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STA N L EY C U P F I N A L COV E R AG E I N O U R S P EC I A L S EC T I O N

FRIDAY • 06.07.2019 • $2.50

RISKS REMAIN AFTER CREST AS FLOODWATER LINGERS, DISRUPTION FAR FROM OVER

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Kevin Jones, right, of the Prairie du Rocher Volunteer Fire Department, catches a sandbag from Devin Godier. Jones, along with Sean Koch, left, adds sandbags to a sand boil seeping through the Prairie du Rocher, Ill., levee along the Mississippi River on Thursday. Boils occur when water seeps through weak spots in the levee, compromising its structural integrity.

BUSINESS DRIES UP ALONG KATY TRAIL BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HARTSBURG, Mo. — Instead of cars, pedestrians and bicyclists, the parking lot at this stop along Missouri’s cross-state Katy Trail bike path is filled with pallets of sandbags ready to help fend off the rising Missouri River. While it remains dry in this southern Boone County town of 106, miles of the trail are under water, upending travel plans and undoing business models for the companies that cater to trail users. “It was pretty much the worst Memorial Day ever,” said Jamie Ciszek, manager

Trump, world leaders praise invasion that saved Europe

of Augusta Brew Haus, a trailside pub on the western edge of St. Charles County where bikers often stop for a drink and a burger as they traverse the crushed-gravel path. To the west, Rick Hockemeyer sounded a similar note about the flood’s effect on business at his Mokane Market in southern Callaway County. “It’s killing it. We’re doing half the amount of business,” Hockemeyer said. Although both report some bicyclists are still trying to make the journey using Please see KATY, Page A7

KEY AREA LEVEES ARE ‘IN GOOD SHAPE’ BY BRYCE GRAY

That’s nearly 16 feet above flood stage, but 3.8 feet below the record 49.6 feet set in 1993. “The risk will last longer than the crest, because the crest is just a high point,” said Sue Casseau, a public affairs specialist for the St. Louis District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Despite some instances of overtopping and failure, Casseau said that key area levees remain “in good shape,” adding that officials have confidence in improvements or reinforcements made to many of the

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Although the secondhighest river crest in recorded history reaches St. Louis on Saturday, flood risk in the region will not necessarily subside as soon as the Mississippi River begins its long-awaited descent. Officials warn that jeopardy remains as the months long flood drags on and tests the performance of area levees tasked with holding the water back. In St. Louis, the Mississippi River is now expected to crest at 45.8 feet on Saturday, the National Weather Service says.

Please see FLOOD, Page A7

Man killed after shooting officer in leg

BY ANNE GEARAN, TOLUSE OLORUNNIPA AND JAMES MCAULEY

BY JACK SUNTRUP

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Washington Post

COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France — President Donald Trump paid tribute Thursday to old men who were once the young Americans who stormed an occupied and fortified shore 75 years ago, and he called the storied invasion on June 6, 1944, “an epic battle and the ferocious eternal struggle between good and evil.” Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and other leaders of the nations that defeated Nazi Germany joined the thinning ranks of D-Day veterans for a commemoration at the Normandy American Cemetery, where nearly 10,000 American war dead are buried. Trump honored the sacrifice and patriotism of veterans in their 90s, who sat hunched behind him in a chilly wind at the last major milestone anniversary that most are likely to see. The president, an avowed nationalist, celebrated American bravery and the unity of fighting forces that landed here and pushed on Please see D-DAY, Page A6

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the shooting. Plainclothes St. Louis officers were working as backup to the marshals’ operation, he said. The suspect was driving in a vehicle with an adult female passenger when marshals converged on the man, Hayden said. The man then took off running and police followed. After a short foot chase, the

JEFFERSON CITY — Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft said Thursday he had rejected two proposed referendums on the state’s new abortion law, a setback for abortion rights proponents seeking to place a measure on the 2020 ballot. Within hours, the ACLU of Missouri, which filed one of the petitions, said it had filed a lawsuit in Cole County Circuit Court asking for a temporary restraining order and injunction barring the secretary of state’s action. Ashcroft, a Republican, said he could not allow the petitions to move forward because part of the law took effect immediately after Gov. Mike Parson signed it last month. The provision banning most abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy takes effect on Aug. 28, but a lesser-known provision that requires two-parent notification for minors seeking an abortion took effect last month. The Republican-led Legislature tacked on what is known as an “emergency clause” to the

Please see SHOOTING, Page A6

Please see ASHCROFT, Page A6

COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A man who identified himself as the father of a man shot and killed by police yells at an officer on Thursday near the intersection of Josephine Baker and Delmar boulevards. BY ERIN HEFFERNAN AND JOE HOLLEMAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — A man was shot and killed by a St. Louis police officer Thursday, after the man shot another officer in the leg, police said. The shooting occurred around noon at Delmar and Josephine Baker boulevards, one block east of Grand Center, behind Circus Flora’s tent.

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Ashcroft bats down public vote on new abortion law

The shooting marks the sixth time a St. Louis police officer shot at someone in 2019. Five of the six were fatal. There were 13 shootings by city officers last year. On Thursday, U.S. marshals were preparing to arrest the man, 26, on a federal weapons charge and parole violation connected to a homicide, St. Louis police Chief John Hayden said at a press conference after

Housman suspect faces more charges Magic House opens satellite location

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Women aim to defend World Cup title

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DeJong’s homer leads Cards over Reds

1 M • C1 Vol. 141, No. 158 ©2019


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.07.2019 1 1 FRIDAY • 06.07.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM DOUGHNUT DAY

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UPCOMING CHATS

National and St. Louis area shops are celebrating National Doughnut Day on Friday, and you can reap the benefits. stltoday.com/entertainment

Crime reporters Kim Bell and Christine Byers discuss the Angie Housman case, including how the family has reacted since Angie’s murder. stltoday.com/podcast

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Five years after Ferguson, police are still getting sensitivity training

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TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jon Belmar is sorry. That’s what he wrote to Nikki Brown a couple of months ago. Belmar, the chief of the St. Louis County Police Department, was letting Brown know that he was ending the investigation into racial discrimination against her, spurred by her complaints when she was an instructor at the county police academy. A 10-year-veteran of the department who now works as a police officer in Illinois, Brown said she became isolated, and her path to promotion blocked, after she had complained of a hostile work environment, including a fellow officer who spoke openly of “skinning coons.” After a nearly two-year internal affairs investigation, Belmar dismissed nearly all of her complaints. Despite validation from one of her fellow instructors, Belmar found “conflicting versions.” The workplace harassment, though? It happened. “I hope you will accept my sincere apology for any aggravation caused by his actions,” Belmar wrote to Brown. “Steps have been taken,” he wrote, to make sure it doesn’t happen again. Perhaps the offending officer underwent sensitivity training. That’s the solution Jimmie Edwards is instituting in the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department, after a multiyear-investigation by a Philadelphia lawyer uncovered hundreds of racist and Islamaphobic social media posts by about 40 current and former city police officers. Yeah, that will do the trick. “Like training sessions will make you non-racist,” a black officer in the city texted me this week upon seeing Edwards’ prescription for the 21 current city cops whose offensive social media posts have been documented. I won’t mention the officer’s name, of course, because when black officers talk to the press, they get punished. That’s what happened a couple of years ago when Sgt. Heather Taylor,

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

St. Louis police officers who took part in a kettling and mass arrest of people at Washington Avenue and Tucker Boulevard in St. Louis remain in the area after the arrests on Sept. 17, 2017. A group of police officers chanted, “Whose Streets, our streets,” as those arrested were loaded into vans to be taken to jail. president of the Ethical Society of Police, spoke to me for a column. The ethical society is an association that represents mostly — but not entirely — black officers in both the city and county police departments. It exists because both departments have well-recorded histories of not doing much to drum out the racists in their midst. One of those racists, according to the Plain View Project database, is a former “officer of the year,” Sgt. Ron Hasty. He loves the Confederate flag, hates Black Lives Matter, considers Muslims less than human, and has demeaned and demonized black people in Facebook posts regularly. Hasty feels free to talk to the press: “Last I checked I had First Amendment rights. I’m not a racist,” Hasty told the Post-Dispatch. “You can talk to any of my friends.” Don’t count the ethical society among Hasty’s friends: “This training will never work for officers like Det. Thomas Mabrey or Sgt. Ronald Hasty,” the society tweeted on Tuesday. “The only option is to fire them.”

Nikki Brown, the former county cop, knows that’s not likely to happen. So does Luther Hall. He’s the black undercover St. Louis police officer who was beaten “like Rodney King” by his fellow white officers in the wake of 2017 protests after the Jason Stockley acquittal. Late last year, four of those officers were indicted in federal court on various charges related to his beating. Some of their own text messages were filled with racial innuendo and bragged of plans that night to beat “the hell out of these (expletive) once the sun goes down and nobody can tell us apart!” Hall hasn’t returned to work. Neither has Milton Green, the black officer shot in a friendly fire incident two years ago by a white officer. Green was near his own home, responding while off-duty to activity in his neighborhood. They’re just black cops, whose lives, it seems, don’t matter as much as those who protect the blue wall of silence. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

CONCERT REVIEW

Sandler blends wry humor, musical interludes BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ

Special to the Post-Dispatch

As a film star, Adam Sandler has been dreadfully predictable — though wildly successful — turning one-note characters that would feel stretched during a five-minute “Saturday Night Live” sketch into the focus of 90-minute films. (To be fair, there have been delightful exceptions to this.) But onstage doing stand-up comedy — as he did Wednesday night at a rain-soaked Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre — his instincts ran in the opposite direction. No idea stuck around long enough to wear out its welcome. Sandler didn’t tell jokes, but rather made wry and often bawdy observations about getting older (he’s 52), being a father (he has two girls, 13 and 10) and trying to keep the spark alive with his wife of 17 years. Mostly, he says, he’s tired. One reason is that his kids wake him up at night to tell him they’re scared that a murderer is hiding under their beds. “No one hides under the bed,” Sandler said he tells them. “They just walk in and kill you.” Other jokes about his family had a lighter touch. “Are you ever driving along with your wife and kids, and you

Illinois lotteries

PEOPLE

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Singer Tom Jones is 79. Actor Ronald Pickup (“The Crown”) is 79. Actor Ken Osmond (Eddie Haskell on “Leave It To Beaver”) is 76. Talk show host Jenny Jones is 73. Actor Liam Jones Neeson is 67. Singersongwriter Johnny Clegg is 66. Actor William Forsythe is 64. Record producer L.A. Reid is 63. Latin pop singer Juan

“Are you ever driving along with your wife and kids, and you open your window just so your left ear can be happy?” Adam Sandler open your window just so your left ear can be happy?” Sandler’s jokes about his marriage were mostly about sex — candles in the bedroom, failed attempts at spontaneity, his wife’s previous lovers — and were pretty raunchy but hilarious. Interspersed between these routines were short, absurdist songs. Sandler sang, accompanied by pianist Dan Bulla, and sometimes played guitar — which he plays well, by the way. Many of the songs clocked in at less than a minute or were just a few lines about things like having OCD or going to Disneyland. But most of them came with a savage twist at the end, as in a country love song that finds a romance blossoming amid genre-correct details such as pickup trucks, strawberry wine and summer rain. “But,” he sang, “Your dad says you gotta dump me because I’m Jewish.”

Luis Guerra is 62. Singerguitarist Gordon Gano of Violent Femmes is 56. Rapper Ecstasy of Whodini is 55. Drummer Eric Kretz of Stone Temple Pilots is 53. Guitarist Dave Hader Navarro is 52. Actress Helen Baxendale (Emily on “Friends”) is 49. Actor Karl Urban (2009’s “Star Trek”) is 47. TV personality Bear Grylls

Some of the songs were longer and more elaborate. One of them, a Devolike techno tune, commented on UFC fighters’ cauliflower ears; another one, “Phone, Wallet, Keys,” showed off Sandler’s rap skills. He also dusted off an old favorite from his “SNL” days, “Red Hooded Sweatshirt.” Sadler’s best number was his heartfelt tribute to Chris Farley, which he sang when hosting “SNL” last month and also performed on his 2018 Netflix special “100% Fresh.” The audience stood and cheered as images of Farley cutting loose displayed on the video screens. Sandler was joined onstage by show opener Rob Schneider for the song “Spaceship 69” — a juvenile concept, but again: funny. During his brief opening set, Schneider commented on the violent storm that blew through the area, delaying the performance by 75 minutes. “That was some biblical (stuff),” he said. “Rain with a chance of locusts and frogs.” His other topics included getting older (“I’m not less interested in sex, just more interested in cookies”), loving his kids a bit more than his wife, and being the “poorest rich guy among all my friends.”

(“Man Vs. Wild”) is 45. Guitarist-keyboardist Eric Johnson of The Shins is 43. Comedian Bill Hader (“Barry,” “Saturday Night Live”) is 41. Actress Anna Torv (“Fringe”) is 40. Actress Larisa Oleynik (“3rd Rock From The Sun,” “Boy Meets World) is 38. Actor Michael Cera (“Juno,” “Arrested Development”) is 31. Rapper Iggy Azalea is 29. Rapper Fetty Wap is 28. — Associated Press


LOCAL

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Housman suspect could be charged in molestation case

DIGEST

BY CHRISTINE BYERS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HILLARY LEVIN, HLEVIN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Jett, a horse at the St. Louis Carriage Company stables on Cerre Street in downtown St. Louis, on Thursday pokes his head out his stall window and checks the ground for any nearby grass. ST. LOUIS — Bridge repair to temporarily close I-70: Westbound Interstate 70 will be closed this weekend to allow crews to make repairs to the Adelaide Avenue bridge, the Missouri Department of Transportation said Thursday. The work will complete repairs needed after a truck struck the overpass in May 2018, MoDOT said. Crews will close westbound I-70 at Adelaide at 8 p.m. Friday. One lane of interstate traffic will detour up and over the ramps at Adelaide during the closure. Additionally, the eastbound express lanes will be closed at 8 p.m. Friday. All I-70 lanes will reopen before the Blues game ends Sunday, MoDOT said. Adelaide will close between the eastbound ramps and Hall Street starting at 8 p.m. Friday. All lanes on Adelaide, including those currently closed for safety, will reopen by morning rush hour Wednesday. Detours around the Adelaide closure will be marked. ST. JOHN — New contract with Sycamore Hills in works: The City Council has given firstround approval to a three-year contract for the police department to provide services to the nearby community of Sycamore Hills, including patrols, police

dispatching and speed enforcement. The contract also provides for vacation checks by the police and coverage in St. John’s Checking On Our Residents program, in which police check on elderly and disabled residents during power outages or natural disasters, Police Chief J.R. “Rusty” Morris said. Sycamore Hills will pay $54,900 in the first year for the services. The cost for the second and third years hasn’t been determined but cannot exceed 5% more than the cost of the preceding year, Morris said. St. John has been providing police services for Sycamore Hills for about 30 years, he said. SPRINGFIELD, ILL. — Bishop prohibits some legislators from receiving Communion: The Roman Catholic bishop of Springfield has banned leaders of the Illinois General Assembly from receiving Holy Communion at local churches because of their involvement in abortion legislation approved last week. Bishop Thomas John Paprocki took the action Thursday against House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton in a decree based on Catholic canon stating that those “who obstinately persist in manifest grave sin are not to be admitted to Holy Communion.”

Additionally, Paprocki barred other Catholic legislators who voted for statutory protection for abortion rights in Illinois. The measure was Democrats’ response to steep restrictions on abortion adopted in at least six Republican-controlled states in an effort to get the issue, legalized by the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, back before the U.S. Supreme Court. Gov. J.B. Pritzker, who is Jewish, has promised to sign the legislation. “To support legislation that treats babies in the womb like property, allowing for their destruction for any reason at any time, is evil,” Paprocki said in a statement. Madigan and Cullerton, both Chicago Democrats, voted “yes” on the measure. In a statement, Madigan said Paprocki had informed him that supporting the so-called Reproductive Health Act would mean forfeiting Communion. “I believe it is more important to protect a woman’s right to make her own health care decisions, including women who become pregnant as a result of rape or incest,” Madigan said. John Patterson, spokesman for Cullerton, said he’s unaware of Cullerton ever attending Mass in Springfield. He declined further comment.

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ST. LOUIS COUNTY — A major break in the 25-year-old Angie Housman case has led prosecutors to reconsider a separate child molestation case, and has spurred calls to the St. Charles County Police Department. St. Charles County Prosecuting Attorney Tim Lohmar announced Wednesday that Earl W. Cox, 61, had been identified through DNA and charged with first-degree murder, kidnapping and sodomy in connection with the Cox death of 9-year-old Angie Housman from St. Ann. Lohmar also released a picture of Cox taken around the time Angie disappeared in 1993, urging the public to contact police if they recalled seeing him in the area. Police still are trying to determine whether Cox acted alone and where he kept Angie during the nine days she was missing. “It’s been a steady stream,” Lohmar said of the calls.“We have a few more leads to pursue.” He did not elaborate. The primary investigators, Lt. Col. John Lankford of St. Ann police and Cpl. Ed Copeland of St. Charles County police, have been pursuing leads ever since learning Cox’s identity March 1, Lohmar said. Among them was tracking down one of two 7-year-old girls Cox was accused of molesting in 1989 — just four years before Angie went missing. The offenses allegedly occurred in a park behind Angie’s elementary school in Overland. In that case, Overland police arrested Cox on suspicion of child molestation. He was charged with assault, but, ultimately, charges were dropped. Copeland and Lankford tracked down one of the two victims out of state, and she has agreed to testify against Cox, Lohmar said. A spokesman for St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell confirmed that his office is considering charges against

Cox in the 1989 case. It’s unclear what makes the case stronger now than it was at the time. Cox’s arrest in that case was enough to revoke his federal parole in 1992. He was serving parole after having been convicted in 1982 of molesting four little girls he babysat while stationed at an Air Force base in Germany. He spent almost all of 1992 in prison at Fort Leavenworth, and was released 11 months before Angie was found dead. In that case, police say Cox kidnapped Angie after she hopped off her school bus just a half-block from her St. Ann home, sexually assaulted and tortured her for nine days and left her tied to a tree in a wooded area of St. Charles County. A hunter found her nude body partly covered with snow on Nov. 27, 1993. The medical examiner determined she died from exposure. Duct tape covered her head, except for her nose. A torn piece of her underwear had been used as a gag. She was handcuffed behind her back. Deep lacerations to both of her wrists and her right thigh showed the torture she endured, according to court documents. Police believe she “struggled extensively” to free herself before she died, according to court documents. Cox resurfaced on law enforcement radar in 2002 when he was arrested for his role in an international online child pornography ring. He was convicted in 2003 and completed his sentence for those crimes in 2011, but remains in a federal prison under “civil commitment.” The designation allows the government to keep a prisoner incarcerated if he or she is deemed highly likely to re-offend. Cox has unsuccessfully appealed his confinement. He is expected to be extradited to face the new charges in Missouri. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

THEATER REVIEW

CONCERT REVIEW

‘The Boy From Oz’ is a must-see jukebox musical BY CALVIN WILSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JON GITCHOFF

Ilana Glazer performs during the first of two shows at the Pageant in St. Louis on Wednesday.

Glazer shows the real Ilana in Pageant show BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Don’t confuse the real Ilana Glazer with Ilana Wexler, the character she played for five seasons of “Broad City” on Comedy Central. There are big differences, she says. Glazer let fans know this during the first of two stand-up shows Wednesday night at the Pageant; the first show was sold out. On her “The Planet is Burning Tour,” she said she was visiting blue spaces (“the hottest part of the flame”) in red states. Taking the stage to Rihanna’s “Sex With Me,” Glazer was obviously happy to be there, calling herself the “Jewie in St. Louie” and thanking people of color specifically for coming to the show. She told everyone to get the business of social media out of the way first, striking several Ins-

tagram-ready poses and staging a Boomerang moment for her own Instagram. After that, fans could put away their phones, relax and be fully in the moment. Then she noted the differences between her and the character she plays on “Broad City,” which recently ended its run. Notably: The way they buy weed isn’t the same. Glazer discussed topics including President Donald Trump, female empowerment and women’s issues, often saying things that “Broad City” fans could imagine her character saying. But Glazer was distinctly smarter and more aware. Looking at the current political climate, she said she thought Trump would stop at game show hosting. It’s time for women to “come clean up this mess,” she said. “Not to romanticize women cleaning.”

She said she feels a little boyish at times and that she’s given hope by gender-nonconforming youth who prefer the pronoun “they” over “he” and “she.” If she were a cocktail, she said she’d be one part gay, two parts straight, and the drink would be called Both Sexes on the Beach. She expounded on why homophobia is “the lamest form of hate,” using the Lil Wayne song “Lollipop” to help make her point. She said the words husband (“I have a cis male partner — eww”) and wife don’t flow out of her mouth easily, though she loves the concept of making a house into a home. After a lengthy bit about feminine products, she expressed her gratitude for being a woman in 2019. She added that it’s also good to be a Jewish woman today — except for the part about Nazis coming back. Women are con-

tinually making strides, she said, thanks in part to the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements and taking back what’s due. “Hopefully we can do it before the planet explodes,” she said. Petey DeAbreu opened, noting early that the show had already surpassed a date in Nashville, Tenn., where he was the only African American he saw. After complaining about the heat, a female audience member screamed for him to take off his shirt. “It’s 2019 — what happened to consent?” he asked. Host Alison Leiby kicked things off, saying that, now that she’s 35, she can finally throw her hat into the ring as a Democratic candidate for president, along with everyone else. Kevin C. Johnson • 314-340-8191 Pop music critic @kevincjohnson on Twitter kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

R. Kelly pleads not guilty to additional sex charges BY SOPHIA TAREEN AND MICHAEL TARM

Associated Press

CHICAGO — R&B singer R. Kelly pleaded not guilty to 11 additional sex-related charges on Thursday, including four counts that carry a maximum prison term of 30 years in prison. Prosecutors did not ask the judge to raise the bond amount for Kelly during the brief hearing in Cook

County court. Kelly stood with his hands folded in front of him and listened to Judge Lawrence Flood describe the charges to him. The Grammy awardwinning singer, who has denied any wrongdoing, left without speaking to reporters. A status hearing was scheduled for June 26. Among the 11 new counts are four counts of aggravated criminal sexual as-

sault, which carries a sentence of up to 30 years in prison. That is more than four times as long as the maximum term for each of the 10 counts Kelly was originally

charged with in February. Kelly’s defense attorney, Steve Greenberg, said after the hearing that he couldn’t speculate as to why prosecutors brought the new charges,

which pertain to one of the four women he was charged in February with sexually abusing years ago, three of whom were minors when the alleged abuse occurred.

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NEWS

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Sit, stay and stress out?

LAW AND ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY — Man shot to death; police arrest suspect: The body of a 19-year-old man was found Wednesday on the lawn of a north St. Louis County home after, police say, he was shot while assaulting another man. St. Louis County police identified the man as Dwayne Green Jr., 19, of Florissant. Police were called about 7:20 p.m. to a report from Shotspotter, a gunshotdetection tool, in the 10600 block of Linnell Drive. Upon arrival, officers found Green with several gunshot wounds in the yard on the residential street. A 21-year-old man was taken into custody at the scene. Police believe the man shot Green after Green began to assault another man at the home. The suspect and Green did not know each other, police said. Police did not release more details on the shooting Thursday. The St. Louis County Police Department asks anyone with information on the shooting to call 636-529-8210 to speak to investigators. To remain anonymous or potentially receive a reward, contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477 if you have any information regarding the incident.

Study suggests dogs feel pressure just like owners BY JEREMY REHM

Associated Press

NEW YORK — When dog owners go through a stressful period, they’re not alone in feeling the pressure — their dogs feel it too, a new study suggests. Dog owners experiencing long bouts of stress can transfer it to their dogs, scientists found in a study published Thursday in Scientific Reports. The Swedish researchers focused on 58 people who own border collies or Shetland sheepdogs. They examined hair from the dog owners and their dogs, looking at the concentrations of a hormone called cortisol, a chemical released into the bloodstream and absorbed by hair follicles in response to stress. Depression, excessive physical exercise and unemployment are just a few examples of stress that can influence the amount of cortisol found in your hair, said Lina Roth of Linkoping

WONG MAYE-E, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Shetland sheepdog performs in February at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York. A study published Thursday in Scientific Reports suggests that dogs owners experiencing long bouts of stress can actually transfer the stress to their dogs. University in Sweden. Roth and her team found that the patterns of cortisol levels in the hair of dog owners closely matched that found in their dogs in both winter and summer months, indicating their stress levels were in sync. She thinks the owners are influencing the dogs rather

than the other way around because several human personality traits appear to affect canine cortisol levels. The researchers don’t know what causes the synchronization in cortisol levels between humans and their pups. But a hint might lie in the fact that the link is stronger with competitive

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CALVERTON PARK — Baby who died in car identified: Authorities have identified the baby girl who died Sunday after being left inside a hot car. The infant was 11-month-old Joseline Eichelberger, according to the St. Louis County Medical Examiner’s Office. Her body was found about 4:30 p.m. Sunday in the 100 block of Anistasia Drive. The Florissant Valley Fire Protection District was called to the scene and found the child unresponsive. First responders were unable to revive her, police said. An investigation determined that the child had been locked inside the car

JEFFERSON COUNTY — Crash on Highway 30 kills woman: A 63-year-old Sullivan woman was killed Wednesday in a crash in western Jefferson County. Carol J. Hoffman, 63, of Sullivan, was driving a 2008 Ford Escape on Highway 30 near Dittmer Road about 5:30 p.m. Wednesday when a pickup going the opposite direction crossed into her lane, causing the crash, according to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Hoffman was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the other vehicle, a Ford F-150, was a 42-year-old man from Lonedell. He had moderate injuries, according the highway patrol. Both drivers were wearing seat belts.

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Shooting From A1

man turned and shot one of the St. Louis officers, striking him in the upper thigh, Hayden said. Another officer then shot and killed the man, he said. Police recovered two firearms in connection with the incident: a loaded .40-caliber semiautomatic pistol and a loaded .223 AR-style pistol. A bag belonging to the suspect and containing a drum magazine with 60 cartridges also was found at the scene, police said. The injured officer was sent to SSM Health St. Louis University Hospital. He was conscious and talking, and headed for surgery Thursday afternoon. Police did not immediately identify the suspect or the officers by name. The officer who was shot is 37 years old and has been with St. Louis police for 14 years. The officer who returned fire is 47 years old and has been with the department for 17 years. The woman in the vehicle

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Crime scene investigators bag evidence Thursday just south of Delmar Boulevard where a man accused of shooting one officer in the leg was killed by another. stayed at the scene and was detained by police. Police did not answer further questions. An eyewitness near the shooting Thursday,Meghan Homa,said she saw multiple police cars racing through the area before spotting a man dressed in black pants and a black sweatshirt half-running

down Washington Boulevard. The man then squeezed through a fence next to the lot of Circus Flora, she said. Homa said she saw an officer wearing a bullet-proof vest follow after him. “He was chasing him and shouting at him,” she told the Post-Dispatch. “Like: Stop running!”

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Homa said she saw the man and officer circle around a trailer on the lot before the officer shot the man. By 12:30 p.m. Thursday, police officers and officials had gathered at the hospital, allowing only emergency traffic through the main entrance. At the crime scene, less than 2 miles north, at least 15 police vehicles had arrived, and police had set a boundary with crime scene tape that stretched for blocks. Evidence markers were set just south of Delmar, near Josephine Baker and Samuel Shepard Drive. By 1:15 p.m., about 35 bystanders had gathered. Several who claimed to know the victim asked police to be allowed past the crime scene tape, closer to the shooting scene. When police refused, some heated exchanges occurred, but nothing further. “You didn’t have to kill him,” said a visibly distraught woman who identified herself as the dead man’s mother. “You could’ve shot him a couple of times; you didn’t have to kill him.”

D-Day From A1

into Europe, helping to turn the tide of the war. “They came from the farms of a vast heartland, the streets of glowing cities and the forges of mighty industrial towns,” Trump said of the teenagers and young men who approached the Normandy shores. “Before the war, many had never ventured beyond their own community. Now, they had come to offer their lives halfway across the world.” He gave, at most, a measured memorial to the transatlantic partnership and the foundation of the United States as the world’s indispensable nation. “Today as we stand together upon this sacred earth, we pledge that our nations will forever be strong and united,” he said. “We will forever be together.” Trump recognized several Americans in attendance by name, including Ray Lambert of West End, North Carolina, who served as a medic in the 16th Infantry Regiment of the Army’s 1st Division, known as “The Big Red One.” Lambert, 98, has said this is probably his final visit to Normandy. Trump broke off his remarks as the crowd cheered Lambert, then turned and crossed the stage with Macron to greet him. Lambert doffed a blue ball cap, embroidered with “D-Day veteran,” to the leaders and the crowd. An 80th anniversary is planned, but even the youngest represented here Thursday would be approaching 100 then. French and U.S. flags flew at half-staff behind the crowd. Omaha Beach below was not visible from the elaborate stage, also decorated with French and U.S. flags, as well as mock-ups of the white crosses and Stars of David that line the grass beyond. Trump has pulled the United States away from Europe and the international rule-making institutions that grew out of the end of World War II. He complains about what he calls imbalances in trade, defense spending and other issues. Trump’s inwardlooking view is not unique, as nationalist leaders and movements are on the rise in Europe. Trump’s address was his first as president that encompassed such a broad mix of history, patriotism and pathos. He read from a screen before him, appearing to stick closely to the script. “We are gathered here on freedom’s altar. On these shores, on these bluffs, on this day 75 years ago, 10,000 men shed their blood and thousands sacrificed their lives for their brothers, for their countries and for the survival of liberty,” he said. “Today, we remember those who fell here, and we honor all who fought right here in Normandy. They won back this ground for civilization.” The landings were the largest joint naval, air and land assault ever undertaken, an audacious feat that helped cement the role of the U.S. military as the world’s preeminent fighting force. Reminders of what was built from the ruins of postwar Europe came from Macron, who praised NATO and other institutions that Trump has criticized as outdated and unfair to the United States. At one point, Macron addressed Trump directly and appeared to riff on Trump’s “Make America Great Again” campaign slogan. “We know what we owe to the United States of America. The United States of America, dear Donald Trump, dear president, which is never greater than when it is fighting for the freedom of others,” Macron said. “The United States of America,

ALEX BRANDON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

From left, President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump, French President Emmanuel Macron and Brigitte Macron watch a flyover during a ceremony to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day on Thursday in Normandy, France. that is never greater than when it shows its loyalty to the universal values that the Founding Fathers defended when, nearly 2 ½ centuries ago, France came to support its independence. “We shall never cease to perpetuate the alliance of free people,” Macron said, arguing that various global institutions such as the United Nations, NATO and the European Union were created for that purpose. Trump has criticized all three of those organizations. He has repeatedly claimed, for example, that the European Union was created “to take advantage of the United States.” In his speech, Trump praised the various countries that joined the Allied fight against the “wicked tyranny of the Nazi empire,” name-checking the Canadians, the British and “the fighting Poles, the tough Norwegians and the intrepid Aussies,” as well as French resistance fighters. “They were the citizens of free and independent nations united by their duty to their compatriots and to millions yet unborn,” he said. Trump’s 2016 political brand was a fuzzy mix of “America First” isolationism and flagwaving nostalgia for a time when the United States had a more certain footing in a changing world. “As far as the Europeans are concerned, I think the general tone is one of desperation at the possibility that the lessons of history could be forgotten,” said François Heisbourg, a former French presidential adviser and a senior adviser at the International Institute for Strategic Studies, a London-based think

tank. “The lesson of history is that the West exists, and when the West is divided, very bad things happen. “We don’t forget that it took the Americans two years to get involved in World War II. But we also know we were saved by the Americans — not only by the Americans, but without the Americans, it would not have been possible.” Giving a speech on the beaches of Normandy is something of a rite of passage for U.S. presidents, who, regardless of their party affiliation, have typically used the opportunity to drive home a message about American internationalism. “We in America have learned bitter lessons from two World Wars,” Ronald Reagan said in 1984, in the course of his memorable “Boys of Pointe du Hoc” speech, written by Peggy Noonan. “It is better to be here ready to protect the peace than to take blind shelter across the sea, rushing to respond only after freedom is lost.” In 2014, President Barack Obama had a similar message. “We have to do our best to uphold in our own lives the values that they were prepared to die for,” he said, referring to the troops who sacrificed their lives on D-Day. “We have to honor those who carry forward that legacy, recognizing that people cannot live in freedom unless free people are prepared to die for it.” After the speeches Thursday, Trump joined Macron near the waterfront of Omaha Beach as vintage fighter planes and bombers flew overhead. Joined by both countries’ first ladies, Melania Trump and Brigitte Ma-

cron of France, the two men then left flowers next to the graves of fallen Americans near the beach. Trump spent less than a full day in France — just long enough for the D-Day memorial and a meeting with Macron. He returned to his golf resort in Ireland on Thursday afternoon, missing other D-Day ceremonies scheduled for later in the day. Trump’s relationship with the French leader — once seemingly sanguine enough to warrant the label of “le bromance” — has soured over the past year. But both presidents were smiling Thursday, and seemed at ease as they embraced during the ceremony and toured the grounds with their wives. “The relationship is outstanding,” Trump said, speaking to reporters at his meeting with Macron in Caen. “The relationship we’ve had together has been terrific.” This chummy tone marked a significant shift from Trump’s last visit to France in November, when he attacked Macron via Twitter upon landing in Paris and then again shortly after he arrived back in Washington. Trump’s own relationship to military service was a subtext of the week’s events. He received multiple draft deferments during the Vietnam War and previously said he was “lucky” to have avoided service. But in an interview broadcast Wednesday, Trump said that although he “was not a fan” of the Vietnam War, he would have fought willingly. “I would not have minded that at all,” he told British interviewer Piers Morgan. “I would have been honored.”

Ashcroft From A1

two-parent notification requirement — the reason that provision took effect immediately. “Because of that declaration by the Legislature, and because of the responsibility of the Secretary of State’s office to follow Missouri Supreme Court precedent, and the Constitution, we have no other avenue but to reject Referendum 1 and Referendum 2,” Ashcroft said. The ACLU and GOP mega-donor David Humphreys last month submitted two proposed referendums to Ashcroft. Humphreys and the ACLU want the referendums to be approved so backers may start collecting signatures to place a question on the November 2020 ballot. Tony Rothert, attorney for the ACLU, called Ashcroft’s move “cowardly” and an attempt to deprive residents of their right to reject newly passed laws. “This move is so predictable, we’ve already assembled our suit to require the Secretary of State to put aside his anti-abortion agenda and do his job by certifying the referendum,” Rothert said in a statement Thursday morning. If the courts reverse Ashcroft’s action, and the language is approved, proponents of a referendum will have until Aug. 28 to turn in more than 100,000 signatures to the secretary of state in order to place the question on the ballot. Ashcroft’s office has made no decision on the validity of a third referendum, also submitted by Humphreys. That referendum seeks to strike everything but the two-parent notification. As Ashcroft made his announcement, lawyer Chuck Hatfield, a Democrat, said the courts have ruled that “true emergency bills ARE exempt from referendum but courts have held that just [because] Legislature says it doesn’t make it so.” Ashcroft, at the news conference, said Hatfield was probably referring to Westhues v. Sullivan and Pollock v. Becker, two century-old court cases. Ashcroft said the two cases make “it clear that the Secretary of State’s Office does not have the ability to decide whether or not an emergency clause is truly an emergency.” Ashcroft said the courts would have to decide whether the twoparent notification piece is truly an emergency. Democrats used the Westhues case as ammunition after Ashcroft’s news conference. “Nearly a century ago, the Missouri Supreme Court ruled in Westhues v. Sullivan that the General Assembly cannot thwart a bill from being subject to a referendum petition simply by tacking on an emergency clause,” House Minority Leader Crystal Quade said in a statement. “Secretary Ashcroft should voluntarily certify these petitions for circulation before a court orders him to do so.” Lowell Pearson, attorney for Humphreys, said he was planning to challenge Ashcroft’s action in court. Pearson said the emergency clause applies to less than 10% of the entire law, meaning the entire law has not been deemed an emergency, only a section. The constitution prevents referendums on laws with emergency clauses, not sections, Pearson said. He also predicted Missouri courts would side with petitioners because the state constitution says the power of the government is “derived from the People.” “The initiative and referendum procedures are a reservation of rights by the People against the government,” Pearson said in a Wednesday letter to Ashcroft. In a Remington Research survey conducted between May 22 and 23 of Missouri voters, 57% of respondents described themselves as “pro-life” while 43% described themselves as “pro-choice.” The poll surveyed 1,042 likely 2020 general election voters and the margin of error was plus or minus 3%. The Missouri law bans abortions at eight weeks, meaning access to abortion in the earliest stages of a pregnancy would not be banned. But after eight weeks, the only exceptions allowing for abortions would be in medical emergencies. There are no exceptions in cases of rape or incest. While the law allows abortions before eight weeks of pregnancy, if the landmark Roe v. Wade case is overturned by the conservative U.S. Supreme Court, that ruling would trigger another provision in Missouri’s law outlawing nearly all abortions; the only exception would be in medical emergencies. Thirty-two percent of Remington poll respondents said they would support a ban on abortions with no rape or incest exceptions, while 54% of respondents said they would oppose such a ban; 14% said they were unsure. Fifty-one percent of respondents said they would support a ban on abortion if there were rape and incest exceptions, while 34% said they would oppose such a law; 15% of respondents weren’t sure. Meanwhile, 40% of respondents said Roe v. Wade should be overturned while 47% said that it should not be overturned; 13% were not sure.


LOCAL

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

Public vote on airport privatization faces headwinds BY MARK SCHLINKMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The chief attorney for the city executive branch said Thursday that an aldermanic bill seeking to require a citywide election on privatizing St. Louis Lambert International Airport wouldn’t be legally binding on city elected officials. City Counselor Julian Bush told an aldermanic committee that an alternative that could pass legal muster is putting a city charter amendment on the ballot to require a public vote. If that passed, a second citywide election would have to be held on privatization itself. Bush said an aldermanic bill simply requiring voter approval would be an unlawful delegation of powers.

“The charter as it today places with the Board of Aldermen ultimately the authority on whether or not the airport should be privatized,” said Bush. “I have serious reservations about the ability of the board to delegate that authority to the people.” The bill’s sponsor, Alderman Cara Spencer, D-20th Ward, was angered at Bush’s statement. But she acknowledged in an interview that it was legally unclear whether her measure could make voters the final decider of the controversial issue. However, she said, aldermen and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment would be unlikely to go against the wishes of the public if voters rejected a privatization deal in a nonbinding election — even if held after the fact.

“We can undo any ordinance we want,” she said, referring to the Board of Aldermen. At Thursday’s committee meeting, Alderman Joe Vaccaro, D-23rd Ward, said he plans to introduce a proposed charter amendment to require a public vote on privatization. He called Spencer’s bill “a feel-good bill but it does nothing.” Spencer said she also would support Vaccaro’s measure but feared that a privatization deal could be hammered out before there’s a chance for the two citywide elections needed under that approach. A charter amendment requires 60% approval while Spencer’s bill would need a simple majority to pass at the polls. Bush said another way to get

the issue before voters might be for citizens to gather signatures to force a citywide referendum on any privatization deal once one was approved. He said the issue probably would be subject to the referendum procedure. Bush emphasized that his view of what could be done legally on the issue was tentative and subject to change. “I have not made a complete review,” he said. Bush is a former circuit judge and an appointee of Mayor Lyda Krewson, who is a major advocate of considering privatization. A city committee currently is reviewing the idea but has yet to decide whether to pursue it. Another type of charter amendment requiring only a single vote potentially could be attempted. Comptroller Darlene Green last

year pointed out that the city’s preliminary application to the Federal Aviation Administration regarding privatization mentioned a charter change as one way to go about it. According to the application, filed by then-Mayor Francis Slay’s administration in 2017, a charter amendment specifically allowing the airport to be leased could be proposed for voter approval. That application offered that as one of two ways to legally carry out privatization, with the other being approval by aldermen. But it described the charter amendment as “the City’s preferred method.” Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Child abuse case dismissed for Fenton firefighter BY JOEL CURRIER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROBERT COHEN PHOTOS, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Water gushes from a manhole at the intersection of Alabama Avenue and Germania Street on Thursday as a hiker walks along River des Peres Greenway.

Flood From A1

structures since the region was afflicted by record-high flooding in 1993. “We are going to be short of record height,” she said. “Overtopping is the threat that causes a breach more often than not. And overtopping is not seen as an immediate threat.” But even where levees are holding and have room to spare above the crest, there are plenty of local complications and contingency plans. That is the case in Randolph County, Illinois, where the county’s western flank includes mile after mile of levee-protected flood plain occupied by farmland and intermittent homes or towns, like Prairie du Rocher. The area’s riverside levee has more than enough height to withstand the current crest, but aspects of daily life are affected nonetheless, said Mike Hoelscher, the coordinator of the Randolph County Emergency Management Agency. For instance, he said the bridge over the Mississippi at Chester — the only one between the St. Louis area and Cape Girardeau — “is shut off and causing a lot of problems,” thanks to flooding in the bottomlands on the Missouri side. Flooded local roads, farmland and a coal-loading dock are also out of service, he adds. And the geographic oddity of Kaskaskia — a town in an isolated nub of

Katy From A1

the trail and associated detours, business has dried up as the river has flooded the bottomlands through which the 237-mile-long trail runs. At mile marker 39, the pathway is flooded out at Frontier Park in St. Charles County. Flood-related closures are spotty through Weldon Spring, Augusta and Treloar, but the trail becomes essentially impassable for some 80 miles between Bluffton and New Franklin. Roads that could serve as detours also are under water. On a normal day, a rider might see deer, squirrels and foxes on the stretch between Hartsburg and Claysville. Now, there are fish jumping from the pools of water that line the 12-foot-wide trail. Flooding, however, is a key rea-

Ducks pass a car in the parking lot of the Cedar Creek Lodge apartments in Affton as water from River des Peres continues to rise on Thursday.

Illinois that was stranded west of the Mississippi after the river changed course centuries ago — is “an island now,” said Hoelscher, with its handful of families forced to travel back and forth by boat. He said the National Guard is prepared to assist the county if needed, and that local officials are in close contact with their neighbors to the north in Monroe County — where levees shielding the flood plain from the river are a bit lower. “Ninety-some days of water on these levees: That is what we’re worried about,” said Hoelscher, referencing the approximate length of time that the river has consecutively been at flood stage in the area. With that projected to be the case for at least a couple more weeks, he said the area is looking at dealing with a “different beast” than it did even in 1993.

“When you start talking about the longevity, the pressure of the water on the levees for this long a period, we’ve got to beware of the unknown. What else will break loose?” he said. Some in Prairie du Rocher echoed that outlook. “It’s kind of in Mother Nature’s hands, I guess,” said Amanda Ford, the village clerk. “It’s not so much a fear of it coming over the top, it’s just making sure the levees can hold, being that saturated.” As a precaution, she said that residents of at-risk properties, including her parents, have moved farm equipment to higher ground or packed belongings onto the beds of trailers and towed them uphill — ready to go, in case of emergency. “Most of them have packed up and taken their stuff out,” Ford said.

son the trail exists. The name comes from the rail line that once ran along its path— the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad, first nicknamed the “K-T.” The segment of the MKT system between Boonville and St. Charles ran along the floodplains of the Missouri River. The line suffered multiple washouts over the years as the river rose and fell. After an especially damaging flood in 1986, the railroad abandoned the line. In April 1990, the first section of the trail opened between Rocheport and McBaine. Last year, the trail drew nearly 380,000 people, with about 70% of those local users and 30% people who are traversing the whole trail, according to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. While there are 26 stops in towns along the stretch, some of those are now blocked by water. Motorists cannot get to the

parking lot of the North Jefferson trailhead across the river from the state capital. And, even if someone enters from a spur connecting the trail with nearby Holts Summit, he or she can only go for about 1 mile to the east before hitting a wall of sandbags. There’s no way to go west because Turkey Creek, which empties into the nearby Missouri River, is backed up with flood water. And trail conditions likely won’t be back to normal after the water recedes. The river is likely to wash out much of the top layer of crushed gravel, forcing DNR workers to spend time smoothing the surface and replacing the rock. “We won’t really know what we’ll be dealing with until the water goes down,” said Melanie Smith, DNR’s Katy Trail coordinator. “It will take a while to assess all that once the water goes down.”

Like in many areas near levees, officials near Prairie du Rocher were fighting sand boils Thursday — spots where groundwater has flooded up to the surface, through a weak or permeable layer of soil or sand. If gone untreated, sand boils can cause flooding or erosion issues. And sometimes they can hint at danger to levees under siege from high water. “It is a risk if particulate matter comes through the sand boils, because what that is, is pieces of levee,” Casseau said. Problems from high water aren’t confined just to major rivers. Reservoirs in Missouri — and elsewhere in the watershed — are reaching record water levels in some cases, requiring the release of additional water. At Truman Reservoir, which hit a record level of 33 feet on Tuesday, dam managers are releasing water at a rate of 40,000 cubic feet per second to keep the lake from rising more. The anticipated releases will be increased, depending on capacity in the Osage and Missouri rivers, the Corps said. Truman Dam impounds Truman Lake and feeds into the Lake of the Ozarks. Ameren Missouri, which manages the lake, said it will open spill gates at Bagnell Dam as soon as Saturday, sending additional water down the lower Osage and creating the potential for flooding. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

Although the trail was still in its formative stages when the Flood of 1993 hit, more than 100 miles of the pathway had to be rebuilt in its aftermath, she said. Back across the river, the Red Wheel Bike Shop has temporarily closed because of flooding in downtown Jefferson City. “The river has won this round. The recent crest has closed West Main and has taken over our parking lot making it almost impossible to get to the store,” the shop said in a Facebook post last week. “This is only a temporary setback and we plan to open back up as soon as possible.” The business also will take a hit from the cancellation of this year’s annual Katy Trail Ride, which was scheduled for June 17-21. The ride, which draws people from around the country to make the trek, is an opportunity for businesses along the

ST. LOUIS COUNTY — A Fenton Fire Protection District firefighter/paramedic’s child abuse charge has been dismissed. Jason Lee, 35, of the 1700 block of Woods Bend Lane in west St. Louis County, was charged in February with a felony count of child abuse, after his 3-month-old daughter was Lee hospitalized Jan. 3 with what police described as a brain bleed. Tim Swope, chief of operations for the St Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, said Thursday the charge was appropriate at the time police presented the case. But further investigation, he said, “determined there was no criminal intent” to hurt the baby. She suffered injuries while Lee was playing with her, Swope said. An assistant St. Louis County prosecutor dismissed the charge Wednesday as part of a deferred prosecution agreement. The charge can be refiled if Lee does not comply with certain conditions, which weren’t available Thursday. Swope provided the PostDispatch a redacted March 25 letter from the state department of social services to the prosecutors’ office lifting restrictions on Lee’s parental care. Police had alleged in court papers that Lee “recklessly shook and dropped” the child. But Lee’s lawyer, Greg Smith, said the police summary failed to tell the whole story. He declined to elaborate Thursday or describe the nature of his client’s deferred case other than that its duration is one year. He said Lee maintains his innocence. Smith said Lee’s infant daughter has made a full recovery. “The baby is healthy. The baby is fine. The baby is doing great,” Smith said. Lee, a five-year veteran of the fire district, was placed on unpaid leave after prosecutors filed the charge. Fenton Fire Chief Tom Steitz said Lee will be reinstated June 18 with back pay from his time on leave. “We believe him and we believe he’s innocent,” Steitz said. “He’s a great employee — loyal, never late. His evaluations were perfect all these years.” Joel Currier • 314-340-8123 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

route to show off their wares and promote themselves for future rides. Smith said she’s aware of other group rides that have changed their plans after learning of the flooding. In addition, she said DNR has contacted groups that were planning rides. “We have had a handful of events that have canceled,” Smith said. Ciszek said the trail has been hit by a triple-whammy in Augusta. Along with the flooding, a tornado blew trees onto the path and a bridge replacement project on the trail has stopped riders from passing through. “Yes, our business is feeling the effects. This whole summer is kind of big wash for all of us along the trail,” she said. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , M 1 8 17 8• FrIDAy • 06.07.2019 A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAy • 06.07.2019 • A8 RAY FARRIS PrESIDENT & PUBLISHEr

GILBERT BAILON EDITOr •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITOrIAL PAGE EDITOr

Pulling the plug Curtain is rapidly coming down on Bob Romanik’s racist radio clown show.

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he racist AM radio menace that is Bob Romanik could soon be history. The felonious Belleville talk show host is under fire from the Federal Communications Commission, which effectively charges that Romanik and his lawyer have lied in federal filings about Romanik’s de facto ownership and control of the stations broadcasting his talk show and commercial commentaries. The FCC seriously frowns on granting licenses to liars and convicted felons like Romanik, and evidence cited in an FCC filing Wednesday suggests he has done everything possible to hide his true role to dupe the FCC into licensing AM station KQQZ and other broadcast facilities under Romanik’s umbrella. Attorney Dennis J. Watkins is the titular licensee as the trustee of Entertainment Media Trust, which was established by Romanik in 2006. On a daily basis, Romanik uses racist and homophobic taunts, aimed particularly at major St. Louis-area political figures. Despite receiving a long list of public complaints, the FCC consistently responds that Romanik’s on-air hate speech doesn’t constitute grounds for license revocation. But lying on an FCC application to hide a station owner/operator’s criminal background does. “Had Romanik identified himself as a party to (Entertainment Media Trust’s) applications and disclosed his felony convictions in those applications, the Commission would have undertaken a careful examination” of Romanik’s criminal background, FCC Media Bureau Chief Michelle Carey stated in ordering this case to be heard by an administrative law judge.

The technicality is similar to the strategy of prosecuting gangster Al Capone for tax evasion. It doesn’t give the public the satisfaction of punishing Romanik for his outrageous on-air conduct, but the result — removing him from the public airwaves — would be the same. Watkins now must prove to a judge that he is worthy to keep the stations’ license despite apparently having conspired with Romanik to hide the truth. So far, he and Romanik have been unable to provide sufficient documentation, such as state and federal tax returns, to demonstrate that someone other than Romanik is in charge. Mounds of paperwork obtained by the FCC, however, point to Romanik as the true boss. Romanik is his own worst enemy on that score, having run repeatedly for public office and filed campaignfinance records in both Missouri and Illinois declaring himself as “radio station owner.” He has used his radio program to promote his campaigns but never reported the free air time in campaign filings as an in-kind donation, as required by law. Additional testimony and paperwork regarding business operations carry Romanik’s name and imprint. But when challenged by the FCC to provide evidence of Watkins’ or others’ involvement in running the stations, none was forthcoming, the FCC complaint says. It’s long past the time for Romanik to fade into obscurity. Judging from the feeble and sickly sound of Romanik’s voice in his recent broadcasts, it appears he has lost the energy to keep fighting. Good riddance. Bob Romanik is shown at his studio in Belleville, where his AM radio show reaches the St. Louis metropolitan area. Romanik, who takes pride in his controversial style, uses the Grim Reaper as his mascot. PETER HOLLEY, WASHINGTON POST

An unsurprising failure Report to Congress says the GOP-mandated tax cuts in 2017 were a bust.

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n a recent report, the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service has confirmed what serious economists had long predicted about the Republican tax cuts of 2017: They have had little effect on wages; average taxpayers saw little benefit; and the cuts aren’t going to “pay for themselves” with growth, as promised. What America is left with is a ballooning deficit, primarily to fuel record stock buybacks that mostly benefit the well-heeled. From the start, this was an expensive hoodwink to benefit the rich — one that voters must hold GOP lawmakers accountable for in next year’s elections. Since the Reagan era, Republicans have stubbornly clung to a shaky theory: That in times of high unemployment, cutting taxes on the rich will prompt them to use that extra money to expand their businesses, creating needed jobs. That, in turn (goes the theory), creates more income for everyone, which increases income tax receipts, thus paying for the tax cuts. This, of course, is supply-side economics, and it has never been borne out. In the real world, business people make their expansion decisions based on market demand, not on how much extra money they might have lying around. This helps explain the dismal real-world record of supply-side policies. High-end tax cuts don’t even have the benefit of spurring consumer purchasing the way low-end tax cuts do, because lower-income people are more likely to spend that extra money immediately to catch up on unmet needs.

“Much of the tax cut was directed at businesses and higher-income individuals who are less likely to spend,” the Congressional Research Service report says. Fans of supply-side economics have promoted it as an answer to high unemployment and economic stagnation. But the research service — a government entity that answers to both parties in Congress — points out that these tax cuts came while the economy was already humming, with unemployment low and dropping. “Fiscal stimulus is limited in an economy that is at or near full employment,” the report says. Having rammed through these deficit-funded tax cuts based on a largely discredited theory of how to stimulate employment, GOP lawmakers now wonder why the primary beneficiaries in the business community used the windfall instead to buy back their own stocks. Republicans also predicted businesses would use the tax cut to raise wages for their existing employees, apparently out of the goodness of their hearts. Unsurprisingly, that didn’t materialize, either. “Ordinary workers had very little growth in wage rates,” the report states. With even Congress’ own researchers knocking down every rationale for these tax cuts, the question remains: What were the cuts all about? The answer is the same one that consistently emerges on economic issues — to benefit the rich at the expense of the rest of America. The rest of America should remember that in November 2020.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Get your nose out of your phone and communicate The manner in which we use our senses to communicate has been altered greatly by technology. Due to the infatuation with social media, we obsess over visual stimulation instead of traditional listening methods of the past. We speak out and challenge other’s views without listening to their side of the story. Communication is no longer about a two-way interaction, but unfortunately a means to sound off and demand our beliefs to be paramount. The old saying, “We were given one mouth and two ears for a reason” is now a thought of the past. We don’t pay attention to feelings, objections and counterarguments. We merely look to push our agenda. The last few years in Washington, D.C., have been a good example of this. Nothing constructive is being passed for the good of all the people in our country. We should already be enjoying the benefits of an infrastructure bill, instead it appears this will be an issue that never sees the light of day. We have lost our senses, an unfortunate result of hunkering down to hashtags and social media fodder. Ronald French • O’Fallon, Mo.

Students need to compete in an ‘American History Bee’ Regarding “National Spelling Bee ends in 8-way tie” (June 1): The children who compete in the Scripps Spelling Bees are dedicated, smart and admirable — even though the spelling bee itself offers an excitement level comparable to watching paint dry on a wall. After all, with the advent of spell-check, every student has the potential of being a spelling champion nowadays. A much better competition would be an American history bee. Kids would have to know the U.S. Constitution and history. Some sample topics might be: the Missouri Compromise, U.S. Senate term lengths, the Berlin Airlift, the rights enshrined in the First Amendment, the Monroe Doctrine, Supreme Court education cases and many more. Such history questions would be interesting and inexhaustible. Knowledge of American history would bestow a Jeffersonian “yeoman” heritage to our young citizens. Larry Blandino • O’Fallon, Mo.

Beware of making clueless Trump ‘president for life’ I’ve been thinking about our country and wondering how will we ever dig ourselves out of this quagmire. There are many reasons for how we arrived here, but nearly all come back to one thing: greed. I thought the 2016 election was kind of like going to the junkyard and picking out the best car. But I thought with Democrat Hillary Clinton’s government experience and a little help from her husband, former President Bill Clinton, she would at least do no harm until we could move on. The most dangerous professionals I’ve ever encountered are those who, in their mind, heart and soul, really believed they knew what they were doing when, in fact, they were clueless. This is Donald Trump personified. He’s taking the path all despots have before him: Give the common people something to embrace or someone to hate and belittle. Denigrate government agencies and applaud dictatorial leaders in the world.

Mark my words, if Trump is reelected, he will declare himself “president for life.” If Trump is re-elected, we may see a realization of the new world order that the Bush family was seeking, but it won’t look anything like what they envisioned. We will all be Trumped. Lew Trigg • Alton

Renovated Soldiers Memorial is not a skateboard park While watching the local television news this past weekend, the reporter was giving a list of events and festivities, including the Blues in the Stanley Cup Final and Cardinals playing the Chicago Cubs. What an exciting time it was for St. Louis. However, what bothered me was the reporter was broadcasting with the newly remodeled Soldiers Memorial in the background. Behind the reporter, people were riding scooters all over the memorial. This is not an amusement, skateboard, or scooter park — it is a war memorial, and it should be treated as one. I don’t know why the city continues to plan almost every event they have in and around Soldiers Memorial, but it needs to stop. People have no respect for the memorials in Washington, D.C., and the same could be said for those who come to Soldiers Memorial in St. Louis to do tricks on their scooters, bikes, or skateboards. I would hope someone addresses this problem before someone gets hurt or damage is done. The city should move their parties down the street to Kiener Plaza. Jim Kozlowski • St. Louis

Enough Trump bashing; focus on issues that affect us Regarding the guest column “Lies about treason and coups” by James Comey (May 30): The Post-Dispatch has hit a new low with this article. I believe Comey is an arrogant liar. Then, the next day the newspaper published the editorial “Hypocrisy, thy name is Mitch McConnell.” I don’t believe the Post-Dispatch has published a single editorial on the hypocrisy of practically every top Democrat, starting with President Barack Obama and Sen. Chuck Schumer. Many of these Democrats were in favor of building a wall a few years ago on our southern border, but now they all oppose it. The newspaper should be writing about what Congress could and should be doing to fix our border crisis. Congress is the primary problem, along with Mexico. The Post-Dispatch worries too much about the president’s style and not enough about things that really affect our lives. Otto Hanslick • St. Charles

Lindbergh didn’t deserve History Museum exhibit Regarding “Giant wedding gift tells unlikely Lindbergh love story in new Missouri History Museum exhibit” (May 31): I was outraged and dumbfounded when I saw this article. You must know that Charles Lindbergh had another family in Germany while still married to his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Lindbergh also was a Nazi sympathizer. I don’t understand your thinking. That goes for the History Museum as well. Esther Smoller • Clayton Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

06.07.2019 • FRIDAY • M 1

75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

FOR THE LIBERTY OF ALL • These are hours of dedication for America. These are hours, too, for self-examination. We fight to liberate, to strike off

chains. For these things our finest youth spends its blood on the beaches of France. The destiny of Europe is our own destiny, and because it is, “our sons, pride of our nation,” are fighting there. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Republicans must do more than grouse about Trump Romney’s rebuke of president’s tariff threat was fine; action would be better. DANA MILBANK Washington Post

Not since they strapped Seamus in his dog crate to the roof of the family car has a member of the Romney household been this distressed. Mitt Romney has watched with varying degrees of displeasure as President Donald Trump turned the Republican Party into the antithesis of the one he led in 2012 as its presidential nominee: alienating allies, degrading immigrants and splitting the nation with hatred. Now, Trump threatens to use an “emergency” declaration to circumvent Congress and start a trade war with Mexico. And so Romney, now a senator from Utah, finally swung into action: He

went to the Senate floor on Tuesday and … delivered a politely worded speech. What? You thought he was actually going to do something? This isn’t to pick on Romney; at least he speaks up. His 20-minute speech was a thorough rebuke of Trump, even if he took pains not to mention Trump by name: Romney spoke of the authoritarian menace of Russia and of North Korea, the benefits of immigration, the dangers of debt and the importance of allies when taking on China — all positions at odds with Trump’s actions. Romney assigned particular responsibility to the president in the need “to shut out the voices of hate and fear, to ignore the divisive and alarming conspiracies and to be more respectful, more empathetic to our fellow Americans.” Amen. But if such

jawboning is all Republican lawmakers can do to rein in the president, the cause is hopeless. Trump is plainly abusing his presidential powers, using “emergency” authority to ignore Congress so he can build a border wall, arm the Saudis and, now, slap tariffs on goods imported from Mexico. Republicans routinely grumble and sometimes threaten action but ultimately do nothing to stop him. Maybe, just maybe, this is about to change. Republican senators on Tuesday declared publicly — and told White House officials privately at a lunch meeting — that they have the votes to reject Trump’s threatened tariffs against Mexico and to override a veto. It would be a meaningful rebuke of the president and his capricious governing style — but only if Republican lawmakers could finally overcome their habit of cowering. Trump, asked about the incipient rebellion at a

news conference in London with British Prime Minister Theresa May, left himself little room for a climbdown, saying Republicans would be “foolish” to block his tariffs against Mexico, given his strength among Republican voters. “I have a 90 percent — 94 percent approval rating as of this morning in the Republican Party. That’s an all-time record. Can you believe that?” he said to May, who is resigning because she lacks support within her Conservative Party. “I love records.” As The Washington Post’s Philip Bump pointed out, no such poll seems to exist, and that figure wouldn’t be a record, anyway. (That was in keeping with Trump’s performance generally in the land of Orwell: He claimed that thousands of Britons were “cheering” for him rather than protesting.) But Trump was animated in demanding that Mexico “stop this onslaught, this invasion” and prove that it

isn’t “run by the cartels and the drug lords.” Trump predicted that the tariffs “will take effect next week” and called it likely that talks will occur “during the time that the tariffs are on.” Given his supporters’ passion about illegal border crossings, it will be difficult for Trump to find a facesaving way to retreat from his threatened tariffs: He can’t capitulate to lawmakers without also appearing to capitulate to Mexico — and a continued flood of immigrants. Back in Washington, some Republicans were already seeking a way out for Trump. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California cheerfully predicted a “solution that solves all problems” with Mexico, and he sided with Trump on his constitutional power to impose tariffs and sell arms under emergency decrees. “The president has the authority to do it,” McCarthy told reporters, an hour after Trump warned Republican

lawmakers not to be foolish. Romney, at least, was true to his principles. He told Bloomberg’s Sahil Kapur that “tariffs on Mexico are a bad idea all the way around.” And he broadened his critique of Trump on the floor. As Trump chastised NATO allies and endorsed a split in the European Union, Romney said: “We should strengthen our alliances, not dismiss or begrudge them.” As Trump, in London, stoked feuds with critics and trading partners, Romney said: “When it comes to cooling the rhetoric and encouraging unity, there’s no more powerful medium than the bully pulpit of the president.” Well said. But if Romney and other Republicans really care about the president’s abuses, they’ll do more than grouse and grumble this time. Dana Milbank @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

‘Party of the people’? Democrats have lost their way. After 65 years voting blue, in 2016 I supported Trump. Here’s why. BY PHILLIP REAGAN

PATRICK SEMANSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A volunteer prepares to place crosses for victims of the mass shooting at a municipal building in Virginia Beach, Va., at a makeshift memorial on Sunday.

A reckoning in Virginia On the heels of a fatal shooting in Virginia Beach, a showdown on gun-control legislation looms. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

If you want to know how things have rolled in Virginia on the firearms issue, consider that Gun Lobby Day is an unofficial but highly memorable event held every year at the state Capitol on Martin Luther King Jr. Day. “That was so wrong for so many reasons,” Jennifer Wexton, a former state senator who is now a member of Congress, observed about the timing of the pro-firearms offensive. Wexton, first drawn to politics in part by her desire for tougher gun laws, said that the state Senate’s Republican leadership would “put up all the gun bills on that day and kill them, one after another.” It was quite a spectacle, said State Sen. Janet Howell, who, like Wexton, is a northern Virginia Democrat. “We would have citizens wandering the halls carrying Uzis and other assault weapons,” she said. “That was Virginia, darlin’.” But it may not be Virginia anymore, or so Wexton, Howell and other advocates of gun safety hope. On Tuesday, Gov. Ralph Northam announced he was calling a special session of the state Legislature to take up a package of gun-control bills in the wake of last week’s mass shooting in Virginia Beach. They include many measures that Republicans, who narrowly control both houses of the state Legislature, have smothered in committee before. They may try to do this again. But it will be harder with an

election looming this fall and the power on the gun issue shifting toward those who favor regulations that only the most fanatical gunrights advocates would question. They include background checks, restrictions of silencers and bump stocks, and “red flag” laws allowing families to seek the removal of firearms from those they fear pose a danger. Democrats need to pick up only two seats in each body to take control of the House and the Senate, and after years in which opponents of gun-safety laws had the upper hand in mobilizing and organizing, the energy has switched sides. Wexton says she noticed a large shift after the shootings at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. “We saw that people were really getting involved in taking on this issue after Parkland,” she said, “and it didn’t go away.” “It’s clear from several recent elections that there’s been a sea change from the old arithmetic that the only people who vote on guns are pro-gun,” said Geoff Garin, who has polled for Democratic candidates in Virginia — Northam among them — for three decades. In his successful 2017 campaign, Garin said, Northam “leaned into support for gun-safety legislation and used his F-rating from the National Rifle Association as a badge of honor.” Former Gov. Terry McAuliffe, Northam’s predecessor and fellow Democrat, notes that he, too, was elected with an F from the NRA — “I’m proud of it,” he told me. It was a sign, he said, the state had “evolved on guns.” Further evidence for this came from 2018 exit polling. Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., who also faced strong opposition from the

NRA, won 82% among voters who said they cast their ballot on the basis of the gun issue, far exceeding his 57% statewide reelection total. Almost all of McAuliffe’s gun proposals were killed by the GOP, but Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., said that the special session called by Northam puts the party’s guncontrol foes in a more difficult position. “Entirely of their own making, the Republicans in the General Assembly are in a pincer,” Connolly said. “Either they act on the governor’s proposals, which are going to be sweeping, or they risk the rage of the electorate. ... The patience of the electorate on these issues has been tested, strained, and is at the breaking point.” Connolly added that Republicans might look for “the path of least resistance” by passing a few modest measures, such as outlawing silencers. The changing politics on guns reflect a response to the pace of the threats — and to personal experiences. Democratic state Sen. Jeremy McPike told of his daughter’s suburban high school going on lockdown at the end of April after a gun was fired. “As the parent of a kid who was in lockdown, it’s real and it’s frightening to see that nothing’s getting done. “It’s devastating as a parent that we can’t do better,” he added. “Where do you draw the line?” It’s your move, Virginia. The special session calls for a different kind of lobbying day, one more in keeping with the spirit of nonviolence that Dr. King preached before he was gunned down. E.J. Dionne @EJDionne Copyright The Washington Post

The Democratic Party, once known as the “party of the people,” has ceased to exist as I once knew it. For 65-plus years, I supported it and voted for it as did my father before me. In 2016, I voted for Republican Donald Trump. The party of the people has forgotten the people who voted for Democratic candidates, supported the platform and had faith that those elected had our best interests at heart. That Democratic Party is gone, replaced by politicians who promote personal agendas, inferior policies and demonstrate an inability to solve the many problems the nation faces. Eight years of stagnant policies under President Barack Obama just could not continue under fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton. Change was needed — and real change, not the status quo. So after having voted for every Democratic candidate for president since Hubert Humphrey, I decided to vote for Trump. Frustration, disappointment, arrogance and a loss of hope among people like me are what got Trump elected. Democratic Party leaders came to the false conclusion that they no longer needed to appease the vast middle of the road — folks who work every day and pay the bills. Those leaders took our votes for granted. They also forgot or never realized that there are 1.8 million combat veterans in this country, many of whom who were disappointed and afraid of the prospect that continued appeasement of known U.S. enemies would make their sorrow and sacrifices seem worthless. I remember when the Democratic Party learned from its mistakes, and tried to never repeat them. That’s no longer true with this new Democratic/ Socialist Party. They learned nothing from the losses in 2016 and continue to blindly follow an agenda that would leave the country with mounting problems and no solutions. No one has the ability to predict the future, but common sense is a wonderful guide to what may happen in 2020. American voters expect results from the people they elected to represent them. People are seeing results from Trump and the Republicans, but not from the Democrat-led House of Representatives. I cannot recall any nation that achieved success under a socialist government. The ideas of the left wingers now vying to control the Democratic Party sound good and look good on paper but are not practical — now nor ever. A socialist government believes and acts as if average voters are idiots, not smart enough to make even the smallest decisions on their own. So the government will make those decisions for us. When has a socialist government ever worked like that without becoming a dictator state? It hasn’t, because people cherish their independence and have the will to make their own decisions, as we have in the U.S. for 243 years. We did it as a republic, deciding who we wanted as leaders. And if those leaders fail us, we elect new ones. The people make the decisions, not the government, not a political party. I recall when the government tried to force on us something we didn’t want — Prohibition. Are people frustrated? Yes, we are, but changing to a form of government radically different from the one our forefathers founded will not solve our frustrations. You don’t fix things that aren’t broken because, at one time or another, you didn’t get what you wanted. There are reasons why the Founding Fathers created the Electoral College and crafted our Constitution, Bill of Rights and three co-equal branches of government. They have seen this country through countless recessions, depressions, a dozen small wars, two world wars and the Civil War, which cost this nation half a million citizens. This form of government saw us through impeachments, a president’s resignation, assassination attempts on presidents — four of them successful — and took us back from the brink of nuclear war. Yet we’re still here. Is our system of government broken? I don’t think so. Phillip Reagan is a retired police officer who lives in Wentzville.


NATION

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

No deal reached yet to avert Trump’s tariffs on Mexico Talks continue with deadline just days away BY JILL COLVIN, MATTHEW LEE AND LUIS ALONSO LUGO

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — U.S. and Mexican officials labored for a second day Thursday to avert import tariffs that President Donald Trump is threatening to impose as he tries to strongarm Mexico into stemming the flow of Central American migrants across America’s southern border. Vice President Mike Pence, monitoring the talks from his travels in Pennsylvania, said the U.S. was “encouraged” by Mexico’s latest proposals but that, so far, tariffs still were set to take effect on Monday. He added that it would be “for the president to decide” whether Mexico was doing enough to head off the tariffs. Pence said that, among other issues, negotiators had been discussing a potential agreement to make it difficult for those who enter Mexico from other countries to claim asylum in the U.S. Mexico has long resisted that request. Trump has threatened to impose a 5% tax on all Mexican goods beginning Monday as part of an escalating tariff regime opposed by many in his own Republican Party. The frantic, last-minute talks underscore Trump’s chaotic approach even when decisions have enormous economic consequences for both the U.S. and its closest allies. Trump has embraced tariffs as a tool he can use as leverage against other countries, dismissing the potential harm to American consumers and manufacturers. Traveling in Europe, Trump told reporters that negotiators had made “a lot of progress,” but stayed coy on whether the tariffs would be implemented.

