ve been to Casa Loma ballroom, but I’m going back for a friend’s birthday party.” •

VOTED #1 BEST GARDEN CENTER

FREE INJURY SCREENS! Opens Tomorrow! Free admission

“I’m going to catch the last couple of days of Twangfest.” •

Presented by

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events “The final production in Opera Theatre’s 2018 season, ‘Orfeo and Euridice,’ opens Saturday night. It’s a beautiful opera.” •

stltoday.com/go

Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

“The Muny season opens with a dance show, ‘Jerome Robbins’ Broadway’!” • The Muny Archive

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COPYRIGHT 2018 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

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Forest Park • 314.746.4599 • mohistory.org 06.08.18-06.14.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

BEST BETS FRIDAY David Byrne with Benjamin Clementine

SARAH BRYAN MILLER

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

The Reverend Horton Heat, Big Sandy, Lara Hope & the Ark Tones WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street • HOW MUCH $22-$25 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

David Byrne fans obviously couldn’t wait for him to make a return to St. Louis. Tickets to his tour stop at Peabody Opera House sold out quickly. Byrne will perform music from his latest album, “American Utopia,” along with other solo material and songs from Talking Heads.

“Comfortably Numb,” “Time” and “Brain Damage,” along with other hits from “Dark Side of the Moon,” “The Wall” and more.

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Music of Pink Floyd’

‘Damon Davis: Darker Gods in the Garden of the Low-Hanging Heavens’

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$85 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

Cosmic, man: On Friday night, the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra gets in touch with the psychedelic and the music of Pink Floyd. The SLSO is joined by conductor Brent Havens, vocalist Randy Jackson and a full rock band with lights and lasers for favorites, including

WHEN Opening reception 7-10 p.m. Friday; hours are noon-5 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Saturday • WHERE The Luminary, 2701 Cherokee Street • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO theluminaryarts.com

The Luminary presents an exhibition of new work by artist Damon Davis, co-director of the documentary film “Whose Streets?” On view through July 12, “Darker Gods in the Garden of the Low-

Hanging Heavens” finds Davis exploring “the function of narrative and its efects on identity and belief systems in communities of color.” The reception features live music by 18andCounting. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘Blithe Spirit’ WHEN Friday through June 26 • WHERE J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts, Lindenwood University, 2300 West Clay Street, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $20 • MORE INFO 636949-4433; actincstl.com

Enjoy classic cars, food, music, children’s activities, trolley rides and more at this 21st annual tribute to the mother road. BY

Noel Coward’s classic comedy “Blithe Spirit” centers on an elegant English couple whose domestic bliss is disturbed when the husband’s deceased first wife moves in with them. A lively woman, she’s even livelier as a ghost. This year, ACT INC has changed its traditional format. Instead of presenting two shows in repertory, it’s staging one in a longer run.

VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

BY JUDITH NEWMARK

Edwardsville Route 66 Festival WHEN 5 p.m.-midnight Friday, 8 a.m.-midnight Saturday • WHERE City Park, 101 South Buchanan Street, Edwardsville • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO edwardsvilleroute66.com

SATURDAY KSHE Pig Roast WHEN 4:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $19.95-$150 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; liveneation.com

The KSHE-curated Pig Roast returns, this time with the Charlie Daniels Band, Dave Mason, the Marshall Tucker Band, Molly Hatchet, the Outlaws, Poco and Rick Derringer. The acts on the schedule pretty much speak for themselves. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Metro East PrideFest WHEN Noon-10 p.m. Saturday • WHERE West Main Street in downtown Belleville • HOW MUCH Free, but donations encouraged • MORE INFO

www.metroeastprideswi.org

Hosted in downtown Belleville, Metro East PrideFest features food, crafts and live entertainment by acts including the Gateway Men’s Chorus, Kristen Goodman and Summer Osborne. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

‘Orfeo and Euridice’ WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday, 8 p.m. Wednesday, 8 p.m. June 15, 7 p.m. June 17, 8 p.m. June 21, and 1 p.m. June 23 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

The fourth and final ofering of Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ 2018 season, Gluck’s beautiful “Orfeo and Euridice,” opens

The Reverend Horton Heat, a regular visitor to St. Louis, returns with his blazing brand of country, rock and blues. Jim Heath fronts the experience. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

That Purple Stuff: A Prince Tribute Party WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE 2720 Cherokee Performing Arts Center, 2720 Cherokee Street • HOW MUCH $5-$10 • MORE INFO eventbrite.com

Another week, another Prince tribute event. This one is probably the best one made in St. Louis, and it doesn’t involve a singer in frilly clothing or even any musicians. It’s the annual That Purple Stuf party, which started years before Prince’s death. James Biko remains at the helm of the DJ-driven party and is joined by DJ JMO and Blvck

FAST FORWARD Keith Urban, June 15 at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre: The four-time Grammy winner brings his “Grai “Graiti ti U World Tour” to town, with special guest Kelsea

Spvde. In the mix will not only be various eras of Prince songs, but artists influenced by Prince, including Janelle Monae, Bilal, D’Angelo and Childish Gambino, and artists produced by Prince, including Sheila E, Vanity 6, the Time and Apollonia 6. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Ani DiFranco, Hailey Heynderickx WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$40 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

Ani DiFranco has titled the tour “Rise Up,” so you know she has some things to say. Her new album is “Binary.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

T-Dubb-O WHEN 9 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Pop’s Nightclub & Concert Venue, 401 Monsanto Avenue, Sauget • HOW MUCH $5-$10 • MORE INFO ticketweb.com

T-Dubb-O, one of St. Louis’ top underground rappers, is presenting “The Dubb-Le Up” this weekend at Pop’s. On the bill with him are Hittamane, Big Lou, Spotlite, Gwuala Stackz, Mona Linski, Trap Dawgs, Cold Kase and Da Money Counters. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SUNDAY The Grand Market WHEN 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday • WHERE .ZACK, 3224 Locust Street • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO kranzbergartsfoundation.org

Music, food, flowers and fashion are the focus of this festival’s second

Steve Grand

Ballerini • St. Louis PrideFest, June 23-24 at Soldiers Memorial: Music headliners for the annual LGBTQ festival include Mýa, Steve Grand, Paige Alyssa, La Bouche and Bonnie McKee • “Theresa Caputo Live!,” June 26 at the Fox Theatre: The star of TLC’s hit “Long Island Medium” will share personal stories about her life and her ability to communicate with the dead • Fair St. Louis, July 4, 6, 7 at Gateway Arch National Park: After four years in Forest Park, St. Louis’ biggest July Fourth celebration returns to its home on the riverfront

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P H O T O S : PA U L A . H E B E R T / I N V I S I O N /A P ( J I M H E AT H ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( J O E B I D E N ) ; A L L A N S P I E R S ( S T E V E G R A N D )

Saturday night at the Loretto-Hilton Center. It stars a St. Louis native, mezzo-soprano Jennifer Johnson Cano, as the legendary musician Orpheus, soprano Andriana Chuchman as Euridice and soprano Maria Valdes as Amore, the god of love. The production is a collaboration with the Big Muddy Dance Company, which will bring life to the opera’s ballets. BY

Jim Heath of the Reverend Horton Heat


year. Explore more than 40 diferent vendors as local folk musicians perform throughout the day. A Zoo for You will bring a petting zoo for children, and the first 100 guests will receive a gift bag. BY DYLAN KIEFER

MONDAY Missouri Chamber Music Festival: Duo WHEN 7 p.m. Monday • WHERE Winifred Moore Auditorium, 470 East Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25 • MORE INFO 314-882-0053; mochambermusicfestival.org

The Missouri Chamber Music Festival opens its one-week run with “Duo,” a program of music composed for two performers. There are actually two duos: New Morse Code (Hannah Collins, cello and Michael Compitello, percussion) and pianists Nina Ferrigno and Hugh Hinton. The program includes the Six Études of Schumann arranged by Claude Debussy, Francis Poulenc’s Sonata and Martin Bresnick’s “Songs of the Mouse People.” The festival continues all week, with programs at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, 5 p.m. Thursday and 7 p.m. Saturday. BY

vehicle on a national reserve and become a keeper at an elephant orphanage. “Kenya’s Kids” replaces the “Can You Solve the Mystery?” exhibit and will be here through Jan. 21. Exhibits focusing on China and Argentina will follow. At the grand opening, enjoy performances by children from F4KIDZ African Performing Arts. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Kat Zhang WHEN 7 p.m. Monday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

Local author Kat Zhang discusses her new novel for middle readers. In “The Memory of Forgotten Things,” a 12-year-old girl seems to have a bit of magical thinking going on about her deceased mother. For one, Sophia “remembers” events with her mom from when she was 10: The problem is her mother died when she was 6. Also, Sophia seems to think an upcoming solar eclipse will somehow let her join her mother. School Library Journal calls the book “a hearttugging and mindbending exploration of time and possibility.”

SARAH BRYAN MILLER

BY JANE HENDERSON

‘Kenya’s Kids’

‘Jerome Robbins’ Broadway’

WHEN Opening 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday; hours are 11 a.m.5:30 p.m. Sunday, 9:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday and Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday • WHERE Magic House, 516 South Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • HOW MUCH Free with $11 admission, free for children under age 1 • MORE INFO magichouse.org

The Magic House’s latest permanent exhibit space, the new World Traveler Gallery, is ready to take visitors on a trip to Africa with its new exhibit, “Kenya’s Kids.” Children can learn about water conservation, explore a rural home, learn Swahili with touchscreen notebooks, “shop” in an outdoor market, drive in a safari

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WHEN 8:15 p.m. nightly, Monday through June 17 • WHERE The Muny, 1 Theatre Drive, Forest Park • HOW MUCH $15-$100, plus the free seats • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

The Muny opens its historic centennial season with a dance show featuring work by one of the most important artists in musical theater history, Jerome Robbins. This epic anthology — which has not been staged since its original 1989 Broadway production and tour — includes selections from many of the Tonywinning directorchoreographer’s nonpareil works: “West

Former Vice President Joe Biden

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JOIN US AT OUR ESTATE SALE Side Story,” “On the Town,” “Peter Pan,” “The King and I” and “Fiddler on the Roof.” All of them played the Muny in seasons past. “Muny Memories: 100 Seasons Onstage,” an exhibition of artifacts, images and interactive media, is on view Saturday through June 2, 2019, at the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

Promise Tour.” Here, he’s scheduled to talk to novelist Curtis Sittenfeld (“American Wife,” “Eligible”). On previous stops, Biden has focused mostly on the most diicult year of his life, when his son, Beau, was dying of brain cancer (also connected to his book, “Promise Me, Dad”). He’s been asked, but apparently hasn’t really answered, whether he might run for president.

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WEDNESDAY Dan Abrams WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Maryville University Auditorium, 650 Maryville University Drive • HOW MUCH Free, but RSVP required • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

Dan Abrams, legal afairs anchor for ABC News, will discuss his book, “Lincoln’s Last Trial: The Murder Case That Propelled Him to the Presidency.” Perhaps only Lincoln experts know all the details of this interesting case in which the future president defended Peachy Quinn Harrison, who was charged with stabbing to death an inlaw. BY JANE HENDERSON

THURSDAY Joe Biden with Curtis Sittenfeld WHEN 7:30 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $42-$247 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

The former vice president stops in St. Louis as one of some 30 cities on his “American

‘Short Films: By, For, About Women’ WHEN 7 p.m. Thursday • WHERE Plaza Frontenac Cinema, 1701 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25 • MORE INFO lunafest.org

Nine short films are included in this Lunafest program that highlights women’s issues and showcases work by women. Filmmakers represented are Megan Brotherton (“Buttercup”), Anne Edgar (“Girls Level Up”), Amanda Quaid (“Toys”), Uttera Singh (“Fanny Pack”), Joey Ally (“Joy Joy Nails”), Svetlana Cvetko (“Yours Sincerely, Lois Weber”), Emily Sheskin (“Jesszilla”), Ifunanya Maduka (“Waiting for Hassana”) and Bekky O’Neil (“Last Summer, In the Garden”). The screening is presented by Girls on the Run St. Louis. BY CALVIN WILSON

Friday 8am-4pm Saturday 8am-4pm

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STLTODAY.COM/MUSIC

Shania Twain and Bastian Baker

Swiss singer makes U.S. touring debut with Twain Opening act Bastian Baker says he can feel the ‘love in the air’ BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

W

ho is Bastian Baker? He’s the Swiss newcomer enviably tasked with opening for Shania Twain on her “Now” tour, coming Wednesday to Enterprise Center. Though he has toured extensively abroad, this is his U.S. touring debut. “It’s a pretty amazing first tour to be on,” Baker says. “It’s giving me a pretty good impression of the U.S.” kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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The singer-songwriter also has opened for Elton John and Bryan Adams. “There’s all these good vibes around the tour,” he says. “There’s 13,000 to 15,000 people every night. As the opener, I wasn’t scared, but I didn’t know how the audience would react. “I go onstage with just me and a guitar. So far, the reaction has been great. I can’t complain. And I get to sing a duet with her every night. That makes it all perfect. There’s a lot of love in the air, and you can really feel it.” Baker and Twain met six years ago

@kevincjohnson

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.08.18-06.14.18

in Switzerland. He had been performing at an event ailiated with the Montreux Jazz Festival, near where he grew up. Twain was at the festival, and after his acoustic performance, she invited him to lunch. “She wanted to say hi and that she appreciated my performance, and we started talking about music,” Baker recalls. “Her husband was there, and we became good friends. She’s an amazing mentor for me.” He was just 20 years old at the time and was getting play on radio stations in Switzerland. “It was an amazing opportunity to ask questions about the industry,” Baker says. “I knew Shania, but I didn’t know all the music and about all her crazy achievements.” He says that first interaction with Twain was “a very normal conversation,” and he was able to get a bit of career advice. “She told me very basic stuf I didn’t know at LONG the time — that I had GOODBYE ▼ to believe in myself, keep writing and stay This isn’t Shania Twain’s irst true to myself,” he farewell tour. says. Who else is calling it quits? The “Now” tour will Page 15 be his first visit to St. Louis. “I know about the St. Louis Blues,” says Bastian, whose father, Bruno Kaltenbacher, had been a professional hockey player. Baker also played hockey before switching to music fulltime. “I like getting to places I’ve never been, like St. Louis,” he says. “I like

to discover the city I’m in, like asking where to go for lunch.” Baker is influenced by artists such as Damien Rice and Angus and Julia Stone, and especially Bruce Springsteen. “I’ve seen him twice, and it gives me goosebumps just to think about it — how much heart he puts in his music,” Baker says of the Boss. “He makes me want to become a better musician. He’s so inspiring.” When it comes to his own music, Baker says, he doesn’t try to fit into any category. Instead, he aims to write melodies that sound good and mean something to him. “I keep it as honest as I can,” he says. Baker’s debut was 2011’s “Tomorrow May Not Be Better,” which features “Lucky” and “I’d Sing For You.” He’s working on his upcoming album with the single “Love on Fire,” which came about after meeting a young woman in Switzerland. She asked him what he did for a living. Instead of explaining it to her, he showed her, grabbing a guitar and writing a song. “By the end of it, she said, ‘Dude, you should record it.’” On the upcoming album, he’s working with producer Jacquire King, who has also worked with Kings of Leon, James Bay, Norah Jones and Twain. “I was really inspired to work with a big producer,” Baker says. “It opened my spectrum of music. I also opened myself up to co-writing. I’m a very normal person talking about normal stuf, my fears, what I’m excited about, what disappoints me.” He compares the sound of his last record, “Facing Canyons” (2015), to that of Mumford & Sons. “This will be more pop, more modern,” he says. “And I don’t see this album as my fourth. I see it as my first album for the second time. It’s the beginning of a new adventure for me.” WHAT Shania Twain, Bastian Baker • WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Enterprise (formerly Scottrade) Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $22-$395 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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P H OTO : S U N N I M A RT I N I FO R N A S H V I L L E M U S I C M E D I A .CO M


Emily Saliers (left) and Amy Ray of Indigo Girls

about the spirit of the students and grad students there. They’re not jaded about anything, and they play passionately. We asked them, and they said yes right away. Q • What do you remember about the night of the recording?

Q&A ▼

Ahead of orchestral album, Indigo Girls prep for SLSO gig BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

I

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

ndigo Girls have been performing regularly with symphony orchestras for several years — long enough to be making return engagements. This weekend at Powell Symphony Hall, the veteran duo — Emily Saliers and Amy Ray — will perform with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. They last played with the SLSO in 2014. Indigo Girls will release their irst symphonic album, “Indigo Girls Live With the University of Colorado Symphony Orchestra,” on June 29. Saliers talked about the album and the group’s work with symphonies.

Q • What sparked Indigo Girls’ interest in performing with symphonies?

the arrangers, picked the songs and have been traveling with it for some years now.

A • I grew up with classical music in my family and have a deep love of orchestral music. And we’ve used string arrangements and instrumental arrangements in some of our recordings. But truthfully, the opportunity was given to us, and it was a no-brainer to say yes. We chose

Q • What’s it like adapting Indigo Girls’ sound to symphonic music? A • It’s challenging in terms of performance. Me and Amy play together all the time, so we’re in sync. We had to adjust. We have to always be on our toes. And you only

kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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have one rehearsal. It’s not like we have days. The arrangements are so complex. There’s no way we could have conceived arrangements like this. (Arrangements are by Sean O’Loughlin). Q • Why hadn’t Indigo Girls recorded an album until now? A • The opportunity wasn’t presented to us before. This wasn’t something we would do on our own. We were asked by an agency to do it, and we were honored. It was a great opportunity to do something we hadn’t done before — a great opportunity to stretch. But it’s still challenging. Every orchestra is different. Every conductor is diferent. Approaches to scores vary. The arrangements are so good I can’t hear the songs without the orchestral parts anymore. Q • Why did you choose the University of Colorado Symphony Orchestra for the album? A • We’d been looking at orchestras to record with for a long time. We’ve had some really good experiences, but the union fees were prohibitive. We couldn’t aford to make an album with professional union players. So we looked into volunteer orchestras. We did a show at the University of Colorado, and there was something

@kevincjohnson

A • I had strep throat. My daughter and I had been trading it back and forth for three years. I got it a lot on the road, though it wasn’t the kind where I’m exploding in pain. But there’s nothing you can do when you have the time arranged with the orchestra. I just let it go and did the best I could.

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I also remember thinking, “This is it — they’re gonna press record. Try to relax.” We were focusing on getting our pitch right, though technology can help with that. Mostly we just wanted to enjoy the moment and be present and be grateful.

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Q • What are your thoughts on the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra? A • It’s world-class, totally professional. It’s a great experience. There are certain cities where the orchestra is top-notch, and St. Louis is one of those cities. There’s a super level of musicianship. St. Louis is a cool city with a real cultural mix of people. Q • How do you prepare for the gig with the SLSO? A • Lots of warming up, lots of water. We both like to work out if we get the time. I’m big on sleep, so I’ll try to get a nap before the show. These shows are intense for us, so we have to have a state of good health. WHAT Indigo Girls with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra • WHEN 7 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $50-$82 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

EAGLE ADVENTURE CAMP

EUCLID AVE. BETWEEN MARYLAND & MCPHERSON

free admission cwecocktailparty.com

Are you ready for an exciting adventure? Come explore your wild side this summer at World Bird Sanctuary’s Eagle Adventure Camp for ages 5-12. Try new things, make new friends, and learn all about birds of prey! Campers will be participating in an array of educational, athletic, and artistic activities to strengthen their inner Eagle. This year we invite you to explore your Inner Eagle in 3 new and exciting ways! Whether you are interested in the paranormal, the natural science, or the supernatural, we will have something just for you! CAMP SESSIONS: for ages 5-12 • 9am-4pm each day

Session 1: June 11-15, 2018 “Myths, Legends, & Artifacts” Session 2: June 18-22, 2018 “Hands-on Bird Science” Session 3: June 25-29, 2018 “Survival & Superpowers” Session 4: July 9-13, 2018 “Myths, Legends, & Artifacts” Session 5: July 16-20, 2018 “Hands-on Bird Science” Session 6: July 23-27, 2018 “Survival & Superpowers”

*visit www.worldbirdsanctuary.org for pricing, registration, and additional information.

06.08.18-06.14.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Super Jam’s DJ takes a trip down hip-hop memory lane rom T.I. to Wiz Khalifa, Drake to Lil Wayne, Master P to Ludacris and K. Michelle to Future, the annual Super Jam concerts have been bringing top hip-hop and R&B to town. The 10-year anniversary of the event is Friday at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre with Post Malone, one of the hottest new rappers in the game. Also on the bill are 21 Savage, Remy Ma, H.E.R. and more. Hot 104.1’s DJ Cuddy, the oicial DJ since the beginning, looks back on the event’s early uncertainty, venue changes, bad behavior and that time Kendrick Lamar was replaced as a headliner.

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WHO T.I., Keyshia Cole, Webbie, Bun B, Yo Gotti, One Chance, Chingy, Murphy Lee, Gorilla Zoe, Joka, Nite Owl, Jibbs, Vic Damone, Hakeem Tha Dream, Jus Bleezy • WHERE Verizon Wireless (now Hollywood Casino) Amphitheater

“It was the irst one and the irst big show an urban radio station put together. At 10,000 tickets sold, we knew we were basically there, so everybody could calm down. Keyshia Cole was being a diva, and Webbie made it a big deal that he had to go on early; he had another show that night in Chicago.”

2009 WHO Jeezy, Trey Songz, Keri Hilson, Yo Gotti, Hurricane Chris, Lil Boosie, Jeremih, Unladylike, Day26, Pleasure P, Soulja Boy, Plies, OJ Da Juiceman • WHERE Verizon Wireless Amphitheater

“We basically knew how to run things successfully, and

Verizon allowed us to come back. This was the irst year of the ‘STL Mixtape’ with Gena, Ludy, Yung Ro, and we started the surprise guest that year with St. Lunatics. That was the bestrun Super Jam.”

