Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 • $2.00

STENGER PLEADS GUILTY

He could face 3-4 years in prison BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — On Monday morning, Steve Stenger was chief executive of St. Louis County. By Monday night, he had resigned in the face of a federal indictment. And on Friday, he pleaded guilty to the three federal counts in a pay-to-play scheme that could earn him three to four years in prison under federal sentencing guidelines. Stenger, 47, will have LAURIE SKRIVAN, P-D to pay restitution. That Steve Stenger outside the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. amount isn’t clear, but the Courthouse on Friday.

plea says Stenger’s actions caused a loss of between $250,000 and $550,000. Loss calculations can include bribes, the cost of contracts either awarded or sought through corruption, as well as the cost to taxpayers of insider real estate deals. Stenger admitted an explicit pay-to-play scheme in his plea. He said he asked for and received contributions from those seeking to do business with St. Louis Please see STENGER, Page A5

Fast-rising water threatens area towns

ROBERT COHEN PHOTOS, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Dan Macheca (right) and Mitch Wieldt get their boating in as Macheca rows along Marshall Road on Friday in Meramec River floodwater, passing the Kirkwood Athletic Association’s baseball and softball fields near Greentree Park.

Local officials scramble to shore up levees FROM WIRE AND STAFF REPORTS

Richard Kotva (left) and Kyle Stewart, union carpenters with T.L. Vinyard General Contractors, finish building the final piece of an aluminum floodwall protecting a Circle K convenience store along Highway 141 in Fenton on Friday. The store has removed its gasoline pumps and has shuttered until expected Meramec River floodwater recedes.

Ladue officer resigns after being charged in shooting

Trump, Putin discuss probe into Russia during call

BY CHRISTINE BYERS

BY ANNE GEARAN,JOHN WAGNER AND ANTON TROIANOVSKI

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The latest round of Midwestern flooding claimed at least four lives, closed hundreds of roads and forced residents of river towns to shore up threatened levees with sandbags as water rose to and near record levels in some communities. The National Weather Service issued flood warnings Friday along a large swath of the Mississippi River, as well as flash flood watches for parts of Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas after recent rounds of heavy rain. In the St. Louis area, flooding forced multiple road and bridge closings, and more were expected through the weekend. Lincoln County emergency-management officials ordered the evacuation of properties between Highway 79 and the Mississippi River after levees in Winfield and Foley were overtopped. High water forced the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District to close its Watkins Creek pump station in Spanish Lake, sending

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said he and Russian President Vladimir Putin discussed the end of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election during a lengthy phone call Friday, but said he did not raise concerns about the possibility of Russian interference to come in the 2020 contest. Trump also contradicted his top national security aides on Russian motives in Venezuela, where the United States and Russia are on opposite sides of a deadly political schism. The two leaders, during their

Please see LADUE, Page A3

Please see PUTIN, Page A5

Bracing for the worst In Davenport, Iowa, concerns were that even after the Mississippi River Please see FLOOD, Page A12

NHL PLAYOFFS > 2ND ROUND > SPORTS

Cubs blank Cards to win 5th straight • B1 Unemployment hits a 49-year low

Washington Post

LADUE — The Ladue police officer charged with assault after she shot a suspected shoplifter, apparently by accident, resigned from the force Friday. Officer Julia Crews turned in her resignation to the police department where she has worked for 13 years, just days after she was charged. “It is with heavy heart that I hereby officially resign my employment as a police officer of the city of Ladue,” she wrote in her letter. Crews, 37, told police she meant to draw her Taser to subdue Ashley Hall, 33, who she says was resisting arrest April 23 in the Schnucks parking lot at the Ladue

about 2.7 million gallons of wastewater a day into the Mississippi River. On Friday, the U.S. Coast Guard closed the Mississippi River near St. Louis to boat and barge traffic as excessive rain and heavy snow melt this spring swelled the major shipping waterway to near record levels. The river — a key transportation artery for shipments of grain, agricultural chemicals, energy products and other commodities — is closed from river mile marker 179 to 184, the Coast Guard said. The Mississippi River gauge at St. Louis rose above 38 feet Friday morning and was expected to rise to 42.5 feet by Monday, about 7 feet below the record crest set in the summer of 1993, according to the National Weather Service.

Ebola deaths top 1,000 in Congo

• A6

• A8

Cohen reports to prison on Monday • A9 TODAY

Rising concerns

67°/49° OCCASIONAL RAIN

EDMUNDSON BACK IN LINEUP GAME 6 > 2 P.M. SUNDAY AT DALLAS

TOMORROW

75°/57° MOSTLY SUNNY

WEATHER B12 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

1 M Vol. 141, No. 124 ©2019


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 • $2.00

STENGER PLEADS GUILTY

He could face 3-4 years in prison BY ROBERT PATRICK

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — On Monday morning, Steve Stenger was chief executive of St. Louis County. By Monday night, he had resigned in the face of a federal indictment. And on Friday, he pleaded guilty to the three federal counts in a pay-to-play scheme that could earn him three to four years in prison under federal sentencing guidelines. Stenger, 47, will have LAURIE SKRIVAN, P-D to pay restitution. That Steve Stenger outside the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. amount isn’t clear, but the Courthouse on Friday.

plea says Stenger’s actions caused a loss of between $250,000 and $550,000. Loss calculations can include bribes, the cost of contracts either awarded or sought through corruption, as well as the cost to taxpayers of insider real estate deals. Stenger admitted an explicit pay-to-play scheme in his plea. He said he asked for and received contributions from those seeking to do business with St. Louis Please see STENGER, Page A5

Fast-rising water threatens area towns

ROBERT COHEN PHOTOS, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Dan Macheca (right) and Mitch Wieldt get their boating in as Macheca rows along Marshall Road on Friday in Meramec River floodwater, passing the Kirkwood Athletic Association’s baseball and softball fields near Greentree Park.

Local officials scramble to shore up levees FROM WIRE AND STAFF REPORTS

Richard Kotva (left) and Kyle Stewart, union carpenters with T.L. Vinyard General Contractors, finish building the final piece of an aluminum floodwall protecting a Circle K convenience store along Highway 141 in Fenton on Friday. The store has removed its gasoline pumps and has shuttered until expected Meramec River floodwater recedes.

Ladue officer resigns after being charged in shooting

Trump, Putin discuss probe into Russia during call

BY CHRISTINE BYERS

BY ANNE GEARAN,JOHN WAGNER AND ANTON TROIANOVSKI

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The latest round of Midwestern flooding claimed at least four lives, closed hundreds of roads and forced residents of river towns to shore up threatened levees with sandbags as water rose to and near record levels in some communities. The National Weather Service issued flood warnings Friday along a large swath of the Mississippi River, as well as flash flood watches for parts of Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas after recent rounds of heavy rain. In the St. Louis area, flooding forced multiple road and bridge closings, and more were expected through the weekend. Lincoln County emergency-management officials ordered the evacuation of properties between Highway 79 and the Mississippi River after levees in Winfield and Foley were overtopped. High water forced the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District to close its Watkins Creek pump station in Spanish Lake, sending

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said he and Russian President Vladimir Putin discussed the end of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election during a lengthy phone call Friday, but said he did not raise concerns about the possibility of Russian interference to come in the 2020 contest. Trump also contradicted his top national security aides on Russian motives in Venezuela, where the United States and Russia are on opposite sides of a deadly political schism. The two leaders, during their

Please see LADUE, Page A3

Please see PUTIN, Page A5

Bracing for the worst In Davenport, Iowa, concerns were that even after the Mississippi River Please see FLOOD, Page A12

NHL PLAYOFFS > SPORTS GAME 6 > 2 P.M. SUNDAY AT DALLAS

Cubs blank Cards to win 5th straight • B1 Unemployment hits a 49-year low

Washington Post

LADUE — The Ladue police officer charged with assault after she shot a suspected shoplifter, apparently by accident, resigned from the force Friday. Officer Julia Crews turned in her resignation to the police department where she has worked for 13 years, just days after she was charged. “It is with heavy heart that I hereby officially resign my employment as a police officer of the city of Ladue,” she wrote in her letter. Crews, 37, told police she meant to draw her Taser to subdue Ashley Hall, 33, who she says was resisting arrest April 23 in the Schnucks parking lot at the Ladue

about 2.7 million gallons of wastewater a day into the Mississippi River. On Friday, the U.S. Coast Guard closed the Mississippi River near St. Louis to boat and barge traffic as excessive rain and heavy snow melt this spring swelled the major shipping waterway to near record levels. The river — a key transportation artery for shipments of grain, agricultural chemicals, energy products and other commodities — is closed from river mile marker 179 to 184, the Coast Guard said. The Mississippi River gauge at St. Louis rose above 38 feet Friday morning and was expected to rise to 42.5 feet by Monday, about 7 feet below the record crest set in the summer of 1993, according to the National Weather Service.

Ebola deaths top 1,000 in Congo

ON THE BRINK STARS LEAD SERIES 3-2

• A6

• A8

Cohen reports to prison on Monday • A9 TODAY

Rising concerns

67°/49° OCCASIONAL RAIN

TOMORROW

75°/57° MOSTLY SUNNY

WEATHER B12 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2 M Vol. 141, No. 124 ©2019


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 M 1 SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM STENGER’S FALL

YOUR STL FAVORITES

Two reporters who have written about links between donations to Steve Stenger and county contracts talk about his indictment. stltoday.com/podcasts

FARM FRESH Spring means seasonal fruits and vegetables at farmers markets across St. Louis. Check out one close to you with our map. stltoday.com/ farmersmarkets

Whether it’s Ted Drewes or Jon Hamm, Sterling K. Brown or Sugarfire barbecue, readers and staff pick their favorite St. Louis things in the Go! list. stltoday.com/go

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Boss of Clayton-based Centene makes top 10 of highest-paid CEOs

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FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Mon-Sun $14.25, Sun-Fri $14.25, Mon-Fri $11.75, Thurs-Sun $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/1/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/8/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BUCKS UP — When it comes to lists, there are good ones, there’s bad ones, and there are ones none of us would mind being on — like the one Centene Corp. topper Michael F. Neidorff just made: “Highest Paid CEOs at America’s Largest Companies,” from the financial website 24/7 Wall Street. Neidorff tallied up to No. 8 spot on the rich list, thanks to his $26.1 million annual salary. He also is chairman of the company’s board of directors. With headquarters in Clayton, Centene is a managed-care business that works with government and private healthinsurance programs. Tonina performs at the Pageant in St. Louis in January. To rank the highest paid CEOs, 24/7 Wall Street reviewed total compensation for the chief executive officers of the nation’s 150 largest public companies for the year ending Dec. 31, 2017. The only other big wheel from an STL-based company to make the list was Timothy Wentworth from Express Scripts Holding, with an annual salary of $15.9 million. Alas, the company has been bought by Cigna. The top spot on the list was a tie, between the Oracle dual monarchy of CEOs, Safra Catz and Mark Hurd, who both drew $108.3 million in 2017. HAMM TIME — So it seems we have actor Thomas Jane to thank for it. Fans of STL No. 1 celeb Jon Hamm may not know how close we all came to not having Hamm become a star on “Mad Men.” A story in Business Insider Australia reports that the role of the tortured and tantalizing advertising executive would have been given to Jane, best known for his roles in “Deep Blue Sea” and “The Punisher.” “The casting directors didn’t know who I was. I wasn’t on anybody’s lists,” Hamm said. “The funny thing was, I think they went to Thomas Jane for it, and they were told that Thomas Jane does not do television.” But funny how Hollywood works. “Mad Men” made its debut in 2007. In 2009, Mr. “I Don’t Do TV” Jane accepted the lead role in the HBO series “Hung.”

JON GITCHOFF

IMAGE COURTESY MISSOURI HISTORY MUSEUM

A mother and her children enjoy ice cream cones at the St. Louis World’s Fair. The fair certainly helped make ice cream cones popular, but they probably were invented by a New Yorker who obtained a patent in 1903.

ists of 2018. Post-Dispatch music critic Kevin C. Johnson described her as a “rapidly MUSICAL NOTE — An STL artist who has emerging ... new favorite on the St. Louis drawn rave reviews from former President music scene, defying categorization along the way.” Barack Obama will lend her sound to an Tickets are $55 and available at Eventupcoming TEDx talk about health. brite. The talk will feature disabilities Singer-bassist Tonina (Saputo) will advocate Sean Gold; social worker Miappear at “Healthcare Head-On,” 5 to 9 chal Grinstein-Weiss; urban planner p.m. May 16 at the St. Louis College of Grace Kyung; child neurologist Dr. John Pharmacy, 4588 Parkview Place. Mantovani; surgery professor Dr. Laurie Saputo graduated from Kirkwood Punch; dietitian Reshaunda Thornton; High, where she began playing in the school band when she was 8. In 2017, she and Chad Sabora, of the Missouri Network for Opiate Reform and Recovery. graduated from the Berklee College of Music. CANDY LAND — The next nostalgia nod In December, Obama released his with Ron “Johnny Rabbitt” Elz promises “best of year” list, and it included Saputo’s song “Historia D Un Amor,” from to be delicious. On Wednesday at the Missouri Hisher “Black Angel” album. She also was tory Museum, Elz will present “A History named by NPR as one of the top 10 art-

of Sweet St. Louis.” The event begins at 10:30 a.m. in the museum’s Lee Auditorium. The program will recall the places and portions that locals have loved over the years — such as Mavrakos candy, World’s Fair ice cream cones and numerous neighborhood bakeries. Speaking at the swirl will be food writer Suzanne Corbett; Dan Abel of Chocolate, Chocolate, Chocolate; and Dr. Harley Hammerman, who will talk about the Velvet Freeze chain of ice cream parlors that once dotted the metro area. A panel discussion about local confection will include Pat Eby, freelance food writer for the Post-Dispatch, and Joy Christensen of The Fountain on Locust. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

LOTTERY Multistate games MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 08-16-22-66-68 Mega ball: 11 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: $252 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $199 million

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1.2 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 01-15-26-29-38 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $50,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 983 Evening: 521 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 7156 Evening: 9491

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 08-17-26-34-45 Evening: 10-11-18-31-43 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $4.25 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 439 FB: 4 Evening: 774 FB: 0 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 8680 FB: 4 Evening: 1483 FB: 3

Man who claimed 2 men carjacked him at gunpoint lied, police say BY KIM BELL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — A man who gave police a detailed description of two men who carjacked him at gunpoint Thursday actually lied about the crime, police say. Turns out, his car was taken by two women he had picked up for sex, police now say. The car’s owner, 21, originally told police he was carjacked while sitting in his car in the 2100 block of East John Avenue about 1:30 a.m. Thursday. He said a man was suddenly standing next to his car door, pointing a gun at him. His original account to police was that the gunman ordered him out of the car, and he got out. Then, the gunman and his accomplice jumped in and drove away. The car’s owner told police he ran to the 1900 block of Obear Avenue and called for help. He provided detailed — albeit fictitious — descriptions of the robbers, from their height to the color of their sweatshirts and pants. One was stocky, the other thin. The gunman wore a bandana over his face, the man said. Police in the department’s Real Time Crime Center monitoring surveillance

cameras spotted the car about three hours later, near Union Boulevard and Northland Avenue. Officers stopped the car in the 5200 block of Northland Avenue, in the Kingsway West neighborhood, and arrested a woman in the driver’s seat. Detectives circled back to the car’s owner. Officers determined that he had lied to them, said St. Louis Officer Michelle Woodling. The man, in reality, had “picked up two females for a sexual encounter” and when he got out of his car, the women drove away, leaving him stranded. Police on Friday said the crime is now classified as a car theft. They applied for warrants against the woman arrested on Northland, but prosecutors declined to file charges. It wasn’t immediately clear if the man who lied about who took his car will be charged with filing a false police report. St. Louis had 104 reports of carjackings this year, according to crime statistics through Thursday. During the same time last year, there were 100 reports of carjackings, Woodling said. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@ post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Jazz bassist Ron Carter is 82. Singer Peggy Santiglia Davison of The Angels is 75. Actor Richard Jenkins (“The Shape of Water”) is 72. Country singer Stella Parton is 70. Bassist Darryl Hunt of The Pogues is 69. Singer Jackie Bass Jackson of The Jacksons is 68. Singeractress Pia Zadora is 67. Singer Oleta Adams is 66. Country singer Randy Travis is 60. Actress Mary McDonough (“The Arnett Waltons”) is 58. Comedian Ana Gasteyer (“Saturday Night Live”) is 52. Actor Will Arnett (“Arrested Development,” “Blades of Glory”) is 49. Bassist Mike Dirnt of Green Day is 47. Contemporary Christian singer Chris Tomlin is 47. TV personality Kimora Lee Simmons is 44. Singer Lance Bass (‘N Sync) is 40. Actress Ruth Negga (“Loving”) is 38. Rapper Jidenna is 34. Actor Alexander Gould (“Weeds”) is 25. Country singer RaeLynn is 25. Actress Amara Miller (“The Descendants”) is 19. – Associated Press


05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

LOCAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A3

Child care hard to find for many Missourians ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBIA, Mo. — More than half of Missourians don’t have access to affordable licensed child care. That means more parents have to cut down work hours, add time to their commute or resort to unregulated in-home facilities to provide child care for their children. According to a 2018 study from the Center for American Progress, a research group dedicated to progressive policies, 54% of Missourians live in child care deserts, areas with an insufficient supply of child care providers. This definition takes into account the number of young children in the area, the number of providers and the number of children per slot in a licensed child care facility or home. The existence of child care deserts often means that parents have to choose between caring for their children or working. “Instead of allowing it to be a family decision, by not having access to quality child care in their area, the decision is made for them,” said Craig Stevenson, director of policy and advocacy at Kids Win Missouri, a children’s advocacy organization. “So, it may not be what’s in the best interest of the families. That may not be what they want, but that’s what they’re forced to do because of the situation they’re in.” Sosha Chaney knows this

firsthand. She’s had to switch providers multiple times for her two oldest children because of the lack of affordable child care in Missouri. Cost is one of the primary reasons that access is an issue in Missouri. In the northern Kansas City suburbs, where Chaney and her family live, child care can cost almost $16,000 annually, the Columbia Missourian reported. Many of these facilities cost the same amount she pays for housing. Before she found her current child care provider, if she wanted to put her kids in a facility near her home, she was forced to choose between making rent payments or paying for child care. “Do I want to have a house to live at, or do I want to have child care?” she said. Chaney qualifies for the Child Care Subsidy Program, through which the state assists eligible Missouri parents and guardians with payments for child care. While this subsidy program helps because she won’t have to pay as much out of pocket, Chaney is still limited as to which facilities her children can attend. This is because many licensed facilities don’t accept government subsidies as a form of payment. So Chaney is not only tasked with finding a facility that suits her children, but also with finding one that accepts subsidies. Even if a facility does accept subsidies, it typically doesn’t

cover the full cost. Until six years ago, Chaney still had to pay a sliding fee, or the portion of child care expenses that a family has to pay directly to child care providers based on income. Although the subsidy helped, Chaney still struggled to make the fee payments. She would switch child care facilities on almost a monthly basis because of the frequent sliding fee changes. She’s since found a solution through Operation Breakthrough, a nonprofit child care center in Kansas City that accepts subsidies and doesn’t require sliding fees. Parents whose children attend Operation Breakthrough don’t pay anything out of pocket — it’s covered by subsidies, federal funding and donations. Because of this program, child care is no longer a financial burden for Chaney and her family. However, many families in Missouri don’t have access to programs like Operation Breakthrough. For families with incomes below the poverty line, paying for child care — even if it is just a sliding fee — is often out of the question. Even in cases where cost and subsidies aren’t issues, access is still limited. “Despite all the factors that we suggest people look at, there’s just not enough availability, especially when you get into the rural areas,” Phillips said. Lack of available child care is a problem that Casey Hanson, a

Columbia resident, knows well. Although she and her husband can afford to place their 18-monthold son in a licensed facility, none of the facilities in Columbia had spots available. “It was surprising to me that if you have the money and you are able to make it work, it still doesn’t mean that the slots are going to be available,” Hanson said. Hanson said she would spend hours looking online and often wouldn’t get a concrete answer on whether a facility had the space for her son. “Anxiety-inducing is certainly the word that I’d attribute to the process,” she said. This pattern is especially prevalent in rural communities. In Missouri, 2.2 million people — 37% of Missouri’s total population — live in areas considered rural, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. For families living in rural areas, access to affordable child care is far more limited. The Center for American Progress’ study shows that rural families face higher challenges in accessing child care compared to families living in urban or suburban areas. “In general, we see clusters of licensed child care in cities,” said Katie Hamm, early childhood vice president at the Center for American Progress. Although patterns vary by state, the ruralurban divide holds true nationally.

Within cities, child care is often concentrated in higher-income areas and may not be accessible to lower-income residents because of transportation constraints and cost, she added. National averages from the Center for American Progress’ study also show that it’s not just Missourians having trouble accessing child care. About 51% of Americans live in what is considered a child care desert. For families who live in areas without affordable licensed child care, unlicensed in-home facilities are often the only viable solution. These facilities are typically not registered with the state, which means they are not regulated like licensed facilities are. The lack of regulation can cause problems for some facilities. Children in unlicensed in-home facilities are at a greater safety risk, which is part of the reason sending children to licensed facilities is important, Hamm said. “When you go to a restaurant, people assume that the health department has been there to inspect it, and child care needs to be the same way,” Hamm said. “It’s all the more important that a child care center has that basic inspection to make sure that the children are safe. It’s kind of a fundamental role of the state to make sure that parents can go to work and know that their children aren’t in danger.”

Ladue From A1

Crossing Shopping Center. Instead she grabbed her gun and shot Hall. St. Louis County Prosecutor Wesley Bell believes Crews acted “recklessly” and charged her with second-degree assault on Wednesday. She posted 10 percent of a $20,000 bail. Crews’ attorney, Travis Noble, said prosecutors will not be able to prove his client acted “recklessly.” But even if Crews is acquitted, she no longer wants to be an officer, he said. “She’s sad that Crews her career as a police officer is officially over after today,” Noble said. “She is turning in her letter of resignation so that she can not be a disHall traction to the Ladue Police Department and other police officers and the citizens of Ladue.” Crews’ letter called the shooting “an innocent mistake.” “As I expressed the day of the April 23 shooting incident, I continue to pray for the full and speedy recovery of (Hall) who suffered injuries as a result of an innocent mistake,” Crews wrote. “I wish for the best for everyone involved and for everyone going forward.” The Ladue department has 26 officers, according to the state’s Peace Officer Standards & Training Commission records. The last time there was an officer-involved shooting was 1976, when a Ladue officer shot a suspected burglar in the leg.

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Karen Carter (center), the mother of Ashley Hall, is interviewed alongside Hall’s father, Robert Hall Sr.; Aigner Hall (right), Hall’s sister; and family attorney William K. Holland at the St. Louis County Justice Center in Clayton on Wednesday. Noble said he doesn’t believe Crews, who lives in Jefferson County, ever previously had to draw her gun or Taser during her career in the west St. Louis suburb of about 8,600. Crews’ friends and family started a GoFundMe page to help “offset her upcoming expenses.” The page is titled “Julia’s Not Alone,” and includes the words,

“In this family, no one fights alone.” “Julia is devastated by the events that occurred,” the site says. “She is a mother, wife and wonderful friend to many. She has touched many lives... It is sad that in the course of ‘doing her job’ she now has a battle to fight.” By Friday afternoon, the site had raised several thousand dollars of

its $20,000 goal. Hall, meanwhile, remains hospitalized and on a ventilator, according to her family. She is a mother of five children, ranging in age from 2 to 17, and her 17-year-old daughter is weeks away from giving birth to Hall’s first grandchild. Hall’s mother, Karen Carter, 52, said her daughter went to

Schnucks on the day she was shot to buy balloons for Carter’s birthday. “I’m a Christian, and I’m praying for the officer and for my daughter right now,” she told reporters after charges against the officer were announced.

tities of cocaine from a Mexican drug cartel to St. Louis between 2012 and 2016 and supplied other dealers who sold cocaine and crack, including Sims. Sims also tried to keep Lemons’ drug ring running after his indictment in 2016. Lemons and Sims are among 34 people who have faced charges in connection with the investigation, including Anthony “TT” Jordan, who could face the death penalty if convicted. He has been accused of murdering nine people and playing a role in the deaths of two others since 2008. Lemons could face 10 years to life in prison when sentenced in July, and Sims could face five to 40 years. Investigators also seized guns, drug ledgers, more than 64 kilograms of cocaine and more than $1.3 million. Law enforcement officials told the Post-Dispatch in 2016 that the group was believed to be responsible for as many as 17 area homiST. LOUIS — Man pleads guilty in cides in the past five years. drug conspiracy: A St. Louis man who led a conspiracy blamed for UNIVERSITY CITY — Police shoot drug murders pleaded guilty to at vehicle: Officers fired shots at federal charges Friday, the U.S. a car that repeatedly ran at police attorney’s office said. in a residential area early Friday, Adrian Lemons, 41, pleaded University City police said. guilty to a cocaine distribution The confrontation started when conspiracy charge. Virgil “V.G.” officers received reports about Sims, 34, of Kennett, in Missouri’s 1:15 a.m. about a suspicious SUV Bootheel, did the same Wednes- that pulled into a backyard in the 6500 block of Crest Avenue. day. Prosecutors say Lemons admitWhen police tried to approach ted managing a criminal enter- the vehicle, the driver hit the gas, prise that brought “vast” quan- nearly striking officers before they

dived out of the way, police said. The driver then revved the engine of the SUV, which moved in the direction of two more officers, and the officers fired shots at the vehicle, according to a news release from the department. Police said the vehicle accelerated, striking several yard structures before becoming wedged in a fence. Officers tried to ask the occupants to leave the vehicle but had to use ballistic shields for protection and to pull them from the SUV to arrest them. No one was seriously injured, but police say two of the car’s occupants were taken to a hospital with minor injuries. The department did not specify the nature or cause of the injuries and did not respond to questions asking whether the shots officers fired hit any of the occupants of the car. There were five people in the vehicle, three of whom were taken into custody. Police found suspected drugs and two stolen guns in the SUV. David Anderson, 18, has been charged with two counts of assault against a special victim and resisting arrest. Anderson is being held on $25,000 cash-only bail. Tommy Conners, 25, had an active warrant for possession of a controlled substance from St. Louis city and was charged with unlawful use of a weapon. A 16-year-old in the car was charged with possession of a controlled substance and possession of a controlled firearm.

LINCOLN COUNTY — Man sentenced in infant son’s death: A man was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison in the shaking death of his 3-month-old son. The baby died after being shaken by his father in October 2015, a jury in Lincoln County concluded in finding Steven Kyle Schnell guilty of felony abuse of a child late Thursday. The jury trial was before St. Charles County Circuit Judge Ted House. The infant, Sawyer Schnell, was injured Oct. 7, 2015, at the family’s home in the 100 block of Rivers Edge Drive in the Moscow Mills area. Sawyer’s father told Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputies that he shook the boy and patted his back because the child seemed to be choking, officials said. But the jury found Schnell, now 29, knowingly caused the injury that resulted in his son’s death, prosecutors said. After being injured, the baby was on life support with injuries that included bleeding of the brain and detached retinas, which police said were indications of shaken baby syndrome. Officials said Schnell told them he had used CPR to restore his son’s breathing but did not seek medical help out of fear of losing his relationship with the boy’s mother. She later noticed something wrong and took the boy to Progress West Hospital. The infant was airlifted to Chil-

dren’s Hospital in St. Louis and later died.

Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

LAW AND ORDER UNIVERSITY CITY — Man attacks people with hammer: A man attacked three people in the Delmar Loop on Friday afternoon, injuring two people with a hammer inside a restaurant. A Washington University student was eating at an outdoor table in the 6600 block of Delmar Boulevard about 4:45 p.m. when a man approached and pushed and punched the student. Some people ran into the nearby Corner 17 restaurant. The man followed them inside and then hit another student and an employee of the restaurant with a hammer. The victims suffered injuries that were serious but not life-threatening. The man fled, driving away in a black Jeep. Police later went to a residence in Webster Groves and took a man into custody. The man has not been charged, but officials said warrants would be applied for Saturday.

CLAYTON — Charges against doctor dismissed: A judge has dismissed domestic assault charges against a Ladue oncologist when his accuser did not show for a preliminary hearing, according to the doctor’s defense lawyer. On Thursday, St. Louis County Associate Circuit Judge Mondonna Ghasedi dismissed three charges against Michael J. Naughton, who was accused of trying to strangle the mother of his four children at his home in December and threatening to shove a butcher knife down her throat. Charges said Naughton stopped attacking his wife when their children interrupted him. Naughton, 52, of the first block of Paxton Lane in Ladue, was charged in December with two felony counts of domestic assault and one count of unlawful use of a weapon. The charges were dropped after prosecutors filed a motion saying their witness would not appear for a scheduled preliminary hearing. “I think she had extreme credibility problems that were only going to get worse,” said Naughton’s lawyer, Scott Rosenblum. A spokeswoman for St. Louis County Prosecutor Wesley Bell could not be reached Friday. The Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis lists Naughton as a medical oncologist and an associate professor at Washington University.


05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 2

LOCAL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A3

Child care hard to find for many Missourians ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBIA, Mo. — More than half of Missourians don’t have access to affordable licensed child care. That means more parents have to cut down work hours, add time to their commute or resort to unregulated in-home facilities to provide child care for their children. According to a 2018 study from the Center for American Progress, a research group dedicated to progressive policies, 54% of Missourians live in child care deserts, areas with an insufficient supply of child care providers. This definition takes into account the number of young children in the area, the number of providers and the number of children per slot in a licensed child care facility or home. The existence of child care deserts often means that parents have to choose between caring for their children or working. “Instead of allowing it to be a family decision, by not having access to quality child care in their area, the decision is made for them,” said Craig Stevenson, director of policy and advocacy at Kids Win Missouri, a children’s advocacy organization. “So, it may not be what’s in the best interest of the families. That may not be what they want, but that’s what they’re forced to do because of the situation they’re in.” Sosha Chaney knows this

firsthand. She’s had to switch providers multiple times for her two oldest children because of the lack of affordable child care in Missouri. Cost is one of the primary reasons that access is an issue in Missouri. In the northern Kansas City suburbs, where Chaney and her family live, child care can cost almost $16,000 annually, the Columbia Missourian reported. Many of these facilities cost the same amount she pays for housing. Before she found her current child care provider, if she wanted to put her kids in a facility near her home, she was forced to choose between making rent payments or paying for child care. “Do I want to have a house to live at, or do I want to have child care?” she said. Chaney qualifies for the Child Care Subsidy Program, through which the state assists eligible Missouri parents and guardians with payments for child care. While this subsidy program helps because she won’t have to pay as much out of pocket, Chaney is still limited as to which facilities her children can attend. This is because many licensed facilities don’t accept government subsidies as a form of payment. So Chaney is not only tasked with finding a facility that suits her children, but also with finding one that accepts subsidies. Even if a facility does accept subsidies, it typically doesn’t

cover the full cost. Until six years ago, Chaney still had to pay a sliding fee, or the portion of child care expenses that a family has to pay directly to child care providers based on income. Although the subsidy helped, Chaney still struggled to make the fee payments. She would switch child care facilities on almost a monthly basis because of the frequent sliding fee changes. She’s since found a solution through Operation Breakthrough, a nonprofit child care center in Kansas City that accepts subsidies and doesn’t require sliding fees. Parents whose children attend Operation Breakthrough don’t pay anything out of pocket — it’s covered by subsidies, federal funding and donations. Because of this program, child care is no longer a financial burden for Chaney and her family. However, many families in Missouri don’t have access to programs like Operation Breakthrough. For families with incomes below the poverty line, paying for child care — even if it is just a sliding fee — is often out of the question. Even in cases where cost and subsidies aren’t issues, access is still limited. “Despite all the factors that we suggest people look at, there’s just not enough availability, especially when you get into the rural areas,” Phillips said. Lack of available child care is a problem that Casey Hanson, a

Columbia resident, knows well. Although she and her husband can afford to place their 18-monthold son in a licensed facility, none of the facilities in Columbia had spots available. “It was surprising to me that if you have the money and you are able to make it work, it still doesn’t mean that the slots are going to be available,” Hanson said. Hanson said she would spend hours looking online and often wouldn’t get a concrete answer on whether a facility had the space for her son. “Anxiety-inducing is certainly the word that I’d attribute to the process,” she said. This pattern is especially prevalent in rural communities. In Missouri, 2.2 million people — 37% of Missouri’s total population — live in areas considered rural, according to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. For families living in rural areas, access to affordable child care is far more limited. The Center for American Progress’ study shows that rural families face higher challenges in accessing child care compared to families living in urban or suburban areas. “In general, we see clusters of licensed child care in cities,” said Katie Hamm, early childhood vice president at the Center for American Progress. Although patterns vary by state, the ruralurban divide holds true nationally.

Within cities, child care is often concentrated in higher-income areas and may not be accessible to lower-income residents because of transportation constraints and cost, she added. National averages from the Center for American Progress’ study also show that it’s not just Missourians having trouble accessing child care. About 51% of Americans live in what is considered a child care desert. For families who live in areas without affordable licensed child care, unlicensed in-home facilities are often the only viable solution. These facilities are typically not registered with the state, which means they are not regulated like licensed facilities are. The lack of regulation can cause problems for some facilities. Children in unlicensed in-home facilities are at a greater safety risk, which is part of the reason sending children to licensed facilities is important, Hamm said. “When you go to a restaurant, people assume that the health department has been there to inspect it, and child care needs to be the same way,” Hamm said. “It’s all the more important that a child care center has that basic inspection to make sure that the children are safe. It’s kind of a fundamental role of the state to make sure that parents can go to work and know that their children aren’t in danger.”

Ladue From A1

Crossing Shopping Center. Instead she grabbed her gun and shot Hall. St. Louis County Prosecutor Wesley Bell believes Crews acted “recklessly” and charged her with second-degree assault on Wednesday. She posted 10 percent of a $20,000 bail. Crews’ attorney, Travis Noble, said prosecutors will not be able to prove his client acted “recklessly.” But even if Crews is acquitted, she no longer wants to be an officer, he said. “She’s sad that Crews her career as a police officer is officially over after today,” Noble said. “She is turning in her letter of resignation so that she can not be a disHall traction to the Ladue Police Department and other police officers and the citizens of Ladue.” Crews’ letter called the shooting “an innocent mistake.” “As I expressed the day of the April 23 shooting incident, I continue to pray for the full and speedy recovery of (Hall) who suffered injuries as a result of an innocent mistake,” Crews wrote. “I wish for the best for everyone involved and for everyone going forward.” The Ladue department has 26 officers, according to the state’s Peace Officer Standards & Training Commission records. The last time there was an officer-involved shooting was 1976, when a Ladue officer shot a suspected burglar in the leg.

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Karen Carter (center), the mother of Ashley Hall, is interviewed alongside Hall’s father, Robert Hall Sr.; Aigner Hall (right), Hall’s sister; and family attorney William K. Holland at the St. Louis County Justice Center in Clayton on Wednesday. Noble said he doesn’t believe Crews, who lives in Jefferson County, ever previously had to draw her gun or Taser during her career in the west St. Louis suburb of about 8,600. Crews’ friends and family started a GoFundMe page to help “offset her upcoming expenses.” The page is titled “Julia’s Not Alone,” and includes the words,

“In this family, no one fights alone.” “Julia is devastated by the events that occurred,” the site says. “She is a mother, wife and wonderful friend to many. She has touched many lives... It is sad that in the course of ‘doing her job’ she now has a battle to fight.” By Friday afternoon, the site had raised several thousand dollars of

its $20,000 goal. Hall, meanwhile, remains hospitalized and on a ventilator, according to her family. She is a mother of five children, ranging in age from 2 to 17, and her 17-year-old daughter is weeks away from giving birth to Hall’s first grandchild. Hall’s mother, Karen Carter, 52, said her daughter went to

Schnucks on the day she was shot to buy balloons for Carter’s birthday. “I’m a Christian, and I’m praying for the officer and for my daughter right now,” she told reporters after charges against the officer were announced.

tities of cocaine from a Mexican drug cartel to St. Louis between 2012 and 2016 and supplied other dealers who sold cocaine and crack, including Sims. Sims also tried to keep Lemons’ drug ring running after his indictment in 2016. Lemons and Sims are among 34 people who have faced charges in connection with the investigation, including Anthony “TT” Jordan, who could face the death penalty if convicted. He has been accused of murdering nine people and playing a role in the deaths of two others since 2008. Lemons could face 10 years to life in prison when sentenced in July, and Sims could face five to 40 years. Investigators also seized guns, drug ledgers, more than 64 kilograms of cocaine and more than $1.3 million. Law enforcement officials told the Post-Dispatch in 2016 that the group was believed to be responsible for as many as 17 area homiST. LOUIS — Man pleads guilty in cides in the past five years. drug conspiracy: A St. Louis man who led a conspiracy blamed for UNIVERSITY CITY — Police shoot drug murders pleaded guilty to at vehicle: Officers fired shots at federal charges Friday, the U.S. a car that repeatedly ran at police attorney’s office said. in a residential area early Friday, Adrian Lemons, 41, pleaded University City police said. guilty to a cocaine distribution The confrontation started when conspiracy charge. Virgil “V.G.” officers received reports about Sims, 34, of Kennett, in Missouri’s 1:15 a.m. about a suspicious SUV Bootheel, did the same Wednes- that pulled into a backyard in the 6500 block of Crest Avenue. day. Prosecutors say Lemons admitWhen police tried to approach ted managing a criminal enter- the vehicle, the driver hit the gas, prise that brought “vast” quan- nearly striking officers before they

dived out of the way, police said. The driver then revved the engine of the SUV, which moved in the direction of two more officers, and the officers fired shots at the vehicle, according to a news release from the department. Police said the vehicle accelerated, striking several yard structures before becoming wedged in a fence. Officers tried to ask the occupants to leave the vehicle but had to use ballistic shields for protection and to pull them from the SUV to arrest them. No one was seriously injured, but police say two of the car’s occupants were taken to a hospital with minor injuries. The department did not specify the nature or cause of the injuries and did not respond to questions asking whether the shots officers fired hit any of the occupants of the car. There were five people in the vehicle, three of whom were taken into custody. Police found suspected drugs and two stolen guns in the SUV. David Anderson, 18, has been charged with two counts of assault against a special victim and resisting arrest. Anderson is being held on $25,000 cash-only bail. Tommy Conners, 25, had an active warrant for possession of a controlled substance from St. Louis city and was charged with unlawful use of a weapon. A 16-year-old in the car was charged with possession of a controlled substance and possession of a stolen firearm.

LINCOLN COUNTY — Man sentenced in infant son’s death: A man was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison in the shaking death of his 3-month-old son. The baby died after being shaken by his father in October 2015, a jury in Lincoln County concluded in finding Steven Kyle Schnell guilty of felony abuse of a child late Thursday. The jury trial was before St. Charles County Circuit Judge Ted House. The infant, Sawyer Schnell, was injured Oct. 7, 2015, at the family’s home in the 100 block of Rivers Edge Drive in the Moscow Mills area. Sawyer’s father told Lincoln County Sheriff’s deputies that he shook the boy and patted his back because the child seemed to be choking, officials said. But the jury found Schnell, now 29, knowingly caused the injury that resulted in his son’s death, prosecutors said. After being injured, the baby was on life support with injuries that included bleeding of the brain and detached retinas, which police said were indications of shaken baby syndrome. Officials said Schnell told them he had used CPR to restore his son’s breathing but did not seek medical help out of fear of losing his relationship with the boy’s mother. She later noticed something wrong and took the boy to Progress West Hospital. The infant was airlifted to Chil-

dren’s Hospital in St. Louis and later died.

Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

LAW AND ORDER UNIVERSITY CITY — Man attacks people with hammer: A man attacked three people in the Delmar Loop on Friday afternoon, injuring two people with a hammer inside a restaurant. A Washington University student was eating at an outdoor table in the 6600 block of Delmar Boulevard about 4:45 p.m. when a man approached and pushed and punched the student. Some people ran into the nearby Corner 17 restaurant. The man followed them inside and then hit another student and an employee of the restaurant with a hammer. The victims suffered injuries that were serious but not life-threatening. The man fled, driving away in a black Jeep. Police later went to a residence in Webster Groves and took a man into custody. The man has not been charged, but officials said warrants would be applied for Saturday.

CLAYTON — Charges against doctor dismissed: A judge has dismissed domestic assault charges against a Ladue oncologist when his accuser did not show for a preliminary hearing, according to the doctor’s defense lawyer. On Thursday, St. Louis County Associate Circuit Judge Mondonna Ghasedi dismissed three charges against Michael J. Naughton, who was accused of trying to strangle the mother of his four children at his home in December and threatening to shove a butcher knife down her throat. Charges said Naughton stopped attacking his wife when their children interrupted him. Naughton, 52, of the first block of Paxton Lane in Ladue, was charged in December with two felony counts of domestic assault and one count of unlawful use of a weapon. The charges were dropped after prosecutors filed a motion saying their witness would not appear for a scheduled preliminary hearing. “I think she had extreme credibility problems that were only going to get worse,” said Naughton’s lawyer, Scott Rosenblum. A spokeswoman for St. Louis County Prosecutor Wesley Bell could not be reached Friday. The Siteman Cancer Center in St. Louis lists Naughton as a medical oncologist and an associate professor at Washington University.


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

DIGEST ST. LOUIS — Poplar Street Bridge work postponed: Road work scheduled for the Poplar Street Bridge and nearby ramps for this weekend has been canceled because of rain, the Missouri Department of Transportation said. The work would have shut down a key ramp leading to the bridge from the south to allow time for repairs needed after several crashes over the winter. The work will be rescheduled, MoDOT said. The ramp, from northbound Interstate 55/eastbound Interstate 44 to eastbound Highway 40 (Interstate 64), was scheduled to close at 7 p.m. Friday and reopen by 5 a.m. Monday. Some other work that was also planned for the weekend has also been canceled and will be rescheduled. ARNOLD — Rules changing for hotels, motels: The City Council amended the zoning regulations for hotels, motels and extended stay establishments in an effort to reduce nuisances and criminal activity. The Arnold Police Department reported that the number of calls for service last year at four hotels was 384, with the majority related to drugs and alcohol, disturbances and suspicious persons or vehicles. A new definition for hotels, motels, and extended stay lodging will refer to them as lodging establishments. The amendment also establishes a new license category for lodging establishments, with stay limitation standards, guest register requirements and prohibitions against certain activities such as drinking on the parking lot. Extended stay lodging will now be a conditional use only in the C-3 commercial district and subject to a number of standards, including minimum acreage, maximum lot coverage and buffering requirements if they abut residential property. Currently there is only one hotel that operates as an extended stay facility. While

CRISTINA M. FLETES, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Dauna McClelland, of Arnold, and her grandson, Connor Gooch, 10, listen as they call out the names of law enforcement officers and firefighters who have died in the line of duty during a memorial ceremony at St. Louis County Memorial Park in Clayton on Friday. McClelland’s husband, Wayne, was a police detective killed in the line of duty in 1975. WoodSpring Suites does not meet all the new requirements, it would be allowed to operate as a nonconforming use. In other news, the council approved the rezoning

and consolidation of seven parcels into one 8.32-acre lot at Old Lemay Ferry and Missouri State roads to allow for 63 assisted-living apartments, 20 memorycare apartments and senior

services at Cedarhurst of year after a small part of it Arnold. fell to the ground recently. The building is at 139 KIRKWOOD — City Hall struc- South Kirkwood Rd. ture needs work: The City During a City Council Hall cupola could be getting work session Thursday, some renovations later this Trace Walls, the city’s su-

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perintendent of facilities operations, showed the council and Mayor Tim Griffin an ornamental bowl that fell off the cupola in March when wind buffeted the building. Walls said he immediately had a general contractor assess the cupola — which, like the entire building, dates to 1941, he said — to make sure it was safe. “Due to rotting wood which is in bad shape, we removed the other three remaining bowls on the corners, as well 20 of the wooden spindles from the cupola,” Walls said. Work on the cupola hasn’t been done since about 2009 and 2010, he said. “Overall, the cupola is in excellent condition,” Walls said. He presented the Council and Griffin with a proposal from contractor JW Fuller Construction to renovate the cupola at a total cost of $30,760, which would include furnishing and installing a new wood decorative railing system, including corner posts made from poplar; furnishing and installing custom-made finials at the four corners; power washing, scraping and painting all wood surfaces, including windows; power washing and painting the dome roof; and providing a 135-foot-tall boom lift for access to the cupola. Walls also suggested the city consider some renovation work on a city-owned gazebo, located in a median on East Argonne Drive across from the Farmer’s Market. He said it dates from 1976, is used extensively by the public and “has some rotting issues, as well as cedar shingles falling off.” Again, a proposal from JW Fuller Construction estimates a renovation cost of $14,797. Walls said the projects would each take about two weeks, depending on weather, and city officials said funds must first be appropriated and legislation approved by Griffin and the council, which could take place as early as May 16.


NEWS

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A5

The rise and fall of Steve Stenger BY JACOB BARKER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch Former St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger pleaded guilty Friday to three federal counts in a pay-to-play scheme. He will be sentenced Aug. 9. His plea likely ends a political career that spanned more than a decade. Here’s a look at Stenger’s time as a public servant.

Nov. 4, 2008 — Political newcomer Steve Stenger, a lawyer and accountant who grew up in Affton, defeats incumbent Republican John Campisi for the 6th District St. Louis County Council seat representing South County. The race is marked by animosity, with the Democrat and Republican accusing each other of being unethical and unfit for the job. Oct. 15, 2013 — Pledging to “clean house” and launch a “top-to-bottom audit of St. Louis County government,” Stenger formally announces his bid to challenge 10-year incumbent St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley. Aug. 5, 2014 — With the strong support of organized labor and longtime former St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch, Stenger cruises to victory over Dooley with 66 percent of the vote. Oct. 23, 2014 — Insurance company owner John Rallo is introduced to Stenger by a close friend, Sorkis J. Webbe Jr., a former St. Louis alderman who was sentenced to prison in 1986 for vote fraud, attempted extortion and harboring a fugitive. Rallo makes his first $5,000 campaign donation to Stenger with the understanding that Stenger would help him get insurance contracts if he won the general election for county executive. Rallo and his associate would go on to donate about $50,000 to Stenger’s campaign. Nov. 4, 2014 — With the events of Ferguson erupting just a few days after Stenger beat Dooley in the Democratic primary, Stenger defeats Republican Rick Stream by less than 2,000 votes in the general election. Some north St. Louis County Democratic Party groups actively back the Republican Stream in retaliation for Stenger’s defeat of Dooley and his alliance with McCulloch. August 2015 — Sheila Sweeney takes over as interim CEO of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership at Stenger’s recommendation. Stenger works with Sweeney to steer contracts and make political hires at the Partnership. May 10, 2016 — The St. Louis County Port Authority awards Rallo a sham $100,000 “marketing” contract to promote the region in the wake of the Ferguson unrest. A month later, Sweeney tacks on $30,000 without board approval in order to pay off political operative John Cross, a close associate of Rep. William Lacy Clay, for his work on Stenger’s 2014 election. The Post-Dispatch reports on the contract in February 2018. June 21, 2016 — St. Louis County Council introduces legislation to move several county offices to Northwest Plaza, which the Stenger administration says will save $10 million over the term of the 20-year lease. It is one of the first deals to raise eyebrows about Stenger’s relationship with his donors and one of the biggest in his tenure. The owners of Northwest Plaza, Robert and David Glarner, have given at least $365,000 to Stenger’s campaign account. A Post-Dispatch investigation in February 2018 shows that the lease deal could end up costing money, and council members say they were misled about the deal. April 4, 2017 — Stenger’s strong support for Prop P, which ends up giving St. Louis County Police officers raises of about 30 percent on average, earns him political support from law enforcement. The St. Louis County Police Association endorses him in his reelection campaign. May 31, 2017 — Rallo and his business partners buy the first of two large industrial parks owned by a county development agency. Federal prosecutors say the deal was engineered by Sweeney at Stenger’s behest. The Post-Dispatch reports on the deal in August 2017. Stenger claims he has no control over the Economic Development Partnership. July 24, 2018 — St. Louis County Council members say sources tell them Partnership CEO Sweeney has been followed by federal agents. Aug. 8, 2018 — Stenger defeats wealthy challenger Mark Mantovani in the Democratic primary for St. Louis County Executive. He cruises to reelection against a little-known Republican opponent. March 21, 2019 — Federal prosecutors issue a federal subpoena to St. Louis County for records related to county contracts and emails and text messages from Stenger and other staff members. April 29, 2019 — Federal indictment of Stenger on payto-play charges is announced; Stenger resigns. May 3, 2019 — Stenger pleads guilty. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Putin From A1

first known conversation in months, also discussed North Korea, whose leader met with Putin last month, and a potential nuclear arms control deal. Speaking to reporters in the Oval Office hours after the call with Putin, Trump described a brief exchange about the conclusion of the two-year investigation. Mueller found that while Russia interfered “in sweeping and systematic fashion,” there was not a criminal conspiracy between Russia and Trump’s campaign. “We discussed it. He actually sort of smiled when he said something to the effect that it started off as a mountain and it ended up being a mouse,” Trump said. “But he knew that, because he knew there was no collusion whatsoever.” The two leaders could not see each other during the call. Trump’s description was meant to convey that it was a light moment, a spokesman said. Trump was asked repeatedly whether he raised the issue of election interference or warned Putin not to do it again. “We didn’t discuss that,” Trump said eventually. “Really, we didn’t discuss it.” In the past, Trump has

bristled at criticism that he has not forcefully confronted Putin over Russian actions aimed at influencing the election and undermining Americans’ faith in their democracy. After the two leaders met in Helsinki last July, Trump accepted what he called Putin’s “extremely strong and powerful” denial of election interference, despite the opposite conclusion by American intelligence agencies. Trump’s comments Friday came shortly after White House press secretary Sarah Sanders told reporters that the Mueller report was discussed “very, very briefly” during the morning phone call, which lasted slightly more than an hour. “It was discussed, essentially in the context that it’s over and there was no collusion, which I’m pretty sure both leaders were very well aware of long before this call took place,” Sanders said. Sanders said most of the conversation was devoted to other topics, including nuclear agreements, North Korea, Venezuela and trade. Trump later tweeted about the call, referring to the Mueller investigation as the “Russian Hoax.” Russian election interference in 2016 included a social media campaign that favored Trump and disparaged Democrat Hillary Clinton, as well as the hack-

LAURIE SKRIVAN, LSKRIVAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Former St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger leaves the Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse after pleading guilty to pay-to-play charges on Friday.

Stenger From A1

County and associated entities, and in return took action on donors’ behalf. The plea follows a yearlong, wide-ranging federal investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Hal Goldsmith said in court that investigators had hours of recorded meetings in Stenger’s home and office, hours of recorded phone calls, and firsthand accounts of numerous people in and out of county government. Stenger, a Democrat, admitted involvement in five “schemes” as part of his plea, four of which involve frequent donor John Rallo. Stenger met Rallo in October 2014 as he was campaigning. At that first meeting at Sam’s Steakhouse in St. Louis County, Stenger accepted $5,000 from Rallo and said if elected, he’d “work to help get Rallo St. Louis County contracts,” his plea says. He did just that — failing to get Rallo two county insurance contracts before successfully helping him win a “sham Port Authority consulting contract,” Goldsmith said. The 2016 contract with the Port Authority was worth $100,000 and was later expanded to $130,000 to cover what was supposed to be a $30,000 payment to “JC, a close associate of a public official,” the plea says. The Post-Dispatch has identified JC as John Cross, and the public official as Rep. William Lacy Clay, DUniversity City. Stenger got help from Sheila Sweeney, CEO of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership and

ing of computers maintained by allies of Clinton and the subsequent release of stolen documents. The special counsel did not find sufficient evidence to bring charges of criminal conspiracy with Russia against Trump or anyone associated with his campaign. The report did not offer a conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice. Attorney General William P. Barr later concluded that there was not sufficient evidence for obstruction of justice, but House Democrats are continuing to pursue that issue. FBI Director Christopher Wray warned last month that Russia is continuing to attempt to undermine U.S. elections, including the presidential election next year. Putin has echoed some of Trump’s talking points in ridiculing the Mueller probe. Russian state television described it as a witch hunt orchestrated by the U.S. political establishment to punish Trump for seeking to improve ties with Russia. Putin has also denied that the Russian government interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign. “We knew a mountain was being made out of a molehill, so to speak, because we knew how it would end beforehand,” Putin said last month. “Now it has come to pass, but it did not make the domestic politi-

director of the St. Louis County Port Authority, the plea says. The plea says Sweeney also helped Rallo and a partner win bids on two properties in Wellston that were purchased for a total of $525,000, far less than the county spent cleaning them up and preparing them for sale. In an effort to conceal the schemes, Stenger and Sweeney told Rallo not to talk to a Post-Dispatch reporter who had written a series of investigative stories about Stenger’s donors, the plea says. The fifth scheme laid out in the plea involved a company seeking to retain the county lobbying contract when it was put up for a bid. That company and its owner donated a total of $59,000 to Stenger’s campaign, and the owner recruited others to donate and held at least one fundraiser, the plea says. Stenger, in turn, told three top staffers to meet with Sweeney and ensure that the company won the contract, the plea says. “Is that what you did in this case?” U.S. District Judge Catherine Perry asked Stenger after Goldsmith detailed his crimes. “Yes, your honor,” Stenger answered. Lawyers for Rallo and Sweeney have declined twice to comment on the case this week. Sweeney’s lawyer was present in court, watching Stenger’s plea. Prosecutors agreed as part of the plea not to seek any further charges against Stenger for any criminal conduct that they are aware of and are investigating. He will be sentenced Aug. 9. Stenger, an attorney, voluntarily surrendered his law license when he

cal situation in the U.S. any easier. Now new excuses are being sought to attack President Trump.” Trump also contradicted Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and other advisers who have said this week that Russia propped up embattled Venezuelan strongman Nicolás Maduro and blocked what might have been a peaceful transfer of power to the U.S.-backed opposition. “He is not looking at all to get involved in Venezuela other than he’d like to see something positive happen for Venezuela,” Trump said after the conversation with Putin, which had been arranged in large part to air differences over Venezuela and de-escalate a brewing proxy fight. Instead, Trump appeared to take Putin at his word that Russia wants to help ease a humanitarian crisis in Venezuela. “And I feel the same way. We want to get some humanitarian aid,” Trump told reporters at the White House. “Right now, people are starving. They have no water. They have no food.” In a statement issued late Wednesday, the White House had said that Russia “must leave” Venezuela and “renounce their support of the Maduro regime.” Russia has significant investments in Venezuela and has been a strong backer of Maduro. Pompeo delivered the

“The events of this week … should send a message that the Department of Justice and federal law enforcement will not tolerate public corruption at any level of government.” Reginald Harris, Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney resigned his county office Monday. Goldsmith declined to comment after Stenger pleaded guilty Friday, citing the ongoing investigation. Stenger’s lawyer, Scott Rosenblum, said they would not answer any questions. Rosenblum gave a brief statement outside the courthouse, during which he said it was a “very difficult day for Steve and his family.” Rosenblum said Stenger accepted responsibility for “lapses in judgment and his conduct in office.” As the two men got in a waiting SUV, University City resident Ruth Tannenbaum shouted, “I voted for you, and you betrayed me!” Tannenbaum had been waiting outside the courthouse for Stenger. Another man, who declined to identify himself other than as a county employee, had crafted a cardboard sign that said “Steve Crook Stinker.” He missed Stenger’s arrival in court, however, and said he had to leave, offering his sign to a reporter. Federal officials said they will continue to hold public office-holders accountable. “The events of this week

same message in a Wednesday call with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, whom Pompeo will see next week in Finland. Pompeo had said that Russia had told Maduro not to step down and accept an offer of passage to Venezuelan ally Cuba. “It’s the case that Maduro may rule for a little while longer, but he’s not going to govern,” Pompeo told Fox News on Thursday. “Structurally, there’s no way he stays in power. It’s time for him to leave, and we need the Cubans and the Russians to follow him out the door.” A day earlier, national security adviser John Bolton had said that if Russians continue to ignore U.S. warnings about malign influence in Venezuela, they

… should send a message that the Department of Justice and federal law enforcement will not tolerate public corruption at any level of government,” Executive Assistant U.S. Attorney Reginald Harris said in a statement. “The people deserve and are entitled to honest services, and trust in their elected officials. And when those elected officials abuse the people’s trust, they will be held accountable and there will be consequences.” Richard Quinn, special agent in charge of the FBI St. Louis Division, said in a statement that Stenger “benefited himself at the expense of St. Louis County citizens by accepting financial gain in exchange for official action. The FBI will continue to investigate and hold accountable public officials who betray the trust of the St. Louis communities they serve. Our citizens deserve nothing less.” St. Louis County Executive Sam Page, who was sworn in Monday night to replace Stenger, has pledged to clean up county government. “This is proof that the justice system works,” Page said Thursday.“Mr. Stenger betrayed the trust that St. Louis County residents placed in our government. I am committed to reforming County government so that pay-to-play politics never infects it again.” Stenger, a former county councilman, was elected to his second term in November after narrowly beating businessman Mark Mantovani in the primary and defeating Republican Paul Berry III in the general election. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

“will do that at their own cost.” The Kremlin said that Putin “underscored that only the Venezuelans themselves have the right to determine the future of their country, whereas outside interference in the country’s internal affairs and attempts to change the government in Caracas by force undermine prospects for a political settlement of the crisis.” Sanders said Trump reiterated “the need for a peaceful transition.” Trump said he and Putin also discussed the possibility of extending a current nuclear agreement or creating a new one that includes China. A trilateral agreement among the world’s major nuclear powers would be significant advance in arms control.

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

M 1 SAturdAy • 05.04.2019 • A6

Unemployment hits 49-year low Average hourly pay rose 3.2 percent from 12 months earlier BY CHRISTOPHER RUGABER

Fed’s Bullard open to rate cut if inflation stays low BY ANN SAPHIR AND HOWARD SCHNEIDER

Associated Press

U.S. employers added a robust 263,000 jobs in April, suggesting that businesses have shrugged off earlier concerns that the economy might slow this year and now anticipate strong customer demand. The unemployment rate fell to a five-decade low of 3.6 percent from 3.8 percent, though that drop reflected a rise in the number of people who stopped looking for work. Average hourly pay rose 3.2 percent from 12 months earlier, a healthy increase that matched the increase in March. Friday’s jobs report from the Labor Department showed that solid economic growth is still encouraging strong hiring nearly a decade into the economy’s recovery from the Great Recession. The economic expansion is set to become the longest in history in July. “The broader economy remains on solid footing, meaning that coming months will see continued job gains and faster wage growth,” said Richard Moody, chief economist at Regions Financial Corp. Trump administration officials insisted that the job market’s gains were a result of the president’s tax cuts and deregulatory policies. “We have entered a very strong and durable prosperity cycle,” said Larry Kudlow, director of the White House’s National Economic Council. President Donald Trump has also pressed the Federal Reserve to cut short-term interest rates because inflation remains low. But most economists said the healthy jobs picture, against the backdrop of low inflation, would reinforce the Fed’s current waitand-see approach. The Fed raised rates four times last year but has signaled that it doesn’t foresee any rate increases this year. Stock investors welcomed Friday’s jobs data. The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 135 points, or 0.7 percent Friday, closing at 26,504.95.

Reuters

CRISTINA M. FLETES, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

People attend a job fair for the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in the downtown T-Rex building in January. The brightening economic picture represents a sharp improvement from the start of the year. At the time, the government was enduring a partial shutdown, the stock market had plunged, trade tensions between the United States and China were flaring and the Fed had just raised shortterm rates in December. Analysts worried that the economy might barely expand in the first three months of the year. Yet the outlook soon brightened. Chair Jerome Powell signaled that the Fed would put rate hikes on hold. Trade negotiations between the U.S. and China made some progress. The economic outlook in some other major economies improved.Share prices rebounded. And in the end, the government reported that the U.S. economy grew at a 3.2 percent annual rate in the January-March period — the strongest pace for a first quarter since 2015. That said, the growth wasledmostlybyfactorsthatcould prove temporary — a restocking of inventories in warehouses and on store shelves and a narrowing of the U.S. trade deficit. By contrast,

consumer spending and business investment, which more closely reflect the economy’s underlying strength, were relatively weak. But American households have become more confident since the winter and are ramping up spending. Consumer spending surged in March by the most in nearly a decade. A likely factor is that steady job growth and solid wage increases have enlarged Americans’ paychecks. Businesses are also spending more freely. Orders to U.S. factories for long-lasting capital goods jumped in March by the most in eight months. That suggested that companies were buying more computers, machinery and other equipment to keep up with growing customer demand. Many businesses say they’re struggling to find workers, yet each month they seem to add a substantial number. Some have taken a range of steps to fill jobs, including training more entrylevel workers, loosening educational requirements and raising pay sharply. Years of steady hiring have

sharply lowered unemployment for a range of population groups. The unemployment rate for women fell last month to 3.1 percent, the lowest point since 1953. The rate for Latinos dropped to 4.2 percent, a record low since 1973, when the government began tracking the data. For Asians, joblessness has matched a record low of 2.2 percent. And the unemployment rate for veterans of the Iraq and Afghan wars dropped to 1.7 percent, also a record low. Most of last month’s job growth occurred in services, which includes both higher-paying jobs in information technology and lower-paying temporary work. Manufacturers added just 4,000 jobs. Construction firms gained 33,000, mostly on public infrastructure projects. Professional and business services, which include IT networking jobs as well as accountants and engineers, led the gains with 76,000. Education and health care added 62,000 jobs, while a category that mostly includes restaurants and hotels gained 34,000.

The Federal Reserve may need to cut interest rates to boost inflation and regain credibility if inflation remains sluggish beyond the second quarter, St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank President James Bullard said on Friday. “I certainly would be open to a cut,” Bullard told Reuters in an interview on the sidelines of a monetary policy conference at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. Bullard voted with the rest of the Fed’s policymakers on Wednesday to keep rates on hold, a move he said was justified because the Fed already made a “huge” policy shift in January by taking off the table the expectation it would raise interest rates this year. “If we go through the summer here and inflation expectations are still too low and actual inflation doesn’t seem to be picking up then I think the level of my concern would get more intense,” Bullard told Reuters in an interview. “I am open to a rate cut to try to combat this – but it would be a rate cut not because of bad data on the U.S. economy – it would be a rate cut because we want to make sure that inflation expectations and eventually actual inflation is more consistent with our 2-percent target,” Bullard said. In his view, he said, such a rate cut would not be insurance against a possible bad outcome, but rather a bid to boost Fed credibility along with inflation, and position the Fed to better fight future downturns. “If you cut rates during boom times that would send a signal you are serious that you are trying to get inflation at 2 (percent) or above our target” of 2 percent. Cutting rates at a time that job growth is weak would be “less successful” at building such credibility, he said.

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MARKET WATCH

05.04.2019 • SATURDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks ended higher on Wall Street Friday, erasing most of the market’s losses for the week and bringing the S&P 500 index close to the record high it reached on Tuesday. A strong report on hiring helped put investors in a buying mood.

Activision Blizzard

45 F

M 52-week range

$39.85

A $84.68

26,720

Dow Jones industrials

26,440

Close: 26,504.95 Change: 197.16 (0.7%)

$350

30

300

15

20

250

10

10

F

M 52-week range

A $23.80

26,000

2,920

Close: 2,945.64 Change: 28.12 (1.0%)

CHICAGO BOT

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

CLOSE

CHG

May 19 May 19 May 19

363 829.50 428

+1 -1 -5.25

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

2,600

Hogs

May 19 Jun 19 May 19 May 19 May 19

137.15 113.42 85.35 16.37 282.50

-1.82 -.25 -.75 +.20 +4.10

Milk Copper

A

21,000

N

D

J

F

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 1,996 2,104 2318 592 108 30

3,266 3,723 2147 602 142 11

2,200

A

N

D

J

F

M

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 19 May 19 Jul 19

74.78 89.25 26.95

+.13 -1.00

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19

61.94 2.0265 207.02 2.567

Cotton

A

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

M

HIGH 26534.96 10986.17 784.30 13044.43 8164.71 2947.85 1981.44 30468.14 1614.02

LOW 26370.09 10822.49 778.04 12990.35 8115.73 2933.02 1967.65 30315.47 1590.51

CLOSE 26504.95 10958.89 783.10 13037.88 8164.00 2945.64 1980.83 30460.59 1614.02

CHG. +197.16 +171.25 +5.13 +108.32 +127.22 +28.12 +27.96 +333.09 +31.37

%CHG. WK +0.75% t +1.59% s +0.66% s +0.84% s +1.58% s +0.96% s +1.43% s +1.11% s +1.98% s

MO QTR s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +13.62% +19.50% +9.84% +14.62% +23.04% +17.50% +19.11% +18.29% +19.68%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.53 30.70 +.08 +0.3

+7.6 +1.8

2.04 General Motors

GM

Aegion Corp

AEGN

15.12

26.80 17.23 +.52 +3.1

+5.6 -26.7 23

... Home Depot

HD

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.62

-6.9 -25.2 dd

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

3.48

1.70

-.12 -6.5

6

ARCH

-6.6 22 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 75.09 101.92 97.73 +2.75 +2.9 +17.8 +24.2 6 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

31.91 30.71 +.21 +0.7 +24.6 +5.0 12

0.60

Belden Inc

BDC

37.79

76.39 61.49 +1.07 +1.8 +47.2

-2.3 11

0.20

Boeing

BA

292.47 446.01 376.46 +.66 +0.2 +16.7 +18.1 35

8.22

7.97

3.75

9.55

1.15

-.07 -5.7 -55.4 -81.9 dd

5.52 +.05 +0.9 +39.7 -40.2 dd

... McDonald’s

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.85

41.09 26.81 +.83 +3.2

-3.7 -20.2 13

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.99

62.08 50.29 +1.03 +2.1

-5.0

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 52.59 +.97 +1.9

...