MARCO UGARTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Military police prepare to take positions on the highway in Metapa, Mexico, on Wednesday. A law enforcement group of police officers, Marines, military police and immigration officials arrived at the area to intercept a caravan of migrants that had earlier crossed the Mexico– Guatemala border. “We’ll see what happens,” Trump said in Ireland before leaving for France to attend a D-Day ceremony. “But something pretty dramatic could happen. We’ve told Mexico the tariffs go on. And I mean it, too. And I’m very happy with it.” It remained unclear whether any deal could be struck with Trump out of the country. Many in Washington still expect the tariffs to go into effect barring a major new concession from Mexico, though lawmakers who have been in talks with both U.S. and Mexican officials said they were hopeful a deal could be reached to satisfy Trump, or at least delay the tariffs’ implementation. Mexican Foreign Secretary Marcelo Ebrard spent several hours at the State Department on Thursday morning, while Trump’s legal counsel and other Mexican aides met at the White House that afternoon. Ebrard told reporters as he left the State Department that progress was

being made and that he was likely to return following consultations at the embassy. He returned in early evening but left again soon after, telling reporters: “We don’t have yet an agreement. So tomorrow morning we are going to keep working.” His spokesman, Roberto Velasco, tweeted, “Options continue to be explored.” “The stance of the United States is focused on measures of migratory control, ours on development,” he said. Still, Ebrard noted that Mexico would deploy 6,000 National Guard troops to its border with Guatemala to help control the flow of migrants. White House spokeswoman Mercedes Schlapp said in an interview that conversations were continuing but “it looks like we’re moving toward this path of tariffs because what we’ve seen so far is that the Mexicans, what they’re proposing, is simply not enough.”

Pence, who led the discussions Wednesday with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other U.S. officials, told reporters in Pennsylvania that the administration had “made it very clear that our neighbors to the south, Mexico, must do more to end the tide of illegal immigration that is besetting our southern border.” During Wednesday’s talks, the gulf between

the countries was clear as Mexico offered small, thus far undisclosed concessions, and the U.S. demanded major action. A senior administration official said the U.S. once again pressed Mexico to step up enforcement on its southern border and to enter into a “safe third country agreement” that would make it difficult for those who enter Mexico from other countries to claim asylum in the U.S. But Mexico surprised U.S. officials Thursday when they returned to the negotiating table and said they would commit to what Pence had requested, according to the official, who cautioned that significant questions about timing and implementation remain. Trump officials have said Mexico can prevent the tariffs by securing its southern border with Guatemala, cracking down on criminal smuggling organizations and overhauling its asylum system. But the U.S. has not proposed concrete metrics to assess whether Mexico is complying, and it is unclear whether even those steps would be enough to satisfy Trump on illegal immigration, a signature issue of his presidency and one that he sees as crucial to his 2020 re-election campaign. Beyond Trump and several White House advisers, few in the administration believe imposing tariffs is a

good idea, according to officials familiar with internal deliberations. Those people worry about the negative economic consequences for Americans and believe the tariffs — which would likely spark retaliatory taxes on U.S. exports — would also hurt the administration politically. The officials were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. Republicans in Congress have warned the White House that they are ready to stand up to the president to try to block his tariffs, which they worry would spike costs to U.S. consumers, harm the economy and imperil a major pending U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade deal. Democratic House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal said he will introduce a resolution of disapproval to stop the tariffs if Trump goes through with his threat, panning it as presidential “overreach.” The Department of Homeland Security announced Wednesday that U.S. Border Patrol apprehensions of migrants illegally crossing the border hit the highest level in more than a decade in May: 132,887 apprehensions, including a record 84,542 adults and children traveling together and 11,507 children traveling alone.

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06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

RUSSIA | US ELECTION INTERFERENCE

Troops’ mission: Paint border wall

Putin: We didn’t meddle

In a mission to “improve the aesthetic appearance” of President Donald Trump’s wall, active-duty troops will begin painting a stretch of border fence as part of a military deployment to secure the border at a time when tens of thousands of Central American families have been arriving in the U.S. and overwhelming the immigration system. Border Patrol spokesman Carlos Pitones said troops will begin painting a section Friday in Calexico, California, about 120 miles east of San Diego. The wall there has 30-foothigh rust-colored steel slats that were erected last year — the first border barriers built under Trump’s presidency. Pitones declined to say which color they would be painted. Sen. Dick, D-Ill., called the wall-painting a “disgraceful misuse” of taxpayer money.

US plans to detain more migrant kids The federal government is opening a new mass facility to hold migrant children in Texas and considering detaining hundreds more youths on three military bases around the country, adding 3,000 new beds to the already overtaxed system. The new emergency facility in Carrizo Springs, Texas, will hold up to 1,600 teens in a complex that once housed oil field workers on government-leased land near the border, said Mark Weber, a spokesman for Office of Refugee Resettlement. The agency is also weighing using Army and Air Force bases in Georgia, Montana and Oklahoma to house an additional 1,400 kids in the coming weeks, amid the influx of children traveling to the U.S. alone. Most of the children arrived in the U.S. without their families. All the new facilities will be considered temporary emergency shelters and not be subject to state child welfare licensing requirements, Weber said. BRIEFLY SUDAN: Sudan’s pro-democracy movement vowed Thursday to press its campaign of civil disobedience until the ruling military council is ousted and killers of protesters are brought to justice, as security forces fanned out across the capital and appeared to thwart any new demonstrations. This week’s crackdown on protests left 108 dead. IRAN: Iran has chosen to “step back and recalculate” after making preparations for an apparent attack against U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf region, but it is too early to conclude the threat is gone, the top commander of American forces in the Mideast said Thursday. CAPITOL THREATS: A Utah man was arrested Tuesday on accusations he threatened to kill members of Congress during a three-year stretch with more than 2,000 phone calls to the U.S. Capitol and profanityladen tirades about Democrats threatening the presidency of Donald Trump. Scott Brian Haven, 54, is charged with interstate transmission of threats to injure. PARKLAND SHOOTING: Scot Peterson, a former Florida deputy charged with 11 criminal counts after failing to confront the gunman in the Parkland school massacre, was released from jail Thursday after a judge reduced his bail and lifted some restrictions. NORTH CAROLINA: More than two years after voter check-in software failed on Election Day in a North Carolina county, federal authorities said Thursday that they will finally conduct a forensic analysis of electronic poll books to see if Russian military hackers who targeted the software provider may have tampered with registration information to disrupt voting. CHILDREN KILLED: Timothy Jones Jr., a South Carolina father convicted of murdering his five young children, should die because he made them suffer in a carefully thought-out plan that would leave no witnesses and help him avoid prison, prosecutors said Thursday as the sentencing phase of Jones’ trial began. — Associated Press

Leader reaffirms claim despite evidence from Mueller investigation BY GARY PRUITT

Associated Press

ST. PETERSBURG, Russia — Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday reaffirmed his staunch denial that his government meddled in the 2016 U.S. presidential election despite the extensive evidence to the contrary, and insisted Moscow has no intention of interfering in any future votes, either. Speaking in response to a question from The Associated Press during a meeting with chief executives of international news agencies in St. Petersburg, the Russian leader said that “we didn’t meddle, we aren’t meddling and we will not meddle in any elections.” Putin and other Russian officials have hotly denied interference

with the U.S. vote to help Donald Trump win the presidency, even though U.S. special counsel Robert Mueller uncovered evidence of a Kremlin operation to interfere with the 2016 vote. He charged 12 Russian military intelligence officers with breaking into Democratic Party emails, and also indicted other Russians who used phony social media accounts to spread divisive rhetoric and to undermine the U.S. political system. Putin insisted that “we don’t have and never had any plans to interfere in U.S. domestic politics,” but added that the Russian government can’t stop private citizens from expressing their views about developments in the U.S. online. “How can we ban them from doing that?” he said. “Do you have such a ban with regard to Russia?” The president added that Russia offered to agree on a set of rules regarding modern communications to President Barack Obama’s administration and then Trump’s

White House, but neither was ready to make the deal. During his meeting, Putin also warned that the U.S. reluctance to start talks on extending a key arms control pact raises the threat of an uncontrollable arms race, and said that Moscow has no plans to send troops to shore up Venezuela’s embattled leader. Asked about Trump’s tweet this week that Moscow informed Washington it had “removed most of their people from Venezuela,” Putin said that Russian experts come and go to service Russian-made weapons bought by Caracas. “We aren’t building any military bases there, we aren’t sending troops there, we have never done that,” Putin said. “But we have fulfilled our contract obligations in the sphere of military-technical cooperation and we will keep doing that.” The Russian leader said the U.S. sanctions against Venezuela

hurt ordinary people, and warned Washington against using force to oust Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro. Russia staunchly backs Maduro, while the U.S. and several dozen other nations threw their support behind opposition leader Juan Guaidó and recognized him as interim president, asserting that Maduro’s re-election last year was illegitimate. Putin said “the crisis in Venezuela should be settled by the Venezuelan people,” adding that “through dialogue, consultations and cooperation between various political forces, the Venezuelan people themselves must decide whether Mr. Maduro should stay in power or not.” The Russian leader said he feels “absolutely neutral” about Guaidó, describing him as a “nice person,” but charged that his leadership claim has created a precedent that could “lead to chaos across the world.”

West Point cadet killed in accident; 22 injured ‘Light medium tactical vehicle’ overturns in wooded terain BY MICHAEL HILL AND TED SHAFFREY

Associated Press

STEVE HELBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

SERVICES BEGIN FOR VICTIMS OF VIRGINIA BEACH SHOOTING The casket of Virginia Beach shooting victim Katherine Nixon is wheeled to a hearse Thursday after a funeral service at St. Gregory The Great Catholic Church in Virginia Beach, Va. Nixon was killed along with 11 others during a mass shooting last Friday. Services for other victims are scheduled through Sunday. Meanwhile, police are still trying to determine a motive for the shootings. Authorities said city employee DeWayne Craddock opened fire in a municipal building a week ago and was later killed in a shootout with police.

How Trump tariffs on China and Mexico could hurt US economy BY PAUL WISEMAN AND JOYCE M. ROSENBERG

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Ten billion here, ten billion there: President Donald Trump’s escalating tariffs on imports to the United States have begun to amount to serious money — and potentially to imperil one of the most resilient economies in American history. Until now, the economy has largely shrugged off damage from Trump’s trade wars. Even as the self-proclaimed Tariff Man piled import taxes on everything from Turkish steel to Canadian aluminum to Chinese burglar alarms, the job market has remained sturdy. At 3.6%, the unemployment rate is at its lowest point in a half-century. In July, the expansion that followed the Great Recession will become the longest on records dating to 1854. But over the past month, Trump has made a higher-stakes gamble on the economy’s durability. He more than doubled tariffs on $200 billion in Chinese imports. He’s preparing to tax an additional $300 billion in goods from China, extending his import taxes to everything Beijing

sells to the United States. In a move that alarmed some of his own advisers and caught investors by surprise, Trump said he would impose a 5% tax on Mexican imports starting Monday — a tax that would reach 25% by Oct. 1 if the Mexican government fails to stop a flow of Central American migrants into the United States. The new tariffs on Chinese and Mexican imports amount to potentially $190 billion a year in new taxes — paid by U.S. importers and typically passed on to consumers. For American households, this means higher prices on fruits and vegetables, autos, electronic components and other necessities. What’s more, exporters, especially farmers, can expect to suffer retaliation when China and Mexico hit back with tariffs or other sanctions on exports from the United States. The tariffs inflict other damage that is harder to measure. They generate uncertainty for American businesses over where to buy supplies, sell goods or situate factories and offices. And they rattle investors and undercut consumer and business confidence. Researchers at UBS calculate

that a 25% tariff on all Chinese imports would shave a full percentage point from U.S. growth over the next year. The economy grew 2.9% in 2018 and will likely be weaker for 2019. Add a 25% tax on Mexican goods, they say, and the United States could tumble into recession for the first time since 2009. The Federal Reserve has taken notice. Chairman Jerome Powell made clear this week that the Fed is prepared intervene, likely by lowering interest rates, if the trade wars were deemed to threaten the expansion. Still, it’s far from sure that Trump’s trade conflicts, even if they escalate, will imperil the economy. Pinelopi Goldberg chief economist of the World Bank, and economists Pablo Fajgelbaum of UCLA, Patrick Kennedy of the University of California, Berkeley, and Amit Khandelwal of Columbia University, calculated that the economic loss from the trade wars last year amounted a minuscule 0.04% of gross domestic product — the broadest gauge of economic output. (Their figure doesn’t include the latest tariff threats.)

WEST POINT, N.Y. — A vehicle loaded with West Point cadets on summer training overturned in rough, wooded terrain Thursday, killing one cadet and injuring several others, the U.S. Military Academy said. The tactical vehicle operated by two soldiers overturned at about 6:45 a.m. as it was headed to a land navigation site as part of standard summer cadet training, said West Point’s superintendent, Lt. Gen. Darryl A. Williams. The two soldiers were injured along with 19 cadets in the Class of 2020. Williams said none of the injuries were life-threatening. Injuries included broken arms and facial abrasions, an official with the hospital at West Point said. “It is not common for these vehicles to turn over. It is very rough terrain,” Williams told reporters at a briefing near the accident site Thursday afternoon. “You can see the hills we have here.” Helicopter footage from WNBC showed a truck flipped over in a wooded area. The investigation is continuing, Williams said, and “we don’t know the details of how the accident actually happened.” The “light medium tactical vehicle” that rolled over has a 5-ton payload and an extended bed, according to West Point. That vehicle class has a passenger capacity of 20, not counting those in the cab, according to an Army technical bulletin. It was not clear whether all the cadets were aboard the vehicle, as opposed to nearby, academy spokesman Lt. Col. Christopher Ophardt said. Classes ended at West Point last month, but the academy runs summer military training exercises for cadets in the heavily wooded hills outside the main gates. The rollover occurred on a fire break road as the vehicle was leaving Camp Natural Bridge.

Trump, Macron discuss many points of disagreement BY SYLVIE CORBET

Associated Press

CAEN, France — The D-Day commemoration was an occasion for France to showcase its long friendship with the United States, but U.S. President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron nevertheless acknowledged their differences on key world issues when they met Thursday. The two leaders showed camaraderie as they marked D-Day at the Normandy American Cemetery near Omaha Beach, where the Americans landed on June 6, 1944, marking the beginning of

the end of Europe’s Nazi occupation. The talks lasted for about two hours, including lunch. Trump and Macron discussed all major issues they disagree on, including Iran, world trade and climate change. The meeting was “positive,” a top official at Macron’s office said after Trump left, speaking on customary condition of anonymity. He noted that being able to have long talks on dividing issues shows that “there’s mutual trust.” There was no immediate readout on the meeting from the U.S. delegation.

Amid rising tensions between Iran and the U.S., Macron delivered a message of appeasement and dialogue, the French official said. Trump played down differences with France over Iran, telling Macron that they both agree Tehran should not have nuclear weapons. He reiterated his offer to reopen negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program. After the U.S. unilaterally withdrew from the nuclear deal meant to keep Tehran from building atomic weapons, France is pushing to keep Iran in the deal and find ways to counter Washington’s in-

creased economic sanctions. On world trade, Macron reiterated that he wants the “rules of the game” to be respected and France’s interests — and companies — to be preserved, the French official said, stressing the issue could not be solved in only one meeting. France hopes to be able to discuss trade and climate with the U.S. again at the upcoming summit of the Group of Seven most advanced economies, which is scheduled to take place in August in southwestern France. Trump has not yet officially confirmed he will attend the summit.


NATION

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Dr. John, otherworldly New Orleans musician, dies BY KEVIN MCGILL AND CAIN BURDEAU

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Dr. John, the New Orleans singer and piano player who blended black and white musical styles with a hoodoo-infused stage persona and gravelly bayou drawl, died Thursday, his family said. He was 77. In a statement released through his publicist, the family said Dr. John, who was born Malcolm John Rebennack, died “toward

the break of day” of a heart attack. They did not say where he died or give other details. He had not been seen in public much since late 2017, when he canceled several gigs. He had been resting at his New Orleans-area home, publicist Karen Beninato said last year. Memorial arrangements were being planned. “The family thanks all whom have shared his unique musical journey, and requests privacy at this time,” the

statement said. “Dr. John was a true Louisiana legend,” Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said in a statement. “He showed the world Louisiana’s rich musical heritage, and his passion for music has left a mark on the industry unlike any other.” Drummer Ringo Starr was among the first musicians to weigh in on Twitter. “God bless Dr. John peace and love to all his family I love the doctor peace and love,” the Beatles legend tweeted.

OBITUARIES Ahrens, Nancy Marie - St. Louis Beckley, Todd L. - St. Louis Brown, Barbara S. "Barb" - St. Louis Cunningham, Kevin David "Sweet Kev" - St. Louis Dickerson, Daniel J. - St. Charles Dooley - see Sheets Jacobs, Kenneth F. " Butch" - St. Louis

Fellow New Orleans singer Irma Thomas said he was loved around the world. “He was just a mystical person,” Thomas told WVUE television when asked what made his music special. “He did what he liked best and was very unique with his style.” His spooky 1968 debut “GrisGris” combined rhythm and blues with psychedelic rock and startled listeners with its sinister implications of otherworldly magic, employing a piano style

Celebrations of Life

Jones, Charles Robert - Dogtown, St. Louis Klaus, Robert F. - Wentzville, MO Markovich, Anastasia "Annie" - St. Louis McAfee, Jane Williams - Clayton Mica, Joseph F. Jr. - St. Charles, MO Miramonti, Shirley Ann - St. Louis Morris, Sue A. - Festus, MO

Ahrens, Nancy Marie

Klaus, Robert F.

Ahrens, Nancy Marie (nee Banden a/k/a Baudentistel), went to be with her Lord and Savior on June 5, 2019, and per her wishes her body was donated to Saint Louis University School of Medicine. Beloved wife of the late George Walter Ahrens; Loving mother and mother-in-law of George (Maria), Kathie Goeddel, Tim, Tom, (Maggi), and the late Ted (Patty). Treasured grandmother of 13 grandchildren and 19 great grandchildren. Nancy is preceded in death by her husband George, son Ted Ahrens, parents Joseph and Marie Banden and brother Joseph Banden. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Friends of Kids with Cancer, 16 Sunnen Drive, Suite 161, St. Louis, MO 63143. Services: A memorial mass will be celebrated on Friday June 7, 2019, 10 am, at St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church, 9740 Sappington Road, St. Louis, MO 63128.

of Wentzville, MO, on Wed., June 5, 2019 at the age of 83 years. Beloved husband of Donna Oelklaus Klaus. Dear father of Bev (Bob) Kersting, Chris (Christy) Klaus, Joe (Lisa) Klaus, and David (Chris) Klaus. Grandfather of 11, great grandfather of 1. Brother of Jack Klaus, Jacqueline Holmes, and Mary Cambron. Services: Mass Mon., June 10, 2019 at 10 AM at St. Theodore Church in Flint Hill. Burial in the Mt. Olive Cemetery. Memorials preferred to St. Theodore Church, Leukemia/Lymphoma Foundation, or Downs Syndrome Association of Greater St. Louis. Visitation at the Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Parkway, Wentzville on Sunday from 12-4 PM

Beckley, Todd L. on Fri., May 31, 2019. A memorial service will be held at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Road., on Sat., June 8, 2:00 p.m.

Brown, Barbara S. "Barb" (nee Fieser) Fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church Monday, June 3, 2019. Beloved wife of Charles Brown; dear step-mom of Aaron (Dana) and the late Jeff Brown; dear step-grandmother of Alexander Yanick Brown; dear sister of Aggie Johnson, Pat Akers and Jim (Wendy) Fieser; dear sister-in-law of Greta (Jerry) DeFries; our dear aunt, great-aunt, niece, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Monday, June 10, 9:30 a.m. to St. John Paul II Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Lakewood Park Cemetery. Barb was a member of the Affton Historical Society for over 20 years and had an associate degree in sign language. Visitation Sunday 4-8 p.m.

Cunningham, Kevin David "Sweet Kev" On Wed., June 5, 2019. Loving son of Shirley Winegardner and t h e l a t e D a vid C u n n i n g h a m ; s t ep s on of t h e late Bill Winegardner; stepbrother of Rick Winegardner; our loving nephew, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry, on Mon., June 10, 9:30 a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials to deGreeff Hospice, Backstoppers, Stray Rescue or Humane Society appreciated. Visitation Sun., 3-8 p.m.

Dickerson, Daniel J. 64, St. Charles, June 3, 2019. Visitation Sun., June 9th, 4-8 pm, Baue Cave Springs. Service Mon., June 10th at 10 am, at the funeral home. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Jacobs, Kenneth F. " Butch" Wednesday, June 5, 2019. Beloved husband of Pat Jacobs (nee Young); loving father of Sheri Cronin; dear grandfather of Dennis (Stephanie) and Danny Cronin; dear great-grandfather of Kayla and Kara Cronin; dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Sunday, June 9, 10:30 a.m. until service at 12:30 p.m. Interment Shepherd Hills Cemetery.

Jones, Charles Robert

Markovich, Anastasia "Annie"

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Motz, Daniel - Ballwin Rahm, Geraldine G. - St. Louis Sheets, Maureen "Moe" - St. Louis Villalobos, Carlos Jr. - Ferguson, MO Wille - see Miramonti

Motz, Daniel 89, June 4, 2019. Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Monday, 10 am. For more info see Schrader.com

Rahm, Geraldine G. (nee Hezel) Baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, June 6, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Richard J. Rahm. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Monica Church on Mon., June 10 at 11 a.m. with visitation at church 1 hour prior to service. See www.osfuneralhomes.com for full obituary. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Sheets, Maureen "Moe"

74, passed 6/5. She is survived (nee Dooley), fortified with the by her husband of 53 years, Miro Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Markovich; children, Michael Church, on Wednesday, June 5, Markovich, and Dina (Tom) Lewis; 2019. Beloved wife for 34 years grandchildren, Sam and Donoof David Sheets; dearest van; siblings, Eleni, Barbara, daughter of the late William and Jimmy, Pete, Sandy, and Gus; Shirley Dooley; loving mother of and many other family members Lisa Janis; dear sister of Mary and friends. Annie lived to give Kaye (David) Mueller, Martin all of her love to her family and (Judy) Dooley, Marsha (Chris) will be deeply missed. Ostmann, Mark (Natalia) Dooley, Services: Visitation Sunday, 6/9, Matthew (Peggy) Dooley and the from 1-8pm (Pomen at 7pm) at late JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Michael (surviving Mary Ann) (7027 Gravois), Service Monday 6/10, at 10am, at Holy Dooley; our dear daughter-in-law, sister-in-law, aunt, greatTrinity Serbian Orthodox Church. Interment Mt. Hope. aunt, cousin and friend. Maureen was a talented paralegal with 40 years of experience in the law field. She retired from the offices of Summers, McAfee, Jane Williams Compton and Wells. Jane passed away on Saturday, Maureen enjoyed her red wine and slot machines. She had June 1, 2019 at the age of 100 a caring heart and had touched many lives. years. Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at KUTIS AFFTON The first child of Imogene Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, June 8, 2:30 - 6 p.m. In lieu of DeSousa and Cecil Madison "Bill" flowers, please consider donating to a charity of your choice. W i l l i a ms , J a n e w a s b o r n in Cleveland, OH on July 25, 1918. Villalobos, Carlos Jr. Most of Jane's adolescence was spent in Topeka, Kansas with her 6/6/2019, 59 years. Visitation 9 a.m. until service time at 10:30 beloved younger sister, Nancy a.m. Mon., 6/10/19 at Hutchens Mortuary, Florissant. Burial at and brother, Bob. She graduated Sacred Heart Cemetery. from the University of Missouri School of Journalism in 1940. Fraternal Notices Jane moved to St. Louis in the early 40's and landed her dream job at D'Arcy Advertising Co. where she earned her place as D'Arcy's first woman copywriter LOCAL 1 - I.B.E.W. and account executive. She loved creating advertising for Please be advised of the death of everything from fashion to Laclede Gas Company to Coca Cola. Bro. Angelo T. Pandolfo In May of 1952, Jane married C. Alan McAfee, M.D. who became Journeyman Wireman Chief of Surgery at St. Luke's Hospital and with whom she Member 4 Years - May 31, 2019 shared a decades long partnership. Visitation Sat. June 8, 2019 10:00 am. Jane was devoted to her children, Alan and Nancy, as well as Memorial Mass following at 12 pm. family and friends. She enjoyed music, dancing, traveling, St. Richard Catholic Church, practicing her French and watching the movie Casablanca 11223 Schuetz Rd., St. Louis, Mo. 63146 (repeatedly)! A history buff, she was fascinated by the Battle of Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. David A. Roth, F.S. the Little Bighorn and King Tut. Jane is survived by Alan McAfee (Corinne), Nancy McAfee of Florists Houston, TX; her brother Bob Williams (Dixie) of Atlanta; stepgrandchildren and great-grandchildren; the extended family of Dierbergs Florist McMahons; many nieces and nephews and numerous friends. Order 24 Hours A special thanks to her caregivers at Sunrise on Clayton and to 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Twila Burgess. Dierbergs.com Services: A Service to celebrate her life will be conducted at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City, on Monday, June 10 at 12:30 p.m. The family will receive friends Schnucks Florist beginning at 12 noon Monday. 65 Metro Locations Memorials in lieu of flowers may be made to the Humane 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 Society of Missouri (where Samantha, Jane's faithful border collie and third child, was adopted), Planned Parenthood or to Cemeteries/Mausoleums the charity of one's choice. A SERVICE OF Bellerive Heritage Garden Cemetery plots for sale. Hirem Garden section, THE LUPTON CHAPEL spaces 4 & 5, Lot 24, Sec. B. $3450 each which includes 15% mainte-

passed away peacefully into the hands of our Lord, on June 3, 2019. Beloved husband of Dana (nee McCarthy); dear father of Deborah McDaniel and the late Charles Gerard Jones. Stepfather of Amy (Brian Merli), Kerri and Christine. Loving grandfather of Mica, Joseph F. Jr. Shaun and Gavin McDaniel, Taylor (Brian Hayes), Madison, of Saint Charles, MO, passed away at the age of 94 on Skyler, Jory, Ian, Hunter, Reagan, Cal and Kennedy. Our dear Monday, June 3, 2019. He was preceded in death by his brother in law, uncle and good friend. beloved wife, Elizabeth Mica; and his parents, Joseph Services: Celebration Mass, Saturday, June 8, at Christ Prince of Peace, 415 Weidman Rd., Manchester at 10:30 a.m. Burial and Anna Mica. He is survived by his children, Margaret (Tony) Kilroy, Shirley private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Special (Dan) Rupp, Joseph Mica III, Diane (Lonnie) Land, and John Olympics or BJC Hospice. (Kelly) Mica; 15 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren, 3 greatgreat-grandchildren; and his sister, Anna (Rich) Craden. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home, 311 Wood Street, O'Fallon, MO where a visitation will be held on Sunday, June 9, from 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm. A Funeral Service will SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND be held at the same location on Monday, June 10, at 10:30 SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES am. Interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Visit Baue.com

STLtoday.com/obits

both rollicking and haunting. He later had a Top 10 hit with “Right Place, Wrong Time,” collaborated with numerous top-tier rockers, won multiple Grammy awards and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. A white man who found a home among black New Orleans musicians, he first entered the music scene when he played with The Grateful Dead,and jammed on The Rolling Stones’ “Exile on Main Street” album.

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Miramonti, Shirley Ann (nee Whittall) 91, passed away on Wednesday, June 5, 2019; preceded in death by her husband, Richard J. Miramonti; survived by sons, Rick, Mickey (Barb Krafve) and daughter, Barb Wille (Mark), 12 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. Services: Funeral service Monday, June 10th, 10:30 a.m. at Calcaterra Funeral Home, 52140 Daggett Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Interment at Sts. Peter & Paul Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, June 9th from 3:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. at Calcaterra Funeral Home. If desired, memorial donations to Arthritis Foundation. Family and friends may sign the online guestbook at www.calcaterrafuneral.com

Morris, Sue A. Sue A. Morris, proprietor of Caveland Roller Rink. Vis. Sun., 6/9, 3-6 p.m. & Funeral Mon., 6/10, 2 p.m. at Vinyard Funeral Home, Festus, MO. www.vinyardfuneralhome.net

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NEWS

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A13

Pentagon ends reviews of Niger ambush BY TAMI ABDOLLAH

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon announced it has concluded its reviews of a 2017 ambush that left four U.S. soldiers dead in the African nation of Niger and said it has found the discipline it meted out to be adequate. Last week, Act- Shanahan ing Secretary of Defense Patrick M. Shanahan accepted that conclusion, which was the result of a monthlong review conducted by four-star Army Gen. Robert Brown that did not go beyond the scope of the initial investigation conducted by Special Operations Africa Command.

Brown found the administration actions, primarily against junior officers, adequate. Based on an examination of the review, “I am satisfied that all findings, awards, and accountability actions were thorough and appropriate,” Shanahan said in a statement issued Wednesday. The release of the 176-page unclassified report ends more than a year of reviews after the Pentagon wrapped an internal investigation into the 2017 ambush. It detailed a series of “individual, organizational, and institutional failures and deficiencies that contributed to the tragic events” but “no single failure or deficiency” to blame for what happened. A 12-member Army special forces unit was accompanying 30

Nigerien forces on a mission to capture or kill a high-level Islamic State group leader in West Africa when they were outnumbered and attacked by more than 100 extremists carrying small arms just outside the village of Tongo Tongo. The investigation into the Oct. 4, 2017, attack resulted in the implementation of 20 recommendations on issues including training, turnover, equipment and improved procedures, according to the Pentagon. The report said U.S. forces didn’t have time to train together before they deployed and didn’t do preparatory battle drills with their Nigerien partners. The mission was hastily planned with lack of attention to

details because of time-sensitive intelligence, received hours earlier, that could lead to capture of a high-value target. The time-sensitive nature of the mission resulted in hasty planning and a lack of attention to details, the unclassified report stated. Investigators found that Special Operations Command in Africa had no process to deal with timesensitive or real-time mission approvals and the command seemed implicitly to allow for last-minute notice of operations. Nine individuals have been disciplined, mainly with letters of reprimand or administrative action. Maj. Gen. Marcus Hicks, who was serving as the commander of special operations

forces in Africa at the time of the attack, was the most senior officer punished. That has left some lawmakers and family members of the fallen soldiers asking whether junior officers were unfairly being forced to take the brunt of the blame. The Pentagon also announced this week that the Army has approved nine awards for valor, including four awarded posthumously to the soldiers killed in the ambush and ensuing firefight. Killed in the attack were Army Sgt. La David T. Johnson, 25, of Miami Gardens, Florida; Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black, 35, of Puyallup, Washington; Staff Sgt. Jeremiah W. Johnson, 39, of Springboro, Ohio; and Staff Sgt. Dustin M. Wright, 29, of Lyons, Georgia.

Electric scooter demand leads to more injuries, fatalities BY CATHY BUSSEWITZ AND AMANDA MORRIS

Associated Press

PATRICK SEMANSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A makeshift memorial rests at the edge of a police cordon on Saturday in front of a municipal building that was the scene of a shooting in Virginia Beach, Va. The Virginia Beach killing is one of 11 mass workplace killings dating back to 2006 in the U.S., according to a database of mass killings maintained through a partnership between AP, USA Today and Northeastern University.

Shootings in workplace rare and puzzling tion that its workers were more prone to violence. A postal worker on disability Here are some of the key takeretirement for psychological is- aways from the data: sues returned to her workplace years later and killed six people. What are the reasons A Connecticut beer delivery people kill co-workers? worker irate over being forced to resign opened fire as he was beSeveral factors have led up to ing escorted out of the building, these mass killings: they include killing eight co-workers. Just a disagreements on the job, feelweek ago, a longtime municipal ing mistreated by bosses and engineer submitted his resigna- colleagues and anger in the aftion in the morning and within termath of court proceedings. “Most of the time there are all hours went on a rampage inside the building, killing 11 co-work- sorts of signs of what the grievers and a contractor. ances were,” said James Alan Fox, The Virginia Beach killing is a criminologist with Northeastone of 11 mass workplace killings ern University who has studied dating back to 2006 in the U.S., mass killings for decades. according to a database of mass Some shooters left behind letkillings maintained through a ters complaining of unfair treatpartnership between AP, USA ment. In the case of the mass Today and Northeastern Uni- shooting at a Manchester, Conversity. necticut, beer distributorship, In all, nearly 90 people have the gunman called 911 as police died in these mass shootings, closed in and told the operator which are defined as 4 or more that he had experienced racism people killed, not including the at the company and wished he’d killed even more co-workers. perpetrator. And while such workplace While the investigation is shootings remain rare among still young, the gunman who the tens of thousands of gun last week carried out the attack deaths each year, they resonate at the municipal building in among Americans who worry Virginia Beach stands in stark they might become an aggrieved contrast; seemingly well-liked, co-worker’s next victim. in good standing with his emThe phenomenon steadily ployer and had not voiced any seeped into the public’s con- grievances. sciousness following a series of Of the 11 workplace shootworkplace massacres, includ- ings tracked in the database, the ing a big one at a post office that most lethal was not the result of eventually led to the term “go- a workplace grievance. A radicaling postal” being coined in the ized couple carried out the attack 1990s. The U.S. Postal Service against the husband’s co-workwent to great lengths to exam- ers at a holiday party in San Berine the issue and dispel the no- nardino, California, killing 14. BY LISA MARIE PANE

Associated Press

Where do most of these workplace killings take place? The shootings by employees have occurred in a variety of locations: a military base, warehouses, catering company, beer distributor, RV part manufacturer and plastics company among them. The data show that the four workplace killings with the highest death toll happened in government offices or at a government work event. However, criminologists who study gun violence caution that the number of workplace shootings is too small to draw reliable conclusions. The government shootings include 13 killed at a military base in Fort Hood, Texas, and 12 at a Navy Yard in Washington, D.C. “There are so many questions we don’t have any answers to,” said Susan B. Sorenson, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Ortner Center on Violence and Abuse in Relationships. “The reality is there are millions of people who go to work every day in government buildings and millions of people who go into government buildings every day. And almost every single one of them goes home safely.”

What happens to the shooters? In almost every case, the shooter killed himself or herself, or was killed by police at a higher rate than other types of public killings, where gunmen were more likely to be arrested.

Out of the 11 cases, the only gunman who survived is Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, an Army psychiatrist who was sentenced to death for the Fort Hood massacre. The gunman in Virginia Beach was killed in the shootout. Nearly all the offenders in workplace killings were men. However, the shooting in San Bernardino was carried out by two killers, one of them a woman who accompanied her husband. In Goleta, Calif. in 2006, the former postal worker who killed seven people was a woman.

What is the history of workplace shootings? Mass workplace killings have been happening for decades in the U.S. and around the world, gaining widespread attention in the 1980s and ‘90s. One of the deadliest was carried out in 1986 by a mail carrier who killed 14 Postal Service colleagues in Edmond, Oklahoma. That incident and others prompted the Postal Service to commission a study in 2000 to examine workplace violence around the time that the term “going postal” was becoming a conversational term. The Postal Service called it “the most comprehensive survey ever conducted of workplace violence in our nation,” including focus groups, interviews with employees and lengthy examination of policies. The report issued several recommendations to flag violent tendencies while claiming that “going postal” is a myth and that postal employees are less violent than the national workforce.

NYPD sorry for ’69 raid at Stonewall gay bar, now a landmark BY JENNIFER PELTZ

Associated Press

NEW YORK — Almost 50 years after a police raid at the Stonewall Inn catalyzed the modern LGBT rights movement, New York’s police commissioner apologized Tuesday for what his department did. “The actions taken by the NYPD were wrong, plain and simple,” Commissioner James O’Neill said during a briefing at police headquarters. “The actions and the laws were discriminatory and oppressive,” he added. “And for that, I apologize.” The apology comes weeks ahead of the milestone anniversary of the raid and the rebellion it sparked the night of June 27-

28, 1969, as patrons and others fought back against officers and a social order that kept gay life in the shadows. Organizers of what is expected to be a massive LGBT Pride celebration in the city this year called this week for police to apologize. So did City Council Speaker Corey Johnson, who is gay. The Pride organizers cheered O’Neill’s remarks. “The NYPD, as an institution, needed to take responsibility for what happened at Stonewall. This isn’t going to undo the decades of violence and discrimination that our community has experienced at the hands of the police, but it’s a good first start,” said James Fallarino, a spokesman for NYC Pride.

Police participate in and protect its annual parade, but the lack of a formal apology from the department for the 1969 raid — the very event that gay pride marches commemorate each June — has hung over the collaboration, Fallarino said. He hopes people will see O’Neill’s remarks as a sign of “the NYPD’s commitment to positive change.” Organizers of an alternative Stonewall anniversary march, however, see no such thing. They called O’Neill’s comments an “empty apology” made under pressure. “Where has this apology been for the last 50 years?” the group, called the Reclaim Pride Coalition, said in a statement. The coalition, which is excluding police

from its Queer Liberation March, is seeking a more sweeping apology from the NYPD. The group says transgender and minority LGBT people, among others, still face heavy-handed policing. At the time of the Stonewall raid, the psychiatric establishment saw homosexuality as a mental disorder, and law enforcement often viewed it as a crime. LGBT people could be subject to arrest for showing affection, dancing together, even for not wearing a certain number of items deemed gender-appropriate. Bars that served gay people at times lost their liquor licenses, and others — like the Stonewall — were simply unlicensed. Raids were common.

Andrew Hardy was crossing the street on an electric scooter in downtown Los Angeles when a car struck him at 50 miles per hour and flung him 15 feet in the air before he smacked his head on the pavement and fell unconscious. The 26-year-old snapped two bones in each leg, broke a thighbone, shattered a kneecap, punctured a lung and fractured three vertebrae in his neck, in addition to sustaining a head injury. “My brother thought I was dead,” said Hardy, who wasn’t wearing a helmet. Doctors told Hardy he’d likely be paralyzed for life. Five months later, he has learned to walk again. But he said he’ll never ride another scooter. “These scooters should not be available to the public,” Hardy said. “Those things are like a death wish.” As stand-up electric scooters have rolled into more than 100 cities worldwide, many of the people riding them are ending up in the emergency room with serious injuries. Others have been killed. There are no comprehensive statistics available but a rough count by The Associated Press of media reports turned up at least 11 electric scooter rider deaths in the U.S. since the beginning of 2018. Nine were on rented scooters and two on ones the victims owned. With summer fast approaching, the numbers will undoubtedly grow as more riders take to the streets. Despite the risks, demand for the two-wheeled scooters continues to soar, popularized by companies like Lime and Bird. In the U.S. alone, riders took 38.5 million trips on rentable scooters in 2018, according to the National Association of City Transportation Officials. Riders adore the free-flying feel of the scooters that have a base the size of a skateboard and can rev up to 15 miles per hour. They’re also cheap and convenient, costing about $1 to unlock with a smartphone app and about 15 cents per minute to ride. And in many cities, they can be dropped off just about anywhere after a rider reaches their destination. But pedestrians and motorists scorn the scooters as a nuisance at best and a danger at worst. Cities, meanwhile, can hardly keep up. In many cases, scootersharing companies dropped them onto sidewalks overnight without warning. Regulations vary from place to place. In New York and the U.K., electric scooters are illegal on public roads and sidewalks, though riders routinely flout the law. Last week in the Swedish city of Helsingborg, a rider was struck and killed by a car just one day after scooters were introduced there, leading to immediate calls for a ban. In Nashville, Tennessee, where another rider was killed, the city’s mayor warned scooter operators they had 30 days to clean up their act or he would propose a ban. Fed up with the thousands of scooters flooding Paris streets, Mayor Anne Hidalgo announced new regulations Thursday limiting the number of scooter operators and imposing a 5 mile-perhour speed limit in areas with heavy foot traffic. The city has already imposed a $150 fine on anyone who rides scooters on sidewalks. Isabelle Albertin, a pianist at Paris’ famed Opera Garnier, suffered a double fracture of her right arm after she was run down by an electric scooter on May 17. She is suing the city and started an organization to push for a ban.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WORLD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

From loss to liberation: Germany’s evolving attitude BY KIRSTEN GRIESHABER AND DAVID RISING

Associated Press

BERLIN — When Chancellor Angela Merkel thanked the Allies for the D-Day invasion and the “liberation” of Germany in World War II, she might have raised some eyebrows internationally. To those at home, the statement was unremarkable. There’s no denying that the machine guns and howitzers firing at the Allied forces landing in Normandy 75 years ago were manned by German soldiers. But over the decades, Germans’ attitudes toward the war evolved from a sense of defeat to something far more complex. While the leaders of France, Britain, the United States and Canada went to England to commemorate the troops’ sacrifice and duty on Wednesday, Merkel listened quietly. After the ceremony was over, she told reporters that she considered her invitation “a gift of history.” When those other leaders went to Normandy for ceremonies on DDay itself on Thursday, Merkel was back in Berlin, holding a regular meeting with governors and discussing bilateral relations with the prime minister of Kosovo. As the generation that elected Adolf Hitler and fought his genocidal war dies away, most Germans today see World War II through the prism of guilt, responsibility and atonement. Almost all agree that the defeat of the Nazis was a good thing. That hasn’t always been the case. Many Germans who survived World War II supported Hitler and the Nazi race ideology that led to the murder of 6 million Jews in Europe — and they were devastated by the downfall of the Third Reich.

MARKUS SCHREIBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tourists stand around the sculpture ‘Mother with her Dead Son’ by artist Kaethe Kollwitz on April 12, 2012, at the Neue Wache in Berlin. The Neue Wache is the central memorial of Germany for the victims of war and tyranny. “After 1945, Germans first referred to the end of World War II as ‘collapse,’” said Johannes Tuchel, director of the German Resistance Memorial Center. Their children, however, were faced with rebuilding the country from the ground up from the total defeat of the Nazis, and they saw potential rather than defeat. “In the 1950s, it became ‘hour zero’” — a new beginning, Tuchel said. After the country was back on its economic feet, younger Germans started to question their elders, culminating in the “1968 movement” in which students confronted their parents with the atrocities committed during the Third Reich. Out of that era has grown today’s

complex attitude. “It has been a process to the point today where it is seen as Germany’s liberation from the Nazis by the Allied forces,” Tuchel said. German leaders largely followed the changing attitudes — and in some cases led them. In 1985, then-West German President Richard von Weizsaecker called the Nazi defeat Germany’s “day of liberation” in a speech marking the 40th anniversary of the war’s end. His words were supported by most Germans, and to this day it is often cited by politicians and taught in schools. Merkel praised his speech when he died in 2015, calling it “a necessary, clear statement that was significant for our German selfimage.”

Another key moment came in 2004, when then-Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder marked the 60th anniversary of Col. Claus von Stauffenberg’s failed attempt to kill Hitler with a briefcase bomb. Schroeder called von Stauffenberg a hero — erasing the Nazis’ “traitor” label that had lingered after the war. Merkel, who at 64 is the first chancellor born after World War II, has taken the new German selfimage even further. On Tuesday in Portsmouth, the embarkation point for the Allied force that invaded Nazi-occupied France in 1944, Merkel called DDay a “unique, unprecedented military operation that eventually brought us in Germany the liberation from National Socialism,” the

Nazi political movement. She noted that the war’s end brought Germany’s rebirth as a leading European democracy, saying it was D-Day that set in motion the “reconciliation and unification of Europe, but also the entire postwar order that has brought us more than 70 years of peace.” Unlike the many grand monuments to the Soviet and western Allied troops who fought against the Nazis, German tributes to its troops are typically understated. Fallen soldiers are commemorated in humble memorials on village squares across the country listing the names of the dead — often grouping the casualties of World Wars I and II. In schools, the military history of World War II is rarely a focus of instruction, with lessons instead concentrating on Holocaust education and the Nazi dictatorship. Of course, not all in Germany see the Nazi era the same way. Alexander Gauland, leader of the far-right Alternative for Germany, recently played down the Nazi period as a “speck of bird poop” in Germany’s history. Bjoern Hoecke, another party leader, suggested it’s time for the country to stop atoning for its Nazi past. But a vast majority — even among those who were born decades after the war — believe it’s essential for Germany to keep alive the memory of the country’s inglorious past. “In school and at home I learned that the Allies — especially the Americans — liberated us,” said Laetitia Zinecker, an 18-year-old business student at Berlin’s Free University. “Our history shapes who we are still today. It’s important that schools continue to teach about the past so that it will not be forgotten.”

The big challenge after D-Day tribute: Keep the memory alive BY RAF CASERT

Associated Press

OMAHA BEACH, France — Now that the ever frailer D-Day veterans are leaving the Normandy beaches, 75 years after their heroics turned the course of World War II and changed Europe, the challenge to keep the memory of that momentous day alive increases ever more. Especially for the veterans themselves. On June 6, 1944, over 4,000 men died in a single day on five French beaches that were foreign to them, all to make the world a better place. It led to the defeat of Nazism and Adolf Hitler, and their sacrifice remains extraordinary to this day. Some of the D-Day survivors reminisced about the biggest day of their lives over lunch at the Normandy American Cemetery Thursday, and Steve Melnikoff of Cockeysville, Maryland, felt a sense of urgency to let his story live on. At 99, it is understandable. “We know we don’t have much time left, so I tell my story so that

BEN JARY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

D-Day veteran Donald Hitchcock poses wearing his campaign medals Tuesday aboard the MV Boudicca ship as veterans return to the scene of the D-Day landings 75 years after the Allied invasion of northern France. Hitchcock was eager to spend the D-Day commemoration on Omaha Beach with the Americans he served alongside all those years ago. the people know it was because ple are having the great time you of that generation, because those have now, the great life you have guys in this cemetery, all you peo- and peace and tranquility,” said

Melnikoff, who controlled a landing barge to take soldiers ashore. Pete Shaw from Canton, Ohio, may be five years his junior but he felt a similar urge to let that special moment live on for new generations. “What we done is one of the greatest things in history, and you gonna learn about it and you gonna read about it,” he said, adding that “if I can help in any way ...” British veteran Donald Hitchcock, 94, a British coder on the HMS Narborough, put it succinctly. “When we are gone that memory will die. We become historical archives,” underscoring a general fear that their spirit will literally be relegated to the history books. The value of such witnesses was there for all to see during the days leading up to D-Day itself when veterans happily mingled with wide-eyed children soaking up an experience no book could give them. Shaw was with a group of veterans brought over from the United States by the Best Defense Foundation and met with kids from the

nearby Port-en-Bessin school earlier this week. “You saw as much emotions in the eyes of the veterans as you did in the eyes of the children,” said Port-en-Bessin mayor Frederic Renaud. That realization that the spirit needs to live on is also hitting younger generations. “We need to focus on it in school, teaching it more, maybe, as a civics lesson, rather than purely a history lesson — about civic duty and responsibility,” said Capt. Cadman Kiker, 35, who is stationed at Fort Hood, Texas. The challenge is to teach “how things got to the point where over 2,000 people had to sacrifice themselves on a single day,” he said. In all, 2,501 Americans were among the 4,414 Allied troops killed on those beaches. Distance always fades memory, and it is a reason why the French remember the fallen soldiers more easily. From childhood, they visit the cemeteries, memorials and museums that dot the Normandy countryside.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 06.07.2019 • B

SEC LEAVES GRAY AREAS ‘Best interest’ rule could be much stronger DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If you invest with a stockbroker, he or she is on notice that any advice must be in your best interest. That may sound unremarkable, but until now brokers only had to recommend “suitable” investments. That’s a lower and more malleable guideline than the new best-interest rule that the Securities and Exchange Commission ad-

opted Wednesday. Boiled down, the 771-page rule says brokers can’t put their own financial interests ahead of a customer’s needs. They must disclose conflicts of interest, although it’s unclear how far they must go in reducing them. Consumer advocates complain that the new regulation is weaker than a fiduciary rule that the Labor Department wrote under President Barack Obama. That rule, which applied only to retirement accounts, was thrown out by a court last year. Carter Dougherty, communica-

tions director at Americans for Financial Reform, says that even the new rule’s title is misleading. “By calling this Regulation Best Interest, (Chairman) Jay Clayton and the SEC have gone full Orwell on us,” Dougherty said. “This regulation does not require your broker to act in your best interest the way a doctor or lawyer does. You still need to treat your broker as a usedcar salesman who might pull a fast one on you.” The brokerage industry supports the proposal and argues that it strengthens investor protection. ANDREW HARNIK, ASSOCIATED PRESS “Compliance with the rule will not be easy for the industry,” says The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, based in Washington, announced this week new regulations requiring Please see NICKLAUS, Page B4 brokers to act in their clients’ best interest.

‘AMAZING’ SPACE IS MADE FOR FUN Magic House opens satellite makerspace in the city BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Magic House @ MADE is set up — literally — for challenges. “Can you design a new toy?” reads one sign in an area for designers. “Can you use these pieces to make a circuit?” reads another in an area for makers. “Can you create a puzzle?” reads another in an area for artists. On Friday, the Magic House children’s museum in Kirkwood opens its first satellite location in St. Louis, a makerspace designed for children ages 6-13. It’s on the second floor of MADE, a makerspace for adults that opened in November at 5127 Delmar Boulevard, two blocks west of Kingshighway. Admission is $5 for anyone over age 1. Beth Fitzgerald, president of the Magic House, said the idea of the space is to give kids the tools they need to create things and work with others in the hope that they eventually take more advanced classes in the downstairs space as teens and young adults. The ideas fostered here could lead to careers in STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math). The space was created in a partnership with the Cortex Innovation Community and MADE. One recent afternoon, 29 fourth graders from nearby New City School tested out the space. As Fitzgerald was describing it, two boys pushed a third on a cart across the polished concrete floor. They made the cart themselves, of wooden and hard foam building pieces. “Oh wow,” said Fitzgerald, holding up her phone to make a video. “They even put a seat on it!” The 7,000-square-foot space — smaller than the Magic House in Kirkwood when it opened 40 years ago — is divided into four areas: a maker workshop, an art studio, a lab for designers and an entrepreneur market place. “Every student is engaged,” pointed out fourth grade teacher Mary McDevitt. That’s no small feat on the last days of school. Off in the artists area, Andrew

COURTESY OF KENDALL BROWN AND MINDY RACKLEY

Kendall Brown and Mindy Rackley say their rehearsal dinner was canceled by the venue, an O’Fallon, Mo., restaurant, because of their sexual orientation.

Restaurant accused of canceling dinner of gay couple BY ANNIKA MERRILEES

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

TIM VIZER PHOTOS

ABOVE: Hollyn Thonen, left, and Adilyn Runge, both 10, watch air-pressured rockets take flight. To pressurize the system, children turn a wheel until they build up enough pressure to “fire” the rockets through a clear tube. LEFT: Taisei Tseng, 10, a fourth grade student, left, and Khalia Rucker, a Magic House intern, get creative in May at the Robots & Circuits station at the Magic House @ MADE location. The small Ozobot follows the special color-coded path Taisei had drawn on the paper, and spins and flashes its lights based on the colors he drew.

Please see MAGIC, Page B4

A St. Louis-area couple say that a restaurant canceled their wedding rehearsal dinner because they are both women. Kendall Brown, one of the brides-tobe, said she received a phone call Tuesday morning from Madison’s Cafe in O’Fallon, Mo., to confirm details for the dinner, which was scheduled for June 13. During the conversation, Brown said, she was asked for the groom’s name. Brown said she clarified that she is marrying a woman. Brown said she then was told she would have to try another venue. The person Brown spoke to said she didn’t condone the relationship, and believed Brown was in an unhealthy relationship, Brown said. “And then I just hung up the phone,” Brown said. Brown, 28, and Mindy Rackley, 36, who have been a couple for six years and live in St. Charles County, said multiple people have offered up locations for their rehearsal dinner since Rackley posted about the incident on social media. Thursday evening, Rackley told the Post-Dispatch that she and Brown are in Please see COUPLE, Page B4

The next Gatorade may be a beer New nonalcoholic beverage infused with electrolytes BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Since Gatorade caught the sports world’s eye when it was credited with contributing to the University of Florida’s Orange Bowl victory in 1967, there hasn’t been much in the way of innovation for athletic beverages. Different vitamin and electrolyte configurations, yes. Some sugar reductions or protein additions. But mostly, athletes were left to choose among fruity, electriccolored drinks in flavors such as Glacier Freeze and Tidal Punch. Except in Germany. There, in the land of bratwursts and streusel, an unorthodox

health trend emerged. A 2011 study on runners training for the Munich Marathon found that athletes who drank nonalcoholic beer in the weeks before and after the race had lower levels of inflammation and a decreased incidence of respiratory infections than a control group. Polyphenols in the beer — antioxidant compounds derived from plants — were given most of the credit. Early last year, the German Olympic team drew media attention for including nonalcoholic beer in its training and recovery regimen. The ski team’s coach, Johannes Scherr, was a co-author of the marathon study. An article about German skiers hoisting a stein while on the slopes caught the eye of St. Louis brewer Jeff Stevens just

after he had launched WellBeing Brewing Company in January 2018. WellBeing exclusively makes nonalcoholic craft beers. “We knew by taking alcohol out of beer that it would be healthier,” Stevens said. “But at that moment it was like, ‘Wow, what if we could add electrolytes?’” Electrolytes — sodium, potassium, chloride and magnesium — help the body regulate nerve and muscle function, among other tasks. They are lost through sweat. But adding any substance to beer has the potential to muddle the flavor, and Stevens wanted his nutrient-enhanced COURTESY OF WELLBEING BREWING CO. “sports brew” to taste like any other craft WellBeing Brewing’s Victory Wheat is beer. a nonalcoholic craft beer infused with Please see BEER, Page B4 electrolytes.

BUSINESS

1 M


BUSINESS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

As tariff concerns rise, mortgage rates plunge It’s the sixth week of declines; banks see surge in refinancing BY KATHY ORTON

Washington Post

In November, mortgage rates appeared ready to soar across the 5% threshold. Seven months later, concerns over trade and global growth have driven them down below 4%. According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average sank to 3.82% with an average 0.5 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1% of the loan amount and are in addition to the interest rate.) It was 3.99% a week ago, and 4.54% a year ago. The 30year fixed rate fell for the sixth week in a row and hasn’t been this low since September 2017. The 15-year fixed-rate average tumbled to 3.28% with an average 0.5 point. It was 3.46% a week ago and 4.01% a year ago. The five-year adjustable rate average

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Rows of houses line the streets in south St. Louis city as seen on May 23. Concerns over tariffs pushed mortgage rates lower for a sixth week. dropped to 3.52% with an average 0.4 point. It was 3.6% a week ago, and 3.74% a year ago. “Mortgage rates fell this week as trade tensions continue to dictate market movements,” said Matthew Speakman, Zillow economic analyst. “During the past few weeks, the way mortgage rates

have reacted to trade-related news has been muted compared to that of Treasury yields,but that pattern changed this week. Friday’s unexpected announcement that the Trump administration planned to raise tariffs on goods imported from Mexico roiled markets and dragged longer-term bond yields

to fresh 20-month lows. Mortgage rates followed suit, hitting their lowest levels since late 2017.” Bond prices have been rising — and yields falling — as investors pulled their money out of stocks and put it into U.S. Treasurys. The yield on the 10-year Treasury plummeted to 2.07% on Monday before bouncing back to 2.12% on Wednesday. Mortgage rates tend to follow the same path as the 10-year bond, but their decline hasn’t been as sharp and it may have run out of steam. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome H. Powell suggested this week that the central bank might lower its benchmark rate, which caused a rally in the stock market. Friday’s employment report also could affect rates. A strong jobs report would likely pull rates higher. Bankrate.com, which puts out a weekly mortgage rate trend index, found that more than half of the experts it surveyed say rates will remain relatively stable in the coming week. “I think bond yields and mort-

BULLETIN BOARD

gage rates will consolidate ahead of the Fed meeting on June 19th, so mortgage rates will be flat in the coming week,” said Michael Becker, branch manager of Sierra Pacific Mortgage in White Marsh, Md. Meanwhile, a surge in refinances propelled mortgage applications. According to the latest data from the Mortgage Bankers Association, the market composite index — a measure of total loan application volume — increased 1.5% from a week earlier. The refinance index grew 6% from the previous week, while the purchase index dropped 2%. The refinance share of mortgage activity accounted for 42.2% of all applications. “Purchase applications maintained a 16-week streak of yearover-year increases, but declined again on a weekly basis,” said Bob Broeksmit, MBA president and CEO. “The recent stock market volatility appears to be giving some prospective buyers hesitation about moving forward with a home purchase.”

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Clayco picks Havel as its new CFO James M. Havel was named executive vice president and chief financial officer of Clayco Enterprise. In his new role, Havel will work directly with Tony Schofield, who remains CFO of the individual Clayco businesses. Before joining Havel Clayco, Havel served as executive vice president and chief financial officer of Express Scripts and Major Brands Holdings. He started his career with Ernst & Young LLP in 1976. Havel is a member of the board of directors of Enterprise Financial Services Corp. and is a certified public accountant. He earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting from Regis University.

0 DOWN

$ ST. LOUIS HOTEL, IMAGE FROM HAWKEYE HOTELS

Poettker Construction is renovating the former Majestic Hotel in downtown St. Louis for Hawkeye Hotels. The nine-story hotel will become the first Le Méridien Marriott Hotel in the St. Louis area. The project is expected to be completed in early fall. The architect of record is Louisiana-based Coleman Partners Architects LLC. AWARDS Kwame Building Group received the American Concrete Paving Association’s Excellence in Concrete Paving Award for taxiway and runway rehabilitation work at St. Louis Lambert International Airport. In a joint venture with HR Green Inc., Kwame provided project management for the $9.7 million, multi-phase project. NewGround was recognized as design partner on a branch system transformation for Atlantic Central Credit Union that received the Achievement in Marketing award from the Canadian Credit Union Association. EXPANDING Soulard Island Distillery, a boutique maker of hand-crafted liquor, signed a deal with ShowMe Beverages for statewide distribution of two of its rum products, Aged and Smoked Honey. Joshua’s Pest Control expanded to St. Louis with a new branch at 4132 Shoreline Drive in Earth City. HELPING OUT Ameren Missouri contributed $25,000 to the American Red Cross to assist with relief efforts following tornado damage in Jefferson City and Eldon. More than 1,400 employees at Purina’s St. Louis headquarters contributed nearly 4,000 volunteer hours during the company’s 18th annual Purina PetCare Pride Day. Frank Burns, assistant director of new markets and historic tax credits for U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corp., was appointed to the board of directors of the Veterans Business Resource Center. MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS Alberici Corp., Byrne & Jones Construction and Central Building & Preservation LP jointly acquired the assets of Leonard Masonry Inc. MORE BUSINESS Auto One Services at 6981 Old State Route 21 in Barnhart now offers U-Haul products and services. MOVING McKinney Group Wealth Management relocated from west St. Louis County to 3450 Bridgeland Drive in Bridgeton. NEW BUSINESS Benjamin F. Edwards launched Edwards Wealth Management, a registered investment advisory firm. The firm is debuting with Blake and Connor Dunlop of the Dunlop Investment Group, a father-son duo that manages $230 million in client assets. OPENING Sugarfire Smoke House opened a new location: • 2323 Plum Street, Suite 100, Edwardsville PROJECTS Poettker Construction is renovating the former Majestic Hotel in downtown St. Louis for Hawkeye Hotels. The nine-story hotel will become the first Le Méridien Marriott Hotel in the St. Louis area. The project is expected to be completed in early fall. The architect of record is Louisiana-based Coleman Partners Architects LLC. St. Luke’s Hospital, Medical Facilities Corp. and NueHealth LLC are developing a new ambulatory surgery center on the west campus of St. Luke’s Hospital. The St. Luke’s Surgery Center of Chesterfield will offer five specialties: orthopedics, gynecology, gastrointestinal, plastic surgery and general surgery. Archimages Inc. was selected as architect for the project, which is expected to be completed by the spring of 2020.

THE BOTTOM LINE Watch as David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher discuss the issues facing our economy and business community. Catch up on past episodes at stltoday.com/watch

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BommaritoINFINITI.com BUSINESS CALENDAR TUESDAY NETWORKING • The Community Service Public Relations Council hosts this breakfast and networking event featuring staff from area nonprofits discussing recruiting, engaging and communicating with your volunteers. • 7:30 to 9:15 a.m.; Maggiano’s Little Italy, 2 The Boulevard, St. Louis • $35 for members, $49 for nonmembers and students; to register: http://bit.ly/2WbIqKv CYBER FRAUD DEFENSE • Enterprise Bank & Trust, in conjunction with the Creve Coeur-Olivette Chamber of Commerce, hosts a lunch and panel discussion

on cyber fraud protection. • 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., Enterprise Bank & Trust, 11401 Olive Boulevard, St. Louis • Free; reservations required. Call (314) 995-5606 or email amwehr@enterprisebank.com. REAL ESTATE • The St. Louis chapter of Commercial Real Estate Women hosts this presentation and walking tour of new developments on Laclede’s Landing. • 4 to 6:30 p.m.; the Vue, 612 North Second Street, St. Louis • $ 5 0 fo r m e m b e r s , $ 7 5 fo r n o n m e m bers; register: https://crewstl.org/events/ special-events/2019-06-11-tour

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF

SUBMIT AN ITEM

LISA BROWN

Business editor

314-340-8127

JACOB BARKER

Economic development

314-340-8291

BRYCE GRAY

Energy and environment

314-340-8307

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

Mindy Mazur joined Lents & Associates LLC as managing director. Kwame Building Group Inc. added Derrick Stanton as civil inspector. RubinBrown promoted the following: Steven Brown to vice chairman; Ken Van Bree to vice chair of Industry Groups; Mark Breakfield to partner in the Wealth Advisory Services Group; Christine Figge to partner in the Business Advisory Services Group; Tim Kennedy and Chris Tkach to partners in the Assurance Services Group; and Dominic Pisoni to partner in the Entrepreneurial Services Group. Cordell Practice Management Group hired Erica L. Jones as public relations and communications associate. Daniel R. Ritter joined Greensfelder, Hemker & Gale PC as an associate in the Employment & Labor practice group. BancorpSouth named Norm Toon as its market president in St. Louis. Independence Center hired Kacey Patterson as a psychiatric nurse practitioner. G&S Acoustics added Roseann Locher as a project manager. Alliance Technologies LLC hired Cody Holland as a help desk analyst. Murphy Co. promoted Kaitlyn Knickmeyer to general ledger specialist and hired Charles Webber as help desk technician.


MARKET WATCH

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks finished higher Thursday, helped by optimism that the U.S. and Mexico can work out a deal before tariffs kick in next week. Bloomberg reported the U.S. was considering delaying a 5% tariff on Mexican goods set to go into effect on Monday.

Cloudera

5

M

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

25,840

Dow Jones industrials

25,260

Close: 25,720.66 Change: 181.09 (0.7%)

12

25

10 M

$16.05

PE: ... Yield: ...

Vol.: 21.7m (9.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.2 b

26,000

2,800

Close: 2,843.49 Change: 17.34 (0.6%)

Vol.: 7.2m (2.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.3 b

CHICAGO BOT

DATE

CLOSE

Corn

Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

420.50 868.75 510

Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

2,800

25,000

CLOSE

CHG

139.27 107.60 79.37 16.22 265.40

-.18 -.25 -.48 +.10 +2.70

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

68.59 102.05 26.35

-.15 +2.95 -.21

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

52.59 1.7076 178.83 2.324

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

22,000 21,000

D

J

F

M

2,200

M

D

J

F

M

A

M

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

3,282 3,460 1590 1147 179 93

2,016 2,025 1264 1636 75 140

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

A

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 25800.30 10155.27 814.94 12710.67 7634.12 2852.10 1885.87 29330.94 1508.54

LOW 25518.05 10013.16 807.63 12606.12 7546.22 2822.45 1865.45 29037.72 1490.77

CLOSE 25720.66 10077.54 812.91 12675.67 7615.55 2843.49 1881.52 29249.82 1503.54

CHG. +181.09 -93.76 +2.76 +60.97 +40.08 +17.34 +6.81 +148.63 -3.25

%CHG. WK +0.71% s -0.92% s +0.34% s +0.48% s +0.53% s +0.61% s +0.36% s +0.51% s -0.22% s

MO QTR t s t t s s t s t s t s t s t s t t

YTD +10.26% +9.89% +14.02% +11.44% +14.77% +13.43% +13.14% +13.59% +11.49%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.53 32.10 +.42 +1.3 +12.5 +3.1

Aegion Corp

AEGN

14.12

26.80 14.50

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.43

Amdocs

DOX

TKR

2.04 General Motors

GM

-.80 -5.2 -11.2 -42.6 19

... Home Depot

HD

-.07 -3.8

-3.1 -27.4 dd

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

52.60

70.31 61.21 +.36 +0.6

+4.5 -10.1 17

76.30 76.53 +.39 +0.5 +17.3 +35.9 27

3.48

1.77

6

1.14 Lee Enterprises 1.90 Lowes

Ameren Corp

AEE

55.21

ABInBev

BUD

Arch Coal

ARCH

64.55 106.86 84.10 +.83 +1.0 +27.8 -10.4 21 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 75.09 101.92 87.69 -.35 -0.4 +5.7 +5.0 6 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

31.91 x27.88 +.12 +0.4 +13.1

37.79

76.39 55.08

Belden Inc

BDC

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

7.97

1.92 +.32 +20.0 -25.6 -78.4 dd -.32 -0.6 +31.9

9.35

... McDonald’s 0.60

... 10

0.20

-1.1 33

8.22

5.84 +.08 +1.4 +47.8 -25.2 dd

...

292.47 446.01 350.64 +1.89 +0.5 3.75

-2.6 11

+8.7

Caleres Inc.

CAL

18.54

41.09 18.92 +.28 +1.5 -32.0 -46.0

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.35

62.08 45.50 +.50 +1.1 -14.0 -14.6 14 1.04b

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 53.89 +.02

-8.7 15

...

Charter

CHTR 260.39 392.14 387.31 +2.35 +0.6 +35.9 +44.8 77

...

Cigna

CI

Citigroup

C

141.95 226.61 153.72 48.42

...

...

-.09 -0.1 -14.5

9

72.55 x58.90 +.10 +0.2

28.18

59.16 30.17 +.60 +2.0 -19.2 -33.5 16

Emerson

EMR

55.39

79.70 62.65

Energizer Holdings

-.64 -1.0

+4.5

-4.6 15

40.71

65.57 43.51 +.49 +1.1

36.09

58.15 40.29

Esco Technologies

ESE

56.65

78.32 73.82 +.38 +0.5 +12.1 +28.2 20

Foresight Energy

FELP

0.60

FutureFuel

FF

4.10

.76

-.64 -1.6

-.07 -7.9 -78.3 -75.1 dd

1.52 5.44

1.57

5.75

2.54

1.84

3.69

2.35 +.04 +1.7 +11.4

84.75 118.23 96.24 8.42

36.65

-.03 -1.2 +41.1 -51.7 dd -.01

...

-7.6

+4.2 +0.7 21 2.20f

153.13 201.15 203.05 +2.92 +1.5 +14.3 +28.3 31

23.12

47.52 23.23

3.75

-.18 -0.8 -23.8 -44.7

...

20.92

81.87 113.73 106.08

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

-.38 -0.4 +19.0 +33.6 11

127.84 153.61 150.91 +.09 +0.1 3.80

5.89

4.67

87.13 85.13

+7.6 +2.3 13

-.10 -2.0 +10.3

... 2.40

-2.7 dd

...

-.19 -0.2 +14.9 +25.3 19

2.37

SF

38.39

61.93 56.92 +.41 +0.7 +37.4

-4.8 18

0.60

TGT

60.15

90.39 85.70 +.21 +0.2 +29.7 +11.4 14

2.56

UPS

89.89 125.09 98.00

USB

43.14

-.21 -0.2

+0.5 -12.7 17

3.84

55.56 52.77 +.26 +0.5 +15.5 +5.3 13

1.48

X

11.67

38.89 13.21 +.12 +0.9 -27.6 -63.9

8

0.20

VZ

47.13

61.58 57.54 +.51 +0.9

7

2.41

+2.3 +23.9

0.32 WalMart

WMT

82.37 106.21 105.11 +.69 +0.7 +12.8 +25.9 60 2.12f

0.13 Walgreen Boots

WBA

49.31

86.31 50.98 +.18 +0.4 -25.4 -16.4

WFC

43.02

59.53 45.92 +.06 +0.1

19.31 10.50 +.12 +1.2 -33.8 -23.5 13 0.24a Wells Fargo

9

1.76

-0.3 -12.6 10

1.80

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Schnucks adds curbside grocery pickup: Schnuck Markets Inc. is expanding its curbside grocery pickup to more stores. The grocery chain said this week that 30 St. Louis area Schnucks stores now offer curbside pickup. The service was first rolled out at four stores in late 2018. Partnering with Instacart, Schnucks’ curbside service allows customers to order products online and have their groceries delivered to their vehicle without having to enter the store. The service is free for Schnucks Delivers Express members and $1.99 for nonmembers. Google to acquire data firm Looker for $2.6 billion: Google is acquiring data analytics firm Looker for $2.6 billion cash in an effort to expand its Google Cloud business. The company says Looker will give its cloud-computing customers more ways to use their data. The companies were already working together and share about 350 customers including Buzzfeed, Hearst and Yahoo! The deal is expected to close later this year. Cloud computing involves companies using remote servers to house their data rather than storing things locally. Amazon, Microsoft, IBM and Alphabet Inc.’s Google are some of the biggest players in the increasingly competitive market. The acquisition is Google Cloud CEO Thomas Kurian’s first major move since he came aboard from software maker Oracle in November 2018. US productivity grew at solid 3.4% rate in first quarter: U.S. productivity grew at a strong 3.4% rate in the January-March quarter, the best showing in more than four years, the Labor Department reported Thursday. It was an encouraging sign that productivity may finally be improving after a long stretch of weakness. The first quarter gain was more than double the 1.3% in-

crease in the fourth quarter, although it was slightly lower than an initial estimate of 3.6% made a month ago. Labor costs fell during the first quarter, declining by 1.6% following a 0.4% drop in the fourth quarter. Productivity, the amount of output per hour of work, is a key factor determining an economy’s growth potential. If the current rebound continues, it would provide support for President Donald Trump’s efforts to achieve sustained 3% growth rates. The slight downward revision in productivity reflected the fact that overall output, as measured by gross domestic product, was revised down from an initial estimate of 3.2% growth to 3.1% growth in the first quarter. The 3.4% advance in productivity was the strongest increase since a 3.7% rise in the third quarter of 2014. Productivity has risen 2.4% over the past four quarters. Ebony photo archive to be auctioned to pay creditors: The photo archive of Ebony Magazine that chronicles African American life is to go on the auction block in July if a Chicago bankruptcy court approves. The collection is being auctioned to pay off secured creditors of Johnson Publishing. The former magazine publisher filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection in April. Johnson Publishing sold its Ebony and Jet magazines three years ago. The Chicago-based company has tried since 2015 to sell its photo archive. The collection of 4 million images chronicles the civil rights movement and the lives of prominent figures such as Billie Holiday and Muhammad Ali. It was once appraised at $46 million. The auction would recover money owed secured creditors filmmaker George Lucas and Mellody Hobson, whose Capital V Holdings loaned $12 million to Johnson Publishing. From staff and wire reports

Silver

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note was unchanged at 2.12% on Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

+9.30 +.12 +.90

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.50 5.25 4.75

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.31 2.21 2.03 1.86 1.88 2.00 2.12 2.62

-0.04 -0.04 -0.01 +0.03 +0.02 ... ... -0.01

1.93 2.12 2.29 2.52 2.81 2.92 2.97 3.12

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

0.56f

32.92 31.25 +.36 +1.2 +40.4 +13.6 39

PRFT POST

64.95

4.64 0.80

0.28

Perficient

RELV

5

1.32

3.84 +.03 +0.8 -17.9 -18.2 dd

5.55

Post Holdings

Stifel Financial

...