2010 WHO Drake, Gucci Mane, Mario, St. Lunatics, TheDream, Chingy, Sean Garrett, Huey, Spify • WHERE Verizon Wireless Amphitheater

“Drake was the headliner, and we had our irst drama. Gucci felt a way going on before Drake. He got to the venue late on purpose. Drake played ball (going on ahead of time). He was mad, but he came out and killed it. He made it harder for Gucci. People walked out (after Drake), though the hood cats stayed. He burned himself. Out of 14,500 people, maybe 8,000 stayed.”

kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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WHO Ludacris, Wiz Khalifa, Waka Flocka, Yo Gotti, Keri Hilson, Nelly, Lloyd, Mindless Behavior, Travis Porter, Tef Poe, Rockwell Knuckles, Block Boyz, Ruka Puf, Gena, YC, MoTre, Shorty Da Prince, Laudie on Da Track • WHERE Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

2008

– AUGUST 4

2011

“Nelly came out during Keri’s set. That was a surprise. Wiz wanted us to hear his guys in Taylor Gang. He got us on the bus, and you know how it goes down on the bus. It was smoky and cloudy. We listened to the music and had a good time with Wiz.”

2012 WHO Jeezy, 2 Chainz, Master P, Miguel, Wale, Diggy Simmons, Elle Varner, Cash Out, OMG Girlz, Fresco Kane • WHERE Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre

“That was the year (radio personality) A-Plus was going around calling himself ‘Few Chainz.’ It was also the year we started doing throwback artists (Master P).”

“The year before, it rained, so we decided to do it indoors. It stormed that year, so we were grateful it was indoors. Originally Kendrick Lamar was headlining, but tickets weren’t selling, so we changed the headliner to Yo Gotti.”

2015 WHO J. Cole, Big Sean, YG, Jeremih, Bas, Cozz & Omen • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre

“We had stage presence in the beginning and brought out Jeremiah and YG. By the time we got to Big Sean and J. Cole, we had to clear of the stage.”

2016 WHO Fetty Wap, 50 Cent, 2 Chainz, K. Michelle, Desiigner, Da Brat, Dreezy, JGE, Young Greatness, Belly, Mai Lee, J.R. • WHERE Scottrade Center

“People were really anxious to see 50 Cent. He brought out G-Unit. People were disappointed Young Thug didn’t show. I think he missed his light or something.”

2013 WHO Lil Wayne, T.I., 2 Chainz, G-Eazy • WHERE Verizon Wireless Amphitheater

(Super Jam attached itself to Lil Wayne and T.I.’s “America’s Most Wanted” tour.) “We did heavy promo for it, radio interviews, but we didn’t have a stage presence. We couldn’t introduce the acts. So it was just promote, promote, promote.”

2014 WHO Yo Gotti, K. Michelle, Mystikal, Juicy J, August Alsina, Rico Love, Tinashe, YG, Ty Dolla $ign, Cash Out, Tifany Foxx, MC Keem, Laudie, Pretty Tony, Lil Terio, JGE Retro, Tef Poe, Doorway, Rockwell Knuckles, Murphy Lee, Kyjuan • WHERE Scottrade (now Enterprise) Center

@kevincjohnson

2017 WHO Future, Migos, A$AP Ferg, Tory Lanez, Zoey Dollaz • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre

(Super Jam tagged its brand to Future’s “Nobody’s Safe” tour.) “We hit up Guccio (St. Louis-based manager/ label CEO) to see if we could get Future, and because of that relationship we were able to get Future.” WHAT Super Jam with Post Malone, 21 Savage, Remy Ma, SOB X RBE, DJ Luke Nasty, Derez De’Shon, H.E.R., Tifany Foxx, Doughboy, Mai Lee, Miistro Freeyo, Kid Goalss, Buddy Lovu, AMR DEE Huncho, J Traxx and Gritz Hofa • WHEN 5:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $75$147 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; livenation.com

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LOCAL EVENTS

Summer time!

fairs • fun • Festivals

JUNE 14 | STL SPORTS ON TAP

JUNE 16 | PRIDE ST. CHARLES

Join us for an evening at the Missouri Athletic Club illed with beer, food and sports talk with the guys that cover it best. Ask your most sought-after sports questions, listen to season recaps and projections and learn stories about sports legends. All LIVE from St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports columnists and beat writers, including Rick Hummel, Ben Frederickson, Derrick Goold, Benjamin Hochman, and many more! All tickets include 2 free beers, complimentary parking, appetizers and more! For tickets and info go to STLtoday.com/ourevents.

It’s oficially Pride Month and you’re invited to Historic St. Charles, MO at Frontier Park for the 4th annual St. Charles Pride Festival on June 16 from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.! Live entertainment all day, including drag shows, a doggy drag show with adoptable dogs, great food, vendors, resources, and youth village with awesome things to do! Join us for this FREE, family-friendly event celebrating diversity in the community! Presented by Proctor & Gamble and Pride St. Charles! pridestcharles.org

Missouri Athletic Club - 405 Washington Ave. St. Louis, Mo 63102 | STLtoday.com/ourevents

Frontier Park | 500 S Riverside Dr, St Charles, MO 63301 | pridestcharles.org

JUNE 23 - 24 | FIESTA IN FLORISSANT

JUNE 23 - 24 | PRIDEFEST ST. LOUIS

This two-day celebration will feature nonstop food and entertainment with live Latino Bands and Folkloric dancers from various countries including Panama, Colombia and Mexico.

Each year, hundreds of thousands of people come to PrideFest and the Grand Pride Parade in St. Louis. The Arch will once again provide the backdrop for the parade on Market Street and will run adjacent to the festival. The parade serves as a method for legislators and candidates to illustrate their support for the LGBT community. The parade also showcases the creative talents and services of the many LGBT-friendly businesses, nonproits and community groups, as they spread their message to all who attend. The parade will be held on June 24, 2018.

Knights of Columbus | 50 St Francois St, Florissant, MO 63031 | hispanicfestivalstl.com

Soldiers Memorial Park | On Market Street, in beautiful Downtown Saint Louis. | pridefe.st

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06.08.18-06.14.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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TICKET TRACKER ▼

SEEN ON THE SCENE

Busch Stadium

cardinals.com/journey

BOYZ II MEN WITH THE ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA • MAY 31 • POWELL HALL 1 Justin Kopf and Amanda Tharp, both of St. Louis 2 Louis and Lindsae White of Wentzville 3 Kenneth and Monet Webster of Belleville 4 LeeAnn Word and Gary Smith, both of Ferguson 5 Kimberly and Lawrence St. Clair of Ballwin 6 Mashaun and Joanna Thomas of St. Louis SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL ST. LOUIS’ “ROMEO & JULIET” • JUNE 1 • FOREST PARK 7 Michael and Amanda Dudley of O’Fallon, Mo. 8 Gabrielle Bishop and Jamal Wayne, both of St. Louis 9 Jon and Charles Mooneyham of St. Louis 10 Robyn Dexter of St. Louis and Zachary White of Richmond Heights 11 Julie and Craig Workman of St. Louis 12 Edgar and Gloria Anaya of St. Louis

• Cheap Trick, added to the 6 p.m. Aug. 24 Journey and Def Leppard concert

Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com

• Tyler Childers, 8 p.m. Nov. 14, $18-$21, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com

• Remo Drive, 8 p.m. July 12, $13-$15. • Idles, Bambara, 8 p.m. Sept. 29, $14-$16, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Fox Theatre metrotix.com

• Anita Baker, 7 p.m. July 22, sold out. • Steve Martin and Martin Short’s “An Evening You Will Forget For the Rest of Your Lives” with I’m With Her, Jef Babko, Steel Canyon Rangers, 8 p.m. Dec. 1, $60$265, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Jussie Smollett

DJ Quik, 8 p.m. July 14, $35-$45. • Monica, Aug. 18, canceled, refunds available at point of purchase.

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• Chief Keef, 8 p.m. Oct. 26, $30$35, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Walk Of the Earth, 8 p.m. Nov. 10, $32.50$35, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Pop’s Nightclub & Concert Venue ticketweb.com

• Yelawolf, 8 p.m. Aug. 8, $25.

ticketmaster.com

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• Thrice, the Bronx, Teenage Wrist, 8 p.m. Oct. 13, $23-$34, on sale at noon Friday.

metrotix.com

The Pageant

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•Trampled By Turtles, Infamous Stringdusters, 8 p.m. Oct. 11, $25-$30.

Old Rock House • Jussie Smollett, June 5, postponed until the fall.

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P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( S E E N ) ; D AV I D M C C L I S T E R / B I G H A S S L E M E D I A ( C H E A P T R I C K ) ; V I C T O R I A W I L L / I N V I S I O N /A P ( J U S S I E S M O L L E T T )

• Jesse McCartney, 8 p.m. July 10, sold out.

• Trivium’s “The Sin and the Sentence World Tour,” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20, $25-$28, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

• Last of the Dying Breed Tour with Scarface,

Cheap Trick

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Marsha Evans & the Coalition

THE BLENDER ▼

Big Muddy Blues Fest is ‘the sound of St. Louis’ All-local music event makes unusual decision to eliminate its main stage

PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

The annual Big Muddy Blues Festival, taking place Aug. 31-Sept. 2 on Laclede’s Landing, is growing into its new format. This is the third year that the festival will present an all-St. Louis lineup, a formula that has proven successful after years of booking national talent with mixed returns. “The festival is made up of people who play here every day, not national talent that costs too much and draws too little,” says Big Muddy organizer Jeremy Segel-Moss. Among the acts are Marquise Knox, Barbara Carr, Big George Brock, Uvee Hayes, Boo Boo Davis, Kim Massie, Roland Johnson, Love Jones Band, Marcell Strong, Renee Smith, Torey Casey and the Southside Hustle,

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more music on smaller stages. Kingdom Brothers, Skeet Rogers and “Spreading the crowd out makes it the Inner City Blues Band, Big Mike more organic — more intimate,” he says. and the Blu City All Stars, Al Holliday In previous years, when it was time and the East Side Rhythm Band, Papa for the headliner to perform, the smaller Ray and the Soul Selectors, Soulard stages would shut down so the crowds Blues Band, Ptah Williams, Melissa could get to the main stage. Neels Band, Aaron Griin, Tonina and While the main stage may be gone, Philip “Dr. Philgood” Graves. the added stage known as “The Segel-Moss calls the festival a Lodge,” on Morgan Street tribute to St. Louis musicians between Second and Third and hesitates to designate streets, will highlight piaany of the acts as headlinnists. ers. “On the poster, every“We’ll feature them withone’s name is the same size,” out all the hubbub,” Segelhe says. Jeremy Segel-Moss Moss says. “It’ll be a piano and a Still, all the names can’t fit fit on microphone.” the first line. The piano room will feature perfor“Of course, Marquise, Big George, mances by Phillip Graves, Ptah WilMarsha — they’re huge names (on the liams, Christopher Parish, Ladale Fitzscene),” he says. “But the other bands patrick, Chase Garrett, Amy Hawkins, playing throughout the festival are as Bill Murphy, Jesse Prather and Ethan important. We look at the festival as Leinwand. being a picture of St. Louis. If you put Oliver Sain and Fontella Bass are all these bands into a blender, that’s the this year’s tribute artists; tributes take sound of St. Louis.” place nearby at the National Blues Segel-Moss says this summer’s festiMuseum. The Sain tribute will include val will feature 69 acts on seven stages, Marsha Evans and Jimmy Hinds. Both more than last year’s festival. take place before the festival start The event will see another intertimes. esting change: the absence of a main Admission prices will increase, $10stage. The spot where it used to be, $15 daily or $25 for both days. Segelat First Street and Lucas Avenue, is Moss points out that admission is about being used as a parking area for conwhat it costs for a show at Broadway struction vehicles. Oyster Bar. Also, he says, Friday night is Segel-Moss acknowledges that the Big Muddy’s free night, with Big George absence of a main stage is unusual. Brock, Barbara Carr, and Ron Edwards, “There isn’t a right way to do this, as far Bob Case and John Erlich. as I know. I just want to see it become Tickets are expected to go on sale this what it is.” month at bigmuddybluesfestival.com. Instead of a main stage, there will be kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

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they’re rich and (c) features such musical numbers as “It’s a Privilege to Pee” and “Snuf That Girl.” But it is not the strangest show that Hollmann and Kotis ever wrote. As of now, that would have to be the current ofering at New Line, “Yeast Nation: The Triumph of Life.” It is perhaps the only musical about onecelled organisms. OK — one-celled organisms that sing and dance. They are the only living creatures on the planet. They are yeast. Eating nothing but salt, the yeast cells live on the floor of the roiling ocean more than 3 billion years ago. It does not sound like Fredand-Ginger-Land. They all dress alike (except for their weird headgear), and they all are ‘Yeast Nation,’ perhaps the only musical about named Jan (pronounced “Yahn”). But one-celled organisms, is onstage at New Line heatre Hollmann and Kostis — whom New Line artistic director Scott Miller describes as “mad geniuses” over, including at the ReperBY JUDITH NEWMARK | POST-DISPATCH THEATER CRITIC — have endowed them with tory Theatre of St. Louis, distinct personalities. The Stray Dog Theatre and New rinetown: The team imagines a rich politiLine Theatre here. Musical” is the cal, social and emotional life Mark Hollmann, who kind of hit that for their micro-organisms, wrote its lyrics and music, musical-theater Mark Hollmann abounding in intrigue and thrill and Greg Kotis, who wrote its dreams float to the discovery of love. lyrics and book, certainly were on. As you might guess from that Hollmann and Kotis have surprised by the success of oh-so-memorable title, the show been working together for a show that (a) is about a came to fame at a fringe festival. years. In the 1980s, they water shortage so severe But it proved so popular that it “overlapped” at the Univerthat people have to pay moved of-Broadway, then on, where sity of Chicago, then both for the privilege of relievit won Tony Awards in 2002 for best Greg Kotis became involved with Chiing themselves, (b) includes original score and best book of a musicago’s flourishing ofbeat, ofscenes at the kind of disgusting cal. Loop theater scene. They met at one of public toilet people have to use unless Since then, it’s been produced all the theaters that was started by U. of C. alumni, Cardif Giant (“named for a jnewmark@post-dispatch.com @judithnewmark The company sings “You Are My Children” in “Yeast Nation”

Another oddball musical from ‘Urinetown’ team

‘U 12

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P.T. Barnum hoax,” Hollmann ofers), and started working together. Currently, the team is in Issaquah, Wash., working on a new musical at the Village Theatre, “ZM.” It’s about a fast-food chain that serves a new food that turns people into zombies. Plainly, Hollmann and Kotis have not moved too far from their Cardif Giant aesthetic. “Cardif Giant had a very specific, darkly comic sensibility, usually embedded in social satire,” says Hollmann, who grew up in Fairview Heights. (Kotis grew up in Wellfleet, Mass. Today the men are practically neighbors. Each married and the father of two children, they live with their families in Harlem.) But the two shows, “Urinetown” and “Yeast Nation,” both have their deepest roots in a 1995 trip Kotis took, touring with another Chicago troupe, the NeoFuturists. A bare-bones production of “Antigone” that he saw in Romania intrigued him. “It made me wonder how far back you could go and still have a story,” he recalls. “Could you go all the way back?” That was the seed of “Yeast Nation.” Then, about 10 days later, after the other actors had returned to Chicago, Kotis found himself alone in Paris “with way too little money.” There he had his first encounter with pay toilets. That turned into “Urinetown.” “Yeast Nation” made its debut in Juneau, Alaska, and has gone on to productions in Chicago, San Francisco, Brooklyn — and now, St. Louis. Kotis is coming to see the show here June 15. Hollmann and Kotis are aware that Miller has something of a reputation for launching oddball shows (“High Fidelity,” “Cry-Baby”) into a world of small theaters that deliberately seek out something diferent. They won’t find much more diferent than this one is. WHAT “Yeast Nation” • WHEN Through June 23 • WHERE Marcelle Theater, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive • HOW MUCH $15-$25 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

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PHOTO: JILL RIT TER LINDBERG


artistic director James Robinson has brought out all the considerable tensions of an epically dysfunctional family. In the pit, music director emeritus Stephen Lord leads the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra idiomatically in music ranging from Broadway ballad to ragtime to spirituals and more. Not to be missed. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Romeo and Juliet’ WHEN 8 p.m. nightly through June 24, except Tuesdays; preshow entertainment at 6:30 p.m. • WHERE Shakespeare Glen, Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-531-9800; sfstl.com

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, under Elena Araoz, stages an intense production of the timeless tragedy, all vivid colors and irresistible impulse. The teenage lovers deserve wiser grownups than Shakespeare included in his script. Before you head to the park, check our illustrated guide to the story at stltoday.com/ go. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘Yeast Nation’

Sigrid Wise (center) and Reynaldo Piniella in “Romeo and Juliet”

RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER

PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF (“ROMEO AND JULIET ”); ERIC WOOLSEY (“LIFE SUCKS”)

‘An American Soldier’ WHEN Through June 22 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

“An American Soldier,” by Huang Ruo and David Henry Hwang, is not an easy opera to take in, but it’s an important one. Based on the true story of Pvt. Danny Chen, who enlisted in the United States Army but was, while stationed in Afghanistan, hazed and bullied until he finally took his own life, “Soldier” deals unflinchingly with racist cruelties and judicial

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blindness. The cast, led at Opera Theatre of St. Louis by Andrew Stenson and Kathleen Kim, is excellent; Huang’s music is an intriguing blend of Chinese and Western influences, tuned to the nature of the characters. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘La Traviata’ WHEN Through June 23 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

Verdi’s tuneful tale of Violetta, the courtesan who finds happiness and love with Alfredo and then surrenders to him, is one of opera’s greatest hits. Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ new production is directed by Patricia

Racette, a soprano who’s sung the leading role about 100 times; her knowledge and understanding of the score shines through. Two fresh-voiced young singers, soprano Sydney Mancasola and tenor Geofrey Agpalo, who started out in the company’s young artists program, are the well-cast leads. The production is a winner.

Greg Johnston and Julie Layton in “Life Sucks”

BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘Regina’ WHEN Through June 24 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘Life Sucks’ WHEN Through Sunday • WHERE Wool Studio Theatre, A&E Building, JCC’s Staenberg Family Campus, 2 Millstone Campus Drive • HOW MUCH $36-$44 • MORE INFO 314-442-3283; jccstl.com

Aaron Posner’s thoughtful, witty and modern rif on Chekhov boasts strong

old) can share in this exploration of family expectations that thwart, or nurture, individuality. The discovery that girls can do anything may be predictable, but it’s still good to hear.

performances all around, particularly from Katy Keating as lovelorn Sonia. Make sure you’re familiar with “Uncle Vanya” before you go — read a synopsis, anyway. You’ll enjoy it much more that way. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘Luchadora!’ WHEN Through June 17 • WHERE Mustard Seed Theatre at Fontbonne University, 6800 Wydown Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15-$35 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Mustard Seed and Theatre Nuevo team up to stage this

family-friendly play about young women challenging the idea that some things are strictly “for boys” — such as the world of Mexican wrestling called Lucha Libre. Adults and kids who aren’t too young (say, at least 10 years

Marc Blitzstein’s adaptation of Lillian Hellman’s “The Little Foxes” has been given first-class treatment by Opera Theatre of St. Louis. The cast, headed by mezzosoprano Susan Graham, who blazes in the title role, is excellent;

WHEN Through June 23 • WHERE Marcelle Theater, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive • HOW MUCH $15-$25 • MORE INFO 314-5341111; metrotix.com

New Line Theatre has long been home to weird shows — and this one, from the creators of “Urinetown,” might be the weirdest yet. Single-cell organisms, singing and dancing in the primordial ooze, more or less simultaneously discover love and dynastic tragedy. The voices are terrific, and the tie-dyed costumes are a hoot; who knew microbiology could be so entertaining? BY JUDITH NEWMARK

Find more events and performances in our new calendar. stltoday.com/events

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Zinzi Clemmons’ debut novel, ‘What We Lose,’ tackles loss and coming of age BY TIRDAD DERAKHSHANI PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

here’s nothing standard about Zinzi Clemmons’ first novel, a gorgeous, taut narrative about grief, identity, race and sexuality enhanced by rap lyrics, archival photos, drawings, graphs and charts. Hailed by Vogue as

T

2017’s literary debut of the year, “What We Lose” is a semiautobiographical coming-of-age story about a young, artistically inclined outsider contending with the loss of a parent. Clemmons visits St. Louis County Library on Tuesday to talk about the book, just out in paperback. Born to a mixed-race South African mother and a black Trinidadian father who grew up in Jamaica, Queens, Clemmons spent her childhood in Pennsylvania. She said that she grew up not feeling she belonged. “I grew up in Swarthmore, and I was from this family who wasn’t exactly upper-class and who was visually very mixed-race,” Clemmons

but that she said in a phone knew her parents interview from didn’t envision her home in Los her becoming Angeles, where an artist. she lives with “Like most her husband, children of poet and immigrants ... translator André “What We Lose” the emphasis Nais-Sahely. A novel by Zinzi always was on “We were Clemmons mixed-race,” she Published by Viking, getting me to 224 pages, $22 find a lucrative said, “but also career,” she said. from Africa, you know. No one “And I was going to become from where I a medical grew up had doctor.” been to Africa. Something Heck, no one happened while had been to Zinzi Clemmons the inner city. ” she was at Brown University. “After Clemmons’ taking so many biology mom was a kindergarten and chemistry courses, teacher, and her dad was I realized I just couldn’t an engineer at Boeing. go through with it. I was She said that she became just so bored with it. interested in photography “And no,” Clemmons and painting in high school,

added with a laugh, her parents “weren’t happy. You know, they were like, ‘We didn’t send you to an Ivy League school so you could be an artist.’” Clemmons said she had never really written before but discovered she had a knack for it while studying under novelist John Edgar Wideman. Clemmons studied creative writing in the Columbia University MFA program and planned to write a first novel about the politics of HIV and AIDS. But “it wasn’t something I really knew about that well, and I had no real feeling for the characters.” By this point, she had moved back home to take care of her mother, who was dying of cancer. “I had written about my

mother before this, and things about my mom kept cropping up in the [AIDS] novel,” Clemmons said. When she turned in her manuscript, her editor was drawn to the parts about her mother and suggested she expand on them. When her mother died in late 2012, Clemmons refocused on the novel with renewed energy. “It was immensely diicult” to write about such a painful topic when it was still so raw, she said. “But I had realized that this was the one thing in my life I had experienced that really was worthy of being written about.” WHAT Zinzi Clemmons • WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-994-3300

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Fast-food workers want raises. Customers want cheap burgers.

