5.1.19

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05.01.2019 • WEdnEsday • M 1

NATIONALS 2 Cardinals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0

1

Goldschmidt 1b

5 0 0 0

0

2 .259

DeJong ss

3 1 1 0

1

0 .342

4 .202

Ozuna lf

4 0 0 0

0

2 .260

Martinez rf

3 1 2 0

1

1 .364

Gant p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

Miller p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Molina c

3 1 0 0

1

1 .262

Wong 2b

4 0 2

1

0

1 .272

Bader cf

4 0 1 2

0

3 .224

Wainwright p

3 0 0 0

0

1 .100

Webb p

0 0 0 0

0

0

O’Neill rf

1 0 1 0

0

0 .303

Totals

34 3 7 3

Washington

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

CARDINALS 3

Carpenter 3b

CARDINALS

---

---

4 15

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Eaton rf

5 1 2

1

0

2 .296

Robles cf

4 1 1

1

0

0 .255

Soto lf

4 0 1 0

0

1 .248

Adams 1b

3 0 1 0

1

0 .275

Suzuki c

3 0 1 0

0

0 .250

Ross p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Kieboom ss

4 0 0 0

0

2 .158

---

Dozier 2b

4 0 0 0

0

2 .184

Difo 3b

2 0 0 0

1

0 .247

Barraclough p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Jennings p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Gomes c

1 0 0 0

0

1 .254

Sanchez p

2 0 0 0

0

0 .083

Suero p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

Sipp p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Kendrick 3b

2 0 1 0

0

0 .314

---

1-Taylor pr

0 0 0 0

0

0 .200

2

8

Totals

34 2 7 2

Cardinals

000

Washington

002 000 000: 2 7 0

300 000: 3 7

1

1-ran for Kendrick in the 9th. E: Wong (3). LOB: Cardinals 8, Washington 9. 2B: DeJong (14). HR: Eaton (2), off Wainwright; Robles (5), off Wainwright. RBIs: Wong (15), Bader 2 (9), Eaton (9), Robles (12). SB: Wong (5). RLISP: Cardinals 5 (Goldschmidt, Ozuna, Wong, Bader, Wainwright); Washington 3 (Dozier, Sanchez 2). GIDP: Soto.

Scherzer still chasing elusive title St. Louis native not worried about Hall of Fame chances BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

WASHINGTON • It has already started happening, whether it’s a headline in The Washington Post, a phrase kicked around another clubhouse, or one mentioned at Mizzou. The frequency is only likely to increase as Max Scherzer’s introduction evolves from Cy Young winner to future Hall of Famer. Not that he’s letting either ring in his ears. “I’ve heard enough people say it,” the St. Louis-area native said Tuesday in the Nationals’ clubhouse. “That’s not what motivates me. If I’m worried about that, I feel like my head is in the wrong spot, and my motivation is in the wrong spot. That all takes care of itself , and that’s after your career. For me, right now, I’m in my career. I’m only here to win and to try to win a World Series. That is the only reason I want to come through those doors and be in this clubhouse — because we can win a World Series.” The Parkway Central grad will start for the 10th time in his career against the Cardinals, his boyhood club, on Wednesday at Nationals Park, and the longtime ace and unchallenged face of the Nationals franchise is coming off history – and poised to make more. In his previous start, Scherzer collected the 2,500th strikeout of his career to become the 35th pitcher in baseball history with that many and the third active pitcher, trailing only C.C. Sabathia and Justin Verlander. With 2,503 strikeouts in 344 games, Scherzer got to 2,500 swifter than any pitcher other than Nolan Ryan (338) and Randy Johnson (313), according to the Elias Sports Bureau. If he has more than 220 strikeouts this season, he’ll overtake David Cone’s 2,668 to have the most by any Missouri-born pitcher in bigleague history. “Sweet,” he said. The Cooperstown-ready résumé is filling up for Scherzer, 34. Only four pitchers have won more Cy Young awards that Scherzer’s three, and all of them are in the Hall of Fame (Johnson, Greg Maddux, and Steve Carlton) or Roger Clemens. Six pitchers have won as many as three Cy Young awards, and the other five are in the Hall of Fame, like Pedro Martinez and Tom Seaver and Sandy Koufax, or still pitching, like Clayton Kershaw. Scherzer’s six All-Star Game appearances trail only

