5.1.19

Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019 • $2.00

HOUSECLEANING BEGINS PAGE PROMISES COLLABORATION, HANDS OUT PINK SLIPS FIRST COUNCIL MEETING

FIRST DAY IN OFFICE

BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • A day after the St. Louis County

CLAYTON • As Sam Page addressed reporters for the first time as St. Louis County executive, he acknowledged that he was not the first to promise to clean up county government. His predecessor, Steve Stenger, who resigned Monday, had once said much the same. Now Stenger faces the possibility of prison and a three-count indictment handed up by a federal grand jury alleging multiple pay-to-play schemes. Page said he would bring a much more respectful and collaborative tone to the job and act immediately to “try to prevent the opportunity

Council voted for its chairman to ascend to county executive, its six remaining members forged ahead with county business Tuesday without addressing the question of how it will operate without a majority party. The appointment of Democrat Sam Page by a 5-1 council vote Monday — hours after the stunning indictment and resignation of County Executive Steve Stenger following a federal “pay to play” sting — left the council split with three Republicans and three Democrats. Vice Chairwoman Hazel Erby, D-1st District, ran the See COUNCIL • Page A4

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com.

St. Louis County Executive Sam Page is applauded by council members Ernie Trakas (left) and Lisa Clancy with Hazel Erby looking on Tuesday during his first County Council meeting as county executive.

See PAGE • Page A4

RE-CREATING BANGERT ISLAND

Mueller reportedly frustrated with Barr over memo on probe

St. Charles wants $2 million in state support, but some cry foul

BY DEVLIN BARRETT AND MATT ZAPOTOSKY Washington Post

WA S H I N GTO N • Special

hope will attract tourists and spending. “We would envision something like San Antonio River Walk, Branson Landing,” said Brad Temme, chief engineer for the city. “Something where you have a mixed-use retail/entertainment district that is alongside a water feature.” The $2 million line item was slipped into

counsel Robert Mueller wrote a letter in late March complaining to Attorney General William Barr that a four-page memo to Congress describing the principal conclusions of the investigation into President Donald Trump “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance” of Mueller’s work, according to a copy of the letter reviewed Tuesday by The Washington Post. The letter and a subsequent phone call between the two men reveal the degree to which the longtime colleagues and friends disagreed as they handled the legally and politically fraught task of investigating the president. Democrats in Congress are likely to scrutinize Mueller’s complaints to Barr as they contemplate the prospect of opening impeachment

See ISLAND • Page A4

See MUELLER • Page A7

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Bangert Island seen looking northeast toward the Blanchette Bridge and the Ameristar casino Monday in St. Charles.

BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES • Rising from the muck of the Missouri River is Bangert Island, which isn’t much of an island anymore. Over the years, a silted-in slough replaced a channel that divided the island from mainland St. Charles. With the help of Missouri taxpayers, officials want that to change.

Included in the state’s $30 billion budget for next fiscal year is a $2 million appropriation to kick-start the digging of a side channel between St. Charles and the island. Officials want to use the dug-up dirt to elevate the land surrounding the island, making it less prone to flooding and more attractive to developers. The planned digging is part of an effort to make the riverfront a destination officials

Venezuelan protests turn violent as GuaidÓ renews push BY SCOTT SMITH AND CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA Associated Press

CARACAS, VENEZUELA • Opposition

leader Juan Guaidó took a bold step to revive his movement to seize power in Venezuela, taking to the streets Tuesday to call for a military uprising that drew quick support from the administration of President Donald Trump and fierce resistance from forces loyal to socialist Nicolas Maduro. The violent street battles that

TODAY

An antigovernment protester walks near a bus that was set on fire Tuesday by opponents of Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro during clashes between rebels and loyalist soldiers in Caracas, Venezuela.

erupted in parts of Caracas were the most serious challenge yet to Maduro’s rule. And while the rebellion seemed to have garnered only limited military support, at least one high-ranking official announced he was breaking with Maduro, in a setback for the embattled president. In an appearance Tuesday night on national television, Maduro declared that the opposition had attempted to impose an “illegitimate government” See VENEZUELA • Page A7

The big dig

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Airport bond refinancing plan backed

• A5

77°/65° THUNDERSTORMS

Local vote on merger gains traction

TOMORROW

72°/54°

Hot Cards edge Nats

THUNDERSTORMS

WEATHER B10 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

SPORTS

• A6

Resurgent Bouwmeester sparks Blues

• B1

1 M

Must-have elements for salads

• LET’S EAT

Vol. 141, No. 121 ©2019

O 24 PE /7 N

BommaritoMazdaWest.com