Page 1

COMING MONDAY: STANLEY CUP FINAL PREVIEW SECTION S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

Sunday • 05.26.2019 • $4.00 • EaRLy EdITIOn

KRATOM TIED TO DEATHS BY JESSE BOGAN

Legal herbal supplement rising in popularity for treating pain, opioid withdrawal, depression

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Officials say kratom caused three deaths here by ‘mitragynine intoxication’ Some cities here have banned substance already; supporters call instead for regulation

CHRISTIAN GOODEN , CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Leaf & Co., a retailer at the Galleria, sells many varieties of kratom, including the tablet pill form seen here on Wednesday.

WEBSTER GROVES — Ryan Brady did what many people do on the fast track. He took advantage of opportunities to play and learn. He traveled to Russia while attending St. Louis University High School, and, with the help of a substantial scholarship, studied engineering at the University of Arizona. In his family’s words, he was fun and faithful, and capitalized on his intellectual curiosity. At 19, though, he was tested like never before. A condition called alopecia universalis took away all the hair on his body. He came

Keeping heads above water

back home to Webster Groves to regroup and try to come to terms with his new appearance. He regularly met with a counselor and psychiatrist who prescribed him medicine for anxiety and depression. By early 2019, he seemed to have rounded a corner. He had a girlfriend and looked forward to another family trip to Belize. “He was at a really good point,” said his mother, Christine Brady. “He was ready for the psychiatrist to wean him off some of these medications.” Please see KRATOM, Page A5

Veterans recall horror, triumph of D-Day This weekend, some of the few who remain will make sentimental return to Normandy BY REBECCA SANTANA

Associated Press

LAURIE SKRIVAN PHOTOS, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

“I like going underwater. I can put my face underwater now,” said Krista Jones, 5, far right, during swim lessons on Wednesday at the James J. Eagan Center in Florissant. From left to right, other swimmers practicing their kicking included Montrill Boyd, 9; Danay Barker, 6; Lola Mukendi, 6; Chloe Kimani, 6; and Jaiden Riggins, 7.

As swimming season starts, coalition aims to prevent drownings BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

N

ot one of the eight adults around the pool saw Kim and Lisa McMullin’s toddler fall into it. It was 1982. The McMullins were at a family pool party about 70 miles from St. Louis when their 22-month-old son, Nicholas, joined other children in playing tag. A child who was the sole swimmer in the pool at the moment found Nicholas at the bottom shortly afterward. Nicholas’s father, Kim, a former Navy diver, pulled the boy out and tried CPR as they waited for an ambulance. Nicholas was airlifted to a “My mom told me I needed to take swimming lessons so I wouldn’t drown. My arm strokes are getting better,” said Barrett Wiley, 12, who practices the freestyle during Please see SWIMMING, Page A4 swim lessons on Wednesday.

Planes spreading out across the sky, nearly wingtip to wingtip. A sniper’s bullet whizzing by the ear. Squeezing a dying soldier’s hand, so he knew he was not alone. Across three quarters of a century, the old veterans of World War II remember that epic day on the beaches of Normandy. For historians, D-Day was a turning point in the war against Germany; for men who were among the 160,000 Allied fighters who mounted history’s largest amphibious invasion, June 6, 1944, remains a kaleidoscope of memories, a signal moment of their youth. Not many of those brave men remain, and those that do often use canes,walkers or wheelchairs. Few are willing or able to return to Normandy for the anniversary. On this Memorial Day weekend, listen to the stories of some who are making that sentimental journey that spans thousands of miles — and 75 years. Please see VETERANS, Page A8

Child support debt costs trucker his livelihood • A2 Learning a lesson from Blues’ Binnington • B1 Vacant Ittner school may become offices • C1 Tread carefully

TODAY

88°/69° SCATTERED STORMS

TOMORROW

88°/70° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER D9 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

SCENE CHANGE

TRADE DISPUTE

GREAT GARDENS

Curtain closes on Steven Woolf’s 33 years leading the Rep. B1

Cabinetmaker views ruling on Chinese imports as a threat. C1

Is your garden blooming with brilliant color? Enter our contest. B1

Join us at the Fabulous Fox! SUNDAY, JUNE 2 at 4 PM

1 M Vol. 141, No. 146 ©2019

Produced by

$25 Reserved Seating Tickets: Fox Box Office • 314.534.1111 • MetroTix.com presented by The Thomas A. Kooyumjian Foundation

Media Partners


COMING MONDAY: STANLEY CUP FINAL PREVIEW SECTION S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

Sunday • 05.26.2019 • $4.00 • FInaL EdITIOn

KRATOM TIED TO DEATHS BY JESSE BOGAN

Legal herbal supplement rising in popularity for treating pain, opioid withdrawal, depression

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Officials say kratom caused three deaths here by ‘mitragynine intoxication’ Some cities here have banned substance already; supporters call instead for regulation

CHRISTIAN GOODEN , CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Leaf & Co., a retailer which opened at the Galleria in April, sells many varieties of kratom, including the tablets seen here on Wednesday.

WEBSTER GROVES — Ryan Brady did what many people do on the fast track. He took advantage of opportunities to play and learn. He traveled to Russia while attending St. Louis University High School, and, with the help of a substantial scholarship, studied engineering at the University of Arizona. In his family’s words, he was fun and faithful, and capitalized on his intellectual curiosity. At 19, though, he was tested like never before. A condition called alopecia universalis took away all the hair on his body. He came

Keeping heads above water

back home to Webster Groves to regroup and try to come to terms with his new appearance. He regularly met with a counselor and psychiatrist who prescribed him medicine for anxiety and depression. By early 2019, he seemed to have rounded a corner. He had a girlfriend and looked forward to another family trip to Belize. “He was at a really good point,” said his mother, Christine Brady. “He was ready for the psychiatrist to wean him off some of these medications.” Please see KRATOM, Page A5

Veterans recall horror, triumph of D-Day This weekend, some of the few who remain will make sentimental return to Normandy BY REBECCA SANTANA

Associated Press

LAURIE SKRIVAN PHOTOS, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

“I like going underwater. I can put my face underwater now,” said Krista Jones, 5, far right, during swim lessons on Wednesday at the James J. Eagan Center in Florissant. From left to right, other swimmers practicing their kicking are Montrill Boyd, 9; Danay Barker, 6; Lola Mukendi, 6; Chloe Kimani, 6; and Jaiden Riggins, 7.

As swimming season starts, coalition aims to prevent drownings BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

N

ot one of the eight adults around the pool saw Kim and Lisa McMullin’s toddler fall into it. It was 1982. The McMullins were at a family pool party about 70 miles from St. Louis when their 22-month-old son, Nicholas, joined other children in playing tag. A child who was the sole swimmer in the pool at the moment found Nicholas at the bottom shortly afterward. Nicholas’s father, Kim, a former Navy diver, pulled the boy out and tried CPR as they waited for an ambulance. Nicholas was airlifted to a “My mom told me I needed to take swimming lessons so I wouldn’t drown. My arm strokes are getting better,” said Barrett Wiley, 12, who practices the freestyle during Please see SWIMMING, Page A4 swim lessons on Wednesday.

Planes spreading out across the sky, nearly wingtip to wingtip. A sniper’s bullet whizzing by the ear. Squeezing a dying soldier’s hand, so he knew he was not alone. Across three quarters of a century, the old veterans of World War II remember that epic day on the beaches of Normandy. For historians, D-Day was a turning point in the war against Germany; for men who were among the 160,000 Allied fighters who mounted history’s largest amphibious invasion, June 6, 1944, remains a kaleidoscope of memories, a signal moment of their youth. Not many of those brave men remain, and those that do often use canes,walkers or wheelchairs. Few are willing or able to return to Normandy for the anniversary. On this Memorial Day weekend, listen to the stories of some who are making that sentimental journey that spans thousands of miles — and 75 years. Please see VETERANS, Page A8

Child support debt costs trucker his livelihood • A2 Curtain closes on Woolf’s 33 years leading the Rep • B1 Vacant Ittner school may become offices • C1 Tread carefully

TODAY

85°/68° SCATTERED STORMS

TOMORROW

88°/70° PARTLY CLOUDY

WEATHER D9 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

CARDS WIN

TRADE DISPUTE

GREAT GARDENS

Gyorko’s three-run homer gives Redbirds 6-3 win over Braves. d1

Cabinetmaker views ruling on Chinese imports as a threat. C1

Is your garden blooming with brilliant color? Enter our contest. B1

Join us at the Fabulous Fox! SUNDAY, JUNE 2 at 4 PM

2 M Vol. 141, No. 146 ©2019

Produced by

$25 Reserved Seating Tickets: Fox Box Office • 314.534.1111 • MetroTix.com presented by The Thomas A. Kooyumjian Foundation

Media Partners


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 M 1 SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM EAT OUTDOORS

NEWS TO USE

UPCOMING CHATS

Warm weather means patio season around St. Louis. We pick 10 of our top spots for dining outdoors.

Whether it’s the latest on the Blues or Cardinals, business news or entertainment, we have a newsletter for all interests. Sign up today.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday

stltoday.com/summerfun

stltoday.com/newsletters

Thursday Friday

Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 2 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888 Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday-Friday 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday 7–10 a.m. on holidays service@stltoday.com SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch. com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday. com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips PRICING The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. Contact at 1-314-340-8888 for additional information.

SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS All subscription offers available at STLtoday.com, including those advertised through our email promotions, on-site messaging, social media and any external means of promotion, are valid for new subscribers only. You must not have been a subscriber in the past thirty (30) days to register for a new subscription offer.

AUTO-RENEWAL, CANCELLATION, AND REFUND POLICY EZ Pay is a convenient electronic payment method that automatically renews your Digital Only or Full Access news subscription service (your “Subscription”). If you register for EZ Pay or debit banking (ACH) payments, your Subscription will continue for the length of the term you select on your plan. On the last day of your current term (your “Renewal Date”), your plan will automatically renew for the same term unless you choose to cancel more than twenty-one (21) days before your Renewal Date (your “Cancellation Date”). If you do not affirmatively cancel your Subscription before your Cancellation Date, YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR AN ADDITIONAL TERM for the plan you initially selected at the rates in effect at the time of renewal. You may cancel your subscription at any time by calling 1-314-340-8888. If you have provided us with a valid credit card number or an alternate payment method saved in your account and you have not cancelled by your Cancellation Date, your subscription will be automatically processed up to fourteen (14) days in advance of your Renewal Date and the payment method you provided to us at or after the time of your initial Subscription purchase will be charged. We reserve the right to change your Subscription rate at any time. If you are not satisfied with your Subscription rate or service, you may cancel your Subscription at any time, and receive a refund for any amounts you have prepaid beyond the date you cancel your Subscription.

FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50.The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 14-41-44-56-62 Mega ball: 10 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: $393 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $308 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1.8 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 04-9-10-30-33 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $50,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 986 Evening: 245 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 2417 Evening: 3699

Child support debt costs trucker his livelihood that a person will be able to pay child support, as it often leads to job loss, TONY MESSENGER reduced employment opportunities, St. Louis Post-Dispatch eviction, and greater difficulty carrying out the responsibilities of everyday life,” the lawsuit alleges. “License suspension as a debt collection method is unconstitutional and irrational when enforced Jamie Wesley didn’t want to see the against people who cannot afford to pay: judge. no amount of coercion can force money It was 2017. Wesley had just done 12 out of a person who has none. Missouri’s years in federal prison on drugs and FSD (family support division) traps parweapons charges. ents in an inescapable cycle of poverty The judge who sent him away, U.S. and criminal culpability by suspending Senior District Judge E. Richard Webber, their driver’s licenses.” wanted to talk to him. Al Johnson, the director of New CoveFor Webber, this is nothing new. The nant Legal Services, says he believes that longtime federal judge often visits with Wesley’s suspension was purely punithe people he has sentenced to prison TONY MESSENGER, POST-DISPATCH tive, with no regard for his ability to pay. when they are released. Since his children are 19 and 22, none of “I just believe that everybody can have Jamie Wesley the money the state collects will actually a better life,” he told a New York Times go to them. reporter a couple of years ago, in explain- on his bank account. Wesley filed for a “If you’re poor and black, this is the hearing to review that decision. He says ing his practice. he was told nothing would happen to his sort of treatment you get from the state,” Wesley said no. Johnson said. The attorney is representdriver’s license until that hearing took “I didn’t really want to ing Wesley in his battle with the state. place. It was scheduled for Sept. 24. go,” he says. “I think they took his driver’s license Now he had no driver’s license. He But he did, eventually, was fired on the spot, hundreds of miles because he demanded a hearing. It’s over and it was a good thing. the top. He’s trying to get back on his from home. Webber encouraged him to “I had to pull over and sit and wait for feet and they’re trying to ruin him.” get a job as an over-theWebber Many states are doing on their own somebody to come get me,” Wesley says. road trucker. The jobs pay what the federal lawsuit might force He slept in his truck on the side of the well, the judge said. Missouri to do. Wesley was floored. The two men cried road. Just last week, Montana Gov. Steve Wesley’s dilemma is not uncommon together. in Missouri, and, in fact, most of the na- Bullock signed a bill that ends that And Wesley got to work. He earned state’s practice of suspending driver’s lition. a commercial truck driving license. By censes for people who can’t afford to pay For too long, driver’s license suspenMarch 2018, he had a job hauling goods court costs. Virginia passed a similar law sion has been used as a debt collection across the country. “It was a blessing,” earlier this year. Last year a federal judge tool for people who can’t afford court he says. costs, who fall behind on child support, suspended the practice in Tennessee. Then the state of Missouri came callFor Wesley, who is 46 and lives in mostly for an inability to pay, and the ing. Bellefontaine Neighbors, losing his livelipractice has perverse results. It was Sept. 10, 2018. Wesley was That’s why St. Louis County Prosecu- hood while he was trying to rebuild his about 120 miles outside of Lansing, tor Wesley Bell announced a plan to stop life after prison was “deflating. It took all Mich., when his boss called. the wind out of my sails,” he said. prosecuting most child support cases The family support division of the He worked in a warehouse for awhile, in criminal court. And it’s why two civil Missouri Department of Social Services and now has his license back, in a temporights organizations — Equal Justice had suspended his driver’s license berary agreement with the state. He’s drivUnder Law and St. Francis Community cause Wesley was behind on child suping a truck again, but worried about what Services — filed a federal class action port. comes next. He couldn’t believe it. Wesley knew he lawsuit in March seeking to end Mis“A guy is no good if he can’t go to souri’s practice of driver’s license suswas behind on child support for his two work,” Wesley said. “Nobody wins.” pension in child support cases. kids. They’re adults now, but the entire “These suspensions are meant to cotime he was in prison, the state kept addTony Messenger • 314-340-8518 erce payment, but for those who cannot @tonymess on Twitter ing to the total he was behind. When he pay, the loss of a driver’s license coungot out of prison, Wesley filed a motion tmessenger@post-dispatch.com to modify his support. The state put a lien terproductively decreases the likelihood

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS — Leader of drug gang sentenced: A St. Louis man who led a local drug gang and ordered two murders was sentenced Friday to 27 years in prison, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. Dionne Lamont “Cuffy” Gatling, 53, was the leader of a gang that bought heroin, cocaine,methamphetamine and marijuana in bulk,and sold the drugs in the St.Louis area from 2009 to 2014, prosecutors said. To retaliate against a man who cooperated with a federal investigation that sent Gatling’s brother,Deron“Juannie”Gatling, to prison, Gatling ordered the murder of Theodis Howard.He was killed on the street outside a St. Louis clinic on April 5, 2010. Gatling drove a co-defendant,Andre Rush, and the two shooters to the scene.Rush was there to point out Howard,41,for the shooters. Deron Gatling died of an asthma attack in prison. Gatling had Andre Rush shoot one his drug dealing associates, Terrance Morgan, 41, on May 2, 2013, in an alley in St. Louis’ Fox Park neighborhood. Gatling thought Morgan’s phone was tapped and that the Drug Enforcement Administration couldn’t use those recordings in court if Morgan were dead. “In murdering two men who knew about his criminal acts,Mr.Gatling took aim at the very foundation of the justice system,” U.S. Attorney Jeff Jensen said in a statement announcing the sentence. Gatling was brought down by a DEA investigation that began in Atlanta with an undercover officer who arranged to supply heroin and cocaine to Gatling. Gatling thought the man was affiliated with a drug cartel. But the nearly four-year period that has

passed since the indictment of Gatling and three others also revealed misconduct in the DEA’s Atlanta office. Defense lawyers repeatedly argued that evidence in the case should be tossed. They said that a DEA supervisor in Atlanta had an affair with a confidential informer who helped set up Gatling. The now former supervisor, Keith Cromer,admitted that the relationship violated DEA’s policy prohibiting more than an “arm’s length” relationship. But he denied having sex with her or falsifying reports to justify $212,000 in payments to her. Gatling pleaded guilty in February to five charges: cocaine distribution conspiracy, heroin distribution conspiracy, attempting to possess both heroin and cocaine and possession of one or more firearms in furtherance of a drug-trafficking crime, with deaths resulting. Andre Alphonso Rush has pleaded guilty to drug charges and a gun charge linked to the two deaths as part of a deal in which prosecutors and his lawyer have agreed to recommend 25 years in prison. Timothy Lamont Rush, another man linked to the gang, pleaded guilty to drug charges and was sentenced May 3 to the time he’d already served in prison. A fourth man,Lorenzo Gibbs,has yet to be sentenced on drug charges. ST. LOUIS — Two die in collision: Two people were killed when a car and a tractor-trailer collided on Natural Bridge Avenue on Friday morning. Few details were available,but police said two people were killed in the crash, about 9 a.m. in the 5600 block of Natural Bridge. The crash involved a red Chevrolet Impala and a tractor-trailer.

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Police investigate the scene of a crash Friday on Natural Bridge Avenue. Two people were killed when a car and a tractortrailer collided. Nelda Granderson, co-owner of nearby Ari’s Ice Cream Parlor and Cafe, said she heard the sound of a car with its “engine gunning” speed by, then heard a big boom. Customers who ran up to help said there were three people in the car. The scene is on the western edge of the city,between Clara Avenue and Goodfellow Boulevard. ST. LOUIS — Slain teenager identified: The teen who was fatally shot early Thursday in the Tower Grove East neighborhood was identified by police Friday. Kristina Curry, 16, of the 3100 block of Oregon Avenue, was found dead just before 5 a.m. Thursday on a rear parking lot at Roosevelt High School at 3230 Hartford Street, police said. She had been shot multiple times. Investigators had no suspects. Authorities asked anyone with information to contact CrimeStoppers online or at 1-866-371-8477. Tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 03-19-24-29-39 Evening: 03-09-21-31-45 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 559 FB: 1 Evening: 467 FB: 0 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 2984 FB: 8 Evening: 3506 FB: 0

PEOPLE

Kravitz

Nicks

Drummer Garry Peterson of The Guess Who is 74. Singer Stevie Nicks is 71. Actor Philip Michael Thomas (“Miami Vice”) is 70. Actress Pam Grier is 70. Country singer Hank Williams Jr. is 70. Actress Margaret Colin is 61. Singer Dave Robbins (BlackHawk) is 60. Actor Doug Hutchison (“The Green Mile”) is 59. Actress Genie Francis (“General Hospital”) is 57. Comedian Bobcat Goldthwait is 57. Singer Lenny Kravitz

is 55. Actress Helena Bonham Carter is 53. Drummer Phillip Rhodes of The Gin Blossoms is 51. Actor Joseph Fiennes (“Shakespeare in Love”) is 49. Singer Joey Kibble of Take 6 is 48. “South Park” co-creator Matt Stone is 48. Singer Lauryn Hill is 44. Bassist Nathan Cochran of MercyMe is 41. Actress Elisabeth Harnois (“CSI”) is 40. Actor Hrach Titizian (“Homeland”) is 40. — Associated Press


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 M 2 SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM EAT OUTDOORS

NEWS TO USE

UPCOMING CHATS

Warm weather means patio season around St. Louis. We pick 10 of our top spots for dining outdoors.

Whether it’s the latest on the Blues or Cardinals, business news or entertainment, we have a newsletter for all interests. Sign up today.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday

stltoday.com/summerfun

stltoday.com/newsletters

Thursday Friday

Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 2 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888 Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday-Friday 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday 7–10 a.m. on holidays service@stltoday.com

Child support debt costs trucker his livelihood TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch. com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday. com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips PRICING The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. Contact at 1-314-340-8888 for additional information.

SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS All subscription offers available at STLtoday.com, including those advertised through our email promotions, on-site messaging, social media and any external means of promotion, are valid for new subscribers only. You must not have been a subscriber in the past thirty (30) days to register for a new subscription offer.

AUTO-RENEWAL, CANCELLATION, AND REFUND POLICY EZ Pay is a convenient electronic payment method that automatically renews your Digital Only or Full Access news subscription service (your “Subscription”). If you register for EZ Pay or debit banking (ACH) payments, your Subscription will continue for the length of the term you select on your plan. On the last day of your current term (your “Renewal Date”), your plan will automatically renew for the same term unless you choose to cancel more than twenty-one (21) days before your Renewal Date (your “Cancellation Date”). If you do not affirmatively cancel your Subscription before your Cancellation Date, YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR AN ADDITIONAL TERM for the plan you initially selected at the rates in effect at the time of renewal. You may cancel your subscription at any time by calling 1-314-340-8888. If you have provided us with a valid credit card number or an alternate payment method saved in your account and you have not cancelled by your Cancellation Date, your subscription will be automatically processed up to fourteen (14) days in advance of your Renewal Date and the payment method you provided to us at or after the time of your initial Subscription purchase will be charged. We reserve the right to change your Subscription rate at any time. If you are not satisfied with your Subscription rate or service, you may cancel your Subscription at any time, and receive a refund for any amounts you have prepaid beyond the date you cancel your Subscription.

FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50.The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888

LOTTERY Multistate games POWERBALL Saturday: 01-02-39-43-66 Powerball: 02 Power play: 03 Estimated jackpot: $308 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 14-41-44-56-62 Mega ball: 10 Megaplier: 2 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $418 million

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Saturday: 28-34-37-40-42-44 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.9 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 06-26-33-36-38 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $66,000 PICK-3 Midday: 999 Evening: 165 PICK-4 Midday: 0949 Evening: 9933

Jamie Wesley didn’t want to see the judge. It was 2017. Wesley had just done 12 years in federal prison on drugs and weapons charges. The judge who sent him away, U.S. Senior District Judge E. Richard Webber, wanted to talk to him. For Webber, this is nothing new. The longtime federal judge often visits with the people he has sentenced to prison when they are released. “I just believe that everybody can have a better life,” he told a New York Times reporter a couple of years ago, in explaining his practice. Wesley said no. “I didn’t really want to go,” he says. But he did, eventually, and it was a good thing. Webber encouraged him to get a job as an over-theWebber road trucker. The jobs pay well, the judge said. Wesley was floored. The two men cried together. And Wesley got to work. He earned a commercial truck driving license. By March 2018, he had a job hauling goods across the country. “It was a blessing,” he says. Then the state of Missouri came calling. It was Sept. 10, 2018. Wesley was about 120 miles outside of Lansing, Mich., when his boss called. The family support division of the Missouri Department of Social Services had suspended his driver’s license because Wesley was behind on child support. He couldn’t believe it. Wesley knew he was behind on child support for his two kids. They’re adults now, but the entire time he was in prison, the state kept adding to the total he was behind. When he got out of prison, Wesley filed a motion

TONY MESSENGER, POST-DISPATCH

Jamie Wesley to modify his support. The state put a lien on his bank account. Wesley filed for a hearing to review that decision. He says he was told nothing would happen to his driver’s license until that hearing took place. It was scheduled for Sept. 24. Now he had no driver’s license. He was fired on the spot, hundreds of miles from home. “I had to pull over and sit and wait for somebody to come get me,” Wesley says. He slept in his truck on the side of the road. Wesley’s dilemma is not uncommon in Missouri, and, in fact, most of the nation. For too long, driver’s license suspension has been used as a debt collection tool for people who can’t afford court costs, who fall behind on child support, mostly for an inability to pay, and the practice has perverse results. That’s why St. Louis County Prosecutor Wesley Bell announced a plan to stop prosecuting most child support cases in criminal court. And it’s why two civil rights organizations — Equal Justice Under Law and St. Francis Community Services — filed a federal class action lawsuit in March seeking to end Missouri’s practice of driver’s license suspension in child support cases. “These suspensions are meant to coerce payment, but for those who cannot

pay, the loss of a driver’s license counterproductively decreases the likelihood that a person will be able to pay child support, as it often leads to job loss, reduced employment opportunities, eviction, and greater difficulty carrying out the responsibilities of everyday life,” the lawsuit alleges. “License suspension as a debt collection method is unconstitutional and irrational when enforced against people who cannot afford to pay: no amount of coercion can force money out of a person who has none. Missouri’s FSD (family support division) traps parents in an inescapable cycle of poverty and criminal culpability by suspending their driver’s licenses.” Al Johnson, the director of New Covenant Legal Services, says he believes that Wesley’s suspension was purely punitive, with no regard for his ability to pay. Since his children are 19 and 22, none of the money the state collects will actually go to them. “If you’re poor and black, this is the sort of treatment you get from the state,” Johnson said. The attorney is representing Wesley in his battle with the state. “I think they took his driver’s license because he demanded a hearing. It’s over the top. He’s trying to get back on his feet and they’re trying to ruin him.” Many states are doing on their own what the federal lawsuit might force Missouri to do. Just last week, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock signed a bill that ends that state’s practice of suspending driver’s licenses for people who can’t afford to pay court costs. Virginia passed a similar law earlier this year. Last year a federal judge suspended the practice in Tennessee. For Wesley, who is 46 and lives in Bellefontaine Neighbors, losing his livelihood while he was trying to rebuild his life after prison was “deflating. It took all the wind out of my sails,” he said. He worked in a warehouse for awhile, and now has his license back, in a temporary agreement with the state. He’s driving a truck again, but worried about what comes next. “A guy is no good if he can’t go to work,” Wesley said. “Nobody wins.”

LAW AND ORDER ST. LOUIS — Three shot outside bar: Three people were wounded in a driveby shooting Friday night outside Midtown Sports Bar and Grill on East Prairie Avenue, police said. All three victims were conscious and breathing when they were taken to a hospital for treatment. An update on their conditions was not immediately available Saturday. ST. LOUIS — Man dies after shooting and crash: A man was shot and then the car he was riding in crashed into another vehicle about 9:30 a.m. Saturday near Martin Luther King Drive and Union Boulevard, police said. The man, 25, was a passenger in the car when he was shot in the shoulder, police said. Investigators believe he was shot by a gunman in a passing vehicle. The car the shooting victim was in crashed into another vehicle after the shooting, police said. The man was pronounced dead at the scene.

EAST ST. LOUIS — St. Louis man killed: A man died early Saturday in what may have been a hit-and-run in East St. Louis, according to the St. Clair County coroner’s office. Pierre L. Rodgers, of the 2300 block of Indiana Avenue, was pronounced dead about 2 a.m. on Mississippi Avenue near Liberty Street, the coroner said. According to a Fox 2 News report, Illinois State Police are looking for a silver Dodge Charger with tinted windows and a temporary Missouri license plate. Anyone with information is asked to contact Sgt. Elbert Jennings at 618-5714124. ST. LOUIS — Car crash victims identified: Two people killed Friday morning in a crash in the 5600 block of Natural Bridge Avenue were identified Saturday as Linda Johnson, 67, and Michell Ivory, 57. Johnson, of the 1300 block of Sharondale Circle, was driving eastbound about 9 a.m. when she lost control of her

Chevrolet Impala, drove into the westbound lanes and struck a tractor-trailer, according to St. Louis police. Johnson and Ivory, of the 2400 block of Adkins Avenue, were pronounced dead at the scene. A second passenger, a 70-year-old man, was treated for minor injuries. The driver of the tractor-trailer was not injured. The crash happened on the western edge of the city, between Clara Avenue and Goodfellow Boulevard. ST. LOUIS — One man killed, another wounded: A man was killed just after 10 p.m. Friday in the 5600 block of Acme Avenue, St. Louis police said. Officers found the man dead with a gunshot wound to the head. A second person was wounded in the shooting and fled a short distance to St. Louis County, where he was found by police officers and taken to a hospital. The 5600 block of Acme Avenue is in St. Louis’ Walnut Park West Neighborhood, near the city-county border.

DIGEST WEST ALTON — Voluntary evacuation order issued: The Rivers Pointe Fire Protection District and city officials issued a voluntary evacuation order Saturday afternoon due to a predicted 36-foot crest of the Mississippi River at the Mel Price Lock and Dam. “We cannot hold 36 feet even with protective measures,” said Fire Chief Rick Pender . Flood stage for the lock and dam is 21 feet; the levees can hold about 34 feet, Pender said. The river is expected to crest Thursday, according to the National Weather Service. “It’s imperative for folks who haven’t

put plans in place to do it now,” Pender February, when they can be changed as said. West Alton has about 560 residents. necessary, or based on feedback, department spokeswoman Lisa Cox said. The MISSOURI — State sets rules on medical department will accept further public marijuana: The Missouri Department of comment on the rules in July and hold a Health and Senior Services posted final public hearing. Marijuana business hopefuls and peorules on the department’s website Friday, a move long awaited by people hoping to use, ple who want to use marijuana for medimake or sell medical marijuana and related cal purposes can start filling out application forms June 4; The department will products. The rules take effect June 3. Sales of various forms of the product accept patient applications July 4 and are to start early next year and are ex- business applications Aug. 3 through 17. Officials will have until Dec. 31 to pected to top $100 million by 2025. The rules posted Friday aren’t perma- score the business applications ahead of nent. They will remain in effect through awarding licenses.

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 01-16-20-27-36 Evening: 03-08-23-29-44 LOTTO Saturday: 24-27-32-41-43-50 Extra shot: 01 Estimated jackpot: $2.25 million PICK-3 Midday: 899 FB: 3 Evening: 030 FB: 2 PICK-4 Midday: 3891 FB: 1 Evening: 2606 FB: 1

PEOPLE

Kravitz

Nicks

Drummer Garry Peterson of The Guess Who is 74. Singer Stevie Nicks is 71. Actor Philip Michael Thomas (“Miami Vice”) is 70. Actress Pam Grier is 70. Country singer Hank Williams Jr. is 70. Actress Margaret Colin is 61. Singer Dave Robbins (BlackHawk) is 60. Actor Doug Hutchison (“The Green Mile”) is 59. Actress Genie Francis (“General Hospital”) is 57. Comedian Bobcat Goldthwait is 57. Singer Lenny Kravitz

is 55. Actress Helena Bonham Carter is 53. Drummer Phillip Rhodes of The Gin Blossoms is 51. Actor Joseph Fiennes (“Shakespeare in Love”) is 49. Singer Joey Kibble of Take 6 is 48. “South Park” co-creator Matt Stone is 48. Singer Lauryn Hill is 44. Bassist Nathan Cochran of MercyMe is 41. Actress Elisabeth Harnois (“CSI”) is 40. Actor Hrach Titizian (“Homeland”) is 40. — Associated Press


05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

TRUCKLOAD SAVINGS! NO CLUB TO JOIN - NO FEES TO PAY - JUST THE LOWEST PRICES!

HURRY IN FOR BEST SELECTION WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Sale prices good Sunday, May 26 through Sunday, June 2, 2019. Stores open until 8PM Memorial Day.

3

99

29

4

each

• Assorted varieties - 14.5–15.25 oz. cans 574-9664

• 20 oz. 573-9885

1199 each

®

each

6-Pack Del Monte® Canned Vegetables

Gourmet Select™ Ultimate Snack Mix

Jack Link's Original Beef Sticks

488 each

Salted Gourmet Peanuts • 40 oz. 574-2109

• 18.4 oz. 574-2132

499 each ®

Fisher Oven-Roasted Nuts Multi-Packs • Assorted varieties 574-2077-2079 Selection may vary.

688

each

24-Pack Fruit Splash™ Flavored Water • Assorted flavors - .5 liter bottles 573-9048

SHOP 1,000s OF GROCERY ITEMS IN-STORE OR AT MENARDS.COM/GROCERY

Stay strong, Missouri. Our thoughts and hopes for a quick recovery are with all affected by the devastating storms this past week. While we were not able to hold our scheduled workshops in Jefferson City, we will continue to work with local partners to make sure digital skills training is available to everyone in the community. Additionally, all of our materials are available for free at google.com/grow.


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Swimming

FROM A1

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Water safety tips

use. A child may be tempted to approach or enby children or placed in the side of the pool to The Centers for Disease Control and Preventer the pool if toys are left in the water. sense a change in water elevation. tion, Missouri Highway Patrol, ZAC Foundation St. Louis hospital where he was and other groups offer tips for staying safe this • Families with swimming pools at home should • Children should always wear U.S. Coast Guardeventually taken off life support. swimming season: install fencing around all four sides of the pool. approved personal flotation devices near open Joyce Russell wasn’t with her water or when playing water sports, even if they The fences should be at least four feet tall and • Never leave a child unsupervised in or around son, David Jackson, 19, in 2017 know how to swim. have self-closing and self-latching gates. when he disappeared under the water. water of Fugitive Beach, an old • Self-latching pool fences, pool nets and covers • Be aware of the locations of drains in pools. • Parents and children should take swimming quarry turned into a swimming can prevent small children from accessing the and water safety classes. Teens and adults attraction near Rolla, Mo. Jackson, water. Parents can buy alarms that may be worn • Remove toys from the pool area when not in should learn CPR. an athlete who had just finished his first year of college, was under water for about 20 minutes before he was found and rescued. He died a week later at a hospital. The two families shared their stories this week with a coalition of St. Louis city and county public safety officials, philanthropies and pool managers launching a coordinated effort to prevent drownings as the swimming season starts this Memorial Day weekend. They were brought together by the Boys and Girls Club of Greater St. Louis and the ZAC Foundation, a non-profit group advancing water safety founded by a family whose 6-yearold son died when his arm became trapped in a pool drain. Drownings are among the leading causes of death for children, but the mostly easily preventable, the the coalition says. Swim classes and lifeguards are only part of the equation; other protections include proper barriers around pools, knowing differences between pools and natural waters, life jackets, and knowing CPR. For years, the McMullins wondered what would have happened if they had taught Nicholas to roll over and float on his back; if they had clearly designated an adult to stand by the pool and keep watch; or had been better trained in CPR. Their son now owns a swim LAURIE SKRIVAN PHOTOS, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM school that teaches young chilDanay Barker, 6, practices her kicking with instructor Ariana Ehrhard, 15, during swim lessons on Wednesday at the James J. Eagan Center in dren water safety skills. And they Florissant. “I am not afraid to put my face in the water,” Danay said. formed a foundation in recent weeks with a goal to educate about that it would “temporarily” shut the risk of drownings. “We realized how little aware- down amid a legal fight with the ness there was around the dangers state. In August the Missouri atof child drownings,” McMullin, of torney general’s office sued the St. Louis, said. “And how emi- owners of the Offsets, a flooded nently preventable they they are.” former quarry 70 miles south of At least 3,709 people drowned St. Louis, following two drowning nationwide in 2017, according to deaths there in July. the most recent data available And a stretch of the Meramec from the Centers for Disease Con- River at Castlewood State Park in trol and Prevention. Ninety people south St.Louis County has claimed drowned in Missouri in the same at least 14 lives in the last 14 years. year, the CDC said. Pools involve a different set of Drownings are the leading cause risks. A St. Louis firefighter’s son of cause of death for children ages 1 drowned at the HoteLumiere pool to 4, and the second leading cause in August during a family party. of unintentional deaths for chil- Witnesses said the pool water was dren ages 14 and older, according so murky no one could tell the boy to the CDC. was at the bottom. Inspection The statistics don’t capture the reports showed the water was impact of near-drownings. About “murky and turbid,” the pool lights 8,700 people younger than age 20 were not on, the divider with floats visited a hospital emergency de- between the shallow and deep end partment for a drowning event in was not in place, the ring buoy rope 2017, according to the American was tangled, the line was not long Academy of Pediatrics. enough to cover the length of the The coalition wants to create an pool, and there was no shepherd’s awareness campaign and compre- crook. Instructors challenge swimmers to blow bubbles at the end of “Ring Around the Rosie” on Wednesday. The risk of drowning is disprohensive prevention plan that it can take nationwide. New Zealand and portionately high for black chilCanada have national drowning- dren, who are four times as likely prevention plans, but the U.S. does to drown than other groups, acThe Missouri Highway Patrol collects data on peonot, said Megan Ferraro, executive cording to Bill Ramos, director of ple who drown in any of the ponds, streams, rivdirector of the ZAC Foundation. the Indiana University School of • 11 drownings took place in the St. Louis ers and lakes across the state, even private lakes The St. Louis metropolitan area Public Health’s Aquatic Institute. area, according to the latest annual report and ponds, but not swimming pools. Boating fais one of three that the ZAC FounThat arises in large part from a on drownings and boating accidents in the talities are counted separately from drownings. dation chose for the pilot pro- history of segregation that barred state. gram, in part because it serves as African-Americans from swim2019* 12 an example of racial and income- ming pools, leading to a genera• 5 drownings occurred over the three days 2018* 27 based disparities in water-safety tional unfamiliarity with swimof Memorial Day Weekend. 2017 59 resources and training. And there ming and water safety. In St. Louis, 2016 38 • Youths under 20 years old accounted for is an abundance of nearby open African-Americans weren’t al2015 68 17 of the drownings. water that swimmers may not real- lowed entry into public pools until 2014 29 ize requires a different set of water June 1949. • 8 drownings were because of flooding or * Preliminary data. The final report for 2018 will safety know-how than pools. And swimming classes may be flooded roadways. be released this summer. “It’s a community at great risk a luxury that families cannot afFrom A1

Drownings by the numbers

and at great need,” Ferraro said. ford. Other obstacles may include “But these are solvable problems.” a lack of access to safe swimming facilities. Those attending the roundtable Disproportionate risk Certain waterways have seen Tuesday floated a number of ideas more drownings than others, in- to meet these challenges, including cluding Fugitive Beach. A man requiring swimming and waterfrom Belleville drowned near the safety training as a part of school same spot at Fugitive Beach as physical education curriculum, Jackson in June 2017. A 6-year-old and incorporating swimming and boy from Fenton drowned there in water-safety training in classes 2014. provided to expectant mothers. They discussed partnering with The Offsets, a swimming hole near Fredericktown, Mo. where at transportation companies to bring least nine people have died since more families to pools and usthe 1980s, announced Monday ing public safety departments to

raise awareness.

‘Eliminate it’ The ultimate goal of the campaign is not to frighten people away from water, said Dr. Flint Fowler, president of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater St. Louis. “We want them to understand the risks, learn how to be safe, and then take full advantage of the fun that can be experienced on the water,” he said. The ZAC Foundation and the Boys & Girls Clubs have been of-

A closer look at some of the 59 drownings in 2017

fering swimming lessons, classroom curriculum and hands-on activities at water-safety camps at Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater St. Louis over the last two years. St. Louis city pools offer free swimming lessons during summer months. And the YMCA offers discounted swimming lessons for children year-round. Rob West, executive director of the YMCA in St. Louis’ O’Fallon Park neighborhood, a predominantly black neighborhood, said

instructors teach about 800 kids the basics of water safety each year. The facility offers swim lessons for $5. “I think it’s so awesome that we are all coming together to deal with an issue that we can eliminate,” he said. “We can eliminate it. We want to say that we will never have a drowning, ever again.” Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

Study: Half of Americans use swimming pools as a bathtub BY MICAH WALKER

Tribune News Service

Summer is almost here, and one of the ways to stay out of the heat is to take a dip in the pool. But how clean is the water? According to a new survey presented by the Water Quality and Health Council, 51% of Americans reported using a swimming pool as a communal bathtub — using the pool as an alternative to showering or rinsing off after engaging in exercise or yard work. Even though 64% of Americans know pool chemicals don’t eliminate the need to shower, people continue to do it anyway. “When dirt, sweat, personal care products, and other things on our bodies react with chlorine, there is less chlorine available to kill germs,” said Dr. Chris Wiant, chair of the Water Quality & Health Council. “Rinsing off for just 1 minute removes most of

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

According to a new survey, around half of Americans reported using a swimming pool as an alternative to showering or rinsing off after engaging in exercise or yard work. the dirt, sweat, or anything else on your body.” The 2019 Healthy Pools survey, released last week, was con-

ducted online by Sachs Media Group and measured perceptions and behaviors related to swimming pools and public health.

The organization interviewed 3,100 Americans adults on April 12 and 13. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.7% at the 95% confidence level and was nationally representative of American adults in terms of age, race, gender, income and region. The survey comes as experts from the council, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Pool and Hot Tub Alliance work to educate the public on healthy and safe swimming. Along with not showering before entering a pool, 40% of Americans admitted they have peed in the pool as an adult. Urine reacts with chlorine, reducing the amount of chemicals available to kill germs. The survey also revealed that 24% of Americans would go in a pool within one hour of having diarrhea, and 48% reported that they never shower before

swimming. Most people did not know that pool chemistry can be impacted by personal care items such as makeup (53%) and deodorant (55%). To check the chlorine and pH levels for a personal or public pool, the council is offering free pool tests kits through its 15th annual Healthy Pools campaign on its website. In addition, the agency is urging people to check local and state health departments for pool inspection records. The records for several states are available on the council’s website. “Pools are great places to have fun with friends and family,” said Jim Mock, interim executive director of the Pool and Hot Tub Alliance. “A trained pool operator can get the mix of pool chemicals healthy and safe, and swimmers can help keep it right by swimming healthy.”


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

‘OUR BODIES, OUR RIGHTS’

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Hundreds protest Missouri legislation banning abortion at 8 weeks BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Hundreds of people gathered Saturday in downtown St. Louis for a student-led protest against a sweeping piece of anti-abortion legislation they say puts lives at risk and is a step back for individual rights. “Our bodies, our rights,” Shri Anantha, 16, with STL ProChoice Student Activists, said to a crowd at Poelker Park that included students of all ages, healthcare workers, Missouri Democrats and candidates for state offices. The legislation signed Friday by Gov. Mike Parson bans most abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy, except in medical emergencies. There are no exceptions for rape, incest or human trafficking. The ban takes effect in late August. “By signing this bill today, we are sending a strong signal to the nation that, in Missouri, we stand for life, protect women’s health, and advocate for the unborn,” Parson said in a statement Friday. “All life has value and is worth protecting.” Some attorneys have said the COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM bill could subject women to felChris Riddle chants with other protesters Saturday as they circle Memorial ony charges if they perform their own abortions. Plaza Park in downtown St. Louis. The protest was organized by STL ProProtesters Saturday said the Choice Student Activists.

ban puts people’s lives at risk by cutting off access to vital healthcare and would disproportionately affect African-Americans and people in poverty. “With this extreme ban on safe and legal abortion, our government is reducing us to our ability to get pregnant, erasing our moral agency, and disregarding our humanity,” said Sarah Felts, spokeswoman for Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood runs the only abortion clinic in the state, in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis. The bill will not stop abortions from being performed, it will force people to use less-safe methods, said Pamela Merritt, co-founder of the abortionrights group Reproaction. She called on protesters to support abortion-rights groups and healthcare facilities. “Abortion will exist despite this ban,” she said. The protesters vowed to fight the bill in court and at the ballot box. The League of Women Voters attended the protest to register voters, particularly students who will be of voting age by 2020. “A vote in 2020 is a vote for a woman’s right to life, said state Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis. “And a woman’s right to life is a woman’s right to choose.” Trish Gunby, a Democratic candidate to fill a vacancy in Missouri’s 99th District in St. Louis County, said the bill represented a regression that conflicted with the rights established under the

1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Roe v. Wade. “I did not think that 40 years ago, as a teenager, I would have more rights than I do today,” she said. If the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, “in whole or in part,” the new Missouri legislation states that all abortions would be made illegal except in cases of a medical emergency. The legislation requires both parents or guardians to be notified before minors can get an abortion, in most cases. Lauryn Donovan, 16, a student at Ladue Horton Watkins High School, said the bill was a form of “institutionalized oppression.” “Don’t force feed your views down somebody’s throat,” Donovan said. The abortion ban doesn’t just affect women, said Louie Westland, 17, a student at Rockwood Summit High School. “This is not a gendered issue,” Westland said. “This is an everybody issue.” Cort VanOstran, a lawyer who narrowly lost the race for Missouri’s 2nd congressional district in November to U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Mo., said he had a message for men in the crowd. “If we want to live in a country where personal freedoms mean something, we should stand up against laws that take away the rights of half the population,” he said. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

Swimming From A1

St. Louis hospital where he was eventually taken off life support. Joyce Russell wasn’t with her son, David Jackson, 19, in 2017 when he disappeared under the water of Fugitive Beach, an old quarry turned into a swimming attraction near Rolla, Mo. Jackson, an athlete who had just finished his first year of college, was under water for about 20 minutes before he was found and rescued. He died a week later at a hospital. The two families shared their stories this week with a coalition of St. Louis city and county public safety officials, philanthropies and pool managers launching a coordinated effort to prevent drownings as the swimming season starts this Memorial Day weekend. They were brought together by the Boys and Girls Club of Greater St. Louis and the ZAC Foundation, a non-profit group advancing water safety founded by a family whose 6-year-old son died when his arm became trapped in a pool drain. Drownings are among the leading causes of death for children, but the mostly easily preventable, the the coalition says. Swim classes and lifeguards are only part of the equation; other protections include proper barriers around pools, knowing differences between pools and natural waters, life jackets, and knowing CPR. For years, the McMullins wondered what would have happened if they had taught Nicholas to roll over and float on his back; if they had clearly designated an adult to stand by the pool and keep watch; or had been better trained in CPR. Their son now owns a swim school that teaches young children water safety skills. And they formed a foundation in recent weeks with a goal to educate about the risk of drownings. “We realized how little awareness there was around the dangers of child drownings,” McMullin, of St. Louis, said. “And how eminently preventable they they are.” At least 3,709 people drowned nationwide in 2017, according to the most recent data available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Ninety people drowned in Missouri in the same year, the CDC said. Drownings are the leading cause of cause of death for children ages 1 to 4, and the second leading cause of unintentional deaths for children ages 14 and older, according to the CDC. The statistics don’t capture the impact of near-drownings. About 8,700 people younger than age 20 visited a hospital emergency department for a drowning event in 2017, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. The coalition wants to create an awareness campaign and comprehensive prevention plan that it can take nationwide. New Zealand and Canada have national drowning-prevention plans, but the U.S. does not, said Megan Ferraro, executive director of the ZAC Foundation. The St. Louis metropolitan area is one of three that the ZAC Foundation chose for the pilot program, in part because it serves as

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Danay Barker, 6, practices her kicking with instructor Ariana Ehrhard, 15, during swim lessons on Wednesday at the James J. Eagan Center in Florissant. “I am not afraid to put my face in the water,” Danay said.

Water safety tips The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Missouri Highway Patrol, ZAC Foundation and other groups offer tips for staying safe this swimming season: • Never leave a child unsupervised in or around water. • Self-latching pool fences, pool nets and covers can prevent small children from accessing the water. Parents can buy alarms that may be worn by children or placed in the side of the pool to sense a change in water elevation. • Families with swimming pools at home should install fencing around all four sides of the pool. The fences should be at least four feet tall and have self-closing and selflatching gates. • Be aware of the locations of drains in pools. • Remove toys from the pool area when not in use. A child may be tempted to approach or enter the pool if toys are left in the water. • Children should always wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation devices near open water or when playing water sports, even if they know how to swim.

Drownings by the numbers The Missouri Highway Patrol collects data on people who drown in any of the ponds, streams, rivers and lakes across the state, even private lakes and ponds, but not swimming pools. Boating fatalities are counted separately from drownings. 2019* 2018* 2017 2016 2015 2014

12 27 59 38 68 29

*Preliminary data. The final report for 2018 will be released this summer.

A closer look at some of the 59 drownings in 2017 • 11 drownings took place in the St. Louis area, according to the latest annual report on drownings and boating accidents in the state. • 5 drownings occurred over the three days of Memorial Day Weekend.

• Youths under 20 years old accounted for 17 of the drownings. • Parents and children should take swimming and water safety classes. • 8 drownings were because of Teens and adults should learn CPR. flooding or flooded roadways.

an example of racial and incomebased disparities in water-safety resources and training. And there is an abundance of nearby open water that swimmers may not realize requires a different set of water safety know-how than pools. “It’s a community at great risk and at great need,” Ferraro said. “But these are solvable problems.”

Disproportionate risk Certain waterways have seen more drownings than others, including Fugitive Beach. A man from Belleville drowned near the same spot at Fugitive Beach as Jackson in June 2017. A 6-yearold boy from Fenton drowned there in 2014. The Offsets, a swimming hole near Fredericktown, Mo. where at least nine people have died

since the 1980s, announced Monday that it would “temporarily” shut down amid a legal fight with the state. In August the Missouri attorney general’s office sued the owners of the Offsets, a flooded former quarry 70 miles south of St. Louis, following two drowning deaths there in July. And a stretch of the Meramec River at Castlewood State Park in south St. Louis County has claimed at least 14 lives in the last 14 years. Pools involve a different set of risks. A St. Louis firefighter’s son drowned at the HoteLumiere pool in August during a family party. Witnesses said the pool water was so murky no one could tell the boy was at the bottom. Inspection reports showed the water was “murky and turbid,” the pool lights were not on, the divider with floats between the shallow and deep end was not in place, the ring buoy rope was tangled, the line was not long enough to cover the length of the pool, and there was no shepherd’s crook. The risk of drowning is disproportionately high for black children, who are four times as likely to drown than other groups, according to Bill Ramos, director of the Indiana University School of Public Health’s Aquatic Institute. That arises in large part from a history of segregation that barred African-Americans from swimming pools, leading to a generational unfamiliarity with swimming and water safety. In St. Louis, African-Americans weren’t allowed entry into public pools until June 1949. And swimming classes may be a luxury that families cannot afford. Other obstacles may include a lack of access to safe swimming facilities. Those attending the roundtable Tuesday floated a number

of ideas to meet these challenges, including requiring swimming and water-safety training as a part of school physical education curriculum, and incorporating swimming and water-safety training in classes provided to expectant mothers. They discussed partnering with transportation companies to bring more families to pools and usingpublicsafetydepartmentsto raise awareness.

‘Eliminate it’ The ultimate goal of the campaign is not to frighten people away from water, said Dr. Flint Fowler, president of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater St. Louis. “We want them to understand the risks, learn how to be safe, and then take full advantage of the fun that can be experienced on the water,” he said. The ZAC Foundation and the Boys & Girls Clubs have been offering swimming lessons, classroom curriculum and hands-on activities at water-safety camps at Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater St. Louis over the last two years. St. Louis city pools offer free swimming lessons during summer months. And the YMCA offers discounted swimming lessons for children year-round. Rob West, executive director of the YMCA in St. Louis’ O’Fallon Park neighborhood, a predominantly black neighborhood, said instructors teach about 800 kids the basics of water safety each year. The facility offers swim lessons for $5. “I think it’s so awesome that we are all coming together to deal with an issue that we can eliminate,” he said. “We can eliminate it. We want to say that we will never have a drowning, ever again.” Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com


FROM A1

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

Kratom From A5

But in the middle of the day, on Jan. 21, he became nauseous at home and unresponsive. He was the first of at least three people in the region this year who public health officials say died from too much “mitragynine,” a natural substance derived from the leaves of kratom, a tree grown in Southeast Asia. The three deaths happened against a backdrop of increasing availability and advertising for kratom. Some consumers are drawn to the “dietary supplement” for pain relief and a natural alternative to treat opioid withdrawal, posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and other health conditions. Amid the rise in popularity and medical examiners who mention kratom in death reports, there has been a call for regulation from the five-year-old American Kratom Association of Haymarket, Va. Kratom is legal in many places, but St. Charles County is considering a ban. Alton and Jerseyville already banned it. “We were concerned that it could lead to an opioid addiction and get into the hands of juveniles,” said Jerseyville Deputy Police Chief Scott Woelfel. “With the fact that there are so many unknowns, it’s better to play it safe.” Kratom first showed up locally in a death studied at the St. Louis County Department of Public Health in 2017. Toxicology reports there and nationally typically find kratom mixed with opioids — heroin, fentanyl, pain pills — that are causing an ongoing epidemic of overdose deaths, cocaine and antidepressant drugs. But kratom alone, or “mitragynine intoxication,” was listed as the cause of death for 21-year-old Brady. Records show that a 46-year-old trucker from

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

tent with an opioid overdose. “If we find a substance in their system that we know can act on the same receptors as morphine, and we have signs on autopsy that are consistent with an opioid-related death, the pieces fit together and the medical examiner can call it,” Riley said. Mary Case, medical examiner for St. Louis, Jefferson, Franklin and St. Charles counties, said she was aware of reports that people get relief from kratom for an array of illnesses and ailments. “This is good and fine and dandy,” she said. “But beCHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM cause this is not regulated, you need to know how much Powdered kratom is shown in a mortar and pestle on Wednesday at Leaf & Co., a retailer at is safe to take. Because if you the Galleria. Three deaths from kratom in the St. Louis region have alarmed public health take too much, you might officials. die. As these cases indicate.”

Widely available

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

David Palatnik and Dafna Revah, who own 22 kratom stores, opened Leaf & Co. in April at the Galleria. south St. Louis County and a 49-year-old grandmother from Franklin County also died from mitragynine intoxication in separate Feb. 7 incidents. Nick Stosz said he found his wife, Julie, on the floor of their Labadie home that morning. After months of decline following an unsuccessful neck surgery and degenerative bone disease, he said, she’d grown so weak that he thought she died from a heart attack. “The one thing that we thought was giving her a little bit of quality of life back was the one thing that killed her,” he said. He said his wife took a teaspoon or two of ground kratom three or four times

a day mixed with orange juice. He said a friend of hers with rheumatoid arthritis suggested taking it for pain relief. He said his wife bought kratom at two different stores in the area over a period of months. He said it helped her sleep an hour or two at a time, which was an improvement to her existence. But she eventually experienced withdrawal symptoms when she didn’t take it. “After a dose or two again, she felt back to herself again,” he said.

Ryan Brady, 21, of Webster Groves, is one of at least three people in the region this year who died from too much “mitragynine,” a natural substance derived from kratom. Brady died in January.

tims had a combination of prescribed or over-thecounter medications in their systems, according to the death reports. None of the toxicology results included opioids or illicit drugs. Sarah Riley, director of the St. Louis University Forensic Toxicology Laboratory, which processes deaths from St. Louis County and other areas, Risk of dependence said in an interview that A common factor be- kratom can have toxic eftween the three kratom fects on its own, but mixing cases is that all of the vic- it with other drugs — prescribed or abused — can increase toxicity. “That is where it is most dangerous,” Riley said. She said the public should know that kratom is not “completely safe,” Total body health begins with better hearing health! partly because there isn’t a standard dosage. “It might be safe to drink Tinnitus affects 1 in 5 people, Those with hearing loss a cup of kratom tea in the and 90% of people of tinnitus experience 30-40% greater morning, but it probably isn’t safe to just chug it all also have a hearing loss cognitive decline day long,” she said. Riley, and other experts, warned there are people Hearing loss is Heart Health - the inner with kratom dependence twice as common in ear is highly sensitive who are medically treated similarly to people with those with diabetes to blood flow! opioid use disorder. “Anecdotally, we see instances of people who are Start a better health and Ototoxicity is caused by more starting to inject it,” she wellness conversation today! said. “It does cause withthan 200 medications that are drawal.” known to cause hearing loss 314-647-EARS (3277) Despite limited peerreviewed research, she was confident to say kratom can “sabotage” the body’s ability to pump toxins out of the brain. And, like opioids, she said, kratom attaches to brain receptors and becomes lethal by suppressing the respiratory system. Hear the Difference a Doctor of Audiology Can Make Full autopsies were done Nancy M. Richman, Au.D., CCC-A 6651 Chippewa St., Ste. Suite217 to 315 in two of the three recent Owner, Doctor of Audiology St. Louis, MO 63109 kratom deaths. Both reported “congested and edematous appearance” in ACCREDITED www.SouthCityHearing.com the lungs which is consisBUSINESS

Hear Better. Live Better.

314-647-EARS (3277)

While there are stores that specialize in selling kratom — as powder, in capsules, taffies and extracts — it’s also available to buy online and at convenience stories that sell items that are supposed to be consumed in moderation. Around the corner from the south St. Louis County home of the 46-year-old long-haul trucker who died, Dirt Cheap sells kratom by the cash register, alongside a hodgepodge of 5-hourenergy shots. The store also sells beer, cigarettes, vaping products and “Dube Tubes,” which are used to “smuggle your dube” in “smell proof” containers that look like tampons. Questions at the store about kratom were referred to Cuba, Mo.-based Wallis Companies, which owns Dirt Cheap and other stores across the region. “Some people find our products controversial,” said Tracey Hughes, a Wallis vice president and spokeswoman. “They are still legal products and there are still a lot of customers that enjoy using those products.” She said everything that Dirt Cheap carries is under regulatory scrutiny. As for kratom, she said: “It’s not a product that the FDA has banned or has any concerns about.” An online Google search for “kratom” and “Food and Drug Administration” turns up a “public health focus” last updated in April. In it, the FDA warns consumers “not to use” kratom because it’s unregulated, appears to expose people to the risk of abuse and dependence, and hasn’t been studied enough. The Mayo Clinic adds: “Depending on what is in the plant and the health of the user, taking kratom may be very dangerous.” The American Kratom Association estimates 15 million people consume kratom in the United States. The association formed five years ago in response to an FDA import alert on kratom and threats by the regulatory agency to classify the substance as a dangerous drug, said Mac Haddow, a Washington, D.C.-based lobbyist for the group. Even though kratom has been banned in parts of Southeast Asia where it has been used for centuries and Indonesia, the largest supplier, is considering a ban, he said, the natural plant leaf is safe. He said it helps

relieve pain, provide an energy or mood boost and reduce anxiety. He said it won’t get you high. He was skeptical of the three deaths in St. Louis. “A family deserves the truth — and so does the kratom community — of what really causes a death,” he said. He blamed kratom deaths on “bad actors” who run the leaf through a chemical process during production to dangerously increase natural levels of 7-hydroxymitragynine in the plant, which, he agreed, can cause fatal overdoses similar to opioids. He said that is why the association supported recent passage of the Kratom Consumer Protection Act in Utah, Georgia and Arizona, which restricts adulteration of the product, requires clear labeling of ingredients and forbids anyone under 18 to buy it. A similar measure didn’t make it through the Missouri Legislature this year. “The only problem that a consumer needs protections against is the adulterated product,” he said, adding later: “It’s potentially dangerous if you take (unadulterated) kratom while taking prescription drugs that might cause an adverse reaction. You should consult your doctor when you are doing that. That’s true for any other medication or dietary supplement you are taking at the same time.” It’s unclear if the three St. Louis-area victims fell prey to natural kratom or adulterated kratom. A $1 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is expanding the St. Louis University toxicology lab to better identify novel psychoactive substances such as 7-hydroxymitragynine.

Now at the Galleria David Palatnik and Dafna Revah don’t seem to be slowing down on their effort to offer the “largest selection of fresh kratom in the Midwest.” At last count, they said they owned 22 kratom stores, including five head shops, in Dallas, Chicago and St. Louis areas. In April, they opened Leaf & Co. above the food court at the Galleria. A kratom menu there offers 15 strains, ranging from Red Bali for mood uplift, pain relief and relaxation to Green Horned Maeng Da mainly for energy. Their store in the Tower Grove neighborhood has a different strain for each week of the year. They were skeptical of the three deaths in the St. Louis area that public health officials say were caused only by kratom, and other deaths caused by kratom mixed with illegal drugs. “There’s always going to be a fight because there isn’t a way for Big Pharma to regulate this,” Revah said of kratom. “It shouldn’t hurt the consumer because there were some bad actors out there.” They called for regulations over a ban. “I want to see kratom in the context of responsible consumers and protecting consumers,” Palatnik said. Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

© 2015 Starkey. All Rights Reserved. 3/15 34154-15

2.00% 2.05% APY

$10,000 or more

APY

$50,000 or more

Money Market Wee pay the same high rates to all our customers, new and current, personal and business. Simple for us, fair for you. And take home a free apple pie when you open, or add to, any account with $10,000 or more.

Des Peres (314) 965-4848

Clayton (314) 863-8844

St. Louis Hills (314) 678-2340

St. Charles (636) 916-4463

Alton (618) 467-1700

O’Fallon, IL (618) 624-1166

Jerseyville (618) 498-2107

Carrollton (217) 942-5408

Edwardsville (618) 307-4701

The money market is a variable rate account. There are no minimum balance fees. On days your balance falls below $10,000, you earn the savings rate, currently .25% APY. APY means Annual Percentage Yield. Rates are effective May 24, 2019 and subject to change. Member FDIC. © 2019


NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Boy Scout sex abuse toll stunning BY KIM CHRISTENSEN

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — For decades, the Boy Scouts of America has closely guarded a trove of secret documents that detail sexual abuse allegations against troop leaders and others. The most complete public accounting of the abuse so far came in 2012 when the Los Angeles Times published a searchable database of 5,000 files and case summaries that are part of the Scouts’ blacklist known as the “perversion files.” Seven years later, more details are emerging about the scope of sex abuse in the youth organization. A researcher hired by the Scouts to analyze records from 1944 to 2016 testified earlier this year that she had identified 7,819 suspected abusers and 12,254 victims. But even those numbers grossly understate how many molesters infiltrated the Scouts’ ranks over the years, according to lawyers who have sued the organization on behalf of hundreds of abuse victims. Most predators were accused of abusing multiple boys, they noted, and many instances of abuse were never reported. The Boy Scouts of America has grappled with years of costly litigation at the same time it has struggled with declining membership. The organization says it is considering bankruptcy protection, which would halt ongoing lawsuits while settlements are negotiated. Seattle attorney Timothy Kosnoff, who has sued the Boy Scouts more than 100 times since 2007, said he and two law firms he has teamed with recently signed more than 350 new clients through a national TV ad campaign and a website, abusedinscouting.com. Kosnoff said the allegations span decades and 48 states, and are made by victims ranging in age from 14 to 97. Most of the accused — 234 — are men who are not named in the blacklist,

which the organization has used to exclude suspected molesters. “Consequently, the number of children who have been abused in Scouting is much larger than the BSA has ever disclosed,” Kosnoff said. “Abused children suffer these wounds for a lifetime. It is time the BSA is held to account fully for this atrocity.” The magnitude of the Scouts’ abuse problem takes on new significance as New York and New Jersey extend their statutes of limitations on child sexual abuse lawsuits, opening the 109-year-old youth organization to a potential slew of new claims. Similar legislation is pending in California. National Scouts officials will not say how many sexual abuse lawsuits have been filed against the group or how much has been paid out in settlements and judgments, and no reliable independent estimates exist. In a statement to The Times, Scouts officials emphasized enhanced youth protection measures now in place, including criminal background checks for Scout leaders and volunteers, and said that 2018 produced only five known cases of sexual abuse among the ranks of 2.2 million Scouts. “We care deeply about all victims of child abuse and sincerely apologize to anyone who was harmed during their time in Scouting,” the statement read. “We believe victims, we support them, and we pay for unlimited counseling by a provider of their choice and we encourage them to come forward. As soon as the BSA is notified of any allegation of abuse, it is immediately reported to law enforcement.” The tally of more than 7,800 suspected abusers identified by the organization’s expert includes some who applied but were never allowed to join the ranks, the Boy Scouts said. The organization would not elaborate.

The number was cited at a Manhattan news conference held in late April by attorney Jeff Anderson, who described his “shock and dismay” at the scale of the abuse but said in a subsequent interview that he believes the figures are on the low side. “It’s emblematic of how little is actually known

about the magnitude of it,” he said. Anderson first learned of the figures while handling an unrelated sexual abuse lawsuit in his home state of Minnesota. Among those testifying in the case was Janet Warren, a professor of psychiatry and neurobehavioral sciences at the University of Virginia, who said

REBATE STIMULUS PACKAGE $2225.00 Rebates For You!

she and a team of computer coders came up with the tallies after spending five years analyzing files under a contract with the Scouts. The numbers are flawed because many perpetrators had multiple victims, many instances of sexual abuse are never reported and the Scouts have acknowledged destroying an unknown

$150 - $700

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $325

Spire Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

$2,225

Potential Savings

number of files over the years, said Paul Mones, one of the lawyers in a landmark Oregon lawsuit that resulted in a nearly $20-million jury verdict against the Scouts in 2010. He said less than a quarter of his Scouts abuse cases in the last 10 years had involved perpetrators who are in the files.

*ADDITIONAL DISCOUNT:

$300-$500 OFF A Complete Heating & A/C System Offer Expires 5/30/19

Summer Maintenance & Specials Start Now.

DON’T WAIT! • Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $340*) Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

0% Financing for 18 Months**

*On Select Models Only Call for Details **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 5/30/19

We are a locally owned & operated company with 39 years of experience behind us! Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

314-754-8772 636-373-7307

long and shoRt tERm REntals

aluminum, stEEl oR wood

Ramps Front - Garage - Rear Entrance + vEtERan and sEnioR discounts

CALL TODAY AND RECEIVE A FREE IN HOME QUOTE

314-325-3199 • 618-206-5963

MEMORIAL WEEKEND SALE ENDS MONDAY

s c i s s a l C r e Summ% OFF MSRP

UP TO

50

Outdoor Dining • Adirondack Chairs • Firepits • Outdoor Seating

Come In Now For Extra Savings during our most popular Annual Event!

Frontenac Store

Ellisville Summer Classics Store:

825 South Lindbergh 63131 • 314-993-5570 Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sat. 10:00-5:30 Tues. & Fri. 10:00-8:00 • Sun. 12:00-5:00

15977 Manchester Road 63011 636-527-7655 Mon-Sat. 10-6 • 1-5 Sunday

www.forshaws.com Quality Since 1871


NATION

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Sharp increase in states’ use of drones gered birds. In Kansas, they could soon be identifying sick cows through heat signatures. Public transportation agencies are using drones in nearly every state, according to a survey obtained by

BY LINDSAY WHITEHURST

Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — In Utah, drones are hovering near avalanches to watch roaring snow. In North Carolina, they’re searching for the nests of endan-

The Associated Press. The report from the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials shows a sharp increase in their use over the last few years, reflecting the rapid adoption of the techHANS PENNINK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW KITCHEN CABINETS. NOW AVAILABLE ALMOST ANY COLOR. NOWINAVAILABLE IN A CAN. CabinEt theaggressive ultimate finish for refurbishing kitchen and CABINETCoat COATishas adhesion and is self-leveling, bathroom cabinets, shelving, furniture, trim, and crown molding. giving your customers a furniture finish. Nofinish matter problem, Delivers an ultra-smooth, factory-like withthe long-lasting ® INSL-Xto has the solution. Visit insl-x.com. beauty. adheres “hard-to-stick” surfaces, including polyurethane and varnish, without a primer. wned

-O Family

“A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1865!”

DES PERES 12017 Manchester Rd. 314-821-1616

BRENTWOOD 8121 Manchester Rd. 314-645-2020

www.reinekedecorating.com

©2015 Benjamin Moore & Co. All trademarks are registered trademarks of their respective owner.

A drone from the New York State Fire Agency helps track a cruise ship that broke from its moorings and became lodged against a bridge earlier this year in Albany, N.Y. nology by governments as well as hobbyists. In 2016, the nonprofit group found no state transportation agency was using drones on a daily basis. Now, 36 states have certified drone pilots on staff. When the survey was done

this month, all but one state was using drones in some way. Since then, the lone holdout — Rhode Island — has bought a drone, said Tony Dorsey, a spokesman for the group. The small, unmanned aircraft are often used for prosaic tasks, like inspecting bridges and roads. With sophisticated cameras and thermal technology, they can detect tiny cracks and identify potential potholes before they’re visible to the human eye. Drones have caused their share of headaches for officials over the years as personal devices forced the grounding of planes at airports or those fighting wildfires. But they also can be useful for work that’s dangerous for people. In Utah, drones record from the air as state workers set off planned avalanches, allowing them to watch the slides close up in real time, said Jared Esselman, director of aeronautics at the state Department of Transportation. Drones also can measure snow and other elements of the state’s rugged terrain to keep them from blocking roads or other infrastructure. “We can predict not only snow slides, but mudslides and water runoff as the snow melts,” Esselman said. “Drones are a perfect tool for any job that is dangerous or dirty.” Utah is getting 40 new drones to take photos at

traffic wrecks for the investigation. In North Carolina, drones are finding the nests of endangered species like the red-cockaded woodpecker, said Basil Yap, unmanned aerial systems program manager at the state’s transportation department. People used to fan out in helicopters or all-terrain vehicles to check for evidence of the protected birds before building new projects, but the drones can do the job quicker with less disruption, Yap said. They’re also used to check for protected bats nesting under bridges and to spray herbicide on invasive plants near shorelines. North Carolina is one of three states working with the Federal Aviation Administration to test drones beyond the operator’s line of sight, at night and over people. The FAA doesn’t usually allow those uses without a special waiver. Also part of the program is Kansas, where workers are using drones to create sophisticated farming programs and monitor cattle heat signatures to prevent any illnesses from spreading. A number of states are beginning to explore how to regulate a flood of private drone traffic expected in the future. In Ohio, the state is working on an air-traffic control system called SkyVision, which would allow drones to detect and avoid other aircraft in flight.

AT TENTION: Hearing Aid Field Trial You or your family member may be a ds at eligible for hearingg aids little or no cost to you! y ! you • Are you experiencing hearing difficulties? • Do people mumble? • Do you feel like a bother to others due to your problems hearing? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may qualify for hearing aids at little or no cost to you. If you live with a hearing problem, you are needed to participate in a special consumer trial program.

Speak One-on-One with our licensed friendly hearing professionals. We are experts in hearing loss, and will work with you to help find the best DAY RISK solution for FREE TRIAL your hearing difficulties.

30

We are seeking 100 people to outhwestern try a new, completely invisible Hearing Centers hearing aid, designed to improve hearing in noisy places, eliminate feedback, and make listening to family and friends enjoyable again. Call Immediately! At the conclusion of this program, the first 100 participants to qualify may keep these hearing aids and enjoy tremendous savings.

SAY GOODBYE TO O CLOGGED GUTTERS WITH OUR NO-CLOG ANT † GUARANTEE • Clog-Free Design • Protective Overhang/Trim • ScratchGuard® Paint Finish • Customization Options • Professional Installation • Good Housekeeping Performance Guarantee

$99 InStallatIon *Does not include cost of material. Expires 5/31/19. CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE!

314-300-9959 • 618-206-5693 • 636-387-4049

DON’T WAIT - Please take a moment and call now. Even if you are not sure if you need hearing aids, don’t miss this chance to receive a FREE hearing screening that will determine if this program is right for you... Call Southwestern now to participate!

Receive a

Call to be Connected to one of our 30 Locations

(314) 230-8119 (618) 206-5940 (636) 203-9842 You Tube

All hearing tests are conducted by a licensed hearing instrument specialist.

50 Gift Certificate

$

with

RESTAURANT.COM

FREE in-home estimate!**

†Guaranteed not to clog for as long as you own your home, or we will clean your gutters for free. **All participants who attend an estimated 60-90-minute in-home product consultation will receive a $50 gift certificate. Visit https://www.restaurant.com/about/terms for complete terms and conditions and https://www.restaurant.com for participating restaurants. Retail value is $50. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. If married or involved with a life partner, both cohabitating persons must attend and complete presentation together. Participants must have a photo ID, be able to understand English, and be legally able to enter into a contract. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 10 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 5/31/19.


NATION

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Anheuser-Busch must pull some ads about MillerCoors Friday granted a preliminary injunction sought by MillerCoors that temporarily stops Anheuser-Busch from using the words “corn syrup” in ads without giving more context. MillerCoors sued its rival in March, saying St. Louisbased Anheuser-Busch spent as much as $30 million on a “false and misleading” campaign, including $13 million in its first commer-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE — A Wisconsin judge ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop suggesting in advertising that MillerCoors’ light beers contain corn syrup, wading into a fight between two beer giants that are losing market share to small independent brewers. U.S. District Judge William Conley for the Western District of Wisconsin on

cials during this year’s Super Bowl. However, the ruling did not affect all of AnheuserBusch’s advertising targeting MillerCoors, allowing the commercials that premiered at the Super Bowl to keep airing. Anheuser-Busch’s ad drew a rebuke from the National Corn Growers Association, which thanked MillerCoors for its support.

NEW KITCHEN CABINETS. NOW AVAILABLE ALMOST ANY COLOR. NOWINAVAILABLE IN A CAN. CabinEt theaggressive ultimate finish for refurbishing kitchen and CABINETCoat COATishas adhesion and is self-leveling, bathroom cabinets, shelving, furniture, trim, and crown molding. giving your customers a furniture finish. Nofinish matter problem, Delivers an ultra-smooth, factory-like withthe long-lasting ® INSL-Xto has the solution. Visit insl-x.com. beauty. adheres “hard-to-stick” surfaces, including polyurethane and varnish, without a primer. wned

-O Family

“A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1865!”

DES PERES 12017 Manchester Rd. 314-821-1616

BRENTWOOD 8121 Manchester Rd. 314-645-2020

www.reinekedecorating.com

©2015 Benjamin Moore & Co. All trademarks are registered trademarks of their respective owner.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Wisconsin judge on Friday ordered Anheuser-Busch to stop suggesting in advertising that MillerCoors’ light beers contain corn syrup. In its lawsuit, MillerCoors said it’s “not ashamed of its use of corn syrup as a fermentation aid.” Corn syrup is used by several brewers during fermen-

tation. During that process, corn syrup is broken down and consumed by yeast so that none of it remains in the final product. Bud Light is brewed with rice instead of corn syrup, but AnheuserBusch uses corn syrup in some of its other beverages, including Stella Artois Cidre and Busch Light beer. MillerCoors applauded the ruling and said Anheuser-Busch should be trying to grow the beer market, not “destroy it through deceptive advertising.” “We are pleased with today’s ruling that will force Anheuser-Busch to change or remove advertisements

that were clearly designed to mislead the American public,” said MillerCoors CEO Gavin Hattersley. Anheuser Busch, however, called the ruling a “victory for consumers” because it allows the brand’s “Special Delivery” Super Bowl ad to continue airing. The ruling affects two Bud Light commercials and billboards that describe Bud Light as containing “100 percent less corn syrup” than Miller Lite and Coors Light. Anheuser Busch said those ads are no longer up and the company had no plans to continue using them.

Small plane left East Alton, crashed off Florida coast ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — U.S. Coast Guard crews searched Saturday for a small airplane that crashed hundreds of miles off the coast of Florida shortly after it was approached by U.S. military jets. The plane flew out of St. Louis Regional Airport of East Alton. It was destined for Fort Lauderdale. News outlets report that Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport air traffic controllers lost communication with the Cessna Citation V

Friday afternoon, prompting the Florida Air National Guard to dispatch two F-15 fighter jets. Maj. Mark R. Lazane is a spokesman for the North American Aerospace Defense Command. He told The New York Times that the fighter jets approached the plane, but it “rapidly” descended and crashed. Lazane says the fighter jets did not fire upon the Cessna. Officials say the pilot was the only person on board. The pilot’s name was not immediately released.

AT TENTION: Hearing Aid Field Trial You or your family member may be a ds at eligible for hearingg aids little or no cost to you! y ! you • Are you experiencing hearing difficulties? • Do people mumble? • Do you feel like a bother to others due to your problems hearing? If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may qualify for hearing aids at little or no cost to you. If you live with a hearing problem, you are needed to participate in a special consumer trial program.

Speak One-on-One with our licensed friendly hearing professionals. We are experts in hearing loss, and will work with you to help find the best DAY RISK solution for FREE TRIAL your hearing difficulties.

30

We are seeking 100 people to outhwestern try a new, completely invisible Hearing Centers hearing aid, designed to improve hearing in noisy places, eliminate feedback, and make listening to family and friends enjoyable again. Call Immediately! At the conclusion of this program, the first 100 participants to qualify may keep these hearing aids and enjoy tremendous savings.

SAY GOODBYE TO O CLOGGED GUTTERS WITH OUR NO-CLOG ANT † GUARANTEE • Clog-Free Design • Protective Overhang/Trim • ScratchGuard® Paint Finish • Customization Options • Professional Installation • Good Housekeeping Performance Guarantee

$99 InStallatIon *Does not include cost of material. Expires 5/31/19. CALL NOW FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE!

314-300-9959 • 618-206-5693 • 636-387-4049

DON’T WAIT - Please take a moment and call now. Even if you are not sure if you need hearing aids, don’t miss this chance to receive a FREE hearing screening that will determine if this program is right for you... Call Southwestern now to participate!

Receive a

Call to be Connected to one of our 30 Locations

(314) 230-8119 (618) 206-5940 (636) 203-9842 You Tube

All hearing tests are conducted by a licensed hearing instrument specialist.

50 Gift Certificate

$

with

RESTAURANT.COM

FREE in-home estimate!**

†Guaranteed not to clog for as long as you own your home, or we will clean your gutters for free. **All participants who attend an estimated 60-90-minute in-home product consultation will receive a $50 gift certificate. Visit https://www.restaurant.com/about/terms for complete terms and conditions and https://www.restaurant.com for participating restaurants. Retail value is $50. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. If married or involved with a life partner, both cohabitating persons must attend and complete presentation together. Participants must have a photo ID, be able to understand English, and be legally able to enter into a contract. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 10 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 5/31/19.


FROM A1

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Veterans From A1

‘One more sunrise’ The day before Dennis Trudeau parachuted into Normandy, he wrote his parents a letter saying he was about to go into battle but they shouldn’t worry. “Everything is going to be fine and dandy,” he wrote. “After all, I’m not scared.” Trudeau joined the Canadian military at 17 and became a paratrooper, in part because they were paid an extra $50 a month. He’s 93 now, living in Grovetown, Georgia. But his memories of D-Day — and the day before D-Day — are undimmed. On June 5, 1944, he and the other paratroopers sat on the tarmac and joked about how they’d be in Paris by Christmas. But when they climbed into the plane, the chatter stopped. Trudeau’s position was by the open jump door; he could look out across the vast array of planes and ships powering toward Normandy. Planes were strung out across the horizon. He prayed: “I just kind of told the Lord, ‘Let me see one more sunrise.’” And then, he jumped. Trudeau landed in water up to his waist in a flooded field. In the dark, he rendezvoused with other paratroopers. They were on the way to their objective when friendly fire hit — an Air Force bomb. Thrown into a ditch, Trudeau heard a dying friend nearby, calling out for his mother. “You train with him and you ate with him and you slept with him and you fought with him. And in less than three hours, he was gone,” he said. Within hours, combat would be over for Trudeau, as well. He was captured by German forces, and spent the duration in a prisonerof-war camp. By the time the war was over he had gone from 135 pounds to about 85. He returned to Normandy in 1955 to see the graves of eight platoon members who didn’t survive. This time, he’ll say a prayer over their graves. “They’re the heroes. They’re the ones who gave everything they had,” he said.

An ‘edge’ in the air There had been a number of false starts ahead of the invasion of Normandy. But Vincent Corsini knew June 6 was different. There was a certain feeling in the

air — an “edge,” as he describes it. Chaplains on deck encouraged troops to pray and troops were given a good breakfast. Certain other D-Day memories are crystal clear: peeking out over the edge of the landing craft with amazement at the U.S. firepower directed at the beach. Machine guns splattering the water as he unloaded. The weight of the 60mm mortars he carried. Tucked against the bottom of the hill overlooking Omaha Beach, he heard someone yelling for help from the water. Taking off as much equipment as he could, he ran back to the waves and found a stranded officer. “As I was standing there looking at him, somebody up on the hill pulled the trigger,” he said. The bullet narrowly missed his ear, feeling like a “sonic boom,” as it passed. Corsini grabbed the officer and pulled him to safety. Corsini went on to fight through the dense hedgerows of Normandy with the 29th Infantry Division until they captured the strategic city of Saint-Lo. At his home in a retirement community in Burlington, North Carolina, a plaque on the wall — “D-Day to St. Lo” — commemorates his efforts. Another marks his receipt of the National Order of the Legion of Honor, France’s highest decoration. He went back for the 50th D-Day anniversary and looked across a cemetery’s field of white crosses. His wife and members of the French Club he meets with monthly encouraged him to go on the 75th anniversary, at age 94. His wartime experiences affected his life forever, he said. “I wouldn’t change my experience for a million dollars,” he said, adding: “I wouldn’t go through it again for a million dollars.”

‘Six feet down is a boy’ Frank DeVita remembers the moment he froze. He had wanted to join the Air Force but had no peripheral vision. He wanted to join the Navy but it would take weeks to start basic training. That’s how he ended up in the Coast Guard on D-Day, ferrying troops to Omaha Beach. His job was to lower the ramp when the craft got to shore and then raise it after the troops clamored clambered out. But in the early morning hours, as machine gun fire rained down on the boat, that ramp served as DeVita’s shield, protecting him and the other men inside. The coxswain screamed at him to lower

the ramp, and in the roar of the cannons and the craft’s diesel engines, DeVita couldn’t hear him. The coxswain screamed again. “I froze. I was so scared because I knew when I dropped that ramp the bullets that were hitting the ramp were going to come into the boat and I’d probably be dead in five minutes,” said DeVita, 94, speaking from his home in Bridgewater, New Jersey. When he finally dropped the ramp, he said 14 or 15 troops were immediately raked by machine gun fire. One soldier fell at his feet, his red hair full of blood: “I reached down and I touched his hand, because I wanted him to know he wasn’t alone.” Then, when he tried to lift the ramp, it was stuck. DeVita had to crawl over dead bodies lining the bottom of the landing craft to fix it. Again and again, the landing craft ferried men to the beach. When there were no more men to ferry, DeVita and the other sailors pulled bodies from the choppy seas. For decades — until recently — he never spoke of these things. This June he’ll make his 12th trip back to Normandy. Eager to keep the memory of what happened there alive, he has often brought others along to places like the American cemetery at Collevillesur-Mer. “Pick out a tombstone, any tombstone. Place your hand on that white marble and say to yourself, ‘Six feet down is a boy.’ .... He gave his life for his country and then you lift your eyes up and you see 9,400 white marble tombstones,” he said. “They all gave their lives for their country.”

A cacophony of sounds At 93, Norman Harold Kirby looks back at D-Day and the months of fighting that followed and finds it hard to remember exactly what happened. “A lot of it, I tried to forget,” he said. The Canadian, who now lives in Lions Bay, British Columbia, had joined the army when he was only 17 and was barely a 19-yearold private when he climbed into the landing craft that would take him to shore. The landing craft hit a mine, blowing a hole in the ship. His ears ringing from the explosion, Kirby abandoned the heavy gear he was carrying, his Bren machine gun and ammunition, and climbed over the side. Many who couldn’t swim died in the water. “I landed on the on the beach

M 1 • SUNDAY • 05.26.2019

with my knife, fork and spoon,” he said. On Juno Beach, he remembers an intense cacophony of sounds. Aircraft flying overhead. Navy shells rocketing toward the German positions. “The noise was just unreal... You couldn’t hear anything, anybody talking or anything. People were yelling,” he said. “You couldn’t hear them because of all the racket going on.” Kirby went back to France and Europe several times after the war as a tourist but for years never returned to Juno Beach. “I would not go to the beach. I always stayed away from it. I didn’t want to go,” he said. Finally his wife sent him on a trip to Normandy for the 50th anniversary of the invasion. This time, she’ll accompany him to the 75th anniversary.

‘Just a kid’ Climbing into the plane that would take him to Normandy, Eugene Deibler had no idea what to expect. The 19-year-old had joined the paratroopers to avoid being a radio operator, trained for months and survived a broken ankle in jump school, but had yet to see combat. Gathered at Merryfield Airfield in southwest England, the paratroopers had already gotten geared up to jump the night before, and then the operation was called off due to bad weather. All that pent-up energy had to go someplace, and Deibler remembers troops getting into fights. The second night, it was a go. Climbing into the plane, Deibler remembers telling himself that if his buddies could do this, so could he. “If you weren’t scared something was wrong with you,” he said. “Because you’re just a kid, you know?” As they arrived at the French coast, he remembers heavy antiaircraft fire and tracer bullets from machine guns lighting up the sky like fireworks. “We said ‘Let’s get the hell out of this plane,’” he said. The jump light went on, and out they went. On the ground, their job was to secure a series of locks on the Douve River to prevent the Germans from opening the locks and flooding the fields. But they ran into such fierce resistance trying to secure another objective — a set of bridges — that they had to fall back. Deibler went on to fight across Normandy, Holland and Belgium, in the Battle of Bastogne.

This will be his first time back to Normandy since the invasion, and he’d like to see what’s changed. At his Charlotte, North Carolina, home, the 94-year-old retired dentist has a collection of World War II books. He’s afraid that the great conflict will be forgotten. “How many people remember the Civil War? How many people will remember World War I? And now it’s the same with World War II,” he said. “World War II will fade away also.”

‘It can’t happen again’ Of all the medals and awards that Steve Melnikoff received as a 23-year-old fighting his way across Europe, the Combat Infantry Badge means the most to him. It signifies the bearer “had intimate contact with the enemy,” he said. And Melnikoff certainly did. When he landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day-plus-1 — June 7, 1944 — victory was far from secure. His unit was part of the bloody campaign to capture the French town of Saint-Lo through fields marked by thick hedgerows that provided perfect cover for German troops. He remembers the battle for Hill 108 — dubbed Purple Heart Hill — for its ferocity. His job was to take up the Browning Automatic Rifle should the man wielding it go down. The Germans had shot and killed his friend who was carrying the BAR, and Melnikoff picked it up. About an hour later, he too was shot. As he went down, he looked to the side and saw his lieutenant also come under fire. “He’s being hit by the same automatic fire, just standing there taking all these hits. And when the machine gun stopped firing he just hit the ground. He was gone,” Melnikoff said. “That is what happens in war,” he said, speaking from his Cockeysville, Maryland, home. For decades he didn’t talk about the war and knows some men who went to their graves never speaking about it again. But he feels an obligation now to talk about what he and others went through. In his hundredth year, he works closely with The Greatest Generations Foundation, which helps veterans return to battlefields where they fought. This year on June 6, he’ll go back to the cemetery and pay his respects. “This prosperity and peace that we’ve had for all these years, it’s because of that generation,” he said. “It can’t happen again and that’s why I go there.”

REDISCOVERING AMERICA | MEMORIAL DAY QUIZ 5. Another Memorial Day tradition is Operation Rolling Thunder. Hundreds of thousands of motorcyclists, many of them military veterans, ride into Washington, D.C., for the annual demonstration. What year did it begin? A: 1968 B: 1978

C: 1988 D: 1998

6. According to custom, how is the U.S. flag to be flown on Memorial Day? A: At full staff B: At half staff C: At half staff until noon, then raised to full staff until sunset D: Alternated hourly

A time to

7. Memorial Day 1922 (which was still observed on May 30 then) was chosen for the dedication of what famous landmark?

remember ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. James Warner, of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), places a flag at a headstone in 2017 at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va.

J. MARK POWELL | InsideSources.com

A

nother Memorial Day is here. But before you throw the hot dogs on the grill or head to the pool, let’s remember what this holiday is about. It’s the day we honor those who gave their lives for the freedom we enjoy. Memorial Day’s birthplace is hotly disputed. So we’ll sidestep the controversy and focus on some aspects of the holiday you may not know, including a couple of fun food facts. Take the quiz below and test your knowledge of this annual tradition.

1. The commander of the Grand Army of the Republic issued a proclamation in 1868 declaring May 30 as a day to place flowers on the graves of Union Civil War dead. What did he call it? A: Memorial Day B: Remembrance Days

C: Heroes Day D: Decoration Day

2. Which state first made Memorial Day a legal holiday in 1873? A: New Hampshire B: New York

C: New Jersey D: Rhode Island

ABOUT THE WRITER: J. Mark Powell is a historical novelist and former broadcast journalist.

3. Gen. Ulysses Grant attended the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery in 1868. Which future president spoke for over an hour and a half that day? A. James Garfield B. Grover Cleveland C. William McKinley D. Theodore Roosevelt

4. A long-standing Memorial Day tradition is the placing of a special wreath in Arlington National Cemetery. Where is this touching ceremony held? A: The Eternal Flame at President Kennedy’s grave B: The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier C: Arlington House D: The USS Maine Memorial

8. Congress eventually passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, with Memorial Day observed on the last Monday in May starting in what year? A: 1949 B: 1960

C: 1971 D: 1982

9. It’s estimated what percentage of Americans will have a cookout during Memorial Day weekend? A: 62% B: 75%

C: 81% D: 99%

10. Finally, hot dogs are a favorite food at those cookouts. How many frankfurters do Americans consume every second between Memorial Day and Labor Day? A: 123 B: 356

C: 550 D: 818

Answers:1-D, 2-B, 3-A, 4-B, 5-C, 6-C, 7-D, 8-C, 9-A, 10-D

Test your knowledge about day that honors the fallen

A: The Golden Gate Bridge B: Mount Rushmore C: The Gateway Arch in St. Louis D: The Lincoln Memorial


FROM A1

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

More than a banner Boy Scout Troops 12 and 35 and Cub Scout Packs 12 and 43 hosted a flag retirement ceremony on Saturday at Valhalla Cemetery in Belleville. The Scouts gathered more than 600 worn out flags for the annual event.

A scoutmaster demonstrates the traditional method of retiring a flag, which involves tearing the flag into strips. The remainder of the flags retired Saturday were retired whole to be more efficient.

Volunteers cut and remove grommets from worn out flags. The grommets are burned individually to remove the flag fabric, then collected. Some Scouts will use these grommets as neckerchief slides. A flag that once covered a soldier’s casket is burned in a fire during the flag retirement ceremony. COLTER PETERSON PHOTOS, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Trenton Piker, 12, Dave Steen, assistant scoutmaster of Troop 12, and Bryant Steen, 14, salute as a flag burns during a flag retirement ceremony Saturday at Valhalla Cemetery in Belleville. The flag had been used to cover a soldier’s casket. Organizers take extra care with such flags to “honor the person, not just the symbol,” said Dave Steen.

Veterans From A1

‘One more sunrise’ The day before Dennis Trudeau parachuted into Normandy, he wrote his parents a letter saying he was about to go into battle but they shouldn’t worry. “Everything is going to be fine and dandy,” he wrote. “After all, I’m not scared.” Trudeau joined the Canadian military at 17 and became a paratrooper, in part because they were paid an extra $50 a month. He’s 93 now, living in Grovetown, Georgia. But his memories of D-Day — and the day before D-Day — are undimmed. On June 5, 1944, he and the other paratroopers sat on the tarmac and joked about how they’d be in Paris by Christmas. But when they climbed into the plane, the chatter stopped. Trudeau’s position was by the open jump door; he could look out across the vast array of planes and ships powering toward Normandy. Planes were strung out across the horizon. He prayed: “I just kind of told the Lord, ‘Let me see one more sunrise.’” And then, he jumped. Trudeau landed in water up to his waist in a flooded field. In the dark, he rendezvoused with other paratroopers. They were on the way to their objective when friendly fire hit — an Air Force bomb. Thrown into a ditch, Trudeau heard a dying friend nearby, calling out for his mother. “You train with him and you ate with him and you slept with him and you fought with him. And in less than three hours, he was gone,” he said. Within hours, combat would be over for Trudeau, as well. He was captured by German forces, and spent the duration in a prisonerof-war camp. By the time the war was over he had gone from 135 pounds to about 85. He returned to Normandy in 1955 to see the graves of eight platoon members who didn’t survive. This time, he’ll say a prayer over their graves. “They’re the heroes. They’re the ones who gave everything they had,” he said.

An ‘edge’ in the air There had been a number of false starts ahead of the invasion of Normandy. But Vincent Corsini knew June 6 was different. There was a certain feeling in the

air — an “edge,” as he describes it. Chaplains on deck encouraged troops to pray and troops were given a good breakfast. Certain other D-Day memories are crystal clear: peeking out over the edge of the landing craft with amazement at the U.S. firepower directed at the beach. Machine guns splattering the water as he unloaded. The weight of the 60mm mortars he carried. Tucked against the bottom of the hill overlooking Omaha Beach, he heard someone yelling for help from the water. Taking off as much equipment as he could, he ran back to the waves and found a stranded officer. “As I was standing there looking at him, somebody up on the hill pulled the trigger,” he said. The bullet narrowly missed his ear, feeling like a “sonic boom,” as it passed. Corsini grabbed the officer and pulled him to safety. Corsini went on to fight through the dense hedgerows of Normandy with the 29th Infantry Division until they captured the strategic city of Saint-Lo. At his home in a retirement community in Burlington, North Carolina, a plaque on the wall — “D-Day to St. Lo” — commemorates his efforts. Another marks his receipt of the National Order of the Legion of Honor, France’s highest decoration. He went back for the 50th D-Day anniversary and looked across a cemetery’s field of white crosses. His wife and members of the French Club he meets with monthly encouraged him to go on the 75th anniversary, at age 94. His wartime experiences affected his life forever, he said. “I wouldn’t change my experience for a million dollars,” he said, adding: “I wouldn’t go through it again for a million dollars.”

‘Six feet down is a boy’ Frank DeVita remembers the moment he froze. He had wanted to join the Air Force but had no peripheral vision. He wanted to join the Navy but it would take weeks to start basic training. That’s how he ended up in the Coast Guard on D-Day, ferrying troops to Omaha Beach. His job was to lower the ramp when the craft got to shore and then raise it after the troops clamored clambered out. But in the early morning hours, as machine gun fire rained down on the boat, that ramp served as DeVita’s shield, protecting him and the other men inside. The coxswain screamed at him to lower

the ramp, and in the roar of the cannons and the craft’s diesel engines, DeVita couldn’t hear him. The coxswain screamed again. “I froze. I was so scared because I knew when I dropped that ramp the bullets that were hitting the ramp were going to come into the boat and I’d probably be dead in five minutes,” said DeVita, 94, speaking from his home in Bridgewater, New Jersey. When he finally dropped the ramp, he said 14 or 15 troops were immediately raked by machine gun fire. One soldier fell at his feet, his red hair full of blood: “I reached down and I touched his hand, because I wanted him to know he wasn’t alone.” Then, when he tried to lift the ramp, it was stuck. DeVita had to crawl over dead bodies lining the bottom of the landing craft to fix it. Again and again, the landing craft ferried men to the beach. When there were no more men to ferry, DeVita and the other sailors pulled bodies from the choppy seas. For decades — until recently — he never spoke of these things. This June he’ll make his 12th trip back to Normandy. Eager to keep the memory of what happened there alive, he has often brought others along to places like the American cemetery at Collevillesur-Mer. “Pick out a tombstone, any tombstone. Place your hand on that white marble and say to yourself, ‘Six feet down is a boy.’ .... He gave his life for his country and then you lift your eyes up and you see 9,400 white marble tombstones,” he said. “They all gave their lives for their country.”

A cacophony of sounds At 93, Norman Harold Kirby looks back at D-Day and the months of fighting that followed and finds it hard to remember exactly what happened. “A lot of it, I tried to forget,” he said. The Canadian, who now lives in Lions Bay, British Columbia, had joined the army when he was only 17 and was barely a 19-yearold private when he climbed into the landing craft that would take him to shore. The landing craft hit a mine, blowing a hole in the ship. His ears ringing from the explosion, Kirby abandoned the heavy gear he was carrying, his Bren machine gun and ammunition, and climbed over the side. Many who couldn’t swim died in the water. “I landed on the on the beach

with my knife, fork and spoon,” he said. On Juno Beach, he remembers an intense cacophony of sounds. Aircraft flying overhead. Navy shells rocketing toward the German positions. “The noise was just unreal... You couldn’t hear anything, anybody talking or anything. People were yelling,” he said. “You couldn’t hear them because of all the racket going on.” Kirby went back to France and Europe several times after the war as a tourist but for years never returned to Juno Beach. “I would not go to the beach. I always stayed away from it. I didn’t want to go,” he said. Finally his wife sent him on a trip to Normandy for the 50th anniversary of the invasion. This time, she’ll accompany him to the 75th anniversary.

‘Just a kid’ Climbing into the plane that would take him to Normandy, Eugene Deibler had no idea what to expect. The 19-year-old had joined the paratroopers to avoid being a radio operator, trained for months and survived a broken ankle in jump school, but had yet to see combat. Gathered at Merryfield Airfield in southwest England, the paratroopers had already gotten geared up to jump the night before, and then the operation was called off due to bad weather. All that pent-up energy had to go someplace, and Deibler remembers troops getting into fights. The second night, it was a go. Climbing into the plane, Deibler remembers telling himself that if his buddies could do this, so could he. “If you weren’t scared something was wrong with you,” he said. “Because you’re just a kid, you know?” As they arrived at the French coast, he remembers heavy antiaircraft fire and tracer bullets from machine guns lighting up the sky like fireworks. “We said ‘Let’s get the hell out of this plane,’” he said. The jump light went on, and out they went. On the ground, their job was to secure a series of locks on the Douve River to prevent the Germans from opening the locks and flooding the fields. But they ran into such fierce resistance trying to secure another objective — a set of bridges — that they had to fall back. Deibler went on to fight across Normandy, Holland and Belgium, in the Battle of Bastogne. This will be his first time back

to Normandy since the invasion, and he’d like to see what’s changed. At his Charlotte, North Carolina, home, the 94-year-old retired dentist has a collection of World War II books. He’s afraid that the great conflict will be forgotten. “How many people remember the Civil War? How many people will remember World War I? And now it’s the same with World War II,” he said. “World War II will fade away also.”

‘It can’t happen again’ Of all the medals and awards that Steve Melnikoff received as a 23-year-old fighting his way across Europe, the Combat Infantry Badge means the most to him. It signifies the bearer “had intimate contact with the enemy,” he said. And Melnikoff certainly did. When he landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day-plus-1 — June 7, 1944 — victory was far from secure. His unit was part of the bloody campaign to capture the French town of Saint-Lo through fields marked by thick hedgerows that provided perfect cover for German troops. He remembers the battle for Hill 108 — dubbed Purple Heart Hill — for its ferocity. His job was to take up the Browning Automatic Rifle should the man wielding it go down. The Germans had shot and killed his friend who was carrying the BAR, and Melnikoff picked it up. About an hour later, he too was shot. As he went down, he looked to the side and saw his lieutenant also come under fire. “He’s being hit by the same automatic fire, just standing there taking all these hits. And when the machine gun stopped firing he just hit the ground. He was gone,” Melnikoff said. “That is what happens in war,” he said, speaking from his Cockeysville, Maryland, home. For decades he didn’t talk about the war and knows some men who went to their graves never speaking about it again. But he feels an obligation now to talk about what he and others went through. In his hundredth year, he works closely with The Greatest Generations Foundation, which helps veterans return to battlefields where they fought. This year on June 6, he’ll go back to the cemetery and pay his respects. “This prosperity and peace that we’ve had for all these years, it’s because of that generation,” he said. “It can’t happen again and that’s why I go there.”


NATION/WORLD

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

DNA test uncovers D-Day love story BY JOHN LEICESTER

Associated Press

LUDRES, France — After decades of searching, Andre Gantois had lost hope. The retired French postal worker figured he’d likely go to his grave without ever knowing who his father was, unable to identify the U.S. serviceman who had fought his way across France after the D-Day landings, taken a bullet to the skull and been nursed back to health in a military hospital by Gantois’ mother. Into his 70s, Gantois still had no clues to pursue, no name to work with, no paper trail to follow. As a consequence, he also had no peace. “Throughout my life, I lived with this open wound,” he says. “I never accepted my situation, of not knowing my father and, most of all, knowing that he didn’t know about me, didn’t know of my existence.” Even as Europe, the United States and their allies mark 75 years since 160,000 Allied troops stormed a heavily-fortified 50-mile stretch of Nazi-occupied coastline in Normandy, the history of D-Day and its aftermath is still being written. Soldiers on all sides fathered tens of thousands of children, some of them unable to ever answer that most existential of questions: Where did I come from? Until a few months ago, when what he calls an unexpected “miracle” changed his life and filled in one of these missing pieces of wartime history, Gantois was among them. Growing up as a postwar kid in eastern France, he would simply draw a line on forms at school that asked pupils for their fathers’ names and other family details. His mother and grandmother told him his father was killed in France’s war in Vietnam that broke out in 1946, the year Gantois was born. The grandmother said his father’s name was Jack. A trusting child, Gantois couldn’t know these were lies. He didn’t pay much heed to elderly neighbors who called him “the young American” or “the American’s kid.” Only at age 15, when Gantois was mourning the death of his mother, taken by tuberculosis at age 37, did he get the truth. “’Listen, Andre, I have to tell you,’” the 73-year-old Gantois recalls his grandmother confessing to him. “’Your dad was an American, in the war.’” At first, Gantois was lost. Later, in his 20s, he became determined to find out more. Having married and with plans to start a family of his own, Gantois felt compelled to put a name, a face, to the patchy story and to fill what his wife, Rosine, now says was “a huge hole” in his life. “He had no name, nothing to go on,” she says. “He told me, ‘I’ll die without ever knowing who he was.’” Visits to U.S. offices in France produced only frustration. Gantois recalls that an embassy official told him: “’A lot of people are looking for their fathers, because they want money, they want to be compensated by the U.S. government. But you have to have proof.’ I had no proof.” Other avenues also proved to be dead ends. Until last June. Urged on by his daughter-in-law, Gantois took a DNA test. Weeks later, in the middle of the night, she called him with the earthshaking results. “’You have an American brother, a sister, a whole family,’” Gantois recalls her telling him. “I didn’t know what to say.” His dad, the test helped reveal, had been Wilburn “Bill” Henderson. From Essex, Missouri, the infantryman landed on Omaha beach seemingly just after D-Day, fought through Normandy, suffered a head wound in the closing months of the war and met Irene Gantois at a hospital in occupied Germany. After Germany’s surrender in May 1945, when the

soldier came to visit her at home in eastern France, she apparently didn’t tell him that she was carrying his child. He returned to the United States, started a family and never spoke to his children about her before his death in 1997. The trail would have ended there for Andre Gantois had his American half brother not also taken a DNA test. By chance, they both picked the same testing company, enabling it to put them together. The two men and Gantois’ half sister, Judy, met for the first time last September

in France. Allen Henderson took the test on a whim, because the company had a special offer on its prices and, he says, because “I thought, well, that would be interesting.” Both Gantois and Henderson acknowledge how lucky they are not only to have found each other but also that their father survived Normandy and its aftermath. “When I was little, he was always telling me stories about being in France and he’d speak a little French and kind of talk about how it was like to lay

in a foxhole and guns, bullets flying over your head and guys dying all around you,” says the 65-year-old Henderson, who lives in Greenville, South Carolina. “Amazing that he survived.” Henderson says he knew straight away when he saw Gantois that they were brothers because the resemblance is so striking. “You know, Andre actually looks more like my dad than I do,” Henderson says. “Your mannerisms, RICHARD SHIRO, ASSOCIATED PRESS your smile, your face, I feel Allen Henderson speaks via Skype earlier this month in almost like I’m talking to Greenville, S.C., to his brother Andre Gantois, who is in my dad.” France.

NOW THROUGH MEMORIAL DAY!

FLOORING

SALE

Pay No Tax!

**

12 MONTHS FREE FINANCING!*

Textured Carpet Reg. 499 sq. ft. Now

Solid Tonal Waterproof Vinyl Color Plush Luxury Plank 40 oz. & 50 oz. Reg. Now

599sq. ft.

Special Price Now

2 3 6

$ 99 $ 99 $ 99 sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad AND Installation

sq. ft.

Includes 8 lb Pad AND Installation

sq. ft.

INSTALLED

Removal of regular carpet and furniture moving FREE!

Save on Wood, Sheet Vinyl,Tile, LVT-LVP, and more!

CREVE COEUR

ELLISVILLE

SOUTH COUNTY

1000 N. Lindbergh (at Olive)

15763 Manchester (just east of Clarkson)

6925 S. Lindbergh (Marshall’s Plaza)

314-993-0808

636-391-8070

314-892-4499

DES PERES

ST. CHARLES

13384 Manchester Rd. (Just west of 270)

Regency Plaza (Bogey Rd., West of 94)

314-909-7474

636-940-2244

ALL STORE HOURS (except Des Peres)

Mon-Fri 9-7 Sat 9-6 Sun 12-5

OPEN MEMORIAL DAY 9-6 Des Peres Store Hours Tue-Fri 10-7 Sat 9-6 Closed Sun & Mon www.EdwardsCarpet.com

*Previous sales excluded. On Approved Credit,1/3 deposit required, minimum payment. See Store for full details. ** Sales tax will be added to sale and then a discount equal to the sales tax will be deducted.


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019 [PROMOTION]

in good taste PRESENTED BY

TROPICAL FRUITS Let the sunshine into your diet SPONSORED CONTENT BY BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

fiber and even healthy fats, when you count avocados — which, yes, are technically fruits.” Dart points out that fat itself isn’t bad; it’s just a matter of how certain fats affect cholesterol. “Avocados are rich in monounsaturated fats. These healthy fats can help lower levels of ‘bad’ blood cholesterol, or LDL, and can also help lower the risk of heart disease and stroke,” he says.

“As a group, tropical fruits are filled with nutrients that may help with controlling blood pressure, keeping digestion working smoothly, and possibly even lowering the risk of cancer and heart disease,” says Hank Dart, prevention and control expert at Siteman Cancer Center. “Among other nutrients, these fruits are often rich in vitamin C, potassium, beta-carotene,

Many tropical fruits are sweet, so if you enjoy peaches, there’s a good chance you’ll also enjoy more exotic ones such as kumquats, pomelos and star fruit. “Many of us treat ourselves regularly to special sweets or coffee drinks,” Dart says. “Try occasionally trading one of those for a trip to the specialty produce aisle and pick a tropical fruit you haven’t tried, or one you

really like but don’t often buy for yourself.” You could also ease in with mangoes and papayas. These are especially great options because they can be enjoyed in many different ways: raw for a snack, grilled as a side dish or blended into a smoothie. Thanks to advancements in shipping and storage, tropical fruits are more accessible than ever. Frozen tropical fruits retain nearly all of the nutrients that fresh fruits do, and they keep for much longer. Dart does recommend steering clear of canned varieties that have added sugar, juice, syrup or salt. You won’t miss them: Tropical fruits have plenty of flavor on their own, and they’re a great way to inject some sundrenched fun into your day.

Think of tropical fruits, and coconuts and rambutans might come to mind: They’re gorgeous to look at, yet puzzling to cook with. Tropical fruits are simply those that originate and thrive in hot and humid climates, weather that Missouri is all too familiar with this time of year. Summer is a great time to take advantage of their incredible biodiversity and their outstanding health benefits.

As a group, tropical fruits are filled with nutrients that may help with controlling blood pressure, keeping digestion working smoothly, and possibly even lowering the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Hank Dart prevention and control expert at Siteman Cancer Center

Smoked Mango Habanero Salsa

PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

YIELDS | ABOUT 10 HALF CUP SERVINGS

5 roma tomatoes, stem removed 1 small yellow onion, peeled and halved 1 medium white onion, peeled and halved ½ cup cilantro 2 mangoes, skin removed and roughly diced 1-2 habanero peppers, depending upon heat preference 1 poblano pepper 1 head of garlic 1 tablespoon paprika

1 tablespoon cumin 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar 3 teaspoons olive oil Juice of 3 small limes Handful of wood chips (not required) Charcoal grill (not required) Cast iron skillet

| preparation | Heat grill to medium heat with cast iron skillet (or another grill safe pan). Remove head from garlic, wrap in tin foil and place on indirect heat of grill. Throw hand full of wood chips on charcoal. Place poblano pepper and onions on direct heat, charring the outsides, about 5-10 minutes. Once both sides of the onion are charred move to indirect heat. Take poblano off grill when all sides are charred and place into a covered bowl for 10 minutes to steam and cool. Peel poblano and remove the stem and place in food processor. While pepper cools place 1 teaspoon olive oil in cast iron skillet, and then the tomatoes. Roast tomatoes on grill for 30 min or until tender. Stir every 10 min. Once onions are tender and tomatoes are roasted, remove from grill along with the garlic. Cut the root off onions and place in food processer along with tomatoes and poblano pepper. Add red wine vinegar, salt, pepper, cumin, and paprika, cilantro, remaining olive oil, and juice from limes. Pulse food processor to chop and mix ingredients. Once mixed, cut stem off habaneros and remove seeds. Roughly chop them and place them in food processor along with the diced mangos. Pulse a few more times to chop and incorporate peppers and mangos. Serve with tortilla chips or over chicken or fish!

PHOTO PROVIDED BY SITEMAN CANCER CENTER

[ TA K E A T RO P I C A L T R I P ] GUAVA

LYCHEE

MANGO

PAPAYA

With more than 100 varieties, guavas range from white to deep pink and can grow from Central America to Thailand. What unites them all is their light, bright taste — much like a strawberry or kiwi — and their stellar nutritional profiles, which include vitamin C, fiber and antioxidants. Enjoying guavas couldn’t be simpler: They can be eaten skin and all. Even their leaves can be used in herbal tea. They’re also commonly found in smoothies, jams and beauty products.

A few years back, lychees went from being relatively unknown (outside of Southeast Asia, at least) to superfood superstars. Lychees are golf-ball-size fruits that are rose in color, floral in scent and covered in bumpy skin — which explains their “alligator strawberry” nickname. Although the skin and pit are not edible, the pearly white flesh holds a delicate taste reminiscent of pear or watermelon. Enjoy them raw or make them into simple syrup and add to drinks.

Peeling a mango, navigating around the pit and getting to the fruit itself isn’t easy, but the taste — like a peach infused with everything awesome about pineapples — is worth the effort. They make a great summery salsa and shine in desserts (think mango sorbet). Or toss them on the grill: The intense heat caramelizes their naturally occurring sugars and deepens their sweetness. Any preparation will bring loads of vitamin C and antioxidants.

Papayas’ origins are surprisingly close to home. Originally from Mexico and northern parts of South America, they’re now grown throughout the southern United States. It’s an underrated, incredibly versatile fruit: Try it grilled and drizzled with honey and lime, blended with banana and coconut milk in a smoothie, or use it as a rejuvenating DIY face mask. Its calorie count is among the lowest of all fruits in the produce section, but it still brings plenty of vitamin C, fiber and potassium.

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY ISTOCK IMAGES

PASSION FRUIT Roughly the same size and color as a plum, passion fruit is steadily finding its way into everyday diets, thanks to its high levels of fiber and vitamins A and C — though its intriguing name doesn’t hurt, either. It’s true that neither the outside (often wrinkly) nor the inside (a golden, gooey pulp filled with seeds) looks particularly appetizing, but with a tart taste similar to mangoes and pineapples, it yields a sweet reward. After cutting the fruit in half, you can scoop out the pulp and eat it raw, or boil it down into a sauce to give chicken or fish a tropical twist.


05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

WEEK IN REVIEW

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO VIEW MORE WEEK IN REVIEW CONTENT

IN THE NEWS Pelosi, Trump trade insults

IN THE NEWS Abortion bills incite protests

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi openly questioned President Donald Trump’s fitness for office Thursday, suggesting a family or staff “intervention” after a dramatic blow-up at a White House meeting the previous day. Both the Republican president and Democratic leaders dug in a day after Pelosi claimed Trump is “engaged in a cover-up” and Trump stalked out of the Cabinet Room demanding an end to congressional investigations before he would work with Congress on crumbling U.S. infrastructure and other matters. Earlier in the week, Pelosi and five of her top investigative committee leaders spoke with fellow Democrats after an increasing number called for the beginning of an impeachment inquiry following special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

At the U.S. Supreme Court, statehouses and other sites across the nation, abortion rights supporters held rallies Tuesday in opposition to the wave of sweeping abortion bans being enacted this year in Midwestern and Southern states. Organizers — including Planned Parenthood, NARAL Pro-Choice America and the American Civil Liberties Union — said tens of thousands of people attended hundreds of events held in all 50 states. The“National Day of Action to Stop the Bans” came in response to a near-total ban on abortion recently signed into law in Alabama, as well as bills enacted or nearing passage in Mississippi , Kentucky, Ohio, Georgia and Louisiana aimed at banning abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

IRAN: The Pentagon on Thursday outlined proposals to the White House that would send military reinforcements to the Middle East to beef up defenses against Iran amid heightened tensions in the region. President Donald Trump said he was not convinced more troops are needed but would do whatever is necessary. TRUMP’S TAXES: New York lawmakers gave final passage to legislation Wednesday that would allow President Donald Trump’s state tax returns to be released to congressional committees that have, so far, been barred from getting the president’s federal filings. SMOKING AGE: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, whose home state of Kentucky was long one of the nation’s leading tobacco producers, introduced bipartisan legislation this week to raise the minimum age for buying tobacco products from 18 to 21.

EVAN VUCCI, ASSOCIATED PRESS

TRUMP REELECTION CAMPAIGN ON THE MOVE, FOCUSES ON BIDEN President Donald Trump voiced confidence this week in his ability to claim a repeat victory in 2020 and took a fresh swipe at one of his leading Democratic rivals, telling Pennsylvania rallygoers that native son Joe Biden had abandoned them by representing Delaware in the Senate. Trump’s visit Monday to the key battleground state came two days after Biden held a campaign rally in Philadelphia, and the former vice president wasn’t far from Trump’s mind. “He left you for another state, and he didn’t take care of you,” Trump said. He also referred to the former vice president by the nickname he has coined for him: “Sleepy Joe.” Biden said Monday in Nashville, Tennessee, that he is running on a pledge to restore the soul of America. He has frequently talked on the campaign trail about the president’s divisive rhetoric and said another four years of Trump would “fundamentally change the character of this nation.” Trump uses his campaign rallies to disparage various Democratic candidates for president, but he has been heavily focused on Biden, suggesting he may be worried about the possibility of facing off next year against the longtime politician. Here, Trump pumps his fist to the crowd after speaking at a campaign rally Monday in Montoursville, Pa.

BIG NUMBER

THE WATER COOLER

19.3M

ROTTEN TOMATOES: Rotten Tomatoes is taking another step to verify that users posting a rating of a movie have actually seen it. The review aggregator said Thursday that users who have purchased tickets on Fandango will get a verified badge next to their review, beginning with films out this weekend like “Booksmart” and “Aladdin.” The verified audience scores will also be displayed on Fandango.

The number of Sunday night viewers for the “Game of Thrones” series finale across HBO’s platforms, topping the previous episode’s 18.4 million to make it the most-viewed episode of any kind in the channel’s history.

HE SAID ...

Politics is a crazy world, but when you have the best employment numbers in history, when you have the best unemployment numbers in history ... I don’t know, how the hell do you lose this election, right?” — President Donald Trump, on the 2020 campaign trail this week

STAR ENGAGEMENT: Wedding bells are in the future for actress Scarlett Johansson and Colin Jost of “Saturday Night Live.” Johansson’s publicist said late last weekend that the couple is officially engaged after two years of dating. No date has been set for the nuptials.

FARM AID: President Donald Trump is delivering another $16 billion in aid to farmers hurt by his trade policies, an effort to relieve economic pain among his supporters in rural America and another sign that the U.S.-China trade war likely won’t end anytime soon.

STORMY SAGA: Michael Avenatti, the attorney who rocketed to fame through his representation of porn star Stormy Daniels in her battles with President Donald Trump, was charged Wednesday with ripping her off. Avenatti denied the allegations. Federal prosecutors say Avenatti used a doctored document to divert about $300,000 that Daniels was supposed to get from a book deal.

WIKILEAKS: The U.S. filed new charges Thursday against Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, accusing him of placing the United States at risk of “serious harm” by publishing thousands of secret and classified documents, including the names of confidential sources for American armed forces. FACEBOOK: Facebook removed more than 3 billion fake accounts from October to March, twice as many as the previous six months, the company said this week. As a result, the company estimates that 5% of its 2.4 billion monthly active users are fake accounts.

SUMMER TRAVEL: The airline industry’s U.S. trade group is predicting another record for summer travel. Airlines for America forecast Tuesday that 257.4 million people will fly on U.S. carriers between June 1 and Aug. 31. That’s a 3.4% increase over last summer, and it works out to about 2.8 million travelers a day.

— Associated Press

LOWER YOUR ENERGY BILLS!

Buy 1 window, get 1 window

50%

Comfort 365 Windows®

Champion Sunroom & Siding

Free Estimates Factory Direct To You Made In The USA 4.5/5 Star GuildQuality Rating

*

OFF

CALL NOW! OFFER ENDS 5-31-19

MEM

ORIA

L DA Y

CALL OR CLICK BEFORE MAY 31! ASK ABOUT OUR FINANCING – 60 MONTHS LOW-INTEREST**

636-764-3707

SaleAtChampion.com

25

% * OFF

SUNROOMS & SIDING CALL NOW! OFFER ENDS 5-31-19

Get an

PLUS!

EXTRA

10 %OFF

*

29 Cassens Court • Fenton

Every Comfort 365 Window® Comes With Our Exclusive Warranty If It Breaks, We Fix It.†

With participation in the YES! Program

CALL BEFORE MAY 31 TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE AND REDEEM THESE SAVINGS! *Minimum purchase of 4 Comfort 365 Windows®, 120 sq. ft. complete sunroom, or 1,200 sq. ft. of siding required. No adjustments can be made on prior sales. Offer subject to change. Additional 10% off (up to $2,000) valid only on the day of your initial in-home estimate with participation in the YES! Program, can be used once per residence per term. See website or a Champion Representative for details. **Subject to credit approval. Fixed interest rate of 7.99% for 60 months. Payment example assumes one time $10,000 purchase on approval date (APR 8.14%) with 1 payment of $105.58, 5 payments of $66.58, and 54 amortized payments of $221.08. Payments assume Account Activation charge of $39 applies and is due with first required payment. Financing for GreenSky® consumer loan programs is provided by federally insured, equal opportunity lender banks. †The Champion Limited Lifetime Warranty applies to Comfort 365 Windows® as long as the original purchaser owns the home. See website or a Champion Representative for details. Offer expires 5-31-19. ©Champion Opco LLC, 2019


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

WASHINGTON

Bland video stirs tension in Texas

Trans protection at risk

AUSTIN, Texas — Texas authorities on Friday denied withholding a cellphone video of Sandra Bland’s confrontational traffic stop, responding to a Democratic legislator’s heated questions about why the 39-second clip never publicly surfaced until now. Bland, a 28-year-old black woman from outside Chicago, had used her phone in 2015 to briefly film a white state trooper as he drew a stun gun and yelled, “I will light you up!” while ordering her out of the car. She was dead three days later, hanging in her jail cell outside Houston. Her death was ruled a suicide. The video had not been publicly seen until it was aired this month by a Dallas television station.