MCD

SR

... ...

8.99 +.05 +0.6 -43.1 -47.6

BTU

1.96 US Bancorp -3.6 -25.8 29 1.20f US Steel +7.1 -26.0 11 0.60f Verizon

ENR

+5.2 -13.9 dd

SKIS

+4.9 -10.2 20

Enterprise Financial EFSC

-.27 -0.8

Peabody Energy

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

53.40

45.00 x35.19

Peak Resorts

0.04

EPC

30.56

171.89 258.86 257.83 +1.57 +0.6 +36.7 +29.1 60

Reliv

CHG

CLOSE

1337.60 14.87 803.70

Gold Platinum

158.09 215.43 197.17 +.48 +0.2 +14.8 +5.0 20

MA

Spire Inc

.0223 .6966 .2576 1.2693 .7449 .1447 1.1228 .0144 .2776 .009223 .051216 .0153 .0672 .000846 1.0058

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

32.51 22.16 +.11 +0.5 +10.2 -29.5

1.80

CBSH

MNK

52-WK LO HI

17.87

-9.9 15

Edgewell

LOW

PREV

.0223 .6976 .2578 1.2690 .7479 .1447 1.1273 .0145 .2781 .009222 .050905 .0154 .0667 .000848 1.0088

Interestrates Interestrates

OLN

75.24 66.47 +.69 +1.0 +27.7 +1.2 10

Commerce Banc.

10.30

0.28

Olin

LEE

+.91 +.0148 +.83 -.054

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest

PE: 47.0 Yield: ...

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

+5.75 -1 +19.25

DATE

Copper

2,400

A M 52-week range $45.70

ExchangeRates

Aug 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19

Milk

23,000

$23.94

CHG

CHICAGO MERC

Hogs

2,600

M

Vol.: 17.7m (7.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $7.1 b

PE: 4.2 Yield: ...

Feeder cattle Live cattle

24,000

30

A M 52-week range $22.15

Futures

S&P 500

3,000

27,000

M

$7.78

PE: 58.0 Yield: ...

CIEN

Close: $45.49 9.61 or 26.8% The developer of high-speed networking technology beat Wall Street’s fiscal second-quarter profit and revenue forecasts. $50 40

8

A M 52-week range $52.44

2,880

2,720

10 DAYS

30 20

Ciena

MIK

Close: $8.18 -1.16 or -12.4% The arts and crafts chain’s sales at established stores fell during the first quarter and it cut its forecast for the year. $14

$35

A M 52-week range $20.18

Vol.: 57.8m (11.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $1.4 b

Michaels Companies

SFIX

Close: $27.04 3.47 or 14.7% The fashion styling service surprised Wall Street with a fiscal third quarter profit and solid revenue.

10

$4.95

24,680

Stitch Fix

CLDR

Close: $5.21 -3.59 or -40.8% The cloud computing company’s revenue forecast fell far short of Wall Street expectations, and its CEO is leaving. $15

2.38 2.13 1.63

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.60 2.65 6.43 3.54 3.40 .35

-0.02 -0.01 -0.05 +0.02 -0.01 +0.04

2.01 3.31 6.38 3.95 3.97 .82

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2843.49 11953.14 7259.85 26965.28 5278.43 43147.83 20774.04 97204.88 16227.80 9682.29

CHG

CHG

YTD

+17.34 -27.67 +39.63 +69.84 -13.56 -272.55 -2.06 +1206.13 +15.14 +23.67

+0.61% -0.23% +0.55% +0.26% -0.26% -0.63% -0.01% +1.26% +0.09% +0.25%

+13.43% +13.20% +7.90% +4.44% +11.58% +3.62% +3.79% +10.60% +13.30% +14.86%

Stocks climb on the hope that US-Mexico trade deal is close Talks between two nations to avert new tariffs are ongoing BY DAMIAN J. TROISE AND ALEX VEIGA

Associated Press

U.S. stocks finished higher Thursday as optimism that the U.S. and Mexico can work out a deal before costly tariffs kick in next week helped power the market to its third straight gain. A modest rally gained strength in the final hour of trading after Bloomberg reported that the U.S. was considering delaying a 5% tariff on Mexican goods that is set to go into effect on Monday. The report came as the two countries held a second day of trade talks. Both sides claimed to be making progress, but President Donald Trump insisted earlier in the day that a “lot of progress” had to be made before he would call off the tariffs. Investors have been anxious about escalating trade disputes between the U.S. and key trading partners, primarily China. Worries that the trade conflicts will drag on, stifling economic growth and hurting corporate profits, drove a monthlong sell-off in May. That derailed a market run that culminated with the benchmark S&P 500 setting an all-time high on April 30. Stocks gave up more ground on Monday, but the market has bounced back and is on track to end the first week of June with solid gains. “History says, as a result of such a good start to the year, don’t be surprised that May is down, because it has been 60% of the time,” said Sam Stovall, chief investment strategist at CFRA. “Yet, after a down May, we tend to get a reflex rally in June 100% of the time.” The S&P 500 index gained 17.34 points, or 0.6%, to 2,843.49. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 181.09 points, or 0.7%, to

RICHARD DREW, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Specialists Michael Pistillo, left, and David Haubner confer on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in mid-May. The U.S. stock market was buoyed Thursday by hopes that new U.S. tariffs on Mexico can be avoided through ongoing talks between the nations. 25,720.66. It briefly climbed 260 points. The Nasdaq composite reversed an early slide, adding 40.08 points, or 0.5%, to 7,615.55. The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies dropped 3.25 points, or 0.2%, to 1,503.54. Stock indexes in Europe finished mixed. Bond prices fell, pushing up the yield on the 10-year Treasury note to 2.13% from 2.12% late Wednesday. U.S. and Mexican officials continued trade talks on Thursday in a bid to avert import tariffs that President Trump has threatened to impose unless Mexico acts to stem the flood of Central American migrants at America’s southern border. Lawmakers who have been in talks with both U.S. and Mexican officials said they were hopeful a deal could be reached to satisfy Trump, or at least delay the tariffs. The trade dispute with Mexico and China threatens to stifle economic growth in the U.S. and globally. Uncertainty surrounding the trade negotiations has sent many traders fleeing to safer investments, like bonds and gold. Still, investors have been in a

buying mood most of this week because they’re betting the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates this year. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday that the central bank would “act as appropriate” if the Trump administration’s disputes with China and Mexico threatened U.S. economic expansion. The government’s May jobs report, due out Friday, could prove a key factor in what the Fed does next. A separate gauge of employment growth by ADP earlier this week showed a sharp slowdown in hiring last month. And economists surveyed by FactSet are projecting that the government will also report that hiring slowed last month. “Investors would prefer a lighter side report for employment Friday because it would help keep the pressure off the Fed from certainly raising rates, but would give it an additional reason to lower rates,” Stovall said. Technology, consumer staples and financial stocks were among the big gainers Thursday. Chipmaker Advanced Micro Devices jumped 7.9%, Campbell Soup added 2.6% and American Express gained 1.1%.


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Nicklaus From B1

a statement from Kenneth Bentsen, chief executive of trade group SIFMA. “The costs to implement will no doubt be significant.” Jasmin Sethi, associate director of policy research at Morningstar, says the rule improves on the status quo. Under the suitability standard, brokers can recommend a high-cost investment over a low-cost one, even if the only advantage is a higher commission for the broker. Sethi said the final regulation improved upon the SEC’s initial proposal, made last year. For instance, it clarifies that the best-interest standard applies to advice given when someone rolls money into an Individual Retirement Account. That’s a vulnerable time for investors, the Government Accountability Office found in a 2013 report. It said brokers often pitched IRA products as “free,” when they really would cost an investor more than his or her workplace retirement plan. The rule also prohibits contests or bonuses tied to the sale of specific products. You don’t want to buy an annuity from a broker who’s more excited about winning a Caribbean cruise than meeting your retirement goals. Other provisions, such as the requirement to mitigate conflicts of interest, are vague. A firm must disclose that it receives revenue-sharing payments for selling a certain mutual fund, but it doesn’t have to stop taking the money. “A lot will depend on enforcement,” Sethi says. “The key is, will they be tough in going after companies that disclose but don’t mitigate?” Another point that’s not clear: Can brokers call themselves “financial advisers?” Critics say this common title is confusing, because registered investment advisers are subject to a fiduciary standard and brokers are not. Regulation Best Interest almost resolves the issue, but not quite. Page 148 says it “would presume” use of this title “to be a violation,” but page 158 backtracks, saying that “we are not expressly prohibiting the use of these names and titles.” That’s the kind of maddening gray area the SEC created by responding to the brokerage industry’s pleas for flexibility. Investors have have gained some new protections, but it will be a while before we know if the brokerage industry is truly acting in their best interests.

TIM VIZER PHOTOS

Fourth grade teacher Mary McDevitt, left, pushes student Daisy Lazaroff, 10, on a wheeled “rig-a-ma-jig” she helped put together at the “Design Small, Build Big” exhibit. The wheeled scooter appears to be the marriage between giant Lego blocks and an erector set. The Magic House had two fourth grade classes from the New City School visit their new permanent satellite location at 5127 Delmar Boulevard in St. Louis on May 23.

David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

Beer From B1

Then he made a serendipitous connection. A mutual acquaintance introduced Stevens to Daniel Schindler, one of the founders of Buoy, the maker of an electrolyte supplement. The 2-year-old St. Louis-based startup primarily sells the flavorless additive through Amazon but had been looking for beverage companies to partner with. “What distinguishes Buoy is we worked to determine the right proportion of what your body needs,” said Schindler. “We used a lot of research from the World Health Organization.” A squeeze of Buoy, he said, has more electrolytes than a Gatorade and can be added to any type of beverage. So Stevens had his nutrient source, but wanted to magnify the beer’s health-conscious image with the right flavor profile. He landed on an orange-infused wheat ale and slightly lowered the carbonation level to smooth its finish. Each 16-ounce can has 85 calories, electrolytes, B vitamins and zero added sugars. WellBeing Victory Wheat went on the market last month. Dietitian Dena French, a professor at Fontbonne University, said that while most people will do just fine chasing their workout with plain old water, “Victory Wheat will also rehydrate you, and without an exorbitant amount of calories.” Eventually, Stevens sees Victory Wheat sponsoring athletic events and races, which have been dominated by A-B InBev’s Michelob Ultra, a lower-calorie lager. “Because we don’t have alcohol in it, we could sponsor athletes in a way Michelob Ultra never could,” he said. But it’s as a sports-drink alternative that he really sees Victory Wheat finding its niche. “Sports drinks fall down because they have a lot of sugar and aren’t very celebratory,” he said. “You don’t celebrate with a Gatorade.” Colleen Schrappen • 314-340-8072 @cschrappen on Twitter cschrappen@post-dispatch.com

Adilyn Runge, 10, uses a regular paintbrush on the “electronic easel” touch-sensitive monitor to paint a digital picture. Children can email the finished artwork from the Magic House’s satellite location in St. Louis. It’s one of the more popular interactive exhibits at the new site. Students from New City School visited the site in May to test out the makerspace and offer suggestions.

Magic From B1

Spittal, 10, touched a real paint brush to an oversized screen, “painting” bold chunks of blue, red and green outlined in thick black lines. “I’m an abstract artist, and I just love art, and I can’t miss out on a chance to use this,” Andrew said. “Adilyn, how does this happen?” he called to classmate Adilyn Runge, also 10, who painted on the digital canvas next to him. “I know, right?” Adilyn responded. “This is so amazing!” During her visit, Adilyn designed a button and made it in a button maker. She also drew an abstract design on a piece of tagboard. A staffer helped her use a machine to cut it into a jigsaw puzzle. Maren Teasdale, 10, stitched a design in a piece of brown burlap stretched on an embroidery hoop. “I think it’s a really fun place to just create,” she said. “A lot of kids don’t have this stuff

Couple From B1

the process of choosing a new venue. She added that it has been a difficult choice to make, as so many people reached out with offers to host the event, for which they expect about 45 guests. “It’s been extremely overwhelming, like the outpouring of love and support that we’ve had from friends and family and people we don’t even know and people in different states,” Brown said. They said they had not paid the restaurant any kind of deposit, and that they are not con-

at home. I definitely don’t have a 3D printer at my house.” The Magic House has a STEAM area at its Kirkwood location, but the St. Louis attraction is a blown-out version of that — with popular elements highlighted and new things added, like two giant Lego building tables and clay available for modeling daily, not just once a month as it is at the art space in Kirkwood. There will be eight staffers at the Magic House @ MADE. In addition to teaching and helping visitors use the equipment and supplies, they will help kids become entrepreneurs. If a child designs something and wants to sell it, staffers will show them how to photograph the product and post it on Generopolis, a St. Louis-founded startup that lets people sell and donate items and give the funds to charity. Emily Elhoffer, director of membership for MADE, the makerspace downstairs, said it’s up to about 130 members so far, not counting nonmembers who have enrolled in classes.

The makers have helped with ideas and planning upstairs, and she hopes more teens ages 14 and up will enroll in classes when they age out of the space upstairs. Rep. Wiley Price, D-St. Louis, represents the new venue’s neighborhood and got to play in the space during a preview night with his daughter Kylie, 8. They both say they had a blast. “I am a child, OK?” he said unashamedly. “I’m 35.” He loved the diversity he saw in the staff and the families playing together that night, and sees the space as a place for kids to learn about what they didn’t think they’d like. From there, that could lead to a career. “They’ll contribute in a way where they thought they never could, when the seed was planted right here on Delmar and Academy.” Justin Idleburg, who lives nearby and is a board member of Forward Through Ferguson and works with organizations to improve communities, also got to play at the space and talked to Magic House leaders

sidering legal action. “We really aren’t trying to harm them in any way,” Brown said. “We don’t want to fight hate with hate. And we’re really just wanting to bring about awareness ... so nobody else has to feel the way that we felt.” “It’s not about harming anybody, it’s just about being human ... and being treated like it,” Rackley said. Madison’s Cafe declined to comment, but the restaurant received a wave of negative reviews on Yelp, an online restaurant and business review website, in the aftermath of the incident. Thursday, Yelp temporarily disabled the ability to post com-

ments on the restaurant’s business page while it worked “to verify the content you see here reflects actual consumer experiences rather than the recent events,” according to a post on the page. The story has garnered attention from national media outlets. A potential legal path forward would not be entirely clear, said Tracy Vandover, employment counsel at the St. Louis-based law firm Carmody MacDonald. The Missouri Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on a number of categories, including race, religion and gender, but does not explicitly forbid discrimination based on

as they planned. He loves the opportunities it will create, especially for those who will attend summer camps through scholarships. The Cortex Innovation Community helped fund the space along with opportunities for free admission and programs aimed at underserved areas. “People who are known to do great things for our region like the Magic House — those are the innovative people you need doing what they’re doing. They came in listening,” he said. Before the kids at New City School left for the day, Magic House staffers listened to the students’ suggestions. One student wanted bags to take away the things they made. Another wanted mini figures in the Lego bins. Another liked the idea of a slime station or a tie-dye workshop. And then they got on the bus, ready to take what they learned back into the world. Valerie Schremp Hahn • 314-340-8246 @valeriehahn on Twitter vhahn@post-dispatch.com

sexual orientation or gender identity. Vandover added that she does believe there is a strong argument based on two cases decided earlier this year by the Missouri Supreme Court. In Missouri, “there are some areas that we can definitely catch up on,” Vandover said. “I think at this point we’re really just waiting for the legislature to make the changes that the Missouri Supreme Court indicated are necessary.” The incident reportedly took place the day after two burning pride banners were placed outside a gay-friendly bar in the Grove.


BUSINESS

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

‘Sell by’ or what? Expiration clarity sought BY CANDICE CHOI

Associated Press

If milk is a few days past its “sell by” date, is it safe to drink? U.S. regulators are urging food makers to be more consistent with labeling terms like “best by” and “enjoy by” that cause confusion. By clarifying the meaning of such dates, they are trying to prevent people from prematurely tossing products and to reduce the mountains of food that goes to waste each year. Even if you rely more on sight and smell to size up foods, you might be surprised by the risks and practices around food spoilage.

What’s new? Phrases like “best by,” “enjoy by” and “fresh through” generally indicate when a food’s quality would decline — not when it becomes unsafe to eat. To help make that clearer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently recommended companies stick with “best if used by.” Industry groups got behind the phrase after earlier guidance from

regulators, along with the more definitive “use by” for perishables food that should be thrown out after a certain date. But the FDA hasn’t endorsed the latter phrase, which could have safety implications. Regardless, the FDA’s recommendation isn’t mandatory, and consumers will likely continue seeing variations, in some cases because of local regulations. With milk, for instance, states may require “sell by” or other labeling.

How accurate are the dates? It’s difficult for manufacturers to pinpoint how long foods will stay good, given variables like how long they sit on loading docks and how they’re stored in people’s homes. Milk should be good for at least a few days after its “sell by” date, though exactly how long will depend on factors including pasteurization methods. Many people use dates on packages as guideposts and rely on their senses. Crackers might

taste stale, for instance, while more perishable foods might be discolored or smell funky. Foods like fresh meat and dairy are more vulnerable to spoilage in part because their moisture allows the small amounts of bacteria to multiply more quickly, said Martin Bucknavage, a food safety expert at Penn State Extension. “As time goes on, the few becomes more and more,” he said.

Is spoilage always bad? Your tolerance for spoilage likely varies depending on the food. Few would keep pouring chunky milk over cereal, but many might overlook a spot of mold on bread. Food safety experts generally recommend throwing out food at the first signs of spoilage. With mold, even a small fleck might be an indicator that there’s a lot more of it that you can’t see. “It’s kind of like an iceberg: It’s only part of what’s going on,” said Leslie Bourquin, a Michigan State University professor of food science and safety. An exception is for certain

dense foods where mold has difficulty spreading. With hard cheeses, for instance, food safety experts say it’s fine to carve out a 1-inch chunk around the mold and eat the rest. If you’re not sure about when it’s safe to eat around mold, the U.S. Department of Agriculture offers a chart. Keep in mind spoilage often isn’t what’s responsible for food poisoning: “Sight and smell aren’t always great indicators of safety,” said Bourquin. A slab of raw chicken, for example, might look fresh but contain salmonella. To limit the chances of getting sick from such germs, regulators recommend safe cooking and handling practices. Canning in a sealed, sterile container is a way to preserve foods for years, while freezing can also stop the clock on spoilage. But even in those cases, foods can deteriorate in quality depending on factors such as acidity and how tightly the package is sealed. In the meantime, the trend toward “natural” foods has prompted some food-makers to

purge some preservatives. But companies may find “natural” alternatives that perform similar functions, and new ways to make foods last longer are emerging. One company, for example, developed an edible peel made from plants that helps extend the shelf-life of produce like avocados.

How are food banks affected? Greater understanding about date labeling might encourage more donations to food banks. In 1996, a federal law sought to encourage donations by shielding individuals and companies that donate food from liability. But Michael Flood of the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank notes concerns about spoilage don’t end with a donation. People who receive donated food may also be confused about the meaning of various dates, and end up throwing products away. “We have the same problem the overall food industry has,” he said.

Phone companies obtain new tools in fight against robocalls BY TALI ARBEL

Associated Press

Federal regulators voted Thursday to give phone companies the right to block unwanted calls without getting customers’ permission first. The Federal Communications Commission’s move

could make call-blocking widespread and help consumers dodge annoying robocalls, which have exploded into a problem that pesters Americans on the level of billions of calls a month. One caveat: Phone companies don’t actually have to

do anything, and they could start charging you if they do — just as they now charge for some caller ID features and other extras. The FCC expects phone companies to offer these tools for free, but it doesn’t require them to. The rise in debt collectors, telemarketers and,

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most worrisome, fraudsters ringing up consumers’ phones have led the FCC and Congress to push phone companies to do more. The companies have been slow to act against such automated calls on their own. Robocalls have increased as cheap software makes it easy to make mass calls. Scammers don’t care if you’ve added your number to the government’s Do Not Call list, and enforcement is negligible. There are 5 billion per month in the U.S., according to call-blocker YouMail. That works out to 14 calls per person. Thursday’s FCC vote could potentially be a powerful counter against unwanted calls. While call-blocking apps already

exist, you have to turn them on or ask for them. Now, along with clarifying that both wireless and landline companies can block unwanted calls without asking customers first, the FCC said that wireless carriers are also allowed to block all callers who aren’t on a customer’s contact list. You would have to request that from your phone company. On the flip side, the measure might inadvertently lead to blocking of automated calls about flight changes, school closings and appointment reminders, Republican Commissioner Michael O’Rielly warned. Royal Credit Union, a small Midwestern bank, worries that

widespread call-blocking would make it harder for their fraud alerts and lowbalance warnings to reach customers. The rules will let consumers “opt out” and ask their phone company not to block anything. Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, a Democrat, criticized the agency Thursday for not requiring that call-blocking services be made free. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai believes phone companies will have an incentive to step up and offer these services for free. “These robocalls that are being placed on their own networks are a hassle and a cost for them to handle,” Pai said in an interview.

CLASSIFIED

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Condos/Townhomes 3 1 2 9 E d w a r d s Pla c e #2 0 2 , Maryland Heights 63043, by owner. 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths condo. Many update s , no ste ps. Must see- $79,900. 636-628-1919.

Open Sunday, June 9, 2-4 pm 334 Couch Ave, Kirkwood

Popular Modern Farmhouse Must see, near Kir kw o o d Park. This new construction beauty offers a neutral open floorplan perfect for casual yet elegant entertaining. Island kitchen features Shaker cabinets w/ under cabinet lighting, gorgeous quartz countertops, subway tile backsplash, professional line stainless appliances & walk-in pantry. Versatile floorplan offers a sitting room/ office that can also be a formal dining room, plus a great room & open concept dining. Job finished hardwood floors, Butlers pantry, mudroom w/custom cubbies, gas fire place w / c u s t o m mantle . Spacious master suite has 2 walkin closets, gorgeous bath w/soak i n g tub & s e parate s howe r. Guest suite has private bath & walk in closet. Bedrooms 3 & 4 share a Jack 'N Jill bath. French doors off great room lead to deck overlooking a very large sodded yard. Offered at $675,000. Nikki Mahn Cottage & Castle 314-799-2050 ï314-909-1156 smmahn@att.net

For Sale By Owner 6618 Arsenal St., 63139 2 br bungalow, full brick masonry home, many updates, must see to appreciate. Desirable Lindenwood Park neighborhood.

Open House Saturday & Sunday, June 8 & 9, 10am-4pm $164,900 Agents Welcome. Call Robert for more info, 314-249-4301 Rental-MO

Audi

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $121.00/wk

'16 Audi S6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 32k mi., #29179A $46,500

205 N 9th Street, St. Louis, MO 63101

314-421-2980 ********* Northwe st STL County. Large 3room, 1 br, 1st floor, assigned, offstreet pkg, access ramp, half-acre lot. $575/mo. incl. refrig., stove & util. 314-341-3168.

Rental-MO 8 8 7 9 Shannon Fox Cir, 63136, Ready now! 1 BR Apt., 1st Floor, u n f u r n i s h e d h a s s t o v e / frig ., water/sewer/trash incl., $500 Rent; $550 Deposit. 8 8 7 5 Shannon Fox Cir. 63136, Ready Soon! 2 BR Apt., 1st Floor, u n f u r n i s h e d h a s s t o v e / frig ., water/sewer/trash incl., $550 Rent; $600 Deposit. Call Ms. Ford (314)388-5850 Beautiful townhome in Chesterfield. 2 br w/ loft, fin. LL, gated community, $3,200 per month. Call 314-862-4717. COMPLETELY remodeled, 1 br apt, all electric with c/a and washer/dryer in unit. $30 app fee, $795/mo. Morganford/ C hippew a area. 3142219568

'17 Audi Q5, Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 45k mi., #P9953 $34,500

Acura '17 Acura RDX w/Tech Pkg., sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, silver, 33k mi., #P9918 $29,963

Audi '18 Audi Q5 Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 7k mi., #27838L $41,000

'17 Audi Q7 Prestige, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9934 $47,777

Land for Sale 520 ACRE HUNTING PRESERVE 90 MILES NORTH OF ST. LOUIS. LARGE LODGE, OUTBUILDINGS, PAVILION, SKEET/ TRAP FIELDS, LAKE/ PONDS, CAMPER HOOKUPS, ETC. SECLUDED OFF HIGHWAY 61. VIEW ONLINE KATONKAGAMEPRESERVE.COM. STARTING $3,200/ACRE. 573-248-4184.

'18 Audi A5 quattro sportback premium plus, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 7k mi., #27851L $41,000

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, #27848L $41,000

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Premium Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 6k mi., #27852L $41,000

'15 Audi S5 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9791 $27,777

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium Plus, quattro, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 38k mi., #P9922A $31,500

'16 Audi A5 Premium Plus, quattro coupe, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9835 $26,000

'18 Audi Q5 Prem/Tech Prem, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 21k, #P9675 $33,000

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 9k, #27847L $41,000

'18 Audi Q5 Tech Prem Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 12k mi., #28330L $40,899

'18 Audi Q52.0T Premium Plus, quattro, clean carfax, 1 owner, awd, #28649L $41,000

Chevrolet

Infiniti

'15 Audi Q7 3.0T Prem Plus, quattro, 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 39k mi., #P9933 $29,777

'03 Chevy Corvette, loaded, very clean, clean carfax, #44452B $17,790

'15 Infiniti, QX80, 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, #98194A $30,963

2018 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9619 $48,000

'15 Chevy Cruze LT, auto, loaded, clean carfax, #44369 $10,990

'17 Infiniti QX80 auto, awd, blue, #95533L $62,000

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27845L $41,000

'11 Chevy Impala LT, loaded, full power, clean carfax, #44509A $8,469

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 17k mi., #P9968 $53,000

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, awd, clean carfax, one owner, 8k miles, #28758L $40,000

'14 Chevy Impala LTZ 2LZ, loaded, full power, clean carfax, #44523A $18,469

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 13k mi., #P9801 $53,000

'18 Audi A6, Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, grey, #28600L $40,899

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 6k mi, Cert, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $38,100 #P9238

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $38,899 #28140L

'18 Audi Q5 Prem Plus/Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 8k mi., #27840L $41,000

'13 Malibu, loaded, clean carfax, very clean, #44673A $10,990

'14 Chevy Malibu LS, loaded, clean carfax, #44527A $11,990

Jaguar 2016 Lexus GS 350 4 door, 34k miles, clean carfax #P9588 $32,100

'18 Jaguar XF 35t R-Sport, 9k mi., sedan, auto, awd, #P9821 $43,000

Corvette '15 Chevy Corvette Z51 3LT, convertible, 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd manual, 51k, #44573A $42,990

'17 Audi A3 Cabriolet, Premium Plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 30k mi., #P9986 $30,963

Jeep '16 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 30k, #P9926 $28,777

Dodge '15 Audi S4 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 50k mi., #P9687 $29,000

'13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $28,899

'15 Jeep Wrangler Unlmtd Rubicon, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 50k, #97397M $31,000

'18 GMC Canyon 4wd, all terrain w/cloth, pickup crew cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 4k, #P9860 $29,433

Hyundai

Kia

'15 Hyundai S ona ta S E, loa de d, cle a n carfax, full powe r, #35151B $10,976

'16 Kia Soul Plus, H/B, loaded, clean carfax, #37184A $11,976

BMW '17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $38,433

Infiniti

Lexus

'17 Infiniti Q50, 3.0t Premium, Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 12k mi., #96195L $29,100

'18 Lexus LC 500h coupe, 6 cyl., RWD, silver, 10k mi., #P9941 $73,777

'17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $61,000 #95548L

'14 Lexus GX 460 Luxury, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 41k mi., #29153A $35,433

'15 BMW M3 4dr sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, manual, white, 29k mi., #P9684 $40,000

'18 Audi A5 Sportback Prem Plus, quattro sportback, 4 cyl., awd, white, 6k, #27841L $43,000 '16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, $30,899 #12382A

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27853L $41,000

'18 Audi A5 sportback premium plus, quattro, 4 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 7k mi., #27849L $41,000

'19 Infiniti Q50 3.0t LUXE, sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 16k mi., #P9984 $28,500 '16 BMW 3 Series Gran Turismo 335i xDrive, hatchback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 37k mi., #P9790 $26,777

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 16k mi., #P9886 $34,777

Buick '18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, 7K Miles, quattro, awd, clean carfax, #28209L $32,899

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Audi

'18 Buick Enclave Essence, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 2k mi., $37,000, #41129A

Lincoln '16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $16,990 #44323A

'16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $16,990 #44323A

'15 Infiniti QX80 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 97k mi., #98388A $30,777

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B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $30,899

'15 GMC Terrain SLE, clean carfax, only 31,xxx miles #44176A $16,569

The Families First Program at Missouri School for the Deaf is looking to hire part-time Parent Advisors. Families First is a home-based early intervention program for families with deaf or hard-of-hearing children ages birth through eight. A Parent Advisor provides support and strategies for families in child development, communication, language development, social/ emotional skills and transition to school. Parent Advisors will be trained with the SKI-HI curriculum.

INVITATION TO BID #19-050 COOL SPRINGS GUARDRAIL PROJECT CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

If you are interested in applying for this position, please contact

Jonah Wilson at 573-592-2572 or ff@msd.dese.mo.gov. IFB# SDA470MSD20001.

Mercedes Benz '16 Mercedes Benz AMG C 63 S, Sedan, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, red, 15k mi., #P9961 $53,000

'15 GMC Yukon SLT, suv, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 122k mi., #97246M $30,000

Crossovers '09 S550 4Matic: Black, Only 55xxx Miles, #44675A, $21,990

'17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $34,000 #P9651

'17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $38,000, #P9626

Subaru '18 Subaru WRX STI Type RA, sedan, 4 cyl., awd, manual, blue, 4k mi., #P9947 $43,500

Toyota

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $39,000 #P9665

'11 Buick Encla ve , loa de d, cle a n carfax, only 28k mi.! #44729A $23,990

'07 CHEVY EQUINOX LS: AWD, Loaded, Only 53xxx Miles, #44685A, $8,992

'19 Chevy Traverse LT, leather, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 20k mi., #P6798 $37,550

Chevrolet Trucks

'16 Chevy Colorado 4wd Z71 crew cab pickup, 6 cyl., 4wd, orange, 27k, #44245A $30,991

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double cab pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 4k mi., #420200A $34,990

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 4k, #44061A $39,990

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT double cab pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 2k mi., #44107A $37,990

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, cre w ca b, 8 cyl., 4 WD, 2k mi., $38,994 #42936A

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, 8 cyl., 4WD, a uto, bla ck, 28k mi., $28,990 #P 6784

'16 Chevy Silverado, 1500 LT, p/u crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 35k mi., #P6803 $31,350

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 51k mi., #P6797 $39,990

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '13 Ram Sport Crew, 4x4, loaded, clean carfax, #44452B $26,469

'19 Chevy Traverse LT, leather, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 18k mi., #P6793 $38,991

'17 GMC Terrain SLT, #L15981 $21,833 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Dodge Durango R/T, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 35k mi., #P9927 $30,777

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $41,100 #79760A

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, s port utility, 4 cyl., FWD, a uto, white , 5k mi., #35139A $31,473

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, red, 5k mi., #35396A $32,463

'18 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, red, 10k mi., #35288A $39,963

GMC Trucks '18 GMC Yukon STL SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 26k mi., #80333B $47,200

'16 Toyota Highlander XLE, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 14k mi., #P9914 $32,777

Mini vans '11 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax, #42365A, $10,990

'11 Honda Odyssey EX-L: Loaded, Full Power, Clean Carfax, #42365A, $10,990

Dogs AKC St. Bernard Puppies! Health Guaranteed. Breeding Saints for 27 yrs. $300 deposit. www.vonduewerhaus.com $1500 217-370-7669

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

sieversretrievers.com

'17 GMC Acadia Limited, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, silver, 26k mi., #P9951 $31,500

'18 GMC Yukon Denali, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 5k mi., #28951M $61,500

German Shephered puppies, AKC, Rin Tin looking puppies 1st set shots and They have been wormed $800. 618-304-6170 Golden Retrievers Puppies. AKC Sir e h a s O F A h ip c le a r a n c e . w w w .r o c k r i d g e g o l d e n retrievers.com $600 5736900109 Pekapoo puppies. Nice, non-shed. So c ia liz e v e r y w e ll. Chipped. Shots, vet checked. Text or call 573-692-2719 Schnauzer & Yorkie Mix Puppies, small, shots & wormed $250 & $300 Call 636-225-4185 Shih Tzu pups 8 weeks old; Boston Terriers; Frenchtons. Shots & Reg. Call (636)699-5911

Garage Sales '17 GMC Yukon Denali, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 17k mi., #29272A $53,500

IN THE MATTER OF: TD D (1 4 4 9 0 3 ) - DOB 5 /2 7 /2 002 AGE 16 years A CHILD ALLEGED TO BE A CHILD IN NEED OF SERVICES AND ANDREA MICHELLE DESHAZIER (MOTHER) TRACY SUTTLE (ALLEGED FATHER) AND ANY UNKNOWN ALLEGED FATHERS

63368

TO:Tracy Suttle and Any Unknown Alleged Father Whereabouts unknown

Cherrywood Parc Subdivision Garage Sale Sat, 6/8/19, 7am-noon. Hwy K between Hwy N and Hutchings Farm. Sponsored By: Tina & Christine Real Living Now Real Estate 636-379-2378 63368 SAL E: 1 0 3 Sunnyside Estates Ct 63368 6/8 6- 11am Decor,Tech,Toys,Furn,Golf

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Bids for St. Louis Community College on B0003824 for Shoretel Maintenance will be received until 2:00 P.M. (local time) on Friday, June 21, 2019 at the Dept. of Purchasing, 3221 McKelvey Road; Bridgeton, MO 63044, and immediately thereafter opened and read. Bid documents can be accessed o n o u r w e b s it e at w w w . stlcc.edu/purchasing or by calling (314) 539-5227. EOE/AA Employer.

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION TO ALL CREDITORS OF AND CLAIMANTS AGAINST THE MIDWEST INDEPENDENT COIN PAYPHONE ASSOCIATION On March 18, 2019, the MIDWEST INDEPENDENT COIN PAYPHONE ASSOCIATION filed its Articles of Dissolution with the Missouri Secretary of State. The dissolution was effective on March 18, 2019. You are hereby notified that if you believe you have a claim against t h e M I DWEST I NDEPENDENT C O I N P A Y P H O N E ASSOCIATION, you must submit immediately a summary in writing of the circumstances surrounding your claim to the Association at 25 Meadow Ridge Drive, St. Peters, MO 63376. The summary of your claim must include the following information: 1.T h e n a m e , a d d r e s s a n d telephone number of the claimant. 2.The date of the event on which the claim is based. 3.A brief description of the nature of the debt and the amount and any documentation of the claim. All claims against the MIDWEST INDEPENDENT COIN PAYPHONE ASSOCIATION will be barred unless the proceeding to enforce the claim is commenced within two (2) y ears of the publication of this notice.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the a b o ve n o te d p a re n t wh o s e whereabouts are unknown, as well as Any Unknown Alleged Fathers, whose whereabouts are also unknown, that the Indiana Department of Child Services has filed its Verified Petition Alleging the child to be in Need of Services, in accordance with I.C. 31-34-9-3, and that an adjudication hearing has be e n s che dule d with the Court. YO U A RE HEREB Y COMMANDED to appear before the Judge of the Marion Superior Court, 2451 N. Keystone Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46218, 317-3278392 for a(n) Default Hearing on 8/7/2019 at 9:30 AM in JUVENILE COURT ROOM 0 1 4 th Floor At said hearing, the Court will conside r the Pe tition and e vide nce thereon and will render its decision as to whether the above named minor child is child in need of services and shall enter adjudication accordingly. Your failure to appear after lawful notice will be deemed as your default and waiver to be present at said hearing. U P O N EN T R Y O F S A ID A DJ UDIC A TIO N, A DISPOSITIONAL HEARING will be held in which the Court will consider (1) Alternatives for the care, treatment, or rehabilitation for the child; (2 ) The necessity, nature, and extent of your participation in the program of care, treatment, or rehabilitation for the child; and (3) Your financial responsibility for any s e rvice s provided for the parent, guardian or custodian of the child including child support. YO U MU S T R ES P O N D b y appearing in person or by an attorney within thirty (30) days after the last publication of this notice, and in the event you fail to do so, an adjudication on s aid petition, judgment by default, may be entered against you, or the court may proceed in your absence, without further notice. /s/ Myla Eldridge Ordered, Myla Eldridge Clerk of said Court, this 5/22/19 Brandi-Janai Nicole Carter, 32535-49 Attorney, Indiana Department of Child Services 4150 N. Keystone Avenue Indianapolis, IN 46205 Fax: 317-542-1323 Work: 317-968-4300

62040 6/7-8, 7am-?, 2652 Adam St. Antqs, baby stuff, name brand clothing, live plants, tools, etc.

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REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is accepting sealed bids for the Cool Springs Rd. Guardrail Project. The Contract Documents, including specifications, are on file at the office of Drex el Te chnologie s at http://planroom.drexeltech.com a n d a re o p e n f o r p u b l i c inspection. Copies of documents may be obtained from Drexel Technologies for the fee listed online. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ì19050 Cool Springs Guardrail Project“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 1 0 0 North Main S treet, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 1 0 :0 0 A.M. CDT, June 26, 2019. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Public Works Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

INVITATION TO PROVIDE PROPOSAL #19-049 ANNEXATION ANALYSIS CONSULTANT CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon is soliciting sealed proposals for an annexation analysis consultant. Specific a t i o n s a re a v a ila b le a t http://w w w . ofallon.m o . us/bidopportunities.

H a r r i s - S t o w e S t a t e U n iv e r s it y (HSSU) is requesting sealed proposals to remedy condensation issues at the Bosley Residence Hall dining facility located on the University's campus at 3017 Laclede Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63103. A mandatory Pre-bid conference and walk-through of the Bosley Residence Hall dining facility will be held on Thursday, June 12, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. The sealed proposals will be acc e p t e d ( i n s e a l e d e n v e lo p es, clearly marked "PROPOSAL FOR BOSLEY RESIDENCE HALL DINING FACILITY CONDENSATION" in the Purchasing Office (Room 105) of the Dr. Henry Givens, Jr., Administration (HGA) building located at 3026 Laclede Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63103, until Wednesday, June 19, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. The proposals will then be publicly opened and read in Room 123 of the HGA building at 10:15 a.m. A Minority Business Enterprises participation g o a l o f 10% and Women Business Enterprises participation goal of 10% has been established for this contract. A copy of the Request for Proposals can be obtained by contacting Barbara A. Morrow at email address: morrowb@hssu.edu, faxing: (314) 340-3322 or calling (314) 340-5763. The University reserves the right to reject any and all proposals and to waive all informalities in proposals.

The Fox C-6 School District is accepting proposals for Cipafilter W e b F ilte rin g . D e ta ils can be found at http://www.fox.k12.mo.us/ community/invitations _to_bid-1

Proposals must be submitted in a sealed envelope clearly marked “RFP #19-049 Annexation Analysis Consultantî to the City of O’Fallon attn., Julie Moellering, 1 0 0 North Main S treet, O’Fallon MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 3 : 0 0 P. M. C DT, June 2 7 , 2 0 1 9 . There will be no public opening of the proposals. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best proposal as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, June 19, 2019 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time. PETITION 19-L Central County Fire and Rescue requests a variance to allow parking on an unpaved surface on a 10.2 +/-acre parcel in the I-2 Heavy Industrial District. The property is located on the south side of Ecology Drive, east of Mid Rivers Mall Drive – 10100 Ecology Drive. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at St. Peters City Hall, One St Peters Centre Boulevard, St. Peters Missouri 63376; Phone 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, extension 670. LOCATION MAP

Veterans Memorial Pkwy. Leonard Dr.

N.T.S

N. Cloverleaf Dr. Site Area S. Cloverleaf Dr.

Mexico Road

North

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on file at the City of St. Peters Planning Department. Notice of Winding Up to All Creditors of and Claimants Against Newcastle Financial LLC Newcastle Financial LLC, a Missouri limited liability company (the “ C o mp a n y ” ) , filed a Notice o f Winding Up with the Missouri Secretary of State Office, Corporations Division on M ay 28, 2019. Pursuant to Section 347.141 of the Missouri Limited Liability Company Act, persons with claims against the Company should present them in accordance with such Notice of Winding Up. In order to file a claim with the Company, you must first furnish the (i) name and address of claimant; (ii) amount of the claim; (iii) date in which the claim arose; (iv) basis for the claim; and (v) documentation of the claim. Claims must be mailed to M atthew Fillo, 16600 Sw ingley R i d g e R o a d , C h e s t e r f i e l d, Missouri 63017-1706. All claims a g a i n s t t h e C o mp a n y w ill b e barred unless proceedings to enforce the claim are commenced within three years after the publication of the notices authorized by statute, whichever is published last.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Maplewood City Council will hold a public hearing on 6/25/19 at 7:30 p . m . i n t h e C i t y H a ll C o u n c il Chambers, 7601 Manchester Rd., Maplewood, MO 63143, to hear citizen's comments on a request by Verizon Wireless to install a 5G small cell antenna on existing utility poles at 7261 Gayola Place and 7402 Zephyr Place.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Maplewood City Council will hold a public hearing on 6/25/19 at 7:30 p . m . i n t h e C i t y H a ll C o u n c il Chambers, 7601 Manchester Rd., Maplewood, MO 63143, to hear citizen's comments on a request by Karen Smith to operate an antique store at 7290 Manchester Rd.

Bids/Proposals INVITATION TO BID BID #19-047 FEISE ROAD LOT IMPROVEMENTS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI

The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri, will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, June 19, 2019 at City Hall, located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard on Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time.

Notice is hereby given that the City of O’Fallon will receive sealed bids cle arly marke d ìBid #1 9 - 0 4 7 FEI SE ROAD LOT IMPROVEMENTS î on or before 2 :0 0 P.M. CDT, June 26, 2019 to City of O’Fallon Attn., Julie Moellering, Purchasing Agent, 1 0 0 North Main Street, O’Fallon MO 63366. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Public Work’s Conference Room.

PETITION 19- K Legacy Housing LLC requests a variance to allow a density increase in a Planned Urban Development (PUD). The property is located north of South Cloverleaf Drive and south of North Cloverleaf Drive at Leonard Drive (Lot B of Cloverleaf Park West Plat 12 as recorded in Book 21 Page 110 at the St. Charles Recorder of Deeds Office and an adjacent 1.0 +/- parcel which is part of survey 6-016-1979) – Pure Apartments.

T h e C o n tra c t Do c u me n ts , including specifications, are on file beginning June 10, 2019 at the office of Drex el Technologies at http:// planroom.drexeltech.com and are open for public inspection. Copies of documents may be obtained from Drexel Technologies for the fee listed online. There will be one (1) bid package associated with this bid. Please reference the detailed scope of work narrative provided in the bid docume nts . The work would include providing the necessary labor, materials and equipment to c o n s t r u c t s i t e infrastructure/roads/trails, construction of a new activity/ conference building, outdoor amphitheater, playground, comfort station, maintenance building, and salt storage building as detailed in the plans and specification provided with the bid documents. An optional pre-bid meeting will be held on June 1 3 , 2 0 1 9 at 1 0 :0 0 A.M. CDT located at the project site (390 Glengate Estates Drive, O’Fallon MO 63366). This address is located approximately 275 feet northwest of the intersection of Feise Rd. and Glengate Estates Dr. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Maplewood City Council will hold a public hearing on 6/25/19 at 7:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 7601 Manchester, M aplew ood, MO 63143, to hear citizen's comments on a request by Edward Neill of The Dubliner located at 2733 Sutton Blvd. for a full liquor and Sunday liquor by the drink license.

Notice of Public Hearing

STLtoday.com/homes

All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, Missouri 63376; 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, extension, 1670. LOCATION MAP

Veterans Memorial Pkwy. Leonard Dr.

N.T.S

N. Cloverleaf Dr. Site Area S. Cloverleaf Dr.

Mexico Road

North

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on file at the City of St. Peters Planning Department

C

'18 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 14k mi., #41163A $39,000

CAUSE NUMBER: 49D15-1810-JC-002641

RFP #: 57819154

'17 Mazda MX-5 Miata, RF Gra nd Touring, coupe , 4 cyl., RWD, 6 spd ma nua l, re d, 25k mi., #P 6674 $24,973

618.396.2494 '16 GMC Sierra 1500 SLE double cab pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 34k mi., #P6806 $29,990

STATE OF INDIANA IN THE MARION SUPERIOR COURT COUNTY OF Marion

S UMMONS FOR S ERVIC E BY PUBLIC ATION & NOTIC E OF CHILD IN NEED OF SERVICES HEARING

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Public Notices

63131: Sat. June 8, 8am till noon. Dougherty Lake Su b d. off Des Peres Rd. Sandy Baker, RE/MAX Results, 314-221-7677

Public Notices

Volvo

'16 Chevy Colorado 4wd Z71 crew cab pickup, 6 cyl., 4wd, orange, 27k, #44245A $30,991

Sponsored by Nancy Schmidt 314-603-9938

Merchandise Wanted

'12 Chevy Tra ve rs e LTZ, loa ded, cle a n carfax, #44498A $15,469

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double ca b pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, bla ck, 2k mi., #42599A $34,992

7 a.m. - 1 p.m. (off Meramec Bottom & Hawkins Fuchs Rd.)

Coldwell Banker Gundaker 314-849-2880

'18 Toyota Camry SE, loaded, clean carfax, full power, #42629B $20,990

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 3k, #P6799 $38,990

Meadowgreen Trails & Hawks View Estates Garage Sale!

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $40,899 #28175L

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 103k mi., #79492B $28,000

'16 CREW CAB DUALLY 4x4: Loa de d, Only 37xxx Mile s ! #44410A, $47,876

63129:

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'15 Toyota 4Runner Trail, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 10k mi., #P9804A $32,777

'16 Volvo XC90 SUV #L1591 $35,810 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

63043 - Country Place Su b d . in Maryland Heights - H W Y 270 to W. on Dorsett Rd. to R. on Pheasant Run Dr. cross over Ameling Rd. and you are there! Sat. June 8, 8 a m - N o o n , H u g e 3 0 F a m ily Subdivision Garage Sale, Rain or Shine. Don't Miss It!

Sport Utility

Porsche '15 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S, Cabriolet, 6 cyl., RWD, 7 spd, black, 3k mi., #P9962 $96,000

Garage Sales

Bids/Proposals

Cave Springs Blvd.

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $62,777

Bids/Proposals

Cave Springs Blvd.

'11 Mazda 3 Touring, Black, Very Clean, #37155A $9,990

PARENT ADVISORS

Jungermann Rd.

GMC Trucks '17 GMC Yukon XL Denali, white, auto, 4wd, 19k mi., #79897A $55,000

Jungermann Rd.

Mazda '18 GMC Acadia Denali, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 21k mi., #97319A $34,433

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STANLEY CUP FINAL — SEE OUR SPECIAL SECTION

BLUES ONE WIN AWAY FRiday • 06.07.2019 • C

DEJONG’S PATIENCE PAYS After teammate’s tip, he jumps on changeup for winning home run BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

At three for his last 46, Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong had about had it. “I didn’t even want to look at the stats,” he said. Still, DeJong had enough patience to wait on a 2-2 changeup from Cincinnati’s Michael Lorenzen in the seventh inning Thursday at Busch Stadium. DeJong stroked a two-run homer to left to break a 1-1 tie and give the Cardinals a 3-1 win in the finale of a series abbreviated to two games by the previous night’s rain. The extra-base hit and runs batted in were the first for DeJong since May 19. The homer was his ninth of the season and came after late-game replacement Yairo Munoz opened the inning with a single to left center. Although neither Paul Goldschmidt nor Yadier Molina had anything to do with the rally on the field, they provided behindthe-scenes assistance. “Goldy gave me a tip before I went up there,” DeJong said. “He said (Lorenzen) has been using his DAVID CARSON PHOTOS, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM changeup more to righties and I saw against Munoz he threw two Paul DeJong, left, is congratulated by teammates after smacking a tiebreaking two-run homer in seventh inning Thursday against the Reds. or three. So it wasn’t in the back of my mind that I was looking for STEady dECLiNES a changeup, it was more protecting myself against the low and in A look at the team's on-base-plus-slugging percentage over the last 35 games, along with changeup that he’d try and get me those of select players. to chase.” The changeup was neither parTeam OPS Carpenter DeJong Goldschmidt Ozuna ticularly low or inside. And DeJong 1.050 had only his fourth hit, third out of the infield, since a weekend series .000 three weeks ago at Texas. “It takes some mental tough.950 ness to overcome things like that,” DeJong said. “Being confident in .900

Please see CARDINALS, Page C5 .850 .800 .750

Cardinals 3, Reds 1

The team’s OPS declined 70 points in 35 games

.700

Up next: 1:20 p.m. Friday at Cubs, FSM

.650

Mikolas (4-5, 4.41) vs. Hamels (4-2, 3.62)

.600 25 32 39 Source: baseball-reference.com

46

53

60

Cardinals starter Dakota Hudson completed his fifth straight quality start, going 6 1/3 and allowing just one run.

> Gant continues his strong season. C5

SLU | YEAR IN REVIEW

WOMEN’S WORLD CUP

The fight for equal footing SLU boasts better soccer

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

United States forward Tobin Heath jumps into the arms of Megan Rapinoe after Heath scored during an exhibition at Busch Stadium last month.

World Cup set to begin as players continue battle for better pay, support BY ANNE M. PETERSON

Associated Press

The world’s best player won’t be at the Women’s World Cup, but the world’s best team will be, with both sides taking a stand for equality. The U.S. national team, ranked No. 1 globally, will try to defend its title in soccer’s premier tournament, which kicks off Friday in Paris. While the Americans make their way around France for the monthlong event, back at home they’re all part

World Cup preview > Players to watch. C3 of a lawsuit that accuses U.S. Soccer of gender discrimination. Meanwhile, Ada Hegerberg, the first female Ballon d’Or winner for the world’s top player, won’t be accompanying Norway’s national team. She stepped away in 2017 because of what she perceives to be a general disregard for women’s soccer by the country’s federation. The crux of her frustration is the uneven pace of progress and strategy in the women’s game. Hegerberg, 23, is at the top of her game. Please see CUP, Page C3

PHOTO COURTESY SLU

Head coach Katie Shields led SLU’s women’s soccer team to the school’s first NCAA tournament on the women’s side since the volleyball team in 2009.

Women were a highlight of 2018-19 along with the men’s basketball team BY STU DURANDO

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

At a university where soccer has generated the greatest historical athletic success, re-establishing some semblance of a national reputation is a priority at St.Louis U. Last season SLU’s programs made one concrete move and one systematic change that athletics director Chris May hopes will be a step toward that goal as the women’s team qualified for the NCAA Tournament and the men’s team transitioned to

a new coaching staff. The women were one of the biggest success stories of 2018-19 at SLU as coach Katie Shields’ team became the first on the women’s side to reach an NCAA tournament since the volleyball team in 2009. The men had some growing pains but saw a relatively young group put together a 6-4-7 record with a dramatically improved offensive attack. “These two programs can compete nationally and talk about competing for an Atlantic 10 championship regularly and being on the national stage competitively,” May said. Shields is 69-40-10 in her six seasons, Please see SLU, Page C6

SPORTS

1 M


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 6/7 at Cubs 1:20 p.m. FSM

Saturday 6/8 at Cubs 6:15 p.m. KTVI (2)

Sunday 6/9 at Cubs 6:05 p.m. ESPN

Monday 6/10 at Marlins 6:10 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 6/9 Game 6: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5)

Wednesday 6/12 Game 7 (if nec.): 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5)

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.07.2019

MEDIA VIEWS

Blues’ Vitale has rollicking rookie year in radio booth

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 6/8 at Hartford 6 p.m.

Saturday 6/15 Tuesday 6/11 US Open Cup vs. at Bethlehem Chicago Fire, 7:30 6 p.m. at Lindenwood

DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Saturday 6/22 vs. North Carolina 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Fri. 6/7: vs. Joliet, 6:35 p.m. Tue. 6/11: vs. River City, 7:05 p.m. Sat. 6/8: vs. Joliet, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 6/12: vs. River City, 11:35 a.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 8:55 a.m. Formula One: Canadian Grand Prix, practice 1, ESPNU 12:55 p.m. Formula One: Canadian Grand Prix, practice 2, ESPNU 3 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: LTi Printing 250, final practice, FS2 5 p.m. ARCA Series from Michigan, FS1 5:30 p.m. IndyCar: DXC Technology 600, Qualification, NBCSN 8 p.m. NASCAR trucks: SpeedyCash.com 400, FS1 BASEBALL 11 a.m. NCAA Tournament: East Carolina vs. Louisville, ESPN2 1:20 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 2 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Oklahoma State vs. Texas Tech, ESPN2 5 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Duke vs. Vanderbilt, ESPN2 6 p.m. Yankees at Indians, MLB Network 8 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Michigan vs. UCLA, ESPN2 BASKETBALL 6 p.m. WNBA: Dallas at Indiana, CBSSN 8 p.m. NBA finals, Game 4: Toronto at Golden State, KDNL (30), WXOS (101.1 FM) GOLF 8:30 a.m. Web.com: BMW Charity Pro-Am, second round, GOLF 11 a.m. LPGA: ShopRite Classic, first round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Canadian Open, second round, GOLF 11:30 p.m. Champions: Japan Championship, second round, GOLF 5:30 a.m. (Sat.) European PGA: GolfSixes Cascais, final Day, GOLF HORSE RACING 6:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Belmont Stakes handicapping seminar with Jay Randolph and Doug Nachman, KTRS (550 AM) SOCCER 8:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Colombia vs. Ukraine, FS2 11:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Italy vs. Mali, FS2 1:30 p.m. UEFA Euro qualifying: Denmark vs. Republic of Ireland, ESPNews 2 p.m. FIFA Women’s World Cup: France vs. Korea Republic, FS1 7 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC at Toronto, FSM Plus TENNIS 10 a.m. French Open: Men’s semifinals, NBCSN 4 a.m. (Sat.) French Open: Girl’s & Boy’s Championships, Tennis Channel TRACK AND FIELD 7:30 p.m. NCAA: Men’s & Women’s Outdoor Championships, ESPN

DIGEST Wentz gets four-year extension with Eagles Carson Wentz and the Philadelphia Eagles have agreed on a four-year contract extension through the 2024 season. The deal announced Thursday night adds four years to Wentz’s rookie contract. Wentz is 23-17 in three seasons as the starting quarterback but has missed 13 games, including five playoff contests over the past two years. The extension is worth $128 million with more than $107 million guaranteed, according to ESPN. Wentz has thrown for 10,152 yards, 70 touchdowns and 28 interceptions with a 92.5 passer rating. (AP) Lions get WR Kearse: Detroit signed receiver Jermaine Kearse to a one-year deal for $1.35 million. Kearse was added to the roster and Jordan Smallwood was released on Detroit’s third and final day of mandatory minicamp Thursday. Kearse has 255 career catches for 3,290 yards and 17 touchdowns,but just 37 receptions for 371 yards last year for the New York Jets. (AP) Stars sign Janmark, Polak: Dallas is bringing back forward Mattias Janmark and defenseman Roman Polak on one-year contracts. Janmark’s $2.3 million contract announced Thursday matches his salary from the 2018-19 season, when he had a career-high 19 assists among 25 points as the Stars reached the second round of the playoffs before losing to the Blues. The 26-year-old was set to become a restricted free agent. Polak re-signed for $1.75 million rather than become an unrestricted free agent again a year after joining the Stars. (AP) Woods, Spieth, Rose paired for U.S. Open: Tiger Woods, Jordan Spieth and Justin Rose — all U.S. Open champions — will be playing the opening two rounds together at the Open at Pebble Beach next week. (AP) Phil Mickelson, missing only the U.S. Open for the career Grand Slam, is in the same group as Dustin Johnson and Graeme McDowell. Johnson won the 2016 U.S. Open at Oakmont; McDowell won his U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. Two-time defending champion Brooks Koepka is in the traditional group with the U.S. Amateur champion, Viktor Hovland of Norway. Joining them is British Open champion Francesco Molinari. (AP) Another horse dies at Santa Anita: Yet another horse sustained a catastrophic injury while training at California’s historic Santa Anita Park racecourse and had to be euthanized,the 27th equine fatality at the track since December.River Derby,an unraced 2-yearold,sustained a fractured shoulder while galloping,trainer Ruben Gomez told the Los Angeles Times. (The Washington Post) Netherlands to Nations League final: The Netherlands took advantage of two defensive mistakes by England in extra time for a 3-1 win in the semifinals of the Nations League on Thursday in Guimaraes, Portugal. The Dutch will play the final of UEFA’s newest competition against host Portugal on Sunday, when it will try to lift its first trophy since the 1988 European Championship. (AP) STLFC moves Open Cup game: St. Louis FC announced that the U.S. Open Cup fourth-round match against the Chicago Fire of Major League Soccer (MLS) on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. will be played at Harlen C. Hunter Stadium at Lindenwood University, due to minor flooding at the World Wide Technology Soccer Park. Tickets are now on sale for $19 across the entire stadium. (Joe Lyons)

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Joey Vitale hopes to join the club. When the Rams won the Super Bowl to cap the 1999 season, Mike Bush was the team’s radio playby-play announcer. It was the only year he had that role with the team. In 2006, when the Cardinals won the World Series for the first time in 24 years, John Rooney was in his initial season in the team’s booth. He was a seasoned baseball broadcaster, but not with the Redbirds. Now Vitale could jump onto that select list of calling a St. Louis championship club in his first year with the team. Vitale, who had no previous broadcast experience, took over for Kelly Chase this season as the Blues’ radio analyst and next week could be on the air describing how their players are skating around with the Stanley Cup for the first time in the club’s history. “It’s been awesome. I never saw it happening this way,” he said of his rookie broadcasting season. “But I’ll take it.” It’s been a rollicking ride for Vitale, 33, who was a center and played in 163 NHL games over parts of six seasons with Pittsburgh and Arizona in a career that ended three seasons ago. He grew up in St. Louis and after his playing days ended returned to town. He had been working for his father’s construction company before the broadcasting opportunity arose, when Chase stepped down to spend more time with his family. So the hockey job came at a key time in Vitale’s life. He had studied journalism at Northeastern University, but this was going to be on-the-job training. “I don’t think I was very good at the beginning. I’m sure my closest relatives and people around me would say, ‘Hang in there, you’re doing great.’ But I think I’ve grown a lot in the role. I’d like to think I’ve improved.” He credits Blues radio playby-play broadcaster Chris Kerber, television play-by-play announcer John Kelly and especially TV analyst Darren Pang as being key mentors. “I got great advice from John, Chris and Darren,” he said. “And Darren Pang probably is my best asset I’ve used because I’m in the same position he has, he’s been doing it so long. He’s constantly talking to me about things to look for, observations on teams and players. Being next to him throughout this process has been tremendously helpful.” Pang, a former goaltender who works from ice level whereas Vitale is in the booth, said he has been glad to help and has had a good student with whom to work. “No. 1, as a fellow broadcaster you try to be there for any questions he might have,” Pang said. “We sit on the plane together, we go to dinner a lot, even between periods of a hockey game we will go back and forth sending texts.

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues radio analyst Joey Vitale (left) could cap his rookie season of working with play-by-play announcer Chris Kerber by helping describe the team’s first Stanley Cup championship celebration. “He’s helped me as much as I’ve going on in his life. You don’t know helped him. It’s been a pleasure to if his mom is sick, if his child was be with him.” up all night. “He and I talked about that in the early going. It’s not like the anBEARING DOWN Kerber is impressed by Vitale’s alyst has to be critical of the team, he just breaks the play down very work ethic. “He’s gotten better as the season honestly and (if you do that) lishas gone along, and he really has teners can deduce whatever they been great from the start,” Kerber need from that.” said. “He works at it, he cares. He talks with other analysts and play- BOSS AND PARTNER by-play guys about what they do Kerber is in the interesting powell, what they like best, and he sition of not only being Vitale’s utilizes it. I think he’s grown tre- partner on the air, but also his boss. mendously and done a hell of a Kerber is the team’s vice president job.” of broadcast and content develPang concurs, saying he gave opment and was instrumental in Vitale this advice at the beginning: Vitale being hired. Kerber said he “Dive into this. It will take you was impressed from the beginning, some places that are a lot of fun. about questions Vitale asked durI’ll try my best to prepare you for ing the interview process. whatever you want to do.” It wasn’t, ‘What does it pay?’ or How has Vitale done? that kind of thing. It was, ‘What “He’s soaked everything in, ev- makes a good analyst, what is the ery little thing you mention to him work that goes into being a good or point out, he listens to you and analyst?” Kerber said. “It was a is respectful,” Pang said. “He has a different type of question you got great feel for the game.” from Joe. It showed he already had a bit of an analytical approach.” Although Vitale lacked broadOBJECTIVE TAKE Unlike some analysts, Vitale casting experience, he certainly hasn’t been afraid to offer analy- didn’t lack verbal communication sis that is critical of the home skills. “I’ve always spoken quickly. I team, which is something at which Chase excelled. Fair, objective cri- come from a big Italian family, so tiquing gives a broadcaster cred- being able to speak quickly and relatively efficiently is important ibility with the audience. Vitale said he talked to Kelly, or else you kind of get overlooked,” Kerber and Pang — who also are he said, chuckling. Still, analyzing a play in a conobjective — about how to handle cise, articulate manner given this. “They all have the same motto: the time constraints of a hockey Don’t say anything on the air that broadcast is not an easy task. He you wouldn’t say to the player’s says his background has helped face,” Vitale said. “That is what I him in that aspect. “Playing hockey, you have to remember. If I say, ‘He’s not having a good night tonight,’ people think quickly because it’s such might think that’s critical. But I a fast game,” he said. “I’ve been could easily go to that player the playing this game since I was 5, so next day and say, ‘Hey, that just I think my motor skills and brain wasn’t your night.’ And he’ll go, really fire pretty quickly because ‘You know what, it wasn’t.’ For I’m constantly under distress at a me to criticize (in a manner) I hockey game or practice. I think wouldn’t say it to the player’s face, that (applies) not only at the rink I’d never cross that line. As long I but also in everyday conversations feel confident that when I see this or engaging in normal everyday player tomorrow I can say exactly life. I think it comes back to playwhat I said over the air, I feel it’s ing a sport that is very fast.” Vitale quickly has fallen in to just healthy criticism.” what could be an unprecedented Kerber concurs. “As a broadcaster, you live by year for the Blues. “I feel very honored to be in this two big rules” regarding criticism, he said. “The first is you don’t say position, I take it very seriously,” something you wouldn’t say to he said. “I’ve really enjoyed myself somebody’s face. The second is, if this year, it’s been an incredible you critique the play and not the season.” player, you’re fine. When you start Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 to critique the player and it gets @caesardan on Twitter personal, you don’t know what’s dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

Small bet on Blues could pay off big for local men BY DAN CAESAR

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Hundreds of thousands of people in the St. Louis area are pulling with their hearts for the Blues to win the Stanley Cup. Scott Kramer is one of them, but he also has a big additional rooting interest — a financial one. Kramer, who works in marketing for Enterprise car rental, was planning a family trip to Las Vegas in late December when the Blues were wallowing in the dregs of the NHL standings. He said he and his brother-in law, Craig Steckler, were discussing bowl wagers to place while at a Christmas Day gathering. Kramer was looking at betting lines on the app for the Westgate “SuperBook,” one of the biggest and most popular sports betting shops in Vegas. “He said, ‘What are futures on the Stanley Cup?’ and I mentioned some of the teams,” Kramer, 49, said. “He said, ‘What are the Blues?’ I almost dropped the phone. ‘I said, ‘Oh my God, they’re 300-1.’ His jaw dropped, he started reeling off (players’ names) — Tarasenko, O’Reilly, ‘Petro.’ He says, ‘This is crazy, they’re a lot better team than this.’ We started doing the math. All they have to do

is make the playoffs, then anything can happen. At 300-1 odds, it was ‘We have to throw something on this.’ We agreed we’d each throw 10 bucks on it.” So if the Blues win the Cup, their $20 ticket will be worth $6,020 — the payout for the huge odds plus the return of the stake. “Our feeling was, at those odds, if we didn’t put anything on them and this was somehow the year they made the run and won it, we’d probably regret it the rest of our lives,” Kramer said. He’s gotten a lot of mileage out of this already. “In January when I got back to work I told people I had bet on the Blues, and most were shrugging me off and laughing,” Kramer said. “As the months went by, they kept coming by saying, ‘You took the Blues to win, right?’ All of a sudden everybody started getting interested in the story. ‘Can I see a picture of the ticket? Oh my God, that’s cool.’” By the way, Kramer already is a winner on the Blues. “When I got to the Westgate I saw they were 150-1 to win the West, so I threw another $10 on that,” he said. That was worth a $1,500 profit.

PROVIDED BY SCOTT KRAMER

Scott Kramer holds his betting ticket on the Blues to win the Stanley Cup. But an even bigger payday now is possible. “It’s been crazy but fun,” Kramer said. “Even if they don’t win, the fun we’ve had on a $10 bet for each of us for the last six months has been well worth it just for the hope, the ride we’ve had.” PREGAME PARADE: Because of Blues mania, Fox Sports Midwest is doubling the length of its pregame program to an hour for the remainder of the Stanley Cup Final. Shows Sunday, and Wednesday if Game 7 is needed, begin at 6 p.m. KSDK (Channel 5), which shows the games, has its lead-in shows at 6:30 p.m., though an earlier start is possible. NBCSN and NHL Network have two-hour productions beginning at 5 p.m.


06.07.2019 • FRIDAY • M 1

PLAYERS TO WATCH

SOCCER

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C3

FIFA WOMEN’S WORLD CUP

Tobin Heath (United States) The midfielder doesn’t like doing fashion shoots and doesn’t get as much attention as some of the other players on the U.S. team, but she is arguably the most skilled player on the roster. She is known for her eye-popping ball-juggling, fancy dribbling, nutmegs and backheel passes. The 31-year-old New Jersey native helped lead the University of North Carolina to three NCAA titles, is a two-time Olympic gold medalist and played in the 2011 and 2015 World Cups.

Amandine Henry (France) The 29-year-old team captain has been a key player for European power Lyon for more than a decade and also played in the United States for the Portland Thorns. She is one of the world’s top defensive midfielders and can score from anywhere on the field. She won the Silver Ball award, given to the tournament’s second-best player, at the 2015 World Cup.

Fran Kirby (England) Kirby is one of the most diminutive players at the World Cup at 5 foot 2 and 115 pounds. She is also one of the most creative, explosive and talented forwards. Kirby plays for Chelsea and was named PFA Women’s Player of the Year for 2017-18. With England, she scored in the 2015 World Cup in a first-round match against Mexico but missed the knockout rounds with injury. Former England coach Mark Sampson nicknamed her “Mini Messi.”

* actual size

Carli Lloyd (United States) Lloyd is the oldest player on the U.S. roster at 36. She won the Golden Boot (top scorer) and Golden Ball (most outstanding player) at the 2015 World Cup, and this will be her fourth — and almost certainly her last — World Cup. She scored a hat trick in the 5-2 win over Japan in the 2015 World Cup final. All three goals were scored in the span of 16 minutes. Lloyd was voted FIFA World Player of the Year in 2015 and 2016. She scored the gold-medal-winning goals at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing and 2012 Olympics in London.

United States forward Alex Morgan

Cup

Dzsenifer Marozsan (Germany) The midfielder, who sat out all of the summer of 2018 after a life-threatening pulmonary embolism, is considered one of the best playmakers in the world. Marozsan appeared in a Bundesliga game at age 15 — the youngest player in history — and twice has been voted best player in the French league. She scored 33 goals for Lyon over the past three seasons and 32 for Germany.

From C1

She had a hat trick for Lyon in its 4-1 win over Barcelona in the recent Women’s Champions League final. In domestic games, she has 211 goals in 208 games. “We are happy for this debate to raise attention and respect for women’s soccer in the world, and I do view it as a big change-maker,” said Lise Klaveness, sporting director for the Norwegian Football Federation. “But I just wish she was in our team.” The U.S. team hopes to collectively be a difference-maker, too. Twenty-eight members of the current player pool filed the lawsuit on March 8 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, alleging “institutionalized gender discrimination” that includes inequitable compensation when compared with their counterparts on the men’s national team. Because the lawsuit is still in the early stages, it’s likely no significant movement will be made until the team returns home. Megan Rapinoe was asked whether the pay issue puts more pressure on the team, which will already be facing a strong field looking to topple the threetime World Cup winners. “I think that the huge media splash of the lawsuit is behind us and we’re obviously focused on the World Cup,” Rapinoe said. “But also it’s like this is our life, and there are a lot of things that we have to grapple and deal with: Family, friends, partners, media, pressures, games, World Cup, travel. So it’s just kind of just one more thing. This team always has a lot of media attention, and we’ve always had a lot of things on our plate so it’s not like it’s anything new, or all of a sudden we’re getting all the more attention. It’s sort of the same for us.” The 24-team tournament will be played at nine stadiums across France over the course of the next month, with the final set for July 7 in Lyon.

