Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 19 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019 • $2.00

HOUSECLEANING BEGINS PAGE PROMISES COLLABORATION, HANDS OUT PINK SLIPS FIRST COUNCIL MEETING

FIRST DAY IN OFFICE

BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • A day after the St. Louis County

CLAYTON • As Sam Page addressed reporters for the first time as St. Louis County executive, he acknowledged that he was not the first to promise to clean up county government. His predecessor, Steve Stenger, who resigned Monday, had once said much the same. Now Stenger faces the possibility of prison and a three-count indictment handed up by a federal grand jury alleging multiple pay-to-play schemes. Page said he would bring a much more respectful and collaborative tone to the job and act immediately to “try to prevent the opportunity

Council voted for its chairman to ascend to county executive, its six remaining members forged ahead with county business Tuesday without addressing the question of how it will operate without a majority party. The appointment of Democrat Sam Page by a 5-1 council vote Monday — hours after the stunning indictment and resignation of County Executive Steve Stenger following a federal “pay to play” sting — left the council split with three Republicans and three Democrats. Vice Chairwoman Hazel Erby, D-1st District, ran the See COUNCIL • Page A4

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com.

St. Louis County Executive Sam Page is applauded by council members Ernie Trakas (left) and Lisa Clancy with Hazel Erby looking on Tuesday during his first County Council meeting as county executive.

See PAGE • Page A4

RE-CREATING BANGERT ISLAND

Mueller reportedly frustrated with Barr over memo on probe

St. Charles wants $2 million in state support, but some cry foul

BY DEVLIN BARRETT AND MATT ZAPOTOSKY Washington Post

WA S H I N GTO N • Special

hope will attract tourists and spending. “We would envision something like San Antonio River Walk, Branson Landing,” said Brad Temme, chief engineer for the city. “Something where you have a mixed-use retail/entertainment district that is alongside a water feature.” The $2 million line item was slipped into

counsel Robert Mueller wrote a letter in late March complaining to Attorney General William Barr that a four-page memo to Congress describing the principal conclusions of the investigation into President Donald Trump “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance” of Mueller’s work, according to a copy of the letter reviewed Tuesday by The Washington Post. The letter and a subsequent phone call between the two men reveal the degree to which the longtime colleagues and friends disagreed as they handled the legally and politically fraught task of investigating the president. Democrats in Congress are likely to scrutinize Mueller’s complaints to Barr as they contemplate the prospect of opening impeachment

See ISLAND • Page A4

See MUELLER • Page A7

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Bangert Island seen looking northeast toward the Blanchette Bridge and the Ameristar casino Monday in St. Charles.

BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. CHARLES • Rising from the muck of the Missouri River is Bangert Island, which isn’t much of an island anymore. Over the years, a silted-in slough replaced a channel that divided the island from mainland St. Charles. With the help of Missouri taxpayers, officials want that to change.

Included in the state’s $30 billion budget for next fiscal year is a $2 million appropriation to kick-start the digging of a side channel between St. Charles and the island. Officials want to use the dug-up dirt to elevate the land surrounding the island, making it less prone to flooding and more attractive to developers. The planned digging is part of an effort to make the riverfront a destination officials

Venezuelan protests turn violent as GuaidÓ renews push BY SCOTT SMITH AND CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA Associated Press

CARACAS, VENEZUELA • Opposition

leader Juan Guaidó took a bold step to revive his movement to seize power in Venezuela, taking to the streets Tuesday to call for a military uprising that drew quick support from the administration of President Donald Trump and fierce resistance from forces loyal to socialist Nicolas Maduro. The violent street battles that

TODAY

An antigovernment protester walks near a bus that was set on fire Tuesday by opponents of Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro during clashes between rebels and loyalist soldiers in Caracas, Venezuela.

erupted in parts of Caracas were the most serious challenge yet to Maduro’s rule. And while the rebellion seemed to have garnered only limited military support, at least one high-ranking official announced he was breaking with Maduro, in a setback for the embattled president. In an appearance Tuesday night on national television, Maduro declared that the opposition had attempted to impose an “illegitimate government” See VENEZUELA • Page A7

The big dig

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Airport bond refinancing plan backed

• A5

77°/65° THUNDERSTORMS

Local vote on merger gains traction

TOMORROW

72°/54°

Hot Cards edge Nats

THUNDERSTORMS

WEATHER B10 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

SPORTS

• A6

Resurgent Bouwmeester sparks Blues

• B1

1 M

Must-have elements for salads

• LET’S EAT

Vol. 141, No. 121 ©2019

O 24 PE /7 N

BommaritoMazdaWest.com


A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019 M 1 WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM MUG SHOTS

HAVE A COCKTAIL

UPCOMING CHATS

Catch up on April’s crime stories by clicking on the person’s name for details of why they were in the news. stltoday. com/crime

Just because the Kentucky Derby is coming doesn’t mean mandatory mint juleps. Try Satan’s Whiskers in this week’s Prep School video. stltoday.com/watch

Wednesday

Friday Monday Tuesday

MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Talk to Metro about MetroLink and buses, noon Tom Timmermann talks Blues, 1 p.m. Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m. Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m.

TONY’S TAKE

CUSTOMER SERVICE 314-340-8888 Customer service hours 6:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Monday-Friday 7–11 a.m. Saturday-Sunday 7–10 a.m. on holidays service@stltoday.com SUBSCRIBE STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 PLACE DEATH NOTICES STLtoday.com or 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 PLACE CLASSIFIED OR OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com or 314-621-6666 FAX AD INFORMATION: 314-340-8664 BUY REPRINTS: STLtoday.mycapture.com

CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch. com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday. com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

GOT A STORY TIP? We want to hear from you. Submit news tips online. They are confidential, and you can choose to remain anonymous. stltoday.com/newstips PRICING The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Mon-Sun $14.25, Sun-Fri $14.25, Mon-Fri $11.75, Thu-Sun $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/1/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/8/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. Contact at 1-314-340-8888 for additional information.

SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS All subscription offers available at STLtoday.com, including those advertised through our email promotions, on-site messaging, social media and any external means of promotion, are valid for new subscribers only. You must not have been a subscriber in the past thirty (30) days to register for a new subscription offer.

AUTO-RENEWAL, CANCELLATION, AND REFUND POLICY EZ Pay is a convenient electronic payment method that automatically renews your Digital Only or Full Access news subscription service (your “Subscription”). If you register for EZ Pay or debit banking (ACH) payments, your Subscription will continue for the length of the term you select on your plan. On the last day of your current term (your “Renewal Date”), your plan will automatically renew for the same term unless you choose to cancel more than twenty-one (21) days before your Renewal Date (your “Cancellation Date”). If you do not affirmatively cancel your Subscription before your Cancellation Date, YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR AN ADDITIONAL TERM for the plan you initially selected at the rates in effect at the time of renewal. You may cancel your subscription at any time by calling 1-314-340-8888. If you have provided us with a valid credit card number or an alternate payment method saved in your account and you have not cancelled by your Cancellation Date, your subscription will be automatically processed up to fourteen (14) days in advance of your Renewal Date and the payment method you provided to us at or after the time of your initial Subscription purchase will be charged. We reserve the right to change your Subscription rate at any time. If you are not satisfied with your Subscription rate or service, you may cancel your Subscription at any time, and receive a refund for any amounts you have prepaid beyond the date you cancel your Subscription.

FULL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTIONS The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS: 476-580. Postmaster send address changes to St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Mon-Sun $14.25, Sun-Fri $14.25, Mon-Fri $11.75, Thurs-Sun $11.75, Sat-Mon $10.50, Fri-Sun $10.50, Sun-Mon $8.00, Sat-Sun Only $8.00, Sunday Only $5.50. The subscription price includes all applicable sales tax and a charge for the convenience of having the paper delivered. To avoid delivery charges, call 1-314-340-8888 to arrange pickup of your paper at a local distribution center. Rates are based on the annual charges for premium days and/or plus sections delivered on 12/23/18, 12/25/18, 1/13/19, 1/27/19, 2/17/19, 2/24/19, 3/10/19, 3/17/19, 3/31/19, 4/14/19, 4/21/19, 5/19/19, 5/26/19, 6/16/19, 6/23/19, 7/14/19, 7/21/19, 8/11/19, 8/18/19, 8/25/19, 9/1/19, 9/15/19, 9/22/19, 9/29/19, 10/13/19, 10/27/19, 11/17/19, 11/28/19, 12/8/19, 12/22/19, 12/29/19, and timing of these charges may affect the length of the subscription. A nonrefundable account setup fee will be charged to qualifying new starts. All Full Access Subscriptions include unlimited digital access. To access these benefits, you must first provide your email address, register with STLtoday.com and activate your account online. To activate your digital account, visit STLtoday. com/activate. For assistance setting up your account, visit STLtoday.com/ subscriberservices or call 1-314-340-8888.

LOTTERY Multistate games MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 24-37-41-61-70 Mega ball: 20 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $229 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $181 million

Missouri lotteries LOTTO Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $1.1 million SHOW ME CASH Tuesday: 01-14-15-20-24 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $134,000 PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 291 Evening: 476 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 5819 Evening: 0816

Illinois lotteries LUCKY DAY LOTTO Tuesday Midday: 02-07-32-33-44 Evening: 03-08-12-21-30 LOTTO Monday: 15-26-35-38-40-47 Extra shot: 17 Thursday’s estimated jackpot: $4 million PICK-3 Tuesday Midday: 126 FB: 4 Evening: 388 FB: 9 PICK-4 Tuesday Midday: 5316 FB: 8 Evening: 6912 FB: 1

An obituary for Better Together, smothered by Stenger’s shadow TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Amid the hubbub of the indictment and resignation of former St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger on Monday, a five-year-old suffered a tragic ending to its brief life. Its name was Better Together. Time of death was sometime Monday morning, when the nonprofit that hoped to merge the city and the county into a new metro city of St. Louis realized it would never be able to rid itself of the Stenger tumor. The patient had been ill for some time. Signs of medical decline began showing in late January when the nonprofit, the offspring of billionaire philanthropist and political donor Rex Sinquefield, announced its ballot initiative that would merge the city and the county in a statewide vote in November 2020. Stenger and many of his political operatives who also worked for Better Together were there to lend support. Glorious announcements were made about how the proposal would improve longstanding divides between black and white in the region, and make it easier to carry out racial equity goals outlined in the Forward Through Ferguson report. Like the slow drip of intravenous fluid that in its final days was keeping Better Together alive, one by one black leaders criticized the plan and said it was a charade. The Rev. Starsky Wilson, who led the Ferguson Commission that called for more equity in the region, referred to the Better Together proposal as “apartheid.” Other city and county leaders found multiple flaws and questioned its tax-cut schemes. But the Stenger tumor is what metastasized. The proposal not only elevated him to be the first mayor of the new merged city, it did so by suspending an election, and it gave him grand powers over the new charter. This was at a time in which nearly everybody in the political world in and around St. Louis knew that the then-county executive was under federal investigation for various “pay to play” schemes. Better Together’s family — including spokesman Ed Rhode, who had held the same job for Stenger — brushed off such criticism. After all, they knew exactly who Stenger was. They pushed to elect him precisely because of who he was.

ROBERT COHEN, RCOHEN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Then-St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger talks with St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson in January at the beginning of a presentation at the Cheshire hotel by the city-county merger advocacy group Better Together. In that election, remember, Better Together’s parent, Sinquefield, funneled $200,000 through an obscure fire district political action committee called MACFPD, to prop up Stenger’s power by trying to defeat a proposition that would allow the St. Louis County Council to rein him in. Around that same time, using a similar scheme, Sinquefield donated $150,000 to the carpenters union’s political action committee. Shortly after Better Together announced its merger plans, the carpenters donated $125,000 to the effort. Right around the time that the MACFPD fund was catching the eyes of federal investigators, it also gave a $5,000 donation to St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson, another backer of Better Together. The tumor grew. Eventually, Better Together opted for surgery. In March, its mother, Nancy Rice, said that the initiative would be refiled. Stenger would no longer be the first unelected mayor. The move had nothing to do with any federal investigation, she said. The same day, Stenger was served with a subpoena, and one of Rice’s board members contradicted her. In April, Better Together underwent an even riskier surgery. It attached itself to John Gaskin. The young president of the county branch of the NAACP held a news conference announcing his organization’s support of the effort. Finally, black support for Better Together!

But there was a problem. Gaskin, who had been given a job by Stenger previously in the county economic partnership that was at the center of the federal investigation, neglected to tell people that Better Together was paying him. He also didn’t tell his board members about his clear conflict of interest. Days later, he was suspended from his job by the national president and CEO of the NAACP. Better Together was left on the surgery table, in a pay-for-play coma. Officially, it is being kept alive by a ventilator, though doctors have declared it brain dead. Its heart and lungs are no longer functioning, and it’s impossible to know who is paying for the life-support machine. Better Together’s campaign arm, Unite STL, has filed minimal paperwork with the Missouri Ethics Commission, showing no payments to Rice nor the multitude of campaign operatives working to keep the effort alive. Taxpayers don’t know who is paying the people working for the initiative. Another dark money committee is funding ethics complaints against municipalities for daring to question some of Better Together’s multitude of flaws. After the Stenger indictment, the wife of Better Together spokesman Rhode, Patti Hageman, resigned her position working for the former county executive. Better Together leaves behind no survivors. Send flowers in lieu of cash. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

UMSL students testify in case of sexual assault on campus BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON — One University of Missouri-St. Louis student said he awoke to being sexually assaulted in the bed of his campus apartment last year. Another said he was molested in his sleep in 2017 and never knew until police — nearly a year later — showed him photos and videos of himself being abused. Bagley The man charged with both crimes is Devonta Bagley, 24, who stands trial this week in St. Louis County Circuit Court on charges of sodomy, burglary and armed criminal action. Prosecutors told jurors in opening statements Tuesday that Bagley was a stranger to both victims and sneaked into their rooms as they slept at the University Meadows apartments in 2017 and 2018. Bagley’s lawyer Joslyn Anthony told jurors that prosecutors were “going to ask you to make some leaps” to find him guilty. Anthony said there was no evidence of a break-in, no injuries to either victim and no attempt by at least one alleged victim to report being attacked either to his roommate, who was in the apartment at the time, or to police. Police weren’t summoned, she said, until after the victim told his father of the attack. But both alleged victims identified Bagley as their attacker on Tuesday and offered explicit details: One of them, now 20, testified that he awoke early on March 11, 2018, when Bagley lifted his bedsheets and then told him to remove his clothes. He said Bagley then placed a pistol on the victim’s bare chest and ordered him to masturbate.

Then, he said, Bagley demanded he flip onto his chest, and Bagley raped him. “Why didn’t you take (the gun) and shoot him?” Assistant Prosecutor Kelly Snyder asked the man. “I was scared,” he said. “I didn’t know if it was loaded. There were a million things running through my head. I just wanted to live.” Bagley then took cellphone photos and threatened to post them to social media, the victim testified Tuesday. Bagley also swiped about $50 cash and snapped a picture of the victim’s drivers license before he fled. The other student, 22, attacked Sept. 30, 2017, testified Tuesday that he is a very deep sleeper, didn’t know Bagley attacked him, and had never seen Bagley before, except in jail photos the police showed him. Two other USML students also reported finding Bagley hiding in the bathroom of their University Meadows apartment about 4 a.m. that same day. Bagley fled after he was found. Prosecutors on Tuesday also elicited testimony of a similar crime at a Kansas State University fraternity house in September 2017. The alleged victim, a 20-year-old Sigma Chi fraternity member, testified that he awoke Sept. 9, 2017, to Bagley performing oral sex on him about 2 a.m. after a house toga party. The KSU student, now 20, said he, too, had never seen Bagley before the attack. Bagley was charged in Riley County, Kan., with aggravated criminal sodomy and aggravated burglary. Charges are pending. Bagley is a July 2017 graduate of KSU, officials have said. He was an UMSL graduate student before he was expelled in the fall of 2017.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Singer Judy Collins is 80. Singer Rita Coolidge is 74. Singer-bassist Nick Fortuna of The Buckinghams is 73. Actor Dann Florek (“Law and Order: SVU”) is 68. Singersongwriter Ray Parker Jr. is 65. Actor Byron Stewart is Collins 63. Actress Maia Morgenstern (“The Passion of the Christ”) is 57. Actor Scott Coffey (“Mulholland Drive,” “The Outsiders”) is 55. Country singer Wayne Hancock is 54. McGraw Actor Charlie Schlatter (“Diagnosis Murder”) is 53. Country singer Tim McGraw is 52. Bassist D’Arcy Wretzky (Smashing Pumpkins) is 51. Director Wes Anderson is 50. Actress Julie Benz (“No Ordinary Family”) is 47. Singer Tina Campbell of Mary Mary is 45. Actor Darius McCrary (“Family Matters”) is 43. Actor Jamie Dornan (“Fifty Shades of Grey”) is 37. Actress Kerry Bishe (“Argo”) is 35. Actress Lizzy Greene (“A Million Little Things”) is 16. – Associated Press

CORRECTION For information about the Bail Project, the organization’s spokesman Camilo Ramirez directed a PostDispatch reporter to a lawsuit filed by ArchCity Defenders and other groups in January. The lawsuit was described incorrectly in a front-page story on Sunday.


LOCAL

05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

‘In God We Trust’ bill targets schools BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY — Missouri could soon join a wave of other states requiring local schools to display the words “In God We Trust.” In a House education committee Tuesday, lawmakers debated a proposal by Rep. Dean Dohrman that is modeled on legislation already adopted in Arkansas, Louisiana, Florida, Tennessee, Alabama and Arizona. It would require all schools to place the nation’s motto in a location within the school where it could be viewed by students. The proposed law would go into effect next year. “I think this is extremely impor-

tant at this time of national stress,” Dohrman said. “We’ve got to keep our national identity or fall into chaos.” Supporters say the phrase is already found on U.S. currency and is often seen on police cars. “This is nothing new,” said Rep. Chuck Basye, R-Rocheport. “It doesn’t promote any particular religion,” added Dohrman, R-La Monte. The proposal marks the second time this spring that members of the House have waded into a debate over the separation of church and state. In March, the House approved legislation allowing public school districts to offer elective courses on the Bible.

Like displaying the national motto, the Bible proposal follows what at least five other states are considering. The faith-based legislation is part of a national effort by the Congressional Prayer Caucus Foundation known as “Project Blitz.” The group has produced a handbook for state lawmakers to advance Christian-based laws. In Tuesday’s hearing, members of the committee said they had received a number of emails from opponents throughout the nation. “I was called a terrorist,” said Rep. Dottie Bailey, R-Eureka. “When I get that kind of hate, I actually feel sorry for them. “The left, the fringe, would try to remove everything that we hold

dear in this country, especially from public places. It’s quite offensive. And I don’t get offended,” Bailey said.“We’re quite lost in the culture today.” Republican Rep. Ben Baker, a Bible college dean from Neosho who sponsored the Bible legislation, also weighed in on the legislation. “I think it’s important for students to remember the roots of our country,” Baker said. But a Baptist minister called the legislation “divisive and unnecessary.” It will send a message to some schoolchildren that, “unless they believe in a monotheistic deity, they are not fully American,” said Brian Kaylor, who oversees Churchnet, a Baptist network

based in Jefferson City. “This bill is not about our national motto,” he said, “as much as it is a sectarian, religious statement.” Don Hinkle, a lobbyist for the Missouri Baptist Convention, said the legislation would not violate the Constitution. As an example, he said the House and Senate open their daily sessions with a prayer. “No one is being coerced to do anything with our national motto,” Hinkle said. The measure still needs a vote in the committee before it can be debated by the full House. The legislation is House Bill 577. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Report confirms higher cancer risk near creek BY BLYTHE BERNHARD

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A federal investigation confirms that people exposed to the contaminated Coldwater Creek in north St. Louis County from the 1960s to the 1990s may have an increased risk of developing bone cancer, lung cancer and leukemia. Exposure to the radioactive contaminants in more recent years could increase the risk of lung cancer, according to the final report released Monday by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Coldwater Creek was contaminated decades ago by nuclear waste from the production of weapons during World War II. The waste was stored in piles near the airport, adjacent to the creek that flows from St. Ann through Florissant to the Missouri River. In 2014, Missouri health officials asked for federal assistance after a state report showed high rates of leukemia, breast, colon and other cancers in areas surrounding the creek. The toxic substances agency, which is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, launched the study in 2016 of potential risks of living or playing near the creek. The agency made four conclusions after estimating the maximum potential exposure of children and adults who touched, swallowed or breathed in contaminated water or soil from Coldwater Creek and its flood plain for multiple hours a day over three decades: • Anyone who lived near or played in the creek from the 1960s to the 1990s may have been exposed to radiological contami-

J.B. FORBES, JFORBES@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Scott Williams, 57, said he doesn’t live next to Coldwater Creek, but he said he does volunteer yard work for his church near there. He went to a public meeting that addressed residents’ concerns about the cancer threats of Coldwater Creek in June at St. Mark’s United Methodist Church in Florissant. nants that could increase the risk of lung cancer, bone cancer or leukemia. Those who were exposed daily in the 2000s after cleanup started could have a slightly increased risk of lung cancer. The risks are small and unlikely to affect the overall cancer rates in the community. • Current or former residents of the Coldwater Creek area do not need additional disease screening because of the small increased risk and potential for adverse effects from overscreening. Residents

should include their possible exposure in any medical history discussions. • Cleanup of the radiological waste including thorium-230 around Coldwater Creek should continue, and signs should be posted warning the public of the ongoing potential exposure. • The agency was unable to determine the risk of other exposure routes, including inhaling dust from nuclear waste storage piles or consuming local dairy or produce. • Since the agency’s preliminary

report was released last summer, the agency received numerous reports of illnesses and deaths among current and former residents. The public comments included tales of playing in the creek, gardening in adjacent backyards and, basements flooding. While residents also expressed concerns about autoimmune diseases, infertility and birth defects, the agency focused on the community’s risk of developing cancers already known to be linked to the same contaminants.

“We recognize the losses so many people in this community have experienced, unfortunately our evaluation cannot prove or disprove that any particular illness was caused by exposure to site contaminants,” the report states. While any radiation exposure is considered potentially harmful, doses from environmental exposures like Coldwater Creek are considered to be far lower than those received by nuclear industry workers, patients receiving medical radiation or Japanese survivors of atomic bombs. The volunteer group Coldwater Creek — Just the Facts has tracked 6,000 former and current residents of the area who have cancer diagnoses. The number includes more than 60 cases of rare appendix cancers, which the health agency did not link to exposure to the creek. Investigators also found no evidence of links to other types of cancers, fertility issues or birth defects as residents have suspected. A statement from the group released Tuesday said they are “encouraged” by the results of the study and will continue to pursue compensation for the residents of North County through the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act for uranium workers and people living downwind from nuclear test sites in the western U.S. The report is available online and at the Florissant Valley Branch library, 195 New Florissant Road. Blythe Bernhard • 314-340-8129 @blythebernhard on Twitter bbernhard@post-dispatch.com

CELEBRATE THE SEASON - STL FARMERS MARKETS WEDNESDAY, MAY 1

CARDMEMBER PREVIEW SHOPPING DAY! Use your Dillard’s Credit Card on today’s purchases to receive these extra savings on all permanently reduced merchandise!

take an extra

30

% off

entire stock

...of all permanently reduced merchandise throughout the store. Don’t have a Dillard’s Credit Card? TODAY, TODAY, Apply today to take advantage of the Dillard’s Cardmember Preview Shopping Day. Wednesday,

Wednesday, Sept. 18 a 10% Off All-Day Welcome Shopping Pass in your first statement Receive September 23

when you spend $100 on your Dillard’s Card the day you open your account.

Maximum discount $100. Offer good only when using your Dillard’s Credit Card. PREVIEW SHOPPING DAY

315

SALE STARTS THURSDAY, MAY 2 LIMITED TIME!


A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 05.01.2019

Page takes over, begins to clean house PAGE • FROM A1

to allow someone to initiate a government decision in exchange for a campaign contribution.” “We will set up as many barriers to that as possible, and I hope to have some policy initiatives in the next couple of weeks,” he said. Page became the county executive Monday night by a 5-1 County Council vote. Under the county charter, Page, a Democrat who had represented the 2nd District, will serve as county executive until after the next general election in November 2020. The winner of that election will serve the balance of Stenger’s term, which expires on Jan. 1, 2023. Page said he had not decided whether to run. Page summoned reporters Tuesday to the conference room of his newly occupied ninthfloor office in the county government building. He said he would work much more collaboratively with council members than Stenger, who degraded them as a “circus” when they opposed him. Stenger had skipped nine of their meetings in a row from November to February, flouting a requirement in the county charter that he attend. Page said the indictment validated the council’s wary stance toward Stenger, and their probes into contracts they believe he steered toward campaign donors. “It was obvious to us that something was wrong,” he said. “When we asked questions, we were met with an enormous amount of hostility, anger and aggression. That also raised flags, but that also gave the county executive some political cover to argue that these were politicians fighting and that the council did not have merit in their position. “A lot of people accepted that position because it was believable in our current, very polarized state of government that we have. … It was an explanation that sold.” He said he gave “credit to the reporters at the Post-Dispatch that they deserve. They requested information, they compared the documents that were being discovered to the statements that were being made and said, ‘This does not make sense,’ and started writing about it. And it’s apparent to us now that the FBI and the U.S. attorney’s office read the papers.” Stenger did not respond to a request for comment. Page said his own leadership style was “to make everyone around me successful and I intend to work with everyone on

COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County Executive Sam Page addresses reporters during a news conference on Tuesday at the county executive’s offices in Clayton. Page took over the role of county executive following the resignation of Steve Stenger amid a federal indictment in a “pay to play” case.

the County Council and use their expertise and their experience to make decisions.”

STAFFING CHANGES Page gave several members of Stenger’s staff notice they had until the end of the day to resign, and making appointments of his own. A source familiar with the transition said Stenger administration officials who are leaving are County Counselor Peter Krane, spokesman Cordell Whitlock, chief of policy Jeff Wagener, operations chief Glenn Powers, and advisers Tom Malecek and Michael Benoist. Krane said he had no comment; the others could not be reached. Patti Hageman, the former St. Louis city counselor who joined Stenger’s team three months ago as a senior policy adviser, turned in her resignation on Monday about 20 minutes before Stenger did the same. She said she had a new job but declined to discuss it. Former Post-Dispatch reporter Paul Hampel, who joined the Stenger administration in October 2015 as a policy adviser, accepted an offer to remain as part of the Page administration. Doug Moore, a former Post-Dispatch reporter hired six weeks ago as the council’s policy director, is

also likely to be heading upstairs to Page’s office. Page said his chief of staff would be Ladue attorney and public relations consultant Winston Calvert, who worked for 18 months as St. Louis city counselor under Mayor Francis Slay before resigning in November 2015. Calvert also worked behind the scenes as an unpaid adviser to Page. He said Garry Earls, chief operating officer to former executive Charlie Dooley, was returning to county government “for a short time” to help with the transition. He acknowledged that many were critical of Earls’ role under Dooley but said, “some of the people who were critical of him have seen what’s happened since he’s been gone and said they wished they had him back.” He said Dooley had been unfairly maligned at the end of his term and said “this week we see the difference between accusations and reality.” Mike Chapman, who had resigned as a Stenger’s director of operations in early 2016, and then worked for County Council member Colleen Wasinger, is also joining Page’s administration in an as-yet-undetermined role. Chapman was depicted in the indictment as having resigned over disagreements with

Stenger and having angered Stenger by standing in the way of awarding a county insurance contract to campaign donor John Rallo. Page said it wasn’t clear if Mark Tucker should continue as county auditor because they had been friends for decades, but said Tucker may continue in his government “or find some other way to contribute to public service.”

MOVING FORWARD Page said he intended to settle a lawsuit between dueling port authority boards appointed by Stenger and the council, and another lawsuit with Stenger over several facets of executive and legislative powers. And he said he intended to replace the board and leadership of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership, an agency Stenger told reporters he did not try to influence but federal agents recorded him as saying he was trying to “own.” He also addressed the possibility of a rift between him and his closest council ally, Hazel Erby, who also wanted to be county executive and vocally protested the council’s vote on Monday without hearing public comment. “Hazel has always been a very close friend of mine, probably

my closest friend on the council, and it’s difficult to be in a position where we have a different opinion,” he said. “It’s a rare event. We’ll see a new commitment to the county executive’s office to work on issues that are important to North County. I expect Hazel to be my partner in that to the extent that she is willing to identify a way that she could help. I expect us to continue to work as a team.” As council chairman, Page was often at odds with Police Chief Jon Belmar, particularly in late 2018 when Belmar railed against the council’s $4 million cut from the police budget Stenger proposed. But on Tuesday Page said, “Being police chief is a very difficult job, especially in St. Louis County, and I think he’s done a good job with some very difficult situations. … I think we’ve all had a good relationship with the chief.” About the Better Together city-county merger proposal, Page said, “I do not believe that a process that does not leave this decision to St. Louis and St. Louis County voters is the right process. … I don’t think it will end well.” Jeremy Kohler • 314-340-8337 @jeremykohler on Twitter jkohler@post-dispatch.com

In Page’s first meeting in charge, council does not address leadership questions COUNCIL • FROM A1

meeting. The council did not address whether Erby, or someone else, would ascend to the powerful chair position — and, if she did, whether one of the Republicans could become the vice chair. “We had enough drama for one week,” Ernie Trakas, R-6th District, said after the meeting. Page’s seat in the 2nd District will remain vacant until a special election is held, probably later this year. He said earlier Tuesday that the county’s Republicans and Democrats would each select a candidate to run without a primary runoff. Page, sitting in the county ex-

ecutive’s chair for the first time, extended an olive branch to Erby, who had wanted the post and a day earlier had blasted her colleagues for immediately voting on Stenger’s replacement without public comment. Erby, Page noted, had been the first council member to allege corruption in Stenger’s administration. She did not respond. Page said he had spent the day meeting with county employees to tell them their work was valued, and said he met with reporters “until they got bored.” He said he would make a report to the council each week. Stenger sporadically attended council meetings, and his report would typically consist of two words:

“Nothing further.” And he would always leave after the public comments and before discussion of bills and resolutions. Councilman Mark Harder, R7th District, thanked Page for staying for the whole meeting as the council advanced and passed several bills and tabled others. Councilman Tim Fitch, R-3rd District, said it was the first time in his four months on the council that he looked forward to meeting “without a sense of dread about what’s next.” Trakas said: “What this represents is the best of government and we have a real chance now of righting the ship toward transparent and accountable government.”

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis County Executive Sam Page pours water for council member Ernie Trakas as fellow council member Lisa Clancy looks on during Page’s first County Council meeting as county executive on Tuesday.

Critics question state help for land owned by St. Charles ISLAND • FROM A1

the budget by Sen. Bill Eigel, RWeldon Spring, who represents the area in question, which is just south of the Interstate 70 bridge heading into St. Charles. The city owns the island and leases it to the county. The county operates a 160acre park on the island, complete with trails and wildlife viewing. The park itself would remain untouched and would remain owned by the city, Temme said. But the city owns private land facing the island, which it would like to sell. “In order to get the land to where it would be attractive to private investment, they need to do something about that side channel that’s been filled in,” Eigel said on the Senate floor last week. “That’s where this money comes in. So this money is preparing the land that the city owns to be able to support future private development.” He said the channel would

resemble a shallow reflecting pool, but Temme said officials had still not decided on what the channel would ultimately look like. Not everyone is happy about the state spending. “Why is it the state’s responsibility to take care of St. Charles’ private infrastructure concerns?” asked Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur. “Why would the people of my district, or any other district in the state, want to hand over this money to St. Charles for St. Charles’ benefit — solely for St. Charles’ benefit. So, I’m concerned about it.” Eigel said other local infrastructure projects the state funds aren’t considered handouts, and he said the filling in of side channels on the Missouri River contributes to flooding. He said the city had originally sought grant money through the Army Corps of Engineers. To demonstrate to the federal government that the project had

proper backing, Eigel said the city pushed a nonbinding resolution through the Legislature last year that voiced support for the project. The city has said that it would put up millions of dollars of city money to fund the digging of the channel. But, Eigel said, efforts to draw money from the corps were unsuccessful. Enter the state. “They (St. Charles officials) were looking for a little bit of assistance to help with this particular infrastructure project,” Eigel said. “I am very supportive of infrastructure projects around the state, like this, to help cities — you know, St. Charles or otherwise — to grow.” When Eigel said this, Schupp cracked a joke. “You were the first one on board with the transportation (bonding proposal),” Schupp said on the Senate floor. “I’m being a little bit facetious.” Eigel’s abrasiveness in the Senate this session adds an-

other wrinkle to this story. He is one of the leaders of the Senate Conservative Caucus, a sixmember bloc of Republicans in the 34-member Senate that has filibustered numerous pieces of legislation this year. Among the items that Eigel initially opposed was Gov. Mike Parson’s $350 million bonding proposal that sought to repair more than 200 bridges across the state, none of them in Eigel’s district. Senators said at the time that rural areas of the state had dire infrastructure needs, unlike the relatively well-off St. Charles County. “If someone is concerned they are not getting enough attention, they just may be blessed that they have good bridges,” Senate President Pro Tem Dave Schatz, R-Sullivan, said in January. The Conservative Caucus has threatened to torpedo numerous priorities this year. The PostDispatch reported Wednesday that in an internal email ob-

tained by the newspaper, Eigel said the group had “pushed chamber anxiety to a high level” and said the group should “stall” Senate business unless its priorities gain traction. Sen. Mike Cierpiot, R-Lee’s Summit, in a recent speech on the Senate floor, raised questions about the Bangert Island project. “We’ve heard a lot this year about conservatives,” Cierpiot said. “One wants $2 million for an island in St. Louis — St. Louis, not Florida — for redevelopment. Picking winners and losers. ... I’m likely to support many of these issues, but I’m not claiming purity as some do.” Since the House did not budget any money for the island project, the two chambers will have to agree to the Senate’s position if the line item is to survive the legislative process and make it to Parson’s desk. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Board endorses airport Costly Joint-Pain bond refinancing plan Injections Replaced By New $2 Pill

Paid Advertisement

BY MARK SCHLINKMANN

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — The city’s top fiscal board on Tuesday endorsed a bond refinancing plan for St. Louis Lambert International Airport, two weeks after Comptroller Darlene Green accused other members of delaying it to help the cause of airport privatization. Mayor Lyda Krewson and Aldermanic President Lewis Reed joined Green in voting in favor of the proposal. The three make up the Board of Estimate and Apportionment. “The interest savings is significant,” said the mayor, who thanked Green for providing answers to questions she has raised. “I have a lot more information today than I did a week ago.” Green said after the meeting that she believes the delay in the estimate board’s endorsement will have “minimal effect” on how the bond refunding fares in financial markets. She said “the test now” is how soon the Board of Aldermen, which also must approve the plan, will do so. “I hope it moves forward without any more

stalling or blocking or political maneuvers that I believe has been happening,” she said. After the estimate board held off a vote on April 16, Green said getting its support quickly was important to signal that the refunding is likely to happen. She alleged that the delay was aimed at putting Lambert’s financial situation and airport operations in a poor light. Reed and Krewson denied that was their motivation and pointed out that the measure still had to go through the aldermanic legislative process, taking at least a few weeks. St. Louis officials have been exploring the idea of leasing city-owned Lambert to a private operator. Green is opposed while Krewson and Reed say they haven’t taken a position. Under the bond plan, about $93 million in outstanding debt will be refinanced at lower interest rates that would save Lambert about $20 million in interest. The measure also calls for the savings to be used to pay off a new set of airport

bonds of around $23.5 million to be issued this year. Airport Director Rhonda Hamm-Niebruegge said revenue from the new bonds would be used to build a new emergency operations center at Lambert, help rebuild a runway, pave two airport-owned parking lots, replace boilers and generators, buy a new snowplow and cover other capital costs. Reed pointed out Tuesday that the measure will have to return to the estimate board for another vote because aldermen will be asked by Green’s office to make some changes in it. The changes would detail a provision allowing the city to repay bondholders sooner than normal if a privatization plan was carried out. The estimate board on Tuesday also endorsed a proposed $1.15 billion city operating budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. That now goes before aldermen, who will soon begin their yearly round of budget hearings. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Free-speech bill seen as chilling for faculty BY LEXI CHURCHILL

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY — The Missouri House approved legislation Tuesday designed to protect the free speech of students and student journalists. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle expressed support for the proposed regulations that would largely bar schools from prior restraint and shield college journalists and their advisers from any disciplinary action as a result of their reporting. However, opponents said other parts of the bill worked against free speech of college professors. The proposal warns faculty to be “cautious” when expressing personal views and says faculty should not introduce subjects unrelated to their class or in areas that they do not have special training. Rep. Justin Hill, R-Lake Saint Louis, spoke of a professor at an unnamed university who uses their own book to teach an English class. Hill claimed the book was filled with onesided articles.

“What are they really getting? Are they getting a biased education into the political viewpoints of that professor? I looked up that professor and they wouldn’t vote for you and me, I promise,” he said. One representative labeled this practice “indoctrination” and said the proposed policy would better keep teachers in line. Democrats argued that the legislation would ultimately hurt a student’s education by restricting challenging viewpoints. They warned the proposal’s unclear regulations would open up schools to potential lawsuits. The initiative says professors could be punished for bringing opinions into the classroom if their speech isn’t “reasonably germane to the subject matter of the class as broadly construed” and makes up a “substantial portion of classroom instruction.” “It allows students and professors to exercise their right to free speech until someone says they can’t,”

said Rep. Ingrid Burnett, D-Kansas City. We’re not clear about who that someone is or what their standards would be.” Rep. Doug Richey, RExcelsior Springs, insisted the initiative would help protect students from professors who use grading as a means to instill their viewpoint as the right opinion. “When a professor has the power of grading and begins to indicate to a class that their perspective is the perspective that ought to be respected and or reflected in their own work, that is not fair to the students,” Richey said. “It squelches their ability to truly, with a degree of objectivity, explore the subject and see where they’re going to land without the undue influence of a professor who is using the power of grading.” The initiative, approved 107-44, now moves to the Senate. The legislation is House Bill 576. Lexi Churchill • 573-556-6184 @Lchurchilll on Twitter lchurchill@post-dispatch.com

Senate advances industrial farm bill Local rules could not exceed state regulations BY JACK SUNTRUP

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY — A proposal to do away with local rules on big farms earned initial approval Tuesday in the Missouri Senate after an overnight filibuster from Democrats concerned about pollution caused by concentrated animal feeding operations. Twenty counties, mostly in the northern half of the state, have sought to regulate the large animal operations known as CAFOs through local health ordinances. But the GOPbacked proposal says counties cannot enact rules more stringent than state standards. Democrats earlier this session stalled a vote on the measure, but they allowed passage Tuesday morning after about 12 hours of debate. They won a concession: setback requirements for what are known as “export only” CAFOs — operations that ship manure to other farms. The Democrats were concerned that owners could spray anywhere, with

no safeguards for streams or public lands. Some farms near CAFOs welcome the manure, which is a fertilizer that can be offered for free. After the amendment by Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, was allowed on the bill, Democrats sat down and allowed the bill to win initial approval on a voice vote. The measure needs one more vote before moving to the House, but with Senate Democrats — who maintain some leverage in the minority because of their filibuster power — out of the way, House Republicans could move fast to approve the bill before the Legislature’s adjournment May 17. Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, cheered news of the approval on Twitter. “BIG win for Missouri farm & ranch families,” he said. The bill “opens doors to meet growing world food demand and ensures we keep more agriculture production in our state, strengthening Missouri’s #1 industry!” Proponents have said local ordinances create a “hodgepodge” of regulations that have stalled expansion of modern agriculture techniques in the state.

“Farming like we used to farm doesn’t feed the world anymore,” said Sen. Mike Bernskoetter, R-Jefferson City, who sponsored the legislation. But opponents — flanked by a vocal statewide network of neighbors affected by the facilities — have said state regulations are lacking, allowing the big farms to run amok. It is unclear, said Brian Smith of the Missouri Rural Crisis Center, whether a new law would nullify local ordinances that are already in place — but the intent of the legislation, backers say, is to create a uniform set of regulations statewide. The agriculture industry in recent days has increased its lobbying presence in the Capitol. The Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, for example, previously had three lobbyists working for it but has hired five more lobbyists since April 19, according to Missouri Ethics Commission records. The Missouri Pork Association hired two more lobbyists last week, increasing its ranks to four lobbyists. The legislation is Senate Bill 391. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

New pill boosts the same lubricating joint Uluid as expensive and painful injections - without using a needle. Users report dramatic relief from swelling, pain and stiffness without side effects and expense. Health News Syndicate HNS—A popular needle injection for people with joint pain is now available in an inexpensive nonprescription pill. The breakthrough came when researchers discovered a way to deliver the injected “relief molecule” through the digestive system. Top US clinics have used these needle injections for years because they deliver powerful relief. Unfortunately, the shots are painful and expensive. They also only work on the joint being treated. The new pill, called Synovia, delivers the same “relief molecule” as the injections. However, it has some impressive advantages. First, it’s inexpensive and nonprescription. Also, relief is delivered to every joint in the body because it enters the bloodstream through the digestive system. This gives it the ability to reduce a much wider variety of pain. Users report greater �lexibility and less stiffness in their knees. Hands and shoulders move painfree for the �irst time in years. Even neck and lower back pain improve dramatically. All this without spending over $600 on needle injections and taking trips to the doctor every week. Themedicalcommunity is very excited about this new breakthrough. Dr. Jacob Moss says, “Synovia is a great option for those suffering from joint pain. Injections are usually a last resort because of the pain and expense. However, Synovia should be taken at the �irst sign of discomfort.”

New Discovery The needle injection procedure has been given to hundreds of thousands of patients over the last several years. Doctors use the shots to boost a critical element of the joint called synovial �luid. This lubricating �luid is found between the cartilage and bones of every joint. According to the �irm’s headofR&D,MikeMcNeill, “Researchers have been working for years to �ind a way to boost this �luid noninvasively. The problem was the molecule used in the injections was too large to absorb into the bloodstream.” Top scientists conquered this obstacle by �inding a smaller form of the same molecule. This new glucose form is easily absorbed by your stomach and intestines! Now those who suffer from joint pain can get relief without painful injections. At less than $2 per day, early users like Steve Young are impressed. He says, “I’ve tried more pills than I can count, without any luck. Synovia is different. My knees and hands haven’t felt this good in years!”

UNHEALTHY: No lubricating %$#!"$' :. 481("/39"0& )48"- .( /3(9"43&+ 4+3- 9. ,3"0)84 1.0+#.0# �luid or cartilage leads to painful 1.0+ (811"0&' rubbing. bone-on-bone

NO MORE NEEDLES: A popular needle injection pain-killer for joint pain is being replaced. The key molecule in these injections can now be delivered by taking a new low-cost pill called Synovia.

Impressive Clinical Results

Approved By Leading Doctors

Leading clinics use injection therapy because it works. Recent clinical trials show the pill form also delivers major relief. One example is a landmark study out of Europe. In the study the active ingredient in Synovia was compared to a popular NSAID pain reliever. The goal was to see if it could reduce pain and swelling around the knee. The results were incredible! After just 30 days, more than 8 out of 10 people who took Synovia’s active ingredient had NO swelling. However, only 2 out of 10 people who took the NSAID experienced reduced swelling. The study also looked at cases of severe swelling. Amazingly, zero cases of severe swelling were detected in the group taking the active ingredient found in Synovia. This means it was 100% effective for the cases of severe swelling! In contrast, 9 out of 10 people taking the NSAID still had severe swelling. McNeill points out, “The impressive thing about this study is the active ingredient wasn’t tested against a fake pill. It was up against one of the most popular NSAIDs people use every day. It’s easy to see why people in pain are excited to get relief without an injection.”

The new delivery system for this molecule has caught the attention of leading medical doctors. “Needle injections for joint pain have been around for years because they work. Being able to get the same relief molecule through a pill is amazing. Injections may be a last resort, but I’d recommend Synovia at the �irst sign of pain,” said Dr. Marie Laguna. Dr. Moss adds, “The research behind the active ingredient in Synovia is very exciting. This product is a great choice for those who haven’t had success with other joint pain treatments.”

The New Way It Delivers Relief Getting relief without injections has big advantages. The most obvious is avoiding being stuck by a large needle every week for 5 weeks. Another downside of injections is the doctor can “miss”. The needle needs to be inserted into a precise spot in the joint to work. Otherwise, you risk the treatment being ineffective. However, boosting your lubricating joint �luid by taking a pill delivers relief to all your joints, not just one. There’s an additional reason the active ingredient in Synovia works so well – it nourishes the cartilage. McNeill says, “This is vital because cartilage does not have blood vessels. The �luid in the joint serves two very important pain-relief roles: lubrication and giving the cartilage the nutrients it needs.”

HEALTHY: Synovia’s active &#($"' ;20.6"3*% 3/9"6+ "0&(+-"+09% ingredients joints and 481("/39+ 7."09%lubricate 30- 0.8("%$ /3(9"43&+ %. "9 /30 (+#&(.5! nourish cartilage!

110% Money Back Guarantee Amazing feedback from users of Synovia has generated a wave of con�idence at the company. So much so that they now offer Synovia with a 110% money back guarantee. The company’s president, Michael Kenneth says, “We’ve seen how well it works. Now we want to remove any risk for those who might think Synovia sounds too good to be true.” Simply take the pill exactly as directed. You must enjoy fast acting relief. Otherwise, return the product as directed and you’ll receive 100% of your money back plus an extra 10%.

How To Get Synovia Today marks the of�icial release of Synovia in Missouri. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to everyone who calls within the next 48 hours. A Regional Order Hotline has been set up for local readers to call. This is the only way to try Synovia with their “110% money back” guarantee. Starting at 6:00 am today the order hotline will be open for 48 hours. All you have to do is call TOLL FREE 1-888-7426605 and provide the operator with the special discount approval code: SYN19. The company will do the rest. Current supplies of Synovia are limited, and callers that don’t get through to the order hotline within the next 48 hours may have to pay more and wait until more inventory is produced. This could take as long as 6 weeks.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. ALL DOCTORS MENTIONED ARE REMUNERATED FOR THEIR SERVICE. ALL CLINICAL STUDIES WERE INDEPENDENTLY CONDUCTED AND WERE NOT SPONSORED BY MAKERS OF SYNOVIA.


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

Lawmakers back local vote on merger BY KURT ERICKSON

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY — The Missouri House voted Tuesday to put another roadblock in the path of the push to merge the city of St. Louis and St. Louis County. Under legislation given preliminary approval by the House on a voice vote, voters in St. Louis and St. Louis County would have to approve the merger proposal backed by the civic group Better Together, which is slated for a statewide vote in 2020. Rep. Dean Plocher, R-Des Peres, who is sponsoring the proposed resolution, said there are merits to discussing how to improve the region, but the rest of the state shouldn’t be able to force the merger on the

people of the city and the county. “I’m all for making the region better. It’s the process I have a problem with,” Plocher said. Rep. Bruce DeGroot, RChesterfield, said voters in his district are “downright hostile” to the idea of a merger. The legislation approved Tuesday, House Joint Resolution 54, aims to amend the Missouri Constitution by requiring any merger to be approved by a majority of voters within the county or city set to be merged. It is among a handful of bills pending in the Legislature this spring as part of opposition to the controversial Better Together ballot proposal. The proposal, first un-

veiled in January, would meld the city, county and all 88 county municipalities into a “metropolitan city” with a unified government and police department. Supporters say a merged mega-city will better compete for businesses and could reduce administrative costs for taxpayers. If Better Together supporters gather enough signatures, the question would be put to a statewide vote in November 2020. Backers earlier filed a revised petition, removing former County Executive Steve Stenger as the would-be mayor of the first “metro city.” Opponents say it’s not fair for the future of the region to be decided by voters in faraway rural counties.

dispenser in the pharmacy, they said. Obermeier is scheduled to be sentenced in July.

neighborhood and assaulted her and another resident Monday morning, police said. A 3-year-old boy at the home during the confrontation was unharmed. Police released new details Tuesday about the fatal shooting, including identifying the dead man — Charles Thomas, 26 — as the aggressor. Thomas was shot dead just before 7:15 a.m. in the 5200 block of Conde Street, a few blocks east of O’Fallon Park. Thomas, who was shot more than once, died at the scene on Conde. He lived in the 11000 block of Prentice Drive in north St. Louis County. Three people were inside the home when Thomas burst in: a man and woman, both 25 years old, and the boy, police say. Police say Thomas assaulted the man and woman; they both had minor injuries. The woman is the one who fatally shot Thomas, police say. The woman, whom police aren’t identifying, has not been charged with a crime.

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY — Former pharmacist admits stealing drugs: A former pharmacist at the St. Clare Hospital near Fenton admitted stealing drugs from the pharmacy for her personal use, the U.S. attorney’s office said. Tina L. Obermeier, 59, of Webster Groves, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in St. Louis to one count of obtaining controlled substances by fraud. Prosecutors say that while working as a pharmacist at the hospital from January 2017 to April 2018, she stole drugs including hydrocodone and methadone, as well as the drugs commonly known as Ritalin and Xanax. Obermeier hid the drugs under her lab coat or other clothing instead of placing them in bins for delivery to patients, caused prescriptions to be filled a second time and filled prescriptions for patients who didn’t have drugs prescribed, prosecutors said. Obermeier stole about 2,476 controlled substances from an automated

OLIVETTE — Pedestrian killed while crossing street: A man, 71, was struck and killed by a car Monday while crossing Olive Boulevard. Police say Earl Jones of Olivette was crossing the street at 11:30 p.m. in the 9300 block of Olive Boulevard when he was struck. Jones was unconscious, but breathing, when Olivette police and firefighters responded. He was taken to Mercy Hospital, where he died. Police say the driver was changing lanes and never saw Jones crossing the street. The driver remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation, according to the police department. ST. LOUIS — Woman kills intruder in College Hill neighborhood: A woman shot to death an intruder who burst into her home in the College Hill

Wanted ONLY

4 97 People 102

“Ladies and gentlemen, this is not a plan. It’s a coup,” said Rep. Jim Murphy, a Republican who represents south St. Louis County. “It’s taking away local control,” said Rep. LaKeySha Bosley, D-St. Louis, who is sponsoring a separate ballot question that also would limit the merger decision to voters in the city and county. Another proposal, sponsored by Rep. Shamed Dogan, R-Ballwin, is a nonbinding resolution that denounces the statewide vote. The measure only requires the backing of both legislative chambers, and would not go to the voters. “Better Together has truly united the St. Louis city and county region,” Dogan said.

Other lawmakers said they were not consulted about the merger idea. “We see it as a huge sign of disrespect,” said Rep. Raychel Proudie, D-Ferguson. Rep. Dottie Bailey, REureka, railed on the Better Together backers, saying they know the merger will fail if only local voters weigh in. “It’s not about making our region better. It’s a power play,” Bailey said. Separately, the St. Louis Democratic Central Committee voted 38-0 on Saturday with two abstaining and 16 absent to oppose the Better Together merger, said chairman Michael Butler, who also is the city’s recorder of deeds. And the council in St.