Administration wants to revoke gains made for LGBTQ Americans BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration moved Friday to revoke newly won health care discrimination protections for transgender people, the latest in a series of actions that aim to reverse gains by LGBTQ Americans in areas ranging from the military to housing and education. The Health and Human Services Department released a proposed regulation that in effect says “gender identity” is not protected under federal laws that prohibit sex discrimination

in health care. It would reverse an Obama-era policy that the Trump administration already is not enforcing. “The actions today are part and parcel of this administration’s efforts to erase LGBTQ people from federal regulations and to undermine nondiscrimination protections across the board,” said Omar Gonzalez-Pagan, a senior attorney on health care at Lambda Legal, a civil rights organization representing LGBT people. The administration also has moved to restrict military service by transgender men and women, proposed allowing certain homeless shelters to take gender identity into account in offering someone a bed for the night and concluded in a 2017 Justice Department memo that

federal civil rights law does not protect transgender people from discrimination at work. As one of her first policy moves, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos withdrew guidance that allowed students to use bathrooms matching their gender identity. More than 1.5 million Americans identify as transgender, according to the Williams Institute, a think tank focusing on LGBT policy at the UCLA School of Law. A bigger number — 4.5% of the population— identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT), according to Gallup. Pushing back against critics, the HHS official overseeing the new regulation said transgender patients would continue to be protected by other federal laws that bar discrimination on the ba-

sis of race, color, national origin, sex, age and disability. “Everyone deserves to be treated with dignity and respect,” said Roger Severino, who heads the HHS Office for Civil Rights. “We intend to fully enforce federal laws that prohibit discrimination.” Asked about the charge that the administration has opened the door to discrimination against transgender people seeking needed medical care of any type, Severino responded, “I don’t want to see that happen.” Behind the dispute over legal rights is a medically recognized condition called “gender dysphoria” — discomfort or distress caused by a discrepancy between the gender that a person identifies as and the gender at birth.

GOP conservative blocks disaster bill WASHINGTON — A House GOP conservative blocked a long-overdue $19 billion disaster aid bill Friday, complaining it leaves out money needed to address the migrant crisis at the border and extending a tempest over hurricane and flood relief that has left the measure meandering for months. The move came a day after the measure flew through the Senate despite a Democratic power move to strip out President Donald Trump’s $4.5 billion request for dealing with a migrant crisis on the U.S.Mexico border. Texas Rep. Chip Roy, a former aide to Texas firebrand Sen. Ted Cruz, complained that it does not contain any money to address increasingly urgent border needs. “It is a bill that includes nothing to address the international emergency and humanitarian crisis we face at our southern border,” Roy said. BRIEFLY TRADE: Stepping up Beijing’s propaganda offensive in the tariffs standoff with Washington, Chinese state media on Friday accused the U.S. of seeking to “colonize global business” with moves against Chinese technology companies. NUKES: North Korea said Friday that nuclear negotiations with the United States will never resume unless the Trump administration moves away from what Pyongyang described as unilateral demands for disarmament. President Donald Trump prepares to travel to Japan this weekend for a summit with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in which the North Korean nuclear issue will likely be on the agenda. KIDNAPPER: A Wisconsin man was sentenced Friday to life in prison for kidnapping 13-year-old Jayme Closs and killing her parents after the girl told the judge she wanted him “locked up forever” for trying to steal her. Jake Patterson, 21, pleaded guilty in March to two counts of intentional homicide and one count of kidnapping. ESPIONAGE: U.S. Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Stephen Kellogg III, 26, has pleaded guilty to two counts of espionage and was sentenced to three years after admitting he took classified information and planned to share it with the Russians, officials said Friday. ESCAPE FEARED: Drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman is blowing smoke about his harsh prison conditions and might be trying to organize a jailbreak, prosecutors suggest in a court filing. Federal prosecutors said the cocaine kingpin is being treated fairly and should be denied earplugs, unlimited commissary access and outdoor recreation time he requested. GAY RIGHTS: Kenya’s High Court on Friday upheld sections of the penal code that criminalize same-sex relations, a disappointment for gay rights activists across Africa where dozens of countries have similar laws. One law punishes “carnal knowledge against the order of nature” and prescribes up to 14 years in prison for people convicted of homosexual acts. — Associated Press

WILL NEWTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘SET THE STANDARD’: SHANAHAN CHALLENGES ACADEMY GRADS Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan told graduates at the U.S. Naval Academy on Friday in Annapolis, Md., to change the status quo and stand their ground in the face of ethical failure, urging them to “set the standard on preventing sexual harassment and assault” among ranks. More than 1,000 midshipmen graduated from the military school. Each received a Bachelor of Science degree, and most were commissioned as either Navy ensigns or second lieutenants in the Marines. Here, the Blue Angels flight demonstration team flies over the academy’s graduation and commissioning ceremony.

Pros wary of intelligence release Critics say leaving the decision to a Trump loyalist is a bad move BY DEB RIECHMANN

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Intelligence professionals warned Friday that President Donald Trump’s decision to give his loyal attorney general carte blanche to disclose stillsecret material from the Russia investigation will let William Barr cherry-pick intelligence to paint a misleading picture about what started the probe. The president claims his campaign was spied upon, though Trump administration officials said they have no specific evi-

dence that anything illegal was done when the campaign came under FBI surveillance that was approved by a court. On Thursday, Trump gave Barr full authority to publicly disclose information about the origins of the investigation the president has repeatedly dismissed as a “hoax.” But Trump’s critics are wary of leaving the decision of what intelligence to release — and what should remain hidden — in Barr’s hands. Barr is a staunch Trump defender who Democrats say spun special counsel Robert Mueller’s report in Trump’s favor, playing down aspects suggesting possible criminal conduct. Mueller also complained to Barr about his handling of the release of the report.

US will fortify its Middle East forces Trump says troops are meant to counter Iran’s threatening activities BY SUSANNAH GEORGE AND LOLITA C. BALDOR

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. will send hundreds of additional troops and a dozen fighter jets to the Middle East in the coming weeks to counter what the Pentagon said is an escalating campaign by Iran to plan attacks against the U.S. and its interests in the region. For the first time, Pentagon officials on Friday publicly blamed Iran and its proxies for recent tanker bombings near United Arab Emirates and a rocket attack in Iraq. President Donald Trump told reporters Friday that the 1,500 troops would have a “mostly protective”

role as part of a build-up that began this month in response to what the U.S. said was a threat from Iran. The announcement caps three weeks of elevated tensions with Iran, as the administration hurled accusations of an imminent attack and abruptly deployed Navy warships to the region. The moves alarmed members of Congress, who demanded proof and details, amid fears the U.S. was lurching toward open conflict with Iran. Also Friday, Iran’s foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif lashed out at Trump during a visit to Pakistan ahead of next week’s emergency Arab League meeting called by Saudi Arabia over the region’s tensions. The Iranian diplomat assailed the American president for his tweet this week warning Iran not to threaten the U.S. again or it would face its “official end.”

That prompted concern that Barr will take a similar approach to his review of the origins of Mueller’s probe, releasing intelligence backing Trump’s claims that it was politically motivated, while keeping classified evidence demonstrating the need for the probe. Barr already asked the U.S. attorney in Connecticut to examine the origins of the Russia investigation to find out if intelligence and surveillance methods used during the probe were lawful and appropriate. Intelligence experts say having someone outside the intelligence community deciding what can be released jeopardizes sources and undercuts America’s partnership with spy agencies in friendly nations.

Traditionally, when Congress, for instance, asks for material to be declassified, the request is forwarded to the intelligence agencies where the information originated or resides. Those agencies recommend what part, if any, can be declassified without jeopardizing intelligence sources or spy craft. Then, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence coordinates the feedback from all the agencies and makes a decision. National Intelligence Director Dan Coats said Friday that 17 intelligence agencies he represents will provide the Justice Department all appropriate information needed for its review of intelligence activities related to Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Arguments over rape, incest divide abortion opponents BY DAVID CRARY

Associated Press

Even as the anti-abortion movement celebrates the sweeping bans passed in several states, it’s divided by a widening rift over whether those prohibitions should apply to victims of rape and incest. The debate pits those who believe any abortion is immoral against those who worry that a no-exception stance could be harmful to some Republican candidates in upcoming elections. A Gallup poll last year found that 77% of Americans support exceptions in cases of rape and incest. “There is a media spotlight shining on this issue,” said Clarke Forsythe, senior counsel with Americans United for Life. “State leaders need to be prudent and reflect not only on state elections but also national elections, and the pace

of change the public might accept.” There’s potential for even more division. The Federalist, an online magazine influential in conservative and anti-abortion circles, ran an article this week by two abortion opponents suggesting that women who induce their own abortions should be prosecuted for murder. The position is at odds with the pro-women rhetoric of leading anti-abortion groups. “We’re 100% percent against prosecuting women.” said Kristi Hamrick, spokeswoman for Students for Life of America. Divisions over rape-andincest exceptions have existed within the anti-abortion movement for years, but have become more apparent as several states in the South and Midwest enacted tough bans on abortion.


A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

ELECTION 2020 | ABORTION

Trump to appeal halt on wall project

New laws risky at polls

SAN FRANCISCO — President Donald Trump on Saturday pledged to file an expedited appeal after a federal judge blocked him from building key sections of his border wall with money secured under his declaration of a national emergency, delivering what may prove a temporary setback on one of his highest priorities. U.S. District Judge Haywood Gilliam Jr.’s order, issued Friday, prevents work from beginning on two of the highest-priority, Pentagon-funded wall projects — one spanning 46 miles in New Mexico and another covering 5 miles in Yuma, Arizona. The judge felt challengers were likely to prevail on their argument that the president was wrongly ignoring Congress’ wishes by diverting Defense Department money.

Venezuela turns to Norway for help

States’ challenges to Roe v. Wade may help Democrats BY ALAN FRAM

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A flood of laws banning abortions in Republican-run states handed Democrats a political weapon heading into next year’s elections,helping them paint the GOP as extreme and court centrist voters who could decide congressional races in swing states, members of both parties say. The Alabama law outlawing virtually all abortions,even in cases of rape or incest, is the strictest so far. Besides animating Democrats, the law prompted President Donald Trump, other Republican leaders and lawmakers seeking reelection next year to distance themselves from the measure. Their reaction underscores that

Republicans have risked overplaying their hand with severe state laws that they hope will prod the Supreme Court,with its ascendant conservative majority, to strike down Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion. The Alabama law is “a loser for Republican candidates in Colorado, without question, and in many other swing parts of the country, because it’s extreme,” said David Flaherty, a Colorado-based Republican consultant who’s worked on congressional races around the country. “It’s only going to widen the gender gap.” Brian Fitzpatrick, a Vanderbilt Law School professor and former aide to Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said there are many“women,moderate women who are going to be scared that this right that they thought they had for the last 40some years is going to be shelved” and they will be motivated to vote. GOP Sens. Joni Ernst of Iowa

and Susan Collins of Maine, both seeking reelection next year, said the Alabama ban goes too far by eliminating exceptions for pregnancies involving rape or incest. A 2005 survey by the Guttmacher Institute, which backs abortion rights, found about 1% of women said they had abortions because of rape or incest. Democrats see the statutes as a way to weave a broader message about Republicans. “You use it as an example of what they do when they’re unchecked,” said Rep. A. Donald McEachin, D-Va., a leader of the Democratic CongressionalCampaignCommittee, House Democrats’ campaign organization. “I think it drives moderate Republicans away from their party.” Democratic presidential contenders are competing to lambast the Alabama law, which allows exceptions when the mother’s health is endangered. Sen. Kirsten

CARACAS, Venezuela — Representatives of the Venezuelan government and opposition have returned to Norway for a mediation effort aimed at resolving the political crisis in the South American country, the Norwegian government said Saturday. Norway said it will facilitate discussions next week in Oslo, in an indication that the negotiation track is gaining momentum after months of escalating tension between Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and Juan Guaidó, the U.S.-backed opposition leader. Representatives of Venezuela’s political factions traveled to the European country earlier this month for talks, but it had been unclear if they would continue to engage with one another amid increased tensions over the opposition’s call for a military uprising on April 30. BRIEFLY AFGHANISTAN: An Afghan security forces raid against Taliban fighters in eastern Nangarhar province mistakenly killed at least six civilians, including a woman and two children, provincial officials said Saturday. Attahullah Khogyani, the provincial governor’s spokesman, said 10 insurgents were also killed in the Friday night attack in Sherzad district. MANHUNT: French police on Saturday hunted a suspect believed to have deposited a paper bag containing a device that exploded Friday, wounding 13 people on a busy pedestrian street in Lyon. He said no group has claimed responsibility for the explosion yet. Authorities said 11 were still in the hospital on Saturday. AMBASSADOR: The U.S. ambassador to China urged Beijing to engage in dialogue with exiled Tibetan Buddhist leader the Dalai Lama during a visit to the Himalayan region over the past week, the U.S. Embassy said Saturday. Terry Branstad also “expressed concerns regarding the Chinese government’s interference in Tibetan Buddhists’ freedom to organize and practice their religion.” SHOOTING: At least two gunmen fired into a crowd outside a bar in Trenton, New Jersey, wounding 10 people, two critically, but the motive for the shooting remains unknown, authorities said. Shooters drove up to the corner outside Ramoneros Liquor and Bar about 12:25 a.m. Saturday and fired more than 30 shots. FLOODING: Officials on Saturday warned some residents in Oklahoma and Arkansas to prepare to head to higher ground because old levees holding back the swollen Arkansas River are stressed and more rain is expected for the flood-weary region. Additional storms are possible in Arkansas, Oklahoma and Kansas over the next week, according to the latest forecasts. EU ELECTIONS: The European Parliament elections shifted to the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Malta and Latvia on Saturday as voters in those European Union nations took part in a landmark ballot in which resurgent nationalists are challenging traditional parties over the future of Europe. The voting ends today. — Associated Press

Gillibrand, D-N.Y., called it an “existential threat to the human rights of women,” while former Vice President Joe Biden said GOP hopes of striking down Roe v. Wade are “pernicious and we have to stop it.” Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi and Ohio have enacted or neared approval of measures barring abortion once there’s a detectable fetal heartbeat, which can occur in the sixth week of pregnancy, before a woman may know she is pregnant. Missouri lawmakers approved an eight-week ban. Spotlighting the perilous political territory Republicans are navigating, an April poll by the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation found that Americans support Roe v. Wade by 2-1. A Gallup poll last year found that 57% of adults who described themselves “pro-life” nonetheless said abortion should be legal if the pregnancy results from rape or incest.

Colombian army chief is linked to slayings Commander accused of extrajudicial killings to inflate body count BY JOSHUA GOODMAN

Associated Press

JULIUS MOTAL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

PENCE TELLS WEST POINT GRADS TO EXPECT TO SEE COMBAT West Point cadets celebrate Saturday at the end of graduation ceremonies at the United States Military Academy in West Point, N.Y. Vice President Mike Pence told the most diverse graduating class in the history of the U.S. Military Academy that the world is “a dangerous place” and they should expect to see combat. Pence spoke as the U.S. plans to send another 1,500 troops to the Middle East to counter what the Trump administration describes as threats from Iran. Meanwhile, the longest war in U.S. history churns on in Afghanistan, and Washington is weighing its options amid political upheaval in Venezuela.

US, Japan to talk trade agreement in state visit Trump has threatened devastating tariffs on automotive exports BY JILL COLVIN AND DARLENE SUPERVILLE

Associated Press

TOKYO — President Donald Trump opened a state visit to Japan on Saturday by needling the American ally over its trade imbalance with the United States. Trump also promoted the U.S. under his leadership, saying “there’s never been a better time” to invest or do business in America, and he urged corporate leaders to come. The president’s first event after arriving in Tokyo was a reception with several dozen Japanese and American business leaders at the U.S. ambassador’s residence. He said the two countries “are hard at work” negotiating a trade agreement. “I would say that Japan has had a substantial edge for many, many years, but that’s OK,” Trump said,

joking that “maybe that’s why you like me so much.” His comments underscored the competing dynamics of a state visit designed to show off the long U.S.-Japan alliance and the close friendship between Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe even as trade tensions run high. Abe has planned a largely ceremonial, four-day visit to suit Trump’s whims and ego. It’s part of Abe’s charm strategy that some analysts say has spared Japan from the full weight of Trump’s trade wrath. Abe and Trump planned to play golf today before Abe gives Trump the chance to present his “President’s Cup” trophy to the winner of a sumo wrestling championship match. On Monday,Trump will become the first head of state to meet Emperor Naruhito since he ascended to the throne this month. “With all the countries of the world, I’m the guest of honor at the biggest event that they’ve had in over 200 years,” Trump

said before the trip. The president is threatening Japan with potentially devastating U.S. tariffs on foreign autos and auto parts. He has suggested he will go ahead with the trade penalties if U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer fails to win concessions from Japan and the European Union. Trump predicted that a U.S.Japan trade deal could be finalized during his trip. But that’s unlikely given that the two sides are still figuring out the parameters of what they will negotiate. Also at issue is the lingering threat of North Korea, which has resumed missile testing and recently fired a series of shortrange missiles that U.S. officials, including Trump, tried to play down despite an agreement by the North to hold off on further testing. Trump’s national security adviser, John Bolton, said the short-range missile tests were a violation of U.N. Security Council resolutions and that sanctions must stay in place.

BOGOTA, Colombia — New evidence has emerged linking the embattled head of Colombia’s army to the alleged cover-up of civilian killings more than a decade ago. The documents, provided to The Associated Press by a person familiar with an ongoing investigation into the extrajudicial killings, come as Gen. Nicacio Martínez Espinel faces mounting pressure to resign over orders he gave troops this year to step up attacks in what some fear could pave the way for a return of serious human rights violations. Colombia’s military is blamed for as many as 5,000 extrajudicial killings at the height of the country’s armed conflict in the mid-2000s as troops under pressure by top commanders inflated body counts, in some cases dressing up civilians as guerrillas in exchange for extra pay and other perks. What became known as the “false positives” scandal cast a dark shadow over the U.S.backed military’s record of battleground victories. Fifteen years later not a single top commander has been held accountable for the slayings. Human Rights Watch in February harshly criticized President Ivan Duque’s appointment of Martínez Espinel, noting that he was second-in-command of the 10th Brigade in northeast Colombia during years for which prosecutors have opened investigations into 23 illegal killings. The rights group revealed that then Col. Martínez Espinel certified payments to an informant who led to “excellent results” in a purported combat operation in which an indigenous civilian and 13-year-old girl were killed. A court later convicted two soldiers of abducting them from their home, murdering them and putting weapons on their bodies so they appeared to be rebels. Martínez Espinel in a statement said he faces no criminal or disciplinary investigations.

Britain’s Conservative hopefuls jockey for position ASSOCIATED PRESS

LONDON — The race to succeed British Prime Minister Theresa May is heating up, the field of Conservative contenders is quickly growing and the focus is squarely on how to handle Brexit. Former House of Commons leader Andrea Leadsom and former Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab joined the fray Saturday night. Both earlier resigned from May’s Cabinet to protest her Brexit policy. Health Secretary Matt Hancock said Saturday morning he is seeking to replace May, joining several

others who announced they will run to become the Conservative party’s next leader, and by default, Britain’s new prime minister. May announced Friday she plans to step down as Conservative Party leader on June 7 and remain as a caretaker prime minister while the party chooses a new leader in a contest that officially kicks off the following week. She plans to remain as party leader through U.S. President Donald Trump’s upcoming state visit and the 75th D-Day anniversary celebrations on June 6.

Her successor will have to try to complete Brexit — a task that May failed to deliver during her three years in office. While she succeeded in striking a divorce deal with the European Union, the plan was defeated three times in Parliament by British lawmakers from across the political spectrum. The EU extended Britain’s departure date to Oct. 31 but there still is no consensus among British lawmakers about how or even if the country should leave the bloc. Even before a new leader is cho-

sen, the Conservative Party is expected to fare poorly when the results of the European Parliament election in Britain are announced tonight. The best-known contestant for the Conservative leadership post is former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who has said he will take Britain out of the EU on Oct. 31 even if no deal has been reached with EU leaders. Economists and business leaders warned that a no-deal departure would have a drastically negative impact on Britain’s economy.


05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

HURRY IN FOR THE

THE TRIPLE 8 CHALLENGE! GIVE US 8 MINUTE TO FEEL THE 8 DEGREES OF COOLNESS FOR 8 HOURS OF COOL Sleep up to 8o cooler* all night long with next-generation, cover-to-cove cooling technology. We’d like you to meet the all-new TEMPUR-LUXEbreeze™.

breezeo

*Based on average heat index of TEMPUR-LUXEbreezeTM compared to TEMPUR-PROAdpat® models measured over an 8-hour period. See store for details.

UPGRADE YOUR MATTRESS WITH AN ADJUSTABLE BASE FOR AS LOW AS $14

** PER MONTH

Fits Your Existing Tub Space in

1-DAY! NO MESS INSTALLATION!

FOR QUEEN SIZE

Arnold Bridgeton 12100 St. Charles Rock Rd. 884 Arnold Commons Dr. (636) 321-2621 (314) 209-9099

Chesterfield 1661 Clarkson Rd. (636) 449-5991 O’Fallon 1301 Hwy K (636) 542-9997

Florissant 13225 New Halls Ferry Rd. (314) 831-8900

Fenton 72 Fenton Plaza (636) 496-6005

St. Peters 4484 South St. Peters Pkwy (636) 928-7999

Fairview Heights 6108 N. Illinois (159) (618) 624-5200

Shrewsbury 7576 Watson Rd. (314) 373-4585

South County 3177 Lemay Ferry Rd. (314) 892-1001

Wentzville 1215 Wentzville Pkwy (636) 856-2334

SPRING SAVINGS SAVE 50% OFF Installation

618-215-7379 • 314-236-9874 Incredible Financing! Lifetime Warranty! Full Senior Discounts! *Offer available with purchase of any complete bath or shower system. Offer cannot be combined with other offers, not valid on previous sales, financing available to those who qualify, see store for details. Expires: May 31, 2019

&")%$ (#!'

5";:(' <+) ?*;( 4(+$('% /6910..

@@@0?<7A;<++!>507*;

==2 ',*+-*>,*1 5,@#/, 7&?*;-?@ "*$@@3

6*$)$.?@ <,%%@, >] 7&?*;-?@ "*$@@ ==23

:,%0( "8@#,(4

KF\F?= M9R#\RP\* L\RN^U K?#[=FHU RH, KFEE*? O33QOQQOU O33Q5QQOU O33Q6QQOS

14OQQO

/-.10.. D

@:[[#< K$R?NFR\ )?#\\ @<R#H\*== =<**\ $#H&*, NFF^#H& &?R<* GF?N*\R#HT*HR[*\*,U R#?T#H=:\R<*,U ,F:P\*T 8R\\*, PF8\ RH, \#, @<R#H\*== =<**\ R#? #H=:\R<*, $#H&*, ,#((:=*? E\R<* >8F EF=#<#FH (:*\ &?R<* @\F8 NFF^U =[F^* PF8\ 9*H< =*<<#H& @HRET"*<C &R= #&H#<#FH =Y=<*[ 7--A$.) 9*,? >F<R\ NFF^#H& R?*R Z=B:R?* #HN$*=X- 436 O05QOQOO L\RN^ FH\YS

/-6110..

V %H(#H#<Y %&H#<#FH <$R< #&H#<*= *RN$ P:?H*? #H,*E*H,*H<\YS V '#&$ E*?(F?[RHN* =<R#H\*== =<**\ P:?H*?=S V @<R#H\*== =<**\ +\R9F?#W*? PR?=S V @<R#H\*== =<**\ NFF^#H& &?R<*=S V 22/ @BS %HS F( <F<R\ NFF^#H& R?*RS >]

8( @*+,$ :( "+)('%*=) *+ #+2%$*7A )(7A#+& 33 ]#==F:?#.= \R?&*=< =<FN^#H& ,*R\*? F( ,*N^#H& E?F,:N<=AA +?** 7*<# NFF\*? 8#<$ ;3UQQQ E:?N$R=* F( NF[EF=#<* ,*N^#H&S !,, (%-*, +-* 5,%?$@(44

J#=N\R#[*?- 'RN^[RHH !:[P*? #= HF< ?*=EFH=#P\* (F? RHY <YEF&?RE$#NR\ *??F?=S

KF\F?= R9R#\RP\* L\RN^ RH, @[F^* 2OQ366QOU 2OQO66QO

",.,($(1 %% @IT55Q !G "?( "*$@@3

/1610..

?<7A;<++,% ,-,- " "(!'&(&*) '%*+#%$ "(! '&(&*)

!!#"$#$$

J*\#9*?Y M9R#\RP\* @** =<F?* (F? ,*<R#\=

($.$, 2*/ ,/2% "2-0,$2! 0, '#1 )0., &22+


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Trump blurs line between governing, campaign BY JILL COLVIN

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — It was an Oprah-worthy moment: President Donald Trump stood before a Louisiana crowd at a taxpayerfunded event and tossed out an enticing promise. “If we win this election, which is just 16 months away, we’re giving you a brand new I-10 bridge.” Trump’s commitment during a visit to a liquefied natural gas export facility last week drew cheers from his audience. But it generated immediate criticism from ethics experts who have already sounded alarms about Trump’s apparent willingness to put the federal bureaucracy to work for his own political benefit. All presidents benefit from the trappings of the office. But as Trump heads into a turbulent re-election campaign, historians and observers are wondering just how far the president might be willing to go in using the levers of presidential power, from the Pentagon to the Justice Department, to energize his supporters and help bolster his election chances, especially if the polls are tilting against him. “I think there’s no limit to what Donald Trump will do to get reelected,” said historian Douglas Brinkley. “When painted into a corner in an election season,” he said Trump has shown a willingness to take “extraordinary leaps to frighten people into voting for him” or make grand infrastructure promises that may never come to pass. Such accusations are nothing new. President George W. Bush’s administration “used every favor they had,” including well-timed grants, to help candidates who “needed a little push,” said Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University. And President Barack Obama was accused of making a political play just months before the 2012 election when he took executive action to create new protections for so-called Dreamer immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.

SCOTT CLAUSE, ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump speaks last week at Cameron LNG Export Terminal in Hackberry, La. While the White House has pushed back on the notion, Trump made clear in the leadup to the 2018 midterm elections that he was willing to use his office as a campaign asset. As he tried to help Republicans hang on to the Senate and minimize losses in the House, Trump turned to his go-to issue — immigration — and made dire warnings from the White House about an “invasion” of Central American migrants, even though the caravan he warned against was still hundreds of miles from the U.S.-Mexico border and dwindling. Then Trump mobilized the U.S. military, deploying thousands of troops to the southern border in what many saw as a political stunt. In the weeks ahead of the election, Trump also threatened to end the constitutional right to birthright citizenship and promised a new, 10% tax cut for the middle class that has yet to materialize six months later.

Dave Levinthal, federal politics editor at the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit news organization specializing in investigative journalism, said that Trump’s unprecedented mixing of government and campaigning began when he launched his reelection effort on Inauguration Day. “That’s really changed the game in a significant way, in that Donald Trump has more or less created a true, permanent presidential campaign,” Levinthal said.“It may have felt like that before but now it really is reality.” Since then, Trump has been steadily raising money and holding political rallies, along with staging official government events that often have the feel of campaign functions. Indeed, Trump used his event last week in Louisiana to size up his 2020 Democratic opponents and dismiss their prospects, before drawing a standing ovation as he promised to rebuild the Calcasieu

River Bridge. “We’ll have it all set to go Day One, right after the election, OK?” Trump told the crowd. The day before, Trump was offering up new federal cash for the crucial battleground states of Florida and Michigan, asking Congress for $200 million for Army Corps of Engineers work in the Florida Everglades, an extra $1.6 billion for NASA and $300 million for Great Lakes restoration work. Trump’s original budget plan had proposed slashing the Great Lakes money, but the president announced he was reversing that during a March rally in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He also promised a swift infusion of federal aid to the hurricane-battered Florida Panhandle during a rally there last week. “He’s already put Florida pork projects into play to make sure he holds that state,” said Brinkley, adding that, while all politicians make such promises, “no

president will use fearmongering and hyperbole to the degree that Trump will to drive a wedge issue home.” Federal law prohibits the promising of favors or other benefits in exchange for supporting a candidate, said Virginia Canter, chief ethics counsel at the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a non-profit government watchdog group. Beyond typical promises of pork and pandering, there is also concern that Trump might be willing to cross other lines. “I do think a lesson that he probably took from the midterms is his ability to put things in motion as president that he can do to affect the electorate — especially his base,” said David Lapan, the former Department of Homeland Security press secretary under Trump and longtime Defense Department spokesman and adviser. “If you start using those powers for political reasons, then you raise questions about your motives.”

Democrats seize on WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS Supreme Court as • BEST WINDOW • FREE, NO PRESSURE campaign issue ESTIMATES • FREE, 18 Month BY SAHIL KAPUR

Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Democrats are attempting to turn the Supreme Court into a campaign issue as they confront President Donald Trump’s success at reshaping the federal judiciary with young, conservative judges and the prospect that abortion rights are close to being eliminated. It’s a shift after decades of GOP candidates rallying their voters with promises to reshape the courts in a backlash to Warren Court rulings of the 1960s, and Roe v. Wade in 1973, the landmark abortion rights ruling. That dynamic lasted through the 2016 election, when Trump won over skeptical evangelicals by vowing to pick conservative justices who would allow states to outlaw abortion. The 2020 Democratic presidential contenders are increasingly bringing up the courts when addressing voters. They’re egged on by activists still furious about Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s refusal to let President Barack Obama fill an open Supreme Court seat in 2016 after the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. That enabled Trump to solidify a 5-4 conservative majority. Focus on the courts was intensified this month with enactment of a law in Alabama that makes performing an abortion a felony in almost all cases. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey said the measure was aimed at forcing the Supreme Court to reconsider abortion rights. Legislatures in other Republican-dominated states have passed or are considering abortion restrictions as conservatives see their first viable chance in a generation to overturn or sharply curtail Roe v. Wade. The Alabama law was roundly denounced by the Democratic2020candidates. In an email to supporters last week, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts warned that “a woman’s constitutional right to abortion is under attack,” and “we’re going to fight this with everything we’ve got.”

At a town hall recently in Nashua, N.H., California Sen. Kamala Harris was confronted by a man who said Republicans“stoleaSupreme Court nominee” by refusing to allow a vote on Merrick Garland during the last 10 months of Obama’s presidency. Harris said that if she’s elected and nominates a Supreme Court nominee, respectfortheprecedentofRoe v.Wade would be“a very significant factor.” Kirsten Gillibrand,theNewYorksenator whoisstrugglingtogaintraction in the nomination contest,vowedto“onlynominate judges who will uphold Roe v. Wade.” Warren, Harris, Gillibrand and Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey as well as Beto O’Rourke and Pete Buttigieg also have indicated willingness to consider restructuring the Supreme Court as a remedy to its conservative tilt, including adding seats or limiting the terms of justices. The candidates are all getting a push from some liberal activists who fault previous Democratic nominees, including Obama and Hillary Clinton, for not placing enough emphasis on the courts as election issue. “It was a huge mistake on the part of the candidates in the primary and then Hillary Clinton in the general election not to talk about the courts” in 2016, said Caroline Fredrickson of the American Constitution Society, a progressive group. “She didn’t talk about what her court would look like. Donald Trump was waving his list around and saying, ‘Here’s who I’d nominate, and they’ll overturn Roe.’ We had nothing to organize around.” In 2020,“It’s definitely become a much stronger issue for progressives,” she said. Adding to the urgency for Democratic candidates is that the Supreme Court could rule on cases involving the Affordable Care Act, immigration and gay rights — central issues for the party — in the middle of the presidential campaign next year.

NO INTEREST FINANCING*

40% OFF SIDING Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 6/30/19.

$200 *with approved credit

314-429-7000 25+ y

millswindow.com

Ea RS

OFF

WINDOWS Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 6/30/19.

Temperature-Controlled Storage Buy or Rent Equipment • Flexible Terms & Rates

Coldtainer Portable Storage Refrigerated, frozen, or heated storage with DC or AC power options. Purchase Coldtainer equipment, or try before you buy with our rental program.

Refrigerated & Frozen Storage Trailers Refrigerated or frozen storage trailers parked onsite for your event. We deliver or you pickup.

Refrigerated Vans Refrigerated vans for delivery or transport. Plug in onsite or vehicle powered. Flexible rental and mileage rates. Or, talk to the CSTK sales team about custom van purchase options.

Call Now To Reserve • (314) 771-6666 • www.cstk.com


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Stan Lee’s former manager arrested ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — A former business manager of Stan Lee was arrested Saturday on elder abuse charges involving the late comic book legend. Keya Morgan was taken into custody in Arizona on an outstanding arrest warrant after being charged by Los Angeles County prosecutors this month. Morgan faces felony charges including theft, embezzlement, forgery or fraud against an elder adult, and false imprisonment of an elder adult. A misdemeanor count also alleges elder abuse. Authorities say Morgan sought to capitalize on the Marvel Comic mastermind’s wealth and exert influence over Lee even though he had no authority to act on his behalf. Police say Morgan pocketed more than $262,000 from autograph signing sessions Lee did in May 2018. Authorities say Morgan at one point also took Lee from his Hollywood Hills home to a Beverly Hills condominium “where Morgan had more control over Lee.” Lee’s daughter said in a request for a restraining order last year that Morgan was manipulating the mentally declining Lee, preventing him from seeing family and friends, and trying to take control of his money and business affairs. Attorney Alex Kessel has said Morgan never abused or took advantage of Lee. Kessel said in an email on Saturday that he was in contact with prosecutors to arrange for Morgan to surrender on Tuesday. “It is unfortunate that the DA and police did not honor our commitment to surrender next week and arrested him,” Kessel said in an email. Lee died in November at the age of 95.

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

North Korea violated UN resolutions, Bolton says But Trump not ‘disturbed’ by missile tests, president tweets BY SIMON DENYER AND ASHLEY PARKER

Washington Post

TOKYO — There is no doubt North Korea violated United Nations Security Council resolutions by testing ballistic missiles this month, national security adviser John Bolton said on Saturday, adding that President Donald Trump is determined to maintain sanctions pressure on the regime until it backs down. The comments mark the first time a senior administration official has confirmed that North Korea launched ballistic missiles in contravention of U.N. resolutions, with officials appearing reluctant until now to make such a clear statement to demonstrate their willingness to restart dialogue. But in a tweet just after 7:30 a.m. Sunday (Tokyo time), Trump directly contradicted his national security adviser, writing, “North Korea fired off some small weapons, which disturbed some of my people, and others, but not me.” “I have confidence that Chairman Kim will keep his promise to me,” Trump added. Bolton and Trump have disagreed on a number of issues in recent weeks, including just how hawkish a stance to take in conflicts with Venezuela and Iran, and that friction has recently spilled into public view. Earlier this month, Trump praised Bolton to reporters but noted that he and his national security adviser often have different views about the use of American power and foreign intervention. In his tweet, Trump also misspelled former vice president Joe Biden’s name, and seemed to side with North Korea and its leader

YOHEI KANASASHI, AP

U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton is surrounded Friday by reporters at the Japanese prime minister’s official residence in Tokyo. Kim Jong Un over Biden — a Democratic presidential candidate, on whom Trump and his allies are most focused — saying he had appreciated a recent comment by North Korean state media calling Biden a “low IQ idiot” whose candidacy should not carry high expectations. Trump wrote that he “also smiled when he called Swampman Joe Bidan a low IQ individual, & worse. Perhaps that’s sending me a signal?” With Trump in Tokyo for a state visit, he faces deadlock and the possible collapse of what he considers to be one of his key foreign policy achievements, calming tensions with Pyongyang, ending its nuclear and missile tests and starting a dialogue about denuclearization. But missiles are being tested, talks have completely dried up and threatening language is on the rise, with both sides demanding that the other back down, in what amounts to a nuclear-armed staring match. North Korea conducted two sets of missile tests earlier this

month, with Bolton describing them as “close-range ballistic missiles,” as well as “more standard SRBMs, short-range ballistic missiles.” U.N. Security Council resolutions, including Resolution 1695, specifically prohibits North Korea from launching any ballistic missiles, he said, adding: “I know that because I wrote it.” “In terms of violating Security Council resolutions, there’s no doubt about that,” Bolton told reporters on Saturday, hours before Trump was due to land and be greeted by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. “I think the prime minister and the president are going to talk about making sure the integrity of the U.N. Security Council resolutions is maintained,” he said. On Friday, North Korea’s foreign ministry again blamed the United States for deliberately causing the collapse of the Hanoi summit between Trump and Kim Jong Un by making unilateral and impossible demands. Dialogue between the two countries will never be resumed unless the United States changes its

“calculation,” an unnamed foreign ministry spokesman told the Korean Central News Agency, “and the further its mistrust and hostile acts toward the DPRK grow,the fiercer our reaction will be.” North Korea’s formal name is the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. “God knows what they said this time,” Bolton said when asked about the latest comments. “After many years of being called human scum by North Korea, I take most of what they say with a grain of salt.” But he made it clear the Trump administration was not about to change its stance. “The North Korean leadership well knows the president’s view,” he said, which he said concurs with that of Abe: “keeping sanctions in place and in force until North Korea shows it has made a strategic decision to give up its nuclear weapons.” “I don’t think that’s going to change,” he added. Bolton rejected suggestions he was behind a hardening of the U.S. negotiating position in Hanoi, arguing it had been Trump’s consistent position, dating back to the campaign trail as well as last year’s Singapore summit with Kim, that North Korea can have a bright future if it surrenders its nuclear arsenal. “The president’s opened the door to North Korea, and we’re just waiting for them to walk through it,” he said. Bolton said Stephen Biegun, the U.S. special representative for North Korea, “can’t wait” to meet his North Korean counterpart again, “but they haven’t responded,” adding that Biegun was ready to get on a plane and go “anywhere, any time.” “We really haven’t heard much from the North Koreans since the Hanoi summit, nor has President Moon of South Korea,” he said.

After 16 days lost in WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS Maui forest, hiker • BEST WINDOW • FREE, NO PRESSURE found via helicopter ESTIMATES • FREE, 18 Month BY ALEX HORTON

Washington Post

Amanda Eller ventured into a dense forest in Hawaii on May 8, confident her three-mile hike would finish so quickly that her phone and water were unnecessary. She left behind her wallet and her keys, hidden in her car’s tire well for when she returned. A physical therapist and yoga instructor who lives on Maui, Eller knew the terrain from a previous hike and veered off the trail for a quick rest. But when she got up to resume, she was turned around, and in a quixotic search for the trail, Eller fractured her leg. She ate insects in the 16 days she was missing in the Makawao Forest Reserve — a disappearance that triggered a massive search drawing hundreds of volunteers, even after authorities scaled back their efforts early on. Eller was found alive Friday, sunburned and smiling. A helicopter search team contracted by her family spotted her four miles from her car, gaunt after surviving on plants and water, a friend told KITV. She was airlifted to a hospital. “She figured it out, she was smart, she was strong, she was prepared. We said that in the beginning and it was absolutely true,” said her father, John Eller, according to KITV. John Eller said his daughter “took a good fall,” and got lost after looking for a way back, he told reporters outside a hospital in a video posted by Maui 24/7. “They found her in a deep ravine, basically unable to get out, as I understand it,” he said. “The rescuers had to be airlifted out as well, because it was so tumultuous,” he added. Eller detailed her survival to The New York Times in an interview. She fractured her leg and tore her meniscus on the third day, her friend said, as rescue efforts ramped up in the jungle thick with creeks,

ravines and brush. Eller used ferns and leaves for warmth when the temperature plummeted, and one night, slept in a wild boar’s den. She ate moths and wild strawberry guavas, her mother Julia Eller told Maui News. She could identify those. Other plants were risky and unknown meals. A flood took her shoes, leaving her barefoot and crawling. “I wanted to give up,” she told the Times. “But the only option I had was life or death.” A battalion of searchers worked day after day to bring Eller back, rappelling from cliffs and combing streams for signs of life. Aggressive boars were killed and their intestines inspected for human remains. Her family offered a $50,000 reward, up from $10,000 in the days after Eller’s disappearance, and hired a helicopter crew to search for her by air. That effort was Eller’s salvation Friday. Searchers Troy Helmer, Javier Cantellops and Chris Berquist spotted the missing hiker from air, foraging for food. “It was unbelievable, dude,” Cantellops told CNN. “Seeing her for the first time in a long time was just unbelievable. It was nothing short of elation.” Her mother, Julia Eller, said her injuries were all treatable, including severe sunburn. “She lost quite a bit of weight, as you can imagine, being lost for that amount of time,” Eller said, Maui News reported. “But she was able to survive it. She had the right skills and did the right things to buy time so that we had a chance to find her.” Photos posted to Facebook show her ankles swollen and legs covered in large, blistered wounds. Maui County Mayor Michael Victorino thanked searchers for their efforts in statement, calling it a “truly a community collaboration.”

NO INTEREST FINANCING*

40% OFF SIDING Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 6/30/19.

$200 *with approved credit

314-429-7000 25+ y

millswindow.com

Ea RS

OFF

WINDOWS Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 6/30/19.

Temperature-Controlled Storage Buy or Rent Equipment • Flexible Terms & Rates

Coldtainer Portable Storage Refrigerated, frozen, or heated storage with DC or AC power options. Purchase Coldtainer equipment, or try before you buy with our rental program.

Refrigerated & Frozen Storage Trailers Refrigerated or frozen storage trailers parked onsite for your event. We deliver or you pickup.

Refrigerated Vans Refrigerated vans for delivery or transport. Plug in onsite or vehicle powered. Flexible rental and mileage rates. Or, talk to the CSTK sales team about custom van purchase options.

Call Now To Reserve • (314) 771-6666 • www.cstk.com


NEWS

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Proof that ultra-processed foods make you gain weight BY EMILY BAUMGAERTNER

Tribune News Service

For four weeks, 20 healthy volunteers checked into a research center hospital and were served a variety of tempting meals: cinnamon french toast, stir-fry beef with broccoli and onions, turkey quesadillas and shrimp scampi. Researchers scrutinized everything that was eaten and came away with the first hard evidence to support a long-held suspicion: Heavily processed foods could be a leading factor in America’s obesity epidemic. The unusual clinical trial compared the volunteers’ calorie consumption and weight gain when they ate a diet based on unprocessed ingredients and when they ate meals dominated by ultra-processed foods. Both daily menus had matching amounts of calories, fat, sugar, carbohydrates and salts, and diners said they were equally tasty and satisfying. Yet the volunteers chose to consume an average of 508 additional calories per day on the ultra-processed diet. After two weeks, they weighed an average of 2 pounds more than their counterparts who had dined on unprocessed foods. The findings, published last week in the journal Cell Metabolism, will force scientists to rethink the complicated relationship between dietary habits and

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Dietitians at the National Institutes of Health designed custom menus to test the health effects of ultra-processed and unprocessed diets on study participants. health. “I thought it was all about the nutrients,” said study leader Kevin Hall, a section chief at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, which is part of the National Institutes of Health. “There’s something other than the sugar and fat on the food label that causes people to overeat and gain weight,” Hall said. “We don’t fully know the mechanism yet, but processed foods aren’t just innocent bystanders.” The American diet has changed drastically over the

past century. Home-grown produce and local poultry have given way to canned vegetables and deep-fried chicken tenders. Doctors have long suspected that changes in food preparation were among the key contributors to the obesity epidemic, but they’ve struggled to find ways to reverse the trend. Almost 40% of adults in America are now obese, more than double the percentage in 1980, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The obesity rate among children

has almost tripled in the same time period. Hall and his colleagues decided it was time to get serious with a randomized controlled trial, considered the gold standard for medical research. They recruited 20 people who weren’t picky eaters and were willing to spend a month living at the NIH’s Metabolic Clinical Research Unit in Bethesda, Md. The volunteers were given three meals per day and were allowed to refill their plates as much as they wanted. They also had access to unlimited snacks. They

Let Us Beautify Your Ugly Concrete! No tear out required, simply resurface!

We offer SEVERAL ATTRACTIVE & DURABLE PRODUCT OPTIONS!! Come see it all! ■ ■ ■ ■

Pebble Stone Epoxy System Texture Craft Outdoor Paver Tiles Epoxy Coatings - Flake System, em, etc. Metallic System,

SUMMER SPECIAL

UP TO

35% OFF

WITH COMBINED DISCOUNTS Call for details. Expires 6-30-19

were randomly assigned to consume either an ultraprocessed diet or an unprocessed one for the first two weeks of the experiment. Then they switched menus for the remaining two weeks. If volunteers ate everything put on their plates all day long, those on the unprocessed diet would have consumed the same number of calories and nutrients as those on the ultra-processed diet. In reality, their consumption was different because the researchers served up gargantuan amounts of food — an average of 5,400 calories each day — and participants left different amounts of food on their plates. Participants said both diets were filling and delicious. That may sound trivial, but it’s important for a nutrition study because it helps eliminate the influence of factors like food preference that could influence the experiment’s results. “I thought it would be a no-brainer that people simply liked the ultra-processed foods better,” Hall said. “My first hypothesis went right out the window.” Some of the foods in each diet were predictable: croissants and sausage for one

morning’s ultra-processed breakfast, or salad with grilled chicken, bulgur and apples for an unprocessed lunch. But other meal assignments might surprise you. For dinner one night, participants on the unprocessed diet got beef tender roast with barley and spinach, while their ultra-processed counterparts consumed turkey and cheese sandwiches with baked chips, canned peaches and nonfat vanilla Greek yogurt. For breakfast one morning, the unprocessed group was served omelets made from fresh eggs, while the other ate scrambled eggs prepared from Fresh Start liquid. Snacks included raw nuts and fruit for the unprocessed diet, but dry roasted peanuts and applesauce for the other. Researchers tracked how much and how fast each person ate, and the contrast between their behavior on the unprocessed and the ultraprocessed diets was stark. For instance, when volunteers were served ultraprocessed foods, they ate at an average rate of around 37 grams and nearly 50 calories per minute. But when eating unprocessed foods, they averaged only about 30 grams and about 32 calories per minute. Hall said the discrepancy could be due to differences in the foods’ texture. Ultraprocessed foods are generally softer, and people tend to eat soft foods quickly. That means volunteers would have swallowed more food by the time their guts were able to register their fullness and send signals to the brain that eating should stop. (In future studies, he said, they’ll examine the role of texture by serving more slow-to-eat but ultra-processed canned soups.) Whatever the explanation, participants gained an average of 2 pounds over the two weeks they ate ultraprocessed foods. Luckily for them, they lost an average of 2 pounds over the two weeks they were on the unprocessed diet.

GIVING BACK Senior, Military & First Responder Discounts! Free no obligation estimates

OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE LOCALLY OWNED & FAMILY OPERATED

314-665-3126 or Toll Free 1-844-Fix-Ugly stonecraftresurfacing.com (349-8459)

Shawn Wolf “The Concr Concrete Doctor”

Study: There is such a thing as too much coffee BY NANCY CLANTON

Tribune News Service

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 5/31/19

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

EasyEntry Shower Fresh • Effortless Modern • Safe • Stylish

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 5/31/19

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

Call Today For a FREE Estimate

314-758-0594 618-857-3458

Some mornings it might feel like you can’t get enough of it, but a new study suggests too much coffee can be harmful. Studies have found that coffee consumption “may help prevent several chronic diseases, including Type 2 diabetes mellitus, Parkinson’s disease and liver disease.” There is little evidence that drinking moderate amounts of coffee — three to four cups a day — poses any health risk. The key words here are “moderate amounts.” A new study from the University of South Australia suggests there is a point where drinking coffee becomes a health risk. “Coffee is the most commonly consumed stimulant in the world — it wakes us up, boosts our energy and helps us focus— but people are always asking ‘How much caffeine is too much?’” professor Elina Hypponen, one of the study’s researchers, said in a press release. Researchers at the university analyzed the health records and the self-reported coffee consumption of 347,077 people between the ages of 37 and 73 in the UK Biobank. The Biobank is a national and international

health resource with unparalleled research opportunities, open to all bona fide health researchers. The study found that people who drink one to two cups of caffeinated coffee a day had a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than people who drank decaf or no coffee at all. But for individuals who consumed six or more cups of caffeinated coffee a day, the risk of cardiovascular disease increased 22 percent. The researchers found no genetic cause for this increase. This is the first time an upper limit has been placed on safe coffee consumption and cardiovascular health. “In order to maintain a healthy heart and a healthy blood pressure, people must limit their coffees to fewer than six cups a day — based on our data six was the tipping point where caffeine started to negatively affect cardiovascular risk,” Hypponen said. Even though the research says five cups of coffee is permissible, Hypponen said each person should know his or her own limit. If you begin feeling jittery, irritable or nauseated, she said, you might have reached your limit for the day. The study was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

D O N AT E YO U R C A R Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri * 100% Tax Deductible

St Louis local and Veteran owned - VA Certified

* Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE * We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not * We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs

WheelsForWishes.org

Call:(314) 499-1300

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

PUBLIC EQUIPMENT

AUCTION Featuring Missouri Equipment Auction in Columbia, MO May 31, 2019 beginning at noon.

Featuring 30 Absolute Ameren Missouri Units and OVER 60 TOTAL UNITS Visit

Missouriequipmentauction.com for full run list or call

573-886-0032 for more details.

䤀䴀倀刀伀嘀䤀一䜀 䰀䤀嘀䔀S 䤀一 吀䠀䔀 S吀⸀ 䰀伀唀䤀S 䄀刀䔀䄀 䘀伀刀 伀嘀䔀刀 ㌀  夀䔀䄀刀S℀

Let us look into your hearing... • Free Hearing Screenings • Free Demonstrations • Free Clean & Checks • Latest Hearing Technology • Tinnitus Relief • 0% Financing Available

ASK US ABOUT OUR UPCOMING SPECIAL EVENTS! Receive up to $

10 GIFT CARD

SRP

on a new pair of Signia hearing aids!

1

AND be entered to win a

FREE VACATION

Offer valid during our Special event only!

belsono HEARING CENTERS

®

A Belsono Hearing Company

Creve Coeur • 314-219-5819 Ellisville • 636-321-3303 Richmond Heights • 636-387-4057 St. Charles • 636-387-4061 St. Louis • 314-219-5829

Call today!

www.belsonohearing.com 1

Must receive hearing evaluation in order to qualify for offer. Must not have received any previous promotional gift card offer within the last year. Valued up to $1,000. One lucky winner will be drawn out of all participants. Drawing will take place on Friday, September 6, 2019 at 115 Route 46, Suite G51, Mountain Lakes, NJ 07046. Employees are not eligible for this drawing. Offer valid during our special event only.

2

⨀栀栀挀㌀㘀

䠀唀刀刀夀 伀䘀䘀䔀刀 䔀一䐀匀 䴀䄀夀 ㌀㄀匀吀

All Participants will receive a

$3,000 OFF

FREE

2


05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

LOCAL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17

PRETTY CITY Rows of houses in south St. Louis are seen from above on Thursday. The houses with the crossgabled roofs in the center of this image are located on the 5600 block of Goethe Avenue. DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@ POST-DISPATCH. COM

BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

Hollywood inspired him, but a Marine’s WWII experiences in the Pacific were laced with grim realities BY LORI ROSE, BRAND AVE. STUDIOS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I was,” Schultz remembered. “I never met him but verybody knew it.” ev A SEAGOING MARINE S After boot camp, Schultz went on to Sea School, A which prepared him to serve as a Seagoing Marine, w a small sma detachment of Marines that served alongside hu undreds of sailors aboard the huge naval warships. In ad ddition to manning anti-aircraft guns, the duties of th he Seagoing Marines iincluded lu d guarding the brig and pro rotecting the ship’s captain. Scchultz, ultz, now 97 and a resident resi nt of Belleville, was asssigned to the USS California, a battleship that had beeen sunk at Pearl Harbor but was rebuilt and ready fo or action again by January 1944. With Schultz aboard, th he California went on to play an important role in deefending ending the islands and atolls of the Pacific Ocean. “W We saw a lot of action,” Schultz said. “Before the la andings, we would bombard the beaches with the big gu uns and clear out any Japanese that might be waiting th here.”

BOB SCHULTZ. PHOTO PROVIDED BY BOB AND SHIRLEY SCHULTZ

T

hank Hollywood for Robert “Bob” Schultz’s decision to join the U.S. Marine Corps.

Schultz was a 20-year-old machinist in Wisconsin when “To the Shores of Tripoli” came out in movie theaters in the months after Pearl Harbor was attacked. “I saw it and was impressed enough to want to be a Marine,” said Schultz, who remembers admiring the famous Marine Corps Blues uniform. “It was the esprit de corps, the uniform, the idea of being in the Marines.” The Marines are said to have credited the film for a surge in recruitment about that time. The movie featured John Payne, Maureen O’Hara and Randolph Scott and was filmed in part at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, where Schultz and thousands of other recruits would go through boot camp. “[Actor] Tyrone Power was there at the same time

After A ground forces went ashore, the Seagoing Marines heelped man the anti-aircraft guns to guard against en raft. “But there wasn’t much because we nemy ai aircraft. had ha so much firepower,” Schultz said. The California was armed with a battery of 14-inch guns that helped clear the way for landings in Saipan, Tinian, Guam and later the Philippines, including the Battle of Surigao Strait. “The 14-inch gun, that’s a huge gun,” Schultz said. “They’re very loud. We were subjected to a lot of noise. For ear protection we were given a little wad of cotton and it got pretty scuzzy after a while.”

smell of burned flesh and the smell of Aqua Velva. “We were still in action and we didn’t have time to bury the dead,” he said. “In the South Pacific it’s hot and dead bodies don’t smell good.” The bodies were stored in the ship’s barbershop and aftershave was liberally doused throughout. Schultz said he still has an aversion to that particular scent. He also remembers how the men were eventually buried at sea after a few words from a chaplain. “When you’re buried at sea, you’re gone,” he said. “They sew you into a canvas bag, the apparatus tilts and off you go. That’s one of the things that I had bad dreams about is these guys in their canvas bags at the bottom of the ocean.” After the kamikaze attack, the ship returned to Bremerton, Wash., for repairs and then rejoined the fleet in June in time to support the troops fighting in Okinawa. Later, Schultz and the crew of the California were among the first Americans in Occupied Japan. “The people were very friendly,” he said. “They wanted to sell anything or buy anything.” The ship finally arrived home to its new port in Philadelphia on Dec. 7, 1945, after sailing from Japan to Singapore, through the Straits of Malacca, to Ceylon and Cape Town, South Africa. Schultz went on to build a career in the insurance industry and has lived for the past 30 years in Belleville. He has enjoyed traveling the world with his wife, as well as attending reunions with his fellow Marines, including the commissioning of the new USS California, a nuclear-powered submarine.

A KAMIKAZE ATTACK In January 1945, while providing shore bombardment at Lingayen Gulf in the Philippines, the ship was hit by a kamikaze, killing 44 and wounding 155.

“The guys gave the captain a piece of the teak deck from the decommissioned ship,” he said. He hopes it serves as a reminder of the Seagoing Marines, whose duty aboard warships continued until 1998. “Seagoing Marines don’t get a lot of publicity.”

“One was coming from behind and it missed us and landed 20 feet away from us and blew up,” Schultz said. “The next one hit us. Fortunately, I had a bulkhead between me and where he hit, but I felt the heat.” What he remembers most about that time was the

Stories are told from the nominee’s point of view. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.

STORIES OF HONOR ® IS PRESENTED BY:

Honoring sacrifice through education C SPONSORED CONTENT AND PHOTO BY COMMUNITY COFFEE

heartfelt remembrances of loved ones who made thee ultimate sacrifice.

ommunity Coffee is a proud supporter of Folds of Honor, a nonprofit that provides scholarships to spouses and children of America’s fallen and disabled service members. Over the past decade, the Folds of Honor Foundation has awarded nearly 20,000 scholarships that cover the costs of higher education, K-12 private education, summer tutoring and other educational needs for dependents who do not qualify for governmental aid.

All told, Community Coffee donated $25,000 to o Folds Fo s of Honor which was enough to cover fivee $5,000 scholarships for family members of fallen ser-vice members. This May through July, a percentagee of proceeds from the sale of Community American n Classic Coffee will go to Folds of Honor.

In 2018, Community Coffee customers participated in a #CommunityCares campaign to raise money and awareness of service members by sharing what veterans mean to them. The response was overwhelming, with people sharing hundreds of stories about the positive impact veterans made in their lives, as well as

Community Coffee’s generous support has helped in extending the reach of Folds of Honor. “We’ve grown a vast amount over the past 10 years,” said Sarah Duncan, Folds of Honor regional development officer. “We’ve grown through big corporate partners like Community Coffee but also through grassroots

COMMUNITY COFFEE PRESENTS CHECK TO FOLDS OF HONOR TEAM IN TULSA, OK. PICTURED L TO R - DONNA SAURAGE, OWNER COMMUNITY COFFEE COMPANY, SARAH DUNCAN, FOLDS OF HONOR AND BEN LESLIE, FOLDS OF HONOR

campaigns and the American people, both individually and as groups, really getting behind our cause and supporting us.” This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios in collaboration with Community Coffee. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 ,M1 81 7•8 SUnDAy • 05.26.2019 A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SUNDAy • 05.26.2019 • A18 RAY FARRIS PRESIDEnT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

‘Bad public policy’ Will Humphreys lead the charge to take his party back from the extremists?

C

onservative mega-donor David Humphreys emerged as an unlikely hero last week in his appeal for Gov. Mike Parson to veto the bill passed by the Legislature on May 17 imposing draconian restrictions on abortion. Parson signed it anyway Humphreys Friday, setting the scene for a potential battle in the months ahead for the soul of Missouri’s Republican Party. Humphreys made an open appeal for Republicans to err on the side of reason, moderation and compassion, especially for the victims of rape and incest who would be penalized by these new abortion restrictions. Parson, by signing House Bill 126 behind closed doors on Friday, has joined forces with the party’s social-conservative extremists. Humphreys feels so strongly about HB 126’s overreach, he might fund a ballot initiative in 2020 to reverse it, a source close to him told the Post-Dispatch’s Kurt Erickson. “I am personally opposed to HB 126 and believe it was poorly thought out and passed without appropriate public debate,” Humphreys said in a statement. “A bill this restrictive, without the opportunity for exceptions for rape and incest, is bad public policy and bad for Missourians.” Parson’s decision to sign the bill anyway deepens the party’s ideological split just as campaigns gear up for the 2020 election, in which the governor would be seeking his first full term after succeeding disgraced Gov. Eric Greitens

in the job a year ago. He is not a political heavy hitter, and ostracizing someone like Humphreys could prove to be a serious strategic error. Humphreys rarely takes overt public stands on major social issues, and for him to do so now indicates how strongly he feels about legislative overreach. “I have never entered the public debate over abortion. Nor have I wanted to. Nor do I really want to now,” Humphreys stated. “It is a very difficult subject. And a very personal one with complicated moral issues for all involved. While I am personally opposed to abortion, I do support women’s right to choose particularly in the case of rape or incest. And I have to believe that the politicians in Jeff City that voted for this bill would themselves support their wives or daughters’ right to choose if their loved ones were raped.” Our issue with Humphreys in the past has been that his generous donations to Republican candidates and causes unduly influences election results, skews democracy and dilutes the power of Missourians’ votes. Politicians, fearful of losing his support, too often blindly support his causes rather than voting their consciences. That he’s conflicted reflects that Humphreys recognizes the nuances of this complicated subject — as should we all — and has determined that extremist solutions are not the answer. Humphreys offers hope that reasonable, moderate Republicans will step forward to take back their party.

Birds tweet better

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Honor service members’ sacrifices on Memorial Day Well, the television networks, newspapers and social media outlets aren’t wasting any time reminding the American consumer about their wonderful sales on National Barbecue Day, which was at one time known as Memorial Day. I remember when that holiday was once used as time to reflect on what price this country has had to pay to enjoy the freedoms we all enjoy, including the sales. Where families would gather together to remember those who once sat in now-empty chairs. When children who never knew their fathers could visit with them at their graveside simply because Memorial Day was devoted to reflection on the memory of these loved ones. Did the fallen give their lives for sales, swimming pools and barbecues? Yes, yes they did. And also for the right to live where we want, marry who we wish, vote for who we wish, write what we want and speak what we wish. These are just a few of the countless freedoms they died for. Did their dying make us a perfect nation with perfect people with perfect laws in a perfect society? No, no to all. They gave their lives to ensure that we continue to strive toward whatever perfection we can attain and be free while we try. Enjoy your sales, your swimming pools and your barbecues, but please set some time aside on Monday to remember those who gave those freedoms to you. They’ve earned it. Remember those who wore their country’s uniform and those who wear it now. Phil Reagan • Wentzville

Abortion is evil incarnate, not just a procedure ASSOCIATED PRESS

It’s springtime, not screentime. Teens need to put their phones down and live.

H

igh school students from four St. Louis-area districts gathered on a Saturday afternoon in midMay to figure out what, exactly, they need in their lives to thrive as students. Among their answers: They need less stress and more free time. One major item didn’t get a mention on their list. The same major source of stress in their lives also is the culprit for why they feel they don’t have enough time: pervasive technology. The average teen’s attention to screen time, about nine hours a day, according to one study, robs them of time in the real world — quality time performing the tasks that build intellect, character and verbal communication skills. When they’re staring at their screens, they aren’t talking faceto-face with their friends or family members. Stresses skyrocket when they see themselves depicted online in an unfavorable light. A misunderstood text or tweet can turn friends into enemies. Obsessions build over the number of Twitter followers or Facebook friends a teen has. Depression can set in. They become sleep-deprived. Grades falter. Go to any mall, park or museum and take stock of the young (and, yes, old) faces staring into their screens rather than enjoying their surroundings. At restaurants, look at the number of couples immersed in something on their phones instead of each other. This technology addiction is fed by the Silicon Valley moguls who created Facebook, Twitter, Google, Instagram and iPhones. And what are Silicon

Valley parents deciding as the antidote to this tech-obsessed world? They are banning it from their own children’s lives. They are enforcing such bans with a level of militancy that suggests they see something the rest of us don’t. Some Silicon Valley parents have installed “nanny cams” specifically to monitor when nannies might be exposing the children under their care to phones, computers or televisions. “I am convinced the devil lives in our phones and is wreaking havoc on our children,” Athena Chavarria told The New York Times last October. She should know, having worked as an executive assistant at Facebook and founder Mark Zuckerberg’s philanthropic arm. Apple chief executive Tim Cook believes technology should be limited in schools. He restricts his nephew’s social media access. Bill and Melinda Gates banned their kids from using cellphones until they were teenagers. Melinda Gates wished she had extended the ban longer. Many parents fret justifiably that cutting off technology and cellphone access could mean not being able to reach their kids in emergencies. One option is a return to the old flip-phone. But it’s a clear warning sign, if Silicon Valley parents see dangers in the technology they helped create, that the rest of us should consider giving our kids a long, healthy break from technology. A big, beautiful world surrounds them. What a tragedy to miss it because a screen keeps blocking their view.

Why do we think killing babies in their mother’s womb is merely a procedure? Seriously? Just a procedure? I’m becoming more aware of Christians, believers in Jesus Christ, or so they claim, who appear in conjunction with the very people who would like to see the elimination of their religion. The abortion debate isn’t a debate. It’s evil incarnate and destroys the people who go through the process. The growing person inside a woman’s womb is not just an inconvenience. Eliminating/killing that person is not just a procedure. Paul Swigert • Florissant

Fallen vets might disagree with Trump’s words “You had some very bad people in that group, but you also had people that were very fine people, on both sides.” This was a quote from President Donald Trump, referring to the neo-Nazis marching in Charlottesville, Va., in August, 2017. The neo-Nazis were marching and chanting “blood and soil,” which originated in 1930s Germany. The Nazi party used it in order to influence the theory of Aryan purity, superiority and cultural dominance. When Hitler took power, the Third Reich used this theory in an attempted extermination of the Jewish population and elimination of the physically and mentally handicapped. The war that followed was to ensure the dominance of Europe by the Aryan race. I don’t think that World War II veterans interred in Arlington, Jefferson Barracks or in Europe would agree with “There were very fine people on both sides.” Robert McKay • Crestwood

Health care professionals are heroes, too Quite frequently we see in various forms of media words that honor our

military and first responders. They are recognized as heroes, and rightly so. I want to call to everyone’s attention to another group of heroes: our health care and dental care professionals. I had several instances this year where I required the services of these professionals. The services I needed were all administered quickly, efficiently and professionally. In every case, my problem, discomfort and/or pain were alleviated. So thanks to all the surgeons, doctors, nurses, dentists, assistants, aides and their administrative staffs out there. You should be recognized as heroes, also, for what you do for society. Mark Helbig • Fenton

The perfect use for the Fox Theatre stage Hey, St. Louis, we have a golden opportunity. The Fox Theatre has one of the largest stages in the world. Let’s offer it up for the Democratic presidential debate. It might just be big enough. Talmage Newton • St. Louis

Bolton’s war drums sound painfully familiar The May 16 cartoon of national security adviser John Bolton beating the war drum with his mustache has a familiar ring. Does anyone remember that toward the end of George W. Bush’s administration Bolton and his fellow neo-conservatives were then beating the war drums to fight Iran? Fortunately, President Bush refused. At that point in his presidency, he had a more realistic foreign policy than he did when our country disastrously invaded Afghanistan and Iraq. What goes around comes around. Hopefully, Bolton’s formerly rejected plan will be derailed once again. Ann H. Zahniser • Greenville, IL

Post-Dispatch, news media keep our leaders honest Wow. One senses that every rock in St. Louis needs to be turned over for inspection. But by whom? Television media give us small, quick public shamings of minor offenders, quickly researched and quickly presented. Our state auditor Nicole Galloway has a large area to cover. The Post-Dispatch has Tony Messenger and a shrinking crew of capable and dedicated people, who are obviously stretched to the limits. Regarding “St. Louis halfway house for federal prisoners turns into cash cow for family that runs it” (May 21): It sounds like it may have been triggered by a tip, and then fleshed out with inspection of public documents. It was excellent, but don’t we all suspect there is so much more to be done? Why doesn’t the Post-Dispatch assemble a corps of volunteers to gather and evaluate public records in order to keep tabs on our government and charities? I suspect a lot of retired individuals with relevant skills would be glad to help. We need a strong and free press. It’s clear that advertising and subscription income is inadequate to sustain highquality journalism. How will our leaders act when they know no one is watching over their shoulder? I shudder to think what things would be like here without the Post-Dispatch. Let me also say that readers who cancel their subscription to the Post-Dispatch because of something that offends them are casting a vote to turn government over to the criminal element. Tom Ryan • Clayton Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 n. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

05.26.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1 25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A19

JUSTICE FOR TERRORISTS • The four men convicted in the World Trade Center bombing will spend the rest of their lives in prison. Americans are left

to wonder why people would want to commit mass murder in the name of a god. That other potential World Trade Center bombers are moving about the streets of New York and other cities is almost a certainty. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

The hypocrisy of anti-abortion activists Dhanan Saminath, who had just been involved in an altercation with a black man named Eric Garner. Saminath texted that GarAs I told the guy who ner had no pulse and was tried that argument with LEONARD probably dead. me on Twitter, that’s disPITTS “Not a big deal,” ingenuous: “If you are as Miami Herald concerned for black life as answered Bannon. “We you purport, may I assume were effecting a lawful arrest.” you have been equally Garner, you will recall, exercised over, say, ongoRecently, a man tried ing police violence against verbally resisted when to convince me that he believes black lives matter. unarmed African-Ameri- police attempted to arrest him for allegedly sellThis is a kind of rhetori- can men and women?” Predictably, he answered ing loose cigarettes on cal judo some anti-aborthe street. Whereupon tion activists have adopted the question with some variant of “all lives matter.” they tackled him to the in debating pro-choice ground, and Officer Daniel Or in other words, No. African Americans. They Pantaleo administered a In itself, the debate was argue that black women not particularly important, chokehold. Eleven times, have abortions at higher Garner, a 350-pound asthbut the timing felt poirates than others and that matic, complained that gnant. It came at roughly this amounts to a “genothe same time news broke they were killing him. cide” or a “holocaust” “I can’t breathe,” he — yes, they often use those of a 2014 text message gasped. words — that black people exchange between New “I can’t breathe.” are morally bound to resist. York Police Lt. Chris“I can’t breathe.” Because black lives matter. topher Bannon and Sgt.

Their pretend concern for black lives is both cynical and offensive.

“I can’t breathe.” “I can’t breathe...” “Not a big deal.” Bannon testified in a police disciplinary hearing that he only meant to reassure Pantaleo (whom a grand jury declined to indict) but that explanation does little to erase the stench of his words. This was not reassurance. It was a verdict on Eric Garner’s worth. One is reminded of the 2015 shooting of Eric Harris, a black man in Tulsa who ran after allegedly selling an illegal gun to an undercover cop. As officers were subduing Harris on the ground, a 73-yearold reserve deputy — who said he meant to reach for his Taser — pulled his gun and fired. “He shot me!” cried Harris. “Oh, my God!”

He told them he was losing his breath. “F--k your breath,” replied a deputy. Harris died. The Tulsa deputy and the New York lieutenant emblematize a disregard African Americans know all too well, a disregard echoed in the acquittal of George Zimmerman and the conviction of the Central Park Five, in the damaged spine of Freddie Gray and the bullet-torn body of Tamir Rice. Nor is that disregard just about policing. It is also about education and journalism, health and sports, banking and essentially every endeavor where human judgment plays a part because where there’s judgment, there is usually disregard for black lives. That disregard indicts,

generally, America’s dream of itself as a land of equality and, specifically, the hypocrisy of anti-abortion activists shedding crocodile tears and crying “genocide” or “holocaust.” Can’t they, at a minimum, spare us that? Can’t they make their case without pretending to be motivated by moist-eyed concern for black lives? More than disingenuous, that’s cynical and offensive. It insults AfricanAmerican intelligence because it asks that we forget or ignore that history of disregard. And that is not an option. Because for us, you see, black lives do matter. Even after they are born. Leonard Pitts Jr. lpitts@miamiherald.com Copyright The Miami Herald

St. Louis region’s bright science-based future If all our indicators are so good, why do we feel so bad? BY EDWARD F. LAWLOR

EVAN VUCCI, ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump walks off after delivering a statement in the White House Rose Garden on Wednesday.

Jeb Bush was right A ‘builder president’ would have fixed the roads. A ‘chaos president’ can’t. KEVIN McDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Well, so much for that $2 trillion infrastructure plan. The one idea on which President Donald Trump and congressional Democrats agreed — and which was the right idea — came crashing down like a neglected bridge last week, after Trump stalked out of a meeting with Democratic leaders. By his own account, Trump preemptively ended the latest infrastructure talks, before they began, out of anger over the unrelated fact that the House is finally doing its constitutional duty and imposing oversight on his presidency. Trump’s repeated characterization of any inquiry into his actions as “treason” should be scary as hell, and would be but for one thing: While Trump often demonstrates his desire to go full Joe Stalin on America, he’s seldom demonstrated the focus to actually do that. Or to do much of anything else that can’t be done via tweet. Obviously, that assessment flies in the face of Trump’s claim to have had, as he has ludicrously tweet-bragged, “the most successful first two years of any president.” That notion, like so much else is tapped out by the president’s diminutive fingers, appears to have originated from somewhere beyond the orbit of Jupiter. In the non-alternate universe that most of us occupy, Trump has successfully accomplished three things: Signing a tax cut that any Republican president would have signed; appointing judges that any Republican president would have appointed; and riding an already-rising economy that any president of either party would have ridden. The rest of his “accomplishments” come down to one word: chaos. When Trump and Republican

leaders fawn over his record, it’s mostly about the humming economy — this from a party that handed Barack Obama an economy in free-fall, then tried to block everything he did to turn it around, and then, when he managed to turn it around anyway, bellyached that it wasn’t growing fast enough. (The one big economic element today that can’t be largely attributed to seeds Obama planted is the deficit spike caused by a Republican tax cut that was supposed to “pay for itself” but which, they now admit, won’t. Can we please, finally, dispense with the fiction that the GOP is the party of economic growth and fiscal responsibility?) So once you acknowledge that Trump got his strong economy mostly in the same way he got his wealth — by inheriting it — and that his judicial appointments are just following Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell’s long-standing and, unfortunately, successful blueprint to push the courts far right of where America is, what’s left? Chaos. According to a list posted by the White House (and which, judging by its weird capitalization and phrasing, looks to have been at least partly written by Trump himself), most of his non-economic “accomplishments” aren’t things that he’s done, but things that he’s undone. Most of it involves pulling away from rules or agreements that were put there for necessary reasons, and leaving chaotic vacuums in their place. “Record number of regulations eliminated” (translation: Partytime for polluters); “Obamacare individual mandate penalty GONE” (so good luck if you have a preexisting medical condition); “Withdrew from the horrible, one-sided Iran Deal” (which helped set the collision course we’re now on with Iran); “Withdrew the United States from the job-killing Paris Climate Accord” (because who needs glaciers, anyway?).

The ultimate chaos has arisen in two areas: trade and immigration. On both topics, the administration’s aggressive and mostly unprovoked confrontations have created crises that have required repeated policy re-routes, the White House bobbing and weaving its way through fights it didn’t have to start. Trump’s trade war with China has required a bailout for farmers, an effective acknowledgment of the economic emergency it’s created in the heartland. Trump’s zero-tolerance stance on unauthorized immigration led to the horrendous policy of separating families and caging children, which Trump then had to reverse in the face of international outrage. Foreign aid cuts to Central America exacerbate the poverty that is driving waves of migrants northward, worsening the chaos at the border. The point is, none of these things had to happen, and all of them have contributed to some of the worst messes facing America today. And now the builder-turnedpresident can’t even build. Last week’s meltdown is only the latest of several consecutive failures to launch the one really good, really popular, potentially historic Trump campaign promise: to carry out the massive overhaul of America’s highways, bridges and other infrastructure that’s been badly needed for decades. Instead, Trump, furious as usual that the Constitution contains so many pesky limits on his power, essentially told Congress that the only way he’ll do his job is if they don’t do theirs. As Stephen Colbert put it last week: “It’s my way, or no highways.” It was Jeb Bush (remember him?) who predicted during the 2016 Republican primaries that Trump would become “a chaos president.” If uncanny prescience is a qualification for high office, Bush should be printing up 2020 campaign bumper stickers right now. kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com @kevinmcdermott (314) 340-8268

Science-based regional economies are the key to jobs and economic opportunity in the next era of our national economy. This is the argument in a new book titled “Jump-Starting America” by Jonathan Gruber and Simon Johnson. Their optimistic idea is that science and innovation produce local economies that spawn jobs at every skill level, not just at the top end for the scientists and engineers. Gruber and Johnson produce an index of regional potential for growth and opportunity based on scientific innovation and commerce. Among their key indicators are cities’ population of degree-holders from top 20 graduate science departments, number of undergrads going to top 20 programs, patents per worker, house prices, crime rates and commuting times. The good news is that St. Louis ranks 12th in this index among the top 102 middlecountry metropolitan areas in economic potential. (Not surprisingly, we do relatively poorly in crime rate and commute times). Other rankings and analyses of innovation and entrepreneurship have also placed St. Louis among the leaders of middle-country metropolitan areas. Of course, St. Louis already has examples of the payoff of science and innovation in our economy, thanks to some purposeful investments and collaborations. The Danforth Plant Science Center, BioSTL and Cortex have all produced significant new companies, revenue to the region, complementary economic development and jobs. St. Louis’ universities and medical centers have themselves been the leading engines of revenue and job growth for the region during the last decade. We indeed have many of the indicators that virtually all analyses of regional economic health claim as essential for success in the new economy. If all these indicators are so good, why do we feel so bad? Clearly, the benefits of science-based economic development have not been shared by race, class or geography in our region. African Americans and Latinos still face enormous structural discrimination and disadvantages. The region’s east-west axis of economic activity does not include the north-south axis of population and need. We continue to be very segregated, provincial, and backward-looking in our human and social capital strategy. As a region we continue to wring our hands, feel comfortable with who we are, yet avoid tackling the hard and controversial work of building a vital and inclusive modern regional economy. So what is to be done? Coastal cities enjoy natural advantages of existing financial markets, technology, physical beauty, population

growth of young people and amenities, and thus consistently emerge on top. Many middle-country regional economies lose because they lack much of those attractive qualities. Nevertheless, many middle-country metropolitan areas, such as Pittsburgh, Nashville and Atlanta, are indeed winning at this game. Metropolitan areas that consistently attract investment, entrepreneurship and growth have a much more comprehensive strategy of social and economic development than has the St. Louis region. The strategy must be social, political and economic. It must embrace issues of race, class, immigration and geography as integral elements of progress. It requires leadership, new institutions, inclusion and, yes, money. Homelessness, criminal justice, gun violence and community development must be co-equals with genomics, cybersecurity and geospatial intelligence in this strategy. Effective governance is key. Despite the negative backlash from the “Better Together” debacle, it is worth reflecting on the importance and urgency of our leadership and institutions taking on regional planning, coalition-building and most important, meaningful action. Frustration has grown in the community that all of the hard work of the Ferguson Commission and other community-based efforts have not yielded results. We have had so much process and bureaucracy in our region, and with each misstep cynicism grows as we fail to be inclusive, effective and aspirational. Construction of the new National GeospatialIntelligence Agency western headquarters in north St. Louis could be a harbinger of the city’s development. NGA decision-makers took note of the many regional assets, including its universities, human capital and attractive downtown environment. North St. Louis stands to benefit economically, while NGA’s partnership with St. Louis University has the expressed goal of fully integrating their institution into the St. Louis economy. The effective jump-starting of St. Louis will require conscious attention to race, class and geography at the same time we embrace the idea that our science-based economy could be the key to long-term opportunity for a broad swath of the population. These two ideas need not be in opposition. We need our regional institutions and leaders to organize and mobilize for an inclusive science-based future economy. Edward F. Lawlor, Ph.D., is the William E. Gordon distinguished professor and dean emeritus of the Brown School, and special assistant to the provost at Washington University. He also is co-director of the American Well-being Project at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C.


A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

® ® ® ®

®

®

BRING A

SALAD When you want to make a big impression, go for the unexpected. At your next potluck, change up your usual salad game with bold flavors and creative ingredient combos.

Summer Spaghetti Salad Start to finish 50 minutes ½ 3 1 3 1 1 6 4 1 1 ¼ 1 ½ 1

Creamy BLT Pasta Salad

1. In a 10-inch skillet heat 2 Tbsp. of the oil over medium. Add garlic; cook and stir 1 minute. Add spaghetti, tossing to coat. Add broth. Cook over medium 10 minutes or until liquid is nearly absorbed, stirring occasionally. Cool 10 minutes. Transfer to a serving dish. 2. Meanwhile, using a spiral vegetable slicer, cut zucchini and yellow squash into long strands. If desired, snip strands into shorter lengths. Add to spaghetti; cool completely. Pull cheese into thin strands; chill until ready to serve. 3. In a medium bowl toss together tomatoes, onion, parsley, vinegar, salt, pepper, and remaining 6 Tbsp. oil. Add cheese to spaghetti mixture. Top with tomato mixture and, if desired, Roasted Walnuts. Makes 10 servings (1½ cups each). ROASTED WALNUTS Preheat oven to 350°F. In a shallow baking pan toss together ½ cup walnuts, 1 tsp. olive oil, and ¼ tsp. kosher salt. Bake 5 minutes or until toasted and fragrant.

Start to finish 25 minutes 4 cups dried gemelli or cavatappi pasta 12 oz. sliced bacon 2 cloves garlic, minced ¾ cup sour cream ½ cup mayonnaise ⅓ cup chopped fresh chives 2 Tbsp. cider vinegar 2 Tbsp. milk ¼ tsp. black pepper 3 cups chopped hearts of romaine lettuce 1½ cups cherry tomatoes, halved 4 oz. cheddar cheese, cubed

Start to finish 30 minutes

1. Lightly brush vegetables with 1 Tbsp. of the oil. Grill sweet pepper, zucchini, and onion, covered, over medium-high 10 minutes or until tender, turning once. Add asparagus the last 3 to 5 minutes, cooking until tender and turning once. Cool slightly. Cut vegetables into 1- to 1½-inch pieces. 2. In a large bowl combine vegetables and pasta. Add vinegar, salt, black pepper, and remaining 3 Tbsp. oil; toss to coat. Sprinkle with oregano. Makes 4 servings (1½ cups each).

PER SERVING 298 cal., 15 g fat (4 g sat. fat), 9 mg chol., 415 mg sodium, 32 g carb., 2 g fiber, 5 g sugars, 11 g pro.

DISH TO SHARE You’ll be potluck and party ready with the delicious to-go recipes in Make & Take™ magazine. Get your copy on newsstands today!

PER SERVING 348 cal., 15 g fat (2 g sat. fat), 0 mg chol., 300 mg sodium, 49 g carb., 8 g fiber, 8 g sugars, 10 g pro.

EW A N

E

1 medium red sweet pepper, quartered lengthwise 1 small zucchini, halved lengthwise ½ of a small red onion, cut into 1/2-inch slices 8 oz. fresh asparagus spears, trimmed ¼ cup olive oil 4 cups cooked whole grain rigatoni pasta ¼ cup balsamic vinegar ½ tsp. salt ⅛ tsp. black pepper 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh oregano

AG

PER SERVING 558 cal., 32 g fat (11 g sat. fat), 57 mg chol., 525 mg sodium, 48 g carb., 3 g fiber, 4 g sugars, 19 g pro.

Grilled Veggie Pasta Salad

C

ST

1. Cook pasta in boiling salted water according to package directions; drain. Rinse with cold water; drain and cool. 2. Meanwhile, in a 12-inch skillet cook bacon over medium until crisp. Drain on paper towels, reserving 1 tsp. drippings. Coarsely chop bacon. Add garlic to reserved drippings. Cook and stir 1 minute or until golden brown and fragrant. 3. For dressing, in an extra-large bowl combine sour cream, mayonnaise, chives, vinegar, milk, pepper, and garlic drippings. 4. Add pasta, bacon, lettuce, tomatoes, and cheese to dressing; toss to coat. If needed, stir in additional milk to reach desired creaminess. If desired, sprinkle with additional chives. Makes 6 servings (2 cups each).

cup olive oil cloves garlic, sliced 12-oz. pkg. spaghetti, broken in half cups reduced-sodium chicken broth medium zucchini, trimmed medium yellow summer squash, trimmed sticks string cheese cups red and yellow cherry tomatoes, chopped cup finely chopped onion cup chopped fresh Italian parsley cup red wine vinegar tsp. kosher salt tsp. freshly ground black pepper recipe Roasted Walnuts (optional)

EN

TUR

E Y . A N

W

ENTER TO WIN TICKETS TO SEE GU YS & D O LL S AT THE MUNY O N FRIDAY, JUNE 14

D I S C O V E R P O S T- D I S PAT C H R E A D E R R E WA R DS AS A SUBSCRIBER, YOU RECEIVE SPECIAL READER REWARDS INCLUDING EVENTS , DE AL S AND MORE . S T LT O D AY. C O M / R E A D E R R E WA R D S


ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • a21

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1 BR A N D AV E. E ST U DIOS CON T EN T

Teacher of the Month R d ’ choice Reader’s h i tteacher h C Carmen Littl Little rounds d out the 2018-2019 Teacher of the Month series CONTENT BY BRAND AVE. STUDIOS

Carmen Little is a special education resource teacher at Woodland Elementary in the Jennings School District whose third-grade students have emotional or behavioral disorders, learning disabilities and autism. She is as quick to give a hug or a high-five or a pep talk to her kids as she is to be upfront with them about some hard realities, like how they may be perceived in society rather than who they are as unique, capable individuals. And that sometimes they’re angry simply because the work they’re being asked to do is difficult. And that none of these excuses should limit how much they can achieve in their lives. This might seem like a lot for third graders to process, but Ms. Little was just about the same age when her life changed forever, thanks to her two fourth-grade teachers at Jackson Park Elementary in University City. “I was retained in fourth grade, which felt very dramatic at the time,” Ms. Little says. “But it was the best thing that ever

happened to me. After trying to fit in all the time, I learned how to become myself. It was when I learned that it was OK to be different.” Ms. Little’s fourthgrade teachers — Gwendolyn Beckwith and Rosalie Gale — instilled in her the confidence that she would go on to do great things. By the time she was 30, Ms. Little had earned three degrees and traveled the world. In turn, she expects great things from her students because she believes they’ll rise to the occasion. “I use a higher-level vocabulary, and it absolutely works. I think they can handle it,” she says. Even in third grade, her students have set their sights on taking college-prep classes when they’re older. Brandi Harris, who nominated Ms. Little for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Teacher of the Month, says, “My daughter often complained that she always pushed her, but I explained to her that she did it out of love and compassion! Ms. Little knew their capabilities, and she made them believe in themselves. She also encouraged me to want to go back to school to be a teacher.” Ms. Little knows her job is a difficult one, but she says she’s as passionate about it now as she has ever been. “If I don’t show up to teach a student how to do affirmations, or to wipe those tears or to start a conversation, who will?” she says. “One day, I’m going to look up, and my kids are going to be amazing, and there will be a voice in their heads telling them that they’re great. And hopefully I’m the whisper behind it.”

Woodland Elementary special education resource teacher Carmen Little. Photo provided by Woodland Elementary.

As our reader’s choice winner, Carmen received a $250 prize from First Community Credit Union.

2018-2019 WINNERS

SERIES IN REVIEW All 10 educators honored in the 20182019 St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Teacher of the Month inspired their students in different ways. It’s in Malissa Mobley’s catchy chant about the communicative properties of addition that her students remember for years. It echoes in the improv nights, theatre showcases and middle school ensemble shows directed by Brandon Riley at Grand Center Arts Academy. Sometimes it isn’t even in English, as in Jim Saali’s Spanish class at Vianney High School, where he believes that foreign language is a path to empathy and inclusion and respect for all people — regardless of religious or ethnic background. Since the St. Louis Post-Dispatch began accepting Teacher of the Month nominations in September, 530 nominations were recieved. The teachers selected were honored with an in-school ceremony and nearly $1,000 in gifts from sponsors including First Community Credit Union, Elco Chevrolet, Kenrick’s Meats & Catering, Purina Farms, Penn Station and the St. Louis Surge. Each teacher was profiled in the print and digital editions of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Summer break is a great time to reflect on the school year — and the teachers who made it an outstanding one. We’ll begin seeking teacher nominations again in the fall and encourage you to cast a ballot for those voices of guidance and inspiration who’ve made a lasting impression on your child’s life. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.

Malissa Mobley

Jim Saali

Lindsay Williams

Laura Hipkiss

Brock Montgomery

Mariacarla Foster

Brandon Riley

Keith Baker

TEACHER OF THE MONTH IS PRESENTED BY:

For all your Savings and all your Loans.

GO! MAGAZINE’S

COUNTDOWN TO SUMMER FUN PRESENTED BY

EXCLUSIVE TO TH E SAI NT LOUIS POST-DISPATCH STORE

2019

TWO TIMES NATIONAL CHAMPIONS WOMEN'S PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL IN OUR CITY

Are you ready for the summer? Are you ready for the good times?

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 NHL STANLEY CUP FINAL SILVER COIN PHOTO MINT $59.99

Enter daily for your chance to win great prizes to help celebrate the long-awaited lazy days. PRIZES INCLUDE: • St. Louis Surge Prize Pack with home-opener tix, T-shirts and autographed poster • See a baseball game compliments of Downtown Cape • Free acupuncture for one year from Modern Acupuncture • A Do-It-Yourself Party from Play Street Museum • 2 VIP tickets to the Songs4Soldiers Concert • 4 spots on any STL Riverfront Adventure at Big Muddy Adventures • 2 VIP tickets to Midwest Salute to the Arts Festival • VIP Prize Pack for Cars and Guitars Event from Downtown Kirkwood • 2 tickets to Circus Flora • 2 night's stay at Gottfried's Cabin and a $100 Downtown Washington, Inc. gift certificate • A Prize Pack to the Washington Town & Country Fair • 4 Six Flags Gold Season Passes

Don’t miss a single event, concert, fair or festival. Download the Go! Summer Fun calendar — or scroll through the online version — at STLtoday.com

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS SILVER COIN 24.99

2019 STANLEY CUP FINAL DUELING GOLD MINT COIN $49.99

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP FINAL SILVER COIN CARD $24.99 CENTER ENTERPRISE

ST. LOUIS BLUES 2019 STANLEY CUP FINAL SIGNATURE TICKET $59.99

EDITION

19 • $2.50 TuEsday • 05.21.20

GLORIOUS Stanley Cup finals Blues return to the in 49 years for the first time

NHL WESTERN CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS PAGE FRONT POSTER $14.99

CHECK OUT MORE BLUES GEAR AT

thepost-dispatchstore.com PRICES ABOVE DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING AND HANDLING.

ENTER EVERY WEEKDAY THROUGH JUNE 5:

STLtoday.com/contests

COLTER PETERSON

David Perron reacts

after scoring a

goal in the first

period against

the San Jose Sharks

in Game 6 of the

Western Conference

finals on Tuesday

ost-dispatch.com • cpeterson@p

night at Enterprise

ICy dETaIL aT EVERy COLd, suBsCRIBE FOR OM/suBsCRIBENOW sTLTOday.C

Center.

SHOP 24/7 ONLINE

O R D E R O N L I N E O R CA L L 1- 8 7 7- P O S T- S T L (1- 8 7 7-7 6 7- 8 7 8 5 ) M O N DAY - F R I DAY 9 A . M . - 5 P. M .


A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

CALL TODAY ON OUR RIDICULOUS

CHINOOK SALE! PRICES LIKE YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN BEFORE.

St. Louis, MO | Las Vegas, NV | Kalispell, MT | Colorado Springs, CO USED 2015 EHGNA ROADTREK E-TREK

stk# 2317

$98,900

NEW 2019 LEISURE TRAVEL WONDER 24MB

stk# 2342

We Service and Repair All RV’s!

$89,995

stk# 2415

NEW 2019 PLEASURE WAY PLATEAU XLMB STD

$119,536

$145,815 stk# 2255

NEW 2019 DYNAMAX FORCE 37TS HD

stk# 2686

NEW 2019 COACHMEN RV CROSSFIT 22D NEW 2017 CHINOOK COUNTRYSIDE CD24FB NEW 2019 PLEASURE-WAY LEXOR TS

$227,197

$109,680

stk# 2054

NEW 2018 DYNAMAX ISATA 4 31DS

$96,576

stk# 1972

NEW 2018 CHINOOK COUNTRYSIDE CD24MB USED 2011 LEISURE TRAVEL UNITY U24CB

stk# 300460

Starting At:

$

$109,680

$72,900

stk# 2528

$118,775

stk# 2261

$97,511

stk# 1504

NEW 2019 COACHMEN RV PRISM 2150 CB

$72,287

stk# 2227

NEW 2017 RENEGADE VILLAGIO 25MBS

NEW 2019 RENEGADE VALENCIA 38BB

$198,270

stk# 2643

USED 2018 DYNAMAX ISATA 4 31DS NEW 2019 EHGNA HYMER AKTIV LOFT EDT.

$85,000

stk# 2484

199 SPRING TUNE UP 00

3100 Telegraph Rd. St. Louis, MO 63125

Monday - Friday • 8:30 am - 5 pm Saturday • 10 am - 4 pm Service Dept. Monday - Friday 8 am - 4:30 on the Service Dept hours

$87,746

stk# 2600

20 YEAR FINANCING AVAILABLE

• Water System Flush • Appliance Service • Point Inspection

CALL TODAY 314-894-3905 Full inventory at www.vancityrv.com

Authorized Dealer of:

Memorial Day Window & Patio Door

Sale This special holiday sale ends on May 31st! Buy 1 window or patio door, get 1 window or patio door

40% OFF H

1

HHH H plus

an additional

• Renewal by Andersen has installed windows for over 10,376 St. Louis and Metro East homeowners, and each one is etched with the Andersen logo—a symbol of excellence for 116 years • Our Fibrex® composite material is so strong we’re able to build thinner frames with a greater glass area that allows more natural light into your home • We eliminate the middleman and manage your entire project—from selling and building the windows to the installation and warranty

$250 off your entire project1 H HHH H with

NO NO

Payments Call to schedule your FREE Window and Patio Door Diagnosis

1

314-754-8447 636-373-7360 618-690-4005

Interest

for 18 months!1 H

HHH H

Offer not available in all areas. Discount applied by retailer representative at time of contract execution. Cannot be combined with other offers. Buy one window and/or patio door, get the second window and/or patio door, of equal or lesser value, 40% off. Discount applied to lowest priced window and/or door products in purchase. To qualify for discount offer, initial contact for a free Window and Patio Door Diagnosis must be made and documented on or before 5/31/19 with the appointment then occurring no more than 10 days after the initial contact. No payments and deferred interest for 18 months available to well qualified buyers on approved credit only. Not all customers may qualify. Higher rates apply for customer with lower credit ratings. Financing not valid with other offers or prior purchases. No Finance Charges will be assessed if promo balance is paid in full in 18 months. Renewal by Andersen retailers are independently owned and operated retailers, and are neither brokers nor lenders. Any finance terms advertised are estimates only, and all financing is provided by third-party lenders unaffiliated with Renewal by Andersen retailers, under terms and conditions arranged directly between the customer and such lender, all subject to credit requirements. Renewal by Andersen retailers do not assist with, counsel or negotiate financing, other than providing customers an introduction to lenders interested in financing. “Renewal by Andersen” and all other marks where denoted are marks of Andersen Corporation. ©2019 Andersen Corporation. All rights reserved. ©2019 Lead Surge LLC. All rights reserved. *Using U.S. and imported parts.


05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

for a limited time

SAVE 50-60%

on select tables, storage, lighting & rugs AS A COMF O RT CL U B ME MBE R

SAVE 30%

FREE SHIPPING

on special order upholstery as a comfort club member, in stores only

on select décor & accessories in stores & online

JOIN MG+BW COMFORT CLUB & SAVE 25-35% ON EVERYTHING, EVERY DAY VISIT A STORE, OR MGBWHOME.COM FOR DETAILS

THIRT Y YEARS OF DESIGN AND INNOVATION PLAZA FRONTENAC | 314.447.7005 | MGBWHOME.COM IN-STOCK & SPECIAL ORDER UPHOLSTERY | TABLES & STORAGE | LIGHTING | RUGS | BED LINENS | ACCESSORIES | WALL ART | WINDOW TREATMENTS A N D T H E M O S T I N D U L G E N T D R E A M M AT T R E SS E S

Featured items may vary by location.


A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

OBITUARIES Bangert, Caroline E. - St. Louis Becker, Mary Ann - St. Louis Begley, Edward Michael - St. Charles Buonamici, William - St. Louis Burt, Dr. Ronald Byron - St. Charles Callahan, James J. Jr. - Chesterfield Daniel, James Thomas - St. Louis Dierkes, Eileen E. - St. Louis DuBray Kelly, Dolores - St. Louis Giessman, William L. - Hazelwood, MO Goodrum, Mary Frances Bomar - St. Louis Gribbins, Martha Ann - Town & Country Hinrichs, Edwin S. - O'Fallon, MO Huff, Barbara A. - St. Louis Jennemann, Doris - St. Louis Jimenez, Ernesto "Ernie" - St. Louis

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Judge, Joseph Martin - St. Louis Karlsen, Geraldine J. - St. Louis Kekelis, David George - St. Charles, MO Kinealy, Mary Kathleen - St. Louis Krehmeyer, Jeanne Ruth - Lake St. Louis Kroner, Mary Ann - Ballwin, MO Layton Sr., Gary W. - Barnhart Marshall, Dan C. - Plano, TX Mauer, Olive Ann - St. Louis McIntosh, John - Kirkwood Miller, John A. - St. Louis Morris, Ken - St. Charles Mueller, Diane D. - St. Louis Nelson, Ruby L. - St. Louis Nieman, Karen S. - St. Louis Olszewski, Edward William - Valley Park, MO

DuBray Kelly, Dolores

Ostmann, Donald Ralph - St. Charles, MO Patton, Lillian L. - Arnold Pederson, Carter Miles - Chesterfield Porter, Helen Leonora "Lee" - Neosho, MO, formerly of St. Louis Reinheimer, Leonard C. - St. Louis Robarts, Virginia - St. Louis Roberts, Molly A. - St. Louis Ruggeri, Diana Louise - St. Louis Scholin, Virginia Lena - St. Louis Selzer, Emily - Florissant Stonecypher, Maria Lucelly "Lucy" - Imperial, MO Stratman - see Ruggeri Stumpf, George E. Sr. - Ballwin, MO Valenti, Mary Lou - St. Charles

Kekelis, David George

of Saint Charles, MO, passed away Sunday, May 19, 2019, at the age of 70. Beloved husband of Rosine A. Kekelis, cherished son of Susie Kekelis and the late George B. Kekelis; devoted father to Jayson (Amy) Kekelis and Kendra (Edward) Hartman; proud Giessman, William L. and adored grandfather of Tyler, Kody, Nora, Lena and Molly; Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Visitation Tuesday, May dear brother of Linda Kekelis; and trusted uncle, brother-in-law 28, 4-8 p.m. Mass Wednesday, May 29, 9:30 a.m. and friend. at St. Martin Deporres. Int. Jefferson Barracks. Dave was a project control engineer in the construction induswww.colliersfuneralhome.com try who enjoyed his retirement with family and friends around Castle Rock Lake in Wisconsin. He was fiercely loyal and protective and will be forever remembered by family and friends as a Goodrum, Mary Frances Bomar Memorial Visitation on May 28 from 10 a.m. until time of champion of integrity and self-reliance. Dave was a master of memorial service at 11 a.m., The Boulevard Independent Living spreadsheets and BBQ and carpentry, and he was always willing Theater, 3330 Ehlmann, St. Charles MO 63301. Interment will to lend a hand or advice - especially about construction, fitake place in Jackson, MS at a future date. In lieu of flowers, the nances and fishing for salmon in Alaska (his favorite place on earth). Dave never met a stranger; his smile warmed many family asks for donations to the Alzheimer's Association hearts. or St. Jude's Childrens Research Hospital. Condolences Memorials may be made in Dave's name to Habitat for may be offered at www.alexanderstlouis.com Humanity. 95, May 24, 2019. Graveside services, Thurs., May 30, 10:45 a.m. Jefferson Barracks. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Bangert, Caroline E. Passed away on Sunday May 19, 2019. Beloved wife of Henry C. Bangert; Loving mother of Henry J. (Joan), Hyatt (Audrey), Jenny (Michael) and Linda (Tim) Bangert; grandmother of 9; great grandmother of 14; dear sister, aunt and friend. Services: Private services will be held with a memorial service at a later date. Condolences may be offered at www.alexanderstlouis.com

Gribbins, Martha Ann

(nee Meiselwitz), at the age of 73, asleep in Jesus on Monday, May 20, 2019. Beloved wife for 47 years of Ronald E. Gribbins; loving mother of John G. Gribbins (Amie) of Atlanta, GA and Michael W. Gribbins; dear grandBecker, Mary Ann mother of Garrett Walker (nee Emken) died suddenly on Gribbins; sister of John May 20, 2019. Preceded in death Meiselwitz, William Meiselwitz was her adoring husband Joseph and Robert Meiselwitz (Cindy); and cherished son Karl. sister-in-law of Ann Gribbins, Heartbroken children Mary Jane, Karen Gribbins and Sue Gribbins; Mary Elizabeth (Brice), Mary aunt, great-aunt, cousin and Margaret (Bill), Paul (Cyndi), and A m y ( S t e v e ) w i l l m i s s h e r friend. Martha was a career teacher with the Clayton School terribly. Her humorous quick- District. Martha was a selfless person and very giving of her witted nature amused her many time to help others. grandchildren and great-grand- Services: A funeral service will be conducted at All Saints Cathchildren. Proud sister to Kurt olic Church, 6430 Clemens Ave. at Westgate Ave., University City on Wednesday, May 29, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. Private inter(Peggy Ann) and Mark, O.S.A.. Mary Ann was born in St. Louis, ment at Kiel City Cemetery, Kiel, Wisconsin. In lieu of flowers raised her children in St. Louis Hills and created many family memorial contributions appreciated to Siteman Cancer Center. memories at Innsbrook Estates. She enjoyed 10 years in Naples, The family will recieve friends at LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 DelFlorida and returned to St. Louis in 2014. Mom loved her mar Blvd., University City, on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 from Cardinals baseball, world traveling, Jeopardy, reading, her 4:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Online condolences at many pets and crossword puzzles. Her stylish ways and www.luptonchapel.com. A SERVICE sassiness brought smiles to many. A memorial Mass is being OF planned. LUPTON CHAPEL

Begley, Edward Michael April 30, 2019, age 79. Memorial Mass, Tues., May 28, St. Cletus Catholic Church, 2705 Zumbehl Road, St. Charles, MO, 6:00 p.m. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Buonamici, William Thurs., May 9, 2019. Celebration of Life June 1, 2019 for what would've been his 90th Birthday, 1:30-3:30 pm, KRIEGSHAUSER WEST. Memories shared at www.kriegshausermortuary.com.

Burt, Dr. Ronald Byron 92, of St. Charles, April 23, 2019. Vis. June 2, 2:00 -4:00 pm with service at 4:00, Baue 3950 West Clay St. Graveside June 3, 9:00 am, Jefferson Barracks. Visit Baue.com

Callahan, James J. Jr. 84, May 13, 2019. Funeral Mass at Ascension Catholic, Chesterfield, Tuesday, 10 a.m. with visitation at 9 a.m. until time of Mass. For more info see Schrader.com.

Daniel, James Thomas

Hinrichs, Edwin S. 94, May 20, 2019. Services: Visitation, Wed., May 29, Assumption Catholic Church O'Fallon, 10:00-11:00 am. Mass to follow at 11:00 am. (636) 240-2242 or visit baue.com

Huff, Barbara A.

Kinealy, Mary Kathleen 78, was called home on April 14, 2019, while enjoying her retirement years in The Villages, FL. Mary was born March 14, 1941 to the late William Kinealy and Genevieve Cukierski. She is survived by a sister, Betty (Walt) Skeistaitis and brother Mike (Fran) Kinealy. She was a loving aunt to Joe (Kelly) and Chris Skeistaitis, Angie (Darin) M'Lady, Joan (Ryan) Schade, numerous great-nieces, nephews and cousins. Services: Memorial visitation will be held on Tuesday, June 4, from 10:00 a.m. until time of memorial service at 12:00 noon at Alexander White Mullen, 11101 St. Charles Rock Rd., St. Ann, MO. In lieu of flowers, send donations to Cancer Society. Inurnment Mount Lebanon Cemetery. Condolences may be offered atwww.alexanderstlouis.com

Krehmeyer, Jeanne Ruth 89, May 18, 2019. Vis. Thu., May 23, Baue Cave Springs, 4-8pm. Svc. Fri., May 24, Holy Cross Lutheran-O'Fallon 10am, with vis. 1-hr. prior. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Kroner, Mary Ann (nee Miele), age 77, passed away on Thursday, May 23, 2019. Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Tuesday, 6:00 pm. For more info see Schrader.com

Layton Sr., Gary W. Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Funeral at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry, Thursday, May 30, 10 a.m. Interment Shepherd Hills Cemetery. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m.

Marshall, Dan C. Dan C. Marshall passed away on April 20, 2019 in Plano, Texas surrounded by his loving family.

(nee White), Friday, May 24, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Dan was born in Caddo, Oklahoma on December 31, 1939 to George Huff. Visitation at Kutis So. Co., 5255 Lemay Ferry, Wed., Lucille M., née Potts, and Daniel L. Marshall. Dan served in the May 29, 11 a.m. until service at 1 p.m. Interment Shepherd Hills. U.S. Navy and was an accomplished businessman, starting and operating several companies in the building and finance industries. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Margaret, née Jennemann, Doris Giljum; his son Dan and his wife Rhonda and grandsons Daniel Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 90, of St. Louis, MO. Memorial Visit and Evan; as well as, son Dennis and his wife Cristina. Dan was Tues., May 28, 3-6 p.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary - Kirkwood. preceded in death by his parents, Daniel and Lucille, sister SanService Tuesday 6 p.m. at Chapel Hill Mortuary - Kirkwood. na, and is survived by his sister Lynn, as well as several nieces and nephews. Services: A Memorial Mass for Dan Marshall will be held on FriJimenez, Ernesto "Ernie" day, May 31, 2019 at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church, May 13, 2019. Memorial Mass Sat., June 1, 11 a.m. at St. 1414 S. Sappington Rd, Crestwood, MO 63126, at 6:00 p.m Barnabas Church, 1400 N. Main St., O' Fallon, MO 63366. www.valhallafunerals.net

Judge, Joseph Martin

Mauer, Olive Ann

passed Friday May 24, 2019. James Thomas Daniel of Saint Fortified with the sacrament of the Holy Mother Church on Mother to Marcia Mueller, Pam Louis, Missouri, passed away Tuesday, May 14, 2019. Son of the late Larry and late Peggy Barr (deceased), Jeff Mauer, peacefully at home Monday, May Judge. Beloved husband of Margaret (nee Ohlman) of 52 1/2 Gayle Mauer (Lan Weisberger); 20, 2019 after living with and years. Devoted father of Bridget; grandfather of Megan grandmother to Garrick (Briana), fighting multiple myeloma for (Brandon); and dearest Great-grandfather (G-pa) of Chloe. Greg, Robert (Anjanette), Kurt over three years. He is survived Loving brother, brother-in-law, and uncle to many. (Lindsey), Jena, Casey, Cami; Joe has donated his body to Saint Louis University School of by his wife, Judith Susan great-grandmother to Aidan, (Cachick), his children and their Medicine. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Cora, Alex, Arthur, Megan, Bryli. spouses: Maggie Daniel Caldwell St. Pius V SVDP Society, 3310 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. A life long resident of St. Louis 63118. His heart belonged to St. Vincent de Paul. and her husband Keith, Susan and proud member of the Class D a n i e l M o s b a c h e r a n d h e r Services: A memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, June 1, of '44 (Cleveland High), she will husband Steve, John Daniel and 2019 at St. Pius V Church 3310 S. Grand Blvd. (at Utah). Greeting be missed by many. his wife Rita, David Daniel, and the family will begin at 9am with mass to follow at 10am. A celebration of Olive's long life Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary…. Natalie Johnson; his grandchilwill be held at a later date. dren Max, Sam, Aubrey, Scott, Thomas, Micah, and Matthew; his brother and sister-in-law David and Barbara Daniel, and Karlsen, Geraldine J. "Jere" McIntosh, John numerous cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, (nee Duff) Fri., May 17, 2019. Visitation at Kutis David Francis and Mildred Emma (Doyle) Daniel and his sister John Wallace McIntosh, 83, of Affton, 10151 Gravois, Tues., June 11, 10:30 a.m. and brother-in-law, Joanne F. and Gerald Patterson. Kirkwood, MO left our earthly until funeral service at 11:30 a.m. Interment J.B. plane peacefully on May 12, National Cemetery. Tom attended Granite City High School and earned his B.A. from 2019. He was born to John and Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, and his Masters in Evelyn McIntosh in Gainesville, TX “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen, Social Work from Saint Louis University. In August of 1958 he in 1935. He shared a lifelong love nor touched, but are felt in the heart.” met the love of his life, Judy Cachick, and their infatuation never of learning and the outdoors with HELEN KELLER waned over their almost 61 years together. They married and his wife of 51 years, Dr. Helen started their family as he was beginning his 40-year career in McIntosh. John taught algebra social work, eventually settling in University City where he and calculus in the St. Louis Comspent the majority of his career as the Assistant Director of the munity College system, and chalEdgewood Program. lenged his students to do their best. He loved athletics and Among things Tom loved were: flying, road trips, fishing trips played softball into his 70's. He without fish, computers, taking photos, cemeteries, spy thrillwas most at peace in the woods and meadows of farmland and ers, church steeples, strong coffee, root beer, chicken livers, natural areas. The family extends heartfelt thanks to the caring baseball, and biking through Forest Park. But most of all he staff at The Quarters of Des Peres. loved his Juju and the family they made together. That love was Services: A Memorial Service is planned for Fall of 2019, and returned; he ended his days with a wife and four kids that were will be announced through Kriegshauser Brothers. crazy about him. There can be no better measure of a life well(www.k-brothers.com) lived. Services: A memorial Mass for Tom will be held on Thursday, May 30 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier College Church, on the St. Louis University campus. The last years of Tom's life were greatly enriched by the advancements made in the treatment of multiple myeloma, so the family requests donations in the name of James Thomas Daniel to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, 383 Main Avenue, 5th Floor Norwalk, CT 06851 in lieu of flowers.

Dierkes, Eileen E. 94, died on May 20, after saying goodbye to each of her children and grandchildren and telling them how much she loved them. Lucky to have her as our mother and grandmother are Christy and Michael Bond, Stephen Dierkes and Wang Hong, Jack and Cindy Dierkes, Nick, Katie, and Laura Bond, and Ryan and Michael Dierkes. She was the wife of Bernard Dierkes, deceased, a loving aunt, avid feminist, and loyal friend to many. There will be a Celebration of Life on September 28, details pending. In lieu of flowers, please perform a random act of kindness.

Beautiful Memorials

At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557

Miller, John A. Sunday, May 19, 2019. Loving husband of the late Deborah Miller; beloved father of Becky Miller; dear son of June and the late Johnnie E. Miller; dear brother of Jana (James) Otwell, Juanita (Gene) Stunckel and Judy (Bill) Donaldson; loving son-in-law of Leroy and the late Betty Rosa; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, nephew, cousin and friend. Mr. Miller was a proud member of UAW for over 42 years. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, May 28, 10:30 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. Visitation Monday, 6-9 p.m.

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits


A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

OBITUARIES Anderson, Gary - St. Louis Bangert, Caroline E. - St. Louis Becker, Mary Ann - St. Louis Begley, Edward Michael - St. Charles Boston - see Brassel Brassel, Jean M. - St. Louis Buonamici, William - St. Louis Burt, Dr. Ronald Byron - St. Charles Callahan, James J. Jr. - Chesterfield Daniel, James Thomas - St. Louis Dierkes, Eileen E. - St. Louis DuBray Kelly, Dolores - St. Louis Friedeck, Jacqueline Rose "Mother Trout" - St. Louis Fuchs, Sylvia C. - Weldon Springs, MO Giessman, William L. - Hazelwood, MO Goodrum, Mary Frances Bomar - St. Louis Gribbins, Martha Ann - Town & Country Hinrichs, Edwin S. - O'Fallon, MO Huff, Barbara A. - St. Louis Hunter, Irene M. - St. Louis Jennemann, Doris - St. Louis

Anderson, Gary 72, of St. Louis, MO, died Friday, May 24, 2019. Visitation, Thursday, May 30, 4-8 p.m. and Service Friday, May 31, 10 a.m., at Webster United Methodist, stlfuneral.com

Celebrations of Life

Jennings, Stephen H. - Chesterfield Jimenez, Ernesto "Ernie" - St. Louis Judge, Joseph Martin - St. Louis Karlsen, Geraldine J. - St. Louis Kekelis, David George - St. Charles, MO Kinealy, Mary Kathleen - St. Louis Krehmeyer, Jeanne Ruth - Lake St. Louis Kroner, Mary Ann - Ballwin, MO Layton Sr., Gary W. - Barnhart Lichius, Helen J. - Manchester Marshall, Dan C. - Plano, TX Mauer, Olive Ann - St. Louis McIntosh, John - Kirkwood Meyer, Elizabeth L. - St. Louis Miller, John A. - St. Louis Morris, Ken - St. Charles Mueller, Diane D. - St. Louis Nelson, Ruby L. - St. Louis Nieman, Karen S. - St. Louis Nikolaisen - see Brassel Olszewski, Edward William - Valley Park, MO

(nee Belloni), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Tuesday, May 21, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Luke J. Brassel; dearest mother of Laura (Mark) Nikolaisen, Luke (Caryn) Brassel and Lynn (Paul) Boston; our grandmother, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral Mass Tuesday, May 28th, 11 a.m. at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Interment at Sts. Peter & Paul Cemetery. Visitation Tuesday from 9 a.m. until the time of the service at church. Memorial donations may be made to the Sick and Elderly Program of the Hill, 2315 Macklind Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110. Please visit www.calcaterrafuneral.com for more information.

Buonamici, William Thurs., May 9, 2019. Celebration of Life June 1, 2019 for what would've been his 90th Birthday, 1:30-3:30 pm, KRIEGSHAUSER WEST. Memories shared at www.kriegshausermortuary.com.

Burt, Dr. Ronald Byron 92, of St. Charles, April 23, 2019. Vis. June 2, 2:00 -4:00 pm with service at 4:00, Baue 3950 West Clay St. Graveside June 3, 9:00 am, Jefferson Barracks. Visit Baue.com

Callahan, James J. Jr. 84, May 13, 2019. Funeral Mass at Ascension Catholic, Chesterfield, Tuesday, 10 a.m. with visitation at 9 a.m. until time of Mass. For more info see Schrader.com.

Gribbins, Martha Ann

James Thomas Daniel of Saint Louis, Missouri, passed away peacefully at home Monday, May 20, 2019 after living with and fighting multiple myeloma for over three years. He is survived by his wife, Judith Susan (Cachick), his children and their spouses: Maggie Daniel Caldwell and her husband Keith, Susan Daniel M os b a ch er and her husband Steve, John Daniel and his wife Rita, David Daniel, and Natalie Johnson; his grandchildren Max, Sam, Aubrey, Scott, Thomas, Micah, and Matthew; his brother and sister-in-law David and Barbara Daniel, and numerous cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, David Francis and Mildred Emma (Doyle) Daniel and his sister and brother-in-law, Joanne F. and Gerald Patterson.

(nee Meiselwitz), at the age of 73, asleep in Jesus on Monday, May 20, 2019. Beloved wife for 47 years of Ronald E. Gribbins; loving mother of John G. Gribbins (Amie) of Atlanta, GA and Michael W. Gribbins; dear grandmother of Garrett Walker Gribbins; sister of John Meiselwitz, William Meiselwitz and Robert Meiselwitz (Cindy); sister-in-law of Ann Gribbins, Karen Gribbins and Sue Gribbins; aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Martha was a career teacher with the Clayton School District. Martha was a selfless person and very giving of her time to help others. Services: A funeral service will be conducted at All Saints Catholic Church, 6430 Clemens Ave. at Westgate Ave., University City on Wednesday, May 29, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. Private interment at Kiel City Cemetery, Kiel, Wisconsin. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions appreciated to Siteman Cancer Center. The family will recieve friends at LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City, on Tuesday, May 28, 2019 from 4:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Online condolences at www.luptonchapel.com. A SERVICE OF LUPTON CHAPEL

DuBray Kelly, Dolores 95, May 24, 2019. Graveside services, Thurs., May 30, 10:45 a.m. Jefferson Barracks. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Friedeck, Jacqueline Rose "Mother Trout" (nee Zurfehr) Fortified with the Sa cra men t s of H ol y Mother Church Thursday, May 23, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Jerome Friedeck; loving mother of Kathy (Jack) Marty, Mark (Anna) Friedeck, Charles (Ye Dandan) Friedeck, Chris (Sue) Friedeck, Ben (Candi) Friedeck and Jim Friedeck; dear grandmother and great-grandmother to many; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin, and friend to all. Jacqueline never met a stranger, was always ready to talk, and was a blessing to all who knew her. Services: Funeral from Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Thursday, May 30, 10:30 a.m. to Mary Queen of Peace Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Stroke Association. Visitation Wednesday, 3-8 p.m.

Fuchs, Sylvia C. (nee Scheulen) Thurs., May 16, 2019. Memorial visitation Thurs., May 30, 10:30 a.m. until Mass 11:30 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Cottleville. www.collierfuneralhome.com

Giessman, William L. Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Visitation Tuesday, May 28, 4-8 p.m. Mass Wednesday, May 29, 9:30 a.m. at St. Martin Deporres. Int. Jefferson Barracks. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Goodrum, Mary Frances Bomar

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

Ostmann, Donald Ralph - St. Charles, MO Patton, Lillian L. - Arnold Pederson, Carter Miles - Chesterfield Pope, Dave - Columbia, IL Porter, Helen Leonora "Lee" - Neosho, MO, formerly of St. Louis Pottinger, Shirley J. - St. Louis Reinheimer, Leonard C. - St. Louis Robarts, Virginia - St. Louis Roberts, Molly A. - St. Louis Ronchetto, Michael - Florissant Ruggeri, Diana Louise - St. Louis Scholin, Virginia Lena - St. Louis Schweig, Norma J. - St. Louis Selzer, Emily - Florissant Stonecypher, Maria Lucelly "Lucy" - Imperial, MO Stratman - see Ruggeri Stumpf, George E. Sr. - Ballwin, MO Valenti, Mary Lou - St. Charles Vogelweid, Gregory A. - St. Louis Werner, August C. "Gus/Boots", Jr. - St. Louis

Daniel, James Thomas

Tom attended Granite City High School and earned his B.A. from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, and his Masters in Social Work from Saint Louis University. In August of 1958 he met the love of his life, Judy Cachick, and their infatuation never Bangert, Caroline E. Passed away on Sunday May 19, 2019. Beloved wife of Henry C. waned over their almost 61 years together. They married and Bangert; Loving mother of Henry J. (Joan), Hyatt (Audrey), started their family as he was beginning his 40-year career in Jenny (Michael) and Linda (Tim) Bangert; grandmother of 9; social work, eventually settling in University City where he spent the majority of his career as the Assistant Director of the great grandmother of 14; dear sister, aunt and friend. Services: Private services will be held with a memorial service Edgewood Program. at a later date. Among things Tom loved were: flying, road trips, fishing trips Condolences may be offered at www.alexanderstlouis.com without fish, computers, taking photos, cemeteries, spy thrillers, church steeples, strong coffee, root beer, chicken livers, Becker, Mary Ann baseball, and biking through Forest Park. But most of all he (nee Emken) died suddenly on loved his Juju and the family they made together. That love was May 20, 2019. Preceded in death returned; he ended his days with a wife and four kids that were was her adoring husband Joseph crazy about him. There can be no better measure of a life wella n d c h e r i s h e d s o n K a r l . lived. Heartbroken children Mary Jane, Mary Elizabeth (Brice), Mary Services: A memorial Mass for Tom will be held on Thursday, Margaret (Bill), Paul (Cyndi), and May 30 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier College Church, on A m y ( S t e v e ) w i l l m i s s h e r the St. Louis University campus. The last years of Tom's life terribly. Her humorous quick- were greatly enriched by the advancements made in the witted nature amused her many treatment of multiple myeloma, so the family requests grandchildren and great-grand- donations in the name of James Thomas Daniel to the Multiple children. Proud sister to Kurt Myeloma Research Foundation, 383 Main Avenue, 5th Floor (Peggy Ann) and Mark, O.S.A.. Norwalk, CT 06851 in lieu of flowers. Mary Ann was born in St. Louis, raised her children in St. Louis Hills and created many family Dierkes, Eileen E. memories at Innsbrook Estates. She enjoyed 10 years in Naples, Florida and returned to St. Louis in 2014. Mom loved her 94, died on May 20, after saying goodbye to each of her chilCardinals baseball, world traveling, Jeopardy, reading, her dren and grandchildren and telling them how much she loved many pets and crossword puzzles. Her stylish ways and them. Lucky to have her as our mother and grandmother are sassiness brought smiles to many. A memorial Mass is being Christy and Michael Bond, Stephen Dierkes and Wang Hong, planned. Jack and Cindy Dierkes, Nick, Katie, and Laura Bond, and Ryan and Michael Dierkes. She was the wife of Bernard Dierkes, deceased, a loving aunt, avid feminist, and loyal friend to many. Begley, Edward Michael There will be a Celebration of Life on September 28, details April 30, 2019, age 79. Memorial Mass, Tues., May 28, St. pending. In lieu of flowers, please perform a random act of Cletus Catholic Church, 2705 Zumbehl Road, St. Charles, kindness. MO, 6:00 p.m. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Brassel, Jean M.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Memorial Visitation on May 28 from 10 a.m. until time of memorial service at 11 a.m., The Boulevard Independent Living Theater, 3330 Ehlmann, St. Charles MO 63301. Interment will take place in Jackson, MS at a future date. In lieu of flowers, the family asks for donations to the Alzheimer's Association or St. Jude's Childrens Research Hospital. Condolences may be offered at www.alexanderstlouis.com

THEM GREAT SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

Hinrichs, Edwin S. 94, May 20, 2019. Services: Visitation, Wed., May 29, Assumption Catholic Church O'Fallon, 10:00-11:00 am. Mass to follow at 11:00 am. (636) 240-2242 or visit baue.com

Huff, Barbara A. (nee White), Friday, May 24, 2019. Beloved wife of the late George Huff. Visitation at Kutis So. Co., 5255 Lemay Ferry, Wed., May 29, 11 a.m. until service at 1 p.m. Interment Shepherd Hills.