AVERAGES Batting Martinez Wieters DeJong Fowler O’Neill Wong Molina Ozuna Goldschmidt Bader Carpenter Munoz Robinson Gyorko Team

AVG .364 .364 .342 .313 .303 .272 .262 .260 .259 .224 .202 .200 .143 .100 .267

Pitching Brebbia Gant Ponce de Leon Hicks Wainwright Gallegos Flaherty Wacha Mikolas Miller Hudson Webb Leone Team

W 1 3 0 1 3 1 3 2 2 1 2 0 0 19

AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 77 12 28 5 0 1 13 4 15 1 2 11 0 4 0 0 0 5 0 4 1 0 117 26 40 14 1 5 13 10 22 2 1 80 12 25 6 0 1 7 12 20 1 1 33 4 10 2 0 1 4 1 13 0 1 92 14 25 4 1 4 15 16 17 5 3 107 11 28 8 0 2 20 5 9 1 1 100 24 26 5 0 10 28 13 25 3 0 116 22 30 3 0 9 19 15 34 0 2 49 8 11 1 0 3 9 9 20 0 1 104 18 21 5 1 3 5 20 31 1 2 10 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 20 2 2 0 0 0 1 2 10 0 1 983 158 262 54 3 40 146 110 248 16 16 L 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 10

ERA 0.55 0.90 1.80 2.13 3.73 3.86 4.06 4.78 5.29 5.56 5.63 7.11 7.30 4.22

G 14 16 1 13 6 8 6 5 6 16 6 9 13 29

GS 0 0 1 0 6 0 6 5 6 0 5 0 0 29

SV IP 0 16.1 2 20.0 0 5.0 9 12.2 0 31.1 0 9.1 0 31.0 0 26.1 0 34.0 1 11.1 1 24.0 0 6.1 0 12.1 13 258.0

H 6 6 2 6 30 6 32 24 34 11 33 4 13 222

R 1 2 1 3 14 4 14 14 21 9 16 5 10 126

ER HR BB SO 1 1 8 20 2 2 7 19 1 1 3 7 3 1 5 16 13 5 12 27 4 2 3 16 14 7 6 36 14 5 17 29 20 8 8 19 7 4 9 16 15 8 13 19 5 2 3 6 10 2 6 14 121 53 111 261

Hall of Famer and Carthage, Mo., native Carl Hubbell among Missouri-born pitchers. This past winter, Mizzou altered its rules for retirement numbers and Scherzer became the first athlete to have his number (No. 31) retired without completing an undergraduate degree. “I’ll always be grateful,” he said. What’s missing is almost as glaring to him as his mantel is gleaming for history: a championship ring. The departure of Bryce Harper has left Scherzer as the bona fide star in the nation’s capital and he already was the soul of the clubhouse. But since signing a sevenyear, $210-million contract with the Nats, Scherzer has won two Cy Young awards and Washington has won zero playoff series. Scherzer last advanced to the World Series with Detroit in 2012, and he has not advanced past the division series since 2013, also with Detroit. He has three remaining seasons on his contract, his mid-30s have arrived, and that sensation of chasing a championship – is it getting more acute? “Stronger,” he said. “Because every other concern you have early in your career kind of goes away. When you’re young in your career, you obviously still want to win the World Series, but you’re also trying to establish yourself in the major leagues, trying to figure out