A $15 MINIMUM WAGE: Fairness, or a job killer?

SCHOOLS RETHINK GRADING Emphasis on learning G Grades are more heavily based o on subject mastery, rather than homework or participation. A tough transition Parents, teachers worry that kids won’t put in the work needed to succeed in school, life.

STEPHANIE S. CORDLE • scordle@post-dispatch.com PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Monica Green rummages through her dresser for hats and gloves for her children to wear to the bus stop on Thursday in St. Louis. Green, mother of seven, was living in an emergency shelter when she was making minimum wage.

BY JIM GALLAGHER

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Rockwood South Middle School sixth-grader Kyle Stilwell, 12, works on his pre-algebra study guide at home on Thursday in Fenton.

BY JESSICA BOCK

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PHOTO: NINA SUBIN

A topic worthy of writing about


E Y B D O GO FOR NOW P H O T O : R O B G R A B O W S K I / I N V I S I O N /A P

Shania Twain

Shania Twain and 8 other acts are hitting the road for a inal time — allegedly BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

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F

or many of today’s veteran performers, a farewell tour doesn’t actually mean goodbye. Often, the tours are marketing gimmicks. They’ve been successful for big-name acts such as Cher, whose many retirements from the road epitomize the farewell fake-out. (“I can’t do another one because I’ll be dead,” the 68-year-old Cher joked at her 2014 stop in St. Louis. “I’m really not coming back this time, I swear to God.”) Shania Twain, who comes to Enterprise (formerly Scottrade) Center on Wednesday, could fall in line with Cher if she isn’t careful. The Canadian country-pop singer in 2015 talked up the fact that her “Rock This Country” tour would be her farewell. ➨

SHANIA TWAIN ▼

WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Enterprise

(formerly Scottrade) Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $22$395 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

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Elton John performs at

At the time, she was Chaifetz Arena in 2013. significantly younger than most performers who call it quits. She said then that her retirement would be from touring and not from making music. “I love music so much. But the performance side of it I feel is a phase in my life,” she said at the time in a Q&A with reporters. “I’ve been doing it for so long. I’ll be 50 this year (she’s 52 now) and been onstage since I was 8 years old, and I’ve put my fair share into performance. The timing is right to do other things musically.” The “You’re Still the One” singer said she missed making records and needed to get back to that. Her last album at the time was “Up!” (2002). “If I’m distracted by all facets of the tour, how much music am I really going to be able to write, and how many albums am I going to be able to make? I can’t do them both at the same time.” Apparently, Twain figured out how to do both, ELTON JOHN releasing her “Now” album in 2017 and deciding she wasn’t finished with the If there’s one farewell tour that road after all. Twain’s reps declined an needs to stick, it’s Elton John’s. His interview request for this story. “Farewell Yellow Brick Road Tour” This year, a number of acts have is making lots of noise, instantly decided that it’s the end of the road. selling out several dozens of dates. It’s too soon to know whether these John will be on the road with this farewells are really final, so we’ll just say tour for three years, with more than goodbye for now. 300 shows on five continents. “It’s

time to come of the road so I can fully embrace the next important chapter of my life,” John, 71, said in a statement. “Performing live fuels me, and I’m ecstatic and humbled to continue to play to audiences across the globe. I plan to bring the passion and creativity that has entertained my fans for decades to my final tour.”

WHEN 8 p.m. Oct. 30 • WHERE Enterprise Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $46.50-$221.50 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

ANITA BAKER

The R&B songstress (“Caught Up in the Rapture,” “Sweet Love,” “You Bring Me Joy”) announced last year that she had retired. The following year, she returned

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P H O T O S : S A R A H C O N A R D ( S I R E LT O N J O H N ) ; A M Y H A R R I S / I N V I S I O N /A P ( A N I TA B A K E R ) ; H A N D O U T ( LY N Y R D S K Y N Y R D ) ; P O S T- D I S PAT C H F I L E ( O Z Z Y O S B O U R N E )

Anita Baker

Lynyrd Skynyrd

with a Farewell Concert Series, which essentially meant she had come out of retirement to perform farewell shows. Who does that? Doesn’t matter. It’s one of the soul music events of the year. WHEN 7:30 p.m. July 22 • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

SLAYER

The metal band, whose last album was “Repentless” (2015), is hanging it up with a final world tour that includes a second leg kicking of July 26. The band is said to be thanking fans for their support over the last 3½ decades. But signing of now just feels premature. We’ll see how this one plays out. WHAT Slayer, Lamb of God, Anthrax, Testament, Napalm Death •

WHEN 4:30 p.m. Aug. 9 • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $29.50$59.50 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; livenation.com

LYNYRD SKYNYRD

No one can be mad at Lynyrd Skynyrd for signing of with its “Last of the Street Survivors Farewell Tour.” It’s a real measure of strength that the Southern rock band — known for “Sweet Home Alabama” and “Freebird” — was able to last so long, much less weather tragedy at the height of its popularity, when three of its members were killed in a plane crash in 1977. The current lineup features Gary Rossington, Johnny Van Zandt, Rickey Medlocke, Mark “Sparky” Matejka, Michael Cartellone, Keith Christopher, Peter Keys, Dale Krantz Rossington and Carol Chase. “It’s hard to imagine, after all these years, the band that Ronnie Van

Zant, Allen Collins and myself started back in Jacksonville, would resonate for this long and to so many generations of fans,” said founding member Gary Rossington. “I’m certain they are looking down from above, amazed that the music has touched so many.” WHAT Lynyrd Skynyrd, Hank Williams Jr., .38 Special, the Steel Woods • WHEN 6 p.m. Aug. 18 • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $39.50-$219.50 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; livenation.com

OZZY OSBOURNE

We’ve definitely been here before with Ozzy Osbourne. In 1992, the Prince of Darkness embarked on his “No More Tours” tour. Now he’s saying farewell with his “No More Tours 2” tour, which will keep him on the road until 2020. He’ll be joined by Zakk Wylde (guitar), Blasko (bass), Tommy Clufetos (drums)

x box office • 314-535-1700 • fabulousFox.com/subscribe

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Ozzy Osbourne

and Adam Wakeman (keyboards). “I’ve been blessed with an amazing life,” Osbourne said in a statement. “I’m looking at this final tour as being a huge celebration for my fans and anyone who has enjoyed my music over the past five decades.” He will revisit his classics along with some of his work with Black Sabbath, which already has disbanded. The tour is not scheduled to visit St. Louis. ➨

swap for one of These: THE ILLUSIONISTS A CHRISTMAS CAROL LES MISÉRABLES RUDOLPH The Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical THE RAT PACK IS BACK ROCK OF AGES BAT OUT OF HELL BEAUTIFUL–The Carole King Musical

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SATURDAY, JUNE 9 • 5PM-11PM IN DOWNTOWN KIRKWOOD KIRKWOOD ROAD AND JEFFERSON AVENUE

5:00-9:00 PM VINTAGE CARS MUSIC ON TWO STAGES: EAST JEFFERSON STAGE 5:00-6:00 p.m. Matching Shoe 6:45-8:15 p.m. Soulard Blues Band 9:00-10:30 p.m. Big Love WEST JEFFERSON STAGE 5:00-6:30 p.m. Trip Daddys 7:15-8:45 p.m. Power Play 9:30-11:00 p.m. Funky Butt Brass Band Bring your lawn/bag chair. Please, no coolers or pets. 2018 Kirkwood Route 66 Festival sponsored by: Kirkwood Electric I Kirkwood Water I City of Kirkwood Downtown Kirkwood SBD I Kirkwood-Des Peres Area Chamber Kirkwood Arts Commission + Kirkwood Arts Foundation Vermillion Speed I Autolift Superstore I Garage Designs Grand Rental Station I First Bank Facebook updates at: Kirkwood, MO Route 66 Cars and Guitars Festival

www.kirkwoodmo.org/carsand guitars

PAUL SIMON

Legendary singersongwriter Paul Simon is in the early stages of bowing out with “Homeward Bound — The Farewell Tour,” capping a performance career that goes back to the early 1960s. He’ll focus on his solo output as well as his work with Simon & Garfunkel. “I’ve often wondered what it would feel like to reach the point where I’d consider bringing my performing career to a natural end,” Simon said in a statement. “Now I know: It feels a little unsettling, a touch exhilarating and something of a relief. I love making music, my voice is still strong and my band is a tight, extraordinary group of gifted musicians. I think about music constantly. I am very grateful for a fulfilling career and, of course, most of all to the audiences who heard something in my music that touched their hearts.” The tour is not scheduled to play St. Louis.

Paul Simon

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Christian band Third Day — known for songs such as “Cry Out to Jesus,” “Mountain of God,” “Call My Name” and “I Need a Miracle” — quietly announced a farewell tour that’s currently underway. It’s not slated to play St. Louis. In addition to the hits, the group will perform songs from its members’ new projects. “We know this is a season that is coming to a close, and we wanted to give our fans one more chance to see us perform live,” lead singer Mac Powell said. “The live show has been the core fan experience, and this tour will give us an opportunity to go out and say thank you to the fans who have always been so supportive of our music.” VANS WARPED TOUR

The artists on the Vans Warped tour are nowhere near retiring, though the

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tour itself is after 20 years. Packaged tours like this one have fallen out of favor, with fans preferring destination festivals such as Coachella, Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza (which itself started as a packaged tour). This year’s lineup includes the Used, Story of the Year, Waterparks, Simple Plan, 3OH!3, Reel Big Fish, Falling in Reverse, We the Kings, Motionless in White, Assuming We Survive, Chase Atlantic, Crown the Empire, Dead Girls Academy, Deez

Nuts, Doll Skin, Don Broco, Every Time I Die, Farewell Winters, Four Year Strong, Hail the Sun, Ice Nine Kills, In Hearts Wake, Knuckle Puck, Mayday Parade, Phinehas, Picturesque, the Amity Aliction, Unearth, Wage War, With Confidence, Twiztid, Sharptooth, Lighterburns, Senses Fail and the Maine. WHEN Noon July 3 • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $30-$45 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; livenation.com

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P H O T O : J I M M Y J E O N G / T H E C A N A D I A N P R E S S V I A A P ( PA U L S I M O N ) ; R O B B D . C O H E N / I N V I S I O N /A P ( T H I R D D AY )

LIVE MUSIC ON TWO STAGES VINTAGE CAR DISPLAY


STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES ▼

Sterling K. Brown (left) and Brian Tyree Henry in “Hotel Artemis”

‘Hotel Artemis’ is built on originality St. Louis native Sterling K. Brown emerges as the sci-i ilm’s most heroic igure ★★★

P H O T O : M AT T K E N N E D Y

BY CALVIN WILSON | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

otel Artemis is actually a Los Angeles hospital, but not just anyone can be treated there. Presided over by the Nurse (Jodie Foster), it’s a place where criminals get patched up, staying long enough to heal before departing for

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their next job. And the Nurse insists that patients abide by the rules, which are so numerous that compiling them in a pamphlet wouldn’t be a bad idea. In order to preserve their anonymity, patients are addressed by their room names. Those currently hiding out at the hospital include bank-robbing brothers Waikiki (St. Louis native Sterling K. Brown) and Honolulu (Brian

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Tyree Henry), assassin Nice (Sofia Boutella) and arms dealer Acapulco (Charlie Day). Struggling to keep everyone in line is Everest (Dave Bautista), an orderly who repeatedly boasts that he’s a “healthcare professional” but isn’t above busting heads should the situation require it. It’s 2028, and the streets are full of rioters protesting the privatization of water. That’s enough to make the Nurse wary of venturing outside the building. But she may have to make an exception: A wounded cop (Jenny Slate) could die if the Nurse doesn’t come to her assistance. And Everest’s skills may be needed when the hospital attracts unwanted visitors. Unusually for a mainstream sciencefiction film,“Hotel Artemis” is more character-based than action-oriented.

The film has a moody sensibility that brings out the best in the fine ensemble cast, with an undercurrent of dark humor that keeps things engagingly of-kilter. Writer-director Drew Pearce takes his time establishing the characters and the story, an approach that draws us in while making us wonder what will happen next — and why. And he elicits firstrate performances. Foster is compelling as a woman with a troubled past, and Brown comes across as the film’s most heroic figure. “Hotel Artemis” is neither a sequel nor a remake, but a film of considerable originality. And that makes it a rarity at the multiplex. WHAT “Hotel Artemis” • RUN TIME 1:33 • RATING R • CONTENT Violence, language, sexual references and drug use

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‘Ocean’s 8’ turns out to be curiously joyless Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett and the rest of the charismatic cast are better than their material ★★½ BY CALVIN WILSON | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ebbie Ocean (Sandra Bullock) just spent five years in prison, and she’s angry. A con woman who takes pride in her work, she can’t wait to get back in the game. But she’s also out to get revenge on a former partner in crime (Richard Armitage) who set her up.

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Of course, if she can also make a lot of money, so much the better. And to do that, she’ll need to assemble a team. With the help of her old pal Lou (Cate Blanchett), Debbie enlists the services of down-on-her-luck fashion designer Rose Weil (Helena Bonham Carter), gifted jewelry maker Amita (Mindy Kaling), unparalleled tech genius Nine Ball (Rihanna), stealthy pickpocket Constance (Awkwafina)

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and shady suburbanite Tammy (Sarah Paulson). The plan is to stage a heist during an exclusive gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Their target: a diamond necklace valued at $150 million and presumably beyond the reach of thieves. Essential to the plan’s success is manipulating Daphne Kluger (Anne Hathaway), the gala’s guest of honor, into wearing the necklace. Considering Daphne’s vanity, that shouldn’t be diicult. Still, there’s always the chance of something going wrong. And Debbie would rather not land back in the slammer. “Ocean’s 8” — a spinof of the crime comedy franchise that starred George Clooney, Brad Pitt and Matt Damon — starts of as a freewheeling romp,

but becomes so preoccupied with the specifics of pulling of the heist that it loses its spark. Working from a screenplay that he co-wrote with Olivia Milch, director Gary Ross (“Seabiscuit”) delivers a film that’s curiously joyless. Unlike Steven Soderbergh, who directed the previous “Ocean’s” films, Ross lacks the necessary lightness of touch. Instead of soaring, the film is disappointingly earthbound. The charismatic cast can’t be faulted. Bullock and Blanchett are more than credible as crooks, and Hathaway is delightful as the self-absorbed Daphne. Unfortunately, “Ocean’s 8” turns out to be a poor showcase for their talents. WHAT “Ocean’s 8” • RUN TIME 1:50 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Language, drug use and suggestive content

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P H O T O : B A R R Y W E T C H E R / P I C T U R E S -V I L L A G E R O A D S H O W P I C T U R E S

From left: Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Mindy Kaling, Sarah Paulson, Awkwaina, Anne Hathaway, Rihanna and Helena Bonham Carter in “Ocean’s 8”


From left: Milly Shapiro, Toni Collette, Gabriel Byrne and Alex Wolf in “Hereditary”

Director’s iendish feature debut Ari Aster throws a bit of everything into ‘Hereditary’ ★★★½ BY MICHAEL PHILLIPS | CHICAGO TRIBUNE

ll happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way, as Tolstoy noted in a sentence so right, by the time you started arguing with it, “Anna Karenina” was of and sufering. If Tolstoy got a look at “Hereditary,” he might’ve added: “Well. There’s unhappy, and then there’s grief-strickenhideously cruel-unholy family secretshorror movie-unhappy.” The latter is the dwelling place of

PHOTO: JAMES MINCHIN — A24

A

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director Ari Aster’s fiendish feature debut. Not everything in “Hereditary” fits together; its rhythm is a little of in its second half, and it’s clear Aster wanted to throw a little bit of everything, from seances to sleepwalking to malevolent specters of doom, at his devastated family unit in the center of his tale. Yet you may be too fraught watching the thing to bother over a few missteps. Working with a superb cast, a crafty, teasing musical score by Colin Stetson and a steady accumulation of wracked nerves, this movie promises a paradoxically bright future for its director. Aster also wrote the screenplay, which begins with an onscreen newspaper obituary noting the passing of a 78-year-old woman at her daughter’s home, near the mountains. (The movie was shot in Utah.) Aster makes no mystery of his protagonist’s feelings regarding her late mother. Toni Collette plays Annie, a driven, somewhat forbidding artist specializing in miniatures. In fastidiously re-created tableau, she depicts tiny little scenes from her own life. At the funeral, early on, Annie speaks of her mother’s “secretive and private” side. Later, when Annie reluctantly visits a

grief-counseling group, she tells the strangers more about that secrecy, along with the streak of madness and loss that runs in her family. Annie’s husband (Gabriel Byrne) is quiet sanity incarnate. He halfwonders if Annie should find a way to unblock her feelings toward her late, un-lamented mother. She does so, without his help, in the worst possible way: We’ll keep spoilers under wraps, but it’s enough to say “Hereditary” makes Annie’s children the playthings of the story’s supernatural element. Forced by Annie to take his troubled, withdrawn younger sister, Charlie (Milly Shapiro), to an unsupervised high school party, stoner Peter (Alex Wolf) concludes the evening in a panic. Charlie has a severe nut allergy, ruthlessly foreshadowed by the filmmaker. Peter rushes her to the car, and takes of, trying to get her to the hospital in time. Then something truly brutal happens, and it’s enough to slap the audience into realizing this family’s troubles have just begun. In interviews Aster has acknowledged the various cinematic influences on “Hereditary,” among them Nicholas Roeg’s “Don’t Look Now” and Roman

Polanski’s “Rosemary’s Baby.” He set out to make “an alienating film,” as he told Film Comment, “whose primary aim was to upset the audience in a very deep way.” Additionally, he said, he wanted an experience “that betrays you on every level, where you become invested in all these people, and what happens to them is not fair. You have to contend with it.” Many will choose not to. If the mixed, largely hostile audience response three years ago to Robert Eggers’ beautiful creep-out “The Witch” is any guide, “Hereditary” may generate its share of resentment. It’s not a cathartic horror movie; its preoccupations and methods are pretty grueling. Annie finds her way to the spirit world by way of a sympathetic amateur medium (Ann Dowd) who takes an interest in her recovery after the highway tragedy. By this time Peter’s barely functioning; between him and his mother, the feelings of guilt, resentment and rage run both ways, and Peter becomes one of the “pawns in a horrible, hopeless machine” one of his fellow English class students talks about, in a discussion of Greek tragedy and pitiless gods. Aster borrows from all over the place, with unusual confidence and purpose. His best images play spatial games between Annie’s miniatures and the goings-on in the real house. Each time Aster cuts to a shot of the spacious semifurnished treehouse behind the family home, the one emitting a ghostly red glow from a space heater, it’s just as arresting as the previous time. Above all, there’s Collette, who sometimes can overdeliver a dramatic moment or an aghast reaction, but in this storytelling context she’s fabulous. It’s a fierce performance with a human pulse, racing one minute, dead still the next. If “Hereditary” isn’t quite up to the horror-debut level of “The Witch,” it’s still a pretty remarkable experience. And now I think I need to pet my dog, or listen to some Gershwin, or something. WHAT “Hereditary” • RUN TIME 2:07 • RATING R • CONTENT Horror violence, disturbing images, language, drug use and brief graphic nudity

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he ‘Nelson Mandela of couture’ gets his due ‘he Gospel According to André’ is an admiring documentary about fashion icon André Leon Talley ★★★ BY ANN HORNADAY | WASHINGTON POST

‘F

ashion is fleeting, style remains.” That is one of several arresting aperçus uttered by André Leon Talley, the charismatic subject of “The Gospel According to André.” At 6-foot-plus, his prodigious frame draped in a breathtaking collection of capes and caftans, the fashion journalist presents a literally larger-than-life figure throughout this admiring documentary portrait, which gives him his due not only as part of the New York vanguard that included artist

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Andy Warhol and fellow editors Diana Vreeland and Anna Wintour, but as an avatar for black excellence in post-Jim Crow America. Following Talley from his stately White Plains home to Paris, Manhattan, Washington, D.C., and his birthplace of Durham, N.C., filmmaker Kate Novack creates a lively homage to the act of self-creation: Growing up with his grandmother in a modest home, Talley — now approaching 70 — received an early education in fabulousness simply by attending church, where African-American laborers and domestics shed their weekly uniforms and arrived decked out in fine dresses,

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hats, gloves and shoes. This is where Talley learned the core tenets of what has become known as “respectability politics” (wherein, as he says at one point, “it’s a moral code to dress well”). His pursuit of a master’s degree at Brown University, where he studied French literature, spun Talley into the orbit of a group of young avantgardists at the Rhode Island School of Design across the street. Moving to New York in 1974, the smart, efortlessly sophisticated Talley began answering phones at Warhol’s Interview magazine and volunteered for Vreeland at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute. Those gigs led to editorial positions at Women’s Wear Daily and Vogue, where he and editor Wintour developed the kind of mind-meld that results in truly groundbreaking creativity, in Talley’s case championing black designers and models and conceiving bold, provocative spreads that engaged the wider culture as much as couture.