Hunter, Irene M. (nee Saeger), 95 on Thursday, May 23. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Thurs., May 30. Funeral 11 a.m. Fri., May 31 Alexander-WhiteMullen Funeral Home. More info www.alexanderstlouis.com.

Jennemann, Doris Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 90, of St. Louis, MO. Memorial Visit Tues., May 28, 3-6 p.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary - Kirkwood. Service Tuesday 6 p.m. at Chapel Hill Mortuary - Kirkwood.

Jennings, Stephen H. passed away, Friday, May 24, 2019. Beloved husband of Joyce Jackson. Loving father of Lauren (John Palmer) Jennings. Dear grandfather of Karolina Jennings and Kaiden Palmer. Brother of the late Diane Jennings Willis. Uncle of Lisa (Matthew) Fister and Laura (Patrick) Domitrz. Brother-in-law of James Willis, Michael (Anna) Jackson, James (Barbara) Jackson, Patti (Harry) Henderson, and Mollie (Robert) Wallace. Son-in-law of Harry and Doris Jackson. Beloved uncle, great-uncle, cousin, and friend to many. Services: Funeral service at Living Word United Methodist Church, 17315 Manchester Road, Wildwood, Wednesday, 11:00 a.m. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Vietnam Veterans of America. Visitation at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Tuesday 4-8 p.m. and at the church, Wednesday, 10 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Jimenez, Ernesto "Ernie" May 13, 2019. Memorial Mass Sat., June 1, 11 a.m. at St. Barnabas Church, 1400 N. Main St., O' Fallon, MO 63366. www.valhallafunerals.net

Judge, Joseph Martin Fortified with the sacrament of the Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, May 14, 2019. Son of the late Larry and late Peggy Judge. Beloved husband of Margaret (nee Ohlman) of 52 1/2 years. Devoted father of Bridget; grandfather of Megan (Brandon); and dearest Great-grandfather (G-pa) of Chloe. Loving brother, brother-in-law, and uncle to many. Joe has donated his body to Saint Louis University School of Medicine. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: St. Pius V SVDP Society, 3310 S. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, Mo. 63118. His heart belonged to St. Vincent de Paul. Services: A memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, June 1, 2019 at St. Pius V Church 3310 S. Grand Blvd. (at Utah). Greeting the family will begin at 9am with mass to follow at 10am. Remember, O most gracious Virgin Mary….

Karlsen, Geraldine J. "Jere" (nee Duff) Fri., May 17, 2019. Visitation at Kutis Affton, 10151 Gravois, Tues., June 11, 10:30 a.m. until funeral service at 11:30 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery.

Kekelis, David George of Saint Charles, MO, passed away Sunday, May 19, 2019, at the age of 70. Beloved husband of Rosine A. Kekelis, cherished son of Susie Kekelis and the late George B. Kekelis; devoted father to Jayson (Amy) Kekelis and Kendra (Edward) Hartman; proud and adored grandfather of Tyler, Kody, Nora, Lena and Molly; dear brother of Linda Kekelis; and trusted uncle, brother-in-law and friend. Dave was a project control engineer in the construction industry who enjoyed his retirement with family and friends around Castle Rock Lake in Wisconsin. He was fiercely loyal and protective and will be forever remembered by family and friends as a champion of integrity and self-reliance. Dave was a master of spreadsheets and BBQ and carpentry, and he was always willing to lend a hand or advice - especially about construction, finances and fishing for salmon in Alaska (his favorite place on earth). Dave never met a stranger; his smile warmed many hearts. Memorials may be made in Dave's name to Habitat for Humanity.

STLtoday.com/obits STLtoday.com/obits

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL


WORLD

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

Decades after failed invasion, Cuba still eyes Venezuela BY JOSHUA GOODMAN

Associated Press

MACHURUCUTO, Venezuela — For all the heated talk coming from Washington about President Nicolás Maduro being a Cuban puppet, there was a time when Cuban troops really did try to take control of Venezuela — or at least a remote coconut-strewn tropical beach. Fifty-two years ago this month an expeditionary force of 12 guerrillas departed from the communist-run island and days later landed in this sleepy fishing village with the goal of spreading Fidel Castro’s revolution to South America. The incursion — condemned at the time as a Cuban “invasion” — was a resounding failure. Of the four Cuban guerrillas transporting the mission, one drowned when their inflatable raft overturned while the others were captured by a military patrol tipped off about the landing by a CIA mole. Within a year, the insurgency, which included eight Venezuelans who evaded capture, was wiped out. Fast-forward a half century and Venezuela’s socialist government would welcome what past governments condemned as “invaders” with a red carpet — a fact not lost on the U.S., which has accused Cuba of being Maduro’s main prop in power as the economy around him falls apart. “No one has done more to support the corrupt Maduro regime

RODRIGO ABD, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman shows a 2012 publication of a local newspaper carrying the story of the 1967 Cuban guerrilla operation earlier this month in Machurucuto, Venezuela. Fifty-two years ago this month, an expeditionary force of 12 guerrillas departed from the communist-run island and days later landed in this sleepy fishing village with the goal of spreading Fidel Castro’s revolution to South America. than Cuba,” Vice President Mike Pence said in a policy speech this month. “The people of Venezuela are essentially Cuba’s hostage.” But the reality of Cuban influence in Venezuela is more nuanced. The extraordinarily tight alliance between the two countries was forged when Castro counseled Hugo Chávez following a failed 2002 coup. Venezuela has since sent an estimated $30 billion worth of oil to Cuba in exchange for Havana dispatching tens of thousands of medical workers and

other government employees, including intelligence and military advisers, according to defectors. While nobody doubts the strong ideological alliance, U.S. estimates of as many as 25,000 Cuban troops on the ground have been denied by Cuba and seem wildly exaggerated even to some in the U.S. intelligence community. “There are no troops,” Carlos Fernández de Cossío, Cuba’s director general of U.S. affairs, said in a recent interview in Washington. “Cuba does not participate in military operations nor in security

OBITUARIES Morris, Ken 60, passed quietly on May 23, 2019. Beloved husband of Charlotte (nee Swan) for 30 years; loving father of Valerie (Andrew) Craven and Marshall Morris. Dear brother of Clifford (Christine) Morris, Jr. and Teresa (the late Dan Kelleher) Morris. Loving son of the late Clifford and Carol Morris, Sr. Ken was a devoted husband and father and he will be remembered for being very kind, caring and always trying to do what was right. Services: Vis. Wed. (5/29) 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Hutchens-Stygar FH, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles). Svc. beginning at 12 p.m. Memorials to Community Living. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Mueller, Diane D. (nee Person), on Wed. May 15, 2019. Beloved mother, daughter, sister, sister-in-law, aunt and friend to many. Services: Memorial Mass Wed., 10 a.m., May 29, 2019 at St. Gabriel Catholic Church, 6303 Nottingham, 63109. Visitation at Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Road on Tues., May 28, 4-8 p.m. Inurnment Mount Hope Cemetery. Visit hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Nelson, Ruby L. (nee Cooke) Passed away Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Frank Nelson; loving mother of Debra (Tom) Shelton, Denise (Bob) Baker, and Deanna (Mark) Nester; dearest grandmother of six and great-grandmother of four. Services: Funeral services to be held in Watertown, South Dakota with Crawford-Osthus Funeral Chapel. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimers Assoc.

Nieman, Karen S. Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Memorial service at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, June 15, 2 p.m.

Olszewski, Edward William passed away on May 24, 2019, surrounded by his loving children. He was 97 years old. Ed was born April 15, 1922 in St. Louis MO, to the late Eugene and Adeline (Kloer) Olszewski. He was a proud graduate of Chaminade College Preparatory School in St. Louis and attended the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, IN. A highly decorated WWII pilot, Ed was a hero who loved his country, a man of deep faith, and a friend to all. He was a devoted husband to the late Mary Ellen (nee Weyforth) Olszewski for 58 years, loving father to six children, and proud grandfather to 11 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. Ed is preceded in death by his parents Eugene and Adeline, his siblings Jane Olszewski Sweeney McCollum, Sr. Ruth Mary, SL, Mary Olszewski Hellrung Richter, his wife Mary Ellen, and eldest son Edward William Olszewski, Jr. Ed is survived by his brother William Olszewski; Children Lori (Terry) Rehme, Michael (Cindy) Olszewski, Richard (Amy) O l s z e w s k i , J a n ie (M ich a el ) L on g, a n d J a y O l s z e w s k i ; Grandchildren Lindsay (Michael) Bradshaw, Leslie Olszewski, Timothy (Nicole) Olszewski, Brian (Matt) Rehme, Pamela Olszewski, Katherine Olszewski, Christopher Card, Ellen Olszewski, Michael Card, Claire Olszewski, and Katherine (Jake) Plaggenburg; Great grandchildren Parker, Jack, and Brooks Bradshaw, Quinn Olszewski, and Jackson and Luke Plaggenburg, and many nieces and nephews. Services: Visitation will be held Tuesday, May 28, 2019 from 3:30-7:30 p.m. at Schrader Funeral Home, 14960 Manchester Road, Ballwin, MO. Funeral mass at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday May 29, 2019 at Sacred Heart Church at 17 Ann Avenue, Valley Park, MO, followed by private burial at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to the Greater St. Louis Honor Flight ( w w w . gslhonorflight.org), and the St. Vincent DePaul Society of Sacred Heart Catholic Church Valley Park. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

operations in Venezuela.” What’s not in doubt is Cuba’s strategic interest in Venezuela — something that traces its roots to the Machurucuto incident. A straggling visitor to the depressed town of 500 would never know from the boarded-up beach kiosks and decaying fishing boats that it was briefly a flashpoint in the Cold War fight against communism. It was chosen as a beachhead because of its proximity to a jungled mountain range stretching toward Caracas that was a major center of guerrilla activity. Ana Morffe, one of the few elderly residents who remember the incident, said she didn’t even know what a guerrilla was at the time. But unbeknownst to her, one of the young fighters sneaked through an open window of her house while she was out washing clothes at the river and cooked himself a meal. “I didn’t see him, but he surely saw me,” said the 75-year-old. Héctor Pérez Marcano, one of the surviving members of the expedition, said Castro’s support stemmed from an overriding interest in Venezuela’s oil. A little more than two weeks after Castro rode into Havana triumphantly in 1959, he flew to Caracas, where massive crowds lined highways to get a glimpse of the bearded revolutionary whose defeat of the U.S.-backed dictator Fulgencio Batista would inspire a

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Patton, Lillian L.

new generation of Latin American leftists. A few years later, Marcano and a few dozen Venezuelans traveled to Cuba for military training. He said the idea of deploying by sea came directly from Castro at a meeting on the top floor of the Habana Libre hotel during the first Tricontinental Conference of revolutionaries from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Almost 18 months later, Castro was present when the rebels shipped out from Santiago de Cuba at 6 a.m., handing each member of the expedition a Rolex watch — the ultimate all-terrain aid for any revolutionary worth his salt, he told them. A year earlier, another landing squad with 15 Cuban guerrillas, including a highlydecorated war hero who would go on to command Castro’s troops in Ethiopia and Angola, landed covertly in western Falcon state. “Back then (for Fidel) Venezuela was the crown jewel of Latin America,” said Marcano. The impact of the clandestine intervention was immediately felt: an emergency meeting of regional diplomats was convened in Washington and Venezuela broke off diplomatic relations with Havana. It would take seven years for them to be restored. Marcano, an opponent of Maduro, said Venezuela’s petrodiplomacy over the past decade has been at the service of Cuba’s interests.

Stonecypher, Maria Lucelly "Lucy"

(nee Quinn) Tues., May 21, 2019. Visitation St. Joseph Church (Imperial) Tues., May 28, 10:30a.m. until Mass 11:30a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. Kutis South County service.

Tuesday, May 21, 2019. 69, of Imperial, MO. Visit Tues. May 28 4-8 p.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary. Mass Wednesday 10 a.m. at Our Lady Queen of Peace - House Springs

Pederson, Carter Miles

Stumpf, George E. Sr.

Baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Sunday, May 19, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Patricia A. Stumpf (nee Foster); dearest father of George E. Jr. (Kerry), Greg (Karen), Geffrey, Grant (Theresa) and Mary (Matt) Tarlano; dearest grandfather of 13 Porter, Helen Leonora "Lee" a n d g r e a t - g r a n d f a t h e r of 8; Lee Porter, of St. Louis, Missouri, passed away at 1:47 p.m. on brother-in-law of Richard (Karen) Wednesday, May 22, 2019. We will celebrate Lee's life with a Foster; our dear uncle and friend visitation from 2:00-3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 28, 2019, at the of many. Peace Lutheran Church, 737 Barracksview Rd. in St. Louis with Services: Funeral Mass at Holy funeral services to follow at 3:00 p.m. Online condolences may Infant Catholic Church, 627 Dennison Dr., Ballwin, Monday, be shared at www.CraftonCantrellFuneralHome.com. June 3, 11:00 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Wounded Warriors Project. A service of the SCHRADER Reinheimer, Leonard C. Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Visitation Kutis Affton Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, May 28, 4-8 p.m. with family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. funeral Mass Wednesday, 10 a.m. at Assumption Church (Mattis Rd.) Valenti, Mary Lou (nee: Schulte) May 20, 2019, age 71. Robarts, Virginia Services: Visitation Tuesday, (nee Rizzo) Wednesday, May 8, 2019. Our dear aunt and May 28, 4-8 p.m., Baue Cave friend. Memorial gathering at John L. Ziegenhein & Son Springs. Service Wednesday, May Funeral Home, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. Sat., June 1, 2-4 p.m. 29, 10 a.m., St. Charles Borromeo. Contact (636) 946-7811 or Roberts, Molly A. visit baue.com. (nee Hynek) Saturday, May 4, 2019. Graveside Service Wed., May 29, 11:00 a.m. at Sacred Heart Cemetery, 980 Graham Rd., (Florissant). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com 80, passed May 18, 2019. He leaves wife Lynn (Heggen); daughters, Krista Hanson (Jim), Kari Carmody (Dan); 4 grandchildren & many treasured friends. Services: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 327 Woods Mill Rd., Manchester, MO, June 15, 11 a.m., visitation before & reception following. Donations to Good Shepherd Church, or to St Luke's Hospice, 101 St Luke's Center Dr., Chesterfield, MO 63017.

Ruggeri, Diana Louise 84, of St. Louis passed away Thursday, May 23, 2019 at SSM Health St. Joseph Hospital. She was born April 27, 1935 in St. Louis, a daughter of Charles and Olga Buscagalia Gaia. She married Louis "Lou" Ruggeri. He preceded her in death. She was also preceded in death by her parents and two brothers. Surviving are her children, John (Jill) Ruggeri, Mario (Kathy) Ruggeri, Lisa (Derek Stratman) Ruggeri; 10 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; one brother, Mario (Vickie) Gaia; several nieces and nephews; and many friends and extended family. Diana touched so many lives and will be dearly missed. She was the President of the Daughters of Mary at St. Joan of Arc and volunteered at many other organizations at church over the years. Services: A Mass of Christian burial will be at 10 a.m., Tuesday May 28, 2019 at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary. Burial will be in Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. Jude Children's Hospital. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com

Scholin, Virginia Lena

(nee Y o u n g ma n ) 89, died peacefully on Wednesday, May 22, 2019, surrounded by her daughters and all other family in spirit. Ginny will surely be missed b y d a u g h t e r s S u z i e (Bill) Kunderman, Marianne (Rob) Fricke and son Chris (Edie Rue). She was preceded in death by her husband of 66 years Ray; son Jim; her 3 brothers, and sister, and parents Lena and Adam Youngman. She was loved by her Ostmann, Donald Ralph sister-in-laws, Del Youngman and of St. Charles, MO, at the age of 66, passed away on Tuesday, B ob b ie Scholin W e y m a n who considered her a sister; May 21, 2019. Dearest son of Lucille Ostmann (nee Schneider) grandchildren Emma (Steve), and Jacob (Kimmy Ulmer) Fricke, and the late Ralph Ostmann; loving father of Jennifer (Alex) Ben (Kathryn), and Jake (Kayla) Kanipe, Oscar and Forrest Giannoulis and Carolyn (Nate) Pettypool; beloved grandfather of Scholin; great-grandmother of Aubry Wozniak, Esme and Leo Gunner and Griffin Pettypool and Sophia and Max Giannoulis; Nelson, and Conrad and Leni Kanipe; and numerous nieces and cherished brother of Ron Ostmann; dear friend to Tom (Kathy) nephews. Genz; treasured cousin, nephew and friend to many. Born Services: There will be a private family burial service. In Ginny's August 25, 1952, Don graduated from Duchesne Catholic High memory, memorials may be made to the Pacific Grove Music School and attended University of Missouri - Columbia. He was Boosters, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Fisher Center an active member of the Knights of Columbus. for Alzheimer's Research Foundation or a charity of your Services: A memorial Mass will be held on Thursday, May 30, choice. A SERVICE OF KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL. 2019 at 11am at Holy Spirit Catholic Church, Centralia. Visitation will take place prior to the service at 10am at Oliver Funeral Home, Centralia, MO. Following the Mass, lunch and additional Selzer, Emily C. visitation will take place at the Holy Spirit Catholic Church Multi- (nee Hucker) Graveside Service Friday, May 31, 10:00 a.m. at purpose Building. Memorial contributions may be made to Sacred Heart Cemetery, 980 Graham Rd. (Florissant). Cancer Research Center, 1210 Old 63 S Suite 5, Columbia, MO www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com 65201. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Florists Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits


05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A25

OBITUARIES

Celebrations of Life

Kinealy, Mary Kathleen

Nieman, Karen S.

78, was called home on April 14, 2019, while enjoying her retirement years in The Villages, FL. Mary was born March 14, 1941 to the late William Kinealy and Genevieve Cukierski. She is survived by a sister, Betty (Walt) Skeistaitis and brother Mike (Fran) Kinealy. She was a loving aunt to Joe (Kelly) and Chris Skeistaitis, Angie (Darin) M'Lady, Joan (Ryan) Schade, numerous great-nieces, nephews and cousins. Services: Memorial visitation will be held on Tuesday, June 4, from 10:00 a.m. until time of memorial service at 12:00 noon at Alexander White Mullen, 11101 St. Charles Rock Rd., St. Ann, MO. In lieu of flowers, send donations to Cancer Society. Inurnment Mount Lebanon Cemetery. Condolences may be offered atwww.alexanderstlouis.com

Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Memorial service at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Saturday, June 15, 2 p.m.

Olszewski, Edward William

passed away on May 24, 2019, surrounded by his loving children. He was 97 years old. Ed was born April 15, 1922 in St. Louis MO, to the late Eugene and Adeline (Kloer) Olszewski. He was a proud graduate of Chaminade College Preparatory School in St. Louis and attended the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, IN. Krehmeyer, Jeanne Ruth A highly decorated WWII pilot, Ed 89, May 18, 2019. Vis. Thu., May 23, Baue Cave Springs, was a hero who loved his country, 4-8pm. Svc. Fri., May 24, Holy Cross Lutheran-O'Fallon a man of deep faith, and a friend 10am, with vis. 1-hr. prior. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com to all. He was a devoted husband to the late Mary Ellen (nee Weyforth) Olszewski for 58 years, loving father to six children, Kroner, Mary Ann and proud grandfather to 11 grandchildren and 6 great (nee Miele), age 77, passed away on Thursday, May 23, grandchildren. 2019. Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Ed is preceded in death by his parents Eugene and Adeline, his Tuesday, 6:00 pm. For more info see Schrader.com siblings Jane Olszewski Sweeney McCollum, Sr. Ruth Mary, SL, Mary Olszewski Hellrung Richter, his wife Mary Ellen, and eldest son Edward William Olszewski, Jr. Layton Sr., Gary W. Ed is survived by his brother William Olszewski; Children Lori Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Funeral at Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry, Thursday, May 30, 10 a.m. Interment (Terry) Rehme, Michael (Cindy) Olszewski, Richard (Amy) O l s z e w s k i , J a n ie (M ich a el ) L on g, a n d J a y O l s z e w s k i ; Shepherd Hills Cemetery. Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m. Grandchildren Lindsay (Michael) Bradshaw, Leslie Olszewski, Timothy (Nicole) Olszewski, Brian (Matt) Rehme, Pamela Lichius, Helen J. Olszewski, Katherine Olszewski, Christopher Card, Ellen 82, May 23, 2019. Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Olszewski, Michael Card, Claire Olszewski, and Katherine (Jake) Home, Ballwin, Wednesday, 7 p.m. Visitation 5-7 p.m. Plaggenburg; Great grandchildren Parker, Jack, and Brooks For more info see Schrader.com Bradshaw, Quinn Olszewski, and Jackson and Luke Plaggenburg, and many nieces and nephews. Services: Visitation will be held Tuesday, May 28, 2019 from Marshall, Dan C. 3:30-7:30 p.m. at Schrader Funeral Home, 14960 Manchester Dan C. Marshall passed away on April 20, 2019 in Plano, Texas Road, Ballwin, MO. Funeral mass at 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday surrounded by his loving family. May 29, 2019 at Sacred Heart Church at 17 Ann Avenue, Valley Park, MO, followed by private burial at Jefferson Barracks Dan was born in Caddo, Oklahoma on December 31, 1939 to National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests Lucille M., née Potts, and Daniel L. Marshall. Dan served in the donations to the Greater St. Louis Honor Flight ( w w w . U.S. Navy and was an accomplished businessman, starting and gslhonorflight.org), and the St. Vincent DePaul Society of operating several companies in the building and finance indus- Sacred Heart Catholic Church Valley Park. Friends may tries. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Margaret, née sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. Giljum; his son Dan and his wife Rhonda and grandsons Daniel and Evan; as well as, son Dennis and his wife Cristina. Dan was preceded in death by his parents, Daniel and Lucille, sister SanOstmann, Donald Ralph na, and is survived by his sister Lynn, as well as several nieces of St. Charles, MO, at the age of 66, passed away on Tuesday, and nephews. May 21, 2019. Dearest son of Lucille Ostmann (nee Schneider) Services: A Memorial Mass for Dan Marshall will be held on Fri- and the late Ralph Ostmann; loving father of Jennifer (Alex) day, May 31, 2019 at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church, Giannoulis and Carolyn (Nate) Pettypool; beloved grandfather of 1414 S. Sappington Rd, Crestwood, MO 63126, at 6:00 p.m Gunner and Griffin Pettypool and Sophia and Max Giannoulis; cherished brother of Ron Ostmann; dear friend to Tom (Kathy) Genz; treasured cousin, nephew and friend to many. Born August 25, 1952, Don graduated from Duchesne Catholic High Mauer, Olive Ann and attended University of Missouri - Columbia. He was passed Friday May 24, 2019. School an active member of the Knights of Columbus. Mother to Marcia Mueller, Pam Services: A memorial Mass will be held on Thursday, May 30, Barr (deceased), Jeff Mauer, 2019 at 11am at Holy Spirit Catholic Church, Centralia. Visitation Gayle Mauer (Lan Weisberger); will take place prior to the service at 10am at Oliver Funeral grandmother to Garrick (Briana), Home, Centralia, MO. Following the Mass, lunch and additional Greg, Robert (Anjanette), Kurt visitation will take place at the Holy Spirit Catholic Church Multi(Lindsey), Jena, Casey, Cami; purpose Building. Memorial contributions may be made to great-grandmother to Aidan, Cancer Research Center, 1210 Old 63 S Suite 5, Columbia, MO Cora, Alex, Arthur, Megan, Bryli. 65201. Alternativefuneralcremation.com A life long resident of St. Louis and proud member of the Class Patton, Lillian L. of '44 (Cleveland High), she will be missed by many. (nee Quinn) Tues., May 21, 2019. Visitation St. Joseph A celebration of Olive's long life Church (Imperial) Tues., May 28, 10:30a.m. until Mass 11:30a.m. will be held at a later date. Interment JB National Cemetery. Kutis South County service.

McIntosh, John John Wallace McIntosh, 83, of Kirkwood, MO left our earthly plane peacefully on May 12, 2019. He was born to John and Evelyn McIntosh in Gainesville, TX in 1935. He shared a lifelong love of learning and the outdoors with his wife of 51 years, Dr. Helen McIntosh. John taught algebra and calculus in the St. Louis Community College system, and challenged his students to do their best. He loved athletics and played softball into his 70's. He was most at peace in the woods and meadows of farmland and natural areas. The family extends heartfelt thanks to the caring staff at The Quarters of Des Peres. Services: A Memorial Service is planned for Fall of 2019, and will be announced through Kriegshauser Brothers. (www.k-brothers.com)

Meyer, Elizabeth L. Elizabeth L. "Betty" Meyer, (nee Fresenburg), 98, fortified with the Sacraments of the Holy Mother Church, died May 17, 2019. Beloved wife of the late August Meyer Jr.; dearest mother of Lucille Hahn, Margaret (Ted) Stefanowycz, Ray (Beth) Meyer, and Don (Diana) Meyer. Our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin, and friend to many. She donated her body to SLU. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to St. Margaret's Church. Services: Memorial Mass, July 26, 2019 at 11:00 at St. Margaret of Scotland Church, 3854 Flad Ave., St Louis, MO

Miller, John A. Sunday, May 19, 2019. Loving husband of the late Deborah Miller; beloved father of Becky Miller; dear son of June and the late Johnnie E. Miller; dear brother of Jana (James) Otwell, Juanita (Gene) Stunckel and Judy (Bill) Donaldson; loving son-in-law of Leroy and the late Betty Rosa; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, nephew, cousin and friend. Mr. Miller was a proud member of UAW for over 42 years. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Tuesday, May 28, 10:30 a.m. Interment JB National Cemetery. Visitation Monday, 6-9 p.m.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Robarts, Virginia (nee Rizzo) Wednesday, May 8, 2019. Our dear aunt and friend. Memorial gathering at John L. Ziegenhein & Son Funeral Home, 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. Sat., June 1, 2-4 p.m.

Roberts, Molly A. (nee Hynek) Saturday, May 4, 2019. Graveside Service Wed., May 29, 11:00 a.m. at Sacred Heart Cemetery, 980 Graham Rd., (Florissant). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Ronchetto, Michael May 24, 2019, 81. Vis. Thu., May 30, Baue Cave Springs, 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm. Svc. Fri., May 31, St. Norbert Catholic Church, 10:00 am. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Ruggeri, Diana Louise 84, of St. Louis, passed away Thursday, May 23, 2019 at SSM Health St. Joseph Hospital. She was born April 27, 1935 in St. Louis, a daughter of Charles and Olga Buscagalia Gaia. She married Louis "Lou" Ruggeri. He preceded her in death. She was also preceded in death by her parents and two brothers. Surviving are her children, John (Jill) Ruggeri, Mario (Kathy) Ruggeri, Lisa (Derek Stratman) Ruggeri; 10 grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; one brother, Mario (Vickie) Gaia; several nieces and nephews; and many friends and extended family. Diana touched so many lives and will be dearly missed. She was the President of the Daughters of Mary at St. Joan of Arc and volunteered at many other organizations at church over the years. Services: A Mass of Christian burial will be at 10 a.m., Tuesday, May 28, 2019 at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church. Visitation will be from 4 to 8 p.m. Monday at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary. Burial will be in Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. Jude Children's Hospital. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com

Scholin, Virginia Lena (nee Y o u n g ma n ) 89, died peacefully on Wednesday, May 22, 2019, surrounded by her daughters and all other family in spirit. Ginny will surely be missed b y d a u g h t e r s S u z i e (Bill) Kunderman, Marianne (Rob) Fricke and son Chris (Edie Rue). She was preceded in death by her husband of 66 years Ray; son Jim; her 3 brothers, and sister, and parents Lena and Adam Youngman. She was loved by her sister-in-laws, Del Youngman and B ob b ie Scholin W e y m a n who considered her a sister; grandchildren Emma (Steve), and Jacob (Kimmy Ulmer) Fricke, Ben (Kathryn), and Jake (Kayla) Kanipe, Oscar and Forrest Scholin; great-grandmother of Aubry Wozniak, Esme and Leo Nelson, and Conrad and Leni Kanipe; and numerous nieces and nephews. Services: There will be a private family burial service. In Ginny's memory, memorials may be made to the Pacific Grove Music Boosters, Breast Cancer Research Foundation, Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation or a charity of your choice. A SERVICE OF KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL.

Schweig, Norma J.

(nee Ross), passed away Thursday, May 23, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Richard H. Sch w eig; dearest mother of Christy (Barry) Wall, Rick (Carissa) Schweig and Jeff (Susan) Schweig; dear grandmother of Ashley (Matt), Alex, Jeffrey, Pederson, Carter Miles Jere and Abby (Blaine); great80, passed May 18, 2019. He leaves wife Lynn (Heggen); daugh- grandmother of Benjamin; our ters, Krista Hanson (Jim), Kari Carmody (Dan); 4 grandchildren dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and & many treasured friends. friend. Services: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 327 Woods Mill Rd., Norma was a veteran of the U.S. Manchester, MO, June 15, 11 a.m., visitation before & reception Navy and served during WWII. following. Donations to Good Shepherd Church, or to St Luke's Services: Visitation at the FAMILY CENTER at SCHRADER Hospice, 101 St Luke's Center Dr., Chesterfield, MO 63017. Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, May 29, 10:30 a.m. until time of service at 11:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Pope, Dave Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to Thursday, May 23, 2019. Beloved husband of Judy Pope (nee American Cancer Society. Friends may sign the family's Neumeister); dear father of David (Becca), Steven (Kayla), Tim on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. and the late Nick Pope; dear grandfather of Natalee and Kinslee; our dear brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and Selzer, Emily C. friend. Dave enjoyed playing pool, riding motorcycles, and loved (nee Hucker) Graveside Service Friday, May 31, 10:00 a.m. at entertaining family and friends. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Sacred Heart Cemetery, 980 Graham Rd. (Florissant). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, May 30, 3:30-9:00 p.m. then to Immaculate Conception Church (Columbia, IL) Friday, May 31st for visitation at 9:00 a.m. until Mass at 10:00 a.m. Stonecypher, Maria Lucelly "Lucy" Interment Mount Olive Cemetery. Tuesday, May 21, 2019. 69, of Imperial, MO. Visit Tues. May 28 4-8 p.m. Chapel Hill Mortuary. Mass Wednesday 10 a.m. at Our Porter, Helen Leonora "Lee" Lady Queen of Peace - House Springs Lee Porter, of St. Louis, Missouri, passed away at 1:47 p.m. on Wednesday, May 22, 2019. We will celebrate Lee's life with a Stumpf, George E. Sr. visitation from 2:00-3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 28, 2019, at the Baptized into the hope Peace Lutheran Church, 737 Barracksview Rd. in St. Louis with of Christ's resurrection, funeral services to follow at 3:00 p.m. Online condolences may Sunday, May 19, 2019. be shared at www.CraftonCantrellFuneralHome.com. Beloved husband of the late Patricia A. Stumpf (nee Foster); Pottinger, Shirley J. dearest father of George E. Jr. (Kerry), Greg (Karen), Geffrey, 85, March 14, 2019. She spent 50 years as a nurse. Memorial visitation: 6-9 p.m., Schrader Funeral Home in Grant (Theresa) and Mary (Matt) Tarlano; dearest grandfather of 13 Eureka. www.stlouiscremation.com a n d g r e a t - g r a n d f a t h e r of 8; brother-in-law of Richard (Karen) Reinheimer, Leonard C. Foster; our dear uncle and friend Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Visitation Kutis Affton of many. Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, May 28, 4-8 p.m. with Services: Funeral Mass at Holy funeral Mass Wednesday, 10 a.m. at Assumption Infant Catholic Church, 627 Dennison Dr., Ballwin, Monday, Church (Mattis Rd.) June 3, 11:00 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Wounded Warriors Project. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the “It is not length of life, but depth of life.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Morris, Ken 60, passed quietly on May 23, 2019. Beloved husband of Charlotte (nee Swan) for 30 years; loving father of Valerie (Andrew) Craven and Marshall Morris. Dear brother of Clifford (Christine) Morris, Jr. and Teresa (the late Dan Kelleher) Morris. Loving son of the late Clifford and Carol Morris, Sr. Ken was a devoted husband and father and he will be remembered for being very kind, caring and always trying to do what was right. Services: Vis. Wed. (5/29) 10 a.m.-12 p.m. at Hutchens-Stygar FH, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles). Svc. beginning at 12 p.m. Memorials to Community Living. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Mueller, Diane D. (nee Person), on Wed. May 15, 2019. Beloved mother, daughter, sister, sister-in-law, aunt and friend to many. Services: Memorial Mass Wed., 10 a.m., May 29, 2019 at St. Gabriel Catholic Church, 6303 Nottingham, 63109. Visitation at Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Road on Tues., May 28, 4-8 p.m. Inurnment Mount Hope Cemetery. Visit hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Nelson, Ruby L. (nee Cooke) Passed away Wednesday, May 22, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Frank Nelson; loving mother of Debra (Tom) Shelton, Denise (Bob) Baker, and Deanna (Mark) Nester; dearest grandmother of six and great-grandmother of four. Services: Funeral services to be held in Watertown, South Dakota with Crawford-Osthus Funeral Chapel. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimers Assoc.

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


WORLD

A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

US FOREIGN RELATIONS | IRAN

MIDEAST POWER PLAYERS & PROXIES A number of key groups could emerge amid tensions between US, Iran

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Newly recruited Shiite fighters, known as Houthis, march during a gathering aimed at mobilizing more fighters into battlefronts to fight pro-government forces in several Yemeni cities in 2017 in Sanaa, Yemen. JON GAMBRELL, ZEINA KARAM AND JOSEF FEDERMAN | Associated Press

A

s long-simmering tensions heat up between the United States and Iran in the Middle East, here’s a look at the various countries or players involved and what could happen:

United States The U.S. has tens of thousands of troops scattered across military bases in the Middle East. It recently sent the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier and strike group to the region, as well as B-52 bombers. That complements the warships of the 5th Fleet in Bahrain, the soldiers of U.S. Army Central in Kuwait, the drones and fighter jets stationed in the United Arab Emirates and the forward headquarters of the U.S. military’s Central Command in Qatar. President Donald Trump has threatened Iran with attack if it first launches an assault on U.S. interests. However, Trump also has sought at times to soften his tone amid his maximum pressure campaign against Tehran, to go with additional sanctions that Washington has imposed after withdrawing from the 2015 nuclear deal that Iran reached with world powers. Analysts fear the chance of a miscalculation by either Iran or the U.S. amid the tensions. Hezbollah fighters stand near a four-wheel vehicle positioned at the site where clashes erupted between Hezbollah and al-Qaida-linked fighters in 2017 near the Lebanon-Syria border.

Hezbollah

An Israeli soldier looks out from a position last year near the southern border village of Mays al-Jabal, Lebanon.

Israel Although Israel has been silent amid the recent tensions, it has played a key role in getting the region to this point. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who considers Iran to be his country’s greatest enemy, welcomed Trump’s withdrawal from the nuclear deal and encouraged renewed economic sanctions. Israeli officials have portrayed the standoff as a matter between Iran and the U.S. But if fighting breaks out, Israel could be targeted by Iran’s regional proxies, such as Hezbollah in Lebanon or Islamic Jihad in Gaza. Israel has the Middle East’s most powerful and advanced military, with F-15 and F-16 warplanes, as well as the next-gener-

ation F-35 fighter jet. It also has warships, submarines and long-range missiles. Israel has a missile-defense system capable of intercepting anything from long-range missiles to short-range rockets fired from Gaza or Lebanon. Israel is widely believed to have a nuclear arsenal, which it neither confirms nor denies. Israel has acknowledged carrying out scores of attacks on Iranian targets in neighboring Syria, sometimes drawing retaliation. Israel, which has conducted pre-emptive bombings of nuclear facilities in Iraq and Syria, has vowed to never allow Iran to obtain an atomic weapon. It also has developed cyberwarfare capabilities.

Saudi Arabia The Sunni rival to Shiite Iran, Saudi Arabia long has watched Tehran with suspicion since its 1979 Islamic Revolution. Relations have cooled and warmed in the last four decades. The U.S. push for the 2015 nuclear deal drew Saudi anger. Since the rise of King Salman and his assertive, 33-year-old son, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the kingdom has taken a far-more militant line. It launched the war in Yemen, targeting Iranian-allied Houthi rebels. Prince Mohammed also compared Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to Nazi Germany’s Adolf Hitler. “We won’t wait for the battle to be in Saudi Arabia,” the prince told the Saudi-owned broadcasting company MBC in 2017. “Instead, we will work so that the battle is for them in Iran, not in Saudi Arabia.” A top Saudi diplomat said the kingdom does not want war but won’t hesitate to defend itself against Iran. Saudi Arabia has a fleet of over 250 fighter jets capable of launching a strike on Iran.

United Arab Emirates The seven sheikhdoms of the United Arab Emirates have long historical ties to Iran, but diplomatic relations between Abu Dhabi and Tehran have worsened in recent years. Analysts believe Abu Dhabi’s powerful crown prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, largely runs day-to-day affairs and military strategy. In U.S. State Department cables released by WikiLeaks, Sheikh Mohammed painted a dire picture of Iran in multiple meetings. He told U.S. diplomats in 2009 he believed “all hell will break loose if Iran attains the bomb, with Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Turkey developing their own nuclear weapons capability and Iran instigating Sunni-Shia conflict throughout the world.” He also described a “near-term conventional war with Iran as clearly preferable to the long term consequences of a nuclear-armed Iran.” The UAE under Sheikh Mohammed has rapidly modern-

An Emirati gunner watches for enemy fire from the rear gate of a United Arab Emirates Chinook military helicopter flying in 2015 over Yemen. ized and expanded its military, with its special forces getting experience in Afghanistan. It now fights alongside Saudi Arabia against Yemen’s Houthi rebels, has reportedly hired Colombian mercenaries and has over 130 fighter jets.

Hezbollah, the most powerful and effective among Iranian-backed militias in the region, has kept quiet recently as tensions have spiked. Its leader, Hassan Nasrallah, however, has said in the past that Iran would not stand alone in any future confrontation with the U.S. The group, formed to combat Israel following its invasion of Lebanon in 1982, has tens of thousands of rockets and missiles that can reach deep into Israel, as well as thousands of disciplined and battle-hardened fighters. Hezbollah has fought alongside government forces in Syria for more than six

years, gaining more experience and expanding its reach. Iran could mobilize Hezbollah to strike at Israel, which would dramatically expand the battlefield but likely draw retaliation that would be devastating for Lebanon. Hezbollah says it is not seeking another war with Israel, and it is not likely to join in any regional confrontation — at least not in the early stages — unless provoked. Hezbollah has lost hundreds of fighters in Syria, exacting a heavy toll on the Shiite community from which it draws most of its support. It is also feeling the crippling U.S. sanctions imposed on the group and its sponsor, Iran.

Iran Iran has both a standing military and its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard. Estimates put its troop strength at over 500,000, with hundreds of thousands more in reserve. Its air force has suffered from Western sanctions, now having a fleet of mostly pre-1979 American fighter jets. However, the Guard maintains an arsenal of ballistic missiles capable of reaching across the wider Middle East, as well as increasingly modern drone fleet. Iran mustered human wave attacks during its 1980s war with neighboring Iraq. It also has additional reach through proxy forces throughout the region and has used that to its advantage over the years. It also has developed cyberwarfare capabilities.

Shiite militias in Iraq Iran can count on the loyalty of tens of thousands of Shiite fighters in Iraq, militias collectively known as the Popular Mobilization forces, or Hashd al-Shaabi in Arabic. Trained, financed and equipped by Iran, the militias battled U.S. forces in the years after the 2003 invasion and remobilized to battle the Islamic State group a decade later. The groups include Asaib Ahl al-Haq, Kataeb Hezbollah and the Badr Organization, all three led by men with close ties to Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the leader of Iran’s elite Quds Force and the architect of Tehran’s regional strategy. The militias were incorporated into Iraq’s armed forces in 2016. Together they number more than 140,000 fighters, and while they fall under the authority of Iraq’s prime minister, the PMF’s top brass align politically with Iran. U.S. forces and the PMF fought side-byside against IS militants after Iraq’s parliament invited the U.S. back into the country in 2014. But now that the war is largely concluded, some militia leaders are calling on U.S. troops to leave again, threatening to expel them by force if necessary.

Young Shiite volunteer militia members prepare to attack Islamic State fighters in 2015 in Tikrit, north of Baghdad.

Yemen’s Houthi rebels Yemen’s Houthi rebels seized the country’s capital, Sanaa, in 2014. It later pushed the country’s internationally recognized government nearly into the sea in Aden before a Saudi-led coalition launched a war against them in March 2015. Since then, the Houthis have been effective guerrilla fighters with small arms but also have launched ballistic missiles into neighboring Saudi Arabia. They’ve flown drones into Patriot missile batteries and exploded bomb-carrying ones over a military parade and a Saudi oil pipeline from a distance. U.N. experts believe their newest drone likely has a range of up to 930 miles. They also have arms seized from Yemeni military barracks, including missiles fired at an Emirati ship, commercial boats and even once against a U.S. warship.


NEWS

A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Plan would fight invasive Asian carp with air bubbles, electric shocks, noise BY TODD SPANGLER

Detroit Free Press

CLIFF OWEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Naysa Modi, 12, from Frisco, Texas, spells “marasmus” incorrectly during the evening finals of the 2018 Scripps National Spelling Bee in Oxon Hill, Md.

At the spelling bee, the most common sound is the toughest BY BEN NUCKOLS

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The word that knocked runner-up Naysa Modi out of last year’s Scripps National Spelling Bee was “Bewusstseinslage” — one of those flashy, impossible-sounding German-derived words that make the audience gasp when they are announced. Naysa believes the seemingly mundane word that knocked her out the year before was just as intimidating, if not more. For the spellers who will gather starting Monday at a convention center outside Washington for this year’s bee, an unremarkable sound is the cause of their angst, their sleepless nights, their lifelong memories of failure. It’s the most common sound in the English language, represented in the dictionary by an upside-down “e,” a gray chunk of linguistic mortar. To the uninitiated, it sounds like “uh.” Spellers know it by its proper name: the schwa. “It’s the bane of every speller’s existence,” Naysa said. “It’s what we hate.” The schwa falls only on unstressed syllables. Any vowel can make the sound, and so can “y.” Sometimes a schwa can show up where vowels fear to tread: Think of the second syllable of the word “rhythm.” And only in the English language can a single sound be so versatile. “It’s why there are spelling bees in English and no other language,” said Peter Sokolowski, a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster who attends the bee regularly. In Romance languages like

French and Spanish, vowels are predictable. The same letters rarely make different sounds. Sokolowski cites the example of “banana” — in Spanish the three “a” sounds are identical, but in English, because the stress falls on the middle syllable, the first and third “a” sounds become schwas. Because English absorbs words from every language, words with obvious spellings in their native tongues can become mysterious. Linguistic experts like Sokolowski or ex-spellers like Scott Remer, who placed fourth in 2008 and later wrote a book, “Words of Wisdom,” to guide high-level spellers, can sense the unease provoked by an unfamiliar schwa. “You can usually tell when they are testing the kids on the schwa and you can often tell when the kids are taken aback by it,” said Remer, 25, who coaches spellers in addition to his day job at the Council on Foreign Relations. “The vast majority of instances where kids misspell is due to the schwa.” Naysa, a 13-year-old from Frisco, Texas, who will be back for one last crack at the bee this year, got dinged out in seventh place two years ago by the word “marasmus,” which means a condition of chronic undernourishment. She went with an “e” for the first vowel. If the word were spelled that way, the pronunciation would be exactly the same. “I knew the word. I knew the word. I had heard it before, I knew the definition of it, but I forgot that schwa in that second,” Naysa said. For a while, she would wake up at night thinking about it.

“Over time, it will still hurt but you stop thinking about it as much, but when I think about it, it really, really bugs me, because it’s obviously ‘m-a,’” Naysa said. “How could I be so stupid?” Spellers have a variety of techniques to deal with the schwa, but nothing is foolproof. Sylvie Lamontagne, a 16-yearold two-time finalist who is coaching five spellers in this year’s bee, said she advises her students to start with the language of origin as they assess which vowel is most likely. “Greek words have ‘o,’ Latin words have ‘i,’ but it doesn’t always hold up and it adds another layer of confusion,” Sylvie said. “It’s just kind of a mess.” Anisha Rao of Corona, California, who tied for 10th in last year’s bee, said she deals with tricky schwas the old-fashioned way: rote memorization. “People don’t like to talk about it,” said Anisha, who’s 13 and will compete again this year, “but sometimes the best way is just to memorize the word.” Schwas can be even more confusing when Scripps, in the later rounds of the bee, digs into the dictionary for words with languages of origin that are obscure or unknown, or words that originated as trademarks. “As a general rule, often trademarks and words from unknown languages that might look shorter, might look easier, are actually way hard,” Sylvie said. “You’re sort of in the dark. You have to do what you can to put it together with very limited information.”

WASHINGTON — The head of the Army Corps of Engineers has signed off on a $778 million plan to stop the spread of Asian carp toward the Great Lakes with air bubbles, electric shocks and noise, sending it to Congress for approval. The plan sent by Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite would block the invasive species’ advance toward Lake Michigan at a key choke point at the Brandon Road Lock and Dam along the Des Plaines River in Illinois. It would: — Put in place additional electric barriers in the waterway to stop most Asian carp from moving through the lock and dam. — Use special underwater speakers while ships were moving through the locks to blast sound waves at decibels and frequencies sufficient to make Asian carp species uncomfortable enough to turn back. — Create what the Corps is calling an air bubble curtain, of a kind currently used to keep ice from building up near some locks and dams, which have “been found to cause an avoidance response in fish.” If Asian carp, which are actually several species of voracious carp not native to North America, reach Lake Michigan, there are worries that they could decimate food sources for other fish and quickly spread throughout the Great Lakes. The plan, which was revealed in draft form some years ago after initially being delayed by the Trump administration, also calls for a flushing lock that would more forcefully flush water that could contain Asian carp species before a ship can move toward Lake Michigan. According to the report, research still must

be done on some of the technology in order to make it effective, including on the noise barrier or “acoustic fish deterrent.” Electric barriers elsewhere in the Chicago-area waterways have generally been found to be effective, though some studies have suggested some small fish may be able to pass through. Asian carp DNA recently was found in Lake Calumet beyond the existing electric barriers, though no fish were found. Now that the Army Corps has signed off on the report, it will fall to Congress to authorize and fund the Brandon Road Lock and Dam project. And the timing could be crucial According to the report, the leading edge of the adult Asian carp population is only 4 to 6 miles from the site and about 47 miles from Lake Michigan. The Army Corps says with full, expedited funding, it hopes to complete the project by 2027, though some of the barriers should be in place much earlier if construction is approved. “Two (Asian carp species), Silver Carp and Bighead Carp, are currently about 4 miles below (Brandon Road),” the final report on the project said. “The proposed implementation strategy allows (barriers) to commence immediately following project authorization.” Michigan members of Congress, who have been pushing for approval of the plan for years, welcomed the announcement. U.S. Rep. Bill Huizenga, RZeeland, called on Congress to “act quickly to protect the Great Lakes ecosystem,” saying he has “been stressing the importance of this project from the beginning.” “Time is of the essence,” he said, “and the Great Lakes cannot wait.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this 2012 file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ commanding officer has endorsed a $778 million plan for upgrading a lock-and-dam complex near Chicago to prevent Asian carp from invading the Great Lakes.

‘Parasite’ is the first Korean film to win Cannes’ top prize BY JAKE COYLE

Associated Press

CANNES, France — South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award on Saturday. The win for“Parasite”marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme d’Or.In the festival’s closing ceremony,jury president Alejandro

Inarritu said the choice was“unanimous” for the nine-person jury. The genre-mixing film was celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.” It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”

Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’competition with“Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix.After it and Noah Baumbach’s“The Meyerowitz Stories”— another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes,the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira. The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to

OBITUARIES Valenti, Mary Lou (nee: Schulte) May 20, 2019, age 71. Services: Visitation Tuesday, May 28, 4-8 p.m., Baue Cave Springs. Service Wednesday, May 29, 10 a.m., St. Charles Borromeo. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com.

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits

French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes. Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.” Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.” Though few quibbled with the

Celebrations of Life

Vogelweid, Gregory A. January 31, 1944 - May 20, 2019. Beloved husband and best friend of Maggie (O'Shaughnessy) for 50 years; cherished father and father-in-law of Matthew (Andrea Thomas) Vogelweid, Megan (Don) Bergin, and Andrew Vogelweid; loving grandfather of Madeline and Alex Vogelweid, Lauren and Gabby Bergin, and Emma Vogelweid; dear brother of Raymond and Annemary Vogelweid (deceased), Barbara Vogelweid, and Norma Vogelweid; dear brotherin-law of John and Barbara O'Shaughnessy, uncle and great- uncle. Best friend to Jay McGillick and Dennis Saunders. Greg succumbed to Acute Myeloid Leukemia and donated his body to St. Louis University. He truly had a servant heart, sharing his time and talents with many organizations and may be best remembered for his love of Maggie and his family, theatre, good wine, a cold beer, and his dapper clothing, as well as Zumba and multiple classes at the Kirkwood YMCA, 26 years given to St. Patrick Center, his commitment to the St. Regis, and his love of the College Church. Service: Memorial Mass will be held on Friday, May 31 at 10:00 a.m. at St. Francis Xavier (College) Church, 3628 Lindell. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to St. Patrick Center, 800 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101.

choice of Bong, some expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time. Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay. In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Werner, August C. "Gus/Boots", Jr. Asleep in Jesus May 22, 2019. Beloved husband of Donna (nee Torrence); dear son of Lois and the late August Werner; loving dad of James "Jim" (Becky) a n d t h e l a t e Gra n t (J es s ica ) Werner; dear grandpa of Mitchell & Avelyn; our brother-in-law, cousin and dear friend of many. I f d e s i r e d , con t rib u t ion s t o American Lung Association. Services: Visitation Tuesday from 4 p.m. till 8 p.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOME (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). Funeral Wednesday 11 a.m. at Salem Lutheran Church with visitation at church from 9:30 a.m. until service time. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Florists Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557


WORLD

05.26.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A27

BRITAIN

The rise and fall of Theresa May Here’s a timeline of Brexit, key events leading to leader’s departure

Theresa May became prime minister in 2016 with one overriding goal: to lead Britain out of the European Union. Three years later, the U.K. is still in the EU, and May’s time in 10 Downing Street is ending. She announced Friday that she will step down as Conservative leader on June 7, remaining as caretaker prime minister during a party leadership contest to choose her successor.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

B

ritish Prime Minister Theresa May said Friday she will step down as Conservative Party leader on June 7, sparking a contest to replace her as party chief and U.K. leader. Here’s a timeline of key events in how Brexit unfolded and how the political crisis led up to May’s ouster as British prime minister:

ASSOCIATED PRESS

2015

Cameron

MAY 7: British voters elect a majority Conservative government. Then-Prime Minister David Cameron confirms in his victory speech that there will be an “in/out” referendum on Britain’s EU membership.

2016 FEB. 20: Cameron confirms that he will campaign for Britain to remain in the 28-nation bloc. The referendum date is set for June. JUNE 23: Britain votes 52% to 48% to leave the EU. JUNE 24: Cameron says he will resign in light of the results. JULY 13: Following a Conservative Party leadership contest, May, then home secretary, becomes prime minister. OCT. 2: May says that Britain will begin the formal process of leaving the EU by the end of March 2017. In order to do this, the British government would have to invoke Article 50 of the EU’s Lisbon Treaty.

2017 MARCH 29: The British government formally triggers Article 50, setting in motion a plan for Britain to leave the EU on March 29, 2019. JUNE 8: A general election called by May to bolster her party’s numbers in Parliament to help with the Brexit negotiations backfires as her Conservative Party loses its majority and continues in a weakened state as a minority government.

JULY 7: May and her Cabinet endorse the so-called Chequers Plan worked out at a fractious session at the prime minister’s country retreat. It leads to the resignations of Brexit Secretary David Davis, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and others who favor a more complete break with the EU.

2018 NOV. 25: EU leaders approve a withdrawal deal reached with Britain after months of difficult negotiations. May urges British Parliament to do the same. DEC. 10: May delays the planned Brexit vote in Parliament one day before it is to be held because it faces certain defeat. She seeks further concessions from the EU. DEC. 12: Conservative lawmakers who back a clean break from the EU trigger a no-confidence vote in May over her handling of Brexit. She wins the vote 200-117, making her safe from another such challenge for a year.

2019 JAN. 15: The Brexit deal comes back to Parliament, where it is overwhelmingly defeated in a 432-202 vote. MARCH 12: Lawmakers reject deal again. MARCH 23: Anti-Brexit protesters flood a central London by the hundreds of thousands demanding a new referendum on whether to leave the EU. MARCH 28: May offers up her job in exchange for her Brexit deal, telling colleagues she would quit within weeks if the agreement was passed.

MAY 7: The U.K. government acknowledges for the first time that the country will definitely take part in the European Parliament elections because there’s no chance that a Brexit deal can be approved in time to avoid them. MAY 17: Talks between Britain’s Conservative government and the opposition Labour Party seeking a compromise over Brexit break down without agreement plunging the country back into a morass of Brexit uncertainty.

MARCH 30: British lawmakers reject the government’s Brexit deal for a third time.

MAY 21: May offers a concession to lawmakers, giving them the chance to vote on whether to hold a new referendum on the country’s membership in the EU — but only if they back her thrice-rejected Brexit agreement.

APRIL 11: Britain and the EU agree to extend the Brexit deadline to Halloween. The Oct. 31 cutoff date averts a precipitous Brexit on April 12.

MAY 24: May says she will step down as Conservative Party leader on June 7 and will serve as caretaker prime minister until her successor is chosen.

Haiti struggles to keep lights on BY RALPH THOMASSAINT JOSEPH

Associated Press

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — When her daughter was 4 years old, Jennifer Jean started a small catering business in Bourdon, a lower middle-class district of the Haitian capital. Starting with the occasional wedding or corporate meeting, she grew the business into a venture that earned her as much as $1,000 a month, enough to pay bills and send her now-teenage daughter and her 7-year-old son to a good private school. Then the blackouts started, making it impossible to do basic activities. Without refrigeration, she now has to buy ice on the street to keep her prepared food cool. “Back in the day you were able to take your car out any time of night, 1 a.m. or 2 a.m.,” said Jean, who is thinking of migrating to the United States. “Now all the streets are dark. You just don’t know what you are going to run into.” Through the Venezuelan aid program known as Petrocaribe, Haiti once received roughly 60,000 barrels of oil a day under favorable terms that beat anything on the open market. More than half the costs of the oil, which came at a heavily discounted price, were repayable over 25 years at a 1% interest rate, allowing the government to supposedly use the windfall for economic development. In exchange, Haiti reliably backed Venezuela against the United States in regional forums such as the Organization of American States. But as President Nicolás Maduro’s government has struggled with plunging petroleum production and a cratering economy, Venezuela has stopped sending billions in subsidized oil to countries throughout Central America and the Caribbean, including Haiti, where the end of cheap oil has meant a sharp reduction in power. Meanwhile, Haiti’s Bureau of Monetization of Development Aid Programs, or BMPAD, quickly ran into its own difficulties. After starting to buy oil on the global market, the bureau said this year that it had run out of operating funds and stopped

DIEU NALIO CHERY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Johny Legagneur charges a light bulb for a client last month at his shop in Petion-Ville, Haiti. Johny uses an inverter and generator to charge laptops, smartphones and rechargeable bulbs for a fee. regularly delivering fuel needed by power station operators to keep the lights on. Now, much of Haiti’s population enjoys electricity for just three hours a day. Nighttime activity has ground to a halt as armed robbers hold up street merchants or break into people’s homes in darkness. Gas stations have gone empty for days, making it nearly impossible for many Haitians to get to work, run errands or take their kids to school. Hospitals are forced to rely on backup generators. “We can’t find gas for our vehicles. Our clients can’t come to us. Sales are down in every sector,” said businessman Reginald Boulos, whose investment group runs major supermarkets and car dealerships. The fuel crisis is helping push Haiti’s economy dangerously close to recession. GDP growth in 2018 was 1.5% — less than half

what the government expected. Economists say this year will likely be the same. Annual inflation has also reached an estimated 17%, while a gallon of gasoline sells on the black market for between $6 and $12. Fuel distributors are reimbursed by the state to the tune of about 27 cents for every subsidized gallon of gasoline sold to customers. That helps keep the price around $2.50 a gallon. But the cash-strapped Haitian state has gone months without paying subsidies and at one point owed some $71 million, leaving Haitian businesspeople to call for the end of the complicated state-oil purchase structure. The path out is murky at best. When President Jovenel Moise tried to eliminate fuel subsidies on July 6 and raise prices of various petroleum products by 38% to 51%, protesters took to streets across the country calling for

him to step down. The decision was quickly reversed, and the International Monetary Fund has since offered the hemisphere’s poorest nation a $96 million low-interest loan. Protesters are also enraged by corruption. A Haitian senate investigation found that more than $2 billion in profits from the Petrocaribe program had been wasted or stolen, leading to a months-long citizen campaign calling for more probes and prosecutions. “The shortages are creating panic. The economy is being damaged. The best approach is liberalizing the market and regulating it, to avoid these problems,” said Maarten Boute, the CEO of Digicel, Haiti’s largest mobile phone network provider. Some other countries in the region have weathered the end of Petrocaribe far better. Jamaica is seeing record economic perfor-

mance. Cuba, however, is suffering from food and fuel shortages, although not as grave as Haiti’s. Moise’s administration has asked BMPAD, the finance ministry and private energy companies to suggest ways to further open up the petroleum market. But BMPAD’s director, Fils Aimé Ignace St Fleur, says the agency will not give up its role overseeing the importation and wholesale pricing of petroleum in Haiti. “The state reserves the right to intervene directly in the market,” he said. But in the district of Bourdon, Jean says her situation is becoming dire. Jean says she can’t find gas, the price of a taxi has doubled, and her children often strain their eyes to study in dim light. “Without electricity,” she says, “we’re in a very difficult situation.”


WORLD

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

US FOREIGN RELATIONS | IRAN

MIDEAST POWER PLAYERS & PROXIES A number of key groups could emerge amid tensions between US, Iran

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Newly recruited Shiite fighters, known as Houthis, march during a gathering aimed at mobilizing more fighters into battlefronts to fight pro-government forces in several Yemeni cities in 2017 in Sanaa, Yemen. JON GAMBRELL, ZEINA KARAM AND JOSEF FEDERMAN | Associated Press

A

s long-simmering tensions heat up between the United States and Iran in the Middle East, here’s a look at the various countries or players involved and what could happen:

United States The U.S. has tens of thousands of troops scattered across military bases in the Middle East. It recently sent the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier and strike group to the region, as well as B-52 bombers. That complements the warships of the 5th Fleet in Bahrain, the soldiers of U.S. Army Central in Kuwait, the drones and fighter jets stationed in the United Arab Emirates and the forward headquarters of the U.S. military’s Central Command in Qatar. President Donald Trump has threatened Iran with attack if it first launches an assault on U.S. interests. However, Trump also has sought at times to soften his tone amid his maximum pressure campaign against Tehran, to go with additional sanctions that Washington has imposed after withdrawing from the 2015 nuclear deal that Iran reached with world powers. Analysts fear the chance of a miscalculation by either Iran or the U.S. amid the tensions. Hezbollah fighters stand near a four-wheel vehicle positioned at the site where clashes erupted between Hezbollah and al-Qaida-linked fighters in 2017 near the Lebanon-Syria border.

Hezbollah

An Israeli soldier looks out from a position last year near the southern border village of Mays al-Jabal, Lebanon.

Israel Although Israel has been silent amid the recent tensions, it has played a key role in getting the region to this point. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who considers Iran to be his country’s greatest enemy, welcomed Trump’s withdrawal from the nuclear deal and encouraged renewed economic sanctions. Israeli officials have portrayed the standoff as a matter between Iran and the U.S. But if fighting breaks out, Israel could be targeted by Iran’s regional proxies, such as Hezbollah in Lebanon or Islamic Jihad in Gaza. Israel has the Middle East’s most powerful and advanced military, with F-15 and F-16 warplanes, as well as the next-gener-

ation F-35 fighter jet. It also has warships, submarines and long-range missiles. Israel has a missile-defense system capable of intercepting anything from long-range missiles to short-range rockets fired from Gaza or Lebanon. Israel is widely believed to have a nuclear arsenal, which it neither confirms nor denies. Israel has acknowledged carrying out scores of attacks on Iranian targets in neighboring Syria, sometimes drawing retaliation. Israel, which has conducted pre-emptive bombings of nuclear facilities in Iraq and Syria, has vowed to never allow Iran to obtain an atomic weapon. It also has developed cyberwarfare capabilities.

Saudi Arabia The Sunni rival to Shiite Iran, Saudi Arabia long has watched Tehran with suspicion since its 1979 Islamic Revolution. Relations have cooled and warmed in the last four decades. The U.S. push for the 2015 nuclear deal drew Saudi anger. Since the rise of King Salman and his assertive, 33-year-old son, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the kingdom has taken a far-more militant line. It launched the war in Yemen, targeting Iranian-allied Houthi rebels. Prince Mohammed also compared Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to Nazi Germany’s Adolf Hitler. “We won’t wait for the battle to be in Saudi Arabia,” the prince told the Saudi-owned broadcasting company MBC in 2017. “Instead, we will work so that the battle is for them in Iran, not in Saudi Arabia.” A top Saudi diplomat said the kingdom does not want war but won’t hesitate to defend itself against Iran. Saudi Arabia has a fleet of over 250 fighter jets capable of launching a strike on Iran.

United Arab Emirates The seven sheikhdoms of the United Arab Emirates have long historical ties to Iran, but diplomatic relations between Abu Dhabi and Tehran have worsened in recent years. Analysts believe Abu Dhabi’s powerful crown prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, largely runs day-to-day affairs and military strategy. In U.S. State Department cables released by WikiLeaks, Sheikh Mohammed painted a dire picture of Iran in multiple meetings. He told U.S. diplomats in 2009 he believed “all hell will break loose if Iran attains the bomb, with Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Turkey developing their own nuclear weapons capability and Iran instigating Sunni-Shia conflict throughout the world.” He also described a “near-term conventional war with Iran as clearly preferable to the long term consequences of a nuclear-armed Iran.” The UAE under Sheikh Mohammed has rapidly modern-

An Emirati gunner watches for enemy fire from the rear gate of a United Arab Emirates Chinook military helicopter flying in 2015 over Yemen. ized and expanded its military, with its special forces getting experience in Afghanistan. It now fights alongside Saudi Arabia against Yemen’s Houthi rebels, has reportedly hired Colombian mercenaries and has over 130 fighter jets.

Hezbollah, the most powerful and effective among Iranian-backed militias in the region, has kept quiet recently as tensions have spiked. Its leader, Hassan Nasrallah, however, has said in the past that Iran would not stand alone in any future confrontation with the U.S. The group, formed to combat Israel following its invasion of Lebanon in 1982, has tens of thousands of rockets and missiles that can reach deep into Israel, as well as thousands of disciplined and battle-hardened fighters. Hezbollah has fought alongside government forces in Syria for more than six

years, gaining more experience and expanding its reach. Iran could mobilize Hezbollah to strike at Israel, which would dramatically expand the battlefield but likely draw retaliation that would be devastating for Lebanon. Hezbollah says it is not seeking another war with Israel, and it is not likely to join in any regional confrontation — at least not in the early stages — unless provoked. Hezbollah has lost hundreds of fighters in Syria, exacting a heavy toll on the Shiite community from which it draws most of its support. It is also feeling the crippling U.S. sanctions imposed on the group and its sponsor, Iran.

Iran Iran has both a standing military and its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard. Estimates put its troop strength at over 500,000, with hundreds of thousands more in reserve. Its air force has suffered from Western sanctions, now having a fleet of mostly pre-1979 American fighter jets. However, the Guard maintains an arsenal of ballistic missiles capable of reaching across the wider Middle East, as well as increasingly modern drone fleet. Iran mustered human wave attacks during its 1980s war with neighboring Iraq. It also has additional reach through proxy forces throughout the region and has used that to its advantage over the years. It also has developed cyberwarfare capabilities.

Shiite militias in Iraq Iran can count on the loyalty of tens of thousands of Shiite fighters in Iraq, militias collectively known as the Popular Mobilization forces, or Hashd al-Shaabi in Arabic. Trained, financed and equipped by Iran, the militias battled U.S. forces in the years after the 2003 invasion and remobilized to battle the Islamic State group a decade later. The groups include Asaib Ahl al-Haq, Kataeb Hezbollah and the Badr Organization, all three led by men with close ties to Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the leader of Iran’s elite Quds Force and the architect of Tehran’s regional strategy. The militias were incorporated into Iraq’s armed forces in 2016. Together they number more than 140,000 fighters, and while they fall under the authority of Iraq’s prime minister, the PMF’s top brass align politically with Iran. U.S. forces and the PMF fought side-byside against IS militants after Iraq’s parliament invited the U.S. back into the country in 2014. But now that the war is largely concluded, some militia leaders are calling on U.S. troops to leave again, threatening to expel them by force if necessary.

Young Shiite volunteer militia members prepare to attack Islamic State fighters in 2015 in Tikrit, north of Baghdad.

Yemen’s Houthi rebels Yemen’s Houthi rebels seized the country’s capital, Sanaa, in 2014. It later pushed the country’s internationally recognized government nearly into the sea in Aden before a Saudi-led coalition launched a war against them in March 2015. Since then, the Houthis have been effective guerrilla fighters with small arms but also have launched ballistic missiles into neighboring Saudi Arabia. They’ve flown drones into Patriot missile batteries and exploded bomb-carrying ones over a military parade and a Saudi oil pipeline from a distance. U.N. experts believe their newest drone likely has a range of up to 930 miles. They also have arms seized from Yemeni military barracks, including missiles fired at an Emirati ship, commercial boats and even once against a U.S. warship.


NEWS

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

OUR QUALITY IS TIMELESS. THIS HEARING AID PRICE ISN’T!

SpaceX launches 60 little satellites; more to come

Miracle-Ear Quality For $895. Why Wait? Hearing is believing! Right now, for a very limited time, you can get a full digital, genuine Miracle-Ear®hearing aid for less than $900. This is one of our smallest, most discreet hearing solutions. Complete with Miracle-Ear sound quality, custom fitting and acomprehensive service and warranty program. Don’t wait, this offer expires on 5/31/19 Getting Started. It’s Free and Easy. At Miracle-Ear, we make our process comfortable and convenient. We also offer you a variety of valuable services** at no charge*.

cally dodging sizable pieces of space junk. The orbiting constellation — named Starlink — will grow in the next few years, Musk said. Twelve launches of 60 satellites each will provide reliable and affordable internet coverage throughout the U.S., he said. Twenty-four launches will serve most of the populated world and 30 launches the entire world. That will be 1,800 satellites in total, with more planned after that. Musk told reporters last week there’s “a fundamental goodness” to giving people in all corners of the globe choices in broadband internet service. He’s especially interested in reaching areas without coverage or where it is expensive or unreliable.

BY MARCIA DUNN

Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX has launched 60 little satellites, the first of thousands that founder Elon Musk plans to put in orbit for global internet coverage. The recycled Falcon rocket blasted off late Thursday night. The firststage booster landed on an ocean platform following liftoff, as the tightly packed cluster of satellites continued upward. Musk said Friday all 60 flat-panel satellites were deployed and online a few hundred miles above Earth. Each weighs 500 pounds and has a single solar panel and a krypton-powered thruster for raising and maintaining altitude. The satellites have the capability of automati-

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Look inside your ear canal…It could just be wax! But more importantly, it might help you to understand why you may be experiencing problems like: • Hearing but not being able to distinguish certain words? • Frequently asking people to repeat themselves • Difficulty hearing on the phone?

We can check for: • Excessive wax build-up • Damage to the eardrum • Fluid accumulation in the middle ear • Other conditions* Now you can get a picture of what’s happening inside your ear – literally. It won’t cost you a penny. • Free Hearing Test* • Free Video Otoscope Exam* • Free Consultation*

Why Wait? Take Advantage of This Offer Today! Call Today! Appointments Will Fill Quickly!

Fine Jewelry, Platinum, Gold, Silver & Diamonds

Sell Your Jewelry

FEDERAL & STATE WORKERS: NO COST HEARING AIDS!

Highest Prices Paid for High End Jewelry • • • • •

Antique & Estate Jewelry Modern Fine Jewelry Sterling Silver Jewelry Native American Jewelry Certified Diamonds

CALL BEFORE 5/31/19. SCHEDULE YOUR ANNUAL HEARING EXAM CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE HEARING TEST* THAT’S RIGHT…NO CO-PAY, NO EXAM FEE, NO ADJUSTMENT FEE! Plus special factory pricing available to non-qualifiers.

Mention Promo Code: KIT0501N

Hear A Better Day

TM

Federal and state workers and retirees may qualify for no cost hearing aids. Insurance pays total cost of two Miracle-Ear™ Audiotone Pro series aids. **Most Federal Government employees and retirees are eligible. You may even be covered if you have other non-federal insurance coverage. All candidates must go through a free evaluation and bring insurance information to verify eligibility.

All Health Insurances Accepted.

*Hearing tests are always free. Not a medical exam. Audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. **BlueCross BlueShield Insurance pays total cost of two Miracle-Ear Audiotone Pro series aids. Health insurance plans may vary by insurer, see store for details. 1 year warranty. If you have a basic plan, we have factory pricing for non-qualifiers.

$

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

Limited time offer.

895!

HURRY Offer Expires in 30 Days

Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117

Trial**

Mention Promo Code: KIT0501N

BATTERY CHARGER

**If you are not completely satisfied, the Valid aids may returnedAudiotone for a full refund onbemodel Prowithin CIC 30 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details.

Valid at participating Miracle-Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. May not be combined with other offers and does not apply to prior sale. See store for details. Cash value 1/20 cent. Offer expires 5/31/19.

KIT0501N

FREE

Save on one of our smallest custom digital hearing aids!

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Chesterfield 636-334-9812 Saint Charles 636-235-9169 South County 314-488-2711 Arsenal 314-666-7115 Creve Coeur 314-312-2999 Union Mention Promo Code: 30 Day 636-492-2966 Arnold 636-875-7645 O’Fallon 636-203-7053 Florissant 314-403-7639 St. Peters 636-487-5570 Crystal City 636-875-7638

• Battery charge lasts all-day! • No Batteries to buy or replace

Free battery charger with the purchase of a pair of select ME-1 or ME-2 hearing aids. May not be combined with other offers. Not valid on previous purchases. Must present coupon to receive offer. Offer expires 5/31/19.

Need More Info Go To: www.YourHearingGuide.com Enter Promo Code: KIT0501N Receive A FREE eBook **If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days of the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fees may apply. See store for details.

TRUST AMERICA’S MOST TRUSTED Offer Expires 04/30/2019 06/09/2019

From

0%

$89

****

APR. APR.

Up to 72 Months For 36-60 months

ASK ABOUT MANUFACTURER & UTILITY COMPANIES

Per Month

$2500

* MAXIMUM COMBINED AVAILABLE REBATES

(314) 236-3348 (618) 206-5697

314-269-0085 • 618-690-4011 Indoor Comfort Team may not offer services in all areas where this ad is distributed. **Financing available with approved credit for qualified buyers instead of manufacturer rebates. *$2500 shown in this ad is maximum rebate, your rebate may be less or none depending on equipement selected.


STLTODAY.COM/LIFE • STLTODAY.COM/GO • SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 • B

ARTS + HOME + TRAVEL

Steve Woolf, longtime artistic director at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, poses with his successor, Hana S. Sharif. CHRISTIAN GOODEN, POST-DISPATCH

SCENE CHANGE

BY CALVIN WILSON | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As artistic director of the Repertory Theater of St. Louis for 33 seasons, Steven Woolf has produced more than 300 shows, some of which he directed — most recently the political drama “Oslo” and the satirical comedy “Admissions.” But at the end of May, he’ll step onto another stage: retirement. Woolf is drawing the curtains on a career that has earned him professional and critical respect, including lifetime achievement awards from the St. Louis Theater Circle, the Arts and Education Council of St. Louis, and Arts for Life. The Rep’s 2019-20 season, which starts in September with Please see WOOLF , Page B5

After 33 years, curtain closes on artistic director Steven Woolf’s time at the Rep

Far from the corner office

INSIDE

We are relearning an important lesson from the Blues’ Binnington POST-DISPATCH PHOTOS BILL McCLELLAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

I knew a man who worked for the brewery. He was smart and conscientious, but he never got past lower management. He didn’t realize his career was stalled until he got a boss several years his junior. By that time, he was making just enough money that looking for another job seemed foolish. He was forced out during the cost-cutting that occurred after the brewery was sold, but fortunately, he was almost ready to retire, anyway. I thought about him a few years ago when former brewery executive Francine Katz sued the brewery claiming she had been paid less than her male counterparts. Her lower salary led to a lower buyout when the brewery was sold. A parade of former executives testified at the trial. They talked about their compensation, which seemed handsome, and their duties, which seemed Please see MCCLELLAN, Page B2

Enter our 2019 Annual Great Garden Contest Is your garden blooming with brilliant color, artfully placed hostas or beautiful water features? Show us. It’s time for the Post-Dispatch Annual Great Garden Contest. We are now accepting entries for the best gardens in the St. Louis metro area. If you love taking photos of your garden, show us. The firstand second-place winners will receive a Friends & Family membership to the Missouri Botanical Garden (valued at $115). How to enter • Visit stltoday.com/contests to enter your photo. The winners • Expert gardening judges will select first- and second-place winners for prizes as well as others for thirdplace and honorable mention.

RULES 1. Only one entry photo (make it your best shot) per household is permitted. Only home gardens allowed (no commercial property). A composite image is OK. 2. Enter by 11:59 p.m. July 3. 3. Photos become the property of the St. Louis PostDispatch, which reserves the right to reproduce, publish and/or exhibit all photos entered. 4. No purchase necessary to enter. Employees (and their families) of Lee Enterprises and the Missouri Botanical Garden are not eligible. 5. Contest is void where prohibited or restricted by law. 6. Contest winners will be announced in the PostDispatch STL Life section on July 28. All winners will be notified no later than July 11. Winners must be willing to have names mentioned and homes photographed July 15-20. 7. Gardens must be from St. Louis metro area. 8. Photos must be from 2019.

AT HOME GET A PEEK AT A HISTORIC HOME ON THE LAFAYETTE SQUARE HOUSE TOUR. PAGE B3

TRAVEL CINCINNATI HAS A THRIVING, VITAL DOWNTOWN, FULL OF THINGS TO DO AND SEE. PAGES B7-B8 STLLIFE

1 1


B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM

ON OUR RADAR GABE HARTWIG deputy features editor ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

JANE HENDERSON books editor jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

All of your heart will be in Havana when you meet this fabulous feline. Havana is a 2-year-old tabby with gorgeous green eyes and the softest sandy coat. Although she is no longer kitten-sized, Havana is still a kitten at heart, so she would love a home where she can spend lots of time playing and pouncing with some new human friends. This beautiful girl is ready to find a forever family that will give her all the love and attention she craves in a home she can call her own.

Five-year-old Diego is a very friendly, full-grown miniature pig who came to Longmeadow Rescue Ranch after his previous owners lost their home and could no longer care for him. Although he loves to snuggle, Diego isn’t a huge fan of belly rubs, but he does enjoy the company of dogs and older children once properly introduced. Diego is a very smart and domesticated guy who knows how to sit and responds to his name.

PETS OF THE WEEK

PREP SCHOOL Our food writer Daniel Neman shows you how to make a classic cocktail, the French 75. stltoday.com/food SUMMER FUN From Shakespeare in the Park to Six Flags, from Ted Drewes to Tower Grove Park, we have your guide to all the fun things to do this summer in St. Louis. stltoday. com/summerfun

NEW ON DVD MOVIES COMING TUESDAY • “Greta”; “Climax”; “Lords of Chaos”; “A Vigilante” COMING JUNE 4 • “A Madea Family Funeral”; “Gloria Bell”; “The Kid”; “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote”; “J.T. LeRoy”; “The Haunting of Sharon”

TELEVISION COMING TUESDAY • “Outlander,” Sea-

One-year-old pointer mix Patty is a gorgeous girl with the sweetest face and temperament. With all her playful puppy energy, Patty would love an active home with a family that will take her along on all their adventures. Because she is still a puppy, Patty would love her new human friends to help with house-training, obedience and all the other skills she needs to grow into a very happy girl. If you’re looking for a four-legged friend with a lively spirit, Patty would be the perfect pooch for you. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights.

To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Macklind Avenue headquarters.

To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Longmeadow Rescue Ranch in Union. Hours and directions at longmeadowrescueranch.org.

son 4; “South Park,” Season 22 COMING JUNE 4 • “Lost in Space,” Sea-

son 1; “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan,” Season 1

GARDENING Q&A

Last week’s pets • Dogs named Beau and Penny are still available for adoption. A cat named King has been adopted. Hours and directions • hsmo.org

PARENT TO PARENT • JODIE LYNN

How to manage Keeping up with hair ties is challenge for mom tent caterpillars on fruit trees BY CHIP TYNAN

Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • Can you tell me what is eating

my cherry trees? There are these large white webs filled with worms and they are eating the leaves. A • The Eastern tent caterpillar is the “worm” that spins the conspicuous white webs or “tents” on the branches of trees in the spring. Tent caterpillars have a general preference for fruits and ornamental fruits, which would include your cherry, as well as plums, apples, crabapples and pears. The caterpillars begin to hatch out in early spring from egg masses laid on the branches the previous summer and actively feed on the new leaves just as they start to grow. This occurs about the same time that saucer magnolias, wild plum and serviceberries are in bloom. Their progress has been slowed somewhat this spring by cooler temperatures, but with the arrival of warmer weather their appetites increase as they grow in size. Emergence usually occurs over a two-to three-week period, and individual caterpillars then feed for four to six weeks. When fully grown at about 2 inches in length, they stop feeding, spin a cocoon and pupate for several weeks before emerging again in summer as adults to mate and lay eggs. Pupal cocoons may be attached to the trunks of trees, but are also frequently affixed to the siding of a house or other structure near infested trees. Even though defoliation sometimes occurs, healthy trees quickly recover with a flush of new foliage in a matter of weeks. While still young and small, caterpillars tend not to venture too far from their webs. If these webs are located near the tips of branches, they can be easily pruned off. If they are located in in the crotch of a major limb and the trunk, to avoid removing too much of the tree they are best physically destroyed rather than being pruned off. This can be easily accomplished with a stick, if you are squeamish about using your hand. Caterpillars return to the web at night, so evening is the best time to destroy the web. Find additional information and control options at tinyurl.com/ dy9d62b. The best way to control this pest is to keep it from hatching in the first place. Learn to recognize tent caterpillar egg masses. These are dark brown, generally oval-shaped “collars” that encircle small twigs. They have a varnished appearance and are easily noticed all winter once the leaves fall off. They are the consistency of soft Styrofoam and can be simply peeled off the twigs with your thumbnail. Pruning the twigs is an alternative that is just as effective. On a small tree like a purple leaf sand cherry this is easily done from the ground or with the aid of a pole pruner. Place such prunings in the hot part of a compost pile or fold them tightly in a paper bag and discard them. Write to Chip Tynan of the Missouri Botanical Garden at chip.tynan@mobot.org or Horticultural Answer Service, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, 63110.

Q • This may sound like a silly parenting challenge, but my daughter’s hair ties have caused a rash on her wrist. It actually got infected. Is there something that would help us to keep up with her hair ties, keep them clean and away from her skin until she needs one?

JODIE LYNN

Parent to Parent

comes in different styles and the ponytail band stays inside the groove of the bangle until it’s needed. Check out gogirldesign. com for more information on ordering and various styles.

CAN YOU HELP? I just graduated from college as the picture. Her daughter Lindsay a nurse practitioner and am was having the same probFrom a reader • With three daughters, looking for some gift ideas lem and asked her mom the situation got really nuts at our house for my stepfather for to help her come up because they all use hair ties, and we Father’s Day. He raised seemed to always be hunting for them. In with an idea for keepmy two siblings and desperation, I bought a large bag of them ing up with her own me by himself after our on Amazon and divided them up in plastic daughter’s hair ties. mother died 10 years ago. Together, they sandwich bags, put their name on the bag He’s a good person and a and gave one to each one of their teachers, brainstormed and came great dad. Now that I have up with the idea of the dance instructors and soccer coaches. The Busy Girl Bangle – Supple They all agreed to help us out and even Busy Girl Bangle. Silver, $25, at gogirldesigns.com a good-paying position, I would like to say thank It is a pretty cool told other moms about my idea. This has you to him for all that he has done for us. invention that does exactly what you’re worked pretty well, and the girls always Can you please suggest some items that looking for: keeping a hair tie clean and know where they can get one if needed. would make him feel as special as we close by, plus they went one step further All three are attending enrichment and made it a fun accessory for little girls. think he is? summer school classes that will last six The Busy Girl Bangle is a colorful weeks, and I’ll just make up new bags to To share parenting tips or submit questions, write to: bangle that is worn on the wrist that has last through this time frame. — Heather Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, an area where a hair tie fits. L. in Minneapolis MO 63040. Email direct2contact@parenttoparent.com, The Go Girl Design bangle bracelet has or go to parenttoparent.com which provides a secure From Jodie Lynn • As “silly” as some and easy way to submit tips or questions. All tips must may think it, keeping up with hair ties can a little charm attached to the hair tie for an extra fashion statement, and girls can have city, state and first and last name or initials to be be a daunting task for parents, especially included in the column. wear multiple ones should they want, and because something so small can quickly of course, most do because they’re pretty, Jodie Lynn is an award-winning parenting columnist, add plenty of extra unneeded frustration fun and functional. when your child has a busy schedule. author of five books and mother to three children. She and her family live in Wildwood. It’s the perfect size for small wrists, This is where Debbie Perry comes into

McClellan

editor of this newspaper was promoted out of the newsroom and into the management of the publishing company. From B1 The editor — he or she is a step above the managing editor — announced that nebulous. The more ill-defined a peranybody on the staff who wanted to be son’s job is, the more important it is. I managing editor could apply. sat in the courtroom and thought not There were two or three senior editors about Katz, but about the man I knew. who were obvious candidates. Also, a Were these guys smarter than him? They few younger editors, lean and hungry like didn’t seem to be. Shakespeare’s Cassius. But there were I have lost touch with the man — he other applicants, people lower on the moved to Florida — but I hope he is a ladder, people whose ambition surprised hockey fan. me. I saw them then in a different light. We are relearning an important lesYes, they might be good, I thought. son as the St. Louis Blues march into the In the end, the company spurned the Stanley Cup Final. in-house candidates and hired an outGoalie Jordan Binnington, whose COLTER PETERSON, POST-DISPATCH sider. He did not work out. arrival coincided with the resurgence of St. Louis Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington Of the in-house candidates, the most the Blues, started the year as the backup surprising had been a man who was goalie on the Blues minor league team. He talks with San Jose Sharks Logan Couture after Game 6 of the NHL Stanley Cup Western widely considered a malcontent. And for was 25. And the No. 4 goalie in the Blues Conference finals at the Enterprise Center. good reason. He was a malcontent. But system. The clock was ticking on his very smart. Looking back on things, it career. He got his chance this season only would have been interesting to see how Think about that. Two teams, with because other people were hurt. entire staffs devoted to evaluating talent, he’d have done. Bear in mind, too, that there is a difBut, of course, he never got the chance. ference between professional sports and completely whiffed — one wiling to give That could be said of most people. UsuWarner away, the other refusing to take most businesses. Professional sports ally, it happens with far less drama. There him. teams have people whose sole job is to is no application process. Your colleagues By the way, Warner got his chance to evaluate talent. don’t know you’re gunning for a big job. lead the Rams to a Super Bowl victory And yet, stories like Binnington’s are It’s more subtle. You don’t get the right in 1999 only because the starter, Trent not unheard of. mentor, or maybe the opportunity for Green, was injured in the preseason. In this city, we had Kurt Warner. He advancement doesn’t come at the exact So if these things happen in the meriwas a backup quarterback so lightly tocratic world of professional sports — no time you’re ready for it. Things slip-slide regarded by the Rams that he was one of away. five players left exposed in the expansion general manager would last long if he Now and then, though, in the world of draft before the 1999 season. Fortunately were to draft or sign people because he sports, somebody reverses the story in a likes them — imagine how often they for St. Louis, the expansion Cleveland very public way. Jordan Binnington, for happen in the more haphazard world of Browns passed on Warner. They did business where biases and personal feel- example. I hope the guy I knew from the choose a quarterback in that expansion brewery is watching. draft — Tampa Bay’s backup Scott Mila- ings hold more sway. Go Blues, he’d say. In other words, how many people were, novich. and are, good enough to have made it to a Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 He did not make the final roster. His corner office? career total passing yardage in the NFL? @Bill_McClellan on Twitter Years ago, the longtime managing Nine yards. bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Control weeds on an ongoing basis to prevent them from robbing moisture, nutrients and sunlight from desirable plants. Apply mulch to all beds to keep weeds controlled. • Prune out dead, diseased and damaged stems in trees and shrubs as soon as they are discovered. Suckers and water sprouts should also be pruned on an as-needed basis.

• Apply a balanced rose fertilizer when the first flush of bloom is past. • It’s not too late to plant heat-loving sweet potatoes. • Turning compost piles that have become soggy will aerate the pile and hasten decomposition.


B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM

ON OUR RADAR GABE HARTWIG deputy features editor ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

JANE HENDERSON books editor jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

All of your heart will be in Havana when you meet this fabulous feline. Havana is a 2-year-old tabby with gorgeous green eyes and the softest sandy coat. Although she is no longer kitten-sized, Havana is still a kitten at heart, so she would love a home where she can spend lots of time playing and pouncing with some new human friends. This beautiful girl is ready to find a forever family that will give her all the love and attention she craves in a home she can call her own.

Five-year-old Diego is a very friendly, full-grown miniature pig who came to Longmeadow Rescue Ranch after his previous owners lost their home and could no longer care for him. Although he loves to snuggle, Diego isn’t a huge fan of belly rubs, but he does enjoy the company of dogs and older children once properly introduced. Diego is a very smart and domesticated guy who knows how to sit and responds to his name.

PETS OF THE WEEK

PREP SCHOOL Our food writer Daniel Neman shows you how to make a classic cocktail, the French 75. stltoday.com/food SUMMER FUN From Shakespeare in the Park to Six Flags, from Ted Drewes to Tower Grove Park, we have your guide to all the fun things to do this summer in St. Louis. stltoday. com/summerfun

NEW ON DVD MOVIES COMING TUESDAY • “Greta”; “Climax”; “Lords of Chaos”; “A Vigilante” COMING JUNE 4 • “A Madea Family Funeral”; “Gloria Bell”; “The Kid”; “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote”; “J.T. LeRoy”; “The Haunting of Sharon”

TELEVISION COMING TUESDAY • “Outlander,” Sea-

One-year-old pointer mix Patty is a gorgeous girl with the sweetest face and temperament. With all her playful puppy energy, Patty would love an active home with a family that will take her along on all their adventures. Because she is still a puppy, Patty would love her new human friends to help with house-training, obedience and all the other skills she needs to grow into a very happy girl. If you’re looking for a four-legged friend with a lively spirit, Patty would be the perfect pooch for you. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights.

To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Macklind Avenue headquarters.

To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Longmeadow Rescue Ranch in Union. Hours and directions at longmeadowrescueranch.org.

son 4; “South Park,” Season 22 COMING JUNE 4 • “Lost in Space,” Sea-

son 1; “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan,” Season 1

GARDENING Q&A

Last week’s pets • Dogs named Beau and Penny are still available for adoption. A cat named King has been adopted. Hours and directions • hsmo.org

PARENT TO PARENT • JODIE LYNN

How to manage Keeping up with hair ties is challenge for mom tent caterpillars on fruit trees BY CHIP TYNAN

Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • Can you tell me what is eating

my cherry trees? There are these large white webs filled with worms and they are eating the leaves. A • The Eastern tent caterpillar is the “worm” that spins the conspicuous white webs or “tents” on the branches of trees in the spring. Tent caterpillars have a general preference for fruits and ornamental fruits, which would include your cherry, as well as plums, apples, crabapples and pears. The caterpillars begin to hatch out in early spring from egg masses laid on the branches the previous summer and actively feed on the new leaves just as they start to grow. This occurs about the same time that saucer magnolias, wild plum and serviceberries are in bloom. Their progress has been slowed somewhat this spring by cooler temperatures, but with the arrival of warmer weather their appetites increase as they grow in size. Emergence usually occurs over a two-to three-week period, and individual caterpillars then feed for four to six weeks. When fully grown at about 2 inches in length, they stop feeding, spin a cocoon and pupate for several weeks before emerging again in summer as adults to mate and lay eggs. Pupal cocoons may be attached to the trunks of trees, but are also frequently affixed to the siding of a house or other structure near infested trees. Even though defoliation sometimes occurs, healthy trees quickly recover with a flush of new foliage in a matter of weeks. While still young and small, caterpillars tend not to venture too far from their webs. If these webs are located near the tips of branches, they can be easily pruned off. If they are located in in the crotch of a major limb and the trunk, to avoid removing too much of the tree they are best physically destroyed rather than being pruned off. This can be easily accomplished with a stick, if you are squeamish about using your hand. Caterpillars return to the web at night, so evening is the best time to destroy the web. Find additional information and control options at tinyurl.com/ dy9d62b. The best way to control this pest is to keep it from hatching in the first place. Learn to recognize tent caterpillar egg masses. These are dark brown, generally oval-shaped “collars” that encircle small twigs. They have a varnished appearance and are easily noticed all winter once the leaves fall off. They are the consistency of soft Styrofoam and can be simply peeled off the twigs with your thumbnail. Pruning the twigs is an alternative that is just as effective. On a small tree like a purple leaf sand cherry this is easily done from the ground or with the aid of a pole pruner. Place such prunings in the hot part of a compost pile or fold them tightly in a paper bag and discard them. Write to Chip Tynan of the Missouri Botanical Garden at chip.tynan@mobot.org or Horticultural Answer Service, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, 63110.

Q • This may sound like a silly parenting challenge, but my daughter’s hair ties have caused a rash on her wrist. It actually got infected. Is there something that would help us to keep up with her hair ties, keep them clean and away from her skin until she needs one?

JODIE LYNN

Parent to Parent

comes in different styles and the ponytail band stays inside the groove of the bangle until it’s needed. Check out gogirldesign. com for more information on ordering and various styles.

CAN YOU HELP? I just graduated from college as the picture. Her daughter Lindsay a nurse practitioner and am was having the same probFrom a reader • With three daughters, looking for some gift ideas lem and asked her mom the situation got really nuts at our house for my stepfather for to help her come up because they all use hair ties, and we Father’s Day. He raised seemed to always be hunting for them. In with an idea for keepmy two siblings and desperation, I bought a large bag of them ing up with her own me by himself after our on Amazon and divided them up in plastic daughter’s hair ties. mother died 10 years ago. Together, they sandwich bags, put their name on the bag He’s a good person and a and gave one to each one of their teachers, brainstormed and came great dad. Now that I have up with the idea of the dance instructors and soccer coaches. The Busy Girl Bangle – Supple They all agreed to help us out and even Busy Girl Bangle. Silver, $25, at gogirldesigns.com a good-paying position, I would like to say thank It is a pretty cool told other moms about my idea. This has you to him for all that he has done for us. invention that does exactly what you’re worked pretty well, and the girls always Can you please suggest some items that looking for: keeping a hair tie clean and know where they can get one if needed. would make him feel as special as we close by, plus they went one step further All three are attending enrichment and made it a fun accessory for little girls. think he is? summer school classes that will last six The Busy Girl Bangle is a colorful weeks, and I’ll just make up new bags to To share parenting tips or submit questions, write to: bangle that is worn on the wrist that has last through this time frame. — Heather Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, an area where a hair tie fits. L. in Minneapolis MO 63040. Email direct2contact@parenttoparent.com, The Go Girl Design bangle bracelet has or go to parenttoparent.com which provides a secure From Jodie Lynn • As “silly” as some and easy way to submit tips or questions. All tips must may think it, keeping up with hair ties can a little charm attached to the hair tie for an extra fashion statement, and girls can have city, state and first and last name or initials to be be a daunting task for parents, especially included in the column. wear multiple ones should they want, and because something so small can quickly of course, most do because they’re pretty, Jodie Lynn is an award-winning parenting columnist, add plenty of extra unneeded frustration fun and functional. when your child has a busy schedule. author of five books and mother to three children. She and her family live in Wildwood. It’s the perfect size for small wrists, This is where Debbie Perry comes into

McClellan

editor of this newspaper was promoted out of the newsroom and into the management of the publishing company. From B1 The editor — he or she is a step above the managing editor — announced that nebulous. The more ill-defined a peranybody on the staff who wanted to be son’s job is, the more important it is. I managing editor could apply. sat in the courtroom and thought not There were two or three senior editors about Katz, but about the man I knew. who were obvious candidates. Also, a Were these guys smarter than him? They few younger editors, lean and hungry like didn’t seem to be. Shakespeare’s Cassius. But there were I have lost touch with the man — he other applicants, people lower on the moved to Florida — but I hope he is a ladder, people whose ambition surprised hockey fan. me. I saw them then in a different light. We are relearning an important lesYes, they might be good, I thought. son as the St. Louis Blues march into the In the end, the company spurned the Stanley Cup Final. in-house candidates and hired an outGoalie Jordan Binnington, whose COLTER PETERSON, POST-DISPATCH sider. He did not work out. arrival coincided with the resurgence of St. Louis Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington Of the in-house candidates, the most the Blues, started the year as the backup surprising had been a man who was goalie on the Blues minor league team. He talks with San Jose Sharks Logan Couture after Game 6 of the NHL Stanley Cup Western widely considered a malcontent. And for was 25. And the No. 4 goalie in the Blues Conference finals at the Enterprise Center. good reason. He was a malcontent. But system. The clock was ticking on his very smart. Looking back on things, it career. He got his chance this season only would have been interesting to see how Think about that. Two teams, with because other people were hurt. entire staffs devoted to evaluating talent, he’d have done. Bear in mind, too, that there is a difBut, of course, he never got the chance. ference between professional sports and completely whiffed — one willing to give That could be said of most people. UsuWarner away, the other refusing to take most businesses. Professional sports ally, it happens with far less drama. There him. teams have people whose sole job is to is no application process. Your colleagues By the way, Warner got his chance to evaluate talent. don’t know you’re gunning for a big job. lead the Rams to a Super Bowl victory And yet, stories like Binnington’s are It’s more subtle. You don’t get the right in 1999 only because the starter, Trent not unheard of. mentor, or maybe the opportunity for Green, was injured in the preseason. In this city, we had Kurt Warner. He advancement doesn’t come at the exact So if these things happen in the meriwas a backup quarterback so lightly tocratic world of professional sports — no time you’re ready for it. Things slip-slide regarded by the Rams that he was one of away. five players left exposed in the expansion general manager would last long if he Now and then, though, in the world of draft before the 1999 season. Fortunately were to draft or sign people because he sports, somebody reverses the story in a likes them — imagine how often they for St. Louis, the expansion Cleveland very public way. Jordan Binnington, for happen in the more haphazard world of Browns passed on Warner. They did business where biases and personal feel- example. I hope the guy I knew from the choose a quarterback in that expansion brewery is watching. draft — Tampa Bay’s backup Scott Mila- ings hold more sway. Go Blues, he’d say. In other words, how many people were, novich. and are, good enough to have made it to a Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 He did not make the final roster. His corner office? career total passing yardage in the NFL? @Bill_McClellan on Twitter Years ago, the longtime managing Nine yards. bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Control weeds on an ongoing basis to prevent them from robbing moisture, nutrients and sunlight from desirable plants. Apply mulch to all beds to keep weeds controlled. • Prune out dead, diseased and damaged stems in trees and shrubs as soon as they are discovered. Suckers and water sprouts should also be pruned on an as-needed basis.

• Apply a balanced rose fertilizer when the first flush of bloom is past. • It’s not too late to plant heat-loving sweet potatoes. • Turning compost piles that have become soggy will aerate the pile and hasten decomposition.


HOME

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

AT HOME WITH GEORGE ASTUDILLO CHACON AND TODD MURRAY

George Astudillo Chacon (left) and Todd Murray Ages • George is 52 and Todd is 50 Occupations • Chacon is a relationship specialist for Charles Schwab; Murray is a VP of sales at Caleres. They also own about eight rental properties in the city. Home • Lafayette Square Family • George and Todd share their home with their two dogs, a rat terrier named Moxie and a goldendoodle puppy named MJ. says. While the house had many striking details that PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH were well-preserved, such as quarter-sawn oak The parlor is a striking mix of old and new with contemporary furniture from Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams alongside an antique piano that came with the floors, intricately carved house. The walls and ceiling are painted in Sherwin-Williams “Sealskin.” woodwork around the staircase, an enormous stained glass window on the stair landing and a distinctive antique tile floor in the foyer, they did a top-to-bottom remodel on the rest, including important internal systems like the HV/AC, electrical and plumbing. They also installed more than 100 light fixtures and more than 200 recessed lights. The renovation took a full year. Chacon and Murray worked with Garcia This circular velvet settee in the ballroom came from one of Properties on the conCaleres’ brand showrooms. struction, using historic tax credits, and employed Nistenhaus Design to help achieve an eclectic blend of traditional and modern style throughout the home. Chacon and Murray created the large master bath in what had been one of five bedrooms. This included comIt has the original fireplace, flanked by two sinks. The freestanding, claw-foot bathtub was bining three of the five salvaged from a teardown home in Frontenac and was practically brand new. second-floor bedrooms to make a large master suite baths and eight fireplaces. consisting of a spacious and well-appointed master Chacon and Murray bath, master bedroom and had just downsized to a smaller home in the Cher- a closet/dressing room. okee Street neighborhood They also removed part of a wall that closed off the and were only in it for a year before upsizing again kitchen to make it more open to the hallway. to the Lafayette Square In the master bedroom, a unique hanging light fixture Various vintage designer house in an unexpected from Restoration Hardware is made of 23 lead crystal balls furnishings collected by turn of events. weighing 10 pounds each. Though meant to hang straight the couple over the years “The contractor we from a tall ceiling, the cords are draped from hooks to create blend in with newer pieces used on a lot of our rental a dramatic statement piece. The bed, from West Elm, floats in from Mitchell Gold + Bob properties called me up the middle of the room, alongside the fireplace. Williams, Restoration one day and said, ‘You Hardware and West Elm. have to come look at this “We like to mix high and house; it’s amazing,’ but we only had 24 hours to go low,” Murray says. “We wanted every room to feel look at it,” recalls Murray. BY AMY BURGER seamless.” He viewed the property in 1923 to local bakery Special to the Post-Dispatch They’ve also incorowners George and Carrie online, which provided A grand St. Louis tradi- Seib. Carrie was a psychic only an aerial shot showing porated a few items the who held regular readings the outline of the grounds previous owner wanted tion, the annual Lafayette including the main house, to remain with the house with wealthy clients in Square Spring Home and including an upright and two carriage houses and the third-floor ballroom. Garden Tour, celebrates a grand piano, a vintage Their children, Dr. George expansive gardens, and its Golden Anniversary recliner used by George Seib and Edna Seib, inher- was instantly intrigued. on June 1 and 2. The tour Seib and the Nasse family’s When they arrived, the ited the home, and George started in 1969 as the original dining table, bufSeib maintained it through house was barely visible neighborhood’s largest fet and chairs made from because the property was the 1980s, operating his fundraiser. Featured on so overgrown, but as they the same wood as the dinprivate medical practice this year’s tour is a stuning room trim. got closer, they could see ning three-story home on out of the house. In the third-floor ballit had been well cared for Only the third ownone of the neighborhood’s The entryway features original woodwork and flooring, plus a room, which is nearly and that the beautiful ers, Chacon and Murray largest lots. The home modern light fixture. 2,000-square-feet, brickwork was all intact. recently underwent a com- purchased it in 2015 from Chacon and Murray added “We said yes before plete renovation by owners George Seib’s niece. Hava complete mini-kitchen. we even saw the inside,” ing sat empty for 15 years, George Astudillo Chacon With comfortable seating, Chacon says. the house had suffered and Todd Murray. a large TV and the grand Having rehabbed a water and other damage The house that origipiano, it’s a favorite gathnumber of properties in and was in need of a full What • The self-guided tour begins at the Park House located nally sat on this lot was the city, they felt they just ering spot for guests and destroyed by the cyclone of update, though its bones at 2023 Lafayette Avenue where tourgoers can pick up their also where they hang out 1896. Its owners, the Nasse and exquisite architectural couldn’t let this one go. tickets. most often to relax with “We woke up not even family, rebuilt the existing details remained intact. When • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 1 and 2 their dogs. looking for a house and The 6,500-squarehome in 1900, working “I love that we use ended the day under confoot, three-story house How much • Tickets are $25 a person in advance and can be with renowned German almost every square inch of tract for the biggest projarchitect Otto J. Wilhelmi. originally featured seven purchased online at lafayettesquare.org. Day of tour tickets the house,” says Chacon. The Nasses sold the house bedrooms, three and a half ect of our lives,” Murray are $30 per person. Children under 12 are free.

Renovation brings home built in 1900 back to life

Lafayette Square Spring Home and Garden Tour

Since 1893

Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm Appointments & Service Available 24 Hrs. A Day, 7 Days A Week

Go Wild With Missouri Natives

FURNITURE REPAIRED FURNITURE REFINISHED 5 Year Workmanship Guarantee Quality Craftsmanship • Refinishing Reupholstery • Antique Restoration Repair • Custom Made Draperies Custom Made Furniture New Furniture • Antiques

314-832-1555 www.zollingerfurniture.com

4821 Fairview Ave., St. Louis, MO 63116 Just east of 3400 S. Kingshighway

We accept

Native plants require less water, less fertilizer and less work, yet reward you with luscious gardens overflowing with blossoms spring till frost. Over 2,000 varieties of plants 1011 N. Woodlawn • Kirkwood, MO

314-965-3070 www.sugarcreekgardens.com

VOTED #1 BEST GARDEN CENTER


ARTS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

OPERA THEATRE OF ST. LOUIS

Lindsay Ammann

So Young Park

Bruno Ravella

Roland Wood

Christian Zaremba

Verdi’s ‘Rigoletto’ gets a dark update Roland Wood takes title role in season’s second production BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

This season, Opera Theatre of St. Louis presents two standardrepertoire operas, Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” and Verdi’s “Rigoletto.” This production of “Rigoletto,” however, is not standard: Instead of the original setting of Mantua, Italy, in the 16th century, director Bruno Ravella has put it in the Paris of the 1870s. To say that Ravella is cosmopolitan is to be guilty of understatement: He was born in Casablanca to Italian and Polish parents, educated primarily in France, and is based in London. He’s worked in the United States as an assistant director at houses including Lyric Opera of Chicago and the Met; this is his American directorial debut. Ravella has staged several Verdi operas: “La Traviata,” “Macbeth” and “Falstaff.” This is his first “Rigoletto.” “The piece is very, very dark,” he says, referring to it as “Rigoletto’s nightmare.” “Everybody thinks they know ‘Rigoletto,’ so it’s a tricky one,” Ravella says. He started by reading the original play, Victor Hugo’s “Le roi s’amuse (The King Amuses Himself),”

given one performance in 1832 before being banned by government censors, to get a sense of the period, Hugo’s reasons for writing it and his interest in the characters. “Having started reading it in French,” he says, “I found there were a lot of things in there that resonated in the world of Victor Hugo.” That inspired him to move it to the France of the 1870s and ’80s and the early years of Parisian cabaret. The first scene of the opera opens with the Duke’s ball; Count Monterone, father of one of the Duke’s victims, “refers to an orgy taking place. This is not something we can put onstage, but I wanted to show the vices of the period: gambling, prostitution, opium. It’s what is happening out of sight, in the underbelly of the city.” Rigoletto doesn’t really have much of a relationship in the opera with the Duke; they interact briefly in the first scene, and that’s it. “I’ve created a relationship between the Duke and Rigoletto, in order to develop the piece,” Ravella says. “Rigoletto is somebody that the Duke enjoys having by his side, somebody who will say whatever the Duke wants him to say in order to protect him. It enables the Duke to stay clean, to an extent.” Baritone Roland Wood is singing the role of Rigoletto for the third time. He describes the

character as a working father who’s trying to get by. “He’s trying make a living and provide for his daughter as a single parent,” Wood says. “Because of the nature of his physical deformity — he’s constantly referred to as a hunchback — he can only do certain things, which he hates, and which he hates himself for having to do. He does it because he loves his daughter.” When preparing the role, he compared Rigoletto to comedians who delight in being cruel and nasty. “It’s accepted that everyone else is in on the joke; if you’re the butt of the joke, it’s incredibly painful, but you have to laugh along, because you know that at some point, it will be someone else’s turn. (Rigoletto) has to be cruel for the Duke, to keep him at his side. It’s his defense mechanism.” Wood thinks the character “grows to enjoy it in some perverse way. He thinks it’s quite fun to be able to thumb his nose at the great and good of society, with complete impunity, provided it still makes them laugh. If he stops making people laugh, he knows that’s it; his time’s up.” Most of the characters in the opera, whether privileged or lower class, transfer comfortably enough to the new era. But what about Rigoletto himself, the court jester? Ravella came up with a concept that, Wood says, makes perfect sense: Rigoletto

being rude and crude and taunting, it’s all through the dummy. Then he’s able to put the dummy With soprano So Young Park as away and say, ‘Right, that’s not Gilda, tenor Joshua Wheeker me anymore; now I’m the loving as the Duke, baritone Roland and caring father.’ It establishes Wood as Rigoletto, mezzo/ the slightly schizophrenic contralto Lindsay Ammann as nature of the character.” Maddalena, bass Christian ZaWood adds: “I’m still playing remba as Sparafucile, conducwith it; I haven’t quite mastered tor Roberto Kalb and director the art of singing my aria with Bruno Ravella my mouth closed yet. It’s someWhen • 8 p.m. June 1, June 5, thing to work on in the next June 14, June 20, June 30; 1 week or so.” p.m. June 22, June 26 The arc of the story, he says, is “horribly tragic. It’s a clasWhere • Loretto-Hilton Center sic morality tale, but slightly for the Performing Arts, 130 skewed, in that the person who Edgar Road, Webster Groves behaves in an immoral way gets How much • $25-$139 off scot-free. Gilda is punished, and Rigoletto is caught More info • 314-961-0644; in the middle of it, the schemer opera-stl.org punished for scheming, but ultimately being punished for trying to protect his family and being a loving father. Rigoletto has done everything he possibly Learn more about the shows could to protect Gilda, but she in Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ still falls prey to the very pow44th festival season. erful man and willingly gives stltoday.com/go herself up. “It’s far more tragic than if Rigoletto were killed at the end. becomes a performer — a ventriloquist who speaks through a It’s a kind of closure, but it’s much more interesting that the dummy. Duke survives, and that Rigo“If you take the jester out of letto is left with absolutely noththe court, who is he? He’s still a kind of hanger-on to the rich and ing, having had only one thing powerful,” Wood says. “The ven- in life.” triloquist’s dummy is his outlet; Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 (Rigoletto) is acting as the Duke’s Classical music critic mouthpiece but is removed from @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com everything he says. When he’s

Verdi’s ‘Rigoletto’

Season guide

LIFE AT COURT IS ABOUT TO GET COMPLICATED

BORIS MARTIN, SONY PICTURES

Producer James Gunn on the set of “Brightburn.”

James Gunn says he’s a better person after being fired BY MIKE CIDONI LENNOX

people he can go to. “There’s a lot of things that people talk about LOS ANGELES — It’s Hollywood-cutthroat this been a roller-coaster year and Hollywood-bad that for James Gunn, who was and all the things that are fired from “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3” over old terrible about Hollywood. But the truth is ... I have tweets in July and rehired one really good gift ... I’m in March. But the writerattracted to really good director who shepherded people, and I have chosen the first two “Guardians” to put wonderful people films to critical and box around me, whether it’s office success said the the actors I work with, the experience has been an crew members I work with, educational one. my, you know, the writ“I’m a better person ers I would deal with, the than I was a year ago,” studio people I deal with,” Gunn told the Associated Press. “It’s made me more Gunn said. “There’s a lot of creative and focused on the really good people in this things that really matter to industry.” The 52-year-old found me, which are my friends, himself under intense my relationships and the scrutiny last year when movies that I’m making.” tweets from nearly a Although even after his firing, Gunn didn’t exactly decade ago in which he joked about subjects such have a fallow period as as pedophilia and rape he was hired fairly soon resurfaced because of farby Marvel’s rival to work right propagandists Mike on the sequel to “Suicide Cernovich and Jack PosoSquad.” Now, Gunn is fully back in the public eye biec after Gunn was critipromoting the horror film cal of President Donald Trump. Gunn apologized “Brightburn,” which he for his tweets, but Walt produced, and resuming work on the third “Guard- Disney Co. chairman Alan Horn said that they were ians” movie. The ordeal has made him inconsistent with the studio’s values. thankful for his friends Both fans and his cast who have supported including Chris Pratt, him throughout. Actress Elizabeth Banks, who stars Bradley Cooper, Zoe Saldana, Vin Diesel and other in “Brightburn,” is one stars rallied behind him in of those in the circle of

Associated Press

the wake of the firing last July. “Although I don’t support James Gunn’s inappropriate jokes from years ago, he is a good man,” Pratt said. But it was still somewhat surprising that Disney backtracked and this March announced that Gunn had been reinstated as the writer and director of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3.” Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige told the AP last month that he was glad it happened. “It was the right thing,” Feige said. “It was something that Alan Horn at Disney really believed was the right thing to do.” The “Guardians” cast was similarly pleased. “It’s awesome. I’m really, really, really happy,” ‘Guardians’ actress Pom Klementieff said at the premiere of “Avengers: Endgame” in April. “He’s an amazing human being, and he’s the best director.” Gunn graduated from St. Louis University High School in 1984. He was married to a fellow former St. Louisan, actress Jenna Fischer, from 2000 to 2008. His brother, actor Sean Gunn, has worked in both “Guardians” movies.

art z o M by NOW OPEN! ONLY 7 PERFORMANCES REMAIN.

Join Opera Theatre's Young Friends on Saturday, June 29 for a private dinner buffet with open bar, all for just $49!

Get Your Tickets Now! Tickets Start at Just $25 All performances sung in English and accompanied by members of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra.

ExperienceOpera.org | (314) 961-0644


ARTS

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Woolf From B1

“Angels in America,” has been programmed by Woolf’s successor, Hana S. Sharif. Recently, in his office at the Rep, on the campus of Webster University in Webster Groves, Woolf reflected on how he became a man of the theater. “My parents were very active culturally,” the Milwaukee native says. “There was a subscription series for children’s theater, and this troupe played all the suburbs.” Kids wore name tags around their necks when attending the monthly performances, he recalls. Another formative experience was seeing a performance of the musical “The Fantasticks” as a teenager. “Little pieces of colored tissue paper, thrown in the air at the beginning, became leaves and props,” Woolf says. “There was something in the poetry of LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM that, and the magic of that, that I From left: Repertory Theatre of St. Louis artistic director Steven Woolf, Broadway veteran Ken Page, and Muny thought was sort of fabulous.” artistic director and executive producer Mike Isaacson pose Dec. 20, 2016, at Woolf’s home in the Central West End.

FILE HANDOUT

Ann Scott and Steven Woolf embrace at a Graceland-themed party to benefit the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis in November 1994.

Moving forward The Rep was founded in 1966. Woolf held several positions with the organization before officially becoming artistic director in 1986. At that point the theater “was in tough shape,” he says. “It wasn’t connecting with the community; it wasn’t connecting with audiences. “There was a lot to be done — and a tiny staff,” Woolf says. “We circled our wagons and did what needed to be done to stabilize the organization, both financially and artistically, and also in terms of the community. And that support — the board (of directors) support, the staff support and the community support — allowed us then to move forward.” On his watch, the Rep has built a solid following, with 12,000 subscribers and an $8 million budget. Woolf describes the Rep’s audience as people “who love good stories. They like language, and they like to laugh — but they also like to think. You certainly saw that with ‘Oslo.’” The play by J.T. Rogers is a fact-based account of efforts to bring about peace between Israel and Palestine. “There is a connection from the stage to the audience that invigorates them and connects with them,” Woolf says. “You

FILE HANDOUT

Steven Woolf in 1981, when he was the Loretto-Hilton (now known as the Rep) production manager. just watch people on the edge of their seat, leaning forward. If the play choice is right, and the production is right, they’re intrigued.” A challenging play to which the audience responded particularly well was Stephen Karam’s “The Humans,” which Woolf directed. The family drama with mystical underpinnings was presented last year on the Rep’s Mainstage. “Did I think people would be battling down the doors to see ‘The Humans’? Probably not,” he says. “But we did very well with that show, I think because of the personal family issues. That story was so compelling to people that I thought it would work, and people came.” Among the other productions he has directed for the Rep

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

Steven Woolf, artistic director of the Rep, in January 1988. POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

Director Ed Amor (left) and Steven Woolf work together at the Repertory Theatre of St. Louis on a 1988 production of “Julius Caesar.”

“If I were to guess, it’s ‘Arcadia’ — still, to this day,” he says. The tragicomedy by English playare “All the Way,” “Betrayal,” wright Tom Stoppard is set in an “We’ve never seen this kind “Closer,” “Copenhagen,” “The English country house and notaof change in the field, all at one Crucible,” “Death of a Salesble for its transitions between time, but the timing is right,” man,” “Red,” “Six Degrees of past and present. Woolf directed Woolf says. “People are saying, Separation” and “Who’s Afraid the 1997 Rep production. we have to embrace the myriad of Virginia Woolf?” “I remember, when I saw it in complexities that make this New York, just being blown away country work. And part of the by it,” he says. “It was about the poetry of America is the conChanges at the top Woolf’s departure and Sharif’s tinuing difference in our popula- future — and about the march of the future on this family in Engarrival are part of a generational tions.” land. About something coming So what’s next for Woolf? shift that has found new artistic “At the end of June, I’m going on, something new. I really fell directors — notably women and to Portugal for 10 days,” he says. in love with the piece. It’s one of people of color — taking over “I’ve never been there. So a river those I wish we could have gotat regional theaters including ten it into the 50th-anniversary cruise sounds perfect.” Actors Theater of Louisville, season. But it didn’t work out.” Woolf has been famously Baltimore Center Stage, Long reluctant to name his favorite Wharf Theater in New Haven, Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Oregon Shakespeare Festival and production in his time at the Theater critic Woolly Mammoth Theater Com- Rep. But as he leaves the job, that @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com seems to have changed. pany in Washington, D.C.


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOOKS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

BEST-SELLERS

NONFICTION

Here are the best-sellers from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended May 18.