Charles County, which would not be included in the merger, voted 6-1 for a resolution supporting the “right to self-determination” of St. Louis and St. Louis County residents. Ed Rhode, a spokesman for Unite StL — the merger campaign organization — said “it’s no surprise the opposition to the Better Together proposal continues to come from politicians who are comfortable maintaining the status quo.” He said that has been the case in cities across the country that have passed reforms. Mark Schlinkmann of the PostDispatch contributed to this report. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Fits Your Existing Tub Space in

1-DAY! NO MESS INSTALLATION!

SPRING SAVINGS SAVE 50% OFF Installation

618-215-7379 • 314-236-9874 Incredible Financing! Lifetime Warranty! Full Senior Discounts! *Offer available with purchase of any complete bath or shower system. Offer cannot be combined with other offers, not valid on previous sales, financing available to those who qualify, see store for details. Expires: May 31, 2019

Call today to connect with a SENIOR LIVING ADVISOR INDEPENDENT LIVING • ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE

102 PEOPLE WANTED IN THE MO/IL /IL AREA WHO HAVE DIFFICULTY HEARING, EARING, especially in noisy situations. Each of our 30 convenient locations have a select number of candidates that can participate. Call now to evaluate a new hearing device, RISK FREE. DO NOT HESITATE! Each location has a LIMITED number of instruments. Call today to see if you are a candidate for this FREE program.

CANDIDATES WILL BE SELECTED:

Next 2-Weeks Only • 9am - 5pm

UNDERSTAND YOUR OPTIONS — Learn the different types of senior care available LOCAL KNOWLEDGE — Our Advisors have the local knowledge to help you hand-pick communities in your area SIMPLIFY — Your dedicated Advisor will simplify your search and help schedule tours EXPERIENCE — Our Advisors help thousands of families understand their options every day SUPPORT — Our team is happy to provide additional support from movers to attorneys and much more

CALL NOW TO BE A SELECTED CANDIDATE!

Southwestern will perform a comprehensive hearing test at NO CHARGE. Call now to see if you qualify. Applicants selected will be asked to evaluate BES T HEA RIN G AID the latest AVA ILA BLE 30 DAY RISK TO DAY FREE revolutionary hearing instruments CANVAS for 30 days, IS TOTALLY RISK KF REE. FREE. TRIAL

HIDDEN IN THIS EAR!

outhwestern

There’s no cost to you! St. Louis (314) 202-6110 Southern IL (618) 206-5955 Missouri (636) 203-9884 !We’re paid by our partner communities

A Place for Mom has helped over a million find families fi nd senior living solutions that meet their unique needs. Our Advisors are trusted, local experts who can help you understand your options.

Hearing Centers

Call to be Connected to one of our 30 Locations

(314) 230-8119 (636) 203-9842 (618) 206-5940 Joan Lunden former host of Good Morning America and senior living advocate.

All hearing tests are conducted by a licensed hearing instrument specialist.


NEWS

05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Democrats, Trump push $2 trillion infrastructure plan ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • In a rare mo-

ment of bipartisanship in Washington, President Donald Trump and Democratic congressional leaders agreed Tuesday to work toward a $2 trillion infrastructure plan to rebuild roads and bridges, provide clean water and extend broadband coverage — but they put off the thorny matter of how to pay for it. Both sides seemed determined to show a willingness to work with the other, even as tension between the White House and congressional Democrats has intensified with the

Schumer added that: “In previous meetings, the president has said, ‘If these investigations continue, I can’t work with you.’” But this time, Schumer said, “He didn’t bring it up.” Schumer said the two sides agreed that infrastructure investments create jobs and make the United States more competitive economically with the rest of the world. Most importantly, Schumer said, “we agreed on a number.” “Originally, we had started a little lower. Even the president was eager to push it up to $2 trillion, and that is a very good thing,” Schumer said.

release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s redacted report on Russia meddling in the 2016 elections. Democrats have multiple investigations of the Trump administration underway, and Trump’s White House is resisting them. But Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said there was “good will in the meeting” — a marked departure from the last White House encounter between Trump and Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, which ended with Trump walking out. “We did come to one agreement: that the agreement would be big and bold,” Pelosi said.

Pelosi and congressional Democrats had asked for the meeting with Trump to discuss launching an ambitious building program that’s a top priority for the party and has been a rare area of potential bipartisan accord with Republicans. Trump, too, has long promised a big infrastructure plan. When Democratic lawmakers emerged, they said Trump agreed that infrastructure investments should go beyond roads and bridges and water systems to also include broadband. Democrats also put the onus on Trump to come up with a plan for how to pay for the package,

Intelligence agency’s leader calls for change VENEZUELA • FROM A1

with the support of the United States and neighboring Colombia. He said Venezuela had been a victim of “aggression of all kinds.” Meanwhile, Guaidó sought to keep the momentum going at the end of the day by releasing his own video message in which he pressed Venezuelans to take to the streets again on Wednesday. The competing quests to solidify a hold on power capped a dramatic day that included a tense moment when armored vehicles plowed into anti-government demonstrators trying to storm the capital’s air base, hitting at least two protesters. U.S. national security adviser John Bolton said the Trump administration was waiting for three key officials, including Maduro’s defense minister and head of the supreme court, to act on what he said were private pledges to remove Maduro. He did not provide details. The stunning events began early Tuesday when Guaidó, flanked by a few dozen national guardsmen and some armored crowd-control vehicles, released the three-minute video shot near the Carlota air base. In a surprise, Leopoldo Lopez, Guaidó’s political mentor and the nation’s most-prominent opposition activist, stood alongside him. Detained in 2014 for leading a previous round of antigovernment unrest, Lopez said he had been released from house arrest by security forces adhering to an order from Guaidó. “I want to tell the Venezuelan people: This is the moment to take to the streets and accompany these patriotic soldiers,” Lopez declared. As the two opposition leaders coordinated actions from a highway overpass, troops loyal to Maduro fired tear gas from inside the adjacent air base. A crowd that quickly swelled to a few thousand scurried for cover, reappearing later with Guaidó at a plaza a few blocks from the disturbances. A smaller

Attorney general set to speak to congressional committee MUELLER • FROM A1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Opponents to Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro face off with members of the Bolivarian National Guard in armored vehicles Tuesday during an uprising in Caracas, Venezuela.

manders who reaffirmed their loyalty. “Nerves of steel!” he said in a message posted on Twitter. Flanked by top military commanders, Defense Minister Vladimir Padrino López condemned Guaidó’s move as a “terrorist” act and “coup attempt.” Meanwhile, Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza said the “right-wing extremists” would not succeed in fracturing the armed forces, which have largely stood with the socialist leader throughout the turmoil. But in a sign that Maduro’s inner circle could be fracturing, the head of Venezuela’s secret police penned a letter breaking ranks with the embattled leader. Manuel Ricardo Cristopher Figuera, the head of Venezuela’s feared SEBIN intelligence agency, wrote a letter to the Venezuelan people saying that while he has always been loyal to Maduro it is now time to “rebuild the country.” He lamented that corruption has become so rampant that “many high-ranking public servants practice it like a sport.” The letter circulating on social media was confirmed by a senior U.S. official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to divulge details of the case.

group of masked youths stayed behind on the highway, lobbing rocks and Molotov cocktails toward the air base and setting a government bus on fire. Amid the mayhem, several armored utility vehicles careened over a berm and drove at full speed into the crowd. “It’s now or never,” said one of the young rebellious soldiers, his face covered in the blue bandanna worn by the few dozen insurgent soldiers. The head of a medical center near the site of the street battles said doctors were treating 50 people, about half of them with injuries suffered from rubber bullets. At least one person had been shot with live ammunition. Venezuelan human rights group Provea said a 24-year-old man was shot and killed during an anti-government protest in the city of La Victoria. Later Tuesday, Lopez and his family sought refuge in the Chilean ambassador’s residence in Caracas, where another political ally has been holed up for over a year. They later moved to the Spanish embassy. There were also reports that 25 troops who had been with Guaidó fled to Brazil’s diplomatic mission. Amid the confusion, Maduro tried to project an image of strength, saying he had spoken to several regional military com-

proceedings and mull how hard to press for Mueller to testify publicly. At the time that Mueller’s letter was sent to Barr on March 27, Barr had days prior announced that Mueller did not find a conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russian officials seeking to interfere in the 2016 presidential election. In his memo to Congress, Barr said that Mueller had not reached a conclusion about whether Trump had tried to obstruct justice, but that Barr reviewed the evidence and found it insufficient to support such a charge. Days after Barr’s announcement, Mueller wrote the previously undisclosed letter to the Justice Department, laying out his concerns in terms that shocked senior Justice Department officials, according to people familiar with discussions. “The summary letter the Department sent to Congress and released to the public late in the afternoon of March 24 did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance of this office’s work and conclusions,” Mueller wrote. “There is now public confusion about critical aspects of the results of our investigation. This threatens to undermine a central purpose for which the Department appointed the Special Counsel: to assure full public confidence in the outcome of the investigations.” The letter made a key request: that Barr release the 448-page report’s introductions and executive summaries, and it made suggested redactions for doing so, according to Justice Department officials who spoke on the condition of anonymity. A spokesman for Mueller declined to comment. Justice Department officials said Tuesday that they were taken aback by the tone of Mueller’s letter and that it came as a surprise to them that he had such concerns. Until they re-

ceived the letter, they believed Mueller was in agreement with them on the process of reviewing the report and redacting certain information. Barr has testified to Congress previously that Mueller declined the opportunity to review the four-page memo to lawmakers that distilled the essence of the special counsel’s findings. In his letter to Barr, Mueller wrote that the redaction process “need not delay release of the enclosed materials. Release at this time would alleviate the misunderstandings that have arisen and would answer congressional and public questions about the nature and outcome of our investigation.” Barr is scheduled to appear Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee — a muchanticipated public confrontation between the nation’s top law enforcement official and Democratic lawmakers, where he is likely to be questioned about his interactions with Mueller. A day after Mueller sent his letter to Barr, the two men spoke by phone, according to law enforcement officials. In that call, Mueller said he was concerned that media coverage of the obstruction investigation was creating public misunderstandings about the office’s work, according to Justice Department officials. Mueller did not express similar concerns about the discussion of the investigation of Russia’s election interference, the officials said. The Washington Post and the New York Times had previously reported some members of Mueller’s team were frustrated with Barr’s memo, though Mueller’s attitude was unknown. Mueller’s report described 10 significant episodes of possible obstruction of justice but said that because of Justice Department policy that says a sitting president cannot be indicted, his team did not reach a conclusion about whether the president had committed a crime.

D O N AT E YO U R C A R

Ugly Concrete? Don’t tear it out!

and said they would meet again in three weeks, when the president will present his ideas. An administration official said paying for infrastructure is something both sides have to work on together. The nation’s top business groups and labor unions support increasing the federal gasoline tax, currently 18.3 cents a gallon. It was last raised in 1993. Schumer said the president didn’t rule out tax increases to pay for infrastructure. The meeting included a dozen congressional Democrats and numerous administration officials.

Wheels For Wishes

HUGE SPRING DISCOUNTS!

Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri

Let us cover your front porch, walkway, patio, pool deck and more with the beautiful

ing surfac uis Re St Lo 0 9 9 ©1

Pebblestone/Epoxy System

* We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not

Available in 15 Beautiful Colors!

* We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs

FREE ESTIMATES! Senior & Military Discounts

St. Louis Resurfacing, Inc. 314-576-9220 1-800-283-6234

CHECK OUT OUR EXCELLENT A+ RATING WITH THE BBB!

www.stlresurfacing.com Serving Metro area for nearly 30 years!

24 months Zero % Interest on qualifying Equipment Serving All Makes and Models

• • • • •

Residential Specialist 10 year Labor Warranty 10 year Parts Warranty Licensed & Bonded Flexible Financing with No Money Down

Fast Reliable Service! Local Utility Rebate $300.00 to $950.00

* 100% Tax Deductible * Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE

WheelsForWishes.org

Call:(314) 499-1300

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

IT’S TIME TO LEARN MORE ABOUT YOUR MODERATE-TO-SEVERE ATOPIC DERMATITIS AND A POTENTIAL TREATMENT OPTION

Attend a FREE educational event!

314-968-9900 636-227-9100 comfortsolutionsstl.com

Pre Season Savings

$7500 A/C Tone Up

Spire

EXP 5/31/19

$25.00 to $300.00

10%OFF A Service Call Discount is not applied to Diagnostics Change EXP 5/31/19 May not offer services in all areas. Rebate may vary on areas and utility service provider. Other limitation and restriction may apply.

When: Wednesday, May 8, 2019 Registration: 5:30 PM Start Time: 6:00 PM Where: Hilton St. Louis Frontenac 1335 South Lindbergh Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63131 Featuring: Tirsa Quartullo, DNP, FNP-C & an actual adult patient living with atopic dermatitis

Call 1-844-387-4936, option 5 to register! Complimentary parking and light fare provided. Family, caregivers, and those interested in learning about moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis are welcome.

© 2018 Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All Rights Reserved. US-DAD-14762(1) Last Update: 12/2018


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 05.01.2019

M 1 WedneSdAy • 05.01.2019 • A8

Facebook pivots toward privacy User growth slows for social media giant By KATIe PAUL Reuters

SAN JOSE, CALIF. — Facebook Inc. on Tuesday debuted an overhaul of its core social network, taking its first concrete steps to refashion itself into a private messaging and ecommerce company. Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg unveiled a fresh design for the world’s biggest social network that de-emphasized its News Feed and showcased its messaging app, online marketplace and video-on-demand site. The company also rolled out features aimed at encouraging users to interact with their close social circle as well as with businesses, such as a “Secret Crush” option for Facebook Dating and a tool for appointment booking. Zuckerberg in March promised changes to the advertising-driven social media company as it was under regulatory scrutiny over propaganda on its platform and users’ data privacy. Facebook’s News Feed continues to draw ad dollars but user growth in its most lucrative markets has slowed. “We believe that there is a community for everyone. So we’ve been working on a major evolution to make communities as central as friends,” said Zuckerberg on Tuesday, speaking at Facebook’s annual F8 conference, where the company gives developers a peek at new product releases. Zuckerberg identified private messaging, short-lasting stories and small groups as the fastest-growing areas of online communication. In the last three years, the number of people using Facebook’s WhatsApp has almost doubled. The social media company is now working on “LightSpeed” in order to make its Messenger app smaller and faster. Facebook will also intro-

U.S. joins pair of lawsuits against Mallinckrodt Drugmaker’s shares drop nearly 16 percent By nATe RAyMOnd Reuters

TONY AVELAR, ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ursula Weiser, from Mexico, plays the new “Star Wars Celebration: Vader Immortal” on the Oculus Quest VR headset at F8, the Facebook developer conference, on Tuesday in San Jose, California. duce Messenger for Mac and Windows and launch a feature called “Product Catalogue” for WhatsApp Business. The desktop version of Messenger will be available this fall. Later this week, Facebook will run a test in Canada for a major change to its Instagram app that would remove the number of likes on photos as well as video views from users’ feeds, permalink pages and profiles. Facebook had delayed rolling out certain products at last year’s F8 event, which came soon after revelations it inappropriately shared information belonging to 87 million users with now-defunct British political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica. “I know that we don’t exactly have the strongest reputation on privacy right now, to put it lightly,” Zuckerberg said on Tuesday. Other Facebook executives introduced changes within the Messenger and Instagram apps aimed at helping businesses connect with customers, including appointment booking and enhanced shopping features as well as a tool to lure customers into direct conversations with companies via ads. The online ad market is

largely dominated by Facebook and Alphabet Inc’s Google. But the field is more diverse for messaging, e-commerce and payments, with big players like Amazon.com Inc, Microsoft Corp and eBay Inc as well as fast-growing Silicon Valley unicorns like workplace messaging app Slack and video conferencing service Zoom Video Communications Inc. “We’ve shown time and again as a company that we have what it takes to evolve,” Zuckerberg said. Facebook pulled in nearly $56 billion in revenue last year, almost of all which came from showing ads to the 2.7 billion people who access its family of apps each month. But Facebook is no longer adding many new users in the United States and Europe, its most lucrative markets, and it must find additional sources of revenue if it is to sustain growth. The product releases at F8 indicated that its answer involves efforts to keep users on its apps for longer, coupled with e-commerce tools Facebook is hoping businesses will pay to use. Fa ce b o o k s h a re s c l ose d Tuesday at $193.40, down $1.38.

May is Better Hearing Month!

BOSTON — the U.S. Justice department has joined a pair of whistleblower lawsuits alleging a drugmaker now owned by mallinckrodt plc improperly promoted an expensive multiple sclerosis treatment and paid kickbacks to doctors who prescribed the drug. News of the department’s decision to intervene in the lawsuits after conducting an investigation into the whistleblowers’ allegations sent the stock price of Mallinckrodt Plc down nearly 16 percent on Tuesday. The lawsuits, filed in federal court in Philadelphia, claimed Questcor Pharmaceuticals, which Mallinckrodt acquired in 2014, defrauded government health care programs by illegally marketing H.P. Acthar Gel. The drug is used to treat infantile spasms and multiple sclerosis. In 2007, Questcor hiked Acthar’s price for a single a vial from about $2,000 to $23,000, one of the lawsuits said. The price of the drug has since soared to more than $40,000. Last year, Acthar represented 35 percent of Mallinckrodt’s $3.2 billion in net sales. Mallinckrodt in a statement said it disagrees with the allegations and has been in “advanced settlement talks with the government over the past several months.” Mallinckrodt’s shares closed Tuesday at $15.46, down $2.87. The lawsuits were filed in 2012 and 2013 by former Questcor employees Charles Strunck and Scott Clark under the False Claims Act, which allows whis-

tleblowers to sue companies on the government’s behalf to recover taxpayer money paid out based on fraudulent claims. The lawsuits are filed under seal so the government can investigate their claims. The Justice Department following an investigation may intervene in the cases, which is typically a major boost for them. In his complaint, Strunck alleged Questcor in an effort to boost sales paid doctors illegal kickbacks in the form of bribes, speaker fees and consulting deals in exchange for promoting and prescribing Acthar. His lawsuit also alleged that Questcor’s sales staff used deceptive and misleading marketing tactics to promote Acthar for uses and treatment regimens not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Justice Department in court filings in both lawsuits made public on March 11 said it was intervening in the cases and planned to file its own complaint within 90 days. The lawsuits were then unsealed. Mallinckrodt in January 2017 agreed to pay $100 million to resolve claims that Questcor violated antitrust laws by sharply increasing the price of Acthar while ensuring that no rival medicine appeared on the market. Mallinckrodt’s U.S. operations are based in Hazelwood, but the company is in the process of spinning off its specialty generic drug business. That company will keep the Mallinckrodt name and remain in the St. Louis area. The parent company, which will focus on branded pharmaceuticals, including H.P. Acthar, is being renamed Sonorant Therapeutics. Sonorant will be based in Bedminster, N.J.

Mom Deserves a Bath Fitter

30+ Years Experience Improving People’s Lives

FREE VIDEO EAR INSPECTION performed by BOARD CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL

BUY ONE GET ONE

FREE HEARING AIDS

*

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED

30 Day

“Heartland Hearing helped maximize my hearing, where others could not.” Jerry, Retired Veteran

*HHC36

Ask ABOUT our TRIAL Period Financing Available

• Premium quality, high gloss acrylic base and wall • Easy to clean, virtually maintenance free • Installed by our team of experts in as little as one day

0% INTEREST FOR 1 YEAR! (NO DOWN PAYMENT) 0% Interest for 1 year with Hearing Aid Financing inancing Subject to credit approval. No interest for 365 days. See in store for details.

Call for an appointment today!

Royce R. LaMarr BC-HIS

10 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS BOWLING GREEN 636-203-9906 CHESTERFIELD 636-387-4118 COLUMBIA 573-303-9198 CREVE COEUR 314-325-1888 FARMINGTON 573-567-3970

• One piece seamless wall provides a watertight fit

FULTON 636-536-1555 JEFFERSON CITY 573-233-1015 SOUTH COUNTY 314-325-8777 ALTON, IL 618-380-4123 SWANSEA, IL 618-857-3305

Call for your FREE in-home CONSULTATION

314-898-0170 636-203-7049 Trust your neighbors - 4.5 star on Google Bath Fitter Franchise. Independently owned and operated by Ideal Bathroom Solutions LLC

®Registered trademark of Bath Fitter Franchising Inc.

* Special offer good on the purchase of a bathtub or shower, wall and faucet kit. One offer per customer. 20% off up to $900. May not be combined with any other offer. Offer must be presented at the time of estimate. Discount applies to same day purchases only. Previous orders and estimates excluded. Offer valid only at the above location. **For as low as $75 Subject to credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. Subject to certain limitations. Offer expires on 2019-05-31.


MARKET WATCH

05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks posted meager gains, enough to notch another record closing high for the S&P 500. Major indexes spent much of the day wobbling or lower on Tuesday, and the S&P 500 edged up in the last few minutes of trading. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, slumped.

Alphabet

10

70

130

1,100

9

60

120

1,000

8

50

F M 52-week range

A

Dow Jones industrials

26,500

Close: 26,592.91 Change: 38.52 (0.1%)

$6.63

$1,289.27 PE: 27.2 Yield: ...

A $15.53

26,000

2,920

Close: 2,945.83 Change: 2.80 (0.1%)

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

25,000

CHG

May 19 May 19 May 19

353.25 841.25 418.50

+1.25 -6.25 -8.25

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

141.60 123.75 84.30 15.96 290.15

-1.80 -1.02 -.47 -.01 +.65

2,400

Copper

Milk

23,000

CLOSE

May 19 Apr 19 May 19 Apr 19 May 19

Hogs

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

22,000 ICE

N

D

J

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,049 1,713 1201 1704 103 42

3,835 3,045 1498 1251 184 29

M

2,200

A

N

D

J

F

M

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 19 May 19 Jul 19

75.98 91.85 26.93

-.15 +.50 -.07

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jun 19 May 19 May 19 Jun 19

63.91 2.1149 207.80 2.575

Cotton

A

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

F

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 26614.04 10882.35 790.37 13067.03 8124.61 2948.22 1973.79 30429.19 1600.29

LOW 26419.47 10712.75 776.76 12968.95 8050.55 2924.11 1954.16 30188.44 1580.90

CLOSE 26592.91 10847.02 790.00 13060.67 8095.39 2945.83 1970.74 30410.02 1591.21

CHG. +38.52 +39.56 +12.53 +52.61 -66.46 +2.80 -3.20 -5.53 -7.15

%CHG. WK +0.15% t +0.37% t +1.61% s +0.40% s -0.81% t +0.10% s -0.16% t -0.02% s -0.45% s

MO QTR s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +14.00% +18.28% +10.81% +14.82% +22.01% +17.51% +18.50% +18.10% +17.99%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

26.80

34.53 30.96 +.08 +0.3

Aegion Corp

AEGN

15.12

26.80 19.91

Allied Hlthcre Prod

AHPI

1.62

Amdocs

DOX

52.60

3.48

1.71

...

+8.5

-0.4

6

... +22.0 -13.7 26

-.01 -0.6

-6.4 -32.0 dd

2.04 General Motors

GM

... Home Depot

HD

... Huttig Building Prod HBP

ARCH

-8.6 22 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc 75.09 101.92 96.98 -2.69 -2.7 +16.9 +27.7 6 1.80 MasterCard

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

1.03

Bank of America

BAC

22.66

31.91 30.58

-.19 -0.6 +24.1 +4.0 12

0.60

Belden Inc

BDC

37.79

76.39 55.55

-.42 -0.8 +33.0 -12.0 10

0.20

Boeing

BA

292.47 446.01 377.69 -1.36 -0.4 +17.1 +13.3 35

8.22

7.97

9.55

1.25 +.13 +11.6 -51.6 -83.8 dd

5.60

-.04 -0.7 +41.8 -39.7 dd

... McDonald’s

...

Caleres Inc.

CAL

22.85

41.09 26.23

-.33 -1.2

-5.7 -20.2 13

Cass Info. Systems

CASS

44.99

62.08 49.33

-.50 -1.0

-6.8 +1.0 15 1.04b

Centene Corp.

CNC

45.44

74.49 51.56

-.70 -1.3

-5.1 15

...

Charter

CHTR 259.48 371.63 371.19 +.22 +0.1 +30.3 +40.9 80

...

Cigna

CI C

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

...

141.95 226.61 158.84 -1.83 -1.1 -11.7 48.42 53.40

75.24 70.70 72.55 60.43

0.28

Olin

-5.6 -10.8

0.52

-6.2

-2.1 dd

0.28

31.09 29.44 +.29 +1.0 +32.3 +18.3 44

...

4.39 +.02 +0.5

PRFT

20.92

73.58 112.61 112.78 +1.17 +1.0 +26.5 +38.8 11

Reinsurance Gp

RGA

Reliv

RELV

+3.9 +0.2 dd

...

Spire Inc

SR

64.95

83.33 84.19 +1.34 +1.6 +13.6 +16.9 19

2.37

Stifel Financial

SF

38.39

61.93 59.67 +.62 +1.0 +44.1 +0.7 19 0.60f

TGT

60.15

90.39 77.42

UPS

89.89 125.09 106.22 +1.38 +1.3

-.66 -1.1

1.04 Target Corp. ... UPS B

ENR

42.74

65.57 47.89

Enterprise Financial EFSC

36.09

58.15 42.54 -1.11 -2.5 +13.0 -13.2 12 0.60f Verizon

Esco Technologies

54.35

74.83 75.00 +1.02 +1.4 +13.9 +30.0 20

-.08 -0.1 +18.8 +7.7 23 1.96f US Bancorp -.30 -0.6 +6.1 -14.2 32 1.20f US Steel

-.08 -5.2 -58.6 -47.3 dd

0.80

POST

Energizer Holdings

1.45

4.64

5

5.55

+7.9 -23.9

Perficient

79.70 70.99

4.10

153.13 198.60 197.57 +.45 +0.2 +11.3 +27.3 30

1.32

Post Holdings

0.04

19.31 14.69 +.03 +0.2

MCD

-.77 -3.4

1.92 ...

171.89 248.21 254.24 +7.11 +2.9 +34.8 +41.1 59

47.84 28.77 -1.13 -3.8

55.39

1.46

-2.2 +34.8

MA

4.10

1.80

-7.5 22

36.65 15.46 -2.86 -15.6

27.10

EMR

11.34

...

BTU

Emerson

FELP

...

-.02 -0.7 +32.7 +22.6

SKIS

59.16 41.23 +.07 +0.2 +10.4

FF

-.13 -4.5 +51.7 -55.5 dd

2.80

Peabody Energy

35.85

Foresight Energy

2.73

3.69

Peak Resorts

EPC

FutureFuel

6.50

34.42 21.69

-7.6 15

+7.2 +1.4 16

1.52

1.84

17.87

-.33 -0.5 +35.8 +5.4 10

0.32 WalMart 0.13 Walgreen Boots

-7.4 +27.7 18 0.24a Wells Fargo

USB

127.84 155.72 151.51 +.44 +0.3 3.80

43.14

5.26

4.40

...

...

+8.0

-1.7 14

-.38 -0.5 +17.1 +9.4 13 +8.9

... 2.40

55.56 53.32 +.32 +0.6 +16.7 +6.2 13

Watlow cuts workers in Colum- from $1.21 billion earlier. bia, Mo.: St. Louis-based Watlow Electric Manufacturing laid off 41 Consumer confidence rose in employees at its Columbia, Mo., March: American consumers are

factory, with more reductions planned this summer as it moves its gas-heating operation to a factory in Mexico. The plant, which now employs 388, will have a headcount of about 270 after the move is completed, a company spokesman said.

feeling more confident this. The conference board, a business research group, said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index rose to 129.2 in April, from 124.2 in March. The index, covering the month through April 18, measures consumers’ assessment of current economic conditions and their exPending home sales rose in pectations for the next six months. March: Contracts to buy previ- Both rose in April. ously owned homes rose to an eight-month high in March, the Stifel reports higher profits, National Association of Realtors revenue: Stifel Financial Corp. said on Tuesday. The NAR’s pend- on Tuesday reported net income of ing home sales index increased to $96.9 million, or $1.22 per share, a reading of 105.8, up from 101.9 for the quarter ended March 31. in February, and the highest since That compared favorably to net July. Pending home contracts are income of $86.4 million, or $1.06, seen as a forward-looking indi- in the year-earlier period. Revenue cator of the health of the housing rose nearly 3 percent to $770.4 milmarket because they become sales lion, the St. Louis-based financial one to two months later. Sepa- services holding company said. rately, the S&P CoreLogic Case- Stifel shares closed Tuesday at Shiller 20-city home price index $59.67, up 62 cents. rose 3 percent from a year earlier, down from an annual gain of 3.5 McDonald’s sales top estimates: percent in January. A short-term bacon promotion, value meals and redesigned resWorkers saw modest gains in in- taurants helped lift McDonald’s come: Wages and benefits for U.S. same-store sales above Wall Street workers rose 0.7 percent in the first estimates for the first time in four three months of the year, a mod- quarters on Tuesday. Promotions est gain that matched the previ- helped drive a 4.5 percent growth ous quarter’s increase. The data, in same-store sales in the U.S. in released Tuesday by the Labor De- the quarter ended March 31, well partment, suggests that growth in above analysts’ expectations of workers’ compensation has stalled a 3.03 percent rise, according to in recent months. In the first quar- Refinitiv IBES. Global same-store ter, wages and benefits increased sales also grew by a better-than2.8 percent compared with a year expected 5.4 percent. earlier. That’s down slightly from a 2.9 percent annual gain in the final Southwest loses top spot for quarter of 2018. customer satisfaction: Southwest Airlines, the biggest user of Beyond Meat raises IPO price Boeing’s 737 Max jets that were range: Plant-based meat maker grounded worldwide following two Beyond Meat Inc. on Tuesday in- fatal crashes, dropped two places creased the expected price range from the top in terms of passenger and size of its initial public offering, satisfaction in 2019, a survey by ahead of an expected market debut the American Customer Satisfacon Wednesday, indicating strong tion Index showed. Southwest was investor demand. The company ranked third this year out of 10 airsaid it expects to offer 9.63 million lines, behind Alaska Air Group and shares, up from 8.75 million shares JetBlue Airways. “Recent deadly and the IPO to be priced between crashes of the Boeing 737 Max … $23 and $25 per share, up from $19 have left Southwest particularly and $21 per share, its latest fil- vulnerable to safety concerns,” ing with the U.S. Securities and ACSI said in its report. Delta Air Exchange Commission showed. Lines ranked fourth, followed by The higher end of the indicative American Airlines and United price range gives the company a Continental. market value of $1.49 billion, up From staff and wire reports

+4.20 +.06 -9.60

-.20 -1.3 -14.5 -50.6

1.48

X

15.49

39.23 15.60

46.09

61.58 57.19 +.35 +0.6

WMT

81.78 106.21 102.84 +1.28 +1.3 +10.4 +18.7 59 2.12f

WBA

52.25

86.31 53.57 +.01

43.02

59.53 48.41 +.14 +0.3

+1.7 +14.9

9

0.20

7

2.41

... -21.6 -17.6 10 +5.1

-4.6 11

1.76 1.80

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

2.43 2.45 2.38 2.26 2.27 2.38 2.50 2.94

... -0.01 -0.02 -0.03 -0.05 -0.04 -0.03 -0.02

1.83 2.03 2.23 2.49 2.79 2.90 2.96 3.12

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

5.50 5.25 4.75

2.56

VZ

WFC

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.50% on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

2.38 2.13 1.63

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.82 2.99 6.13 3.71 3.62 .51

+0.01 +0.02 -0.02 +0.02 +0.02 -0.02

1.94 3.29 6.26 3.94 3.92 .76

GlobalMarkets

-4.8 18 3.84f

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Other: x - ex-dividend.

BUSINESS DIGEST

Silver Platinum

1.57

OLN

Edgewell

ESE

45.00 38.95 -1.06 -2.6 +16.4 +10.3 dd

81.16 118.23 113.14 +.92 +0.8 +22.5 +35.9 25

Arch Coal

Citigroup

30.56

11.65

55.21

64.55 106.86 88.94 +.93 +1.1 +35.1

CHG

CLOSE

1282.80 14.90 891.70

Gold

158.09 215.43 203.70 +1.54 +0.8 +18.6 +10.8 22 5.44f

LOW

AEE BUD

.0225 .7057 .2539 1.2935 .7436 .1485 1.1183 .0143 .2766 .008952 .052606 .0155 .0698 .000862 .9805

PreciousMetals NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

MNK

Ameren Corp

3.75

52-WK LO HI

LEE

-6.0 -17.8 15 1.14f Lee Enterprises 74.91 72.77 +1.41 +2.0 +11.6 +25.0 26 1.90 Lowes

PREV

.0226 .7051 .2550 1.3037 .7467 .1485 1.1221 .0144 .2777 .008979 .052794 .0155 .0699 .000859 .9816

Interestrates Interestrates

70.31 55.08 +.70 +1.3

ABInBev

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

TKR

+.41 +.0321 +2.31 -.018

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

$132.13

ExchangeRates

DATE

Feeder cattle Live cattle

A

PE: 37.8 Vol.: 7.5m (0.4x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $121.2 b Yield: 2.2%

PE: 30.4 Yield: ...

CHICAGO MERC

2,600

F M 52-week range

$77.09

$90.74

Vol.: 5.5m (6.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $4.1 b

CHICAGO BOT

2,800

24,000

110

A

Futures

S&P 500

3,000

27,000

F M 52-week range

$50.88

Vol.: 172.9m (1.9x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $88.6 b Yield: 0.4%

2,960

2,880

10 DAYS

F M 52-week range

LLY

Close: $117.04 -2.56 or -2.1% The pharmaceutical company cut its revenue forecast for the year as its faces drug price declines and more generic competition for its drugs. $140

$11

26,720

21,000

Eli Lilly

TREX

Close: $69.27 -7.26 or -9.5% The maker of fences and deck products reported weak first quarter profit and cited manufacturing problems and higher costs. $80

1,200

Vol.: 6.2m (4.5x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $415.1 b

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Trex

GE

Close: $10.17 0.44 or 4.5% The industrial conglomerate surprised investors with solid first quarter profit and revenue results.

$1,300

$970.11

26,280

General Electric

GOOG

Close: $1,188.48 -99.10 or -7.7% Google’s parent company reported a slowdown advertising revenue growth during the first quarter.

INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2945.83 12344.08 7403.77 29699.11 5586.41 44597.32 22258.73 96353.32 16580.73 9769.74

CHG

CHG

YTD

+2.80 +16.06 -36.89 -193.70 +5.44 -359.41 -48.85 +165.57 -19.64 +29.26

+0.10% +0.13% -0.50% -0.65% +0.10% -0.80% -0.22% +0.17% -0.12% +0.30%

+17.51% +16.91% +10.04% +15.03% +18.09% +7.10% +11.21% +9.63% +15.76% +15.90%

Buffett backs Occidental bid BLOOMBERG

Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway will invest $10 billion in Occidental Petroleum to help the oil producer in its $38 billion bid for Anadarko Petroleum. Berkshire will receive 100,000 shares of preferred Occidental stock that will accrue dividends of 8 percent a year, according to a statement Tuesday. Buffett’s intervention, which is contingent on the deal for Anadarko closing, comes a day after Anadarko agreed to serious negotiations with Occidental despite having accepted a lower offer last month from Chevron Corp. Occidental’s smaller size and financial resources make its offer riskier for Anadarko shareholders than the $33 billion proposal from Chevron. Occidental went public with its offer last week, creating an unusual bidding war for oil assets, after being rebuffed several times by Anadarko’s board.

“Before this announcement came out, my opinion was that Chevron would have to increase their bid to be competitive. I think at this point you would consider Chevron’s bid dead.” Bill Nygren, chief investment officer of Harris Associates “Before this announcement came out, my opinion was that Chevron would have to increase their bid to be competitive,” said Bill Nygren, chief investment officer of Harris Associates, which manages $120 billion and holds about a 3 percent stake in Anadarko. “I think at this point you would consider Chevron’s bid dead.”

Chevron believes its “signed agreement with Anadarko provides the best value and the most certainty to Anadarko’s shareholders,” spokesman Kent Robertson said. A representative for Anadarko didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Buffett has been searching for ways to deploy big chunks of a cash pile that grew to $112 billion at the end of 2018. The Occidental investment would make the company one of Berkshire’s 10 biggest public-company stakes. The investment gives Berkshire dividend-paying preferred stock and warrants to buy common shares, a structure Buffett has used before in taking stakes in Bank of America Corp. and Goldman Sachs Group Inc. An Occidental corporate jet was in Omaha, Neb. — Buffett’s hometown — over the weekend, according to flight-tracking data.

EPA reaffirms safety of Roundup ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency is reaffirming that a popular weedkiller is safe for users, even as legal claims mount from people who blame the herbicide for their cancer. The EPA’s draft findings Tuesday come after two recent U.S.

court verdicts have awarded multimillion-dollar claims to men who blame glyphosate for their lymphoma. Glyphosate is the active ingredient in Roundup. Bayer, which acquired Roundup-maker Monsanto last year, has reported U.S. lawsuits from 13,400 people over exposure to the weedkiller.

The EPA’s draft findings in a periodic review conclude that glyphosate “is not likely to be carcinogenic to humans.” Scientist Nathan Donley of the Center for Biological Diversity says the agency is relying on industry-backed studies and ignoring research that points to higher risks of cancer.

Apple sales slip on weakening iPhone demand ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Apple’s sales are still shrinking amid weakening iPhone demand, despite the company’s effort to emphasize services designed to bring in a steady flow of money from the 1.4 billion of its devices still in use. Revenue for the JanuaryMarch quarter fell 5 percent from the same time in 2017 to $58 billion, the company said in its earnings report Tuesday. That downturn followed a

5 percent drop in the previous quarter. It’s the first time Apple has suffered two consecutive quarterly revenue declines in two-and-ahalf years. Apple still posted a profit of $11.6 billion during its latest quarter, though that was down 16 percent compared to last year. That translated into $2.46 per share, down 10 percent from last year, but above the $2.36 per share forecast among analysts surveyed by FactSet.

The Cupertino, Calif.-based company also announced a 5 percent increase in its quarterly dividend to 77 cents per share. That news, coupled with results that weren’t quite as bad as analysts had feared, seemed to please investors. Apple’s stock gained more than 5 percent in after-hours trading, following a company forecast that signaled the revenue slump may be ending in the current April-June quarter.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S P A P E R • F O U N D E D B Y J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . M1 21, •1 8WeDneSDAy 78 A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 05.01.2019

WEDNESDAy • 05.01.2019 • A10 RAY FARRIS PReSIDenT & PUBLISHeR

GILBERT BAILON eDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON eDITORIAL PAGe eDITOR

Cleaning house Under new management, St. Louis County’s door is open to far-reaching reforms.

S

teve Stenger might be gone from St. Louis County government, but his ample thumbprint of corrupt practices has yet to be erased. The first job of newly appointed County Executive Sam Page and the County Council will be to disentangle county contracting operations from Stenger’s web, perform a deep clean of all who helped advance his pay-for-play practices, and institute far more transparent procurement and contracting procedures going forward. Page wasted no time Tuesday preparing to oust several of Stenger’s cronies. The cleaner system Page has in mind must include the institution of overlapping checks and balances to minimize the possibility of success by individuals intent on using government offices for personal profit. State Auditor Nicole Galloway indicates that she stands ready to assist in identifying gaps, and the county should take her up on the offer. Among Page’s first orders of business should be to establish more effective walls between his own office and county departments authorized to procure services and sign contracts. One of the major weaknesses exposed by the federal indictment unsealed Monday was the enormous, largely unchecked sway Stenger and his senior staffers had over some procurement and contracting procedures. Bidding processes that were supposed to be sealed and fully competitive were allegedly rigged to reward Stenger’s favored donors. One of the main people who made that possible was Sheila Sweeney, who was chief executive of the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership and a

longtime board member of the St. Louis County Port Authority. Those key positions, plus her oversight of the Land Clearance for Redevelopment Authority, gave Sweeney extraordinary reach and power to influence contracting approvals. Lax oversight, coupled with enormous power concentrated in the hands of a few officials, no doubt gave Stenger and his accomplices confidence that they could do pretty much what they wanted without being caught. Other city and county governments around the country have learned from past mistakes and instituted stricter procedures and practices to limit graft. New York City, for example, requires politicians and their campaign committees to report significant donors who have business dealings with the city. A “doing business database” lists the names of individuals and companies who have business dealings with New York City’s government. Companies must list the names of all senior managers plus any person with major holdings in the company. The city’s Campaign Finance Board and the public are granted full access to the database to help cross-check the names against campaign donor lists. This is what real transparency looks like. As suspicions ran high regarding Stenger, the County Council last year sought to limit pay-to-play by banning campaign donations from people with pending county business during a 90-day window before and after a contract is put up for bid and subsequently awarded. Nevertheless, significant gaps remain — as Stenger’s indictment made embarrassingly clear. Sam Page listens as council member Hazel Erby calls for public comment before a vote is taken for the new county executive on Monday. ROBERT COHEN, POST-DISPATCH

Playing with fire Trump’s reckless lie about abortion is exactly what the debate doesn’t need.

R

ight after President Donald Trump officially crossed the 10,000-lie mark in The Washington Post’s ongoing tally, he unfurled one of his worst, telling a crowd over the weekend that healthy newborn babies are being executed after birth by doctors and mothers. In a society where shooting rampages can be sparked by extremist political myths, it’s hard to imagine a more irresponsible fable for a president to drop into the middle of the already-explosive debate over abortion rights. That debate is a serious one, with people of strong convictions on both sides. All of them, regardless of their views, should be loudly condemning Trump’s inflammatory rhetoric. Yet among his fellow Republicans in Congress, the reaction has been one of shameful silence. Trump used to call himself “very pro-choice,” but he now mouths the orthodoxy of his adopted Republican Party. As with his public expressions of biblical faith, to which Trump is also a newcomer, his anti-abortion rhetoric betrays a fundamental lack of understanding of the issue. “The baby is born, the mother meets with the doctor, they take care of the baby, they wrap the baby beautifully,” Trump told a rally in Wisconsin on Saturday, “and then the doctor and the mother determine whether or not they will execute the baby.” To be clear: What Trump described simply does not happen — not within the context of legal abortion, and

presumably not ever. If it did, the doctor and mother both would properly be charged with murder. Period. This is Trump’s cartoonish contribution to the debate over so-called “late-term abortion.” Itself a misnomer, it describes extremely rare third-trimester abortions generally employed only during pregnancies that have already turned dangerous or tragic, and never near (let alone after) full-term normal deliveries. But with his usual mix of ignorance and dishonesty, the president has concocted the most hellish fictional scenario he can. The better to whip up his base. Throughout Trump’s presidency, the Post has tracked what it calls his “false and misleading claims.” He crossed the 10,000 mark Friday, the day before expressing this dystopian delivery-room nonsense. Whether it’s trade, immigration, economic statistics, America’s history or his own documented attempts to thwart the probe into Russian election meddling, Trump has spun whatever warped reality he wanted. He knows his crowds will reward his lies with cheers, and GOP silence will allow them to pass unchallenged. Abortion clinics and providers already face threats of violence, and sometimes actual violence. In spreading this particular kind of lie, Trump is flinging lit matches around a powder keg. If at some point it goes up, Republicans in Congress who didn’t even attempt to rein in their deeply irresponsible president will have to reckon with it.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS

County loses executive; Better Together loses mayor

and the “perpetual foreigner” persist. Ed Shew • Lake St. Louis

Regarding “St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger indicted in federal pay-for-play sting, resigns” (April 30): This is the same guy who Better Together wanted to make mayor of the mega-city that would be created by the merger of St. Louis and St. Louis County. Tom Bakersmith • Maplewood

Drug abusers could get better care under House bill

Trump cheated and deserves impeachment To Mr. Trump: No, you didn’t win; you cheated. So much of our politics, especially elections, are reported and discussed as if they’re sporting events. And in that context, Vince Lombardi’s famous comment rules: “Winning isn’t everything; it’s the only thing.” This is doubly true both of Republicans who say the 2016 election settled everything, and of Democrats who shy away from impeachment and look toward the 2020 election to set things right. Winning is the only thing. But using the sports-contest analogy, we now have incontrovertible evidence that the contest was not won fairly. The Trump campaign cheated. If this were the Olympics, his medals would have been taken away from him. And that’s what our Congress needs to do now. If we ever want to restore fair elections — locally, statewide and nationally — we must address the cheating that occurred in 2016. It begins with impeachment. Virginia Gilbert • St. Louis

Stereotyping still harms Asian and Pacific Americans Being labeled “The Model Minority” or “Perpetual Foreigner” is among the damaging stereotypes facing Asian and Pacific Americans. Perhaps the most troubling aspect of prejudice against Asian and Pacific Americans is the denial that there is a problem. I’m still asked, “Where are you from? Your English is so good” — thus assigning me an identity other than American, a “perpetual foreigner,” an often held belief for people who do not share one’s language, religion or skin color. Asian and Pacific Americans are sometimes referred to as the “model minority” and cannot claim discrimination because of high standardized test scores, college attendance and income level. Actually, this term is false flattery, and it’s also often used to drive a racial wedge between Asian and Pacific Americans and African and Hispanic Americans. “If Asians can do it, they can do it.” An unfortunate stereotype, the “model minority” label erases the many Asian and Pacific Americans living in poverty and struggling. Not all are rocket scientists and doctors. They are not monolithic; ask Bhutanese, Hmong, Laotians, Cambodians and Vietnamese. That black failure and Asian success cannot be explained by inequities and racism allows a segment of white America to avoid any responsibility for addressing systematic dehumanization or the damage it continues to inflict. This damage includes segregation, health outcomes, the rise of white nationalism, police brutality, mass incarceration, voter suppression and employment and housing discrimination towards African Americans. As long as people continue seeking ways to forgo responsibility for racism, the stereotypes of the “model minority”

Missouri House Bill 168, currently in the Missouri Senate Health and Pensions Committee, provides protections for health care workers to engage with those who are actively using drugs. Missouri is pouring millions of dollars into other interventions, however harm reduction is one of the only interventions that engage those who are actively using. Community health must continue to care for drug users. Dead people do not recover, and the loss of individuals to overdose causes a long-term ripple through communities. According to the American Action Forum, the Missouri opioid crisis is causing a loss of $57 billion dollars to the state’s economy. This is an economic crisis for our state. Syringe service programs work to get individuals into treatment through direct referral and then get reintegrated into the workforce. Individuals who engage in these programs are five times more likely to enter into treatment programs. Community health workers want to address the opioid crisis, but they need Missouri to pass legislation allowing them to use techniques that are proven to work. Harm reduction is rooted in empowering communities to directly take care of each other, without burdensome regulations. HB 168 is supported by many groups, including the Missouri Network for Opiate Reform and Recovery, Missouri Recovery Network, Missouri Family Health Council, Missouri State Medical Association, Missouri Pharmacy Association, Empower MO, BJC and the City of St. Louis Department of Health. I urge state Sen. Bob Onder to bring HB 168 up for a hearing in his committee, followed by Senate passage. Aaron Laxton • St. Louis

People of privilege should help solve racial injustice For Lent this year, a group of us went on a civil rights pilgrimage to Birmingham, Montgomery and Selma, Ala. A diverse group, we wanted to learn and understand the challenges of the civil rights movement. What we saw, experienced and remembered was brutal and horrific. The National Memorial for Peace and Justice, in its starkness and silence, screamed of the innumerable lynchings and terrorism inflicted on innocent people. I was saddened after reading the April 21 letter to the editor by Bryan Kirchoff, “Homes without fathers can be source of society’s woes.” I beg to differ. It is time for people of privilege to find ways to make freedom real and substantial. It is time for broader thinking and action. It is time for equal opportunity. Our society of white privilege has failed to recognize the horrors of slavery and Jim Crow laws that continue as an inordinate number of black males are in the prison system or killed by police. A long list of injustices exists. But we of privilege want to blame the lack of fathers instead of blaming ourselves for a system we created and continue to support that is a “cage of poverty, an abyss of despair, a cup of endurance, a degenerating sense of nobodiness” to use Martin Luther King Jr.’s words. Jane Siebel • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON editorial Page editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 n. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

05.01.2019 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

25 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A11

NO NEED FOR TERM LIMITS • The membership of Congress has changed dramatically in the last four years. Though the re-election rate of incumbents

remains high, many no longer see Congress as a lifetime job. In any case, the answer to entrenched incumbency is not term limits but campaign finance reform, which would level the playing field for challengers. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

HELP is on the way to consider consequences Teaching kids to navigate ethical dilemmas of scientific innovation. BY MICHAEL G. TSICHLIS AND VASILIKA TERSS TSICHLIS

For over a decade, the dizzying pace of scientific and technological innovation has prompted educators to place greater emphasis on instructing K-12 students in science, technology, engineering, and math, or STEM. To better meet the needs of a tech-driven workforce, Gov. Mike Parson signed a bill in October authorizing the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to create a “STEM Career Awareness Program,” that encourages students to explore those fields beginning in sixth grade. Few challenge the need for quality education in those fields. What is often left out of the

conversation, however, are the potentially challenging ethical quandaries that can result from scientific innovation. For example, many would consider it a noble goal if medical advances supported by work in genetics, nanotechnology and cybernetics produced treatments and cures that lengthen our lifespan and enhance our quality of life. On the other hand, are we willing to accept the risks to privacy and possible discrimination that go with others accessing our genetic profiles? Expect a Pandora’s Box of such questions to be unleashed in coming years. Who will benefit from such applications? Who will not? Will there be a choice? Are we prepared to relinquish such important ethical decisions to tech

elites or the algorithmic conclusions of artificial intelligence itself? Is this the path for a society that claims to live by democratic values? The challenge with today’s children is how to best steer them through such ethical dilemmas. Such guideposts are readily found in the fields of humanities, ethics, literature, and philosophy, or HELP. HELP directly ties to STEM. Corresponding to the all-encompassing, multi-disciplinary term “science,” humanities refers to that broad array of studies in human experience — particularly history — that traces the trajectory of human development and its related progress, challenges, and dangers. Paralleling technology is the study of ethics, the tools by which we understand and make moral choices. As engineering

concerns the language of design, so too does literature provide the narrative language of human experiences, such as life lessons and moral dilemmas pondered in works like “I, Robot,” among others. Finally, as mathematics is the study of the world by numeric precision, philosophy suggests ways to navigate the imprecise world and messy relationships between human perception and action. The disciplines of humanities, ethics, literature, and philosophy will not only be essential to future workers in scientific research and development, but for all who grapple with the proper applications and limits to these developments in a democratic society. The emphasis is not principally to ask “How do we do it?” but rather “Whom will it benefit?”, “How might it do harm?”, and

ultimately “Should we do it?” It’s about what millennia of collective experience has shown us. It’s about wisdom-building. Science doesn’t happen in a value-free vacuum. Developing a research question or hypothesis is itself an exercise laden with presuppositions based on one’s priorities and values. If society is to remain built on freedom and participation — and not merely a race to keep up with advances in science, technology, engineering and math with little reflection on their consequences — HELP subjects will be essential to the K-12 education. The lessons of humanities, ethics, literature and philosophy are as vital as their STEM counterparts. There is also a diversity of personal, family, cultural, and faith-based foundations that undergird students’ ethical and moral

decision-making developed outside of public schools. But K-12 students spend the bulk of their young lives in a schoolbased setting, and the least we can do is ensure the instruction they receive includes the fundamentals of how to make the best possible choices. If we fail to engage our children in the discernment between right and wrong, it will be left to others to do it for them, be they corporations, government entities or the next upgrade in artificial intelligence. Michael G. Tsichlis holds a doctorate in Public Policy and is on the Lindbergh Schools Board of Directors. Vasilika Terss Tsichlis has an educational specialist’s degree in Educational Leadership and is working on a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction at Saint Louis University. After a 30-year career as a teacher and administrator she currently works in higher education.