(A table-turning 1996 reenactment of “Gone With the Wind” for Vanity Fair, featuring Naomi Campbell as Scarlett O’Hara, was particularly prescient.) The musician Will.I.Am calls Talley “the Nelson Mandela of couture, the Kofi Annan of what you got on.” “The Gospel According to André” only briefly addresses Talley’s private life or, more accurately, lack of one. Although Talley shares a few candid reflections on how racism and homophobia afected his life, viewers must connect the dots more deeply on their own. The structure of the film, which is framed within the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, feels dated and by now too-familiar, as we witness another set of happy, anticipatory faces turn stricken and somber as the unexpected results are announced. (His eyes always firmly on the prize, Talley still has nice things to say about Melania Trump’s inauguration outfit.) At its best, “The Gospel According to André” gives viewers the rare chance to get to know someone who, until now, has mostly been known as that impeccably turned-out gentleman who seems to know everybody at the annual Costume Institute gala. Talley, it turns out, merits admiration not only for his intellect, work ethic and ability to contextualize fashion within history, literature, visual art and music, but for the exacting eye and determination with which he has created his own character. The obstacles, clearly, were present from the start. Talley, notes one observer, “was so many things he wasn’t supposed to be.” In “The Gospel According to André,” a star isn’t born. He gives birth to himself, through sheer force of will. WHAT “The Gospel According to André” • RUN TIME 1:34 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Suggestive and mature thematic material

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PHOTO: MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Fashion editor André Leon Talley in “The Gospel According to André”


who had dreams of being a rodeo star. With Brady Jandreau as a character based on himself. CW

‘The Seagull’ ★½

‘Show Dogs’ ★★½ PG • 1:30 • Will Arnett

stars in this comedy about a cop and a Rottweiler who go undercover at a dog show. WASHINGTON POST

PG-13 • 1:38 • Annette

Bening and Saoirse Ronan can’t save this mediocre adaptation of Chekhov’s classic play. Directed by Michael Mayer. CW

‘Sherlock Gnomes’ PG • 1:26 • Garden

Ryan Reynolds in “Deadpool 2”

ALSO IN THEATERS ▼

‘Acrimony’

Ashcraft with Susea McGearhart. Directed by Baltasar Kormakur. Not reviewed. LOS

Directed by Kay Cannon.

ANGELES TIMES

PG-13 • 1:44 • Jane Fonda

R • 2:00 • Taraji P.

Henson stars as a woman wronged by her husband. With Lyriq Bent, Crystle Stewart, Ajiona Alexus, Antonio Madison. Written and directed by Tyler Perry. Not available for review. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Action Point’ R • 1:25 • Johnny

Knoxville stars as the proprietor of a safetychallenged theme park threatened by the arrival of a nearby mega-amusement park. With Chris Pontius, Dan Bakkedahl, Matt Schulze, Eleanor Worthington-Cox. Written by John Altschuler and Dave Krinsky; story by Knoxville, Derek Freda, Altschuler, Krinsky, Mike Judge. Directed by Tim Kirkby. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Adrift’

PHOTO: T WENTIETH CENTURY FOX

PG-13 • 2:00 • Shailene

Woodley and Sam Clalin star as a pair of bohemian lovers whose sailing adventure leads into a catastrophic hurricane. Written by Aaron Kandell, Jordan Kandell, David Branson Smith; based on a book by Tami Oldham

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‘Avengers: Infinity War’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:29 • The

superheroes must cope with a global existential threat in what’s said to be the penultimate ilm in the franchise. Thrilling but preposterous. Directed by Anthony and Joe Russo. CALVIN WILSON

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

from director Claire Denis. In French with English subtitles.

‘Book Club’ ★½

WASHINGTON POST

and Diane Keaton deserve better than this anemic feature-length sitcom about a group of women who regularly gather to discuss a popular erotic novel. CW

‘Breaking In’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:28 • A young

‘Beast’ ★★★

mother played by Gabrielle Union battles a quartet of burglars to save her children in this taut thriller.

R • 1:47 • Michael

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pearce directed his psychological thriller. With Jessie Buckley and Johnny Flynn. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Black Panther’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 2:15 • Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan and Lupita Nyong’o star in this thrilling tale of an African king, his adventures and his adversaries. A huge step forward for black cinema and a terriic time at the movies. Directed by Ryan Coogler (“Creed”). CW

‘Deadpool 2’ ★★★ R • 1:59 • Ryan Reynolds

is back as the superantihero. Not as good as the original, but that’s to be expected. With Josh Brolin and Zazie Beetz. CW

‘First Reformed’ ★★★½ R • 1:53 • Ethan Hawke is outstanding as a pastor facing a crisis of faith in this provocative and mesmerizing drama from writerdirector Paul Schrader (“American Gigolo”). CW

‘Blockers’ ★★½

‘Let the Sunshine In’ ★★★

R • 1:42 • Leslie Mann

NR • 1:34 • Juliette

and John Cena star as parents determined to interfere with their daughters’ prom.

Binoche is a woman coming to terms with her romantic life in this comedy-drama

‘Life of the Party’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:45 • Melissa McCarthy is the only reason to see this lackluster comedy about a mom who returns to college. Directed by Ben Falcone (“Tammy”). CW

Ruth Bader Ginsburg. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Rider’ ★★★½ R • 1:44 • Chloé Zhao

(“Songs My Brothers Taught Me”) directed this drama about a severely injured cowboy

gnomes Gnomeo and Juliet and their family and friends return, aided by the famous detective in this animated sequel. Voiced by James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Maggie Smith, Michael Caine, Johnny Depp. Directed by John Stevenson. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Solo: A Star Wars Story’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:15 • Alden Ehrenreich takes over from Harrison Ford as Han Solo in this unnecessary but fun space romp. With Donald Glover. Directed by Ron Howard. CW

‘Upgrade’ ★★ R • 1:35 • Logan Marshall-Green stars in this science-iction/ horror lick about a man whose life is radically changed after a mugging. Directed by Leigh Whannell. WASHINGTON POST

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ ★★

‘Truth or Dare’ ★½

PG • 1:49 • Oprah

PG-13 • 1:40 • A

Winfrey, Mindy Kaling and Reese Witherspoon appear as otherworldly beings in this mediocre adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s beloved novel. Directed by Ava DuVernay (“Selma”). CW

humorless horror lick about college kids trapped in a deadly game. With Lucy Hale. Directed by Jef Wadlow. WASHINGTON POST

‘Tully’ ★★★½ R • 1:36 • Charlize

Theron is terriic in this comedy-drama about a frazzled mom who gets much-needed

Use our new calendar to ind theaters and showtimes near you. stltoday.com/events

INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO ATTEND A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING

‘Pope Francis: A Man of His Word’ ★★★ PG • 1:36 • Director

Wim Wenders, who is best known for narrative ilms (“Wings of Desire”), ofers an unconventional documentary of the pontif as he travels the world, bringing with him a message of peace and hope. CW

To download your complimentary passes to attend the advance screening on 6/13, enter the following code, while supplies last, at

‘A Quiet Place’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:30 • Emily Blunt and John Krasinski star in this tale of a family stalked by terrifying creatures. Horror of the irst order. Directed by Krasinski. CW

FocusFeatures Screenings.com: KoCvA44517 *Passes are available on a first-come, firstserved basis, while supplies last. Quantities are limited. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per person. Void where prohibited. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. Seating at this screening is on a first-come, first-served basis. The screening is overbooked to ensure capacity and seating is not guaranteed. This film is rated PG-13.

‘RBG’ ★★★ PG • 1:37 • Betsy West and

Julie Cohen directed this engrossing, entertaining and unabashedly adoring documentary about Supreme Court Justice

help from a night nanny (Mackenzie Davis). Directed by Jason Reitman (“Up In the Air”). CW

FocusFeatures.com/Wont-You-Be-My-Neighbor |

@MrRogersMovie | #MrRogersMovie

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From left: Kim Cattrall, Cynthia Nixon, Sarah Jessica Parker and Kristin Davis

COMMENTARY ▼

‘Sex and the City’ bent the rules for TV, women Twenty years ago, the HBO series helped level the playing ield BY LORRAINE ALI | LOS ANGELES TIMES

PHOTO: MARK LIDDELL / HBO

W

hen “Sex and the City” arrived on HBO in June 1998, sopranos were still singers with high voices, Larry David was the guy who wrote “Seinfeld,” and “Six Feet Under,” “Deadwood” and “The Wire” were years from being credited with starting a revolution of original cable series programming. Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker), Samantha (Kim Cattrall), Charlotte (Kristin Davis) and Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) ushered in change on $900

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Jimmy Choo stilettos, loosening up TV conventions as they swilled martinis in designer dresses some of them shouldn’t have been able to aford on their respective salaries. Free of the constraints of network television, they cursed like R-rated film heroes, discussed (and had) sex in graphic detail and strived to be fabulous rather than likable. “It’s slim pickings out there,” said Samantha during one of many episodes where the women were lamenting their dating prospects. “You can’t swing a Fendi purse without knocking over five losers.” It was the cynicism of Gen X,

coupled with a sexual awakening post-AIDS crisis, in an era when the city was moving up from grungy to moneyed. “Sex and the City” became must-watch Sunday night viewing for young(ish) women, gay men and anyone else who finally saw their embarrassing drunken confessionals with friends, and disastrous/scandalous dating moments, dramatized on screen. Each episode walked the line between fantasy and reality, sentimentality and raunch, and dressed it all to the nines. In Carrie’s world, walking 10 blocks in 6-inch heels was a glamorous act of independence, not a painful, crippling slog that ended in Duane Reade’s bandages and plastic flip-flops aisle. And all those high-end dinners and high-calorie drinks never resulted in Miranda bursting the seams of that tiny Patricia Field mini-dress. I remember watching the premiere of “Sex and the City” in New York, where I lived at the time, prepared to hate the show for making their female characters so materialistic and mancrazy. Yet I loved it. Bad behavior, objectifying the other sex — we didn’t even know the real name of Carrie’s great love Mr. Big (Chris Noth) until the final episode — and seeking power in the workplace were equal-opportunity ventures in their version of Manhattan. But the show wasn’t meant to represent the real lives of city women. It was there to entertain those who hadn’t been represented. “Sex and the City” has since been maligned for being unrealistic, for being too white and for setting feminism back with vain characters obsessed with shopping and sex. But Carrie and company weren’t meant to carry the feminist mantle from “Murphy Brown” to “Girls,” HBO’s millennial version of “Sex and the City.” They simply leveled the playing field. They were the primary focus, and male characters were peripheral. It was their conversations we finally got to hear, not men talking about them. Successful TV series with femaledriven narratives were rare back then, and those that did survive past one

season were often centered on motherhood or marriage. Bufy had been slaying for only a little over a year, and “The Powerpuf Girls” were busy empowering, well, girls, not women. The “Sex and the City” foursome were equalizers. They weren’t acting like men; they were reflecting the changing values and roles of women from one generation to the next, which in Miranda’s case meant choosing to have a baby out of wedlock and in Samantha’s, sleeping with as many young men as possible. Was the cast super white in a city that was not? Absolutely. Did the show miss about a billion opportunities to portray single, working women as more than the composite characters they sometimes were in “Sex and the City”? Yes. Perhaps if it was rebooted for the #MeToo era, it would tackle issues of representation, harassment in the workplace, or even the workplace. We rarely saw them at work, except when Carrie the sex columnist was writing at home, in her way-too-nicefor-casual-lounging underwear. Without the show, however, we may not have had the conversations that inspired more female-led narratives by female writers, like “Big Little Lies” or “The Handmaid’s Tale.” And HBO might still be the home box oice you watched only when you were too tired to change the channel. “Sex and the City,” along with the uber-masculine 1997 prison drama “Oz,” was the first original-series drama to make HBO a destination for smart, risky original series programming that bent rules and the ratings game. The series, which predated Tinder, streaming, Facebook and smartphones, has influenced the modern TV viewing experience far more than Carrie, Samantha, Miranda or Charlotte could have ever imagined when they were still making booty calls from pay phones. So don’t diminish the influence these women from a less politicized TV era still have on the shows we watch. They broke down barriers, even if it was with the swing of an absurdly priced Fendi handbag.

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‘Kimmy’ character is ‘very far’ from the real Tituss Burgess BY JOSEPH V. AMODIO | NEWSDAY

I

f you know only one thing about Tituss Burgess, make it this: There’s a big diference between Tituss, the actor (two S’s), and Titus, the character he plays (one S). Many fans, even co-workers, sometimes don’t get it. A breakout star on the hit Netlix series “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt,” Burgess’ portrayal of outrageous, struggling actor Titus Andromedon has earned him three Emmy nominations — and online GIFs galore. The show, created by Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, about that ever-perky doomsday

TV Q&A ▼

Q • Why did Elias Koteas, who played Detective Alvin Olinsky on “Chicago P.D.,” die on the show? Did Elias want to leave? A • Olinsky was a casualty of the show’s complicated storytelling around Olinsky, Hank Voight (Jason Beghe) and Denny Woods (Mykelti Williamson). Executive producer Rick Eid told Entertainment Weekly that “once that Woods-Voight-Olinsky storyline really became front and center and

26

Tituss Burgess in “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”

cult survivor Kimmy (St. Louis native Ellie Kemper), her out, loud and proud roomie (Burgess), quirky landlady (Carol Kane) and downtrodden socialite pal (Jane Krakowski), with occasional visits from Kimmy’s former captor (Jon Hamm, also of St. Louis), has been craved, controversial and critically acclaimed. The irst half of the fourth — and last — season premiered last week. A native of Athens, Ga., Burgess, 39, has appeared on Broadway in “Guys and Dolls,” “The Little Mermaid” and “Jersey Boys.” Q • Say it ain’t so — “Kimmy’s” fourth

we started thinking of ways to dramatize it and play it through to its honest conclusion, it was an idea that just kept coming up.” It was a powerful way of making Voight pay a price for his actions and “an interesting way for Olinsky to exit.” And in this case the narrative overwhelmed the producers’ love for Koteas. Eid told US Weekly that breaking the news to Koteas was “just horrible.” Q • I was a big fan of the original “Hawaii Five-0.” With the

season is the last? A • Unfortunately, true. It came as a huge shock to us all. But the writers are delivering some very pointed, funny material. So, yeah, it is the last one but … we’re doing a movie. That’ll be like a two-hour Season 5. So it doesn’t feel as “This is it!” as it sounds. Q • The role of Titus is often described as tailor-made for you. So … what’s not so tailor-made about it? What’s challenging? A • I think it’s tailor-made to it my skill set. But … who he is, is very far from me. The most diicult thing is having new directors every week come to set thinking that I’m going to

newer series I was hoping for a remake — with a few updates — but these two scrufy guys, sleeves rolled up, often driving around in a truck and hardly ever in their oice, just don’t make it for me. I suppose it plays well to the younger crowd, though. A • Since the series has been picked up for its ninth season in the fall, yes, there are people who like its blend of action, humor and Hawaiian locations. It reportedly has an average of 11

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million viewers per week, good enough to rank among the 20 most-watched shows on network TV. It is not nearly as successful among viewers 18 to 49 years old, who are often sought by advertisers. But the series’ overall audience is noteworthy because, as the Los Angeles Times noted some time ago, fewer people are watching TV on Friday nights than on Sunday through Thursday. “Five-0” has another advantage for CBS: It is successful internationally. And a

be that man. Which has often made for a diicult working process. When I get a note to change something, I often don’t respond right away. And I probably won’t look you in the eye when you’re giving it to me. I’m mostly trying to integrate as rapidly as I can what you’ve just told me … and undo the performance I just did. But some people have seen me through the lens of Titus Andromedon, and think I’m being a diva or combative or unruly, and it’s just not so. It makes the process so labored. Q • You must rue the day they named your character Titus. A • Oh, it’s just the worst. Some people think it’s so easy to play because they think it’s me. That’s what’s been hardest. Q • Where are you headed post-”Kimmy”? A • I’ve written a musical. I bought the rights to the ilm “The Preacher’s Wife,” which starred Whitney Houston. We’re bringing it to Broadway, hopefully in the near future.

top CBS executive told the Times that around the world, “action adventure and escapist entertainment translate very well. The language is less important.” Q • In the early ’90s there was a show on Fox about a James Bond-type secret agent, which was ilmed in central Florida. What was the name of the show, and who were the stars? A • That was “Fortune Hunter,” which aired on Fox for a few weeks in 1994. Mark Frankel starred as Carlton

Q • Will you be in it? A • Oh, no, no, no, no. I want to give other people jobs. There are a couple of movies I’m doing this summer that will be announced soon. One is very exciting, with a huge, huge, huge star I’ll be playing opposite. Q • I could talk to you all day about your “Kimmy” colleagues. How about we do one of those “irst word that comes to mind” games. First: Ellie Kemper. A • Sister. Q • Jane Krakowski. A • (There’s a long pause — then he laughs.) Umm … vixen. Q • Carol Kane. A • Legend. Q • Jon Hamm. A • Hot. Q • Tina Fey. A • Omnipotent. Q • What have you

“SOME PEOPLE THINK IT’S SO EASY TO PLAY BECAUSE THEY THINK IT’S ME. THAT’S WHAT’S BEEN HARDEST.” TITUSS BURGESS

Dial, a former spy now taking on jobs around the world for a private company called Intercept. John Robert Hofman was Harry Flack, Dial’s tech-savvy associate. While Intercept was supposedly in San Francisco, Florida illed in for that and other locations on the series. But, even with NFL football as a lead-in, the show did not catch on. Q • I remember a show called “Filthy Rich” that was a spoof of “Dallas.” It starred Dixie Carter. Who else

learned from her? A • She zooms out and zooms in simultaneously. I’ve never heard her speak ill of anyone. And she’s the most generous collaborator I’ve ever worked with. She knows how to get what she needs out of your performance and lets you do your own thing all at the same time. Q • One last thing — how are your dogs? A • Oh, thank you. I love that you asked. It’s the closest thing I’ll ever get to being a parent. I will not bring children into this world. Q • Really. A • Yes. Really. But my dogs are wonderful. They seem more in tune with me than ever. I came home last night, exhausted, and they usually rush me at the door. But … they waited till I settled down on the couch under a blanket, and they gently crawled up and put their heads on top of me. I started crying. It’s like they know. WHAT “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” • WHEN Now streaming • WHERE Netlix • MORE INFO netlix.com/kimmyschmidt

was on it, and who sang the theme song? A • “Filthy Rich” was a parody of prime-time soaps, with a family ighting following the death of wealthy patriarch Big Guy Beck. Airing irst in the summer of 1982, it was a surprise hit, and CBS brought it back the following October, where it did not do well; it was over in 1983. Besides Carter, the cast included Delta Burke, Charles Frank, Jerry Hardin, Ann Wedgeworth and Nedra Volz. Big Guy was originally played by Slim

Pickens, then by Forrest Tucker after Pickens’ death. The series’ creator was Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, who would rocket to TV fame with “Designing Women” in 1986 — a series that also featured Carter and Burke. As for the theme, country hitmaker Bucky Jones — who wrote the song — told me it was sung by Ronnie McDowell. BY RICH HELDENFELS, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Send questions to Rich Heldenfels, P.O. Box 417, Mogadore, OH 44260, or brenfels@gmail.com.

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PHOTO: ERIC LIEBOWITZ/NETFLIX

Q&A


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Sashimi moriawase at Nippon Tei

Nippon Tei transforms into a sushi revelation Chef Nick Bognar’s eforts to elevate the local sushi scene result in one of St. Louis’ most exciting restaurants ★★★ BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

I

f you want the best value for your money in St. Louis dining right now, you can’t beat the nigiri omakase at Nippon Tei. For $18, chef Nick

ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

28

Bognar prepares five immaculate pieces of nigiri sushi. Your selection likely will include a sushi standby like salmon, but even here Bognar might treat you to sake toro, salmon’s sweeter, more luscious belly meat. And Bognar doesn’t mechanically

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@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.08.18-06.14.18

aix this sake toro onto rice smeared with wasabi paste. Instead, he brushes the fish with nikiri (sweet soy sauce) and then garnishes it with grated real-deal wasabi root. Or Bognar might torch the salmon belly and balance its now steak-like fatty richness with lemon zest. He’ll set this beside whichever specials have arrived on the most recent flight from Japan: snowy, fleetingly sweet hirame; oily, intensely briny mackerel; shimaaji, its balance of body and sweetness the ideal midpoint between the hirame and the mackerel. If you’re lucky, there will be a luxurious serving of uni from Hokkaido, Japan, creamy as custard, its flavor pure,

cold ocean distilled. Is that a sliver of A5 Wagyu beef from Japan, basted with tare, lightly torched and melting in your mouth like steak butter? It is, and it, all of it, whatever you receive, is $18. If you prefer sashimi, Bognar’s sashimi moriawase, with 12 precisely cut pieces and accompaniments, including a rainbow of roe, is enough for two people and also a steal at $36. For those of us who have despaired of the state of sushi in St. Louis, Nippon Tei is a revelation. Or, really, it’s two revelations. Not only is the 26-yearold Bognar trying to bring the St. Louis sushi scene into 2018, he’s doing so at the restaurant his mother, Ann Bognar, opened in 2001, when he was 10, a place that years ago settled comfortably into the bland shopping-plaza-scape of Manchester Road near Ballwin. Growing up as the son of a chef, Bognar felt pressure not to enter the restaurant industry himself, he told me in a phone interview. Inevitably, though, as a teenager, he worked parttime in his mother’s restaurant, and he studied in the culinary-arts program at South Technical High School in Sunset Hills. He learned about preparing sushi at Nippon Tei, he worked catering gigs with his high-school culinary instructor, and he realized he loved cooking. “I had a drive to get really good at something,” he said, “and I was lucky to be at (Nippon Tei) and talk to the sushi chef.”