the league, trying to have success, trying to be consistent. These are the hardest things to do in the game. That’s still a battle in its own right. But your ultimate reason why you do what you do is to win the World Series.” The Nats’ perpetual pennant chase pivoted this winter toward pitching and youth as they added lefty Patrick Corbin to a rotation that already included Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg, and also saw Harper leave for the rival Phillies. Two of the Nats’ starting outfielders are 21, or younger. One of the game’s top technicians with his mechanics, Scherzer saw a flaw after a recent dud in Miami. He shortened his arm swing – “You can’t speed up your arm to solve time, so you have to actually shorten up the path,” he said – and the results got him past 2,500. In that start, 21-year-old rookie shortstop Carter Kieboom homered and outfielder Victor Robles, 21, stole two bases. Scherzer struck out 10. The Nats lost. That gave him 84 games with at least 10 strikeouts. Same as Carlton. No other active pitcher has more than 65. Not that he’s counting. “I’m more focused on what’s going on here in this clubhouse,” Scherzer said. “I expect winning plays. I don’t care how they do it, or who does it, or how old they are, how young. I expect this clubhouse to make winning plays across the diamond, whether it’s on the mound, on the bases, or in the box. Find a way to keep scratching runs. “However we do that, it’s music to my ears.”

FOWLER HAS FLU Outfielder Dexter Fowler’s flu-like symptoms worsened overnight and the switch-hitter was sent for treatment and fluids to help him recover. The Cardinals had Fowler remain at the team hotel Tuesday night for his and their benefit, manager Mike Shildt said, and he was not available for that evening’s game. Fowler’s family was also ill, his wife shared on social media. … Luke Gregerson, on the verge of coming back from the injured list, will throw a live batting practice against teammates Wednesday at Nationals Park. Shildt said he and the coaches want to see Gregerson in a controlled setting against major-league hitters before determining when to activate the veteran reliever. That likely puts his earliest return this weekend at Wrigley Field. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

DP: Cardinals 1. Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Wainwright 61/3 6 2 Webb Gant Miller

2/ 3

2

0 0 0

11/3 1 0 0 2/ 3

0 0 0

2

5 80 3.73

0 0

6 7.11

0

2 27 0.90

0

1 12 5.56

Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez

5 5 3

Suero

3

7 94 5.91

0

3 27 6.92

2/ 3

0 0 0

0

2 11 7.36

1/ 3

0 0 0

1

2 19 1.64

Jennings

2/ 3

1 0 0

1

1 18 0.00

Ross

1/ 3

0 0 0

0 0

Sipp

1 1 0 0

2

Barraclough 1

2 3.86

Webb pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. W: Wainwright 3-2. L: Sanchez 0-4. S: Miller 1-2. H: Webb 3, Gant 6. Inherited runnersscored: Webb 2-0, Gant 1-0, Miller 1-0, Ross 2-0. HBP: Wainwright 2 (Suzuki,Robles). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:09. A: 19,753 (41,313).

HOW THEY SCORED NATIONALS THIRD Eaton homers. Robles homers. Nationals 2, Cardinals 0. CARDINALS FOURTH DeJong walks. Martinez singles. Molina walks. Wong singles. DeJong scores. Bader singles. Molina scores. Martinez scores. Cardinals 3, Nationals 2.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Adam Wainwright turns in a solid effort, allowing the Nationals two runs in 6 1/3 innings Tuesday night in Washington.

Cards come from behind again vs. Nationals CARDINALS • FROM B1

ror the bullpen walked later in the game. After Wainwright’s 6 1/3 strong innings, relievers Tyler Webb, John Gant and Andrew Miller had to get eight outs with a one-run cushion. When each of them entered the game, that tying run was already on base. Not once flinched. Webb got a double play to erase his inherited runner. Gant retired three batters in order in the eighth. With Jordan Hicks unavailable to microwave the ninth inning, Miller retired both batters he faced and got his first save of the season. For the second time in as many nights against the Nats, the Cardinals fell behind early and rallied for all of their runs in one burst. They claimed their 10th win in their past 12 games, and for only the second time in club history had 18 wins in April. There’s a vibe radiating from their versatility. In the past week, the Cardinals have thundered to wins behind Marcell Ozuna’s gluttonous RBI run. They’ve followed steadying starting pitching to wins, like they did with Jak Flaherty’s seven shutout innings Sunday. Bader’s