Marta (Brazil) The six-time FIFA Player of the Year and alltime World Cup leading scorer is desperate to win the one trophy that has eluded her. Marta plays for the Orlando Pride and is still a threat at 33. Widely considered the best female player in history, she developed her ball skills like young Brazilian boys — kicking around wadded-up socks and plastic bags.

Alex Morgan (United States) The most marketed American female player since Mia Hamm is the face of the defending champions and was the squad’s top scorer in 2018, with 18 goals in 20 games, including a hat trick against Japan. The 29-year-old forward has endorsements with Coca-Cola, Secret and Nike. She wrote a series of children’s books about girls’ soccer, has appeared on FIFA video games and has 5.8 million followers on Instagram. She also has been in the forefront of the battle for gender equality in the sport.

Megan Rapinoe (United States) She isn’t the biggest player on the U.S. roster, but she always gets noticed. Rapinoe is the team’s fiercest social justice warrior. She has slammed soccer leadership for its treatment of women, was the first openly gay woman to pose for the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue and has said she will not visit the White House should the U.S. team win the World Cup. She says she loves her country, but calls herself “a walking protest” of the Trump administration.

VAR In March, FIFA approved the use of video review for the World Cup in France. The Video Assistant Referee system, or VAR, was used at the men’s World Cup in Russia last year.

Khadija “Bunny” Shaw (Jamaica) Nobody in the world scored more than Bunny during World Cup qualifying. The 5-11 University of Tennessee forward scored a remarkable 19 goals in 12 matches, including three at the Women’s CONCACAF Championship to lead the Reggae Girlz to their first-ever World Cup.

Prize money The prize money for the World Cup will be $30 million, of which $4 million will go to the federation of the champion. While the total is double the prize money for the 2015 Women’s World Cup, it is a fraction of the $400 million in prize money for last year’s men’s World Cup, of which $38 million went to champion France. FIFA, soccer’s international governing body, says prize money for the 2022 men’s World Cup will be $440 million.

Christine Sinclair (Canada) The 35-year-old remains a force while competing in her fifth World Cup. She is on pace to reach 300 games and 200 goals for her career. She ranks second all-time in international goals — male and female — with 181 international goals, second behind American Abby Wambach, who scored 184. — Michelle Kaufman, The Miami Herald

Ticket fiasco

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

FORMAT Group stage: The top two teams in each group advance to the knockout Round of 16, along with the next four-highest teams based on point totals (3 pts for win, 1 pt for tie, 0 pts for loss). The tournament opens Friday with a match between France and South Korea. (FIFA world rankings with country) Group A: France (4), Norway (12), South Korea (14), Nigeria (38) Group B: Germany (2), Spain (13), China (16), South Africa (49) Group C: Italy (15), Brazil (10), Australia (6), Jamaica (53) Group D: England (3), Scotland (20), Argentina (37), Japan (7) Group E: Netherlands (8), Canada (5), New Zealand (19), Cameroon (46) Group F: Sweden (9), United States (1), Chile (39), Thailand (34)

Knockout stage: June 22-25, singleelimination round of 16 Quarterfinals: June 27-29 Semifinals: July 2-3, at Lyon, France Third place: July 6, at Nice, France Championship: July 7, at Lyon, France

Some fans who ordered tickets to World Cup matches were surprised last month when they discovered their seats were not together. The issue was especially problematic for families bringing young children. After an outcry on social media, FIFA said it would work with the local organizing committee to resolve the issues. Some fans recently reported tickets that had been delivered electronically were no longer available, with the message: “FIFA and the LOC are currently working on improving the seating arrangements for certain orders for a limited number of matches. If your order is affected, please expect to receive a dedicated communication shortly.”

Scheduling conflicts FIFA has also been criticized for scheduling the World Cup final on the same day as the Copa America final in Rio and the CONCACAF Gold Cup final in Chicago. U.S. coach Jill Ellis pointedly said: “In my own personal opinion, playing three big matches in one day isn’t supporting the women’s game. So there you go.”


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THURSDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Colorado San Diego Arizona San Francisco

W 35 33 30 28 23 W 34 35 31 30 28 W 43 32 31 31 25

L 27 29 32 33 37 L 27 28 29 31 33 L 20 29 31 32 36

Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .565 — — 4-6 W-2 20-11 15-16 .532 2 — 4-6 L-2 16-15 17-14 .484 5 3 4-6 W-2 17-10 13-22 .459 6½ 4½ 8-2 W-4 15-15 13-18 .383 11 9 7-3 L-1 11-18 12-19 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .557 — — 4-6 L-1 21-11 13-16 .556 — — 6-4 W-1 19-13 16-15 .517 2½ 1 6-4 W-1 20-13 11-16 .492 4 2½ 4-6 W-2 13-18 17-13 .459 6 4½ 5-5 L-1 15-15 13-18 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .683 — — 8-2 L-1 25-7 18-13 .525 10 ½ 8-2 W-1 18-12 14-17 .500 11½ 2 3-7 L-2 16-18 15-13 .492 12 2½ 3-7 W-1 14-16 17-16 .410 17 7½ 4-6 L-2 10-18 15-18

Wednesday’s results Washington 6, Chi. White Sox 4 Miami 8, Milwaukee 3 Arizona 3, L.A. Dodgers 2 (11) Chicago Cubs 9, Colorado 8 Philadelphia 7, San Diego 5 Pittsburgh 7, Atlanta 4 N.Y. Mets 7, San Francisco 0 Cincinnati at St. Louis, ppd. Thursday’s results N.Y. Mets 7, San Francisco 3 Milwaukee 5, Miami 1 Pittsburgh 6, Atlanta 1 Colorado 3, Chicago Cubs 1 St. Louis 3, Cincinnati 1 Washington at San Diego, (n) Today’s games St. Louis (Mikolas 4-5) at Chicago Cubs (Hamels 4-2), 1:20 p.m. Cincinnati (Mahle 2-5) at Philadelphia (Eflin 5-5), 6:05 p.m. Arizona (Kelly 5-6) at Toronto (Stroman 3-7), 6:07 p.m. Atlanta (Soroka 6-1) at Miami (Urena 4-6), 6:10 p.m. Colorado (Senzatela 4-4) at N.Y. Mets (Matz 4-4), 6:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Kingham 1-1) at Milwaukee (Woodruff 7-1), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Fedde 1-0) at San Diego (Margevicius 2-6), 9:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-0) at San Francisco (Pomeranz 1-6), 9:15 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 39 37 33 23 19 W 41 31 29 23 19 W 43 32 30 30 26

L 22 23 29 39 43 L 20 31 32 36 43 L 21 28 31 32 40

Pct .639 .617 .532 .371 .306 Pct .672 .500 .475 .390 .306 Pct .672 .533 .492 .484 .394

GB — 1½ 6½ 16½ 20½ GB — 10½ 12 17 22½ GB — 9 11½ 12 18

WC — — — 10 14 WC — 2 3½ 8½ 14 WC — — 2½ 3 9

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 3-7 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-5 1-9 L10 8-2 7-3 3-6 6-4 2-8

Str W-1 W-2 W-4 L-1 L-2 Str W-1 L-1 L-2 L-2 L-6 Str W-1 W-2 L-1 W-1 L-1

Home 21-12 17-14 14-12 12-19 8-23 Home 19-9 17-15 17-14 10-19 11-20 Home 22-8 22-10 18-15 16-15 13-22

Away 18-10 20-9 19-17 11-20 11-20 Away 22-11 14-16 12-18 13-17 8-23 Away 21-13 10-18 12-16 14-17 13-18

Wednesday’s results Washington 6, Chi. White Sox 4 Texas 2, Baltimore 1, (12) Toronto 11, N.Y. Yankees 7 Boston 8, Kansas City 0 Cleveland 9, Minnesota 7 L.A. Angels 10, Oakland 9 Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 0 Seattle 14, Houston 1 Tampa Bay 6, Detroit 1 Boston 7, Kansas City 5 Houston 8, Seattle 7 (14) N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 2

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Thursday’s results Minnesota 5, Cleveland 4 Texas 5, Baltimore 4 Oakland at L.A. Angels, (n)

Today’s games Arizona (Kelly 5-6) at Toronto (Stroman 3-7), 6:07 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 6-2) at Detroit (Boyd 5-4), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (German 9-1) at Cleveland (Plesac 0-1), 6:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Chirinos 6-2) at Boston (Porcello 4-5), 6:10 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 6-4) at Texas (Lynn 7-4), 7:05 p.m. Baltimore (Ynoa 0-2) at Houston (Cole 5-5), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Nova 3-5) at Kansas City (Bailey 4-6), 7:15 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 5-6) at L.A. Angels (Heaney 0-0), 9:07 p.m.

Rockies’ Lambert stellar in debut ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Peter Lambert’s major league debut exceeded even his own expectations. Lambert allowed four hits over seven innings and struck out nine, helping the Colorado Rockies beat the Chicago Cubs 3-1 on Thursday. “What a great day,” Lambert said. “Wrigley Field. It was awesome. The atmosphere. The fans. it was crazy out there. I thought I would go out there and feel the heart pumping, but I was all right.” A 22-year-old righthander selected in the second round with the 44th overall pick of the 2015 amateur draft, Lambert was called up from Triple-A Albuquerque before the game. He retired 11 straight batters during a stretch before Kris Bryant doubled with one out in the sixth. Bryant scored on Javier Báez’s twoout single. He also singled on his first pitch as a big league batter. PIRATES 6, BRAVES 1: Colin Moran and Gregory Polanco hit consecutive home runs in the second inning and host Pittsburgh beat Atlanta.

Reports: Braves, Keuchel agree The Braves have reached an agreement to sign freeagent left-hander Dallas Keuchel, according to multiple reports. The deal is reportedly for one year and $13 million. Keuchel won the American League Cy Young Award in 2015, with a 20-8 record and a 2.48 ERA. He struck out 216 batters in 232 innings, while walking only 51 that season. He helped lead the Astros to a second-place finish in the AL West before Houston lost to the Kansas City Royals in a Division Series. The past three seasons, Keuchel compiled a 35-28 record with a 3.77 ERA. Overall, Keuchel has been chosen for two All-Star games and has won five Gold Gloves. Keuchel, 31, was drafted by the Astros in the seventh round of the 2009 draft after his career at the University of Arkansas.

Maddon: Kimbrel would need time CHICAGO — Cubs manager Joe Maddon was projecting how to use Craig Kimbrel, even before Chicago announced a deal with the free agent closer. Maddon said Thursday he thought the right-hander might be ready to pitch in three weeks. “I would imagine in the position that’s he’s been in, he had some kind of a strategy or program mapped out,” Maddon said. “The first thing you do is find out and then set up a program. You think about a three-week window, normally it sounds right.” BRIEFLY MARINERS: Outfielder Braden Bishop was hospitalized in Seattle after suffering a lacerated spleen from being hit by a pitch last week while playing in Triple-A Tacoma. Bishop started in center field for the Mariners on Tuesday night before realizing something was wrong. It was initially thought he had a sore neck. PADRES: Rookie shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. returned to the San Diego lineup Thursday night against Washington after missing 34 games with a strained left hamstring. PHILLIES: The team stripped Odubel Herrera’s likeness from Citizens Bank Park this week in Philadelphia. The outfielder is on administrative leave while facing domestic-abuse charges. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

15

Braves pitcher Mike Foltynewicz (1-5) has allowed 15 home runs, one shy of NL leader Kyle Freeland of Colorado. He allowed two homers in the second inning of Atlanta’s 6-1 loss Thursday at Pittsburgh. The 2018 All-Star has struggled so mightily he actually managed to lower his ERA to 5.89. — Associated Press

major league-leading 23rd home run and Mike Moustakas added two homers to lead host Milwaukee over Miami. TWINS 5, INDIANS 4: Max Kepler had four hits, including three home runs, and drove in four runs to power Minnesota over host Cleveland. Jose Barrios allowed two runs on two hits and a walk in six innings to get the victory.

YANKEES 6, BLUE JAYS 2: BREWERS 5, MARLINS 1: Aaron Hicks and Gio UrChristian Yelich hit his shela hit home runs to back

a sharp seven innings by J.A. Happ as New York beat host Toronto. Happ allowed a run on four hits.

RED SOX 7, ROYALS 5: Mookie Betts hit a two-run homer off Danny Duffy in a four-run third and Boston RANGERS 4, ORIOLES 3: defeated host Kansas City Hunter Pence hit a home to complete a series sweep. run and Ariel Jurado went RAYS 6, TIGERS 1: Travis six solid innings as host d’Arnaud hit two home runs Texas topped Baltimore. in Tampa Bay’s victory over METS 7, GIANTS 3: Amed Ro- host Detroit. sario and Dominic Smith hit back-to-back home runs to ASTROS 8, MARINERS 7 begin the first inning, then (14): Myles Straw led off Todd Frazier hit a tiebreak- the 14th inning with a triple ing drive in the eighth as and scored on Yuli Gurriel’s host New York beat San sacrifice fly, and Houston Francisco. outlasted host Seattle.

BOX SCORES Rockies 3, Cubs 1

Red Sox 7, Royals 5

Pirates 6, Braves 1

Twins 5, Indians 4

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tapia lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Story ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .292 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .337 Dahl rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .335 Rodgers 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .267 Desmond cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .240 Reynolds 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .180 Iannetta c 2 0 0 1 0 1 .254 Lambert p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals 32 3 6 3 1 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Bryant rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .271 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Baez ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .307 Contreras c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Bote 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .281 Almora Jr. cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Descalso 2b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .194 Quintana p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .042 Heyward ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 12 Colorado 000 200 100 — 3 6 0 Chicago 000 001 000 — 1 5 0 LOB — Colorado 4, Chicago 6. 2B — Story (14), Desmond 2 (16), Reynolds (6), Bryant (17). RBIs — Dahl (24), Desmond (23), Iannetta (12), Baez (40). SB — Schwarber (1). SF — Iannetta. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lambert, W, 1-0 7 4 1 1 1 9 1.29 Diaz, H, 3 1 1 0 0 1 2 1.93 Oberg, S, 3-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.65 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Quintana, L, 4-5 71/3 6 3 3 0 4 3.77 2 /3 0 0 0 0 1 5.65 Edwards Jr. Ryan 1 0 0 0 1 2 4.79 T — 2:40. Att. — 36,375

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 3 1 1 2 2 0 .271 Benintendi lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .267 Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .297 Martinez dh 2 1 1 0 0 0 .296 Travis ph-dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Devers 3b 3 1 1 2 2 0 .316 Vazquez c 4 1 1 2 0 0 .289 Chavis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .248 Nunez 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .248 Bradley Jr. cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .188 Totals 34 7 9 6 6 8 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .292 Mondesi ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .274 Gordon lf 5 2 3 1 0 2 .284 Soler dh 5 1 2 2 0 0 .239 O’Hearn 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .192 Cuthbert 3b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .375 Lopez 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .217 Gallagher c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .190 Hamilton cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .234 Totals 41 5 14 5 1 11 Boston 004 000 300 — 7 9 0 Kansas City 020 010 101 — 5 14 0 LOB — Boston 7, Kansas City 10. 2B — Martinez (12), Soler (14), Lopez (4), Hamilton (5). 3B — Vazquez (1). HR — Betts (10), off Duffy; Cuthbert (3), off Weber; Soler (16), off Walden; Gordon (10), off Taylor. RBIs — Betts 2 (29), Devers 2 (40), Vazquez 2 (22), Gordon (39), Soler 2 (42), Cuthbert (5), Hamilton (6). SB — Bogaerts (2), Nunez (5), Lopez (1). DP — Kansas City 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Weber 11/3 5 2 2 0 1 5.12 Brewer, W, 1-2 2 2 0 0 1 2 5.40 Walden 12/3 1 1 1 0 2 2.08 Brasier, H, 3 1 2 0 0 0 2 3.86 Taylor 1 2 1 1 0 1 6.00 Hembree, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.67 Barnes, S, 4-7 1 2 1 1 0 2 3.28 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Duffy, L, 3-3 21/3 4 4 4 2 2 4.68 Flynn 31/3 3 0 0 2 3 1.17 Barlow 11/3 1 3 3 2 3 5.64 McCarthy 2 1 0 0 0 0 6.59 Taylor pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored — Brewer 2-0, Walden 3-0, Hembree 1-0, Flynn 1-0, Barlow 2-0. HBP — Duffy (Bradley Jr.). WP — Brasier, Barlow. T — 3:26. Att. — 19,928

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna Jr. cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .280 Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .265 Freeman 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .307 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Markakis rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Riley lf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .329 McCann c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .281 Flowers ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .248 Albies 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .260 Foltynewicz p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Joyce ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Camargo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .370 Totals 33 1 7 1 4 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Newman 2b-3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Reynolds lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .346 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Bell 1b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .338 Moran 3b 3 1 1 2 0 1 .280 Diaz c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .298 Polanco rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .260 Tucker ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .198 Stallings c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .214 Archer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .063 Frazier 2b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .252 Totals 31 6 10 6 1 7 Atlanta 100 000 000 — 1 7 0 Pittsburgh 030 000 03x — 6 10 1 E — Newman (5). LOB — Atlanta 10, Pittsburgh 3. 2B — McCann (5), Bell 3 (25), Tucker (8), Diaz (5). HR — Freeman (16), off Archer; Moran (8), off Foltynewicz; Polanco (6), off Foltynewicz. RBIs — Freeman (38), Bell 2 (56), Moran 2 (32), Polanco (17), Diaz (16). SB — Donaldson (1). S — Swanson, Archer. LIDP — Newman. DP — Atlanta 2; Pittsburgh 1. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Foltynewicz, L, 1-5 6 6 3 3 1 5 5.89 Newcomb 1 1 1 1 0 1 3.04 Webb 1 3 2 2 0 1 2.89 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Archer, W, 3-5 6 6 1 1 2 6 5.20 Liriano, H, 5 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 1.21 1 Vazquez, S, 15-16 1 /3 1 0 0 2 1 2.30 Inherited runners-scored — Webb 1-1, Liriano 2-0, Vazquez 1-0. WP — Webb. T — 2:58. Att. — 18,232

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler cf-rf 4 3 4 4 1 0 .266 Polanco ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .336 Garver dh 5 0 1 1 0 4 .304 Rosario lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Gonzalez rf-3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .244 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Adrianza 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Buxton cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Astudillo c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 35 5 7 5 3 8 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Santana dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .284 Bauers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .214 Ramirez 3b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .204 Luplow lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .248 Naquin rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .265 Mercado ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .274 Perez c 2 1 1 2 1 0 .227 Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Totals 32 4 4 4 2 9 Minnesota 102 010 100 — 5 7 2 Cleveland 000 010 201 — 4 4 1 E — Polanco (8), Schoop (5), Ramirez (11). LOB — Minnesota 7, Cleveland 4. 2B — Garver (5), Santana (13). HR — Kepler (13), off Bauer; Kepler (14), off Bauer; Kepler (15), off Bauer; Perez (10), off Berrios; Mercado (2), off Rogers. RBIs — Kepler 4 (40), Garver (21), Naquin (11), Perez 2 (22), Mercado (5). SB — Polanco (2). SF — Perez. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Berrios, W, 8-2 6 2 2 1 1 6 3.14 Magill 0 1 1 1 1 0 4.50 May, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.27 Rogers, S, 6-8 2 1 1 1 0 3 2.25 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bauer, L, 4-6 8 5 5 5 3 7 3.93 2 Edwards /3 0 0 0 0 0 2.25 1 /3 2 0 0 0 1 4.91 Smith Berrios pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Magill pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Magill 1-1, May 2-1. HBP — Bauer (Adrianza). T — 3:02. Att. — 15,350

Brewers 5, Marlins 1

AROUND THE MAJORS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford can’t make an over-the-shoulder catch on a run-scoring bloop single by the Mets’ Jeff McNeil in the seventh inning Thursday in New York.

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dean lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .186 Cooper 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .278 Anderson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .230 Ramirez rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .329 Riddle cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .182 Prado ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .239 Alfaro c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Rojas ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .266 Smith p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .056 Herrera ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .226 Granderson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 14 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 3 2 2 0 1 0 .258 Yelich rf 4 1 3 2 0 1 .328 Braun lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .272 Perez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Moustakas 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .267 Aguilar 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .188 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Pina c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .130 Gamel lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Peralta p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Grandal c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Totals 31 5 9 5 2 4 Miami 000 001 000 — 1 5 1 Milwaukee 301 000 10x — 5 9 0 E — Smith (2). LOB — Miami 7, Milwaukee 5. 2B — Dean (5), Riddle (2), Herrera (6), Granderson (10). HR — Yelich (23), off Smith; Moustakas (17), off Smith; Moustakas (18), off Smith. RBIs — Cooper (16), Yelich 2 (51), Braun (32), Moustakas 2 (39). SB — Cain (6), Yelich (13). S — Peralta. DP — Miami 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smith, L, 3-4 5 6 4 4 2 2 3.41 Brice 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.70 Guerrero 1 3 1 1 0 0 3.75 Romo 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.29 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Peralta, W, 3-2 6 4 1 1 0 9 5.11 Jeffress, H, 6 12/3 1 0 0 1 2 3.10 Hader, S, 14-15 11/3 0 0 0 1 3 2.35 Inherited runners-scored — Hader 3-0. HBP — Jeffress (Anderson). T — 2:47. Att. — 25,409

Astros 8, Mariners 7 (14) Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fisher rf-lf 6 1 2 0 0 1 .262 Stubbs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Bregman dh-ss 6 1 3 1 1 0 .281 Brantley lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .329 Straw rf-lf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Gurriel 3b 6 1 1 2 0 0 .257 Chirinos c 3 3 1 2 4 2 .247 White 1b 6 0 3 0 1 1 .220 Marisnick cf 5 0 0 0 1 1 .248 Kemp 2b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .231 Mayfield ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .074 Reddick ph-rf 1 0 0 1 0 0 .307 Totals 49 8 14 8 8 8 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith lf-cf 6 0 1 1 1 1 .208 Haniger cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .220 Williamson ph-lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .127 Encarnacion dh 5 2 2 1 2 1 .244 Vogelbach 1b 5 1 2 1 2 1 .247 Beckham pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Seager 3b 7 0 0 0 0 2 .216 Santana rf 6 1 2 1 1 1 .267 Narvaez c 6 1 2 1 1 2 .282 Long 2b 7 1 0 1 0 4 .211 Moore ss 5 1 2 1 1 1 .211 Totals 53 7 11 7 9 16 Houston 300 010 110 100 01 — 8 14 0 Seattle 100 000 311 100 00 — 7 11 0 LOB — Houston 11, Seattle 13. 2B — Brantley (18), Kemp (5), Encarnacion (7). 3B — Straw (1). HR — Chirinos (10), off Adams; Bregman (18), off Milone; Mayfield (1), off Elias; Narvaez (9), off Rondon. RBIs — Bregman (44), Gurriel 2 (27), Chirinos 2 (28), Kemp (8), Mayfield (2), Reddick (21), Smith (16), Encarnacion (42), Vogelbach (36), Santana (45), Narvaez (23), Long (2), Moore (7). SB — Smith (16), Moore (4). SF — Gurriel, Kemp, Reddick. S — Marisnick. DP — Seattle 2. Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Verlander 61/3 5 3 3 0 7 2.40 1 /3 3 1 1 0 0 1.61 Harris, H, 10 2 Pressly, H, 16 /3 1 1 1 2 0 0.93 2 Osuna 1 /3 1 1 1 1 0 2.17 Rondon 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.86 James 2 0 0 0 3 4 4.93 Devenski, W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 3 4 4.01 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA 2 Adams /3 3 3 3 2 0 5.56 Milone 51/3 3 1 1 1 1 3.10 Elias 1 2 1 1 0 1 4.34 Bautista 1 1 1 1 2 0 9.00 Bass 2 2 1 1 2 1 2.16 Brennan 1 1 0 0 0 2 3.82 Gearrin 2 1 0 0 0 1 3.91 Festa, L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5.73 Inherited runners-scored — Harris 2-2, Pressly 2-0, Osuna 2-0, Milone 1-0. WP — Bautista, Bass. T — 5:06. Att. — 20,258

Rays 6, Tigers 1 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Diaz 1b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .257 Pham dh 5 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Meadows lf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .349 Garcia rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .300 Heredia rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Adames ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .256 Arroyo 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .211 Kiermaier cf 3 1 2 0 0 1 .245 d’Arnaud c 3 2 2 4 1 1 .171 Robertson 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .211 Totals 38 6 14 6 2 9 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goodrum ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Beckham 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Castellanos dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .263 Dixon rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .296 Stewart lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .240 Rodriguez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .207 Lugo 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Castro ph-3b 1 0 1 0 1 0 .269 Greiner c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Jones cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .242 Totals 33 1 8 1 2 7 Tampa Bay 100 200 030 — 6 14 0 Detroit 100 000 000 — 1 8 0 LOB — Tampa Bay 8, Detroit 7. 2B — Garcia (11), Kiermaier (10), Robertson (8), Castellanos (20), Stewart (12). HR — d’Arnaud (1), off Norris; Adames (6), off Stumpf; d’Arnaud (2), off Stumpf. RBIs — Meadows (38), Adames (18), d’Arnaud 4 (9), Dixon (19). SB — Dixon (3), Jones (6). CS — Kiermaier (3), Robertson (1). S — Kiermaier. DP — Tampa Bay 2; Detroit 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Stanek 2 2 1 1 0 2 2.88 Beeks, W, 5-0 41/3 4 0 0 0 2 2.76 Roe, H, 12 1 0 0 0 2 2 2.95 Wood 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 2.33 1 Castillo /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.12 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Norris, L, 2-5 52/3 11 3 3 1 6 4.60 Alcantara 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 4.67 2 Stumpf /3 2 3 3 1 0 4.20 1 Farmer /3 1 0 0 0 0 5.01 Adams 1 0 0 0 0 2 9.53 Inherited runners-scored — Roe 1-0, Wood 1-0, Castillo 1-0, Alcantara 1-0. WP — Wood. PB — Greiner (1). T — 3:08. Att. — 21,442

Yankees 6, Blue Jays 2 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 4 1 3 2 1 0 .323 Hicks cf 5 1 2 3 0 1 .238 Voit dh 3 0 0 0 2 0 .263 Sanchez c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Morales 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .189 Frazier rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Urshela 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .323 Estrada ss 4 1 0 0 0 2 .280 Maybin lf 4 2 2 0 0 1 .282 Totals 36 6 8 6 4 7 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sogard 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .290 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .236 Grichuk dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .232 Gurriel Jr. lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .191 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Drury rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Maile c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .181 Totals 34 2 8 1 0 4 New York 040 200 000 — 6 8 1 Toronto 000 001 001 — 2 8 1 E — Estrada (1), Guerrero Jr. (5). LOB — New York 7, Toronto 5. 2B — LeMahieu 2 (14), Maybin (5), Sogard (8). HR — Hicks (3), off Jackson; Urshela (4), off Jackson; Sogard (5), off Happ. RBIs — LeMahieu 2 (40), Hicks 3 (14), Urshela (24), Sogard (15). DP — New York 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Happ, W, 6-3 7 4 1 1 0 4 4.48 Green 1 4 1 1 0 0 9.16 Chapman, S, 18-19 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.46 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jackson, L, 0-4 31/3 6 6 2 2 3 11.90 Pannone 32/3 1 0 0 1 1 5.91 Mayza 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.32 Luciano 1 1 0 0 1 2 6.56 Green pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored — Chapman 3-1, Pannone 1-0. T — 3:07. Att. — 25,657

Mets 7, Giants 3 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Yastrzemski lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .238 Sandoval 3b 4 2 1 1 0 1 .285 Belt 1b 4 1 1 2 0 2 .246 Vogt c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Crawford ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .208 Pillar rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Duggar cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Anderson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .400 Longoria ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Totals 30 3 3 3 1 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 3 1 1 1 0 1 .252 McNeil ph-2b 2 0 2 2 0 0 .345 Smith lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .373 Davis ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .265 Conforto rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .253 Frazier 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .246 Hechavarria 2b-ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .258 Lagares cf 3 2 2 1 1 0 .196 Nido c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .217 Wheeler p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Ramos ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .281 Totals 33 7 13 7 4 3 San Francisco 000 201 000 — 3 3 0 New York 200 000 14x — 7 13 0 LOB — San Francisco 2, New York 8. 2B — Lagares (4). HR — Belt (9), off Wheeler; Sandoval (8), off Wheeler; Rosario (8), off Anderson; Smith (4), off Anderson; Frazier (5), off Melancon. RBIs — Sandoval (22), Belt 2 (27), Rosario (33), Smith (9), Frazier 2 (15), Lagares (13), McNeil 2 (17). SB — Conforto (4). S — Gomez. DP — San Francisco 3. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA Anderson 6 6 3 3 3 3 4.18 Moronta, BS, 3-3 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 3.25 2 Watson /3 0 0 0 0 0 2.38 Melancon, L, 2-1 1 5 4 4 1 0 3.70 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wheeler 7 3 3 3 1 6 4.61 Lugo, W, 3-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.76 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 2 6.29 Anderson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Moronta 1-1, Watson 2-0. HBP — Wheeler (Anderson), Melancon (Davis). T — 2:43. Att. — 28,857

Rangers 4, Orioles 3 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wilkerson cf-lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .236 Mancini dh 4 1 3 1 0 0 .306 Smith Jr. lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .249 1 0 0 0 0 1 .184 Broxton cf Nunez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Ruiz 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .236 Alberto 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .308 Davis rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .164 Sisco c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .200 Villar pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 R.Martin ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .172 Totals 32 3 8 3 2 11 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .225 Santana lf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .291 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .300 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Pence dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .288 Cabrera 3b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .251 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Guzman 1b 3 0 2 1 0 0 .217 Kiner-Falefa c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .231 Mathis c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .149 Totals 29 4 8 3 2 5 Baltimore 100 011 000 — 3 8 1 Texas 020 020 00x — 4 8 0 E — Davis (1). LOB — Baltimore 6, Texas 4. 2B — Davis (5), Sisco (1), Guzman (10). HR — Mancini (13), off Jurado; Pence (12), off Hess. RBIs — Wilkerson (15), Mancini (31), Davis (18), Santana (14), Pence (40), Guzman (19). SB — Villar (12), DeShields (10). CS — Guzman (2). SF — Santana. S — R.Martin. DP — Baltimore 1; Texas 2. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hess, L, 1-8 6 8 4 3 1 2 7.08 Castro 2 0 0 0 1 3 5.57 Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jurado, W, 3-2 6 8 3 3 1 6 2.78 Chavez, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.60 C.Martin, H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.70 Kelley, S, 7-10 1 0 0 0 1 1 2.38 Hess pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Castro 1-0. HBP — Jurado (Sisco). T — 2:29. Att. — 20,462

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1885 — The American Association allowed pitchers to throw overhand. 1906 — The Chicago Cubs scored 11 runs in the first inning off New York Giants aces Christy Mathewson and Joe McGinnity and went on to a 19-0 victory. 1936 — The New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians played 16 innings without recording a strikeout. The Yankees won 5-4. 1946 — Chicago pitcher Claude Passeau won his own game with a two-run game-ending homer in the ninth inning against Brooklyn. The Cubs won 2-0. 1950 — The Boston Red Sox collected 42 total bases, including six home runs and 23 hits in a 20-4 rout of the St. Louis Browns. 1968 — Oakland’s Blue Moon Odom lost his bid for a no-hitter when Davey Johnson singled with two outs in the

ninth inning. Odom settled for a 6-1 win over Baltimore. 1970 — Vic Davalillo of the St. Louis Cardinals got a pinch hit in the seventh inning — twice — in the same game. The Cardinals beat the Padres, 10-7. 1982 — Steve Garvey of the Los Angeles Dodgers became the fifth major leaguer to play in 1,000 consecutive games. 1989 — Ernie Whitt had three hits and drove in three runs as the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Milwaukee Brewers 4-2 in the first game in major league history played indoors and outdoors on the same day. With the threat of rain, the SkyDome’s $100 million retractable roof was closed. 2007 — Joe Torre became the 10th manager in major league history to get 2,000 victories as the New York Yankees defeated the Chicago White Sox 10-3.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THURSDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee St. Louis Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Colorado San Diego Arizona San Francisco

W 35 33 30 28 23 W 34 35 31 30 28 W 43 32 32 31 25

L 27 29 32 34 37 L 27 28 29 31 33 L 20 29 31 32 36

Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .565 — — 4-6 W-2 20-11 15-16 .532 2 — 4-6 L-2 16-15 17-14 .484 5 3 4-6 W-2 17-10 13-22 .452 7 5 7-3 L-1 15-15 13-19 .383 11 9 7-3 L-1 11-18 12-19 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .557 — — 4-6 L-1 21-11 13-16 .556 — — 6-4 W-1 19-13 16-15 .517 2½ 1 6-4 W-1 20-13 11-16 .492 4 2½ 4-6 W-2 13-18 17-13 .459 6 4½ 5-5 L-1 15-15 13-18 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .683 — — 8-2 L-1 25-7 18-13 .525 10 ½ 8-2 W-1 18-12 14-17 .508 11 1½ 4-6 W-1 17-18 15-13 .492 12 2½ 3-7 W-1 14-16 17-16 .410 17 7½ 4-6 L-2 10-18 15-18

Wednesday’s results Washington 6, Chi. White Sox 4 Miami 8, Milwaukee 3 Arizona 3, L.A. Dodgers 2 (11) Chicago Cubs 9, Colorado 8 Philadelphia 7, San Diego 5 Pittsburgh 7, Atlanta 4 N.Y. Mets 7, San Francisco 0 Cincinnati at St. Louis, ppd. Thursday’s results N.Y. Mets 7, San Francisco 3 Milwaukee 5, Miami 1 Pittsburgh 6, Atlanta 1 Colorado 3, Chicago Cubs 1 St. Louis 3, Cincinnati 1 San Diego 5, Washington 4 Today’s games St. Louis (Mikolas 4-5) at Chicago Cubs (Hamels 4-2), 1:20 p.m. Cincinnati (Mahle 2-5) at Philadelphia (Eflin 5-5), 6:05 p.m. Arizona (Kelly 5-6) at Toronto (Stroman 3-7), 6:07 p.m. Atlanta (Soroka 6-1) at Miami (Urena 4-6), 6:10 p.m. Colorado (Senzatela 4-4) at N.Y. Mets (Matz 4-4), 6:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Kingham 1-1) at Milwaukee (Woodruff 7-1), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Fedde 1-0) at San Diego (Margevicius 2-6), 9:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-0) at San Francisco (Pomeranz 1-6), 9:15 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 39 37 33 23 19 W 41 31 29 23 19 W 43 32 30 30 26

L 22 23 29 39 43 L 20 31 32 36 43 L 21 28 31 32 40

Pct .639 .617 .532 .371 .306 Pct .672 .500 .475 .390 .306 Pct .672 .533 .492 .484 .394

GB — 1½ 6½ 16½ 20½ GB — 10½ 12 17 22½ GB — 9 11½ 12 18

WC — — — 10 14 WC — 2 3½ 8½ 14 WC — — 2½ 3 9

L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 3-7 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-5 1-9 L10 8-2 7-3 3-6 6-4 2-8

Str W-1 W-2 W-4 L-1 L-2 Str W-1 L-1 L-2 L-2 L-6 Str W-1 W-2 L-1 W-1 L-1

Home 21-12 17-14 14-12 12-19 8-23 Home 19-9 17-15 17-14 10-19 11-20 Home 22-8 22-10 18-15 16-15 13-22

Away 18-10 20-9 19-17 11-20 11-20 Away 22-11 14-16 12-18 13-17 8-23 Away 21-13 10-18 12-16 14-17 13-18

Wednesday’s results Washington 6, Chi. White Sox 4 Texas 2, Baltimore 1, (12) Toronto 11, N.Y. Yankees 7 Boston 8, Kansas City 0 Cleveland 9, Minnesota 7 L.A. Angels 10, Oakland 9 Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 0 Seattle 14, Houston 1 Tampa Bay 6, Detroit 1 Boston 7, Kansas City 5 Houston 8, Seattle 7 (14) N.Y. Yankees 6, Toronto 2

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Thursday’s results Minnesota 5, Cleveland 4 Texas 5, Baltimore 4 Oakland at L.A. Angels, (n)

Today’s games Arizona (Kelly 5-6) at Toronto (Stroman 3-7), 6:07 p.m. Minnesota (Gibson 6-2) at Detroit (Boyd 5-4), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (German 9-1) at Cleveland (Plesac 0-1), 6:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Chirinos 6-2) at Boston (Porcello 4-5), 6:10 p.m. Oakland (Anderson 6-4) at Texas (Lynn 7-4), 7:05 p.m. Baltimore (Ynoa 0-2) at Houston (Cole 5-5), 7:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Nova 3-5) at Kansas City (Bailey 4-6), 7:15 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 5-6) at L.A. Angels (Heaney 0-0), 9:07 p.m.

Rockies’ Lambert stellar in debut WIRE REPORTS

CHICAGO — Peter Lambert’s major league debut exceeded even his own expectations. Lambert allowed four hits over seven innings and struck out nine, helping the Colorado Rockies beat the Chicago Cubs 3-1 on Thursday. “What a great day,” Lambert said. “Wrigley Field. It was awesome. The atmosphere. The fans. it was crazy out there. I thought I would go out there and feel the heart pumping, but I was all right.” A 22-year-old righthander selected in the second round with the 44th overall pick of the 2015 amateur draft, Lambert was called up from Triple-A Albuquerque before the game. He retired 11 straight batters during a stretch before Kris Bryant doubled with one out in the sixth. He also singled on his first pitch as a big league batter.

takas added two homers to RANGERS 4, ORIOLES 3: lead host Milwaukee over Hunter Pence hit a home run and Ariel Jurado went Miami. six solid innings as host TWINS 5, INDIANS 4: Max Texas topped Baltimore. Kepler had four hits, including three home runs, METS 7, GIANTS 3: Amed Roand drove in four runs to sario and Dominic Smith hit power Minnesota over host back-to-back home runs to Cleveland. Jose Barrios al- begin the first inning, then PIRATES 6, BRAVES 1: Colin lowed two runs on two hits Todd Frazier hit a tiebreakMoran and Gregory Polanco and a walk in six innings to ing drive in the eighth as host hit consecutive home runs in get the victory. New York beat San Francisco. the second inning and host YANKEES 6, BLUE JAYS 2: RED SOX 7, ROYALS 5: Pittsburgh beat Atlanta. Aaron Hicks and Gio Ur- Mookie Betts hit a two-run BREWERS 5, MARLINS 1: shela hit home runs to back homer off Danny Duffy in a Christian Yelich hit his a sharp seven innings by J.A. four-run third and Boston major league-leading 23rd Happ as New York beat host defeated host Kansas City home run and Mike Mous- Toronto. to complete a series sweep.

Reports: Braves, Keuchel agree The Braves have reached an agreement to sign freeagent left-hander Dallas Keuchel, according to multiple reports. The deal is reportedly for one year and $13 million. Keuchel won the American League Cy Young Award in 2015, with a 20-8 record and a 2.48 ERA. He struck out 216 batters in 232 innings, while walking only 51 that season. He helped lead the Astros to a second-place finish in the AL West before Houston lost to the Kansas City Royals in a Division Series. The past three seasons, Keuchel compiled a 35-28 record with a 3.77 ERA. Overall, Keuchel has been chosen for two All-Star games and has won five Gold Gloves. Keuchel, 31, was drafted by the Astros in the seventh round of the 2009 draft after his career at the University of Arkansas.

Maddon: Kimbrel would need time CHICAGO — Cubs manager Joe Maddon was projecting how to use Craig Kimbrel, even before Chicago announced a deal with the free agent closer. Maddon said Thursday he thought the right-hander might be ready to pitch in three weeks. “I would imagine in the position that’s he’s been in, he had some kind of a strategy or program mapped out,” Maddon said. “The first thing you do is find out and then set up a program. You think about a three-week window, normally it sounds right.” BRIEFLY MARINERS: Outfielder Braden Bishop was hospitalized in Seattle after suffering a lacerated spleen from being hit by a pitch last week while playing in Triple-A Tacoma. Bishop started in center field for the Mariners on Tuesday night before realizing something was wrong. It was initially thought he had a sore neck. PADRES: Rookie shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. returned to the San Diego lineup Thursday night against Washington after missing 34 games with a strained left hamstring. PHILLIES: The team stripped Odubel Herrera’s likeness from Citizens Bank Park this week in Philadelphia. The outfielder is on administrative leave while facing domestic-abuse charges. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

15

Braves pitcher Mike Foltynewicz (1-5) has allowed 15 home runs, one shy of NL leader Kyle Freeland of Colorado. He allowed two homers in the second inning of Atlanta’s 6-1 loss Thursday at Pittsburgh. The 2018 All-Star has struggled so mightily he actually managed to lower his ERA to 5.89. — Associated Press

RAYS 6, TIGERS 1: Travis d’Arnaud hit two home runs in Tampa Bay’s victory over host Detroit. ASTROS 8, MARINERS 7 (14): Myles Straw led off the 14th inning with a triple and scored on Yuli Gurriel’s sacrifice fly, and Houston outlasted host Seattle. PADRES 5, NATIONALS 4: Joey Lucchesi settled down after giving up four runs in the first inning, and the San Diego bullpen pitched four scoreless innings for a home victory over Washington.

BOX SCORES Rockies 3, Cubs 1

Red Sox 7, Royals 5

Pirates 6, Braves 1

Twins 5, Indians 4

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tapia lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Story ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .292 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .337 Dahl rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .335 Rodgers 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .267 Desmond cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .240 Reynolds 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .180 Iannetta c 2 0 0 1 0 1 .254 Lambert p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals 32 3 6 3 1 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .227 Bryant rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .271 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Baez ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .307 Contreras c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Bote 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .281 Almora Jr. cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Descalso 2b 2 0 0 0 1 2 .194 Quintana p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .042 Heyward ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 12 Colorado 000 200 100 — 3 6 0 Chicago 000 001 000 — 1 5 0 LOB — Colorado 4, Chicago 6. 2B — Story (14), Desmond 2 (16), Reynolds (6), Bryant (17). RBIs — Dahl (24), Desmond (23), Iannetta (12), Baez (40). SB — Schwarber (1). SF — Iannetta. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lambert, W, 1-0 7 4 1 1 1 9 1.29 Diaz, H, 3 1 1 0 0 1 2 1.93 Oberg, S, 3-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.65 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Quintana, L, 4-5 71/3 6 3 3 0 4 3.77 2 /3 0 0 0 0 1 5.65 Edwards Jr. Ryan 1 0 0 0 1 2 4.79 T — 2:40. Att. — 36,375

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 3 1 1 2 2 0 .271 Benintendi lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .267 Bogaerts ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .297 Martinez dh 2 1 1 0 0 0 .296 Travis ph-dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Devers 3b 3 1 1 2 2 0 .316 Vazquez c 4 1 1 2 0 0 .289 Chavis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .248 Nunez 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .248 Bradley Jr. cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .188 Totals 34 7 9 6 6 8 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .292 Mondesi ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .274 Gordon lf 5 2 3 1 0 2 .284 Soler dh 5 1 2 2 0 0 .239 O’Hearn 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .192 Cuthbert 3b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .375 Lopez 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .217 Gallagher c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .190 Hamilton cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .234 Totals 41 5 14 5 1 11 Boston 004 000 300 — 7 9 0 Kansas City 020 010 101 — 5 14 0 LOB — Boston 7, Kansas City 10. 2B — Martinez (12), Soler (14), Lopez (4), Hamilton (5). 3B — Vazquez (1). HR — Betts (10), off Duffy; Cuthbert (3), off Weber; Soler (16), off Walden; Gordon (10), off Taylor. RBIs — Betts 2 (29), Devers 2 (40), Vazquez 2 (22), Gordon (39), Soler 2 (42), Cuthbert (5), Hamilton (6). SB — Bogaerts (2), Nunez (5), Lopez (1). DP — Kansas City 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Weber 11/3 5 2 2 0 1 5.12 Brewer, W, 1-2 2 2 0 0 1 2 5.40 Walden 12/3 1 1 1 0 2 2.08 Brasier, H, 3 1 2 0 0 0 2 3.86 Taylor 1 2 1 1 0 1 6.00 Hembree, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.67 Barnes, S, 4-7 1 2 1 1 0 2 3.28 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Duffy, L, 3-3 21/3 4 4 4 2 2 4.68 Flynn 31/3 3 0 0 2 3 1.17 Barlow 11/3 1 3 3 2 3 5.64 McCarthy 2 1 0 0 0 0 6.59 Taylor pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored — Brewer 2-0, Walden 3-0, Hembree 1-0, Flynn 1-0, Barlow 2-0. HBP — Duffy (Bradley Jr.). WP — Brasier, Barlow. T — 3:26. Att. — 19,928

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Acuna Jr. cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .280 Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .265 Freeman 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .307 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Markakis rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Riley lf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .329 McCann c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .281 Flowers ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .248 Albies 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .260 Foltynewicz p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Joyce ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Camargo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .370 Totals 33 1 7 1 4 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Newman 2b-3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Reynolds lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .346 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Bell 1b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .338 Moran 3b 3 1 1 2 0 1 .280 Diaz c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .298 Polanco rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .260 Tucker ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .198 Stallings c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .214 Archer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .063 Frazier 2b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .252 Totals 31 6 10 6 1 7 Atlanta 100 000 000 — 1 7 0 Pittsburgh 030 000 03x — 6 10 1 E — Newman (5). LOB — Atlanta 10, Pittsburgh 3. 2B — McCann (5), Bell 3 (25), Tucker (8), Diaz (5). HR — Freeman (16), off Archer; Moran (8), off Foltynewicz; Polanco (6), off Foltynewicz. RBIs — Freeman (38), Bell 2 (56), Moran 2 (32), Polanco (17), Diaz (16). SB — Donaldson (1). S — Swanson, Archer. LIDP — Newman. DP — Atlanta 2; Pittsburgh 1. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Foltynewicz, L, 1-5 6 6 3 3 1 5 5.89 Newcomb 1 1 1 1 0 1 3.04 Webb 1 3 2 2 0 1 2.89 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Archer, W, 3-5 6 6 1 1 2 6 5.20 Liriano, H, 5 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 1.21 1 Vazquez, S, 15-16 1 /3 1 0 0 2 1 2.30 Inherited runners-scored — Webb 1-1, Liriano 2-0, Vazquez 1-0. WP — Webb. T — 2:58. Att. — 18,232

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler cf-rf 4 3 4 4 1 0 .266 Polanco ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .336 Garver dh 5 0 1 1 0 4 .304 Rosario lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .272 Gonzalez rf-3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .244 Schoop 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Adrianza 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Buxton cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Astudillo c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 35 5 7 5 3 8 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Santana dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .284 Bauers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .214 Ramirez 3b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .204 Luplow lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .248 Naquin rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .265 Mercado ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .274 Perez c 2 1 1 2 1 0 .227 Martin cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Totals 32 4 4 4 2 9 Minnesota 102 010 100 — 5 7 2 Cleveland 000 010 201 — 4 4 1 E — Polanco (8), Schoop (5), Ramirez (11). LOB — Minnesota 7, Cleveland 4. 2B — Garver (5), Santana (13). HR — Kepler (13), off Bauer; Kepler (14), off Bauer; Kepler (15), off Bauer; Perez (10), off Berrios; Mercado (2), off Rogers. RBIs — Kepler 4 (40), Garver (21), Naquin (11), Perez 2 (22), Mercado (5). SB — Polanco (2). SF — Perez. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Berrios, W, 8-2 6 2 2 1 1 6 3.14 Magill 0 1 1 1 1 0 4.50 May, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.27 Rogers, S, 6-8 2 1 1 1 0 3 2.25 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bauer, L, 4-6 8 5 5 5 3 7 3.93 2 Edwards /3 0 0 0 0 0 2.25 1 /3 2 0 0 0 1 4.91 Smith Berrios pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Magill pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Magill 1-1, May 2-1. HBP — Bauer (Adrianza). T — 3:02. Att. — 15,350

Brewers 5, Marlins 1

AROUND THE MAJORS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Giants shortstop Brandon Crawford can’t make an over-the-shoulder catch on a run-scoring bloop single by the Mets’ Jeff McNeil in the seventh inning Thursday in New York.

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dean lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .186 Cooper 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .278 Anderson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .230 Ramirez rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .329 Riddle cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .182 Prado ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .239 Alfaro c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Rojas ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .266 Smith p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .056 Herrera ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .226 Granderson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 14 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 3 2 2 0 1 0 .258 Yelich rf 4 1 3 2 0 1 .328 Braun lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .272 Perez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Moustakas 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .267 Aguilar 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .188 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Pina c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .130 Gamel lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Peralta p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Grandal c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Totals 31 5 9 5 2 4 Miami 000 001 000 — 1 5 1 Milwaukee 301 000 10x — 5 9 0 E — Smith (2). LOB — Miami 7, Milwaukee 5. 2B — Dean (5), Riddle (2), Herrera (6), Granderson (10). HR — Yelich (23), off Smith; Moustakas (17), off Smith; Moustakas (18), off Smith. RBIs — Cooper (16), Yelich 2 (51), Braun (32), Moustakas 2 (39). SB — Cain (6), Yelich (13). S — Peralta. DP — Miami 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smith, L, 3-4 5 6 4 4 2 2 3.41 Brice 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.70 Guerrero 1 3 1 1 0 0 3.75 Romo 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.29 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Peralta, W, 3-2 6 4 1 1 0 9 5.11 Jeffress, H, 6 12/3 1 0 0 1 2 3.10 Hader, S, 14-15 11/3 0 0 0 1 3 2.35 Inherited runners-scored — Hader 3-0. HBP — Jeffress (Anderson). T — 2:47. Att. — 25,409

Astros 8, Mariners 7 (14) Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fisher rf-lf 6 1 2 0 0 1 .262 Stubbs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Bregman dh-ss 6 1 3 1 1 0 .281 Brantley lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .329 Straw rf-lf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Gurriel 3b 6 1 1 2 0 0 .257 Chirinos c 3 3 1 2 4 2 .247 White 1b 6 0 3 0 1 1 .220 Marisnick cf 5 0 0 0 1 1 .248 Kemp 2b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .231 Mayfield ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .074 Reddick ph-rf 1 0 0 1 0 0 .307 Totals 49 8 14 8 8 8 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith lf-cf 6 0 1 1 1 1 .208 Haniger cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .220 Williamson ph-lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .127 Encarnacion dh 5 2 2 1 2 1 .244 Vogelbach 1b 5 1 2 1 2 1 .247 Beckham pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Seager 3b 7 0 0 0 0 2 .216 Santana rf 6 1 2 1 1 1 .267 Narvaez c 6 1 2 1 1 2 .282 Long 2b 7 1 0 1 0 4 .211 Moore ss 5 1 2 1 1 1 .211 Totals 53 7 11 7 9 16 Houston 300 010 110 100 01 — 8 14 0 Seattle 100 000 311 100 00 — 7 11 0 LOB — Houston 11, Seattle 13. 2B — Brantley (18), Kemp (5), Encarnacion (7). 3B — Straw (1). HR — Chirinos (10), off Adams; Bregman (18), off Milone; Mayfield (1), off Elias; Narvaez (9), off Rondon. RBIs — Bregman (44), Gurriel 2 (27), Chirinos 2 (28), Kemp (8), Mayfield (2), Reddick (21), Smith (16), Encarnacion (42), Vogelbach (36), Santana (45), Narvaez (23), Long (2), Moore (7). SB — Smith (16), Moore (4). SF — Gurriel, Kemp, Reddick. S — Marisnick. DP — Seattle 2. Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Verlander 61/3 5 3 3 0 7 2.40 1 /3 3 1 1 0 0 1.61 Harris, H, 10 2 Pressly, H, 16 /3 1 1 1 2 0 0.93 2 Osuna 1 /3 1 1 1 1 0 2.17 Rondon 1 1 1 1 0 1 2.86 James 2 0 0 0 3 4 4.93 Devenski, W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 3 4 4.01 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA 2 Adams /3 3 3 3 2 0 5.56 Milone 51/3 3 1 1 1 1 3.10 Elias 1 2 1 1 0 1 4.34 Bautista 1 1 1 1 2 0 9.00 Bass 2 2 1 1 2 1 2.16 Brennan 1 1 0 0 0 2 3.82 Gearrin 2 1 0 0 0 1 3.91 Festa, L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 1 2 5.73 Inherited runners-scored — Harris 2-2, Pressly 2-0, Osuna 2-0, Milone 1-0. WP — Bautista, Bass. T — 5:06. Att. — 20,258

Rays 6, Tigers 1 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Diaz 1b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .257 Pham dh 5 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Meadows lf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .349 Garcia rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .300 Heredia rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Adames ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .256 Arroyo 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .211 Kiermaier cf 3 1 2 0 0 1 .245 d’Arnaud c 3 2 2 4 1 1 .171 Robertson 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .211 Totals 38 6 14 6 2 9 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goodrum ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Beckham 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Castellanos dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .263 Dixon rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .296 Stewart lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .240 Rodriguez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .207 Lugo 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Castro ph-3b 1 0 1 0 1 0 .269 Greiner c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Jones cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .242 Totals 33 1 8 1 2 7 Tampa Bay 100 200 030 — 6 14 0 Detroit 100 000 000 — 1 8 0 LOB — Tampa Bay 8, Detroit 7. 2B — Garcia (11), Kiermaier (10), Robertson (8), Castellanos (20), Stewart (12). HR — d’Arnaud (1), off Norris; Adames (6), off Stumpf; d’Arnaud (2), off Stumpf. RBIs — Meadows (38), Adames (18), d’Arnaud 4 (9), Dixon (19). SB — Dixon (3), Jones (6). CS — Kiermaier (3), Robertson (1). S — Kiermaier. DP — Tampa Bay 2; Detroit 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Stanek 2 2 1 1 0 2 2.88 Beeks, W, 5-0 41/3 4 0 0 0 2 2.76 Roe, H, 12 1 0 0 0 2 2 2.95 Wood 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 2.33 1 Castillo /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.12 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Norris, L, 2-5 52/3 11 3 3 1 6 4.60 Alcantara 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 4.67 2 Stumpf /3 2 3 3 1 0 4.20 1 Farmer /3 1 0 0 0 0 5.01 Adams 1 0 0 0 0 2 9.53 Inherited runners-scored — Roe 1-0, Wood 1-0, Castillo 1-0, Alcantara 1-0. WP — Wood. PB — Greiner (1). T — 3:08. Att. — 21,442

Yankees 6, Blue Jays 2 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 4 1 3 2 1 0 .323 Hicks cf 5 1 2 3 0 1 .238 Voit dh 3 0 0 0 2 0 .263 Sanchez c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Morales 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .189 Frazier rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Urshela 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .323 Estrada ss 4 1 0 0 0 2 .280 Maybin lf 4 2 2 0 0 1 .282 Totals 36 6 8 6 4 7 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Sogard 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .290 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .236 Grichuk dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .232 Gurriel Jr. lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Hernandez cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .191 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Drury rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Maile c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .181 Totals 34 2 8 1 0 4 New York 040 200 000 — 6 8 1 Toronto 000 001 001 — 2 8 1 E — Estrada (1), Guerrero Jr. (5). LOB — New York 7, Toronto 5. 2B — LeMahieu 2 (14), Maybin (5), Sogard (8). HR — Hicks (3), off Jackson; Urshela (4), off Jackson; Sogard (5), off Happ. RBIs — LeMahieu 2 (40), Hicks 3 (14), Urshela (24), Sogard (15). DP — New York 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Happ, W, 6-3 7 4 1 1 0 4 4.48 Green 1 4 1 1 0 0 9.16 Chapman, S, 18-19 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.46 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jackson, L, 0-4 31/3 6 6 2 2 3 11.90 Pannone 32/3 1 0 0 1 1 5.91 Mayza 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.32 Luciano 1 1 0 0 1 2 6.56 Green pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored — Chapman 3-1, Pannone 1-0. T — 3:07. Att. — 25,657

Mets 7, Giants 3 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Yastrzemski lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .238 Sandoval 3b 4 2 1 1 0 1 .285 Belt 1b 4 1 1 2 0 2 .246 Vogt c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Crawford ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .208 Pillar rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .213 Duggar cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Anderson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .400 Longoria ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Totals 30 3 3 3 1 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 3 1 1 1 0 1 .252 McNeil ph-2b 2 0 2 2 0 0 .345 Smith lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .373 Davis ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .265 Conforto rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .253 Frazier 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .246 Hechavarria 2b-ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .258 Lagares cf 3 2 2 1 1 0 .196 Nido c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .217 Wheeler p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Ramos ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .281 Totals 33 7 13 7 4 3 San Francisco 000 201 000 — 3 3 0 New York 200 000 14x — 7 13 0 LOB — San Francisco 2, New York 8. 2B — Lagares (4). HR — Belt (9), off Wheeler; Sandoval (8), off Wheeler; Rosario (8), off Anderson; Smith (4), off Anderson; Frazier (5), off Melancon. RBIs — Sandoval (22), Belt 2 (27), Rosario (33), Smith (9), Frazier 2 (15), Lagares (13), McNeil 2 (17). SB — Conforto (4). S — Gomez. DP — San Francisco 3. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA Anderson 6 6 3 3 3 3 4.18 Moronta, BS, 3-3 1/3 2 0 0 0 0 3.25 2 Watson /3 0 0 0 0 0 2.38 Melancon, L, 2-1 1 5 4 4 1 0 3.70 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wheeler 7 3 3 3 1 6 4.61 Lugo, W, 3-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.76 Familia 1 0 0 0 0 2 6.29 Anderson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Moronta 1-1, Watson 2-0. HBP — Wheeler (Anderson), Melancon (Davis). T — 2:43. Att. — 28,857

Rangers 4, Orioles 3 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Wilkerson cf-lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .236 Mancini dh 4 1 3 1 0 0 .306 Smith Jr. lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .249 1 0 0 0 0 1 .184 Broxton cf Nunez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .241 Ruiz 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .236 Alberto 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .308 Davis rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .164 Sisco c 2 1 1 0 1 0 .200 Villar pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 R.Martin ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .172 Totals 32 3 8 3 2 11 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .225 Santana lf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .291 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .300 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Pence dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .288 Cabrera 3b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .251 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Guzman 1b 3 0 2 1 0 0 .217 Kiner-Falefa c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .231 Mathis c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .149 Totals 29 4 8 3 2 5 Baltimore 100 011 000 — 3 8 1 Texas 020 020 00x — 4 8 0 E — Davis (1). LOB — Baltimore 6, Texas 4. 2B — Davis (5), Sisco (1), Guzman (10). HR — Mancini (13), off Jurado; Pence (12), off Hess. RBIs — Wilkerson (15), Mancini (31), Davis (18), Santana (14), Pence (40), Guzman (19). SB — Villar (12), DeShields (10). CS — Guzman (2). SF — Santana. S — R.Martin. DP — Baltimore 1; Texas 2. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hess, L, 1-8 6 8 4 3 1 2 7.08 Castro 2 0 0 0 1 3 5.57 Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jurado, W, 3-2 6 8 3 3 1 6 2.78 Chavez, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.60 C.Martin, H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.70 Kelley, S, 7-10 1 0 0 0 1 1 2.38 Hess pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Castro 1-0. HBP — Jurado (Sisco). T — 2:29. Att. — 20,462

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1885 — The American Association allowed pitchers to throw overhand. 1906 — The Chicago Cubs scored 11 runs in the first inning off New York Giants aces Christy Mathewson and Joe McGinnity and went on to a 19-0 victory. 1936 — The New York Yankees and the Cleveland Indians played 16 innings without recording a strikeout. The Yankees won 5-4. 1946 — Chicago pitcher Claude Passeau won his own game with a two-run game-ending homer in the ninth inning against Brooklyn. The Cubs won 2-0. 1950 — The Boston Red Sox collected 42 total bases, including six home runs and 23 hits in a 20-4 rout of the St. Louis Browns. 1968 — Oakland’s Blue Moon Odom lost his bid for a no-hitter when Davey Johnson singled with two outs in the

ninth inning. Odom settled for a 6-1 win over Baltimore. 1970 — Vic Davalillo of the St. Louis Cardinals got a pinch hit in the seventh inning — twice — in the same game. The Cardinals beat the Padres, 10-7. 1982 — Steve Garvey of the Los Angeles Dodgers became the fifth major leaguer to play in 1,000 consecutive games. 1989 — Ernie Whitt had three hits and drove in three runs as the Toronto Blue Jays beat the Milwaukee Brewers 4-2 in the first game in major league history played indoors and outdoors on the same day. With the threat of rain, the SkyDome’s $100 million retractable roof was closed. 2007 — Joe Torre became the 10th manager in major league history to get 2,000 victories as the New York Yankees defeated the Chicago White Sox 10-3.


CARDINALS

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

Cardinals 3, Reds 1 Cincinnati Senzel cf Votto 1b Suarez 3b Dietrich 2b Winker lf Puig rf Iglesias ss Barnhart c DeSclafani p Garrett p a-VanMeter ph Lorenzen p Peralta p c-Peraza ph Totals Cardinals Carpenter 3b Gyorko 3b DeJong ss Goldschmidt 1b Ozuna lf Fowler rf Gant p b-Martinez ph Hicks p Wong 2b Wieters c Bader cf Hudson p Miller p Munoz rf Totals Cincinnati Cardinals

AB 3 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 2 0 1 0 0 1 31 AB 4 0 4 4 4 3 0 1 0 4 4 2 1 0 1 32

000 001

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 100 000

NOTEBOOK

H 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .266 .246 .277 .263 .238 .210 .294 .197 .158 --.231 .125 --.212

H 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 9

BI 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 11

Avg. .225 .204 .275 .271 .255 .248 .000 .292 --.237 .277 .238 .059 --.311

000 20x

— —

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

1 3

5 9

0 0

a-doubled for Garrett in the 7th. b-grounded out for Gant in the 8th. c-grounded out for Peralta in the 9th. LOB: Cincinnati 8, Cardinals 7. 2B: Senzel (8), Puig (5), VanMeter (2). HR: DeJong (9), off Lorenzen. RBIs: Barnhart (18), Carpenter (22), DeJong 2 (28). SB: Puig (8), Carpenter (3), Ozuna (5), Fowler (4), Wong (10). SF: Barnhart. S: Hudson. Runners left in scoring position: Cincinnati 5 (Suarez 2, Winker, Iglesias, DeSclafani); Cardinals 5 (Goldschmidt, Wieters, Bader, Hudson 2). Runners moved up: Fowler. Cincinnati DeSclafani Garrett Lorenzen, L, 0-1 Peralta

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 5 6 1 1 1 7 96 4.70 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.69 1 1 /3 2 2 2 0 3 28 3.27 2/3 0 0 0 0 0 4 4.50

Cardinals Hudson Miller Gant, W, 5-0 Hicks, S, 12-13

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 6 1/3 5 1 1 4 3 93 3.70 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.92 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.10 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.80

Inherited runners-scored: Miller 2-0, Gant 2-0. Umpires: Home, Dan Bellino; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Larry Vanover. T: 2:58. A: 44,654 (45,538).

How they scored CARDINALS THIRD Harrison Bader singles to center field. Dakota Hudson out on a sacrifice bunt to shallow infield, Tucker Barnhart to Derek Dietrich. Harrison Bader to third. Matt Carpenter singles to right field. Harrison Bader scores. With Paul DeJong batting, Matt Carpenter steals second. Paul DeJong grounds out to third base, Eugenio Suarez to Joey Votto. Paul Goldschmidt lines out to center field to Nick Senzel. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 1 left on. Cardinals 1, Reds 0. REDS FOURTH Derek Dietrich flies out to center field to Harrison Bader. Jesse Winker singles to right field. Yasiel Puig doubles to left field. Jesse Winker to third. Jose Iglesias is intentionally walked. Tucker Barnhart out on a sacrifice fly to left field to Marcell Ozuna. Jesse Winker scores. Anthony DeSclafani reaches on a fielder’s choice to third base. Yasiel Puig out at third. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Reds 1, Cardinals 1. CARDINALS SEVENTH Yairo Munoz singles to left field. Matt Carpenter strikes out swinging. Paul DeJong homers to left field. Yairo Munoz scores. Paul Goldschmidt strikes out swinging. Marcell Ozuna strikes out swinging. 2 runs, 2 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 3, Reds 1.