Patience with dignity

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 2. “The 18th Abduction” • Patterson/Paetro 3. “The Night Window” • Dean Koontz 4. “Blessing in Disguise” • Danielle Steel 5. “Redemption” • David Baldacci. 6. “Sunset Beach” • Mary Kay Andrews 7. “The Guest Book” • Sarah Blake 8. “Neon Prey” • John Sandford 9. “Fire & Blood” • George R.R. Martin 10. “The Big Kahuna” • Evanovich/Evanovich HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Howard Stern Comes Again” • Howard Stern 2. “Becoming” • Michelle Obama 3. “Everything Is F*cked” • Mark Manson 4. “The Pioneers” • David McCullough 5. “Girl, Stop Apologizing” • Rachel Hollis 6. “The British Are Coming” Rick Atkinson 7. “Own Your Everyday” • Jordan Lee Dooley 8. “The Proximity Principle” • Ken Coleman 9. “The Latte Factor” • Bach/Mann 10. “Sacred Duty” • Tom Cotton MASS MARKET 1. “Past Tense” • Lee Child 2. “The Gray Ghost” • Cussler/Burcell 3. “Spymaster” • Brad Thor 4. “Field of Bones” • J.A. Jance 5. “Sweet Vengeance” • Fern Michaels 6. “Red Alert” • Patterson/ Karp 7. “Texas Skies” • Debbie Macomber 8. “The Fallen” • David Baldacci. Vision 9. “Come Sundown” • Nora Roberts 10. “The Summer Retreat” • Sheila Roberts TRADE PAPERBACK 1. “The Mueller Report” • (Scribner) 2. “The Mister” • E.L. James 3. “Little Fires Everywhere” • Celeste Ng 4. “I Will Teach You to Be Rich” • Ramit Sethi 5. “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” • Heather Morris 6. “The Woman in the Window” • A.J. Finn 7. “Shelter in Place” • Nora Roberts 8. “The Death of Mrs. Westaway” • Ruth Ware 9. “Target: Alex Cross” • James Patterson 10. “Dark Sacred Night” • Michael Connelly Here are the best-sellers at area independent stores for the week that ended May 19. Stores reporting: The Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, the Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books. ADULTS 1. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 2. “The Overstory” • Richard Powers 3. “Stop Doing That Sh*t” • Gary John Bishop 4. “Chemistry” • Weike Wang 5. “The View From Flyover Country” • Sarah Kendzior 6. “Milk and Honey” • Rupi Kaur 7. “100 Things Cardinals Fans Should Know and Do Before They Die” • Derrick Goold 8. “The Stranger Inside” • Laura Benedict 9. “Alexander Hamilton” • Ron Chernow 10. “A Delicate Aggression: Savagery and Survival in the Iowa Writers’ Workshop” • David Dowling CHILDREN/YOUNG ADULTS 1. “Endling #2: The First” • Katherine Applegate 2. “What Is Given From the Heart” • Patricia C. McKissack 3. “Young Lincoln” • Jan Jacobi 4. “Dog Man: Brawl of the Wild” • Dav Pilkey 5. “The Super Life of Ben Braver” • Marcus Emerson 6. “Merci Suarez Changes Gears” • Meg Medina 7. “Here We Are” • Oliver Jeffers 8. “The Good Egg” • Jory John 9. “If I Was the Sunshine” • Julie Fogliano 10. “Dr. Seuss’s You Are Kind” • Dr. Seuss

St. Louis woman’s story of wartime internment camps told in new book

survival in a world where we feared we would still be outcasts.” Judy Mundle of Des After the war, her Peres became close friends mother traveled to the in the mid-1970s with a West Coast on a train fellow office worker, Janice that stopped briefly in St. Koizumi of Manchester. Koizumi Mundle Louis. In a letter to her Mundle heard Koizumi’s daughter, she said: moved to hard-knocks life story, “The people gathered so-called which began when Japathere handed out sandassembly nese-Americans like her wiches, cookies, and even were shuttled off to intern- centers. chocolates to everyone. “I ment camps in World War We all took one of each, don’t II. started eating, and said After the war, as a young know of thank you many, many anyone in wife, she moved with her times. We just couldn’t Stockton, husband and infant son imagine this kindness Califorto Japan — where, as an “The Block directed toward us. … nia — my American, she found herManager” As long as I live, I will homeself hated by the natives. By Judy remember that moment in town Now, Mundle has writMundle my heart. I am sure every— who ten “The Block Manager,” Published one there felt the same refused. a first-person account of by Open as I did. Some of the men Many Koizumi’s life, as told in Books Press, gathered together to talk, Mundle’s words. (Because people 282 pages, FAMILY PHOTO then more, and then they were of privacy concerns, $18.95 (trade Janice Koizumi (back right) with her mother and five siblings spoke with the rest of us, fiercely Koizumi is called “Janet paperback) in the mid-1930s. and then we all decided the Konishi” in the book. Now angry; same thing — the entire all were 99, she recently moved to train of us Japanese leaving depended on what she a go-between connectscared. Four to five thouChicago.) camp would stay right here calls gaman, which her ing Japanese-American sand Japanese lived in The book opens in May in St. Louis.” inmates to their American account translates as Stockton then, and we 1942 in California, KoiYears later, after living shared the same fate at the guards. Her skill as a trans- “patience with dignity.” zumi’s birthplace. “No in postwar Japan, Koizumi As the war progressed lator made her invaluable one barged into our homes hands of the US governand Allied victory seemed would also settle in the St. to both groups. She was ment: on May 10, 1942, or handcuffed us to take Louis area. Her husband assured, she saw “the moved among camps — we forfeited our homes, us away, as had happened died in 1993, but her son conflicted emotions jobs, private lives, beloved first, to the boondocks of to the Jewish people in earned several college in the eyes of so many. Europe,” the account says, pets, worldly goods beyond Arkansas and then, after degrees and succeeded, After these long years, marrying a hard-line what we could carry, and “although we had been thanks in large part to his the Japanese had become Japanese-born American all freedoms guaranteed shunned and chastised dependent on the govern- mother’s gaman — and by the Constitution of our who refused to give up his like the Jews since Pearl guts. allegiance to his homeland, ment for their room and country.” Harbor. The government to northern California, to a board and management of Harry Levins of Manchester retired The title stems from simply notified all the their lives. For us, freedom in 2007 as senior writer of the Postcamp for hard-liners. West Coast Japanese when Koizumi’s appointment meant challenges for basic Dispatch. Throughout, Koizumi in the interment camps as and where we would be

BY HARRY LEVINS

Special to the Post-Dispatch

FICTION

FICTION

Hero in ‘Flight Portfolio’ rescued The creator of ‘Hannibal’ returns with new monster Jewish artists in World War II that elevate him above being a typical antagonist, while Hans-Peter has a In Thomas Harris’ new novel, “Cari Mora,” the title lye machine and weapons. character escaped a violent They are both monsters, but only one is past and now lives truly terrifying. in Miami. She can The push for the stay in the United treasure puts Mora States thanks to in the middle of a temporary proruthless people tected status, but who will do anyshe still fears being thing to achieve sent back to her their goals, and to native country. stay alive she will Cari Mora works “Cari Mora” have to remember as caretaker of the skills she learned house that was once A novel by owned by drug lord Thomas Harris in her past that she was trying to forget. Pablo Escobar.The Published by Descriptions house has a reputa- Grand Central, tionofnotonlybeing 320 pages, $29 run between vague and excessively haunted,but also graphic. A couple of scenes the possibility of a treasure of $25 million of gold hidden will remind readers of the brain-eating scene from somewhere underneath “Hannibal.” The writing it.So when a man named veers between elegant and Hans-Peter Schneider and his colleagues rent the house repulsive. Readers who are fans of “Red Dragon” and to make a film,she knows “Silence of the Lambs” will what they are really after. be disappointed in Harris’ Hans-Peter is a sociofirst novel to not feature path like another famous Harris villain, but he does Lecter since his debut in 1975. Ultimately this book not come close to the will be remembered for its nuance and sophisticalook at the Miami area amid tion of Hannibal Lecter. Lecter has elements of his carnage, greed, the plight of immigrants and survival. personality and behavior

BY JEFF AYERS

are of the kind invariably Newsday reviewed using the same small cachet of words: Here’s a question: Is rich, sweeping, ambitious, there such a thing as a heartfelt, exquisite. genius? To her credit, Orringer A great deal hinges on earns them all. the answer for She’s a superb the reader of researcher, a natu“The Flight ral storyteller and Portfolio” by a clear writer. It’s Julie Orringer. impossible not to It’s a novel get caught up in about a real hisrooting for Fry and torical figure, Grant to fall in love Varian Fry, who again. It’s impostraveled from “The Flight sible not to hope the United Portfolio” that Fry’s refugees States to MarA novel by find safety. seille, France, Julie Orringer But it’s there that in 1940 and Published by one might begin constructed a Knopf, 562 to wonder about daring, effecpages, $28.95 the idea of genius tive network — “that lovely old for refugees bedtime story,” as the from the Nazis, with critic Peter Schjeldahl a particular emphasis has called it. “The Flight on saving famous artPortfolio” takes its stakes ists and their families. Among those were — well, (the rescue of great artists) for granted, just as geniuses, including Marc Fry must have. Should we? Chagall, Jean Arp and You might start by asking numerous others. why so many geniuses Fry was indisputably a have been white men, for member of another, more instance; or observing tangible phylum, the hero; with minimal back- that a Danish economist recently discovered an ing, he ultimately saved thousands of lives, often breaking the law and taking desperate risks. When forced to return to the United States in 1942, he wrote a furious article called “The Massacre of Jews in Europe” for The New Republic. Israel, in 1994, bestowed upon him the honorific “Righteous Among the Nations,” granted to gentiles who put their lives at stake to save Jews during the Holocaust. He was the first American to receive it. “The Flight Portfolio” begins with a smart and resourceful depiction of this precarious work. It then interrupts Fry by giving him an unexpected encounter with an old lover from Harvard, the fictional Elliot Grant. Fry has a wife in New York, but his heart has never fully healed from this deeper relationship. When Grant asks Fry for help, the book’s political and personal narratives merge. Orringer is a blue-chip writer with a string of prizes and fellowships and a previous bestseller, “The Invisible Bridge.” That, too, was a long novel set during World War II, and both books

BY CHARLES FINCH

overwhelming correlation between family income and the likelihood of a career in the arts. In other words, it’s hard to know quite what to make of Fry’s brief. Was Thomas Mann’s family more important than a thousand others? Chagall’s? But those difficulties aren’t within Orringer’s range. The Holocaust is an immense, impossible latticework of stories, its filaments running in every direction, breaking off, coming loose. “The Flight Portfolio” constructs of one of them a satisfying and commanding novel. Yet the further we get from living memory of the war, perhaps the less the novels about it — Orringer’s, Alan Furst’s, Anthony Doerr’s — should be quite so rich, so sweeping, so satisfying. The stories move slower but cling longer in a writer like Nobel Prize winner Patrick Modiano, the author of foggy, searching, desperate novellas that incarnate the haunted reality of that period. Then again, he’s a genius.

Associated Press

Now in its final days!

British sculptor Rachel Whiteread casts the hidden spaces in-between, above, and beneath everyday objects, creating a range of evocative sculptures that make the invisible visible. Rachel Whiteread is the first comprehensive survey of the internationally acclaimed artist’s career.

Closing June 9. Open Memorial Day 9 am to 5 pm. Members always free. For ticket information, visit slam.org/RachelWhiteread. slam.org/RachelWhiteread #RachelWhiteread

Presented in St. Louis with support from the E. Desmond Lee Family Endowment for Exhibitions; the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency; and the National Endowment for the Arts.


05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

TRAVEL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

WENDY PRAMIK, USA TODAY

Rheingeist Brewery in Cincinnati’s Over the Rhine neighborhood is a playground for thirsty adults.

Hey! When did

Above: The Banks — on the banks of the Ohio River — is a popular draw throughout the day.

Cincinnati get so fun?

PHOTO COURTESY THE BANKS

Right: Anyone who loves neon, nostalgia or just brilliant marketing will be drawn to the American Sign Museum in Cincinnati. LIZ DUFOUR, ENQUIRER MEDIA

Bottom left: Newport Aquarium, across the Ohio River from Cincinnati, is home to 20,000 fish and other sea creatures. Some are a trifle bizarre. PHOTO BY DANIEL NEMAN

Bottom right: Fountain Square is the heart of Cincinnati’s thriving downtown. LOUIS RIDEOUT, CINCINNATI USA CVB

NEWPORT AQUARIUM

Sharks swim all around you — and even over you — at the Newport Aquarium, located just across the river from Cincinnati.

STL MEDICAL REPORT

Culture, arts, lively neighborhoods and countless restaurants ‘n’ bars

PRESENTED BY

BY DANIEL NEMAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Our job is to first diagnose to see what type of hearing loss you have and whether it can be corrected medically or surgically. It isn’t just about hearing aids.

Dave Harris, PhD Director of SLUCare Audiology Photo provided by SLUCare Physician Group

By Lori Rose Brand Ave. Studios Contributing Writer

Many people wouldn’t dream of skipping routine dental visits. Your hearing and ear care shouldn’t be any different, says Dr. Dave Harris, the director of SLUCare’s audiology team, which has offices in the Doctors Office Building near SSM Health Saint Louis University Hospital and at SLUCare Otolaryngology West County at 555 N. New Ballas Road. Just as you have your teeth cleaned, vision checked or your blood tested, having a regular hearing screening should be a routine component of your health care, Dr. Harris says. “Your hearing is a big deal, and your quality of life is a big deal,” says Dr. Harris. Unlike hearing aid retailers, the SLUCare audiology team offers a full range of services for ear and hearing care to ensure that patients aren’t missing out on life due to hearing loss. Dr. Harris says it’s important to seek expert care if you have a family history of hearing problems, are regularly exposed to loud noise, have a sudden loss of hearing or ringing in your ears, or when you or your loved ones begin to notice you’re missing out on aspects of conversations around you. “We do a full hearing evaluation,” Harris says. “Our job is to first di-

agnose to see what type of hearing loss you have and whether it can be corrected medically or surgically. It isn’t just about hearing aids. We also do balance testing and treatment. Some patients have conditions that will cause both.”

hearing aids eliminate the need to frequently replace tiny disposable batteries. Users simply put their hearing aids on a charger at night just as they would their cell phone.

When hearing aids are the best option, SLUCare specialists are trained to help patients choose the right device for them based on their lifestyle and needs, Dr. Harris says.

Hearing aids have come a long way, Dr. Harris says. Still, many people are unaware of what modern hearing aids look like and what they can do.

“We let them know what type of hearing aids would be best, but we also let them know it’s their decision,” Dr. Harris says. “It really just depends on their lifestyle and what they need the hearing aid to do.”

“Their experience is with their mother or their grandmother who used to wear them and hated them,” he says. “We need to try to overcome the stigma of getting a hearing aid. If people can use AirPods and think that’s OK, they shouldn’t have any objections to wearing hearing aids.”

Dr. Harris recently helped a surgeon choose hearing aids that are fully automatic, so that when he scrubs in to the operating room, he won’t have to touch his ear to adjust the device. A judge who had trouble hearing the jurors in his courtroom is now using a device with a remote microphone. Dr. Harris says hearing aid technology continues to improve, and devices are more streamlined and simpler than ever to use. Advances include wireless connectivity so that hearing aids not only communicate with each other but can interact with a patient’s telephone or television, for example. Rechargeable

NOT YOUR GRANDMOTHER’S HEARING AID

Whatever device a patient chooses, a SLUCare specialist will set it up so that all the patient has to do is wear it — and enjoy hearing what they’ve been missing. “They say, ‘Wow, these are light, I don’t even feel them,’” Dr. Harris says. “And then they realize maybe they were missing some things.” SLUCare audiologists also will continue to work with patients over time to make sure the device is meeting their changing needs. Dr. Harris says he recommends patients be seen at least every six months.

To learn more about SLUCare Audiology, visit slucare.edu/hearing or call 314-977-5910.

hen I dream, I dream of Cincinnati. I haven’t lived in the Queen City for more than 35 years, but it still inhabits my subconscious. And while I still return once or twice a year, I decided to make my most recent visit different. This time, I decided to see the city as a tourist. That means museums, neighborhoods, parks and restaurants. It means staying in a downtown hotel and exploring some places I had never been before. It means forgoing (some of) the familiar haunts of my youth and looking at the town through the eyes of someone who has never seen it. And here is what I learned: My home town is a great town. It has a thriving, vital downtown, full of things to do and see. It is awash in lively neighborhoods studded with intriguing shops, restaurants and bars (bear with me: “shops, restaurants and bars” is going to become a running theme). It has a proud history and a deep appreciation of culture and the arts. The city’s pulsing heart is Fountain Square, a one-block plaza in the middle of downtown distinguished by a large and reasonably impressive fountain. It’s where the city comes together for concerts, speeches, demonstrations or just an outdoor lunch. The square itself has a couple of restaurants ‘n’ bars and an ice cream parlor, while the surrounding blocks offer many more places to eat and drink. If Fountain Square is the city’s heart, then Eden Park is its soul. It’s a small park, as parks go, but it is lovely and serene, with expansive views of the Ohio River. It’s where you will find the Krohn Conservatory, a large greenhouse with paths winding through

W

DANIEL NEMAN, POST-DISPATCH

Cincinnati’s famous Skyline chili begins with a layer of spaghetti that is topped with a sauce and shredded cheddar cheese. displays of plants; kids will love walking behind the indoor waterfall. Farther up the road in the park is the Cincinnati Art Museum, home to an extensive collection of perfectly acceptable art, a few dreadful works and, as it turns out, more masterpieces and nearmasterpieces than I had remembered. Van Gogh’s “Undergrowth with Two Figures” is probably the collection’s best-known work, but Picasso, Chagall and Van Dyke are also stunningly represented. Chinese bronzes from 1200 BC are a can’t-miss, and so is a unique chapel with Spanish frescoes from the 1100s. At the top of the hill sits Mount Adams, which has long been Cincinnati’s answer to Greenwich Village: bohemian, full of funky shops, restaurants ‘n’ bars, and home to hipsters. The views are priceless, especially from the Immaculata Church, which is honored with the neighborhood’s most prominent location. In Mount Adams, people in the know have been going to the tiny, charming, Blind Lemon bar since 1963. This subterranean landmark is hidden away, but the crowds (up to 49 at a time, though an outdoor courtyard makes it bigger) relish its cluttered decor, intimate feel and nightly non-loud music. Mount Adams used to be Please see CINCINNATI, Page B8


TRAVEL

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Cincinnati From B7

the city’s center for nightlife, but in recent years revelers have been heading instead to the expansive neighborhood known as Over the Rhine, named for the German immigrants who first lived there. Now, the 19th century buildings are home to countless quirky shops, restaurants ‘n’ bars. Taste of Belgium, a local six-restaurant chain, has a branch there, offering Belgian waffles, croissants, steak and frites, crepes and a version of shrimp and grits in which the grits are cooked into a waffle. Brunch is served late at night on weekends, which may be the best dining idea ever. For an even more traditional French bistro experience, try the French Crust, which is owned by one of the city’s most respected chefs, JeanRobert de Cavel. Here you can find seasonally changing menus for breakfast, lunch and dinner. I had the seafood quiche, which was the day’s special. It was delicately decadent, but anything you sample there is likely to be excellent. Cincinnati is a beer town, and a neighborhood called Over the Rhine is obviously going to be home to more than one brewery and tap house. Christian Moerlein, the city’s first craft brewery, is an excellent example. Samuel Adams, which is brewed in Cincinnati (as well as Boston) has a taproom there, too. But if you’re looking for a more youthful vibe in the neighborhood the locals call OTR, you can walk up a couple of flights of stairs to Rhinegeist Brewery. Here, in what used to be a factory, is a combination beer room and play house, with pinball, corn hole, occasional trivia and more than 25 of their own beers on tap. There is a rooftop bar with good views, too. Also downtown is the oddly named JACK Casino, which is both swanky and smoke-free. It is lushly appointed, with all the games you would expect, plus a few reasonably exotic variations: Mississippi Stud, Criss Cross Poker and a combination of several games called Synergy Table Games. A couple of blocks away is a true Cincinnati institution, Arnold’s Bar and Grill. Founded in 1861, it is the area’s oldest restaurant ‘n’ bar. There is nothing sleek about it; it features well-worn wood, an old tiled floor and a bathtub in the dining area on the second floor that, according to legend, was used during Prohibition to make bathtub gin. Though the restaurant is crowded for lunch and dinner, it is at its homiest and most welcoming at night at the well-stocked bar, where you can always find interesting, albeit tipsy, conversation. If you like to enjoy the most modern ideas in art, the Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center is also downtown. Set in something of an artistic marvel, itself (the award-winning building was designed by Zaha Hadid), the museum features three floors of frequently changing exhibitions, plus a top floor called the Unmuseum, a fun place where children and adults can explore art. Want even more art? Right next door is the 21c Museum Hotel, which has carved out a niche in the luxury hotel sector by including a rotating collection of modern art in every lobby of the small chain. The company’s 11th property is expected to open in St. Louis in late 2020. The beds at this hotel are more comfortable than you have at home, even if you have a comfortable bed, and the showers, too, are better than yours. The hotel dining room, the Metropole, is a destination restaurant even for local residents. The 21c is also notable for the whimsical, 4-feethigh yellow plastic penguins that stalk the halls and are moved several times a day — they may be looking out the lobby window or surprising you

PHOTOS BY DANIEL NEMAN, POST-DISPATCH

Above: Even the building housing the Cincinnati Center for Contemporary Art is artistic; it has won several awards for its design. Left: In a Creation Museum diorama, Eve hangs out with a dinosaur in the Garden of Eden.

CINCINNATI USA CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU

The John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge spans the Ohio River between Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Ky.

If you go GETTING THERE: Cincinnati is about 350 miles from St. Louis. That’s less than a six-hour drive unless there is construction along the way, which there will be. MORE INFO: „ Krohn Conservatory, 513-

„

„

„ „ „ „

„

„

421-4086, cincinnatiparks. com/krohn Cincinnati Art Museum, 513-721-2787, cincinnatiartmuseum.org The Blind Lemon, 513-2413885, mtadamsbarandgrill. com/the-blind-lemon Taste of Belgium, 513-3965800, authenticwaffle.com French Crust, 513-4553720, frenchcrust.com Rhinegeist Brewery, 513381-1367, rhinegeist.com JACK Casino, 513-252-0777, jackentertainment.com/ cincinnati Arnold’s Bar and Grill, 513-421-6234, arnoldsbarandgrill.com Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center, 513-345-8400, contemporaryartscenter.org

in the elevator. One is in each room, too; I left mine snuggled up in bed when I left. For anyone who loves neon or nostalgia, the American Sign Museum is absolutely not to be missed. Here, in fine working order, is a large (but not too large) collection of bright, blinking and winking lighted signs — plus some older painted signs. Everyone who goes picks out a favorite; how can you not? Savvy travelers know not to ignore Northern Kentucky, just across the river. Here, too, are plenty of fascinating spots to hit, including the controversial Creation Museum. Founded in 2007, it purports to tell the history of the Earth according to the bible, from Adam and Eve to Jesus. Located in a beautiful setting and representing the state of the art in museum design, the Creation Museum presents near full-size dioramas of Adam and Eve with dinosaurs and other animals in the Garden of Eden. A large section is also devoted to Noah and the flood, which the museum contends occurred about 4,350 years ago. The flood is given particular importance because, according to the museum, it created the conditions that now lead secular scientists to believe

„ 21c Museum Hotel,

„

„

„

„ „

„

513-578-6600, 21cmuseumhotels.com/ cincinnati American Sign Museum, 513-541-6366, americansignmuseum.org Creation Museum, 888-582-4253, creationmuseum.org Newport Aquarium, 800-406-3474, newportaquarium.com Bouquet, 859-491-7777, bouquetrestaurant.com National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, 513-333-7739, freedomcenter.org Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame & Museum, 513-7657923, mlb.com/reds/hallof-fame

in evolution and theorize that the Earth is more than 4 billion years old. The riverside town of Newport, Ky., once known for its raucous and not always legal nightlife, is

now better known as home to the Newport Aquarium. This is an impressive facility, full of colorful, beautiful and sometimes bizarre water creatures (the buffalo trunkfish just looks wrong). The huge shark tank is sure to be a highlight of any visit, and so is the penguin display — it’s called Penguin Palooza. You can touch stingrays in the stingray pool and cross a nerve-wracking rope bridge over the sharks. In nearby Covington, Ky., you’ll find Mainstrasse, a street full of restaurants ‘n’ bars, some with live music. I found my way to a fabulous farm-totable place called Bouquet, a restaurant and wine bar with a menu that changes weekly. The building dates from the 1830s, when it was used as a doctor’s office, and the restaurant is so popular I almost couldn’t get a seat on a Wednesday night without reservations. Mainstrasse has a laidback feel, so for a more energized experience, go back across the Ohio river to a bustling section in downtown Cincinnati called the Banks. Located

between the baseball stadium and the football stadium, the family friendly Banks has a mixture of national restaurant brands and local outfits, many with a sports theme. But the Banks offers culture, too. The gorgeously situated National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is there, bringing busloads of students and tourists to its disappointingly limited collection (it fills out some of its space with sections on the mistreatment of American Indians and on the women’s suffrage movement). A block or so away is the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame & Museum. Here, the casual baseball fan will find plenty that thrills and excites, while fans of the Reds will totally geek out. I totally geeked out. No trip to Cincinnati is complete without trying the city’s best-known dish, Cincinnati chili, especially the version served by Skyline. Native Cincinnatians have the city’s favorite food running in their veins, but those without the good fortune of having been born there often do not understand its charms.

THE SHELDON 2019-2020 SEASON SHAPING SOUND.

Subscriptions on Sale NOW! LOS LOBOS

ANGÉLIQUE KIDJO

CÉCILE MCLORIN SALVANT

RUTHIE FOSTER

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

THE MILK CARTON KIDS

SFJAZZ COLLECTIVE

THE 442S

ARTURO SANDOVAL W/JANE MONHEIT BROTHERS LAZAROFF JOHN MCEUEN AND MUCH MORE!

CALL THE SHELDON AT 314.533.9900 OR VISIT THESHELDON.ORG

At its most basic version, it is a plate of spaghetti topped with chili and a large helping of shredded mild cheddar cheese, but the chili does not taste like ordinary chili. The problem is that it shouldn’t even be called chili; it bears only the faintest resemblance to chili. Think of it as a Greek meat sauce that is served on pasta with cheese, like pastichio but different. Less polarizing is the city’s impossibly good ice cream. Graeter’s has the national reputation, especially for its stunningly soft and chewy chocolate chips. But a lot of Cincinnatians will tell you that the best tasting ice cream is actually found at Aglamesis Bros. I had a hot fudge sundae with mocha chip ice cream there; it was my go-to order as a teenager, and it was just as blissful now as it was back then. But don’t take my word for it. Try ’em both — Graeter’s and Aglamesis. They’re especially good after Skyline chili. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com


TRAVEL

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

Bauhaus

comes home

Museum showcasing the legacy of the influential German design school opens in Weimar BY GEIR MOULSON

Associated Press

WEIMAR, GERMANY — The German city where the Bauhaus was born a century ago is paying tribute to the school behind a string of modern design icons with a new museum meant to anchor it in its turbulent historical context. The Bauhaus Museum in Weimar, a functional but elegant concrete cube designed by German architect Heike Hanada, showcases many of the items that blurred the lines between the artistic and the industrial — producing some of the precursors of modern mass design and helping make the Bauhaus influential far beyond its relatively brief existence. Visitors can admire exhibits such as Peter Keler’s cradle made of a blue circle, a yellow triangle and red square, produced in 1922 under the direction of artist Wassily Kandinsky; Wilhelm Wagenfeld’s domed table lamp of 1924; Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s steel easy chair and stool from 1929, and early precursors of the fitted kitchen. But the museum also explores the wider and constantly shifting ambitions of the Bauhaus, which started work in April 1919 under architect Walter Gropius as Germany grappled with its political future after World War I. It reflects the political troubles that forced the school to move twice then close down shortly after the Nazis came to power in 1933. The aim is not just to show off architecture and design but also to see the school and its leading lights “in their diversity, with their contradictions and how they are anchored in the 20th century,” said BenjaminImmanuel Hoff, Thuringia state’s culture minister. Weimar stands for both the high points of German classical culture and the low points of the country’s history. It was home to the poets Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller and composer Franz Liszt, but later to the Nazis’ notorious Buchenwald concentration camp. The new museum offers views toward the historical center and a tower built as a memorial to Buchenwald. It was built next door to the Gauforum, a monumental Nazi-era administrative complex and parade ground, where a permanent exhibit on Nazi slave labor is to open next year. The Bauhaus itself fell foul of right-leaning local authorities in Weimar — long suspicious of its unconventional students and teachers — who slashed

PHOTOS BY JENS MEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

A visitor stands in front of a sound installation in one of the exhibition halls at the Bauhaus Museum. People walk in one of the exhibition halls at the Bauhaus Museum. The museum designed by Berlin-based architect Heike Hanada will focus on the early Bauhaus that was founded in Weimar in 1919 and stayed there until 1925. funding in 1925. That forced it to move northeast to Dessau, then a rising industrial city, where the iconic glass-fronted Bauhaus headquarters and a residential estate with 90 apartments were built. Dessau’s Nazi-dominated council forced the Bauhaus to close in 1932, and an attempt by Mies van der Rohe — the last director — to keep it going in Berlin lasted only a few months. Gropius, the first Bauhaus director, left Weimar a collection of 168 Bauhaus objects including ceramics, metalwork, furniture and rugs that is a mainstay of the museum’s collection. It survived World War II packed up in a room at Weimar’s city palace. Curators are keen to stress that the Bauhaus didn’t come from nowhere, and the collection at the simultaneously restored Neues Museum nearby underlines that — showcasing work by Belgian designer Henry van de Velde and others that foreshadowed the school’s attempts

Peter Keler’s cradle, produced in 1922, at the new Bauhaus Museum in Weimar, Germany. to fuse fine and applied art. Bauhaus Museum director Ulrike Bestgen said it’s a myth that “everything was totally revolutionary and totally new.” But Gropius and his associates took a very different direction. Gropius’ Bauhaus manifesto urged young people to “help work not just on physical construction but on a new society,” Bestgen said. Bauhaus students had to learn a craft in one of 10 Bauhaus

workshops. Those included a stage workshop, a kind of theatrical laboratory that explored movement, form and light. Weimar is home to the small, cubic Haus am Horn, erected in 1923 as the first recognizably Bauhaus building. It is also where the Bauhaus started developing models intended

for mass production. That idea intensified in Dessau — where a second new Bauhaus museum is expected to open in September. Gropius’ successor, Hannes Mayer, stressed the school’s social aims and advocated producing “people’s necessities, not luxuries.” Meyer was blamed for the radicalization of students who turned to communism and was fired by the Dessau city council in 1930. His replacement, Mies van der Rohe, focused more on the aesthetics of architecture. The Bauhaus was a “school as a big experiment for creative experiences,” Bestgen said. “The Bauhaus kept correcting itself, kept coming up with new approaches to do things better, because they accepted that such a process of development includes failure.”

RIGHT: People stand in front of the new Bauhaus Museum building during a light installation performance in April.

Cruise line rivals Broadway with 134 shows, 50 theaters roamed the halls in crop tops and buns. One stretched into a wide split on the floor. There are 14 MIAMI — In a nondescript dance studios, 15 rehearsal rooms, building in North Miami, two a recording studio, gymnasiums dozen dancers in bouncing yeland auditorium. Exercise equiplow skirts are high kicking the ment lines some hallways. Nearby can-can, aerialists are spinning are living accommodations for perilously high from silk cords 470 of the performers. and frantic seamstresses are Often dismissed in the past as hemming outfits in a 20,000 square-foot costume shop. They second-tier, cruise entertainment has evolved to a genre that are all part of a company that Royal Caribbean says commands puts on more live productions a year than Broadway and London’s some of the best talent and technology around. West End combined. Several of the main characters Royal Caribbean Internationin “Mama Mia” are from the al’s cruise line directs 134 shows in 50 theaters on 26 ships around Broadway version of the show. While New York theater has the world, including seven struggled to turn profits with its Broadway-originating shows, small, intimate venues, fickle eight aqua shows, 18 ice shows crowds and finite real estate, the and dozens of original musicals. cruise industry’s onboard audi“We have a nightly audience ence is growing exponentially. of about 100,000. It is by scale a Royal Caribbean is building five very, very large operation. Probably under one roof, the biggest in ships in the coming years, each the world,” said Nick Weir, senior with a custom-built theater with vice president of entertainment. sophisticated stages and high“At any one time, there’s 1,500 to tech effects. A few years ago, they 1,800 cast members employed to built a small plane with a 22-foot wingspan that now flies over the make this all come to life.” audience in every production of It takes two to four weeks for “FLIGHT: Dare to Dream.” an army of dancers, singers and “The stages that they have aerialists to learn a show before they’re dispatched to ports as far on the ships, the technology is far better than it ever was on a away as Australia and China. On a recent afternoon, dancers Broadway stage, even 10 years

BY KELLI KENNEDY

Associated Press

in a few weeks. Singer and dancer Oli Reynolds, 26, wrapped up a starring role in London’s West End production of “Mama Mia” and came back to Royal Caribbean where he’s reprising the same role. “I think there’s still a stigma about cruise ship performing ... historically, a lot of cruise lines didn’t put the focus on the performing, it was more about the destinations,” said Reynolds, who stressed that’s changed. “People come from Cirque du Soleil, they come from Vegas, they come from London, they come from Broadway and it is a progression ELLIS RUA, ASSOCIATED PRESS in my career for me.” Performer Montana Moore dances during a rehearsal at Royal Caribbean’s John Kenrick, a musical theater entertainment training facility in North Miami, Fla. Dismissed in the past historian and adjunct professor as second-tier, cruise entertainment has evolved to a genre that Royal at New York University, says the Caribbean says commands some of the best talent and technology around. evolution was inevitable as more sophisticated cruise audiences — accustomed to seeing shows ago,” said Greg Graham, who was 25,000 performers last year in spots like Vegas and Atlantic alone. the resident choreographer for City — are demanding better “At my audition there were “Billy Elliot” on Broadway before entertainment. coming to the cruise line to cho- hundreds of girls ... it’s very “It’s certainly upped the game. competitive. There are so many reograph “Hairspray.” (Cruise theater) used to be a little people who want to be doing Roughly 3,000 hopefuls better perhaps than summer this,” said Taryn Borman, a showed up to recent auditions stock just with better costumes,” for “Hairspray” in New York and 21-year-old Australian dancer, said Kenrick, adding “it’s defiwho’s performing on a ship for London. Weir said the casting operation the first time in a new show with nitely improved. I can’t say it’s Broadway.” is massive, culling talent from 75 aerialists and contortionists. She’ll head to Asia with the cast cities a year auditioning nearly


TRAVEL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

Q: Will Global Entry notify me if my membership is about to expire? A: U.S. Customs and Border Protection sends you an email notification when your membership status changes. Acosta says that its systems send out notifications but that they sometimes end up in spam or junk folders. He adds, “We have no control over your email, and we BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT highly recommend that if not hours, from your Special to the Washington Post transit times. Understand- you periodically log into ably, Global Entry is wildly your Trusted Traveler ProIf you have a Global Entry membership, which popular. It has grown from grams account to check for updates.” fewer than 15,000 memallows you to skip some Within a year, Global bers in 2009 to more than of the airport lines, lucky Entry members will begin you. But you might want to 6 million in 2019, Acosta receiving a reminder each check your expiration date. says. time they use the kiosk Here are some of the A majority of Global upon arrival in the United most frequently asked Entry members who joined the program in 2012 questions about renewing States, alerting them of the number of days before Global Entry: to 2014 are applying for their membership expires. Q: How do I find out renewal now, according Q: How much does it when my Global Entry to Pete Acosta, Trusted cost? membership expires? Traveler Programs direcA: It costs $100. HowA: You can find your tor for U.S. Customs and ever, some credit cards, Global Entry expiration Border Protection (CPB). such as American Express, Factor in the coming sum- date by logging into your mer travel season and this Trusted Traveler Programs will reimburse you for your membership. Check account. If it’s going to year’s partial government your card to see whether it shutdown, and you have all expire within one year, offers this benefit. select the blue “Renew the makings of a possible Q: Do I really have to delay in your membership Application” button under fill out that form all over “Program Membership” renewal. again? Global Entry gives expe- and proceed accordingly. A: Yes. CBP changed its There’s no penalty dited customs clearance online systems in the last for renewing early. Your to preapproved, low-risk five years, so you will need membership will be valid travelers arriving in the for five years from the date to create a new account United States and grants your current Global Entry when you submit a request them TSA PreCheck stafor renewal. membership expires. tus. It can shave minutes,

Renewing your Global Entry membership

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Q: Do I need to schedule another interview? A: An interview for membership renewal “may not be necessary,” according to CBP. Once you submit your renewal application and fee, periodically check your Trusted Traveler Programs account for updates to learn whether you are required to go to a Global Entry enrollment site for an interview. You’ll receive an email when your membership status changes. CBP declined to say how many members would need a new interview. Q: What if I can’t find a convenient interview location? A: Instead of scheduling an appointment at a CBP Trusted Traveler Programs enrollment center, conditionally approved Global Entry members can have their interviews without an appointment when they arrive on an international flight at any of the 49 airports participating in CBP’s Enrollment on Arrival program. Q: How do I know if Global Entry received my renewal application? A: You can check the status of your application from your TTP website dashboard, which is displayed after you log in. If your application status is “Pending Review,” then

BRING IT ON HOME • JAMAICA Who and where • Erin (left) and Rebecca Berghold of Florissant at Tony’s Hut on Seven Mile Beach in Negril, Jamaica. They left this Vess “St. Louis Made” shirt there. The trip • They celebrated their 20th anniversary with a trip to Jamaica. Travel tip • Have a chartered travel bus pick you up from the airport. “We used Dudley’s Big Ship Taxi all week long. Before we left Montego Bay, we stopped at the Mega Mart, like a small Sam’s Club, and stocked up on water and snacks for the week. Much cheaper than getting staples from in or around the resort especially if staying in a noninclusive.” Contribute • Email your photo to stlpost@gmail.com. Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including where they are from and where you are standing in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little about the trip and a travel tip.

your application has been received and is being processed. Q: How long does it take to renew Global Entry? A: Processing times vary by applicant. The extended partial government shutdown substantially added to the backlog of CBP’s TTP applications and renewals.

Q: Is there a grace period? A: Yes. If you submit your renewal application before your five-year membership ends, CBP will give you a six-month grace period to complete and submit your renewal. Christopher Elliott is a consumer advocate, journalist and co-founder of the advocacy group Travelers United.

A & R Block Travel LTD. Since 1976

www.arblocktravel.com

M O T O R C O A C H

CAPE COD WITH MARTHA’S VINEYARD AUGUST 17-25, 2019................................... $1005

MACKINAC ISLAND SEPTEMBER 8-14, 2019 ................................ $739

NEW YORK & THE STATUE OF LIBERTY SEPTEMBER 19-25, 2019.............................. $859

MYRTLE BEACH SHOW TRIP SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2019.............................. $755

MAINE OCTOBER 5-12, 2019 .................................. $1025

NASHVILLE SHOW TRIP NOVEMBER 4-8, 2019 ................................... $699

T O U R S

MT. RUSHMORE & YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK AUG. 23- SEP. 1, 2020.. $1399 ALL TOURS INCLUDE: FREE PARKING, MOTORCOACH TRANSPORTATION FROM ST. LOUIS, ACCOMMODATIONS, MOST MEALS, SIGHTSEEING & TOUR DIRECTOR

CALL 314.576.1700

2019 SERIES

meet the author presented by St. Louis County Library Foundation St. Louis County Library Headquarters 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63131 Full author schedule available at www.slcl.org/authors.

Rebecca Makkai Jean Kwok Tuesday, June 4, 7:00 p.m. “The Great Believers” (Makkai) “Searching for Sylvie Lee” (Kwok)

Casey Cep Tuesday, June 11, 7:00 p.m. “Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee”

Martin Walker Wednesday, June 12, 7:00 p.m. “The Body in the Castle Well: A Bruno, Chief of Police Mystery”

Ambassador William Burns Monday, June 24, 7:00 p.m. “The Back Channel: A Memoir of American Diplomacy and a Case for Its Renewal” Presented by the ‘Buzz’ Westfall Favorite Author Series

Unless otherwise mentioned, all events are free and take place at St. Louis County Library Headquarters, 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd. Doors open one hour prior to event time. Space is limited; early arrival is highly recommended.

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever.

Come in and find out why our clients say,

“I’m so glad I found you!”

Left: upper denture Right: upper implant

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

$

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office (314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office (636) 200-2664

The timeless appeal and beauty of quality hardwood floors enhances your furnishings and allows you to create the ambiance you desire whether you’re going for a warm comfortable atmosphere or a smooth contemporary feeling. STOP BY TODAY TO VIEW OUR WIDE SELECTION OF HARDWOOD FLOORING, CARPET, AND VINYL. 6215 Ronald Reagan Dr, Lake St Louis, MO 63367

(636) 561-5441


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 • C

Midwest has seen weedkiller use soar Cure-all or crutch? Overreliance on the controversial product has led to resistance; health concerns also grow BY CHRISTOPHER WALLJASPER AND RAMIRO FERRANDO

Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting

Farmers have been using the weedkiller glyphosate — a key ingredient of the product Roundup — at soaring levels even as glyphosate has become increasingly less effective and as health concerns and lawsuits mount. Nationwide, the use of glyphosate on crops increased from 13.9 million pounds in 1992 to 287 million pounds in 2016, according to estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey.

A review of the agency’s data by the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting shows that farmers across the Midwest used an estimated 188.7 million pounds of glyphosate in 2016 — nearly 40 times more than in 1992 when they used a total of 4.6 million pounds. The data for the year 2016 is the latest available. Farmers in those 12 states — including Illinois, Indiana, Iowa and Nebraska — grow most of the country’s soybean and corn crops. Glyphosate is now the primary way farmers manage weeds that would otherwise reduce the

amount of grain they can produce. The Midwest accounts for 65% of the nation’s use of glyphosate for crops, according to the Center’s analysis. The estimates are from data collected through surveys of farms and may be high in some cases. However, the estimates provide an overview over decades on how dramatically glyphosate use has increased. As a caution, the Midwest Cen- CHRISTOPHER WALLJASPER, THE MIDWEST CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING ter reviewed data with low esti- James Benham’s herbicide applicator on his Indiana farm has a 90-foot mates of pesticide use on crops boom. He says the machine can apply herbicides at 100 acres per hour. Benham, whose equipment is shown Wednesday, has been farming for Please see ROUNDUP, Page C4 nearly 50 years.

TRADE DISPUTE OVER CABINETS

Debate heats up on office productivity, temperature Women work better if it’s warmer, men if it’s colder, study says BY JENA MCGREGOR

Washington Post

but in a similar case involving quartz countertops the government has proposed punitive tariffs as high as 348 percent. “Something like that could put us out of business,” Knichel said. “It would definitely make it a lot more difficult to compete.” One of Knichel’s suppliers, Randy Goldstein of Kitchen Cabinet Distributors in Raleigh,

Women have a new weapon they can use to make their case against the chilly office conditions many experience each summer, as their sleeveless summer work clothes do battle with cranked-up air conditioning. A new study shows women tend to perform better on certain skills when the temperature is a little warmer, making them more productive, while men tend to perform better when the temperature is a bit cooler. In a paper released Wednesday by the journal PLOS One, researchers at the University of Southern California and the WZB Berlin Social Science Center reported that in experiments, tests scores on verbal and math skills improved for women as the temperatures rose, and were better for men when they declined (though to a lesser effect), opening a new front in the office thermostat wars. The paper’s release set off yet another round of attention and headlines to what’s been called the “thermostat patriarchy,” or the gender divide on where to set the thermostat in the office. A few years ago, a scientific paper in the journal Nature Climate Change turned up the dial of the debate when it offered physiological data for why women and men are comfortable at different indoor temperatures and spelled out how office temperatures may be based on the needs of a 40-year-old, 154-pound man. Then last summer, it flared up again when Cynthia Nixon,

Please see NICKLAUS, Page C3

Please see OFFICE, Page C4

COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Dennis Britton installs hinges on cabinet doors on Thursday in the workspace of St. Louis Cabinet Warehouse in Ellisville.

Small firm views ruling on Chinese imports as threat DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Joe Knichel doesn’t flinch when a builder wants kitchen cabinets for an apartment building or an entire subdivision on a tight schedule. His usual reply is, “How fast

do you need them?” Knichel, owner of St. Louis Cabinet Warehouse in Ellisville, can call a supplier, order readyto-assemble kits with all the doors, drawers, partitions and hardware, build the cabinets in his shop and deliver them in an average of two weeks. That’s far less than the one to four months a made-to-order cabinet firm would require, and Knichel says quick-turn-

around orders are a good niche for his four-employee company. He fears, though, that a pending trade case will endanger the business model. In April, the U.S. International Trade Commission issued a preliminary ruling that American cabinet manufacturers had been injured by Chinese imports – including imports of the kits that Knichel relies upon. A final ruling is months away,

Vacant Ittner school may become offices Site should be done sometime in 2020 BY JACOB BARKER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Michael Hamburg’s Pier Property Group is planning a $6.3 million rehab of a William B. Ittnerdesigned school as 20,000 square feet of offices in the Forest Park Southeast neighborhood. The former Rock Spring School at 3974 Sarpy Avenue was built in 1898 as a St. Louis Public Schools elementary building. It was later sold to a private organization that operated it as Providence Educational Center, a high

school for young adults. Mark Fishel has owned it for years, and Hamburg said he believes the school has been vacant for about 20 years. Hamburg expects the sale to close later in the summer. Construction should start soon after to turn the building into offices, and the building should be complete by the second quarter of 2020. The three-story school has good visibility from nearby Highway 40 (Interstate 64), which Hamburg believes should help make it a desirable office location. “It’s always something that stuck out to me driving through the neighborhood,” he said.

Rock Spring School was the first time Ittner, the prominent designer of many of St. Louis’ historic school buildings, diverted from the Classical Revival style, according to the building’s nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. It is a unique building in the architect’s career. He apparently wasn’t completely satisfied with the layout and moved on to other styles as his career progressed, according to the listing. Hamburg plans to apply for state and federal historic tax RENDERING COURTESY OF PIER PROPERTY GROUP, TRIVERS ASSOCIATES credits and tax abatement from Michael Hamburg’s Pier Property Group plans to rehab the 1898 William B. Ittner-designed Rock Spring School at 3974 Sarpy Avenue into 20,000 Please see ITTNER, Page C4 square feet of offices.

BUSINESS

1 M

Up to 4,800 SF Office / Medical Space Available for Lease off Hwy 94 2730 S. St. Peters Pkwy, St. Peters MO 63303 For More Information: Noel Fehr | 314-994-4953 nfehr@naidesco.com Where Can We Help You?

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE SERVICES, WORLDWIDE

www.naidesco.com


BUSINESS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Work longer and watch savings add up Don’t ignore Waiting until later to take your Social Security check offers the biggest benefit BY LIZ WESTON

NerdWallet

Retirement experts frequently recommend working longer if you haven’t saved enough. But you may not realize just how powerful a little extra work can be. Researchers who compared the relative returns of working longer versus saving more last year reached some startling findings. Among them: • Working three to six months longer was the equivalent of saving an additional 1% for 30 years. • Working just one extra month was similar to saving an additional 1% for 10 years before retirement. • Delaying the start of retirement from age 62 to age 66 could raise someone’s annual, sustainable standard of living by 33%. 123RF.COM This is potentially great news for people in their 50s and 60s who are Delaying the start of retirement from age 62 to age 66 could raise someone’s annual, able and willing to stay on the job. But sustainable standard of living by 33%. younger people shouldn’t use the findings as an excuse to ignore their 401(k) s, since many people retire earlier than they planned. “I would see this as a positive message for people who maybe didn’t save as much as they could have and they’re wondering what to do,” says researcher Sita Slavov, a professor of public policy at George Mason University in Arlington, Va., and a faculty research fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. “I would not use this to advise younger people not to save.”

Open Monday, Memorial Day 9am-4pm

Potentially higher standard of living The study, which Slavov co-authored with her former Stanford University professor John Shoven and two of his other students, Gila Bronshtein and Jason Scott, first compared the effects of saving more, working longer or trimming investment expenses. They used theoretical households who save 9% of their salary over 30 years starting at age 36. Then they looked at actual households from the University of Michigan’s Health and Retirement Study, which tracks thousands of people 50 and over. The trends were the same: Working longer had the biggest impact on the household’s standard of living in retirement. That makes sense. When you’re young, your savings have decades for compounded returns to grow. Likewise, keeping investment fees low means more of your money is available to compound. So an increase in savings or decrease in expenses can have an outsized impact. When you’re older, your savings have less time left to grow: The runway ahead of you is shorter. So working longer starts to have the biggest effect. Most of the benefit comes from delaying the start of Social Security checks, the researchers found, but continued contribution to retirement accounts and delayed withdrawal from those accounts are also factors. You’re not required to start Social Security when you retire, or vice versa, but most people do, Slavov notes, so the study was structured to reflect that.

0% for 60 months = $16.67 per $1,000 financed. See dealer for details.

What claiming at 62 can cost you

2019 CaDIllaC XT4

Starting Social Security at 62, the earliest age you can claim retirement benefits, means locking in a permanently smaller check. Your check could be as much as 76% larger if you waited until age 70, when your monthly benefit maxes out. Delaying increases your checks by about 7% each year between age 62 and what’s known as your full retirement age: currently 66, but rising to 67 for people born in 1960 and later. After full retirement age, your benefit rises by 8% each year you delay. The advantages of delaying Social Security typically are so great that many financial planners now recommend clients tap other resources, including retirement funds, if that allows them to put off claiming. Thanks to current low interest rates, there’s no other investment that gives such a high, guaranteed return. And while the larger checks are designed to compensate for the fact that people who claim later will receive fewer payments over their lifetimes, longer life expectancies mean that most people will see more money overall by waiting. Delaying is particularly advantageous for the higher earner in a married couple and for single people, Slavov’s previous research with Shoven found. Their latest research shows that, overall, lower earners benefit even more from delay than higher earners. Again, that makes sense, because Social Security is progressive. It’s designed to replace a larger proportion of lower-income people’s earnings. The more you rely on Social Security, the more it can pay to wait — if you can. Slavov acknowledges that job loss, bad health or the need to care for a loved one often can push people into retirement earlier than they planned. (A 2018 TransAmerica study found 56% of the retirees surveyed retired earlier than expected.) “These results really apply to people who have the option of working longer,” Slavov says. “Obviously, that’s not going to be an option for everyone.”

2019 CaDIllaC ESCalaDE, XT5, XTS

0

% fOR

60 MONThS

your mental well-being in retirement

Transition from work may be difficult, prove costly

123RF.COM

The transition to retirement itself is enough to trigger mood problems if you are emotionally unprepared, said Jamie Hopkins, director of Retirement Research at Carson Group. BY BETH PINSKER

Reuters

Retirement savings can suffer from interest rate moves, market volatility and other financial risks, but depression can be just as damaging. The transition to retirement itself is enough to trigger mood problems if you are emotionally unprepared, said Jamie Hopkins, director of Retirement Research at Carson Group. “What we typically see is photos of retiree couples on the beach, and they look happy,” Hopkins said. But others feel isolated when suddenly separated from meaningful work. “Some people don’t know what they are supposed to be doing,” Hopkins said. Catalysts such as declining health can be depressing as life gets more limited. Caregivers often become widows or widowers, and are at high-risk without a significant other to care for them. “Lots of widows refer to it as ‘JellO brain,’” said Kathleen Rehl, author of “Moving Forward on Your Own: A Financial Guide for Widows,” and for years a financial planner primarily for widows. “You just can’t think straight, and it shuts down some of your normal functions.”

Financial impacts

1.

9% fOR

60 MONThS

1.9% for 60 months = $17.48 per $1,000 financed. See dealer for details.

Bommarito CADILLAC BommaritoCadillac.com LOCATION 4190 I-70 North Outer Road St. Peters, MO 63376

SALES 636-928-2300 Saturday full service available 7am-3pm by appointment only.

The Bottom Line: Medical marijuana Legal marijuana is an $8.5 billion industry in which Missouri will soon participate, thanks to an initiative approved by voters. Jim Gallagher and David Nicklaus discuss what that means from a business perspective.

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF

Due diligence

LISA BROWN

Business editor

314-340-8127

JACOB BARKER

Economic development

314-340-8291

BRYCE GRAY

Energy and environment

314-340-8307

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

To e-mail a staff member, use the first initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

MARKETS • WEEK IN REVIEW Dow Jones

Nasdaq

S&P 500

+95.22

+8.73

+3.82

25,585.69

7,637.01

2,826.06

SOURCE: Reuters

Depression can have a real and lasting financial impact, so mental health must be a factor in retirement planning. “We talk about diversifying your portfolio and your life,” said Neal Van Zutphen, a certified financial planner from Tempe, Ariz., whose clients include those who wildly spend to fill a void. Consider just health care costs: Depression lowers immune system responses, strains the heart, limits the ability to care for yourself, and depletes energy. A home health aide or assisted living facility costs more than $4,000 a month in most parts of the country, and a shared room at a nursing home can run more than $7,000, according to Genworth’s 2018 Cost of Care survey. “It just knocks the socks off any other expense,” said Debra Newman, a recent retiree who spent her consulting career selling long-term care insurance to reduce such risks. Hopkins assesses clients’ happiness and finances when creating retirement projections. The key question: Where will you find your meaning? Then Hopkins prompts people to think about goal-based planning. Retirees planning to go on a cruise or buy a second home need to do more than rely on their general savings, said Hopkins. Phased retirement, with shorter work hours, helps clients ease into a new lifestyle. “This gives you the ability to test-drive retirement, as opposed to cold turkey,” Hopkins said.

MARKET WATCH: Page C5

Depressed retirees are also vulnerable to scams targeting those desperate for help, experts said. Rehl worked with one widow who handed over a chunk of her life savings to buy the Iraqi currency and lost it all. Many widows she works with fall prey because of financial illiteracy. Complicated insurance products with suspect terms can wreck retirement plans, Rehl noted. Financial education is the best bet, but for people experiencing grief and possible depression, a thick, jargonfilled report can be daunting. Graphics are Rehl’s answer. She divided up widow Liz’s $1.5 million into colored blocks, including for inheritance, charity and spending (to create memories with family). Each area was tied to a goal-based investment strategy. “She’d bring this graphic to meetings,” said Rehl, and they worked together to plot out the rest of her financial life.


BUSINESS

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

Nicklaus From C1

N.C., expects major disruption if the cabinet kits are hit with steep duties. (They’re already subject to the 25% tariff that President Donald Trump imposed on many Chinese products.) “The reality is that China is the only country that reliably produces a ready-to-assemble cabinet,” Goldstein said. “They have decades of expertise and a supply chain optimized for ready-to-assemble cabinet production.” By most measures, the domestic manufacturers aren’t hurting. They’ve sold more cabinets at higher prices in each of the past couple of years, and their employment has been stable. The only injury they can cite is that imports are capturing much of the industry’s growth. China went from 12% of U.S. cabinet sales in 2016 to 16% in 2018, while domestic makers’ market share fell from 83% to 77%. Goldstein argues that the manufacturers are misusing trade law to crush an innovative segment of the market. “This whole case is about eliminating competition, not about protecting American workers,” he says. If companies like his and Knichel’s can’t provide a lowcost, quick-turnaround alternative to custom cabinets, Goldstein says, “the net impact will be a re-

Dennis Britton drills a screw into a cabinet on Thursday in the workspace of St. Louis Cabinet Warehouse in Ellisville.

COLTER PETERSON PHOTOS, POST-DISPATCH

Dennis Britton crosses another cabinet off his build list on Thursday in the workspace of St. Louis Cabinet Warehouse in Ellisville. Britton uses lists from each job to make sure all the cabinets end up with the right customer, crossing each one off as it is built. duction in consumer choice and a reduction in jobs.” The cabinet industry isn’t alone in bringing a trade case against China. The ITC is investigating alleged dumping of two dozen Chinese products, from ceramic tile to crawfish tail meat. Dan Ikenson, a trade expert at the Cato Institute, thinks the

flood of complaints has more to do with politics than economics. “This case, like many cases brought against China in the past year, is taking advantage of the anti-China sentiment that seems prevalent right now,” he said. It’s not unusual, he adds, for one segment of an industry to wield trade laws against a rival

segment — in this case, the readyto-assemble cabinet industry. In doing so, the domestic industry is really going after the pocketbooks of builders and rehabbers. “Their customers have choices, and they don’t want them to have choices,” Ikenson said. Knichel knows his customers value the quick-delivery option.

“The reality is that China is the only country that reliably produces a ready-toassemble cabinet. They have decades of expertise and a supply chain optimized for ready-to-assemble cabinet production.” RandyGoldstein, Kitchen Cabinet Distributors “My contractor and real estate investor clients rely on me to get the product faster, which equates to more money in their pocket,” he said. He just hopes he can keep offering that choice. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

MOUND CITY MONEY From David Nicklaus’ blog about St. Louis business. stltoday.com/ moundcitymoney

Shopping center owner plans ‘Shark Tank’-style competition for new retail concepts: The owner of a Lake Saint Louis shopping center is looking for a few good retail ideas. Cohen Equities of New York, owner of The Meadows at Lake Saint Louis, is launching a competition called RetailNext to find one or more retail concepts that are ready to open as soon as this holiday season. The winner or winners will receive free build-out, rent and marketing support at The Meadows, a package valued at $100,000. They’ll also be mentored by the competition’s 12 judges, who include Build-A-Bear Workshop founder Max-

ine Clark, Norty Cohen of marketing firm Moosylvania and St. Louis Fashion Fund founder Susan Sherman. Cohen Equities is promoting RetailNext as a competition similar to the “Shark Tank” TV show, with the public invited to vote via social media. The contest is open to everyone from first-time entrepreneurs to established retailers wanting to test a new concept. Entries can be submitted through The Meadows’ website and are due by Aug. 16. Organizers plan to feature finalists at a live event Sept. 11 and announce a winner the following week. Activist investor reduces stake in Build-A-Bear: Activist investor J. Carlo Cannell, who criticized Build-A-Bear Workshop’s

board two months ago, has reduced his stake in the stuffed-animal retailer. Cannell notified the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday that he has lowered his stake to 4.30% from 5.66%. His Alta, Wyo., investment firm, Cannell Capital, sold 205,188 shares this month for between $5.18 and $5.53 a share. In a March SEC filing, Cannell criticized the board’s “lack of alignment” with shareholders. He said he reserved the right to nominate new directors and to pursue “strategic initiatives to enhance shareholder value.” Another investor, David Kanen of Coral Springs, Fla., also has made noises about shaking up Build-ABear’s board. Kanen owns

St. Louis’s Most Affordable Office Space

9.3% of the Overland-based company. Save-A-Lot reportedly attracts interest from strategic buyers: Save-A-Lot’s Canadian owner recently told investors it has had interest from “multiple strategic partners” interested in buying the discount grocery chain, according to Debtwire. Reuters reported May 6 that Onex, the Canadian private equity firm that bought Save-A-Lot in 2016, had hired investment bank PJ Solomon to explore a sale. A “strategic partner” presumably would refer to a supermarket operator, as opposed to a financial buyer such as another private equity firm. Debtwire, a financial-information unit of media company Acuris, attributed its report to anonymous sources familiar with the matter. Reshmi Basu, restructuring editor at Debtwire, said she talked to sources who were on a May 15 conference call to discuss Save-A-Lot’s first-quarter results. The chain lost $2 million before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization, the report said, on revenue of $955 million.

The sources also said Onex made a new $20 million secured loan to Save-ALot and was close to finalizing a $40 million loan “to provide a liquidity buffer,” according to Debtwire. “They said they didn’t need the liquidity, but it was done as a buffer to give them more comfort,” Basu said. A Moody’s report in November predicted that the chain would “burn a significant amount of cash” this year. Onex bought Save-A-Lot in 2016 for $1.4 billion. The chain took on a $740 million term loan and $250 million line of credit then and remains “very highly levered,” Basu said. The term loan has been quoted recently at between 50 and 55 cents on the dollar, indicating some doubt about whether Save-A-Lot can support so much debt. Save-A-Lot, based in St. Ann, operates 1,230 discount supermarkets, twothirds of which are owned by franchisees. Shoe industry pleads for relief from ‘catastrophic’ tariff: More than 170 shoe companies, including three based in the St. Louis area, are asking President Donald

Trump to leave footwear out of his trade war with China. Shoes are among Chinese goods, worth around $300 billion a year, that Trump has proposed adding to a list of imports subject to a 25 percent tariff. Trump is using the punitive tariff to gain leverage with China over unfair trade practices. The shoe companies, in a letter dated Monday, tell Trump the tariff would cost their customers $7 billion a year. “The proposed additional tariff of 25 percent on footwear would be catastrophic for our consumers, our companies and the American economy as a whole,” the letter says. The companies note that footwear is “a very capital intensive industry” and that companies “cannot simply move factories to adjust to these changes.” The letter’s 173 signers include Caleres of Clayton, Elan Polo International of Overland and Rawlings Sporting Goods of Town and Country. The letter also is signed by such shoe brands as Adidas, Nike and Reebok and retailers including Foot Locker and J.C. Penney.

2 PRIME LOCATIONS 3 SUITES LEFT!

skobusch@bommarito.net

From 500 to 1,100 sq. ft.

314-731-7025

Ask For Stacie Kobusch Today!

• Flexible Lease Terms Move In Ready • Primary Access to Hwy. 270, Hwy. 70, Hwy. 170 & Hwy. 40 • St. Louis' Best - Prices From $10.75 sq. ft. and $447.00 Per Month • Full Service Includes All Utilities • Minutes From St. Louis International Airport • Conveniently Located Near Post Offices • Carpeted Offices Wall To Wall • Door to Door Mail Service • Includes Janitorial Services • 24/7 Digital Video Surveillance • Great Hwy. and Major Artery Visibility • Call Today for Details And Appointment • 24/7 - On Call Management Team $ave Money On Your Next Office Space *See Bommarito Leasing Representative For Full Details.

BUSINESS CENTERS - 2 LOCATIONS -

HAZELWOOD - 320 Brookes Dr. WEST COUNTY - 13610 Barrett Office Dr. Bommarito.com “Bommarito - We Make Office Space Affordable!”

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Deposit & Loan Guide

Institution

Synchrony Bank

Int Chking Money Acct Mkt Acct Min Min

NA

1.20

NA

0

3 mo CD Min

6 mo CD Min

0.75

1.00

12 mo CD Min

18 mo CD Min

2.70

2.75

2,000 2,000 2,000 2,000

24 mo CD Min

36 mo CD Min

60 mo CD Min

2.80

2.85

2.90

2,000 2,000 2,000

Great Rates + Safety = Peace of Mind. Member FDIC.

Phone / Website

800-869-3813 www.synchronybank.com

TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FEATURE, CALL SALES DEPARTMENT @ 773-320-8492

Savings Update

How to protect your accounts from charity scams By Sabrina Karl Giving to help others is a noble gesture. But unfortunately, there are scammers out there striving to turn fake charitable asks into collections of bank account numbers and other personal information.

mimic the name of a well-known charity to trick you into thinking they’re calling from an organization you’re familiar with.

Charities are important to our society and helping fund their missions is not something to shy away from. But it’s smart to ensure the donation you’re considering will go to a legitimate organization rather than a fraudster looking to siphon money out of your bank account.

The scammer’s goal is obviously to collect a donation that goes right into their pocket. But even worse is the potential for them to keep cheating you if they’ve successfully collected your banking information. Once a fraudster has your account number, the only way to fully protect yourself from future unauthorized withdrawals is to close the account.

Fraudulent charity requests often purport to provide disaster relief or support veterans, police officers, or fire fighters. But when any kind of solicitation comes directly to you, especially by telephone, be alert and do your homework.

If the cause being promoted interests you, do your own research to identify legitimate charities doing work you want to support. Then donate by credit card through the official ways they provide on their website.

The number one rule is to never provide your social security number, your date of birth, or your bank account number to anyone contacting you for a donation. Also pay close attention to the charity’s name, as some criminals will closely

In any case, whether you give by debit, credit, or check, monitor your statements carefully to ensure you’ve only been charged the amount you approved, and that unauthorized recurring donations aren’t later going through.

Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 05/21/19 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.


C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Roundup From C1

and crop fields to avoid overestimation. And not all crops can be sprayed with glyphosate. Therefore, the rate applies only to crops engineered to survive the pesticide. Roundup was manufactured by agriculture company Monsanto until the Creve Coeur-based company was bought by German pharmaceutical company Bayer in 2018. Overreliance on glyphosate, which was once regarded as a miracle product, has caused weeds to grow resistant to the chemical and led to diminished research and development for new weed management solutions, according to Bill Curran, president-elect of the Weed Science Society of America and emeritus professor of weed science at Penn State University. “We’re way overreliant on Roundup,” Curran said. “Nobody thought we were going to be dealing with the problems we are dealing with today.” Meanwhile, juries have recently awarded at least $2.2 billion in damages to plaintiffs in three separate cases who claimed that glyphosate caused the cancer non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Bayer is appealing those cases, and the monetary awards are likely to be lowered.

Resistance to glyphosate grows Despite warning that overuse could lead to weed resistance, manufacturers of glyphosate have continued selling the product to farmers at increasing rates. James Benham has been farming in southeast Indiana for nearly 50 years. Benham said, as resistance grew, Roundup went from a cure-all to a crutch. “Sometimes if you timed it just right, you could get away with just one spraying. Now we’re spraying as often as three or four times a year,” he said. Benham said farmers continue to spend more on seed and chemicals but aren’t seeing more profit. “That puts the farmer in that much more of a crisis mode. Can’t do without it, can’t hardly live with it,” he said. As glyphosate became less effective, farmers turned to even more pesticides to try and grow successful crops each year. Glyphosate was first introduced by Monsanto in 1974. But it wasn’t until the 1990s, when the company released genetically modified corn, soybean and cotton seeds that could withstand the weedkiller that the use of glyphosate saw a dramatic increase, said Sarah Ward, associate professor of plant genetics at Colorado State University. “I think it did become too much of a good thing. I think growers locked on to the simplicity, and the effectiveness of using glyphosate as your primary, or in many

Ittner From C1

St. Louis’ economic development office for the project. Meanwhile, Hamburg’s other projects are moving along. His first, the 164-unit Woodward Lofts project in an old printing factory along Vandeventer and Tower Grove avenues, opened in January and tenants are leasing apartments now. His $8 million, 33-unit Steelcote Lofts project in Midtown should be completed by the end of June. He’s recently started the second phase of that project, Steelcote Crossing, a $4 million rehab of the Columbia Oil building to the south into 15 lofts and ground floor space for a brewery or distillery. That project received 10 years of 80 percent tax abatement from the St. Louis Mid-

Office From C1

Andrew Cuomo’s Democratic primary opponent for New York governor, asked a TV station to set the debate hall thermostat to a warm 76 degrees, calling workplaces “notoriously sexist when it comes to room temperature,” The New York Times reported. When the PLOS One article prompted its own furious round of headlines and social media attention — “tweeting this while wrapped up in the blanket I keep at my desk,” wrote one woman on Twitter as she shared a headline on the paper — researcher Tom Chang, an associate professor of finance and business economics at the University of Southern California’s business school, wasn’t surprised. Not only did the Nixon-

DARRELL HOEMANN, THE MIDWEST CENTER FOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING

A farmer works the field on property near Mansfield, Ill., on Monday. able, farmers used a variety of other pesticides to combat specific weeds. Jack Boyer, a farmer who plants around 800 acres of corn, soybeans and cereal rye in northeast Iowa, said before Roundup, he would apply a mixture of pesticides to the soil before planting, or or spray on patches of weeds after the crop emerged from the ground. “It was quite a labor-intensive process, as well as more chemicals,” Boyer said. “When Roundup, or glyphosate came along, it made things a whole lot simpler and really cleaned up the area, for a long time.” Even after applying pesticides, farmers or farm workers would walk the fields, chopping weeds out by hand. “As a young teenager, I spent a good chunk of my summer with a hoe in hand, chopping those weeds out,” said Mary Boote, chief executive officer of Global Farmers Network, a nonprofit group based in Des Moines, Iowa, that advocates for farmers around the world. In the late 1990s, when glyphosate was combined with genetically modified seeds that could withstand the herbicide, it was a scientific breakthrough in crop biotechnology, according to Boote. She said glyphosate did more than just help farmers grow better crops. “The advent of glyphosate was a game-changer. Not only did it effectively kill the weeds that were threatening and taking away maximum crop production, there was a quality of life issue,” Boote said. The combination of planting glyphosate-resistant seeds, then applying the chemical over the top of the crop allowed farmers to apply a fewer number of chemicals, and led to the rise of no-till farming, which prevented soil erosion. Game-changer Alan Kadolph, a farmer in Before glyphosate was avail- Hardin County, Iowa, said some cases your only means of weed control,” Ward said. When the patent for glyphosate expired in 2000, it opened the door for generic production, and usage increased even more. By 2007, the University of Nebraska’s Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources noted at least 40 generic glyphosate-based herbicides, including offerings by DowDuPont (now Corteva Agriscience) and Syngenta. Charla Lord, spokeswoman for Bayer, said in an email statement that glyphosate is safe and still effective for farm and residential use. “Glyphosate-based herbicides are supported by one of the most extensive worldwide human health and environmental effects databases ever compiled for a pesticide product. Glyphosate’s ability to effectively control unwanted vegetation provides benefits that extend from individual farms to global trade to national parks to golf courses to local governments to gardeners,” Lord said. But as glyphosate use shows little sign of slowing, some experts fear what it means for farmers and consumers. In 2017, Monsanto reported net sales of $3.7 billion in its agricultural productivity division, which includes glyphosate, up $213 million from 2016, according to its annual report. Market researchers predict the glyphosate market to grow to $8.5 billion to $10 billion annually by 2021 up from $5 billion now. “The increase in agricultural productivity reflects increased volume of Roundup and other glyphosate-based herbicides globally,” Monsanto said in the report. Market researchers predict sales of glyphosate will be between $8.5 billion and $10 billion by 2021.

moved away from other weed management practices, like cultivation or hand-chopping, all together. “It all went back to cost-effectiveness. Roundup was such a cheap product per acre,” Kadolph said.

Victims of success Dane Bowers, technical product lead for herbicides at Syngenta, said glyphosate worked so well in the late 1990s and early 2000s, people didn’t believe that weeds could develop a resistance to it. “We’re kind of a victim of our own success here,” Bowers said. “It is such an effective herbicide, it was really difficult to convince people to reduce their reliance on it. It made weed control so simple, effective and affordable.” But with that dramatic shift to glyphosate came a drastic increase in use as well, especially in the Midwest. Farmers were applying it multiple times a year to keep weeds at bay. Kadolph said some farmers got used to how versatile glyphosate could be. “It was so easy. You didn’t have to worry about what stage the weeds were (at) out in your field. You just changed your rate of Roundup. ‘I’m not going to spray this week, I’ll spray next week,’” he said. Aaron Hager, a weed scientist at the University of Illinois, said the overreliance on glyphosate accelerated the growth of weed resistance. “In any biological system, when you make such a dramatic shift to a very limited number of options to control a pest, that system is very likely going to evolve,” Hager said. Lord said weed resistance is not a new problem for farmers. “Farmers have been dealing with this issue of herbicide resistant weeds since the 1950s, and it

is a reality that growers know how to manage,” Lord said in an email. Ward said this resistance is different because of how widespread glyphosate use has become. “Growers locked on to the simplicity, and the effectiveness of using glyphosate as your primary, or in many cases your only means of weed control,” Ward said. Charles Benbrook, an agricultural economist who has published several studies on glyphosate, and testified as an expert witness on behalf of plaintiffs, said the overuse of glyphosate has presented farmers with real financial challenges. “The sad reality is that, weed management on conventional, biotech-dependent corn, soybeans and cotton farms is out of control,” he said. “It’s created a serious economic problem for farmers, because they’re spending far more for seed and weed control.” In 2017, farmers spent $17.6 billion on chemicals according to the USDA’s 2017 Census of Agriculture. That more than doubled in 20 years. During the same time, farmers spent $21 billion on seed, up from $6 billion in 1997, when genetically modified seeds were just hitting the market. The adoption of genetically modified seeds was rapid. For example, genetically engineered corn made up 17 percent of all corn planted in 2000; by 2016, 92 percent of all corn planted was genetically engineered, according to USDA data. “It’s just a whole different ballgame, because of how powerful, and how successful glyphosate has become,” Curran said. The Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting is a nonprofit, online newsroom offering investigative and enterprise coverage of agribusiness, Big Ag and related issues through data analysis, visualizations, in-depth reports and interactive web tools. Visit us online at www.investigatemidwest.org

town Redevelopment Corporation — which the city created at SLU’s request in 2017 — that St. Louis University runs with SSM Health. Next to the Steelcote building, Hamburg plans to start this summer on a new $20 million, 96unit apartment building called Mill Creek Flats. That project received 20 years of tax abatement from the SLU-run redevelopment corporation — 10 years of 85 percent property tax abatement followed by 10 years of 40 percent abatement. The St. Louis Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority also took a step Tuesday to allow Pier Property to receive a sales tax exemption on construction materials purchased for the Mill Creek Flats project. The Board of Aldermen also must approve the exemption. RENDERING VIA MICHAEL HAMBURG, TRIVERS ASSOCIATES

Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

An artist’s rendering shows the rehabbed interior of the historic Rock Spring School that Pier Property Group plans to renovate.

Cuomo flap break out when they were wrapping up the paper last year, “but for the past 10-plus years, I’ve been arguing with my wife about the thermostat at the house,” Chang said. And at USC’s business school, he said, “the female faculty have illicit space heaters under their desks; they wear sweaters; they have blankets,” he said. “This is relevant for anyone who works in an office space.” What Chang was surprised by was the magnitude of his study’s results. Chang and his co-author, Agne Kajackaite, tested verbal and math skills in tests of college students in Berlin. They found that for every 1-degree increase in Celsius, the number of math questions answered correctly by women went up by 1.76 percent. Put another way: Even within normal indoor temperature variations — increasing the temperature from the 60s to the 70s in the room — female per-

formance on the math tests increased by 15 percent. “This was a really large effect,” Chang said. Performance by males, meanwhile, dropped by about 3 percent, on average, when the temperature rose over the same variance. Chang said the explanation for the difference isn’t entirely clear, but some research suggests the effect may be biological, or based on size — average surface area to body volume comparisons for men vs. women. “I haven’t seen anything definitive,” he said. What’s not likely to be the explanation, at least in this case, was clothing. Because the test was run in college students, he said, there weren’t the same kind of sartorial differences between male and female participants. Rather than button-down shirts and pants or sleeveless blouses or dresses, both male and female students dressed in relatively similar ways, he said: “They

were all coming in in shorts and a T-shirt.” Chang acknowledges that it’s also unclear whether the same productivity effects would be seen in a workplace environment as the student participants, but suggests the results are still a reminder employers should be more mindful that indoor temperatures aren’t just about making employees comfortable, but making them more productive. What can employers do in response? The ubiquity of open office plans makes it more challenging, but Chang doesn’t rule out the idea of having different temperature settings in different spaces. Most important, he said, is to recognize that something should be done if people are complaining or actively making their own accommodations to cold temperatures. “Everybody is latching on to the battle of the sexes, but I don’t think that’s the right les-

son to take away from our work,” Chang said. “I think the two lessons are first, that these environmental factors matter more than people think they do when it comes to productivity. The other is one size doesn’t fit all. ... If half of the people in your office are sneaking space heaters under their desk or talking about how it’s hot all the time, you should take that more seriously.” In places with good climate like Los Angeles, some fresh air might even be something to consider. His own office, Chang says, is in a modern building designed by the recently deceased architect I.M. Pei with beautiful glass windows overlooking a rose garden. But some issues with the air conditioning have meant temperatures have fluctuated, at times, between 55 and over 90 degrees. “If we had windows that would open, it would be 73 degrees all the time.”


MARKET WATCH

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1 15 BEST LARGE-CAP STOCKS COMPANY

TICKER

Sprint Corp Target Corp Sea Ltd Total Systems Svc PG&E Corp Centrais Elec Brasil Centrais El Brasil B Copart Inc AutoZone Inc Humana Lyft Inc Medtronic Inc Incyte Corp HP Inc Mohawk Inds

DIV

YLD

S ... ... TGT 2.56 3.1 SE ... ... TSS .52 .5 PCG 2.12f 11.3 EBR ... ... EBR/B ... ... CPRT ... ... AZO ... ... HUM 2.20 .8 LYFT ... ... MDT 2.00 2.1 INCY ... ... HPQ .64 3.2 MHK ... ...

52-WEEK P/E HIGH LOW 4 14 ... 29 28 ... ... 36 19 22 ... 56 77 6 11

FRIDAY CLOSE

7.90 5.09 7.16 90.39 60.15 81.57 32.00 10.52 29.99 102.67 75.58 113.45 49.42 5.07 18.83 10.89 3.14 8.21 11.33 3.43 8.55 70.47 44.61 70.99 1074.67 622.43 1052.19 355.88 225.65 263.33 88.60 47.17 57.10 100.15 81.66 93.03 88.83 57.00 81.75 27.08 18.06 20.03 228.49 109.35 145.90

15 BEST MID-CAP STOCKS

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

COMPANY

29.2 |9541 35.2 5.8 7| 652 14.3 17.4 |9996 114.5 12.7 |8321 16.9 -19.6 98731| -56.7 -2.1 | 986532 86.8 9 -5.1 | 9754 75.1 9 6.2 |9 32.1 1.8 | 9521 66.4 9 2.1 7532| -10.8 -0.2 0 6.5 |7432 9.8 9.0 |86321 20.9 3.2 743| -9.6 14.9 95| -34.1

15.9 15.1 12.4 12.0 10.6 9.9 8.2 8.2 6.9 6.3 6.2 6.0 5.9 5.3 5.2

0.98 10.68 3.32 12.15 1.81 0.74 0.65 5.39 68.10 15.51 3.31 5.30 4.55 1.01 7.21

TICKER

Cavco Industries Inc Array BioPharma Arrowhead Pharma Avon Products Skyline Cp Iovance Therapeutics Roku Inc Trex Co Inc Adv Drainage Sys L Brands Inc Univrsl Corp Genesee & Wyoming Azul SA ADS Coherus BioSci Dycom Inds Inc

DIV

COMPANY

DIV

YLD

P/E

KSS 2.68 QCOM 2.48 SPLK ... LOW 1.92 DVN .32 AVGO 10.60 ECA .07 HTHT .34e CXO .50 NTAP 1.92f

5.2 3.7 ... 2.0 1.2 4.1 1.2 1.1 .5 3.1

11 dd dd 21 17 ... 10 25 15 22

83.28 50.63 90.34 49.10 143.70 83.69 118.23 84.75 46.54 20.37 323.20 197.46 14.28 5.00 49.60 24.90 160.81 93.31 88.08 54.50

TICKER

Kohls Corp Qualcomm Inc Splunk Inc Lowes Cos Devon Energy Broadcom Inc EnCana Corp Huazhu Group ADS Concho Resources NetApp Inc

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 51.12 66.21 119.30 95.37 26.99 255.94 5.91 30.87 101.23 61.99

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.1 4.8 5.3 ... ... ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

24 261.80 112.00 dd 26.82 12.56 dd 22.74 9.56 37 3.98 1.30 dd 34.78 12.72 dd 18.25 7.26 dd 90.00 26.30 41 90.74 50.88 25 33.50 23.04 9 38.14 21.47 8 76.98 50.67 32 95.83 68.27 ... 34.09 15.53 dd 21.18 8.32 27 100.76 41.78

15 BEST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR 156.31 27.09 24.04 3.70 25.60 17.25 95.78 65.50 29.96 24.84 57.53 94.47 26.38 20.36 51.10

34.62 5.23 4.58 0.60 3.65 2.22 11.75 6.71 2.94 2.40 5.51 9.01 2.44 1.81 4.41

28.4 23.9 23.5 19.4 16.6 14.8 14.0 11.4 10.9 10.7 10.6 10.5 10.2 9.8 9.4

27.5 875421| -24.4 16.3 |99754321 67.5 26.5 |99983 124.9 16.0 |999543 88.5 29.6 765| -12.5 55.4 |6521 5.7 51.0 |99983 160.4 -13.8 |7621 11.0 7.4 |8541 17.1 -5.1 87421| -22.6 9.1 |876543 28.1 7.0 |87321 22.2 3.7 |76541 13.5 31.4 |9641 33.1 4.8 9821| -43.1

COMPANY

TICKER

Del Frisco’s Rest Sesen Bio Inc Circor Intl Karyopharm Therap Red Violet Inc Dasan Zhone Solut Hibbett Sports Inc Pieris Pharmaceutic pdvWireless Inc USA Technologies XOMA Corp Nemaura Medical Inc Champions Oncology Kopin Corp Boot Barn Hldgs

DIV

COMPANY

-29.4 87642| -13.8 -23.6 |97541 20.3 -13.4 |865 10.4 -15.2 6| 21 2.1 -17.4 9974321| -34.8 -17.5 8| 74 11.8 -17.2 99985432| -54.5 -29.8 986542| -26.0 -14.3 98754321| -28.2 -13.8 7542| -5.3

-19.6 -18.8 -12.6 -12.5 -11.8 -11.7 -11.1 -10.6 -10.3 -10.3

TICKER

Pure Storage Inc Ensco Rowan PLC ADS Foot Locker Inc ProPetro Holding Cp Sina Corporation Whiting Petroleum Callon Petrol Chesapk Engy Carrizo Oil & Gas Ambarella Inc

DIV

PSTG ... ESV ... FL 1.52f PUMP ... SINA ... WLL ... CPE ... CHK ... CRZO ... AMBA ...

YLD P/E

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

... ... 3.4 ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

29.14 38.04 68.00 25.38 96.71 56.47 13.09 5.60 31.57 52.12

16.14 -4.48 -21.7 -27.8 98532| -27.1 8.63 -2.23 -20.5 -45.2 951| -18.2 44.40 -10.80 -19.6 -25.2 |96521 20.5 18.81 -4.53 -19.4 -19.0 |431 0.9 40.04 -9.06 -18.5 -36.1 999541| -52.9 19.24 -4.24 -18.1 -30.5 999862| -62.0 6.81 -1.37 -16.7 -9.1 9986543| -46.7 2.01 -0.40 -16.6 -32.3 99972| -55.6 10.85 -2.07 -16.0 -15.3 99975431| -57.4 38.24 -7.18 -15.8 -22.8 985| -26.7

13.99 8.81 44.47 11.27 40.34 18.37 5.57 1.71 9.67 30.00

52-WEEK FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN HIGH LOW CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

... ... .3 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

14.10 3.24 50.61 21.71 13.38 15.59 29.60 6.55 48.39 16.83 25.99 3.98 17.90 3.81 32.21

8 dd 26 dd dd 73 15 ... dd ... dd ... cc dd 14

4.61 .66 19.73 3.92 4.76 9.10 13.08 2.39 22.50 3.19 11.02 .80 3.92 .96 15.01

6.94 2.02 43.40 6.19 12.86 13.07 23.96 4.41 49.70 7.13 18.98 1.03 9.90 1.26 30.10

46.1 40.3 39.5 33.4 26.2 24.7 23.8 22.8 20.5 18.2 17.3 16.9 16.5 14.5 14.3

2.19 0.58 12.30 1.55 2.67 2.59 4.61 0.82 8.44 1.10 2.80 0.15 1.40 0.16 3.76

0.7 83.6 28.2 27.6 71.9 18.9 16.9 40.4 28.4 31.5 56.5 0.9 11.2 3.3 1.8

9763| -50.9 |321 1.0 7632| -14.7 987543| -68.0 |9864 60.7 |76 13.8 87521| -30.2 941| -37.9 |9872 64.3 9742| -47.2 874| -28.7 98752| -66.7 |9986543 121.7 987421| -65.7 |87 27.5

10 WORST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

dd ... 25 ... 23 dd 14 3 6 dd

YLD P/E

DFRG ... SESN ... CIR .15 KPTI ... RDVT ... DZSI ... HIBB ... PIRS ... PDVW ... USAT ... XOMA ... NMRD ... CSBR ... KOPN ... BOOT ...

10 WORST MID-CAP STOCKS

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

-12.48 -15.29 -17.19 -13.65 -3.62 -33.95 -0.74 -3.65 -11.67 -7.10

YLD P/E

CVCO ... ARRY ... ARWR ... AVP ... SKY ... IOVA ... ROKU ... TREX ... WMS .32 LB 1.20 UVV 3.04f GWR ... AZUL ... CHRS ... DY ...

10 WORST LARGE-CAP STOCKS 52-WEEK HIGH LOW

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

COMPANY

TICKER

Biocryst Phar Valeritas Holdings Tocagen Inc Exela Technologies OncoSec Medical Mallinckrodt plc Nabors Inds Bluegreen Vacations Ocular Therapeutix Genocea Bioscience

BCRX VLRX TOCA XELA ONCS MNK NBR BXG OCUL GNCA

DIV

YLD P/E

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... .24 10.2 .60 5.8 ... ... ... ...

dd ... ... dd ... ... dd ... dd ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 9.95 41.60 15.80 7.34 19.60 36.65 7.75 26.22 8.28 8.16

3.10 2.10 4.40 1.90 2.46 8.45 1.81 9.67 2.35 2.24

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 3.32 2.31 4.59 1.67 2.49 9.61 2.35 10.32 2.64 4.25

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR -54.7 -50.9 -48.3 -44.9 -44.7 -34.5 -31.7 -31.0 -23.7 -23.6

-4.01 -2.39 -4.29 -1.36 -2.01 -5.07 -1.09 -4.64 -0.82 -1.31

-56.8 99653| -40.3 -61.5 9999942| -92.2 -55.9 998754| -52.0 -49.1 999643| -58.0 -55.5 9999852| -83.6 -47.5 997643| -44.3 -34.9 999852| -65.3 -31.2 9983| -46.0 -35.5 999765| -62.9 -23.2 9965321| -40.5

Note: Stocks classified by market capitalization, the product of the current stock price and total shares outstanding. Ranges are $100 million to $1 billion (small); $1 billion to $8 billion (mid); greater than $8 billion (large).

S&P 500 HOW TO READ THE TABLES Dividend: Expected cash payment to shareholders. PE ratio: Multiple of stock price to company earnings. 52-week high/low: Trading range over the past year. Last: Selling price at end of week. Net change: Dollar change in price of stock from previous week. Percent change: From the previous week.

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

AES Corp AFLAC s AT&T Inc AbbottLab AbbVie Abiomed Accenture ActivsBliz Acuity AdobeInc AdvAuto AMD AffilMgrs Agilent AirProd AkamaiT AlaskaAir Albemarle AlexREE Alexion lf AlignTech Allegion Allergan AlliData AlliantEg s Allstate Alphabet C Alphabet A Altria Amazon Ameren AmAirlines AEP AmExp AmIntlGrp AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen Amphenol Anadarko AnalogDev Ansys Anthem Aon plc Apache Apple Inc ApldMatl ArchDan Arconic AristaNetw Assurant ATMOS Autodesk AutoData AutoZone AvalonBay AveryD BB&T Cp

.55 1.08 2.04 1.28 4.28

13 18.52 12.30 16.50 +.16 16 52.45 41.45 52.01 +.10 6 34.53 26.80 32.27 +.47 47 80.74 60.32 76.98 +1.01 13 103.16 75.62 80.06 +.60 68 459.75 228.00 270.39 +9.91 27 183.35 132.63 178.81 +.48 19 84.68 39.85 42.29 -4.10 16 173.01 103.48 135.51 +.45 57 291.70 204.95 274.77 -5.08 27 186.15 123.06 158.09 +.12 cc 34.14 12.71 26.44 -1.06 7 168.19 87.00 88.40 -.52 70 82.27 60.42 68.36 -.75 28 210.15 148.44 204.49 -5.43 36 86.19 57.18 77.89 +.34 17 74.83 53.39 60.59 -1.45 11 108.74 65.98 66.80 -.96 32 147.59 109.04 145.34 -.96 29 141.86 92.56 127.15 -3.75 69 398.88 177.93 311.47 -11.14 ... 102.54 74.83 99.28 -1.19 21 197.00 125.84 135.51 -4.69 8 250.27 140.92 143.34 -2.31 24 48.80 38.22 48.72 +.62 14 102.73 77.00 96.37 +.73 28 1289.27 970.11 1133.47 -28.83 34 1296.98 977.66 1138.61 -30.17 17 66.04 42.40 52.40 +.05 88 2050.501307.00 1823.28 -45.72 27 75.72 55.21 75.38 +.67 10 45.82 28.81 29.17 -2.57 23 88.26 62.71 88.29 +2.44 16 120.88 89.05 119.51 +.44 dd 56.36 36.16 52.76 +.39 76 203.85 134.87 203.00 +.57 49 113.92 77.73 113.69 +1.65 11 153.15 95.69 146.39 +2.60 10 94.88 69.36 80.68 +2.95 35 88.76 63.14 84.49 -1.41 14 210.19 166.30 171.28 +1.37 23 105.51 74.95 89.51 -2.11 26 76.70 40.40 71.99 -.62 25 118.54 76.62 98.42 -2.41 37 197.05 136.80 182.15 -5.38 18 317.99 220.80 277.25+12.18 36 182.61 134.82 177.79 -2.75 17 50.03 24.56 27.33 -3.08 18 233.47 142.00 178.97 -10.03 11 53.23 28.79 39.50 -2.99 12 52.06 38.63 39.16 -1.52 16 23.60 15.63 22.25 +.29 24 331.27 187.08 255.94 +5.82 50 111.43 82.31 100.85 +6.71 19 104.07 84.35 102.81 +.68 dd 178.95 117.72 161.22 -13.11 43 165.50 121.40 161.85 +.13 19 1074.67 622.43 1052.19+68.10 34 204.53 160.50 205.28 +2.14 29 117.00 82.89 101.26 -.40 12 54.96 40.68 48.33 +.45

2.92 .37f .52 .24 1.28 .66 4.64 1.40 1.47f 3.88 1.08 2.96 2.52 1.34 2.00 3.20 1.90 .40 2.68 1.56 1.28 3.68f 2.00f 3.88f 1.60 .56 5.80 .92 1.20 2.16f 3.20f 1.60 1.00 3.08f .84f 1.40 .08m 2.40 2.10f 3.16 6.08 2.32f 1.62

rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Split increased shares by at least 20% in last year. t Paid in stock. Approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of stock. un Unit, including more than one security. v Trading halted on primary market. vj In bankruptcy or receivership. x Ex-dividend.

j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year. Cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. lf Late filing with SEC. m Current annual rate, decreased by most recent dividend announcement. n New issue in the last year. p Initial dividend. Annual rate not known. Yield not shown. pf Preferred-stock issue. pr Preferences. r Declared or paid in last 12 months plus stock dividend. rs Reverse split decreased outstanding shares by at least 50% in last year.

FOOTNOTES a Extra dividends paid but not included. b Annual rate plus stock dividend. c Liquidating dividend. cc P/E greater than 99 cld Issue recalled for redemption by company. dd loss in last 12 months e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Annual rate, increased on most recent dividend announcement. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Doesn’t meet continued-listing standards. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split.

+1.0 +.2 +1.5 +1.3 +.8 +3.8 +.3 -8.8 +.3 -1.8 +.1 -3.9 -.6 -1.1 -2.6 +.4 -2.3 -1.4 -.7 -2.9 -3.5 -1.2 -3.3 -1.6 +1.3 +.8 -2.5 -2.6 +.1 -2.4 +.9 -8.1 +2.8 +.4 +.7 +.3 +1.5 +1.8 +3.8 -1.6 +.8 -2.3 -.9 -2.4 -2.9 +4.6 -1.5 -10.1 -5.3 -7.0 -3.7 +1.3 +2.3 +7.1 +.7 -7.5 +.1 +6.9 +1.1 -.4 +.9

NAME

DIV

PE

BallCorp s BkofAm BkNYMel Baxter s BectDck BerkH B BestBuy Biogen BlackRock BlockHR Boeing BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BrMySq BrownFB s CBOE Glb CBRE Grp CBS B CF Inds s CH Robins CME Grp CMS Eng CSX CVS Health CabotO&G Cadence CampSp CapOne CardnlHlth CarMax Carnival Caterpillar Celanese Celgene Centene s CenterPnt CntryLink Cerner ChartCm n Chevron Chipotle ChubbLtd ChurchDwt s Cimarex CinnFin Cintas Cisco Citigroup CitizFincl CitrixSy s Clorox CocaCola CognizTch ColgPalm Comcast s Comerica ConAgra ConchoRes ConocoPhil ConEd

.60f .60 1.12 .88f 3.08

31 11 11 35 95 27 20 13 16 10 33 10 41 30 15 33 43 19 11 dd 18 41 35 19 9 17 54 14 8 dd 18 12 11 9 16 16 21 4 37 75 16 cc 18 ... 9 11 34 24 9 9 21 25 94 18 27 20 10 16 15 10 18

2.00 13.20f 1.00 8.22 .68 3.80 1.64 .66f 1.24 .20 .72 1.20 2.00 3.00f 1.48 .96f 2.00 .36f 1.40 1.60 1.92f 2.00 3.44 2.48f 1.15f 1.00 4.76 2.94e .91f .80 2.24 2.05f 1.40f 1.80 1.28 1.40 4.24f 1.60 .80 1.72f .84 2.68f .85 .50 1.22 2.96

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

65.31 31.91 58.22 82.25 265.87 224.07 84.37 388.67 557.00 29.81 446.01 51.00 140.35 41.00 63.69 57.92 115.11 52.41 59.59 56.51 101.20 197.08 57.36 80.73 82.15 27.65 70.49 43.98 101.26 58.31 81.67 67.69 159.37 119.29 97.07 74.49 31.42 24.20 70.76 387.41 128.55 727.00 148.39 75.22 103.91 100.00 227.64 57.53 75.24 42.87 116.82 167.70 50.84 83.35 73.10 43.96 100.64 39.43 160.81 80.24 88.41

34.71 22.66 43.67 61.05 208.62 184.75 47.72 216.12 360.79 22.45 292.47 32.46 107.84 29.96 44.30 44.57 87.87 37.45 41.38 38.90 77.72 157.21 42.52 58.47 51.72 20.95 39.08 32.04 69.90 42.17 55.24 45.64 112.06 82.91 58.59 45.44 25.10 9.64 48.78 259.48 100.22 383.20 119.54 46.32 55.62 66.33 155.98 40.25 48.42 27.62 94.17 119.86 42.10 56.73 57.41 30.67 63.69 20.22 93.31 56.75 71.12

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

61.35 -1.22 28.18 -.22 45.16 -.92 75.10 -.88 235.19 +6.83 201.69 -1.58 65.94 -2.99 227.06 -2.22 435.76 -5.80 27.54 +.52 354.90 -.12 35.64 -.62 132.02 -1.63 38.47 +1.15 46.81 -.04 52.13 106.95 +1.16 48.11 +.81 47.48 -.90 40.80 -1.67 79.72 -2.50 187.92 +4.07 57.24 +.78 74.90 -3.50 53.07 +.19 25.70 -.47 63.99 -4.67 37.53 -1.60 90.78 +.24 45.95 +.92 76.48 +.09 51.61 -1.57 122.90 +.14 99.38 -2.26 95.24 -.18 56.87 +.83 29.39 -.38 10.11 -.48 70.59 +2.11 375.00 -11.41 118.71 -1.81 662.56 -53.35 148.17 +3.18 74.71 +.83 64.00 -4.55 99.69 +1.96 222.50 -.92 54.37 -1.98 64.39 -.68 34.44 -.32 94.65 -1.15 149.63 +2.58 49.61 +.41 61.87 +2.63 71.20 -.77 42.67 -.87 72.42 -1.09 28.83 -.25 101.23 -11.67 59.88 -2.22 88.14 +1.20

-1.9 -.8 -2.0 -1.2 +3.0 -.8 -4.3 -1.0 -1.3 +1.9 -1.7 -1.2 +3.1 -.1 +1.1 +1.7 -1.9 -3.9 -3.0 +2.2 +1.4 -4.5 +.4 -1.8 -6.8 -4.1 +.3 +2.0 +.1 -3.0 +.1 -2.2 -.2 +1.5 -1.3 -4.5 +3.1 -3.0 -1.5 -7.5 +2.2 +1.1 -6.6 +2.0 -.4 -3.5 -1.0 -.9 -1.2 +1.8 +.8 +4.4 -1.1 -2.0 -1.5 -.9 -10.3 -3.6 +1.4

Mutual funds GL: Long Government GR: Global Real Estate GS: Short Government HM: High-Yield Muni HY: High-Yield Bond IB: World Bond IC: Trading-Inverse Commodities ID: Industrials IE: Trading-Inverse Equity IH: World Allocation IP: Inflation-Protected Bond IS: Trading-Miscellaneous JS: Japan Stock LB: Large Blend LC: Trading-Leveraged Commodities LE: Trading-Leveraged Equity LG: Large Growth LO: Long-Short Equity LP: Energy Limited Partnership LS: Latin America Stock LV: Large Value MA: Allocation - 50-70% Equity MB: Mid-Cap Blend MG: Mid-Cap Growth MI: Muni National Intermediate ML: Muni National Long MQ: Miscellaneous Region MR: Miscellaneous Sector MS: Muni National Short MU: Multisector Bond MV: Mid-Cap Value ND: Trading-Inverse Debt NE: Market Neutral NT: Nontraditional Bond PJ: Pacific/Asia ex-Japan Stock RI: Target-Date Retirement RR: Preferred Stock SB: Small Blend SC: Communications SF: Financial SG: Small Growth SH: Health SI: Muni Single State Intermediate SL: Muni Single State Long SN: Natural Resources SP: Equity Precious Metals

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Friday value: Price at which shares can be sold. Year-to-date return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Three-year and five-year annualized return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Objective: Fund’s investment category. 1-yr Rank: On a 1-to-5 scale, with 1 meaning the fund ranks in the top 20% of its category. FUND OBJECTIVES: AL: Allocation - 70-85% Equity AM: Multialternative BB: Commodities Broad Basket BL: Bank Loan BM: Bear Market CA: Allocation - 30-50% Equity CC: Consumer Defense CD: Consumer Cyclical CH: China Region CI: Intermediate-Term Bond CL: Long-Term Bond CR: Multicurrency CS: Short-Term Bond CV: Convertibles DP: Diversified Pacific/Asia EB: Emerging-Markets Bond EE: Equity Energy EI: India Equity EM: Diversified Emerging Markets ES: Europe Stock FA: Foreign Small/Mid-Value FB: Foreign Large-Blend FF: Managed Futures FG: Foreign Large-Growth FQ: Foreign Small/Mid-Blend FR: Foreign Small/Mid-Growth FV: Foreign Large-Value FX: Single Currency GI: Intermediate Government NAME

FRI NAV

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

AB DiversMunicipal 14.48 +.01 ReltvValA m 5.27 -.03 AMG YacktmanI 20.57 -.05 Akre FocRetail m 41.23 -.14 AllianzGI NFJDivValA m 11.80 -.11 American Century EqIncInv 8.80 -.01 GrInv 33.27 -.56 HeritageA m 18.62 -.27 IntlGrA m 11.39 -.09 SelA m 70.25 -1.21 UltraInv 46.48 -1.06 American Funds AMCpA m 30.99 -.54 AmrcnBalA m 26.71 -.17 AmrcnHiIncA m 10.12 -.03 AmrcnMutA m 40.72 -.13 BdfAmrcA m 12.91 +.02 CptWldGrIncA m 47.17 -.47 CptlIncBldrA m 60.19 -.12 CptlWldBdA m 19.75 +.10 EuroPacGrA m 50.24 -.31 FdmtlInvsA m 57.57 -.97 GlbBalA m 31.91 -.11 GrfAmrcA m 48.34 -.83 IncAmrcA m 22.04 -.07 IntlGrIncA m 31.83 -.21 IntrmBdfAmrA m13.42 +.01 InvCAmrcA m 37.17 -.59 NewWldA m 63.68 -.37 NwPrspctvA m 42.57 -.45 SmCpWldA m 54.43 -.32 TheNewEcoA m 43.43 -.69 TxExBdA m 13.15 WAMtInvsA m 45.25 -.36 Angel Oak MltStratIncIns 11.07 +.01 Artisan IntlInstl 31.17 +.21 IntlSmMdInv 13.50 -.04 IntlValueInstl 33.90 -.08 SmCpInvs 32.25 -.41 Baird AggrgateBdInstl 10.88 +.03 CorPlusBdInstl 11.21 +.03 ShrtTrmBdInstl 9.70 +.01 BlackRock AlCpEngyRsInvA m9.71 -.32 EqDivInstl 20.76 -.08 GlbAllcIncInstl 18.62 -.06 GlbAllcIncInvA m18.49 -.06 HYBdInstl 7.54 -.02 StrIncOpIns 9.76 +.01 StratMuOpIns 11.73 -.02 TtlRetInstl 11.55 +.02 CGM Rlty 26.79 +.21 Calamos MktNetrlIncIns 13.08 -.01 Causeway IntlValInstl d 14.55 -.23

+3.5 +10.3 +8.0 +21.5 +10.9

+1.8 +10.6

+2.1 MS 1 +8.3 LV 2

+11.7

+8.3 LV

1

+20.9 +14.7 LG

1

+8.8

+5.1 LV

4

+11.9 +17.0 +20.8 +13.1 +15.9 +15.0

+10.0 +9.3 LV 1 +16.3 +12.0 LG 2 +13.0 +9.4 MG 2 +6.4 +2.2 FG 4 +15.2 +12.2 LG 3 +17.3 +13.2 LG 3

+11.1 +7.7 +8.1 +9.1 +3.7 +10.7 +7.7 +3.1 +11.4 +10.4 +7.3 +13.0 +7.6 +9.5 +2.3 +10.1 +11.0 +13.0 +16.1 +11.8 +4.1 +10.6

+12.4 +9.3 LG +8.5 +7.2 MA +7.2 +3.4 HY +10.9 +8.7 LV +2.2 +2.3 CI +9.4 +5.1 WS +5.4 +3.8 IH +2.0 +0.7 IB +8.4 +3.3 FG +11.8 +9.6 LB +5.5 +3.2 IH +14.6 +11.1 LG +7.2 +5.4 AL +6.4 +0.4 FB +1.3 +1.3 CS +10.5 +8.2 LB +10.3 +3.2 EM +12.4 +8.4 WS +12.5 +8.1 SW +15.2 +9.5 LG +2.7 +3.4 MI +12.4 +9.4 LB

+2.4 +13.2 +18.7 +8.7 +22.3

+5.7

+3.9 MU 4

+8.0 +2.8 +6.4 +2.1 +6.2 +2.8 +20.9 +13.5

+4.3 +4.6 +2.2

+2.7 +3.2 +2.0

+9.5 +11.7 +6.7 +6.6 +8.1 +3.0 +4.6 +4.6

+.8 +11.0 +5.6 +5.3 +7.3 +3.7 +3.7 +2.7

+6.5

5 2 1 1 2 4 1 2 4 4 2 5 1 2 1 4 1 2 1 5 2 2

FG FR FB SG

+3.0 CI +3.2 PI +1.7 CS

1 1 2

-8.3 +8.5 +3.1 +2.8 +4.2 +2.4 +4.2 +2.9

1 2

EE LV IH IH HY NT MI PI

4 3

+7.5

+5.6 LB

5

+3.6

+4.8

+3.5 NE

+6.9

+4.3

-0.1 FV

3

NAME

FRI NAV

ClearBridge AggresivGrA m 174.11 LgCpGrI 50.68 Cohen & Steers PrfrdScInc,IncI 13.61 Columbia DivIncIns 22.02 GlbDivOppA m 17.91 SelM/CValA m 10.30 DFA EMktCorEqI 19.63 EMktSCInstl 19.18 EmMktsInstl 26.24 EmMktsValInstl 27.18 FvYrGlbFIIns 10.79 GlbEqInstl 22.24 GlbRlEsttSec 11.66 InflProtSecIns 11.84 IntlCorEqIns 12.65 IntlRlEsttScIns 5.12 IntlSmCoInstl 17.26 IntlSmCpValIns 17.51 IntlValInstl 16.78 ItmGovtFIIns 12.56 LgCpIntlInstl 21.85 OneYearFIInstl 10.32 RlEsttSecInstl 38.79 ShTrmExQtyI 10.80 TAUSCorEq2Instl 18.04 TMdUSMktwdVl 29.17 TMdUSTrgtedVal 32.59 TwYrGlbFIIns 9.97 USCorEq1Instl 23.14 USCorEqIIInstl 21.28 USLgCo 21.85 USLgCpValInstl 34.93 USMicroCpInstl 20.07 USSmCpInstl 32.69 USSmCpValInstl 31.98 USTrgtedValIns 21.55 USVectorEqInstl 17.73 Davis NYVentureA m 27.78 Delaware Inv ValInstl 20.89 Dodge & Cox Bal 98.22 GlbStk 11.98 Inc 13.76 IntlStk 39.62 Stk 184.19 DoubleLine CorFII 10.91 LowDurBdI 10.02 TtlRetBdI 10.59 TtlRetBdN b 10.59 Eaton Vance AtlntCptSMIDCI 35.74 FltngRtInstl 8.93 Edgewood GrInstl 33.69 FPA Crescent d 32.67 NewInc 9.96 USVal 10.29 Federated InsHYBdIns d 9.70

SR: Real Estate SS: Muni Single State Short ST: Technology SU: Utilities SV: Small Value TA: Target-Date 2000-2010 TD: Target-Date 2015 TE: Target-Date 2020 TG: Target-Date 2025 TH: Target-Date 2030 TI: Target-Date 2035 TJ: Target-Date 2040 TK: Target-Date 2045 TL: Target-Date 2055 TN: Target-Date 2050 TW: Corporate Bond TV: Tactical Allocation UB: Ultrashort Bond VD: Trading-Leveraged Debt VL: Stable Value VO: Volatility WS: World Stock XM: Allocation - 85+% Equity XO: Infrastructure XQ: Target-Date 2060+ XR: Option Writing XS: Long-Short Credit XP: Emerging-Markets LocalCurrency Bond XY: Allocation - 15-30% Equity. FOOTNOTES b -Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d -Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f -front load (sales charges). m -Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA-not available. p -previous day´s net asset value. s -fund split shares during the week. x - fund paid a distribution during the week. WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR -4.38 +9.9 -1.03 +17.0 -.02 +8.5

+8.7 +4.8 LG +16.4 +14.1 LG +5.6

+5.7 RR

2

-.17 +12.5 -.08 +12.1 -.15 +16.0

+12.1 +10.1 LV 1 +6.4 +2.0 WS 3 +7.8 +5.4 MV 2

+.05 +.02 +.01 +.29 +.01 -.26 +.05 +.02 -.10 +.04 -.16 -.24 -.17 +.06 -.09 +.01 +.09 +.01 -.27 -.33 -.75 +.01 -.34 -.31 -.26 -.38 -.41 -.62 -.98 -.54 -.30

+9.1 +1.1 EM +7.4 +2.0 EM +9.6 +1.2 EM +11.6 +1.0 EM +1.9 +2.0 WH +9.9 +6.0 WS +6.8 +7.2 GR +2.2 +1.6 IP +6.2 +1.9 FB +4.1 +3.8 GR +5.5 +3.0 FQ +3.4 +1.0 FA +6.9 +0.1 FV +1.5 +2.3 GI +7.0 +1.7 FB +1.4 +1.0 UB +8.0 +9.1 SR +1.9 +1.8 CS +11.2 +8.0 LB +10.2 +7.4 LV +7.2 +4.9 SV +1.5 +1.1 WH +12.2 +9.0 LB +11.2 +7.9 LB +13.0 +10.4 LB +9.9 +7.0 LV +9.7 +6.6 SB +8.7 +6.4 SB +6.6 +3.7 SV +7.2 +4.3 SV +9.3 +6.0 MV

3 5 3 3 5 4 1 1 5 5 3 5 4 1 2 2 1 1 5 4 4 5 4 5 2 5 4 4 5 4 4

-.65 +13.4

+10.2

+7.8 LB

5

-.25 +7.2

+8.3

+8.0 LV

3

+2.1 +2.3 +1.7 +1.2 +2.3 +11.0 +16.6 +4.4 +8.4 +12.0 +8.3 +5.2 +5.6 +3.6 +9.7 +1.2 +19.2 +2.3 +12.7 +11.3 +9.2 +1.4 +13.0 +12.5 +13.6 +9.2 +8.7 +10.1 +6.8 +9.0 +11.1

-.44 -.11 +.02 -.29 -1.49

+8.4 +8.6 +4.6 +7.3 +10.7

+10.0 +10.6 +3.7 +6.8 +13.4

+6.7 +4.5 +3.0 -0.3 +8.6

MA WS PI FV LV

2 4 3 2 3

+.03 +.01 +.03 +.03

+4.0 +2.5 +2.9 +2.9

+3.1 +2.7 +2.9 +2.6

+3.1 +2.2 +3.1 +2.9

PI CS PI PI

4 4

-.26 +19.8 +4.8 -.40 +17.0

+13.9 +13.2 MG 2 +5.4 +3.8 BL 2 +19.5 +15.7 LG

2

-.51 +10.6 +.01 +1.9 -.19 +16.4

+7.2 +2.9 +5.7

+4.8 MA 3 +1.9 CS 3 +3.8 LB 3

-.02 +8.5

+6.7

+4.7 HY

1

NAME

DIV

PE

ConstellA CooperCo Corning Costco Coty CrwnCstle Cummins DR Horton DTE DXC Tch n Danaher Darden DaVita Inc Deere DeltaAir Dentsply DevonE DiambkEn DigitalRlt Discover DiscIncA DiscIncC DishNetw h Disney DollarGen DollarTree DomEngy Dover Dow Inc n DukeEngy DukeRlty E-Trade eBay s EOG Rescs EastChem Eaton Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElectArts EliLilly EmersonEl Entergy Equifax Equinix EqtyRsd EssexPT EsteeLdr EverestRe EversrceE Exelon Expedia h ExpdIntl ExtraSpce ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp Facebook Fastenal s FedExCp FedRlty FidNatInfo FifthThird FstRepBk FirstEngy Fiserv s Flowserve Fluor FootLockr FordM Fortinet Fortive n FBHmSec FrankRes FrptMcM Gallaghr Gap Garmin Gartner GenDynam GenElec GenMills GenMotors GenuPrt GileadSci GlobPay s GoldmanS Graingr HCA Hldg HCP Inc HP Inc Hallibrtn Hanesbds s HarleyD HarrisCorp

3.00f .06 .80 2.60f .50 4.50 4.56 .50 3.78f .84f .68 3.00

12 92 13 37 ... 95 45 11 23 59 39 22 12 14 10 dd 17 16 57 10 14 13 11 18 18 14 16 23 ... 22 24 16 8 dd 9 18 39 13 56 20 dd 20 43 21 cc 49 51 55 10 24 20 53 21 26 17 18 25 13 34 23 9 23 22 9 21 9 37 cc 21 25 8 42 ... 18 11 7 32 9 21 47 17 dd 15 dd 18 11 51 8 18 19 18 6 12 8 12 33

3.04 1.40 .35 .32 .75f 4.32 1.60

1.76f 1.28f 3.67 1.92 .70p 3.71 .86 .56 .56 1.15f 2.48 2.84f 1.84 2.45 2.58 1.96 3.64 1.56 9.84 2.27f 7.80 1.72 5.60 2.14 1.45 1.28 1.00f 3.60f 3.48f .68 1.60 2.60 4.08 1.40 .88 .76f 1.52 .76 .84 1.52f .60a .28 .88 1.04 .20 1.72 .97 2.12 4.08f .04 1.96 1.52 3.05 2.52 .04 3.40f 5.76f 1.60f 1.48 .64 .72 .60 1.50 2.74

FRI NAME NAV StratValDivIns 5.67 TtlRetBdInstl 10.76 Fidelity 500IdxInsPrm 98.45 AsstMgr20% 13.18 AsstMgr50% 17.67 AsstMgr70% 21.34 BCGrowth 96.42 BCGrowth 14.53 BCGrowthK 96.57 Balanced 22.82 BalancedK 22.82 Cap&Inc 9.91 ChinaRegion 31.63 CmdtyStrat 4.66 Contrafund 12.60 ContrafundK 12.61 ConvertibleSecs 28.21 CptlApprec 33.87 DivGro 28.21 DiversIntl 35.55 EmergMketsOpps17.67 EmergingAsia 40.88 EqDividendInc 24.52 EqIncome 56.74 ExMktIdxInPr 60.06 FltngRtHiInc 9.53 FourinOneIdx 44.71 Frdm 2015 12.37 Frdm 2020 15.37 Frdm 2025 13.40 Frdm 2030 16.55 Frdm 2035 13.78 Frdm 2040 9.60 GlbexUSIdxInsPr 12.31 GlobalexUSIdx 12.02 GrDiscv 36.07 GroCo 16.61 GroCo 18.79 GroCoK 18.81 Growth&Inc 37.43 IntlDiscv 40.84 IntlGr 15.36 IntlIdxInstlPrm 39.88 IntlVal 9.29 InvmGradeBd 11.23 InvmGradeBd 7.93 LowPrStk 47.22 LowPrStkK 47.19 Magellan 10.25 MidCapStock 34.55 NasdCmpIdx 99.55 NewMktsInc 14.89 OTCPortfolio 11.61 OTCPortfolioK 11.79 Overseas 46.56 Puritan 21.39 PuritanK 21.38 SCValue 14.41 ShTrmBd 8.63 SmCpOpps 13.27 StkSelorAllCp 44.11 TotalBond 10.61 TtlMktIdxInsPrm 80.02 USBdIdxInsPrm 11.58 Value 10.01 Worldwide 26.38 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 30.68 NewInsC m 26.21 NewInsI 31.45 StgInc 12.26 StgIncC m 12.07 StgIncI 12.27 TotalBondI 10.59 Fidelity Select Biotechnology 19.46 ConsumerStaples83.53 Energy 35.64 HealthCare 23.58 MedTech&Devcs 52.19 NaturalRes 24.78 Swre&ITSvcs 17.84 Technology 16.10 First Eagle GlbA m 55.26 Franklin Templeton CATxFrIncA1 m 7.52 FdrTFIncA1 m 11.90 GlbBdA m 11.24 GlbBdAdv 11.19 GlbBdR6 11.19 Gr,IncA m 21.53 GrA m 104.11 IncA1 m 2.29 IncAdv 2.27 IncC m 2.32 MsrTxFrIncA1 m 11.69 MutBeaconA m 15.04 MutBeaconC m 15.02 MutBeaconZ 15.19 MutEuropeanC m18.94 MutGlbDiscvA m29.19 MutGlbDiscvZ 29.82 MutZ 26.93 RisingDivsA m 62.92 UtlsA1 m 20.86 GE RSPUSEq 52.39 Gabelli SmCpGrAAA m 52.07 Goldman Sachs SmCpValA m 47.78 Guggenheim MgdFutsStratP b18.60 Harbor CptlApprecInstl 71.36 Harding Loevner IntlEqInstl d 21.38 Hartford CptlApprecA m 35.25

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

234.26 302.36 36.56 251.01 14.87 130.60 169.45 47.02 129.35 96.75 134.67 125.33 79.11 169.99 61.32 55.88 46.54 140.78 125.10 82.51 34.89 31.55 37.47 142.37 126.84 111.61 78.14 99.46 60.52 91.67 31.69 66.46 40.86 133.53 110.17 89.46 186.34 71.00 197.86 151.26 132.13 79.70 99.37 138.69 496.57 77.69 294.61 180.20 252.73 74.87 51.03 139.77 80.69 108.20 87.36 199.71 63.88 81.80 218.62 35.94 266.67 139.29 121.75 32.16 107.75 43.22 91.19 56.86 60.60 68.00 12.15 96.96 89.48 58.75 35.82 18.38 84.81 34.21 89.72 161.85 207.72 14.52 53.66 45.00 115.20 79.61 152.24 245.08 372.06 147.42 32.23 27.08 50.87 22.57 46.79 189.41 WK CHG +.01 +.02

-1.13 -.01 -.07 -.15 -2.21 -.32 -2.22 -.23 -.23 -.05 -1.43 -.04 -.15 -.15 -.23 -.32 -.49 -.11 -.03 -.40 -.14 -.40 -.87 -.01 -.32 -.03 -.06 -.06 -.09 -.10 -.08 -.04 -.04 -.55 -.30 -.34 -.34 -.67 -.11 -.13 -.08 -.04 +.02 +.01 -.52 -.52 -.07 -.10 -2.32 +.01 -.30 -.30 -.02 -.16 -.16 -.24

150.37 221.50 26.23 189.51 5.91 99.99 124.40 32.39 94.25 49.19 94.59 86.93 47.61 128.32 45.08 33.93 20.37 85.19 100.05 54.36 20.60 19.25 23.22 98.81 86.87 78.78 61.53 65.83 48.00 71.96 24.67 40.41 26.01 82.04 67.40 64.46 135.77 45.50 134.38 73.91 81.65 55.39 75.83 88.68 335.29 61.17 227.05 121.47 201.09 52.76 39.63 108.11 62.90 83.70 64.65 136.65 40.52 60.10 123.02 23.69 150.94 115.09 94.53 22.12 79.42 32.93 68.45 35.88 28.00 44.47 7.41 58.10 62.89 35.27 27.34 9.60 64.54 21.09 59.39 120.89 143.87 6.66 36.42 30.56 89.87 60.32 94.81 151.70 255.38 101.30 23.30 18.06 23.03 11.57 31.36 123.24

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

198.68 -6.11 291.22 -1.51 29.70 -.21 247.30 -1.05 13.08 -.42 127.83 +.58 159.92 +1.82 44.63 +.09 128.79 +1.34 53.08 -3.25 132.04 +.94 120.13 +.27 47.56 -1.67 138.95 +4.13 54.12 -.77 53.75 -.68 26.99 -3.62 104.11 -6.72 119.98 +2.00 76.90 +.01 27.14 -.73 25.51 -.71 34.22 -1.11 132.79 -2.25 121.96 +1.77 98.42 -1.97 77.72 +2.12 90.90 -3.55 49.20 -1.60 88.81 +1.61 30.70 -.03 46.85 -1.11 36.13 -.77 87.16 -5.86 68.78 -2.44 77.39 -1.36 182.48 +.95 60.89 +.93 169.38 -3.74 92.31 -4.95 116.79 +.78 62.53 -2.29 98.99 +1.10 121.72 +.99 496.52 +8.70 77.19 +.57 290.97 +4.95 165.16 -2.46 249.91 +1.65 74.88 +1.89 49.56 +.58 115.92 -.02 71.71 -2.83 106.98 +.99 74.10 -1.81 136.94 -3.28 49.35 -.02 70.92 -4.31 181.06 -4.24 30.86 -1.23 159.93 -9.99 132.45 +1.34 118.74 +.01 27.23 -.05 100.52 +.56 42.86 +.39 86.90 -.40 48.64 -.84 29.04 -.57 44.40 -10.80 9.83 -.46 77.74 -4.88 78.04 -2.48 52.97 +.18 33.28 +.06 10.08 -.29 84.28 +.93 21.46 -.82 77.65 -.49 154.02 +.50 164.03 -2.34 9.45 -.55 52.81 +.41 35.12 -1.88 98.59 +.50 66.89 +.53 153.44 +3.63 193.00 -4.43 258.56 -8.54 123.84 +.33 31.83 +.22 20.03 +1.01 22.97 -2.21 15.78 -1.04 34.50 -.06 187.08 +3.43