Trump loyalists will turn their backs on McGahn President refutes report, calling former White House counsel a liar. JONAH GOLDBERG Los Angeles Times

WILLIAM GLASHEEN, THE POST-CRESCENT

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally on Saturday in Green Bay, Wis.

Let’s impeach Trump for being a great president He’s making America great at anti-semitism and white power. dictator and nuclear menace. Now, The Washington Post reports DANA MILBANK Trump’s team promised to pay Kim Washington Post a great sum — $2 million — for the release of hostage Otto Warmbier. Article IV: Donald John Trump has been a great president for Rus“If I’m guilty of anything, it’s that sia. I’ve been a great president and the Trump’s greatly amusing lawDemocrats don’t like it.” yer Rudy Giuliani recently said — President Trump, discussing “there’s nothing wrong with takthe Mueller report on April 26 ing information from Russians” for electoral help. And Trump has Articles of impeachment thwarted attempts to protect the exhibited by the House of Reprecountry from more great Russian sentatives of the United States of attacks in 2020. America in the name of itself and Article V: Donald John Trump of the people of the United States has been a great president for the of America, against Donald John rich. Trump, president of the United A new Post-ABC poll finds States of America, in maintenance that 60 percent of voters say and support of its impeachment the country’s great economic against him for being a “great system mainly benefits those in president”: power. Trump has cut taxes for Article I: Donald John Trump has been a great president for anti- the wealthy and corporations and hired hundreds of former corpoSemites. rate lobbyists. Jew haters have enjoyed record Article VI: Donald John Trump greatness during the Trump presihas been a great president for dency. Saturday’s deadly attack fact-checkers. at a California synagogue came The Post’s Fact Checker exactly six months after a massareported Monday that Trump has cre at a synagogue in Pittsburgh. made 10,000 false or misleadTrump has joked about Jews ing claims as president. Just this being money-grubbing, tweeted weekend, he alleged that under an anti-Semitic image, declined Democrats’ beliefs, a newborn to call off supporters threatening anti-Semitic violence and echoed baby is swaddled “beautifully and then the doctor and the mother anti-Semitic tropes about “glodetermine whether or not they balists” while stoking conspiracy will execute the baby.” He also theories about prominent Jewish announced that if Democrats try Americans. to impeach him, “I would first Article II: Donald John Trump head to the U.S. Supreme Court,” has been a great president for which does not decide impeachwhite supremacists. Trump famously said there were ment. Article VII: Donald John Trump some “very fine people” among the white supremacists who came has been a great president for lawyers. to Charlottesville in 2017 for a As Trump pushes the bounds white-nationalist rally at which armed neo-Nazis carried torches, of legality to ever greater elaschanted “Jews will not replace us” ticity, and his lawyers to evergreater creativity, Fox News’s and killed a counterprotester. Andrew Napolitano, previously Article III: Donald John Trump a stalwart Trump defender, now has been a great president for says the Mueller report exposed North Korea. “unlawful, defenseless and conTrump’s embrace of Kim Jong demnable” actions by Trump. Un as a great, “honorable” man Trump now labels Napolitano’s gave legitimacy to the repressive

previously great legal thinking “very dumb.” Article VIII: Donald John Trump has been a great president for disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Monday that measles cases hit an outstanding 25-year high. Trump, who had previously spread fears that vaccines cause autism, has presided over the loss of health insurance by 7 million people — one of the greatest drop-offs in U.S. history. Article IX: Donald John Trump has been a great president for trade rivals. Senate Finance Committee Chairman Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, says Trump’s great steel tariffs are a “tax on Americans,” and he has threatened to kill Trump’s renegotiated North American Free Trade Agreement. This follows the recent report that the U.S. trade deficit in goods was the greatest — highest — in history last year. Article X: Donald John Trump has been a great president for illegal immigration. Customs and Border Protection reported that last month’s apprehensions along the southern border hit a great, 12-year high. Article XI: Donald John Trump has been a great president for “bullshit.” Trump publicly uttered “bullshit” three times in the last two months. While leading this great assault on presidential norms, he has also presided over the greatest increases in federal debt during a peacetime expansion, the greatest turnover of presidential staff and the greatest rises in sea levels. Wherefore, Donald John Trump, by being such a great president, warrants impeachment and trial, and removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States. Dana Milbank Twitter: @Milbank Copyright The Washington Post

So Don McGahn is in the president’s crosshairs. Whose side are you on? I ask because this is perhaps the perfect test for a special subgroup of Donald Trump supporters. Call them the “But Gorsuchers.” At the beginning of the Trump administration, when things got off to a rocky start, the go-to response from many Trump boosters was some version of “Yes, but we got Neil Gorsuch on the Supreme Court.” As things got more chaotic, it became a joke to say, “Yeah, but Gorsuch” after every embarrassing revelation or disturbing tweet. But from a conservative perspective that places a high priority on the court, this was an utterly defensible point of view. Many Republicans who were reluctant to vote for Trump only came around after he promised to pick judges exclusively from a list vetted by the conservative Federalist Society and the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. This reassured the voters who took Trump seriously when he talked about putting his sister on the Supreme Court. If the opportunity to put a conservative on the court — or deny Hillary Clinton a chance to do so — was why you ultimately voted for him, then “But Gorsuch” was a fair retort. You don’t hear “But Gorsuch” often these days, for two reasons. The first is entirely to Trump’s credit — again from a certain Republican or conservative perspective. Brett Kavanaugh is on the Supreme Court, too. Scores of excellent judges have been appointed to the lower courts. We’ve seen tax cuts, deregulation, the partial dismantling of Obamacare and a number of other conservative accomplishments on Trump’s watch. His supporters — reluctant and wholehearted alike — have every reason to count these things in the “pro” column. Then there’s the second reason, which is less favorable to Trump. Whether you call it the party line, right-wing political correctness or simply a desire to cater to the president’s fragile ego, it’s simply not acceptable to publicly criticize Trump on the right. Prominent religious leaders feel compelled to dismiss Trump’s sordid sexual history. Passionate constitutionalists simply shrug or celebrate Trump’s words and deeds, no matter how contrary they may be to constitutional principles.

You have to gush about his genius when there’s little discernible wisdom in what he does, and you must marvel at his courage when there’s none to be seen. Credit for Trump’s wins is all his; blame for his losses is all somebody else’s. The “But Gorsuch” argument is also known as the transactional case for Trump. You don’t have to like or approve of what he does, but it’s worth putting up with because of the results. This is what you hear when you talk to Republican politicians and many prominent conservative activists and donors in private. But when was the last time you heard it on TV or talk radio? Indeed, the demand that everyone see the emperor’s new clothes is so powerful that criticizing — or even being inconvenient to — the president’s preferred messaging is seen not only as a kind of treason but as proof that the critic isn’t really a conservative at all. Which brings me to McGahn, who until recently was considered a widely respected, unimpeachably conservative lawyer. I have no idea what the former White House counsel’s personal views on Trump are. But based on his actions, he was at minimum a conservative transactionalist. He didn’t attack the president; he joined Trump’s team. It was McGahn’s job to shepherd Gorsuch, Kavanaugh and other judges through the confirmation process. By the time McGahn left the White House last year, not only had he scored two Supreme Court victories for the president, he’d been a Sherpa to 59 other federal judgeships. Also, according to the Mueller report, McGahn may well have saved the Trump presidency by refusing to follow the president’s orders to derail the Mueller probe. McGahn cooperated with special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. He didn’t want to; he was told to by Trump and his legal team. Now, Trump is calling McGahn a liar. The president denies he told McGahn to fire Mueller. Trump and his attorney, Rudy Giuliani, have insinuated that McGahn’s handwritten notes from his conversations with the president are somehow fraudulent. We’ll see how things unfold, but it looks as if a lot of people, when forced to choose, will opt to throw McGahn under the bus, because loyalty to the president is now the definition of what it means to be a Republican or a conservative. And saying “But Gorsuch” won’t help McGahn. Jonah Goldberg goldbergcolumn@gmail.com Copyright Tribune Content Agency


LOCAL

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY — Man charged with killing ex-girlfriend: Prosecutors filed murder charges Tuesday against Jordan P. Beck, 21, of Black Jack, in the shooting death of his ex-girlfriend. Beck is charged with firstdegree murder, first-degree burglary and two counts of armed criminal action. He lives in the 4900 block of Kennewick Drive in Black Jack and was being held in jail in lieu of $200,000 bail, cash only. Authorities say Beck went to the home of Celia Kollie, 18, about 1 p.m. Monday in the 1400 block of Annilo Drive in Hazelwood. Kollie and her mother were sitting in the kitchen when he shot the glass sliding door to get inside, police said. He then chased Kollie into the garage and shot her until he ran out of bullets. Beck told police he could not bear to see her moving on, police said. Beck’s father told the Post-Dispatch that his son has suffered from mental health problems for years. “He’s not a horrible kid,” Patrick Beck said. “He’s just disturbed.” Patrick Beck said his son called him immediately after the shooting and again threatened to take his own life. “I can’t believe what I did, Dad,” Beck said his son told him. “I messed up. I’m sorry.” Patrick Beck said he was “overwhelmingly sorry” for his son’s actions. “I don’t know how to make anything better,” he said. “But I’ll pray for them for the rest of my life.”

dead in a street. Police were called to a shooting scene about 4:15 p.m. Monday in the 5900 block of Highland Avenue. They found a car and a van stopped alongside each other on the residential street. Between the cars, police found two bodies. The victims have been identified as Jonathan Young, 27, of the 1600 block of Old South River Road in St. Charles County; and Desha Davis, 25, of the 8300 block of Midland Boulevard in Vinita Park. Both had been shot numerous times, police say. A 1-year-old boy was found at the scene. Paramedics took him to a hospital for evaluation, but police said the boy was uninjured. St. Louis Animal Control came to the scene and took custody of a small black dog found inside one of the vehicles. The dog appeared to be unhurt. Police said they had no witnesses and no suspect description at this point in the investigation. Police are encouraging any witnesses to call 1-866-3718477. Callers can remain anonymous.

argued that Mullen’s order, which required Gardner to turn over user names and passwords to allow police to access the server, “will destroy the privilege doctrine” and “would eradicate the necessary confidential nature of criminal investigations and open the floodgates to others, including criminal defense attorneys, having access to the privileged information of any (circuit attorney’s office) investigation.” Police officers Monday evening seized a server from the circuit attorney’s office about two hours after Mullen had issued his order. Gardner’s appeal said 10 to 15 police officers, plus lawyers working for a special prosecutor, “secretly entered the Circuit Attorney’s Office and took the Office’s server.” The search warrant in question seeks six months of electronic data, including emails and attachments, as part of a monthslong grand jury investigation of William Don Tisaby, a former FBI agent Gardner hired to investigate then-Gov. Eric Greitens.

ST. LOUIS — Second man sentenced in store ST. LOUIS — Gardner robbery: A St. Louis man appeals to block judge’s was sentenced Tuesday to order on search warrant: nine years in prison for the The city’s top prosecutor armed robbery of a 7-Eleven on Tuesday challenged a store here in 2017. judge’s order a day before Travion Lindsey, 20, is the that her office relinquish second man sentenced to records to a special prison in connection with prosecutor in a pending the armed robbery Oct. 18, grand jury investigation. 2017, and a carjacking the Lawyers for Circuit day earlier. Attorney Kimberly M. Lindsey’s accomplices, Gardner appealed to the Jevante Phillips and Ahmaad Missouri Eastern District Ali, stole a car at gunpoint Court of Appeals to block ST. LOUIS — Police from a woman in St. Louis’ Circuit Judge Michael identify couple found Dutchtown neighborhood Mullen’s order that shot to death: Homicide Gardner’s office comply with and used the car to commit detectives had no suspects a Feb. 21 search warrant for the robbery, according to Tuesday in the double shooting the day before that data on the office’s servers. prosecutors. All three men arrived at Gardner’s lawyers left a man and a woman

R E G BUR D E I TR EST B E H T U’VRE YOV NE E

the 7-Eleven at 4948 Christy Avenue in the car, according to prosecutors. They entered the store wearing masks and with their guns displayed. Lindsey stood guard at the door at first while the other two men stole lottery tickets and money from the cash register, prosecutors said. Lindsey eventually helped the men take cash out of the register; they also stole liquor bottles, cigarettes and candy before fleeing in the stolen car. University City police found the stolen car Oct. 19. Investigators traced a stolen cellphone and matched photos the men posted to Facebook of themselves wearing masks and carrying firearms with video from the 7-Eleven, according to court documents. All three men admitted to their roles in the carjacking

and robbery, according to prosecutors. Phillips was sentenced in February to 11 years in prison. Ali’s sentencing hearing is set for May 8. O’FALLON, MO. — Police seek domestic assault suspect: Police were searching for a man who they say fired a gun at a former girlfriend in the 100 block of Lincoln Street on Monday night. Police do not know the whereabouts of Malik Payne, 23. Payne faces charges from the St. Charles County prosecuting attorney’s office of domestic assault in the first degree, armed criminal action, unlawful use of a weapon and felon in possession of a firearm. He will be held in lieu of $50,000 bail if he is apprehended. On Monday evening,

police responded to calls of shots fired in the 100 block of Lincoln Street. A woman told police that during a fight Payne fired shots at her and she took cover in a nearby apartment building. Payne fled in a white sports car. O’Fallon police are encouraging anyone with information on Payne’s whereabouts to call detectives at 636-379-5664. ST. LOUIS — Two shot in south St. Louis: Two men suffered critical injuries in a shooting Tuesday evening in the 3900 block of Illinois Avenue. Police responded to the scene about 6:20 p.m. One man was shot in the chest, and one man was shot in the lower back. Both men were conscious and breathing when they were taken to a hospital for treatment.

CLASSIFIED All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise ‘any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.’ This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

Homes for Sale-IL ****************************** For Lease or Sale, Peoria, IL. 8,000-100,000 sf Frozen Storage. 309-360-4779 ******************************

Audi 2018 Audi Q5 Premium Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 21k mi #P9607 $32,992

2018 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD #P9619 $46,992

2018 Audi Q5 Premium Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 21k mi #P9607 $32,992

'18 Audi Q5 Prem/Tech Prem, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 21k, #P9675 $32,992

Audi

Audi

18 Audi Q7: Prestige, Quattro, Sportback, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $58,992 #P9657

'17 A6 Premium Plus: 7xxx Miles, AWD, Auto, $35,077, #80249A

'15 Audi S5 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black, 50k mi., #P9791 $29,077

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 6k mi, Cert, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, $37,992 #P9238

'16 Audi A8 L: 4.0T, Sport, 31K Miles, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner $45,992 #P9681

'16 Audi A5 Premium Plus, quattro coupe, 4 cyl., awd, auto, black, 25k mi., #P9835 $28,000

2018 Audi A6 Premium Plus 6k mi, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #P9238 $37,992

'18 Audi S4 Premium Plus, quattro sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 8k mi., #29014A $48,510

'15 Audi S4 Premium Plus, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 50k mi., #P9687 $28,992

2018 Audi A6 Premium Plus 6k mi, Certified, Clean Carfax 1 Owner #P9238 $37,992

'18 Audi A6 Premium Plus: 12K Miles, AWD, Carfax 1 Owner, $38,992 #28140L

Continued on Page B9

Let Us Beautify Your Ugly Concrete! No tear out required, simply resurface!

We offer SEVERAL ATTRACTIVE & DURABLE PRODUCT OPTIONS!!

Spring Savings UP TO

35% OFF

WITH COMBINED DISCOUNTS Call for details. Expires 5-15-19

■ Pebble Stone Epoxy System ■ Texture Craft ■ Outdoor Paver Tiles ■ Epoxy Coatings - Flake System, Metallic System, etc.

GIVING BACK

est. 2015

3453 Hampton Ave St. Louis, MO 63139 314-833-3207

Senior, Military & First Responder Discounts! Free no obligation estimates

www.fandbseatery.com

Come in and find out why our clients say,

“I’m so glad I found you!”

OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE • LOCALLY OWNED & FAMILY OPERATED

314-665-3126 or Toll Free 1-844-Fix-Ugly stonecraftresurfacing.com

(349-8459)

Shawn Wolf “The Concrete Doctor”

Had it with dentures? Dental implants are more affordable than ever. Left: upper denture Right: upper implant

The timeless appeal and beauty of quality hardwood floors enhances your furnishings and allows you to create the ambiance you desire whether you’re going for a warm comfortable atmosphere or a smooth contemporary feeling. STOP BY TODAY TO VIEW OUR WIDE SELECTION OF HARDWOOD FLOORING, CARPET, AND VINYL. 6215 Ronald Reagan Dr, Lake St Louis, MO 63367

(636) 561-5441 Monday - Friday 8am - 4:30pm Appointments & Service Available 24 Hrs. A Day, 7 Days A Week

Starting at $17,500 Start eating the food you love and living the life you deserve.

$

1

• Consultation and X-Rays • Second Opinion

Implant dentistry is a non-specialty interest area not recognized by the ADA that requires no specific educational training to advertise this service.

Since 1893

Call Now Dr. Barry Brace & Associates Kirkwood Office (314) 200-2599 O’Fallon Missouri Office (636) 200-2664

200-400% More Tomatoes

FURNITURE REPAIRED FURNITURE REFINISHED 5 Year Workmanship Guarantee

Quality Craftsmanship • Refinishing Reupholstery • Antique Restoration Repair • Custom Made Draperies Custom Made Furniture New Furniture • Antiques

314-832-1555 www.zollingerfurniture.com 4821 Fairview Ave., St. Louis, MO 63116 Just east of 3400 S. Kingshighway We accept

Stronger! Faster! Super Yields! • Mighty ‘Mato super tomatoes are created by grafting resulting in 2-4 times more fruit • An increased ability to uptake water and nutrients results in improvements in taste • Naturally strong, no chemicals needed, perfect for ORGANIC gardening

Over 2,000 varieties of plants 1011 N. Woodlawn Kirkwood, MO

314-965-3070 www.sugarcreekgardens.com

Voted #1 Best Garden Center


05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

NATION&WORLD DIGEST

WASHINGTON | RUSSIA PROBE

Minnesota officer convicted in killing

Dems keep up pressure

MINNEAPOLIS — A Minneapolis police officer was convicted of third-degree murder Tuesday in the fatal shooting of an unarmed woman who approached his squad car minutes after calling 911 to report a possible rape behind her home, a rare instance of an officer being convicted after asserting he fired in a life-or-death situation. Mohamed Noor was also convicted of manslaughter in the July 2017 death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, a 40-yearold dual citizen of the U.S. and Australia whose death bewildered and angered people in both countries. Noor, a police officer for the past two years who testified that he shifted to policing from a career in business because he “always wanted to serve,” was acquitted of the most serious charge of intentional seconddegree murder. Minnesota sentencing guidelines call for up to 15 years on the murder conviction and nearly five years on the manslaughter conviction, although judges aren’t bound by the guidelines and can impose lower sentences.

White House resisting efforts to follow up on Mueller investigation LISA MASCARO AND MARY CLARE JALONICK

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Democrats are steeling for an extraordinary fight with President Donald Trump as the White House stonewalls congressional oversight demands in the aftermath of special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. In the latest case, Trump, his family and the Trump Organization filed a lawsuit against Deutsche Bank and Capital One attempting to thwart congressional subpoenas into his financial and business dealings, asserting

the requests are out of bounds. That comes as Trump’s treasury secretary is declining to produce the president’s tax returns, Attorney General William Barr is threatening to back out of his agreement to appear this week before the Democratic-led House Judiciary Committee, and former White House counsel Don McGahn and other officials are being encouraged not to testify before Congress. “He’s prepared to fight us tooth and nail. And we’re prepared to fight him back,” said Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., the chairwoman of the Financial Services Committee. “He obviously has something to hide.” The standoff pits the legislative and executive branches against each other in a constitutional showdown not seen since the

Watergate era. Neither side is expected to back down. From Trump’s perspective, since Mueller finished his report on Russian interference into the election, there’s no further need to investigate. It’s a view largely backed by the president’s party in Congress. But Democrats say it’s their duty to conduct oversight even as they also are confronting the limits of their own enforcement powers. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, said the stonewalling “certainly builds the case that the administration and the president is engaged in wholesale obstruction of Congress, completely extraconstitutional, trying to make the presidency not responsive to Congress, trying to make the presidency into a monarchy.”

Nadler said the White House’s position is “absolutely unacceptable.” Impeachment proceedings, though, which would run through Nadler’s committee, remain off the table for now, as Speaker Nancy Pelosi is urging the House chairmen to push forward with their oversight agendas. Republicans have largely stood by Trump and shown little interest in the oversight agenda many view as little more than a partisan attack on the president. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, in his first remarks in Washington since the special counsel’s report was released almost two weeks ago, said he “didn’t hear a single word about the Mueller report” from constituents at home in Kentucky.

Mental health staff cleared in Parkland FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. — The mental health professionals who treated the Parkland school shooter before his murderous rampage had no legal responsibility to warn anyone that he was violent, a judge ruled Tuesday. Broward Judge Patti Englander Henning threw out lawsuits against Henderson Behavioral Health, which treated gunman Nikolas Cruz before he shot 34 people — 17 fatally — at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in February 2018. Florida law is clear, the judge said: Mental health workers have no duty to protect the public from possible harm by someone they have no control over. Unlike other medical doctors, who can rely on diagnostic tools to confirm diseases, mental health professionals cannot accurately predict whether a person will be violent, she explained. BRIEFLY TERROR PLOT: Mark Domingo, an Army veteran accused of plotting terrorist attacks in California, was demoted and discharged from the military for a serious offense, a U.S. official said Tuesday. Military records show Domingo served about 16 months in the Army, including a four-month stint in Afghanistan in fall 2012. BORDER WALL: Democrats controlling the House are attempting to use a popular veterans measure to block President Donald Trump from transferring $3.6 billion from military base construction to build his long-sought wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. The $108 billion measure, which was introduced Tuesday, funds veterans benefits and improvements to military bases. FALSE ACCUSATION: A Michigan college student said Tuesday that pro-Trump agitators recruited him to falsely claim he was raped by Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, then published the smear without his permission. Hunter Kelly, 21, said conservative activists Jacob Wohl and Jack Burkman sought to use him for the “despicable scheme.” HEATED TOBACCO: U.S. health officials on Tuesday said Philip Morris can sell a cigarette alternative that heats tobacco without burning it. The Food and Drug Administration has not yet decided whether to allow the device, IQOS, to be advertised as less harmful than cigarettes. A decision on that marketing pitch could come later this year.

DMITRI LOVETSKY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

PREPARATIONS UNDERWAY FOR PARADE TO MARK WWII Self-propelled artillery vehicles are transported by trucks Tuesday after a rehearsal for the Victory Day military parade in St. Petersburg, Russia. The parade, which takes place at Dvortsovaya Square on May 9, will mark 74 years since the Allied victory in World War II.

Barr faces showdown at hearing Senate Democrats likely to call out AG for protecting Trump ERIC TUCKER AND MARY CLARE JALONICK

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Attorney General William Barr will face lawmakers’ questions today for the first time since releasing special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report, in what promises to be a dramatic showdown as he defends his actions before Democrats who accuse him of spinning the investigation’s findings in President Donald Trump’s favor. Barr’s appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee is

MUSLIM BROTHERHOOD: President Donald Trump and his national security team are weighing whether to designate the Muslim Brotherhood a foreign terrorist organization, the White House said Tuesday. — Lee wire reports

president, Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. Democrats are likely to focus on Barr’s statements and actions in the last six weeks that unnerved them. The first hint of discontent surfaced last month when Barr issued a four-page statement that summarized what he said were the main conclusions of the Mueller report. In the letter, Barr revealed that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein cleared Trump of obstruction of justice after Mueller and his team found evidence on both sides of the question but didn’t reach a conclusion. Barr is likely to defend himself by noting how he released the report on his own even though he

didn’t have to under the special counsel regulations, and that doing so fulfilled a pledge he made at his confirmation hearing to be as transparent as the law allowed. After the letter’s release, Barr raised eyebrows anew when he told a congressional committee that he believed the Trump campaign had been spied on, a common talking point of the president and his supporters. He also equivocated on a question of whether Mueller’s investigation was a witch hunt, saying someone who feels wrongly accused would reasonably view an investigation that way. That was a stark turnabout from his confirmation hearing, when he said he didn’t believe Mueller would ever be on a witch hunt.

Biden enjoys surge N. Carolina campus after official launch shooting leaves 2 dead Former vice president polling well ahead of the crowded field DOUGLAS PERRY

RAPE SENTENCING: James McClusky, an upstate New York judge who stoked social media outrage for sentencing a former school bus driver to probation in the rape of a 14-year-old, is getting “numerous vitriolic” phone calls, court officials said Tuesday.

expected to highlight the partisan schism around Mueller’s report and the Justice Department’s handling of it. It will give the attorney general his most extensive opportunity to explain the department’s actions, including a press conference held before the report’s release, and for him to repair a reputation bruised by allegations that he’s the president’s protector. Barr also is invited to appear Thursday before the Democraticled House Judiciary panel, but the Justice Department said he would not testify if the committee insisted on having its lawyers question the attorney general. His appearance today will be before a Republican-led committee chaired by a close ally of the

Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — A new national poll shows former Vice President Joe Biden’s support growing after his announcement last week that he’s running for president next year. In a CNN/SSRS poll of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents released Tuesday, Biden was the preferred candidate of 39% of respondents. (He came in at 28% in CNN’s mid-March poll, before he announced he was officially in the race.) Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders landed at 15%, down 4 points in the past month, a significant

downward trend for the only candidate other than Biden to have near-universal name recognition. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has the support of 8% of the CNN/SSRS survey’s respondents. She was followed by South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (7%), former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke (6%) and California Sen. Kamala Harris (5%). Biden was the front-runner in most Democratic polls for months but it was only last Thursday when he formally announced he was getting into the race. In a Quinnipiac University National Poll, also released Tuesday, Biden leads the pack with support from 38 percent of respondents. Warren placed second with 12 percent and Sanders came in third at 11 percent. Buttigieg ended up with 10 percent in this poll, and Harris took 8 percent.

Suspect is in custody; he appears to have acted alone, police say TOM FOREMAN JR.

Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — A shooting on a North Carolina university campus left two people dead and four wounded Tuesday, prompting a lockdown and chaotic scene in the state’s largest city. UNC Charlotte issued a campus lockdown late Tuesday afternoon, saying shots were fired. The campus was declared secure in the evening after a suspect was taken into custody. “Shots reported near kennedy. Run, Hide, Fight. Secure yourself immediately,” the university said in an alert, referring to the school’s Kennedy building on

campus. Mecklenburg Emergency Medical Services Agency said on Twitter that two people were killed, two others had lifethreatening injuries and another two people were treated for less serious injuries. They said the numbers could change. Aerial shots from local television news outlets showed police officers running toward a building, while another view showed students running on a campus sidewalk. Police said one suspect was in custody, and it didn’t appear that others were involved.It was not immediately clear whether the victims were students. The university has more than 26,500 students and 3,000 faculty and staff. The campus is located northeast of the city center and is surrounded by residential areas.


NATION

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

Autism screenings at a younger age show promise BY BRADLEY J. FIKES

Tribune News Service

SAN DIEGO — Children with autism spectrum disorder can be reliably diagnosed as young as 14 months, according to a study by University of California-San Diego autism researchers. If results are confirmed by independent research, this would be the earliest age this has Pierce proven feasible. Earlier detection means earlier treatment, which should improve outcomes, said Karen Pierce, co-director of the UCSD Autism Center for Excellence. Pierce led the study with Eric Courchesne, the center’s other co-director. Autism screening should be first done at 18 months, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the average age of diagnosis in the U.S. is 4 years. That gap represents a missed opportunity to guide these very young children into normal social

“The brain is very plastic. It’s developing at a really super-fast pace from birth to age 3. There’s a lot of connections that are formed between brain cells. So hopefully we can shape those connections.” Karen Pierce, co-director of the UCSD Autism Center for Excellence development, Pierce said. “The brain is very plastic. It’s developing at a really super-fast pace from birth to age 3,” she said. “There’s a lot of connections that are formed between brain cells. So hopefully we can shape those connections.” The study was published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Results are based on development of 1,269 toddlers in San Diego County, selected from a universal screening program to

detect possible autism. Children suspected of having ASD via screening were referred for an in depth developmental evaluation by a licensed clinician to determine whether they actually had autism or some other disorder. The toddlers were originally assessed between 12 and 36 months, and had at least one follow-up evaluation. For those originally diagnosed at 14 months, 79 percent were again found to be on the spectrum at follow-up. By 16 months, the diagnosis was 83 percent reliable. However, for those diagnosed at 12 to 13 months, the rate was just 50 percent. Of the total number of toddlers assessed, seven originally placed on the spectrum went on to normal development, the study found. Contrarily, 105 toddlers originally diagnosed as not having autism were identified as being on the spectrum at a later visit. “From a policy perspective, that tells parents and pediatricians to repeat screening,” Pierce said. The study is “well done and an important first step” to identifying autism as early as possible,

OBITUARIES Cusanelli, Betty L. - Affton Flanagan-Fetsch, Juanita Marie - St. Louis Gray, Thomas "Tom" - St. Peters, MO Jerashen, Jane - St. Louis Levison, Jack A. - St. Louis

Cusanelli, Betty L. (nee Miller), Passed away peacefully at home, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Saturday, April 27th, 2019 at the age of 93. Beloved wife and best friend of the late D o me n i c "Dan" Cu s a n el l i; l ovin g mot h er of M i c h a e l (D eb b ie) Cusanelli, Lorenzo (Mary) Cusanelli, Mary (Robert) Ziegler; proud grandmother of Steven Ziegler, David Ziegler, Brittany Cusanelli and Domenic Cusanelli. Preceded in death by her brothers Paul "Jake" Miller and Frank Miller. Betty was a homemaker while the children were young, then joined her husband in the family restaurant business. In retirement Betty and Dan were fortunate to enjoy good health and traveled the world for over 20 years missing only the Holy Land and The Great Wall. In addition, they were generous supporters of their church and many local institutions. She continued to be active and independent later in life. Betty was humble and had a kind spirit. She will be fondly remembered and dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Betty and her family would like to thank the LSS caregivers and SSM Hospice for their care and assistance. Service: All services will be held privately. Contributions may be made in her name to the American Heart Association. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com

Flanagan-Fetsch, Juanita Marie (née Kirn) In the arms of Her Savior, March 30th 2019. Please visit - St.LouisCremation.com

Gray, Thomas "Tom" 66, 4/29/19. Vis. 5/3, 4 p.m. - 8 p.m., Hutchens-Stygar FH, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. Svc. 5/4, 10 a.m., Sts. Joachim & Ann Ch., 4112 McClay Rd. (St. Chas.). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Jerashen, Jane (nee Kuba), now with Jesus on Monday, April 29, 2019. Beloved wife of William Jerashen; loving mother of Tammy (Mark) Endres and Cheryl (Wayne) Sell; cherished grandmother of 4; great-grandmother of 7; our dear sister, and friend to many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. Friday, May 3, 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 p.m.

said David Mandell, associate director of the Center for Autism Research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Mandell said he and other autism experts have advocated earlier screening than what has been recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The task force expressed concern that false diagnoses can cause harm by needlessly stressing patients. On its website, the task force says “the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in young children for whom no concerns of ASD have been raised by their parents or a clinician.” “It really flies in the face of the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and other physician groups,” Mandell said. “And so different research groups have been scrambling to try and put together pieces of the evidence.” Mandell said diagnoses of autism are known to be more stable than diagnoses of other devel-

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Lum, John - St. Louis McLaughlin, Jeanne F. - St. Louis Miller - see Cusanelli Nieder, Shelia Lea (Williams) - Roaming Shores, OH Paubel, Dorothy - Ballwin

opmental delays, for which the task force does recommend early screening. A more skeptical view came from Mayada Elsabbagh, co-director of Transforming Autism Care Consortium, and a research scientist at Montreal Children’s Hospital. Elsabbagh said the social and communications skills measured for autism diagnosis aren’t fully developed until toddlerhood. So a specific diagnosis in infancy isn’t feasible. However, she said it is possible to detect more general signs of developmental delay in infants. “Therefore, while we can’t tell if the condition we are dealing with is autism or another form of developmental delay or problem, it’s critical that these kids and their families receive support and help during this uncertain period,” Elsabbagh said. Pierce said the study needs to be duplicated in toddlers living elsewhere than San Diego. This is now being performed in Phoenix. The evaluation criteria she developed are being used by other researchers.

Schmidt F.S.M., Sister Mary Paul - St. Louis Stallings, David P. - St. Louis Sukalski, Mitchel V. - Alexandria, VA Welch, Lark - St. Louis Ziegler - see Cusanelli

Levison, Jack A.

Sukalski, Mitchel V.

April 28, 2019, age 89; beloved father and father-in-law of Ross Levison (fiancée Miss Tony Todd) and J oH a n n a Levison Kittner (Robert); former husband of Claudia Levison Morcus; partner of Ilse Shaiper; grandfather of Jonah Roy and Jett Roy; dear uncle and friend. Services: Funeral service Friday, May 3, 10:00 a.m. at Congregation Shaare Emeth, 11645 Ladue Road. Interment following at Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery, 650 White Road. Memorial contributions preferred to Alzheimersprevention.org. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Alexandria, VA - Mitchel V. Sukalski, 82, died April 27, 2019 after a recent move from St. Louis. Mitch is survived by his loving wife, Elayne; his children, Mitchel W., Dare, and Alyse; sisters, Lorraine and Celene; and his 6 grandchildren-Cheyenne, Sierra, Jonathan, William, Elayna, and Joseph. Born in Phila., PA in December 1936 to Mitchell Edward Sukalski and Helen Sukalski, Mitch attended St. Joseph's Prep, La Salle U., and U. of Tennessee. Between 1958 and 1969, Mitch served his country as an officer and helicopter pilot in the US Army. He was honorably discharged at the rank of Major, having earned the Distinguished Flying Cross for a daring nighttime rescue in Vietnam.

Lum, John Sunday, April 28, 2019 at the age of 94. John was born on January 24, 1925. He was inducted into the U.S. Army Air Corps, 1943 -1945. He graduated from Washington University in 1950, the same year he married Helen Haw. John was a mechanical engineer with Shure Richardson and Gross Engineering. He served on F e r g u s o n P l a n Commis s ion , president of the Kiwanis, ran y o u t h s p o r t s l ea gu es a n d a leading member of Immanuel UCC. In 2002, he was Ferguson's Citizen of the Year. John was preceded in death by his wife Helen, son Gary. Surviving are his siblings, Rose Char, Helen Belz, Emmett Lum, Nancy O'Connor; his children Barbara Lum, Beverly Lum, Philip, (Denora) Lum, their children Johnathan, Deborah and George; Joan, (Barton) Moy, their children Sela and Matthew; Arthur, (Beth) Lum, their children Joseph and James, and many cousins, nieces, and nephews. Services: Visitation is Fri., May 3, from 5-8 p.m. at Immanuel UCC, 221 Church St., Ferguson, MO, and on Sat., 9:30-10:30 a.m. Funeral at 10:30 a.m., Valhalla Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please donate to Immanuel UCC. www.valhallafunerals.net

McLaughlin, Jeanne F. Thursday, April 25, 2019. Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Thursday, May 2, 5-7 p.m. Funeral service Friday, 10:15 a.m. Interment National Cemetery.

Nieder, Shelia Lea (Williams) 62, of Roaming Shores, Ohio, passed away Thursday, April 25, 2019. Shelia was born November 15, 1956 in Wentzville, Missouri, the daughter of Landon and Oma Maurice Williams. Shelia is survived by her husband of 29 years, Dwayne Nieder, her three children, Shawn (Courtney) Schlueter, Jessica (Mitchell) Hatfield, and Timothy Nieder; brother Charles (Diane) Williams; grandchildren, Pollux Gilbert, Gabryella, Mitchy, Jr. and Kaillynn Hatfield; her best friend, Debbie Adams; and her dogs, Mia and Marley. She is preceded in death by her parents. Services: Visitation will be held Friday, May 3, 2019 from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m.. at Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville, MO. Burial will take place Saturday, May 4, 21019 at 10 a.m. at Eternal Peace Cemetery. Online obituary and condolences at www.ducro.com

Services: May 3, at Good Shepherd Church in Alexandria, VA at 4:00 p.m. (visitation at 3:00 p.m.). Arlington National Cemetery burial at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Assist. League of STL alstl.org.

Welch, Lark (nee Hampton), April 29, 2019. Asleep in Jesus. Dearest wife of the late Kenneth Welch; dear mother of Todd Cash, Derek Cash, Heather Avioli and Christopher Welch (Nicole); proud grandmother of Dominic Cash, Louis Avioli II, Samantha and Evan Cash, Lacey and Madeline Welch; beloved daughter of the late Leroy and Eulah Hampton (nee Parish); dear sister of the late Angela Hampton and survived by brothers Don, R.D. and David Hampton; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin & friend. Services: Visitation at the Ortmann-Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, MO 63141 on Wed., May 1, 5:308 p.m. Funeral Service in Immaculate Conception Chapel at Chaminade College Preparatory, 425 S. Lindbergh, St. Louis, MO 63131 on Thur., May 2 at 10 a.m. (meet at Chaminade). Private Interment. Donations to Chaminade College Preparatory, 425 S. Lindbergh Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63131. Arrangements by Kevin & Ellen O'Sullivan Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Florists Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

STLtoday.com/obits

Paubel, Dorothy 79, April 28, 2019. Memorial service at Manchester UMC, Ballwin, Saturday, 11:00 a.m. For more info, see Schrader.com

Schmidt F.S.M., Sister Mary Paul Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, on Monday, April 29, 2019. Our dear friend and Sister in Religious Life. Services: Visitation at The Sarah Community, 12284 DePaul Dr., Bridgeton, MO on Wednesday, May 1, 2019 from 1:15 p.m. until time of funeral Mass at 2 p.m. Interment Calvary Cemetery. A KUTIS CITY service.

Stallings, David P. after a long illness, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, April 30, 2019. Loving father of Joshua (Cindi) Stallings, Luke Stallings, Kyle Stallings, Maura Stallings and the late Ryan Stallings and David "D.J." Stallings Jr.; dear grandfather of Tobias Edwards; loving son of Allen and the late Sue Ann Stallings; dear brother of Steve (Laurie) Stallings; dear uncle, cousin and friend to many. David loved sports, music and the movies. Services: Funeral service Thursday May 2, 9:30 am at the Hoffmeister South County Chapel, 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd. St. Louis, MO. with visitation from 8:00 am until time of service. Interment National Cemetery, Jefferson Barracks, MO. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Association. Share your condolences online at www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of floral designers is dedicated to the highest level of personal service.

Order 24 Hours schnucksfloral.com (314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557


05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

NEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Peek into brain shows mimic of Alzheimer’s BY LAURAN NEERGAARD

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Some people told they have Alzheimer’s may instead have a newly identified mimic of the disease — and scientists say even though neither is yet curable, it’s critical to get better at telling different kinds of dementia apart. Too often, the word dementia is used interchangeNelson ably with Alzheimer’s when there are multiple types of brain degeneration that can harm people’s memory and thinking skills. “Not everything that looks like Alzheimer’s disease is Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Julie Schneider, a neuropathologist at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. And among all the known dementias, this newly identified kind “is the most striking mimic of Alzheimer’s,” she added. It’s not clear how many people have this particular type, which an international team of scientists defined Tuesday in the journal Brain. But there could be a sizable number, said Dr. Peter Nelson of the University of Kentucky, the paper’s lead author.

The dementia was dubbed “LATE,” an acronym chosen in part because the oldest seniors seem at greatest risk. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, and autopsies have long found its telltale signs in the brain: sticky plaque from an abnormal buildup of amyloid protein, and tangles of another protein named tau. Only recently have scientists developed special, pricey scans that can measure that buildup in living brains. Then studies with those scans found about a third of people with Alzheimer’s symptoms lack amyloid buildup — ruling out Alzheimer’s, said Schneider, senior author of Tuesday’s paper. What else could cause their dementia? It turns out another protein, named TDP-43, also can run amok in the brain. Scientists knew it plays a role in a completely different disorder, Lou Gehrig’s disease. Then, they linked TDP-43 buildup to severe shrinking of the hippocampus, a brain region key for learning and memory. Nelson said about a quarter of people over age 85 have enough abnormal TDP-43 to affect their memory or thinking abilities. For now, it takes an autopsy to spot — the symptoms seem like Alzheim-

er’s until a specialist can peer inside the brain. “What is now clear is that a lot of dementia is caused by gloppy proteins. We used to think it was just two gloppy proteins, amyloid and tau,” Nelson said. The next step: Finding better ways to measure abnormal TDP43 and diagnose LATE. (It stands for an unwieldy scientific name — Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy.) “Our ultimate goal is to test people hopefully in a very noninvasive way,” said National Institute on Aging dementia specialist Nina Silverberg. That’s key to eventually MARK CORNELISON, UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY developing treatments. Dr. Peter T. Nelson inspects a section of brain Monday in the neuropathology lab at the Sanders-Brown Center for Aging in Lexington, Other culprits frequently Ky. On Tuesday, scientists, including lead author Nelson, released results showing a buildup of an abnormal protein named TDP-43 sometimes overlooked causes dementia. • Strokes, sometimes small “silent”ones,can trigger what’s called ity and tends to strike at a younger 43-caused disease adds to the vascular dementia, something sci- age than Alzheimer’s, yet can still complexity, said Alzheimer’s Asentists at the National Institutes of be misdiagnosed. sociation chief science officer MaHealth think might be prevented Many older patients probably ria Carrillo, who wasn’t involved with better blood pressure control. have “mixed dementia,” several with the new research. • Lewy body dementia, named brain changes that combine to “We must learn more about each for clumps of still another abnor- cause trouble, Dr. Walter Koro- contributing cause of dementia mal protein, can cause Alzheim- shetz, head of NIH’s National In- so we can understand how these er’s-like symptoms along with stitute of Neurological Disorders changes begin and interact and movement and other problems. and Stroke, told a recent meeting co-occur, and how to best diag• Frontotemporal dementia of- about non-Alzheimer’s dementias. nose, treat and prevent them,” she ten triggers changes in personalTuesday’s paper about TDP- said.

Parents are stunned athlete son accused in synagogue attack BY ELLIOT SPAGAT AND JULIE WATSON

Associated Press

ERIC GAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS

William Linares, 5, who is traveling with his mother, Suanny Gomez, from Honduras and seeking asylum in the United States, eats breakfast Tuesday provided by volunteers in Matamoros, Mexico. Gomez said she does not have money to pay a proposed fee for seeking asylum.

Trump’s proposed fee may place deep burden on asylum-seekers BY NOMAAN MERCHANT AND COLLEEN LONG

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Asylumseekers waiting to get into the U.S. sleep in small tents set up by the border, depending on volunteers and churches to bring them food and clothing. Some scrape together 25 cents to pay a toll to get on an international bridge where they can use a bathroom. They’ve fled violence-ridden homelands, often arriving at the U.S. border deep in debt, paying $7,000 or more to smugglers. Under President Donald Trump’s latest immigration proposal, they could face another demand on their meager resources: a fee to process their asylum applications. It’s not known how much the fee might be, but any amount would likely be a burden. “If we came from our country, it’s because we didn’t have the opportunity to work. We don’t have money,” said Suanny Gomez, a 24-year-old woman from Honduras who waited in a tent with her 5-year-old son, William. The proposed application fee and other changes are the latest in a series of proposals from an administration struggling to cope with a surge of migrant families arriving at the southern border. The migrants have overwhelmed federal resources and complicated Trump’s efforts to claim victory at

the border as he runs for re-election next year. The fee proposal was part of a memo Trump signed Monday directing his attorney general and acting homeland security secretary to take additional measures to overhaul the asylum system, which he insists is plagued by “rampant abuse.” It said the application fee would not exceed the cost of processing applications, but officials did not immediately provide an estimate for what that might be. Trump gave Homeland Security Department officials 90 days to come up with new regulations to ensure that applications are adjudicated within 180 days of filing, except under exceptional circumstances. He called on officials to immediately revoke work authorizations when people are denied asylum and ordered removed from the country. He also wants to bar anyone who has entered or tried to enter the country illegally from receiving a provisional work permit. Immigration advocates said the fees could push applicants further into poverty. “Asylum-seekers are fleeing persecution, and have left their families, communities, homes, jobs and possessions behind in order to save their lives,” said Archi Pyati, policy chief at Tahirih Justice Center.

Democratic House Majority leader Steny Hoyer said Trump was undermining American ideals. “This latest move will do nothing to address the humanitarian crisis on our border of the Trump Administration’s own making,” he said in a statement. On Tuesday, acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan described that crisis, telling a House subcommittee the department was running out of money and out of resources for dealing with the mass of people coming to the border. He said the White House would send a supplemental request for funding, along with some legislative suggestions. McAleenan, formerly the U.S. Customs and Border Protection commissioner, said the system cracked under the sheer volume of people coming to the U.S. In a single day, April 16, almost 5,000 people crossed the border. Agents and officers don’t have the resources to hold, process or properly care for them. “Simply put, the system is full and we are well beyond our capacity,” he said. “The status quo is not acceptable.” McAleenan has been in charge for about two weeks, after the resignation of Kirstjen Nielsen, who left amid a staff shake-up orchestrated by the White House.

POWAY, Calif. — The man accused of opening fire inside a Southern California synagogue was an accomplished student, athlete and musician whose embrace of white supremacy and anti-Semitism has dumbfounded his family and others who thought they knew him well. John T. Earnest, 19, made the dean’s list both semesters last Earnest year as a nursing student at California State University, San Marcos. In high school, he had stellar grades, swam on the varsity team and basked in the applause of classmates for his piano solos at talent shows. Earnest apparently became radicalized sometime over the last two years and is charged with murder and attempted murder in Saturday’s assault on the Chabad of Poway synagogue, which killed one woman and injured three people, including the rabbi. He is also charged with arson in connection with an attack last month on a mosque in nearby Escondido. Owen Cruise, 20, saw Earnest every day during senior year at Mt. Carmel High School in San Diego when the two were in calculus and physics together. They were also both in the school’s amateur radio club. Earnest’s piano performances drew audiences to their feet. He did a rendition of “Pirates of the Caribbean” and played Chopin and Beethoven. “Crowds would be cheering his name,” Cruise said Monday. “Everybody loved him.” Earnest counted Jews and black people among his friends. His father, John A. Earnest, is a popular physics teacher at Mt. Carmel, where he has worked for 31 years. “He was very close to his dad,” Cruise said. “He always hung out in his classroom, came to see him at lunch. He always seemed like a nice guy … He didn’t seem like the type of person who would go off the deep end.”

Earnest’s father volunteered to help students with exams and homework, said Cruise, who praised his former teacher for having a big impact on his life. On the morning of the shooting, the elder Earnest was hosting a study hour for an Advanced Placement exam and brought cookies, Cruise said. Cruise, now a sophomore at the University of California, San Diego, said the suspect lived at home and saw his parents every day. “The way John T. acted is not representative at all of the way he was raised,” Cruise said. “They are an outstanding family. Some of the finest people I’ve ever met.” The suspect’s parents said their son and five siblings were raised in a family that “rejected hate and taught that love must be the motive for everything we do.” “To our great shame, he is now part of the history of evil that has been perpetrated on Jewish people for centuries,” the parents said Monday in their first public comments. “Our son’s actions were informed by people we do not know, and ideas we do not hold.” The parents, who are cooperating with investigators, do not plan to plan to provide legal representation to their son, whose initial court appearance was Tuesday. Earnest burst into the synagogue on the last day of Passover, a major Jewish holiday that celebrates freedom, and opened fire with an assault-style rifle on the crowd of about 100, police said. He fled when the rifle jammed, according to authorities and witnesses, avoiding an Army combat veteran and an off-duty Border Patrol agent who pursued him. He called 911 to report the shooting and surrendered a short time later. Lori Kaye, a founding member of the congregation, was killed. Rabbi Yisroel Goldstein was shot in the hands, while Noya Dahan, 8, and her uncle Almog Peretz suffered shrapnel wounds. Kaye, 60, was remembered for her kindness Monday at a memorial service at the packed synagogue in Poway, a well-to-do suburb north of San Diego.

New Japanese emperor faces challenge replacing father BY FOSTER KLUG

Associated Press

When Crown Prince Naruhito on Wednesday becomes, by official Japanese count, the 126th person to occupy the Chrysanthemum Throne since 660 B.C., he will be ceremonially armed with the glittering, ancient imperial regalia of sword and jewel. Beyond the material trappings that accompany what the Japanese claim to be the world’s oldest continuous hereditary monarchy, however, the new emperor will also receive a much more important, though less dazzling, inheritance: The deep and abiding respect his father — Akihito, who abdicated as emperor on Tuesday — has accumulated over his threedecade reign.

Replicating this bequest on his own will be Naruhito’s greatest challenge. The love many in Japan feel for 85-year-old Akihito was on full display when he made his last official visit to the winter sumo tournament earlier this year. A huge crowd of people leapt to their feet, whooping and smiling as they held up babies and waved flags. This outpouring of emotion, however, was earned through much smaller moments, such as his visit in 2011, wearing a windbreaker instead of his usual bespoke suit, to comfort victims of a massive earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdowns. Entering a Tokyo shelter where evacuees were living, he knelt on the

wooden floor and listened to the stories of survival and devastation. Akihito has no political power under the postwar constitution, and his official duties are heavy on photos, ceremonial visits and foreign trips, his every public move stage-managed by an aggressive and controlling Imperial Household Agency. Yet, through his dogged outreach to his subjects in Japan, and his expressions of remorse to people in parts of Asia where his father’s troops once rampaged, he has redefined the role of emperor and, in the KYODO NEWS process, made himself much Japanese Emperor Akihito, front left, and Empress Michiko, front right, more popular than any elected acknowledge the crowd during their Jan. 20 visit to the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament at Ryogoku Kokugikan in Tokyo. politician.


NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

Instagram reminds of ‘what we lost’ Holocaust brought to attention of new generation BY ISAAC SCHARF AND AUDREY HOROWITZ

Associated Press

JERUSALEM — For seven decades, survivor testimony has been the centerpiece of Holocaust commemoration. But with the world’s community of aging survivors rapidly shrinking and global understanding of the genocide that killed 6 million Jews declining, advocates of Holocaust remembrance are seeking new and creative ways to share witnesses’ stories with younger generations. Much as Anne Frank’s diary gripped the older generations, an Instagram account based on a true 13-year-old Jewish victim’s journal, called Eva.Stories, is generating buzz among the young. “If we want to bring the memory of the Holocaust to the young generation, we have to bring it to where they are,” said the project co-producer, Mati Kochavi, an Israeli hightech billionaire who hails from a family of Holocaust victims, survivors and educators. “And they’re on Instagram.” Kochavi and his daughter, Maya, have created a series of 70 Instagram stories that chronicle the downward spiral of Eva Heyman’s life in the fateful spring of 1944 when the Nazis conquered Hungary. Eva was one of approximately 430,000 Hungarian Jews who were deported to Nazi concentration camps between May 15 and July 9 of 1944. Of the estimated 6 million Jews killed in the Holocaust, around 568,000 were Hungarian, according to Israel’s Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial. Eva’s tale, produced as a Hollywood-style movie with a cast of foreign actors and multimilliondollar budget, will stream throughout Israel’s Holocaust Remembrance Day, which begins at sundown Wednesday. The installments appear as if Eva had owned a smartphone dur-

ing World War II and was using Instagram to broadcast her life updates. The story goes live Wednesday, opening with Eva’s happier adolescent experiences then darkening as night falls. The Nazis tighten their hold on Hungary’s Jews, confiscating her family’s business, belongings and home, deporting Eva to the ghetto and ultimately to the Auschwitz death camp. The story’s climactic event is timed to follow Israel’s two-minute siren that wails nationwide on Thursday, bringing the country to a standstill at 10 a.m., in annual commemoration of Jewish Holocaust victims. Even days before the series’ release, the account had amassed over 180,000 followers. One of them was Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who posted a video to Instagram on Monday urging Israelis to follow the account and spread stories of survivors via social media in order to “remind ourselves what we lost in the Holocaust and what was returned to us by the creation of the state of Israel.” “What if a girl in the Holocaust had Instagram?” asked the trailer, released on Sunday. The brief film shows simulated cellphone footage of Eva’s fictionalized life, from dancing with friends and a birthday with her grandparents, to Nazi troops marching through the streets of Budapest. Dozens of Holocaust victims kept diaries of their experiences, with the best known work written by Anne Frank. The Kochavis pored over scores of the diaries before deciding on Eva, who, Maya Kochavi said, is the kind of girl “a modern kid in 2019 could connect to,” with an unrequited middle school crush, family drama and grand ambitions to become a news photographer. They hope Eva’s firsthand account will engage otherwise disinterested or uninformed youths. Yet the concept is not without controversy. While the bulk of the feedback appears to be positive, some critics fear the story, with

its internet lingo, hashtags and emojis, risks trivializing Holocaust atrocities. “A cheapening of the Holocaust compressed into Boomerang,” one Instagram user, Dor Levi, wrote in Hebrew in response to the trailer. He facetiously remarked that “the place for commemorating the Holocaust and getting the message across is on Instagram, between the butt of a random model and a video of a chocolate cake.” Maya Kochavi said she anticipated backlash. But she defended Instagram as a place where “lots of very intense and very powerful movements are happening,” with potential to convey history’s relevance at a time when anti-Semitism is surging in parts of the world, and Holocaust deniers are amplifying their dangerous messages online. “It is frightening but quite clear to me. We might be the last generation that

Associated Press

SEATTLE — Though less likely to study in a formal technology or engineering course, America’s girls are showing more mastery of those subjects than their boy classmates, according to newly released national education data. Known as “The Nation’s Report Card,” the latest findings made public Tuesday from the National Assessment of Educational Progress also shows U.S.

YAD VASHEM VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS

This photo shows 13-year-old Eva Heyman in Hungary months before she was killed in a Nazi concentration camp in 1944. An Instagram account based on Eva’s real-life journal is generating buzz.

Easy EntrancE solutions home • garage • basement

CALL TODAY FOR 00

$50 OFF RAMPS AND STAIRLIFTS!!!

314-325-3151 • 618-857-3446 • 636-893-1349

Girls outscore boys on tech, engineering BY SALLY HO

really remembers and cares about the Holocaust,” said her father. The Kochavis said that as part of their work, they found that a tiny fraction of social media conversations about the Holocaust in the U.S. and Europe are young people. Their research resonates with recent studies by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany revealing significant gaps in Holocaust knowledge among American millennials. As physical relics disintegrate and human memories fade, Eva’s Instagram story contributes to a growing push by Holocaust museums and memorials to capture young people’s attention with interactive technology, such as video testimonies, apps and holograms. The efforts aim, Maya said, “to make monumental historical events tangible and relatable.”

Four Neighborhood Locations Serving the Greater St. Louis Area *Based on visits lasting 4 hours or more. Opt for 24-hour home care for maximum benefit Services are Paid via Private Pay or Long Term Care Insurance

eighth-graders in 2018 did significantly better overall compared to 2014’s test results, particularly among students who are white, black, Asian or low-income. The gap between girls and boys is also growing wider as compared to the last time the federal government compiled technology and engineering literacy data among a representative sample of students and public schools across the country.

Caring Companionship | Experienced & Screened Caregivers | Insured & Bonded

locally owned, serving the Greater st. louis area

(314) 403-0058 or (618) 215-7388 Air Conditioner $29 & Coil $ 1999 Service Fee Call

starting at

Top rated by a leading consumer magazine.

(Installed)

Furnace (Installed)

starting at

$

1499

american Made, american owned.

With Repair Service

Prices shown sho is to connect to existing fuel lines, electrical, ducting and piping. Other sizes and configurations can be purchased at the discounted rate shown plus an additional discount upgrade fee. Picture may not represent actual equipment shown.

To be performed during normal business hours. Not valid with any other offers. One coupon per customer. Expires 5/15/19.

UNSTOPPABLE PRODUCTS. UNBELIEVABLE DEALS.

Vintage • Luxury • High Grade • Pre-Owned

trane systems are put through the harshest testing imaginable — all so they can run through anything. and now, you can get 0% aPr for 48 months† or instant rebates up to $1,000**. We never stop finding ways to bring you products that never stop.

Sell Your Watch

314-236-9887 618-215-7388 $

†the Wells Fargo Home Projects credit card is issued by Wells Fargo Bank n.a., an Equal Housing lender. special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit. the special terms aPr will continue to apply until all qualifying purchases are paid in full. the monthly payment for this purchase will be the amount that will pay for the purchase in full in equal payments during the promotional (special terms) period. the aPr for Purchases will apply to certain fees such as a late payment fee or if you use the card for other transactions. For new accounts, the aPr for Purchases is 28.99%. if you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. this information is accurate as of 1/1/2019 and is subject to change. For current information and expiration date, call us at 1-800-431-5921. **see your independent trane Dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. special financing offers or instant rebates up to $1,000 valid on Qualifying Equipment only. offers vary by equipment. all sales must be to homeowners in the united states. Void where prohibited.

What is Your Old Watch Worth? • Vintage Mens Sport Watches • High Grade Dress Watches • Pocket Watches

50 OFF

Installation tanked Water Heater or tank-less Expires 5/15/19

Imagine your home, totally organized! Custom Closets, Garage Cabinets, Home Offices, Pantries, Laundries, and Hobby Rooms.

Omega

Pocket Watches

For a FREE ESTIMATE

Breitling

Broken & Parts

Rolex

Entire Collections

Text a Photo 314-974-6699

2018 © All Rights Reserved. Closets by Design, Inc.

Walk in Closet

40% Off Plus FrEE Installation 40% off any order of $1000 or more. 30% off any order of $700 or more. Not valid with any other offer. Free installation with any complete unit order of $500 or more. With incoming order, at time of purchase only. Expires 5/31/2019

Bedroom Closet

Garage Cabinets

Home Office

www.closetsbydesign.com Used Jewelry Buyer 122 North Main Street • St. Charles, MO 63301 usedjewelrybuyer.com • (636) 896-4117

SPECIAL FINANCING for up to 18 Months! With approved credit. Call or ask your Designer for details. Not available in all areas.

Call for Free Estimate

314-230-8143 • 618-433-3159 LV

Follow us

Locally Owned and Operated


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019 • B

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS • BLUES LEAD SERIES 2-1 Game 1 Blues 3, Stars 2 GWG: Tarasenko

Game 2 Stars 4, Blues 2 GWG: Janmark

Wednesday, 8:30 p.m. at Dallas NBCSN

Game 3 Blues 3, Stars 2 GWG: Maroon

*May 7, TBA at Enterprise

*May 5, TBA at Dallas

Friday, 8:30 p.m. at Enterprise NBCSN

* If necessary

VACATION CAN WAIT

PHOTO BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Stars goalie Ben Bishop makes a save on a point-blank shot by Ryan O’Reilly on Monday.

PHOTO BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Tyler Bozak knocks in a shot behind Stars goalie Ben Bishop at Dallas on Monday.

Bouwmeester shines as a reliable veteran BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DALLAS • Perhaps the crazi-

est thing about this crazy Blues season, one in which Jordan Binnington became a standout starting goalie and some guy named Oskar Sundqvist scored 14 goals, is that Blues fans now actually like Jay Bouwmeester. Once seen as old and a liability, he’s now a reliable veteran. Fans used to want him on another team, and now they wonder how their team would hold up without him. The bruised Blue blocked eight

shots in Game 3 — not one Dallas player blocked more than three, yet two other Blues blocked four each, to go along with Bouwmeester’s octet. Oh, and “Bow” was a plus-3 in Game 3, tallying two assists, too. “He is,” teammate Alexander Steen said,“a beast.” They’re saying this about Jay Bouwmeester — can you believe it? It really has made for one of the neater stories of the season. And, just like the journey of Patrick Maroon or David Perron, a microcosm of the season — veterans who played so poorly they were healthy scratches in late 2018 … and are now huge parts of the 2019 postseason. See HOCHMAN • Page B2

Bozak, O’Reilly finally play in second round BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • P-D

The Blues’ Alex Pietrangelo (right) is congratulated by Jay Bouwmeester after scoring on a slap shot from the point during the third on Monday in Dallas.

LINDELL’S DIVES A FLOP Stars player takes heat after poor acting job on Monday . B2

DALLAS • For the past 10 years, this usually has been vacation time for Tyler Bozak. “I was probably in Hawaii or Mexico or something like that,” Bozak said. “There’s actually some old pictures on social media (from) the time off. I was constantly on vacation (this time of year).” As for Ryan O’Reilly, he’s usually playing hockey somewhere in May — but for Team Canada in the World Championships. “So you’re just skating on your own and watching the (NHL) playoffs,” he said. “Usually, I have a little down time.

BUNT GETS BIRDS GOING

But still, you’re gearing up for a tournament, so it’s not a true vacation.” Bozak and O’Reilly both broke into the NHL in 2009-10 — or 10 seasons ago. They have played a combined 1,439 regular-season games. Strangely, despite all that experience, this is the first time for either player in the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Bozak played his entire NHL career with the Toronto Maple Leafs prior to joining the Blues. In those nine seasons with Toronto, Bozak made the playoffs only three times — the 2012-13, ’16-17 and ’17-18 seasons — and got eliminated in the first round See BLUES • Page B3

Cardinals will soar once their pitching matches their hitting success JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Nationals Park – their 10th come-frombehind win of the season. Washington starter Anibal Sanchez called the bunt a “surprise,” and Wong couldn’t have putted it straighter down the line. “Really good court awareness for Kolten, really taking what is out there,” manager Mike Shildt said. “Felt like a free hit and a free RBI and a run for us.” Said starter Adam Wainwright: “Perfectly executed, at a perfect time.” As tight a line as Wong’s bunt had in the fourth inning was the margin for er-

April did not play out exactly as the Cardinals expected. Their pitching staff was not their strength. Staff ace Miles Mikolas struggled with his command. So did key relief addition Andrew Miller and young starters Jack Flaherty and Dakota Hudson. Potential star Carlos Martinez remained sidelined by shoulder woes. Top prospect Alex Reyes suffered a broken left pinkie finger while punching a wall in the minors. Starter Michael Wacha missed one start due to a sore knee and reliever Mike Mayers shut down with a months-long shoulder injury. Whew! Despite all of that — plus the lingering absence of injured relievers Luke Gregerson and Brett Cecil — the Cardinals not only survived the month, they flourished. After losing five of their first eight games this season, the Cardinals won 15 of their next 20 to take the NL Central lead. They figured out how to beat Milwaukee and how to pitch to (or around) Brewers slugger Christian Yelich. How good could they become once they pitch to the high level they anticipated for this season? The Cardinals bought their pitchers time by averaging a league-best 5.53 runs per game through Monday’s games. The acquisition of Paul Goldschmidt had the desired impact on the batting order. Better yet, Marcell Ozuna and Dexter Fowler have returned to their 2017 production levels after difficult ’18

See CARDINALS • Page B5

See GORDON • Page B3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Paul DeJong comes in to score on a bunt single by Kolten Wong as Nationals catcher Kurt Suzuki has no play.

After Wong’s RBI tap, Bader follows with game-winning hit BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • Before he begins any round of batting practice, Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong bunts five pitches down the third-base line and then five down the first-base line to keep his touch in tune. It’s a routine that he’s returned to since last season and focused on this season for one reason. It can be the biggest smallest part of his game. And he’s now free to use it. With the Cardinals down early Tues-

CARDINALS

3 NATIONALS

2

> 6:05 p.m. Wednesday at Nationals, FSM > Miles Mikolas (2-2, 5.29 ERA) vs. Max Scherzer (1-3, 4.12 ERA) > Nats ace still searching for elusive title . B5

day to Washington, Wong heisted a run and unlocked the decisive rally with a bases-loaded, two-out bunt down the third-base line. Wong’s bunting bravado brought Paul DeJong home and set up Harrison Bader’s two-run single that sent the Cardinals to a 3-2 victory at

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019 • B

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS • BLUES LEAD SERIES 2-1 Game 1 Blues 3, Stars 2 GWG: Tarasenko

Game 2 Stars 4, Blues 2 GWG: Janmark

Wednesday, 8:30 p.m. at Dallas NBCSN

Game 3 Blues 3, Stars 2 GWG: Maroon

*May 7, TBA at Enterprise

*May 5, TBA at Dallas

Friday, 8:30 p.m. at Enterprise NBCSN

* If necessary

VACATION CAN WAIT

PHOTO BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Stars goalie Ben Bishop makes a save on a point-blank shot by Ryan O’Reilly on Monday.

PHOTO BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Tyler Bozak knocks in a shot behind Stars goalie Ben Bishop at Dallas on Monday.

Bouwmeester shines as a reliable veteran BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DALLAS • Perhaps the crazi-

est thing about this crazy Blues season, one in which Jordan Binnington became a standout starting goalie and some guy named Oskar Sundqvist scored 14 goals, is that Blues fans now actually like Jay Bouwmeester. Once seen as old and a liability, he’s now a reliable veteran. Fans used to want him on another team, and now they wonder how their team would hold up without him. The bruised Blue blocked eight

shots in Game 3 — not one Dallas player blocked more than three, yet two other Blues blocked four each, to go along with Bouwmeester’s octet. Oh, and “Bow” was a plus-3 in Game 3, tallying two assists, too. “He is,” teammate Alexander Steen said,“a beast.” They’re saying this about Jay Bouwmeester — can you believe it? It really has made for one of the neater stories of the season. And, just like the journey of Patrick Maroon or David Perron, a microcosm of the season — veterans who played so poorly they were healthy scratches in late 2018 … and are now huge parts of the 2019 postseason. See HOCHMAN • Page B2

Bozak, O’Reilly finally play in second round BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • P-D

The Blues’ Alex Pietrangelo (right) is congratulated by Jay Bouwmeester after scoring on a slap shot from the point during the third on Monday in Dallas.

LINDELL’S DIVES A FLOP Stars player takes heat after poor acting job on Monday . B2

DALLAS • For the past 10 years, this usually has been vacation time for Tyler Bozak. “I was probably in Hawaii or Mexico or something like that,” Bozak said. “There’s actually some old pictures on social media (from) the time off. I was constantly on vacation (this time of year).” As for Ryan O’Reilly, he’s usually playing hockey somewhere in May — but for Team Canada in the World Championships. “So you’re just skating on your own and watching the (NHL) playoffs,” he said. “Usually, I have a little down time.

BUNT GETS BIRDS GOING

But still, you’re gearing up for a tournament, so it’s not a true vacation.” Bozak and O’Reilly both broke into the NHL in 2009-10 — or 10 seasons ago. They have played a combined 1,439 regular-season games. Strangely, despite all that experience, this is the first time for either player in the second round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Bozak played his entire NHL career with the Toronto Maple Leafs prior to joining the Blues. In those nine seasons with Toronto, Bozak made the playoffs only three times — the 2012-13, ’16-17 and ’17-18 seasons — and got eliminated in the first round See BLUES • Page B3

Cardinals will soar once their pitching matches their hitting success JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Nationals Park – their 10th come-frombehind win of the season. Washington starter Anibal Sanchez called the bunt a “surprise,” and Wong couldn’t have putted it straighter down the line. “Really good court awareness for Kolten, really taking what is out there,” manager Mike Shildt said. “Felt like a free hit and a free RBI and a run for us.” Said starter Adam Wainwright: “Perfectly executed, at a perfect time.” As tight a line as Wong’s bunt had in the fourth inning was the margin for er-

April did not play out exactly as the Cardinals expected. Their pitching staff was not their strength. Staff ace Miles Mikolas struggled with his command. So did key relief addition Andrew Miller and young starters Jack Flaherty and Dakota Hudson. Potential star Carlos Martinez remained sidelined by shoulder woes. Top prospect Alex Reyes suffered a broken left pinkie finger while punching a wall in the minors. Starter Michael Wacha missed one start due to a sore knee and reliever Mike Mayers shut down with a months-long shoulder injury. Whew! Despite all of that — plus the lingering absence of injured relievers Luke Gregerson and Brett Cecil — the Cardinals not only survived the month, they flourished. After losing five of their first eight games this season, the Cardinals won 15 of their next 20 to take the NL Central lead. They figured out how to beat Milwaukee and how to pitch to (or around) Brewers slugger Christian Yelich. How good could they become once they pitch to the high level they anticipated for this season? The Cardinals bought their pitchers time by averaging a league-best 5.53 runs per game through Monday’s games. The acquisition of Paul Goldschmidt had the desired impact on the batting order. Better yet, Marcell Ozuna and Dexter Fowler have returned to their 2017 production levels after difficult ’18

See CARDINALS • Page B5

See GORDON • Page B3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Paul DeJong comes in to score on a bunt single by Kolten Wong as Nationals catcher Kurt Suzuki has no play.

After Wong’s RBI tap, Bader follows with game-winning hit BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • Before he begins any round of batting practice, Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong bunts five pitches down the third-base line and then five down the first-base line to keep his touch in tune. It’s a routine that he’s returned to since last season and focused on this season for one reason. It can be the biggest smallest part of his game. And he’s now free to use it. With the Cardinals down early Tues-

CARDINALS

3 NATIONALS

2

> 6:05 p.m. Wednesday at Nationals, FSM > Miles Mikolas (2-2, 5.29 ERA) vs. Max Scherzer (1-3, 4.12 ERA) > Nats ace still searching for elusive title . B5

day to Washington, Wong heisted a run and unlocked the decisive rally with a bases-loaded, two-out bunt down the third-base line. Wong’s bunting bravado brought Paul DeJong home and set up Harrison Bader’s two-run single that sent the Cardinals to a 3-2 victory at

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 5/1 at Nationals 6:05 p.m. FSM

Thursday 5/2 at Nationals 3:05 p.m. FSM

Friday 5/3 at Cubs 1:20 p.m. FSM

Saturday 5/4 at Cubs 3:05 p.m. FSM, FS1

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 5/1 Playoffs at Stars 8:30 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 5/3 Playoffs vs. Stars 8:30 p.m. NBCSN

Sunday 5/5 Playoffs at Stars TBA (if nec.)

Tuesday 5/7 Playoffs vs. Stars TBA (if nec.)

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 5/4 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 5/11 at Charleston 6:30 p.m.

Saturday 5/18 at Louisville 6 p.m.

Saturday 6/1 vs. Memphis 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 4 at 1 p.m. Subsequent Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STLFC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR WEDNESDAY BASEBALL 12 p.m. Athletics at Red Sox, MLB Network 3 p.m. Yankees at Diamondbacks (joined in progress), MLB Network 6:05 p.m. Cardinals at Nationals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. Astros at Twins, ESPN 10 p.m. Dodgers at Giants (joined in progress), MLB Network BASKETBALL 8 p.m. NBA playoffs: Trail Blazers at Nuggets, TNT GOLF 1:30 p.m. PGA Professional Championship, final round, GOLF 10 p.m. European PGA: China Open, first round, GOLF 2 a.m. (Thu.) European PGA: China Open, first round, GOLF HOCKEY 6 p.m. NHL playoffs: Islanders at Hurricanes, NBCSN 8:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues at Stars, NBCSN, KYKY (98.1 FM) SOCCER 2 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Barcelona vs. Liverpool, TNT SOFTBALL 6 p.m. College: Missouri-Kansas City at Missouri, SEC Network TENNIS 1 p.m. Munich-ATP & Estoril-ATP Early rounds, Tennis Channel 4 a.m. (Thu.) Munich-ATP & Estoril-ATP Early rounds, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Ajax wins 1-0 for lead in Champions semifinal Donny van de Beek gave Ajax a 1-0 win over Tottenham on Tuesday in London in the first leg of their Champions League semifinal, edging the Dutch side toward a first European Cup final in 23 years. A Tottenham side depleted by injuries and suspension gifted the visitors too much space to string together slick passes early on, and the 22-year-old Van de Beek ghosted into the penalty area to receive a throughball from Hakim Ziyech before knocking a shot past goalkeeper Hugo Lloris in the 15th minute. Overwhelmed in the first half, Tottenham was more assertive after the break against the 1995 champions but lacked the attacking end product to equalize with Harry Kane injured and Son Heung-min suspended. The hosts, contesting their first European Cup semifinal in 57 years, also had to contend with the loss of defender Jan Vertonghen in the first half because of a head injury. Barcelona hosts Liverpool in the other semifinal Wednesday. (AP)

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 05.01.2019

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Lindell’s dives are a flop Roasted for response to Bortuzzo contact BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DALLAS • The reviews are in on Esa Lindell, and well, it appears almost universal that the Dallas defenseman needs acting lessons. His series of flops upon moderate contact from the Blues’ Robert Bortuzzo was roundly roasted by mainstream media and on social media after Monday’s 4-3 St. Louis victory in Game 3 of the Western Conference semifinal. USA Today said Lindell “crumpled like a piece of paper” after a third check by Bortuzzo, adding that it was “a terrible flop.” Deadspin had its fun, as it usually does, saying: “When Robert Bortuzzo gave him love taps with his stick, all of Lindell’s bones instantly disintegrated and he hurled himself to the ice, limbs flailing.” The sports website theorized that Lindell had “apparent inner-ear issues” causing him to lose his balance easily. On social media, the sequence of events was characterized as Lindell’s “WWE tryout tape.” Another showed a picture of Lindell dressed like a soccer player and, you know, taking a dive. And someone created a fake Wikipedia page for Lindell, that referred to the native of Helsinki, Finland as “a Finnish professional diver.” As for the Blues and Stars, there was little embellishment when it came to Lindell’s embellishment. “The refs saw what they saw and made the call,” Bortuzzo said Tuesday. “I’m just trying to play on the edge. That’s a battle that happens a lot in the game. I think the refs did a good job. That’s about it.” As for interim coach Craig Berube, he barely nibbled on the topic. “I don’t really comment on calls and stuff like that too much,” Berube said. “It’s just part of the game. They’re battling and the ref called both guys. ... They’re gonna call the game the way they call it and see it at the time. Again, you gotta deal with the call. That’s the way we look at things.” Over in the Dallas locker room Tuesday, Lindell said of Bortuzzo: “He crossed at me hard. I wasn’t expecting him to come hard again. I’m not that kind of player. But you know there’s nothing I can change

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Robert Bortuzzo knocks Stars Esa Lindell to the ice after Bortuzzo had already received a high sticking penalty from the referee Monday night. Lindell got a two-minute penalty for embellishment.

anymore or affect what happened yesterday. I’m already focused on tomorrow.” When asked about being penalized for embellishment, Lindell said: “Well, they called us both, so I guess we both did something there.”

PRAISE FOR SCHWARTZ After scoring the Blues’ first goal Monday, Jaden Schwartz has scored six times in the Blues’ last four playoff games. Entering Tuesday’s games, he shared the NHL goalscoring lead for this postseason. To put his surge in perspective, it took Schwartz 46 regular-season games to score his sixth goal of the season — Feb.19 against Toronto. “Schwartz has been really hard,” Dallas coach Jim Montgomery said. “His explosiveness off faceoffs and his faceoff intensity, and his ability to win one-on-one battles with his foot speed and his leverage. It just made that (Ryan O’Reilly) line a little more dynamic.” Schwartz was moved up to left wing on the Blues’ top line for Mon-

day’s game.

FACEOFF ISSUES The Blues won only 27 of 72 faceoffs Monday, for a 38-percent success rate that matched their season low. “We’ve got to do a better job for sure,” Berube said. “That’s a real good faceoff team over there. We can do some things maybe to change it up a little bit in the faceoff circle, and we’ll talk about that and make a couple adjustments on that.” The Blues previously had a 38-percent faceoff rate Nov. 19 against the Los Angeles Kings — the night Mike Yeo was fired. The only other time the Blues were below 40 percent came on Jan. 7 in Philadelphia — Binnington’s first start — when they were at 39 percent (23 of 59). During the regular season the Blues ranked sixth in the league in faceoffs (51.4 percent), but Dallas ranked fourth at 51.9. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Doran tabbed for Indoor Soccer Hall of Fame • St. Louis indoor soccer legend Daryl Doran, who set a record by playing in 828 indoor games, was recently named to the Indoor Soccer Hall of Fame. Doran, 56, starred at CBC and played one season at St. Louis University before beginning his pro career with the St. Louis Steamers in 1982. His playing career lasted 22 seasons and included 415 goals and 529 assists. As a player, he was a six-time all-star, a two-time National Professional Soccer League selection and the 1996-97 NPSL Defender of the Year. In addition, Doran spent much of his career as a player-coach and guided the original St. Louis Ambush to an NPSL title in 1995. It’s the only pro soccer title in area history. (Joe Lyons) Hall of Famer Gino Marchetti dies • Gino Marchetti, a Hall of Fame defensive end who helped the Baltimore Colts win NFL championships in 1958 and ’59, died Monday in Paoli, Pa., at age 93. Marchetti was named to the Pro Bowl in 11 of his 14 NFL seasons. In the 1958 NFL title game, known as “The Greatest Game Ever Played,” he broke a leg in the fourth quarter but refused to be taken into the locker room. He watched from behind the end zone as quarterback Johnny Unitas guided the Colts to the winning touchdown over the New York Giants. Marchetti fought in the Battle of the Bulge in World War II before playing for a 1951 University of San Francisco team that went 9-0. (AP) ESPN The Magazine is going digital only • ESPN announced Tuesday that it will cease publication of ESPN The Magazine. The Disney-owned sports media outlet plans to redirect the magazine’s features and reporting efforts to digital platforms, where it said “the vast majority of readers already consume our print journalism. ... The only change here is that we are moving away from printing it on paper and sending it in the mail.” Meanwhile, Meredith Corp. is in the process of trying to sell Sports Illustrated. The Wall Street Journal reported last week that licensing company Authentic Brands Group has emerged as a leading contender to acquire the magazine. (Chicago Tribune) Judge throws out Spanier conviction • A federal judge has thrown out former Penn State president Graham Spanier’s childendangerment conviction, less than a day before he was due to turn himself in to jail. U.S. Magistrate Judge Karoline Mehalchick in Scranton, Pa., issued a decision late Tuesday that gives state prosecutors three months to retry Spanier. She agreed with Spanier’s argument he was improperly charged under a 2007 law for actions that occurred in 2001, when he was responding to a complaint about assistant coach Jerry Sandusky showering with a boy on campus. Spanier, 70, had been due to report to jail Wednesday to begin serving a minimum sentence of two months. He was forced out as president shortly after Sandusky’s arrest in 2011. (AP)

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundoff@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Off St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-744-5725

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester fights with the Jets’ Jacob Trouba for the puck during the first period on April 20.

Bouwmeester ‘is a quiet guy, but he’s extremely solid’ HOCHMAN • FROM B1

“It goes back to the (hip) injury and surgery he had over the summer,” coach Craig Berube shared on Wednesday before Blues practice. “That surgery is a tough one to recover from. I’ve seen it with other players in the league and it takes a year, and he did it in a couple months where he got his game back. He’s a great pro. He worked at it, realized where he was at and this is what we’re getting out of him. “With that injury and stuff, you’ve got to be careful with the minutes — and rest is important, too.I thought that early on and then slowly integrating more minutes and more minutes. Him and Parayko have been a very good pair for a long time now.” Yes, the Bouwmeester-Parayko pairing has as many virtues as vowels. When teammate Carl Gunnarsson was asked to describe why they’re playing so well, he smirked and said: “You want me to point out only one thing?” The fellow defenseman began to gush about their minutes-gobbling and play-making, their skating ability and puck tenacity.“They’re animals,” he said. The Blues lead this secondround series 2-1, and heading

into Wednesday’s Game 4, Bouwmeester will be key if St. Louis wants to pull off yet another road victory this postseason. Neither he nor Parayko was on the ice for a Dallas goal last game. But “Bow” was on the ice for the last two St. Louis goals — tallying the first assist on both. In a rare pairing, he was out there with Alex Pietrangelo following a power play, and it was Bouwmeester who fed “Petro” for his one-timer goal. And on the Maroon goal, which instantly became a memorable moment for this postseason, it was Bouwmeester who set it up. With the brazenness of a pool shark, or one of those bearded San Jose Sharks, Bouwmeester angled the puck off the boards with perfect precision. Maroon retrieved it behind the net and promptly netted the game-winner. Maroon got the glory, but Bouwmeester quietly made his mark. Fitting for the guy’s personality. “He’s a quiet guy, but he’s extremely solid in the way that he plays the game,” Steen said. “He leads that way, leads our group and creates that competitiveness … He’s one of those guys that you know to trust in every circumstance for us. Plays a lot of minutes. Probably the most solid professional I’ve ever played with, as far as being prepared and getting himself back to where he needs to be for every game.” Now, Bouwmeester’s Game 3

wasn’t impeccable. He got looped into a make-up call and was sent off for tripping, and later returned to the box after Jamie Benn’s pressuring forecheck forced him to lift the puck out of play, delaying the game. And there was tic-tac-toe passing in the second that tangled up Bouwmeester and Parayko. Tyler Seguin was left alone in front of the net but couldn’t redirect the puck for a golden goal chance. Sometimes in hockey, you can fail on a play, but if the other team doesn’t then capitalize, it’s forgotten. But that’s the thing about the new “Bow,” who’s a lot like the old “Bow,” back when the Blues shelled out big bucks for him in a contract extension in 2013 — he’s evenkeeled and regroups quickly. After some forgettable stretches in recent years, Bouwmeester played so well this year that he earned yet another extension, this one a one-year deal for next year. What a roller-coaster ride, for him and the fans. “He’s the ultimate pro,” defenseman Robert Bortuzzo said. “It’s something I realized Day 1 when I got here, the way he carries himself on and off the ice, he’s a huge part of our locker room. He’s a man of few words, but when he speaks,he’s got everyone’s ears. The ultimate pro and teammate and he’s playing incredible hockey and a massive part of our group.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

05.01.2019 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • B3

Cards bullpen has high-end potential GORDON • FROM B1

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Ryan O’Reilly, Vladimir Tarasenko and Tyler Bozak start to celebrate after goalie Jordan Binnington stopped the Colorado Avalanche in the shootout in a game in early April at the Enterprise Center.

Bozak, O’Reilly enjoying their first trip to second round BLUES • FROM B1

each time. That all added up to 18 playoff games over his career until now. The postseason had been even more scarce for O’Reilly. He made it as a rookie in 2009-10 with Colorado, and once again in ’13-14 with the Avalanche. And that’s it. Two series. Two first-round exits. Thirteen total games. Until now. After not getting a sniff of the playoffs in three years in Buffalo, one of the reasons O’Reilly was excited about the monster trade last July 1 that sent him to St.Louis was the opportunity to reach the postseason and perhaps make a Stanley Cup run. Ditto for Bozak,who signed with the Blues via free agency on July 1. “Absolutely. I’m not getting any younger, that’s for sure,” said Bozak, 33. “Winning was the No. 1 priority for me and obviously looking at the teams that I wanted to be a part of,St.Louis seemed to be the best fit, a team that I had played against a bunch and knew how hard it was to play against them and how good of a team they were.” Yes, the Maple Leafs have an exciting high-powered team, but once again they were one and done in the playoffs this season. Bozak is still playing. “It’s crazy how hard it is to get to this point,” he said. “It’s been a fun year obviously so far, and we want to keep it going.” For now, the family vacation with wife Molly and their two young children is on hold. “She’s having a lot of fun,” Bozak said. “It’s just being in the moment like this and still playing. Everyone’s still enjoying it. We want to do this as long as we can.” Granted, merely making the second round probably doesn’t qualify as a Cup run, but there can’t be anyone on the Blues roster happier to be in the midst of the Western Conference semifinals against Dallas than Bozak and O’Reilly. After a decade of waiting, they finally made it to Round 2. As for O’Reilly, Team Canada already has been formed for the Worlds,but this year the squad must do without him. “Playoffs are the best way to be a rink rat,” O’Reilly said.“It’s the best opportunity to do what matters most.” O’Reilly and Bozak hope to have only two games remaining in the second round, a premise that would mean the Blues win out and move on to the conference finals and more uncharted ice. “It’s exciting hockey,” O’Reilly said. “It was nice to start at home (in Round 2). To be in this situation is great, but at the same time, we need to — for myself — I’ve got to find a way to produce more and be more of a threat. “It is difficult. You can see it’s been a long process already and how you have to find a way to bring that jump and physicality every shift. Because when you don’t, that’s when they start to generate momentum. The intensity of it and the physicality of it is tough.” Be it Winnipeg in Round 1 or Dallas in Round 2, Blues opponents have focused on stopping the O’Reilly line, which includes Vladimir Tarasenko on right wing, and in some unusual line-juggling by interim coach Craig Berube, has included Brayden Schenn, David Perron and Jaden Schwartz

REBATE STIMULUS PACKAGE $2225.00 Rebates For You!

Ryan O’Reilly shoots from his knees against Winnipeg in the first round of the playoffs.

SERIES STATISTICS BLUES 9 11.1 (1 for 9) 75 28 29.3 74 44.8 3/2/4

CATEGORY GOALS POWER PLAY PERCENTAGE PENALTY KILL PERCENTAGE PENALTY MINUTES SHOTS/GAME HITS FACEOFF WIN PERCENTAGE GOALS BY PERIOD

BLUES

STARS

Points (G, A): Parayko 4 (1, 3), Schwartz 3 (2, 1), Tarasenko 2 (2, 0), Bozak 2 (1, 1), Pietrangelo 2 (1, 1), Bouwmeester 2 (0, 2), O’Reilly 2 (0, 2), Fabbri 1 (1, 0), Maroon 1 (1, 0), Barbashev 1 (0, 1), Dunn 1 (0, 1), Perron 1 (0, 1), Schenn 1 (0, 1), Thomas 1 (0, 1). Penalty minutes: Bouwmeester 4, Dunne 4, Gunnarsson 4, Perron 4, Pietrangelo 4, Bortuzzo 2, Maroon 2, Parayko 2, Tarasenko 2. Shots (min. 6): Tarasenko 11, Perron 9, Pietrangelo 9, Schwartz 9, Bozak 6, Maroon 6, Parayko 6. Hits (min. 5): Schwartz 9, Maroon 8, Sundqvist 8, Schenn 7, Tarasenko 7, Barbashev 5. Faceoff win pct. (min. 10): Bozak 53.8 (21 wins, 18 losses), Barbashev 47.6 (10, 11), O’Reilly 44.3 (43, 54), Sundqvist 43.8 (7, 9), Schenn 33.3 (8, 16). Average time on ice (min. 17): Pietrangelo 24:49, Bouwmeester 23:17, Parayko 23:08, O’Reilly 21:57, Tarasenko 19:15, Perron 19:00, Schenn 18:52, Sundqvist 17:57, Gunnarsson 17:42, Schwartz 17:03. Save percentage: Binnington .915 (86 of 94).

Points (G, A): Hintz 4 (2, 2), Zuccarello 4 (0, 4), Benn 2 (1, 1), Heiskanen 2 (1, 1), Janmark 2 (1, 1), Spezza 2 (1, 1), Dickinson 2 (0, 2), Cogliano 1 (1, 0), Radulov 1 (1, 0), Seguin 1 (1, 0), Dowling 1 (0, 1), Klingberg 1 (0, 1). Penalty minutes: Benn 6, Comeau 6, Lindell 4, Polak 4, Faksa 2, Fedun 2, Hintz 2, Janmark 2, Klingberg 2. Shots (min. 6): Radulov 9, Seguin 9, Benn 8, Heiskanen 8, Klingberg 8, Zuccarello 7, Dickinson 6, Janmark 6, Spezza 6. Hits (min. 5): Lindell 9, Polak 9, Benn 7, Comeau 7, Faksa 6, Radulov 6. Faceoff win pct. (min. 10): Seguin 62.9 (39 wins, 23 losses), Faksa 58.5 (24, 17), Hintz 50 (16, 16), Benn 50 (14, 14), Spezza 47.8 (11, 12). Average time on ice (min. 17): Lindell 25:57, Klingberg 25:50, Heiskanen 24:14, Seguin 20:34, Radulov 19:46, Benn 19:06, Zuccarello 17:17. Save percentage: Bishop .898 (79 of 88).

on left wing over nine games this postseason. O’Reilly has two goals and four assists, so he has hardly disappeared in the playoffs. Then again, he brings new meaning to the phrase “his own harshest critic.” In this series, faceoffs have been an issue for O’Reilly, who led the NHL in faceoff wins during the regular season (1,086) and finished eighth in faceoff percentage (56.9). But he has struggled against the Stars, winning only 44.3 percent in the first three games. “I’ve been going up against (Tyler) Seguin a lot and he’s really good,” O’Reilly said. “He finds a way to put his skate in the dot a lot, which is tough to go against. No problem, I want to be on the ice and taking every draw that I can.”

As for Bozak, he has two goals and three assists this postseason. Flanked by wingers Pat Maroon and Robert Thomas, he’s centering one of the Blues’ most effective lines of the playoffs. “I think it’s a great balance with ‘Rig’ (Maroon) being so big out there, Bozy being so confident,” Vince Dunn said. “Obviously Robby likes to play with speed and skill. Bozy’s a very responsible player out there. He really supports everyone through the middle of the ice.” Even so, it’s not exactly a vacation out there.

$150 - $700

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $325

Spire Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

$2,225

Potential Savings

Summer Maintenance & Specials Start Now.

DON’T WAIT! • Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $340*) Must purchase a complete* Amana System 16 Seer A/C or better, and a 96% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace 10 YEAR PARTS & LABOR WARRANTY*

STARS 9 25 (2 for 8) 88.9 30 31.7 69 55.2 4/1/4

0% Financing for 18 Months**

*On Select Models Only Call for Details **With approved credit use either financing or rebate. Expires 5/30/19

We are a locally owned & operated company with 39 years of experience behind us! Total Comfort Heating & Air Conditioning • Emergency Service: 8am-9pm • 7 Days A Week - No Overtime!

314-754-8772 636-373-7307

Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

*ADDITIONAL DISCOUNT:

Jeff Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com

PREDICT HOW THE MLB PLAYERS WILL DO IN MAY

$300-$500 OFF A Complete Heating & A/C System Offer Expires 5/30/19

campaigns. Paul DeJong has developed into a legitimate No. 3 hitter and, as always, Yadier Molina has stubbornly refused to age. The Cardinals are building big innings and posting crooked numbers on the scoreboard, as they did Monday night with their six-run outburst against the Nationals in the fifth inning in Washington D.C. They are running more, taking more tactical at-bats and relying less on the long ball. “It’s always fun to run around and see everybody taking good at-bats, hitting the ball the right way, keeping the line moving,” hot-hitting outfielder Jose Martinez said Sunday. “That’s what this team is going to do this year.” So the Cardinals should really take off once they get their typically good pitching. They head into May with the division’s second-worst team earnedrun average. April played out like extended spring training for the Cardinals rotation. Dakota Hudson failed to work at least six innings in all five of his starts. Mikolas failed to reach that standard in four of his six starts. Wacha completed six innings in just two of five starts, and Flaherty has gone three for six. The rotation did make incremental progress during a 7-2 home stand, capped by Flaherty’s seven-inning outing Sunday. “We’re going to start putting a couple of good starts together and start piggybacking with each other,” Flaherty said after that 5-2 victory. “It’s just indicative of what we’re capable of,” manager Mike Shildt said. “We saw it with Jack, we saw it with (Wainwright), we saw it with Miles. (Daniel Ponce de Leon) gave us a nice spot start in there. (Hudson has) been great last several outings, keep building, moving forward. It’s a good rotation.” Well, it’s getting there anyways. The same can be said for the bullpen, which got solid work from closer Jordan Hicks and near perfection from set-up men John Gant and John Brebbia early on this season. Middle reliever Dominic Leone was doing great until the weekend, when he got shelled twice. Geovanny Gallegos ate some innings as a fill-in, as did hard-throwing rookie Ryan Helsley. On the other hand, Miller has yet to settle in, and fellow lefthander Tyler Webb has looked like a placeholder. Still, the Cardinals possess high-end potential in the bullpen. At some point this summer they could line up seven or eight relievers capable of handling high-leverage work. Gregerson has a history of that sort of success and provided glimpses of that during his rehabilitation tour of the minors. Mayers should return for the second half of the season after rebuilding his shoulder strength. Helsley could be a big-time weapon after adds more polish back at Memphis. After training as a starter this spring, he has shifted his focus to relief work. Could he be the second coming of Hicks? Adding Carlos Martinez to the bullpen later this month could move the Cardinals even closer to lockdown mode. The organization is stretching out the star-crossed Reyes to start games later this season, so perhaps Martinez could remain in a relief role longer than he expects. After all, Ponce de Leon could also step into the rotation if needed. So could lefty Austin Gomber, who has been outstanding at Memphis this season. Jake Woodford has made encouraging progress as well at the Triple-A level, adding more organizational depth. By midsummer, the Cardinals should be winning the arms race again. That advantage and their improved offense should make them a serious contender. “It’s been a really good feeling knowing that we are in this situation and us as a staff probably hasn’t pitched as well as we wanted to,” Flaherty said. “Everybody knows we’re going to turn it around and start pitching better.”

(You select) Hitter: Hitter: Hitter: Hitter: Pitcher: Pitcher: 1 pt. for a Hit (hitter) or a Strikeout (Pitcher) 3 pts. for a HR (Hitter) or a Win (Pitcher) ** Email entries to: zman920@yahoo.com LISTEN LIVE WEEKDAYS On the Line w/the Z-man brought to you by SHINE TIME AUTO DETAILING www.shinetime314.com WE TAKE YOUR PHONE CALLS! Sports Talk 4 pm - 6pm WGNU - 920 am MOST POINTS Entrant’s Name: E-mail:

WINS A $100 GIFT CERTIFICATE TO

POST SPORTS BAR & GRILL (3 locations)


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TUESDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia New York Atlanta Washington Miami Central St. Louis Milwaukee Chicago Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles San Diego Arizona Colorado San Francisco

W 16 14 14 12 8 W 19 17 14 12 12 W 19 17 16 13 12

L 13 14 15 16 21 L 10 14 12 14 16 L 12 13 13 17 17

St. Louis 6, Washington 3 Cincinnati 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Atlanta 3, San Diego 1

Pct .552 .500 .483 .429 .276 Pct .655 .548 .538 .462 .429 Pct .613 .567 .552 .433 .414

GB — 1½ 2 3½ 8 GB — 3 3½ 5½ 6½ GB — 1½ 2 5½ 6

WC — 1½ 2 3½ 8 WC — — ½ 2½ 3½ WC — — — 3½ 4

L10 5-5 4-6 5-5 3-7 4-6 L10 9-1 5-5 7-3 2-8 6-4 L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 5-5 4-6

Str L-1 L-1 L-1 L-2 L-4 Str W-4 W-2 W-2 L-8 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 L-2 L-3 W-1

Home 11-6 5-7 9-9 6-10 5-12 Home 12-4 10-6 7-4 6-7 7-6 Home 12-4 7-8 5-7 5-7 6-8

Away 5-7 9-7 5-6 6-6 3-9 Away 7-6 7-8 7-8 6-7 5-10 Away 7-8 10-5 11-6 8-10 6-9

Monday’s results Milwaukee 5, Colorado 1 San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 2

Tuesday’s results Detroit 3, Philadelphia 1 Milwaukee 4, Colorado 3 St. Louis 3, Washington 2 Pittsburgh at Texas, (n) N.Y. Mets 4, Cincinnati 3 (10) N.Y. Yankees at Arizona, (n) Cleveland 7, Miami 4 L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, (n) San Diego 4, Atlanta 3 Chicago Cubs at Seattle, (n) Today’s games Pittsburgh (Taillon 1-3) at Texas (Miller 1-1), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 2-2) at Arizona (Kelly 2-2), 2:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Lester 1-1) at Seattle (Gonzales 5-0), 5:40 p.m. Detroit (Norris 1-0) at Philadelphia (Nola 2-0), 6:05 p.m. St. Louis (Mikolas 2-2) at Washington (Scherzer 1-3), 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati (DeSclafani 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (deGrom 2-3), 6:10 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 2-2) at Miami (Smith 2-0), 6:10 p.m. San Diego (Strahm 0-2) at Atlanta (Fried 3-1), 6:20 p.m. Colorado (Senzatela 2-1) at Milwaukee (Anderson 2-0), 6:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 3-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 1-4), 8:45 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Detroit Chicago Kansas City West Houston Seattle Texas Oakland Los Angeles

W 19 17 14 13 10 W 17 16 13 12 9 W 18 18 14 14 12

L 9 11 14 17 20 L 10 12 14 14 20 L 12 13 13 18 17

Pct .679 .607 .500 .433 .333 Pct .630 .571 .481 .462 .310 Pct .600 .581 .519 .438 .414

GB — 2 5 7 10 GB — 1½ 4 4½ 9 GB — ½ 2½ 5 5½

WC — — 2½ 4½ 7½ WC — ½ 3 3½ 8 WC — — 2 4½ 5

L10 5-5 9-1 7-3 6-4 2-8 L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 5-5 2-8 L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 9-7 10-2 W-3 8-7 9-4 W-3 7-8 7-6 W-2 7-7 6-10 L-4 3-10 7-10 Str Home Away L-1 9-5 8-5 W-1 7-4 9-8 W-1 6-5 7-9 W-3 6-6 6-8 L-2 6-10 3-10 Str Home Away W-1 10-3 8-9 L-2 7-9 11-4 W-2 10-4 4-9 L-5 10-8 4-10 W-1 8-7 4-1

Boston 9, Oakland 4 Minnesota 1, Houston 0

Monday’s results Chicago White Sox 5, Baltimore 3 Tampa Bay 8, Kansas City 5

Detroit 3, Philadelphia 1 Cleveland 7, Miami 4 Boston 5, Oakland 1 Houston 11, Minnesota 0 Pittsburgh at Texas, (n)

Tuesday’s results N.Y. Yankees at Arizona, (n) Toronto at L.A. Angels, (n) Chicago Cubs at Seattle, (n) Baltimore at Chi White Sox, ppd. Tampa Bay at Kansas City, ppd.

Today’s games Oakland (Fiers 2-2) at Boston (Velazquez 0-2), 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (TBD) at Kansas City (Duffy 0-1), 12:15 p.m., 1st game Pittsburgh (Taillon 1-3) at Texas (Miller 1-1), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 2-2) at Arizona (Kelly 2-2), 2:40 p.m. Baltimore (Hess 1-4) at Chi White Sox (Rodon 3-2), 3:10 p.m., 1st game Tampa Bay (TBD) at Kansas City (Junis 2-2), 4 p.m., 2nd game Chicago Cubs (Lester 1-1) at Seattle (Gonzales 5-0), 5:40 p.m. Detroit (Norris 1-0) at Philadelphia (Nola 2-0), 6:05 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 2-2) at Miami (Smith 2-0), 6:10 p.m. Baltimore (TBD) at Chicago White Sox (TBD), 6:40 p.m., 2nd game Houston (McHugh 3-2) at Minnesota (Perez 3-0), 7:10 p.m. Toronto (Stroman 1-3) at L.A. Angels (Pena 0-1), 9:07 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

WASHINGTON — Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon is finally heading to the injured list with a bruised left elbow after sitting out seven of Washington’s past eight games. Rendon joins two other members of the team’s starting infield on the IL: first baseman Ryan Zimmerman and shortstop Trea Turner. Lefty reliever Dan Jennings’ contract was selected from Double-A Harrisburg on Tuesday so he could replace Rendon on the roster before Washington’s game against the St. Louis Cardinals. The Nationals also designated right-hander Austin Adams for assignment. Rendon was hit by a pitch on his elbow during an April 20 game against Miami, ending a 17-game hitting streak.