Gant continues his strong season Reliever gets fifth win, lowers his ERA to 1.10 BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

How do you spell “Most Valuable Player?” In the Cardinals’ case, how about G-A-N-T? We’ve come 60 games’ worth of the season and probably not many folks at the start of it had Gant tied for the team lead in wins at five, second in saves at three and first in “holds,” at nine. The converted starter gained his fifth win in five decisions Thursday, retiring all four men he faced in a 3-1 win over Cincinnati. Opponents are hitting a ridiculously low .124 against him and his earned run average is equally almost unfathomable at 1.10. “He’s been a big asset in the bullpen for a lot of different roles,” said manager Mike Shildt. “Sixth, seventh, eighth ... he got the ninth (inning) the other day. He’s been effective against lefties (.052 average) ...” DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM But Gant, hardly one to tout himself, Cardinals reliever Andrew Miller continued his success against the Reds’ Joey Votto on Thursday. said, “I would say I’m more proud of what this team has accomplished and what I OFF DAY BLUES think we’re going to accomplish.” AVERAGES With non-closers being named to more The Cardinals had been 2-8 after an off Batting AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E All-Star teams lately, Gant would seem to Munoz day before Thursday’s win. .311 45 7 14 2 0 0 1 1 8 0 1 J.Martinez .292 161 21 47 8 0 3 21 14 34 1 2 have a chance this year. “That’s been a struggle for us this .277 47 5 13 2 0 3 10 1 15 1 0 “I’m only concerned with what the St. Wieters year,” said shortstop Paul DeJong before DeJong .275 222 42 61 17 1 9 28 30 47 4 3 Louis Cardinals are doing, and that’s it,” Goldschmidt .271 229 37 62 4 0 12 27 30 68 0 3 the game. Gant said. “I didn’t know what the record was, Ozuna .255 220 42 56 12 0 16 51 24 51 5 0 .248 161 22 40 8 0 5 15 26 46 4 4 But Shildt offered, “Numbers don’t lie.” Fowler but I knew it wasn’t good because of .238 122 18 29 5 1 5 14 16 41 1 1 And Matt Carpenter said, “Who knows Bader the way we come off of an off day. It just Wong .237 194 23 46 8 1 6 27 23 36 10 4 where we would be without him right Carpenter .225 213 35 48 8 1 9 22 35 62 3 4 seems flat. We’ve got to have some sort Gyorko .204 54 5 11 0 0 2 7 6 14 2 2 now?” of spark.” .000 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Gant has appeared in 28 of the Cardinals’ Knizner Team .250 2013 287 503 90 4 76 271 217 500 37 29 60 games. “My body was made to play evMONDAY’S PITCHER IS . . . W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO ery day, so I come in ready to play every Pitching Daniel Ponce de Leon still might figGant 5 0 1.10 28 0 3 32.2 13 4 4 3 9 35 day,” he said. ure as Monday’s starter in Miami. The Brebbia 1 2 2.10 27 0 0 30.0 20 7 7 3 11 36 “My body feels good.” Helsley 0 0 3.38 4 0 0 8.0 4 3 3 2 2 10 Memphis righthander was supposed to Hudson 4 3 3.70 13 12 1 65.2 72 35 27 9 31 45 start late Thursday night at Tacoma and 1 0 3.75 21 0 0 24.0 15 10 10 4 6 38 MILLER HANDLES VOTTO AGAIN Gallegos Shildt said, “I think maybe he’ll get a start Flaherty 4 3 3.76 12 12 0 64.2 54 28 27 11 20 73 Lefthander Andrew Miller caught Hicks 2 2 3.80 23 0 12 21.1 14 9 9 1 11 25 and (pitch) maybe an inning or two. I’m lefthanded-batting Joey Votto of the Reds C.Martinez 0 0 3.86 8 0 1 7.0 4 3 3 0 4 5 not sure.” 2 2 3.92 27 0 1 20.2 19 11 9 5 10 28 looking at a strike three slider in the sev- Miller Michael Wacha and Ryan Helsley, curWebb 0 1 4.26 21 0 0 19.0 9 9 9 2 12 16 enth inning. Votto has only three hits in 25 Wainwright 5 5 4.34 12 12 0 66.1 61 33 32 9 30 59 rently residing in the Cardinals’ bullpen, 4 5 4.41 12 12 0 69.1 69 35 34 12 12 49 also could start. at-bats against Miller in their careers al- Mikolas Wacha 3 2 6.30 11 9 0 50.0 57 38 35 12 32 48 though Votto has walked 15 times. Mike Mayers, out since April 16 with Team 31 29 4.24 60 60 18 530.2 473 269 250 84 220 518 “I can explain (the latter) by probably a right shoulder lat strain, is ahead of the vast majority of it coming in 2008 and schedule and is slated to throw a bullpen 2009 when I was a pretty poor starting CARPENTER BATTERED, BRUISED session this weekend. “Everybody’s tickpitcher in Florida,” said Miller. Carpenter fouled two more balls off his led he’s this far ahead of where he might Research, however, indicated that a legs, continuing an uncommon rash of such be based on what he had,” said Shildt. young Miller didn’t walk a young Votto at occurrences, and he even had to come out Shildt guessed that Mayers might be all in those years and not in 2010 either, so of the game after seven innings. pitching in minor leagues rehabilitation all the walks came later. On Thursday, Carpenter took another games by the end of June and Mayers “He’s always an interesting at-bat be- shot to the right shin and then one under long has been shooting for pitching in cause he covers everything,” Miller said. the left knee. “If I take too many more, I’m the majors after the All-Star break in “He’s one of the best hitters of our gen- going to retire. mid-July. “You can go six months without fouling “(That) doesn’t seem to be unreasoneration and you just do what you can do to get him out.” a ball off your shins. I bet I’ve done it 10 able at this point,” said Shildt. Miller credited catcher Matt Wieters times in the last four days.” with the game plan during the at-bat. In the meantime, Carpenter has hit THE CUBS — and KIMBREL “Obviously, he was right,” Miller said. “You safely in six consecutive games but it has Discussing the Cubs’ signing of freedo your scouting reports and try to game been a painful experience. “I’ve got some agent relief ace Craig Kimbrel to a threeplan and try to remember how you faced medicine that should help with that,” he year deal, Shildt said, “Clearly, he’s a guys previously ... and try to stay one step said, but he was in some doubt about play- guy who’s had success at the back end of ahead.” games. We enjoy competition. We’ll see ing Friday in Chicago. “I’m at the point where (the right leg) is what it’s about.” Of the past five hitters he has faced, Shildt, asked if he had been asked his Miller has struck out lefthanded-hitting so raw and so tender ... have you ever had Kyle Schwarber, Anthony Rizzo and Votto, an ingrown toenail? You just touch it and opinions about any other free agents (perhaps Dallas Keuchel?), responded, and also participated in a force play on a it’s so sensitive,” he said. ball hit back to him. “That’s how my whole shin feels. It’s not jokingly,“I haven’t had any of those conMiller said, “I’m throwing pitches I want a good feeling. versations. That’s out of my pay grade.” and I like my chances when I do that. The “Maybe a day (off) will let it subside. Rick Hummel main thing is that when you get on a run, We’ll have to play it by ear — or borrow @cmshhummel on Twitter you want to ride it out as long as possible.” Yadi’s (catching) equipment.” rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From C1

myself, and when that (pitch) shows up middle-middle, I’m ready to swing and ready to hit.” He had found he walked more in May than in April. “I was probably too patient,” he said. “I was taking too many heaters early in the count and expanding (the strike zone) after that. When I realized I’d missed a pitch to hit, I’d get anxious and want to swing.” Manager Mike Shildt said, “He’s a patient guy, but he’s probably been chasing around the perimeter of the zone more than he would like.” Even with his freefall, DeJong still was hitting .275 before Thursday. “That tells you what I did in the first month and a half,” he said. “But you can’t ride that forever. It’s like Babe Ruth said. ‘Yesterday’s home runs don’t count today.’” Molina, out with a right thumb injury, had some counsel for Munoz, who had been nothing for his last 10. “When I was picking my bat in the dugout, Yadi told me that he trusted me to put a ball in play, and that’s what I did,” Munoz said. “I knew my first swing wasn’t the best swing. But I adjusted.” The Cardinals, who hadn’t been doing a lot of base stealing lately, swiped four bases. One was by Marcell Ozuna, who tied his single-season high at five, set with Miami. Ozuna hasn’t been thrown out in eight steal attempts for the Cardinals over two seasons, and Kolten Wong is 10 for 10 this year after his theft Thursday. DeJong explained that “we did our homework on (Anthony) DeSclafani, knowing his ‘tells.’ And putting pressure on the other team definitely helped us out.” Though none of the steals led to a run, an alert base-running play by speedy Harrison Bader did create the first score in the third. After Bader opened with a single, Dakota Hudson dropped a sacrifice bunt that hugged the foul line. Catcher Tucker Barnhart finally picked the ball up and threw to first. Bader, who had slowed briefly at second, noticed that he could get a jump on shortstop Jose Iglesias, who was covering second, and raced Iglesias to third. Bader slid safely into the bag at third as Iglesias, desperately running alongside like

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Umpire Sean Barber calls Reds right fielder Jesse Winker out after Cardinals second baseman Kolten Wong completed the force play at second. a cornerback in the NFL, was fortunate to pluck a one-hop throw from first by second baseman Derek Dietrich. With the infield in, Matt Carpenter slashed a single past a diving Joey Votto at first. “That was a winning play Harrison made,” said Shildt. “Good bunt by Dakota. (Bader) not taking anything for granted. Head up, aggressive from the beginning. If you’re going to go first to third, regardless of whether it’s on a bunt or a base hit, it’s how you start it. It was a big-league play.” Bader said that “in this game, you’ve always got to keep your head on a swivel. In

the past, I wasn’t trying to make the play happen the way I did. But I noticed that on bunts third baseman (Eduardo) Suarez evacuates a little. I remember getting to second and looking up and seeing the field of play being open at third. It was just a footrace at that point, so I put my head down and ran.” There was no decision for him, but this was the ninth consecutive start in which Hudson, who tied a career high at 6 1/3 innings, went at least five innings and allowed three or fewer runs and the fifth in succession he went six or more innings not permitting more than three runs. Jordan Hicks, taking a little off his fast-

ball — he was throwing only 100 after consistently hitting 102-104 lately — gained his 12th save in 13 tries. Suddenly, after all the nonsense of May, the Cardinals found themselves only 2 ½ games out of first place in the National League Central Division as they headed to Chicago for a three-game weekend set. They were clean. And smooth. The hot water, which had been an issue all week at Busch Stadium, was back on. “I’m freshly shaven,” said Shildt. “That should tell you something.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Hudson delivers another strong start He matched his career-best in innings pitched; other starters also improving BY JOE LYONS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Dakota Hudson could not help feeling a little disappointed as he left Thursday afternoon’s game at Busch Stadium. After all, the rookie righthander pitched into the seventh inning for just the second time as a bigleaguer. But after getting a strikeout — his third of the day — to open the seventh, he allowed Josh VanMeter, a Cincinnati pinch hitter, to double into the left-field corner. Then he walked Nick Senzel, the Reds’ lead-off hitter. Hudson’s day was over. “I just felt like I was in a great position there when I got that first out,” Hudson said after the Cardinals rallied late for the 3-1 victory over the visiting Reds. “I just needed to stay locked in and focused on making that next pitch. “I always want to finish as strong if not stronger than when I started the game. I knew the bullpen had it — I have all the confidence in the world in those guys — but I’m also competitive with myself, so I was a little bit upset in what happened.” But lefthander Andrew Miller came on to strike out Joey Votto with two on for the second out in the seventh. And then John Gant came on to retire Eugenio Suarez on a first-pitch popout to end the inning and the threat. In the bottom of the seventh, the Cardinals rallied for the win. Yairo Munoz, who came in during a double-switch when Gant entered, led off with a single. An out later, Paul DeJong deposited a changeup from Cincy reliever Michael Lorenzen over the fence down the left-field line for the win. The Cardinals have now won five of six heading into a three-city road trip that begins Friday afternoon at Wrigley Field.

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals starting pitcher Dakota Hudson delivers in the second inning Thursday. “Sometimes the offense is going to come through later in the game,” Hudson said. “I just want to go out and give them seven or eight or nine (innings), whatever it takes to where I can give them a chance to win. “I’m happy the guys rallied for the win because that’s what it’s all

about. But I would’ve liked to finish a little stronger.” Hudson, a first-round draft choice out of Mississippi State in 2016, has been as solid as they come over the last month for the Cardinals. Thursday represented his ninth straight start of five or more innings. After Thursday, he’s

4-3 with a 3.70 ERA. Hudson matched a career-high, going 6 1/3 innings and recorded 13 outs by infielders. “Just trying to get ground balls, trying to get some quick outs,” he said. “He’s been great,” said Gant, a reliever who improved to 5-0 and

lowered his ERA to 1.10 by retiring the four hitters he faced Thursday. “He’s pitching to contact, throwing a lot of strikes. He’s filling the zone and doing what we need him to do.” Over their last 11 games, Cardinals’ starters have an ERA of just 2.73. “Honestly, I couldn’t let (Adam Wainwright) throw 126 pitches and throw harder than me,” Hudson kidded. “Couple of moments today where I tried to amp up ... I think I had a walk because of it, which kind of stinks. Just trying to give it everything I’ve got when I’m out there. “But I think it’s about building each other up as a staff. We have a couple of challenges that we’ve put together to keep us as a starting rotation accountable for what we’re doing out there.” Working exclusively out of the bullpen last season, Hudson went 4-1 with a 2.63 ERA. In 27 1/3 innings, he allowed 19 hits and just eight earned runs. This year, he made starts in 12 of 13 appearances and has a save in the other game. “Honestly, it’s about just staying within myself and trying not to do too much out there,” he said. “I think it’s about throwing Dakota’s best pitch rather trying to do too much. “I’m fortunate (because) we have some great catchers who kind of teach me and build me up along the way. I just feel like I’m going out there and I’m executing pitch by pitch. It feels like I’m playing catch out there and feel like I’m getting the weak ground balls, the weak contact, and able to make adjustments out there. “Early in the season, I had a bunch of guys, the whole team honestly, that had confidence in me and now I’m feeding off that. I’m taking that confidence and doing what I do. It’s just execution and the reassurance from my catchers, my pitching coach and the other guys on the team.” Joe Lyons @joelyonspd on twitter jlyons@post-dispatch.com

FRENCH OPEN

SLU

American teen Anisimova stuns Halep

From C1

Top four men’s seeds reach semis for first time in eight years BY HOWARD FENDRICH

Associated Press

PARIS — Amanda Anisimova smacked one last backhand winner to complete her upset of defending champion Simona Halep in the French Open quarterfinals, flung her racket and covered her mouth with both hands. Eyes wide, Anisimova then spread her arms with palms up and said, “What?!” In a tournament filled with surprises, Anisimova provided the latest Thursday. Just 17 and ranked merely 51st, yet possessing the mindset and mien of someone much more experienced and accomplished, the American withstood a late charge by Halep and won 6-2, 6-4 to reach her first Grand Slam semifinal. “I don’t think it will sink in, at least not for today. Yeah, I mean, it’s crazy,” said Anisimova, who was born in New Jersey to Russian parents and moved to Florida when she was 3. “I really can’t believe the result today. And getting the opportunity to play against Simona, that’s amazing. But how it ended is even crazier to me.” That’s a fair assessment of the entire tournament. Serena Williams, No. 1 Naomi Osaka and No. 2 Karolina Pliskova lost in the third round; Angelique Kerber and Caroline Wozniacki were gone in the first. The highest-seeded player in the semifinals is No. 8 Ash Barty, the Australian who will face Anisimova. Barty advanced by beating No. 14 Madison Keys of the United States 6-3, 7-5. “I felt,” Barty said, “like I was in control.” The other semifinal is No. 26 Johanna Konta of Britain against unseeded 19-year-old Marketa Vondrousova of the Czech Republic. Because rain washed out all play Wednesday, the women’s semifinals — normally Thursday, one after another in the main stadium — will be played simultaneously on the secondand third-largest courts this morning. The biggest arena will host the men’s semifinals: Rafael Nadal vs. Roger Federer, and Novak Djokovic vs. Dominic Thiem. It’s the first time the top four men’s seeds are the last four standing at a major tournament since the 2013 Austra-

CHRISTOPHE ENA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Amanda Anisimova, 17, of the U.S. celebrates after winning her quarterfinal match at the French Open on Thursday in Paris. Anisimova routed defending champion Simona Halep of Romania.

1978

The last time none of the four women’s semifinalists at a Grand Slam tournament had ever reached a major final — at the Australian Open 41 years ago.

MICHEL EULER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serbia’s Novak Djokovic stretches for a shot against Germany’s Alexander Zverev during their French Open quarterfinal match Thursday in Paris. Djokovic won 7-5, 6-2, 6-2. lian Open, and the first time at Roland Garros since 2011. Djokovic stretched his Grand Slam winning streak to 26 matches as he pursues a fourth consecutive major trophy, beating Alexander Zverev 7-5, 6-2, 6-2. Thiem eliminated No. 10 seed Karen Khachanov 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. “Controlling the points was the key, I think,” said 2018 French Open runner-up Thiem, who made only 12 unforced errors, 25 fewer than Khachanov. “I didn’t miss a lot today.” Not only has none of the remaining women won a Grand Slam trophy, none has participated in a major final. “Well,” said Halep, who was seeded third, “nothing surprises me anymore in tennis.” Still, Anisimova’s rapid rise is noteworthy. Already the first tennis player born in the 2000s to get to a Slam quarterfinal, she’s now

the youngest U.S. woman into the semis at Roland Garros since Jennifer Capriati was 14 in 1990. Anisimova or Vondrousova could each become the first teenager since Iva Majoli in 1997 to win the French Open, where the slow clay courts require patience from shot to shot, the movement and endurance to get to ball after ball, the smarts to construct points. Anisimova certainly checked all those boxes Thursday. Facing a former No. 1 and major champ, in the tournament’s largest arena, the teenager was poised as can be. “She was pretty calm,” said Halep, who acknowledged feeling the stress of trying to win a second consecutive title in Paris. “She showed that she’s able to do good things and big things.” Yet to drop a set through five matches, Anisimova plays with

a confident, take-it-to-theopponent style. She doesn’t rely on power so much as precision, depositing what she’s called “effortless shots” near lines and often wrong-footing Halep. And to think: It was in 2016 that Anisimova was the junior runner-up at Roland Garros at 14. “I actually kind of miss juniors, but, I mean, this is a new phase,” she said, shrugging. “Obviously I respect (Halep) a lot. But I know I’m capable of doing a lot, and I know I can play very well. I mean, I never doubt my abilities. Today that showed.” Did it ever. “For a 17-year-old to play that well,” said Chris Evert, the American who won seven of her 18 major trophies in Paris, “is pretty awesome.” Most impressive, perhaps, was this: Halep had won 16 return games in a row coming in, but Anisimova was 6-for-7 on break points. “I’m really happy with my performance,” Anisimova said, “because this is one of the best matches I’ve ever played.” There’s not a long list for comparison. This was just the 43rd tour-level match of Anisimova’s nascent career, only her fourth major tournament.

and the Billikens won the A-10 championship last fall before losing in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. SLU’s athletics school year was highlighted by the men’s basketball team’s run to the A-10 tournament title and berth in the NCAA Tournament.The Billikens won four games in four days in New York and earned national attention for their feat. Meanwhile, Shields continued an equally impressive rebuild. She has kept high-end talent flowing into the program. Despite losing leading goal scorer Maddie Pokorny, the Billikens will return much of their firepower, including Hannah Friederich, who led the team with 30 points. That puts the women a step ahead of the men and provides a vision of where coach Kevin Kalish hopes to have his team in coming seasons. Kalish took over a program that had failed to reach the NCAA Tournament for three consecutive years. But the process of returning to form began with a competitive team that tied nationally ranked Notre Dame on the road and had a 2-1 loss to top-10 Denver. “Soccer is really important to us,” May said. “Katie has done a fantastic job recruiting regionally and nationally. With the evolution of the program, as they continue to grow, they’re getting local kids who want to come back and transfer. “Both of them are having success with St. Louis products. Kevin took over and put his stamp on the program and is recruiting unbelievably well.” Both teams draw well at Hermann Stadium. The women were 28th nationally in attendance in 2017 and last season averaged 788 fans. The men averaged 1,271, an increase of about 200 per game over 2017, when they were 32nd nationally. This offseason, the turf on the playing and practice fields is being replaced and upgraded before the teams begin preparation for the 2019 season. The men’s basketball and women’s soccer teams were the only ones to reach their respective NCAA tournaments. But that step by coach Travis Ford’s team is the most significant in terms of athletic prestige. The attendance and energy level at Chaifetz Arena made large leaps, and May hopes that can carry over to the overall department. “The year-end product was what we had hoped for,” he said. “It was a great ride, but the future is also very bright. It impacts every sport we have with the energy, passion and positives in how it impacts us in so many ways with all of the athletes coming through.” Playing in the tournament also provides a financial boost. In general, the budget doesn’t change much, but May believes it is at a competitive level. “We feel we can compete with how the budgets are,” he said. “Each sport has a different focus of where they’re trying to go. The programs are positioned in a way that they can compete in the A-10 and then grow from there.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

NBA FINALS

Warriors welcome Thompson’s return Golden State acknowledges it missed his defense in Game 3 JANIE MCCAULEY

Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — Everyone knows about Klay Thompson’s ability to get dangerously hot in a hurry on offense. His stingy defense might just be the thing that matters most when he returns for the Golden State Warriors in Game 4 of the NBA Finals tonight with his team trailing Toronto 2-1. “We can’t fall into the trap of thinking offense alone is going to win us another championship or letting that end of the floor affect our defense,” Stephen Curry said on the heels of a postseason career-best 47-point performance in the Warriors’ Game 3 defeat. Thompson is scheduled to play barring any further issues with his strained left hamstring after he sat out the 123-109 loss Wednesday. Teammate Kevin Durant remains sidelined as he attempts to work back from a strained right calf. With the way Kawhi Leonard, Kyle Lowry and Danny Green delivered time and again for the Raptors to answer every big shot by Curry, Thompson’s defense will be a key part of the two-time defending champions’ adjustment as they try to even the series at home before another trip to Toronto. “People fall in love with his shooting and how hot he can get on the offensive end, but the way that our team plays defensively and the chemistry that we have and the experience, he’s right at the forefront of that,” Curry said. “And it’s a tough adjustment when guys who haven’t been in that position consistently and in these type of moments are thrown into his minutes. So you would love to have him out there on that end of the floor as well, especially with a team like Toronto.” Thompson, who was injured late in Golden State’s Game 2 win at Toronto, even surprised the Raptors when he didn’t take the court for tipoff. The Raptors still had him on the board to play when the team left the locker room just before game time. Not facing Thompson became a key advantage and all five Toronto starters scored in double figures — and Curry was forced to take on a greater load. “He’s a great defender. I think he’s one of the best, right up there at the top of the best wing defenders in the league,” Raptors coach Nick Nurse said of Thompson. “He’s probably underrated in that department. He really puts in some awesome defensive performances for them, especially when they really need them.” Here are some things to watch for tonight:

They’ve seen it all Last season, the Warriors had to win Game 7 of the Western Conference finals on the road in Houston. They triumphed with an ailing coach Steve Kerr sidelined for much of the 16-1 title run in 2017.

FRANK GUNN, THE CANADIAN PRESS

The Warriors could use the top-notch defense of guard Klay Thompson, left, who was surprisingly unable to play in Wednesday’s 123-109 loss to Danny Green and the Raptors in Game 3 of the NBA Finals. He sat out with a strained left hamstring. This fifth straight NBA Finals has brought on its own challenges, most notably all the injuries. “Our best basketball is usually played when our backs are against the wall,” Warriors’ Draymond Green said.

Warriors minority owner who shoved Lowry fined $500K, banned one year WIRE REPORTS

Durant still watching Durant wasn’t going to get on the court in a scrimmage situation Thursday as the Warriors had initially thought, but might do so as soon as today or Saturday with the hope he still could return before the Finals are done. “There was no setback. I was hoping that today would be the day when he could get out on the floor,” Kerr said. “It’s not going to be today.” Durant, the two-time reigning Finals MVP who was averaging 34.2 points this postseason before the injury, was hurt in Game 5 of the Western Conference semifinals against the Rockets on May 8. He has missed the eight games since.

Farewell to Oracle Oracle Arena really is on its last hurrah. Game 4 is the only remaining guaranteed contest at the arena before Golden State moves to the new Chase Center in San Francisco next season. “We’re going to miss it here for sure,” Kerr said. “We’re looking forward to the new arena. It’s going to be amazing, but we’ll always miss Oracle.”

OAKLAND, Calif. — Mark Stevens, a Warriors’ investor and a member of the team’s executive board, was banned from the NBA for one year and fined $500,000 Thursday — one day after he shoved Lowry during the fourth quarter of Game 3. The NBA announced its decision not long after Lowry said Stevens “shouldn’t be a part of our league.” Lowry crashed into the front two rows of seats opposite the Warriors bench while chasing a loose ball. As he got up, Stevens, who was sitting a few seats down from the collision, reached over and pushed the Raptors guard in the left shoulder. “Mr. Stevens’ behavior last night did not reflect the high standards we hope to exemplify as an organization,” the team said in a statement.“We’re extremely disappointed in his actions and, along with Mr. Stevens, offer our sincere apology to Kyle Lowry and the Toronto Raptors organization for this unfortunate misconduct. There is no place for such interaction between fans — or anyone — and players at an NBA game.” Stevens, who was ejected from the game and escorted out of Oracle Arena,

is on the USC Board of Trustees and he and wife Mary had donated more than $100 million to the university as of 2017. Forbes describes Stevens as a venture capitalist who is worth an estimated $2.3 billion. It is unclear how much of an ownership stakes he has in the Warriors, who list him as a team executive. Warriors players and coaches lauded the way Lowry was able to keep his emotions in check, and many followed their team’s statement and offered apologies to both the Raptors and their point guard. “Obviously, when you see the video, it’s pretty clear who was in the wrong,” Warriors guard Stephen Curry said, who added that he doesn’t personally know Stevens. The NBA’s ban covers all league games and also forbids Stevens from being part of any team events. “If Kyle was to then hit back, a lot more than a fine would have then happened to Kyle,” Warriors forward Draymond Green said. the Raptors were stunned to learn that Stevens was part of the Warriors’ organization. “I was shocked,” Toronto guard Danny Green said. “And a little appalled.”

AROUND THE NBA

Raptors getting by with a thin bench OAKLAND, Calif. — Toronto coach Nick Nurse did something interesting in Game 3 of the NBA Finals on Wednesday night. He shortened his already-short bench. TheRaptorshaveresortedtoeight players in their rotation through most of these finals.The once-deep Raptors have been thinner since the trade that brought Marc Gasol from Memphis in February.

NBA FINALS SCHEDULE Nurse has used just Fred VanVleet, Serge Ibaka and Norman Powell off the bench for any real minutes in this series (or the previous). Powell played only 6:13 in Game 3, after averaging 13 minutes a game in the first two games. Nurse decided rather than use Golden State’s patchwork rotation as an opening to expand his bench, he would double down.Nurse went with his top seven extensively, and it paid off with a dominating performance in Game 3.

Nets net cap space by trading Crabbe, picks BROOKLYN — Get ready for a free agency war in New York. The Nets will have the ability to create two max slots after agreeing to a trade Thursday with the Hawks to clear Allen Crabbe’s salary. For taking on Crabbe, the Hawks will receive Brooklyn’s 2019 first-round pick (17th overall), its lottery-protected pick in 2020 and its 2021 second-round pick.

The Nets also get Taurean Prince in the deal. TheNetswillbemajorplayersina loadedfreeagencyclass.Theircompetition includes the Knicks, who also have the cap space for two max players in a summer that is shaping up as a big-market bonanza. Kevin Durant, Kawhi Leonard, Kemba Walker, Klay Thompson, Jimmy Butler, Khris Middleton and Tobias Harris are all eligible for unrestricted free agency. — Wire reports

Best-of-seven; x-if necessary

TORONTO 2, GOLDEN STATE 1 Game 1: Toronto, 118-109 Game 2: Golden State, 109-104 Game 3: Toronto, 123-109 Today: at Golden State, 8 p.m. Monday: at Toronto, 8 p.m. x-June 13: at Golden State, 8 p.m. x-June 16: at Toronto, 7 p.m.

HORSE RACING

Mott out to win Belmont — minus the mayhem Tacitus — not Derby champ Country House — is the trainer’s star

Belmont Stakes field

WIRE REPORTS

NEW YORK — Trainer Bill Mott was finishing a conversation about Roger Maris while standing outside his barn at Belmont Park and wearing a New York Yankees cap. Mott had thought the man who broke Babe Ruth’s record was from his home state, South Dakota. It actually was North Dakota, although the Hall of Fame trainer wasn’t about to totally lose the debate. He insisted Maris bought his beer in South Dakota. After some laughs, the talk shifted to Saturday’s Belmont Stakes, the final leg of what has been a chaotic Triple Crown, not only for thoroughbred racing but for the 65-year-old Mott. Mott saddled two horses for the Kentucky Derby. Almost no one thought Country House was the one we’d be talking about after the finish. Tacitus, winner of the Tampa Bay Derby and the Wood Memorial, was supposed to be the star. He actually ran well in the Derby, moving up to third after Maximum Security was disqualified, but he quickly became an afterthought in the tumult. What will be remembered, of course, is the Maximum Security DQ for interfering with eventual

Pos., Horse

Trainer

Jockey

Odds

1. Joevia

Gregg Sacco

Jose Lezcano

30-1

2. Everfast

Dale Romans

Luis Saez

12-1

3. Master Fencer

Koichi Tsunoda

Julien Leparoux

8-1

4. Tax

Danny Gargan

Irad Ortiz Jr.

15-1

5. Bourbon War

Mark Hennig

Mike Smith

12-1

6. Spinoff

Todd Pletcher

Javier Castellano

15-1

7. Sir Winston

Mark Casse

Joel Rosario

12-1

8. Intrepid Heart

Todd Pletcher

John Velazquez

10-1

9. War of Will

Mark Casse

Tyler Gaffalione

2-1

10. Tacitus

Bill Mott

Jose Ortiz

9-5

SETH WENIG, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Weights: 126 pounds. Distance: 1 1/2 miles. Purse: $1.5 million.

Trainer Bill Mott, middle, stops to talk to people Thursday at Belmont Park in Elmont, New York.

First place: $900,000. Second place: $300,000. Third place: $165,000. Fourth place: $90,000. Fifth place: $45,000. Post time: 5:46 p.m.

Preakness winner War of Will. That elevated Country House to first place and put Mott in a category with Maris — an asterisk next to their names. Maris got it for hitting a thenrecord 61 homers in 162 games in 1961. It broke Babe Ruth’s record of 60 homers in 154 games in 1927. Mott will be remembered as the first trainer to win the Kentucky Derby after the first horse across the finish line was disqualified. A wry smile crosses Mott’s face when he is reminded of the link to Maris. “My statistics probably haven’t exceeded his,” Mott said Thursday, acknowledging the asterisk

reference. He admitted that being in the Derby winner’s circle was awkward. He felt a few of the people shaking his hand were trying to get away as quickly as possible. It almost was like apologizing for winning or being named the winner. “I certainly don’t want the owners or anybody else to think I’m not pleased about winning,” Mott said, adding Country House ran his heart out in the Kentucky Derby. Mark Casse, who trains War of Will and also will be looking for his second win in this Triple Crown, said he felt bad for Mott the day after the Derby.

“I think it has been hard on Bill,” Casse said. “Bill is such a great guy. You talk about class, you’ll find his name right next to it. It’s tough no one wants to win that way. Nobody wants to win that way.” What would make his Triple Crown season perfect is having the 1½-mile race go off without a hitch. The disqualification marred the Kentucky Derby. The Preakness was highlighted by War of Will’s performance and another horse running around the Maryland track after unseating his rider. Ten colts have been entered for

the Belmont, but it seems to be a two-horse race. Tacitus, who will be racing for the first time since the Derby, is the 9-5 favorite. War of Will is the 2-1 second choice. The other eight horses are rated at 8-1 or higher. Trainer Mark Hennig, who handles 12-1 Bourbon War, said Tacitus and War of Will are the most accomplished colts in the field. “I don’t think any of them has been dominant, like some of those horses who come here to the Belmont odds-wise,” Henning said, referring to recent Triple Crown winners Justify (2018) and American Pharoah (2015).


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

PAUL BAILLARGEON, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Waterloo’s Tommy Carr is mobbed by his teammates after scoring the winning run against Effingham in the Class 3A Sauget Super-Sectional on Monday at GCS Ballpark in Sauget, Ill.

UP AND RUNNING

Selfless play spurs versatile Waterloo to Class 3A state tournament semi BY BRIAN WEBSTER

STLhighschoolsports.com

Pitchers and catchers have enough to do in high school baseball, so courtesy runners often take their place on the base paths. During Monday’s Class 3A super-sectional contest at Sauget, Waterloo courtesy runners Tommy Carr and Logan Hopfinger could have maybe used a breather. The two seemed to be on base constantly during the Bulldogs’ five-inning, 11-1 romp over Effingham. Not that they minded. “Coach (Mark Vogel) loves people who can run,” Carr said. “He likes to use our runners every way he can, whether it be stealing bases, bunting, hitting and running, everything.” The Bulldogs (23-12) are back in the state semifinals for the first time since beating LaGrange Park (Nazareth Academy) 6-1 for third place in 2011. They’ll take on Burbank (St. Laurence) at 10 a.m. Friday at Silver Cross Stadium in Joliet. The Vikings (33-5) play in the Chicago Catholic Conference

and last appeared in the semis as a Class 4A team in 2017. Waterloo’s arms deserve most of the credit for the team’s ability to steamroll its postseason opponents by a combined score of 35-6. Double aces Drake Downing (1.82) and Dustin Crawford (1.45) take a combined record of 18-5 into the final four. But the legs also helped the Bulldogs get there. Two of the runs the Bulldogs scored in Saturday’s 3-1 sectional championship victory over Carbondale came off sacrifice flies. “We’ve got guys who can run,” Vogel said. “Those guys who courtesy ran (against Effingham), Tommy Carr and Logan Hopfinger, they’ve been a big part of our team at different parts of the year.” Carr ran Monday for the pitcher, Crawford, who drew a walk in the first inning, singled in the second and fourth innings, and was hit by a pitch leading off the fifth. Carr got a stolen base and scored two runs out of all that. That’s a nice bouquet of stats in a supersectional game for a senior who had to settle for a reserve role.

CLASS 3A STATE TOURNAMENT At Route 66 Stadium, Joliet Semifinals, Friday St. Laurence (33-5) vs. Waterloo (23-12), 10 a.m. Dixon vs. Lombard Montini, noon Placing games, Saturday Third place: 9 a.m. Championship: 11 a.m. “I started off the season playing a little bit,” Carr said.“I didn’t play my best baseball, so coach found a way to still get me playing.” Carr had just seven hits in 36 at bats during the season, but three of those hits were doubles, one was a triple. He has also been an effective relief pitcher, logging a 1.31 ERA in 16 innings of work, with 10 walks and 22 strikeouts. The senior said he’s happy to do whatever he can for his teammates. “That’s kind of what this team is,” Vogel said. “They get along with each other, they’re not selfish. If we need a courtesy runner, they’re willing to do that, even if

they’re not in the starting lineup.” Hopfinger, a promising sophomore, had a starting position on the team before a broken hand sent him to the bench. His cast came off two days before Monday’s supersectional. He jogged to first base twice as a pinch runner for catcher Trey Kueper and scored a run in the fourth inning. “Coach mixes it up,” Hopfinger said. “He gives a lot of people opportunities. This was actually the first time in the playoffs that Tommy and I have ran.” Strong defense and a keen sense of teammwork have given the Bulldogs an edge since the postseason started. All of it snapped into place after Waterloo completed a difficult regular-season schedule. The Bulldogs’ last three games before regional play came against Belleville West, Alton and Edwardsville, three teams that played for regional titles in 4A. “What we’ve done really well in this postseason that at times we didn’t do in the regular season is played really good defense,” Vogel said.“We were really up and down,

especially in the middle part of the season, but our conference gets us ready to play anybody. And then we played a lot of Southwest Conference teams the last week (before regionals) and that gets us ready for stuff like this.” Both Carr and Hopfinger were on base when Monday’s game ended. Carr was on second, Hopfinger on first when senior shortstop Josh Wittenauer belted a gapper to right field that took a hop off the warning track and over the fence for a ground rule double. Carr crossed the plate with the 11th run, providing the final margin for the mercy rule. In that moment, it all came together for Carr, who in April accepted a smaller role for himself so the team might have a chance to do bigger things. Now the ‘Dogs are doing it. “We were struggling a little bit at the time and I didn’t like the decision,” Carr said of his earlyseason demotion. “But I see what we’re doing right now and I’m fine with it. I’m just doing everything I can to help.”

Edwardsville’s experience paves way to state semifinal BY PAUL HALFACRE

STLhighschoolsports.com

JOLIET — Blake Burris walked out of the tunnel at Route 66 Stadium in 2017 and heard an abnormal amount of noise. It made him pause. The Edwardsville High outfielder was greeted by a sea of orange and black. His ears were overwhelmed by the roar of a crowd as the players were announced. Then a sophomore, he was stunned by the response. “I was surprised by the number of people there,” Burris said. “For as far away as it was, it was a little overwhelming at the time — but I think going back it won’t be as overwhelming.” Burris, now a senior and with plenty of pressure-packed games under his belt, is ready to embrace the final four noise and pressure as the Tigers (35-5) take on Hampshire (22-14) at 5 p.m. on Friday in a state semifinal at Route 66 Stadium in Joliet “It felt really good (to win the super-sectional),” Burris said. “This was one of our goals to get to the state semifinal and now our goal is to get a win on Friday.” St. Charles North (26-10) will face Chicago St. Rita (32-6) at 3 p.m. in the first Class 4A semifinal. The winners meet at 5 p.m. on Saturday for the state crown. Edwardsville will be looking for its third championship and first since 1998. Burris learned from the state experience two years ago and he

BASEBALL LEADERS Batting Average Adam Stroup, Hancock Eli Dale, St. Pius X Drew Dant, Mater Dei Tommy Pratt, Bayless J. McCormick, StD A. Ohland, Lafayette G. Hibbs, Warrenton J. Miller, Sullivan Michael Long, MICDS Joey Johnson, Fox Jimmy Obertop, WCA I. Wilson, Hancock D. Olejnik, St. Louis Pat T. Bastunas, T’land B. Spawr, V. Park C. Hancock, H’boro Colby Ott, Jefferson B. Cooper, FH Cent. Ryan Waller, Libergh Jack Owens, M’coutah Home Runs Colin Bergmann, CBC

H 37 35 53 33 43 36 30 37 33 30 48 38 61 35 33 33 34 32 32 41

AB 65 64 100 65 85 72 60 75 67 61 98 78 127 73 71 71 74 70 70 90

Avg 569 547 530 508 506 500 500 493 493 492 490 487 480 479 465 465 459 457 457 456 # 11

PAUL HALFACRE, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Edwardsville’s Drake Westcott (33) celebrates after scoring a run during the Class 4A Springfield Super-Sectional on Monday at Lincoln Land Community College in Springfield, Ill. expects to use those lessons to his advantage. Senior Dalton Wallace believes that the experience of being there will help, but also uses it to help the younger players, who will be making their first trip to Joliet. “Just telling them it’s another game,” Wallace said. “You can’t go at it thinking it’s the last game or if you’re in the state championship even if you are. You can’t go at it with that mentality of this team’s record its this, we’re going to win. You need to show up and

Jacob Hager, Luth. South Jimmy Obertop, Westminster D. Olejnik, St. Louis Pat Drake Westcott, Edville. Garrett Weiner, A. Marq. Gavin Baldwin, Nashville Elias Stevens, CBC Drew Dant, Mater Dei Spencer Hunter, Borgia Joe Schmidt, Borgia Brandon Hager, Luth. South Josh Gibson, O’Fallon Jeremy Schork, Summit Ryan Waller, Lindbergh Wes Collins, O’Fallon Tyler Hedtkamp, St. Pius X Caleb Goforth, Triad Eli Dale, St. Pius X Kurtis Byrne, CBC Triples D. Olejnik, St. Louis Pat Nick Shields, Bayless Ricardo Young, Haz. East C.J. Cepicky, Vianney Colin Shea, Bellvl. West Ty Stauss, Lafayette

11 9 9 9 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 6 5 5 # 9 8 7 7 6 6

play that game.” While this won’t be his first time in the state semifinals, coach Tim Funkhouser is not taking the trip for granted. “We were there two years ago, but you really cherish and value each opportunity you get because it’s a difficult task to get to this point,” he said. “You can tell that our guys are focused. Their goal was not just to get to this point, but to go ahead and close it out and take care of business each game.” Part of that laser-like focus

Jacob Hager, Luth. South Desmond Woods, McNorth Riley Phillips, Alton Hayden Moore, Edwardsville Christian Hancock, H’boro Eli Dale, St. Pius X Riley McCarthy, Valmeyer Ethon Anderson, Seckman Ryan Malzahn, OFChrist Kylon Cunningham, CBC Shane Wilhelm, Columbia Tyler Kennedy, Eureka Carter Wiegman, Highland Sam Cogan, A. Marquette Doubles Mark Branz, Gibault Tim Reinholz, Gibault Max Ringering, Edville. Michael Long, MICDS Matt Schark, Howell Brandon Hager, Luth. South Sam Hurayt, Lutheran SC Robby Taul, Alton Colin Bergmann, CBC Kurtis Byrne, CBC Drew Dant, Mater Dei

6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 # 17 16 15 14 14 14 14 13 13 13 13

comes from the demanding schedule that Funkhouser presented the Tigers from the very start of the campaign. “The competition hasn’t changed a lot in the postseason,but that’s part of his philosophy,” Burris said. “No days off. I don’t think we had one off day off all season. We always got a game in no matter what the condition. He scheduled a lot of really good games and a lot of good tournaments.” Edwardsville faced the likes of De Smet (Missouri Class 5 cham-

Trevor Kelly, Union Riley McCarthy, Valmeyer Josh Dima, Althoff Jack Czeschin, Borgia Tyler Fogarty, Chaminade Sam Scott, Mascoutah Bryce Bultman, Nashville Jimmy Obertop, Westminster P. Baalman, St. Louis Pat Runs Batted In D. Olejnik, St. Louis Pat Jimmy Obertop, Westminster Evan Gray, Bellvl. East A.J. Mueller, Columbia Tim Reinholz, Gibault Jacob Hager, Luth. South Nick Rudin, St. Louis Pat Cole Malawy, Nashville Colin Bergmann, CBC Joe Schmidt, Borgia Colin Shea, Bellvl. West Garrett Weiner, A. Marq. Logan Seidler, Valmeyer Drake Westcott, Edville. Gavin Baldwin, Nashville Cole Buckner, Gibault

13 13 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 # 57 48 45 44 43 41 41 40 39 39 38 38 38 38 38 37

Riley McCarthy, Valmeyer Carson Parker, Nashville Wes Collins, O’Fallon Brandon Hager, Luth. South Runs Hayden Moore, Edwardsville D. Olejnik, St. Louis Pat Austin Sweeney, Gibault Garrett Weiner, A. Marq. Mark Branz, Gibault Josh Gibson, O’Fallon Carter Lee, St. Louis Pat Will Lanxon, Bellvl. West Josh Marion, Columbia J. Mains, St. Louis Pat Colin Bergmann, CBC Gavin Baldwin, Nashville Cole Malawy, Nashville Sam Horner, Columbia Blake Burris, Edwardsville Richie Minda, Luth. South L. Thibodeaux, Pky. North Jacob Rowold, Valmeyer Drew Mize, FZ West Zach Gunn, St. Louis Pat

CLASS 4A STATE TOURNAMENT At Route 66 Stadium, Joliet Semifinals, Friday St. Charles North (26-10) vs. Chicago St. Rita (32-6), 3 p.m. Hampshire (22-14) vs. Edwardsville (35-5), 5 p.m. Placing games, Saturday Third place: 3 p.m. Championship: 5 p.m. pion), Teutopolis (Illinois Class 2A champion), Waterloo (Illinois Class 3A semifinalist). While the difficult games were a grind early on, Wallace believes that all those contests prepared them for this weekend. “He told us all year that’s why he set it up for a reason and now we’re in the state (semifinals),” Wallace said.“I’m glad he set it up that way. It shows us what we needed to do and what we needed to work on.” As a member of the team that finished second, losing to Crystal Lake South 8-3 two years ago, Burris has been getting constant encouragement from past teams and past teammates, including brother Dylan Burris. “He’s talked about not changing anything in our approach,” Blake Burris said. “They’re just another group of boys that play ball and for us to continue doing what we’ve been doing all year. And hopefully we’ll come back with something that they weren’t able to bring back.”

36 36 35 35 # 54 52 51 51 49 49 48 45 43 42 41 41 41 40 40 40 39 39 39 38

Stolen Bases Josh Gibson, O’Fallon Wes Collins, O’Fallon Blain Tuepker, Wright City Tyler Fogarty, Chaminade Isiah Wilson, Hancock Slugging % Cole Banker, SLUH Carter McCain, Liberty Alec Bonvicino, Granite Ryan Findlay, Lafayette Jevonye Johnson, Carnahan Earned Run Average Chase Beard, Windsor N. Beaton, Vianney Adam Stilts, Alton Josh Abel, De Smet Zach Brasier, WCA Strikeouts S. Wilhelm, Columbia D. Downing, Waterloo M. Boyer, Edville. Jordan Duncan, Herky Evan Gray, B. East

W-L 8-1 7-2 4-4 7-1 6-1 IP 61.3 65.3 63.3 56.3 47.7

# 50 37 35 34 34 Avg 3000 3000 2000 2000 1308 Avg 0.17 0.57 0.59 0.78 0.94 K’s 95 90 87 86 84


SPORTS

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

GOLF

Bradley takes lead in Canadian Open ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANCASTER, Ontario — Keegan Bradley had a 7-under 63 for a one-shot lead after the first round of the RBC Canadian Open on Thursday. “Today I was in complete control of my ball,” Bradley said. “Then when you couple that with feeling good on the greens, that’s when a 63 or a good, nice round happens.” Bradley was convinced that his clubhouse lead would not withstand the afternoon groups, but it did. Roberto Castro of the U.S. was the only player that teed off in the second wave to reach second, tying Canada’s Nick Taylor, Ireland’s Shane Lowry, South Korea’s Sungjae Im and South Africa’s Erik van Rooyen. This year the tournament has moved up in the golf calendar, making it a lead-in event to the U.S. Open and drawing a significantly stronger group of competitors. Defending tournament champion Dustin Johnson, the No. 2 player in the world, shot a 1-over 71. Last year Johnson pulled away from the field after a nearly twohour rain delay to win his first Canadian Open, firing 6-under 66 in the final round to finish at 23 under. Brooks Koepka, fresh off his PGA Championship win, shot an even-par 70 and is tied for 84th. Taylor of Abbotsford, British Columbia, led the Canadian contingent, shooting a 6-under 64. Taylor, who started on hole No. 10, made four birdies in a row to open his back nine at the Hamilton Golf and Country Club.

ADRIAN WYLD, THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

Dustin Johnson watches his shot from the 14th tee during the Canadian Open on Thursday in Ancaster, Ontario. Mackenzie Hughes was one of five Canadians within three shots of Bradley. Adam Hadwin of Abbotsford had a 5-under 65, while David Hearn of nearby Brantford, Ontario, and Drew Nesbitt of Shanty Bay, Ontario, both tied Hughes. As soon as Hughes’ partners were done teeing off at No. 13, he bent down, opened up a small bag and pulled out a jersey. It took a moment for fans to realize what he was doing, but as Hughes straightened out the familiar black and red of a Kawhi

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Odds Underdog American League RED SOX................. -$170..................... Rays Twins ..................... -$132................. TIGERS Yankees ................. -$118............... INDIANS RANGERS ............... -$110...............Athletics ASTROS.................. -$340................. Orioles ROYALS .................. -$115.............White Sox ANGELS.................. -$160.............. Mariners National League CUBS ...................... -$130....................Cards PHILLIES ................ -$155..................... Reds Braves.................... -$168.............. MARLINS METS...................... -$190.................Rockies BREWERS............... -$240................. Pirates PADRES.................. -$110..............Nationals Dodgers ................. -$220.................GIANTS Interleague BLUE JAYS.............. -$132................. Dbacks BASKETBALL NBA Finals Favorite Points Underdog WARRIORS ................. 5.................... Raptors Money line: WARRIORS -$220, Raptors +$180 Odds to win series: Warriors -$110 vs. Raptors -$110 SOCCER Odds to win the FIFA Women’s World Cup USA....................5/2 Italy .................40/1 France................7/2 China ...............50/1 Germany ............5/1 South Korea.....50/1 England .............6/1 New Zealand....60/1 Netherlands.....10/1 Argentina...... 100/1 Japan ...............12/1 Chile.............. 100/1 Brazil ...............16/1 Scotland........ 100/1 Australia ..........18/1 Cameroon ..... 200/1 Sweden ............20/1 Nigeria.......... 200/1 Spain................20/1 South Africa.. 200/1 Canada.............28/1 Jamaica ........ 250/1 Norway ............30/1 Thailand........ 250/1 BOXING Heavyweight bout, June 15, Las Vegas Tyson Fury -$5000 vs. Tom Schwarz +$4000 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein Favorite

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Placed OF DJ Stewart on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF/OF Stevie Wilkerson from Norfolk (IL). DETROIT TIGERS: Sent SS Jordy Mercer to Toledo (IL) for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Optioned INF Taylor Ward to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHP Jaime Barria from Salt Lake. Announced RHP John Curtiss elected free agency in lieu of accepting an outright assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS: Placed OF Braden Bishop on the 10-day IL. TAMPA BAY RAYS: Released C Erik Kratz. Sent 2B Joey Wendle to Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab assignment. National League CHICAGO CUBS: Assigned OF Jim Adduci outright to Iowa (PCL). COLORADO ROCKIES: Placed LHP Mike Dunn on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Monday. Selected the contract of RHP Peter Lambert from Albuquerque (PCL). Sent OF Charlie Blackmon to Albuquerque for a rehab assignment. Transferred LHP Harrison Musgrave to the 60-day IL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS: Activated C Austin Barnes from the 10-day IL. Optioned C Will Smith to Oklahoma City (PCL)kill. SAN DIEGO PADRES: Reinstated SS Fernando Tatis Jr. from the 10-day IL. Optioned INF Ty France to El Paso (PCL). FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS: Released OL Andrew Lauderdale. Claimed OL Desmond Harrison off waivers from Cleveland. CLEVELAND BROWNS: Signed OT Ka’John Armstrong. DETROIT LIONS: Waived WR Jordan Smallwood. Signed WR Jermaine Kearse. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES: Agreed to terms with QB Carson Wentz on a four-year contract extension through the 2024 season. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS: Released OL Andrew Peterson. Signed WR Ron’quavion Tarver and DL Trenton Thompson. HOCKEY National Hockey League DALLAS STARS: Signed D Roman Polak and F Mattais Janmark to one-year contract extensions. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS: Fined Portland Timbers M Sebastian Blanco and D Larrys Mabiala for violating heads to the face against the LA Football Club. Fined Atlanta United FJosef Martinez for simulation/embellishment against the Chicago Fire. COLLEGE ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE: Named Debbie Williamson supervisor of women’s basketball officials. COLONIAL STATES ATHLETIC CONFERENCE: Announced Valley Forge will join the conference as a core member, effective July 1, 2020. AUGUSTA: Announced the resignation of assistant men’s basketball coach Drew Gibson to take the same position at Navy. BRADLEY: Named Halley Morell women’s golf coach. ETSU: Announced sophomore QB Cade Weldon is transferring from Miami and junior QB Chance Thrasher from Coastal Carolina. NEW JERSEY CITY: Named Jacob Mishkin men’s and women’s tennis coach. NIAGARA: Signed women’s basketball coach Jada Pierce to a contract extension through the 2022-23 season. VANDERBILT: Named Carlos Daniel men’s basketball strength and conditioning coach.

Leonard Toronto Raptors jersey, the cheers rose to a crescendo, with spectators pounding on the boards that surround the hockeythemed hole at the RBC Canadian Open known as The Rink. Like many Raptors fans, Hughes hopes that Toronto wins the NBA Finals against the Golden State Warriors and can re-sign Leonard, who will become a free agent this summer. “I don’t think my wearing the jersey influenced him at all, but I hope that he stays,” Hughes said. “I try to have some fun with that

GOLF 14th Metropolitan Open Championship Second round | Thursday Country Club of St. Albans Ryan Sullivan, Winston-Salem, NC 67-68-135 -7 Emerson Newsome, Dacula, Ga. 70-65-135 -7 Ian Snyman, Denton, Texas 69-67-136 -6 Julian Taylor, Fulton, Mo. 67-69-136 -6 Chris Naegel, Wildwood 66-70-136 -6 Hayden Wood, Edmond, Okla. 68-68-136 -6 Stuart Thomas, Surprise, Ariz. 67-69-136 -6 Logan McCracken, Okla. City 68-69-137 -5 Steven Kupcho, Westminster, Colo. 69-68-137 -5 Brett White, Caledonia, Mich. 65-73-138 -4 James Nitties, Botany, NSW 66-72-138 -4 Barrett Kelpin, Kalamazoo, Mich.67-71-138 -4 Eric Hallberg, Scottsdale, Ariz. 70-68-138 -4 Ted Smith, Orlando, Fla. 68-70-138 -4 Brian Bullington, Frankfort, IL 65-74-139 -3 Nathan Yankovich, Blacklick, Ohio 67-72-139 -3 Reilly Ahearn (a), St. Louis 69-70-139 -3 Ryan Williams, Phoenix 67-72-139 -3 Rylee Reinertson, Norman, Okla. 71-68-139 -3 Ben Crancer, College Sta., Texas 70-70-140 -2 Otto Black, Brighton, Mich. 69-71-140 -2 Wesley Hunter, Mobile, Ala. 68-72-140 -2 Dan Woltman, Beaver Dam, Wis. 67-73-140 -2 Francesco Ruffino, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 70-70-140 -2 Stephen Stallings, Louisville, Ky. 70-70-140 -2 69-72-141 -1 Charlie Holland, Dallas Jerred Barley, Tipton, Mich. 69-72-141 -1 Matt McClung, Fulshear, Texas 71-70-141 -1 Brandon Holtz, Bloomington, Ill.70-71-141 -1 Chris Meyer, Dallas 71-70-141 -1 Nick Latimer, Singer Isl., Fla. 68-73-141 -1 Stephen Grant, Plantation, Fla. 73-68-141 -1 David Abolt, Cuba, Mo. 72-70-142 E Franklin Corpening, Aledo, Texas70-72-142 E Josh Radcliff, Coppell, Texas 74-68-142 E Zachary Olsen, Memphis, Tenn. 75-67-142 E Brendon Doyle, Louisville, Ky. 72-70-142 E Kyle Rodes, Plymouth, Mich. 72-70-142 E Spence Fulford, Davenport, Fla. 69-73-142 E Tommy Schaff, Ridgeland, S.C. 72-70-142 E

Canadian Open At Hamilton (Ontario) Golf & Country Club Purse: $7.6M | Yards: 6,967; Par 35-35—70 First round, Thursday Keegan Bradley ............... 32-31 — 63 -7 Shane Lowry.................... 33-31 — 64 -6 Sungjae Im ...................... 33-31 — 64 -6 Nick Taylor....................... 31-33 — 64 -6 Erik van Rooyen............... 32-32 — 64 -6 Roberto Castro ................ 32-32 — 64 -6 Scott Brown ..................... 32-33 — 65 -5 Adam Hadwin .................. 33-32 — 65 -5 Matt Kuchar..................... 32-33 — 65 -5 Sebastian Munoz ............. 31-34 — 65 -5 Danny Lee........................ 32-33 — 65 -5 Jimmy Walker .................. 33-32 — 65 -5 Russell Henley ................. 32-33 — 65 -5 Graeme McDowell ........... 33-32 — 65 -5 Adam Schenk................... 31-35 — 66 -4 Danny Willett................... 32-34 — 66 -4 Webb Simpson................. 34-32 — 66 -4 David Hearn..................... 34-32 — 66 -4 Drew Nesbitt.................... 34-32 — 66 -4 Harris English .................. 30-36 — 66 -4 Peter Malnati................... 33-33 — 66 -4 Mackenzie Hughes........... 32-34 — 66 -4 Henrik Stenson................ 33-33 — 66 -4 Talor Gooch ..................... 33-33 — 66 -4 Alex Noren....................... 33-34 — 67 -3 Jonas Blixt ....................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Rory McIlroy .................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Daniel Berger .................. 34-33 — 67 -3 Colt Knost ........................ 34-33 — 67 -3 Jonathan Byrd ................. 33-34 — 67 -3 Dylan Frittelli................... 35-32 — 67 -3 Jose de Jesus Rodriguez.. 34-33 — 67 -3 Robert Streb.................... 35-32 — 67 -3 Scott Langley................... 32-35 — 67 -3 Peter Uihlein ................... 33-34 — 67 -3 Kevin Tway....................... 33-34 — 67 -3 D.J. Trahan....................... 35-32 — 67 -3 J.J. Spaun......................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Joaquin Niemann............. 33-34 — 67 -3 Hank Lebioda................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Richard Jung.................... 35-32 — 67 -3 Bill Haas .......................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Roger Sloan ..................... 35-33 — 68 -2 Hudson Swafford............. 33-35 — 68 -2 Matt Every ....................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Josh Teater ...................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Cameron Tringale ............ 34-34 — 68 -2 Wes Roach ....................... 32-36 — 68 -2 Paul Barjon...................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Harold Varner III.............. 33-35 — 68 -2 Ryan Palmer.................... 36-32 — 68 -2 Kelly Kraft........................ 35-33 — 68 -2 Scott Stallings.................. 34-34 — 68 -2 Sepp Straka ..................... 35-33 — 68 -2 Kyle Jones........................ 33-35 — 68 -2 Jim Knous ........................ 35-33 — 68 -2 Joey Garber ..................... 32-36 — 68 -2 Ryan Yip .......................... 35-33 — 68 -2 Ben Crane ........................ 35-34 — 69 -1 Trey Mullinax................... 35-34 — 69 -1 George McNeill ................ 37-32 — 69 -1 Martin Laird .................... 33-36 — 69 -1 Luke Donald .................... 37-32 — 69 -1 Brian Harman.................. 37-32 — 69 -1 Jim Furyk......................... 34-35 — 69 -1 J.J. Henry ......................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Dominic Bozzelli .............. 35-34 — 69 -1 Jake Knapp ...................... 34-35 — 69 -1 Martin Piller .................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Zach Bauchou.................. 35-34 — 69 -1 Roberto Diaz.................... 33-36 — 69 -1 Billy Hurley III.................. 34-35 — 69 -1 Ricky Barnes.................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Sangmoon Bae ................ 33-36 — 69 -1 Chad Collins..................... 38-31 — 69 -1 Brandt Snedeker ............. 33-36 — 69 -1 Rod Pampling .................. 35-34 — 69 -1 Cody Gribble .................... 33-36 — 69 -1 Chad Campbell ................ 35-34 — 69 -1 Tyler Duncan ................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Austin Connelly ............... 36-33 — 69 -1 Adam Svensson ............... 35-34 — 69 -1 Chris Thompson............... 33-36 — 69 -1 Sam Saunders ................. 37-33 — 70 E Denny McCarthy .............. 35-35 — 70 E Nick Watney..................... 35-35 — 70 E

hole. Life’s short so, whatever, I’m just going to have some fun,” said Hughes, who donned a Toronto Maple Leafs jersey at last year’s version of the Rink at Glen Abbey Golf Club in Oakville, Ontario. “The crowd enjoys that stuff so it’s fun for me to do. “I love all these Toronto sports teams whether it’s Leafs, Raptors, Blue Jays. That was just a fun way to show my Toronto pride and Canada pride.” Hughes, from nearby Dundas, Ontario, walked up the fairway in the jersey to chants of “Let’s

SOCCER

Corey Conners ................. 34-36 Seamus Power................. 35-35 Ollie Schniederjans.......... 34-36 Mike Weir......................... 34-36 Collin Morikawa............... 34-36 James Allenby ................. 35-35 Brandon Harkins ............. 35-35 Wyndham Clark ............... 35-35 Brendon Todd .................. 32-38 Ryan Armour ................... 37-33 Brooks Koepka ................ 34-36 Justin Thomas ................. 35-35 Whee Kim ........................ 35-35 Alex Prugh....................... 37-33 Alex Cejka ........................ 35-35 John Chin......................... 35-35 Richard T. Lee .................. 35-35 Michael Gligic .................. 36-34 David Lingmerth.............. 36-35 Padraig Harrington ......... 34-37 Johnson Wagner .............. 38-33 Sergio Garcia ................... 35-36 Jim Herman ..................... 37-34 Dustin Johnson................ 33-38 Fabian Gomez.................. 36-35 Bud Cauley....................... 35-36 Curtis Luck....................... 35-36 Brady Schnell .................. 36-35 Bubba Watson ................. 36-35 Zach Johnson................... 36-35 Richy Werenski ................ 34-37 Nate Lashley.................... 36-35 Stephan Jaeger................ 35-36 Will Claxton ..................... 37-34 Ben Silverman ................. 36-35 Thomas DeMarco............. 36-35 Derek Fathauer................ 36-36 Martin Trainer ................. 35-37 Brian Gay......................... 35-37 J.B. Holmes...................... 37-35 Chris Stroud..................... 33-39 a-Etienne Brault .............. 39-33 Nicholas Lindheim........... 37-35 a-Chris Crisologo ............. 37-35 Carlos Ortiz...................... 37-35 Austin Cook ..................... 37-35 Scott Piercy ..................... 36-36 Brandon Hagy.................. 37-35 Seth Reeves ..................... 37-36 Tyrone Van Aswegen ....... 35-38 Tom Hoge ........................ 36-37 Lucas Bjerregaard ........... 37-36 Zack Sucher ..................... 37-36 Chase Wright ................... 36-37 Kramer Hickok................. 37-36 Cameron Davis ................ 36-37 Aaron Wise ...................... 38-36 Shawn Stefani.................. 37-37 Tom Lovelady .................. 39-35 JC Deacon ........................ 38-36 Anders Albertson ............ 37-37 Brice Garnett ................... 39-35 a-Matthew Anderson....... 36-38 Marc-Etienne Bussieres... 34-40 a-Joseph Deraney ............ 38-37 a-Joey Savoie................... 40-35 Albin Choi ........................ 38-38 Michael Blair ................... 40-36 Julian Etulain................... 39-37 a-Josh Whalen ................. 40-39 (a-amateur)

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70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 76 76 76 79

E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +9

Area holes in one Pheasant Run: Jim Denniger, hole No. 17, 169 yards, driver, June 5. Tamarack: Jim Mackey, hole No. 17, 128 yards, 9-iron, May 31.

TENNIS French Open Thursday Men’s Quarterfinals Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Alexander Zverev (5), Germany, 7-5, 6-2, 6-2. Dominic Thiem (4), Austria, def. Karen Khachanov (10), Russia, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. Women’s Quarterfinals Ashleigh Barty (8), Australia, def. Madison Keys (14), United States, 6-3, 7-5. Amanda Anisimova, United States, def. Simona Halep (3), Romania, 6-2, 6-4. Friday Men’s semifinals Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, vs. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, vs. Dominic Thiem (4), Austria Women’s semifinals Ashleigh Barty (8), Australia, vs. Amanda Anisimova, United States Johanna Konta (26), Britain, vs. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic

BOXING Fight Schedule Saturday At Madison Square Garden, New York, Gennady Golovkin vs. Steve Rolls, 12, super middleweights; Charles Conwell vs. Courtney Pennington, 10, for the vacant USBA super welterweight; Ali Akhmedov vs. Marcus McDaniel, 10, super middleweights. At Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Reno, Nev. (ESPN), Oscar Valdez vs. Jason Sanchez, 12, for Valdez’s WBO featherweight title; Michael Seals vs. Christopher Brooker, 10, light heavyweights; Andy Vences vs. Albert Bell, 10, super featherweights. June 15 At Arena Riga, Riga, Latvia, Mairis Briedis vs. Krzysztof Glowacki, 12, for Briedis’ WBC Diamond and Glowacki’s WBO cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Yunier Dorticos vs. Andrew Tabiti, 12, cruiserweights (World Boxing Super Series semifinals). At First Direct Arena, Leeds, England, Josh Warrington vs. Kid Galahad, 12, for Warrington’s IBF featherweight title; Jason Welborn vs. JJ Metcalf, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super welterweight title; Zelfa Barrett vs. Lyon Woodstock, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super featherweight title. At MGM Grand, Las Vegas, Tyson Fury vs. Tom Schwarz, 12, heavyweights.

Women’s World Cup GROUP STAGE MATCHES GROUP A Friday, Paris: France vs. South Korea, 2 p.m. Saturday, Reims: Norway vs. Nigeria, 8 a.m. June 12, Nice: France vs. Norway, 2 p.m. June 12, Grenoble: Nigeria vs. S. Korea, 8 a.m. June 17, Rennes: France vs. Nigeria, 2 p.m. June 17, Reims: S. Korea vs. Norway, 2 p.m. GROUP B Saturday, Le Havre: China vs. S. Africa, 11 a.m. Saturday, Rennes: Germany vs. China, 2 p.m. June 12, Valenciennes: Germany vs. Spain, 11 a.m. June 13, Paris: South Africa vs. China, 2 p.m. June 17, Montpellier: Germany vs. S. Africa, 11 a.m. June 17, Le Havre: China vs. Spain, 11 a.m. GROUP C Sunday, Valenciennes: Australia vs. Italy, 6 a.m. Sunday, Grenoble: Brazil vs. Jamaica, 8:30 a.m. June 13, Montpellier: Australia vs. Brazil, 11 a.m. June 14, Reims: Jamaica vs. Italy, 2 p.m. June 18, Grenoble: Australia vs. Jamaica, 2 p.m. June 18, Valenciennes: Italy vs. Brazil, 2 p.m. GROUP D Sunday, Nice: England vs. Scotland, 11 a.m. Monday, Paris: Argentina vs. Japan, 11 a.m. June 14, Rennes: Japan vs. Scotland, 8 a.m. June 14, Le Havre: England vs. Argentina, 11 a.m. June 19, Nice: Japan vs. England, 2 p.m. June 19, Paris: Scotland vs. Argentina, 2 p.m. GROUP E Monday, Montpellier: Canada vs. Cameroon, 2 p.m. Tuesday, Le Havre: New Zealand vs. Netherlands, 8 a.m. June 15, Valenciennes: Netherlands vs. Cameroon, 11 a.m. June 15, Grenoble: Canada vs. New Zealand, 2 p.m. June 20, Reims: Netherlands vs. Canada, 11 a.m. June 20, Montpellier: Cameroon vs. New Zealand, 11 a.m. GROUP F Tuesday, Rennes: Chile vs. Sweden, 11 a.m. Tuesday, Reims: United States vs. Thailand, 2 p.m. June 16, Paris: United States vs. China, 8 a.m. June 16, Nice: Sweden vs. Thailand, 11 a.m. June 20, Le Havre: Sweden vs. United States, 2 p.m. June 20, Rennes: Thailand vs. China, 2 p.m.

Major League Soccer

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 8 4 4 28 28 18 Montreal 8 7 3 27 21 28 D.C. United 7 4 6 27 23 18 Atlanta 8 5 2 26 19 11 New York 7 5 3 24 25 16 New York City FC 5 1 8 23 23 17 Toronto FC 5 6 3 18 24 23 Orlando City 5 7 3 18 22 21 Chicago 4 6 6 18 24 23 Columbus 5 9 2 17 16 24 New England 4 8 4 16 17 33 Cincinnati 3 11 2 11 14 33 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 11 1 4 37 39 13 LA Galaxy 9 6 1 28 22 19 Seattle 7 4 5 26 26 21 Houston 7 3 3 24 21 14 FC Dallas 6 6 3 21 20 20 Minnesota United 6 6 3 21 23 24 Real Salt Lake 6 8 1 19 21 27 San Jose 5 6 3 18 21 25 Vancouver 4 6 6 18 17 20 Sporting K.C. 3 5 6 15 24 25 Portland 4 7 2 14 19 26 Colorado 3 9 3 12 24 34 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Thursday New York City FC 5, Cincinnati 2 Friday Sporting K.C. at Toronto FC, 6 p.m. Saturday FC Dallas at San Jose, 2:30 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Colorado, 8 p.m. MLS LEADERS, THROUGH WEDNESDAY Goals Carlos Vela, LFC........................................ 16 Zlatan Ibrahimovic, LA ............................. 11 Josef Martinez, ATL .................................. 10 Nani, ORL.....................................................8 Wayne Rooney, DC.......................................8 Diego Rossi, LFC ..........................................8 Kei Kamara, COL..........................................7 Krisztian Nemeth, KC ..................................7 Johnny Russell, KC.......................................7 Saphir Taider, MTL.......................................7 Chris Wondolowski, SJ.................................7 Assists Carlos Vela, LFC........................................ 10 Nicolas Lodeiro, SEA....................................8 Diego Valeri, POR ........................................7 Eduard Atuesta, LFC....................................6 Sebastian Blanco, POR ................................6 Alberth Elis, HOU.........................................6 Cristian Espinoza, SJ....................................6 Romain Metanire, MIN ................................6 Maximiliano Moralez, NYC...........................6 Alejandro Pozuelo, TOR...............................6 Shots on Goal Carlos Vela, LFC........................................ 35 Diego Rossi, LFC ....................................... 25 Zlatan Ibrahimovic, LA ............................. 20 Josef Martinez, ATL .................................. 20 Kei Kamara, COL....................................... 19 Aleksandar Katai, CHI............................... 18 Nani, ORL.................................................. 18 Wayne Rooney, DC.................................... 17 Jefferson Savarino, RSL............................ 17 Saphir Taider, MTL.................................... 17 Goals-Allowed Avg. Brad Guzan, ATL .................................... 0.73 Tyler Miller, LFC..................................... 0.81 Bill Hamid, DC........................................ 1.06 Luis Robles, NYR.................................... 1.07 Joe Willis, HOU....................................... 1.08 Sean Johnson, NYC ................................ 1.15 Saves Bill Hamid, DC........................................... 67 David Bingham, LA ................................... 56 Stefan Frei, SEA........................................ 51

go Raptors” and went on to shoot a 4-under 66 to finish the first round in a tie for 15th. He would have been in an even better position if he hadn’t double-bogeyed the 18th hole, his only score worse than par. “Just spoiled it at the end there, but I was 6 under through 17 and it was pretty stress free for the most part,” Hughes said. “All in all it’s a great day score-wise, just not the way I wanted to finish.” There are 26 Canadians in the field at the national championship, and they’re all hoping to end a 65-year spell of futility. The previous Canadian to win the event was Pat Fletcher in 1954 at Vancouver’s Point Grey Golf and Country Club. “We all obviously want to be the first one to win this, but we all want each other to do well,” said Hadwin, who briefly delayed his post-round news conference so that Hughes could concentrate on teeing off nearby. “Any Canadian winner is good.” A three-minute pause in play starting at 12:10 p.m. was held as six planes from the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum flew over the course to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Allied invasion of Normandy, France. The group of planes included a rare Lancaster Mk 10 bomber from the Second World War and a modern CC-130 Hercules. “It’s obviously an emotional day for a lot of people,” Hadwin said. “To kind of see the planes that were used and then a couple newer age ones, it was pretty cool to stand on the fairway and see that.”