-9.6 15

...

Charter

CHTR 259.48 378.36 377.68 +7.27 +2.0 +32.5 +34.8 82

...

CI C

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

141.95 226.61 152.83 -5.39 -3.4 -15.0 48.42 53.40

0.28

-1.4 15 1.04b

1.52

1.57

6.50

2.71 +.02 +0.7 +50.6 -54.4 dd

...

1.84

3.69

2.74

...

-.02 -0.7 +29.9 +17.5

36.65 16.14 +.44 +2.8

+2.2 +20.8

1.92 ...

MA

171.89 257.43 247.95 +.76 +0.3 +31.4 +33.7 58

MCD

153.13 200.00 197.52 +2.91 +1.5 +11.2 +23.8 30

1.32 4.64

Olin

OLN

17.87

34.42 21.34 +.70 +3.4

+6.1 -30.4

47.84 29.01 +1.42 +5.1

-4.8 -19.3

0.52

-6.6 +1.7 dd

0.28

31.85 32.07 +.49 +1.6 +44.1 +32.7 48

...

5

Peabody Energy

BTU

26.61

Peak Resorts

SKIS

4.10

Perficient

PRFT

20.92

Post Holdings

POST

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

Reliv

RELV

-3.4 dd

...

Spire Inc

SR

64.95

86.76 85.55 +1.00 +1.2 +15.5 +20.4 19

2.37

Stifel Financial

5.55

4.37

-.08 -1.8

73.58 113.73 103.16 -6.59 -6.0 +15.7 +44.2 10 127.84 155.72 150.69 +1.24 +0.8 3.80

5.26

4.55 +.18 +4.2

+7.5 +0.1 13 +7.4

... 2.40

0.04 1.80

SF

38.39

61.93 59.69 +1.27 +2.2 +44.1 +2.0 19 0.60f

72.55 61.58 +.78 +1.3

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

TGT

60.15

90.39 75.94

UPS

89.89 125.09 106.65 +1.14 +1.1

-.48 -0.6 +14.9 +9.6 13 +9.4

35.85

59.16 41.71 +.64 +1.6 +11.7

Emerson

EMR

55.39

USB

Energizer Holdings

ENR

42.74

79.70 71.10 +1.00 +1.4 +19.0 +6.6 23 1.96f US Bancorp 65.57 47.02 -.33 -0.7 +4.1 -10.7 31 1.20f US Steel

X

14.16

39.23 16.88 +2.49 +17.3

-7.5 -54.8 10

0.20

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.09

58.15 43.81 +1.26 +3.0 +16.4 -16.1 12 0.60f Verizon

VZ

46.09

61.58 57.24 +.25 +0.4

+1.8 +24.4

2.41

Esco Technologies

54.35

76.12 76.79 +1.94 +2.6 +16.6 +35.1 21

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

1.38 11.34

4.10

1.50

-.02 -1.3 -57.1 -48.4 dd

19.31 14.43 +.11 +0.8

55.56 53.48 +.30 +0.6 +17.0 +9.5 13

7

1.48

0.32 WalMart

WMT

81.78 106.21 102.08 +.93 +0.9

0.13 Walgreen Boots

WBA

52.25

86.31 54.08 +.29 +0.5 -20.9 -12.8 10

1.76

WFC

43.02

59.53 48.65 +.35 +0.7

1.80

-9.0 +22.5 18 0.24a Wells Fargo

+9.6 +19.6 59 2.12f

+5.6

-4.2 11

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Sinclair to buy Disney’s sports networks: Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., the largest U.S. broadcast station owner, said on Friday it would buy Walt Disney Co’s interests in 21 regional sports networks for $9.6 billion. The sale includes Fox Sports Midwest, which televises the St. Louis Cardinals and St. Louis Blues games. Sinclair owns 191 TV stations, including KDNL 30, an ABC affiliate, in St. Louis. Disney, which owns cable sports network ESPN, bought the networks as part of its $71 billion acquisition of TwentyFirst Century Fox Inc.’s film and television assets. The media company agreed to sell the networks as part of an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice. Including minority equity interests, the assets are valued at $10.6 billion, the company said. Completion of the deal is subject to customary closing conditions, including the approval of the U.S. Department of Justice. Judge approves Fiat Chrysler diesel emissions settlement: A federal judge in San Francisco on Friday approved a $307.5 million civil settlement for about 100,000 U.S. owners of Fiat Chrysler diesel vehicles that the government said had illegal software that allowed them to emit excess emissions. Under the settlement approved by Judge Edward Chen, about 100,000 owners and lessees of Ram 1500 and Jeep Grand Cherokee 3.0-liter diesel vehicles from model years 2014 to 2016 will receive payments for having a software reflash completed. Most owners will receive $3,075 payments. Current owners and leaseholders have until February 2021 to submit a claim, and until May 2021 to complete the repair and receive compensation, while former owners have until August to submit a claim. The Italian-American automaker on Jan. 10 announced it had settled with the U.S. Justice Department, the state of Cali-

fornia and diesel owners over civil claims that it used illegal software that produced false results on diesel-emissions tests. A criminal investigation is ongoing. Soybeans down for fourth straight week: U.S. soybean futures eased on Friday for a sixth consecutive session, posting a fourth straight weekly drop as rain-delayed U.S. corn planting may fuel a shift to more soybean acres despite sluggish export demand from top importer China. Corn edged upward for a seventh straight day and notched its first weekly gain in four weeks, lifted by concerns about late planting and possible yield declines due to excessive rains and flooding this spring. Wheat eased after two sessions of strong gains as traders pocketed profits from a run to two-week highs. Much of the market’s focus remained on Midwestern weather, with corn planting already behind the normal pace. Traders are also keen to hear any developments from U.S.-China trade talks, which are due to shift from Beijing to Washington next week. “It’s just kind of a choppy day. The beans were incredibly oversold, making new contract lows yesterday. We had the (export) sale to Mexico so they were supported early in the day, but they’ve backed off now,” said Mark Gold, managing partner at Top Third Ag Marketing. “The talk is that we will lose corn acres into beans because of wet planting,” he said. Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) July soybeans ended down a penny at $8.42-¼ a bushel after notching a contract low of $8.40-½. The contract was down 2.9 percent in the week. July corn settled ¼ cent higher at $3.70-¾ a bushel, ending the week up 2.6 percent. CBOT July wheat fell 6 cents to $4.38 a bushel, closing out the week down 1 percent, a fourth straight weekly drop. From staff and wire reports

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.50 5.25 4.75

2.56

EPC

ESE

+9.50 +.37 +20.60

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.42 2.45 2.39 2.32 2.33 2.43 2.53 2.92

-0.01 ... -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02

1.82 2.01 2.22 2.48 2.78 2.90 2.95 3.12

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

2.38 2.13 1.63

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.83 3.02 6.15 3.76 3.66 .58

+0.02 +0.04 +0.05 +0.08 +0.05 -0.04

1.97 3.32 6.29 3.99 3.96 .75

GlobalMarkets

-1.8 18 3.84f

Edgewell

43.14

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.53% on Friday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

0.80

-8.2 15

-2.2 22

Silver Platinum

75.24 x70.67 +.76 +1.1 +35.7 +5.9 10 +9.2 +1.9 16

CHG

CLOSE

1279.20 14.91 874.80

Gold

-.45 -0.2 +16.7 +10.5 22 5.44f

81.16 118.23 112.36 +.25 +0.2 +21.7 +35.8 25

Arch Coal

Citigroup

45.00 38.80 +.55 +1.4 +16.0 +9.9 dd

11.65

64.55 106.86 88.10 +.56 +0.6 +33.9

Cigna

30.56

158.09 215.43 200.56

LOW

55.21

BUD

.0223 .6997 .2522 1.3029 .7418 .1485 1.1175 .0144 .2780 .008969 .052299 .0153 .0688 .000857 .9810

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

MNK

AEE

ABInBev

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

52-WK LO HI

LEE

Ameren Corp

+.13 +.0082 -.76 -.022

PREV

.0225 .7016 .2538 1.3164 .7447 .1485 1.1194 .0145 .2791 .009002 .052751 .0154 .0697 .000858 .9827

Interestrates Interestrates

70.31 55.16 +.39 +0.7

-5.8 -16.4 15 1.14f Lee Enterprises 74.91 72.95 +.61 +0.8 +11.8 +27.1 26 1.90 Lowes

$331.27 PE: 71.6 Yield: ...

Vol.: 5.8m (6.7x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $21.1 b

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest

A

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

22,000 ICE

M 52-week range

ExchangeRates

DATE

2,800

2,400

F

$187.08

$105.73

Vol.: 14.9m (3.1x avg.) PE: 7.2 Mkt. Cap: $1.5 b Yield: 3.0%

Live cattle

23,000

200

A

Futures

S&P 500

25,000 24,000

M 52-week range

$17.55

Vol.: 19.6m (2.7x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $7.0 b Yield: 5.5%

3,000

27,000

F

ANET

Close: $278.41 -32.44 or -10.4% The cloud networking company expects revenue in the current quarter to fall short of Wall Street forecasts.

$40

2,960

2,880

10 DAYS

Arista Networks

WW

Close: $22.96 2.65 or 13.1% The weight-loss program operator’s first quarter loss was much narrower than Wall Street had forecast.

20

$13.57

Vol.: 25.7m (2.1x avg.) PE: 106.8 Mkt. Cap: $36.0 b Yield: 0.8%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Weight Watchers

NWL

Close: $16.63 1.98 or 13.5% The maker of Sharpie and Elmer’s products beat Wall Street’s first quarter earnings and revenue forecasts. $25

$50

40

26,160

Newell Brands

ATVI

Close: $47.15 -2.40 or -4.8% The videogame maker behind “Call of Duty” gave investors a weak profit forecast for the year.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2945.64 12412.75 7380.64 30081.55 5548.84 44277.24 22258.73 96007.88 16494.43 9741.99

CHG

CHG

YTD

+28.12 +67.33 +29.33 +137.37 +9.99 -35.19 -48.85 +480.26 +83.55 -4.07

+0.96% +0.55% +0.40% +0.46% +0.18% -0.08% -0.22% +0.50% +0.51% -0.04%

+17.50% +17.56% +9.70% +16.51% +17.29% +6.33% +11.21% +9.24% +15.16% +15.57%

Defective stroller fix sent to avoid safety recall BY TODD C. FRANKEL

Washington Post

Britax Child Safety sent defective replacement parts for its BOB jogging stroller to nearly 200 customers in recent weeks, according to the company, raising new questions about a settlement with U.S. regulators that allowed the company to avoid a safety recall. The fix — a new metal bolt for securing the BOB stroller’s front wheel — was being offered by Britax as part of an agreement with the Consumer Product Safety Commission reached late last year that ended the agency’s pursuit of a mandatory recall. The agency claimed that hundreds of BOB stroller crashes and nearly 100 injuries were caused by the spontaneous failure of the BOB’s front wheel. Britax said the wheel was safe, however, and that consumers were to blame for the crashes. But as part of its settlement, the company agreed to

DUSTIN FRANZ, WASHINGTON POST

Britax’s BOB Stroller launch an online safety campaign in January and to offer some consumers two new ways of securing the front wheel on the threewheeled stroller. Britax said so far it has received four reports of “breakage on thrubolt axles,” according to a statement released Thursday, shortly after an inquiry from the Washington Post. The company said 197 customers received the potentially defective bolts but that it had no reports of injuries. Britax said it was working to develop a new bolt. It also said it

was not aware of problems with the other replacement part, a modified quick-release axle. The Consumer Product Safety Commission said it was aware of the issue, but agency spokesman Joe Martyak declined to comment further on “compliance deliberations.” Brian Awsumb of Minneapolis said in an interview that the replacement bolt he received in late April for his BOB stroller broke into two pieces the day after he installed it. He said it was disturbing that Britax’s fix to one problem with the stroller resulted in another. “Good thing we weren’t running with our 7-month-old baby,” Awsumb said. The defective bolts are the latest problem for Britax since its settlement with federal regulators in November, which was the subject of an investigation by The Post into how the consumer safety agency backed off its demand for a recall.

Developer drops hotel as part of condo plan BY JACOB BARKER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The developers planning a new condo tower in Clayton at the corner of Bemiston Avenue and Forsyth Boulevard have dropped plans for a hotel as part of the project. “After a thorough review of existing site challenges and further consideration of what the community would welcome, I have concluded that a hotel is not a good fit at this location,” Fred S. Kummer, president and CEO, HBE Corporation, said in a statement. “Instead, we will move forward with the planned condominium building on the Bemiston side at this time. This extraordinary residential asset will benefit both the Clayton community and the entire St. Louis region.” Kummer, 89, and his team — Steve Smith, CEO of the Law-

rence Group; F. Stafford Manion, president of Gladys Manion Inc.; and Clayton-based Castle Design — announced the project in February. They are still finalizing designs, but the development group says the change in plans should allow construction to proceed more quickly. The Central Avenue side of the site, where the hotel was planned, will now be used for construction staging during the project, expected to begin soon after existing tenant leases expire in February. The group plans to discuss with the city what will best fit on the side where the hotel was planned, indicating it could be a retail, restaurant and entertainment building. Even with the change in plans, the 1936 Shanley building, at 7800 Maryland Avenue, is still in the path of the wrecking ball.

The structure, on the National Register of Historic Places, is generally recognized as the first International Style building in the Midwest. Preservationists have mounted a drive to save it. The developers say they are asking for no tax incentives and that a large residential building will add pedestrian traffic and vibrancy to downtown Clayton that residents want. Kummer’s HBE Corp., founded in 1960 and based in Creve Coeur, was one of the largest private companies in the region and used to own the Adam’s Mark Hotel chain before deciding to solely focus on its other business of building hospitals and medical facilities. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


MARKET WATCH

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A7

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks ended higher on Wall Street Friday, erasing most of the market’s losses for the week and bringing the S&P 500 index close to the record high it reached on Tuesday. A strong report on hiring helped put investors in a buying mood.

Activision Blizzard

45 F

M 52-week range

$39.85

A $84.68

26,720

Dow Jones industrials

26,440

Close: 26,504.95 Change: 197.16 (0.7%)

$350

30

300

15

20

250

10

10

F

M 52-week range

A $23.80

26,000

2,920

Close: 2,945.64 Change: 28.12 (1.0%)

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

CHG

May 19 May 19 May 19

363 829.50 428

+1 -1 -5.25

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 19 Jun 19 May 19 May 19 May 19

137.15 113.42 85.35 16.37 282.50

-1.82 -.25 -.75 +.20 +4.10

Milk Copper

2,400

CLOSE

Feeder cattle Hogs

21,000

N

D

J

F

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 1,996 2,104 2318 592 108 30

3,266 3,723 2147 602 142 11

2,200

A

N

D

J

F

M

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 19 May 19 Jul 19

74.78 89.25 26.95

+.13 -1.00

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19 Jun 19

61.94 2.0265 207.02 2.567

Cotton

A

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

M

HIGH 26534.96 10986.17 784.30 13044.43 8164.71 2947.85 1981.44 30468.14 1614.02

LOW 26370.09 10822.49 778.04 12990.35 8115.73 2933.02 1967.65 30315.47 1590.51

CLOSE 26504.95 10958.89 783.10 13037.88 8164.00 2945.64 1980.83 30460.59 1614.02

CHG. +197.16 +171.25 +5.13 +108.32 +127.22 +28.12 +27.96 +333.09 +31.37

%CHG. WK +0.75% t +1.59% s +0.66% s +0.84% s +1.58% s +0.96% s +1.43% s +1.11% s +1.98% s

MO QTR s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +13.62% +19.50% +9.84% +14.62% +23.04% +17.50% +19.11% +18.29% +19.68%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

NAME

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.53 30.70 +.08 +0.3

+7.6 +1.8

2.04 General Motors

GM

Aegion Corp

AEGN

15.12

26.80 17.23 +.52 +3.1

+5.6 -26.7 23

... Home Depot

HD

-6.9 -25.2 dd

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.62

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

3.48

1.70

-.12 -6.5

6

ARCH

-6.6 22 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 75.09 101.92 97.73 +2.75 +2.9 +17.8 +24.2 6 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

31.91 30.71 +.21 +0.7 +24.6 +5.0 12

0.60

Belden Inc

BDC

37.79

76.39 61.49 +1.07 +1.8 +47.2

-2.3 11

0.20

Boeing

BA

292.47 446.01 376.46 +.66 +0.2 +16.7 +18.1 35

8.22

7.97

3.75

9.55

1.15

-.07 -5.7 -55.4 -81.9 dd

5.52 +.05 +0.9 +39.7 -40.2 dd

... McDonald’s

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.85

41.09 26.81 +.83 +3.2

-3.7 -20.2 13

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.99

62.08 50.29 +1.03 +2.1

-5.0

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 52.59 +.97 +1.9

...

-9.6 15

...

Charter

CHTR 259.48 378.36 377.68 +7.27 +2.0 +32.5 +34.8 82

...

CI C

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

141.95 226.61 152.83 -5.39 -3.4 -15.0 48.42 53.40

0.28

-1.4 15 1.04b

Olin

1.57

6.50

2.71 +.02 +0.7 +50.6 -54.4 dd

...

1.84

3.69

2.74

...

-.02 -0.7 +29.9 +17.5

36.65 16.14 +.44 +2.8

+2.2 +20.8

...

MA

171.89 257.43 247.95 +.76 +0.3 +31.4 +33.7 58

MCD

153.13 200.00 197.52 +2.91 +1.5 +11.2 +23.8 30

OLN

17.87

34.42 21.34 +.70 +3.4 47.84 29.01 +1.42 +5.1

+6.1 -30.4

1.92

1.32 4.64

5

0.80

-4.8 -19.3

0.52

-6.6 +1.7 dd

0.28

31.85 32.07 +.49 +1.6 +44.1 +32.7 48

...

BTU

26.61

SKIS

4.10

Perficient

PRFT

20.92

Post Holdings

POST

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

Reliv

RELV

-3.4 dd

...

Spire Inc

SR

64.95

86.76 85.55 +1.00 +1.2 +15.5 +20.4 19

2.37

Stifel Financial

SF

38.39

61.93 59.69 +1.27 +2.2 +44.1 +2.0 19 0.60f

TGT

60.15

90.39 75.94

UPS

89.89 125.09 106.65 +1.14 +1.1

0.04 1.80

72.55 61.58 +.78 +1.3

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

+9.2 +1.9 16

1.52

Peabody Energy

-8.2 15

5.55

4.37

-.08 -1.8

73.58 113.73 103.16 -6.59 -6.0 +15.7 +44.2 10 127.84 155.72 150.69 +1.24 +0.8 3.80

5.26

4.55 +.18 +4.2

+7.5 +0.1 13 +7.4

-.48 -0.6 +14.9 +9.6 13 +9.4

... 2.40

35.85

59.16 41.71 +.64 +1.6 +11.7

Emerson

EMR

55.39

Energizer Holdings

ENR

42.74

79.70 71.10 +1.00 +1.4 +19.0 +6.6 23 1.96f US Bancorp 65.57 47.02 -.33 -0.7 +4.1 -10.7 31 1.20f US Steel

X

14.16

39.23 16.88 +2.49 +17.3

-7.5 -54.8 10

0.20

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.09

58.15 43.81 +1.26 +3.0 +16.4 -16.1 12 0.60f Verizon

VZ

46.09

61.58 57.24 +.25 +0.4

+1.8 +24.4

2.41

Esco Technologies

54.35

76.12 76.79 +1.94 +2.6 +16.6 +35.1 21

ESE

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

1.38 11.34

4.10

1.50

-.02 -1.3 -57.1 -48.4 dd

19.31 14.43 +.11 +0.8

43.14

55.56 53.48 +.30 +0.6 +17.0 +9.5 13

7

1.48

0.32 WalMart

WMT

81.78 106.21 102.08 +.93 +0.9

0.13 Walgreen Boots

WBA

52.25

86.31 54.08 +.29 +0.5 -20.9 -12.8 10

1.76

WFC

43.02

59.53 48.65 +.35 +0.7

1.80

-9.0 +22.5 18 0.24a Wells Fargo

+9.6 +19.6 59 2.12f

+5.6

-4.2 11

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST Sinclair to buy Disney’s sports networks: Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., the largest U.S. broadcast station owner, said on Friday it would buy Walt Disney Co’s interests in 21 regional sports networks for $9.6 billion. The sale includes Fox Sports Midwest, which televises the St. Louis Cardinals and St. Louis Blues games. Sinclair owns 191 TV stations, including KDNL 30, an ABC affiliate, in St. Louis. Disney, which owns cable sports network ESPN, bought the networks as part of its $71 billion acquisition of TwentyFirst Century Fox Inc.’s film and television assets. The media company agreed to sell the networks as part of an agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice. Including minority equity interests, the assets are valued at $10.6 billion, the company said. Completion of the deal is subject to customary closing conditions, including the approval of the U.S. Department of Justice. Judge approves Fiat Chrysler diesel emissions settlement: A federal judge in San Francisco on Friday approved a $307.5 million civil settlement for about 100,000 U.S. owners of Fiat Chrysler diesel vehicles that the government said had illegal software that allowed them to emit excess emissions. Under the settlement approved by Judge Edward Chen, about 100,000 owners and lessees of Ram 1500 and Jeep Grand Cherokee 3.0-liter diesel vehicles from model years 2014 to 2016 will receive payments for having a software reflash completed. Most owners will receive $3,075 payments. Current owners and leaseholders have until February 2021 to submit a claim, and until May 2021 to complete the repair and receive compensation, while former owners have until August to submit a claim. The Italian-American automaker on Jan. 10 announced it had settled with the U.S. Justice Department, the state of Cali-

fornia and diesel owners over civil claims that it used illegal software that produced false results on diesel-emissions tests. A criminal investigation is ongoing. Soybeans down for fourth straight week: U.S. soybean futures eased on Friday for a sixth consecutive session, posting a fourth straight weekly drop as rain-delayed U.S. corn planting may fuel a shift to more soybean acres despite sluggish export demand from top importer China. Corn edged upward for a seventh straight day and notched its first weekly gain in four weeks, lifted by concerns about late planting and possible yield declines due to excessive rains and flooding this spring. Wheat eased after two sessions of strong gains as traders pocketed profits from a run to two-week highs. Much of the market’s focus remained on Midwestern weather, with corn planting already behind the normal pace. Traders are also keen to hear any developments from U.S.-China trade talks, which are due to shift from Beijing to Washington next week. “It’s just kind of a choppy day. The beans were incredibly oversold, making new contract lows yesterday. We had the (export) sale to Mexico so they were supported early in the day, but they’ve backed off now,” said Mark Gold, managing partner at Top Third Ag Marketing. “The talk is that we will lose corn acres into beans because of wet planting,” he said. Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) July soybeans ended down a penny at $8.42-¼ a bushel after notching a contract low of $8.40-½. The contract was down 2.9 percent in the week. July corn settled ¼ cent higher at $3.70-¾ a bushel, ending the week up 2.6 percent. CBOT July wheat fell 6 cents to $4.38 a bushel, closing out the week down 1 percent, a fourth straight weekly drop. From staff and wire reports

+9.50 +.37 +20.60

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.42 2.45 2.39 2.32 2.33 2.43 2.53 2.92

-0.01 ... -0.01 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02

1.82 2.01 2.22 2.48 2.78 2.90 2.95 3.12

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.50 5.25 4.75

2.56

EPC

USB

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.53% on Friday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

2.38 2.13 1.63

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.83 3.02 6.15 3.76 3.66 .58

+0.02 +0.04 +0.05 +0.08 +0.05 -0.04

1.97 3.32 6.29 3.99 3.96 .75

GlobalMarkets

-1.8 18 3.84f

Edgewell

-2.2 22

Silver Platinum

Peak Resorts

75.24 x70.67 +.76 +1.1 +35.7 +5.9 10

CHG

CLOSE

1279.20 14.91 874.80

Gold

-.45 -0.2 +16.7 +10.5 22 5.44f

81.16 118.23 112.36 +.25 +0.2 +21.7 +35.8 25

Arch Coal

Cigna

45.00 38.80 +.55 +1.4 +16.0 +9.9 dd

11.65

55.21

64.55 106.86 88.10 +.56 +0.6 +33.9

Citigroup

30.56

158.09 215.43 200.56

LOW

AEE BUD

.0223 .6997 .2522 1.3029 .7418 .1485 1.1175 .0144 .2780 .008969 .052299 .0153 .0688 .000857 .9810

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

MNK

Ameren Corp

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

52-WK LO HI

LEE

ABInBev

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70.31 55.16 +.39 +0.7

-5.8 -16.4 15 1.14f Lee Enterprises 74.91 72.95 +.61 +0.8 +11.8 +27.1 26 1.90 Lowes

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CHICAGO MERC

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$187.08

$105.73

Vol.: 14.9m (3.1x avg.) PE: 7.2 Mkt. Cap: $1.5 b Yield: 3.0%

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ANET

Close: $278.41 -32.44 or -10.4% The cloud networking company expects revenue in the current quarter to fall short of Wall Street forecasts.

$40

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Arista Networks

WW

Close: $22.96 2.65 or 13.1% The weight-loss program operator’s first quarter loss was much narrower than Wall Street had forecast.

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Close: $16.63 1.98 or 13.5% The maker of Sharpie and Elmer’s products beat Wall Street’s first quarter earnings and revenue forecasts. $25

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Close: $47.15 -2.40 or -4.8% The videogame maker behind “Call of Duty” gave investors a weak profit forecast for the year.

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Defective stroller fix sent to avoid safety recall BY TODD C. FRANKEL

Washington Post

Britax Child Safety sent defective replacement parts for its BOB jogging stroller to nearly 200 customers in recent weeks, according to the company, raising new questions about a settlement with U.S. regulators that allowed the company to avoid a safety recall. The fix — a new metal bolt for securing the BOB stroller’s front wheel — was being offered by Britax as part of an agreement with the Consumer Product Safety Commission reached late last year that ended the agency’s pursuit of a mandatory recall. The agency claimed that hundreds of BOB stroller crashes and nearly 100 injuries were caused by the spontaneous failure of the BOB’s front wheel. Britax said the wheel was safe, however, and that consumers were to blame for the crashes. But as part of its settlement, the company agreed to

DUSTIN FRANZ, WASHINGTON POST

Britax’s BOB Stroller launch an online safety campaign in January and to offer some consumers two new ways of securing the front wheel on the threewheeled stroller. Britax said so far it has received four reports of “breakage on thruboltaxles,” accordingtoastatement released Thursday, shortly after an inquiry from the Washington Post. The company said 197 customers received the potentially defective bolts but that it had no reports of injuries. Britax said it was working to develop a new bolt. It also said it

was not aware of problems with the other replacement part,a modified quick-release axle. The Consumer Product Safety Commission said it was aware of the issue, but agency spokesman Joe Martyak declined to comment further on “compliance deliberations.” Brian Awsumb of Minneapolis said in an interview that the replacement bolt he received in late April for his BOB stroller broke into two pieces the day after he installed it. He said it was disturbing that Britax’s fix to one problem with the stroller resulted in another. “Good thing we weren’t running with our 7-month-old baby,” Awsumb said. The defective bolts are the latest problem for Britax since its settlement with federal regulators in November, which was the subject of an investigation by The Post into how the consumer safety agency backed off its demand for a recall.

Developer drops hotel as part of condo plan BY JACOB BARKER

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The developers planning a new condo tower in Clayton at the corner of Bemiston Avenue and Forsyth Boulevard have dropped plans for a hotel as part of the project. “After a thorough review of existing site challenges and further consideration of what the community would welcome, I have concluded that a hotel is not a good fit at this location,” Fred S. Kummer, president and CEO, HBE Corporation, said in a statement. “Instead, we will move forward with the planned condominium building on the Bemiston side at this time. This extraordinary residential asset will benefit both the Clayton community and the entire St. Louis region.” Kummer, 89, and his team — Steve Smith, CEO of the Law-

rence Group; F. Stafford Manion, president of Gladys Manion Inc.; and Clayton-based Castle Design — announced the project in February. They are still finalizing designs, but the development group says the change in plans should allow construction to proceed more quickly. The Central Avenue side of the site, where the hotel was planned, will now be used for construction staging during the project, expected to begin soon after existing tenant leases expire in February. The group plans to discuss with the city what will best fit on the side where the hotel was planned, indicating it could be a retail, restaurant and entertainment building. Even with the change in plans, the 1936 Shanley building, at 7800 Maryland Avenue, is still in the path of the wrecking ball.

The structure, on the National Register of Historic Places, is generally recognized as the first International Style building in the Midwest. Preservationists have mounted a drive to save it. The developers say they are asking for no tax incentives and that a large residential building will add pedestrian traffic and vibrancy to downtown Clayton that residents want. Kummer’s HBE Corp., founded in 1960 and based in Creve Coeur, was one of the largest private companies in the region and used to own the Adam’s Mark Hotel chain before deciding to solely focus on its other business of building hospitals and medical facilities. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

CONGO

City to pay $20M over police killing

Ebola deaths top 1,000

MINNEAPOLIS — Minneapolis will pay $20 million to the family of an unarmed woman shot by a police officer after she called 911 to report a possible crime, city leaders announced Friday, just three days after the former officer was convicted of murder. The settlement reached with the family of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a dual citizen of the U.S. and Australia, is believed to be the largest stemming from police violence in the state of Minnesota. It’s believed that Mohamed Noor is the first Minnesota officer to be convicted of murder for an on-duty shooting. Asked about the amount and speed of the settlement, Mayor Jacob Frey cited Noor’s unprecedented conviction, as well as the officer’s failure to identify a threat before he used deadly force. “This is not a victory for anyone, but rather a way for our city to move forward,” he said.

Attacks on treatment centers hampering containment efforts SALEH MWANAMILONGO AND KRISTA LARSON

Associated Press

KINSHASA, Congo — More than 1,000 people have died from Ebola in eastern Congo since August, the country’s health minister said Friday as hostility toward health workers continues to hamper efforts to contain the second-deadliest outbreak of the virus. Health Minister Oly Ilunga told The Associated Press that four deaths in the outbreak’s epicenter of Katwa helped push the death toll to 1,008. Two more

deaths were reported in the city of Butembo. The outbreak declared almost nine months ago already had caused the most deaths behind the 2014-2016 outbreak in West Africa’s Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia that killed more than 11,000 people. A volatile security situation and deep community mistrust have hampered efforts to control the epidemic in eastern Congo. Ebola treatment centers have come under repeated attack, leaving government health officials to staff clinics in the hotspots of Butembo and Katwa. International aid organizations stopped their work in the two communities because of the violence. A Cameroonian epidemiologist working with WHO

was killed last month during an assault on a hospital in Butembo. Insecurity has become a “major impediment” to controlling the Ebola outbreak, Michael Ryan, WHO’s health emergencies chief, told reporters Friday in Geneva. He said 119 attacks have been recorded since January, 42 of them directed at health facilities, while 85 health workers have been wounded or killed. Dozens of rebel groups operate in the region, and political rivalries in part drive’s community rejection of health personnel. “Every time we have managed to regain control over the virus and contain its spread, we have suffered major, major security events,” Ryan said.“We are anticipating a scenario of continued intense transmission” of the disease.

WHO has said the most recent Ebola outbreak remained contained to eastern Congo even as the number of cases rises in a dense, highly mobile population near the border with Uganda and Rwanda. Many people fear going to Ebola treatment centers, choosing instead to stay at home and risk transmitting the disease. Residents of highly volatile Butembo believe Ebola was brought to the city on purpose, said Vianney Musavuli, 24. “I am deeply saddened to learn that the number of Ebola deaths has exceeded 1,000,” Musavuli said “The problem is that people here in this area believe Ebola is a political thing, and that’s why residents are still attacking the teams in retaliation.”

TROPICAL WEATHER

Two plead guilty in Charlottesville riot CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — Two members of a white supremacist group pleaded guilty Friday to federal rioting charges in connection with a white nationalist rally in Virginia and political rallies in California. Benjamin Drake Daley, 26, of Redondo Beach, California, and Michael Paul Miselis, 30, of Lawndale, California, each pleaded guilty to a single count of conspiracy to riot. Daley and Miselis are the last of four members of the Rise Above Movement indicted in Virginia to plead guilty. The militant white supremacist group was known for having members who train in mixed martial arts street-fighting techniques. Two other members of the group — Cole White and Thomas Gillen — each previously pleaded guilty to the same charge. All four men admitted they punched and kicked demonstrators who showed up to protest against white nationalists during a torch-lit march at the University of Virginia and the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville in August 2017. BRIEFLY AFGHANISTAN: An Afghan grand council convened by President Ashraf Ghani ended Friday with a resounding call for peace with the Taliban and a promise from the president to free 175 Taliban prisoners ahead of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month that starts next week. VENEZUELA: The Trump administration ended a week of pointed but vague threats of a military response to the Venezuelan political crisis Friday with a meeting at the Pentagon to consider its options, though there was still no sign any action was on the horizon. DARKNET CHARGES: European and American investigators have broken up one of the world’s largest online criminal marketplaces for drugs, hacking tools and financial-theft wares in a series of raids in the United States and Germany, authorities said Friday. Three German men were arrested on allegations they operated the so-called “Wall Street Market” darknet platform. KELLY: Former White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly has joined the board of the conglomerate that operates the largest facility for migrant children in the country. Caliburn International’s CEO James Van Dusen confirmed the appointment of the former Trump cabinet member Friday. NORTH KOREA: About 10 million people in North Korea are facing “severe food shortages” after the East Asian nation had one of the worst harvests in a decade, the United Nations’ top food agencies said Friday. The shortfall is the result of drought and flooding as well as a lack of fuel and fertilizers. HURRICANE FLORENCE: A National Hurricane Center report issued Friday said Hurricane Florence killed 22 people across three states, was the ninth most destructive storm in terms of property damage in U.S. history and spawned 44 tornadoes. — Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Motorcycles lie on a street Friday in Puri district after Cyclone Fani hit the coastal eastern state of Odisha in India.

Powerful cyclone lashes India 1.2 million evacuated in unprecedented effort EMILY SCHMALL AND BIKAS DAS

Associated Press

KOLKATA, India — Cyclone Fani tore through India’s eastern coast on Friday as a grade 5 storm, lashing beaches with rain and winds gusting up to 127 miles per hour and affecting weather as far away as Mount Everest as it approached the former imperial capital of Kolkata. The India Meteorological Department said the “extremely severe” cyclone in the Bay of Bengal hit the coastal state of Odisha around 8 a.m., with weather impacted across the Asian subcontinent. Dust storms were forecast in the desert state of Rajasthan bordering Pakistan, heat waves in the coastal state of Maharashtra on the Ara-

bian Sea, heavy rain in the northeastern states bordering China and snowfall in the Himalayas. Around 1.2 million people were evacuated from low-lying areas of Odisha and moved to nearly 4,000 shelters, according to India’s National Disaster Response Force. Indian officials put the navy, air force, army and coast guard on high alert. Odisha Special Relief Commissioner Bishnupada Sethi said the evacuation effort was unprecedented in India. By Friday afternoon, Fani had weakened to a “very severe” storm as it hovered over coastal Odisha and was forecast to move northnortheast toward the Indian state of West Bengal. In Bhubaneswar, a city in Odisha famous for an 11th-century Hindu temple, palm trees whipped back and forth like mops across skies made opaque by gusts of rain. It is a “very, very scary feeling,”

Congressional map ordered redrawn Federal judges say Ohio districts give GOP unfair unadvantage DAN SEWELL

Associated Press

CINCINNATI — A panel of federal judges ruled Friday that Ohio’s congressional districts were unconstitutionally drawn by the Republicans for their political advantage, and it ordered a new map for the 2020 elections. The ruling, if it stands, could prove an important victory for the Democrats, who are hoping redrawn boundaries will not only help them pick up House seats but also energize voters and boost turnout in this longtime battleground state, helping them defeat President Donald Trump. Republican officials said they

would appeal. The panel unanimously declared the current map an“unconstitutional partisan gerrymander,” saying the GOP-controlled Ohio Legislature put the Democrats at a disadvantage by packing lots of them into four districts and scattering the rest across the remaining 12. “Democratic candidates must run a significantly longer distance to get to the same finish line,” the judges wrote. The Republicans hold a 12-4 advantage in Ohio’s congressional delegation under the current map. Republican Attorney General Dave Yost said he will seek to stay the court order while appealing to the U.S. Supreme Court. He called the opinion “a fundamentally political act that has no basis whatsoever in the Constitution.”

said Tanmay Das, a 40-year-old resident, who described “the sound of wind as if it will blow you away.” Most of the area’s thatchedroof houses were destroyed, and there was no electricity. The national highway to Puri, a popular tourist beach city with other significant Hindu antiquities, was littered with fallen trees and electricity poles and a blue highway sign, making it impassable. A special train ran Thursday to evacuate tourists from the city. The airport in Kolkata, the capital of West Bengal, closed from 3 p.m. Friday to Saturday morning, and rail lines were closed. The storm hit in the middle of India’s six-week general election, with rain forecast in Kolkata forcing political parties to cancel campaign events. At least 200 trains were canceled across India.

The storm hit in the middle of India’s six-week general election, with rain forecast in Kolkata forcing political parties to cancel campaign events. The National Disaster Response Force dispatched 54 rescue and relief teams of doctors, engineers and deep-sea divers to floodprone areas along the coast and as far afield as Andaman and Nicobar Islands, a group of islands that comprise a union territory about 840 miles east of mainland India in the Bay of Bengal. More than 1,430 miles away on Mount Everest, some mountaineers and Sherpa guides were descending to lower camps as weather worsened at higher elevations. The government issued a warning that heavy snowfall was expected in the higher mountain areas with rain and storms lower down, and asked trekking agencies to take tourists to safety.

Pushing off impeachment, Democrats attack Barr MARY CLARE JALONICK

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Democrats are splintered by calls to impeach President Donald Trump. But they have found another common enemy and an alternate political foil in Attorney General William Barr. Calls for Barr’s resignation erupted across the Democratic Party this week after he testified before the Senate and rebuffed the House twice, first by denying Democrats a full, unredacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, and then by skipping a hearing to review it. In response, Democrats threatened to hold Barr in criminal contempt of Congress — a lengthy legal process that could go on for months. The feud with Barr has animated Democrats and temporarily shifted attention away from impeachment — and by extension, the party’s divisions over

whether to pursue it. But with Trump resisting other congressional investigations, and testimony from Mueller likely on the horizon, the impeachment question seems unlikely to subside for long. For now, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, who would lead impeachment proceedings, are putting their emphasis on investigating Trump, his business dealings and his administration. If Democrats do decide to impeach the president, they will have already made part of the case through oversight. Trump’s refusal to comply with their requests — with Barr just the latest example — will only strengthen the case. “Impeachment is never off the table, but should we start there? I don’t agree with that,” Pelosi said Friday at an event in Medford, Massachusetts.


05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

Bunk bed is Cohen’s reality BY MICHAEL R. SISAK AND JIM MUSTIAN

Associated Press

NEW YORK — “The Situation” and the Fyre Festival fraudster are already there. President Donald Trump’s former lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, is up next. It’s not reality TV. It’s a federal prison 70 miles from New York City where white-collar and D-list scoundrels can do time while playing bocce ball and noshing on rugelach. Cohen, 53, is due to report Monday to the Federal Correctional Institution, Otisville to start a three-year sentence for tax evasion, lying to Congress and campaign finance crimes. Tucked in the lush countryside south of the Catskill Mountains, Otisville is actually two federal facilities with a total of about 800 inmates: a medium-security prison where former NFL star Darren Sharper is serving a 20-year rape sentence, and a satellite camp for non-violent offenders like Cohen. There, he’ll be serving his sentence with the likes of “Jersey Shore” star-turned-tax fraud convict Michael “The Situation” Sorrentino and Fyre Festival’s Billy McFarland. The U.S. Bureau of Prisons, which runs the federal prison system, has been tight-lipped about Cohen’s placement. The agency denied a reporter’s request to tour the Otisville facility and declined to comment for this article. The camp does have its allure. About 115 inmates sleep in bunks lined up in barrackstyle halls, instead of individual or two-man cells like in higher-security facilities. There are lockers to store personal belongings, washers and dryers for laundry, microwaves to heat up food and ice machines to keep cool. Alums include accountant Kenneth Starr, who was accused of bilking celebrities like Uma Thurman with bad investments, and former Cendant chairman Walter Forbes and ex-Connecticut Gov. John Rowland. New York Ponzi schemer Bernie Madoff wanted to go to Otisville, but the Bureau of Prisons sent him to North Carolina instead. Otisville is also known as a favorite among prison-bound Jews for its Kosher meals and Shabbat services. Add in recreational amenities like tennis courts, horseshoes and cardio equipment, and it sounds like the closest thing the federal prison system has to sleepaway camp. Forbes once ranked Otisville as one of “America’s 10 Cushiest Prisons,” but former employees and inmates say it’s hardly “Club Fed.” Inmates are still doing time and they’re still separated from their families and friends — save for occasional visits. “Prison is disrespectful. It’s impersonal,” said former Otisville case manager Jack Donson. “He’s never going to get any sleep because there’s always lights on, there’s always inmates snoring. There are officers walking around jingling keys. You shower out in the open. It’s very demeaning.” Cohen could also be a target of bullying, harassment or worse for his cooperation with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation and other probes, and that could make him a candidate for the prison’s protective housing unit, said Donson. Trump himself has branded Cohen a “rat.” Factor in the camp’s design — off a secluded two-lane road, without much fencing or security — and Cohen could find himself easily harassed by paparazzi or ambushed by someone looking to do harm, said Donson. “He’s not a good fit,” said Donson. Cameron Lindsay, a retired warden who oversaw Otisville as deputy regional director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, said he would “think long and hard about placing Cohen in a general population, at least in the beginning,” given the “intense media coverage and extreme type of support the president receives from some of his supporters.” A prison handbook advises inmates to carry themselves in a “confident manner at all times,” to trust their instincts and to “choose your associates wisely.” Cohen’s first stop at Otisville will be admission and orientation.

NEWS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A9

Government to house more immigrants in tents BY CEDAR ATTANASIO AND NOMAAN MERCHANT

Associated Press

EL PASO, Texas — About 50 asylum seekers stood this week in a circle near a bridge between the U.S. and Mexico to hear an American attorney explain what would happen to them when they entered U.S. custody. The attorney, Jodi Goodwin, told them they would probably end up at one of the Border Patrol’s smaller stations, which migrants call “la hielera” — Spanish for icebox because of their cold temperatures. Goodwin advised them to wear their heaviest clothing or borrow clothes from someone else, and to eat a hearty meal before crossing the bridge. In a carrying voice, she repeated in Spanish, “Eat well and dress well.” The advice reflects reality on the border, where a lack of space means some immigrants must sleep on floors in Border Patrol stations, while others are held in military-style tents next to an El Paso bridge. The government will

soon open two more that could start taking immigrants soon. The newest tent cities — in El Paso and in the Rio Grande Valley — will hold 1,000 parents and families, expanding the Border Patrol’s capacity to hold and process the surge of immigrants who have arrived in recent months and overwhelmed authorities. The capacity could be expanded at some point. “I hope it’s enough,” said Carmen Qualia, executive officer for the Border Patrol’s Rio Grande Valley sector. “We don’t know what we don’t know.” The tents will offer bathrooms, recreation areas and sleeping quarters that are divided by gender and by families and children traveling alone. Detainees will sleep on mats. The tent complex in Donna, Texas, is split into four pods, each labeled a different color. In each pod, a private security guard stands watch. Gray sleeping mats are stacked on one side, and portable toilets and sinks are lined up on another. The air conditioning

system keeps each pod at a comfortable temperature, but emits a constant humming that can make it hard to hear. The tents are set to operate through the end of the year, at a cost of as much as $37 million. A contractor in Rome, New York, obtained the bid to build the tents, which the government calls “softsided” shelters. The Border Patrol’s El Paso sector has become the epicenter of the influx of immigrant families from Central America. On Tuesday alone, agents arrested around 1,100 migrants in the El Paso sector, including 424 who crossed in Sunland Park, New Mexico, according to Border Patrol spokesman Ramiro Cordero. In March alone, the agency apprehended more than 100,000 immigrants, including 53,000 family members. The situation has drawn agents away from their traditional duties of patrolling the border and forced Immigration and Customs Enforcement to refuse to hold immigrants because it does not have

enough detention space. ICE is dropping large groups of immigrants at bus stations and cities, including Phoenix, San Antonio, Texas, and Albuquerque, New Mexico. But before the immigrants are handed over to ICE or released, the Border Patrol must process them, and the agency is struggling to keep up. In recent weeks, immigrants have been forced to sleep in hastily constructed tents on top of gravel under a bridge in El Paso. Critics decried the conditions as inhumane and corroborated accounts of migrants who said that they were held too long and did not have access to bedding while sleeping in the cold. “For far too long, El Paso — America’s new Ellis Island, has lacked adequate temporary processing facilities to address the increase in the number of asylum-seeking families arriving at our doorstep,” said El Paso Rep. Veronica Escobar, who took fellow Democrats on tours of the bridge setting.

ARIANA CUBILLOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS

An anti-government protester dressed as Lady Liberty, wearing the colors of Venezuela’s flag, hugs a fellow protester during a demonstration Wednesday near La Carlota airbase in Caracas, Venezuela.

After days of tumult, Venezuela future murky BY CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA

Associated Press

CARACAS, Venezuela — After days of upheaval, Venezuela is sinking back into political stalemate. In the fourth month of their standoff, President Nicolás Maduro and opposition leader Juan Guaidó are unable to deliver a knock-out blow as Venezuela spirals deeper into neglect, isolation and desperation. Abrupt shifts or behind-the-scenes power plays can’t be ruled out, but there is a sense that the two camps are entrenched — too strong to be dislodged, too weak for clear-cut victory. So what’s next? The opposition and its chief patron, the United States, emerged with fewer options after Guaidó, leader of the oppositioncontrolled National Assembly, stood Tuesday outside a military base and urged the armed forces to overthrow Maduro. The plan collapsed. Venezuela’s military commander instead pledged loyalty to Maduro, and four people died in clashes between protesters and police after the opposition’s risky bid for control. The streets of Caracas were calm on Thursday after the violence of the previous two days. Guaidó’s new plan is to build toward a general strike, though the date is not fixed and how effective that would be in a country with a shattered economy and an

exhausted population is open to question. One Venezuela expert said the opposition and the U.S. now have the hard task of devising a new way forward after seeing a small contingent of security forces join Guaidó outside the military base, but no sign that any other military units had heeded the call to rebel. “You only get to play this card once, and now that it’s been played it’s hard to see what else can be done,” said Fernando Cutz, who until April 2018 led U.S. policy on Venezuela at the National Security Council under both Presidents Barack Obama and Donald Trump. At the same time, Maduro’s government is under massive strain, loathed by much of the population as it attempts to steer a decaying nation. The fact that it has not yet moved to arrest Guaidó after accusing him of trying to stage a coup suggests it is not confident enough to do so and is wary about any increase in diplomatic and economic pressure from the U.S. and dozens of other nations that say Guaidó is Venezuela’s rightful president. Any attempt to detain Guaidó would be “highly inflammatory,” said Eileen Gavin, senior Latin America analyst at Verisk Maplecroft, a global risk consultancy. “From Maduro’s perspective, it might be better to simply dismiss

Guaidó as a mere nuisance and a U.S. stooge, thereby undermining Guaidó’s faltering movement and — once again — splintering the fractious Venezuelan opposition,” Gavin said in a report. The government has started to target people since the failed rebellion. On Thursday, Venezuela’s top court ordered the arrest of Guaidó’s political mentor, Leopoldo López, who took refuge in the Spanish Embassy after defying a house arrest order and joining the attempt to topple Maduro this week. The court also opened a treason investigation of Edgar Zambrano, the deputy head of the National Assembly who had joined Guaidó outside the military base in Caracas. Some analysts believe U.S. allegations that three top Venezuelan officials had been involved in the plot against Maduro will not split his government, but tie those officials closer to him. One of the government figures, Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino López, pledged loyalty to Maduro and indicated that there had been attempts to lure the military into backing the opposition. “They try to buy us as if we were mercenaries,” he said in what amounted to a warning to any would-be defectors in the military. The United States has imposed sanctions on Venezuela’s oil industry as well as on key figures in Maduro’s government, which is

digging in despite dire economic and humanitarian problems that have forced around 10% of Venezuelans to leave the country in recent years, creating Latin America’s biggest migrant crisis. Cutz said that while it’s likely the U.S. will ramp up rhetoric against Maduro’s government, it has already deployed the key weapon — oil sanctions. Its last options include the long-threatened idea of military intervention, which is unlikely, or moving onto another foreign policy priority, according to Cutz. “It seems more like a temper tantrum than strategic thinking,” he said of the bellicose rhetoric coming out of the White House. “If I’m a low-level colonel, why would I now risk my life to share secrets with the Americans if they aren’t going to keep their mouths shut.” Trump has indicated that the United States is not focusing on a military option for now. “And we’re doing everything we can do, short of, you know, the ultimate,” Trump said in an interview Wednesday on Fox Business Network. “There are people that would like to do — have us do the ultimate, but we are — we are — we have a lot of options open. But when we look at what’s going on there, it’s an incredible mess.” Trump said Maduro was “tough, but I think he’s losing a lot of control.”

SpaceX delays launch to repaired space station BY MARCIA DUNN

Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX delayed a supply run Friday to the International Space Station, back to full power and accepting deliveries after quick repairs. A Falcon rocket was poised to blast off before dawn Friday, with a Dragon cargo capsule. But an electrical problem cropped up

at the last minute with the ocean platform needed to recover the first-stage booster following liftoff. SpaceX said it will try again early this morning. The delivery is already running a few days late because of a space station power shortage that stalled deliveries until a failed electrical box could be replaced. NASA completed the job Thursday.

The landing platform was stationed 14 miles offshore. The new booster was originally supposed to return to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station for eventual recycling, but SpaceX is still cleaning up from the April 20 accident that destroyed a crew Dragon capsule. The empty capsule was undergoing ground testing when the blast occurred. The cause is not yet known.

SpaceX said before today’s launch attempt, it will patch a helium leak at the launch pad that also occurred late in the countdown. With only a split second to launch the rocket, there was not enough time to solve any issues. If the Dragon capsule isn’t flying by today, SpaceX will have to wait a week before its next try because of other Air Force operations.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1M2 , 11 8 8 A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 7SATURDAY • 05.04.2019

SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITY

Short takes Don’t sweat the trivial stuff Remember the war in Afghanistan? That is, the longest war in U.S. history, launched in 2001 to annihilate al-Qaeda and send its Taliban hosts packing? These days, an overwhelming Taliban resurgence has led to the radical group’s embarrassingly unchecked takeover of the Afghan countryside. In response, the U.S. military has decided that such pesky details as territorial control don’t really matter in the big picture anymore. “We are focused on setting the conditions for a political settlement to safeguard our national interests,” spokesman Col. Dave Butler told The New York Times. Trying to assess where Taliban forces were entrenched and in control “did little to serve our mission of protecting our citizens and allies,” he said. John Sopko, the inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, offered an apt analogy of this tacit admission of defeat: “It’s like turning off the scoreboard at a football game and saying scoring a touchdown or field goal isn’t important.”

DAN MARTIN, POST-DISPATCH

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Money for ad praising Blunt is better spent on research

TED S. WARREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Maureen Walsh pauses during an interview Monday at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash.

Nurses’ heart rates on the rise Washington state Sen. Maureen Walsh is getting some unexpected schooling on the rigors of nursing. Maybe she thought no one was paying attention when she made an offhand remark on the state Senate floor last month that nurses in rural hospitals don’t really need regular breaks because they “probably play cards for a considerable amount of the day.” A national petition campaign via Change.org is calling for Walsh to shadow a nurse for an entire shift, so she can help herself sift fact from fiction about what the job entails. The petition drive has collected more than 800,000 signatures. Walsh, a Walla Walla Republican, acknowledged to her Senate colleagues last week that her comments were “very unfortunate” and “harsh,” and that she had “frankly insulted a great number of nurses in this nation.” She said her office had received 30,000plus phone calls and emails. She said she will accept an invitation to shadow a nurse for a shift. Perhaps the greatest irony here is that Walsh’s mother worked as a nurse.

Sigh. Students and blackface. Again. Students, parents, teachers and administrators at a high school near Chicago were duly outraged when a video surfaced on social media Sunday depicting a small group of white students driving around in blackface and ordering fast food at a drive-through window. One of the boys wore a Homewood-Flossmoor High School sweatshirt, making them easily traceable. The Flossmoor, Ill., high school has about 2,800 students — about 70 percent of whom are African American. It’s not clear what possessed the boys to take a walk on the dumb side, but the response they received at school certainly is one they’ll never forget. As administrators were inundated with calls and emails, they met with all families and students involved. Other students’ parents met to voice their concerns. On Tuesday, about 1,000 students staged a school-permitted walkout. It wasn’t clear how much authority the school has to discipline the students for actions they took off campus, but the principal, Jerry Lee Anderson, sent a letter to all parents assuring them that “we are doing everything possible to ensure that these students understand the ramifications of their actions and that appropriate consequences are received.” Perhaps the boys’ parents can start by requiring them to earn enough money for a trip to the Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala., for a soul-rattling lesson on why there’s nothing funny about racism.

Judicial cluelessness As America grapples with sexual assault issues, a judge in New York clearly doesn’t get it: A school bus driver convicted of the statutory rape of a 14-year-old girl on his route won’t spend a day in prison because the judge decided probation is enough. Shane M. Piche, 26, a former bus driver for the school district in Watertown, N.Y., took the girl to his home and plied her with alcohol. He pleaded guilty to third-degree rape. Judge James McClusky could have sent Piche to prison. Instead, he gave him 10 years probation and the lowest-level status on the Piche state’s sex offender registry. That tap on the wrist came despite the girl’s family’s plea for real punishment. It’s the latest in a string of shockingly light sentences in rape cases, like that of former Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner, who got just six months in jail for raping an unconscious woman. The judge in that case was recalled due to public outrage. The good people of Watertown should be considering that.

Logging off Americans are sitting more than ever, and computers are to blame, says a new study. The National Center for Health Statistics reports that average American adults spend about 6½ hours a day sitting. That’s an hour a day more than they did a dozen years ago. Teenagers are even more immobile, sitting eight hours a day, the study says. Based on 16 years of data, the report, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, makes clear that television isn’t the growing part of the problem. While about 60 percent of people spend two hours a day or more watching TV, that percentage has remained basically unchanged over the years. What has changed is computer usage. In 2003, fewer than 30 percent of adults spent more than an hour of personal time daily in front of a computer; today, more than half do. Experts note that lack of physical activity can usher in a range of health problems including obesity, diabetes and heart disease. So close that cat video, and go for a walk.

I couldn’t help but notice the eyecatching, full-page ad in the April 28 Post-Dispatch from the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement thanking Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt. In very large, capital letters the ad thanked Blunt “for your leadership in Congress to bring awareness to the public health crisis posed” by that disease. The cynic in me suspected that Blunt had raised not just “awareness” but also money. Of course, even a cynic like me is in favor of allocating public and private funds to seek a treatment and cure for Alzheimer’s. But I have to wonder how this 501(c)(4) social welfare organization justifies to its contributors running such a newspaper ad, which is labeled as a “paid political advertisement.” Surely, Blunt’s support for Alzheimer’s research does not depend on a contribution meant to raise his political profile. It seems the ad represents money that was solicited for, but is not being spent on, a cure for Alzheimer’s. While I have no doubt that Blunt is sincere in his efforts for Alzheimer’s research, I would personally be even more thankful if I thought we could count on his support for broad-based public health efforts like strengthening the Affordable Care Act with its provision, rejected by our Republicancontrolled state Legislature, to provide federal funds to expand Medicare benefits for the working poor in Missouri, many uninsured Alzheimer’s victims among them. Andy Ayers • St. Louis

Board, teachers oversee city schools, not consultants After reading William Suggs’ guest column (April 18), “School consortium undermines local control,” I would like to offer two thoughts. First, Suggs seems to have very carefully studied the background of Bellwether Education Partners, the consultant hired by St. Louis Public Schools. He offers theories and speculation about their work, methods and motivations. However, I wish he had reviewed the district’s agreement with Bellwether more carefully. St. Louis Public Schools did not hire Bellwether to run schools. The two Consortium Partnership Network schools remain under the governance of the Board of Education. The Bellwether contract, which expires June 30, requires only that Bellwether support the schools, as they develop their state accountability plans. Bellwether is simply a shortterm facilitating partner. Second, the Teacher Leadership Teams of these schools and their respective principals will be completely responsible for developing and implementing a unique learning experience at each school. Suggs calls for local control. I don’t think the education of St. Louis Public School students can get any closer to local control than to place the responsibility squarely in the hands of the Teacher Leadership Teams. Each school will create academic goals and objectives and will be held responsible for achieving those goals by the Consortium Partnership Network board, which includes a parent, the superintendent, the Board of Education president, a representative of the mayor and a representative of the president of the Board of Aldermen. The Consortium Partnership Network is simply our attempt to give schools

the autonomy and flexibility to make the best decisions for the students they educate. Rick Sullivan • St. Louis President/CEO of the Special Administrative Board

We must save our country from Trump and his enablers Americans sit on their phones and their hands while President Donald Trump and his staff take a wrecking ball to everything that is honorable, good and decent in our great country. I understand that people are worried about the economy, jobs, wages, health care, etc., but if the country is taken down around our ears, none of that will matter. Remember that as long as he is allowed to serve, he will be making lifetime appointments of judges. He will be affecting everything — our relationships with our allies, NATO, banking and consumer laws, ecology, Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security. These changes will affect us for generations. Please stand up and be counted among those of us who wish to save our dear land from one of it’s greatest threats: Donald Trump and his enablers. They must go now before it is too late. Jackie Daugherty • St. Peters

Healthy food will be critical to future urban planning A new global trend in urban planning has begun. Cities and nations worldwide have become increasingly concerned about the lack of accessibility of affordable healthy food for their citizens. The World Health Organization has acknowledged this and has attempted to foster recognition of a problem that, if reversed, may decrease obesity and promote health. Food is not simply a rural issue, the transportation costs affect city dwellers and emissions from transport are everyone’s problem. Somewhere in your city is a family struggling to get by. It may not be you, but it could be. One day you could be the one making the decision between one healthy meal, or a week’s worth of unhealthy food. Urban planning has only focused on three of the four basic needs: water, shelter and air. Food, as important as it is, is not treated as a need nor a right, but as “not our problem.” And yet it is everyone’s problem. Urban planning needs to be more conscious of the people it is supposed to be providing for in setting aside space for growth. St. Louis, look to cities like Toronto, Amsterdam and Kampala for guidance. They are making strides to show how it is possible to integrate food into infrastructure. Elaina Tirrel • Hermann

Raasch and Goldberg columnists are fair, readable Thank goodness for the dispassionate voices of columnists Chuck Raasch and Jonah Goldberg. They at least spark an interest in reading their columns whereas the other opinion writers are so biased there is no point in wasting your time. Unfortunately, I am so cynical about the Post-Dispatch that it causes me to wonder if the disparagement was legitimate, or just the Post-Dispatch’s way of positioning to support Joe Biden. Larry Buschman • Warren County Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1M2 , 11 8 8 A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 7SATURDAY • 05.04.2019

SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITY

Short takes Don’t sweat the trivial stuff Remember the war in Afghanistan? That is, the longest war in U.S. history, launched in 2001 to annihilate al-Qaeda and send its Taliban hosts packing? These days, an overwhelming Taliban resurgence has led to the radical group’s embarrassingly unchecked takeover of the Afghan countryside. In response, the U.S. military has decided that such pesky details as territorial control don’t really matter in the big picture anymore. “We are focused on setting the conditions for a political settlement to safeguard our national interests,” spokesman Col. Dave Butler told The New York Times. Trying to assess where Taliban forces were entrenched and in control “did little to serve our mission of protecting our citizens and allies,” he said. John Sopko, the inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, offered an apt analogy of this tacit admission of defeat: “It’s like turning off the scoreboard at a football game and saying scoring a touchdown or field goal isn’t important.”

DAN MARTIN, POST-DISPATCH

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

Money for ad praising Blunt is better spent on research

TED S. WARREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. Maureen Walsh pauses during an interview Monday at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash.

Nurses’ heart rates on the rise Washington state Sen. Maureen Walsh is getting some unexpected schooling on the rigors of nursing. Maybe she thought no one was paying attention when she made an offhand remark on the state Senate floor last month that nurses in rural hospitals don’t really need regular breaks because they “probably play cards for a considerable amount of the day.” A national petition campaign via Change.org is calling for Walsh to shadow a nurse for an entire shift, so she can help herself sift fact from fiction about what the job entails. The petition drive has collected more than 800,000 signatures. Walsh, a Walla Walla Republican, acknowledged to her Senate colleagues last week that her comments were “very unfortunate” and “harsh,” and that she had “frankly insulted a great number of nurses in this nation.” She said her office had received 30,000plus phone calls and emails. She said she will accept an invitation to shadow a nurse for a shift. Perhaps the greatest irony here is that Walsh’s mother worked as a nurse.

Sigh. Students and blackface. Again. Students, parents, teachers and administrators at a high school near Chicago were duly outraged when a video surfaced on social media Sunday depicting a small group of white students driving around in blackface and ordering fast food at a drive-through window. One of the boys wore a Homewood-Flossmoor High School sweatshirt, making them easily traceable. The Flossmoor, Ill., high school has about 2,800 students — about 70 percent of whom are African American. It’s not clear what possessed the boys to take a walk on the dumb side, but the response they received at school certainly is one they’ll never forget. As administrators were inundated with calls and emails, they met with all families and students involved. Other students’ parents met to voice their concerns. On Tuesday, about 1,000 students staged a school-permitted walkout. It wasn’t clear how much authority the school has to discipline the students for actions they took off campus, but the principal, Jerry Lee Anderson, sent a letter to all parents assuring them that “we are doing everything possible to ensure that these students understand the ramifications of their actions and that appropriate consequences are received.” Perhaps the boys’ parents can start by requiring them to earn enough money for a trip to the Legacy Museum and National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala., for a soul-rattling lesson on why there’s nothing funny about racism.

Judicial cluelessness As America grapples with sexual assault issues, a judge in New York clearly doesn’t get it: A school bus driver convicted of the statutory rape of a 14-year-old girl on his route won’t spend a day in prison because the judge decided probation is enough. Shane M. Piche, 26, a former bus driver for the school district in Watertown, N.Y., took the girl to his home and plied her with alcohol. He pleaded guilty to third-degree rape. Judge James McClusky could have sent Piche to prison. Instead, he gave him 10 years probation and the lowest-level status on the Piche state’s sex offender registry. That tap on the wrist came despite the girl’s family’s plea for real punishment. It’s the latest in a string of shockingly light sentences in rape cases, like that of former Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner, who got just six months in jail for raping an unconscious woman. The judge in that case was recalled due to public outrage. The good people of Watertown should be considering that.

Logging off Americans are sitting more than ever, and computers are to blame, says a new study. The National Center for Health Statistics reports that average American adults spend about 6½ hours a day sitting. That’s an hour a day more than they did a dozen years ago. Teenagers are even more immobile, sitting eight hours a day, the study says. Based on 16 years of data, the report, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, makes clear that television isn’t the growing part of the problem. While about 60 percent of people spend two hours a day or more watching TV, that percentage has remained basically unchanged over the years. What has changed is computer usage. In 2003, fewer than 30 percent of adults spent more than an hour of personal time daily in front of a computer; today, more than half do. Experts note that lack of physical activity can usher in a range of health problems including obesity, diabetes and heart disease. So close that cat video, and go for a walk.