Mead named president of Hall COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. — Longtime Los Angeles Angels media relations director Tim Mead has been appointed president of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The 61-year-old Mead has spent 40 years working in baseball, all with the Angels. He has been their vice president of communications the past 22 years. “I am both humbled and excited about the opportunity to join the dedicated and amazing staff in Cooperstown,” Mead said in a statement Tuesday. “The Angels have meant everything to my family and me. My gratitude and respect to those I have worked with and for can never be totally conveyed.” Mead becomes the seventh president in the 80-year history of the organization. BRIEFLY MARLINS: Miami outfielder Lewis Brinson was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans, the latest setback for the team’s centerpiece in the Christian Yelich trade. Brinson is hitting .197 with 28 strikeouts in 76 at-bats. — Wire reports

24.3%

Walk rate for Los Angeles Angels outfielder Mike Trout prior to Tuesday’s game. It’s the highest rate in his career along with making contact on 90 percent of his swings. — MLB

Porcello pitches 8 scoreless innings WIRE REPORTS

BOSTON — Rick Porcello pitched eight shutout innings and struck out a season-high eight as the Boston Red Sox beat the Oakland Athletics 5-1 on Tuesday night. Porcello allowed only two hits and walked two while winning his second straight start. He also became the first starter to go past the seventh inning for the World Series champion Red Sox in a rough opening month of the season. Mookie Betts and Mitch Moreland homered for Boston, and the Red Sox won for the fourth time in six games. PADRES 4, BRAVES 3: Franmil Reyes homered twice and drove in three runs, Eric Hosmer also went deep and rookie Chris Paddack turned in another impressive start, leading San Diego to a victory over host Atlanta. Reyes homered on the 11th pitch of the game, followed by another solo shot in the sixth to break a 2-2 tie. BREWERS 4, ROCKIES 3: Jhoulys Chacin pitched six shutout innings and gave up just two hits as host Milwaukee defeated Colorado for the second time in as many games. Jesus Aguilar

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Mets shortstop Amed Rosario tags out Reds baserunner Phillip Ervin on Tuesday in New York. hit a three-run homer in the seventh inning to expand the Brewers’ advantage. The Rockies got three runs in the ninth inning, including a two-run home run by Ian Desmond. METS 4, REDS 3 (10): Rookie Pete Alonso hit a game-winning sacrifice fly off Cincinnati closer Raisel Iglesias in the 10th inning, and host New York rebounded from a blown ninth-inning lead to beat Cincinnati and avoid dropping below .500 for the first time this year. J.D. Davis, who entered in a ninth-in-

ning double switch, doubled to left-center to cap a 10-pitch at-bat leading off the 10th against Iglesias.

his second extra-base hit of the season, and Cleveland beat host Miami. Trevor Bauer overcame a slow start to pitch seven innings. ASTROS 11, TWINS 0: Ger- He allowed four runs and rit Cole struck out 11 bat- struck out 10. ters through seven innings and brought a no-hitting TIGERS 3, PHILLIES 1: Niko into the sixth as Houston Goodrum hit a two-run dominated host Minne- home run as part of a threesota. Carlos Correa finished run third inning as Detroit with three RBIs, and George defeated host Philadelphia. Springer hit a solo home run The Phillies scored a run and a RBI single for the As- in the first inning as Rhys tros. Hoskins singled in Andrew McCutchen, but the Tigers INDIANS 7, MARLINS 4: Car- were able to keep the Phillos González hit a tiebreak- lies off the board for the reing three-run homer, only mainder of the game.

BOX SCORES

Phillies right fielder Bryce Harper drops a ball during the eighth inning on Tuesday in Philadelphia. The Tigers won 3-1. Red Sox 5, Athletics 1

Rendon to IL after missing 7 of 8

STAT OF THE DAY

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

Oakland Semien ss Grossman lf Chapman 3b Davis dh Piscotty rf Morales 1b Pinder 2b Laureano cf Hundley c Totals Boston Benintendi lf Betts rf Martinez dh Bogaerts ss Devers 3b Chavis 2b Moreland 1b Bradley Jr. cf Leon c Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 30 AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 2 32

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 R 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 5

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 1 .311 1 1 1 0 .221 0 0 0 1 .282 0 0 1 1 .218 0 0 1 1 .256 0 0 0 1 .162 0 0 0 1 .281 1 0 0 2 .234 1 0 0 1 .190 3 1 3 9 H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 0 .265 2 1 0 0 .295 0 0 0 0 .324 0 0 1 2 .271 1 1 0 1 .294 2 0 0 2 .313 1 2 1 0 .213 0 0 0 2 .148 1 1 1 0 .154 7 5 3 7

Oakland 000 000 001 Boston 110 210 00x

— —

1 3 1 5 7 0

E — Laureano (2). LOB — Oakland 5, Boston 6. 2B — Hundley (1), Devers (8). HR — Grossman (3), off Thornburg; Betts (6), off Brooks; Moreland (8), off Brooks. RBIs — Grossman (8), Betts (15), Devers (8), Moreland 2 (17), Leon (2). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Brooks, L, 2-3 41/3 6 5 4 3 2 5.74 Hendriks 21/3 1 0 0 0 2 2.08 1 /3 0 0 0 0 1 6.23 Buchter Soria 1 0 0 0 0 2 6.28 Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Porcello, W, 2-3 8 2 0 0 2 8 5.52 Thornburg 1 1 1 1 1 1 7.71 Inherited runners-scored — Hendriks 2-0, Buchter 1-0. T — 2:34. Att. — 31,754

Padres 4, Braves 3 San Diego AB R H Garcia 2b 3 1 0 Reyes rf 4 2 3 Machado ss 4 0 1 Hosmer 1b 4 1 2 France 3b 4 0 0 Myers lf 3 0 0 Mejia c 3 0 0 Margot cf 3 0 0 Paddack p 2 0 0 Kinsler ph-2b 1 0 0 Totals 31 4 6 Atlanta AB R H Albies 2b 4 0 0 Swanson ss 4 1 1 Freeman 1b 4 0 0 Acuna Jr. cf 4 0 1 Markakis rf 3 1 1 Camargo 3b 4 1 1 McCann c 3 0 2 Culberson pr 0 0 0 Joyce lf 4 0 2 Teheran p 2 0 0 Inciarte ph 1 0 0 Flowers ph 1 0 0 Totals 34 3 8

BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 .214 3 0 0 .232 0 0 1 .236 1 0 0 .252 0 0 1 .250 0 0 1 .248 0 0 3 .146 0 0 1 .253 0 0 1 .000 0 0 1 .133 4 1 9 BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 .289 0 0 2 .260 0 0 0 .300 1 0 2 .276 0 1 0 .330 0 0 1 .231 0 0 0 .325 0 0 0 .417 2 0 1 .259 0 0 1 .000 0 0 1 .233 0 0 1 .340 3 1 9

San Diego 101 002 000 Atlanta 020 000 010

— —

4 6 0 3 8 0

LOB — San Diego 1, Atlanta 6. 2B — Reyes (3), Swanson (6). HR — Reyes (7), off Teheran; Reyes (8), off Teheran; Hosmer (5), off Teheran. RBIs — Reyes 3 (14), Hosmer (18), Acuna Jr. (19), Joyce 2 (5). CS — Culberson (1). DP — Atlanta 2. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO ERA Paddack, W, 2-1 6 4 2 2 1 5 1.91 Wingenter, H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.51 Stammen, H, 9 1 2 1 1 0 1 3.12 Yates, S, 14-14 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.56 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Teheran, L, 2-4 7 5 4 4 1 8 5.35 Winkler 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.70 Dayton 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00 HBP — Wingenter (McCann). WP — Teheran. T — 2:42. Att. — 18,626

Brewers 4, Rockies 3

Indians 7, Marlins 4

Mets 4, Reds 3 (10)

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dahl rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .321 Story ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Murphy 1b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .242 Arenado 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .271 McMahon 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .224 Desmond cf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .196 Tapia lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .265 Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .189 Wolters c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Marquez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Hampson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Totals 30 3 4 3 4 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Thames rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Guerra p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Moustakas 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Grandal c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .283 T.Shaw 3b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .194 Aguilar 1b 3 1 1 3 0 1 .163 Gamel lf-rf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .273 Arcia ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .235 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .375 Braun ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 29 4 6 3 0 7 Colorado 000 000 003 — 3 4 0 Milwaukee 000 001 30x — 4 6 0 LOB — Colorado 4, Milwaukee 1. 2B — Murphy (3), Arenado (7), Gamel (5). HR — Desmond (3), off Hader; Aguilar (3), off Marquez. RBIs — Arenado (21), Desmond 2 (13), Aguilar 3 (12). DP — Colorado 1; Milwaukee 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Marquez, L, 3-2 7 6 4 4 0 6 2.93 B.Shaw 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Chacin, W, 3-3 6 2 0 0 3 1 5.24 Guerra, H, 5 21/3 1 2 2 1 6 2.20 2 /3 1 1 1 0 2 3.68 Hader, S, 7-7 Inherited runners-scored — Hader 1-1. T — 2:22. Att. — 25,673

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 1 2 0 0 2 .243 Martin cf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .221 Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .181 Santana 1b 5 2 3 2 0 0 .316 Gonzalez rf 3 2 1 3 1 1 .261 Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .200 Bauers lf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .241 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .213 Bauer p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Freeman ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .214 Totals 33 7 9 7 3 5 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .188 Wallach ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Prado 3b-1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .294 B.Anderson rf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .243 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Alfaro c 3 0 0 0 1 3 .286 Cooper 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Berti pr-ss-3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .158 Rojas ss-1b-ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .276 Galloway cf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .211 Alcantara p 1 0 0 1 0 1 .125 Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .148 Totals 31 4 5 4 5 12 Cleveland 024 000 010 — 7 9 0 Miami 120 100 000 — 4 5 2 E — Prado (1), Alcantara (2). LOB — Cleveland 6, Miami 7. 2B — Prado (4). HR — Santana (3), off Alcantara; Gonzalez (2), off Alcantara; Granderson (4), off Bauer. RBIs — Santana 2 (16), Gonzalez 3 (5), Bauers (11), Freeman (3), Granderson (11), Prado (8), B.Anderson (6), Alcantara (1). SB — Lindor (1), Ramirez (9). SF — Bauers, Freeman. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bauer, W, 4-1 7 4 4 4 4 10 2.45 Wittgren, H, 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0.87 Hand, S, 9-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.32 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Alcantara, L, 1-3 51/3 7 6 4 3 1 4.86 2 N.Anderson /3 0 0 0 0 2 2.08 Conley 1 1 0 0 0 1 7.59 Kinley 1 1 1 1 0 1 3.60 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 9.00 T — 2:56. Att. — 7,247

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza 2b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .202 Votto 1b 4 0 2 0 1 1 .245 Suarez 3b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .230 Puig rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .192 Casali c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .289 Barnhart ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .209 Ervin cf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .200 Dietrich ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .204 Winker lf-cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .228 J.Iglesias ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .304 Castillo p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .071 Farmer ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 1-Lorenzen pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 —R.Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 —Totals 37 3 8 3 6 13 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b 5 1 4 1 0 0 .370 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .292 Nimmo lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .233 Conforto rf 4 0 1 1 0 3 .269 Frazier 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .207 Ramos c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Rosario ss 3 0 2 0 1 1 .274 Lagares cf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .218 Vargas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .370 Davis 3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .302 Totals 33 4 9 4 3 12 Cincinnati 000 001 002 0 — 3 8 0 New York 001 000 110 1 — 4 9 3 One out when winning run scored. E — McNeil (2), Ramos (3), Vargas (1). LOB — Cincinnati 11, New York 6. 2B — Votto (7), McNeil (8), Davis (4). HR — Suarez (7), off Vargas; Frazier (2), off Castillo. RBIs — Peraza (7), Suarez (16), Farmer (8), McNeil (12), Alonso (26), Conforto (14), Frazier (7). SB — Peraza (4), Puig (3), Rosario (3). CS — Ervin (1). SF — Alonso. S — Vargas. DP — Cincinnati 2; New York 2. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Castillo 62/3 5 2 2 3 7 1.45 2 /3 1 1 1 0 2 2.45 Stephenson 1 Garrett /3 1 0 0 0 1 1.42 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.56 Hughes Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.05 R.Iglesias, L, 1-4 1/3 2 1 1 0 0 3.68 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Vargas 51/3 3 1 1 3 5 5.75 Gsellman 12/3 1 0 0 1 3 3.86 Familia, BS, 2-2 12/3 4 2 2 1 3 6.28 Zamora 0 0 0 0 1 0 0.00 Gagnon, W, 1-0 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 6.75 Zamora pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored — Stephenson 1-0, Garrett 1-1, Hughes 1-0, Zamora 2-0, Gagnon 3-0. HBP — Gagnon (Dietrich). WP — Castillo. T — 3:24. Att. — 20,836

Tigers 3, Phillies 1 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .222 Castellanos rf 5 1 2 0 0 2 .273 Cabrera 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .282 Goodrum lf 3 1 1 2 1 1 .238 Rodriguez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Greiner c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .222 Mercer ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .137 Turnbull p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Castro ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 34 3 7 3 4 11 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .241 Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .329 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Hoskins 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .279 Realmuto c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Williams lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Franco 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .252 Velasquez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Gosselin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Totals 31 1 4 1 2 10 Detroit 003 000 000 — 3 7 1 Philadelphia 100 000 000 — 1 4 1 E — Rodriguez (2), Harper (2). LOB — Detroit 8, Philadelphia 7. 2B — Castellanos (10), Hernandez (6). 3B — Rodriguez (1). HR — Goodrum (3), off Velasquez. RBIs — Cabrera (11), Goodrum 2 (11), Hoskins (24). SB — McCutchen (1). DP — Philadelphia 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Turnbull, W, 2-2 6 3 1 1 2 5 2.53 Alcantara, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.46 Jimenez, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.76 Greene, S, 12-12 1 1 0 0 0 3 1.29 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Velasquez, L, 1-1 32/3 6 3 3 3 7 2.73 1 Ramos /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.68 Nicasio 2 0 0 0 1 2 5.02 Dominguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.76 Morgan 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Neris 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.70 Inherited runners-scored — Ramos 2-0. HBP — Turnbull 2 (Williams,Realmuto). WP — Turnbull 3. T — 3:10. Att. — 31,759

Astros 11, Twins 0 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 2 2 2 1 2 .274 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .248 White 1b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .261 Bregman 3b 5 1 1 1 1 2 .271 Brantley lf 5 2 3 0 1 0 .331 Correa ss 3 0 2 3 1 0 .298 Kemp pr-2b 1 1 0 0 0 0 .179 Reddick dh 5 0 3 1 0 0 .352 Diaz 1b-2b-ss 4 0 0 1 0 0 .205 Chirinos c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .271 Marisnick cf 4 2 1 2 0 2 .267 Totals 42 11 15 10 5 8 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler rf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .278 Polanco ss 2 0 0 0 2 2 .320 Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .295 Cave ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .232 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Adrianza 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .176 Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Totals 29 0 3 0 5 12 Houston 001 024 040 — 11 15 0 Minnesota 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 E — Polanco (4), Cron (2). LOB — Houston 12, Minnesota 7. 2B — Springer (7), Altuve (3), Brantley (7), Correa (9), Kepler (5). HR — Springer (9), off Pineda; Marisnick (2), off Pineda; Bregman (5), off Magill. RBIs — Springer 2 (24), Bregman (14), Correa 3 (18), Reddick (7), Diaz (9), Marisnick 2 (5). SB — Marisnick (1). SF — Correa, Diaz. DP — Houston 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Cole, W, 2-4 7 1 0 0 3 11 3.95 James 1 1 0 0 2 1 7.36 Devenski 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.27 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Pineda, L, 2-2 5 9 5 5 1 2 6.21 Magill 2 3 2 2 0 3 6.75 1 /3 1 4 3 3 1 8.74 Mejia 2 Harper /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.31 Romero 1 1 0 0 1 2 7.50 T — 3:18. Att. — 12,181

THIS DATE IN BASEBALL 1951 — New York’s Mickey Mantle hit his first major league home run in an 8-3 loss at Chicago. 1968 — Philadelphia Phillies pitcher John Boozer was ejected by umpire Ed Vargo at Shea Stadium for throwing spitballs during his warmup pitches. Boozer was the second major league pitcher to be ejected from a game for this. 1969 — Houston’s Don Wilson beat the Cincinnati Reds with a 4-0 no-hitter at Crosley Field, one day after the Reds’ Jim Maloney no-hit the Astros and nine days after Wilson absorbed a 14-0 pounding by Cincinnati.


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TUESDAY’S GAMES

NATIONAL LEAGUE East Philadelphia New York Atlanta Washington Miami Central St. Louis Milwaukee Chicago Pittsburgh Cincinnati West Los Angeles Arizona San Diego Colorado San Francisco

W 16 15 14 12 8 W 19 17 14 13 12 W 20 17 17 13 12

L 13 14 15 16 21 L 10 14 12 14 17 L 12 13 13 17 18

St. Louis 6, Washington 3 Cincinnati 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Atlanta 3, San Diego 1

Pct .552 .517 .483 .429 .276 Pct .655 .548 .538 .481 .414 Pct .625 .567 .567 .433 .400

GB — 1 2 3½ 8 GB — 3 3½ 5 7 GB — 2 2 6 7

WC — 1½ 2½ 4 8½ WC — ½ 1 2½ 4½ WC — — — 4 5

L10 5-5 4-6 5-5 3-7 4-6 L10 9-1 5-5 7-3 2-8 5-5 L10 6-4 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 11-6 5-7 W-1 6-7 9-7 L-1 9-9 5-6 L-2 6-10 6-6 L-4 5-12 3-9 Str Home Away W-4 12-4 7-6 W-2 10-6 7-8 W-2 7-4 7-8 W-1 6-7 7-7 L-1 7-6 5-11 Str Home Away W-1 12-4 8-8 W-1 6-7 11-6 W-1 7-8 10-5 L-3 5-7 8-10 L-1 6-9 6-9

Monday’s results Milwaukee 5, Colorado 1 San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 2

Tuesday’s results Detroit 3, Philadelphia 1 Milwaukee 4, Colorado 3 St. Louis 3, Washington 2 Pittsburgh 6, Texas 4 (11) N.Y. Mets 4, Cincinnati 3 (10) Arizona 3, N.Y. Yankees 1 Cleveland 7, Miami 4 L.A. Dodgers 10, San Francisco 3 San Diego 4, Atlanta 3 Chicago Cubs at Seattle, (n) Today’s games Pittsburgh (Taillon 1-3) at Texas (Miller 1-1), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 2-2) at Arizona (Kelly 2-2), 2:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Lester 1-1) at Seattle (Gonzales 5-0), 5:40 p.m. Detroit (Norris 1-0) at Philadelphia (Nola 2-0), 6:05 p.m. St. Louis (Mikolas 2-2) at Washington (Scherzer 1-3), 6:05 p.m. Cincinnati (DeSclafani 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (deGrom 2-3), 6:10 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 2-2) at Miami (Smith 2-0), 6:10 p.m. San Diego (Strahm 0-2) at Atlanta (Fried 3-1), 6:20 p.m. Colorado (Senzatela 2-1) at Milwaukee (Anderson 2-0), 6:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 3-1) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 1-4), 8:45 p.m.

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Tampa Bay New York Toronto Boston Baltimore Central Minnesota Cleveland Detroit Chicago Kansas City West Houston Seattle Texas Oakland Los Angeles

W 19 17 14 13 10 W 17 16 13 12 9 W 18 18 14 14 12

L 9 12 14 17 20 L 10 12 14 14 20 L 12 13 14 18 17

Pct .679 .586 .500 .433 .333 Pct .630 .571 .481 .462 .310 Pct .600 .581 .500 .438 .414

GB — 2½ 5 7 10 GB — 1½ 4 4½ 9 GB — ½ 3 5 5½

WC — — 2½ 4½ 7½ WC — ½ 3 3½ 8 WC — — 2½ 4½ 5

L10 5-5 8-2 7-3 6-4 2-8 L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 5-5 2-8 L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str Home Away W-3 9-7 10-2 L-1 8-7 9-5 W-3 7-8 7-6 W-2 7-7 6-10 L-4 3-10 7-10 Str Home Away L-1 9-5 8-5 W-1 7-4 9-8 W-1 6-5 7-9 W-3 6-6 6-8 L-2 6-10 3-10 Str Home Away W-1 10-3 8-9 L-2 7-9 11-4 L-1 10-5 4-9 L-5 10-8 4-10 W-1 8-7 4-10

Boston 9, Oakland 4 Minnesota 1, Houston 0

Monday’s results Chicago White Sox 5, Baltimore 3 Tampa Bay 8, Kansas City 5

Detroit 3, Philadelphia 1 Cleveland 7, Miami 4 Boston 5, Oakland 1 Houston 11, Minnesota 0 Pittsburgh 6, Texas 4 (11)

Tuesday’s results Arizona 3, N.Y. Yankees 1 Toronto at L.A. Angels, (n) Chicago Cubs at Seattle, (n) Baltimore at Chi White Sox, ppd. Tampa Bay at Kansas City, ppd.

Today’s games Oakland (Fiers 2-2) at Boston (Velazquez 0-2), 12:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Stanek 0-0) at Kansas City (Junis 2-2), 12:15 p.m., 1st game Pittsburgh (Taillon 1-3) at Texas (Miller 1-1), 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Tanaka 2-2) at Arizona (Kelly 2-2), 2:40 p.m. Baltimore (Hess 1-4) at Chi White Sox (Rodon 3-2), 3:10 p.m., 1st game Tampa Bay (Snell 2-2) at Kansas City (Sparkman 0-1), 4 p.m., 2nd game Chicago Cubs (Lester 1-1) at Seattle (Gonzales 5-0), 5:40 p.m. Detroit (Norris 1-0) at Philadelphia (Nola 2-0), 6:05 p.m. Cleveland (Kluber 2-2) at Miami (Smith 2-0), 6:10 p.m. Baltimore (Cashner 4-1) at Chi. White Sox (Nova 0-3), 6:40 p.m., 2nd Houston (McHugh 3-2) at Minnesota (Perez 3-0), 7:10 p.m. Toronto (Stroman 1-3) at L.A. Angels (Pena 0-1), 9:07 p.m.

AROUND THE MAJORS

Sabathia notches 3,000th strikeout PHOENIX — New York Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia became the 17th player in major league history and third left-hander to reach 3,000 career strikeouts in Tuesday’s 3-1 loss to the Arizona Diamondbacks. Sabathia (1-1) arrived in the desert needing three strikeouts to hit 3,000 and got them all in the third inning. The milestone whiff came when he got John Ryan Murphy swinging, sending the Yankees pouring out of the dugout. The crowd roared and continued cheering until the big left-hander tipped his cap before hugging his kids in the front row. Sabathia became the first pitcher to reach 3,000 strikeouts since Atlanta’s John Smoltz in 2008, and joined Randy Johnson and Steve Carlton as the only lefties to do it.

Rendon to IL after missing 7 of 8 WASHINGTON — Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon is finally heading to the injured list with a bruised left elbow after sitting out seven of Washington’s past eight games. Rendon joins two other members of the team’s starting infield on the IL: first baseman Ryan Zimmerman and shortstop Trea Turner. The Nationals also designated right-hander Austin Adams for assignment. BRIEFLY HALL OF FAME: Longtime Los Angeles Angels media relations director Tim Mead has been appointed president of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. MARLINS: Miami outfielder Lewis Brinson was optioned to Triple-A New Orleans, the latest setback for the team’s centerpiece in the Christian Yelich trade. Brinson is hitting .197 with 28 strikeouts in 76 at-bats. PADRES: San Diego placed Fernando Tatis Jr. on the 10day injured list with a left hamstring strain. Tatis is still undergoing test, and there is no immediate timetable for his return. — Wire reports

STAT OF THE DAY

24.3%

Walk rate for Los Angeles Angels outfielder Mike Trout prior to Tuesday’s game. It’s the highest rate in his career along with making contact on 90 percent of his swings. — MLB

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

Porcello pitches 8 scoreless innings WIRE REPORTS

BOSTON — Rick Porcello pitched eight shutout innings and struck out a season-high eight as the Boston Red Sox beat the Oakland Athletics 5-1 on Tuesday night. Porcello allowed only two hits and walked two while winning his second straight start. He also became the first starter to go past the seventh inning for the World Series champion Red Sox in a rough opening month of the season. Mookie Betts and Mitch Moreland homered for Boston, and the Red Sox won for the fourth time in six games. DIAMONDBACKS 3, YANKEES 1: CC Sabathia reached the 3,000 career strikeout milestone, but was outpitched by Arizona ace Zack Greinke in the Diamondbacks’ home victory over New York. Greinke (5-1) won his fifth straight game and stretched his scoreless innings streak to 18 before Gleyher Torres’ run-scoring double in the fourth inning. PADRES 4, BRAVES 3: Franmil Reyes homered twice and drove in three runs, Eric Hosmer also went deep and rookie Chris Paddack turned in another impressive start, leading San Diego to a victory in Atlanta. Reyes homered on the 11th pitch of the game, followed by another solo shot in the sixth to break a 2-2 tie.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Mets shortstop Amed Rosario tags out Reds baserunner Phillip Ervin on Tuesday in New York. METS 4, REDS 3 (10): Rookie Pete Alonso hit a game-winning sacrifice fly off Cincinnati closer Raisel Iglesias in the 10th inning, and host New York rebounded from a blown ninth-inning lead to beat Cincinnati and avoid dropping below .500 for the first time this year. PIRATES 6, RANGERS 4 (11): Bryan Reynolds led off the 11th inning with his first career homer and Starling Marte then added a tworun shot as Pittsburgh won in Arlington, Texas, to snap an eight-game losing streak. TIGERS 3, PHILLIES 1: Niko Goodrum hit a two-run home run as part of a three-

run third inning as Detroit defeated host Philadelphia. The Phillies scored a run in the first inning as Rhys Hoskins singled in Andrew McCutchen, but the Tigers were able to keep the Phillies off the board for the remainder of the game.

seventh inning to expand the Brewers’ advantage.

INDIANS 7, MARLINS 4: Carlos González hit a tiebreaking three-run homer, only his second extra-base hit of the season, and Cleveland beat host Miami. Trevor Bauer overcame a slow ASTROS 11, TWINS 0: Gerrit start to pitch seven innings. Cole struck out 11 batters He allowed four runs and through seven innings and struck out 10. brought a no-hitting into the sixth as Houston domi- DODGERS 10, GIANTS 3: Danated host Minnesota. vid Freese hit a three-run homer and Justin Turner BREWERS 4, ROCKIES 3: went deep for the first time Jhoulys Chacin pitched six this season as Los Angeles shutout innings and gave cruised to a victory in San up just two hits as host Mil- Francisco. Kiké Hernández waukee defeated Colorado also connected, and Walker for the second time in as Buehler pitched into the many games. Jesus Aguilar sixth inning to remain unhit a three-run homer in the beaten in six starts.

BOX SCORES Red Sox 5, Athletics 1 Oakland Semien ss Grossman lf Chapman 3b Davis dh Piscotty rf Morales 1b Pinder 2b Laureano cf Hundley c Totals Boston Benintendi lf Betts rf Martinez dh Bogaerts ss Devers 3b Chavis 2b Moreland 1b Bradley Jr. cf Leon c Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 30 AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 2 32

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 R 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 5

Astros 11, Twins 0

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 1 .311 1 1 1 0 .221 0 0 0 1 .282 0 0 1 1 .218 0 0 1 1 .256 0 0 0 1 .162 0 0 0 1 .281 1 0 0 2 .234 1 0 0 1 .190 3 1 3 9 H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 0 .265 2 1 0 0 .295 0 0 0 0 .324 0 0 1 2 .271 1 1 0 1 .294 2 0 0 2 .313 1 2 1 0 .213 0 0 0 2 .148 1 1 1 0 .154 7 5 3 7

Oakland 000 000 001 Boston 110 210 00x

— —

1 3 1 5 7 0

E — Laureano (2). LOB — Oakland 5, Boston 6. 2B — Hundley (1), Devers (8). HR — Grossman (3), off Thornburg; Betts (6), off Brooks; Moreland (8), off Brooks. RBIs — Grossman (8), Betts (15), Devers (8), Moreland 2 (17), Leon (2). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Brooks, L, 2-3 41/3 6 5 4 3 2 5.74 Hendriks 21/3 1 0 0 0 2 2.08 1 Buchter /3 0 0 0 0 1 6.23 Soria 1 0 0 0 0 2 6.28 Boston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Porcello, W, 2-3 8 2 0 0 2 8 5.52 Thornburg 1 1 1 1 1 1 7.71 Inherited runners-scored — Hendriks 2-0, Buchter 1-0. T — 2:34. Att. — 31,754

Padres 4, Braves 3 San Diego AB R H Garcia 2b 3 1 0 Reyes rf 4 2 3 Machado ss 4 0 1 Hosmer 1b 4 1 2 France 3b 4 0 0 Myers lf 3 0 0 Mejia c 3 0 0 Margot cf 3 0 0 Paddack p 2 0 0 Kinsler ph-2b 1 0 0 Totals 31 4 6 Atlanta AB R H Albies 2b 4 0 0 Swanson ss 4 1 1 Freeman 1b 4 0 0 Acuna Jr. cf 4 0 1 Markakis rf 3 1 1 Camargo 3b 4 1 1 McCann c 3 0 2 Culberson pr 0 0 0 Joyce lf 4 0 2 Teheran p 2 0 0 Inciarte ph 1 0 0 Flowers ph 1 0 0 Totals 34 3 8

BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 0 .214 3 0 0 .232 0 0 1 .236 1 0 0 .252 0 0 1 .250 0 0 1 .248 0 0 3 .146 0 0 1 .253 0 0 1 .000 0 0 1 .133 4 1 9 BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 .289 0 0 2 .260 0 0 0 .300 1 0 2 .276 0 1 0 .330 0 0 1 .231 0 0 0 .325 0 0 0 .417 2 0 1 .259 0 0 1 .000 0 0 1 .233 0 0 1 .340 3 1 9

San Diego 101 002 000 Atlanta 020 000 010

— —

4 6 0 3 8 0

LOB — San Diego 1, Atlanta 6. 2B — Reyes (3), Swanson (6). HR — Reyes (7), off Teheran; Reyes (8), off Teheran; Hosmer (5), off Teheran. RBIs — Reyes 3 (14), Hosmer (18), Acuna Jr. (19), Joyce 2 (5). CS — Culberson (1). DP — Atlanta 2. San Diego IP H R ER BB SO ERA Paddack, W, 2-1 6 4 2 2 1 5 1.91 Wingenter, H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.51 Stammen, H, 9 1 2 1 1 0 1 3.12 Yates, S, 14-14 1 1 0 0 0 2 0.56 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO ERA Teheran, L, 2-4 7 5 4 4 1 8 5.35 Winkler 1 0 0 0 0 1 2.70 Dayton 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.00 HBP — Wingenter (McCann). WP — Teheran. T — 2:42. Att. — 18,626

Brewers 4, Rockies 3 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dahl rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .321 Story ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Murphy 1b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .242 Arenado 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .271 McMahon 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .224 Desmond cf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .196 Tapia lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .265 Reynolds ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .189 Wolters c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Marquez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Hampson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Totals 30 3 4 3 4 9 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 Thames rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Guerra p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Moustakas 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Grandal c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .283 T.Shaw 3b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .194 Aguilar 1b 3 1 1 3 0 1 .163 Gamel lf-rf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .273 Arcia ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .235 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .375 Braun ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Totals 29 4 6 3 0 7 Colorado 000 000 003 — 3 4 0 Milwaukee 000 001 30x — 4 6 0 LOB — Colorado 4, Milwaukee 1. 2B — Murphy (3), Arenado (7), Gamel (5). HR — Desmond (3), off Hader; Aguilar (3), off Marquez. RBIs — Arenado (21), Desmond 2 (13), Aguilar 3 (12). DP — Colorado 1; Milwaukee 1. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO ERA Marquez, L, 3-2 7 6 4 4 0 6 2.93 B.Shaw 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO ERA Chacin, W, 3-3 6 2 0 0 3 1 5.24 Guerra, H, 5 21/3 1 2 2 1 6 2.20 2 Hader, S, 7-7 /3 1 1 1 0 2 3.68 Inherited runners-scored — Hader 1-1. T — 2:22. Att. — 25,673

Phillies right fielder Bryce Harper drops a ball during the eighth inning on Tuesday in Philadelphia. The Tigers won 3-1. Mets 4, Reds 3 (10)

Indians 7, Marlins 4

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Peraza 2b 4 0 1 1 1 1 .202 Votto 1b 4 0 2 0 1 1 .245 Suarez 3b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .230 Puig rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .192 Casali c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .289 Barnhart ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .209 Ervin cf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .200 Dietrich ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .204 Winker lf-cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .228 J.Iglesias ss 5 1 2 0 0 0 .304 Castillo p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .071 Farmer ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 Totals 37 3 8 3 6 13 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b 5 1 4 1 0 0 .370 Alonso 1b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .292 Nimmo lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .233 Conforto rf 4 0 1 1 0 3 .269 Frazier 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .207 Ramos c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .247 Rosario ss 3 0 2 0 1 1 .274 Lagares cf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .218 Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .370 Davis 3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .302 Totals 33 4 9 4 3 12 Cincinnati 000 001 002 0 — 3 8 0 New York 001 000 110 1 — 4 9 3 One out when winning run scored. E — McNeil (2), Ramos (3), Vargas (1). LOB — Cincinnati 11, New York 6. 2B — Votto (7), McNeil (8), Davis (4). HR — Suarez (7), off Vargas; Frazier (2), off Castillo. RBIs — Peraza (7), Suarez (16), Farmer (8), McNeil (12), Alonso (26), Conforto (14), Frazier (7). SB — Peraza (4), Puig (3), Rosario (3). CS — Ervin (1). SF — Alonso. S — Vargas. DP — Cincinnati 2; New York 2. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO ERA Castillo 62/3 5 2 2 3 7 1.45 2 Stephenson /3 1 1 1 0 2 2.45 1 Garrett /3 1 0 0 0 1 1.42 1 Hughes /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.56 Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.05 R.Iglesias, L, 1-4 1/3 2 1 1 0 0 3.68 New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Vargas 51/3 3 1 1 3 5 5.75 Gsellman 12/3 1 0 0 1 3 3.86 Familia, BS, 2-2 12/3 4 2 2 1 3 6.28 Zamora 0 0 0 0 1 0 0.00 Gagnon, W, 1-0 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 6.75 Zamora pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored — Stephenson 1-0, Garrett 1-1, Hughes 1-0, Zamora 2-0, Gagnon 3-0. HBP — Gagnon (Dietrich). WP — Castillo. T — 3:24. Att. — 20,836

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 5 1 2 0 0 2 .243 Martin cf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .221 Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .181 Santana 1b 5 2 3 2 0 0 .316 Gonzalez rf 3 2 1 3 1 1 .261 Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .200 Bauers lf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .241 Perez c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .213 Bauer p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Freeman ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .214 Totals 33 7 9 7 3 5 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 3 1 1 1 1 1 .188 Wallach ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Prado 3b-1b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .294 B.Anderson rf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .243 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Alfaro c 3 0 0 0 1 3 .286 Cooper 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Berti pr-ss-3b 1 0 0 0 1 0 .158 Rojas ss-1b-ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .276 Galloway cf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .211 Alcantara p 1 0 0 1 0 1 .125 Walker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .148 Totals 31 4 5 4 5 12 Cleveland 024 000 010 — 7 9 0 Miami 120 100 000 — 4 5 2 E — Prado (1), Alcantara (2). LOB — Cleveland 6, Miami 7. 2B — Prado (4). HR — Santana (3), off Alcantara; Gonzalez (2), off Alcantara; Granderson (4), off Bauer. RBIs — Santana 2 (16), Gonzalez 3 (5), Bauers (11), Freeman (3), Granderson (11), Prado (8), B.Anderson (6), Alcantara (1). SB — Lindor (1), Ramirez (9). SF — Bauers, Freeman. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO ERA Bauer, W, 4-1 7 4 4 4 4 10 2.45 Wittgren, H, 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0.87 Hand, S, 9-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 1.32 Miami IP H R ER BB SO ERA Alcantara, L, 1-3 51/3 7 6 4 3 1 4.86 2 /3 0 0 0 0 2 2.08 N.Anderson Conley 1 1 0 0 0 1 7.59 Kinley 1 1 1 1 0 1 3.60 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 0 9.00 T — 2:56. Att. — 7,247

Tigers 3, Phillies 1 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Candelario 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .222 Castellanos rf 5 1 2 0 0 2 .273 Cabrera 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .282 Goodrum lf 3 1 1 2 1 1 .238 Rodriguez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .276 Greiner c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .222 Mercer ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .234 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .137 Turnbull p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Castro ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 34 3 7 3 4 11 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .241 Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .329 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Hoskins 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .279 Realmuto c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Williams lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .266 Franco 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .252 Velasquez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Gosselin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Dominguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Totals 31 1 4 1 2 10 Detroit 003 000 000 — 3 7 1 Philadelphia 100 000 000 — 1 4 1 E — Rodriguez (2), Harper (2). LOB — Detroit 8, Philadelphia 7. 2B — Castellanos (10), Hernandez (6). 3B — Rodriguez (1). HR — Goodrum (3), off Velasquez. RBIs — Cabrera (11), Goodrum 2 (11), Hoskins (24). SB — McCutchen (1). DP — Philadelphia 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO ERA Turnbull, W, 2-2 6 3 1 1 2 5 2.53 Alcantara, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 3.46 Jimenez, H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 2 4.76 Greene, S, 12-12 1 1 0 0 0 3 1.29 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO ERA Velasquez, L, 1-1 32/3 6 3 3 3 7 2.73 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.68 Ramos Nicasio 2 0 0 0 1 2 5.02 Dominguez 1 0 0 0 0 1 4.76 Morgan 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Neris 1 1 0 0 0 1 2.70 Inherited runners-scored — Ramos 2-0. HBP — Turnbull 2 (Williams,Realmuto). WP — Turnbull 3. T — 3:10. Att. — 31,759

Pirates 6, Rangers 4 Pittsburgh Frazier 2b Marte cf Polanco rf Bell 1b M.Cabrera dh Shuck pr-dh Moran 3b Diaz pr-c Reynolds lf Tucker ss Totals Texas Choo lf Santana ph Odor 2b Andrus ss Mazara rf Pence dh Gallo cf A.Cabrera 3b Forsythe 1b Kiner-Falefa c Totals

AB 6 6 5 5 4 2 5 4 5 5 47 AB 5 1 5 4 5 3 2 5 5 4 39

R 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 6 R 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 4

H 2 1 1 2 1 0 2 1 2 2 14 H 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 7

BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 2 .258 2 0 3 .200 0 1 1 .269 2 1 2 .286 0 0 1 .329 0 0 0 .196 0 0 2 .268 0 0 1 .125 1 0 0 .423 0 0 0 .250 6 2 12 BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 1 .333 0 0 1 .339 0 0 3 .145 0 1 2 .361 0 0 1 .242 0 2 1 .304 2 3 1 .264 2 0 1 .235 0 0 1 .278 0 1 1 .200 4 7 13

Pittsburgh 000 000 003 03 — 6 14 0 Texas 000 200 010 01 — 4 7 1 E — Choo (3). LOB — Pittsburgh 11, Texas 9. 2B — Bell (8), Reynolds (5), Diaz (1). HR — Reynolds (1), off Chavez; Marte (3), off Chavez; Gallo (10), off Vazquez. RBIs — Frazier (6), Marte 2 (11), Bell 2 (21), Reynolds (1), Gallo 2 (25), A.Cabrera 2 (19). SB — Odor (2), Andrus (6). CS — Odor (3). DP — Pittsburgh 1. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO ERA Lyles 4 3 2 2 4 5 2.42 Brault 2 1 0 0 0 3 8.31 2 Feliz 1 /3 0 1 0 2 3 0.00 1 /3 0 0 0 1 0 0.00 Liriano Kela 1 1 0 0 0 0 4.63 Crick, W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 5.14 Vazquez, S, 7-7 1 2 1 1 0 1 0.71 Texas IP H R ER BB SO ERA 2 Sampson 5 /3 5 0 0 0 5 3.58 1 /3 1 0 0 0 1 5.40 B.Martin, H, 1 Kelley, H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 1.50 C.Martin, H, 5 1 1 0 0 1 2 3.97 Leclerc, BS, 2-7 1 4 3 3 0 2 8.44 2 Chavez, L, 0-1 1 /3 2 3 2 1 1 8.79 1 /3 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Jurado Inherited runners-scored — Liriano 3-1, B.Martin 1-0, Jurado 1-0. HBP — Sampson (Cervelli). PB — Diaz (1).

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 5 2 2 2 1 2 .274 Altuve 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .248 White 1b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .261 Bregman 3b 5 1 1 1 1 2 .271 Brantley lf 5 2 3 0 1 0 .331 Correa ss 3 0 2 3 1 0 .298 Kemp pr-2b 1 1 0 0 0 0 .179 Reddick dh 5 0 3 1 0 0 .352 Diaz 1b-2b-ss 4 0 0 1 0 0 .205 Chirinos c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .271 Marisnick cf 4 2 1 2 0 2 .267 Totals 42 11 15 10 5 8 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler rf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .278 Polanco ss 2 0 0 0 2 2 .320 Cruz dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .295 Cave ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .232 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Adrianza 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .176 Castro c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Totals 29 0 3 0 5 12 Houston 001 024 040 — 11 15 0 Minnesota 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 E — Polanco (4), Cron (2). LOB — Houston 12, Minnesota 7. 2B — Springer (7), Altuve (3), Brantley (7), Correa (9), Kepler (5). HR — Springer (9), off Pineda; Marisnick (2), off Pineda; Bregman (5), off Magill. RBIs — Springer 2 (24), Bregman (14), Correa 3 (18), Reddick (7), Diaz (9), Marisnick 2 (5). SB — Marisnick (1). SF — Correa, Diaz. DP — Houston 1. Houston IP H R ER BB SO ERA Cole, W, 2-4 7 1 0 0 3 11 3.95 1 1 0 0 2 1 7.36 James Devenski 1 1 0 0 0 0 3.27 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO ERA Pineda, L, 2-2 5 9 5 5 1 2 6.21 Magill 2 3 2 2 0 3 6.75 1 /3 1 4 3 3 1 8.74 Mejia 2 Harper /3 1 0 0 0 0 2.31 Romero 1 1 0 0 1 2 7.50 T — 3:18. Att. — 12,181

Diamondbacks 3, Yankees 1 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .221 Voit 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .275 Sanchez c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .233 Torres ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .272 Tauchman rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .177 Maybin lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .364 Estrada 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .353 Wade 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Sabathia p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Urshela ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .345 Totals 30 1 5 1 1 9 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .286 Marte cf-2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Escobar 3b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .303 Peralta lf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .317 Walker 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .307 Flores 2b-1b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .241 Ahmed ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Murphy c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Greinke p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .375 Totals 29 3 7 3 3 7 New York 000 100 000 — 1 5 0 Arizona 010 100 01x — 3 7 0 LOB — New York 3, Arizona 6. 2B — Sanchez (2), Torres (7), Marte (5), Escobar 2 (9). HR — Flores (1), off Sabathia. RBIs — Torres (15), Peralta (20), Flores 2 (7). CS — Maybin (1). SF — Peralta. DP — New York 1; Arizona 1. New York IP H R ER BB SO ERA Sabathia, L, 1-1 51/3 5 2 2 2 5 2.66 Holder 12/3 0 0 0 1 1 4.50 Britton 1 2 1 1 0 1 3.00 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO ERA Greinke, W, 5-1 72/3 5 1 1 1 7 3.27 1 Chafin, H, 4 /3 0 0 0 0 1 2.45 Holland, S, 6-6 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Inherited runners-scored — Holder 2-0. T — 2:33. Att. — 36,352

Dodgers 10, Giants 3 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez cf 5 1 2 2 0 1 .258 Seager ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .236 Turner 3b 4 2 2 1 1 1 .279 Bellinger rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .431 Freese 1b 4 2 2 3 1 0 .233 Muncy 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .247 Taylor lf 4 1 1 2 0 0 .171 Barnes c 4 1 1 2 0 1 .219 Buehler p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Beaty ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 37 10 10 10 5 6 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .202 Solarte lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Posey c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Kratz c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Belt 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .237 Longoria 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .212 Crawford ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .198 Pillar cf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .204 Duggar rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Pomeranz p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Blach p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 32 3 6 3 1 9 Los Angeles 000 306 100 — 10 10 0 San Francisco 010 002 000 — 3 6 0 LOB — Los Angeles 5, San Francisco 3. 2B — Taylor (3), Barnes (3), Posey (10). 3B — Belt (2). HR — Freese (2), off Pomeranz; Hernandez (6), off Blach; Turner (1), off Blach. RBIs — Hernandez 2 (17), Turner (10), Freese 3 (8), Taylor 2 (9), Barnes 2 (10), Posey (9), Belt (12), Pillar (19). DP — Los Angeles 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO ERA Buehler, W, 3-0 51/3 6 3 3 1 6 5.22 Floro 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Garcia 2 0 0 0 0 1 4.91 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO ERA Pomeranz, L, 1-3 4 3 3 3 2 3 4.08 Gott 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.69 Blach 31/3 7 7 7 3 1 18.90 2 Bergen /3 0 0 0 0 0 5.00 Inheritedrunners-scored—Floro 1-0, Bergen 2-0. T — 2:45. Att. — 32,017 T — 4:14. Att. — 18,641


05.01.2019 • WEdnEsday • M 1

NATIONALS 2 Cardinals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0

1

Goldschmidt 1b

5 0 0 0

0

2 .259

DeJong ss

3 1 1 0

1

0 .342

4 .202

Ozuna lf

4 0 0 0

0

2 .260

Martinez rf

3 1 2 0

1

1 .364

Gant p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

Miller p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Molina c

3 1 0 0

1

1 .262

Wong 2b

4 0 2

1

0

1 .272

Bader cf

4 0 1 2

0

3 .224

Wainwright p

3 0 0 0

0

1 .100

Webb p

0 0 0 0

0

0

O’Neill rf

1 0 1 0

0

0 .303

Totals

34 3 7 3

Washington

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

CARDINALS 3

Carpenter 3b

CARDINALS

---

---

4 15

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Eaton rf

5 1 2

1

0

2 .296

Robles cf

4 1 1

1

0

0 .255

Soto lf

4 0 1 0

0

1 .248

Adams 1b

3 0 1 0

1

0 .275

Suzuki c

3 0 1 0

0

0 .250

Ross p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Kieboom ss

4 0 0 0

0

2 .158

---

Dozier 2b

4 0 0 0

0

2 .184

Difo 3b

2 0 0 0

1

0 .247

Barraclough p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Jennings p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Gomes c

1 0 0 0

0

1 .254

Sanchez p

2 0 0 0

0

0 .083

Suero p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

Sipp p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Kendrick 3b

2 0 1 0

0

0 .314

---

1-Taylor pr

0 0 0 0

0

0 .200

2

8

Totals

34 2 7 2

Cardinals

000

Washington

002 000 000: 2 7 0

300 000: 3 7

1

1-ran for Kendrick in the 9th. E: Wong (3). LOB: Cardinals 8, Washington 9. 2B: DeJong (14). HR: Eaton (2), off Wainwright; Robles (5), off Wainwright. RBIs: Wong (15), Bader 2 (9), Eaton (9), Robles (12). SB: Wong (5). RLISP: Cardinals 5 (Goldschmidt, Ozuna, Wong, Bader, Wainwright); Washington 3 (Dozier, Sanchez 2). GIDP: Soto.

Scherzer still chasing elusive title St. Louis native not worried about Hall of Fame chances BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

WASHINGTON • It has already started happening, whether it’s a headline in The Washington Post, a phrase kicked around another clubhouse, or one mentioned at Mizzou. The frequency is only likely to increase as Max Scherzer’s introduction evolves from Cy Young winner to future Hall of Famer. Not that he’s letting either ring in his ears. “I’ve heard enough people say it,” the St. Louis-area native said Tuesday in the Nationals’ clubhouse. “That’s not what motivates me. If I’m worried about that, I feel like my head is in the wrong spot, and my motivation is in the wrong spot. That all takes care of itself , and that’s after your career. For me, right now, I’m in my career. I’m only here to win and to try to win a World Series. That is the only reason I want to come through those doors and be in this clubhouse — because we can win a World Series.” The Parkway Central grad will start for the 10th time in his career against the Cardinals, his boyhood club, on Wednesday at Nationals Park, and the longtime ace and unchallenged face of the Nationals franchise is coming off history – and poised to make more. In his previous start, Scherzer collected the 2,500th strikeout of his career to become the 35th pitcher in baseball history with that many and the third active pitcher, trailing only C.C. Sabathia and Justin Verlander. With 2,503 strikeouts in 344 games, Scherzer got to 2,500 swifter than any pitcher other than Nolan Ryan (338) and Randy Johnson (313), according to the Elias Sports Bureau. If he has more than 220 strikeouts this season, he’ll overtake David Cone’s 2,668 to have the most by any Missouri-born pitcher in bigleague history. “Sweet,” he said. The Cooperstown-ready résumé is filling up for Scherzer, 34. Only four pitchers have won more Cy Young awards that Scherzer’s three, and all of them are in the Hall of Fame (Johnson, Greg Maddux, and Steve Carlton) or Roger Clemens. Six pitchers have won as many as three Cy Young awards, and the other five are in the Hall of Fame, like Pedro Martinez and Tom Seaver and Sandy Koufax, or still pitching, like Clayton Kershaw. Scherzer’s six All-Star Game appearances trail only

AVERAGES Batting Martinez Wieters DeJong Fowler O’Neill Wong Molina Ozuna Goldschmidt Bader Carpenter Munoz Robinson Gyorko Team

AVG .364 .364 .342 .313 .303 .272 .262 .260 .259 .224 .202 .200 .143 .100 .267

Pitching Brebbia Gant Ponce de Leon Hicks Wainwright Gallegos Flaherty Wacha Mikolas Miller Hudson Webb Leone Team

W 1 3 0 1 3 1 3 2 2 1 2 0 0 19

AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 77 12 28 5 0 1 13 4 15 1 2 11 0 4 0 0 0 5 0 4 1 0 117 26 40 14 1 5 13 10 22 2 1 80 12 25 6 0 1 7 12 20 1 1 33 4 10 2 0 1 4 1 13 0 1 92 14 25 4 1 4 15 16 17 5 3 107 11 28 8 0 2 20 5 9 1 1 100 24 26 5 0 10 28 13 25 3 0 116 22 30 3 0 9 19 15 34 0 2 49 8 11 1 0 3 9 9 20 0 1 104 18 21 5 1 3 5 20 31 1 2 10 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 20 2 2 0 0 0 1 2 10 0 1 983 158 262 54 3 40 146 110 248 16 16 L 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 10

ERA 0.55 0.90 1.80 2.13 3.73 3.86 4.06 4.78 5.29 5.56 5.63 7.11 7.30 4.22

G 14 16 1 13 6 8 6 5 6 16 6 9 13 29

GS 0 0 1 0 6 0 6 5 6 0 5 0 0 29

SV IP 0 16.1 2 20.0 0 5.0 9 12.2 0 31.1 0 9.1 0 31.0 0 26.1 0 34.0 1 11.1 1 24.0 0 6.1 0 12.1 13 258.0

H 6 6 2 6 30 6 32 24 34 11 33 4 13 222

R 1 2 1 3 14 4 14 14 21 9 16 5 10 126

ER HR BB SO 1 1 8 20 2 2 7 19 1 1 3 7 3 1 5 16 13 5 12 27 4 2 3 16 14 7 6 36 14 5 17 29 20 8 8 19 7 4 9 16 15 8 13 19 5 2 3 6 10 2 6 14 121 53 111 261

Hall of Famer and Carthage, Mo., native Carl Hubbell among Missouri-born pitchers. This past winter, Mizzou altered its rules for retirement numbers and Scherzer became the first athlete to have his number (No. 31) retired without completing an undergraduate degree. “I’ll always be grateful,” he said. What’s missing is almost as glaring to him as his mantel is gleaming for history: a championship ring. The departure of Bryce Harper has left Scherzer as the bona fide star in the nation’s capital and he already was the soul of the clubhouse. But since signing a sevenyear, $210-million contract with the Nats, Scherzer has won two Cy Young awards and Washington has won zero playoff series. Scherzer last advanced to the World Series with Detroit in 2012, and he has not advanced past the division series since 2013, also with Detroit. He has three remaining seasons on his contract, his mid-30s have arrived, and that sensation of chasing a championship – is it getting more acute? “Stronger,” he said. “Because every other concern you have early in your career kind of goes away. When you’re young in your career, you obviously still want to win the World Series, but you’re also trying to establish yourself in the major leagues, trying to figure out

the league, trying to have success, trying to be consistent. These are the hardest things to do in the game. That’s still a battle in its own right. But your ultimate reason why you do what you do is to win the World Series.” The Nats’ perpetual pennant chase pivoted this winter toward pitching and youth as they added lefty Patrick Corbin to a rotation that already included Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg, and also saw Harper leave for the rival Phillies. Two of the Nats’ starting outfielders are 21, or younger. One of the game’s top technicians with his mechanics, Scherzer saw a flaw after a recent dud in Miami. He shortened his arm swing – “You can’t speed up your arm to solve time, so you have to actually shorten up the path,” he said – and the results got him past 2,500. In that start, 21-year-old rookie shortstop Carter Kieboom homered and outfielder Victor Robles, 21, stole two bases. Scherzer struck out 10. The Nats lost. That gave him 84 games with at least 10 strikeouts. Same as Carlton. No other active pitcher has more than 65. Not that he’s counting. “I’m more focused on what’s going on here in this clubhouse,” Scherzer said. “I expect winning plays. I don’t care how they do it, or who does it, or how old they are, how young. I expect this clubhouse to make winning plays across the diamond, whether it’s on the mound, on the bases, or in the box. Find a way to keep scratching runs. “However we do that, it’s music to my ears.”