USL Championship

Major League leaders

Eastern W L T Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 8 0 5 29 20 4 New York Red Bulls II 7 3 2 23 27 14 Nashville 6 3 4 22 20 10 Ottawa 6 2 3 21 17 9 Indy 6 2 3 21 15 8 Louisville 6 4 3 21 21 17 North Carolina 5 2 5 20 19 10 STLFC 5 1 4 19 12 6 Charleston 4 3 5 17 15 15 Atlanta 2 3 5 4 13 12 18 Bethlehem Steel 3 6 4 13 18 26 Pittsburgh 2 2 6 12 13 13 Loudoun 3 4 3 12 14 15 Birmingham 3 6 3 12 9 20 Memphis 2 6 4 10 12 17 Charlotte 1 7 5 8 13 25 Swope Park Rangers 1 7 4 7 17 29 Hartford 1 9 3 6 10 28 Western W L T Pts GF GA New Mexico 6 1 7 25 31 19 Portland II 6 2 4 22 26 18 Phoenix 5 2 5 20 26 14 Reno 5 2 5 20 24 16 Fresno 5 2 5 20 20 12 El Paso 5 2 5 20 16 12 OKC Energy 5 4 5 20 20 20 Austin 5 5 3 18 14 15 LA Galaxy II 4 4 6 18 22 28 Tulsa 4 4 5 17 24 21 Sacramento 5 5 2 17 15 17 Rio Grande Valley 4 5 4 16 23 23 Las Vegas 4 6 3 15 18 22 Real Monarchs 3 6 3 12 21 24 San Antonio 3 7 3 12 16 21 Colorado Springs 3 8 2 11 11 21 Tacoma 2 10 3 9 13 40 Friday New York Red Bulls II at Atlanta 2, 6:30 p.m. Tulsa at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Saturday STLFC at Hartford, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Swope Park Rangers, 4 p.m. Loudoun at Louisville, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Birmingham at Charleston, 6:30 p.m. North Carolina at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Tacoma at Colorado Springs, 7 p.m. Indy at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. Portland II at Austin, 7:30 p.m. Reno at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. LA Galaxy II at El Paso, 8:30 p.m. Sacramento at New Mexico, 8:30 p.m. Rio Grande Valley at Real Monarchs, 9 p.m. OKC Energy at Fresno, 9:30 p.m. Orange County at Las Vegas, 9:30 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .370; McNeil, New York, .345; Bell, Pittsburgh, .338; Arenado, Colorado, .337; Dahl, Colorado, .335; Rendon, Washington, .329; Yelich, Milwaukee, .328; Baez, Chicago, .307; Freeman, Atlanta, .307; JTurner, Los Angeles, .303. RUNS: Story, Colorado, 57; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 51; Arenado, Colorado, 48; Bryant, Chicago, 47; Yelich, Milwaukee, 47; Bell, Pittsburgh, 45; Freeman, Atlanta, 45; McCutchen, Philadelphia, 45; Rendon, Washington, 44; 2 tied at 42. RBI: Bell, Pittsburgh, 56; Arenado, Colorado, 54; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 54; Ozuna, Cardinals, 51; Yelich, Milwaukee, 51; Escobar, Arizona, 48; Alonso, New York, 45; Harper, Philadelphia, 44; Rizzo, Chicago, 44; 3 tied at 43. HITS: Arenado, Colorado, 82; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 81; Bell, Pittsburgh, 79; Baez, Chicago, 74; Freeman, Atlanta, 73; Story, Colorado, 71; Escobar, Arizona, 70; Hosmer, San Diego, 67; KMarte, Arizona, 67; 2 tied at 66. DOUBLES: Bell, Pittsburgh, 25; Harper, Philadelphia, 20; Rendon, Washington, 19; Ahmed, Arizona, 18; Baez, Chicago, 18; Cain, Milwaukee, 18; Seager, Los Angeles, 18; 4 tied at 17. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 5; Escobar, Arizona, 5; Rosario, New York, 4; Tapia, Colorado, 4; Dahl, Colorado, 3; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 3; KMarte, Arizona, 3; Pederson, Los Angeles, 3; Swanson, Atlanta, 3; 16 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: Yelich, Milwaukee, 23; Alonso, New York, 20; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 20; Reyes, San Diego, 19; Bell, Pittsburgh, 18; Moustakas, Milwaukee, 18; Pederson, Los Angeles, 18; Dietrich, Cincinnati, 17; Renfroe, San Diego, 17; 4 tied at 16. STOLEN BASES: Yelich, Milwaukee, 13; Dyson, Arizona, 12; Story, Colorado, 11; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10; Wong, Cardinals, 10; Robles, Washington, 9; Acuna Jr., Atlanta, 8; Puig, Cincinnati, 8; TTurner, Washington, 8; 2 tied at 7. PITCHING: Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-1; Fried, Atlanta, 7-3; Maeda, Los Angeles, 7-2; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 7-1; 9 tied at 6. ERA: Ryu, Los Angeles, 1.35; Davies, Milwaukee, 2.20; Castillo, Cincinnati, 2.38; Eflin, Philadelphia, 3.02; Scherzer, Washington, 3.06; Greinke, Arizona, 3.09; Hendricks, Chicago, 3.16; Teheran, Atlanta, 3.28; Lyles, Pittsburgh, 3.38; Smith, Miami, 3.41. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 117; Strasburg, Washington, 104; Wheeler, New York, 93; Ray, Arizona, 91; Castillo, Cincinnati, 90; Marquez, Colorado, 88; deGrom, New York, 84; Corbin, Washington, 83; Smith, Miami, 82; Syndergaard, New York, 81. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Meadows, Tampa Bay, .349; Polanco, Minnesota, .336; Brantley, Houston, .329; LeMahieu, New York, .323; Anderson, Chicago, .322; Devers, Boston, .316; Dozier, Kansas City, .314; Fletcher, Los Angeles, .313; La Stella, Los Angeles, .311; Springer, Houston, .308. RUNS: Bogaerts, Boston, 50; Betts, Boston, 48; Devers, Boston, 47; Haniger, Seattle, 46; Trout, Los Angeles, 45; Bregman, Houston, 43; Encarnacion, Seattle, 43; Rosario, Minnesota, 42; 5 tied at 41. RBI: Abreu, Chicago, 52; Rosario, Minnesota, 50; Santana, Seattle, 45; Bregman, Houston, 44; Springer, Houston, 43; Encarnacion, Seattle, 42; Mondesi, Kansas City, 42; Soler, Kansas City, 42; Gallo, Texas, 41; Smith Jr., Baltimore, 41. HITS: Brantley, Houston, 78; Polanco, Minnesota, 78; Devers, Boston, 75; Merrifield, Kansas City, 75; LeMahieu, New York, 72; Bogaerts, Boston, 69; Mancini, Baltimore, 68; Mondesi, Kansas City, 68; Fletcher, Los Angeles, 67; 3 tied at 66. DOUBLES: Buxton, Minnesota, 20; Castellanos, Detroit, 20; Bogaerts, Boston, 18; Brantley, Houston, 18; Devers, Boston, 17; Mancini, Baltimore, 17; Polanco, Minnesota, 17; 4 tied at 16. TRIPLES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 8; Merrifield, Kansas City, 7; Polanco, Minnesota, 5; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 4; Buxton, Minnesota, 3; Castellanos, Detroit, 3; Dozier, Kansas City, 3; Gardner, New York, 3; Rodriguez, Detroit, 3; Smith, Seattle, 3. HOME RUNS: Sanchez, New York, 19; Bregman, Houston, 18; Rosario, Minnesota, 18; Encarnacion, Seattle, 17; Gallo, Texas, 17; Springer, Houston, 17; Abreu, Chicago, 16; Chapman, Oakland, 16; Soler, Kansas City, 16; 6 tied at 15. STOLEN BASES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 22; Smith, Seattle, 16; Anderson, Chicago, 15; Ramirez, Cleveland, 15; Gordon, Seattle, 12; Andrus, Texas, 11; Hamilton, Kansas City, 11; Villar, Baltimore, 11; Buxton, Minnesota, 10; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 10. PITCHING: German, New York, 9-1; Verlander, Houston, 9-2; Berrios, Minnesota, 8-2; Giolito, Chicago, 8-1; Odorizzi, Minnesota, 8-2; Lynn, Texas, 7-4; Montas, Oakland, 7-2; Morton, Tampa Bay, 7-0; Perez, Minnesota, 7-2; 8 tied at 6. ERA: Odorizzi, Minnesota, 1.96; Morton, Tampa Bay, 2.30; Verlander, Houston, 2.40; Giolito, Chicago, 2.54; Minor, Texas, 2.55; Montas, Oakland, 2.83; Stroman, Toronto, 2.84; Boyd, Detroit, 3.01; Turnbull, Detroit, 3.01; Berrios, Minnesota, 3.15. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 116; Sale, Boston, 110; Verlander, Houston, 110; Bauer, Cleveland, 103; Boyd, Detroit, 97; Bieber, Cleveland, 92; Morton, Tampa Bay, 91; Snell, Tampa Bay, 91; Minor, Texas, 87; Carrasco, Cleveland, 79.

BASEBALL NCAA Division I Super Regionals Best-of-3; x-if necessary Louisville, Ky. Friday: Louisville (47-16) vs. East Carolina (47-16), 11 a.m. Saturday: Louisville vs. East Carolina, 2 p.m. x-Sunday: Louisville vs. East Carolina, 11 a.m. Nashville, Tenn. Friday: Vanderbilt (52-10) vs. Duke (34-25), 5 p.m. Saturday: Vanderbilt vs. Duke, 8 p.m. x-Sunday: Vanderbilt vs. Duke, 2 p.m. Lubbock, Texas Friday: Texas Tech (42-17) vs. Oklahoma State (39-19), 2 p.m. Saturday: Texas Tech vs. Oklahoma St, 5 p.m. x-Sunday: Texas Tech vs. Oklahoma St, 5 p.m. Los Angeles Friday: UCLA (51-9) vs. Michigan (44-19), 8 p.m. Saturday: UCLA vs. Michigan, 8 p.m. x-Sunday: UCLA vs. Michigan, 8 p.m. Chapel Hill, N.C. Saturday: North Carolina (45-17) vs. Auburn (36-25), 11 a.m. Sunday: North Carolina vs. Auburn, TBA x-Monday: North Carolina vs. Auburn, Noon Starkville, Miss. Saturday: Mississippi State (49-13) vs. Stanford (45-12), 2 p.m. Sunday: Mississippi State vs. Stanford, 8 p.m. Monday: Mississippi State vs. Stanford, 6 p.m. Fayetteville, Ark. Saturday: Arkansas (44-17) vs. Mississippi (40-25), 11 a.m. Sunday: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, 2 p.m. x-Monday: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, 3 p.m. Baton Rouge, La. Saturday: LSU (40-24) vs. Florida State (39-21), 2 p.m. Sunday: LSU vs. Florida State, 5 p.m. x-Monday: LSU vs. Florida State, 7:30 p.m.

Frontier League East W L Pct. GB Schaumburg 15 8 .652 — Lake Erie 12 10 .545 2½ Windy City 12 12 .500 3½ Washington 9 16 .360 7 Joliet 8 15 .348 7 West W L Pct. GB Evansville 13 10 .565 — River City 13 10 .565 — Florence 13 10 .565 — Southern Illinois 12 11 .522 1 Gateway 9 14 .391 4 Wednesday Florence 8, Windy City 2, 7 innings Windy City 11, Florence 4, 7 innings Southern Illinois 5, Washington 4, 14 innings Schaumburg 6, Gateway 3 Joliet 4, Evansville 2 Lake Erie at River City, (2), ppd. Thursday Lake Erie 9, River City 6, 7 innings Lake Erie at River City, Game 2, (n) Windy City 3, Florence 2 Washington 9, Southern Illinois 2 Gateway at Schaumburg, (n) Evansville at Joliet, (n) Friday Florence at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Joliet at River City, 6:35 p.m. Gateway at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Saturday Southern Illinois at Lake Erie, 5:05 p.m. Evansville at Schaumburg, 6 p.m. Gateway at Windy City, 6:05 p.m. Florence at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Joliet at River City, 6:35 p.m.


SPORTS

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

GOLF

Bradley takes lead in Canadian Open ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANCASTER, Ontario — Keegan Bradley had a 7-under 63 for a one-shot lead after the first round of the RBC Canadian Open on Thursday. “Today I was in complete control of my ball,” Bradley said. “Then when you couple that with feeling good on the greens, that’s when a 63 or a good, nice round happens.” Bradley was convinced that his clubhouse lead would not withstand the afternoon groups, but it did. Roberto Castro of the U.S. was the only player that teed off in the second wave to reach second, tying Canada’s Nick Taylor, Ireland’s Shane Lowry, South Korea’s Sungjae Im and South Africa’s Erik van Rooyen. This year the tournament has moved up in the golf calendar, making it a lead-in event to the U.S. Open and drawing a significantly stronger group of competitors. Defending tournament champion Dustin Johnson, the No. 2 player in the world, shot a 1-over 71. Last year Johnson pulled away from the field after a nearly twohour rain delay to win his first Canadian Open, firing 6-under 66 in the final round to finish at 23 under. Brooks Koepka, fresh off his PGA Championship win, shot an even-par 70 and is tied for 84th. Taylor of Abbotsford, British Columbia, led the Canadian contingent, shooting a 6-under 64. Taylor, who started on hole No. 10, made four birdies in a row to open his back nine at the Hamilton Golf and Country Club.

ADRIAN WYLD, THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

Dustin Johnson watches his shot from the 14th tee during the Canadian Open on Thursday in Ancaster, Ontario. Mackenzie Hughes was one of five Canadians within three shots of Bradley. Adam Hadwin of Abbotsford had a 5-under 65, while David Hearn of nearby Brantford, Ontario, and Drew Nesbitt of Shanty Bay, Ontario, both tied Hughes. As soon as Hughes’ partners were done teeing off at No. 13, he bent down, opened up a small bag and pulled out a jersey. It took a moment for fans to realize what he was doing, but as Hughes straightened out the familiar black and red of a Kawhi

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Odds Underdog American League RED SOX................. -$170..................... Rays Twins ..................... -$132................. TIGERS Yankees ................. -$118............... INDIANS RANGERS ............... -$110...............Athletics ASTROS.................. -$340................. Orioles ROYALS .................. -$115.............White Sox ANGELS.................. -$160.............. Mariners National League CUBS ...................... -$130....................Cards PHILLIES ................ -$155..................... Reds Braves.................... -$168.............. MARLINS METS...................... -$190.................Rockies BREWERS............... -$240................. Pirates PADRES.................. -$110..............Nationals Dodgers ................. -$220.................GIANTS Interleague BLUE JAYS.............. -$132................. Dbacks BASKETBALL NBA Finals Favorite Points Underdog WARRIORS ................. 5.................... Raptors Money line: WARRIORS -$220, Raptors +$180 Odds to win series: Warriors -$110 vs. Raptors -$110 SOCCER Odds to win the FIFA Women’s World Cup USA....................5/2 Italy .................40/1 France................7/2 China ...............50/1 Germany ............5/1 South Korea.....50/1 England .............6/1 New Zealand....60/1 Netherlands.....10/1 Argentina...... 100/1 Japan ...............12/1 Chile.............. 100/1 Brazil ...............16/1 Scotland........ 100/1 Australia ..........18/1 Cameroon ..... 200/1 Sweden ............20/1 Nigeria.......... 200/1 Spain................20/1 South Africa.. 200/1 Canada.............28/1 Jamaica ........ 250/1 Norway ............30/1 Thailand........ 250/1 BOXING Heavyweight bout, June 15, Las Vegas Tyson Fury -$5000 vs. Tom Schwarz +$4000 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein Favorite

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES: Placed OF DJ Stewart on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF/OF Stevie Wilkerson from Norfolk (IL). DETROIT TIGERS: Sent SS Jordy Mercer to Toledo (IL) for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES ANGELS: Optioned INF Taylor Ward to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHP Jaime Barria from Salt Lake. Announced RHP John Curtiss elected free agency in lieu of accepting an outright assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS: Placed OF Braden Bishop on the 10-day IL. TAMPA BAY RAYS: Released C Erik Kratz. Sent 2B Joey Wendle to Charlotte (FSL) for a rehab assignment. National League CHICAGO CUBS: Assigned OF Jim Adduci outright to Iowa (PCL). COLORADO ROCKIES: Placed LHP Mike Dunn on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Monday. Selected the contract of RHP Peter Lambert from Albuquerque (PCL). Sent OF Charlie Blackmon to Albuquerque for a rehab assignment. Transferred LHP Harrison Musgrave to the 60-day IL. LOS ANGELES DODGERS: Activated C Austin Barnes from the 10-day IL. Optioned C Will Smith to Oklahoma City (PCL)kill. SAN DIEGO PADRES: Reinstated SS Fernando Tatis Jr. from the 10-day IL. Optioned INF Ty France to El Paso (PCL). FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS: Released OL Andrew Lauderdale. Claimed OL Desmond Harrison off waivers from Cleveland. CLEVELAND BROWNS: Signed OT Ka’John Armstrong. DETROIT LIONS: Waived WR Jordan Smallwood. Signed WR Jermaine Kearse. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES: Agreed to terms with QB Carson Wentz on a four-year contract extension through the 2024 season. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS: Released OL Andrew Peterson. Signed WR Ron’quavion Tarver and DL Trenton Thompson. HOCKEY National Hockey League DALLAS STARS: Signed D Roman Polak and F Mattais Janmark to one-year contract extensions. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS: Fined Portland Timbers M Sebastian Blanco and D Larrys Mabiala for violating heads to the face against the LA Football Club. Fined Atlanta United FJosef Martinez for simulation/embellishment against the Chicago Fire. COLLEGE ATLANTIC COAST CONFERENCE: Named Debbie Williamson supervisor of women’s basketball officials. COLONIAL STATES ATHLETIC CONFERENCE: Announced Valley Forge will join the conference as a core member, effective July 1, 2020. AUGUSTA: Announced the resignation of assistant men’s basketball coach Drew Gibson to take the same position at Navy. BRADLEY: Named Halley Morell women’s golf coach. ETSU: Announced sophomore QB Cade Weldon is transferring from Miami and junior QB Chance Thrasher from Coastal Carolina. NEW JERSEY CITY: Named Jacob Mishkin men’s and women’s tennis coach. NIAGARA: Signed women’s basketball coach Jada Pierce to a contract extension through the 2022-23 season. VANDERBILT: Named Carlos Daniel men’s basketball strength and conditioning coach.

Leonard Toronto Raptors jersey, the cheers rose to a crescendo, with spectators pounding on the boards that surround the hockeythemed hole at the RBC Canadian Open known as The Rink. Like many Raptors fans, Hughes hopes that Toronto wins the NBA Finals against the Golden State Warriors and can re-sign Leonard, who will become a free agent this summer. “I don’t think my wearing the jersey influenced him at all, but I hope that he stays,” Hughes said. “I try to have some fun with that

GOLF 14th Metropolitan Open Championship Second round | Thursday Country Club of St. Albans Ryan Sullivan, Winston-Salem, NC 67-68-135 -7 Emerson Newsome, Dacula, Ga. 70-65-135 -7 Ian Snyman, Denton, Texas 69-67-136 -6 Julian Taylor, Fulton, Mo. 67-69-136 -6 Chris Naegel, Wildwood 66-70-136 -6 Hayden Wood, Edmond, Okla. 68-68-136 -6 Stuart Thomas, Surprise, Ariz. 67-69-136 -6 Logan McCracken, Okla. City 68-69-137 -5 Steven Kupcho, Westminster, Colo. 69-68-137 -5 Brett White, Caledonia, Mich. 65-73-138 -4 James Nitties, Botany, NSW 66-72-138 -4 Barrett Kelpin, Kalamazoo, Mich.67-71-138 -4 Eric Hallberg, Scottsdale, Ariz. 70-68-138 -4 Ted Smith, Orlando, Fla. 68-70-138 -4 Brian Bullington, Frankfort, IL 65-74-139 -3 Nathan Yankovich, Blacklick, Ohio 67-72-139 -3 Reilly Ahearn (a), St. Louis 69-70-139 -3 Ryan Williams, Phoenix 67-72-139 -3 Rylee Reinertson, Norman, Okla. 71-68-139 -3 Ben Crancer, College Sta., Texas 70-70-140 -2 Otto Black, Brighton, Mich. 69-71-140 -2 Wesley Hunter, Mobile, Ala. 68-72-140 -2 Dan Woltman, Beaver Dam, Wis. 67-73-140 -2 Francesco Ruffino, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 70-70-140 -2 Stephen Stallings, Louisville, Ky. 70-70-140 -2 69-72-141 -1 Charlie Holland, Dallas Jerred Barley, Tipton, Mich. 69-72-141 -1 Matt McClung, Fulshear, Texas 71-70-141 -1 Brandon Holtz, Bloomington, Ill.70-71-141 -1 Chris Meyer, Dallas 71-70-141 -1 Nick Latimer, Singer Isl., Fla. 68-73-141 -1 Stephen Grant, Plantation, Fla. 73-68-141 -1 David Abolt, Cuba, Mo. 72-70-142 E Franklin Corpening, Aledo, Texas70-72-142 E Josh Radcliff, Coppell, Texas 74-68-142 E Zachary Olsen, Memphis, Tenn. 75-67-142 E Brendon Doyle, Louisville, Ky. 72-70-142 E Kyle Rodes, Plymouth, Mich. 72-70-142 E Spence Fulford, Davenport, Fla. 69-73-142 E Tommy Schaff, Ridgeland, S.C. 72-70-142 E

Canadian Open At Hamilton (Ontario) Golf & Country Club Purse: $7.6M | Yards: 6,967; Par 35-35—70 First round, Thursday Keegan Bradley ............... 32-31 — 63 -7 Shane Lowry.................... 33-31 — 64 -6 Sungjae Im ...................... 33-31 — 64 -6 Nick Taylor....................... 31-33 — 64 -6 Erik van Rooyen............... 32-32 — 64 -6 Roberto Castro ................ 32-32 — 64 -6 Scott Brown ..................... 32-33 — 65 -5 Adam Hadwin .................. 33-32 — 65 -5 Matt Kuchar..................... 32-33 — 65 -5 Sebastian Munoz ............. 31-34 — 65 -5 Danny Lee........................ 32-33 — 65 -5 Jimmy Walker .................. 33-32 — 65 -5 Russell Henley ................. 32-33 — 65 -5 Graeme McDowell ........... 33-32 — 65 -5 Adam Schenk................... 31-35 — 66 -4 Danny Willett................... 32-34 — 66 -4 Webb Simpson................. 34-32 — 66 -4 David Hearn..................... 34-32 — 66 -4 Drew Nesbitt.................... 34-32 — 66 -4 Harris English .................. 30-36 — 66 -4 Peter Malnati................... 33-33 — 66 -4 Mackenzie Hughes........... 32-34 — 66 -4 Henrik Stenson................ 33-33 — 66 -4 Talor Gooch ..................... 33-33 — 66 -4 Alex Noren....................... 33-34 — 67 -3 Jonas Blixt ....................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Rory McIlroy .................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Daniel Berger .................. 34-33 — 67 -3 Colt Knost ........................ 34-33 — 67 -3 Jonathan Byrd ................. 33-34 — 67 -3 Dylan Frittelli................... 35-32 — 67 -3 Jose de Jesus Rodriguez.. 34-33 — 67 -3 Robert Streb.................... 35-32 — 67 -3 Scott Langley................... 32-35 — 67 -3 Peter Uihlein ................... 33-34 — 67 -3 Kevin Tway....................... 33-34 — 67 -3 D.J. Trahan....................... 35-32 — 67 -3 J.J. Spaun......................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Joaquin Niemann............. 33-34 — 67 -3 Hank Lebioda................... 34-33 — 67 -3 Richard Jung.................... 35-32 — 67 -3 Bill Haas .......................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Roger Sloan ..................... 35-33 — 68 -2 Hudson Swafford............. 33-35 — 68 -2 Matt Every ....................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Josh Teater ...................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Cameron Tringale ............ 34-34 — 68 -2 Wes Roach ....................... 32-36 — 68 -2 Paul Barjon...................... 34-34 — 68 -2 Harold Varner III.............. 33-35 — 68 -2 Ryan Palmer.................... 36-32 — 68 -2 Kelly Kraft........................ 35-33 — 68 -2 Scott Stallings.................. 34-34 — 68 -2 Sepp Straka ..................... 35-33 — 68 -2 Kyle Jones........................ 33-35 — 68 -2 Jim Knous ........................ 35-33 — 68 -2 Joey Garber ..................... 32-36 — 68 -2 Ryan Yip .......................... 35-33 — 68 -2 Ben Crane ........................ 35-34 — 69 -1 Trey Mullinax................... 35-34 — 69 -1 George McNeill ................ 37-32 — 69 -1 Martin Laird .................... 33-36 — 69 -1 Luke Donald .................... 37-32 — 69 -1 Brian Harman.................. 37-32 — 69 -1 Jim Furyk......................... 34-35 — 69 -1 J.J. Henry ......................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Dominic Bozzelli .............. 35-34 — 69 -1 Jake Knapp ...................... 34-35 — 69 -1 Martin Piller .................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Zach Bauchou.................. 35-34 — 69 -1 Roberto Diaz.................... 33-36 — 69 -1 Billy Hurley III.................. 34-35 — 69 -1 Ricky Barnes.................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Sangmoon Bae ................ 33-36 — 69 -1 Chad Collins..................... 38-31 — 69 -1 Brandt Snedeker ............. 33-36 — 69 -1 Rod Pampling .................. 35-34 — 69 -1 Cody Gribble .................... 33-36 — 69 -1 Chad Campbell ................ 35-34 — 69 -1 Tyler Duncan ................... 35-34 — 69 -1 Austin Connelly ............... 36-33 — 69 -1 Adam Svensson ............... 35-34 — 69 -1 Chris Thompson............... 33-36 — 69 -1 Sam Saunders ................. 37-33 — 70 E Denny McCarthy .............. 35-35 — 70 E Nick Watney..................... 35-35 — 70 E

hole. Life’s short so, whatever, I’m just going to have some fun,” said Hughes, who donned a Toronto Maple Leafs jersey at last year’s version of the Rink at Glen Abbey Golf Club in Oakville, Ontario. “The crowd enjoys that stuff so it’s fun for me to do. “I love all these Toronto sports teams whether it’s Leafs, Raptors, Blue Jays. That was just a fun way to show my Toronto pride and Canada pride.” Hughes, from nearby Dundas, Ontario, walked up the fairway in the jersey to chants of “Let’s

SOCCER

Corey Conners ................. 34-36 Seamus Power................. 35-35 Ollie Schniederjans.......... 34-36 Mike Weir......................... 34-36 Collin Morikawa............... 34-36 James Allenby ................. 35-35 Brandon Harkins ............. 35-35 Wyndham Clark ............... 35-35 Brendon Todd .................. 32-38 Ryan Armour ................... 37-33 Brooks Koepka ................ 34-36 Justin Thomas ................. 35-35 Whee Kim ........................ 35-35 Alex Prugh....................... 37-33 Alex Cejka ........................ 35-35 John Chin......................... 35-35 Richard T. Lee .................. 35-35 Michael Gligic .................. 36-34 David Lingmerth.............. 36-35 Padraig Harrington ......... 34-37 Johnson Wagner .............. 38-33 Sergio Garcia ................... 35-36 Jim Herman ..................... 37-34 Dustin Johnson................ 33-38 Fabian Gomez.................. 36-35 Bud Cauley....................... 35-36 Curtis Luck....................... 35-36 Brady Schnell .................. 36-35 Bubba Watson ................. 36-35 Zach Johnson................... 36-35 Richy Werenski ................ 34-37 Nate Lashley.................... 36-35 Stephan Jaeger................ 35-36 Will Claxton ..................... 37-34 Ben Silverman ................. 36-35 Thomas DeMarco............. 36-35 Derek Fathauer................ 36-36 Martin Trainer ................. 35-37 Brian Gay......................... 35-37 J.B. Holmes...................... 37-35 Chris Stroud..................... 33-39 a-Etienne Brault .............. 39-33 Nicholas Lindheim........... 37-35 a-Chris Crisologo ............. 37-35 Carlos Ortiz...................... 37-35 Austin Cook ..................... 37-35 Scott Piercy ..................... 36-36 Brandon Hagy.................. 37-35 Seth Reeves ..................... 37-36 Tyrone Van Aswegen ....... 35-38 Tom Hoge ........................ 36-37 Lucas Bjerregaard ........... 37-36 Zack Sucher ..................... 37-36 Chase Wright ................... 36-37 Kramer Hickok................. 37-36 Cameron Davis ................ 36-37 Aaron Wise ...................... 38-36 Shawn Stefani.................. 37-37 Tom Lovelady .................. 39-35 JC Deacon ........................ 38-36 Anders Albertson ............ 37-37 Brice Garnett ................... 39-35 a-Matthew Anderson....... 36-38 Marc-Etienne Bussieres... 34-40 a-Joseph Deraney ............ 38-37 a-Joey Savoie................... 40-35 Albin Choi ........................ 38-38 Michael Blair ................... 40-36 Julian Etulain................... 39-37 a-Josh Whalen ................. 40-39 (a-amateur)

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70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 76 76 76 79

E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +9

Area holes in one Pheasant Run: Jim Denniger, hole No. 17, 169 yards, driver, June 5. Tamarack: Jim Mackey, hole No. 17, 128 yards, 9-iron, May 31.

TENNIS French Open Thursday Men’s Quarterfinals Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Alexander Zverev (5), Germany, 7-5, 6-2, 6-2. Dominic Thiem (4), Austria, def. Karen Khachanov (10), Russia, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. Women’s Quarterfinals Ashleigh Barty (8), Australia, def. Madison Keys (14), United States, 6-3, 7-5. Amanda Anisimova, United States, def. Simona Halep (3), Romania, 6-2, 6-4. Friday Men’s semifinals Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, vs. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, vs. Dominic Thiem (4), Austria Women’s semifinals Ashleigh Barty (8), Australia, vs. Amanda Anisimova, United States Johanna Konta (26), Britain, vs. Marketa Vondrousova, Czech Republic

BOXING Fight Schedule Saturday At Madison Square Garden, New York, Gennady Golovkin vs. Steve Rolls, 12, super middleweights; Charles Conwell vs. Courtney Pennington, 10, for the vacant USBA super welterweight; Ali Akhmedov vs. Marcus McDaniel, 10, super middleweights. At Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Reno, Nev. (ESPN), Oscar Valdez vs. Jason Sanchez, 12, for Valdez’s WBO featherweight title; Michael Seals vs. Christopher Brooker, 10, light heavyweights; Andy Vences vs. Albert Bell, 10, super featherweights. June 15 At Arena Riga, Riga, Latvia, Mairis Briedis vs. Krzysztof Glowacki, 12, for Briedis’ WBC Diamond and Glowacki’s WBO cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Yunier Dorticos vs. Andrew Tabiti, 12, cruiserweights (World Boxing Super Series semifinals). At First Direct Arena, Leeds, England, Josh Warrington vs. Kid Galahad, 12, for Warrington’s IBF featherweight title; Jason Welborn vs. JJ Metcalf, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super welterweight title; Zelfa Barrett vs. Lyon Woodstock, 12, for the vacant Commonwealth super featherweight title. At MGM Grand, Las Vegas, Tyson Fury vs. Tom Schwarz, 12, heavyweights.

Women’s World Cup GROUP STAGE MATCHES GROUP A Friday, Paris: France vs. South Korea, 2 p.m. Saturday, Reims: Norway vs. Nigeria, 8 a.m. June 12, Nice: France vs. Norway, 2 p.m. June 12, Grenoble: Nigeria vs. S. Korea, 8 a.m. June 17, Rennes: France vs. Nigeria, 2 p.m. June 17, Reims: S. Korea vs. Norway, 2 p.m. GROUP B Saturday, Le Havre: China vs. S. Africa, 11 a.m. Saturday, Rennes: Germany vs. China, 2 p.m. June 12, Valenciennes: Germany vs. Spain, 11 a.m. June 13, Paris: South Africa vs. China, 2 p.m. June 17, Montpellier: Germany vs. S. Africa, 11 a.m. June 17, Le Havre: China vs. Spain, 11 a.m. GROUP C Sunday, Valenciennes: Australia vs. Italy, 6 a.m. Sunday, Grenoble: Brazil vs. Jamaica, 8:30 a.m. June 13, Montpellier: Australia vs. Brazil, 11 a.m. June 14, Reims: Jamaica vs. Italy, 2 p.m. June 18, Grenoble: Australia vs. Jamaica, 2 p.m. June 18, Valenciennes: Italy vs. Brazil, 2 p.m. GROUP D Sunday, Nice: England vs. Scotland, 11 a.m. Monday, Paris: Argentina vs. Japan, 11 a.m. June 14, Rennes: Japan vs. Scotland, 8 a.m. June 14, Le Havre: England vs. Argentina, 11 a.m. June 19, Nice: Japan vs. England, 2 p.m. June 19, Paris: Scotland vs. Argentina, 2 p.m. GROUP E Monday, Montpellier: Canada vs. Cameroon, 2 p.m. Tuesday, Le Havre: New Zealand vs. Netherlands, 8 a.m. June 15, Valenciennes: Netherlands vs. Cameroon, 11 a.m. June 15, Grenoble: Canada vs. New Zealand, 2 p.m. June 20, Reims: Netherlands vs. Canada, 11 a.m. June 20, Montpellier: Cameroon vs. New Zealand, 11 a.m. GROUP F Tuesday, Rennes: Chile vs. Sweden, 11 a.m. Tuesday, Reims: United States vs. Thailand, 2 p.m. June 16, Paris: United States vs. China, 8 a.m. June 16, Nice: Sweden vs. Thailand, 11 a.m. June 20, Le Havre: Sweden vs. United States, 2 p.m. June 20, Rennes: Thailand vs. China, 2 p.m.

Major League Soccer

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Philadelphia 8 4 4 28 28 18 Montreal 8 7 3 27 21 28 D.C. United 7 4 6 27 23 18 Atlanta 8 5 2 26 19 11 New York 7 5 3 24 25 16 New York City FC 5 1 8 23 23 17 Toronto FC 5 6 3 18 24 23 Orlando City 5 7 3 18 22 21 Chicago 4 6 6 18 24 23 Columbus 5 9 2 17 16 24 New England 4 8 4 16 17 33 Cincinnati 3 11 2 11 14 33 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 11 1 4 37 39 13 LA Galaxy 9 6 1 28 22 19 Seattle 7 4 5 26 26 21 Houston 7 3 3 24 21 14 FC Dallas 6 6 3 21 20 20 Minnesota United 6 6 3 21 23 24 Real Salt Lake 6 8 1 19 21 27 San Jose 5 6 3 18 21 25 Vancouver 4 6 6 18 17 20 Sporting K.C. 3 5 6 15 24 25 Portland 4 7 2 14 19 26 Colorado 3 9 3 12 24 34 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Thursday New York City FC 5, Cincinnati 2 Friday Sporting K.C. at Toronto FC, 6 p.m. Saturday FC Dallas at San Jose, 2:30 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Colorado, 8 p.m. MLS LEADERS, THROUGH WEDNESDAY Goals Carlos Vela, LFC........................................ 16 Zlatan Ibrahimovic, LA ............................. 11 Josef Martinez, ATL .................................. 10 Nani, ORL.....................................................8 Wayne Rooney, DC.......................................8 Diego Rossi, LFC ..........................................8 Kei Kamara, COL..........................................7 Krisztian Nemeth, KC ..................................7 Johnny Russell, KC.......................................7 Saphir Taider, MTL.......................................7 Chris Wondolowski, SJ.................................7 Assists Carlos Vela, LFC........................................ 10 Nicolas Lodeiro, SEA....................................8 Diego Valeri, POR ........................................7 Eduard Atuesta, LFC....................................6 Sebastian Blanco, POR ................................6 Alberth Elis, HOU.........................................6 Cristian Espinoza, SJ....................................6 Romain Metanire, MIN ................................6 Maximiliano Moralez, NYC...........................6 Alejandro Pozuelo, TOR...............................6 Shots on Goal Carlos Vela, LFC........................................ 35 Diego Rossi, LFC ....................................... 25 Zlatan Ibrahimovic, LA ............................. 20 Josef Martinez, ATL .................................. 20 Kei Kamara, COL....................................... 19 Aleksandar Katai, CHI............................... 18 Nani, ORL.................................................. 18 Wayne Rooney, DC.................................... 17 Jefferson Savarino, RSL............................ 17 Saphir Taider, MTL.................................... 17 Goals-Allowed Avg. Brad Guzan, ATL .................................... 0.73 Tyler Miller, LFC..................................... 0.81 Bill Hamid, DC........................................ 1.06 Luis Robles, NYR.................................... 1.07 Joe Willis, HOU....................................... 1.08 Sean Johnson, NYC ................................ 1.15 Saves Bill Hamid, DC........................................... 67 David Bingham, LA ................................... 56 Stefan Frei, SEA........................................ 51

go Raptors” and went on to shoot a 4-under 66 to finish the first round in a tie for 15th. He would have been in an even better position if he hadn’t double-bogeyed the 18th hole, his only score worse than par. “Just spoiled it at the end there, but I was 6 under through 17 and it was pretty stress free for the most part,” Hughes said. “All in all it’s a great day score-wise, just not the way I wanted to finish.” There are 26 Canadians in the field at the national championship, and they’re all hoping to end a 65-year spell of futility. The previous Canadian to win the event was Pat Fletcher in 1954 at Vancouver’s Point Grey Golf and Country Club. “We all obviously want to be the first one to win this, but we all want each other to do well,” said Hadwin, who briefly delayed his post-round news conference so that Hughes could concentrate on teeing off nearby. “Any Canadian winner is good.” A three-minute pause in play starting at 12:10 p.m. was held as six planes from the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum flew over the course to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Allied invasion of Normandy, France. The group of planes included a rare Lancaster Mk 10 bomber from the Second World War and a modern CC-130 Hercules. “It’s obviously an emotional day for a lot of people,” Hadwin said. “To kind of see the planes that were used and then a couple newer age ones, it was pretty cool to stand on the fairway and see that.”

USL Championship

Major League leaders

Eastern W L T Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 8 0 5 29 20 4 New York Red Bulls II 7 3 2 23 27 14 Nashville 6 3 4 22 20 10 Ottawa 6 2 3 21 17 9 Indy 6 2 3 21 15 8 Louisville 6 4 3 21 21 17 North Carolina 5 2 5 20 19 10 STLFC 5 1 4 19 12 6 Charleston 4 3 5 17 15 15 Atlanta 2 3 5 4 13 12 18 Bethlehem Steel 3 6 4 13 18 26 Pittsburgh 2 2 6 12 13 13 Loudoun 3 4 3 12 14 15 Birmingham 3 6 3 12 9 20 Memphis 2 6 4 10 12 17 Charlotte 1 7 5 8 13 25 Swope Park Rangers 1 7 4 7 17 29 Hartford 1 9 3 6 10 28 Western W L T Pts GF GA New Mexico 6 1 7 25 31 19 Portland II 6 2 4 22 26 18 Phoenix 5 2 5 20 26 14 Reno 5 2 5 20 24 16 Fresno 5 2 5 20 20 12 El Paso 5 2 5 20 16 12 OKC Energy 5 4 5 20 20 20 Austin 5 5 3 18 14 15 LA Galaxy II 4 4 6 18 22 28 Tulsa 4 4 5 17 24 21 Sacramento 5 5 2 17 15 17 Rio Grande Valley 4 5 4 16 23 23 Las Vegas 4 6 3 15 18 22 Real Monarchs 3 6 3 12 21 24 San Antonio 3 7 3 12 16 21 Colorado Springs 3 8 2 11 11 21 Tacoma 2 10 3 9 13 40 Friday New York Red Bulls II at Atlanta 2, 6:30 p.m. Tulsa at Phoenix, 9:30 p.m. Saturday STLFC at Hartford, 6 p.m. Charlotte at Swope Park Rangers, 4 p.m. Loudoun at Louisville, 6 p.m. Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Birmingham at Charleston, 6:30 p.m. North Carolina at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Tacoma at Colorado Springs, 7 p.m. Indy at Memphis, 7:30 p.m. Portland II at Austin, 7:30 p.m. Reno at San Antonio, 7:30 p.m. LA Galaxy II at El Paso, 8:30 p.m. Sacramento at New Mexico, 8:30 p.m. Rio Grande Valley at Real Monarchs, 9 p.m. OKC Energy at Fresno, 9:30 p.m. Orange County at Las Vegas, 9:30 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .370; McNeil, New York, .345; Bell, Pittsburgh, .338; Arenado, Colorado, .337; Dahl, Colorado, .335; Rendon, Washington, .329; Yelich, Milwaukee, .328; Baez, Chicago, .307; Freeman, Atlanta, .307; JTurner, Los Angeles, .303. RUNS: Story, Colorado, 57; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 51; Arenado, Colorado, 48; Bryant, Chicago, 47; Yelich, Milwaukee, 47; Bell, Pittsburgh, 45; Freeman, Atlanta, 45; McCutchen, Philadelphia, 45; Rendon, Washington, 44; 2 tied at 42. RBI: Bell, Pittsburgh, 56; Arenado, Colorado, 54; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 54; Ozuna, Cardinals, 51; Yelich, Milwaukee, 51; Escobar, Arizona, 48; Alonso, New York, 45; Harper, Philadelphia, 44; Rizzo, Chicago, 44; 3 tied at 43. HITS: Arenado, Colorado, 82; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 81; Bell, Pittsburgh, 79; Baez, Chicago, 74; Freeman, Atlanta, 73; Story, Colorado, 71; Escobar, Arizona, 70; Hosmer, San Diego, 67; KMarte, Arizona, 67; 2 tied at 66. DOUBLES: Bell, Pittsburgh, 25; Harper, Philadelphia, 20; Rendon, Washington, 19; Ahmed, Arizona, 18; Baez, Chicago, 18; Cain, Milwaukee, 18; Seager, Los Angeles, 18; 4 tied at 17. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 5; Escobar, Arizona, 5; Rosario, New York, 4; Tapia, Colorado, 4; Dahl, Colorado, 3; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 3; KMarte, Arizona, 3; Pederson, Los Angeles, 3; Swanson, Atlanta, 3; 16 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: Yelich, Milwaukee, 23; Alonso, New York, 20; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 20; Reyes, San Diego, 19; Bell, Pittsburgh, 18; Moustakas, Milwaukee, 18; Pederson, Los Angeles, 18; Dietrich, Cincinnati, 17; Renfroe, San Diego, 17; 4 tied at 16. STOLEN BASES: Yelich, Milwaukee, 13; Dyson, Arizona, 12; Story, Colorado, 11; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10; Wong, Cardinals, 10; Robles, Washington, 9; Acuna Jr., Atlanta, 8; Puig, Cincinnati, 8; TTurner, Washington, 8; 2 tied at 7. PITCHING: Ryu, Los Angeles, 9-1; Fried, Atlanta, 7-3; Maeda, Los Angeles, 7-2; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 7-1; 9 tied at 6. ERA: Ryu, Los Angeles, 1.35; Davies, Milwaukee, 2.20; Castillo, Cincinnati, 2.38; Eflin, Philadelphia, 3.02; Scherzer, Washington, 3.06; Greinke, Arizona, 3.09; Hendricks, Chicago, 3.16; Teheran, Atlanta, 3.28; Lyles, Pittsburgh, 3.38; Smith, Miami, 3.41. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 117; Strasburg, Washington, 104; Wheeler, New York, 93; Ray, Arizona, 91; Castillo, Cincinnati, 90; Marquez, Colorado, 88; deGrom, New York, 84; Corbin, Washington, 83; Smith, Miami, 82; Syndergaard, New York, 81. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Meadows, Tampa Bay, .349; Polanco, Minnesota, .336; Brantley, Houston, .329; LeMahieu, New York, .323; Anderson, Chicago, .322; Devers, Boston, .316; Dozier, Kansas City, .314; Fletcher, Los Angeles, .313; La Stella, Los Angeles, .311; Springer, Houston, .308. RUNS: Bogaerts, Boston, 50; Betts, Boston, 48; Devers, Boston, 47; Haniger, Seattle, 46; Trout, Los Angeles, 45; Bregman, Houston, 43; Encarnacion, Seattle, 43; Mancini, Baltimore, 42; Rosario, Minnesota, 42; 4 tied at 41. RBI: Abreu, Chicago, 52; Rosario, Minnesota, 50; Santana, Seattle, 45; Bregman, Houston, 44; Springer, Houston, 43; Encarnacion, Seattle, 42; Mondesi, Kansas City, 42; Soler, Kansas City, 42; Gallo, Texas, 41; Smith Jr., Baltimore, 41. HITS: Brantley, Houston, 78; Polanco, Minnesota, 78; Devers, Boston, 75; Merrifield, Kansas City, 75; LeMahieu, New York, 72; Mancini, Baltimore, 71; Bogaerts, Boston, 69; Mondesi, Kansas City, 68; Fletcher, Los Angeles, 67; 3 tied at 66. DOUBLES: Buxton, Minnesota, 20; Castellanos, Detroit, 20; Bogaerts, Boston, 18; Brantley, Houston, 18; Devers, Boston, 17; Mancini, Baltimore, 17; Polanco, Minnesota, 17; 4 tied at 16. TRIPLES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 8; Merrifield, Kansas City, 7; Polanco, Minnesota, 5; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 4; Buxton, Minnesota, 3; Castellanos, Detroit, 3; Dozier, Kansas City, 3; Gardner, New York, 3; Rodriguez, Detroit, 3; Smith, Seattle, 3. HOME RUNS: Sanchez, New York, 19; Bregman, Houston, 18; Rosario, Minnesota, 18; Encarnacion, Seattle, 17; Gallo, Texas, 17; Springer, Houston, 17; Abreu, Chicago, 16; Chapman, Oakland, 16; Soler, Kansas City, 16; 6 tied at 15. STOLEN BASES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 22; Smith, Seattle, 16; Anderson, Chicago, 15; Ramirez, Cleveland, 15; Gordon, Seattle, 12; Villar, Baltimore, 12; Andrus, Texas, 11; Hamilton, Kansas City, 11; 3 tied at 10. PITCHING: German, New York, 9-1; Verlander, Houston, 9-2; Berrios, Minnesota, 8-2; Giolito, Chicago, 8-1; Odorizzi, Minnesota, 8-2; Lynn, Texas, 7-4; Montas, Oakland, 7-2; Morton, Tampa Bay, 7-0; Perez, Minnesota, 7-2; 8 tied at 6. ERA: Odorizzi, Minnesota, 1.96; Morton, Tampa Bay, 2.30; Verlander, Houston, 2.40; Giolito, Chicago, 2.54; Minor, Texas, 2.55; Montas, Oakland, 2.83; Stroman, Toronto, 2.84; Boyd, Detroit, 3.01; Turnbull, Detroit, 3.01; Berrios, Minnesota, 3.15. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 116; Sale, Boston, 110; Verlander, Houston, 110; Bauer, Cleveland, 103; Boyd, Detroit, 97; Bieber, Cleveland, 92; Morton, Tampa Bay, 91; Snell, Tampa Bay, 91; Minor, Texas, 87; Carrasco, Cleveland, 79.

BASEBALL NCAA Division I Super Regionals Best-of-3; x-if necessary Louisville, Ky. Friday: Louisville (47-16) vs. East Carolina (47-16), 11 a.m. Saturday: Louisville vs. East Carolina, 2 p.m. x-Sunday: Louisville vs. East Carolina, 11 a.m. Nashville, Tenn. Friday: Vanderbilt (52-10) vs. Duke (34-25), 5 p.m. Saturday: Vanderbilt vs. Duke, 8 p.m. x-Sunday: Vanderbilt vs. Duke, 2 p.m. Lubbock, Texas Friday: Texas Tech (42-17) vs. Oklahoma State (39-19), 2 p.m. Saturday: Texas Tech vs. Oklahoma St, 5 p.m. x-Sunday: Texas Tech vs. Oklahoma St, 5 p.m. Los Angeles Friday: UCLA (51-9) vs. Michigan (44-19), 8 p.m. Saturday: UCLA vs. Michigan, 8 p.m. x-Sunday: UCLA vs. Michigan, 8 p.m. Chapel Hill, N.C. Saturday: North Carolina (45-17) vs. Auburn (36-25), 11 a.m. Sunday: North Carolina vs. Auburn, TBA x-Monday: North Carolina vs. Auburn, Noon Starkville, Miss. Saturday: Mississippi State (49-13) vs. Stanford (45-12), 2 p.m. Sunday: Mississippi State vs. Stanford, 8 p.m. Monday: Mississippi State vs. Stanford, 6 p.m. Fayetteville, Ark. Saturday: Arkansas (44-17) vs. Mississippi (40-25), 11 a.m. Sunday: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, 2 p.m. x-Monday: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, 3 p.m. Baton Rouge, La. Saturday: LSU (40-24) vs. Florida State (39-21), 2 p.m. Sunday: LSU vs. Florida State, 5 p.m. x-Monday: LSU vs. Florida State, 7:30 p.m.

Frontier League East W L Pct. GB Schaumburg 15 9 .625 — Lake Erie 12 11 .522 2½ Windy City 12 12 .500 3 Joliet 9 15 .375 6 Washington 9 16 .360 6½ West W L Pct. GB River City 14 10 .583 — Florence 13 10 .565 ½ Evansville 13 11 .542 1 Southern Illinois 12 11 .522 1½ Gateway 10 14 .417 4 Wednesday Florence 8, Windy City 2, 7 innings Windy City 11, Florence 4, 7 innings Southern Illinois 5, Washington 4, 14 innings Schaumburg 6, Gateway 3 Joliet 4, Evansville 2 Lake Erie at River City, (2), ppd. Thursday Lake Erie 9, River City 6, 7 innings River City 5, Lake Erie 4, 7 innings Windy City 3, Florence 2 Washington 9, Southern Illinois 2 Gateway 6, Schaumburg 5 Joliet 3, Evansville 2, 12 innings Friday Florence at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Southern Illinois at Lake Erie, 6:05 p.m. Evansville at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Joliet at River City, 6:35 p.m. Gateway at Windy City, 7:05 p.m. Saturday Southern Illinois at Lake Erie, 5:05 p.m. Evansville at Schaumburg, 6 p.m. Gateway at Windy City, 6:05 p.m. Florence at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Joliet at River City, 6:35 p.m.


FOOTBALL

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Brady sets his own pace for 20th season with Patriots when it’s time to go.” Brady, who will be 42 in August, is entering the final year of his contract. He jokingly told reporters that the status of negotiations was none of their business and said “those things work themselves out.” He also didn’t back off from past assertions that he would play until he was at least 45. “I hope I can play that

BY MARK FARINELLA

Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Tom Brady probably has seen everything and tried everything to prepare himself for the rigors of the next season as he enters his 20th year in the NFL. Perhaps that’s why nobody connected with the New England Patriots has been alarmed that their veteran quarterback has skipped voluntary offseason workouts with the team for the past two years, choosing to prepare on his own terms. “Trying to get ready individually and collectively, everyone has different things they have to do,” Brady said Thursday after the last practice of the team’s mandatory minicamp at Gillette Stadium. “I think our coaches do a great job of preparing our guys. Individually guys are coming out here trying to get better, I’m trying to do the same thing, and when we come together like this, it gives us a chance to see where we’re all at.” Brady, who is coming off his sixth Super Bowl championship last season, said he and supermodel wife Gisele Bündchen have to find ways to share the duties of parenting their three children

long,” Brady said. “You have to set goals for yourself, and you have short term and long term, and the reality is that this year is the most important one, and that’s the one that I’m focused on. I hope there’s a lot of football beyond this, but it’s a contact sport. I’ve said that for a long time, too. I don’t think you can take those things for granted.” Brady also addressed re-

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Patriots quarterback Tom Brady delivers a pass during practice Thursday in Foxborough, Mass.

cent attempts made by a company he owns to trademark the phrase “Tom Terrific.” Fans of the New York Mets and their Hall of Fame pitcher, Tom Seaver, reacted negatively on social media, claiming that the nickname is more popularly associated with the ace hurler. Brady said he attempted to trademark the phrase so others could not use the nickname in association

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with him. “It’s unfortunate,” he said. “I was actually trying to do something because I didn’t like the nickname, and I wanted to make sure no one used it because some people wanted to use it. Then it got spun around to something different than what it was. Good lesson learned, and I’ll try to do things a little different in the future.”

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because of their divergent careers. “My wife is a very ambitious woman and she travels a lot, so we’re just trying to divide some responsibility at home,” he said. “She supports me a lot, my family supports me a lot and my kids aren’t getting any younger, so I just try to spend time with them when I can and still get the other things done that I need to get done and be ready to go

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ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

A shower or thunderstorm WIND NE 8-16 mph

Mostly cloudy and humid WIND NE 7-14 mph

A t-storm in the area WIND NE 7-14 mph

Mostly cloudy, a t-storm WIND NNE 7-14 mph

82°

64°

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

MONDAY

While a wedge of dry air will keep the Great Lakes and much of the Northeast sunny today, a broad area of rain and thunderstorms will drench locations from the middle and lower Mississippi Valley to the Southeast coast. Severe storms will erupt over the northern High Plains and central Rockies. The Northwest will be cool and showery.

TUESDAY

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Partly sunny and Nice with sun and breezy clouds WIND WIND NNW 10-20 mph WNW 6-12 mph

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. 80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 83/61 81/58 Bloomington Urbana 82/60 83/62

Kirksville 83/60

Quincy 83/60

Decatur 84/62

Springfield 57 84/62 Effingham 70 55 82/64

35

Columbia 81/63 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 82/64 City 79/64 55 82/65 Union 79/62 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 76/62 78/66 Farmington 76/63 Cape Girardeau 77/67 Springfield 76/62 Poplar Bluff West Plains 74/67 55 74/64 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

34.56 33.17 32.68 28.97 34.71

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Thu. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

-0.87 +0.18 +0.63 +0.66 +0.28

16 28.30 -0.53 15 26.96 -0.26 25 36.69 -0.12 26 38.49 -0.09 18 34.37 -0.23 419 433.76 -0.19 21 37.90 -0.22 30 44.76 +0.01 27 44.92 +0.26 32 45.17 +0.47 20 18 14

25.67 -0.13 25.36 -0.54 28.39 -0.31

15 16 24 15 40

4.05 +0.61 23.04 +0.07 41.20 +0.03 2.30

Forecast Temperature

100

80

60

81

87

87 79

62

65

47.36 +0.61 358.70 371.49 515.62 659.38 739.43 684.27 916.93 864.31 603.11 409.90 626.74 449.18

F

S

65

Average High

85

68

68

82

64

77 67

82

-0.38 -0.47 -1.45 +0.15 +0.03 -0.02 +0.03 +0.02 -0.02 -0.01 -0.66 -0.08

Average Low

77

79

58 M

66

57

75

76

60

59

58

T

W

T

40

S

M

T

Temperature High/low 85°/68° Normal high/low 82°/64° Last year high/low 90°/66° Record high 97° (2011) Record low 44° (1894) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Thu. 0.46” Month to date (normal) 1.66” (0.93”) Year to date (normal) 28.03” (17.30”) Record for this date 1.47” (1993)

Pollen Yesterday Low - 2 Low - 2 Moderate - 9 High - 45855 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Thursday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

12 60 47 272 219

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

81° noon

81° 4 p.m.

73° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

W

T

F

S

S

Atlanta 85/69

El Paso 100/72

Chihuahua 98/70

-10s -0s

0s

Houston 93/71 Miami 91/81

Monterrey 104/75

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

Stationary front

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

80/56/s 89/60/s 66/53/pc 85/69/t 96/72/pc 83/63/pc 84/70/t 62/41/pc 71/61/s 84/73/t 77/63/c 78/68/t 77/57/pc 80/66/c 75/60/pc 86/70/pc 90/74/t 84/54/s 84/61/pc 85/77/t 79/57/s 83/60/s 88/74/pc 93/71/pc 82/66/c 83/63/c 98/73/s 81/68/r

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

81/55/s 89/60/s 64/51/pc 81/69/t 98/76/s 84/63/s 82/70/t 66/43/pc 72/59/s 86/71/t 77/65/c 78/68/t 76/62/pc 77/68/c 81/65/pc 91/73/s 91/74/t 74/45/s 83/63/pc 83/76/t 79/63/s 84/56/s 88/74/s 96/72/s 78/67/c 83/63/pc 96/74/s 85/67/pc

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

City

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

75/60/pc 77/68/t 81/69/r 91/81/t 72/53/pc 88/63/s 87/69/t 80/70/r 87/78/t 78/64/s 82/62/pc 87/67/pc 90/76/t 84/64/s 102/76/s 81/61/pc 72/54/pc 62/51/sh 80/60/s 79/48/pc 97/75/s 70/62/pc 70/55/s 57/50/sh 89/81/t 99/66/s 83/68/pc 85/64/c

79/61/pc 80/71/t 83/71/t 92/81/t 72/55/pc 86/61/pc 85/70/t 82/70/t 91/77/pc 80/62/s 87/64/pc 86/65/pc 91/76/t 83/63/s 101/77/s 80/62/s 73/51/s 69/49/s 90/62/s 65/45/pc 99/77/s 71/62/pc 78/58/s 66/50/pc 89/81/t 99/68/s 83/66/pc 87/67/pc

National Extremes Thursday in the 48 contiguous states High: 107 Needles, Calif.

Skywatch Rise

Set

5:37 a.m. 9:54 a.m.

8:24 p.m. none

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

New Moon

Jun 10

Jun 17

Jun 25

Jul 2

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Low: 29 Leadville, Colo.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Ice

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Snow

Today Hi/Lo/W

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Sun Moon

New York 78/64

Washington 83/68

Kansas City 83/63

Los Angeles 75/60

Cold front

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Toronto 76/54

Denver 84/54

San Francisco 70/55

93

78

64

Minneapolis 88/63

Chicago 77/57

Statistics through 5 p.m. Thursday

69° 8 a.m.

Montreal 77/50

Winnipeg 92/64

Detroit 79/57

-1.41

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Billings 67/45

ALMANAC

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Joplin 78/63

Seattle 57/50

77° 67° 82° 66° 77° 58° 79° 60°

The pattern is shifting a bit over the next few days. While there is a chance of rain and a few storms today, most of that threat is south of St. Louis. We can’t rule out an isolated downpour thought.

Kansas City 83/63

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

72/53/r 87/69/s 112/84/s 92/75/t 84/66/pc 78/61/s 63/40/s 94/69/s 90/81/pc 57/49/r 90/83/sh 83/65/s 68/41/s 63/52/r 74/51/s 111/83/s

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

62/51/sh 90/72/s 113/84/pc 89/79/t 91/62/s 75/55/c 65/45/s 94/70/s 90/81/pc 59/45/sh 90/82/t 80/64/s 69/39/s 63/49/c 86/56/s 109/86/c

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

75/57/t 77/50/s 88/63/s 87/79/pc 74/58/c 111/84/pc 64/52/t 81/64/s 80/66/s 89/78/pc 63/34/s 73/59/r 64/54/sh 75/67/r 76/54/s 63/49/c

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

79/55/pc 72/53/s 87/65/pc 88/78/t 74/59/pc 113/86/pc 68/52/pc 80/67/pc 80/64/s 89/79/pc 69/35/s 79/61/pc 66/53/pc 79/65/sh 73/53/c 66/48/pc

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 06.07.19–06.13.19 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

‘DARK PHOENIX’ IS A BIG, DULL DUD

Page 16

Ledisi promises to be herself in St. Louis Symphony Orchestra concert Page 6 Morning Glory on Cherokee is a classic diner with a chef’s personal touch Page 24

NEW LIGHT BRIDGE AND NEW LIGHTS!

NEW STAGE — WITH AUTOMATION!

COOL AIR! DRY ORCHESTRA!

THE MUNY’S BIG REVEAL RENOVATIONS AND TECH UPGRADES BRING THE VENERABLE VENUE INTO THE 21ST CENTURY Page 13 BY CALVIN WILSON


06.07.19–06.13.19 ▼

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3

SUNDAY, JUNE 30

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

Visit EnterpriseCenter.com for the complete upcoming events schedule.

Audience members are illuminated by the glow of stage lights at the Muny in 2018.

Cover story

Ticket Tracker. Page 10

When the Muny opens its season with “Guys and Dolls,” it also unveils a multimilliondollar makeover. Page 13

Russ Mohr’s “Kingdom Sessions” album puts faith into action. Page 11

Datebook Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Marc Maron at Helium Comedy Club, the International Horseradish Festival in Collinsville, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue at the Pageant and David Sedaris at Left Bank Books. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks. Page 4

“Rocketman” doesn’t leave sex to the imagination, and that’s progress. Page 20

See & Do

Note to Hollywood: Young women go to the movies more than men. Page 21

More than 100 local, national and international artists will show and sell their wares at the Webster Arts Fair. Page 12

“When They See Us” is a powerful, overdue telling of the injustices endured by the Central Park Five. Page 22

Recently reviewed theater. Page 12

Tan France on his memoir, Olive Garden and why he nearly quit “Queer Eye.” Page 23

Screens

TV Q&A. Page 23

Fuel

Music & Clubs

“Dark Phoenix” is the biggest dud of the “X-Men” franchise. Page 16

TUESDAY, JUNE 18

SATURDAY, JUNE 29

In concert with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, R&B artist Ledisi promises to just be herself. Page 6 Sarah Shook offers a challenge to some of country music’s mores. Page 8

“The Secret Life of Pets 2” is a well-crafted sequel. Page 17 “The Tomorrow Man,” an improbable rom-com, is set in a doomsday prepper’s shelter. Page 18 Recently reviewed movies. Page 19

Morning Glory is a classic diner with a chef’s personal touch. Page 24 Recently reviewed restaurants. Page 26 Twisted Ranch is coming to Tropical Liqueurs. Page 27

ON THE COVER • Muny improvements include a new stage, towers and light bridge. Photo by Chris Lee

SUNDAY, JULY 7

MONDAY, JULY 8

THURSDAY, JULY 18

Visit StifelTheatre.com for the complete upcoming events schedule.

EnterpriseCenter.com StLouisBlues.com StifelTheatre.com Enterprise Center Group Sales: 314-622-5454 | Stifel Theatre Group Sales: 314-499-7676

2

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.07.19-06.13.19

WHAT’S HOT AT STLTODAY.COM ➨ Hot reads! Summer book offerings include titles by familiar authors and a few new voices. stltoday.com/books ➨ The Impossible Burger is so popular that restaurants can’t get their hands on it. stltoday.com/offthemenu ➨ Before you head to Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, brush up with a guide to “Love’s Labors Lost.” stltoday.com/go ➨ Our critic suggests more than 30 dining destinations near the Stanley Cup Final action. stltoday.com/offthemenu

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : P O S T- D I S PAT C H F I L E ( M U N Y ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( L E D I S I ) ; 2 0 T H C E N T U R Y F O X ( “ D A R K P H O E N I X ” ) ; C O LT E R P E T E R S O N , P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( M O R N I N G G L O R Y )

TUESDAY, JUNE 18


HERE’S WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS WEEK ▼

“An annual tradition: Circus Flora.” •

“I can’t believe it’s already time for another Muny season. Looking forward to starting the second century in style!” •

OUR TEAM

“Superchunk and Wussy at Twangfest on Saturday night.” •

Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Norma Klingsick • production editor, 314-340-8103, nklingsick@post-dispatch.com Gary Hairlson • photo editor, 314-340-8279, ghairlson@post-dispatch.com Jon Naso • photo editor, 314-340-8775, jnaso@post-dispatch.com

“Going to work with 12 high school students for a journalism workshop through June 17 at Western Kentucky University.” •

Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com

“Circus Flora at the Big Top! It manages to amaze us every year. But those tightrope walkers give me an annual heart attack.” •

Emily Tintera • event and sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischoff • Post-Dispatch vice president of sales and marketing, 314-340-8529, dbischoff@post-dispatch.com

CONTRIBUTORS

“A doubleheader Saturday night: Bill Bellamy at Helium Comedy Club and the Prince tribute at the Ready Room.” •

Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • theater critic

“The production of Monteverdi’s ‘Coronation of Poppea’ at Opera Theatre of St. Louis promises to be worth seeing and hearing.” •

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • stltoday.com/events Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe

“Relatives are coming to town, so I see a visit to City Museum in the near future.” •

stltoday.com/go

Write to us ae@post-dispatch.com Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

stltoday.com/apps

@gostlouis

“Attending three graduation parties and two weddings in one weekend!” •

@gostl

@gostl

COPYRIGHT 2019 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

stltoday.com/go

Cabins, tent sites, and white silica sand beaches surrounding a beautiful lake await your arrival at Klondike Park in scenic Augusta, Missouri! This affordable, premier camping destination boasts spectacular views of Historic Missouri Wine Country and many exciting amenities. Make a reservation online or call us today.

636-949-7535 • stccparks.org •

/StCharlesCountyParks

06.07.19-06.13.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


STLTODAY.COM/EVENTS ▼

Phish performs in 2012 at the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn.

BEST BETS FRIDAY International Horseradish Festival

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

El Monstero with the St. Louis Philharmonic Orchestra

WHEN 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday • WHERE West Main Street, Collinsville • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO internationalhorseradishfestival. com

Bill Bellamy WHEN 7:30 and 10 p.m. Friday; 5, 7:30 and 10 p.m. Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Helium Comedy Club, St. Louis Galleria, 1151 St. Louis Galleria Street, Richmond Heights • HOW MUCH $27-$35 • MORE INFO heliumcomedy.com

Comedian and actor Bill Bellamy is known for his roles in any number of movies, including “Love Jones,” “Booty Call” and “How to Be a Player,” but he’s proven just as effective behind a microphone talking about life and love. Expect the proceedings to be smooth yet raunchy. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, 14141 Riverport Drive, Maryland Heights • HOW MUCH $19-$91 • MORE INFO livenation.com

Pink on tour in Lincoln, Neb.

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$40 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts, Lindenwood University, 2300 West Clay Street, St. Charles • HOW MUCH $20 • MORE INFO luboxoffice.com

“Parking Lot Symphony,” the latest album by Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, is full of brassy New Orleans funk and blues. Trombone Shorty says the album is a “life record about prevailing no matter what type of roadblock is in front of you.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

ACT INC presents “Travels With My Aunt,” Giles Havergal’s adaptation of the Graham Greene novel about a retired bank manager’s adventures with his eccentric aunt. Four actors — Anthony Wininger, Ted Drury, Jake Blonstein and Timothy Patrick Grumich — take on more than 25 characters. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘Travels With My Aunt’

David Sedaris

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, 7:30 p.m. June 22, 2 p.m. June 23 • WHERE

WHEN 6 p.m. Friday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH

$20, includes copy of book • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

Don’t get too excited that there are still tickets to meet David Sedaris on the paperback tour of his last book, “Calypso.” You won’t be in the store, or even part of the “sidewalk listening party,” because those tickets are sold out. But Sedaris will stay signing books and talking to fans until the Mississippi recedes, if necessary. The last time he visited Left Bank Books he apparently stayed for 10 hours signing books. So buy a “general admission” ticket that comes with a copy of his essays, go get something to eat or drink,

perhaps read “Calypso,” and the bookstore will alert you when it’s time to join the signing line. BY JANE HENDERSON

affection. Artistic director Gary F. Bell directs the show, which stars Susie Lawrence, Kay Love, Tim Naegelin and Melissa Harlow. BY GABE HARTWIG

Stray Dog Theatre: ‘Sylvia’ WHEN Friday through June 22; various performance times • WHERE Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Avenue • HOW MUCH $25-$30 • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

Stray Dog Theatre presents A.R. Gurney’s comedy about another stray dog — named Sylvia. When Greg brings Sylvia home from the park, his wife views the dog as a rival for his

SATURDAY Metro East PrideFest WHEN Noon-10 p.m. Saturday • WHERE West Main Street in downtown Belleville • HOW MUCH Free, but donations encouraged • MORE INFO metroeastprideswi.org

Belleville’s celebration of LGBTQ equality on three blocks of West Main Street includes a drag show featuring Ravyn Winters, Tassandra Crush,

Roxie M. Valentine and Kameo Dupree; musical performances by CHARIS, Gateway Men’s Chorus, Champagne Fixx, and StompBox and the Mixtapes; a high heel drag race; and food from local vendors. BY GABE HARTWIG

Elizabeth Kennedy and Paul Lincoln: ‘Summer Vacation of Song’ WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Pink Floyd tribute band El Monstero’s annual weeklong run at the Pageant has expanded to include a summer date at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre, and this year it’s a special one: El Monstero joins forces with the St. Louis Philharmonic Orchestra. Celebration Day: A Tribute to Led Zeppelin will also play with the orchestra and will open the show. El Monstero will revisit “The Wall” and a few other Pink Floyd hits. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

‘That Purple Stuff’ WHEN 8 p.m Saturday • WHERE The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Avenue • HOW MUCH $7-$13 • MORE INFO eventbrite.com

James Biko leads the charge locally for DJ spins honoring “Weird Al” Yankovic

Soprano (and St. Louis native) Elizabeth Kennedy

FAST FORWARD “Kidz Bop World Tour 2019,” June 16 at Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre: Kidz Bop, the family-friendly series featuring popular songs performed “by kids for kids,” has sold more than 20 million albums since debuting in 2001 • Carrie Underwood, June 18 at Enterprise Center: The seven-time Grammy winner is joined by guests Maddie & Tae and Runaway June on her “Cry Pretty Tour 360,” which precedes a Sept. 14 album release • “Theresa Caputo Live! The Experience,” June 18 at Stifel Theatre: The star of TLC’s “Long Island Medium” connects with audience members to share messages she says are from their departed loved ones in a live show • “Weird Al” Yankovic, June 22 at the Fox Theatre: “Eat It,” “Like a Surgeon,” “Amish Paradise,” “White & Nerdy” — the biggest-selling comedy recording artist will perform all his hit parodies, this time with a live orchestra 4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.07.19-06.13.19

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ stltoday.com/events stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : D AV E M A R T I N ( P H I S H ) ; C H R I S P I Z Z E L L O ( “ W E I R D A L” YA N K O V I C )

Horseradish burgers, horseradish wings, Italian subs with horsey sauce, Horseradish Walking Tacos — just about any dish can be spiced up at the International Horseradish Festival. Collinsville’s 32nd annual celebration of the versatile root vegetable also features a bloody mary contest, craft village, car show, family fun area and 5K run, plus the Little Miss and Mister Horseradish Festival Pageant. BY GABE HARTWIG

will bring a program of American classical and popular songs suitable for summertime to the Kranzberg. Kennedy and her longtime collaborator, pianist Paul Lincoln, will perform works by Samuel Barber (“Knoxville: Summer of 1915”), George Gershwin (“Porgy and Bess”), Kurt Weill (“Street Scene”), Jerry Bock (“She Loves Me”) and more. It’s all meant to evoke a classic American summer, from barbecue to porch swings to romance.


Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue at Scottrade Center (now Enterprise Center) in 2017

MAY 20 – AUGUST 3

Summer Reading Club @ St. Louis County Library

particular artists, and his annual Prince tribute, “That Purple Stuff,” is his most popular. The event mixes some of Prince’s biggest hits with deep cuts, as well as music from acts that were affiliated with the iconic artist. Prince would have turned 61 on Friday. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SUNDAY Opera Theatre of St. Louis: ‘The Coronation of Poppea’

PHOTO: JON GITCHOFF

WHEN 7 p.m. Sunday; 8 p.m. Thursday, June 22, June 26, June 28; 1 p.m. June 15 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314-961-0644; opera-stl.org

Poppea is young, beautiful and in search of a crown: She knows what she wants, and that’s to be the Empress of Rome. To get that, she’s willing to cause amazing havoc in the lives of others, and she doesn’t mind if her target, the Emperor Nero, orders up a few deaths to make her happy. Monteverdi’s opera “The Coronation of Poppea” represents the triumph of vice over virtue, but it’s got some great music to carry it off. Poppea is sung by mezzo-soprano Emily Fons, and tenor Benton Ryan is Nero. Nicholas Kok will conduct from the harpsichord; Tim Albery directs the production, originally presented by

stltoday.com/go

England’s Opera North. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: ‘Unforgettable: Nat and Natalie’ WHEN 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $45-$68 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

In this tribute to a pair of jazz and pop music icons (who were also father and daughter), Nat King Cole and Natalie Cole, conductor Kevin McBeth will be joined by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and vocalists Dee Daniels and Denzal Sinclaire. The program celebrates Nat King Cole’s centenary year with hits that include “Unforgettable,” “Mona Lisa,” “L-O-V-E” and more. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

MONDAY Neal Stephenson WHEN 7 p.m. Monday • WHERE Mad Art Gallery, 2727 South 12th Street • HOW MUCH $29, includes copy of book • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

The science fiction group Archon joins Left Bank Books in presenting Neal Stephenson’s “Fall; or Dodge in Hell,” his latest novel that is close to 900 pages long. It’s dual title makes more sense when you learn that the story involves a man who dies but his consciousness is

restored when technology has caught up with this sort of thing. Dodge lives in an afterlife called Bitworld, a place for digital souls, while flesh-and-blood humans inhabit a parallel world. Stephenson will personalize books, and fans can take photos from the signing line. BY JANE HENDERSON

TUESDAY Phish

waiting for a new album. The band’s Ezra Koenig told Rolling Stone magazine he’s not fazed when critics say rock is dead. “I know a lot of people in bands who have this fatalistic vibe, like, ‘Oh, no, rock’s dead, nobody cares.’ So what are you going to do about it? Either quit, or figure out a way to be excited about it. I’ve probably played more guitar in the past few years than I have in my entire life.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

WHEN 7:30 p.m. TuesdayWednesday • WHERE Chaifetz Arena, 1 South Compton Avenue • HOW MUCH $45-$85 • MORE INFO ticketmaster.com

THURSDAY Marc Maron

Can’t make it to Bonnaroo this month to catch Phish? No worries. Just before the jam band takes the stage at the Tennessee music festival, it kicks off its tour with a doubleheader at Chaifetz Arena. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

WEDNESDAY Vampire Weekend WHEN 7:30 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$85 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Fans of Vampire Weekend last heard from the rock band in 2013 with “Modern Vampires of the City.” The band is back with “Father of the Bride,” an album that was preceded by a trio of “double singles” to excite fans who’d been

WHEN 8 p.m. Thursday; 7:30 and 10 p.m. June 14-15 (early shows sold out) • WHERE Helium Comedy Club, St. Louis Galleria, 1151 St. Louis Galleria Street, Richmond Heights • HOW MUCH $30 • MORE INFO 314727-1260; heliumcomedy.com

You might know Marc Maron from his popular interview podcast “WTF,” which has featured comedians, musicians, actors and even President Barack Obama talking with Maron in his Los Angeles garage. Or you might know him as an actor in “GLOW” on Netflix. But Maron is a stand-up comic first and foremost, and he is back on the road with new material. BY IAN FROEB

Fun programs and activities for the whole family! Learn more at www.slcl.org.