-3.0 -.5 -.7 -.4 -3.1 +.5 +1.2 +.2 +1.1 -5.8 +.7 +.2 -3.4 +3.1 -1.4 -1.2 -11.8 -6.1 +1.7 -2.6 -2.7 -3.1 -1.7 +1.5 -2.0 +2.8 -3.8 -3.1 +1.8 -.1 -2.3 -2.1 -6.3 -3.4 -1.7 +.5 +1.6 -2.2 -5.1 +.7 -3.5 +1.1 +.8 +1.8 +.7 +1.7 -1.5 +.7 +2.6 +1.2 -3.8 +.9 -2.4 -2.3 -5.7 -2.3 -3.8 -5.9 +1.0 -.2 +.6 +.9 -.5 -1.7 -1.9 -19.6 -4.5 -5.9 -3.1 +.3 +.2 -2.8 +1.1 -3.7 -.6 +.3 -1.4 -5.5 +.8 -5.1 +.5 +.8 +2.4 -2.2 -3.2 +.3 +.7 +5.3 -8.8 -6.2 -.2 +1.9

- PCT RETURN RNK YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +9.7 +5.5 +6.3 LV 1 +4.5 +3.1 +2.9 PI 3 LB XY CA MA LG LG LG MA MA HY CH BB LG LG CV LG LB FG EM PJ LV LV MB BL AL TD TE TG TH TI TJ FB FB LG LG LG LG LB FG FG FB FV CI CI MV MV LG MB LG EB LG LG FG MA MA SV CS SB LG PI LB CI MV WS

2 3 4 5 3 1 3 2 2 5 3 1 4 4 1 5 3 2 2 1 2 1 3 1 2 5 5 5 5 5 5 2 2 3 5 5 5 4 4 1 2 2 1 1 3 3 4 1 4 5 4 4 2 3 3 2 3 1 5 2 3 1 3 2

-.25 +16.4 -.22 +16.1 -.26 +16.5 +6.0 +.01 +5.7 +.01 +6.1 +.02 +4.9

+14.4 +10.7 LG +13.6 +9.8 LG +14.7 +10.9 LG NA NA MU +4.0 +2.4 MU +5.1 +3.4 MU +3.2 +3.0 PI

4 4 4 4 5 4 2

+.13 -.71 -2.11 +.27 +.58 -1.08 -.23 -.47

+13.7 +21.4 +7.8 +6.9 +10.4 +10.2 +21.3 +20.0

+8.1 +4.2 -2.3 +11.3 +18.6 -1.0 +24.0 +22.8

SH CC EE SH SH EE ST ST

5 1 3 3 1 1 1 5

-.32 +8.6

+6.0

+4.2 IH

4

-.18 -.59 +.02 -.96 +.03 -.18 -.24

-.01 -.01 -.01 -.24 -1.23 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.05 -.05 -.06 -.31 -.23 -.23 -.13 -.62 +.28

+13.7 +4.5 +7.8 +9.7 +14.8 +14.6 +14.8 +11.0 +11.0 +11.1 +7.3 +3.6 +15.5 +15.5 +12.7 +14.1 +11.5 +12.3 +7.6 +10.5 +12.4 +13.1 +14.9 +5.7 +11.4 +7.1 +7.7 +8.3 +9.2 +10.2 +10.6 +8.4 +8.5 +16.1 +17.6 +17.3 +17.3 +12.5 +12.0 +14.6 +10.0 +8.0 +4.5 +4.6 +8.8 +8.9 +15.5 +13.4 +15.7 +6.4 +16.7 +16.7 +13.9 +9.5 +9.6 +9.7 +2.0 +15.0 +14.8 +4.9 +13.9 +3.8 +15.1 +14.1

+5.3 +4.0 +1.9 +2.0 +2.1 +3.9 +15.7 +9.4 +9.5 +9.0 +4.0 +10.3 +10.0 +10.4 +7.8 +10.9 +11.0 +11.1 +14.0 +15.8

-.72 +13.8

+13.1 +4.0 +6.7 +8.3 +18.6 +19.9 +18.7 +9.3 +9.4 +8.1 +13.1 -1.3 +15.8 +15.9 +9.6 +12.1 +10.2 +5.7 +12.0 +14.0 +8.7 +9.9 +12.2 +5.0 +9.8 +7.1 +7.6 +8.0 +9.2 +9.9 +9.9 +7.6 +7.7 +17.2 +19.7 +19.1 +19.3 +10.9 +5.9 +9.0 +7.1 +3.1 +3.1 +3.1 +8.2 +8.3 +13.4 +11.4 +17.3 +5.1 +19.6 +19.8 +7.4 +9.2 +9.3 +6.5 +1.6 +11.1 +12.7 +3.3 +12.9 +2.2 +7.0 +12.5

+10.5 +3.1 +4.7 +5.6 +13.8 +14.8 +13.9 +7.4 +7.5 +5.4 +5.8 -10.0 +12.4 +12.5 +4.2 +9.4 +7.7 +2.8 +2.6 +6.5 +7.1 +6.8 +8.1 +3.4 +6.9 +5.1 +5.4 +5.6 +6.3 +6.7 +6.7 +1.6 +1.6 +12.7 +14.9 +14.5 +14.7 +7.8 +2.9 +5.3 +2.0 -0.2 +3.0 +2.7 +6.1 +6.2 +10.9 +7.8 +13.9 +3.7 +15.6 +15.7 +4.9 +7.4 +7.5 +6.1 +1.3 +7.5 +9.1 +3.1 +10.0 +2.6 +5.0 +7.9

+8.7 +5.7 -7.5 +10.6 +17.9 -7.4 +18.6 +16.6

+2.9 +4.3 MC +2.1 +3.1 ML +4.4 +1.2 IB +4.6 +1.5 IB +4.8 +1.6 IB +5.1 +0.1 WS +14.9 +11.6 LG +7.6 +3.4 CA +7.8 +3.5 CA +7.1 +2.8 CA +2.3 +2.8 SL +9.1 +5.4 WS +8.2 +4.6 WS +9.4 +5.7 WS +2.9 -0.2 ES +6.8 +3.4 WS +7.0 +3.7 WS +7.5 +4.6 XM +11.6 +9.1 LB +11.0 +10.2 SU

1 5 2 2 2 5 3 2 2 2 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 2 1 1

+13.1

2

+9.4 LG

-.65 +10.5

+8.2

+5.4 SB

3

-.84 +11.9

+8.8

+6.0 SB

3

-.13 +4.9

-.5

+0.3

4

-1.88 +15.2

+17.4 +13.6 LG

-.30 +10.7

+9.2

+4.4 FG

-.36 +17.1

+12.6

+8.5 LB

4

2

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

153.59 42.50 43.66 96.84 49.08 15.03 92.17 88.08 423.21 28.38 39.65 16.35 16.68 203.79 28.85 32.07 90.00 37.76 67.75 211.46 115.61 340.14 59.71 68.84 292.76 414.63 87.67 84.35 71.99 55.53 149.49 121.29 32.88 169.22 73.00 124.70 193.19 87.75 114.66 46.00 19.37 130.90 103.00 80.66 46.47 92.74 123.97 97.37 198.61 127.43 61.12 78.56 108.68 80.53 106.64 61.39 235.54 33.04 86.50 90.34 41.00 116.49 147.79 18.60 101.19 214.76 74.14 186.36 69.01 442.00 19.99 85.40 118.50 79.91 198.23 43.91 363.85 104.35 133.60 222.00 214.94 106.54 333.74 167.56 70.47 58.25 59.93 47.13 135.91 479.64 191.49 104.20 65.57 128.43 189.46 54.44

150.63 +3.68 18.98 -.66 35.53 -.05 90.03 -.27 22.39 -1.56 13.22 -.23 33.79 +1.77 61.99 -7.10 354.39 -.06 15.05 -.41 31.92 +1.00 11.78 +.37 12.06 +.50 203.37 +4.39 28.51 +.22 23.00 -.60 82.16 -2.41 21.70 -2.15 33.50 -3.59 199.27 -4.25 91.34 -2.08 312.07 +5.38 55.38 -1.54 51.16 -2.13 145.15 -11.38 366.85+13.83 53.47 +.71 78.81 -.70 65.66 -2.51 52.77 -1.73 131.97 +1.75 107.75 -4.02 30.80 +1.01 106.96 -1.71 67.56 -1.68 91.01 -5.83 158.30 -5.61 86.17 -.10 109.85 -2.95 36.25 +.24 16.05 -.14 129.50 -1.01 86.36 +.42 47.35 -2.32 41.95 +.48 84.64 -2.17 82.94 -1.87 96.67 +.61 147.00 -7.27 103.75 -.63 54.22 -.53 75.41 -1.20 106.69 -.76 80.22 +2.50 97.75 -.06 61.16 +.73 236.23 +6.11 32.12 -.36 62.30 -1.63 66.21 -15.29 35.14 +.05 98.04 +.81 109.24 -3.27 7.96 -.80 86.84 +2.84 180.00 +2.93 70.53 +1.26 185.69 +.18 66.76 -.20 312.56 +7.62 14.19 -.21 84.56 -.27 113.89 +1.11 56.31 +.62 154.78 -5.54 37.03 +.15 348.07 -10.53 92.78 -4.42 123.68 -1.20 214.33 +1.39 208.74 -1.24 88.61 +1.73 224.60 -5.17 154.51 -.06 37.00 -2.02 43.25 +.04 43.19 -2.03 41.70 +.02 134.35 +3.90 430.72 -4.96 171.33 -3.13 69.53 -.50 44.03 +.18 126.69 -.21 158.30 -3.89 54.35 +.53

SwstAirl .72f 12 64.02 44.28 51.15 -1.09 -2.1 StanBlkDk 2.64 29 155.22 106.41 132.80 -2.05 -1.5 Starbucks s 1.44 34 79.65 47.37 76.15 -2.76 -3.5 StateStr 1.88 9 101.35 57.87 58.97 -1.42 -2.4 Stryker 2.08 31 199.85 144.75 184.77 +.63 +.3 SunTrst 2.00 11 75.08 46.05 62.35 +.43 +.7 Symantec .30 9 24.77 17.43 19.85 +.01 +.1 Synchrony .84 9 36.08 21.78 34.81 -.10 -.3 Synopsys 40 124.12 79.14 116.71 -4.68 -3.9 Sysco 1.56 30 75.98 59.44 75.05 +.12 +.2 TE Connect 1.76 11 99.52 69.84 86.67 -2.41 -2.7 TJX .92f 17 113.28 41.49 51.62 -1.42 -2.7 TakeTwo cc 139.91 84.41 105.02 -1.64 -1.5 Tapestry 1.35 19 54.35 29.82 29.71 -1.07 -3.5 Target 2.56 14 90.39 60.15 81.57+10.68 +15.1 Technip .13 13 33.60 18.20 22.01 -.32 -1.4 Teleflex 1.36 37 309.99 226.02 295.61 -.39 -.1 TexInst 3.08 19 119.32 87.70 105.06 -1.73 -1.6 Textron .08 10 72.87 43.27 47.56 -1.54 -3.1 ThermoFis .76 34 282.98 202.83 271.80+10.07 +3.8 3M Co 5.76 23 219.75 164.59 166.09 -1.56 -.9 Tiffany 2.20 26 141.64 73.04 93.65 -2.37 -2.5 Torchmark .69 7 91.28 69.68 87.19 -.20 -.2 TotalSys .52 29 102.67 75.58 113.45+12.15 +12.0 TractSupp 1.40f 27 107.98 72.35 101.14 +.81 +.8 TransDigm 24.00 30 489.95 307.36 445.90 -11.85 -2.6 Travelers 3.28f 16 148.85 111.08 147.94 +.45 +.3 TripAdvis 59 69.00 43.40 45.24 +.25 +.6 Twitter 96 47.79 26.19 37.41 -.09 -.2 Tyson 1.50 15 83.36 49.77 81.46 -1.03 -1.2 UDR 1.37f 53 45.92 35.37 45.31 +.44 +1.0 UltaBeauty 33 359.69 224.43 335.09 -7.36 -2.1 UndrArm s 41 24.96 16.52 23.54 -.04 -.2 UnAr C wi dd 23.28 15.05 20.91 +.21 +1.0 UnionPac 3.52f 22 180.02 128.08 172.17 -2.45 -1.4 UtdContl 10 97.85 65.45 80.79 -.71 -.9 UPS B 3.84 16 125.09 89.89 95.85 -3.55 -3.6 UtdRentals 9 173.00 94.28 118.54 -7.79 -6.2 US Bancrp 1.48 12 55.56 43.14 51.33 -.23 -.4 UtdTech 2.94 20 144.40 100.48 131.40 -2.35 -1.8 UtdhlthGp 3.60 20 287.94 208.07 247.63 +6.25 +2.6 UnivHlthS .40 16 142.22 109.37 123.09 +1.21 +1.0 UnumGrp 1.04 1 41.28 26.77 33.99 -.80 -2.3 VF Corp 2.04 24 97.00 67.18 84.04 -1.45 -1.7 ValeroE 3.60 20 126.98 68.81 76.22 -7.49 -8.9 VarianMed 32 142.50 101.42 128.07 -2.58 -2.0 Ventas 3.17 58 65.70 51.80 65.94 +.97 +1.5 Verisign 40 203.28 126.52 194.73 -.57 -.3 Verisk 1.00 44 144.48 102.74 142.21 +.24 +.2 VerizonCm 2.41 8 61.58 47.13 59.32 +1.23 +2.1 VertxPh 26 195.81 144.07 171.77 +3.04 +1.8 ViacomB .80 6 34.44 23.31 28.06 -.39 -1.4 Visa s 1.00 54 165.74 121.60 162.64 -1.45 -.9 Vornado 2.64 42 77.59 59.48 67.68 +.69 +1.0 VulcanM 1.24f 27 133.59 82.52 126.25 -3.39 -2.6 WEC Engy 2.36 26 82.28 58.48 82.41 +1.51 +1.9 Wabtec .48 20 115.40 62.67 65.46 -.44 -.7 WalMart 2.12f 59 106.21 81.81 102.67 +1.81 +1.8 WalgBoots 1.76 9 86.31 51.36 51.77 -.50 -1.0 WsteMInc 2.05 23 109.66 79.96 108.43 +.30 +.3 Waters 27 255.21 167.94 206.25 -1.95 -.9 Wellcare 32 324.99 218.55 275.53 +.83 +.3 WellsFargo 1.80 10 59.53 43.02 46.17 +.47 +1.0 Welltower 1.68e 19 81.37 56.49 81.57 +1.53 +1.9 WDigital 2.00 15 88.62 33.83 40.98 -3.65 -8.2 WstnUnion .80 10 21.37 16.42 19.36 +.04 +.2 WestRck 1.82 10 62.05 34.49 34.84 -1.82 -5.0 Weyerhsr 1.36 17 38.39 20.52 23.01 -1.34 -5.5 Whrlpl 4.80f dd 156.75 99.40 124.89 -3.74 -2.9 WmsCos 1.52f 10 32.22 20.36 26.99 -.51 -1.9 WillisTwW 2.60 37 187.91 134.50 177.73 +1.73 +1.0 Wynn 4.00f 15 197.68 90.06 114.20 -6.22 -5.2 XcelEngy 1.62 26 59.10 41.99 58.99 +.78 +1.3 Xilinx 1.48f 51 141.60 64.15 101.21 -3.55 -3.4 Xylem .96 31 84.41 60.65 73.93 -1.29 -1.7 YumBrnds 1.68 36 104.47 77.09 100.99 -.31 -.3 ZimmerBio .96 22 134.55 96.99 114.52 -1.90 -1.6 ZionsBcp 1.20 13 59.19 38.08 45.34 +.24 +.5 Zoetis .66 47 103.97 78.90 102.40 +.43 +.4

NAME

DIV

HartfdFn 1.20 18 54.28 40.54 53.24 -.34 -.6 Hasbro 2.72 57 109.60 76.84 98.32 +1.17 +1.2 HelmPayne 2.80f dd 73.74 44.56 50.47 -5.01 -9.0 HSchein s 19 71.61 53.89 67.02 -.90 -1.3 Hershey 2.89 28 131.79 89.29 130.19 +2.01 +1.6 Hess 1.00 dd 74.81 35.59 59.47 -6.22 -9.5 HP Ent n .45e 34 17.59 12.09 14.39 -.23 -1.6 Hilton .60 45 94.64 63.76 89.91 -3.02 -3.2 Hologic cc 48.82 37.47 44.69 -.18 -.4 HomeDp 5.44 20 215.43 158.09 193.59 +1.01 +.5 HonwllIntl 3.28 18 174.34 123.48 166.68 -2.45 -1.4 Hormel s .84 22 46.26 35.17 40.27 +.48 +1.2 HostHotls 1.00a 47 22.47 15.94 19.26 +.08 +.4 Humana 2.20 22 355.88 225.65 263.33+15.51 +6.3 HuntJB 1.04 19 131.74 88.38 89.26 -6.76 -7.0 HuntBncsh .56 12 16.53 11.12 13.21 -.01 -.1 HuntgtnIng 3.44 19 262.32 173.80 205.54 -.60 -.3 IdexxLab s 62 256.22 176.11 256.11 +6.55 +2.6 IHS Mark 34 59.14 44.52 58.38 +.98 +1.7 IPG Photon 21 261.77 104.64 131.01 -3.04 -2.3 ITW 4.00 26 158.69 117.75 145.72 -4.88 -3.2 Illumina 60 372.61 261.61 312.45 +4.82 +1.6 Incyte 77 88.83 57.00 81.75 +4.55 +5.9 IngerRd 2.12 28 125.26 85.15 120.19 -.63 -.5 Intel 1.26 15 59.59 42.36 44.57 -.32 -.7 IntcntlExc s 1.10 19 82.65 69.34 81.83 +.61 +.8 IBM 6.48f 13 154.36 105.94 132.28 -2.04 -1.5 IntFlav 2.92 37 150.57 121.85 134.71 -1.96 -1.4 IntPap 2.00f 14 59.57 37.55 42.77 -1.80 -4.0 Interpublic .94 14 25.10 19.61 22.10 -.43 -1.9 Intuit 1.88 47 272.14 182.61 257.48+12.03 +4.9 IntSurg s 68 589.32 430.24 476.53 -13.61 -2.8 Invesco 1.24f 8 28.53 15.38 20.42 -.02 -.1 IronMtn 2.44 27 37.32 30.22 31.31 -.78 -2.4 JPMorgCh 3.20 12 119.24 91.11 109.71 -1.06 -1.0 JackHenry 1.60 37 163.68 119.30 132.49 -2.86 -2.1 JacobsEng .68 28 82.24 55.17 75.85 -.69 -.9 JohnJn 3.80f 23 148.99 118.62 138.85 +1.19 +.9 JohnContl n 1.04 26 40.33 28.30 38.51 -.44 -1.1 JnprNtwk .76 14 30.80 24.82 25.19 +.01 KLA Tnc 3.00 12 129.03 80.65 103.81 -4.79 -4.4 KC Southn 1.44 20 125.92 90.55 120.85 -1.10 -.9 Kellogg 2.24 14 74.98 53.14 56.56 -.46 -.8 Keycorp .56 10 21.91 13.66 16.63 +.05 +.3 Keysight 77 93.77 52.67 73.69 -8.17 -10.0 KimbClk 4.12 32 132.47 99.36 130.63 +1.70 +1.3 Kimco 1.12 19 18.64 14.29 18.18 +.09 +.5 KindMorg 1.00f 20 20.57 14.62 20.06 -.15 -.7 Kohls 2.68 11 83.28 50.63 51.12 -12.48 -19.6 KraftHnz n 1.60 9 64.99 31.20 31.11 -1.42 -4.4 Kroger s .56f 9 32.74 23.43 23.72 -.50 -2.1 L Brands 1.20 9 38.14 21.47 24.84 +2.40 +10.7 L-3 Tch 3.40 24 244.95 158.76 242.15 +4.71 +2.0 LKQ Corp 15 36.10 22.74 26.54 -.56 -2.1 LabCp 20 190.36 119.38 166.80 +2.39 +1.5 LamResrch 4.40 19 209.50 122.64 181.90 -12.26 -6.3 LambWst n .80 20 83.86 62.46 62.13 -5.50 -8.1 LeggPlat 1.60f 17 46.71 33.48 37.19 -.34 -.9 LennarA .16 10 55.77 37.29 51.91 -1.22 -2.3 LincNat 1.48 9 71.27 48.07 63.49 -.51 -.8 LockhdM 8.80 41 351.35 241.18 338.78 +.79 +.2 Loews .25 15 52.62 42.06 52.22 +.44 +.8 Lowes 1.92 21 118.23 84.75 95.37 -13.65 -12.5 LyonBas A 4.00 7 118.85 77.52 77.93 -2.22 -2.8 M&T Bk 4.00 12 180.77 133.78 164.92 +1.14 +.7 MGM Rsts .48 7 32.18 21.62 25.54 -.35 -1.4 MSCI Inc 2.32 34 230.44 134.28 218.86 -5.95 -2.6 Macerich 3.00 22 60.95 39.60 40.41 -1.33 -3.2 Macys 1.51 7 41.99 20.86 21.01 -.76 -3.5 MarathnO .20 dd 24.20 12.57 14.43 -1.04 -6.7 MarathPt s 2.12 7 88.45 49.71 50.29 -1.66 -3.2 MarIntA 1.92f 28 142.19 100.62 125.00 -5.43 -4.2 MarshM 1.82f 26 97.68 74.30 95.38 -.41 -.4 MartMM 1.92 31 232.88 150.75 212.12 -5.41 -2.5 Masco .48 19 41.00 27.03 37.28 -.27 -.7 MasterCrd 1.32 58 258.86 171.89 251.48 -1.07 -.4 Mattel .60 78 17.98 9.09 10.94 +.11 +1.0 MaximIntg 1.84 24 63.68 46.64 53.35 -.24 -.4 McCorm 2.28 22 157.00 99.53 155.19 +.13 +.1 McDnlds 4.64 30 201.15 153.13 197.77 -1.45 -.7 McKesson 1.56 11 151.24 106.11 129.92 +4.92 +3.9 Medtrnic 2.00 56 100.15 81.66 93.03 +5.30 +6.0 Merck 2.20 30 83.85 58.03 81.17 +2.45 +3.1 MetLife 1.76f 10 50.40 37.76 47.83 +.50 +1.1 MettlerT 50 762.90 500.74 728.82 +2.40 +.3 Microchp 1.46f 43 104.20 60.70 80.42 -2.47 -3.0 MicronT 3 64.66 28.39 34.00 -2.06 -5.7 Microsoft 1.84 28 131.37 93.96 126.24 -1.83 -1.4 MidAApt 3.84 21 115.79 90.53 114.82 -.23 -.2 Mohawk 11 228.49 109.35 145.90 +7.21 +5.2 MolsCoorB 1.64 9 71.04 54.17 58.72 +.06 +.1 Mondelez 1.04 13 52.98 38.79 52.13 -.10 -.2 MonstrBv s 34 66.38 47.74 63.42 -.21 -.3 Moodys 2.00 27 197.73 129.26 185.10 -.83 -.4 MorgStan 1.20 9 52.72 36.74 42.96 -.92 -2.1 Mosaic .20f 34 37.37 21.51 21.60 -1.20 -5.3

MotrlaSolu Mylan NV NRG Egy Nasdaq NOilVarco Navient NektarTh NetApp Netflix s NewellBr NewmtM NewsCpA NewsCpB NextEraEn NiSource s Nielsen plc NikeB s NobleEngy Nordstrm NorflkSo NorTrst NorthropG NorwCruis Nucor Nvidia OReillyAu OcciPet Omnicom ONEOK Oracle PNC PPG s PPL Corp PVH Corp Paccar PackAmer ParkerHan Paychex PayPal n Pentair PeopUtdF PepsiCo PerkElm Perrigo Pfizer PhilipMor Phillips66 PinWst PioNtrl PriceTR PrinFncl ProLogis ProctGam ProgsvCp Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp Qorvo Qualcom QuantaSvc QstDiag RLauren RangeRs RJamesFn Raytheon RltyInco RedHat RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegionsFn RepubSvc ResMed RobtHalf RockwlAut Rollins s Roper RossStrs s RylCarb S&P Glbl SBA Com SLGreen SVB FnGp Salesforce Schlmbrg Schwab SeagateT SealAir SempraEn Sherwin SimonProp SkywksSol SmithAO s Smucker SnapOn SouthnCo

2.28 28 6 .12 57 1.88f 21 .20 dd .64 8 9 1.92f 22 cc .92 dd .56 24 .20 dd .20 ... 5.00 15 .80 36 1.40 dd .88 63 .48f dd 1.48a 14 3.44f 21 2.40 16 5.28f 33 13 1.60 10 .64 26 24 3.12 41 2.60 16 3.46f 48 .96f 54 3.80 12 1.92 19 1.65 13 .15 12 1.28 10 3.16 12 3.52f 20 2.48f 33 70 .72 11 .71f 12 3.82f 15 .28 33 .76 23 1.44 17 4.56 17 3.60f 7 2.95 22 .64f cc 3.04 19 2.16 11 2.12f 27 2.87 25 .10e 32 4.00 10 1.88f 21 6.80 26 .44 18 38 2.48 dd .16 24 2.12 18 2.75f 16 .08 9 .88f 13 3.77f 26 2.71f 40 cc 2.34 24 15 .56 10 1.88 39 1.48f 36 1.24 21 3.88 23 .42 37 1.85 33 1.02 23 2.80 16 2.28f 33 cc 3.40 34 17 cc 2.00 22 .68f 17 2.52 9 .64 21 3.87f 21 4.52 33 8.20 23 1.52 11 .88 17 3.40 16 3.80 15 2.48f 26

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR Heartland SelValInv m 25.24 -.16 +11.3 +11.6 +7.1 LV 2 Hodges Retail m 36.17 -1.42 +21.7 +5.6 +2.5 MG 5 INVESCO ComStkA m 23.89 -.42 +11.5 +10.6 +6.2 LV 5 DiversDivA m 19.47 +.01 +12.0 +6.4 +6.8 LV 1 EqandIncA m 9.99 -.10 +10.0 +7.5 +5.5 MA 5 HYMuniA m 10.19 +5.7 +4.4 +5.9 HM 2 IntlGrA m 31.64 -.25 +13.0 +4.8 +1.8 FG 2 IVA WldwideI d 16.80 -.11 +5.5 +5.5 +2.9 IH 4 Ivy GlbGrA m 42.66 -.38 +11.8 +9.4 +5.0 WS 3 JPMorgan CPBondR6 8.29 +.03 +4.5 +3.1 +3.1 PI 1 CoreBondI 11.60 +.04 +3.9 +2.4 +2.6 CI 2 CoreBondR6 11.61 +.04 +3.9 +2.5 +2.8 CI 1 EqIncI 17.59 -.07 +11.6 +11.4 +9.1 LV 1 HighYieldR6 7.18 -.01 +7.8 +6.4 +3.8 HY 2 MCapValA m 37.02 -.32 +14.8 +7.8 +6.9 MB 2 MCapValL 37.95 -.32 +15.1 +8.3 +7.4 MB 2 USLCpCrPlsI 26.82 -.44 +12.9 +11.8 +9.1 LB 4 USRsrchEnhEqR626.63 -.29 +13.5 +12.4 +9.3 LB 2 Janus Henderson BalancedT 33.73 -.16 +9.5 +11.2 +7.5 MA 1 EnterpriseT 130.63 -.86 +20.0 +16.9 +13.9 MG 2 FlexibleBondT 10.19 +.01 +3.9 +2.0 +2.0 PI 5 GlobalLifeSciT 55.56 +.31 +10.6 +11.0 +11.1 SH 2 John Hancock BdR6 15.76 +.03 +5.2 +3.7 +3.3 PI 1 DiscpValI 19.53 -.21 +9.0 +9.8 +6.7 LV 4 DiscpValMCI 20.17 -.19 +15.1 +8.2 +7.9 MB 3 DiscpValR6 19.56 -.21 +9.0 +9.9 +6.8 LV 4 FdmtlLgCpCorA m43.63 -.73 +17.9 +11.0 +8.9 LB 4 IntlGrI 26.20 -.33 +10.6 +8.6 +6.1 FG 4 MltMgLsBlA b 14.09 -.07 +9.0 +7.4 +4.7 MA 4 MltmgrLsGr1 b 14.50 -.12 +10.2 +8.6 +5.5 AL 4 Lazard EMEqInstl 16.73 +.15 +4.2 +7.7 -1.2 EM 3 GlbLtdInfrsIns 14.99 +11.6 +11.3 +10.8 XO 4 IntlStratEqIns 14.36 -.04 +11.4 +6.5 +2.4 FG 2 Leuthold CorInvmRetail d 18.10 -.04 +3.9 +5.3 +3.9 TV 3 Loomis Sayles BdInstl 13.48 -.01 +6.0 +4.9 +2.3 MU 5 GrY 16.54 -.40 +15.7 +15.6 +13.8 LG 1 Lord Abbett AffiliatedA m 14.50 -.15 +10.7 +10.3 +7.7 LV 2 FltngRtF b 8.92 -.01 +5.0 +4.8 +3.7 BL 4 ShrtDurIncA m 4.19 +2.8 +2.7 +2.1 CS 2 ShrtDurIncC m 4.22 +2.5 +2.1 +1.5 CS 3 ShrtDurIncF b 4.19 +2.8 +2.8 +2.2 CS 1 ShrtDurIncI 4.19 +2.8 +2.9 +2.3 CS 1 MFS GrA m 105.42 -1.09 +19.4 +17.7 +13.6 LG 1 GrI 112.41 -1.16 +19.5 +18.0 +13.9 LG 1 InstlIntlEq 25.32 -.11 +13.1 +9.9 +3.9 FG 1 TtlRetA m 18.68 -.06 +9.4 +6.6 +5.6 MA 2 ValA m 40.18 -.13 +14.1 +9.1 +8.0 LV 2 ValI 40.41 -.14 +14.2 +9.4 +8.3 LV 2 Mairs & Power BalInv 93.72 -.29 +8.6 +7.5 +6.0 MA 1 GrInv 118.68 -1.16 +11.5 +9.5 +8.3 LB 1 MassMutual SelectMdCpGrI 22.07 -.29 +16.8 +13.9 +11.9 MG 2 Matthews AsianGrIncInv 14.88 -.02 +6.9 +4.7 +1.4 PJ 1 ChinaInv 15.90 -.63 +10.6 +16.5 +7.0 CH 5 Meridian ContrarianLgcy d 34.78 -.60 +12.6 +14.5 +9.4 MB 3 GrLegacy d 38.17 -.48 +15.1 +14.7 +10.9 SG 3 Metropolitan West TtlRetBdI 10.70 +.03 +4.2 +2.5 +2.6 PI 1 TtlRetBdM b 10.70 +.03 +4.1 +2.3 +2.3 PI 1 TtlRetBdPlan 10.07 +.03 +4.2 +2.6 +2.6 PI 1 Northeast Investors NorthstInvTrust 4.30 -.06 +2.8 +6.2 -2.0 HY 5 Northern IntlEqIdx d 11.84 -.01 +10.0 +6.9 +1.8 FB 2 StkIdx 32.74 -.38 +13.6 +13.0 +10.4 LB 2 Nuveen HYMuniBdA m 17.69 -.01 +7.0 +5.5 +6.6 HM 1 HYMuniBdI 17.69 -.01 +7.0 +5.7 +6.9 HM 1 IntermDrMnBdI 9.39 +4.2 +2.9 +3.4 MI 2 Oakmark EqAndIncInv 29.25 -.42 +8.8 +7.8 +4.7 MA 5 IntlInv 21.84 -.54 +6.7 +6.6 +0.4 FB 5 Inv 76.08 -1.69 +11.4 +11.0 +7.6 LB 5 SelInv 38.87 -.69 +13.6 +5.3 +3.5 LB 5 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCpStrat14.57 -.13 +11.2 +7.2 +5.3 SW 3 LgCpStrats 14.07 -.09 +11.2 +8.2 +5.7 WS 3 StratOpps 7.31 -.06 +8.1 +6.2 +3.4 IH 4 Oppenheimer CptlIncA m 10.12 -.04 +6.5 +4.4 +3.3 CA 3 DevMktsA m 41.23 -.39 +8.0 +10.8 +1.6 EM 2 DevMktsY 40.65 -.38 +8.1 +11.1 +1.8 EM 1 GlbA m 85.12 -.76 +15.2 +12.9 +7.1 WS 4 GlbAllcA m 17.40 -.05 +6.9 +4.9 +3.1 IH 5 GoldSpecMnralA m14.81 -.13 +3.3 +.2 -0.8 SP 1 IntlGrY 38.66 -.47 +11.4 +3.5 +1.2 FG 5 LtdTrmGvtA m 4.36 +.01 +1.7 +1.2 +1.0 GS 2 MnStrA m 46.18 -.57 +16.5 +10.7 +9.1 LB 1 Osterweis StrInc 11.10 +4.1 +5.6 +3.5 HY 5 PGIM Investments TtlRetBdZ 14.43 +.04 +5.3 +3.9 +3.7 PI PIMCO AlAstInstl 11.39 +.04 +4.6 +6.8 +2.3 TV 1 HYInstl 8.78 -.02 +8.3 +6.6 +4.5 HY 1 IBdUSDHI 10.95 +.01 +3.8 +4.5 +4.9 WH IncA m 12.05 +.01 +4.1 +5.8 +4.8 MU IncC m 12.05 +.01 +3.8 +5.0 +4.1 MU IncI2 12.05 +.01 +4.2 +6.1 +5.2 MU IncInstl 12.05 +.01 +4.3 +6.2 +5.3 MU InvtGrdCdtBdI 10.41 +.01 +6.8 +4.9 +4.5 TW 1 LowDrInstl 9.77 +2.2 +1.9 +1.3 CS 4 RlRetInstl 10.97 +.01 +4.4 +2.5 +1.2 IP 1 ShrtTrmIns 9.79 -.02 +1.4 +2.4 +1.9 UB 5 TtlRetA m 10.17 +.01 +3.7 +2.6 +2.3 PI 4

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR TtlRetIns 10.17 +.01 +3.8 +3.0 +2.7 PI 3 PRIMECAP Odyssey AgrsGr 43.00 -.81 +12.3 +17.5 +13.4 MG 5 Gr 37.75 -.74 +8.7 +15.7 +12.1 LG 5 Stk 31.49 -.54 +9.5 +12.9 +10.1 LB 5 Parnassus CorEqInv 44.62 -.47 +14.7 +12.8 +9.7 LB 1 Pioneer Am 28.04 -.27 +13.5 +13.5 +9.8 LB 1 CorEqA m 18.21 -.23 +14.3 +12.9 +8.5 LB 4 Putnam DiversIncA m 6.87 +.01 +5.8 +6.1 +2.3 NT 4 EqIncA m 23.72 -.25 +12.5 +10.8 +7.7 LV 3 GlbUtlsA m 13.08 +.20 +11.8 +8.3 +5.2 SU 5 IncA m 6.96 +4.9 +4.3 +2.4 PI 3 SustLeadersA m 88.79 -1.19 +19.2 +18.0 +12.6 LG 1 Royce LowPricedStkSvc m6.96 -.16 +10.0 +9.2 +1.4 SB 3 SmlrCoGrSvc m 7.79 -.12 +16.4 +12.4 +6.9 SG 4 SpecEqInvm d 18.13 -.27 +4.0 +7.8 +4.1 SV 1 Schwab FdmtlUSLgCIdx 16.20 -.22 +11.3 +10.4 +8.1 LV 3 HC 23.77 +.28 +3.6 +8.5 +8.9 SH 2 IntlIdx 19.26 -.03 +9.9 +7.0 +1.8 FB 2 SP500Idx 43.54 -.50 +13.7 +13.0 +10.4 LB 2 Schwab1000Idx 63.58 -.73 +14.0 +12.9 +10.1 LB 2 TtlStkMktIdx 49.62 -.60 +13.9 +12.9 +10.0 LB 3 Segall Bryant & Hami PlusBdRtl 10.63 +.03 +4.3 +3.0 +2.9 PI 2 State Farm Gr 81.00 -.91 +11.2 +10.1 +7.9 LB 1 T. Rowe Price BCGr 111.37 -1.76 +16.0 +19.4 +14.7 LG 3 Comm&TeInv 113.02 -2.25 +20.8 +18.9 +14.7 SC 1 CptlAprc 29.95 -.03 +12.9 +10.7 +9.8 MA 1 DivGr 47.45 -.21 +14.8 +13.1 +11.2 LB 1 EMBd 11.55 +.02 +7.1 +4.8 +3.7 EB 4 EMStk 40.02 -.32 +6.8 +11.7 +4.0 EM 2 EmergEurope 14.35 +.22 +10.6 +8.5 -2.8 MQ 3 EqIdx500 75.47 -.87 +13.6 +12.8 +10.2 LB 2 EqInc 30.42 -.29 +12.0 +10.2 +6.6 LV 3 FinclSvcs 25.86 +.04 +14.7 +13.9 +9.6 SF 1 GlbTech 14.41 -.51 +18.1 +18.7 +18.3 ST 5 GrStk 66.01 -1.04 +15.6 +17.6 +13.5 LG 3 HY 6.51 -.01 +8.2 +6.7 +4.0 HY 2 HlthSci 74.17 +.82 +10.7 +12.3 +12.7 SH 3 InsLgCpGr 40.62 -.63 +13.8 +20.9 +15.1 LG 2 InsMdCpEqGr 56.51 -.69 +17.0 +14.8 +13.0 MG 2 InsSmCpStk 24.06 -.14 +18.5 +15.7 +10.8 SG 1 IntlDiscv 61.71 -.31 +11.2 +8.9 +6.7 FR 3 IntlStk 16.56 -.14 +10.6 +7.6 +3.3 FG 3 IntlValEq 12.90 -.07 +6.9 +2.2 -1.3 FV 3 LatinAmerica 23.12 +.82 +5.1 +11.2 -0.3 LS 2 MdCpGr 88.82 -1.03 +16.3 +14.2 +12.3 MG 2 MdCpVal 26.24 -.42 +7.5 +6.7 +6.3 MV 4 NewHorizons 59.58 -.43 +23.6 +23.0 +16.0 MG 1 NewInc 9.43 +.02 +4.3 +2.4 +2.4 CI 2 OverseasStk 10.00 -.09 +7.5 +6.4 +1.7 FB 4 QMUSSmCpGrEq 36.19 -.38 +16.1 +13.6 +10.6 SG 3 RlEstt 28.83 -.02 +17.1 +4.9 +7.0 SR 5 Rtr2015 14.02 -.05 +7.8 +6.9 +5.0 TD 3 Rtr2020 21.23 -.10 +8.7 +7.9 +5.5 TE 3 Rtr2025 16.89 -.10 +9.5 +8.6 +6.0 TG 3 Rtr2030 24.57 -.17 +10.2 +9.3 +6.4 TH 3 Rtr2035 18.01 -.13 +10.8 +9.9 +6.7 TI 2 Rtr2040 25.62 -.22 +11.2 +10.3 +6.9 TJ 2 Rtr2045 17.45 -.16 +11.5 +10.4 +7.0 TK 2 Rtr2050 14.72 -.13 +11.5 +10.4 +7.0 TN 2 SciandTech 36.69 -1.32 +16.9 +19.7 +15.5 ST 5 SmCpStk 48.86 -.30 +18.4 +15.4 +10.5 SG 1 SmCpVal 45.34 -.39 +13.8 +11.9 +7.4 SB 1 SpectrumInc 12.33 +.01 +5.4 +4.3 +3.1 MU 3 SummitMnIntrInv12.02 +3.9 +2.2 +2.8 MI 3 TFInc 10.14 +4.0 +2.5 +3.4 ML 4 Val 34.61 -.33 +13.2 +10.1 +7.5 LV 2 TCW EMIncIns 8.12 +.01 +7.5 +6.2 +3.7 EB TtlRetBdI 9.86 +.03 +3.5 +2.3 +2.6 PI TIAA-CREF BdIdxIns 10.80 +.03 +3.7 +2.1 +2.5 CI 2 EqIdxIns 20.71 -.25 +13.8 +12.9 +10.1 LB 3 IntlEqIdxIns 18.60 -.02 +9.9 +7.0 +2.0 FB 1 LgCpGrIdxIns 31.72 -.51 +16.1 +16.5 +13.0 LG 2 LgCpValIdxIns 19.24 -.15 +11.8 +9.4 +7.4 LV 2 Thornburg LtdTrmMnI 14.40 +.02 +2.3 +1.4 +1.7 MS 1 Thrivent LgCpStkA m 24.89 -.30 +9.6 +9.3 +5.7 WS MidCpStkA m 22.64 -.38 +12.1 +13.5 +10.4 MB MnBdA m 11.33 -.01 +3.8 +1.9 +3.0 ML Torray Torray 48.01 -.26 +11.0 +6.7 +6.2 LV 3 Tweedy, Browne GlbVal d 26.85 -.34 +7.9 +7.1 +3.3 FV 1 USAA Gr 29.95 -.58 +16.0 +14.6 +12.3 LG 2 Inc 13.04 +.03 +5.3 +3.6 +3.1 PI 1 PrcMtlsMnral 11.68 -.17 +.2 -4.2 -3.4 SP 3 TEIntermTrm 13.49 +4.1 +2.6 +3.1 MI 2 VALIC Co I StkIdx 40.29 -.46 +13.5 +12.7 +10.1 LB 2 Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl 261.61 -3.02 +13.7 +13.1 +10.5 LB 2 500IdxInv 261.57 -3.02 +13.6 +12.9 +10.4 LB 2 BalIdxAdmrl 36.03 -.21 +9.9 +8.7 +7.2 MA 1 BalIdxIns 36.03 -.21 +9.9 +8.8 +7.2 MA 1 CAITTxExAdm 11.93 +3.8 +2.5 +3.2 MF 1 CptlOppAdmrl 144.02 -3.47 +9.1 +15.3 +11.9 LG 5 DevMIdxAdmrl 13.04 -.03 +9.5 +7.0 +2.1 FB 3 DevMIdxIns 13.05 -.03 +9.5 +7.0 +2.1 FB 3 DivGrInv 28.44 -.04 +16.4 +13.1 +10.8 LB 1 EMStkIdxInAdm 33.14 -.25 +4.5 +9.2 +1.2 EM 3 EMStkIdxIns 25.20 -.19 +4.6 +9.3 +1.2 EM 3 EngyAdmrl 88.87 -3.01 +9.5 +2.6 -5.0 EE 1 EqIncAdmrl 73.58 -.16 +11.5 +10.9 +9.0 LV 1 EqIncInv 35.10 -.08 +11.5 +10.8 +8.9 LV 1 ExplorerAdmrl 90.53 -1.02 +16.4 +16.3 +10.0 SG 3 ExtMktIdxAdmrl 86.73 -1.25 +14.9 +12.2 +8.1 MB 3 ExtMktIdxIns 86.73 -1.25 +14.9 +12.2 +8.1 MB 3 ExtMktIdxInsPls214.03 -3.09 +14.9 +12.2 +8.1 MB 3 FAWexUSIAdmr 30.61 -.09 +8.3 +7.6 +1.9 FB 2 FAWexUSIIns 97.06 -.28 +8.3 +7.6 +1.9 FB 2

107.22 18.93 29.90 75.49 21.67 8.23 29.22 54.50 231.23 13.57 29.06 10.65 10.85 155.06 23.23 20.53 66.53 17.11 33.67 138.65 75.96 223.63 39.36 49.79 124.46 264.50 51.29 65.85 50.26 42.40 108.45 94.37 25.30 86.46 53.43 77.90 140.82 61.32 74.66 35.28 13.66 98.06 71.31 36.28 35.32 64.67 78.44 73.41 119.08 84.59 40.42 55.21 72.80 56.71 75.61 49.23 193.89 20.64 54.74 49.10 27.90 78.95 95.63 7.61 69.11 144.27 52.37 115.31 55.38 291.10 12.39 66.83 90.64 52.79 141.46 33.07 245.59 75.91 89.48 156.68 146.13 76.77 177.70 113.60 34.99 37.83 35.38 30.22 100.49 355.28 158.21 60.12 40.34 91.32 135.29 42.50

+2.5 -3.4 -.1 -.3 -6.5 -1.7 +5.5 -10.3 -2.7 +3.2 +3.2 +4.3 +2.2 +.8 -2.5 -2.8 -9.0 -9.7 -2.1 -2.2 +1.8 -2.7 -4.0 -7.3 +3.9 +1.3 -.9 -3.7 -3.2 +1.3 -3.6 +3.4 -1.6 -2.4 -6.0 -3.4 -.1 -2.6 +.7 -.9 -.8 +.5 -4.7 +1.2 -2.5 -2.2 +.6 -4.7 -.6 -1.0 -1.6 -.7 +3.2 -.1 +1.2 +2.7 -1.1 -2.5 -18.8 +.1 +.8 -2.9 -9.1 +3.4 +1.7 +1.8 +.1 -.3 +2.5 -1.5 -.3 +1.0 +1.1 -3.5 +.4 -2.9 -4.5 -1.0 +.7 -.6 +2.0 -2.3 -5.2 +.1 -4.5 +3.0 -1.1 -1.8 -.7 +.4 -.2 -2.4 +1.0

DIV

PE

FRI NAME NAV GNMAAdmrl 10.39 GNMAInv 10.39 GlbEqInv 29.43 GrIdxAdmrl 80.62 GrIdxIns 80.62 GrandIncAdmrl 76.89 HCAdmrl 79.11 HCInv 187.59 HYCorpAdmrl 5.77 HYTEAdmrl 11.57 HiDivYldIdxInv 33.79 InTrBdIdxAdmrl 11.43 InTrInGdAdm 9.74 InTrTEAdmrl 14.30 InTrTrsAdmrl 11.14 InflPrtScAdmrl 25.44 InflPrtScIns 10.36 InsIdxIns 256.41 InsIdxInsPlus 256.43 InsTrgRt2020Ins 22.67 InsTtlSMIInPls 61.11 IntlGrAdmrl 88.35 IntlGrInv 27.77 IntlValInv 34.58 LTInGrdAdm 10.21 LTTEAdmrl 11.77 LfStrCnsrGrInv 19.87 LfStrGrInv 33.07 LfStrModGrInv 26.90 LgCpIdxAdmrl 65.58 LtdTrmTEAdmrl 11.01 MCpGrIdxAdm 61.47 MCpVlIdxAdm 55.41 MdCpGrInv 27.11 MdCpIdxAdmrl 198.26 MdCpIdxIns 43.80 MdCpIdxInsPlus 216.01 PrmCpAdmrl 131.15 PrmCpCorInv 25.55 PrmCpInv 126.53 RlEstIdxAdmrl 124.78 RlEstIdxInstl 19.31 SCpGrIdxAdm 62.41 SCpValIdxAdm 54.52 STBdIdxAdmrl 10.45 STBdIdxIns 10.45 STBdIdxInsPlus 10.45 STInfPrScIdAdmr24.54 STInfPrScIdIns 24.56 STInfPrScIdxInv 24.51 STInvmGrdAdmrl 10.62 STInvmGrdIns 10.62 STInvmGrdInv 10.62 STTEAdmrl 15.81 STTrsAdmrl 10.52 SeledValInv 25.22 SmCpIdxAdmrl 72.26 SmCpIdxIns 72.26 SmCpIdxInsPlus208.57 StarInv 25.93 StrEqInv 30.73 TMCapApAdm 145.66 TMSmCpAdm 60.74 TrgtRtr2015Inv 14.78 TrgtRtr2020Inv 30.86 TrgtRtr2025Inv 18.48 TrgtRtr2030Inv 33.66 TrgtRtr2035Inv 20.66 TrgtRtr2040Inv 35.66 TrgtRtr2045Inv 22.39 TrgtRtr2050Inv 36.03 TrgtRtr2055Inv 39.10 TrgtRtrIncInv 13.44 TtBMIdxAdmrl 10.73 TtBMIdxIns 10.73 TtBMIdxInsPlus 10.73 TtInBIdxAdmrl 22.46 TtInBIdxIns 33.70 TtInBIdxInv 11.23 TtInSIdxAdmrl 27.37 TtInSIdxIns 109.46 TtInSIdxInsPlus 109.49 TtInSIdxInv 16.36 TtlSMIdxAdmrl 70.35 TtlSMIdxIns 70.36 TtlSMIdxInv 70.31 TxMgBalAdmrl 32.03 USGrAdmrl 101.33 USGrInv 39.11 ValIdxAdmrl 41.99 ValIdxIns 41.99 WlngtnAdmrl 69.90 WlngtnInv 40.48 WlslyIncAdmrl 63.28 WlslyIncInv 26.12 WndsrAdmrl 68.15 WndsrIIAdmrl 61.57 WndsrIIInv 34.69 WndsrInv 20.20 Victory RSPtnrsA m 23.81 Virtus VontobelEMOppI 10.74 WCM FocIntGrIns 16.48 Weitz ValInv 43.34 sHickory 48.03 Wells Fargo CommonStkA f 20.37 SpMCpValIns 38.22 Western Asset CorBdI 12.65 CorPlusBdI 11.61 CorPlusBdIS 11.60 Mgd Mns A m 16.24 iShares S&P500IdxK 336.36

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.01 +2.6 +1.8 +2.3 GI 2 +.01 +2.6 +1.7 +2.2 GI 3 -.22 +12.2 +11.5 +6.8 WS 3 -1.42 +17.0 +14.9 +11.8 LG 3 -1.42 +17.0 +14.9 +11.8 LG 3 -.99 +12.8 +12.6 +10.4 LB 3 +1.09 +2.9 +6.2 +8.4 SH 3 +2.59 +2.9 +6.2 +8.4 SH 3 +8.7 +6.4 +4.5 HY 1 -.01 +5.2 +3.9 +4.7 ML 1 -.25 +10.2 +10.2 +8.9 LV 2 +.03 +4.9 +2.5 +3.0 CI 1 +.02 +5.1 +2.9 +3.2 TW 1 +4.0 +2.5 +3.1 MI 1 +.03 +3.1 +1.4 +2.1 GI 1 +.06 +3.9 +2.0 +1.4 IP 1 +.02 +3.9 +2.0 +1.5 IP 1 -2.96 +13.7 +13.1 +10.5 LB 2 -2.96 +13.7 +13.1 +10.5 LB 2 -.08 +7.8 +7.2 NA TE 2 -.73 +13.9 +13.0 +10.1 LB 2 -1.93 +11.5 +12.8 +5.8 FG 4 -.61 +11.5 +12.7 +5.7 FG 4 -.14 +7.7 +7.4 +1.0 FV 1 +.06 +8.5 +4.5 +5.4 CL 2 +4.9 +3.2 +4.2 ML 1 -.04 +6.9 +5.9 +4.7 CA 2 -.21 +10.0 +9.1 +6.3 AL 2 -.11 +8.5 +7.5 +5.5 MA 3 -.77 +13.8 +13.2 +10.4 LB 2 +.01 +2.2 +1.6 +1.6 MS 1 -.80 +19.6 +13.0 +10.0 MG 2 -.63 +12.9 +9.1 +7.3 MV 2 -.28 +21.2 +13.5 +9.7 MG 2 -2.43 +16.3 +11.1 +8.7 MB 1 -.53 +16.3 +11.1 +8.7 MB 1 -2.63 +16.3 +11.1 +8.7 MB 1 -2.19 +8.4 +15.5 +11.9 LG 5 -.39 +9.2 +13.7 +10.7 LB 4 -2.11 +8.4 +15.4 +11.8 LG 5 +.18 +18.9 +6.5 +8.0 SR 2 +.03 +18.9 +6.5 +8.0 SR 2 -.73 +18.0 +14.4 +9.2 SG 2 -.85 +11.8 +9.1 +7.0 SV 1 +.01 +2.3 +1.6 +1.5 CS 1 +.01 +2.3 +1.6 +1.5 CS 1 +.01 +2.3 +1.6 +1.5 CS 1 -.01 +2.2 +1.6 +0.7 IP 4 -.01 +2.2 +1.6 +0.7 IP 4 -.01 +2.2 +1.5 +0.6 IP 4 +.01 +2.9 +2.3 +2.0 CS 1 +.01 +3.0 +2.3 +2.1 CS 1 +.01 +2.9 +2.2 +1.9 CS 1 +.01 +1.2 +1.3 +1.0 MS 4 +1.6 +1.2 +1.1 GS 2 -.42 +12.2 +6.8 +4.5 MV 5 -1.00 +14.6 +11.5 +8.0 SB 1 -1.00 +14.7 +11.5 +8.0 SB 1 -2.88 +14.7 +11.6 +8.1 SB 1 -.20 +9.2 +8.6 +6.2 MA 3 -.49 +13.1 +10.2 +7.5 MB 4 -1.73 +14.0 +13.2 +10.4 LB 2 -1.10 +9.3 +11.1 +8.6 SB 3 -.03 +6.6 +6.2 +4.7 TD 3 -.11 +7.8 +7.2 +5.3 TE 3 -.08 +8.6 +7.9 +5.7 TG 3 -.18 +9.2 +8.5 +6.0 TH 3 -.12 +9.8 +9.1 +6.3 TI 3 -.24 +10.4 +9.7 +6.5 TJ 3 -.16 +10.8 +9.9 +6.6 TK 3 -.27 +10.8 +9.9 +6.6 TN 3 -.29 +10.8 +9.9 +6.6 TL 3 -.02 +5.8 +4.9 +3.9 RI 2 +.03 +3.9 +2.2 +2.5 CI 2 +.03 +3.9 +2.2 +2.5 CI 2 +.03 +3.9 +2.3 +2.5 CI 2 +.06 +4.0 +3.4 +4.1 WH 2 +.08 +4.0 +3.4 +4.1 WH 2 +.03 +3.9 +3.4 +4.0 WH 2 -.09 +8.2 +7.3 +1.8 FB 3 -.36 +8.2 +7.4 +1.9 FB 3 -.36 +8.2 +7.4 +1.9 FB 3 -.06 +8.2 +7.3 +1.8 FB 3 -.83 +13.9 +13.0 +10.1 LB 2 -.84 +13.9 +13.0 +10.1 LB 2 -.84 +13.8 +12.9 +10.0 LB 3 -.17 +8.7 +7.6 +6.6 CA 1 -1.56 +16.6 +16.3 +13.2 LG 2 -.61 +16.5 +16.2 +13.0 LG 2 -.23 +10.8 +11.6 +9.1 LV 2 -.23 +10.8 +11.6 +9.1 LV 2 -.09 +9.8 +9.4 +7.4 MA 1 -.05 +9.8 +9.3 +7.3 MA 1 +.14 +7.7 +6.1 +5.6 CA 1 +.06 +7.7 +6.1 +5.5 CA 1 -.92 +11.2 +9.2 +6.2 LV 5 -.98 +11.5 +9.6 +6.9 LV 3 -.56 +11.5 +9.5 +6.8 LV 3 -.28 +11.2 +9.1 +6.1 LV 5 -.28 +18.6

+12.1

+.02 +7.8

+7.1

+5.3 SB

1

+2.5 EM 1

-.07 +17.5

+12.5

+8.4 FG

-.53 +18.1 -.69 +19.6

+10.0 +6.1

+6.0 LG 1 +3.5 MB 1

-.17 +15.9 -.30 +17.8

+10.9 +9.4

+7.3 MB 2 +7.6 MV 1

+.01 +.05 +.04 -.02

+4.8 +5.1 +5.2 +4.2

-3.88 +13.6

+3.4 +4.0 +4.1 +2.5

+3.4 +3.8 +3.9 +3.3

1

CI PI PI ML

1 4

+13.1 +10.5 LB

2


C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

w 5 1 i n p e s o t of A

ssummer r

LL

UNDE $15

R

WRITTEN BY

JORDAN BARANOWSKI Stock up for summer: These 15 wine favorites will help you through the dog days. Make sure you clear out plenty of space in your home bar, as you’ll want multiple bottles of some of these.

1. LA VOSTRA

2. MINA MESA

PROSECCO A hint of peach is brought to life with bright bubbles in this Prosecco.

CABERNET PASO ROBLES Smooth and well balanced, this Cabernet is created by a seventh-generation winemaker.

Italy, 750 mL, $10.99

California, 750 mL, $10.99

$9.34 with coupon

$9.34 with coupon

4. CHATEAU FABREGUES

3. CHÂTEAU TOUR DE BONNET BLANC 2016 James Suckling – 91 An already lively Bordeaux gets punched up a bit with a hint of lemon. France, 750 mL, $14.99

$12.74 with coupon

5. VAL DO SOSEGO ALBARIÑO

6. RIVER ROAD

COSTIÈRES DE NÎMES Whet your appetite with this supple, strawberry-scented wine that makes an excellent apéritif.

RIAS BAIXAS 2017 Wine Enthusiast – 90 This new wave Spanish wine is extremely versatile. Try it with appetizers, seafood or spicy dishes.

CHARDONNAY UNOAKED Aged in steel, River Road skips Chardonnay’s usual oak backbone.

France, 750 mL, $14.99

Spain, 750 mL, $14.99

$12.74 with coupon

$12.74 with coupon

$12.74 with coupon

7. L’AURATÆ

California, 750 mL, $14.99

8. GOVERNORS BAY

NERO D’AVOLA Environmentally conscience, this affordable Sicilian wine features pure fruit flavors. Italy, 750 mL, $9.99

$8.49 with coupon 10. D’AUTREFOIS

9. FIREBRAND

SAUVIGNON BLANC MARLBOROUGH Wake up your palate with this Sauvignon Blanc, with a hint of melon running through the backbone.

BOURBON BARREL AGED RED BLEND A bold blend with ripe fruit flavors, this wine is punched up by a final aging in whiskey barrels.

New Zealand, 750 mL, $12.99

California, 750 mL, $10.99

$11.04 with coupon

$9.34 with coupon

11. LA DELIZIA

PINOT NOIR You’ll want a few bottles of this complex and medium-bodied wine on hand for your next get-together.

12. CRUZ ALTA

PINOT GRIGIO This versatile wine is an excellent pairing with chicken or as an afterdinner sipper.

MALBEC RESERVE Enjoy this spicy and structured Malbec, which was created from three different high-altitude vineyards.

Italy, 750 mL, $6.99

$5.94 with coupon

France, 750 mL, $12.99

$11.04 with coupon 13. CRIMSON RANCH

Argentina, 750 mL, $12.99

$11.04 with coupon

14. DOUBLE BLACK

15. RADIUS MERLOT

CHARDONNAY Powerful and elegant, a glass (or two) of this Chardonnay will impress your guests.

ZINFANDEL PASO ROBLES An intense flavor profile and powerful finish are the calling cards of this California Zinfandel.

Pop open this bottle, and pair with your favorite cheeses, especially Monterey Jack.

California, 750 mL, $14.99

California, 750 mL, $13.99

$12.74 with coupon

$11.89 with coupon

$10.19 with coupon

Washington, 750 mL, $11.99

WINERY DIRECT® COUPON | Valid 5/29/2019 - 6/2/2019

ONLINE CODE: 1963

15% Off Wine Save 15% on thousands of Winery Direct® wines priced $6.99 or higher. Valid on 750ml and/or 1.5L wines only. Excludes items with prices ending in 7. Cannot be combined with any other Total Wine & More Coupon or in combination with the Mix 6 Discount. Coupon valid in MO only. Not valid on previous purchases or delivery orders where applicable. Offer valid 5/29/2019 - 6/2/2019. Valid in-store and online. Limit one online code per customer. For in-store purchases, must present coupon at time of purchase. One-time-use coupon.

40000001963 40000001963

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online, and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid from 5/29/2019 through 6/2/2019 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2019 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

Sunday • 05.26.2019 • d

BASEBALL: ‘VELOCITY IS THE NUMBER ONE THING’

Velocity is changing the game

PHOTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST BY DAVID RYDER

Driveline Baseball in Kent, Wash., is key to understanding baseball’s velocity movement.

Driveline has done as much as any entity to cultivate speed

An app displays data from an athlete’s pitch, which was tracked by a camera system at Driveline Baseball.

WASHINGTON POST

KENT, Wash. — The epicenter of baseball’s velocity movement smells like a gym, looks like a highend camera store and sounds like an out-of-sync kick-drum, the arrhythmic beat provided by the thump-thump-thump of weighted baseballs being flung against a padded wall. In a batting cage outfitted with high-speed cameras, data-tracking units and video monitors, a succession of pitchers pump full-throttle fastballs into catcher’s mitts — then consult with an iPad-wielding coach to go over results — while other athletes lift weights off to the side, and still others hurl color-coded balls weighing between 3.5 ounces and

four pounds (a standard baseball weighs five ounces) into the wall from point-blank range. To understand how velocity has taken over the sport — with the average fastball in Major League Baseball rising nearly four mph in the past 18 years, creating a cascade of changes to the essential nature of the game — Driveline Baseball is as good a place as any to start. A bleak industrial park about 20 minutes south of Seattle — with neighbors ranging from a plumbing company to a wine importer to a company that manufactures and sells hydraulic lifts — is a strange place to find baseball’s most successful and influential biomechanics laboratory.

PHOTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST BY DOUG KAPUSTIN

High School basketball star Anthony Harris works with a resistance band during a rehab appointment in Falls Church, Va., as part of his recovery from a torn ACL.

Year-round basketball may be cause of rise in ACL tears WASHINGTON POST

Long before high school basketball star Anthony Harris tore his ACL in December, his father was doing his best to prevent his son from suffering the serious knee injury. Anthony Harris Sr. visited multiple doctors and trainers and asked what workouts were best for strengthening the knee. He had them run tests to see how vulnerable his son — a senior at Paul VI High School in Fairfax, Virginia, who is

signed to play at the University of North Carolina next season — was to getting hurt. He built rest time into his training schedule. “There was a lot of things we tried to do to prevent him getting injured,” Harris Sr. said. However, the precautionary approach wasn’t able to keep Harris from tearing Please see BASKETBALL, Page D3

Driveline’s mission, according to founder Kyle Boddy, is “data-driven player development.” But in terms of where it fits within baseball’s shifting landscape, Driveline is best known as “that place where pitchers disappear for the winter and show up the next spring with a few extra ticks on their fastballs.” Driveline didn’t invent velocity — or “velo,” in the industry vernacular — but it has done perhaps as much as any other entity in existence to cultivate and hone it. “Velocity is the number one thing,” said the 36-year-old Boddy, a former collegiate pitcher, Microsoft software developer, competitive Please see VELOCITY, Page D7

JOE GIDDENS, PA VIA AP

Norwich City players celebrate in Norwich, England, earlier this month after securing promotion to the Premier League and winning the second-tier League Championship.

EPL’s $215 million playoff is biggest in team sports BY BLOOMBERG

The biggest financial prize in sports gets awarded next week, and it won’t be going to the NBA champs. Two English soccer teams are battling for at least $215 million. Derby County Football Club and Aston Villa Football Club meet Monday in London for the highly coveted final spot in the Premier League next season. Getting pro-

moted to the world’s most-popular soccer league lets the winner share in the riches of its billion-dollar media deals. The loser returns to England’s second division for another season. The winner will take in at least 170 million pounds ($215 million US) in added revenue over the next three years, Please see SOCCER, Page D3

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 • D

ORIGINAL BLUES SET STAGE STANLEY CUP FINAL BLUES VS. BRUINS

Scorned by some, teams proud of what they accomplished

Monday 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5)

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

”Hockey’s version of the ‘nouveau riche’ are the St. Louis Blues. The Blues have been Stanley Cup finalists for the past two years, but that doesn’t mean a thing. They reached the finals by defeating their minor league opponents in the West Division. When the chips were down, the Blues proved that they were less than first class.” Those were the words of Stan Fischler prior to the 1970 Stanley Cup Final, a writer described at the time by legendary

Wednesday 7 p.m. at Boston, NBCSN Saturday 6/1 7 p.m. at Enterprise, NBCSN Monday 6/3 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5) *Thursday 6/6 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5) *Sunday 6/9 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5) *Wed. 6/12 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5) * If necessary

Please see BLUES, Page D6

INSIDE

RAY LUSSIER, BOSTON RECORD AMERICAN

> Why wait? Blues are eager to get back into action. D6 > Blues are a big deal in Saskatchewan. D7

Bobby Orr goes into orbit after scoring the goal that won the Stanley Cup for the Bruins in 1970 against the Blues at Boston Garden.

COMING MONDAY > Get ready for the Stanley Cup Final with our special preview section.

Cards get back above .500

Orr image is iconic one in hockey lore BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For decades, his Boston accent has been phonetic fugitive, hidden like the Whitey Bulger of dialects. It seldom reveals itself, Randy Lussier explained, but during an exciting moment on the phone Friday, well … “He moseyed over and there was an empty stool,” said Lussier, telling a story – the story – about his late father. “And then he goes: ‘Oh my GAWWWD!’” Photographer Ray Lussier worked for the Boston Record American (now the Herald). It was May 10, 1970. Game 4, Stanley Cup Final, Blues at Bruins. Overtime. Lussier’s assigned shooting hole, cut out of the glass, was on the end where the Bruins goalie would be. But the Bruins led in the series, 3-0. The shot to get would be of the Please see HOCHMAN, Page D6

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Jedd Gyorko smacks a pinch-hit, three-run home run in the eighth inning Saturday night against the Braves.

Gyorko’s three-run HR in eighth inning is big blow in win

Cardinals 6, Braves 3

BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One of the biggest issues the Cardinals have had in a moribund May that weakened their claim as a contender was getting their best players at their best in the best spots change games. Too often All-Star leadoff hitter Matt Carpenter didn’t get on base so that only rarely did Paul Goldschmidt, the best bat in the lineup, hit with a runner in scoring position. Early deficits meant the Cardinals’ offense spent most of the game swimming upstream for rallies, and late deficits gave them no reason to use their best arm, closer Jordan Hicks. Goldschmidt had 12 at-bats with runners in scoring position in May before Saturday’s game, and Hicks hadn’t had a save opportunity in nearly four weeks. Their best never meshed. With two rallies Saturday to avoid becoming a losing team,

Up next: 6:05 p.m. Sunday vs. Braves, ESPN Flaherty (4-3, 4.19) vs. Teheran (3-4, 3.67) Carlson heads class of young Cards hitting prospects. D3

Jedd Gyorko, center, celebrates with Marcell Ozuna and Matt Carpenter after Gyorko’s three-run home run gave the Cardinals a 6-3 lead Saturday. the Cardinals made that happen. Goldschmidt snapped an early tie with an RBI single, Carpenter tied the game in the eighth, and after a pinch-hit sock from Jedd Gyorko, Hicks got his save opportunity. The righthander closed the ninth for a 6-3 victory against Atlanta at Busch Stadium. The Cardinals trailed 3-2 en-

tering the bottom of the eighth but a key replay challenge kept the inning alive. Instead of hitting into a deflating double play, the replay revealed that Paul DeJong had outrun the throw to first base. That allowed him to take third on Marcell Ozuna’s single and score on Carpenter’s single past shortstop. That tied the game, 3-3. Pinch-hitting for

Ending curse would be big for Blues GM BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

the pitcher, Gyorko jumped on the second pitch from Dan Winkler for his first home run of the season. Gyorko’s three-run blast earned him a curtain call that proved as cathartic as it was celebratory. The Cardinals didn’t sink below .500 for the first time since April 7. Gyorko’s homer was his first as a pinch-hitter since May 2015. Hicks’ 10th save of the season his first since April 29. The rally cleaned up a game that starter Dakota Hudson had a grip on early. The righthander pitched 6 1/3 innings and allowed two runs on five hits. He left the

The phone calls come on the good days, after a sister does her best to make sure her father can understand his son. Dad has Parkinson’s and the dementia that sometimes accompanies it. The good days are becoming harder to find. Family and staff members at the assisted living center in Sarnia, Ontario, try to keep the 86-year-old hockey Hall of Famer up to date on the St. Louis Blues. Sometimes it’s hard to tell what sinks in. When the clouds part, the son calls. The sister holds the phone. Dad listens. Neil Armstrong’s 22-year career as a respected NHL linesman secured him a place in hockey’s hall along with one heck of a nickname: Iron Man. His career workload reached an impressive 1,744 games. Then he switched his stripes for scouting and

Please see CARDINALS, Page D4

Please see FREDERICKSON, Page D7

SPORTS

2 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 05.26.2019 • D

ORIGINAL BLUES SET STAGE STANLEY CUP FINAL BLUES VS. BRUINS

Scorned by some, teams proud of what they accomplished

Monday 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5)

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

”Hockey’s version of the ‘nouveau riche’ are the St. Louis Blues. The Blues have been Stanley Cup finalists for the past two years, but that doesn’t mean a thing. They reached the finals by defeating their minor league opponents in the West Division. When the chips were down, the Blues proved that they were less than first class.” Those were the words of Stan Fischler prior to the 1970 Stanley Cup Final, a writer described at the time by legendary

Wednesday 7 p.m. at Boston, NBCSN Saturday 6/1 7 p.m. at Enterprise, NBCSN Monday 6/3 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5) *Thursday 6/6 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5) *Sunday 6/9 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5) *Wed. 6/12 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5) * If necessary

Please see BLUES, Page D6

INSIDE

RAY LUSSIER, BOSTON RECORD AMERICAN

> Why wait? Blues are eager to get back into action. D6 > Blues are a big deal in Saskatchewan. D7

Bobby Orr goes into orbit after scoring the goal that won the Stanley Cup for the Bruins in 1970 against the Blues at Boston Garden.

COMING MONDAY > Get ready for the Stanley Cup Final with our special preview section.

Cards get back above .500

Orr image is iconic one in hockey lore BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

For decades, his Boston accent has been phonetic fugitive, hidden like the Whitey Bulger of dialects. It seldom reveals itself, Randy Lussier explained, but during an exciting moment on the phone Friday, well … “He moseyed over and there was an empty stool,” said Lussier, telling a story – the story – about his late father. “And then he goes: ‘Oh my GAWWWD!’” Photographer Ray Lussier worked for the Boston Record American (now the Herald). It was May 10, 1970. Game 4, Stanley Cup Final, Blues at Bruins. Overtime. Lussier’s assigned shooting hole, cut out of the glass, was on the end where the Bruins goalie would be. But the Bruins led in the series, 3-0. The shot to get would be of the Please see HOCHMAN, Page D6

PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Jedd Gyorko smacks a pinch-hit, three-run home run in the eighth inning Saturday night against the Braves.

Gyorko’s three-run HR in eighth inning is big blow in win

Cardinals 6, Braves 3

BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

They had seized the lead, misplaced the lead, and teetered right there on the edge, staring into the crevasse in the standings that leads to a losing record when the Cardinals finally found the team they intend to be. The team they once were, the team they talked about finding again during a private team meeting Saturday, and the team they needed to be pulled together in the eighth inning to rally against Atlanta for a 6-3 victory at Busch Stadium. Down by a run entering the inning, the Cardinals turned three singles and one replay challenge into a tie game before Jedd Gyorko wrenched them ahead with a tiebreaking, three-run homer. His jolt was as cathartic as it was dramatic. The dugout exhaled. In the handshake line to celebrate the win that avoided a losing record, catcher Yadier

Up next: 6:05 p.m. Sunday vs. Braves, ESPN Flaherty (4-3, 4.19) vs. Teheran (3-4, 3.67) Carlson heads class of young Cards hitting prospects. D3

Jedd Gyorko, center, celebrates with Marcell Ozuna and Matt Carpenter after Gyorko’s three-run home run gave the Cardinals a 6-3 lead Saturday. Molina echoed a message from earlier in the day. “That’s how we play,” he said. “That’s who we are,” manager Mike Shildt said. “And that is how we play, and that is a representation of how we do when we put it all together. It’s pretty special when you see it there. Guys scratched, clawed, believed and dug in and got it done. You just

have to fight, man.” Starter Dakota Hudson gave the Cardinals a career-best 6 1/3 innings and left the game with a one-run lead. A leadoff double in the seventh however baited the mousetrap that snapped on reliever Carlos Martinez. With three doubles in the inning, two off Martinez, Atlanta had flipped the game, filched a 3-2 lead, and

Ending curse would be big for Blues GM BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

put the Cardinals two innings away from a 25-26 record almost a third of the way through the season. A moribund May, assured of being their fourth losing month in their past six, weakened their claim to being a contender and left their results looking too similar to recent seasons. Although a record is hard to outrun, Shildt has insisted the play, the process, and the statistics all say differently, and Gyorko shared a similar sentiment with his teammates during their gathering Saturday, one organized and confirmed by players.

The phone calls come on the good days, after a sister does her best to make sure her father can understand his son. Dad has Parkinson’s and the dementia that sometimes accompanies it. The good days are becoming harder to find. Family and staff members at the assisted living center in Sarnia, Ontario, try to keep the 86-year-old hockey Hall of Famer up to date on the St. Louis Blues. Sometimes it’s hard to tell what sinks in. When the clouds part, the son calls. The sister holds the phone. Dad listens. Neil Armstrong’s 22-year career as a respected NHL linesman secured him a place in hockey’s hall along with one heck of a nickname: Iron Man. His career workload reached an impressive 1,744 games. Then he switched his stripes for scouting and

Please see CARDINALS, Page D4

Please see FREDERICKSON, Page D7

SPORTS

4 M


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 5/25 vs. Braves 6:15 p.m. KTVI (2)

Sunday 5/26 vs. Braves 6:05 p.m, ESPN

Tuesday 5/28 at Phillies 6:05 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 5/29 at Phillies 6:05 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Monday 5/27 Game 1: 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5)

Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 Game 2: 7 p.m. at Game 3: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, Boston, NBCSN NBCSN

Monday 6/3 Game 4: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5)

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 vs. Memphis U.S. Open Cup 7:30 p.m. vs. Madison, 7 p.m.

Saturday 6/8 at Hartford 6 p.m.

Saturday 6/15 at Bethlehem 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Sat. 5/25: vs. Evansville, 6:35 p.m. Tue. 5/28: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m. Sun. 5/26: vs. Evansville, 6:05 p.m. Wed. 5/29: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STLFC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR Saturday AUTO RACING 7:30 a.m. NASCAR: Coca-Cola 600, practice, FS1 7:55 a.m. Formula One: Monaco Grand Prix, qualifying, ESPN2 8:30 a.m. NASCAR Xfinity: Alsco 300, qualifying, FS1 10 a.m. NASCAR: Coca-Cola 600, final practice, FS1 12 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: Alsco 300, FS1 BASEBALL 9 a.m. Big Ten Tournament: Michigan vs. Nebraska, BTN 9 a.m. Big 12 Tournament: West Virginia vs. Texas Tech, FSM Plus 11 a.m. Big South Tournament: Campbell vs. TBA, ESPNU 12 p.m. ACC Tournament: North Carolina vs. Boston College, FSM 12 p.m. SEC Tournament: Georgia vs. Mississippi, SEC Network 12:30 p.m. Big 12 Tournament: Oklahoma State vs. TBA, FSM Plus 1 p.m. Big Ten Tournament: Ohio State vs. TBA, BTN 1:20 p.m. Reds at Cubs, MLB Network 3 p.m. Diamondbacks at Giants, FS1 3:30 p.m. SEC Tournament: Vanderbilt vs. LSU, SEC Network 4 p.m. Big 12 Tournament: Teams TBA, FSM Plus 4 p.m. ACC Tournament: Georgia Tech vs. N. Carolina St., FSM 5 p.m. Big Ten Tournament: Teams TBA, BTN 6:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Braves, KTVI (2), KMOX (1120 AM) 7:30 p.m. Big 12 Tournament: Teams TBA, FSM Plus 9 p.m. Big Ten Tournament: Teams TBA, BTN 9 p.m. Rangers at Angels, MLB Network BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. WNBA: Phoenix at Seattle, KDNL (30) 7 p.m. WNBA: Chicago at Minnesota, CBSSN 7:30 p.m. NBA playoffs: Bucks at Raptors, TNT BOXING 5 p.m. PBC Fight Night, Prelims, FS2 6 p.m. PBC Fight Night, Prelims, FS1 7 p.m. Super welterweights: Austin Trout vs. Terrell Gausha, FS1 9 p.m. Super featherweights: Masayuki Ito vs. Jamel Herring, ESPN GOLF 12 p.m. PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, third round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, third round, KMOV (4) 2 p.m. Senior PGA Championship, third round, KSDK (5) 2 p.m. LPGA: Pure Silk Championship, third round, GOLF 5:30 a.m. (Sun.) European PGA: Made in Denmark, final round, GOLF LACROSSE 11 a.m. NCAA Tournament: Virginia vs. Duke, ESPN2 1:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Yale vs. Penn State, ESPN2 RUGBY 7:30 a.m. Premiership: Saracens vs. Gloucester Rugby, NBCSN 5 p.m. Major League: Austin at Houston SaberCats, CBSSN SOCCER 8:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Portugal vs. South Korea, FS2 10:50 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: France vs. Saudi Arabia, FS2 12:55 p.m. Deutsche Pokal final: Leipzig vs. Bayern Munich, ESPNews 1:20 p.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Argentina vs. South Africa, FS2 SOFTBALL 11 a.m. NCAA Tournament: Oklahoma State vs. Florida State, ESPN 1 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Texas vs. Alabama, ESPN 3 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Oklahoma vs. Northwestern, ESPN 5 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Florida vs. Tennessee, ESPN 5 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Minnesota vs. LSU, ESPN2 7 p.m. NCAA Tournament: UCLA vs. James Madison, ESPN 7 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Arizona vs. Mississippi, ESPN2 9 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Washington vs. Kentucky, ESPN2 TENNIS 3 p.m. NCAA Men’s Singles final, Tennis Channel 7 p.m. NCAA Women’s Singles final, Tennis Channel 4 a.m. (Sun.) French Open, first round, Tennis Channel

WEBSTER UNIVERSITY PHOTO

Webster University’s Ben Swords entered the weekend hitting a team-leading .363. He also leads the Gorloks in hits (62), runs (47), doubles (19) and RBIs (51).

Webster advances to within one victory of World Series BY JOE LYONS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Webster University baseball team took a step toward the NCAA Division III baseball championships Friday, knocking off No. 2 Concordia of Chicago 4-3 in the Midwest Super Regional in River Forest, Ill. The 18th-ranked Gorloks (3611) and Cougars (42-9) will meet again Saturday at 11 a.m. A deciding game, if needed, would be played later Saturday. The Webster-Concordia winner advances to the World Series next week in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Webster jumped on top 3-0 Friday, but after Concordia tied it in the sixth, the Gorloks came up with the winning run in the bottom of the seventh. After Webster’s Matt Staker doubled and took third on a bunt single by Danny Strohm (Lutheran South), Staker scored on a fielder’s choice as Strohm was forced at second on a grounder by Aron Hopp. Staker had two hits and an RBI to lead the Gorloks. Sean Beaver (8-3) pitched into the eighth for the win, while Adrian Santiago finished to record his ninth save. Leading the way for Webster this season is junior righthander Matt Mulhearn (12-2, 2.01 ERA) and sophomore third baseman Ben Swords, who entered the postseason hitting .354 and leading the Gorloks with 51 RBIs. Both Mulhearn and Swords were named all-league and second-team all-region. Staker, a sophomore shortstop, also earned all-league honors. The other .300 hitters in the Gorloks lineup are senior right fielder Nate Tholl (.325, 22 steals), junior left fielder A.J. Smith (.324, 29 RBIs) and sophomore Staker (.301, 36 RBIs).

McKENDREE WINS FISHING TITLE With a pair of boats in the top 15, McKendree won its first Bass Pro Shops School of the Year title Friday. At the BoatUS Collegiate Bass Fishing National Championship at Pickwick Lake in Alabama, the Bearcats clinched the season title as Trevor McKinney/Blake Johnson took fifth and Nate Doty/Jacob Louis finished 11th.

HONOR ROLL SLU senior Connor Lehmann set a school and conference record with 19 strikeouts, but Rhode Island scored twice in the bottom of the 10th for a 2-1 walk-off win in the league tournament. The previous SLU mark was 16 strikeouts by Mike Ruhman in 1996. The Billikens (25-30) had two players earn A-10 honors. Junior Jake Garella (Edwardsville) was named for the second time after leading the squad in batting average (.330), hits (75), RBIs (46) and doubles (27). Junior center fielder Corrigan Bartlett hit .310 and scored 39 runs. „ Lindenwood’s men’s golf team placed a program-best 12th at the NCAA DII championships earlier this week in West Virginia. The Lions were led by freshman Joe MacNeil, who tied for 28th. Lindenwood senior Brad Currier earned the Elite 90 award given to the student-athlete with the highest GPA at each NCAA championship event „ Washington U.’s Nick Matteucci (Parkway South) earned his second Elite 90 award at the NCAA DIII men’s track and field championships. Matteucci, who’s competing in the 1,500 and 5,000, has a 4.0 GPA in chemical engineering. „ Missouri sophomore Sophia

Rivera (Brentwood) and senior Becky Keating earned trips to the NCAA track and field championships with performances on Thursday. Rivera qualified 11th in the javelin while Keating was 12th in the hammer throw in Sacramento, Calif. „ Missouri State’s Drew Millas (Belleville East) repeated as a Missouri Valley Conference firstteamer in baseball. Millas hit .275 with five homers and 25 RBIs. „ UMSL golfer Joel Sylven has been named winner of the DII Phil Mickelson Outstanding Freshman Award. The Tritons placed 10th nationally this week at the NCAA DII championships in Daniels, W.Va. Sophomore Reilly Ahearn (Ladue) led UMSL by tying for 28th. Sylven and Ahearn were named to the All-Midwest team. „ Webster sophomore Jacob Ridenhour (Jerseyville) made history Thursday, qualifying fifth in the preliminary rounds to earn a spot in the 200 final at the NCAA Division II Track and Field Championships in Geneva, Ohio. „ Missouri Baptist athletes competing at the NAIA Track and Field Championships in Gulf Shores, Ala., include, among the men, Tremaine Bobo (Parkway North) in the long jump, Kyle Christopher (Wright City) in the discus, Elijah McNairy (Parkway North) in the 110 hurdles, Adam Vincent in the pole vault, and Jordan Crawford in the 5000-meter race walk. Among the women, Megan McCrary (Fort Zumwalt South) in the long jump and triple jump, Sydney Neiter (Farmington) in the high jump, Maegan Saleh (Marquette) in the long jump, and Becca Starrett (Edwardsville) in the 3000-meter steeplechase. Joe Lyons @joelyonspd on twitter jlyons@post-dispatch.com

Sunday’s highlights AUTO RACING 8:05 a.m. Formula One: Monaco Grand Prix, ESPN 11 a.m. Indianapolis 500, KSDK (5) 5 p.m. NASCAR: Coca-Cola 600, KTVI (2) BASEBALL 1 p.m. Phillies at Brewers, MLB Network 6:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Braves, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) GOLF 12 p.m. PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, final round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, final round, KMOV (4) 2 p.m. Senior PGA Championship, final round, GOLF 3 p.m. Senior PGA Championship, final round, KSDK (5) 3 p.m. LPGA: Pure Silk Championship, final round, GOLF SOCCER 10:30 a.m. Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Mexico, ESPN 5 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC vs. Seattle, Fox Sports 1 SOFTBALL 1 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Northwestern vs. Oklahoma, ESPN 1 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Tennessee vs. Florida, ESPNU 3 p.m. NCAA Tournament: LSU vs. Minnesota, ESPN 3 p.m. NCAA Tournament: James Madison vs. UCLA, ESPNU 7 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Mississippi vs. Arizona, ESPN2 9 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Kentucky vs. Washington, ESPN2

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch. com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

DIGEST Blixt takes lead in Colonial golf Jonas Blixt holed out for 132 yards for eagle on the par-4 17th, highlighting a 6-under 64 that gave him the second-round lead at the PGA Tour’s Colonial on Friday in Fort Worth, Texas. Blixt was 9 under after his bogey-free round, one stroke better than Kevin Na (62) and firstround leader Tony Finau (68). Local favorite and 2016 Colonial winner Jordan Spieth, a stroke off the lead after the first round, shot 70 and was four behind Blixt. Other golf: Defending champion Paul Broadhurst and Esteban Toledo shared the lead after two rounds in the Senior PGA Championship. Broadhurst and Toledo both shot 3-under 67 to reach 3-under 137 at Oak Hill Country Club’s East Course in Pittsford, N.Y. ... Matthias Schwab shot a 5-under 66 to reach 8 under for a one-stroke lead at the European Tour’s Made in Denmark event. .... Jennifer Song, Jacqui Concolino and Bronte Law share the second-round lead in the LPGA Tour’s Pure Silk Championship. Concolino shot a 4-under 67 to tie Song (68) and Law (68) at 9-under 133 at Kingsmill Resort Williamsburg, Va. ... Michelle Wie has withdrawn from next week’s

U.S. Women’s Open to continue Other tennis: After a tantrum in her recovery from a hand injury. Italy last week, the 36th-ranked Nick Kyrgios withdrew from the (AP) French Open on Friday. The ATP Suh has deal with Bucs: Defen- said the Australian player cited sive tackle Ndamukong Suh, who illness as the reason. ... Fourthhelped the Rams make the Super seeded Caroline Garcia won Bowl last season, has agreed to an all-French matchup against terms with Tampa Bay. Suh made Chloe Paquet to reach the final $14 million on a one-year contract of the Internationaux de Straslast season in Los Angeles. He’ll bourg on Friday in France. Garcia make $9.25 million with the Bucs. won 6-3, 6-4 and will battle for the title with No. 6 seed Dayana (AP) Yastremska of Ukraine. YastremDe Sousa back for KU: Kansas for- ska upset second-seeded Aryna ward Silvio De Sousa will be eligi- Sabalenka 6-4, 6-4. (AP) ble to play basketball next season after the NCAA’s reinstatement Mizzou makes coaching change committee agreed Friday with an to swimming programs: Mizappeal filed by the school. The zou’s swimming and diving teams NCAA had declared De Sousa in- have a new head coach. He’s no eligible this past season and next stranger to the program. The season in early February after his school removed the interim coach named surfaced in an FBI probe title from Andrew Grevers, who into corruption in college bas- served in that capacity this past ketball. (AP) season while coach Greg Rhodenbaugh was placed on paid adZverev, Jarry in Geneva final: ministrative leave as MU invesAlexander Zverev will seek his tigated undisclosed allegations first title this season against related to “team management 75th-ranked Nicolas Jarry in the issues.” Grevers, an assistant on Geneva Open final on Saturday. Rhodenbaugh’s staff since 2010, Top-seeded Zverev was pushed led the MU men’s team to a prohard in a 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-3 win over gram-best second-place finish at Federico Delbonis of Argentina. this past season’s SEC ChampiUnseeded Chilean Jarry advanced onships and an 11th-place tie at to his first career final by beating the NCAA Championships while fifth-seeded Radu Albot of Mol- the women’s team finished 22nd. dova 6-3, 6-4. (AP) (Dave Matter)


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

FRENCH OPEN

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 5/26 vs. Braves 6:05 p.m, ESPN

Tuesday 5/28 at Phillies 6:05 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 5/29 at Phillies 6:05 p.m. FSM

Thursday 5/30 at Phillies 12:05 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Monday 5/27 Game 1: 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5)

Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 Game 2: 7 p.m. at Game 3: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, Boston, NBCSN NBCSN

Monday 6/3 Game 4: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5)

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 vs. Memphis U.S. Open Cup 7:30 p.m. vs. Madison, 7 p.m.

Saturday 6/8 at Hartford 6 p.m.

Saturday 6/15 at Bethlehem 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Sun. 5/26: vs. Evansville, 6:05 p.m. Tue. 5/28: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m. Wed. 6/5: vs. Lake Erie, 5:05 p.m. Wed. 5/29: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR Sunday AUTO RACING 8:05 a.m. Formula One: Monaco Grand Prix, ESPN 11 a.m.

Indianapolis 500, KSDK (5)

5 p.m.

NASCAR: Coca-Cola 600, KTVI (2)

GREGORIO BORGIA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Top-ranked Naomi Osaka withdrew from her Italian Open quarterfinal due to a right hand injury, but she is more confident she’s past the injury and her lack of success on clay, heading into her first-round match Tuesday.

BASEBALL 10 a.m.

AAC final: Cincinnati vs. Connecticut, ESPNews

11 a.m.

ACC final: North Carolina vs. Georgia Tech, ESPN2

1 p.m.

Big Ten final: Teams TBA, BTN

1 p.m.

Big 12 final: Teams TBA, FSM

1 p.m.

C-USA final: Florida Atlantic vs. So. Mississippi, CBSSN

1 p.m.

Phillies at Brewers, MLB Network

2 p.m.

SEC final: Mississippi vs. Vanderbilt, ESPN2

BY HOWARD FENDRICH

Associated Press

6:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Braves, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) GOLF 12 p.m.

PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, final round, GOLF

2 p.m.

PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, final round, KMOV (4)

2 p.m.

Senior PGA Championship, final round, GOLF

3 p.m.

Senior PGA Championship, final round, KSDK (5)

3 p.m.

LPGA: Pure Silk Championship, final round, GOLF

HOCKEY 6 p.m.

Memorial Cup final: Halifax vs. Rouyn-Noranda, NHL Network

LACROSSE 11 a.m.

Women’s NCAA final: Maryland vs. Boston College, ESPNU

MOTORCYCLE RACING 9 a.m.

Motocross MX2, France, Race 1, CBSSN

10 a.m.

Motocross MXGP, France, Race 1, CBSSN

SOCCER 8:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Mexico vs. Japan, FS1 10:30 a.m. Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Mexico, ESPN 10:50 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Ecuador vs. Italy, FS1 1:20 p.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Poland vs. Tahiti, FS1 5 p.m.

MLS: Sporting KC vs. Seattle, Fox Sports 1

SOFTBALL 1 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: Northwestern vs. Oklahoma, ESPN

1 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: Tennessee vs. Florida, ESPNU

3 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: LSU vs. Minnesota, ESPN

3 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: James Madison vs. UCLA, ESPNU

7 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: Mississippi vs. Arizona, ESPN2

9 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: Kentucky vs. Washington, ESPN2

TENNIS 4 a.m.

Osaka feeling comfortable on clay

(Mon.) French Open, first round, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Broadhurst leads in Senior PGA Championship Defending champion Paul Broadhurst waited out two storm delays to shoot a bogey-free third round Saturday and open a two-shot lead at the Senior PGA Championship in Pittsford, N.Y. The breaks in play didn’t affect the 53-year-old from England, who finished with a 3-under 67 and moved to 6-under 204 for the $3.25 million major at Oak Hill’s East Course. He entered the day as the co-leader with Esteban Toledo, who tumbled into seventh at 1 over for the tournament after shooting 4-over 74. Retief Goosen is second at 4 under after a 67. Ken Tanigawa is third at 3 under following a 66. Champions Tour moneyleader Scott McCarron moved into contention with a fourbirdie, one-bogey round to sit alone in fourth at 2 under. (AP) Canada, Finland in hockey final: Mark Stone scored his tournament-leading eighth goal, Matt Murray made 39 saves and Canada beat the Czech Republic 5-1 on Saturday night in Bratislava, Slovakia, to advance to face Finland in the world hockey championship final. In the first semifinal, Marko Anttila scored midway through the third period in Finland’s 1-0 victory over Russia. (AP) Reddick wins Xfinity race: Tyler Reddick won the Xfinity Series race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday after taking the lead for good on a restart with 15 laps to go. The defending Xfinity champion led 110 of 200 laps to win for the second time this season and the second time in three races. He finished more than two seconds ahead of Justin Allgaier. Jeffrey Earnhardt was third, followed by Noah Gragson and Justin Haley. Canadiens sign Kulak: The Montreal Canadiens have agreed to a three-year contract with defenseman Brett Kulak. The deal was announced Saturday and runs through the 2021-22 season, carrying an average annual value of $1.85 million. (AP) Zverev wins Geneva Open: Alexander Zverev saved two match points after waiting out two long rain delays to win his first title this season, beating Nicolas Jarry 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (8) in the Geneva Open final on Saturday. (AP) Webster headed to DIII World Series: Scoring runs in all but the ninth inning, visiting Webster University blew by No. 1-ranked Concordia of Chicago 17-6 Saturday to earn a spot in the NCAA Division III baseball College World Series. The 18th-ranked Gorloks (37-11), who won 4-3 Friday in the Midwest Super Regional, move on to play starting May 31 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Joe Lyons)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch. com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

PARIS — On the day Naomi Osaka won the Australian Open for her second consecutive major championship, she was asked whether it was too soon to start thinking about grabbing four in a row. “You know the French Open’s next, right?” she said, smiling and fiddling with her fingers. “We love that clay court.” The sarcasm was obvious. Osaka was well aware of her 4-3 career record at Roland Garros, where play begins Sunday, and her 5-4 mark on clay last season. Still, she also quickly acknowledged being intrigued by the idea of adding to the run that began at the 2018 U.S. Open in pursuit of a non-calendar Grand Slam: “I’m not going to lie and say that thought hasn’t crossed my mind.” Osaka is seeded No. 1 at a major for the first time, and her play on clay has been much better lately, with a semifinal and a pair of quarterfinals in the run-up to Paris. She also says the thumb and abdominal issues of recent weeks are now resolved. “I mean, definitely for me, I feel like I should be an all-court player. Honestly, it’s been a bit of a ride trying to figure out how to play better on clay throughout these years, but I think this year, I have been playing well,” said Osaka, who is to play Anna Karolina Schmiedlova in the first round Tuesday. “So I’m really excited to see what happens here.” Other things to watch at the French Open, the year’s second Grand Slam tournament:

Chatrier, was rebuilt over the past year in preparation for installing a retractable roof ahead of the 2020 tournament, while a new, 5,000seat show court surrounded by greenhouses will be inaugurated today. Court Simonne Mathieu is named after the Frenchwoman who won Roland Garros in 1938 and 1939, then volunteered for the nation’s army during World War II. That arena’s debut match features 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza against 96th-ranked Taylor Townsend of the United States.

Nadal will try to be the first to go past 11 and, thanks to his Italian Open title this month, suddenly seems to be ready to defend his King of Clay crown in Paris. “It wouldn’t be fair to pick anybody else but him as the main favorite, because he has won this tournament so many times,” said No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic, who lost to Nadal in the Rome final. “He has lost, what, two times in his career on Parisian clay?” Yep, Novak, that’s right. Nadal is 86-2 at the French Open.

Roger that

What a run

Roger Federer returns to play at the French Open for the first time since 2015, scheduled to face Lorenzo Sonego at Court Philippe Chatrier today. He missed the tournament in 2016 because of lingering back issues, then sat out the entire clay circuit each of the next two years to focus on preparing for the grass and hard courts. His 20 Grand Slam singles titles include one from France, exactly a decade ago. “In some ways, I’m happy to be here, and I just want to get through that first round to get the campaign going. That’s my focus right now,” he said. “Not thinking too far ahead.”

Djokovic is putting together quite a streak himself, with a chance to win four straight majors for the second time, something he called “extra motivation and incentive.” He’s also gaining on Federer’s 20 majors and Nadal’s 17; a title in France would bring Djokovic’s tally to 16. “This is the tournament that I was preparing for, so to say, for last couple of months. I wanted to peak in this tournament.”

O Canada

With three seeded players under the age of 20 — No. 20 Denis Shapovalov, No. 25 Felix AugerAliassime and No. 22 Bianca AnSerena’s health dreescu — Canada is expected to be Serena Williams has completed a major player on the tennis scene only three matches since her Aus- for years. tralian Open ended four months ago, and she cited a bothersome Among the missing left knee when pulling out of her Nick Kyrgios was the latest past two tournaments. So just how big name to withdraw from the healthy the 23-time major cham- field — and it comes after he was pion is will be a key storyline dur- kicked out of the Italian Open for ing Week 1. Williams is to face Vi- a temper tantrum and then bashed talia Diatchenko in the first round the French Open on social media. Monday. Other players who are missing, Roland renaissance and with well-documented injuThere’s change all around the Dirty dozen ries, include Andy Murray, Maria grounds of the French Open. The No one has ever won a Grand Sharapova, Kevin Anderson and main stadium, Court Philippe Slam singles title 12 times. Rafael John Isner.

Na settles for 69, 2-shot Colonial lead BY SCHUYLER DIXON

Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Tex. — If Jordan Spieth thinks a winless streak approaching two years seems like forever, he might want to check with fellow major winner Jim Furyk. Both have a chance to end droughts at Colonial — if they can overtake third-round leader Kevin Na today. Na settled for a 1-under 69 a day after going low at Colonial again, taking a two-shot lead at 9 under Saturday over a group that included the local favorite in Spieth and Furyk, the 2003 U.S. Open champion who hasn’t won in four years. “I’m not really looking at it as like the glass is half empty, the hourglass has almost run out of sand,” said the 49-year-old Furyk, who has just one of his 17 PGA Tour victories in the past nine years but was second at the Players Championship in March. “This year has been kind of a new lease on life.” Furyk, winless since 2015 at Hilton Head, matched the 68 of Spieth, whose last victory was his third major title at the 2017 British Open. Joining them at 7 under was C.T. Pan, who was tied with Na before bogeys on the final two holes. Pan settled for a 68 as well. First-round leader Tony Finau (71) fell into the group at 7 under with a bogey on 18 after hitting his driver into the water. Defending champion Justin Rose, the highest-ranked player in the field at No. 3, shot his second 74 in three rounds and is 5 over. Na recovered from a double bogey at the par-five 11th that cost him the lead, steadying himself

over the final seven holes. His 62 in the second round was his third at least that low over a span of six rounds at Colonial. After hitting driver into a bunker at 11, Na’s second shot caught the lip of the bunker as he turned in frustration because a fan’s cellphone went off during his swing. Caddy Kenny Harms lambasted the woman, and Na said he was upset until he saw the horrified look on her face. “He was screaming at her, and he has every right to do so,” Na said. “I felt bad for the lady. So I said, ‘C’mon Kenny. Let’s forget about it. Let’s just go.’” Only problem was, Na couldn’t seem to shake it. His third shot landed in a greenside bunker, and the fourth sailed over the green. A chip shot still didn’t reach the green, before another chip lipped out. Na made the short putt for a 7 before almost making a chip for birdie on 12 after another poor tee shot. His third and final birdie was an 18-footer on the par-three 13th. “Sometimes it takes a little bit of time to get yourself together after something like that happens and you make a double bogey,” said Na, who finished fourth at last year’s Colonial after tying the course record with a final-round 61. “I think I played pretty solid the rest of the way in.” Birdies among the leaders were fairly scarce with most of them playing in windy conditions that have made afternoon rounds difficult all week on the cozy course made famous by Ben Hogan. Second-round leader Jonas Blixt didn’t have any, opening

with a bogey on the easy par-5 first before three more in his 74. He is four shots back. The best rounds came from players with earlier tee times. Mackenzie Hughes shot 65 to join Spieth, Furyk and company. Charley Hoffman had the day’s best round at 7-under 63 and was tied at 6 under with Austin Cook, who shot 65. Spieth had all three of his birdies on the front nine, barely missing one on the back when his long chip at the par-3 16th lipped out. The 2016 Colonial champ, who was runner-up the years before and after that title, had his only bogey at 17, one of the 10 fairways he missed in 14 tries. “I’d like to hit more greens in regulation, and in order to do that, I’ve probably got to be playing out of more fairways,” said Spieth, coming off a tie for third at the PGA Championship for his first top-20 finish of the season. “It just comes down to ball-striking.” Pan, a month removed from his first career PGA Tour win at Hilton Head, recorded four birdies over the first 10 holes and held the lead alone after Na’s double bogey. The native of Taiwan avoided a double by making a testy putt on 17 before missing a short par attempt at 18. “I’m sure the experience at RBC (Heritage) helped me to get here,” said Pan, who overtook thirdround leader Dustin Johnson for that win. “I feel more comfortable on Sunday for sure. I know what I need to do in order to become the leader.” Spieth and Furyk know that feeling. It’s just been awhile.


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

M 4 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

FRENCH OPEN

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 5/26 vs. Braves 6:05 p.m, ESPN

Tuesday 5/28 at Phillies 6:05 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 5/29 at Phillies 6:05 p.m. FSM

Thursday 5/30 at Phillies 12:05 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Monday 5/27 Game 1: 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5)

Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 Game 2: 7 p.m. at Game 3: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, Boston, NBCSN NBCSN

Monday 6/3 Game 4: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5)

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 vs. Memphis U.S. Open Cup 7:30 p.m. vs. Madison, 7 p.m.

Saturday 6/8 at Hartford 6 p.m.

Saturday 6/15 at Bethlehem 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Sun. 5/26: vs. Evansville, 6:05 p.m. Tue. 5/28: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m. Wed. 6/5: vs. Lake Erie, 5:05 p.m. Wed. 5/29: vs. Florence, 7:05 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR Sunday AUTO RACING 8:05 a.m. Formula One: Monaco Grand Prix, ESPN 11 a.m.

Indianapolis 500, KSDK (5)

5 p.m.

NASCAR: Coca-Cola 600, KTVI (2)

GREGORIO BORGIA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Top-ranked Naomi Osaka withdrew from her Italian Open quarterfinal due to a right hand injury, but she is more confident she’s past the injury and her lack of success on clay, heading into her first-round match Tuesday.

BASEBALL 10 a.m.

AAC final: Cincinnati vs. Connecticut, ESPNews

11 a.m.

ACC final: North Carolina vs. Georgia Tech, ESPN2

Osaka feeling comfortable on clay

12 p.m.

Big Ten tournament: Minnesota vs. Ohio State

1 p.m.

Big 12 final: West Virginia vs. TBA, FSM

1 p.m.

C-USA final: Florida Atlantic vs. So. Mississippi, CBSSN

1 p.m.

Phillies at Brewers, MLB Network

BY HOWARD FENDRICH

Associated Press

2 p.m.

SEC final: Mississippi vs. Vanderbilt, ESPN2

3 p.m.

Big Ten final: Nebraska vs. early winner, BTN

6:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Braves, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) GOLF 12 p.m.

PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, final round, GOLF

2 p.m.

PGA: Charles Schwab Challenge, final round, KMOV (4)

2 p.m.

Senior PGA Championship, final round, GOLF

3 p.m.

Senior PGA Championship, final round, KSDK (5)

3 p.m.

LPGA: Pure Silk Championship, final round, GOLF

HOCKEY 6 p.m.

Memorial Cup final: Halifax vs. Rouyn-Noranda, NHL Network

LACROSSE 11 a.m.

Women’s NCAA final: Maryland vs. Boston College, ESPNU

MOTORCYCLE RACING 9 a.m.

Motocross MX2, France, Race 1, CBSSN

10 a.m.

Motocross MXGP, France, Race 1, CBSSN

SOCCER 8:20 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Mexico vs. Japan, FS1 10:30 a.m. Women’s exhibition: United States vs. Mexico, ESPN 10:50 a.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Ecuador vs. Italy, FS1 1:20 p.m. FIFA U-20 World Cup: Poland vs. Tahiti, FS1 5 p.m.

MLS: Sporting KC vs. Seattle, Fox Sports 1

SOFTBALL 1 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: Tennessee vs. Florida, ESPNU

9 p.m.

NCAA Tournament: Kentucky vs. Washington, ESPN2

TENNIS 4 a.m.

(Mon.) French Open, first round, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Broadhurst leads in Senior PGA Championship Defending champion Paul Broadhurst waited out two storm delays to shoot a bogey-free third round Saturday and open a two-shot lead at the Senior PGA Championship in Pittsford, N.Y. The breaks in play didn’t affect the 53-year-old from England, who finished with a 3-under 67 and moved to 6-under 204 for the $3.25 million major at Oak Hill’s East Course. He entered the day as the co-leader with Esteban Toledo, who tumbled into seventh at 1 over for the tournament after shooting 4-over 74. Retief Goosen is second at 4 under after a 67. Ken Tanigawa is third at 3 under following a 66. Champions Tour moneyleader Scott McCarron moved into contention with a fourbirdie, one-bogey round to sit alone in fourth at 2 under. (AP) Canada, Finland in hockey final: Mark Stone scored his tournament-leading eighth goal, Matt Murray made 39 saves and Canada beat the Czech Republic 5-1 on Saturday night in Bratislava, Slovakia, to advance to face Finland in the world hockey championship final. In the first semifinal, Marko Anttila scored midway through the third period in Finland’s 1-0 victory over Russia. (AP) Reddick wins Xfinity race: Tyler Reddick won the Xfinity Series race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Saturday after taking the lead for good on a restart with 15 laps to go. The defending Xfinity champion led 110 of 200 laps to win for the second time this season and the second time in three races. He finished more than two seconds ahead of Justin Allgaier. Jeffrey Earnhardt was third, followed by Noah Gragson and Justin Haley. Canadiens sign Kulak: The Montreal Canadiens have agreed to a three-year contract with defenseman Brett Kulak. The deal was announced Saturday and runs through the 2021-22 season, carrying an average annual value of $1.85 million. (AP) Zverev wins Geneva Open: Alexander Zverev saved two match points after waiting out two long rain delays to win his first title this season, beating Nicolas Jarry 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (8) in the Geneva Open final on Saturday. (AP) Webster headed to DIII World Series: Scoring runs in all but the ninth inning, visiting Webster University blew by No. 1-ranked Concordia of Chicago 17-6 Saturday to earn a spot in the NCAA Division III baseball College World Series. The 18th-ranked Gorloks (37-11), who won 4-3 Friday in the Midwest Super Regional, move on to play starting May 31 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Joe Lyons)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch. com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

PARIS — On the day Naomi Osaka won the Australian Open for her second consecutive major championship, she was asked whether it was too soon to start thinking about grabbing four in a row. “You know the French Open’s next, right?” she said, smiling and fiddling with her fingers. “We love that clay court.” The sarcasm was obvious. Osaka was well aware of her 4-3 career record at Roland Garros, where play begins Sunday, and her 5-4 mark on clay last season. Still, she also quickly acknowledged being intrigued by the idea of adding to the run that began at the 2018 U.S. Open in pursuit of a non-calendar Grand Slam: “I’m not going to lie and say that thought hasn’t crossed my mind.” Osaka is seeded No. 1 at a major for the first time, and her play on clay has been much better lately, with a semifinal and a pair of quarterfinals in the run-up to Paris. She also says the thumb and abdominal issues of recent weeks are now resolved. “I mean, definitely for me, I feel like I should be an all-court player. Honestly, it’s been a bit of a ride trying to figure out how to play better on clay throughout these years, but I think this year, I have been playing well,” said Osaka, who is to play Anna Karolina Schmiedlova in the first round Tuesday. “So I’m really excited to see what happens here.” Other things to watch at the French Open, the year’s second Grand Slam tournament:

Chatrier, was rebuilt over the past year in preparation for installing a retractable roof ahead of the 2020 tournament, while a new, 5,000seat show court surrounded by greenhouses will be inaugurated today. Court Simonne Mathieu is named after the Frenchwoman who won Roland Garros in 1938 and 1939, then volunteered for the nation’s army during World War II. That arena’s debut match features 2016 champion Garbine Muguruza against 96th-ranked Taylor Townsend of the United States.

Nadal will try to be the first to go past 11 and, thanks to his Italian Open title this month, suddenly seems to be ready to defend his King of Clay crown in Paris. “It wouldn’t be fair to pick anybody else but him as the main favorite, because he has won this tournament so many times,” said No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic, who lost to Nadal in the Rome final. “He has lost, what, two times in his career on Parisian clay?” Yep, Novak, that’s right. Nadal is 86-2 at the French Open.

Roger that

What a run

Roger Federer returns to play at the French Open for the first time since 2015, scheduled to face Lorenzo Sonego at Court Philippe Chatrier today. He missed the tournament in 2016 because of lingering back issues, then sat out the entire clay circuit each of the next two years to focus on preparing for the grass and hard courts. His 20 Grand Slam singles titles include one from France, exactly a decade ago. “In some ways, I’m happy to be here, and I just want to get through that first round to get the campaign going. That’s my focus right now,” he said. “Not thinking too far ahead.”

Djokovic is putting together quite a streak himself, with a chance to win four straight majors for the second time, something he called “extra motivation and incentive.” He’s also gaining on Federer’s 20 majors and Nadal’s 17; a title in France would bring Djokovic’s tally to 16. “This is the tournament that I was preparing for, so to say, for last couple of months. I wanted to peak in this tournament.”

O Canada

With three seeded players under the age of 20 — No. 20 Denis Shapovalov, No. 25 Felix AugerAliassime and No. 22 Bianca AnSerena’s health dreescu — Canada is expected to be Serena Williams has completed a major player on the tennis scene only three matches since her Aus- for years. tralian Open ended four months ago, and she cited a bothersome Among the missing left knee when pulling out of her Nick Kyrgios was the latest past two tournaments. So just how big name to withdraw from the healthy the 23-time major cham- field — and it comes after he was pion is will be a key storyline dur- kicked out of the Italian Open for ing Week 1. Williams is to face Vi- a temper tantrum and then bashed talia Diatchenko in the first round the French Open on social media. Monday. Other players who are missing, Roland renaissance and with well-documented injuThere’s change all around the Dirty dozen ries, include Andy Murray, Maria grounds of the French Open. The No one has ever won a Grand Sharapova, Kevin Anderson and main stadium, Court Philippe Slam singles title 12 times. Rafael John Isner.

Na settles for 69, 2-shot Colonial lead BY SCHUYLER DIXON

Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Tex. — If Jordan Spieth thinks a winless streak approaching two years seems like forever, he might want to check with fellow major winner Jim Furyk. Both have a chance to end droughts at Colonial — if they can overtake third-round leader Kevin Na today. Na settled for a 1-under 69 a day after going low at Colonial again, taking a two-shot lead at 9 under Saturday over a group that included the local favorite in Spieth and Furyk, the 2003 U.S. Open champion who hasn’t won in four years. “I’m not really looking at it as like the glass is half empty, the hourglass has almost run out of sand,” said the 49-year-old Furyk, who has just one of his 17 PGA Tour victories in the past nine years but was second at the Players Championship in March. “This year has been kind of a new lease on life.” Furyk, winless since 2015 at Hilton Head, matched the 68 of Spieth, whose last victory was his third major title at the 2017 British Open. Joining them at 7 under was C.T. Pan, who was tied with Na before bogeys on the final two holes. Pan settled for a 68 as well. First-round leader Tony Finau (71) fell into the group at 7 under with a bogey on 18 after hitting his driver into the water. Defending champion Justin Rose, the highest-ranked player in the field at No. 3, shot his second 74 in three rounds and is 5 over. Na recovered from a double bogey at the par-five 11th that cost him the lead, steadying himself

over the final seven holes. His 62 in the second round was his third at least that low over a span of six rounds at Colonial. After hitting driver into a bunker at 11, Na’s second shot caught the lip of the bunker as he turned in frustration because a fan’s cellphone went off during his swing. Caddy Kenny Harms lambasted the woman, and Na said he was upset until he saw the horrified look on her face. “He was screaming at her, and he has every right to do so,” Na said. “I felt bad for the lady. So I said, ‘C’mon Kenny. Let’s forget about it. Let’s just go.’” Only problem was, Na couldn’t seem to shake it. His third shot landed in a greenside bunker, and the fourth sailed over the green. A chip shot still didn’t reach the green, before another chip lipped out. Na made the short putt for a 7 before almost making a chip for birdie on 12 after another poor tee shot. His third and final birdie was an 18-footer on the par-three 13th. “Sometimes it takes a little bit of time to get yourself together after something like that happens and you make a double bogey,” said Na, who finished fourth at last year’s Colonial after tying the course record with a final-round 61. “I think I played pretty solid the rest of the way in.” Birdies among the leaders were fairly scarce with most of them playing in windy conditions that have made afternoon rounds difficult all week on the cozy course made famous by Ben Hogan. Second-round leader Jonas Blixt didn’t have any, opening

with a bogey on the easy par-5 first before three more in his 74. He is four shots back. The best rounds came from players with earlier tee times. Mackenzie Hughes shot 65 to join Spieth, Furyk and company. Charley Hoffman had the day’s best round at 7-under 63 and was tied at 6 under with Austin Cook, who shot 65. Spieth had all three of his birdies on the front nine, barely missing one on the back when his long chip at the par-3 16th lipped out. The 2016 Colonial champ, who was runner-up the years before and after that title, had his only bogey at 17, one of the 10 fairways he missed in 14 tries. “I’d like to hit more greens in regulation, and in order to do that, I’ve probably got to be playing out of more fairways,” said Spieth, coming off a tie for third at the PGA Championship for his first top-20 finish of the season. “It just comes down to ball-striking.” Pan, a month removed from his first career PGA Tour win at Hilton Head, recorded four birdies over the first 10 holes and held the lead alone after Na’s double bogey. The native of Taiwan avoided a double by making a testy putt on 17 before missing a short par attempt at 18. “I’m sure the experience at RBC (Heritage) helped me to get here,” said Pan, who overtook thirdround leader Dustin Johnson for that win. “I feel more comfortable on Sunday for sure. I know what I need to do in order to become the leader.” Spieth and Furyk know that feeling. It’s just been awhile.


SPORTS

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

Basketball

Part of the problem, medical professionals say, is that early specialization in basketball or any sport can leave children more vulnerable to injury as they grow up. Neha Raukar, a senior associate professor in the department of emergency medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science in Minnesota, said early sports specialization is “an American public health disaster.” Raukar equates repetitive

stress to fatiguing of the muscles, with hundreds of microtears occurring every day through strenuous activities. She uses a paper clip to explain the process: If you bend a paper clip back and forth long enough, eventually it breaks. ACL tears are of particular concern. They have long been a common injury, Klimkiewicz said, and girls’ basketball players are especially vulnerable. He said girls ages 15 to 25 are five to eight times more likely to tear their ACLs playing basketball than boys. “It [usually] isn’t someone landing on you, it usually is, you are coming down kind of . . . midstride instead of the beginning or end of the stride,” Klimkiewicz said. “The muscle shuts down and you expose the ACL. When everything fatigues and shuts down and you are putting more stress on the ACL . . . that is when you are more likely to see it.” Klimkiewicz said over-

use over time and, in some cases, being poorly conditioned can lead to fatigue. Klimkiewicz stressed the importance of ACL prevention programs, which are mostly carried out by physicians or sports medicine doctors. However, doctors are struggling to get the program in front of young participants. Klimkiewicz said if kids start at age 14 or 15, “it is too late,” and ideally they should be introduced as young as age 6. More research has come out about the concerning effects of sport specialization, Raukar said, and it has included recommendations for kids to rest and cross-train. But the information is failing to get beyond medical circles and out to the general population. “No one is really listening,” Raukar said. Fudd, — who in two high school seasons has won two All-Met Player of the Year awards, played for Team USA and was named the 2018-19 Gatorade national player of the year — was aware of the risks of serious knee injuries before tearing the ACL and medial collateral ligament (MCL) in her right knee in midApril. The injury occurred after she absorbed contact during a 3-on-3 tournament with USA Basketball. It was the type of injury that could happen to any player in any game, but it also came after a 38-game high school schedule — the same number of games played by college national champion Baylor — that included league and state championships in addition to a run to the title game of a national tournament. The Fudds say they have always made a concerted effort to monitor Azzi’s workload, limiting the amount of “exposure camps” and clinics she attends because they deemed it “unnecessary and doing too much.” They also had her compete in sports other than basketball when she was younger, aware of the concerns over sport specialization.

Business of Sports podcast, the co-founder of Fortress Investment Group said the difference in broadcast money alone for a team in the Premier League versus the second tier is at least $100 million a year. Here’s how it works: Every year the three worst performers are demoted from the Premier League, and three teams are promoted to take their place. The top two teams in England’s second tier are guaranteed a spot in the higher league, and the next four finishers enter a

playoff for that third and final spot — which Derby County and Aston Villa are now vying for. Monday’s match is “definitely the most valuable single-game prize in any team sport,” said Stefan Szymanski, a University of Michigan economist whose books include Soccernomics. While similar games in Germany and Spain also have big financial implications, nothing comes close to England’s because of the Premier League’s TV deals, he said.

The Premier League divvies up its media millions based on a complex formula that varies depending on how well a team performs and how often it is on TV. The payouts form the bulk of most teams’ annual revenue, vastly outpacing ticket sales or sponsorships. According to Deloitte, the revenue difference between a middling Premier League season and a year in England’s second division is about $120 million. If Monday’s winner is demoted after just one season, it will

From D1

his ACL during a December game, when a defender collided with his knee as he went up for a layup. Harris was one of three elite Washington-area basketball players to suffer the injury during a six-month span, along with Paul VI teammate and Duke commit Jeremy Roach and Azzi Fudd, a sophomore at St. John’s who was recently named girls’ national player of the year. The injuries have prompted a question about youth basketball: Amid a demanding, year-round schedule that includes high school games, AAU tournaments and all-star competitions, are kids being asked to play too much? “We are pushing our kids to the limit where they are playing 365, 24/7,” said John Klimkiewicz, an orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and joint replacements in the Washington area. “As you increase the number of exposures, I don’t care. If you go down the ski slope enough you’re going to hurt yourself. It’s kind of a little bit of a time bomb.” Though medical experts and coaches stress that every injury is unique and stop short of connecting all ACL tears to overuse, they agree that top teenagersare being made susceptible to injuries, wear and tear, and burnout. Families such as the Harrises are aware of the risks facing players who compete year-round, but the nature of the sport’s schedule doesn’t leave them with many alternatives. The workload question is being asked all the way up to the professional level, and many acknowledge that the typical pressures and motivational tactics that come with competitive sports don’t always make it easy for parents or the athletes to allow time for rest. “People put stuff out like, ‘While you’re resting, so and so is in the gym.’ Or, ‘while you are

Soccer From D1

according to the financial consulting firm Deloitte. And that’s the worst-case scenario — if the team is immediately relegated again to the sport’s back bench. A longer run in the big league means even more riches. It’s a “financial cliff,” according to Aston Villa coowner Wes Edens, who also owns basketball’s Milwaukee Bucks. Speaking last month on the Bloomberg

PHOTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST BY DOUG KAPUSTIN

Anthony Harris receives treatment during a physical therapy session. doing this and resting, so and so is doing this and you’re getting left behind,’ stuff like that,” said Kesha Walton, the girls’ basketball coach at Bishop Ireton High School in Alexandria, Virginia. “Maybe make a quiet time across the board, I don’t know. . . . Football, baseball, basketball, whatever. After the season is over, everyone sit down.”

Overuse leads to failure

Ugly Concrete? Don’t tear it out!

HUGE SPRING DISCOUNTS!

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

“Over the years, we have been very conscientious about doing preventive exercises and strengthening areas that are commonly know to be weaker in females,” said Tim Fudd, Azzi’s father. “Azzi has a strong foundation, and that was proven to not matter as much due to her particular situation.” Similar to the Fudds, Harris Sr. said his son’s ACL tear appeared to be unavoidable, although he did acknowledge that fatigue could have been a factor, given that it wasn’t a “massive hit” to the knee. Regardless of the causes, however, the injuries force athletes into a significant recovery period, with ACL tears keeping athletes from the court for a minimum of nine months. “It’s not a small problem,” Klimkiewicz said. “I say to the kids that come in [with ACL tears], ‘Listen, I’ll get you back, but you can’t do it again.’ And if you look at the incidents, they are at more risk of tearing their other [ACL] a year later.”