FOWLER HAS FLU Outfielder Dexter Fowler’s flu-like symptoms worsened overnight and the switch-hitter was sent for treatment and fluids to help him recover. The Cardinals had Fowler remain at the team hotel Tuesday night for his and their benefit, manager Mike Shildt said, and he was not available for that evening’s game. Fowler’s family was also ill, his wife shared on social media. … Luke Gregerson, on the verge of coming back from the injured list, will throw a live batting practice against teammates Wednesday at Nationals Park. Shildt said he and the coaches want to see Gregerson in a controlled setting against major-league hitters before determining when to activate the veteran reliever. That likely puts his earliest return this weekend at Wrigley Field. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

DP: Cardinals 1. Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Wainwright 61/3 6 2 Webb Gant Miller

2/ 3

2

0 0 0

11/3 1 0 0 2/ 3

0 0 0

2

5 80 3.73

0 0

6 7.11

0

2 27 0.90

0

1 12 5.56

Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez

5 5 3

Suero

3

7 94 5.91

0

3 27 6.92

2/ 3

0 0 0

0

2 11 7.36

1/ 3

0 0 0

1

2 19 1.64

Jennings

2/ 3

1 0 0

1

1 18 0.00

Ross

1/ 3

0 0 0

0 0

Sipp

1 1 0 0

2

Barraclough 1

2 3.86

Webb pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. W: Wainwright 3-2. L: Sanchez 0-4. S: Miller 1-2. H: Webb 3, Gant 6. Inherited runnersscored: Webb 2-0, Gant 1-0, Miller 1-0, Ross 2-0. HBP: Wainwright 2 (Suzuki,Robles). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:09. A: 19,753 (41,313).

HOW THEY SCORED NATIONALS THIRD Eaton homers. Robles homers. Nationals 2, Cardinals 0. CARDINALS FOURTH DeJong walks. Martinez singles. Molina walks. Wong singles. DeJong scores. Bader singles. Molina scores. Martinez scores. Cardinals 3, Nationals 2.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Adam Wainwright turns in a solid effort, allowing the Nationals two runs in 6 1/3 innings Tuesday night in Washington.

Cards come from behind again vs. Nationals CARDINALS • FROM B1

ror the bullpen walked later in the game. After Wainwright’s 6 1/3 strong innings, relievers Tyler Webb, John Gant and Andrew Miller had to get eight outs with a one-run cushion. When each of them entered the game, that tying run was already on base. Not once flinched. Webb got a double play to erase his inherited runner. Gant retired three batters in order in the eighth. With Jordan Hicks unavailable to microwave the ninth inning, Miller retired both batters he faced and got his first save of the season. For the second time in as many nights against the Nats, the Cardinals fell behind early and rallied for all of their runs in one burst. They claimed their 10th win in their past 12 games, and for only the second time in club history had 18 wins in April. There’s a vibe radiating from their versatility. In the past week, the Cardinals have thundered to wins behind Marcell Ozuna’s gluttonous RBI run. They’ve followed steadying starting pitching to wins, like they did with Jak Flaherty’s seven shutout innings Sunday. Bader’s

homer cracked the scoreboard Monday, and later he stole a hit with a bunt, too. He and Wong have both been drilling on bunts in large part because they know the power at the top is waiting if they prime the offense. For Wong, it’s a reflection on the clearance he’s received from Shildt to be himself. “I’ve never been a power guy,” Wong said. “That was never something I wanted to do. It was a trend that was going around the clubhouse that if you wanted to play you had to put up those good numbers. As soon as Shildt told me to play my game — bunting has always been my game. It’s always been something I’ve prided myself on. I brought it back.” With the bases loaded in the fourth and Sanchez leaning on his sharp cutter, Wong came to the plate and spied third baseman, Wilmer Difo, playing back. The Nats put superb fielder Anthony Rendon on the injured list Tuesday, leaving a committee at the hot corner. Wong placed the first pitch he saw — a splitter — down the line. As DeJong passed it down the line he saw it rolled true — better than if Wong had bowled it.

“That’s probably one of my better bunts,” Wong said. Bader followed by slipping a single to center for the lead against Sanchez (0-4), and Wainwright (3-2) responded with a perfect fourth. Like so many opponents in the past fortnight, Washington took a lead against the Cardinals with a pair of home runs. Only the flightless Orioles have allowed more home runs this season than 53 hit against the Cardinals through 29 games. The Cardinals have minimized the bruising by limiting opponents to solo homers. Nationals leadoff hitter Adam Eaton jumped the first pitch he saw in the third inning — a spiraling cutter — for a solo homer down the right-field line, and Victor Robles by drilling a 3-1 curveball over the left-center wall. Wainwright would entice further trouble with a four-pitch walk to former teammate Matt Adams and a hit batter, all with one out. He then reached safe harbor along the Anacostia River. Even in the stormiest innings, the back half of the Nats’ line was where Wainwright swamped ral-

lies. After back-to-back singles opened the second inning, Wainwright struck out rookie Carter Kieboom and two groundouts to slip free of the inning. In the third, Wainwright struck out Kieboom on a curve and then sent three strikes past Brian Dozier to end the threat. The top of the sixth ended when Bader worked Wander Suero through a 13-pitch at-bat that ended with a strikeout. Wainwright finished the bottom of the inning on five pitches — against the bottom of the Nats’ lineup. Wainwright teased them with a four-seam cutter and a sinker that crossed the plate differently, and then had the curve as a trump to play. “I think Waino is always a master of a lot of things — the art of pitching,” Shildt said. “He’s a smart competitor. He’s very strategic, obviously. He and Yadi share a brain and have a game plan and they adjust their plan. It was fun to watch them work. They can do it without words. They’re in synch with each other.” That comes from starting 248 games together — more than any other Cardinals’ battery and now tied with Tom Glavine and Javy Lopez for the 10th-most in baseball history.

The only time one of the bottom four batters in Washington’s lineup reached base against Wainwright was on an intentional walk, which loaded the bases and dared Sanchez to do something against Wainwright’s movement. Sanchez skipped a ball back to Wainwright and off the pitcher’s cleat. The carom went right to Paul Goldschmidt at first for the out. Said Wainwright,“... we’ll take our chances that it has a good bounce. Which it may have had the best bounce I’ve ever seen off a pitcher’s leg. … Completely planned.” All the bounces and bunts went their way. Mostly because they’re looking for them. “It’s about finding ways to score runs without the home run,” DeJong said. “We’re batting. We’re getting good at-bats. And we know if that continues someone is getting the big hit. It just doesn’t have to be the biggest hit. It can be a smart hit. We can score runs in a lot of ways, win games in any way, and we’re making teams aware.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


05.01.2019 • WEdnEsday • M 2

NATIONALS 2 Cardinals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 0 0

1

Goldschmidt 1b

5 0 0 0

0

2 .259

DeJong ss

3 1 1 0

1

0 .342

4 .202

Ozuna lf

4 0 0 0

0

2 .260

Martinez rf

3 1 2 0

1

1 .364

Gant p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

Miller p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Molina c

3 1 0 0

1

1 .262

Wong 2b

4 0 2

1

0

1 .272

Bader cf

4 0 1 2

0

3 .224

Wainwright p

3 0 0 0

0

1 .100

Webb p

0 0 0 0

0

0

O’Neill rf

1 0 1 0

0

0 .303

Totals

34 3 7 3

Washington

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

CARDINALS 3

Carpenter 3b

CARDINALS

---

---

4 15

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Eaton rf

5 1 2

1

0

2 .296

Robles cf

4 1 1

1

0

0 .255

Soto lf

4 0 1 0

0

1 .248

Adams 1b

3 0 1 0

1

0 .275

Suzuki c

3 0 1 0

0

0 .250

Ross p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Kieboom ss

4 0 0 0

0

2 .158

---

Dozier 2b

4 0 0 0

0

2 .184

Difo 3b

2 0 0 0

1

0 .247

Barraclough p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Jennings p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Gomes c

1 0 0 0

0

1 .254

Sanchez p

2 0 0 0

0

0 .083

Suero p

0 0 0 0

0

0 .000

Sipp p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Kendrick 3b

2 0 1 0

0

0 .314

---

1-Taylor pr

0 0 0 0

0

0 .200

2

8

Totals

34 2 7 2

Cardinals

000

Washington

002 000 000: 2 7 0

300 000: 3 7

1

1-ran for Kendrick in the 9th. E: Wong (3). LOB: Cardinals 8, Washington 9. 2B: DeJong (14). HR: Eaton (2), off Wainwright; Robles (5), off Wainwright. RBIs: Wong (15), Bader 2 (9), Eaton (9), Robles (12). SB: Wong (5). RLISP: Cardinals 5 (Goldschmidt, Ozuna, Wong, Bader, Wainwright); Washington 3 (Dozier, Sanchez 2). GIDP: Soto.

Scherzer still chasing elusive title St. Louis native not worried about Hall of Fame chances BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

WASHINGTON • It has already started happening, whether it’s a headline in The Washington Post, a phrase kicked around another clubhouse, or one mentioned at Mizzou. The frequency is only likely to increase as Max Scherzer’s introduction evolves from Cy Young winner to future Hall of Famer. Not that he’s letting either ring in his ears. “I’ve heard enough people say it,” the St. Louis-area native said Tuesday in the Nationals’ clubhouse. “That’s not what motivates me. If I’m worried about that, I feel like my head is in the wrong spot, and my motivation is in the wrong spot. That all takes care of itself , and that’s after your career. For me, right now, I’m in my career. I’m only here to win and to try to win a World Series. That is the only reason I want to come through those doors and be in this clubhouse — because we can win a World Series.” The Parkway Central grad will start for the 10th time in his career against the Cardinals, his boyhood club, on Wednesday at Nationals Park, and the longtime ace and unchallenged face of the Nationals franchise is coming off history – and poised to make more. In his previous start, Scherzer collected the 2,500th strikeout of his career to become the 35th pitcher in baseball history with that many and the third active pitcher, trailing only C.C. Sabathia and Justin Verlander. With 2,503 strikeouts in 344 games, Scherzer got to 2,500 swifter than any pitcher other than Nolan Ryan (338) and Randy Johnson (313), according to the Elias Sports Bureau. If he has more than 220 strikeouts this season, he’ll overtake David Cone’s 2,668 to have the most by any Missouri-born pitcher in bigleague history. “Sweet,” he said. The Cooperstown-ready résumé is filling up for Scherzer, 34. Only four pitchers have won more Cy Young awards that Scherzer’s three, and all of them are in the Hall of Fame (Johnson, Greg Maddux, and Steve Carlton) or Roger Clemens. Six pitchers have won as many as three Cy Young awards, and the other five are in the Hall of Fame, like Pedro Martinez and Tom Seaver and Sandy Koufax, or still pitching, like Clayton Kershaw. Scherzer’s six All-Star Game appearances trail only

AVERAGES Batting Martinez Wieters DeJong Fowler O’Neill Wong Molina Ozuna Goldschmidt Bader Carpenter Munoz Robinson Gyorko Team

AVG .364 .364 .342 .313 .303 .272 .262 .260 .259 .224 .202 .200 .143 .100 .267

Pitching Brebbia Gant Ponce de Leon Hicks Wainwright Gallegos Flaherty Wacha Mikolas Miller Hudson Webb Leone Team

W 1 3 0 1 3 1 3 2 2 1 2 0 0 19

AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 77 12 28 5 0 1 13 4 15 1 2 11 0 4 0 0 0 5 0 4 1 0 117 26 40 14 1 5 13 10 22 2 1 80 12 25 6 0 1 7 12 20 1 1 33 4 10 2 0 1 4 1 13 0 1 92 14 25 4 1 4 15 16 17 5 3 107 11 28 8 0 2 20 5 9 1 1 100 24 26 5 0 10 28 13 25 3 0 116 22 30 3 0 9 19 15 34 0 2 49 8 11 1 0 3 9 9 20 0 1 104 18 21 5 1 3 5 20 31 1 2 10 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 20 2 2 0 0 0 1 2 10 0 1 983 158 262 54 3 40 146 110 248 16 16 L 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 10

ERA 0.55 0.90 1.80 2.13 3.73 3.86 4.06 4.78 5.29 5.56 5.63 7.11 7.30 4.22

G 14 16 1 13 6 8 6 5 6 16 6 9 13 29

GS 0 0 1 0 6 0 6 5 6 0 5 0 0 29

SV IP 0 16.1 2 20.0 0 5.0 9 12.2 0 31.1 0 9.1 0 31.0 0 26.1 0 34.0 1 11.1 1 24.0 0 6.1 0 12.1 13 258.0

H 6 6 2 6 30 6 32 24 34 11 33 4 13 222

R 1 2 1 3 14 4 14 14 21 9 16 5 10 126

ER HR BB SO 1 1 8 20 2 2 7 19 1 1 3 7 3 1 5 16 13 5 12 27 4 2 3 16 14 7 6 36 14 5 17 29 20 8 8 19 7 4 9 16 15 8 13 19 5 2 3 6 10 2 6 14 121 53 111 261

Hall of Famer and Carthage, Mo., native Carl Hubbell among Missouri-born pitchers. This past winter, Mizzou altered its rules for retirement numbers and Scherzer became the first athlete to have his number (No. 31) retired without completing an undergraduate degree. “I’ll always be grateful,” he said. What’s missing is almost as glaring to him as his mantel is gleaming for history: a championship ring. The departure of Bryce Harper has left Scherzer as the bona fide star in the nation’s capital and he already was the soul of the clubhouse. But since signing a sevenyear, $210-million contract with the Nats, Scherzer has won two Cy Young awards and Washington has won zero playoff series. Scherzer last advanced to the World Series with Detroit in 2012, and he has not advanced past the division series since 2013, also with Detroit. He has three remaining seasons on his contract, his mid-30s have arrived, and that sensation of chasing a championship – is it getting more acute? “Stronger,” he said. “Because every other concern you have early in your career kind of goes away. When you’re young in your career, you obviously still want to win the World Series, but you’re also trying to establish yourself in the major leagues, trying to figure out

the league, trying to have success, trying to be consistent. These are the hardest things to do in the game. That’s still a battle in its own right. But your ultimate reason why you do what you do is to win the World Series.” The Nats’ perpetual pennant chase pivoted this winter toward pitching and youth as they added lefty Patrick Corbin to a rotation that already included Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg, and also saw Harper leave for the rival Phillies. Two of the Nats’ starting outfielders are 21, or younger. One of the game’s top technicians with his mechanics, Scherzer saw a flaw after a recent dud in Miami. He shortened his arm swing – “You can’t speed up your arm to solve time, so you have to actually shorten up the path,” he said – and the results got him past 2,500. In that start, 21-year-old rookie shortstop Carter Kieboom homered and outfielder Victor Robles, 21, stole two bases. Scherzer struck out 10. The Nats lost. That gave him 84 games with at least 10 strikeouts. Same as Carlton. No other active pitcher has more than 65. Not that he’s counting. “I’m more focused on what’s going on here in this clubhouse,” Scherzer said. “I expect winning plays. I don’t care how they do it, or who does it, or how old they are, how young. I expect this clubhouse to make winning plays across the diamond, whether it’s on the mound, on the bases, or in the box. Find a way to keep scratching runs. “However we do that, it’s music to my ears.”

FOWLER HAS FLU Outfielder Dexter Fowler’s flu-like symptoms worsened overnight and the switch-hitter was sent for treatment and fluids to help him recover. The Cardinals had Fowler remain at the team hotel Tuesday night for his and their benefit, manager Mike Shildt said, and he was not available for that evening’s game. Fowler’s family was also ill, his wife shared on social media. … Luke Gregerson, on the verge of coming back from the injured list, will throw a live batting practice against teammates Wednesday at Nationals Park. Shildt said he and the coaches want to see Gregerson in a controlled setting against major-league hitters before determining when to activate the veteran reliever. That likely puts his earliest return this weekend at Wrigley Field. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

DP: Cardinals 1. Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Wainwright 61/3 6 2 Webb Gant Miller

2/ 3

2

0 0 0

11/3 1 0 0 2/ 3

0 0 0

2

5 80 3.73

0 0

6 7.11

0

2 27 0.90

0

1 12 5.56

Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez

5 5 3

Suero

3

7 94 5.91

0

3 27 6.92

2/ 3

0 0 0

0

2 11 7.36

1/ 3

0 0 0

1

2 19 1.64

Jennings

2/ 3

1 0 0

1

1 18 0.00

Ross

1/ 3

0 0 0

0 0

Sipp

1 1 0 0

2

Barraclough 1

2 3.86

Webb pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. W: Wainwright 3-2. L: Sanchez 0-4. S: Miller 1-2. H: Webb 3, Gant 6. Inherited runnersscored: Webb 2-0, Gant 1-0, Miller 1-0, Ross 2-0. HBP: Wainwright 2 (Suzuki,Robles). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Nick Mahrley; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:09. A: 19,753 (41,313).

HOW THEY SCORED NATIONALS THIRD Eaton homers. Robles homers. Nationals 2, Cardinals 0. CARDINALS FOURTH DeJong walks. Martinez singles. Molina walks. Wong singles. DeJong scores. Bader singles. Molina scores. Martinez scores. Cardinals 3, Nationals 2.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Adam Wainwright turns in a solid effort, allowing the Nationals two runs in 6 1/3 innings Tuesday night in Washington.

Cards come from behind again vs. Nationals CARDINALS • FROM B1

ror the bullpen walked later in the game. After Wainwright’s 6 1/3 strong innings, relievers Tyler Webb, John Gant and Andrew Miller had to get eight outs with a one-run cushion. When each of them entered the game, that tying run was already on base. Not once flinched. Webb got a double play to erase his inherited runner. Gant retired three batters in order in the eighth. With Jordan Hicks unavailable to microwave the ninth inning, Miller retired both batters he faced and got his first save of the season. For the second time in as many nights against the Nats, the Cardinals fell behind early and rallied for all of their runs in one burst. They claimed their 10th win in their past 12 games, and for only the second time in club history had 18 wins in April. There’s a vibe radiating from their versatility. In the past week, the Cardinals have thundered to wins behind Marcell Ozuna’s gluttonous RBI run. They’ve followed steadying starting pitching to wins, like they did with Jak Flaherty’s seven shutout innings Sunday. Bader’s

homer cracked the scoreboard Monday, and later he stole a hit with a bunt, too. He and Wong have both been drilling on bunts in large part because they know the power at the top is waiting if they prime the offense. For Wong, it’s a reflection on the clearance he’s received from Shildt to be himself. “I’ve never been a power guy,” Wong said. “That was never something I wanted to do. It was a trend that was going around the clubhouse that if you wanted to play you had to put up those good numbers. As soon as Shildt told me to play my game — bunting has always been my game. It’s always been something I’ve prided myself on. I brought it back.” With the bases loaded in the fourth and Sanchez leaning on his sharp cutter, Wong came to the plate and spied third baseman, Wilmer Difo, playing back. The Nats put superb fielder Anthony Rendon on the injured list Tuesday, leaving a committee at the hot corner. Wong placed the first pitch he saw — a splitter — down the line. As DeJong passed it down the line he saw it rolled true — better than if Wong had bowled it.

“That’s probably one of my better bunts,” Wong said. Bader followed by slipping a single to center for the lead against Sanchez (0-4), and Wainwright (3-2) responded with a perfect fourth. Like so many opponents in the past fortnight, Washington took a lead against the Cardinals with a pair of home runs. Only the flightless Orioles have allowed more home runs this season than 53 hit against the Cardinals through 29 games. The Cardinals have minimized the bruising by limiting opponents to solo homers. Nationals leadoff hitter Adam Eaton jumped the first pitch he saw in the third inning — a spiraling cutter — for a solo homer down the right-field line, and Victor Robles by drilling a 3-1 curveball over the left-center wall. Wainwright would entice further trouble with a four-pitch walk to former teammate Matt Adams and a hit batter, all with one out. He then reached safe harbor along the Anacostia River. Even in the stormiest innings, the back half of the Nats’ line was where Wainwright swamped ral-

lies. After back-to-back singles opened the second inning, Wainwright struck out rookie Carter Kieboom and two groundouts to slip free of the inning. In the third, Wainwright struck out Kieboom on a curve and then sent three strikes past Brian Dozier to end the threat. The top of the sixth ended when Bader worked Wander Suero through a 13-pitch at-bat that ended with a strikeout. Wainwright finished the bottom of the inning on five pitches — against the bottom of the Nats’ lineup. Wainwright teased them with a four-seam cutter and a sinker that crossed the plate differently, and then had the curve as a trump to play. “I think Waino is always a master of a lot of things — the art of pitching,” Shildt said. “He’s a smart competitor. He’s very strategic, obviously. He and Yadi share a brain and have a game plan and they adjust their plan. It was fun to watch them work. They can do it without words. They’re in synch with each other.” That comes from starting 248 games together — more than any other Cardinals’ battery and now tied with Tom Glavine and Javy Lopez for the 10th-most in baseball history.

The only time one of the bottom four batters in Washington’s lineup reached base against Wainwright was on an intentional walk, which loaded the bases and dared Sanchez to do something against Wainwright’s movement. Sanchez skipped a ball back to Wainwright and off the pitcher’s cleat. The carom went right to Paul Goldschmidt at first for the out. Said Wainwright,“... we’ll take our chances that it has a good bounce. Which it may have had the best bounce I’ve ever seen off a pitcher’s leg. … Completely planned.” All the bounces and bunts went their way. Mostly because they’re looking for them. “It’s about finding ways to score runs without the home run,” DeJong said. “We’re batting. We’re getting good at-bats. And we know if that continues someone is getting the big hit. It just doesn’t have to be the biggest hit. It can be a smart hit. We can score runs in a lot of ways, win games in any way, and we’re making teams aware.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

NHL PLAYOFFS

NHL PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

Bobrovsky saves day for Blue Jackets Goalie stops 36 shots, Columbus takes 2-1 series lead over Boston MITCH STACY

Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Sergei Bobrovsky kept up his impressive postseason play, making 36 saves as the Columbus Blue Jackets beat the Boston Bruins 2-1 on Tuesday night to take a 2-1 lead in their Eastern Conference semifinal series. Boone Jenner and Matt Duchene scored for the Blue Jackets, who won a second-round home game for first time in franchise history. Game 4 of the best-of-seven series is Thursday night. Columbus has won 13 of 15 games dating back to March 24. Tuukka Rask had 32 saves for Boston. The Bruins’ only goal was a fluke in the last minute of the second period, the only chink in an otherwise brilliant game by Bobrovsky, who is having the best postseason of his career. Bobrovsky withstood a flurry by Boston earlier in the second period, including an acrobatic save that saw him sweep away a puck from in front of the goal line. The Bruins pulled Rask with 2:11 left

but couldn’t beat Bobrovsky with the 6-on-5 advantage. Columbus overcame deficits twice to win Game 2 in overtime at Boston on Saturday but never trailed in Game 3. There were some big hits, but the game was less testy than the previous two meetings between the teams in the postseason. The Blue Jackets struck late in the first period when Jenner, skating left to right across the slot, slid the puck past Rask on the glove side before the goalie could adjust. The goal with 1:23 left was Jenner’s first of the postseason. With Zdeno Chara in the penalty box for high-sticking Jenner in the face, the Blue Jackets swarmed for an extended time in front of the Boston net before Duchene tapped in another goal with 7:18 left in the second. Boston made it a one-goal game with 40 seconds left in the middle period. Amid a knot of players in front the Columbus net, the puck trickled behind Bobrovsky and over the line. The goal initially was waved off by an official, but a video review determined that play hadn’t stopped before the puck slid in. Jake DeBrusk got credit for the goal.

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

COLUMBUS 2, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston 3, Columbus 2, OT Game 2: Colum. 3, Boston 2, 2OT Tuesday: Columbus 2, Boston 1 Thursday: at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Saturday: at Boston, 6:15 p.m. x-Monday: at Columbus, TBD x-May 8: at Boston, TBD

CAROLINA 2, NEW YORK ISLANDERS 0 Game 1: Carolina 1, New York 0, OT Game 2: Carolina 2, New York 1 Today: at Carolina, 6 p.m. Friday: at Carolina, 6 p.m. x-Sunday: at New York, TBD x-May 7: at Carolina, TBD x-May 8: at New York, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE

ST. LOUIS 2, DALLAS 1 Game 1: St. Louis 3, Dallas 2 Game 2: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Monday: St. Louis 4, Dallas 3 Today: at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Friday: at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday: at Dallas, TBD x-May 7: at St. Louis, TBD

SAN JOSE 1, COLORADO 1 Game 1: San Jose 5, Colorado 2 Game 2: Colorado 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday: at Colorado, (n) Thursday: at Colorado, 9 p.m. Saturday: at San Jose, 9 p.m. x-Monday: at Colorado, TBD x-May 8: at San Jose, TBD

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Blue Jackets defenseman Dean Kukan sends Bruins winger David Pastrnak to the ice along the boards during the second period in Game 3 of the teams’ second-round Eastern Conference series Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Rangers add Fox ahead of draft

men, trailing Hobey Baker Award winner Cale Makar (49). The 21-year-old from Jericho, New York, helped the United States win NEW YORK — The New York a bronze medal at the 2018 world Rangers acquired Hobey Baker fi- junior championship. nalist Adam Fox from the Carolina Hurricanes in exchange for their Coach hopeful of second-round pick this year and a conditional third-round choice Mrazek’s return next year. RALEIGH, N.C. — Goalie Petr Rangers general manager Jeff Mrazek was not at practice TuesGorton announced the deal for the day, but his condition was slightly Harvard defenseman on Tuesday. upgraded by Hurricanes coach Rod New York will have nine picks in Brind’Amour. the June draft, with at least two in “We’re lucky. The report I got the first round. was (the lower-body injury) isn’t Fox played in 33 games for the as bad as we feared,” the coach said Crimson, collecting nine goals a day before Game 3 of the Eastern and 39 assists. He ranked second Conference second-round series in points among NCAA defense- with the New York Islanders at

NBA PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

PNC Arena. Brind’Amour said Mrazek is “day to day” and possibly could return this series, adding, “Petr was playing lights-out.” Brind’Amour stressed the Canes would be extra cautious with Mrazek, given the nature of his injury. Meanwhile, Hurricanes rookie Andrei Svechnikov said: “I feel good, great.” He hopes to play tonight. Svechnikov has been out with a concussion since Game 3 of the Capitals series. Defenseman Trevor van Riemsdyk (upper-body) and forward Saku Maenalanen (hand) are out.

Calvert for Tuesday night’s Game 3 against San Jose in Denver. Sven Andrighetto took Calvert’s place in the lineup in the Western Conference series, which was tied at 1-1.

SHARKS: San Jose captain Joe Pavelski and forward Joonas Donskoi didn’t travel with the team to Denver, coach Peter DeBoer said. Pavelski and Donskoi were hurt during the Vegas series and have yet to play in this one. DeBoer also said center Gustav Nyquist went home to be with his wife for the birth of their child. He was exBRIEFLY pected back in time for Tuesday AVALANCHE: Colorado was to be night’s game. without physical forward Matt — Wire reports

NBA PLAYOFFS

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS

MILWAUKEE 1, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston, 112-90 Tuesday: Milwaukee, 123-102 Friday: at Boston, 7 p.m. Monday: at Boston, 6 p.m. May 8: at Milwaukee, TBD x-May 10: at Boston, TBD x-May 13: at Milwaukee, TBD

TORONTO 1, PHILADELPHIA 1 Game 1: Toronto, 108-95 Game 2: Philadelphia, 94-89 Thursday: at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Sunday: at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m. x-May 7: at Toronto, TBD x-May 9: at Phila., TBD x-May 12: at Toronto, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo looks to shoot over Celtics counterpart Aron Baynes during the first half of Game 2 of the teams’ second-round Eastern Conference series Tuesday night in Milwaukee.

Bucks shoot down doubt Milwaukee roars out to 31-point lead in response to defeat in Game 1 CHARLES F. GARDNER

STAT OF THE DAY

22

Vince Carter, who last season played with the Atlanta Hawks, said Tuesday he plans to return for a 22nd season — the most in NBA history. The swingman has played for eight teams and he said hopes to return to Atlanta for a second season.

Curtis McElhinney (35 years, 343 days), subbing for injured Petr Mrazek, will become the oldest goalie to make his first Stanley Cup playoff start when the Carolina Hurricanes host the New York Islanders tonight in their Eastern Conference series.

Kanter willing to shoulder the load

EASTERN CONFERENCE

DENVER 1, PORTLAND 0 Game 1: Denver, 121-113 Today: at Denver, 8 p.m. Friday: at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sunday: at Portland, 6 p.m. x-May 7: at Denver, TBD x-May 9: at Portland, TBD x-May 12: at Denver, TBD

35

AROUND THE NBA

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

GOLDEN STATE 1, HOUSTON 0 Game 1: Golden State, 104-100 Tuesday: at Golden State, (n) Saturday: at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Monday: at Houston, 8:30 p.m. x-May 8: at Golden State, TBD x-May 10: at Houston, TBD x-May 12: at Golden State, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

Associated Press

MILWAUKEE — Giannis Antetokoumpo had 29 points and 10 rebounds, Khris Middleton made seven of Milwaukee’s 20 3-pointers, and the Bucks beat the Boston Celtics 123-102 on Tuesday night to even their second-round Eastern Conference playoff series at a game apiece. Antetokoumpo bounced back from a sub-par performance in Game 1, repeatedly attacking the rim with powerful drives to the basket. He went 7-for-16 from the floor and 13 of 18 at the foul line. Middleton finished with 28 points for Milwaukee, which went 20-for-47 from beyond the arc. Eric Bledsoe added 21 points and five assists.

The Bucks led by as many as 31 points after an opening half that was closely played. Game 3 is Friday night in Boston. Marcus Morris paced the Celtics with 17 points. Jaylen Brown had 16 and Al Horford finished with 15. Kyrie Irving, who had 26 points and 11 assists in the Celtics’ 11290 victory in the series opener, finished with nine points on 4-for-18 shooting in 31 minutes. Milwaukee broke the game open by outscoring Boston 39-18 in the third quarter. Antetokounmpo scored 15 points in the period, including a 3-pointer over Horford to give the Bucks an 81-71 lead with 5:33 left. Antetokounmpo tipped in his own miss and made another 3-pointer to help Milwaukee pull away. The Bucks went on a 24-2 run to carry a 98-73 lead into the fourth. Brook Lopez and George Hill

each finished with 10 points for Milwaukee. Pat Connaughton grabbed 11 rebounds to help the Bucks to a 54-45 advantage on the glass. Antetokounmpo came out in an aggressive mode, getting to the foul line for eight attempts in the first quarter and making five. But he missed his only three field goal tries in the period. Irving was 0-for-6 from the field, but the Celtics moved the ball freely while taking a 30-25 lead after one quarter. Boston was 9 of 21 from the field and 9 of 10 at the line in the first quarter. Antetokounmpo scored his first basket on a powerful left-handed dunk that got the Bucks within two and had the crowd on its feet early in the second quarter. Milwaukee led 59-55 at the break, fueled by 3-pointers from Middleton, Bledsoe and Hill. The Bucks outscored the Celtics 34-25 in the second quarter.

DENVER — Enes Kanter didn’t even think about his sore left shoulder as he soared in for a first-quarter dunk and hung from the rim with his left hand. Then, the Portland center grimaced and grabbed the shoulder. Sore shoulder and all, Kanter finished with 26 points in a 121113 loss to the Denver Nuggets on Monday night in Game 1 of the Western Conference semifinals. All things considered he held up just fine. “I don’t have another choice,” Kanter said. “I don’t even try to think about my shoulder. It’s the playoffs. Just got to go out there and play hard and play smart.” Kanter suffered the injury in the Trail Blazers’ deciding Game 5 win over Oklahoma City last Tuesday. He was questionable heading into the series opener against Denver but looked sharp early as he scored 10 of his points in the first quarter. Now more treatment awaits as he and the Blazers try to rebound tonight in Game 2. “Just keep playing through it,” Kanter said. “Pain killers, injections, anything I can do to help my teammates. Doesn’t matter. One arm, two arms, I’m going to go out there and help my teammates win.” BRIEFLY WARRIORS: Forward Kevin Durant says Houston’s James Harden uses his body well to draw fouls, something which he feels creates a lack of “landing space” following the Rockets star’s 3-pointers — a subject of controversy following Golden State’s 104-100 win in the teams’ Western Conference opener Sunday. “I don’t think he’s been cheating the game at all … I think he plays inside the game, plays within the rules of the game,” Durant said. “Referees aren’t gonna be perfect all game, just like players aren’t.” CAVALIERS: Cleveland officials were scheduled to interview former Memphis coach J.B. Bickerstaff, 40, on Tuesday about their coaching vacancy, though the team would not confirm reports. — Wire reports


SPORTS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

NHL PLAYOFFS

NHL PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

Couture’s hat trick puts Sharks on top

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

COLUMBUS 2, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston 3, Columbus 2, OT Game 2: Colum. 3, Boston 2, 2OT Tuesday: Columbus 2, Boston 1 Thursday: at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Saturday: at Boston, 6:15 p.m. x-Monday: at Columbus, TBD x-May 8: at Boston, TBD

Bobrovsky stops 36 shots as Blue Jackets go up 2-1 on Bruins

saves for Colorado, which snapped an eight-game home win streak. The Avalanche went on the power play with 2:56 left when Couture was called for tripping. Colorado pulled Grubauer for an extra skater, WIRE REPORTS but Couture wrapped it up with a DENVER — Logan Couture goal to register the hat trick. scored three times, including the go-ahead goal with 7:10 remain- BLUE JACKETS 2, BRUINS 1: Sergei ing, and the San Jose Sharks beat Bobrovsky kept up his impressive the Colorado Avalanche 4-2 on postseason play, making 36 saves Tuesday night to take a 2-1 lead in as Columbus won at home to take their Western Conference semifi- a 2-1 lead in their Eastern Confernal series. ence semifinal series over Boston. Couture sent a shot over the Boone Jenner and Matt Duchene shoulder of Avalanche goaltender scored for the Blue Jackets, who Philipp Grubauer just 65 seconds won a second-round home game after Matt Nieto tied the score. for first time in franchise history. Couture sealed it on an empty-net Columbus has won 13 of 15 games goal with 29.5 seconds remaining. dating back to March 24. Timo Meier also scored for the Tuukka Rask had 32 saves for Sharks, who improved to 24-16 Boston. The Bruins’ only goal was all-time in Game 3 of a series. a fluke in the last minute of the It’s been an exciting few days second period, the only chink in for Sharks center Gustav Nyquist, an otherwise brilliant game by whose wife gave birth to a daughter Bobrovsky, who is having the best Monday. He returned to the team postseason of his career. Bobrovsky withstood a flurry by before the game and recorded two assists. Boston earlier in the second peMartin Jones stopped 25 shots. riod, including an acrobatic save Nathan MacKinnon had a short- that saw him sweep away a puck handed goal and Nieto added an- from in front of the goal line. The other to help the Avalanche re- Bruins pulled Rask with 2:11 left bound from a 2-0 first-period but couldn’t beat Bobrovsky with deficit. Philipp Grubauer made 27 the 6-on-5 advantage.

CAROLINA 2, NEW YORK ISLANDERS 0 Game 1: Carolina 1, New York 0, OT Game 2: Carolina 2, New York 1 Today: at Carolina, 6 p.m. Friday: at Carolina, 6 p.m. x-Sunday: at New York, TBD x-May 7: at Carolina, TBD x-May 8: at New York, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE

ST. LOUIS 2, DALLAS 1 Game 1: St. Louis 3, Dallas 2 Game 2: Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Monday: St. Louis 4, Dallas 3 Today: at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Friday: at St. Louis, 8:30 p.m. x-Sunday: at Dallas, TBD x-May 7: at St. Louis, TBD

SAN JOSE 2, COLORADO 1 Game 1: San Jose 5, Colorado 2 Game 2: Colorado 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday: San Jose 4, Colorado 2 Thursday: at Colorado, 9 p.m. Saturday: at San Jose, 9 p.m. x-Monday: at Colorado, TBD x-May 8: at San Jose, TBD

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Blue Jackets defenseman Dean Kukan sends Bruins winger David Pastrnak to the ice along the boards during the second period in Game 3 of the teams’ second-round Eastern Conference series Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio.

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Rangers add Fox ahead of draft

men, trailing Hobey Baker Award winner Cale Makar (49). The 21-year-old from Jericho, New York, helped the United States win NEW YORK — The New York a bronze medal at the 2018 world Rangers acquired Hobey Baker fi- junior championship. nalist Adam Fox from the Carolina Hurricanes in exchange for their Coach hopeful of second-round pick this year and a conditional third-round choice Mrazek’s return next year. RALEIGH, N.C. — Goalie Petr Rangers general manager Jeff Mrazek was not at practice TuesGorton announced the deal for the day, but his condition was slightly Harvard defenseman on Tuesday. upgraded by Hurricanes coach Rod New York will have nine picks in Brind’Amour. the June draft, with at least two in “We’re lucky. The report I got the first round. was (the lower-body injury) isn’t Fox played in 33 games for the as bad as we feared,” the coach said Crimson, collecting nine goals a day before Game 3 of the Eastern and 39 assists. He ranked second Conference second-round series in points among NCAA defense- with the New York Islanders at

NBA PLAYOFFS SCORES, SCHEDULE

PNC Arena. Brind’Amour said Mrazek is “day to day” and possibly could return this series, adding, “Petr was playing lights-out.” Brind’Amour stressed the Canes would be extra cautious with Mrazek, given the nature of his injury. Meanwhile, Hurricanes rookie Andrei Svechnikov said: “I feel good, great.” He hopes to play tonight. Svechnikov has been out with a concussion since Game 3 of the Capitals series. Defenseman Trevor van Riemsdyk (upper-body) and forward Saku Maenalanen (hand) are out. BRIEFLY AVALANCHE: Colorado was to be without physical forward Matt

Calvert for Tuesday night’s Game 3 against San Jose in Denver. Sven Andrighetto took Calvert’s place in the lineup. SHARKS: San Jose captain Joe Pavelski and forward Joonas Donskoi didn’t travel with the team to Denver, coach Peter DeBoer said. Pavelski and Donskoi were hurt during the Vegas series and have yet to play in this one. MILESTONES: Tuesday’s game was the latest in April that Columbus has played in franchise history. ... David Krejci joined Ray Bourque (125) and Bobby Orr (66) as the third player in Boston franchise history to have 60 playoff assists. — Wire reports

NBA PLAYOFFS

CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS

MILWAUKEE 1, BOSTON 1 Game 1: Boston, 112-90 Tuesday: Milwaukee, 123-102 Friday: at Boston, 7 p.m. Monday: at Boston, 6 p.m. May 8: at Milwaukee, TBD x-May 10: at Boston, TBD x-May 13: at Milwaukee, TBD

TORONTO 1, PHILADELPHIA 1 Game 1: Toronto, 108-95 Game 2: Philadelphia, 94-89 Thursday: at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Sunday: at Philadelphia, 2:30 p.m. x-May 7: at Toronto, TBD x-May 9: at Phila., TBD x-May 12: at Toronto, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

STAT OF THE DAY

22

Vince Carter, who last season played with the Atlanta Hawks, said Tuesday he plans to return for a 22nd season — the most in NBA history. The swingman has played for eight teams and he said hopes to return to Atlanta for a second season.

Curtis McElhinney (35 years, 343 days), subbing for injured Petr Mrazek, will become the oldest goalie to make his first Stanley Cup playoff start when the Carolina Hurricanes host the New York Islanders tonight in their Eastern Conference series.

Kanter willing to shoulder the load

EASTERN CONFERENCE

DENVER 1, PORTLAND 0 Game 1: Denver, 121-113 Today: at Denver, 8 p.m. Friday: at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sunday: at Portland, 6 p.m. x-May 7: at Denver, TBD x-May 9: at Portland, TBD x-May 12: at Denver, TBD

35

AROUND THE NBA

All series best-of-seven; x-if necessary

GOLDEN STATE 2, HOUSTON 0 Game 1: Golden State, 104-100 Tuesday: Golden State, 115-109 Saturday: at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Monday: at Houston, 8:30 p.m. x-May 8: at Golden State, TBD x-May 10: at Houston, TBD x-May 12: at Golden State, TBD

STAT OF THE DAY

Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo looks to shoot over Celtics counterpart Aron Baynes during the first half of Game 2 of the teams’ second-round Eastern Conference series Tuesday night in Milwaukee.

Bucks shoot down doubt Milwaukee roars out to 31-point lead in response to defeat in Game 1 WIRE REPORTS

MILWAUKEE — Giannis Antetokounmpo attacked the rim, Khris Middleton connected from long range and Eric Bledsoe turned in an effective performance. The Milwaukee Bucks looked more like themselves in Game 2. Antetokounmpo had 29 points and 10 rebounds and Middleton made seven of Milwaukee’s franchise playoff-high 20 3-pointers, helping the Bucks even their second-round playoff series against the Boston Celtics with a 123-102 victory Tuesday night. Antetokounmpo, one of the top candidates for NBA MVP, went 7 for 16 from the floor and 13 of 18 at the foul line. It was an important turnaround for Milwaukee after he had 22 points on 7-for-21 shooting in Game 1 on Sunday. Middleton finished with 28 points. Bledsoe, who was held to six points in the series opener, finished with 21 points and five

assists. The Bucks led by as many as 31 points after a closely played opening half. Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinal series is Friday night in Boston. “I think that’s more what we’re accustomed to seeing,” Bucks coach Mike Budenholzer said. “I liked our spirit, our activity, our competitiveness all up and down the roster. Giannis and Khris and Bled really set a tone. “We need to capture that, take it to Boston with us and play that way up there.” Marcus Morris paced Boston with 17 points. Jaylen Brown had 16, and Al Horford finished with 15. Kyrie Irving, who had 26 points and 11 assists in the Celtics’ 11290 victory in Game 1, had nine points on 4-of-18 shooting. “We weren’t very good on either end,” coach Brad Stevens said. Milwaukee broke it open by outscoring Boston 39-18 in the third quarter. Antetokounmpo scored 15 points in the period, including a 3-pointer over Horford to give the Bucks an 81-71 lead with 5:33 left. Antetokounmpo tipped in his own miss and made another 3 to

help Milwaukee pull away. The Bucks went on a 24-2 run to carry a 98-73 lead into the fourth. WARRIORS 115, ROCKETS 109: Both Golden State and Houston mostly stopped bickering at the officials. Instead, they played basketball. The Warriors finished with a home win and a 2-0 series lead in the Western Conference semifinals. They did so by worrying less about the calls and focusing more on their play. The Warriors featured plenty of offensive balance with Kevin Durant (29 points), Klay Thomopson (21), Stephen Curry (20), Andre Iguodala (16) and Draymond Green (15 points, 12 rebounds, seven assists). Curry dislocated his left middle finger in the first quarter before playing with tape around it. Green collected his 4th technical of the postseason, leaving him three shy of a one-game suspension. Rockets guard James Harden, who had 29 points on 9-of-19 shooting, suffered an eye injury in the first quarter.

DENVER — Enes Kanter didn’t even think about his sore left shoulder as he soared in for a first-quarter dunk and hung from the rim with his left hand. Then, the Portland center grimaced and grabbed the shoulder. Sore shoulder and all, Kanter finished with 26 points in a 121113 loss to the Denver Nuggets on Monday night in Game 1 of the Western Conference semifinals. All things considered he held up just fine. “I don’t have another choice,” Kanter said. “I don’t even try to think about my shoulder. It’s the playoffs. Just got to go out there and play hard and play smart.” Kanter suffered the injury in the Trail Blazers’ deciding Game 5 win over Oklahoma City last Tuesday. He was questionable heading into the series opener against Denver but looked sharp early as he scored 10 of his points in the first quarter. Now more treatment awaits as he and the Blazers try to rebound tonight in Game 2. “Just keep playing through it,” Kanter said. “Pain killers, injections, anything I can do to help my teammates. Doesn’t matter. One arm, two arms, I’m going to go out there and help my teammates win.” BRIEFLY WARRIORS: Forward Kevin Durant says Houston’s James Harden uses his body well to draw fouls, something which he feels creates a lack of “landing space” following the Rockets star’s 3-pointers — a subject of controversy following Golden State’s 104-100 win in the teams’ Western Conference opener Sunday. “I don’t think he’s been cheating the game at all … I think he plays inside the game, plays within the rules of the game,” Durant said. “Referees aren’t gonna be perfect all game, just like players aren’t.” CAVALIERS: Cleveland officials were scheduled to interview former Memphis coach J.B. Bickerstaff, 40, on Tuesday about their coaching vacancy, though the team would not confirm reports. — Wire reports


SPORTS

05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

KENTUCKY DERBY

Derby favorite Omaha Beach draws No. 12 post BY GARY B. GRAVES

Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Knowing their favored horses won’t start the Kentucky Derby on the rail left Richard Mandella and Bob Baffert more relieved than happy. What matters for the Hall of Fame trainers is turning workable starting spots into victory — and a long-sought celebration for Mandella. Omaha Beach is the 4-1 early favorite for Saturday’s 145th Run for the Roses after drawing the No. 12 post position on Tuesday. That could be a good sign for the colt and Mandella, considering that the horse favored to win the Derby has taken the past six. “I hope it comes out that way,” Mandell said. Baffert-trained Game Winner is the 5-1 second choice from the No. 16 post in the 20-horse field for the first leg of the Triple Crown. Game Winner will start inside stablemate Roadster, the 6-1 cothird choice with Improbable, a Baffert colt who will go off from the No. 5 hole in the 1¼-mile race at Churchill Downs. Omaha Beach enters the $3 million showcase on a three-race winning streak. The dark brown colt is coming off a one-length victory in the slop over Improbable in the Arkansas Derby, a race that demonstrated his recent knack for getting up front quickly and staying there. Mandella believes Omaha Beach and Hall of Fame jockey Mike Smith, who won last year’s Derby for Baffert aboard Justify, will make the most of his spot. “It’s really important if you get luck with it,” Mandella said. “If you get a bad luck, a good post

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Rays..................... -$160.................ROYALS Rays..................... -$175.................ROYALS WHITE SOX........... -$165..................Orioles WHITE SOX........... -$150..................Orioles RED SOX............... -$135............... Athletics Astros .................. -$140...................TWINS ANGELS................ -$110.............. Blue Jays National League NATIONALS .......... -$162.................... Cards METS.................... -$172......................Reds BRAVES................ -$155.................. Padres BREWERS............. -$130................. Rockies Dodgers ............... -$135................. GIANTS Interleague Pirates ................. -$115..............RANGERS Yankees ............... -$118................ DBACKS Cubs..................... -$112............ MARINERS PHILLIES .............. -$200................... Tigers Indians................. -$162...............MARLINS NBA Favorite Points Underdog Western Conference NUGGETS ................3.5....................Blazers Eastern Conference Thursday 76ERS..................... PK ...................Raptors NHL Favorite Odds Underdog HURRICANES . -$125/+$105 ........Islanders STARS ............ -$125/+$105 ..............Blues Grand Salami: Over/under 10.5 goals. SOCCER UEFA Champions League BARCELONA....................................... -$125 Liverpool .......................................... +$310 Draw: +$270 Over/under: 3.0 goals NFL Favorite Open/current Underdog BEARS................. 3.5/3.5 ...............Packers VIKINGS .............. 4.5/4.5 ............... Falcons EAGLES .................. 8/8............ Washington JETS .................... 3.5/3.5 .....................Bills Ravens ................ 3.5/3.5 ...........DOLPHINS BUCS ................... 1.5/1.5 ..................49ers Chiefs..................... 5/5.................JAGUARS BROWNS ................ 5/5......................Titans Rams................... 2.5/2.5 .......... PANTHERS CARDS.................. PK/PK ....................Lions SEAHAWKS.......... 7.5/7.5 ...............Bengals CHARGERS .......... 3.5/3.5 ................... Colts COWBOYS............ 7.5/7.5 ................. Giants PATRIOTS ............... 6/6.................. Steelers SAINTS................ 7.5/7.5 ................ Texans RAIDERS ............. 2.5/2.5 .............. Broncos Note: These are preliminary opening lines and could jump in either direction pending the draft, trades and injuries in the pre-season. Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

PRO HOCKEY NHL playoffs Tuesday

Blue Jackets 2, Bruins 1 Boston 0 1 0 — 1 Columbus 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Columbus, Jenner 1 (Nash, Harrington), 18:37. Penalties: Foligno, CBJ, (slashing), 11:17; Krug, BOS, (tripping), 19:04. Second period: 2, Columbus, Duchene 5 (Foligno, Atkinson), 12:42 (pp). 3, Boston, DeBrusk 2 (Kuhlman, Krejci), 19:20. Penalties: Marchand, BOS, (high sticking), 10:49. Third period: None. Penalties: Savard, CBJ, (tripping), 11:18; Bergeron, BOS, (tripping), 11:35. Shots: Boston 12-10-15: 37. Columbus 10-17-7: 34. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 2; Columbus 1 of 3. Goalies: Boston, Rask 5-5 (34 shots-32 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 6-1 (37-36). A: 19,337. Referees: Kevin Pollock, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Greg Devorski. PLAYOFF LEADERS, THROUGH MONDAY GOALS Logan Couture, SAN Tomas Hertl, SAN Jaden Schwartz, STL Mark Stone, VGS Nicklas Backstrom, WAS Charlie Coyle, BOS Warren Foegele, CAR Auston Matthews, TOR Max Pacioretty, VGS Alexander Radulov, DAL Mikko Rantanen, COL ASSISTS Erik Karlsson, SAN Jaccob Slavin, CAR Tyson Barrie, COL Brent Burns, SAN Nathan MacKinnon, COL Alex Pietrangelo, STL Shea Theodore, VGS PLUS/MINUS John Klingberg, DAL Mathew Barzal, NYI Zdeno Chara, BOS Jordan Eberle, NYI Alexander Radulov, DAL Jaccob Slavin, CAR

GP 9 9 9 7 7 9 9 7 7 9 7 GP 9 9 7 9 7 9 7 GP 9 6 9 6 9 9

G 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 A 10 10 7 7 7 7 7 +/7 6 6 6 6 6

position doesn’t work. “His last couple of races he kind of sits back and bides his time a little bit, then decides when to just cruise along. Mike will have to figure that out.” Baffert, meanwhile, aims to match Ben Jones’ record with his sixth Kentucky Derby win and second straight. He won last year with Justify, culminating in the Triple Crown. That came CHARLIE RIEDEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS three years after he took the Kentucky Derby hopeful Omaha Beach gets a bath after a workout at Churchill Downs Tuesday in Louisville, Ky. Triple Crown with American Pharoah. It remains to be seen how the said of the horse who had a threeDerby will unfold hitting the first race winning streak halted in the turn with so many horses vying HORSE Louisiana Derby. “Our horse is TRAINER JOCKEY ODDS for the same spot, but Improbable really on his game, so he’ll come 1. War of Will Mark Casse Tyler Gaffalione 20-1 away from there running. is in a relatively good spot. Game Winner, who won the 2. Tax “I think we’ll probably be on Danny Gargan Junior Alvarado 20-1 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile here last the lead and play catch me if you 3. By My Standards Bret Calhoun Gabriel Saez 20-1 fall, and Roadster will have their can. And you know, if we come Peter Miller Drayden Van Dyke 50-1 away from there like he norwork cut out for them, start- 4. Gray Magician ing from post positions that 5. Improbable mally does, we’re going to come Bob Baffert Irad Ortiz Jr. 6-1 are a combined 4-for-87 in the away from there running. ... I’ve George Weaver Javier Castellano 20-1 Derby. When it was noted that 6. Vekoma thought I had great draws before Roadster’s No. 17 post is 0-for- 7. Maximum Security Jason Servis and gotten wiped out, so maybe Luis Saez 10-1 40, nervous laughter grew in a this is the change.” William Mott Jose Ortiz 10-1 crowded room of horsemen in- 8. Tacitus Points leader Tacitus will start cluding Baffert, his connections 9. Plus Que Parfait from the No. 8 post with 10-1 Brendan Walsh Ricardo Santana Jr. 30-1 and the media. odds as he tries to give trainer Bill Todd Pletcher Corey Lanerie 30-1 Baffert later took all of his 10. Cutting Humor Mott his first Derby victory. The horses’ slots in stride, if only be- 11. Haikal son of Tapit and Close Hatches by Kiaran McLaughlin Raviv Maragh 30-1 cause none was on the rail. War First Defence has Grade 2 wins in Richard Mandella Mike Smith 4-1 of Will drew that unenviable spot 12. Omaha Beach the Wood Memorial and Tampa and was given 20-1 odds as a re- 13. Code of Honor Bay Derby during a three-race Claude McGaughey John Velazquez 15-1 sult. surge. 14. Win Win Win Michael Trombetta Julian Pimentel 15-1 “I like the 16 hole, it’s a good Another 10-1 choice is unKoichi Tsunoda Julien Leparoux 50-1 spot,” he said of Game Win- 15. Master Fencer beaten Maximum Security, who starts from the No. 7 hole and will ner’s position. “Roadster, he’s 16. Game Winner Bob Baffert Joel Rosario 5-1 out there. I don’t know. I always try to follow up his victory in the Bob Baffert Florent Geroux 6-1 get two horses together. A lot of 17. Roadster Grade 1 Florida Derby. times in California they draw so 18. Long Range Toddy Steven Asmussen Jon Court Todd Pletcher entries Spinoff 30-1 ... I’ll be watching those two leavand Cutting Humor face 30-1 19. Spinoff Todd Pletcher Manny Franco 30-1 ing there.” odds after drawing the Nos. 19 War of Will’s trainer, Mark 20. Country House and 10 post positions. William Mott Flavien Prat 30-1 Casse, chose to be encouraged Also eligible is 30-1 BodexAE. Bodexpress Gustavo Delgado Chris Landeros 30-1 about his horse’s post. press, who can get into the field “It could be worse, I think,” he Source: Associated Press with a defection.