Come on,

get app-y! Downloa app today nd get instant access.

Watch for updates on weather-related event cancellations. stltoday.com/go

06.07.19-06.13.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

5


STLTODAY.COM/MUSIC ▼

Grammy-nominated R&B singer is excited to tackle the challenges of performing in a concert hall — and wants to release a symphonic album BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC

S

oul songstress Ledisi makes her debut with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra this weekend, but it’s hardly her first go-round in such a setting. She performed at the Kennedy Center for two sold-out shows with the National Symphony Orchestra a couple of years ago, has performed with the Count Basie Orchestra and New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, and has other symphonic dates lined up. Long before all that, the New Orleans native performed with a big band in high school. “It has always been a thing I’ve wanted to do, and I want to keep doing it,” says Ledisi, born Ledisi Anibade Young. “I can’t wait to do this again.” The 12-time Grammy nominee’s most recent album was “Let Love Rule” (2017). “I feel like it’s a tradition of ours (as African Americans) we kind of strayed away from. It’s not as popular in the R&B world,” she says of performing with orchestras. She’s looking forward to performing her music with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra and has great things to say about the organization. “They do things together and decide together. I hope I don’t get in anybody’s way,” she says. “I’m just going to be myself and respect what’s going on. I’m not trying to be something I’m not. Whatever gig you’ve ever seen me at — gospel, R&B, jazz — it’s always been Ledisi. I don’t play. And I love it all.” Ledisi is excited to tackle the challenges of performing with an orchestra in a concert hall. “You have to project like an opera singer,” she says. “You have to count on the room more than the microphone. You definitely have to have some lungs. It’s like building a muscle to make it stronger. That’s the oldschool way. “Symphony halls are so beautiful and have great sound. The way the buildings are built, kjohnson@post-dispatch.com

6

the way the conductors arrange the pieces, it’s all really technical. The arrangements matter, the piano player matters, the conductor matters, every part matters. My part is telling the story. That’s the magic of the music.” Coming from New Orleans, blending styles has always been her thing. “I sneak everything in and mix things up, and people will hear that,” Ledisi says. “If you listen to my music, it’s in there, and that’s what you’ll see in St. Louis. Not too many singers can do that, and why not do it with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra?” Ledisi has recorded some of her symphonic work and would like to release a symphonic album. But she says she has more work to do with orchestras first. “I don’t know when, but I definitely want to document it,” she says. “We’ll see what happens. But right now, I just want to get more under my belt to show I’m worthy to others. I already know I am. I’m waiting for others to catch up. I gotta build an audience and show people I know how to do it and I respect it.” With the SLSO, Ledisi will perform her own material and more, including “All the Way, “Pieces of Me,” The Answer to Why” and “Bravo.” There also will be music by Nina Simone; Ledisi has been touring with a “Nina and Me” show. “She’s a part of my whole thing,” Ledisi says. “Most people know me for doing ‘Four Women’ on BET.” She performed the song with Kelly Price, Jill Scott and Marsha Ambrosius on the 2010 “Black Girls Rock” special and on the “For Colored Girls” soundtrack.

Ledisi

WHAT St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: “An Evening With Ledisi” • WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday • Where Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $55-$95 • MORE INFO slso.org

“YOU HAVE TO COUNT ON THE ROOM MORE THAN THE MICROPHONE. YOU DEFINITELY HAVE TO HAVE SOME LUNGS. IT’S LIKE BUILDING A MUSCLE TO MAKE IT STRONGER. THAT’S THE OLD-SCHOOL WAY.”

P H O T O : A M Y H A R R I S / I N V I S I O N /A P

Ledisi promises she’ll be herself in concert with SLSO

“She has always been a part of my legacy, Ledisi says. “I can’t get away with not tributing her in my journey. Everyone doesn’t sound good doing her music. There are parts of you that really have to go there, go deep, because those words mean something.” Ledisi says she wouldn’t mind releasing a Simone tribute album.“There’s talk about that,” she says,“but it’s expensive.” She first discovered Simone as a girl; her mother would sing Simone’s tunes to wake up the family. At the time, she thought they were her mother’s songs. “Every time I feel a certain way, she shows up somewhere, whether it’s her music, an image of her, or someone mentions her,” she says. Whatever Ledisi releases as her follow-up to “Let Love Rule,” it’ll be on her own terms. “I’m in talks and deciding what to do with my recording career right now. I don’t want to give anything away, but I’m working on stuff. I’m going to move at my own pace and do it when I’m ready. I want it to be authentic, and I don’t want to rush because everybody says it’s time to put out new music.”

LEDISI ON PERFORMING IN A CONCERT HALL

@kevincjohnson

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.07.19-06.13.19

stltoday.com/go


Go Wild With Missouri Natives

The Perfect Day Trip! (30 minutes from downtown St. Louis)

Strawberry Festival June 1st & 2nd There will be over 200 craft, food, music & entertainment!

Father's Day Car Show June 16th LIVE YOUR LIFE

TO THE FULLEST

Bring Dad &Treat him to lunch, shopping, and enjoy the cars, trucks, and motorcycles on display at this one-of-a-kind Father’s Day Car Show!

Annual Day Lily Sale Sat. June 22nd • 9-5pm (or until sold out) The Daylilies for our annual sale come from a state inspected garden and all of the bulbs are cultivated right here in Kimmswick!

3 Day Sizzling Summer Sidewalk Sale

Native plants require less water, less fertilizer and less work, yet reward you with luscious gardens overflowing with blossoms spring till frost.

Join us July 19th thru the 21st Participating Kimmswick shops will be lining our great streets and offering tons of DEALS!

Over 2,000 varieties of plants 1011 N. Woodlawn • Kirkwood, MO

314-965-3070

9th Annual ALS Kimmswick 5K

www.sugarcreekgardens.com

Saturday August 17th Join us to support ALS!

VOTED #1 BEST GARDEN CENTER

www.gokimmswick.com 636-464-6464

148th Annual Millstadt

Fireman’s Picnic

Friday & Saturday June 7th & 8th • Liederkranz Park, Millstadt, IL

FrIday NIght: Black top Boulevard

Saturday NIght: top gunz

House Engine orn Kettle C

MIDWAY PRESENTED BY: TRIBOUT’S CARNIVAL

Advanced Armbands ($15) Fried Fish are available at Village Hall “the Fireman’s Way” & Millstadt IGA

E N T E R T O W I N M O N T H LY

chIcago BaLL tourNaMeNt: FIRST PITCH ON FRIDAY @ 6:30 PM

S T. L O U I S C A R D I N A L S P R I Z E PA C K S

FIRST PITCH ON SATURDAY @ 10 AM

Burge rs BBQ P , Brats, & ulled Pork Ainad S hriners Dru Friday N m & Bugle C orp ight @ 7P M

Ice

cold B Sod eer & a

homemade corndogs & hot Wings

& dinners s*** chicken Finger chicken

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@ ign up rney - S rday tu ole Tou Corn H :00 AM on Sa 9:30-10

Thank You For Your Support! Millstadt Union Fire Department

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Sarah Shook challenges some of country music’s mores ‘Songwriting is my therapist,’ says the singer-songwriter whose latest album is all about previous shattered relationships BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ | SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

here’s no danger that the world will ever run short of songs about heartache, but on her most recent album, 2018’s “Years,” singer-songwriter Sarah Shook acknowledges that she has been known to sometimes dish it out just as she’s been made to take it. The album’s 10 songs are all about shattered relationships — “that well runs deep,” Shook says by phone just before playing the Tumbleweeds Music Festival in Lacygne, Kan. — but several of them are told not from her own perspective, but that of her ex (or, possibly, exes). “Most of the songs on ‘Years’ were written when I was in a very unhealthy relationship, and my previous relationship was also really unhealthy,” she says. “But I think it’s important to be fair, and any time a relationship is failing, it’s never 100 percent one person’s fault. Even if one person is abusive or narcissistic or whatever, there’s always something that the other person is doing to contribute.”

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“Heartache in Hell” is one such song. It finds a lovelorn ex awash in alcohol and loneliness, waiting for her return and “Walk(ing) the floors over you till I die.” Shook cites the album-opening “Good as Gold” as one that finds her “projecting how I wanted my then-partner to feel about me, because at the time he was very possessive and controlling. My hope was for him to get to a place where I wasn’t viewed as an object or as a possession and I was given equal status as a person.” Apparently, that didn’t happen. Writing songs from experience, however unpleasant, Shook says, “is very cathartic. I like to joke that songwriting is my therapist, because it really gets the emotions out and lays it all out in a way that I can look at it and think about it and work toward not repeating the same mistakes.” Her current relationship is a good one, she reports, “and it’s a validating feeling. Like, ‘OK, this is how it’s supposed to work.’” Shook grew up in a religious household in upstate New York. She was home-schooled and did not hear any secular rock or country

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.07.19-06.13.19

music until she got a car and a job at age 17. “My co-workers were just a bunch of goofy teenagers, and they were like, ‘Oh my God, I can’t believe you don’t know who so-and-so is,’” she says. “They just started loaning me CDs, giving me the stuff that they were excited about. So my foray into non-Christian music started with, like, Belle and Sebastian and Elliott Smith and the Decemberists.” Later, when she discovered country music, it was of the classic variety: George Jones, Wanda Jackson, Charley Pride. “To me, that’s what country music was and is,” she says. She’d already been sketching sets of lyrics, though she didn’t realize at the time how much they fit the country mold. Hearing Johnny Cash’s version of “Long Black Veil,” she says, “was like some kind of weird homecoming. It was like, ‘This is it. This is what I do. This is what has come naturally to me.’” Shook split from her upbringing, though she says it was “never an in-your-face kind of rebellion.” After moving to North Carolina, though, she did name her first band Sarah Shook & the Devils” “That was a fun little rib at the old folks,” she says with a laugh. “They were like, ‘We know what you’re doing.’ They thought it was hilarious.” Though hesitant about making an album — and as leery then as she is now about the vagaries of the music business — Sarah Shook & the Disarmers recorded “Sidelong” and released it locally in 2015. The band per-

forms Friday at Twangfest. The album caught the attention of Bloodshot Records, which signed Shook and rereleased “Sidelong” in 2017. Before recording “Years,” she listened to her previous effort and knew she could do better. “I decided I wasn’t going to drink in the studio and be more present emotionally and mentally, and I think that paid off a lot,” she says. “There’s a pretty palpable difference in my use of “I LIKE TO JOKE tone and nuance THAT SONGWRITING and control and things like that.” IS MY THERAPIST, And then, too, BECAUSE IT curtailing her REALLY GETS THE drinking has simply EMOTIONS OUT made her feel better. AND LAYS IT ALL “It’s helpful, OUT IN A WAY especially when THAT I CAN LOOK you’re playing AT IT AND THINK outdoor shows at 3 ABOUT IT AND o’clock in the afterWORK TOWARD NOT noon and it’s 95 deREPEATING THE grees and you’re not SAME MISTAKES.” hungover, which is SARAH SHOOK awesome,” she says. Shook is already working on music for a new album, and her rising prominence on the scene offers a challenge to some of country music’s mores. She doesn’t labor the point but does identify herself as a “vegan, bisexual, atheist mom.” “I’ve been out as bi for years and years,” she says. “It’s really not a big deal. But it is interesting navigating the country music world, where there are still a lot of very outdated notions about gender roles and how women should behave.” As for the atheism, see above. Meanwhile, she’s the mother of a 12-year-old son. She misses him terribly when she’s on the road, she says, and she’s suitably freaked out at the idea of soon being the mother of a teenager. But here’s the thing: Of all those descriptors, it’s being vegan that can often pose the biggest challenge these days. “It was a struggle when we started touring,” Shook says. “I would usually bring a bag of nonperishable stuff to snack on. I think it was two years ago now, Yeti gave us a cooler that was a total game-changer. So now I’ll go to the grocery store and stock up on all kinds of fruits and vegetables and tofurkey. “It makes a noticeable difference when I can eat healthy on the road versus stopping at another gas station and going, ‘OK, I guess I’ll have a banana and some sunflower seeds.’” WHAT Twangfest: Sarah Shook & the Disarmers with Amanda Anne Platt & the Honeycutters and Kevin Gordon • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday (Twangfest continues Saturday) • WHERE Off Broadway, 3509 Lemp Avenue • HOW MUCH $20-$23 • MORE INFO twangfest.com

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PHOTO: ANTHONY NGUYEN

Sarah Shook & the Disarmers


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06.07.19-06.13.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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TICKET TRACKER

at 10 a.m. June 14.

Helium Comedy Club

ticketmaster.com • Ian Noe, 8 p.m. Oct. 11, $10-$12. • Mike Watt + the Missingmen, 8 p.m. Oct. 21, $20-$23.

Chaifetz Arena ticketmaster.com • Tyler, the Creator, Goldlink, Blood Orange, 7 p.m. Oct. 4, $39.50-$59.50, on sale Friday. • Erykah Badu, Goodie Mob with CeeLo Green, 8 p.m. Oct. 5, $64-$130, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Delmar Hall

heliumcomedy.com • Emo Phillips, 8 p.m. July 11, 7:30 and 10 p.m. July 12-13, $17-$33.

Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre livenation.com • Kid Rock and Hank Williams Jr. “Hot October Nights,” 7 p.m. Oct. 4, $45$149.50, on sale at 10 a.m. June 7.

• Satsang, 8 p.m. Nov. 7, $12-$15.

• Cavetown, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 8, $20-$24, on sale at noon Friday.

The Pageant

Fox Theatre metrotix.com • Diana Ross “Diana’s Music Book,” 8 p.m. July 25, $46.50-$151.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Cody Jinks, Ward Davis, 8 p.m. Nov. 9, ticket prices to be announced, on sale

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etix.com

• American Football, 8 p.m. Sept. 14, $25-$30.

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Off Broadway • Titus Andronicus, 8 p.m. Oct. 4, $15-$18.

• Bone Thugs-NHarmony featuring Dirty Muggs, 7 p.m. July 21, $25-$60.

JUDAS PRIEST • JUNE 3 • STIFEL THEATRE 1 Jerald Smith of Barnhart and Caleigh Hampton of St. Louis 2 From left: Matthew Jansen of St. Louis and Ann and Chris Jansen of Bridgeton 3 Tim and Chris Galarza of Florissant 4 Wes Burgess (left) and Chas Schranck, both of St. Louis 5 Angi Laskowski of Columbia, Ill., and Sam Welge of Creve Coeur 6 Rick Porterfield of Warden, Ill., and Rachel Philyppone of Florissant 7 Sean Ebeling and Karen Blessing, both of St. Peters 8 Jon Kinnison and Cindy Harr, both of Fenton 9 Brian and Tonya Porshinsky of St. Louis 10 Laura McFarland of Wentzville and Donna Craig of St. Charles 11 Melissa Sides and Wesley Richards, both of St. Louis 12 Mike and Crickett Miller of Augusta, Mo.

• Don “DC” Curry, 8 p.m. July 18, 7:30 and 10 p.m. July 19-20, $18-$30.

ticketmaster.com

Fox Sports Midwest Live! at Ballpark Village

SEEN ON THE SCENE ▼

ticketmaster.com • Summerbash ’19 with Starlito, Don Trip, Light Skin Keisha, 9 p.m. July 20, $30-$45. • Tash Sultana, 8 p.m. Sept. 11, $39.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Conan Gray “The Comfort Crowd Tour,” 8 p.m. Oct. 29, $25-$30. • Sleater-Kinney, 8 p.m. Nov. 5, $27.50-$32.50. • Nate Bargatze: “Good Problem to Have,” 10 p.m. Nov. 16, $35, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF (SEEN ON THE SCENE); RICHARD SHOTWELL (DIANA ROSS)

Blueberry Hill Duck Room

Diana Ross Find more photos from these events and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/photos

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Russ Mohr

ects dealing with topics of justice and equality come from African Americans; the fact that Mohr is white gives it extra heft. “During the beginning of the civil rights movement, white brothers and sisters played a part,” J.R. says. “Russ understands and lives this. When it comes to this project, he’s more than a white dude who’s killing it. He’s a white dude who’s an advocate for love and More than 70 singers and musicians from several cities justice, and he has done the homework. This is real, not just a white collaborate on project reflecting ‘God’s love to the world’ dude who wants to bring people together. This is his life, and he’s a about putting faith into action. It’s BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON | POST-DISPATCH POP MUSIC CRITIC true advocate.” about justice and reconciliation Mohr, a father of children of and compassion. It’s about imagThe ingredients that color, is a worship leader, along ining and praying and working for a make up Russ Mohr’s J.R. with J.R., at the Journey Tower better tomorrow.” new “The Kingdom Mohr, who previously was part of the Sessions” album are Grove. He says those issues haven’t been at the forefront in churches. But “The simple yet proven: love, bands Fundamental Elements and LP OutKingdom Sessions” shows that doesn’t have siders, says he wanted to make a faith-based unity, diversity, faith, to always be the case. project that would bring together a diverse community, beauty, truth. “Where was the church when someone group of artists. The album brings together more than 70 was lying in the street for five hours?” Mohr Among the artists: J.R. (the Grammysingers and musicians from several cities says, referencing the 2014 shooting death of winning St. Louis-based producer who has including St. Louis, New York City, Kansas Mike Brown in Ferguson. “We’re speaking on worked with Lecrae and Andy Mineo), Brian City, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Denver, Portthings the church has kind of ignored.” Owens, Sho Baraka, Liz Vice, Latina Alattas land, Ore., and Nashville, Tenn. Their work is “The Kingdom Sessions” took several years (of Page CXVI), Odd Thomas (of Beautiful spread across 14 songs and two interludes. to finish and began with the song “Press On.” Eulogy), Kenny DeShields and We Are Root “‘The Kingdom Sessions’ is about music Mohr met with J.R. and Owens for initial Mod. and faith bringing people together to reflect writing sessions in fall of 2015. He describes J.R. (aka Courtney Peebles) says most projGod’s love to the world,” Mohr says. “It’s “Press On” as a song about moving past hardships and evil “to a place of justice, a kjohnson@post-dispatch.com stltoday.com/blender @kevincjohnson THE BLENDER

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF TG MEDIA (MOHR); COURTESY OF SONGSBYTITUS (J.R.)

Mohr’s ‘Kingdom Sessions’ album puts faith into action

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place of love and a call to endure.” The song evolved as its theme grew broader. Listening to key speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. helped refine the lyrics. “We ain’t done yet,” Mohr says, explaining the song’s message. “We’re seeing so many things going on in society, things politically, things inside the church, things with race, with immigration. There’s a lot we gotta unpack.” “The Kingdom Sessions,” which includes “Imagine” (featuring DeShields), is a soulful effort influenced by the likes of Stevie Wonder, Curtis Mayfield, Bill Withers and Donny Hathaway. “One of the dope things about Russ — we call him blue-eyed soul,” J.R. says. “He has this vibe about him that’s part Justin Timberlake, part John Legend, and the project lends itself to that. The other dope part sonically is you get that soul, but it’s diverse. A track may be all live horns and bass and guitar and organ, but then you might get a track with a hip-hop drum sample. It’s a very wellrounded project.” In addition to soul, the album includes nods to blues, jazz, gospel, funk and hip-hop. Lining up all the artists for “The Kingdom Sessions” may have been the easiest part of the process. “That’s why a guy like Brian (Owens) fits in so well on the project,” Mohr says. “He breathes this stuff.” Most of the artists donated their time or contributed for next to nothing. Once they came on board, the bulk of the time was spent on writing, which began with hours-long conversations about what the songs would be about. “‘What’s going on? How are you wrestling with the stuff going on in the world? If you had five minutes on the album, what would you say? What do you wanna teach people? Let’s put that to music.’ That’s the writing process that really took up time,” Mohr says. The core of the musicians are from St. Louis. The choir was made up of St. Louis singers from 16 different churches. “The Kingdom Sessions” will be available at a CD release party Friday at the Ready Room. The album is available digitally June 14. Cbabi Bayoc, who designed the album artwork, will sell autographed prints of the cover. Most of the St. Louis artists who perform on the album are expected at the event, which Mohr says will look like a family jam session. “People will be on and off the stage,” he says. “It’ll look like a visual representation of the album.” WHAT Russ Mohr with Brian Owens & Deacons of Soul • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Ready Room, 4195 Manchester Avenue • HOW MUCH $12-$15 • MORE INFO eventbrite.com

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RECENTLY REVIEWED THEATER ▼

‘Be More Chill’

it to the sun. Then, the layers are removed, and the paper — or sometimes fabric — is submerged in water. Whatever was exposed to the light turns Prussian blue. “They are sun prints,” Robertson says. “I never quite know how they are going to turn out. There are a lot of variables.” HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES

Bryan Yung sets up his watercolor artwork for the 2016 Webster Arts Fair in Webster Groves. Yung traveled from Virginia for the fair.

Webster Arts Fair can serve as a crash course More than 100 local, national and international artists will show and sell their wares — and hopefully inspire art appreciation BY COLLEEN SCHRAPPEN | ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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ne of Jeane Vogel’s pet peeves is when people complain that a piece of art is overpriced. | Usually, she says, it stems from a lack of understanding about the process and products that go into the creation of a painting, sculpture or woodwork. “We don’t have a lot of art education anymore about how art is made,” says Vogel, the executive director of Webster Arts, the nonprofit that puts on the annual Webster Arts Fair. But the outdoor art show, which runs Friday through Sunday at Bompart and Lockwood avenues in Webster Groves, can serve as a crash course. In addition to the 105 local, national and international artists who will be showing and selling their wares, there will be seven demonstration areas where organizations such as Craft Alliance and Midwest Metalcschrappen@post-dispatch.com

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smiths will give an up-close view of their handiwork. “When you see what it takes to create a bowl or a hand-woven cloth, you see that what you’re getting is different than what you get at the store,” Vogel says. The artists, selected by a blind jury, are also eager to explain their work to fairgoers. People commonly see Maggie Robertson’s blue-hued cyanotypes and assume they are indigo dyes, so she takes advantage of that opening to start a conversation. “That’s when I start to explain the process totally,” Robertson says. Cyanotypes, an early photographic technique, comprise a little bit of chemistry, some abstract thinking and a lot of sunlight. After mixing ferric ammonium citrate with potassium ferricyanide, “I brush the chemicals on my paper. It goes on a Mountain Dew yellow color,” she says. When the paper dries, Robertson creates a design to lay on top, using cutouts or pressed plants. She puts the piece outside to expose

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Jane Olson Glidden returns to the Webster Arts Fair year after year as a representative of the Weavers Guild of St. Louis. She loves it when she can introduce someone to a loom for the first time. “We have demonstrations that show the historic craft and a table of looms that kids — I should say kids of all ages — can play with,” she says. Guild members don’t just work with looms, though. “Many are weavers, but some might be fiber enthusiasts,” says Glidden, who has been weaving for 50 years, since an art teacher introduced her to the craft when she was a high school freshman. “There’s such a wonderful, broad variety of opportunities in the fiber arts.” Guilders crochet, tat, spin, braid bobbin lace and produce tapestries. Knitting, in particular, will be celebrated on Saturday, which happens to be World Wide Knit in Public Day. “We’re going to ‘yarn bomb’ our booth and encourage people to sit and knit with us,” Glidden says. “I love when you realize, ‘there are other people like me who like to do this.’” After adding to the yarn graffiti, visitors can stop by an “instrument petting zoo” to try some of Music Folk’s tubas, tam-tams and glockenspiels or test their game strategies with the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of St. Louis. Yucandu Art Studio and the Missouri Falun Dafa Association will also have hands-on projects available for the 20,000 or so estimated fairgoers. Musical performances will be held at three stages, and local vendors such as Serendipity Ice Cream and Mission Taco Joint will keep everyone well fed. But the art, of course, is the highlight. “There’s something at every price point,” says Vogel, the fair director. “From a $30 mug to a $10,000 sculpture and everything in between. There’s something wonderful about putting something on your wall that speaks to you.”

WHEN Through June 22 • WHERE The Marcelle, 3310 Samuel Shepard Drive • HOW MUCH $20-$30 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

New Line Theatre presents this nonstop hilarious musical about a teenage nerd who takes a drug that promises to make him cool. Teen angst has rarely been so entertainingly outrageous. Directed by Mike Dowdy-Windsor and Scott Miller. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘Charlie Johnson Reads All of Proust’ WHEN Through June 15 • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

The Midnight Company presents Amy Crider’s amusing one-person comedy-drama about a man who decides to read the complete “Remembrance of Things Past,” aka “In Search of Lost Time.” With Joe Hanrahan. Directed by Sarah Lynne Holt. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘Love’s Labors Lost’ WHEN Through June 23 • WHERE Shakespeare Glen on Fine Arts Drive in Forest Park • HOW MUCH Free; $10-$40 for reserved seats • MORE INFO sfstl.com

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis presents the Bard’s comedy about romance among royals. It’s a fun production that’s relatable even to folks who aren’t particularly into Shakespeare. Directed by Tom Ridgely. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘The Marriage of Figaro’ WHEN Through June 29 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” is one of the greatest operas ever written, a profound work with both great comedy and great humanity. Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ fine production is directed by Mark Lamos and conducted by Christopher Allen, with sopranos Monica Dewey and Susannah Biller as Susanna and the Countess, respectively; bass-baritone Aubrey Allicock as Figaro, baritone Theo Hoffman as the Count and mezzosoprano Samantha Gossard as Cherubino. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Verdi’s ‘Rigoletto’ WHEN Through June 30 • WHERE Loretto-Hilton Center, 130 Edgar Road, Webster Groves • HOW MUCH $25-$139 • MORE INFO 314961-0644; opera-stl.org

Giuseppe Verdi’s “Rigoletto” is one of the standards of the operatic repertoire. The production at Opera Theatre of St. Louis has a superb cast, including the fine English baritone Roland Wood in the title role, soprano So Young Park as his doomed daughter Gilda and tenor Joshua Wheeker as the Duke. Roberto Kalb conducts idiomatically; Bruno Ravella is the imaginative director. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Find more performances in our calendar, and add your own group’s upcoming events. stltoday. com/ events

Susannah Biller in “The Marriage of Figaro”

WHAT Webster Arts Fair • WHEN 6-10 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Lockwood and Bompart avenues,

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P H O T O S : P O S T- D I S PAT C H F I L E ( A R T FA I R ) ; E R I C W O O L S E Y ( “ M A R R I A G E O F F I G A R O ” )

STLTODAY.COM/ARTS


The Muny unveiled new improvements on Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in St. Louis.

THE MUNY’S

BIG REVEAL Outdoor theater in Forest Park kicks off its second century with upgrades that will make it one of the country’s ‘premiere’ stages

P H O T O S : C H R I S L E E ( M U N Y ) ; P O S T- D I S PAT C H F I L E ( I S A A C S O N )

BY CALVIN WILSON | POST-DISPATCH THEATER CRITIC

Artistic director and executive producer Mike Isaacson welcomes theatergoers at the start of the Muny’s centennial season in June 2018.

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ith its 101st season, the Muny promises to present the kind of musical theater that has made it a St. Louis institution — but with a big difference. • The shows will be enhanced by state-of-the-art technology designed to bring the venerable venue into the 21st century. And that should make “Guys and Dolls,” which kicks off the season on Monday, an even more dazzling experience. • “You can never completely separate the idea of the Muny from the idea of St. Louis,” says Mike Isaacson, artistic director and executive producer. He describes the outdoor theater in Forest Park as “a civic idea and an artistic endeavor,” and its renovation that started after the 100th season last summer as “taking something we know and love and making it better. That sense of renewal is exciting for a community.” cwilson@post-dispatch.com

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@calvinwilsonstl

06.07.19-06.13.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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“BY THE 1930S, IT WAS A PREMIERE STAGE IN THE UNITED STATES. AND EVERYBODY KNEW IT. THIS RETURNS IT TO THAT.”

A rendering of Muny renovations includes shells — which will be in place for the 2020 season — on either side of the stage and can be colored with LED lighting.

ALSO THIS SUMMER AT THE MUNY ▼

“Kinky Boots” • June 19-25 • Based on the hit 2005 film about a financially challenged shoe manufacturer who teams up with a cabaret performer, the show with songs by Cyndi Lauper will make its debut in a regional theater. Graham Scott Fleming, J. Harrison Ghee and Taylor Louderman star.

Isaacson says the redo is nothing less than the Muny and its audience deserve. “By the 1930s, it was a premiere stage in the United States,” he says. “And everybody knew it. This returns it to that.” Last year, the Muny announced a $100 million fundraising campaign to rebuild the theater’s stage, maintain its 11.5-acre campus and bolster its endowment, which supports education and outreach programs. Improvements in phase one of the project include two turntables and tracks that will move sets and actors more efficiently, up-to-date stage lighting, additional LED screens for digital projections, a protected orchestra pit and better distribution of breezes to the audience. also worked on Muny productions indon Greenberg, the show stars Ben DaThe renovation will provide the Muny vis as Sky Masterson, with the flexibility to produce a wider e so Brittany cluding “Jersey Boys,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and “Young FrankenBradford as Sister Sarah range of shows, says Sean Smith, stein.” Brown, Jordan Gelber Muny director of operations. “With this new computerized as Nathan Detroit and “With some of the newer titles, system of being able to seamKendra Kassebaum as you need the infrastructure to lessly and quickly transition beMiss Adelaide. do them,” he says. “We’ve been tween scenes, it keeps the pace of The 1955 film vermaking it work, but it’s kind of Ben Davis Jordan Gelber the show moving,” he says. sion featured two of the been duct tape here, shoestring Isaacson says goal is to take adbiggest names of that decade: there.” ays the goa vantage of technology to make the Marlon Brando as gambler Work remains to be done, much va Muny offerings “better, brighter Masterson and Frank of it involving architectural eleand faster. Sinatra as con man ments, Smith says. “What we’ll be doing this seaDetroit. “We have seven new trees that son is creating this new vocabuPaul Tate dePoo are going to be planted onstage,” lary,” he says. “We’ve had great III, scenic designer of he says. “They’re quite large — success with using the upstage approximately 30 to 35 feet tall — Kendra Kassebaum “Guys and Dolls,” says Brittany Bradford scenery wall as a storytelling deand we’ve already purchased them.” the theater’s renovation has sce vice. Now, we’ll have the two additional significantly expanded his toolkit. The trees are scheduled to be in place in side LED walls — which can give us dif“Before, when you didn’t have an auMarch 2020. ferent locations, different colors, different tomation system — which is basically a “Guys and Dolls,” a classic musical about expressions.” gangsters, gamblers and other colorful New tracking system for large pieces of scenAlong with other improvements, IsaaYork characters, will introduce theatergoers ery — it all had to be manually brought on cson says, the artists behind the scenes at by crew members,” says dePoo, who has to the Muny’s new mojo. Directed by Gor-

The new turntable on the Muny’s new stage uses QR codes to register its position as it rotates to reposition scenery. It replaces a turntable that originally was installed in 1930.

the Muny now have the resources to make its productions even more magical. “This community deserves something wonderful,” he says. “That, to me, is very important.” WHAT “Guys and Dolls” • WHEN 8:15 p.m. Monday through June 16 • WHERE The Muny, 1 Theatre Drive, Forest Park • HOW MUCH $15$105, plus the free seats • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

SEVEN SHOW SEASON TICKET PACKAGE ON SALE NOW

P H O T O S : C O U R T E S Y O F T H E M U N Y ( P E R F O R M E R S , R E N D E R I N G ) ; C H R I S L E E ( T U R N TA B L E , L I G H T I N G , A I R V E N T S ) ; J O N G I T C H O F F ( F I R E W O R K S )

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR & EXECUTIVE PRODUCER MIKE ISAACSON

“1776” • June 27-July 3 • St. Louis favorite Adam Heller is Benjamin Franklin, Robert Petkoff is John Adams and Keith Hines Jr. is Thomas Jefferson in the musical about events surrounding the signing of the Declaration of Independence. In the era of “Hamilton,” the show has a new relevance. Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” • July 8-16 • Inspired by the timeless fairy tale about a spirited young woman, the show from theater legends Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II features Mikaela Bennett as the title character. The cast also includes Jason Gotay, Ashley Brown and Vicki Lucas. “Footloose” • July 18-24 • Mason Reeves stars as a teen whose dancing upsets the status quo in a conservative town. But he’s a rebel with all the right moves. Also in the cast are Jeremy Kushnier, McKenzie Kurtz and Kennedy Holmes. Based on a 1984 film featuring Kevin Bacon, which inspired a 2011 remake.

ABOVE • A worker adjusts a diffuser at the side of the stage that improves airflow throughout the theater.

Lerner & Loewe’s “Paint Your Wagon” • July 27-Aug. 2 • The tale of a romantic triangle during the Gold Rush will be presented in a revised edition. Matt Bogart, Mamie Parris, Omar Lopez-Cepero and Mark Evans star. The 1969 film version featured an unlikely star in a singing role: Clint Eastwood.

ABOVE LEFT • Fireworks punctuate the final number in “An Evening With the Stars,” which preceded the Muny’s centennial season in 2018. The performance had been postponed from the night before due to storms. BELOW LEFT • A new overhead light bridge spans the front of the Muny stage, holding lighting instruments and other equipment. It replaces a structure that had been in place since the 1930s.

“Matilda” • Aug. 5-11 • Will Swenson, Laura Michelle Kelly, Ann Harada and Josh Grisetti take the stage in the Muny premiere of the musical based on Roald Dahl’s children’s novel that revolves around a very special girl. St. Louis-based author and illustrator Mary Engelbreit created the look of the show.

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STLTODAY.COM/MOVIES ▼

‘Dark Phoenix’ is biggest dud of the ‘X-Men’ franchise What’s truly amazing is seeing the charismatic, star-packed cast flail about in this flat, poorly written film ★½ BY KATIE WALSH | TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

ou wouldn’t like Jean Grey when she’s angry. But there’s not much to like about “Dark Phoenix” at all. While the long-running, timescrambling Fox “X-Men” franchise has been showing diminishing returns since “X-Men: Apocalypse,” “Dark Phoenix,” the directorial debut of writer Simon Kinberg, is the dud of all duds, a boring, flat film that doesn’t seem to even start before it’s over. With this final installment, the franchise goes out with a resounding thud. If you’re not familiar with Jean Grey, played here by Sophie Turner, and previously by Famke Janssen, we get to know

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her tragic backstory in “Dark Phoenix.” As a young mutant, she has a hard time controlling her incredibly powerful telekinetic and psychic abilities. She causes a car accident, killing her parents, and is taken under the wing of Charles Xavier (James McAvoy), who becomes her de facto father figure and teaches her how to control her gift. But during an attempt to rescue astronauts from the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992 (yup), Jean ends up absorbing a direct hit from a solar flare of sorts. She survives, but her powers are even more acute. And she has a hard time controlling things when she’s emotional, especially since this cosmic incident ripped the Band-Aids off all the childhood trauma she’s repressed.

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For “Game of Thrones” fans, it is tempting to imagine Turner as the all-powerful being she deserves to be. But with its incredibly clunky and obvious script, “Dark Phoenix” just doesn’t do Turner justice. For an actress who can cut precision daggers with a sideways glance, Kinberg asks her to be a sledgehammer, requiring her to shout every emotional beat and turn, relentlessly hammering the themes and messaging. “My emotions make me strong!” Jean declares to a white-haired alien succubus played by Jessica Chastain, indicating that apparently Brené Brown was added to the syllabus at Xavier’s School for Gifted Youngsters. Hans Zimmer’s restless, propulsive score never lets “Dark Phoenix” settle. And the entire film feels like an extended prologue before the neon watercolor swirl of a climax, where Jean’s powers go turbosupernatural and explode into a muddy CGI aurora borealis. Despite all the characters essentially running around shouting “emotions!” the whole time, the only reaction one can muster is a limp shrug. What’s truly amazing about “Dark Phoenix” is watching the charismatic, award-

winning, star-packed cast flail about in this poorly written nonsense cartoon. McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence and Nicholas Hoult all agreed to come back for the film, despite the expiration of their “XMen” contracts, and one hopes they were paid handsomely for the favor. It’s actually astonishing to watch Lawrence suiting back up in the blue makeup to deliver faux girlpower lines about how they really should call it the “X-Women.” Chastain, making her first superhero movie appearance, plays some kind of alien who wants Jean’s powers (Why? For what?) and commands the blandest army of Gap commercial extras in pursuit of the X-Men. “Dark Phoenix” racks up a rap sheet of offenses (it doesn’t even look remotely like 1992!), but perhaps the worst is proving what “X-Men: Apocalypse” started in its treatment of Oscar Isaac. Despite the caliber and talent of the actor, lackluster writing, directing and editing can warp a performance into something truly dreadful. Now that’s power. WHAT “Dark Phoenix” • RUN TIME 1:53 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Intense sequences of sci-fi violence and action including some gunplay, disturbing images and brief strong language

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

P H O T O : D O A N E G R E G O R Y/ T W E N T I E T H C E N T U R Y F O X V I A A P

Jennifer Lawrence in “Dark Phoenix”


From left: Max (voiced by Patton Oswalt), Duke (Eric Stonestreet) and Liam (Henry Lynch) in “The Secret Life of Pets 2”

‘The Secret Life of Pets 2’ is a well-crafted sequel Second film better grounds itself in its own universe and includes plenty for grown-ups to enjoy ★★★ BY MARK KENNEDY | ASSOCIATED PRESS

f the sweet, animated 2016 film “The Secret Life of Pets” was mostly for kids, its new sequel might be for another segment of the audience altogether — whoever is buying the tickets. Amid the cute critter shenanigans, this one has plenty of lessons for the parents. Most of the same gang is back this time: Kevin Hart as the fluffy white bunny Snowball, Eric Stonestreet as the goofy giant Newfoundland, Lake Bell as the laconic cat Chloe and Jenny Slate as the plucky Pomeranian Gidget. This time, though, our main hero terrier, Max, is voiced by Patton Oswalt, replacing the disgraced Louis CK. Both films in the franchise deal with a new addition to the family. In the first, it was a new dog that allowed the filmmakers to explore sibling rivalry. This time, the stranger is a baby, who Max learns to love unconditionally but which also ups his anxiety levels. (Any helicoptering parent out there knows what we mean.)

P H O T O : I L L U M I N AT I O N E N T E R TA I N M E N T/ U N I V E R S A L P I C T U R E S

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stltoday.com/go ★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent

Returning screenwriter Brian Lynch and returning director Chris Renaud, who also voices the guinea pig Norman, have actually concocted three interlocking plots in “The Secret Life of Pets 2.” It’s a wise decision since none is deep enough to carry the film alone, forcing some convoluted stitching together. But they manage it, creating a solid piece of entertainment for all ages, if not a terribly revelatory one. In one story, Max finds himself ever fearful for her owner’s new toddler, stressing out as the boy’s protector. “Was the world always this dangerous?” he asks after a harrowing New York City stroll. He even develops a nervous scratching tick that requires a mortifying dog cone. A trip to a farm in the country seems to offer a respite. Getting his head right is his quest. Before he leaves, he asks Gidget to take care of his favorite squeaky toy. She promptly loses it in a cat lady’s apartment filled with crazed felines. Getting it back is her comedic quest. Meanwhile, Snowball is asked by a brave Shih Tzu (newcomer Tiffany Haddish) to rescue a

tiger cub held by a malevolent circus boss. His quest is, like the others ones, to find his inner superhero. Oswalt is a fine replacement for Max, able to connect with the character’s timidity, wonder and blossoming courage. He is helped by a gruff farm dog voiced by Harrison Ford, who unfortunately muddies his first animated voice role with some hyper-masculinity. Ford’s alpha dog is pure action cool, ripping off Max’s cone in disgust (not the best message for kids in treatment), rejecting Max’s embarrassed neurosis and being the cold, silent type. “The first step in not being afraid, is acting like you’re not afraid,” he advises. Ford gets to play with his own he-man screen persona, but we’re not sure this John Wayne bit — or the whole dynamic of pampered city folks versus tough country folks — is what we need right now. Another drawback is the scary elements: fearful wolves and an awful villain with a whip and a cattle prod. Even so, the majority of the film is carefully constructed, switching from plot to plot to plot while also incorporating old characters — Dana Carvey’s elderly Basset hound and Hannibal Buress as dachshund Buddy — in an increasingly complex patchwork, fed by a lively soundtrack that includes Stevie Wonder, Jefferson Airplane, Coolio and ZZ Top. As signs of how well engineered this movie is, a cover of Bill Withers’ “Lovely Day” is used at the end, a callback to the original song’s appearance in the first film. It also opens with “Empire State of Mind,” an echo

of how the first one opened with Taylor Swift’s “Welcome to New York.” There are some nifty touches, including a dream sequence in which Snowball fantasizes about being a caped crusader, which creates a comic book sequence within an animated film. Bell pretty much steals the movie when her cat gets high on catnip and later teaches Gidget the “way of the cat” — complete with mandatory walking on a laptop keyboard and batting mugs off tables. All this with extraordinary animated effects. You will marvel at how real the illustrators have made this world, from rocky cliffs to speeding cars and dazzling eyes. In a neat twist, too, the cat lady becomes the butt of jokes but also a heroine. It all builds to a climax where all three plots converge, some stretched uncomfortably. Max is clearly the emotional center of the film, but Snowball’s journey is just weird, starting as a bunny who plays a dress-up superhero, morphing into a real superhero who is revealed to be anything but, before proving he is a superhero, kind of. (Stick around for the end credits to see Hart as a gangsta Snowball rapping “Panda” by Desiigner.) If the knock on “The Secret Life of Pets” was that it was a rip-off of “Toy Story,” then the second film better grounds itself in its own universe. Like its main three characters, it has learned to be comfortable in its own animated skin. WHAT “The Secret Life of Pets 2” • RUN TIME 1:26 • RATING PG • CONTENT Some action and rude humor

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An improbable rom-com, set in a doomsday shelter Many aspects of the script for ‘The Tomorrow Man’ are misconceived, underdeveloped or just plain feeble ★½ BY MARK JENKINS | SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

d Hemsler won’t stop thinking about tomorrow, but that’s not because he’s an optimist. The title character of “The Tomorrow Man” is what’s known as a “prepper”: someone who’s eagerly planning for the collapse of human civilization that he’s sure is looming. If Ed, as a movie hero, is improbable, so is nearly everything about writer-director Noble Jones’ debut feature. “The Tomorrow

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Man” is primarily a golden-years romance, with ingratiating lead performances by John Lithgow and his co-star, Blythe Danner. But many aspects of the script are misconceived, underdeveloped or just plain feeble. Ed is retired, long-divorced and living in an unidentified furrow of Middle America. His son, who lives close, but not too close, doesn’t much enjoy Dad’s telephone rants about the imminent end of it all. Ed has a more sympathetic audience online, where he posts warnings on message boards under the name “Captain Reality.”

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At first, the movie seems as committed to impending societal breakdown as its protagonist is. But then Ed notices a woman during his frequent runs to the local supermarket. Ronnie Meisner (Danner) doesn’t use credit cards, just like Ed. It must be a sign. But of what? Lonely Ronnie, a widow who lives by herself, is more confused than alarmed by Ed’s interest in her. She soon warms to him and agrees to dinner. On the drive home, he’s flooded with emotion when she begins to sing along to a tune that’s close to his heart: “Muskrat Love,” by Captain & Tennille. Only in a rom-com would anyone encounter a character — let alone two of them — so moved by that ditty. “The Tomorrow Man” contrives a few tests for the new relationship, including Thanksgiving dinner with Ed’s son (Derek Cecil), daughter-in-law (Katie Aselton) and surly teenage granddaughter (Sophie Thatcher). The first big crisis comes after Ed allows

Ronnie to become the only outsider ever to enter his secret room, stocked with food and supplies. Then she invites him to her place, which is not at all what he expected. The director, who began his career making music videos, serves here as his own cinematographer. But he doesn’t bring any particular sense of style to the film, playing down flashy visuals while stressing performances by Lithgow and Danner and the meager scenario. “The Tomorrow Man” would be more interesting, and more difficult, if Ed subscribed to any of the hateful beliefs common among preppers. But his paranoia is unmoored from the current political climate, which makes the film’s final veer back to Ed’s obsession seem all the more forced and hollow. The movie’s ending could be called a twist. But it’s really more of a belly flop. WHAT “The Tomorrow Man” • RUN TIME 1:35 • RATING PG13 • CONTENT Brief strong language and sexuality

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

PHOTO: BLEECKER STREET

Blythe Danner and John Lithgow in “The Tomorrow Man”


ALSO IN THEATERS ▼

‘John Wick: Chapter 3 — Parabellum’ ★★★

Mena Massoud (left) and Will Smith in “Aladdin”

R • 2:10 • Third installment

— light on exposition but easily the best so far — picks up moments after “John Wick 2” ended, with a $14 million bounty on our man John’s head, and everyone in Manhattan after him. Starring Keanu Reeves. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

‘Aladdin’ ★★ PG • 2:08 • Guy Ritchie,

who directs and is a coscreenwriter, has taken the 1992 film’s structure, added elements from the Broadway musical and made some nice script tweaks. Starring Will Smith, Mena Massoud and Naomi Scott. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part’ ★★★ PG • 1:46 • The innocent-

‘All Is True’ ★★★

looking Lego Duplo characters introduced in the first movie turn into invading space aliens in the sequel. Featuring the voices of Chris Pratt, Will Arnett, Alison Brie, Tiffany Haddish, Charlie Day and more. CHICAGO TRIBUNE

PG-13 • 1:41 • Kenneth

Branagh plays William Shakespeare contemplating the end of his career in an intriguing speculative drama about the playwright’s final years. Also directed by Branagh. WASHINGTON POST

‘Little’ ★★★

‘Avengers: Endgame’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 3:02 • The final movie in Marvel’s Infinity Saga focuses on the efforts of Captain America (Chris Evans) and the remaining Avengers to rewind the effects of Thanos’ “Infinity War” snap. As high as the stakes are, “Endgame” is also a very funny movie. WASHINGTON POST

‘The Best of Enemies’ ★½

P H O T O S : D I S N E Y ( “A L A D D I N ” ) ; D A N I E L M C FA D D E N ( “ G O D Z I L L A : K I N G O F T H E M O N S T E R S ” )

PG-13 • 2:13 • Based on

the 1971 true story of school desegregation in Durham, N.C., wherein a Ku Klux Klan Exalted Cyclops locked horns with an African-American sharecropper’s daughter and community organizer — and she prevailed. Through the experience, they became lifelong friends.

PG-13 • 1:48 • Marsai Martin, the 14-year-old star of “Black-ish,” pitched, produced and stars in this hilarious, empowering movie that is like a reverse “Big.” Also starring Regina Hall and Issa Rae. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Long Shot’ ★★★ high school movies of all time. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Breakthrough’ ★★½ PG • 1:50 • The remarkable

true story of St. Charles’ John Smith is a miraculous tale that could make a wonderful and inspirational 30-minute film. Instead, “Breakthrough” is more like an overlong — and bad — Lifetime movie. Starring Chrissy Metz (“This Is Us”), Topher Grace and Marcel Ruiz. DANIEL NEMAN

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Brightburn’ ★★½

‘The Biggest Little Farm’ ★★★

R • 1:31 • “Brightburn” asks the question: What would happen if Superman were actually a one-man alien invasion force? And then it asks: What if he weren’t a man, but a boy? Written by St. Louis native screenwriting cousins Brian and Mark Gunn. DN

PG • 1:31 • Documentary

chronicles the exploits of Molly and John Chester, a Los Angeles-based chef and cinematographer, respectively, who established a modern, organic farm on 200 acres of barren land. WASHINGTON POST

‘A Dog’s Journey’ ★★½ PG • 1:48 • The second film

‘Booksmart’ ★★★★ R • 1:42 • For her directorial

debut, actress-turneddirector Olivia Wilde comes out swinging with not only one of the best movies of the year, but one of the best

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adapted from W. Bruce Cameron’s novels and a follow-up to “A Dog’s Purpose,” offers up an interesting, complex story into which we can sink our teeth. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Ghost Fleet’ NR • 1:30 • Documentary

about activists working to free enslaved fisherman in Indonesia. Directed by Shannon Service, Jeffrey Waldron. Not reviewed.

R • 2:05 • A winning pair, Seth

Millie Bobby Brown in “Godzilla: King of the Monsters”

Rogen and Charlize Theron put the rom into the com of Machiavellian Washington, D.C., political machinations. It’s “Veep” but less acidtongued and a lot more swoony. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Godzilla: King of the Monsters’ ★★½

‘Ma’ ★★½

PG-13 • 2:11 • A sequel

turns in a brilliantly campy performance in an otherwise serviceable high school horror flick. Directed by Tate Taylor.

R • 1:39 • Octavia Spencer

in the loosest possible sense, this Godzilla installment requires minimal recall of just what went down in Tokyo and San Francisco back in 2014. Focus has shifted to a family of scientists who lived through the attack. ASSOCIATED PRESS

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Pet Sematary’ ★★

‘Hellboy’ ★★ R • 2:00 • Monster hunter

Hellboy (David Harbour) confronts his own origins and existence as half-man, half-monster while battling to save the world from the Blood Queen witch Vivian Nimue (Milla Jovovich), who was dismembered by King Arthur and locked in separate coffins to keep her from running roughshod over the earth with her monster gang. It’s a lot. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World’ ★★½ PG • 1:44 • Third movie brings the franchise to a close with an affectionate chapter that continues the adventures of the Viking boy-turnedchief Hiccup (Jay Baruchel) and his faithful dragon, Toothless. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘The Hustle’

‘The Intruder’

PG-13 • 1:43 • Anne Hathaway

ONE-HALF STAR

and Rebel Wilson play con women who join forces for revenge. Written by Stanley Shapiro, Paul Henning, Dale Launer, Jac Schaeffer; story by Shapiro, Henning, Launer. Directed by Chris Addison. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

PG-13 • 1:42 • Cheesy thriller

stars Michael Ealy and Meagan Good as a young couple who discover there’s someone else inside their new dream home. WASHINGTON POST

R • 1:41 • The mean roads and mangy cats of Stephen King’s 1983 novel are back from the dead in Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer’s vividly acted, blandly condensed remake of Mary Lambert’s 1989 movie. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Pokémon Detective Pikachu’ ★½ PG • 1:44 • Film adaptations

of video games have proved a dicey proposition in the past, and this one just feels like a money grab. You’ve played Pokémon Go? Call this one Pokémon Don’t Go. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Poms’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:31 • Diane Keaton stars as a woman in her 70s who, prompted by a dire cancer diagnosis, acts on a repressed dream of being a cheerleader. It’s “Bring It On” in a senior living facility — but less witty. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Rocketman’ ★★½ R • 2:01 • Glittery Elton John

biopic is a more-or-less true, authorized account but one that frequently breaks free of stubborn things like chronology and gravity. Starring Taron Egerton. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Tolkien’ ★★ PG-13 • 1:51 • Its title suggests

that it is a portrait of the formative years of J.R.R. Tolkien, but it’s also very much a movie about the English author’s relationship with three other men. WASHINGTON POST

‘UglyDolls’ ★★ PG • 1:28 • Animated film

about outlandishly kooky dolls is flat and narratively bland — nothing more than a merchandising opportunity. The thin story is padded out with pop songs, and characters are voiced almost entirely by music superstars: Kelly Clarkson, Janelle Monáe, Nick Jonas, Blake Shelton, Pitbull. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Us’ ★★★½ R • 1:56 • Jordan Peele’s (“Get Out”) ’70s-inspired horror flick wears its references on its sleeve, grapples with big ideas and crawls with creepy tension, lightened with dashes of well-earned humor. A jaw-dropping performance by Lupita Nyong’o makes for a whipsmart modern horror classic. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Wonder Park’ ★★ PG • 1:25 • Animated film takes place in an amusement park dreamed up by a mother and daughter who whisper ideas into the ear of a stuffed chimp. But all the movie’s wonder disappears when there’s an illness in the family. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Use our calendar to find theaters and showtimes near you. stltoday.com/events

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COMMENTARY ▼

‘Rocketman’ makes progress for LGBTQ representation The new Elton John biopic is not a perfect representation of the queer experience, but it is certainly a step forward BY GARRETT SCHLICHTE | SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

ueer people often feel left out of our own stories. For generations, straight actors, writers and directors were the ones to tell queer stories on screen, which meant that LGBTQ characters were either drawn stereotypically — or that their storylines were so subtle viewers might not even notice them. Gay love could be present as long as it didn’t alienate straight viewers. For example, Rami Malek won an Oscar for best actor for his portrayal of Freddie Mercury in “Bohemian Rhapsody,” but the film handles Mercury’s bisexual identity as a blip in his life, rather than a central component of his story. The 2017 gay love story “Call Me

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By Your Name” does a masterful job depicting the chemistry and attraction between its main characters, but sex is only implied, not explicitly seen on screen. And then there is the ever frustrating trope of having to guess the sexuality of queer characters on screen, such as Kate McKinnon’s Jillian Holtzmann in the 2016 “Ghostbusters” remake. McKinnon’s character was supposedly pansexual, although there would be no way to know that while watching the film. Finally, we have “Rocketman,” which doesn’t shy away from exploring the highs and lows of a gay icon’s life. The way that the film handles Elton John’s sexuality is a step in the right direction. While it is currently being hailed as the first major studio film to include a gay sex scene — and that’s a big

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 06.07.19-06.13.19

deal — it is also noteworthy for how ordinary it is. It is not the climax of the film; it just happens, and then it is over. Nor is it the only avenue through which John, played by Taron Egerton, explores his sexuality. We see him grapple with platonic and romantic love, come out, and explore how he wants to present himself to the world. Queerness is not one-dimensional, and this film honors that. It is refreshing to see a film where the actors and director do not seem embarrassed to be creating a film about the life of a queer person. While Malek found it difficult to embrace Mercury’s status as a gay icon, Egerton told Out magazine that he was “very proud” of how “Rocketman” portrayed John’s sexuality. “The way we approached (the scene where Elton John loses his virginity) was that we were going to try and treat the significant male relationship in the movie with tenderness and consideration, and try and portray it as something that it is, which is a beautiful moment of male intimacy.” While most queer people will not end up as multiplatinum, Grammy-winning rock stars who go on to be knighted by the Queen (though we can dream!), most will fall in and out of love, experience intimacy and heartache. They will likely experience these

things several times over. Audiences have watched straight couples go through these love lifecycles for decades, depictions that have shaped viewers’ ideas and understanding of romantic relationships. However, these stories provide only a fraction of the possibilities. There are many moments captured in the film that are touchstones of the queer experience, and the film is better for their inclusion. “Rocketman” weaves John’s sexuality throughout the entire film, not just relegating it to one moment. There is a touching scene where he comes out to and comes on to the man who will become his lifelong collaborator, Bernie Taupin (Jamie Bell). There are more difficult scenes, including when John comes out to his mother, who tells him that he will never be loved properly. He struggles through an abusive relationship with his manager John Reid (Richard Madden). By the end of the film, John proudly embraces his flamboyance. “Rocketman” may be indicative of a larger change within the film industry. GLAAD recently released its 2019 Studio Responsibility Index, which tracks LGBTQ representation in films released by the seven major film studios each year, and noted some significant improvements. In 2018, 18 percent of films released included LGBTQ characters; 11 of those films included lesbian characters (significantly more than the previous year). However, no transgender or non-binary characters were represented in major studio films in 2018, and only 42 percent of LGBTQ characters were queer people of color (down from 57 percent the previous year). “Rocketman” is not a perfect representation of the queer experience, but it is certainly a step forward. Much of this could be due to John’s participation in the production of the film and his insistence that it be an accurate portrayal of his life. Credit must also be given to the queer community at large, which has been relentless in insisting that their stories be represented accurately and authentically, rather than straight-washed. Considering that international screenings of the film have already begun censoring the sex scene, there is more work to be done. Art is meant to convey components of the human experience so that we may better understand experiences other than our own. The hope is not that these stories will assimilate to a dominant culture, but that they will help us appreciate and celebrate that difference. A major studio film that gives us an authentic glimpse into the life of a gay rock star is progress — but queer superheroes, queer romantic comedies, queer thrillers and queer characters that are part of other movies who have more to do than be the token queer — must be next. And soon. stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : D AV I D A P P L E B Y, PA R A M O U N T P I C T U R E S

Taron Egerton as Elton John in “Rocketman”


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KENNETH

JUDI

IAN

BRANAGH

DENCH

McKELLEN

“MESMERIZING.”

“GORGEOUS, DEVASTATING and THRILLING.” -Eric Kohn, Indiewire

-Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

IN 1613 SHAKESPEARE RETIRED. HE STILL HAD ONE LAST STORY TO TELL — HIS OWN.

One woman’s quest to expose the darkest secret on the sea.

ALL IS TRUE DIRECTED BY KENNETH BRANAGH WRITTEN BY BEN ELTON

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Brie Larson in “Captain Marvel”

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Note to Hollywood: Young women go to the movies more than men P H O T O : C H U C K Z L O T N I C K , M A R V E L S T U D I O S / WA LT D I S N E Y S T U D I O S M O T I O N P I C T U R E S

BY ANOUSHA SAKOUI | BLOOMBERG

ollywood churns out superhero films dominated by male characters, but winning over young women can be key to success at the box office. U.S. female filmgoers ages 15 to 24 account for 2 million admissions a week, compared with 1.7 million for their male counterparts, according to a study by Webedia Movies Pro and Vertigo Research. Cinephiles over the age of 50 also are an outsized force at the box office, despite blockbuster movies generally targeting the young, the report found. The results suggest that Hollywood could generate more revenue by better serving these groups, said Marine Suttle, Webedia’s chief product

H

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officer. Already, the industry has made progress: Walt Disney’s “Captain Marvel” and “Dark Phoenix” have put female protagonists at the center of superhero stories this year. But a disproportionate share of speaking roles still go to men. “Diversity in the cast is what is going to bring diversity in the auditorium,” Suttle said in an interview. In the top 30 films surveyed between March 2018 and February of this year, 30 percent of casts were female. But films with a higher percentage of female characters drew more women to theaters. Movies with a majority of women in the audience had an average 45 percent female representation in the cast. A similar correlation was found in moviegoers above the age

of 50, according to the study. Still, it’s hard to determine trends because this was the first year the researchers did the study. Last year’s “Book Club,” which starred Jane Fonda and Diane Keaton, was one example of successfully tapping older viewers. It exceeded revenue expectations by drawing an audience that was 80 percent female and 60 percent over the age of 50, according to Box Office Mojo. Groups like the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative have been tracking the level of gender and racial diversity in Hollywood. The latest study by the group showed an increase in women on screen, with 40 of the 100 top films in 2018 featuring a female lead or co-lead. Only 11 featured female actors over age 45, but that was more than double the number the year prior. As studios consolidate and potentially make fewer movies, the companies that remain will need to make films that attract all audiences, Suttle said.

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06.07.19-06.13.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

21


‘When They See Us’ is a powerful, overdue telling of Central Park Five injustices BY HANK STUEVER | WASHINGTON POST

‘W

hen They See Us,” which premiered last week on Netflix, is the kind of miniseries you get when the right showrunner assembles the right team and right performers with the unequivocating intent to correct an important story that many people still get wrong. In this case, the celebrated producer, director and screenwriter Ava DuVernay (“Selma,” “Queen Sugar”) takes on the injustice of what happened to the Central Park Five — four African American

22

men and one Hispanic man who, as teenagers, were rounded up, taken to a police precinct office and coerced into saying they brutally assaulted and raped a white woman who was jogging in Central Park one evening in April 1989. There was never any physical evidence that they did. The confessions the boys (who ranged in age from 14 to 16) gave came after many hours of coercion, intimidation and threats from detectives; two of the boys were separately urged by their fathers to tell the police what they wanted to hear. In media coverage, the boys were compared to savages

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who took part in a “wilding” crime spree. The real estate mogul Donald Trump took out newspaper ads to demand their execution. The boys — Korey Wise, Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana, Kevin Richardson and Antron McCray — were found guilty on some of the charges in a 1990 trial. They spent between six and 13 years in detention centers and prisons. As everyone ought to know by now, the jogger’s true attacker confessed in 2002, and his DNA matched the physical evidence. A state Supreme Court vacated the Central Park Five’s sentences on the district attorney’s recommendation. As adults, the five men sued the city and finally reached a $41 million settlement in 2014. If the next words that occur to you are “Yes, but what about the victim?” (meaning the jogger, Trisha Meili, who wrote

a memoir and still publicly expresses her doubt about a lone attacker, as well as her disappointment that the city agreed to a settlement), then it seems you have two options, 30 years later: You can absorb what “When They See Us” is trying to tell you, or you can retreat comfortably back to the open-shut templates of “Law & Order” reruns. Split into four episodes, DuVernay’s approach bluntly but successfully turns this story inside-out, borrowing the look of true-crime dramas while discarding the genre’s usual tropes. It focuses on the boys, their families and the irreparable effects of their jailing. Rather than lionize them, it goes one better and humanizes them. As the title suggests, it’s all about how they were seen, and, by extension, how most minority teenage

case fit the wilding narrative. You better believe DuVernay is in no mood to re-litigate, build a Wikipedia page or pay lip service to anybody’s doubts. Here, in this telling, the cops are almost always corrupt, Fairstein is menacingly reckless and the prosecutor (Vera Farmiga as Elizabeth Lederer) lucks out in the second episode with a jury willing to convict the boys based on the videotaped confessions alone. This swift treatment of the crime and the trial allows DuVernay and her co-writers (Robin Swicord, Attica Locke, Yusuf Hassan and Michael Starrbury) to spread their wings in the series’ second half: Once the headlines die down, the boys become men — first languishing behind bars and then, after most of them make parole, trying to put their lives back together. The story of their parents and family (with fine performances from Niecy Nash, John Leguizamo and Michael K. Williams, among others) also begin to take shape. The showstopper comes in the fourth episode, as Korey, who was tried and convicted as an adult rather than as a juvenile, embarks on a violently terrifying, dozenyear journey through the state prison system, which includes a long detour into solitary confinement and a heartbreaking, hallucinatory (yet artfully envisioned) glimpse of his past and present. Jerome, the only actor in the series to play both the teen and adult versions of his character, gives a remarkable performance, as the system beats Korey down to the mental equivalent of rubble and he emerges as an entirely different man. When the news of his freedom comes — and the series reaches its full, swelling sense of the miraculous — the viewer will finally understand his or her part in all this: All that’s being asked of us is to see. WHAT “When They See Us” • WHEN Four episodes available for streaming • WHERE Netflix • MORE INFO netflix.com/whentheyseeus

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P H O T O : AT S U S H I N I S H I J I M A , N E T F L I X

Aunjanue Ellis and Ethan Herisse in “When They See Us.”

boys are still often seen — not as children and young citizens, but as potential thugs. The series is deftly attuned to context, portraying a late-’80s New York that seethes with mob mentality when it comes to solving and prosecuting this particular crime — which, to be sure, was both heinous and infuriating. This is a drama about modern lynching; rather than leading to a noose and branch, it follows the Central Park Five on a ruinous trip through a penal system that finds ways to punish inmates even after they’re paroled. In tone and execution, “When They See Us” fits somewhere between John Ridley’s underwatched ABC anthology “American Crime,” which also subverted the procedural genre in revealing ways, and Ryan Murphy’s FX hit “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story,” which taught viewers a thing or two about the effects of time and context. Without any background primer, the first episode moves quickly through the night of the crime and the days after, beginning with the adolescent lure of watching a group of one’s peers decide, in the moment, to head off to Central Park on a spring evening. The pace and dialogue are not expository, nor do they provide much time to get to know the boys intimately as characters. (That comes later.) The young actors playing the teens (Jharrel Jerome as Korey; Ethan Herisse as Yusef; Caleel Harris as Antron; Asante Blackk as Kevin; Marquis Rodriguez as Raymond) ably convey the confusion and panic of being misidentified, hauled in and falsely accused. Felicity Huffman (talk about timing) plays Linda Fairstein, the newly appointed head of the district attorney’s sexcrimes unit, who arrives at the crime scene not long after an unconscious, nearly dead Meili was discovered. “When They See Us” is unsparing in the way it portrays Fairstein pushing detectives to make the


Tan France

named Rob, and takes readers behind the scenes of the Netflix sensation that is “Queer Eye.” The 36-year-old also peppers the narrative with fashion and lifestyle insights, including do’s and don’ts for wearing jeans, key first-date tips and a rundown of the world’s best-dressed celebrities. France will discuss his book and meet fans Saturday at the St. Louis County Library headquarters. The sold-out event benefits the Library Foundation’s literacy programs.

Q&A ▼

Tan France on his memoir, Olive Garden and the time he nearly quit ‘Queer Eye’ BY THOMAS FLOYD | WASHINGTON POST

T

an France had already wrapped up work on his memoir a few months ago when a particularly tumultuous trip through U.S. airport security made him realize he hadn’t told the full story.

TV Q&A ▼

P H O T O : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

Q • Can you tell me what happened to CBS News’ Jeff Glor and John Dickerson? Where are they? A • Since Susan Zirinsky became president of CBS News in March, the network has been shaking up its talent lineups — part of what Zirinsky called “the start of a new era” in early May. That included bumping “CBS Evening News” anchor Glor from his post in favor

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“I was very rudely reminded of my color and my name being a Muslim name,” says the “Queer Eye” fashion expert, whose full name is Tanveer Wasim France. “I thought, ‘OK, this really should be in the book. I want to speak for people who don’t get an opportunity to speak up.’” France says he’s been

of Norah O’Donnell, who will take the anchor chair this summer. The network announced last week that Glor will become a CBS News special correspondent and starting June 22 will join Michelle Miller and Dana Jacobson on “CBS This Morning Saturday.” O’Donnell will continue to contribute to “60 Minutes” (where, by the way, Steve Kroft has retired) and will be lead anchor of CBS’ primaries and election coverage. The evening news will also move its

steered into airport holding rooms for additional screening at least 24 times. “Naturally Tan,” which hits shelves this week, now includes a chapter titled “9/11” that confronts such racial profiling. The memoir doesn’t shy away from other difficult subject matter, including France’s complicated childhood and the depression he experienced while juggling ownership of three different fashion businesses. But “Naturally Tan” isn’t short on upbeat material, as France sweetly reflects on meeting his husband, a “Mormon cowboy”

base from New York City to Washington, D.C., this fall. “CBS This Morning” has set its weekday hosts as Gayle King, Anthony Mason and Tony Dokoupil. John Dickerson, who had been on the morning show, is joining “60 Minutes” and, says CBS, will have “a key role as a contributing anchor to … political coverage of primary and election nights.” Q • The character of J.J. on “Sex and the City” appears to be Lin-Manuel Miranda. Could it be?

A • No, although Miranda (“Hamilton,” “Mary Poppins Returns”) does have a “Sex and the City” connection. The character of J.J. Mitchell was played in two “SATC” episodes by Mark Grapey. You may also have seen him in other productions, for example playing Peter Kalmick on “Chicago Med.” Miranda, meanwhile, can be spotted in the first “Sex and the City” movie, along with his directing partner Thomas Kail. They played, as Slate summed it up, “two guys who move a couch”

Q • This memoir opens with a chapter about your experience growing up gay in a traditional Pakistani family and the racism you dealt with being raised in a small English town. How did it feel to revisit that? A • That could’ve been tough for anybody who hasn’t resolved their issues, but I’ve made peace with how things were. It’s just ridiculous that it happened, that amount of racism, but it’s not something that still feels painful. The hardest part of the book is where I talk about my businesses, and how at one point it made me feel truly suicidal. That’s the only time I really struggled writing a chapter. Talking through those feelings (with contributing writer Caroline Donofrio) and reliving those moments was really, really hard. Q • You also recall going to “Queer Eye” creator David Collins early during the

when Miranda (Cynthia Nixon) is apartment hunting. Q • Is “Better Call Saul” all over? A • Shooting for the fifth season began in Albuquerque in April. But don’t start planning a new season watch party quite yet. It looks as if the latest episodes won’t get on the air until 2020. Q • Do you know if “A Million Little Things” has been renewed for a second

Season 1 shoot and offering to leave because you felt you were ruining the show. What do you hope readers take away from understanding that self-doubt? A • I’m not the kind of person who was raised in a family (that says), “You can do anything!” I’m definitely not American. I’m British and also South Asian, which means I always think I’ll fail miserably until somebody actually does hold a mirror up and shows that I’m able to do this. When you’ve never been in front of the camera before, it can be terrifying, and I suffer from really bad anxiety a lot of the time because it’s all so new to me and I’m actually quite shy. I hope this encourages people to just step out of their comfort zone and try something they normally wouldn’t try. Q • This also is a book with lifestyle tips and plenty of wit and humor. How did you balance the tone? A • I am very playful. Most people who know me know I’m seldom serious, so I wanted it to be a true reflection of who I am.

It’s not very often you’ll find me talking about something super serious and not then be completely inappropriate. Q • My favorite line was when you recalled going to an Olive Garden on your first date with your now-husband and wondered why the employees ask, “Are you celebrating anything today?” instead

season? There didn’t seem to be a lot of loose ends in the final episode of the first season, which leads me to believe it’s gone. A • As ABC announced in May, a new round of “A Million Little Things” will air this fall, on Thursday nights between “Grey’s Anatomy” and “How to Get Away With Murder.” If you’re looking for hints about what’s coming, you could check out series creator DJ Nash on Twitter. He’s @heydjnash. Q • The one-season run of

of, “What happened to your life that you’re ending up at the Olive Garden?” A • Actually, that was the only one that my publishers were like, “Are you sure you want this to be worded the way that it’s worded?” Because I am denigrating them at that point. But it felt appropriate. I’ve thought it for the last 10 years — why do they ask that question? It makes no sense. So I’m glad you enjoyed it! Q • You mention the possibility of new opportunities in the memoir, and then Netflix recently announced you’ll be co-hosting the competition series “Next in Fashion” with Alexa Chung. What made that show the right fit? A • It’s my dream project. I love “Queer Eye,” and I hope that it will continue on for years and years and years and I will be allowed to be a part of it. But “Next in Fashion” is a real passion project. Me and Alexa get along like a house on fire. It’s a really fun, fast-paced show, and the designers are world-class. It has a feel of — I’m probably not allowed to say this, but I’m going to anyway — “The Great British Baking Show.” It has a sweetness to it that that has. I was so boisterous every time I’d get on set, thinking, “I can’t believe I get to do this for a job.” WHAT Tan France • WHEN 7 p.m. Saturday • WHERE St. Louis County Library headquarters, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO slcl.org

Stephen Merchant’s “Hello Ladies,” merely eight episodes on HBO, made no sense. The show was great, acting and story splendid and different, with so much more that could have been created. Why was it so short lived? A • Merchant is a funny guy, as is evident in everything from his collaborations with Ricky Gervais to his guest appearances on “The Big Bang Theory.” But, according to reports when “Hello Ladies” was canceled in 2014, the audience for

it was small to begin with and shrank over its run. (Yes, even for a premium service like HBO, audience numbers can matter.) The network did at least follow the eight episodes with a farewell movie late in 2014. You can find that on DVD, streaming and HBO On Demand. BY RICH HELDENFELS, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE Send questions to Rich Heldenfels, P.O. Box 417, Mogadore, OH 44260, or brenfels@gmail.com.