Many within the basketball community acknowledge that kids are playing too much, but few have been able to come up with solutions. In the race to land college scholarships, kids are specializing in the sport and playing it year-round at increasingly younger ages, juggling participation on middle or high school teams with playing on AAU teams and attending all-star camps. The issue of overuse is relevant all the way up to the NBA. At an event in Washington in mid-May, Commissioner Adam Silver addressed the topic of “load management” that had sparked conversation throughout the season, after stars such as LeBron James and Kawhi Leonard sat out games to rest. “In the modern NBA we’ve had an 82-game season for roughly 50 years,” Silver said. “And maybe

it’s too many games on the players’ bodies.” He also said that if “legitimate resting of [NBA] players resulted in them being healthier in the playoffs, healthier longer, able to continue their careers longer, I think we’d be in favor of it.” This question of “how much is too much?” tracks back to the youth level, and in 2016, USA Basketball and the NBA partnered to create a set of recommended guidelines to “enhance the playing experience for young athletes.” These included delaying single-sport specialization in basketball until age 14 or older and suggestions for the number of games kids should play in a day or week — taking into consideration practice length, rest time and sleep. “This started with a concern not only for potential injury, but burnout and mental health,” said Jay Demings, USA Basketball’s youth and sport development director. “Putting less of a focus on the competitive aspect of basketball and more the fun of the sport, which is the number one reason kids play sports.” Harris Sr. said he believes the basketball community is becoming more adept to change. Shoe-sponsored AAU circuits have teams playing only four to five games over a three-day weekend, compared with the multiple per day young athletes would play in past years. More coaches are aware of their role in trying to manage workloads and look for fatigue in their players. Parents such as Harris are taking preventive measures. But there is still risk any time a player steps onto the court, Tim Fudd said, no matter what precautions are taken. “I don’t know how we could’ve prevented Azzi’s other than not be in the place at that time,” he said. “Given the physicality that occurred at the moment, any player would’ve been vulnerable to injury.”

also receive a parachute payment of about $95 million over two years. Previous playoff winners have had varied levels of success. Fulham, which won promotion last year over Aston Villa, was relegated after its first season. Huddersfield Town, which won the 2017 playoff, stayed up for two seasons before being sent down alongside Fulham. Then there’s Crystal Palace, which won the playoff in 2013 and is still in the Premier League. Aston Villa is no stranger to England’s top tier. The club was a founding member of the Premier League in 1992, when it finished second, and stayed there until 2016. Derby County, on the

other hand, has spent most of the Premier League era in the lower tier. The club had just two short Premiership stints, never finishing above eighth. In addition to the clubs, a number of sponsors will win or lose on Monday. Aston Villa’s official jersey provider is local menswear brand Luke 1977. Derby County’s official partners include Marston’s, a pub and hotel operator based in nearby Wolverhampton. One company that might not be sweating the outcome — online gambling operator 32Red. The Gibraltar-based casino and sports betting company, owned by Kindred Group Plc, is the main jersey sponsor for both teams.

How much is too much

ilable

va ys! Gift Certificates tes a tifica he Holida r e C t Gif ct fAvailable or t

FREE

Perfe

Let us cover your front porch, walkway, patio, pool deck and more with the beautiful

Pebblestone/Epoxy System Available in 15 Beautiful Colors!

ing surfac uis Re St Lo 0 9 9 ©1

FREE ESTIMATES! Senior & Military Discounts

St. Louis Resurfacing, Inc. 314-576-9220 1-800-283-6234

CHECK OUT OUR EXCELLENT A+ RATING WITH THE BBB!

www.stlresurfacing.com

Fly Tying & Casting Lessons Our FFF Certified instructors have been teaching fly casting and fly tying in the St. Louis area for over 35 year...FREE!

Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

8307 Manchester Rd.

Serving Metro area for nearly 30 years!

314-963-7884 • www.feather-craft.com

24 months Zero % Interest on qualifying Equipment Serving All Makes and Models

• • • • •

Residential Specialist 10 year Labor Warranty 10 year Parts Warranty Licensed & Bonded Flexible Financing with No Money Down

Fast Reliable Service! Local Utility Rebate $300.00 to $950.00

314-968-9900 636-227-9100 comfortsolutionsstl.com

Pre Season Savings

Brought to you by SHINE TIME AUTO DETAIL-shinetime314.com

$7500

SPORTS TALK 314-880-0808

A/C Tune Up Spire

EXP 5/31/19

$25.00 to $300.00

10%OFF A Service Call Discount is not applied to Diagnostics Change EXP 5/31/19 May not offer services in all areas. Rebate may vary on areas and utility service provider. Other limitation and restriction may apply.

WE ENCOURAGE LISTENERS TO CALL

920 AM-WGNU * 4 pm - 6 pm M-F Listen/Watch live at www.wgnu920am.com


BASEBALL

05.26.2019 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D3

CARDINALS INSIDER

Carlson heads class of young hitters He’s among a rare group of Cards’ fast-ascending position players DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

He went to elementary school a short walk from Elk Grove High, where his father, Jeff, coached baseball, so every afternoon Dylan Carlson, not yet 10, toddled over to be around his dad and their California hometown team. A boy among young men, Dylan hopped in the batting cage and followed their lead. He hit off the tee, righthanded, until he spied one of his dad’s players hitting from the opposite side of a tee. Dylan copied the lefthanded swing, and he’s been switch-hitting ever since because his father never said to stop. That was never the coach’s style. At a time when some kids are held back to be older, bigger, more mature members of their grade, Jeff Carlson pushed his sons forward. Dylan and younger brother Tanner graduated at 17. Dylan, born in October 1998, would have been 17 on his first day of college had he not signed as the Cardinals’ first-round pick in 2016. At 10 he played against 12 year olds. He started high school at 13, possibly the youngest freshman ever to play for his dad’s team, lining up against opponents that spring four years older. Coach Carlson wanted his team to face the best pitching prospects in California, when possible, and wanted his sons to play up an age, or three. “For me, one way you’re going to see somebody get better is to put them against somebody better,” the longtime coach explained this past week. “I wanted them challenged. Seeing the best is going to help you improve and develop as a hitter. And, you’re going to experience failure, learn how to handle failure, and survive. Dylan had to figure that out at a young age.” Still does. Only the level has changed. The youngest player in Cardinals’ major-league spring training and one of the youngest in the Texas League, Carlson has asserted himself at the head of his class, a group of young, swift-rising position players

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals prospect Dylan Carlson tracks the ball during a defensive drill at spring training in Jupiter, Fla. the likes of which the Cardinals haven’t seen in at least a generation. At Class AA Springfield, center fielder Carlson, a strong candidate for this year’s Futures Game, entered the weekend with the fourth-highest slugging percentage in the Texas League (.534) and fifth-highest OPS (.891). He’s the one 20-year-old in the league’s top 40 in OPS. At 19, Cardinals prospect Nolan Gorman is the only teenager in the top 10 for the Midwest League in OPS (.889). Teammate Ivan Herrera, an 18-year-old catcher, would join Gorman with a .896 OPS if he had enough plate appearances to qualify. The Cardinals have two of the youngest position players in the Texas League, Carlson and Elehuris Montero (20). The arrival at Low-A Peoria of Malcom Nunez (18) and Jhon Torres (19) gives the organization four of the youngest position players in the Midwest League. The gathering of barely of not-yet-twentysomething talent comes as a storm of young players, like Atlanta’s Ozzie Albies and Ronald Acuna Jr., arrive in the majors – and stay. From the batter’s box at DoubleA, Carlson looks up and doesn’t just see the possibilities ahead. He sees peers already ahead. “I think it’s awesome that there are guys getting it done at the highest level who are my age,” Carlson said. “It gives you that goal

to not only get there but to succeed when you do get there. It also gives you that confidence that, hey, someone else is doing it, someone else who is young is doing it. So, why can’t I do it? It does the reverse, too. It gives you that little push, that kick in the butt: ‘Hey, there are guys already there at your age. C’mon. What’s keeping you?’” This past season, five position players age 21 or younger played at least 100 games in the majors – the most since Jason Heyward, Giancarlo Stanton, and three others had at least 100 games in 2011. Washington’s Juan Soto, Carlson’s contemporary in the 2016 Gulf Coast League, debuted at 19 last season. Already this year, Fernando Tatis Jr. (20) and Vladimir Guerrero Jr. (20) have made their bigleague debuts. At one point last year, Atlanta had the three youngest players in the majors with 21-year-old starter Mike Soroka, who faced the Cardinals on Saturday at Busch Stadium, with fielders Acuna and Albies. That duo led all major-league players, 21 or younger, in WAR with 4.1 and 3.8, respectively. Acuna won the Rookie of the Year Award a month before his 21st birthday. “As an industry we no longer get so hung up on age. It’s the level. It’s how are they performing at that level,” said Braves general manager Alex Anthopoulos

this past week. “Like anything, you’re asking your development staff, ‘Can they handle it? Is this the right time to do it?’ What you hope is the player is so dominant that you have to be challenged at the next level. We’re seeing young guys, impactful, young, talented, dynamic players that are helping teams win.” For the first time in at least 25 years, seven of the Cardinals’ top 10 prospects according to Baseball America are position players. All are at full-season affiliates now. Two are 20. Two are teenagers. “I tell the minor leaguers every spring,” said John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations, “we’ll go as fast as you want to go.” To prepare the organization and the hitters, the Cardinals made a move this past winter with this wave of talent in mind. The hiring of Jeff Albert as the Cardinals’ major-league hitting coach was designed to have him install “an overarching strategy and thinking about hitting,” Mozeliak said. The goal was to create an infrastructure and “philosophy” throughout the organization “as these guys take big steps forward.” The whole program coordinates hitting coaches at each level, a minor-league offensive strategist, and former AllStar Ryan Ludwick roving the minors and talking with hitters. All of them draw on

Ugly Concrete? Don’t tear it out!

HUGE SPRING DISCOUNTS!

the same message. During a recent visit with the Springfield club, the strategist George Greer approached Carlson after a home run to ask about his approach. Carlson explained how he scouted the pitcher and his trusted pitch and expected to be “jammed inside.” So from the left side of the plate he prepared for that pitch and when he got it “jumped all over it.” Greer patted him on the back. “Well, thank you very much,” the coach said. “Carry on.” A highly respected college coach and widely regarded hitting guru, Greer described how developing hitters always starts with the scouts who identify them because “you can’t go to Lowe’s to build a house if there’s no lumber there.” That raw lumber, however, is moving quicker and arriving younger because of Development 2.0. Wi-Fi and smartphones have revolutionized development – and accelerated it, Jeff Carlson and Greer both said. “They’re giving guys more information between games and in some cases between at-bats than ever before,” Greer said. “One off days these guys are going fishing like we did, they’re watching video. The whole thing has been sped up, but only to that point because they can handle the challenge. This group doesn’t get paralysis by analysis.” There is a crossroads of hallways at the Cardinals’ spring training complex – one way leads to the minorleague side, the other to the major-league offices and clubhouse – and it was near ilable

va ys! Gift Certificates tes a tifica he Holida r e C t Gif ct fAvailable or t

Pebblestone/Epoxy System Available in 15 Beautiful Colors!

ing surfac uis Re St Lo 0 9 9 ©1

FREE ESTIMATES! Senior & Military Discounts

St. Louis Resurfacing, Inc. 314-576-9220 1-800-283-6234

CHECK OUT OUR EXCELLENT A+ RATING WITH THE BBB!

www.stlresurfacing.com

Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

FREE

Perfe

Let us cover your front porch, walkway, patio, pool deck and more with the beautiful

this juncture that Carlson found Matt Carpenter and Paul Goldschmidt studying video this spring. He watched them watch video of opposing pitchers, and eventually started asking questions about what they were looking for. How they decoded it. How they used it. Those answers he now uses at Class AA to scout opponents. In the cages all spring, it was like being back at Elk Grove after school – he was the kid studying the bigger boys for things to borrow. Albert encourages the use of a heavier bat, so Carlson does that for his first round in the batting cage each day. Carlson watched switch-hitter Dexter Fowler step into the tee as if finding a rhythm for a moving pitch. Carlson now does the same. Fowler joked that Carlson kept trying to best him in “exit velocity contests.” Earlier in his career, Carlson used the first round of batting practice on the field to get loose and hit the ball where it was pitched. He saw big-leaguers, like Yadier Molina, use that first round to exclusively drive the ball to the opposite field. Carlson now does that, too. It’s the next frontier for his lefthanded swing. “There are so many more steps that are part of the game as you keep moving up,” Carlson said. “ It’s more strategy, I’ve noticed. In Aball guys rely on their talent a little more and here having a mental edge is the separator.” That’s a lesson Carlson learned at an early age, as a freshman facing seniors, a 10-year-old standing in against adolescents. As he met the challenge his father encouraged, Carlson found “I had to really use every edge I could against more-advanced competition.” He found it through strike-zone savvy and discipline. That skill plays up. Last summer, he rose to the level he played by slashing his strikeout rate. He’s improved that again this year with almost twice as many times on base (71) as strikeouts (37) and two and half times as many total bases (93). This trend, his ongoing work in center field, and his showing in spring training has placed Carlson in the conversation for the Cardinals’ 2020 outfield plans. He’ll be 21. When he arrives that challenge will feel familiar, but maybe he’ll encounter something rarer on the ballfield. He’ll probably be playing against kids his own age. “It’s inspiring,” Carlson said. “It’s motivating.”

Fly Tying & Casting Lessons Our FFF Certified instructors have been teaching fly casting and fly tying in the St. Louis area for over 35 year...FREE!

Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

8307 Manchester Rd.

Serving Metro area for nearly 30 years!

314-963-7884 • www.feather-craft.com

24 months Zero % Interest on qualifying Equipment Serving All Makes and Models

• • • • •

Residential Specialist 10 year Labor Warranty 10 year Parts Warranty Licensed & Bonded Flexible Financing with No Money Down

Fast Reliable Service! Local Utility Rebate $300.00 to $950.00

314-968-9900 636-227-9100 comfortsolutionsstl.com

Pre Season Savings

Brought to you by SHINE TIME AUTO DETAIL-shinetime314.com

$7500

SPORTS TALK 314-880-0808

A/C Tune Up Spire

EXP 5/31/19

$25.00 to $300.00

10%OFF A Service Call Discount is not applied to Diagnostics Change EXP 5/31/19 May not offer services in all areas. Rebate may vary on areas and utility service provider. Other limitation and restriction may apply.

WE ENCOURAGE LISTENERS TO CALL

920 AM-WGNU * 4 pm - 6 pm M-F Listen/Watch live at www.wgnu920am.com


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati West Los Angeles San Diego Arizona Colorado San Francisco

W 30 29 24 20 16 W 29 29 25 25 23 W 33 27 25 23 21

L 21 23 26 31 32 L 20 23 23 25 27 L 18 24 25 26 28

Pct .588 .558 .480 .392 .333 Pct .592 .558 .521 .500 .460 Pct .647 .529 .500 .469 .429

GB — 1½ 5½ 10 12½ GB — 1½ 3½ 4½ 6½ GB — 6 7½ 9 11

WC — — 4 8½ 11 WC — — 2 3 5 WC — 1½ 3 4½ 6½

L10 6-4 8-2 4-6 4-6 6-4 L10 4-6 5-5 5-5 3-7 5-5 L10 7-3 5-5 3-7 5-5 5-5

Str W-2 W-3 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-2 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str W-1 W-4 L-5 W-1 L-2

Home 18-10 14-12 13-9 11-14 9-17 Home 17-9 17-10 10-12 15-11 12-11 Home 19-6 14-14 11-13 10-11 10-15

Away 12-11 15-11 11-17 9-17 7-15 Away 12-11 12-13 15-11 10-14 11-16 Away 14-12 13-10 14-12 13-15 11-13

Thursday’s results N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 4 Philadelphia 9, Chicago Cubs 7 Pittsburgh 14, Colorado 6 Atlanta 5, San Francisco 4 (13) Miami 5, Detroit 2 Friday’s results Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 5 Philadelphia 6, Milwaukee 4 L.A. Dodgers 10, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 5, St. Louis 2 Washington 12, Miami 10 Colorado 8, Baltimore 6 San Diego 6, Toronto 3 Arizona at San Francisco, (n) Detroit 9, N.Y. Mets 8 Today’s games Cincinnati (Mahle 1-5) at Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3), 1:20 p.m. San Diego (Quantrill 0-2) at Toronto (Jackson 0-1), 2:07 p.m. Arizona (Clarke 0-1) at San Francisco (Suarez 0-1), 3:05 p.m. Miami (Alcantara 2-4) at Washington (Corbin 4-2), 3:05 p.m. Detroit (TBD) at N.Y. Mets (Vargas 1-2), 3:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Arrieta 4-4) at Milwaukee (Chacin 3-5), 3:10 p.m. Atlanta (Soroka 5-1) at St. Louis (Hudson 3-3), 6:15 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 6-1) at Pittsburgh (Musgrove 3-4), 6:15 p.m. Baltimore (Cashner 4-2) at Colorado (Freeland 2-5), 8:10 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 32 29 27 20 15 W 34 26 23 19 17 W 34 24 25 22 23

L 17 19 24 31 36 L 16 24 27 29 32 L 18 23 25 27 29

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .653 — — 9-1 W-5 17-10 15-7 .604 2½ — 5-5 L-1 13-11 16-8 .529 6 — 5-5 L-1 13-10 14-14 .392 13 7 3-7 L-3 9-17 11-14 .294 18 12 1-9 L-7 6-19 9-17 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .680 — — 9-1 W-4 16-8 18-8 .520 8 ½ 5-5 W-1 15-12 11-12 .460 11 3½ 4-6 L-1 11-13 12-14 .396 14 6½ 1-8 W-1 9-17 10-12 .347 16½ 9 3-7 L-1 10-15 7-17 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .654 — — 7-3 W-1 19-6 15-12 .511 7½ 1 7-3 W-4 17-8 7-15 .500 8 1½ 6-3 W-3 14-10 11-15 .449 10½ 4 3-7 L-4 13-13 9-14 .442 11 4½ 3-7 L-3 10-14 13-15

Thursday’s results N.Y. Yankees 6, Baltimore 5 Minnesota 16, L.A. Angels 7 Boston 8, Toronto 2 Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 2 Miami 5, Detroit 2 Chicago White Sox 4, Houston 0 Friday’s results San Diego 6, Toronto 3 Colorado 8, Baltimore 6 Detroit 9, N.Y. Mets 8 Seattle at Oakland, (n) Cleveland 3, Tampa Bay 1 Texas at L.A. Angels, (n) Houston 4, Boston 3 N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, ppd. Minnesota 11, Chi. White Sox 4 Today’s games Chicago White Sox (Banuelos 2-3) at Minnesota (Gibson 4-2), 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Happ 3-3) at Kansas City (Duffy 3-1), 1:15 p.m. San Diego (Quantrill 0-2) at Toronto (Jackson 0-1), 2:07 p.m. Seattle (Kikuchi 3-1) at Oakland (Fiers 3-3), 3:07 p.m. Detroit (TBD) at N.Y. Mets (Vargas 1-2), 3:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Morton 4-0) at Cleveland (Carrasco 4-4), 3:10 p.m. Boston (Price 2-2) at Houston (Peacock 5-2), 6:15 p.m. Baltimore (Cashner 4-2) at Colorado (Freeland 2-5), 8:10 p.m. Texas (Minor 5-3) at L.A. Angels (Skaggs 4-4), 9:07 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Nats GM says Martinez safe WASHINGTON — Nationals general manager Mike Rizzo says second-year manager Dave Martinez’s job is safe for now despite Washington’s sluggish start to the season. The Nationals have lost five straight and entered Friday at 19-31, better than only the Miami Marlins, Kansas City Royals and Baltimore Orioles. Rizzo says there is blame to go around. Asked specifically about his confidence in Martinez, he says “we’re not making any decisions with a third of the season gone.” “We’ve got a lot of season left. Davey’s not happy with what’s going on. Nobody’s happy with what’s going on — the fanbase, the ownership, and myself,” he added.

A’s place Davis on injured list OAKLAND, Calif. — The Oakland Athletics have placed designated hitter Khris Davis on the 10-day injured list with a left hip/oblique contusion. Davis was injured May 5 chasing a foul ball in Pittsburgh when he ran into the railing near left field at PNC Park. Davis was removed from the game and played sparingly over the next two weeks before the decision was made to put him on the IL.

Paxton’s knee still bothersome TAMPA, Fla. — New York Yankees pitcher James Paxton still has discomfort in his ailing left knee, and shortstop Didi Gregorius planned to start a minor league injury rehabilitation assignment that Saturday that has him returning to the big league team by mid-June. Paxton allowed one hit in four innings and struck out seven against Detroit in extended spring training Friday. He has not pitched for the Yankees since May 3. “I felt it a little bit, but I still was able to make my pitches, which is what I wanted to see,” Paxton said. BRIEFLY METS: Matt Kemp and Ervin Santana agreed to a minor league contracts with New York. Santana was designated for assignment by the White Sox in April, and Kemp was released by Cincinnati on May 4. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

1

The Toronto Blue Jays made history Friday by becoming the first team in league history to start two sons of Hall of Famers in a lineup. Vladimir Guerrero Jr. has been with the team since April 26, and Cavan Biggio, son of Craig Biggio, was called up to bat eighth and play second base. — MLB

Ninth-inning home run lifts Reds ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO — Eugenio Suárez hit a two-run homer in the ninth inning off Cubs reliever Steve Cishek, rallying the Cincinnati Reds over Chicago 6-5 on Friday. Joey Votto drew a leadoff walk from Cishek and Suarez hit the next pitch for his 14th home run. Yasiel Puig hit a two-run homer and an RBI single for the Reds after missing two games with a sprained right shoulder. Anthony Rizzo homered for the third straight game, and Kyle Schwarber and Kris Bryant also went deep to help Chicago take an early 4-0 lead. The NL Central-leading Cubs have lost three of four to the last-place Reds this season. DODGERS 10, PIRATES 2: David Freese hit a grand slam in the first inning, and Los Angeles was never tested by host Pittsburgh. Walker Buehler struck out six batters over six innings while allowing just five hits. He gave up one earned run and one walk.

Matt Adams followed in the very next at-bat with a solo shot. PADRES 6, BLUE JAYS 4: Hunter Renfroe hit a tiebreaking, three-run home run in the eighth inning, Greg Garcia and Austin Hedges also went deep and San Diego beat host Toronto for its fourth straight win. PHILLIES 6, BREWERS 4: Philadelphia scored in six Astros baserunner Aledmys Diaz scores as Red Sox catcher separate innings and overSandy Leon reaches for a tag on Friday in Houston. came Christian Yelich’s MLB-leading 20th homer TIGERS 9, METS 8: JaCoby ASTROS 4, RED SOX 3: Ryan to defeat host Milwaukee. Jones drove in two runs Pressly and Roberto Osuna on a double, and Brandon each gave up a run for host TWINS 11, WHITE SOX 4: Dixon added an RBI single, Houston over the final two Host Minnesota hit three all coming in the seventh innings, but the Astros homers to become the first inning to push Detroit past were able to hold off visit- team to reach 100 on the host New York. Adeiny ing Boston. Houston scored season as it defeated ChiHechavarria led the Mets’ all four of its runs off Chris cago. Max Kepler drove in offense with a three-run Sale. four runs on three hits. shot in the fourth inning. NATIONALS 12, MARLINS ROCKIES 8, ORIOLES 6: INDIANS 3, RAYS 1: Roberto 10: Ten players had hits for Trevor Story hit a two-run, Perez hit an infield single in host Washington, which walk-off homer to push the eighth inning, and then got four runs in the bottom Colorado past Baltimore. Jake Bauers walked with the of the eighth inning for a The Rockies tied the game bases loaded to carry host come-from-behind vic- in the seventh inning when Cleveland to a victory over tory over Miami. Juan Soto Story and Nolan Arenado Tampa Bay. hit a three-run homer, and hit back-to-back homers. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

BOX SCORES Reds 6, Cubs 5

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Senzel cf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .238 Votto 1b 4 2 2 0 1 1 .215 Lorenzen pr-rf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .125 Suarez 3b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .258 Winker lf-rf-lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .230 Puig rf 4 1 2 3 0 2 .213 Casali ph-c 0 0 0 0 1 0 .265 Dietrich 2b-lf-1b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .240 J.Iglesias ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .299 VanMeter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Farmer 2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Barnhart c 5 0 1 0 0 3 .175 DeSclafani p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Peraza ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .209 Totals 38 6 11 6 4 13 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 4 2 1 1 1 1 .233 Bryant 3b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .283 Rizzo 1b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .279 Baez ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .313 Heyward rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Caratini c 2 0 0 0 2 0 .400 Zagunis pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Descalso 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .208 Contreras ph-c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .315 Almora Jr. cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Hendricks p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .182 Russell 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Totals 34 5 8 5 4 9 Cincinnati 000 102 102 — 6 11 0 Chicago 103 000 010 — 5 8 1 E — Bryant (5). LOB — Cincinnati 11, Chicago 6. 2B — Votto (8), Winker (6). HR — Puig (8), off Hendricks; Suarez (14), off Cishek; Schwarber (8), off DeSclafani; Bryant (12), off DeSclafani; Rizzo (14), off DeSclafani. RBIs — Suarez 2 (33), Winker (17), Puig 3 (28), Schwarber (18), Bryant 2 (34), Rizzo (38), Contreras (31). SB — Rizzo (2). CS — Heyward (1). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA DeSclafani 32/3 5 4 4 3 2 4.99 Peralta 11/3 1 0 0 0 3 5.50 Bowman 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Garrett 11/3 1 1 1 1 2 1.66 Hernandez, W, 1-2 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 3.65 R.Iglesias, S, 11-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.20 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hendricks 6 6 3 3 1 9 3.34 Brach 12/3 4 1 1 1 3 2.95 1 Montgomery /3 0 0 0 0 0 4.61 Cishek, L, 1-2 0 1 2 2 1 0 3.13 Norwood 1 0 0 0 1 1 0.00 Cishek pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored — Peralta 3-0, Hernandez 2-1, Montgomery 2-0, Norwood 1-0. HBP — Hendricks (Winker), Cishek (Winker). T — 3:19. Att. — 35,266

Padres 6, Blue Jays 3

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia 3b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .263 France ph-3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .212 Reyes rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .253 Margot cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Machado ss 2 1 1 0 2 1 .269 Hosmer 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .284 Renfroe lf-rf 3 1 1 3 1 2 .230 Naylor dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Myers cf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .186 Hedges c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .195 Totals 34 6 7 6 4 12 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Drury rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .216 Guerrero Jr. 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .230 Smoak dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Tellez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .248 Grichuk cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .237 Galvis ss 3 1 2 2 0 1 .271 Gurriel Jr. lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .186 Biggio 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Jansen c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .179 Totals 30 3 3 3 1 13 San Diego 002 010 030 — 6 7 0 Toronto 000 030 000 — 3 3 1 E — Hudson (1). LOB — San Diego 5, Toronto 2. 2B — Kinsler (7), France (3). HR — Hedges (5), off Thornton; Garcia (2), off Thornton; Renfroe (12), off Hudson; Galvis (7), off Lucchesi; Gurriel Jr. (1), off Lucchesi. RBIs — Garcia (8), Hosmer (29), Renfroe 3 (26), Hedges (10), Galvis 2 (21), Gurriel Jr. (8). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lucchesi 62/3 3 3 3 1 11 4.25 1 Wisler, W, 2-1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.50 Erlin, H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.63 Stammen, S, 2-6 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.67 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Thornton 6 4 3 3 3 10 4.42 Law 1 1 0 0 0 1 4.91 Hudson, L, 3-2 1 1 3 2 1 0 4.18 Pannone 1 1 0 0 0 1 6.56 Inherited runners-scored — Wisler 1-0. HBP — Stammen (Smoak). T — 2:49. Att. — 19,480

Dodgers 10, Pirates 2 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beaty lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Taylor lf-cf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .215 Muncy 2b-3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .267 Turner 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .283 Pederson ph-lf 2 1 2 1 0 0 .239 Bellinger rf 5 1 1 2 0 0 .389 Seager ss 3 1 1 0 2 0 .233 Freese 1b 4 2 2 4 1 1 .239 Hernandez cf-2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .216 Barnes c 5 0 2 2 0 2 .233 Buehler p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .048 Stripling p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Garlick ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 39 10 13 10 5 6 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .253 Marte cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .247 Polanco rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .266 Bell 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .337 Reynolds lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .318 Moran 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Elmore ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .056 Diaz c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .246 Tucker ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .155 Brault p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Newman 3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .345 Totals 34 2 7 2 1 6 Los Angeles 502 000 210 — 10 13 0 Pittsburgh 010 000 100 — 2 7 1 E — Moran (5). LOB — Los Angeles 7, Pittsburgh 7. 2B — Muncy (5), Barnes 2 (7), Taylor (7), Frazier (9), Marte (10), Bell (16), Moran (6), Newman (5). 3B — Pederson (3). HR — Freese (4), off Feliz; Bellinger (18), off Hartlieb. RBIs — Muncy (31), Bellinger 2 (46), Freese 4 (14), Barnes 2 (14), Pederson (26), Frazier (12), Diaz (4). SB — Turner (1). DP — Pittsburgh 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA Buehler, W, 5-1 6 5 1 1 1 6 3.58 Stripling 1 2 1 1 0 0 3.20 Alexander 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.14 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.79 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA 1 Feliz, L, 2-1 /3 4 5 5 1 0 8.25 Brault 52/3 3 2 2 3 1 7.11 1 Stratton /3 0 0 0 0 0 7.88 Hartlieb 12/3 5 3 3 1 2 7.36 Holmes 1 1 0 0 0 3 3.24 HBP — Stripling (Marte). WP — Hartlieb. T — 3:15. Att. — 32,388

Indians 3, Rays 1

Phillies 6, Brewers 4

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows dh 5 1 2 0 0 2 .325 Pham lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .287 Choi 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .259 Garcia rf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .281 Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 4 .280 Adames ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .240 Kiermaier cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 d’Arnaud c 4 0 2 0 0 2 .102 Velazquez 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Robertson ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .194 Totals 34 1 6 1 4 16 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .285 Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Santana 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .282 Luplow rf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .260 Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .199 R.Perez c 3 0 1 1 1 2 .231 Bauers lf 3 0 0 1 1 2 .217 Haase dh 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Freeman ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Martin cf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .220 Totals 28 3 6 3 6 9 Tampa Bay 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 Cleveland 000 100 02x — 3 6 1 E — Ramirez (8). LOB — Tampa Bay 10, Cleveland 8. 2B — Meadows 2 (7), Pham (6). HR — Luplow (6), off Snell. RBIs — Garcia (22), Luplow (11), R.Perez (15), Bauers (18). SB — Garcia (4), Kiermaier (7), Luplow (2). CS — Martin (4). S — Kipnis. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Snell 62/3 4 1 1 3 7 3.07 Alvarado, L, 0-4 1 2 2 2 3 1 3.15 1 Wood /3 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bieber 5 4 1 1 4 10 3.11 2 O.Perez /3 0 0 0 0 1 3.55 2 Cimber /3 1 0 0 0 0 3.26 1 Olson /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.21 Cole, W, 2-1 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 1.17 Hand, S, 13-13 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.29 Inherited runners-scored — Alvarado 2-0, Wood 3-0, Cimber 1-0, Olson 1-0, Cole 1-0. WP — Snell. T — 3:20. Att. — 24,084

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .263 Segura ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .322 Harper rf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .235 Hoskins 1b 4 2 2 1 1 1 .260 Realmuto c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .273 Hernandez 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .304 Velasquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kingery cf-2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .373 Franco 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .223 Eickhoff p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gosselin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Herrera cf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .217 Totals 37 6 11 6 2 11 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Yelich rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .325 Braun lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .278 Moustakas 3b 3 1 1 1 1 2 .261 Grandal c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .271 Thames 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .231 e-Perez ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Hiura 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .270 Arcia ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .254 Anderson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .198 Gamel ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Nottingham ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Totals 34 4 8 4 2 11 Philadelphia 110 111 100 — 6 11 0 Milwaukee 112 000 000 — 4 8 0 LOB — Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 5. 2B — McCutchen 2 (12), Harper (14), Hernandez (13), Kingery (7), Moustakas (13), Grandal (4). HR — Hoskins (12), off Peralta; Arcia (5), off Eickhoff; Yelich (20), off Eickhoff. RBIs — McCutchen (25), Harper 2 (34), Hoskins (39), Kingery (7), Franco (29), Yelich (42), Moustakas (31), Grandal (26), Arcia (18). SB — Hiura (1). CS — Yelich (1). SF — Harper. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Eickhoff 3 5 4 4 1 1 3.86 Garcia 1 1 0 0 0 1 3.86 Velasquez, W, 2-2 2 1 0 0 1 4 3.62 Dominguez, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.71 Morgan, H, 12 1 1 0 0 0 1 1.96 Neris, S, 9-9 1 0 0 0 0 3 1.99 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Anderson 4 6 3 3 0 4 3.25 Albers 1 2 1 1 1 2 4.71 Peralta, L, 2-2 2 3 2 2 0 3 5.97 Burnes 2 0 0 0 1 2 9.58 T — 3:23. Att. — 40,254

Tigers 9, Mets 8 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goodrum 3b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .214 Stewart lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .208 Castellanos rf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .267 Cabrera 1b 2 1 2 2 2 0 .306 Rodriguez ss 5 1 0 0 0 4 .250 Hicks c 5 1 1 0 0 3 .241 Harrison 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .165 Jones cf 5 2 2 4 0 1 .183 Soto p 2 0 2 0 0 01.000 Lugo ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .150 Dixon ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .304 Beckham ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Totals 40 9 14 9 3 11 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .259 J.Davis lf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .282 Frazier 3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Alonso 1b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .256 Ramos c 4 2 2 2 0 0 .257 Gomez cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .158 R.Davis rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Hechavarria 2b 4 1 2 3 0 1 .208 Syndergaard p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Altherr ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .065 Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .310 Totals 37 8 11 8 2 7 Detroit 220 011 300 — 9 14 0 New York 001 411 010 — 8 11 1 E — Frazier (2). LOB — Detroit 9, New York 4. 2B — Goodrum (10), Castellanos (15), Hicks (7), Jones (4), Rosario (7), Alonso (9), Hechavarria (2). HR — Jones (5), off Syndergaard; Cabrera (2), off Syndergaard; Rosario (5), off Soto; Hechavarria (1), off Soto; Alonso (17), off Reininger; Altherr (1), off Farmer; Ramos (3), off Jimenez. RBIs — Stewart (16), Castellanos (14), Cabrera 2 (21), Jones 4 (11), Dixon (12), Rosario (27), Alonso (38), Ramos 2 (27), Hechavarria 3 (3), Altherr (2). SB — Goodrum (4). SF — Stewart, Cabrera. DP — Detroit 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Soto 32/3 6 5 5 1 4 11.20 Reininger 11/3 2 1 1 0 0 9.20 Farmer, W, 3-3 1 1 1 1 0 1 4.29 Alcantara, H, 7 1 0 0 0 1 0 5.24 Jimenez, H, 10 1 2 1 1 0 2 4.22 Greene, S, 16-17 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.23 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Syndergaard 51/3 10 6 6 1 9 4.93 2 Bashlor /3 0 0 0 0 0 0.93 Gagnon, L, 3-1 1 3 3 3 1 1 4.80 Familia 1 1 0 0 1 1 5.85 Santiago 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Inherited runners-scored — Bashlor 2-1. T — 3:12. Att. — 27,082

Astros 4, Red Sox 3 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Chavis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .270 Betts rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .293 Bogaerts ss 3 1 1 1 1 1 .289 Martinez dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .302 Pearce 1b 3 0 1 0 0 2 .177 Moreland ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .236 Benintendi lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .261 Nunez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .190 Leon c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .175 Vazquez ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .300 Bradley Jr. cf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .170 Totals 33 3 7 3 3 14 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .308 Kemp lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Bregman 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .261 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Gurriel 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Diaz 2b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .272 Chirinos c 2 1 0 0 2 1 .250 Reddick lf-rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .329 White dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .226 Marisnick cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .284 Totals 30 4 4 3 5 6 Boston 000 001 011 — 3 7 3 Houston 011 200 00x — 4 4 0 E — Bogaerts 2 (4), Pearce (3). LOB — Boston 6, Houston 8. 2B — Betts (14). HR — Bogaerts (9), off Miley; Bradley Jr. (3), off Pressly; Vazquez (7), off Osuna; Marisnick (6), off Sale. RBIs — Bogaerts (33), Bradley Jr. (11), Vazquez (17), Springer (43), Marisnick 2 (13). SF — Springer. DP — Houston 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Sale, L, 1-6 6 3 4 2 2 5 4.19 Walden 1 1 0 0 0 0 1.53 Hembree 1 0 0 0 3 1 3.13 Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Miley, W, 5-2 6 4 1 1 2 8 3.32 Harris, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.02 Pressly, H, 11 1 2 1 1 1 3 0.41 Osuna, S, 13-13 1 1 1 1 0 2 0.81 WP — Sale. T — 2:48. Att. — 35,606

Nationals 12, Marlins 10 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf-rf 6 2 2 1 0 0 .190 Cooper rf-1b 6 1 2 0 0 1 .191 B.Anderson 3b 4 2 2 2 1 0 .235 Walker 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .282 Herrera cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .193 Castro 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .231 Ramirez cf-rf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .323 Alfaro c 5 2 3 3 0 1 .257 Rojas ss 4 0 1 0 1 1 .250 Lopez p 2 0 1 2 0 1 .286 Chen p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Prado 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Dean lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .194 Totals 43 10 15 10 3 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .275 Eaton rf 4 2 1 2 1 1 .272 Rendon 3b 4 3 2 2 1 1 .326 Soto lf 4 2 3 3 1 0 .281 Adams 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .257 Dozier 2b 3 1 0 0 2 2 .206 Robles cf 4 1 1 2 0 2 .244 Gomes c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 McGowin p 1 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Taylor ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .208 Kendrick ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Totals 37 12 14 11 5 8 Miami 220 130 011 — 10 15 1 Washington 103 011 24x — 12 14 4 E — Rojas (5), Turner 2 (3), Dozier (2), Robles (3). LOB — Miami 11, Washington 7. 2B — Granderson (8), Ramirez (1), Turner (5), Rendon (18), Robles (8), Taylor (4). HR — B.Anderson (5), off McGowin; Granderson (6), off McGowin; Alfaro (7), off Doolittle; Eaton (5), off Lopez; Rendon (10), off Lopez; Soto (8), off Guerrero; Adams (4), off Guerrero. RBIs — Granderson (13), B.Anderson 2 (18), Castro (13), Ramirez (2), Alfaro 3 (16), Lopez 2 (2), Turner (6), Eaton 2 (14), Rendon 2 (29), Soto 3 (33), Adams (14), Robles 2 (19). DP — Miami 2; Washington 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lopez 32/3 7 4 4 1 1 5.40 Chen 1 2 1 1 0 1 8.80 2 /3 2 1 1 0 2 2.29 Brice Conley 1 1 2 2 2 1 6.63 N.Anderson, L, 1-2 1 0 2 2 2 1 5.57 Guerrero 0 2 2 2 0 0 3.48 2 /3 0 0 0 0 2 5.57 Kinley Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA McGowin 4 6 5 5 1 2 9.00 Ross 1 2 3 3 1 1 9.22 Grace 1 0 0 0 1 0 7.66 Rainey 1 1 0 0 0 2 6.00 Sipp 0 1 1 1 0 0 6.30 Barraclough, W, 1-1 1 2 0 0 0 2 5.12 Doolittle, S, 9-11 1 3 1 1 0 0 3.68 Sipp pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Guerrero pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored — Chen 1-0, Conley 2-0, N.Anderson 1-0, Guerrero 2-2, Barraclough 1-1. HBP — Ross (B.Anderson), Brice (Robles), Rainey (Ramirez). WP — Conley. PB — Alfaro (6). T — 3:59. Att. — 29,173

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1906 — Jesse Tannehill’s 3-0 victory over the Chicago White Sox ended a 20-game losing streak — 19 at home — for the Boston Red Sox. 1935 — Babe Ruth, winding up his career with the Boston Braves, hit three homers and a single at Pittsburgh, but the Pirates won 11-7. Ruth connected once off Red Lucas and twice off Guy Bush. 1941 — Boston’s Ted Williams raised his batting average over .400 for the first time during the season. Williams finished the season at .406.

Rockies 8, Orioles 6

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 5 0 1 1 0 1 .243 Wilkerson rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Mancini 1b-rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Smith Jr. lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .270 Ruiz 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .240 Broxton cf 4 1 2 2 0 2 .170 Alberto 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .305 Severino c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .244 Nunez ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .227 Davis ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Totals 35 6 10 6 2 10 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tapia lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .286 Story ss 4 2 2 4 1 1 .274 Arenado 3b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .325 Murphy 1b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .217 Desmond cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .225 Dahl rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .303 Rodgers 2b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .333 Wolters c 4 0 1 1 0 0 .292 Hoffman p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 McMahon ph-2b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 36 8 14 8 2 8 Baltimore 031 100 100 — 6 10 0 Colorado 100 200 302 — 8 14 0 LOB — Baltimore 5, Colorado 5. 2B — Villar (12), Mancini (16), Alberto (4), Severino (4), Dahl (13), Wolters (10). 3B — Murphy (1). HR — Broxton (1), off Hoffman; Smith Jr. (9), off Hoffman; Nunez (11), off Diaz; Arenado (12), off Means; Story (12), off Armstrong; Arenado (13), off Armstrong; Story (13), off Givens. RBIs — Villar (20), Smith Jr. (29), Broxton 2 (4), Severino (11), Nunez (26), Story 4 (35), Arenado 2 (37), Rodgers (5), Wolters (15). SB — Alberto (3). CS — Wilkerson (1). S — Means. DP — Baltimore 2. Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Means 5 7 3 3 2 4 2.96 Kline, H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.95 2 /3 1 1 1 0 0 10.24 Bleier, H, 1 Armstrong, BS 1/3 3 2 2 0 0 6.08 Fry 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.32 Givens, L, 0-3 1/3 2 2 2 0 1 5.64 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hoffman 5 7 5 5 2 3 8.10 Diaz 1 1 1 1 0 2 4.50 Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.41 Shaw 1 2 0 0 0 2 2.61 Oberg, W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.69 Diaz pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Armstrong 1-1. WP — Dunn, Fry. PB — Severino (5). T — 3:17. Att. — 32,397

Twins 11, White Sox 4 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tilson cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .306 Moncada 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .284 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .263 Castillo c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .176 McCann c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Jimenez lf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .224 Anderson ss 3 1 3 0 0 0 .337 Rondon ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Alonso dh 4 0 1 2 0 1 .177 Sanchez 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .228 Cordell rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Totals 35 4 9 4 0 7 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler dh 4 2 3 4 0 0 .271 Polanco ss 3 1 0 0 2 0 .339 Adrianza pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Gonzalez rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .244 Rosario lf 5 1 4 3 0 1 .285 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271 Sano 3b 3 3 1 1 2 1 .250 Schoop 2b 3 2 1 0 0 0 .271 Arraez ph-2b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .467 Castro c 5 1 1 0 0 3 .233 Buxton cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .261 Totals 36 11 12 10 5 10 Chicago 040 000 000 — 4 9 1 Minnesota 122 320 10x — 11 12 1 E — Cordell (2), Polanco (7). LOB — Chicago 7, Minnesota 9. 2B — Anderson (6), Kepler (11), Gonzalez (6), Rosario (7), Schoop (13), Castro (5), Buxton (19). HR — Rosario (15), off Lopez; Sano (5), off Lopez; Kepler (11), off Lopez. RBIs — Moncada (32), Abreu (41), Alonso 2 (22), Kepler 4 (29), Gonzalez (17), Rosario 3 (42), Sano (9), Buxton (25). SF — Kepler. S — Moncada. DP — Minnesota 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lopez, L, 3-5 32/3 7 8 8 2 3 6.03 Burr 1 2 2 2 1 3 4.58 Fry 11/3 2 0 0 0 1 5.89 Vieira 2 1 1 0 2 3 2.08 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Berrios, W, 7-2 62/3 9 4 1 0 4 3.20 1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 3.93 May Littell 2 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Inherited runners-scored — Burr 1-1, Fry 2-2, May 1-0. HBP — Berrios 2 (Tilson,Tilson), Lopez (Schoop), Fry (Cron). WP — Lopez. T — 3:27. Att. — 29,638

MLB CALENDAR June 3 — Amateur draft starts, Secaucus, N.J. June 13 — Detroit vs. Kansas City at Omaha, Neb. June 15 — International amateur signing period closes. June 19-20 — Owners meeting, New York. June 29-30 — New York Yankees vs. Boston at London. July 2 — International amateur signing period opens. July 9 — All-Star Game at Cleveland. July 21— Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31 — Last day during the season to trade a player. Aug. 18 — Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Cubs at Williamsport, Pa. Aug. 31 — Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Oct. 1-2 — Wild-card games. Oct. 22 — World Series starts.


CARDINALS

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Cardinals 6, Braves 3 Atlanta Acuna Jr. cf Swanson ss Freeman 1b Donaldson 3b Markakis rf Riley lf Flowers c Albies 2b Soroka p a-Camargo ph Swarzak p Winkler p Totals

AB 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 0 31

Cardinals Fowler cf-rf Goldschmidt 1b DeJong ss Ozuna lf Carpenter 3b J.Martinez rf C.Martinez p Miller p b-Gyorko ph Hicks p Molina c Wong 2b Hudson p Bader cf Totals Atlanta Cardinals

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

AB 3 3 4 4 4 2 0 0 1 0 4 4 2 1 32

010 000

R 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 000 110

H 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 3 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 9

BI 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 6

200 04x

NOTEBOOK

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .274 .262 .315 .260 .288 .341 .268 .264 .056 .212 -----

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 8

Avg. .271 .269 .298 .234 .222 .306 ----.186 --.268 .233 .071 .266

— —

3 6

7 9

1 0

a-grounded out for Soroka in the 7th. b-homered for Miller in the 8th. E: Flowers (1). LOB: Atlanta 5, Cardinals 5. 2B: Markakis (14), Riley (2), Flowers (1), Albies (9). HR: Gyorko (1), off Winkler. RBIs: Riley (13), Flowers (10), Albies (23), Goldschmidt (25), Carpenter 2 (17), Gyorko 3 (5). RLISP: Atlanta 2 (Swanson, Soroka); Cardinals 1 (DeJong). GIDP: Donaldson, Riley, J.Martinez. DP: Atlanta 2; Cardinals 3. Atlanta Soroka Swarzak, H, 1 Winkler, L, 1-1

IP 6 1 1

H 5 0 4

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

R ER BB SO NP ERA 2 1 1 5 80 1.07 0 0 0 2 12 4.32 4 4 0 1 24 3.60

Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson 6 1/3 5 2 2 2 2 74 4.22 2/ C.Martinez 2 1 1 1 0 19 2.70 3 Miller, W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 4.34 Hicks, S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.65 Inherited runners-scored: C.Martinez 1-1. HBP: Soroka (Fowler). Umpires: Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 2:40. A: 45,760 (45,538).

How they scored BRAVES SECOND Josh Donaldson singles to right field. Nick Markakis grounds out to shallow infield to Paul Goldschmidt. Josh Donaldson to second. Austin Riley doubles to left field. Josh Donaldson scores. Tyler Flowers grounds out to shortstop, Paul DeJong to Paul Goldschmidt. Ozzie Albies is intentionally walked. Mike Soroka grounds out to shallow infield, Matt Carpenter to Paul Goldschmidt. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Braves 1, Cardinals 0.

CARDINALS FOURTH Paul Goldschmidt reaches on catcher interference. Interference error by Tyler Flowers. Paul DeJong strikes out swinging. Marcell Ozuna grounds out to third base, Josh Donaldson to Freddie Freeman. Paul Goldschmidt to second. Matt Carpenter singles to shallow center field. Paul Goldschmidt scores. Jose Martinez grounds out to shortstop, Dansby Swanson to Freddie Freeman. 1 run, 1 hit, 1 error, 1 left on. Braves 1, Cardinals 1.

CARDINALS FIFTH Yadier Molina singles to shallow left field. Kolten Wong flies out to deep center field to Ronald Acuna Jr.. Dakota Hudson strikes out swinging. Dexter Fowler hit by pitch. Yadier Molina to second. Paul Goldschmidt singles to right field. Dexter Fowler to third. Yadier Molina scores. Paul DeJong grounds out to third base, Josh Donaldson to Freddie Freeman. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Cardinals 2, Braves 1.

BRAVES SEVENTH Nick Markakis doubles to left center field. Austin Riley lines out to deep right field to Jose Martinez. Nick Markakis to third. Tyler Flowers doubles to deep left field. Nick Markakis scores. Ozzie Albies doubles to right center field. Tyler Flowers scores. Johan Camargo pinch-hitting for Mike Soroka. Johan Camargo grounds out to shortstop, Paul DeJong to Paul Goldschmidt. Ozzie Albies to third. Ronald Acuna Jr. walks. Dansby Swanson grounds out to third base, Matt Carpenter to Paul Goldschmidt. 2 runs, 3 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Braves 3, Cardinals 2.

CARDINALS EIGHTH. Paul Goldschmidt singles to shallow infield. Paul DeJong reaches on a fielder’s choice to second base. Paul Goldschmidt out at second. Marcell Ozuna singles to right field. Paul DeJong to third. Matt Carpenter singles to shallow center field. Marcell Ozuna to second. Paul DeJong scores. Jedd Gyorko pinch-hitting for Andrew Miller. Jedd Gyorko homers to center field. Matt Carpenter scores. Marcell Ozuna scores. Yadier Molina pops out to Freddie Freeman. Kolten Wong strikes out swinging. 4 runs, 4 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 6, Braves 3.

Uneven offense caught watching Cardinals need to put ball in play with runners on base BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A root problem with the Cardinals’ uneven offense – it goes big or it doesn’t go home – has not been generating the potential for rallies. It’s how often they let those opportunities pass by. Sometimes just looking. The Cardinals’ lineup has produced scads of baserunners and it even boasts the hitter who has the most at-bats with runners in scoring position in the majors. Yet, the Cardinals sag when it comes to slugging in those spots, and on Friday typified their troubles with strikeouts. The Cardinals struck out 11 times in the loss to Atlanta, seven of them looking – and three of them coming in six at-bats with runners in scoring position. Rallies die without contact. “The thing that was a little frustrating about last night was the strikeouts,” manager Mike Shildt said. “That is something that we haven’t done. If you don’t put the ball in play you have virtually no chance at a rally or scoring runs. We didn’t do that enough. We took a lot of called third strikes. We don’t want to chase. That’s not our game. We needed to have been better with putting the ball in play.” The Cardinals entered Saturday’s game with 409 at-bats with runners in scoring position, the fifth-most in the National League and most in the NL Central. They have had 159 of them this month and hit a respectable .252 (40-for-159). But that’s misleading. Eleven of those hits came in one game. In the other 20, they’re hitting .215 (21-for-135). With two outs and runners in scoring position, their strikeouts spike to one per every 4.11 plate appearances. That’s the sixth-worst in the NL and lower half in baseball. In those same two-out situations, their slugging drops to .376, well off the .422 league average with runners in scoring position and two outs. A drag on their production has been a .413 slugging percentage with runners in scoring position that ranks 21st in baseball. The recent reordering of the lineup reflects a distribution problem. Marcell Ozuna, still the cleanup hitter, entered the Saturday with the most at-bats in the majors with runners in scoring position (61) and a robust 45 RBIs as a result. More than half of those at-bats, however, have come with two outs, truncating rallies. Only Ozuna and Yadier Molina rank in the top 40 when it comes to chances with runners in scoring position (RISP). Two of last year’s MVP vote-getters Matt Carpenter and Paul Goldschmidt have 33 RISP at-bats each; 140 players have more. Of Goldschmidt’s 78 at-bats in May, only 12 came with a runner in scoring position. He’s had more than one such at-bat in a game only twice. If the sluggers aren’t getting the opportunities, then the slugging in those opportunities will shrink. “We haven’t had anyone drive in over 100 runs in too long,” Shildt said, referencing the Cardinals’ most recent 100-RBI season, in 2012 by Matt Holliday. “Analytically, they’d say it’s based on opportunity. That makes some sense. We’ve created opportunities for people – which is a defense for our offense, right? We could easily have three guys drive in 100 runs. Wouldn’t surprise me.” Moving Carpenter down in the order and Dexter Fowler up to leadoff does orient the on-base percentage around increasing Goldschmidt’s chances with runners on base and turning Carpenter’s extra-base threat from an igniter to a force multiplier. The shift could show up in who gets the chances and what the Cardinals do with them. Regardless of who, what drives rallies is

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Harrison Bader laments the called third strike that ended Friday night’s loss to the Braves as Braves catcher Brian McCann walks off.

AVERAGES Batting Munoz Wieters J.Martinez DeJong Fowler Goldschmidt Molina Bader Ozuna Wong Carpenter Gyorko Team Pitching Gant Brebbia Hicks C.Martinez Helsley Flaherty Hudson Miller Gallegos Webb Mikolas Wainwright Mayers Wacha Team

AVG AB .342 38 .333 24 .306 147 .298 191 .271 133 .269 197 .268 183 .266 94 .234 188 .233 163 .222 185 .186 43 .256 1724

R H 6 13 1 8 21 45 39 57 20 36 35 53 18 49 15 25 37 44 20 38 32 41 3 8 257 442

2B 2 0 8 17 8 4 13 4 11 6 8 0 84

3B 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 4

HR 0 1 3 8 4 10 4 4 14 6 7 1 64

RBI 0 6 21 26 13 25 32 12 45 25 17 5 241

BB SO SB E 1 6 0 1 0 7 1 0 13 31 1 2 27 38 4 2 25 39 2 3 27 61 0 3 6 15 4 1 13 33 0 1 21 43 3 0 22 28 7 4 31 49 2 3 3 13 1 2 192 418 27 26

W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 3 0 1.32 23 0 2 27.1 12 4 4 3 7 27 1 2 1.65 23 0 0 27.1 18 5 5 3 9 32 1 2 2.65 18 0 10 17.0 10 5 5 1 7 21 0 0 2.70 4 0 0 3.1 2 1 1 0 2 3 0 0 3.38 4 0 0 8.0 4 3 3 2 2 10 4 3 4.19 10 10 0 53.2 47 26 25 9 20 58 3 3 4.22 11 10 1 53.1 63 33 25 9 24 38 2 2 4.34 23 0 1 18.2 16 11 9 5 10 24 1 0 4.36 18 0 0 20.2 15 10 10 4 6 33 0 0 4.70 18 0 0 15.1 6 8 8 2 6 14 4 5 4.76 11 11 0 62.1 63 34 33 12 10 46 4 4 4.82 10 10 0 52.1 51 29 28 8 23 41 0 1 5.40 8 0 0 8.1 10 5 5 2 5 8 3 2 5.59 9 9 0 46.2 50 32 29 9 29 43 26 25 4.40 51 51 14 449.2 406 236 220 76 181 436

putting the ball in play. “We’ve got to bear-down and put the ball in play and force them to make a play,” Shildt said.

MINOR MATTERS Rangel Ravelo, a first baseman/outfielder at Class AAA Memphis, started Saturday one game shy of tying the affiliate’s record for longest hitting streak. Ravelo homered Friday to push his streak to 19 consecutive games. In 1999, for Cardinal Adam Kennedy had a 20-game hitting streak for the Redbirds. … High-A Palm Beach announced four selections for the

Florida State League’s All-Star Game: Outfielder Justin Toerner, April’s player of the month in the league and leagueleader with a .329 average; reliever Bryan Dobzanski, who has a 0.59 ERA and five saves in 16 appearances; catcher Julio Rodriguez, who has 19 RBIs and a .339 average; and pitcher Angel Rondon. Rondon was 4-1 with a 2.04 ERA in 39 2/3 innings before a recent promotion to Class AA Springfield. … Nolan Gorman continues to be the priority third baseman at LowA Peoria, where he has nine homers and a .868 OPS, but the Cardinals have mixed in 18-year-old Malcom Nunez at the same position. Once short-season clubs begin or Gorman merits a promotion full-time playing time at third will open for Nunez in Peoria or State College.

WOODFORD, ETC. Jake Woodford, a candidate to start Wednesday’s game in Philadelphia, walked six and struck out five in a no-decision for Class AAA Memphis on Friday night. Shildt said Wednesday’s starter will come from Memphis, implying Daniel Ponce de Leon and Woodford to be in the conversation. … During batting practice Saturday, on the final swing of his group’s round, Ozuna hit a ball that cleared the concourse beyond left field and hit an awning above a beverage stand. It bounced and carried over the fence onto Clark Avenue. … With his solo homer Friday, Carpenter became the 30th player in Cardinals history with 500 RBIs. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From D1

game with the lead – but saw as the Cardinals found a new way to sabotage themselves. The bullpen leaked two runs and Atlanta had the edge until the eighth. While the team all around him has searched for some semblance of consistency, first-year starter Hudson has quietly, steadily, even subtly found his. His start Saturday against the Braves was his fourth quality start of the month in five starts. He’s been one of the few starters to tame opponents on the road in May, allowing a total of three earned runs in 12 innings away from Busch Stadium, and with each outing he’s maintained a feel for what got him to the majors: getting greedy with grounders. With the help of a diving, snow-cone grab in shallow right field by second baseman Kolten Wong, Hudson went five innings before the Cardinals got an out for him in the outfield. His first 13 outs came on the ground, and the one run scored against him while he was in the game – that came on the ground, too. Josh Donaldson skipped a single past a diving Wong to lead off the second inning, and he took second on – what else? – a groundball to first base. That put him in scoring position when rookie Austin Riley pulled a pitch from Hudson. Riley’s grounder threaded between third baseman Carpenter and third base for an

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals third base coach Ron ‘Pop’ Warner congratulates Jedd Gyorko as he rounds the bases after hitting a three-run home run Saturday. RBI double and a 1-0 lead. From there, Hudson didn’t allow another Brave to reach third base until the seventh inning. For the third consecutive start, Hudson pitched at least six innings and for the seventh consecutive start he allowed no more than three earned runs. In a month, he’s hacked his ERA down from 5.62 to 4.22. A leadoff double by Nick Markakis in the seventh built the

mousetrap that excused Hudson from the start and snapped on reliever Carlos Martinez. The arm the Cardinals want to use in the seventh or eighth innings to bring a lead to Hicks entered with the tying run at third in Markakis. The first batter Martinez faced, Flowers, tagged a double off the left-field wall that scored Markakis and put the go-ahead run in scoring position. Flowers came home on Albies’ double to right-

center, and only Albies’ headfirst slide into second base saved the Cardinals from falling farther behind in the inning. Albies’ double slipped under the glove of center fielder Harrison Bader and to the wall. Because he was so intent on his headfirst slide, Albies didn’t see that – and by the time he did he didn’t have any chance to advance to third. That proved costly as he would have scored an insur-

ance run on any of the grounders that followed. Martinez slipped free of the inning having allowed one inherited run, one run all of his own, and a one-run lead to vanish. The Cardinals crafted their lead out of little seams in Mike Soroka’s start. The Braves’ 21-year-old righthander had bedeviled the Cardinals went they went down to Georgia earlier this month, shutting them out for seven inning and striking out three. He pushed that shutout through three more innings Saturday on only 22 pitches. When Soroka retired Dexter Fowler on a groundball to end the third inning, the righthander had almost twice as many outs (nine) as he had thrown balls (five). It took his catcher getting in the way for the Cardinals to solve Soroka. Goldschmidt reached base on a catcher’s interference to open the fourth inning. The next two Cardinals got him as far as second base to bring up Carpenter with a runner in scoring position. One of the goals of the new-look lineup is to capitalize on Carpenter’s nose for doubles and see if he can shift from rally-starter to rally-maker. He had a single and a home run Friday night in his first turn as the fifth hitter in the Cardinals’ lineup. On Saturday, during Take 2, he singled in each of his first two at-bats, and the second single sent Goldschmidt home to tie the game, 1-1. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Cardinals 6, Braves 3 Atlanta Acuna Jr. cf Swanson ss Freeman 1b Donaldson 3b Markakis rf Riley lf Flowers c Albies 2b Soroka p a-Camargo ph Swarzak p Winkler p Totals

AB 3 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 0 31

Cardinals Fowler cf-rf Goldschmidt 1b DeJong ss Ozuna lf Carpenter 3b J.Martinez rf C.Martinez p Miller p b-Gyorko ph Hicks p Molina c Wong 2b Hudson p Bader cf Totals Atlanta Cardinals

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

AB 3 3 4 4 4 2 0 0 1 0 4 4 2 1 32

010 000

R 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 000 110

H 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 3 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 9

BI 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 6

200 04x

NOTEBOOK

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .274 .262 .315 .260 .288 .341 .268 .264 .056 .212 -----

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 8

Avg. .271 .269 .298 .234 .222 .306 ----.186 --.268 .233 .071 .266

— —

3 6

7 9

1 0

a-grounded out for Soroka in the 7th. b-homered for Miller in the 8th. E: Flowers (1). LOB: Atlanta 5, Cardinals 5. 2B: Markakis (14), Riley (2), Flowers (1), Albies (9). HR: Gyorko (1), off Winkler. RBIs: Riley (13), Flowers (10), Albies (23), Goldschmidt (25), Carpenter 2 (17), Gyorko 3 (5). RLISP: Atlanta 2 (Swanson, Soroka); Cardinals 1 (DeJong). GIDP: Donaldson, Riley, J.Martinez. DP: Atlanta 2; Cardinals 3. Atlanta Soroka Swarzak, H, 1 Winkler, L, 1-1

IP 6 1 1

H 5 0 4

M 4 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

R ER BB SO NP ERA 2 1 1 5 80 1.07 0 0 0 2 12 4.32 4 4 0 1 24 3.60

Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson 6 1/3 5 2 2 2 2 74 4.22 2/ C.Martinez 2 1 1 1 0 19 2.70 3 Miller, W, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 4.34 Hicks, S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.65 Inherited runners-scored: C.Martinez 1-1. HBP: Soroka (Fowler). Umpires: Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Mark Carlson; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 2:40. A: 45,760 (45,538).

How they scored BRAVES SECOND Josh Donaldson singles to right field. Nick Markakis grounds out to shallow infield to Paul Goldschmidt. Josh Donaldson to second. Austin Riley doubles to left field. Josh Donaldson scores. Tyler Flowers grounds out to shortstop, Paul DeJong to Paul Goldschmidt. Ozzie Albies is intentionally walked. Mike Soroka grounds out to shallow infield, Matt Carpenter to Paul Goldschmidt. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Braves 1, Cardinals 0.

CARDINALS FOURTH Paul Goldschmidt reaches on catcher interference. Interference error by Tyler Flowers. Paul DeJong strikes out swinging. Marcell Ozuna grounds out to third base, Josh Donaldson to Freddie Freeman. Paul Goldschmidt to second. Matt Carpenter singles to shallow center field. Paul Goldschmidt scores. Jose Martinez grounds out to shortstop, Dansby Swanson to Freddie Freeman. 1 run, 1 hit, 1 error, 1 left on. Braves 1, Cardinals 1.

CARDINALS FIFTH Yadier Molina singles to shallow left field. Kolten Wong flies out to deep center field to Ronald Acuna Jr.. Dakota Hudson strikes out swinging. Dexter Fowler hit by pitch. Yadier Molina to second. Paul Goldschmidt singles to right field. Dexter Fowler to third. Yadier Molina scores. Paul DeJong grounds out to third base, Josh Donaldson to Freddie Freeman. 1 run, 2 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Cardinals 2, Braves 1.

BRAVES SEVENTH Nick Markakis doubles to left center field. Austin Riley lines out to deep right field to Jose Martinez. Nick Markakis to third. Tyler Flowers doubles to deep left field. Nick Markakis scores. Ozzie Albies doubles to right center field. Tyler Flowers scores. Johan Camargo pinch-hitting for Mike Soroka. Johan Camargo grounds out to shortstop, Paul DeJong to Paul Goldschmidt. Ozzie Albies to third. Ronald Acuna Jr. walks. Dansby Swanson grounds out to third base, Matt Carpenter to Paul Goldschmidt. 2 runs, 3 hits, 0 errors, 2 left on. Braves 3, Cardinals 2.

CARDINALS EIGHTH. Paul Goldschmidt singles to shallow infield. Paul DeJong reaches on a fielder’s choice to second base. Paul Goldschmidt out at second. Marcell Ozuna singles to right field. Paul DeJong to third. Matt Carpenter singles to shallow center field. Marcell Ozuna to second. Paul DeJong scores. Jedd Gyorko pinch-hitting for Andrew Miller. Jedd Gyorko homers to center field. Matt Carpenter scores. Marcell Ozuna scores. Yadier Molina pops out to Freddie Freeman. Kolten Wong strikes out swinging. 4 runs, 4 hits, 0 errors, 0 left on. Cardinals 6, Braves 3.

Uneven offense caught watching Cardinals need to put ball in play with runners on base BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A root problem with the Cardinals’ uneven offense – it goes big or it doesn’t go home – has not been generating the potential for rallies. It’s how often they let those opportunities pass by. Sometimes just looking. The Cardinals’ lineup has produced scads of baserunners and it even boasts the hitter who has the most at-bats with runners in scoring position in the majors. Yet, the Cardinals sag when it comes to slugging in those spots, and on Friday typified their troubles with strikeouts. The Cardinals struck out 11 times in the loss to Atlanta, seven of them looking – and three of them coming in six at-bats with runners in scoring position. Rallies die without contact. “The thing that was a little frustrating about last night was the strikeouts,” manager Mike Shildt said. “That is something that we haven’t done. If you don’t put the ball in play you have virtually no chance at a rally or scoring runs. We didn’t do that enough. We took a lot of called third strikes. We don’t want to chase. That’s not our game. We needed to have been better with putting the ball in play.” The Cardinals entered Saturday’s game with 409 at-bats with runners in scoring position, the fifth-most in the National League and most in the NL Central. They have had 159 of them this month and hit a respectable .252 (40-for-159). But that’s misleading. Eleven of those hits came in one game. In the other 20, they’re hitting .215 (21-for-135). With two outs and runners in scoring position, their strikeouts spike to one per every 4.11 plate appearances. That’s the sixth-worst in the NL and lower half in baseball. In those same two-out situations, their slugging drops to .376, well off the .422 league average with runners in scoring position and two outs. A drag on their production has been a .413 slugging percentage with runners in scoring position that ranks 21st in baseball. The recent reordering of the lineup reflects a distribution problem. Marcell Ozuna, still the cleanup hitter, entered the Saturday with the most at-bats in the majors with runners in scoring position (61) and a robust 45 RBIs as a result. More than half of those at-bats, however, have come with two outs, truncating rallies. Only Ozuna and Yadier Molina rank in the top 40 when it comes to chances with runners in scoring position (RISP). Two of last year’s MVP vote-getters Matt Carpenter and Paul Goldschmidt have 33 RISP at-bats each; 140 players have more. Of Goldschmidt’s 78 at-bats in May, only 12 came with a runner in scoring position. He’s had more than one such at-bat in a game only twice. If the sluggers aren’t getting the opportunities, then the slugging in those opportunities will shrink. “We haven’t had anyone drive in over 100 runs in too long,” Shildt said, referencing the Cardinals’ most recent 100-RBI season, in 2012 by Matt Holliday. “Analytically, they’d say it’s based on opportunity. That makes some sense. We’ve created opportunities for people – which is a defense for our offense, right? We could easily have three guys drive in 100 runs. Wouldn’t surprise me.” Moving Carpenter down in the order and Dexter Fowler up to leadoff does orient the on-base percentage around increasing Goldschmidt’s chances with runners on base and turning Carpenter’s extra-base threat from an igniter to a force multiplier. The shift could show up in who gets the chances and what the Cardinals do with them.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Harrison Bader laments the called third strike that ended Friday night’s loss to the Braves as Braves catcher Brian McCann walks off.

AVERAGES Batting Munoz Wieters J.Martinez DeJong Fowler Goldschmidt Molina Bader Ozuna Wong Carpenter Gyorko Team Pitching Gant Brebbia Hicks C.Martinez Helsley Flaherty Hudson Miller Gallegos Webb Mikolas Wainwright Mayers Wacha Team

AVG AB .342 38 .333 24 .306 147 .298 191 .271 133 .269 197 .268 183 .266 94 .234 188 .233 163 .222 185 .186 43 .256 1724

R H 6 13 1 8 21 45 39 57 20 36 35 53 18 49 15 25 37 44 20 38 32 41 3 8 257 442

2B 2 0 8 17 8 4 13 4 11 6 8 0 84

3B 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 4

HR 0 1 3 8 4 10 4 4 14 6 7 1 64

RBI 0 6 21 26 13 25 32 12 45 25 17 5 241

BB SO SB E 1 6 0 1 0 7 1 0 13 31 1 2 27 38 4 2 25 39 2 3 27 61 0 3 6 15 4 1 13 33 0 1 21 43 3 0 22 28 7 4 31 49 2 3 3 13 1 2 192 418 27 26

W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 3 0 1.32 23 0 2 27.1 12 4 4 3 7 27 1 2 1.65 23 0 0 27.1 18 5 5 3 9 32 1 2 2.65 18 0 10 17.0 10 5 5 1 7 21 0 0 2.70 4 0 0 3.1 2 1 1 0 2 3 0 0 3.38 4 0 0 8.0 4 3 3 2 2 10 4 3 4.19 10 10 0 53.2 47 26 25 9 20 58 3 3 4.22 11 10 1 53.1 63 33 25 9 24 38 2 2 4.34 23 0 1 18.2 16 11 9 5 10 24 1 0 4.36 18 0 0 20.2 15 10 10 4 6 33 0 0 4.70 18 0 0 15.1 6 8 8 2 6 14 4 5 4.76 11 11 0 62.1 63 34 33 12 10 46 4 4 4.82 10 10 0 52.1 51 29 28 8 23 41 0 1 5.40 8 0 0 8.1 10 5 5 2 5 8 3 2 5.59 9 9 0 46.2 50 32 29 9 29 43 26 25 4.40 51 51 14 449.2 406 236 220 76 181 436

Regardless of who, what drives rallies is putting the ball in play. “We’ve got to bear-down and put the ball in play and force them to make a play,” Shildt said.

MINOR MATTERS Rangel Ravelo, a first baseman/outfielder at Class AAA Memphis, started Saturday one game shy of tying the affiliate’s record for longest hitting streak. Ravelo homered Friday to push his streak to 19 consecutive games. In 1999, for Cardinal Adam Kennedy had a 20-game hitting

streak for the Redbirds. … High-A Palm Beach announced four selections for the Florida State League’s All-Star Game: Outfielder Justin Toerner, April’s player of the month in the league and leagueleader with a .329 average; reliever Bryan Dobzanski, who has a 0.59 ERA and five saves in 16 appearances; catcher Julio Rodriguez, who has 19 RBIs and a .339 average; and pitcher Angel Rondon. Rondon was 4-1 with a 2.04 ERA in 39 2 / 3 innings before a recent promotion to Class AA Springfield. … Nolan Gorman continues to be the priority third baseman at Low-A Peoria, where he has nine homers and a .868 OPS, but the Cardinals have mixed in 18-year-old Malcom Nunez at the same position. Once shortseason clubs begin or Gorman merits a promotion full-time playing time at third will open for Nunez in Peoria or State College.

WOODFORD, ETC. Jake Woodford, a candidate to start Wednesday’s game in Philadelphia, walked six and struck out five in a nodecision for Class AAA Memphis on Friday night. Shildt said Wednesday’s starter will come from Memphis, implying Daniel Ponce de Leon and Woodford to be in the conversation. … During batting practice Saturday, on the final swing of his group’s round, Ozuna hit a ball that cleared the concourse beyond left field and hit an awning above a beverage stand. It bounced and carried over the fence onto Clark Avenue. … With his solo homer Friday, Carpenter became the 30th player in Cardinals history with 500 RBIs.

Cardinals From D1

They arrived early. They spoke openly. “I told the group as someone who has been around and gotten to watch a lot – we’d been doing things right,” Gyorko said. “There have been times in the past when I’ve been here where we’ve kicked the ball around or made bad baserunning. That’s not the case. We’re playing good, solid baseball. It’s just things haven’t clicked for whatever reason. The guys in this room – everyone knows that we’re a good team. “We needed that win,” he added. “That’s a big win for us.” Before the Cardinals could win it, they first had to win a replay. With Paul Goldschmidt at first, Paul DeJong skipped a grounder to second and appeared to outrace the double-play throw to first. Umpire Hunter Wendelstedt felt differently and called him out. A rally ended before it got going, like so many for the Cardinals. Shildt challenged the call because the feel in the dugout, confirmed by the video crew, was that DeJong was safe. DeJong never left the bag. First baseman Freddie “Freeman looked at me funny and I said, ‘Uh, I’m safe. I don’t know what you’re seeing,’” DeJong said. “Things aren’t going good right now. I couldn’t get doubled-up there.” Replay confirmed his read. The rally revived, the dugout enlivened, Marcell Ozuna hit an opposite-field single to right to

DAVID CARSON, DCARSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Cardinals third base coach Ron ‘Pop’ Warner congratulates Jedd Gyorko as he rounds the bases after hitting a three-run home run Saturday. move DeJong to third. Matt Carpenter, newly recast as an RBI man, delivered with an oppositefield single to tie the game, 3-3. Gyorko admitted that rare at-bats has left his “timing suspect now,” but on the second pitch he saw he launched his first extra-base hit of the season and his first pinch-hit homer as a Cardinal. His last one came in May 2015. “Jedd says, ‘You know what, we’ve gone away enough, let’s go out,’” Shildt said. “It was a little bit of a microcosm of us – just a

big relief.” While the team all around him has searched for some semblance of consistency, first-year starter Hudson has quietly, steadily, even subtly found his. Without a feel for his curveball Saturday, he leaned on the pitch that got him to the majors, the sinker, and went inning for inning against Braves power-sinker youngster Mike Soroka. Including a diving catch by Kolten Wong in shallow right field, Hudson’s first 15 outs came via infields. He

got greedy with grounders. With 19 putouts at first, Goldschmidt came one shy of tying the Cardinals’ club record for a nine inning game. Fifteen of the first 19 batters Hudson face hit the ball on the ground, and even the first run he allowed came on a groundball double that threaded between Carpenter and third base. That reliance on his sinker authored his fourth quality start of the month and his seventh consecutive start with three or fewer earned runs. Hudson’s assertive May con-

trasted with a month largely defined by absence for the Cardinals. Too often they have failed to get their best players at their best in the best spot to impact the game. Before Saturday, Goldschmidt had 12 at-bats with a runner in scoring position in the first 21 games of the month, and closer Jordan Hicks had zero save opportunities in nearly four weeks. Carpenter’s average clung to .200 and kept him from igniting rallies. Given a chance to drive in a run Saturday, Goldschmidt did with a single in the fifth to give the Cardinals a 2-1 lead. Carpenter had two RBI singles and since moving to the fifth spot in the order he has five hits in two days and rather than starting scoring jags he’s extending them with three RBIs. Hicks was likely going to get the ninth inning Saturday, whether a save greeted him there or not. The bullpen started stirring with a one-run lead, funneling it toward Hicks, and once the Cardinals started stirring to reclaim the lead, Hicks was ready. He retired all three batters he faced for his 10th save of the season, and first since April 29. That’s what they had been talking about. That’s how they want to play. “When you fight like we’ve been fighting and you get that reward and you get it done, that’s what this is ultimately about, and yeah, it’s like, ‘Alright, we remember this,’” Shildt said. “We did it. (This team) has some really, really strong leadership to steward through this place we were in – past tense – and we move forward.”


MOTOR SPORTS

05.26.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D5 “We made improvements. That’s what’s good about me driving and Rudy (Fugle) crew-chiefing. These guys do a great job working on it, and we just keep getting better.”

NASCAR WEEKLY

— Kyle Busch, after winning Friday at Charlotte — his 56th career Trucks win

THIS WEEK’S CUP RACE

BUILDING MOMENTUM

Coca-Cola 600 Distance: 400 laps, or 600 miles Where: Charlotte Motor Speedway, a 1.5-mile asphalt oval in Concord, N.C. When: 5 p.m. Sunday. TV: FOX Radio: Performance Racing Network Last year’s winner: Kyle Busch Worth mentioning: Kyle Busch became the first Cup Series driver to win at every track on the current schedule (excluding the new Charlotte roval) with his win here last year.

STOP ‘N’ GO Who’s hot Kyle Larson: It’s not a points-paying race, but winning the All-Star Race at least serves as a much-needed confidence booster. Bubba Wallace: Forget that he didn’t win the All-Star Race. Wallace was the star of the show Saturday, and his emotional honesty continues to be compelling.

Who’s not hot

CHUCK BURTON, URTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Austin Dillon: He got caught in a wreck he didn’t cause, but it’s entirely possible that was his last All-Star Race for a while. Ryan Newman: Between fighting Clint Bowyer and a poor finish in the All-Star Race, Newman is going to limp back into Charlotte for the second weekend. — Brendan Marks

Kyle Larson celebrates in victory lane Saturday after winning the All-Star Race at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina.

Kyle Larson eager for a turnaround after success at All-Star Race PETE IACOBELLI

Associated Press

K

yle Larson was among NASCAR’s rising young stars in 2017 with four victories and his second straight playoff appearance. Then came a 20-month winless drought that left him and his Chip Ganassi Racing team searching for answers. Larson believes he found several during a breakthrough weekend at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina. He became just the second driver to win the Monster Energy Open to get into the All-Star Race before outlasting Kevin Harvick and Kyle Busch to win the main event and $1 million prize Saturday night. The 26-year-old Larson understands he has much more to prove before declaring a turnaround, starting this week with the Coca-Cola 600, also at CMS. Still, it was a satisfying moment in more than a season of struggles. “In losing close races, I feel like I’ve done a good job of not getting stressed out,” Larson said. “With those losses that I’ve had, you grow from each and every one of them.” Larson certainly has had difficult moments since taking the checkered flag at Richmond in September 2017. Perhaps the most memorable came at Talladega Superspeedway last month when his No. 42 lifted off the track, struck the interior

wall head on and went on a slow series of barrel rolls before stopping. Larson was not hurt in the frightening incident that might have unhinged some drivers with less resolve. “That wasn’t the first flip I’ve ever had,” he said. “I don’t get scared from it. It doesn’t rough me up. It doesn’t bother me. Thankfully I was uninjured, other than a stiff neck for a couple of days, so that also helps.” Larson said it’s the problems on the track, like crashes that left him 39th in Texas and 37th at Richmond this season, that stick with him. “That stuff’s harder to overcome more than flipping down the back stretch,” he said. Things began looking up at Dover this month with a third-place finish. He followed with another top 10 at Kansas to head to Charlotte with a belief things were improving. Larson took the win in the Open, where three drivers advance into the main feature. He kept his cool — and stayed out of trouble — during the first three stages of the All-Star Race before moving from sixth to the front with a tremendous push from Harvick on a restart 12 laps from the end. Larson held off Harvick and Busch for the win. Larson discovered quickly he’s got work to do for a fourth straight playoff appearance. The All-Star win neither locked him into the field nor gave him

precious playoff points. He thinks his entire organization will have a boost heading into the rest of the season. Larson’s crew chief, Chad Johnston, said the team’s frustrations were with results, not abilities. A winning attitude never wavered, even if the wins didn’t come. “We definitely haven’t started off like we wanted to,” Johnston said. “But normally we start off pretty well and don’t wind up finishing well. So hopefully we’re on pace to kind of hit our stride to where we’re stringing together some finishes and competing for wins.” Larson points to the string of bad finishes and no finishes. “I knew we were putting ourselves in a bad spot to make it to the playoffs,” he said. Larson has taken steps to stay mentally and physically prepared. He’s spent more time improving his strength and stamina. He’s also kept a good perspective during tough times. When he woke up Saturday, Larson’s biggest concern was getting his 4-year-old son, Owen, to his T-ball game on time. Larson is ready for the grueling 600, NASCAR’s longest race, where his best finish was seventh a year ago. “Hopefully we can keep this balance that we’ve got with our car and stay strong next week, too,” he said.

MONSTER ENERGY CUP SERIES STANDINGS The top 30 drivers as of May 11 Rank/Driver

Points

1 Joey Logano 2 Kyle Busch 3 Kevin Harvick 4 Chase Elliott 5 Brad Keselowski 6 Denny Hamlin 7 Martin Truex Jr. 8 Kurt Busch 9 Clint Bowyer 10 Ryan Blaney 11 Aric Almirola 12 Alex Bowman 13 Daniel Suarez 14 Erik Jones 15 Kyle Larson

478 469 440 423 421 404 396 387 357 340 334 329 315 308 304

Rank/Driver

Points

16 Jimmie Johnson 17 Ryan Newman 18 Austin Dillon 19 William Byron 20 R. Stenhouse Jr. 21 Paul Menard 22 Ty Dillon 23 Chris Buescher 24 Ryan Preece 25 Matt DiBenedetto 26 Daniel Hemric 27 David Ragan 28 Corey Lajoie 29 Bubba Wallace 30 Mike McDowell

292 284 281 277 267 267 226 225 181 167 163 144 130 129 119

XFINITY SERIES STANDINGS The top 20 drivers as of May 4 Rank/Driver

Points

1. Tyler Reddick 2. Christopher Bell 3. Cole Custer 4. Austin Cindric 5. Justin Allgaier 6. Chase Briscoe 7. John Hunter Nemechek 8. Ryan Sieg 9. Noah Gragson 10. Michael Annett

462 439 391 381 348 335 325 315 304 297

Rank/Driver

Points

11. Justin Haley 12. Brandon Jones 13. Ross Chastain 14. Gray Gaulding 15. Brandon Brown 16. Garrett Smithley 17. Jeremy Clements 18. Josh Williams 19. Ray Black Jr. 20. David Starr

294 286 244 207 204 163 155 149 141 140

Next Xfinity race: Alsco 300, Charlotte Motor Speedway, noon Saturday (FS1)

TRUCK SERIES STANDINGS The top 20 drivers as of May 17 Rank/Driver 1 Grant Enfinger 2 Stewart Friesen 3 Brett Moffitt 4 Ben Rhodes 5 Matt Crafton 6 Johnny Sauter 7 Austin Hill 8 Todd Gilliland 9 Harrison Burton 10 Sheldon Creed

Points 331 316 298 297 294 273 264 253 252 219

Rank/Driver 11 Tyler Dippel 12 Spencer Boyd 13 Brennan Poole 14 Jordan Anderson 15 Gus Dean 16 Tyler Ankrum 17 Austin W. Self 18 Cory Roper 19 Angela Ruch 20 Jesse Little

Points 165 145 143 136 129 124 110 99 92 91

Questions to ponder entering the series’ longest race BRENDAN MARKS

championship-caliber car, and young William Byron has a bit further to go before he can capitalize on his talent. So where does that leave Hendrick? The program still is one of NASCAR’s preeminent operations. But saying it’s in the same stratosphere as Joe Gibbs Racing or Team Penske right now isn’t accurate. HMS has a long and storied history at Charlotte, and finding victory lane Sunday would go a long ways toward re-establishing its elite status.

Charlotte Observer

NASCAR is hoping this week’s Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway turns out as well as last week’s All-Star festivities. The All-Star Race featured some of the more exciting racing of this NASCAR season for the second consecutive year. Of course the Coca-Cola 600 is the opposite sort of race — most notably the longest vs. the shortest — but at least there’s plenty of story lines to follow as the weekend unfolds. Here are a few worth watching:

4. Can Kyle Busch repeat and get back to winning?

1. Does Larson’s All-Star momentum carry over? Kyle Larson won something in NASCAR for the first time in almost two years. Winning the All-Star Race counts for no points and doesn’t do anything to get him back into the playoffs, but it’s a nice start. “It’s been such a rocky start and we haven’t gotten any momentum at all up until the last couple weeks a little bit, and then today I hope kind of helps it,” he said after Saturday’s win. Larson was a Cup Series championship contender who saw his chances sink with a blown engine in the playoffs two years ago. He’s still a budding talent, but it’s worth watching to see if his All-Star victory translates into something more tangible. He sits 15th in the points standings.

JASON MINTO, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bubba Wallace finished fifth in last weekend’s All-Star Race.

2. Can Bubba Wallace shift his trend at home? Bubba Wallace’s sophomore season at NASCAR’s highest level has gone about as poorly as possible. He doesn’t have a top 20 finish, and he’s broken down with reporters multiple times in the last month when talking about those struggles. It’s been a difficult stretch to watch for such a fun, promising

young driver. But Wallace has a reason to be hopeful heading into the 600. He won the second stage of the All-Star Open, put himself in contention during the All-Star Race and managed a fifth-place finish. Wallace’s emotions still were out in the open, but happy tears are much more welcome than sad ones. Wallace is one of NASCAR’s more magnetic drivers, and the sport should be

rooting for him to springboard off his moments last weekend.

3. Is the Hendrick team turnaround for real? Chase Elliott has won this year and is fourth in the points standings, but he’s the only one. Alex Bowman has three straight second-place finishes but still no Cup wins in his career. Jimmie Johnson is two years into his search for another

Kyle Busch finally checked Charlotte off his list last May when he won his first Coca-Cola 600 after finishing second or third seven times before that. That meant Busch became the first driver to win at every track on the current Cup Series schedule. The 600 was just one dominant showing by Busch in 2018, who also coasted to the championship race before ultimately falling to Joey Logano. If there is any driver worth taking on any given race day, Busch again would be the choice. He already won three races this season and sits second in the points standings. But he is enduring his worst threerace stretch of the year. Busch was in contention at the AllStar Race, so maybe things are turning around.


BASEBALL

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 2

SATURDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati West Los Angeles San Diego Arizona Colorado San Francisco

W 31 29 25 21 16 W 30 29 25 26 23 W 33 28 27 23 21

L 21 24 26 31 33 L 20 24 23 25 28 L 18 24 25 26 30

Pct .596 .547 .490 .404 .327 Pct .600 .547 .521 .510 .451 Pct .647 .538 .519 .469 .412

GB — 2½ 5½ 10 13½ GB — 2½ 4 4½ 7½ GB — 5½ 6½ 9 12

WC — — 3 7½ 11 WC — — 1½ 2 5 WC — ½ 1½ 4 7

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 4-6 6-4 L10 5-5 5-5 5-5 4-6 5-5 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 5-5 4-6

Str W-3 L-1 W-1 W-2 L-2 Str W-1 L-2 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-5 W-2 W-1 L-4

Home 18-10 14-12 14-9 12-14 9-17 Home 18-9 17-11 10-12 16-11 12-11 Home 19-6 14-14 11-13 10-11 10-17

Away 13-11 15-12 11-17 9-17 7-16 Away 12-11 12-13 15-11 10-14 11-17 Away 14-12 14-10 16-12 13-15 11-13

Friday’s results Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 5 Philadelphia 6, Milwaukee 4 L.A. Dodgers 10, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 5, St. Louis 2 Washington 12, Miami 10 Colorado 8, Baltimore 6 San Diego 6, Toronto 3 Arizona 18, San Francisco 2 Detroit 9, N.Y. Mets 8 Saturday’s results Chicago Cubs 8, Cincinnati 6 N.Y. Mets 5, Detroit 4 (13) San Diego 19, Toronto 4 St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3 Washington 5, Miami 0 L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, (n) Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 2 Baltimore at Colorado, (n) Arizona 10, San Francisco 4 Today’s games San Diego (Paddack 4-2) at Toronto (Stroman 2-6), 12:07 p.m. Detroit (Turnbull 2-3) at N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 3-3), 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Maeda 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Archer 1-4), 12:35 p.m. Miami (Smith 3-1) at Washington (Fedde 0-0), 12:35 p.m. Philadelphia (Eflin 5-4) at Milwaukee (Woodruff 6-1), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Roark 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Quintana 4-3), 1:20 p.m. Baltimore (Hess 1-6) at Colorado (Marquez 5-2), 2:10 p.m. Arizona (Weaver 3-3) at San Francisco (Anderson 0-0), 3:05 Atlanta (Teheran 3-4) at St. Louis (Flaherty 4-3), 6:05 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 33 30 27 20 15 W 35 26 23 19 17 W 35 25 27 22 23

L 17 19 25 32 36 L 16 25 28 30 33 L 18 23 25 28 31

Pct .660 .612 .519 .385 .294 Pct .686 .510 .451 .388 .340 Pct .660 .521 .519 .440 .426

GB WC — — 2½ — 7 — 14 7 18½11½ GB WC — — 9 1 12 4 15 7 17½ 9½ GB WC — — 7½ — 7½ — 11½ 4 12½ 5

L10 9-1 6-4 5-5 3-7 1-9 L10 9-1 4-6 4-6 1-8 3-7 L10 7-3 8-2 8-1 3-7 2-8

Str W-6 W-1 L-2 L-4 L-7 Str W-5 L-1 L-2 L-1 L-2 Str W-2 W-5 W-8 L-5 L-5

Home 17-10 13-11 13-10 9-18 6-19 Home 17-8 15-13 11-13 9-17 10-16 Home 20-6 17-8 16-10 13-14 10-14

Away 16-7 17-8 14-15 11-14 9-17 Away 18-8 11-12 12-15 10-13 7-17 Away 15-12 8-15 11-15 9-14 13-17

Friday’s results San Diego 6, Toronto 3 Colorado 8, Baltimore 6 Detroit 9, N.Y. Mets 8 Oakland 6, Seattle 2 Cleveland 3, Tampa Bay 1 Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3 Houston 4, Boston 3 N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, ppd. Minnesota 11, Chi White Sox 4 Saturday’s results Minnesota 8, Chicago White Sox 1 Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 7, Kansas City 3, 1st Houston 4, Boston 3 San Diego 19, Toronto 4 N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, (n), 2nd Oakland 6, Seattle 5 Baltimore at Colorado, (n) N.Y. Mets 5, Detroit 4 (13) Texas at L.A. Angels, (n) Today’s games San Diego (Paddack 4-2) at Toronto (Stroman 2-6), 12:07 p.m. Detroit (Turnbull 2-3) at N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 3-3), 12:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Cleveland (Bauer 4-3), 12:10 p.m. Boston (Rodriguez 4-3) at Houston (Verlander 8-1), 1:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Covey 0-3) at Minnesota (Odorizzi 6-2), 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (German 9-1) at Kansas City (Duffy 3-1), 1:15 p.m. Baltimore (Hess 1-6) at Colorado (Marquez 5-2), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (Leake 3-5) at Oakland (Anderson 5-3), 3:07 p.m. Texas (Jurado 1-2) at L.A. Angels (Heaney 0-0), 3:07 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Springer placed on 10-day IL HOUSTON — The Houston Astros placed outfielder George Springer on the 10-day injured list Saturday with a left hamstring strain, but could be close to getting star second baseman Jose Altuve back from injury. Houston general manager Jeff Luhnow said Springer suffered a Grade 2 sprain, but would not give a timetable for how long the outfielder would be out. Houston manager AJ Hinch said Springer will miss more than 10 days. “Our doctors have told us that he’s injured, but it’s not as dramatic as we have feared,” Hinch said. “He’s going to be out a little while, and he’s going to exceed the ten days, but they were encouraged by their findings and observations. He’s really sore. He’s not going to do anything for the foreseeable future. Hopefully, if the initial diagnosis is right, we avoided the catastrophe.” Altuve has been out since May 11 with a left hamstring strain after beating out an infield single.

Boston’s Price leaves in first HOUSTON — Boston Red Sox left-hander David Price has left his start at Houston due to flu-like symptoms. Price lasted three batters and 15 pitches before leaving with two out in the first inning Saturday night. It was the shortest start of Price’s career and his shortest outing of any kind since Sept. 18, 2008, when he got two outs while pitching in relief for Tampa Bay. After allowing a single to Michael Brantley, manager Alex Cora rushed out of the dugout to Price. Following a short conversation, Cora motioned to the bullpen, replacing Price with Colton Brewer. Price was placed on the injured list on May 3 with left elbow tendinitis. He returned Monday and allowed two unearned runs in five innings against the Blue Jays. BRIEFLY ANGELS: Los Angeles placed Matt Harvey on the 10-day injured list with an upper back strain, two days after what he deemed an “embarrassing” loss. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

470

Luke Voit’s tiebreaking seventh-inning home run Saturday vs. the Royals traveled 470 feet, the longest in his career. Only seven longer homers have been hit this season in all of MLB.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Padres pound Blue Jays for 19 runs ASSOCIATED PRESS

TORONTO — Austin Hedges connected for a grand slam, and the San Diego Padres hit a franchise-record seven home runs to romp past the Toronto Blue Jays 19-4 Saturday for their fifth straight win. Wil Myers and Hunter Renfroe each hit two home runs and Ian Kinsler and Eric Hosmer also homered. The previous team record was six, set in Cincinnati on July 17, 1998. Hedges hit his first career slam and drove in five runs. Myers went 2 for 2, drove in four and scored four times, and Renfroe had four hits, scored four and drove in three. TWINS 8, WHITE SOX 1: Kyle Gibson struck out nine in seven innings,and host Minnesota beat Chicago for its 10th win in 11 games. Gibson gave up five hits and walked none. His only blemish was José Abreu’s leadoff homer in the fourth inning. YANKEES 7, ROYALS 3: Luke Voit hit a go-ahead homer in the seventh inning, helping New York earn its sixth consecutive win in the opener of a day-night doubleheader against host Kansas City. Yankees pitcher J.A. Happ threw six strong innings, striking out 10. Brett Gardner had three hits and scored

PHILLIES 7, BREWERS 2: Jake Arrieta pitched eight effective innings, Andrew McCutchen homered and Philadelphia beat host Milwaukee. César Hernández, Rhys Hoskins and J.T. Realmuto also connected in Philadelphia’s third consecutive win. Hoskins finished with three hits and two RBIs, and Hernández also drove in two runs. DIAMONDBACKS 10, GIANTS 4: Ketel Marte homered for the second consecutive day, Adam Jones had two hits and an RBI, and Arizona beat host San Francisco. ATHLETICS 6, MARINERS 5: Mike Fiers won in his first ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS start at the Coliseum since Royals center fielder Billy Hamilton catches a fly ball during pitching a no-hitter earlier the sixth inning of the first game in a doubleheader Saturday this month and Oakland beat in Kansas City, Mo. Seattle for its eighth straight win, a streak that has a sustwice. four-hitter for his second pended game in the middle. career shutout, helping host CUBS 8, REDS 6: Addison Washington to the victory METS 5, TIGERS 4 (13): Russell homered at Wrigley over Miami. Corbin struck Tomás Nido homered Field for the first time since out five and walked one. Yan against Buck Farmer leading he was suspended for vio- Gomes’ three-run double to off the 13th inning, Wilson lating baseball’s domestic right field capped a five-run Ramos homered twice and violence policy, leading the fourth inning for the Nation- the New York beat Detroit for another comeback vicCubs to a wild victory over als. Cincinnati. With the wind tory during this wild homeblowing out on a warm day, RAYS 6, INDIANS 2: Charlie stand. Albert Almora Jr. and Jason Morton struck out 10 batHeyward also connected to ters and gave up just three ASTROS 4, RED SOX 3: Carlos help the NL Central-leading hits over six innings to helps Correa singled in Aledmys Cubs. Tampa Bay defeat host Diaz in the bottom of the Cleveland. Tommy Pham ninth inning as host HouNATIONALS 5, MARLINS 0: and Ji-Man Choi each hit ston earned a walk-off vicPatrick Corbin pitched a two-runs homers. tory over Boston.

BOX SCORES Cubs 8, Reds 6

Yankees 7, Royals 3

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Senzel cf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .235 Votto 1b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .226 Suarez 3b 5 0 3 1 0 0 .267 Winker lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .224 Puig rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .213 Dietrich 2b 3 2 1 1 1 0 .243 Iglesias ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304 Barnhart c 4 2 3 2 0 1 .195 Mahle p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067 VanMeter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167Totals 38 6 14 6 3 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .234 Bryant 3b-rf 4 1 2 0 1 2 .288 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .278 Baez ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .308 Heyward rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .238 Caratini c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .379 Almora Jr. cf 2 2 1 1 1 0 .264 Russell 2b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .256 Darvish p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .053 Bote 3b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .254 Totals 33 8 11 8 3 8 Cincinnati 020 021 010 — 6 14 0 Chicago 010 410 02x — 8 11 0 LOB — Cincinnati 8, Chicago 7. 2B — Barnhart (3), Bryant (15), Rizzo (10), Bote (8). HR — Barnhart (5), off Darvish; Puig (9), off Darvish; Dietrich (13), off Darvish; Almora Jr. (6), off Mahle; Russell (2), off Mahle; Heyward (7), off Mahle. RBIs — Senzel (8), Suarez (34), Puig (29), Dietrich (28), Barnhart 2 (14), Schwarber (19), Rizzo 2 (40), Heyward (19), Almora Jr. (19), Russell 2 (4), Bote (18). CS — Iglesias (3). SF — Schwarber. S — Almora Jr.. DP — Chicago 2. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Mahle 5 9 6 6 1 5 4.15 Lorenzen 2 0 0 0 0 3 2.30 1 /3 2 2 2 1 0 4.15 Hughes, L, 2-2 2 Peralta /3 0 0 0 1 0 5.30 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Darvish 7 12 6 6 2 5 5.40 1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 4.96 Ryan 2 /3 0 0 0 1 1 0.00 Maples, W, 1-0 Chatwood, S, 1-1 1 2 0 0 0 0 2.76 Darvish pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored — Peralta 2-1, Ryan 1-0, Maples 1-0. HBP — Mahle (Rizzo). WP — Darvish. T — 3:13. Att. — 40,929

First Game New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hicks cf 4 2 1 0 1 2 .200 Voit 1b 5 2 2 2 0 0 .266 Sanchez c 4 0 0 0 1 3 .268 Torres ss 5 0 0 0 0 2 .293 Frazier dh 3 1 1 2 1 0 .260 Gardner lf 4 2 3 0 0 0 .240 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .333 Estrada 2b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .318 Maybin rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Totals 36 7 10 7 3 10 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lopez 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .324 Merrifield rf 4 1 2 3 0 1 .296 Mondesi ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .281 Dozier 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Soler dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Owings 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .137 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .197 Hamilton cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .227 Totals 33 3 6 3 0 11 New York 200 001 220 — 7 10 1 Kansas City 000 003 000 — 3 6 0 E — Sanchez (8). LOB — New York 6, Kansas City 3. 2B — Frazier (5), Estrada (3). 3B — Gardner (3). HR — Voit (13), off Barlow; Merrifield (7), off Happ. RBIs — Voit 2 (37), Frazier 2 (26), Urshela (20), Estrada 2 (11), Merrifield 3 (26). SB — Gardner (6), Mondesi (18). SF — Urshela. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Happ, W, 4-3 6 4 3 3 0 10 5.09 Ottavino, H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.48 Cessa 2 2 0 0 0 1 3.33 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Junis 6 6 3 3 2 7 5.58 Barlow, L, 1-1 11/3 4 4 4 1 1 4.62 Peralta 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 5.48 Inherited runners-scored — Peralta 1-0. T — 2:42. Att. — 25,243

Nationals 5, Marlins 0 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dean lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Cooper rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .196 Anderson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Castro 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Ramirez cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .353 Prado 1b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .243 Rojas ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .252 Holaday c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Alcantara p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Totals 28 0 4 0 1 5 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Eaton rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .273 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .324 Soto lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .287 Adams 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .260 Dozier 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .201 Robles cf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .247 Gomes c 2 0 1 3 2 1 .239 Corbin p 4 0 0 0 0 1 .136 Totals 30 5 7 4 5 3 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Washington 000 500 00x — 5 7 0 E — Anderson (2). LOB — Miami 2, Washington 7. 2B — Ramirez (2), Robles (9), Gomes (5). RBIs — Soto (34), Gomes 3 (16). DP — Miami 1; Washington 3. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Alcantara, L, 2-5 5 6 5 4 2 2 4.50 Garcia 3 1 0 0 3 1 5.62 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Corbin, W, 5-2 9 4 0 0 1 5 2.85 HBP — Alcantara (Robles). WP — Alcantara. T — 2:25. Att. — 33,163

Athletics 6, Mariners 5 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .233 Vogelbach dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Narvaez c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Santana lf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .278 Seager 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .500 Bruce rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .193 Crawford ss 4 0 1 1 0 2 .269 Long 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .174 Totals 36 5 9 5 0 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .274 Pinder rf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .269 Chapman 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .262 Olson 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Canha dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .233 Profar 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .197 Laureano cf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Grossman lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Phegley c 2 1 0 0 0 1 .271 Totals 32 6 11 6 1 5 Seattle 001 110 002 — 5 9 1 Oakland 101 300 01x — 6 11 0 E — Santana (9). LOB — Seattle 4, Oakland 5. 2B — Seager (1), Bruce (9), Crawford (5), Long (2), Pinder (9), Canha (3), Laureano (9). HR — Santana (9), off Fiers; Haniger (13), off Fiers; Santana (10), off Treinen; Chapman (12), off Kikuchi. RBIs — Haniger 2 (28), Santana 2 (41), Crawford (4), Semien (23), Pinder 2 (18), Chapman (29), Profar (27), Laureano (16). SB — Laureano (4). SF — Laureano. DP — Seattle 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kikuchi, L, 3-2 31/3 10 5 4 1 1 3.82 Adams 12/3 0 0 0 0 3 4.05 Bass 2 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Brennan 1 1 1 1 0 0 2.30 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fiers, W, 4-3 6 5 3 3 0 3 5.00 Buchter, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.78 Trivino, H, 11 1 1 0 0 0 2 2.52 Treinen, S, 10-12 1 3 2 2 0 0 3.20 Inherited runners-scored — Adams 1-0. HBP — Kikuchi (Phegley). T — 2:52. Att. — 18,975

Phillies 7, Brewers 2

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .263 Segura ss 4 1 1 1 1 0 .320 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .230 Hoskins 1b 4 2 3 2 1 0 .270 Realmuto c 5 1 1 1 0 1 .271 Hernandez 2b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .307 Kingery 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .357 Herrera cf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .228 Arrieta p 4 0 1 0 0 2 .136 Totals 38 7 12 7 5 8 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Yelich rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .323 Braun lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Gamel lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .266 Grandal c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .268 Thames 1b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .234 Hiura 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .197 Arcia ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .256 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Perez 2b 2 0 0 1 0 1 .239 Totals 30 2 5 2 1 9 Philadelphia 111 010 003 — 7 12 0 Milwaukee 000 000 110 — 2 5 0 LOB — Philadelphia 9, Milwaukee 2. 2B — Hoskins (10), Herrera (10), Arcia (6). HR — McCutchen (8), off Chacin; Hernandez (5), off Chacin; Hoskins (13), off Claudio; Realmuto (8), off Claudio; Moustakas (13), off Arrieta. RBIs — McCutchen (26), Segura (23), Hoskins 2 (41), Realmuto (32), Hernandez 2 (23), Moustakas (32), Perez (9). SB — Harper (2), Hoskins (1), Herrera (2). CS — Herrera (2). DP — Philadelphia 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Arrieta, W, 5-4 8 5 2 2 1 8 3.60 Alvarez 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.98 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Chacin, L, 3-6 5 7 4 4 3 6 4.88 Houser 2 1 0 0 2 1 3.86 Guerra 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.30 Claudio 1 3 3 3 0 0 5.57 T — 2:52. Att. — 42,475

Padres 19, Blue Jays 4 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia dh-ss 5 2 2 1 1 1 .272 Naylor rf 6 0 3 2 0 2 .300 Machado ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .267 Maton p 1 0 1 1 0 0 .500 Hosmer 1b 5 3 3 1 0 0 .292 Allen ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Renfroe lf 6 4 4 3 0 1 .248 France 3b 6 1 2 0 0 2 .222 Myers cf 2 4 2 4 3 0 .232 Kinsler 2b 3 3 1 2 2 0 .189 Hedges c 5 1 1 5 0 4 .195 Totals 45 19 20 19 6 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Galvis ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Guerrero Jr. 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .222 Smoak 1b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .219 Tellez dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Jansen c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .178 Grichuk rf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .232 Gurriel Jr. lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .196 Biggio 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Davis cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .114 Maile c-p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .136 Totals 30 4 4 4 2 12 San Diego 120 432 250 — 19 20 1 Toronto 010 200 010 — 4 4 0 E — Naylor (1). LOB — San Diego 8, Toronto 1. 2B — Garcia (7), Naylor (1). HR — Myers (8), off Jackson; Kinsler (6), off Jackson; Hedges (6), off Jackson; Renfroe (13), off Law; Hosmer (8), off Gaviglio; Renfroe (14), off Gaviglio; Myers (9), off Gaviglio; Gurriel Jr. (2), off Quantrill; Smoak (9), off Quantrill. RBIs — Garcia (9), Naylor 2 (2), Hosmer (30), Renfroe 3 (29), Myers 4 (19), Kinsler 2 (11), Hedges 5 (15), Maton (1), Galvis (22), Smoak 2 (25), Gurriel Jr. (9). SB — Renfroe (3). DP — San Diego 1; Toronto 2. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO ERA Quantrill, W, 1-2 6 2 3 3 2 9 5.14 Maton 2 2 1 0 0 2 4.96 Wieck 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.74 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jackson, L, 0-2 4 7 7 7 1 2 9.00 Maile 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.00 Pannone 1 3 3 3 2 2 7.40 Law 1 2 2 2 0 2 6.00 Rosscup 1 1 2 1 2 2 3.60 2 /3 6 5 5 1 1 3.60 Gaviglio 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.63 Biagini Inherited runners-scored — Biagini 2-0. HBP — Jackson (Kinsler), Pannone (Hedges), Maile (Myers). PB — Maile (3). T — 3:04. Att. — 24,212

Twins 8, White Sox 1

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Moncada 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .283 Abreu dh 4 1 2 1 0 2 .267 McCann c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .322 Jimenez lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .225 Rondon ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .203 Alonso 1b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .181 Zavala ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Sanchez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Tilson rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Totals 32 1 6 1 1 13 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Polanco dh 5 0 2 0 0 2 .340 Gonzalez rf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .239 Schoop 2b 3 2 0 0 2 2 .266 Rosario lf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .286 Cron 1b 3 2 2 4 1 0 .278 Sano 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Arraez ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .467 Astudillo c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .262 Adrianza ss-3b 4 1 3 4 0 0 .231 Buxton cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .255 Totals 33 8 10 8 6 8 Chicago 000 100 000 — 1 6 1 Minnesota 200 300 03x — 8 10 1 E — Alonso (1), Adrianza (2). LOB — Chicago 6, Minnesota 7. 2B — Abreu (14), Rosario (8), Cron (8). HR — Abreu (13), off Gibson; Adrianza (4), off Herrera. RBIs — Abreu (42), Cron 4 (34), Adrianza 4 (12). CS — Garcia (2). DP — Chicago 1 (Sanchez, Rondon, Alonso); Minnesota 1 (Adrianza, Cron). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Banuelos, L, 2-4 4 5 5 5 3 4 7.71 Minaya 2 2 0 0 1 1 1.59 Fry 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.59 2 Herrera /3 3 3 3 1 1 6.97 1 Marshall /3 0 0 0 1 1 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson, W, 5-2 7 5 1 1 1 9 4.08 Magill 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.64 Parker 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.04 Inherited runners-scored — Marshall 1-0. HBP — Gibson (Garcia). T — 3:16. Att. — 39,139

Diamondbacks 10, Giants 4

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte cf 4 2 2 1 1 1 .270 Vargas 2b 5 2 1 2 0 0 .243 Escobar 3b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .279 Jones rf 2 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Swihart rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .184 Cron 1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .200 Ahmed ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .265 Locastro lf 4 2 2 1 1 0 .292 Avila c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Clarke p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Kelly ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Totals 38 10 13 8 3 5 San FranciscoAB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 5 1 0 0 0 1 .241 Duggar cf 3 0 2 0 0 1 .243 Austin ph-lf 1 1 0 0 1 0 .262 Posey c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Longoria ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .231 Solano ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .182 Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 2 1 2 .302 Belt 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .227 Pillar rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .223 Yastrzemski lf-cf 3 1 0 0 0 2 .000 Crawford ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .204 Suarez p 2 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Vogt c 1 0 1 0 1 0 .250 Totals 34 4 9 4 5 7 Arizona 203 140 000 — 10 13 0 San Francisco 010 000 300 — 4 9 2 E — Sandoval (4), Belt (3). LOB — Arizona 6, San Francisco 9. 2B — Escobar (13), Jones (13), Cron (1), Locastro 2 (2), Duggar (8), Pillar (8). 3B — Marte (3). HR — Marte (11), off Suarez. RBIs — Marte (36), Vargas 2 (8), Escobar (38), Jones (32), Cron 2 (2), Locastro (3), Sandoval 2 (18), Suarez (1), Longoria (19). SF — Jones, Cron. FIDP — Cron. DP — San Francisco 3. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA Clarke, W, 1-1 61/3 6 3 3 3 4 2.93 2 Chafin /3 1 1 1 2 0 3.86 Bradley 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.09 Holland 1 2 0 0 0 2 1.59 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA Suarez, L, 0-2 4 9 9 7 3 2 9.00 Dyson 1 1 1 0 0 2 2.42 Rodriguez 2 0 0 0 0 0 4.81 Melancon 1 1 0 0 0 0 2.21 Watson 1 2 0 0 0 1 2.84 Suarez pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored — Chafin 2-1, Dyson 2-2. HBP — Clarke (Yastrzemski). WP — Suarez 2. T — 3:06. Att. — 31,531

Rays 6, Indians 2 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows rf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .320 Pham lf 5 2 2 2 0 0 .290 Choi 1b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .264 Garcia dh 5 1 2 0 0 1 .285 Lowe 2b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .287 Adames ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .242 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .236 d’Arnaud c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .094 Robertson 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .195 Totals 38 6 12 6 1 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Santana dh 4 1 2 1 0 2 .287 Bauers 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .213 Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .200 Luplow rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Martin cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .227 Perez c 2 0 0 0 2 1 .226 Allen lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .098 Totals 31 2 5 2 3 12 Tampa Bay 010 021 200 — 6 12 0 Cleveland 010 000 010 — 2 5 1 E — Lindor (1). LOB — Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 6. 2B — Lowe (10), Santana (10). HR — Choi (4), off Carrasco; Lowe (11), off Carrasco; Pham (8), off Carrasco; Santana (9), off Sadler. RBIs — Pham 2 (24), Choi 2 (16), Lowe 2 (30), Santana (29), Martin (13). SB — Garcia (5). S — Adames. DP — Cleveland 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Morton, W, 5-0 6 3 1 1 2 10 2.54 Sadler 2 1 1 1 1 0 1.76 Castillo 1 1 0 0 0 2 2.39 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Carrasco, L, 4-5 61/3 9 6 5 1 6 4.60 Smith 12/3 3 0 0 0 3 0.00 Otero 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.00 HBP — Morton (Lindor). T — 2:55. Att. — 25,882

Mets 5, Tigers 4 (13)

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goodrum ss 7 1 1 0 0 2 .211 Lugo 3b 7 0 4 0 0 1 .259 Castellanos rf 6 0 1 1 0 1 .264 Cabrera 1b 5 0 1 0 1 0 .303 Stewart lf 3 0 1 0 3 0 .212 Harrison 2b 6 1 2 0 0 1 .173 Greiner c 4 1 0 0 2 1 .169 Jones cf 5 0 2 1 1 3 .192 Carpenter p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Dixon ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .316 Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Beckham ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .247 Hicks ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 49 4 14 4 7 11 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 1 0 0 1 0 .253 J.Davis lf 5 1 0 0 1 0 .270 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Nido ph-c 2 1 1 1 0 0 .194 Ramos c 4 2 3 4 1 0 .270 Gomez cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Smith 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Frazier 3b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .217 Altherr rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .056 Hechavarria 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Vargas p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 R.Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Lagares cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 44 5 7 5 3 8 Detroit 100 002 010 000 0 — 4 14 2 New York 010 102 000 000 1 — 5 7 1 2B — Harrison (7). HR — Dixon (4), off Bashlor; Ramos (4), off Carpenter; Ramos (5), off Ramirez; Nido (2), off Farmer. RBIs — Castellanos (15), Jones (12), Dixon 2 (14), Ramos 4 (31), Nido (5). SB — Jones 2 (4). SF — Castellanos. DP — Detroit 1; New York 3. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Carpenter 5 2 2 1 0 5 9.00 Ramirez 2 1 2 2 1 2 3.46 Hardy 2 1 0 0 1 0 5.40 Alcantara 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.01 Stumpf 1 2 0 0 1 1 2.92 Jimenez 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.03 Farmer, L, 3-4 0 1 1 1 0 0 4.71 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Vargas 5 5 1 1 3 3 5.22 Bashlor 1 1 2 2 1 2 2.53 Gsellman, H, 4 12/3 2 1 1 0 0 3.41 1 Diaz /3 1 0 0 0 1 1.80 Font 2 2 0 0 1 2 6.15 Zamora 1 2 0 0 0 0 1.59 Santiago, W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 2 3 0.00 T — 4:11. Att. — 40,691

Astros 4, Red Sox 3

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi lf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .266 Betts rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .292 Moreland 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .228 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .284 Devers 3b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .326 Chavis 2b 4 2 2 0 0 1 .277 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Vazquez dh-c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .299 Leon c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Martinez ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .302 Pearce ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .175 Totals 35 3 9 3 3 10 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Diaz 2b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .278 Bregman 3b 3 0 1 0 2 1 .263 Brantley lf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .327 Correa ss 4 1 3 1 1 1 .294 Gurriel 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .262 Reddick rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .333 White dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .237 Stassi c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Chirinos c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Totals 36 4 13 4 4 5 Boston 000 000 102 — 3 9 0 Houston 000 002 101 — 4 13 0 LOB — Boston 9, Houston 12. 2B — Benintendi (9), Devers (14), Diaz 2 (5). RBIs — Benintendi (21), Vazquez 2 (19), Correa (34), Gurriel (18), Reddick (15), White (7). SB — Benintendi (5). DP — Boston 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA 2 Price /3 1 0 0 0 1 3.24 Brewer 21/3 5 0 0 0 1 5.32 Lakins 21/3 2 2 2 1 1 4.50 2 Hembree /3 1 0 0 0 0 3.04 Velazquez 2 2 1 1 1 2 5.40 Barnes, L, 2-1 0 2 1 1 2 0 2.25 Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Peacock 6 4 0 0 1 8 3.19 2 /3 1 1 1 1 0 2.60 Rondon, H, 7 Pressly, H, 12 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 0.39

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1930 — Joe Sewell of the Cleveland Indians, who fanned only three times in 353 at-bats during the season, was struck out twice in the same game by Pat Caraway of the White Sox. 1937 — Billy Sullivan and Bruce Campbell appeared for the Cleveland Indians as pinch hitters. Each hit a home run, making it the first time two American League pinch hitters hit home runs in the same game. The Indians beat the Athletics, 8-6. 1956 — Cincinnati Reds pitchers John Klippstein, Hershell Freeman and Joe Black combined for 9 2-3 hitless innings, but lost 2-1 in 11 innings to the Philadelphia Phillies.


BASEBALL

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 4

SATURDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati West Los Angeles San Diego Arizona Colorado San Francisco

W 31 29 25 21 16 W 30 29 25 26 23 W 34 28 27 23 21

L 21 24 26 31 33 L 20 24 24 25 28 L 18 24 25 27 30

Pct .596 .547 .490 .404 .327 Pct .600 .547 .510 .510 .451 Pct .654 .538 .519 .460 .412

GB — 2½ 5½ 10 13½ GB — 2½ 4½ 4½ 7½ GB — 6 7 10 12½

WC — — 3 7½ 11 WC — — 2 2 5 WC — ½ 1½ 4½ 7

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 4-6 6-4 L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6 5-5 L10 8-2 6-4 4-6 4-6 4-6

Str W-3 L-1 W-1 W-2 L-2 Str W-1 L-2 L-2 W-1 L-1 Str W-2 W-5 W-2 L-1 L-4

Home 18-10 14-12 14-9 12-14 9-17 Home 18-9 17-11 10-13 16-11 12-11 Home 19-6 14-14 11-13 10-12 10-17

Away 13-11 15-12 11-17 9-17 7-16 Away 12-11 12-13 15-11 10-14 11-17 Away 15-12 14-10 16-12 13-15 11-13

Friday’s results Cincinnati 6, Chicago Cubs 5 Philadelphia 6, Milwaukee 4 L.A. Dodgers 10, Pittsburgh 2 Atlanta 5, St. Louis 2 Washington 12, Miami 10 Colorado 8, Baltimore 6 San Diego 6, Toronto 3 Arizona 18, San Francisco 2 Detroit 9, N.Y. Mets 8 Saturday’s results Chicago Cubs 8, Cincinnati 6 N.Y. Mets 5, Detroit 4 (13) San Diego 19, Toronto 4 St. Louis 6, Atlanta 3 Washington 5, Miami 0 L.A. Dodgers 7, Pittsburgh 2 Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 2 Baltimore 9, Colorado, 6 Arizona 10, San Francisco 4 Today’s games San Diego (Paddack 4-2) at Toronto (Stroman 2-6), 12:07 p.m. Detroit (Turnbull 2-3) at N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 3-3), 12:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Maeda 5-2) at Pittsburgh (Archer 1-4), 12:35 p.m. Miami (Smith 3-1) at Washington (Fedde 0-0), 12:35 p.m. Philadelphia (Eflin 5-4) at Milwaukee (Woodruff 6-1), 1:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Roark 3-3) at Chicago Cubs (Quintana 4-3), 1:20 p.m. Baltimore (Hess 1-6) at Colorado (Marquez 5-2), 2:10 p.m. Arizona (Weaver 3-3) at San Francisco (Anderson 0-0), 3:05 Atlanta (Teheran 3-4) at St. Louis (Flaherty 4-3), 6:05 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 34 30 27 20 16 W 35 26 23 19 17 W 35 25 27 22 23

L 17 19 25 32 36 L 16 25 28 30 34 L 18 23 25 28 31

Pct .667 .612 .519 .385 .308 Pct .686 .510 .451 .388 .333 Pct .660 .521 .519 .440 .426

GB — 3 7½ 14½ 18½ GB — 9 12 15 18 GB — 7½ 7½ 11½ 12½

WC — — — 7 11 WC — ½ 3½ 6½ 9½ WC — — — 4 5

L10 9-1 6-4 5-5 3-7 2-8 L10 9-1 4-6 4-6 1-8 3-7 L10 7-3 8-2 8-1 3-7 2-8

Str W-7 W-1 L-2 L-4 W-1 Str W-5 L-1 L-2 L-1 L-3 Str W-2 W-5 W-8 L-5 L-5

Home 17-10 13-11 13-10 9-18 6-19 Home 17-8 15-13 11-13 9-17 10-17 Home 20-6 17-8 16-10 13-14 10-14

Away 17-7 17-8 14-15 11-14 10-17 Away 18-8 11-12 12-15 10-13 7-17 Away 15-12 8-15 11-15 9-14 13-17

Friday’s results San Diego 6, Toronto 3 Colorado 8, Baltimore 6 Detroit 9, N.Y. Mets 8 Oakland 6, Seattle 2 Cleveland 3, Tampa Bay 1 Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3 Houston 4, Boston 3 N.Y. Yankees at Kansas City, ppd. Minnesota 11, Chi White Sox 4 Saturday’s results Minnesota 8, Chicago White Sox 1 Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 2 N.Y. Yankees 7, Kansas City 3, 1st Houston 4, Boston 3 San Diego 19, Toronto 4 N.Y. Yankees 6, Kansas City, 5, 2nd Oakland 6, Seattle 5 Baltimore 9, Colorado, 6 N.Y. Mets 5, Detroit 4 (13) Texas at L.A. Angels, (n) Today’s games San Diego (Paddack 4-2) at Toronto (Stroman 2-6), 12:07 p.m. Detroit (Turnbull 2-3) at N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 3-3), 12:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Cleveland (Bauer 4-3), 12:10 p.m. Boston (Rodriguez 4-3) at Houston (Verlander 8-1), 1:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Covey 0-3) at Minnesota (Odorizzi 6-2), 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (German 9-1) at Kansas City (Duffy 3-1), 1:15 p.m. Baltimore (Hess 1-6) at Colorado (Marquez 5-2), 2:10 p.m. Seattle (Leake 3-5) at Oakland (Anderson 5-3), 3:07 p.m. Texas (Jurado 1-2) at L.A. Angels (Heaney 0-0), 3:07 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Springer placed on 10-day IL HOUSTON — The Houston Astros placed outfielder George Springer on the 10-day injured list Saturday with a left hamstring strain, but could be close to getting star second baseman Jose Altuve back from injury. Houston general manager Jeff Luhnow said Springer suffered a Grade 2 sprain, but would not give a timetable for how long the outfielder would be out. Manager AJ Hinch said he will miss more than 10 days.