I couldn’t help but notice the eyecatching, full-page ad in the April 28 Post-Dispatch from the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement thanking Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt. In very large, capital letters the ad thanked Blunt “for your leadership in Congress to bring awareness to the public health crisis posed” by that disease. The cynic in me suspected that Blunt had raised not just “awareness” but also money. Of course, even a cynic like me is in favor of allocating public and private funds to seek a treatment and cure for Alzheimer’s. But I have to wonder how this 501(c)(4) social welfare organization justifies to its contributors running such a newspaper ad, which is labeled as a “paid political advertisement.” Surely, Blunt’s support for Alzheimer’s research does not depend on a contribution meant to raise his political profile. It seems the ad represents money that was solicited for, but is not being spent on, a cure for Alzheimer’s. While I have no doubt that Blunt is sincere in his efforts for Alzheimer’s research, I would personally be even more thankful if I thought we could count on his support for broad-based public health efforts like strengthening the Affordable Care Act with its provision, rejected by our Republicancontrolled state Legislature, to provide federal funds to expand Medicare benefits for the working poor in Missouri, many uninsured Alzheimer’s victims among them. Andy Ayers • St. Louis

Board, teachers oversee city schools, not consultants After reading William Suggs’ guest column (April 18), “School consortium undermines local control,” I would like to offer two thoughts. First, Suggs seems to have very carefully studied the background of Bellwether Education Partners, the consultant hired by St. Louis Public Schools. He offers theories and speculation about their work, methods and motivations. However, I wish he had reviewed the district’s agreement with Bellwether more carefully. St. Louis Public Schools did not hire Bellwether to run schools. The two Consortium Partnership Network schools remain under the governance of the Board of Education. The Bellwether contract, which expires June 30, requires only that Bellwether support the schools, as they develop their state accountability plans. Bellwether is simply a shortterm facilitating partner. Second, the Teacher Leadership Teams of these schools and their respective principals will be completely responsible for developing and implementing a unique learning experience at each school. Suggs calls for local control. I don’t think the education of St. Louis Public School students can get any closer to local control than to place the responsibility squarely in the hands of the Teacher Leadership Teams. Each school will create academic goals and objectives and will be held responsible for achieving those goals by the Consortium Partnership Network board, which includes a parent, the superintendent, the Board of Education president, a representative of the mayor and a representative of the president of the Board of Aldermen. The Consortium Partnership Network is simply our attempt to give schools

the autonomy and flexibility to make the best decisions for the students they educate. Rick Sullivan • St. Louis President/CEO of the Special Administrative Board

We must save our country from Trump and his enablers Americans sit on their phones and their hands while President Donald Trump and his staff take a wrecking ball to everything that is honorable, good and decent in our great country. I understand that people are worried about the economy, jobs, wages, health care, etc., but if the country is taken down around our ears, none of that will matter. Remember that as long as he is allowed to serve, he will be making lifetime appointments of judges. He will be affecting everything — our relationships with our allies, NATO, banking and consumer laws, ecology, Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security. These changes will affect us for generations. Please stand up and be counted among those of us who wish to save our dear land from one of it’s greatest threats: Donald Trump and his enablers. They must go now before it is too late. Jackie Daugherty • St. Peters

Healthy food will be critical to future urban planning A new global trend in urban planning has begun. Cities and nations worldwide have become increasingly concerned about the lack of accessibility of affordable healthy food for their citizens. The World Health Organization has acknowledged this and has attempted to foster recognition of a problem that, if reversed, may decrease obesity and promote health. Food is not simply a rural issue, the transportation costs affect city dwellers and emissions from transport are everyone’s problem. Somewhere in your city is a family struggling to get by. It may not be you, but it could be. One day you could be the one making the decision between one healthy meal, or a week’s worth of unhealthy food. Urban planning has only focused on three of the four basic needs: water, shelter and air. Food, as important as it is, is not treated as a need nor a right, but as “not our problem.” And yet it is everyone’s problem. Urban planning needs to be more conscious of the people it is supposed to be providing for in setting aside space for growth. St. Louis, look to cities like Toronto, Amsterdam and Kampala for guidance. They are making strides to show how it is possible to integrate food into infrastructure. Elaina Tirrel • Hermann

Raasch and Goldberg columnists are fair, readable Thank goodness for the dispassionate voices of columnists Chuck Raasch and Jonah Goldberg. They at least spark an interest in reading their columns whereas the other opinion writers are so biased there is no point in wasting your time. Unfortunately, I am so cynical about the Post-Dispatch that it causes me to wonder if the disparagement was legitimate, or just the Post-Dispatch’s way of positioning to support Joe Biden. Larry Buschman • Warren County Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


LOCAL

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A11

FAITH PERSPECTIVES

What non-believers can teach the religious GREG WEEKS Manchester united Methodist Church

JESSE BOGAN, JBOGAN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Rev. Herman Otten in his rural Franklin County office on May 11, 2016.

Controversial pastor dead at 86 Herman Otten started his own newspaper to rail against critics BY JESSE BOGAN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NEW HAVEN — Flanked by a lot of books and a gold bust of Martin Luther, the Rev. Herman Otten sat at his desk in 2016 and shared plans for his own funeral. As a Lutheran minister for more than five decades, he’d officiated a lot of services and knew how expensive burials could be. “I think it’s horrendous,” he told the Post-Dispatch. “So mine is not going to cost anything.” The Rev. Otten had one of his congregants at Trinity Lutheran Church in New Haven who ran a sawmill make him a coffin out of cedar planks. Now he pointed to it in the interview. The coffin stood behind his desk, doubling as a bookcase. “You’ve got to be prepared,” he said. “I’ve got it all written out.” The Rev. Otten died April 24, 2019, at home while battling interstitial lung disease, family said. He was 86. As requested, they buried him in the cedar coffin the day after at Camp Trinity, the 200-acre spread in rural Franklin County where he’d trained for triathlons, typed out about 30 books by hand, and he and his wife, Grace, of 56 years raised seven children in a log cabin that he helped build. “He always wanted to live his life as a line drive, not a pop fly,” said his daughter, Ruth Rethemeyer. “He was working up until the last moments.” Herman J. Otten was born March 3, 1933, in New York City. His parents were from Germany. In 1957, he completed a master’s degree in history from Washington University and graduated from Concordia Seminary, which helps supply the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod’s 6,000 congregations with pastors. But the seminary never certified him as a candidate for ordination. He’d burned a lot of bridges by charging some of his seminary

professors with teaching false doctrine and accusing the Kirkwood-based Missouri Synod of not doing enough to stop it. Even still, Trinity Lutheran, where Otten had worked as a graduate student in New Haven, extended a call for him to preach there. He accepted and lasted 55 years. He also dug in as editor of his newspaper, initially called Lutheran News. He used it to endorse or lambaste candidates running for control of the Missouri Synod and shame what he perceived as false teachings of the Bible. Otten believed his coverage helped lead to the historic walkout in 1974 at Concordia called Seminex, when most of its professors and students left and eventually joined other denominations. Martin Marty was another one of Otten’s targets over the years. An American religious history scholar at the University of Chicago, he’s an ordained minister in the left-leaning Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Yet the only time Marty recalled meeting Otten was on an escalator at a hotel or convention center for a Missouri Synod event. “He asked me one blunt question — I forget what it was — but I know I could only give a terse and unnuanced response,” Marty said by email. “I recall that he regularly quoted that unmemorable sentence or two.” “From my distance,” he added, “I observed him enjoying too much the polemics of church fighting. He went out of his way to pick fights, always battling toward what seemed to me to be destructive ends.” The “all-by-itself-condemning feature of Ottenism,” Marty said, was its anti-Semitism and Holocaust denial. Christian News, the current name of Otten’s newspaper, has been on the radar of the Anti-Defamation League for decades. “I feel confident in saying that Herman Otten was an unrepentant anti-Semite and Holocaust denier until the end of his life, and his beliefs are prevalent in

Christian News, both in his own writings and in the works of other authors he reprinted,” Aryeh Tuchman, associate director of league’s Center on Extremism, said Friday by email. He said recent content supported his comment, including a March 25 reprint in Christian News of Charles E. Carlson, which claimed that “Israeli Zionists” were among those responsible for the terrorist attacks in New Zealand. “The Christian News, true to its function as a Christian Lutheran paper, has, since its founding in 1962, combated a number of false beliefs which I consider to be hoaxes no less than the Holocaust,” Otten once wrote. Asked about this topic in 2016, Otten told the Post-Dispatch: “Does that make me anti-Semitic because I think Jews are lost?” David Finck, a former elder at Trinity Lutheran in New Haven, said Otten wasn’t anti-Semitic behind the pulpit. He said he wasn’t an avid reader of Christian News because there was a lot of content he didn’t understand. “My mind isn’t that complicated,” said Finck, 66, a financial planner. “There was so much stuff in there that it was hard to put together.” He remembered Otten as a pastor who tended his flock of 120 congregants and trained for Ironman triathlons well into his 60s. Between deadlines, Otten ran and cycled the hillsides, swam laps in a small pond by his cabin. In one word, Finck described Otten as “redeemed.” When Finck visited him in the hospital in April, he said, Otten bowed his head and spoke the words of a Lutheran hymn: “He said when I survey the wondrous cross on which the Prince of Glory died, my richest gain I count but loss, and pour contempt on all my pride.” Asked how Otten will be remembered, the Missouri Synod said in a brief statement: “We don’t know.” Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

OBITUARIES Koenig, Donald Bernard - St. Charles

Koenig, Donald Bernard 87, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on May 2, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Dorothy T. Koenig; beloved son of t h e late A m b r o s e a n d H il d a Koenig; devoted father of Diane Koenig, Barbara (John) Brugger, Joyce (Alan) Ashton, Joan Koenig and Mark (Joan) Koenig; cherished grandfather of Lauren and Megan Ashton, and Leslie Brugger, and dear brother-in-law of Elsie Koenig, wife of the late Robert. He was preceded in death by his siblings, Harold (Emma), Raymond (Maridel) Norbert (Winnifred), Florence (Stanley) Zumbehl, Marie (Wesley) Will. Don was a Third Degree Knight with Council 823, St. Charles, member of VFW Post 2866 and was a Korean War veteran of the United States Navy. His passion was always farming, gardening, where he grew the best tomatoes and cabbage, and traveling. He worked as a journeyman lineman for 38 years for Ameren-St. Charles and was a member of IBEW Local 1439. Services: Vis: Sun. (5/5) from 4-8 p.m. at Hutchens-Stygar Funeral & Cremation Center, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles). Svc: Procession from Hutchens-Stygar FH at 9:45 a.m. for Mass at 10:30 at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church (St. Charles) Memorials: Emmaus Homes.www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Faith communities, though differing in beliefs, should have at their common core one mission: to bring out the best in people and not the worst. Unfortunately, it doesn’t always work out that way. The misguided zeal of some religious people can lead to actions that go against the values of the religion itself; the atrocities in New Zealand and Sri Lanka are extreme, and sad, reminders. Closer to home, religious folks can sometimes spend more energy in internal debates than in addressing human need. Given this fickleness, it’s helpful to remember that religion isn’t required in order to be moral or ethical. Indeed, when you see people who profess no faith caring for people just as passionately as the religious are supposed to, it calls us back to our shared human roots. At the base line, we are not defined by our religion, politics or any human construct. We are simply creatures labeled Homo sapiens. How should we live with each other? Israeli historian Yuval Harari, in his book “21 Lessons for the 21st Century,” writes about the ideals of modern secularism. He sees four key values of ethical secularists.

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Dione Carver of Manchester helps make sandwiches in 2013 at Kingdom House during a day of service by members of Manchester United Methodist Church.

but acting with equal fervor. Don’t ask God to do something for which you’re not willing to work and sacrifice. These four values can serve as a standard of measurement for a religious tradition. They will be that which the non-religious will use to judge a faith community. In a declining religious world, it won’t be our doctrines that will attract people. People will not stream into a church because they’re eager to hear the Nicene Creed. They will become involved if the beliefs of that fellowship encourage, and don’t discourage, truth, compassion, equality and responsibility. As a Christian, I appreciate Harari’s insight. Do my beliefs and attitudes encourage or disTruth — Use your mind and courage? Most importantly, do learn from the sciences. What they honor the priorities embodyou learn from the facts should ied by Christ? serve to question assumptions One of Jesus’ most radical and shape actions. For religious stories fits quite nicely with the people that means looking at secular mindset. the world honestly and putting In his famous tale (Matthew faith into action, accordingly. For 25:31-46) of the sheep and goats, example, climate change is real. he praises people who were comWhat will we do about it? passionate to others, even though they were not necessarily reliCompassion — Suffering is also gious. As they were reaching out real, and should be the prime mover for people. Religious folks to a stranger, a sick person, or any of “the least of these,” they didn’t must be about alleviating pain know that they were also reachand not causing more harm, wherever it occurs. That includes ing out to Jesus. So tightly does Christ identify with the sufferers at the border of our nation or of that their faces reflect his. our local community. Judging is That should always be the incompatible with most religious focus of Christianity. Compaslifestyles. sion knows no barriers, including religion. Equality — Among the most inAs a Christian pastor, the sidious suffering people inflict is most joy I experience is when I denying someone their dignity see people light up because the and rights. For religious people that means eliminating the words Christ they profess is the Christ they see in the faces of people “us” and “them.” This requires guarding against prejudice mas- they serve. It just doesn’t get any better querading in pious attire. than that. Responsibility — Modern secular- Greg Weeks is senior pastor of Manchester ists take responsibility for making United Methodist Church. He is a regular things better and don’t rely on a Faith Perspectives contributor to STLtoday. higher power. For religious people com/religion. He has launched a blog at www. revgregweeks.com. that means praying with fervor

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LOCAL

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Flood From A1

reached a record height, the worst was far from over. The crest inched above the 1993 record Thursday, and forecasters are calling for up to 4 more inches of rain next week, meaning the high water is likely to stick around and potentially rise. Several blocks of downtown Davenport were flooded this week when a flood barrier succumbed to the onslaught of water. The river at the Quad Cities has been at major flood stage or higher for 41 consecutive days. Historic flooding was happening elsewhere along the river, too. The National Weather Service is now projecting flood levels to reach the second- or third-highest ever at several Mississippi River towns in northeast Missouri — Hannibal, Louisiana, Clarksville and Winfield — and western Illinois towns such as Quincy, Alton and Grafton. In a conference call Friday, Mayor Jo Anne Smiley of Clarksville said her city has in place more than 3,000 tons of gravel and 1,000 tons of sand, with volunteers and inmates helping fill sandbags. “We’re within inches of the highest level ever, and we will be probably be able to secure everything we need to,” Smiley said. Still, she expressed frustration that the city has faced the same flood problem “again and again and again,” and she called on Congress to provide financial assistance to river towns. Mayor Rick Eberlin of Grafton said he was surprised by the speed of the flooding. “We’re seeing some things we’ve not seen before. ... Kind of caught us off guard. As a matter of fact, the prediction graph was a couple days out. We thought we had more time to vacate the businesses along the river side of Main Street.” Eberlin said most of the roads to Grafton are closed, with the only accessibility from the north, from Route 3. Mayor Phil Stang of Kimmswick, which is south of where the Meramec River joins the Mississippi, said the town is busily building atop a permanent levee in hope of holding back the water. On Friday morning, trucks carrying clay, rock and sand were rumbling past his home. The river

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

Walker said the city could be facing the third-highest flood in its history. “In the last six years, we’ve had approximately eight or nine floods,” Walker said. “We’re doing flood control every eight months.” Citing the heavy cost of flood response and the loss of business, Walker said, “We’re barely keeping our head above water.” High river levels are expected to continue with about 1.5 to 2 inches of rain forecast to fall across Iowa and Illinois through Friday, the U.S. Weather Prediction Center said. From January to March, many parts of the Midwest have had among their top 10 rainy and snowiest seasons. St. Louis, like most of the Midwest, has experienced more rain than usual this year: 20.45 inches of precipitation since Jan. 1, 8.53 inches above normal, according to National Weather Service data. ROBERT COHEN PHOTOS, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM The Mississippi isn’t the only Bruce Gary of the Velo Force cycling team runs out of road on Marshall Road as Meramec River floodwater river bulging out of its banks. overtakes the street in Valley Park on Friday. Moderate flooding at Missouri River towns like Washington and St. Charles in Missouri was causing headaches like road closures, but few homes were impacted. The Meramec River in suburban St. Louis is rising fast and will crest Sunday and Monday around 15 feet above flood stage in towns like Arnold and Valley Park, threatening several homes and businesses.

Fatalities

A man who declined to be identified takes a ride with an Italian mastiff along Marshall Road through Meramec River floodwater in Valley Park on Friday. is expected to reach 42.5 feet on Sunday, he said. “We’ve closed off the city completely. As soon as it rains, we are a bathtub,” Stang said. “I will not let that water into the city of Kimmswick.” Sandbagging efforts began Friday in Winfield, where the Pin Oak Levee was threatened. Winfield, about 50 miles north of St. Louis, was among many towns where volunteers were racing the clock to

add sandbags to the tops of levees and around homes and businesses. The surging Mississippi also was causing problems in West Alton, where the town’s 500 or so residents were under a voluntary evacuation. Along the Osage River, high water inundated campsites at MariOsa Campground. The Mississippi River at Chester on Friday was at nearly 37 feet with the weather service forecast-

ing it to crest at more than 43 feet by Monday. Flood stage is 27 feet. Public works employees in Alton erected a barrier wall Thursday after a sudden Mississippi River surge closed roadways. On Friday, the Argosy Casino Alton was forced to close as floodwater crept higher into downtown. Alton Mayor Brant Walker said Friday the river was at 35.5 feet, and “we’re expecting to crest Monday into Tuesday.”

On Friday afternoon, the body of a missing kayaker was found in a swollen southwest Missouri creek. Missouri State Highway Patrol Sgt. John Lueckenhoff identified the man as 35-year-old Scott M. Puckett of Forsyth, Mo. The body of his friend, Alex Ekern, 23, was found Thursday. Puckett and Ekern were among three men who began paddling Wednesday afternoon in Bull Creek near the town of Walnut Shade. The patrol said the three were swept over a low-water bridge and caught in what is called a hydraulic, which creates a washing-machine effect that is hard to escape. One man survived. Flooding also claimed the life of a camper found Wednesday after he was caught in water from an overflowing creek near Ava, also in southwest Missouri. And in northern Indiana, a 2-year-old was killed when his mother drove onto a flooded road. Includes reporting by The Associated Press, Reuters, Bloomberg and the Post-Dispatch.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 • B

BIG GAME 5 CLASH

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ Brayden Schenn slams into the Stars’ John Klingberg during the first period of Game 5 on Friday at Enterprise Center.

Edmundson is back in Blues lineup

Benn big trouble so far in series

BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When the Blues and Stars got on each others’ nerves at the end of the second period of Game 4 on Wednesday, the emotions spread to the press box, where the Blues’ scratches for the game sat. “I looked around,” defenseman Joel Edmundson said, “I saw (Chris Thorburn) was standing up. There’s a couple of us that really wanted to be out there.” Edmundson, who enjoys that kind of thing, having led the Blues in penalty minutes this season, got his chance on Friday, getting back in the lineup for Game 5 after two games as a healthy scratch. Robert Bortuzzo took a seat. “I’ll be the first one to admit that the first two games of this series, they weren’t my best games,” Edmundson

COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A shot from Blues center Robert Thomas bounces off the chest of Stars goaltender Ben Bishop Please see BLUES, Page B6 during the first period Friday.

LATE GAME Friday night’s game was not over for this edition. Get coverage online at STLtoday.com

The pest’s presence is growing. He has lured Vladimir Tarasenko, the scorer the Blues can’t afford to have anywhere but on the ice, into the penalty box. He has delivered a swift cup check – ouch – to Blues goalie Jordan Binnington. He has been penalized for tripping (twice), roughing, and unsportsmanlike conduct. And that was just four games into this best-of-seven Western Conference semifinal, long before Friday night’s first puck drop of Game 5. Please see FREDERICKSON, Page B7

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS • SERIES IS TIED, 2-2 Game 1 Blues 3, Stars 2 GWG: Tarasenko

Game 2 Stars 4, Blues 2 GWG: Janmark

Game 3 Blues 4, Stars 3 GWG: Maroon

Game 4 Stars 4 Blues 2 GWG: Klingberg

Friday, Late at Enterprise

Sunday, 2 p.m. at Dallas KSDK (5)

*Tuesday, 7 p.m. at Enterprise NBCSN

> Hurricanes sweep Islanders with 5-2 victory in Game 4. B7

* If necessary

Hendricks tidily dispatches Birds BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHARLIE RIEDEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

WIDE-OPEN DERBY Game Winner is the tepid favorite in an evenly matched field. B8

CHICAGO — They didn’t see many pitches to begin with. And of the few from Kyle Hendricks the Cardinals did hit, most vanished — predictably —into a Cub’s glove. Shifted to the left of his base, Cubs second baseman Daniel Descalso stole a hard-shot single from Paul DeJong. Racing in from center, Jason Heyward slid to rob Jose Martinez of a sinking-liner single. Marcell Ozuna had nothing to show for a hard liner to right and a harder grounder down the third-base line, and the hardest of Matt Carpenter’s bolts — a 100-mph liner off the bat — was

Cubs 4, Cardinals 0 3:05 p.m. Saturday at Cubs, FSM, FS1 Wacha (2-0, 4.78) vs. Darvish (2-3, 5.02) caught, unceremoniously, by Anthony Rizzo at first. It’s sure tricky to hit ‘em when there’s nowhere they ain’t. Putting the ball in play catered to Hendricks’ brisk pace, fell KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS into the Cubs’ rigged defensive Cubs pitcher Kyle Hendricks (center) celebrates with teammates Anthony Rizzo (left) and Willson Contreras after shutting out the Please see CARDINALS, Page B5 Cardinals on 81 pitches Friday afternoon.

SPORTS

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TWO THINGS T H AT A RE

D R IN K R E S P O N S IB LY

GREAT ON ICE JACK DANIEL’S and OLD NO. 7 are registered trademarks. © 2019 Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey, 40% Alcohol by Volume (80 proof). Distilled and Bottled by JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, Lynchburg, Tennessee.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 05.04.2019 • B

GAME 5 LETDOWN

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ Jaden Schwartz is tripped up by the Stars’ Miro Heiskanen in front of Stars goalie Ben Bishop during the second period Friday at Enterprise Center.

Luck not enough to steal a win

Stars edge Blues to lead series BY JIM THOMAS

BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

So here it is. The Blues are on the brink of elimination after Friday’s 2-1 loss to the Dallas Stars put them down 3-2 in the series. A loss Sunday in Dallas or Tuesday in St. Louis ends this unexpected joyride. “Got to win or you go home, simple as that,” Jaden Schwartz said. “Desperation level needs to be the highest it’s ever been. Got to play our best game and we feel confident going in there (to Dallas).” Trailing in a series standing for the first time in this postseason, the Blues need two victories to reach the conference finals for the second time in four years but just the fourth time in 33 years. Please see BLUES, Page B6

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

We spend so much time talking about the aspects of the game that can be controlled, yet completely ignore the obvious independent variable out there on the ice: Luck. The difference between Stanley Cup champions and the teams left dismantled in their wake so often comes down to the random, such as how a puck rifles off a post, or the timing of a shocking third-period brain lapse from a goalie who had been in complete control. Do everything in your power, and the

The Stars’ Jamie Benn is shoved to the ice by the Blues’ Joel Edmundson in front of Blues goalie Jordan Binnington during the first period Friday.

Please see FREDERICKSON, Page B7

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS • STARS LEAD SERIES, 3-2 > Edmundson makes a return to lineup. B6

Game 1 Blues 3, Stars 2 GWG: Tarasenko

Game 2 Stars 4, Blues 2 GWG: Janmark

Game 3 Blues 4, Stars 3 GWG: Maroon

Game 4 Stars 4 Blues 2 GWG: Klingberg

Friday, Stars 2 Blues 1 GWG: Lindell

Sunday, 2 p.m. at Dallas KSDK (5)

*Tuesday, 7 p.m. at Enterprise NBCSN

> Hurricanes sweep Islanders with 5-2 victory in Game 4. B7

* If necessary

Hendricks tidily dispatches Birds BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHARLIE RIEDEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS

WIDE-OPEN DERBY Game Winner is the tepid favorite in an evenly matched field. B8

CHICAGO — They didn’t see many pitches to begin with. And of the few from Kyle Hendricks the Cardinals did hit, most vanished — predictably —into a Cub’s glove. Shifted to the left of his base, Cubs second baseman Daniel Descalso stole a hard-shot single from Paul DeJong. Racing in from center, Jason Heyward slid to rob Jose Martinez of a sinking-liner single. Marcell Ozuna had nothing to show for a hard liner to right and a harder grounder down the third-base line, and the hardest of Matt Carpenter’s bolts — a 100-mph liner off the bat — was

Cubs 4, Cardinals 0 3:05 p.m. Saturday at Cubs, FSM, FS1 Wacha (2-0, 4.78) vs. Darvish (2-3, 5.02) caught, unceremoniously, by Anthony Rizzo at first. It’s sure tricky to hit ‘em when there’s nowhere they ain’t. Putting the ball in play catered to Hendricks’ brisk pace, fell KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS into the Cubs’ rigged defensive Cubs pitcher Kyle Hendricks (center) celebrates with teammates Anthony Rizzo (left) and Willson Contreras after shutting out the Please see CARDINALS, Page B5 Cardinals on 81 pitches Friday afternoon.

SPORTS

H E RE’S TO

TWO THINGS T H AT A RE

D R IN K R E S P O N S IB LY

GREAT ON ICE JACK DANIEL’S and OLD NO. 7 are registered trademarks. © 2019 Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey, 40% Alcohol by Volume (80 proof). Distilled and Bottled by JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, Lynchburg, Tennessee.

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 5/4 at Cubs 3:05 p.m. FSM, FS1

Sunday 5/5 at Cubs 6:05 p.m. ESPN

Monday 5/6 vs. Phillies 7:05 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 5/7 vs. Phillies 6:45 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 5/5 Playoffs at Stars 2 p.m. KSDK (5)

Tuesday 5/7 Playoffs vs. Stars 7 p.m., NBCSN (if nec.)

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 5/11 at Charleston 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday 5/15 Saturday 5/18 U.S. Open Cup vs. at Louisville Duluth or at Des 6 p.m. Moines, TBA

Saturday 6/1 vs. Memphis 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 4 at 1 p.m. Subsequent Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STLFC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR Saturday AUTO RACING 8 a.m. NASCAR: Gander RV 400. practice, FS1 9 a.m. NASCAR Xfinity: Allied Steel Buildings 200, qualifying, FS1 11 a.m. NASCAR: Gander RV 400, final practice, FS1 12:30 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: Allied Steel Buildings 200, FS1 BASEBALL 11 a.m. College: Missouri at Tennessee, SEC Network 12 p.m. College: Pittsburgh at Florida State, FSM Plus 12 p.m. Twins at Yankees, MLB Network 2 p.m. College: Ohio State at Minnesota, BTN 2 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Texas A&M, SEC Network 3:05 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, FSM, FS1, KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m. Athletics at Pirates, FS1 7 p.m. College: Alabama at Auburn, SEC Network 7 p.m. College: Vanderbilt at South Carolina, ESPNU 9 p.m. Dodgers at Padres (joined in progress), MLB Network BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. NBA playoffs: Warriors at Rockets, KDNL (30) BOXING 9 p.m. Light heavyweights: Artur Beterbiev vs. Radivoje Kalajdzic, ESPN FOOTBALL Midnight AFL Premiership: Geelong vs. Essendon, FS2 GOLF 12 p.m. PGA: Wells Fargo Championship, third round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Wells Fargo Championship, third round, KMOV (4) 2 p.m. Champions: Insperity Invitational, second round, GOLF 5 p.m. LPGA: MEDIHEAL Championship, third round, GOLF 11:30 p.m. European PGA: China Open, final round, GOLF HOCKEY 6:15 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blue Jackets at Bruins, KSDK (5) 9 p.m. NHL playoffs: Avalanche at Sharks, NBCSN HORSE RACING 11 a.m. Thoroughbreds: Kentucky Derby prep races, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Kentucky Derby (post time 5:50 p.m.) KSDK (5) LACROSSE 9 a.m. Men’s MAAC final: Quinnipiac vs. Marist, ESPNU 11 a.m. Women’s Patriot final: Navy at Loyola (Md.), CBSSN 11 a.m. Men’s American East final: Vermont vs. UMBC, ESPNU 1 p.m. ACC final: Notre Dame at Virginia, ESPNU 1:30 p.m. Women’s Big East final: Georgetown vs. Denver, FS2 3:30 p.m. Men’s Big East final: Georgetown at Denver, CBSSN 6 p.m. Men’s Big Ten final: Penn State vs. Johns Hopkins, BTN MOTORCYCLE RACING 8:55 p.m. Monster Energy Supercross, Las Vegas, USA RUGBY 9 a.m. PRO14: Munster vs. Benetton, ESPN2 8 p.m. College: Division 1A Tournament, Life vs. California, CBSSN SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Bournemouth vs. Tottenham, NBCSN 8:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Bayern Munich vs. Hannover, FS2 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Wolverhampton vs. Fulham, NBCSN 11:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Werder Bremen vs. Borussia Dortmund, FS2 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Cardiff City vs. Crystal Palace, KSDK (5) 1 p.m. MLS: LA Galaxy at New York Red Bulls, ESPN 1:45 p.m. English Premier League: Newcastle United vs. Liverpool, NBCSN 9 p.m. Primera Division: Tijuana vs. Puebla, FS1 SOFTBALL 12 p.m. College: Michigan at Maryland, BTN 3 p.m. College: Northwestern at Minnesota, ESPN2 5 p.m. College: Alabama at LSU, SEC Network 5 p.m. College: Auburn at Arkansas, ESPNU 6 p.m. College: Baylor at Texas, FSM Plus 7 p.m. College: Oklahoma State at Oklahoma, ESPN VOLLEYBALL 1 p.m. Women’s Beach NCAA Tournament, ESPN2 3 p.m. Women’s Beach NCAA Tournament, ESPN 5 p.m. Women’s Beach NCAA Tournament, ESPN2 7 p.m. NCAA men’s final: Hawaii vs. Long Beach State, ESPN2

Sunday’s highlights AUTO RACING 1 p.m. NASCAR: Gander RV 400, FS1 BASEBALL 12 p.m. Twins at Yankees, MLB Network 3 p.m. Astros vs. Angels, ESPN 6:05 p.m. Cardinals at Cubs, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) BASKETBALL 2:30 p.m. NBA playoffs: Raptors at 76ers, KDNL (30) 6 p.m. NBA playoffs: Nuggets at Trail Blazers, TNT GOLF 12 p.m. PGA: Wells Fargo Championship, final round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Wells Fargo Championship, final round, KMOV (4) 2 p.m. Champions: Insperity Invitational, final round, GOLF 5 p.m. LPGA: MEDIHEAL Championship, final round, GOLF HOCKEY 2 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues at Stars, KSDK (5), KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m. NHL playoffs: Hurricanes at Islanders, NBCSN

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M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

Dufner takes Wells Fargo lead with a 63 BY DOUG FERGUSON

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Jason Dufner’s game was going nowhere, so he changed everything from his swing coach to his equipment to his caddie. It didn’t get any better. He at least is starting to see signs of it coming together with an 8-under 63 on Friday in the Wells Fargo Championship, matching his career-low score on the PGA Tour and giving him a one-shot lead going into the weekend at Quail Hollow. Dufner considers it the best two rounds he has put together since the 2017 Memorial, which also is the last time he had a 36hole lead. “See how it goes being in the heat of it on Saturday and Sunday,” Dufner said. “I’ve been there before. It’s been a while, but I kind of know what to expect. It will be a good challenge to see where I’m at, what I’m doing.” Dufner was at 11-under 131. Joel Dahmen made his first bogey of the week on his final hole of the second round — from the middle of the fairway, no less — but still had a 66 and was oneshot behind. So was Max Homa, who also knows about coping with bad results when he missed the cut in 14 out of 17 events in 2017. He birdied his last two holes for a 63. The weekend at the Wells Fargo Championship will not feature Phil Mickelson for the first time since he started playing it in 2004. Mickelson shot 41 on the front nine and wound up with a 76 to miss the cut by four shots. Rory McIlroy was stride for stride with Dufner until he dropped three shots over the last two holes. McIlroy made double bogey with a fat shot out of a bunker and a pitch too strong over the green at No. 8. Then he went over the green on No. 9 for a bogey and a 70. Even so, he was five behind and in the mix for a third title at Quail Hollow. He was at 6-under 136 along with Patrick Reed, who had a 69 as he goes for his first top 10 of the year. Defending champion Jason Day (69) was six behind. “I stood up here last night talking about that I got the most out of it yesterday, and today it was the complete opposite. I turned a 66 into a 70,” McIlroy said. “Golf, it’s a funny game, and these things happen.” Dufner didn’t find too much funny about last year, when his world ranking fell from No. 41 to No. 124 and he missed 11 cuts. That’s when he decided to make changes to just about everything. “This is my fourth caddie of the year so far,” he said. “I left Chuck Cook, started doing some other things. I started working with Phil Kenyon. I think I’m on my fourth or fifth putter this year. I’m on my fourth or fifth driver, my fourth or fifth golf ball, fourth or fifth lob wedge. I’m trying to find stuff that’s going to work.” It worked on Friday at Quail Hollow. He started his round by missing the green 35 yards to the left and holing the chip over the bunker. He made a 20-foot eagle putt. He missed a 3-foot par putt. He drove the green on the par-4 14th for another birdie. And he capped it all off with a 40-foot birdie putt on the pen-

CHUCK BURTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Joel Dahmen chips to the ninth hole during the second round of the Wells Fargo Championship at Quail Hollow Club on Friday in Charlotte, N.C. insula green at the par-3 17th. It was the first time he shot 63 since Oak Hill in 2013, the year he won the PGA Championship. “I’m just getting to that point where I’m kind of settled with everything,” he said. “Sometimes you make a change and it happens immediately. For me, that wasn’t the case. But kind of getting past all those changes and settling into playing some better golf instead of coming to tournaments wondering how I might play or how it might go or is this going to be the right change. Getting to where I feel more comfortable with that and I can just go out play free and play some good golf.” Dufner turned 42 in March and realizes he doesn’t have many years left to compete at a high level. “I’m not really trying to be mediocre,” he said. “I’m searching for things that are going to make me a better player.” Homa always had the talent, winning the NCAA title at Cal with a three-shot victory over Jon Rahm. He just fell into the trap of thinking he had to be even better when he got to the PGA Tour, and he’s had a rough go of it. But when he’s driving it well, it frees up the rest of his game. He also went back to longtime friend Joe Greiner, who caddied for him his first year on tour until leaving for another friend, Kevin Chappell. “Joe stayed with me until it became financially irresponsible for him to work for me,” Homa said. Chappell had back surgery and is out until the fall, and Homa brought Greiner back. “My attitude is awesome nowadays,” he said. “I don’t really get too down on myself. I have an awesome, awesome caddie that doesn’t let me. If I’m quiet, he yells at me and tells me quiet golfers are usually very mean to themselves, so we have a good thing going.”

GOLF ROUNDUP Tanigawa shares lead in Champions event Ken Tanigawa birdied the first three holes for a share of the lead with Tim Petrovic when firstround play in the PGA Tour Champions’ Insperity Invitational at the Woodlands in Texas was suspended Friday because of lightning and heavy rain. Petrovic completed six holes. Corey Pavin, Jerry Smith, Mike Goodes,Shaun Micheel,Kent Jones and Glen Day were a stroke back. Pavin, Smith and Goodes played seven holes,Micheel and Jones five, and Day two. Youngster makes cut in China: Having only recently completed his high school midterms, 14-yearold Chinese golfer Kuang Yang felt underprepared heading into his first event on the European Tour in Senzhen, China. It hasn’t stopped him making the cut in historic fashion at the China Open. Kuang holed a par putt from around 20 feet on No. 18 Friday to shoot a second straight 1-under 71 and make it to the weekend.He became the youngest person to make the cut at a regular European Tour event at 14 years, six months, 12 days. Kuang is less than a month older than compatriot Guan Tianlang, who made the cut at the Masters in 2013. Another Chinese player,Wu Ashen,has a two-stroke lead after shooting a 7-under 65 Friday. He is looking to win his home tournament for the second time, after a victory in 2015. Ryu leads LPGA event: So Yeon Ryu shot a 2-under 70 on Friday at difficult Lake Merced in Daly City, Calif.,to take a one-stroke lead over follow South Korean Sei Young Kim and American Ryann O’Toole in the LPGA MEDIHEAL Championship. O’Toole birdied her last three holes for a 65, matching the best score in the first two rounds.

DIGEST Serengeti Empress wins Kentucky Oaks race Serengeti Empress went wireto-wire to win the $1.25 million Kentucky Oaks by 1¾ lengths over Liora on Friday at Churchill Downs, in Louisville. Serengeti Empress started from the No. 13 post to lead by the first turn and kept it up despite Liora’s late attempt to close the gap.She rebounded from a seventhplace run in the Fair Grounds Oaks to win the premier race for 3-year-old fillies and earn her second win in three starts this year. Serengeti Empress also gave trainer Tom Amoss his first Kentucky Oaks victory. Ridden by Jose Ortiz, Serengeti Empress covered 1¾ miles 1:50.17 and paid $28, $14.80 and $9.60. Liora returned $32.60 and $17. Lady Apple paid $7 to show. The start of the race featured a scary moment when Positive Spirit fell and threw jockey Manny Franco after clipping another runner as the 14-horse field closed together from the gate. Both walked off the track. (AP) Chiefs’ Hill denies allegations: A lawyer for Tyreek Hill has denied allegations of child abuse made against his client. Responding to the release of audio that caused the Kansas City Chiefs to bar their star wide receiver from team activities, the lawyer suggested that Hill’s fiancee, Crystal Espinal, is guilty of

abusing their 3-year-old son. The lawyer, Trey Pettlon, addressed a letter to NFL investigator Lisa Friel. He painted a portrait of the 25-year-old Pro Bowler as a loving father whose roughest treatment of his son has come in the form of disciplinary spankings, and whose menacing words to his fiancee, as heard on the recording, were very much out of character. On the tape, Espinal accused Hill of punching his son in the chest when the boy was crying, and of using a belt on the child. Espinal also told Hill that his son is “terrified” of him. Hill replied, “You need to be terrified of me, too, (expletive).” Police are investigating the matter. (Washington Post)

termined date later this season. “As long as the predictions are correct,it shouldn’t be nearly as bad as it’s been in the past,” STLFC vicepresident/general manager Jeremy Alumbaugh said. “But there’s definitely going to be some flooding and rather than taking a chance, we wanted to avoid any trouble.” The club’s next scheduled home match is on June 1,against Memphis. (Joe Lyons) Garin pulls upset in Munich tennis tourney: Cristian Garin saved two match points before stunning twotimedefendingchampionAlexander Zverev 6-4, 5-7, 7-5 in the quarterfinals of the Munich Open tennis event.Garin,ranked No.47,claimed his first win over a top-10 player.He next faces third-seeded Marco Cecchinato,who beat Marton Fucsovics 1-6, 7-5, 7-5. Matteo Berrettini defeated three-time champion Philipp Kohlschreiber 4-6,7-5,6-4 and will face fourth-seeded Roberto Bautista Agut, who beat Guido Pella 4-6, 6-4, 6-0. (AP)

Raiders keep Martin: The Oakland Raiders are bringing back freeagent running back Doug Martin, after Isaiah Crowell reportedly went down with an Achilles tendon injury this week.Martin had 172 carries for 723 yards and four touchdowns last season. His return gives the Raiders a veteran back behind rookie first- S. Williams on comeback trail: Serround pick Josh Jacobs. ena Williams is set to return from injury at the Italian Open, in Rome, STLFC match postponed: Flood- which begins May 13. She has not ing along the Meramec River have played since withdrawing from her prompted St. Louis FC to postpone third-round match at the Miami its scheduled Saturday night match Open in March because of a knee inwith Ottawa Fury FC at the Soccer jury.She hasn’t played in Rome since Park in Fenton. The United Soccer winning her fourth title at the clayLeague Championship contest will court tennis event in 2016,when she be rescheduled at a yet-to-be-de- beat Madison Keys in the final. (AP)


SPORTS

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

Washington U.’s Howard is 9-0 BY STU DURANDO

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

John Howard was pitching the final game of his high school career and his graduation from Clayton High was hours away when he threw the pitch that caused the pop that threw his baseball future into uncertainty. He was headed to Washington University but had no idea when he would throw again, let alone become effective. After two seasons that saw him progress but not flourish, Howard has quietly put together two of the best years by a pitcher in the Division III program’s history. He is the lone senior and leader of the best D-III pitching staff in the country as the No. 8-ranked Bears take a 29-5-1 record into their final regularseason games Saturday at Knox College. Howard is 9-0 with a 1.15 earned run average, and Washington University leads the country by a significant margin with a team ERA of 1.87, which would rank among the top 10 in D-III history if it can be maintained. “I spent the summer between my sophomore and junior year playing in a summer league,” Howard said. “When I came back in the fall, I felt like the ball was coming out of my hand differently. It started to feel like I hit my stride. I think it was long enough after the surgery that something clicked again.” Howard was 6-3 with a 1.01 ERA last year, allowing one or fewer runs in 11 of his 12 appearances. He started this season by allowing three earned runs at Hendrix but rebounded to break the school’s singleseason win record. The rest of the staff – all underclassmen – has tried to keep pace. Out of the top six in innings pitched, none has an ERA higher than 2.25.

MARY BUTKUS, WUSTL PHOTOS

Washington University’s John Howard is the leader of the best D-III pitching staff in the country. He is 9-0 with a 1.15 earned run average. But Howard is the workhorse, having thrown 70 2/3 innings in his 10 starts. Opponents have hit .207 against him and he has 79 strikeouts with 12 walks. “His last two years have just been total consistency,” coach Pat Bloom said. “I don’t know that he’s had a bad start. He’s given us a chance to win the game every time. To me, whether the numbers are great or not, I look at whether he gave us a chance to win.” A lot of great performances have been necessary to build the numbers the Bears have achieved overall. They are first in the country in walks/hits

per inning pitched at 1.05. They are second in hits per nine innings (7.02), strikeout-to-walk ratio (4.3) and walks per nine innings (2.23). Ryan Loutous is 1-0 with a 1.63 ERA in 10 starts. Matt Ashbaugh has made seven starts and is 6-0 with a 2.08 ERA. Others include Matt Lopes (3-0, 1.21), Mitchell Black (2-2, 1.45) and Tim Tague (4-0, 2.25). “It’s less about competition than wanting to pick up the guy behind you or in front of you,” Howard said. “It’s feeding off of a good start or working into a good bullpen. If you’re coming out in the middle of an

inning, you know the guy coming in, no matter how many guys are on base, he’s going to get out of it. It’s a very comfortable feeling.” The Bears are in good position to make the NCAA Tournament field, which will be announced May 13. It would be a nice finish to Howard’s college career, which was launched by a trip to New York for a showcase event in high school. That’s where he first talked to the previous Washington University coach. Before Howard landed on campus he needed his ulnar collateral ligament repaired from the injury at Clayton. Four years later,

he’s hoping to buck the odds and find his way into the major league draft. He understands that he doesn’t fit the mold of a big, hard-throwing pitching prospect. He is 6 feet and his fastball tops out in the low 90s. Howard said his go-to pitch is a slider and he also has a changeup and curve. Bloom, who coached Jordan Zimmermann of the Detroit Tigers at Wisconsin-Stevens Point, thinks Howard is draft worthy. “I don’t think many guys out there have his fullgrown repertoire and ability to use it whenever he wants,” Bloom said. “John doesn’t have the raw arm

talent of Zimmermann, but I would say in terms of refinement and pitching consistency, I’d put him up there with the best I’ve coached.” If it doesn’t work out, Howard already has landed a job in New York. He is double majoring in history and marketing and is ready for the real world. But a chance to extend his baseball career? “I hope it happens,” he said. “An opportunity to keep playing would be something really special.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

100% CASH FOR VINTAGE Reisinger reaches GLVC milestone BASEBALL CARDS (1900-1969) BY JOE LYONS

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Private collectors in town paying ALL CASH for vintage baseball, football & basketball card collections from 1900-1969 ONLY. Looking for complete & partial sets, stars and higher grade commons.

$250,000 TO SPEND & WE PAY ALL CASH AND WAY MORE THAN DEALERS!

Truman State’s Christa Reisinger,who starred locally at Troy Buchanan High, became the Great Lakes Valley Conference’s first three-time softball player of the year this week. “Christa’s having an incredible season,” Truman coach Erin Brown said. “We all take what she’s able to do for granted because she’s so good and competes at that level all the time. I’m so grateful she chose Truman and is leaving a legacy of excellent softball all over our record book and the season isn’t over.” The senior center fielder is the program’s career leader in stolen bases (170), runs (239), batting average (.487), hits (325), total bases (512) and triples (18). In addition, she’s second in home runs (38), fourth in at-bats (667), fifth in RBIs (133) and seventh in doubles (37). The GLVC’s other honorees included pitcher of the year Jennifer Leonhardt (Southern Indiana), freshman of the year Emma Walbert (Truman State) and coach of the year Amanda Scott (UMSL). Scott is 10856 in her third season with the Tritons; earlier this season,she became the quickest in program history to reach win No. 100. Also named to the first team were UMSL junior pitcher Andee Tiffee, Maryville junior pitcher and utility player Alyssa Callans, Maryville junior shortstop Jaclyn Pasakarnis and Maryville sophomore outfielder Hannah Tolley.

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Megan Micke, a Washington High productwhostarred at East Central College and went on to Lyon College in Arkansas, was named to the All-American Midwest Conference softball squad after a sensational junior season with the Scots. She hit .355, led the team with six home runs and swiped a leaguebest 36 bases. Defensively, she had a fielding percentage of .923 and was part of nine double plays this season. Lindenwood’s Neil

Fischer, a senior first baseman from Vianney, was named the National Collegiate Baseball Writers Association’s hitter of the week after batting .733 (11 for 15) with a 1.267 slugging percentage and .800 onbase percentage. He had two homers, two doubles and drove in 14 runs. For the season, he’s hitting .304 and leads the Lions with seven homers and 52 RBIs. In softball,the Lions’Austine Pauley, a junior from Francis Howell North, was named MIAA softball player of the week after hitting .471 with three home runs and 10 RBIs last week. St. Louis U sophomore first baseman Sadie Wise, a Kirkwood High product, was named Atlantic 10 Conference softball player of the week. She hit safely in three games last week, going five for nine, in a series at St. Joseph’s.She had a grand slam, drove in five and had her 17th double of the season — a SLU single-season record — in a 6-4 series-opening win,hit a two-run homer in a 12-0 SLU win in Game 2 and had a hit and a walk in the series finale. Wise is second in the league in batting average (.411) and tied for second in doubles (17). Maryville’s Cody Klotz (Oakville) was named GLVC player of the week in baseball after going 10 for 20 with three homers, six runs scored and nine driven in last week. He had three multi-hit games in helping the Saints win two games at No. 7 Quincy and then win three versus Truman State. Missouri Baptist junior righthander Delissa Dennison (Staunton) was named to the American Midwest Conference softball team after picking up 10 wins, posting a 2.24 ERA and finishing the season with 139 strikeouts. In baseball, Spartans catcher Anthony Enwiya (.329, 6 HR, 34 RBI), outfielder Caleb Dean (.356, 7 HR, 17 SB), shortstop DeShawn Lookout (.344, 14 2B, 29 RBI) and junior pitcher Josh Ray were named to

the all-league team. Ray, from Seckman, went 7-1 with 3.08 ERA and was also named Newcomer pitcher of the year. The Spartans’ Masen Palmier (Parkway South) was named pitcher of the week after improving to 4-0. After beating Hannibal 16-5, he struck out nine and allowed just two hits over eight innings in a 5-0 win over Lindenwood-Belleville. Webster University junior Meredith Sowers captured six golds — in the 800, 100 hurdles, 400 hurdles, pole vault, 4x100 and 4x400 — to earn track athlete of the year honors in the St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference. The Gorloks’ coaching staff was honored for winning backto-back titles. Fontbonne’s Raven Venegas was named field athlete of the year while her sister, Jillian,was named field newcomer. The track newcomer was Greenville’s Cayden Sharp. On the men’s side, Greenville took first, had the top field athlete (Mitchell Hooten, Red Bud), the field newcomer (Nate Brown) and track newcomer (Rakim Murphy). Principia’s Corey Carter was the track athlete of the year. McKendree sophomore golfer Natasha AinsleyThomas has been selected to compete in the NCAA Division II East Super Regional, which will take place May 6-8 in Owensboro, Ky. Ainsley-Thomas qualified by tying for fourth at the GLVC Tournament. UMSL junior Emma Thorngren tied with AinsleyThomas, earning All-GLVC honors for the third straight year. The Tritons earned a spot in the super regional for the 10th straight year. Also competing in Kentucky will be Maryville junior Carmen Villaverde. Maryville senior Lucas Shafer, the GLVC’s lacrosse player of the year, scored a career-best eight goals and adding a pair of assists in a season-ending 18-13 loss to Rockhurst in the league tournament.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central St. Louis Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado San Francisco

W 18 16 16 13 9 W 20 17 18 14 13 W 20 18 18 15 13

L 13 16 16 18 22 L 12 12 16 15 18 L 13 13 14 17 18

San Diego 11, Atlanta 2 N.Y. Mets 1, Cincinnati 0

Pct .581 .500 .500 .419 .290 Pct .625 .586 .529 .483 .419 Pct .606 .581 .563 .469 .419

GB — 2½ 2½ 5 9 GB — 1½ 3 4½ 6½ GB — 1 1½ 4½ 6

WC — 2½ 2½ 5 9 WC — — 1½ 3 5 WC — — ½ 3½ 5

L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 3-7 3-7 L10 7-3 8-2 5-5 2-8 5-5 L10 6-4 7-3 7-3 6-4 5-5

Str W-2 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-2 W-5 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-1 W-2 W-1 W-2 W-1

Home Away 13-6 5-7 10-10 6-6 7-8 9-8 7-11 6-7 6-13 3-9 Home Away 12-4 8-8 8-4 9-8 11-8 7-8 6-8 8-7 7-6 6-12 Home Away 12-4 8-9 7-7 11-6 7-8 11-6 5-7 10-10 7-9 6-9

Thursday’s results Colorado 11, Milwaukee 6 Washington 2, St. Louis 1

Friday’s results Chicago Cubs 4, St. Louis 0 Oakland 14, Pittsburgh 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 2 San Francisco at Cincinnati, (n) Atlanta 7, Miami 2 Arizona at Colorado, (n) Milwaukee 3, N.Y. Mets 1 L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, (n) Today’s games St. Louis (Wacha 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3), 3:05 p.m. Atlanta (Soroka 2-1) at Miami (Richards 0-4), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Bassitt 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Williams 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Washington (Corbin 2-1) at Philadelphia (Arrieta 4-2), 6:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 2-2) at Milwaukee (Gonzalez 0-0), 6:10 p.m. San Francisco (Rodriguez 3-3) at Cincinnati (Roark 1-1), 6:10 p.m. Arizona (Weaver 2-1) at Colorado (Freeland 2-4), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Hill 0-0) at San Diego (Lucchesi 3-2), 7:40 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Seattle Texas Los Angeles Oakland

W 21 18 14 14 11 W 19 17 14 14 11 W 18 18 14 15 15

L 11 13 17 18 22 L 11 13 15 15 22 L 14 16 15 17 19

Pct GB .656 — .581 2½ .452 6½ .438 7 .33310½ Pct GB .633 — .567 2 .483 4½ .483 4½ .333 9½ Pct GB .563 — .529 1 .483 2½ .469 3 .441 4

M 1 • SATURDAY • 05.04.2019

WC — — 3½ 4 7½ WC — — 2½ 2½ 7½ WC — 1 2½ 3 4

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 5-5 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 5-5 4-6 L10 5-5 2-8 3-7 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 9-7 12-4 W-1 9-7 9-6 L-3 7-8 7-9 L-1 8-7 6-11 L-2 3-11 8-11 Str Home Away L-1 11-5 8-6 W-1 8-4 9-9 W-2 8-7 6-8 W-1 7-5 7-10 L-2 8-11 3-11 Str Home Away L-2 10-3 8-11 L-5 7-11 11-5 L-2 10-6 4-9 W-4 11-7 4-10 W-1 10-8 5-11

Boyd strikes out 9 as Tigers jump out early melee between the teams last season.

WIRE REPORTS

DETROIT — Matthew Boyd struck out nine in another solid outing, and the Detroit Tigers scored three runs in the first inning of a 4-3 victory over the Kansas City Royals on Friday night. It was the sixth straight quality start for Boyd, who allowed two runs and five hits in seven innings. He walked one. Joe Jimenez struck out two in a perfect eighth. Shane Greene allowed a solo homer to Jorge Soler in the ninth, but he was able to close the game out for his American League-leading 13th save in 13 chances. Greene retired Martin Maldonado on a popup with the tying run on second to end it. RAYS 7, ORIOLES 0: Tyler Glasnow pitched seven innings of threehit ball to earn his major league-leading sixth win, and Tampa Bay got a slump-breaking homer from Mike Zunino in a rout of host Baltimore. Glasnow

PHILLIES 4, NATIONALS 2: Rhys Hoskins hit a three-run homer, Jerad Eickhoff threw five crisp innings and host Philadelphia beat Washington. YANKEES 6, TWINS 3: Host New York lost left-hander James Paxton to a knee injury early, but the bullpen took over to help defeat Minnesota. Gary Sanchez hit two home runs for the Yankees. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS It was his 12th multi-home Royals pitcher Jorge Lopez knocks over Tigers’ Ronny run game in 284 games. Rodriguez as he scores on a wild pitch Friday in Detroit. ATHLETICS 14, PIRATES 1: struck out eight, walked right side to score Leonys Josh Phegley drove in eight none and lowered his AL- Martin from second base. runs on four hits, which best ERA to 1.47. included a solo home run, BRAVES 7, MARLINS 2: as Oakland defeated host INDIANS 2, MARINERS Freddie Freeman and Brian Pittsburgh. 1: Pinch-hitter Tyler McCann each homered to Naquin’s two-out single help Atlanta settle its score BREWERS 3, METS 1: Ryan in the ninth inning drove in with Jose Ureña and beat Braun hit a tie-breaking, the winning run and host host Miami. Braves right- two-run homer as host MilCleveland defeated Seat- hander Kevin Gausman waukee defeated New York. tle. Naquin, batting for was ejected in the second Lorenzo Cain added a home Jordan Luplow, grounded inning for throwing a 97 run in the bottom of the first the first pitch from An- mph fastball behind Ureña, inning to answer a score by thony Swarzak through the who was at the center of a the Mets to open the game.

BOX SCORES

Thursday’s results Minnesota 8, Houston 2 Chicago White Sox 6, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 3, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 6, Toronto 2 Friday’s results N.Y. Yankees 3, Minnesota 3 Oakland 14, Pittsburgh 1 Tampa Bay 7, Baltimore 0 Toronto at Texas, (n) Detroit 4, Kansas City 3 Boston at Chicago White Sox, (n) Cleveland 2, Seattle 1 Today’s games Minnesota (Odorizzi 3-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Happ 1-2), 12:05 p.m. Kansas City (Bailey 2-3) at Detroit (Ross 1-3), 3:10 p.m. Seattle (Leake 2-3) at Cleveland (Carrasco 2-3), 3:10 p.m. Oakland (Bassitt 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Williams 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Baltimore (Bundy 0-4), 6:05 p.m. Boston (Rodriguez 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Banuelos 2-0), 6:10 p.m. Houston (Miley 1-2) vs. L.A. Angels (Cahill 1-2) at Monterrey, 6:10 p.m. Toronto (TBD) at Texas (Lynn 3-2), 7:05 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Indians’ Kluber out indefinitely CLEVELAND — The Indians placed star pitcher Corey Kluber on the injured list with a broken right arm that will sideline him indefinitely. Kluber sustained a non-displaced fracture of his ulna bone May 1 when he was hit by a line drive against Miami. He underwent further imaging test Thursday at the Cleveland Clinic, and the results confirmed the diagnosis. The Indians said Kluber does not need surgery for now. He will be re-examined in three to four weeks. Kluber’s loss is a major blow to the Indians, who trail Minnesota in the AL Central and haven’t been hitting. Cleveland is missing two starters from one of baseball’s best rotations as Mike Clevinger remains out with a strained back muscle.

Reds bring up prospect Senzel CINCINNATI — With an offense that’s last in the National League, the Reds brought up top prospect Nick Senzel and let him continue learning a new position at the major league level. Cincinnati called up Senzel for his major league debut against the San Francisco Giants on Friday. The 23-yearold outfielder batted second and played center, the spot they’ve been aiming him toward since the offseason. “We don’t bring guys up to put them on the sidelines,” said Dick Williams, the president of baseball operations. “We expect him to inject some energy and help the outfield defense. Nick is ready to do that.” Senzel was taken second overall in the 2016 amateur draft out of Tennessee. He signed for a $6.2 million bonus, but his ascent was slowed by bouts of vertigo and a broken right index finger last season. BRIEFLY YANKEES: Miguel Andújar (right shoulder) expects to be activated from the injured list today. Manager Aaron Boone said Gio Urshela will continue to play third base regularly with Andujar serving as the designated hitter. METS: New York optioned first baseman Dominic Smith the Triple-A Syracuse. The team called up shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria from Triple-A. The Mets also transferred pitcher Drew Smith to the 60-day injured list. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

12

The Yankees’ Gary Sanchez homered twice in a 6-3 victory over the Minnesota Twins on Friday. It was Sanchez’s 12th multihomer performance in 284 major league games, second only to Hall of Famer Ralph Kiner, who had 12 in his first 282 career games.. — Wire reports

The Indians’ Tyler Naquin, bottom, grabs Leonys Martin, top, after hitting a winning RBI single Friday in Cleveland. Tigers 4, Royals 3 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Mondesi dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Gordon lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Dozier 1b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .340 Soler rf 3 1 3 2 0 0 .242 Gutierrez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .269 Owings ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .143 O’Hearn ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .170 Maldonado c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .181 Hamilton cf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .212 Totals 32 3 7 3 1 13 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .226 Castellanos rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .271 Cabrera dh 4 0 3 1 0 0 .295 Dixon pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Goodrum lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Rodriguez 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .324 Beckham 2b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Greiner c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .138 Totals 31 4 8 3 2 7 Kansas City 000 200 001 — 3 7 0 Detroit 301 000 00x — 4 8 0 LOB — Kansas City 5, Detroit 6. 2B — O’Hearn (4), Rodriguez (5). 3B — Gutierrez (1). HR — Soler (8), off Greene. RBIs — Soler 2 (21), Gutierrez (8), Cabrera (12), Rodriguez 2 (7). CS — Hamilton (4). SF — Soler. DP — Kansas City 1 (Owings, Dozier). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lopez, L, 0-3 7 5 4 4 2 6 5.09 Peralta 1 3 0 0 0 1 6.60 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Boyd, W, 3-2 7 5 2 2 1 9 3.05 Jimenez, H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.38 Greene, S, 13-13 1 2 1 1 0 2 1.80 HBP — Boyd (Gordon), Lopez (Beckham). WP — Lopez. T — 2:33. Att. — 14,020

Indians 2, Mariners 1

Seattle AB R Gordon 2b 4 0 Haniger cf 4 0 Vogelbach dh 2 0 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 D.Santana lf 4 0 Bruce rf 4 1 Narvaez c 4 0 Beckham ss 4 0 Healy 3b 2 0 Moore 3b 2 0 Totals 34 1 Cleveland AB R Lindor ss 3 0 Martin cf 4 2 Ramirez 3b 4 0 C.Santana 1b 3 0 Luplow rf 2 0 Naquin ph 1 0 Gonzalez lf 3 0 Kipnis 2b 3 0 Plawecki c 3 0 Bauers dh 3 0 Totals 29 2 Seattle 000 100 Cleveland 000 100

H BI BB SO Avg. 2 0 0 0 .304 1 0 0 3 .237 0 0 2 0 .289 1 0 0 1 .231 0 0 0 1 .275 1 1 0 1 .189 1 0 0 0 .289 2 0 0 1 .284 0 0 0 1 .231 0 0 0 2 .184 8 1 2 10 H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 1 1 .214 1 0 0 1 .214 1 0 0 2 .186 0 0 1 1 .314 1 0 1 1 .273 1 1 0 0 .278 0 0 0 2 .226 0 0 0 0 .173 0 0 0 1 .200 0 0 0 2 .231 4 1 3 11 000 — 1 8 0 001 — 2 4 0

LOB — Seattle 8, Cleveland 4. 2B — Beckham 2 (11), Martin (5), Luplow (2). HR — Bruce (10), off Bieber. RBIs — Bruce (18), Naquin (8). SB — Gordon (9). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kikuchi 7 3 1 1 1 10 3.98 Rosscup 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.74 Swarzak, L, 2-1 2/3 1 1 1 2 1 3.60 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bieber 72/3 6 1 1 1 8 3.16 Perez 0 0 0 0 1 0 7.94 1 Cimber /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.15 Hand, W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.23 Inherited runners-scored — Cimber 1-0. T — 2:46. Att. — 16,334

Yankees 6, Twins 3

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garver c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Polanco ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .327 Cruz dh 3 1 1 2 1 2 .303 Cron 1b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .220 Gonzalez lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .191 Kepler rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Schoop 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .270 Adrianza 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Buxton cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .247 Totals 30 3 4 3 4 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 1 0 1 0 1 .212 Voit 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .278 Sanchez c 4 2 3 2 0 1 .265 Torres ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Ford dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .179 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .338 Tauchman lf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .174 Maybin rf 2 2 1 0 1 1 .400 Wade 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Totals 29 6 8 5 2 9 Minnesota 001 000 020 — 3 4 2 New York 110 210 10x — 6 8 1 E — Cron (3), Buxton (1), Torres (4). LOB — Minnesota 5, New York 4. HR — Cruz (6), off Britton; Sanchez (9), off Gibson; Sanchez (10), off Morin. RBIs — Cruz 2 (20), Cron (16), Gardner (12), Voit (27), Sanchez 2 (20), Torres (16). SF — Cron. S — Wade. DP — Minnesota 2; New York 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson, L, 2-1 5 7 5 2 2 5 4.68 Morin 2 1 1 1 0 3 4.50 Romero 1 0 0 0 0 1 6.43 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Paxton 3 2 1 0 3 1 3.11 Holder, W, 2-0 2 0 0 0 0 2 4.00 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.20 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.42 Britton 1 1 2 2 1 1 4.15 Chapman, S, 6-7 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.19 T — 3:08. Att. — 35,911

Phillies 4, Nationals 2

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton lf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .294 Robles rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Kendrick 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .349 Adams 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .238 Suzuki c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .269 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .181 Kieboom ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Hellickson p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Gomes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Taylor cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .115

Totals 33 2 6 2 3 12 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Segura ss 4 2 2 1 0 1 .345 Harper rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .234 Hoskins 1b 3 1 2 3 0 1 .288 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Williams lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Hernandez 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .284 Franco 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .255 Eickhoff p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .034 Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 29 4 6 4 1 10 Washington 001 001 000 — 2 6 0 Philadelphia 100 003 00x — 4 6 0 2B — Suzuki (2), Harper (9). 3B — Eaton (2). HR — Suzuki (3), off Dominguez; Segura (2), off Hellickson; Hoskins (10), off Jennings. Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hellickson 51/3 4 2 2 0 9 5.33 Jennings, L, 0-1, BS 2/3 1 2 2 1 1 7.71 Miller 2 1 0 0 0 0 3.97 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Eickhoff 5 3 1 1 3 7 2.05 Dominguez, W, 3-0 1 1 1 1 0 2 5.40 Morgan, H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00 Neshek, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.77 Neris, S, 5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 2.45 T — 2:42. Att. — 33,125

Braves 7, Marlins 2

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Albies 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .289 Donaldson 3b 5 0 3 3 0 1 .275 Freeman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .311 Acuna Jr. lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Markakis rf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .321 Swanson ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .262 McCann c 3 1 1 3 0 1 .304 Inciarte cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Gausman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Toussaint p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Joyce ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .400 Totals 34 7 10 7 4 7 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Rojas ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .281 Anderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .246 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Prado 1b 3 2 1 0 1 2 .280 Alfaro c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .301 Berti 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .177 Urena p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Walker ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .256 Galloway ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Totals 32 2 6 2 5 11 Atlanta 101 102 200 — 7 10 0 Miami 010 001 000 — 2 6 0 2B — Donaldson (9). HR — Freeman (6), off Urena; McCann (2), off Urena. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gausman 12/3 1 1 1 1 1 4.83 Toussaint, W, 2-0 4 4 1 1 3 6 6.35 1 Blevins, H, 2 /3 0 0 0 1 0 0.00 Winkler 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.35 Webb 2 1 0 0 0 3 0.00 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Urena, L, 1-5 6 6 5 5 3 4 5.45 2 Guerrero /3 2 2 2 1 0 2.84 Chen 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 11.45 Kinley 1 1 0 0 0 2 3.38 T — 3:08. Att. — 7,198

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1869 — Henry Chadwick published his first annual baseball handbook. The book eventually evolved into Spalding’s Official Baseball Guide. 1869 — The Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first all-professional team, played its first regular-season game and beat the Great Westerns of Cincinnati 45-9. 1871 — The Fort Wayne Kekiongas beat the Cleveland Forest Citys 2-0 in the first game played in the National Association. In the 127 games during the 1871 season, there were four shutouts. 1910 — The Browns and Cardinals played home games in St. Louis, and President Taft, not wanting to offend either club, saw parts of each game at Robinson Field and Sportsman’s Park. 1939 — Boston rookie Ted Williams became the first player to hit a home run that cleared the right-field seats at Briggs Stadium in Detroit. It was his first at-bat at Detroit. Boston edged the Tigers 7-6. 1944 — Black fans were allowed to buy grandstand seats for the first time in St. Louis. The Cardinals were the last major league club to desegregate seating. Black fans had been restricted to the bleachers.