Kentucky Derby odds

PRO BASKETBALL

TRANSACTIONS

NBA playoffs

BASEBALL NATIONAL BASEBALL HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM — Named Tim Mead president. Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspnded Houston minor league 3B J.J. Matijevic 50 games after a second positive test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Added RHP Shawn Armstrong to the 25-man roster. DETROIT TIGERS — Placed RHP Tyson Ross on the paternity list. Activated SS Jordy Mercer from the 10-day IL. Placed 2B Josh Harrison on the 10-day IL. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Selected the contract of RHP Griffin Canning. Designated RHP John Curtiss for assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS — Recalled OF Braden Bishop from Tacoma (PCL). Optioned OF Mallex Smith to Tacoma. Named Ichiro Suzuki as an instructor for the team. National League MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned OF Lewis Brinson to New Orleans (PCL). Reinstated OF Garrett Cooper from the 10-day IL. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Placed SS Fernando Tatis Jr. on the 10-day IL, retroactive to April 29. Recalled RHP Phil Maton from El Paso (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Selected the contract of LHP Dan Jennings from Harrisburg (EL). Placed 3B Anthony Rendon on the 10-day IL, retroactive to April 27. Recalled INF Adrian Sanchez from Harrisburg (EL). Optioned RHP Erick Fedde to Harrisburg. Designated RHP Austin Adams for assignment. American Association CHICAGO DOGS — Released OF Joe Benson. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Released INF Josh Anthony. Traded RHP Sean Watkins to Florence (FL) for future considerations. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Announced INF Drew Stankiewicz signed with Cleveland (AL). KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Traded RHP Audury Acevedo to Texas for a player to be named. MILWAUKEE MILKMEN — Released RHP Jordan Kraus. TEXAS AIRHOGS — Signed RHP Taylor Wright. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Acquired RHP Sean Watkins from Gary SouthShore (AA). Released OF Jimmy Heck and C-1B Tyler Lancaster. RASCALS — Released UTL Jay Estes and RHPs Sam Thoele and Alex Viera. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Signed RHP Chase Cunningham. BASKETBALL Women’s National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES SPARKS — Re-signed G Chelsea Gray. FOOTBALL National Football League INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed RB Spencer Ware. Waived S Isaiah Johnson and DT DeShawn Williams. Released WR James Wright. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Waived RB James Butler, LB Cayson Collins, WR Rashard Davis, G-C Cameron Hunt and WR De’Mornay Pierson-El. TENNESSEE TITANS — Claimed LB Riley Bullough off waivers from Tampa Bay. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Waived DB Alex Carter, G Kyle Fuller, OT Darius James, WR Tre McBride, DB Harlan Miller and G Salesi Uhatafe. Signed DE Ryan Bee, LB B.J. Bunt, OT Juwann Bushell-Beatty, TE Elkanah Dillon, S Jojo McIntosh, OT Chidi Okeke and WRs T.J. Rahming and Steve Smith Jr. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Signed WR Matt Hazel and DE Ja’Von Rolland-Jones. HOCKEY National Hockey League LOS ANGELES KINGS — Signed D Markus Phillips to a three-year entry-level contract. NEW YORK RANGERS — Acquired D Adam Fox from Carolina for a 2019 second-round draft pick and a conditional 20202 third-round draft pick. MOTORSPORTS NASCAR — Reinstated Truck Series driver Austin Wayne following a violation of the substance abuse policy. Fined Austin Dillon’s crew chief Danny Stockman Jr. $25,000, deducted 10 championship points and suspended chief Gregory Ebert one race for infractions last weekend in the Geico 500. Fined Ryan Blaney’s crew chief Jeremy Bullins $10,000 for loose lug nuts found on Blaney’s car after the race. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Suspended Philadelphia Union D Kai Wagner an additional match for the red card he received for serious foul play in the 89th minute of Philadelphia’s match against the Montreal Impact. NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION — Named Kevin Hitchcock assistant coach. COLLEGE BELMONT — Named Mick Hedgepeth men’s director of basketball operations. EASTERN MICHIGAN — Named Nicole Sherwin assistant director of compliance. GEORGE MASON — Named Dr. Deborah Beck Corbatto deputy athletic director, internal operations/risk management. NEW JERSEY CITY — Announced the school will join the Skyline Conference as an affiliate member in men’s volleyball in Spring, 2020. NORTH CAROLINA — Named Courtney Banghart women’s basketball coach. VIRGINIA — Announced graduate WRs Dejon Brissett (Richmond) and Terrell Chatman (Arizona State) will transfer to the school. WAKE FOREST — Signed football coach Dave Clawson to a contract extension through the 2026 season.

Tuesday

Bucks 123, Celtics 102 Boston: Tatum 2-10 1-2 5, Morris 6-8 2-2 17, Horford 6-10 0-0 15, Irving 4-18 0-0 9, J.Brown 5-12 6-7 16, Ojeleye 1-2 2-2 5, Hayward 1-5 2-2 5, Yabusele 2-2 2-3 6, Williams III 1-2 2-2 4, Baynes 2-3 0-0 4, Rozier 2-10 5-5 9, Wanamaker 2-4 2-2 7. Totals 34-86 24-27 102. Milwaukee: Mirotic 3-10 2-2 9, Antetokounmpo 7-16 13-18 29, Lopez 3-10 1-2 10, Bledsoe 7-12 4-4 21, Middleton 10-18 1-1 28, Ilyasova 1-4 2-2 4, Wilson 1-3 0-0 2, Frazier 1-2 0-0 2, Hill 3-6 2-2 10, S.Brown 0-3 0-0 0, Connaughton 2-4 0-0 5, Snell 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 39-89 25-31 123. Boston 30 25 18 29 — 102 Milwaukee 25 34 39 25 — 123 3-point goals: Boston 10-28 (Morris 3-4, Horford 3-5, Ojeleye 1-1, Wanamaker 1-1, Hayward 1-3, Irving 1-5, Baynes 0-1, J.Brown 0-2, Tatum 0-2, Rozier 0-4), Milwaukee 20-47 (Middleton 7-10, Bledsoe 3-5, Lopez 3-8, Antetokounmpo 2-4, Hill 2-4, Snell 1-1, Connaughton 1-3, Mirotic 1-5, Ilyasova 0-1, Frazier 0-1, Wilson 0-2, S.Brown 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 45 (Rozier, Horford 8), Milwaukee 54 (Connaughton 11). Assists: Boston 19 (Irving 4), Milwaukee 22 (Bledsoe 5). Total fouls: Boston 23, Milwaukee 24. A: 17,536 (17,500). PLAYOFF LEADERS, THROUGH MONDAY SCORING AVERAGE G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, GOL 7 79 68 245 35.0 Lillard, POR 6 65 44 204 34.0 Leonard, TOR 7 79 41 219 31.3 Harden, HOU 6 52 45 174 29.0 George, OKC 5 44 40 143 28.6 Antetokounmpo, MIL 5 44 32 127 25.4 Jokic, DEN 8 73 40 199 24.9 Curry, GOL 7 49 41 166 23.7 Siakam, TOR 7 69 12 163 23.3 Irving, BOS 5 44 15 116 23.2 McCollum, POR 6 53 13 138 23.0 Westbrook, OKC 5 40 23 114 22.8 DeRozan, SAN 7 58 38 154 22.0 Williams, LAC 6 45 34 130 21.7 Mitchell, UTA 5 36 24 107 21.4 Embiid, PHL 6 41 41 127 21.2 LeVert, BRO 5 36 21 105 21.0 Aldridge, SAN 7 55 27 140 20.0 Gallinari, LAC 6 39 28 119 19.8 Murray, DEN 8 59 23 156 19.5 Russell, BRO 5 37 11 97 19.4 Middleton, MIL 5 29 20 92 18.4 Harrell, LAC 6 46 18 110 18.3 Bogdanovic, IND 4 25 15 72 18.0 Jackson, DET 4 28 6 71 17.8 Paul, HOU 6 38 19 104 17.3 Gordon, HOU 6 35 11 103 17.2 Butler, PHL 7 41 30 119 17.0 Thompson, GOL 7 45 10 117 16.7 Bledsoe, MIL 5 32 13 83 16.6 Tatum, BOS 5 31 11 81 16.2 Harris, PHL 7 42 14 111 15.9 Rubio, UTA 5 28 17 77 15.4 Kanter, POR 6 38 16 92 15.3 Evans, IND 4 21 8 61 15.2 Gordon, ORL 5 29 10 76 15.2 Simmons, PHL 7 46 14 106 15.1 White, SAN 7 41 19 106 15.1 FIELD GOAL PCT FG FGA PCT Harrell, LAC 46 63 .730 Adams, OKC 28 42 .667 Simmons, PHL 46 70 .657 Favors, UTA 23 36 .639 Kanter, POR 38 61 .623 Allen, BRO 19 32 .594 Gobert, UTA 19 32 .594 Capela, HOU 24 41 .585 Brown, BOS 25 43 .581 Leonard, TOR 79 137 .577 3-POINT PCT 3FG 3FGA PCT Kennard, DET 9 15 .600 Craig, DEN 12 21 .571 Evans, IND 11 20 .550 Curry, POR 7 13 .538 Green, LAC 12 23 .522 Brown, MIL 6 12 .500 Gilgeous-Alexander, LA 9 18 .500 Middleton, MIL 14 28 .500 Tatum, BOS 8 16 .500 Forbes, SAN 15 31 .484 FREE THROW PCT FT FTA PCT Carroll, BRO 8 8 1.000 Griffin, DET 7 7 1.000 Harris, BRO 8 8 1.000 Hayward, BOS 13 13 1.000 Iwundu, ORL 9 9 1.000 Shamet, LAC 10 10 1.000 Curry, GOL 41 42 .976 Durant, GOL 68 74 .919 Jokic, DEN 40 44 .909 Middleton, MIL 20 22 .909 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF TOT AVG Drummond, DET 4 20 32 52 13.0 Jokic, DEN 8 28 66 94 11.8 Embiid, PHL 6 15 53 68 11.3 Antetokounmpo, MIL 5 12 44 56 11.2 Horford, BOS 5 10 42 52 10.4 Gobert, UTA 5 23 28 51 10.2 Harris, PHL 7 8 63 71 10.1 Capela, HOU 6 17 42 59 9.8 Kanter, POR 6 20 38 58 9.7 Aldridge, SAN 7 19 48 67 9.6 ASSISTS G AST AVG Westbrook, OKC 5 53 10.6 Jokic, DEN 8 70 8.8 Rubio, UTA 5 43 8.6 Irving, BOS 5 42 8.4 Green, GOL 7 56 8.0 Lowry, TOR 7 56 8.0 Harden, HOU 6 46 7.7 Williams, LAC 6 46 7.7 Jackson, DET 4 28 7.0

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park results First $6,000, 5f, Time 1:00.80 Jochero (U.Lopez), 18.80, 5.00, No Tix Willow Ridge (V.Bailon), 2.80, No Tix Scratched: Sircorri. Also Ran: Crafty Prospect. Exacta (1-4) $47.60. $1 Trifecta (1-4-2) $44.60. Second $6,000, 1mi, Time 1:45.91. Caliche Lane (C.Emigh), 8.40, 3.40, 2.40 Rosie’s Flame (J.Tavares), 3.20, 2.40 Pasture Ornament (U.Lopez), 3.40 Also Ran: Summer Seashell, Dixie Lee Attack, Hamcat. $1 Daily Double (1-2) $46.70. Exacta (2-3) $21.00. $0.1 Superfecta (2-3-1-6) $7.88. $1 Trifecta (2-3-1) $29.90. Third $5,800, 5f, Time 0:59.89. Thisduckcanfly (C.Emigh), 3.40, 2.40, 2.10 Wildwoodsummertime (U.Lopez), 2.40, 2.10 Trouncer (J.Molina, Jr.), 2.20 Scratched: Flaunt. Also Ran: Peteizum, Tyler T, Morninglover Rambo. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-2-2/6) 3 Correct $49.40. $1 Daily Double (2-6) $4.00. Exacta (6-4) $6.20. $0.1 Superfecta (6-4-1-7) $1.55. $1 Trifecta (6-4-1) $7.60. Fourth $9,800, 5f, Time 0:59.91. Boohoo Sue (J.Tavares), 16.60, 5.20, No Tix Dr Winn Kyi (V.Bailon), 5.00, No Tix Also Ran: Precious Kowgirl, See Grace Fly By. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-2/6-1) 3 Correct $33.95. $1 Daily Double (6-1) $30.80. Exacta (1-4) $77.80. $1 Trifecta (1-4-3) $59.70. Fifth $5,800, 5f, rain, Time 1:00.13. Marnate (C.Emigh), 7.20, 4.40, 3.80 Praisem (J.Molina, Jr.), 3.20, 2.20 Holyhoot (U.Lopez), 3.20 Also Ran: Daddy Was a Hussla, Serena’s Halo, Sassy and Regal, Ice Attack. $0.5 Pick 3 (2/6-1-6) 3 Correct $52.40. $1 Daily Double (1-6) $45.80. Exacta (6-5) $21.40. $0.1 Superfecta (6-5-1-2) $15.10. $1 Trifecta (6-5-1) $42.10. Sixth $10,000, 5f, Time 0:59.34. American Heritage (J.Molina, Jr.), 5.00, 2.40, No Tix Jolly Ghaaly (C.Emigh), 2.60, No Tix Scratched: Wildwood Willy. Also Ran: Barton Attack, Thunder Down Under. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-6-1) 3 Correct $81.05. $1 Daily Double (6-1) $20.80. Exacta (1-4) $9.40. $0.1 Superfecta (1-4-2-3) $3.73. $ 1 Trifecta (1-4-2) $8.30. Seventh $6,000, 5f, Time 1:00.68. Hero’s and Dreams (C.Emigh), 6.20, 3.60, 2.60 Shrimp (U.Lopez), 3.20, 2.40 Lion’s Wager (J.Molina, Jr.), 3.00 Scratched: Cubbie Girl North, Affirmance. Also Ran: Holy Ekati, Phantasmic, Fu Peggy. $0.5 Pick 4 (1-6-1-4) 4 Correct $316.85. $0.5 Pick 3 (6-1-4) 3 Correct $27.80. $0.1 Superfecta (4-2-3-6) $3.61. $1 Trifecta (4-2-3) $19.80. $1 Consolation Double (1-7) $1.70. $1 Daily Double (1-4) $10.90. Exacta (4-2) $16.40.

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Cup POINTS LEADERS 1. Kyle Busch, 430. 2. Joey Logano, 415. 3. Denny Hamlin, 367. 4. Kevin Harvick, 350. 5. Brad Keselowski, 337. 6. Martin Truex Jr, 328. 7. Chase Elliott, 324. 8. Kurt Busch, 323. 9. Ryan Blaney, 306. 10. Clint Bowyer, 288. 11. Aric Almirola, 288. 12. Daniel Suarez, 266. 13. Austin Dillon, 253. 14. Ryan Newman, 251. 15. Alex Bowman, 239. 16. Jimmie Johnson, 238. 17. Paul Menard, 234. 18. Erik Jones, 230. 19. William Byron, 226. 20. Ricky Stenhouse Jr, 223. SCHEDULE Sunday, May 5: Gander RV 400, Dover, Del. Saturday, May 11: Digital Ally 400, Kansas City, Kan. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy Open, Concord, N.C. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy All-Star Race, Concord, N.C. Sunday, May 26: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. Sunday, June 2: Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, June 9: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Sunday, June 23: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. Sunday, June 30: Camping World 400, Joliet, Ill.

GOLF

BASEBALL Major League leaders

Area holes in one Wolf Hollow Golf Club: Gary Jones, hole no. 14, 146 yards, 5 hybrid, April 30 Whitmoor Country Club: Scott Schnemann, hole no. 14 south, 130 yards, pitching wedge, April 30

AREA COLLEGES SCHEDULE College baseball Missouri vs. Southeast Missouri, 3 p.m. Wednesday Track and Field 2019 Great Lakes Valley Conference Outdoor Championships, Thursday-Saturday.

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA D.C. United 5 3 2 17 13 10 Montreal 5 3 2 17 12 14 Philadelphia 4 3 2 14 13 10 Toronto FC 4 2 1 13 19 13 Columbus 4 5 1 13 8 11 Orlando City 3 3 3 12 13 14 New York City FC 2 1 6 12 11 12 Chicago 2 4 3 9 12 13 New York 2 4 2 8 9 9 Atlanta 2 3 2 8 6 8 Cincinnati 2 5 2 8 8 14 New England 2 6 2 8 10 19 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 7 1 2 23 26 8 LA Galaxy 7 1 1 22 15 8 Seattle 5 1 3 18 18 12 FC Dallas 5 2 2 17 14 9 Houston 5 1 1 16 15 8 Minnesota United 4 3 2 14 18 15 Real Salt Lake 3 5 1 10 11 16 Sporting K.C. 2 2 4 10 19 15 San Jose 2 5 2 8 12 19 Portland 2 5 1 7 11 19 Vancouver 1 5 3 6 7 12 Colorado 0 7 2 2 12 24 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Friday Vancouver at Colorado, 8 p.m. Saturday LA Galaxy at New York, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 3 p.m. New York City FC at Montreal, 4 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at San Jose, 9 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at Sporting K.C., 8 p.m.

UEFA Champions League (Home teams listed first) SEMIFINALS First Leg, Tuesday Tottenham (England) 0, Ajax (Netherlands) 1 Wednesday Barcelona (Spain) vs. Liverpool (England), 2 p.m. Second Leg, May 7 Liverpool vs. Barcelona, 2 p.m. May 8 Ajax vs. Tottenham, 2 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday, June 1, Madrid Semifinal winners, 2 p.m.

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA 36 30 2 4 90 22 36 28 7 1 84 20 36 23 1 12 65 36 36 20 8 8 60 39 36 20 6 10 69 49 36 19 8 9 64 51 36 15 9 12 46 44 36 15 6 15 51 47 36 14 8 14 50 44 36 14 8 14 51 52 36 13 7 16 45 54 36 12 7 17 43 48 36 11 9 16 36 45 36 12 6 18 52 65 36 11 7 18 44 63 36 9 11 16 44 61 36 9 8 19 33 55 36 9 4 23 30 66 36 7 5 24 34 76 36 3 5 28 20 74 Friday Everton vs. Burnley, 2 p.m. Saturday Bournemouth vs. Tottenham, 6:30 a.m. West Ham vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Wolverhampton vs. Fulham, 9 a.m. Cardiff vs. Crystal Palace, 11:30 a.m. Newcastle vs. Liverpool, 1:45 p.m. Sunday Huddersfield vs. Man United, 8 a.m. Chelsea vs. Watford, 8 a.m. Arsenal vs. Brighton, 10:30 a.m. Monday Man City vs. Leicester, 2 p.m.

Man City Liverpool Tottenham Chelsea Arsenal Man United Wolverhampton Leicester Everton Watford West Ham Crystal Palace Newcastle Bournemouth Burnley Southampton Brighton Cardiff Fulham Huddersfield

Pts 92 91 70 68 66 65 54 51 50 50 46 43 42 42 40 38 35 31 26 14

Through Tuesday’s early games NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .434; McNeil, New York, .370; Rendon, Washington, .356; Yelich, Milwaukee, .353; DeJong, Cardinals, .342; Cabrera, Pittsburgh, .333; Markakis, Atlanta, .330; Peralta, Arizona, .325; Walker, Arizona, .316; Baez, Chicago, .315. RUNS: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 30; DeJong, Cardinals, 26; Yelich, Milwaukee, 26; Albies, Atlanta, 24; McCutchen, Philadelphia, 24; Ozuna, Cardinals, 24; Baez, Chicago, 23; Freeman, Atlanta, 23; 4 tied at 22. RBI: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 37; Yelich, Milwaukee, 34; Ozuna, Cardinals, 28; Alonso, New York, 26; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 24; Baez, Chicago, 22; Franco, Philadelphia, 22; Soto, Washington, 22; Swanson, Atlanta, 22; 2 tied at 21. HITS: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 46; DeJong, Cardinals, 40; Peralta, Arizona, 39; McNeil, New York, 37; Yelich, Milwaukee, 36; Albies, Atlanta, 35; Baez, Chicago, 35; Blackmon, Colorado, 34; Eaton, Washington, 34; Markakis, Atlanta, 34. DOUBLES: DeJong, Cardinals, 14; Peralta, Arizona, 13; Rendon, Washington, 10; Walker, Arizona, 10; Bryant, Chicago, 9; Jones, Arizona, 9; Markakis, Atlanta, 9; Posey, San Francisco, 9; 11 tied at 8. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 3; Tapia, Colorado, 3; Bell, Pittsburgh, 2; Dahl, Colorado, 2; Marte, Arizona, 2; Pederson, Los Angeles, 2; Rosario, New York, 2; Segura, Philadelphia, 2; Swanson, Atlanta, 2; Verdugo, Los Angeles, 2. HOME RUNS: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 14; Yelich, Milwaukee, 14; Ozuna, Cardinals, 10; Pederson, Los Angeles, 10; Alonso, New York, 9; Baez, Chicago, 9; Goldschmidt, Cardinals, 9; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 8; Reyes, San Diego, 8; Winker, Cincinnati, 8. STOLEN BASES: Robles, Washington, 7; Story, Colorado, 6; Tatis Jr., San Diego, 6; Yelich, Milwaukee, 6; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 5; Wong, Cardinals, 5; 5 tied at 4. PITCHING: Arrieta, Philadelphia, 4-2; Greinke, Arizona, 4-1; 20 tied at 3. ERA: Davies, Milwaukee, 1.38; Castillo, Cincinnati, 1.45; Paddack, San Diego, 1.91; Musgrove, Pittsburgh, 2.06; Smith, Miami, 2.17; Fried, Atlanta, 2.30; Samardzija, San Francisco, 2.53; Marquez, Colorado, 2.94; Hamels, Chicago, 3.16; Margevicius, San Diego, 3.23. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 54; Castillo, Cincinnati, 50; Strasburg, Washington, 48; Corbin, Washington, 44; Teheran, Atlanta, 44; Marquez, Colorado, 43; deGrom, New York, 43; Holland, San Francisco, 40; Greinke, Arizona, 39; Syndergaard, New York, 39. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Anderson, Chicago, .375; Andrus, Texas, .365; Mancini, Baltimore, .355; Reddick, Houston, .352; Dozier, Kansas City, .349; Brantley, Houston, .331; Choo, Texas, .330; Goodwin, Los Angeles, .329; Martinez, Boston, .324; Polanco, Minnesota, .320. RUNS: Haniger, Seattle, 28; Mancini, Baltimore, 23; Betts, Boston, 22; Merrifield, Kansas City, 22; Moncada, Chicago, 22; Anderson, Chicago, 21; Garcia, Chicago, 21; Semien, Oakland, 21; Springer, Houston, 21; Voit, New York, 21. RBI: Santana, Seattle, 30; Voit, New York, 25; Abreu, Chicago, 24; Mondesi, Kansas City, 24; Rosario, Minnesota, 24; Springer, Houston, 24; Davis, Oakland, 23; Gallo, Texas, 23; AGordon, Kansas City, 22; Healy, Seattle, 21. HITS: Brantley, Houston, 39; Mancini, Baltimore, 39; Andrus, Texas, 38; Semien, Oakland, 38; Anderson, Chicago, 36; Santana, Seattle, 36; Martinez, Boston, 34; Merrifield, Kansas City, 34; 4 tied at 33. DOUBLES: Buxton, Minnesota, 12; Healy, Seattle, 12; Choo, Texas, 11; Haniger, Seattle, 11; Mancini, Baltimore, 11; Castellanos, Detroit, 10; AGordon, Kansas City, 10; Simmons, Los Angeles, 10; 4 tied at 9. TRIPLES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 5; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 3; Merrifield, Kansas City, 3; Polanco, Minnesota, 3; 7 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: Rosario, Minnesota, 11; Davis, Oakland, 10; Altuve, Houston, 9; Bruce, Seattle, 9; Gallo, Texas, 9; Springer, Houston, 9; 5 tied at 8. STOLEN BASES: Anderson, Chicago, 10; Ramirez, Cleveland, 9; DGordon, Seattle, 8; Hamilton, Kansas City, 8; Mondesi, Kansas City, 8; Smith, Seattle, 8; DeShields, Texas, 7; Buxton, Minnesota, 6; Pham, Tampa Bay, 6; Villar, Baltimore, 6. PITCHING: German, New York, 5-1; Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 5-0; Gonzales, Seattle, 5-0; Bauer, Cleveland, 4-1; Berrios, Minnesota, 4-1; Cashner, Baltimore, 4-1; Chirinos, Tampa Bay, 4-0; Montas, Oakland, 4-2; Verlander, Houston, 4-1; 14 tied at 3. ERA: Stroman, Toronto, 1.43; Shoemaker, Toronto, 1.57; Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 1.75; Sanchez, Toronto, 2.32; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.46; Verlander, Houston, 2.46; Turnbull, Detroit, 2.53; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.54; German, New York, 2.56; Morton, Tampa Bay, 2.76. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 65; Bauer, Cleveland, 55; Verlander, Houston, 53; Paxton, New York, 51; Boyd, Detroit, 48; Berrios, Minnesota, 41; Carrasco, Cleveland, 41; Rodon, Chicago, 40; 4 tied at 39.


SPORTS

05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

KENTUCKY DERBY

Derby favorite Omaha Beach draws No. 12 post BY GARY B. GRAVES

Associated Press

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Knowing their favored horses won’t start the Kentucky Derby on the rail left Richard Mandella and Bob Baffert more relieved than happy. What matters for the Hall of Fame trainers is turning workable starting spots into victory — and a long-sought celebration for Mandella. Omaha Beach is the 4-1 early favorite for Saturday’s 145th Run for the Roses after drawing the No. 12 post position on Tuesday. That could be a good sign for the colt and Mandella, considering that the horse favored to win the Derby has taken the past six. “I hope it comes out that way,” Mandell said. Baffert-trained Game Winner is the 5-1 second choice from the No. 16 post in the 20-horse field for the first leg of the Triple Crown. Game Winner will start inside stablemate Roadster, the 6-1 cothird choice with Improbable, a Baffert colt who will go off from the No. 5 hole in the 1¼-mile race at Churchill Downs. Omaha Beach enters the $3 million showcase on a three-race winning streak. The dark brown colt is coming off a one-length victory in the slop over Improbable in the Arkansas Derby, a race that demonstrated his recent knack for getting up front quickly and staying there. Mandella believes Omaha Beach and Hall of Fame jockey Mike Smith, who won last year’s Derby for Baffert aboard Justify, will make the most of his spot. “It’s really important if you get luck with it,” Mandella said. “If you get a bad luck, a good post

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Rays..................... -$160.................ROYALS Rays..................... -$175.................ROYALS WHITE SOX........... -$165..................Orioles WHITE SOX........... -$150..................Orioles RED SOX............... -$135............... Athletics Astros .................. -$140...................TWINS ANGELS................ -$110.............. Blue Jays National League NATIONALS .......... -$162.................... Cards METS.................... -$172......................Reds BRAVES................ -$155.................. Padres BREWERS............. -$130................. Rockies Dodgers ............... -$135................. GIANTS Interleague Pirates ................. -$115..............RANGERS Yankees ............... -$118................ DBACKS Cubs..................... -$112............ MARINERS PHILLIES .............. -$200................... Tigers Indians................. -$162...............MARLINS NBA Favorite Points Underdog Western Conference NUGGETS ................3.5....................Blazers Eastern Conference Thursday 76ERS..................... PK ...................Raptors NHL Favorite Odds Underdog HURRICANES . -$125/+$105 ........Islanders STARS ............ -$125/+$105 ..............Blues Grand Salami: Over/under 10.5 goals. SOCCER UEFA Champions League BARCELONA....................................... -$125 Liverpool .......................................... +$310 Draw: +$270 Over/under: 3.0 goals Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

PRO HOCKEY NHL playoffs Tuesday

Blue Jackets 2, Bruins 1 Boston 0 1 0 — 1 Columbus 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Columbus, Jenner 1 (Nash, Harrington), 18:37. Penalties: Foligno, CBJ, (slashing), 11:17; Krug, BOS, (tripping), 19:04. Second period: 2, Columbus, Duchene 5 (Foligno, Atkinson), 12:42 (pp). 3, Boston, DeBrusk 2 (Kuhlman, Krejci), 19:20. Penalties: Marchand, BOS, (high sticking), 10:49. Third period: None. Penalties: Savard, CBJ, (tripping), 11:18; Bergeron, BOS, (tripping), 11:35. Shots: Boston 12-10-15: 37. Columbus 10-17-7: 34. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 2; Columbus 1 of 3. Goalies: Boston, Rask 5-5 (34 shots-32 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 6-1 (37-36). A: 19,337. Referees: Kevin Pollock, Francois St Laurent. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Greg Devorski.

Sharks 4, Avalanche 2 San Jose 2 0 2— 4 Colorado 0 1 1— 2 First period: 1, San Jose, Couture 7 (Meier, Nyquist), 15:24. 2, San Jose, Meier 3, 18:42. Penalties: Nieto, COL, (holding), 4:55; Cole, COL, (interference), 9:02; Kane, SJ, (high sticking), 10:22. Second period: 3, Colorado, MacKinnon 5 (Cole), 15:51. Penalties: Cole, COL, (high sticking), 5:06; Dillon, SJ, (interference), 10:48; Kerfoot, COL, (interference), 13:51. Third period: 4, Colorado, Nieto 4 (Makar, Girard), 11:45. 5, San Jose, Couture 8 (Nyquist, Meier), 12:50. 6, San Jose, Couture 9 (M.Karlsson), 19:30. Penalties: San Jose bench, served by Labanc (too many men on the ice), 6:02; Couture, SJ, (tripping), 17:04. Shots: San Jose 13-13-5: 31. Colorado 7-9-11: 27. Power-plays: San Jose 0 of 4; Colorado 0 of 4. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 6-3 (27 shots-25 saves). Colorado, Grubauer 5-3 (30-27). A: 18,106. Referees: Francis Charron, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Brian Murphy. PLAYOFF LEADERS, THROUGH MONDAY GOALS Logan Couture, SAN Tomas Hertl, SAN Jaden Schwartz, STL Mark Stone, VGS Nicklas Backstrom, WAS Charlie Coyle, BOS Warren Foegele, CAR Auston Matthews, TOR Max Pacioretty, VGS Alexander Radulov, DAL Mikko Rantanen, COL ASSISTS Erik Karlsson, SAN Jaccob Slavin, CAR Tyson Barrie, COL Brent Burns, SAN Nathan MacKinnon, COL Alex Pietrangelo, STL Shea Theodore, VGS

GP 9 9 9 7 7 9 9 7 7 9 7 GP 9 9 7 9 7 9 7

G 6 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 A 10 10 7 7 7 7 7

position doesn’t work. “His last couple of races he kind of sits back and bides his time a little bit, then decides when to just cruise along. Mike will have to figure that out.” Baffert, meanwhile, aims to match Ben Jones’ record with his sixth Kentucky Derby win and second straight. He won last year with Justify, culminating in the Triple Crown. That came CHARLIE RIEDEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS three years after he took the Kentucky Derby hopeful Omaha Beach gets a bath after a workout at Churchill Downs Tuesday in Louisville, Ky. Triple Crown with American Pharoah. It remains to be seen how the said of the horse who had a threeDerby will unfold hitting the first race winning streak halted in the turn with so many horses vying HORSE Louisiana Derby. “Our horse is TRAINER JOCKEY ODDS for the same spot, but Improbable really on his game, so he’ll come 1. War of Will Mark Casse Tyler Gaffalione 20-1 away from there running. is in a relatively good spot. Game Winner, who won the 2. Tax “I think we’ll probably be on Danny Gargan Junior Alvarado 20-1 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile here last the lead and play catch me if you 3. By My Standards Bret Calhoun Gabriel Saez 20-1 fall, and Roadster will have their can. And you know, if we come Peter Miller Drayden Van Dyke 50-1 away from there like he norwork cut out for them, start- 4. Gray Magician ing from post positions that 5. Improbable mally does, we’re going to come Bob Baffert Irad Ortiz Jr. 6-1 are a combined 4-for-87 in the away from there running. ... I’ve George Weaver Javier Castellano 20-1 Derby. When it was noted that 6. Vekoma thought I had great draws before Roadster’s No. 17 post is 0-for- 7. Maximum Security Jason Servis and gotten wiped out, so maybe Luis Saez 10-1 40, nervous laughter grew in a this is the change.” William Mott Jose Ortiz 10-1 crowded room of horsemen in- 8. Tacitus Points leader Tacitus will start cluding Baffert, his connections 9. Plus Que Parfait from the No. 8 post with 10-1 Brendan Walsh Ricardo Santana Jr. 30-1 and the media. odds as he tries to give trainer Bill Todd Pletcher Corey Lanerie 30-1 Baffert later took all of his 10. Cutting Humor Mott his first Derby victory. The horses’ slots in stride, if only be- 11. Haikal son of Tapit and Close Hatches by Kiaran McLaughlin Raviv Maragh 30-1 cause none was on the rail. War First Defence has Grade 2 wins in Richard Mandella Mike Smith 4-1 of Will drew that unenviable spot 12. Omaha Beach the Wood Memorial and Tampa and was given 20-1 odds as a re- 13. Code of Honor Bay Derby during a three-race Claude McGaughey John Velazquez 15-1 sult. surge. 14. Win Win Win Michael Trombetta Julian Pimentel 15-1 “I like the 16 hole, it’s a good Another 10-1 choice is unKoichi Tsunoda Julien Leparoux 50-1 spot,” he said of Game Win- 15. Master Fencer beaten Maximum Security, who starts from the No. 7 hole and will ner’s position. “Roadster, he’s 16. Game Winner Bob Baffert Joel Rosario 5-1 out there. I don’t know. I always try to follow up his victory in the Bob Baffert Florent Geroux 6-1 get two horses together. A lot of 17. Roadster Grade 1 Florida Derby. times in California they draw so 18. Long Range Toddy Steven Asmussen Jon Court Todd Pletcher entries Spinoff 30-1 ... I’ll be watching those two leavand Cutting Humor face 30-1 19. Spinoff Todd Pletcher Manny Franco 30-1 ing there.” odds after drawing the Nos. 19 War of Will’s trainer, Mark 20. Country House and 10 post positions. William Mott Flavien Prat 30-1 Casse, chose to be encouraged Also eligible is 30-1 BodexAE. Bodexpress Gustavo Delgado Chris Landeros 30-1 about his horse’s post. press, who can get into the field “It could be worse, I think,” he Source: Associated Press with a defection.

Kentucky Derby odds

PRO BASKETBALL

TRANSACTIONS

NBA playoffs

BASEBALL NATIONAL BASEBALL HALL OF FAME AND MUSEUM — Named Tim Mead president. Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspnded Houston minor league 3B J.J. Matijevic 50 games after a second positive test for a drug of abuse in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Added RHP Shawn Armstrong to the 25-man roster. DETROIT TIGERS — Placed RHP Tyson Ross on the paternity list. Activated SS Jordy Mercer from the 10-day IL. Placed 2B Josh Harrison on the 10-day IL. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Selected the contract of RHP Griffin Canning. Designated RHP John Curtiss for assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS — Recalled OF Braden Bishop from Tacoma (PCL). Optioned OF Mallex Smith to Tacoma. Named Ichiro Suzuki as an instructor for the team. National League MIAMI MARLINS — Optioned OF Lewis Brinson to New Orleans (PCL). Reinstated OF Garrett Cooper from the 10-day IL. SAN DIEGO PADRES — Placed SS Fernando Tatis Jr. on the 10-day IL, retroactive to April 29. Recalled RHP Phil Maton from El Paso (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Selected the contract of LHP Dan Jennings from Harrisburg (EL). Placed 3B Anthony Rendon on the 10-day IL, retroactive to April 27. Recalled INF Adrian Sanchez from Harrisburg (EL). Optioned RHP Erick Fedde to Harrisburg. Designated RHP Austin Adams for assignment. American Association CHICAGO DOGS — Released OF Joe Benson. GARY SOUTHSHORE RAILCATS — Released INF Josh Anthony. Traded RHP Sean Watkins to Florence (FL) for future considerations. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Announced INF Drew Stankiewicz signed with Cleveland (AL). KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Traded RHP Audury Acevedo to Texas for a player to be named. MILWAUKEE MILKMEN — Released RHP Jordan Kraus. TEXAS AIRHOGS — Signed RHP Taylor Wright. Frontier League FLORENCE FREEDOM — Acquired RHP Sean Watkins from Gary SouthShore (AA). Released OF Jimmy Heck and C-1B Tyler Lancaster. RASCALS — Released UTL Jay Estes and RHPs Sam Thoele and Alex Viera. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS — Signed RHP Chase Cunningham. BASKETBALL Women’s National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES SPARKS — Re-signed G Chelsea Gray. FOOTBALL National Football League INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Signed RB Spencer Ware. Waived S Isaiah Johnson and DT DeShawn Williams. Released WR James Wright. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Waived RB James Butler, LB Cayson Collins, WR Rashard Davis, G-C Cameron Hunt and WR De’Mornay Pierson-El. TENNESSEE TITANS — Claimed LB Riley Bullough off waivers from Tampa Bay. WASHINGTON REDSKINS — Waived DB Alex Carter, G Kyle Fuller, OT Darius James, WR Tre McBride, DB Harlan Miller and G Salesi Uhatafe. Signed DE Ryan Bee, LB B.J. Bunt, OT Juwann Bushell-Beatty, TE Elkanah Dillon, S Jojo McIntosh, OT Chidi Okeke and WRs T.J. Rahming and Steve Smith Jr. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Signed WR Matt Hazel and DE Ja’Von Rolland-Jones. HOCKEY National Hockey League LOS ANGELES KINGS — Signed D Markus Phillips to a three-year entry-level contract. NEW YORK RANGERS — Acquired D Adam Fox from Carolina for a 2019 second-round draft pick and a conditional 20202 third-round draft pick. MOTORSPORTS NASCAR — Reinstated Truck Series driver Austin Wayne following a violation of the substance abuse policy. Fined Austin Dillon’s crew chief Danny Stockman Jr. $25,000, deducted 10 championship points and suspended chief Gregory Ebert one race for infractions last weekend in the Geico 500. Fined Ryan Blaney’s crew chief Jeremy Bullins $10,000 for loose lug nuts found on Blaney’s car after the race. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Suspended Philadelphia Union D Kai Wagner an additional match for the red card he received for serious foul play in the 89th minute of Philadelphia’s match against the Montreal Impact. NEW ENGLAND REVOLUTION — Named Kevin Hitchcock assistant coach. COLLEGE BELMONT — Named Mick Hedgepeth men’s director of basketball operations. EASTERN MICHIGAN — Named Nicole Sherwin assistant director of compliance. GEORGE MASON — Named Dr. Deborah Beck Corbatto deputy athletic director, internal operations/risk management. NEW JERSEY CITY — Announced the school will join the Skyline Conference as an affiliate member in men’s volleyball in Spring, 2020. NORTH CAROLINA — Named Courtney Banghart women’s basketball coach. VIRGINIA — Announced graduate WRs Dejon Brissett (Richmond) and Terrell Chatman (Arizona State) will transfer to the school. WAKE FOREST — Signed football coach Dave Clawson to a contract extension through the 2026 season.

Tuesday

Bucks 123, Celtics 102 Boston: Tatum 2-10 1-2 5, Morris 6-8 2-2 17, Horford 6-10 0-0 15, Irving 4-18 0-0 9, J.Brown 5-12 6-7 16, Ojeleye 1-2 2-2 5, Hayward 1-5 2-2 5, Yabusele 2-2 2-3 6, Williams III 1-2 2-2 4, Baynes 2-3 0-0 4, Rozier 2-10 5-5 9, Wanamaker 2-4 2-2 7. Totals 34-86 24-27 102. Milwaukee: Mirotic 3-10 2-2 9, Antetokounmpo 7-16 13-18 29, Lopez 3-10 1-2 10, Bledsoe 7-12 4-4 21, Middleton 10-18 1-1 28, Ilyasova 1-4 2-2 4, Wilson 1-3 0-0 2, Frazier 1-2 0-0 2, Hill 3-6 2-2 10, S.Brown 0-3 0-0 0, Connaughton 2-4 0-0 5, Snell 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 39-89 25-31 123. Boston 30 25 18 29 — 102 Milwaukee 25 34 39 25 — 123 3-point goals: Boston 10-28 (Morris 3-4, Horford 3-5, Ojeleye 1-1, Wanamaker 1-1, Hayward 1-3, Irving 1-5, Baynes 0-1, J.Brown 0-2, Tatum 0-2, Rozier 0-4), Milwaukee 20-47 (Middleton 7-10, Bledsoe 3-5, Lopez 3-8, Antetokounmpo 2-4, Hill 2-4, Snell 1-1, Connaughton 1-3, Mirotic 1-5, Ilyasova 0-1, Frazier 0-1, Wilson 0-2, S.Brown 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 45 (Rozier, Horford 8), Milwaukee 54 (Connaughton 11). Assists: Boston 19 (Irving 4), Milwaukee 22 (Bledsoe 5). Total fouls: Boston 23, Milwaukee 24. A: 17,536 (17,500).

Warriors 115, Rockets 109 Houston: Gordon 6-13 0-0 15, Tucker 3-5 4-4 13, Capela 5-7 4-8 14, Paul 6-14 4-4 18, Harden 9-19 8-9 29, Faried 0-1 0-0 0, Nene 0-0 0-0 0, G.Green 2-4 0-0 6, House Jr. 0-2 0-0 0, Shumpert 0-4 0-0 0, Rivers 5-8 0-0 14. Totals 36-77 20-25 109. Golden State: Iguodala 6-9 2-4 16, Durant 9-22 8-10 29, D.Green 6-10 3-3 15, Curry 6-16 5-5 20, Thompson 8-18 2-2 21, McKinnie 1-3 0-0 2, Looney 1-1 0-0 2, Jerebko 2-4 0-0 4, Bogut 0-1 0-0 0, Livingston 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 42-91 20-24 115. Houston 20 29 26 34—109 Golden State 29 29 24 33—115 3-Point Goals: Houston 17-40 (Rivers 4-6, Tucker 3-5, Harden 3-7, Gordon 3-7, G.Green 2-3, Paul 2-7, House Jr. 0-1, Shumpert 0-4), Golden State 11-36 (Durant 3-6, Thompson 3-9, Curry 3-13, Iguodala 2-5, McKinnie 0-1, D.Green 0-2). Fouled Out: Capela. Rebounds: Houston 41 (Capela, Tucker 10), Golden State 45 (D.Green 12). Assists: Houston 17 (Paul 6), Golden State 24 (D.Green 7). Total Fouls: Houston 21, Golden State 23. Technicals: Nene, D.Green. A: 19,596 (19,596). PLAYOFF LEADERS, THROUGH MONDAY SCORING AVERAGE G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, GOL 7 79 68 245 35.0 Lillard, POR 6 65 44 204 34.0 Leonard, TOR 7 79 41 219 31.3 Harden, HOU 6 52 45 174 29.0 George, OKC 5 44 40 143 28.6 Antetokounmpo, MIL 5 44 32 127 25.4 Jokic, DEN 8 73 40 199 24.9 Curry, GOL 7 49 41 166 23.7 Siakam, TOR 7 69 12 163 23.3 Irving, BOS 5 44 15 116 23.2 McCollum, POR 6 53 13 138 23.0 Westbrook, OKC 5 40 23 114 22.8 DeRozan, SAN 7 58 38 154 22.0 Williams, LAC 6 45 34 130 21.7 Mitchell, UTA 5 36 24 107 21.4 Embiid, PHL 6 41 41 127 21.2 LeVert, BRO 5 36 21 105 21.0 Aldridge, SAN 7 55 27 140 20.0 Gallinari, LAC 6 39 28 119 19.8 Murray, DEN 8 59 23 156 19.5 Russell, BRO 5 37 11 97 19.4 Middleton, MIL 5 29 20 92 18.4 Harrell, LAC 6 46 18 110 18.3 Bogdanovic, IND 4 25 15 72 18.0 3-POINT PCT 3FG 3FGA PCT Kennard, DET 9 15 .600 Craig, DEN 12 21 .571 Evans, IND 11 20 .550 Curry, POR 7 13 .538 Green, LAC 12 23 .522 Brown, MIL 6 12 .500 Gilgeous-Alexander, LA 9 18 .500 Middleton, MIL 14 28 .500 Tatum, BOS 8 16 .500 FREE THROW PCT FT FTA PCT Carroll, BRO 8 8 1.000 Griffin, DET 7 7 1.000 Harris, BRO 8 8 1.000 Hayward, BOS 13 13 1.000 Iwundu, ORL 9 9 1.000 Shamet, LAC 10 10 1.000 Curry, GOL 41 42 .976 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF TOT AVG Drummond, DET 4 20 32 52 13.0 Jokic, DEN 8 28 66 94 11.8 Embiid, PHL 6 15 53 68 11.3 Antetokounmpo, MIL 5 12 44 56 11.2 Horford, BOS 5 10 42 52 10.4 Gobert, UTA 5 23 28 51 10.2 Harris, PHL 7 8 63 71 10.1 Capela, HOU 6 17 42 59 9.8 Kanter, POR 6 20 38 58 9.7 Aldridge, SAN 7 19 48 67 9.6 ASSISTS G AST AVG Westbrook, OKC 5 53 10.6 Jokic, DEN 8 70 8.8 Rubio, UTA 5 43 8.6 Irving, BOS 5 42 8.4 Green, GOL 7 56 8.0 Lowry, TOR 7 56 8.0 Harden, HOU 6 46 7.7 Williams, LAC 6 46 7.7 Jackson, DET 4 28 7.0

HORSE RACING Fairmount Park results First $6,000, 5f, Time 1:00.80 Jochero (U.Lopez), 18.80, 5.00, No Tix Willow Ridge (V.Bailon), 2.80, No Tix Scratched: Sircorri. Also Ran: Crafty Prospect. Exacta (1-4) $47.60. $1 Trifecta (1-4-2) $44.60. Second $6,000, 1mi, Time 1:45.91. Caliche Lane (C.Emigh), 8.40, 3.40, 2.40 Rosie’s Flame (J.Tavares), 3.20, 2.40 Pasture Ornament (U.Lopez), 3.40 Also Ran: Summer Seashell, Dixie Lee Attack, Hamcat. $1 Daily Double (1-2) $46.70. Exacta (2-3) $21.00. $0.1 Superfecta (2-3-1-6) $7.88. $1 Trifecta (2-3-1) $29.90. Third $5,800, 5f, Time 0:59.89. Thisduckcanfly (C.Emigh), 3.40, 2.40, 2.10 Wildwoodsummertime (U.Lopez), 2.40, 2.10 Trouncer (J.Molina, Jr.), 2.20 Scratched: Flaunt. Also Ran: Peteizum, Tyler T, Morninglover Rambo. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-2-2/6) 3 Correct $49.40. $1 Daily Double (2-6) $4.00. Exacta (6-4) $6.20. $0.1 Superfecta (6-4-1-7) $1.55. $1 Trifecta (6-4-1) $7.60. Fourth $9,800, 5f, Time 0:59.91. Boohoo Sue (J.Tavares), 16.60, 5.20, No Tix Dr Winn Kyi (V.Bailon), 5.00, No Tix Also Ran: Precious Kowgirl, See Grace Fly By. $0.5 Pick 3 (2-2/6-1) 3 Correct $33.95. $1 Daily Double (6-1) $30.80. Exacta (1-4) $77.80. $1 Trifecta (1-4-3) $59.70. Fifth $5,800, 5f, rain, Time 1:00.13. Marnate (C.Emigh), 7.20, 4.40, 3.80 Praisem (J.Molina, Jr.), 3.20, 2.20 Holyhoot (U.Lopez), 3.20 Also Ran: Daddy Was a Hussla, Serena’s Halo, Sassy and Regal, Ice Attack. $0.5 Pick 3 (2/6-1-6) 3 Correct $52.40. $1 Daily Double (1-6) $45.80. Exacta (6-5) $21.40. $0.1 Superfecta (6-5-1-2) $15.10. $1 Trifecta (6-5-1) $42.10. Sixth $10,000, 5f, Time 0:59.34. American Heritage (J.Molina, Jr.), 5.00, 2.40, No Tix Jolly Ghaaly (C.Emigh), 2.60, No Tix Scratched: Wildwood Willy. Also Ran: Barton Attack, Thunder Down Under. $0.5 Pick 3 (1-6-1) 3 Correct $81.05. $1 Daily Double (6-1) $20.80. Exacta (1-4) $9.40. $0.1 Superfecta (1-4-2-3) $3.73. $ 1 Trifecta (1-4-2) $8.30. Seventh $6,000, 5f, Time 1:00.68. Hero’s and Dreams (C.Emigh), 6.20, 3.60, 2.60 Shrimp (U.Lopez), 3.20, 2.40 Lion’s Wager (J.Molina, Jr.), 3.00 Scratched: Cubbie Girl North, Affirmance. Also Ran: Holy Ekati, Phantasmic, Fu Peggy. $0.5 Pick 4 (1-6-1-4) 4 Correct $316.85. $0.5 Pick 3 (6-1-4) 3 Correct $27.80. $0.1 Superfecta (4-2-3-6) $3.61. $1 Trifecta (4-2-3) $19.80. $1 Consolation Double (1-7) $1.70. $1 Daily Double (1-4) $10.90. Exacta (4-2) $16.40.