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ stltoday.com/go Extraordinary

P H O T O S : J . B . F O R B E S / P O S T- D I S PAT C H


Sake toro maki

Nigiri omakase with madai, saba, sake toro, maguro and Wagyu A5

(One of the Nippon Tei sushi chefs he learned from was his aunt, Whitney Yoon, who now opeartes Sushi Koi in the Central West End. Coincidentally, about a month ago, doing research for next year’s edition of the STL 100, I ate a fine meal at Sushi Koi and wondered how I’d missed the place for so long.) Bognar attended culinary school at Forest Park Community College and went to work as chef and manager at Tei Too, his family’s Thai restaurant in Webster Groves. (Ann Bognar is originally from Thailand.) In 2015, he helped kickstart the area’s ramen boomlet by opening Ramen Tei in what had been Nippon Tei’s bar. I was tough on Ramen Tei in my 1½-star review. In hindsight, the food notwithstanding, I didn’t appreciate how appealingly ambitious the young Bognar was to undertake such a project. (Bognar has recently revamped Ramen Tei’s operation. I didn’t include it in this review, however.) Meanwhile, one of Bognar’s childhood friends had moved to Austin, Texas, and was a server at the sushi restaurant Uchiko, where chef Tyson Cole, among many plaudits, had won the James Beard Foundation’s “Best Chef: Southwest” award in 2011. Bognar used his connection to land a job there. “That’s when the real learning began,” Bognar said. “They were doing things I’d done before, but it was all be-

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ing done in a better way.” Dishes didn’t appear on the menu until they had been studied and tested for weeks. The ethos, Bognar said, was daunting: “Anything can be improved. Anything can be pushed to its limits.” After a year, Bognar moved to Cincinnati to be with his girlfriend and oversaw a new sushi concept in that city. His mother liked the more contemporary style of sushi he’d learned in Austin and showcased in Cincinnati and thought it was time for a change at Nippon Tei. Bognar hasn’t changed the look of his mother’s restaurant. It remains a pleasant retreat from the strip-mall hustle, its ambiance part generic sushi restaurant, part hotel-lobby bar. Bognar’s menu isn’t expansive: a few salads, excellent versions of familiar starters like gyoza ($7) and crab rangoon ($7); rice bowls and pork tonkatsu. I’m generally ambivalent about the multiple-ingredient sushi rolls popular at American restaurants. At Nippon Tei, I recommend looking for what Bognar himself seeks in assembling his nigiri omakase: the best fish, the fish in season. So on one visit I enjoyed a spider roll ($14) with tempura-fried softshell crab and, for a potent seasonal accompaniment, asparagus. The gorgeous sake toro is the heart of its selfnamed roll ($14), its richness doubled with avocado and cut with lemon zest, ponzu and the heat of togarashi.

You can order nigiri sushi and sashimi a la carte, though you’ll be hard-pressed to assemble the balance of quality and value that the omakase and moriawase selections do. And if the value doesn’t tempt you, know that Nick Bognar hasn’t just made Nippon

Tei the biggest bang for your dining buck; he’s also transformed it into one of St. Louis’ most exciting restaurants. WHERE Nippon Tei, 14025 Manchester Road • MORE INFO 636-386-8999; nippon.teistl.com • MENU Sushi and other traditional Japanese fare • HOURS Lunch TuesdayFriday, dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included) Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 7/11/18

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 7/11/18

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1764 Public House ★½ WHERE 39 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-405-8221; 1764pub. com • MENU Upscale St. Louis- and New Orleansinluenced fare • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Billie-Jean ★★★½ WHERE 7610 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7978484; billiejeanstl.com • MENU Contemporary American and Southeast Asian cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Bing Bing ★★ WHERE 567A Melville Avenue, University City • MORE INFO 314-669-9229; facebook.com/ bingbingstl • MENU Jianbing and other Chinese fare • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily

The Blue Duck ★ WHERE 2661 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-769-9940; blueduckstl.com • MENU Contemporary American food • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Cafe Piazza ★★ WHERE 1900 Arsenal Street • MORE INFO 314-343-0294; cafepiazza.com • MENU Pizza as well as panini and breakfast fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern ★★ WHERE 2101 Chouteau Avenue • More info 314241-4677; charlevillebeer. com • MENU Hearty pub fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Cibare Italian Kitchen ★½ WHERE 777 River City Casino Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-388-3777; www. rivercity.com/dining/cibareitalian-kitchen • MENU Pasta, pizza and more Italian fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

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The Clover and the Bee ★★

A “king” cut of oakroasted prime rib at Iron Barley High Hog Ridge

WHERE 100 West Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-9421216; thecloverandthebee. com • MENU Casual bistro fare • HOURS Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wednesday-Sunday

WHERE 3196 South Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-266-5400; pizzaheadstl. com • MENU New York-style pizza by the slice or whole pie • HOURS Lunch TuesdaySaturday, dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

WHERE 200 North Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1488; clubtacostl. com • MENU Tacos with a variety of illings drawn from various cuisines • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Polite Society ★★★

Cork & Barrel Chophouse ★½

Das Bevo ★★ WHERE 4749 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314832-2251; dasbevo.com • MENU German fare with contemporary lair HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Del Pietro’s ★★½ WHERE 1059 South Big Bend Boulevard, Richmond Heights • MORE INFO 314-224-5225; mikedelpietros.com • MENU Traditional Italian fare • HOURS Dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

El Toluco Taqueria & Grocery ★★ WHERE 14234 Manchester Road, Manchester • MORE INFO 636-6865444; facebook.com/ eltolucotaqueria • MENU Tacos, tortas and more taqueria fare • HOURS 9 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaySaturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (no restaurant service on Tuesday)

Grace Meat + Three ★★★ WHERE 4270 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-533-2700; stlgrace. com • MENU Traditional Southern main dishes and sides • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday and Tuesday)

WHERE 8025 Bonhomme Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-899-9767; parigistl. com • MENU Elegant versions of classic Italian dishes • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner MondaySaturday, brunch Sunday

Pizza Head ★★

Club Taco ★½

WHERE 7337 Mexico Road, St. Peters • MORE INFO 636-387-7030; corkandbarrel. com • MENU Steaks, chops and pizza • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday

Parigi ★★★

Handcrafted by Bissinger’s ★

The Humble Pie

WHERE 32 Maryland Plaza • MORE INFO 314-367-7750; handcraftedbybissingers. com • MENU Light breakfast, lunch and dinner fare, plus chocolate • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

WHERE 9783 Clayton Road, Ladue • MORE INFO 314997-7070; eatthehumblepie. com • MENU Thin-crust and Sicilian-style pan pizzas • HOURS 4-9 p.m. daily

Herbie’s ★★½ WHERE 8100 Maryland Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-769-9595; herbies.com • MENU Classic American and French bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Hi-Pointe Drive-In ★★ WHERE 1033 McCausland Avenue • MORE INFO 314349-2720; hipointedrivein. com • MENU Fast-casual burgers, sandwiches and milkshakes • HOURS 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily

Himalayan Yeti ★★ WHERE 3515 South Kingshighway • MORE INFO 314-354-8338; himalayanyetistlouis.com • MENU Indian and Nepalese cuisine • HOURS Lunch bufet and dinner daily

Hugo’s Pizzeria ★★½ WHERE 3135 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-896-4846; hugospizzeria.com • MENU Pizzas both conventional and creative • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.08.18-06.14.18

★★

Iron Barley High Hog Ridge ★★½ WHERE 3367 High Ridge Boulevard, High Ridge • MORE INFO 636-671-9911; ironbarleyshighhogridge. com • MENU Hearty comfort fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

J. Smugs GastroPit ★★½ WHERE 2130 Macklind Avenue • MORE INFO 314499-7488; jsmugsgastropit. com • MENU Barbecue, including pork ribs and beef brisket • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, noon-7 p.m. Sunday

Kalbi Taco Shack ★★ WHERE 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314240-5544; kalbitacoshack. com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

Knead Bakehouse + Provisions ★★½ WHERE 3467 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314376-4361; kneadbakehouse. com • MENU Breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuesday-Friday,

8 a.m.-3 p.m. SaturdaySunday (closed Monday)

L’Acadiane ★½ WHERE 1915 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-8750108; lacadiane.com • MENU Creole- and Cajuninspired fare • HOURS Lunch Wednesday-Friday, dinner Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Lemmons by Grbic ★★½ WHERE 5800 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-899-9898; lemmonsrestaurant.com • MENU American fare with a Balkan accent • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Sunday, lunch Saturday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Like Home French Cafe & Pastry ★★½ WHERE 3855 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO 314319-0099; likehomecommeal amaison.com • MENU French cafe fare and pastries • HOURS 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Louie ★★★ WHERE 706 DeMun Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314300-8188; louiedemun.com • MENU Rustic Italian fare • HOURS Dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

Mac’s Local Eats ★★ WHERE Inside Tamm Avenue Bar, 1225 Tamm Avenue • MORE INFO 314-479-8155;

macslocalbuys.com • MENU Burgers and fries • HOURS 3-9 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 3-10 p.m. Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday, noon-9 p.m. Sunday (Tamm Avenue Bar open 3 p.m.-1 a.m. Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-midnight Sunday)

The Mad Crab ★★ WHERE 8080 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-801-8698; facebook.com/madcrabstl • MENU Seafood boils featuring shrimp, crab and crawish • HOURS 3-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Nudo House ★★★ WHERE 11423 Olive Boulevard, Creve Coeur • MORE INFO 314-2748046; facebook.com/ nudohousestl • MENU Ramen and pho • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

One Way Mexican Restaurant ★★ WHERE 5912 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314833-5550; onewaycafeandbar. business.site • MENU Traditional Mexican fare • HOURS 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily

WHERE 1923 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-325-2553; politesocietystl.com • MENU Contemporary and classic bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Privado ★★★★ WHERE 6665 Delmar Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-899-9221; privadostl.com • MENU A ticketed tasting menu of progressive American cuisine • HOURS Dinner Friday and Saturday

Sardella ★★★½ WHERE 7734 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-773-7755; sardellastl.com • MENU Contemporary fare with Italian and Californian inluences • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday

Sister Cities Cajun ★★½ WHERE 3550 South Broadway • MORE INFO 314-405-0447; sistercitiescajun.com • MENU Gumbo, po’boys and more • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

Snax Gastrobar ★★ WHERE 3500 Watson Road • MORE INFO 314353-9463 • MENU Casual American fare • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Squatter’s Cafe ★★½ WHERE 3524 Washington Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-925-7556; squatterscafe. com • MENU Creative modern breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday (limited menu available 2-4 p.m.)

The Stellar Hog ★★ WHERE 5623 Leona Street • MORE INFO 314-4818448; thestellarhog.com • MENU Barbecue featuring beef brisket and pork ribs • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Wednesday)

The Taco & Ice Cream Joint ★★½ WHERE 2738 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314224-5799; facebook.com/ tacoandicecreamjoint • MENU Tacos and other taqueria fare, ice cream and popsicles • HOURS 11 a.m.10 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday

Turn ★★½ WHERE 3224 Locust Street • MORE INFO 314-240-5157; davidkirklandcatering.com/ turn • MENU Casual breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS Breakfast and lunch TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Vicia ★★★★ WHERE 4260 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314553-9239; viciarestaurant. com • MENU Modern, progressive cuisine with an emphasis on vegetables • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday

The Wood Shack ★★½ WHERE 1862 South 10th Street • MORE INFO 314-8334770; thewoodshacksoulard. com • MENU Sandwiches featuring smoked meats • HOURS 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday) BY IAN FROEB

Pangea ★★½ WHERE 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles • MORE INFO 636757-3579; pangeaworldfusion. com • MENU Contemporary bistro fare with global accents • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

DINING OUTDOORS Find our guide to 10 great restaurant patios in our Summer Fun Guide. stltoday.com/summerfun

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ stltoday.com/go Extraordinary

P H O T O : J . B . F O R B E S / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

RECENTLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS


SMALL BITES ▼

A few new reasons to visit J’s Pitaria Since opening a year ago, this small restaurant has expanded its menu BY IAN FROEB POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

’m late in recommending J’s Pitaria, which the married team of Josi and Zamir Jahic opened about a year ago in Bevo Mill. There’s at least one upside to my tardiness, though. Between my irst visits to J’s Pitaria last fall and now, when I’ve inally extricated my review schedule from the food processor of paternity leave and writing the STL 100, this small, winning restaurant has expanded its menu. The heart of the J’s Pitaria menu remains pita,

I

OFF THE MENU ▼

P H O T O S : I A N F R O E B / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Hiro Poke Co. coming to the Eatery downtown A few years ago, well before the poke craze washed ashore in St. Louis, Bernie Lee put the Hawaiian raw-ish dish on the menu of Hiro Asian Kitchen, his restaurant and STL 100 staple on Washington Avenue in Downtown West. No one ordered it, he tells Of the Menu, and after two months he 86’d the dish. Now poke is booming

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The lahmacun, or Turkish pizza

Stufed pita

or burek, or any number of variations in name and shape and illing by which this dish is known in the Zahic’s native Bosnia, the Balkans, Turkey and elsewhere. At J’s the Jahics serve cigar-shaped rolls of thin phyllo dough illed with meat, cheese, spinach and cheese or potato. (Sweet options with Nutella or apple are also available.) You pay by weight, with the savory pita priced

nationally, and Lee is ready to try again. “I feel it’s time,” he says.

at $6.99 per pound. Whichever you order — I prefer the seasoned ground beef and the creamed-spinach-esque spinach-cheese combo — the best part is the contrast between the crackling-crisp pita and the tender illing. I don’t mean this as a slight against the pita, but J’s could just as easily be named after its doner kebab ($7.99). The juicy meat, with just the right

a protein, vegetables and fruits to mix in, sauces and garnishes.

Lee will open Hiro Poke Co. inside the Eatery, the food hall that opened in January at the One Metropolitan Square building downtown. He is targeting the middle of June for opening.

At Hiro Asian Kitchen, Lee also anticipated the St. Louis ramen boomlet by a couple of years. Unlike Hiro’s poke, the ramen — a pork version and a shrimp-based spicy seafood ramen — have stuck on the menu.

Hiro Poke Co. will ofer a set menu of three bowls: poke (tuna or salmon), teriyaki chicken or tofu. Diners can also build their own bowl by choosing a base (white rice, brown rice or salad),

Hiro Poke Co. will ofer neither of those. Instead, Lee will feature a ramen style that he saw as all the rage on his most recent trip to Japan: chicken paitan. This he describes as a creamy chicken broth

that is lighter than a traditional pork broth but still robust in lavor. A vegetarian version with tofu and mushroom also will be available. BY IAN FROEB

Eater names Nixta’s Alex Henry a ‘Young Guns’ semifinalist The inluential dining website Eater has named Nixta executive chef Alex Henry a semiinalist for its annual “Young Guns” awards. The honor, per Eater, “highlights frontand back-of-house rising stars who are early in their careers

amount of spit-roasted char, and the airy somun bread that contains it make this one of the best doner kebabs in town. That somun bread also accompanies an order of garlicky, paprika-dusted hummus ($5.99), one of the items added to the menu since my visits this fall. Also new since then is lahmacun ($6.49), or Turkish pizza, a latbread topped with a minced

but already exhibit the drive, ambition, thought and care necessary to take on the restaurant world.” Henry is one of 50 semiinalists. Eater will announce the inalists next month. Ashley Shelton, executive chef of Sardella and Pastaria, was a “Young Gun” inalist in 2016. Though he knew he had been nominated for the honor, he says he was still shocked to learn he was among the 50 chefs and other industry professionals selected. Henry was born in Merida, Mexico, and

meat, tomato, onion, garlic and red pepper. At J’s, the lahmacun is rolled up so that it looks something like a shawarma sandwich. It’s light in body, or as light as something with meat can be, and the onion, the pepper and especially the tomato hold their own against the meat for an overall lavor that is as sharp as it is meaty. Would you believe me if I said I was waiting for

moved to St. Louis as a child. Eater credits Henry as having created “a heavily Mexicaninluenced menu pulling from his background in traditional Mexican cooking, inluence(d) by Yucatan and Mayan traditions, while using seasonal, local Midwestern ingredients.” Before Nixta, Henry worked at the widely acclaimed Vicia. He has also worked at Brasserie by Niche and Taste, and he credits chef Rob Uyemura — now of Local Chef Kitchen but for whom

J’s to ofer lahmacun all along? Well, you should try it anyway. WHERE J’s Pitaria, 5003 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-339-5319; facebook.com/jspitaria • MENU Stufed pita and other Bosnian fare • HOURS 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Read more of Ian’s Small Bites reviews every Tuesday in Of the Menu. stltoday. com/ofthemenu

Henry worked at YaYa’s Euro Bistro in Chestreield — as a special inluence for teaching him the importance of sustainability in the kitchen. Henry is the second executive chef at Nixta, which chef-restaurateur Ben Poremba opened in November 2016. Poremba and inaugural executive chef Tello Carreon won broad acclaim for Nixta’s Mexican fare, including 3½ stars from this restaurant critic and a No. 9 ranking in Bon Appétit magazine’s

“best new restaurants in America” list in 2017. Carreon left Nixta in October of last year. Henry took over that month and has remade the restaurant’s menu since then, and its No. 7 ranking in the 2018 edition of the STL 100 included a meal under his stewardship. BY IAN FROEB

Find more St. Louis restaurant news in Of the Menu. stltoday. com/ofthemenu

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FEATURES

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2018 Nissan Kicks SPECIAL FEATURE______________ A BOLD DESIGN DOWN TO THE LAST DETAIL Stop and take in Kicks’ aggressive exterior. Sharp edges cut from the hood and headlights into sweeping, sinuous lines that low backwards over aerodynamic wraparound LED taillights.

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2018 Nissan Kicks

DRIVING WITH DAN By DAN WIESE

New subcompact crossover embraces adult responsibility Nissan's newest small crossover has a different worldview than the tiny 2011-2017 Nissan Juke it replaces. Like the music box that shared its name, Juke appealed to buyers' party instincts -- in the car's case with quirky styling, turbocharged power and a modest cargo hold. Let the good times roll, it igured, and we'll deal with practical matters later. The all-new (to the U.S., at least) 2018 Nissan Kicks, on the other hand, believes it is practicality and frugality that really give buyers of small crossovers a kick. And so, compared to Juke, Kicks provides fewer tractive wheels but more mpg, less horsepower but more cargo room, less torque but more passenger room, less styling audacity but more crossover presence, and -- perhaps most important to buyers in this entry-level segment -- less dollars on its bottom line compared to Juke. While the front-drive Juke had been available with optional all-wheel drive, Kicks comes strictly as a front-driver. And power to those wheels is managed in Kicks exclusively by a CVT automatic, unlike Juke, which made available a six-speed manual for more adventurous buyers. That said, Kicks is EPA rated at 33 combined mpg, four better than an automatic-equipped, front-drive Juke. And, it's notable, Juke preferred a diet of Premium gas; Kicks is happy with Regular. Under the hood, Kicks jettisons Juke's

Contributing Automotive Writer drivingwithdan@gmail.com

2018 Nissan Kicks DRIVE FORMAT: Front-wheel drive BASE PRICE: S: $18,965; SV: $20,665; SR: $21,265 ENGINE: 1.6-liter I-4 HORSEPOWER: 125 TORQUE: 115 lb.-ft. RECOMMENDED FUEL: Regular TRANSMISSION: CVT automatic with manual mode EPA MPG: 33 mpg combined city/hwy WHEELBASE: 103.1 inches LENGTH: 169.1 inches CARGO (rear seat up): 25.3 cu. ft. WHERE BUILT: Aguascalientes, Mexico

Offered only with front-wheel drive, the new Nissan Kicks subcompact crossover replaces the far quirkier Juke.

party-pal 1.6-liter blown four in favor of a naturally aspirated, 1.6-liter four-banger that makes 125 hp and 115 lb.-ft. of torque -- numbers that represent decreases of 63 and 62, respectively, compared to Juke. Inside, Kicks is notably roomier than its predecessor thanks to dimensions that stretch 6.7 inches farther in length and just over half an inch loftier in height, all riding a wheelbase that covers an additional 3.5 inches of real estate. As a result, 04

RIDES MAGAZINE

Kicks's 25 cubic feet of seats-up cargo room more than doubles the 10.5 offered by Juke, along with providing a notably roomier rear seat. All that extra room is wrapped in crossover styling that is much more traditional than the endearingly whacky wardrobe of Juke. That said, Kicks does go off the reservation a bit, offering several available hey-look-at-me two-tone paint treatments that include white, orange or red with a black roof; gray with an orange roof; or blue with a white roof. Offered in S, SV and SR trims, Kicks, even in base trim, boasts such standards as Automatic Emergency Braking, Bluetooth Hands-free Phone System, three USB ports, roof rails and Intelligent Auto Headlights.

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SV adds, among other things, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, Blind Spot Warning, Rear Cross Trafic Alert, keyless entry and start, 17-inch aluminum-alloy wheels, heated outside mirrors, automatic climate control and satellite radio receiver. The lair of the top-of-the-line SR is evident in LED low-beam headlights, fog lights, black heated outside mirrors, roof spoiler and, inside, leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, upgraded fabric trim and surround-view monitor. Finally, Kicks starts at just $18,965 -$2,245 less than a base 2017 Juke. At press time, the most speciic information we had on Kicks's U.S. arrival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it's been on sale in South America since 2016 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is "early June." With that in mind, if Kicks isn't at your favorite Nissan dealer yet, it will be in about 15 minutes.


1957 Ford was full of problems — but not from the timing belt DEAR CAR TALK: You recently wrote about a guy whose timing belt broke, who tried to restart his car but whose valves survived only through sheer good luck. In 1957, I had a new Ford six-cylinder, standard shift. Driving out in the country late one night, when the car was relatively new, the tim¬ing belt broke. There was no damage to the engine, but I did try to crank it sev¬eral times, not knowing what had caused the initial loss of all engine power. Was I also one of the lucky ones, or was there something different about that model of Ford? — Lindle

Your Ford did not have an interference engine. So the valves could be fully open and the piston could be at the top dead center, and the two would not touch. So among the many problems you probably had with that Ford, getting the valves crushed by the pistons was not one of them. You also didn’t have a timing belt. You had a timing chain, or even timing gears, which were more common then. Interestingly, we’re seeing a lot more timing chains again these days, as manufacturers have igured out how to make them truly reliable

(unlike the one in your 1957 Ford). And now they almost never fail. So you were one of the lucky ones, Lindle. Lucky you were driving a ’57 Ford instead of a ’07 Ford. *** Why do unmitigated cheapskates like Ray continue to buy nothing but old clunkers? Find out by ordering Tom and Ray’s guide “How to Buy a Great Used Car: Secrets Only Your Mechanic Knows.” Send

DEAR LINDLE: There are a lot of differences between the 1991 Honda Civic I wrote about and your 1957 Ford, Lindle. One is that a 1991 Honda was extremely unlikely to die on you in 1991. But more importantly, your old Ford did not have an “interference engine.” Starting in the 1980s, Honda, and lots of other manufacturers, started making engines in which the open valves and the pistons shared the same space at times — or overlapped — inside each cylinder. The timing belt, as its name suggests, ensures that when the valves drop down from the top and open into the cylinder, the piston is not near the top at the top of its stroke. And when the piston comes up to the top, it ensures that the valves are closed and out of the way. The advantage of this design is that it allows for an increase in compression ratio and lets the valves get wider, which means more power and better mileage from the same-size engine. But if the timing belt breaks or jumps, the pistons can — and often do — crash into the valves and bend them. That’s why manufacturers — especially those that use interference engine designs — insist that customers change their timing belts at 90,000 miles (on average). And why we strongly reinforce that advice to our customers.