BASEBALL CALENDAR June 3 — Amateur draft starts, Secaucus, N.J. June 13 — Detroit vs. Kansas City at Omaha, Neb. June 15 — International amateur signing period closes. June 19-20 — Owners meeting, New York. June 29-30 — New York Yankees vs. Boston at London. July 2 — International amateur signing period opens. July 9 — All-Star Game at Cleveland. July 21 — Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y.

July 31 — Last day during the season to trade a player. Aug. 18 — Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Cubs at Williamsport, Pa. Aug. 31 — Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Oct. 1-2 — Wild-card games. Oct. 22 — World Series starts. October TBA — Trading resumes, day after World Series.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central St. Louis Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado San Francisco

W 18 16 16 13 9 W 20 17 18 14 13 W 20 18 18 15 13

L 13 16 16 18 22 L 12 12 16 15 18 L 13 13 14 17 18

San Diego 11, Atlanta 2 N.Y. Mets 1, Cincinnati 0

Pct .581 .500 .500 .419 .290 Pct .625 .586 .529 .483 .419 Pct .606 .581 .563 .469 .419

GB — 2½ 2½ 5 9 GB — 1½ 3 4½ 6½ GB — 1 1½ 4½ 6

WC — 2½ 2½ 5 9 WC — — 1½ 3 5 WC — — ½ 3½ 5

L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 3-7 3-7 L10 7-3 8-2 5-5 2-8 5-5 L10 6-4 7-3 7-3 6-4 5-5

Str W-2 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-2 W-5 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-1 W-2 W-1 W-2 W-1

Home Away 13-6 5-7 10-10 6-6 7-8 9-8 7-11 6-7 6-13 3-9 Home Away 12-4 8-8 8-4 9-8 11-8 7-8 6-8 8-7 7-6 6-12 Home Away 12-4 8-9 7-7 11-6 7-8 11-6 5-7 10-10 7-9 6-9

Thursday’s results Colorado 11, Milwaukee 6 Washington 2, St. Louis 1

Friday’s results Chicago Cubs 4, St. Louis 0 Oakland 14, Pittsburgh 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 2 San Francisco at Cincinnati, (n) Atlanta 7, Miami 2 Arizona at Colorado, (n) Milwaukee 3, N.Y. Mets 1 L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, (n) Today’s games St. Louis (Wacha 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3), 3:05 p.m. Atlanta (Soroka 2-1) at Miami (Richards 0-4), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Bassitt 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Williams 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Washington (Corbin 2-1) at Philadelphia (Arrieta 4-2), 6:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 2-2) at Milwaukee (Gonzalez 0-0), 6:10 p.m. San Francisco (Rodriguez 3-3) at Cincinnati (Roark 1-1), 6:10 p.m. Arizona (Weaver 2-1) at Colorado (Freeland 2-4), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Hill 0-0) at San Diego (Lucchesi 3-2), 7:40 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Chicago Detroit Kansas City West Houston Seattle Texas Los Angeles Oakland

W 21 18 14 14 11 W 19 17 14 14 11 W 18 18 14 15 15

L 11 13 17 18 22 L 11 13 15 15 22 L 14 16 15 17 19

Pct GB .656 — .581 2½ .452 6½ .438 7 .33310½ Pct GB .633 — .567 2 .483 4½ .483 4½ .333 9½ Pct GB .563 — .529 1 .483 2½ .469 3 .441 4

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

WC — — 3½ 4 7½ WC — — 2½ 2½ 7½ WC — 1 2½ 3 4

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 5-5 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 5-5 4-6 L10 5-5 2-8 3-7 6-4 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 9-7 12-4 W-1 9-7 9-6 L-3 7-8 7-9 L-1 8-7 6-11 L-2 3-11 8-11 Str Home Away L-1 11-5 8-6 W-1 8-4 9-9 W-2 8-7 6-8 W-1 7-5 7-10 L-2 8-11 3-11 Str Home Away L-2 10-3 8-11 L-5 7-11 11-5 L-2 10-6 4-9 W-4 11-7 4-10 W-1 10-8 5-11

Boyd strikes out 9 as Tigers jump out early melee between the teams last season.

WIRE REPORTS

DETROIT — Matthew Boyd struck out nine in another solid outing, and the Detroit Tigers scored three runs in the first inning of a 4-3 victory over the Kansas City Royals on Friday night. It was the sixth straight quality start for Boyd, who allowed two runs and five hits in seven innings. He walked one. Joe Jimenez struck out two in a perfect eighth. Shane Greene allowed a solo homer to Jorge Soler in the ninth, but he was able to close the game out for his American League-leading 13th save in 13 chances. Greene retired Martin Maldonado on a popup with the tying run on second to end it. RAYS 7, ORIOLES 0: Tyler Glasnow pitched seven innings of threehit ball to earn his major league-leading sixth win, and Tampa Bay got a slump-breaking homer from Mike Zunino in a rout of host Baltimore. Glasnow

PHILLIES 4, NATIONALS 2: Rhys Hoskins hit a three-run homer, Jerad Eickhoff threw five crisp innings and host Philadelphia beat Washington. YANKEES 6, TWINS 3: Host New York lost left-hander James Paxton to a knee injury early, but the bullpen took over to help defeat Minnesota. Gary Sanchez hit two home runs for the Yankees. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS It was his 12th multi-home Royals pitcher Jorge Lopez knocks over Tigers’ Ronny run game in 284 games. Rodriguez as he scores on a wild pitch Friday in Detroit. ATHLETICS 14, PIRATES 1: struck out eight, walked right side to score Leonys Josh Phegley drove in eight none and lowered his AL- Martin from second base. runs on four hits, which best ERA to 1.47. included a solo home run, BRAVES 7, MARLINS 2: as Oakland defeated host INDIANS 2, MARINERS Freddie Freeman and Brian Pittsburgh. 1: Pinch-hitter Tyler McCann each homered to Naquin’s two-out single help Atlanta settle its score BREWERS 3, METS 1: Ryan in the ninth inning drove in with Jose Ureña and beat Braun hit a tie-breaking, the winning run and host host Miami. Braves right- two-run homer as host MilCleveland defeated Seat- hander Kevin Gausman waukee defeated New York. tle. Naquin, batting for was ejected in the second Lorenzo Cain added a home Jordan Luplow, grounded inning for throwing a 97 run in the bottom of the first the first pitch from An- mph fastball behind Ureña, inning to answer a score by thony Swarzak through the who was at the center of a the Mets to open the game.

BOX SCORES

Thursday’s results Minnesota 8, Houston 2 Chicago White Sox 6, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 3, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 6, Toronto 2 Friday’s results N.Y. Yankees 3, Minnesota 3 Oakland 14, Pittsburgh 1 Tampa Bay 7, Baltimore 0 Toronto at Texas, (n) Detroit 4, Kansas City 3 Boston at Chicago White Sox, (n) Cleveland 2, Seattle 1 Today’s games Minnesota (Odorizzi 3-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Happ 1-2), 12:05 p.m. Kansas City (Bailey 2-3) at Detroit (Ross 1-3), 3:10 p.m. Seattle (Leake 2-3) at Cleveland (Carrasco 2-3), 3:10 p.m. Oakland (Bassitt 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Williams 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Baltimore (Bundy 0-4), 6:05 p.m. Boston (Rodriguez 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Banuelos 2-0), 6:10 p.m. Houston (Miley 1-2) vs. L.A. Angels (Cahill 1-2) at Monterrey, 6:10 p.m. Toronto (TBD) at Texas (Lynn 3-2), 7:05 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Indians’ Kluber out indefinitely CLEVELAND — The Indians placed star pitcher Corey Kluber on the injured list with a broken right arm that will sideline him indefinitely. Kluber sustained a non-displaced fracture of his ulna bone May 1 when he was hit by a line drive against Miami. He underwent further imaging test Thursday at the Cleveland Clinic, and the results confirmed the diagnosis. The Indians said Kluber does not need surgery for now. He will be re-examined in three to four weeks. Kluber’s loss is a major blow to the Indians, who trail Minnesota in the AL Central and haven’t been hitting. Cleveland is missing two starters from one of baseball’s best rotations as Mike Clevinger remains out with a strained back muscle.

Reds bring up prospect Senzel CINCINNATI — With an offense that’s last in the National League, the Reds brought up top prospect Nick Senzel and let him continue learning a new position at the major league level. Cincinnati called up Senzel for his major league debut against the San Francisco Giants on Friday. The 23-yearold outfielder batted second and played center, the spot they’ve been aiming him toward since the offseason. “We don’t bring guys up to put them on the sidelines,” said Dick Williams, the president of baseball operations. “We expect him to inject some energy and help the outfield defense. Nick is ready to do that.” Senzel was taken second overall in the 2016 amateur draft out of Tennessee. He signed for a $6.2 million bonus, but his ascent was slowed by bouts of vertigo and a broken right index finger last season. BRIEFLY YANKEES: Miguel Andújar (right shoulder) expects to be activated from the injured list today. Manager Aaron Boone said Gio Urshela will continue to play third base regularly with Andujar serving as the designated hitter. METS: New York optioned first baseman Dominic Smith the Triple-A Syracuse. The team called up shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria from Triple-A. The Mets also transferred pitcher Drew Smith to the 60-day injured list. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

12

The Yankees’ Gary Sanchez homered twice in a 6-3 victory over the Minnesota Twins on Friday. It was Sanchez’s 12th multihomer performance in 284 major league games, second only to Hall of Famer Ralph Kiner, who had 12 in his first 282 career games.. — Wire reports

The Indians’ Tyler Naquin, bottom, grabs Leonys Martin, top, after hitting a winning RBI single Friday in Cleveland. Tigers 4, Royals 3 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Mondesi dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Gordon lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Dozier 1b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .340 Soler rf 3 1 3 2 0 0 .242 Gutierrez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .269 Owings ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .143 O’Hearn ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .170 Maldonado c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .181 Hamilton cf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .212 Totals 32 3 7 3 1 13 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .226 Castellanos rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .271 Cabrera dh 4 0 3 1 0 0 .295 Dixon pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Goodrum lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Rodriguez 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .324 Beckham 2b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Greiner c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .138 Totals 31 4 8 3 2 7 Kansas City 000 200 001 — 3 7 0 Detroit 301 000 00x — 4 8 0 LOB — Kansas City 5, Detroit 6. 2B — O’Hearn (4), Rodriguez (5). 3B — Gutierrez (1). HR — Soler (8), off Greene. RBIs — Soler 2 (21), Gutierrez (8), Cabrera (12), Rodriguez 2 (7). CS — Hamilton (4). SF — Soler. DP — Kansas City 1 (Owings, Dozier). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lopez, L, 0-3 7 5 4 4 2 6 5.09 Peralta 1 3 0 0 0 1 6.60 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Boyd, W, 3-2 7 5 2 2 1 9 3.05 Jimenez, H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.38 Greene, S, 13-13 1 2 1 1 0 2 1.80 HBP — Boyd (Gordon), Lopez (Beckham). WP — Lopez. T — 2:33. Att. — 14,020

Indians 2, Mariners 1

Seattle AB R Gordon 2b 4 0 Haniger cf 4 0 Vogelbach dh 2 0 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 D.Santana lf 4 0 Bruce rf 4 1 Narvaez c 4 0 Beckham ss 4 0 Healy 3b 2 0 Moore 3b 2 0 Totals 34 1 Cleveland AB R Lindor ss 3 0 Martin cf 4 2 Ramirez 3b 4 0 C.Santana 1b 3 0 Luplow rf 2 0 Naquin ph 1 0 Gonzalez lf 3 0 Kipnis 2b 3 0 Plawecki c 3 0 Bauers dh 3 0 Totals 29 2 Seattle 000 100 Cleveland 000 100

H BI BB SO Avg. 2 0 0 0 .304 1 0 0 3 .237 0 0 2 0 .289 1 0 0 1 .231 0 0 0 1 .275 1 1 0 1 .189 1 0 0 0 .289 2 0 0 1 .284 0 0 0 1 .231 0 0 0 2 .184 8 1 2 10 H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 1 1 .214 1 0 0 1 .214 1 0 0 2 .186 0 0 1 1 .314 1 0 1 1 .273 1 1 0 0 .278 0 0 0 2 .226 0 0 0 0 .173 0 0 0 1 .200 0 0 0 2 .231 4 1 3 11 000 — 1 8 0 001 — 2 4 0

LOB — Seattle 8, Cleveland 4. 2B — Beckham 2 (11), Martin (5), Luplow (2). HR — Bruce (10), off Bieber. RBIs — Bruce (18), Naquin (8). SB — Gordon (9). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kikuchi 7 3 1 1 1 10 3.98 Rosscup 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.74 Swarzak, L, 2-1 2/3 1 1 1 2 1 3.60 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bieber 72/3 6 1 1 1 8 3.16 Perez 0 0 0 0 1 0 7.94 1 Cimber /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.15 Hand, W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.23 Inherited runners-scored — Cimber 1-0. T — 2:46. Att. — 16,334

Yankees 6, Twins 3

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garver c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Polanco ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .327 Cruz dh 3 1 1 2 1 2 .303 Cron 1b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .220 Gonzalez lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .191 Kepler rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Schoop 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .270 Adrianza 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Buxton cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .247 Totals 30 3 4 3 4 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 1 0 1 0 1 .212 Voit 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .278 Sanchez c 4 2 3 2 0 1 .265 Torres ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Ford dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .179 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .338 Tauchman lf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .174 Maybin rf 2 2 1 0 1 1 .400 Wade 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Totals 29 6 8 5 2 9 Minnesota 001 000 020 — 3 4 2 New York 110 210 10x — 6 8 1 E — Cron (3), Buxton (1), Torres (4). LOB — Minnesota 5, New York 4. HR — Cruz (6), off Britton; Sanchez (9), off Gibson; Sanchez (10), off Morin. RBIs — Cruz 2 (20), Cron (16), Gardner (12), Voit (27), Sanchez 2 (20), Torres (16). SF — Cron. S — Wade. DP — Minnesota 2; New York 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson, L, 2-1 5 7 5 2 2 5 4.68 Morin 2 1 1 1 0 3 4.50 Romero 1 0 0 0 0 1 6.43 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Paxton 3 2 1 0 3 1 3.11 Holder, W, 2-0 2 0 0 0 0 2 4.00 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.20 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.42 Britton 1 1 2 2 1 1 4.15 Chapman, S, 6-7 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.19 T — 3:08. Att. — 35,911

Phillies 4, Nationals 2

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton lf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .294 Robles rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Kendrick 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .349 Adams 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .238 Suzuki c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .269 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .181 Kieboom ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Hellickson p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Gomes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Taylor cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .115

Totals 33 2 6 2 3 12 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Segura ss 4 2 2 1 0 1 .345 Harper rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .234 Hoskins 1b 3 1 2 3 0 1 .288 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Williams lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Hernandez 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .284 Franco 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .255 Eickhoff p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .034 Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 29 4 6 4 1 10 Washington 001 001 000 — 2 6 0 Philadelphia 100 003 00x — 4 6 0 2B — Suzuki (2), Harper (9). 3B — Eaton (2). HR — Suzuki (3), off Dominguez; Segura (2), off Hellickson; Hoskins (10), off Jennings. Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hellickson 51/3 4 2 2 0 9 5.33 Jennings, L, 0-1, BS 2/3 1 2 2 1 1 7.71 Miller 2 1 0 0 0 0 3.97 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Eickhoff 5 3 1 1 3 7 2.05 Dominguez, W, 3-0 1 1 1 1 0 2 5.40 Morgan, H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00 Neshek, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.77 Neris, S, 5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 2.45 T — 2:42. Att. — 33,125

Braves 7, Marlins 2

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Albies 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .289 Donaldson 3b 5 0 3 3 0 1 .275 Freeman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .311 Acuna Jr. lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Markakis rf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .321 Swanson ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .262 McCann c 3 1 1 3 0 1 .304 Inciarte cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Gausman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Toussaint p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Joyce ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .400 Totals 34 7 10 7 4 7 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Rojas ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .281 Anderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .246 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Prado 1b 3 2 1 0 1 2 .280 Alfaro c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .301 Berti 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .177 Urena p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Walker ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .256 Galloway ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Totals 32 2 6 2 5 11 Atlanta 101 102 200 — 7 10 0 Miami 010 001 000 — 2 6 0 2B — Donaldson (9). HR — Freeman (6), off Urena; McCann (2), off Urena. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gausman 12/3 1 1 1 1 1 4.83 Toussaint, W, 2-0 4 4 1 1 3 6 6.35 1 Blevins, H, 2 /3 0 0 0 1 0 0.00 Winkler 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.35 Webb 2 1 0 0 0 3 0.00 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Urena, L, 1-5 6 6 5 5 3 4 5.45 2 Guerrero /3 2 2 2 1 0 2.84 Chen 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 11.45 Kinley 1 1 0 0 0 2 3.38 T — 3:08. Att. — 7,198

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1869 — Henry Chadwick published his first annual baseball handbook. The book eventually evolved into Spalding’s Official Baseball Guide. 1869 — The Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first all-professional team, played its first regular-season game and beat the Great Westerns of Cincinnati 45-9. 1871 — The Fort Wayne Kekiongas beat the Cleveland Forest Citys 2-0 in the first game played in the National Association. In the 127 games during the 1871 season, there were four shutouts. 1910 — The Browns and Cardinals played home games in St. Louis, and President Taft, not wanting to offend either club, saw parts of each game at Robinson Field and Sportsman’s Park. 1939 — Boston rookie Ted Williams became the first player to hit a home run that cleared the right-field seats at Briggs Stadium in Detroit. It was his first at-bat at Detroit. Boston edged the Tigers 7-6. 1944 — Black fans were allowed to buy grandstand seats for the first time in St. Louis. The Cardinals were the last major league club to desegregate seating. Black fans had been restricted to the bleachers.

BASEBALL CALENDAR June 3 — Amateur draft starts, Secaucus, N.J. June 13 — Detroit vs. Kansas City at Omaha, Neb. June 15 — International amateur signing period closes. June 19-20 — Owners meeting, New York. June 29-30 — New York Yankees vs. Boston at London. July 2 — International amateur signing period opens. July 9 — All-Star Game at Cleveland. July 21 — Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y.

July 31 — Last day during the season to trade a player. Aug. 18 — Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Cubs at Williamsport, Pa. Aug. 31 — Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster. Sept. 1 — Active rosters expand to 40 players. Oct. 1-2 — Wild-card games. Oct. 22 — World Series starts. October TBA — Trading resumes, day after World Series.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Miami Central St. Louis Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado San Francisco

W 18 16 16 13 9 W 20 17 18 14 13 W 20 19 18 15 14

L 13 16 16 18 22 L 12 12 16 15 19 L 13 13 14 18 18

San Diego 11, Atlanta 2 N.Y. Mets 1, Cincinnati 0

Pct .581 .500 .500 .419 .290 Pct .625 .586 .529 .483 .406 Pct .606 .594 .563 .455 .438

GB — 2½ 2½ 5 9 GB — 1½ 3 4½ 7 GB — ½ 1½ 5 5½

WC — 2½ 2½ 5 9 WC — — 1½ 3 5½ WC — ½ ½ 4 4½

L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 3-7 3-7 L10 7-3 8-2 5-5 2-8 4-6 L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 5-5 6-4

Str W-2 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-2 W-5 W-1 L-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-3 W-1 L-1 W-2

Home Away 13-6 5-7 10-10 6-6 7-8 9-8 7-11 6-7 6-13 3-9 Home Away 12-4 8-8 8-4 9-8 11-8 7-8 6-8 8-7 7-7 6-12 Home Away 12-4 8-9 7-7 12-6 7-8 11-6 5-8 10-10 7-9 7-9

Thursday’s results Colorado 11, Milwaukee 6 Washington 2, St. Louis 1

Friday’s results Chicago Cubs 4, St. Louis 0 Oakland 14, Pittsburgh 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 2 San Francisco 12, Cincinnati 11 (11) Atlanta 7, Miami 2 Arizona 10, Colorado, 9 Milwaukee 3, N.Y. Mets 1 L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, (n) Today’s games St. Louis (Wacha 2-0) at Chicago Cubs (Darvish 2-3), 3:05 p.m. Atlanta (Soroka 2-1) at Miami (Richards 0-4), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Bassitt 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Williams 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Washington (Corbin 2-1) at Philadelphia (Arrieta 4-2), 6:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Wheeler 2-2) at Milwaukee (Gonzalez 0-0), 6:10 p.m. San Francisco (Rodriguez 3-3) at Cincinnati (Roark 1-1), 6:10 p.m. Arizona (Weaver 2-1) at Colorado (Freeland 2-4), 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Hill 0-0) at San Diego (Lucchesi 3-2), 7:40 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Detroit Chicago Kansas City West Houston Seattle Los Angeles Texas Oakland

W 21 18 15 15 11 W 19 17 14 14 11 W 18 18 15 14 15

L 11 13 17 18 22 L 11 13 15 16 22 L 14 16 17 16 19

Pct GB .656 — .581 2½ .469 6 .455 6½ .33310½ Pct GB .633 — .567 2 .483 4½ .467 5 .333 9½ Pct GB .563 — .529 1 .469 3 .467 3 .441 4

WC — — 3 3½ 7½ WC — — 2½ 3 7½ WC — 1 3 3 4

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 6-4 4-6 L10 5-5 2-8 6-4 2-8 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 9-7 12-4 W-1 9-7 9-6 W-1 7-8 8-9 W-1 8-7 7-11 L-2 3-11 8-11 Str Home Away L-1 11-5 8-6 W-1 8-4 9-9 W-1 7-5 7-10 L-1 8-8 6-8 L-2 8-11 3-11 Str Home Away L-2 10-3 8-11 L-5 7-11 11-5 W-4 11-7 4-10 L-3 10-7 4-9 W-1 10-8 5-11

Thursday’s results Minnesota 8, Houston 2 Chicago White Sox 6, Boston 4 Tampa Bay 3, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 6, Toronto 2 Friday’s results N.Y. Yankees 3, Minnesota 3 Oakland 14, Pittsburgh 1 Tampa Bay 7, Baltimore 0 Toronto 1, Texas 0 (12) Detroit 4, Kansas City 3 Boston 6, Chicago White Sox 1 Cleveland 2, Seattle 1 Today’s games Minnesota (Odorizzi 3-2) at N.Y. Yankees (Happ 1-2), 12:05 p.m. Kansas City (Bailey 2-3) at Detroit (Ross 1-3), 3:10 p.m. Seattle (Leake 2-3) at Cleveland (Carrasco 2-3), 3:10 p.m. Oakland (Bassitt 1-0) at Pittsburgh (Williams 1-1), 6:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Baltimore (Bundy 0-4), 6:05 p.m. Boston (Rodriguez 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Banuelos 2-0), 6:10 p.m. Houston (Miley 1-2) vs. L.A. Angels (Cahill 1-2) at Monterrey, 6:10 p.m. Toronto (TBD) at Texas (Lynn 3-2), 7:05 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Indians’ Kluber out indefinitely CLEVELAND — The Indians placed star pitcher Corey Kluber on the injured list with a broken right arm that will sideline him indefinitely. Kluber sustained a non-displaced fracture of his ulna bone May 1 when he was hit by a line drive against Miami. He underwent further imaging test Thursday at the Cleveland Clinic, and the results confirmed the diagnosis. The Indians said Kluber does not need surgery for now. He will be re-examined in three to four weeks. Kluber’s loss is a major blow to the Indians, who trail Minnesota in the AL Central and haven’t been hitting. Cleveland is missing two starters from one of baseball’s best rotations as Mike Clevinger remains out with a strained back muscle.

Reds bring up prospect Senzel CINCINNATI — With an offense that’s last in the National League, the Reds brought up top prospect Nick Senzel and let him continue learning a new position at the major league level. Cincinnati called up Senzel for his major league debut against the San Francisco Giants on Friday. The 23-yearold outfielder batted second and played center, the spot they’ve been aiming him toward since the offseason. “We don’t bring guys up to put them on the sidelines,” said Dick Williams, the president of baseball operations. “We expect him to inject some energy and help the outfield defense. Nick is ready to do that.” Senzel was taken second overall in the 2016 amateur draft out of Tennessee. He signed for a $6.2 million bonus, but his ascent was slowed by bouts of vertigo and a broken right index finger last season. BRIEFLY YANKEES: Miguel Andújar (right shoulder) expects to be activated from the injured list today. Manager Aaron Boone said Gio Urshela will continue to play third base regularly with Andujar serving as the designated hitter. METS: New York optioned first baseman Dominic Smith to Triple-A Syracuse. The team called up shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria from Triple-A. The Mets also transferred pitcher Drew Smith to the 60-day injured list. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

12

The Yankees’ Gary Sanchez homered twice in a 6-3 victory over the Minnesota Twins on Friday. It was Sanchez’s 12th multihomer performance in 284 major league games, second only to Hall of Famer Ralph Kiner, who had 12 in his first 282 career games.. — Wire reports

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

Boyd strikes out 9 as Tigers jump out early WIRE REPORTS

DETROIT — Matthew Boyd struck out nine in another solid outing, and the Detroit Tigers scored three runs in the first inning of a 4-3 victory over the Kansas City Royals on Friday night. It was the sixth straight quality start for Boyd, who allowed two runs and five hits in seven innings. He walked one. Joe Jimenez struck out two in a perfect eighth. Shane Greene allowed a solo homer to Jorge Soler in the ninth, but he was able to close the game out for his American League-leading 13th save in 13 chances. Jorge Lopez settled down nicely after a tough start. He allowed four runs and five hits in seven innings. “He made a little adjustment after the first inning and he just got a lot sharper,” Royals manager Ned Yost said. “He left some sliders up in the first and they hit them, but he didn’t let them do that the rest of the way.” Miguel Cabrera hit an RBI single in the first, giving the Tigers a 1-0 lead before Lopez had recorded an out. RAYS 7, ORIOLES 0: Tyler Glasnow pitched seven innings of threehit ball to earn his major league-leading sixth win, and Tampa Bay got a slump-breaking homer from Mike Zunino in a rout of host Baltimore. YANKEES 6, TWINS 3: Host New York lost left-hander James Paxton to a knee injury early, but the bullpen took over to help defeat

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Royals pitcher Jorge Lopez knocks over the Tigers’ Ronny Rodriguez as he scores on a wild pitch Friday in Detroit. Minnesota. Gary Sanchez picked up a victory over the RED SOX 6, WHITE SOX 1: Chris Sale dominated his hit two home runs. Rockies. former team and earned INDIANS 2, MARINERS PHILLIES 4, NATIONALS 2: his first win of the season 1: Pinch-hitter Tyler Rhys Hoskins hit a three- as Boston defeated host Naquin’s two-out single in run homer, Jerad Eickhoff Chicago. Sale struck out the ninth inning drove in threw five crisp innings 10 and walked one over six the winning run and host and host Philadelphia beat innings. Cleveland defeated Seattle. Washington. GIANTS 12, REDS 11 (11): BRAVES 7, MARLINS 2: ATHLETICS 14, PIRATES 1: Evan Longoria homered in Freddie Freeman and Brian Josh Phegley drove in eight the top of the 11th inning McCann each homered to runs on four hits, which to lead San Francisco to a help Atlanta settle its score included a solo home run, road victory over Cincinwith Jose Ureña and beat as Oakland defeated host nati. host Miami. Braves right- Pittsburgh. hander Kevin Gausman was BLUE JAYS 1, RANGERS 0 ejected in the second inning BREWERS 3, METS 1: Ryan (12): Danny Jansen scored for throwing a 97 mph fast- Braun hit a tie-breaking, Brandon Drury on a sacritwo-run homer as host fice bunt to give Toronto ball behind Ureña. Milwaukee defeated New a road victory over host DIAMONDBACKS 10, ROCK- York. Lorenzo Cain added Texas. The Blue Jays finIES 9: Host Colorado scored a home run in the bottom ished with 11 hits but were three runs in the bottom of of the first inning to answer unable to put a run across the ninth, but Greg Holland a score by the Mets to open the plate over the opening 11 innings. closed the door as Arizona the game.

BOX SCORES Tigers 4, Royals 3 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Mondesi dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Gordon lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Dozier 1b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .340 Soler rf 3 1 3 2 0 0 .242 Gutierrez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .269 Owings ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .143 O’Hearn ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .170 Maldonado c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .181 Hamilton cf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .212 Totals 32 3 7 3 1 13 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .226 Castellanos rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .271 Cabrera dh 4 0 3 1 0 0 .295 Dixon pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Goodrum lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Rodriguez 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .324 Beckham 2b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Greiner c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .138 Totals 31 4 8 3 2 7 Kansas City 000 200 001 — 3 7 0 Detroit 301 000 00x — 4 8 0 LOB — Kansas City 5, Detroit 6. 2B — O’Hearn (4), Rodriguez (5). 3B — Gutierrez (1). HR — Soler (8), off Greene. RBIs — Soler 2 (21), Gutierrez (8), Cabrera (12), Rodriguez 2 (7). CS — Hamilton (4). SF — Soler. DP — Kansas City 1 (Owings, Dozier). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lopez, L, 0-3 7 5 4 4 2 6 5.09 Peralta 1 3 0 0 0 1 6.60 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Boyd, W, 3-2 7 5 2 2 1 9 3.05 Jimenez, H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.38 Greene, S, 13-13 1 2 1 1 0 2 1.80 HBP — Boyd (Gordon), Lopez (Beckham). WP — Lopez. T — 2:33. Att. — 14,020

Indians 2, Mariners 1 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .304 Haniger cf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .237 Vogelbach dh 2 0 0 0 2 0 .289 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231 D.Santana lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Bruce rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .189 Narvaez c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .289 Beckham ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .284 Healy 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Moore 3b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .184 Totals 34 1 8 1 2 10 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .214 Martin cf 4 2 1 0 0 1 .214 Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .186 C.Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .314 Luplow rf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .273 Naquin ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .278 Gonzalez lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .226 Kipnis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .173 Plawecki c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Bauers dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .231 Totals 29 2 4 1 3 11 Seattle 000 100 000 — 1 8 0 Cleveland 000 100 001 — 2 4 0 LOB — Seattle 8, Cleveland 4. 2B — Beckham 2 (11), Martin (5), Luplow (2). HR — Bruce (10), off Bieber. RBIs — Bruce (18), Naquin (8). SB — Gordon (9). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO ERA Kikuchi 7 3 1 1 1 10 3.98 Rosscup 1 0 0 0 0 0 1.74 Swarzak, L, 2-1 2/3 1 1 1 2 1 3.60 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bieber 72/3 6 1 1 1 8 3.16 Perez 0 0 0 0 1 0 7.94 1 /3 1 0 0 0 0 4.15 Cimber Hand, W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.23 Inherited runners-scored — Cimber 1-0. T — 2:46. Att. — 16,334

Yankees 6, Twins 3

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garver c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Polanco ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .327 Cruz dh 3 1 1 2 1 2 .303 Cron 1b 3 0 1 1 0 2 .220 Gonzalez lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .191 Kepler rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .255 Schoop 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .270 Adrianza 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Buxton cf 2 1 0 0 1 0 .247 Totals 30 3 4 3 4 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 1 0 1 0 1 .212 Voit 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .278 Sanchez c 4 2 3 2 0 1 .265 Torres ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .270 Ford dh 4 0 1 0 0 2 .179 Urshela 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .338 Tauchman lf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .174 Maybin rf 2 2 1 0 1 1 .400 Wade 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .204 Totals 29 6 8 5 2 9 Minnesota 001 000 020 — 3 4 2 New York 110 210 10x — 6 8 1 E — Cron (3), Buxton (1), Torres (4). LOB — Minnesota 5, New York 4. HR — Cruz (6), off Britton; Sanchez (9), off Gibson; Sanchez (10), off Morin. RBIs — Cruz 2 (20), Cron (16), Gardner (12), Voit (27), Sanchez 2 (20), Torres (16). DP — Minnesota 2; New York 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gibson, L, 2-1 5 7 5 2 2 5 4.68 Morin 2 1 1 1 0 3 4.50 Romero 1 0 0 0 0 1 6.43 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Paxton 3 2 1 0 3 1 3.11 Holder, W, 2-0 2 0 0 0 0 2 4.00 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.20 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.42 Britton 1 1 2 2 1 1 4.15 Chapman, S, 6-7 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.19 T — 3:08. Att. — 35,911

Phillies 4, Nationals 2

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton lf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .294 Robles rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .246 Kendrick 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .349 Adams 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .238 Suzuki c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .269 Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .181 Kieboom ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Hellickson p 1 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Gomes ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Taylor cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .115 Totals 33 2 6 2 3 12 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Segura ss 4 2 2 1 0 1 .345 Harper rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .234 Hoskins 1b 3 1 2 3 0 1 .288 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Williams lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Hernandez 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .284 Franco 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .255 Eickhoff p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .034 Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 29 4 6 4 1 10 Washington 001 001 000 — 2 6 0 Philadelphia 100 003 00x — 4 6 0 2B — Suzuki (2), Harper (9). 3B — Eaton (2). HR — Suzuki (3), off Dominguez; Segura (2), off Hellickson; Hoskins (10), off Jennings. Washington IP H R ER BB SO ERA Hellickson 51/3 4 2 2 0 9 5.33 Jennings, L, 0-1, BS 2/3 1 2 2 1 1 7.71 Miller 2 1 0 0 0 0 3.97 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Eickhoff 5 3 1 1 3 7 2.05 Dominguez, W, 3-0 1 1 1 1 0 2 5.40 Morgan, H, 8 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00 Neshek, H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.77 Neris, S, 5-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 2.45 T — 2:42. Att. — 33,125

Braves 7, Marlins 2

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Albies 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .289 Donaldson 3b 5 0 3 3 0 1 .275 Freeman 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .311 Acuna Jr. lf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .270 Markakis rf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .321 Swanson ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .262 McCann c 3 1 1 3 0 1 .304 Inciarte cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .237 Gausman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Toussaint p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Joyce ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .276 Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .400 Totals 34 7 10 7 4 7 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Rojas ss 5 0 1 0 0 2 .281 Anderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .246 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Prado 1b 3 2 1 0 1 2 .280 Alfaro c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .301 Berti 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .177 Urena p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Walker ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .256 Galloway ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Totals 32 2 6 2 5 11 Atlanta 101 102 200 — 7 10 0 Miami 010 001 000 — 2 6 0 2B — Donaldson (9). HR — Freeman (6), off Urena; McCann (2), off Urena. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gausman 12/3 1 1 1 1 1 4.83 Toussaint, W, 2-0 4 4 1 1 3 6 6.35 1 Blevins, H, 2 /3 0 0 0 1 0 0.00 Winkler 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.35 Webb 2 1 0 0 0 3 0.00 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Urena, L, 1-5 6 6 5 5 3 4 5.45 2 /3 2 2 2 1 0 2.84 Guerrero Chen 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 11.45 Kinley 1 1 0 0 0 2 3.38 T — 3:08. Att. — 7,198

Rays 7, Orioles 0

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Lowe 2b 4 2 2 0 1 1 .311 Pham lf 4 0 3 2 1 0 .305 Choi 1b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .269 Diaz 3b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .257 N.Lowe dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .263 Garcia rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .269 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .260 Zunino c 4 1 1 3 0 0 .198 Adames ss 3 2 2 0 1 1 .228 Totals 34 7 12 7 6 7 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .274 Mancini rf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .331 Smith Jr. lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .299 Nunez dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Ruiz 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Alberto 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .316 Davis 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .171 Wilkerson cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .242 Severino c 3 0 0 0 0 3 .250 Totals 31 0 5 0 0 10 Tampa Bay 100 402 000 — 7 12 0 Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 LOB — Tampa Bay 9, Baltimore 4. 2B — B.Lowe (7), Pham (2). 3B — Kiermaier (4). HR — Zunino (3), off Straily. RBIs — Pham 2 (14), Choi (10), N.Lowe (1), Zunino 3 (15). SF — Choi, N.Lowe. DP — Tampa Bay 1; Baltimore 3. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO ERA Glasnow, W, 6-0 7 3 0 0 0 8 1.47 Sadler 2 2 0 0 0 2 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO ERA Straily, L, 1-2 41/3 9 5 5 3 2 7.43 Ramirez 42/3 3 2 2 3 5 4.50 T — 2:38. Att. — 10,034

Red Sox 6, White Sox 1

Boston AB R Benintendi lf-cf 5 0 Betts rf 4 0 Martinez dh 5 1 Bogaerts ss 5 1 Devers 3b 5 2 Chavis 2b 4 1

H 2 0 3 2 2 2

BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 1 .278 1 1 2 .293 0 0 0 .339 0 0 0 .270 3 0 0 .298 2 1 0 .310

Moreland 1b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .202 Lin cf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Pearce lf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .100 Leon c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .118 Totals 36 6 11 6 6 7 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia lf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .270 Anderson ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .342 Abreu 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .277 McCann dh 4 0 2 1 0 2 .373 Sanchez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Moncada 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .298 Rondon 2b-p 4 0 1 0 0 1 .260 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .179 Cordell rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .217 Delmonico ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Engel cf 2 1 0 0 1 2 .216 Totals 31 1 5 1 3 14 Boston 300 003 000 — 6 11 1 Chicago 000 000 010 — 1 5 0 2B — Martinez (7), McCann (6), Rondon (3). HR — Devers (1), off Lopez; Chavis (4), off Lopez. RBIs — Betts (17), Devers 3 (13), Chavis 2 (10), McCann (8). Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Sale, W, 1-5 6 3 0 0 1 10 5.25 Hembree 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.02 Brewer 1 1 1 1 2 1 6.23 Smith 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lopez, L, 2-4 5 8 6 6 3 6 6.69 Rondon 1 2 0 0 0 0 0.00 Ruiz 11/3 1 0 0 2 0 6.75 2 Osich /3 0 0 0 0 0 3.00 Colome 1 0 0 0 1 1 1.98 T — 3:15. Att. — 17,504

Athletics 14, Pirates 1

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 5 0 1 2 1 0 .298 Laureano cf 5 1 1 0 0 3 .233 Grossman ph-lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .210 Chapman 3b 6 2 3 2 0 0 .300 Davis lf 3 3 0 0 3 0 .222 Piscotty rf 6 1 1 0 0 2 .246 Morales 1b 4 3 3 1 1 1 .183 Profar 2b 4 2 1 1 0 0 .168 Phegley c 5 2 4 8 0 0 .288 Anderson p 3 0 2 0 0 0 .667 Bolt ph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 43 14 16 14 6 7 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .255 Marte cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .212 Cabrera rf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .344 Diaz c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .150 Bell 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .283 Reynolds lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .394 Cervelli c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .169 Shuck rf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .213 Kang 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Tucker ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Moran ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Musgrove p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Kingham p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Reyes ph-rf-ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .128 Totals 36 1 7 1 2 8 Oakland 052 400 201 — 14 16 2 Pittsburgh 100 000 000 — 1 7 2 LOB — Oakland 9, Pittsburgh 10. 2B — Chapman (9), Phegley 2 (7). HR — Chapman (9), off Liriano; Phegley (4), off Rodriguez. RBIs — Semien 2 (18), Chapman 2 (22), Morales (5), Profar (14), Phegley 8 (21), Bell (22). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Anderson, W, 4-2 6 4 1 1 2 4 3.89 Petit 1 2 0 0 0 0 2.45 Hendriks 1 1 0 0 0 2 1.96 Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 2 6.23 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Musgrove, L, 1-3 22/3 6 7 5 2 1 2.63 Kingham 21/3 5 4 4 2 3 6.39 Feliz 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00 Liriano 2 2 2 2 0 2 1.42 Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 2 1 5.14 T — 3:26. Att. — 16,428

Brewers 3, Mets 1

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .348 Alonso 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .289 Cano 2b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .264 Conforto rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .272 Ramos c 3 0 1 1 1 1 .250 Broxton pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .146 Nimmo cf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .211 Gagnon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Frazier 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Rosario ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .267 Matz p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .182 Lagares cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Totals 32 1 7 1 3 12 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .269 Grandal c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .283 Braun lf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .226 Aguilar 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .165 Hader p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Moustakas 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .279 Perez 2b 4 0 3 0 0 1 .246 Gamel rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .279 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Woodruff p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .429 Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Shaw 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .189 Totals 33 3 10 3 2 4 New York 100 000 000 — 1 7 0 Milwaukee 100 020 00x — 3 10 1 E — Aguilar (2). LOB — New York 7, Milwaukee 8. 2B — Conforto (9), Moustakas (7), Perez (2). HR — Cain (4), off Matz; Braun (7), off Matz. RBIs — Ramos (18), Cain (12), Braun 2 (20). SB — Rosario (4), Braun (2), Perez (2). CS — McNeil (4). DP — New York 1; Milwaukee 3. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Matz, L, 3-2 52/3 9 3 3 1 3 3.86 Gsellman 11/3 0 0 0 1 0 3.60 2 Avilan /3 1 0 0 0 1 9.28 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 6.43 Gagnon Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Woodruff, W, 4-1 5 6 1 1 2 7 4.71 Claudio, H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.86 Guerra, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 2.08 Hader, S, 8-8 2 1 0 0 1 5 3.24

T — 3:01. Att. — 32,550

Giants 12, Reds 11 (11) San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 6 1 1 2 0 1 .200 Gerber lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .333 Austin ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .313 Sandoval ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Posey c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .253 Solarte lf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .217 Belt 1b 5 1 1 2 1 1 .229 Longoria 3b 5 2 3 2 1 0 .223 Crawford ss 5 1 2 1 1 1 .202 Pillar cf 6 1 1 0 0 0 .205 Duggar rf 5 1 3 3 0 1 .256 Vincent p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Vogt c 3 3 3 2 0 0 1.000 Totals 47 12 17 12 4 10 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Votto 1b 7 0 0 0 0 3 .217 Senzel cf 5 1 1 0 2 2 .200 Winker lf 5 2 3 1 0 1 .243 Suarez ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Puig rf 5 3 2 1 0 0 .188 Dietrich 2b 4 2 3 6 0 0 .250 Lorenzen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Schebler lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .123 J.Iglesias ss 5 1 2 0 1 1 .308 Farmer 3b-2b 6 1 2 2 0 2 .219 Gray p 2 0 0 0 1 0 .111 Peraza 2b-lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .194 Barnhart c 2 1 0 0 3 2 .192 Casali pr-c 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Totals 49 11 13 10 7 16 San Francisco 000 304 031 01 — 12 17 2 Cincinnati 305 110 100 00 — 11 13 0 E — Pillar (1), Vincent (2). LOB — San Francisco 8, Cincinnati 13. 2B — Gerber (1), Vogt (1), Winker 2 (4), J.Iglesias (5). HR — Panik (2), off Peralta; Vogt (1), off R.Iglesias; Longoria (4), off Hughes; Dietrich (6), off Beede; Dietrich (7), off Beede; Farmer (4), off Vincent. RBIs — Panik 2 (9), Belt 2 (15), Longoria 2 (13), Crawford (3), Duggar 3 (14), Vogt 2 (2), Winker (14), Puig (16), Dietrich 6 (20), Farmer 2 (10). SB — Puig (4), Dietrich (1), J.Iglesias (1). SF — Duggar. S — Beede. DP — Cincinnati 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA Beede 21/3 7 8 8 2 3 30.86 Vincent 2 1 2 1 1 4 2.75 Bergen 1 2 0 0 0 1 4.50 Melancon 12/3 1 1 1 2 0 2.02 Dyson 1 1 0 0 0 2 3.18 Watson 1 1 0 0 1 1 3.48 Moronta, W, 1-2 1 0 0 0 1 3 1.80 Smith, S, 8-8 1 0 0 0 0 2 2.84 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Gray 5 4 3 3 3 2 3.89 Peralta 1 4 4 4 0 1 4.09 Lorenzen, H, 1 1 4 2 2 0 1 2.04 2 /3 2 1 1 0 2 2.02 Garrett, H, 4 R.Iglesias, BS, 2-8 11/3 2 1 1 0 2 3.94 Hughes, L, 2-1 11/3 1 1 1 1 2 5.14 2 Duke /3 0 0 0 0 0 9.00 T — 4:29. Att. — 23,478

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1869 — Henry Chadwick published his first annual baseball handbook. The book eventually evolved into Spalding’s Official Baseball Guide. 1869 — The Cincinnati Red Stockings, the first all-professional team, played its first regular-season game and beat the Great Westerns of Cincinnati 45-9. 1910 — The Browns and Cardinals played home games in St. Louis, and President Taft, not wanting to offend either club, saw parts of each game at Robinson Field and Sportsman’s Park. 1939 — Boston rookie Ted Williams became the first player to hit a home run that cleared the right-field seats at Briggs Stadium in Detroit. It was his first at-bat at Detroit. Boston edged the Tigers 7-6. 1944 — Black fans were allowed to buy grandstand seats for the first time in St. Louis. The Cardinals were the last major league club to desegregate seating. Black fans had been restricted to the bleachers.


CARDINALS

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

Cubs 4, Cardinals 0 Cardinals Carpenter 3b Goldschmidt 1b DeJong ss Ozuna lf Martinez rf Molina c Wong 2b Bader cf Flaherty p Gallegos p Leone p a-Fowler ph Totals Chicago Descalso 2b Bryant 3b Rizzo 1b Baez ss Contreras c Zobrist rf-lf Schwarber lf Almora Jr. cf Heyward cf-rf Hendricks p Totals Cardinals Chicago

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 0 0 1 30 AB 3 3 3 4 4 3 2 0 4 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 R 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

000 003

H 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 4 H 0 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

000 000

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 BI 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

NOTEBOOK

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .190 .254 .323 .270 .361 .263 .262 .237 .100 .000 —— .321

BB 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 6

SO 1 1 0 3 2 1 1 0 0 3 12

Avg. .247 .229 .252 .312 .299 .224 .236 .243 .315 .077

000 — 0 10x — 4

4 6

0 0

a-singled for Leone in the 9th. LOB: Cardinals 3, Chicago 7. 2B: Bryant (11). HR: Rizzo (8), off Flaherty. RBIs: Rizzo 3 (23), Baez (25). SB: Flaherty (1). CS: Bader (3), Rizzo (1). Runners left in scoring position: Cardinals 1 (Carpenter); Chicago 2 (Heyward 2). Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Flaherty, L, 3-2 52/3 4 3 3 4 9 110 4.17 Gallegos 11/3 2 1 1 1 2 20 3.86 Leone 1 0 0 0 1 1 11 6.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, W, 2-4 9 4 0 0 0 3 81 3.93 Inherited runners-scored: Gallegos 3-0. PB: Molina (1). Umpires: Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Dave Rackley; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 2:28. A: 34,978 (41,649).

How they scored CUBS THIRD Kyle Hendricks called out on strikes. Daniel Descalso walks. On Yadier Molina’s passed ball, Daniel Descalso to second. Kris Bryant walks. Anthony Rizzo homers to right field. Kris Bryant scores. Daniel Descalso scores. Javier Baez strikes out swinging. Willson Contreras called out on strikes. Cubs 3, Cardinals 0. CUBS SEVENTH Kyle Hendricks strikes out swinging. Daniel Descalso strikes out swinging. Kris Bryant doubles to deep left field. Anthony Rizzo is intentionally walked. Javier Baez singles to deep right center field. Anthony Rizzo to third. Kris Bryant scores. With Willson Contreras batting, Anthony Rizzo picked off, caught stealing home. Cubs 4, Cardinals 0.

Efficient outing Just seven players have completed a nine-inning shutout with fewer pitches than Kyle Hendricks’ 81: Team Player Year vs. Opp. Pitches Jon Lieber

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

2001 CHC vs. CIN

78

Bob Tewksbury 1990 STL vs. HOU

79

Kevin Brown

1990 TEX vs. MIN

79

Aaron Cook

2008 COL vs. SDP

79

Steve Rogers

1976 MON vs. SDP

80

Doug Drabek

1990 PIT vs. STL

80

Rich Harden

2005 OAK vs. TEX

80

Aaron Cook

2012 BOS vs. SEA

81

Carl Willey

1963 NYM vs. PHI

81

Kyle Hendricks 2019 CHC vs. STL

81

Gallegos makes ‘heck of a case’ Reliever is likely to remain after return of Gregerson BY DERRICK GOOLD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO — When an inevitable roster move is on the horizon with no obvious corresponding injury or ineffectiveness, the Cardinals usually offer a glimpse into their off-field discussions through their on-field actions. If they’re looking for reasons to use a player, they often have reasons to keep him. Enter Giovanny Gallegos. For the third time this week, Gallegos entered a taut game Friday and handled his assignment well, negotiating out of a bases-loaded mess in the sixth inning and allowing one run after an intentional walk in the seventh. He had two holds in the preceding Washington series, and of the 16 batters he’s faced this week he’s struck out six. As the Cardinals get ready to add veteran Luke Gregerson to the bullpen as early as Saturday, Gallegos has given them reasons he should remain. And the Cardinals have given every indication he will. “He’s made a heck of a case,” manager Mike Shildt said after the Cardinals’ 4-0 loss Friday at Wrigley Field. “He’s been able to demonstrate (steadiness with runners on base). He’s got no scare in him.” The Cardinals gave Gregerson two days to recover from his live batting practice session Wednesday in Washington, but the clock is ticking on the time they have to make a formal move with the veteran reliever. His 30-day rehab assignment exhausted Friday, and the Cardinals must either add him to the active roster, agree on a reason he should return to the injured list, or consider parting ways. John Mozeliak, Cards president of baseball operations, suggested there is a “high probability” that Gregerson will be in the big-league bullpen this weekend. That would limit the team’s ability to use options to shuttle in and shuttle out fresh arms. That is how the Cardinals approached the bullpen a year ago. Gallegos and John Brebbia are positioned to be a part of any bullpen tag-team, but both have established roles and reliability in relief. “It’s not our goal to create ultimately flexibility,” Mozeliak said. “But when you have it, it can be helpful. Having someone like Luke come back and be able to contribute is also important. So there is that fine line between having flexibility and having someone who think can help you. Obviously (Gallegos) was one of the people (with) flexibility. The way he’s pitching though we’re probably going to use that flexibility. Pitching well is a good thing.” Where the Cardinals are likely to find that flexibility for a move is on the bench. Such a move would allow for an outfielder such as Tyler O’Neill to get regular playing time at Class AAA Memphis, especially as his at-bats have been sporadic since he returned from an injury.

KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Daniel Descalso tags Harrison Bader to complete a pickoff during the sixth inning Friday.

AVERAGES Batting Martinez Wieters Munoz DeJong Fowler Ozuna Molina O’Neill Wong Goldschmidt Bader Carpenter Gyorko Team Pitching Brebbia Gant Hicks Wainwright Gallegos Flaherty Mikolas Wacha Hudson Miller Leone Webb Team

AVG AB R H .361 83 13 30 .357 14 0 5 .333 15 3 5 .323 127 27 41 .321 81 12 26 .270 111 26 30 .263 114 11 30 .263 38 4 10 .262 103 14 27 .254 126 23 32 .237 59 8 14 .190 116 18 22 .160 25 2 4 .264 1084 164 286 W L 1 0 3 0 1 1 3 2 1 0 3 2 3 2 2 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 12

2B 6 0 1 14 6 7 8 2 4 3 2 5 0 58

3B HR RBI BB SO SB 0 1 15 6 16 1 0 0 5 0 4 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 5 13 10 24 2 0 1 7 12 20 1 0 10 29 14 25 3 0 2 21 5 9 1 0 1 4 1 18 0 1 4 16 17 19 6 0 9 19 15 38 0 0 3 10 10 23 0 1 3 5 21 36 1 0 0 1 2 12 1 3 40 152 116 274 19

E 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 3 2 1 2 2 18

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0.49 15 0 0 18.1 7 1 1 1 8 21 0.90 16 0 2 20.0 6 2 2 2 7 19 2.13 13 0 9 12.2 6 3 3 1 5 16 3.73 6 6 0 31.1 30 14 13 5 12 27 3.86 10 0 0 11.2 9 5 5 2 4 20 4.17 7 7 0 36.2 36 17 17 8 10 45 4.72 7 7 0 40.0 41 22 21 8 9 23 4.78 5 5 0 26.1 24 14 14 5 17 29 4.80 7 6 1 30.0 37 18 16 8 15 26 5.56 16 0 1 11.1 11 9 7 4 9 16 6.00 15 0 0 15.0 14 10 10 2 7 19 6.75 10 0 0 6.2 4 5 5 2 3 6 4.04 32 32 13 283.0 242 133 127 54 120 291

CARLOS TO PEORIA Carlos Martinez’s acceleration back to the majors as a reliever will begin, officially, Sunday when the righthander starts a rehab assignment with Low-A Peoria (Ill.). Martinez (shoulder) spent the previous week in Jupiter, Fla., facing Cardinals’ minor-league players in live batting practice scenarios at the team’s spring-training facility. The decision to have Martinez prepare and return to the Cardinals as a reliever could require a shorter rehab assignment than the 30-day maximum . Instead of building arm strength through his rehab assignment — like he would as a starter — Martinez will move from scheduled,

scripted appearances to situational and back-to-back outings. He might start some minor-league games, but that will only be to assure he appears and gets the needed work before relief spots later.

NEW VIEW OF WRIGLEY There’s more room to move, more room to lounge, to stretch, to hide, to breathe, and yet one of the neatest features of the overhauled and modernized visitors’ clubhouse at Wrigley Field is something original to the ballpark — windows. The new, relocated manager’s office on the first-base side of the ballpark has windows that overlook Ernie Banks’ statue and the intersection of Sheffield and Addison. “It’s the only office I’ve had since I’ve been managing with windows,” Shildt said. “Original windows, too. Natural light. Pretty cool.”

SHILDT APOLOGIZES, ETC. When the first-base umpire called Paul Goldschmidt out on a check-swing strike in the eighth inning Thursday in Washington, Shildt unleashed a verbal Roman candle of curse words . He apologized Friday. “That wasn’t my best moment, especially as a man of faith,” he said. “Competition got the best of me. I apologize. I’ve had my mouth washed out with soap.” • Cardinals outfielder Dexter Fowler lost eight pounds during the series in Washington as he fought off a virus, Shildt said. Fowler singled in a pinch-hit appearance Friday and said afterward that he felt like he had regained his strength to start this weekend. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals From B1

traps, and left the Cardinals going scoreless Friday for the first time this season. In a 4-0 win at Wrigley Field, Hendricks needed only 81 pitches to author arguably the most efficient shutout ever by a Cub against the Cardinals. The game turned on the Cardinals’ inability to wedge hits between the defense, and the Cubs not having to bother. Two walks in the third inning preceded Rizzo’s three-run homer that simply sent the game’s decisive hit where the Cardinals couldn’t go, the bleachers. “We got beat. We didn’t beat ourselves,” Cardinals manager Mike Shildt said. “We hit some balls at people. That’s part of the game. (Hendricks) did a nice job, he really did. That was pitching, the art of pitching.” More like the art of minimalism. With fewer brushstrokes than any pitcher has needed to shut out the Cardinals since 1990, Hendricks held them to four hits, and the only Cardinal to reach second base was pitcher Jack Flaherty. He had to steal it. A “Maddux,” named for Hall of Famer Greg Maddux, is a shutout that requires fewer than 100 pitches. It’s a control freak’s gem. And since pitch counts have been reliably tracked, only Doug Drabek got through nine shutout innings against the Cardinals in fewer pitches. Took him 80 on Sept. 30, 1990. Maddux himself needed 88 to pull off a Maddux against the Cardinals in 1995. In the past 30 years, no Cub has shut out the Cardinals in less than 114 pitches, according to BaseballReference.com. Hendricks had the fewest pitches in a shutout in the majors since 2012, the fewest pitches by a Cub in a shutout since Jon Lieber in 2001. “Really masterful,” Shildt said. “He did what he does every single time,” Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong said. “He attacked with what he has. He tries to use the deception and your aggression to get you out. That was something that we talked about — we tried to keep him in the zone but not take too many pitches. He’s going to throw strikes. It’s just a matter of if you can sneak some base hits in there and get him.” That’s in large part because of the picket-fence defense so many of the Cardinals faced so many times they made contact against Hendricks (2-4). The first meeting of the 2019 season between the Midwest’s oldest rivals was re-

ANTONIO PEREZ, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

The Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo launches a three-run home run in the third inning Friday. ally a continuation of the modern saga. Both are good. Both intend to contend. The Cardinals arrived in first place in the division, 2½ games ahead of the Cubs, and winners in 11 of their past 14 games. The Cubs came from the West Coast, buoyed by a four-game winning streak. If either team saw this series as a measuring stick — eyeballing a chief challenger — then it was really more of the same. The Cubs already know the Cardinals like a good tailor. They’ve been sizing them up for a few years, trimming them back, fitting them for third place. Look no further than where they tuck their outfielders, where the seams are in their infield. Hendricks finished the fifth inning and got his 15th out on his 48th pitch. Five of the next six outs came on strong defensive plays or plays made by a shifted infielder. Twice a Cardinal stung a pitch up the middle — only to see an infielder standing there as if with a magnet. Ten of the game’s 15 hardest-hit balls were by Cardinals. Hendricks’ efficiency was aided by

scouting proficiency. “There are not a lot of secrets out there,” Shildt said. “We play each other a thousand times a year,” Flaherty said. “So everybody pretty much knows everybody in the division. That’s just how it is. There’s no weak link in this division.” Flaherty (3-2) and his feel for the Cubs’ lineup was clear in how he described working around it, as if a safecracker. Dating to last season, Rizzo has reached base against the Cardinals in nine consecutive plate appearances. Keeping others off around him limits trouble. Flaherty didn’t in the third. A tight strike zone put him behind on Descalso, and a walk to Descalso was followed by a walk to Kris Bryant. Rizzo tagged a fine pitch for a three-run homer, but Flaherty insisted he didn’t trace that back to a missed strike call to Descalso. “It’s just a different at-bat with guys on,” Flaherty said. “I mean, if you’re going to dwell on it, you’re asking for bad things

to happen. If I’m still thinking about that pitch as the rest of that at-bat goes, I’ve still got more chances to get him out. (The ump) missed one. Whatever. I still have a couple of more pitches to get him out. I wasn’t able to.” The Cubs extended their lead to four runs in the seventh after skirting around Rizzo with a walk and watching Javier Baez drive in the run. Flaherty had left the game by then, turning a bases-loaded jam over to the bullpen. He needed a seasonhigh 110 pitches to get 17 outs. Hendricks got through his first 18 outs on 55 pitches. “Some games are hard-fought. Both teams execute. A play happens here or there. That’s the game,” Shildt said. “One ball got out of the ballpark. One ball got into the gap. Otherwise we’d still be out there playing. But we’re not. And we’ll show up and play” Saturday. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


BLUES

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

Blues From B1

said. “You sit out a couple games, you get to see the game from a different angle.” What coach Craig Berube wanted was Edmundson to play a more physical game. “Over the course of the year, he has done a real good job of playing against top players and doing a good job of it, shutting them down,” Berube said. “We need a physical edge from him, for sure, but (also) defending against some of their top guys.” Edmundson was paired with Alex Pietrangelo, a pairing the Blues used often in the second half of the season, and Carl Gunnarsson was teamed with Vince Dunn in a pairing of two lefthanded shots. Berube has adopted a rotation of sorts in the back, with three players for two spots. Edmundson, Bortuzzo and Gunnarsson have taken turns sitting out on defense, with an off game or a minor injury being enough to take someone out of the lineup. Gunnarsson was a healthy scratch for the first four games of the postseason, then he came back and Bortuzzo sat out for four games and then Bortuzzo returned and Edmundson was out for two games. Now, Edmundson is back and Bortuzzo is sitting. “We are kind of keeping them all going a bit,” Berube said. “They have played really well at times. It’s just a rotation. It’s how they are playing, and what we need that game. It’s a good time for Joel to come back in and give us what he’s got.”

HAIR TODAY At a time of year when beards are in vogue for players, defenseman Jay Bouwmeester has gone his own way, being clean shaven for the playoffs. “I can’t grow a beard,” he said. “I’ve tried growing a beard, it hasn’t worked for me, so I’m not growing a beard. … I just look stupid. I’ve tried it in years in past, it doesn’t work, so I’m trying something different.” Bouwmeester said his bare face hasn’t brought any comments from his teammates. “No,” he said. “Nowadays everybody has a beard. Half these guys have a beard all year, so what’s the deal? This year, that’s my approach.” Indeed, the abundance of facial hair throughout the season raises the question: Is it a playoff beard if you’ve had it all season long? “Kind of, I guess,” said center Ryan O’Reilly, one of those players with a beard year round. “I think my regular season beard is a little more tapered than this. This is kind of doing whatever it wants.” As for Bouwmeester’s lack of a beard, O’Reilly said it wasn’t an COLTER PETERSON, CPETERSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM issue but it was noticeable. Blues center Oskar Sundqvist flips at the boards while battling Stars defenseman Ben Lovejoy for the puck during the first period Friday. “It’s a little different, a little weird,” he said. “Everyone’s different, right?” playoffs, taking over from Jared Coreau. … Defenseman Jakub Jerabek, who the Blues acquired NOTES The Blues forward personnel for a sixth-round draft pick from stayed the same for the eighth Edmonton at the start of the straight game. ... Stars defense- season and played in one game, man Joel Hanley, who made his has signed a contract with Poseries debut in Game 4, sat out dolsk Vityaz of the KHL, the with an upper-body injury. Dal- league tweeted. Jerabek played las coach Jim Montgomery said one game for the Blues when Hanley was day-to-day. Dillon they were low on defensemen at Heatherington made his debut the start of the season, and was and took Hanley’s spot in the a minus-3 in 7:52 of ice time. He lineup (which had been Taylor was a healthy scratch for seven Fedun’s spot) and forward Mat- games and was sent to San Antias Janmark came in for Tyler tonio, where he spent the rest of Pitlick. ... Not that it is likely the season. to matter, but Ville Husso is Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 healthy again and is now listed @tomtimm on Twitter as the Blues No. 3 goalie for the ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

BLUES PLAYOFF STATISTICS Prior to Friday’s game SKATERS

GP G A P +/- PIM PPG SHG GWG OTG S S% TOI/G Sft/G FO%

Pietrangelo

10 1 8 9 0

8

0

0

0

0 29 3.4 24:59 32.2 0.0

Schwartz

10 6 2 8

4

0

1

0

2

0 24 25.0 16:46 23.3 0.0

O’Reilly

10 2 6 8 -5

2

1

0

1

0 23 8.7 21:41 28.1 48.6

Parayko

10 1 5 6 0

2

0

0

0

0 24 4.2 22:44 31.8 0.0

Tarasenko

10 5 0 5 -6

4

4

0

1

0 36 13.9 18:58 24.3 0.0

Bozak

10 2 3 5

1

4

0

0

1

0 16 12.5 13:31 20.2 52.2

Perron

10 2 3 5 -3

6

1

0

0

0 24 8.3 18:30 23.4 0.0

Bouwmeester 10 0 5 5

2

8

0

0

0

0 7 0.0 21:54 30.0 0.0

Sundqvist

10 2 2 4

3

2

0

0

0

0 17 11.8 16:53 23.4 45.1

Schenn

10 1 3 4 -4

2

0

0

0

0 15 6.7 19:11 25.0 46.1

Dunn

10 0 4 4 -6

4

0

0

0

0 14 0.0 16:55 24.9 0.0

Maroon

10 2 1 3

1

2

0

0

1

0 18 11.1 12:54 17.4 0.0

Thomas

10 1 2 3

3

6

0

0

0

0 18 5.6 13:33 18.3 53.9

Edmundson

8 0 2 2 -2

4

0

0

0

0 10 0.0 14:45 22.9 0.0

Fabbri

7 1 0 1 -2

0

0

0

0

0 11 9.1

Steen

10 1 0 1 -1

0

0

0

0

0 4 25.0 11:53 18.4 50.0

Barbashev

10 0 1 1 -1

0

0

0

0

0 4 0.0 10:44 16.3 50.0

Sanford

3 0 0 0 -1

0

0

0

0

0 0 0.0

Gunnarsson

6000

1

4

0

0

0

0 3 0.0 16:44 26.7 0.0

Bortuzzo

6000

1

4

0

0

0

0 4 0.0 14:01 21.3 0.0

GOALIES GP-GS W-L GAA SV%

SA SV GA SO G A

Binnington 10-10 6-4 2.80 .906 298 270

28

0 0

1

8:11 12.7 0.0

7:14 11.3 0.0

P PIM 1

TOI

4 600:03

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Stars’ Jamie Benn tries to control the puck in front of Blues goalie Jordan Binnington during the first period Friday at Enterprise Center in St. Louis.