Boston’s Price leaves in first HOUSTON — Boston Red Sox left-hander David Price has left his start at Houston due to flu-like symptoms. Price lasted three batters and 15 pitches before leaving with two out in the first inning Saturday night. It was the shortest start of Price’s career and his shortest outing of any kind since Sept. 18, 2008, when he got two outs while pitching in relief for Tampa Bay. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

470

Luke Voit’s tiebreaking seventh-inning home run Saturday vs. the Royals traveled 470 feet, the longest in his career. Only seven longer homers have been hit this season in all of MLB.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Padres 19, Blue Jays 4 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia dh-ss 5 2 2 1 1 1 .272 Naylor rf 6 0 3 2 0 2 .300 Machado ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .267 Maton p 1 0 1 1 0 0 .500 Hosmer 1b 5 3 3 1 0 0 .292 Allen ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Renfroe lf 6 4 4 3 0 1 .248 France 3b 6 1 2 0 0 2 .222 Myers cf 2 4 2 4 3 0 .232 Kinsler 2b 3 3 1 2 2 0 .189 Hedges c 5 1 1 5 0 4 .195 Totals 45 19 20 19 6 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Galvis ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Guerrero Jr. 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .222 Smoak 1b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .219 Tellez dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Jansen c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .178 Grichuk rf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .232 Gurriel Jr. lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .196 Biggio 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Davis cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .114 Maile c-p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .136 Totals 30 4 4 4 2 12 San Diego 120 432 250 — 19 20 1 Toronto 010 200 010 — 4 4 0 E — Naylor (1). LOB — San Diego 8, Toronto 1. 2B — Garcia (7), Naylor (1). HR — Myers (8), off Jackson; Kinsler (6), off Jackson; Hedges (6), off Jackson; Renfroe (13), off Law; Hosmer (8), off Gaviglio; Renfroe (14), off Gaviglio; Myers (9), off Gaviglio; Gurriel Jr. (2), off Quantrill; Smoak (9), off Quantrill. RBIs — Garcia (9), Naylor 2 (2), Hosmer (30), Renfroe 3 (29), Myers 4 (19), Kinsler 2 (11), Hedges 5 (15), Maton (1), Galvis (22), Smoak 2 (25), Gurriel Jr. (9). SB — Renfroe (3). DP — San Diego 1; Toronto 2. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO ERA Quantrill, W, 1-2 6 2 3 3 2 9 5.14 Maton 2 2 1 0 0 2 4.96 Wieck 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.74 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Jackson, L, 0-2 4 7 7 7 1 2 9.00 Maile 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.00 Pannone 1 3 3 3 2 2 7.40 Law 1 2 2 2 0 2 6.00 Rosscup 1 1 2 1 2 2 3.60 2 Gaviglio /3 6 5 5 1 1 3.60 1 Biagini /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.63 Inherited runners-scored — Biagini 2-0. HBP — Jackson (Kinsler), Pannone (Hedges), Maile (Myers). PB — Maile (3). T — 3:04. Att. — 24,212

Padres pound Blue Jays for 19 runs ASSOCIATED PRESS

muto also connected in Philadelphia’s third consecutive win. Hoskins finished with three hits and two RBIs, and Hernández also drove in two runs.

TORONTO — Austin Hedges connected for a grand slam, and the San Diego Padres hit a franchise-record seven home runs to romp past the Toronto Blue Jays 19-4 Saturday for their fifth straight win. Wil Myers and Hunter Renfroe each hit two home runs and Ian Kinsler and Eric Hosmer also homered. Thepreviousteamrecordwas six, set in Cincinnati on July 17, 1998. Hedges hit his first career slam and drove in five runs. Myers went 2 for 2, drove in four and scored four times, and Renfroe had four hits, scored four and drove in three.

DIAMONDBACKS 10, GIANTS 4: Ketel Marte homered for the second consecutive day, Adam Jones had two hits and an RBI,and Arizona beat host San Francisco. ATHLETICS 6, MARINERS 5: Mike Fiers won in his first start at the Coliseum since pitching a no-hitter earlier this month and Oakland beat Seattle for its eighth straight win, a streak that has a suspended game in the middle. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

TWINS 8, WHITE SOX 1: Kyle Gibson struck out nine in seven innings,and host Minnesota beat Chicago for its 10th win in 11 games. Gibson gave up five hits and walked none.

Royals center fielder Billy Hamilton catches a fly ball during the sixth inning of the first baseball game in a doubleheader Saturday in Kansas City, Mo.

over Miami. Corbin struck out five and walked one. Yan Gomes’ three-run double to right field capped a five-run CUBS 8, REDS 6: Addison fourth inning for the NationRussell homered at Wrigley als. Field for the first time since he was suspended for vio- YANKEES 7, ROYALS 3 (1ST); lating baseball’s domestic YANKEES 6, ROYALS 5 (2ND): violence policy, leading the Luke Voit hit a go-ahead Cubs to a wild victory over homer in the seventh inCincinnati. ning, helping New York earn its sixth consecutive win in NATIONALS 5, MARLINS 0: the opener of a day-night Patrick Corbin pitched a doubleheader against host four-hitter for his second Kansas City. A five-run seccareer shutout, helping host ond inning provided all the Washington to the victory offense necessary as the Yan-

kees finished off the sweep. RAYS 6, INDIANS 2: Charlie Morton struck out 10 batters and gave up just three hits over six innings to helps Tampa Bay defeat host Cleveland. Tommy Pham and Ji-Man Choi each hit two-runs homers. PHILLIES 7, BREWERS 2: Jake Arrieta pitched eight effective innings, Andrew McCutchen homered and Philadelphia beat host Milwaukee. César Hernández, Rhys Hoskins and J.T. Real-

METS 5, TIGERS 4 (13): Tomás Nido homered against Buck Farmer leading off the 13th inning, Wilson Ramos homered twice and the New York beat Detroit for another comeback victory. ASTROS 4, RED SOX 3: Carlos Correa singled in Aledmys Diaz in the bottom of the ninth inning as host Houston earned a walk-off victory over Boston. DODGERS 7, PIRATES 2: Hyun-Jin Ryu scattered 10 hits over six innings and allowed just two runs as Los Angeles defeated host Pittsburgh. Corey Seager and Cody Bellinger each had two RBIs for the Dodgers.

BOX SCORES Cubs 8, Reds 6

Yankees 7, Royals 3

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Senzel cf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .235 Votto 1b 5 1 3 0 0 0 .226 Suarez 3b 5 0 3 1 0 0 .267 Winker lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .224 Puig rf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .213 Dietrich 2b 3 2 1 1 1 0 .243 Iglesias ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304 Barnhart c 4 2 3 2 0 1 .195 Mahle p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .067 VanMeter ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167Totals 38 6 14 6 3 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .234 Bryant 3b-rf 4 1 2 0 1 2 .288 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .278 Baez ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .308 Heyward rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .238 Caratini c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .379 Almora Jr. cf 2 2 1 1 1 0 .264 Russell 2b 4 2 3 2 0 0 .256 Darvish p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .053 Bote 3b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .254 Totals 33 8 11 8 3 8 Cincinnati 020 021 010 — 6 14 0 Chicago 010 410 02x — 8 11 0 LOB — Cincinnati 8, Chicago 7. 2B — Barnhart (3), Bryant (15), Rizzo (10), Bote (8). HR — Barnhart (5), off Darvish; Puig (9), off Darvish; Dietrich (13), off Darvish; Almora Jr. (6), off Mahle; Russell (2), off Mahle; Heyward (7), off Mahle. RBIs — Senzel (8), Suarez (34), Puig (29), Dietrich (28), Barnhart 2 (14), Schwarber (19), Rizzo 2 (40), Heyward (19), Almora Jr. (19), Russell 2 (4), Bote (18). CS — Iglesias (3). SF — Schwarber. S — Almora Jr.. DP — Chicago 2. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Mahle 5 9 6 6 1 5 4.15 Lorenzen 2 0 0 0 0 3 2.30 1 /3 2 2 2 1 0 4.15 Hughes, L, 2-2 2 Peralta /3 0 0 0 1 0 5.30 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Darvish 7 12 6 6 2 5 5.40 1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 4.96 Ryan 2 /3 0 0 0 1 1 0.00 Maples, W, 1-0 Chatwood, S, 1-1 1 2 0 0 0 0 2.76 Darvish pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored — Peralta 2-1, Ryan 1-0, Maples 1-0. HBP — Mahle (Rizzo). WP — Darvish. T — 3:13. Att. — 40,929

First Game New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hicks cf 4 2 1 0 1 2 .200 Voit 1b 5 2 2 2 0 0 .266 Sanchez c 4 0 0 0 1 3 .268 Torres ss 5 0 0 0 0 2 .293 Frazier dh 3 1 1 2 1 0 .260 Gardner lf 4 2 3 0 0 0 .240 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .333 Estrada 2b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .318 Maybin rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Totals 36 7 10 7 3 10 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lopez 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .324 Merrifield rf 4 1 2 3 0 1 .296 Mondesi ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .281 Dozier 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Soler dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Owings 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .137 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .197 Hamilton cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .227 Totals 33 3 6 3 0 11 New York 200 001 220 — 7 10 1 Kansas City 000 003 000 — 3 6 0 E — Sanchez (8). LOB — New York 6, Kansas City 3. 2B — Frazier (5), Estrada (3). 3B — Gardner (3). HR — Voit (13), off Barlow; Merrifield (7), off Happ. RBIs — Voit 2 (37), Frazier 2 (26), Urshela (20), Estrada 2 (11), Merrifield 3 (26). SB — Gardner (6), Mondesi (18). SF — Urshela. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Happ, W, 4-3 6 4 3 3 0 10 5.09 Ottavino, H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.48 Cessa 2 2 0 0 0 1 3.33 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Junis 6 6 3 3 2 7 5.58 Barlow, L, 1-1 11/3 4 4 4 1 1 4.62 Peralta 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 5.48 Inherited runners-scored — Peralta 1-0. T — 2:42. Att. — 25,243

Nationals 5, Marlins 0 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dean lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Cooper rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .196 Anderson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Castro 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Ramirez cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .353 Prado 1b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .243 Rojas ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .252 Holaday c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Alcantara p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Totals 28 0 4 0 1 5 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Eaton rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .273 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .324 Soto lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .287 Adams 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .260 Dozier 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .201 Robles cf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .247 Gomes c 2 0 1 3 2 1 .239 Corbin p 4 0 0 0 0 1 .136 Totals 30 5 7 4 5 3 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Washington 000 500 00x — 5 7 0 E — Anderson (2). LOB — Miami 2, Washington 7. 2B — Ramirez (2), Robles (9), Gomes (5). RBIs — Soto (34), Gomes 3 (16). DP — Miami 1; Washington 3. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Alcantara, L, 2-5 5 6 5 4 2 2 4.50 Garcia 3 1 0 0 3 1 5.62 Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Corbin, W, 5-2 9 4 0 0 1 5 2.85 HBP — Alcantara (Robles). WP — Alcantara. T — 2:25. Att. — 33,163

Athletics 6, Mariners 5 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .233 Vogelbach dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .252 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Narvaez c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Santana lf 4 2 2 2 0 0 .278 Seager 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .500 Bruce rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .193 Crawford ss 4 0 1 1 0 2 .269 Long 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .174 Totals 36 5 9 5 0 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .274 Pinder rf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .269 Chapman 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .262 Olson 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Canha dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .233 Profar 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .197 Laureano cf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Grossman lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Phegley c 2 1 0 0 0 1 .271 Totals 32 6 11 6 1 5 Seattle 001 110 002 — 5 9 1 Oakland 101 300 01x — 6 11 0 E — Santana (9). LOB — Seattle 4, Oakland 5. 2B — Seager (1), Bruce (9), Crawford (5), Long (2), Pinder (9), Canha (3), Laureano (9). HR — Santana (9), off Fiers; Haniger (13), off Fiers; Santana (10), off Treinen; Chapman (12), off Kikuchi. RBIs — Haniger 2 (28), Santana 2 (41), Crawford (4), Semien (23), Pinder 2 (18), Chapman (29), Profar (27), Laureano (16). SB — Laureano (4). SF — Laureano. DP — Seattle 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kikuchi, L, 3-2 31/3 10 5 4 1 1 3.82 Adams 12/3 0 0 0 0 3 4.05 Bass 2 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Brennan 1 1 1 1 0 0 2.30 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fiers, W, 4-3 6 5 3 3 0 3 5.00 Buchter, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.78 Trivino, H, 11 1 1 0 0 0 2 2.52 Treinen, S, 10-12 1 3 2 2 0 0 3.20 Inherited runners-scored — Adams 1-0. HBP — Kikuchi (Phegley). T — 2:52. Att. — 18,975

Yankees 6, Royals 5 Second Game New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b-1b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .320 Voit dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Gardner cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .238 Torres ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .287 Morales 1b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .200 Estrada pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .318 Frazier rf 3 2 1 0 2 1 .262 Urshela 3b 3 1 1 0 2 0 .333 Romine c 4 1 3 2 0 0 .227 Maybin lf 3 1 2 3 1 1 .254 Totals 35 6 10 6 7 7 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lopez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .293 Merrifield rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .297 Mondesi ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .291 Gordon lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Dozier 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .299 Soler dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .244 O’Hearn 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Hamilton ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .227 Gallagher c 3 0 1 2 0 1 .137 Gore cf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .333 Totals 33 5 9 5 2 7 New York 051 000 000 — 6 10 1 Kansas City 101 200 001 — 5 9 1 E — Chapman (1), Gore (1). LOB — New York 10, Kansas City 4. 2B — Maybin (3), Mondesi (11), Dozier 2 (11), Soler (13). RBIs — LeMahieu (26), Romine 2 (11), Maybin 3 (7), Mondesi (41), Dozier (30), Soler (32), Gallagher 2 (4). SB — Frazier (1). SF — Gallagher. DP — Kansas City 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Green 1 3 1 1 0 012.15 Adams, W, 1-0 4 5 3 3 1 3 3.86 Holder, H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.68 Kahnle, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.71 Britton, H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.31 Chapman, S, 14-15 1 0 1 0 1 1 1.74 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lopez, L, 0-6 1 6 5 5 1 1 6.79 Sparkman 31/3 2 1 1 3 1 2.92 McCarthy 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 9.82 Boxberger 1 1 0 0 2 0 6.16 Diekman 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.00 Kennedy 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.05 Inherited runners-scored — Sparkman 1-0, McCarthy 1-0. HBP — Sparkman (Voit). T — 3:07. Att. — 18,599

Phillies 7, Brewers 2

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .263 Segura ss 4 1 1 1 1 0 .320 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .230 Hoskins 1b 4 2 3 2 1 0 .270 Realmuto c 5 1 1 1 0 1 .271 Hernandez 2b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .307 Kingery 3b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .357 Herrera cf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .228 Arrieta p 4 0 1 0 0 2 .136 Totals 38 7 12 7 5 8 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Yelich rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .323 Braun lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Gamel lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .266 Grandal c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .268 Thames 1b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .234 Hiura 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .256 Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .197 Arcia ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .256 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Perez 2b 2 0 0 1 0 1 .239 Totals 30 2 5 2 1 9 Philadelphia 111 010 003 — 7 12 0 Milwaukee 000 000 110 — 2 5 0 LOB — Philadelphia 9, Milwaukee 2. 2B — Hoskins (10), Herrera (10), Arcia (6). HR — McCutchen (8), off Chacin; Hernandez (5), off Chacin; Hoskins (13), off Claudio; Realmuto (8), off Claudio; Moustakas (13), off Arrieta. RBIs — McCutchen (26), Segura (23), Hoskins 2 (41), Realmuto (32), Hernandez 2 (23), Moustakas (32), Perez (9). SB — Harper (2), Hoskins (1), Herrera (2). CS — Herrera (2). DP — Philadelphia 1. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Arrieta, W, 5-4 8 5 2 2 1 8 3.60 Alvarez 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.98 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Chacin, L, 3-6 5 7 4 4 3 6 4.88 Houser 2 1 0 0 2 1 3.86 Guerra 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.30 Claudio 1 3 3 3 0 0 5.57 T — 2:52. Att. — 42,475

Twins 8, White Sox 1

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Moncada 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .283 Abreu dh 4 1 2 1 0 2 .267 McCann c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .322 Jimenez lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .225 Rondon ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .203 Alonso 1b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .181 Zavala ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Sanchez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Tilson rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Totals 32 1 6 1 1 13 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Polanco dh 5 0 2 0 0 2 .340 Gonzalez rf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .239 Schoop 2b 3 2 0 0 2 2 .266 Rosario lf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .286 Cron 1b 3 2 2 4 1 0 .278 Sano 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Arraez ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .467 Astudillo c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .262 Adrianza ss-3b 4 1 3 4 0 0 .231 Buxton cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .255 Totals 33 8 10 8 6 8 Chicago 000 100 000 — 1 6 1 Minnesota 200 300 03x — 8 10 1 E — Alonso (1), Adrianza (2). LOB — Chicago 6, Minnesota 7. 2B — Abreu (14), Rosario (8), Cron (8). HR — Abreu (13), off Gibson; Adrianza (4), off Herrera. RBIs — Abreu (42), Cron 4 (34), Adrianza 4 (12). CS — Garcia (2). DP — Chicago 1 (Sanchez, Rondon, Alonso); Minnesota 1 (Adrianza, Cron). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Banuelos, L, 2-4 4 5 5 5 3 4 7.71 Minaya 2 2 0 0 1 1 1.59 Fry 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.59 2 Herrera /3 3 3 3 1 1 6.97 1 Marshall /3 0 0 0 1 1 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson, W, 5-2 7 5 1 1 1 9 4.08 Magill 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.64 Parker 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.04 Inherited runners-scored — Marshall 1-0. HBP — Gibson (Garcia). T — 3:16. Att. — 39,139

Diamondbacks 10, Giants 4

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte cf 4 2 2 1 1 1 .270 Vargas 2b 5 2 1 2 0 0 .243 Escobar 3b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .279 Jones rf 2 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Swihart rf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .184 Cron 1b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .200 Ahmed ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .265 Locastro lf 4 2 2 1 1 0 .292 Avila c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .258 Clarke p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Kelly ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Totals 38 10 13 8 3 5 San FranciscoAB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 5 1 0 0 0 1 .241 Duggar cf 3 0 2 0 0 1 .243 Austin ph-lf 1 1 0 0 1 0 .262 Posey c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Longoria ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .231 Solano ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .182 Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 2 1 2 .302 Belt 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .227 Pillar rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .223 Yastrzemski lf-cf 3 1 0 0 0 2 .000 Crawford ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .204 Suarez p 2 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Vogt c 1 0 1 0 1 0 .250 Totals 34 4 9 4 5 7 Arizona 203 140 000 — 10 13 0 San Francisco 010 000 300 — 4 9 2 E — Sandoval (4), Belt (3). LOB — Arizona 6, San Francisco 9. 2B — Escobar (13), Jones (13), Cron (1), Locastro 2 (2), Duggar (8), Pillar (8). 3B — Marte (3). HR — Marte (11), off Suarez. RBIs — Marte (36), Vargas 2 (8), Escobar (38), Jones (32), Cron 2 (2), Locastro (3), Sandoval 2 (18), Suarez (1), Longoria (19). SF — Jones, Cron. FIDP — Cron. DP — San Francisco 3. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA Clarke, W, 1-1 61/3 6 3 3 3 4 2.93 2 Chafin /3 1 1 1 2 0 3.86 Bradley 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.09 Holland 1 2 0 0 0 2 1.59 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA Suarez, L, 0-2 4 9 9 7 3 2 9.00 Dyson 1 1 1 0 0 2 2.42 Rodriguez 2 0 0 0 0 0 4.81 Melancon 1 1 0 0 0 0 2.21 Watson 1 2 0 0 0 1 2.84 Suarez pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored — Chafin 2-1, Dyson 2-2. HBP — Clarke (Yastrzemski). WP — Suarez 2. T — 3:06. Att. — 31,531

Rays 6, Indians 2 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows rf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .320 Pham lf 5 2 2 2 0 0 .290 Choi 1b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .264 Garcia dh 5 1 2 0 0 1 .285 Lowe 2b 3 1 2 2 1 1 .287 Adames ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .242 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .236 d’Arnaud c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .094 Robertson 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .195 Totals 38 6 12 6 1 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .215 Santana dh 4 1 2 1 0 2 .287 Bauers 1b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .213 Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .200 Luplow rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Martin cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .227 Perez c 2 0 0 0 2 1 .226 Allen lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .098 Totals 31 2 5 2 3 12 Tampa Bay 010 021 200 — 6 12 0 Cleveland 010 000 010 — 2 5 1 E — Lindor (1). LOB — Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 6. 2B — Lowe (10), Santana (10). HR — Choi (4), off Carrasco; Lowe (11), off Carrasco; Pham (8), off Carrasco; Santana (9), off Sadler. RBIs — Pham 2 (24), Choi 2 (16), Lowe 2 (30), Santana (29), Martin (13). SB — Garcia (5). S — Adames. DP — Cleveland 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Morton, W, 5-0 6 3 1 1 2 10 2.54 Sadler 2 1 1 1 1 0 1.76 Castillo 1 1 0 0 0 2 2.39 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Carrasco, L, 4-5 61/3 9 6 5 1 6 4.60 Smith 12/3 3 0 0 0 3 0.00 Otero 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.00 HBP — Morton (Lindor). T — 2:55. Att. — 25,882

Mets 5, Tigers 4 (13) Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Goodrum ss 7 1 1 0 0 2 .211 Lugo 3b 7 0 4 0 0 1 .259 Castellanos rf 6 0 1 1 0 1 .264 Cabrera 1b 5 0 1 0 1 0 .303 Stewart lf 3 0 1 0 3 0 .212 Harrison 2b 6 1 2 0 0 1 .173 Greiner c 4 1 0 0 2 1 .169 Jones cf 5 0 2 1 1 3 .192 Carpenter p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Dixon ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .316 Rodriguez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Beckham ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .247 Hicks ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 49 4 14 4 7 11 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rosario ss 5 1 0 0 1 0 .253 J.Davis lf 5 1 0 0 1 0 .270 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Nido ph-c 2 1 1 1 0 0 .194 Ramos c 4 2 3 4 1 0 .270 Gomez cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Smith 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Frazier 3b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .217 Altherr rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .056 Hechavarria 2b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .172 Vargas p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 R.Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Lagares cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 44 5 7 5 3 8 Detroit 100 002 010 000 0 — 4 14 2 New York 010 102 000 000 1 — 5 7 1 2B — Harrison (7). HR — Dixon (4), off Bashlor; Ramos (4), off Carpenter; Ramos (5), off Ramirez; Nido (2), off Farmer. RBIs — Castellanos (15), Jones (12), Dixon 2 (14), Ramos 4 (31), Nido (5). SB — Jones 2 (4). SF — Castellanos. DP — Detroit 1; New York 3. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Carpenter 5 2 2 1 0 5 9.00 Ramirez 2 1 2 2 1 2 3.46 Hardy 2 1 0 0 1 0 5.40 Alcantara 1 0 0 0 0 0 5.01 Stumpf 1 2 0 0 1 1 2.92 Jimenez 1 0 0 0 0 0 4.03 Farmer, L, 3-4 0 1 1 1 0 0 4.71 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Vargas 5 5 1 1 3 3 5.22 Bashlor 1 1 2 2 1 2 2.53 Gsellman, H, 4 12/3 2 1 1 0 0 3.41 1 Diaz /3 1 0 0 0 1 1.80 Font 2 2 0 0 1 2 6.15 Zamora 1 2 0 0 0 0 1.59 Santiago, W, 1-0 2 1 0 0 2 3 0.00 T — 4:11. Att. — 40,691

Astros 4, Red Sox 3 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi lf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .266 Betts rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .292 Moreland 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .228 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .284 Devers 3b 4 1 3 0 0 1 .326 Chavis 2b 4 2 2 0 0 1 .277 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Vazquez dh-c 4 0 1 2 0 1 .299 Leon c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Martinez ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .302 Pearce ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .175 Totals 35 3 9 3 3 10 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Diaz 2b 5 2 2 0 0 0 .278 Bregman 3b 3 0 1 0 2 1 .263 Brantley lf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .327 Correa ss 4 1 3 1 1 1 .294 Gurriel 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .262 Reddick rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .333 White dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .237 Stassi c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Chirinos c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Kemp cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Totals 36 4 13 4 4 5 Boston 000 000 102 — 3 9 0 Houston 000 002 101 — 4 13 0 LOB — Boston 9, Houston 12. 2B — Benintendi (9), Devers (14), Diaz 2 (5). RBIs — Benintendi (21), Vazquez 2 (19), Correa (34), Gurriel (18), Reddick (15), White (7). SB — Benintendi (5). DP — Boston 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA 2 /3 1 0 0 0 1 3.24 Price Brewer 21/3 5 0 0 0 1 5.32 Lakins 21/3 2 2 2 1 1 4.50 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 3.04 Hembree Velazquez 2 2 1 1 1 2 5.40 Barnes, L, 2-1 0 2 1 1 2 0 2.25 Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Peacock 6 4 0 0 1 8 3.19 2 /3 1 1 1 1 0 2.60 Rondon, H, 7 Pressly, H, 12 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 0.39 Osuna, W, 3-0, BS 1 3 2 2 1 1 1.54 T — 3:28. Att. — 40,722

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1930 — Joe Sewell of the Cleveland Indians, who fanned only three times in 353 at-bats during the season, was struck out twice in the same game by Pat Caraway of the White Sox. 1937 — Billy Sullivan and Bruce Campbell appeared for the Cleveland Indians as pinch hitters. Each hit a home run, making it the first time two American League pinch hitters hit home runs in the same game. The Indians beat the Athletics, 8-6. 1962 — Sandy Koufax struck out 16 Phillies to lead the Dodgers to a 6-3 victory.


SPORTS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 05.26.2019

FRENCH OPEN MEN TO WATCH

WOMEN TO WATCH NAOMI OSAKA Ranked: 1 Grand Slam singles titles: 2 — Australian Open (2019), U.S. Open (’18) Aces: After going only 5-4 on clay last year, heads to Paris with a 7-1 mark on the surface in 2019. ... Withdrew with injuries from tournaments in Stuttgart (abdominal muscle) and Rome (thumb). Topspin: Big hitting carried her to two Grand Slam titles in a row on hard courts. Clay presents different challenges.

NOVAK DJOKOVIC Ranked: 1 Grand Slam singles titles: 15 — French Open (2016), Australian Open (’08, ’11, ’12, ’13, ’15, ’16, ’19), Wimbledon (’11, ’14, ’15, ’18), U.S. Open (’11, ’15, ’18) Aces: Eyes fourth consecutive major title, which also would move him closer to the only men with more career Slam titles, Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. ... Seven career victories on clay against Nadal are three more than any other player. Topspin: His 21-match Grand Slam winning streak and recent form on clay — won Madrid Open without dropping a set; reached Italian Open final before losing to Nadal — make for an imposing presence in Paris. RAFAEL NADAL Ranked: 2 Grand Slam singles titles: 17 — French Open (2005, ’06, ’07, ’08, ’10, ’11, ’12, ’13, ’14, ’17, ’18), Australian Open (’09), Wimbledon (’08, ’10), U.S. Open (’10, ’13, ’17) Aces: 86-2 at Roland Garros with 11 titles. Losses: 2009 against Robin Soderling, 2015 against Novak Djokovic. ... Overall mark of 429-39 on clay, a .917 winning percentage. ... Capturing tour-leading 37.5 percent of return games in 2019. Topspin: Hold off on those predictions of Nadal’s demise. He is playing well on clay when it matters the most. ROGER FEDERER Ranked: 3 Grand Slam singles titles: 20 — French Open (2009), Australian Open (’04, ’06, ’07, ’10, ’17, ’18), Wimbledon (’03, ’04, ’05, ’06, ’07, ’09, ’12, ’17), U.S. Open (’04, ’05, ’06, ’07, ’08) Aces: How good was Federer on clay in his prime? He went 2-9 against Nadal and 84-5 against anyone else in 100 matches from 2005 to 2009. ... Collected 101st career title and 1,200th match victory this season, joining Jimmy Connors as the only men in the professional era with that many in each category. Topspin: Returns to Roland Garros after sitting it out the past three years. His absence in ’16 ended his then-record streak of 65 consecutive appearances at majors. There’s no reason to think he couldn’t stick around until the last weekend. DOMINIC THIEM Ranked: 4 Grand Slam singles titles: 0 — Best: Runner-up at French Open (2018) Aces: Nine career titles came on clay. ... Teamed with 2004 Olympic gold medalist Nicolas Massu for coaching ahead of the clay circuit. Topspin: Profiles as a title contender with his sturdy frame and powerful groundstrokes, four wins over Nadal on clay and a 16-3 French Open record over the past three years. ALEXANDER ZVEREV Ranked: 5 Grand Slam singles titles: 0 — Best: Quarterfinals at French Open (2018) Aces: Has half as many match wins and only a fourth as many final appearances so far in ’19 as he did a year ago at this time. ... Went through a recent 4-8 stretch. Topspin: Zverev contends, “I always have felt that I’m one of the best players in the world on clay,” but he hasn’t played that way this season. He certainly possesses the talent to turn around it. STEFANOS TSITSIPAS Ranked: 6 Grand Slam singles titles: 0 — Best: Semifinals at Australian Open (2019) Aces: Enjoys a career-high ranking. ... Youngest player to own victories over Djokovic, Nadal (on clay, no less) and Federer. Topspin: Run in Australia and recent showings on clay (title in Estoril, final in Madrid, semifinal in Rome) showed he’s starting to realize his potential, with a big forehand and slick volleys set up by good movement for a 6-foot-4 guy. KEI NISHIKORI Ranked: 7 Grand Slam singles titles: 0 — Best: Runner-up at U.S. Open (2014) Aces: Struggled on his preferred hard courts more than usual this season, but a semifinal run at the Barcelona Open showed he still can contend on clay when healthy. Topspin: Needs to avoid running himself ragged in the early rounds the way he did at the Australian Open, which led to a retirement in the quarterfinals.

Novak Djokovic

Rafael Nadal

Roger Federer

THREE WISE MEN Federer, Nadal, Djokovic still rule men’s tennis HOWARD FENDRICH AND ANDREW DAMPF

knee injuries in 2019, and his play hasn’t always been up to his usual Associated Press standards. he Big 3 are still very much “Been some low moments for me,” around. They’re still leading he said. the rankings, still collecting the But Nadal looked a lot more like himbiggest trophies. And they’re still the self in Rome, where he handed oppodominant figures in men’s tennis, nents a total of four 6-0 sets, including responsible for the main story lines one against Djokovic in the final. when the French Open starts Sunday. Asked to look ahead to Paris after Roger Federer returns to Roland that three-set loss, Djokovic said: Garros for the first time since 2015 — “Nadal, No. 1 favorite, without a and a decade after he completed the doubt. Then everyone else.” career Grand Slam by winning his “He’s one of the greatest championly trophy there. Rafael Nadal seeks ons this game has ever seen,” Djokovic a record-extending 12th title in Paris. said. “His mentality, his approach, his Novak Djokovic bids to win his fourth resilience, ability to fight back after major championship in a row for the long absence from the tour, injuries, second time in his career, something surgeries. He’s had it all. He keeps on neither of his two great rivals ever ac- showing to the world why he’s one of complished. the biggest legends of tennis history.” They occupy the top three spots in Djokovic, who turned 32 on the rankings, with Djokovic followed Wednesday, missed the last half of by Nadal then Federer. They occupy the 2017 with a bad right elbow. He eventop three slots on the list of most men’s tually had surgery last year, which he Grand Slam titles, with Federer’s 20 began with a 6-6 record and losses in followed by Nadal’s 17 and Djokovic’s the Australian Open’s fourth round 15. And they have combined to win the and French Open’s quarterfinals. He past nine major tournaments, with was so bothered by the latter, which three apiece. stretched his major title drought to “Nadal’s reign is never two years, that he left over. Just like Federer’s Roland Garros in a huff, reign isn’t ending,” said declaring he might skip Riccardo Piatti, who Wimbledon. Roland Garros, Paris coached Djokovic when So much for that. First-round matches the Serb was a teen and Not only did he play start Sunday. has worked with other at the All England Club, Women’s singles top-10 players. “As long he won the trophy. He final: June 8 as they play, they’re althen did the same at the ways very dangerous. U.S. Open and Australian Men’s singles But let’s not forget that Open, making him the final: June 9 Djokovic is No. 1.” only man in tennis hisThere was a stretch tory with three separate when some wondered whether this streaks of three consecutive majors. group might be done with all of that Djokovic now has a shot at a non-calwinning. endar Grand Slam, something he alFederer, who’s now 37, went 4½ ready accomplished in 2015-16 — and years without adding to his Slam can set his sights on a true Grand Slam, count. He dealt with knee surgery and winning all four majors in the same recurring back problems. He sat out season, which only has been done by the 2016 French Open, ending a streak two men: Donald Budge in 1938 then of 65 straight major appearances, then Rod Laver in 1962 and 1969. missed the U.S. Open and Rio OlymAnd Djokovic has looked good on pics that year, too. He skipped the en- clay lately, winning the title in Madrid tire clay-court circuit each of the last before losing to Nadal in Rome. two years before finally coming back So the question is: How much longer this season and reaching the quarter- can this trio continue to thrive and hold finals in Madrid and Rome, where he off talented up-and-coming players withdrew, citing an injured right leg. such as 25-year-old Dominic Thiem, “In practice in Switzerland, I felt who lost to Nadal in last year’s French good right away,” Federer said about Open final, or 20-year-old Stefanos what it initially was like for him on Tsitsipas, who beat Federer in Australia the slow surface, which requires extra in January before losing his first Grand footwork and lengthy, grind-it-out Slam semifinal to Nadal? exchanges. “Very happy where I’m at, “Time is undefeated and these guys to be quite honest. I was a bit surprised are doing a hell of a job of fighting it that it went as easy as it did.” off, but it has to come at some point,” Nadal, who turns 33 during the said International Tennis Hall of Fame French Open, did not win a title all sea- member Andy Roddick, the 2003 U.S. son until last week at the Italian Open, Open champion. “Once these guys which is surprising because it means he are gone, there’s a serious vacuum. ... kept faltering on his beloved clay. Roger, Rafa and Novak — they’re arguHe’s been sidelined by hand and ably the three best of all time.”

T

French Open

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Serena Williams reacts after losing a point to Karolina Pliskova in their quarterfinal match at the Australian Open in January.

SIMONA HALEP Ranked: 3 Grand Slam singles titles: 1 — French Open (2018) Aces: Among the WTA’s top 10 in break points converted and first-serve percentage in 2019. ... Pulled out of Italian Open with hamstring problem, but said she was sure she’d be OK for Paris. Topspin: Tries to defend a Grand Slam title for the first time. Her movement and defense-to-offense skills have carried her to three of the past five finals at Roland Garros. KIKI BERTENS Ranked: 4 Grand Slam singles titles: 0 — Best: Semifinals at French Open (2016) Aces: Ranks in the tour’s top two in aces and service points won this season. ... Hit 20 aces in one match. ... Went semifinals-title-semifinals at past three clay events. Topspin: Has the game and confidence to go far in Paris. Many in tennis think she is ready to play well deep into the second week at a major tournament. PETRA KVITOVA Ranked: 6 Grand Slam singles titles: 2 — Wimbledon (2011, ’14) Aces: Pulled out of Rome with a left calf issue. ... Is third on tour in aces this year but also has hit by far the most double-faults. Topspin: Only has been past the third round once at Roland Garros since getting to the 2012 semifinals. Her strong lefty strokes and recent form on clay could mean that changes this year. SLOANE STEPHENS Ranked: 7 Grand Slam singles titles: 1 — U.S. Open (2017) Aces: Recently hired coach Sven Groeneveld, who worked with past French Open champions Maria Sharapova and Ana Ivanovic. Topspin: Run to last year’s final in Paris showed that Stephens is capable of winning a Grand Slam championship on clay to go with her hard-court title from the U.S. Open. ASH BARTY Ranked: 8 Grand Slam singles titles: 0 — Best: Quarterfinals at Australian Open (2019) Aces: After going 1-6 against top-10 opponents in 2018, she is 6-4 in those matches in 2019. ... Played cricket while away from the tour for nearly two years after the 2014 U.S. Open. Topspin: After major breakthroughs at the Australian Open in January and when she collected the title at the Miami Open in March, seems poised to show big improvement on her 2-5 career record at the French Open. SERENA WILLIAMS Ranked: 10 Grand Slam singles titles: 23 — French Open (2002, ’13, ’15), Australian Open (’03, ’05, ’07, ’09, ’10, ’15, ’17), Wimbledon (’02, ’03, ’09, ’10, ’12, ’15, ’16), U.S. Open (’99, 02, ’08, ’12, ’13, ’14) Aces: Back in the top 10 this year after dropping out of the top 400 while away from the tour to have a baby. ... Reached two Grand Slam finals in 2018 after missing about 1½ years of majors. ... Pulled out of last two tournaments because of injured left knee. Topspin: Comes to Paris with only one claycourt match since last year’s French Open. There’s also uncertainty about the status of her knee. So while she’s always considered a favorite when she is healthy, it is hard to know what to expect from her this time around.


STANLEY CUP FINAL

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Why wait? Blues eager to start series BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Saturday was Day 4 of a fiveday break between games for the Blues. Other than the nine days off between games the Blues had with their bye week and the All-Star break, it’s the most time they’ve had off since training camp began in September. So the players are eager to get going again. “It’s nice to get some rest, that’s big for the body,” said defenseman Robert Bortuzzo, “but we’ve been going every second day for a long time here. We’ll take the break, but you can see the excitement on the ice. We took two days off the ice, you come back revitalized and at the end of the day, everyone loves playing this game and we want to be out there playing.” “It’s one of those things,” said forward Brayden Schenn. “You’re going to bed or you’re around the house and you’re thinking about it. It comes to the point you just want to get the games going already. Get in the heat of the series.” The Blues had an optional practice on Saturday before flying to Boston, and most everyone took part. The only players not on the J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM ice were goalie Jordan Binnington, A trainer looks at Robert Bortuzzo after he was injured during a playoff game against Winnipeg last month at Enterprise Center. defensemen Jay Bouwmeester and Colton Parayko and forwards Ryan O’Reilly, David Perron and have concussion symptoms, along Maroon. down their Black Aces, the mi- (sixth round) and David Noel Ivan Barbashev. with whatever damage caused by “Ask Schenner why I fell,” Blais nor-leaguers who work with the (fifth round), or lose their rights the puck hitting him. Dunn made said Saturday. “Schenner pushed team in the playoffs and are on to them. Bourque had four goals a mad scramble to the bench af- me. That’s why I fell. He just standby in case of emergency. and eight assists in 57 games for DUNN SKATES Defenseman Vince Dunn skated ter being hit and was helped down pushed me because he was ex- Jordan Nolan, Chris Butler and Owen Sound of the OHL and cited.” with the team for the first time the hallway. Mitch Reinke are the only ones Noel had 13 goals and 14 assists Blais said he cut his lip when still around who will make the in 37 games for Val d’Or in the since taking a puck to the face in he went down, but at least no one trip to Boston. … Blues defensive QMJHL. … The junior season for the first period of Game 3 of the BOTTOM’S UP conference final with San Jose. If you look at a clip of the Blues’ stepped on him in the confusion. prospect Niko Mikkola, playing Alexei Toropchenko, the Blues “I’m going to remember that for Finland at the world cham- fourth-round pick in 2017, ended Dunn skated with a full visor and a bench celebrating after Pat Maclear plastic football-style mouth roon’s overtime goal in Game 7 celebration all my life,” Blais said. pionships in Slovakia, advanced on Friday when Guelph lost in against Dallas, you’ll see every- “Everyone back home was laugh- to the final with a 1-0 win over the Memorial Cup semifinals by guard below that. Neither Dunn nor coach Craig one going over the boards to join ing about it. Well, it’s funny, Russia. Finland will face Canada Rouyn-Noranda, 6-4. ToropBerube spoke to reporters on Sat- in, but one player doesn’t quite right? I didn’t really enjoy it, but in the final on Sunday. … Mean- chenko had three goals and three it’s all right. Game 7, OT winner, while, the business of hockey assists in four games. urday (it’s unclear how well Dunn make it. can talk at the moment), so there Forward Sammy Blais caught you’ve got to be happy.” rolls on. Per Capfriendly.com, was no update on his status, but his leg on the boards as he went the Blues have until June 1 to sign Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 he was traveling with the team over and landed up going splat on NOTES two players they drafted in 2017, @tomtimm on Twitter to Boston. Dunn was believed to the ice while everyone went after The Blues have winnowed defensemen Trenton Bourque ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Hochman From D1

Boston shot to win the Cup. And there was the open stool on the other end … a Boston Globe photographer had run to the stands for a drink. “So my dad took a seat,” Lussier said, “and 40 seconds later, there it was.” Hovering above the ice, Bobby Orr is forever frozen. Lussier got the shot, all right. On his Nikon F with a 35mm lens, he captured the scoring and soaring Orr, tripped by the Blues’ Noel Picard a millisecond after the shot. The superstar is a superhero, parallel to the ice, arms out, mouth agape. “The photo is everywhere. In Boston, there’s not a sports bar you can walk in and it’s not up on the wall,” said Randy, who has lived in Colorado for nearly four decades. “I think one of the surprising places I saw it was in a geometry text book.” And because the snapshot is omnipresent, “it’s like (my dad)

J. WALTER GREEN, AP PHOTO

Bruins star Bobby Orr is seen on the ice during game action at Boston Garden during the 1974-75 season. living every day,” Lussier said. “He’s living in this special place. Especially now with the rematch. Yes, the Blues are finally, mercifully back in the Stanley Cup Final. And they play Boston. “It’s almost eerie,” said Blues broadcaster John Kelly, whose father, Dan, called the Orr goal for a nationally televised audience.

Blues From D1

Post-Dispatch columnist Bob Broeg as a New York-based “freelance hack.” Broeg didn’t like anyone picking on his town’s Blues. After all, the Blues had nothing to do with the expansion rules, far less generous than those in place for the expansion Vegas Golden Knights a couple of years ago. They had nothing to do with the fact that the NHL added six expansion teams at once — doubling the size of the league — and placed all six expansion teams in one division. That meant the winner in the West would face an established team from the big, bad East for the Stanley Cup. “We’re so very proud of what we did,” one of those original Blues, Bobby Plager. said Friday. “We didn’t win the Stanley Cup but we were there. I used to say, if you don’t win the Stanley Cup, be the team that loses. That means you’re No. 2.” Those Blues were a hodgepodge of aging stars and career minorleaguers hungry for a chance. But they had a great work ethic, an unbelievable coach in Scotty Bowman, and they just happened to represent the West — the expansion division — in the Stanley Cup Final in their first three years of existence. Obviously, it wasn’t a fair fight. The Blues lost all three Cup finals — to Montreal in 1968 and ‘69, and Boston in 1970 and were

COURTESY ST. LOUIS BLUES

Bob Plager is seen in 1972. swept every time. When the last of those Cup finalists lost to the Bruins in 1970, Broeg wrote prophetically about what the future might hold: ”Realistically, with Chicago moving into the West, and some important players taking on more age, it might be some time again before the Blues reach the Stanley Cup finals. One of these years, hopefully sooner rather than later, the old Stanley Cup ... will be carted off by a Blues captain, the way Boston’s Johnny Bucyk skated away with the prize yesterday.” It turned out to be later rather than sooner — 49 years later. But they finally made it back. Tuesday’s 5-1 victory over the San Jose Sharks made the Blues the Best in the West for the fourth time in franchise history,

“It’s crazy that the stars have aligned.” For 49 years, the Orr photo has haunted many St. Louis fans, for it eternally encapsulates the Blues losing. And it not only haunts, but it taunts. Maybe if it the photo was from, say, the 1969 final – and the Blues still made it in 1970 but lost – it wouldn’t be as painful. But because it’s 1970, the picture teases, as if Orr himself is screaming: “This black-andwhite photo from when Nixon was in office is the most-recent image of your team playing for the Stanley Cup.” But it is a hell of a picture. An iconic click. And of all the players, too. “He’s a legend,” Randy said of Bobby. “Somebody who exemplified the Boston spirit of hockey.” Ray Lussier, in a way, became connected with the great No. 4. After the championship, the humble Orr even gave Lussier two autographed sticks for his sons. Randy, 8, hung his upon a couple of nails on his bedroom wall. But in New Hampshire, the Lussiers lived near a pond, and the local

firefighters would sometimes spray and empty the hydrants upon the pond. “So we had our own Zamboni!” Randy said. “It would freeze over.” And Randy would take his Bobby Orr stick, signed by Bobby Orr, out to the pond … to pretend he was Bobby Orr. His father’s photo is one of the rare instances in which a photo makes a moment even grander than the video can. Neil Leifer’s shot of Ali knocking out Liston is like that. But the Orr score video is also enhanced by the euphoric description by the late Dan Kelly: “Bobby Orr ... behind the net to Sanderson to OOOORR! BOBBY OOOORR! ... scores, and the Boston Bruins have won the Stanley Cup!” Kelly was actually the Blues’ radio broadcaster, but he was on the national TV broadcast for CBS. Back in St. Louis, 9-yearold John watched from home. “I was a huge fan already of the Blues – like everyone I was disappointed, I really was,” John said. “But my father will be forever

and the first time since 1970. No one is happier for the current Blues than Plager, now 76, and still active as a Blues ambassador. Of the original corps of defensemen on the 1967-68 team, Plager is the only one still alive. From that ‘70 D-corps that faced Boston for the Cup, brother Barclay Plager, Noel Picard, Al Arbour and defenseman/forward swingman Jimmy Roberts are all gone. They and their teammates established the foundation of Blues hockey, capturing the imagination of a city with those three consecutive Cup appearances. Youngsters who had never skated before, started skating. Those who never learned to skate played street hockey. Bob remembers holding youth “hockey schools” in those early days with brother Barclay, and teammates such as Picard and Red Berenson at a time when St. Louis had only two indoor rinks: the Arena and Winterland. With their instant success and involvement in the infancy of youth hockey, the seeds were planted. St. Louis wouldn’t be the hockey town it is today without the original Blues. In the 2016 NHL draft, five St. Louisans were taken in the first round. In Game 7 of the Western Conference semifinal between the Blues and Dallas on May 7, a St. Louisan (Pat Maroon) scored the game-winning goal in double overtime against a St. Louisan (Ben Bishop). But in May 1970, the Blues

were heavy underdogs and the subject of ridicule entering the Cup Final. An emerging powerhouse, the Bruins had 11 players age 25 or younger, including 22-year-old defensive phenom Bobby Orr. The Blues had nine players who had played for Stanley Cup champions elsewhere, including Jean-Guy Talbot (seven Cups) and captain Arbour (Cups with three different franchises). But Talbot and Arbour were both 37, past their prime. Future Hall of Fame goalies Jacques Plante and Glenn Hall were 41 and 38 respectfully. In Game 1 of the ‘70 Final, Plante was knocked unconscious by a deflected Fred Stanfield shot that cracked Plante’s mask. “He was in the hospital just about for the whole series,” Bobby Plager said. “That finished him. He couldn’t play any more.” Brother Barclay was lost for the series with a cracked sternum in Game 1. Hall entered the series injured. Bobby Plager and Arbour played with separated shoulders. To handle the pain, Bobby Plager said he needed “23 needles every game. We’d numb it and freeze it but it didn’t work.” Even at full strength, the Blues would have had trouble with Orr, Bucyk, Phil Esposito, Derek Sanderson, Gerry Cheevers & Co. At less than full strength? The Bruins won by scores of 6-1, 6-2 and 4-1 in Games 1-3, and weren’t shy about taking verbal shots at the Blues. “I thought this was going to be

tied to that game and that goal. It’s amazing. “And to me, Bobby Orr is more than being one of the greatest players – he’s also one of the greatest people in our game. As a matter of fact, when my father was sick in the hospital, I know that numerous times that Bobby Orr called him to talk to him, to encourage him. I was in the room one time when he called. “For a player to call a broadcaster who he obviously didn’t have a close association with, because he was never on his team, that just shows you what kind of person Bobby Orr is. The kind of man he is.” Orr is 71. He is scheduled to be at TD Garden on Monday, the Globe reported. But Orr’s presence is perpetually at the Garden – outdoors, there’s a statue of the leaping Orr. And on Monday night, surely Bruins and Blues fans will take photos of the statue of the photo. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

a lot tougher,” Sanderson said after Game 1. “They never threw a check all night. They’re known for bodychecking only in the West Division.” After Game 2 — Game 2! — the city of Boston announced plans for its Stanley Cup victory parade. With the series heading back to Boston for Games 3 and 4, Sanderson lamented the fact that he probably wouldn’t be returning to St. Louis. “They have a lot of goodlooking women in this town, but I’d rather end the series in Boston,” he said. They did just that. But the beat-up Blues pushed Boston to the limit in Game 4, losing 4-3 in overtime on Orr’s iconic goal. “Well, they can’t laugh at us now,” Bowman said. “We stood up to them pretty good today. It was a matter of pride. Nobody wants to be humiliated.” The Bruins gave the Blues grudging respect. “Don’t be too hard on them,” Cheevers told reporters. “They have some good hockey players but no (depth). That’s been made very clear by their injuries.” And from the great Orr: “They sure played like professional athletes. They went out like champions, the Blues did.” Forty-nine years later, the Blues are still looking for that championship. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

Velocity From D1

weightlifter, professional gambler and Hardball Times blogger who started Driveline in 2008 and now serves as its chief technology officer. “We don’t shy away from saying that. You hear all this stuff about, ‘You don’t have to throw hard. You just have to learn to pitch.’ It’s not true.” The average pitcher who throws 85 mph or higher, according to Boddy, gains two to three mph after training at Driveline. “And there are examples of guys coming here at 75 mph in high school and then four years later they’re throwing 97 to 99,” he says.“That happens. It’s not common, obviously.” As recently as five years ago, few had even heard of Driveline, but its influence now stretches across the game, from its bullpens to its coaching staffs to its front offices. A half-dozen major league teams contract with the company as consultants — the only two that Boddy will name are the Chicago White Sox and Philadelphia Phillies; the others prefer to remain unnamed — and Driveline counts more than 50 individual big leaguers as clients, led by Cleveland Indians ace Trevor Bauer, who, armed with a new changeup developed over the winter at Driveline, went 4-1 with a 2.45 ERA before a couple of stumbles in May. At Driveline’s “scout day” in January — held to showcase its roster of free agents, college players and independent-league clients looking to sign with big league organizations — more than 40 scouts and executives from 20 MLB teams packed Driveline’s already-cramped facility to watch 19 pitchers throw bullpens. According to Boddy, eight of them received signing offers. And meanwhile, Boddy himself, a natural contrarian bordering on a gadfly, has come to be seen as an oracle for baseball’s influential analytics community, his tweets and his blog posts at Driveline’s website devoured by those cutting-edge folks hungry to know where the game is heading next. “He’s naturally curious, and he’s not willing to accept ‘Just because’ as an answer,” Baltimore Orioles right-hander Dan Straily, an early Driveline advocate, said of Boddy. “Like,‘Why do you do this?’‘Well, I’ve always just done that.’ ‘But why?’ ‘Well, just because.’ Kyle’s not willing to accept that answer.” Straily, 30, is a typical Driveline success story. He first trained there in the winter after the 2015 season, when a sore shoulder and deteriorating mechanics saw his fastball drop to the 88-89-mph range, resulting in his spending the majority of that season getting battered around in Class AAA. After a winter at Driveline, he showed up for spring training in 2016 throwing 92 to 93 — pain-free — and went on to the best season of his major league career, going 14-8 with a 3.76 ERA for the Cincinnati Reds. “Since then,I’ve made maybe 90 starts,” he said,“and I can honestly say I’ve never come in the next day and said, ‘My arm hurts.’ “ Indeed, pure velocity on its own is of no use unless it can be cultivated without injuring arms — what good is it to throw 100 mph if your elbow is going to explode? — and it as at that intersection of performance and health that Driveline’s true battle is being waged.

Efficiency is the goal At a computer desk ringed with three large monitors, Anthony Brady — whose official title is Driveline’s “biomechanist and lead motion-capture technician” — moves to the edge of his chair

PHOTO FOR THE WASHINGTON POST BY DAVID RYDER

Driveline’s mission, according to founder Kyle Boddy, is “data-driven player development.” and points excitedly to the middle screen. “Right there!” he says. On the screen, a three-dimensional skeleton is making a pitching motion, its movements representing an animated version of those taken from a minor league pitcher who recently underwent a biomechanical evaluation at Driveline — which involves stripping down to a pair of shorts and making a series of pitches on a mound ringed by 15 high-speed cameras recording at 240 frames per second, while wearing 47 markers recording precise movements and measuring such things as the pitcher’s “trunk tilt,”“elbow flexion,”“scapular retraction,” “horizontal abduction” and “Varus torque.” This particular skeleton belongs to a 5-foot-8, 155-pound pitcher with a 98-mph fastball — which would seem to be a near-impossibility biomechanically, except this particular pitcher possesses a “freak athleticism,” the skeletal representation of which on the computer screen electrifies Brady in the same way the discovery a new planet might an astronomer. “See this move right here?” Brady says, slowing down the skeleton’s video delivery.“His hips rotate forward while his whole trunk is still rotating back. Most people create a max level of separation when they land, and their hips go, and then their trunk goes. Instead, this guy, his hips open while his trunk is still going back. So he’s creating additional separation. It’s freak athleticism — it’s hypermobility.” From a distance, it can appear Driveline’s entire purpose is little more than helping pitchers put up impressive numbers on the radar gun, as in the many YouTube videos of its pitchers taking running starts — a drill known as “pulldowns,” “crowhops” or “run-ngun” — and throwing their entire bodies into full-effort heaves that have clocked in at up to 107 mph. But in truth, Driveline’s “holy grail,” according to Boddy, is not velocity itself, but “efficiency” — defined as “how much velocity you can produce per normalized unit of stress.” In other words: how fast you can throw without exploding the ligaments and tendons in your arm. To achieve that efficiency,Driveline employs a squad of trainers, coaches, “biomechanists” and developers, and an array of equipment ranging from the weighted

PlyoCare balls to high-tech Rapsodo and HitTrax data-tracking systems (to show spin-rate and axis), Motus compression sleeves (to measure elbow torque), Optitrack high-speed cameras, Keiser pneumatic exercise machines and K-Motion vests for “biofeedback training.” Naturally, Driveline’s methods and philosophies have their critics, from old-school organizations that don’t buy fully into the datadriven approach (Boddy names the Washington Nationals as a “bottom-five” franchise in terms of progressiveness) to sports doctors who equate added velocity with added risk of injury. In one influential study completed in 2018 at the American Sports Medicine Institute in Birmingham, Alabama, and led by former Boston Red Sox trainer Mike Reinold, researchers found that while a Driveline-styled velocity program involving weighted balls could produce a “statistically significant” increase in pitch velocity, it also resulted in a 24% higher injury rate. “If a guy gains three miles per hour from an offseason program,” said Glenn Fleisig, ASMI’s research director and a co-author of the 2018 study, “he’s going to be more at risk [of injury].” Boddy doesn’t dispute the study’s findings, but he said the injury risk can be mitigated through proper biomechanical analysis, instruction and proper rest-andrecovery practices — all of them important factors in Driveline’s quest for the “holy grail” of efficiency. “We know that pitchers who gain velocity are probably going to experience greater forces [on the elbow and shoulder],” he said. “So you should do things that can mitigate those forces. Which means mechanical changes. Which is why our own studies show no increase in force — because we do a lot of biomechanical training. . . . The [ASMI study] said as velocity goes up, forces go up — I agree with that. But the question is: How can we not do that? We can instruct people to not do that. It’s not a given that they have to go hand in a hand.” Brady, the Driveline biomechanist, knows that firsthand. He first came to Driveline in the summer of 2016 as a struggling pitcher for Division III University of Puget Sound and a two-time Tommy John surgery survivor whose career

was down to last chances. “I was throwing in the low-80s, and my arm hurt every day,” he recalled. But after 3 ½ months at Driveline, he said, “I came out of here throwing in the low 90s and was completely healthy. I went from barely playing on a D3 school to playing on a mid-major D1 school [the University of Northern Colorado]. The last bullpen I threw at Driveline, my second pitch off the mound, I hit 90.6 [mph]. I said, ‘I haven’t hit 90 in five years.’” While playing at Northern Colorado, Brady completed a master’s degree in biomechanics, and with his playing days over, he came to work at Driveline. Several of the company’s employees, in fact, are former clients. “It fosters a lot of buy-in,” Brady said of his employer. “It’s hard to see what’s going on here and not want to be involved.” The room in which Brady and three associates crunch data — “Where the real nerd stuff happens,” Boddy said, with a tinge of envy in his voice — is cramped and dark, because the nerds prefer to keep the lights off. Stenciled onto the wall, barely visible in the dim glow of computer lights, is a quote from Richard P. Feynman, the Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist: “It doesn’t matter how beautiful your theory is. It doesn’t matter how smart you are. If it doesn’t agree with experiment, it’s wrong.”

The science of pitching “I love the nostalgia of the game,” Boddy says unironically. Confronted with the contradiction in that statement — because Boddy is arguably among the people most responsible for obliterating baseball’s aesthetic links to its past — he nods and says, “I’d agree with that.” Largely because of the rise of velocity, today’s game — with record numbers of strikeouts and home runs, a leaguewide batting average at a 47-year low and fewer balls in play than ever before — bears little resemblance to the one Boddy fell in love with as a child in Cleveland in the 1980s. “I remember seeing Roger Clemens pitch, sitting at 93 to 95 [mph] the entire game. It was unreal,” he says, adding, “Now, that’s every right-handed starter in the game.” He says those words without a tinge of regret in his voice. The strikeout is king now, and that’s

We buy, sell, repair, and restore collectible cars

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

State of the art facility housed in an all brick 50,000 square building

1946 MG TC

1971 Jaguar E-Type

4,400 Miles, manual, finished in black with red leather interior and chrome wire wheels, it is strikingly lovely to behold.

Beautiful 1971 all matching numbers car with complete/comprehensive engine rebuild less than 17,000 miles ago. 75,000 Miles, manual with Black interior.

$39,500

$85,000

1961 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk I

1962 Austin-Healey 3000 Tri-Carb

Super strong engine, working overdrive, flawless transmission, chrome wire wheels and very very solid in every way. 67,000 Miles, manual, black interior.

This car has been fully restored and includes some interesting and desirable upgrades. One is a modern five speed transmission providing synchromesh in all forward gears, better gear spacing.

$45,000

$46,900

$ 10 Year Parts Warranty!

R-410A

Please call if you have a classic car for sale.

11714 Saint Charles Rock Road, Bridgeton, MO 63044

314-348-5774 • Jeff@ItsAliveAuto.com • ItsAliveAuto.com Follow us on Facebook at It’s Alive Automotive

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 2/28/19

Your one stop shop for repair, restoration, sales Down draft heated paint booth • Laser alignment • Vapor blasting • Road force balancing • Classic auto air and 5 speed conversion

not a bad thing. He roundly rejects the notion that balls in play necessarily translate to excitement. “I like the game where it’s at,” he says. “I don’t find grounding out to second base 40 times a game very exciting at all. On an afternoon in early April, with MLB in its first week of the 2019 season, Driveline was packed with independent league players and college players in training ahead of the June draft. Seeing Bauer succeed with the Indians is great publicity for Driveline, but nothing is as satisfying to Boddy as helping an independent league pitcher — whether a former big leaguer trying to climb his way back, or a 21-year-old kid trying to make it in the first place — get a shot with an MLB organization. “It’s great for us to be at the major league level, and to make an impact there,” he says, “but to me, the impact should be made at the lower levels, enabling people who would otherwise not get a look. To me, the technology isn’t ruining baseball. It’s giving people a chance who wouldn’t otherwise have a chance.” Boddy is also doing his part to help hitters level the playing field against all those firebreathing pitchers, with their fastballs fueled by Driveline velocity-training and their breaking pitches computer-designed and developed in Driveline’s lab as if they were test-tube organisms. In recent years, Driveline has branched into coaching hitters, using the same data- and camera-driven training methods. “The pitching has outpaced the hitting lately,” Boddy said. “But its cyclical. Hitters are always going to be behind, because pitchers initiate the action. But we’re going to see it tilt back eventually.” Boddy doesn’t see Driveline — and its many competitors and collaborators — as ruining the game of baseball, as some would claim. If he has helped convert the craft of pitching from an art to a science, well, maybe it needed more science and less art in the first place. He may be a mad scientist, and he may have unleashed upon the sport a monster, one that’s measured in miles per hour and devours wooden bats. But at least for now, the monster hasn’t destroyed the entire city. “The game’s not worse,” Boddy said. “It’s just different.”

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


STANLEY CUP FINAL

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

Blues are a big deal in Saskatchewan Three Blues hail from the Canadian province BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If the Blues are taking St. Louis by storm, captivating a city that has seen nothing but hockey hardship over the years, the residents of the Gateway to the West are not alone. There is another place, 1,500 miles away, caught up in Blues’ fever: the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. That’s because the Blues have become Saskatchewan South. Their roster contains three, uh, Saskatchewanners? Saskatchewanites? “Saskatchewanians?” guessed Brayden Schenn, with both uncertainty and, it turns out, accuracy. In Schenn, Jaden Schwartz and Tyler Bozak, the Blues have the most Saskatchewan-heavy roster in the league. From Regina to Saskatoon, from Moose Jaw to Swift Current, the Blues have become Saskatchewan’s team. “They absolutely are,” said Rod Pederson, a Saskatchewan author and broadcaster. “Surfing everyone’s social media, if they’re not cheering for the Blues, they’re trying to get their friends cheering. There’s a groundswell of support for them in this part of the world.” For those not well-versed in Canadian geography, here’s a primer on what, according to their license plates, is the Land of the Living Skies: Saskatchewan, north of Montana and North Dakota, is big. At 251,700 square miles, the prairie province is slightly smaller than Texas. Saskatchewan is small. With a population of 1.162 million, it’s less than half the size of metropolitan St. Louis. Saskatchewan is flat. “Everyone always says you can see your dog run away for a few days,” Bozak said. Saskatchewan is hockey. The province is also a major producer of potash and uranium, but they’re a lot harder to root for. There were 30 players in the

Frederickson From D1

worked 25 years for the Montreal Canadiens. On top of that, he was a golf pro at the Sarnia Golf and Curling Club. You know, during his down time. Neil’s son is Blues president of hockey operations and general manager Doug Armstrong. Doug isn’t sure this is much of a story. The finalist for NHL general manager of the year has been right often this season, but he’s wrong about that one. It’s a tough story, because there are times when Neil’s mind slips and strays, creating consequences that, while innocent, sting. But it’s an important story, because the work ethic that drives the executive who steers the Blues was passed down from father to son. Doug is preparing to watch his team in its first Stanley Cup Final since 1970, which just so happened to be a series between Boston and St. Louis that included games officiated by, you

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Jaden Schwartz, left and Brayden Schenn go after a puck in the corner during a regular-season game this season against Calgary at Enterprise Center.

NHL this year who were born in Saskatchewan, and only three Canadian provinces – Ontario, Quebec and Manitoba – have produced more Hockey Hall of Famers than Saskatchewan. That list is headed by Gordie Howe and includes Bryan Trottier, Eddie Shore and two Blues, Glenn Hall and Bernie Federko. (Longtime Blues radio colorman Kelly Chase is also from Saskatchewan.) Saskatchewan has the highest per capita rate of NHL hockey players, better than any province, U.S. state or

foreign country. The capital of Saskatchewan is Regina – with a long I – but the capital of Saskatchewan hockey is St. Louis. St. Louis and Saskatchewan will forever be linked by the failed effort in 1983 to relocate the team to Saskatoon – which may be more fun to say than any city in North America – a city with a population of 246,000 and a 15,000-seat arena, just in case anyone else wants to give it a try. Now, they are linked because of Bozak, Schenn and Schwartz,

who give the Blues not only three Saskatchewanians, but three of the best. Schenn, from Saskatoon, led players from the province in points this season and in each of the past three years, the three have been in the top seven from the province in points. In the playoffs this year, Schwartz has 12 goals, Bozak has five and Schenn two. “Saskatchewan is all about hockey,” said Federko, who grew up in Foam Lake. “It’s very cold all the time, the outside temperatures are below freezing from mid-October through the end of March. Your outside activities always have ice involved in them whether you’re in your backyard or if you’re at a pond. All the little towns have rinks so kids play hockey, the girls play hockey now. Everybody plays hockey now. It’s kind of always been that way; that’s the culture.” “It’s an awesome hockey community,” said Bozak, who’s from Regina. “Every kid grows up playing hockey. We’ve got long

guessed it, Neil. Forty-nine years after Neil shared the ice with Bobby Orr, Doug is hoping the team he built takes the rematch. He’s also hoping his dad can grasp this moment, hoping game days are good days. “I know he’s paying attention as much as possible,” Doug said. “I know they have the games tuned in there. He goes in and out. I’m sure he’s enjoying it.” Some of Doug’s earliest hockey memories were formed on a track. He would tag along during his dad’s intense offseason training sessions. Neil took pride in keeping up with the players on the ice. He might have been in better shape than a few. He definitely ran more than some. Neil’s reputation as a respected official and dogged scout was once the best, and only, line on Doug’s résumé. That’s changed. Doug’s drive to do right by his dad has not. “I would hope I had a quarter of his work ethic,” Doug said. “My biggest fear was tarnishing his name.”

Doug’s first real hockey job was with the Minnesota North Stars in the early 1990s. Bobby Clarke added him to a skeleton crew that was attempting to rebound from a league expansion period that pilfered players and executives. The experience was as valuable as the paycheck was light. Doug coordinated travel plans for the team, helped coaches scout and kept stats during games. He heard stories about his dad, how hard he worked. Neil, the official, earned the respect of players and coaches by being invisible on the ice. He owned every rare missed or mistaken call. Neil, the scout, would be the first one at the rink. He would even chat up the Zamboni drivers to get their input on players. Doug tried to work like Neil, never forgetting the words his boss told him on day one. “Your dad got you the job,” Clarke said to Doug when he was hired. “But he won’t keep it for you.” Three decades of hard work turned an entry-level legacy hire into a respected hockey executive who has spent 15 years as a gen-

eral manager between Dallas and St. Louis. Doug was the first Blues GM to be named GM of the year (2012), and he has become synonymous with robust winning percentages, contention for the division title and an annual presence in the postseason. Since he was officially promoted to Blues GM entering the 2010-11 season, his team ranks fourth in regular-season win percentage (.621) and has made the playoffs seven of nine times. A family legacy continues. Doug’s son, Blake, is currently balancing law school with scouting for the Vegas Golden Knights. There is one missing piece. The elusive Stanley Cup has dodged Doug since the Stars won it when he was an assistant GM in 1999. Capturing it then was something, sure. It would not, could not, compare to ending the Blues’ curse. After the Blues beat San Jose in the Western Conference Finals, Doug stood in an Enterprise Center hallway and explained what it has been like to push the boulder up the hill. He used to be angered

SASKATCHEWAN-BORN POINTS LEADERS (2018-19 REGULAR SEASON) Player Team G Brayden Schenn STL 17 Ryan Getzlaf ANA 14 Damon Severson NJD 11 Tyler Bozak STL 13 Jordan Eberle NYI 19 Patrick Marleau TOR 16 Jaden Schwartz STL 11 Ryan Murray CBJ 1 Zack Smith OTT 9 Braydon Coburn TBL 4

A 37 34 28 25 18 21 25 28 19 19

P 54 48 39 38 37 37 36 29 28 23

We buy, sell, repair, and restore collectible cars

1946 MG TC

1971 Jaguar E-Type Beautiful 1971 all matching numbers car with complete/comprehensive engine rebuild less than 17,000 miles ago. 75,000 Miles, manual with Black interior.

$39,500

$85,000

1961 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk I

1962 Austin-Healey 3000 Tri-Carb

Super strong engine, working overdrive, flawless transmission, chrome wire wheels and very very solid in every way. 67,000 Miles, manual, black interior.

This car has been fully restored and includes some interesting and desirable upgrades. One is a modern five speed transmission providing synchromesh in all forward gears, better gear spacing.

$45,000

$46,900

10 Year Parts Warranty!

11714 Saint Charles Rock Road, Bridgeton, MO 63044

314-348-5774 • Jeff@ItsAliveAuto.com • ItsAliveAuto.com Follow us on Facebook at It’s Alive Automotive

Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

2,895 Installed

- 70,000 BTU Furnace - 2-1/2 Ton Air Conditioner - 2-1/2 Ton Coil Present equipment and flue type may vary price.

Take Advantage of $1000 Lennox Rebates* Plus more rebates from your utility company *On select qualifying systems

Expires Expires5/15/15 2/28/19

Your one stop shop for repair, restoration, sales Please call if you have a classic car for sale.

by the “Same Old Blues” narrative he inherited unfairly upon his arrival from Dallas. Over time, he realized his wounds were scabs compared to his emotionally scarred fans. He was asked if simply returning to the series that awards the Stanley Cup should be considered a big breakthrough. He shook his head. “I can tell you the Stanley Cup champions. I’m not sure I can go through who they played,” he answered. “I mean, you want to win. I know we haven’t been here in a long time. But it’s certainly not the ultimate goal, to get here and be satisfied.” Perhaps the most beautiful thing about the Stanley Cup is that it travels. Its parade lasts a year. Those who win it take it where they please, like to an assisted living center in Sarnia on one of Dad’s good days. “That would certainly be in the plans,” Doug said. “It would be great to share another good memory with him.”

$

R-410A

Down draft heated paint booth • Laser alignment • Vapor blasting • Road force balancing • Classic auto air and 5 speed conversion

Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Mike Shannon’s MIKE SHANNON’S CHOICE: Choice:

State of the art facility housed in an all brick 50,000 square building

4,400 Miles, manual, finished in black with red leather interior and chrome wire wheels, it is strikingly lovely to behold.

winters, long cold winters. The outdoor rinks are probably up and lot longer than most places. It’s something we always did growing up, playing on the outdoor rink. All your friends played and everyone had fun doing it.” If there’s a stereotype of a Saskatchewan player, it’s of a big strapping hard-working farm boy. “When I was a kid we’d always go to tournaments and there would be teams from Saskatchewan,” said Jay Bouwmeester, who hails from neighboring Alberta. “It’s always the farm kids. And they always had a couple of really good little players, that’s like Schwartzie or Schenner and then they’d have some big guys you didn’t want to go too near that created room for everybody else.” There is a provincial pride the pervades the three – “You can never have enough Sasky guys out there,” Schenn said – and all three make visits home in the summer to keep in touch with their roots. Pederson said that Schwartz’s sister Mandi, who died of leukemia at the age of 23 in 2011, is “a mythical figure here. She inspired a generation of female hockey players. I think it’s a real heart-tugging factor with the Schwartz family for sure.” “I’m from there so I’m biased,” said Schwartz, from the Regina suburb of Wilcox and who Bouwmeester said is the most prototypical Saskatchewanian of the bunch, quiet and low key off the ice, a tireless worker on the ice. “Everyone loves Saskatchewan people. They’re nice. They’re hard working. There’s a lot of small towns, so people get close. There’s a lot of good relations with people and they’re very caring, which is really nice. Any time you go back home you can tell the warm welcomes you get from everyone.” “Hard working people, great people, friendly people,” Schenn said. “I’m proud to be from there.”

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

GALMICHE & SONS WWW.GALMICHEANDSONS.COM 314-993-1110

SINCE 1950


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

GIRLS TRACK AND FIELD

COMEBACK KID John Burroughs’ Fuller returns to state meet after two injury-riddled seasons BY DAVID KVIDAHL

STLhighschoolsports.com

LADUE — Daniel Harris eyed a sour apple sucker. The John Burroughs boys and girls track and field coach, Harris uses bubble gum-filled lollipops to soothe or celebrate. When things are good grape is the choice. When things aren’t so good it’s cherry. Sour apple usually doesn’t make it out of the bag but these are unusual circumstances. Three years worth of work are in jeopardy and there’s nothing Harris can do about it. Burroughs senior sprinter Madison Fuller is returning to the state meet for the first time since 2016. Then a freshman sensation, Fuller powered her way to Class 3 championships in the 100and 200-meter dashes. When she walked off the track that day, Fuller had no idea how hard it would be to make her way back to the state meet. “I had high hopes for the coming years, but it hit a couple of lows,” Fuller said. Fuller tore her hamstring early in her sophomore season and was unable to compete. She and the Burroughs coaching staff made some adjustments to her training regimen with the hopes it would help her remain healthy as a junior. It nearly worked. With an emphasis on rest and recovery during the season, Fuller made it through the district meet. She advanced to the sectional meet and qualified for the state in the 100.

While running a relay for the Bombers at the sectional, Fuller re-injured her hamstring. She scratched out of the 200 and was unable to compete the following week at the state meet for the second consecutive season. Fuller came all the way back only to have another obstacle stand in her way. “There was a low point that you hit when you’re injured that you really want to be out there,” Fuller said. “I knew with all the recovery work I was going to do that I was going to get better and look ahead and think of things like state this year, going out on a high and making sure it was what I dreamt it would be.” The 5-foot-9 Fuller has given herself that opportunity. Healthy this spring, she dominated at the district and sectional meets as she swept all three of her open events. At the sectional she set personal records in the 100 (11.71 seconds), 200 (24.13) and 400 (56.33). She is at the peak of her powers headed into this weekend’s state championship meet. Only Saturday’s state championship meet isn’t the meet Fuller spent the last year preparing for. When a tornado caused significant damage to Jefferson City High’s Adkins Stadium late Wednesday night, it forced the state meet to be moved. The Missouri State High School Activities Association devised an alternate plan that split the Class 3, 4 and 5 state meets between three dif-

Schedule (All events Saturday) SITES Class 5: At Battle High Class 4: At Washington High Class 3: At University of Missouri’s Audrey J. Walton Stadium Para events, all classes: At University of Missouri’s Audrey J. Walton Stadium TIME SCHEDULE Field events: 9 a.m., 11 a.m. and noon Running prelims: 10 a.m. Running finals: 11 a.m. GORDON RADFORD, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

After winning two state titles as a freshman, John Burroughs senior Madison Fuller overcame son is not super vocal on our team. But Madison is multiple injuries to make her way back to the state meet this weekend. very much lead by example 1,600-meter relay team in and she’ll give you that one ferent sites and turned the event decision.” normal two-day schedule Saturday will test Fuller the last race of the meet. kernel of wisdom that just in ways no one expected. Should the Bombers dy- permeates everyone else. into a one day. Instead of racing four She went to Harris early on namic duo accomplish They’re just soaking it in times Saturday, Fuller will and asked what he thought their goal, a state trophy is and saying, ‘Yeah, if she can have to run six times. about adding the 400 to her in their future. They might do that there’s some things Which is why Harris was repertoire. He wasn’t ex- even have an outside shot at for me to learn from that.’ To considering that sour apple actly enthused about put- defending their team cham- have that kind of example is sucker. ting more on Fuller’s plate, pionship. contagious.” “It’s vastly different than but he understood why she If Fuller could rewind her “Kylie and I have defiwhat (the athletes) were wanted to try. nitely have expectations,” senior season she would, prepared to do,” Harris said. “I think it’s why she asked Fuller said. “We know we’ve as would Harris. Her time The revised schedule of me what she asked,” Har- worked hard over the sea- at Burroughs has flown by has put Harris in a twist. ris said. “‘Coach can I really son. It’s great. There’s so and while she’s been workFuller put in so much time become that workhorse much positive energy with ing toward the state meet and worked tirelessly to sprinter? I want to prove I that.” she’s not welcoming the end earn her chance to compete am resilient enough to overPositive energy tends to of her time as a Bomber. It’s at the state meet. But her come what has been the in- follow Fuller. Even after a journey that has had painlong-term health is Har- jury bug the last two years she was unable to race at ful moments but immense ris’ primary concern. Fuller to do something special as I the state meet last year, she amounts of joy. Fuller is goalso has a college career to head on in my collegiate ca- traveled with the team and ing to miss it. “I’m sure there will come consider as she signed with reer.’ Who would I be to get did what she could to help Vanderbilt in the fall. in the way of that?” her teammates with en- a point at the end of state Fuller and Harris will Fuller’s goal is to sweep couraging words and feed- when it’s wrapping up that have to weigh how she feels all three of her open events back. This season she’s been I’ll take a look around,” in the moment against the while her teammate, sopho- a model leader on how to Fuller said. “This is what bigger picture and see where more Kylie Goldfarb, takes overcome adversity and re- I’ve been a part of the last they land. a shot at winning the 800 main focused on your goals. four years and I’ve been so “Every athlete wants to and 1,600. Goldfarb is the “The way of being an in- lucky to have great teamaccomplish what they set top seed in both. Goldfarb spiration to others, Madison mates and a great coaching out to accomplish,” Harris and Fuller then will join has fulfilled that in every staff and everyone around said. “It will be an event by forces on the Burroughs way,” Harris said. “Madi- me.”

GIRLS SOCCER | CLASS 1A STATE SEMIFINAL

BOYS TENNIS

Area entries roll into state semifinals BY BILL HESTER

Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

SEAN KING, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Columbia’s Fae Harrell (10) celebrates one of her two goals Friday during a 5-0 victory against Lisle in a Class 1A girls soccer state semifinal at North Central College in Naperville, Ill.

THE GOAL IS NEAR Columbia rolls one win from first championship BY JIM FAASEN

STLhighschoolsports.com

NAPERVILLE, Ill. — Columbia High had the longest appearance drought of all four semifinalists entering the Illinois Class 1A girls soccer state tournament Friday at North Central College’s Benedetti-Wehrli Stadium. A lot of other experiences paid off just as much for the Eagles, who rolled past Lisle 5-0 in their first state semifinal since 2008 and moved within one victory of their first state championship. Four different players scored goals for Columbia (26-2-1, No. 2 in the STLhighschoolsports.com small-schools rankings), which will take on Winnetka North Shore Country Day (16-3) — last season’s 1A runner-up — at 5 p.m. Saturday in the 1A title game. “It’s great to come in here and show people who Columbia is and to show off our awesome soccer program,” junior midfielder Reagan Mauch said. “It’s fun to come into a place where not a lot of people know us so we can showcase what we have. We wanted to show Northern Illinois what we do and how we play soc-

cer down south.” Mauch scored Columbia’s opening goal in the 14th minute and assisted a pair of goals by senior midfielder Fae Harrell, the first in the 17th minute to make it 2-0 and the second in the 49th to make it 4-0. Haley Glover gave Columbia a 3-0 edge by scoring in the 26th minute and then assisted on senior Kennedy Jones’ goal in the 53rd minute. “It just shows people that we have so many talented girls who can score in so many ways,” Harrell said. “Reagan put a couple of great balls in there for me to finish. They were beautiful. They were perfect.” Making the third state semifinal appearance in program history, the Eagles won their 12th consecutive game and advanced to their second state final. In 2006, they lost 3-2 to Chicago Latin in the Class A title game. In 2008, the Eagles finished third after a semifinal loss. Columbia’s three-goal outburst in the first 26 minutes of the semifinal against Lisle (18-2-2) didn’t indicate any nerves of a long state layoff. “I knew it was important to score early, so it was awesome to be the one to get it,” Mauch said.“I was happy to be the one to get it.” Lisle, in the state semifinals for the third time this

decade but first time since 2012, had a seven-game win streak snapped. The Eagles outshot Lisle 15-1 and owned a 7-2 advantage in corner kicks. “They played pretty much the way we expected,” Lisle coach Paul Kohorn. “One of the comments I made to my assistant coach was that they were doing everything to us that we’ve done to everyone else.” Columbia senior goalkeeper Rylee Iorio made one save in earning the shutout victory. The next test is last year’s 1A state runner-up in North Shore, which pushed its win streak to 12 games by beating Herscher in the late semifinal. Whichever team wins will be a first-time girls soccer state champion. “This is why we play the schedule we do, to play difficult teams and that is the beauty of playing in the St. Louis area,” Columbia coach Jamey Bridges said. “We get quality competition and we play all three classes. We don’t view it as a win or loss thing, we view it as a learning thing. To play the Edwardsvilles, the Collinvilles, the Granite Citys, the Althoffs. It’s to prepare us for things like this. We throw records out at this time. We know we’re battle-tested, so we just go out and do what we’ve done all year.”

SPRINGFIELD, MO. — MICDS junior Chase Nwamu was hoping to make quick work of his opponent Friday in the singles quarterfinal round of Missouri Class 1 boys tennis state tournament at Cooper Tennis Complex. Nwamu knew that was not going to be easy since he faced Luke Steiner of Springfield Catholic. Steiner finished fourth at state in singles last year and was 22-1 going into the quarterfinal. But Nwamu got his wish, beating Steiner 6-2, 6-0 in just about an hour. That was a far cry of Nwamu’s first-round match, which took two hours and 40 minutes and was the last of the firstround matches to be completed. He finally finished off talented freshman Richie King of Barstow, 6-3, 6-7, 6-4. “That first match was a grind for almost three hours,” Nwamu said. “It could have gone either way. I did want to get the other match over quickly, although you can’t go into a match thinking that. I just wanted to play my best and get it over quickly. Now I can go to the hotel and take a nap.” Nwamu’s win was one of many for St. Louis area players, who dominated the first day of the individual portion of the state tournament. John Burroughs, which defeated MICDS in the championship dual match of the Class 1 team tournament Thursday, will be involved in both Class 1 singles semifinals Saturday. Nwamu will face John Burroughs sophomore Rory Sutter in one semifinal. They are the No. 2 singles players on each team and will be playing the fourth time this season. Sutter won the first meeting in three sets, Nwamu won the second in straight sets and the third was in the team tournament. It was not finished, but Nwamu

Woodman

Erb

had a 6-4, 5-2 lead when the match was stopped when the Bombers got the clinching fifth win. “Playing Rory requires a lot of focus,” Nwamu said. “He is so consistent. It is a real challenge to play him. I have to make sure I keep calm.” The other Class 1 singles semifinal features the No. 1 singles players on each team between defending Class 1 singles champion Evan Erb of MICDS and John Burroughs’ Akash Rajan. They have played three times this season and Rajan has a 2-1 advantage after a win in the team championship Thursday. Both players were dominant in their two matches Friday. Rajan lost three total games while Erb lost four. Three of the four semifinalists in Class 1 doubles also are area teams. Sam Wang and Dav Nayak of John Burroughs will face Charles McEnery and Gary Gaertner of Priory in one semifinal. Both doubles teams had a pair of straightset wins Friday. Burroughs made it a clean sweep of semifinalists for the team as Adam Zhao and Thomas Dobbs won a thrilling quarterfinal match over Dylan Heck and Noah Hamlett of Thomas Jefferson Independent, 6-3, 7-6 (7). They will face Nathan Turtledove and Logan Stevens of Pembroke Hill, the lone non-St. Louis area team in the semifinals. Turtledove and Stevens prevented a Class 1 St. Louis sweep with a 6-4, 6-2 win over Priory’s Sean Finnie and John Newell. There was similar St. Louis success in Class 2, led by an impressive day for Lindbergh. Freshman Brian Kim advanced to the semifinals in singles while Layton Wille and Calvin Faris did so in doubles. Kim lost just two games in

his two victories. “We didn’t make it as a team, so it is fun to have success here,” Kim said. “I felt coming in that I had no pressure since I was a freshman. High school tennis is all about fun and the sport is only a part of it. I thought everything was up to par.” Kim now has the huge challenge of facing CBC senior A.J. Woodman in the semifinals. “He is the top seed and a great player,” Kim said of Woodman. “I have hit a few times with him in clinics. I have absolutely no expectations against him. I am just going to try and make him work and whatever happens, happens.” Wille and Faris’ 6-4, 6-3 win over Owen Mulcahy and Tyson Cowger of Liberty was extremely satisfying. Mulcahy and Cowger had beaten Wille and Faris last year and were on the top line of the Class 2 doubles bracket. CBC advanced both a singles and doubles entry into the semifinals. Woodman, a former state doubles champion who finished third in singles last year, had what might prove to be his toughest match in the quarterfinals. He defeated Zach Grueber of state champion Rock Bridge, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2 in a rematch of the title match of the MICDS Tournament of Champions. Woodman remains undefeated and will bring a 26-0 record into his semifinal match against Kim. Clayton Maack, who teamed with Woodman for the doubles title two years ago, advanced to the semifinals along with David Abilez with a 6-2, 6-2 quarterfinal win over Victor Stefanescu and Leo Da Silva of SLUH. Ladue’s Jeremy Ouyang is yet another area semifinalist. Ouyang won a pair of straight-set matches, including a 6-0, 6-2 win over SLUH’s Nick Fischer in the quarterfinals. The semifinals for both classes are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. Saturday in Springfield.


MOTOR SPORTS

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

RACING | INDIANAPOLIS 500

PICKING UP SPEED Indy 500 takes spotlight for rising IndyCar Series

Indy 500 11 a.m. Sunday TV: NBC Defending champion: Will Power Race length: 200 laps (500 miles) Track length: 2.5 miles

JENNA FRYER

The Brickyard: The track was paved with 3.2 million bricks after the gravel and tar surface caused several deaths. A three-foot strip of those original bricks still exists on the starting line.

Associated Press

T

Indy 500 lineup

ROW 3 ROW 4 ROW 5 ROW 6

ter Racing. The highest-starting Honda driver is rookie Colton Herta, who became IndyCar’s youngest winner earlier this year just days before his 19th birthday. The son of former IndyCar driver Bryan Herta has been spectacular around Indianapolis — he drives for Harding Steinbrenner Racing, a team partially owned by the grandson of late New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner — and is a legitimate contender. “He’s tremendously talented and not fazed by a lot, and that definitely shows he’s Bryan Herta’s kid,” said Marco Andretti, who is starting 10th on Sunday.“He’s very even-keeled and doesn’t get excited a lot. He’s just a natural and fast, you know? He’s a fast rookie and not afraid of anything.” The Herta entry has an alliance with Andretti Autosport, which has been a bit under the radar during the month of May. Rossi is probably the strongest of the Andretti group, but Conor Daly, in a fifth entry, has been fast in the best car of his life. Daly doesn’t have a race planned after Sunday, and he needs a huge payday to get back in a car this season. Castroneves again will go for a record-tying fourth victory, a mark he’s desperately chasing in the final years of his career. Penske moved him to sports cars but keeps bringing him back to Indy, where he is trying to join A.J. Foyt, Rick Mears and Al Unser Sr. as four-time winners. “Only a few guys have done that. I dream big,” Castroneves said. “I definitely want to make it happen, and I won’t give up that easy. Someone can say ‘Nah, it’s never going to happen.’ As long as I have an opportunity, I’m going to keep trying.”

ROW 7

lane milk. IndyCar, slow in rebuilding, is on the up, and drivers argue the on-track product is better than anything else out there. “It’s the most competitive racing series in the world. It’s the tightest,” said Alexander Rossi, the 2016 Indy 500 champion as a rookie after he flamed out in Formula One. “On any weekend, you have no idea who is going to win the race.” IndyCar has had five different winners through its first five races this season, but Pagenaud might be the first repeat winner. He’s the favorite to repeat his win from two weeks ago on Indy’s road course. His job with Roger Penske is on the line — Pagenaud knows it — but he is on the pole Sunday and Penske could not be more pleased. The venerable owner, celebrating the 50th anniversary of his first Indy 500, is going for his 18th win in the showcase race. He is Pageanud’s biggest fan, even as Team Penske goes into the race with a quartet of cars capable of winning. The team also has defending winner Will Power, three-time winner Helio Castroneves and former series champion Josef Newgarden. Penske is bullish on everything right now, especially IndyCar. “I think the good thing that’s happening in IndyCar, the races are shorter (than NASCAR), we have diversity across the field, people are racing (from) different countries, and to me, I think we’re on a good ride,” he said. The 103rd running of the 500 is especially rich on story lines. Chevrolet has had more speed than Honda and swept the top four spots in qualifying with Pagenaud followed by the trio from Ed Carpen-

ROW 8

ASSOCIATED PRESS, DARRON CUMMINGS

Simon Pagenaud follows Santino Ferrucci into a turn during practice for Sunday’s Indianapolis 500.

ROW 2

ROW 1

After Sunday qualifying; race Sunday Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) Pos. Driver MPH 1. (22) Simon Pagenaud 229.992 2. (20) Ed Carpenter 229.889 3. (21) Spencer Pigot 229.826 4. (63) Ed Jones 229.646 5. (88) Colton Herta 229.086 6. (12) Will Power 228.645 7. (18) Sebastien Bourdais 228.621 8. (2) Josef Newgarden 228.396 9. (27) Alexander Rossi 228.247 10. (98) Marco Andretti 228.756 11. (25) Conor Daly 228.617 12. (3) Helio Castroneves 228.523 13. (7) Marcus Ericsson 228.511 14. (30) Takuma Sato 228.300 15. (33) James Davison 228.273 16. (14) Tony Kanaan 228.120 17. (15) Graham Rahal 228.104 18. (9) Scott Dixon 228.100 19. (77) Oriol Servia 227.991 20. (23) Charlie Kimball 227.915 21. (48) JR Hildebrand 227.908 22. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay 227.877 23. (19) Santino Ferrucci 227.731 24. (4) Matheus Leist 227.717 25. (60) Jack Harvey 227.695 26. (42) Jordan King 227.502 27. (81) Ben Hanley 227.482 28. (26) Zach Veach 227.341 29. (10) Felix Rosenqvist 227.297 30. (39) Pippa Mann 227.244 31. (24) Sage Karam 227.740 32. (5) James Hinchcliffe 227.543 33. (32) Kyle Kaiser 227.372 ROW 11 ROW 10 ROW 9

he Indianapolis 500 once was considered one of the top sporting events of the year, an iconic, milk-drenched staple of Memorial Day weekend filled with patriotism and nostalgia, triumph and disappointment. It nearly is impossible to maintain reverential status for 103 years, and the Indy 500, like almost everything in sports, has had its declines. Huge crowds no longer jam the grandstands to watch qualifying or Carb Day, and the economics of racing and sponsorship has pared down the entry list. But IndyCar is experiencing a renaissance of sorts, and interest in a series largely supported by “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” slowly is returning. The hype certainly has been high at Indianapolis Motor Speedway this year, where a strong infield crowd attended practice days and large groups of teens roamed the grounds as part of school field trips. The race itself, which will be broadcast for the first time by NBC, could be a good one. Qualifying for Sunday’s race produced the tightest Indy 500 field in history with only 1.8 mph separating pole sitter Simon Pagenaud at 229.992 mph from Pippa Mann, the slowest qualifier at 227.224. There were 36 entrants, which meant three drivers would not make the field, and once-proud McLaren was humiliated to miss the race with superstar Fernando Alonso. The two-time Formula One champion nearly salvaged McLaren’s mortifying return to Indianapolis when he gallantly held it wide open for four desperate laps in an overhauled car worked on until the very last moment. The car did not have the right gear ratio on a run that should have gotten Alonso into the 33-car field,and mighty McLaren was bumped by tiny Juncos Racing and young American driver Kyle Kaiser. The result is Kaiser, winner of nothing of national note, and Mann, driving for the Clauson-Marshall team that races sprint cars the rest of the year, are in the race. Alonso, needing the Indy 500 to complete his quest of the Triple Crown, and an actual Formula One team went back to Europe. “It’s a big missed opportunity. It clearly says, ‘This isn’t something you show up and can easily do,’” said Mark Miles, CEO of Hulman & Co., which owns IndyCar, the Indy 500 and the speedway. “So it says this is complicated, this is hard.” The Indy 500 still will draw at least 250,000 people — more if Sunday’s forecast didn’t call for rain — and those who show will be treated to a true spectacle in the push to drink the victory

IndyCar points leaders Through May 11 1. Josef Newgarden 2. Scott Dixon 3. Alexander Rossi 4. Simon Pagenaud 5. Takuma Sato 6. Will Power 7. Graham Rahal 8. Sebastien Bourdais 9. Ryan Hunter-Reay 10. James Hinchcliffe 11.Felix Rosenqvist 12.Jack Harvey 13.Colton Herta 14.Marco Andretti 15.Spencer Pigot 16.Matheus Leist 17.Ed Jones 18.Santino Ferrucci 19.Zach Veach 20.Marcus Ericsson

182 176 146 138 132 119 113 111 109 107 106 100 95 95 93 78 78 76 73 67

Most drivers want NASCAR’s longest race to remain 600 miles BY STEVE REED

Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. — With a furrowed brow NASCAR legend Darrell Waltrip scoffed at the notion that the Coca-Cola 600 race is too long and should be shortened by, say, maybe a hundred miles or so. “Is that what some thirtysomething said?” the 72-yearold Waltrip said to The Associated Press. Well, as a matter of fact... It was 38-year-old Denny Hamlin who recently suggested that NASCAR should shorten its longest race because nobody — at least not the friends that he knows — wants to sit and watch stock cars race around an oval 400 times for nearly five hours. But Waltrip, a five-time winner of the Coca-Cola 600, said that would be a mistake. “It’s a tough race, it’s a grueling race,” Waltrip said. “It takes a long time to run this race. But it’s iconic. It’s the only one we have. Our sport is definitely in a tailspin if we ever do away with the Coke 600, I will tell you that.” Waltrip is getting plenty of support in the garage. Joey Logano said he gets a little angry when people suggest the race many refer to as the crown jewel of NASCAR should be shortened, saying to him it’s a no-brainer to keep the race length. “This is a special race, this is the Coca-Cola 600,” Logano said. “It has been around for a very long time. Yeah, you keep it. That is what it makes it so special, what makes it so unique. Does every other race need to be 500 miles, probably not? But certain ones, the iconic ones, need to stay.” NASCAR has shortened some races, including at Pocono. But to defending champion Kyle Busch, changing the 600 wouldn’t be right. “I think it brings a different aspect to our sport — it’s longevity,” Busch said. “People will say, ‘It’s too long. It’s boring.’ Whatever. Well, you know, it’s a part of the product and history that we’ve had on Memorial Day weekend for a long time that you run the extra 100 miles.” While Hamlin would be just as happy winning a Coca-Cola 300, others disagree. Brad Keselowski said the race honors the tradition of the sport. The race began in 1961, growing into a Memorial Day tradition at Charlotte Motor Speedway and a

celebration of those who served in the military. “This race is a different challenge than anything else we have — and by a good bit,” Keselowski said. “I appreciate so much about this race. I appreciate that you are going to go through the daytime and be burning hot and the car is going be out of control. Then we are going to transition to nighttime and the cars are going to be just crazy fast. I think that is tremendous.” Keselowski also said the race pushes the limits of a vehicle, specific to performance and endurance. But critics would argue that in today’s world of improved technology, cars have gotten stronger. The attrition rate in the Coca-Cola 600 is at an all-time low, erasing the antiquated idea of this being the ultimate test of man and machine. Three cars didn’t finish the race last year because of engine issues, which isn’t all that unusual for the average 500-mile race. “I bet you we could probably go 800 maybe even 1,000 miles on a race car before you’d start to see problems,” said Busch, who won his first Coca-Cola 600 in 2018. “It’s just a matter of length and attention span, I guess.” One thing everyone can agree on — the race is a grind. Keselowski said the biggest advice he would give young drivers is to “drink water.” And Sunday is expected to be no exception, with temperatures likely reaching the mid-90s in the late afternoon when a heatwave hits the Carolinas. The 21-year-old William Byron will start on the pole for the CocaCola 600 today, and the Charlotte kid is looking for his first win on a track where he grew up watching NASCAR’s longest race. “I loved it as a kid,” said Byron. “I came to this race every year since 2004 or so. It was a great race. Obviously it was long, but I appreciated that because there was so much strategy and so much survival involved in it. You knew the guys who won this race were a big deal. The best cars and the best drivers always won this race.” Keselowski agreed. He thinks shortening it wouldn’t be right. “It seems like for whatever reason over the last couple of years that question keeps coming more and more. I have resisted so much because of how much respect I have for this race,” Keselowski said. “And I would hate to see that change.”

CHUCK BURTON PHOTOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kyle Busch covers his ears as he looks out of the garage before practice Thursday for the NASCAR Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C.

Clint Bowyer waits in his car before practice for the NASCAR Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Thursday in Concord, N.C.


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 1

POSTSEASON UPDATE BASEBALL

BOYS LACROSSE | STATE CHAMPIONSHIP

Final Carbondale 5, Massac County 4 (9 innings) —CLASS 2A NEWTON SECTIONAL Final, Saturday Teutopolis vs. Mater Dei (16-10), 10 a.m. —CLASS 1A SOUTH CENTRAL SECTIONAL Final, Saturday Marissa (16-5) vs. Christ Our Rock, 11 a.m. —CLASS 1A STEELEVILLE SECTIONAL Final Goreville 14, Elverado 0 (6 innings) —CLASS 1A JACKSONVILLE SECTIONAL Final Hardin Calhoun vs. Jacksonville Routt, 4:30 GIRLS SOCCER MISSOURI —CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals, Saturday Nerinx (17-3-2) at Lindbergh (16-9), noon LS West (15-3-1) at Kickapoo (19-5-1), noon Howell (12-8-1) at FH Central (14-8-1), noon Liberty (KC) (20-2) at LS North (8-12), 1 p.m. —CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals, Saturday Summit (17-3-3) at Cape Central (18-5), noon Glendale (17-7-1) at Union (25-1-1), 1 p.m. St. Dominic (23-3-1) vs. Incarnate Word (18-5-3) at Westminster, 11 a.m. Kearney (19-2) at Notre Dame de Sion (14-5-1), 11 a.m. —CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Wednesday At Swope Soccer Village, Kansas City Pleasant Hill (22-1) vs. Cape Notre Dame (23-1-1) noon Pembroke Hill (10-8) vs. Visitation (17-4), 2 p.m. Third place: 10 a.m. Thursday, May 30 Championship: 2 p.m. Thursday, May 30 —CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Wednesday At Swope Soccer Village, Kansas City New Covenant (12-7) vs. St. Vincent (14-7), 4 p.m. Lone Jack (16-4) vs. Duchesne (11-8), 6 p.m. Third place: noon Thursday, May 30 Championship: 4 p.m. Thursday, May 30 ILLINOIS —CLASS 3A MOLINE SECTIONAL Final Minooka 2, Edwardsville 1 (OT) —CLASS 2A CIVIC MEMORIAL SECTIONAL Final, Saturday Chatham (4-2) vs. Triad (17-3-2), 10 a.m. —CLASS 1A STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals At North Central College Columbia 5, Lisle 0 North Shore Country Day 2, Herscher 0 Third place, Saturday Herscher (23-5) vs. Lisle (18-2-2), 3 p.m. Championship, Saturday North Shore Country Day (16-3) vs. Columbia (26-2-1), 5 p.m. BOYS VOLLEYBALL —BELLEVILLE EAST SECTIONAL Semifinals Minooka def. Lincoln-Way East 14-25, 26-24, 25-21 O’Fallon def. Edwardsville 25-14, 25-21 Championship, Tuesday Minooka vs. O’Fallon, 6 p.m. BOYS LACROSSE —MSLA STATE TOURNAMENT Championship, Friday At Lindenwood University MICDS 15, De Smet 1 —MSLA SHOW ME CUP Championship, Friday At Lindenwood University Parkway West 6, Westminster 5 GIRLS LACROSSE —MSLA STATE TOURNAMENT Third place, Saturday Lafayette (20-1) vs. MICDS (10-9),9 a.m. Championship, Saturday Summit (17-1) vs. St. Joseph’s 11 a.m. ILLINOIS —WASHINGTON (ILL.) SECTIONAL Championship Lincoln-Way Central 13, O’Fallon 7

MISSOURI —CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals De Smet 3, Rock Bridge 2 (8 innings) Semifinals, Friday, May 31 At CarShield Field Marquette (23-8) vs. Willard (29-6), 4 p.m. De Smet (12-13-1) vs. Staley (27-5), 6:30 p.m. Third place: 11 a.m. Saturday, June 1 Championship: 1:30 p.m. Saturday June 1 —CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals Borgia 9, Sikeston 6 Westminster 14, St. Dominic 3 (5 innings) Semifinals, Thursday, May 30 At CarShield Field Borgia (21-7) vs. Helias (23-4), 4 p.m. Westminster (28-6) vs. Savannah (25-1), 6:30 p.m. Third place: 11 a.m. Friday, May 31 Championship: 1:30 p.m. Friday, May 31 —CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Monday At CarShield Field Fatima (14-14) vs. Saxony (22-3), 4 p.m. Blair Oaks (21-11) vs. Montgomery County (17-8), 6:30 p.m. Third place: 11 a.m. Tuesday Championship: 1:30 p.m. Tuesday —CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Wednesday At CarShield Field Skyline (21-7) vs. Ellington (27-1), 4 p.m. Silex (12-4) vs. Seymour (20-7), 6:30 p.m. Third place: 11 a.m. Thursday, May 30 Championship: 1:30 p.m. Thursday, May 30 —CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Tuesday At CarShield Field St. Elizabeth (16-4) vs. Cooter (20-6), 4 p.m. La Plata (17-1) vs. Weaubleau (19-9), 6:30 p.m. Third place: 11 a.m. Wednesday Championship: 1:30 p.m. Wednesday ILLINOIS —CLASS 4A ALTON REGIONAL Final, Saturday Alton (14-18) vs. Edwardsville (31-5), 10 a.m. —CLASS 4A GRANITE CITY REGIONAL Final, Saturday O’Fallon (25-8) vs. Belleville West (26-7), 11 a.m. —CLASS 3A COLUMBIA REGIONAL Final, Saturday Waterloo (19-12) vs. Columbia (24-8), 11 a.m. —CLASS 3A CENTRALIA REGIONAL Final, Saturday Mount Vernon (18-8) vs. Marion (194), 11 a.m. —CLASS 3A TRIAD REGIONAL Final, Saturday Highland (22-13) vs. Mascoutah (29-3), 11 a.m. —CLASS 2A BENTON SECTIONAL Final, Saturday Harrisburg vs. Nashville (30-6), 11 a.m. —CLASS 2A PLEASANT PLAINS SECTIONAL Final, Saturday Pleasant Plains vs. New Berlin, 11 a.m. —CLASS 2A TEUTOPOLIS SECTIONAL Final, Saturday Mater Dei (20-9) vs Teutopolis, 10 a.m. —CLASS 1A GREENVILLE SECTIONAL Final, Saturday Gibault (24-8) vs. Carrollton (10-2), 11 a.m. SOFTBALL —CLASS 4A EDWARDSVILLE REGIONAL Final Edwardsville 6, Collinsville 5 —CLASS 4A BELLEVILLE EAST REGIONAL Final, Saturday O’Fallon (23-9) vs, Belleville West (15-11), 11 a.m. —CLASS 3A CIVIC MEMORIAL REGIONAL Final Freeburg 6, Triad 0 —CLASS 3A JERSEYVILLE REGIONAL Final Jerseyville 8, Columbia 1 —CLASS 3A HERRIN REGIONAL Final Centralia 4, Mount Vernon 3 (9 innings) —CLASS 3A CARBONDALE REGIONAL

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

MESSAGE DELIVERED MICDS rolls to sixth consecutive MSLA title BY BRIAN WEBSTER

STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. CHARLES — Graham Bundy Jr.’s aggressive charge at the De Smet goal in the opening seconds said it all. The five-time defending champions, and especially their record-breaking senior, weren’t going to be denied. Bundy Jr. wound up and fired, scoring the first of his six goals just 11 seconds into the game, sparking MICDS to a 15-1 victory past De Smet for its sixth consecutive Missouri Scholastic Lacrosse Association state championship. “That was our mentality,” Bundy Jr.said of his all-out attack on the goalie to start the game. “I wanted to send an early message, and the message we wanted to send as a team. Just get out and get on them.” The Georgetown-bound Bundy sent the message, all right. He had five of his goals in the first half, four during a devastating opening assault that left De Smet (16-5) down 7-0afterjust12minutesofplay.

Bundy Jr. and senior goalie Joe McGuire said the Rams entered the game with a collective chip on their shoulders, eager to prove their dominance all over again. “I’d put all my money on Graham seven days a week and twice on Sunday,” McGuire said. The Rams (18-1) pushed their winning streak against area teams to 92 games,the last loss coming April 10, 2014, to CBC. McGuire stopped 12 shots in Friday’s title game. The Spartans managed 16 shots against the Rams’ keyed-up, physical defense — a unit that drew plenty of flags but got its job done. “De Smet stung us in the first game (a 15-12 MICDS win) and I think our guys took that to heart,” Rams coach Andy Kay said.“In their minds,they had something to prove.” McGuire hasn’t been as celebrated among area coaches for his goalie skills because the Rams have been so dominant. It’s created a perception the

senior hasn’t faced the kind of tough shots some other elite stoppers have, but McGuire put all that to bed. “McGuire hears everybody talking about other goalies,” Kay said. “He hears that and we hear it, too. I think he had a chip on his shoulder coming into the game. To me, he proved to be the top goalie in the state.” Bundy Jr.’s fellow Division I seniors chimed in, of course. Boston University signee Thomas Niedringhaus had four goals, two in that first quarter. Penn State-bound

Henry Carpenter had two goals and three assists before halftime, by which time the Rams led 10-1. Carpenter finished with three goals and four assists. Only a goal by senior midfielder Luke Wetzel, with 3:54 left in the first half, kept the Spartans from being held scoreless in the first half. They trailed 10-0 when Wetzel got them on the board. The turbo clock ran for the entire fourth quarter after the Rams took a 13-1 lead late in the third quarter on Bundy Jr.’s sixth goal.

43.02; 8. Columbia, 43.55 110 hurdles: 2. Jamariantte Burgess, East St. Louis, 14.24; 4. Steven Harris, Cahokia, 14.42; 5. Stuart Adkinson, Marion, 14.49; 7. Andrew Johnson, East St. Louis, 14.78 100: 3. Carson Rantanen, Staunton, 10.74; 6. Devin Wills, Mascoutah, 10.91 800: 2. Jackson McAlister, Waterloo, 1:58.66; 11. Eli Ward, Waterloo, 2:00.40; 12. Corbin Schwable, Freeburg, 2:00.81 800 relay: 3. East St. Louis, 1:29.51; 5. Carbondale, 1:29.77; 7. Mascoutah, 1:29.87 400: 1. Willie Johnson, East St. Louis, 48.47; 2. Marcus Lampley, East St. Louis, 48.97 300 hurdles: 2. Noah Williams, Freeburg, 39.03; 4. Jamariantte Burgess, East St. Louis, 39.28; 5. Steven Harris, Cahokia, 39.46; 8. Andrew Johnson, East St. Louis, 40.25 1600: 8. Brooks Harlan, Centralia, 4:31.17 200: 3. Marcus Lampley, East St. Louis, 22.21; 5. Willie Johnson, East St. Louis, 22.45; 8. Devin Wills, Mascoutah, 22.59 1600 relay: 3. East St. Louis, 3:22.57; 5. Freeburg, 3:25.54 BOYS TENNIS Missouri State Championships At Cooper Tennis Complex, Springfield CLASS 2 SINGLES Main draw First round: AJ Woodman, CBC, def. Noah Koch, Liberty-KC, 6-0, 6-3; Brian Kim, Lindbergh, def. William Schellman, Francis Howell North, 6-1, 6-0; Grant Ouyang, Ladue, def. Garret Lewis, Joplin, 6-1, 6-4; Nicholas Fischer, SLUH, def. Son Nguyen, Blue Springs South, 0-6, 6-1, 7-6 (2); Cameron Duello, Liberty-KC, def. Sachin Milli, Francis Howell North, 6-1, 6-3 Quarterfinals: Woodman, CBC, def. Zachary Grueber, Rock Bridge, 7-6 (5), 6-2; Kim, Lindbergh, def. Hogan Stoker, Lee’s Summit West, 6-1, 6-0; Ouyang, Ladue, def. Fischer, SLUH, 6-0, 6-2 Consolation draw First round: Schellman, Francis Howell North, def. Payton LaFevers, Glendale, 6-4, 6-2; Joshua Wilde, Jefferson City, def. Sachin Milli, Francis Howell North, 6-0, 6-3

Quarterfinals: Fischer, SLUH, def. Schellman, Francis Howell North, 6-3, 6-1 CLASS 2 DOUBLES Main draw First round: Layton Wille-James Faris, Lindbergh, def. Ian Atwater-Grant Wiedeman, Rockhurst, 6-2, 6-4; Ethan Hinni-Adnan Pattan, Marquette, def. Nicholas Mathis-Logan Leslie, Lee’s Summit North, 6-3, 6-1; Luke BouchardKavin Anand, Rock Bridge, def. Benjamin Ell-Cole Sherman, Francis Howell North, 6-0, 6-0; Clayton Maack-David Abilez, CBC, def. Joseph West-Kanish Patel, Francis Howell North, 6-1, 6-1; Leo Da Silva-Victor Stefanescu, SLUH, def. Cooper Hayes-Andrew Robaska, Park Hill South, 6-4, 6-2. Quarterfinals: Wille-Faris, Lindbergh, def. Owen Mulcahy-Tyson Cowger, Liberty, 6-4, 6-3; Bouchard-Anand, Rock Bridge, def. Hinni-Pattan, Marquette, 6-1, 6-2; Maack-Abilez, CBC, def. Da Silva-Stefanescu, SLUH, 6-2, 6-2 Consolation draw First round: Mathis-Leslie, Lee’s Summit North, def. Ell-Sherman, Francis Howell North, 6-3, 6-1; Hayes-Robaska, Park Hill South, def. West-Patel, Francis Howell North, 6-1, 6-0 Quarterfinals: Da Silva-Stefanescu, SLUH, def. Mathis-Leslie, Lee’s Summit North, 6-1, 6-3; Hayes-Robaska, Park Hill South, def. Hinni-Pattan, Marquette, 6-2, 6-0 CLASS 1 SINGLES Main draw First round: Evan Erb, MICDS, def. Eric Hahn, Dexter, 6-1, 6-2; Akash Rajan, John Burroughs, def. Jarrett Teel, Forsyth, 6-1, 6-0; Chase Nwamu, MICDS, def. Richard King, Barstow, 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-4; Rory Sutter, John Burroughs, def. Aiden Petterson, Fulton, 6-0, 6-1 Quarterfinals: Erb, MICDS, def. Justin House, St. Michael the Archangel, 6-1, 6-0; Rajan, John Burroughs, def. Ian Ding, Thomas Jefferson Independent, 6-1, 6-1; Nwamu, MICDS, def. Luke Steiner, Springfield Catholic, 6-2, 6-0; Sutter, John Burroughs, def. Cory Conley, Warrensburg, 6-2, 6-2 CLASS 1 DOUBLES Main draw First round: Dharmadev Nayak-Samuel Wang,

John Burroughs, def. Tage Young-Kristopher Rudel, Savannah, 6-0, 6-1; Charles McEneryGary Gaertner, Priory, def. James AndrewsHenry Stevens, Pembroke Hill, 6-3, 6-4; Adam Chanliongco-Trenton Vann, Springfield Catholic, def. Robert Vance-Blake Dobey, St. Pius X, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 6-2; Sean Finnie-John Newell, Priory, def. Nicholas Shieldes-Mitchel Houghton, Trenton, 6-1, 6-1; Adam Zhao-Thomas Dobbs, John Burroughs, def. Jon Deroo-Jordan Letterman, Forsyth, 6-2, 6-1 Quarterfinals: Nayak-Wang, John Burroughs, def. Bennett Hoshaw-Charles Fraser, Kirksville, 6-4, 6-3; McEnery-Gaertner, Priory, def. Chanliongco-Vann, Springfield Catholic, 6-1, 6-0; Nathan Turtledove-Logan Stevens, def. Pembroke Hill, Finnie-Newell, Priory, 6-4, 6-2; Zhao-Dobbs, John Burroughs, def. Dylan DeanNoah Hamlett, Thomas Jefferson Independent, 6-3, 7-6 (7) Consolation draw Quarterfinals: Finnie-Newell, Priory, def. Andrews-Stevens, Pembroke Hill, 6-4, 6-3 Illinois State Championships (Sites in Chicago area) CLASS 2A DOUBLES Main draw Quarterfinals: Joseph Daw-Noah Hernandez, Hinsdale Central def. Seth Lipe- Gabrielle Montanari, Edwardsville, 6-0, 6-4 CLASS 2A SINGLES Consolation draw Third round: Kevin Li, Wheaton North def. Max Skaer, Belleville East, 8-4 Fourth round: Zach Trimpe, Edwardsville, def. Charlie Chernawsky, Deerfield, 8-1 CLASS 1A DOUBLES Consolation draw Third round: Arjun Tangella-Zachary Donnini, Urbana University def. Sean FroidcouerCameron Woods, Triad, 8-4 Fourth round: Daniel McCluskey-AJ Bower, Alton Marquette def. Daniel Han-Charlie McGowan, Chicago University, 8-0 Fifth round: Ethan Sabotta-Jacob Valencic, Washington def. Daniel McCluskey -AJ Bower, Alton Marquette, 8-5

PAUL KOPSKY, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

MICDS players celebrate their victory in the Missouri Scholastic Lacrosse Association championship Friday at Lindenwood University in St. Charles.

FRIDAY’S RESULTS SOFTBALL Freeburg 500 010 0 6 10 0 Triad 000 000 0 0 4 2 L-Liz Young. Collinsville 001 001 3 5 6 0 Edwardsville 100 130 1 6 10 0 W-Ryleigh Owens. HR-E Maria Smith 2Jerseyville 000 006 2 8 12 0 Columbia 000 000 1 1 5 0 W-Claire Anderson. GIRLS SOCCER Columbia 5, Lisle 0 C: Fae Harrell 2, Haley Glover, Kennedy Jones, Reagan Mauch; shutout by Rylee Iorio BOYS TRACK AND FIELD Illinois State Championships At Eastern Illinois University, Charleston (Area qualifiers for Saturday’s finals) CLASS 3A Long jump: 8. Elijah McCauley, Belleville East, 22-8.75 Pole vault: 1. (tie) Trison Paul, Belleville East, 14-0 Triple jump: 12. Kenyon Johnson, Edwardsville, 45-3.75 100: 2. Jermarrion Stewart, Colllinsville, 10.49; 6. Deonte McGoy, Alton, 10.70 1600: 2. Andrew O’Keefe, Granite City, 4:20.55 200: 4. Jermarrion Stewart, Collinsville, 22.15 CLASS 2A Long jump: 3. Logan Rubin, Salem, 22-2.5; 5. Ronnie Hunsaker, Columbia, 21-8 Pole vault: 1. (tie) Jadon Elliott, Triad, 13-3 High jump: 1. (tie) Terrence Hargrove, East St. Louis; Zack Pluff, Freeburg; and Martiez Pinnick, Carbondale, 6-3 Shot put: 9. Josh Schmid, Marion, 51-0.75; 10. Mathew Wilson, Mascoutah, 51-0; 12. James Gunn, Marion, 50-9.75 Triple jump: 2. (tie) Ronnie Hunsaker, Columbia, 43-7; 8. Elijah Felton, East St. Louis, 43-1.25 Discus: 3. Josh Schmid, Marion, 164-4 3200 relay: 8. Triad, 8:12.58; 10. Mascoutah, 8:16.86 400 relay: 2. Triad, 42.80; 4. East St. Louis,

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

Locally severe thunderstorms will stretch from the Northeast to the Ohio Valley on Sunday, while severe weather targets the southern Plains. California will be unusually cool and stormy for May.

TODAY

TONIGHT

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

Scattered storms

Mostly cloudy

Warm with clouds and sun WIND SSW 5-15 mph

Partly cloudy, night storms WIND SW 5-15 mph

Partly cloudy, night storms WIND W 10-15 mph

Partly cloudy and pleasant WIND NW 5-10 mph

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND WSW 5-10 mph

WIND W 5-10 mph

85°

68°

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 77/60 76/62 Bloomington Urbana 76/59 79/61

Kirksville 78/64

Quincy 78/66

Decatur 79/61 Springfield 57 79/63 Effingham 70 55 81/64

35

Columbia Kansas City 70 82/68 80/67 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 85/68 City 84/62 82/67 Union 55 82/67 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 82/67 84/66 Farmington 82/65 Cape Girardeau 86/67 Joplin 44 Springfield 84/67 83/66 West Plains Poplar Bluff 87/67 55 84/64

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

32 23 21 20 25

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

29.46 -1.92 31.05 +2.23 30.53 +1.67 27.25 +2.20 31.43 +1.90

16 25.24 +0.54 15 23.42 +0.94 25 33.70 +0.59 26 34.35 +1.19 18 29.05 +1.25 419 428.18 +1.70 21 32.05 +1.77 30 38.45 +1.66 27 39.13 +0.75 32 40.54 +0.25 20 18 14

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

24.99 +0.47 23.67 +0.48 24.83 +0.06

15 16 24

8.02 -2.57 19.22 +3.28 34.73 +1.72

15

10.37 +4.38

40

44.46 358.92 376.68 527.13 659.15 731.06 681.82 918.22 863.33 600.88 410.16 617.00 446.98

-0.59 +0.02 +1.31 +2.42 -0.02 -0.05 +0.49 -0.05 +1.51 +0.72 +0.08 +2.76 +0.83

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

100

88

87 78

80

70 60

70 70

69 58

54

40

S

92 82

S

M

72

Average High 88

70

85

88

68

70

Average Low 88

82

80

81

62

61

63

W

T

F

69

59 49 T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

Minneapolis 76/57 Chicago 67/51

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Mostly cloudy with a chance of storms Sunday. Highs in the mid-80s. More sunshine Monday and warmer; upper 80s for the high. The chance for a spotty storm will hang around.

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

Billings 71/47

88° 70° 88° 69° 82° 62° 80° 61°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Location

Winnipeg 54/38

Seattle 73/55

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

Statistics through 5 p.m. Friday

New York 88/66 Washington 91/70

Denver 75/46

San Francisco 60/51

Temperature High/low 92°/72° Normal high/low 78°/60° Last year high/low 88°/67° Record high 92° (2019) Record low 40° (1961) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Fri. 0.00” Month to date (normal) 5.68” (3.58”) Year to date (normal) 24.56” (15.23”) Record for this date 2.15” (1927)

Montreal 74/48 Toronto 74/51 Detroit 75/54

Kansas City 80/67

Los Angeles 60/51

Atlanta 96/72

El Paso 94/65 Houston 90/74

Chihuahua 95/59

Miami 89/75

Monterrey 95/70

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Moderate - 21 Absent High - 61 High - 18450 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Friday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

17 99 84 130 128

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

74° 8 a.m.

78° noon

84° 4 p.m.

78° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

81/55/pc 80/48/s 54/47/sh 96/72/s 92/71/pc 91/67/t 96/70/s 71/50/c 80/61/pc 98/72/s 86/63/t 95/68/s 67/51/pc 83/63/t 77/55/t 89/69/pc 90/69/s 75/46/s 78/65/c 89/74/s 75/54/pc 85/60/pc 87/73/s 90/74/pc 77/61/t 80/67/c 73/50/pc 91/68/s

77/54/pc 76/46/s 57/46/c 95/74/pc 92/74/pc 83/65/pc 96/72/pc 69/52/sh 71/56/pc 98/75/s 83/67/pc 94/70/s 76/67/t 85/68/c 76/64/c 88/73/pc 94/72/s 70/42/pc 82/65/t 87/74/s 73/60/t 81/55/s 88/75/s 90/76/sh 83/67/pc 82/68/t 72/58/pc 89/70/pc

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

60/51/sh 88/69/pc 92/71/s 89/75/s 64/49/pc 76/57/s 97/71/s 94/67/s 91/74/s 88/66/pc 83/66/pc 81/67/c 95/69/s 90/68/pc 84/60/s 80/59/t 72/54/pc 75/56/pc 63/50/t 73/51/pc 90/72/pc 63/56/sh 60/51/t 73/55/pc 95/74/s 84/53/s 91/70/t 82/65/pc

67/53/pc 90/71/c 91/73/pc 91/76/pc 66/62/t 65/53/r 97/70/pc 94/71/pc 91/75/s 80/62/pc 83/68/c 84/66/t 95/72/s 81/64/s 79/60/s 80/66/pc 70/48/pc 74/54/sh 70/51/pc 60/51/sh 90/74/pc 64/55/pc 64/53/r 78/55/pc 96/76/s 79/54/s 84/69/pc 81/68/pc

National Extremes

Friday in the 48 contiguous states High: 100 Cherry Point, N.C. Low: 13 Climax, Colo.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

5:42 a.m. 1:51 a.m.

8:16 p.m. 12:39 p.m.

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

May 26

Jun 3

Jun 10

Jun 17

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

67/52/pc 79/61/s 109/75/pc 95/81/sh 75/59/pc 68/57/c 67/47/pc 93/69/s 87/76/pc 62/45/pc 88/79/t 81/58/c 69/43/s 70/51/c 82/53/s 106/82/s

61/47/sh 79/62/pc 108/76/pc 95/80/t 81/56/s 69/51/t 65/43/s 95/70/s 86/77/sh 58/43/sh 87/79/t 85/60/pc 68/44/s 64/48/sh 84/55/pc 108/81/s

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

81/55/pc 74/48/pc 72/52/pc 85/74/s 73/59/r 106/78/pc 70/57/c 80/69/pc 66/58/t 88/77/pc 62/36/pc 86/64/pc 73/53/s 86/69/pc 74/51/pc 69/54/pc

83/58/pc 68/47/pc 67/53/pc 84/74/s 75/59/c 109/77/pc 69/49/sh 83/70/s 68/58/t 87/77/pc 64/39/c 69/53/r 65/50/s 85/69/pc 67/54/pc 70/53/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


FOR THE RECORD

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 2

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Odds Underdog American League INDIANS............... -$135......................Rays TWINS .................. -$240............. White Sox ASTROS................ -$185.................Red Sox Yankees ............... -$150.................ROYALS ANGELS................ -$160................ Rangers ATHLETICS ........... -$155...............Mariners National League NATIONALS .......... -$145................. Marlins Dodgers ............... -$158................PIRATES BREWERS............. -$152..................Phillies CUBS.................... -$155......................Reds Dbacks ................. -$115................. GIANTS CARDS.................. -$142.................. Braves Interleague Padres ................. -$128.............BLUE JAYS METS.................... -$175................... Tigers ROCKIES............... -$270..................Orioles NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Stanley Cup Monday BRUINS .......... -$160/+$140 ..............Blues Odds to win series: BRUINS -$160 vs. Blues +$140 SOCCER English Football League Championship Monday Wembley Stadium Aston Villa ........... +$120 Derby................... +$230 Draw: +$225 Over/under: 2.5 goals UEFA Europa League Final Wednesday Baku, Azerbaijan Chelsea ................ +$135 Arsenal ................ +$200 Draw: +$230 Over/under: 2.5 goals June 7 France Odds to win the FIFA Women’s World Cup 40/1 USA 5/2 Italy 50/1 France 7/2 China Germany 5/1 South Korea 50/1 England 6/1 New Zealand 60/1 Netherlands 10/1 Argentina 100/1 Japan 12/1 Chile 100/1 Brazil 16/1 Scotland 100/1 Australia 18/1 Cameroon 200/1 Sweden 20/1 Nigeria 200/1 Spain 20/1 South Africa 200/1 Canada 28/1 Jamaica 250/1 Norway 30/1 Thailand 250/1 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX : Recalled LHP Manny Banuelos from 10-day IL. Placed C Welington Castillo on 7-day IL. Recalled C Seby Zavala from Charlotte. OAKLAND ATHLETICS: Designated RHP Fernando Rodney for assignment. Selected LFP Wei-Chung Wang from Las Vegas (PCL). SEATTLE MARINERS: Recalled IF Kyle Seager from 60-day IL. Optioned INF Dylan Moore to Tacoma (WA. Placed Sam Tuivailala to 60-day (IL). National League CHICAGO CUBS: Recalled LHP Tim Collins and RHP Dillon Maples from Iowa. Optioned RHP James Norwood and OF Mark Zagunis to Iowa. NEW YORK METS : Recalled LHP Jason Vargas from IL. Optioned IF Luis Guillorne to Syracuse (IL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: Designated OF Mac Williamson for assignment. Placed RHP Trevor Gott on the 10-day IL. Selected OF Mike Yastrzemski from Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Dereck Rodriguez from Sacramento (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Aquired RHP George Kontos’ contract from Long Island (AL). Returned RHP Cody Mincey to the active list. Recalled RHP James Bourque from Harrisburg. Optioned RHP Joe Ross to Fresno (Calif.) Recalled from rehab OF Andrew Stevenson and optioned him to Fresno (Calif). American Association FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS: Released RHP Reese Gregory. Signed RHP Cole Christensen. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS: Signed RHP Eric Morell LHP; Braulio Torres-Perez signed with the Pericos de Puebla (Mexican League). JOLIET SLAMMERS: Released RHP Justin Curry, 3B Frank Podkul and RHP Miko Sklar. KANSAS CITY T-BONES: Sold the contract of RHP Randall Delgado to the New York Yankees. LINCOLN SALTDOGS: Released RHP Colby Blueberg. MILWAUKEE MILKMEN: Released LHP Kevin Matthews. QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS: Transfered INF Freudis Nova from extended spring training. Recalled C Ruben Castro from the 7-day IL. Transferred OF Marty Costes to Fayetteville (CL) and OF Ramiro Rodriguez to extended spring training. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS: Signed C Trey Fulton and OF General McArthur. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES: Signed C Cody Young. Canadian Football League BRITISH COLUMBIA LIONS: Signed PK Sergio Castillo. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS: Signed OL Jamar McGloster and Israel Helms.

Favorite

PRO BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs

WNBA

EASTERN Atlanta Connecticut Indiana Chicago New York Washington WESTERN Minnesota Seattle Las Vegas Los Angeles Dallas Phoenix

W L Pct 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 W L Pct 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 Friday Atlanta 76, Dallas 72 Indiana 81, New York 80 Saturday Seattle 77, Phoenix 68 Connecticut 84, Washington 69 Minnesota 89, Chicago 71 Sunday Los Angeles at Las Vegas, 7 p.m.

GB — — — 1 1 1 GB — — ½ ½ 1 1

MLS

East W L Pct. Lake Erie 9 5 .643 Schaumburg 9 5 .643 Windy City 7 8 .467 Joliet 4 11 .267 Washington 4 11 .267 West W L Pct. Rascals 9 6 .600 Evansville 8 6 .571 Florence 8 6 .571 Grizzlies 7 7 .500 Southern Illinois 7 7 .500 Saturday’s Games Southern Illinois 6, Florence 1 Grizzlies at Washington, late Schaumburg 6, Joliet 5 Windy City 4, Lake Erie 2 Washington 8, Grizzlies 2 Evansville 15, Rascals 1 Sunday’s Games Joliet at Schaumburg, 1 p.m. Lake Erie at Windy City, 2:05 p.m. Grizzlies at Washington, 4:35 p.m. Southern Illinois at Florence, 4:35 p.m. Evansville at Rascals, 5:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Joliet at Schaumburg, 1 p.m.

Fairmount Park

Saturday FIRST $10,000, alc opt cl, 3YO up F&M, 1mi, clear. 4 (4) Enchilada (J.Simpson), 3.60, 2.40No Tix 3 (3) Caliche Lane (A.Ortiz), 3.00, No Tix Off 7:32. Time 1:42.17. Fast. Also Ran: Phantasmic. Exacta (4-3) paid $5.00.

COLLEGES Saturday’s College Baseball Scores

SECOND $9,000, mdn spl wt, 3YO up, 6f, clear. 2 (2) Tap’s Big Shot (J.Diego), 2.80, 2.10No Tix 3 (3) Close Behind (J.Simpson), 3.80, No Tix Off 8:00. Time 1:14.53. Fast. Also Ran: Honeydolist, Bee Attack. DQ: Close Behind (1-2). $1 Daily Double (4-2) paid $2.10. Exacta (2-3) paid $6.40. $1 Trifecta (2-3-1) paid $6.00.

(Best-of-3; x-if necessary) Host school is home team for Game 1; visiting school is home team for Game 2; coin flip determines home team for Game 3 At Tallahassee, Fla. Oklahoma State 1, Florida State 1 Thursday, May 23: Oklahoma State 3, Florida State 1, 9 innings Friday, May 24: Florida State 4, Oklahoma State 1 Saturday, May 25: Oklahoma State 3, Florida State 2 At Tuscaloosa, Ala. Alabama 1, Texas 1 Thursday, May 23: Alabama 3, Texas 0 Friday, May 24: Texas 7, Alabama 5 Saturday, May 25: Alabama 8, Texas 5 At Gainesville, Fla. Florida 1, Tennessee 0 Friday, May 24: Florida 3, Tennessee 0 Saturday, May 25: Tennessee 3, Florida 2 x-Sunday, May 26: Florida vs. Tennessee, 1 p.m. At Minneapolis Minnesota 1, LSU 0 Friday, May 24: Minnesota 5, LSU 3 Saturday, May 25: Minnesota 3, LSU 0

FOURTH $9,000, mdn spl wt, 3YO up, 6f, clear. 5 (5) Tudors Charge (J.Simpson), 8.20, 6.00, No Tix 3 (3) B Salty (J.Diego), 6.40, No Tix Off 9:09. Time 1:13.27. Fast. Also Ran: Lookin’ At Mike, A P Fireball. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-5-5) 3 Correct Paid $9.30. $1 Daily Double (5-5) paid $42.70. Exacta (5-3) paid $47.80. $1 Trifecta (5-3-1) paid $49.90.

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

Clouds and sun, a t-storm WIND S 6-12 mph

Partly cloudy

81°

68°

MONDAY

TUESDAY

Saturday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $7.3 million Yardage: 7,209; Par 70 Third Round Kevin Na 70-62-69: 201 Mackenzie Hughes 68-70-65: 203 C.T. Pan 68-67-68: 203 Jordan Spieth 65-70-68: 203 Jim Furyk 69-66-68: 203 Tony Finau 64-68-71: 203 Charley Hoffman 70-71-63: 204 Austin Cook 72-67-65: 204 Ryan Palmer 68-69-68: 205 Nick Watney 67-68-70: 205 Jonas Blixt 67-64-74: 205 Andrew Putnam 69-70-67: 206 Scott Piercy 70-68-68: 206 Tyrrell Hatton 71-66-69: 206 Peter Uihlein 67-73-67: 207 Brian Gay 69-71-67: 207 Emiliano Grillo 69-70-68: 207 Kevin Tway 68-70-69: 207 Roger Sloan 65-72-70: 207 Jason Dufner 67-68-72: 207 Rory Sabbatini 68-66-73: 207 Matt Every 70-69-69: 208 Brandt Snedeker 74-67-68: 209 Martin Laird 72-69-68: 209 J.J. Henry 67-73-69: 209 Kevin Streelman 69-71-69: 209 David Toms 71-68-70: 209 Martin Kaymer 73-65-71: 209 Daniel Berger 71-67-71: 209 Josh Teater 68-70-71: 209 Dominic Bozzelli 73-69-68: 210 Billy Horschel 72-69-69: 210 Tom Hoge 70-69-71: 210 Adam Long 70-69-71: 210 Chesson Hadley 67-72-71: 210 Russell Knox 71-68-71: 210 Vaughn Taylor 74-67-70: 211 Jimmy Walker 67-74-70: 211 Joaquin Niemann 71-70-70: 211 Francesco Molinari 71-70-70: 211 Sam Burns 69-72-70: 211 Danny Lee 69-71-71: 211 Tyrone Van Aswegen 69-71-71: 211 Brian Harman 70-69-72: 211 Anirban Lahiri 68-71-72: 211 Max Homa 70-68-73: 211 Trey Mullinax 67-69-75: 211 Ben Silverman 69-71-72: 212 Kyoung-Hoon Lee 72-69-71: 212 Bill Haas 69-71-72: 212 Scott Brown 67-73-72: 212 Brice Garnett 73-66-73: 212 Talor Gooch 72-70-71: 213 Ben Crane 75-67-71: 213 Chris Stroud 72-70-71: 213 Corey Conners 69-73-71: 213 Aaron Baddeley 73-69-71: 213 Beau Hossler 70-71-72: 213 Peter Malnati 74-67-72: 213 Mike Weir 71-71-72: 214 Branden Grace 71-71-72: 214 Ian Poulter 73-69-72: 214 Ted Potter, Jr. 70-72-72: 214 Cameron Champ 70-72-72: 214 Jhonattan Vegas 74-67-73: 214

THURSDAY

Partly sunny and Warm with some Cloudy, a t-storm warm sun or two WIND WIND WIND SW 8-16 mph SW 10-20 mph SSW 10-20 mph

Pleasant with some sun WIND WNW 7-14 mph

Saturday At Kingsmill Resrt, River Course Williamsburg, Va. Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,430; Par 71 Third Round Nasa: Hataoka 68-67-65: 200 Bronte: Law 65-68-67: 200 Brooke: M.: Henderson 66-71-64: 201 Jennifer: Song 65-68-68: 201 Carlota: Ciganda 69-65-68: 202 Madelene: Sagstrom 68-66-69: 203 Wei-Ling: Hsu 72-67-65: 204 Katherine: Perry 66-73-66: 205 Caroline: Masson 69-69-67: 205 Angel: Yin 67-69-69: 205 Ashleigh: Buhai 68-67-70: 205 Charley: Hull 68-69-69: 206 Peiyun: Chien 69-67-70: 206 Azahara: Munoz 71-69-67: 207 Morgan: Pressel 71-69-67: 207 Kendall: Dye 70-70-67: 207 Haeji: Kang 70-70-67: 207 Gaby: Lopez 68-72-67: 207 Mi: Jung: Hur 68-71-68: 207 Mi: Hyang: Lee 68-70-69: 207 Brittany: Lincicome 68-69-70: 207 Jasmine: Suwannapura 66-71-70: 207 Haru: Nomura 69-67-71: 207 Nelly: Korda 69-66-72: 207 Lindy: Duncan 70-71-67: 208 Minjee: Lee 68-73-67: 208

-9 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4

Made In Denmark

Saturday At Himmerland Golf & Spa Resort Farso, Denmark Purse: $3.35 million Yardage: 6,881; Par: 71 Third Round Bernd Wiesberger (Aut) 68-69-67: 204 Robert Macintyre (USA) 67-70-68: 205 Max Schmitt (Ger) 68-70-68: 206 Matthias Schwab (Aut) 68-66-72: 207 Oliver Wilson (USA) 68-71-68: 208 Romain Langasque (Fra) 69-66-72: 208 Pablo Larrazabal (Spa) 68-71-68: 208 Paul Dunne (USA) 68-70-70: 209 Alejandro Canizares (Spa) 66-69-73: 209 Matthew Southgate (USA) 66-73-69: 209 Richie Ramsay (USA) 72-69-68: 209 Espen Kofstad (Nor) 68-72-69: 209 Scott Jamieson (USA) 70-70-69: 209 Lee Westwood (USA) 70-73-66: 209 Lasse Jensen (Den) 72-69-69: 210 Paul Waring (USA) 66-75-69: 210 Richard McEvoy (USA) 72-71-67: 210 Chris Paisley (USA) 68-71-71: 210 G. Fernandez-Castano (Spa) 71-72-67: 210 Jason Scrivener (Aus) 69-74-67: 210 Tapio Pulkkanen (Fin) 70-70-70: 210 Edoardo Molinari (Ita) 66-73-71: 210 Stuart Manley (USA) 69-70-72: 211 Wade Ormsby (Aus) 71-70-70: 211 Grant Forrest (USA) 70-71-70: 211 Benjamin Hebert (Fra) 67-72-72: 211 John Catlin (USA) 67-74-70: 211 Louis De Jager (Rsa) 68-75-68: 211 Adrian Otaegui (Spa) 71-72-68: 211 Alvaro Quiros (Spa) 70-67-74: 211 Gavin Moynihan (USA) 74-68-70: 212

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

WEDNESDAY

LPGA Tour: Pure Silk Championship

PGA Tour: Colonial

Saturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Tyler Reddick, Chevrolet, 200. 2. (6) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (9) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Toyota, 200. 4. (10) Noah Gragson , Chevrolet, 200. 5. (35) Justin Haley , Chevrolet, 200. 6. (8) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 200. 7. (16) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 200. 8. (12) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 200. 9. (7) Austin Cindric, Ford, 200. 10. (5) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 200. 11. (37) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 200. 12. (14) John Hunter Nemechek , Chevrolet, 200. 13. (17) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 200. 14. (19) Gray Gaulding, Chevrolet, 200. 15. (32) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 200. 16. (28) Ray Black II, Chevrolet, 200. 17. (30) Garrett Smithley, Chevrolet, 200. 18. (21) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 199. 19. (11) Chase Briscoe , Ford, 199. 20. (25) Brandon Brown , Chevrolet, 198. 21. (26) Joey Gase, Toyota, 198. 22. (29) David Starr, Chevrolet, 198. 23. (34) Vinnie Miller, Chevrolet, 197. 24. (2) Cole Custer, Ford, 196. 25. (24) Ronnie Bassett Jr, Chevrolet, 195. 26. (33) Matt Mills, Chevrolet, 194. 27. (22) Josh Williams, Chevrolet, Suspension, 187. 28. (4) Austin Dillon(i), Chevrolet,

NCAA Division I Softball Super Regionals

THIRD $5,800, cl, 3YO up F&M, 6f, clear. 5 (5) May Be Suspect (J.Simpson), 14.40, 7.80, 3.60 2 (2) Pink for Me (R.Arrieta), 3.80, 2.40 4 (4) Sing Kitty Sing (J.Molina, Jr.), 2.40 Off 8:42. Time 1:13.89. Fast. Also Ran: At the Wire, Just Sky, Longway Home. $0.5 Pick 3 (4-2-5) 3 Correct Paid $9.35. $1 Daily Double (2-5) paid $11.50. Exacta (5-2) paid $60.40. $0.1 Superfecta (5-2-4-1) paid $12.86. $1 Trifecta (5-2-4) paid $57.60.

Area holes in one

Old Hickory: Denny Roodman, hole No. 5, 111 yards, 9-iron. Birch Creek: Mark Hartman, hole No. 16, 115 yards, pitching wedge, May 25. Forest Hills: Joe O’Donnell, hole No. 6 (Championship), 174 yards, 5-iron, May 24.

NASCAR Xfinity Cup: 38th Annual Alsco 300

TOURNAMENTS Southeastern Conference Mississippi 5, Georgia 3 Vanderbilt 13, LSU 4

Saturday At Oak Hill Country Club Rochester, N.Y. Purse: $3.25 million Yardage: 6,896; Par 70 Third Round Paul Broadhurst 70-67-67: 204 Retief Goosen 67-72-67: 206 Ken Tanigawa 67-74-66: 207 Scott McCarron 72-69-67: 208 Corey Pavin 69-74-66: 209 John Riegger 69-71-69: 209 Esteban Toledo 70-67-74: 211 Jesper Parnevik 68-74-70: 212 Mike Goodes 72-69-71: 212 Jerry Kelly 70-70-72: 212 Kirk Triplett 70-71-72: 213 Scott Parel 66-73-74: 213 Duffy Waldorf 69-74-71: 214 Rocco Mediate 71-71-72: 214 Taichi Teshima 69-77-69: 215 Vijay Singh 72-73-70: 215 Bob Sowards 71-73-71: 215 Tommy Armour III 70-73-72: 215 Paul Lawrie 69-72-74: 215 Prayad Marksaeng 71-74-71: 216 David Frost 72-71-73: 216 Darren Clarke 68-74-74: 216 Jerry Smith 71-74-72: 217

GOLF

Thursday’s qualifying; race Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. (Car number in parentheses) 1. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 183.424 mph. 2. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 183.069. 3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 182.933. 4. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 182.766. 5. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 182.741. 6. (41) Daniel Suarez, Ford, 182.710. 7. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 182.679. 8. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 182.667. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 182.661. 10. (8) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 182.506. 11. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 182.414. 12. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 182.346. 13. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 182.322. 14. (19) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 182.297. 15. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 182.131. 16. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 182.082. 17. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 181.830. 18. (6) Ryan Newman, Ford, 181.598. 19. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 181.452. 20. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.372. 21. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 181.324. 22. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 181.311. 23. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 181.311. 24. (47) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 180.971. 25. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 180.953. 26. (36) Matt Tifft, Ford, 180.270. 27. (95) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 180.132. 28. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 180.102. 29. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 179.964. 30. (32) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 179.354. 31. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 178.489. 32. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 177.754. 33. (52) Bayley Currey, Ford, 177.416. 34. (96) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 177.223. 35. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 176.667. 36. (53) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 174.752. 37. (27) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 174.503. 38. (51) Cody Ware, Ford, 169.747. 39. (77) Quin Houff, Chevrolet, 169.030. 40. (66) Joey Gase, Toyota, 168.439.

70-72-73: 215 +5 74-67-74: 215 +5 69-71-75: 215 +5 68-72-75: 215 +5 69-71-75: 215 +5 72-68-77: 217 +7 69-72-77: 218 +8 71-71-78: 220+10

Senior PGA Championship Scores

Monaco GP Results

NASCAR Cup: 60th Annual COCA-COLA 600 Lineup

GB — — 2½ 5½ 5½ GB — ½ ½ 1½ 1½

Brian Stuard Justin Rose Matthew Fitzpatrick Abraham Ancer Nate Lashley Tim Herron Byeong Hun An Graeme McDowell

PARIS, May 25 (Xinhua): Following are the 2019 Monaco F1 Grand Prix qualifying results on Saturday: 1. Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, 1:10.166 2. Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes, 1:10.252 3. Max Verstappen, Red Bull, 1:10.641 4. Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari, 1:10.947 5. Pierre Gasly, Red Bull, 1:11.041 6. Kevin Magnussen, Haas, 1:11.109 7. Daniel Ricciardo, Renault, 1:11.218 8. Daniil Kvyat, Toro Rosso, 1:11.271 9. Carlos Sainz, McLaren, 1:11.417 10. Alexander Albon, Toro Rosso, 1:11.653Enditem

MOTOR SPORTS

BASEBALL Frontier League

Overheating, 186. 29. (20) Camden Murphy(i), Chevrolet, Front Hub, 173. 30. (36) Mason Diaz, Chevrolet, Accident, 100. 31. (1) Christopher Bell, Toyota, Accident, 90. 32. (31) Joe Nemechek(i), Toyota, Vibration, 58. 33. (15) Bayley Currey(i), Chevrolet, Electrical, 35. 34. (13) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Handling, 31. 35. (18) Timmy Hill, Toyota, Engine, 17. 36. (23) Josh Bilicki, Chevrolet, Vibration, 10. 37. (27) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, Brakes, 6. 38. (38) Chad Finchum, Toyota, Engine, 5.

At Norman, Okla. Oklahoma 1, Northwestern 0 Friday, May 24: Oklahoma 3, Northwestern 0 Saturday, May 25: Oklahoma 8, Northwestern 0 x-Sunday, May 26: Oklahoma vs. Northwestern, 1 p.m. At Seattle Washington 1, Kentucky 0 Friday, May 24: Washington 3, Kentucky 0 Saturday, May 25: Washington (49-7) vs. Kentucky (36-23), ppd. to May 26 x-Sunday, May 26: Washington vs. Kentucky, 9 p.m. At Los Angeles UCLA 1, James Madison 0 Friday, May 24: UCLA 6, James Madison 1 Saturday, May 25: UCLA 7 vs. James Madison 2 x-Sunday, May 26: UCLA vs. James Madison, 3 p.m. At Tucson, Ariz. Arizona 1, Mississippi 0 Friday, May 24: Arizona 5, Mississippi 2 Saturday, May 25: Arizona 9, Mississippi St. 1 x-Sunday, May 26: Arizona vs. Mississippi, 7 p.m.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA D.C. United 7 4 4 25 19 14 Philadelphia 7 4 3 24 24 15 New York 6 5 3 21 21 16 Montreal 6 6 3 21 17 23 Atlanta 6 5 2 20 14 11 New York City FC 4 1 7 19 16 13 Toronto FC 5 5 2 17 22 20 Chicago 4 5 5 17 21 18 Columbus 5 8 1 16 12 19 Orlando City 4 7 3 15 19 21 New England 3 8 4 13 15 32 Cincinnati 3 9 2 11 11 25 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 10 1 4 34 36 11 Seattle 7 1 5 26 22 14 LA Galaxy 8 5 1 25 19 17 Houston 7 3 2 23 20 13 Minnesota United 6 4 3 21 21 18 Real Salt Lake 6 6 1 19 20 21 FC Dallas 5 6 3 18 18 19 Vancouver 4 6 5 17 16 19 San Jose 4 6 2 14 18 23 Portland 4 6 2 14 17 23 Sporting K.C. 2 4 5 11 20 20 Colorado 1 9 2 5 17 30 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday New York City FC 1, Chicago 1, tie Vancouver 2, FC Dallas 1 D.C. United 1, New England 1, tie New York 2, Cincinnati 0 Portland 3, Philadelphia 1 Minnesota United 1, Houston 0 Columbus at Colorado, late Sunday Seattle at Sporting K.C., 5 p.m. San Jose at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m.

HORSE RACING

Toronto 100, Milwaukee 94

Middleton 5-13 0-0 14, Antetokounmpo 7-18 5-10 21, Lopez 5-12 8-9 18, Bledsoe 3-9 1-2 8, Brogdon 3-6 2-2 10, Ilyasova 3-7 5-6 13, Hill 4-10 1-2 10, Connaughton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-75 22-31 94. Leonard 9-22 8-11 27, Siakam 7-17 3-4 18, M.Gasol 2-3 0-0 6, Lowry 6-10 2-2 17, Green 0-4 0-0 0, Powell 3-5 2-3 9, Ibaka 4-7 1-2 9, VanVleet 5-6 0-0 14. Totals 36-74 16-22 100. Milwaukee 31 19 26 18— 94 Toronto 18 25 28 29—100 3-Point Goals: Milwaukee 12-34 (Middleton 4-8, Brogdon 2-5, Antetokounmpo 2-5, Ilyasova 2-5, Bledsoe 1-3, Hill 1-5, Lopez 0-3), Toronto 12-27 (VanVleet 4-5, Lowry 3-4, M.Gasol 2-2, Powell 1-1, Siakam 1-3, Leonard 1-8, Green 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 42 (Antetokounmpo 11), Toronto 38 (Leonard 17). Assists: Milwaukee 19 (Bledsoe 7), Toronto 20 (Lowry 8). Total Fouls: Milwaukee 22, Toronto 24. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Mike Budenholzer. A: 20,478 (19,800).

PRO SOCCER

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

Thunderstorms with damaging winds and flooding will sweep from the Ohio Valley to the mid-Atlantic today, while record heat bakes the South. More severe weather will target the Plains as a rare May storm brings rain, thunderstorms and mountain snow to California. Most of the state will be cooler than Fairbanks, Alaska. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND S 4-8 mph

80

Peoria 77/64

74

Macomb 76/63 Bloomington 76/63

Kirksville 78/66

Quincy 78/66

55

Urbana 77/64

Decatur 77/63 Springfield 57 77/65 Effingham 70 55 80/65

35

Columbia Kansas City 70 82/67 78/68 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 81/68 City 85/61 83/67 Union 55 82/66 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 83/67 83/65 Farmington 82/64 Cape Girardeau 86/67 Joplin 44 Springfield 83/68 83/67 West Plains Poplar Bluff 86/66 55 83/65

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Sat. Change

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Sat. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

28.10 -1.36 31.69 +0.64 31.72 +1.19 27.87 +0.62 32.64 +1.21

16 24.49 -0.75 15 23.33 -0.09 25 33.54 -0.16 26 35.04 +0.69 18 30.07 +1.02 419 429.53 +1.35 21 33.46 +1.41 30 39.91 +1.46 27 40.32 +1.19 32 41.04 +0.50 20 18 14

25.25 +0.26 23.85 +0.18 25.02 +0.19

15 16 24 15 40

6.48 -1.54 19.35 +0.13 36.23 +1.50 5.05

43.66 -0.80 358.90 376.71 527.55 659.18 732.98 682.28 918.01 863.58 601.34 410.10 618.74 447.89

Forecast Temperature

100

87 80

78 70

92

70 60

58

54

40

S

M

90

82

70

Average High 88

88

81

-0.02 +0.03 +0.42 +0.03 -0.21 +0.46 -0.21 +0.25 +0.46 -0.06 +1.74 +0.91

72

72

68

Average Low

82

82

83

64

65

75 70

70 63

59

59

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

Detroit 74/56

Toronto 72/49

Chicago 69/55

San Francisco 58/52 Los Angeles 60/51

New York 87/65 Washington 90/70

Kansas City 78/68 Atlanta 96/72 El Paso 93/62

Houston 90/73

Chihuahua 95/60

Miami 89/78

Monterrey 95/72

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Moderate - 21 Absent High - 61 High - 18450 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Saturday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

16 115 90 146 134

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

78° 8 a.m.

87° noon

80° 4 p.m.

77° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

81/55/pc 80/47/s 54/46/r 96/72/s 91/73/sh 91/68/t 96/71/s 70/50/c 83/62/pc 99/75/s 85/66/pc 95/68/s 69/55/t 83/66/t 73/54/t 89/72/pc 90/68/s 75/47/t 78/64/t 89/74/s 74/56/t 88/59/pc 87/73/s 90/73/pc 79/66/t 78/68/t 73/53/pc 91/69/s

76/52/s 76/44/s 58/47/c 95/73/s 91/76/pc 84/67/pc 95/71/s 71/52/sh 70/54/s 98/76/s 83/67/pc 93/69/s 73/61/t 83/70/pc 75/61/pc 87/74/pc 93/70/s 70/42/pc 82/64/t 87/74/s 71/57/t 80/53/s 87/74/s 90/76/pc 82/69/pc 83/69/t 73/60/pc 89/69/s

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

60/51/r 89/71/pc 92/73/s 89/78/s 64/50/pc 75/55/s 97/70/s 94/69/s 92/75/s 87/65/pc 83/68/pc 81/67/t 95/71/s 90/67/pc 84/62/s 76/58/t 75/54/pc 74/56/pc 61/51/t 73/50/pc 89/73/sh 63/58/r 58/52/t 70/55/pc 96/76/s 83/56/s 90/70/t 81/66/pc

66/53/s 90/73/pc 90/73/s 89/76/s 60/52/r 61/51/r 98/68/s 93/70/s 91/75/s 79/60/s 83/69/c 86/66/t 96/72/s 83/63/s 78/59/s 78/62/pc 69/45/pc 76/55/sh 70/52/pc 61/50/sh 89/75/pc 65/56/pc 64/53/pc 79/55/pc 94/76/s 78/52/s 85/68/pc 83/68/c

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

National Extremes

Today’s Air Quality

High: 102 Jesup, Ga.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

5:42 a.m. 1:51 a.m.

8:16 p.m. 12:39 p.m.

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

May 26

Jun 3

Jun 10

Jun 17

Saturday in the 48 contiguous states Low: 18 Sunset Crater, Ariz.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

49 T

Statistics through 5 p.m. Saturday Temperature High/low 90°/72° Normal high/low 79°/60° Last year high/low 88°/71° Record high 93° (1953) Record low 38° (1925) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Sat. 0.00” Month to date (normal) 5.68” (3.74”) Year to date (normal) 24.56” (15.39”) Record for this date 2.47” (1968)

Montreal 73/50

Minneapolis 75/55

Denver 75/47

-5.32

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Winnipeg 55/33 Billings 69/48

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Periods of clouds and sunshine today with a shower or thunderstorm around; humid. Tonight will have some patchy clouds and it will be warm and humid. Breezy and very warm tomorrow with partial sun.

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

Seattle 70/55

88° 70° 88° 70° 82° 63° 75° 59°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Location

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

67/52/c 80/63/pc 111/77/pc 95/81/t 78/56/sh 68/57/c 67/48/c 92/69/pc 87/77/pc 62/47/pc 85/81/t 81/59/s 69/43/c 69/50/pc 80/52/s 106/76/s

62/49/c 82/63/pc 107/75/pc 94/79/t 81/58/s 68/52/t 68/42/pc 94/70/pc 86/76/sh 58/43/r 87/78/t 83/61/pc 69/45/c 66/48/c 83/55/pc 109/82/c

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

80/56/pc 73/50/pc 71/53/pc 85/73/pc 73/56/r 104/78/pc 71/56/c 79/69/s 67/59/r 87/78/pc 59/35/pc 86/66/s 73/53/s 87/69/pc 72/49/pc 70/51/pc

81/58/pc 60/44/c 67/58/pc 84/74/s 75/59/pc 107/77/pc 69/49/c 82/70/s 68/58/t 87/77/pc 63/37/c 71/53/r 65/51/s 87/71/s 70/52/pc 69/54/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


FOR THE RECORD

05.26.2019 • Sunday • M 4

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Odds Underdog American League INDIANS............... -$135......................Rays TWINS .................. -$240............. White Sox ASTROS................ -$185.................Red Sox Yankees ............... -$150.................ROYALS ANGELS................ -$160................ Rangers ATHLETICS ........... -$155...............Mariners National League NATIONALS .......... -$145................. Marlins Dodgers ............... -$158................PIRATES BREWERS............. -$152..................Phillies CUBS.................... -$155......................Reds Dbacks ................. -$115................. GIANTS CARDS.................. -$142.................. Braves Interleague Padres ................. -$128.............BLUE JAYS METS.................... -$175................... Tigers ROCKIES............... -$270..................Orioles NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Stanley Cup Monday BRUINS .......... -$160/+$140 ..............Blues Odds to win series: BRUINS -$160 vs. Blues +$140 SOCCER English Football League Championship Monday Wembley Stadium Aston Villa ........... +$120 Derby................... +$230 Draw: +$225 Over/under: 2.5 goals UEFA Europa League Final Wednesday Baku, Azerbaijan Chelsea ................ +$135 Arsenal ................ +$200 Draw: +$230 Over/under: 2.5 goals June 7 France Odds to win the FIFA Women’s World Cup 40/1 USA 5/2 Italy 50/1 France 7/2 China Germany 5/1 South Korea 50/1 England 6/1 New Zealand 60/1 Netherlands 10/1 Argentina 100/1 Japan 12/1 Chile 100/1 Brazil 16/1 Scotland 100/1 Australia 18/1 Cameroon 200/1 Sweden 20/1 Nigeria 200/1 Spain 20/1 South Africa 200/1 Canada 28/1 Jamaica 250/1 Norway 30/1 Thailand 250/1 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX : Recalled LHP Manny Banuelos from 10-day IL. Placed C Welington Castillo on 7-day IL. Recalled C Seby Zavala from Charlotte. OAKLAND ATHLETICS: Designated RHP Fernando Rodney for assignment. Selected LFP Wei-Chung Wang from Las Vegas (PCL). SEATTLE MARINERS: Recalled IF Kyle Seager from 60-day IL. Optioned INF Dylan Moore to Tacoma (WA. Placed Sam Tuivailala to 60-day (IL). National League CHICAGO CUBS: Recalled LHP Tim Collins and RHP Dillon Maples from Iowa. Optioned RHP James Norwood and OF Mark Zagunis to Iowa. NEW YORK METS : Recalled LHP Jason Vargas from IL. Optioned IF Luis Guillorne to Syracuse (IL). SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS: Designated OF Mac Williamson for assignment. Placed RHP Trevor Gott on the 10-day IL. Selected OF Mike Yastrzemski from Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Dereck Rodriguez from Sacramento (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS: Aquired RHP George Kontos’ contract from Long Island (AL). Returned RHP Cody Mincey to the active list. Recalled RHP James Bourque from Harrisburg. Optioned RHP Joe Ross to Fresno (Calif.) Recalled from rehab OF Andrew Stevenson and optioned him to Fresno (Calif). American Association FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS: Released RHP Reese Gregory. Signed RHP Cole Christensen. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS: Signed RHP Eric Morell LHP; Braulio Torres-Perez signed with the Pericos de Puebla (Mexican League). JOLIET SLAMMERS: Released RHP Justin Curry, 3B Frank Podkul and RHP Miko Sklar. KANSAS CITY T-BONES: Sold the contract of RHP Randall Delgado to the New York Yankees. LINCOLN SALTDOGS: Released RHP Colby Blueberg. MILWAUKEE MILKMEN: Released LHP Kevin Matthews. QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS: Transfered INF Freudis Nova from extended spring training. Recalled C Ruben Castro from the 7-day IL. Transferred OF Marty Costes to Fayetteville (CL) and OF Ramiro Rodriguez to extended spring training. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS: Signed C Trey Fulton and OF General McArthur. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES: Signed C Cody Young. Canadian Football League BRITISH COLUMBIA LIONS: Signed PK Sergio Castillo. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS: Signed OL Jamar McGloster and Israel Helms.

Favorite

PRO BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs

WNBA

EASTERN Atlanta Connecticut Indiana Chicago New York Washington WESTERN Minnesota Seattle Las Vegas Los Angeles Dallas Phoenix

W L Pct 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 W L Pct 1 0 1.000 1 0 1.000 0 0 .000 0 0 .000 0 1 .000 0 1 .000 Friday Atlanta 76, Dallas 72 Indiana 81, New York 80 Saturday Seattle 77, Phoenix 68 Connecticut 84, Washington 69 Minnesota 89, Chicago 71 Sunday Los Angeles at Las Vegas, 7 p.m.

GB — — — 1 1 1 GB — — ½ ½ 1 1

TOURNAMENTS Southeastern Conference Mississippi 5, Georgia 3 Vanderbilt 13, LSU 4

NCAA Division I Softball Super Regionals

(Best-of-3; x-if necessary) Host school is home team for Game 1; visiting school is home team for Game 2; coin flip determines home team for Game 3 At Tallahassee, Fla. Oklahoma State 2, Florida State 1 Thursday, May 23: Oklahoma State 3, Florida State 1, 9 innings Friday, May 24: Florida State 4, Oklahoma State 1 Saturday, May 25: Oklahoma State 3, Florida State 2 At Tuscaloosa, Ala. Alabama 2, Texas 1 Thursday, May 23: Alabama 3, Texas 0 Friday, May 24: Texas 7, Alabama 5 Saturday, May 25: Alabama 8, Texas 5 At Gainesville, Fla. Florida 1, Tennessee 1 Friday, May 24: Florida 3, Tennessee 0 Saturday, May 25: Tennessee 3, Florida 2 Sunday, May 26: Florida vs. Tennessee, 1 p.m. At Minneapolis Minnesota 2, LSU 0 Friday, May 24: Minnesota 5, LSU 3 Saturday, May 25: Minnesota 3, LSU 0 At Norman, Okla. Oklahoma 2, Northwestern 0 Friday, May 24: Oklahoma 3, Northwestern 0 Saturday, May 25: Oklahoma 8, Northwestern 0 At Seattle Washington 1, Kentucky 0 Friday, May 24: Washington 3, Kentucky 0 Saturday, May 25: Washington (49-7) vs. Kentucky (36-23), ppd. to May 26 x-Sunday, May 26: Washington vs. Kentucky, 9 p.m. At Los Angeles UCLA 2, James Madison 0 Friday, May 24: UCLA 6, James Madison 1 Saturday, May 25: UCLA 7, James Madison 2 x-Sunday, May 26: UCLA vs. James Madison, 3 p.m. At Tucson, Ariz. Arizona 2, Mississippi 0 Friday, May 24: Arizona 5, Mississippi 2 Saturday, May 25: Arizona 9, Mississippi St. 1

MLS

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA D.C. United 7 4 4 25 19 14 Philadelphia 7 4 3 24 24 15 New York 6 5 3 21 21 16 Montreal 6 6 3 21 17 23 Atlanta 6 5 2 20 14 11 New York City FC 4 1 7 19 16 13 Toronto FC 5 5 2 17 22 20 Chicago 4 5 5 17 21 18 Columbus 5 9 1 16 14 22 Orlando City 4 7 3 15 19 21 New England 3 8 4 13 15 32 Cincinnati 3 9 2 11 11 25 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 10 1 4 34 36 11 Seattle 7 1 5 26 22 14 LA Galaxy 8 5 1 25 19 17 Houston 7 3 2 23 20 13 Minnesota United 6 4 3 21 21 18 Real Salt Lake 6 6 1 19 20 21 FC Dallas 5 6 3 18 18 19 Vancouver 4 6 5 17 16 19 San Jose 4 6 2 14 18 23 Portland 4 6 2 14 17 23 Sporting K.C. 2 4 5 11 20 20 Colorado 2 9 2 8 20 32 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Saturday New York City FC 1, Chicago 1, tie Vancouver 2, FC Dallas 1 D.C. United 1, New England 1, tie New York 2, Cincinnati 0 Portland 3, Philadelphia 1 Minnesota United 1, Houston 0 Colorado 3, Columbus 2 Sunday Seattle at Sporting K.C., 5 p.m. San Jose at Toronto FC, 6:30 p.m.

Fairmount Park

SECOND $9,000, mdn spl wt, 3YO up, 6f, clear. 2 (2) Tap’s Big Shot (J.Diego), 2.80, 2.10No Tix 3 (3) Close Behind (J.Simpson), 3.80, No Tix Off 8:00. Time 1:14.53. Fast. Also Ran: Honeydolist, Bee Attack. DQ: Close Behind (1-2). $1 Daily Double (4-2) paid $2.10. Exacta (2-3) paid $6.40. $1 Trifecta (2-3-1) paid $6.00. THIRD $5,800, cl, 3YO up F&M, 6f, clear. 5 (5) May Be Suspect (J.Simpson), 14.40, 7.80, 3.60 2 (2) Pink for Me (R.Arrieta), 3.80, 2.40 4 (4) Sing Kitty Sing (J.Molina, Jr.), 2.40 Off 8:42. Time 1:13.89. Fast. Also Ran: At the Wire, Just Sky, Longway Home. $0.5 Pick 3 (4-2-5) 3 Correct Paid $9.35. $1 Daily Double (2-5) paid $11.50. Exacta (5-2) paid $60.40. $0.1 Superfecta (5-2-4-1) paid $12.86. $1 Trifecta (5-2-4) paid $57.60.

East Lake Erie Schaumburg Windy City Joliet Washington West River City Evansville Florence Gateway Southern Illinois

W L Pct. 9 5 .643 9 5 .643 7 8 .467 4 11 .267 4 11 .267 W L Pct. 9 6 .600 8 6 .571 8 6 .571 7 7 .500 7 7 .500 Saturday Southern Illinois 6, Florence 1 Gateway at Washington, 6:05 p.m. Schaumburg 6, Joliet 5 Windy City 4, Lake Erie 2 Washington 8, Gateway 2 Evansville 15, River City 1

FOURTH $9,000, mdn spl wt, 3YO up, 6f, clear. 5 (5) Tudors Charge (J.Simpson), 8.20, 6.00, No Tix 3 (3) B Salty (J.Diego), 6.40, No Tix Off 9:09. Time 1:13.27. Fast. Also Ran: Lookin’ At Mike, A P Fireball. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-5-5) 3 Correct Paid $9.30. $1 Daily Double (5-5) paid $42.70. Exacta (5-3) paid $47.80. $1 Trifecta (5-3-1) paid $49.90.

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST TODAY

TONIGHT

Clouds and sun, a t-storm WIND S 6-12 mph

Partly cloudy

81°

68°

MONDAY

TUESDAY

GOLF

Thursday’s qualifying; race Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. (Car number in parentheses) 1. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 183.424 mph. 2. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 183.069. 3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 182.933. 4. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 182.766. 5. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 182.741. 6. (41) Daniel Suarez, Ford, 182.710. 7. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 182.679. 8. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 182.667. 9. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr, Ford, 182.661. 10. (8) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 182.506. 11. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 182.414. 12. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 182.346. 13. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 182.322. 14. (19) Martin Truex Jr, Toyota, 182.297. 15. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 182.131. 16. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 182.082. 17. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 181.830. 18. (6) Ryan Newman, Ford, 181.598. 19. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 181.452. 20. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 181.372. 21. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 181.324. 22. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 181.311. 23. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 181.311. 24. (47) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 180.971. 25. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 180.953. 26. (36) Matt Tifft, Ford, 180.270. 27. (95) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 180.132. 28. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 180.102. 29. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 179.964. 30. (32) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 179.354. 31. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 178.489. 32. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 177.754. 33. (52) Bayley Currey, Ford, 177.416. 34. (96) Parker Kligerman, Toyota, 177.223. 35. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 176.667.

GB — — 2½ 5½ 5½ GB — ½ ½ 1½ 1½

Area holes in one

Old Hickory: Denny Roodman, hole No. 5, 111 yards, 9-iron. Birch Creek: Mark Hartman, hole No. 16, 115 yards, pitching wedge, May 25. Forest Hills: Joe O’Donnell, hole No. 6 (Championship), 174 yards, 5-iron, May 24.

THURSDAY

Partly sunny and Warm with some Cloudy, a t-storm warm sun or two WIND WIND WIND SW 8-16 mph SW 10-20 mph SSW 10-20 mph

Pleasant with some sun WIND WNW 7-14 mph

LPGA Tour: Pure Silk Championship

Saturday At Kingsmill Resrt, River Course Williamsburg, Va. Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,430; Par 71 Third Round Nasa: Hataoka 68-67-65: 200 Bronte: Law 65-68-67: 200 Brooke: M.: Henderson 66-71-64: 201 Jennifer: Song 65-68-68: 201 Carlota: Ciganda 69-65-68: 202 Madelene: Sagstrom 68-66-69: 203 Wei-Ling: Hsu 72-67-65: 204 Katherine: Perry 66-73-66: 205 Caroline: Masson 69-69-67: 205 Angel: Yin 67-69-69: 205 Ashleigh: Buhai 68-67-70: 205 Charley: Hull 68-69-69: 206 Peiyun: Chien 69-67-70: 206 Azahara: Munoz 71-69-67: 207 Morgan: Pressel 71-69-67: 207 Kendall: Dye 70-70-67: 207 Haeji: Kang 70-70-67: 207 Gaby: Lopez 68-72-67: 207 Mi: Jung: Hur 68-71-68: 207 Mi: Hyang: Lee 68-70-69: 207 68-69-70: 207 Brittany: Lincicome Jasmine: Suwannapura 66-71-70: 207 Haru: Nomura 69-67-71: 207 Nelly: Korda 69-66-72: 207

PGA Tour: Colonial

Saturday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $7.3 million Yardage: 7,209; Par 70 Third Round Kevin Na 70-62-69: 201 Mackenzie Hughes 68-70-65: 203 C.T. Pan 68-67-68: 203 Jordan Spieth 65-70-68: 203 Jim Furyk 69-66-68: 203 Tony Finau 64-68-71: 203 Charley Hoffman 70-71-63: 204 Austin Cook 72-67-65: 204 Ryan Palmer 68-69-68: 205 Nick Watney 67-68-70: 205 Jonas Blixt 67-64-74: 205 Andrew Putnam 69-70-67: 206 Scott Piercy 70-68-68: 206 Tyrrell Hatton 71-66-69: 206 Peter Uihlein 67-73-67: 207 Brian Gay 69-71-67: 207 Emiliano Grillo 69-70-68: 207 Kevin Tway 68-70-69: 207 Roger Sloan 65-72-70: 207 Jason Dufner 67-68-72: 207 Rory Sabbatini 68-66-73: 207 Matt Every 70-69-69: 208

-9 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

WEDNESDAY

Saturday At Oak Hill Country Club Rochester, N.Y. Purse: $3.25 million Yardage: 6,896; Par 70 Third Round Paul Broadhurst 70-67-67: 204 Retief Goosen 67-72-67: 206 Ken Tanigawa 67-74-66: 207 Scott McCarron 72-69-67: 208 Corey Pavin 69-74-66: 209 John Riegger 69-71-69: 209 Esteban Toledo 70-67-74: 211 Jesper Parnevik 68-74-70: 212 Mike Goodes 72-69-71: 212 Jerry Kelly 70-70-72: 212 Kirk Triplett 70-71-72: 213 Scott Parel 66-73-74: 213 Duffy Waldorf 69-74-71: 214 Rocco Mediate 71-71-72: 214 Taichi Teshima 69-77-69: 215 Vijay Singh 72-73-70: 215 Bob Sowards 71-73-71: 215 Tommy Armour III 70-73-72: 215 Paul Lawrie 69-72-74: 215 Prayad Marksaeng 71-74-71: 216 David Frost 72-71-73: 216 Darren Clarke 68-74-74: 216 Jerry Smith 71-74-72: 217

Monaco GP Results

NASCAR Cup: 60th Annual COCA-COLA 600 Lineup

74-67-68: 209 -1 72-69-68: 209 -1 67-73-69: 209 -1 69-71-69: 209 -1 71-68-70: 209 -1 73-65-71: 209 -1 71-67-71: 209 -1 68-70-71: 209 -1 73-69-68: 210 E 72-69-69: 210 E 70-69-71: 210 E 70-69-71: 210 E 67-72-71: 210 E 71-68-71: 210 E 74-67-70: 211 +1 67-74-70: 211 +1 71-70-70: 211 +1 71-70-70: 211 +1 69-72-70: 211 +1 69-71-71: 211 +1 69-71-71: 211 +1 70-69-72: 211 +1 68-71-72: 211 +1 70-68-73: 211 +1 67-69-75: 211 +1 69-71-72: 212 +2 72-69-71: 212 +2 69-71-72: 212 +2 67-73-72: 212 +2 73-66-73: 212 +2 72-70-71: 213 +3 75-67-71: 213 +3 72-70-71: 213 +3 69-73-71: 213 +3 73-69-71: 213 +3 70-71-72: 213 +3 74-67-72: 213 +3 71-71-72: 214 +4 71-71-72: 214 +4 73-69-72: 214 +4 70-72-72: 214 +4 70-72-72: 214 +4 74-67-73: 214 +4 70-72-73: 215 +5 74-67-74: 215 +5 69-71-75: 215 +5 68-72-75: 215 +5 69-71-75: 215 +5 72-68-77: 217 +7 69-72-77: 218 +8 71-71-78: 220+10

Senior PGA Championship Scores

PARIS, May 25 (Xinhua): Following are the 2019 Monaco F1 Grand Prix qualifying results on Saturday: 1. Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes, 1:10.166 2. Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes, 1:10.252 3. Max Verstappen, Red Bull, 1:10.641 4. Sebastian Vettel, Ferrari, 1:10.947 5. Pierre Gasly, Red Bull, 1:11.041 6. Kevin Magnussen, Haas, 1:11.109 7. Daniel Ricciardo, Renault, 1:11.218 8. Daniil Kvyat, Toro Rosso, 1:11.271 9. Carlos Sainz, McLaren, 1:11.417 10. Alexander Albon, Toro Rosso, 1:11.653Enditem

MOTOR SPORTS

BASEBALL Frontier League

Saturday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. (Car number in parentheses) 1. (3) Tyler Reddick, Chevrolet, 200. 2. (6) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (9) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Toyota, 200. 4. (10) Noah Gragson , Chevrolet, 200. 5. (35) Justin Haley , Chevrolet, 200. 6. (8) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 200. 7. (16) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 200. 8. (12) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 200. 9. (7) Austin Cindric, Ford, 200. 10. (5) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 200. 11. (37) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 200. 12. (14) John Hunter Nemechek , Chevrolet, 200. 13. (17) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 200. 14. (19) Gray Gaulding, Chevrolet, 200. 15. (32) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 200. 16. (28) Ray Black II, Chevrolet, 200. 17. (30) Garrett Smithley, Chevrolet, 200. 18. (21) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 199. 19. (11) Chase Briscoe , Ford, 199. 20. (25) Brandon Brown , Chevrolet, 198. 21. (26) Joey Gase, Toyota, 198. 22. (29) David Starr, Chevrolet, 198. 23. (34) Vinnie Miller, Chevrolet, 197. 24. (2) Cole Custer, Ford, 196. 25. (24) Ronnie Bassett Jr, Chevrolet, 195. 26. (33) Matt Mills, Chevrolet, 194. 27. (22) Josh Williams, Chevrolet, Suspension, 187. 28. (4) Austin Dillon(i), Chevrolet, Overheating, 186. 29. (20) Camden Murphy(i), Chevrolet, Front Hub, 173. 30. (36) Mason Diaz, Chevrolet, Accident, 100. 31. (1) Christopher Bell, Toyota, Accident, 90. 32. (31) Joe Nemechek(i), Toyota, Vibration, 58. 33. (15) Bayley Currey(i), Chevrolet, Electrical, 35. 34. (13) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Handling, 31. 35. (18) Timmy Hill, Toyota, Engine, 17. 36. (23) Josh Bilicki, Chevrolet, Vibration, 10. 37. (27) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, Brakes, 6. 38. (38) Chad Finchum, Toyota, Engine, 5.

Saturday’s College Baseball Scores

PRO SOCCER

Saturday FIRST $10,000, alc opt cl, 3YO up F&M, 1mi, clear. 4 (4) Enchilada (J.Simpson), 3.60, 2.40No Tix 3 (3) Caliche Lane (A.Ortiz), 3.00, No Tix Off 7:32. Time 1:42.17. Fast. Also Ran: Phantasmic. Exacta (4-3) paid $5.00.

NASCAR Xfinity Cup: 38th Annual Alsco 300

COLLEGES

SEVENTH $5,800, cl, 3YO up, 6f, clear. 2 (2) Yaba Daba Doo (G.Retana), 3.80, 2.80, 2.20 1 (1) Alshujaa (V.Santiago) 3.20, 2.80 3 (3) To the Top N Back (J.Simpson) ,3.80 Off 10:27. Time 1:13.37. Fast. Scratched: Wildwood’s Afleet. Also Ran: Raisedonrocknroll, Barton Attack, Aqtaar. $0.5 Pick 4 (5-4/5-1-2/7) 4 Correct Paid $24.05. $0.5 Pick 3 (4/5-1-2/7) 3 Correct Paid $4.50. $1 Daily Double (1-2) paid $3.20. Exacta (2-1) paid $8.60. $0.1 Superfecta (2-1-3-6) paid $4.20. $1 Trifecta (2-1-3) paid $13.60. Attendance unavailable. ITW $9,241. IST $107,948.18. Handle $81,879.5. Total Handle $199,068.

Brandt Snedeker Martin Laird J.J. Henry Kevin Streelman David Toms Martin Kaymer Daniel Berger Josh Teater Dominic Bozzelli Billy Horschel Tom Hoge Adam Long Chesson Hadley Russell Knox Vaughn Taylor Jimmy Walker Joaquin Niemann Francesco Molinari Sam Burns Danny Lee Tyrone Van Aswegen Brian Harman Anirban Lahiri Max Homa Trey Mullinax Ben Silverman Kyoung-Hoon Lee Bill Haas Scott Brown Brice Garnett Talor Gooch Ben Crane Chris Stroud Corey Conners Aaron Baddeley Beau Hossler Peter Malnati Mike Weir Branden Grace Ian Poulter Ted Potter, Jr. Cameron Champ Jhonattan Vegas Brian Stuard Justin Rose Matthew Fitzpatrick Abraham Ancer Nate Lashley Tim Herron Byeong Hun An Graeme McDowell

36. (53) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 174.752. 37. (27) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 174.503. 38. (51) Cody Ware, Ford, 169.747. 39. (77) Quin Houff, Chevrolet, 169.030. 40. (66) Joey Gase, Toyota, 168.439.

Sunday Joliet at Schaumburg, 1 p.m. Lake Erie at Windy City, 2:05 p.m. Gateway at Washington, 4:35 p.m. Southern Illinois at Florence, 4:35 p.m. Evansville at River City, 5:05 p.m. Monday Joliet at Schaumburg, 1 p.m.

SIXTH $10,000, alc opt cl, 3YO up F&M, 6f, clear. 1 (1) W W Put and Take (V.Santiago), 3.00, 2.40, No Tix 5 (5) Mary Jeans Wildcat (J.Molina, Jr.) ,3.00, No Tix. Off 10:01. Time 1:13.52. Fast. Also Ran: Ghaaleb’s Sicilian, Ruler Runaway. $0.5 Pick 3 (5-4/5-1) 3 Correct Paid $9.35. $1 Daily Double (5-1) paid $2.90. Exacta (1-5) paid $5.60. $1 Trifecta (1-5-3) paid $8.10.

HORSE RACING

Toronto 100, Milwaukee 94

Middleton 5-13 0-0 14, Antetokounmpo 7-18 5-10 21, Lopez 5-12 8-9 18, Bledsoe 3-9 1-2 8, Brogdon 3-6 2-2 10, Ilyasova 3-7 5-6 13, Hill 4-10 1-2 10, Connaughton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-75 22-31 94. Leonard 9-22 8-11 27, Siakam 7-17 3-4 18, M.Gasol 2-3 0-0 6, Lowry 6-10 2-2 17, Green 0-4 0-0 0, Powell 3-5 2-3 9, Ibaka 4-7 1-2 9, VanVleet 5-6 0-0 14. Totals 36-74 16-22 100. Milwaukee 31 19 26 18— 94 Toronto 18 25 28 29—100 3-Point Goals: Milwaukee 12-34 (Middleton 4-8, Brogdon 2-5, Antetokounmpo 2-5, Ilyasova 2-5, Bledsoe 1-3, Hill 1-5, Lopez 0-3), Toronto 12-27 (VanVleet 4-5, Lowry 3-4, M.Gasol 2-2, Powell 1-1, Siakam 1-3, Leonard 1-8, Green 0-4). Fouled Out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 42 (Antetokounmpo 11), Toronto 38 (Leonard 17). Assists: Milwaukee 19 (Bledsoe 7), Toronto 20 (Lowry 8). Total Fouls: Milwaukee 22, Toronto 24. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Mike Budenholzer. A: 20,478 (19,800).

FIFTH $7,000, cl, 3YO up, 4f, clear. 5 (4) Thisduckcanfly (V.Santiago), 3.80, 2.80, 2.20 1 (1) Wildcat Lite (J.Diego) 4.60, 2.40 3 (3) Mucho Macho Dan (J.Molina, Jr.), 2.60 Off 9:36. Time 0:46.61. Fast. Scratched: Commander’s Castle. Also Ran: Whiskey Runner, What’s a Yat, Legs On Fire. $0.5 Pick 3 (5-5-4/5) 3 Correct Paid $25.45. $1 Daily Double (5-5) paid $7.30. Exacta (5-1) paid $10.00. $0.1 Superfecta (5-1-3-7) paid $2.63. $1 Trifecta (5-1-3) paid $7.60.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D9

Thunderstorms with damaging winds and flooding will sweep from the Ohio Valley to the mid-Atlantic today, while record heat bakes the South. More severe weather will target the Plains as a rare May storm brings rain, thunderstorms and mountain snow to California. Most of the state will be cooler than Fairbanks, Alaska. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND S 4-8 mph

80

Peoria 77/64

74

Macomb 76/63 Bloomington 76/63

Kirksville 78/66

Quincy 78/66

55

Urbana 77/64

Decatur 77/63 Springfield 57 77/65 Effingham 70 55 80/65

35

Columbia Kansas City 70 82/67 78/68 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 81/68 City 85/61 83/67 Union 55 82/66 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 83/67 83/65 Farmington 82/64 Cape Girardeau 86/67 Joplin 44 Springfield 83/68 83/67 West Plains Poplar Bluff 86/66 55 83/65

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Sat. Change

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Sat. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

28.10 -1.36 31.69 +0.64 31.72 +1.19 27.87 +0.62 32.64 +1.21

16 24.49 -0.75 15 23.33 -0.09 25 33.54 -0.16 26 35.04 +0.69 18 30.07 +1.02 419 429.53 +1.35 21 33.46 +1.41 30 39.91 +1.46 27 40.32 +1.19 32 41.04 +0.50 20 18 14

25.25 +0.26 23.85 +0.18 25.02 +0.19

15 16 24 15 40

6.48 -1.54 19.35 +0.13 36.23 +1.50 5.05

43.66 -0.80 358.90 376.71 527.55 659.18 732.98 682.28 918.01 863.58 601.34 410.10 618.74 447.89

Forecast Temperature

100

87 80

78 70

92

70 60

58

54

40

S

M

90

82

70

Average High 88

88

81

-0.02 +0.03 +0.42 +0.03 -0.21 +0.46 -0.21 +0.25 +0.46 -0.06 +1.74 +0.91

72

72

68

Average Low

82

82

83

64

65

75 70

70 63

59

59

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

Detroit 74/56

Toronto 72/49

Chicago 69/55

San Francisco 58/52 Los Angeles 60/51

New York 87/65 Washington 90/70

Kansas City 78/68 Atlanta 96/72 El Paso 93/62

Houston 90/73

Chihuahua 95/60

Miami 89/78

Monterrey 95/72

Cold front

Warm front

Stationary front

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Flurries

Snow

Ice

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Moderate - 21 Absent High - 61 High - 18450 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Saturday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

16 115 90 146 134

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

78° 8 a.m.

87° noon

80° 4 p.m.

77° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

81/55/pc 80/47/s 54/46/r 96/72/s 91/73/sh 91/68/t 96/71/s 70/50/c 83/62/pc 99/75/s 85/66/pc 95/68/s 69/55/t 83/66/t 73/54/t 89/72/pc 90/68/s 75/47/t 78/64/t 89/74/s 74/56/t 88/59/pc 87/73/s 90/73/pc 79/66/t 78/68/t 73/53/pc 91/69/s

76/52/s 76/44/s 58/47/c 95/73/s 91/76/pc 84/67/pc 95/71/s 71/52/sh 70/54/s 98/76/s 83/67/pc 93/69/s 73/61/t 83/70/pc 75/61/pc 87/74/pc 93/70/s 70/42/pc 82/64/t 87/74/s 71/57/t 80/53/s 87/74/s 90/76/pc 82/69/pc 83/69/t 73/60/pc 89/69/s

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

60/51/r 89/71/pc 92/73/s 89/78/s 64/50/pc 75/55/s 97/70/s 94/69/s 92/75/s 87/65/pc 83/68/pc 81/67/t 95/71/s 90/67/pc 84/62/s 76/58/t 75/54/pc 74/56/pc 61/51/t 73/50/pc 89/73/sh 63/58/r 58/52/t 70/55/pc 96/76/s 83/56/s 90/70/t 81/66/pc

66/53/s 90/73/pc 90/73/s 89/76/s 60/52/r 61/51/r 98/68/s 93/70/s 91/75/s 79/60/s 83/69/c 86/66/t 96/72/s 83/63/s 78/59/s 78/62/pc 69/45/pc 76/55/sh 70/52/pc 61/50/sh 89/75/pc 65/56/pc 64/53/pc 79/55/pc 94/76/s 78/52/s 85/68/pc 83/68/c

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

National Extremes

Today’s Air Quality

High: 102 Jesup, Ga.

airnow.gov

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Skywatch Sun Moon

Rise

Set

5:42 a.m. 1:51 a.m.

8:16 p.m. 12:39 p.m.

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

May 26

Jun 3

Jun 10

Jun 17

Saturday in the 48 contiguous states Low: 18 Sunset Crater, Ariz.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

49 T

Statistics through 5 p.m. Saturday Temperature High/low 90°/72° Normal high/low 79°/60° Last year high/low 88°/71° Record high 93° (1953) Record low 38° (1925) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Sat. 0.00” Month to date (normal) 5.68” (3.74”) Year to date (normal) 24.56” (15.39”) Record for this date 2.47” (1968)

Montreal 73/50

Minneapolis 75/55

Denver 75/47

-5.32

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Winnipeg 55/33 Billings 69/48

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Periods of clouds and sunshine today with a shower or thunderstorm around; humid. Tonight will have some patchy clouds and it will be warm and humid. Breezy and very warm tomorrow with partial sun.

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

Seattle 70/55

88° 70° 88° 70° 82° 63° 75° 59°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Location

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

67/52/c 80/63/pc 111/77/pc 95/81/t 78/56/sh 68/57/c 67/48/c 92/69/pc 87/77/pc 62/47/pc 85/81/t 81/59/s 69/43/c 69/50/pc 80/52/s 106/76/s

62/49/c 82/63/pc 107/75/pc 94/79/t 81/58/s 68/52/t 68/42/pc 94/70/pc 86/76/sh 58/43/r 87/78/t 83/61/pc 69/45/c 66/48/c 83/55/pc 109/82/c

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

80/56/pc 73/50/pc 71/53/pc 85/73/pc 73/56/r 104/78/pc 71/56/c 79/69/s 67/59/r 87/78/pc 59/35/pc 86/66/s 73/53/s 87/69/pc 72/49/pc 70/51/pc

81/58/pc 60/44/c 67/58/pc 84/74/s 75/59/pc 107/77/pc 69/49/c 82/70/s 68/58/t 87/77/pc 63/37/c 71/53/r 65/51/s 87/71/s 70/52/pc 69/54/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


SPORTS

D10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 05.26.2019

WNBA | SEASON PREVIEW

TOUGH

ROAD

TO REPEAT

ELAINE THOMPSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle’s Breanna Stewart, right, and Sue Bird helped the Storm win the WNBA title last season, but both are sidelined by injuries.

Injuries take a toll on Seattle, opening the door for a new champion DOUG FEINBERG

Associated Press

t’s been a busy offseason for the WNBA with big names changing places, a new commissioner and a few injuries to some of the sport’s greatest players. The league tips off its 23rd season with teams hoping for a shot to win the championship this year. The defending champion Seattle Storm may be extremely hard-pressed to repeat, however. Reigning MVP Breanna Stewart suffered an Achilles injury in the winter while playing for a Russian club team. She’ll be sidelined for the season. The Storm took another hit this week when it was announced that veteran point guard Sue Bird was going to be sidelined indefinitely with a knee injury. Seattle also is missing coach Dan Hughes as he battles cancer. “The most important thing to us is that Sue is healthy and strong. Based on her

I

feedback and evaluation from her longtime surgeon and our medical team, it was determined the best course of action was a scope,” Storm CEO and general manager Alisha Valavanis said.“We have confidence this will support Sue’s full recovery and we look forward to her return to the court.” Washington, Las Vegas and Los Angeles are the favorites to win the title with the Storm short-handed. The Mystics lost to the Storm in the WNBA Finals last season. The Aces added 6-foot-8 Australian star Liz Cambage last week. The runner-up for the MVP in 2018 will give Las Vegas a dynamic duo in the frontcourt, pairing her with last season’s top rookie, A’ja Wilson. The Sparks added Chiney Ogwumike from the Connecticut Sun, pairing her with her sister Nneka. The sisters will have to carry the load a little more in the early part of the season because Candace Parker is sidelined with a hamstring injury for a few weeks. Here are a few other tidbits for the upcoming season:

Missing in action Stewart, Bird and Parker aren’t the only players not playing for the early part of the season because of injury. Angel Mc-

Coughtry still is recovering from a knee injury she suffered last year. Diana Taurasi is out for at least a month while recovering from a back injury. It isn’t just injuries that are sidelining some of the league’s top players. Skylar Diggins-Smith gave birth to a baby boy this spring and hopes to return to the Dallas Wings lineup at some point this season. Maya Moore decided to take a year away from playing basketball to focus on her family and “some ministry dreams that have been stirring in my heart for many years.”

New lady in charge The WNBA has a new leader after the league hired Cathy Engelbert as its commissioner last week. The previous four leaders of the WNBA had been known as president. “Commissioner, first of all, honored and humbled to have that title. And it comes with awesome responsibility ... just really humbled,” Engelbert said. Engelbert has been CEO of Deloitte US, an accounting organization that works with Fortune 500 companies, since 2015. She was the first woman to hold that job. Engelbert won’t start until around the AllStar break in late July.

More TV options The league struck a deal to broadcast 40 of its games on the CBS Sports Network. That nearly doubles the amount of games on national television from last year. The TV channel will use local broadcast feeds for now, similar to what NBA TV does for WNBA games. The league also has a deal with ESPN to show 16 regular-season telecasts, including three on ABC. The upcoming NBA TV schedule of WNBA games has not been finalized yet, but nearly 50 games are expected to be broadcast — the same as last year.

New ownership The New York Liberty found a new owner in the offseason when the team was bought by an investment group led by Brooklyn Nets minority owner Joseph Tsai. Tsai, co-founder of the e-commerce giant Alibaba Group, bought a 49 percent interest in the Nets in April. The team played an exhibition game at Barclays Center and drew more than 4,000 fans. The team will play most of its home games this season in Westchester, but Tsai said at the exhibition game that he would welcome more games at Barclays.

TEAM CAPSULES

LAS VEGAS ACES 2018: 14-20, 9th place; missed playoffs OUTLOOK: Las Vegas added Liz Cambage, which turned the Aces into an instant title contender because they now boast one of the best frontcourts in the league. The Aces also drafted Jackie Young with the No. 1 pick to bolster their roster. The only real question might be how quickly coach Bill Laimbeer can get the team to play together with the new pieces.

Mystics forward Elena Delle Donne

WASHINGTON MYSTICS 2018: 22-12, 3rd place; lost to Seattle in WNBA Finals OUTLOOK: The Mystics reached the finals but didn’t have enough to overcome Seattle when Elena Delle Donne got hurt. Washington will try to win the franchise’s first championship. Most of last season’s team is back, and the Mystics will have Emma Meesseman for most of the season. She sat out last season while helping Belgium prepare for the FIBA World Cup.

MINNESOTA LYNX 2018: 18-16, 7th place; lost to Los Angeles in the first round OUTLOOK: Lindsay Whalen retired from the WNBA and is coaching at her alma mater, Minnesota. Maya Moore is taking the season off. Yet coach Cheryl Reeve didn’t sit idle in the offseason, acquiring guard Odyssey Sims as well as drafting Napheesa Collier. Add those two to veterans Sylvia Fowles and Seimone Augustus and the Lynx should be in the playoff hunt again this season.

SEATTLE STORM

Mercury center Brittney Griner

2018: 26-8, 1st place; won WNBA title. OUTLOOK: It’s been a rough offseason for the Storm, who lost Breanna Stewart to an Achilles injury and Sue Bird to a knee injury. The team also will be without coach Dan Hughes indefinitely as he battles cancer. The Storm might find themselves back in the lottery unless Jewell Loyd and Natasha Howard get some help from second-year guard Jordin Canada.

ATLANTA DREAM

CHICAGO SKY

2018: 23-11, 2nd place; lost in semifinals to Washington OUTLOOK: Atlanta has a talented backcourt led by Tiffany Hayes and Renee Montgomery and solid frontcourt play with Elizabeth Williams and Jessica Breland. The Dream weren’t far off from reaching the finals. Angel McCoughtry’s return from the ACL injury she suffered in August could bolster the team to make a late-season run.

2018: 13-21, 10th place; missed playoffs OUTLOOK: There’s no doubt the Sky can put a lot of points on the board, but can new coach James Wade help them on the defensive end? Chicago added firstround pick Katie Lou Samuelson to a talented core led by guards Courtney Vandersloot and Allie Quigley. Chicago also has a talented pair of second-year players in Gabby Williams and Diamond DeShields. This might be one of the most exciting teams to watch this season.

LOS ANGELES SPARKS 2018: 19-15, 7th place; lost in second round to Washington OUTLOOK: Los Angeles added Chiney Ogwumike to an already talented frontcourt, teaming her with sister Nneka. The pair out of Stanford will need to carry the load on offense for a few weeks while Candace Parker recovers from a hamstring injury. They’ll definitely have help from All-Star guard Chelsea Gray. New coach Derek Fisher will try to get the Sparks going after spending years in the NBA.

Storm guard Jordin Canada

CONNECTICUT SUN 2018: 21-13, 4th place; lost to Phoenix in second round OUTLOOK: The Sun have nearly everyone back from last season’s team except Chiney Ogwumike. The team went 21-13 without her in 2017 and had the same record last season. The Sun players feel this might be their best opportunity to get out of the second round of the playoffs and make a run to the title led by Jasmine Thomas and Alyssa Thomas. Ogwumike’s departure opens more minutes for All-Star Jonquel Jones.

DALLAS WINGS 2018: 15-19, 8th place; lost to Phoenix in first round OUTLOOK: The future looks bright for Dallas even if the present might be a struggle early on. The Wings traded Liz Cambage to Las Vegas for Moriah Jefferson and Isabelle Harrison. Jefferson is working her way back from an injury, and it’s unclear if she’ll play this season. Harrison will help bolster the frontcourt in the absence of Cambage. The Wings also will have to play without All-Star guard Skylar Diggins-Smith, who is working her way back into shape after giving birth to a baby boy this spring. The Wings did bolster their team in the draft, taking Notre Dame star Arike Ogunbowale.

NEW YORK LIBERTY Aces center Liz Cambage

2018: 7-27, 11th place; missed playoffs OUTLOOK: New ownership has given optimism to the Liberty players and their fans. The team will try and produce on the court this season after suffering through one of the worst years in franchise history. The draft was helpful with New York taking Asia Durr with the No. 2 pick and getting a potential steal in the second round with 6-9 Chinese center Han Xu.

PHOENIX MERCURY

INDIANA FEVER

2018: 20-14, 5th place; lost to Seattle in semifinals OUTLOOK: Phoenix will have to do without Diana Taurasi for at least the first month of the season because of a back injury. There is still plenty of talent on the roster, led by 6-foot-8 center Brittney Griner. She has help from DeWanna Bonner and rookie Alanna Smith, who excelled at Stanford.

2018: 6-28, 12th place; missed playoffs OUTLOOK: The Fever suffered a blow when Victoria Vivians got hurt overseas this winter, sidelining the second-year player for the season. Indiana did add her college teammate Teaira McCowan in the draft and are building a solid young group to complement veteran Candice Dupree.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

D10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 05.26.2019

BOYS TRACK AND FIELD | ILLINOIS CHAMPIONSHIP

FLYERS LEAVE NO DOUBT East St. Louis claims 2A crown one year after suspension BY DAVID KVIDAHL

STLhighschoolsports.com

CHARLESTON — Willie Johnson kept it together all day. When the state championship trophy found his hands, he let it out Saturday. All the anger. All the frustration. All the pain. Replaced by overwhelming joy. A junior sprinter for the East St. Louis boys track and field team, Johnson knelt on the artificial turf of O’Brien Field with the Class 2A state championship trophy in front of him and savored the moment. “That was a very special moment,” Johnson said. “For me to hold that trophy, that was very special.” A year after it was banned from postseason competition after a fight in its grandstands during the Southwestern Conference Championships, East St. Louis returned to the state meet with a vengeance. East St. Louis overwhelmed the competition as it scored 84 points to win the Class 2A championship and double up runner up Marengo, which finished with 42. Mahomet-Seymour was third with 40.5. It’s the 12th state championship for the Flyers and the first since they won Class 3A in 2016. Since 2007, East Side has won three championships and finished as the runner-up three times. They’re all sweet, but the disappointment of last season made Saturday’s victory extra special. “The victory means everything. It’s a victory of vindication.

PAUL HALFACRE, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

East St. Louis coach Barry Malloyd holds up the Class 2A championship trophy after the Illinois boys track and field state meet Saturday at Eastern Illinois University’s O’Brien Field in Charleston. Things happen for a reason, this is about resilience,” East St. Louis coach Barry Malloyd said. “It’s all right to get knocked down, but can you get up? We made it through that. We made it through the psychological healing of dealing what we had to deal with and here we are.” From the time they were told they would not get to compete in the postseason last spring, the Flyers went to work. East St. Louis arrived at Eastern Illinois University with a busload of competitors and a champion’s focus. The combination of the two proved decisive. The 400-meter relay opened the meet with a victory in 41.81

seconds as junior Jashawn Anderson, sophomore Keontez Lewis, junior Nathaniel Robinson and junior Marcus Lampley held off a strong effort from runner up Rich Central, which finished in 41.99. Then things got interesting. Junior Jamariantte Burgess was the top seed entering the 110-meter hurdles but didn’t clear the seventh hurdle cleanly and stumbled as he landed. It completely threw off his rhythm and he finished ninth in 16.31. It was a brutal blow to Burgess, who had eyes on a championship, but Malloyd said he wanted to transfer that frustration into the upcoming 300-meter hurdles. “We still have fight in us,” Mal-

loyd said. “It’s not over, we need you to redeem yourself and that’s what he did.” Burgess returned to the track and took second in the 300 hurdles in 37.82. Senior teammate Andrew Johnson was fifth in both the 110s (14.81) and 300s (38.92). Senior Terrence Hargrove Jr. didn’t have the meet he hoped, either. In his first season ever as a high jumper, Hargrove entered the final of the event with a personal best of 6-10. He topped out at 6-7 and finished third as Eureka freshman Trevor Heffren won by clearing 6-9. “Everyone has their good days. Everyone has their bad days,” Hargrove said. “Today was just his

day. He jumped very well today. I’m top three, I’m satisfied.” Johnson and Lampley ended the suspense when they finished first and second, respectively, in the 400. Johnson crossed in 47.65. Lampley clocked a 48.17. The duo combined for more points in the 200 as Lampley took second in 21.58 and Johnson was fifth in 21.77. “It means everything. It means a lot. It means so much after what happened last year,” Lampley said. “We lost a lot of runners. It means everything to us to bounce back how we did and win the state meet.” The only question entering the 1,600-meter relay was the margin of the Flyers’ victory. When Lampley handed Johnson the baton for the anchor leg, Eureka was close by and sophomore Micah Senior took the opportunity to pass Johnson. Senior held the lead down the back stretch, but as they came around the corner Johnson pushed past and powered his way to the finish line, giving the Flyers a cherry on top as they won in 3:18.13. Eureka was second in 3:18.52. “I wasn’t worried about that,” Johnson said. “That’s one race we hate losing. That race is special to us. When it comes, we lock in and get it moving.” East Side spent the last year preparing for Saturday. It achieved its goal, but now the Flyers have a new challenge. As the defending state champions everyone will be coming for them. With so many underclassmen in the fold the Flyers will once again be formidable. But will they have the same drive to protect what is now theirs once more? “We’re coming back next year, we’re going to put in that work over the summer time,” Johnson said. “We’re going to be good.”

STATE TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS (Winners and area individual results; team trophy winners) BOYS MISSOURI STATE MEETS CLASS 5 At Battle High School Team totals: 1. Hazelwood West 66, 2. Lee’s Summit North 49, 3. Rock Bridge 48, 4. Jefferson City 44 100: 1. Justin Robinson, Hazelwood West, 10.56; 6. Angelo Butts, McCluer North, 10.98; 7. Imon Bell, Hazelwood Central, 11.23 200: 1. Justin Robinson, Hazelwood West, 21.96; 3. Brian Stiles, Hazelwood West, 22.16; 4. Caden Phipps, Lafayette, 22.34 400: 1. Justin Robinson, Hazelwood West, 46.3; 2. Brian Stiles, Hazelwood West, 47.91; 5. Michael Pate, Lafayette, 49.68; 13. Charles Perry, SLUH, 51.47 800: 1. Lazarus Williams, SLUH, 1:53.29; 5. Martin Strong, Kirkwood, 1:57.47; 7. Cole Johnson, Lafayette, 1:57.86; 8. Mason Walters, Marquette, 1:57.87; 12. Nathan Key, Seckman, 2:00.89; 13. Cole Sutton, Fort Zumwalt North, 2:00.99 1600: 1. Christian Baker, Kirkwood, 4:13.03; 5. Lucas Rackers, SLUH, 4:18.81; 7. Harrison Brown, Lafayette, 4:23.25; 9. Patrick Hetlage, SLUH, 4:25.62; 11. Drew Schulte, Timberland, 4:32.72; 15. Jakob McMillin, Fox, 4:55.27 3200: 1. Christian Baker, Kirkwood, 9:16.34; 4. Lucas Rackers, SLUH, 9:28.47; 7. Michael Nicholson, Lafayette, 9:31.31; 9. AJ Wallach, Kirkwood, 9:33.75; 13. Tim Maxwell, Seckman, 10:08.46 110 hurdles: 1. Martez Manuel, Rock Bridge, 14.2; 5. Keshon Campbell, Chaminade, 14.79 300 hurdles: 1. Cortney Watkins, Hickman, 37.54; 2. Aaron Holmes, Hazelwood West, 38.29; 9. Kenneth Ellis, Ritenour, 40.16; 10. Aaron Toben, Lafayette, 40.18; 11. Stephen Beeler, Eureka, 40.43; 16. Elijah Kruse, Northwest Cedar Hill, 41.79 400 relay: 1. Lee’s Summit North, 41.47; 4. Lafayette, 42.49; 8. Hazelwood Central, 42.66; 13. Pattonville, 43.22; 14. Hazelwood West, 43.26 800 relay: 1. Hazelwood West, 1:26.44; 4. McCluer North, 1:28.25; 5. Lafayette, 1:28.65; 15. Ritenour, 1:31.61 1600 relay: 1. McCluer North, 3:18.55; 7. Lafayette, 3:23.89; 9. Hazelwood West, 3:25.95; 13. Marquette, 3:26.54 3200 relay: 1. Kirkwood, 7:43.68; 2. SLUH, 7:45.7; 6. Lafayette, 7:54.51; 10. Seckman, 8:09.15; 13. Marquette, 8:14.45 High jump: 1. Devon Richardson, Lee’s Summit North, 6-10; 2. Donald HatfieldJackson, Fox, 6-09; 7. Cooper Wise, Kirkwood, 6-05; 10. Kendall Banks-Price, Fort Zumwalt North, 6-02 Pole vault: 1. Reagan Ulrich, Branson, 16-00; 13. Johnny Garvey, Lindbergh, 13-03; 14. Benjamin Ludwig, Francis Howell North, 12-09 Long jump: 1. Johnny Brackins, Lee’s Summit, 23-09.25; 5. Michael Jackson, Pattonville, 22-05; 7. Nick Smith, CBC, 21-10.5; 11. Devon Williams, McCluer North, 20-07.75; 12. Antonio Sanders, Eureka, 20-01; 15. Keagan Roshell, Eureka, 18-03 Triple jump: 1. Devon Richardson, Lee’s Summit North, 48-03.5; 4. Donald HatfieldJackson, Fox, 46-04; 5. Justin Johnson, Ritenour, 46-02.25; 6. Devon Williams, McCluer North, 45-11.5; 7. Jayden Kouadio, Fort Zumwalt West, 44-11.5; 11. Christian Wallace-Hughes, SLUH, 44-03.5; 12. Keagan Roshell, Eureka, 44-03 Shot put: 1. Adetomiwa Adebawore, North Kansas City, 62-07.75; 5. Charles Davis, Hazelwood West, 50-06; 9. Dylan Wright, Fort Zumwalt West, 47-09; 10. Darion Baker, Lafayette, 47-06.5; 11. Terrell Sanderson, Pattonville, 46-10.5; 14. Jacques Combs, De Smet, 45-08.75 Discus: 1. Devin Roberson, Jefferson City, 218-04; 4. Bryce Eaton, Timberland, 167-00; 8. Isaiah Wilkes, Pattonville, 156-08; 4. Carl Bossert, Vianney, 152-10; 11. Charles Davis, Hazelwood West, 149-10; 15. Darion Baker, Lafayette, 97-06 Javelin: 1. Zach Westmoreland, Joplin, 194-06; 6. Mason Brock, Francis Howell, 164-06; 9. Tyler Schulte, Fox, 158-11; 11. Nathan Kovis, Eureka, 157-10; 13. Hunter Tabor, Francis Howell North, 151-09; 15. Donovan Prott, Pattonville, 142-08; 16. Marquis Robinson, Kirkwood, 133-08 CLASS 4 At Washington HS Team totals: 1. Grandview 63, 2. Festus 50, 3. Summit 44, 4. Ladue 34 100: 1. Joshua Sutton, MICDS, 10.85; 2. Jack McCormick, St. Dominic, 11.06; 3. Jacob Brunsman, Summit, 11.08; 4. Harold Trainer, Grandview, 11.09; 6. Johnathan Edwards, Parkway North, 11.2; 8. Christopher Poinsett, Union, 11.34 200: 1. Joshua Sutton, MICDS, 21.85; 2. Jacob Brunsman, Summit, 22.23; 3. Jah’Shon McCarter, Riverview Gardens, 22.41; 7. Johnathan Edwards, Parkway North, 23.02 400: 1. Jacob Brunsman, Summit, 48.08; 5. Kendrick Banks, McCluer, 49.43; 7. Nolan Chmiel, Warrenton, 49.84; 9. Terrico Garrett, University City, 50.95; 10. Daulton Bender, Washington, 51; 11. Sam Wright, Hillsboro, 51.31; 12. Wyatt Radford, De Soto, 51.39 800: 1. Jack Crull, Helias, 1:58.49; 2. Reginald King, Grandview, 1:58.55; 4. Terrico Garrett, University City, 1:59.78; 6. Markeith Crawford, Ladue, 2:00.15; 11. Nolan Schroff, Fort Zumwalt East, 2:04.75; 12. David Buckley, Webster Groves, 2:05.34; 13. Dylan Conner, Summit, 2:06.56; 15. Collin Clark, Ladue, 2:10.21 1600: 1. Max McDaniel, Festus, 4:21.2; 7. Alec Whitener, Festus, 4:28.78; 8. Gottlieb Gerstenecker, Parkway Central, 4:29; 11. Samuel Getz, Webster Groves, 4:36.58; 12. Andrew Ahrens, Parkway Central, 4:39.42; 15. Nathan Nordwald, Warrenton, 4:45.09; 16. Thomas Doss, St. Charles, 4:51.05; 17. John Martin, Ladue, 4:59.62

3200: 1. Max McDaniel, Festus, 9:27.23; 4. Alec Whitener, Festus, 9:45.72; 5. Charlie Teeter, Webster Groves, 9:51.93; 7. Gottlieb Gerstenecker, Parkway Central, 10:04.02; 8. Noah Little, Washington, 10:04.77; 9. Andrew Smock, Ladue, 10:11.19; 13. Isaiah Hayward, Clayton, 10:28.05; 15. Thomas Doss, St. Charles, 10:34.44 110 hurdles: 1. Adam Bell, Borgia, 14.7; 2. D’Monte’ Blanks, Grandview, 14.78; 4. Jacob Pauly, Festus, 14.9; 7. Bruce Jordan, Liberty (Wentzville), 15.24; 8. David Buckner, Parkway North, 17.16 300 hurdles: 1. Demetrius Clark, Union, 38.79; 4. D’Monte’ Blanks, Grandview, 40.06; 5. Bruce Jordan, Liberty (Wentzville), 40.25; 8. Jacob Pauly, Festus, 40.92; 10. Marquis Hawkins, McCluer, 40.96; 11. Luke Schaefer, Parkway Central, 41.12; 14. Landon Oxford, Fort Zumwalt East, 42.67 400 relay: 1. Ladue, 42.99; 4. Fort Zumwalt South, 43.7; 3. Sullivan, 43.7; 8. Fort Zumwalt East, 44.19; 10. Parkway North, 44.36; 13. Festus, 46.93 800 relay: 1. Grandview, 1:29.13; 3. Ladue, 1:29.88; 6. St. Mary’s, 1:30.82; 7. Sullivan, 1:31.41; 8. St. Charles West, 1:31.52; 10. Riverview Gardens, 1:31.91; 12. Festus, 1:33.23; 13. St. Clair, 1:33.28 1600 relay: 1. Ladue, 3:22.12; 3. Union, 3:25; 4. St. Charles West, 3:25.05; 5. McCluer, 3:25.8; 8. Summit, 3:26.95; 14. De Soto, 3:30.16; 15. Parkway Central, 3:31.86 3200 relay: 1. Festus, 7:59.06; 4. Ladue, 8:02.36; 7. Webster Groves, 8:09.3; 8. St. Charles, 8:11.08; 9. Summit, 8:13.84; 10. Parkway Central, 8:19.72; 14. Fort Zumwalt East, 8:33.55; 15. Parkway North, 8:40.08; 16. Grandview, 8:56.67 High jump: 1. Michael Jenkins, McCluer, 6-7; 2. Jacques Thomas, Summit, 6-6; 6. Jermaine Yarbough, Grandview, 6-4; 10. Cameron Kriete, Union, 6-2; 13. Caleb Tillis, Parkway Central, 6-2; 15. Anthony Lemons, St. Charles West, 6-0 Pole vault: 1. Nolan Bone, Liberty, 15-9; 4. Gavin McDonald, Pacific, 14-9; 7. Austin Coale, Festus, 14-0; 11. Tommaso Maiocco, MICDS, 13-06 Long jump: 1. Remerdie Ndiang, Kirksville, 23-6; 3. Isaac Readnour, Hillsboro, 22-8; 6. Jaylan Watson, Festus, 21-6.75; 8. Ryan Long, Parkway Central, 21-3.75; 9. Kennedy Nwaneri, Grandview, 20-11.75; 10. Nicholas Waltke, Ladue, 20-11.5; 11. Blaine Blankenship, Sullivan, 20-10.75; 13. Cameron Kriete, Union, 20-07.75 Triple jump: 1. Remerdie Ndiang, Kirksville, 47-08.5; 2. Jacques Thomas, Summit, 46-09; 4. Kennedy Nwaneri, Grandview, 45-10; 6. Danny Barafundi, Summit, 44-11.75; 9. Ryan Long, Parkway Central, 44-04.5; 12. Blaine Blankenship, Sullivan, 43-06.5 Shot put: 1. Justice Akinmoladun, Grandview, 57-02; 6. Elisha Turner, Grandview, 49-06.75; 7. Tyler Hesse, Sullivan, 49-02; 9. Jacob Morris, Fort Zumwalt East, 48-05.25; 10. Trent Durell, Summit, 46-07.75; 12. Cole Schnettgoecke, Webster Groves, 45-09.25; 13. Seifeldin Elkhashab, Windsor, 45-05.5; 15. Tristan Davis, Fort Zumwalt East, 44-04; 16. John Wilson, St. Charles West, 42-10.75 Discus: 1. Jacob Morris, Fort Zumwalt East, 171-07; 3. Justice Akinmoladun, Grandview, 160-02; 4. Tristan Davis, Fort Zumwalt East, 155-00; 7. Xavier Yancey, McCluer, 150-08; 8. Larry Minner, Westminster, 147-04; 9. Brandon West, Ladue, 143-07; 12. Seifeldin Elkhashab, Windsor (Imperial), 135-11; 16. Zach McNees, Hillsboro, 124-08 Javelin: 1. Gabriel Kurtz, Camdenton, 191-04; 7. Austin Anderson, Festus, 164-04; 8. Torre’ Dyson, Hazelwood East, 162-01; 10. Nicholas Luechtefeld, Union, 158-09; 14. Seifeldin Elkhashab, Windsor (Imperial), 143-10; 16. Tristan Davis, Fort Zumwalt East, 133-06 CLASS 3 At University of Missouri Team totals: 1. Trinity 100, 2. Cardinal Ritter 82, 3. Centralia 48, 4. Maplewood-RH 27 100: 1. Kemeric Winston, Trinity, 10.71; 2. Grant Conway, St. James, 10.77; 3. Jaden Williams, Cardinal Ritter, 10.84 200: 1. Kemeric Winston, Trinity, 21.33; 3. Joshua Hopkins, Lutheran North, 21.97; 4. Andrew Hudson, Carnahan, 22.18 400: 1. Hasani Barr, Cardinal Ritter, 48.55; 2. Lee Steward, Cardinal Ritter, 49.75; 3. Adreion Keys, McCluer South-Berkeley, 50.09; 5. Derrick Miller, John Burroughs, 51.06 800: 1. Malik Stewart, Maplewood-RH, 1:57.84; 2. Lee Steward, Cardinal Ritter, 1:57.92; 13. Brody Hudson, Lutheran St. Charles, 2:08.72; 14. Adreion Keys, McCluer South-Berkeley, 2:10.07; 16. Nathan Forck, Tolton, 2:26.56 1600: 1. Carson Sanders, Orchard Farm, 4:24.36; 2. Malik Stewart, Maplewood-RH, 4:28.18; 4. Jonathon Coffman, Herculaneum, 4:31.23; 5. George Blanco, DuBourg, 4:33.59 3200: 1. Carson Sanders, Orchard Farm, 9:50.51; 2. Jonathon Coffman, Herculaneum, 9:51.02; 5. Akash Mallady, John Burroughs, 10:03.02; 8. Secondo Kaka, Lutheran North, 10:19.42; 11. Callum Hardwicke, O’Fallon Christian, 10:45.51; 13. Isaac Stout, Lutheran North, 10:48.48 110 hurdles: 1. Grant Conway, St. James, 13.65; 2. Thomas Sonntag, Trinity, 14.72 300 hurdles: 1. Jaden Williams, Cardinal Ritter, 38.2; 2. Thomas Sonntag, Trinity, 38.56; 3. Grant Conway, St. James, 39.4; 6. Abdoulaya Sarr, North Tech, 40.55; 8. Max Greener, Orchard Farm, 40.87; 16. Michael Moore, Bayless, 48.42 400 relay: 1. Trinity, 42.34; 2. Cardinal Ritter, 43.15; 3. Lift For Life , 43.32; 4. John Burroughs, 43.9; 6. Carnahan, 44.3; 9. St. James, 44.5; 12. McCluer South-Berkeley, 44.78 800 relay: 1. Trinity, 1:27.76; 2. Cardinal Ritter, 1:28.84; 4. Lutheran North, 1:30.79; 4. McCluer South-Berkeley, 1:31.88

1600 relay: 1. Cardinal Ritter, 3:16.93; 3. Maplewood-RH, 3:28.87; 5. Lutheran North, 3:30.1; 8. John Burroughs, 3:31.23; 9. McCluer South-Berkeley, 3:32.17; 11. Trinity, 3:34.14 3200 relay: 1. East Newton, 8:13.23; 6. Maplewood-RH, 8:23.02; 10. Orchard Farm, 8:29.51; 11. Whitfield, 8:30.08; 15. Owensville, 8:45.65 High jump: 1. Peyton Davis, Centralia, 6-4; 5. DaJaun Young, Trinity, 6-1; 13. Logan MacDonald, Maplewood-RH, 5-8 Pole vault: 1. Jesse Pinkley, Ste. Genevieve, 15-9; 10. Boyde Nicks, Owensville, 12-3; 8. Jacob Luther, Owensville, 12-3; 10. Michael Pills, Duchesne, 12-3 Long jump: 1. Peyton Davis, Centralia, 22-8; 2. Mario McKinney Jr. , Vashon, 22-3.25; 3. Joshua Hopkins, Lutheran North, 22-3; 5. Rasheed Ricketts, Cardinal Ritter, 21-9.75; 7. Myles Norwood, Trinity, 21-6; 10. Isaiah Williams, Trinity, 20-06.5; 13. Aarnarian Snow, Orchard Farm, 19-10.5 Triple jump: 1. Rasheed Ricketts, Cardinal Ritter, 49-2.25; 2. Isaiah Williams, Trinity, 47-0.5; 3. DaJaun Young, Trinity, 46-5; 6. Myles Norwood, Trinity, 43-7.25; 9. Joshua Hopkins, Lutheran North, 42-8.75; 10. Jalik Smith, Lutheran North, 42-1.75 Shot put: 1. Paden Lewis, North Callaway, 52-8.75; 2. David Reid, Trinity, 49-4; 5. Jacob Taylor, Lutheran South, 48-6; 9. Gabriel Rubio, Lutheran St. Charles, 47-6; 11. Jacob Martinez, Lutheran South, 47-1.5; 14. Joseph Moore, Cardinal Ritter, 46-6.75 Discus: 1. Anthony Heard, Lutheran St. Charles, 153-8; 5. Christian Locke, Lutheran St. Charles, 147-1; 11. Nick Miles, Herculaneum, 126-11; 13. Callum Cunningham, Lutheran South, 123-0; 15. Cornell Robinson, Lutheran North, 104-2 Javelin: 1. Malcolm Harvey, Trinity, 184-8; 4. Kiyah Christensen, Winfield, 166-8; 6. Julian Juszczyk, Trinity, 163-0; 10. Xavier Sykes, Maplewood-RH, 147-4; 14. James Day, Lutheran South, 114-8 PARA EVENTS At University of Missouri Shot put: 1. Allen Bublitz, Holt, 6-0 100: 1. Hunter Bushnell, Eldon, 40.85; 2. Allen Bublitz, Holt, 1:36.67 200: 1. Hunter Bushnell, Eldon, 1:11.58; 2. Allen Bublitz, Holt, 1:25.91 BOYS ILLINOIS STATE MEETS At Eastern Illinois University CLASS 3A Team totals: 1. Crete-Monee 66, 2. Homewood-Flossmoor 53, 3. Oak Park and River Forest 30, 4. Fox Lake Grant 28 100: 1. Marcellus Moore, Plainfield North, 10.39; 2. Jermarrion Stewart, Collinsville, 10.54; 6. Deonte McGoy, Alton, 10.79 200: 1. Marcellus Moore, Plainfield North, 21.22; 2. Jermarrion Stewart, Collinsville, 21.29 400: 1. Jason Thormo, Fox Lake Grant, 47.97 800: 1. Thomas Shilgalis, Naperville Central, 1:54.86; 8. Cassius Havis, Alton, 1:57.29; 8. Cassius Havius, Alton, 1:57.29 1600: 1. Andrew O’Keefe, Granite City, 4:13.5 3200: 1. Josh Methner, Arlington Heights Hersey, 9:06.88; 9. Roland Prenzler, Edwardsville, 9:19.26 110 hurdles: 1. Marcellus Moore, Plainfield North, 10.39; 1. Victor Cameron, CreteMonee, 13.93 300 hurdles: 1. Robert Williams, Springfield, Illinois, 38.14 400 relay: 1. Crete-Monee, 41.12 800 relay: 1. Homewood-Flossmoor, 1:27 1600 relay: 1. Fox Lake Grant, 3:19.44 3200 relay: 1. Naperville Central, 7:45.03 High jump: 1. Alex Babbington, Plainfield East, 6-09 Pole vault: 1. Zachary Frye, Lake Park, 15-03; 8. Trison Paul, Belleville East, 14-06 Long jump: 1. Jamal Safo, Crete-Monee, 23-05.5; 2. Elijah McCauley, Belleville East, 23-03.25 Triple jump: 1. Quinton Stringfellow, Homewood-Flossmoor, 49-04; 12. Kenyon Johnson, Edwardsville, 45-03.75 Shot put: 1. Sam Liokumovich, Deerfield, 61-09.25 Discus: 1. Jordan Johnson, Quincy, 205-08 CLASS 2A Team totals: 1. East St. Louis 84, 2. Marengo 42, 3. Mahomet-Seymour 40.5, 4. Dixon 30 100: 1. Finnigan Schirmer, Marengo, 10.62; 9. Devin Wills, Mascoutah, 11.12 200: 1. Leondre Pollard, Thornridge, 21.55; 2. Marcus Lampley, East St. Louis, 21.58; 5. Willie Johnson, East St. Louis, 21.77; 9. Devin Wills, Mascoutah, 22.63 400: 1. Willie Johnson, East St. Louis, 47.65; 2. Marcus Lampley, East St. Louis, 48.17 800: 1. Riley Wells, Rockford Christian, 1:56.02; 7. Jackson McAlister, Waterloo, 1:58.04; 9. Corbin Schwable, Freeburg, 1:58.8; 12. Eli Ward, Waterloo, 2:01.04 1600: 1. Daniel Chen, Illinois Math & Science , 4:20.91 3200: 1. Mathias Powell, Mahomet-Seymour, 9:24.15; 18. Jarod Willis, Triad, 10:36.18 110 hurdles: 1. Finnigan Schirmer, Marengo, 14.22; 2. Steven Harris, Cahokia, 14.29; 2. Stephen Harris , Cahokia, 14.29; 5. Andrew Johnson, East St. Louis, 14.81; 9. Jamarriante Burgess, East St. Louis, 16.31 300 hurdles: 1. Finnigan Schirmer, Marengo, 37.71; 2. Jamarriante Burgess, East St. Louis, 37.82; 3. Steven Harris, Cahokia, 38.31; 3. Stephen Harris , Cahokia, 38.31; 5. Andrew Johnson, East St. Louis, 38.92; 8. Noah Williams, Freeburg, 39.75 400 relay: 1. East St. Louis, 41.81; 4. Triad, 42.97; 8. Columbia, 43.5 800 relay: 1. Rich Central, 1:26.68; 3. East St. Louis, 1:28.37; 6. Mascoutah, 1:29.73 1600 relay: 1. East St. Louis, 3:18.13; 5. Freeburg, 3:24.98; 3200 relay: 1. Dixon, 7:55.24; 9. Mascoutah, 8:13.98; 10. Triad, 8:19.26 High jump: 1. Trevor Heffren, Eureka,

Illinois, 6-09; 2. Zack Pluff, Freeburg, 6-08; 3. Terrence Hargrove, East St. Louis, 6-07 Pole vault: 1. Chandlar Ifft, Prairie Central, 16-00; 3. Jadon Elliott, Triad, 15-00 Long jump: 1. Ryan Curington, Chicago De La Salle, 23-00.75; 6. Ronnie Hunsaker, Columbia, 21-08 Triple jump: 1. Kahlil Ross, Springfield Lanphier, 46-09.5; 7. Ronnie Hunsaker, Columbia, 43-07; 11. Elijah Felton, East St. Louis, 43-01.25 Shot put: 1. Hunter Hendershot, MahometSeymour, 62-01.25; 6. Matthew Wilson, Mascoutah, 53-01.75 Discus: 1. Hunter Hendershot, MahometSeymour, 182-04 CLASS 1A Team totals: 1. Catlin Salt Fork 40, 2. DuQuoin 36, 3. Pana 36, 4. Morrison (Ill.) 33 100: 1. Cody Klein, Pana, 10.85 200: 1. Cody Klein, Pana, 21.57; 7. EJ Kahl, Piasa Southwestern, 22.38 400: 1. Samuel Herenton, Chicago Providence, 48.16 800: 1. Boston Stewart, Decatur St. Teresa, 1:54.93; 4. Jacob Landon, Carlinville, 1:57.1; 10. Camden Sadler, Althoff, 2:00.53 1600: 1. Christopher Collet, Seneca, 4:24.71 3200: 1. Christopher Collet, Seneca, 9:36.99; 22. Will Brant, O’Fallon First Baptist, 10:38.86; 23. Alex Detmer, Mater Dei, 10:39.09; 27. Brandon Arhing, Father McGivney, 10:48.55 110 hurdles: 1. Mason Barr, Colfax Ridgeview, 13.94; 6. Kendall Kennedy, Madison, Illinois, 15.31 300 hurdles: 1. Mason Barr, Colfax Ridgeview, 37.7; 5. Kendall Kennedy, Madison, Illinois, 40.36 400 relay: 1. Spring Valley (Hall), 42.74 800 relay: 1. Spring Valley (Hall), 1:29.49; 9. Althoff, 1:32.29 1600 relay: 1. Sherrard, 3:24.48 3200 relay: 1. Morrison (Ill.), 7:57.85 High jump: 1. Jorden Tedford, Warrensburg, 6-10; 6. Michael Douglas, Carlinville, 6-05 Pole vault: 1. Kyle Kruthtoff, Erie, 16-08; 5. Isaac Daugherty, Carlinville, 14-06; 9. Dustin Roberts, Carlinville, 13-06 Long jump: 1. Dasani Edward, DuQuoin, 23-05.5; 8. Will Walton, Carlinville, 21-08.5 Triple jump: 1. Ramsey Hunt, Shiloh Hume, 46-03.25; 4. Will Walton, Carlinville, 44-10.25; 6. Gavyn Lietz, Nashville, 43-05 Shot put: 1. Greg Zellers, New Berlin, 5509.25; 11. Jacob Brown, Wesclin, 48-10 Discus: 1. Joe Kingery, Teutopolis, 179-10; 8. Bryce Chadduck, Dupo, 153-02 GIRLS MISSOURI STATE MEETS CLASS 5 At Battle HS Team totals: 1. Lee’s Summit West 86, 2. Pattonville 63, 3. Ozark 43, 4. Battle 42 100: 1. Lauryn Taylor, McCluer North, 11.97; 2. Courtney Williams, Nerinx Hall, 12.06; 3. Danielle Frank, Hazelwood Central, 12.12 200: 1. Danielle Frank, Hazelwood Central, 24.35; 3. Courtney Williams, Nerinx Hall, 24.74 400: 1. Courtney Williams, Nerinx Hall, 54.87; 3. Danielle Frank, Hazelwood Central, 57.42; 9. Zora Williams, Francis Howell, 59.18; 11. Mackenzie Montandon, Oakville, 59.99; 13. Gabrielle Russina, Parkway South, 1:01.37 800: 1. Audrey Parson, Lee’s Summit West, 2:13.19; 3. Keilah Wilkes, Pattonville, 2:16.22; 4. Chloe Hershenow, Parkway West, 2:17.33; 6. Mary Ralston, Kirkwood, 2:18.31; 12. Chloe Figgins, Francis Howell, 2:25.42; 13. Isabelle Williams, Fort Zumwalt West, 2:26.41; 14. Leah Kleekamp, Eureka, 2:26.42 1600: 1. Madelynn Hill, Liberty (KC), 5:02.05; 4. Anna Karner, Lafayette, 5:09.81; 6. Chloe Hershenow, Parkway West, 5:12.34; 9. Marisa Jacknewitz, Nerinx Hall, 5:16.31; 12. Madilyn Moore, Timberland, 5:22.92; 13. Amie Martin, Fox, 5:23.97; 14. Savannah Lesher, Eureka, 5:24.67 3200: 1. Ginger Murnieks, Lee’s Summit West, 10:57.31; 2. Anna Karner, Lafayette, 11:24.04; 4. Gracyn Pietrusinski, Holt, 11:28.76; 7. Amie Martin, Fox, 11:35.06; 9. Katelynn Quade, Marquette, 11:39.84; 10. Lucy Ndungu, Pattonville, 11:42.56; 12. Stephanie Anthonies, Seckman, 11:58.41; 15. Sarah Russom, Francis Howell, 12:14.96; 16. Kayla Voelker, Eureka, 12:23.46 100 hurdles: 1. Tyra Wilson, Rock Bridge, 13.7; 2. Michelle Owens, McCluer North, 13.97; 6. Kennedi Watkins, Marquette, 15.1 300 hurdles: 1. Tyra Wilson, Rock Bridge, 42.35; 4. Nyla Adams, Ritenour, 45.42; 7. Kaitlyn Bell, Northwest Cedar Hill, 46.8; 8. Eve Shelton, Hazelwood West, 46.99; 15. Ja’Nia Lewis, Eureka, 54.53 400 relay: 1. McCluer North, 47.63; 4. Hazelwood West, 48.77; 13. Hazelwood Central, 50.41; 14. Oakville, 50.51; 15. Lafayette, 50.75 800 relay: 1. McCluer North, 1:40.28; 2. Pattonville, 1:42.02; 9. Hazelwood West, 1:44.21; 13. Hazelwood Central, 1:45.46; 15. Oakville, 1:47.3 1600 relay: 1. Park Hill , 3:54.7; 2. Pattonville, 3:56.86; 10. Ritenour, 4:06.82; 13. Eureka, 4:09.28; 15. Francis Howell, 4:10.51; 16. Nerinx Hall, 4:18.14 3200 relay: 1. Lee’s Summit West, 9:17.14; 4. Lafayette, 9:33.56; 5. Eureka, 9:34.13; 8. Marquette, 9:39.01; 10. Kirkwood, 9:43.35; 12. Francis Howell, 9:46.01; 14. Fort Zumwalt West, 9:55.99 High jump: 1. Jessica Haney, Lee’s Summit West, 5-06; 3. Erica Schamel, Northwest Cedar Hill, 5-05; 9. Lauren Hoffman, Fort Zumwalt West, 5-02; 12. Terrika Burks, Kirkwood, 5-00; 14. Abby Williams, Mehlville, 4-10; 14. Mikiyah Stiles, Hazelwood Central, 4-10; 14. Nyla Adams, Ritenour, 4-10 Pole vault: 1. Olivia Lyon, Ozark, 11-03; 3. Elizabeth Schilling, Lafayette, 10-09; 6. Annabelle Williams, Marquette, 10-06; 14. Julia Stinnett, Lafayette, 9-09; 15. Alexis

Nadreau, Parkway West, 9-09; 12. Kayla Fitzwilliam, Oakville, 9-09 Long jump: 1. Brooke Jenkins, Pattonville, 18-03.5; 2. Elizabeth Schilling, Lafayette, 1707.5; 7. Samaya Peterson, Pattonville, 17-05; 16. Alana Clopton, Kirkwood, 14-11.75 Triple jump: 1. Tyra Wilson, Rock Bridge, 3905.5; 2. Brooke Jenkins, Pattonville, 38-09.25; 4. Samaya Peterson, Pattonville, 38-00; 5. Haley Hudson, Lafayette, 37-05; 10. Mikiyah Stiles, Hazelwood Central, 36-05.75; 11. Janae Taylor, Fort Zumwalt West, 36-04.5 Shot put: 1. Kennedy Aurentz, Kickapoo, 4700.25; 3. Diamond Richardson, Pattonville, 44-10.25; 7. Coriana Proemsey, Kirkwood, 40-04; 11. J’dyn Green, Timberland, 38-08; 12. Alea Farmer, Eureka, 37-06.5; 13. Adrianna Kennedy, Troy Buchanan, 36-04.5; 14. Evyn Edwards, Hazelwood Central, 34-05.5 Discus: 1. Diamond Richardson, Pattonville, 138-05; 12. Brittany Hawthorne, Lafayette, 111-03; 13. Donyall Sharp, McCluer North, 106-07; 14. Alea Farmer, Eureka, 100-10 Javelin: 1. Megan Fortner, Northwest Cedar Hill, 158-00; 4. Julia Crenshaw, Fort Zumwalt West, 132-05; 5. Bailey Broemmer, Timberland, 125-09; 7. Elizabeth Bailey, Eureka, 124-07; 9. Katherine Bollinger, Lafayette, 118-03; 11. Alivia Auer, Oakville, 115-09; 12. Kendall Battle, Pattonville, 114-09; 13. Daisy Clark, Francis Howell Central, 112-06; 16. Madison Chester, Lafayette, 94-08 CLASS 4 At Washington HS Team totals: 1. Parkway North 73, 2. Webster Groves 53, 3. Parkway Central 49, 4. MICDS 39 100: 1. Alicia Burnett, Parkway North, 11.58; 2. Kayelyn Tate, Parkway Central, 12.1; 3. Sandrea Cogio, Gateway STEM, 12.42; 4. Jhordin Galmore, MICDS, 12.52; 5. Josauni Swisher, Clayton, 12.54; 6. Lana Dorsey, Grandview, 12.67; 7. Sidney Martin, Hazelwood East, 12.69 200: 1. Alicia Burnett, Parkway North, 23.83; 2. Kayelyn Tate, Parkway Central, 24.96; 3. Jhordin Galmore, MICDS, 25.48; 4. Marshaun Bostic, Gateway STEM, 25.7; 6. Karrington Green, Clayton, 25.83; 8. Sandrea Cogio, Gateway STEM, 26.81 400: 1. Cheyenne Melvin, McCluer, 57.12; 3. Eliana Liebman, Parkway Central, 58.39; 5. Jhordin Galmore, MICDS, 59.15; 8. Karlie Wooten, Liberty (Wentzville), 59.56; 9. Ayanna Allen, University City, 59.61; 15. Marketa Wagner, Summit, 1:02.03; 16. Nnenna Okpara, Parkway Central, 1:09.71 800: 1. Claire Ayers, Washington, 2:16.06; 2. Emma Kelley, Webster Groves, 2:19.75; 3. Reina McMillan, Parkway North, 2:19.8; 4. Madelyn Gray, Fort Zumwalt South, 2:20.35; 5. Erika Mellor, De Soto, 2:20.74; 8. Elyssa Toal, Incarnate Word, 2:21.27; 9. Palmer Mihalevich, MICDS, 2:21.33 1600: 1. Lila Bensky, Ladue, 5:11.69; 2. Safiya Ratliff, Parkway North, 5:11.94; 4. Claire Ayers, Washington, 5:14.74; 5. Ally Kruger, Liberty (Wentzville), 5:16.95; 10. Audrey Kelly, Fort Zumwalt East, 5:23.76; 11. Mia Reed, Washington, 5:29.81 3200: 1. Olivia Littleton, Smithville, 11:22.38; 2. Ally Kruger, Liberty (Wentzville), 11:24.73; 3. Safiya Ratliff, Parkway North, 11:30.69; 7. Lilly Jackson, St. Charles West, 11:52.35; 8. Lila Bensky, Ladue, 11:56.57; 9. Tabitha Bevan, Parkway North, 12:05.11; 12. Amanda Espy, Westminster, 12:22.83; 13. Allison Faerber, Festus, 12:25.13; 14. Mia Reed, Washington, 12:33.79; 16. Lena Liang, Ladue, 12:54.75 100 hurdles: 1. Scout Regular, Incarnate Word, 14.13; 2. Akiya Kollore, Normandy, 14.85; 4. Deseray Washington, Union, 14.89; 5. Kaitlyn McGinnitey, De Soto, 14.99; 7. Alexis Bellamy, MICDS, 15.16 300 hurdles: 1. Angelina Arinze, Webster Groves, 43.6; 2. Melvin Chelby, McCluer, 44.83; 7. Kaitlyn McGinnitey, De Soto, 45.47; 9. Deseray Washington, Union, 46.09; 10. Anaya Spears, Fort Zumwalt East, 46.15; 11. Scout Regular, Incarnate Word, 46.23; 15. Evie Marshall, Parkway North, 48.97; 16. Alexis Bellamy, MICDS, 49.4 400 relay: 1. Hazelwood East, 48.67; 2. Parkway Central, 48.93; 3. Gateway STEM, 49.17; 5. McCluer, 49.83; 6. Clayton, 49.98; 8. Fort Zumwalt East, 50.27; 9. Grandview, 50.37; 12. Summit, 50.85; 14. Union, 51.1 800 relay: 1. Parkway North, 1:40.98; 2. Parkway Central, 1:41.96; 3. Gateway STEM, 1:43.38; 4. Normandy, 1:44.55; 6. Hazelwood East, 1:45.09; 7. Grandview, 1:45.51; 10. Webster Groves, 1:47.28; 11. Riverview Gardens, 1:47.5; 12. De Soto, 1:47.79 1600 relay: 1. Parkway North, 3:59.4; 2. MICDS, 4:01.72; 3. Webster Groves, 4:02.03; 5. McCluer, 4:03.69; 7. Incarnate Word, 4:04.88; 9. Parkway Central, 4:07.85; 11. Liberty (Wentzville), 4:12.08; 14. De Soto, 4:13.59 3200 relay: 1. Liberty (Wentzville), 9:32.6; 2. Parkway North, 9:37.57; 3. MICDS, 9:46.71; 5. Webster Groves, 9:48.12; 7. Washington, 9:49.91; 8. Incarnate Word, 9:51.01; 11. Summit, 10:11.65; 13. Ladue, 10:18.62; 15. Festus, 10:19.25 High jump: 1. Eliza Maupin, Web