homer cracked the scoreboard Monday, and later he stole a hit with a bunt, too. He and Wong have both been drilling on bunts in large part because they know the power at the top is waiting if they prime the offense. For Wong, it’s a reflection on the clearance he’s received from Shildt to be himself. “I’ve never been a power guy,” Wong said. “That was never something I wanted to do. It was a trend that was going around the clubhouse that if you wanted to play you had to put up those good numbers. As soon as Shildt told me to play my game — bunting has always been my game. It’s always been something I’ve prided myself on. I brought it back.” With the bases loaded in the fourth and Sanchez leaning on his sharp cutter, Wong came to the plate and spied third baseman, Wilmer Difo, playing back. The Nats put superb fielder Anthony Rendon on the injured list Tuesday, leaving a committee at the hot corner. Wong placed the first pitch he saw — a splitter — down the line. As DeJong passed it down the line he saw it rolled true — better than if Wong had bowled it.

“That’s probably one of my better bunts,” Wong said. Bader followed by slipping a single to center for the lead against Sanchez (0-4), and Wainwright (3-2) responded with a perfect fourth. Like so many opponents in the past fortnight, Washington took a lead against the Cardinals with a pair of home runs. Only the flightless Orioles have allowed more home runs this season than 53 hit against the Cardinals through 29 games. The Cardinals have minimized the bruising by limiting opponents to solo homers. Nationals leadoff hitter Adam Eaton jumped the first pitch he saw in the third inning — a spiraling cutter — for a solo homer down the right-field line, and Victor Robles by drilling a 3-1 curveball over the left-center wall. Wainwright would entice further trouble with a four-pitch walk to former teammate Matt Adams and a hit batter, all with one out. He then reached safe harbor along the Anacostia River. Even in the stormiest innings, the back half of the Nats’ line was where Wainwright swamped ral-

lies. After back-to-back singles opened the second inning, Wainwright struck out rookie Carter Kieboom and two groundouts to slip free of the inning. In the third, Wainwright struck out Kieboom on a curve and then sent three strikes past Brian Dozier to end the threat. The top of the sixth ended when Bader worked Wander Suero through a 13-pitch at-bat that ended with a strikeout. Wainwright finished the bottom of the inning on five pitches — against the bottom of the Nats’ lineup. Wainwright teased them with a four-seam cutter and a sinker that crossed the plate differently, and then had the curve as a trump to play. “I think Waino is always a master of a lot of things — the art of pitching,” Shildt said. “He’s a smart competitor. He’s very strategic, obviously. He and Yadi share a brain and have a game plan and they adjust their plan. It was fun to watch them work. They can do it without words. They’re in synch with each other.” That comes from starting 248 games together — more than any other Cardinals’ battery and now tied with Tom Glavine and Javy Lopez for the 10th-most in baseball history.

The only time one of the bottom four batters in Washington’s lineup reached base against Wainwright was on an intentional walk, which loaded the bases and dared Sanchez to do something against Wainwright’s movement. Sanchez skipped a ball back to Wainwright and off the pitcher’s cleat. The carom went right to Paul Goldschmidt at first for the out. Said Wainwright,“... we’ll take our chances that it has a good bounce. Which it may have had the best bounce I’ve ever seen off a pitcher’s leg. … Completely planned.” All the bounces and bunts went their way. Mostly because they’re looking for them. “It’s about finding ways to score runs without the home run,” DeJong said. “We’re batting. We’re getting good at-bats. And we know if that continues someone is getting the big hit. It just doesn’t have to be the biggest hit. It can be a smart hit. We can score runs in a lot of ways, win games in any way, and we’re making teams aware.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com