BLUES

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

NOTES

Edmundson makes a return to lineup BY TOM TIMMERMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When the Blues and Stars got on each others’ nerves at the end of the second period of Game 4 on Wednesday, the emotions spread to the press box, where the Blues’ scratches for the game sat. “I looked around,” defenseman Joel Edmundson said, “I saw (Chris Thorburn) was standing up. There’s a couple of us that really wanted to be out there.” Edmundson, who enjoys that kind of thing, having led the Blues in penalty minutes this season, got his chance on Friday, getting back in the lineup for Game 5 after two games as a healthy scratch. Robert Bortuzzo took a seat. “I’ll be the first one to admit that the first two games of this series, they weren’t my best games,” Edmundson said. “You sit out a couple games, you get to see the game from a different angle.” What coach Craig Berube wanted was Edmundson to play a more physical game.

“Over the course of the year, he has done a real good job of playing against top players and doing a good job of it, shutting them down,” Berube said. “We need a physical edge from him, for sure, but (also) defending against some of their top guys.” Edmundson was paired with Alex Pietrangelo, a pairing the Blues used often in the second half of the season, and Carl Gunnarsson was teamed with Vince Dunn in a pairing of two lefthanded shots. Berube has adopted a rotation of sorts in the back, with three players for two spots. Edmundson, Bortuzzo and Gunnarsson have taken turns sitting out on defense, with an off game or a minor injury being enough to take someone out of the lineup. Gunnarsson was a healthy scratch for the first four games of the postseason, then he came back and Bortuzzo sat out for four games and then Bortuzzo returned and Edmundson was out for two

games. Now, Edmundson is back and Bortuzzo is sitting. “We are kind of keeping them all going a bit,” Berube said. “They have played really well at times. It’s just a rotation. It’s how they are playing, and what we need that game. It’s a good time for Joel to come back in and give us what he’s got.”

HAIR TODAY At a time of year when beards are in vogue for players, defenseman Jay Bouwmeester has gone his own way, being clean shaven for the playoffs. “I can’t grow a beard,” he said. “I’ve tried growing a beard, it hasn’t worked for me, so I’m not growing a beard. … I just look stupid. I’ve tried it in years in past, it doesn’t work, so I’m trying something different.” Bouwmeester said his bare face hasn’t brought any comments from his teammates. “No,” he said. “Nowadays everybody has a beard. Half these

guys have a beard all year, so what’s the deal? This year, that’s my approach.” Indeed, the abundance of facial hair throughout the season raises the question: Is it a playoff beard if you’ve had it all season long? “Kind of, I guess,” said center Ryan O’Reilly, one of those players with a beard year round. “I think my regular season beard is a little more tapered than this. This is kind of doing whatever it wants.” As for Bouwmeester’s lack of a beard, O’Reilly said it wasn’t an issue but it was noticeable. “It’s a little different, a little weird,” he said. “Everyone’s different, right?”

NOTES The Blues forward personnel stayed the same for the eighth straight game. ... Stars defenseman Joel Hanley, who made his series debut in Game 4, sat out with an upper-body injury. Dallas coach Jim Montgomery said Hanley was day-to-day. Dil-

lon Heatherington made his debut and took Hanley’s spot in the lineup (which had been Taylor Fedun’s spot) and forward Mattias Janmark came in for Tyler Pitlick. ... Not that it is likely to matter, but Ville Husso is healthy again and is now listed as the Blues No. 3 goalie for the playoffs, taking over from Jared Coreau. … Defenseman Jakub Jerabek, who the Blues acquired for a sixth-round draft pick from Edmonton at the start of the season and played in one game, has signed a contract with Podolsk Vityaz of the KHL, the league tweeted. Jerabek played one game for the Blues when they were low on defensemen at the start of the season, and was a minus-3 in 7:52 of ice time. He was a healthy scratch for seven games and was sent to San Antonio, where he spent the rest of the season. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Blues From B1

The home bounceback the Blues so desperately needed after Wednesday’s 4-2 setback in Dallas never materialized. The Blues trailed 2-0 after two periods, but couldn’t recreate the Manitoba Miracle, when they also trailed 2-0 after two periods in a series tied two games apiece, but rallied for a dramatic 3-2 victory. They came close Friday, with Schwartz’s third-period goal narrowing the Dallas lead to 2-1 and energizing a crowd of 18,542 that had spent parts of the game booing the home team. But Dallas goalie Ben Bishop, the former Blues and Chaminade College Prep product, was excellent in goal, stopping 38 of 39 shots. That tied a Dallas postseason record for goals in a regulation game. “He played a great game,” interim coach Craig Berube said. “Our goalie kept us in there, too, and played a good game. Made a lot of big saves. Both goalies played well. We have to find a way to get more goals.” Even with all those saves, Bishop left a lot of rebounds out there on the ice, but for one reason or another the Blues couldn’t get to many. They simply didn’t have a whole lot going net front. “We just have to get inside more,” Schwartz said. “Pucks were laying there, we just have to find a way to get inside, get body position and get a little more traffic.” And the Blues’ power play was feeble most of the game. They were able to muster only five shots on four power plays against the Stars’ elite penalty kill unit. Not nearly good enough. “Breakouts,” Brayden Schenn said. “I don’t think we’re entering the zone as good as we can. It’s making it pretty tough on each other. We’re kind of putting each other in bad spots. “I think execution has gotta be way better. As soon as the execution picks up, then the swagger will come, the confidence will come and that’s when we start getting chances.” The Blues have now lost four of six this postseason at Enterprise Center. Trailing 2-0 entering the third period, Berube put his lines in a blender. He went SchwartzSchenn-Vladimir Tarasenko on one line. Robby Fabbri-Ryan O’Reilly-David Perron on another. The fourth line consisted of Oskar Sundqvist-Ivan Barbashev-Alexander Steen. That meant the only unchanged line was the third: Pat Maroon-Tyler Bozak-Robert Thomas. Despite the switches, the Blues looked tentative, maybe a little tight, in the early minutes of the period. But then Alex Pietrangelo sent a harmless looking shot from behind center ice in on Bishop. Bishop was getting crowded by an onrushing Thomas and muffed his clearing attempt. The puck found its way to Schwartz who beat Bishop near side at the 8:26 mark to make it a 2-1 game. A crowd that was booing just seconds earlier erupted. Before you knew it, there were chants of “Let’s go Blues!” in Enterprise. It was Schwartz’s seventh goal of the playoffs. During the regular season, he didn’t score his seventh goal until March 12. The Blues kept the pressure going after that, drawing a penalty on Jamie Benn for hooking Schenn. The Blues got nothing done on the power play, and the clocked ticked down at Enterprise. Sundqvist had an excellent chance with just 4:15 left, maneuvering in

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ Alexander Steen lands in the Blues goal in the third period Friday.

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ Brayden Schenn slams into the Stars’ John Klingberg during the first period of Game 5 on Friday at Enterprise Center. front of the Dallas net and getting Bishop down on the ice. But Sundqvist couldn’t lift his shot over the pads of Bishop. The Blues pulled goalie Jordan Binnington with a minute left, and finished out the game buzzing around Bishop, but couldn’t finish. They were yelling “Boo!” not “Blues” as the second period ended — a strange thing to hear in Game 5 of Round 2. The Blues had two power plays

in the period — three if you count the 1-minute, 26-second carryover from a penalty late in the first period. But they couldn’t get one past Bishop. The last power play, which came late in the second period, was particularly feeble with the Blues having trouble even getting the puck into the Dallas zone. But it was Dallas that scored the only goal of the period, taking a 2-0 lead on Esa Lindell’s

first career playoff goal at the 6:13 mark of the second. Once again the Blues got caught in transition on the goal. There was a rush by Dallas, with the Blues backing in, and then a drop pass to Lindell by Alexander Radulov. Lindell’s backhand through traffic bounced off the left foot of defenseman Jay Bouwmeester and deflected past Binnington. Following Lindell’s goal, Colton Parayko got the crowd excited with a shot that fooled some in the crowd, including the person responsible for the “goal” horn. There was a brief review by the NHL situation room in Toronto, but it was clear the puck bounced off the post. Dallas scored early, just 2:42 into the game when Jason Spezza, left alone in front, sent a roof shot past Binnington after a pass from Tyler Seguin behind the net. Spezza got the goal, his third of the playoffs, but it was the Stars’ transition game — which has given the Blues trouble all season — that started the sequence. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Stars 2, Blues 1 Dallas Blues

1 0

1 0

0— 2 1 —1

First period D: Spezza 3 (Janmark, Seguin), 2:42. Penalties: Schenn, STL, (hooking), 6:57; Polak, DAL, (holding), 19:24. Second period D: Lindell 1 (Klingberg, Radulov), 6:13. Penalties: Comeau, DAL, (hooking), 9:47; Cogliano, DAL, (high sticking), 17:14. Third period B: Schwartz 7, 8:26. Penalties: Benn, DAL, (hooking), 8:47; Schenn, STL, (slashing), 20:00. Shots on goal Dallas 11 11 5 27 Blues 13 11 15 39 Power-plays Dallas 0 of 1; Blues 0 of 4. Goaltenders Dallas, Bishop 7-4 (39 shots-38 saves). Blues, Binnington 6-5 (27-25). A: 18,542. Referees: Francis Charron, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Mark Shewchyk.


05.04.2019 • SATURDAY • M 1

NHL

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B7

NHL PLAYOFFS

Hurricanes sweep away Islanders

NHL PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

WIRE REPORTS

RALEIGH, N.C. — Teuvo Teravainen and Greg McKegg scored 66 seconds apart in the second period, and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the New York Islanders 5-2 on Friday night to sweep their second-round series. Teravainen and linemate Sebastian Aho each finished with a goal and an assist, captain Justin Williams and rookie star Andrei Svechnikov each added insurance goals and goalie Curtis McElhinney made 26 saves in his second career playoff start. The Hurricanes — who went a decade between playoff berths — earned the first four-game sweep in franchise history and have reached the Eastern Conference final in each of their last four postseason appearances since 2002. They’re also unbeaten in five home playoff games. Now Carolina — after winning six straight and eight of nine — will have some time to heal before it faces the Columbus-Boston winner. Mathew Barzal scored a power-play goal and Brock Nelson added a late goal for the Islanders, who managed just five goals in the series. They kept the identity of their starting goalie a secret until warmups — when Robin Lehner led them onto the ice for the fourth straight game in the series. He didn’t last long. Coach Barry Trotz pulled him in favor of backup Thomas Greiss after the bang-bang goals by Teravainen

BOSTON 2, COLUMBUS 2 Game 1: Boston 3, Columbus 2, OT Game 2: Colum. 3, Boston 2, 2OT Game 3: Columbus 2, Boston 1 Game 4: Boston 4, Columbus 1 Today: at Boston, 6:15 p.m. Monday: at Columbus, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday: at Boston, TBD

CAROLINA 4, NEW YORK ISLANDERS 0 Game 1: Carolina 1, New York 0, OT Game 2: Carolina 2, New York 1 Game 3: Carolina 5, New York 2 Friday: Carolina 5, New York 2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

GERRY BROOME, ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS 2, DALLAS 2 Game 1: St. Louis 3, Dallas 2 Game 2: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Game 3: St. Louis 4, Dallas 3 Game 4: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Friday: at St. Louis, (n) Sunday: at Dallas, 2 p.m. x-Tuesday: at St. Louis, 7 p.m.

Hurricanes forward Sebastian Aho gets through a trio of Islanders defenders and scores past goalie Robin Lehner in the first period of Friday’s Game 4 victory, completing a four-game series sweep for Carolina. and McKegg early in the second. Teravainen put the Hurricanes ahead to stay after some slick passes from Aho and Warren Foegele set up his sixth goal of the postseason. And McKegg chased Lehner when the goalie couldn’t keep hold of the rebound of Brett Pesce’s shot and

the Carolina rookie stuffed it in for his first playoff goal. Greiss wasn’t much better against the relentless Hurricanes, with Williams scoring their third goal of the period off a give-and-go from Nino Niederreiter at 8:51 and Svechnikov riling up the rowdy Ca-

niacs with his goal with 4:47 left. Lehner and Greiss each finished with eight saves for the Islanders. Their counterpart — McElhinney — wouldn’t let them make this a game again, stopping Josh Bailey from point-blank range with about 10 1/2 minutes remaining.

even-strength draws in the series. As always with face-offs, wins and losses aren’t entirely decided by the guys who take them. The Blue Jackets’ wingers and defensemen are getting outworked on draws.

with an assist. MacKinnon is humming right now, with at least a point in eight straight playoff games. His goal in Game 4 helped the Avalanche to a 3-0 win over the San Jose Sharks and tied the Western Conference semifinal series at two games apiece. Game 5 is tonight in San Jose. Both from the Halifax, Nova Scotia, area and Crosby and MacKinnon frequently train together in the offseason. Watching the work ethic of the Penguins’ superstar eight years his senior has rubbed off. “I see how hard he works,” MacKinnon said, “and committed he is.”

BRIEFLY

SAN JOSE 2, COLORADO 2 Game 1: San Jose 5, Colorado 2 Game 2: Colorado 4, San Jose 3 Game 3: San Jose 4, Colorado 2 Game 4: Colorado 3, San Jose 0 Today: at San Jose, 9 p.m. Monday: at Colorado, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday: at San Jose, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Bruins dominating in face-off circle Typically, overall face-off win percentage isn’t a big deal. It becomes a big deal, though, when the numbers become polar opposites. The Boston Bruins have won 56.7% of face-offs to 43.3% for the Columbus Blue Jackets, who were dominated yet again in Game 4 on Thursday — winning just 41 percent of 66 draws in a 4-1 loss. Game 5 is tonight with the Eastern Conference series tied 2-2. Patrice Bergeron (14-for-21, 67%), David Krejci (8-for-11, 73%) and Sean Kuraly (8-for-12, 67%) did the most face-off damage for the Bruins, who’ve won 59.5% of all

Avs’ MacKinnon heeds Crosby’s advice DENVER — Nathan MacKinnon received a text message from a good buddy just before the start of the playoffs. The basic point: Attack and dictate the pace. The speedy Colorado Avalanche forward has taken Sidney Crosby’s advice to heart. Credit Crosby

SHARKS: A positive for San Jose has been the play of goalie Martin Jones. He took the loss in Game 4 but made several remarkable saves among his 25. Goaltending was considered a Sharks weakness, but through four games, Jones has a 2.28 goals-against average and .920 save percentage. RANGERS: The team’s rebuilding continued to pick up steam Friday as the club announced it has agreed to terms on entry-level contracts with Russian goaltender Igor Shesterkin and forward Vitali Kravtsov, who was one of the team’s three first-round picks in the 2018 draft. —Wire reports

Frederickson From B1

The Dallas Stars are at their best when captain Jamie Benn is skating on nerves, and there does not seem to be a team Benn pesters better than the Blues. “He’s a player who brings it all,” defenseman Colton Parayko said after Friday’s morning skate. “He’s hard to play against. And at the same time, he will go down and score a goal. He has different elements to his game that make it tough. He gets into tough areas. He always likes to be in the mix. He likes to be everywhere. It’s fun for him. We just have to make sure we play between the whistles, and step up.” Benn scored a power-play goal in Game 1. He dished the assist on a Roope Hintz goal in Game 2. And after a relatively quiet Game 3 that was claimed by the Blues – the two are not a coincidence – Benn crawled right back beneath the hometown team’s skin in Game 4. He assisted on another Hintz goal that pushed the Blues into a three-goal deficit in the second period, then started a fire with Binnington, prompting some chatter what was still smoldering as Friday night’s game neared. Binnington might not know Dallas coach Jim Montgomery’s name, but the Blues always have their eyes on No. 14 in green. Benn’s Game 4 assist, a perfectly placed puck that split two Blues before landing on the center of Hintz’s stick, captured why he is a maddening antagonist who the Blues (begrudgingly) respect. One second, he can be sitting on top of Alex Pietrangelo, dispensing an embarrassing facewash. The next, he can be making SportsCenter’s Top 10 – if ESPN realized the NHL playoffs were in progress. Benn, 29, made his NHL debut during the 2009-10 season. He has been a Star his entire career, and a thorn in the Blues’ side just as long. Over the course of his decade in the league, Benn leads all NHL players in regularseason goals (19) scored against the Blues. And only nine players during that span have totaled more penalties against the Blues than Benn’s 14 in 39 games. But here’s the thing. The Blues have done an impressive job of shutting up and shutting down Benn

J.B. FORBES JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ Pat Maroon tries to screen Stars goalie Ben Bishop during the first period Friday. in their postseason meetings. Their fight to keep it that way is one of the many aspects that will define this airtight series. Benn is a plus-6 player through his 29 career postsea-

son games. He chewed up Minnesota (plus-5) in 2016. He spit out Nashville (plus-3) in the first round this season, quieting those who wrote him off after a careerworst regular season. But Benn is

now minus-3 against the Blues between the Western Conference semifinals in 2016 and the first four games of this secondround meeting. He entered Friday’s Game 5 with a zero for a

16

Power plays for the Boston Bruins through four games of their series against the Blue Jackets — 10 more than Columbus allowed in four games against Tampa Bay in the first round. The Bruins have scored just three goals (18.8%), but the Blue Jackets know they cannot continue to give them that many opportunities.

plus-minus during this series. His sharp assist and expert instigation in Game 4 suggested he’s starting to leave fingerprints. “We have to do a better job at frustrating him,” Ryan O’Reilly said. “He’s obviously a great player, and he brings everything to the game. He tries to stir the pot, but he’s also impacting the game offensively. It’s a tough task, but we have to be much harder on their top players. It’s something we’ve talked about. They’re leading the charge, and he’s one of those guys. We have to step in his way, finish our checks, frustrate him as best we can.” Tired of watching his team lag in 5-on-5 play, Stars coach Montgomery made a savvy switch before Game 4. He separated his top line, planting Jason Dickinson and Mats Zuccarello with center Tyler Seguin on one line while matching Benn and Alexander Radulov with center Hintz on another. The look had never been used in the regular season. Perhaps it should have been. Hintz scored his fifth goal of the postseason after the change. Seugin, Radulov and Zuccarello each had two assists. Benn? He had his latest assist to Hintz, then peppered the gumbo with a painfully-placed stick to Binnington, drawing an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty that set up Binnington for a double-whammy of roughing and slashing that provided the Stars a power play to start the third period. That, per Sports Illustrated, made Binnington the first goalie since May of 2003 to receive a double minor in the playoffs. Benn, wearing a disturber’s grin, was feeling it. The Blues were beginning to feel his presence. That fine line of managing Benn is getting harder to skate as the stars of Dallas begin to shine. “Guys just have to match his intensity,” Pat Maroon said. “He’s a gamer. He shows up. He’s performed well against the Blues, from what I’ve heard. So, guys give it back to him. There’s going to be jawing back and forth. There’s going to be intensity. Don’t go out of the way to take a stupid penalty, or take a big hit. If you have a chance, lay a lick on him.” Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

NHL

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

NHL PLAYOFFS

Hurricanes sweep away Islanders

NHL PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

WIRE REPORTS

RALEIGH, N.C. — Teuvo Teravainen and Greg McKegg scored 66 seconds apart in the second period, and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the New York Islanders 5-2 on Friday night to sweep their second-round series. Teravainen and linemate Sebastian Aho each finished with a goal and an assist, captain Justin Williams and rookie star Andrei Svechnikov each added insurance goals and goalie Curtis McElhinney made 26 saves in his second career playoff start. The Hurricanes — who went a decade between playoff berths — earned the first four-game sweep in franchise history and have reached the Eastern Conference final in each of their last four postseason appearances since 2002. They’re also unbeaten in five home playoff games. Now Carolina — after winning six straight and eight of nine — will have some time to heal before it faces the Columbus-Boston winner. Mathew Barzal scored a power-play goal and Brock Nelson added a late goal for the Islanders, who managed just five goals in the series. They kept the identity of their starting goalie a secret until warmups — when Robin Lehner led them onto the ice for the fourth straight game in the series. He didn’t last long. Coach Barry Trotz pulled him in favor of backup Thomas Greiss after the bang-bang goals by Teravainen

BOSTON 2, COLUMBUS 2 Game 1: Boston 3, Columbus 2, OT Game 2: Colum. 3, Boston 2, 2OT Game 3: Columbus 2, Boston 1 Game 4: Boston 4, Columbus 1 Today: at Boston, 6:15 p.m. Monday: at Columbus, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday: at Boston, TBD

CAROLINA 4, NEW YORK ISLANDERS 0 Game 1: Carolina 1, New York 0, OT Game 2: Carolina 2, New York 1 Game 3: Carolina 5, New York 2 Friday: Carolina 5, New York 2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

GERRY BROOME, ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS 2, DALLAS 2 Game 1: St. Louis 3, Dallas 2 Game 2: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Game 3: St. Louis 4, Dallas 3 Game 4: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Friday: at St. Louis, (n) Sunday: at Dallas, 2 p.m. x-Tuesday: at St. Louis, 7 p.m.

Hurricanes forward Sebastian Aho gets through a trio of Islanders defenders and scores past goalie Robin Lehner in the first period of Friday’s Game 4 victory, completing a four-game series sweep for Carolina. and McKegg early in the second. Teravainen put the Hurricanes ahead to stay after some slick passes from Aho and Warren Foegele set up his sixth goal of the postseason. And McKegg chased Lehner when the goalie couldn’t keep hold of the rebound of Brett Pesce’s shot and

the Carolina rookie stuffed it in for his first playoff goal. Greiss wasn’t much better against the relentless Hurricanes, with Williams scoring their third goal of the period off a give-and-go from Nino Niederreiter at 8:51 and Svechnikov riling up the rowdy Ca-

niacs with his goal with 4:47 left. Lehner and Greiss each finished with eight saves for the Islanders. Their counterpart — McElhinney — wouldn’t let them make this a game again, stopping Josh Bailey from point-blank range with about 10 1/2 minutes remaining.

even-strength draws in the series. As always with face-offs, wins and losses aren’t entirely decided by the guys who take them. The Blue Jackets’ wingers and defensemen are getting outworked on draws.

with an assist. MacKinnon is humming right now, with at least a point in eight straight playoff games. His goal in Game 4 helped the Avalanche to a 3-0 win over the San Jose Sharks and tied the Western Conference semifinal series at two games apiece. Game 5 is tonight in San Jose. Both from the Halifax, Nova Scotia, area and Crosby and MacKinnon frequently train together in the offseason. Watching the work ethic of the Penguins’ superstar eight years his senior has rubbed off. “I see how hard he works,” MacKinnon said, “and committed he is.”

BRIEFLY

SAN JOSE 2, COLORADO 2 Game 1: San Jose 5, Colorado 2 Game 2: Colorado 4, San Jose 3 Game 3: San Jose 4, Colorado 2 Game 4: Colorado 3, San Jose 0 Today: at San Jose, 9 p.m. Monday: at Colorado, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday: at San Jose, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Bruins dominating in face-off circle Typically, overall face-off win percentage isn’t a big deal. It becomes a big deal, though, when the numbers become polar opposites. The Boston Bruins have won 56.7% of face-offs to 43.3% for the Columbus Blue Jackets, who were dominated yet again in Game 4 on Thursday — winning just 41 percent of 66 draws in a 4-1 loss. Game 5 is tonight with the Eastern Conference series tied 2-2. Patrice Bergeron (14-for-21, 67%), David Krejci (8-for-11, 73%) and Sean Kuraly (8-for-12, 67%) did the most face-off damage for the Bruins, who’ve won 59.5% of all

Avs’ MacKinnon heeds Crosby’s advice DENVER — Nathan MacKinnon received a text message from a good buddy just before the start of the playoffs. The basic point: Attack and dictate the pace. The speedy Colorado Avalanche forward has taken Sidney Crosby’s advice to heart. Credit Crosby

SHARKS: A positive for San Jose has been the play of goalie Martin Jones. He took the loss in Game 4 but made several remarkable saves among his 25. Goaltending was considered a Sharks weakness, but through four games, Jones has a 2.28 goals-against average and .920 save percentage. RANGERS: The team’s rebuilding continued to pick up steam Friday as the club announced it has agreed to terms on entry-level contracts with Russian goaltender Igor Shesterkin and forward Vitali Kravtsov, who was one of the team’s three first-round picks in the 2018 draft. —Wire reports

Frederickson From B1

The Dallas Stars are at their best when captain Jamie Benn is skating on nerves, and there does not seem to be a team Benn pesters better than the Blues. “He’s a player who brings it all,” defenseman Colton Parayko said after Friday’s morning skate. “He’s hard to play against. And at the same time, he will go down and score a goal. He has different elements to his game that make it tough. He gets into tough areas. He always likes to be in the mix. He likes to be everywhere. It’s fun for him. We just have to make sure we play between the whistles, and step up.” Benn scored a power-play goal in Game 1. He dished the assist on a Roope Hintz goal in Game 2. And after a relatively quiet Game 3 that was claimed by the Blues – the two are not a coincidence – Benn crawled right back beneath the hometown team’s skin in Game 4. He assisted on another Hintz goal that pushed the Blues into a three-goal deficit in the second period, then started a fire with Binnington, prompting some chatter what was still smoldering as Friday night’s game neared. Binnington might not know Dallas coach Jim Montgomery’s name, but the Blues always have their eyes on No. 14 in green. Benn’s Game 4 assist, a perfectly placed puck that split two Blues before landing on the center of Hintz’s stick, captured why he is a maddening antagonist who the Blues (begrudgingly) respect. One second, he can be sitting on top of Alex Pietrangelo, dispensing an embarrassing facewash. The next, he can be making SportsCenter’s Top 10 – if ESPN realized the NHL playoffs were in progress. Benn, 29, made his NHL debut during the 2009-10 season. He has been a Star his entire career, and a thorn in the Blues’ side just as long. Over the course of his decade in the league, Benn leads all NHL players in regularseason goals (19) scored against the Blues. And only nine players during that span have totaled more penalties against the Blues than Benn’s 14 in 39 games. But here’s the thing. The Blues have done an impressive job of shutting up and shutting down Benn

J.B. FORBES JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

The Blues’ Pat Maroon tries to screen Stars goalie Ben Bishop during the first period Friday. in their postseason meetings. Their fight to keep it that way is one of the many aspects that will define this airtight series. Benn is a plus-6 player through his 29 career postsea-

son games. He chewed up Minnesota (plus-5) in 2016. He spit out Nashville (plus-3) in the first round this season, quieting those who wrote him off after a careerworst regular season. But Benn is

now minus-3 against the Blues between the Western Conference semifinals in 2016 and the first four games of this secondround meeting. He entered Friday’s Game 5 with a zero for a

16

Power plays for the Boston Bruins through four games of their series against the Blue Jackets — 10 more than Columbus allowed in four games against Tampa Bay in the first round. The Bruins have scored just three goals (18.8%), but the Blue Jackets know they cannot continue to give them that many opportunities.

plus-minus during this series. His sharp assist and expert instigation in Game 4 suggested he’s starting to leave fingerprints. “We have to do a better job at frustrating him,” Ryan O’Reilly said. “He’s obviously a great player, and he brings everything to the game. He tries to stir the pot, but he’s also impacting the game offensively. It’s a tough task, but we have to be much harder on their top players. It’s something we’ve talked about. They’re leading the charge, and he’s one of those guys. We have to step in his way, finish our checks, frustrate him as best we can.” Tired of watching his team lag in 5-on-5 play, Stars coach Montgomery made a savvy switch before Game 4. He separated his top line, planting Jason Dickinson and Mats Zuccarello with center Tyler Seguin on one line while matching Benn and Alexander Radulov with center Hintz on another. The look had never been used in the regular season. Perhaps it should have been. Hintz scored his fifth goal of the postseason after the change. Seugin, Radulov and Zuccarello each had two assists. Benn? He had his latest assist to Hintz, then peppered the gumbo with a painfully-placed stick to Binnington, drawing an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty that set up Binnington for a double-whammy of roughing and slashing that provided the Stars a power play to start the third period. That, per Sports Illustrated, made Binnington the first goalie since May of 2003 to receive a double minor in the playoffs. Benn, wearing a disturber’s grin, was feeling it. The Blues were beginning to feel his presence. That fine line of managing Benn is getting harder to skate as the stars of Dallas begin to shine. “Guys just have to match his intensity,” Pat Maroon said. “He’s a gamer. He shows up. He’s performed well against the Blues, from what I’ve heard. So, guys give it back to him. There’s going to be jawing back and forth. There’s going to be intensity. Don’t go out of the way to take a stupid penalty, or take a big hit. If you have a chance, lay a lick on him.” Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


NHL

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 2

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

NHL PLAYOFFS

Hurricanes sweep away Islanders

NHL PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

WIRE REPORTS

RALEIGH, N.C. — Teuvo Teravainen and Greg McKegg scored 66 seconds apart in the second period, and the Carolina Hurricanes beat the New York Islanders 5-2 on Friday night to sweep their second-round series. Teravainen and linemate Sebastian Aho each finished with a goal and an assist, captain Justin Williams and rookie star Andrei Svechnikov each added insurance goals and goalie Curtis McElhinney made 26 saves in his second career playoff start. The Hurricanes — who went a decade between playoff berths — earned the first four-game sweep in franchise history and have reached the Eastern Conference final in each of their last four postseason appearances since 2002. They’re also unbeaten in five home playoff games. Now Carolina — after winning six straight and eight of nine — will have some time to heal before it faces the Columbus-Boston winner. Mathew Barzal scored a power-play goal and Brock Nelson added a late goal for the Islanders, who managed just five goals in the series. They kept the identity of their starting goalie a secret until warmups — when Robin Lehner led them onto the ice for the fourth straight game in the series. He didn’t last long. Coach Barry Trotz pulled him in favor of backup Thomas Greiss after the bang-bang goals by Teravainen

BOSTON 2, COLUMBUS 2 Game 1: Boston 3, Columbus 2, OT Game 2: Colum. 3, Boston 2, 2OT Game 3: Columbus 2, Boston 1 Game 4: Boston 4, Columbus 1 Today: at Boston, 6:15 p.m. Monday: at Columbus, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday: at Boston, TBD

CAROLINA 4, NEW YORK ISLANDERS 0 Game 1: Carolina 1, New York 0, OT Game 2: Carolina 2, New York 1 Game 3: Carolina 5, New York 2 Friday: Carolina 5, New York 2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

GERRY BROOME, ASSOCIATED PRESS

DALLAS 3, ST. LOUIS 2 Game 1: St. Louis 3, Dallas 2 Game 2: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Game 3: St. Louis 4, Dallas 3 Game 4: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Friday: Dallas 2, St. Louis 1 Sunday: at Dallas, 2 p.m. x-Tuesday: at St. Louis, 7 p.m.

Hurricanes forward Sebastian Aho gets through a trio of Islanders defenders and scores past goalie Robin Lehner in the first period of Friday’s Game 4 victory, completing a four-game series sweep for Carolina. and McKegg early in the second. Teravainen put the Hurricanes ahead to stay after some slick passes from Aho and Warren Foegele set up his sixth goal of the postseason. And McKegg chased Lehner when the goalie couldn’t keep hold of the rebound of Brett Pesce’s shot and

the Carolina rookie stuffed it in for his first playoff goal. Greiss wasn’t much better against the relentless Hurricanes, with Williams scoring their third goal of the period off a give-and-go from Nino Niederreiter at 8:51 and Svechnikov riling up the rowdy Ca-

niacs with his goal with 4:47 left. Lehner and Greiss each finished with eight saves for the Islanders. Their counterpart — McElhinney — wouldn’t let them make this a game again, stopping Josh Bailey from point-blank range with about 10 1/2 minutes remaining.

even-strength draws in the series. As always with face-offs, wins and losses aren’t entirely decided by the guys who take them. The Blue Jackets’ wingers and defensemen are getting outworked on draws.

with an assist. MacKinnon is humming right now, with at least a point in eight straight playoff games. His goal in Game 4 helped the Avalanche to a 3-0 win over the San Jose Sharks and tied the Western Conference semifinal series at two games apiece. Game 5 is tonight in San Jose. Both from the Halifax, Nova Scotia, area and Crosby and MacKinnon frequently train together in the offseason. Watching the work ethic of the Penguins’ superstar eight years his senior has rubbed off. “I see how hard he works,” MacKinnon said, “and committed he is.”

BRIEFLY

SAN JOSE 2, COLORADO 2 Game 1: San Jose 5, Colorado 2 Game 2: Colorado 4, San Jose 3 Game 3: San Jose 4, Colorado 2 Game 4: Colorado 3, San Jose 0 Today: at San Jose, 9 p.m. Monday: at Colorado, 9 p.m. x-Wednesday: at San Jose, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Bruins dominating in face-off circle Typically, overall face-off win percentage isn’t a big deal. It becomes a big deal, though, when the numbers become polar opposites. The Boston Bruins have won 56.7% of face-offs to 43.3% for the Columbus Blue Jackets, who were dominated yet again in Game 4 on Thursday — winning just 41 percent of 66 draws in a 4-1 loss. Game 5 is tonight with the Eastern Conference series tied 2-2. Patrice Bergeron (14-for-21, 67%), David Krejci (8-for-11, 73%) and Sean Kuraly (8-for-12, 67%) did the most face-off damage for the Bruins, who’ve won 59.5% of all

Avs’ MacKinnon heeds Crosby’s advice DENVER — Nathan MacKinnon received a text message from a good buddy just before the start of the playoffs. The basic point: Attack and dictate the pace. The speedy Colorado Avalanche forward has taken Sidney Crosby’s advice to heart. Credit Crosby

SHARKS: A positive for San Jose has been the play of goalie Martin Jones. He took the loss in Game 4 but made several remarkable saves among his 25. Goaltending was considered a Sharks weakness, but through four games, Jones has a 2.28 goals-against average and .920 save percentage. RANGERS: The team’s rebuilding continued to pick up steam Friday as the club announced it has agreed to terms on entry-level contracts with Russian goaltender Igor Shesterkin and forward Vitali Kravtsov, who was one of the team’s three first-round picks in the 2018 draft. —Wire reports

16

Power plays for the Boston Bruins through four games of their series against the Blue Jackets — 10 more than Columbus allowed in four games against Tampa Bay in the first round. The Bruins have scored just three goals (18.8%), but the Blue Jackets know they cannot continue to give them that many opportunities.

Frederickson From B1

luck is supposed to stand on your side. Don’t, and she has a way of teasing — no, torturing — a team that sniffed a chance to steal a win it did not really deserve. Luck arrived for the Blues in third period of the fifth game of the Western Conference semifinals. She made Dallas goalie Ben Bishop, who had been a human force field all night, freeze. He left a puck unprotected and vulnerable at the top of the crease and by the time he woke up, Jaden Schwartz had pounced, cutting the Stars’ lead to one with more than 11 minutes to play. A silent Enterprise Center roared to life, and that was before Dallas captain Jamie Benn picked a very dangerous time to pick up a hooking penalty that handed the Blues a power play. More luck. But luck can only do so much, and right now she is more likely to grace your Powerball ticket than the Blues’ power play. The Blues promptly squandered their fourth and final advantage of the evening, adding it to the long list of opportunities unclaimed. Four breathtaking hits, then a stunning fizzle, followed by a rally that felt like fool’s gold, and now your bounce-back Blues are backed deep into the corner of this best-of-seven series. They trail for the first time in the postseason few thought they would reach months ago. In order to write another chapter of their impressive story, they will need to snap out of the relapse that stirred bad memories of that miserable team they were months ago. Too harsh? Tell that to the fans who booed the Blues off the ice after the second period. Hours before the 2-1 loss that put them behind three games to two in the series, before his face was turning shades of red that matched the center line, Blues coach Craig Berube stressed the importance a fast start. “We need to be aggressive here right away tonight,” he said. Aggression was no problem. In fact, it seemed to become one. The Blues hit everything that moved, as if enough dropped shoulders would make up for everything else they did not do. Oskar Sunqvist mashed Miro

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Blues Robby Fabbri and Stars Roope Hintz go down during the second period of the game between the St. Louis Blues and the Dallas Stars in the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs on Friday, at the Enterprise Center in St. Louis.

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Stars goalie Ben Bishop looks back to see the puck bounce off of the side post during the second period of the game between the St. Louis Blues and the Dallas Stars in the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs on Friday at the Enterprise Center in St. Louis. Fans thought the puck went in, but the replay showed it hitting the pipe and not going in. Heiskanen about as soon as Charles Glenn finished, “brave.” Brayden Schenn left his skates to completely demolish Roope Hintz. Ivan Barbashev rocked Jason Spezza. Then Schenn drilled Spezza, too.

The crowd loved it. The Stars simply ignored it. Perhaps it was an omen when it was Spezza who sniped the game’s first goal. The Blues hit and hit and hit, but they are the team now bruised.

Their home-ice disadvantage now shows a 2-4 postseason record here. Goalie Jordan Binnington is playing well, and he’s not the reason the Blues now trail, but he’s not quite matching Bishop. Whatever ghost froze Bishop for a moment disappeared after his lapse. He was excellent before, and more importantly, after. Suddenly, the Blues are struggling to stay on the puck, struggling to get the kind of production from their top-six players that the Stars are getting from 35-year-old fourth-line right winger Spezza, struggling to skate forward instead of toward their own zone. They were physical, but fundamentally unsound. The Stars are now rolling in waves. Some groaning about officiating is fair. Remember when the Blues’ Tyler Bozak got called for interference in Game 4 when he barely stuck out his rump? Where was that call when Bozak got deskated by the right leg/hip/everything of Blake Comeau? And when did tripping become allowed? So much was missed out there

that the Blues had one too many men on the ice at one point, and nothing was called. Nothing was scored, either. The latter says a lot more about Friday’s loss than any claims of officiating bias. On top of the advantage that the officials missed, the Blues managed just five power-play shots on their four chances. That won’t win. Not now. Not against these guys. “They do a good job of pressuring, but we have to execute better,” Berube said after the loss. “That’s what it boils down to. Execution.” Take the third-period as a positive if you like. Of course, the same thing could be said after the Game 4 loss. The Blues are a third-period team. That used to be noted a a strength. Now it’s looking more like a problem. That’s the problem with waiting for luck to strike late. She can only do so much, and too often sides with the team that wins her over with work. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 05.04.2019

145TH RUNNING OF THE KENTUCKY DERBY

Running in the rain ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Kentucky Derby entrant Code of Honor waits on the track before a workout Thursday at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky.

Baffert tries for record-tying sixth Derby win Associated Press

B

How to watch

POST POSITIONS AND ODDS PP

After the early favorite, Omaha Beach, withdrew, Game Winner is favored to win from the 16th post. The favorite has won the Derby in each of the past five years. The starting gate will be one short with 19 horses vying to wear the garland of red roses.

BETH HARRIS

ob Baffert times three. The two-time Triple Crown-winning trainer saddles the top three choices in a Kentucky Derby lacking a dominant favorite. Game Winner is the pre-race favorite, albeit a tepid one at 9-2, on what could be a wet day at Churchill Downs. Improbable and Roadster were installed as the co-second choices at 5-1. “Last year we came in here with Justify and we knew it was my race to lose,” Baffert said. The 19-horse field for the 145th Derby today reflects the prep season leading to the opening leg of the Triple Crown: no horse commanded the attention. “There are a lot of good horses in here,” Baffert said. “They’re a pretty evenly matched group.” The picture got scrambled again when initial favorite Omaha Beach was scratched because of Coverage a breathing starts today problem, dealat 1:30 p.m. ing a devason NBC. Post tating blow to time is 5:50. 68-year-old trainer Richard Mandella, whose Hall of Fame resume lacks only a Derby victory. That prompted the early odds to be redone. The race also lost 30-1 shot Haikal after the colt was scratched with an infected left front foot. “This is a crazy game and anything can happen,” said Bret Calhoun, who trains By My Standards. “We just have to hold our breaths until we get there.” War of Will benefited slightly from Haikal’s scratch. He won’t have to start in the No. 1 post, which will be left vacant. The field will break from posts 2 through 20. A win by any of Baffert’s trio

Path to glory

Purse: $3 million First place: $1.86 million Stables

Main track 1-mile oval

Ba

c

c ret kst

2 3 4 5

h

Winner’s Circle Infield Finish

Turf Course

6 7

Clubhouse Spires

8

Grandstand

Trainer Bob Baffert would tie him with Ben Jones for the most Derby victories with six. He would become the first trainer to win the race in consecutive years twice. His last back-toback winners were in 1997 and 1998. Baffert won last year’s Derby — the rainiest on record — with Justify. Today’s forecast calls for a 90 percent chance of rain and a high of 66 degrees. It sure looks like anybody’s soggy race this time. “It’s whoever gets the trip,” Baffert said about the 1 ¼-mile journey. “Especially now that it’s going to rain, we don’t know what is going to happen. It’s too bad the weather is not going to work with us.” Game Winner finished second to Roadster in the Santa Anita Derby. Roadster’s only loss in four career starts was to Game Winner. Improbable went 3-0 last year, including a win on the Churchill Downs dirt, and finished second in this year’s Arkansas Derby. A victory by any of the four California-based horses would boost the struggling industry in the state, where a spate of 23 horse deaths over three months at Santa Anita triggered a raft of medication and safety rules changes that are affecting the rest of the sport. Every horse in the Derby, ex-

1

9 CHURCHILL DOWNS Race distance: 1¼ miles

10

Triple Crown winners

13

Year 1919 1930 1935 1937 1941 1943 1946

Horse Sir Barton 1948 Citation Gallant Fox 1973 Secretariat Omaha 1977 Seattle Slew War Admiral 1978 Affirmed Whirlaway 2015 American Count Fleet Pharoah Assault 2018 Justify (pictured)

14 15 16 17

Winning post positions 10

(Since 1930)

8

7

7 5 5

Before the introduction of the starting gate in 1930, horses were held back at the start by ropes, ribbon or wooden barriers.

9

8

4 2

5

4 2

3

2

4

1 1 1 0 POST 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 SOURCE: Churchill Downs Incorporated Tribune News Service/Associated Press graphics

cept Japan-bred Master Fencer, will run on Lasix, the anti-bleeding medication allowed on race day in the U.S. Churchill Downs and the other Triple Crown tracks announced recently the drug will be banned starting in 2021. Game Winner’s breeding suggests a sloppy track would appeal to him, although he’s never raced on one. Neither has Code of Honor, Roadster, Tax and Vekoma. Horses that are 1-for-1 on offtracks are: Master Fencer, Max-

18 19 20 21

Horse • Trainer/Jockey

Opening odds

War of Will 15-1 Mark Casse/Tyler Gaffalione Tax 20-1 Danny Gargan/Junior Alvarado By My Standards 15-1 Bret Calhoun/Gabriel Saez Gray Magician 50-1 Peter Miller/Drayden Van Dyke Improbable 5-1 Bob Baffert/Irad Ortiz Jr. Vekoma 15-1 George Weaver/Javier Castellano Maximum Security 8-1 Jason Servis/Luis Saez Tacitus 8-1 William Mott/Jose Ortiz Plus Que Parfait 30-1 Brendan Walsh/Ricardo Santana Jr. Cutting Humor 30-1 Todd Pletcher/Mike Smith Code of Honor 12-1 Shug McGaughey/John Velazquez Win Win Win 12-1 Michael Trombetta/Julian Pimentel Master Fencer 50-1 Koichi Tsunoda/Julien Leparoux Game Winner 9-2 Bob Baffert/Joel Rosario Roadster 5-1 Bob Baffert/Florent Geroux Long Range Toddy 30-1 Steven Asmussen/Jon Court Spinoff 30-1 Todd Pletcher/Manny Franco Country House 30-1 William Mott/Flavien Prat Bodexpress 30-1 Gustavo Delgado/Chris Landeros

SCRATCHES: Haikal, 11 (hoof injury); Omaha Beach, 12 (breathing problem) NOTE: Numbers listed are post positions, which may differ from program numbers. Odds as of Friday afternoon.

imum Security, Spinoff, Tacitus and War of Will. Those with one or two losses on such tracks are: Bodexpress, By My Standards, Country House, Cutting Humor, Gray Magician, Improbable, Long Range Toddy, Plus Que Parfait and Win Win Win. Baffert touted undefeated Florida Derby winner Maximum Security as the horse that should be the favorite. “He’s a horse that nobody is talking about and that’s a horse

that I’m worried about,” he said. “He’s run faster than we have.” Gary and Mary West have two shots to win their first Derby since they own both Game Winner and Maximum Security. The other trainers besides Baffert with multiple starters are Bill Mott and Todd Pletcher. Mott, the second winningest trainer all-time at Churchill Downs, saddles Tacitus and Country House in pursuit of his first Derby win in a Hall of Fame career.

Derby darlings: Five horses to watch in the 145th Kentucky Derby Game Winner is now the favorite to win the Kentucky Derby after Omaha Beach was scratched. He’s among a trio of horses trained by Hall of Famer Bob Baffert, who’s chasing a record-tying sixth Derby win and second in a row after Triple Crown winner Justify. Some horses that could make the race interesting:

Game Winner

Maximum Security

Roadster

Tacitus

Improbable

Post No. 16, 9-2 odds The Bob Baffert-trained colt, now the Derby favorite with Omaha Beach scratched, won last fall’s Breeders’ Cup Juvenile at Churchill Downs to cap a 4-0 campaign as the top 2-year-old with three Grade 1 wins. Game Winner hasn’t won since then but his consecutive seconds as a 3-year-old have been close. He has earned $1.846 million lifetime and gives Baffert one of three chances to win his sixth Derby and tie Ben Jones for the most all time. Joel Rosario will make his fifth consecutive start atop the horse.

Post No. 7, 8-1 odds He won the Florida Derby by an impressive 3 ½ lengths for his first graded stakes triumph while improving to 4-0 lifetime. One of two Derby entrants owned by Gary and Mary West — Game Winner is the other — has won his starts by a combined 37 ¾ lengths at Gulfstream Park. The bay colt quickly has moved to the front in all but his second race, which he closed strongly to win by 6 ½ lengths. He figures to set the pace with a post in the middle. Maximum Security, trained by Jason Servis and ridden by Luis Saez, has won $649,400.

Post No. 17, 5-1 odds The Baffert-trained gray colt established himself as a Derby favorite by beating Game Winner by a half-length to win the Santa Anita Derby for his third victory in four career starts. He has earned $706,200 lifetime and usually saves his best for the stretch run. Jockey Florent Geroux will mount Roadster for the first time in place of Hall of Famer and 2018 Triple Crown winner Mike Smith, who rode the first four starts but chose to ride Omaha Beach in the Derby. Smith now will ride Cutting Humor.

Post No. 8, 8-1 odds He enters the Derby atop the standings with 150 points following consecutive Grade 2 stakes wins in the Wood Memorial and Tampa Bay Derby. He can give Hall of Fame trainer Bill Mott his first Derby triumph along with three in the Belmont Stakes. He followed a fourth-place debut at Belmont as a 2-year-old with three wins in a row. He has earned $653,000 in his career. Tacitus is able to get through traffic to the front. Jockey Jose Ortiz will make his fifth trip atop the son of Tapit and Close Hatches by First Defence.

Post No. 5, 5-1 odds Baffert’s third colt has been second in both 2019 starts, finishing a length behind Omaha Beach in the Arkansas Derby and a neck behind Long Range Toddy in the Rebel Stakes. A five-length victory in the Grade 1 Los Alamitos Cash Call Futurity capped his 3-0 record as a 2-year-old. He has won $619,520 in his career. He has worked to be in the hunt early and will have a good post position to work with. Irad Ortiz Jr. has the mount. — Gary B. Graves, Associated Press


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 05.04.2019

145TH RUNNING OF THE KENTUCKY DERBY

Running in the rain ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Kentucky Derby entrant Code of Honor waits on the track before a workout Thursday at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky.

Baffert tries for record-tying sixth Derby win Associated Press

B

How to watch

POST POSITIONS AND ODDS PP

After the early favorite, Omaha Beach, withdrew, Game Winner is favored to win from the 16th post. The favorite has won the Derby in each of the past five years. The starting gate will be one short with 19 horses vying to wear the garland of red roses.

BETH HARRIS

ob Baffert times three. The two-time Triple Crown-winning trainer saddles the top three choices in a Kentucky Derby lacking a dominant favorite. Game Winner is the pre-race favorite, albeit a tepid one at 9-2, on what could be a wet day at Churchill Downs. Improbable and Roadster were installed as the co-second choices at 5-1. “Last year we came in here with Justify and we knew it was my race to lose,” Baffert said. The 19-horse field for the 145th Derby today reflects the prep season leading to the opening leg of the Triple Crown: no horse commanded the attention. “There are a lot of good horses in here,” Baffert said. “They’re a pretty evenly matched group.” The picture got scrambled again when initial favorite Omaha Beach was scratched because of Coverage a breathing starts today problem, dealat 1:30 p.m. ing a devason NBC. Post tating blow to time is 5:50. 68-year-old trainer Richard Mandella, whose Hall of Fame resume lacks only a Derby victory. That prompted the early odds to be redone. The race also lost 30-1 shot Haikal after the colt was scratched with an infected left front foot. “This is a crazy game and anything can happen,” said Bret Calhoun, who trains By My Standards. “We just have to hold our breaths until we get there.” War of Will benefited slightly from Haikal’s scratch. He won’t have to start in the No. 1 post, which will be left vacant. The field will break from posts 2 through 20. A win by any of Baffert’s trio

Path to glory

Purse: $3 million First place: $1.86 million Stables

Main track 1-mile oval

Ba

c

c ret kst

2 3 4 5

h

Winner’s Circle Infield Finish

Turf Course

6 7

Clubhouse Spires

8

Grandstand

Trainer Bob Baffert would tie him with Ben Jones for the most Derby victories with six. He would become the first trainer to win the race in consecutive years twice. His last back-toback winners were in 1997 and 1998. Baffert won last year’s Derby — the rainiest on record — with Justify. Today’s forecast calls for a 90 percent chance of rain and a high of 66 degrees. It sure looks like anybody’s soggy race this time. “It’s whoever gets the trip,” Baffert said about the 1 ¼-mile journey. “Especially now that it’s going to rain, we don’t know what is going to happen. It’s too bad the weather is not going to work with us.” Game Winner finished second to Roadster in the Santa Anita Derby. Roadster’s only loss in four career starts was to Game Winner. Improbable went 3-0 last year, including a win on the Churchill Downs dirt, and finished second in this year’s Arkansas Derby. A victory by any of the four California-based horses would boost the struggling industry in the state, where a spate of 23 horse deaths over three months at Santa Anita triggered a raft of medication and safety rules changes that are affecting the rest of the sport. Every horse in the Derby, ex-

1

9 CHURCHILL DOWNS Race distance: 1¼ miles

10

Triple Crown winners

13

Year 1919 1930 1935 1937 1941 1943 1946

Horse Sir Barton 1948 Citation Gallant Fox 1973 Secretariat Omaha 1977 Seattle Slew War Admiral 1978 Affirmed Whirlaway 2015 American Count Fleet Pharoah Assault 2018 Justify (pictured)

14 15 16 17

Winning post positions 10

(Since 1930)

8

7

7 5 5

Before the introduction of the starting gate in 1930, horses were held back at the start by ropes, ribbon or wooden barriers.

9

8

4 2

5

4 2

3

2

4

1 1 1 0 POST 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 SOURCE: Churchill Downs Incorporated Tribune News Service/Associated Press graphics

cept Japan-bred Master Fencer, will run on Lasix, the anti-bleeding medication allowed on race day in the U.S. Churchill Downs and the other Triple Crown tracks announced recently the drug will be banned starting in 2021. Game Winner’s breeding suggests a sloppy track would appeal to him, although he’s never raced on one. Neither has Code of Honor, Roadster, Tax and Vekoma. Horses that are 1-for-1 on offtracks are: Master Fencer, Max-

18 19 20 21

Horse • Trainer/Jockey

Opening odds

War of Will 15-1 Mark Casse/Tyler Gaffalione Tax 20-1 Danny Gargan/Junior Alvarado By My Standards 15-1 Bret Calhoun/Gabriel Saez Gray Magician 50-1 Peter Miller/Drayden Van Dyke Improbable 5-1 Bob Baffert/Irad Ortiz Jr. Vekoma 15-1 George Weaver/Javier Castellano Maximum Security 8-1 Jason Servis/Luis Saez Tacitus 8-1 William Mott/Jose Ortiz Plus Que Parfait 30-1 Brendan Walsh/Ricardo Santana Jr. Cutting Humor 30-1 Todd Pletcher/Mike Smith Code of Honor 12-1 Shug McGaughey/John Velazquez Win Win Win 12-1 Michael Trombetta/Julian Pimentel Master Fencer 50-1 Koichi Tsunoda/Julien Leparoux Game Winner 9-2 Bob Baffert/Joel Rosario Roadster 5-1 Bob Baffert/Florent Geroux Long Range Toddy 30-1 Steven Asmussen/Jon Court Spinoff 30-1 Todd Pletcher/Manny Franco Country House 30-1 William Mott/Flavien Prat Bodexpress 30-1 Gustavo Delgado/Chris Landeros

SCRATCHES: Haikal, 11 (hoof injury); Omaha Beach, 12 (breathing problem) NOTE: Numbers listed are post positions, which may differ from program numbers. Odds as of Friday afternoon.

imum Security, Spinoff, Tacitus and War of Will. Those with one or two losses on such tracks are: Bodexpress, By My Standards, Country House, Cutting Humor, Gray Magician, Improbable, Long Range Toddy, Plus Que Parfait and Win Win Win. Baffert touted undefeated Florida Derby winner Maximum Security as the horse that should be the favorite. “He’s a horse that nobody is talking about and that’s a horse

that I’m worried about,” he said. “He’s run faster than we have.” Gary and Mary West have two shots to win their first Derby since they own both Game Winner and Maximum Security. The other trainers besides Baffert with multiple starters are Bill Mott and Todd Pletcher. Mott, the second winningest trainer all-time at Churchill Downs, saddles Tacitus and Country House in pursuit of his first Derby win in a Hall of Fame career.

Derby darlings: Five horses to watch in the 145th Kentucky Derby Game Winner is now the favorite to win the Kentucky Derby after Omaha Beach was scratched. He’s among a trio of horses trained by Hall of Famer Bob Baffert, who’s chasing a record-tying sixth Derby win and second in a row after Triple Crown winner Justify. Some horses that could make the race interesting:

Game Winner

Maximum Security

Roadster

Tacitus

Improbable

Post No. 16, 9-2 odds The Bob Baffert-trained colt, now the Derby favorite with Omaha Beach scratched, won last fall’s Breeders’ Cup Juvenile at Churchill Downs to cap a 4-0 campaign as the top 2-year-old with three Grade 1 wins. Game Winner hasn’t won since then but his consecutive seconds as a 3-year-old have been close. He has earned $1.846 million lifetime and gives Baffert one of three chances to win his sixth Derby and tie Ben Jones for the most all time. Joel Rosario will make his fifth consecutive start atop the horse.

Post No. 7, 8-1 odds He won the Florida Derby by an impressive 3 ½ lengths for his first graded stakes triumph while improving to 4-0 lifetime. One of two Derby entrants owned by Gary and Mary West — Game Winner is the other — has won his starts by a combined 37 ¾ lengths at Gulfstream Park. The bay colt quickly has moved to the front in all but his second race, which he closed strongly to win by 6 ½ lengths. He figures to set the pace with a post in the middle. Maximum Security, trained by Jason Servis and ridden by Luis Saez, has won $649,400.

Post No. 17, 5-1 odds The Baffert-trained gray colt established himself as a Derby favorite by beating Game Winner by a half-length to win the Santa Anita Derby for his third victory in four career starts. He has earned $706,200 lifetime and usually saves his best for the stretch run. Jockey Florent Geroux will mount Roadster for the first time in place of Hall of Famer and 2018 Triple Crown winner Mike Smith, who rode the first four starts but chose to ride Omaha Beach in the Derby. Smith now will ride Cutting Humor.

Post No. 8, 8-1 odds He enters the Derby atop the standings with 150 points following consecutive Grade 2 stakes wins in the Wood Memorial and Tampa Bay Derby. He can give Hall of Fame trainer Bill Mott his first Derby triumph along with three in the Belmont Stakes. He followed a fourth-place debut at Belmont as a 2-year-old with three wins in a row. He has earned $653,000 in his career. Tacitus is able to get through traffic to the front. Jockey Jose Ortiz will make his fifth trip atop the son of Tapit and Close Hatches by First Defence.

Post No. 5, 5-1 odds Baffert’s third colt has been second in both 2019 starts, finishing a length behind Omaha Beach in the Arkansas Derby and a neck behind Long Range Toddy in the Rebel Stakes. A five-length victory in the Grade 1 Los Alamitos Cash Call Futurity capped his 3-0 record as a 2-year-old. He has won $619,520 in his career. He has worked to be in the hunt early and will have a good post position to work with. Irad Ortiz Jr. has the mount. — Gary B. Graves, Associated Press


SPORTS

05.04.2019 • SATURDAY • M 1

NBA PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B9

NBA PLAYOFFS

AROUND THE NBA

Monty Williams hired to lead Suns

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

MILWAUKEE 2, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston, 112-90 Game 2: Milwaukee, 123-102 Friday: Milwaukee, 123-116 Monday: at Boston, 6 p.m. Wednesday: at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. x-May 10: at Boston, TBD x-May 13: at Milwaukee, TBD

PHILADELPHIA 2, TORONTO 1 Game 1: Toronto, 108-95 Game 2: Philadelphia, 94-89 Game 3: Philadelphia, 116-95 Sunday: at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday: at Toronto, 7 p.m. x-Thursday: at Philadelphia, TBD x-May 12: at Toronto, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

GOLDEN STATE 2, HOUSTON 0 Game 1: Golden State, 104-100 Game 2: Golden State 115-109 Today: at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Monday: at Houston, 8:30 p.m. x-Wed.: at Golden St, 9:30 p.m. x-May 10: at Houston, TBD x-May 12: at Golden State, TBD

DENVER 1, PORTLAND 1 Game 1: Denver, 121-113 Game 2: Portland, 97-90 Friday: at Portland, (n) Sunday: at Portland, 6 p.m. Tuesday: at Denver, 9:30 p.m. x-Thursday: at Portland, TBD x-May 12: at Denver, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

9

Jayson Tatum had just 9 total points in Boston’s first two games against Milwaukee. The second-year forward averaged 19.2 points per game during the Celtics’ first-round sweep of the Pacers, shooting 50 percent from the floor. He scored 20 in a Game 3 loss Friday.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES .............. -$125.................... Twins INDIANS ............... -$190...............Mariners TIGERS ................. -$135...................Royals Rays ..................... -$165............... ORIOLES Astros .................. -$132.................ANGELS Red Sox ................ -$155............WHITE SOX RANGERS ............. -$135.............. Blue Jays National League CUBS .................... -$122.................... Cards Braves.................. -$152...............MARLINS PHILLIES .............. -$115.............. Nationals BREWERS ............. -$108......................Mets REDS .................... -$130................... Giants ROCKIES............... -$128..................Dbacks Dodgers ............... -$125.................PADRES Interleague Athletics .............. -$110................PIRATES NBA Points Underdog Western Conference ROCKETS .................3.5 ................. Warriors Eastern Conference Sunday Raptors ...................1.5 .....................76ERS Favorite

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BRUINS .......... -$140/+$120 .. Blue Jackets SHARKS ......... -$130/+$110 ......Avalanche SOCCER English Premier League Liverpool .............................................-$300 NEWCASTLE UNITED ........................... +$850 UEFA Champions League Tuesday LIVERPOOL ..........................................-$110 Barcelona ........................................... +$230 Wednesday AJAX ................................................... +$115 Tottenham .......................................... +$210 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

PRO BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs Friday

Bucks 123, Celtics 116 Milwaukee: Mirotic 5-9 0-0 13, Antetokounmpo 8-13 16-22 32, Lopez 3-6 0-0 7, Bledsoe 4-15 0-4 9, Middleton 6-12 5-6 20, Ilyasova 1-2 2-2 5, Frazier 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 9-12 1-2 21, Snell 1-3 0-0 2, Connaughton 5-11 0-0 14. Totals 42-83 24-36 123. Boston: Tatum 7-14 6-6 20, Morris 6-8 0-0 16, Horford 4-8 6-6 17, Irving 8-22 11-12 29, J.Brown 6-12 3-4 18, Hayward 2-8 4-4 10, Ojeleye 2-4 0-0 6, Theis 0-1 0-0 0, Baynes 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 35-81 30-32 116. Milwaukee 25 30 40 28: 123 Boston 30 26 31 29: 116 3-point goals: Milwaukee 15-37 (Connaughton 4-9, Middleton 3-6, Mirotic 3-7, Hill 2-3, Ilyasova 1-1, Lopez 1-4, Bledsoe 1-6, Antetokounmpo 0-1), Boston 16-40 (Morris 4-5, Horford 3-5, J.Brown 3-7, Ojeleye 2-3, Hayward 2-4, Irving 2-8, Baynes 0-1, Rozier 0-2, Tatum 0-5). Fouled out: J.Brown. Rebounds: Milwaukee 44 (Antetokounmpo 13), Boston 44 (Tatum 11). Assists: Milwaukee 23 (Antetokounmpo 8), Boston 24 (Irving 6). Total fouls: Milwaukee 26, Boston 27. Technicals: Tatum. A: 18,624 (18,624).

PRO HOCKEY NHL Playoffs Friday

Hurricanes 5, Islanders 2 NY Islanders 1 0 1 — 2 Carolina 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Barzal 2 (Eberle, Toews), 2:30 (pp). 2, Carolina, Aho 4 (Teravainen, Faulk), 4:44 (pp). Penalties: Svechnikov, CAR, (high sticking), 1:13; Komarov, NYI, (roughing), 4:02; Martinook, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:33; Mayfield, NYI, (tripping), 6:33. Second period: 3, Carolina, Teravainen 6 (Aho, Foegele), 2:11. 4, Carolina, McKegg 1 (Pesce, Martinook), 3:17. 5, Carolina, Williams 3 (Niederreiter, Staal), 8:51. Penalties: McGinn, CAR, (high sticking), 5:38; Mayfield, NYI, (interference), 9:54; Niederreiter, CAR, (slashing), 14:47; Cizikas, NYI, (hooking), 17:40. Third period: 6, Carolina, Svechnikov 3 (Faulk), 15:13. 7, NY Islanders, Nelson 4 (Toews, Mayfield), 18:51. Penalties: Komarov, NYI, (high sticking), 5:02. Shots: NY 10-6-12: 28. Carolina 6-11-4: 21. Power-plays: NY 1 of 3; Carolina 1 of 4. Goalies: NY, Greiss 0-0 (10 shots-8 saves), Lehner 4-4 (11-8). Carolina, McElhinney 3-0 (28-26). A: 19,495. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Jonny Murray.

Celtics guard Jayson Tatum, right, and Aron Baynes defend against Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo Friday in Boston.

Bucks overpower Celtics Hill, Connaughton score 35 points off bench to assist Antetokounmpo ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Giannis Antetokounmpo had 32 points and 13 rebounds, George Hill finished with 21 points and the Milwaukee Bucks beat the Boston Celtics 123116 on Friday night to take a 2-1 lead in the Eastern Conference semifinal series. Khris Middleton added 20 points. Antetokounmpo had only 13 field goal attempts but had 16 points from the free throw line. Including Milwaukee’s two regular-season games in Boston, he has scored 30 or more points in each of his trips to TD Garden in 2018-19. Kyrie Irving scored 29 points for the Celtics. Milwaukee had a 42-16 advantage in bench scoring, which included Hill’s 21 and Pat Connaughton’s 14. Boston led by a point at the half but was outscored 40-31 in the third quarter and trailed by as many as 17

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Placed RHP Corey Kluber on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 2. Recalled RHP Jon Edwards from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS — Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the paternity list. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Recalled OF Skye Bolt from Las Vegas (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Selected RHP Derek Law from Buffalo (IL). Designated UTL UTIL Alen Hanson for assignment. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Recalled OF Tim Locastro from Reno (PCL). Optioned C Caleb Joseph to Reno. Sent RHP Matt Koch outright to Reno. ATLANTA BRAVES — Recalled RHP Touki Toussaint from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS — Reinstated RHP Oscar De La Cruz from restricted list and assigned him to Tennessee (SL). Transferred RHP Tony Barnette to the 60-day DL. CINCINNATI REDS — Selected the contract of OF Nick Senzel from Louisville. Optioned RHP Matt Bowman to Louisville. Transferred 2B Scooter Gennett to the 60-day IL. COLORADO ROCKIES — Reinstated C Chris Iannetta from the 10-day IL. Designated C Drew Butera for assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Reinstated RHP Austin Brice from the 10-day IL. Optioned LHP Jarlin García to New Orleans (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Selected the contract of INF Adeiny Hechavarría from Syracuse (IL). Optioned INF Dominic Smith to Syracuse. Transferred RHP Drew Smith to the 60-Day IL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated INF-OF José Osuna from the 10-day IL and optioned him to Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Luis Perdomo to El Paso (PCL). Transferred RHP Brett Kennedy to the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of OF Alex Dickerson from El Paso. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Recalled RHP Tyler Beede from Sacramento (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Mike Gerber from Sacramento. Placed C Erik Kratz on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 1. Designated OF Gerardo Parra for assignment. Midwest League QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS — Announced RHP Matt Ruppenthal was transferred from extended spring training to the team. Placed OF Marty Costes on the 7-day IL. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Released RHP Matt Kostalos. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Philadelphia G Ben Simmons $20,000 and assessed him a Flagrant Foul 1 for making contact to the groin of Toronto G Kyle Lowry during a May 2 game. CHICAGO BULLS — Signed coach Jim Boylen to a contract extension. PHOENIX SUNS — Named Monty Williams coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed TE Maxx Williams to a one-year contract. ATLANTA FALCONS — Agreed to terms with RB Qadree Ollison, RB Marcus Green, DE John Cominsky and CB Jordan Miller. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed WR Dorian Baker, QB David Blough, TE Stephen Carlson, OT Brian Fineanganofo, P Jamie Gillan, RB Darrin Hall, S J.T. Hassell, WR D.J. Montgomery, DE Jarrell Owens, CB Jermaine Ponder, DE Wyatt Ray, LB Anthony Stubbs, C Trevon Tate, C Willie Wright and LB Dedrick Young II. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed DE Rashan Gary, S Darnell Savage, DT Kingsley Keke, CB Ka’dar Holloman, RB Dexter Williams, LB Ty Summers, LB Curtis Bolton, WR Matthew Eaton, CB Kabion Ento, CB Javien Hamilton, TE Davis Koppenhaver, OT Yosh Nijman, LB Randy Ramsey, LB Greg Roberts, CB Nydair Rouse, QB Manny Wilkins and G Larry Williams. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed LB Ben Banogu, OL Jackson Barton, OL Javon Patterson, DE Gerri Green, LB E.J. Speed, WR Ashton Dulin, WR Penny Hart, K Clayton Hatfield, TE Hale Hentges, DE Jegs Jegede, CB Jamal Peters, CB Chris Rayford, DT Johnny Robinson and DT Jordan Thompson. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed DT Armon Watts. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed CB Julian Love, OT George Asafo-Adjei, DT Chris Slayton, QB Eric Dungey, OT Paul Adams, DB Jake Carlock, DB Mark McLaurin, DB Jacob Thieneman, TE C.J. Conrad, DE Jeremiah Harris, DE Nate Harvey, RB Jon Hilliman, C James O’Hagan, LB Josiah Tauaefa, WR Alex Wesley, WR Reggie White. Waived WR Jawill Davis and OT Jylan Ware. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Placed RB Isaiah Crowell on the injured reserve list. Signed LB Te’von Coney, G Lester Cotton Sr., WR Keelan Doss, LB Koa Farmer, FB Alec Ingold, OT Andre James, CB Dylan Mabin, G Lukayus McNeil, CB Keisean Nixon and OT Tyler Roemer. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Signed LB Zach Brown to a one-year contract. Claimed safety Blake Countess off waivers from the Los Angeles Rams.

points in the final period. The Celtics were outscored 52-24 in the paint and had 18 turnovers leading to 28 Milwaukee points. The Bucks threw the Celtics a tactical curveball in Game 2, inserting Nikola Mirotic into the starting lineup in place of Sterling Brown. In Game 3, it was Celtics coach Brad Stevens who brought new wrinkles, notably going with a small lineup that featured 6-foot-7 Semi Ojeleye guarding the 6-11 Antetokounmpo when he returned to the game at the start of the second quarter and again in the third quarter. Boston also kept attacking Antetokounmpo throughout the game when it had the ball. It included a one-handed dunk by Jaylen Brown over the Bucks’ star early in the third quarter that brought the Celtics fans inside TD Garden to their feet. It was reminiscent of a two-handed dunk he had over Antetokounmpo in Boston’s Game 1 win. Friday’s version included several nice defensive plays by Jaylen Brown, including blocking a Tony Snell layup attempt off the backboard.

HOCKEY National Hockey League TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Re-signed D Jan Rutta to a one-year, one-way contract. American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Cleveland D Doyle Somerby one game for an illegal check to the head of an opponent in a May 1 game at Toronto. ECHL ECHL — Fined Toledo’s Kevin Tansey an undisclosed amount for his actions in a May 1 game against Cincinnati. READING ROYALS — Named Chris Powell director of corporate sales and sponsorships. COLLEGE BUFFALO — Named Hunter Jenkins men’s assistant basketball coach. DUKE — Extended football coach David Cutcliffe’s contract through the 2022 season. PURDUE — Announced men’s graduate basketball G Jahaad Proctor has transferred from High Point.

AREA COLLEGES Softball UMSL 3, Lewis 0 UMSL 4, Illinois Springfield 2 Baseball St. Louis U. 18, Rhode Island 6

GOLF PGA Wells Fargo Championship Friday. At Quail Hollow, Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $7.9M | Yardage: 7,554; Par 71 Second Round Jason Dufner 68-63 — 131 -11 Joel Dahmen 66-66 — 132 -10 Max Homa 69-63 — 132 -10 Rory McIlroy 66-70 — 136 -6 Patrick Reed 67-69 — 136 -6 Justin Rose 70-67 — 137 -5 Seamus Power 69-68 — 137 -5 Jason Day 68-69 — 137 -5 Pat Perez 69-68 — 137 -5 Brendon Todd 68-70 — 138 -4 Sebastian Munoz 68-70 — 138 -4 Martin Laird 67-71 — 138 -4 Kyle Stanley 69-69 — 138 -4 Sungjae Im 70-69 — 139 -3 Fabian Gomez 70-69 — 139 -3 Aaron Wise 69-70 — 139 -3 Jhonattan Vegas 72-67 — 139 -3 Lucas Glover 70-69 — 139 -3 Vaughn Taylor 68-71 — 139 -3 Richy Werenski 70-69 — 139 -3 Tom Hoge 70-70 — 140 -2 Kevin Streelman 71-69 — 140 -2 Jim Knous 68-72 — 140 -2 Jason Kokrak 70-70 — 140 -2 69-71 — 140 -2 Paul Casey Matt Jones 70-70 — 140 -2 Doc Redman 70-70 — 140 -2 Alex Prugh 73-68 — 141 -1 Adam Long 70-71 — 141 -1 Rickie Fowler 71-70 — 141 -1 Tony Finau 72-69 — 141 -1 Chez Reavie 70-71 — 141 -1 Henrik Stenson 74-67 — 141 -1 Jimmy Walker 71-70 — 141 -1 Bill Haas 69-72 — 141 -1 Beau Hossler 69-72 — 141 -1 Shawn Stefani 76-65 — 141 -1 Dylan Frittelli 67-74 — 141 -1 Wes Roach 70-71 — 141 -1 Adam Schenk 67-74 — 141 -1 Brice Garnett 70-71 — 141 -1 Trey Mullinax 72-69 — 141 -1 John Senden 68-73 — 141 -1 Colt Knost 73-68 — 141 -1 Nate Lashley 71-70 — 141 -1 Kramer Hickok 72-69 — 141 -1 Byeong Hun An 72-70 — 142 E Kyoung-Hoon Lee 72-70 — 142 E Webb Simpson 69-73 — 142 E Daniel Berger 73-69 — 142 E Sergio Garcia 69-73 — 142 E Adam Hadwin 73-69 — 142 E Nick Watney 70-72 — 142 E Harris English 71-71 — 142 E Roberto Diaz 70-72 — 142 E Rory Sabbatini 76-66 — 142 E J.J. Henry 70-72 — 142 E Brendan Steele 72-70 — 142 E Keith Mitchell 68-74 — 142 E Brandon Harkins 73-69 — 142 E Nick Taylor 67-75 — 142 E Luke List 75-68 — 143 +1 Matthew Short 76-67 — 143 +1 Ryan Blaum 71-72 — 143 +1 Ollie Schniederjans 74-69 — 143 +1 Hideki Matsuyama 73-70 — 143 +1 Gary Woodland 73-70 — 143 +1 Brian Harman 68-75 — 143 +1 Cody Gribble 71-72 — 143 +1 Bud Cauley 73-70 — 143 +1 Joaquin Niemann 73-70 — 143 +1 Hank Lebioda 71-72 — 143 +1 Chase Wright 71-72 — 143 +1 Julian Etulain 73-70 — 143 +1 Zack Sucher 72-71 — 143 +1 Failed to make the cut Martin Trainer 73-71 — 144 +2 John Chin 75-69 — 144 +2 Adam Svensson 73-71 — 144 +2 Brandon Hagy 72-72 — 144 +2 Sangmoon Bae 71-73 — 144 +2

Denny McCarthy Zach Johnson Keegan Bradley Ben Crane Carlos Ortiz Ernie Els Jim Herman Rod Pampling Ryan Armour Roberto Castro Kelly Kraft Anders Albertson Roger Sloan Cameron Champ Tyler Duncan Peter Malnati Dominic Bozzelli Ben Silverman Joey Garber Ted Potter, Jr. Charles Howell III Peter Uihlein Robert Streb Cameron Davis Brady Schnell Russell Henley Sung Kang Chad Collins Sepp Straka Chesson Hadley J.T. Poston David Hearn Michael Thompson Scott Brown Hudson Swafford Phil Mickelson Harold Varner III Jonas Blixt Sam Saunders Tom Lovelady Chris Thompson Broc Everett Scott Stallings Johnson Wagner Cameron Tringale Whee Kim Alvaro Ortiz Chris Stroud Danny Willett Kyle Jones Billy Hurley III Wyndham Clark Nathan Stamey Jose de Jesus Rodriguez Josh Teater Nicholas Lindheim Anirban Lahiri Mackenzie Hughes Padraig Harrington Derek Fathauer Chip McDaniel Matt Every Danny Lee Scott Langley Martin Piller Seth Reeves Steve Scott Curtis Luck Mathew Goggin Tyrone Van Aswegen Will MacKenzie Freddie Jacobson Stephan Jaeger Jonathan Byrd

Still, Milwaukee managed to keep racking up points in the paint. The Bucks led by as many as 12 in the third quarter and took a 95-87 lead into the fourth. That was the score when Brown was called for his fifth foul with 10:53 left on what appeared to be a light touch of Eric Bledsoe near the baseline. It brought animated protests from both Brown and Stevens. A few trips later, Tatum received a technical for protesting his foul of Antetokounmpo. The Bucks started to rack up points at the line, and their lead grew to 11497 by the time Brown came back into the game with 4:53 remaining. The Celtics players wore black warmup T-shirts adorned with a green No. 17 to honor Hall of Famer John Havlicek, who died last week at age 79 after a short battle with Parkinson’s disease. The team also observed a moment of silence for him prior to tipoff. After the game’s first timeout, a highlight video was shown on the jumbotron. It ended with a spotlight being shined on his retired No. 17 banner hanging in the rafters.

72-72 70-74 70-74 72-73 72-73 74-71 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 73-72 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 74-71 71-74 71-74 71-74 74-72 73-73 73-73 76-70 75-71 74-72 71-75 70-76 76-70 74-72 71-76 74-73 74-73 72-75 72-75 73-74 71-76 77-70 70-77 75-72 75-72 74-73 78-69 76-72 79-69 71-77 73-75 77-71 73-75 75-73 76-72 79-70 74-75 77-72 75-74 77-72 75-74 79-71 75-75 75-75 78-72 75-75 75-76 75-77 78-74 79-73 76-76 75-77 71-81 76-77 79-75 75-79 77-77 76-78 78-79

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144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 151 152 152 152 152 152 152 153 154 154 154 154 157

+2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +11 +12 +12 +12 +12 +15

LPGA Mediheal Championship

Friday, Daly City, Calif. Purse: $1.8M | : 6,551; Par 72 Second Round So Yeon Ryu 67-70 — 137 Ryann O’Toole 73-65 — 138 Sei Young Kim 72-66 — 138 He Yong Choi 74-65 — 139 Na Yeon Choi 72-67 — 139 Inbee Park 70-69 — 139 Charley Hull 69-70 — 139 Eun-Hee Ji 67-72 — 139 Shanshan Feng 73-67 — 140 Chella Choi 72-68 — 140 Louise Ridderstrom 71-69 — 140 Maria Torres 69-71 — 140 In Gee Chun 69-71 — 140 Peiyun Chien 68-72 — 140 Megan Khang 75-66 — 141 Bronte Law 73-68 — 141 Yu Liu 76-66 — 142 Dottie Ardina 72-70 — 142 Azahara Munoz 69-73 — 142 Amy Yang 68-74 — 142 Laetitia Beck 74-69 — 143 Jeongeun Lee6 74-69 — 143 Lexi Thompson 73-70 — 143 Jaclyn Lee 72-71 — 143 Klara Spilkova 72-71 — 143 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 72-71 — 143 In-Kyung Kim 72-71 — 143 Angela Stanford 71-72 — 143 Amy Olson 70-73 — 143 Sarah Schmelzel 70-73 — 143

-7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

European PGA China Open

Friday, Shenzhen, China Purse: $2.97M | Yardage: 7,145; Par: 72 Second Round Ashun Wu, China 66-65 — 131 Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland 65-68 — 133 Jorge Campillo, Spain 65-69 — 134 Benjamin Hebert, France 67-68 — 135 Min Woo Lee, Australia 69-67 — 136 Jason Scrivener, Australia 70-66 — 136 Sean Crocker, USA 68-68 — 136

PHOENIX — The Suns are looking for stability after Igor Kokoskov was fired last week after one disappointing season. They hope Monty Williams is the man to lead their turnaround. Phoenix announced Friday that it had come to terms with Williams. He will take over as Phoenix’s fifth coach in five seasons when the 76ers’ playoff run ends. They lead Toronto 2-1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals. The 47-year-old Williams spent five seasons in charge in New Orleans from 2010 to 2015, a stint during which he led the franchise to two postseason appearances. He is in his first season as an assistant with the 76ers. Williams takes over a Suns team that has been mired in mediocrity, missing the playoffs for nine straight seasons. Phoenix finished 19-63 this season, second-worst in franchise history.

Lue favorite for Lakers position LOS ANGELES — Per multiple reports, the Lakers are expected to soon move toward hiring Tyronn Lue as their next coach. ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that no offer has been made yet to Lue by the Lakers, but they are proceeding toward an offer to Lue in the coming days. Brad Turner of the Los Angeles Times reports that Lue is in Las Vegas waiting to hear from the Lakers about the job. BRIEFLY 76ers: Ben Simmons has been fined $20,000 and assessed a Flagrant Foul 1 for elbowing Toronto guard Kyle Lowry in the groin in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinal series. The NBA announced the penalties Friday, a day after the game in Philadelphia.

Erik Van Rooyen, South Africa 68-68 — 136 Victor Dubuisson, France 68-68 — 136 Romain Langasque, France 67-69 — 136 Nacho Elvira, Spain 68-69 — 137 David Lipsky, USA 65-72 — 137 Jordan Smith, England 67-70 — 137 Mikko Korhohen, Finland 68-69 — 137 Scott Jamieson, Scotland 68-69 — 137 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-69 — 137 Jacques Kruyswijk, South Africa 70-67 — 137 Others Micah Lauren Shin, USA 69-70 — 139 Berry Henson, USA 70-70 — 140 Julian Suri, USA 69-72 — 141 Paul Peterson, USA 69-72 — 141 John Catlin, USA 66-76 — 142

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Gander RV 400 Lineup Friday’s qualifying; Race Sunday At Dover (Del.) International Speedway Lap Length: 1 mile (Car number in parentheses) 1. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 165.960 mph. 2. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 165.555. 3. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 165.464. 4. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 164.722. 5. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 164.707. 6. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 164.331. 7. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 164.249. 8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 164.151. 9. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 164.114. 10. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 164.017. 11. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 163.577. 12. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 163.347. 13. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 163.228. 14. (41) Daniel Suarez, Ford, 163.095. 15. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 162.999. 16. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 162.970. 17. (95) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 162.837. 18. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 162.631. 19. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 162.602. 20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 162.514. 21. (6) Ryan Newman, Ford, 162.338. 22. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 161.921. 23. (8) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 161.674. 24. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 161.312. 25. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 161.254. 26. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 161.247. 27. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 160.578. 28. (32) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 159.490. 29. (47) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 158.604. 30. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 157.694. 31. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 156.876. 32. (36) Matt Tifft, Ford, 155.629. 33. (51) Cody Ware, Ford, 154.050. 34. (52) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 153.951. 35. (77) Quin Houff, Chevrolet, 153.420. 36. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 0.000. 37. (27) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 0.000.

NASCAR Truck Series JEGS 200 Friday, Dover (Del.) International Speedway (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (2) Johnny Sauter, Ford, 200. 2. (1) Brett Moffitt, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (9) Harrison Burton, Toyota, 200. 4. (6) Grant Enfinger, Ford, 200. 5. (5) Matt Crafton, Ford, 200. 6. (11) Ben Rhodes, Ford, 200. 7. (12) Austin Hill, Toyota, 200. 8. (15) Derek Kraus, Toyota, 200. 9. (10) Tyler Ankrum, Toyota, 200. 10. (16) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (7) Raphael Lessard, Toyota, 200. 12. (4) Stewart Friesen, Chevrolet, 200. 13. (19) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 200. 14. (18) Gus Dean, Chevrolet, 200. 15. (14) Todd Gilliland, Toyota, 200. 16. (32) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 198. 17. (20) Natalie Decker, Toyota, 197. 18. (23) Tyler Dippel, Chevrolet, 197. 19. (17) Austin Wayne Self, Chevrolet, 197. 20. (25) Tyler Hill, Chevrolet, 197. 21. (22) Jordan Anderson, Chevrolet, 196. 22. (27) Spencer Boyd, Chevrolet, 192. 23. (8) Brennan Poole, Toyota, DVP, 189. 24. (30) Ray Ciccarelli, Chevrolet, 188. 25. (28) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, 186. 26. (21) Joe Nemechek, Chev, Suspension, 167. 27. (3) Sheldon Creed, Chev, Accident, 160. 28. (24) Reid Wilson, Chev, Alternator, 140. 29. (13) Jesse Little, Ford, Track Bar, 115. 30. (26) Korbin Forrister, Toyota, Accident, 108. 31. (29) Josh Reaume, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 51. 32. (31) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 28. Average Speed of Race Winner: 107.431 mph. Time of Race: 1 Hrs, 51 Mins, 42 Secs. Margin of Victory: 0.603 Seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 35 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: B. Moffitt 1-48, G. Enfinger 49, B. Moffitt 50-81, J. Sauter 82-93, G. Enfinger 94, S. Creed 95-116, B. Moffitt 117, H. Burton 118, S. Creed 119-155, G. Enfinger 156, B. Rhodes 157-169, J. Sauter 170-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): Brett Moffitt 3 times for 81 laps; Sheldon Creed 2 times for 59 laps; Johnny Sauter 2 times for 43 laps; Ben Rhodes 1 time for 13 laps; Grant Enfinger 3 times for 3 laps; Harrison Burton 1 time for 1 lap.

—Wire reports

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park entries SATURDAY, KENTUCKY DERBY DAY Post: 1 p.m. FIRST: 5 ½F, IL. BRED $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Crafty Attack Thurman 7-2 2 Close Behind Diego 9-2 3 My Pest Pal Lopez 2-1 4 Silent Be Dale Arrieta 12-1 5 I Will Be Molina 15-1 6 Unspoken Valor Bailon 9-5 SECOND: 5 ½F, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Cheadle Thurman 5-1 2 Sweet Circle Molina 4-1 3 The Narrowing Way Retana 5-2 4 Summer Passport Simpson 2-1 5 Sunny Kitten Lopez 7-2 6 Flamingo Beach Diego 30-1 THIRD: 5F, $12,500 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Sunny’s Storm Diego 15-1 2 Mutakddim Road Simpson 8-1 3 Durango Kid Bailon 4-1 4 Christmas Cookie Lopez 9-5 5 Hellofaguy Arrieta 5-1 6 Cat’s Runaway Molina 7-2 7 Tiz too Much Retana 8-1 FOURTH: 5F, F&M $5,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Kalispell Diego 3-1 2 Viola Marie Molina 2-1 3 Acrobatic Ally Arrieta 5-1 4 Waddle Lopez 8-1 5 Ghaaleb’s Appeal Bailon 9-5 FIFTH: 5 ½F, F&M MSW 3&UP PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Southern Attack Thurman 20-1 2 W W Put and Take Bailon 8-5 3 Helen Mae’s Song Diego 20-1 4 Enchilada Simpson 15-1 5 Little Molitta Arrieta 8-1 6 Swifty Cause U. Lopez 6-1 7 Tiz Hoppin Molina 9-5 8 Song of the Forest Retana 15-1 9 Barbiello W. Lopez 20-1 SIXTH: 1 MILE, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Shobiz Star Arrieta 5-2 2 Rous Thurman 6-1 3 Tabaddol Retana 6-1 4 Jaguar Ridge Diego 4-1 5 Mr. Ticker Talker Molina 9-5 6 Lil R’slast Bailon 8-1 SEVENTH: 6F, $15,000 ALOWANCE PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Trappe Valley Arrieta 12-1 2 Halo Hunter Molina 4-1 3 Purging the Stone Lopez 5-2 4 W W Cookie Monster Retana 3-1 5 Shanghai Point Diego 10-1 6 Dandy Gal(m) Bailon 2-1 EIGHTH: 5 ½F, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Retractable Arrieta 12-1 2 Smart Alex’s Posse Lopez 7-2 3 Gonzo Diego 9-2 4 Georgie My Boy Tavares 4-1 5 Seba’s Dancer Simpson 8-1 6 Electric Cat Bailon 8-1 7 Too Dim Molina 3-1 8 Boyfriend Brian(IRE) Thurman 8-1

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 5 3 2 17 15 D.C. United 5 3 2 17 13 Montreal 5 3 2 17 12 Toronto FC 4 2 1 13 19 Columbus 4 5 1 13 8 Orlando City 3 3 3 12 13 New York City FC 2 1 6 12 11 Chicago 2 4 3 9 12 New York 2 4 2 8 9 Atlanta 2 3 2 8 6 Cincinnati 2 6 2 8 8 New England 2 6 2 8 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF Los Angeles FC 7 1 2 23 26 LA Galaxy 7 1 1 22 15 Seattle 5 1 3 18 18 FC Dallas 5 2 2 17 14 Houston 5 1 1 16 15 Minnesota United 4 3 2 14 18 Real Salt Lake 3 5 1 10 11 Sporting Kansas City 2 2 4 10 19 San Jose 2 5 2 8 12 Portland 2 5 1 7 11 Vancouver 1 5 3 6 7 Colorado 0 7 2 2 12 Friday Vancouver at Colorado, (n) Saturday LA Galaxy at New York, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 3 p.m. New York City FC at Montreal, 4 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at San Jose, 9 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at Sporting Kansas City, 8 p.m.

GA 10 10 14 13 11 14 12 13 9 8 16 19 GA 8 8 12 9 8 15 16 15 19 19 12 24


SPORTS

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

NBA PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

NBA PLAYOFFS

AROUND THE NBA

Monty Williams hired to lead Suns

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

MILWAUKEE 2, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston, 112-90 Game 2: Milwaukee, 123-102 Friday: Milwaukee, 123-116 Monday: at Boston, 6 p.m. Wednesday: at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. x-May 10: at Boston, TBD x-May 13: at Milwaukee, TBD

PHILADELPHIA 2, TORONTO 1 Game 1: Toronto, 108-95 Game 2: Philadelphia, 94-89 Game 3: Philadelphia, 116-95 Sunday: at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday: at Toronto, 7 p.m. x-Thursday: at Philadelphia, TBD x-May 12: at Toronto, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

GOLDEN STATE 2, HOUSTON 0 Game 1: Golden State, 104-100 Game 2: Golden State 115-109 Today: at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Monday: at Houston, 8:30 p.m. x-Wed.: at Golden St, 9:30 p.m. x-May 10: at Houston, TBD x-May 12: at Golden State, TBD

DENVER 1, PORTLAND 1 Game 1: Denver, 121-113 Game 2: Portland, 97-90 Friday: at Portland, (n) Sunday: at Portland, 6 p.m. Tuesday: at Denver, 9:30 p.m. x-Thursday: at Portland, TBD x-May 12: at Denver, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

9

Jayson Tatum had just 9 total points in Boston’s first two games against Milwaukee. The second-year forward averaged 19.2 points per game during the Celtics’ first-round sweep of the Pacers, shooting 50 percent from the floor. He scored 20 in a Game 3 loss Friday.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES.............. -$125.................... Twins INDIANS............... -$190...............Mariners TIGERS ................. -$135...................Royals Rays..................... -$165............... ORIOLES Astros .................. -$132.................ANGELS Red Sox................ -$155............WHITE SOX RANGERS ............. -$135.............. Blue Jays National League CUBS.................... -$122.................... Cards Braves.................. -$152...............MARLINS PHILLIES .............. -$115.............. Nationals BREWERS............. -$108......................Mets REDS.................... -$130................... Giants ROCKIES............... -$128..................Dbacks Dodgers ............... -$125.................PADRES Interleague Athletics .............. -$110................PIRATES NBA Points Underdog Western Conference ROCKETS.................3.5................. Warriors Eastern Conference Sunday Raptors...................1.5.....................76ERS

Favorite

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BRUINS .......... -$140/+$120 .. Blue Jackets SHARKS ......... -$130/+$110 ......Avalanche SOCCER English Premier League Liverpool .............................................-$300 NEWCASTLE UNITED........................... +$850 UEFA Champions League Tuesday LIVERPOOL ..........................................-$110 Barcelona ........................................... +$230 Wednesday AJAX ................................................... +$115 Tottenham .......................................... +$210 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

PRO BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs Friday

Bucks 123, Celtics 116 Milwaukee: Mirotic 5-9 0-0 13, Antetokounmpo 8-13 16-22 32, Lopez 3-6 0-0 7, Bledsoe 4-15 0-4 9, Middleton 6-12 5-6 20, Ilyasova 1-2 2-2 5, Frazier 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 9-12 1-2 21, Snell 1-3 0-0 2, Connaughton 5-11 0-0 14. Totals 42-83 24-36 123. Boston: Tatum 7-14 6-6 20, Morris 6-8 0-0 16, Horford 4-8 6-6 17, Irving 8-22 11-12 29, J.Brown 6-12 3-4 18, Hayward 2-8 4-4 10, Ojeleye 2-4 0-0 6, Theis 0-1 0-0 0, Baynes 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 35-81 30-32 116. Milwaukee 25 30 40 28: 123 Boston 30 26 31 29: 116 3-point goals: Milwaukee 15-37 (Connaughton 4-9, Middleton 3-6, Mirotic 3-7, Hill 2-3, Ilyasova 1-1, Lopez 1-4, Bledsoe 1-6, Antetokounmpo 0-1), Boston 16-40 (Morris 4-5, Horford 3-5, J.Brown 3-7, Ojeleye 2-3, Hayward 2-4, Irving 2-8, Baynes 0-1, Rozier 0-2, Tatum 0-5). Fouled out: J.Brown. Rebounds: Milwaukee 44 (Antetokounmpo 13), Boston 44 (Tatum 11). Assists: Milwaukee 23 (Antetokounmpo 8), Boston 24 (Irving 6). Total fouls: Milwaukee 26, Boston 27. Technicals: Tatum. A: 18,624 (18,624).

PRO HOCKEY NHL Playoffs Friday

Hurricanes 5, Islanders 2 NY Islanders 1 0 1 — 2 Carolina 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Barzal 2 (Eberle, Toews), 2:30 (pp). 2, Carolina, Aho 4 (Teravainen, Faulk), 4:44 (pp). Penalties: Svechnikov, CAR, (high sticking), 1:13; Komarov, NYI, (roughing), 4:02; Martinook, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:33; Mayfield, NYI, (tripping), 6:33. Second period: 3, Carolina, Teravainen 6 (Aho, Foegele), 2:11. 4, Carolina, McKegg 1 (Pesce, Martinook), 3:17. 5, Carolina, Williams 3 (Niederreiter, Staal), 8:51. Penalties: McGinn, CAR, (high sticking), 5:38; Mayfield, NYI, (interference), 9:54; Niederreiter, CAR, (slashing), 14:47; Cizikas, NYI, (hooking), 17:40. Third period: 6, Carolina, Svechnikov 3 (Faulk), 15:13. 7, NY Islanders, Nelson 4 (Toews, Mayfield), 18:51. Penalties: Komarov, NYI, (high sticking), 5:02. Shots: NY 10-6-12: 28. Carolina 6-11-4: 21. Power-plays: NY 1 of 3; Carolina 1 of 4. Goalies: NY, Greiss 0-0 (10 shots-8 saves), Lehner 4-4 (11-8). Carolina, McElhinney 3-0 (28-26). A: 19,495. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Jonny Murray.

Celtics guard Jayson Tatum, right, and Aron Baynes defend against Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo Friday in Boston.

Bucks overpower Celtics Hill, Connaughton score 35 points off bench to assist Antetokounmpo ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Giannis Antetokounmpo had 32 points and 13 rebounds, George Hill finished with 21 points and the Milwaukee Bucks beat the Boston Celtics 123116 on Friday night to take a 2-1 lead in the Eastern Conference semifinal series. Khris Middleton added 20 points. Antetokounmpo had only 13 field goal attempts but had 16 points from the free throw line. Including Milwaukee’s two regular-season games in Boston, he has scored 30 or more points in each of his trips to TD Garden in 2018-19. Kyrie Irving scored 29 points for the Celtics. Milwaukee had a 42-16 advantage in bench scoring, which included Hill’s 21 and Pat Connaughton’s 14. Boston led by a point at the half but was outscored 40-31 in the third quarter and trailed by as many as 17

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Placed RHP Corey Kluber on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 2. Recalled RHP Jon Edwards from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS — Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the paternity list. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Recalled OF Skye Bolt from Las Vegas (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Selected RHP Derek Law from Buffalo (IL). Designated UTL UTIL Alen Hanson for assignment. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Recalled OF Tim Locastro from Reno (PCL). Optioned C Caleb Joseph to Reno. Sent RHP Matt Koch outright to Reno. ATLANTA BRAVES — Recalled RHP Touki Toussaint from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS — Reinstated RHP Oscar De La Cruz from restricted list and assigned him to Tennessee (SL). Transferred RHP Tony Barnette to the 60-day DL. CINCINNATI REDS — Selected the contract of OF Nick Senzel from Louisville. Optioned RHP Matt Bowman to Louisville. Transferred 2B Scooter Gennett to the 60-day IL. COLORADO ROCKIES — Reinstated C Chris Iannetta from the 10-day IL. Designated C Drew Butera for assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Reinstated RHP Austin Brice from the 10-day IL. Optioned LHP Jarlin García to New Orleans (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Selected the contract of INF Adeiny Hechavarría from Syracuse (IL). Optioned INF Dominic Smith to Syracuse. Transferred RHP Drew Smith to the 60-Day IL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated INF-OF José Osuna from the 10-day IL and optioned him to Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Luis Perdomo to El Paso (PCL). Transferred RHP Brett Kennedy to the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of OF Alex Dickerson from El Paso. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Recalled RHP Tyler Beede from Sacramento (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Mike Gerber from Sacramento. Placed C Erik Kratz on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 1. Designated OF Gerardo Parra for assignment. Midwest League QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS — Announced RHP Matt Ruppenthal was transferred from extended spring training to the team. Placed OF Marty Costes on the 7-day IL. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Released RHP Matt Kostalos. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Philadelphia G Ben Simmons $20,000 and assessed him a Flagrant Foul 1 for making contact to the groin of Toronto G Kyle Lowry during a May 2 game. CHICAGO BULLS — Signed coach Jim Boylen to a contract extension. PHOENIX SUNS — Named Monty Williams coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed TE Maxx Williams to a one-year contract. ATLANTA FALCONS — Agreed to terms with RB Qadree Ollison, RB Marcus Green, DE John Cominsky and CB Jordan Miller. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed WR Dorian Baker, QB David Blough, TE Stephen Carlson, OT Brian Fineanganofo, P Jamie Gillan, RB Darrin Hall, S J.T. Hassell, WR D.J. Montgomery, DE Jarrell Owens, CB Jermaine Ponder, DE Wyatt Ray, LB Anthony Stubbs, C Trevon Tate, C Willie Wright and LB Dedrick Young II. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed DE Rashan Gary, S Darnell Savage, DT Kingsley Keke, CB Ka’dar Holloman, RB Dexter Williams, LB Ty Summers, LB Curtis Bolton, WR Matthew Eaton, CB Kabion Ento, CB Javien Hamilton, TE Davis Koppenhaver, OT Yosh Nijman, LB Randy Ramsey, LB Greg Roberts, CB Nydair Rouse, QB Manny Wilkins and G Larry Williams. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed LB Ben Banogu, OL Jackson Barton, OL Javon Patterson, DE Gerri Green, LB E.J. Speed, WR Ashton Dulin, WR Penny Hart, K Clayton Hatfield, TE Hale Hentges, DE Jegs Jegede, CB Jamal Peters, CB Chris Rayford, DT Johnny Robinson and DT Jordan Thompson. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed DT Armon Watts. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed CB Julian Love, OT George Asafo-Adjei, DT Chris Slayton, QB Eric Dungey, OT Paul Adams, DB Jake Carlock, DB Mark McLaurin, DB Jacob Thieneman, TE C.J. Conrad, DE Jeremiah Harris, DE Nate Harvey, RB Jon Hilliman, C James O’Hagan, LB Josiah Tauaefa, WR Alex Wesley, WR Reggie White. Waived WR Jawill Davis and OT Jylan Ware. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Placed RB Isaiah Crowell on the injured reserve list. Signed LB Te’von Coney, G Lester Cotton Sr., WR Keelan Doss, LB Koa Farmer, FB Alec Ingold, OT Andre James, CB Dylan Mabin, G Lukayus McNeil, CB Keisean Nixon and OT Tyler Roemer. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Signed LB Zach Brown to a one-year contract. Claimed safety Blake Countess off waivers from the Los Angeles Rams.

points in the final period. The Celtics were outscored 52-24 in the paint and had 18 turnovers leading to 28 Milwaukee points. The Bucks threw the Celtics a tactical curveball in Game 2, inserting Nikola Mirotic into the starting lineup in place of Sterling Brown. InGame3,itwasCelticscoachBrad Stevens who brought new wrinkles, notably going with a small lineup that featured 6-foot-7 Semi Ojeleye guarding the 6-11 Antetokounmpo when he returned to the game at the start of the second quarter and again in the third quarter. Boston also kept attacking Antetokounmpo throughout the game when it had the ball.It included a one-handed dunk by Jaylen Brown over the Bucks’ star early in the third quarter that brought the Celtics fans inside TD Garden to their feet. It was reminiscent of a two-handed dunk he had over Antetokounmpo in Boston’s Game 1 win. Friday’s version included several nice defensive plays by Jaylen Brown, including blocking a Tony Snell layup attempt off the backboard.

HOCKEY National Hockey League TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Re-signed D Jan Rutta to a one-year, one-way contract. American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Cleveland D Doyle Somerby one game for an illegal check to the head of an opponent in a May 1 game at Toronto. ECHL ECHL — Fined Toledo’s Kevin Tansey an undisclosed amount for his actions in a May 1 game against Cincinnati. READING ROYALS — Named Chris Powell director of corporate sales and sponsorships. COLLEGE BUFFALO — Named Hunter Jenkins men’s assistant basketball coach. DUKE — Extended football coach David Cutcliffe’s contract through the 2022 season. PURDUE — Announced men’s graduate basketball G Jahaad Proctor has transferred from High Point.

AREA COLLEGES Softball UMSL 3, Lewis 0 UMSL 4, Illinois Springfield 2 Baseball St. Louis U. 18, Rhode Island 6

GOLF PGA Wells Fargo Championship Friday. At Quail Hollow, Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $7.9M | Yardage: 7,554; Par 71 Second Round Jason Dufner 68-63 — 131 -11 Joel Dahmen 66-66 — 132 -10 Max Homa 69-63 — 132 -10 Rory McIlroy 66-70 — 136 -6 Patrick Reed 67-69 — 136 -6 Justin Rose 70-67 — 137 -5 Seamus Power 69-68 — 137 -5 Jason Day 68-69 — 137 -5 Pat Perez 69-68 — 137 -5 Brendon Todd 68-70 — 138 -4 Sebastian Munoz 68-70 — 138 -4 Martin Laird 67-71 — 138 -4 Kyle Stanley 69-69 — 138 -4 Sungjae Im 70-69 — 139 -3 Fabian Gomez 70-69 — 139 -3 Aaron Wise 69-70 — 139 -3 Jhonattan Vegas 72-67 — 139 -3 Lucas Glover 70-69 — 139 -3 Vaughn Taylor 68-71 — 139 -3 Richy Werenski 70-69 — 139 -3 Tom Hoge 70-70 — 140 -2 Kevin Streelman 71-69 — 140 -2 Jim Knous 68-72 — 140 -2 Jason Kokrak 70-70 — 140 -2 Paul Casey 69-71 — 140 -2 Matt Jones 70-70 — 140 -2 Doc Redman 70-70 — 140 -2 Alex Prugh 73-68 — 141 -1 Adam Long 70-71 — 141 -1 Rickie Fowler 71-70 — 141 -1 Tony Finau 72-69 — 141 -1 Chez Reavie 70-71 — 141 -1 Henrik Stenson 74-67 — 141 -1 Jimmy Walker 71-70 — 141 -1 Bill Haas 69-72 — 141 -1 Beau Hossler 69-72 — 141 -1 Shawn Stefani 76-65 — 141 -1 Dylan Frittelli 67-74 — 141 -1 Wes Roach 70-71 — 141 -1 Adam Schenk 67-74 — 141 -1 Brice Garnett 70-71 — 141 -1 Trey Mullinax 72-69 — 141 -1 John Senden 68-73 — 141 -1 Colt Knost 73-68 — 141 -1 Nate Lashley 71-70 — 141 -1 Kramer Hickok 72-69 — 141 -1 Byeong Hun An 72-70 — 142 E Kyoung-Hoon Lee 72-70 — 142 E Webb Simpson 69-73 — 142 E Daniel Berger 73-69 — 142 E Sergio Garcia 69-73 — 142 E Adam Hadwin 73-69 — 142 E Nick Watney 70-72 — 142 E Harris English 71-71 — 142 E Roberto Diaz 70-72 — 142 E Rory Sabbatini 76-66 — 142 E J.J. Henry 70-72 — 142 E Brendan Steele 72-70 — 142 E Keith Mitchell 68-74 — 142 E Brandon Harkins 73-69 — 142 E Nick Taylor 67-75 — 142 E Luke List 75-68 — 143 +1 Matthew Short 76-67 — 143 +1 Ryan Blaum 71-72 — 143 +1 Ollie Schniederjans 74-69 — 143 +1 Hideki Matsuyama 73-70 — 143 +1 Gary Woodland 73-70 — 143 +1 Brian Harman 68-75 — 143 +1 Cody Gribble 71-72 — 143 +1 Bud Cauley 73-70 — 143 +1 Joaquin Niemann 73-70 — 143 +1 Hank Lebioda 71-72 — 143 +1 Chase Wright 71-72 — 143 +1 Julian Etulain 73-70 — 143 +1 Zack Sucher 72-71 — 143 +1 Failed to make the cut Martin Trainer 73-71 — 144 +2 John Chin 75-69 — 144 +2 Adam Svensson 73-71 — 144 +2 Brandon Hagy 72-72 — 144 +2 Sangmoon Bae 71-73 — 144 +2

Denny McCarthy Zach Johnson Keegan Bradley Ben Crane Carlos Ortiz Ernie Els Jim Herman Rod Pampling Ryan Armour Roberto Castro Kelly Kraft Anders Albertson Roger Sloan Cameron Champ Tyler Duncan Peter Malnati Dominic Bozzelli Ben Silverman Joey Garber Ted Potter, Jr. Charles Howell III Peter Uihlein Robert Streb Cameron Davis Brady Schnell Russell Henley Sung Kang Chad Collins Sepp Straka Chesson Hadley J.T. Poston David Hearn Michael Thompson Scott Brown Hudson Swafford Phil Mickelson Harold Varner III Jonas Blixt Sam Saunders Tom Lovelady Chris Thompson Broc Everett Scott Stallings Johnson Wagner Cameron Tringale Whee Kim Alvaro Ortiz Chris Stroud Danny Willett Kyle Jones Billy Hurley III Wyndham Clark Nathan Stamey Jose de Jesus Rodriguez Josh Teater Nicholas Lindheim Anirban Lahiri Mackenzie Hughes Padraig Harrington Derek Fathauer Chip McDaniel Matt Every Danny Lee Scott Langley Martin Piller Seth Reeves Steve Scott Curtis Luck Mathew Goggin Tyrone Van Aswegen Will MacKenzie Freddie Jacobson Stephan Jaeger Jonathan Byrd

Still, Milwaukee managed to keep racking up points in the paint. The Bucks led by as many as 12 in the third quarter and took a 95-87 lead into the fourth. That was the score when Brown was called for his fifth foul with 10:53 left on what appeared to be a light touch of Eric Bledsoe near the baseline. It brought animated protests from both Brown and Stevens. A few trips later, Tatum received a technical for protesting his foul of Antetokounmpo. The Bucks started to rack up points at the line,and their lead grew to 11497 by the time Brown came back into the game with 4:53 remaining. The Celtics players wore black warmup T-shirts adorned with a green No. 17 to honor Hall of Famer John Havlicek, who died last week at age 79 after a short battle with Parkinson’s disease. The team also observed a moment of silence for him prior to tipoff. After the game’s first timeout, a highlight video was shown on the jumbotron. It ended with a spotlight being shined on his retired No. 17 banner hanging in the rafters.

72-72 70-74 70-74 72-73 72-73 74-71 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 73-72 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 74-71 71-74 71-74 71-74 74-72 73-73 73-73 76-70 75-71 74-72 71-75 70-76 76-70 74-72 71-76 74-73 74-73 72-75 72-75 73-74 71-76 77-70 70-77 75-72 75-72 74-73 78-69 76-72 79-69 71-77 73-75 77-71 73-75 75-73 76-72 79-70 74-75 77-72 75-74 77-72 75-74 79-71 75-75 75-75 78-72 75-75 75-76 75-77 78-74 79-73 76-76 75-77 71-81 76-77 79-75 75-79 77-77 76-78 78-79

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144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 151 152 152 152 152 152 152 153 154 154 154 154 157

+2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +11 +12 +12 +12 +12 +15

LPGA Mediheal Championship

Friday, Daly City, Calif. Purse: $1.8M | : 6,551; Par 72 Second Round So Yeon Ryu 67-70 — 137 Ryann O’Toole 73-65 — 138 Sei Young Kim 72-66 — 138 He Yong Choi 74-65 — 139 Na Yeon Choi 72-67 — 139 Inbee Park 70-69 — 139 Charley Hull 69-70 — 139 Eun-Hee Ji 67-72 — 139 Shanshan Feng 73-67 — 140 Chella Choi 72-68 — 140 Louise Ridderstrom 71-69 — 140 Maria Torres 69-71 — 140 In Gee Chun 69-71 — 140 Peiyun Chien 68-72 — 140 Megan Khang 75-66 — 141 Bronte Law 73-68 — 141 Yu Liu 76-66 — 142 Dottie Ardina 72-70 — 142 Azahara Munoz 69-73 — 142 Amy Yang 68-74 — 142 Laetitia Beck 74-69 — 143 Jeongeun Lee6 74-69 — 143 Lexi Thompson 73-70 — 143 Jaclyn Lee 72-71 — 143 Klara Spilkova 72-71 — 143 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 72-71 — 143 In-Kyung Kim 72-71 — 143 Angela Stanford 71-72 — 143 Amy Olson 70-73 — 143 Sarah Schmelzel 70-73 — 143

-7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

European PGA China Open

Friday, Shenzhen, China Purse: $2.97M | Yardage: 7,145; Par: 72 Second Round Ashun Wu, China 66-65 — 131 Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland 65-68 — 133 Jorge Campillo, Spain 65-69 — 134 Benjamin Hebert, France 67-68 — 135 Min Woo Lee, Australia 69-67 — 136 Jason Scrivener, Australia 70-66 — 136 Sean Crocker, USA 68-68 — 136

PHOENIX — The Suns are looking for stability after Igor Kokoskov was fired last week after one disappointing season. They hope Monty Williams is the man to lead their turnaround. Phoenix announced Friday that it had come to terms with Williams. He will take over as Phoenix’s fifth coach in five seasons when the 76ers’ playoff run ends. They lead Toronto 2-1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals. The 47-year-old Williams spent five seasons in charge in New Orleans from 2010 to 2015, a stint during which he led the franchise to two postseason appearances. He is in his first season as an assistant with the 76ers. Williams takes over a Suns team that has been mired in mediocrity, missing the playoffs for nine straight seasons. Phoenix finished 19-63 this season, second-worst in franchise history.

Lue favorite for Lakers position LOS ANGELES — Per multiple reports, the Lakers are expected to soon move toward hiring Tyronn Lue as their next coach. ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that no offer has been made yet to Lue by the Lakers, but they are proceeding toward an offer to Lue in the coming days. Brad Turner of the Los Angeles Times reports that Lue is in Las Vegas waiting to hear from the Lakers about the job. BRIEFLY 76ers: Ben Simmons has been fined $20,000 and assessed a Flagrant Foul 1 for elbowing Toronto guard Kyle Lowry in the groin in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinal series. The NBA announced the penalties Friday, a day after the game in Philadelphia.

Erik Van Rooyen, South Africa 68-68 — 136 Victor Dubuisson, France 68-68 — 136 Romain Langasque, France 67-69 — 136 Nacho Elvira, Spain 68-69 — 137 David Lipsky, USA 65-72 — 137 Jordan Smith, England 67-70 — 137 Mikko Korhohen, Finland 68-69 — 137 Scott Jamieson, Scotland 68-69 — 137 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-69 — 137 Jacques Kruyswijk, South Africa 70-67 — 137 Others Micah Lauren Shin, USA 69-70 — 139 Berry Henson, USA 70-70 — 140 Julian Suri, USA 69-72 — 141 Paul Peterson, USA 69-72 — 141 John Catlin, USA 66-76 — 142

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Gander RV 400 Lineup Friday’s qualifying; Race Sunday At Dover (Del.) International Speedway Lap Length: 1 mile (Car number in parentheses) 1. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 165.960 mph. 2. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 165.555. 3. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 165.464. 4. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 164.722. 5. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 164.707. 6. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 164.331. 7. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 164.249. 8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 164.151. 9. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 164.114. 10. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 164.017. 11. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 163.577. 12. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 163.347. 13. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 163.228. 14. (41) Daniel Suarez, Ford, 163.095. 15. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 162.999. 16. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 162.970. 17. (95) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 162.837. 18. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 162.631. 19. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 162.602. 20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 162.514. 21. (6) Ryan Newman, Ford, 162.338. 22. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 161.921. 23. (8) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 161.674. 24. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 161.312. 25. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 161.254. 26. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 161.247. 27. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 160.578. 28. (32) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 159.490. 29. (47) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 158.604. 30. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 157.694. 31. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 156.876. 32. (36) Matt Tifft, Ford, 155.629. 33. (51) Cody Ware, Ford, 154.050. 34. (52) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 153.951. 35. (77) Quin Houff, Chevrolet, 153.420. 36. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 0.000. 37. (27) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 0.000.

NASCAR Truck Series JEGS 200 Friday, Dover (Del.) International Speedway (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (2) Johnny Sauter, Ford, 200. 2. (1) Brett Moffitt, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (9) Harrison Burton, Toyota, 200. 4. (6) Grant Enfinger, Ford, 200. 5. (5) Matt Crafton, Ford, 200. 6. (11) Ben Rhodes, Ford, 200. 7. (12) Austin Hill, Toyota, 200. 8. (15) Derek Kraus, Toyota, 200. 9. (10) Tyler Ankrum, Toyota, 200. 10. (16) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (7) Raphael Lessard, Toyota, 200. 12. (4) Stewart Friesen, Chevrolet, 200. 13. (19) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 200. 14. (18) Gus Dean, Chevrolet, 200. 15. (14) Todd Gilliland, Toyota, 200. 16. (32) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 198. 17. (20) Natalie Decker, Toyota, 197. 18. (23) Tyler Dippel, Chevrolet, 197. 19. (17) Austin Wayne Self, Chevrolet, 197. 20. (25) Tyler Hill, Chevrolet, 197. 21. (22) Jordan Anderson, Chevrolet, 196. 22. (27) Spencer Boyd, Chevrolet, 192. 23. (8) Brennan Poole, Toyota, DVP, 189. 24. (30) Ray Ciccarelli, Chevrolet, 188. 25. (28) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, 186. 26. (21) Joe Nemechek, Chev, Suspension, 167. 27. (3) Sheldon Creed, Chev, Accident, 160. 28. (24) Reid Wilson, Chev, Alternator, 140. 29. (13) Jesse Little, Ford, Track Bar, 115. 30. (26) Korbin Forrister, Toyota, Accident, 108. 31. (29) Josh Reaume, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 51. 32. (31) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 28. Average Speed of Race Winner: 107.431 mph. Time of Race: 1 Hrs, 51 Mins, 42 Secs. Margin of Victory: 0.603 Seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 35 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: B. Moffitt 1-48, G. Enfinger 49, B. Moffitt 50-81, J. Sauter 82-93, G. Enfinger 94, S. Creed 95-116, B. Moffitt 117, H. Burton 118, S. Creed 119-155, G. Enfinger 156, B. Rhodes 157-169, J. Sauter 170-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): Brett Moffitt 3 times for 81 laps; Sheldon Creed 2 times for 59 laps; Johnny Sauter 2 times for 43 laps; Ben Rhodes 1 time for 13 laps; Grant Enfinger 3 times for 3 laps; Harrison Burton 1 time for 1 lap.

—Wire reports

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park entries SATURDAY, KENTUCKY DERBY DAY Post: 1 p.m. FIRST: 5 ½F, IL. BRED $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Crafty Attack Thurman 7-2 2 Close Behind Diego 9-2 3 My Pest Pal Lopez 2-1 4 Silent Be Dale Arrieta 12-1 5 I Will Be Molina 15-1 6 Unspoken Valor Bailon 9-5 SECOND: 5 ½F, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Cheadle Thurman 5-1 2 Sweet Circle Molina 4-1 3 The Narrowing Way Retana 5-2 4 Summer Passport Simpson 2-1 5 Sunny Kitten Lopez 7-2 6 Flamingo Beach Diego 30-1 THIRD: 5F, $12,500 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Sunny’s Storm Diego 15-1 2 Mutakddim Road Simpson 8-1 3 Durango Kid Bailon 4-1 4 Christmas Cookie Lopez 9-5 5 Hellofaguy Arrieta 5-1 6 Cat’s Runaway Molina 7-2 7 Tiz too Much Retana 8-1 FOURTH: 5F, F&M $5,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Kalispell Diego 3-1 2 Viola Marie Molina 2-1 3 Acrobatic Ally Arrieta 5-1 4 Waddle Lopez 8-1 5 Ghaaleb’s Appeal Bailon 9-5 FIFTH: 5 ½F, F&M MSW 3&UP PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Southern Attack Thurman 20-1 2 W W Put and Take Bailon 8-5 3 Helen Mae’s Song Diego 20-1 4 Enchilada Simpson 15-1 5 Little Molitta Arrieta 8-1 6 Swifty Cause U. Lopez 6-1 7 Tiz Hoppin Molina 9-5 8 Song of the Forest Retana 15-1 9 Barbiello W. Lopez 20-1 SIXTH: 1 MILE, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Shobiz Star Arrieta 5-2 2 Rous Thurman 6-1 3 Tabaddol Retana 6-1 4 Jaguar Ridge Diego 4-1 5 Mr. Ticker Talker Molina 9-5 6 Lil R’slast Bailon 8-1 SEVENTH: 6F, $15,000 ALOWANCE PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Trappe Valley Arrieta 12-1 2 Halo Hunter Molina 4-1 3 Purging the Stone Lopez 5-2 4 W W Cookie Monster Retana 3-1 5 Shanghai Point Diego 10-1 6 Dandy Gal(m) Bailon 2-1 EIGHTH: 5 ½F, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Retractable Arrieta 12-1 2 Smart Alex’s Posse Lopez 7-2 3 Gonzo Diego 9-2 4 Georgie My Boy Tavares 4-1 5 Seba’s Dancer Simpson 8-1 6 Electric Cat Bailon 8-1 7 Too Dim Molina 3-1 8 Boyfriend Brian(IRE) Thurman 8-1

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 5 3 2 17 15 D.C. United 5 3 2 17 13 Montreal 5 3 2 17 12 Toronto FC 4 2 1 13 19 Columbus 4 5 1 13 8 Orlando City 3 3 3 12 13 New York City FC 2 1 6 12 11 Chicago 2 4 3 9 12 New York 2 4 2 8 9 Atlanta 2 3 2 8 6 Cincinnati 2 6 2 8 8 New England 2 6 2 8 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF Los Angeles FC 7 1 2 23 26 LA Galaxy 7 1 1 22 15 Seattle 5 1 3 18 18 FC Dallas 5 2 2 17 14 Houston 5 1 1 16 15 Minnesota United 4 3 2 14 18 Real Salt Lake 3 5 1 10 11 Sporting Kansas City 2 2 4 10 19 San Jose 2 5 2 8 12 Portland 2 5 1 7 11 Vancouver 1 5 3 6 7 Colorado 0 7 2 2 12 Friday Vancouver at Colorado, (n) Saturday LA Galaxy at New York, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 3 p.m. New York City FC at Montreal, 4 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at San Jose, 9 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at Sporting Kansas City, 8 p.m.

GA 10 10 14 13 11 14 12 13 9 8 16 19 GA 8 8 12 9 8 15 16 15 19 19 12 24


SPORTS

05.04.2019 • SATURDAY • M 2

NBA PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B9

NBA PLAYOFFS

AROUND THE NBA

Monty Williams hired to lead Suns

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

MILWAUKEE 2, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston, 112-90 Game 2: Milwaukee, 123-102 Friday: Milwaukee, 123-116 Monday: at Boston, 6 p.m. Wednesday: at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. x-May 10: at Boston, TBD x-May 13: at Milwaukee, TBD

PHILADELPHIA 2, TORONTO 1 Game 1: Toronto, 108-95 Game 2: Philadelphia, 94-89 Game 3: Philadelphia, 116-95 Sunday: at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday: at Toronto, 7 p.m. x-Thursday: at Philadelphia, TBD x-May 12: at Toronto, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

GOLDEN STATE 2, HOUSTON 0 Game 1: Golden State, 104-100 Game 2: Golden State 115-109 Today: at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Monday: at Houston, 8:30 p.m. x-Wed.: at Golden St, 9:30 p.m. x-May 10: at Houston, TBD x-May 12: at Golden State, TBD

DENVER 1, PORTLAND 1 Game 1: Denver, 121-113 Game 2: Portland, 97-90 Friday: at Portland, (n) Sunday: at Portland, 6 p.m. Tuesday: at Denver, 9:30 p.m. x-Thursday: at Portland, TBD x-May 12: at Denver, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

9

Jayson Tatum had just 9 total points in Boston’s first two games against Milwaukee. The second-year forward averaged 19.2 points per game during the Celtics’ first-round sweep of the Pacers, shooting 50 percent from the floor. He scored 20 in a Game 3 loss Friday.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES .............. -$125.................... Twins INDIANS ............... -$190...............Mariners TIGERS ................. -$135...................Royals Rays ..................... -$165............... ORIOLES Astros .................. -$132.................ANGELS Red Sox ................ -$155............WHITE SOX RANGERS ............. -$135.............. Blue Jays National League CUBS .................... -$122.................... Cards Braves.................. -$152...............MARLINS PHILLIES .............. -$115.............. Nationals BREWERS ............. -$108......................Mets REDS .................... -$130................... Giants ROCKIES............... -$128..................Dbacks Dodgers ............... -$125.................PADRES Interleague Athletics .............. -$110................PIRATES NBA Points Underdog Western Conference ROCKETS .................3.5 ................. Warriors Eastern Conference Sunday Raptors ...................1.5 .....................76ERS Favorite

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BRUINS .......... -$140/+$120 .. Blue Jackets SHARKS ......... -$130/+$110 ......Avalanche SOCCER English Premier League Liverpool .............................................-$300 NEWCASTLE UNITED ........................... +$850 UEFA Champions League Tuesday LIVERPOOL ..........................................-$110 Barcelona ........................................... +$230 Wednesday AJAX ................................................... +$115 Tottenham .......................................... +$210 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

PRO BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs Friday

Bucks 123, Celtics 116 Milwaukee: Mirotic 5-9 0-0 13, Antetokounmpo 8-13 16-22 32, Lopez 3-6 0-0 7, Bledsoe 4-15 0-4 9, Middleton 6-12 5-6 20, Ilyasova 1-2 2-2 5, Frazier 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 9-12 1-2 21, Snell 1-3 0-0 2, Connaughton 5-11 0-0 14. Totals 42-83 24-36 123. Boston: Tatum 7-14 6-6 20, Morris 6-8 0-0 16, Horford 4-8 6-6 17, Irving 8-22 11-12 29, J.Brown 6-12 3-4 18, Hayward 2-8 4-4 10, Ojeleye 2-4 0-0 6, Theis 0-1 0-0 0, Baynes 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 35-81 30-32 116. Milwaukee 25 30 40 28 — 123 Boston 30 26 31 29 — 116 3-point goals: Milwaukee 15-37 (Connaughton 4-9, Middleton 3-6, Mirotic 3-7, Hill 2-3, Ilyasova 1-1, Lopez 1-4, Bledsoe 1-6, Antetokounmpo 0-1), Boston 16-40 (Morris 4-5, Horford 3-5, J.Brown 3-7, Ojeleye 2-3, Hayward 2-4, Irving 2-8, Baynes 0-1, Rozier 0-2, Tatum 0-5). Fouled out: J.Brown. Rebounds: Milwaukee 44 (Antetokounmpo 13), Boston 44 (Tatum 11). Assists: Milwaukee 23 (Antetokounmpo 8), Boston 24 (Irving 6). Total fouls: Milwaukee 26, Boston 27. Technicals: Tatum. A: 18,624 (18,624).

PRO HOCKEY NHL Playoffs Friday

Hurricanes 5, Islanders 2 NY Islanders 1 0 1 — 2 Carolina 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Barzal 2 (Eberle, Toews), 2:30 (pp). 2, Carolina, Aho 4 (Teravainen, Faulk), 4:44 (pp). Penalties: Svechnikov, CAR, (high sticking), 1:13; Komarov, NYI, (roughing), 4:02; Martinook, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:33; Mayfield, NYI, (tripping), 6:33. Second period: 3, Carolina, Teravainen 6 (Aho, Foegele), 2:11. 4, Carolina, McKegg 1 (Pesce, Martinook), 3:17. 5, Carolina, Williams 3 (Niederreiter, Staal), 8:51. Penalties: McGinn, CAR, (high sticking), 5:38; Mayfield, NYI, (interference), 9:54; Niederreiter, CAR, (slashing), 14:47; Cizikas, NYI, (hooking), 17:40. Third period: 6, Carolina, Svechnikov 3 (Faulk), 15:13. 7, NY Islanders, Nelson 4 (Toews, Mayfield), 18:51. Penalties: Komarov, NYI, (high sticking), 5:02. Shots: NY 10-6-12: 28. Carolina 6-11-4: 21. Power-plays: NY 1 of 3; Carolina 1 of 4. Goalies: NY, Greiss 0-0 (10 shots-8 saves), Lehner 4-4 (11-8). Carolina, McElhinney 3-0 (28-26). A: 19,495. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Jonny Murray.

Celtics guard Jayson Tatum, right, and Aron Baynes defend against Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo Friday in Boston.

Bucks overpower Celtics Hill, Connaughton score 35 points off bench to assist Antetokounmpo ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Giannis Antetokounmpo had 32 points and 13 rebounds, George Hill finished with 21 points and the Milwaukee Bucks beat the Boston Celtics 123116 on Friday night to take a 2-1 lead in the Eastern Conference semifinal series. Khris Middleton added 20 points. Antetokounmpo had only 13 field goal attempts but had 16 points from the free throw line. Including Milwaukee’s two regular-season games in Boston, he has scored 30 or more points in each of his trips to TD Garden in 2018-19. Kyrie Irving scored 29 points for the Celtics. Milwaukee had a 42-16 advantage in bench scoring, which included Hill’s 21 and Pat Connaughton’s 14. Boston led by a point at the half but was outscored 40-31 in the third quarter and trailed by as many as 17

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Placed RHP Corey Kluber on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 2. Recalled RHP Jon Edwards from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS — Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the paternity list. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Recalled OF Skye Bolt from Las Vegas (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Selected RHP Derek Law from Buffalo (IL). Designated UTL UTIL Alen Hanson for assignment. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Recalled OF Tim Locastro from Reno (PCL). Optioned C Caleb Joseph to Reno. Sent RHP Matt Koch outright to Reno. ATLANTA BRAVES — Recalled RHP Touki Toussaint from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS — Reinstated RHP Oscar De La Cruz from restricted list and assigned him to Tennessee (SL). Transferred RHP Tony Barnette to the 60-day DL. CINCINNATI REDS — Selected the contract of OF Nick Senzel from Louisville. Optioned RHP Matt Bowman to Louisville. Transferred 2B Scooter Gennett to the 60-day IL. COLORADO ROCKIES — Reinstated C Chris Iannetta from the 10-day IL. Designated C Drew Butera for assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Reinstated RHP Austin Brice from the 10-day IL. Optioned LHP Jarlin García to New Orleans (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Selected the contract of INF Adeiny Hechavarría from Syracuse (IL). Optioned INF Dominic Smith to Syracuse. Transferred RHP Drew Smith to the 60-Day IL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated INF-OF José Osuna from the 10-day IL and optioned him to Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Luis Perdomo to El Paso (PCL). Transferred RHP Brett Kennedy to the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of OF Alex Dickerson from El Paso. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Recalled RHP Tyler Beede from Sacramento (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Mike Gerber from Sacramento. Placed C Erik Kratz on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 1. Designated OF Gerardo Parra for assignment. Midwest League QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS — Announced RHP Matt Ruppenthal was transferred from extended spring training to the team. Placed OF Marty Costes on the 7-day IL. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Released RHP Matt Kostalos. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Philadelphia G Ben Simmons $20,000 and assessed him a Flagrant Foul 1 for making contact to the groin of Toronto G Kyle Lowry during a May 2 game. CHICAGO BULLS — Signed coach Jim Boylen to a contract extension. PHOENIX SUNS — Named Monty Williams coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed TE Maxx Williams to a one-year contract. ATLANTA FALCONS — Agreed to terms with RB Qadree Ollison, RB Marcus Green, DE John Cominsky and CB Jordan Miller. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed WR Dorian Baker, QB David Blough, TE Stephen Carlson, OT Brian Fineanganofo, P Jamie Gillan, RB Darrin Hall, S J.T. Hassell, WR D.J. Montgomery, DE Jarrell Owens, CB Jermaine Ponder, DE Wyatt Ray, LB Anthony Stubbs, C Trevon Tate, C Willie Wright and LB Dedrick Young II. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed DE Rashan Gary, S Darnell Savage, DT Kingsley Keke, CB Ka’dar Holloman, RB Dexter Williams, LB Ty Summers, LB Curtis Bolton, WR Matthew Eaton, CB Kabion Ento, CB Javien Hamilton, TE Davis Koppenhaver, OT Yosh Nijman, LB Randy Ramsey, LB Greg Roberts, CB Nydair Rouse, QB Manny Wilkins and G Larry Williams. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed LB Ben Banogu, OL Jackson Barton, OL Javon Patterson, DE Gerri Green, LB E.J. Speed, WR Ashton Dulin, WR Penny Hart, K Clayton Hatfield, TE Hale Hentges, DE Jegs Jegede, CB Jamal Peters, CB Chris Rayford, DT Johnny Robinson and DT Jordan Thompson. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed DT Armon Watts. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed CB Julian Love, OT George Asafo-Adjei, DT Chris Slayton, QB Eric Dungey, OT Paul Adams, DB Jake Carlock, DB Mark McLaurin, DB Jacob Thieneman, TE C.J. Conrad, DE Jeremiah Harris, DE Nate Harvey, RB Jon Hilliman, C James O’Hagan, LB Josiah Tauaefa, WR Alex Wesley, WR Reggie White. Waived WR Jawill Davis and OT Jylan Ware. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Placed RB Isaiah Crowell on the injured reserve list. Signed LB Te’von Coney, G Lester Cotton Sr., WR Keelan Doss, LB Koa Farmer, FB Alec Ingold, OT Andre James, CB Dylan Mabin, G Lukayus McNeil, CB Keisean Nixon and OT Tyler Roemer. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Signed LB Zach Brown to a one-year contract. Claimed safety Blake Countess off waivers from the Los Angeles Rams.

points in the final period. The Celtics were outscored 52-24 in the paint and had 18 turnovers leading to 28 Milwaukee points. The Bucks threw the Celtics a tactical curveball in Game 2, inserting Nikola Mirotic into the starting lineup in place of Sterling Brown. In Game 3, it was Celtics coach Brad Stevens who brought new wrinkles, notably going with a small lineup that featured 6-foot-7 Semi Ojeleye guarding the 6-11 Antetokounmpo when he returned to the game at the start of the second quarter and again in the third quarter. Boston also kept attacking Antetokounmpo throughout the game when it had the ball. It included a one-handed dunk by Jaylen Brown over the Bucks’ star early in the third quarter that brought the Celtics fans inside TD Garden to their feet. It was reminiscent of a two-handed dunk he had over Antetokounmpo in Boston’s Game 1 win. Friday’s version included several nice defensive plays by Jaylen Brown, including blocking a Tony Snell layup attempt off the backboard.

HOCKEY National Hockey League TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Re-signed D Jan Rutta to a one-year, one-way contract. American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Cleveland D Doyle Somerby one game for an illegal check to the head of an opponent in a May 1 game at Toronto. ECHL ECHL — Fined Toledo’s Kevin Tansey an undisclosed amount for his actions in a May 1 game against Cincinnati. READING ROYALS — Named Chris Powell director of corporate sales and sponsorships. COLLEGE BUFFALO — Named Hunter Jenkins men’s assistant basketball coach. DUKE — Extended football coach David Cutcliffe’s contract through the 2022 season. PURDUE — Announced men’s graduate basketball G Jahaad Proctor has transferred from High Point.

AREA COLLEGES Softball UMSL 3, Lewis 0 UMSL 4, Illinois Springfield 2 Baseball St. Louis U. 18, Rhode Island 6

GOLF PGA Wells Fargo Championship Friday. At Quail Hollow, Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $7.9M | Yardage: 7,554; Par 71 Second Round Jason Dufner 68-63 — 131 -11 Joel Dahmen 66-66 — 132 -10 Max Homa 69-63 — 132 -10 Rory McIlroy 66-70 — 136 -6 Patrick Reed 67-69 — 136 -6 Justin Rose 70-67 — 137 -5 Seamus Power 69-68 — 137 -5 Jason Day 68-69 — 137 -5 Pat Perez 69-68 — 137 -5 Brendon Todd 68-70 — 138 -4 Sebastian Munoz 68-70 — 138 -4 Martin Laird 67-71 — 138 -4 Kyle Stanley 69-69 — 138 -4 Sungjae Im 70-69 — 139 -3 Fabian Gomez 70-69 — 139 -3 Aaron Wise 69-70 — 139 -3 Jhonattan Vegas 72-67 — 139 -3 Lucas Glover 70-69 — 139 -3 Vaughn Taylor 68-71 — 139 -3 Richy Werenski 70-69 — 139 -3 Tom Hoge 70-70 — 140 -2 Kevin Streelman 71-69 — 140 -2 Jim Knous 68-72 — 140 -2 Jason Kokrak 70-70 — 140 -2 69-71 — 140 -2 Paul Casey Matt Jones 70-70 — 140 -2 Doc Redman 70-70 — 140 -2 Alex Prugh 73-68 — 141 -1 Adam Long 70-71 — 141 -1 Rickie Fowler 71-70 — 141 -1 Tony Finau 72-69 — 141 -1 Chez Reavie 70-71 — 141 -1 Henrik Stenson 74-67 — 141 -1 Jimmy Walker 71-70 — 141 -1 Bill Haas 69-72 — 141 -1 Beau Hossler 69-72 — 141 -1 Shawn Stefani 76-65 — 141 -1 Dylan Frittelli 67-74 — 141 -1 Wes Roach 70-71 — 141 -1 Adam Schenk 67-74 — 141 -1 Brice Garnett 70-71 — 141 -1 Trey Mullinax 72-69 — 141 -1 John Senden 68-73 — 141 -1 Colt Knost 73-68 — 141 -1 Nate Lashley 71-70 — 141 -1 Kramer Hickok 72-69 — 141 -1 Byeong Hun An 72-70 — 142 E Kyoung-Hoon Lee 72-70 — 142 E Webb Simpson 69-73 — 142 E Daniel Berger 73-69 — 142 E Sergio Garcia 69-73 — 142 E Adam Hadwin 73-69 — 142 E Nick Watney 70-72 — 142 E Harris English 71-71 — 142 E Roberto Diaz 70-72 — 142 E Rory Sabbatini 76-66 — 142 E J.J. Henry 70-72 — 142 E Brendan Steele 72-70 — 142 E Keith Mitchell 68-74 — 142 E Brandon Harkins 73-69 — 142 E Nick Taylor 67-75 — 142 E Luke List 75-68 — 143 +1 Matthew Short 76-67 — 143 +1 Ryan Blaum 71-72 — 143 +1 Ollie Schniederjans 74-69 — 143 +1 Hideki Matsuyama 73-70 — 143 +1 Gary Woodland 73-70 — 143 +1 Brian Harman 68-75 — 143 +1 Cody Gribble 71-72 — 143 +1 Bud Cauley 73-70 — 143 +1 Joaquin Niemann 73-70 — 143 +1 Hank Lebioda 71-72 — 143 +1 Chase Wright 71-72 — 143 +1 Julian Etulain 73-70 — 143 +1 Zack Sucher 72-71 — 143 +1 Failed to make the cut Martin Trainer 73-71 — 144 +2 John Chin 75-69 — 144 +2 Adam Svensson 73-71 — 144 +2 Brandon Hagy 72-72 — 144 +2 Sangmoon Bae 71-73 — 144 +2

Denny McCarthy Zach Johnson Keegan Bradley Ben Crane Carlos Ortiz Ernie Els Jim Herman Rod Pampling Ryan Armour Roberto Castro Kelly Kraft Anders Albertson Roger Sloan Cameron Champ Tyler Duncan Peter Malnati Dominic Bozzelli Ben Silverman Joey Garber Ted Potter, Jr. Charles Howell III Peter Uihlein Robert Streb Cameron Davis Brady Schnell Russell Henley Sung Kang Chad Collins Sepp Straka Chesson Hadley J.T. Poston David Hearn Michael Thompson Scott Brown Hudson Swafford Phil Mickelson Harold Varner III Jonas Blixt Sam Saunders Tom Lovelady Chris Thompson Broc Everett Scott Stallings Johnson Wagner Cameron Tringale Whee Kim Alvaro Ortiz Chris Stroud Danny Willett Kyle Jones Billy Hurley III Wyndham Clark Nathan Stamey Jose de Jesus Rodriguez Josh Teater Nicholas Lindheim Anirban Lahiri Mackenzie Hughes Padraig Harrington Derek Fathauer Chip McDaniel Matt Every Danny Lee Scott Langley Martin Piller Seth Reeves Steve Scott Curtis Luck Mathew Goggin Tyrone Van Aswegen Will MacKenzie Freddie Jacobson Stephan Jaeger Jonathan Byrd

Still, Milwaukee managed to keep racking up points in the paint. The Bucks led by as many as 12 in the third quarter and took a 95-87 lead into the fourth. That was the score when Brown was called for his fifth foul with 10:53 left on what appeared to be a light touch of Eric Bledsoe near the baseline. It brought animated protests from both Brown and Stevens. A few trips later, Tatum received a technical for protesting his foul of Antetokounmpo. The Bucks started to rack up points at the line, and their lead grew to 11497 by the time Brown came back into the game with 4:53 remaining. The Celtics players wore black warmup T-shirts adorned with a green No. 17 to honor Hall of Famer John Havlicek, who died last week at age 79 after a short battle with Parkinson’s disease. The team also observed a moment of silence for him prior to tipoff. After the game’s first timeout, a highlight video was shown on the jumbotron. It ended with a spotlight being shined on his retired No. 17 banner hanging in the rafters.

72-72 70-74 70-74 72-73 72-73 74-71 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 73-72 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 74-71 71-74 71-74 71-74 74-72 73-73 73-73 76-70 75-71 74-72 71-75 70-76 76-70 74-72 71-76 74-73 74-73 72-75 72-75 73-74 71-76 77-70 70-77 75-72 75-72 74-73 78-69 76-72 79-69 71-77 73-75 77-71 73-75 75-73 76-72 79-70 74-75 77-72 75-74 77-72 75-74 79-71 75-75 75-75 78-72 75-75 75-76 75-77 78-74 79-73 76-76 75-77 71-81 76-77 79-75 75-79 77-77 76-78 78-79

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144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 151 152 152 152 152 152 152 153 154 154 154 154 157

+2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +11 +12 +12 +12 +12 +15

LPGA Mediheal Championship

Friday, Daly City, Calif. Purse: $1.8M | : 6,551; Par 72 Second Round So Yeon Ryu 67-70 — 137 Ryann O’Toole 73-65 — 138 Sei Young Kim 72-66 — 138 He Yong Choi 74-65 — 139 Na Yeon Choi 72-67 — 139 Inbee Park 70-69 — 139 Charley Hull 69-70 — 139 Eun-Hee Ji 67-72 — 139 Shanshan Feng 73-67 — 140 Chella Choi 72-68 — 140 Louise Ridderstrom 71-69 — 140 Maria Torres 69-71 — 140 In Gee Chun 69-71 — 140 Peiyun Chien 68-72 — 140 Megan Khang 75-66 — 141 Bronte Law 73-68 — 141 Yu Liu 76-66 — 142 Dottie Ardina 72-70 — 142 Azahara Munoz 69-73 — 142 Amy Yang 68-74 — 142 Laetitia Beck 74-69 — 143 Jeongeun Lee6 74-69 — 143 Lexi Thompson 73-70 — 143 Jaclyn Lee 72-71 — 143 Klara Spilkova 72-71 — 143 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 72-71 — 143 In-Kyung Kim 72-71 — 143 Angela Stanford 71-72 — 143 Amy Olson 70-73 — 143 Sarah Schmelzel 70-73 — 143

-7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

European PGA China Open

Friday, Shenzhen, China Purse: $2.97M | Yardage: 7,145; Par: 72 Second Round Ashun Wu, China 66-65 — 131 Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland 65-68 — 133 Jorge Campillo, Spain 65-69 — 134 Benjamin Hebert, France 67-68 — 135 Min Woo Lee, Australia 69-67 — 136 Jason Scrivener, Australia 70-66 — 136 Sean Crocker, USA 68-68 — 136

PHOENIX — The Suns are looking for stability after Igor Kokoskov was fired last week after one disappointing season. They hope Monty Williams is the man to lead their turnaround. Phoenix announced Friday that it had come to terms with Williams. He will take over as Phoenix’s fifth coach in five seasons when the 76ers’ playoff run ends. They lead Toronto 2-1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals. The 47-year-old Williams spent five seasons in charge in New Orleans from 2010 to 2015, a stint during which he led the franchise to two postseason appearances. He is in his first season as an assistant with the 76ers. Williams takes over a Suns team that has been mired in mediocrity, missing the playoffs for nine straight seasons. Phoenix finished 19-63 this season, second-worst in franchise history.

Lue favorite for Lakers position LOS ANGELES — Per multiple reports, the Lakers are expected to soon move toward hiring Tyronn Lue as their next coach. ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that no offer has been made yet to Lue by the Lakers, but they are proceeding toward an offer to Lue in the coming days. Brad Turner of the Los Angeles Times reports that Lue is in Las Vegas waiting to hear from the Lakers about the job. BRIEFLY 76ers: Ben Simmons has been fined $20,000 and assessed a Flagrant Foul 1 for elbowing Toronto guard Kyle Lowry in the groin in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinal series. The NBA announced the penalties Friday, a day after the game in Philadelphia.

Erik Van Rooyen, South Africa 68-68 — 136 Victor Dubuisson, France 68-68 — 136 Romain Langasque, France 67-69 — 136 Nacho Elvira, Spain 68-69 — 137 David Lipsky, USA 65-72 — 137 Jordan Smith, England 67-70 — 137 Mikko Korhohen, Finland 68-69 — 137 Scott Jamieson, Scotland 68-69 — 137 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-69 — 137 Jacques Kruyswijk, South Africa 70-67 — 137 Others Micah Lauren Shin, USA 69-70 — 139 Berry Henson, USA 70-70 — 140 Julian Suri, USA 69-72 — 141 Paul Peterson, USA 69-72 — 141 John Catlin, USA 66-76 — 142

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Gander RV 400 Lineup Friday’s qualifying; Race Sunday At Dover (Del.) International Speedway Lap Length: 1 mile (Car number in parentheses) 1. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 165.960 mph. 2. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 165.555. 3. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 165.464. 4. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 164.722. 5. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 164.707. 6. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 164.331. 7. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 164.249. 8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 164.151. 9. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 164.114. 10. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 164.017. 11. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 163.577. 12. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 163.347. 13. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 163.228. 14. (41) Daniel Suarez, Ford, 163.095. 15. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 162.999. 16. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 162.970. 17. (95) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 162.837. 18. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 162.631. 19. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 162.602. 20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 162.514. 21. (6) Ryan Newman, Ford, 162.338. 22. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 161.921. 23. (8) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 161.674. 24. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 161.312. 25. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 161.254. 26. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 161.247. 27. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 160.578. 28. (32) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 159.490. 29. (47) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 158.604. 30. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 157.694. 31. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 156.876. 32. (36) Matt Tifft, Ford, 155.629. 33. (51) Cody Ware, Ford, 154.050. 34. (52) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 153.951. 35. (77) Quin Houff, Chevrolet, 153.420. 36. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 0.000. 37. (27) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 0.000.

NASCAR Truck Series JEGS 200 Friday, Dover (Del.) International Speedway (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (2) Johnny Sauter, Ford, 200. 2. (1) Brett Moffitt, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (9) Harrison Burton, Toyota, 200. 4. (6) Grant Enfinger, Ford, 200. 5. (5) Matt Crafton, Ford, 200. 6. (11) Ben Rhodes, Ford, 200. 7. (12) Austin Hill, Toyota, 200. 8. (15) Derek Kraus, Toyota, 200. 9. (10) Tyler Ankrum, Toyota, 200. 10. (16) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (7) Raphael Lessard, Toyota, 200. 12. (4) Stewart Friesen, Chevrolet, 200. 13. (19) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 200. 14. (18) Gus Dean, Chevrolet, 200. 15. (14) Todd Gilliland, Toyota, 200. 16. (32) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 198. 17. (20) Natalie Decker, Toyota, 197. 18. (23) Tyler Dippel, Chevrolet, 197. 19. (17) Austin Wayne Self, Chevrolet, 197. 20. (25) Tyler Hill, Chevrolet, 197. 21. (22) Jordan Anderson, Chevrolet, 196. 22. (27) Spencer Boyd, Chevrolet, 192. 23. (8) Brennan Poole, Toyota, DVP, 189. 24. (30) Ray Ciccarelli, Chevrolet, 188. 25. (28) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, 186. 26. (21) Joe Nemechek, Chev, Suspension, 167. 27. (3) Sheldon Creed, Chev, Accident, 160. 28. (24) Reid Wilson, Chev, Alternator, 140. 29. (13) Jesse Little, Ford, Track Bar, 115. 30. (26) Korbin Forrister, Toyota, Accident, 108. 31. (29) Josh Reaume, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 51. 32. (31) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 28. Average Speed of Race Winner: 107.431 mph. Time of Race: 1 Hrs, 51 Mins, 42 Secs. Margin of Victory: 0.603 Seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 35 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: B. Moffitt 1-48, G. Enfinger 49, B. Moffitt 50-81, J. Sauter 82-93, G. Enfinger 94, S. Creed 95-116, B. Moffitt 117, H. Burton 118, S. Creed 119-155, G. Enfinger 156, B. Rhodes 157-169, J. Sauter 170-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): Brett Moffitt 3 times for 81 laps; Sheldon Creed 2 times for 59 laps; Johnny Sauter 2 times for 43 laps; Ben Rhodes 1 time for 13 laps; Grant Enfinger 3 times for 3 laps; Harrison Burton 1 time for 1 lap.

—Wire reports

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park entries SATURDAY, KENTUCKY DERBY DAY Post: 1 p.m. FIRST: 5 ½F, IL. BRED $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Crafty Attack Thurman 7-2 2 Close Behind Diego 9-2 3 My Pest Pal Lopez 2-1 4 Silent Be Dale Arrieta 12-1 5 I Will Be Molina 15-1 6 Unspoken Valor Bailon 9-5 SECOND: 5 ½F, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Cheadle Thurman 5-1 2 Sweet Circle Molina 4-1 3 The Narrowing Way Retana 5-2 4 Summer Passport Simpson 2-1 5 Sunny Kitten Lopez 7-2 6 Flamingo Beach Diego 30-1 THIRD: 5F, $12,500 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Sunny’s Storm Diego 15-1 2 Mutakddim Road Simpson 8-1 3 Durango Kid Bailon 4-1 4 Christmas Cookie Lopez 9-5 5 Hellofaguy Arrieta 5-1 6 Cat’s Runaway Molina 7-2 7 Tiz too Much Retana 8-1 FOURTH: 5F, $5,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Kalispell Diego 3-1 2 Viola Marie Molina 2-1 3 Acrobatic Ally Arrieta 5-1 4 Waddle Lopez 8-1 5 Ghaaleb’s Appeal Bailon 9-5 FIFTH: 5 ½F, MSW 3&UP PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Southern Attack Thurman 20-1 2 W W Put and Take Bailon 8-5 3 Helen Mae’s Song Diego 20-1 4 Enchilada Simpson 15-1 5 Little Molitta Arrieta 8-1 6 Swifty Cause U. Lopez 6-1 7 Tiz Hoppin Molina 9-5 8 Song of the Forest Retana 15-1 9 Barbiello W. Lopez 20-1 SIXTH: 1 MILE, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Shobiz Star Arrieta 5-2 2 Rous Thurman 6-1 3 Tabaddol Retana 6-1 4 Jaguar Ridge Diego 4-1 5 Mr. Ticker Talker Molina 9-5 6 Lil R’slast Bailon 8-1 SEVENTH: 6F, $15,000 ALOWANCE PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Trappe Valley Arrieta 12-1 2 Halo Hunter Molina 4-1 3 Purging the Stone Lopez 5-2 4 W W Cookie Monster Retana 3-1 5 Shanghai Point Diego 10-1 6 Dandy Gal(m) Bailon 2-1 EIGHTH: 5 ½F, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Retractable Arrieta 12-1 2 Smart Alex’s Posse Lopez 7-2 3 Gonzo Diego 9-2 4 Georgie My Boy Tavares 4-1 5 Seba’s Dancer Simpson 8-1 6 Electric Cat Bailon 8-1 7 Too Dim Molina 3-1 8 Boyfriend Brian(IRE) Thurman 8-1

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 5 3 2 17 15 D.C. United 5 3 2 17 13 Montreal 5 3 2 17 12 Toronto FC 4 2 1 13 19 Columbus 4 5 1 13 8 Orlando City 3 3 3 12 13 New York City FC 2 1 6 12 11 Chicago 2 4 3 9 12 New York 2 4 2 8 9 Atlanta 2 3 2 8 6 Cincinnati 2 6 2 8 8 New England 2 6 2 8 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF Los Angeles FC 7 1 2 23 26 LA Galaxy 7 1 1 22 15 Seattle 5 1 3 18 18 FC Dallas 5 2 2 17 14 Houston 5 1 1 16 15 Minnesota United 4 3 2 14 18 Real Salt Lake 3 5 1 10 11 Sporting Kansas City 2 2 4 10 19 Vancouver 2 5 3 9 10 San Jose 2 5 2 8 12 Portland 2 5 1 7 11 Colorado 0 8 2 2 14 Friday Vancouver 3, Colorado 2 Saturday LA Galaxy at New York, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 3 p.m. New York City FC at Montreal, 4 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at San Jose, 9 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at Sporting Kansas City, 8 p.m.

GA 10 10 14 13 11 14 12 13 9 8 16 19 GA 8 8 12 9 8 15 16 15 14 19 19 27


SPORTS

05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 2

NBA PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

NBA PLAYOFFS

AROUND THE NBA

Monty Williams hired to lead Suns

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

MILWAUKEE 2, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston, 112-90 Game 2: Milwaukee, 123-102 Friday: Milwaukee, 123-116 Monday: at Boston, 6 p.m. Wednesday: at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. x-May 10: at Boston, TBD x-May 13: at Milwaukee, TBD

PHILADELPHIA 2, TORONTO 1 Game 1: Toronto, 108-95 Game 2: Philadelphia, 94-89 Game 3: Philadelphia, 116-95 Sunday: at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m. Tuesday: at Toronto, 7 p.m. x-Thursday: at Philadelphia, TBD x-May 12: at Toronto, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

GOLDEN STATE 2, HOUSTON 0 Game 1: Golden State, 104-100 Game 2: Golden State 115-109 Today: at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Monday: at Houston, 8:30 p.m. x-Wed.: at Golden St, 9:30 p.m. x-May 10: at Houston, TBD x-May 12: at Golden State, TBD

DENVER 1, PORTLAND 1 Game 1: Denver, 121-113 Game 2: Portland, 97-90 Friday: at Portland, (n) Sunday: at Portland, 6 p.m. Tuesday: at Denver, 9:30 p.m. x-Thursday: at Portland, TBD x-May 12: at Denver, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

9

Jayson Tatum had just 9 total points in Boston’s first two games against Milwaukee. The second-year forward averaged 19.2 points per game during the Celtics’ first-round sweep of the Pacers, shooting 50 percent from the floor. He scored 20 in a Game 3 loss Friday.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES.............. -$125.................... Twins INDIANS............... -$190...............Mariners TIGERS ................. -$135...................Royals Rays..................... -$165............... ORIOLES Astros .................. -$132.................ANGELS Red Sox................ -$155............WHITE SOX RANGERS ............. -$135.............. Blue Jays National League CUBS.................... -$122.................... Cards Braves.................. -$152...............MARLINS PHILLIES .............. -$115.............. Nationals BREWERS............. -$108......................Mets REDS.................... -$130................... Giants ROCKIES............... -$128..................Dbacks Dodgers ............... -$125.................PADRES Interleague Athletics .............. -$110................PIRATES NBA Points Underdog Western Conference ROCKETS.................3.5................. Warriors Eastern Conference Sunday Raptors...................1.5.....................76ERS

Favorite

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog BRUINS .......... -$140/+$120 .. Blue Jackets SHARKS ......... -$130/+$110 ......Avalanche SOCCER English Premier League Liverpool .............................................-$300 NEWCASTLE UNITED........................... +$850 UEFA Champions League Tuesday LIVERPOOL ..........................................-$110 Barcelona ........................................... +$230 Wednesday AJAX ................................................... +$115 Tottenham .......................................... +$210 Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

PRO BASKETBALL NBA Playoffs Friday

Bucks 123, Celtics 116 Milwaukee: Mirotic 5-9 0-0 13, Antetokounmpo 8-13 16-22 32, Lopez 3-6 0-0 7, Bledsoe 4-15 0-4 9, Middleton 6-12 5-6 20, Ilyasova 1-2 2-2 5, Frazier 0-0 0-0 0, Hill 9-12 1-2 21, Snell 1-3 0-0 2, Connaughton 5-11 0-0 14. Totals 42-83 24-36 123. Boston: Tatum 7-14 6-6 20, Morris 6-8 0-0 16, Horford 4-8 6-6 17, Irving 8-22 11-12 29, J.Brown 6-12 3-4 18, Hayward 2-8 4-4 10, Ojeleye 2-4 0-0 6, Theis 0-1 0-0 0, Baynes 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 35-81 30-32 116. Milwaukee 25 30 40 28 — 123 Boston 30 26 31 29 — 116 3-point goals: Milwaukee 15-37 (Connaughton 4-9, Middleton 3-6, Mirotic 3-7, Hill 2-3, Ilyasova 1-1, Lopez 1-4, Bledsoe 1-6, Antetokounmpo 0-1), Boston 16-40 (Morris 4-5, Horford 3-5, J.Brown 3-7, Ojeleye 2-3, Hayward 2-4, Irving 2-8, Baynes 0-1, Rozier 0-2, Tatum 0-5). Fouled out: J.Brown. Rebounds: Milwaukee 44 (Antetokounmpo 13), Boston 44 (Tatum 11). Assists: Milwaukee 23 (Antetokounmpo 8), Boston 24 (Irving 6). Total fouls: Milwaukee 26, Boston 27. Technicals: Tatum. A: 18,624 (18,624).

PRO HOCKEY NHL Playoffs Friday

Hurricanes 5, Islanders 2 NY Islanders 1 0 1 — 2 Carolina 1 3 1 — 5 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Barzal 2 (Eberle, Toews), 2:30 (pp). 2, Carolina, Aho 4 (Teravainen, Faulk), 4:44 (pp). Penalties: Svechnikov, CAR, (high sticking), 1:13; Komarov, NYI, (roughing), 4:02; Martinook, CAR, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 6:33; Mayfield, NYI, (tripping), 6:33. Second period: 3, Carolina, Teravainen 6 (Aho, Foegele), 2:11. 4, Carolina, McKegg 1 (Pesce, Martinook), 3:17. 5, Carolina, Williams 3 (Niederreiter, Staal), 8:51. Penalties: McGinn, CAR, (high sticking), 5:38; Mayfield, NYI, (interference), 9:54; Niederreiter, CAR, (slashing), 14:47; Cizikas, NYI, (hooking), 17:40. Third period: 6, Carolina, Svechnikov 3 (Faulk), 15:13. 7, NY Islanders, Nelson 4 (Toews, Mayfield), 18:51. Penalties: Komarov, NYI, (high sticking), 5:02. Shots: NY 10-6-12: 28. Carolina 6-11-4: 21. Power-plays: NY 1 of 3; Carolina 1 of 4. Goalies: NY, Greiss 0-0 (10 shots-8 saves), Lehner 4-4 (11-8). Carolina, McElhinney 3-0 (28-26). A: 19,495. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Jonny Murray.

Celtics guard Jayson Tatum, right, and Aron Baynes defend against Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo Friday in Boston.

Bucks overpower Celtics Hill, Connaughton score 35 points off bench to assist Antetokounmpo ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — Giannis Antetokounmpo had 32 points and 13 rebounds, George Hill finished with 21 points and the Milwaukee Bucks beat the Boston Celtics 123116 on Friday night to take a 2-1 lead in the Eastern Conference semifinal series. Khris Middleton added 20 points. Antetokounmpo had only 13 field goal attempts but had 16 points from the free throw line. Including Milwaukee’s two regular-season games in Boston, he has scored 30 or more points in each of his trips to TD Garden in 2018-19. Kyrie Irving scored 29 points for the Celtics. Milwaukee had a 42-16 advantage in bench scoring, which included Hill’s 21 and Pat Connaughton’s 14. Boston led by a point at the half but was outscored 40-31 in the third quarter and trailed by as many as 17

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS — Placed RHP Corey Kluber on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 2. Recalled RHP Jon Edwards from Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS — Reinstated RHP Tyson Ross from the paternity list. OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Recalled OF Skye Bolt from Las Vegas (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Selected RHP Derek Law from Buffalo (IL). Designated UTL UTIL Alen Hanson for assignment. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Recalled OF Tim Locastro from Reno (PCL). Optioned C Caleb Joseph to Reno. Sent RHP Matt Koch outright to Reno. ATLANTA BRAVES — Recalled RHP Touki Toussaint from Gwinnett (IL). CHICAGO CUBS — Reinstated RHP Oscar De La Cruz from restricted list and assigned him to Tennessee (SL). Transferred RHP Tony Barnette to the 60-day DL. CINCINNATI REDS — Selected the contract of OF Nick Senzel from Louisville. Optioned RHP Matt Bowman to Louisville. Transferred 2B Scooter Gennett to the 60-day IL. COLORADO ROCKIES — Reinstated C Chris Iannetta from the 10-day IL. Designated C Drew Butera for assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Reinstated RHP Austin Brice from the 10-day IL. Optioned LHP Jarlin García to New Orleans (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Selected the contract of INF Adeiny Hechavarría from Syracuse (IL). Optioned INF Dominic Smith to Syracuse. Transferred RHP Drew Smith to the 60-Day IL. PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Reinstated INF-OF José Osuna from the 10-day IL and optioned him to Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES — Optioned RHP Luis Perdomo to El Paso (PCL). Transferred RHP Brett Kennedy to the 60-day IL. Selected the contract of OF Alex Dickerson from El Paso. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Recalled RHP Tyler Beede from Sacramento (PCL). Selected the contract of OF Mike Gerber from Sacramento. Placed C Erik Kratz on the 10-day IL, retroactive to May 1. Designated OF Gerardo Parra for assignment. Midwest League QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS — Announced RHP Matt Ruppenthal was transferred from extended spring training to the team. Placed OF Marty Costes on the 7-day IL. American Association GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Released RHP Matt Kostalos. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined Philadelphia G Ben Simmons $20,000 and assessed him a Flagrant Foul 1 for making contact to the groin of Toronto G Kyle Lowry during a May 2 game. CHICAGO BULLS — Signed coach Jim Boylen to a contract extension. PHOENIX SUNS — Named Monty Williams coach. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Signed TE Maxx Williams to a one-year contract. ATLANTA FALCONS — Agreed to terms with RB Qadree Ollison, RB Marcus Green, DE John Cominsky and CB Jordan Miller. CLEVELAND BROWNS — Signed WR Dorian Baker, QB David Blough, TE Stephen Carlson, OT Brian Fineanganofo, P Jamie Gillan, RB Darrin Hall, S J.T. Hassell, WR D.J. Montgomery, DE Jarrell Owens, CB Jermaine Ponder, DE Wyatt Ray, LB Anthony Stubbs, C Trevon Tate, C Willie Wright and LB Dedrick Young II. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed DE Rashan Gary, S Darnell Savage, DT Kingsley Keke, CB Ka’dar Holloman, RB Dexter Williams, LB Ty Summers, LB Curtis Bolton, WR Matthew Eaton, CB Kabion Ento, CB Javien Hamilton, TE Davis Koppenhaver, OT Yosh Nijman, LB Randy Ramsey, LB Greg Roberts, CB Nydair Rouse, QB Manny Wilkins and G Larry Williams. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed LB Ben Banogu, OL Jackson Barton, OL Javon Patterson, DE Gerri Green, LB E.J. Speed, WR Ashton Dulin, WR Penny Hart, K Clayton Hatfield, TE Hale Hentges, DE Jegs Jegede, CB Jamal Peters, CB Chris Rayford, DT Johnny Robinson and DT Jordan Thompson. MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Signed DT Armon Watts. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed CB Julian Love, OT George Asafo-Adjei, DT Chris Slayton, QB Eric Dungey, OT Paul Adams, DB Jake Carlock, DB Mark McLaurin, DB Jacob Thieneman, TE C.J. Conrad, DE Jeremiah Harris, DE Nate Harvey, RB Jon Hilliman, C James O’Hagan, LB Josiah Tauaefa, WR Alex Wesley, WR Reggie White. Waived WR Jawill Davis and OT Jylan Ware. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Placed RB Isaiah Crowell on the injured reserve list. Signed LB Te’von Coney, G Lester Cotton Sr., WR Keelan Doss, LB Koa Farmer, FB Alec Ingold, OT Andre James, CB Dylan Mabin, G Lukayus McNeil, CB Keisean Nixon and OT Tyler Roemer. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — Signed LB Zach Brown to a one-year contract. Claimed safety Blake Countess off waivers from the Los Angeles Rams.

points in the final period. The Celtics were outscored 52-24 in the paint and had 18 turnovers leading to 28 Milwaukee points. The Bucks threw the Celtics a tactical curveball in Game 2, inserting Nikola Mirotic into the starting lineup in place of Sterling Brown. InGame3,itwasCelticscoachBrad Stevens who brought new wrinkles, notably going with a small lineup that featured 6-foot-7 Semi Ojeleye guarding the 6-11 Antetokounmpo when he returned to the game at the start of the second quarter and again in the third quarter. Boston also kept attacking Antetokounmpo throughout the game when it had the ball.It included a one-handed dunk by Jaylen Brown over the Bucks’ star early in the third quarter that brought the Celtics fans inside TD Garden to their feet. It was reminiscent of a two-handed dunk he had over Antetokounmpo in Boston’s Game 1 win. Friday’s version included several nice defensive plays by Jaylen Brown, including blocking a Tony Snell layup attempt off the backboard.

HOCKEY National Hockey League TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Re-signed D Jan Rutta to a one-year, one-way contract. American Hockey League AHL — Suspended Cleveland D Doyle Somerby one game for an illegal check to the head of an opponent in a May 1 game at Toronto. ECHL ECHL — Fined Toledo’s Kevin Tansey an undisclosed amount for his actions in a May 1 game against Cincinnati. READING ROYALS — Named Chris Powell director of corporate sales and sponsorships. COLLEGE BUFFALO — Named Hunter Jenkins men’s assistant basketball coach. DUKE — Extended football coach David Cutcliffe’s contract through the 2022 season. PURDUE — Announced men’s graduate basketball G Jahaad Proctor has transferred from High Point.

AREA COLLEGES Softball UMSL 3, Lewis 0 UMSL 4, Illinois Springfield 2 Baseball St. Louis U. 18, Rhode Island 6

GOLF PGA Wells Fargo Championship Friday. At Quail Hollow, Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $7.9M | Yardage: 7,554; Par 71 Second Round Jason Dufner 68-63 — 131 -11 Joel Dahmen 66-66 — 132 -10 Max Homa 69-63 — 132 -10 Rory McIlroy 66-70 — 136 -6 Patrick Reed 67-69 — 136 -6 Justin Rose 70-67 — 137 -5 Seamus Power 69-68 — 137 -5 Jason Day 68-69 — 137 -5 Pat Perez 69-68 — 137 -5 Brendon Todd 68-70 — 138 -4 Sebastian Munoz 68-70 — 138 -4 Martin Laird 67-71 — 138 -4 Kyle Stanley 69-69 — 138 -4 Sungjae Im 70-69 — 139 -3 Fabian Gomez 70-69 — 139 -3 Aaron Wise 69-70 — 139 -3 Jhonattan Vegas 72-67 — 139 -3 Lucas Glover 70-69 — 139 -3 Vaughn Taylor 68-71 — 139 -3 Richy Werenski 70-69 — 139 -3 Tom Hoge 70-70 — 140 -2 Kevin Streelman 71-69 — 140 -2 Jim Knous 68-72 — 140 -2 Jason Kokrak 70-70 — 140 -2 Paul Casey 69-71 — 140 -2 Matt Jones 70-70 — 140 -2 Doc Redman 70-70 — 140 -2 Alex Prugh 73-68 — 141 -1 Adam Long 70-71 — 141 -1 Rickie Fowler 71-70 — 141 -1 Tony Finau 72-69 — 141 -1 Chez Reavie 70-71 — 141 -1 Henrik Stenson 74-67 — 141 -1 Jimmy Walker 71-70 — 141 -1 Bill Haas 69-72 — 141 -1 Beau Hossler 69-72 — 141 -1 Shawn Stefani 76-65 — 141 -1 Dylan Frittelli 67-74 — 141 -1 Wes Roach 70-71 — 141 -1 Adam Schenk 67-74 — 141 -1 Brice Garnett 70-71 — 141 -1 Trey Mullinax 72-69 — 141 -1 John Senden 68-73 — 141 -1 Colt Knost 73-68 — 141 -1 Nate Lashley 71-70 — 141 -1 Kramer Hickok 72-69 — 141 -1 Byeong Hun An 72-70 — 142 E Kyoung-Hoon Lee 72-70 — 142 E Webb Simpson 69-73 — 142 E Daniel Berger 73-69 — 142 E Sergio Garcia 69-73 — 142 E Adam Hadwin 73-69 — 142 E Nick Watney 70-72 — 142 E Harris English 71-71 — 142 E Roberto Diaz 70-72 — 142 E Rory Sabbatini 76-66 — 142 E J.J. Henry 70-72 — 142 E Brendan Steele 72-70 — 142 E Keith Mitchell 68-74 — 142 E Brandon Harkins 73-69 — 142 E Nick Taylor 67-75 — 142 E Luke List 75-68 — 143 +1 Matthew Short 76-67 — 143 +1 Ryan Blaum 71-72 — 143 +1 Ollie Schniederjans 74-69 — 143 +1 Hideki Matsuyama 73-70 — 143 +1 Gary Woodland 73-70 — 143 +1 Brian Harman 68-75 — 143 +1 Cody Gribble 71-72 — 143 +1 Bud Cauley 73-70 — 143 +1 Joaquin Niemann 73-70 — 143 +1 Hank Lebioda 71-72 — 143 +1 Chase Wright 71-72 — 143 +1 Julian Etulain 73-70 — 143 +1 Zack Sucher 72-71 — 143 +1 Failed to make the cut Martin Trainer 73-71 — 144 +2 John Chin 75-69 — 144 +2 Adam Svensson 73-71 — 144 +2 Brandon Hagy 72-72 — 144 +2 Sangmoon Bae 71-73 — 144 +2

Denny McCarthy Zach Johnson Keegan Bradley Ben Crane Carlos Ortiz Ernie Els Jim Herman Rod Pampling Ryan Armour Roberto Castro Kelly Kraft Anders Albertson Roger Sloan Cameron Champ Tyler Duncan Peter Malnati Dominic Bozzelli Ben Silverman Joey Garber Ted Potter, Jr. Charles Howell III Peter Uihlein Robert Streb Cameron Davis Brady Schnell Russell Henley Sung Kang Chad Collins Sepp Straka Chesson Hadley J.T. Poston David Hearn Michael Thompson Scott Brown Hudson Swafford Phil Mickelson Harold Varner III Jonas Blixt Sam Saunders Tom Lovelady Chris Thompson Broc Everett Scott Stallings Johnson Wagner Cameron Tringale Whee Kim Alvaro Ortiz Chris Stroud Danny Willett Kyle Jones Billy Hurley III Wyndham Clark Nathan Stamey Jose de Jesus Rodriguez Josh Teater Nicholas Lindheim Anirban Lahiri Mackenzie Hughes Padraig Harrington Derek Fathauer Chip McDaniel Matt Every Danny Lee Scott Langley Martin Piller Seth Reeves Steve Scott Curtis Luck Mathew Goggin Tyrone Van Aswegen Will MacKenzie Freddie Jacobson Stephan Jaeger Jonathan Byrd

Still, Milwaukee managed to keep racking up points in the paint. The Bucks led by as many as 12 in the third quarter and took a 95-87 lead into the fourth. That was the score when Brown was called for his fifth foul with 10:53 left on what appeared to be a light touch of Eric Bledsoe near the baseline. It brought animated protests from both Brown and Stevens. A few trips later, Tatum received a technical for protesting his foul of Antetokounmpo. The Bucks started to rack up points at the line,and their lead grew to 11497 by the time Brown came back into the game with 4:53 remaining. The Celtics players wore black warmup T-shirts adorned with a green No. 17 to honor Hall of Famer John Havlicek, who died last week at age 79 after a short battle with Parkinson’s disease. The team also observed a moment of silence for him prior to tipoff. After the game’s first timeout, a highlight video was shown on the jumbotron. It ended with a spotlight being shined on his retired No. 17 banner hanging in the rafters.

72-72 70-74 70-74 72-73 72-73 74-71 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 73-72 73-72 74-71 72-73 71-74 74-71 71-74 71-74 71-74 74-72 73-73 73-73 76-70 75-71 74-72 71-75 70-76 76-70 74-72 71-76 74-73 74-73 72-75 72-75 73-74 71-76 77-70 70-77 75-72 75-72 74-73 78-69 76-72 79-69 71-77 73-75 77-71 73-75 75-73 76-72 79-70 74-75 77-72 75-74 77-72 75-74 79-71 75-75 75-75 78-72 75-75 75-76 75-77 78-74 79-73 76-76 75-77 71-81 76-77 79-75 75-79 77-77 76-78 78-79

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144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 146 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 150 150 151 152 152 152 152 152 152 153 154 154 154 154 157

+2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +6 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +10 +11 +12 +12 +12 +12 +15

LPGA Mediheal Championship

Friday, Daly City, Calif. Purse: $1.8M | : 6,551; Par 72 Second Round So Yeon Ryu 67-70 — 137 Ryann O’Toole 73-65 — 138 Sei Young Kim 72-66 — 138 He Yong Choi 74-65 — 139 Na Yeon Choi 72-67 — 139 Inbee Park 70-69 — 139 Charley Hull 69-70 — 139 Eun-Hee Ji 67-72 — 139 Shanshan Feng 73-67 — 140 Chella Choi 72-68 — 140 Louise Ridderstrom 71-69 — 140 Maria Torres 69-71 — 140 In Gee Chun 69-71 — 140 Peiyun Chien 68-72 — 140 Megan Khang 75-66 — 141 Bronte Law 73-68 — 141 Yu Liu 76-66 — 142 Dottie Ardina 72-70 — 142 Azahara Munoz 69-73 — 142 Amy Yang 68-74 — 142 Laetitia Beck 74-69 — 143 Jeongeun Lee6 74-69 — 143 Lexi Thompson 73-70 — 143 Jaclyn Lee 72-71 — 143 Klara Spilkova 72-71 — 143 Anne-Catherine Tanguay 72-71 — 143 In-Kyung Kim 72-71 — 143 Angela Stanford 71-72 — 143 Amy Olson 70-73 — 143 Sarah Schmelzel 70-73 — 143

-7 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1

European PGA China Open

Friday, Shenzhen, China Purse: $2.97M | Yardage: 7,145; Par: 72 Second Round Ashun Wu, China 66-65 — 131 Tapio Pulkkanen, Finland 65-68 — 133 Jorge Campillo, Spain 65-69 — 134 Benjamin Hebert, France 67-68 — 135 Min Woo Lee, Australia 69-67 — 136 Jason Scrivener, Australia 70-66 — 136 Sean Crocker, USA 68-68 — 136

PHOENIX — The Suns are looking for stability after Igor Kokoskov was fired last week after one disappointing season. They hope Monty Williams is the man to lead their turnaround. Phoenix announced Friday that it had come to terms with Williams. He will take over as Phoenix’s fifth coach in five seasons when the 76ers’ playoff run ends. They lead Toronto 2-1 in the Eastern Conference semifinals. The 47-year-old Williams spent five seasons in charge in New Orleans from 2010 to 2015, a stint during which he led the franchise to two postseason appearances. He is in his first season as an assistant with the 76ers. Williams takes over a Suns team that has been mired in mediocrity, missing the playoffs for nine straight seasons. Phoenix finished 19-63 this season, second-worst in franchise history.

Lue favorite for Lakers position LOS ANGELES — Per multiple reports, the Lakers are expected to soon move toward hiring Tyronn Lue as their next coach. ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski reports that no offer has been made yet to Lue by the Lakers, but they are proceeding toward an offer to Lue in the coming days. Brad Turner of the Los Angeles Times reports that Lue is in Las Vegas waiting to hear from the Lakers about the job. BRIEFLY 76ers: Ben Simmons has been fined $20,000 and assessed a Flagrant Foul 1 for elbowing Toronto guard Kyle Lowry in the groin in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinal series. The NBA announced the penalties Friday, a day after the game in Philadelphia.

Erik Van Rooyen, South Africa 68-68 — 136 Victor Dubuisson, France 68-68 — 136 Romain Langasque, France 67-69 — 136 Nacho Elvira, Spain 68-69 — 137 David Lipsky, USA 65-72 — 137 Jordan Smith, England 67-70 — 137 Mikko Korhohen, Finland 68-69 — 137 Scott Jamieson, Scotland 68-69 — 137 Matthieu Pavon, France 68-69 — 137 Jacques Kruyswijk, South Africa 70-67 — 137 Others Micah Lauren Shin, USA 69-70 — 139 Berry Henson, USA 70-70 — 140 Julian Suri, USA 69-72 — 141 Paul Peterson, USA 69-72 — 141 John Catlin, USA 66-76 — 142

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Gander RV 400 Lineup Friday’s qualifying; Race Sunday At Dover (Del.) International Speedway Lap Length: 1 mile (Car number in parentheses) 1. (9) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 165.960 mph. 2. (24) William Byron, Chevrolet, 165.555. 3. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 165.464. 4. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 164.722. 5. (88) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 164.707. 6. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 164.331. 7. (10) Aric Almirola, Ford, 164.249. 8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 164.151. 9. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 164.114. 10. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 164.017. 11. (12) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 163.577. 12. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 163.347. 13. (19) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 163.228. 14. (41) Daniel Suarez, Ford, 163.095. 15. (20) Erik Jones, Toyota, 162.999. 16. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 162.970. 17. (95) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, 162.837. 18. (21) Paul Menard, Ford, 162.631. 19. (1) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 162.602. 20. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 162.514. 21. (6) Ryan Newman, Ford, 162.338. 22. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 161.921. 23. (8) Daniel Hemric, Chevrolet, 161.674. 24. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 161.312. 25. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 161.254. 26. (34) Michael McDowell, Ford, 161.247. 27. (43) Bubba Wallace, Chevrolet, 160.578. 28. (32) Corey LaJoie, Ford, 159.490. 29. (47) Ryan Preece, Chevrolet, 158.604. 30. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 157.694. 31. (00) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 156.876. 32. (36) Matt Tifft, Ford, 155.629. 33. (51) Cody Ware, Ford, 154.050. 34. (52) BJ McLeod, Chevrolet, 153.951. 35. (77) Quin Houff, Chevrolet, 153.420. 36. (15) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 0.000. 37. (27) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 0.000.

NASCAR Truck Series JEGS 200 Friday, Dover (Del.) International Speedway (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (2) Johnny Sauter, Ford, 200. 2. (1) Brett Moffitt, Chevrolet, 200. 3. (9) Harrison Burton, Toyota, 200. 4. (6) Grant Enfinger, Ford, 200. 5. (5) Matt Crafton, Ford, 200. 6. (11) Ben Rhodes, Ford, 200. 7. (12) Austin Hill, Toyota, 200. 8. (15) Derek Kraus, Toyota, 200. 9. (10) Tyler Ankrum, Toyota, 200. 10. (16) Ross Chastain, Chevrolet, 200. 11. (7) Raphael Lessard, Toyota, 200. 12. (4) Stewart Friesen, Chevrolet, 200. 13. (19) Brandon Jones, Toyota, 200. 14. (18) Gus Dean, Chevrolet, 200. 15. (14) Todd Gilliland, Toyota, 200. 16. (32) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, 198. 17. (20) Natalie Decker, Toyota, 197. 18. (23) Tyler Dippel, Chevrolet, 197. 19. (17) Austin Wayne Self, Chevrolet, 197. 20. (25) Tyler Hill, Chevrolet, 197. 21. (22) Jordan Anderson, Chevrolet, 196. 22. (27) Spencer Boyd, Chevrolet, 192. 23. (8) Brennan Poole, Toyota, DVP, 189. 24. (30) Ray Ciccarelli, Chevrolet, 188. 25. (28) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Chevrolet, 186. 26. (21) Joe Nemechek, Chev, Suspension, 167. 27. (3) Sheldon Creed, Chev, Accident, 160. 28. (24) Reid Wilson, Chev, Alternator, 140. 29. (13) Jesse Little, Ford, Track Bar, 115. 30. (26) Korbin Forrister, Toyota, Accident, 108. 31. (29) Josh Reaume, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 51. 32. (31) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, Too Slow, 28. Average Speed of Race Winner: 107.431 mph. Time of Race: 1 Hrs, 51 Mins, 42 Secs. Margin of Victory: 0.603 Seconds. Caution Flags: 6 for 35 laps. Lead Changes: 11 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: B. Moffitt 1-48, G. Enfinger 49, B. Moffitt 50-81, J. Sauter 82-93, G. Enfinger 94, S. Creed 95-116, B. Moffitt 117, H. Burton 118, S. Creed 119-155, G. Enfinger 156, B. Rhodes 157-169, J. Sauter 170-200. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): Brett Moffitt 3 times for 81 laps; Sheldon Creed 2 times for 59 laps; Johnny Sauter 2 times for 43 laps; Ben Rhodes 1 time for 13 laps; Grant Enfinger 3 times for 3 laps; Harrison Burton 1 time for 1 lap.

—Wire reports

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park entries SATURDAY, KENTUCKY DERBY DAY Post: 1 p.m. FIRST: 5 ½F, IL. BRED $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Crafty Attack Thurman 7-2 2 Close Behind Diego 9-2 3 My Pest Pal Lopez 2-1 4 Silent Be Dale Arrieta 12-1 5 I Will Be Molina 15-1 6 Unspoken Valor Bailon 9-5 SECOND: 5 ½F, $4,000 MCL PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Cheadle Thurman 5-1 2 Sweet Circle Molina 4-1 3 The Narrowing Way Retana 5-2 4 Summer Passport Simpson 2-1 5 Sunny Kitten Lopez 7-2 6 Flamingo Beach Diego 30-1 THIRD: 5F, $12,500 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Sunny’s Storm Diego 15-1 2 Mutakddim Road Simpson 8-1 3 Durango Kid Bailon 4-1 4 Christmas Cookie Lopez 9-5 5 Hellofaguy Arrieta 5-1 6 Cat’s Runaway Molina 7-2 7 Tiz too Much Retana 8-1 FOURTH: 5F, $5,000 AOC PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Kalispell Diego 3-1 2 Viola Marie Molina 2-1 3 Acrobatic Ally Arrieta 5-1 4 Waddle Lopez 8-1 5 Ghaaleb’s Appeal Bailon 9-5 FIFTH: 5 ½F, MSW 3&UP PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Southern Attack Thurman 20-1 2 W W Put and Take Bailon 8-5 3 Helen Mae’s Song Diego 20-1 4 Enchilada Simpson 15-1 5 Little Molitta Arrieta 8-1 6 Swifty Cause U. Lopez 6-1 7 Tiz Hoppin Molina 9-5 8 Song of the Forest Retana 15-1 9 Barbiello W. Lopez 20-1 SIXTH: 1 MILE, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Shobiz Star Arrieta 5-2 2 Rous Thurman 6-1 3 Tabaddol Retana 6-1 4 Jaguar Ridge Diego 4-1 5 Mr. Ticker Talker Molina 9-5 6 Lil R’slast Bailon 8-1 SEVENTH: 6F, $15,000 ALOWANCE PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Trappe Valley Arrieta 12-1 2 Halo Hunter Molina 4-1 3 Purging the Stone Lopez 5-2 4 W W Cookie Monster Retana 3-1 5 Shanghai Point Diego 10-1 6 Dandy Gal(m) Bailon 2-1 EIGHTH: 5 ½F, $3,200 CND CLM PP HORSE JOCKEY ODDS 1 Retractable Arrieta 12-1 2 Smart Alex’s Posse Lopez 7-2 3 Gonzo Diego 9-2 4 Georgie My Boy Tavares 4-1 5 Seba’s Dancer Simpson 8-1 6 Electric Cat Bailon 8-1 7 Too Dim Molina 3-1 8 Boyfriend Brian(IRE) Thurman 8-1

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 5 3 2 17 15 D.C. United 5 3 2 17 13 Montreal 5 3 2 17 12 Toronto FC 4 2 1 13 19 Columbus 4 5 1 13 8 Orlando City 3 3 3 12 13 New York City FC 2 1 6 12 11 Chicago 2 4 3 9 12 New York 2 4 2 8 9 Atlanta 2 3 2 8 6 Cincinnati 2 6 2 8 8 New England 2 6 2 8 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF Los Angeles FC 7 1 2 23 26 LA Galaxy 7 1 1 22 15 Seattle 5 1 3 18 18 FC Dallas 5 2 2 17 14 Houston 5 1 1 16 15 Minnesota United 4 3 2 14 18 Real Salt Lake 3 5 1 10 11 Sporting Kansas City 2 2 4 10 19 Vancouver 2 5 3 9 10 San Jose 2 5 2 8 12 Portland 2 5 1 7 11 Colorado 0 8 2 2 14 Friday Vancouver 3, Colorado 2 Saturday LA Galaxy at New York, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 3 p.m. New York City FC at Montreal, 4 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at San Jose, 9 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at Sporting Kansas City, 8 p.m.

GA 10 10 14 13 11 14 12 13 9 8 16 19 GA 8 8 12 9 8 15 16 15 14 19 19 27


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE BASEBALL Troy (15-6) vs. Palmyra, at Quincy ND, 9 a.m. Wright City (11-10) at Linn (3-0), 9 a.m. Francis Howell (15-14) at FZ South (15-9), 9:30 a.m. Hazelwood West (6-11) at Parkway North (15-9), 10 a.m. Northwest-CH (5-13) at Fox (10-6), 10 a.m. Lutheran South (17-8) vs. Holt (8-13), at Borgia, 10 a.m. Sacred Heart (0-2) at Collinsville (10-11), 10 a.m. Centralia (Ill.) (3-16) at Carlyle (6-15), 10 a.m. John Burroughs (5-9) at Principia (1-8), 10 a.m. Marquette (13-8) at FZ West (16-11-1), 10 a.m. Liberty (15-4) at FH North (7-15), 10 a.m. Vianney (19-8) at Alton Marquette (17-6), 10 a.m. Priory (10-9) at MICDS (11-8), 10 a.m. Lebanon (0-11) at Brussels (1-4), 10 a.m. Warrenton (9-11) at Sullivan (12-6), 10 a.m. Hardin Calhoun (11-14) at Southwestern (7-17), 10 a.m. Normal U. High at O’Fallon (15-7), 10 a.m. Columbia (17-4) at Triad (11-12), 10 a.m. Troy (15-6) at Quincy Notre Dame (2-1), 11 a.m. Maplewood-RH (7-11-1) at Bayless (9-10), 11 a.m. Highland (10-10) at Edwardsville (19-4), 11 a.m. Hancock (11-7) vs. Brentwood (8-8), 11 a.m. Hermann (11-8) vs. Wright City (11-10), at Linn, 11 a.m. Timberland (14-6) at Eldon, 11 a.m. Crystal City (1-11) at Grandview (2-11), 11 a.m. Wesclin (10-13) at Okawville (9-10), 11 a.m. Belleville West (17-4) at Gibault (18-5), 11 a.m. Francis Howell (15-14) at FZ South (15-9), 11:30 a.m. Sacred Heart (0-2) at Collinsville (10-11), noon Vianney (19-8) at Alton Marquette (17-6), noon Alton (10-13) at Webster Groves (11-9), noon Highland (10-10) at Lockport (2-0), noon Marquette (13-8) at FZ West (16-11-1), 12:30 p.m. Lutheran South (17-8) at Borgia (15-6), 1 p.m. Hermann (11-8) at Linn (3-0), 1 p.m. Belleville West (17-4) vs. Althoff (9-10), at Gibault, 1 p.m. Wesclin (10-13) at Okawville (9-10), 1 p.m. Duchesne (7-15) at Orchard Farm (9-9), 1 p.m. St. Charles (6-14) vs. Jefferson (15-3), at Palmyra, 1 p.m. Chatham (3-1) at Edwardsville (19-4), 1:30 p.m. Timberland (14-6) at Eldon, 1:30 p.m. Maplewood-RH (7-11-1) at Bayless (9-10), 2 p.m. Brentwood (8-8) at Hancock (11-7), 2 p.m. Westminster (22-3) at FH North (7-15), 2 p.m. Webster Groves (11-9) vs. Ladue (9-4), at Webster, 2:30 p.m. St. Charles (6-14) at Palmyra, 3 p.m. Mater Dei (14-8) vs. Freeburg (13-10), at Busch Stadium, 3 p.m. Gibault (18-5) vs. Althoff (9-10), at Whitey Herzog, 6 p.m. SOFTBALL MARISSA INVITATIONAL Consolation semifinals: 10 a.m. Semifinals: 11:30 a.m. Seventh place: 1 p.m. Consolation final: 1 p.m. Third place: 2:30 p.m. Championship: 2:30 p.m. GIRLS SOCCER CLASS 1A BREESE CENTRAL REGIONAL First round Mount Carmel, Illinois (0-1) vs. Salem (0-6), 4:30 p.m. NON-TOURNAMENT GAMES FZ North (8-7) at FZ South (10-6-1), 9 a.m. St. Pius X (6-9) at John Burroughs (6-4), 11 a.m. Villa Duchesne (12-5) at Ladue (10-11), 11:30 a.m. Trinity (10-6-1) at O’Fallon Christian (4-12), noon Visitation (10-4) at Webster Groves (8-5-1), 2 p.m. Granite City (8-5-3) at Edwardsville (10-7), 5:30 p.m. Carbondale (5-12) at Althoff (16-4-1), 6:30 p.m. BOYS VOLLEYBALL O’FALLON TOURNAMENT Bronze semifinals: 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 a.m. Guaranteed match: 10:30 a.m. Bronze final: 11:30 a.m. Quarterfinals: 8:30 a.m. & 9:30 a.m. Silver semifinals: 10:30 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Championship semifinals: 10:30 a.m. & 11:30 a.m. Silver final: 12:30 p.m. Third place: 12:30 p.m. Championship: 12:30 p.m. BOYS LACROSSE Chaminade (7-4) at Eureka (14-4), 11 a.m. BOYS TENNIS NORMAL UNIVERSITY INVITATIONAL Teams: Belleville West, Normal University High, Triad, 8:30 a.m. MOLINE INVITATIONAL Teams: Alton, Moline, 9 a.m. WATER POLO Ladue (9-16) at Kirkwood (11-13), 9 a.m. Oakville (12-11) at Lindbergh (22-7), 11 a.m. Parkway South (20-8) vs. Chaminade (6-9), at Lindbergh, 12:15 p.m. Marquette (16-8-1) vs. Parkway Central (8-21), at MICDS, 12:30 p.m. De Smet (16-9-1) vs. Lafayette (12-19), at Lindbergh, 1:30 p.m. CBC (8-13) at MICDS (15-3), 1:45 p.m. John Burroughs (10-11) vs. St. Louis U. High (19-2), at Lindbergh, 2:45 p.m. TRACK AND FIELD COLLINSVILLE INVITATIONAL Teams: Belleville West, Collinsville, Highland, Jerseyville, Mascoutah, Waterloo, Wesclin, 9 a.m. LUTHERAN SOUTH INVITATIONAL Teams: Lutheran South, Metro-East Lutheran, Vianney, 9 a.m. CLASS 1 DISTRICT 1 MEET At Cape Girardeau Central Teams: Barat, Bell City, Chamois, Clopton, Community R-6, Couch, Crystal City, Delta, Essex, Fulton School at St. Albans, MSD Missouri School for Deaf, Oran, Scott County Central, Silex, St. Paul Lutheran, Van Buren, Viburnum, Wellsville, Zalma, 10 a.m. CLASS 2 DISTRICT 4 MEET At New Haven Teams: Belle, Bourbon, Cabool, Conway, Dixon, Gainesville, Hartville, Licking, Mansfield, New Haven, Plato, Steelville, Missouri, 10:30 a.m. CLASS 2 DITRICT 2 MEET At Principia Teams: Brentwood, Cleveland, Crossroads College Prep, Elsberry, Grandview, Jefferson, McKinley, Medicine and Bioscience, Northwest Academy, Principia, Valley Park, West County (Leadwood), 11:30 a.m.

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

GIRLS LACROSSE

BLOCKBUSTER

Roux helps St. Joseph’s hold off rival Cor Jesu BY BEN VESSA

Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

MARYLAND HEIGHTS • It’s a play known as Netflix. When a St. Joseph’s girls lacrosse player enters the offensive zone, she looks for a trailer, and when that trailer is Catey Roux, the play usually becomes a blockbuster. Roux scored six goals, Ellie Boveri added five and the Angels’ defense held Cor Jesu to just three second-half goals in a 15-12 victory on Friday at Lou Fusz Soccer Park. St. Joseph’s (8-4) scored the first goal of the game, but led for only 14 seconds of the first half, as Cor Jesu leaned heavily on the power and quickness of Lauren Koesterer. The senior attacker scored three times, forced double-teams and carved out open space for her teammates, as the Chargers led 9-8 at halftime. “We just needed to compose ourselves and get focused,” St. Joseph’s coach Jennifer Bisch said.“We were getting a little defensively frazzled, but we knew if we could stop (Koesterer),then we would be able to control the midfield.” And it was the play of Roux in the first half that kept the Angels within striking distance. Roux scored four goals, often emerging through a sea of bodies to find the net, and also added an assist on a Boveri goal. As a sophomore, Roux scored 28 goals. On Friday, she netted her 55th goal in just 12 games. “We were trying to fire off double (teams) and even triple (teams)

PAUL BAILLARGEON, SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

St. Joseph’s Catey Roux runs past Cor Jesu’s Claire Polizzi on Friday in Maryland Heights. if we could, but how do you stop a kid who is that good?” Cor Jesu coach Andrew Shipp said about Roux. The Angels defense, led by senior Alex McWhirter, was brilliant from the opening draw of the second half, holding Cor Jesu scoreless for the first 10 minutes, and allowing the Angels to reclaim the lead. “Defensively, we just really worked hard,” McWhirter said. “In the second half, we had the heart and the emotion, and we just wanted it.” While St. Joe’s defense was clamping down, Boveri was just getting revved up. After Roux scored on a free position shot to tie the score, Boveri began her destruction of a strip of grass

behind the Cor Jesu net. Three times in the second half Boveri accepted the ball on the left side of the net, then turned on the jets, raced behind the net and emerged out the other side to score. “I kind of had this adrenaline rush, which I get when we’re down or we need help,” Boveri said. “I just wrapped it around and tucked it in the top corner, and it seemed to work pretty well.” Cor Jesu (9-2) cut the lead to 14-12 with just over three minutes to play when Boveri’s adrenaline kicked in again, ending with a 30yard sprint to the net that iced the game and began a team celebration. “Being up two goals isn’t really a

done deal, but being up three goals with a minute left, it’s time to start celebrating,” Boveri said. St. Joe’s has been doing a lot of celebrating since a 13-12 overtime victory against MICDS on April 2. It was their first loss in the state of Missouri since 2016 for the backto-back state champion Rams, and served as a springboard for the Angels, who rattled of five straight wins after that. “We beat MICDS, that was our first goal, we beat (Cor Jesu), that was our second goal, and we want to be in the final four, that’s our third goal,” Bisch said. And with the continued stellar play of Roux, Boveri and the rest of the Angels, St. Joe’s may be binging on even more wins come playoff time.

BASEBALL

Chaminade rallies to beat Vianney in extra innings BY PAUL HALFACRE

STLhighschoolsports.com

KIRKWOOD • Hunter Shaheen isn’t known for his speed around the basepaths. But when he made contact with one out in the top of the seventh inning of a one-run game, the senior catcher put his head down and ran. “I just put my head down for a little bit just to try and get out of there fast as possible because, being a catcher, the assumption is that we’re slow,” Shaheen said. Shaheen’s hustle paid off as he set up the Red Devils for the tying run in the top of the seventh before junior Patrick Clohisy drove in the game-winner in a 3-2, eightinning victory over Metro Catholic Conference rival Vianney on Friday. “I’ve started on varsity for four years and this is the first time we’ve beaten them, so it feels pretty good,” Shaheen said. Chaminade (19-6, 3-4 MCC), the No. 8 large school in the STLhighschoolsports.com rankings, snapped a 12-game losing streak to its conference foe. The last time Chaminade defeated Vianney was a 3-2 victory on April 4, 2013. Shaheen came to the plate in the top of the seventh with the Red Devils trailing 2-1 against Vianney starting pitcher Nathan Beaton, who was dealing. After

PAUL HALFACRE, STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Chaminade’s Teddy Phelan (right) scores the tying run on Friday at Vianney High School in Kirkwood. giving up a run in the first inning, snapping a streak of 29 consecutive scoreless innings, Beaton shut down Chaminade until Shaheen got the plate. Shaheen battled for six pitches before lining a single into the outfield. Running hard out of the box, Shaheen finally looked up and saw the ball roll to the wall. “It’s something we end each practice,” Chaminade coach Chris Chiburis said. “Getting to a certain spot and going hard no matter what because you’re not going to second base if you’re not going hard. He rounded it really well, and just kept going.” Shaheen sprinted around second

base and reached third safely before Chiburis put in senior Teddy Phelan as a courtesy runner. “I was like, ‘Coach, get me out here. I need an inhaler,’” Shaheen said. “I don’t do a lot of running behind the plate.” Phelan scored on a passed ball one at-bat later to tie it and force extra innings. “That was one where you’ve got to find a way to keep that in front of you (in the outfield),” Vianney coach Scott Brown said. “You’ve got to find a to overcome that. We always talk about limiting the damage and we just didn’t quite do that. They got the run and we couldn’t quite muster up.”

After giving up a first-inning, game-tying home run to Vianney’s Brock Daniels, Shaheen gave some words of wisdom to sophomore right-handed starting pitcher Jack Weber. “My main thing with the guys, if they’ve given up a big hit or home run that can sway the game, I just say take a deep breathe and go back at it,” Shaheen said. “Every pitch is a new game in my mind.” Weber threw six innings, scattering four hits while giving up one earned run before Sam Howell came on in relief to pitch the final two innings for his third win of the season. “Their pitcher pitched a good game and they made all the plays and we didn’t,” Brown said. “In a game like this, one play can make a difference.” Vianney (19-9, 6-1 MCC) will get a short turnaround before hosting St. Mary’s and Alton Marquette on Saturday morning. “The biggest thing is that we’ve got to keep on improving,” Brown said. “All you have to do is look across the field at that team. They’ve made a lot of improvements and are a much better ball team. At this time of the year, you’ve got to keep finding a way to get better. If you’re complacent, teams will catch up with you.”