05

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CAR TALK By RAY MAGLIOZZI Contributing Automotive Writer cartalk@gmail.com

$4.75 (check or money order) to Car Talk/ Used Car, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. Got a question about cars? Write to Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or email by visiting Car Talk at www.cartalk.com. © 2018 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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BEST OF ST. CHARLES 3 YEARS IN A ROW BOMMARITO ST. PETERS Winner St. Charles County Reader's Choice Poll

N I B N I A G R BA All State Inspected.

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2008 Saturn Astra RX

2004 Volvo XC90 2.5T

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2011 Chevy HHR

2011 Mazda 2 Hatchback

2007 Mercedes Benz C-Class

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2006 Chrysler 300C

2003 Toyota Highlander

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$7,990

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2010 Chevy Equinox LT

2009 Chrysler 300 Limited

2002 Jaguar XK8 Conv.

2006 Acura TSX

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2007 Chevy Silverado 1500

2014 Chevy Spark LT

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2011 Mini Cooper S Countryman

2014 Chevy Cruze LS

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2009 Cadillac CTS

2011 Toyota Camry

2013 Ford Escape SE

2014 Mitsubishi Mirage G4 SE

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2012 Chevy Impala LTZ

2013 Hyundai Veloster

2015 Nissan Sentra SV

2014 Ford Fusion SE

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RIDES MAGAZINE

$12,390

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6 Years / 100,000 Miles 12 Months / 12,000 Miles 24 Months / 24,000 Miles

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2014 Honda Civic CVT LX

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2015 Nissan Altima I4

2012 Ram 1500 SLT

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2012 VW Touareg VR6

2014 Mazda CX-5 Gr. Touring

2017 Jeep Patriot Latitude

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2017 Nissan Altima SV

2017 Chevy Cruze HB LT

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2016 Chevy Malibu LS

2015 Chrysler Town & Country

2017 Mazda 3 Touring

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2010 Infiniti QX56

2012 BMW X5 xDrive50i

2014 Cadillac SRX Performance

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Bommaritostpeters.com 09

RIDES MAGAZINE

$17,990

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2015 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500 LT 24K Miles, Stk# C11669P

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14,797

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28,216

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2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

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23,307

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2009 Infiniti G37x

2006 Toyota Corolla S

2006 Jeep Commander

# 28612B

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$

5,300

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5,444

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5,500

2006 Dodge Ram 1500 ST

2006 Honda Odyssey EX

2007 Mazda CX-9 SUV

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$

7,100

2011 Chevy Camaro 1LS

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12,000

2014 Ford Taurus Limited

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13,604

2012 Audi S4 #28388B

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$

15,100

2008 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited

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17,100

2011 Lincoln MKS EcoBoost

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$

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10,000

2011 Chevy Silverado 1500

6,500

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11,500

2015 Kia Optima LX

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$

12,100

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$

14,000

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15,999

2014 Lexus CT 200h Hatchback #28607A

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17,100

12,300

2013 Ford Explorer XLT

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2012 Honda CR-V LX

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14,000

2015 Honda Civic EX-L w/Navi

$

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$

16,100

2014 Subaru XV Crosstrek SUV

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17,300

16,500

2015 Nissan Altima

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$

18,604

13,000

2014 Chevy Volt

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$

14,300

2016 Mazda 6 i Touring

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16,500

2014 Acura RDX

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19,500

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2016 Jeep Compass Latitude #40208B

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2013 Ford Explorer Limited #28682A

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2015 Buick LaCrosse Premium #39268A

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6,999

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2017 Chevy Spark LS

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14,300

2013 Cadillac SRX Luxury

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12,500

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2011 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE Ext Cab

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2015 Toyota Camry SE Sedan

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8,300

2012 Nissan Altima 2.5 S Coupe

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$

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6,300

$

$

2011 Toyota Sienna

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7,300

2008 Acura MDX 3.7L

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2006 Mazda MX-5 Gr. Touring

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$

20,000

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2011 KIA OPTIMA

5,995

2011 TOYOTA SIENNA $

11,697

2014 CHEVY MALIBU

2007 CHEVY AVALANCHE $

10,995

2014 NISSAN MAXIMA $

10,697

2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON

2015 FORD FOCUS

2010 DODGE CHARGER $

2011 FORD TAURUS

2010 NISSAN FRONTIER $

2016 HYUNDAI ELANTRA $

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Stk. #69626-1, 2WD

Stk. #50822-1, XLE

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2012 HYUNDAI SANTA FE $ Stk. #68358-1, FWD, GLS

8,995

11,995

10,995

Stk. #50312-1, 2WD, KING CAB

ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

$

10,397

Stk. #95535-1, LT

$

9,995

Stk. #69149-1, AWD, GLS

Stk. #69439-2, SEL

Stk. #95595, SE

$

11,995

12,995

370

70 270

HYUNDAI 40/64

12

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

2014 HYUNDAI SONATA $ Stk. #68565-1, GLS

11,597

2013 HYUNDAI TUSCON $

12,397

Stk. #68742-1, 2WD, LIMITED

2013 GMC TERRAIN

$

9,995

Stk. #50183-1, FWD, SLE

2012 CHEVY EQUINOX $ Stk. #69374-1, FWD, LT

10,995


844-467-9452

StCharlesHyundai.com

Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

2015 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE Stk. #69204-1, 4WD

$10,995

2011 TOYOTA CAMRY LE Stk. #50402-2

$6,995

2009 TOYOTA COROLLA S

$6,995

Stk. #95251-6

2011 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS

2009 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS

2004 HONDA ACCORD EX Stk. #68364-2

$4,995

2017 KIA SOUL

$6,397

Stk. #68759-1

$9,995

Stk. #50463-2

$5,995

2008 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE

2008 CHEVROLET COBALT LT Stk. #49609-2

$12,997

2011 CHRYSLER 200

2010 LINCOLN TOWN CAR LIMITED #50624-2, SIGNITURE

$5,995

Stk. #50015-1

2006 BUICK RAINIER CXL Stk. #69220-1, 2WD

$8,995

Stk. #50006-1

$3,995

#50942-1

$7,995

844-467-9452

StCharlesHyundai.com 2010 CHEVY EQUINOX LS Stk. #95635-1, AWD

$7,995

2009 FORD TAURUS LIMITED

2013 CHRYSLER 300 Stk. #49614-1, C

5701 Veterans Memorial Pkwy Saint Peters, MO 63376

$10,697 13

Stk. #50443-1

RIDES MAGAZINE

$6,397

2009 FORD FOCUS SEL Stk. #69057-1

2013 GMC TERRAIN SLE Stk. #50542-1,AWD

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

$13,297

06-08-18

$5,995

2007 NISSAN ARMADA SE Stk. #50319-1, 2WD

stltoday.com/RIDES

$7,995


SUNTRUP PRE-OWNED Visit us online for complete inventory

www.SuntrupBuickGMC.com

SAVE $1,000â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON YOUR NEXT PRE-OWNED VEHICLE!!! $

6,990

$

11,477

2005 CHEVROLET BLAZER

2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2010 FORD EDGE

4DR, 4WD, EXT Stk # 49233-1

99,067 Miles, Stk # 49560-1

81,177 Miles, Stk # 24859-1

4DR Limited, Stk # P3825-1

11,880

$

12,800

12,888

$

$

12,900

$

2017 NISSAN VERSA SEDAN

2009 GMC ACADIA

2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

2017 KIA FORTE

31,076 Miles, Stk # P3827

Stk # 49329-1

72,248 Miles Stk # 49506-1

34,418 Miles, Stk # P3836

$

14,900

$

15,900

17,500

$

2015 BUICK ENCORE

2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE LIMITED

18,990

19,900

$

$

18,700

$

2012 BMW 535I XDRIVE

FWD, 19K Miles Stk # P3809

19,300 Miles, Stk # P3874

WEY BUU SED!!

9,995

$

8,800

$

2017 CHEVROLET IMPALA

81,901 Miles, Stk # 48904-1

27,800

$

42K Miles Stk # P3844

36,900

$

2017 BUICK ENCORE

2015 CHEVY EQUINOX 1LT

2016 BUICK ENCLAVE

2016 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER

5,413 Miles Stk # 48267-3

FWD, 13K Miles Stk # P3833

PREMIUM AWD 60,851 Miles Stk # 24656-1

Stk # 3815

NEARLY 500 NEW & USED VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM!

S

CAR

* With down payment of $2,500 cash or trade, With Approved Credit, based on 4.9% APR for 72 months.

866-420-7771 14

RIDES MAGAZINE

Credit Problems? CALL STACEY Specializing in Bankruptcies

636-939-0800

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

4200 N. SERVICE RD. I-70 & CAVE SPRINGS stltoday.com/RIDES

W BUE

US Y CARESD !!


Bommarito

South County Pre-Owned Center

2017 Chevy Traverse LT

2015 Chevy Malibu LS

2017 Chevy Camaro 1LT

Stk. #P6444, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certiied

Stk. #P6470, One Owner,, Clean Carfax, GM Certiied

Stk. #P6492, 17K Miles, Convertible, GM Certiied

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$24,969

$12,990

$24,776

2015 Chevy Equinox LT

2017 Mazda CX-3 Touring

2016 Chevy Cruze 1LT

Stk. #P6517, 35K Miles, GM Certiied

Stk. #33347A, Backup Camera, GM Certiied

Stk. #P6466, 24K Miles, GM Certiied

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$20,893

$18,990 UNDER $10,000 2007 Chrysler T&C Stk. #P6334A........... SALE PRICE $3,990 2005 Chevy Trailblazer Stk. #P6434B.. SALE PRICE $5,769 2006 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #42717A.... SALE PRICE $5,996 2008 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #42738A SALE PRICE $6,444 2005 Buick LaCrosse CXL Stk. #42760A SALE PRICE $7,990 2008 Chevy Impala LS Stk. #42755A... SALE PRICE $7,990 2008 Hyundai Santa Fe Stk. #42580C. SALE PRICE $7,990 2008 Honda Civic EX Stk. #42591A...... SALE PRICE $7,990 2008 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #42756A.... SALE PRICE $8,649 2011 Kia Sportage Stk. #35029A ........... SALE PRICE $8,659 2012 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #42841A.... SALE PRICE $8,990 2014 Hyundai Sonata Stk. #P6313A..... SALE PRICE $9,544 2013 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6320A SALE PRICE $9,969 2010 Buick LaCrosse CXL Stk. #400165A ... SALE PRICE $9,969 2008 Mercury Mariner Stk. #42831A ... SALE PRICE $9,969 2014 Chevy Cruze 2LT Stk. #42487A... SALE PRICE $9,990

UNDER $15,000

2010 Buick LaCrosse CXL Stk. #42866A SALE PRICE $10,869 2013 Chevy Equinox 1LT Stk. #42512A SALE PRICE $10,969 2011 Ford Escape XLT Stk. #P6494A SALE PRICE $11,469 2011 Dodge Durango Stk. #P6467A. SALE PRICE $12,469 2015 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #P6470. SALE PRICE $12,990 2012 Lexus CT Stk. #33745B................ SALE PRICE $13,469 2016 Ford Fusion SE Stk. #42735A .. SALE PRICE $13,758 2008 Ford F-150 XLT Stk. #42564A... SALE PRICE $13,869 2016 Chevy Cruze LTD Stk. #P6495 SALE PRICE $13,976 2016 Chevy Cruze LTD 1LT Stk. #P6466 SALE PRICE $13,990 2008 Ford F-150 SuperCrew Stk. #42564A SALE PRICE $13,990

2015 Nissan Altima Stk. #P6513 ....... SALE PRICE $13,990 2013 Chevy Camaro 2LS Stk. #42725A SALE PRICE $13,990 2016 Jeep Compass Stk. #P6447..... SALE PRICE $13,998 2013 Mazda CX-9 Stk. #35042A ......... SALE PRICE $14,440 2016 Toyota Corolla Stk. #33720A .... SALE PRICE $14,569 2016 Chevy Trax LS Stk. #42849A..... SALE PRICE $14,769 2016 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #42570A SALE PRICE $14,990 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #42283A. SALE PRICE $14,990 2014 Dodge Charger SE Stk. #P6433A SALE PRICE $14,992

UNDER $20,000 2015 Nissan Altima Stk. #P6512 ....... SALE PRICE $15,769 2015 Mazda 3 i Touring Stk. #P6500 SALE PRICE $15,793 2013 Lincoln MKX Stk. #P6270A........ SALE PRICE $15,990 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #42859A SALE PRICE $15,990 2017 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #P6465. SALE PRICE $15,990 2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #P6408A SALE PRICE $15,990 2015 Buick Encore Stk. #42788A....... SALE PRICE $15,990 2017 Chevy Cruze LT Stk. #P6491 ... SALE PRICE $15,990 2015 Nissan Frontier Stk. #42129A .. SALE PRICE $16,764 2015 Nissan Altima Stk. #P6511 ....... SALE PRICE $16,769 2014 CR-V EX-L Stk. #42285A............. SALE PRICE $16,790 2016 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #P6523 . SALE PRICE $16,990 2017 Dodge Journey SXT Stk. #P6497 SALE PRICE $17,469 2015 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #P6461 . SALE PRICE $17,679 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan Stk. #P6402 SALE PRICE $17,770 2017 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #P6429 . SALE PRICE $17,969 2016 Hyundai Tucson Stk. #42897A. SALE PRICE $17,990 2015 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #P6515 SALE PRICE $17,990 2015 Nissan Rogue Stk. #35474A ..... SALE PRICE $18,504

$13,990 2017 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6442 . SALE PRICE $18,769 2010 GMC Sierra Stk. #P6424A .......... SALE PRICE $18,969 2017 Dodge Gr. Caravan SXT Stk. #P6489 SALE PRICE $18,990 2015 Mazda 3 s Touring Stk. #35376A SALE PRICE $18,993 2017 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6520 . SALE PRICE $19,776 2000 Chevy Corvette Stk. #400051B SALE PRICE $19,969

UNDER $25,000

2018 Chevy Malibu LS Stk. #42692A .. SALE PRICE $20,969 2013 GMC Yukon XL Stk. #P6199A ..... SALE PRICE $20,990 2017 Dodge Challenger SXT Stk. #P6473 SALE PRICE $20,990 2015 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6509 . SALE PRICE $21,990 2012 Chevy Silverado Stk. #P6406A SALE PRICE $22,991 2014 Chevy Silverado LT Stk. #42653A SALE PRICE $23,969 2017 Nissan Maxima Stk. #P6496 ....... SALE PRICE $23,990 2007 Chrysler Paciica Stk. #P6522 SALE PRICE $24,440 2017 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6444 SALE PRICE $24,969 2017 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6472 SALE PRICE $24,969

OVER $25,000

2017 Chevy Equinox Stk. #42282A ...... SALE PRICE $25,469 2017 Mazda 6 Gr. Touring Stk. #33618A SALE PRICE $25,993 2018 Chevy Impala Premier Stk. #P6501 SALE PRICE $26,769 2014 Honda Pilot Stk. #42634A.......... SALE PRICE $26,985 2018 Chevy Colorado Stk. #P6483 SALE PRICE $28,990 2015 Toyota Highlander Stk. #33580A SALE PRICE $30,969 2016 Silverado 1500 LT Stk. #P6468 SALE PRICE $31,969 2016 Mazda CX-9 Gr. Touring Stk. #310219A SALE PRICE $33,493 2017 Dodge Challenger R/T Stk. #42413A SALE PRICE $36,769 2017 Chevy Tahoe LT Stk. #P6521 ... SALE PRICE $43,990

6127 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • BommaritoChevy.com • 314-487-9800 15

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

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14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011 SALES (636) 200-2822 SERVICE (877) 589-2738 â&#x20AC;¢ PARTS (877) 606-3265 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE

Suntrup 100K Warranty 0.9% Financing On All 2013 & 2014 Certiied Volvos

$8,990

$10,000

$15,000

$15,000

2004 ACURA MDX W TOURING PACKAGE

2008 TOyOTA HIGHLANDER SPORT SUV Stk # 193561

2013 AUDI A6 2.0T PREMIUM PLUS

2012 MERCEDES BENz GLK 350 4MATIC SUV

Stk # 194031

Stk # 188791

Stk # 194661

$17,800

$17,850

$23,750

$26,725

2011 CHEVy TAHOE 4X4

2015 MINI COOPER

2016 VOLVO S60 T5 DRIVE -E PREMIER

2014 LEXUS ES 300H 4DR SD

Stk # P42511

Stk # P41751

Stk # L1434

Stk # 192325

$30,980

$32,500

$33,800

$38,825

2017 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED

2017 FORD EXPLORER LIMITED

2017 JEEP SAHARA UNLIMITED

2018 VOLVO S90 T5 AWD MOMENTUM SEDAN

Leather, 4x4, Stk # P4254

Stk # P4245

Stk # P4291

Stk # L1421

$38,850

$46,800

$48,800

CALL FOR PRICE!

2018 VOLVO S90 T5 FWD MOMENTUM SEDAN

2018 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE SUMMIT 4X4

2018 VOLVO XC90 T6 AWD MOMENTUM

2011 GMC ACADIA DENALI

Stk # L1425

Stk # L13901

Stk # P4296

Stk # 195111

www.wcvolvo.com 16

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


St. Louis Auto 2727 Delmar Bl Blvd. • St. Louis, MO • All Vehicles Guaranteed To Pass MVI & Emissions • We Take Trade Ins • Great Cash Deals

• New Inventory Daily! • Warranty On Engine & Transmission

→ →

Several Scooters to Choose From! Call for Details!

$

$

Mon-Fri 9 am - 5:30 pm 1st & Last Saturday of Month 10 am - 3 pm

Downs Start @ $ 500 Payments Low Monthly Payments Term 12 - 18 - 24 Months

05 CHEVROLET AVEO LS

13 CHRYSLER 200

79 CHEVROLET EL CAMINO

97 CHEVROLET GMT

07 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 3500

4dr Sedan

45k miles

Automatic,Gasoline

Automatic 4-Speed

STAKE BED

3,500 CASH /$600 DOWN

$

9,500 CASH

$

9,995 CASH

$

3,995 CASH/$750 DOWN

05 SATURN RELAY

88 JAGUAR XJ-SERIES XJS

96 SATURN SLI

92 MAZDA MX-5 MIATA

4dr Mini-Van

2dr Convertible

4dr Sedan

2dr Convertible

5,500 CASH /$1,500 DOWN

14,995

$

CASH

$

2,800 CASH/$500 DOWN

$

$

11,995 CASH

02 GMC ENVOY SLT 2WD 4dr SUV $

5,500 CASH/$1,500 DOWN

88 PORSCHE 944

98 TOYOTA COROLLA 4dr Sedan

4,500 CASH

$

2,800 CASH

$

3,200 CASH/$750 DOWN

All Financed Cars Guaranteed To Pass State Inspection & Emission Testing www.stlouisautocarsales.com

314-436-2277 17

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2015 TOYOTA SIENNA SE Stk# B8869A

SALE PRICE

2017 NISSAN ALTIMA SV

$

25,890

2016 GMC ACADIA SLT SLT-1 Stk# M18202A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

27,990

SALE PRICE

15,990

Stk# B9064

SALE PRICE

$

14,490

Stk# C18024R

SALE PRICE

28,990

$

13,990

Stk# B9227

SALE PRICE

$

SALE PRICE

18,290

7,290

$

Stk# M17250RA

SALE PRICE 2016 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT SE

53,990

$

2017 INFINITI QX30 PREMIUM

$

Stk# V18103A

2011 MAZDA MAZDA2 SPORT

2018 CADILLAC CT6 STANDARD

2013 LINCOLN MKS

Stk# C18010A

SALE PRICE

$

2016 FORD MUSTANG GT PREMIUM

2015 MAZDA MAZDA3 I SV Stk# M18099A

Stk# B9138

2011 HONDA PILOT TOURING

Stk# V17797A

SALE PRICE

15,490

$

2017 DODGE CHARGER DAYTONA 392

28,990

$

Stk# B9157

SALE PRICE

38,290

$

BommaritoSt. Peters PRE-OWNED CENTER 4190 N. Service Rd. â&#x20AC;¢ I-70 & Cave Springs View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritostpeters.com 18

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

TOLL FREE

1-866-244-9085

stltoday.com/RIDES


To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2015 HONDA CIVIC EXL

2016 AUDI A8 L

Stk# 28171A

SALE PRICE

45,500

$

2017 BMW X3 XDRIVE28I Stk# P9261

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

29,000

$

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

16,100

$

32,300

$

Stk# 79018A

SALE PRICE

7,300

$

28,444

SALE PRICE

23,500

$

Stk# P9276

SALE PRICE

33,300

$

2012 HONDA CR-V LX

Stk# 11615A

SALE PRICE

6,300

$

2016 AUDI S7

$

Stk# 78259A

2015 AUDI A5 PREMIUM PLUS

2006 TOYOTA COROLLA S

2015 INFINITI Q50 SPORT Stk# P9282

Stk# 11278A

2007 DODGE CHARGER R/T

2017 NISSAN MURANO PLATINUM Stk# P9278

2013 FORD F-150 XL

Stk# 79418B

SALE PRICE

14,300

$

2017 MAZDA MAZDA6 GRAND TOURING

Stk# P9158

SALE PRICE

58,050

$

Stk# 11277

SALE PRICE

28,100

$

BommaritoWest County PRE-OWNED CENTER

15736 MANCHESTER AT CLARKSON RD. TOLL

View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritowestcounty.com FREE 19

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2004 Harley Davidson

2003 Acura TLS

2018 Audi A3

2017 Audi A6 2.0T Premium

2017 Audi Q3

2017 Audi R8 5.2 V10 plus

Sportster 1200CC Like New

94K miles, new tires. Good shape. Needs transmission.

Premium, 2.0L TFSI 4 Cyl, 5K Miles, Cosmos Blue Metallic, #28200L

Plus, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof #27540L

Utopia Blue Metallic, 18K Miles, 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl Quattro #P9285

Mythos Black Metallic, 1K Miles, #28748A

Call for Price

$1,400

$31,100

(636) 578-2258

Call 314-218-0709

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

1971 Harley Davidson

2006 Acura TSX

2017 Audi A4

2015 Audi A8

2017 Audi Q3

2016 Audi S3

Sportster Mint condition. 23K miles.

Automatic, Sunroof, Local Trade #V9188A

2.0Turbo Premium Plus, S-Line, Quattro #V18351A

Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats #27112A

#P06705

$25,499

Prestige, Quattro, Red, 28K, Local Trade #M17475B

Call for Price

$30,300

$38,604

$173,300

By Owner 573-883-2158

$8,990

$32,490

$40,604

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 Acura ILX

2012 Armada Platinum

2015 Audi A5

2015 Audi A8 L

2018 Audi Q5

2016 Audi S5 3.0T

28K Miles, Automatic, Navigation, Sunroof, #B9178

blue, only 54Kmi., fully loaded, 1 owner, exc. cond.

Florette Silver, Convertible, 35K Miles, #P9276

4.0T, Phantom Black Pearl, #P9093

Ibis White, 2.0L FSI 4-Cyl Quattro, 9K Miles, #P9275

Cabriolet, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats #28074A

$22,490

$21,500;

$33,300

$49,604

$42,300

$36,990

$44,604

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

By Owner (314)614-6543

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2013 Acura MDX

2018 Audi A3

2013 Audi A6

2016 Audi A8 L

2016 Audi Q5

2016 Audi S7

AWD, 67K Miles, Tech Package Stk #B9123

Premium, 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl, 4K Miles, Monsoon Gray Metallic #28202L

2.0T, Black/Black, #188791

3.0T, V6, Mythos Black Metallic, 20K Miles #28171A

2.0T Premium, 30K Miles #28273N

4.0L TFSI V8, 44K Miles, Power Moonroof, Bluetooth, #P9158

$32,100

$15,000

$22,490

$45,500

$31,000

$58,050

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2005 Acura MDX

2018 Audi A3 2.0T

2018 Audi A6

2016 Audi Q3

2017 Audi Q7

2014 Audi S8

AWD, 4 Door, Black, 3.5L V6, #555847

Premium, 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl, 5K Miles, Monsoon Gray Metallic #28201L

3.0L V-6, Quattro #28152L

Monsoon Gray Metallic, 2.0TFSI, Premium Plus #28721A

Graphite Gray, 34K Miles, #97232A

Moonlight Blue, 4.0L TSFI V-6, 34K Miles #P9235

$7,795 St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

$30,100 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

20

$48,100

$31,999

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

$48,300 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES

$50,500 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2018 BMW 430i

2010 BMW X3 M

2010 Buick LaCross CXL

1985 Buick Skylark

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2007 Cadillac SRX

Convertible, 2.0L I-4 Cyl, RWD, #P9269

Sport #P42501

New Arrival!, NHTSA 5-Star Rating White, #400165A

Custom 4 door Sedan, Black, 2.8L V6, 44K Miles #427577

ESU, Platinum Edition #C8832A

V6, Leather, Pano Roof, Cadillac Trade #C18111A

$37,531

$13,800 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$9,969

$3,800

$24,490

$7,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2018 BMW 430i

2012 BMW X5

2016 Buick LaCrosse

2017 Buick Verano

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2018 Cadillac XTS

Convertible, Melbourne Red metallic, RWD, #P9253

Sunroof, Navigation, AWD, #B9066A

Premium, Black, Local Trade, Nav! #C17220RA

Sport, Touring, Stock #P06742

ESV Platinum Edition, Black, 69K, AWD #C9107

Luxury, Radiant Silver Metallic, 15K Miles #P9287

$25,490

$16,000

$38,000

$17,990

$35,990

$38,300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2013 BMW 550i,

2014 Buick Encore

2010 Buick Lacrosse

2016 Cadillac CTS

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2015 Cadillac XTS

White / Black,59k miles, ex. cond, Loaded,

71K, #L14351

CXL, White, Loaded, Only 69K Miles #42806A

3K Miles, Savings #C16150R

Platinum Edition, AWD, 6.2L V-8, White Diamond, 84K Miles #P9224

Stock #P06795

$11,870 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$11,462

$32,990

Call or text 314-954-1747.

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$31,500 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2018 BMW 740i

2015 Buick Encore

2010 Buick Lacrosse

2013 Cadillac CTS-V

2015 Cadillac Escalade

2017 Chevrolet Suburban

3.0L I-6 Cyl, RWD, 18K Miles #P9212

Convenience, Clean Carfax, 1-Owner, Backup Camera #42788A

CXL, Loaded, Clean Carfax #42866A

46K Miles, GM Muscle Car, Lots of Fun! #C9177

Luxury, Black Raven, 6.2L V-8, 4x4, #79440A

1 Owner Clean Carfax, Backup Camera, Remote Start, #P9026

$33,495

$23,500

$57,500

$15,990

$10,869

$38,990

$52,300

$50,604

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2015 BMW M3

2016 Buick Envision

2008 Buick Lucerne CXL

2013 Cadillac Escalade

2012 Cadillac SRX

2017 Chevrolet Tahoe

Sakhir Orange Metallic, 3.0L I-6 Cyl, RWD, #P9154

Premium, AWD, 23K Miles, #49406-1

White Diamond, Heated Front Seats, Carfax 1 Owner #C180565A

White Diamond, 55K, Loaded, 1 Owner #C9143A

49K, Pano Roof, Mocha, Certified #C17416RA

LT, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth GM Certified Pre-Owned, #P9027

$46,100 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$27,900 Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

21

$5,808

$35,990

$18,490

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$45,604 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Chevrolet Tahoe

1996 Chevy C/K 1500

2000 Chevy Corvette

2018 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Equinox

LTZ, 5.3L V-8 Cyl, 4X4, Black, 41K Miles #97317A

Automatic, Black, 4.3L V6, 157K Miles #211483AA

Extra Clean, Tanga Tops, Only 57K Miles! #400051B

#P06802

Stock #P06762

LT Stock # P06725

$45,300

$4,495

$19,969

$15,713

$19,972

$16,001

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2010 Chevy Camaro

1997 Chevy C/K 1500

2012 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Cruze

2016 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Equinox

2LT, RS Package, Leather #49021-1

Red, Automatic, 4.3L V6 #217156AA

Stock #180289A

LT, RS, Leather, Loaded #42487A

Stock #P06681

$9,990

$19,060

Premier, Black, M/R, Loaded #42282A

$3,995

$8,439

$17,888

$25,469

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2016 Chevy Camaro

2018 Chevy Colorado

2018 Chevy Cruze

2012 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Equinox

2014 Chevy Equinox

1LT, Yellow/Black, ZL1 Wheels #V18340A

LT, Crew Cab, 4x4, Backup Camera, Black #P6483

LS Stock #180632

LT Backup Camera, Sunroof, Remote Start #C181456A

LT, Stock #P06700

$14,340

$10,991

$17,978

LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax #42859A

$23,490

$28,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2013 Chevy Camaro

2004 Chevy Corvette

2017 Chevy Cruze L

2015 Chevy Equinox

2014 Chevy Equinox

2012 Chevy Impala

2LS, Loaded, Clean Carfax #42725A

Convertible, 53K Miles, Automatic #C9127A

Stock #170584

LT, Silver Ice Metallic, 16K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner #C11617P

Stock #P06703

$14,910

Auto, Sunroof, V6, Leather #C8884A

$22,490

$17,833

$12,124

$13,990

$15,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2013 Chevy Captiva LT

2008 Chevy Corvette

2014 Chevy Cruze

2011 Chevy Equinox

2015 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Impala

Stock #180688B

Convertible Stk #P06714

LTZ Stock #180715A

$25,500

$12,687

Low Miles, Backup Camera, Remote Start #C181459A

1LT #P06724

$10,900 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$12,226 Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

22

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

$14,292

stltoday.com/RIDES

$10,990

#P06641

$18,564 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Chevy Impala

2015 Chevy Malibu

2013 Chevy Malibu LS

2013 Chevy Silverado

2014 Chevy Silverado

2014 Chevy Spark

2LT Stock #P06662

Black, Automatic, Certified #M17474C

Stock #P06777

2500HD, LT, Blue Topaz, 34K Miles #C181468A

LT, 4x4, Double Cab, Black #42653A

Stock #180231A

$15,990

$10,752

$32,998

$23,969

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,604

$8,422

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Impala

2014 Chevy Malibu 2 LTZ

2006 Chevy Malibu

2013 Chevy Silverado

2012 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Spark

Stock #P06682

Stk #180347A

3500 Diesel, LTZ, C/C, 63K Miles #P3818

LT, Crew Cab, 4x4, Loaded #P6406A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$15,344

Auto, Loaded, Very Clean #42717A

LS, Stock #170974

$22,245

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$41,900

$22,991

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2013 Chevy Impala

2018 Chevy Malibu

2015 Chevy Malibu

2007 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Sonic

2012 Chevy Suburban

#P06747

1LT, Stock #P06689

LS, Carfax one Owner, Fuel Efficient, #P6470

V8, Automatic, Well Maintained, #V18388B

Stock #P06801

LT, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, 3rd Row #C162105A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$19,402 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$9,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2016 Chevy Impala

2016 Chevy Malibu

2000 Chevy Malibu

2016 Chevy Silverado

2016 Chevy Sonic

2013 Chevy Tahoe

LS, Stock #P06767

1LT #P06716

1500, LT, Crew Cab, Black, 4x4, 5.3L V-8 #79052A

LTZ, Sunroof, DVD, Leather #49049-2

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$15,815

LS, 4 Door, #274467

LS, Stock #180580

$17,600

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$3,500

$32,500

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

2000 Chevy Impala

2016 Chevy Malibu

2013 Chevy Silverado 1500

2018 Chevy Silverado 1500

2014 Chevy Sonic

2015 Chevy Tahoe

4 Door, Green, Automatic, 3.4L V6, #324975G

LS, Stock #P06771

Black, Vortec 5.3L V8 SFI VVT, Flex Fuel, #C180145A

Crew Cab, Stock #P06757

Stock #P06803

Stock #P06790

$2,995

$9,472

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$18,991

$34,699 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$10,517

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

$16,600

23

$5,990

$12,990

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

$14,131

$11,990

stltoday.com/RIDES

$12,115

$21,180

$30,888

$44,500 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Chevy Tahoe

2011 Chrysler 300C

2015 Dodge Challenger

2005 Dodge Dakota

2016 Ford Edge

2016 Ford Expedition

Stock #P06592

Stock #P06752

39K Miles, AWD, Leather, Sunroof #V17115A

XLT #P06683

$14,538

R/T, 5-speed #P3836

SLT, Quad Cab, 4WD #P06731

$45,159 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$29,477

$27,990

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Tahoe

2017 Chrysler Pacifica

2017 Dodge Challenger

2013 Dodge Dart

2015 Ford Escape

2017 Ford Explorer

LT, Loaded, GM Certified, One Owner, Black #P6521

Touring, Black, Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax #P6522

R/T 392, S Cat Pack, One Owner, Only 1K Miles, #42413A

SE, 60K Miles, Black, Auto #B8988A

Titanium #194821

EL, Limited, 4WD, Black, Well Equiped Stk #B9070

$9,990

$19,700

Call For Price!

$25,900

$43,990

$24,440

$36,769

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2018 Chevy Trax

2004 Chrysler Sebring

2017 Dodge Challenger

2016 Dodge Grand Caravan

2006 Ford Escape

2015 Ford Explorer

LS Stock #180527

$15,565

108K Miles, 2.4L I4, Tan, 2dr Convertible #219623

SRX, Coupe, White Knuckle, Carfax 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient, #P6473

SXT, Stock #P06739

XLT, 4 Door, 2.3L, Automatic, Gray #C16159

Sport, Quad Seats, Nav, Pano Roof #B9079

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

$20,990

$16,073

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 Chevy Trax

2007 Chrys Town & Country

2017 Dodge Charger

2013 Dodge Grand Caravan

1993 Ford Escort

2016 Ford Explorer

LS, One Owner, GM Certified #42849A

Won't Last!! #P6334A

R/T 392, 16K Miles, Just Arrived #B9157

SXT, Clean Carfax, Loaded! #P6320A

108K Miles, Tan, LX 4dr Wagon, 1.9L I4 #255217

XLT, FWD, Black w/ Black Wheels #B8557A

$14,769

$3,995

$4,995

$34,990

$36,990

$28,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$3,990

$40,490

$9,969

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$2,795

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2006 Chrysler 300

2014 Dodge Avenger

2014 Dodge Charger

1992 Ford E350

2017 Ford Expedition

2017 Ford Explorer

Black, Chrome Wheels, Nav, Sunroof #B9047A

SE, Stock #P06791

SE #P06812

$7,990

$10,500

Cargo Cutaway Van, Beige, 7.5L #A25205

Limited, 3.5L V-6, 4x4 #P9243

XLT, FWD, 9K, Local Trade #B8963A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,014 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

24

RIDES MAGAZINE

$6,500

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

$34,500 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES

$31,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2016 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford Focus

2016 Ford Mustang

2015 GMC Acadia

2010 GMC Sierra

2015 GMC Yukon Denali

XLT #180601A

$23,733

Titanium, Sunroof, Leather #24883-1

GT, Premium #B9064

Denali, Quicksilver Metallic, 34K Miles, #79619A

Crew Cab, Loaded, 4x4 #P6424A

Nav, DVD, Sunroof, 22's #49511-1

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$28,990

$33,300

$18,969

$43,888

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

2017 Ford Explorer

2016 Ford Focus

2017 Ford T-350

2017 GMC Acadia

2012 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon

Stock #P06624

$22,563

Hatchback, Loaded, Only 14K Miles #42735A

15 Pass, High Roof, 2 to Choose #B9072

Ebony Twilight, 3.6L V-6 AWD #P9298

SLE-2, Low Miles, Backup Camera, Fuel Efficient #C181283A

XL, Denali, Loaded, Certified #C17441B

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$28,490

$32,999

$14,446

$44,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2007 Ford Explorer

2004 Ford Freestar

2014 Ford Taurus

2012 GMC Acadia SLE

2013 GMC Terrain

2017 GMC Yukon

Eddie Bauer Edition, 4WD, White, #A54882

SEL, 4 Door, Green, 2.4L V6 #A84294AA

SE #48869-2

#180515A

SLE, FWD, Black, 35K Miles #C18063C

SLT, Onxy Black, 20K Miles, 4x4,#P9277

$12,888

$14,200

$8,995

$11,888

$13,758

$4,500

$17,990

$48,300

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2014 Ford F-150

2014 Ford Fusion

2015 Ford Taurus

2002 GMC Envoy

2018 GMC Terrain

2015 GMC Yukon

XLT, 4x4 #P3810

SE, Stock #P06684A

#P06655

$12,000

$12,692

SLT, 2WD, 4.2L I6, Silver #242603R

1K Miles, FWD, White #B9076B

SLT, Onyx Black, Blind Spot Sensor, 4x4 #P9066

$25,900

$38,604

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2008 Ford F150

2017 Ford Fusion SE

2017 Genesis G80

2016 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT

2016 GMC Terrain

2016 GMC Yukon Denali

XLT, Crew Cab, Loaded, #42564A

#P06786

3.8 Sedan, Casablanca White, 3.8L V-6, AWD, 4K Miles #40165A

Crew Cab, 5.3L V-8 cyl, 4x4, 41K Miles, Carfax One Owner #79260A

SLE-2, Fuel Efficient, Bluetooth, Black, 24K Miles #P6507

6.2L V-8, 4x4, #97157A

$13,869

$14,318 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$33,555

$20,769

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

25

$45,000

RIDES MAGAZINE

$5,500

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

$26,490

stltoday.com/RIDES

$56,531


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 GMC Yukon Denali

2013 GMC Yukon

2008 Honda Civic

2013 Hyundai Accent

2009 Hyundai Sonata

2012 Infiniti FX35

6.2L V-8, 4x4, Onyx Black, #79558A

XL, SLT, Black, Loaded #P6199A

EX, Coupe, Black, Loaded #42591A

GLS Stock #180481A

$20,990

$7,990

Limited, Auto, Sunroof, 1 Owner #V18142B

44xxx Miles, #L4131

$10,965

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$6,290

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2016 GMC Yukon Denali

2011 Honda Accord

2014 Honda CR-V

2012 Hyundai Elantra

2015 Hyundai Sonata

2018 Infiniti Q50

6.2L V-8 Cyl, 4X4, Onyx Black, 27K Miles #79516A

EX-L, Heated Front Seats, Fuel Efficient, Silver #C181516A

EX-L, Sunroof, Leather Seats, Blue, #42285A

GLS, Sunroof, Automatic #C9107A

#P06804

$15,700

3.5L V-6, AWD, #P9217

$39,000

$23,855

$9,972

$16,790

$7,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 GMC Yukon Denali

'15 Honda Accord EXL

2016 Honda HR-V

2015 Hyundai Santa Fe

2015 Hyundai Sonata

2018 Infiniti Q50

XL, 7K Miles, 6.2L V-8, 4x4 #79287A

Low miles. 1 owner. Like new. $26,500. Call 636-271-6448

LX, Auto, 14K, Local Trade #V18381A

Sport, AWD, #49571-1

Stock #P06804

$15,798

3.0L V-6, AWD, 21K Miles, #P9281

$51,300

$63,101 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$32,500

$19,990

$21,477

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$33,999

2015 GMC Yukon

2016 Honda Civic

2016 Honda Odyssey

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe

2013 Hyundai Sonata

2018 Infiniti QX60

XL, SLE, Stock #P06727

EX-T, 17K, Local Trade #V18243A

35K Miles, Local Trade, 1 Owner #V18401A

Limited, Monaco White, 3.3L V-6, AWD, 18K Miles, #P9153

GLS, Stock #P06738

Liquid Platinum, 3.5L V-6, FWD, #P9254

$30,100

$8,541

$37,844

$19,990

$27,490

$37,000

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2015 GMC Yukon

2014 Honda Civic

2014 Honda Pilot

2008 Hyundai Santa Fe

2014 Hyundai Sonata

2015 Infiniti QX70

XL, SLE, #P06729

$37,800

Coupe, Automatic, Dyno Blue Pearl #B8879A

Touring, 4x4, Navigation, Loaded, Very Clean, #42634A

Auto, Loaded #42580C

Fuel Efficient, Bluetooh, Pearl White, FWD, #P6313A

3.7L V-6, AWD, Moonlight White, 23K Miles #P9289

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$13,990

26

$26,985 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

RIDES MAGAZINE

$7,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

$9,544

$33,300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Infiniti QX80

2004 Jaguar Vanden

2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2015 Jeep Wrangler

2011 Kia Sportage

2014 Lexus IS 350

Graphite Shadow, 5.6L V-8, AWD, #P9279

White, Loaded, Well Serviced #C8785A

5.7L V-8 Cyl, 4X4, 20K Miles, Black Crystal Pearlcoat, #128722A

Unlimited Sport, Automatic, All New Wheels & Tires, #B9084

Loaded, Very Clean #35029A

AWD #192852

$25,000

$50,300

$7,490

$8,659

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$33,300

Call For Price

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2016 Infiniti QX80

2018 Jeep Cherokee

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Kia Forte

2013 Land Rover

2016 Lincoln MKX

5.6L V-8, AWD, Black Obsidian, #79409A

Latitude, Low Miles, Backup Camera, Fuel Efficient #C181379A

Stock #P06715

LX #P3836

$13,477

Range Rover, SE, 5.0L V-8 cyl, 63K Miles, Firenze Red Metallic #P9203

GTA, 21K, #193041

$22,000

$49,100

$35,820

$47,999

$17,465

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Lou Fusz Chewy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2017 Infiniti QX80

2016 Jeep Compass Latitude

2012 Jeep Liberty Sport

2015 Kia Optima

2014 Land Rover

2013 Lincoln MKX

Navigation, Power Moonroof, Parking Sensors #153707

FWD, Remote Start, Heated Front Seats #P6447

Latitude, Heated Front Seats, One Owner #C181540A

LX, #48740-2

Range Rover, 5.0L V8 Supercharged, 4x4, #P9120

Loaded, Very Clean #P6270A

$11,672

$14,900

$62,999

$13,998

$51,604

$15,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2017 Infiniti QX80

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Renegade

2016 Kia Sorento

2012 Lexus CT 200h

2017 Lincoln Navigator

9K Miles, 5.6L V-8, AWD #79441A

LTD, #P4254

Trailhawk, 4WD, 4K Miles #V18402B

Loaded, Clean Carfax #33745B

Ingot Silver, Bluetooth, Backup Cam, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating, #P9025

$64,980

LX, Remington Red, 3rd Row Seating, Backup Camera #C180148A

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$18,985

$13,469

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 Jaguar F-Pace S

2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2016 Jeep Wrangler

2016 Kia Sorento

2016 Lexus GS-F

1998 Lincoln Town Car

British Racing Green Metallic , 3.0L V-6 Cyl #P9109

SRT-8, Navigation, Pano Roof, #B9169

Unlimited, Sahara, 4x4, Nav, Leather, Hardtop, Only 8K Miles, #48806-1

SX, Navigation, Sunroof, Leather #P3814

20K Miles, Molten Pearl, Loaded #B9059

Signature, Green, 4.6L V8, #654416

$51,604 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$32,000

$24,490

$35,888

$36,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

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Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

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06-08-18

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

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$44,604

$2,200 St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Maserati Levante

2018 Mazda CX-9

2017 Mazda Mazda6

2017 Mazda 6 Touring

2012 Mercedes-Benz GLK

2012 Mini Cooper

7K Miles, 3.0L V-6, AWD #P9149

Grand Touring, Navigation, 1K Miles, Snowflake White, #12065L

Grand Touring, Deep Crystal Blue, 2K Miles, #11571L

3K Miles, Automatic, Great Sale Price, #M17209R

64K, #194661

$15,000

Countryman S, Auto, 40K Miles #49358-2

$63,100

$42,999

$32,999

$20,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

2017 Mazda CX-5

2012 Mazda 3

2016 Mazda Mazda6

2017 Mercedes-Benz AMG

2016 Mercedes-Benz GLE

2015 Mini Cooper

Grand Touring, Eternal Blue Mica, 2K Miles, Moonroof, Nav #11391L

5 Door #191842

Grand Touring, 1K Miles, Blind Spot Sensor, #11577L

C 43 4MATIC, One Owner, AWD, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, #P9060

19K, #P41751

$33,999 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$32,999

350, 4Matic, 3.5L V-6, AWD, #28548A

$56,604

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$37,000 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2017 Mazda CX-5

2014 Mazda 3

2001 Mazda Miata

2013 Mercedes-Benz C250

2009 Merc Grand Marquis

2015 Mini Cooper

Grand Select, Deep Crystal Blue Mica, Navaigation, Moonroof #11524L

iSport, 42K Miles, Automatic, Certified #V17159B

87K Miles, Black, Automatic, Bose #M9105A

Fuel Efficient, Sunroof, Turbo Charged #C181418A

LS Stock #P06668

Manual, Pano Sunroof, 31K Miles #B9204

$7,955

$7,018

$13,888

$17,850

$16,990

$33,999

$12,990

$7,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$12,272

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2013 Mazda CX-5

2014 Mazda Mazda3

2017 Mazda 3

2013 Mercedes-Benz G63

2008 Mercury Mariner

2013 Mini Cooper "S"

Stock #P06743A

#P06702

$12,326

$12,700

Touring, 1 Owner, Mazda Certified #M9136

AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles #P9126

Leather, Moonroof, Black #42831A

31K Miles, One of a Kind, MUST SEE! #B9130

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$16,990

$88,604

$9,969

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

YOUR 24/7 NEWS SOURCE 28

RIDES MAGAZINE

$15,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

(INSTANT ACCESS TO STORIES YOU NEED TO KNOW)

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

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PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Mini Cooper

2017 Nissan Altima SE

2015 Nissan Frontier

2017 Nissan Rogue

1996 Oldsmobile 88

2017 Ram ProMaster

S, Auto, John Cooper Extra's #B9203

#P06710

One Owner, Clean Carfax, 30K Miles, #42129A

Stock #P06789

Cargo Van, Local Trade #M18052A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$16,764

$20,575

Local Trade, Well Serviced #B8827C

$22,490

$17,670

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$3,990

$21,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2003 Mitsubishi Outlander

2017 Nissan Altima

2017 Nissan Murano

2015 Nissan Rogue

1983 Oldsmobile Cutlass

2008 Saturn Astra

AWD, XLS, 4 Door, Silver, #060594A

#P06745

Gun Metallic, 3.5L V-6, FWD, 18K Miles, #P9278

SV, One Owner, Clean Carfax, #35474A

Supreme Brougham, 2 Door Coupe, #357064

Automatic, Alloys, Power Options, 94K Miles, #M18009A

Contact Us! St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Mitzubishi Mirage

2012 Nissan Armada

31K, Auto, Backup Camera, Power Pkg, #V18220A

Espresso Black, 67K Miles, Nav, Backup Camera #C181376A

Stock #P06736

$24,225

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$10,990

$14,738

$32,300 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2017 Nissan Murano

$20,901

$18,504

$3,200

$5,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

St. Louis Auto Car Sales 314-436-2277

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2008 Nissan Sentra

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera

2013 Toyota 4Runner SR5

Automatic, Power Options, Just Arrived, #M9044A

4S Cabriolet, White, 23K Miles #79457A

68xxx Miles, #L4131

$4,390

$69,000 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$26,850

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2013 Nissan Altima

2017 Nissan Armada

2006 Nissan Pathfinder

2015 Nissan Titan

2015 Ram 1500 Longhorn

2016 Toyota Avalon

2.5 SV, New Front & Back Brakes, Backup Camera #C181200A

SL, AWD, Silver #V18235A

LE, 4WD, 3rd Row #V18115B

4 Door, Crew Cab, 4WD, 52K Miles, #B9063

XLE Stk #P06706

$7,890

$29,990

Crew Cab, 35K Miles, 5.7L V-8 4x4 #P9215

$36,500

$9,808

$19,999

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2015 Nissan Altima

2018 Nissan Armada

2016 Nissan Rogue

2017 Nissan Titan XD

2014 Ram 2500

2014 Toyota Camry

Stock #P06809

5.6L V-8, AWD, 38K Miles, Pearl White #P9288

S, Stock #P06621

$13,854

$15,990

Crew Cab, Magnetic Black, 1K Miles, 5.0L V-8, #96719A

6.7 Diesel, Crew Cab Laramie, 4 New Tires, #B9170

L, Carfax 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient #C180141A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$38,300 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$47,490

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

$39,990

29

RIDES MAGAZINE

$48,604

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

stltoday.com/RIDES

$12,783


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2018 Toyota Camry

2016 Toyota Corolla

2015 Toyota Yaris

2013 Volkswagen Passat

2011 Volkswagen Tiguan

2004 Volvo XC90

Stock #P06799

Black Sand Pearl, Aux Audio Input, Cruise Control #33720A

LE #P06726

SE, Black #P3843

$19,628

$14,888

S, 4motion, 80K, Local Trade #M18093A

AWD, Sunroof, Automatic #M18220A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$14,569

$10,640 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$11,490

$6,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2011 Toyota Corolla

2014 Toyota FJ Cruiser AT

2007 Volkswagen Beetle

2007 Volkswagen Passat

2018 Volkswagen Tiguan

2014 VW EOS

Stock #P06781

Black, 4.0L V-6 4x4 #P9155

56K Miles, Automatic #V18135A

Wagon, 102K #L14321

$11,330

S, 7K Miles, Time to Save! #V8873

Komfort Pkg, 28K Miles, Auto, Certified, #V9191

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$32,100

$8,490

$7,500

$20,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$21,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2008 Toyota Highlander

2016 Volkswagen CC

2014 Volkswagen Passat

2016 Volvo S80

2013 VW Golf

#193561

2.0Turbo Sport, 6K, White #V8362

S, Navigation, 18" Wheels, VW Certified, #V9146

Luxury, 34K, 100K Warr, #192161

$10,855

31K Miles, Auto, VW Certified, #V9187

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$12,990

$25,000

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2003 Toyota Highlander

2013 Volkswagen GTI

2014 Volkswagen Passat

2016 Volvo XC60

2017 VW Tiguan

FWD, V6, 119K Miles, Very Nice #V18445A

Automatic, 61K Miles, 2 Door #V9211

Stock #P06806

Clean Carfax One Owner, AWD, Backup Camera 22K Miles, #96733A

5K Miles, FWD, Like New, Save, #V8226

$14,480

$12,080

$22,990

$7,990

$33,604

$13,990

$21,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 Toyota Highlander

2010 Volkswagen Jetta

2013 Volkswagen Passat

2013 Volvo XC90

2005 Toy-Hauler C-Class

LTD, M/R, Loaded, One Owner #33580A

Stock #180108A

SE, Stock #P06756

$30,969

$14,494

AWD, 100K Warranty #192241

$9,364 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

EVERYTHING ST. LOUIS ORDER ONLINE 24/7

thepost-dispatchstore.com 1-877-POST-STL (1-877-767-8785) MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 A.M. - 5 P.M.

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

30

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

$20,000 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

stltoday.com/RIDES

29ft - automatic/gas 65K miles -

$16,900 or best offer. Mike @ 314-775-5626.


2015 JEEP CHEROKEE

2014 CHEVY MALIBU 2LTZ

Latitude, FWD, One Owner

Clean Carfax, 50K Miles

*

$15,442

STK #180347A

*

STK #P06808

2016 CHEVY MALIBU LS

2015 FORD MUSTANG

One Owner Clean Carfax

Fastback Ecoboost, 45K Miles

*

$16,600

STK #180732A

2018 TOYOTA CAMRY SE

2017 DODGE CHARGER SXT

Clean Carfax, 38K Miles

Plus Coupe, 34K Miles

*

$19,859

STK #P06788

$22,000*

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

2008 CHEVY CORVETTE

Limited, 4WD, 70K Miles

Convertible, V8, Clean Carfax, 61K Miles

* STK# P06714

2017 BUICK CASCADA

2015 GMC ACADIA SLT-1 Heated & Cooled Seats,

Convertible, Clean Carfax

$26,682*

STK #P06758

*Tax, Title, License Fees F Extra. Photos may not be actual representation.

2244 S. KINGSHIGHWAY. “At The Entrance To The Hill”

M. W. F. 9a.m.-- 9p.m. T. TH. Sat. 9a.m.-- 6p.m. 31

$28,118 FOREST PARK

DON BROWN CHEVROLET

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ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

06-08-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

*

HWY 40

HWY 44

ILLINOIS

/70

Bluetooth

866-883-8841

$26,231*

HWY 55

$23,399

STK #P06715

STK #P06775

$18,900*

HAMPTON

STK #P06771

$16,364

KINGSHIGHWAY

www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com

"At the entrance to the Hill"

www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com • www.donbrownchevrolet.com

Don Brown


Perfect early Father's Day gift! Join us for a night of food, drinks, fun while talking about your favorite sports teams! Ask your most sought-after sports questions, listen to season recaps and projections, learn stories about sports legends and much more!

All LIVE from: RICK HUMMEL BEN FREDERICKSON DERRICK GOOLD JEFF GORDON ROGER HENSLEY BENJAMIN HOCHMAN DAVID MATTER JESUS ORTIZ JIM THOMAS

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YOUR VIEWS. PUBLISHED. Become a contributor to an ongoing conversation about the best ways to address problems, right wrongs and make our society better. Your input can generate useful ideas that catalyze positive action. Let your view be known and voice be heard in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Write a letter to the editor at STLtoday.com/letters J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Friday • 06.08.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES North-South vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠K J 8 5 ♥6 4 3 2 ♦8 4 ♣A K J WEST EAST ♠9 7 4 ♠Q 6 3 ♥Q 10 7 5 ♥J ♦A 10 9 6 ♦Q J 5 3 ♣9 8 ♣10 7 4 3 2 SOUTH ♠A 10 2 ♥A K 9 8 ♦K 7 2 ♣Q 6 5 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1NT Pass 2♣ Pass 2♥ Pass 4♥ All pass Opening lead: Nine of ♣ North-South arrived in four hearts after a routine Stayman auction. Despite a combined 28 high-card points, the deal required some careful handling. Declarer won the opening club lead with dummy’s ace and led a low heart to the jack and ace. He crossed back to dummy with a club to the jack to lead another heart, playing the eight when East showed out. West won with the 10, but with no clubs remaining, had a diicult decision to make. A

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD heart or a diamond would be instantly fatal, so he did the best he could by shifting to a spade. This did pick up the spade suit for declarer, but South might have done that on his own. South captured East’s queen of spades with his ace and saw a clear road home. West must have the ace of diamonds, or he surely would have shifted to a diamond rather than a spade. South cashed the king of hearts, followed by the 10 of spades and a spade to dummy’s king. Dummy’s jack of spades was cashed, which West refused to ruf as South shed a diamond. West, trying hard, also declined to ruf the king of clubs, but he couldn’t escape his fate. South led dummy’s last trump, which West had to win. West had to give declarer the king of diamonds for his tenth trick. Well played! (06/08/18)

Across 1 Subversive use of computers to promote a political agenda 11 Sharp 15 One who gets the show on the road 16 Dim 17 What’s not going anywhere? 18 Animal with a big bite, informally 19 Liberal arts dept. 20 Exact revenge legally 21 Constitutional 22 Bring (out) 25 Plant tissue 27 Apt rhyme for “casino” 28 Some animal tissue

31 Stunners 34 Dentist’s direction 36 1940s PM 37 “May I help you?” 38 Gave secondhand? 40 What the middle of the U.S. is usually on, for short 41 Involve 43 Becomes successful 45 Baked 46 Eats 47 One of the Greats? 48 Have a good time 50 Sci-fi writer McCaffrey, who was the first woman to win a Hugo for fiction 51 Not eat

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If June 8 is your birthday • This year you might need to stay on top of various opportunities as they head your way. If you are single, you will meet several new types of people. If you are attached, the two of you might start planning a trip or vacation to a new area. Aries knows how to get you going.

WORD GAME June 8 WORD — EQUIVOCAL (EQUIVOCAL: ih-KWIV-ih-kul: Open to two or more interpretations; ambiguous.) Average mark 32 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 45 or more words in EQUIVOCAL? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — INFERRING reign fining infer rein fire infringe reining firer inner rife firing nine rifer firn feign ring frier fern ringer fringe fine grief erring finer grin refining finger RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

53 Not a team player 55 Director Anderson 57 Texting preamble 58 Lack of polish 63 Portend 64 Finally 65 Lay eyes on 66 “How about we get started?!”

Down 1 Some hand waves 2 Tsp. or tbsp. 3 Keeper of the books, for short 4 DC area? 5 Private eyes 6 Brit’s exclamation 7 It has a large holding area 8 Good name for an optometrist 9 One signatory to the Treaty of Fort Laramie 10 “Mere rhetoric is not enough” 11 The KC Chiefs are in it 12 Snack at a county fair or baseball park 13 Indiana Jones pursuit 14 KO 22 French city where an English/French treaty was signed in 1420

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★★ You might be active, energetic and ready to go. You could clear out a diicult task with ease. Honor a fast change and make a needed adjustment. Tonight: Hang out with friends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ Remain sensitive to how much you need to pay in order to clear up a problem. Your happy-go-lucky personality emerges, which allows greater give-and-take between you and a friend. Tonight: Treat a pal to dinner out. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ You might be more playful than you have been in a while. Honor a fast change and remain steady. If you keep the big picture in mind, you won’t have a diicult time with some erratic behavior from those around you. Tonight: In weekend mode. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ You’ll ind a partner to be somewhat diicult and touchy. Understand what is happening around you, and know where you are heading with a particular matter. Tonight: At a favorite restaurant. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ How you deal with a loved one could change as the day goes on. It appears that someone you run into in the morning feels as if he or she needs to clear the air with you. Tonight: Only where your friends are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ You have a tendency

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Michael Hawkins

23 Evangelist’s exhortation 24 What has a lot in store for you? 26 ___ machine (restaurant fixture) 28 Research done outside the lab 29 Put together 30 Crown holders 32 Freshwater minnow

33 Fixed rate 35 Comparatively twisted 39 Org. found early in the phone book 42 Gray area? 44 Natural seasoning 49 Gossipmonger 51 Computer menu heading 52 Contemporary of Hosea 54 Pool surface

55 Proceed on one’s way 56 Breakfast item in a box 59 “___ Olvidados” (1950 Luis Buñuel film) 60 Slangy turndown 61 Long-running procedural 62 Arrivals in “Arrival,” for short

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0504

WORD SCRIMMAGE

to want to give people what they ask for. Presently you will give more than is considered reasonable. You could tire yourself out from running around. Tonight: A force to behold. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You might wonder which way to go when handling a personal matter. This issue could afect your inances and security. A real estate venture might not be the best idea right now. Tonight: Spice up your life. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ Listen to a loved one’s bottom line, and know what it is you expect from this person in general. One of you might want more than the other party can give. Tonight: Among the crowds.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You might want to try a new approach or do something very diferently. Keep smiling, and understand what is happening around you, yet also be willing to open up to a conversation. Tonight: Speak your mind. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ You could be overwhelmed because of a money issue. You might turn the issue upside down and still not ind an answer. Let it go, at least until you are sure about what would be best. Tonight: Listen to a suggestion. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★★ You might feel inspired and empowered by a discussion you have with a creative person in your life. One idea after another opens up new doors. Keep talks rolling, and be willing to put yourself out on a limb. Tonight: Hang with a friend.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★ Be aware of the costs of continuing as you have been. A need for self-discipline could mark the next 24 hours. Be willing to respond accordingly. Listen carefully to an older friend or relative. Tonight: Head home early. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

06.08.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Woman is stuck in one-way friendship ments on. I have no desire to be “friends” with her anymore, but I’m not sure how to get out of it. Thoughts? — EX-FRIEND IN THE EAST Dear Ex-Friend • Continue to respond to her texts less and less frequently. If she asks if you are mad at her, tell her you aren’t mad, you just are busy. If she wants more detail, tell her you have noticed that she has shown no interest in what your life is like, and to you that’s not friendship. Dear Abby • My mother is getting up in years. Because of a multitude of health problems, she will soon have to enter a nursing home. She currently lives in her own home with her dog, “Skippy,” and is facing the problem of what to do with Skippy when she has to move. Skippy has growled at people in the past, including children, and has a brief biting history, which limits Mom’s options and makes it impossible for her to

bring the dog with her to a group nursing home. We’re unable to take Skippy on because we’re at our legal limit, according to the laws of our municipality, and we know of no one we can place a dog with such issues with. Any ideas? — NEEDS A HOME FOR NIPPY SKIPPY Dear Needs • Contact the dog rescue groups in your area. Perhaps they can locate a home for an older dog — I assume Skippy is older — in a household where there are no children. It’s regrettable that your mother didn’t socialize her pet when it was a puppy, because it would have made it easier to keep Skippy with her. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Arm of chair is longer. 2. Pot is moved. 3. Leg is moved. 4. Collar is smaller. 5. Curtain is not as wide. 6. Earring is missing.

Dear Abby • I have a friend who brags nonstop about her boyfriend, her job, her new car, etc. She only comes out of the woodwork every so often to text me things like, “Roy just got a $13 raise at work!” I respond with wholehearted support and congratulations, then don’t hear from her again until days later, when I receive another text saying something like, “My boss said I can work any hours I want from now on!” I’m not sure why she sends me these messages. Could it be to make me jealous of her “fairytale” lifestyle, which I’m not sure I believe she even truly lives? We have no other meaningful conversation or time together, and I am growing tired of texts that are solely meant to showcase her wins in life. I have tried to distance myself by responding less and less and not initiating conversations, but then she asks why I’m “mad” at her. I feel like I am nothing more than a wall she posts her accomplish-

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Man taunts long-ago romantic rival

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Dear Miss Manners • Circumstances have placed me in social circles with a couple I have known many years. The wife was my true love from high school. She chose another to wed, and I have always held my tongue and in no way have interfered, or revealed the private hurt the loss of her afection once caused me. We sometimes meet at group dinners and parties. Whenever I am alone with her husband, my old rival, he rubs it in that she shares a marriage bed with him and not me. He expresses this crudely, in ways that would outrage his wife and all of our mutual friends. What should I do? Gentle Reader • Avoid being alone in his company. If you cannot and he continues, excuse yourself saying, “Forgive me. I am sure that our respective wives would highly disapprove of this

conversation. You will understand if I take my leave and spare them.” Dear Miss Manners • My husband recently threw me a surprise 40th birthday party at a local establishment we frequent. Several friends were in attendance and had braved bad driving conditions to share in the 9 p.m. celebration. The party was a complete surprise and I had an unforgettable time. I would like to be able to say it was an absolute success. However, the delight I was still basking in the following day was cut short when I talked to my mom. My husband had not invited my parents because he did not think they would attend, due to the party not starting until later. In addition, no other family were in attendance, and the invitation was created via social media, which my parents are not part of. My parents are very hurt, feel slighted by my husband and said

it should have been up to them to decide if 9 p.m. and poor road conditions were enough to keep them home. Up until now, my parents and husband have had a loving relationship. My husband realized his error and took it upon himself to contact my parents to extend a sincere apology, but my mom is one to hold grudges. How do we move forward? Gentle Reader • Groveling. Or rather, ask your husband to grovel. Have him issue another heartfelt apology, this time in writing, and follow up with your parents by telling them how devastated he is, and that he has sworn he will never make a similar assumption again. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.08.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Safety provisions in place for acne treatment Dear Dr. Roach • Our 31-year-old daughter has fought a losing battle with acne since adolescence. Accutane has been suggested many times, and now she is about to begin treatment. We have always been too afraid of this powerful drug to try it. Are we right to be afraid? — L.E.M.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • Isotretoin (Accutane) is indeed a powerful medication, and although it clearly is beneficial for acne, its side effects are suiciently important that a thorough discussion is appropriate before starting this medication, especially in a woman of childbearing age. Isotretoin is a powerful teratogen, meaning it causes birth defects. These sometimes are severe enough to cause a stillbirth, but a child born to a woman taking Accutane has a high risk of a serious congenital malformation. Even babies who appear normal at birth are more likely to have developmental problems in the brain. For this reason, any woman of childbearing potential must commit to efective birth control (abstinence from heterosexual intercourse or two effective methods, such as oral contraceptive plus a barrier method). Women also need monthly pregnancy tests and counseling visits, and prescribers require extra training to be able to prescribe this medication. The manufacturer recommends against getting pregnant in the cycle following cessation of treatment; however, at least one case report noted a birth defect consistent with isotretoin in the second month, so I think waiting an additional month, with extra precautions, is prudent. Both men and women are at risk for additional side effects of Accutane. Depression and other mental health issues, including psychosis, are possible, and people should be screened for depression and thoughts of suicide. Dry skin and inflammation around the lips are common, and often require lotions to treat. A connection with bowel disease is controversial. Elevations in cholesterol and triglyceride levels also are common, but seldom require stopping medication. I don’t have space to cover all of the less-common possible side efects. On the other hand, isotretoin is the most effective treatment for severe nodular acne that has not responded to other treatments. Severe acne is associated with its own problems, including risk of depression. Despite its risk of side efects, isotretoin is a reasonable choice in carefully selected patients who agree to the necessary conditions of treatment. At 31, your daughter certainly can make her own choice about this.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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