06.07.19-06.13.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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A classic diner with a chef’s personal touch Morning Glory Diner isn’t trying to ‘elevate’ diner food — it presents that fare on an appealingly personal scale ★ ★ BY IAN FROEB | POST-DISPATCH RESTAURANT CRITIC

A

sign inside Morning Glory Diner encourages you to ask about the pie. I didn’t need the nudge. From where I sat eating lunch

ifroeb@post-dispatch.com

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at the restaurant’s counter I could see the glistening golden-brown crust of a freshly baked example. To be clear, this wasn’t one of several pies inside some smudged display case. This was it: the pie of the day or, at least, the pie of this moment. I asked about it.

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@ianfroeb

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Blueberries, inky purple and lushly sweet underneath that crackling crust. Though full from lunch, I ordered a slice to go ($4). I didn’t have a fork at my desk. How did I eat the pie? Don’t ask. The pie — both the specific pie I tried and the potential for pie that sign suggests, the craving for pie it sneaks into your subconscious — gets to the heart of this 3-monthold Cherokee Street restaurant’s charm. Morning Glory isn’t a twist on the classic American diner, nor is it trying to “elevate” diner food. Instead, it presents that fare on an appealingly personal scale. Chef and owner Ari Ellis has worked for some of the most acclaimed chefs in St. Louis, including Josh Galliano at the Libertine and Rick Lewis at Quincy Street Bistro and then Southern. After spells at the

Biscuits and gravy at Morning Glory Diner

takeout-focused Kounter Kulture and the butcher and sandwich shop Bolyard’s Meat & Provisions, in 2017 she opened her first concept, the Cut, serving sausages inside the Fortune Teller Bar on Cherokee. In a phone interview, though, Ellis told me her goal was always to open a diner. (She closed the Cut last year to focus on Morning Glory.) The diner’s appeal is nostalgic, she said. Her stepfather would tell her about the Agawam Diner, a classic Massachusetts diner. Growing up in Arnold, she and her family would eat at Waffle House; later, she would discover classic St. Louis spots like Courtesy Diner and Tiffany’s Original Diner. And, Ellis added, for herself and others with a soft spot for breakfast: “You can always get breakfast at the diner.” stltoday.com/go ★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

P H O T O S : C O LT E R P E T E R S O N , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

STLTODAY.COM/DINING


Though nostalgia informs Morning Glory, the restaurant doesn’t try to recapture the look and feel of a classic diner. There is a jukebox, yes, but there is fresh, bright paint on the wall framing the open kitchen where Ellis and kitchen manager Chris Hill work, and the design has even retained some of the sleek tile from the space’s predecessor, Vista Ramen. The overall look is more quirky neighborhood hangout than conventional diner, with an everyone-is-already-a-regular vibe embodied by manager David Stavron. By diner standards, Morning Glory’s menu is compact. The slinger leads the breakfast selections, though if you can look past St. Louis tradition, I suspect two other dishes will become Morning Glory’s sigBREAKFAST natures. Given Ellis’ ALL DAY ▼ work at the Cut, it Satisfy that craving with won’t surprise you our guide to more than that she serves but30 St. Louis-area diners. termilk biscuits ($8) stltoday.com/go with a luscious, peppery sausage gravy you might be tempted to order by itself. The chicken and johnny cakes plate ($9) tops two cornmeal pancakes with boneless, skinless chicken thighs that have been buttermilk-brined for 24 hours, coated in cornmeal and deep-fried. The chicken’s Cajun-inflected spice stands up to the sweetness of the johnny cakes even after you have slathered them with butter and syrup — and even doused in butter and syrup, the johnny cakes retain their shape and spring. Of course, in true diner fashion, you can build your own platter of two eggs cooked your way with sausage or bacon, hash browns and toast ($8), or you can cobble together a smaller or larger plate from the a-la-carte options. The a-la-carte breakfast menu might be essential if you don’t eat meat — even more so if you also don’t eat eggs — though the menu does offer a parfait ($7) and a hearty, modestly spicy three-bean chili ($5). Lunch options include the obligatory griddled burger with cheese (single $7, double $9) and a sandwich featuring the buttermilk-brined fried chicken ($9). I preferred the chicken with the johnny cakes; for a sandwich, I’d opt for a straightforward egg-meat-cheese breakfast sandwich ($6) or the BLT ($8). The latter sandwich’s generous tangle of crisp bacon distracted me from the usual BLT flaw, less-than-spectacular tomatoes. Only on my final visit was there a pie within view to tempt me. Don’t leave it to chance. Read the sign. Ask about the pie. WHERE Morning Glory Diner, 2609 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO No listed phone number • MENU Classic American diner fare • HOURS 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

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Double cheeseburger at Morning Glory Diner

Chicken and johnny cakes at Morning Glory Diner.

Morning Glory Diner at 2609 Cherokee Street

06.07.19-06.13.19 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Pide at Balkan Treat Box in Webster Groves

1764 Public House ★½ WHERE 39 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-405-8221; 1764pub.com • MENU Upscale St. Louis- and New Orleans-influenced fare • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch MondayFriday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

L’Acadiane ★½ WHERE 1915 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-875-0108; lacadiane.com • MENU Creole- and Cajun-inspired fare • HOURS Lunch WednesdayFriday, dinner Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

808 Maison ★★★ WHERE 808 Geyer Avenue • MORE INFO 314-594-4505; 808maison.com • MENU Classic French fare • HOURS Dinner Wednesday-Saturday

Like Home French Cafe & Pastry ★★½

Bakers & Hale ★★½

WHERE 8103 Big Bend Boulevard, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-733-5700; balkantreatbox. com • MENU Bosnian, Turkish and other Balkan-inspired fare • HOURS 11 a.m.-3 p.m. (or until sold out) Wednesday-Sunday

The Benevolent King ★★★ WHERE 7268 Manchester Road, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-8990440; thebenevolentking.com • MENU Moroccan-inspired cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Billie-Jean ★★★½ WHERE 7610 Wydown Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7978484; billiejeanstl.com • MENU Contemporary American and Southeast Asian cuisine • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

The Boathouse at Forest Park ★★ WHERE 6101 Government Drive, Forest Park • MORE INFO 314366-1555; boathousestl.com • MENU Sandwiches, flatbread pizzas and more casual American fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Saturday, brunch Sunday

Brasswell ★★ WHERE Rockwell Beer Co., 1320 South Vandeventer Avenue • MORE INFO 314-256-1657; rockwellbeer. com • MENU Burgers, beer brats,

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Kalbi Taco Shack ★★ WHERE 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314-240-5544; kalbitacoshack.com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

WHERE 3467 Hampton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-376-4361; kneadbakehouse.com • MENU Breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m. TuesdayFriday, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. SaturdaySunday (closed Monday)

WHERE 5800 Southwest Avenue • MORE INFO 314-279-5799; 58hundred.com • MENU Bar-andgrill, comfort-food fare • HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday, lunch Monday-Friday (closed Sunday)

Balkan Treat Box ★★★

Pie Guy Pizza ★★ WHERE 4189 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-899-0444; pieguystl.com • MENU New York-style pizza • HOURS 4:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesday-Thursday, 4:30 p.m.-3:30 a.m. Friday, noon-3:30 a.m. Saturday

Knead Bakehouse + Provisions ★★½

58Hundred ★★

WHERE 7120 Montclaire Avenue, Godfrey • MORE INFO 618-4339748; bakershale.com • MENU Seasonal American fare, with pizza, tacos and more • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Saturday, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

only; closed Saturday)

chicken sandwiches and fries • HOURS 11 a.m.-10 p.m. TuesdayThursday, 11 a.m.-midnight FridaySaturday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday

Brick River Cider Co. ★★ WHERE 2000 Washington Avenue • MORE INFO 314-224-5046; brickrivercider.com • MENU Brewpub fare and cider made on site • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

Carnivore ★★ WHERE 5257 Shaw Avenue • MORE INFO 314-449-6328; carnivore-stl.com • MENU Steaks, with Italian-American dishes • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Saturday and Sunday

The Chocolate Pig ★★ WHERE 4220 Duncan Avenue • MORE INFO 314-272-3230; thechocolatepig.com • MENU Gastropub fare and an extensive dessert program • HOURS Lunch and dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

Cibare Italian Kitchen ★½ WHERE 777 River City Casino Boulevard • MORE INFO 314388-3777; www.rivercity.com/ dining/cibare-italian-kitchen • MENU Pasta, pizza and more Italian fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

Cinder House ★★★

Elmwood ★★★

Hugo’s Pizzeria ★★½

WHERE Four Seasons Hotel St. Louis, 999 North Second Street • MORE INFO 314-881-5759; cinderhousestl.com • MENU Brazilian dishes and wood-grilled meats • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

WHERE 2704 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314261-4708; elmwoodstl.com • MENU Contemporary American fare from a coal-fired kitchen • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday

WHERE 3135 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-896-4846; hugospizzeria.com • MENU Pizzas both conventional and creative • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Club Taco ★½

The Frisco Barroom ★★½

WHERE 200 North Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1488; clubtacostl.com • MENU Tacos with a variety of fillings drawn from various cuisines • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Cocina Latina ★★½

WHERE 8110 Big Bend Boulevard, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-455-1090; thefriscostl. com • MENU Classic pub fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Grand Tavern ★★

WHERE 508 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314-696-2294; facebook.com/cocinaslatina • MENU Peruvian and other South American fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

WHERE 626 North Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-405-3399; grandtavernstl.com • MENU Contemporary American fare • HOURS Dinner and breakfast daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Cork & Barrel Chophouse ★½

Hamilton’s Urban Steakhouse & Bourbon Bar ★★½

WHERE 7337 Mexico Road, St. Peters • MORE INFO 636-387-7030; corkandbarrel.com • MENU Steaks, chops and pizza • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday

The Curry Club ★★ WHERE 1635 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield • MORE INFO 636778-7777; stlcurryclub.com • MENU Southern Indian fare in a fast-casual setting • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

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WHERE 2101 Chouteau Avenue • MORE INFO 314-241-2333; hamiltonsteak.com • MENU Steaks and other chops • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday (closed Sunday and Monday)

Han Lao ★★½ WHERE 1250 Strassner Drive, Brentwood • MORE INFO 314932-1354; hanlaostl.com • MENU Lao and Thai cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

Iron Barley High Hog Ridge ★★½ WHERE 3367 High Ridge Boulevard, High Ridge • MORE INFO 636-6719911; ironbarleyshighhogridge. com • MENU Hearty comfort fare • HOURS Lunch and dinner TuesdaySaturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

J. Devoti Trattoria ★★★ WHERE 5100 Daggett Avenue • MORE INFO 314-7735553; jdevoti.com • MENU Contemporary American fare, with Italian influences • HOURS Dinner Wednesday-Saturday (closed Sunday-Tuesday)

WHERE 3855 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-319-0099; likehomestl.com • MENU French cafe fare and pastries • HOURS 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Liliana’s Italian Kitchen ★★ WHERE 11836 Tesson Ferry Road • MORE INFO 314-729-1800; lilianasitalinakitchen.com • MENU Pizza, pasta and sandwiches • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday, closed Monday

Louie ★★★

Jerk Soul ★★½ WHERE 2016 Salisbury Street • MORE INFO 314-601-3871; facebook.com/jerksoulstl • MENU Jerk chicken and more Caribbean fare • HOURS Noon-8 p.m. Sunday-Friday (carryout

WHERE 3196 South Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314266-5400; pizzaheadstl.com • MENU New York-style pizza by the slice or whole pie • HOURS Lunch Tuesday-Saturday, dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Polite Society ★★★ WHERE 1923 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-325-2553; politesocietystl. com • MENU Contemporary and classic bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Sardella ★★★½ WHERE 7734 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-7737755; sardellastl.com • MENU Contemporary fare with Italian and Californian influences • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday

Pangea ★★½ WHERE 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles • MORE INFO 636757-3579; pangeaworldfusion. com • MENU Contemporary bistro fare with global accents • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Thai Table ★★ WHERE 7403 Manchester Road, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-4496919; thaitablestl.com • MENU Thai cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily (closed Tuesday)

Union 30 ★½ WHERE Hotel St. Louis, 705 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-241-4300; hotelsaintlouis.com/union30 • MENU Casual, contemporary American fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

WHERE 4260 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-553-9239; viciarestaurant.com • MENU Modern, progressive cuisine with an emphasis on vegetables • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday

Simba Ugandan Restaurant ★★

VP Square ★★½

Sister Cities Cajun ★★½

WHERE 14025 Manchester Road • MORE INFO 636-386-8999; nippon. teistl.com • MENU Sushi and other traditional Japanese fare • HOURS Lunch Tuesday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

WHERE 2738 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314224-5799; facebook.com/ tacoandicecreamjoint • MENU Tacos and other taqueria fare, ice cream and popsicles • HOURS 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sunday

WHERE 2655 Ann Avenue • MORE INFO 314-354-8488; savagestl. com • MENU Often-changing tasting menus of local ingredients • HOURS Dinner ThursdaySunday (open at noon for drinks and limited a-la-carte menu)

Majeed Mediterranean Restaurant ★★

Nippon Tei ★★★

The Taco & Ice Cream Joint ★★½

Vicia ★★★★

WHERE 706 DeMun Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-3008188; louiedemun.com • MENU Rustic Italian fare • HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday (closed Sunday)

WHERE 4658 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-282-0981; facebook.com/majeed mediterraneanrestaurant • MENU Syrian cuisine • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

WHERE 4200 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-390-2020 • MENU A wide range of Mediterranean and Levantine dishes • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday

Savage ★★★½

WHERE 8531 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-475-5630; facebook.com/ simbaugandanrestaurant • MENU Traditional Ugandan fare • HOURS Lunch buffet and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

J. Smugs GastroPit ★★½ WHERE 2130 Macklind Avenue • MORE INFO 314-499-7488; jsmugsgastropit.com • MENU Barbecue, including pork ribs and beef brisket • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, noon-7 p.m. Sunday

Pizza Head ★★

Sultan Mediterranean Restaurant ★★★

WHERE 3550 South Broadway • MORE INFO 314-405-0447; sistercitiescajun.com • MENU Gumbo, po’boys and more • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

The Stellar Hog ★★ WHERE 5623 Leona Street • MORE INFO 314-481-8448; thestellarhog. com • MENU Barbecue featuring beef brisket and pork ribs • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Wednesday)

WHERE 3611 Juniata Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4838; facebook.com/vpsquarestl • MENU Pan-Asian cuisine, including Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese dishes • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

The Wood Shack ★★½ WHERE 1862 South 10th Street • MORE INFO 314-833-4770; thewoodshacksoulard.com • MENU Sandwiches featuring smoked meats • HOURS 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

Yellowbelly ★★½ WHERE 4659 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO yellowbellystl.com • MENU Seafood and rum-focused cocktails • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Wednesday-Sunday BY IAN FROEB

The Stone Turtle ★★ WHERE 6355 Clayton Avenue • MORE INFO 314-349-1933; stoneturtlestl.com • MENU Gastropub fare • HOURS Lunch Monday-Saturday, dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Search Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s interactive restaurant guide. stltoday.com/stl100

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P H O T O : L A U R I E S K R I VA N , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

PREVIOUSLY REVIEWED RESTAURANTS


Brisket sandwich at Twisted Ranch

The

Blue Owl Restaurant & Bakery in historic Kimmswick

Looking for a specific cuisine, price range or location? Check Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s guide to essential St. Louis restaurants.

Treat Dad to a Wonderful Homecooked Meal and Fabulous Dessert! Reservations for parties of 5 or more.

OFF THE MENU ▼

Twisted Ranch coming to Tropical Liqueurs Twisted Ranch, the Soulard restaurant that became a viral-video sensation for its ranch-dressing theme, will open a location inside Tropical Liqueurs (aka Trops) at 4104 Manchester Avenue in Forest Park Southeast’s Grove district. “The menu is still being finalized, but guests can expect to see some of their favorites along with some new flavors and items that will only be available at Trops,” Twisted Ranch cofounder and owner Chad Allen said in a statement. The counter-service Twisted Ranch is slated to debut inside Tropical Liqueurs this summer. Twisted Ranch opened in 2015 at 1730 South Eighth Street in Soulard, offering multiple varieties of ranch dressing with its fare. In 2017, a Buzzfeed video about the restaurant drew millions of views and brought crowds to the restaurant. In 2018, Twisted Ranch moved to its current Soulard location, 1731 South Seventh Street. BY IAN FROEB

P H O T O : R O B E R T C O H E N , P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Sugarfire products come to Schnucks Schnucks Markets are offering an assortment of meats and side dishes from Sugarfire Smoke House, the St. Louis-based restaurant chain. The heat-and-eat meats include several sizes of rib packages, beef brisket, pulled pork, sliced turkey, pulled chicken and, best of all, brisket burnt ends for prices ranging from $6 to $20. The side dishes — mac and cheese, baked beans,

cole slaw and potato salad — go for $3 to $8. The offerings are available in the deli and prepared food section of the stores. BY DANIEL NEMAN

Iraqi, Turkish pastries come to Affton The Affton area is home to a new restaurant featuring Iraqi and Turkish pastries. The married team of Esraa and George Simon opened Sedara Sweets & Ice Cream on Saturday at 8011 Mackenzie Road. Esraa Simon is a native of Baghdad, Iraq, and slender, cylindrical Iraqistyle baklava occupy the top shelf of one of Sedara’s bakery display cases. Heftier (relatively speaking) Turkish pastries fill out the case.

Us Join ebrate l & Ce e Mayo! D Cinco R JOIN US FOON SPECIALS

Margarita Monday

120 W Jefferson Ave Kirkwood, MO 63122 (314) 821-0877

OPEN 10AM TO 5PM FATHER’S DAY Sunday June 16 Enjoy the Car Show!

Open July 4th 10-3 www.theblueowl.com Tue-Fri 10-3 • Sat & Sun 10-5 636-464-3128

(The difference is reflected in the price: $1.99 for the Iraqi pastries, $2.99 for the Turkish.) Sedara offers more than baklava, however. As its name suggests, there is hand-scooped ice cream (made by Cedar Crest Ice Cream), and there are bagels, brownies and more baked goods. George Simon tells Off the Menu that his and Esraa’s goal is to mix Western and Eastern flavors. This is the Simons’ first restaurant. Simon says he and Esraa noticed a lot of traffic here at the intersection of Mackenzie and Heege roads, and when they saw a storefront was available, they decided to go for it.

Authentic Italian Food in a Family Atmosphere Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials! We also cater. Party Pans for a delicious meal for any size group.

Prime Rib Dinners the last weekend of every month Tues-Sat 11am-10pm • Sun Noon-9pm Closed Mon

The current hours are 8 a.m.-10 p.m. daily. The phone number is 314532-6508. BY IAN FROEB Find more St. Louis restaurant news in Off the Menu. stltoday. com/offthemenu

★stltoday.com/go Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary

5442 Old Hwy 21, Imperial

636.942.2405

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STA N LEY CU P FI NA L EDIT ION

FRIDAY • 06.07.2019 • $2.50

2

GAME 5

BLUES LEAD SERIES 3-2

1

WHAT A TRIP! 2-1 win puts Blues on verge of Cup title

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Bruins forward Noel Acciari flips after contact from the Blues’ Tyler Bozak (21), a play some believe should have drawn a penalty. Seconds later, David Perron scored the winning goal.

Blues players celebrate David Perron’s goal that made the score 2-0 midway through the third period in Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final at TD Garden in Boston on Thursday night.

GAME 1

GAME 2

GAME 3

GAME 4

GAME 5

GAME 6

GAME 7*

5/27 at Boston Bos 0 2 2 — 4 Stl 1 10 — 2 GWG: Kuraly

5/29 at Boston Stl 2 0 0 1 — 3 Bos 2 0 0 0 — 2 GWG: Gunnarsson

Sat. at Blues Bos 3 2 2 — 7 Stl 0 1 1 — 2 GWG: Kuraly

Mon. at Blues Stl 20 2 — 4 Bos 1 10 — 2 GWG: O’Reilly

Thur. at Boston Stl 0 1 1 — 2 Bos 0 0 1 — 1 GWG: Perron

7 p.m. Sunday at Blues KSDK (Ch.5)

7 p.m. Wednesday at Boston KSDK (Ch.5)

* IF NECESSARY

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1 M


STA N LEY CU P FI NA L EDIT ION

FRIDAY • 06.07.2019 • $2.50

2

GAME 5

BLUES LEAD SERIES 3-2

1

WHAT A TRIP! Victory puts Blues on verge of Cup title

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Bruins forward Noel Acciari flips backward after contact from Tyler Bozak (21) Thursday night. Whether Acciari was tripped or he embellished – or both – is subject to debate, but there’s no question the controversial play led to David Perron’s winning goal seconds later while Acciari watched from his knees.

GAME 1

GAME 2

GAME 3

GAME 4

GAME 5

GAME 6

GAME 7*

5/27 at Boston Bos 0 2 2 — 4 Stl 1 10 — 2 GWG: Kuraly

5/29 at Boston Stl 2 0 0 1 — 3 Bos 2 0 0 0 — 2 GWG: Gunnarsson

Sat. at Blues Bos 3 2 2 — 7 Stl 0 1 1 — 2 GWG: Kuraly

Mon. at Blues Stl 20 2 — 4 Bos 1 10 — 2 GWG: O’Reilly

Thur. at Boston Stl 0 1 1 — 2 Bos 0 0 1 — 1 GWG: Perron

7 p.m. Sunday at Blues KSDK (Ch.5)

7 p.m. Wednesday at Boston KSDK (Ch.5)

* IF NECESSARY

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2 M


STANLEY CUP FINAL

S2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

2

GAME 5

BLUES LEAD SERIES 3-2

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

1

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues players congratulate goalie Jordan Binnington at the end of the game after he made 38 saves in their 2-1 win Thursday night at TD Garden in Boston.

BLUES ONE AWAY FROM THE CUP Tense win at Boston is good for 3-2 series lead BLUES 2, BRUINS 1

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

Blues Boston

BOSTON

hree down, one to go. The Blues are on the doorstep of hockey history, on the brink of winning the franchise’s first Stanley Cup. Thursday’s 2-1 victory over the Boston Bruins at TD Garden gave the Blues a 3-2 lead in the best-ofseven Cup Final. They can clinch with a victory in Game 6 Sunday at Enterprise Center in St. Louis. The Blues continued their road warrior ways, winning for the ninth time in 12 away games this postseason. In the history of the Stanley Cup, only five teams have won more in a single postseason. Meanwhile, Jordan Binnington continued his own march through playoff history. His ninth road victory established an NHL record for a rookie goaltender in one postseason - he had shared the previous mark of eight with Ron Hextall (1987, for Philadelphia). And Binnington has tied the rookie record for most overall wins in one postseason at 15, a mark he now shares with four others. Zach Sanford-Ryan O’Reilly-David Perron have been a line for only 14 games - regular season and playoffs combined, but they had 13 goals and 26 as a unit in those games after a dazzling between-the-legs backhand from Sanford to O’Reilly resulted in the game’s first goal. Actually, Sanford’s pass was between two sets of legs - his own and then Boston defenseman Charlie McAvoy, with O’Reilly on the receiving end in front of the net. Just 55 seconds into the second period, O’Reilly’s backhand beat Boston goalie Tuukka Rask top shelf. It was O’Reilly’s sixth goal of the postseason, but his third goal in the last two games. For Sanford, it was his third assist in as many games since returning to the lineup in Game 3 of this final. He had been a healthy scratch the previous 18 contests, and was called off the bench only because of Oskar Sundqvist’s Game 3 suspension. Playing in his 106th game of the season, more than anyone in the NHL, O’Reilly has come on strong late in the playoffs with eight points (three goals, five assists) in his last six games. The Blues were outshot 8-6 in the pe-

0 0

1 0

1 1

— —

2 1

First Period None. Penalties: Dunn, STL, (delay of game), 6:27; Marchand, BOS, (slashing), 17:22. Second Period Blues: O’Reilly 6 (Sanford, Pietrangelo), 0:55. Penalties: Perron, STL, (interference), 9:25. Third Period Blues: Perron 7 (Bozak, O’Reilly), 10:36. Boston: DeBrusk 4 (Krug), 13:32. Penalties: Steen, STL, (interference), 3:09.

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington defends his goal as the Bruins’ David Krejci tries to shove the puck past Binnington’s pads in the third period Thursday night.

Shots on Goal Blues 8 Boston 17

6 8

7 14

— —

21 39

Power play Blues 0 of 1; Boston 0 of 3.

riod and killed off their second penalty of the night when Perron was sent off for interference against David Pastrnak at the 9:25 mark of the second. Early in the third period it became 3-for-3 on the penalty kill for St. Louis after another interference penalty, this one against Alexander Steen against David Krejci. Binnington made a key save on David Pastrnak on the power play, but Boston had a more dangerous chance on a 2-on-1 rush with McAvoy shooting wide. But the Bruins came close again when Pastrnak tried a wraparound. Krejci came in for the rebound and kept jamming away at Binnington before the play was whistled dead with 13 minutes to play. The officiating crew consulted with the NHL situation room in Toronto but there was no conclusive proof that the puck crossed the goal line. Just 1 minute and 1 second later, Colton Parayko did everything but score when his shot flicked off Rask and hit the post. Next came the defining moment in the game. Tyler Bozak was in behind Noel Acciari of the Bruins in the St. Louis offensive zone. Bozak stuck out his stick and touched the puck, Acciari fell backwards and the entire crowd and everyone on the Boston bench thought it should have been a tripping penalty. But there was no call by referees Steve

Kozari and Kelly Sutherland. Seconds later, Perron scored his seventh goal of the postseason but first of this series on a shot that deflected in off Rask. The crowd responded by showering the ice with debris. So the Blues had a 2-0 lead with 9:24 to go, but not for long. With the Blues about to get whistled for a delayed penalty, Jake DeBrusk fired from the right faceoff circle and beat Binnington far side. With 6:28 to play it was a 2-1 game and TD Garden was alive. Boston threw a lot at the Blues and Binnington in the opening minutes, outshooting St. Louis 11-2 in the first nine minutes of play. The Blues regrouped to a degree over the rest of the period but it was still 17-8 Bruins in shots after one - which would put Binnington on a 51-save pace. The Bruins got an early power play chance when Vince Dunn sent a clearing attempt into the stands 6 1/2 minutes into the game. But the Blues’ penalty kill did its job, limiting Boston to two shots. The crowd at TD Garden was jacked from the start, in part because of the return of veteran defenseman Zdeno Chara, whose status was uncertain for this game after taking a puck to the mouth in Game 4 Monday in St. Louis. Chara took part in the team’s optional morning skate and was in the starting lineup wearing protective gear that

Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 15-9 (39 shots-38 saves). Boston, Rask 14-8 (21-19). A: 17,565 (17,565). T: 2:39. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Pierre Racicot.

looked almost like a football facemask. Binnington was on his game from the outset, getting help from hockey gods when Brad Marchand hit the post with 4:49 left in the period. Marchand later found himself in the penalty box for slashing, when he poked Binnington in the stomach with his stick. But the Blues fell to 1-for-14 on the power play in this series, with only one shot on goal. (Boston also had one shot playing shorthanded.) St. Louis did have its chances, most notably Bozak on a feed from below the goal line by Pat Maroon. There was a brief delay afterwards as game officials conferred with Toronto, apparently checking if Bozak’s shot crossed the goal line. Brayden Schenn had a Grade A chance from the slot off a feed from Vladimir Tarasenko near the right points. And with just 1:28 left in the first, Rask stopped a backdoor attempt by Perron.

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STANLEY CUP FINAL

S2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

2

GAME 5

BLUES LEAD SERIES 3-2

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

1

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Brayden Schenn knocks down the Bruins’ Charlie McAvoy during the second period of Game 5 on Thursday night at TD Garden in Boston.

BLUES ONE AWAY FROM THE CUP Tense win at Boston is good for 3-2 series lead BLUES 2, BRUINS 1

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

Blues Boston

BOSTON

hree down, one to go. The Blues are on the doorstep of hockey history, on the brink of winning the franchise’s first Stanley Cup. It came cloaked in some controversy but Thursday’s 2-1 victory over the Boston Bruins at TD Garden gave the Blues a 3-2 lead in the best-ofseven Cup Final. They can clinch with a victory in Game 6 Sunday at Enterprise Center in St. Louis. Just one more win. “It’s obviously a lot of emotion that goes through your head and stuff like that,” Brayden Schenn said. “We’ve been battling all year, we’ve been grinding all year. We know what’s at stake ... and we’re gonna be ready for Game 6.” The Blues got goals from a suddenlyrevived Ryan O’Reilly and feisty David Perron. They got one of the best games yet from rookie goalie Jordan Binnington, who stopped 38 of 39 shots. In the process, Binnington continued his own march through playoff history. His ninth road victory established an NHL record for a rookie goaltender in one postseason. And he tied the NHL rookie record for most overall wins in one postseason at 15, a mark he now shares with four others. “He was excellent all game, and did a great job in the first period for sure,” coach Craig Berube said. “They came hard, Boston. We were tested in the first (period) for sure and ‘Binner’ stood tall. Big reason we won the game.” The Blues killed off three Boston power plays Thursday, making them 6-for-6 on the penalty kill since allowing four power-play goals in Game 3 Saturday. And they may have benefited most from a penalty that wasn’t called. Midway through the third period, with the Blues up 1-0, Tyler Bozak came at Boston’s Noel Acciari from behind. Bozak stuck out his stick and appeared to touch the puck, Acciari fell backward and the crowd at TD Garden, not to mention everyone on the Boston bench, thought it should have been a tripping penalty. But there was no call by referees Steve Kozari and Kelly Sutherland. Seconds later, Perron scored his seventh goal of the postseason but first of this series on an attempted pass that deflected off Boston goalie Tuukka Rask and into the net. “It’s not like something crazy was missed in my opinion,” Perron said of the no-call. “I don’t know.”

0 0

1 0

1 1

— —

2 1

First Period None. Penalties: Dunn, STL, (delay of game), 6:27; Marchand, BOS, (slashing), 17:22. Second Period Blues: O’Reilly 6 (Sanford, Pietrangelo), 0:55. Penalties: Perron, STL, (interference), 9:25. Third Period Blues: Perron 7 (Bozak, O’Reilly), 10:36. Boston: DeBrusk 4 (Krug), 13:32. Penalties: Steen, STL, (interference), 3:09. Shots on Goal Blues 8 Boston 17

6 8

7 14

— —

21 39

Power play Blues 0 of 1; Boston 0 of 3. The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko hugs goalie Jordan Binnington at the end of Game 5 after Binnington made 38 saves in a victory against the Bruins.

The crowd thought otherwise, showering the ice with debris. “It was a little puck battle,” Bozak said. “I went for the puck with my stick and it kinda got caught in his feet. I don’t know. And then we just got the puck back. DP (Perron) tried to pass it and it banked in off Rask and went in. So we’ll take it.” Bruins coach Bruce Cassidy didn’t take it - lightly, that is - when it came to the no-call. “The narrative changed after Game 3,” Cassidy said. “There’s a complaint or whatever put forth by the opposition. It just seems to have changed everything.” That was a reference to some mild complaining by Berube following his team’s 7-2 loss in Game 3 about the amount of penalties being called against the Blues. In stark contrast to Berube after the “Hand Pass” game against San Jose, when the Blues coach said very little about that blown call in overtime, Cassidy had plenty to say about the Bozak no-call. “Their player is on his way to the box,” Cassidy said. “It’s right in front of the official. ... The spotter took (Acciari) out of the game for a possible concussion. I mean, it’s blatant. It had a big effect on the game.” Cassidy went on to say that the NHL is “getting a black-eye” with their play-

off officiating and said the no-call on Bozak was “egregious.” The NHL eventually apologized for the blown call on the hand pass by San Jose. At the start of the Cup Final, commissioner Gary Bettman said his head almost exploded when he saw that play. There were no apologies from the NHL on Thursday night. NHL senior vice president and director of officiating Stephen Walkom said this about Thursday’s no-call to a pool reporter after the game: “We don’t make comments on judgment calls within games. There are hundreds of judgment calls in every game. The official on the play, he viewed it and he didn’t view it as a penalty at the time.” So the Blues had a 2-0 lead with 9:24 to go, but not for long. With the Blues about to get whistled for a delayed penalty, Jake DeBrusk fired from the right faceoff circle and beat Binnington. With 6:28 to play it was a 2-1 game and TD Garden came alive. But the Blues weathered the storm down the stretch, continuing their road warrior ways. It was their ninth victory in 12 away games this postseason. In the history of the Stanley Cup, only five teams have won more in a single postseason. “Probably not as pretty as we’d like it to be, but we gutted it out and got

Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 15-9 (39 shots-38 saves). Boston, Rask 14-8 (21-19). A: 17,565 (17,565). T: 2:39. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Pierre Racicot.

the job done,” Schenn said. “Binner played unbelievable for us. They took it to us for most of that game. We sat back maybe a little too much, and we’re gonna have to change that for Game 6.’ Bozak agreed. “They pushed hard in the first, the second and the third,” he said. “I think Binner really held it down for us. And we got a couple late for him.” Well, actually the game’s first goal O’Reilly’s - came just 55 seconds into the second period. The line of Zach Sanford-O’ReillyPerron has been together for only 14 games - regular season and playoffs combined, but they ended Game 5 with 14 goals and 27 assists in those games with the first goal coming on a dazzling between-the-legs backhand pass from Sanford to O’Reilly. Actually, Sanford’s pass was between two sets of legs - his own and then Boston defenseman Charlie McAvoy, with O’Reilly on the receiving end in front of the net. O’Reilly’s backhand beat Rask top shelf. And helped put the Blues just one win away from hockey history.


06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

STANLEY CUP FINAL

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • S3


S4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STANLEY CUP FINAL

M 1 • FRIDAY • 06.07.2019

THE GOALIE IS GOLDEN

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington stops a wraparound attempt by the Bruins’ Brad Marchand as Colton Parayko defends during the third period Thursday night at TD Garden in Boston.

Bruins are on the brink because Jordan Binnington wouldn’t fold BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BOSTON

B

efore the trash fell toward the ice like snow, and before fans wearing the same colors turned on one another in the stands, and before a city with a championship pedigree became one on the brink, Marcus Johansson’s reaction said it all. The left-handed shot of the Bruins forward launched early in the third period was a screaming missile, the kind of laser that can make a goalie look like he’s buffering until the shot is buried in the net behind him. Jordan Binnington never moved. He wasn’t frozen. He was already in the perfect position. Binnington’s glove snapped shut around the puck. He didn’t react. Johansson did. The frustrated Bruin on his team’s silent second line looked up toward the rafters of TD Garden, where six championship banners hang, as if to ask the hockey gods why this goalie would not give, why he was somehow getting better as this series aged. Johansson bent over at the waist. His hands rested on his knees. Boston was showing signs of cracking, and the most important moments of Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final had not yet arrived. These Blues are one win away from lifting Lord Stanley’s Cup for the first time, one win away from becoming legends forever, thanks to their 2-1 win against Boston at TD Garden on Thursday night. They won because David Perron kept playing when everyone else paused to wonder if Tyler Bozak’s leg whip of Noel Acciari would turn into a penalty. It didn’t, and Perron — the player some thought should be benched because he keeps taking penalties — made it a 2-0 game in the third. They won because Zach Sanford, who watched the last games played here in Boston from press row alongside Post-Dispatch reporters as a healthy scratch, made a jaw-dropping first-period pass to teammate Ryan O’Reilly, who is playing like a man possessed. Sanford’s no-look pass zipped not just between his legs, but also the legs of Charlie McAvoy before O’Reilly flashed past Jake DeBrusk to beat goalie Tuukka Rask. But more than anything, they won because Binnington once again continued to strengthen his grip on the throat of an opponent as a postseason series ages. He blanketed Boston until the third period, gave the Bruins one breath when DeBrusk

scored with 13:32 to play, and then took hope away once more. In the biggest game in Blues history until Game 6, Binnington tied his hero Patrick Roy (1986) as one of four goalies who have 15 playoff wins as a rookie. The Blues are now 7-1 in Games 5, 6 and 7 this postseason. The biggest reason wears No. 50. Binnington set his postseason high of 38 saves on 39 shots in a display that included a stuffed wraparound that stood the test of a review, multiple pucks he punched out of the air, saves he made while he was being pushed out of his goal, and saves made while he was trying to push Bruins out of his goal. The first period belonged to Binnington. He smoothed things over better than a Zamboni. The Bruins out-shot the Blues 17-8 while out-hitting them 23-18. From the moment when Bruins captain Zdeno Chara, inspiring his team by playing with a broken jaw, slammed Brayden Schenn into the wall as if to prove his health,the B’s were on the attack. The Blues iced the puck to save time. They gave Boston a power play because they sent a puck into the stands to save time. When Brad Marchand, who ripped four shots and put two on goal in that period, zoomed into Binnington after a save to give him a poke with his stick, you had to wonder how long he could hold up. Why do we keep wondering? Schenn got juked out of his skates in the first period. Alexander Steen got his stick taken away from him. Pat Maroon, pointless in six games entering this one, could not net his shot on a prime breakaway. Noel Acciari leveled Alex Pietrangelo. Torey Krug crushed Steen. Binnington wiped it all away. The Blues found their game in the second period, starting with Vladimir Tarasenko’s blitz toward the net as soon as the puck dropped. The Blues, rolling their lines in short shifts, created offensive zone time and stressful scoring chances thanks to their enthusiastic forecheck. The constant was Binnington. He got some luck, like when pucks hit posts and one ricochet split his legs. He got some help, like when Carl Gunnarsson’s diving save with fewer than two minutes left cleared a puck from the crease as Binnington scrambled for his blocker. More than anything, he got the Blues to a place they have never been before. He reset his choke-hold after DeBrusk beat him, one again turning a frenzied crowd into a frustrated one. He made his final save on Krug with seven seconds left in the game. Boston fans were already trickling toward the exits by then. Binnington had broken them, and maybe their team.

LET’S GO

BLUES

TEAM PHYSICIANS for the ST. LOUIS BLUES and YOU


S4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STANLEY CUP FINAL

M 2 • FRIDAY • 06.07.2019

THE GOALIE IS GOLDEN

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington stops a wraparound attempt by the Bruins’ Brad Marchand as Colton Parayko defends during the third period Thursday night at TD Garden in Boston.

Bruins are on the brink because Jordan Binnington wouldn’t fold BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BOSTON

M

arcus Johansson’s reaction was a sign. It will get lost, of course, because Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final went mad. The story will shift to the men on the ice we are not supposed to notice, because that’s what happens when a league can’t seem to figure out how to find officials who can keep up with the cameras that catch what human eyes miss. The discussion will stick on Tyler Bozak’s trip of Noel Acciari, and how and why things might have changed if a missed penalty didn’t help the Blues take a two-goal third-period lead in a game they won 2-1. There’s just one problem there. That story completely ignores the beginning and the end, and forgets to mention the main character. The Blues are not one win away from lifting the Stanley Cup for the first time because of a non-call. They are not one win away from becoming legends forever because a trip was missed. They left here 60 minutes away from a curse lifted because of a 25-year-old who wears No. 50. Jordan Binnington is doing it again. The Blues’ rookie goalie is once more choking the life out of another playoff opponent as a series reaches its most crucial point. Johansson told us so. Before the Blues had to dodge water bottles, before discarded rally towels fell toward the ice like snow, before fans wearing black and gold went from trading high-fives to exchanging haymakers, Johansson offered a tell. The Bruins were trailing 1-0 when the forward on Boston’s silent second line found a wide-open lane and launched his left-handed shot toward Binnington. It was the kind of shot that can make a goalie look like he’s buffering until the goal horn sounds. Binnington indeed looked frozen. The goalie never moved. Didn’t need to. He was already in the perfect position. Save made. Easy. Seven and a half minutes into a third period that was about to spiral into madness, Johansson responded to Binnington’s save by looking toward the rafters of TD Garden, where the banners of the Bruins and the Celtics hang, as if to ask the sports gods of this championshiprich city if they have ever encountered an opponent like this. Johansson bent at his

waist. He looked at his skates. His hands rested on his knees. And there it was, a sign of the crack before the chaos. We will never know for sure what would have happened if Bozak’s trip of Acciari — a missed penalty but one that was not as obvious as some will make it seem — would have been called. We can, however, take an educated guess. The team with the better goalie would have won the game. Advantage, Blues. The Blues won, in part, because a whistle did not blow. They won, in part, because David Perron was the only player on the ice who played until the whistle did blow. They won because Zach Sanford, a Boston-area native who watched the first two games of this series from the press box alongside PostDispatch scribes as a healthy scratch, made a jaw-dropping first-period pass to teammate Ryan O’Reilly. But more than anything, the Blues won because Binnington plays for the Blues. Binnington blanketed Boston until the third. He gave the Bruins one single breath when Jake DeBrusk’s one-timer from the circle hit the net with 6:28 to play. And then the goalie ripped hope away again. Against a team that had found new life, beneath the roar of a crowd that was foaming at the mouth, Binnington faced five more shots on goal before the game’s end. He stopped them all. Sean Kuraly tried and failed. Charlie McAvoy tried and failed. John More tried and failed. Torey Krug tried and failed. Twice. In the biggest game in Blues history until Sunday, Binnington tied his hero Patrick Roy (1986) as one of four goalies who have 15 playoff wins as a rookie. The Blues are now 7-1 in Games 5, 6 and 7 this postseason. Their goalie is slamming the door closed again. He’s made 59 saves on 62 shots in back-toback wins. Thursday night’s 38 saves on 39 shots was his postseason best. Binnington’s display included a stuffed wraparound that stood the test of a review, multiple pucks he punched out of the air, saves he made while he was being pushed out of his goal, and saves made while he was trying to push Bruins out of his goal. Most importantly, the goalie who pulled this season away from the edge of disaster led the Blues to the precipice of immortality. His final save came against Krug with seven seconds left. Boston fans were already trickling toward the exits by then. One young Bruins fan flashed the goalie a middle finger. No. 50 was No. 1.

LET’S GO

BLUES

TEAM PHYSICIANS for the ST. LOUIS BLUES and YOU


STANLEY CUP FINAL

06.07.2019 • FRIDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • S5

PLAY ONE FOR BERNIE Long-suffering fans, like Federko, are nearing the unthinkable BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BOSTON

T

he night before Game 5, on the quiet, narrow streets of Boston’s old Italian area, noise spilled out of one of the North End restaurants. Just what was going on in there? As you walked closer, you began to make out the sound. Could it be? Yep, it was “Gloria.” And inside, there was Blues legend Bernie Federko, the Hall of Famer, a great grin across his famous face. He was responsible for the request – talked the owner into it – and Federko and some other Blues folks soaked it all in. A night later, so did all of St. Louis. Blues 2, Bruins 1. Game 5 in Boston. It was, unequivocally, the greatest win in the history of St. Louis Blues history … yet, it could get bumped down to No. 2 on Sunday. Each win means more than the last. The Blues will host Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final, and if the Blues win, they win the Stanley Cup. It’s happening. History is happening. The fellows with the white gloves will bring Lord Stanley’s Cup to the Enterprise Center on Sunday. To think, the Cardinals’ famed Game 6 in the 2011 World Series could have company in regard to greatest games. Closing out a series, so many in sports say, is always the hardest task. But the Blues have two shots at it now. If they need the second one. It’s been a series defined by tough plays, starting in Game 1 when a helmet-less Torey Krug avoided a charging penalty and obliterated Blues rookie Robert Thomas, who hasn’t played since. But a non-call in Game 5 will be remembered – Tyler Bozak’s arguable trip on Noel Acciari. There wasn’t a call, and the Blues scored in the following seconds. The crowd booed, threw items onto the ice, and booed some more. The Bruins got the goal back with 6:28 left, but that only cut the lead to 2-1. With about two minutes left, the Bruins had a near-chance to score, but Carl Gunnarsson, the same Blue who scored the overtime winner in Boston, got his stick in the crease to stop a puck from slipping in. The loud Boston fans, naturally, cheered and cheered (and cheered) for

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues center Ryan O’Reilly looks for a teammate in front of the net during the second period Thursday night. O’Reilly scored the first goal, his third of the series.

Chara. Zdeno Chara, the towering captain, played with a reported broken jaw and inspired the city in the way Willis Reed did New York, coming out for Game 7 of the 1970 NBA Finals. The first period was exactly what the Blues didn’t want – Boston creating offense, peppering Jordan Binnington and even getting a power play. But the Blues

survived and kept it scoreless. The Bruins utilized the final line change and a booming crowd to confuse the Blues. Boston tallied 17 shots in the first period and created 13 categorized scoring chances, per NaturalStattrick.com. Though the Blues tallied seven shots and all were scoring chances. When the Blues shot, they were high-quality

shots. Credit the Blues coaches and players for the infusion of energy and strategy. Before the Olympia ice resurfacer could be completely parked, the Blues already had a breakaway, thanks to the intense speed of Vladimir Tarasenko. He couldn’t score, but the statement was made. The Blues were rejuvenated. Forty seconds later … goal. Ryan O’Reilly scored it, but we’ll remember it because of the Zach Sanford pass. Backhand – between his legs … and the defender’s. O’Reilly did the rest. As the period extended, the Blues didn’t have the same offensive prowess, but the Blues smothered the Bruins’ time and space, time and again. Boston only had eight shots in the second period. Sanford’s story is incredible. He grew up a Bruins fan in New Hampshire. He said Thursday morning that his parents decorated the basement with a lot of Bruins stuff – including the famous Bobby Orr photo, against the Blues, from the 1970 Stanley Cup Final. Sanford even ran a victory lap in his buddy’s neighborhood after the Bruins won the Cup in 2011. But now he’s a Blue. And his father died right before this season began. Now Sanford is playing in the Cup Final against his boyhood heroes. The Blues have struggled on the penalty kill during the Final – of Boston’s 15 goals, only six had come five-on-five. But after two periods, the Blues killed both penalties, and the second one, holy moly, the Blues looked like the Bruins. It took Boston nearly 80 seconds to even get set up in the Blues defensive zone. With less than a minute left in the second period, Boston’s David Krejci found himself alone in front of the goal, while the Blues’ Alex Pietrangelo had a direct shot. Krejci saved the puck with his body, an amazing play. Earlier this series, passionate Blues fan Jon Hamm was asked about his childhood St. Louis sports fandom. The Emmy-winning actor from “Mad Men” put the Blues winning the Cup in perspective by comparing it to his childhood as a Cardinals fan. “In ‘82,” he said, “my dad took me to Game 1 and Game 7. We lost Game 1 and won Game 7. I didn’t know what to do. I was a Cardinal fan in the 1970s – I didn’t think we were ever going to go to the World Series, much less win it. I was just kind of running around, I didn’t know what to do, randomly screaming. No one did! I think if this happens, it’s going to be that times infinity.”

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STANLEY CUP FINAL

06.07.2019 • FRIDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • S5

WHAT NERVES? Binnington puts long-suffering fans, like Federko, on Cup doorstep BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BOSTON

J

ordan Binnington stood in a quiet TD Garden hallway plastered with posterboards, decorated with wellwishes for the Bruins by sweet schoolchildren whose souls this man had crushed. He had just stopped 38 of 39 Boston shots, won Game 5 on the road and said live on ESPN, when asked what makes him nervous, that “when you find out, you let me know.” And now, the Blues goalie was here, all alone, asked to put it all in perspective. “I’m a loyal guy,” Binnington said softy, talking about both St. Louis and the Blues. “The fan base is incredible. I love being part of a team. As a goalie, you just try to be there for when the team needs you, and trust them to do their job – and they’ve been incredible. I’m happy I could be of help for them. … We have each other’s backs.” In the latest biggest game in franchise history, Binnngton had everyone’s back. Blues 2, Bruins 1. The Blues will host Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Final, and if the Blues win they win the Stanley Cup. It’s unbelievable. It’s unfathomable. It’s happening. The fellows with the white gloves will bring Lord Stanley’s Cup to the Enterprise Center on Sunday. Magical words in St. Louis. The night before Game 5, on the quiet, narrow streets on Boston’s old Italian area, noise spilled out of one of the North End restaurants. Just what was going on in there? As you walked closer, you began to make out the sound. Could it be? Yep, it was “Gloria.” And inside, there was Blues legend Bernie Federko, the Hall of Famer, a great grin across his famous face. He was responsible for the request – talked the owner into it – and Federko and some other Blues folks soaked it all in. A night later, so did all of St. Louis. Now, closing out a series, so many in sports say, is always the hardest task. But the Blues have two shots at it now. Or they might not need them both. “We’ve got a job to do here,” captain Alex Pietrangelo said, when asked about the emotions building toward Game 6. “We still have to win our next game. We still have a lot of things that we can get

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues center Ryan O’Reilly looks for a teammate in front of the net during the second period Thursday night. O’Reilly scored the first goal, his third of the series.

better at. I know you’re probably looking for some big emotion – and don’t get me wrong, we’re all happy we’re in this spot – but we’ll take tonight and regroup tomorrow and get ready for Sunday.”

The Blues sure don’t want to return back to Boston, where they got away with a trip and ran away with Game 5 in their sweaty hockey bags. It’s been a series defined by tough plays, starting all the way back to Game

1, when a helmet-less Torey Krug avoided a charging penalty and obliterated Blues rookie Robert Thomas, who hasn’t played since. But a non-call in Game 5 will be remembered – Tyler Bozak’s arguable trip on Noel Acciari. There wasn’t a call, and the Blues scored in the following seconds. The TD Garden crowd booed, threw items onto the ice, and booed some more. The Bruins got the goal back with 6:28 left, but that only cut the lead to 2-1, ultimately the final score. The Blues bruise. They’re tough, unfazed, and they throw four lines at opponents – basically, they’re out-Bostoning Boston. “It wasn’t our best game of the series, but sometimes your goalie is going to make some big saves, especially early on to change the momentum,” Pietrangelo said. “He did that, and I thought we played a lot better in the second period there. We had some good looks.” The first period was exactly what the Blues didn’t want – Boston creating offense, peppering Binnington and even getting a power play. But the Blues survived and kept it scoreless. Credit the coaches and players for the infusion of energy and strategy. Before the Olympia ice resurfacer could be parked following the first intermission, the Blues already had a breakaway chance, thanks to the intense speed of Vladimir Tarasenko. He didn’t score, but the statement was made. The Blues were rejuvenated. Forty second later … goal. Ryan O’Reilly scored it, but we’ll remember it because of the Zach Sanford pass. Backhand. Between his legs … and the defender’s. O’Reilly did the rest. David Perron, a hated Blue in Boston, scored the winning goal. The Blues are coming home with a chance to win their first Cup. Earlier this series, passionate Blues fan Jon Hamm was asked about his childhood St. Louis sports fandom. The Emmy-winning actor from “Mad Men” put the Blues winning the Cup in perspective by comparing it to his childhood as a Cardinals fan. “In ‘82,” he said, “my dad took me to Game 1 and Game 7. We lost Game 1 and won Game 7. I didn’t know what to do. I was a Cardinal fan in the 1970s – I didn’t think we were ever going to go to the World Series, much less win it. I was just kind of running around, I didn’t know what to do, randomly screaming. No one did! I think if this happens, it’s going to be that times infinity.”

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S6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STANLEY CUP FINAL

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

SCENES FROM GAME 5

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues forward Ryan O’Reilly flips a puck to a young fan before the start of Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final on Thursday at TD Garden in Boston.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Mike Dixon of Belleville cheers during the watch party at Enterprise Center, which hosted another sellout crowd.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Crystal Peairs watches nervously during the first period at the Enterprise Center watch party.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Andi Malick, left, celebrates with Nina and Charlie Harris after Ryan O’Reilly scored early in the second period.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington gets some help from defenseman Vince Dunn in clearing a puck from the front of the net during the second period of Game 5 on Thursday at TD Garden. Binnington stopped 37 of 38 shots in the Blues’ 2-1 victory.

Subscribe for every cold, icy detail at STLtoday.com/subscribenow


S6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STANLEY CUP FINAL

M 2 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

SCENES FROM GAME 5

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues players congratulate goalie Jordan Binnington after their 2-1 win Thursday night at TD Garden in Boston. Binnington stopped 38 shots in his 15th win of the postseason.

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Kelly Copein dances in her “Gloria” shirt while celebrating the Blues’ 2-1 victory with friends at Duke’s Bar in Soulard on Thursday night.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Vincent Schmitz, left, and Ben Gliedt celebrate David Perron’s goal Thursday at the Enterprise Center watch party for Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final. The Blues could win the franchise’s first Cup on home ice Sunday.

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Fans react to David Perron’s goal while watching the game at Duke’s Bar in Soulard.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Boston’s Charlie McAvoy ties up Blues forward Jaden Schwartz on Thursday at TD Garden. The Bruins outhit the Blues 43-34 in Game 5.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

David Perron tries to get to a loose puck in front of Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask early in Game 5. Perron scored midway through the third period to give the Blues a 2-0 lead.


STANLEY CUP FINAL

06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • S7

NOTEBOOK

LEADERSHIP FROM CHARA 42-year-old captain plays through pain; Backes is a healthy scratch BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

BOSTON • Zdeno Chara took a puck to

the face in the second period of Game 4, may have broken his jaw, and on Thursday night, he was back in the lineup for Game 5. Fellow defenseman Matt Grzelcyk, out since entering the concussion protocol after a hit by Oskar Sundqvist in Game 2, did not return to the lineup. With uncertainty over how much Chara would be able to play, the Bruins dressed seven defensemen, also sending out Steven Kampfer. That meant Boston had to drop a forward, and former Blues captain David Backes was the odd man out. Chara’s status was the mystery of the day. He took the ice for the team’s optional morning skate, moving at half speed through practice. Coach Bruce Cassidy said Chara and Grzelcyk would be game-time decisions. Grzelcyk spoke to the media and said, “If I’m in, I’m going to be ready to play and I’ll be excited to join the guys again.” Chara, meanwhile, couldn’t speak. He answered, in writing, two questions asked by the Professional Hockey Writers Association through the Bruins public relations staff. Q: What’s your biggest challenge in skating with this type of injury? A: “At this time of the playoffs, everyone has injuries and there are challenges that you have to overcome to play. I’m no different than any player on either team.” Q: How do you weigh the risk of further injury when deciding whether to play? A: “You don’t think about that. You think about playing. You don’t go into a game thinking you might get hurt.” Just his presence on the ice in the morning was enough to spur on his teammates. “When you hear the stories of how he was brought up,” Bruins forward Brad Marchand said, “he was brought up as a tough, hard-working person. Very respectful. So it doesn’t surprise me at all to see him — I don’t think it surprised anyone to see him out there. He wants to win more than anything, and he shows that every single night. You never know what he’s playing through — he keeps everything quiet and to him, and he’s not worried about complaining about injuries or anything like that. He’s willing to play with one leg, one arm.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Bruins defenseman Zdeno Chara battles for a puck against Vladimir Tarasenko during the first period of Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final on Thursday. Speculation after Game 4 was that a broken jaw would keep Chara from skating for the remainder of the series.

It doesn’t matter. He’s out there working as hard as he can and sacrificing his body because he knows, at the end of the day, you win — it’s worth everything you go through. Not everyone has that. You can’t teach that, you can’t push that on people. It’s either in you or it’s not. He’s able to play through pain — a lot more pain than most people. Probably anyone in this league. It’s incredible to see. I know I couldn’t do what he does. So you have a lot of respect for him, watching what he puts himself through and how he just goes about his business.” “Much is made of his professionalism, his toughness, his approach,” defenseman John Moore said. “But until you see that in the flesh, you have a whole other level of appreciation for it. The guy’s 42. When I’m 42, I’m cer-

tainly not going to be the first guy in the gym, weighing all my food, squatting the most on the team. Those are all the things you respect. You throw in the fact that what he’s going through — that’s something I’ll tell my kids about. Life lessons I’ll carry long beyond hockey.” Chara got a thunderous and extended ovation when he was introduced in the starting lineup before the game, standing on the ice with a helmet with a football-style mouth guard but no visor. In the morning, he skated with a full visor. Backes had played just 9:09 in Game 4, the least ice time for any Bruin other than Chara. He had no points in the first four games and was a healthy scratch earlier in the playoffs, for the last two games of the first-round series with Toronto and the first three games of the next round with Columbus.

CONVENIENT STOP Playing in a Stanley Cup Final has been a big thrill for Blues forward Zach Sanford, and it’s also been pretty convenient since he grew up in the Boston area and his family is still here. “It’s pretty cool,” he said. “They don’t really have too travel to go to the away games. My family’s been at all the games so far, even when I haven’t played. So they’ve been so supportive.” He’s also heard from friends he grew up with. “I’ve even gotten some texts they hope I do well but they want to the Bruins to win,” he said. “But I think they’re slowly shifting over to becoming Blues fans.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

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S8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

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BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across 1 Sponsor’s purchase 8 Opportunities to watch the big game? 15 “You said it!” 16 Befuddled 17 Conversation, some say 18 Potential consequence of time travel 19 Useful piece of code 20 Dessert traditionally served with an RC Cola in the South 22 “The ottle ___” (short story by Robert Louis Stevenson) 23 Disappointing RSVPs

25 Acts like an ass? 26 Ring site 27 Some diving positions 29 F1 neighbor 30 As low as you can go 31 Historical subject of a Verdi opera 33 Powerful engine 35 Festival display 37 Bargain 38 No-goodnik 42 Impales 46 Stopped lying 47 In the style of 49 Treasure 50 Staying power 51 Virtual community admin 53 Zola title heroine

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAMES June 7 WORD — MYELITIS (MYELITIS: my-eh-LYE-tis: Inflammation of the spinal cord.) Average mark 30 words. Time limit 35 minutes. Can you find 38 or more words in MYELITIS? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — ESPOUSED used suds epode deep sued epos depose suede seed does peso seep dope pose soup dose posse souse douse pseudo sped dues puss speed dupe opus spouse updo spud RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

54 Long shot, typically 55 Emergency alert 57 Classic sports cars 58 Titular woodcutter of a folk tale 60 Bygone brand of weight-loss pills 62 Record collection? 63 Increase in interest 64 “Now you listen to me!” 65 Peacock feature

Down 1 “Driving Miss Daisy” setting 2 One with no class? 3 Any character with a token in Clue 4 Doll 5 Fall guy? 6 Ingredient in some chips 7 Automaker Bugatti who reportedly said “I make my cars to go, not to stop” 8 It might prevent a spill 9 First name in erotica 10 Get on 11 Palindromic exclamation 12 Record holder

Puzzle by Trenton Charlson

13 CW sitcom/ horror drama about a medical examiner who eats brains 14 Dr. Ruth, for one 21 Cartoonist Thomas 24 See 28-Down 26 Kip spender 28 Destination of one with a 24-Down

30 Its headquarters are at 30 Rockefeller Plaza 32 Band aid 34 Hall monitors, for short 36 Recess appointment? 38 “Yesterday” and “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” e.g. 39 Biological rings 40 Boxer rebellion?

41 If not 43 Zips one’s lip 44 Spicy Chinese dish with peanuts 45 Ingredient in some chips 48 Blood lines 51 Dry 52 Friend of Thomas the Tank Engine 55 Instance 56 “Bones” 59 “Poppycock!” 61 ___ Peacock

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0503

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR FRIDAY, JUNE 7, 2019: This year, you open up to a change of pace or lifestyle. You become more enthusiastic about your day-to-day interactions. If you’re single, you could meet someone on the bus to work or when taking off on a mini trip. You could be delighted by this person’s funloving and experience-oriented style. If you’re attached, the two of you might take a seminar on how to communicate better, or decide on a massage class together. This class or happening will only bring you closer and add to your bond. At the same time, you will understand each other even more. LEO loves to entice you to join them! ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) HHHH Your playfulness takes you down an interesting path. Use care when eyeing an important expense or financial matter. You feel more connected than you have in a long time. Tonight: Add in some naughtiness. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) HHHH You could be overly tired and dragging your feet over a sudden event. You can handle what is going on, knowing how it will turn out. Your confidence helps others remain confident. Tonight: Happily head home first. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) HHHHH Speak your mind, but do not be surprised at another person’s reaction. You will have a colorful conversation as a result. What is clear is that both of you are ready for the weekend. Tonight: At your favorite haunt. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) HHHH Be aware of the costs of making an expenditure. You might want to consider saying no rather than getting too involved in deciding about this object. Your final reaction could be a surprise, not only to others but to you. Tonight: Invite a friend to join you. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) HHHHH Your energy draws many people toward you. You surprise a boss, older friend or relative, and this person might be highly reactive. Demonstrate your caring in such a way that others can receive your message. Tonight: All smiles.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) HHH Step back and be less reactive. You can get a lot done if you so choose. If you have plans, do not change them. You might need to recharge your energy. The unexpected could trigger a strong reaction. Tonight: A must appearance. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) HHHHH Make a point of following your friends. They seem to have a strong opinion about what needs to happen. You have been juggling the pros and cons for a while. The end results depend on how you handle pressure. Tonight: Out celebrating. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) HHH Others look at what is happening around you. They wish they had the respect of others that you have. You deal with an erratic relationship with ease and a big smile. You know what to do. Be positive about what is happening. Tonight: Out. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22DEC. 21) HHHHH Reach out to a loved one at a distance. You love hearing from this person and catching up on others’ news. You could find that you are unusually high-strung, even for you. Try to squeeze in some exercise. Tonight: Calm down and TGIF. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) HHHHH Your closeness to a key associate or partner could make all the difference in how you handle a dynamic change. You also view this person as insightful, especially around funds. Get together for a late lunch meeting, which could easily go to the end of the day. Tonight: Only with favorite people. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) HHHH Others naturally seek you out. Right now, you are searching for a special friend whom you often confide in and get feedback from. You could find today’s path hectic. An unexpected development could easily distract you. Of late, you have found that an element of your personal or domestic life is out of sync. Tonight: TGIF. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) HHHH You might decide to veer from your routine. You will schedule appointments for yourself. You might not be in the mood to socialize as much as you are to clear your desk or complete a project that is close to your heart. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise. BORN TODAY Vice President Mike Pence (1959), musician Prince (1958), singer Tom Jones (1940)

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

MYIDL RIBEK NAACLO SIRINA ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans. here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: POISE DINKY LETTER CANARY Answer: The best pitcher in baseball would stay with his current team if they could — STRIKE A DEAL


06.07.2019 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

Woman still grieves for stillborn baby DEAR ABBY • My aunt had a stillborn baby 20 years ago. At the time, I was a teenager. Ever since then she has lived a morbid lifestyle — like you’d see in a scary movie. After the first year, she threw a party with a cake for all of us, and wanted us to sing “Happy Birthday” to a baby that never lived. When my grandfather died recently, she made sure the preacher announced that my grandfather also had another grandchild. I found out that when her cat died she kept it in the house for several days because she didn’t want to let it go. It bothers us a lot, because she acts like she is the victim in life and tries to make people feel guilty for being happy. How do we talk to her? — Crystal in Nevada Dear Crystal • Your aunt should have sought grief counseling

after she lost her baby. That she would throw a birthday party a year later and expect everyone to participate as if the child had lived is truly sad. Because you and your relatives feel she still hasn’t gotten beyond the tragedy, those closest to her should suggest she talk with a therapist now or join a support group. That said, I am not sure her wish that her little angel be mentioned at your grandfather’s funeral was out of line. Although the baby was stillborn, I’m sure the loss was grieved by your grandfather as well as your aunt. Dear Abby • Our oldest son has had a girlfriend for almost two years. She’s a lovely, kind and quality person, the type you would want him to marry. The problem I’m having is that I have slipped and called her by the name of his former girlfriend.

This happens sometimes during casual conversation, especially when I’m not concentrating. I have tried to be careful because I don’t want to hurt her or my son’s feelings, but sadly, I have. I know she has heard me at least a couple of times. I have no affinity for the former girlfriend. Abby, this is damaging my relationship with my son and his girlfriend although she is too classy to say a word. What do I do? — Heartbroken in New England Dear Heartbroken • When it happens again — and it may — apologize, explain that it’s embarrassing, and you don’t know why it happens. Then THANK her for being as classy as she has been about it. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

MISS MANNERS

An even split? Opt for separate checks Dear Miss Manners • My friends and I, all professionals, have been meeting periodically for lunch for over 20 years. From the beginning, we split the bill four ways. Perhaps the assumption was that it would all even out over time, but it has not. There are clear subsidizers and subsidizees. (Yes, I am a subsidizer.) Occasionally, a subsidizee will contribute a few extra dollars. Otherwise, we continue to split the bill evenly. No one complains, and no one is trying to take advantage. We all enjoy one another’s company very much. Unexpectedly, at the end of a recent lunch, our waitress cheerfully asked if we would like separate checks. I responded, “Yes, please.” My friend, who styles himself as The Nicest Guy You Know, chastised me, saying that separate checks would place an extra burden on the waitress. I replied that she would not have offered if that were so. The waitress left and returned

shortly with four checks. I must ask that Miss Manners assume that my friend’s motivation was solely concern for the waitress. Was he nevertheless being overprotective, or was I inconsiderate, as he claims? Gentle Reader • If the waitress is offering to perform a service — one that is much needed — why would you not graciously take her up on it? It is probably not convenient for her to write down numerous food substitutions either, but she does it. Or the restaurant will take a stand against it and clearly state so. Dear Miss Manners • Sadly, my fiance’s father passed away last week. Despite having told his grown children that my fiance’s ex-wife should not come to the funeral, she showed up anyway. Before his father’s dementia got to the point that he didn’t know people, he wanted nothing to do with this woman. My fiance’s oldest sister had stayed

TV FRIDAY

friendly with her, and in the last two years has invited her to visit. In the 10-plus years since their divorce, my fiance has sacrificed going to grandchildren’s birthday parties in order to avoid her. Am I wrong for being upset that both my fiance and his father have been so blatantly disrespected? Gentle Reader • Not wrong, just too late. If the ex-wife has already attended the funeral, Miss Manners does not foresee you getting much satisfaction out of being upset in the aftermath. If your fiance’s relationship with his sister is not such that he can ask her to help him with an uncomfortable situation, then proceeding as you have — avoiding the ex-wife as best you can — seems to be the only recourse.

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 6/7/19

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Beat Shazam Beauty 2 queens; sanitation workers. (cc)

MasterChef The fight FOX 2 News at 9:00pm into the top 20 contin- (N) (cc) ues. (cc)

CBS Whistleblower: Sea 4 World. (N) (cc)

Hawaii Five-0 McGar- Blue Bloods: Disrupted. rett investigates a cold A run-in with commucase. nity activists.

NBC American Ninja Warrior: Atlanta City Qualifiers. Dateline NBC (N) (cc) 5 Drew Drechsel and more. (cc) PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc) CW 11

Send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.

Brain Secrets With Dr. Michael Merzenich Maintaining cognitive fitness. (cc)

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

ÍBrainWorks Functions of the human brain.

Masters of Masters of The Big Illusion (N) Illusion (N) Stage (N) (cc) (cc) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Green Acres (cc)

The Big Stage (N) (cc)

Hogan’s Hogan’s Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Jimmy Kimmel 30 Live (N)

NBA Count- Í2019 NBA Finals: Toronto Raptors at Golden down State Warriors. (N) (cc)

ION 46

NCIS: Los Angeles Granger interrogates Jennifer Kim.

NCIS: Los Angeles Se- NCIS: Los Angeles An cret files are stolen at a extremist group takes fire scene. over a school.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 06.07.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

DR. KEITH ROACH

Surgery is valid fix for sleep disorder Dear Dr. Roach • My son, who is 30 years old, was recently diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea and currently uses a CPAP machine. He does not want to use this for the rest of his life, therefore, he has researched surgery to correct his OSA. Recently he consulted with a sleep expert, and now has surgery scheduled with that doctor. My son will have a septoplasty and a palate expansion before a more radical surgery in a year called MMA. I value your objective opinion and hope you can give me some reassurance that these surgeries are worth the pain. — G.M. Answer • Although CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure, which works by using air to keep the airway open) is the usual treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, surgery is another effective way to treat OSA. Surgery is most appropriate for those who wish a surgical solution, those who have a surgically correctable problem (see below), and those who are good candidates for surgery; younger age makes surgery seem more reasonable to me. The specific surgery chosen depends on an individual’s unique anatomy. Surgery on the uvula, soft palate and pharynx is the most common surgery, but maxillomandibular advancement surgery (MMA) has been shown to be successful in several well-known medical centers in the U.S., such as Mayo Clinic and Stanford. Success rates are high. Not knowing your son and not being a surgeon, I can’t give an objective opinion for him in particular, but I can say that in appropriate patients, surgical treatment of OSA is reasonable. Dear Dr. Roach • I’m a 79-year-old male in relatively good health. During the past year, I have lost underarm hair. What could be the cause? And is there a connection with the inability to get an erection? — A.F. Answer • I would be concerned about low testosterone. Androgens, particularly testosterone, are responsible for growth and maintenance of body hair. Loss of body hair, especially pubic and axillary hair, is not common with low testosterone levels unless the testosterone was very low for a long period of time, usually over a year. Other symptoms of low testosterone include loss of muscle mass, lower energy levels, decreased libido and depression. Not all men will get all symptoms, but having more than one symptom is suggestive of low testosterone, especially in men who have difficulty getting an erection. Your doctor should check your testosterone. Testosterone replacement is appropriate for men with symptoms of low testosterone and clear evidence by laboratory of a repeatedly low level.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics