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GAME 1 > 7 P.M. MONDAY AT BOSTON

BLUES ADVANCE TO STANLEY CUP FINALS

THE WEST IS WON J.B. FORBES

WEDNESDAY • 05.22.2019 • $2.50

WALK ON THE WILD SIDE Zoo exhibit to give primates — including humans — new place to explore BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When planning a new habitat to build for the primates at the St. Louis Zoo, the zoo looked to the primates. The primates like to climb. They like to explore. They like to go outside. Some even like to interact with you. COURTESY OF THE ST. LOUIS ZOO The zoo announced on WednesA rendering shows the Primate Canopy Trails at the St. Louis Zoo.

New helmet law could see deaths rise by a third

day a new attraction, Primate Canopy Trails, where you and the primates will be able to explore, climb and go outside together. Picture mature trees connected by netted tunnels for the monkeys and lemurs, and among and around those a raised boardwalk, climbing structures and a clear tunnel for the humans. The $11.5 million expansion, which is projected to open in two

Activists protest abortion bans

BY KURT ERICKSON

years, will be built in the south end of the zoo next to the Primate House, in the space once occupied by the old sea lion arena. It will be free to the public and funded by donors. Construction starts later this year. “We can only imagine what it will be like for some of these animals who have never felt the sun Please see ZOO, Page A4

City residency rule for police under review

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY CHRISTINE BYERS

JEFFERSON CITY — The number of motorcycle riders who die in Missouri is likely to increase if Gov. Mike Parson signs off on a new helmet law this summer. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, states that have approved laws similar to the bill Missouri lawmakers sent Parson last week have seen fatalities increase by more than a third. “When states enact universal helmet laws, deaths, injuries and medical costs go down. When they repeal those laws, the reverse often happens,” the institute noted in its 2017 annual report. Before adjourning for the summer on Friday, the House and the Senate approved legislation that would require motorcycle riders under the age of 18 to wear protective headgear. That means adults will be able to go without helmets, as long as they can prove they have health insurance.

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Please see HELMET, Page A6

TODAY

Bigger fish to fry

87°/70° MOSTLY SUNNY

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Demonstrators block Fourth Street on Tuesday in St. Louis after staging a protest against increased abortion restrictions approved last week by the Missouri Legislature. BY DAVID CRARY

Associated Press

At the U.S. Supreme Court, statehouses and other sites across the nation, abortion rights supporters held rallies Tuesday in opposition to the wave of sweeping abortion bans being enacted this year in Midwestern and Southern states. Organizers — including Planned Parenthood, NARAL Pro-Choice America and the American Civil Liberties Union — predicted tens of thousands of people would attend hundreds of events scheduled in all 50 states. The “National Day of Action to Stop the Bans” came in response to a near-total ban on abortion recently signed into law in Alabama, as

well as bills enacted or nearing passage in Mississippi, Kentucky, Ohio, Georgia and Louisiana aimed at banning abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected. That can happen in the sixth week of pregnancy, before many women know they’re pregnant. Missouri lawmakers have passed an eight-week ban. None of the laws has taken effect, and all will likely be blocked while legal challenges play out. Ban supporters hope one or more of the measures might reach the Supreme Court and possibly trigger reversal of the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationwide. In Washington, a demonstration outside the

ST. LOUIS — The city’s police department is about 135 officers short of full strength and suffers from a shortage of qualified city residents interested in joining its ranks. The only thing holding back St. Louisan Ryan Lynch from rejoining the force last year was a residency policy that would keep him from moving out of the city. When Mayor Lyda Krewson pledged to support residency waivers for the next 50 hires who asked for them, Lynch jumped. He’s now one of two officers who have expressed interest in the waivers but probably won’t get them. Their situations are the latest layer of contention when it comes to the city’s residency requirements. Through decades, the residency issue has been debated, legislated and litigated. The aldermanic Public Employees Committee on Wednesday will begin considering a bill that Please see RESIDENCY, Page A4

Please see ABORTION, Page A6

TOMORROW

85°/71° Offsets won’t open for holiday •

PARTLY SUNNY

WEATHER B10 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

A2

Dissolution for Better Together? •

A4

Tax break sought for new hotel •

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Cards plan doubleheader vs. KC •

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1 M Vol. 141, No. 142 ©2019

LET’S GO

BLUES

Team physicians for the St. Louis Blues

BE TREATED LIKE A PRO


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 05.22.2019 1 1 WEDNESDAY • 05.22.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM SUMMER FUN

LOVING THE BLUES

UPCOMING CHATS

From music festivals to series and concerts, we highlight some of our favorite music that will keep St. Louisans jamming all summer long. stltoday.com/ summerfun

Whether you want to hear Jim Thomas and Jeff Gordon talk about the playoffs or look through our playoff galleries, we’ve got you covered. stltoday.com/ blues

Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m.

TONY’S TAKE

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888

An open letter to suburban moms about Missouri’s legislative session

Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday-Friday 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday 7–10 a.m. on holidays service@stltoday.com SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch. com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday. com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

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FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday-Sunday $14.25, Sunday-Friday $14.25, Monday-Friday $11.75, Thursday-Sunday $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50.The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 6/30/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/01/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/08/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

LOTTERY Multistate games MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 10-50-55-56-58 Mega ball: 15 Megaplier: 5 Estimated jackpot: $367 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $288 million

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.7 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 01-10-20-23-27 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $306,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 279 Evening: 690 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 1373 Evening: 6788

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 12-23-35-36-40 Evening: 04-09-10-12-34 LOTTO Monday: 06-16-19-21-34-39 Extra shot: 07 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $6.25 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 498 FB: 5 Evening: 682 FB: 5 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 7258 FB: 7 Evening: 7061 FB: 3

TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Dear St. Louis Suburban Mom, As you know, you’re kind of a big deal, perhaps the most important demographic in American elections these days. When our party, the Republican Party, got its hat handed to us nationally in the last midterms, it was suburban moms like you who really did us damage. Well, not you, specifically. You still mostly voted for Rep. Ann Wagner. Thanks for that. But she’s nervous enough about 2020 that she’s started up a suburban caucus. That’s how important you are. In light of that, we thought we’d explain to you what an incredible job we did standing up for you in the recently completed session of the Missouri Legislature. First off, and this is really important: We didn’t raise your taxes. As you save to send your children to college, it’s important to us to allow you to spend your hard-earned money the way you want to. Of course, that doesn’t mean college isn’t going to get more expensive. Because we are so committed to never, ever raising taxes, Missouri is among the lowest-funded higher education systems in the country. And that’s why the Board of Curators of the University of Missouri voted to raise tuition 5 percent starting next year. Some might call that a back-door tax increase. Not us. Speaking of college, if you are sending your daughter to a university in the state — public or private — we want you to know about our efforts to change the federal Title IX regulations meant to protect her from sexual assault or discrimination. We fell just short in our effort to gut those Obama-era regulations this year, but rest assured, we’ll be back at it next year. Keep in mind, the university folks, and various women’s advocacy groups, will tell your daughter that our efforts would have made it less likely that she would report a sexual assault during her time in school. And this is likely true. But think about the other side of this. Too many of the sons of your wealthier neighbors are facing the unintended consequences of such protections. Some of them had to switch universities just because they are no longer allowed to, as conservative commentator Stephen Moore put it, do “stupid things” and “chase skirts.” Can you imagine the

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, CGOODEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Gov. Mike Parson holds a news conference in his office on Friday near the end of the 2019 session of the Missouri Legislature session. horror of having to face your friends at the country club and have to tell them Young Tanner ended up transferring to Vatterott College from Washington University? We’ve got those boys’ backs and want you to know we’ll be fighting for them again next legislative session. While we fell a little short there, here’s where we were really successful. Missouri passed one of the most severe abortion bans in the country. That means that if your daughter does happen to get pregnant after she gets raped on campus, we’ve assured that she has to carry the rapist’s baby to full term. We’re sure you recall several years back when our party wasn’t fully committed to such a pro-life position. That was during the Todd Akin days, when, as you’ll recall, many of you ended up voting for Democrat Claire McCaskill for Senate because of Akin’s unfortunate “legitimate rape” comments. Trust us, we’re past that. We’ve moved on to “consensual rape,” like what happens when the frat boy is out sowing his wild oats. Of course, such rapes can lead to babies, and now we’re going to protect those babies. When that baby is born, likely after your daughter drops out of school, of course, we want to be sure to continue to protect your hard-earned tax dollars. That’s why we’ve made sure that tens of thousands of Missouri children, most of them poor, no longer have access to Medicaid. Once again, this is an area where

Missouri is leading the nation. You can thank the Missouri Republican Party for that. Here’s another area where we stand out: If your daughter, after dropping out of college and giving birth to her rapist’s baby, turns to a life of drugs, such as opioids, Missouri will protect her personal health information better than any other state in the nation. You see, every other state has a law that will stop your daughter from doctor shopping to find the drugs she has become addicted to. To accomplish that, they have created prescription drug monitoring programs that allow medical professionals and some law enforcement agencies to have access to your daughter’s health information. Thanks to the Missouri Republican Party, Missouri is the only state in the nation that doesn’t have such a database. We’re proud of that. We value your freedom too much to spend any taxpayer dollars on protecting the life of your daughter, or her baby, once he or she is born, of course. Freedom and fetuses. That’s what we’re about. Vote for us in 2020. Thank you, Missouri Republican Party Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Quarry swimming hole won’t open for Memorial Day BY JACK SUNTRUP

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY — The owners of the Offsets, a swimming hole south of St. Louis where at least nine people have died since the 1980s, announced Monday the destination will be “temporarily” shut down amid a legal fight with the state. “The government should not be able to dictate nor demonize a privately owned business/swimming hole,” a post on the Offsets’ Facebook page read. The Missouri attorney general’s office in August 2018 sued the owners of the Offsets — Gary and Rebecca Henson — and Offsets Recreation LLC, following two drowning deaths there in July. The flooded former quarry is 70 miles south of St. Louis, near Fredericktown. Then-Attorney General Josh Hawley called the swimming hole a “public nuisance.” He asked a Madison County, Mo., judge to issue an injunction to close the swimming hole un-

KEVIN JENKINS, DAILY JOURNAL

Authorities gather at a flooded quarry known as the Offsets in Madison County, Mo., in July 2018. A Chesterfield man drowned after diving off a cliff. til owners address safety concerns. As of Tuesday, the court has not issued any injunction to close the swimming hole, but the state filed a proposed judgment on Monday. The proposal asks the court to close the grounds until further notice. Hawley’s office said that some bluffs are taller than 40 feet, and that when patrons jump into the water, they can’t

easily access flat ground because they are surrounded by bluffs. “There is nowhere for an injured or tiring swimmer to rest, and a swimmer in trouble may have to swim hundreds of feet to safety,” the lawsuit says. Hawley’s office said that the owners of the destination use signs and waivers that are “insufficient” in warning guests about the property’s dangers. The lawsuit also says there

are no life preservers available near the bluffs and no lifeguards on duty. The lawsuit also says that an added danger is the force with which swimmers hit the water, noting that at least one of the victims broke his neck while jumping. The Offsets’ waiver does note that there is a risk of injury or death by jumping off the cliffs, and there are signs posted around the property. But near the tallest cliffs, most popular with guests, the only signs read “no flipping,” the lawsuit says. No one answered the Offsets’ phone when a reporter called on Tuesday. The Facebook post blames the temporary closure on “government over reach” and says the state is holding a private business to a higher standard than it holds operators of state-owned attractions. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

BIRTHDAYS Actor Michael Constantine (“My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” “Room 222”) is 92. Pianist Peter Nero is 85. Actor-director Richard Benjamin is 81. Actor Frank Converse Campbell is 81. Actress Barbara Parkins (“Peyton Place,” “Valley of the Dolls”) is 77. Songwriter Bernie Taupin is 69. Actor Al Corley (“Dynasty”) is 64. Singer Morrissey is 60. Actress Ann Cusack (“Jeff Foxworthy Show,”

“A League of Their Own”) is 58. Bassist Dana Williams of Diamond Rio is 58. Guitarist Jesse Valenzuela of Gin Blossoms is 57. Actor Mark Christopher Lawrence Constantine (“Chuck”) is 55. Singer Johnny Gill is 53. Bassist Dan Roberts of Crash Test Dummies is 52. Actress Brooke Smith (“Grey’s Anatomy,” “The Silence of the Lambs”) is 52. Actor Michael Kelly (“House of Cards”) is 50. Model Naomi Campbell

is 49. Actress Anna Belknap (“CSI: NY”) is 47. Singer Donell Jones is 46. Actor Sean Gunn (“Guardians of the Galaxy,” “Gilmore Girls”) is 45. Actress A.J. Langer (“Private Practice”) is 45. Actress Ginnifer Goodwin (“Once Upon a Time”) is 41. Singer Vivian Green is 40. Actress Maggie Q (“Insurgent,” “Divergent”) is 40. Actress Molly Ephraim (“Last Man Standing”) is 33. Actress Anna Baryshnikov (“Superior Donuts”) is 27. Actress Camren Bicondova (“Gotham”) is 20. — Associated Press


LOCAL

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

DIGEST

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Kevin Speis of VFW Post 5077 of O’Fallon, Mo., waves to motorcyclists from Big Bend Road over Interstate 270 in Kirkwood during Tuesday’s “Run for the Wall” event. Riders, who headed from Wentzville to the St. Louis VA Medical Center at Jefferson Barracks, are honoring veterans and those killed in action from multiple routes that converge on Friday in Arlington, Va. WASHINGTON, D.C. — Hawley bill targets data collection: U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley introduced legislation Tuesday that would give internet users the ability to opt out of allowing their personal data to be tracked and collected, the latest effort in the Missouri Republican’s broader campaign against big tech. Hawley’s Do Not Track Act is modeled after the national Do Not Call list, which allows people to opt out of telemarketing calls. Hawley’s office says it would allow internet users to opt out of tracking by clicking a setting in their browsers or by downloading an app. Hawley said the measure is in response to big tech companies collecting “incredible amounts of deeply personal, private data from people without giving them the option to meaningfully consent.” “They have gotten incredibly rich by employing creepy surveillance tactics on their users, but too often the extent of this data extraction is only known after a tech company irresponsibly

handles the data and leaks it all over the internet,” Hawley said in a statement. “The American people didn’t sign up for this, so I’m introducing this legislation to finally give them control over their personal information online.” The Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general would have the authority to enforce the legislation, and the bill would give the FTC the power to create related regulations. Companies would face a minimum $100,000 fine or up to $1,000 per day per affected person for knowingly violating the rules. Negligent violations could be punished by as much as $50 per day per affected person. The bill includes an exception for data collected to help law enforcement. ST. LOUIS COUNTY — I-44 shutdown scheduled: All lanes of Interstate 44 between Interstate 270 and South Geyer Road will be closed in Sunset Hills later this month to remove an overpass, the

Missouri Department of Transportation announced. The interstate will close at 7 p.m. on Friday, May 31, so workers can remove the westbound Watson Road overpass bridge over I-44. The interstate is set to reopen by 5 a.m. on Monday, June 3. Crews will work rebuilding the bridge for five months, according to the department. During the closure, drivers will still be able to access both north and south I-270 and eastbound Watson Road from both directions of I-44. But drivers who wish to continue on I-44 will be detoured. Eastbound drivers will be redirected to take Watson Road and turn onto Lindbergh Boulevard to get back to Interstate 44. Westbound Interstate 44 drivers will be redirected to take the Interstate 270 exit and use the westbound Watson ramp after the bridge to continue on west on Interstate 44. When the lanes reopen, eastbound I-44 will be restriped with

MEN’S SPORTSWEAR

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ST. LOUIS — Lottery customer wins $1 million: If you recently bought a lottery ticket in Defiance, Monday could have been your lucky day. The Missouri Lottery announced that someone purchased a winning Mega Millions ticket worth $1 million at the Double D Market, 1300 Highway DD. The ticket matched all five white-ball numbers drawn Friday: 5, 17 28, 32 and 63. The lottery advised the winner to sign the back of the ticket immediately. Winners have 180 days after the drawing to claim

their prize at a lottery office in St. Louis, Jefferson City, Kansas City or Springfield. LADUE — John Burroughs plan advances: The City Council approved an amendment Monday to a special use permit that would allow John Burroughs School, at 755 South Price Road, to construct a new natatorium. The amendment changes the campus site plan, including construction of an additional parking area with 64 new spaces, renovation of a 35-year-old, six-lane natatorium to become a multi-purpose athletic space (including squash courts), construction of a new eight-lane natatorium just south of the existing facility, and modifications to an existing field hockey field, to enlarge the field slightly and install new synthetic turf to allow its use for multiple sports (including lacrosse and soccer) and install new permanent bleachers. The proposal does not request lighting or a sound system for the field.

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two regular lanes, one ramp lane for northbound I-270 and one ramp lane for southbound I-270. The new lanes will give crews working on the Watson Road overpass room to reconstruct the bridge as well as drainage and pavement work. While the bridge is closed, Watson Road drivers can use Lindbergh to access westbound I-44 and northbound and southbound I-270.

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A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Better Together vice chair calls for dissolution BY DAVID HUNN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — A key member of the city-county merger initiative has quit its board, citing “major reservations” about the future of the organization and calling for the resignation of three top officials. Better Together Vice Chairman Will Ross, associate dean for diversity at Washington University School of Medicine, said he worries that the nonprofit is planning to take its existing proposal and “repurpose it,” without community input. “I don’t have the confidence that the same people at the table can do this and be trusted,” Ross said. “At this point, when we’ve had such an abysmal — and I use that word correctly — such an abysmal response from the public, I think it’s time for a complete restructuring.” Ross’ comments come before a Better Together board meeting scheduled for Thursday. Other trustees did not on Tuesday echo his concerns. They did, however, say that they expect to contemplate the organization’s future at the meeting.

“I’m sure there will be a great deal of discussion,” said trustee Jeff Aboussie, a former union official and current lobbyist. “I think this is a very, very delicate and important decision that all of us have to make, in this whole region.” Better Together announced two weeks ago that it was again pulling its beleaguered consolidation proposal from ballot consideration and suspending its campaign arm, UniteSTL. Since then, Ross — one of five task force members who helped write the organization’s report and recommendations — said he has tried to engage in the reboot but hasn’t been contacted by Better Together director Nancy Rice. On Friday, he sent Rice an ultimatum. He called for the dissolution of Better Together or, in the absence of such a decision, the removal of Rice, board Chairman Joe Adorjan and communications chief Ed Rhode. “At this point, I don’t know whether Better Together is a viable entity, or whether it even should be,” Ross wrote in his email to Rice. “I understand the move to shutter Unite STL, but the public,

the Better Together board, and the Task Force deserve more information about the next steps. This silence only validates the suspicion that decisions about Better Together are made by an insular, self-serving group.” Ross said he would support the appointment of Better Together’s second-in-command, Dave Leipholtz, as new director, calling him knowledgeable, “incredibly bright” and “less dismissive than Nancy has been.” Rice and Adorjan did not return phone calls seeking comment. Rhode declined to discuss Ross’ resignation. Better Together publicly announced its proposal in late January to merge the governments of St. Louis, St. Louis County and all 88 county municipalities into one “metropolitan city.” The plan was almost immediately attacked by residents and municipal officials who were publicly outraged by two main parts of the measure: a proposal to put the initiative to a statewide vote, and the automatic appointment of then-St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger as first mayor of the merged metro city.

When news broke in March that federal prosecutors were investigating Stenger, Better Together removed him from the proposal. Board members and insiders began urging the nonprofit’s leaders to consider major changes. On May 6, the UniteSTL campaign committee — which includes Rice and Washington University Chancellor Mark Wrighton — pulled the initiative from ballot consideration. Wrighton said then that they were examining how to move forward. He called for a more inclusive process and said leaders were open to changes to the proposal. But he also suggested that the organization’s problem was largely communication, not the substance of the initiative. Multiple Better Together board members said Tuesday that they had no misgivings on the organization’s direction. Trustee Mike Hejna, president and CEO of Gundaker Commercial Group in St. Louis, said he does not blame Better Together leadership for the organization’s struggles. He blames Stenger, and bad timing — and is still committed to the mission.

“St. Louis has not had growth in 30 years,” said Hejna, who noted he was not speaking for Gundaker. “Part of the problem is our dysfunction in our municipal delivery system. Better Together brought that problem to the surface and offered a pretty dramatic solution.” Solving the problem will require “the entire village,” Hejna said, and Better Together still may play a role. “I don’t think we need to stop trying,” he said. Ross, too, emphasized that he still believed in Better Together’s goals — but no longer its methods. “I want to acknowledge the great work of the task force,” he said. “A lot of that information is valid, and I hope it’s not dismissed. But in order to really accept that validity, Better Together has to humble itself and repurpose itself.” “Absent any of that action,” he concluded, “I don’t think anyone should trust Better Together going forward.” David Hunn • 314-340-8121 @davidhunn on Twitter dhunn@post-dispatch.com

Zoo From A1

on their face,” said Heidi Hellmuth, the zoo’s curator of primates. “It’s going to be life-changing.” The new area will be about 35,000 square feet, slightly bigger than the footprint of the Primate House itself. About 45 primates — old world monkeys, new world monkeys and lemurs — live at the Primate House, built in 1925. They will all get to use the new outside space. The Primate House has been renovated over the years and now has 13 indoor habitats with clear fronts that allow visitors to see and interact. Zookeepers change up the spaces, adding logs and ropes and climbing structures, and the monkeys sometimes use tunnels to go between habitats. The Primate House has six small outdoor enclosures, but they’re used only by lemurs and saki monkeys. The other primates can’t use them because they’re either too small or too strong for the structures. About three years ago, Hellmuth recalled, keepers first brought the saki monkeys to the outdoor structures. “It brought tears to my eyes,” she said. The looks in the sakis’ eyes changed as they felt the wind blow in their faces for the first time, listened to the birds, and felt the warmth of the sun. “They didn’t want to come inside for days,” she said. Animal welfare, and the fact that most of the primates live indoors, was a big factor when the zoo completed a strategic plan about five years ago. The humans knew the animals would benefit from going outside. Visitors to the zoo this spring may have noticed workers taking down the old arena and planting grass. Two large sycamore trees and one blue ash tree will be wrapped in netting and serve as habitats. Surveyors made 3D scans of the existing trees, which they dropped into a computer model to figure out where to build the tree habitats and how to build around the root systems, said David McGuire, the zoo’s vice president of architecture and planning.

Residency From A1

would abolish the requirement for all employees. If the bill passes, the matter would go before voters. Krewson said she supports a repeal for all employees. She called her waivers a “stop-gap measure” for police. Lynch has been told he’s not eligible for a waiver, and the reasons have varied, said his wife, Michelle Lynch, who spoke on his behalf because the department forbids officers from speaking to reporters. She said her husband left police work in 2017 to try a corporate job but decided serving and protecting was his passion. When he recently asked about a waiver, the department told him his previous service disqualified him because he was technically not a recruit. They also said he already lives in the city and the charter forbids employees from moving out, Michelle Lynch said. The second officer could not be reached for comment, but, along with Lynch, is the subject of a police union grievance alleging that Krewson did not properly negotiate the waivers and that they should apply to all officers, not just those hired after her announcement.

RENDERINGS COURTESY OF THE ST. LOUIS ZOO

A rendering of the St. Louis Zoo’s planned Sycamore Sanctuary, a habitat that will be created around an existing sycamore tree. A raised boardwalk for visitors will pass beside the tree. them back and forth between the Primate House and the Canopy Trails. An animal care building will sit in the middle of Primate Canopy Trails and will serve as an enrichment area for the primates and a shelter from weather. The building will not be open to the public, but visitors will be able to look through windows at keepers and animals. The area will be planted with “browse gardens” where food will be cultivated for the animals, and inside the habitats they can pick a tasty treat, like willow, mulberries and marigolds. They’ll also be able to see and interact with birds and insects that will naturally fly inside, and even eye their predator neighbors: the lions in Big Cat Country. The public will be able to get to Primate Canopy Trails through three main entrances, one of them through the Primate House. At another entrance will be tree climbing structures for kids, similar to the climbing tree structure at the Magic House children’s museum. While the public will be able to

get among the trees with the primates, they’ll keep a safe distance — at least 6 feet from netted structures. Panels separate the primates from humans in overhead spots. “So you don’t have too natural of an experience,” Hellmuth joked. The St. Louis Zoo got ideas for the attraction from the Philadelphia Zoo, whose Zoo360 features tunnels and trails throughout the zoo for animals to explore outside their normal habitats. As they planned,Hellmuth and other staffers also took a field trip to City Museum in St. Louis, to study humans climbing in the wild. The new exhibit also means more ways for keepers and researchers to study the primates and may also open up breeding possibilities and larger primate family groups. “It’s a quantum leap forward in so many ways. Animals, staff, visitors, everything,” said Hellmuth. “I think this will be an exhibit you hear about for years to come.”

peal all residency requirements for all city employees. First, the Board of Aldermen would have to agree to put the plan on the ballot. Previous efforts have failed. But there is another way — through the state Legislature. State Rep. Ron Hicks, RDardenne Prairie, filed a bill that would have repealed residency requirements for all municipal police departments earlier this year. “It died on the vine,” said Jeff Roorda, business manager for the St. Louis Police Officers Association. Some residents and aldermen have opposed repealing residency, saying having officers live in the city they patrol invests them in the community and makes them better officers. Michelle Lynch disagrees. “I grew up in the city and he grew up here — we’re very vested in the success of the city. Whether we reside on a different side of River Des Peres doesn’t make us any less invested in loving St. Louis city, because we both really do,” she said. Frank is among those who support repealing the residency re‘It’s Byzantine’ quirement. Krewson is hoping voters will “It’s Byzantine,” he said. “The make the confusion moot by residency requirement severely changing the city’s charter to re- limits our ability to recruit and

retain,” he said. “People may not be able to sell their house, have financial or other reasons they don’t want to move to the city, so we’re not able to recruit from Jennings, Illinois, Jefferson County or even St. Louis County.” Ultimately, the Civil Service Commission decides who gets waivers. Frank serves as secretary to the commission, which is composed of three members appointed by the mayor. According to the city charter, those who do get waivers must have them renewed every year. Frank said he anticipates the commission will grant waivers to those who are eligible, but Michelle Lynch said the uncertainty isn’t fair. “Who wants to live like that? Year to year not knowing if you’ll get approval?” Lynch said her husband would quit the force and apply with a department in the county when their twins are closer to school age. “He will be willing to leave the job he loves because it’s more important to get them the care they need,” Michelle Lynch said. Their boys are 2½ years old.

A rendering of the Primate Panorama entrance, at which visitors could watch the primates while passing through a clear tube. They also had to rebuild the zoo train tunnel that runs under that piece of ground, and work plans around that. A total of eight habitats and more than a dozen netted tunnels connecting them will mean there could be more than 70 combinations of monkeys, lemurs and habitats, which will keep things exciting for everyone — even the humans. The boardwalk will climb

about 15 feet above ground, placing humans among the trees. “Our greatest mission is connecting animals with people,” said Michael Macek, zoo director. “We are always looking for new ways to do that.” The animals will be able to choose among certain habitats. If they want a break from the crowds, they can go in shelters inside the habitats. Keepers can also take

The Police Officers Association has opposed the residency requirement since it was enacted in May 1973. Over the years, pensions have been threatened and families have lived apart to avoid violation of the policy. Krewson said she sympathizes with the Lynches. “This wasn’t what we were thinking about when I said, ‘Let’s do 50 waivers.’”

Now, about 270 of the fire department’s 700 or so employees — or about 40 percent — live outside the city, Frank said. But the firefighters’ exception had a catch: Firefighters could move out as long as the St. Louis Public Schools were not fully accredited, or for five years after the district regained full accreditation, which it did in 2017. “The clock is ticking for a lot of people,” Frank said. That includes police. The department was run by the state when officers won permission to move out of the city. The city regained control of the police department in September 2013. Police Chief John Hayden said in an interview Thursday that only officers hired before then can move out after seven years. In an interview Saturday, Krewson disagreed, saying policies in place during the state control of the department carried over when the city took control. That debate won’t be tested until September 2020 when the first officers hired under city control reach seven years and can apply to move out of the city

Clock is ticking About 550 of about 1,870 police department employees already live outside the city limits. They won that right in 2005 when the police commissioners decided to allow officers with seven years of service to live outside the city, effective immediately. Commonly cited reasons for employees wanting to live elsewhere include the quality of public education and crime, Personnel Director Richard Frank said. But other reasons include spouses wanting to be closer to their jobs, or a preference for a more rural environment, Frank said. For the Lynch family, it’s schools. They believe a school in the county would better serve their autistic twin boys. Firefighters sought the same seven-year option through the state Legislature, and got it in 2010.

Valerie Schremp Hahn • 314-340-8246 @valeriehahn on Twitter vhahn@post-dispatch.com

Mark Schlinkmann of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Ward reduction fight resumes BY MARK SCHLINKMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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ST. LOUIS — With the Better Together proposal to merge St. Louis and St. Louis County shelved at least temporarily, the city’s own ward reduction plan approved by voters in 2012 is back on political center stage at City Hall. Some members of the Board of Aldermen on Tuesday sparred over an advisory committee that is supposed to take public input before the board in 2021 redraws the boundary lines and cuts the wards to 14 from 28. Alderman Heather Navarro, who chairs the yetto-be-appointed advisory panel, told the aldermanic Legislation Committee that more than 50 people applied and that a 5-member selection group would pick the members.

The advisory panel, she said, would study how the reduction in aldermen and the new larger wards could affect everyday operations such as the delivery of constituent services and the divvying up of capital improvements money. The actual redrawing of the wards will be done by the aldermen. “We’re making sure that we’re doing our due diligence as elected leaders in this city,” said Navarro, D-28th Ward. She said Alderman Pam Boyd, D-27th Ward, had been serving as co-chair but resigned about a month ago. Navarro said the selection panel includes Serena Muhammad of the city Violence Prevention Coalition; Todd Swanstrom, a public policy professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis; Michael Evans, a political

science professor at HarrisStowe State College; David Gerth, executive director of Metropolitan Congregations United, and Nicole Hudson, a Washington University official and a former mayoral aide. But Alderman John Collins-Muhammad, D-21st Ward, a ward reduction opponent who wants the entire issue put back on the ballot for a re-vote next year, complained that the advisory committee process wasn’t representative of the whole city. Asked by Collins-Muhammad how many of the selection panel members resided in north St. Louis, Navarro said she didn’t know where they lived. She said they were picked because of their expertise on public policy and community organizing.

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Abortion From A1

Supreme Court drew hundreds of protesters and several Democratic presidential candidates. Sens. Cory Booker of New Jersey, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, in addition to Reps. Eric Swalwell of California and Tim Ryan of Ohio, were among the attendees as multiple members of Congress spoke to a crowd that hoisted signs defending abortion rights. “I cannot tell you how important this moment in our country’s history is,” Gillibrand said. “Do not allow this moment to lapse without putting everything you can behind it. Organize, advocate and vote.” Some protesters carried purple signs that declared, “Abortion is a human right.” Among their chants: “No church/No state/Women must decide their fate.” Lauri Ploch, 67, came from Alexandria, Virginia, with a sign depicting a drawing of a uterus and the message, “Mine, not yours.” Ploch recalled the conflict over birth control and abortion rights in her youth, and suggested that her generation mistakenly believed that such struggles were in the past. “I got complacent for a little while. I think a lot of people did,” she said. “Right now we need to really get up in their faces and show that we are ready to fight to keep our rights.” In Atlanta, several hundred protesters jammed onto the steps of the Georgia statehouse. Chants of “Vote them out!” and “My body, my right!” blared through a loudspeaker as passing drivers honked their horns in support. One woman carried a coat hanger with a sign that read, “Not going back.” Brandi Borgwat, 42, drove about 30 minutes from her home in Woodstock, Georgia, to join the protests. “I didn’t protest before because it sounded so insane that I didn’t believe it would pass,” Borgwat said of Georgia’s new law. It’s scheduled to take effect on Jan. 1, but opponents have vowed to sue to block it. In St. Louis, a crowd stretched from the west side of Luther Ely Smith Park, in the shadow of the Arch, across Fourth Street

Helmet From A1

The legislation has been on the wish list of motorcycle rights groups for years, but it has never made it to a governor’s desk. Tony Shepherd, lobbyist for A Brotherhood Aimed Toward Education, or ABATE, said getting the helmet law across the finish line came as a surprise given its long history of failing. “We are stoked,” the 62-year-old O’Fallon, Mo., resident said. “We’re still in disbelief.” The original sponsor of the proposal is Sen.Eric Burlison, a Springfield Republican who had backed similar

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Shelby Morgan, of Barnhart, demonstrates in front of the Old Courthouse in St. Louis on Tuesday to oppose a bill passed last week by the Missouri Legislature that tightens restrictions on abortions. “I believe that women should have a choice about what to do with their bodies,” Morgan said. to the steps of the Old Courthouse. Signs warned that “Signers of HB126 will pay at the polls,” referring to Missouri’s restrictive bill, and that “Women will die. Republicans don’t care.” Speakers, including the Rev. Traci Blackmon; St. Louis Treasurer Tishaura Jones; Democratic Rep. Cora Faith Walker of Ferguson; two OB-GYNs; and Alison Dreith, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri, told the crowd that the bill was about controlling women and would not stop abortions but simply prevent safe access to them. They handed out Missouri Gov. Mike Parson’s phone number and implored the crowd to “flood” his office with calls and to vote those who supported the ban out of office. At the end of the organized event, some protesters filled Fourth Street, blocking traffic and chanting “veto” and “we

legislation during his tenure in the House. The measure awaits Parson’s signature.As a member of the House in the 2000s, Parson twice voted in favor of abolishing the state’s helmet laws.If approved,the change would take effect Aug. 28. Shepherd attributed the win to a new mix of lawmakers in the Senate and the fact that the legislation was just one provision in a larger mix of transportation-related changes that were included in one bill. “It just happened to come at the right time,” Shepherd said. In the past, there has been resistance largely in the Missouri Senate because operating a motorcycle tends to be

won’t go back” for about 20 minutes before leaving. Ashley Buck, 30, a waitress from St. Louis, held a cardboard sign that read, “I’m a Pro-Choice Mom” on one side and “Ask Me About My 2 Abortions — I Am Not Ashamed” on the other. She said she had one at age 16, and another at age 27. “My choice,” Buck said. That same message was echoed by several hundred people gathered in the Utah Capitol rotunda. Their chant: “My body, my choice!” Utah legislators recently passed a ban on abortions after 18 weeks but have agreed not to enforce the ban as a court challenge plays out. In the crowd of abortion rights activists, one counterprotester, JACQUELYN MARTIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS Deanna Holland, stood with an Kristin Mink of Silver Spring, Md., holds her three-week-old daughter anti-abortion sign urging people Tuesday as she protests restrictive abortion laws outside the Supreme to care for unborn fetuses. Court in Washington. Being able to access abortion services earlier in life allowed Mink to have the life she has today, with her two children, Mink Robert Patrick of the Post-Dispatch said. contributed to this report.

more hazardous than operating a car. According to National Highway Transportation Safety Administration,1,859 motorcyclist lives were saved in 2016 because they were wearing helmets. In addition, if all riders had worn helmets, an additional 802 lives would have been saved, the report notes. According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, helmets reduce the risk of head injuries from motorcycle crashes by

69 percent and deaths by 37 percent. Currently, 19 states and the District of Columbia have universal helmet laws requiring all motorcyclists to wear a helmet.Twenty-eight states require only some motorcyclists to wear a helmet. Three states — Illinois, Iowa and New Hampshire — do not have a motorcycle helmet law. According to the institute, when California imposed a helmet law covering all riders in 1992, the number of mo-

torcyclist fatalities dropped by 37 percent. When Texas changed its law in 1977 to require helmets only for riders younger than 18, the state saw a 35 percent increase in motorcycle fatalities.The Lone Star State reinstated its helmet law in 1989 and saw serious injury crashes decrease by 11 percent. In 1997,Texas again weakened its helmet law, requiring helmets only for riders younger than 21. Operator fatalities increased 31 per-

cent in the first full year following the repeal. Shepherd downplayed the statistics,saying he’s crashed his bike with and without a helmet. “It’s about freedom. We want to get the government out of our lives. We’re not outlawing helmets. We are letting you decide,” Shepherd said. The legislation is Senate Bill 147. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

LAW AND ORDER HILLSBORO — Man found dead a day after release: About a day after being released from the Jefferson County Jail, a man was found dead Tuesday morning on the parking lot between the jail and the sheriff’s office. A sheriff’s office spokesman, Grant Bissell, said foul play is not suspected in the man’s death. There were no signs of violence. A jail employee found the body of 54-year-old Gary Finklang at about 7 a.m. Tuesday near some trash bins, on the parking lot between the jail and sheriff’s office, Bissell said. The jail is at 510 First Street in Hillsboro. Bissell said Finklang had been booked into the jail about 8 p.m. Sunday on suspicion of driving under the influence. He was released from the jail about 8 a.m. Monday — about 23 hours before he was found dead. Jefferson County Sheriff David Marshak tweeted that Finklang had been arrested on suspicion of DWI, drug possession and driving while his license had been revoked. He had been seen in Hillsboro during the day of his release, Marshak said. ST. LOUIS COUNTY — Man sentenced for shooting at officer: A man from Ferguson who shot at an off-duty police officer after being ejected from a bar was sentenced Tuesday to six and a half years in federal prison, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. On Aug. 23, 2017, Rudolph K. Clarett, 40, fired shots with a 9mm handgun at the officer, who was working security at a St. Louis County bar that had just thrown out Clarett, prosecutors said. The officer was not injured. Clarett was also caught with a 9mm handgun on Feb. 17, 2018, by a St. Louis County police officer who discovered that the car Clarett was driving was stolen, they said. Clarett pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in St. Louis in February to two counts of possessing a firearm while a convicted felon. ST. LOUIS — Shooting victim identified: Police have identified a man found shot dead on a vacant parking lot in St. Louis on Monday night. Durwin Harris, 25, had been shot multiple times and died at the scene, police say. He was found in the 4900 block of Arlington Avenue, just north of Interstate 70 in the Mark Twain neighborhood. Harris had lived in the 1300 block of Temple Place in St. Louis. Neighbors told a reporter they heard about two dozen gunshots. Police say they don’t know who killed Harris. Authorities asked anyone with information to contact CrimeStoppers at 1-866371-8477 (tipsters can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward) or the St. Louis Police Department’s homicide division at 314-444-5371. ALTON — Police looking for vandals: Police are asking for the public’s help in locating the vandals who shattered about 50 lights and stole bulbs from the amphitheater in Riverfront Park sometime Monday night or early Tuesday morning, causing about $6,000 in damage. Anyone who provides information leading to the arrest and conviction of the vandals could receive $1,000. “It’s very disappointing to me that at a time when resources are already being stretched thin we now have to divert workers from their tasks related to flood repairs and city beautification,” Alton Public Works Director Robert Barnhart said in a statement. “Instead of those vital projects, my staff is now working to restore fixtures that are only broken because of foolish acts of vandalism.” Officials say this is the second such incident in two weeks; several bulbs were damaged sometime May 9 or May 10. The parks are typically open from sunrise to sunset, unless evening events are approved by the city.

The city has issued a zerotolerance policy effective immediately, stating that anyone caught trespassing in the park after hours will be arrested. Police are encouraging anyone with information to call the Alton Police Department at 618-463-3505 or reach out to the department through social media. ST. LOUIS — Former Wellston housing official admits theft: The former head of the Wellston Housing Authority pleaded guilty Monday to a federal theft charge and admitted stealing tenants’ rent money. Marchell Benton, 63, de-

posited tenant rent money in her personal bank account or used it to pay the rent of relatives who were tenants, her plea agreement says. Benton then falsified records to show that the tenants whose rent money she’d misused had paid their rent, or used another tenant’s rent money to cover up her theft. The scheme ran from at least Jan. 1, 2013, to April 28, 2015, the plea says. Benton was executive director of the Wellston Housing Authority at the time and was responsible for day-to-day operations, as well as collecting rent and keeping rent records,

the plea says. The plea agreement doesn’t tally up the exact total of rent stolen but penalizes her for a “loss amount” of $15,000$40,000. The housing authority was under administrative receivership by U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development at the time because of bad governance and property conditions. At her sentencing hearing in August, Benton could face six to 12 months in prison.

against three local judges and their colleagues across the state, claiming that she was improperly stripped her of the power to run her office. The suit was filed Saturday in Cole County Circuit Court. It follows an unsuccessful appeal of a January vote by the judges to remove Karla Allsberry’s authority to hire and fire her employees and submit a budget shortly after Allsberry took office. Among the judges named in the suit are Presiding Judge Patrick Flynn and St. LINCOLN COUNTY — Cir- Louis Circuit Judge Steven cuit clerk sues judges: The Ohmer, who heads a state circuit clerk has filed suit court committee that heard

Allsberry’s appeal. The suit says Flynn wrongly claimed in the January meeting that he was forced to take action by a “crisis” in the clerk’s office and has since verbally harassed a deputy clerk, threatened to place Allsberry on leave and assaulted Allsberry during a meeting by grabbing documents out of her hands. Flynn said he could not comment on the suit. Allsberry’s suit also says she has been blocked from obtaining a financial audit of the clerk’s office. She is seeking a judge’s order that would reverse the January vote.

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'16 Audi S3 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 22k mi., #P9793A $32,963

'18 Audi A5 Sportback Prem Plus, quattro sportback, 4 cyl., awd, white, 6k, #27841L $44,900

'16 Audi Q5 Premium, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 22k mi., #P9901 $27,000

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05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Audi

Ford

Nissan/Datsun

GMC Trucks

'16 Audi S6 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 32k mi., #29179A $46,900

'13 EDGE: #190421, $12,572 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '18 Ford Transit 250, clean carfax, full power, #44561A $25,990

'17 Nissan Armada Platinum, #192411 $34,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $62,000

Pontiac

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, #27848L $42,500

'15 Audi S5 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9791 $27,777

'17 Audi S8 Plus, 4.0 TFSI, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 25k mi., #29184A $79,900

'15 Hyundai Sonata SE, loaded, clean carfax, full power, #35151B $10,976

'17 GMC Yukon Denali, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 17k mi., #29272A $53,900

Subaru

'18 GMC Yukon Denali, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 5k mi., #28951M $63,250

'18 Subaru WRX STI Type RA, sedan, 4 cyl., awd, manual, blue, 4k mi., #P9947 $45,500

Toyota '15 Toyota 4Runner Trail, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 10k mi., #P9804A $33,963

'19 Infiniti QX60 LUXE, 9k mi., black, awd, variable, #98090L $39,200 '18 Toyota Camry SE, loaded, clean carfax, full power, #42629B $20,990

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, 13k mi., $35,200 #P9817

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus, awd, 6k mi., clean carfax, 1 owner #28604L $35,100

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $38,100 #28140L

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 6k mi, Cert, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $38,250 #P9238

'17 Audi A6 Premium Plus, sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, white, 3k mi., #P9907 $35,000

'18 Audi A6, Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, grey, #28600L $42,100

'18 Audi S4 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 8k mi., #29014A $46,777

'15 Audi S4 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 50k mi., #P9687 $30,100

'16 Audi A5 Premium Plus, quattro coupe, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9835 $28,200

'17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $63,200 #95548L

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl, awd, auto, black, 16k mi., #P9887 $57,000

'15 Infiniti QX80 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 97k mi., #98388A $31,963

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 17k mi., #P9968 $54,963

'17 Infiniti QX80 auto, awd, blue, #95533L $63,777

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 16k mi., #P9886 $37,000

'17 Infiniti Q50, 3.0t Premium, Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 12k mi., #96195L $29,250

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27853L $42,600 '18 Jaguar XF 35t R-Sport, 9k mi., sedan, auto, awd, #P9821 $43,200 '18 GMC Canyon 4wd, all terrain w/cloth, pickup crew cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 4k, #P9860 $31,777

Kia '16 Kia Soul Plus, H/B, loaded, clean carfax, #37184A $11,990

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $38,777

'16 S 60 T5: Drive-E Ins cription S e da n, #L1603, $18,5 00 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 S60 T5 R: Special Edition, #L1582, $19,550 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC90: SUV $36,500, #L1566 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 XC 60 T6: SUV, #L15531, $10,822 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo XC90 SUV #L1591 $36,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Volvo XC60 T5, awd, ins cription, #P 4358 $26,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC 90 SUV: #197901, $34,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC90 T5 Momentum: AWD $32,800 #L1559 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo S60 T5, #L1529 $18,891 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '13 Volvo XC60 T6 #L16051 $16,855 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'16 Silverao 1500 LT 27k Miles, 4WD, Auto, 4.3L $26,990 #P6756

'15 SIILVERADO 1500 LT: Double Cab Pickup, 8 Cyl 4WD, Auto, Black, 36xxx Miles, #P6781, $28,450

'16 SILVERADO 1500 LT: Double Cab Pickup, 8 Cyl, 4WD, Auto, Silver, 41xxx Miles, #P6783, $27,990

'16 CREW CAB DUALLY 4x4: Loaded, Only 37xxx Miles! #44410A, $47,900

Lexus '16 BMW M3, Sedan 6 cyl., rwd, manual, black, lthr., 8k mi., #29149A $50,225

'16 BMW M255ix Drive Coupe, 36k mi., 6 cyl., 3.0L, awd, auto, #P9768 $27,900

'15 BMW M3 4dr sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, manual, white, 29k mi., #P9684 $41,100

'16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, $32,100 #12382A

'16 RC 300 Coupe: 16xxx Miles, Auto, AWD, Keyless Start, $30,100, #P9644

'14 Lexus GX 460 Luxury, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 41k mi., #29153A $36,777

'18 Lexus LC 500h coupe, 6 cyl., RWD, silver, 10k mi., #P9941 $73,700

Lincoln '16 Lincoln MKZ: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean $17,500 #44323A

'16 BMW 3 Series Gran Turismo 335i xDrive, hatchback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 37k mi., #P9790 $26,777

Mazda Buick '18 Buick Enclave Essence, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 2k mi., $38,200, #41129A

'17 Buick LaCrosse Premium Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 17k mi., #P9893 $27,000

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $32,200

'18 GMC Acadia Denali, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 21k mi., #97319A $35,275

'16 Mazda 3 Touring, loaded, clean carfax, #35570A $6,990

Cadillac '13 Cadillac XTS Premium, awd, sedan, #P43601, $22,825 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, pickup crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 4k, #44061A $39,990

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double cab pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 2k mi., #42599A $34,992

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double ca b pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, 4k mi., #420200A $34,990

'15 Chevy Corvette Z51 3LT, convertible, 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd manual, 51k, #44573A $44,990

'17 Chevy Corvette 1LT, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 6k mi., #44452A $45,490

Dodge '13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $28,200

'11 Dodge Nitro, heat, loaded, 4x4, very clean, #44053A $9,469

STLtoday.com/jobs

Sport Utility '18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $41,250 #28175L

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $40,100 #P9665

'07 CHEVY EQUINOX LS: AWD, Loa de d, Only 53xxx Mile s , #44685A, $8,992

'11 Chevy Equinox LT, clean carfax, loaded, #44351A $8,996

'19 Chevy Tahoe LT, sport utility vehicle, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, grey, 19k mi., #P6835 $47,994

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 103k mi., #79492B $28,200

'19 Chevy Traverse LT, leather, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 20k mi., #P6798 $37,770

'19 Chevy Tra ve rs e LT, lthr., 6 cyl., awd, a uto, grey, 18k mi., $38,991, #P 6793

'17 GMC Terrain SLT, #L15981 $23,755 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Dodge Durango R/T, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 35k mi., #P9927 $32,250

'15 GMC YUKON DENALI: Loa de d, Cle a n Carfax, GM Ce rtifie d! #42629A, $37 ,990

'16 GMC Yukon SLE, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 27k mi, #P9894 $37,000

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $41,250 #79760A

'17 Mazda MX-5 Miata, RF Gra nd Touring, coupe , 4 cyl., RWD, 6 spd ma nua l, re d, 25k mi., #P 6674 $24,973

'16 Toyota Highlander XLE, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 14k mi., #P9914 $32,000

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500, auto, black, 45k mi., $28,750 #P6780

Mini vans '16 Chevy Silverado, 1500 LT, p/u crew cab, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, 35k mi., #P6803 $31,490

'11 HONDA ODYS S EY EX-L: Loa de d, Full P owe r, Cle a n Carfax, #42365A, $11,469

'08 Chevy Silverado, Reb Cab, loaded, clean carfax, #P6783A $8,990

Motorcycles

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, cre w ca b, 8 cyl., 4 WD, 2k mi., $38,994 #42936A

2002 KTM XC250 Asking $1200, (314)996-9826 '97 Harley Road King Classic, exc cond. 1 owner, low mi, $6800. 314-541-3267

Landscape Laborers '13 Mazda 3, loaded, clean carfax, full power, #35620A $10,776

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, 8 cyl., 4WD, auto, black, 28k mi., $29,350 #P6784

'11 Mazda 3 Touring, Black, Very Clean, #37155A $9,769 '16 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, 5.3L, Auto, 35K Mi., $27,550 #P6752

Mercedes Benz Corvette

'17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $40,100, #P9626

'02 Chevy Avalanche, loaded, very clean, clean carfax, #44085B $7,790

Chevrolet '11 MALIBU LT: Le a the r, Loa de d, #44595, $8,770

'17 Toyota Tacoma SR5/TRD Sport/TRD Off Road, double cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 12k mi., #P9875 $33,500

Chevrolet Trucks Jaguar 2016 Lexus GS 350 4 door, 34k miles, clean carfax #P9588 $32,250

BMW

Toyota Trucks

Crossovers Volvo

'09 S550 4Matic: Black, Only 55xxx Miles, #44675A, $23,770

'16 Mercedes Benz AMG C 63 S, Sedan, 8 cyl., RWD, auto, red, 15k mi., #P9961 $54,963

'13 C300 4MATIC: #196422, $11,220 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $35,100 #P9651

'12 Mercedes-Benz C-Class C 300 4MATIC Sedan, #196422 $11,220 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Mercedes-Benz SLK 300, Roadster, 4 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 18k mi., #12811A $34,700

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 51k mi., #P6797 $39,990

GMC Trucks '15 CANYON SLE: Loa de d, Ext Ca b, Only 6xxx Mile s ! #37170AA, $21,469

'18 GMC Yukon STL SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 26k mi., #80333B $47,200

Mitchell Inc DBA Mitchell Lawn & Landscape is hiring qualified laborers: lay sod, plant, mow, trim, water, dig, spread dirt, rake, prune, mulch, blow, weed, load/unload materials. Lift up to 75lbs. On the job training. No edu req'd. 3mos. v e r if ia b le ex perience r e q ' d. $14.52/hr. $21.78/hr. O.T. 7am4pm, M-F. Some O.T./weekends may be avail. 24 positions avail for temporary full time work 5/15/1911/1/19. Franklin County area jobsites. Transportation provided to/from jobsites frm Franklin County pickup location. Call Judy: 636458-1000 or email resume: judy@ mitchelllandscapingstl.com. Apply @St. Charles County Job Center, 636-255-6060. Assistance finding/securing lodging avail if needed at no add'l charge. Employer will make all deductions req'd by law frm each paycheck as well as opt'l a d v a n c e s against p a y up to $75/day at end of each workday for room/board at no interest for 1 s t 2 w k s . & for opt'l u n i f o r m c le a n in g ex pense @ $ 3 5 / m o. Year-end bonuses based on performance/quality of job. Workers reimbursed for transportation/subsistence to place of work if worker completes 50% of work period. Return transportation provided if worker completes work period or is dismissed early by employer. No cost tools, supplies, equipment.

'17 GMC Yukon XL Denali, white, auto, 4wd, 19k mi., #79897A $57,200

Dogs STLtoday.com/readerrewards

The Francis Howe ll School District will be requesting proposals for mis ce llane ous carpentry work district wide . For more information, please call 636-851-6300.

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

618.396.2494 '15 GMC Terrain SLE, clean carfax, only 31,xxx miles #44176A $16,569

Infiniti '19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 13k mi., #P9801 $54,200

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: Puppies Ready Now !

'06 Pontiac G6 GT Coupe, loaded, full power, clean carfax, #37044B $4,990

Hyundai '17 Audi Q7 Prestige, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9934 $49,500

Public Notices

AKC German Shepherd Puppies Guard Dog Line, Long Haired $500. Call (573) 756-2494

sieversretrievers.com HAVANESE - 8 & 11 wks. Champ bloodlines. Various colors . Home raised. AKC Reg. $1200-$1800, (573) 578-8585 Mini Australian Shepherd pups, Blue Merle, Red Merles blue eyes, Red Tris, ASDR reg., Ch. lines, Guar. $600, 314-795-9041 ROTTWEILER PUPPIES German Bloodline. $1000.00 618 335 1738 Sheltie AKC Puppies Farm raised, great markings, Ready 6/27. Pick out now. $800 ea. (573)819-9547

Merchandise Wanted WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665 WANTED - Top Dollar Paid for Old Beer Cans or Beer Related Items! Soda items as well. Call 618-444-5440.

Misc. Merchandise For Sale G r o c e r y Equipm ent f o r Sale Shelving, Shopping Carts and Refrigerated Cases. Located at 1001 Majestic Dr, Valley Park MO 63026. Call (314)623-1572

Bargain Box Crosley 3 spd. turntable, $125.00 Hoover Wind tunnel vacuum cleaner, $125. 8 sheet paper shredder, $40. 314-326-9164 24 ft. Werner Equalizer Ladder Rarely used. $135.00. 314-993-4016 Pool table excellent condition. Dismantled for easy pick up. $150; (573) 631-7586

Public Notices ST. LOUIS COUNTY PUBLIC NOTICE

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Bids/Proposals Architectural & Engineering Services RFQ Teen Room Project, Small Library Branch Project and As-Needed Services REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS The St . C harle s C ity - C ounty Library District requests RFQ submission from qualified firms to provide Archite ctural & Engineering Services for Teen Room Project, S mall Library Branch Project, and As-Needed Architectural and Engineering Services. Responses must be received no laterthan 3 p.m. CS T on June 7 , 2019. RFQ at https://www.mylibrary.org /bids-and-rfps

INVITATION TO BID Brinkmann Constructors would like to invite you to bid on the Demolition, Earthwork, SWPPP and Utility packages of work for the Missouri S&T Student Design Center Expansion. Please use the civil drawings dated 4/23/19 and the geotech report dated December 21, 2018 for estimating.

St. Louis County as an Urban Entitlement County is eligible to apply for and receive federal funds from the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for t h e Community Development Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership and Emergency Solutions Grant programs. St. Louis County is also the Lead Agency for the St. Louis County HOME Consortium. The St. Louis County HOME Consortium is a group of contiguous units of local government that have joined together for the purpose of receiving a HOME allocation and administering a HOME Program as a single grantee. The members of the St. Louis County HOME Consortium include St . Louis County, the City of Florissant, the City of O'Fallon, Jefferson County and St. Charles County.

Please contact Andrew Lucas with Brinkmann Constructors at (636) 537-9700 with any questions.

The St. Louis County HOME Consortium has prepared a draft of its Fiscal Year 2019 Action Plan which is an application for federal funds which will be provided by H U D f o r t h e aforementioned programs. This draft 2019 Action Plan includes proposed activities that the St. Louis County HOME Consortium plans to undertake utilizing funds that should be made available on or about July 1, 2019. Copies of this draft 2019 Action Plan will be available for public rev i e w a n d c o m m e n t b e g in n ing Thursday, May 23, 2019 thru June 24, 2019, at the following locations during normal business hours (8 am - 4 pm Monday thru Friday).

Inte re s te d Ge ne ral C ontracting firms should request by mail or email for requirements on qualifications and additional bidding requirements from the office of:

St. Louis County Government Centers • We s t - 7 4 C l a r k s o n - Wi l s o n Center Chesterfield, MO 63017 (314-615-0900) • Northwest Crossing 715 Northwest Plaza Drive St. Ann, MO 63074 (314-615-7400) • South - 4546 Lemay Ferry Road St. Louis, MO 63129 (314-615-4000) St. Louis County Department of Planning • Office of Community Development - 41 S. Central, 5th floor, Clayton, MO 63105 (314615-4414) St. Louis County Library System • Headquarters Location 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63131 (314-994-3300) City of Florissant • Government Building - 1055 Rue St. Francois, Florissant, MO 63031 (314-839-7680) City of O'Fallon • City Hall - 100 N. Main Street, O'Fallon, MO 63366 (636-240-2000) Jefferson County • Jefferson County Economic Dev e lo p me n t Corporation - 5 217 Highway B, Hillsboro, MO 63050 (636-797-5336) St. Charles County • Administrative Building - 201 N. S e c o n d St ., St . C h a r le s , M O 63301 (636-949-7900) All comments regarding the draft of the 2019 Action Plan should be put in writing on or before June 24, 2019 and directed to: Mr. Jim Holtzman, Director Office of Community Development 41 S. Central Avenue, 5th floor Clayton, MO 63105 Phone: (314) 615-4414 (VOICE) 1-800-735-2966 (Relay Missouri TTY Callers) 1-800-735-2466 (Relay Missouri Voice Callers) EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that a public hearing to solicit citizen comments regarding the St. Louis County HOME Consortium draft 2019 Action Plan will be held:

Brinkmann will have the bid documents online at: https://secure.smartinsight.co/#/Publ icBidProject/445648

Request for Proposal for General Contracting Services for Phelps Health Phelps Health located in Rolla Missouri is seeking proposals and additional information for qualified General Contractor Services for an up-coming 9200 square foot Surgery Clinic in shell space in the D e l b e r t Day C ance r Ins titute (DDCI) on the main campus.

TKH Inc. Attention: Carla Welch 121 Hunter Avenue Suite 205 St. Louis MO 63124 314-721-1618 Or by email: cwelch@tkhinc.com Proposals will be due to TKH no later than 2pm (local time) on June 20, 2019. Proposals will be opened in public.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Millstone Weber, LLC is soliciting proposals for Reconstruction of Taxiway K from Taxiway F to Cargo Apron, Le tting No 8 6 9 6 at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. Please phone 636-6888794, fax 636-949-3129 or email bob.stubbs@millstoneweber.com or r y a n .t a y lo r @ mills t o n e w e b er.com, quotes to Bob Stubbs by 5 : 0 0 p m Monday, June 3 rd. S ubcontract work include s , removals, concrete, bituminous pavement, PCC backfill, hauling, landscaping, striping, and electrical. Plans and Specifications are available for review on City of St Louis w e b s it e http:// w w w .stlbps.org/plan room.aspx or at Millstone Weber office.

YOLO O

'18 Audi Q5 Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 7k mi., #27838L $42,963

Dogs

Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 5:30 p.m. St. Louis County Government Center, 5th floor 41 S. Central Ave., Clayton, MO 63105 For more information, special accommodations, or to submit written comments if you are unable to attend the hearing, contact Mr. Jim Holtzman, listed above.

You Only List Once STLtoday.com/homes


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Let’s go ® pick up the Cup Congratulations St. Louis Blues on winning the NHL® Western Conference! We wish you the best of luck in the Stanley Cup® Final. Let’s Go Blues!

©2019 Enterprise Rent-A-Car. The ”e“ logo and Enterprise are registered trademarks of Enterprise Holdings, Inc. NHL, the NHL Shield, the word mark and image of the Stanley Cup and the Stanley Cup Final logo are registered trademarks of the National Hockey League. NHL and NHL team marks are the property of the NHL and its teams. © NHL 2019. All Rights Reserved.


NATION

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

All eyes on Gregory as new archbishop in Washington BY JULIE ZAUZMER AND MICHELLE BOORSTEIN

Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Wilton Gregory, a longtime Catholic cleric who has been a leader in the church’s efforts to address its sexual abuse crisis for more than two decades, was installed Tuesday as archbishop of Washington. Gregory takes the helm of

one of the most prominent Catholic dioceses, in the nation’s capital, at a time when the church locally and globally is embroiled once again in controversy. The new archbishop will be expected to reassure local Catholics stunned by the misdeeds of the previous two archbishops, while the Vatican tries to prevent abuse and to keep disillu-

sioned American members from leaving the church. Under the grand dome of the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, North America’s largest Catholic church, Gregory was loudly cheered by eight red-robed cardinals, almost 50 bishops and thousands of Catholic faithful, as he held out the paper scroll proclaim-

ing him the Washington archbishop. For many, he represents a beacon of hope, that a new leader can set right a stricken community. In his first words to the archdiocese, he acknowledged Catholic leaders’ fault in the sexual abuse crisis — “We clerics and hierarchs have irrefutably been the source of this

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job by Pope Francis last month. Gregory previously served the Diocese of Belleville and has served as archbishop of Atlanta since 2004. He is expected to be made a cardinal soon after he takes over the Washington archdiocese. Gregory pledged in his homily that he would be a bishop “who honestly confesses his faults and failings before you when I commit them, not when they are revealed.” It was the first line of his address that drew applause. Many local Catholic leaders expressed hope that he would tackle abuse issues head-on and draw former Catholics back to church. “He is the right person at the right time,” said Frank Butler, a former staffer for the U.S. bishops conference and retired longtime leader of the Catholic philanthropy group FADICA. “He’s a man of great integrity and character. He assumes his leadership when his flock has been deeply wounded. ... Rebuilding trust will be Archbishop Gregory’s greatest challenge.” Wuerl and Gregory sat beside each other at the front of the basilica during the ceremony on Tuesday, and Wuerl was the first speaker at the Mass. Parishioners in the archdiocese are looking for concrete steps that will signify a change from the old ways, said Pat McGuire, the president of Trinity Washington University, a Catholic institution in the District of Columbia. She suggested that Gregory could answer Francis’ recent call to create a system for laypeople to hold bishops accountable for misconduct, and could increase leadership roles for women in the church. “I think people are eager to get a look at Wilton Gregory. They want to hear him. People are hungry for a new direction. That is his opportunity,” she said.

DOWN

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current tempest” — but focused much more on the importance of maintaining faith in Jesus Christ regardless of troubling circumstances. Many Catholics have lost faith, or been so hurt by their church that they have turned away. So many have left Catholicism since the sexual abuse crisis was first widely exposed in 2002 that the Pew Research Center reports that 13% of Americans are former Catholics. Those who still identify as Catholics are dissatisfied with many church teachings: 76% want permission to use birth control; almost half believe the church should accept gay marriage; about 60% think priests should be allowed to marry and women should be allowed to be priests. And the past year has brought a new wave of scandal, with intense scrutiny of the actions of bishops across the country. Nowhere has that been more acute than Washington. The Washington archdiocese remains healthy and affluent compared with many in the country, with a growing population fueled by immigrants. But it has been sorely tested. First came the revelation that Theodore McCarrick, Washington’s archbishop from 2001 to 2006 and a highly visible diplomat for years after, had allegedly sexually harassed minors and adults. Within months, McCarrick became the first U.S. cardinal to be removed from the priesthood for sexual abuse. A Pennsylvania grand jury report released in August said Cardinal Donald Wuerl mishandled abuse cases when he was bishop of Pittsburgh. After protests, Wuerl retired from his role as archbishop of Washington in October. Into this rattled and heartsick archdiocese steps Gregory, a 71-yearold cleric tapped for the

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A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

M 1 WednesdAy • 05.22.2019 • A12

McDonald’s faces more harassment complaints WASHINGTON POST

WASHINGTON — More than two dozen current and former McDonald’s workers filed sexual harassment complaints Tuesday to confront what they say is widespread misconduct at the fast-food behemoth. Twenty of the 25 complaints were filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, according to the labor group Fight for $15; the rest will play out in civil court. The allegations include groping, indecent exposure, propositions for sex and lewd com-

ments — behavior that reportedly took place at corporate and franchise stores in 20 cities. The action was supported by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund, an initiative created to help people who have been sexually harassed at work, especially in low-wage jobs. Since the fund began, thousands of workers have requested legal help, highlighting the influence of the #MeToo movement and its reach beyond Hollywood and the entertainment industry. Among the complainants is a

New Orleans woman whose manager dismissed her groping complaint because she was “probably giving sex appeal” and a Chicago worker who says she was fired after complaining about a manager who offered to expose himself to her, according to the legal defense fund. Four of the cases involve teenagers. The filings against McDonald’s are part of a broader push that began in 2016 to hold the company accountable for what cooks and cashiers say are inadequate responses to complaints of harassment.

This is the third round of complaints brought on by McDonald’s workers in recent years, according to Fight for $15, bringing the total number to 50. “McDonald’s refuses to take responsibility for harassment experienced by employees in its restaurants,” said Gillian Thomas, senior staff attorney for the ACLU Women’s Rights Project. “With this new round of filings, we are seeking relief for them while calling on shareholders to call the company’s management to account.”

Tax break sought for new hotel downtown 12-story, 154-room building proposed for Olive Street BY JACOB BARKER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Downtown St. Louis could get yet another hotel if an Iowa company secures all necessary approvals. Hawkeye Hotels, based in Iowa City, is proposing a 12-story, $16.5 million, 154-room hotel on a parking lot it owns at 1014-1018 Olive Street. The new hotel, dubbed Moxy St. Louis, would be located next to another Hawkeye-owned property, the 91-room Hotel Majestic St. Louis, at 1019 Olive Street. Staff at the St. Louis Development Corp. is recommending that the St. Louis Board of Aldermen approve a 10-year property tax abatement of 90 percent. The former Hotel Majestic will become a Le Méridien, an upscale Marriott brand. Hawkeye is not seeking any incentives for that rehab project, expected to be completed in late autumn. The Moxy, another Marriott brand, is new “but it’s caught on pretty fast,” said Samir Patel, development manager for Hawkeye. There are only 14 Moxy hotels in

RENDERING BY DYNAMIK DESIGN

Hawkeye Hotels has proposed building Moxy St. Louis, a 12-story, 154room hotel at 1014-1018 Olive Street in downtown St. Louis. the country now, and this would be the second developed by Hawkeye, which owns and operates 50 hotels. The hotels are the latest in a string of lodging proposals downtown, including an 86-room Hotel Indigo in the LaSalle building under construction a couple

blocks away at 501 Olive Street. Over 100 rooms have recently been added to the downtown market and hundreds more are planned or under construction. Restoration St. Louis recently opened Hotel St. Louis in the historic Union Trust building, and last month its owners announced

plans to expand the hotel into the adjacent Chemical Building. Underway is Fe Equus’ 143room hotel in the old International Shoe Co. headquarters. A Live! by Loews hotel under construction in Ballpark Village will add 216 rooms to the entertainment district. And a 185-room, $48 million 21c Museum Hotel is planned for the old YMCA downtown. The 21c’s ownership group, Colorado-based Nuovo RE, also applied for tax abatement. St. Louis Development Corp. staff is recommending 10 years of 90 percent tax abatement and five years of 50 percent abatement. All of the hotel additions have prompted SLDC to seek a consultant market report on the area’s hotel market and room demand. Some aldermen have questioned whether the city should be subsidizing so many hotels. The city’s Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority has been considering hiring H&H Financial, the firm of Chesterfield hotel analyst Gary Andreas, to study the market. The cost would be $11,500. The board in January balked at the hotel contract, calling it unnecessary. But on Tuesday, it approved hiring Andreas to conduct the study. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Vouchers blocked at 5 T.E.H. properties over renovations BY JESSE BOGAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The Housing Authority of St. Louis County said Tuesday that it would not allow new subsidized housing vouchers to be used at five apartment complexes owned by T.E.H. Realty, one of the largest providers of affordable housing in the region. Officials also said existing vouchers in use at the five properties in question will not be renewed. T.E.H. has been on the radar

in recent years following publicity over poor living conditions, primarily at Springwood Apartments in Bel-Ridge, the first of at least a dozen properties that affiliates of the firm purchased in the area since late 2014. Substandard living conditions and building code violations have also been reported at Park Ridge and Northwinds Apartments in Ferguson, which have a combined 774 units. T.E.H. is the new owner of the two complexes that were refurbished about a decade ago with

Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm Appointments & Service Available 24 Hrs. A Day, 7 Days A Week

the lure of at least $42 million in low-income housing tax credits. “The work has not been up to the level that it needs to go,” Susan Rollins, director of the Housing Authority of St. Louis County, said Tuesday at a meeting with the Post-Dispatch editorial board. She added about T.E.H. representatives: “They, in fact, call us to come back and inspect all the time and say they have done just a little bit more and a little bit more. And we are still not happy

Since 1893

with what they have done.” A county inspection of Park Ridge Apartments on Tuesday found some improvements to the walkways and units, but John Fraser, deputy director of finance and administration at the housing authority, said T.E.H. didn’t do what it was supposed to do in the basements, such as clean a sewer backup and fix smoke detectors and hanging lights. Representatives of T.E.H. didn’t respond to a request for comment late Tuesday afternoon.

The Chicago-based company declined to comment for this report. But CEO Steve Easterbrook, addressing the harassment allegations in a letter dated Monday to Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., said McDonald’s is “committed to creating and sustaining a culture of trust where employees feel safe, valued and respected.” On Thursday, McDonald’s workers in several cities, including St. Louis, will walk out, demanding the right to union representation. The demonstration is led by Fight for $15.

J.C. Penney, Kohl’s results point to retail difficulties ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The outlook for department stores got murkier Tuesday after J.C. Penney and Kohl’s reported fiscal first quarter results that showed they struggled at the start of the year. Penney, which has been trying to turn around its business for several years after a disastrous reinvention plan, reported a wider than expected loss and sales declines during the quarter. Kohl’s sales momentum took a pause during the quarter as well, and it cut its fiscal 2020 profit outlook as it struggled with slumping sales. Midpriced department stores have been trying to reinvent themselves as more shoppers go online. They’ve also been hurt by increasing competition from the likes of T.J. Maxx and other offprice stores, which offer coveted brands at cheaper prices. To lure customers, department stores have been doing a variety of things like offering exclusive merchandise and adding online services. But apparently, those efforts haven’t yet translated into higher sales. “The middle market is collapsing,” says Steve Dennis, a strategic retail adviser. “They’re fighting so many headwinds.” Department stores are facing the threat of escalating trade wars with China that could mean higher prices on clothing and other goods. J.C. Penney and Kohl’s both said there’s been minimal impact from the tariffs already in effect, but the latest round, which would hit toys, shirts, household goods and sneakers, has them especially worried. Their comments echoed that of executives from Macy’s and Walmart last week. The question is how resilient shoppers will be in the face of higher prices even as the economy remains strong.

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MARKET WATCH

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Technology companies helped power stocks broadly higher Tuesday, snapping the market’s two-day losing streak. The rally followed the U.S. government’s decision to postpone proposed restrictions on technology sales to Chinese companies.

Kohl’s

1.5

60 50

F

M A 52-week range

1.0

M $83.28

Dow Jones industrials

25,660

Close: 25,877.33 Change: 197.43 (0.8%)

$3.16

26,000

40 30

2,860

Close: 2,864.36 Change: 24.13 (0.9%) 10 DAYS

$8.45

20

M

CHG

Corn

Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

394.25 822 478.75

+5.25 -9.75 +.50

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

May 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 May 19 May 19

134.37 110.85 90.10 16.29 272.35

+.22 -.50 -1.65 -1.25

ICE

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Cotton

Jul 19 Jul 19 Jul 19

67.32 92.90 25.85

-.59 +3.00 -.15

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19

63.02 2.0193 207.94 2.613

Milk Copper

2,400

N

D

J

F

A

2,200

M

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

3,129 3,208 2190 548 99 52

1,947 2,059 2055 863 61 74

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 25898.27 10563.59 799.43 12732.86 7804.44 2868.88 1902.11 29630.45 1545.98

LOW 25779.61 10491.45 790.32 12668.33 7752.92 2854.02 1885.20 29318.03 1529.82

CLOSE 25877.33 10510.87 791.93 12720.72 7785.72 2864.36 1899.74 29586.85 1545.25

CHG. +197.43 +49.14 +0.74 +103.91 +83.35 +24.13 +24.05 +268.77 +20.29

%CHG. WK +0.77% s +0.47% s +0.09% s +0.82% s +1.08% s +0.85% s +1.28% s +0.92% s +1.33% s

MO QTR t t t t s s t s t s t s t t t s t t

YTD +10.93% +14.62% +11.08% +11.84% +17.34% +14.26% +14.23% +14.90% +14.59%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.53 32.41 +.22 +0.7 +13.6 +6.7

Aegion Corp

AEGN

15.12

26.80 15.59 +.06 +0.4

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.43

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

70.31 60.95 +.12 +0.2 75.25 74.29

3.48

1.45

Ameren Corp

AEE

55.21

ABInBev

BUD

64.55 106.86 81.00

Arch Coal

ARCH

6

-4.5 -39.4 21

-.19 -11.6 -20.6 -35.9 dd +4.0

-5.3 17

-.40 -0.5 +13.9 +36.1 26

AVDL

1.03

BAC

22.66

31.91 28.69 +.29 +1.0 +16.4

-4.3 11

37.79

76.39 56.90 +1.93 +3.5 +36.2

Belden Inc

BDC BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

GM

... Home Depot

HD

... Huttig Building Prod HBP 1.14 Lee Enterprises 1.90 Lowes

... +23.1 -12.0 20 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 75.09 101.92 90.21 +.79 +0.9 +8.7 +15.1 6 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

Boeing

2.04 General Motors

-.01

Bank of America

7.97

1.47 +.13 +9.7 -43.0 -80.8 dd

... McDonald’s 0.60

-3.9 11

0.20

292.47 446.01 358.75 +5.96 +1.7 +11.2 +2.6 33

8.22

5.13 +.28 +5.8 +29.9 -47.3 dd

... 0.28

3.75

9.55

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.45

41.09 23.44 +.68 +3.0 -15.8 -35.9 11

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.35

62.08 45.62

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 57.14 +1.63 +2.9

-3.8 16

...

Charter

CHTR 259.48 387.41 379.21 +1.92 +0.5 +33.1 +39.7 75

...

Cigna

CI

Citigroup

C

-.26 -0.6 -13.8 ...

-8.2 14 1.04b

Olin

72.55 60.28 +.41 +0.7

31.74

59.16 32.23 +.42 +1.3 -13.7 -27.5 17

Emerson

EMR

55.39

Energizer Holdings

+6.9

... ...

84.75 118.23 111.10 +1.90 +1.7 +20.3 +28.7 25 12.95

36.65

9.87 -3.16 -24.3 -37.5 -17.0

171.89 257.43 255.36 +1.87 +0.7 +35.4 +33.7 59

MCD

153.13 200.68 199.84 +.85 +0.4 +12.5 +26.3 30

5.55

4.12

0.28

-.12 -0.4 +42.0 +28.0 47

...

20.92

76.05 113.73 107.60 +.73 +0.7 +20.7 +41.6 10

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

Reliv

RELV

Spire Inc

SR

41.88

Esco Technologies

ESE

54.60

78.32 72.78 +.84 +1.2 +10.5 +26.8 20

Foresight Energy

FELP

0.60

FutureFuel

FF

127.84 154.10 152.58 +.44 +0.3 3.80

5.89

4.64

87.13 85.42

4.64 0.80

-.18 -3.7

+8.8 +3.9 14

... 2.40

+9.5 +5.4 dd

...

-.33 -0.4 +15.3 +26.4 19

2.37

SF

38.39

61.93 57.95 +.39 +0.7 +39.9

-2.8 18

0.60

TGT

60.15

90.39 71.96

-2.6 12

2.56

UPS

89.89 125.09 99.41 +.89 +0.9

+1.9 -11.4 17

3.84

USB

43.14

55.56 51.90 +.18 +0.3 +13.6 +5.1 13

1.48

-.12 -0.2

+8.9

X

14.13

39.23 14.90 +.64 +4.5 -18.3 -60.3

9

0.20

VZ

47.13

61.58 59.50 +.49 +0.8

8

2.41

0.32 WalMart

WMT

81.81 106.21 101.12

0.13 Walgreen Boots

WBA

51.79

86.31 52.76 +.50 +1.0 -22.8 -16.0 10

1.76

WFC

43.02

59.53 46.33 +.88 +1.9

1.80

19.31 11.33 +.15 +1.3 -28.6 -15.5 14 0.24a Wells Fargo

-.40 -0.4

+5.8 +28.6

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.42% on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

-4.10 -.04 +1.20

+8.6 +23.9 58 2.12f

+0.5 -12.1 10

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

2.38 2.13 1.63

5.50 5.25 4.75

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.37 2.41 2.36 2.26 2.23 2.32 2.42 2.84

+0.01 ... +0.03 +0.03 +0.03 +0.02 +0.01 +0.01

1.92 2.13 2.29 2.57 2.90 3.02 3.06 3.20

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

0.56f

PRFT

64.95

1.32

-6.1 dd

POST

36.09

32.92 31.60

5

-.02 -0.1 -13.0 -30.5 -.25 -5.7 -12.0

1.92 ...

MA

Perficient

ENR

10.83

-.05 -1.6 +55.8 -48.8 dd -.05 -1.6 +45.5 +32.8

Post Holdings

+9.3 -10.0 21

.80 +.04 +5.3 -77.1 -74.5 dd

2.81 3.07

47.84 x26.53

Enterprise Financial EFSC

4.10

5.81 3.69

4.10

1.96 US Bancorp 65.57 45.51 +.25 +0.6 +0.8 -17.7 30 1.20f US Steel 58.15 42.28 +.38 +0.9 +12.4 -21.8 12 0.60f Verizon 79.70 65.33 +1.43 +2.2

1.52

1.57

26.31

Stifel Financial

Silver Platinum

1.84

BTU

-1.2 16

53.40

45.00 37.13 +.16 +0.4 +11.0 +1.9 dd

SKIS

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

EPC

30.56

Peabody Energy

0.04

CHG

CLOSE

1272.00 14.37 815.40

Gold

158.09 215.43 191.45 +.50 +0.3 +11.4 +4.3 21 5.44f

Peak Resorts

1.80

CBSH

MNK

.0221 .6906 .2439 1.2726 .7445 .1447 1.1168 .0143 .2792 .009094 .052440 .0155 .0695 .000837 .9916

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

33.63 22.73 +.68 +3.1 +13.0 -31.2

-4.6 10

Edgewell

LOW

52-WK LO HI

17.87

75.24 66.08 +1.12 +1.7 +26.9

Commerce Banc.

LEE

PREV

.0223 .6881 .2469 1.2705 .7461 .1449 1.1158 .0144 .2766 .009039 .052557 .0155 .0695 .000838 .9888

Interestrates Interestrates

OLN

141.95 226.61 154.66 +.99 +0.6 -14.0 -13.7 15 48.42

TKR

-.08 +.0094 +.58 -.060

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$52.21

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

22,000 21,000

M

ExchangeRates

CLOSE

Hogs

2,600

M A 52-week range

PE: ... Vol.: 3.3m (23.0x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $855.6 m Yield: 0.3%

PE: ... Yield: ...

DATE

Live cattle

F

$19.73

$36.65

CHICAGO BOT

Wheat

2,800

23,000

M A 52-week range

Vol.: 17.1m (7.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $827.2 m

Soybeans

25,000 24,000

F

Futures

S&P 500

3,000

27,000

$50

10 M

CIR

Close: $43.00 12.34 or 40.3% Crane Co. is offering about $895 million to buy the industrial pumps and valves maker.

20 0

Vol.: 14.1m (1.4x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $338.5 m Yield: 74.8%

2,920

2,800

10 DAYS

M A 52-week range

$0.92

Vol.: 25.9m (7.3x avg.) PE: 11.5 Mkt. Cap: $9.0 b Yield: 4.9%

26,120

F

Circor International

MNK

Close: $9.87 -3.16 or -24.3% The drug developer is suing the U.S. government over a Medicaid drug rebate decision for its Acthar gel. $30

$2.0

70

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Mallinckrodt

JCP

Close: $1.07 -0.08 or -7.0% The retailer’s first quarter sales fell and its loss was wider than analysts had forecast.

$80

$54.15

25,200

J.C. Penney

KSS

Close: $55.15 -7.76 or -12.3% The department store chain’s first quarter results and its profit outlook for the year fell short of forecasts.

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

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2.05 3.39 6.35 4.04 4.04 .89

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2864.36 12143.47 7328.92 27657.24 5385.46 43190.11 21272.45 94484.63 16426.47 9624.16

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BUSINESS DIGEST City courts 200-employee headquarters: St. Louis is courting a company that officials say could add 200 jobs near Union Station, but they’re staying mum on the company’s identity. The St. Louis Enhanced Enterprise Zone on Tuesday approved a 10-year, 75 percent property tax abatement for the building at 401 S. 18th Street. City economic development officials say the property’s owner, Woodcrest Capital of Fort Worth, Texas, plans $3 million in improvements. The potential tenant would put in $1 million and possibly move 200 jobs to the spot. St. Louis Development Corp. Executive Director Otis Williams would not reveal the name of the company but did tell board members “it is not a city relocation.” He described it as a “headquarters facility with a wide range of supporting jobs.” The building on 18th Street, the former headquarters of the Missouri Foundation For Health before it moved to Forest Park Southeast, is mostly vacant now, Williams said. USDA finalizing aid plan for farmers: President Donald Trump’s administration is considering paymentsof$2perbushelforsoybeans, 63 cents per bushel for wheat and 4 cents per bushel for corn as part of a package of up to $20 billion to offset U.S. farmers’ losses from the trade war with China, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday. Those payments would exceed the rates paid last year to farmers in a similar aid package. Trump earlier this month directed the Department of Agriculture to work on a new aid plan for farmers as Washington and Beijing intensified their 10-month-old trade war by raising tariffs on each other’s goods. U.S. existing home sales fell in April: U.S. home sales fell for a second straight month in April amid weakness in the lower-priced segment of the market, which is suffering from an acute shortage of properties, the National Association of Realtors reported Tuesday. Existing home sales fell 0.4% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.19 million units last month. They were down 4.4 percent compared to April 2018, the 14th straight year-on-year decrease in home sales. The Realtors group noted a

10 percent drop in sales of houses priced $100,000 and below, reflecting a smaller inventory of lower-priced housing. Sanders to attend Walmart meeting:Walmartworkersseekingaseat on the retailer’s board of directors have invited Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., to introduce a shareholders’ proposal at the company’s annual meeting on June 5 in Bentonville, Ark. If passed, the measure would require the retailer to consider its 1.5 million hourly U.S. employees when nominating candidates to its board. “These workers need and deserve a seat at the table,” the presidential candidate told The Washington Post. The measure, though, is not likely to pass. Walmart shareholders have voted down every employee proposal in company history, according to United for Respect. Home Depot reports strong profit, revenue: Home Depot reported better-than-expected profit and revenue for the first quarter despite a damp start to 2019. That inclement weather and an extra week in the previous fiscal year weighed on the home improvement retailer’s same-store sales, which increased 2.5%, short of the 4.2% expected by industry analysts. The retailer earned $2.51 billion, or $2.27 per diluted share, for the three months ended May 5. That compares with $2.4 billion, or $2.08, a year ago. Revenue rose to $26.38 billion from $24.95 billion. Southwest mechanics ratify agreement: Southwest Airlines Co.’s mechanics union said on Tuesday its members had overwhelmingly voted to ratify a tentative contract agreement with the airline, ending seven years of labor negotiations fraught with legal disputes and flight disruptions. In a statement on its website, the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association, which represents around 2,500 Southwest mechanics, said about 95 percent of its members had voted to accept the labor agreement. Southwest, which had been forced to cancel hundreds of flights earlier this year stemming from the mechanics dispute, said it welcomed the agreement. From staff and wire reports

Mallinckrodt sues health agencies Drugmaker’s shares plummet after it predicts sales hit REUTERS

Mallinckrodt Plc filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and forecast an approximately 10% hit to annual net sales of Acthar gel following changes to Medicaid rebate calculations, sending its shares plunging as much as 34% on Tuesday. Acthar, which is used to treat infantile spasms and multiple sclerosis, is the company’s biggest revenue generator, bringing about $1.11 billion in 2018, or 35% of total revenue. However, its annual sales growth has been slowing since 2016, with analysts predicting another decline in 2019. The lawsuit also named the

health agency’s Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), after the division changed how it calculated Medicaid discounts for Acthar gel. Mallinckrodt said the change could result in a one-time charge of up to $600 million. CMS is reviewing the lawsuit, a spokesman said. “While it remains to be seen whether Mallinckrodt’s lawsuit will allow it relief from CMS’ ruling, this will be yet another near-term overhang on Acthar,” said Ami Fadia, an analyst with SVB Leerink. The U.S. Justice Department last month joined a pair of whistleblower lawsuits alleging a drugmaker now owned by Mallinckrodt improperly promoted Acthar and paid kickbacks to doctors who prescribed the treatment. Mallinckrodt said CMS’ decision could impede its efforts

to develop new therapies for patients with fewest treatment options. The Medicaid program provides health coverage to lowincome Americans and is jointly paid for by the states and the federal government. The company’s shares closed $9.87, down $3.16. Including the session’s loss, Mallinckrodt’s shares have declined about 38% this year. Mallinckrodt’s U.S. operations are based in Hazelwood, but the company is in the process of spinning off its specialty generic drug business. That company will keep the Mallinckrodt name and remain in the St. Louis area. The parent company, which will focus on branded pharmaceuticals, including H.P. Acthar, is being renamed Sonorant Therapeutics. Sonorant will be based in Bedminster, N.J.

Bayer to probe Monsanto’s data gathering; effort to influence pesticide debate alleged REUTERS

BERLIN — Bayer on Tuesday hired law firm Sidley Austin to investigate a Europe-wide data collection scheme run by its Monsanto unit, which targeted journalists, politicians and other stakeholders to influence the debate on pesticides. Bayer last week admitted that Creve Coeur-based Monsanto, which it acquired for $63 billion last year, had gathered nonpublic information as part of the campaign, which French media said sought to influence the public debate on pesticides and genetically modified products. Bayer faces potentially heavy litigation costs from U.S. lawsuits in which plaintiffs claim that its Roundup weedkiller,

which contains glyphosate, causes cancer. Bayer disputes this. In a document posted on its website on Tuesday, Bayer said St. Louis-based public relations and marketing agency FleishmanHillard, on behalf of Monsanto, had mapped stakeholders in France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Spain and United Kingdom as well as stakeholders related to EU institutions. Sidley Austin will investigate how many stakeholders were included in those files and whether people from other countries could also be affected, Bayer said. A spokesman previously said the company did not believe a similar effort was undertaken in the U.S.

The law firm would then contact affected people, most of them journalists, politicians and scientists, no later than by the end of the coming week. French prosecutors said they had opened an inquiry after newspaper Le Monde filed a complaint alleging that Monsanto had kept a file of 200 names in hopes of influencing their positions. Bayer has ended its PR collaboration with FleishmanHillard, but continues to work with the firm on marketing projects. Bayer shares have shed more than 40 percent since a first adverse U.S. judgment on Roundup last August, leaving the company with a market capitalization smaller than the price it paid for Monsanto.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C .M1 21, •1 8WeDneSDAy 78 A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 05.22.2019

WEDNESDAy • 05.22.2019 • A14 RAY FARRIS PReSIDenT & PUBLISHeR

GILBERT BAILON eDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON eDITORIAL PAGe eDITOR

Accountability, please A taxpayer-funded halfway house helps operators wallow in wealth.

O

n paper, at least, Dismas House of St. Louis was supposed to be a halfway house to help federal prisoners transition back into society — a much-needed service that helps reduce recidivism and put ex-offenders on a path to productivity. Who could argue against that? In reality, it bears all the hallmarks of a scam designed to put millions of taxpayer dollars into the pockets of its operators while federal inmates live in substandard conditions with apparently liberal access to drugs and alcohol. Since taxpayer dollars fund this operation, a thorough federal or state audit is needed to determine whether Dismas House’s nonprofit status has been abused to enable its operators to wallow in wealth. The Post-Dispatch’s Tony Messenger offered broad outlines of the Dismas House operation and the $5 million paid out between 2011 and 2016 to two of its top operators, who ran it like a family business. Dismas House hides its full financial records behind a flimsy religious-exemption claim that shields it from the reporting requirements that apply to other nonprofits. The absence of public scrutiny translates into minimal accountability — an invitation for abuse. Dismas House might, of course, operate just barely within the legal boundaries. If so, why does it smell so fishy? Dismas House’s claim of a religious exemption dates back to 1959, when the nonprofit’s founders, a Jesuit priest and a lawyer for Mafia figures, ran it as part of a ministry. They have long since departed the scene, as has the religious pretense behind the operation. For the past 13 years, the board of Dismas House has been dominated by John Flatley and his sister, Vivienne Bess. Together, they have milked its proceeds by awarding themselves lavish salaries. Flatley’s son, Patrick, was

JESSE BOGAN, POST-DISPATCH

The Dismas House of St. Louis, an unmarked building at 5025 Cote Brilliante Avenue, has about 140 beds for men transitioning from federal prison. among other beneficiaries. John Flatley’s base salary in 2012 was $645,450 when he served as executive director. Bess made $252,867 that year. Also on the board is Bess’ husband, Gary Bess, who served as former St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger’s parks director. The Flatleys, Besses and close associates maintain an interlocking board that runs a separate nonprofit offshoot, Forward Assist Inc., that acquires real estate used as group homes for recovering addicts and alcoholics. Board membership also overlaps with a private real estate investment holding company, Forward Invest LLC, which makes personal mortgage loans. Beneficiaries of those loans include some of those same interlocking board members. The high salaries and apparent shuffle of funds from one entity to the other helps obscure whatever is actually happening with the $42 million, five-year contract awarded to Dismas House by the Missouri Bureau of Prisons to house federal prisoners. “This is our personal family business,” Patrick Flatley told Messenger. And that’s exactly how this supposedly nonprofit, religious-exempt, taxpayer-funded operation appears to be run. Which is why a full audit is more than justified.

10-point perk plan Kris Kobach has a few demands before he’ll agree to be America’s top xenophobe.

K

ris Kobach isn’t asking much to grant America his services as President Donald Trump’s new immigration czar. Just 24/7 use of a government jet. And a West Wing office with “walk-in” privileges to the Oval Office. And a future appointment to head Homeland Security. Oh, and authority over top Cabinet officials, including the attorney general and the secretary of defense. For these and some other modest demands, America would get an immigration czar who’s spent his whole career proving how disastrous such an appointment would be. What a bargain! Kobach’s entire elective résumé consists of two terms as Kansas’ secretary of state and the loss of a gubernatorial race. Yet he’s shown a Forrest Gump-like ability to insert himself into some of America’s biggest controversies — if Gump had been a self-promoting purveyor of noxious xenophobia. In 2017, Kobach signed on to cochair a commission investigating Trump’s unfounded claim that illegal voting by non-citizens cost him the 2016 popular vote. There was never a molecule of truth to Trump’s votefraud assertion, but that didn’t stop Kobach from making a three-ring show out of the commission before it was unceremoniously shuttered. Remember the notorious “papers, please” law allowing former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio to essentially stop anyone with brown skin and demand they prove their citizenship? Kobach, freelancing outside his own state, was its chief architect. He co-authored a similar measure in Alabama and offered legal counsel to defend anti-immigrant laws in Pennsylvania and Texas. Now Trump wants an “immigration czar” to coordinate immigration policy across federal agencies. Given Trump’s open hostility toward immigrants almost regardless of legal status, Kobach perhaps believes he has an in. How else to explain a remarkable list of

CAROLYN KASTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Trump and former Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. his demands reported by The New York Times? In addition to the jet, a top-paying designation as “Assistant to the President” and other perks, Kobach is asking that he become, effectively, more powerful than people whose appointments have to be confirmed by the Senate (this one wouldn’t, possibly by design). Among Kobach’s demands is that the president “sits down individually with Czar and the secretaries of Homeland Security, Defense, Justice, Ag, Interior, and Commerce, and tells each of the Secretaries to follow the directives of the Czar without delay, subject to appeal to the President in cases of disagreement.” Trump seems blind to factors like Kobach’s malicious approach to immigration issues, his involvement in laws that keep getting overturned, or even the fact that his attempt to prove Trump’s voter-fraud fantasy wound up thoroughly disproving it. Giving Cabinet-dominating authority to a non-Senate-confirmed position would be constitutionally questionable. But abiding by the Constitution never was one of Trump’s top concerns. Trump might nevertheless want to consider this: Any self-proclaimed dealmaker who linked up with a grifter like Kris Kobach would be certifiable — as a chump.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS experienced a traumatic loss of control concerning her safety and her own body. This bill would only seek to re-traumatize these women in further removing their ability to control their bodies and lives. As a woman and gender-studies scholar, I am appalled by the actions of the Missouri Legislature. Rosie Jones • Maplewood.

CHRISTIAN GOODEN, POST-DISPATCH

A demonstrator protests outside the House of Representatives chamber in the Missouri State Capitol on Friday as the House voted to pass a new bill that would virtually ban all abortions in the state.

Women will fight back against legislature Regarding “Near-total ban on abortion approved by Missouri House, heads to governor” (May 18): I am appalled that the Missouri Legislature would ban abortion after eight weeks. We’ve now joined the list of “Most Stupid States in the Union” thanks to their action. The Republicans are messing with women’s health care decisions, and we won’t tolerate it for long. Lawmakers should be prepared for the fight of their lives in the next election, because they have stirred a hornet’s nest. Women will not stand for our health decisions being left up to a bunch of largely outstate lawmakers who have no concept of what a rape does to a woman’s soul when she becomes impregnated by a violent criminal. Or, when a woman is carrying a sick and dying baby in her womb and must make a gut-wrenching decision to abort. Or, the fear of dying and leaving other children behind because she can stroke out at any moment during pregnancy from preeclampsia — when both mom and baby could die. They might be gleeful about stripping us of our choices right now, but Missouri legislators will soon regret holding this extreme vote to hurt women, and they should expect a multitude of Missouri women going into the voting booths next year to kick their sorry butts to the curb because we refuse to allow them to control us, our bodies or our most intimate decisions. We will stand up and fight back against their tyranny toward women. Rusti Levin • University City

Women must have control over their own bodies Missouri’s abortion bill removes people’s ability to exercise self-determination. Our country reinforces the concept of the “American Dream,” wherein people are able to make their own choices in pursuit of their individual happiness. Yet, this bill directly impedes such a liberty. This bill also fails to recognize the very real experiences of those who are pregnant and/or those who think they might be pregnant. At eight weeks, many women may not know they are pregnant. Menstruation cycles may not be consistent, or women may not notice one skipped period. Moreover, eight weeks does not take into account the extenuating factors in people’s lives: getting off work to travel for an abortion, acquiring the funds for an abortion and developing practical plans with their support networks. A third contention I have with this bill concerns those with limited support networks. I work at a domestic and sexual violence service agency and have interacted with many clients who are pregnant as a result of rape, incest or reproductive manipulation. In these circumstances, the survivor’s autonomy has already been limited; she has often

Missouri Legislature should banish theocrats Women, are you paying attention? Laws are being passed that are severely restricting or potentially eliminating the constitutional right to make your own reproductive decisions, including the very personal decision to terminate a pregnancy. Some of these laws also preclude the potential to terminate the pregnancy due to rape or incest. Please take note that all of the states proceeding with this draconian behavior are controlled by the GOP. President Donald Trump has named two associate Supreme Court justices who may vote to overturn Roe v. Wade. A majority of the lawmakers making these decisions are white, male and Republican. It is time to get out the female vote. Even if you disagree with some positions within the Democratic platform, this one issue alone should have you running from a party that wants to take us all back to the dark ages. Please get out the vote so we can rid ourselves of these theocrats. Ryan Geraty • Lake Saint Louis

Missouri abortion law is against Constitution This extreme and dangerous Missouri legislation criminalizes abortion as early as eight weeks, before some women even know they’re pregnant, with no exception for rape or incest. The bill now goes to the desk of Gov. Mike Parson, who has made clear his willingness to sign. For many Missourians, the unconstitutional ban would remove access to safe abortion. It violates Supreme Court precedent in an attempt to ultimately overturn Roe v Wade. Abortion is an incredibly personal and sometimes complex decision that should and must occur between a pregnant woman, her family and her doctor — not categorically decided by politicians inexperienced in matters of reproductive and maternal health care. In a state already lacking health care and an abysmal maternal mortality rate that exceeds that of some developing nations, Gov. Parson and anti-choice state lawmakers have made the express decision to fuel the continuing decay of health care in Missouri. They also uphold the egregious claim that the government deserves a hand in the bodily autonomy and deeply personal parenting choices of pregnant Missourians. I call on the governor to reject this unconstitutional ban. Alex Keeley • Kirkwood

Unborn children denied to tell their own story Regarding “Missouri 8-week abortion ban one step from going to governor” (May 16): Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, comments in part that the bill portrays women as “vessels of pregnancy rather than understanding that women’s lives all hold different stories.” I would suggest that the lives of unborn children hold only one story — their struggle to survive. Following an abortion, the mother will still have her story to live, which cannot be said of her unborn child. Mary Simon • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON editorial Page editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 n. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

05.22.2019 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 50 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

THE SOLDIERS WHO OBJECT TO WAR • The military is said to be deeply concerned over increasing dissent among GIs over the war in Vietnam. Just

how far soldiers can legally go in this regard is not quite clear, but it is obviously a good deal farther than the Pentagon would like. What are young dissenters who feel this deeply supposed to do? Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Amash puts duty first in taking stand against Trump Bullies like the president cannot be appeased and must be confronted. Constitution give Congress the right not to act? Democrats should be asked these questions, too. I understand that many, apparently including House Speaker Nancy Justin Amash finally said Pelosi, believe that starting impeachment proceedings out loud what many other would damage the party’s Republicans know but will prospects in the 2020 eleconly whisper: “President tion. But isn’t duty supTrump engaged in specific posed to take precedence actions and a pattern of over political expediency? behavior that meet the It clearly did for Amash, threshold for impeachwhose reward for his prinment.” Amash’s party may cipled stance was a Twitter never forgive him. His nation ought to thank him. blast from Donald Trump The Michigan congress- and a primary challenge for his seat. man on Saturday became Classy as ever, Trump the first significant GOP official to acknowledge the called Amash a “total lightclear implication of special weight” and a “loser who sadly plays right into our counsel Robert Mueller’s opponents [sic] hands!” All report. Every Republican member of Congress should the president accomplished with this name-calling was be pressed for an on-therecord response. How does to give Amash’s analysis a much wider hearing. the president’s conduct Amash wrote in a series not amount to obstruction of tweets that he reached of justice? Where does the EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

his conclusion “only after having read Mueller’s redacted report carefully and completely, having read or watched pertinent statements and testimony, and having discussed this matter with my staff, who thoroughly reviewed materials and provided me with further analysis.” That sounds like the sort of thing we pay elected officials and their staff members to do. But Amash wrote that few of his colleagues “even read Mueller’s report; their minds were made up based on partisan affiliation.” That’s actually a key point. Anyone who reads the 448-page report can see, as Amash concludes, that Attorney General William Barr — in his four-page summary, his congressional testimony and other statements — “intended to mislead the public” about Mueller’s findings. Barr apparently “hopes people will not notice,” his deception, Amash says. Busted. Amash’s

emperor’s-new-clothes moment did not cause the dam of blind GOP solidarity to break. Instead, his colleagues attacked him, with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., saying that maybe Amash “wants some type of exit strategy.” In other words, apparently, carefully reading the Mueller report and thoughtfully analyzing its findings means you’re no longer welcome in today’s Republican Party and might as well leave. As McCarthy noted, this is not the first time that Amash has been inconveniently faithful to his principles. I disagree with many of Amash’s libertarian views, but it is refreshing to see a politician stand up for what he believes. In the Mueller report, Amash finds “multiple examples of conduct satisfying all the elements of obstruction of justice.” Impeachment, Amash notes, “does not even require probable cause that a crime ... has been

committed,” but simply that an official “has engaged in careless, abusive, corrupt or otherwise dishonorable conduct.” Trump does all of the above, all of the time. I’m under no illusions here. At this point it is clear that the vast majority of congressional Republicans will stay aboard the rustbucket USS Trump, which has been taking on water from the beginning, until it actually begins to sink. But here is a line from Amash’s tweetstorm that Democrats should reflect on: “While impeachment should be undertaken only in extraordinary circumstances, the risk we face in an environment of extreme partisanship is not that Congress will employ it as a remedy too often but rather that Congress will employ it so rarely that it cannot deter misconduct.” Speaking of misconduct, the Trump administration is now refusing to comply with perfectly lawful subpoenas issued by duly constituted committees of

the U.S. Congress. If this president is allowed to get away with such defiance, why wouldn’t the next president do the same — or go even further? What good is a system of checks and balances if officials decline to use the tools that the framers of the Constitution so painstakingly crafted? I can’t be certain what the political impact of a formal impeachment process might be. Trump would doubtless claim he was being persecuted, as a way to rile up his base and boost GOP turnout. But he will surely claim victimhood anyway, even if Pelosi decides not to move forward. Bullies cannot be appeased. They must be confronted. Democrats’ options for avoiding impeachment are narrowing. Amash’s politically dangerous stand is a reminder that elected officials, regardless of party, are supposed to put duty first. Eugene Robinson erobinson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

AMERICA’S ABORTION DEBATE

Alabama’s unexpected lesson on abortion Defend right-to-life by supporting women and lifting up the poor. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

JOSE LUIS MAGANA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Anti-abortion activists march toward the U.S. Supreme Court during the March for Life in Washington on Jan. 18.

It’s about choice — word choice Extremist laws aren’t ‘pro-life,’ they are anti-women. BY RICHARD CHERWITZ

Scholars of communication for decades have studied how rhetoric matters — how language choices are strategic and can substantially affect the outcome of debates and policy on important public issues. Recent intense and emotionally charged abortion arguments in several states, including last week in the Missouri Legislature, offer powerful illustrations of the way language makes a difference. From a rhetorical perspective, the recent Alabama law prohibiting abortion in almost all cases (including cases involving rape or incest) and severely punishing doctors who perform abortions, as well as similar draconian and extremist laws passed by Georgia, Missouri and Ohio are not actually “pro-life” policies. More accurately, they may be “pro-birth,” perhaps even “forced-birth” and “antiwomen” laws. If anti-abortion laws were genuine “pro-life” measures, they would include provisions guaranteeing food, health care and education — all necessary for sustaining life. Moreover, those supporting and voting for these laws would not simultaneously cut or reduce the funding for programs like Planned Parenthood and Medicaid that are designed to help prevent abortion and protect the health of the mother and child. The use of “pro-life” language is unmistakably a calculated public relations decision to tap into the value system of conservatives and evangelicals who view abortion as exclusively

about protecting the “life” (according to their opinion) of an unborn — and not about the larger issue of the health and well-being of women, and certainly not that of their children. Why is this significant? This strategy permits and empowers anti-abortion advocates rhetorically to assume a higher moral ground by disingenuously framing the debate as “pro-life” versus “proabortion.” This not only distorts the argument but makes it far easier to convince state legislators to adopt extreme policies prohibiting almost all cases of abortion and to harshly punish doctors and women who violate the restrictive new laws. Labeling the anti-abortion movement as a pro-life cause is not only misleading, it is inaccurate and unfair. Abortion-rights defenders need to be mindful of the consequence of these rhetorical maneuverings by proponents of anti-abortion legislation. To help discourage the further adoption of this type of legislation, they must do a better job of finding the precise language that more persuasively conveys the pro-choice position: protecting the reproductive rights and health of women and girls, providing access to contraception, advancing sex education and securing the right to a safe abortion while working at the same time to reduce the need for the procedure. In addition, those who advocate pro-choice policies should employ language that shows forcefully and tangibly what

specifically is entailed by antiabortion laws. For example, why not say that these measures are also anti-life — in view of the fact that they do nothing to provide the ingredients essential for life, such as food, medical care and education? Similarly, those who seek to fend off the increasing number of inflexible abortion laws might have more persuasive traction if they used words such as “forced-birth” and “antiwoman” to describe those proposing the prohibition of abortion. This would help the public discover how anti-abortion advocates cloak their arguments in and hide behind misleading terminology. Regardless of what one believes or what policies one proposes, the choice of language has enormous rhetorical sway. Words matter and are a significant dimension of legislative strategies. My own research about “language-in-use” over the past 40 years demonstrates that the words initially employed by politicians on a given issue are often internalized and repeated by their audiences, setting the agenda for debate. This in turn subconsciously shapes attitudes, rendering it difficult to alter the direction of future arguments on the topic. The enormous impact of rhetoric cannot be underestimated, as the current clash over abortion laws so clearly reveals. Richard Cherwitz is the Ernest S. Sharpe Centennial Professor in the Moody College of Communication and founder of the Intellectual Entrepreneurship Consortium at the University of Texas at Austin.

It’s instructive that Alabama has handed the anti-abortion movement a great victory by passing the most restrictive ban in the country — and Republican politicians who regularly tout themselves as pro-life don’t like it. Abortion is cast by its opponents as a “non-negotiable” question. Yet it turns out to be very negotiable and, indeed, a matter of “personal belief.” Thus did House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., say he opposes the Alabama law because it “goes further than I believe” by failing to include exceptions for pregnancies caused by rape or incest. Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel was right there with him. “Personally, I would have the exceptions,” McDaniel told CNN. “That’s my personal belief.” Of course the Alabama abortion law is extreme. But you cannot fault the consistency of the Alabama legislators who supported it. If abortion is murder, it’s murder. I suppose you can have gradations on murder charges — first or second degree, say, or voluntary manslaughter — but that’s not the issue here. McCarthy and McDaniel can’t really think abortion is murder if they believe it’s OK some of the time. Writing on the conservative website The Bulwark, Jonathan V. Last called the Alabama law “the most damaging development to the pro-life movement in decades.” Wow! Why so? “If you want to end the abortion regime, you don’t get rid of it by outlawing abortion,” he explains. “There is a teaching effect to the law, but it’s not strong enough to support a law which does not have the consent of a large percentage of the citizenry. You get rid of abortion by moving public opinion. Which is hard. It’s incremental. It’s small steps.” Pause on Last’s thought — you don’t get rid of abortion by outlawing it. But the entire thrust of the contemporary right-to-life movement is to get rid of abortion by outlawing it. Even with the exemptions McCarthy favors, the Alabama law would still outlaw almost all abortions. The dirty secret is that supposedly pro-life politicians support the exceptions because they poll well. But if your stand on abortion is based on a deep moral conviction, polling

should have nothing to do with it. Which is why I am among those — and I think there are a lot of us — who despise the way abortion is discussed in our politics. The issue has become a partisan cudgel, the subject of a lot of posturing involving self-interested calculation that rarely involves much respect for the ethical commitments of the opposing sides. Whether the fetus is a human life from the moment of conception or a potential life, a human being is the result at the end of nine months of pregnancy. So it shouldn’t be hard for even the most prochoice person to understand why those who oppose abortion believe as they do. At the same time, only women bear the physical burdens of pregnancy and society, as currently constituted, demands far more of mothers than fathers. So it should not be hard for even the most ardent pro-lifers to understand why women who advocate for abortion rights see control over their own reproduction as inextricably linked to gender equality. But opponents of abortion must acknowledge this: Making abortion illegal doesn’t stop abortion. It does, however, make abortions unsafe for women who have them. A study by the Guttmacher Institute found that there were 22.3 million abortions between 2010 and 2014 in countries where abortion is highly restricted — and 74 percent of those abortions were unsafe. I share the right-to-life movement’s desire to reduce the number of abortions. But I also agree with the pro-choice movement that making abortion illegal or virtually impossible to obtain will only place women’s lives in jeopardy. A better way forward would start by reducing the incidence of abortion through better family-planning programs. Even more important, we can give poor women who bring children into the world the help they need after giving birth. The abortion rate is six times higher among poor women than affluent women. This is not because the rich have more moral qualms. The poor, unlike the wealthy, live with the fear that they will not be able to give their children the life they deserve. And we can honor the responsibilities mothers take on — in deeds not just words — by making the rules surrounding work more family-friendly. The bottom line: If you truly want to defend the right to life, support women and lift up the poor. E.J. Dionne Twitter: @EJDionne Copyright The Washington Post


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

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ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

WASHINGTON | RUSSIA PROBE

May OKs revote on Brexit referendum

Impeachment calls swell

LONDON — In a major concession, British Prime Minister Theresa May on Tuesday offered U.K. lawmakers the chance to vote on whether to hold a new referendum on the country’s membership in the European Union — but only if they back her thrice-rejected Brexit agreement. May made the offer as part of a desperate attempt to persuade Parliament to back a divorce deal that will allow the U.K. make an orderly, if delayed, departure from the EU. She plans to ask the House of Commons to vote in early June on a withdrawal agreement bill, in what May called a “last chance” to seal a Brexit deal. Soon after that vote, she will give a timetable for her departure as Conservative leader and prime minister.

Arizona prisons’ book ban draws ire PHOENIX — Arizona has banned prisoners from reading a book that discusses the impact of the criminal justice system on black men, drawing outcry from First Amendment advocates who say the move is censorship. The American Civil Liberties Union called on the Arizona Department of Corrections this week to rescind the ban on “Chokehold: Policing Black Men.” The book by Paul Butler, a former federal prosecutor, examines law enforcement and mass incarceration through its treatment of African-American men. “In order for them to ban a book, they have to show the restriction is related to a legitimate prison interest,” said Emerson Sykes, an ACLU attorney. “There’s no interest to keep inmates from learning about the criminal justice system and policing.” Butler, a criminal law professor at Georgetown University, said his publisher was notified by email in March that his book had “unauthorized content.” BRIEFLY HUAWEI: The United States on Monday announced that it is delaying some restrictions on U.S. technology sales to Chinese tech powerhouse Huawei in what it calls an effort to ease the blow on Huawei smartphone owners and smaller U.S. telecoms providers that rely on its networking equipment. JOURNALIST RAIDED: San Francisco police agreed in court Tuesday to return property seized from freelance journalist Bryan Carmody in raids aimed at uncovering the source of a leaked police report into the unexpected death of the city’s public defender, Jeff Adachi.

Trump blocks McGahn from testifying; Barr offers committee a deal MARY CLARE JALONICK AND LISA MASCARO

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — More Democrats are calling — and more loudly — for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump after his latest defiance of Congress by blocking his former White House lawyer from testifying on Tuesday. A growing number of rank-andfile House Democrats, incensed by former Counsel Don McGahn’s empty chair in the Judiciary Committee hearing room, are pushing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other leaders to act. Their impatience is running up against the speaker’s preference for a more methodical approach, including already-unfolding court battles.

POLICE VIOLENCE: Three New Jersey police officers are on paid administrative leave as authorities investigate a violent arrest that was caught on video. The probe stems from the arrest of 19-year-old Cyprian Luke Sunday in Dover. The video shows him being punched repeatedly in the face by officers as he was taken into custody. The officers’ names have not been released and no charges have been filed. IMMIGRATION CZAR: Ken Cuccinelli, the former attorney general of Virginia, will join the Department of Homeland Security as an “immigration czar” to coordinate policy across federal agencies, according to a White House official who spoke Tuesday on condition of anonymity. RAIL FUNDING: California sued Tuesday to block the Trump administration from canceling nearly $1 billion for the state’s high-speed rail project, escalating the state’s feud with the federal government. The Federal Railroad Administration announced last week it would not give California the money awarded by Congress nearly a decade ago, arguing that the state has not made enough progress on the project. — Associated Press

and “out of step with America.” Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said wryly of Amash’s position, “I don’t think it’s going to be a trend-setting move.” House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler on Tuesday also issued subpoenas for more Trump administration officials — former White House communications director Hope Hicks and Annie Donaldson, a former aide in the White House counsel’s office — for documents and testimony. Nadler gaveled open Tuesday’s hearing with a stern warning that McGahn will be held in contempt for failing to appear. “Our subpoenas are not optional,” Nadler said. “We will not allow the president to stop this investigation.” However, Rep. Doug Collins, the ranking Republican on the committee, spoke scornfully of Nadler’s position, calling the session a “circus” and saying the chairman preferred a public “fight

over fact-finding.” Also Tuesday, the Justice Department said it is willing to provide the House Intelligence Committee with documents from special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, as long as the panel agrees not to take any action against Attorney General William Barr. The unusual request comes after the committee’s chairman, Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, warned that the committee would take an unspecified “enforcement action” against Barr or the Justice Department after they refused to hand over an unredacted version of Mueller’s report and other documents related to the Russia investigation that shadowed Donald Trump’s presidency for nearly two years. Nadler said the committee would vote to hold McGahn in contempt, though that’s not expected until June, after lawmakers return from the Memorial Day recess.

Trump officials: We don’t want a war

SEVERE WEATHER

Shanahan says recent military action was meant to deter Iran LISA MASCARO AND SUSANNAH GEORGE

Associated Press

MIKE SIMONS, TULSA WORLD VIA AP

Michelle Underwood searches through the wreckage of a feed store where she stored most of her belongings Tuesday in Peggs, Okla.

Central US storms leave trail of tornadoes, floods Two dead in Missouri; funnel cloud lands near Tulsa airport JIM SALTER AND KEN MILLER

PARDON-PROOFING: A presidential pardon for federal crimes won’t be enough to clear a person of similar state charges under legislation approved Tuesday by New York state lawmakers. Gov. Andrew Cuomo is expected to sign the measure into law.

Pelosi summoned some of them — still a small fraction of the House Democratic caucus — to a meeting of investigators Wednesday to assess strategy. Some other Democratic leaders, while backing Pelosi, signaled that a march to impeachment may at some point become inevitable. “We are confronting what might be the largest, broadest cover-up in American history,” Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said. If a House inquiry “leads to other avenues including impeachment,” the Maryland Democrat said, “so be it.” One Republican congressman, Justin Amash of Michigan, has called for impeachment proceedings. He said Tuesday he thinks other GOP lawmakers should join him — but only after reading special counsel Robert Mueller’s report carefully. Republican House leader Kevin McCarthy dismissed Amash as out of step with House Republicans

Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — Dangerous storms left a string of more than 30 tornadoes across the central U.S., damaging homes in Oklahoma, demolishing a racetrack grandstand in Missouri and inundating the region with water over a short period. Two deaths, both in Missouri, were blamed on the severe weather that started in the Southern Plains Monday night and moved to the northeast. Missouri and parts of Illinois and Arkansas were in the crosshairs Tuesday. By Wednesday, the storm will move into Great Lakes region, where it will weaken. But another storm system was gathering steam for later this week, potentially covering an area from Texas to Chicago, according to the National Weather Service. Patrick Marsh, warning coordination meteorologist for the Na-

tional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Storm Prediction Center, said eyewitnesses reported 26 tornadoes Monday and six more Tuesday. One, near Tulsa, was a mile wide with winds in the range of 111 mph to 135 mph. “It certainly isn’t anything to mess with,” Marsh said. A tornado early Tuesday near Tulsa International Airport injured one person and damaged about a dozen homes. The airport was unscathed, but passengers were moved into shelters for about 30 minutes and several flights were delayed. Tulsa Area Emergency Management spokeswoman Kim MacLeod said crews rescued a man who was pinned under a tree. In Arkansas, crews worked Tuesday afternoon to free a woman trapped under a tree topped by strong winds. Arkansas Department of Emergency Management spokeswoman Melody Daniel said the woman was alert and talking. StormsMondayeveningflipped campers at Lucas Oil Speedway in Hickory County, Missouri, injuring seven people, four of whom were taken to hospitals.

The speedway’s grandstand also was destroyed, forcing cancellation of racing this weekend that was expected to draw about 3,000 campers. Another twister Tuesday afternoon hit a hit a drive-thru wild animal park in southern Missouri. Webster County Emergency Management Director Tom Simmons said buildings were damaged at the Wild Animal Safari near Strafford, but there were no reports that people or animals were injured. Heavy rain was called a contributing factor in the deaths of two people in a traffic accident Tuesday near Springfield, Missouri. The Missouri State Highway Patrol said an SUV skidded across the center of U.S. 160 and struck a tractor-trailer, killing both people in the SUV. Missouri authorities also reported several water rescues from flash flooding. Among them was an 18-year-old woman who was swept off a flooded road near Joplin Monday and stranded overnight until nearby residents heard her yelling. She had only minor injuries.

WASHINGTON — Tamping down talk of war, top Trump administration officials told Congress on Tuesday that recent actions by the U.S. deterred attacks on American forces, but some lawmakers remained deeply skeptical of the White House approach in the Middle East. After a day of closed-door briefings on Capitol Hill, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said their objective over recent days was to deter Iran. Now they want to prevent further escalation, Shanahan said. “We’re not about going to war,” Shanahan told reporters. “Our biggest focus at this point is to prevent Iranian miscalculation,” said Shanahan, flanked by Pompeo, after back-to-back briefings for the House and Senate.“We do not want the situation to escalate.” Meanwhile, Yemen’s Iranian-allied Houthi rebels attacked a Saudi airport and military base with a bomb-laden drone Tuesday. There were no immediate reports of injuries or damage. The attack on the Saudi city of Najran came after Iran announced it has quadrupled its uranium-enrichment production capacity, though still at a level far lower than needed for atomic weapons, a year after the U.S. withdrew from Iran’s nuclear deal with world powers. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani also seeks expanded executive powers to better deal with “economic war” triggered by the Trump’s administration, the staterun IRNA news agency reported. After Tuesday’s meeting with President Donald Trump’s officials, skeptical Democrats sought out a second opinion, holding their own briefing with former Obama administration officials, former CIA Director John Brennan and Wendy Sherman, an architect of the Iran nuclear deal.

Congressional leaders make some progress on budget Lawmakers hope to avoid repeat of 35-day government shutdown ANDREW TAYLOR

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Top leaders of both parties in Congress made better-than-expected progress Tuesday on two must-do items on the legislative agenda: averting automatic budget cuts and meeting a deadline later this year to increase the government’s borrowing limit. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who’s been a

key force in getting negotiations running, said both the debt limit increase and the outlines of a two-year spending agreement would likely be merged into one package if a deal can be worked out. Driving the bipartisan talks is the desire to avoid automatic spending cuts that threaten to hit the Pentagon and other federal agencies with budget reductions averaging 10 percent. At the same time, increasing the debt limit is required to avert a first-ever, market-quaking default on government obligations like interest payments and Social Security benefits.

It would also minimize the chances of a repeat of the 35-day government shutdown of December and January. Tuesday’s meeting included Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney and the top four leaders of Congress, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. They returned for a second session later Tuesday and adjourned with plans to reconvene soon. “We’re making progress,” said House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif. McConnell met with President Donald Trump last week and

warned him that failure to reach a pact with Democrats could lead to endless bickering over the length of stopgap measures to prevent a government shutdown or put the government on course for $71 billion in cuts to the Pentagon. In his March budget submission, Trump employed bookkeeping gimmicks to protect the defense budget and called for sweeping cuts to domestic programs. Just last week, he decided he went too far in cutting popular environmental restoration programs and reversed those cuts, along with cuts to the Special Olympics that were widely panned.


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

OBITUARIES Altvater - see Key Anderhub, Anthony P. - Ballwin Belfiore, Joan Frances - Henley, MO Biesterfeld, Craig Stewart - St. Louis Carey, Mary Ann - Maryland Heights Cody, Peggy Jean - Maryland Heights Davenport - see Zimmermann DeGuire III, Art - St. Louis Desloge - see Key Enloe, Myron W. - St. Louis Evans, Eleanor Claire - St. Charles Farny, William - House Springs, MO

Anderhub, Anthony P. Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Sat., May 18, 2019. Dear husband of Eleanor Corich Anderhub; dear father of Bryan A. Anderhub and Beth M. Anderhub; dear father-in-law of Susan L. Anderhub; dear grandfather of Rebecca L. Jahn (Donald) and Christopher B. Anderhub; dear great-grandfather of Elliot P. and Billie L. Jahn. Anthony worked as a Mechanical Engineer at McDonnell Douglas for 36 years. He worked on project Mercury, Gemini, the Space Shuttle and every aircraft they produced during that time frame. Services: Funeral Mass Fri., May 24, 10 am at St. Clement of Rome Church, 1510 Bopp Rd. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Thurs., 4-8 p.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood.

Celebrations of Life

Ferguson, Clifton N. - St. Louis Fowler, Sharron - Cape Coral, FL Key, Ann Jones - Clayton Konczakowski, William J. Jr. - St. Louis Krehmeyer, Jeanne Ruth - Lake St. Louis Kummer, Robert G. Jr. - St. Louis Landefeld, Colleen - St. Louis Lucas - see Key Marino - see Carey McCredie, William Thomas "Bill" - Arnold Richter, Sally Ann - St. Louis Ronshausen - see Zimmermann

McCredie, William Thomas "Bill"

(née Beach) fortified with the s a cra men t s of H ol y M ot h er Church Tuesday, May 21, 2019, at the age of 86. Beloved wife of the late Glennon J. Evans; dearest mother of Dr. James G. (Sue) Evans; loving grandmother of Michael J. Evans and Jessica (Ben) Swagman; great-grandmother of Kei J. Evans; dear sister of Doris A. Fox; dearest friend of many. Services: Funeral Service 10 a.m., Saturday, May 25, 2019, at HUTCHENS-STYGAR Funeral & Cremation Center, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles). Interment Calvary Cemetery. Memorial contributions appreciated to the Alzheimer's Association. VISITATION 4-8 p.m. Friday, May 24 at Hutchens-Stygar. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

87, of Arnold, MO, died May 19, 2019. Loving husband, father, grandfather, and great grandfather, he is survived by his wife Joann; daughters Kim (James) Elmore, Dawn Collins (Jeff) Haumesser, Terri (George) Hummel; grandchildren Devon (David) Mues, Trevor Collins, Britney Collins, Kasey Hummel, Ian Elmore, Katherine Elmore; and great-grandsons Liam and Connor Mues. Born November 11, 1931, Bill attended East St. Louis Senior High, served in the Navy on the USS Porterfield, worked for Union Electric, then joined the Rock Community Fire Protection District as Training Officer and retired as Chief in 1997. Servi c es : Funeral Friday, May 24, 9 a.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes-South County 4830 L ema y Ferry Rd. VISITATION THURSDAY, 4-8 p.m. Donations may be sent to de Greeff Hospice or American Cancer Society.

Farny, William 76, May 18, 2019. Funeral service at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Friday 9:30 am. Visitation Thursday 4-8 pm. For more info see Schrader.com

Ferguson, Clifton N. Sunday, May 19, 2019. Visit Wed. (5/22), 5-8 pm, John L. Ziegenhein & Sons, 7027 Gravois 63116. Funeral Thurs (5/23), Tower Grove Baptist Church. Burial Jefferson Barracks.

Fowler, Sharron

Sharron Fowler, Mar 9th, 2019, age 62. A Celebration of Life, Joan F. (Verstringer) Belfiore, 80, Sat, May 25th at Tower Grove Park, Lily Pond Shelter, 4256 of Henley, Missouri, passed away Magnolia Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110. Monday, May 20, 2019, at her home surrounded by her family. She was born November 16, Key, Ann Jones 1938, in St. Louis, Missouri, a Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on daughter of the late Edward and Sunday, May 19, 2019. Wife of the late Frank L. Key ; mother of Helen (Nieters) Verstringer. John A. Key, III (the late Sally), Ann Key Lucas (the late Jim), Joan was a 1956 graduate of St. Martha Key Altvater (Chris) and Maria Key Desloge (Tim); loving Francis DeSales High School in grandmother and great-grandmother. St. Louis. On October 8, 1960, Ann was preceded in death by her parents Edward D. Jones Joan was united in marriage in Sr. and Ursula Griesedieck Jones, her brother Edward D. Jones St. Louis, to Anthony Belfiore, Jr., Jr. (Pat) and her sister Martha E. Jones. who passed away May 14, 2018. Services: The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of Joan loved going out to eat, enjoyed her quarterly Card Club Lourdes Catholic Church, Forsyth at Asbury, University City on outings with her girlfriends, working out at the Health Plex, Saturday, May 25th at 10:00 a.m. Interment Calvary Cemewatching cooking shows, and reading. when she had the tery. Memorials appreciated to the St. Louis Priory School opportunity. Her greatest joy was spending time with her or to Villa Duchesne and Oak Hill School. family. A SERVICE OF Joan is also survived by two sons: Anthony Belfiore, III (wife THE LUPTON CHAPEL Donna) of Henley; Jeffrey E. Belfiore (wife Tamera) of House Springs; one sister: Dorothy Schenk (Richard) of Ellisville; sisterKonczakowski, William J. Jr. in-law: Norma Belfiore of St. Charles; brother-in law: Joseph Fortified with the Belfiore of O?Fallon; sister-in law: Rose Schnitzer of St. Louis Sacraments of the Holy County; four grandchildren: Kathy Ann Belfiore, Nicholas Mother Church on May Anthony Belfiore (wife Marie), Vincent Anthony Belfiore, and Thaddeus Salender, Jr. (wife Shannon); great grand-daughter: 15, 2 0 19 . L ovin g fa t h er a n d Josephine Belfiore and numerous beloved nieces and nephews. f a t h e r - i n - l a w o f T i m ( M e g ) Joan was preceded in death by her husband: Anthony Belfiore, K o n c z a k o w s k i ; c h e r i s h e d Jr.; parents: Edward and Helen Verstringer; two brothers-in law: grandfather of Alex, and Nicholas; Frank Belfiore, Domiano Belfiore; sister in law Janet Belfiore and dear brother of Byron and friend of many. great grandson AJ (Anthony Joseph) Belfiore. Services: A Memorial Visitation will be held from 4:00 p.m. to Services: Visitation Saturday, 7:00 p.m. Friday, May 24, 2019, with prayer service to follow at M a y 2 5 , 2 0 1 9 , 1 - 3 p . m . a t 7:00 p.m. at John L. Ziegenhein and Sons Funeral Home South Hutchens Mortuary, 675 Graham County Chapels, 4830 Lemay Ferry Road, St. Louis, MO 63129 Rd. Interment private. 314-894-8444

Passed away on Sunday, May 19, 2019. Husband of Isabel Hall Biesterfeld; father of Christopher Biesterfeld (Betsy), Lindsay Luby (Timothy) and Samuel Biesterfeld (Tricia); son of Ula Biesterfeld and the late Howard Biesterfeld; grandfather of Brittany, Bailey, Justin, Maya, Grace and Ava, Natalie and Bobby, and Benjamin; brother of James Biesterfeld and Peggy Wagner (Pat). Craig practiced law in St. Louis for over forty years with integrity and the highest ethical standards. Services: The Funeral Service will be conducted at Concordia Lutheran Church, Marshall at Sarah, Maplewood on Friday, May 24 at 10:00 a.m. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law. The family will receive friends at THE LUPTON CHAPEL, 7233 Delmar Blvd., University City on Thursday from 5:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Carey, Mary Ann (n ee E n gel b rech t ) B a p t iz ed into t h e hope of Christ's Resurrection, Tuesday, May 21, 2019. Beloved wife of Joseph L. Carey; dear mother of Jeff (Ruth) Carey, Vicki (Tony) Marino, Jodi (Dan) Walsh and Karen (Sean) Simpson; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at the ORTMANN STIPANOVICH Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Thurs., May 23 from 9-11 a.m. then to St. John Bosco Catholic Church, 12934 Marine Ave., St. Louis, MO 63146 for 11:30 a.m. Mass of Christian Burial. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to Pancreatic Cancer Action Network appreciated (https://www.pancan.org). Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Cody, Peggy Jean Saturday, May 18, 2019. Memorial Mass Friday, May 24, 11:30 a.m. at Holy Spirit Church, Maryland Heights. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

DeGuire III, Art Saturday, May 18, 2019. Loving son of Art & Lynn Ann DeGuire; cherished brother of Amanda. Visitation Sunday, May 26, 1-6 p.m. at BOPP Chapel. See www.boppchapel.com

Enloe, Myron W. Asleep with Christ M on ., May 20, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Betty L. Enloe (nee Wagener); dearest father of Debbie Mueller and the late Kenneth M. Enloe; loving grandfather of Alana and Greg Mueller, Cathy (Jeff) Green, Michael and Ryan (Shelley) Enloe; great-grandfather of Clayton and Chase Green, Braeden, Trent, Kendall and Dean Enloe; dear brother of the late Kenneth E. Enloe; our dear uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel 5255 Lemay Ferry Road Thur., May 23 at 10 a.m. Interment Mt. Hope Cemetery. Visitation Wed., 4-8 p.m.

Sansoucie - see Siebert Schrautemeier, Bernard E. - St. Louis Siebert, Herbert C. - Shrewsbury Simpson - see Carey Stetson, Marylin Claire - St. Louis Tacke, Clifford Jr. - St. Louis Walsh - see Carey Welch, Clare A. - St. Louis Ziegelmeyer, Roy Carl - Arnold Zimmermann, Jeanette E. - St. Louis

Evans, Eleanor Claire

Belfiore, Joan Frances

Biesterfeld, Craig Stewart

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Krehmeyer, Jeanne Ruth 89, May 18, 2019. Vis. Thu., May 23, Baue Cave Springs, 4-8pm. Svc. Fri., May 24, Holy Cross Lutheran-O'Fallon 10am, with vis. 1-hr. prior. (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Richter, Sally Ann (nee Deem), entered into the arms of Jesus on Monday, May 20, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Herbert Richter; loving Mom of Grant D. (Barbara) and Clark A. (Noelle) Richter; dear Grandma of Emily, Jordon, Kyle, Sam and Logan; great-grandma of Annabelle and Aiden; our dear aunt, great-aunt and friend. Services: Visitation at St. John UCC, 11333 St. John Church Rd., 63123 on Thursday, May 23 from 10 a.m. until time of service at 11:30 a.m. Interment Mascoutah City Cemetery. Contributions in Sally's memory may be made to St. John UCC (Mehlville) or Samaritan's Purse www.samaritanspurse.org would be appreciated. A KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY service.

Schrautemeier, Bernard E. Monday, May 20, 2019. Beloved husband of Cecelia Schrautemeier (nee Williams); dear father of Thomas (Chris) Schrautemeier; loving grandfather of Andrew and Alex Schrautemeier; dear son of the late Bernard E. Sr. and Florence Schrautemeier; our dear cousin and friend. Mr. Schrautemeier was a professor of Physics at St. Louis Community College at Meramec for 35 years. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Thurs., May 23, 2 p.m. Interment Mt. Olive Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Visitation Thursday 12 noon - 2 p.m.

Siebert, Herbert C. Passed away on Sunday, May 19, 2019 at the age of 94. Beloved husband of Brenda Siebert (nee Sansoucie); dear step-father of Lisa (John) Smith and Scott DeClue; loving grandfather of Crystal Mart a in , Ivy M a n l e y , S a m a n t h a Pouge, Jessica Irvin and Natalie Irvin; special great-grandfather of Kacy and Fallon; Herb also leaves behind a lot of great friends and family. He served in the U.S. Army from 1943-1946. He was a gunner and was in the Battle of the Bulge. He retired from Boeing after 30 years; was in a lot of bowling leagues and loved to dance. Herb Siebert was a true hero. Services: Memorial Service Thursday, May 23rd, 11:30 a.m. at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 Chippewa St., St. Louis, MO 63109. Interment with full military honors at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations in Herb's name may be made to the Salvation Army, Gateway Corp. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com

Stetson, Marilyn Claire

(nee Allen) Sunday, May 19, 2019. Beloved wife of the late fortified with the Sacraments of Robert Stetson; loving mother of Holy Mother Church, Thursday, Christine (Stewart) Johnson, May 16, 2019. Beloved husband Katherine (David) Dawson and of 59 years to the late Joann Carrie (Greg Abrams) Stetson; Kummer (nee Johnson); father of dearest grandmother of Logan Robert G. III (Pat), Richard J. (Jessica), Katie, Laura (Dan), (Barb) and Michael A. (Pat) Lexi, Maggie, Thomas, Blake and Kummer and Mary E. (Ken) Shaw; Evan; dear sister of Jane grandfather of 9; great-grand(Dwaine) Tabor and the late father of 10; brother of G. Glenn Raleigh "Tuffy" Allen; dear aunt, (late Kate) Kummer; dear uncle, cousin and friend to many. great-uncle and friend. Member Servi c es : Funeral at K U T I S of and past officer of St. Louis Assembly, K of C Honor Guard AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, May 24, at 12 p.m. Mrs. Stetson was a former member of Terre du Lac Country Club and and DuBourg Council 4099. Friendship Village, Sunset Hills. Private Interment at a later Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Lemay Ferry Rd., on Saturday, May 25, 8:15 a.m.-10:15 a.m. Concord Trinity United Methodist Church. Visitation with Funeral Mass 11 a.m. at Queen of All Saints Catholic Thursday, 4-8 p.m. Church. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Masses preferred.

Kummer, Robert G. Jr.

Landefeld, Colleen 76 years. Visititation Friday, May 24, 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. Service Friday, May 24, 1 p.m. Both at Ziegenhein on Gravois.

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NATION/WORLD

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A19

‘Medicare for All’ benefits ‘leapfrog’ other nations BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Generous benefits. No copays. No need for private policies. The “Medicare for All” plan advocated by leading 2020 Democrats appears more lavish than what’s offered in other advanced countries, compounding the cost but also potentially broadening its popular appeal. While other countries do provide coverage for all, benefits vary. Canada’s plan, often cited as a model, does not cover outpatient prescription drugs and many Canadians have private insurance for medications. Many countries don’t cover long-term care. But the Medicare for All plan from Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders

would charge no copays or deductibles for medical care, allowing only limited cost-sharing for certain prescription drugs. Sanders Sanders would cover longterm care home and community-based services. Dental, vision and hearing coverage would be included. The House version of the legislation is along similar lines. “Medicare for All proposals would leapfrog other countries in terms of essentially eliminating private insurance and out-ofpocket costs, and providing very expansive benefits,” said Larry Levitt, a health policy expert with

the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. “It raises questions about how realistic the proposals are.” Shifting the sprawling U.S. health care system to a government-run “single-payer” plan is one of the top issues in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, but the candidates are divided. Some have endorsed Sanders’ call, while others want to expand coverage within the current mix of private and government insurance. Independent studies estimate Medicare for All would dramatically increase government spending, from $25 trillion to $35 trillion or more over 10 years. It stands no chance with Republicans controlling the White House and the Sen-

ate, but it is getting hearings in the Democratic-led House. Economist Sherry Glied, dean of New York University’s Wagner school of public policy, says the offer of generous benefits may be needed to persuade Americans satisfied with employer coverage that they would be better off in a new government plan. “You are going to have to be very generous if you want this to be politically appealing to lots of people,” said Glied, who was a senior health care adviser in the Obama administration. Glied says components like benefits, copayments and deductibles would all be negotiable. “People put out talking points and then they see what Congress

is willing to swallow,” said Glied. “Who knows where it would come out in the end.” A second congressional hearing on Medicare for All is scheduled Wednesday before the House Budget Committee. Votes this year appear unlikely. The plan is a punching bag for Republicans trying to tag Democrats as “socialists.” In a statement, Sanders’ office said it’s fair for the senator to compare Medicare for All to what other countries have because “all those other countries guarantee health care as a right,” as his plan would. “Sen. Sanders believes providing comprehensive coverage through the government to all residents is the best way to do it,” said the statement.

EPA cuts cast doubt on research of children’s health risks BY ELLEN KNICKMEYER

Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Anti-Syrian regime protesters flash the victory sign as they wear Syrian revolution flags during a 2011 demonstration in the Baba Amr area, Homs province, Syria. The Syria Justice and Accountability Center, a Washington-based Syrian rights group, said in a report released Tuesday that thousands of documents collected from abandoned Syrian government offices reveal the reach of President Bashar Assad’s security agencies, offering a rare glimpse into the inner workings of his secretive apparatus.

Documents offer look inside Syrian government crackdown BY SARAH EL DEEB

Associated Press

BEIRUT — Thousands of documents purportedly found in abandoned Syrian government offices during the country’s civil war reveal the reach of President Bashar Assad’s shadowy security agencies that sought to eliminate dissent at all costs, according to a rights report published Tuesday. The documents obtained by the Washington-based Syria Justice and Accountability Center, show the agencies spied on the populace at large, sought to eliminate dissidents through detention, intimidation or killings and systematically persecuted the Kurdish minority even before the onset the 2011 uprising against Assad. The report, titled “Walls Have Ears, An Analysis of Classified Syrian Security Sector Documents” and based on a sample

of 5,000 documents, presents some of the most damning evidence of state involvement — at the highest level — in the bloody crackdown on protesters, dissidents, and even foreign journalists in Syria. The documents also offer a rare glimpse into the inner workings of Assad’s security agencies and how pervasively they monitored Syrians’ everyday lives. Sometimes handwritten, notes contain orders from top commanders to arrest, detain and “do what is necessary” to quell the unrest. One document details how a man informed on his own brother for supporting anti-Assad protests, prompting a security commander to seek permission to lure the brother into a trap. Another document, from the country’s top intelligence agency, the National Security Office,

identified a French journalist of Lebanese descent as an “instigator of protests” and barred her from entering the country. Several of the documents identify protesters by name, labelling many as terrorists without any evidence, while others detail the government’s policy of containing and monitoring political activities of the Kurdish minority. “The documents show clearly that orders were very centralized and came from really high-level officials, including from heads of the security agency themselves, and in lots of documents from the National Security Office,” said Mohammad Al-Abdallah, the director of the Washingtonbased group. “This, combined with the nature of the orders — deployment of military units, surveillance, the use of lethal force, persecutions of the Kurds — all are proof

OBITUARIES

a systematic state practice, and can be used as evidence to establish both the Syrian state responsibility and the individual criminal responsibility for committing war crimes and crimes against humanity,” he added. When protests erupted in March 2011 in Syria — in part inspired by the wave of uprisings around the region later labeled the Arab Spring — the government responded with a violent crackdown. The crackdown in turn sparked an armed rebellion against government forces, dividing Syria into government and rebel-held areas. Almost nine years later, more than 400,000 people have been killed, half of the pre-war population of 23 million is either displaced internally or refugees in neighboring countries. Most of the towns and cities lie in ruins.

Celebrations of Life

Tacke, Clifford Jr.

Zimmermann, Jeanette E.

Sunday, May 19, 2019. Peacefully at age 95. Loving dedicated husband (60 years) to the late Bernice Tacke (nee Bayers); proud father of Susan Zito, Debra (Thomas) Wandling, Nancy (Jeff) Allen and Laura (Timothy) Schoen; dear grandfather of 9; great-father of 9; brother, brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Mr. Tacke was a WWII Veteran 880th Airborne, the New Guinea Campaign and Luzon Campaign. Retired after 44 years as General Foreman A-B Pipe Shop, Local 562. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Thursday, May 23, 4-8 p.m. Roadside service 10:30 a.m. Friday, May 24, at JB National Cemetery (meet at cemetery office 10:15 a.m.)

(nee Jennewein), Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection Sunday, May 19, 2019. Wife of the late Norbert C. Zimmermann; dear mother of Tom (Melissa) Zimmermann, Nancy (Sam) Ronshausen and Jane (Mike) Davenport; sister of the late Norman Jennewein and Bernice DeLarber; dear grandmother of Greg (Jamie) Andrew, Nicole, Adam and Kirstin; great-grandmother of Braylen and Greyson; our sister-in-law, aunt, greataunt, cousin and friend of many. Memorials may be made to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation or charity of your choice. Services: Memorial Mass Saturday, 11 a.m. at St. Mark Catholic Church (4200 Ripa Avenue). VISITATION FRIDAY, 3 p.m. 8 p.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS Funeral Homes-South County (4830 Lemay Ferry Rd.).

Welch, Clare A. of St. Louis, MO passed away of natural causes on May 11, 2019. Clare was born in St. Louis on January 17, 1951. She never married. She was predeceased by her parents, Arthur and Loraine Welch. She is survived by her uncle, Cornelius C Welch, of Maui, Hawaii, and several cousins.

Ziegelmeyer, Roy Carl on Sat. May 18, 2019. A Memorial visitation will be held at St. David Catholic Church on Sat., May 25 from 10 a.m. until Mass at 11 a.m. Private interment at J.B. Arrangements by Kutis So. Co.

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU

WASHINGTON — Long-running research projects credited with pivotal discoveries about the harm that pesticides, air pollution and other hazards pose to children are in jeopardy or shutting down because the Environmental Protection Agency will not commit to their continued funding, researchers say. The projects being targeted make up a more than $300 million, federally funded program that over the past two decades has exposed dangers to fetuses and children. Those findings have often led to increased pressure on the EPA for tighter regulations. Children’s health researchers and environmental groups accuse the EPA of trying to squelch scientific studies that the agency views as running counter to the Trump administration’s mission of easing regulations and promoting business. “A lot of the centers, including mine, have identified a lot of chemicals that are associated with diseases in children,” said Catherine Metayer, an epidemiologist who directs research into children’s leukemia at University of California at Berkeley through the federal program. The EPA awarded smallerthan-average funding for the research grants for this year, asked Congress to cut funding for it from its budget, and has refused to commit to future funding for the program. “The EPA anticipates future funding opportunities that support EPA’s high priority research topics, including children’s health research,” spokesman James Hewitt said, while declining to answer questions on the future for the national research projects. With no word on future funding, researchers overall “have been kind of scrambling to find a way to continue that work which is so important,” said Tracey Woodruff, director of the children’s center at the University of California at San Francisco.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

InMemorials Memoriam

Cole, Thomas Gerard May 22, 1948 - July 22, 2018 In this world Death did us part Yet you remain ever In each of our hearts. Loving you always, Elaine, Ellen and Brian

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NATION

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Draft IRS memo backs Congress’ right to see tax returns tive purpose for demanding them. But, according to the IRS memo, which had not been previously reported, the disclosure of tax returns to the committee “is mandatory, requiring the Secretary to disclose returns, and return information, requested by the tax-writing Chairs.” The 10-page document says the law “does not allow the Secretary to exercise discretion in disclosing the information provided the statutory conditions are met” and directly rejects the reason that Mnuchin has cited for witholding the information. “[T]he Secretary’s obligation to disclose return and return information would not be affected by the failure of a tax writing committee ... to state a reason for the request,” it

BY JEFF STEIN AND JOSH DAWSEY

Washington Post

WASHINGTON — A confidential Internal Revenue Service legal memo says tax returns must be given to Congress unless the president takes the rare step of asserting executive privilege, according to a copy of the memo obtained by The Washington Post. The memo contradicts the Trump administration’s justification for denying lawmakers’ request for President Donald Trump’s tax returns, exposing fissures in the executive branch. Trump has refused to turn over his tax returns but has not invoked executive privilege. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has instead denied the returns by arguing there is no legisla-

says. It adds that the “only basis the agency’s refusal to comply with a committee’s subpoena would be the invocation of the doctrine of executive privilege.” The memo is the first sign of potential dissent within the administration over its approach to the tax returns issue. The IRS said the memo, titled “Congressional Access to Returns and Return Information,” was a

draft document authored by a lawyer in the Office of Chief Counsel and did not represent the agency’s “official position.” The memo is stamped “DRAFT,” it is not signed, and it doesn’t reference Trump. The agency says the memo was prepared last fall. At the time, Democrats were making clear they would likely seek copies of Trump’s tax returns under a

1924 law that states that the IRS “shall” turn over tax returns to Congress. Precisely who wrote the memo and reviewed it could not be learned. The agency says IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig and current chief counsel Michael Desmond, who took over in February, were not familiar with it until a Washington Post inquiry this week. The IRS says it was never for-

warded to Treasury. Executive privilege is generally defined as the president’s ability to deny requests for information about internal administration talks and deliberations. On Friday, Mnuchin rejected a subpoena from the House Ways and Means Committee to turn over the tax returns, a move that will now likely lead to a court battle.

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WEDNESDAY • 05.22.2019 • B

FINAL-LY

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues players (from left) Jay Bouwmeester, David Perron, Tyler Bozak and Ryan O’Reilly celebrate Bozak’s goal that made the score 4-1 during the third period Tuesday night at Enterprise Center.

Blues’ heroics wipe away decades of disappointment

Back in Stanley Cup finals for first time in 49 years

What a feeling for Blues’ long-suffering fan base

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Blues last saw Boston in the Stanley Cup finals back in 1970, when Bruins defenseman Bobby Orr finished them off with his Game 4 overtime goal. Orr famously went airborne with his iconic celebration . . . and the Blues sank into decades of soul-sapping frustration. Now the Blues are finally back up on the big stage, bidding for their first Cup. They advanced by eliminating the San Jose Sharks 5-1 in Game 6 of the Western Conference finals in a frenzied Enterprise Center. Fans waited nearly five decades for this chance and endured many numbing setbacks. So their persistent chant of “We want the Cup!” was understandable. Just a few months ago, they thought this team would cause more of the familiar exasperation.

Stick taps to Glenn Hall and the Plager brothers, Jimmy Roberts and Ron Schock. To Red Berenson and Noel Picard. Al Arbour, Terry Crisp, Jacques Plante — the whole crew from the infancy of St. Louis Blues hockey. They laid the foundation and electrified this town a half-century ago with Stanley Cup finals appearances in each of their first three years of existence. Fellas, you now have company. For the first time since 1970, the Blues are returning to the Cup finals. This town of toasted ravioli-crunching, pork steak-munching, Bud-guzzling Blues fans are electrified once more. The last time the Blues made the Cup finals in 1970, they faced the Boston Bruins. After defeating the San Jose Sharks 5-1 Tuesday at Enterprise Center, the Blues face. ... the Boston Bruins in the Cup finals. Game 1 is Monday in Boston. Dead last in the 31-team NHL on Jan. 2, the Blues need four victories against Boston to complete their improbable worst-to-first journey. The Blues took the San Jose series 4-2 winning the last three contests. And as was the case with Winnipeg in

At 9:35 p.m. Tuesday, the fans inside Enterprise Center were seized by deafening delirium and it was glorious. For the first time since 1970, the Blues will play in the Stanley Cup finals. For anyone in St. Louis under age 49, it’s a never-felt-it feeling. This was an emotion unlocked. You’ve experienced amazing, one-of-a-kind moments and different stages in your life. Earning your driver’s license, graduating from high school, getting married. And now, you can refer to that feeling from Tuesday — that all-encompassing bliss that kisses your face and makes you scream and smile uncontrollably and beautifully. St. Louis 5, San Jose 1. The Blues won Game 6. The Blues will play the Boston Bruins for the Stanley Cup.

Please see GORDON, Page B7

Please see BLUES, Page B6

Please see HOCHMAN, Page B7

> Notebook: Sharks missing three of their key players. B6

WESTERN CONFERENCE FINALS • BLUES WIN SERIES 4-2 Game 1 Sharks 6, Blues 3 GWG: Meier

Game 2 Blues 4, Sharks 2 GWG: Bortuzzo

Game 3 Sharks 5, Blues 4, OT GWG: Karlsson

Game 4 Blues 2, Sharks 1 GWG: Bozak

Game 5 Blues 5, Sharks 0 GWG: Sundqvist

Game 6 Blues 5, Sharks 1 GWG: Tarasenko

Stanley Cup finals, Game 1: 7 p.m. Monday at Boston, KSDK (5)

SPORTS

1 M


WEDNESDAY • 05.22.2019 • B

FINAL-LY

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues players (from left) Jay Bouwmeester, David Perron, Tyler Bozak and Ryan O’Reilly celebrate Bozak’s goal that made the score 4-1 during the third period Tuesday night at Enterprise Center.

Blues’ heroics wipe away decades of disappointment

Back in Stanley Cup finals for first time in 49 years

What a feeling for Blues’ long-suffering fan base

BY JIM THOMAS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When the Blues last met Boston in the Stanley Cup finals back in 1970, Bruins defenseman Bobby Orr finished them off with his Game 4 overtime goal. “We were the expansion team, they were the original six and Bobby Orr was pretty good that year,” noted Bob Plager, a mainstay of those early Blues. Orr famously went airborne with his iconic celebration — slightly aided by Noel Picard’s trip — and the Blues slowly sank into decades of soul-sapping frustration. Now the Blues are finally back up on the big stage, bidding for their first Cup. They advanced by eliminating the San Jose Sharks 5-1 in Game 6 of the Western Conference finals in a frenzied Enterprise Center. Fans waited nearly five decades for this chance

Stick taps to Glenn Hall and the Plager brothers, Jimmy Roberts and Ron Schock. To Red Berenson and Noel Picard. Al Arbour, Terry Crisp, Jacques Plante — the whole crew from the infancy of St. Louis Blues hockey. They laid the foundation and electrified this town a half-century ago with Stanley Cup finals appearances in each of the team’s first three years of existence. Fellas, you now have company. For the first time since 1970, the Blues are returning to the Cup finals. This town of toasted ravioli-crunching, pork steak-munching, Bud-guzzling Blues fans are electrified once more. The Blues — yes, the Blues — are playing for the Cup, winning the Western Conference finals four games to two with a 5-1 victory Tuesday over the San Jose Sharks at Enterprise Center. “I don’t understand yet,” said Vladimir Tarasenko, whose power-play goal late in the first period counts as the game-winner. “It’s obviously a pretty big deal for us to get what we get. The feeling is we’re not done yet. “Really proud of the team how far we go, but there’s still

They hugged and hugged and hugged, the squeezes squeezing out tears. There were Patrick Maroon and his brother, Jordan Binnington and his father, Tom Stillman and an equipment guy, Kelly Chase and a cop, Colton Parayko and 11-year-old Laila Anderson — who’s fighting a rare disease and put Colton’s gift, a CONFERENCE CHAMPS hat, upon her bald head. “My dream is coming true,” Laila exclaimed. “We’re so close.” At 9:35 p.m. Tuesday, the fans inside Enterprise Center experienced a deafening delirium and it was glorious. For the first time since 1970, the Blues will play in the Stanley Cup finals. For anyone in St. Louis under age 49, it’s a never-felt-it feeling. This was an emotion unlocked. You’ve experienced amazing,

Please see GORDON, Page B7

Please see BLUES, Page B6

Please see HOCHMAN, Page B7

> Notebook: Sharks missing three of their key players. B6

WESTERN CONFERENCE FINALS • BLUES WIN SERIES 4-2 Game 1 Sharks 6, Blues 3 GWG: Meier

Game 2 Blues 4, Sharks 2 GWG: Bortuzzo

Game 3 Sharks 5, Blues 4, OT GWG: Karlsson

Game 4 Blues 2, Sharks 1 GWG: Bozak

Game 5 Blues 5, Sharks 0 GWG: Sundqvist

Game 6 Blues 5, Sharks 1 GWG: Tarasenko

Stanley Cup finals, Game 1: 7 p.m. Monday at Boston, KSDK (5)

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

GOLF

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 5/22 vs. Royals (DH) 12:15 and 6:45 FSM

Friday 5/24 vs. Braves 7:15 p.m. FSM

Saturday 5/25 vs. Braves 6:15 p.m. FOX

Sunday 5/26 vs. Braves 6:05 p.m. FSM, ESPN2

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Monday 5/27 Game 1: 7 p.m. at Boston, KSDK (5)

Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 Game 2: 7 p.m. at Game 3: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, Boston, NBCSN NBCSN

Monday 6/3 Game 4: 7 p.m. at Enterprise, KSDK (5)

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Wednesday 5/29 Saturday 6/1 vs. Memphis U.S. Open Cup 7:30 p.m. vs. Madison, 7 p.m.

Saturday 6/8 at Hartford 6 p.m.

Saturday 6/15 at Bethlehem 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FRONTIER LEAGUE BASEBALL • Home games RIVER CITY RASCALS GATEWAY GRIZZLIES Wed. 5/22: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Wed. 5/22: vs. Evansville, 7:05 p.m. Thu. 5/23: vs. So. Illinois, 6:35 p.m. Thu. 5/23: vs. Evansville, 7:05 p.m.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 3:55 a.m. (Thu.) Formula One: Monaco Grand Prix: practice 1, ESPN2 BASEBALL 9 a.m. Big Ten tournament: Illinois vs. Maryland, BTN 9 a.m. Big 12 tournament: West Virginia vs. Kansas, FSM Plus 9:30 a.m. SEC tournament: Georgia vs. Texas A&M, SEC Network 12:10 p.m. Athletics at Indians, MLB Network 12:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 12:30 p.m. Big 12 tournament: Texas Tech vs. Kansas State, FSM Plus 1 p.m. Big Ten tournament: Michigan vs. Ohio State, BTN 1 p.m. SEC tournament: Arkansas vs. Mississippi, SEC Network 3 p.m. Diamondbacks at Padres (joined in progress), MLB Network 4 p.m. Big 12 tournament: Baylor vs. Oklahoma, FSM Plus 4:30 p.m. SEC tournament: Vanderbilt vs. Auburn, SEC Network 5 p.m. Big Ten tournament: Indiana vs. Iowa, BTN 6:45 p.m. Cardinals vs. Royals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. Phillies at Cubs, MLB Network 7:30 p.m. Big 12 tournament: Oklahoma State vs. Texas Christian, FSM Plus 8 p.m. SEC tournament: Mississippi State vs. South Carolina or Louisiana State, SEC Network 9 p.m. Big Ten tournament: Minnesota vs. Nebraska, BTN 10 p.m. Braves at Giants (joined in progress), MLB Network GOLF 3 p.m. Women’s college match play championship, GOLF 4:30 a.m. (Thu.) European PGA Tour: Made in Denmark, first round, GOLF SOCCER 7 p.m. USL: Nashville at Birmingham, ESPNews TENNIS 3 p.m. College: National championships, Tennis Channel 3 a.m. (Thu.) Roland Garros qualifying, Geneva-ATP, Lyon-ATP & Strasbourg-WTA quarterfinals, Tennis Channel

DIGEST

Bruins play waiting game for Cup finals The Boston Bruins think they’ve found a way to stay sharp for the Stanley Cup finals while waiting a total of 10 days between games. The NHL’s Eastern Conference champions will hold a public intrasquad scrimmage on Thursday night, and coach Bruce Cassidy said he’ll try to maintain a regular game-day schedule so that the players will get back in the routine before the opener of the championship series on Monday vs. the Blues. “We’ve got some ideas we bandied around. We came up with this one,” Cassidy said on Tuesday, the Bruins’ fifth day off since sweeping the Carolina Hurricanes in the East finals. “We’ve had good practices, but this will be a little bit different.” The Bruins needed seven games to dispatch the Toronto Maple Leafs in the opening round, then had one day off before starting the second round against Columbus. They finished off the Blue Jackets in six games, and had two days to rest before Game 1 against the Hurricanes. But that series ended Thursday. (AP) MU ousted in SEC baseball tourney: Missouri’s punchless offense didn’t reappear in Hoover, Ala. Seeded 10th in the Southeastern Conference baseball tournament, the Tigers lost 2-1 to Mississippi in a single-elimination game. After scoring in the second inning, the Tigers squandered their few chances the rest of the game. In the ninth, pinch-runner Josh Holt Jr. reached second base with two outs. But after a walk to Paul Gomez, reliever Tyler Myers struck out Thomas Broyles to end the game. Widely considered an NCAA tourney bubble team before losing to Ole Miss, the Tigers (34-22-1) now wait for the NCAA selection announcement Monday, when the 64-team field is revealed. (Dave Matter) Kraft’s case postponed: A judge in West Palm Beach, Fla., delayed the trial of New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft on a misdemeanor charge that he paid for sex at a massage parlor. Judge Leonard Hanser agreed to postpone the trial indefinitely while prosecutors appeal his decision blocking their use of secretly shot video. The footage allegedly shows Kraft twice engaging in sex at the Orchids of Asia Day Spa in January. Kraft, 77, has pleaded not guilty but issued a public apology. (AP) Also in the NFL: Tampa Bay released Gerald McCoy, a six-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle who was with the team for nine seasons. McCoy, the third pick in the 2010 draft, was due to make $13 million next season but none of it was guaranteed. McCoy, 31, had six sacks and a team-leading 21 quarterback pressures last year. He has 54½ sacks in 123 career games. There’s speculation that the team is interested in free agent Ndamukong Suh as a replacement. ... New England reached an agreement on a two-year extension with receiver Julian Edelman, 32, The Associated Press reported. The deal with the reigning Super Bowl MVP is worth $18 million, $12 million guaranteed. (AP) Canada blanks U.S. in hockey tourney: Pierre-Luc Dubois scored early to back the shutout goaltending of Matt Murray, sending Canada past the United States 3-0 at the world hockey championship, in Kosice, Slovakia. Both teams already were assured quarterfinal berths and were competing for seeding. Canada won Group A and next plays Switzerland. The Americans will face the undefeated Russians on Thursday. Also, Finland meets Sweden and Czech Republic plays Germany. (AP) WNBA’s Bird is sidelined: The Seattle Storm have lost 11-time WNBA All-Star point guard Sue Bird for at least two months because of a knee injury. Losing Bird is another devastating blow to the reigning WNBA champions, who are without reigning league MVP Breanna Stewart for the entire season because of a torn Achilles tendon. And coach Dan Hughes’ availability for Saturday’s season opener, against Phoenix, is uncertain after he underwent surgery to remove a cancerous tumor last week. (The Seattle Times)

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SETH WENIG, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Brooks Koepka reacts Sunday after winning the PGA Championship at Bethpage Black in Farmingdale, New York.

OVERDUE PRAISE Why it took four majors for Koepka to get his just due BY DOUG FERGUSON

Associated Press

Majors matter more than any other golf tournament. They are not the sole measure of greatness. And that might be one reason it took Brooks Koepka winning four majors — as many as Rory McIlroy and one more than Jordan Spieth among his contemporaries — for the 29-year-old Floridian to get the kind of attention his game deserves. Never mind the No. 1 ranking that came with his victory Sunday in the PGA Championship. That could change in two weeks. Koepka now is at that level — and it took back-to-back titles in the U.S. Open and PGA Championship to get there — that he makes people look when he walks onto the range, that he’s considered a favorite wherever he goes without anyone having to look up the odds. Why wasn’t it enough when he won last summer at Shinnecock Hills to become the first repeat winner of the U.S. Open in 29 years and only the second player to successfully defend the U.S. Open since Ben Hogan in 1951? Same major, yes, but Erin Hills and Shinnecock were entirely different tests. What kept him from megastar status when he added the PGA Championship last summer at Bellerive to join Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Hogan and Gene Sarazen as the only players to win the U.S. Open and the PGA in the same year? That kind of company is as elite as it gets. What made Koepka different was that he seemed to show up only at the big events. That’s a nice problem to have. Koepka now has won four of his past eight majors, a stretch not seen since Woods won seven of 11 in an amazing run through the 2002 U.S. Open at Bethpage Black. The only other tournaments Koepka won during his run of majors was the Dunlop Phoenix in Japan in 2017 (by nine shots) and the CJ Cup last fall in South Korea. Woods won 19 other times during his stretch of majors, 15 of them on the PGA Tour. Roger Maltbie’s description of Woods at Pebble Beach — “It’s not a fair fight” — goes well beyond that 2000 U.S. Open. It’s never fair to compare Woods with anyone. He won at a rate never before seen in golf, and it probably won’t happen again. Koepka is aware that his trophy collection is weighted heavily toward the majors. Justin Ray of a golf analytics group called “15th Club” pointed out over the weekend that Woods and Koepka are the only active players who have more victories than missed cuts in the majors: 15-9 for Woods, 4-2 for Koepka. Don’t get the idea that Koepka would trade any of his four majors for a few more Texas Opens or Phoenix Opens. It simply explains why it took longer for golf fans to embrace what he has done in the past two years. Koepka touched on this Saturday night after he had a seven-shot lead — a PGA Championship record — and faced questions that were intended to find out what he was doing differently to win majors so regularly. “I’m just that much more focused,” Koepka said. “I think I’m more focused than anybody out there. My focus probably goes up, I don’t know, tenfold of what it does in a tour event — which isn’t good. I mean, it’s good that I’m doing it in the majors, but I need to do that in regular weeks.” Consider some accomplishments of other players from his generation. McIlroy won 12 times starting with his first major in the 2011 U.S. Open through his fourth major in the 2014 PGA Championship. Spieth won the Masters and U.S. Open in 2015 when he chased the Grand Slam, but he also won the Valspar Championship, John Deere Classic and Tour Championship that year. Spieth was 23 when he won the third leg of the career Grand Slam at the 2017 British Open, and he already had 11 titles on the PGA Tour (14 worldwide). They also had name recognition before they turned pro. McIlroy was the low amateur at Carnoustie in the 2007 British Open when he was 18. Spieth tied for 16th in the Byron Nelson Classic when he was 16. Koepka? His last name was pronounced “Cupcake” on the first tee at the Phoenix Open in 2015, his first PGA Tour victory. The game was always there. In a 2015 interview with Golf Digest, Steve Williams, who was on the bag for 13 of Woods’ majors, was quoted as saying: “Once in a great while, a player comes along who hits a golf ball the way it was meant to be hit. Powerful, piercing, the perfect trajectory. Of the young players out there, one I’ve seen has that special ball flight: Brooks Koepka.” Majors never should be dismissed for their value, for the legacy they create. At this point, Koepka really doesn’t need to win more PGA Tour titles to add to his reputation. “Now he’s got it. And he got it in the right way,” Paul Azinger said Tuesday. “By not getting attention, he has become a (tough guy) with a chip on his shoulder who says, ‘I can do anything you say I can’t.’” That should do.

THIS WEEK PGA TOUR

CHARLES SCHWAB CHALLENGE Colonial CC in Fort Worth, Texas Yardage: 7,209; Par: 70 Purse: $7.3 million; Winner’s share: $1,314,000 Television: Thursday-Friday, 3-6 p.m. (Golf Channel); Saturday-Sunday, noon-1:45 p.m. (Golf Channel), 2-5 p.m. (CBS) Defending champion: Justin Rose What to know: Jordan Spieth is coming off a tie for third at the PGA Championship, his first top 20 of the year and best result since last year’s Masters. Patrick Reed was planning to play then withdrew. He has gone eight straight tournaments without a top-20 finish. Colonial is the longest-running PGA Tour event held on the same course. Defending champion Justin Rose is the highest-ranked player in the field at No. 3. PGA OF AMERICA AND PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS

SENIOR PGA CHAMPIONSHIP Oak Hill CC (East) in Pittsford, New York Yardage: 6,896; Par: 70 Purse: $3.25 million; Winner’s share: $585,000 Television: Thursday-Friday, noon-3 p.m. (Golf Channel); Saturday, 2-5 p.m. (NBC); Sunday, 2-3 p.m. (Golf Channel), 3-5 p.m. (NBC) Defending champion: Paul Broadhurst What to know: Steve Stricker, who won his first PGA Tour Champions major at the Regions Tradition two weeks ago, decided to skip Colonial to play the Senior PGA. Oak Hill has hosted the PGA Championship three times, won by Jack Nicklaus in 1980, Shaun Micheel in 2003 and Jason Dufner in 2013. It also hosted the Ryder Cup in 1995, won by Europe. It will host the PGA Championship for a fourth time in May 2023. The winner gets a lifetime exemption to the Senior PGA and will be exempt into the Senior U.S. Open and Senior British Open. Jeff Sluman is in the field and will be part of a team that renovates Oak Hill in time for the 2023 PGA Championship. The course is only 281 yards shorter than it was for the PGA Championship in 2013. LPGA TOUR

PURE SILK CHAMPIONSHIP Kingsmill Resort in Williamsburg, Virginia Yardage: 6,445; Par: 71 Purse: $1.3 million; Winner’s share: $195,000 Television: Thursday-Friday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. (Golf Channel-tape delay); Saturday, 2-5 p.m. (Golf Channel); Sunday, 3-6 p.m. (Golf Channel) Defending champion: Ariya Jutanugarn What to know: After a two-week break, the LPGA Tour begins one of its biggest stretches. The U.S. Women’s Open follows Kingsmill, then the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship at Hazeltine two weeks after the U.S. Women’s Open. Jutanugarn has won at Kingsmill two of the last three years. Inbee Park at No. 6 is the only player from the top 10 in the world ranking not playing Kingsmill.

NUMBER OF THE WEEK

4

Brooks Koepka, Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods and Seve Ballesteros are the only players to win four majors before turning 30 in the past 50 years.

FINAL WORD “I can’t imagine what a Ryder Cup will be like around here. I think it would be intimidating, no doubt” Paul Casey, on the Ryder Cup coming to Bethpage Black in 2024.


NBA PLAYOFS

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

NBA PLAYOFFS | EASTERN CONFERENCE FINAL

NBA PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

AROUND THE NBA

Doncic, Young lead All-Rookie team

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

NEW YORK — With Dallas’ Luka Doncic and Atlanta’s Trae Young leading the way, the top five NBA draft picks from 2018 have been selected as the top five NBA rookies this season. Doncic and Young were unanimous first-team selections for the NBA All-Rookie team, which was announced Tuesday. Phoenix’s Deandre Ayton, Memphis’ Jaren Jackson and Sacramento’s Marvin Bagley III are also on the first team, which was chosen by 100 voters who cover the league. Ayton, Bagley, Doncic, Jackson and Young were the first five picks in the last year’s draft. Others receiving votes: Phoenix’s Mikal Bridges; New York’s Kevin Knox and Allonzo Trier; Minnesota’s Josh Okogie, Dallas’ Jalen Brunson; Brooklyn’s Rodions Kurucs; Chicago’s Wendell Carter Jr.; Charlotte’s Miles Bridges; Detroit’s Bruce Brown; Sacramento’s Harry Giles III; Orlando’s Mo Bamba; and Indiana’s Aaron Holiday.

EASTERN CONFERENCE CONFERENCE FINAL

MILWAUKEE 2, TORONTO 2 Game 1: Milwaukee, 108-100 Game 2: Milwaukee, 125-103 Game 3: Toronto, 118-112, 2OT Tuesday: Toronto, 120-102 Thursday: at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. Saturday: at Toronto, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday: at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE CONFERENCE FINAL

GOLDEN STATE 4, PORTLAND 0 Game 1: Golden State, 116-94 Game 2: Golden State, 114-111 Game 3: Golden State, 110-99 Game 4: Golden State, 119-117, OT

NBA FINALS

GOLDEN STATE VS. EASTERN WINNER May 30: at Mil./Toronto, 8 p.m. June 2: at Mil./Toronto, 7 p.m. June 5: at Golden State, 8 p.m. June 7: at Golden State, 8 p.m. x-June 10: at Mil./Toronto, 8 p.m. x-June 13: at Golden State, 8 p.m. x-June 16: at Mil./Toronto, 7 p.m.

STAT OF THE DAY

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Raptors forward Kawhi Leonard dunks on Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo during Game 4 Tuesday in Toronto.

Raptors dominate Game 4 to square series with Bucks scored 30 points. Milwaukee lost its second straight following a six-game winning streak. It dropped consecutive games just once during the regular season, at Utah on March 2 and at Phoenix on March 4. Toronto’s Fred VanVleet, who missed 16 of 20 shot attempts through the first three games of the series, went 5 for 6 from the field in Game 4. He made each of his three 3-point tries and finished with 13 points. Ahead 94-81 to start the fourth, the Raptors extended their lead with a 10-3 spurt, including seven points from VanVleet. Powell’s fast-break layup with 8:35 left put

BY IAN HARRISON

Associated Press

TORONTO — Kyle Lowry scored 25 points, Kawhi Leonard had 19 and the Toronto Raptors beat the Milwaukee Bucks 120-102 on Tuesday night to even the Eastern Conference finals at two games apiece. Serge Ibaka had 17 points and 13 rebounds for the Raptors, who improved to 7-2 at home this postseason. Reserve Norm Powell scored 18 points, and Marc Gasol had 17. The home team has won all four games in the series so far. Game 5 is Thursday night in Milwaukee. Giannis Antetokounmpo had 25 points and 10 rebounds for the top-seeded Bucks. Khris Middleton

6

The Golden State Warriors became just the sixth professional team from North America to go to five straight championships, joining the Montreal Canadiens (NHL), Boston Celtics (NBA), Cleveland Browns (NFL), New York Yankees (MLB) and New York Islanders (NHL).

Toronto up 104-84. Antetokounmpo shot 5 for 8 in the opening frame, matching the number of made baskets he had during Milwaukee’s double-overtime loss in Game 3. However, the Bucks star went 4 for 9 the rest of the way. Leonard missed three of his four attempts in the first but Lowry scored 12 points for the Raptors, who rallied from an early sevenpoint deficit to lead 32-31 after one. After scoring the final four points of the first quarter, the Raptors widened their lead with a 9-0 run to begin the second. Ibaka’s dunk with 9:56 to go gave Toronto a 4131 lead.

Beilein set to bring Cavaliers success INDEPENDENCE, Ohio — High on a wall and across the courts from where John Beilein was sitting, the Cavaliers’ basketball history stared the new coach in the face. He wants to make it richer. “Look at all those banners up there,” Beilein said, pointing toward reminders of the 2016 NBA championship, Eastern Conference titles and division crowns won by the Cavs — most of them in the past decade. “It’s been done before. Why can’t it be done again?” Beilein, who was introduced Tuesday by the Cavs, is ready for his next recovery project. BRIEFLY TRAIL BLAZERS: Portland and guard Damian Lillard are expected to come to terms on a supermax deal this summer for four years and $191 million. To qualify for the supermax, Lillard has to be voted to one of the three All-NBA teams. — Wire reports

Rust? Warriors will happily take the rest BY TIM REYNOLDS

Associated Press

And now, they wait. Again. The Golden State Warriors have gotten used to going to the NBA Finals, and their win in Portland on Monday night clinched their fifth consecutive trip. They’ve also gotten used to waiting for those Finals to begin, with long layoffs after the Western Conference final having become their norm. By the time Game 1 of the NBA Finals arrives in either Milwaukee or Toronto on May 30, it’ll be a 10-day gap between games for the Warriors. It’s not the longest in NBA history, but

it matches the length of the break that the Warriors handled in 2017, and this marks the third time in this five-year run that they’ve had at least a week off. “Happy to get a little rest before we have to play again,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. It is much-needed rest, too. The Warriors clinched the series in Portland without Kevin Durant, DeMarcus Cousins and Andre Iguodala — all sidelined by injuries. There’s no way of knowing yet if Durant and Cousins will be back in time for the Finals, either. Plenty of other Warriors are dealing with bumps and bruises as well. Accruing rust is always a major con-

cern during days without games,but the Warriors surely feel the obvious advantage — rest — outweighs any drawbacks right now — especially after they were stretched to seven games by Houston last year in the West final and only had two days off before the NBA Finals. It’s a long break, for certain. But it’s not a record-setting one. The longest gap between the conference final and NBA Finals came in 1982, when the Los Angeles Lakers sat around for 12 days before beginning their series against Philadelphia. Teams with at least a one-week gap before Game 1 of the NBA Finals are 14-11 in the series.

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Warriors guards Stephen Curry, left, and Quinn Cook react during the second half of Game 4 of the Western Conference final series Monday in Portland, Ore.

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BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TUESDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati West Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado San Francisco

W 28 26 22 19 14 W 28 28 24 24 22 W 32 25 24 21 20

L 20 22 25 29 31 L 18 22 21 23 26 L 17 23 24 25 26

Pct .583 .542 .468 .396 .311 Pct .609 .560 .533 .511 .458 Pct .653 .521 .500 .457 .435

GB — 2 5½ 9 12½ GB — 2 3½ 4½ 7 GB — 6½ 7½ 9½ 10½

WC — — 3½ 7 10½ WC — — ½ 1½ 4 WC — 1 2 4 5

L10 6-4 8-2 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 6-4 4-6 6-4 3-7 6-4 L10 7-3 3-7 3-7 5-5 4-6

Str L-1 W-1 W-2 L-3 W-4 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str W-2 L-3 W-1 W-1 L-1

Home 18-10 14-12 11-8 10-14 9-17 Home 16-7 16-9 9-10 14-9 12-11 Home 19-6 11-13 12-14 9-11 9-13

Away 10-10 12-10 11-17 9-15 5-14 Away 12-11 12-13 15-11 10-14 10-15 Away 13-11 14-10 12-10 12-14 11-13

Monday’s results N.Y. Mets 5, Washington 3 Atlanta 4, San Francisco 1 Philadelphia 5, Chicago Cubs 4 (10) San Diego 2, Arizona 1 Tuesday’s results Colorado 5, Pittsburgh 0 Miami 5, Detroit 4 (11) N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 5 Atlanta at San Francisco, (n) L.A. Dodgers 7, Tampa Bay 3 Arizona at San Diego, (n) Cincinnati 3, Milwaukee 0 Kansas City at St. Louis, ppd. Chicago Cubs 3, Philadelphia 2 Today’s games Cincinnati (Castillo 5-1) at Milwaukee (Davies 5-0), 12:10 p.m. Kansas City (Keller 2-5) at St. Louis (Wacha 3-1), 12:15 p.m., 1st Arizona (Kelly 4-4) at San Diego (Lauer 2-4), 2:40 p.m. Colorado (Gray 3-4) at Pittsburgh (TBD), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Hill 1-1) at Tampa Bay (TBD), 6:10 p.m. Miami (Urena 1-6) at Detroit (Norris 2-2), 6:10 p.m. Washington (Scherzer 2-5) at N.Y. Mets (deGrom 3-5), 6:10 p.m. Kansas City (Bailey 4-4) at St. Louis (Wainwright 3-4), 6:45 p.m., 2nd game Philadelphia (Irvin 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (Hamels 4-0), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Fried 6-2) at San Fran. (Samardzija 2-2), 8:45 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Oakland Texas Los Angeles Seattle

W 30 27 25 20 15 W 31 25 21 18 16 W 32 24 22 22 23

L 17 18 23 28 33 L 16 22 25 27 31 L 16 25 23 25 27

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .638 — — 8-2 W-3 17-10 13-7 .600 2 — 4-6 L-2 12-11 15-7 .521 5½ ½ 6-4 L-1 13-10 12-13 .417 10½ 5½ 4-6 W-1 9-14 11-14 .313 15½10½ 2-8 L-4 6-17 9-16 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .660 — — 7-3 W-1 15-8 16-8 .532 6 — 5-5 L-2 14-10 11-12 .457 9½ 3½ 5-5 L-2 11-13 10-12 .400 12 6 1-8 L-1 9-15 9-12 .340 15 9 3-7 W-1 10-15 6-16 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .667 — — 9-1 W-1 17-4 15-12 .490 8½ 2 6-3 W-2 14-10 10-15 .489 8½ 2 5-5 W-2 15-8 7-15 .468 9½ 3 5-5 L-2 13-11 9-14 .460 10 3½ 3-7 L-1 10-14 13-13

Monday’s results Boston 12, Toronto 2 Texas 10, Seattle 9 Oakland 6, Cleveland 4 Houston 3, Chicago White Sox 0 N.Y. Yankees 10, Baltimore 7 Minnesota 3, L.A. Angels 1 Tuesday’s results Oakland 5, Cleveland 3 Seattle at Texas, (n) N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 4 Chi. White Sox at Houston, (n) L.A. Dodgers 7, Tampa Bay 3 Minnesota at L.A. Angels, (n) Toronto 10, Boston 3 Kansas City at St. Louis, ppd. Miami 5, Detroit 4 (11) Today’s games Oakland (Montas 5-2) at Cleveland (Rodriguez 1-3), 12:10 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 5-3) at Texas (Sampson 1-3), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 2-1) at Baltimore (Straily 1-3), 6:05 p.m. Boston (TBD) at Toronto (Sanchez 3-4), 6:07 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Hill 1-1) at Tampa Bay (TBD), 6:10 p.m. Miami (Urena 1-6) at Detroit (Norris 2-2), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Nova 2-4) at Houston (Cole 4-4), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Perez 6-1) at L.A. Angels (Harvey 2-3), 8:07 p.m.

Canha steps in, then steps up His home run lifts Oakland after Davis departs ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — Pinch-hitter Mark Canha’s two-run homer off struggling Cleveland starter Trevor Bauer in the third inning sent the Oakland Athletics to their fifth straight win, 5-3 over the Indians on Tuesday night. Canha replaced injured slugger Khris Davis and connected off Bauer, who managed to hang around for six innings despite early wildness. Athletics manager Bob Melvin said Davis, who has been nursing a bruised hip, was placed on the injured list after the game. Oakland reliever Liam Hendricks pitched two scoreless innings and Blake Treinen, the A’s fourth reliever, worked the ninth.

Dodgers pitcher Urías reinstated ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Julio Urías was reinstated Tuesday from administrative leave by Major League Baseball. Urías was placed on leave while MLB officials looked into his May 13 arrest on allegations of misdemeanor domestic battery. Police said Urías was taken into custody in the parking lot of a Los Angeles shopping mall but didn’t release details. The leave lasted seven days. In previous MLB investigations, management and the players’ association agreed to extend leaves while probes continued. Urías, a 22-year-old left-hander from Culiacan, Mexico, began the season in the starting rotation but moved to the bullpen once Clayton Kershaw came off the injured list. To make room on the roster for Urías, outfielder Kyle Garlick was optioned to Triple-A Oklahoma City.

Angels’ Simmons (ankle) put on IL LOS ANGELES — The Angels placed shortstop Andrelton Simmons on the 10-day injured list with a severely sprained ankle suffered Monday night. He was among a slew of players placed on the IL. Others hitting the IL included Mariners second baseman Dee Gordon (wrist) and third baseman Ryon Healy (back) along with Astros right-hander Collin McHugh (elbow); Nationals right-hander Jeremy Hellickson (shoulder); Reds reliever Zach Duke (calf); Marlins utility player Jon Berti (oblique); and Toronto reliever Ryan Tepera (elbow). BRIEFLY BREWERS: Outfielder Christian Yelich, the 2018 NL MVP who is hitting .325 with 19 home runs and 41 RBIs, was scratched from Milwaukee’s lineup with back discomfort. RANGERS: Reliever Shawn Kelley learned that two lumps removed from his throat last week were benign, and the 35-year-old right-hander was activated from the IL. CARDINALS: The opener of the I-70 series between host St. Louis and the Kansas City Royals was postponed because of a forecast for severe weather and rescheduled as part of a day-night doubleheader today. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

141,913

The number of square feet of FieldTurf Vertex that will be transported by truck starting June 4 from the company’s plant in Auchel, France, to be used when the New York Yankees face the Boston Red Sox for their games June 29 and 30 at Olympic Stadium in London. The games will be MLB’s first in Europe during the regular season. — Associated Press

ROCKIES 5, PIRATES 0: German Márquez struck out seven over eight dominant innings, Trevor Story hit his ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS 11th home run and Colorado defeated host Pittsburgh. White Sox center fielder Leury Garcia catches a line drive Márquez gave up three hits, hit by Astros batter Michael Brantley to end the first inning walked one and didn’t allow Tuesday night in Houston. a runner to third base as the runs and drove in five runs RBI single as host Chicago Rockies snapped a fouras host Toronto beat Boston. walked off a winner. game losing streak. DODGERS 7, RAYS 3: Clayton Kershaw pitched into the seventh inning, and Joc Pederson knocked in two runs to lead Los Angeles over host Tampa in St. Petersburg, Florida.

CUBS 3, PHILLIES 2: Albert Almora’s fielder’s choice BLUE JAYS 10, RED SOX 3: scored Kris Bryant and Rowdy Tellez hit two home Javier Baez followed with an

REDS 3, BREWERS 0: Sonny Gray threw six scoreless innings, and three relievers followed suit as Cincinnati beat host Milwaukee. YANKEES 11, ORIOLES 4: Clint Frazier homered twice and had a career-high five RBIs, Gary Sánchez contributed a three-run drive and New York kept up its

MARLINS 5, TIGERS 4 (11): Chad Wallach’s RBI double in the 11th gave Miami the lead in a win in Detroit. METS 6, NATIONALS 5: Amed Rosario’s infield single scored Adeiny Hechavarria with the winning run in the bottom of the ninth to lift host New York over Washington.

BOX SCORES Athletics 5, Indians 3 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .263 Chapman 3b 5 0 1 1 0 2 .262 Olson 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .228 Davis dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Canha ph-dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .210 Piscotty rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .258 Profar 2b 1 1 1 1 1 0 .206 Grossman lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Laureano cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .238 Phegley c 2 0 0 1 1 1 .276 Totals 33 5 7 5 4 7 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .286 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .219 Santana 1b 2 1 1 1 2 1 .290 Gonzalez lf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .210 Luplow ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Ramirez 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .194 Bauers dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .228 Perez c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Plawecki c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Martin cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .226 Mercado rf-lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .294 Totals 30 3 4 3 7 9 Oakland 012 100 010 — 5 7 0 Cleveland 101 100 000 — 3 4 0 LOB — Oakland 8, Cleveland 7. 2B — Semien (12), Chapman (12), Laureano (6), Mercado (3). HR — Canha (6), off Bauer; Profar (7), off Cimber; Lindor (7), off Bassitt; Santana (8), off Bassitt. RBIs — Chapman (28), Profar (26), Phegley (28), Canha 2 (11), Lindor (15), Santana (28), Mercado (3). DP — Oakland 1; Cleveland 1. Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bassitt 32/3 3 3 3 6 6 2.48 Hendriks, W, 2-0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1.35 2 Buchter, H, 3 /3 0 0 0 1 0 4.02 Soria, H, 5 12/3 0 0 0 0 0 4.76 Treinen, S, 9-11 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.70 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bauer, L, 4-3 6 4 4 4 4 5 3.95 Cimber 11/3 3 1 1 0 0 3.38 Wittgren 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 1.02 Inherited runners-scored — Hendriks 2-0, Soria 1-0, Wittgren 1-0. HBP — Bauer 3 (Profar,Profar,Phegley). T — 3:22. Att. — 13,705

Rockies 5, Pirates 0

AROUND THE MAJORS

assault on host Baltimore’s pitching. New York, which is 8-2 against the Orioles this season while outscoring them 73-40, made it easy for right-hander Domingo Germán to win his sixth consecutive start and increase his major league-leading win total to nine.

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 5 0 3 2 0 0 .302 Story ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .265 Dahl lf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .288 Arenado 3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .308 McMahon 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .259 Murphy 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .176 Desmond cf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .223 Wolters c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .289 Marquez p 3 0 1 1 0 0 .190 Totals 35 5 10 4 4 5 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Reynolds lf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .325 Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .325 Cabrera rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .338 Moran 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .234 Cervelli c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .185 Diaz c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Tucker ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .163 Archer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Newman ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Elmore ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Totals 31 0 3 0 2 8 Colorado 011 200 010 — 5 10 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 E — McMahon (5), Cervelli (2). LOB — Colorado 8, Pittsburgh 6. 2B — Murphy (6), Reynolds (8). 3B — Blackmon (5). HR — Story (11), off Archer. RBIs — Blackmon 2 (30), Story (31), Marquez (6). CS — Blackmon (2). S — Marquez. DP — Pittsburgh 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Marquez, W, 5-2 8 3 0 0 1 7 3.38 Estevez 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.27 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Archer, L, 1-4 5 6 4 3 2 3 5.55 Stratton 3 4 1 1 2 1 7.96 Feliz 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.06 T — 2:41. Att. — 12,265

Mets 6, Nationals 5 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 5 1 2 1 0 2 .297 Eaton rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .333 Soto lf 4 1 2 2 0 2 .254 Parra 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .226 Robles cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .240 Dozier 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .207 Gomes c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .231 Taylor ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Kendrick ph-1b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .306 Totals 32 5 8 5 3 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil lf-rf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .333 Rosario ss 5 0 1 1 0 0 .263 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Alonso 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .260 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .206 Ramos c 3 1 2 0 1 1 .243 Gomez rf-cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Lagares cf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .205 Smith ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .308 Hechavarria ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .133 Wheeler p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Davis ph-lf 1 1 1 3 1 0 .283 Totals 32 6 8 6 4 7 Washington 010 000 220 — 5 8 0 New York 000 010 311 — 6 8 0 Two outs when winning run scored. LOB — Washington 5, New York 6. 2B — Turner (3), Soto (9), McNeil (13). HR — Soto (7), off Wheeler; Dozier (7), off Wheeler; Davis (5), off Suero; Alonso (16), off Rainey. RBIs — Turner (5), Soto 2 (30), Dozier 2 (13), McNeil (15), Rosario (26), Alonso (36), Davis 3 (14). SB — Turner (6). CS — Robles (3). S — Eaton, Fedde. DP — Washington 2. Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fedde 5 4 1 1 1 1 2.87 Suero 11/3 2 3 3 1 3 6.20 2 /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.40 Sipp 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 8.27 Grace, H, 3 Rainey, L, 0-1 1 1 2 2 2 3 9.00 1 /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.58 Barraclough New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wheeler 7 4 3 3 2 6 4.74 1 Familia /3 2 2 2 1 0 6.50 1 /3 1 0 0 0 1 1.93 Zamora 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 1.12 Bashlor Diaz, W, 1-2 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.93 Inherited runners-scored — Barraclough 2-1, Zamora 2-1, Bashlor 2-0. HBP — Fedde 2 (Alonso,Lagares). PB — Gomes (6). T — 3:05. Att. — 24,631

Marlins 5, Tigers 4 Miami AB Granderson lf 3 Herrera pr-cf 0 Cooper rf 6 B.Anderson 3b 4 Walker 1b 5 Castro 2b 4 Alfaro dh 5 H.Ramirez cf-lf 5 Rojas ss 5 Wallach c 5 Totals 42 Detroit AB Goodrum lf 5 Lugo 3b 4 Castellanos rf 5 Cabrera 1b 4 Dixon pr-1b 1 Rodriguez ss 4 Stewart dh 3 Harrison 2b 4 Greiner c 4 Jones cf 4 Totals 38 Miami 110 100 Detroit 001 100

R H BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 5 10 5 R H BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4 5 4 100 01 002 00

BB 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 — —

SO Avg. 1 .183 0 .198 2 .152 0 .234 1 .281 0 .225 3 .248 1 .263 1 .236 1 .250 10 SO Avg. 2 .204 2 .125 2 .253 0 .297 1 .275 3 .260 1 .178 0 .161 3 .182 3 .179 17 5 10 1 4 5 1

E — Castro (5), Rodriguez (5). LOB — Miami 9, Detroit 4. 2B — B.Anderson (8), Wallach 2 (3), Castellanos (13). HR — H.Ramirez (1), off Turnbull; B.Anderson (3), off N.Ramirez; Jones (4), off Smith. RBIs — B.Anderson 2 (14), H.Ramirez (1), Wallach 2 (3), Cabrera 2 (18), Rodriguez (18), Jones (7). SF — B.Anderson, Rodriguez. DP — Detroit 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smith 5 3 2 2 0 7 2.38 Brice, H, 1 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 2.00 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 8.79 Chen, H, 1 Guerrero, H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.75 Romo, BS, 1-8 1 2 2 0 1 1 5.06 N.Anderson, W, 1-1 2 0 0 0 1 5 4.95 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Turnbull 5 7 3 3 2 4 2.68 N.Ramirez 3 1 1 1 0 3 2.45 Hardy 1 0 0 0 1 0 6.35 Greene 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.35 Jimenez, L, 2-2 1 2 1 1 1 2 4.19 WP — Smith 2, N.Anderson. T — 3:29. Att. — 15,565

Reds 3, Brewers 0 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Senzel cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .254 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .209 Suarez 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .254 Ervin rf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .286 J.Iglesias ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .293 Farmer 2b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .230 Winker ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .221 Casali c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .269 Peraza lf-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .199 Gray p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Dietrich ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .237 Totals 30 3 4 2 3 10 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .273 Moustakas 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Braun lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .275 Grandal c 1 0 0 0 3 1 .264 Thames 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .229 Hiura 2b 4 0 2 0 0 2 .286 Gamel rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .248 Gonzalez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Woodruff ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Totals 30 0 6 0 5 14 Cincinnati 300 000 000 — 3 4 0 Milwaukee 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 LOB — Cincinnati 3, Milwaukee 8. 2B — Ervin (1), Cain (16). 3B — Senzel (2). RBIs — Ervin (2), Farmer (14). SB — Farmer (2). CS — Senzel (1), Braun (1). DP — Cincinnati 2. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gray, W, 1-4 6 5 0 0 4 9 3.78 Hernandez, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.42 Garrett, H, 7 1 0 0 0 1 3 1.33 R.Iglesias, S, 10-12 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.33 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gonzalez, L, 2-1 5 3 3 3 3 4 2.39 Peralta 2 0 0 0 0 2 5.79 Houser 2 1 0 0 0 4 4.40 WP — Gonzalez. T — 2:39. Att. — 36,829

Blue Jays 10, Red Sox 3 Boston AB Benintendi lf 4 Betts rf 4 Moreland dh 4 Bogaerts ss 4 Devers 3b 3 Chavis 2b 3 Vazquez c 4 Bradley Jr. cf 4 Pearce 1b 2 Totals 32 Toronto AB Davis cf 5 Guerrero Jr. 3b 5 Smoak 1b 3 Tellez dh 5 Grichuk rf 4 Galvis ss 2 McKinney lf 3 Jansen c 4 Drury 2b 3 Totals 34

R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 1 1 .267 0 0 0 1 2 .289 1 1 1 1 2 .239 0 0 0 1 2 .278 1 2 1 1 0 .320 0 0 0 1 1 .287 0 0 0 0 0 .305 1 2 1 0 1 .157 0 1 0 2 1 .141 3 7 3 8 10 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 0 2 .111 2 2 0 0 1 .247 1 0 0 1 0 .214 2 2 5 0 2 .248 2 2 1 0 1 .243 2 1 0 2 0 .266 1 0 0 1 3 .239 0 1 1 0 1 .183 0 2 3 1 0 .209 10 11 10 5 10

Boston 000 001 020 Toronto 000 332 20x

— —

3 7 0 10 11 1

E — Guerrero Jr. (4). LOB — Boston 10, Toronto 6. 2B — Drury (8). HR — Moreland (13), off Stroman; Devers (5), off Biagini; Bradley Jr. (2), off Gaviglio; Tellez (7), off Rodriguez; Grichuk (8), off Rodriguez; Tellez (8), off Rodriguez. RBIs — Moreland (32), Devers (26), Bradley Jr. (10), Tellez 5 (24), Grichuk (19), Jansen (9), Drury 3 (14). LIDP — Guerrero Jr.. DP — Boston 1; Toronto 3. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Rodriguez, L, 4-3 5 6 6 6 3 5 5.43 Thornburg 1 2 2 2 2 3 7.71 Brewer 2 3 2 2 0 2 5.95 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Stroman, W, 2-6 6 5 1 1 6 4 2.81 2 /3 0 0 0 1 2 3.48 Mayza 2 /3 1 1 1 0 1 3.54 Biagini Gaviglio 12/3 1 1 1 1 3 1.95 Stroman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Mayza 2-0, Biagini 3-0. HBP — Thornburg (Smoak). WP — Rodriguez. T — 3:17. Att. — 14,407

Pirates left fielder Bryan Reynolds has the ball kick off his glove after leaping to catch a drive by Rockies batter Trevor Story. The ball landed in the stands for a solo home run in the third inning Tuesday in Pittsburgh. Dodgers 7, Rays 3 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beaty dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Freese dh-dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .224 Muncy 1b 4 2 1 0 1 0 .263 Turner 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .281 Bellinger rf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .404 Hernandez 2b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .219 Seager ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .235 Taylor lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .203 Pederson ph-lf 2 0 2 2 0 0 .233 Verdugo cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Barnes c 4 0 1 1 0 3 .225 Totals 38 7 12 6 5 8 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows dh 5 0 2 1 0 1 .340 Pham lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .278 Choi 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Garcia rf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .286 d’Arnaud c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .070 Kiermaier ph-cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .232 Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283 Robertson 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .195 Heredia cf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .239 Kratz c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .108 Adames ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .237 Totals 36 3 10 3 1 9 Los Angeles 101 100 301 — 7 12 0 Tampa Bay 000 000 300 — 3 10 1 E — Garcia (1). LOB — Los Angeles 10, Tampa Bay 7. 2B — Turner (6), Freese (5), Pederson (2), Pham (5), Garcia (8), Heredia (4), Kiermaier (7). RBIs — Turner (23), Hernandez (22), Seager (20), Barnes (12), Pederson 2 (25), Meadows (24), Pham (19), Adames (10). SB — Muncy (3), Seager (1). SF — Turner. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kershaw, W, 4-0 61/3 6 2 2 1 8 3.33 Baez 0 1 1 1 0 0 3.38 1 /3 2 0 0 0 0 3.38 Alexander Floro, H, 3 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 0.44 Jansen 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.80 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wood, L, 1-1 2 2 1 0 1 3 0.00 Beeks 42/3 8 5 5 2 4 3.19 2 /3 1 0 0 1 1 2.40 Roe Kolarek 12/3 1 1 1 1 0 3.31 Inherited runners-scored — Baez 2-1, Alexander 2-2, Floro 2-0, Roe 2-1, Kolarek 1-0. WP — Beeks. T — 3:10. Att. — 15,862

Yankees 11, Orioles 4 New York LeMahieu 2b Estrada 2b Voit 1b Sanchez dh Hicks cf Torres ss Urshela 3b Frazier rf Maybin lf Romine c Totals Baltimore Wilkerson cf Smith Jr. lf Mancini rf Ruiz 3b Villar ss Davis 1b Nunez dh Alberto 2b Wynns c Totals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 2 3 0 0 0 .325 1 0 0 0 0 0 .294 5 1 2 0 0 2 .260 5 2 1 4 0 1 .263 3 2 1 0 2 0 .182 3 1 1 1 2 0 .299 5 1 1 1 0 2 .336 4 2 2 5 0 0 .268 4 0 1 0 0 3 .269 4 0 0 0 0 2 .191 38 11 12 11 4 10 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 1 3 0 2 .264 4 0 1 0 0 1 .271 3 0 2 0 1 0 .309 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 4 1 1 0 0 1 .182 4 0 0 0 0 2 .214 3 1 2 1 0 0 .297 4 1 0 0 0 0 .219 35 4 8 4 1 6

New York 303 032 000 Baltimore 000 031 000

— —

11 12 1 4 8 1

E — German (2), Alberto (5). LOB — New York 4, Baltimore 6. 2B — Urshela (10), Davis (4). HR — Sanchez (14), off Hess; Frazier (7), off Hess; Frazier (8), off Hess; Wilkerson (5), off German. RBIs — Sanchez 4 (30), Torres (24), Urshela (17), Frazier 5 (23), Wilkerson 3 (13), Alberto (12). DP — New York 1; Baltimore 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA German, W, 9-1 5 5 3 2 1 5 2.60 Hale, S, 1-1 4 3 1 1 0 1 2.25 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hess, L, 1-6 5 8 9 9 4 5 6.75 Lucas 3 4 2 2 0 5 4.91 Bleier 1 0 0 0 0 0 10.00 HBP — German (Alberto). T — 2:49. Att. — 17,389

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1933 — Joe Sewell of the New York Yankees struck out for the first time in the season during a 3-0 win over Cleveland. Sewell would strike out only three more times in 524 at-bats. 1957 — The Boston Red Sox hit four home runs in the sixth inning of an 11-0 win over

Cleveland. Gene Mauch, Ted Williams, Dick Gernert and Frank Malzone connected. All the homers came on the first 16 pitches from Cal McLish. 1963 — Mickey Mantle hit a pitch from Kansas City’s Bill Fischer off the right-field facade at Yankee Stadium in an 8-7 victory over the A’s.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati West Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado San Francisco

W 28 26 22 19 14 W 28 28 24 24 22 W 32 25 25 21 21

L 20 23 25 29 31 L 18 22 21 23 26 L 17 24 24 25 26

Pct .583 .531 .468 .396 .311 Pct .609 .560 .533 .511 .458 Pct .653 .510 .510 .457 .447

GB — 2½ 5½ 9 12½ GB — 2 3½ 4½ 7 GB — 7 7 9½ 10

TUESDAY’S GAMES WC — — 3½ 7 10½ WC — — ½ 1½ 4 WC — 1½ 1½ 4 4

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 6-4 4-6 6-4 3-7 6-4 L10 7-3 3-7 4-6 5-5 5-5

Str L-1 L-1 W-2 L-3 W-4 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str W-2 L-4 W-2 W-1 W-1

Home 18-10 14-12 11-8 10-14 9-17 Home 16-7 16-9 9-10 14-9 12-11 Home 19-6 11-13 13-14 9-11 10-13

Away 10-10 12-11 11-17 9-15 5-14 Away 12-11 12-13 15-11 10-14 10-15 Away 13-11 14-11 12-10 12-14 11-13

Monday’s results N.Y. Mets 5, Washington 3 Atlanta 4, San Francisco 1 Philadelphia 5, Chicago Cubs 4 (10) San Diego 2, Arizona 1 Tuesday’s results Colorado 5, Pittsburgh 0 Miami 5, Detroit 4 (11) N.Y. Mets 6, Washington 5 San Diego 3, Arizona 2 L.A. Dodgers 7, Tampa Bay 3 San Francisco 4, Atlanta 3, Cincinnati 3, Milwaukee 0 Kansas City at St. Louis, ppd. Chicago Cubs 3, Philadelphia 2 Today’s games Cincinnati (Castillo 5-1) at Milwaukee (Davies 5-0), 12:10 p.m. Kansas City (Keller 2-5) at St. Louis (Wacha 3-1), 12:15 p.m., 1st Arizona (Kelly 4-4) at San Diego (Lauer 2-4), 2:40 p.m. Colorado (Gray 3-4) at Pittsburgh (DuRapau 0-0), 6:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Hill 1-1) at Tampa Bay (TBD), 6:10 p.m. Miami (Urena 1-6) at Detroit (Norris 2-2), 6:10 p.m. Washington (Scherzer 2-5) at N.Y. Mets (deGrom 3-5), 6:10 p.m. Kansas City (Bailey 4-4) at St. Louis (Wainwright 3-4), 6:45 p.m., 2nd Philadelphia (Irvin 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (Hamels 4-0), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Fried 6-2) at San Fran. (Samardzija 2-2), 8:45 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 30 27 25 20 15 W 31 25 21 18 16 W 33 23 24 22 23

L 17 18 23 28 33 L 16 22 26 27 31 L 16 23 25 25 28

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .638 — — 8-2 W-3 17-10 13-7 .600 2 — 4-6 L-2 12-11 15-7 .521 5½ ½ 6-4 L-1 13-10 12-13 .417 10½ 5½ 4-6 W-1 9-14 11-14 .313 15½10½ 2-8 L-4 6-17 9-16 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .660 — — 7-3 W-1 15-8 16-8 .532 6 — 5-5 L-2 14-10 11-12 .447 10 4 5-5 L-3 11-13 10-13 .400 12 6 1-8 L-1 9-15 9-12 .340 15 9 3-7 W-1 10-15 6-16 Pct GB WC L10 Str Home Away .673 — — 9-1 W-2 18-4 15-12 .500 8½ 1½ 6-4 W-3 16-8 7-15 .490 9 2 6-3 W-2 14-10 10-15 .468 10 3 5-5 L-2 13-11 9-14 .451 11 4 3-7 L-2 10-14 13-14

Monday’s results Boston 12, Toronto 2 Texas 10, Seattle 9 Oakland 6, Cleveland 4 Houston 3, Chicago White Sox 0 N.Y. Yankees 10, Baltimore 7 Minnesota 3, L.A. Angels 1 Tuesday’s results Oakland 5, Cleveland 3 Texas 5, Seattle 3 N.Y. Yankees 11, Baltimore 4 Houston 5, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Dodgers 7, Tampa Bay 3 Minnesota at L.A. Angels, (n) Toronto 10, Boston 3 Kansas City at St. Louis, ppd. Miami 5, Detroit 4 (11) Today’s games Oakland (Montas 5-2) at Cleveland (Rodriguez 1-3), 12:10 p.m. Seattle (Gonzales 5-3) at Texas (Sampson 1-3), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 2-1) at Baltimore (Straily 1-3), 6:05 p.m. Boston (Porcello 3-4) at Toronto (Sanchez 3-4), 6:07 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Hill 1-1) at Tampa Bay (TBD), 6:10 p.m. Miami (Urena 1-6) at Detroit (Norris 2-2), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Nova 2-4) at Houston (Cole 4-4), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Perez 6-1) at L.A. Angels (Harvey 2-3), 8:07 p.m.

Canha steps in, then steps up His home run lifts Oakland after Davis departs ASSOCIATED PRESS

CLEVELAND — Pinch-hitter Mark Canha’s two-run homer off struggling Cleveland starter Trevor Bauer in the third inning sent the Oakland Athletics to their fifth straight win, 5-3 over the Indians on Tuesday night. Canha replaced injured slugger Khris Davis and connected off Bauer, who managed to hang around for six innings despite early wildness. Athletics manager Bob Melvin said Davis, who has been nursing a bruised hip, was placed on the injured list after the game.

Dodgers pitcher Urías reinstated ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Julio Urías was reinstated Tuesday from administrative leave by Major League Baseball. Urías was placed on leave while MLB officials looked into his May 13 arrest on allegations of misdemeanor domestic battery. Police said Urías was taken into custody in the parking lot of a Los Angeles shopping mall but didn’t release details. The leave lasted seven days. In previous MLB investigations, management and the players’ association agreed to extend leaves while probes continued. Urías, a 22-year-old left-hander from Culiacan, Mexico, began the season in the starting rotation but moved to the bullpen once Clayton Kershaw came off the injured list. To make room on the roster for Urías, outfielder Kyle Garlick was optioned to Triple-A Oklahoma City.

Angels’ Simmons (ankle) put on IL LOS ANGELES — The Angels placed shortstop Andrelton Simmons on the 10-day injured list with a severely sprained ankle suffered Monday night. He was among a slew of players placed on the IL. Others hitting the IL included Mariners second baseman Dee Gordon (wrist) and third baseman Ryon Healy (back) along with Astros right-hander Collin McHugh (elbow); Nationals right-hander Jeremy Hellickson (shoulder); Reds reliever Zach Duke (calf); Marlins utility player Jon Berti (oblique); and Toronto reliever Ryan Tepera (elbow). BRIEFLY BREWERS: Outfielder Christian Yelich, the 2018 NL MVP who is hitting .325 with 19 home runs and 41 RBIs, was scratched from Milwaukee’s lineup with back discomfort. RANGERS: Reliever Shawn Kelley learned that two lumps removed from his throat last week were benign, and the 35-year-old right-hander was activated from the IL. CARDINALS: The opener of the I-70 series between host St. Louis and the Kansas City Royals was postponed because of a forecast for severe weather and rescheduled as part of a day-night doubleheader today. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

141,913

The number of square feet of FieldTurf Vertex that will be transported by truck starting June 4 from the company’s plant in Auchel, France, to be used when the New York Yankees face the Boston Red Sox for their games June 29 and 30 at Olympic Stadium in London. The games will be MLB’s first in Europe during the regular season. — Associated Press

RANGERS 5, MARINERS 3: Lance Lynn allowed two runs over seven innings, and Shawn Kelley earned the save as host Texas beat Seattle, which has gone 1026 since a 13-2 start. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

White Sox center fielder Leury Garcia catches a line drive hit by Astros batter Michael Brantley to end the first inning Tuesday night in Houston. BLUE JAYS 10, RED SOX 3: Rowdy Tellez hit two home runs and drove in five runs as host Toronto beat Boston. DODGERS 7, RAYS 3: Clayton Kershaw pitched into the seventh inning, and Joc Pederson knocked in two runs to lead Los Angeles over host Tampa in St. Petersburg, Florida.

ASTROS 5, WHITE SOX 1: Justin Verlander took a no-hitter into the seventh, striking out a season-high 12 in eight innings of onehit ball to lead host Houston CUBS 3, PHILLIES 2: Albert over Chicago. Almora’s fielder’s choice

ROCKIES 5, PIRATES 0: German Márquez struck out seven over eight dominant innings, Trevor Story hit his scored Kris Bryant, and 11th home run and Colorado Javier Baez followed with an defeated host Pittsburgh. RBI single as host Chicago walked off a winner. MARLINS 5, TIGERS 4 (11): Chad Wallach’s RBI double REDS 3, BREWERS 0: Sonny in the 11th gave Miami the Gray threw six scoreless lead in a win in Detroit. innings, and three relievers followed suit as Cincinnati METS 6, NATIONALS 5: beat host Milwaukee. Amed Rosario’s infield single scored Adeiny HechaYANKEES 11, ORIOLES 4: varria with the winning run Clint Frazier homered twice in the bottom of the ninth and had a career-high five to lift host New York over RBIs, Gary Sánchez con- Washington.

BOX SCORES Athletics 5, Indians 3 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .263 Chapman 3b 5 0 1 1 0 2 .262 Olson 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .228 Davis dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Canha ph-dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .210 Piscotty rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .258 Profar 2b 1 1 1 1 1 0 .206 Grossman lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .220 Laureano cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .238 Phegley c 2 0 0 1 1 1 .276 Totals 33 5 7 5 4 7 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .286 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .219 Santana 1b 2 1 1 1 2 1 .290 Gonzalez lf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .210 Luplow ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 Ramirez 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .194 Bauers dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .228 Perez c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .228 Plawecki c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Martin cf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .226 Mercado rf-lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .294 Totals 30 3 4 3 7 9 Oakland 012 100 010 — 5 7 0 Cleveland 101 100 000 — 3 4 0 LOB — Oakland 8, Cleveland 7. 2B — Semien (12), Chapman (12), Laureano (6), Mercado (3). HR — Canha (6), off Bauer; Profar (7), off Cimber; Lindor (7), off Bassitt; Santana (8), off Bassitt. RBIs — Chapman (28), Profar (26), Phegley (28), Canha 2 (11), Lindor (15), Santana (28), Mercado (3). DP — Oakland 1; Cleveland 1. Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bassitt 32/3 3 3 3 6 6 2.48 Hendriks, W, 2-0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1.35 2 /3 0 0 0 1 0 4.02 Buchter, H, 3 Soria, H, 5 12/3 0 0 0 0 0 4.76 Treinen, S, 9-11 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.70 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bauer, L, 4-3 6 4 4 4 4 5 3.95 Cimber 11/3 3 1 1 0 0 3.38 Wittgren 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 1.02 Inherited runners-scored — Hendriks 2-0, Soria 1-0, Wittgren 1-0. HBP — Bauer 3 (Profar,Profar,Phegley). T — 3:22. Att. — 13,705

Rockies 5, Pirates 0

AROUND THE MAJORS

tributed a three-run drive and New York whipped host Baltimore. Domingo Germán won his sixth consecutive start and increased his major league-leading win total to nine.

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 5 0 3 2 0 0 .302 Story ss 5 1 1 1 0 2 .265 Dahl lf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .288 Arenado 3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .308 McMahon 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .259 Murphy 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .176 Desmond cf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .223 Wolters c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .289 Marquez p 3 0 1 1 0 0 .190 Totals 35 5 10 4 4 5 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Reynolds lf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .325 Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .325 Cabrera rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .338 Moran 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .234 Cervelli c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .185 Diaz c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Tucker ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .163 Archer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Newman ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Elmore ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Totals 31 0 3 0 2 8 Colorado 011 200 010 — 5 10 1 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 E — McMahon (5), Cervelli (2). LOB — Colorado 8, Pittsburgh 6. 2B — Murphy (6), Reynolds (8). 3B — Blackmon (5). HR — Story (11), off Archer. RBIs — Blackmon 2 (30), Story (31), Marquez (6). CS — Blackmon (2). S — Marquez. DP — Pittsburgh 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Marquez, W, 5-2 8 3 0 0 1 7 3.38 Estevez 1 0 0 0 1 1 3.27 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Archer, L, 1-4 5 6 4 3 2 3 5.55 Stratton 3 4 1 1 2 1 7.96 Feliz 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.06 T — 2:41. Att. — 12,265

Mets 6, Nationals 5 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 5 1 2 1 0 2 .297 Eaton rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Rendon 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .333 Soto lf 4 1 2 2 0 2 .254 4 1 1 0 0 1 .226 Parra 1b Robles cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .240 Dozier 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .207 Gomes c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .231 Taylor ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Kendrick ph-1b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .306 Totals 32 5 8 5 3 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil lf-rf 5 0 2 1 0 1 .333 Rosario ss 5 0 1 1 0 0 .263 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Alonso 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .260 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .206 Ramos c 3 1 2 0 1 1 .243 Gomez rf-cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Lagares cf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .205 Smith ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .308 Hechavarria ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .133 Wheeler p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Davis ph-lf 1 1 1 3 1 0 .283 Totals 32 6 8 6 4 7 Washington 010 000 220 — 5 8 0 New York 000 010 311 — 6 8 0 Two outs when winning run scored. LOB — Washington 5, New York 6. 2B — Turner (3), Soto (9), McNeil (13). HR — Soto (7), off Wheeler; Dozier (7), off Wheeler; Davis (5), off Suero; Alonso (16), off Rainey. RBIs — Turner (5), Soto 2 (30), Dozier 2 (13), McNeil (15), Rosario (26), Alonso (36), Davis 3 (14). SB — Turner (6). CS — Robles (3). S — Eaton, Fedde. DP — Washington 2. Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Fedde 5 4 1 1 1 1 2.87 Suero 11/3 2 3 3 1 3 6.20 2 Sipp /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.40 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 8.27 Grace, H, 3 Rainey, L, 0-1 1 1 2 2 2 3 9.00 1 /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.58 Barraclough New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wheeler 7 4 3 3 2 6 4.74 1 Familia /3 2 2 2 1 0 6.50 1 /3 1 0 0 0 1 1.93 Zamora 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 1.12 Bashlor Diaz, W, 1-2 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.93 Inherited runners-scored — Barraclough 2-1, Zamora 2-1, Bashlor 2-0. HBP — Fedde 2 (Alonso,Lagares). PB — Gomes (6). T — 3:05. Att. — 24,631

Marlins 5, Tigers 4 (11) Miami AB Granderson lf 3 Herrera pr-cf 0 Cooper rf 6 B.Anderson 3b 4 Walker 1b 5 Castro 2b 4 Alfaro dh 5 H.Ramirez cf-lf 5 Rojas ss 5 Wallach c 5 Totals 42 Detroit AB Goodrum lf 5 Lugo 3b 4 Castellanos rf 5 Cabrera 1b 4 Dixon pr-1b 1 Rodriguez ss 4 Stewart dh 3 Harrison 2b 4 Greiner c 4 Jones cf 4 Totals 38 Miami 110 100 Detroit 001 100

R H BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 5 10 5 R H BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4 5 4 100 01 002 00

BB 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 — —

SO Avg. 1 .183 0 .198 2 .152 0 .234 1 .281 0 .225 3 .248 1 .263 1 .236 1 .250 10 SO Avg. 2 .204 2 .125 2 .253 0 .297 1 .275 3 .260 1 .178 0 .161 3 .182 3 .179 17 5 10 1 4 5 1

E — Castro (5), Rodriguez (5). LOB — Miami 9, Detroit 4. 2B — B.Anderson (8), Wallach 2 (3), Castellanos (13). HR — H.Ramirez (1), off Turnbull; B.Anderson (3), off N.Ramirez; Jones (4), off Smith. RBIs — B.Anderson 2 (14), H.Ramirez (1), Wallach 2 (3), Cabrera 2 (18), Rodriguez (18), Jones (7). SF — B.Anderson, Rodriguez. DP — Detroit 1. Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Smith 5 3 2 2 0 7 2.38 Brice, H, 1 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 2.00 1 Chen, H, 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 8.79 Guerrero, H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.75 Romo, BS, 1-8 1 2 2 0 1 1 5.06 N.Anderson, W, 1-1 2 0 0 0 1 5 4.95 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Turnbull 5 7 3 3 2 4 2.68 N.Ramirez 3 1 1 1 0 3 2.45 Hardy 1 0 0 0 1 0 6.35 Greene 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.35 Jimenez, L, 2-2 1 2 1 1 1 2 4.19 WP — Smith 2, N.Anderson. T — 3:29. Att. — 15,565

Reds 3, Brewers 0 Cincinnati AB Senzel cf 3 Votto 1b 4 Suarez 3b 3 Ervin rf 3 J.Iglesias ss 4 Farmer 2b 3 Winker ph-lf 1 Casali c 3 Peraza lf-2b 3 Gray p 2 Dietrich ph 1 Totals 30 Milwaukee AB Cain cf 3 Moustakas 3b 4 Braun lf 3 Grandal c 1 Thames 1b 4 Hiura 2b 4 Gamel rf 4 Arcia ss 4 Gonzalez p 1 Woodruff ph 1 Aguilar ph 1 Totals 30 Cincinnati 300 Milwaukee 000

R H BI BB SO Avg. 1 1 0 1 0 .254 0 1 0 0 1 .209 1 0 0 1 2 .254 1 1 1 1 1 .286 0 1 0 0 2 .293 0 0 1 0 1 .230 0 0 0 0 1 .221 0 0 0 0 1 .269 0 0 0 0 0 .199 0 0 0 0 1 .077 0 0 0 0 0 .237 3 4 2 3 10 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 2 0 1 0 .273 0 0 0 0 1 .250 0 1 0 1 2 .275 0 0 0 3 1 .264 0 0 0 0 2 .229 0 2 0 0 2 .286 0 0 0 0 2 .273 0 0 0 0 2 .248 0 0 0 0 1 .000 0 1 0 0 0 .333 0 0 0 0 1 .200 0 6 0 5 14 000 000 — 3 4 0 000 000 — 0 6 0

LOB — Cincinnati 3, Milwaukee 8. 2B — Ervin (1), Cain (16). 3B — Senzel (2). RBIs — Ervin (2), Farmer (14). SB — Farmer (2). CS — Senzel (1), Braun (1). DP — Cincinnati 2. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gray, W, 1-4 6 5 0 0 4 9 3.78 Hernandez, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 2 3.42 Garrett, H, 7 1 0 0 0 1 3 1.33 R.Iglesias, S, 10-12 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.33 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gonzalez, L, 2-1 5 3 3 3 3 4 2.39 Peralta 2 0 0 0 0 2 5.79 Houser 2 1 0 0 0 4 4.40 WP — Gonzalez. T — 2:39. Att. — 36,829

Blue Jays 10, Red Sox 3 Boston AB Benintendi lf 4 Betts rf 4 Moreland dh 4 Bogaerts ss 4 Devers 3b 3 Chavis 2b 3 Vazquez c 4 Bradley Jr. cf 4 Pearce 1b 2 Totals 32 Toronto AB Davis cf 5 Guerrero Jr. 3b 5 Smoak 1b 3 Tellez dh 5 Grichuk rf 4 Galvis ss 2 McKinney lf 3 Jansen c 4 Drury 2b 3 Totals 34

R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 1 1 .267 0 0 0 1 2 .289 1 1 1 1 2 .239 0 0 0 1 2 .278 1 2 1 1 0 .320 0 0 0 1 1 .287 0 0 0 0 0 .305 1 2 1 0 1 .157 0 1 0 2 1 .141 3 7 3 8 10 R H BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 0 2 .111 2 2 0 0 1 .247 1 0 0 1 0 .214 2 2 5 0 2 .248 2 2 1 0 1 .243 2 1 0 2 0 .266 1 0 0 1 3 .239 0 1 1 0 1 .183 0 2 3 1 0 .209 10 11 10 5 10

Boston 000 001 020 Toronto 000 332 20x

— —

3 7 0 10 11 1

E — Guerrero Jr. (4). LOB — Boston 10, Toronto 6. 2B — Drury (8). HR — Moreland (13), off Stroman; Devers (5), off Biagini; Bradley Jr. (2), off Gaviglio; Tellez (7), off Rodriguez; Grichuk (8), off Rodriguez; Tellez (8), off Rodriguez. RBIs — Moreland (32), Devers (26), Bradley Jr. (10), Tellez 5 (24), Grichuk (19), Jansen (9), Drury 3 (14). LIDP — Guerrero Jr.. DP — Boston 1; Toronto 3. Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Rodriguez, L, 4-3 5 6 6 6 3 5 5.43 Thornburg 1 2 2 2 2 3 7.71 Brewer 2 3 2 2 0 2 5.95 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO ERA Stroman, W, 2-6 6 5 1 1 6 4 2.81 2 /3 0 0 0 1 2 3.48 Mayza 2 /3 1 1 1 0 1 3.54 Biagini 2 Gaviglio 1 /3 1 1 1 1 3 1.95 Stroman pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored — Mayza 2-0, Biagini 3-0. HBP — Thornburg (Smoak). WP — Rodriguez. T — 3:17. Att. — 14,407

Dodgers 7, Rays 3 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Beaty dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Freese dh-dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .224 Muncy 1b 4 2 1 0 1 0 .263 Turner 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .281 Bellinger rf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .404 Hernandez 2b 4 2 1 1 1 1 .219 Seager ss 5 1 2 1 0 1 .235 Taylor lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .203 Pederson ph-lf 2 0 2 2 0 0 .233 Verdugo cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .318 Barnes c 4 0 1 1 0 3 .225 Totals 38 7 12 6 5 8 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows dh 5 0 2 1 0 1 .340 Pham lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .278 Choi 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Garcia rf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .286 d’Arnaud c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .070 Kiermaier ph-cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .232 Lowe 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .283 Robertson 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .195 Heredia cf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .239 Kratz c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .108 Adames ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .237 Totals 36 3 10 3 1 9 Los Angeles 101 100 301 — 7 12 0 Tampa Bay 000 000 300 — 3 10 1 E — Garcia (1). LOB — Los Angeles 10, Tampa Bay 7. 2B — Turner (6), Freese (5), Pederson (2), Pham (5), Garcia (8), Heredia (4), Kiermaier (7). RBIs — Turner (23), Hernandez (22), Seager (20), Barnes (12), Pederson 2 (25), Meadows (24), Pham (19), Adames (10). SB — Muncy (3), Seager (1). SF — Turner. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kershaw, W, 4-0 61/3 6 2 2 1 8 3.33 Baez 0 1 1 1 0 0 3.38 1 /3 2 0 0 0 0 3.38 Alexander 1 Floro, H, 3 1 /3 1 0 0 0 0 0.44 Jansen 1 0 0 0 0 1 3.80 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Wood, L, 1-1 2 2 1 0 1 3 0.00 Beeks 42/3 8 5 5 2 4 3.19 2 /3 1 0 0 1 1 2.40 Roe Kolarek 12/3 1 1 1 1 0 3.31 Inherited runners-scored — Baez 2-1, Alexander 2-2, Floro 2-0, Roe 2-1, Kolarek 1-0. WP — Beeks. T — 3:10. Att. — 15,862

Rangers 5, Mariners 3 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Haniger cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .232 Do.Santana lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .267 Vogelbach dh 3 1 0 0 1 1 .264 Encarnacion 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .260 Narvaez c 4 1 3 2 0 0 .301 Bruce rf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .183 Beckham 3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .259 Crawford ss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .238 Long 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .083 Totals 31 3 6 3 1 12 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Forsythe ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .307 Calhoun lf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .435 Da.Santana cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .317 Pence dh 4 1 1 0 0 0 .305 Mazara rf 4 2 3 1 0 1 .261 Gallo cf-lf 3 2 2 2 1 1 .293 Cabrera 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .216 Odor 2b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .165 Guzman 1b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .215 Mathis c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .167 Totals 31 5 8 5 5 9 Seattle 000 000 201 — 3 6 0 Texas 010 101 02x — 5 8 0 LOB — Seattle 3, Texas 8. 2B — Mazara 2 (10), Gallo (11), Guzman (6), Mathis (2). HR — Narvaez (8), off Kelley; Gallo (15), off Elias. RBIs — Narvaez 2 (20), Bruce (26), Mazara (24), Gallo 2 (35), Cabrera (26), Guzman (11). SB — Mazara (1), Odor (4). SF — Bruce, Cabrera. Santana. DP — Texas 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Milone, L, 0-1 5 3 2 2 1 6 3.60 Adams 1 2 1 1 1 1 5.40 Brennan 1 1 0 0 1 0 2.05 2 /3 2 2 2 1 1 3.70 Elias 1 Sadzeck /3 0 0 0 1 1 2.37 Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lynn, W, 6-3 7 5 2 2 1 11 4.67 Leclerc, H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.03 Kelley, S, 3-4 1 1 1 1 0 0 1.80 Inherited runners-scored — Sadzeck 1-0. WP — Lynn, Sadzeck. T — 2:56. Att. — 19,157

Cubs 3, Phillies 2 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .244 Segura ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .318 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 Hoskins 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .251 Realmuto c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .309 Kingery cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .375 Franco 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .229 Eflin p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .176 Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Gosselin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 33 2 6 2 3 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .217 Bryant 3b 4 2 3 0 1 0 .275 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .256 Contreras c 5 0 1 1 0 0 .317 Heyward rf 3 0 0 0 2 0 .239 Almora Jr. cf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .276 Descalso 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Baez ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .323 Russell ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .259 Quintana p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .056 Zagunis ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .265 Bote ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .243 Totals 35 3 10 3 7 2 Philadelphia 000 000 200 — 2 6 0 Chicago 100 000 002 — 3 10 1 One out when winning run scored. E — Contreras (6). LOB — Philadelphia 7, Chicago 15. 2B — Segura (10), Kingery (5), Franco (10), Bryant (13), Rizzo (9). RBIs — McCutchen 2 (21), Contreras (30), Almora Jr. (14), Baez (32). SB — Realmuto (2). S — Quintana. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Eflin 6 6 1 1 4 2 2.76 2 /3 1 0 0 0 0 5.14 Garcia, H, 1 1 Alvarez, H, 3 1 /3 1 0 0 1 0 4.42 1 /3 2 2 2 2 0 4.09 Nicasio, L, 0-2 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Quintana 6 2 0 0 3 4 3.30 Edwards Jr., H, 3 2/3 2 2 2 0 0 11.05 Kintzler 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 3.18 1 /3 1 0 0 0 0 0.00 Cedeno 2 /3 0 0 0 0 1 4.60 Ryan, W, 1-1 Inherited runners-scored — Alvarez 1-0, Kintzler 2-2, Ryan 1-0. WP — Alvarez. T — 3:34. Att. — 36,768

Yankees 11, Orioles 4 New York LeMahieu 2b Estrada 2b Voit 1b Sanchez dh Hicks cf Torres ss Urshela 3b Frazier rf Maybin lf Romine c Totals Baltimore Wilkerson cf Smith Jr. lf Mancini rf Ruiz 3b Villar ss Davis 1b Nunez dh Alberto 2b Wynns c Totals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 2 3 0 0 0 .325 1 0 0 0 0 0 .294 5 1 2 0 0 2 .260 5 2 1 4 0 1 .263 3 2 1 0 2 0 .182 3 1 1 1 2 0 .299 5 1 1 1 0 2 .336 4 2 2 5 0 0 .268 4 0 1 0 0 3 .269 4 0 0 0 0 2 .191 38 11 12 11 4 10 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 1 3 0 2 .264 4 0 1 0 0 1 .271 3 0 2 0 1 0 .309 4 0 0 0 0 0 .247 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 4 1 1 0 0 1 .182 4 0 0 0 0 2 .214 3 1 2 1 0 0 .297 4 1 0 0 0 0 .219 35 4 8 4 1 6

New York 303 032 000 Baltimore 000 031 000

— —

11 12 1 4 8 1

E — German (2), Alberto (5). LOB — New York 4, Baltimore 6. 2B — Urshela (10), Davis (4). HR — Sanchez (14), off Hess; Frazier (7), off Hess; Frazier (8), off Hess; Wilkerson (5), off German. RBIs — Sanchez 4 (30), Torres (24), Urshela (17), Frazier 5 (23), Wilkerson 3 (13), Alberto (12). DP — New York 1; Baltimore 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA German, W, 9-1 5 5 3 2 1 5 2.60 Hale, S, 1-1 4 3 1 1 0 1 2.25 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hess, L, 1-6 5 8 9 9 4 5 6.75 Lucas 3 4 2 2 0 5 4.91 Bleier 1 0 0 0 0 0 10.00 HBP — German (Alberto). T — 2:49. Att. — 17,389

Astros 5, White Sox 1 Chicago Garcia cf Moncada 3b Abreu 1b Castillo c Jimenez lf Alonso dh Anderson ss Tilson rf Sanchez 2b Totals Houston Reddick rf Bregman 3b Brantley dh Correa ss Gurriel 1b Diaz 2b Chirinos c Kemp lf Marisnick cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 2 3 3 2 28 AB 2 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 2 29

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 R 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 5

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 2 .276 0 0 0 4 .278 1 1 0 1 .259 0 0 0 1 .173 0 0 0 3 .221 0 0 1 0 .181 0 0 0 0 .323 0 0 0 1 .308 0 0 1 2 .225 1 1 2 14 H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 1 1 .333 0 0 1 0 .265 1 2 0 0 .326 1 1 1 1 .292 2 1 0 0 .269 2 0 0 0 .277 0 0 0 0 .243 1 0 1 0 .246 0 0 2 0 .286 8 4 6 2

Chicago 000 000 100 Houston 000 140 00x

— —

1 1 1 5 8 0

E — Castillo (4). LOB — Chicago 2, Houston 7. 2B — Brantley (14), Kemp (1). HR — Abreu (11), off Verlander; Gurriel (4), off Covey. RBIs — Abreu (39), Brantley 2 (34), Correa (32), Gurriel (17). DP — Chicago 3. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Covey, L, 0-3 4 4 4 4 4 1 5.31 Bummer 1 2 1 1 1 0 0.79 Ruiz 1 1 0 0 1 0 5.11 Minaya 1 1 0 0 0 1 1.93 Colome 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.89 Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Verlander, W, 8-1 8 1 1 1 1 12 2.24 Rondon 1 0 0 0 1 2 2.16 WP — Bummer. T — 2:53. Att. — 31,392

Padres 3, Diamondbacks 2 Arizona AB R H Jones rf 4 0 0 Marte 2b 4 0 0 Escobar 3b 4 1 1 Peralta lf 2 0 0 Swihart lf 2 0 0 Walker 1b 4 0 1 Ahmed ss 3 0 0 Dyson cf 3 0 1 Murphy c 3 1 1 Greinke p 1 0 1 b-Avila ph 1 0 0 Totals 31 2 5 San Diego AB R H Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 Reyes rf 4 0 0 Machado ss 2 1 1 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 Renfroe lf-rf 3 0 0 France 3b 3 0 0 Margot cf 3 0 0 Hedges c 3 0 1 Garcia ph 1 0 0 Myers ph-lf 1 0 0 Totals 27 3 4 Arizona San Diego

BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 1 .271 0 0 0 .254 1 0 1 .274 0 0 2 .309 0 0 1 .174 0 0 1 .268 0 0 0 .249 0 0 1 .267 1 0 0 .180 0 0 0 .320 0 0 1 .269 2 0 8 BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 .184 0 0 2 .252 1 1 0 .266 2 0 1 .279 0 0 1 .230 0 0 0 .190 0 0 0 .246 0 0 1 .181 0 0 0 .239 0 0 1 .226 3 1 6

000 110 000 000 003 00x

—2 5 —3 4

0 0

LOB: Arizona 3, San Diego 2. HR: Escobar (11), off Strahm; Murphy (4), off Strahm; Hosmer (7), off Greinke. RBIs: Escobar (32), Murphy (7), Machado (25), Hosmer 2 (26). S: Greinke, Strahm. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke, L, 6-2 7 4 3 3 1 5 98 2.89 Andriese 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 4.39 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strahm, W, 2-3 6 4 2 2 0 2 69 3.06 Maton 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 5.65 Stammen 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.77 Yates, S, 19-19 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 1.17 Umpires: Home, Jerry Meals; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Marty Foster. T: 2:21. A: 19,969.


05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

BASEBALL

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Poor road starting pitching plagues Cards Slugging percentage also low despite high ‘hard contact’ rate

AVERAGES Batting Munoz DeJong J.Martinez Wieters Fowler Molina Bader Goldschmidt Wong Ozuna Carpenter Gyorko Team

BY RICK HUMMEL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Cardinals will have 11 of their next 14 games at home, beginning with Wednesday’s day-night doubleheader with Kansas City. That was created by Tuesday’s scheduled contest being postponed because of foreboding weather. Because the Cardinals are 14-9 at home and 10-14 on the road, that should augur well — in addition to the fact that five of the 11 games will be contested against lastplace teams Kansas City and Cincinnati. The rotation’s earned-run average is 3.45 at home, which is laudable. It is 5.81 on the road, which is horrible and that failing has the attention of John Mozeliak, the club’s president of baseball operations. “The month of May certainly has been frustrating at times when you look at the simple view of wins (five) and losses (13),” Mozeliak said after Tuesday’s game was bagged. “A lot of times when a team is struggling, it’s usually the inconsistencies. Sometimes you pitch well and don’t hit well. Sometimes you hit well and don’t pitch well. Overall we have to be more consistent in our play. “In terms of the rotation on the road, it’s definitely struggled, there’s no denying that. Clearly, we need to do a better job.” The Cardinals have played in some hitters’ parks on the road, such as Milwaukee (twice), Monterrey, Mexico, and Chicago’s Wrigley Field. But the numbers on the road nonetheless are jarring. Even counting the staff’s relative success at home, none of the starting pitchers has an ERA under 4.00. None has one over 5.00, either, but anything over 4.00 generally isn’t considered good. Asked if changes are on the horizon, Mozeliak said, “I don’t think you rule anything out or speak in absolutes. But you do want, and you do need, to start seeing some improvement.” There are options at Memphis in righthander Daniel Ponce de Leon, who was up with the big club for one impressive start; lefthander Austin Gomber, who pitched well before encountering a minor biceps problem; righthander Jake Woodford, who probably has been Memphis’ best pitcher but who isn’t on the 40-man roster yet, and hard-throwing lefthander Genesis Cabrera, who has been better lately although he had a 6.95 ERA entering Tuesday’s game at Nashville. “Internally we’ve had discussions,” Mozeliak said. “We’re certainly not oblivious to what’s happened with the rotation, but we’re going to be home for a few days and hope that some of these pitchers pitch well and build some confidence.” Mozeliak said that moving John Gant, outstanding in relief, to the rotation had been discussed. “But I don’t feel at this point it would be

Pitching C.Martinez Gant Brebbia Hicks Helsley Gallegos Flaherty Hudson Wainwright Miller Mikolas Wacha Webb Team

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Daniel Ponce de Leon is a candidate to be promoted from the minors for a spot in the struggling big-league pitching rotation.

Royals at Cardinals 12:15 and 6:45 p.m. Wednesday, FSM Game 1: Keller (2-5, 4.66) vs. Wacha (3-1, 4.93) Game 2: Bailey (4-4, 5.36) vs. Wainwright (3-4, 4.75) an immediate answer,” he said. Alex Reyes, he said, will need two or three starts at least in the minors after recovering from a broken left hand. And Carlos Martinez, who had had a bad shoulder, will remain in the big-league bullpen. “What we saw out of him this past weekend (in Texas) we’ve had some positive feedback from,” Mozeliak said. “He feels good. But starting to put too much on his

plate might not make the most sense physically.” Before he repaired to his couch to watch the Blues play Tuesday night, Cardinals manager Mike Shildt said lately he had been diving into piles of statistics and had come to the conclusion that the two biggest problem areas had been too many walks issued by Cardinals pitchers — they have given the 11th most out of 30 teams — and too low a slugging percentage. Shildt said that the rotation swoon this month came after a good stretch of starts in April. But he said, “Ultimately, we’ve walked too many people. We’ve gotten behind and got into unfavorable counts and that has driven up the damage.” That part of the Cardinals game is a “controllable,” as Shildt likes to say. The lineup for the doubleheader, Shildt said, will look a little different only because there are two games and many po-

AVG AB .371 35 .320 178 .319 141 .300 20 .273 121 .267 172 .259 85 .254 181 .242 149 .233 172 .205 171 .179 39 .257 1596 W L 0 0 3 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 4 3 3 3 3 4 1 2 4 4 3 1 0 0 24 23

R 6 38 21 1 18 16 15 32 18 34 27 2 237

H 13 57 45 6 33 46 22 46 36 40 35 7 410

2B 2 17 8 0 7 13 4 4 6 9 8 0 81

3B 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3

HR 0 8 3 1 3 4 4 10 5 13 5 0 58

RBI 0 26 21 6 12 31 11 24 22 40 12 2 221

BB SO SB E 1 6 0 1 25 34 4 2 11 30 1 2 0 6 1 0 23 33 2 2 6 14 3 1 13 29 0 1 27 57 0 3 22 22 6 4 20 42 3 0 28 45 2 3 3 13 1 2 182 384 25 24

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0.00 2 0 0 1.2 0 0 0 0 1 2 1.37 22 0 2 26.1 11 4 4 3 7 27 1.78 21 0 0 25.1 15 5 5 3 9 30 2.81 17 0 9 16.0 10 5 5 1 7 21 2.84 3 0 0 6.1 3 2 2 2 0 7 3.86 16 0 0 18.2 12 8 8 3 6 31 4.19 10 10 0 53.2 47 26 25 9 20 58 4.40 10 9 1 47.0 58 31 23 9 22 36 4.75 9 9 0 47.1 45 26 25 7 19 39 4.86 21 0 1 16.2 16 11 9 5 9 22 4.88 10 10 0 55.1 56 31 30 10 10 37 4.93 8 8 0 42.0 43 25 23 8 26 39 5.27 16 0 0 13.2 6 8 8 2 6 14 4.40 47 47 13 413.2 371 217 202 71 168 409

sition players will get at least one start. So don’t look for any long-term drastic changes just yet, and rest assured that Matt Carpenter, 20 for 45 (.444) against Kansas City starter Homer Bailey, will be in the lineup. Other Cardinals who had large success against Bailey when he was with the Reds are Paul DeJong (.429, two homers), Yadier Molina (.400, three homers) and Jose Martinez (.467, one homer). Dexter Fowler and Marcell Ozuna also have slugged homers against Bailey. But there hasn’t been a whole of lot of slugging lately. “Our slugging percentage (.420) is probably our biggest outlier,” Shildt said, referring to the Cardinals’ 15th-place standing out of 30 big-league teams. “We haven’t done much damage and our OPS is down — for three or four of our guys (Carpenter and Paul Goldschmidt among others) somewhat significantly.” But Shildt points to the Cardinals’ drawing more walks striking out less. “When you look at the on-base opportunities, the lineup still works,” he said. “We haven’t been able to get the big hit and do much damage. “It’s hard to say how much we’ve controlled the slugging percentage,” he added. “Nobody wants to hear any more about hard outs. But the reality of it is that our hard contact has improved.” The statistics Shildt cited said the Cardinals’ hard contact rate was 42.5 percent in March/April and 43.6 percent of balls hit in May for one of the top couple of hard contact rates in the majors. “Our walks have increased by half a percentage point in May and our strikeouts have gone down 2.6 percent,” Shildt said. “You literally scratch your head.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Cast of unknowns, reclamations has Yankees in first BY DAVE SHEININ

The Washington Post

BALTIMORE — Even given 50 guesses, before the start of this season, as to which New York Yankees player would be the key to a pivotal three-week stretch in May in which the team surged into first place in the American League’s toughest division — and even handed the giveaway hint that the team would place 17 different players on the injured list, 13 of them concurrently — not even the most die-hard fan would have come up with the name Gio Urshela. No one could have guessed in February, March or April that it would be Urshela, a 27-year-old third baseman in his third organization in 12 months, who would lead the Yankees with 10 RBIs this month, including a handful that have tied or won games; who would be hitting .414 with runners in scoring position this season; who would be looked upon with admiration and gratitude by teammates who probably didn’t know his name last August, when the Yankees acquired him from the Toronto Blue Jays without giving up a single player in return. “He’s probably our MVP at this point,” reliever Adam Ottavino said last week. But by now, maybe we should have seen it coming. Maybe it shouldn’t be surprising that the Yankees would kick over a rock one August (paying cash considerations to the Blue Jays for Urshela, a .225/.274/.315 career hitter to that point) and by the next May have on their hands a new building block — a player who, even when the Yankees return to something approximating full strength, appears to have earned a spot on the roster. Because that is precisely what the Yankees do now, as well as any big-market team in the majors — and maybe as well as any team in the game, period. Yes, the modern Yankees are still defined in part by their massive payrolls — roughly $210 million this season, third-highest in the majors. But with much of that giant payroll now parked on the injured list, they are also defined these days by a sharp, shrewd resourcefulness that helps explain how they have survived one of the worst runs of injuries of any contender in recent memory. According to data at Spotrac, the Yankees have lost a total of 650 player days to the injured list this season, 101 more than any other team in the majors, and 218 more than any other AL team. Even now, with players slowly making their way back to the roster, their current injured list includes MVPcaliber sluggers (Aaron Judge, Giancarlo Stanton), ace-caliber starting pitchers (Luis Severino, James Paxton), a top setup man (Dellin Betances) and last year’s AL rookie of the year runner-up (Miguel Andujar). Into this void has stepped a cast of unknowns, reclamations and other finds who

FRANK FRANKLIN II, ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Yankees’ Luke Voit follows through on an RBI single last week in New York. have combined to not only keep the Yankees afloat but, at 29-17 following Monday’s win over the Baltimore Orioles,in first place in the AL East by a game over the Tampa Bay Rays. “We’ve had a lot of our guys in various roles gain a lot of experience,” manager Aaron Boone said. “Obviously, a lot of guys have done well with it, have had some success. I think that leads to confidence and knowing they can not only play here, but thrive here. We’ve needed every bit of it. And these are guys who have a chance to not only play a short-term role for us, but also a long-term role — and hopefully we’ll benefit from that as the season unfolds, and also down the stretch.” It isn’t just Urshela. It’s also first baseman Luke Voit, buried a year ago on the Cardinals’ depth chart, now posting an .873 OPS with 11 homers while holding down the No. 2 or No. 3 spot in the lineup most nights. It’s infielder Thairo Estrada, best known for missing nearly the entire 2018 season after being shot during a botched robbery attempt in his native Venezuela, now hitting .303/.324/.545 for the Yankees since an April call-up. It’s righthander Do-

mingo German, a one-time middling Miami Marlins prospect and middling Yankees swingman, now 8-1 with a 2.50 ERA as the de facto ace of their rotation. “You always wonder, what was it that his original team didn’t see, but that the Yankees did,” lefty reliever Zach Britton said. “Take Luke Voit — the way [the Yankees’ analytics staff] ran the numbers and thought that type of player with consistent at-bats would be great in our stadium. You’re like, ‘Why would St. Louis not see that?’ “ With Urshela, the Yankees were initially attracted to his glove work — not exactly a big secret,with scouts across the industry rating him as one of the best defensive third base prospects.But they also thought he might be able to hit enough to make an impact in the majors. Urshela held the same belief. “Basically, it’s more confidence. To me it’s more mental than mechanic,” Urshela said of his rise as a hitter. “I had a pretty good season [in the minors] in 2014. But I think the difference between that year and this year is, in 2014 I was hitting but I wasn’t sure why. I was just swinging, swinging, swinging. This year, the big difference is I know what I’m

doing. I know what’s helping me be more consistent in the box.” Urshela’s emergence has helped the Yankees survive the most devastating of their 2019 injuries, the only one that will cost them the services of a star player for the rest of this season — that of Andujar, who underwent shoulder surgery last week and will be out at least until next spring. Pretty much everyone else of note is either back already (catcher Gary Sanchez, center fielder Aaron Hicks) or due to return in the next few weeks (Judge, Stanton, Betances, Paxton, shortstop Didi Gregorius) or months (Severino). Given the Yankees’ surprising hold on first place despite the many injuries, the effect of getting all those players back is likely to be similar to that of a contending team adding multiple superstar-caliber players at the trade deadline. “When you don’t feel like you need to go out and make a trade to add great pieces, and you’ve got all-stars you’re waiting to get back,” Britton said, “you would assume we’re going to be a better, more wellrounded team when they all get back.”


NHL PLAYOFFS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

STANLEY CUP FINALS • BLUES VS. BRUINS Monday 7 p.m. at Boston KSDK (5)

Wednesday 5/29 7 p.m. at Boston NBCSN

Saturday 6/1 7 p.m. at Enterprise NBCSN

Monday 6/3 7 p.m. at Enterprise KSDK (5)

*Thursday 6/6 7 p.m. at Boston KSDK (5)

*Sunday 6/9 7 p.m. at Enterprise KSDK (5)

*Wed. 6/12 7 p.m. at Boston KSDK (5) * If necessary

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Three top players miss game for San Jose BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Sharks were without their top two goal scorers in the regular season and one of their top defensemen for Game 6 Tuesday night at Enterprise Center. Defenseman Erik Karlsson and forwards Tomas Hertl and Joe Pavelski sat out Game 6 for San Jose, as injuries old and new kept the trio out of the crucial game. Pavelski had 38 goals and Hertl had 35 for the Sharks, and Hertl had nine goals in the first two rounds of the playoffs before being held to one by the Blues in the first five games. Karlsson, a two-time Norris Trophy winner, has been battling leg and groin injuries all season and left Game 5 in the second period. He was questionable going into that game, but coach Peter DeBoer took a chance on playing him, a gamble that didn’t pay off when Karlsson, who missed some shifts late in Game 4, couldn’t continue. Hertl, who was second on the

Sharks in points with 74 in the regular season, was injured in the second period of Game 5 after a hit by Ivan Barbashev in the neutral zone. Neither made the trip to St. Louis. Pavelski made the trip, and DeBoer said he would be a gametime decision, but when the Sharks came out for pregame warm-ups, Pavelski wasn’t there. Dylan Gambrell, who played in eight games for the Sharks in the regular season and one in the playoffs, and Marcus Sorensen, who had played every playoff game before Game 5, stepped in for Hertl and Pavelski, and Tim Heed, who played 37 games in the regular season, replaced Karlsson.

unsportsmanlike conduct penalty and a 10-minute misconduct. “I don’t know (why), do you have the answer?” Pietrangelo said. “I have no idea. I don’t know, I’ll take that as a compliment, I guess. I guess they think I have an impact on the game. They can run at me all they want. ... If I’ve got to take a few hits to get this team to win, it’s OK with me.” As to a hit on Pavelski that knocked him out of Game 6, Pietrangelo said: “I don’t know what he left with. That’s tough because we kind of got sandwiched between the ref, so I don’t know. I honestly don’t. I hit him and then I looked down and he went off the ice, and I went back to play.”

COME AND GET ME

Defenseman Joel Edmundson, whose power-play time had been largely limited to going onto the ice with a few seconds to play when teams are about to go back to even strength, has been logging regular power-play time in

In the third period of Game 5, the Sharks sent out forward Micheal Haley apparently for the sole purpose of going after Alex Pietrangelo. He repeatedly crosschecked Pietrangelo and got an

POWER ED

the playoffs. In Game 4, Edmundson played 1:20 on the power play, and in Game 5 he played 3:06 in a game in which the Blues had a man advantage for 9:22. The move was brought on by two events — the injury to defenseman Vince Dunn in Game 3 and the Blues giving up a shorthanded goal and another goal to a player right out of the penalty box in Game 2. “I enjoy it,” Edmundson said. “It’s obviously a new thing for me. I played a bit in juniors, but over the past five years there hasn’t been much power-play time. Just watching some video, talking to my unit, figuring out where I should be, what I should do. It’s still a learning process. I’m just trying to be out there and keep it simple.” One of Edmundson’s responsibilities on the power play is to make sure there aren’t any more short-handed goals for the opposition. “Absolutely,” he said. “That’s the main reason I’m out there.

Throughout the playoffs, we’ve been having too many odd-man rushes when they’re on the penalty kill. I’m out there as a safety valve. I just want to keep it simple and get pucks on net and let the forwards bury it.” “With Dunn out of the lineup, Eddie’s a good choice,” coach Craig Berube said. “Eddie’s got some good power-play skills actually. He makes some good plays out there on the power play. He’s got a pretty good shot.” There were a few times earlier in the season when Berube told Edmundson to be ready to go on the ice on the power play because Pietrangelo or Colton Parayko needed a breather when rolling up the heavy minutes they often do. “At the moment I was pretty happy that they kept those guys out there,” Edmundson said, “but now that I’ve got a few reps in today and watched some video, I’m pretty comfortable now.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Blues From B1

Round 1 and Dallas in Round 2, the series-clinching triumph came at home. To say that the crowd was jacked up Tuesday would be understatement. With tornado warnings blaring and fans instructed to enter the arena bowl (and get away from the glass at the Enterprise entrance), the puck dropped for Game 6 of the Western Conference finals. It didn’t take long for the excitement to bubble over into a roar. On a sequence that started with a 2-on-1 break with Ryan O’Reilly and Sammy Blais, Blais took a pass from O’Reilly all alone in the right faceoff circle. Blais had time to measure his shot and find the net just 92 seconds into play. The goal originally was credited to Blais, but then was changed to David Perron on a net-front deflection. It was Perron’s sixth of this postseason and third of this series. With the Blues’ defense limiting San Jose’s attack to the perimeter, St. Louis controlled much of the opening period. The Blues were as energized as the crowd, and perhaps had too much adrenaline flowing at times as several passes and potential scoring chances missed connections. With just 3:51 left in first, San Jose’s Barclay Goodrow was whistled for tripping Robert Bortuzzo. The Blues’ new-look/old-look power play unit took the ice and needed only seven seconds to score. Stationed in one of his favorite spots, the left faceoff circle, Vladimir Tarasenko zipped a high shot on the near side past Sharks goalie Martin Jones. So it was 2-0 Blues and Enterprise was about as loud as it has been all season. The goal extended Tarasenko’s career-long postseason point streak to six games — all six games of this series. It was his eighth goal of the postseason and third of this season. Since coach Craig Berube went with Tarasenko, O’Reilly, Colton Parayko, Tyler Bozak and Pat Maroon on the first unit — the same five that opened the season on the top power play unit — the Blues have scored a power play goal in all four games in this series. The only reason why Dylan Gambrell was in the lineup Tuesday for San Jose was because Joe Pavelski and Tomas Hertl were both out of the lineup due to injury. The 22-year-old center had only 11 regular-season games on his resume, and Tuesday marked just his second postseason game. Nonetheless, he made the Blues sweat for a while in the second period, when he got behind the St. Louis defense for a mini-breakaway and beat Jordan Binnington with a high wrister from about 25 feet. The Sharks caught the Blues changing defensemen on the goal, which came at the 6:40 mark of the period. But the crowd didn’t get restless, and the Blues didn’t get tight. They just kept playing, until San Jose’s Justin Braun was sent off for hooking Robert Thomas. With just 10 seconds left on the power play, Alex Pietrangelo fired from just inside the blueline in the middle of the ice. Jones left a rebound at his feet. Brayden Schenn, dug the puck away from the feet of Jones and sent home the rebound for a 3-1 Blues lead at the 12:47 mark of the period.

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Sharks’ Logan Couture couldn’t get to the rebound that bounced off Blues goalie Jordan Binnington during the second period Tuesday night.

Blues 5, Sharks 1 San Jose Blues

0 2

1 1

0 2

— —

1 5

First period B: Perron 6 (Blais, O’Reilly), 1:32. B: Tarasenko 8 (Parayko, O’Reilly), 16:16 (pp). Penalties: Goodrow, SJ, (tripping), 16:09. Second period S: Gambrell 1 (Donskoi, Jones), 6:40. B: Schenn 2 (Thomas, Pietrangelo), 12:47 (pp). Penalties: Braun, SJ, (hooking), 10:57. Third period B: Bozak 5 (Perron, O’Reilly), 13:05. B: Barbashev 2 (Sundqvist), 17:45. Penalties: Maroon, STL, (tripping), 1:36. Shots on goal San Jose 9 Blues 7

7 9

10 3

— 26 — 19

Power-plays San Jose 0 of 1; Blues 2 of 2. Goaltenders San Jose, Jones 10-8 (18 shots-14 saves). Blues, Binnington 11-7 (26-25). A: 18,684. COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM Referees: Francis Charron, Gord Dwyer. Blues center Robert Thomas (left) and Sharks left wing Evander Kane go down while fighting for the puck during Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Cherrey.

the first period Tuesday night. offs (two goals, 11 assists) a Blues postseason record for a defenseman. The Blues were on their heels early in the third period, in part because a Pat Maroon tripping penalty put San Jose on the power play just 1 ½ minutes in. Kevin Labanc of the Sharks hit the crossbar on the power play. Then Logan Couture, got beCOLTER hind the Blues’ defense but BinPETERSON, nington made a calm — not nerCPETERSON @POST-DISPATCH. vous — glove save with 9 1/ minCOM utes left to play. With less than eight minutes to play San Jose had 10 shots in the third period to zero for the plays. It looked like the Sharks weren’t going away. Until that is, Tyler Bozak’s fifth postseason goal deflected in off the stick of Gustav Nyquist. It was 4-1 with 6:55 to play and the Blues could see all the way to Boston, even before Ivan Barbashev’s empty-netter his game-tying goal in Game 5 of made it 5-1. the Winnipeg series. Jim Thomas Pietrangelo’s assist on the play @jthom1 on Twitter gave him 13 points for these play- jthomas@post-dispatch.com Blues left wing David Perron (57) scores against Sharks goaltender Martin Jones during the first period of Game 6.

After the Blues’ Game 2 victory in this series, Schenn uttered what could be considered a team battle cry by saying: “We’re not

going away.” He made his rebound attempt go away — right into the San Jose net — for his second goal of the playoffs and his first since


NHL PLAYOFFS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

STANLEY CUP FINALS • BLUES VS. BRUINS Monday 7 p.m. at Boston KSDK (5)

Wednesday 5/29 7 p.m. at Boston NBCSN

Saturday 6/1 7 p.m. at Enterprise NBCSN

Monday 6/3 7 p.m. at Enterprise KSDK (5)

*Thursday 6/6 7 p.m. at Boston KSDK (5)

*Sunday 6/9 7 p.m. at Enterprise KSDK (5)

*Wed. 6/12 7 p.m. at Boston KSDK (5) * If necessary

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Three top players miss game for San Jose BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Sharks were without their top two goal scorers in the regular season and one of their top defensemen for Game 6 Tuesday night at Enterprise Center. Defenseman Erik Karlsson and forwards Tomas Hertl and Joe Pavelski sat out Game 6 for San Jose, as injuries old and new kept the trio out of the crucial game. Pavelski had 38 goals and Hertl had 35 for the Sharks, and Hertl had nine goals in the first two rounds of the playoffs before being held to one by the Blues in the first five games. Karlsson, a two-time Norris Trophy winner, has been battling leg and groin injuries all season and left Game 5 in the second period. He was questionable going into that game, but coach Peter DeBoer took a chance on playing him, a gamble that didn’t pay off when Karlsson, who missed some shifts late in Game 4, couldn’t continue. Hertl, who was second on the

Sharks in points with 74 in the regular season, was injured in the second period of Game 5 after a hit by Ivan Barbashev in the neutral zone. Neither made the trip to St. Louis. Pavelski made the trip, and DeBoer said he would be a gametime decision, but when the Sharks came out for pregame warm-ups, Pavelski wasn’t there. Dylan Gambrell, who played in eight games for the Sharks in the regular season and one in the playoffs, and Marcus Sorensen, who had played every playoff game before Game 5, stepped in for Hertl and Pavelski, and Tim Heed, who played 37 games in the regular season, replaced Karlsson.

unsportsmanlike conduct penalty and a 10-minute misconduct. “I don’t know (why), do you have the answer?” Pietrangelo said. “I have no idea. I don’t know, I’ll take that as a compliment, I guess. I guess they think I have an impact on the game. They can run at me all they want. ... If I’ve got to take a few hits to get this team to win, it’s OK with me.” As to a hit on Pavelski that knocked him out of Game 6, Pietrangelo said: “I don’t know what he left with. That’s tough because we kind of got sandwiched between the ref, so I don’t know. I honestly don’t. I hit him and then I looked down and he went off the ice, and I went back to play.”

COME AND GET ME

Defenseman Joel Edmundson, whose power-play time had been largely limited to going onto the ice with a few seconds to play when teams are about to go back to even strength, has been logging regular power-play time in

In the third period of Game 5, the Sharks sent out forward Micheal Haley apparently for the sole purpose of going after Alex Pietrangelo. He repeatedly crosschecked Pietrangelo and got an

POWER ED

the playoffs. In Game 4, Edmundson played 1:20 on the power play, and in Game 5 he played 3:06 in a game in which the Blues had a man advantage for 9:22. The move was brought on by two events — the injury to defenseman Vince Dunn in Game 3 and the Blues giving up a shorthanded goal and another goal to a player right out of the penalty box in Game 2. “I enjoy it,” Edmundson said. “It’s obviously a new thing for me. I played a bit in juniors, but over the past five years there hasn’t been much power-play time. Just watching some video, talking to my unit, figuring out where I should be, what I should do. It’s still a learning process. I’m just trying to be out there and keep it simple.” One of Edmundson’s responsibilities on the power play is to make sure there aren’t any more short-handed goals for the opposition. “Absolutely,” he said. “That’s the main reason I’m out there.

Throughout the playoffs, we’ve been having too many odd-man rushes when they’re on the penalty kill. I’m out there as a safety valve. I just want to keep it simple and get pucks on net and let the forwards bury it.” “With Dunn out of the lineup, Eddie’s a good choice,” coach Craig Berube said. “Eddie’s got some good power-play skills actually. He makes some good plays out there on the power play. He’s got a pretty good shot.” There were a few times earlier in the season when Berube told Edmundson to be ready to go on the ice on the power play because Pietrangelo or Colton Parayko needed a breather when rolling up the heavy minutes they often do. “At the moment I was pretty happy that they kept those guys out there,” Edmundson said, “but now that I’ve got a few reps in today and watched some video, I’m pretty comfortable now.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Blues From B1

one more opponent to beat. It feels unbelievable. I’m not going to lie.” The last time the Blues made the Cup finals in 1970, they faced Bobby Orr and the Boston Bruins. Nearly a half-century later, they’re back in the Cup and playing ... Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand, Tuukka Rask and the Boston Bruins in the Cup finals. Game 1 is Monday in Boston. Dead last in the 31-team NHL on Jan. 2, the Blues need four victories against Boston to complete their improbable worst-tofirst journey. “I always thought this was possible when looking at this group,” said Ryan O’Reilly, the team’s unofficial regular-season MVP who had three assists Tuesday. “But having the struggles we had early in the year and then rallying to be here now, it’s amazing that we actually have a chance to win a Stanley Cup now.” They do. The Blues have never won a Stanley Cup. In fact, they’ve never even won a Stanley Cup game, getting swept by the Montreal Canadiens in 1968 and ‘69, and the Bruins in 1970. But as the clock wound down at Enterprise, and the crowd kept chanting “We want the Cup! We want the Cup!” all things seemed possible. “To go through what we went through this year is not easy,” said Alex Pietrangelo, who with an assist Tuesday set a Blues record for most points by a defenseman in one postseason (13). “I’m sure people questioned me (as captain) and questioned the group. “Sometimes you question yourself. But sometimes you have to lean on the people around you. They were nothing but supportive. When you have a group that’s as close as ours is — the hard times are hard, but you can have those hard and honest conversations with each other and we did that when things weren’t going well.” Things went well Tuesday. With rare exception, the Blues were in control against a San Jose team missing three injured mainstays: Erik Karlsson, Joe Pavelski and Tomas Hertl. The team that scored first won every game in this series, and on Tuesday it was David Perron on a tip-in of a Sammy Blais shot just 92 seconds into play. “I’ve never played in an atmosphere like that,” Blais said. “I think it was incredible at the end when they were singing, ‘We want the Cup!’ Everyone on the bench had chills and it was a great moment.” Tarasenko’s goal gave the Blues’ revived power-play unit a goal in the last four games of this series, and gave the Blues a 2-0 lead. But Dylan Gambrell made the Blues sweat for a while when he got behind the St. Louis defense for a mini-breakaway and beat Jordan Binnington with a high wrister at the 6:40 mark of the second period to cut the lead to 2-1. Gambrell, whose resume includes only 11 regular-season NHL games, was in the lineup only because of the injuries to Pavelski and Hertl. Brayden Schenn restored order for the home team six min-

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Sharks’ Logan Couture couldn’t get to the rebound that bounced off Blues goalie Jordan Binnington during the second period Tuesday night.

Blues 5, Sharks 1 San Jose Blues

0 2

1 1

0 2

— —

1 5

First period B: Perron 6 (Blais, O’Reilly), 1:32. B: Tarasenko 8 (Parayko, O’Reilly), 16:16 (pp). Penalties: Goodrow, SJ, (tripping), 16:09. Second period S: Gambrell 1 (Donskoi, Jones), 6:40. B: Schenn 2 (Thomas, Pietrangelo), 12:47 (pp). Penalties: Braun, SJ, (hooking), 10:57. Third period B: Bozak 5 (Perron, O’Reilly), 13:05. B: Barbashev 2 (Sundqvist), 17:45. Penalties: Maroon, STL, (tripping), 1:36. Shots on goal San Jose 9 Blues 7

7 9

10 3

— 26 — 19

Power-plays San Jose 0 of 1; Blues 2 of 2. Goaltenders San Jose, Jones 10-8 (18 shots-14 saves). Blues, Binnington 11-7 (26-25). A: 18,684. COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON @POST-DISPATCH.COM Referees: Francis Charron, Gord Dwyer. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Scott Cherrey. Blues left wing David Perron (57) scores against Sharks goaltender Martin Jones during the first period.

The Sharks outshot the Blues 10-0 over the first 12 ½ minutes of the third period, but then came goals by Tyler Bozak and then an empty-netter for Ivan Barbashev. A night that began with tornado warnings blaring around the arena ended with — what else? — “Gloria.” Alumni on hand such as Brett Hull and Kelly Chase fought back tears. With their newly-minted Western Conference championship hats in place, the Blues posed at center ice with the Clarence S. Campbell Bowl, which goes to the Western champion. But none of them touched it — that’s bad luck. Who would have thought this COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM possible? Blues center Robert Thomas (left) and Sharks left wing Evander Kane go Just a year removed from down while fighting for the puck during the first period Tuesday night. being an organizational outcast in Providence — the AHL farm utes later, when he gathered a re- season. The two-goal lead re- team of the Boston Bruins — bound from the skates of Sharks stored, it was only a matter of Binnington was asked if he ever goalie Martin Jones and scored time before the Blues could see imagined he’d be in this spot a year a later. just his second goal of this post- all the way to Boston.

“I wouldn’t have put money on it,” he said. Six months ago, when soon to be non-interim coach Craig Berube took over what looked like a sinking ship, he wouldn’t have put money on a Stanley Cup appearance either. “No,” Berube said. “We were just trying to get on the right track then. Once we got going though in January and February, I knew we had a good hockey team. We get in the playoffs and anything can happen. ... Credit to our players. They battled and they believed they were gonna make the playoffs and we made it. And now we’re here.” Here, but as Bobby Plager reminded, there’s work to be done. “Four more wins, boys,” he told reporters. Four more wins. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


NHL PLAYOFFS

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

Hochman From B1

The last day the Blues were in a Stanley Cup finals game — May 10, 1970 — Bobby Orr scored and soared above the ice. Only four times since then had the Blues even advanced to the conference finals. And now, finally, the Stanley Cup finals. A lot of people compare this fan base to the long-suffering followers of the Detroit Lions or Cleveland Indians, or those even of the Chicago Cubs, before they ended their drought in 2016. However, here’s the thing about the Blues — those other teams have gone through long droughts where, very early in the season, it was known that the team was bad. But the Blues often have been, at least, pretty good. The longest stretch the Blues have gone without making the playoffs is three years. They had a streak in which they made the postseason tournament every year for a quarter-century! Yet, not once did they advance the finals. Annual teasing, annual tempting, annual torture. If you’re picking your poison, that might be more brutal than being a fan of a hopeless loser for long stretches in numerous generations. And, of course, this particular season was an emotional whirlwind, one not for the weak. On January 2, the St. Louis Blues had the fewest points in the National Hockey League. Asked when he truly thought they could turn this thing around, Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester said: “Honestly, probably not until that streak and we won 10 games. Before that, you’re looking at the standings and are like, ‘Man, we’ve got to jump over a lot of teams. Unless we do something like (a crazy winning streak), it’s not going to happen.’ And when we did, we kind of got closer and then we were playing good. You’re like — OK, we’re playing good and we have a lot of division games to play. Maybe we can make the playoffs. But up until that point, we might have been playing better. But the reality was, if we didn’t win all those games we just weren’t going to catch up.” Coach Craig Berube changed everything. Sometimes stoic, sometimes fiery, always honest and honorable, the former enforcer reinforced what makes winning hockey. “He’s made us realize that if we do what he says and what he wants us to do, we’re a pretty good team,” Bouwmeester said. And the matchup couldn’t be sweeter. Of course, if the Blues had matched up with the Carolina Hurricanes, in whatever city those guys are in, it would’ve been quite a big deal. But there would be something almost ceremonial about St. Louis beating Boston to win its first Stanley Cup. The Bruins, an “original six” team, was the Blues’ opponent in their most-recent Stanley Cup finals, back in 1970. The NBA’s St. Louis Hawks won their only championship in 1958, back when Bob Pettitt and the boys beat the Boston Celtics.The St. Louis Rams lost Super Bowl XXXVI to the New England Patriots. And the St. Louis Cardinals have had numerous World Series battles with the Boston Red Sox. Seemingly every generation of Cards fans have faced the Red Sox in the fall classic. In 1946, the Cards won on the famed “Mad Dash” by Enos Slaughter; in 1967, Bob Gibson and “El Birdos” won it all; in 2004, the Cards were an amazing team but the Red Sox made history and won it all; in 2013, David Ortiz and Boston broke St.

Gordon From B1

This talent-laden squad underachieved under fretful coach Mike Yeo, and it was slow to respond when Craig Berube replaced him. Then, when you least expected it, the Blues pulled together and began their long climb up the standings and into the bracket. They upset Winnipeg in six games, outlasted Dallas in seven and then dispatched the Sharks to avenge their loss in the 2016 conference finals. The Blues won the last two games of the series by a combined scored of 10-1. They tilted the ice against the Sharks while gen-

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues fan Trey Kerr, 35, cries with joy as the team wraps up its victory over San Jose on Tuesday night that sent it to the Stanley Cup finals for the first time since 1970. “You have no idea how much this means to me,” Kerr said.

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Vladimir Tarasenko celebrates after scoring COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM on a power play in the first period Tuesday Blues goalie Jordan Binnington blocks a shot from San Jose’s Micheal Haley, right, while night to give the Blues a 2-0 lead en route to Robert Thomas defends on Tuesday night. their historic victory. “Well, first of all, I think they’re going to be a really tough out in the playoffs,” he said. “I see trying to beat their team in a series is not going to be easy, because of what they’ve gone through. With what they’ve gone through as a team, if you come out on the other side, you build that resilience, and you build a steeliness to your personality that’s hard to defeat. They went through it. They could have gone the other way. It could have been a really tough year. But they drew upon their character and their competitiveness and they pushed it in the right direction. . . . “I think character-wise and competewise, this is as deep as St. Louis has ever been. And I mean, you look at it, they got quality people sitting there on the fourth line right now, and they’ve got a steeliness COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM to their group.” They’ve got the steeliness to win the Blues left winger David Perron celebrates after scoring the first goal of the game Tuesday. sterling silver. March, he was asked about this current Benjamin Hochman Louis hearts, yet again. When former Blues coach Ken Hitch- Blues team. He summed up their resilience @hochman on Twitter cock was in town with the Oilers, back in with this harbinger of an assessment: bhochman@post-dispatch.com

erating hope that they have a shot against Boston in the Cup finals. Back in the late ‘60s, Blues fans must have believed their team would always be in the hunt. It was the best of the NHL’s six new teams, loaded with well-respected veterans. The Blues advanced out of the expansion bracket to the Cup final in their first three years, only to get swept by Montreal twice and Boston once. Then the NHL blended the expansion teams with the Original Six teams to restore competitive balance. The easy path to the Cup finals vanished and the Blues spent the better part of five decades battling to stay relevant and, at times, stay in business. Ownership instability became a recur-

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ring theme. Sid Salomon Jr. was an awesome expansion owner, but his son Sid Salomon III did a poor job succeeding him. Ralston Purina picked up the pieces, thanks to chairman R. Hal Dean. But after he retired, Ralston Purina shut down the franchise after the NHL blocked its sale to Saskatoon investors. Then came Harry Ornest to save the franchise, slash costs, mess with the sweaters, turn the family dog loose in the bowels of The Arena before mercifully selling to Mike Shanahan’s local group. Those civic titans spent record-setting dollars to add star power to the franchise. But eventually they fired Shanahan and later they bailed completely. Bill and Nancy Laurie came along, lost millions of their Walmart dollars and bailed. The Dave Checketts group came along, ran out of money and bailed. Finally Tom Stillman arrived to bring stability and restore the positive vibe of Salomon’s early days. On his watch, the Blues built revenue, spent to the NHL salary cap, pulled off a successful Winter Classic and earned the right to host the 2020 All-Star Game. Finally the Blues can command the full respect of peer franchises. Through all the ups and downs, the Blues employed some of the greatest hockey minds during their five-plus decades: Lynn Patrick, Scotty Bowman, Al Arbour, Cliff Fletcher, Jimmy Devellano, Jacques Demers, Emile Francis, Mike Keenan, Joel Quenneville and Ken Hitchcock. The Blues also employed many of the league’s all-time scorers, including Wayne Gretzky, Adam Oates, Doug Gilmour, Dale Hawerchuk, Brett Hull, Brendan Shanahan, Pierre Turgeon, Al MacInnis, Peter Stastny and Phil Housley. The franchise has suffered heartache, including Bob Gassoff’s fatal motorcycle wreck and the Russian plane crash that killed Pavol Demitra and Igor Korolev, two alumni who wore No. 38 here. Assistant coach Barclay Plager lost his battle with brain tumors. Another franchise icon, broadcaster Dan Kelly, lost his fight with cancer. Doug Wickenheiser and Erik Johnson suffered catastrophic knee injuries on team outings. Both were first overall picks in the NHL Draft, and neither reached their full potential. Bad trades, there were a few. The team sent a young Paul MacLean to Winnipeg for defenseman Scott Campbell, who quickly retired due to his asthma condi-

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ David Perron celebrates a goal that Brayden Schenn scored despite the efforts of San Jose’s Joakim Ryan (47) and goaltender Martin Jones. Schenn’s goal gave the Blues a 3-1 lead in the second period Tuesday night at Enterprise Center. tion. Joe Mullen exited for the package of Gino Cavallini, Charlie Bourgeois and Eddy Beers. How about swapping Gilmour for Mike Bullard’s remnants? Yeah, Dougie had some off-ice issues, but come on. Can you imagine losing a young Rod Brind’Amour for Ron Sutter and Murray Baron? Or trading Oates for Craig Janney? Or moving Chris Pronger for Eric Brewer and scraps? Much of the franchise’s half-century of mediocrity was hard-earned. But now the Blues are finally writing an uplifting new chapter about the Stanley Cup quest that stunned the league. General manager Doug Armstrong assembled a deep, talented roster, and Berube has driven the team to higher and higher performance levels. So Vladimir Tarasenko, Brayden Schenn, Ryan O’Reilly and Jordan Binnington are getting the opportunity that Garry Unger, Brian Sutter, Bernie Federko and Mike Liut never got. This is going to be special. Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com


NHL PLAYOFFS

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

Hochman From B1

one-of-a-kind moments and different stages in your life. Earning your driver’s license, graduating from high school, getting married. And now, you can refer to that feeling from Tuesday — the time you felt something you never felt before as a Blues fan, that all-encompassing bliss, that unwavering, irreversible feeling. St. Louis 5, San Jose 1. The Blues won Game 6. The Blues will play the Boston Bruins for the Stanley Cup. “I don’t know if I cried that much when I actually won,” said Brett Hull, the greatest Blue, who won his first Stanley Cup with Dallas. “And we still haven’t won anything yet. But it’s so exciting for this franchise and this city and the fans. . . . “The way they were playing (in Game 5), it was like there was no chance we were going to lose (Game 6). I saw (the team owner) Mr. Stillman before the game, and I was like: ‘Are you OK?’ He looked like he was scared to death. I go: ‘Tom, don’t worry! We have no chance of losing.’ “It was after the clock hit zero when, all of a sudden, the flood of emotions came. I saw Bob Plager and was like: ‘Oh my God!’ And I watched Kelly Chase out here crying.” The last day the Blues were in a Stanley Cup finals game, May 10, 1970, Bobby Orr scored and soared above the ice. Only four times since then had the Blues even advanced to the conference finals. And now, finally, the Stanley Cup finals. “It’s so special to be able to do this in this town,” said forward Alexander Steen, the longest-tenure current Blues player. “I don’t think people outside this city understand what a community we have here. It’s very special.” Some folks might compare the Blues’ fan base to the long-suffering followers of the Detroit Lions or Cleveland Indians, or those even of the Chicago Cubs before they ended their drought in 2016. However, here’s the thing about the Blues — those other teams have gone through long droughts where, very early in the season, it was known that the team was bad. But the Blues often have been, at least, pretty good. The longest stretch they have gone without making the playoffs is three years. They had a streak in which they made the postseason tournament every year for a quarter-century! Yet, not once in that span did they advance the finals. An annual tease, annual tempting, annual torture. If you’re picking your poison, that might be more brutal than being a fan of a hopeless loser for long stretches in numerous generations. And, of course, this particular season was an emotional whirlwind, not one for the weak. On January 2, the St. Louis Blues had the fewest points in the National Hockey League. Asked when he truly thought they could turn this thing around, defenseman Jay Bouwmeester said: “Honestly, probably not until that streak and we won 10 games.

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues fan Trey Kerr, 35, cries with joy as the team wraps up its victory over San Jose on Tuesday night that sent it to the Stanley Cup finals for the first time since 1970. “You have no idea how much this means to me,” Kerr said.

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Jaden Schwartz and Tyler Bozak celebrate Bozak’s goal during the third period Tuesday. In the background is interim coach Craig Berube. Before that, you’re looking at the standings and are like, ‘Man, we’ve got to jump over a lot of teams. Unless we do something like (a crazy winning streak), it’s not going to happen.’ And when we did, we kind of got closer and then we were playing good. You’re like, ‘OK, we’re playing good and we

have a lot of division games to play. Maybe we can make the playoffs.’ But up until that point, we might have been playing better, but the reality was — if we didn’t win all those games, we just weren’t going to catch up.” And the next matchup couldn’t be

sweeter. Of course, if the Blues had matched up with the Carolina Hurricanes, in whatever city those guys are in, it would’ve been quite a big deal. But there’s something almost ceremonial about the possibility of St. Louis beating Boston to win its first Stanley Cup. The Bruins, an “original six” team, were the opponent in the Blues’ most-recent Stanley Cup finals. The NBA’s St. Louis Hawks won their only championship in 1958, when Bob Pettit and the boys beat the Boston Celtics. The St. Louis Rams lost Super Bowl XXXVI to the New England Patriots. And the St. Louis Cardinals have had numerous World Series battles with the Boston Red Sox. Seemingly each generation of Cards fans have faced the Red Sox in the fall classic. In 1946, the Cards won on the famed “Mad Dash” by Enos Slaughter; in 1967, Bob Gibson and “El Birdos” won it all; in 2004, the Cards were an amazing team, but the Red Sox made history and won it all; in 2013, David Ortiz and Boston broke St. Louis hearts, yet again. A couple stars of that 2013 team — Yadier Molina and Adam Wainwright — were among the fans Tuesday at Enterprise Center. During Game 6, the ballplayers were interviewed on the jumbotron. “Waino” yelled into the microphone: “We want to see a Stanley Cup finals come to St. Louis!” Well, it’s actually happening. Dreams are coming true. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

Gordon From B1

and endured many numbing setbacks. So their persistent chant of “We want the Cup!” Tuesday night was understandable. “This city and what’s gone on here ... you look up at the screen and you see Yadi (Molina) here, the baseball players here with their Blues sweater on,” Plager said amid the postgame celebration. “We went to the finals a few times, I didn’t see any Cardinals with the Blues sweater on. They’ve taken this city.” Just a few months ago, fans feared this team would cause more exasperation. This talent-laden squad underachieved under fretful coach Mike Yeo and it was slow to respond when Craig Berube replaced him. Then, when you least expected it, the Blues pulled together and began their long climb up the standings and into the bracket. They upset Winnipeg in six games, outlasted Dallas in seven and then dispatched the Sharks to avenge their loss in the 2016 conference finals. “We built for a long time, over the years,

COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington blocks a shot from San Jose’s Micheal Haley, right, while Robert Thomas defends on Tuesday night. to get this opportunity,” Blues captain Alex Pietrangelo said. The Blues won the last two games of the series by a combined scored of 10-1. They looked very capable of taking the fight to

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The Blues’ David Perron celebrates a goal that Brayden Schenn scored despite the Boston in the Cup finals. “They have a hard team, a hard team to efforts of San Jose’s Joakim Ryan (47) and play against,” winger Vladimir Tarasenko goaltender Martin Jones. Schenn’s goal gave said of the Bruins. “We have a hard team the Blues a 3-1 lead in the second period. too.” Back in the late 60s, Blues fans must bailed. The Dave Checketts group came have believed their team would always be along, ran out of money and bailed. Finally Tom Stillman brought stability. in the hunt. It was best of the NHL’s six new teams, loaded with well-respected “Mr. Stillman said, ‘Here, get us a winner, whatever it costs, whatever we have to spend veterans. The Blues advanced out of the expansion to get it,’” Plager said.“We’ve done that.” During their five-plus decades, the Blues bracket to the Cup finals in their first three years, only to get swept by Montreal twice have suffered much heartache, includand Boston once. Then the NHL blended ing Bob Gassoff’s fatal motorcycle wreck, the expansion teams with the Original Six the brain tumors that took down Barclay Plager and the cancer that claimed broadteams to balance the conferences. The easy path to the Cup finals vanished caster Dan Kelly. “Barclay’s wife was up there, his kids,” and the Blues spent the better part of five decades battling to stay relevant and, at Plager said of the alumni box. “A lot of tears up there.” times, stay in business. Doug Wickenheiser and Erik Johnson, Through all of their travails, the Blues employed some of the greatest hockey minds: two former first overall draft picks, sufLynn Patrick, Scotty Bowman, Al Arbour, fered catastrophic knee injuries during Cliff Fletcher, Jimmy Devellano, Jacques team parties. Then there were the many Demers, Emile Francis, Mike Keenan, Joel management-inflicted wounds with bad trades. Quenneville and Ken Hitchcock. The team sent a emerging goal-scorer The Blues also featured many of the league’s all-time scorers, including Wayne Paul MacLean to Winnipeg for defenseman Gretzky, Adam Oates, Doug Gilmour, Dale Scott Campbell, who quickly retired due to Hawerchuk, Brett Hull, Brendan Shana- his asthma condition. And how about swaphan, Pierre Turgeon, Al MacInnis, Peter ping Gilmour for Mike Bullard? Yeah, Dougie had some off-ice issues, but come on. Stastny and Phil Housley. Can you imagine sacrifice a young Rod But ownership instability became a recurring theme. Sid Salomon Jr. was an Brind’Amour to get Ron Sutter and Murray awesome expansion owner, but his son Sid Baron? Or moving Chris Pronger for Eric Salomon III let things slide. Ralston Purina Brewer and scraps? There are so many colorful memories! picked up the pieces, but eventually shut down the franchise after the NHL blocked But now Tarasenko, Brayden Schenn, Ryan O’Reilly and Jordan Binnington are getting its sale to Saskatoon investors. Harry Ornest swooped in, slashed costs the opportunity Garry Unger, Brian Sutter, and unleashed the family dog in the bow- Bernie Federko and Mike Liut never got. “We want do it for the city, one more els of The Arena. Mike Shanahan’s group rescued the team and spent record-setting round,” defenseman Colton Parayko said. “Let’s keep going.” dollars to add star power to the franchise. But in time those money guys fired Sha- Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 nahan, then bailed themselves. Bill and @gordoszone on Twitter Nancy Laurie came along, lost millions and jgordon@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

MOTOR SPORTS | INDY 500

FOOTBALL

NFL’s new rules may be tweaked Owners to consider modifying pass interference reviews BY STEVEN WINE

Associated Press

DARRON CUMMINGS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

JR Hildebrand leaves the pits Monday during practice for the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Focus shifts to the stacked field McLaren fiasco aside, the 33-car lineup is loaded with talent BY JENNA FRYER

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — The soap opera surrounding McLaren’s failed bid to qualify Fernando Alonso for the Indianapolis 500 is over. The spotlight is there for the taking. The McLaren debacle dominated the first week at Indianapolis Motor Speedway and dwarfed every other team and driver trying to make Sunday’s race, including plenty of contenders ready to star in “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” Team Penske, Ed Carpenter Racing and engine-maker Chevrolet have shown the most consistency, while Honda and its flagship Andretti Autosport and Chip Ganassi Racing teams have work to do before the 500. Penske is on the pole for an 18th time with Simon Pagenaud, and Chevrolet earned the top four starting

spots in qualifying as the ECR trio of team owner Ed Carpenter, Spencer Pigot and Ed Jones took spots two through four. Only 1.8040 seconds separated Pagenaud from Kyle Kaiser, the final qualifier, to set the closest field in Indy 500 history. “I think all the cars are so close these days,” Pagenaud said. “(You) can see that all the teams are raising the game, all the drivers are raising their game. It’s honestly tremendous to be in this era of the sport because you get better and better every weekend and it never stops.” The fight to make the race was dramatic up and down pit lane. The Ganassi cars, with five-time series champion Scott Dixon and rookie Felix Rosenqvist,have been nothing special so far, and Rosenqvist needed a total rebuild of his confidence following a crash three days before qualifying. Rosenqvist was coached by three-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dario Franchitti, who shadowed the Swedish driver and got him back up to speed and into the race.

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Athletics .............. -$118................. INDIANS Mariners .............. -$112............... RANGERS Yankees ............... -$215.................ORIOLES Red Sox................ -$150.............. BLUE JAYS ASTROS................ -$340...............White Sox Twins ................... -$112.................. ANGELS National League Reds..................... -$120............... BREWERS PADRES................ -$135................... Dbacks Rockies ................ -$117................. PIRATES METS.................... -$107................Nationals CUBS .................... -$145................... Phillies Braves.................. -$152...................GIANTS Interleague CARDS.................. -$170.................... Royals CARDS.................. -$175.................... Royals TIGERS ................. -$115...................Marlins Dodgers ............... -$125.......................RAYS SOCCER UEFA Europa League Final, May 29 Chelsea ............................................... +$135 Arsenal ............................................... +$200 UEFA Champions League Final, June 1 Liverpool .............................................-$110 Tottenham .......................................... +$290 Odds to win the FIFA Women’s World Cup USA....................5/2 Group A France................7/2 France................1/5 Germany ............5/1 Norway ..............5/1 South Korea.....15/1 England .............6/1 Nigeria.............30/1 Group B Netherlands.....10/1 Germany ............1/5 Japan ...............12/1 Spain..................5/1 Brazil ...............16/1 China ...............15/1 Australia ..........18/1 South Africa.....60/1 Group C Sweden ............20/1 Brazil .................6/5 Spain................20/1 Australia ............6/5 Canada.............28/1 Italy ...................8/1 Norway ............30/1 Jamaica ...........80/1 Italy .................40/1 Group D England .............1/2 China ...............50/1 Japan .................3/2 South Korea.....50/1 Argentina.........15/1 New Zealand....60/1 Scotland...........20/1 Group E Argentina...... 100/1 Netherlands.......4/5 Chile.............. 100/1 Canada...............6/6 Scotland........ 100/1 New Zealand....10/1 Cameroon ..... 200/1 Cameroon ........40/1 Group F Nigeria.......... 200/1 USA....................1/5 South Africa.. 200/1 Sweden ..............7/2 Jamaica ........ 250/1 Chile.................25/1 Thailand........ 250/1 Thailand........ 100/1 BOXING IBF/WBA/WBO heavyweight title fight June 1, Madison Square Garden Anthony Joshua -$3000 vs. Andy Ruiz Jr. +$1500 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Sent LHP Brian Johnson to Portland (EL) for a rehab assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS — Placed RHP Collin McHugh on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Brady Rogers from Round Rock (PCL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned RHP Heath Fillmyer to Omaha (PCL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Placed SS Andrelton Simmons on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF Luis Rengifo from Salt Lake (PCL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Selected the contract of RHP David Hale from Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL). Transferred 3B Miguel Andujar to the 60-day IL. SEATTLE MARINERS — Designated RHP Ryan Garton for assignment. Placed INFs Dee Gordon and Ryon Healy on the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Parker Markel to Tacoma (PCL). Selected the contract of LHP Tommy Milone from Tacoma. Recalled INF Shed Long from Tacoma. Reinstated INF Dylan Moore from the 10-day IL. Sent RHP Gerson Bautista to Tacoma for a rehab assignment. Signed RHP Anthony Bass to a one-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Optioned LHP Brett Martin to Nashville (PCL). Reinstated RHP Shawn Kelley from the 10-day IL. Sent SS Elvis Andrus and OF Scott Heineman to Frisco (TL) for rehab assignments. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Placed RHP Ryan Tepera on the 10-day IL. Recalled RHP Jimmy Cordero from Buffalo (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Optioned RHP Wes Parsons to Gwinnett (IL). CINCINNATI REDS — Placed LHP Zach Duke on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Monday. Recalled INF Josh VanMeter from Louisville (IL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Optioned OF Kyle Garlick to Oklahoma City (PCL). Reinstated LHP Julio Urias from administrative leave. MIAMI MARLINS — Placed INF/OF Jon Berti on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Sunday. Recalled OF Austin Dean from New Orleans (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Transferred 2B Jed Lowrie to the 60-day IL. CARDINALS — Released RHP Luke Gregerson. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed LHP Travis Bergen on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF Donovan Solano from Sacramento (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent OF Andrew Stevenson to Fresno (PCL) for a rehab assignment. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed LHP Brandon Sherman and RHP Mariel Checo. Placed RHP Tucker Healy on the reserve/retired list. NEW BRITAIN BEES — RHP Zach Stewart retired. Signed RHP Devin Burke and SS Taylor Motter. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Released RHP Eric Gleese. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Released 1B Trey Ganns. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Signed DE Jerry Hughes to a two-year contract extension. Named Eric Wood to the media content team. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Waived OT De’Ondre Wesley. Claimed G Jake Eldrenkamp off waivers from New England. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Placed OL Jared Veldheer on the reserve/retired list. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Named Jim Abrams director of college scouting, Dwayne Joseph director of pro personnel, DuJuan Daniels assistant director of player personnel, Walter Juliff senior adviser to the general manager, Jack Gilmore scouting coordinator, John Hill pro scout and Adam Maxie pro scouting assistant. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Released DT Gerald McCoy. Claimed TE Jordan Leggett off waivers from the N.Y. Jets. COLLEGE MARYLAND — Announced junior QB Josh Jackson is transferring from Virginia Tech and senior TE Tyler Mabry from Buffalo. MISSISSIPPI STATE — Granted a contract extension to football coach Joe Moorhead through the 2022 season. NAVY — Announced the retirement of women’s cross country coach Karen Boyle. PROVIDENCE — Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Ed Cooley on a multi-year contract extension. ST. NORBERT — Named Tim Dean women’s tennis coach. TENNESSEE — Announced sophomore men’s basketball C Uros Plavsic is transferring from Arizona State. VANDERBILT — Named Faragi Phillips assistant men’s basketball coach. WASHINGTON STATE — Fired baseball coach Marty Lees.

GOLF Area holes in one Meramec Lakes: Kenny Moyer, hole No. 2, 150 yards,9-iron, May 16. Forest Park: Andy Berra, hole No. 8 (Dogwood), 117 yards, sand wedge, May 18. Acorns: Tom Andres, hole No. 9, 130 yards, 8-iron, May 18.

AREA COLLEGES BASEBALL SEC tournament: Mississippi 2, Missouri 1

BOXING Fight Schedule

Saturday At Osceola Heritage Park, Kissimmee, Fla. (ESPN), Masayuki Ito vs. Jamel Herring, 12, super featherweight titles; Adam Lopez vs. Jean Carlos Rivera, 10, featherweights; Jose Pedraza vs. Antonio Lozada, 10, lightweights; Jeyvier Contron vs. Koki Eto, 10, super bantamweights; Adam Lopez vs. Jean Carlos Rivera, 10, featherweights. At MGM National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md., Oleksandr Usyk vs. Carlos Takam, 12, heavyweights; Filip Hrgovic vs. Greg Corbin, 10, heavyweights; Devin Haney vs. Antonio Moran, 10, lightweights. At Beau Rivage Resort & Casino, Biloxi, Miss. (FS1), Austin Trout vs. Terrell Gausha, 10, super welterweights; Chordale Booker vs. Wale Omotoso, 10, super welterweights; Carlos Negron vs. Daniel Martz, 10, heavyweights; Ahmed Elbiali vs Marlos Eduardo Simoes, 10, light heavyweights.

“We all tried to keep him calm,” Franchitti said. “He had that look on the third (qualifying) run of, ‘I really don’t want to do this.’” Rosenqvist qualified the car 29th, narrowly avoiding Sunday’s stressful “Last Row Shootout” that eliminated Alonso. Of all the drivers who crashed during last week’s practice and went to backups, Rosenqvist was the only one to make it into the race on the first day of qualifying. “I feel probably as calm as I’ve been after that crash I had,” Rosenqvist said.“And I also had a feeling we could have gone much quicker, as well.” Sage Karam had similar struggles even as he attempted to qualify for his sixth Indy 500. The American didn’t like his car and clearly was spooked; teammate JR Hildebrand had to shake down the car for Karam and assure him it had no gremlins. Karam rebounded Sunday and was the fastest qualifier among the six vying for the final three spots in the race. He edged James Hinchcliffe, who didn’t make

the race last year and crashed in Saturday qualifying to put him in a desperate hole Sunday, while Kaiser of tiny Juncos Racing snagged the final spot in the field and sent home Alonso and McLaren. “The pressure, yeah, I mean it’s insane,” Karam said. “I never want to go through this again.” Kaiser crashed Friday, a day before qualifying, and team owner Ricardo Juncos had every employee work through the night to prepare a car. The team lost both its primary sponsors right before opening day, practiced all week in a plain white car and Kaiser turned four flawless laps to earn his second Indy 500 start. “We have a good momentum and a lot of companies started calling us, a lot of people,” Juncos said. “You won’t see a white car now this weekend because we already have something on the table.” The drivers aren’t back on the track until Friday’s “Carb Day” and it will be a final chance for Andretti Autosport to see what they’ve got for the race.

HORSE RACING

PRO BASKETBALL

Fairmount Park

NBA Playoffs

Tuesday FIRST $5,800, cl, 3YO up, 1mi, cloudy. 1 (1) Joey B (V.Santiago) 3.80 3.20 No Tix 2 (2) Lil R’slast (J.Tavares) 6.20 No Tix

Late Monday

Off 1:02. Time 1:43.11. Sloppy. Also Ran: Mr. Ticker Talker, Tyler T. Exacta (1-2) paid $25.80. $1 Trifecta (1-2-4) paid $26.10. SECOND $6,000, cl, 3YO up F&M, 6f, cloudy. 2 (2) Klondike Annie (J.Molina, Jr.) 7.20 4.00 2.80 6 (6) Alley ‘o Malley (J.Tavares) 7.20 5.40 3 (3) Luckymrsbond (J.Simpson) 5.00 Off 1:32. Time 1:13.12. Sloppy. Also Ran: Miss Barham, She’s Fine Tuned, W W Ace’s Up, Taste of Raj. $1 Daily Double (1-2) paid $7.40. Exacta (2-6) paid $50.20. $0.1 Superfecta (2-6-3-5) paid $28.16. $1 Trifecta (2-6-3) paid $106.20. THIRD $6,800, cl, 3YO up F&M, 6f, cloudy. 1 (1) Sassy and Regal (J.Molina, Jr.) 4.60 3.40 2.40 6 (6) Hoosessential (G.Retana) 5.20 3.20 7 (7) Brown Shoes (J.Tavares) 2.60 Off 2:01. Time 1:13.70. Sloppy. Also Ran: Dancing High, Rosie’s Relish, Causing Smiles, Arkansas Traveler, Dorthys Blitz. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-2-1) 3 Correct Paid $11.60. $1 Daily Double (2-1) paid $9.10. Exacta (1-6) paid $28.20. $0.1 Superfecta (1-6-7-5) paid $23.04. $1 Trifecta (1-6-7) paid $34.20. FOURTH $5,800, cl, 3YO up, 6f, cloudy. 2 (2) Roski (J.Molina, Jr.) 3.80 2.10 No Tix 3 (3) Smart Alex’s Posse (V.Santiago) 2.20 No Tix Off 2:30. Time 1:11.67. Sloppy. Scratched: Cool Ambition. Also Ran: Tabaddol. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-1-2) 3 Correct Paid $9.95. $1 Daily Double (1-2) paid $5.40. Exacta (2-3) paid $4.80. $1 Trifecta (2-3-1) paid $4.60. FIFTH $7,000, cl, 3YO up, 6f, cloudy. 8 (8) Summer Passport (A.Ortiz) 9.40 5.60 4.40 9 (9) El Caminante (J.Simpson) 6.00 4.40 7 (7) American Success (J.Tavares) 5.00 Off 2:58. Time 1:13.32. Sloppy. Also Ran: Thundering Richie, Good Play, Aggro Crag, Drewmatic, Wave Land Outlaw, Unspoken Valor. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-2-8) 3 Correct Paid $9.05. $1 Daily Double (2-8) paid $11.10. Exacta (8-9) paid $74.20. $0.1 Superfecta (8-9-7-6) paid $147.89. $1 Trifecta (8-9-7) paid $177.20. SIXTH $8,200, , 3YO up F&M, 5½f, cloudy. 2 (2) Para Vivir (G.Retana) 9.40 3.20 No Tix 1 (1) My Fouroone Kplan (V.Santiago) 2.60 No Tix Off 3:27. Time 1:04.95. Sloppy. Scratched: Arctic Music. Also Ran: Precious Kowgirl, Marnate. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-8-2) 3 Correct Paid $27.50. $1 Daily Double (8-2) paid $29.50. Exacta (2-1) paid $16.80. $0.1 Superfecta (2-1-6-3) paid $4.75. $1 Trifecta (2-1-6) paid $36.10. SEVENTH $9,800, alc opt cl, 3YO up, 6f, cloudy. 1 (1) Midnight Las Vegas (J.Tavares) 2.80 2.40 2.10 3 (3) Summer Disco (V.Santiago) 3.20 2.60 2 (2) Serious Talk (J.Molina, Jr.) 3.80 Off 3:55. Time 1:10.38. Sloppy. Scratched: Dr. Liechty, Lee’s Luck, Hold the Door. Also Ran: Ripe Attack, Cornfed, Green Means Go. $0.5 Pick 4 (2-8-2-1/4/5/8) 4 Correct Paid $39.10. $0.5 Pick 3 (8-2-1/4/5/8) 3 Correct Paid $18.80. $1 Daily Double (2-1) paid $8.50. Exacta (1-3) paid $7.20. $0.1 Superfecta (1-3-2-7) paid $3.75. $1 Trifecta (1-3-2) paid $13.50 (c) 2019 Equibase Company LLC, all rights reserved.

BASEBALL Frontier League

Warriors 119, Trail Blazers 117 (OT) Golden State 36 29 22 24 8 — 119 Portland 35 34 26 16 6 — 117 Golden State: McKinnie 5-12 1-2 12, Green 7-13 3-4 18, Bell 3-5 1-2 7, St.Curry 11-25 8-9 37, Thompson 7-21 0-0 17, Looney 5-7 2-2 12, Jerebko 0-4 0-0 0, Bogut 2-3 0-0 4, Cook 2-5 0-0 4, Livingston 4-4 0-0 8, Evans 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 46-99 15-19 119. Portland: Harkless 2-3 1-3 5, Aminu 0-2 0-0 0, Leonard 12-16 1-2 30, Lillard 11-24 2-2 28, McCollum 10-22 1-1 26, Collins 4-7 1-1 10, Kanter 3-4 0-0 6, Se.Curry 0-1 1-1 1, Hood 3-11 0-0 7, Turner 2-8 0-0 4. Totals 47-98 7-10 117. 3-point goals: Golden State 12-39 (St.Curry 7-16, Thompson 3-10, Green 1-3, McKinnie 1-5, Jerebko 0-2, Cook 0-3), Portland 16-41 (Leonard 5-8, McCollum 5-9, Lillard 4-12, Collins 1-3, Hood 1-6, Aminu 0-1, Harkless 0-1, Se.Curry 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Golden State 56 (Looney, Green 14), Portland 38 (Leonard 12). Assists: Golden State 30 (St.Curry, Green 11), Portland 31 (Lillard 12). Total fouls: Golden State 17, Portland 15. Technicals: Golden State coach Warriors (Defensive three second). A: 20,064 (19,393).

NBA All-Rookie Teams (Voted by a global panel of 100 sportswriters and broadcasters: First-team vote, 2 points; second-team vote, 1 point) First Team Player, Team 1st 2nd Total Luka Doncic, Dal 100 200 Trae Young, Atl 100 200 Deandre Ayton, Pho 95 5 195 Jaren Jackson Jr., Mem 60 39 159 Marvin Bagley III, Sac 56 44 156 Second Team Player, Team 1st 2nd Total Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, LAC 40 58 138 Collin Sexton, Cle 39 54 132 Landry Shamet, LAC 3 79 85 Mitchell Robinson, N.Y. 3 71 77 Kevin Huerter, Atl 1 43 45 Other players receiving votes (first-team votes in parentheses): Mikal Bridges, Pho, (1) 31; Kevin Knox, N.Y., 22; Josh Okogie, Min, (1) 12; Jalen Brunson, Dal, 10; Allonzo Trier, N.Y., 10; Rodions Kurucs, Bro, 9; Wendell Carter Jr., Chi, 7; Miles Bridges, Cha, (1) 6; Bruce Brown, Det, 2; Harry Giles III, Sac, 2; Mo Bamba, Orl, 1; Aaron Holiday, Ind, 1.

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 7 3 3 24 23 D.C. United 7 4 3 24 18 Montreal 6 5 3 21 15 Atlanta 6 4 2 20 13 New York City FC 4 1 6 18 15 New York 5 5 2 17 17 Toronto FC 5 5 2 17 22 Columbus 5 8 1 16 12 Chicago 4 5 4 16 20 Orlando City 4 6 3 15 19 New England 3 8 3 12 14 Cincinnati 3 8 2 11 11 WESTERN W L T Pts GF Los Angeles FC 9 1 4 31 32 Seattle 7 1 5 26 22 Houston 7 2 2 23 20 LA Galaxy 7 5 1 22 18 Minnesota United 5 4 3 18 20 FC Dallas 5 5 3 18 17 Real Salt Lake 5 6 1 16 18 San Jose 4 6 2 14 18 Vancouver 3 6 4 13 12 Portland 3 6 2 11 14 Sporting K.C. 2 4 5 11 20 Colorado 1 9 2 5 17 Wednesday Vancouver at New York, 7 p.m. Friday LA Galaxy at Orlando City, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Montreal at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Saturday New York City FC at Chicago, 2:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Vancouver, 6 p.m. D.C. United at New England, 6:30 p.m. New York at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Portland at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m.

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. — NFL owners meeting today will consider a proposal to refine the new rule that allows challenges involving pass interference, and may also announce locations to host upcoming drafts. Owners voted in March to allow interference calls or non-calls to be challenged by coaches and reviewed via replay as a one-year experiment. The tweak proposed this week would take the decision to review pass interference in the final two minutes of each half out of the hands of the officials. Reviews in the final two minutes would require a coach’s challenge, too. “The concern is how many stoppages will we end up with in the last two minutes,” Atlanta Falcons president and CEO Rich McKay said Tuesday. “One thing we do not want to do is be a game that has multiple stops in the last two minutes.” Under the rule adopted in March, in the final two minutes only officials in the booth can stop the game for reviews involving pass interference, as is the case with other reviewable plays. Owners are expected to vote on whether to let the NFL competition committee decide on changing the rule after it discusses the subject with the league’s coaches. McKay, a member of the committee, said the group has conference calls with coaches scheduled for early June. Owners will also consider a proposal to exempt Hail Mary passes so they’re not reviewable. That would require the league coming up with the definition of a Hail Mary. “I actually don’t think it’s that hard,” McKay said. “It’s going to be from what yard line was it thrown, were there multiple receivers, how much time is left on the clock. But you want to get input from the coaches — what definition are you comfortable with?”

GA 12 13 19 9 12 14 20 19 17 20 31 23 GA 9 14 12 17 18 17 20 23 16 22 20 30

East W L Pct. Lake Erie 7 2 .778 Schaumburg 5 4 .556 Joliet 4 7 .364 Windy City 4 7 .364 Washington 2 8 .200 West W L Pct. Rascals 6 4 .600 Evansville 5 4 .556 Grizzlies 5 4 .556 Florence 5 4 .556 Southern Illinois 5 4 .556 Tuesday’s Games Windy City 1, Joliet 0 Lake Erie at Schaumburg, (n) Southern Illinois at Rascals, ppd. Evansville at Grizzlies, ppd. Wednesday Florence at Washington, 10:05 a.m. Joliet at Windy City, 10:35 a.m. Lake Erie at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Southern Illinois at Rascals, 6:35 p.m. Evansville at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m.

MOTOR SPORTS GB — 2 4 4 5½ GB — ½ ½ ½ ½

Major League Leaders NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .405; Cabrera, Pittsburgh, .338; McNeil, New York, .331; Bell, Pittsburgh, .325; Yelich, Milwaukee, .325; Contreras, Chicago, .321; DeJong, Cardinals, .320; Martinez, Cardinals, .319; Baez, Chicago, .319; Freeman, Atlanta, .319. RBI: Bell, Pittsburgh, 44; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 44; Yelich, Milwaukee, 41; Ozuna, Cardinals, 40; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 36; Alonso, New York, 35; Arenado, Colorado, 35; Bryant, Chicago, 32; 9 tied at 31. DOUBLES: DeJong, Cardinals, 17; Rendon, Washington, 17; Baez, Chicago, 16; Peralta, Arizona, 16; Ahmed, Arizona, 15; Cain, Milwaukee, 15; Walker, Arizona, 15; Bell, Pittsburgh, 14; 4 tied at 13. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 5; Tapia, Colorado, 4; Escobar, Arizona, 3; Rosario, New York, 3; Swanson, Atlanta, 3; 17 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: Yelich, Milwaukee, 19; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 17; Alonso, New York, 15; Reyes, San Diego, 15; Bell, Pittsburgh, 14; Pederson, Los Angeles, 14; Ozuna, Cardinals, 13; Suarez, Cincinnati, 13; 12 tied at 11. PITCHING: Fried, Atlanta, 6-2; Greinke, Arizona, 6-1; Ryu, Los Angeles, 6-1; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 6-1; Castillo, Cincinnati, 5-1; Davies, Milwaukee, 5-0; Eflin, Philadelphia, 5-4; Maeda, Los Angeles, 5-2; Marquez, Colorado, 5-2; Soroka, Atlanta, 5-1. ERA: Ryu, Los Angeles, 1.52; Davies, Milwaukee, 1.54; Castillo, Cincinnati, 1.90; Paddack, San Diego, 1.93; Lyles, Pittsburgh, 1.97; Smith, Miami, 2.25; Greinke, Arizona, 2.78; Fried, Atlanta, 2.86; Eflin, Philadelphia, 2.89; Hamels, Chicago, 3.13. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 87; Strasburg, Washington, 82; Castillo, Cincinnati, 76; Corbin, Washington, 76; Marquez, Colorado, 72; Ray, Arizona, 67; deGrom, New York, 67; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 65; 3 tied at 64. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Polanco, Minnesota, .335; Reddick, Houston, .331; Anderson, Chicago, .329; Brantley, Houston, .328; LeMahieu, New York, .325; Andrus, Texas, .325; Devers, Boston, .314; Springer, Houston, .313; La Stella, Los Angeles, .310; Mancini, Baltimore, .309. RBI: Springer, Houston, 42; Abreu, Chicago, 38; Santana, Seattle, 38; Mondesi, Kansas City, 37; Rosario, Minnesota, 35; Bregman, Houston, 34; Encarnacion, Seattle, 34; AGordon, Kansas City, 34; Voit, New York, 34; Gallo, Texas, 33. DOUBLES: Buxton, Minnesota, 18; Healy, Seattle, 16; Mancini, Baltimore, 15; AGordon, Kansas City, 14. TRIPLES: Merrifield, Kansas City, 6; Mondesi, Kansas City, 6; Polanco, Minnesota, 5; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 4. HOME RUNS: Springer, Houston, 17; Bregman, Houston, 14; Gallo, Texas, 14; Sanchez, New York, 14; Vogelbach, Seattle, 14; Encarnacion, Seattle, 13; Rosario, Minnesota, 13; 5 tied at 12. PITCHING: German, New York, 9-1; Verlander, Houston, 7-1; Berrios, Minnesota, 6-2; Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 6-1; Odorizzi, Minnesota, 6-2; Perez, Minnesota, 6-1; Walden, Boston, 6-0; 9 tied at 5. ERA: Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 1.86; Odorizzi, Minnesota, 2.38; Verlander, Houston, 2.38; Turnbull, Detroit, 2.40; German, New York, 2.60; Minor, Texas, 2.64; Morton, Tampa Bay, 2.65; Montas, Oakland, 2.67; Perez, Minnesota, 2.89; Stroman, Toronto, 2.95. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 93; Sale, Boston, 83; Bauer, Cleveland, 80; Verlander, Houston, 77; Boyd, Detroit, 73; Snell, Tampa Bay, 71; Bieber, Cleveland, 69.

NASCAR Monster Energy Cup POINTS LEADERS 1. Joey Logano....................................... 478 2. Kyle Busch ......................................... 469 3. Kevin Harvick .................................... 440 4. Chase Elliott ...................................... 423 5. Brad Keselowski ................................ 421 6. Denny Hamlin.................................... 404 7. Martin Truex Jr. ................................. 396 8. Kurt Busch......................................... 387 9. Clint Bowyer ...................................... 357 10. Ryan Blaney .................................... 340 11. Aric Almirola ................................... 334 12. Alex Bowman .................................. 329 13. Daniel Suarez .................................. 315 14. Erik Jones........................................ 308 15. Kyle Larson ..................................... 304 16. Jimmie Johnson .............................. 292 17. Ryan Newman ................................. 284 18. Austin Dillon.................................... 281 19. William Byron.................................. 277 20. Paul Menard.................................... 267 SCHEDULE (WINNERS) x-non-points race Feb. 10: x-Advance Auto Clash (Jimmie Johnson) Feb. 14: x-Duel 1 at Daytona (Kevin Harvick) Feb. 14: x: Duel 2 at Daytona (Joey Logano) Feb. 17: Daytona 500 (Denny Hamlin) Feb.24:FoldsofHonorQuikTrip500(Keselowski) March 3: Pennzoil 400 (Joey Logano) March 10: TicketGuardian 500 (Kyle Busch) March 17: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Busch) March 24: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski) March31:O’ReillyAutoParts500(DennyHamlin) April 7: Food City 500 (Kyle Busch) April 13: Toyota Owners 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) April 28: Geico 500 (Chase Elliott) May 6: Gander RV 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) May 11: Digital Ally 400 (Brad Keselowski) May 18: x-Monster Energy Open (Kyle Larson) May 18: x-Monster All-Star Race (Kyle Larson) Sunday: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. Sunday, June 2: Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, June 9: Brooklyn, Mich. Sunday, June 23: Sonoma, Calif. Sunday, June 30: Joliet, Ill. Saturday, July 6: Daytona Beach, Fla. Saturday, July 13: Sparta, Ky. Sunday, July 21: Loudon, N.H. Sunday, July 28: Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, Aug. 4: Watkins Glen, N.Y. Sunday, Aug. 11: Brooklyn, Mich. Saturday, Aug. 17: Bristol, Tenn. Sunday, Sept. 1: Darlington, S.C. Sunday, Sept. 8: Indianapolis Sunday, Sept. 15: Las Vegas Saturday, Sept. 21: Richmond, Va. Sunday, Sept. 29: Concord, N.C. Sunday, Oct. 6: Dover, Del. Sunday, Oct. 13: Talladega, Ala. Sunday, Oct. 20: Kansas City, Kan. Sunday, Oct. 27: Martinsville, Va. Sunday, Nov. 3: Fort Worth, Texas Sunday, Nov. 10: Avondale, Ariz. Sunday, Nov. 17: Homestead, Fla.

Indianapolis 500 Lineup after qualifying; race Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway 1. (22) Simon Pagenaud, Chevrolet, 229.992. 2. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 229.889. 3. (21) Spencer Pigot, Chevrolet, 229.826. 4. (63) Ed Jones, Honda, 229.646. 5. (88) Colton Herta, 229.086. 6. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 228.645. 7. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Honda, 228.621. 8. (2) Josef Newgarden, Chevrolet, 228.396. 9. (27) Alexander Rossi, Honda, 228.247. 10. (98) Marco Andretti, Honda, 228.756. 11. (25) Conor Daly, Chevrolet, 228.617. 12. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 228.523. 13. (7) Marcus Ericsson, 228.511. 14. (30) Takuma Sato, Honda, 228.300. 15. (33) James Davison, Honda, 228.273. 16. (14) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 228.120. 17. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 228.104. 18. (9) Scott Dixon, Honda, 228.100. 19. (77) Oriol Servia, Honda, 227.991. 20. (23) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 227.915. 21. (48) JR Hildebrand, Chevrolet, 227.908. 22. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 227.877. 23. (19) Santino Ferrucci, 227.731. 24. (4) Matheus Leist, Chevrolet, 227.717. 25. (60) Jack Harvey, Honda, 227.695. 26. (42) Jordan King, Chevrolet, 227.502. 27. (81) Ben Hanley, 227.482. 28. (26) Zach Veach, Honda, 227.341. 29. (10) Felix Rosenqvist, 227.297. 30. (39) Pippa Mann, Honda, 227.244. 31. (24) Sage Karam, Chevrolet, 227.740. 32. (5) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 227.543. 33. (32) Kyle Kaiser, Chevrolet, 227.372.


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

MOTOR SPORTS | INDY 500

FOOTBALL

NFL’s new rules may be tweaked Owners to consider modifying pass interference reviews BY STEVEN WINE

Associated Press

DARRON CUMMINGS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

JR Hildebrand leaves the pits Monday during practice for the Indianapolis 500 at Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Focus shifts to the stacked field McLaren fiasco aside, the 33-car lineup is loaded with talent BY JENNA FRYER

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — The soap opera surrounding McLaren’s failed bid to qualify Fernando Alonso for the Indianapolis 500 is over. The spotlight is there for the taking. The McLaren debacle dominated the first week at Indianapolis Motor Speedway and dwarfed every other team and driver trying to make Sunday’s race, including plenty of contenders ready to star in “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” Team Penske, Ed Carpenter Racing and engine-maker Chevrolet have shown the most consistency, while Honda and its flagship Andretti Autosport and Chip Ganassi Racing teams have work to do before the 500. Penske is on the pole for an 18th time with Simon Pagenaud, and Chevrolet earned the top four starting

spots in qualifying as the ECR trio of team owner Ed Carpenter, Spencer Pigot and Ed Jones took spots two through four. Only 1.8040 seconds separated Pagenaud from Kyle Kaiser, the final qualifier, to set the closest field in Indy 500 history. “I think all the cars are so close these days,” Pagenaud said. “(You) can see that all the teams are raising the game, all the drivers are raising their game. It’s honestly tremendous to be in this era of the sport because you get better and better every weekend and it never stops.” The fight to make the race was dramatic up and down pit lane. The Ganassi cars, with five-time series champion Scott Dixon and rookie Felix Rosenqvist,have been nothing special so far, and Rosenqvist needed a total rebuild of his confidence following a crash three days before qualifying. Rosenqvist was coached by three-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dario Franchitti, who shadowed the Swedish driver and got him back up to speed and into the race.

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Athletics .............. -$118................. INDIANS Mariners .............. -$112............... RANGERS Yankees ............... -$215.................ORIOLES Red Sox................ -$150.............. BLUE JAYS ASTROS................ -$340...............White Sox Twins ................... -$112.................. ANGELS National League Reds..................... -$120............... BREWERS PADRES................ -$135................... Dbacks Rockies ................ -$117................. PIRATES METS.................... -$107................Nationals CUBS .................... -$145................... Phillies Braves.................. -$152...................GIANTS Interleague CARDS.................. -$170.................... Royals CARDS.................. -$175.................... Royals TIGERS ................. -$115...................Marlins Dodgers ............... -$125.......................RAYS SOCCER UEFA Europa League Final, May 29 Chelsea ............................................... +$135 Arsenal ............................................... +$200 UEFA Champions League Final, June 1 Liverpool .............................................-$110 Tottenham .......................................... +$290 Odds to win the FIFA Women’s World Cup USA....................5/2 Group A France................7/2 France................1/5 Germany ............5/1 Norway ..............5/1 South Korea.....15/1 England .............6/1 Nigeria.............30/1 Group B Netherlands.....10/1 Germany ............1/5 Japan ...............12/1 Spain..................5/1 Brazil ...............16/1 China ...............15/1 Australia ..........18/1 South Africa.....60/1 Group C Sweden ............20/1 Brazil .................6/5 Spain................20/1 Australia ............6/5 Canada.............28/1 Italy ...................8/1 Norway ............30/1 Jamaica ...........80/1 Italy .................40/1 Group D England .............1/2 China ...............50/1 Japan .................3/2 South Korea.....50/1 Argentina.........15/1 New Zealand....60/1 Scotland...........20/1 Group E Argentina...... 100/1 Netherlands.......4/5 Chile.............. 100/1 Canada...............6/6 Scotland........ 100/1 New Zealand....10/1 Cameroon ..... 200/1 Cameroon ........40/1 Group F Nigeria.......... 200/1 USA....................1/5 South Africa.. 200/1 Sweden ..............7/2 Jamaica ........ 250/1 Chile.................25/1 Thailand........ 250/1 Thailand........ 100/1 BOXING IBF/WBA/WBO heavyweight title fight June 1, Madison Square Garden Anthony Joshua -$3000 vs. Andy Ruiz Jr. +$1500 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Sent LHP Brian Johnson to Portland (EL) for a rehab assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS — Placed RHP Collin McHugh on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Saturday. Recalled RHP Brady Rogers from Round Rock (PCL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Optioned RHP Heath Fillmyer to Omaha (PCL). LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Placed SS Andrelton Simmons on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF Luis Rengifo from Salt Lake (PCL). NEW YORK YANKEES — Selected the contract of RHP David Hale from Scranton/WilkesBarre (IL). Transferred 3B Miguel Andujar to the 60-day IL. SEATTLE MARINERS — Designated RHP Ryan Garton for assignment. Placed INFs Dee Gordon and Ryon Healy on the 10-day IL. Optioned RHP Parker Markel to Tacoma (PCL). Selected the contract of LHP Tommy Milone from Tacoma. Recalled INF Shed Long from Tacoma. Reinstated INF Dylan Moore from the 10-day IL. Sent RHP Gerson Bautista to Tacoma for a rehab assignment. Signed RHP Anthony Bass to a one-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS — Optioned LHP Brett Martin to Nashville (PCL). Reinstated RHP Shawn Kelley from the 10-day IL. Sent SS Elvis Andrus and OF Scott Heineman to Frisco (TL) for rehab assignments. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Placed RHP Ryan Tepera on the 10-day IL. Recalled RHP Jimmy Cordero from Buffalo (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Optioned RHP Wes Parsons to Gwinnett (IL). CINCINNATI REDS — Placed LHP Zach Duke on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Monday. Recalled INF Josh VanMeter from Louisville (IL). LOS ANGELES DODGERS — Optioned OF Kyle Garlick to Oklahoma City (PCL). Reinstated LHP Julio Urias from administrative leave. MIAMI MARLINS — Placed INF/OF Jon Berti on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Sunday. Recalled OF Austin Dean from New Orleans (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Transferred 2B Jed Lowrie to the 60-day IL. CARDINALS — Released RHP Luke Gregerson. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed LHP Travis Bergen on the 10-day IL. Recalled INF Donovan Solano from Sacramento (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Sent OF Andrew Stevenson to Fresno (PCL) for a rehab assignment. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed LHP Brandon Sherman and RHP Mariel Checo. Placed RHP Tucker Healy on the reserve/retired list. NEW BRITAIN BEES — RHP Zach Stewart retired. Signed RHP Devin Burke and SS Taylor Motter. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Released RHP Eric Gleese. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Released 1B Trey Ganns. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — Signed DE Jerry Hughes to a two-year contract extension. Named Eric Wood to the media content team. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Waived OT De’Ondre Wesley. Claimed G Jake Eldrenkamp off waivers from New England. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Placed OL Jared Veldheer on the reserve/retired list. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Named Jim Abrams director of college scouting, Dwayne Joseph director of pro personnel, DuJuan Daniels assistant director of player personnel, Walter Juliff senior adviser to the general manager, Jack Gilmore scouting coordinator, John Hill pro scout and Adam Maxie pro scouting assistant. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Released DT Gerald McCoy. Claimed TE Jordan Leggett off waivers from the N.Y. Jets. COLLEGE MARYLAND — Announced junior QB Josh Jackson is transferring from Virginia Tech and senior TE Tyler Mabry from Buffalo. MISSISSIPPI STATE — Granted a contract extension to football coach Joe Moorhead through the 2022 season. NAVY — Announced the retirement of women’s cross country coach Karen Boyle. PROVIDENCE — Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Ed Cooley on a multi-year contract extension. ST. NORBERT — Named Tim Dean women’s tennis coach. TENNESSEE — Announced sophomore men’s basketball C Uros Plavsic is transferring from Arizona State. VANDERBILT — Named Faragi Phillips assistant men’s basketball coach. WASHINGTON STATE — Fired baseball coach Marty Lees.

GOLF Area holes in one Meramec Lakes: Kenny Moyer, hole No. 2, 150 yards,9-iron, May 16. Forest Park: Andy Berra, hole No. 8 (Dogwood), 117 yards, sand wedge, May 18. Acorns: Tom Andres, hole No. 9, 130 yards, 8-iron, May 18.

AREA COLLEGES BASEBALL SEC tournament: Mississippi 2, Missouri 1

BOXING Fight Schedule

Saturday At Osceola Heritage Park, Kissimmee, Fla. (ESPN), Masayuki Ito vs. Jamel Herring, 12, super featherweight titles; Adam Lopez vs. Jean Carlos Rivera, 10, featherweights; Jose Pedraza vs. Antonio Lozada, 10, lightweights; Jeyvier Contron vs. Koki Eto, 10, super bantamweights; Adam Lopez vs. Jean Carlos Rivera, 10, featherweights. At MGM National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md., Oleksandr Usyk vs. Carlos Takam, 12, heavyweights; Filip Hrgovic vs. Greg Corbin, 10, heavyweights; Devin Haney vs. Antonio Moran, 10, lightweights. At Beau Rivage Resort & Casino, Biloxi, Miss. (FS1), Austin Trout vs. Terrell Gausha, 10, super welterweights; Chordale Booker vs. Wale Omotoso, 10, super welterweights; Carlos Negron vs. Daniel Martz, 10, heavyweights; Ahmed Elbiali vs Marlos Eduardo Simoes, 10, light heavyweights.

“We all tried to keep him calm,” Franchitti said. “He had that look on the third (qualifying) run of, ‘I really don’t want to do this.’” Rosenqvist qualified the car 29th, narrowly avoiding Sunday’s stressful “Last Row Shootout” that eliminated Alonso. Of all the drivers who crashed during last week’s practice and went to backups, Rosenqvist was the only one to make it into the race on the first day of qualifying. “I feel probably as calm as I’ve been after that crash I had,” Rosenqvist said.“And I also had a feeling we could have gone much quicker, as well.” Sage Karam had similar struggles even as he attempted to qualify for his sixth Indy 500. The American didn’t like his car and clearly was spooked; teammate JR Hildebrand had to shake down the car for Karam and assure him it had no gremlins. Karam rebounded Sunday and was the fastest qualifier among the six vying for the final three spots in the race. He edged James Hinchcliffe, who didn’t make

the race last year and crashed in Saturday qualifying to put him in a desperate hole Sunday, while Kaiser of tiny Juncos Racing snagged the final spot in the field and sent home Alonso and McLaren. “The pressure, yeah, I mean it’s insane,” Karam said. “I never want to go through this again.” Kaiser crashed Friday, a day before qualifying, and team owner Ricardo Juncos had every employee work through the night to prepare a car. The team lost both its primary sponsors right before opening day, practiced all week in a plain white car and Kaiser turned four flawless laps to earn his second Indy 500 start. “We have a good momentum and a lot of companies started calling us, a lot of people,” Juncos said. “You won’t see a white car now this weekend because we already have something on the table.” The drivers aren’t back on the track until Friday’s “Carb Day” and it will be a final chance for Andretti Autosport to see what they’ve got for the race.

HORSE RACING

PRO BASKETBALL

Fairmount Park

NBA Playoffs

Tuesday FIRST $5,800, cl, 3YO up, 1mi, cloudy. 1 (1) Joey B (V.Santiago) 3.80 3.20 No Tix 2 (2) Lil R’slast (J.Tavares) 6.20 No Tix Off 1:02. Time 1:43.11. Sloppy. Also Ran: Mr. Ticker Talker, Tyler T. Exacta (1-2) paid $25.80. $1 Trifecta (1-2-4) paid $26.10. SECOND $6,000, cl, 3YO up F&M, 6f, cloudy. 2 (2) Klondike Annie (J.Molina, Jr.) 7.20 4.00 2.80 6 (6) Alley ‘o Malley (J.Tavares) 7.20 5.40 3 (3) Luckymrsbond (J.Simpson) 5.00 Off 1:32. Time 1:13.12. Sloppy. Also Ran: Miss Barham, She’s Fine Tuned, W W Ace’s Up, Taste of Raj. $1 Daily Double (1-2) paid $7.40. Exacta (2-6) paid $50.20. $0.1 Superfecta (2-6-3-5) paid $28.16. $1 Trifecta (2-6-3) paid $106.20. THIRD $6,800, cl, 3YO up F&M, 6f, cloudy. 1 (1) Sassy and Regal (J.Molina, Jr.) 4.60 3.40 2.40 6 (6) Hoosessential (G.Retana) 5.20 3.20 7 (7) Brown Shoes (J.Tavares) 2.60 Off 2:01. Time 1:13.70. Sloppy. Also Ran: Dancing High, Rosie’s Relish, Causing Smiles, Arkansas Traveler, Dorthys Blitz. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-2-1) 3 Correct Paid $11.60. $1 Daily Double (2-1) paid $9.10. Exacta (1-6) paid $28.20. $0.1 Superfecta (1-6-7-5) paid $23.04. $1 Trifecta (1-6-7) paid $34.20. FOURTH $5,800, cl, 3YO up, 6f, cloudy. 2 (2) Roski (J.Molina, Jr.) 3.80 2.10 No Tix 3 (3) Smart Alex’s Posse (V.Santiago) 2.20 No Tix Off 2:30. Time 1:11.67. Sloppy. Scratched: Cool Ambition. Also Ran: Tabaddol. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-1-2) 3 Correct Paid $9.95. $1 Daily Double (1-2) paid $5.40. Exacta (2-3) paid $4.80. $1 Trifecta (2-3-1) paid $4.60. FIFTH $7,000, cl, 3YO up, 6f, cloudy. 8 (8) Summer Passport (A.Ortiz) 9.40 5.60 4.40 9 (9) El Caminante (J.Simpson) 6.00 4.40 7 (7) American Success (J.Tavares) 5.00 Off 2:58. Time 1:13.32. Sloppy. Also Ran: Thundering Richie, Good Play, Aggro Crag, Drewmatic, Wave Land Outlaw, Unspoken Valor. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-2-8) 3 Correct Paid $9.05. $1 Daily Double (2-8) paid $11.10. Exacta (8-9) paid $74.20. $0.1 Superfecta (8-9-7-6) paid $147.89. $1 Trifecta (8-9-7) paid $177.20. SIXTH $8,200, , 3YO up F&M, 5½f, cloudy. 2 (2) Para Vivir (G.Retana) 9.40 3.20 No Tix 1 (1) My Fouroone Kplan (V.Santiago) 2.60 No Tix Off 3:27. Time 1:04.95. Sloppy. Scratched: Arctic Music. Also Ran: Precious Kowgirl, Marnate. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-8-2) 3 Correct Paid $27.50. $1 Daily Double (8-2) paid $29.50. Exacta (2-1) paid $16.80. $0.1 Superfecta (2-1-6-3) paid $4.75. $1 Trifecta (2-1-6) paid $36.10. SEVENTH $9,800, alc opt cl, 3YO up, 6f, cloudy. 1 (1) Midnight Las Vegas (J.Tavares) 2.80 2.40 2.10 3 (3) Summer Disco (V.Santiago) 3.20 2.60 2 (2) Serious Talk (J.Molina, Jr.) 3.80 Off 3:55. Time 1:10.38. Sloppy. Scratched: Dr. Liechty, Lee’s Luck, Hold the Door. Also Ran: Ripe Attack, Cornfed, Green Means Go. $0.5 Pick 4 (2-8-2-1/4/5/8) 4 Correct Paid $39.10. $0.5 Pick 3 (8-2-1/4/5/8) 3 Correct Paid $18.80. $1 Daily Double (2-1) paid $8.50. Exacta (1-3) paid $7.20. $0.1 Superfecta (1-3-2-7) paid $3.75. $1 Trifecta (1-3-2) paid $13.50 (c) 2019 Equibase Company LLC, all rights reserved.

BASEBALL Frontier League

Tuesday

Raptors 120, Bucks 102

Milwaukee: Mirotic 4-10 1-2 11, Antetokounmpo 9-17 6-10 25, Lopez 3-5 0-0 8, Bledsoe 2-7 1-2 5, Middleton 11-15 4-5 30, Ilyasova 3-5 1-2 7, Wilson 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 1-2 2-2 5, Frazier 0-1 2-2 2, Brogdon 2-11 0-1 4, Connaughton 1-4 0-0 3, Brown 1-2 0-0 2, Snell 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-80 17-26 102. Toronto: Leonard 6-13 6-8 19, Siakam 3-6 1-1 7, M.Gasol 6-11 2-2 17, Lowry 6-11 10-10 25, Green 2-5 0-0 4, Powell 6-18 2-3 18, Miller 0-0 0-0 0, Boucher 0-2 0-0 0, Moreland 0-0 0-0 0, Ibaka 7-12 3-3 17, Lin 0-1 0-0 0, VanVleet 5-6 0-0 13, Meeks 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 41-87 24-27 120. Milwaukee 31 24 26 21 — 102 Toronto 32 33 29 26 — 120 3-point goals: Milwaukee 11-35 (Middleton 4-7, Lopez 2-3, Mirotic 2-8, Hill 1-2, Antetokounmpo 1-3, Connaughton 1-3, Frazier 0-1, Brown 0-1, Ilyasova 0-2, Bledsoe 0-2, Brogdon 0-3), Toronto 14-41 (Powell 4-13, VanVleet 3-3, M.Gasol 3-6, Lowry 3-7, Leonard 1-3, Meeks 0-1, Boucher 0-1, Siakam 0-2, Green 0-2, Ibaka 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Milwaukee 40 (Antetokounmpo 10), Toronto 44 (Ibaka 13). Assists: Milwaukee 30 (Middleton 7), Toronto 32 (M.Gasol 7). Total fouls: Milwaukee 22, Toronto 23. Technicals: Milwaukee coach Bucks (Defensive three second), Toronto coach Raptors (Defensive three second). A: 20,237 (19,800).

NBA All-Rookie Teams

(Voted by a global panel of 100 sportswriters and broadcasters: First-team vote, 2 points; second-team vote, 1 point) First Team Player, Team 1st 2nd Total Luka Doncic, Dal 100 200 Trae Young, Atl 100 200 Deandre Ayton, Pho 95 5 195 Jaren Jackson Jr., Mem 60 39 159 Marvin Bagley III, Sac 56 44 156 Second Team Player, Team 1st 2nd Total Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, LAC 40 58 138 Collin Sexton, Cle 39 54 132 Landry Shamet, LAC 3 79 85 Mitchell Robinson, N.Y. 3 71 77 Kevin Huerter, Atl 1 43 45 Other players receiving votes (first-team votes in parentheses): Mikal Bridges, Pho, (1) 31; Kevin Knox, N.Y., 22; Josh Okogie, Min, (1) 12; Jalen Brunson, Dal, 10; Allonzo Trier, N.Y., 10; Rodions Kurucs, Bro, 9; Wendell Carter Jr., Chi, 7; Miles Bridges, Cha, (1) 6; Bruce Brown, Det, 2; Harry Giles III, Sac, 2; Mo Bamba, Orl, 1; Aaron Holiday, Ind, 1.

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 7 3 3 24 23 D.C. United 7 4 3 24 18 Montreal 6 5 3 21 15 Atlanta 6 4 2 20 13 New York City FC 4 1 6 18 15 New York 5 5 2 17 17 Toronto FC 5 5 2 17 22 Columbus 5 8 1 16 12 Chicago 4 5 4 16 20 Orlando City 4 6 3 15 19 New England 3 8 3 12 14 Cincinnati 3 8 2 11 11 WESTERN W L T Pts GF Los Angeles FC 9 1 4 31 32 Seattle 7 1 5 26 22 Houston 7 2 2 23 20 LA Galaxy 7 5 1 22 18 Minnesota United 5 4 3 18 20 FC Dallas 5 5 3 18 17 Real Salt Lake 5 6 1 16 18 San Jose 4 6 2 14 18 Vancouver 3 6 4 13 12 Portland 3 6 2 11 14 Sporting K.C. 2 4 5 11 20 Colorado 1 9 2 5 17 Wednesday Vancouver at New York, 7 p.m. Friday LA Galaxy at Orlando City, 6 p.m. Atlanta at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Montreal at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Saturday New York City FC at Chicago, 2:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Vancouver, 6 p.m. D.C. United at New England, 6:30 p.m. New York at Cincinnati, 6:30 p.m. Portland at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Houston at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Columbus at Colorado, 8 p.m.

KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. — NFL owners meeting today will consider a proposal to refine the new rule that allows challenges involving pass interference, and may also announce locations to host upcoming drafts. Owners voted in March to allow interference calls or non-calls to be challenged by coaches and reviewed via replay as a one-year experiment. The tweak proposed this week would take the decision to review pass interference in the final two minutes of each half out of the hands of the officials. Reviews in the final two minutes would require a coach’s challenge, too. “The concern is how many stoppages will we end up with in the last two minutes,” Atlanta Falcons president and CEO Rich McKay said Tuesday. “One thing we do not want to do is be a game that has multiple stops in the last two minutes.” Under the rule adopted in March, in the final two minutes only officials in the booth can stop the game for reviews involving pass interference, as is the case with other reviewable plays. Owners are expected to vote on whether to let the NFL competition committee decide on changing the rule after it discusses the subject with the league’s coaches. McKay, a member of the committee, said the group has conference calls with coaches scheduled for early June. Owners will also consider a proposal to exempt Hail Mary passes so they’re not reviewable. That would require the league coming up with the definition of a Hail Mary. “I actually don’t think it’s that hard,” McKay said. “It’s going to be from what yard line was it thrown, were there multiple receivers, how much time is left on the clock. But you want to get input from the coaches — what definition are you comfortable with?”

GA 12 13 19 9 12 14 20 19 17 20 31 23 GA 9 14 12 17 18 17 20 23 16 22 20 30

East W L Pct. Lake Erie 7 3 .700 Schaumburg 6 4 .600 Windy City 4 7 .364 Joliet 4 7 .364 Washington 2 8 .200 West W L Pct. Rascals 6 4 .600 Evansville 5 4 .556 Grizzlies 5 4 .556 Florence 5 4 .556 Southern Illinois 5 4 .556 Tuesday’s Games Windy City 1, Joliet 0 Schaumburg 6, Lake Erie 0 Southern Illinois at Rascals, ppd. Evansville at Grizzlies, ppd. Wednesday Florence at Washington, 10:05 a.m. Joliet at Windy City, 10:35 a.m. Lake Erie at Schaumburg, 6:30 p.m. Southern Illinois at Rascals, 6:35 p.m. Evansville at Grizzlies, 7:05 p.m.

MOTOR SPORTS GB — 1 3½ 3½ 5 GB — ½ ½ ½ ½

Major League Leaders NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .404; Cabrera, Pittsburgh, .338; McNeil, New York, .333; Bell, Pittsburgh, .325; Yelich, Milwaukee, .325; Baez, Chicago, .323; DeJong, Cardinals, .320; Martinez, Cardinals, .319; Freeman, Atlanta, .319; Segura, Philadelphia, .318. RBI: Bell, Pittsburgh, 44; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 44; Yelich, Milwaukee, 41; Ozuna, Cardinals, 40; Alonso, New York, 36; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 36; Arenado, Colorado, 35; Bryant, Chicago, 32; Baez, Chicago, 32. DOUBLES: DeJong, Cardinals, 17; Rendon, Washington, 17; Baez, Chicago, 16; Cain, Milwaukee, 16; Peralta, Arizona, 16; Ahmed, Arizona, 15; Walker, Arizona, 15. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 5; Tapia, Colorado, 4; Escobar, Arizona, 3; Rosario, New York, 3; Swanson, Atlanta, 3; 18 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: Yelich, Milwaukee, 19; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 17; Alonso, New York, 16; Reyes, San Diego, 15; Bell, Pittsburgh, 14; Pederson, Los Angeles, 14; Ozuna, Cardinals, 13; Suarez, Cincinnati, 13; 12 tied at 11. STOLEN BASES: Dyson, Arizona, 12; Yelich, Milwaukee, 9; Robles, Washington, 8; Story, Colorado, 8. PITCHING: Fried, Atlanta, 6-2; Greinke, Arizona, 6-1; Ryu, Los Angeles, 6-1; Woodruff, Milwaukee, 6-1; Castillo, Cincinnati, 5-1; Davies, Milwaukee, 5-0; Eflin, Philadelphia, 5-4; Maeda, Los Angeles, 5-2; Marquez, Colorado, 5-2; Soroka, Atlanta, 5-1. ERA: Ryu, Los Angeles, 1.52; Davies, Milwaukee, 1.54; Castillo, Cincinnati, 1.90; Paddack, San Diego, 1.93; Lyles, Pittsburgh, 1.97; Smith, Miami, 2.38; Eflin, Philadelphia, 2.76; Greinke, Arizona, 2.78. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 87; Strasburg, Washington, 82; Castillo, Cincinnati, 76; Corbin, Washington, 76; Marquez, Colorado, 72; Smith, Miami, 71. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Polanco, Minnesota, .335; Reddick, Houston, .333; Brantley, Houston, .326; LeMahieu, New York, .325; Andrus, Texas, .325; Anderson, Chicago, .323; Devers, Boston, .320; Springer, Houston, .313; La Stella, Los Angeles, .310. RBI: Springer, Houston, 42; Abreu, Chicago, 39; Santana, Seattle, 38; Mondesi, Kansas City, 37; Gallo, Texas, 35; Rosario, Minn, 35. HITS: Brantley, Houston, 61; Polanco, Minnesota, 60; Devers, Boston, 57; Springer, Houston, 57; Merrifield, Kansas City, 56; Simmons, Los Angeles, 56; Mancini, Baltimore, 55; Anderson, Chicago, 54; LeMahieu, New York, 54; 6 tied at 52. DOUBLES: Buxton, Minnesota, 18; Healy, Seattle, 16; Mancini, Baltimore, 15; Brantley, Houston, 14; AGordon, Kansas City, 14. TRIPLES: Merrifield, Kansas City, 6; Mondesi, Kansas City, 6; Polanco, Minnesota, 5. HOME RUNS: Springer, Houston, 17; Gallo, Texas, 15; Bregman, Houston, 14; Sanchez, New York, 14; Vogelbach, Seattle, 14. STOLEN BASES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 17; Anderson, Chicago, 13; DGordon, Seattle, 12; Ramirez, Cleveland, 12. PITCHING: German, New York, 9-1; Verlander, Houston, 8-1; Berrios, Minnesota, 6-2; Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 6-1; Lynn, Texas, 6-3; Odorizzi, Minnesota, 6-2; Perez, Minnesota, 6-1; Walden, Boston, 6-0; 8 tied at 5. ERA: Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 1.86; Verlander, Houston, 2.24; Odorizzi, Minnesota, 2.38; German, New York, 2.60; Minor, Texas, 2.64; Morton, TB, 2.65; Montas, Oakland, 2.67. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 93; Verlander, Houston, 89; Sale, Boston, 83; Bauer, Cleveland, 80; Boyd, Detroit, 73; Snell, Tampa Bay, 71; Bieber, Cleveland, 69.

NASCAR Monster Energy Cup POINTS LEADERS 1. Joey Logano....................................... 478 2. Kyle Busch ......................................... 469 3. Kevin Harvick .................................... 440 4. Chase Elliott ...................................... 423 5. Brad Keselowski ................................ 421 6. Denny Hamlin.................................... 404 7. Martin Truex Jr. ................................. 396 8. Kurt Busch......................................... 387 9. Clint Bowyer ...................................... 357 10. Ryan Blaney .................................... 340 11. Aric Almirola ................................... 334 12. Alex Bowman .................................. 329 13. Daniel Suarez .................................. 315 14. Erik Jones........................................ 308 15. Kyle Larson ..................................... 304 16. Jimmie Johnson .............................. 292 17. Ryan Newman ................................. 284 18. Austin Dillon.................................... 281 19. William Byron.................................. 277 20. Paul Menard.................................... 267 SCHEDULE (WINNERS) x-non-points race Feb. 10: x-Advance Auto Clash (Jimmie Johnson) Feb. 14: x-Duel 1 at Daytona (Kevin Harvick) Feb. 14: x: Duel 2 at Daytona (Joey Logano) Feb. 17: Daytona 500 (Denny Hamlin) Feb.24:FoldsofHonorQuikTrip500(Keselowski) March 3: Pennzoil 400 (Joey Logano) March 10: TicketGuardian 500 (Kyle Busch) March 17: Auto Club 400 (Kyle Busch) March 24: STP 500 (Brad Keselowski) March31:O’ReillyAutoParts500(DennyHamlin) April 7: Food City 500 (Kyle Busch) April 13: Toyota Owners 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) April 28: Geico 500 (Chase Elliott) May 6: Gander RV 400 (Martin Truex Jr.) May 11: Digital Ally 400 (Brad Keselowski) May 18: x-Monster Energy Open (Kyle Larson) May 18: x-Monster All-Star Race (Kyle Larson) Sunday: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. Sunday, June 2: Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, June 9: Brooklyn, Mich. Sunday, June 23: Sonoma, Calif. Sunday, June 30: Joliet, Ill. Saturday, July 6: Daytona Beach, Fla. Saturday, July 13: Sparta, Ky. Sunday, July 21: Loudon, N.H. Sunday, July 28: Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, Aug. 4: Watkins Glen, N.Y. Sunday, Aug. 11: Brooklyn, Mich. Saturday, Aug. 17: Bristol, Tenn. Sunday, Sept. 1: Darlington, S.C. Sunday, Sept. 8: Indianapolis Sunday, Sept. 15: Las Vegas Saturday, Sept. 21: Richmond, Va. Sunday, Sept. 29: Concord, N.C. Sunday, Oct. 6: Dover, Del. Sunday, Oct. 13: Talladega, Ala. Sunday, Oct. 20: Kansas City, Kan. Sunday, Oct. 27: Martinsville, Va. Sunday, Nov. 3: Fort Worth, Texas Sunday, Nov. 10: Avondale, Ariz. Sunday, Nov. 17: Homestead, Fla.

Indianapolis 500 Lineup after qualifying; race Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway 1. (22) Simon Pagenaud, Chevrolet, 229.992. 2. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 229.889. 3. (21) Spencer Pigot, Chevrolet, 229.826. 4. (63) Ed Jones, Honda, 229.646. 5. (88) Colton Herta, 229.086. 6. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 228.645. 7. (18) Sebastien Bourdais, Honda, 228.621. 8. (2) Josef Newgarden, Chevrolet, 228.396. 9. (27) Alexander Rossi, Honda, 228.247. 10. (98) Marco Andretti, Honda, 228.756. 11. (25) Conor Daly, Chevrolet, 228.617. 12. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 228.523. 13. (7) Marcus Ericsson, 228.511. 14. (30) Takuma Sato, Honda, 228.300. 15. (33) James Davison, Honda, 228.273. 16. (14) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 228.120. 17. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda, 228.104. 18. (9) Scott Dixon, Honda, 228.100. 19. (77) Oriol Servia, Honda, 227.991. 20. (23) Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 227.915. 21. (48) JR Hildebrand, Chevrolet, 227.908. 22. (28) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Honda, 227.877. 23. (19) Santino Ferrucci, 227.731. 24. (4) Matheus Leist, Chevrolet, 227.717. 25. (60) Jack Harvey, Honda, 227.695. 26. (42) Jordan King, Chevrolet, 227.502. 27. (81) Ben Hanley, 227.482. 28. (26) Zach Veach, Honda, 227.341. 29. (10) Felix Rosenqvist, 227.297. 30. (39) Pippa Mann, Honda, 227.244. 31. (24) Sage Karam, Chevrolet, 227.740. 32. (5) James Hinchcliffe, Honda, 227.543. 33. (32) Kyle Kaiser, Chevrolet, 227.372.


05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

GIRLS SOCCER

POSTSEASON UPDATE

NO DOUBT ABOUT IT Columbia rolls into first state semifinal since 2008 BY JIM FAASEN

STLhighschoolsports.com

COLUMBIA, ILL. — The Columbia High girls soccer team suffered a gut-wrenching super-sectional loss to eventual Class 1A state champion Quincy Notre Dame two seasons ago. The second time around proved to be much sweeter for those Eagles who played in both games with an 8-1 victory Tuesday against Decatur St. Teresa to earn a trip to the 1A state semifinals. “It’s not something we really expected going in,” said junior midfielder Reagan Mauch, who was a freshman player on the Columbia team that lost in the 2017 supersectional. “The last time we were here it was super close, but unfortunately we lost. That one wasn’t fun. This one turned out a lot better. It was much more fun.” Columbia (25-2-1, No. 2 in the STLhighschoolsports.com smallschools rankings) will play Lisle at 5 p.m. Friday at North Central College in Naperville. It’s Columbia’s first state semifinal appearance since 2008 and just the third in program history. Senior midfielder Chloe Graff scored just four minutes in for the Eagles to begin a parade of goals. Fae Harrell scored three goals, Graff had two goals and one assist and Mauch had two goals and one assist to lead the offensive outburst. Haley Glover also scored for Columbia, Kennedy Jones had two assists and Sophia Bonaldi had one assist. “We came out ready even though we were limited in what we knew of them,” Eagles coach Jamey Bridges said. “After the first couple of minutes, it was apparent how they were playing defensively. We came out with an urgency. They were definitely ready.” Columbia outshot St. Teresa 28-1 and held the advantage in corner kicks by a 13-0 count. The Eagles led 5-0 at halftime. “This was great because we just played simple and played as a team,” Harrell said. “It was really fun going out there and working hard to get each other good looks. This feels great.” Senior Rylee Iorio played most of the 62 minutes to earn the win without facing a shot. St. Teresa (22-3-2) broke up the shutout bid when senior forward Camryn Wagner scored off of senior

TIM VIZER, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Columbia’s Chloe Graff (left) celebrates a goal with teammate Fae Harrell in the Class 1A girls soccer super-sectional game Tuesday in Columbia. backup goalkeeper Mattea Baumann with seven minutes left. The winner of the Columbia-Lisle semifinal will play in the 1A state final at 5 p.m. Saturday against either North Shore Country Day or Herscher, which play in the second 1A semifinal at 7 p.m. Friday.

“This is a good feeling,” Harrell said. “It was an enjoyable game today. We’re ready to go out, work and do more. Since freshman year, this has been the dream of the seven seniors. We’re ready to see what we can do now.”

BASEBALL

Borgia beats Lutheran South BY PAUL HALFACRE

STLhighschoolsports.com

AFFTON — In a game with six home runs, a triple worked just fine Tuesday afternoon to help Borgia rally for a 7-6 victory at Lutheran South in a Class 4 baseball sectional. Jack Czeschin said he thought he got enough of the ball in the bottom of the sixth inning for his second home run, but his two-run triple did the damage needed for the Knights (20-7). “We’re down by one and I just wanted to get a good swing on the ball,” Czeschin said. “Not going to lie, I thought that one was going out, too. To hit it where I did and to get two runs in to take the lead, there is nothing better than that.” Borgia did not lead before Czeschin’s two-run triple and entered the bottom of the sixth trailing 6-4. The Knights snapped an eightgame losing streak to Lutheran South (22-10) dating to the 2011 season, including a loss in a district final last season. With its first sectional victory since 2005, Borgia advanced to play host to Sikeston (16-7) on Thursday in a Class 4 quarterfinal. Sikeston beat Ste. Genevieve in another sectional Tuesday, 6-0. “It feels awesome,” Borgia coach Rob Struckhoff said. “Lutheran South is a great team. We’ve had some bad luck against them. (Lutheran South coach Steve Pfund) has had our number for a while, it’s just good to get over the hump with these guys and I’m just very proud of the guys because they just keep battling.” The Knights had to keep battling after the Lancers went ahead 2-0 in the first inning. Richie Minda and Jacob Hager got the home run derby started in the first inning for Lutheran South by hitting home runs on consecutive pitches by Borgia starter Joe Schmidt. “Those back-to-back home runs on back-to-back pitches, that kind of puts you down, but we stuck with it,” Czeschin said. “We stuck with the game plan and our approach at the plate and put some good swings on the ball.”

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

PAUL HALFACRE, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Borgia’s Bryce Mayer (left) and Adam Molitor (12) celebrate after beating Lutheran South in a Class 4 baseball sectional Tuesday at Lutheran High. Schmidt helped his own cause with a two-run homer in the bottom half of the first for a 2-2 tie. But the Lancers went back ahead 3-2 in the top of the second and extended the lead to 5-2 in the fourth on Minda’s second homer of the game. Louis Eckelkamp hit a solo home run in the fourth to keep Borgia within 5-3 and Czeschin crushed a two-strike fastball nearly over the scoreboard in left field for a solo home run in the fifth to trim South’s edge to 5-4. “I saw that fastball up and my eyes just lit up,” Czeschin said. “That’s the farthest ball I’ve ever hit in my life.” The Lancers pushed their edge out to 6-4 heading into the bottom of the sixth, and the Knights closed the gap to 6-5 off an error. Then with Adam Molitor waiting at third base and speedy senior Tyler Glosemeyer at first base, Czeschin took a 2-1 pitch to the gap in left-center to score the go-ahead run and give the Knights a 7-6 lead.

After Lutheran South chased Schmidt from the game in the fourth inning, junior Bryce Mayer came in for Borgia and limited the Lancers to just one run on three hits over the final 3 1-3 innings. “They knew that we can hit the fastball, so he just kept us off-balance with his off-speed stuff and he did a good job,” Lutheran South coach Steve Pfund said. Schmidt had to get out of a jam in the top of the seventh. He allowed two one-out singles before recording the final two outs. Czeschin collected three RBI in a 2-for-4 day, while Schmidt went 1-for-2 with two RBI. For Lutheran South, Minda hit two home runs, going 2-for-3 with four RBI. How his team responded in the first told Struckhoff all he needed to know. “To only give up the two runs and to put two right back on them, I think that turned the game around,” Struckhoff said. “That made everyone know that it’s going to be a game and not just some of the same.”

MISSOURI BASEBALL —CLASS 5 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Vianney 9. Hillsboro 1 Willard 10, Webb City 1 De Smet 8, McCluer North 0 Rock Bridge 5, Francis Howell 0 Rockhurst 11, Blue Springs South 1 Wednesday’s games CBC 1, Marquette 1 (game suspended in 7th inning, will resume at 4 p.m. at Vianney) Glendale (21-7) at Camdenton (17-9), 5:30 p.m. Staley (25-5) at Liberty (KC) (28-6), 5 p.m. —CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Sikeston 6, Ste. Genevieve 0 Borgia 7, Lutheran South 6 Monett 5, Springfield Catholic 4 Westminster 12, Jennings 0 St. Dominic 10, Orchard Farm 0 Wednesday’s games Marshfield (15-6) at Helias (21-4), 5 p.m. Pembroke Hill (19-6) at Odessa (15-8), 6 p.m. Savannah (23-1) at St. Pius X KC (16-4), 3 p.m. —CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Saxony Lutheran 9, Malden 8 West County 11, Valley Park 10 Fatima 2, Houston 1 Ava 1, Clever 0 Montgomery County 13, Whitfield 1 South Callaway 1, Palmyra 0 Blair Oaks 15, Lamar 3 Lawson 7, Summit Christian 6 Quarterfinals, Wednesday West County (21-6) at Saxony Lutheran (21-3), 4:30 p.m. Ava (18-5) at Fatima (13-14), 5 p.m. South Callaway (24-8) at Montgomery County (16-8), 4:30 p.m. Lawson vs at Blair Oaks —CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Ellington 5, Portageville 4 Chaffee 9, Valle Catholic 2 Skyline 6, Russellville 5 Lone Jack at Adrian, 5 p.m. Wednesday. Seymour 3, Purdy 2 Marion C Early at Liberal, 7 p.m. Wednesday. Silex 11, Northeast (Cairo) 1 St. Joseph LeBlond 14, Scotland County 5 Quarterfinals, Wednesday Chaffee (22-5) at Ellington (26-1), 4 p.m. St. Joseph LeBlond (8-12) at Silex (11-4), 4:30 p.m. —CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Cooter 10, Oran 0 Dora 12, Eminence 3 St. Elizabeth 5, Northwest (Hughesville) 4 Wellsville 4, Concordia 1 Walnut Grove 6, Verona 4 Weaubleau 12, Sheldon 5 La Plata 11, Green City 1 Northeast Nodaway at North Harrison, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Quarterfinals Dora at Cooter, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Wellsville at St. Elizabeth, 6 p.m. Wednesday. Weaubleau at Walnut Grove, 5 p.m. Wednesday. La Plata vs TBD ILLINOIS BASEBALL —CLASS 4A ALTON REGIONAL Semifinals Quincy vs Edwardsville (30-5), 4 p.m. Wednesday. Alton (13-18) vs Belleville East (18-17) 4 p.m. Thursday. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 4A GRANITE CITY REGIONAL Semifinals, Thursday Granite City (15-18) vs Belleville West (25-7), 4 p.m. Collinsville (13-16) vs O’Fallon (24-8), 6 p.m. Thursday. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 3A COLUMBIA REGIONAL Semifinals Cahokia (3-14) at Columbia (23-8), 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Freeburg (18-14) vs Waterloo (18-12), 4:30 p.m. Thursday. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday —CLASS 3A CENTRALIA REGIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday Salem vs Marion, 4 p.m. Olney Richland County vs Mount Vernon, 6 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday —CLASS 3A TRIAD REGIONAL Semifinals Jerseyville (15-17) vs Mascoutah (28-3), 4:15 p.m. Wednesday. Highland (20-13) at Triad (13-22), 4:15 p.m. Thursday. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 2A BENTON SECTIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday Nashville vs. Fairfield, 4 p.m. Harrisburg vs. Ziegler-Royalton, 6:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday. —2A PLEASANT PLAINS SECTIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday New Berlin vs. Beardstown, 4:30 p.m. Carlinville vs. Pleasant Plains, 6:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 2A TEUTOPOLIS SECTIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday Gillespie vs. Teutopolis, 4 p.m. Mater Dei vs. Robinson, 7 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 10 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 1A GREENVILLE SECTIONAL At Greenville University Semifinals, Wednesday Valmeyer vs. Carrollton, 4:30 p.m. Greenfield vs. Gibault, 6:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday. SOFTBALL —CLASS 4A EDWARDSVILLE REGIONAL Semifinal, Wednesday Granite City (4-16) at Collinsville (9-17), 4:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winner at Edwardsville (23-4), 10 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 4A BELLEVILLE EAST REGIONAL Semifinals Belleville West (14-11) vs Alton (23-9), 4:30 p.m. Thursday. O’Fallon (22-9) at Belleville East (18-16), 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 3A CIVIC MEMORIAL REGIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday Civic Memorial (14-12) vs. Triad (22-7), 4:30 p.m. Waterloo (14-13) vs. Freeburg (14-11), 6:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 4:30 p.m. Friday. —CLASS 3A JERSEYVILLE REGIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday East St. Louis (1-13) vs. Columbia (18-8), 4:30 p.m. Highland (12-11) at Jerseyville (20-11), 6:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 4:30 p.m. Friday. —CLASS 3A HERRIN REGIONAL First round Salem 6,Herrin 5 Mount Vernon 12, Richland County 0 Semifinals Salem vs Centralia, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday. Mount Vernon vs Breese Central (16-7), 2:30 p.m. Thursday. Championship Semifinal winners, 4:30 p.m. Friday. —CLASS 3A CARBONDALE REGIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday Massac County 7, Marion 6 (9) Carbondale 9, Murphysboro 4 Championship Massac County at Carbondale, 4:30 p.m. Friday —CLASS 2A NEWTON SECTIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday Mater Dei vs. Arthur, 4:30 p.m. Teutopolis vs. Mount Carmel, 6:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 4:30 p.m. Friday —CLASS 1A SOUTH CENTRAL SECTIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday Christ Our Rock vs Oblong, 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Marissa (15-5) vs Bridgeport Red Hill, 5 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 11 a.m. Saturday —CLASS 1A STEELEVILLE SECTIONAL Semifinals, Wednesday

Goreville at Steeleville (18-12), 3 p.m. Pope County vs Elverado, 4:30 p.m. Championship Semifinal winners, 4:30 p.m. Friday. —CLASS 1A JACKSONVILLE REGIONAL Semifinals Jacksonville Routt 8, White Hall North Greene 4 Payson Seymour vs Hardin Calhoun (274), 4:30 p.m. Wednesday Championship Routt vs. TBD, 4:30 p.m. Friday MISSOURI GIRLS SOCCER —CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Lindbergh 2, Jackson 1 Eureka (10-7-3) at Nerinx Hall (16-3-2), 4 p.m. Wednesday. Springfield Central at Kickapoo (1-2-1), 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Lee’s Summit West 7, Jefferson City 0 Francis Howell Central 5, McCluer North 1 Francis Howell 4, Hickman 0 Lee’s Summit North 4, Blue Springs 0 Liberty (KC) 2, Staley 1 Quarterfinal TBD at Lindbergh (16-9), Saturday. Lee’s Summit West at TBD, Saturday. Francis Howell (12-8-1) at Francis Howell Central (14-8-1), noon Saturday. Liberty at Lee’s Summit North, Semifinals TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 12 p.m. 5/31. TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 2 p.m. 5/31. Third place TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 10 a.m. 6/1. Championship TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 2 p.m. 6/1. —CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Cape Girardeau Central 2, Windsor 1 Summit 1, St. Joseph’s 0 Union 2, Rolla 0 Glendale 5, Carl Junction 1 Incarnate Word 3, Westminster 0 Liberty (10-10-1) at St. Dominic (22-3-1), 4 p.m. Wednesday; game tied 2-2 going into overtime Notre Dame de Sion 5, Bolivar 0 Kearney 4, Grain Valley 0 Quarterfinals Summit (17-3-3) at Cape Girardeau Central, noon Saturday. Glendale at Union (25-1-1), 1 p.m. Saturday. TBD at Incarnate Word (18-5-3), Saturday. Kearney vs. Notre Dame de Sion, TBD Semifinals TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 4 p.m. 5/31. TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 6 p.m. 5/31. Third place TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 12 p.m. 6/1. Championship TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 4 p.m. 6/1. —CLASS 2 STATE TOURNAMENT Sectional round Cape Notre Dame 5, Lutheran South 1 Rosati-Kain 10, Roosevelt 0 St. Clair 4, Logan-Rogersville 1 Pleasant Hill 2, Springfield Catholic 0 Visitation 3, Trinity 2 Southern Boone 2, St. Charles West 1 Pembroke Hill 1, St. Pius X (Kansas City) 0 Maryville 2, Chillicothe 0 Quarterfinals, Wednesday Cape Notre Dame (23-1-1) vs Rosati-Kain (17-7) at SLUH, 5 p.m. St. Clair (15-7-1) at Pleasant Hill (22-1), 5 p.m. Southern Boone (24-3) at Visitation (16-4), 5 p.m. Pembroke Hill vs. Maryville (13-7), TBD Semifinal TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 12 p.m. 5/29. TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 2 p.m. 5/29. Third place TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 10 a.m. 5/30. Championship TBD at Swope Soccer Village, 2 p.m. 5/30. —CLASS 1 STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals, Wednesday Maplewood-RH (15-6-1) at St. Vincent (14-7), 6 p.m. Crocker (13-5-1) vs. New Covenant (12-7) at Waynesville, 5 p.m. Duchesne (10-8) vs. Crossroads College Prep (10-4) at Forest Park, 4 p.m. St. Michael the Archangel (17-5) at Lone Jack (16-4), 6 p.m. ILLINOIS GIRLS SOCCER —CLASS 3A MOLINE SECTIONAL Semifinals Edwardsville 3, O’Fallon 1 Minooka 1, Bradley-Bourbonnais 0 Championship At Moline Minooka vs Edwardsville (15-8), 6 p.m. Friday. —CLASS 2A CIVIC MEMORIAL SECTIONAL At Bethalto Sports Complex Semifinals, Wednesday Mattoon vs. Triad (16-3-2), 4 p.m. Chatham vs. Marion (15-5), 6 p.m. Championship TBD, 10 a.m. Saturday. —CLASS 1A COLUMBIA SUPER-SECTIONAL Tuesday Columbia 8, Decatur St. Teresa 1 MISSOURI BOYS VOLLEYBALL —CLASS 4 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals, Tuesday Pattonville (31-5) vs SLUH (29-1) at Webster Groves, 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. Vianney def. Francis Howell North, 25-18, 25-20 Championship, Thursday Vianney (26-6) vs Pattonville-SLUH winner at Webster Groves, 5:30 p.m. —CLASS 3 STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals Mehlville (27-4) at Webster Groves (20-11) , 6:45 p.m. Wednesday. Chaminade def. Lutheran South, 25-17, 25-18 Championship, Thursday Chaminade (27-6) vs Mehlville-Webster Groves winner at Webster Groves, 7:30 p.m. ILLINOIS BOYS VOLLEYBALL —GRANITE CITY REGIONAL Semifinals Edwardsville def. Father McGivney, 25-21, 25-18 Belleville East def. Granite City, 25-21, 25-23 Championship, Wednesday Belleville East (17-12) vs Edwardsville (18-8), 6 p.m. —O’FALLON REGIONAL Semifinals, Tuesday O’Fallon def. Belleville West, 25-16, 25-14 Althoff def. Metro-East Lutheran, 25-18, 25-23 Championship, Wednesday Althoff (5-8) at O’Fallon (21-8), 6 p.m. Wednesday. BOYS LACROSSE —MSLA STATE TOURNAMENT Semifinals MICDS leads SLUH 15-2 at halftime; game to be resumed at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at MICDS De Smet leads Eureka 7-3 in second quarter; game to be resumed at 5 p.m. Wednesday at Lindenwood Championship, Friday Semifinal winners at Lindenwood, 7:30 p.m.

—MSLA SHOW ME CUP Semifinals Parkway West 9, O’Fallon 7 Westminster 13, Holt 12 Final, Friday Westminster (9-8) vs Parkway West (9-7) at Lindenwood, 5 p.m. MISSOURI GIRLS LACROSSE —MSLA STATE TOURNAMENT Quarterfinals Lafayette 14, Marquette 8 Summit 15, John Burroughs 8 St. Joseph’s 9, Kirkwood 7 MICDS leads Cor Jesu 6-4 at halftime; game to be resumed at 4 p.m. Wednesday at MICDS Semifinals, Thursday Summit (16-1) at Lafayette (20-0) , 4 p.m. St. Joseph’s (12-5) vs. TBD ILLINOIS GIRLS LACROSSE —WASHINGTON (ILL.) SECTIONAL Semifinals Belleville Township (5-8) vs O’Fallon (131), 5:30 p.m. Thursday Washington vs. Lincoln-Way Central, 7 p.m. Wednesday Championship, Friday Semifinal winners, 7 p.m. at Washingto


SPORTS

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 05.22.2019

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

SIDELINE SCRUTINY MATT YORK, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan State coach Tom Izzo talks with forward Nick Ward last April during a Final Four game in Minneapolis.

Basketball coaches try to walk the line between motivation and mistreatment

SHANNON RYAN

Chicago Tribune

he scene was played over and over. It became a trending topic on social media and a hot take on sports talk shows. Michigan State basketball coach Tom Izzo marched onto the court during a timeout, reached for forward Aaron Henry’s wrist for a moment and repeatedly pointed at him while yelling during a first-round victory against Bradley in the NCAA Tournament. Izzo hopped up to yell in Henry’s face in the huddle before another player intervened to calm down Izzo. The reaction surprised Izzo. “Will I ever shake my finger in front of a kid again? No, I won’t,” he recently said. “I can change that. But I know this: I won’t quit holding players accountable. I won’t quit disciplining them.” He received support from colleagues, former players and most of the college basketball community, while Henry and his father defended Izzo and shrugged off the exchange as welcomed and deserved discipline. But others criticized and dissected Izzo’s temperament on ESPN roundtables, in newspaper columns and on sports talk radio. For many, the incident highlighted a new landscape for college basketball coaches, who must figure out how to toe the line instead of crossing it. Right or wrong, some coaches say — and many seem to think it’s wrong — increased public scrutiny of their sideline demeanors

T

and in-game interactions with players is making the job more challenging. With more player autonomy, more smartphone cameras and more places for fans to voice outrage on social media, every steely glare or finger wag by a coach is analyzed as much as his rotations. Coaches are ever more cognizant of their actions and the public perception that shapes their reputations and their university’s. “A lot of coaches are conscious of it,” said Temple’s Aaron McKie, 46, hired last month to coach his alma mater. “Just like you watch tape of the teams, there’s coaches who watch film of themselves and might say, ‘I’ve got to change that.’” “Too many young coaches, they’re scared to coach,” said fiery South Carolina coach Frank Martin, 53. “People are so consumed with keeping their paycheck. They’re scared of being who they are. It’s not about being an old dog learning new tricks. You’re always learning and evolving. But we can’t sell out who we are because of people who don’t know (the sport) trying to move the line and trying to keep those people happy rather than people who are relevant.” Most coaches agree what constitutes crossing a line — in particular, physical

State in 2010.He quickly apologized after the game, saying then: “I’m an old-school guy, but I understand the times are real sensitive now. I love him. I don’t know what to tell you.It’s wrong on my part and is completely out of line and has no part in the game.” Women’s basketball is far from exempt. North Carolina coach Sylvia Hatchell resigned last month after 33 years following an independent investigation into player and staff complaints that she made racially insensitive comments and pressured injured players to compete. Georgia Tech fired MaChelle Joseph in March after 16 years when an independent investigation found that she bullied players. The line of acceptability seems to have shifted. “Who changed the line?” Martin said. “The people who have given in to the phoniness of the business. I tell people all the time, I am who I am. If I’m going to be phony when cameras are on, I’m not being true to players and their expectations of me. Nobody forces them to pick the school they go to. They sign up, they know what they are walking into.” Many coaches recalled their playing days, when coaches kept relationships with players at arm’s length. Coaches now are expected to build deep personal bonds with players, which most agree is a positive. Good or bad, coaches have had to adapt to new expectations as the public holds them more accountable.

force toward a player. Bob Knight’s hardcore methods with Indiana players, including a video that showed Knight grabbing Neil Reed around the neck during practice in 1997, eventually came to be considered abusive, and he was fired in 2000. Rutgers fired coach Mike Rice in 2013 after video emerged of him throwing basketballs at players and shoving them during practice. Those were clearer violations. But what about red-faced coaches cursing at players who screwed up the game plan? What about grabbing a player’s jersey? Where’s the line between motivation and mistreatment? It’s hard to imagine a 2019 version of former Temple coach John Chaney only getting a one-game suspension, as he did in 1994, for bursting into a news conference and threatening to “kill” and beat up then-Massachusetts coach John Calipari. Current coaches have faced criticism for far less egregious displays of anger. Iowa coach Fran McCaffery is wellknown for his sideline blowups, mostly aimed at officials. He was suspended two games last season for berating a referee in the hallway after a game. Martin hit senior Chris Merriewether’s arm with the back of his hand at Kansas

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

Dry weather will prevail along the Eastern Seaboard today as showers and thunderstorms dampen areas from Michigan to Ohio and Arkansas. Drenching rain is forecast to spread through the northern Plains and Upper Midwest while locally severe storms threaten Oklahoma and Kansas. The West will stay cool with rain and mountain snow.

TODAY

TONIGHT

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Mostly sunny

Partly cloudy

Partly sunny

Mostly sunny

WIND S 8-16 mph

WIND S 7-14 mph

WIND WSW 7-14 mph

WIND SSW 8-16 mph

Not as hot with a t-storm WIND WSW 7-14 mph

Showers and thunderstorms WIND W 7-14 mph

87°

70°

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. 80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 81/62 81/58 Bloomington Urbana 82/64 84/67

Kirksville 78/57

Quincy 82/62

Decatur 83/68

Springfield 57 84/67 Effingham 70 55 85/68

35

Columbia 84/65 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 87/70 City 85/64 86/68 Union 55 87/69 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 85/68 84/70 Farmington 85/69 Cape Girardeau 86/72 Springfield 84/68 Poplar Bluff West Plains 85/71 55 84/69 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

25.78 +1.35 23.48 +3.03 22.69 +1.26 19.72 +1.44 25.24 +0.04

16 22.51 +1.06 15 20.33 +0.56 25 30.42 +0.47 26 31.76 -0.09 18 26.83 -0.44 419 424.70 -0.67 21 28.37 -0.64 30 35.02 -0.65 27 38.00 -0.74 32 40.50 -0.50 20 18 14

24.04 -0.56 23.52 -0.08 24.95 -0.45

15 16 24 15 40

3.86 -0.11 13.59 -0.60 31.74 -0.72 2.33

46.06 -0.54 359.43 374.44 522.45 659.05 724.82 679.91 916.87 851.10 599.22 409.82 611.83 445.67

100

80

91

88

Forecast Temperature 88

80

87

58

64

67

-0.24 -0.48 -1.08 +0.62 -0.38 +0.40 -0.38 +0.04 +0.01 -0.07 -0.10 -0.11

70 58

54

T

F

S

S

M

Average Low

89 82

81

83

86

68

68

69

69

70

69

40

W

85

78 70

60

Average High

71

70

Temperature High/low 70°/49° Normal high/low 78°/59° Last year high/low 81°/65° Record high 93° (1941) Record low 38° (1883) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Tue. 0.59” Month to date (normal) 4.30” (3.11”) Year to date (normal) 23.18” (14.76”) Record for this date 2.00” (1957)

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Tuesday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

0 63 69 94 113

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

83° noon

86° 4 p.m.

78° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

Toronto 62/49 Detroit 73/63

New York 73/59 Washington 75/61

Chicago 81/62

Atlanta 91/71

El Paso 91/64 Chihuahua 96/61

-10s -0s

Montreal 69/51

Kansas City 76/58

Los Angeles 69/56

Cold front

High - 133 Low - 2 High - 62 Moderate - 10543

65° 8 a.m.

Minneapolis 65/49

Denver 49/34

Statistics through 5 p.m. Tuesday

0s

Houston 90/77

Miami 89/77

Monterrey 98/73

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

Stationary front

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

72/53/s 74/52/pc 61/46/pc 91/71/pc 92/77/pc 75/61/pc 91/67/s 62/48/c 67/54/s 88/69/pc 89/68/pc 81/69/c 81/62/pc 85/67/c 79/66/t 87/74/pc 86/70/s 49/34/pc 71/50/pc 85/73/s 73/63/sh 73/52/s 88/73/s 90/77/pc 80/66/pc 76/58/pc 65/53/pc 87/69/c

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

72/56/c 70/43/s 56/45/sh 91/73/s 92/76/pc 86/69/t 93/69/s 66/49/c 67/58/pc 88/67/pc 87/66/t 88/70/pc 76/52/pc 85/66/t 81/56/t 90/73/pc 85/68/s 50/37/sh 72/61/c 85/72/s 79/54/t 71/59/c 86/74/sh 88/75/pc 81/62/pc 75/69/c 70/57/pc 89/67/s

Showers

T-storms

Rain

City

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

69/56/sh 87/69/c 86/72/pc 89/77/pc 74/58/pc 65/49/r 93/67/s 90/70/pc 90/74/s 73/59/s 81/69/t 70/49/s 92/70/s 75/58/pc 75/57/pc 78/66/t 67/47/s 74/54/pc 76/53/pc 57/45/sh 90/77/pc 65/58/sh 67/52/pc 75/54/s 94/71/s 78/53/pc 75/61/pc 78/63/t

National Extremes Tuesday in the 48 contiguous states

Today’s Air Quality

High: 99 Edinburg, Texas

airnow.gov

Skywatch Rise

Sun Moon

Set

5:44 a.m. 11:57 p.m.

8:13 p.m. 8:53 a.m.

Last Quarter

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

May 26

Jun 3

Jun 10

Jun 17

Snow

Ice

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

66/54/pc 89/70/pc 90/69/s 88/76/s 72/49/pc 66/52/pc 93/69/s 92/67/s 90/74/s 74/63/c 84/69/c 72/63/c 90/68/s 82/68/c 78/62/s 82/57/t 63/53/pc 77/54/s 76/53/pc 54/48/sh 91/76/pc 66/57/pc 69/53/pc 75/54/s 93/71/s 77/52/s 86/71/t 80/67/t

Low: 16 Aspen Springs, Colo.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Flurries

Today Hi/Lo/W

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

49 T

San Francisco 67/52

-0.12

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Winnipeg 53/41 Billings 53/41

ALMANAC

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Joplin 82/67

Seattle 75/54

85° 71° 89° 70° 82° 68° 81° 68°

We will get a break today from the active and stormy weather. Lots of sunshine today with a gusty south wind. We are warming into the mid- and upper 80s across the region. More storms could be back tomorrow.

Kansas City 76/58

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

61/49/s 79/63/c 103/76/s 95/81/t 95/60/s 60/48/r 61/38/pc 108/84/s 88/79/pc 57/47/c 85/79/t 91/69/s 70/48/s 68/49/pc 83/56/c 104/83/s

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

66/50/sh 79/60/pc 105/76/s 91/81/t 99/67/s 66/49/pc 61/38/s 110/86/s 88/78/pc 60/47/sh 85/79/t 96/73/s 72/49/s 71/51/pc 86/58/pc 105/81/s

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

82/58/pc 69/51/pc 77/57/pc 85/75/s 76/59/sh 104/80/pc 70/51/c 86/71/s 68/54/t 87/78/sh 61/34/s 76/54/s 75/59/s 75/62/pc 62/49/pc 68/53/s

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

82/58/t 69/54/r 70/48/r 85/71/pc 74/60/pc 104/79/pc 72/55/c 85/73/pc 68/53/s 86/77/pc 69/40/s 82/57/s 73/57/pc 78/65/s 75/49/t 67/52/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 05.22.2019 • L

Enjoy foul mudammas, a popular Middle Eastern street food, at breakfast or anytime

A DELICIOUS

OBSESSION BY DANIEL NEMAN | St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In Cairo, breakfast is likely to be a plate of beans mixed with a wonderful array of spices and flavors, and eaten with a piece of pita. • The dish is called foul mudammas, and it is something of a national obsession. Vendors have been selling it on the streets of Egypt for hundreds of years, maybe thousands. • It is so popular that, even though it is universally considered a breakfast item, it is eaten all day long. Just about every country in the northern Africa and the Middle East has its own way of serving foul mudammas (in Syria, for instance, it is topped with Aleppo peppers). But it was in Egypt that the dish was probably invented, and Egypt is where it remains most popular. Please see MUDAMMAS, Page L5

HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH

How awful — I had to judge a cocktail contest Bourbon Battle Semifinals, sponsored by Lux Row DistillSt. Louis ers. Ten local bartenders went Post-Dispatch head-to-head in a contest to create a bourbon-based cocktail worthy of representing St. Louis in the national finals in I felt like Brer Rabbit begging, September. Six cities will be represented “Please don’t throw me into the at that final contest. The grand bourbon patch.” prize winner will receive 60 I was asked to be a judge at a contest among bartenders try- custom-labeled bottles from a barrel of his own choosing, ing to make the best bourbon cocktail. I thought about it for a which is a big deal to people in full nanosecond before agreeing the bourbon business. Because the stakes were high, to participate. the pressure placed on the four The contest was held last judges was intense. week at Brennan’s, in the Fortunately, one of my favorCentral West End. I have been ite ways to deal with pressure is pondering the experience ever with bourbon. So that worked since, and after Aristotelian levels of thought I have come to out well. Even so, I had an additional the inescapable conclusion that source of stress coming from I ought to be invited to judge my immediate left. The judge cocktail contests more often. seated next to me was Ted Last week’s event was the United States Bartenders’ Guild Kilgore, the beverage director DANIEL NEMAN

and proprietor of Planter’s House and inarguably the most accomplished mixologist in town. His cocktail recipes have appeared basically everywhere, and he is the only Beverage Alcohol Resource certification holder in the area. I don’t even know what that means, but I’m impressed. Sitting next to Kilgore at a cocktail competition is like a pony sharing a stall with Secretariat. It’s like a Little League player facing Nolan Ryan. It’s like playing one-on-one with Michael Jordan. And yes, I know all of my references are at least 30 years old, but Kilgore’s knowledge of cocktails is so intimidating that it made me feel like a boy drinking next to a man. (I’m just going to go with the idea that I was a boy 30 years ago. Don’t do the math.) Our two fellow judges were

no slouches, either. Mark Soifer is the St. Louis chapter leader of the United States Bartenders’ Guild, and Allyson Mace is cofounder and publisher of Sauce Magazine. On the other hand, I was introduced as not only being the food writer for the PostDispatch but also a “bourbon enthusiast.” I like that. I think I want it on my tombstone. With so much on the line, we judges took our jobs seriously. Each cocktail was given a score based on its appearance, its aroma, its creativity and its taste. We only had a few sips from each drink, which was kind of a waste, but you can see the logic behind it. The base spirit for each cocktail was Rebel Yell Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, which is made by the sponsor, Please see NEMAN, Page L5

DOS REYES SHARES ITS RECIPE FOR GUACAMOLE. PAGE L3 GET YOUR GRILL READY FOR SUMMER WITH OUR TIPS. PAGE L4 LET’S EAT

1 1


ON OUR RADAR

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

DANIEL NEMAN food writer dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES

Italian malvasia and gargenega

Palo Popcorn Hot White Cheddar

BY GAIL APPLESON • SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

When you think about white wine from Italy, pinot grigio is probably the first name that comes to mind. But Italy produces many other grape varieties that are used to make interesting and delicious whites. For example, malvasia is one of the country’s most widely planted grapes that’s often added to both white and red wines to enhance body and flavor. A blend of malvasia and chardonnay is reviewed below along with a white wine made from another popular Italian grape, gargenega.

Contrade 2017 Malvasia Chardonnay, Puglia IGT, Italy Bought • Grapevine Wines, 309 South Kirkwood Road, in May for $9.99 Description • Contrade is a brand launched in 2015 by the Falvo family, owners of Masseria Li Veli winery in Puglia. The aim was to produce high-quality wines with value pricing and at the same time, raise awareness of indigenous grape varieties. Made from 90 percent malvasia and 10 percent chardonnay, this is a light-bodied, easy-to-drink white that’s fine for everyday drinking. It’s a simple, soft and fruity wine that ends with a lemony finish. It can be enjoyed as an aperitif wine or with light fare.

Monte Del Frà 2017 ‘ega, Veronese IGT, Italy

You can do spicy popcorn wrong (as a bunch of us learned recently) or you can do it very, very right. Palo Popcorn’s Hot White Cheddar snack is alarmingly addictive. The cheddar flavor helps a lot, but the real secret is Hot Charlie’s Hot Sauce Dust, which is made by Oakville’s own Charlie Backer. It’s pleasingly hot, if you like it hot, but watch out — it’s hard not to eat the whole bag in one sitting. Size • 7 ounces Price • $3.79 Available • Dierbergs, some Schnucks, Oakville Butcher Block, Beef Jerky Outlet, Saucy-One, Paddy O’s, Cotton’s Ace Hardware of Affton

Bought • Grapevine Wines, 309 South Kirkwood Road, in May for $12.99

— Daniel Neman

Description • If you like Soave wines, give this crisp white a try. It’s made from 100 percent garganega, which is also the dominant grape variety in Soave. This aromatic white comes from the Monte del Frà winery, located in the village of Custoza near Verona. Dry and well-balanced, this is a zesty, refreshing white that has a mouth-filling texture. It has more character, complexity and finesse than the Contrade blend. Light- to medium-bodied, it would go well with appetizers, pasta, seafood and fish.

PREP SCHOOL

French 75 cocktail Cleverly named for a particularly lethal gun in World War I, the French 75 is a sparkling (in all senses of the word) and delightful cocktail, especially in the summer. In a favorite Prep School video, Daniel Neman shows how to make one. stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

Inside-Out Tacos Yield: 4 servings 1 tablespoon chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon sweet paprika ½ teaspoon dried oregano ½ teaspoon granulated garlic (aka garlic powder) ¼ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon onion powder 1/8 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper, plus more as needed 1 tablespoon extravirgin olive oil 12 ounces lean ground beef (93 percent lean or higher)

TOM MCCORKLE, THE WASHINGTON POST

Turn your taco inside out BY ELLIE KRIEGER

Special to The Washington Post

I have a soft spot in my heart for hard-shell tacos. It’s partly thanks to joyful childhood memories of meals whipped up from those boxed kits, but it’s also because they taste lipsmackingly good with their warm, spiced meat; crisp, cool vegetables and crunchy, fried shells. These days, taco night at home takes as many forms as there are Tuesdays in a year, from fish with slaw on soft wholewheat tortillas to sliced steak with charred poblano peppers on fresh corn tortillas. When I hanker for the crunch of those retro ground-beef tacos, I make them, but I ditch the box and give mine a healthy update by turning them inside

Sinfully rich brownies for real chocolate lovers

out. I make lettuce leaves the shells to be piled with fillings and use crunchy tortilla chips as one of the toppings. This essentially flips the ratio of vegetables to fried tortillas from the original and makes the whole meal lighter and more healthful while keeping all the right textures and flavors in place. I also stir black beans into the spiced meat to introduce some plant protein. (You could use ground turkey or another can of beans instead of the beef, if you prefer.) Fill the lettuce cups with the fragrant meat and beans, top with chopped tomatoes, shredded cheddar, pickled jalapeños, a fresh spray of cilantro and a sprinkle of crunchy chips for a meal that will take you back to you childhood but also make you glad you’re all grown up.

1 (15-ounce) can no-salt-added black beans, drained and rinsed ½ cup water 24 large leaves of gem lettuce or hearts of romaine (about 3 heads) 2 medium tomatoes, cut into small dice 2 ounces (½ cup) shredded sharp cheddar cheese ¼ to 1/3 cup chopped pickled jalapeño peppers (jarred) 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves 2 ounces (1 cup) crushed tortilla chips

1. Whisk together the chili powder, cumin, paprika, oregano, garlic, salt, onion powder and cayenne pepper in a small bowl. 2. Heat the oil until shimmering in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the ground beef and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring and breaking it up with the spoon until no pink remains. Add the beans and the chili powder mixture; cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the water and cook, stirring, for 1 minute, until the liquid is mostly absorbed. 3. Place the spiced meat mixture and each of the remaining ingredients in separate serving dishes, and put them out on the table so diners can build their own tacos. To assemble, place about 2 tablespoons of the meat mixture into each lettuce leaf. 4. Garnish with tomatoes, cheese, pickled jalapeños, cilantro and some crushed tortilla chips. Per serving (using ¼ cup pickled jalapeños): 470 calories; 35g protein; 46g carbohydrates; 19g fat; 6g saturated fat; 70mg cholesterol; 560mg sodium; 17g dietary fiber; 7g sugar From nutritionist and cookbook author Ellie Krieger.

Fudgy Brownies Yield: 36 servings

5 ounces bittersweet or semisweet chocolate, chopped 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped BY AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN 8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 4 pieces Brownies are controversial territory to chart: Some like them cakey and light in 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa 7/8 powder flavor — more of a snack than a rich dessert; some like them moist and chewy; 1 ¼ cups granulated sugar and others, the biggest chocoholics, like 3 large eggs them to be purely decadent — almost as 2 teaspoons vanilla extract dense as fudge and deliciously dark. ½ teaspoon salt We wanted to make sinfully rich 1 cup (5 ounces) all-purpose flour CARL TREMBLAY, AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN brownies that would be a chocolate lover’s dream, so we started by using 1. Adjust oven rack to middle position, and heat oven to 350 degrees. Make a foil sling three forms of chocolate: unsweetened for an 8-inch square baking pan by folding 2 long sheets of aluminum foil so each is 8 chocolate for intensity, cocoa powinches wide. Lay sheets of foil in pan perpendicular to each other, with extra foil hanging der for complexity and bittersweet or over edges of pan. Push foil into corners and up sides of pan, smoothing foil flush to pan. semisweet chocolate for moisture and Grease foil. well-rounded flavor. Melting butter 2. Microwave bittersweet and unsweetened chocolates in bowl at 50 percent power for 2 along with the chocolate was the key to a minutes. Stir in butter and continue to microwave, stirring often, until melted. Whisk in fudgy texture, and a generous three eggs cocoa and let mixture cool slightly. contributed richness and structure. In 3. Whisk sugar, eggs, vanilla and salt in a large bowl until combined. Whisk chocolate addition to providing a clean sweetness, mixture into sugar mixture until smooth. Using a rubber spatula, stir in flour until no dry granulated sugar gave the baked brown- streaks remain. Transfer batter to prepared pan and smooth top. Bake until toothpick ies a delicate, shiny, crackly top crust. inserted in center comes out with few moist crumbs attached, 35 to 40 minutes, rotating We found it best to cut these brownies pan halfway through baking. into small bites rather than big bake-sale 4. Let brownies cool completely in pan on wire rack, about 2 hours. Using foil overhang, squares — a little goes a long way. Tastremove brownies from pan. (Uncut brownies can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.) Cut into ers preferred the more complex flavor 36 squares before serving. of bittersweet chocolate over semisweet Per serving: 98 calories; 5g fat; 25mg cholesterol; 38mg sodium; 12g carbohydrate; 1g chocolate. fiber; 8g sugar; 2g protein.

CRISTINA M. FLETES, POST-DISPATCH

WHAT’S FRESH

Spring greens, fresh herbs and carrots This week at area farmers markets you’ll find strawberries, asparagus, locally foraged and grown mushrooms, radishes, lettuce, spring mix greens, spinach, kale, carrots, chard and fresh herbs such as cilantro, dill, rosemary and basil. To use the green onions, kale, cilantro and radishes you’ll find at the market, see this recipe from last year’s Let’s Eat section for Vegetable Spring Rolls. Information provided by the Lake Saint Louis Farmers and Artists Market.

Vegetable Spring Rolls Yield: 12 servings 1 cup plain yogurt Zest and juice from 1 lemon Sea salt, to taste 6 to 8 leaves lacinato (or Tuscan) kale 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 12 spring roll wrappers 1 cup hummus 1 kohlrabi, peeled and julienned 1 watermelon radish, peeled and julienned 2 tablespoons Egyptian dukkah spice blend, plus more as needed 4 green onions, thinly sliced ¾ cup cilantro or mint leaves 1 daikon radish, peeled and julienned 4 red radishes, julienned 3 small (or 1 medium) beets, peeled and julienned Freshly ground black pepper, to taste Toasted black sesame seeds Note: If kohlrabi or watermelon radishes are unavailable, substitute with an equal amount of prepared broccoli slaw mix, jicama or chayote squash. 1. In a small bowl, combine the yogurt, lemon zest, lemon juice and a pinch of salt. Stir to combine, then cover and refrigerate. 2. Trim the stems from the kale leaves and cut the leaves into 4-inch squares (you will need 12 total). Transfer the kale to a large resealable bag and add the olive oil and a pinch of salt. Seal the bag and gently massage the leaves to tenderize the kale. 3. Fill a large shallow bowl with warm water. One at a time, dip the spring roll wrappers into the water and soak until just pliable, about 10 seconds. Remove from the water and lay on a clean work surface and blot the wrap to remove any excess water. 4. Starting at about 1 inch from the lower edge, place a square of the massaged kale, then spread about 1 tablespoon of hummus across the kale. Top with a thin layer of kohlrabi and watermelon radish. Sprinkle with about ½ teaspoon of dukkah, about 1 tablespoon of green onion, and about 1 tablespoon of herbs. Top with a layer of daikon, red radish and beet, then season with additional dukkah or salt and pepper, to taste. 5. Dampen your fingertips. Carefully, but firmly, pull the lower edge of the wrap up and over the filling to start the roll. After the first full rotation, fold in each side of the wrap to close in the ends and continue to roll closed, ending with the seam-side down. 6. Transfer the completed roll to a platter, and then continue to form 12 rolls. Do not stack the finished rolls, as they will stick together if touching. Cover the finished rolls with lightly oiled parchment paper and refrigerate until ready to serve. 7. To serve the spring rolls, use a very sharp knife to cut each roll in half. Drizzle with the reserved lemon yogurt sauce and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Per serving: 193 calories; 6g fat; 6mg cholesterol; 399mg sodium; 32g carbohydrate; 10g fiber; 9g sugar; 5g protein.


LET’S EAT

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • L3

SPECIAL REQUEST

Guacamole at Dos Reyes is light and flavorful BY PAT EBY

Special to the Post-Dispatch

Q • I’d like to have the recipe for the guacamole at Dos Reyes Mexican Restaurant. It’s creamy, delicious and great with their fresh tortilla chips. — David Loeb, St.Louis A • The guacamole at Dos Reyes Mexican Restaurant is exceptional for its fresh, light flavors of avocado, lemon, diced tomato and chopped cilantro with a touch of heat from a jalapeno. Chef Mauricio Garnica tops it with minced fresh onion, corn kernels and crumbled queso fresco. The garnishes have great eye appeal, plus they add pops of flavor and texture as well. “Guacamole is popular in every restaurant in Mexico. The funny thing is, in Mexico we use it on plates, on the side, to add to tacos, steak and fajitas. In the United States, it is served like a dip for chips. When my mother made guacamole, we never had chips on the table,” Garnica says. “If you go to an American tourist area in Mexico, you can ask for salsa and chips, but it’s not a Mexican standard.” Garnica and his partner Jorge Salazar first met in a food safety certification class. Garnica was working as an assistant manager and baker at Companion Cafe in Clayton. Salazar managed the kitchen at Three Kings restaurant on Delmar. When Companion Cafe closed, Garnica went to work with Salazar at Three Kings. The two men realized they shared a common dream to own a Mexican restaurant serving the traditional foods with the fresh food and flavors they grew up with in Mexico. In 2017, they realized their dream and opened as One Way Cafe and Bar. Within six months, they changed the cafe’s name to Dos Reyes

Dos Reyes Mexican Restaurant 5912 Hampton Avenue 314-833-5550; search for it on facebook.com

To request recipe Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@postdispatch.com.

Mexican Restaurant. “We realized our name didn’t reflect our food,” Garnica says. Dos Reyes translates to two kings, Garnica and Salazar, working together to bring authentic Mexican flavors to their restaurant. “Everything is made fresh in our kitchen,” Garnica says. The most popular dishes in the summer are the enchiladas and street tacos, which guests usually enjoy on the covered patio that fronts on Hampton Avenue. Fajitas remain a popular dish year round, but peak in the cool months. “We’ve just begun serving them on skillets,” Garnica says. “In Mexico, we ate them on plates, but our customers wanted the skillets.” The enchiladas, burritos and tacos all feature slow-cooked and roasted meats cooked in house. They also serve a selection of Mexican sandwiches, called tortas, that are big enough to share. Try these with another customer favorite, the Mexican Street Corn Dip, which was a Special Request last year.

PAT EBY

Dos Reyes Mexican Restaurant House-Made Guacamole Yield: ¾ to 1 ¼ cups guacamole 1 small tomato 1 small fresh jalapeno, about 2 inches long Leaves only of one large sprig of cilantro; no stems Juice of ½ large lemon 2 medium Haas ripe avocados A pinch of salt

¼ teaspoon garlic powder ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon minced onion 1 ½ tablespoons crumbled queso fresco 1 tablespoon corn kernels, fresh or frozen, and lightly steamed

Notes: Buy avocados with unblemished skins and no soft spots and ripen before use. To tell if it is ripe, hold the fruit and apply a slight pressure. If it yields to gentle pressure, it is probably ripe. Check the stem of the avocado. If the stem holds fast, it’s not ripe. If the stem pulls away easily but the spot underneath is brown or discolored, there may be brown spots inside. If the stem pulls away with slight pressure to uncover a green spot, it’s probably ripe. • Queso fresco is a Mexican cheese made from cow milk or from a combination of cow and goat milk. It has a crumbly texture with a fresh, bright, milky flavor that sets off the taste and creaminess of the guacamole. 1. Rinse, then core and chop the tomato into a small dice, about ¼-inch. 2. Use gloves to handle the jalapeno. Rinse under cool water, chop off the stem end and cut in half lengthwise. Dos Reyes leaves the seeds and ribs in the pepper. They can be removed if desired. Cut the peppers in a 1/8-inch dice and combine with the tomatoes. 3. Chop the cilantro leaves and set aside 4. Roll the lemon on the counter to break the cells for juicing, then cut in half horizontally. Use a reamer or a lemon press to juice. An alternate method if you don’t have the tools is to hold the lemon half in the palm of the hand, then insert the tines of a fork into the segments and twist to break more of the juice cells and squeeze into a small dish. Remove all seeds. 5. Using a sharp knife, make a lengthwise cut in the avocado from the top until the knife hits the seed. Rotate the avocado, keeping the knife close to the pit, from top to bottom. Rotate the avocado a quarter turn and cut again, top to bottom. 6. Gently pull the avocado away from the pit. When one quarter remains attached to the pit, remove it carefully with fingers. 7. Peel the skin from the flesh and roughly chop it into large pieces. Place in a small deep bowl. 8. Add the chopped cilantro, diced tomatoes, diced jalapenos and lemon juice, salt and garlic powder. Stir with a fork to blend, pressing down gently a few times to mash part of the avocado. Some chunks should remain. Don’t over mix. 9. Gently stir in the pepper last. 10. Place in a small deep bowl. Sprinkle with minced onion, crumbled queso and corn kernels. 11. Serve as an addition to top enchiladas, burritos or tacos. Use as a small side salad, or serve with tortilla chips as a dip. Per serving (based on 4): 134 calories; 11g fat; 2g saturated fat; 2mg cholesterol; 2g protein; 9g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; 5g fiber; 611mg sodium; 31mg calcium

When fresh peas season hits, be sure to grab them Plenty of Peas With Butter and Herbs

BY JEANMARIE BROWNSON

Chicago Tribune (TNS)

Now is the time to embrace the emerald green wonders of spring: Sweet peas. Fresh, sweet green peas are one of the few vegetables found only in their brief season. Beyond spring, fresh pod peas (aka shelling peas or English peas) barely exist. For a few brief spring weeks, fresh shelling peas grace the bins at farmers markets and produce stands ready for shucking. If you’ve not cooked fresh peas, know that their sweetness and deep, green vegetable flavor are like none other. Like sweet corn, the natural sugars in the peas change as they age — even day-old peas have a different sweetness than fresh picked. If you’re into it, buy both and cook them side by side. You’ll taste the difference. Shucking peas sounds like a romantic job best done on the porch rocking chair. True, but shucking during a Netflix marathon works, too. Simply hold the pea pod with the seam toward you and pop it open at the end opposite where it was attached to the vine. Use your fingertip to dislodge the peas into a bowl. It takes nearly 1 ½ pounds of peas in the pod to yield a cup of shelled peas. I must confess that I am a fan of the containers of shucked peas some market vendors sell — super timesaving. I can toss them in my weekend post-farmers market omelet, or have a fresh green vegetable on the table in less than 5 minutes. That is, if I don’t munch on them all in their raw state of spring

Yield: 4 to 6 servings 1 ½ cups (6 ounces) fresh snow peas, trimmed of their strings, cut crosswise in half or thirds 2 cups (6 ounces) small sugar snap peas, trimmed of their strings, optional

Spring pea and poblano soup can be served hot or cold. goodness. No shucking required for spring’s other pea offerings: Snow peas and sugar snaps. Snow peas, aka Chinese peas, are flat, pale green and picked and eaten before the peas inside plump. Sugar snaps likewise, are consumed pod, pea and all. Both are much beloved for their crunch and readily available in small bags in most grocery stores. Do scoop them up when they appear at the farmers market — they have a superior crunch and sweetness to their packaged brethren. Except for the very

smallest snow peas and sugar snap peas, you’ll need to string this type of pea. Simply hold the pea at the end that was connected to the vine and pull down to remove the string. The effort pays off when the peas are eaten raw as a snack or sauteed or steamed as a vegetable side. We tuck more pea flavor into salads and stir fries with fresh pea shoots (aka pea greens). The tender shoots come from a cultivar of snow peas and are used widely in Chinese cooking. Due to their popularity with chefs, fresh

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2 cups (about 10 ounces) freshly shucked green peas (English peas) 3 to 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill Maldon sea salt to taste

Note: You’ll need about 3 pounds peas in the pod to yield 2 cups shucked peas. Variations on this simple recipe include swapping out the butter for extra-virgin olive oil and/or changing the fresh dill to fresh basil. Caramelized sliced onions or pearl onions are gorgeous added to the cooked and buttered peas. 1. Heat a medium saucepan filled with salted water to a boil. Add the snow peas and the sugar snap peas. Cook, 1 minute. Add the shucked peas. Cook just until the peas turn bright green and lose a touch of their crunch, 1 ½ to 2 minutes more. Drain well; return to the pan. 2. Add half of the butter to the pan; swirl to melt it into the peas. Stir in the chives, dill and a pinch or two of salt. Top with remaining butter. Serve right away. Per serving (based on 6): 113 calories; 6g fat; 4g saturated ABEL URIBE, CHICAGO TRIBUNE fat; 15mg cholesterol; 11g carbohydrates; 5g sugar; 4g protein; 118mg sodium; 4g fiber pea shoots now appear at farmers markets and specialty stores in addition to Asian markets. I buy pea shoots, which are extremely fragile, the day I plan to cook them — if kept dry and refrigerated they can last a day or two at most. I like to use small, delicate-tasting leaves and tendrils in salads and as a garnish. If the shoots sport large leaves and thickish stems, saute them in olive oil — they wilt like spinach — for about a minute. Life is good when I have all the pea options before me — so I cook them together and season them lightly with spring herbs, plenty of sweet butter and coarse salt. Peas in abundance mean a simple soup enhanced with the dark green flavors (and occasionally some heat) from a poblano chile. Serve the soup hot with fresh cheese or cold with hot pepper sauce. Of course, frozen peas can stand in for all the fresh peas in these recipes.

Pea and Poblano Soup With Queso Fresco Yield: 4 servings 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium poblano chile, cored, seeded, diced 1 medium (6 ounces) red potato, peeled, diced ½ small yellow onion, finely chopped, about ½ cup 2 cups (about 10 ounces) freshly shucked small green peas (English peas)

3 cups vegetable or chicken broth 2 to 4 tablespoons unsweetened coconut milk or heavy (whipping) cream ¼ teaspoon salt For the garnish ½ cup crumbled queso fresco, farmers cheese or feta 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro

1. Heat oil in medium saucepan over medium heat until hot. Add poblano, potato and onion. Saute until onion is forktender, about 5 minutes. 2. Stir in broth; simmer, covered, 15 minutes. Stir in peas; simmer, uncovered, stirring often, 3 minutes. Puree soup as smooth as you like with an immersion blender (or in small batches in a loosely covered blender and then return soup to saucepan). 3. Heat soup to a simmer. Stir in coconut milk or cream to taste. Season with salt. Serve in small bowls topped with crumbled cheese and cilantro. Or cool to room temperature, then refrigerate until chilled. Serve cold, with the garnishes. Per serving: 229 calories; 11g fat; 3g saturated fat; 11mg cholesterol; 26g carbohydrates; 8g sugar; 8g protein; 546mg sodium; 6g fiber


L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Ready, set, grill A guide to outdoor cooking BY ELIZABETH KARMEL, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

I

hear the siren call of the grill year-round, but in spring and summer it seems like everyone wants to get outside and cook. I love grilling for these reasons: The convection heat of an outdoor grill provides texture and flavor to vegetables, fruit, meat and fish. During cooking, extra fat renders and drips away from the food, so grilling can be healthful to boot. I say it’s the best way to cook, bar none. This guide from the Washington Post and America’s Test Kitchen lays out the basic tools and techniques for success, including some of my favorite food-preparation tips. Chances are, you own or have access to a gas grill, so this guide is primarily geared toward that. But you’ll find that much of the information applies for charcoal grillers, as well.

PHOTOS BY TOM MCCORKLE, THE WASHINGTON POST

Use direct heat — the food is directly over the heat source — when the food takes less than 20 minutes to cook. Use indirect heat when your food takes longer than 20 minutes to cook.

Using direct vs. indirect heat Use direct heat — the food is directly over the heat source — when the food takes less than 20 minutes to cook. Examples: sliced vegetables, shrimp, burgers, hot dogs, cooked sausage and boneless, skinless chicken breasts. For charcoal grillers: Spread a layer of gray-ashed charcoal evenly across the charcoal grate. Heavy-duty mitts are helpful when grilling. Use indirect heat — the heat is on either side of the food, with the burners under the food turned off — when your food takes longer than 20 minutes to cook. Examples: bone-in chicken pieces, roasts, fresh sausages, whole chickens and turkeys. For charcoal grillers: Build two piles of white-ash charcoal on either side of a disposable drip pan. You don’t have to spend a lot for a basic tool kit, whose items The exception to these rules is delicate foods such as fish fillets, which call for indirect-heat grilling because it is gentler and more forgiving. are widely available: Once you master these two methods, you can use a combination of them to up your game: Sear a large piece of food over di• Two pairs of long-handled, locking tongs (for raw and rect heat before finishing it over indirect. This works well for most steaks, chops and roasts. It is also how you “reverse sear,” cooked foods). Use red tape to label one pair for raw foods and green tape to label the other pair for cooked foods. This starting with indirect heat and then searing a steak or chop over direct heat at the end of the cooking time. helps prevent cross-contamination. • Instant-read thermometer, to make sure the interior of the food is properly cooked. • Oven/grill thermometer for grills that don’t have an inset or Vegetables headed for the grill should be cleaned and cut in working thermometer. slices that won’t fall through the grates, about ½-inch thick. • Heavy-duty mitts (preferably long) to protect your hands and forearms as you baste and turn hot food on the hot grill. Recommended for direct-heat grilling: asparagus, bell peppers, squash, zucchini, eggplant, corn in the husk, scal• Long-handled lighter to ease fire ignition in hard-to-reach lions and onions; also large strawberries, melon and bananas gas grills and for lighting fire starters. • Heatproof tray, such as rimmed baking sheet, for carrying/ (in their peels). To be grilled over indirect heat: firm, whole vegetables gathering your supplies. • Silicone bristle basting brush for sauces applied at the end such as potatoes, carrots, heads of garlic, artichokes, large mushrooms such as portobellos. Prep them with the grilling of the cooking time. trilogy; also, whole fruit including apples, pears, peaches, • Resealable zip-top bags for oiling and pre-prepping your apricots, etc. Many of these will benefit by a short amount food. • Heavy-duty aluminum foil for cleaning the grill (crumple up, of time directly over the heat to get grill marks but will be primarily cooked with indirect heat. (Technically, that would hold by tongs). be a next-level, combination method.) For great grill marks, For charcoal grillers: place your (direct-heat) food across the grates from left to • Chimney starter for lighting charcoal briquettes or lump right. I cut squash and zucchini lengthwise and place them charcoal. across the grates. • Fire starters: nontoxic, odorless cubes that make lighting For fish and seafood: I almost always use indirect heat, charcoal a breeze. and that includes grilling whole fish, large shellfish, lobster and crabs. Sticking to the grate is a common problem when you’re cooking fish on the grill, so here are a couple ways to avoid it. Place your fish on cedar planks; I do almost every time I grill fish. It works exceptionally well and makes a rustic presentation. Exceptions to my indirect-heat rule include firm seafood steaks such as tuna, swordfish and small shellfish and bivalves (in the shell) such as shrimp, oysters, clams and mussels that are best grilled over direct heat. Burgers: To make really good beef burgers, start with a custom blend. Cuts to choose from include brisket, chuck, Vegetables headed for the grill should be cleaned and cut in sirloin, short rib, hanger steak, aged rib-eye trimmings. Keep slices that won’t fall through the grates. the mix free of filler add-ins (bread crumbs, eggs), don’t over-work the meat, use a light hand to shape the patties and season them lightly just before grilling. They may not look perfect, but don’t worry, they’ll taste perfect. When you shape the patties, place your thumb at the center and press down; this divot will keep your burgers from moundPreheating is a must. For a charcoal grillers, you want to ing as they cook — I call it swollen-belly syndrome. build a fire in a chimney starter and let the flames burn until all the briquettes or lump charcoal are covered with a whitegray ash.

Getting started

Prepping the favorites

Cleaning, the last word

Preheating This is a must, and the first step in cleaning the grill. Think of it as a sterilization process. For gas grillers: Turn all gas-grill burners on high, so the grill reaches its maximum temperature for 10 minutes. Next, crumple up foil into a ball about the size of an orange, hold it with your long-handled tongs and use it to clean the grill grates; or use a special, sturdy metal-bristle brush you trust. Then, reduce the temperature you need for cooking. For a charcoal grillers: You want to build a fire in a chimney starter and let the flames burn until all the briquettes or lump charcoal are covered with a white-gray ash. Pour them onto the charcoal grate and put the lid on the grill, making sure the air vents are open all the way. Keep the lid on the grill for five minutes, then clean the grill grates and start Use crumpled up heavy-duty aluminum foil held by tongs to cooking. You may need to adjust the lid vents to reduce the clean your grill. temperature.

Always brush hot cooking grates after you cook. Repeat that same step you used to preheat the grill: Crank up the heat to high and let it go for 10 minutes, then brush. These two steps will keep the cleaning easy. If you have a lot of residue left from your last grilling session, let it run for 30 to 40 minutes — or until everything on the grates has turned to a whitegray ash. For charcoal grillers: Light the coals and let them burn with the lid on the grill until you can brush the grates clean. Once a year, clean the inside of the grill with warm, soapy water — no abrasives. Make sure you rinse the grill well and let it preheat with all burners on high for 30 to 40 minutes to burn off any residue. And although most grill grates are dishwasher-safe, I don’t go that route, because it strips the grates of all their seasoning — the “good stuff.” Now you are ready to get outside and get grilling.

Season simply, with the trilogy Oil: Extra-virgin olive oil prevents sticking, keeps foods juicy and promotes caramelization/grill marks. But note: Oil the food, not the grill grate. Why? Because the oil on a preheating grate will start to burn and become tacky. Your food won’t stick when it is brushed all over with a thin coat of olive oil and placed on a clean cooking grate. Also, the coating will act as a barrier, preventing natural juices/water in the food from turning into steam and evaporating. That means your food won’t dry out before it’s done. Bag it: My bag trick will save time, coat your food sparingly and evenly, and keep your hands grease-free. It is also a handy and sanitary way to carry food to the grill. Here’s what to do: Place your prepped food in a resealable zip-top bag and pour in a little olive oil. Seal and massage the food through the bag to give it a thin, all-over coating. Keep the bag refrigerated until you’re ready to cook. Seasoning: Salt brings out the flavor in just about anything. Season your food with salt after you have coated it with the oil and just before it goes on the grill, otherwise the salt will draw the juices to the surface. Start with a pinch; there is a fine line between just right and too much. It’s easy to add but almost impossible to subtract. Pepper is not quite as essential as the first two items in this trilogy, but I am a fan of black pepper for grilling. A coarse or flaky “butcher grind” is preferable, because it will not bring as much heat to your food as a finely ground pepper (dust).

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LET’S EAT

05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • L5

Foul Mudammas Yield: 4 servings ½ lemon, juiced Salt and pepper 1 small tomato, diced 2 tablespoons flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped Pita, for serving

1 (14-ounce) can fava beans 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 tablespoons chopped red onion 1 garlic clove, crushed ¼ teaspoon cumin 1 tablespoon tahini ¾ cup water

1. Drain and rinse beans. Remove skins by gently pinching the beans; the skins will slide right off. Discard skins. 2. Put 1 tablespoon of the oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. When it begins to shimmer, add onion. Sauté until softened, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and cook 30 seconds. Stir in beans, cumin, tahini, the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil and water. Cover and simmer until beans are heated through, about 7 minutes. If pan starts to get dry, add a little more water. 3. Add lemon juice and cook uncovered 1 minute. Taste and season liberally with salt and pepper. Remove crushed garlic clove, if possible. Serve topped with diced tomato and chopped parsley, with pita to scoop it all up. Per serving (not including pita): 162 calories; 9g fat; 1g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 7g protein; 15g carbohydrate; 1g sugar; 4g fiber; 1,037mg sodium; 42mg calcium HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH Recipe by Daniel Neman

Mudammas From L1

So I decided to make this street food the Egyptian way, with fava beans and relatively few frills to get in the way of pure dining enjoyment. Naturally, I decided to start by soaking dried fava beans overnight, and then beginning the long and somewhat painful process of peeling the tough outer skins. Just for the sake of scientific comparison, I made another batch using a can of fava beans. Ordinarily, I am of the firm opinion that cooking the natural, unprocessed way is always best. And the foul mudammas I made with the dried beans was excellent. But I have to tell you, the ratio of effort to flavor makes the dried beans the less attractive way to go. This was especially true because the bag of dried large beans I bought was actually a mixture of both large and small beans, which means they took different amounts of time to cook. Some ended up overcooked while others were undercooked. I had to throw out the undercooked beans. The canned beans, on the other hand, were fast and easy to deal with — though you still have to cook them for about 10 minutes to get them just the right texture. And I still had to peel the beans, but it was much easier (and kinder to my fingertips) than peeling the dried beans after they had soaked for hours. And the taste? When mixed with garlic, olive oil, cumin, red onion, lemon juice and more, they were sublime. To be perfectly honest, the canned beans tasted better than the dried ones. But wait, as they used to say on cheesy commercials, there’s more! Foul mudammas is traditionally eaten with pieces of pita used to scoop up the beans and convey them to your mouth. Pita is obviously available at the store. Or you can make your own. And here is where the flavor-to-effort ratio kicks into high gear. Because store-bought pita is fine. It’s all right. But it doesn’t have half the flavor of homemade. Pita seems like it would be tricky to make, but it isn’t. It is actually one of the easiest breads, even with that mystical pocket in the middle. The pocket is formed by steam created when the dough heats, but I don’t really understand how it works beyond that. What I do know is that the secret to making the pocket is to roll the dough out thin, about 3/16 of an inch. That’s the width of a yardstick they used to hand out at hardware stores, back when there were hardware stores. Pita isn’t just easy to make, it is also fast. It only requires 20 minutes to rise, and 6 minutes to knead. For that matter, it takes less than 8 minutes to bake. And yet, the flavor is more lively than the storebought disks. It’s more complex, too, and deeper. Tear off a hunk of warm, fresh-made pita, wrap it around some foul mudammas, and you’ll feel like you’re at a food stall on the crowded streets of Cairo. And do you know what? The guy who made it there probably didn’t soak the dried fava beans, either.

Pita DANIEL NEMAN, POST-DISPATCH

Yield: 8 servings

Naomi Roquet’s Millions of Peaches cocktail won the first Lux Row Distillers’ Bourbon Battle semifinal on May 14. The drink combines Rebel Yell bourbon, Benedictine, Giffard Crème de Pêche (peach liqueur) and Fernet Branca.

2¼ teaspoons (1 package) active dry yeast (not fast-rising) 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup hot water, 120 to 130 degrees

2½ cups bread flour, approximately 2 teaspoons salt 1 tablespoon granulated sugar

Neman

well-balanced concoction blending Rebel Yell bourbon with Giffard Crème From L1 de Pêche (peach liqueur), Benedictine (to bring out Lux Row Distillery (their parent company, Luxco, is the honeyed notes in the bourbon) and just a splash located in St. Louis). Many of the competitors of the bitter Fernet Branca, served over hand-crushed added fruit juices to their bourbon, and nearly every- ice and garnished with plenty of mint. Roquet one tempered the added sweetness with some form said she was delighted to win and looks forward to of bitter liqueur, such as competing in the finals in Campari or an Amaro. September. Meanwhile, Two of the competitors took advantage of the the very day I wrote this I was invited to be a judge classic combination of at an upcoming cocktail peach and bourbon, and one of them was voted the competition in Clayton. I like where this trend is winner. Naomi Roquet of Reeds American Table won going. with her drink called Millions of Peaches. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter This winning drink dneman@post-dispatch.com was an exceptionally

1. Measure 1 cup of the flour into the bowl of a stand mixer or other large mixing bowl. Stir in the salt, sugar and yeast. Add the oil and hot water, and blend with a paddle attachment at low speed for 30 seconds before increasing to high for 3 minutes, or beat vigorously with a wooden spoon for 3½ minutes. Stir in the rest of the flour, ½ cup at a time. The dough should be a shaggy mass that will clear the sides of the bowl. If the dough is moist, add a small amount of additional flour. 2. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and knead for 6 minutes, or use a dough hook in the mixer for 6 minutes. The dough should be soft and slightly sticky; if it is too sticky, add a little more flour as you knead. 3. Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Divide the dough into 8 pieces. Roll into balls, cover with a towel or waxed paper, and let rest for 20 minutes. 4. With the palm of your hand, flatten each ball into a disk. Finish with a rolling pin, flattening the dough into a disk about 6 inches in diameter and 3/16 inches thick. Their thinness is more important than making them perfectly round; irregularity adds charm. Place each piece on a 7-inch square piece of aluminum foil; this will help them puff. 5. Place 2 or 3 of the breads with the foil directly on the oven rack. Bake for 7 to 8 minutes, or until they are puffed. Repeat with the remaining disks. 6. Remove the breads from the oven and wrap in a large piece of foil. The tops will fall and there will be a pocket in the center. Serve warm, or let cool and freeze. Thaw before using. To reheat, stack several in a pile, wrap with foil and place in a 375-degree oven for 10 to 15 minutes. Per serving: 194 calories; 4g fat; 1g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 6g protein; 33g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; 1g fiber; 584mg sodium; 8mg calcium Adapted from “Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads,” by Bernard Clayton

Serving St. Louis for over 100 years

Store Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9am-8pm Sun. 9am-5:30pm Vincent’s 12TH Street Market

OPEN Memorial Day till 3pm

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$ 59

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2

Turkey Bacon

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$ 49

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GROCERIES/HEALTH FOOD

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629 $ 29 Roast Beef ..................... 6 $ 99 Provel ............................ 5 $ 49 Muenster........................ 6 $ 99 Chicken Salad ................. 4 Turkey Breast....................

$

lb. lb. lb. lb. lb.

PRODUCE Fresh

4/$1 White $ Mushrooms .................. 2/ 3 Iceberg ¢ Lettuce ............................ 99 Jumbo ¢ Yellow Onion ................... 49 Lemons........................ 8 oz. pkg.

hd.

lb.

FROZEN FOODS Blue Bunny

5 Grown In Idaho $ Fries ........................... 2/ 5 $

28 oz. var.

DAIRY Kraft

American Singles .............. 2/

5 Philly $ Cream Cheese.................. 2/ 4 12 oz. pkg.

$

8 oz. bar

6 oz. pkg.

BEER Michigan

9 $ 99 New Belgium Ranger ........... 8 Belleville $ 99 Bunny ¢ Main Street ................ 15 Buns................................ 99 Mexico $ 99 Urbana ......................... 8 Kraft ¢ BBQ Sauce ....................... 99 WINE Hunt's ¢ Collevento Ketchup Sqz. ................... 99 Pinot Grigio.............. $1099 Gatorade Valdichiana $ Thirst Quencher ............ 10/ 10 Bianco ......................... $699 Hoopla Bush's $ 99 $ 99 Cabernet .................. 21 Baked Beans ................. 1 Enrique Foster Kraft $ 99 $ Salad Dressing .............2/ 5 Malbec......................... 9 Kraft SPIRITS $ Deluxe Mac & Cheese .............2/ 7 Lady Bligh $ 99 Pringles Spice Rum...................... 7 $ Chips .............................2/ 3 SODA HY•TOP $ 99 Dr. Pepper ¢ Charcoal.......................... 3 7•UP..............................99 HY•TOP $ 99 Dr. Pepper $ Lighter Fluid ................... 4 7•UP........................ 3/ 10 6 pak btl. Bells 2 Hearted ..............

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6 pak btl.

12 pak sampler

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17-18 oz. btl.

20-24 oz. btl.

750 ml.

32 oz. btl.

750 ml.

22-28 oz. can

750 ml.

16 oz. var.

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lb.

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Regular Franks

$ 59

We Accept Food Stamps

750 ml.

9-14 oz. box

5 oz. can

750 ml.

15 lb. bag

2 ltr. btl.

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12 pak/ 12 oz. can

FRESH MEAT ORDERS STOCK-UP & SAVE!! MEAT ORDER #2 ALL PORK!!! 3 lb Pork Steak 2 lb Pork Sausage 1 lb Bacon

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1 lb Swiss Cheese 3 lb Chuck Roast 3 lb Pork Shoulder Roast 4 lb Chicken Wings

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Vincent’s Market Is Proud To Carry

Rustic Rub Seasoning


L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

May

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

LIMITED-TIME SPECIALS Written by JORDAN BARANOWSKI

May is a busy month – lots of holidays to celebrate and summer is starting to peek around the corner. Prepare for your spring and summer social gatherings by stocking up on our May limited-time specials. Check out these prices on all your favorite wines and spirits.

Wine SAVE $3

SAVE $5

ARMANI PROSECCO Pour yourself a glass of this Italian sparkler, with notes of apple blossom and lemon zest. Italy, 750 mL

$13.99

$16.99

DOMAINE LOUBEJAC PINOT NOIR WILLAMETTE 2017 James Suckling – 91

California, 750 mL $24.99

Oregon, 750 mL

SAVE $3 DOUBLE BLACK CABERNET SAUVIGNON PASO ROBLES If you’re new to Cabernet, Double Black is a good place to begin.

SEXTANT CABERNET SAUVIGNON PASO ROBLES Bold Cabernet flavors are enhanced with a savory spice kick, including a hint of oregano.

California, 750 mL $13.99

$10.99

California, 750 mL $22.99

$17.99

SAVE $4

ROCK VIEW CHARDONNAY RESERVE MENDOCINO Rock View Chardonnay rocks – look for plenty of hazelnut and honeysuckle flavors.

$19.99 SAVE $5

SAVE $3

Dom Loubejac is a flawless example of Oregon Pinot Noir.

OAK RIDGE ZINFANDEL LODI AV RESERVE Oak Ridge Zinfandel’s bold mouthfeel is accented by its smooth and expansive finish. California, 750 mL $27.99

$23.99

$16.99 $19.99 SAVE $3

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AMICI SAUVIGNON BLANC NAPA 2017 James Suckling – 91 This Sauvignon Blanc is a favorite for fans of the grape and can convert skeptics.

ALMODI TERRA ALTA PETIT RED 2015 Beverage Dynamics – 91 The big flavors of this Spanish red wine are perfect paired with hearty meals.

California, 750 mL $24.99

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Spain, 750 mL $12.99

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Spirits SAVE $5

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TOWER VODKA Wine Enthusiast – 91

TWO STARS BOURBON Wine Enthusiast – 91

Experience the flavor of top-shelf vodka without the top-shelf price. Plus, Tower is a great cocktail base. United States, 1.75 L $24.99

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Brown sugar and wood essence will warm you to the core with this delicious bourbon.

R. L. SEALE’S FINEST 10 YR OLD RUM No mixers needed here: Pour yourself a glass, and transport to the Caribbean.

United States, 750 mL $20.99

Scotland, 750 mL $33.99

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3 AMIGOS AÑEJO TEQUILA Treat yourself with this tequila, ice and a fresh lime to enhance a warm, sunny day.

HADLEY & SONS GIN Hadley & Sons presents floral gin notes on the front, followed by cucumber and citrus flavors on the finish.

Mexico, 750 mL $31.99

United States, 1.75 L $22.99

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GRANGESTONE 12 YR SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY Grangestone is aged for 12 years to hit that perfect balance of flavor.

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WINERY DIRECT® COUPON

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SAVE $4 ROYALE ORANGE ORANGE LIQUEUR

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VALID 5/22/2019-5/29/2019

Excludes items with prices ending in 7. Cannot be combined with any other Total Wine & More WINE Coupon or in combination with the Mix 6 Discount. Coupon valid in MO locations only. Not valid on previous purchases or delivery orders, where applicable. Offer valid 5/22/20195/29/2019. Valid in-store and online. Limit one online code per web order. For in-store purchases, must present coupon at time of purchase. One-time-use coupon.

BLACK EAGLE BOURBON Add a splash of Coca-Cola or ginger ale, and enjoy the sunshine. United States, 1.75 L $22.99

$20.99

France, 750 mL $21.99

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Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online, and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Wednesday • 05.22.2019 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD Across 1 Veronica ___, author of the best-selling “Divergent” series 5 Green and soft, say 10 Movie with famous “dun dun” theme music 14 Measurement that might be a lot? 15 Some Japanese cartoons 17 Profess 18 Menu item #1: A bowlful of Cap’n Crunch that’s been on top of the fridge for four years 20 Rhyming opposite of break 21 Officers-to-be 22 Opera term that’s sometimes a woman’s name

24 Coffee alternative 25 Austin Powers or Jack Bauer 26 Menu item #2: The charred remains of a slice of whole wheat 29 W.C. 30 “___ Flux” (1990s sci-fi series) 32 Kinds 33 Org. whose participants wear helmets 35 Follower of Mary 37 Zip 38 Plea concerning the menu in 18-, 26-, 53- and 64-Across? 42 Chest coverer 43 “Eight more hours and I’m outta here!” 44 “Ya got that right” 46 Subject of a sleep lab study 49 Words to a backstabber

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAMES May 22 WORD — LEUKOCYTE (LEUKOCYTE: LOO-kuh-site: A white blood cell.) Average mark 23 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 33 or more words in LEUKOCYTE? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — STORIES tore sire toss sister tress site tries sore trio sorest resist sort rest sortie riot sties rise stir rite store rose tier rosiest tire rote tiro RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

51 Go out for a bit 53 Menu item #3: A Red Delicious, assuming you find sawdust delicious 57 Writing surface 59 Wrath 60 Fail to enunciate 61 Cow sans calf 62 Ben ___, pirate in “Treasure Island” 64 Menu item #4: Something to pour in coffee for a sour surprise 67 “Stat!” 68 Pig, cutely 69 Dot on an ocean map 70 Future-gazer 71 City in West Yorkshire 72 NBA’s Young, familiarly

Down 1 Troublemaker 2 Stop sign shape 3 Sacrifice of square footage for location, e.g. 4 ___ Keller, first deaf and blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts 5 PC alternatives 6 “He still the ___” (lyric in Beyoncé’s “Countdown”) 7 Word before and after yes, in the military 8 Below-the-belt campaign tactic 9 Long (for)

Puzzle by Alison Ohringer and Erik Agard

10 Song one loves, in modern slang 11 Image next to a user name 12 Most socially conscious 13 Comfy pants 16 Not much light can get through it 19 Grammy-winning James 23 Bewildered 26 Wild hog 27 Not satisfied, as expectations 28 “___-daisy!”

31 Actor Idris 34 Media lawyer’s specialty 36 Roll with a hole 37 Sound of failure 39 Broken bone revealers 40 Toy for a windy day 41 Ingredient in a melt 45 Kneecap 46 Close chicas 47 Read over 48 Dance done to the 2015 hit “Watch Me”

50 Not new 52 Started listening, with “up” 54 As well 55 It gets bigger in the dark 56 Accident-___ 58 The sky, perhaps 61 That woman’s 63 Broadcaster of “Wait Wait ... Don’t Tell Me!” 65 1950s prez 66 Guided

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0417

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR WEDNESDAY, MAY 22, 2019: This year, your upbeat personality melts the barriers of others. If single, you could have quite a few choices to make. You also need to decide if you want a committed longterm tie. If you’re attached, the two of you like hanging out together. Your sweetie helps inspire you but also encourages you to grow past your present thinking. Avoid ruts and standoff situations that CAPRICORN points out. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) ★★★★ Take charge of a problem. You will be able to handle the matter once you cool off some. You will need to take a strong stand and be willing to walk past a problem. You might feel as if a change is needed. Tonight: Whatever you are doing, you are noticed. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) ★★★★★ You have the ability to see a problem beyond its obvious beginning. You can identify the irritants and also find successful solutions. Someone might call upon your abilities. Be aware of your finances and not overspending. Tonight: Return calls first. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) ★★★★ Your ability to get past a problem allows you more flexibility than you realize. A partner could get stuck on one solution and not open up to different thoughts. Be aware of your limits when dealing with a person who often acts like a stick in the mud. Tonight: Say yes to an offer. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) ★★★★ You might want to defer to a friend or loved one, as you have a lot going on. You feel as if you cannot make a change fast enough. You feel relief when another person tosses his or her hat in the ring and pitches in. Adapt to this positive effort. Tonight: Flow with the moment. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) ★★★ Pace yourself and get as much done as possible. You could experience a jolt out of the blue, which could take some extra time to work through. A partner has an idea that you might not be able to realize. Make a change if possible. Tonight: Take a night off for yourself.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) ★★★★★ Creative ideas come forth with an unexpected development. A partner is inspirational. You might be overly serious when trying to get a project going. You might try making some major changes if possible. Tonight: Swap ideas with a close associate. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) ★★★ Defer to someone who cares about the outcome of a problem in much the same way you do. You might not always agree with this person, but you often agree on the process or on how a problem is handled. A family member could be difficult, to say the least. Tonight: Get past a problem. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) ★★★★ Talking might take some of the pressure off a situation. The problem might surround someone who does not want to share. You see a personal matter far differently than others. You try to open up a discussion unsuccessfully. Tonight: Stay open. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) ★★★★ You have a unique style that others often do not get. In fact, many people look at you as a risk taker with no boundaries. You might be held back from advancing or agreeing to a project. You see a financial problem heading your way. Tonight: Let someone else treat. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) ★★★ Your way of approaching a personal issue on your mind might not get through to others. You might feel like shutting down, but that might not work at all. Evaluate the possibility of a sudden change in pace or attitude. Tonight: Whatever you want. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) ★★★ What is happening behind the scenes could stun you. The less said, the more comfortable others will be with you. What you hear could shock you at times. Use caution around finances. Tonight: Go for R and R. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) ★★★★ A meeting could energize you. Stop and decide how realistic you are about this matter. Your imagination can find solutions should you hit a problem. Trust yourself to come up with the right idea for the majority of people. Tonight: Adapt to a last-minute change. BORN TODAY Doctor/author Arthur Conan Doyle (1859), model Naomi Campbell (1970), composer Richard Wagner (1813)

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

MRACP NREUP SOCOHE CYKTSI ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) Yesterday’s

Jumbles: TIGER CRANK HAPPEN HOMILY Answer: His wife found out that her new ring was a cheap imitation, and now he’d — PAY THE PRICE


05.22.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

His online flirtations cross the line Dear Abby • My boyfriend and I have been a couple for three years. We live together and have an incredible relationship and an amazing sex life. A while ago, he was approached by a strange woman on social media. Through Hangouts he told her she was beautiful and that he was looking for the right woman to be with. Their communication lasted about a week. It has now happened again. He handed out his phone number, and this one has sent him videos of her dancing wearing next to nothing. When he talks to these other women, he tells them he lives alone. When I tell him this bothers me, he doesn’t get upset. He swears he has feelings for only me and no one else, and that he’s just having a little fun. Should I be worried? — Sharing Him in Ohio Dear Sharing Him • You should not only be worried, you should be out of there. You may have

invested three years in this person, but the sooner you divest yourself of him the better it will be for you. His actions show that his word cannot be trusted. He’s not only lying to these women, he is also lying to you. Dear Abby • I’m a 13-year-old girl, and I’m bisexual. Some of my closest friends know, but that’s it. Mom doesn’t know, and neither do my gramma or papa. I’m afraid if I tell them they’ll be disappointed in their little girl. Also, I’m growing up without a father, so that may have something to do with it. It took me a while to figure out that I was bisexual. It was at the beginning of seventh grade, when people were talking about being bi. So I guess I need to find out who I am as a person. When I told my friend I was bi and I liked her, she was shocked and surprised. I think she took it the wrong way and thought I was asking her out. That afternoon she came up to me and said, “I

like you, but only as a friend. I hope this doesn’t damage our friendship.” For me it did, and I haven’t gotten the courage to go talk to her about it again. I was only saying that to tell her how I FEEL, not to ask her out. — Insecure and Confused Dear Insecure and Confused • You are right that you need to find out who you are as a person. You are very young and still discovering. People do NOT become gay or bisexual because of conversations they hear in the seventh grade or because their fathers are absent. Sexual orientation is simply a part of who we are. You were clumsy about the way you “outed” yourself to your friend. Put aside your fears, talk to her again and explain that you weren’t asking her out. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

CAROLYN HAX

Daughter doesn’t blend with new family Adapted from a recent online discussion.

Dear Carolyn • My ex-husband and I divorced when our daughter was 3. I went on to get remarried to a man who had two children from a previous marriage. We then had two kids of our own. My ex-husband is remarried but they don’t have any kids. Overall, we co-parent really well and we have equal time with our daughter. I am happy with this arrangement, but it’s becoming more obvious my daughter is not. She is 13. Her step-siblings are 11 and 9 and her sisters are 3 and 6 months. Despite our best efforts to blend our families, for some reason she just does not click with the other kids. She isn’t mean to them and wouldn’t bully them or anything like that, but she doesn’t really interact with them much beyond family group stuff. When she is with my ex-husband, she is able to spend more time with friends because his

house is closer to them. Besides that, she just seems happier without a lot of people and the chaos in our house. On the weekends she is here, I often go looking for her and find her reading by herself in her room while her siblings all play elsewhere. How can we blend our families more successfully? — Visited Answer • She could be in a non-blended family of five children (or two or 12) and still prefer to read in her room while her siblings play elsewhere. Certainly at age 13, where the urge to tell one’s family to go away is strong, and especially when three of the four of the siblings, if not all four, are on a completely different developmental planet. I don’t think there’s anything terrible about a kid this age being somewhat disengaged at home. We don’t learn to be resourceful when we get everything we want as we want it

when we want it. Her needs are for a quieter environment than your home provides, so she has found a way to meet them. Good for her. The only thing I would suggest is the basic raisinga-teenager survival pack: Be unobtrusive but watchful; find ways to spend time with her one-on-one (yes, I’m hilarious) that meet her where she is vs. where you want her to be; and keep an open mind about the best way to give her what she needs. It may be that it serves her better to tilt her schedule more toward being at her dad’s, especially given the proximity to friends ... but also don’t assume reading in her room equates to unhappiness. Like I said: watchful. Her feeling emotionally safe is the best encouragement for her to “blend” wherever she is. tellme@washpost.com

TV WEDNESDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 5/22/19

7:00

7:30

FOX MasterChef Celebrity 2 Family Showdown (N) (cc)

8:00

8:30

Paradise Hotel: Episode 106. (N) (cc)

9:00

9:30

FOX 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

CBS The Amazing Race (N) The Amazing Race (N) SEAL Team Shaw rec4 (cc) (cc) ommends the team be split up. (N) Chicago Fire Severide Chicago P.D. Voight and NBC Chicago Med Dr. 5 Charles and Caroline set and Kidd work together. his team go off-book. (N) (cc) (N) plans. (N) PBS Nature Relationship 9 between humans and horses. (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

NOVA: Lost Viking Army. The Great Heathen army. (N)

Breakthrough: The Ideas That Changed the World (N) (cc)

My Last Days A mother’s battle with breast cancer. (N)

Jane The Virgin Alba and Jorge make an big decision. (N)

Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

ABC Live in Front of a Studio Audience: Single Par- Whiskey Cavalier: 30 Norman Lear’s All in the Family and ents (8:31) Czech Mate. (N) (cc) The Jeffersons ION 46

Blue Bloods A woman Blue Bloods A hostage Blue Bloods A mob atasks Frank for a favor. victim won’t press tacks Gormley outside charges. his home.

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15977 Manchester Road 63011 636-527-7655 Mon-Sat. 10-6 • 1-5 Sunday

www.forshaws.com Quality Since 1871


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.22.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

DR. KEITH ROACH

Partner needs to be aware of genital herpes risk Dear Dr. Roach • I am a 75-year-old male in excellent health who is sexually active. During my thirties, I was exposed to the herpes virus 2, but recurrences now are extremely rare and mild. Even so, I use a condom during sexual intercourse and also take acyclovir beforehand. How long before intercourse should acyclovir be taken so that it is at high strength? If I take two 400-mg tablets instead of one, will that improve protection? Will acyclovir by itself provide enough protection so that a condom is not necessary? Finally, if my female partner takes acyclovir, will that help increase protection? — Anon. Answer • There are conflicting answers to your questions, but here is my summary: People with any history of genital herpes are at risk of shedding infectious virus, which can potentially infect a partner who has never had it. Although people with lesions (such as painful blisters) are much more infectious, people with no symptoms at all can transmit the virus. Many people with genital herpes don’t even know they have it. Acyclovir, like its more potent cousin, valacyclovir (Valtrex), suppresses viral shedding — but the suppression isn’t complete, and takes about five days for maximum effectiveness. Valacyclovir reduced overall days of shedding (and therefore potential infectivity) from 11 percent of days to 3 percent of days. The studies I found to suppress shedding used acyclovir 400 mg twice daily. In couples where one person had genital herpes and the other didn’t, chronic suppression did not reduce the likelihood of the uninfected partner getting herpes, but this study was done in people with HIV, who likely have a higher risk of infecting their partner. Condoms reduce transmission of genital herpes by about 30 percent. Your partner taking medication to prevent infection (called pre-exposure prophylaxis) makes some sense; however, I could find no good data to show how effective it might be. Because of these factors, your female partner should understand that despite you doing everything you can, she is still at risk of acquiring genital herpes, so she should be aware of that fact prior to initiating sexual activity.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark

Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

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