FRIDAY’S RESULTS BOYS TRACK HARRISBURG INVITATIONAL Team scores: 1. East St. Louis 154, 2. Marion 137.5, 3. Triad 119, 4. Mount Vernon, Illinois 90.5, 5. Herrin 76.5 100 meters: 1. Johnnie Caswell, Triad, 11.23; 2. Nathaniel Robinson, East St. Louis, 11.27; 3. Keveon Anderson, East St. Louis, 11.38 200 meters: 1. Keontez Lewis, East St. Louis, 22.59; 2. Johnnie Caswell, Triad, 22.6; 3. Brendan Vaughn, Vienna, 23.31 400 meters: 1. Nathaniel Robinson, East St. Louis, 51.95; 2. Alex Smith, Vienna, 52.32; 3. Xavier Mix, East St. Louis, 52.54 800 meters: 1. Willie Johnson, East St. Louis, 2:01.41; 2. Drew Ringle, Herrin, 2:04.1; 3. Luke Perry, Triad, 2:05.25 1600 meters: 1. Drake Bleier, Triad, 4:39.57; 2. Jarod Willis, Triad, 4:40.57; 3. Matthew Crabtree, Marion, 4:48.16 3200 meters: 1. Kevin Perkins, Mount Vernon, Illinois, 10:33.64; 2. Logan Morgan, Marion, 10:37.22; 3. Caleb Bagwell, Triad, 10:53.12 110 hurdles: 1. Stuart Adkinson, Marion, 14.82; 2. Jamarriante Burgess, East St. Louis, 14.87; 3. Alec Sledge, Mount Vernon, Illinois, 16.49 300 hurdles: 1. Jamarriante Burgess, East St. Louis, 39.9; 2. Darrione Williams, East St. Louis, 41.53; 3. Stuart Adkinson, Marion, 42.18 400 relay: 1. East St. Louis, 43; 2. Marion, 45.26; 3. Mount Vernon, Illinois, 45.51; 800 relay: 1. East St. Louis, 1:30.51; 2. Triad, 1:33.37; 3. Herrin, 1:35.1 1600 relay: 1. East St. Louis, 3:23.45; 2. Triad, 3:31.64; 3. Mount Vernon, Illinois, 3:35.84 3200 relay: 1. Marion, 8:34.45; 2. Herrin, 8:41.93; 3. Vienna, 8:47.59 High jump: 1. CJ Johnson, Frankfort, 6-06; 3. Will Hancock, Triad, 6-00; 2. Trammel Hawkins, Mount Vernon, Illinois, 6-00 Pole vault: 1. Jadon Elliott, Triad, 14-00; 3. Dyson Roye, Marion, 12-06; 2. Kody Cavender, Harrisburg, Illinois, 12-06 Long jump: 1. Darrione Williams, East St. Louis, 20-08.75; 2. Lane Ross, Vienna, 2001.5; 3. Trammel Hawkins, Mount Vernon, Illinois, 19-10 Triple jump: 1. Darrione Williams, East St. Louis, 42-04.5; 2. Billy Braid, Herrin, 40-00.5; 3. JT Stone, Harrisburg, Illinois, 39-00.25 Shot put: 1. Josh Schmid, Marion, 51-01; 2. Zach Gibbs, Harrisburg, Illinois, 50-01; 3. James Gunn, Marion, 48-07 Discus: 1. Josh Schmid, Marion, 149-09; 2. James Gunn, Marion, 141-03; 3. Chase Belangee, Mount Vernon, Illinois, 134-07 GAC CENTRAL MEET Team scores: 1. Fort Zumwalt East 149, 2. Timberland 112, 3. Washington 96, 4. Fort

Zumwalt North 91, 5. Liberty (Wentzville) 79, 6. Fort Zumwalt South 58 100 meters: 1. Keshon Smith, Fort Zumwalt East, 11.31; 2. Joshua Johnston, Fort Zumwalt East, 11.424; 3. Isaiah Edmonds, Fort Zumwalt South, 11.428 200 meters: 1. Daulton Bender, Washington, 22.8; 2. Keshon Smith, Fort Zumwalt East, 22.82; 3. Tyler Oakes, Fort Zumwalt North, 23.29 400 meters: 1. Daulton Bender, Washington, 51.25; 2. Joshua Paskiewicz, Fort Zumwalt East, 52.44; 3. Kameron Davis, Liberty (Wentzville), 52.71 800 meters: 1. Drew Schulte, Timberland, 2:02.84; 2. Nolan Schroff, Fort Zumwalt East, 2:03.51; 3. Tyler Hudson, Liberty (Wentzville), 2:06.99 1600 meters: 1. Drew Schulte, Timberland, 4:38.78; 2. Noah Little, Washington, 4:39.83; 3. Trevor Peimann, Timberland, 4:41.23 3200 meters: 1. Drew Schulte, Timberland, 10:15.1; 2. Noah Little, Washington, 10:17.57; 3. Trevor Peimann, Timberland, 10:18.55 110 hurdles: 1. Bruce Jordan, Liberty (Wentzville), 15.57; 2. Elijah Edmonds, Fort Zumwalt South, 16.08; 3. Vashon Riggins, Timberland, 16.42 300 hurdles: 1. Bruce Jordan, Liberty (Wentzville), 41.22; 2. Elijah Edmonds, Fort Zumwalt South, 41.83; 3. Landon Oxford, Fort Zumwalt East, 42.26 400 relay: 1. Fort Zumwalt North, 43.92; 2. Fort Zumwalt East, 43.96; 2. Fort Zumwalt South, 43.96 800 relay: 1. Fort Zumwalt East, 1:32.64; 2. Fort Zumwalt North, 1:32.66; 3. Timberland, 1:32.89 1600 relay: 1. Washington, 3:33.9; 2. Fort Zumwalt East, 3:37.07; 3. Fort Zumwalt North, 3:38.42 3200 relay: 1. Timberland, 8:24.98; 2. Fort Zumwalt East, 8:26.22; 3. Fort Zumwalt North, 8:32.43 High jump: 1. Kendall Banks-Price, Fort Zumwalt North, 5-10; 2. Dan Hierholzer, Timberland, 5-08; 3. Jake Schwepker, Fort Zumwalt South, 5-08 Pole vault: 1. Nolan Bone, Liberty (Wentzville), 15-03; 2. Jake Schwepker, Fort Zumwalt South, 12-06; 3. Aidan Siemer, Fort Zumwalt North, 12-00 Long jump: 1. Jeffrey Radichel, Liberty (Wentzville), 20-00.5; 2. Bryce Meyer, Washington, 19-04.75; 3. Matthew Reynolds, Fort Zumwalt South, 19-04.25 Triple jump: 1. Jeffrey Radichel, Liberty (Wentzville), 43-10; 2. Izaiah Hartrup, Fort Zumwalt North, 41-00.75; 3. Bryce Meyer, Washington, 39-09.5 Shot put: 1. Tristan Davis, Fort Zumwalt East, 45-08.25; 2. Jacob Morris, Fort Zumwalt East, 44-09; 3. Jackson Petty,

Timberland, 43-05.25 Discus: 1. Jacob Morris, Fort Zumwalt East, 158-00; 2. Bryce Eaton, Timberland, 145-05; 3. Tristan Davis, Fort Zumwalt East, 137-04 Javelin: 1. Andrew Gildehaus, Washington, 134-08; 2. Tristan Davis, Fort Zumwalt East, 128-02; 3. Ryan Medley, Fort Zumwalt North, 126-04 GIRLS TRACK MVC CHAMPIONSHIPS Team scores: 1. Triad 166, 2. Mascoutah 114, 3. Highland 105, 4. Waterloo 84, 5. Civic Memorial 45.5, 6. Jerseyville 39.5 100 meters: 1. Timia Williams, Mascoutah, 13.1; 2. Lauren Johnson, Triad, 13.37; 3. Rachel Yates, Triad, 13.38 200 meters: 1. Faith Grapperhaus, Triad, 26.67; 2. Maura Niemeier, Civic Memorial, 27.43; 3. Cameryn Hodges, Mascoutah, 27.71 400 meters: 1. Anya Holloway, Mascoutah, 59.65; 2. Sydney Hartoin, Triad, 1:00.19; 3. Kayla Edwards, Triad, 1:01.86 800 meters: 1. Kate Marti, Highland, 2:28.47; 2. Haley Jackson, Triad, 2:29.48; 3. Hannah Tonsor, Jerseyville, 2:34.24 1600 meters: 1. Krista Rittenhouse, Highland, 5:38.89; 2. Julia Loeh, Highland, 5:42.05; 3. Alyssa Kowalski, Triad, 5:50.96 3200 meters: 1. Jenna Schwartz, Waterloo, 11:17.47; 2. Ella King, Waterloo, 12:11.51; 3. Grace Meyer, Highland, 12:24.19 100 hurdles: 1. Marah Johnston, Waterloo, 17.23; 2. DeJae Hudson, Mascoutah, 17.57; 3. Lydia Hadowsky, Highland, 17.7 300 hurdles: 1. Marah Johnston, Waterloo, 50.42; 2. Payton Rasmussen, Triad, 51.21; 3. Kaylee Vahle, Jerseyville, 52.81 400 relay: 1. Mascoutah, 50.81; 2. Triad, 51.35; 3. Jerseyville, 53.18 800 relay: 1. Triad, 1:47.53; 2. Mascoutah, 1:49.79; 3. Waterloo, 1:55.46 1600 relay: 1. Mascoutah, 4:07.76; 2. Triad, 4:15.2; 3. Waterloo, 4:18.22 3200 relay: 1. Triad, 10:12.69; 2. Mascoutah, 10:14.79; 3. Highland, 10:32.13 High jump: 1. Jacklynn Woelfel, Civic Memorial, 5-01; 3. Lilly Cawley, Triad, 4-10; 2. Faith Grapperhaus, Triad, 4-10 Pole vault: 1. Bridget Coolican, Triad, 9-09; 3. Olivia Lee, Mascoutah, 9-00; 2. Megan Griesbaum, Highland, 9-00 Long jump: 1. DeJae Hudson, Mascoutah, 17-10; 2. Maura Niemeier, Civic Memorial, 1705.5; 3. Denise D’Antonio, Triad, 16-05.5 Triple jump: 1. Maura Niemeier, Civic Memorial, 35-09.75; 2. Lexi Liles, Jerseyville, 35-04.75; 3. Denise D’Antonio, Triad, 34-11.5 Shot put: 1. Taylor Kesner, Highland, 3809.5; 2. Krista Cochran, Triad, 35-06.5; 3. Caleigh Miller, Triad, 32-01 Discus: 1. Taylor Kesner, Highland, 115-09; 2. Elise Dodel, Waterloo, 100-00; 3. Taylor

Simpson, Mascoutah, 98-11 GAC CENTRAL MEET Team scores: 1. Timberland 130, 2. Fort Zumwalt East 127, 3. Washington 120, 4. Liberty (Wentzville) 90, 5. Fort Zumwalt South 57.5, 6. Fort Zumwalt North 49.5 100 meters: 1. Quierra Johnston, Fort Zumwalt East, 12.94; 2. Sarah Bozeman, Fort Zumwalt South, 13.02; 3. Jordyn Grimes, Fort Zumwalt North, 13.1 200 meters: 1. Quierra Johnston, Fort Zumwalt East, 26.56; 2. Alexis Walker, Fort Zumwalt South, 26.92; 3. Eunice Antwi, Fort Zumwalt East, 27.38 400 meters: 1. Karlie Wooten, Liberty (Wentzville), 59.77; 2. Quierra Johnston, Fort Zumwalt East, 1:01.28; 3. Emma Duncan, Washington, 1:03.85 800 meters: 1. Claire Ayers, Washington, 2:25.15; 2. Megan Venturella, Liberty (Wentzville), 2:27.3; 3. Adrienne Rockette, Liberty (Wentzville), 2:27.46 1600 meters: 1. Ally Kruger, Liberty (Wentzville), 5:17.35; 2. Claire Ayers, Washington, 5:22.27; 3. Madelyn Gray, Fort Zumwalt South, 5:24.74 3200 meters: 1. Ally Kruger, Liberty (Wentzville), 11:41.14; 2. Mia Reed, Washington, 12:00.67; 3. Audrey Kelly, Fort Zumwalt East, 12:16.87 100 hurdles: 1. Ingrid Figas, Washington, 16.1; 2. Morgan Gratza, Washington, 16.82; 3. Anaya Spears, Fort Zumwalt East, 18.26 300 hurdles: 1. Ingrid Figas, Washington, 48.07; 2. Anaya Spears, Fort Zumwalt East, 50.19; 3. Maddy Lucas, Timberland, 50.95; 400 relay: 1. Fort Zumwalt South, 51.39; 2. Timberland, 52.01; 3. Fort Zumwalt North, 52.22 800 relay: 1. Fort Zumwalt East, 1:49.74; 2. Fort Zumwalt South, 1:49.95; 3. Timberland, 1:51.66 1600 relay: 1. Washington, 4:15.57; 2. Liberty (Wentzville), 4:16.13; 3. Timberland, 4:28.99 3200 relay: 1. Liberty (Wentzville), 9:51.81; 2. Washington, 9:52.98; 3. Timberland, 10:17.32 High jump: 1. Morgan Gratza, Washington, 5-04; 2. Jessica Clausner, Fort Zumwalt North, 4-10; 3. Courtney Boehm, Timberland, 4-08 Pole vault: 1. Sarah Friend, Timberland, 9-00; 2. Claire Meara, Timberland, 8-06; 3. Khalia Rhone, Fort Zumwalt East, 7-06 Long jump: 1. Makayla Davis, Fort Zumwalt South, 15-08.75; 2. Corey Fletcher, Timberland, 15-07.75; 3. Morgan Gratza, Washington, 15-07 Triple jump: 1. Kaitlyn Simms, Fort Zumwalt North, 33-02; 2. Gabriella Ringo, Timberland, 32-11; 3. Morgan Gratza, Washington, 31-09.5

Shot put: 1. J’dyn Green, Timberland, 3603.25; 2. Shelonda Thomas, Fort Zumwalt East, 35-03.75; 3. Hyja Hutchinson, Fort Zumwalt East, 33-02.5 Discus: 1. J’dyn Green, Timberland, 115-02; 2. Makenna Jasper, Timberland, 110-06; 3. Shelonda Thomas, Fort Zumwalt East, 99-05 Javelin: 1. Macie Farrier, Fort Zumwalt East, 110-00; 2. Sophia Olszowka, Washington, 106-01; 3. Bailey Broemmer, Timberland, 100-02 BASEBALL Houston 001 001 5 7 9 0 St. Louis Pat 320 023 0 10 10 0 W-Frank Griesbauer. . Mt Vernon 000 100 0 1 6 0 Waterloo 030 100 0 4 9 2 W-Dustin Crawford. Chaminade 100 000 11 3 7 0 Vianney 100 010 00 2 4 0 W-Sam Howell. FZ North 220 010 0 5 7 0 Pky. North 111 131 0 8 10 0 W-Elijah Tiznado. L-Andrew Schwerdt. HR-F Ryan Frazier Freeburg 200 020 11 6 12 0 Civic Mem. 004 010 00 5 9 0 W-Nick Yeager. FZ West 130 001 0 5 7 0 Holt 000 000 0 0 2 0 W-Tyler Kotsis. HR-F Drew Mize Haz. Central 001 1 3 2 Seckman 358 16 15 0 W-Parker Boyd. L-Noah Gallagher. Timberland 001 000 0 1 5 0 FH Central 003 510 0 9 12 4 W-Zach Baldi. De Smet 030 000 011 5 7 0 Howell 000 210 010 4 8 3 L-Brett Brazill. O’F Christian 001 100 0 2 3 0 FZ East 123 013 0 10 10 0 W-Nick Kaufmann. HR-F Blake Davis Summit 000 010 1 2 5 0 FH North 000 000 0 0 0 2 L-Nolan Hutson. Vandalia 000 120 0 3 4 0 Gillespie 004 012 0 7 10 4 W-Collin Johnson. Highland 000 020 0 2 3 0 Glenwood 000 100 0 1 4 0 W-Payne Waldman. Teutopolis 000 000 0 0 2 1 Edwardsville 100 000 0 1 3 2 W-Dawson Taylor. L-Dawson Smith. SOFTBALL Alton 100 010 1 3 7 4 Bellvl. East 002 011 0 4 10 3 W-Stephanie Bigham. L-Abby Scyoc. HR-A Abby Scyoc; B Alyssa Krausz Vandalia 000 000 0 0 2 0 Gillespie 101 204 0 8 11 0

W-Sydney Bires. HR-G Sydney Bires -Rylee Jarman -Keaton Link Highland 101 033 0 8 10 0 Columbia 000 000 0 0 5 0 W-Sam Miener. HR-H Sydney Parkerson GIRLS SOCCER Mehlville 1, Notre Dame 0 M: Jenna Benson; shutout by Loren Vandover Seckman 3, Northwest-CH 1 S: Hayley Hogenmiller 2, Lexi Jacobsmeyer Alton 0, Highland 0 H: shutout by Bella LaPorta In. Word 3, MICDS 0 I: Madi Dunahue 2, Olivia Layton; shutout by Grace Paez Mater Dei 4, Civic Mem. 1 M: Faith Rackers 3, Mailee Toennies Marquette 3, Webster 0 M: Maddie Barton, Katie Baumgartner, Keri Wood; shutout by Tabby Cacheris, Teresa Dorhauer. FZ West 3, FZ North 2 FW: Maddie Marshall, Kaitlyn Nichols, Ashton Soots Lindbergh 4, Fox 0 L: Julie Baudendistel, Kayti Graefe, Izzy Feltenstein, Morgan Goodrich FH Central 4, Oakville 2 F: Jenna Mathis 2, Mackenzie Jones, Jay Viola O: Mackenzie Deutschmann, Jenna Frisella BOYS VOLLEYBALL Mehlville def. Bellvl. West 25-19, 25-11 O’Fallon def. Howell 25-21, 25-16 Chaminade def. Oakville 25-18, 25-21 Pky. West def. Pky. South 25-13, 25-21 FZ South def. CBC 25-16, 25-17 Howell def. Summit 25-18, 25-19 Chaminade def. Althoff 25-23, 25-19 Luth. South def. Bellvl. East 25-19, 25-19 Bellvl. West def. Seckman 25-23, 25-14 O’Fallon def. Summit 25-22, 25-19 Bellvl. East def. Webster 25-14, 28-27 Mehlville def. Seckman 25-16, 25-16 Althoff def. Oakville 25-20, 23-25, 15-12 Luth. South def. Webster 24-26, 25-21, 15-1 GIRLS LACROSSE Lafayette 16, Nerinx Hall 4 L: Katherine Goddin 5, Kate Deline 3, Sophia Scheller 2, Mia Simpson 2, Ansley Hails, Courtney Joerz, Kari Kamrud, Anna Reynolds Pky. West 9, Eureka 6 E: Sydney Tiemann 2, Natalie Archambault 2, Madi Reisig, Lexi Sigmund BOYS TENNIS Timberland 9, Troy 0 Clayton 9, Oakville 0 Marquette 9, Webster Groves 0


05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B11

CLASSIFIED Audi

BMW

Infiniti

Chevrolet Trucks

Sport Utility

Dogs

'18 Q5 Premium Plus/Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 7k mi., #27839L $41,250

'16 BMW M3, Sedan 6 cyl., rwd, manual, black, lthr., 8k mi., #29149A $50,225

'19 Infiniti QX50 Essential, 4 cyl., awd, 4k mi., $37,250 #98030L

'16 Silverao 1500 LT 27k Miles , 4WD, Auto, 4.3L $27,991 #P 6756

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $41,250 #28175L

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

'16 BMW M255ix Drive Coupe, 36k mi., 6 cyl., 3.0L, awd, auto, #P9768 $28,250

'17 Infiniti Q50, 3.0t Premium, Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 12k mi., #96195L $29,250

'15 SIILVERADO 1500 LT: Double Ca b P ickup, 8 Cyl 4WD, Auto, Bla ck, 36xxx Mile s , #P 6781, $29,560

'16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, $32,250 #12382A

'17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $60,000 #95548L

Puppies Ready Now ! 2018 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9619 $48,250

'16 Audi A7 3.0 Premium Plus, quattro sportback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, #P9890 $40,000

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, awd, clean carfax, one owner, 8k miles, #28758L $41,250

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, 7K Miles, quattro, awd, clean carfax, #28209L $33,250

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, #27850L $42,700

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27845L $42,500

'18 Audi Q5 Prem Plus/Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 8k mi., #27840L $41,250

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27844L $42,700

'18 Audi Q52.0T Premium Plus, quattro, clean carfax, 1 owner, awd, #28649L $41,250

'18 Audi Q5 Prem/Tech Prem, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 21k, #P9675 $34,250

'15 BMW M3 4dr sedan, 6 cyl., RWD, manual, white, 29k mi., #P9684 $41,250

'16 BMW 3 Series Gran Turismo 335i xDrive, hatchback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 37k mi., #P9790 $26,900

'18 Buick Enclave Essence, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 2k mi., $39,000, #41129A

'17 Buick LaCrosse Premium Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 17k mi., #P9893 $27,000

Cadillac '16 XT3 P LATINUM: Loa de d, Cle a n Carfax, Only 13xxx Mile s ! $32,990, #44255A

'13 Escalade Platinum: AWD, 85xxx Miles, DVD, Leather, 3rd Row, $27,225, #P9760

'16 Audi Q5 Premium, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 22k mi., #P9901 $27,000

'12 CRUZE ECO: One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax, #37041A, $7,990 '18 Audi Q5 Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 7k mi., #27838L $42,963 '11 MALIBU LT: Le a the r, Loa de d, #44595, $8,770 '17 Audi Q7 Prestige, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9934 $49,500

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, pickup cre w ca b, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, white , 3k mi., #P 6799 $40,990

Lexus '16 RC 300 Coupe: 16xxx Miles, Auto, AWD, Keyless Start, $30,250, #P9644

'14 Lexus GX 460 Luxury, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 41k mi., #29153A $34,000

Lincoln

Mazda '18 GMC Acadia Denali, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 21k mi., #97319A $36,000

Dodge '13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $30,000

'16 CHARGER R/T: Loa de d, Bla ck, One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax, #44589A, $24,990

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $28,900

'19 Chevy Tra ve rs e LT, lthr., 6 cyl., awd, a uto, grey, 18k mi., $38,991, #P 6793

'11 GMC Acadia SUV $6,822, #198211 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Dodge Durango R/T, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, white, 35k mi., #P9927 $32,250

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, 8 cyl., 4WD, a uto, bla ck, 28k mi., $30,290 #P 6784

'15 GMC YUKON DENALI: Loa de d, Cle a n Carfax, GM Ce rtifie d! #42629A, $37 ,990

'13 EDGE: #190421, $13,880 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'15 Honda Accord EX-L, one owne r, loa de d, cle a n carfax $13,750, #44443A

'08 ACCORD EX-L: 3.5 V6, Loa de d, Cle a n Carfax, #44592A, $8,990

Infiniti '19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl, awd, auto, black, 16k mi., #P9887 $57,000

'18 Audi A6, Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, grey, #28600L $42,250

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 13k mi., #P9801 $55,900 '18 Audi S4 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 8k mi., #29014A $47,999

'15 Infiniti QX80 4wd, 4 dr., sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 97k mi., #98388A $31,963

'15 Audi S4 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 50k mi., #P9687 $30,250 '17 Infiniti QX80 auto, awd, blue, #95533L $59,900

'17 Audi S8 Plus, 4.0 TFSI, quattro sedan, 8 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 25k mi., #29184A $79,200 '19 Infiniti QX60 LUXE, 9k mi., black, awd, variable, #98090L $38,000 '18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, #27853L $42,600 '19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 16k mi., #P9886 $37,000 '18 GMC Canyon 4wd, all terrain w/cloth, pickup crew cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 4k, #P9860 $32,000

'15 Infiniti QX80, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 86k mi., #98311A $32,000

BMW '19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, 13k mi., $37,000 #P9817

'16 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, 5.3L, Auto, 35K Mi., $27,990 #P 6752

'13 C300 4MATIC: #196422, $11,220 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $35,250 #P9651

'16 Mercedes-Benz SLK 300, Roadster, 4 cyl., RWD, auto, black, 18k mi., #12811A $34,700

'16 GMC Yukon SLE, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 27k mi, #P9894 $37,000

Garage Sales 63137. Chambers at Hwy 367. Early Bird Sale 5/3, 3-7:30 pm & Regular Sale 5/4; 8:30am-1 pm Grace Chapel Rummage Sale $1 bag sale 12:30pm Supports Youth There will also be a Plant Sale & BBQ Saturday.

Karastan Wool Rugs, tabriz design, 10'x14' and 3'x5'. $2,000 for both. 314-283-9118.

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Bargain Box Area rug- Oriental Weavers brand, Ariana design, 9'x12', navy blue, $350. 314-283-9118 Kenmore Fridge, like new, clean 18.5 CF, Almond , glass shelving. $349.00. 314-631-6688. Treadmill- True brand, model# 540HRC w/ mat, hardly used. $300. 314-283-9118

Public Notices '16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, s ilve r, 51k mi., #P 6797 $41,385

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $41,250 #79760A

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, white , 5k mi., $31,473 #35139A

'15 CANYON SLE: Loa de d, Ext Ca b, Only 6xxx Mile s ! #37170AA, $21,469

'18 GMC Yukon STL SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 26k mi., #80333B $47,200

'19 Mazda CX-9 Grand Touring, sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 11k mi., #P9936 $35,963

'17 GMC Acadia Denali, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 21k mi., #P9922 $33,750

'08 SIERRA DENALI 2500: Cre w Ca b Die s e l, Only 400 Mile s ! GM Ce rtifie d! #44550A, $58,5 00

'17 GMC Yukon XL Denali, white, auto, 4wd, 19k mi., #79897A $59,000

Toyota Trucks '17 Toyota Tacoma SR5/TRD Sport/TRD Off Road, double cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 12k mi., #P9875 $34,000

Sealed bids for Pavement Repairs, Missouri State Highway Patrol, General Headquarters, 1510 E. Elm St. Jefferson City, MO 65101, Pr o je c t N o . R 1 7 0 4 - 0 1 w ill b e received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, May 30, 2019. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

Bids/Proposals ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

'17 Mazda MX-5 Miata, RF Gra nd Touring, coupe , 4 cyl., RWD, 6 spd ma nua l, re d, 25k mi., #P 6674 $24,973

'16 Toyota Highlander XLE, sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 14k mi., #P9914 $32,000

Mini vans

'17 Nissan Armada Platinum, #192411 $35,000 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '11 Sentra S R, Auto, Loa de d, $6,750 #44404

German Shepherd Pups - AKC, Protection & Friendship. Asking $500. Call (573)756-2494 Golden Doodle pups - 8 weeks old on April 25th, will be up to date on shots and ready for your home. $875 618-664-2942 Poodles, Toy, AKC, 8 Mos., Males, smart, no shedding, health guar. W ill H O L D f o r M other's D ay or Graduation $650, Call 6 3 6 537-3797 St Bernard pups, AKC, 9 weeks & 6 weeks $700 636-333-2814

Household Merchandise

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $62,000

'11 HONDA ODYS S EY EX-L: Loa de d, Full P owe r, Cle a n Carfax, #42365A, $11,469

Sealed bids will be received by Wentzville R-IV School District, at the Wentzville Administration Offices, 280 Interstate Drive, We n t z v ille , M O 6 3 3 8 5 , u n t il TUESDAY, MAY 14, 2019, at 1:00 P.M. CST, for the Heritage Intermediate School Storm Sewer Work. Bids w ill be opened publicly at that time. Drawings and Specifications for this project are available through the Wentzville School District; Vendor Regi s t r y . Vis it w w w .w e n t z v i l l e . k1 2 .m o . u s - D e p a r t me n t s Finance & Facilities - Purchasing to register with Vendor Registry to download drawings and Specifications. Not less than the prevailing hourly wage rates, as determined by the State of Missouri, Division of Labor Standards, shall be paid all workers employ ed on this project. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive technicalities, to select any contractor filing a proposal, and to reject any or all bids. NO PRE-BID MEETING IS SCHEDULED

Vans '18 Chevy Expre s s Ca rgo Va n, 24K Mile s , Ce rtifie d, RWD, $22,475 #P 6649

Announcements Toyota '15 Toyota 4Runner Trail, sport utility, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, red, 10k mi., #P9804A $33,963

Volvo

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $39,000

'16 CHEVY TRAVERS E LTZ: Loa de d, One Owne r, GM Ce rtifie d $17,750, #P 6679

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, cre w ca b, 8 cyl., 4 WD, 2k mi., $38,994 #42936A

'09 S 550 4Matic: Bla ck, Only 55xxx Mile s , #44675A, $24,869

Honda

'17 Audi A6 Premium Plus, sedan, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, white, 3k mi., #P9907 $35,000

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500, a uto, bla ck, 45k mi., $29,500 #P 6780

'19 Chevy Tra ve rs e LT, le a the r, s port utility, 6 cyl., awd, a uto, bla ck, 20k mi., #P 6798 $38,990

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, 4 cyl., FWD, a uto, re d, 5k mi., $32,463 #35396A

Nissan/Datsun Ford

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 6k mi, Cert, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $38,250 #P9238

'10 AVALANCHE: Loa de d, One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax, #44085A, $13,469

GMC Trucks

'15 Chevy Corve tte Z51 3LT, conve rtible , 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd ma nua l, 51k mi., #44573A $43,770

'18 Audi A4 Premium Plus, awd, 6k mi., clean carfax, 1 owner #28604L $35,500

'17 A6 Premium Plus: 7xxx Miles, AWD, Auto, $33,900, #80249A

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double ca b pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, 4k mi., #420200A $34,990

'14 Chevy Equinox LS SUV $10,000 #197862 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 103k mi., #79492B $28,000

'12 MAZDA 3 S P ORT: Loa ded, Cle a n Carfax, $6,770, #37065A

Mercedes Benz Corvette

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $38,250 #28140L

'18 Jaguar XF 35t R-Sport, 9k mi., sedan, auto, awd, #P9821 $44,000

'15 J e e p Wra ngle r Manua l, Bla ck $26,990 #37069A

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Chevrolet

'19 CAMARO LT: Only 400 Mile s ! Loa de d! #44654A, $3 0,990

'16 Audi A5 Premium Plus, quattro coupe, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9835 $29,000

'16 CREW CAB DUALLY 4x4: Loa de d, Only 37xxx Mile s ! #44410A, $48,75 0

'16 Lincoln MKZ: Loa de d, Full P owe r, Ve ry Cle a n $17,750 #44323A

'16 Audi S3 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 22k mi., #P9793A $32,963

'15 Audi S5 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9791 $26,900

2016 Lexus GS 350 4 door, 34k miles, clean carfax #P9588 $32,250

Jeep

'07 CHEVY EQUINOX LS: AWD, Loa de d, Only 53xxx Mile s , #44685A, $8,992

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS

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Jaguar

Buick

'13 S ONIC LTZ: H/B, Loade d, Cle a n Carfax, #44461A, $9,969

'18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus, Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, #27848L $42,500

'16 SILVERADO 1500 LT: Double Ca b Pickup, 8 Cyl, 4WD, Auto, Silve r, 41xxx Mile s , #P6783, $28,500

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $40,250 #P9665

'16 S 60 T5: Drive-E Ins cription S e da n, #L1603, $18,5 00 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '07 Volvo XC90 3.2 SUV, #199671 $6,800 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 S 60 T5 R: S pe cia l Edition, #L1582, $20,000 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '18 V60 T5: Cros s Country, AWD, #L1571, $24,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC90: SUV $37,755, #L1566 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 XC 60 T6: SUV, #L15531, $10,822 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo XC90 SUV #L1591 $36,882 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Volvo XC60 T5, awd, ins cription, #P 4358 $26,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC 90 SUV: #197901, $37,890 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC90 T5 Mome ntum: AWD $33,500 #L1559 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo S 60 T5, #L1529 $19,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

STLtoday.com/homes

'11 TACOMA PRERUNNER: Double Ca b, Loa de d, #44563B, $13,990

Crossovers

Dogs Airedale Terrier AKC Male pups Born 03/27. Parents on site in Taylorville, IL 100 miles north. $750, (217)820-0129 Boston Terrier Puppies, 5 females, home-raised, 5wks, 618-967-2774

'17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $40,250, #P9626

STLtoday.com/jobs

ATTENTION If you or someone you know worked for Lyons Sheet Metal or Sheet Metal Local 36 in St. Louis between 1950 and 1970 please call Rebecca at Simmons Hanly Conroy toll-free at (855) 9882537. You can also email Rebecca at rcockrell@simmonsfirm.com

STLtoday.com/readerrewards


SPORTS

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATURDAY • 05.04.2019

NASCAR

Elliott captures Dover pole with track record runs are tedious, but teams continued to find loopholes that made the format a farce. Most drivers waited until the very last moment to pull off pit lane for their qualifying run; and all 12 drivers in the final round at California in March missed the cutoff point to even register a lap. Elimination-style rounds also were cut. NASCAR said the single-car qualifying format will be in effect for the rest of the season, though group qualifying will remain in place at road courses. “Qualifying, in my opinion, has been too much of a topic of conversation,” Harvick said. “The way that qualifying is now across all three series is going to be good to take away the conversation. We don’t need to be talking about qualifying, especially on a week like this especially after you had Chase Elliott win a race. Here we are talking about qualifying instead of celebrating our most popular driver’s most recent win.” Kyle Larson, Joey Logano and fellow Hendrick driver Alex Bowman round out the top five. The top five qualifiers all bettered Keselowski’s mark. The 23-year-old Elliott became the youngest pole winner at Dover. Elliott got his first win of the season, first for Chevrolet and first for Hendrick Motorsports.

BY DAN GELSTON

Associated Press

DOVER, Del. — Chase Elliott took a solo run on the track for qualifying and was alone atop the Dover speed chart. Elliott followed his first win of the season with a pole at Dover International Speedway, topping the speed chart on a blistering day at the track with a record 165.960 mph in NASCAR’s first qualifying session since it reverted to singlelap runs. Elliott, NASCAR’s most popular driver, won last week at Talladega and kept the good times rolling Friday when he led a 1-2 front row for Hendrick Motorsports with William Byron. Finishing first at Dover is nothing new for Elliott, who won the fall race in his No. 9 Chevrolet last season. “Hopefully we can keep it going in the right direction,” Elliott said. The speeds on the mile concrete track may be heading in a dangerous direction for the field in Sunday’s Cup race. The new package this season had cars coming to Dover with 750 horsepower and more downforce that led to each car seemingly going faster than the last earlier in the day. Brad Keselowski held the track record of 164.444 mph, and 23 cars topped that speed during Friday’s lone practice session. “If it’s a surprise to anybody, it’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS ARCHIVES

Chase Elliott, the pole-sitter for Sunday’s race in Dover, Delaware, won last week in Talladega, Alabama. not a surprise to the race teams,” 2014 NASCAR champion Kevin Harvick said. “I would argue that fast is easier this time around than it was last year with a bunch less downforce. It’s a lot faster, but in my opinion it’s a fair amount easier.” Kyle Busch said there was “no question” the cars had hit dangerous speeds at Dover.

“If you have a problem here with the speeds we are carrying into the corner, it is going to hurt,” he said. “The faster you go, the harder you are going to hit the wall. The IndyCar guys were flying around here, and they don’t come here anymore because it was too fast, too dangerous for them. Eventually there comes a point where it becomes too fast

for a stock car, too.” Elliott claimed the official mark in single-lap qualifying. NASCAR for more than five years has used a group qualifying format, but it was abandoned this week and it was back to single-car laps to set the field. NASCAR was adamant it was trying to keep qualifying entertaining for fans because single-car

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP Sauter wins at Dover for 3rd straight time Johnny Sauter won for the third straight time at Dover International Speedway, racing to his first NASCAR Truck Series victory of the season Friday night in Dover, Del. Sauter took the lead with 30 laps to go on the concrete mile oval, and held off Brett Moffitt after a restart with five laps to go for his 24th career victory in the series. Sauter edged Moffitt by 0.603 seconds in the No. 13 ThorSport Racing Ford. Sauter returned to ThorSport this season after a split with GMS Racing, “When you get kicked to the curb, you feel like you have a lot to prove,” Sauter

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said. “I have to thank (owners) Duke and Rhonda Thorson most importantly. A couple months ago I didn’t know if I’d be racing.” Moffitt, who started on the pole, led for the first 48 laps before Sauter took the lead on Lap 82, and the two were near the front for the rest of the race. Moffitt led for a race-high 82 laps and finished second for his fourth top-five finish this season. “It’s all about track position, really,” Moffitt said. “When we were out front, we could lead and won the first stage, but it was just a lot of traffic cost us track position that we never got back.” Harrison Burton was third, followed by Grant Enfinger and Matt Crafton.

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Associated Press

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

TODAY

TONIGHT

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Occasional rain WIND NNE 5-10 mph

Clear to partly cloudy WIND NNW 3-7 mph

Mostly sunny and warmer WIND NNW 3-6 mph

Slight chance storms WIND S 5-10 mph

Chance rain and t-storms WIND SW 5-10 mph

Rain and storms likely WIND SE 1015 mph

67°

49°

Shawn Wolf “The Concrete Doctor”

(349-8459)

A storm moving through the Tennessee Valley will bring rain as far north as Ohio and Illinois today. It will also produce severe weather from the central Appalachians to the Louisiana and Florida Gulf coasts. Some spotty showers and thunderstorms will occur from western Kansas to New Mexico, with showers in the Dakotas and Minnesota. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. 80

Peoria 67/46

74

55

Macomb 69/44 Bloomington 66/45

Kirksville 68/44

Urbana 67/45

Quincy 68/46

Decatur 66/46

Springfield 57 67/45 Effingham 70 55 65/46

35

Columbia 69/47 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 67/49 City 66/47 55 69/44 Union 68/44 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 67/47 64/50 Farmington 65/45 Cape Girardeau 66/52 Springfield 70/46 Poplar Bluff West Plains 67/52 55 68/48 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

25.77 -0.16 27.93 +1.98 29.43 +1.93 26.17 +1.71 30.95 +3.55

16 28.24 +0.94 15 24.90 +1.46 25 35.35 +0.98 26 35.20 +2.27 18 27.88 +2.60 419 426.72 +3.83 21 30.53 +3.88 30 36.59 +3.76 27 35.27 +1.63 32 38.22 +0.95 20 18 14

31.25 +3.62 21.66 +3.09 20.24 +1.78

15 16 24

13.75 +1.62 19.11 +4.42 32.41 +3.35

15

16.39 +5.70

40

47.19 359.30 371.31 514.40 658.43 713.87 668.77 919.20 873.65 597.57 410.72 616.15 444.89

none -0.18 +2.68 +7.04 +0.11 +0.57 +0.87 +0.57 +24.99 +0.33 +0.12 +3.45 -0.11

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

79

Forecast Temperature

73

57

60

40

75

Average High

43 S

41 S

53

56

M

T

75

75 67

61

W

Billings 66/42

Average Low

Denver 69/44

Statistics through 5 p.m. Friday Temperature High/low 62°/53° Normal high/low 73°/53° Last year high/low 77°/65° Record high 92° (1949) Record low 31° (1976) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Fri. Trace Month to date (normal) 1.57” (0.42”) Year to date (normal) 20.45” (12.07”) Record for this date 1.99” (2013)

Pollen Yesterday High - 316 Absent Absent High - 29069 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Friday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

0 3 6 34 50

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

54° 8 a.m.

60° noon

65° 4 p.m.

63° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

57

T

62 53

F

79

82 75

67 57

63

62

S

M

T

66

62

49

S

71

W

53

51

T

F

Toronto 57/41 Detroit 62/44

9

10

11+

Atlanta 81/64 El Paso 90/62 Houston 80/65 Chihuahua 88/59

-10s -0s

0s

Miami 87/75

Monterrey 89/67

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

Stationary front

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

68/50/pc 76/51/pc 51/39/pc 81/64/t 80/61/pc 79/59/sh 77/63/t 76/49/s 59/50/c 86/67/t 74/53/t 83/67/t 64/44/pc 64/49/r 56/46/sh 78/60/c 89/70/pc 69/44/s 68/50/s 80/71/t 62/44/pc 71/53/pc 79/65/sh 80/65/r 63/49/r 68/48/s 91/67/s 74/57/r

66/49/r 81/53/pc 49/40/r 80/62/pc 85/65/pc 70/53/r 80/60/pc 79/49/s 57/47/r 83/64/t 74/49/pc 79/60/sh 71/52/c 73/49/s 63/49/s 83/65/s 88/70/t 72/45/s 71/53/c 80/68/t 69/48/pc 62/49/r 78/65/s 88/65/pc 71/52/s 73/57/pc 89/63/s 77/59/s

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

72/55/pc 70/55/r 73/60/t 87/75/t 61/45/pc 70/47/pc 82/65/t 72/58/t 80/69/t 68/54/pc 71/51/pc 74/55/s 90/70/pc 76/58/pc 96/69/s 64/49/r 58/45/c 75/51/s 81/48/s 74/52/s 81/64/pc 69/59/pc 65/51/pc 67/50/s 88/74/pc 93/60/s 80/64/t 71/51/pc

69/55/pc 76/54/pc 76/59/pc 89/75/pc 67/48/t 62/46/c 83/62/pc 77/53/pc 84/70/c 58/50/r 77/60/s 72/55/c 88/72/t 67/53/r 96/66/s 69/48/c 59/43/r 75/51/s 72/50/pc 76/54/s 84/66/pc 68/61/pc 64/53/pc 68/49/s 85/76/t 94/58/s 71/57/r 75/61/pc

High: 99 Thermal, Calif.

Rise

Set

6:01 a.m. 6:12 a.m.

7:56 p.m. 7:48 p.m.

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

May 4

May 11

May 18

May 26

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Low: 7 Lake Yellowstone, Wyo.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Skywatch

Ice

City

National Extremes Friday in the 48 contiguous states

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Snow

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Flurries

Today Hi/Lo/W

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Sun Moon

New York 68/54

Washington 80/64

Kansas City 68/48

Los Angeles 72/55

Cold front

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Minneapolis 70/47

San Francisco 65/51

100

80

Montreal 61/42

Chicago 64/44

ALMANAC

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Joplin 71/48

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

75° 57° 79° 63° 82° 62° 75° 62°

Rain and some storms move in for Saturday morning into the early afternoon. Then we’ll start to dry out. Thankfully, we see a dry and sunny day Sunday. A slight chance of storms will return Monday.

Kansas City 68/48

Winnipeg 53/29 Seattle 67/50

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

50/42/t 66/56/pc 86/60/pc 98/82/t 81/58/pc 51/34/t 70/63/t 84/64/pc 88/79/t 50/34/pc 81/74/pc 72/54/s 78/51/s 52/37/sh 74/46/s 108/80/s

51/41/sh 73/56/t 90/61/s 97/82/pc 73/46/s 55/37/sh 70/54/r 95/78/pc 88/79/t 50/38/pc 79/72/sh 83/62/pc 73/50/s 55/40/pc 73/46/pc 109/81/s

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

81/56/pc 61/42/pc 58/41/pc 85/75/pc 78/58/pc 105/76/pc 50/38/sh 88/77/pc 62/51/t 86/77/pc 70/46/pc 80/51/s 71/56/sh 73/59/pc 57/41/c 60/45/c

79/54/pc 68/48/s 69/53/sh 85/75/pc 77/62/pc 106/79/pc 54/36/sh 87/75/pc 61/44/sh 85/76/pc 71/48/c 78/45/pc 66/58/sh 73/60/s 62/44/pc 61/46/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


SPORTS

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

NASCAR

Elliott captures Dover pole with track record runs are tedious, but teams continued to find loopholes that made the format a farce. Most drivers waited until the very last moment to pull off pit lane for their qualifying run; and all 12 drivers in the final round at California in March missed the cutoff point to even register a lap. Elimination-style rounds also were cut. NASCAR said the single-car qualifying format will be in effect for the rest of the season, though group qualifying will remain in place at road courses. “Qualifying, in my opinion, has been too much of a topic of conversation,” Harvick said. “The way that qualifying is now across all three series is going to be good to take away the conversation. We don’t need to be talking about qualifying, especially on a week like this especially after you had Chase Elliott win a race. Here we are talking about qualifying instead of celebrating our most popular driver’s most recent win.” Kyle Larson, Joey Logano and fellow Hendrick driver Alex Bowman round out the top five. The top five qualifiers all bettered Keselowski’s mark. The 23-year-old Elliott became the youngest pole winner at Dover. Elliott got his first win of the season, first for Chevrolet and first for Hendrick Motorsports.

BY DAN GELSTON

Associated Press

DOVER, Del. — Chase Elliott took a solo run on the track for qualifying and was alone atop the Dover speed chart. Elliott followed his first win of the season with a pole at Dover International Speedway, topping the speed chart on a blistering day at the track with a record 165.960 mph in NASCAR’s first qualifying session since it reverted to singlelap runs. Elliott, NASCAR’s most popular driver, won last week at Talladega and kept the good times rolling Friday when he led a 1-2 front row for Hendrick Motorsports with William Byron. Finishing first at Dover is nothing new for Elliott, who won the fall race in his No. 9 Chevrolet last season. “Hopefully we can keep it going in the right direction,” Elliott said. The speeds on the mile concrete track may be heading in a dangerous direction for the field in Sunday’s Cup race. The new package this season had cars coming to Dover with 750 horsepower and more downforce that led to each car seemingly going faster than the last earlier in the day. Brad Keselowski held the track record of 164.444 mph, and 23 cars topped that speed during Friday’s lone practice session. “If it’s a surprise to anybody, it’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS ARCHIVES

Chase Elliott, the pole-sitter for Sunday’s race in Dover, Delaware, won last week in Talladega, Alabama. not a surprise to the race teams,” 2014 NASCAR champion Kevin Harvick said. “I would argue that fast is easier this time around than it was last year with a bunch less downforce. It’s a lot faster, but in my opinion it’s a fair amount easier.” Kyle Busch said there was “no question” the cars had hit dangerous speeds at Dover.

“If you have a problem here with the speeds we are carrying into the corner, it is going to hurt,” he said. “The faster you go, the harder you are going to hit the wall. The IndyCar guys were flying around here, and they don’t come here anymore because it was too fast, too dangerous for them. Eventually there comes a point where it becomes too fast

for a stock car, too.” Elliott claimed the official mark in single-lap qualifying. NASCAR for more than five years has used a group qualifying format, but it was abandoned this week and it was back to single-car laps to set the field. NASCAR was adamant it was trying to keep qualifying entertaining for fans because single-car

MOTOR SPORTS ROUNDUP Sauter wins at Dover for 3rd straight time Johnny Sauter won for the third straight time at Dover International Speedway, racing to his first NASCAR Truck Series victory of the season Friday night in Dover, Del. Sauter took the lead with 30 laps to go on the concrete mile oval, and held off Brett Moffitt after a restart with five laps to go for his 24th career victory in the series. Sauter edged Moffitt by 0.603 seconds in the No. 13 ThorSport Racing Ford. Sauter returned to ThorSport this season after a split with GMS Racing, “When you get kicked to the curb, you feel like you have a lot to prove,” Sauter

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said. “I have to thank (owners) Duke and Rhonda Thorson most importantly. A couple months ago I didn’t know if I’d be racing.” Moffitt, who started on the pole, led for the first 48 laps before Sauter took the lead on Lap 82, and the two were near the front for the rest of the race. Moffitt led for a race-high 82 laps and finished second for his fourth top-five finish this season. “It’s all about track position, really,” Moffitt said. “When we were out front,we could lead and won the first stage, but it was just a lot of traffic cost us track position that we never got back.” Harrison Burton was third, followed by Grant Enfinger and Matt Crafton.

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Associated Press

ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

TODAY

TONIGHT

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Occasional rain WIND NNE 5-10 mph

Clear to partly cloudy WIND NNW 3-7 mph

Mostly sunny and warmer WIND NNW 3-6 mph

Slight chance storms WIND S 5-10 mph

Chance rain and t-storms WIND SW 5-10 mph

Rain and storms likely WIND SE 1015 mph

67°

49°

Shawn Wolf “The Concrete Doctor”

(349-8459)

A storm moving through the Tennessee Valley will bring rain as far north as Ohio and Illinois today. It will also produce severe weather from the central Appalachians to the Louisiana and Florida Gulf coasts. Some spotty showers and thunderstorms will occur from western Kansas to New Mexico, with showers in the Dakotas and Minnesota. Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. 80

Peoria 67/46

74

55

Macomb 69/44 Bloomington 66/45

Kirksville 68/44

Urbana 67/45

Quincy 68/46

Decatur 66/46

Springfield 57 67/45 Effingham 70 55 65/46

35

Columbia 69/47 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 67/49 City 66/47 55 69/44 Union 68/44 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 67/47 64/50 Farmington 65/45 Cape Girardeau 66/52 Springfield 70/46 Poplar Bluff West Plains 67/52 55 68/48 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Fri. Change

Location

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

25.77 -0.16 27.93 +1.98 29.43 +1.93 26.17 +1.71 30.95 +3.55

16 28.24 +0.94 15 24.90 +1.46 25 35.35 +0.98 26 35.20 +2.27 18 27.88 +2.60 419 426.72 +3.83 21 30.53 +3.88 30 36.59 +3.76 27 35.27 +1.63 32 38.22 +0.95 20 18 14

31.25 +3.62 21.66 +3.09 20.24 +1.78

15 16 24

13.75 +1.62 19.11 +4.42 32.41 +3.35

15

16.39 +5.70

40

47.19 359.30 371.31 514.40 658.43 713.87 668.77 919.20 873.65 597.57 410.72 616.15 444.89

none -0.18 +2.68 +7.04 +0.11 +0.57 +0.87 +0.57 +24.99 +0.33 +0.12 +3.45 -0.11

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

79

Forecast Temperature

73

57

60

40

75

Average High

43 S

41 S

53

56

M

T

75

75 67

61

W

Billings 66/42

Average Low

Denver 69/44

Statistics through 5 p.m. Friday Temperature High/low 62°/53° Normal high/low 73°/53° Last year high/low 77°/65° Record high 92° (1949) Record low 31° (1976) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Fri. Trace Month to date (normal) 1.57” (0.42”) Year to date (normal) 20.45” (12.07”) Record for this date 1.99” (2013)

Pollen Yesterday High - 316 Absent Absent High - 29069 Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Friday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

0 3 6 34 50

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

54° 8 a.m.

60° noon

65° 4 p.m.

63° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

57

T

62 53

F

79

82 75

67 57

63

62

S

M

T

66

62

49

S

71

W

53

51

T

F

Toronto 57/41 Detroit 62/44

9

10

11+

Atlanta 81/64 El Paso 90/62 Houston 80/65 Chihuahua 88/59

-10s -0s

0s

Miami 87/75

Monterrey 89/67

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

Stationary front

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

68/50/pc 76/51/pc 51/39/pc 81/64/t 80/61/pc 79/59/sh 77/63/t 76/49/s 59/50/c 86/67/t 74/53/t 83/67/t 64/44/pc 64/49/r 56/46/sh 78/60/c 89/70/pc 69/44/s 68/50/s 80/71/t 62/44/pc 71/53/pc 79/65/sh 80/65/r 63/49/r 68/48/s 91/67/s 74/57/r

66/49/r 81/53/pc 49/40/r 80/62/pc 85/65/pc 70/53/r 80/60/pc 79/49/s 57/47/r 83/64/t 74/49/pc 79/60/sh 71/52/c 73/49/s 63/49/s 83/65/s 88/70/t 72/45/s 71/53/c 80/68/t 69/48/pc 62/49/r 78/65/s 88/65/pc 71/52/s 73/57/pc 89/63/s 77/59/s

Showers

T-storms

Rain

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

72/55/pc 70/55/r 73/60/t 87/75/t 61/45/pc 70/47/pc 82/65/t 72/58/t 80/69/t 68/54/pc 71/51/pc 74/55/s 90/70/pc 76/58/pc 96/69/s 64/49/r 58/45/c 75/51/s 81/48/s 74/52/s 81/64/pc 69/59/pc 65/51/pc 67/50/s 88/74/pc 93/60/s 80/64/t 71/51/pc

69/55/pc 76/54/pc 76/59/pc 89/75/pc 67/48/t 62/46/c 83/62/pc 77/53/pc 84/70/c 58/50/r 77/60/s 72/55/c 88/72/t 67/53/r 96/66/s 69/48/c 59/43/r 75/51/s 72/50/pc 76/54/s 84/66/pc 68/61/pc 64/53/pc 68/49/s 85/76/t 94/58/s 71/57/r 75/61/pc

High: 99 Thermal, Calif.

Rise

Set

6:01 a.m. 6:12 a.m.

7:56 p.m. 7:48 p.m.

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

May 4

May 11

May 18

May 26

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Low: 7 Lake Yellowstone, Wyo.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Skywatch

Ice

City

National Extremes Friday in the 48 contiguous states

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Snow

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Today’s Air Quality

airnow.gov

Flurries

Today Hi/Lo/W

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.

Sun Moon

New York 68/54

Washington 80/64

Kansas City 68/48

Los Angeles 72/55

Cold front

Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Minneapolis 70/47

San Francisco 65/51

100

80

Montreal 61/42

Chicago 64/44

ALMANAC

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Joplin 71/48

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

75° 57° 79° 63° 82° 62° 75° 62°

Rain and some storms move in for Saturday morning into the early afternoon. Then we’ll start to dry out. Thankfully, we see a dry and sunny day Sunday. A slight chance of storms will return Monday.

Kansas City 68/48

Winnipeg 53/29 Seattle 67/50

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

50/42/t 66/56/pc 86/60/pc 98/82/t 81/58/pc 51/34/t 70/63/t 84/64/pc 88/79/t 50/34/pc 81/74/pc 72/54/s 78/51/s 52/37/sh 74/46/s 108/80/s

51/41/sh 73/56/t 90/61/s 97/82/pc 73/46/s 55/37/sh 70/54/r 95/78/pc 88/79/t 50/38/pc 79/72/sh 83/62/pc 73/50/s 55/40/pc 73/46/pc 109/81/s

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

81/56/pc 61/42/pc 58/41/pc 85/75/pc 78/58/pc 105/76/pc 50/38/sh 88/77/pc 62/51/t 86/77/pc 70/46/pc 80/51/s 71/56/sh 73/59/pc 57/41/c 60/45/c

79/54/pc 68/48/s 69/53/sh 85/75/pc 77/62/pc 106/79/pc 54/36/sh 87/75/pc 61/44/sh 85/76/pc 71/48/c 78/45/pc 66/58/sh 73/60/s 62/44/pc 61/46/s

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV1

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Saturday • 05.04.2019 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CRYPTOQUIP

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign.

WORD GAMES

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2019: This year, you make waves just by being you. Your personality melts resistance. If single, the issue of whom to date could be a problem if you do not follow your heart’s desire. If attached, the two of you will break patterns and create more happy moments together. Do not listen to a stubborn TAURUS.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) !!! If someone offers you an opportunity to take off and visit or explore a new part of town, say “yes.” A new setting invigorates your thoughts and energy. You find that you have a new perspective on a situation by the time the day is over. Tonight: Opt for new. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) !!!!! One-on-one relating takes time, but you have time, if you so choose. Making plans with a special person helps feed your bond and recharge you individually. Turn off your cell and throw yourself into the experience. Tonight: Off to the movies or a concert. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) !!!! Opting to go along with a partner’s or dear friend’s ideas could make this day memorable and special. The two of you are very different, yet you have similarities. The mix can trigger a lot of excitement and fun.Tonight:Respectdifferences. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) !!! You like to enjoy yourself, yet certain issues need to clear out of your mind. Handle what is preventing you from being present in various other situations. Do not worry about other matters. Complete what you must in order to flow. Tonight: Make it early. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) !!!! Understand what is happening around a child or loved one. The time might be right for a quiet moment or day together just to chat and enjoy each other. You remember how much you enjoy this person. Tonight: Celebrate this bond. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) !!!! Stay close to home and follow through on what must happen. Whether you decide to do a lengthy cleaning, fill the pool or paint a room, you enjoy yourself. Friends might drop by, leading to a spontaneous happening. Tonight: Order pizza. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) ! ! ! ! Reach out for a friend who you don’t connect with as frequently as you’d like. Make plans for today, if you can, as others will get together soon. A conversation might stick in your mind for a long time. Be sure you are clear about what the other party means. Tonight: Hang out.

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) !!! Spending could be a hot topic -- to do or not to do? Either way, you find pluses and minuses. Others will look at life and see today as a time to live it up. Ultimately, you make the choice you want. You will not be left wondering “What if?” Tonight: Living it up. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) !!!!! You are personality plus, saying and doing whatever you want. Finally, you feel free enough to be yourself. Do be aware of any ramifications, as you want to maximize the positives in the next few days. Go for what you want. Tonight: Delighted to be where you are. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) !!! You might want to slow down to consider an issue and your choices. You need a slow period to catch up on what you are doing. First, take care of yourself. Imagine what you desire, and look at it as a possibility. Consider different avenues. Tonight: With your best friend. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) !!!! You discover how much fun you have with a particular person. In fact, making plans seems irrelevant and not connected to the fun you have with this person. Whatever you decide works. You might consider exploring a new interest. Tonight: Where the party or crowds are. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) !!!!! A must appearance becomes possible. You have many other concerns, but you will handle the moment with grace. An older relative or friend appreciates your visit or call. You might be more conBORN TODAY cerned about this person than Actor Richard Jenkins (1947), you choose to say. Tonight: To U.S. senator Doug Jones (1954), the wee hours. actress Audrey Hepburn (1929)

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

LIRGL SLOAS LIMWED CABONE ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

EVERYDAY

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

THE (Answers Monday) Yesterday’s

Jumbles: DRINK RODEO JOVIAL MEDIUM Answer: She was becoming angrier, but, after thinking about it, it was — MIND OVER “MADDER”


05.04.2019 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

DEAR ABBY

Ties fade to former in-laws Dear Abby • I was married to my first husband for 13 years and was very close to his family. His parents and sister were like my own. We ended up divorcing, and it was an extremely painful situation. His family wanted to stay in touch with me because they still loved me. I felt the same, so we remained connected through Facebook and the occasional phone call. After I remarried, their phone calls became less frequent, but we still remain connected on Facebook and message each other now and then. It has been six years since my divorce, and we are drifting further apart now because they often post photos of my ex and his new wife, who has become their daughter in my place. It’s painful because it’s a reminder that our relationship is fading away. Sometimes I wonder if it was healthy for us to stay in touch since all our online connection

does is make us sad that things aren’t the way they used to be. Should I politely cut ties? How can I let go of such wonderful people in my life? — Hurting ExDaughter-in-law Dear Hurting • As the circumstances of life change, so can the intensity of relationships. It says a lot about the one you had with your in-laws that they have remained in contact with you all this time. However, you and your ex have remarried, and your lives have taken different paths. Because seeing posts of the new wife causes you pain, stop viewing them and concentrate your energies on the life you have now. Dear Abby • I recently quit my job for several reasons. I was no longer satisfied with my work, and I was overwhelmed with the demands from my job and attending a graduate program. I told my boss I was feeling stressed out working for them since starting my graduate pro-

gram. She was supportive and said “the door was always open.” Soon after quitting, I reached out to her twice for a letter of recommendation. To my dismay she never replied. I took it personally since I had worked alongside her for nearly five years. Abby, am I blowing this out of proportion? Is it normal for businesses to ignore former employees when asking for a letter of recommendation? — Confused in the West Dear Confused • In some states, it can be risky for a company to provide a letter of recommendation. That is why if prospective employers ask for information, they are given only the dates the person was employed there, for fear of legal liability. This may be why your former employer was unwilling to write one for you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

MISS MANNERS

Help rude relative find her ‘filter’ Dear Miss Manners • We have a relative by marriage who seems to feel that her family is superior to ours, which is her prerogative. However, over the years we have discerned that she seems to lack a filter in expressing insulting opinions and thoughts. I can generally ignore this, except when she insults members of my immediate family such as my mother or brother. I say nothing, but then deeply regret not defending them afterward. At our last family luncheon, she made a comment about me, TO me, that was so offensive it was actually quite amusing. She was not perceptive enough to grasp this. Should I continue to ignore her slights, or should I gently respond? I’ve read that confronting bullies can encourage them to back away. Gentle Reader • So does

laughing at them, although Miss Manners recognizes that this can backfire. If it happens again, you could follow up by saying, “Oh, I am so sorry. You were serious. I have never been addressed that way before and did not know how to respond.” If she is insulting your family members, you are well within your rights to defend them. Dear Miss Manners • When we celebrated our daughter’s becoming bat mitzvah seven months ago, she received many checks as gifts. The envelopes with the checks were kept until thank-you notes were written, or so I thought. Soon after the event, my daughter left for summer camp. A few days ago, she was looking through a box that contained some jewelry she received as gifts. She discovered three checks she apparently had not opened!

TV SATURDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Do we contact the people, tell them what happened, and ask if we can deposit the checks? My gut tells me that after this much time, we should be happy they attended the affair and not cash the checks. Gentle Reader • Which will leave your guests wondering what happened — and having trouble balancing their checking accounts. Have your daughter send the thank-you letters now, apologizing profusely for their tardiness and stating that you hope it would still be all right to deposit them. Miss Manners assures you that your guests would rather know that the checks were accounted for — no matter how late.

5/4/19

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX MasterChef Pasta race; 9-1-1: Ocean’s 9-1-1. A FOX 2 News at 9:00pm 2 éclairs elimination test. going-away party goes (N) (cc) (cc) awry. CBS Million Dollar Mile (N) Ransom: Unfit. A baby 48 Hours (N) (cc) 4 (cc) is stolen by a serial kidnapper. (N) NBC ÎNHL Hockey: Conference Semifinal: Teams 5 TBA. (N)

Saturday Night Live (N) (cc)

PBS Antiques Roadshow: 9 Billings. Chinese jade brush washer. (cc)

The Woman in White Sir Percival’s secret is exposed. (cc)

Í A PASSAGE TO INDIA (’84) HHH (Judy Davis)

Mom (cc)

2 Broke Girls (cc)

CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

Mom (cc)

METV Svengoolie: Frankenstein. (cc) 24

2 Broke Girls (cc)

Star Trek The Enterprise battles Romulans. (cc)

ABC NBA Count- NBA Basketball: Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. (N) (cc) 30 down

Send your questions to Miss Manners at her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Andrews McMeel Syndication, 1130 Walnut St., Kansas City, MO 64106.

ION 46

Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Seduction Victims Unit: Vulnerable. (cc) of stepson.

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: Lust. (cc)

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EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

EVERYDAY

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 05.04.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CAROLYN HAX

Her constant lateness causes disruption Dear Carolyn • For the umpteenth time, my stepdaughter and her family arrived 45 minutes late for a family gathering, disrupting others who were just picking up their forks to eat dinner. I feel she disrespects the time, planning, money, and effort required to host a sit-down dinner for 15 people, which only happens a few times per year. She never offers to bring a dish, clean up after the event, or host at her home. She claims to have ADD, but refuses to get a professional evaluation. She has no hobby or career and is a stay-athome mom. We’ve gently advised her to budget and find some means of earning for herself and her children since she has repeatedly threatened divorce from her alcoholic spouse. My husband, who raised her as a single dad, says, “Your grown kids are so engaged with life; what’s wrong with my daughter?” but often excuses her behavior. My kids think she’s a drama queen, but are kind to her. I’m no longer waiting for someone who is 40 and still calls herself “daddy’s little girl” to take more responsibility. I’d just like to have some peaceful, enjoyable family meals. Strategies please. — Colorado Answer • If you’re serving dinner at 7, then tell her 6; reserve seats for her family together at the end of the table, so if they’re late, the emptiness is contained; serve at 7 promptly whether she’s there or not; and don’t react when she still arrives after you’ve started. “Hi everyone, glad you made it [no sarcasm], come dig in.” This minimizes the disruption and detaches your planning from her decision-making, which should do it for a peaceful-meals strategy. I also unsolicitedly suggest a minimalresentment, maximalcompassion strategy: A 40-year-old parent with no income, an alcoholic spouse, a possible disability and no action plan beyond empty threats has many more serious problems than drama or being late for three dinners a year. This is an emotional house fire — please don’t let your main concern be that your tulips get singed. Ultimately your stepdaughter must help herself and her family. However, some focus and compassion from you and your husband could light a path through the chaos: “We are concerned about you; alcoholism is a complicated and destructive problem; will you let us help you find help?” Be ready with names of good therapists who specialize in substance-abuse issues, and say you’ll pay the tab (if you’re able and she isn’t). This is intervention at arm’s length — a respectful way to help where few such options exist.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

tellme@washpost.com

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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