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Monster Energy Cup POINTS LEADERS 1. Kyle Busch, 430. 2. Joey Logano, 415. 3. Denny Hamlin, 367. 4. Kevin Harvick, 350. 5. Brad Keselowski, 337. 6. Martin Truex Jr, 328. 7. Chase Elliott, 324. 8. Kurt Busch, 323. 9. Ryan Blaney, 306. 10. Clint Bowyer, 288. 11. Aric Almirola, 288. 12. Daniel Suarez, 266. 13. Austin Dillon, 253. 14. Ryan Newman, 251. 15. Alex Bowman, 239. 16. Jimmie Johnson, 238. 17. Paul Menard, 234. 18. Erik Jones, 230. 19. William Byron, 226. 20. Ricky Stenhouse Jr, 223. SCHEDULE Sunday, May 5: Gander RV 400, Dover, Del. Saturday, May 11: Digital Ally 400, Kansas City, Kan. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy Open, Concord, N.C. Saturday, May 18: x-Monster Energy All-Star Race, Concord, N.C. Sunday, May 26: Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. Sunday, June 2: Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. Sunday, June 9: FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Sunday, June 23: Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. Sunday, June 30: Camping World 400, Joliet, Ill.

GOLF

BASEBALL

Area holes in one

Major League leaders

Wolf Hollow Golf Club: Gary Jones, hole no. 14, 146 yards, 5 hybrid, April 30 Whitmoor Country Club: Scott Schnemann, hole no. 14 south, 130 yards, pitching wedge, April 30

NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING: Bellinger, Los Angeles, .431; McNeil, New York, .370; Rendon, Washington, .356; Yelich, Milwaukee, .353; DeJong, Cardinals, .342; Markakis, Atlanta, .330; Cabrera, Pittsburgh, .329; Peralta, Arizona, .317; Baez, Chicago, .315; Fowler, Cardinals, .313. RUNS: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 32; DeJong, Cardinals, 26; Yelich, Milwaukee, 26; Albies, Atlanta, 24; McCutchen, Philadelphia, 24; Ozuna, Cardinals, 24; Baez, Chicago, 23; Freeman, Atlanta, 23; 4 tied at 22. RBI: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 37; Yelich, Milwaukee, 34; Ozuna, Cardinals, 28; Alonso, New York, 26; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 24; Baez, Chicago, 22; Franco, Philadelphia, 22; Soto, Washington, 22; Swanson, Atlanta, 22; 3 tied at 21. HITS: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 47; DeJong, Cardinals, 40; Peralta, Arizona, 39; McNeil, New York, 37; Yelich, Milwaukee, 36; Albies, Atlanta, 35; Baez, Chicago, 35; Blackmon, Colorado, 34; Eaton, Washington, 34; Markakis, Atlanta, 34. DOUBLES: DeJong, Cardinals, 14; Peralta, Arizona, 13; Posey, San Francisco, 10; Rendon, Washington, 10; Walker, Arizona, 10; Bryant, Chicago, 9; Escobar, Arizona, 9; Jones, Arizona, 9; Markakis, Atlanta, 9; 12 tied at 8. TRIPLES: Blackmon, Colorado, 3; Tapia, Colorado, 3; 9 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: Bellinger, Los Angeles, 14; Yelich, Milwaukee, 14; Ozuna, Cardinals, 10; Pederson, Los Angeles, 10; Alonso, New York, 9; Baez, Chicago, 9; Goldschmidt, Cardinals, 9; Hoskins, Philadelphia, 8; Reyes, San Diego, 8; Winker, Cincinnati, 8. STOLEN BASES: Robles, Washington, 7; Story, Colorado, 6; Tatis Jr., San Diego, 6; Yelich, Milwaukee, 6; Bellinger, Los Angeles, 5; Wong, Cardinals, 5; 5 tied at 4. PITCHING: Greinke, Arizona, 5-1; Arrieta, Philadelphia, 4-2; 21 tied at 3. ERA: Davies, Milwaukee, 1.38; Castillo, Cincinnati, 1.45; Paddack, San Diego, 1.91; Musgrove, Pittsburgh, 2.06; Smith, Miami, 2.17; Fried, Atlanta, 2.30; Lyles, Pittsburgh, 2.42; Samardzija, San Francisco, 2.53; Marquez, Colorado, 2.94; Hamels, Chicago, 3.16. STRIKEOUTS: Scherzer, Washington, 54; Castillo, Cincinnati, 50; Strasburg, Washington, 48; Greinke, Arizona, 46; Corbin, Washington, 44; Teheran, Atlanta, 44; Marquez, Colorado, 43; deGrom, New York, 43; Holland, San Francisco, 40; Syndergaard, New York, 39. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING: Anderson, Chicago, .375; Andrus, Texas, .361; Mancini, Baltimore, .355; Reddick, Houston, .352; Dozier, Kansas City, .349; Choo, Texas, .333; Brantley, Houston, .331; Goodwin, Los Angeles, .329; Martinez, Boston, .324; Polanco, Minnesota, .320. RUNS: Haniger, Seattle, 28; Mancini, Baltimore, 23; Betts, Boston, 22; Merrifield, Kansas City, 22; Moncada, Chicago, 22; Anderson, Chicago, 21; Garcia, Chicago, 21; Semien, Oakland, 21; Springer, Houston, 21; Voit, New York, 21. RBI: Santana, Seattle, 30; Gallo, Texas, 25; Voit, New York, 25; Abreu, Chicago, 24; Mondesi, Kansas City, 24; Rosario, Minnesota, 24; Springer, Houston, 24; Davis, Oakland, 23; AGordon, Kansas City, 22; Healy, Seattle, 21. HITS: Andrus, Texas, 39; Brantley, Houston, 39; Mancini, Baltimore, 39; Semien, Oakland, 38; Anderson, Chicago, 36; Santana, Seattle, 36; Choo, Texas, 34; Martinez, Boston, 34; Merrifield, Kansas City, 34; 4 tied at 33. DOUBLES: Buxton, Minnesota, 12; Healy, Seattle, 12; Choo, Texas, 11; Haniger, Seattle, 11; Mancini, Baltimore, 11; Castellanos, Detroit, 10; AGordon, Kansas City, 10; Simmons, Los Angeles, 10; 4 tied at 9. TRIPLES: Mondesi, Kansas City, 5; Kiermaier, Tampa Bay, 3; Merrifield, Kansas City, 3; Polanco, Minnesota, 3; 7 tied at 2. HOME RUNS: Rosario, Minnesota, 11; Davis, Oakland, 10; Gallo, Texas, 10; Altuve, Houston, 9; Bruce, Seattle, 9; Springer, Houston, 9; 5 tied at 8. STOLEN BASES: Anderson, Chicago, 10; Ramirez, Cleveland, 9; DGordon, Seattle, 8; Hamilton, Kansas City, 8; Mondesi, Kansas City, 8; Smith, Seattle, 8; DeShields, Texas, 7; 4 tied at 6. PITCHING: German, New York, 5-1; Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 5-0; Gonzales, Seattle, 5-0; Bauer, Cleveland, 4-1; Berrios, Minnesota, 4-1; Cashner, Baltimore, 4-1; Chirinos, Tampa Bay, 4-0; Montas, Oakland, 4-2; Verlander, Houston, 4-1; 14 tied at 3. ERA: Stroman, Toronto, 1.43; Shoemaker, Toronto, 1.57; Glasnow, Tampa Bay, 1.75; Sanchez, Toronto, 2.32; Bauer, Cleveland, 2.46; Verlander, Houston, 2.46; Turnbull, Detroit, 2.53; Snell, Tampa Bay, 2.54; German, New York, 2.56; Morton, Tampa Bay, 2.76. STRIKEOUTS: Cole, Houston, 65; Bauer, Cleveland, 55; Verlander, Houston, 53; Paxton, New York, 51; Boyd, Detroit, 48; Berrios, Minnesota, 41; Carrasco, Cleveland, 41; Rodon, Chicago, 40; 4 tied at 39.

AREA COLLEGES SCHEDULE College baseball Missouri vs. Southeast Missouri, 3 p.m. Wednesday Track and Field 2019 Great Lakes Valley Conference Outdoor Championships, Thursday-Saturday.

PRO SOCCER Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA D.C. United 5 3 2 17 13 10 Montreal 5 3 2 17 12 14 Philadelphia 4 3 2 14 13 10 Toronto FC 4 2 1 13 19 13 Columbus 4 5 1 13 8 11 Orlando City 3 3 3 12 13 14 New York City FC 2 1 6 12 11 12 Chicago 2 4 3 9 12 13 New York 2 4 2 8 9 9 Atlanta 2 3 2 8 6 8 Cincinnati 2 5 2 8 8 14 New England 2 6 2 8 10 19 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 7 1 2 23 26 8 LA Galaxy 7 1 1 22 15 8 Seattle 5 1 3 18 18 12 FC Dallas 5 2 2 17 14 9 Houston 5 1 1 16 15 8 Minnesota United 4 3 2 14 18 15 Real Salt Lake 3 5 1 10 11 16 Sporting K.C. 2 2 4 10 19 15 San Jose 2 5 2 8 12 19 Portland 2 5 1 7 11 19 Vancouver 1 5 3 6 7 12 Colorado 0 7 2 2 12 24 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Wednesday Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Friday Vancouver at Colorado, 8 p.m. Saturday LA Galaxy at New York, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Houston, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at Orlando City, 3 p.m. New York City FC at Montreal, 4 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Portland at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at San Jose, 9 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Atlanta at Sporting K.C., 8 p.m.

UEFA Champions League (Home teams listed first) SEMIFINALS First Leg, Tuesday Tottenham (England) 0, Ajax (Netherlands) 1 Wednesday Barcelona (Spain) vs. Liverpool (England), 2 p.m. Second Leg, May 7 Liverpool vs. Barcelona, 2 p.m. May 8 Ajax vs. Tottenham, 2 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday, June 1, Madrid Semifinal winners, 2 p.m.

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA 36 30 2 4 90 22 36 28 7 1 84 20 36 23 1 12 65 36 36 20 8 8 60 39 36 20 6 10 69 49 36 19 8 9 64 51 36 15 9 12 46 44 36 15 6 15 51 47 36 14 8 14 50 44 36 14 8 14 51 52 36 13 7 16 45 54 36 12 7 17 43 48 36 11 9 16 36 45 36 12 6 18 52 65 36 11 7 18 44 63 36 9 11 16 44 61 36 9 8 19 33 55 36 9 4 23 30 66 36 7 5 24 34 76 36 3 5 28 20 74 Friday Everton vs. Burnley, 2 p.m. Saturday Bournemouth vs. Tottenham, 6:30 a.m. West Ham vs. Southampton, 9 a.m. Wolverhampton vs. Fulham, 9 a.m. Cardiff vs. Crystal Palace, 11:30 a.m. Newcastle vs. Liverpool, 1:45 p.m. Sunday Huddersfield vs. Man United, 8 a.m. Chelsea vs. Watford, 8 a.m. Arsenal vs. Brighton, 10:30 a.m. Monday Man City vs. Leicester, 2 p.m.

Man City Liverpool Tottenham Chelsea Arsenal Man United Wolverhampton Leicester Everton Watford West Ham Crystal Palace Newcastle Bournemouth Burnley Southampton Brighton Cardiff Fulham Huddersfield

Pts 92 91 70 68 66 65 54 51 50 50 46 43 42 42 40 38 35 31 26 14


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

BOYS GOLF

FRESHMAN PHENOM Kolar wins landmark district championship for Maplewood-RH BY CHRIS GOVE

STLhighschoolsports.com

O’FALLON, MO. • Kal Kolar is the

one. That’s not just because the Maplewood-Richmond Heights High freshman won the Class 2 District 5 boys golf medalist title Tuesday at The Falls Golf Club with a 1-over-par 72, a score that gave him a seven-shot victory over Whitfield junior Drew Newlin’s runner-up 79. It’s also because Kolar made history simply by representing Maplewood-Richmond Heights in golf at all. In large part because of the freshman’s presence on campus, MRH added boys golf to its athletics offerings for the first time this spring. “The important thing for me is he’s a good kid, a great golfer, a great human being overall,” said Shane Dixon, a ninth-year Maplewood-RH history teacher who took on the role of the program’s first coach. “He’s the epitome of a studentathlete. To be able to have a team gives him so many more opportunities.” Kolar’s parents petitioned the MRH school board and athletics director Amber Jordan to have the golf program created. For many years one of the area’s top junior players in his age group, Kolar also played a part in getting the sport added by mak-

GORDON RADFORD • SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Maplewood-Richmond Heights’ Kal Kolar chips onto the fourth green during the Class 2 District 5 tournament on Tuesday at The Falls Golf Club in O’Fallon, Mo. ing a speech to the school board last fall. “I just said I wanted a golf team because it would give me an opportunity to play against bigger schools and showcase my talent and showcase myself to get a college scholarship,” said Kolar, who was Maplewood’s only varsity player in its maiden season. Kolar, who said he has been playing golf since he was 5 years

old and began playing tournaments at 7, has been the Gateway Section PGA Junior Tour’s player of the year in his age division for the last two years. He also was the youngest player to represent St. Louis’ Metropolitan Amateur Golf Association last fall in the 20th annual Mid-America Junior Cup against players from the Kansas City Golf Association. The diminutive 15-year-old

freshman said his best golf memory so far has been playing in the U.S. Kids World Championship at Pinehurst Resort in North Carolina. “That was a good learning experience because I played against kids that were like hitting the ball 260 (yards) at the age of 10,” Kolar said. “It was just eye-opening for me. There, the kids are so good they’re shooting 65 on golf courses I’m struggling on. It’s just

mind-boggling.” Kolar didn’t struggle too much during his first district tournament, shooting a 2-over 38 on the front nine before a delay of about two hours because of heavy rain. He finished the day by shooting 1-under 34 on the back nine, punching his ticket to the Class 3 Sectional 2 tournament Monday at Bogey Hills Country Club. “I’m feeling good,” said Kolar, who proudly wore his oversized blue MRH hat and collared shirt. “I hit the ball really good today. I feel like I can contend at state and I hope I do.” Linn was the district champion with a team score of 343, edging Whitfield’s 344. Both teams advanced to play in next week’s sectional along with the top 15 individuals — led by Kolar — from non-qualifying teams. Lutheran St. Charles, which was third in the team standings with a 357, advanced all five of its golfers individuals and will post a sectional score next week. Its effort was led by third-place Josh Thomason’s 82. Whitfield earned the runner-up team position thanks to Newlin’s runner-up showing in his first district tournament. Henry Nordlund tied for third with an 82 and Clay Strege tied for eighth with an 86. A junior, Newlin overcame a 10 on his fourth hole to break 80, including a 1-under par 34 on the back nine. “I hit it out of bounds twice in a row,” Newlin said. “Actually after doing that, I was more relaxed. I thought my round was over, but it just kept me relaxed.”

TUESDAY’S RESULTS

BOYS VOLLEYBALL

Mehlville tops Parkway South in three sets BY JOE HARRIS

Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

MANCHESTER • Mehlville found its

mojo just in time. Fresh off of a disappointing showing in the ultra-competitive Lafayette Tournament last weekend, the sloppy play followed the Panthers into their match Tuesday at Parkway South. But after dropping the first set, Mehlville found its game to come back for a 2325, 25-21, 25-16 victory in a Suburban West boys volleyball match. “After that Lafayette Tournament we hit a little bump in the road,” Mehlville setter Regis Ung said. “But we had practice (Monday) and we worked on some specific areas and that helped us tonight.” Ung finished with 28 assists, two kills, a block and an ace for Mehlville (18-3, 7-1), No. 1 in the STLhighschoolsports small-school rankings. Ryan Lively, who set the Mehlville school record for career kills during the Lafayette Tournament, added 10 more kills to his resume as well as an assist, a block and an ace. Lee Kreutzman had eight kills and Vince Trosky put down nine kills. “I think it was playing for each other as opposed to playing as individuals,” Lively said. “Once we play together I think we’re unstoppable, so it was nice to bring the team together and connect.” Braeden Jester had eight kills for Parkway South (10-9-2, 5-4) and Riley Donovan added five. Alex Schmitz had 16 assists. Mehlville got a little breathing room in the second set by taking advantage of four successive hitting errors by the Patriots to take an 18-14 lead. A pair of Panthers errors drew South back to within two, but a Kreutzman kill and a Patriots error sent the match to the third set. “Everyone on the court’s capable of

RICK ULREICH • SPECIAL TO STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

Mehlville senior Vince Trosky (9) celebrates after getting the game-winning kill on Tuesday at Parkway South High School. putting the ball down and our setter trusts everyone,” Lively said. “That’s why we can get around blocks and we can fool blockers and get solos because theydon’t’knowwhoisgoingtogetset.” Mehlville built on that momentum to race out to a 10-2 lead in the third set. Trosky had two kills and Ung added an ace during the salvo. “We were hitting the floor,” Ung said. “That’s something we worked on too. Our defense picked it up and we passed better.” A Kreutzman kill, followed by two more South errors, extended Mehlville’s lead to 17-6. Ung had a pair of kills to bring up match point and ended it by finding Trosky for his fifth kill of the set. “They’re a strong, strong team,” South coach Staci Noyes said. “I think they made a lot of errors in that first game that they cleaned up in the second. We started making more errors in the second and third set and my guys when they get in a hole they have a hard time just digging back out and

Mehlville didn’t let up.” Donovan had three kills for South and the Patriots took advantage of 17 Mehlville errors to win the first set. “It is very uncharacteristic of us,” Mehlville coach Mark Wilhite said.“We just weren’t getting a good first touch on the ball and we weren’t putting ourselves in a position to do good things. Hopefully we got it out of our system and we’re ready to go on a little run.” Lively had seven of his 10 kills in the first set. Wilhite said the Panthers’ improved passing allowed Ung to get the entire offense involved in the second and third sets instead of just feeding Lively out of system balls. Mehlville hopes the recent struggles will pay off in the postseason. “We have to come in and play tough every single day,” Wilhite said. “Nobody’s going to give us anything. We’ve got to be the scrappy team. We got to be the team with energy. We can’t just rely on our pure talent to win games. We’ve got to have a little heart in this too.”

Pawnee (2-0) at Gillespie (11-7), 4:30 p.m. Alton Marquette (16-7) at Collinsville (8-11), 4:30 p.m. Red Bud (10-10) at DuQuoin (1-2), 4:30 p.m. Civic Memorial (9-9) at Jerseyville (16-10), 4:30 p.m. Mount Vernon (4-3) at Cahokia (0-4), 4:30 p.m. ME Lutheran (1-4) at Lebanon (6-12), 4:30 p.m. Murphysboro (0-3) at Carbondale (9-4), 4:30 p.m. Wesclin (8-13) at Valmeyer (2-11), 4:30 p.m. Belleville West (9-6) at Freeburg (11-7), 4:30 p.m. Carlinville (4-5) at Wood River (6-12), 5 p.m. Granite City (4-12) at Roxana (9-16), 6:15 p.m. GIRLS SOCCER University City (10-6) at Hazelwood East (3-7), 4 p.m. Rosati-Kain (12-6) at John Burroughs (5-4), 4 p.m. Incarnate Word (13-4-3) at Villa Duchesne (11-5), 4 p.m. Metro (11-1) vs. Miller Career (0-1), at Vashon, 4 p.m. Westminster (6-10) at Kirkwood (9-5), 4:15 p.m. Sumner (0-2) vs. Medicine and Biosc (6-5), 4:15 p.m. Nerinx Hall (10-3-2) at MICDS (3-8), 4:15 p.m. Cardinal Ritter (0-5) at DuBourg (4-8-1), 4:15 p.m. Gateway STEM (5-4) at Roosevelt (5-2), 4:15 p.m. Wesclin (16-4) at Staunton (5-10), 4:30 p.m. Chatham (1-1) at Edwardsville (9-7), 4:30 p.m. Washington (12-6) at Union (19-1-1), 5 p.m. De Soto (2-13-2) at St. Vincent (5-4), 5 p.m. Carbondale (5-12) at Sikeston (1-7), 5 p.m. St. Joseph’s (13-1) at St. Dominic (18-1-1), 5:30 p.m. Civic Memorial (11-9-2) at Jerseyville (7-10), 5:30 p.m. Affton (7-7-1) at Windsor (5-11), 6 p.m. FH Central (9-7) at Fort Zumwalt South (10-5-1), 6 p.m. Columbia (18-2-1) at Freeburg (11-11), 6:30 p.m. BOYS VOLLEYBALL St. Louis U. High (21-1) at O’Fallon (16-5), 4:30 p.m. CBC (2-16-1) at Vianney (19-3), 5 p.m. Duchesne (1-10) at Westminster (10-13), 5:15 p.m. Pky. Central (6-12-2) at Pky. West (15-6-1), 5:30 p.m. Kirkwood (15-9) at Webster Groves (13-8), 5:30 p.m. Pattonville (25-4) at Summit (6-10-1), 5:30 p.m. Althoff (2-4) at Father McGivney (5-7), 5:30 p.m. Ritenour (2-17) at Affton (10-11-2), 5:30 p.m. De Smet (12-6) at St. Mary’s (15-9-1), 6 p.m. Belleville East (11-8) at Lutheran South (13-4-1), 6 p.m. BOYS LACROSSE Parkway South (3-8) vs. Marquette (6-4), at Chesterfield, 5 p.m. Westminster (7-6) at Ladue (4-5), 5:30 p.m.

Seckman (2-7) vs. Fort Zumwalt West (2-8), at OF SportsPark, 6 p.m. Francis Howell (3-5) at Summit (9-2), 7 p.m. GIRLS LACROSSE Parkway West (13-8) at John Burroughs (5-5), 4 p.m. FH Central (7-5) at Visitation (3-5), 4 p.m. St. Joseph’s (7-2) at Kirkwood (5-8), 4:15 p.m. Ladue (5-5) at Pattonville (5-7), 4:15 p.m. Villa Duchesne (4-5) at MICDS (5-8), 4:15 p.m. Rosati-Kain (2-3) at Notre Dame (7-3), 4:15 p.m. Incarnate Word (7-7) at Clayton (8-2), 4:15 p.m. Marquette (9-4) at Cor Jesu (9-1), 4:30 p.m. Hazelwood West (3-6) at Lindbergh (0-10), 5 p.m. O’Fallon (10-1) at Westminster (6-8), 5:15 p.m. BOYS TENNIS MCC CHAMPIONSHIPS Teams: CBC, Chaminade, De Smet, SLUH, Vianney, 9 a.m. DUALS Lutheran North at McCluer, 3:30 p.m. McCluer at Hazelwood Central, 3:30 p.m. Belleville West at O’Fallon, 3:30 p.m. John Burroughs at Priory, 4 p.m. Sacred Heart-Griffin at Alton Marquette, 4 p.m. Marion at Centralia, Illinois, 4 p.m. Marquette at Eureka, 4:30 p.m. Lafayette at Westminster, 4:30 p.m. TRACK AND FIELD BENTON INVITATIONAL Teams: Benton, Illinois, Father McGivney GAC MEET At Francis Howell Central Teams: Fort Zumwalt West, FH Central, 2:30 p.m. MCC CHAMPIONSHIPS At De Smet Teams: CBC, Chaminade, De Smet, SLUH, Vianney, 4 p.m. CAHOKIA CONFERENCE MEET At Columbia Teams: Wesclin, 4 p.m. SUBURBAN CONFERENCE MEET-RED POOL At Kirkwood Teams: Fox, Kirkwood, McCluer North, Mehlville, Oakville, Parkway South, Pattonville, Seckman, 4 p.m. SOUTHWESTERN CONFERENCE MEET At Belleville West Teams: Alton, Belleville East, Belleville West, Collinsville, East St. Louis, Edwardsville, O’Fallon, 4 p.m.

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BASEBALL Affton (2-12) at Bayless (9-10), 4 p.m. Metro (7-4) vs. Miller Career (2-0), 4 p.m. Dupo (4-10) vs. Gillespie (9-9), at GCS Ballpark, 4 p.m. Francis Howell (15-13) at Troy (14-6), 4:15 p.m. Pattonville (5-15) at St. Charles West (10-7), 4:15 p.m. Orchard Farm (9-9) at Valley Park (14-5), 4:15 p.m. Jerseyville (11-13) at Civic Memorial (11-11), 4:15 p.m. Lutheran North (1-15) at Westminster (21-3), 4:15 p.m. Waterloo (12-6) at Triad (10-12), 4:15 p.m. Holt (6-13) at Fort Zumwalt West (16-9-1), 4:15 p.m. Fort Zumwalt North (6-15) at Liberty (13-4), 4:15 p.m. Highland (10-10) at Mascoutah (19-3), 4:15 p.m. Eureka (11-5) at Lindbergh (10-10), 4:15 p.m. MICDS (10-8) at Priory (10-8), 4:15 p.m. Clayton (10-12) at Fox (9-6), 4:15 p.m. Jennings (5-5) vs. University City (8-3), 4:15 p.m. Festus (5-12) at Parkway Central (5-18), 4:15 p.m. North Tech (1-6) at McCluer S-Berkeley (1-6), 4:15 p.m. HW West (6-11) at Parkway South (7-16), 4:15 p.m. FH Central (10-9) at FH North (7-14), 4:15 p.m. Washington (8-10) at FZSouth (15-8), 4:15 p.m. Union (9-8) at Sullivan (12-5), 4:30 p.m. De Soto (9-6) at Cape Central (0-1), 4:30 p.m. Belleville East (13-9) at Breese Central (8-17), 4:30 p.m. Lutheran South (16-8) at Burroughs (5-8), 4:30 p.m. Collinsville (10-10) at Freeburg (12-10), 4:30 p.m. Centralia (Ill.) (1-16) at Marion (15-3), 4:30 p.m. New Berlin (1-1) at Alton Marquette (17-6), 4:30 p.m. Mount Olive (1-5) at Edinburg, 4:30 p.m. Okawville (8-10) at Nashville (24-4), 4:30 p.m. Lafayette (15-3) at Marquette (13-8), 4:30 p.m. Mehlville (7-9) at Chaminade (17-6), 4:30 p.m. ME Lutheran (4-7) at East St. Louis (1-10), 4:30 p.m. Herrin (0-3) at Carbondale (7-2), 4:30 p.m. Principia (1-8) at Hancock (11-7), 4:30 p.m. Mount Vernon (11-4) at Cahokia (2-8), 4:30 p.m. Gibault (18-5) at Mater Dei (14-8), 4:30 p.m. Brussels (1-4) at Roxana (7-13), 4:30 p.m. Carlinville (10-2) at Wood River (7-16), 5 p.m. Hermann (11-8) at Silex (1-0), 5 p.m. Holt (6-13) at Fort Zumwalt West (16-9-1), 6:15 p.m. SOFTBALL Granite City (4-12) at Roxana (9-16), 4:15 p.m. Triad (15-5) at Waterloo (11-10), 4:15 p.m. Mascoutah (3-15) at Highland (9-6), 4:15 p.m. Marion (12-3) at Centralia (Ill.) (9-1), 4:15 p.m.

BOYS GOLF CLASS 2 DISTRICT 5 TOURNAMENT Team totals: 1. Linn 343, 2. Whitfield 344, 3. Lutheran St. Charles 357, 4. Duchesne 372, 5. Herculaneum 462, 6. O’Fallon Christian 467 Medalist: Kai Kola, Maplewood-RH, 72 Sectional-qualifying teams Linn: 5. Alek Peters, 84; 5. Ethan Russell, 84; 5. Kole Peters, 84; 11. Jimmy McCusky, 91; 21. Ben Steinbeck, 104 Whitfield: 2. Drew Newlin, 79; 3. Henry Nordlund, 82; 8. Clay Strege, 86; 16. Donny Diemer, 97; 18. Sam Miller, 100 Sectional-qualifying individuals Belle: 25. Gavin Snodgrass, 110 Duchesne: 10. Alex Blase, 89; 11. Blake Rufkahr, 91; 11. Nolan Kelsey, 91; 19. Ryan Walsh, 101; 20. Tyler Rufkahr, 103 Maplewood-RH: 1. Kai Kolar, 72 Lutheran St. Charles: 3. Josh Thomason, 82; 8. Joel Meyer, 86; 14. Jacob Franklin, 92; 16. Sam Moehring, 97; 22. Justin Dobrinic, 105 O’Fallon Christian: 22. Blake Ottomeyer, 105; 24. Carlos Sardina, 108 Herculaneum: 15. Dylan Beranek, 93 Others Belle: 29. Brett Butler, 121; 36. Peyton Moran, 174 Herculaneum: 26. Justin Placher, 116; 30. Kory Mueller, 124; 32. Ryan Kattengell, 129 O’Fallon Christian: 28. Tommy Herr, 117; 34. Evan Whittier, 137; 35. Nathan Virtue, 147 Trinity: 26. Steven Berry, 116; 31. Ben Kuhlman, 126; 37. Hayden Schlereth, 188 Valley Park: 33. Eric Willenbrock, 132 CLASS 2 DISTRICT 2 TOURNAMENT Team totals: 1. Willow Springs 348, 2. St. James 374, 3. Cuba 386, 4. Mountain ViewLiberty 394, 5. Ava 431, 6. Houston 445, 7. Steelville, Missouri 458 Medalist: Ryan Cawvey, Willow Springs, 74 Sectional-qualifying teams Willow Springs: 1. Ryan Cawvey, 74; 7. Brandon Marcak, 90; 9. Jackson Bailey, 91; 12. Garret Graves, 93; 17. Owen Duddridge, 100 St. James: 2. Micah Bartle, 80; 6. Isaac Helterbrand, 89; 15. Harrison Janes, 96; 23. Hannah Shasserre, 109; 31. Jacob Rinehart, 117 Sectional-qualifying individuals Ava: 17. Drake King, 100; 20. Blake King, 105 Cuba: 3. Jonathan Bayless, 87; 11. Pavin Clark, 92; 16. Austin Shockley, 98; 23. Brining Mulkey, 109 Dixon: 12. Alex Easterling, 93 Houston: 7. Thomas Smith, 90; 22. Josh Smith, 106 Licking: 9. James Swan, 91 Mountain View-Liberty: 3. Mason Tharp, 87; 5. Gabriel McClellan, 88; 20. Nicholas Alcorn, 105 Steelville, Missouri: 12. Jackson Case, 93; 17. Courtney Lea, 100 Others Ava: 25. Logan Burks, 110; 30. Dylan Sawyer, 116; 32. Tanner Crandall, 122 Cuba: 33. Conor Workman, 123 Dixion: 29. Ty Goforth, 115 Houston: 26. Logan Cary, 111; 37. Samuel Davidson, 138 Mountain Grove: 34. TJ Drone, 126; 35. Cody Carruthers, 127 Mountain View-Liberty: 28. Zachary Stretch, 114; 36. Landen Cooley, 129 Steelville, Missouri: 26. Garrett Marshall, 111; 38. Garrett Mullen, 154; 39. Drew Martin, 173 BOYS TRACK AAA CONFERENCE MEET Team scores: 1. Trinity 171, 2. Cardinal Ritter 127, 3. St. Dominic 93, 4. Lutheran St. Charles 78, 5. Tolton 73, 6. Borgia 59, 7. St. Mary’s 57, 8. O’Fallon Christian 39, 9. DuBourg 15, 10. Duchesne 11 100 meters: 1. Kemeric Winston, Trinity, 10.97; 2. Jack McCormick, St. Dominic, 11.2; 3. Keith Jones, Cardinal Ritter, 11.25; 200 meters: 1. Keven Lomax, Cardinal Ritter, 22.9; 2. Rasheed Ricketts, Cardinal Ritter, 23.12; 3. Timothy Reedy, St. Mary’s, 23.32 400 meters: 1. Montrell Richards, Cardinal Ritter, 51.48; 2. Paul Reed, Trinity, 51.69; 3. Daimond Casseus, St. Mary’s, 53.67 800 meters: 1. Nathan Forck, Tolton, 2:00.7; 2. William Nicholson, St. Dominic, 2:05.79; 3. Drew Snider, Borgia, 2:06.52 1600 meters: 1. Grant Straatmann, Borgia, 4:40.93; 2. William Nicholson, St. Dominic, 4:43.5; 3. Drew Snider, Borgia, 4:47.65 3200 meters: 1. Callum Hardwicke, O’Fallon Christian, 10:46.57; 2. Travis Fruend, Lutheran St. Charles, 10:47.02; 3. Harley Kaufman, Lutheran St. Charles, 10:58.56 110 hurdles: 1. Adam Bell, Borgia, 15.17; 2. Thomas Sonntag, Trinity, 15.26; 3. Myles Norwood, Trinity, 16.35 300 hurdles: 1. Jaden Williams, Cardinal Ritter, 39.92; 2. Thomas Sonntag, Trinity, 40.27; 3. Adam Bell, Borgia, 43 400 relay: 1. Trinity, 43.14; 2. Cardinal Ritter, 44.37; 3. St. Mary’s, 44.52 800 relay: 1. Trinity, 1:29.93; 2. Cardinal Ritter, 1:30.8; 3. St. Mary’s, 1:33.55 1600 relay: 1. Cardinal Ritter, 3:30.79; 2. Trinity, 3:31.1; 3. Tolton, 3:36.26 3200 relay: 1. Cardinal Ritter, 8:25.65; 2. Tolton, 8:33.93; 3. Lutheran St. Charles, 8:46.26 High jump: 1. DaJaun Young, Trinity, 6-00; 2. Isaiah Rivers, DuBourg, 5-10; 3. Jarod Aholt, Tolton, 5-08 Pole vault: 1. Tyler Sachs, St. Dominic, 12-00; 2. Michael Pills, Duchesne, 12-00; 3. Luke McNeil, O’Fallon Christian, 10-06 Long jump: 1. Rasheed Ricketts, Cardinal Ritter, 21-10; 2. Isaiah Williams, Trinity, 2108; 3. Myles Norwood, Trinity, 20-02 Triple jump: 1. Rasheed Ricketts, Cardinal Ritter, 47-01.5; 2. Isaiah Williams, Trinity, 44-07; 3. DaJaun Young, Trinity, 43-08

Shot put: 1. Patrick Harris, St. Mary’s, 45-04; 2. Joseph Moore, Cardinal Ritter, 45-03.75; 3. David Reid, Trinity, 44-08.75 Discus: 1. Christian Locke, Lutheran St. Charles, 143-06; 2. Anthony Heard, Lutheran St. Charles, 142-04.5; 3. Parker Haight, Tolton, 119-03 Javelin: 1. Malcolm Harvey, Trinity, 142-01; 2. Justin Scales, Trinity, 124-02; 3. Tyler Mersnick, St. Dominic, 118-08 GIRLS TRACK AAA CONFERENCE MEET Team scores: 1. Trinity 146, 2. Cardinal Ritter 119.5, 3. Tolton 101.5, 4. Borgia 84, 5. Lutheran St. Charles 78, 6. St. Dominic 64, 7. O’Fallon Christian 60, 8. Notre Dame 36, 9. Rosati-Kain 20, 10. DuBourg 12, 11. Duchesne 10 100 meters: 1. Brayan Washington, Cardinal Ritter, 12.6; 2. Akilah Heffner, Trinity, 12.84; 3. Leah Thames, Trinity, 12.96 200 meters: 1. Dayna Reid, Trinity, 26.07; 2. Brayan Washington, Cardinal Ritter, 27.18; 3. Emily Marut, St. Dominic, 27.84 400 meters: 1. Dayna Reid, Trinity, 59.42; 2. Kristin Booker, Cardinal Ritter, 1:00.46; 3. Mercedes Schroer, O’Fallon Christian, 1:00.56 800 meters: 1. Mercedes Schroer, O’Fallon Christian, 2:36.95; 2. Grace Garner, Notre Dame, 2:38.46; 3. Denae Glenn, O’Fallon Christian, 2:43.02 1600 meters: 1. Jessica Bodmer, St. Dominic, 5:43.69; 2. Grace Garner, Notre Dame, 5:45.57; 3. Mary-Rourke Boyd, Tolton, 5:56.83 3200 meters: 1. Mary-Rourke Boyd, Tolton, 12:38.42; 2. Jessica Bodmer, St. Dominic, 12:55.85; 3. Anna Gangloff, Tolton, 13:04.88 100 hurdles: 1. Sydney Juszczyk, Trinity, 15.35; 2. Shaila Jones, Trinity, 15.6; 3. Maggie Dooley, O’Fallon Christian, 16.93; 3. Lauren Beauchamp, O’Fallon Christian, 16.93 300 hurdles: 1. Kayla Millett, Trinity, 48.03; 2. Sydney Mitchell, Cardinal Ritter, 48.8; 3. Samantha Sieve, Trinity, 49 400 relay: 1. Cardinal Ritter, 49.45; 2. Trinity, 50.05; 3. Borgia, 54.45; 3. Borgia, 54.45; 800 relay: 1. Trinity, 1:47.27; 2. Cardinal Ritter, 1:48.58; 3. Tolton, 1:58.65 1600 relay: 1. Cardinal Ritter, 4:08.01; 2. Trinity, 4:24.77; 3. Lutheran St. Charles, 4:26.56 3200 relay: 1. O’Fallon Christian, 10:44.94; 2. Cardinal Ritter, 10:49.77; 3. St. Dominic, 11:04.3 High jump: 1. Samantha Sieve, Trinity, 4-10; 2. Alyx Hutchins, Trinity, 4-06; 3. Deanna Wilson, Cardinal Ritter, 4-06 Pole vault: 1. Elizabeth Rothweiler, Duchesne, 8-06; 2. Grace West, Borgia, 8-00; 3. Natalie Guehne, Borgia, 7-06 Long jump: 1. Sydney Mitchell, Cardinal Ritter, 16-01; 2. Nya Hall, Trinity, 15-00; 3. Ellie Reynolds, Tolton, 14-08 Triple jump: 1. Sydney Juszczyk, Trinity, 35-04.5; 2. Maggie Dooley, O’Fallon Christian, 32-08; 2. Lauren Beauchamp, O’Fallon Christian, 32-08; 4. Olivia Barnes, Tolton, 32-01.5 Shot put: 1. Jenna Grzeskowiak, Lutheran St. Charles, 34-05; 2. Lynnae Grus, Borgia, 31-02; 3. Claire Jordon, Lutheran St. Charles, 30-00 Discus: 1. Angelina White, Rosati-Kain, 134-03; 2. Jenna Grzeskowiak, Lutheran St. Charles, 109-11; 3. Lynnae Grus, Borgia, 99-06 Javelin: 1. Sydney Juszczyk, Trinity, 11709; 2. Courtney Widmer, Tolton, 94-01; 3. Bridget Bartlett, Tolton, 87-02 BASEBALL St. Louis Pat 6 5 0 OKC 1 3 0 W-Evan Clawson. Lebanon 0 3 0 Red Bud 10 10 0 W-Tyler Koester. Althoff 101 010 0 3 3 0 Marion 200 100 1 4 6 0 L-Tyler Tieman. Dupo 010 010 0 2 5 0 New Athens 010 112 0 5 7 0 W-George Schneider. SOFTBALL Lebanon 000 040 1 5 6 0 Red Bud 050 311 0 10 15 2 W-Emma Durbin. Dupo 000 000 0 0 5 0 New Athens 130 001 0 5 8 0 W-Julia Drake. GIRLS SOCCER U. City 4, McCluer 1 U: Aaliyah Brown 2, Mary Kate Standish, Annie Rhoades McCluer North 4, Ritenour 2 M: Kira McGrellis 3, Skyla Koch Trinity 0, Lutheran SC 0 L: shutout by Erin Turner FZ West 2, FH Central 0 Fo: Ashlyne Hunt, Kaitlyn Nichols BOYS VOLLEYBALL De Smet def. Chaminade 25-19, 23-25, 25-15 Borgia def. Lutheran SC 25-16, 25-22 FZ South def. Zumwalt East 25-23, 25-17 Mehlville def. Pky. South 23-25, 25-21, 25-16 Kirkwood def. Lindbergh 26-24, 25-23 Vianney def. Pky. Central 25-16, 25-11 Affton def. Cape ND 25-20, 22-25, 26-24 Lafayette def. Northwest-CH 25-18, 25-20 Howell def. FH Central 25-15, 29-27 St. Mary’s def. O’F Christian 25-23, 25-16 BOYS TENNIS Marquette 6, Lafayette 0 WATER POLO MICDS 11, Pky. Central 7 M: Filip Alesic 4, John Curylo 3, Davis Johnson 2, David Shapshovich, Chris Shannon JohnBurroughs 7, Summit 5 S: Noah Roberts 2, Dorian Piel 2, Zachary Swayne


05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

CLASSIFIED Continued from Page A12 Audi '18 Q5 Premium Plus/Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 7k mi., #27839L $42,200

'18 Q5 Premium Plus/Tech Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 7k mi., #27839L $42,200

'18 Audi Q5 Prem Plus/Tech Prem Plus, quattro sport utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 8k mi., #27840L $42,200

Ford

Mercedes Benz

GMC Trucks

'13 EDGE: #190421, $13,880 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'17 Mercedes-Benz E 300: Luxury, Carfax 1 Owner, RWD, Sedan, $33,992 #P9651

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $62,963

'08 ACCORD EX-L: 3.5 V6, Loa de d, Cle a n Carfax, #44592A, $8,990

2019 Infiniti QX50 Essential, AWD, 5k mi #98051L $41,992

Infiniti

'18 GMC Canyon 4wd, all terrain w/cloth, pickup crew cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 4k, #P9860 $32,333

BMW '16 x6 xDrive 351i: AWD, 4 Cyl, 29xxx Miles, $41,992, #P9759

'17 Audi Q7 Premium Plus, quattro sport utility, 6 cyl., awd, auto, black 50k, #29142A $39,333

'16 BMW M3, Sedan 6 cyl., rwd, manual, black, lthr., 8k mi., #29149A $51,992

'16 BMW M3, Sedan 6 cyl., rwd, manual, black, lthr., 8k mi., #29149A $51,992

'16 BMW 4: Series 435i xDrive, 26K Miles, AWD, Coupe, $31,992 #P9722

'15 BMW M3: 4 Door Sedan, 29K Miles, RWD, Manual $40,992 #P9684

'16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, $31,992 #12382A

'16 BMW 535i xDrive: 29KMi, AWD, Sedan, $31,992 #12382A

'16 BMW 3 Series Gran Turismo 335i xDrive, hatchback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, gray, 37k mi., #P9790 $29,077

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl, awd, auto, black, 16k mi., #P9887 $57,200

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl, awd, auto, black, 16k mi., #P9887 $57,200

'19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, blue, 16k mi., #P9886 $37,200

'15 Infiniti QX80, sport utility, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 86k mi., #98311A $31,200

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 13k mi., #P9801 $58,077

'19 Infiniti QX80 LUXE, 8 cyl., awd, auto, black, 13k mi., #P9801 $58,077

'19 Infiniti QX50: AWD, 5 k Miles $41,992 #9805IL

Cadillac '16 XT3 P LATINUM: Loa de d, Cle a n Carfax, Only 13xxx Mile s ! $32,990, #44255A

'13 Escalade Platinum: AWD, 85xxx Miles, DVD, Leather, 3rd Row, $28,992, #P9760

Chevrolet '13 S ONIC LTZ: H/B, Loade d, Cle a n Carfax, #44461A, $9,969

Toyota Trucks '11 TACOMA PRERUNNER: Double Ca b, Loa de d, #44563B, $13,990

'19 Infiniti QX50 Essential, 4 cyl., awd, white, 5k mi., $38,992 #98001L

'19 Infiniti QX50 Essential, 4 cyl., awd, 4k mi., $38,992 #98030L

Volvo '16 S 60 T5: Drive-E Ins cription S e da n, #L1603, $18,5 00 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '07 Volvo XC90 3.2 SUV, #199671 $6,800 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 S 60 T5 R: S pe cia l Edition, #L1582, $20,000 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '18 V60 T5: Cros s Country, AWD, #L1571, $24,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC90: SUV $37,755, #L1566 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 XC 60 T6: SUV, #L15531, $10,822 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo XC90 SUV #L1591 $36,882 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Volvo XC60 T5, awd, ins cription, #P 4358 $26,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC 90 SUV: #197901, $37,890 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 XC90 T5 Mome ntum: AWD $33,500 #L1559 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Volvo S 60 T5, #L1529 $19,500 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'16 Silverao 1500 LT 27k Miles , 4WD, Auto, 4.3L $27,991 #P 6756

'15 SIILVERADO 1500 LT: Double Ca b P ickup, 8 Cyl 4WD, Auto, Bla ck, 36xxx Mile s , #P 6781, $29,560

'16 SILVERADO 1500 LT: Double Ca b Pickup, 8 Cyl, 4WD, Auto, Silve r, 41xxx Mile s , #P6783, $28,500

'16 CREW CAB DUALLY 4x4: Loa de d, Only 37xxx Mile s ! #44410A, $48,75 0 '17 Infiniti QX80 AWD, 8 cyl., auto, blue, 8k mi., $61,000 #95548L

Jaguar

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, pickup cre w ca b, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, white , 3k mi., #P 6799 $40,990

'18 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, double ca b pickup, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, 4k mi., #420200A $34,990

'10 AVALANCHE: Loa de d, One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax, #44085A, $13,469

Sport Utility '18 Audi Q5 Premium Plus: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 8K Miles, Certified $39,992 #28175L

'18 Audi Q5 Premium: Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, 21k Miles, $32,992 #P9607

'18 Audi Q7: Premium Plus, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, $46,992 #P9619

Garage Sales '18 Audi A7 Prestige Quattro Sportback, 6 cyl., AWD, auto, blue 18k mi., $58,992 #P9657

62234 - Church Rummage Sale, Thurs 5/2, 5-7:30 pm, Fri. 5/3, 9am-Noon, St. John UCC, 307 W. Clay, Collinsville, IL 63011: MULTI SUB SALES 5/1 & 5/4, 141 & Dutchmill area more info 314-504-0933 63026

'16 BMW X5 50i: xDrive, Clean Carfax, 1 Owner, AWD, 41K Miles $41,992 #P9665

'07 CHEVY EQUINOX LS: AWD, Loa de d, Only 53xxx Mile s , #44685A, $8,992

'14 Chevy Equinox LS SUV $10,000 #197862 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '15 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 103k mi., #79492B $29,000

'19 Chevy Tra ve rs e LT, le a the r, s port utility, 6 cyl., awd, a uto, bla ck, 20k mi., #P 6798 $38,990

HUGE SALE - 2 SUBDIV. SATURDAY May 4, 7am-1pm From Gravois/Hwy 30: R Summit Rd, R Country Home and R Summit Rd , R Winter Top

Sponsored by: Amal Eche, Realtor 314-707-0026 Coldwell Banker Gundaker 636-343-1500 63304 SUBDIVISION SALE Wed. 5/1, 8am-4pm. "The Lakes" off O'Fallon Rd. & Hwy. K. Watch for balloons on mailboxes! 63304

SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE Whitmoor Country Club From Hwy 40 to East on Hwy 94 Right onto Wolfrum Road Left onto Whitmoor Drive

'16 CHEVY TRAVERS E LTZ: Loa de d, One Owne r, GM Ce rtifie d $17,750, #P 6679

'19 Chevy Tra ve rs e LT, lthr., 6 cyl., awd, a uto, grey, 18k mi., $38,991, #P 6793

636-936-3463 636-441-1360 63304: The Vineyards Subdivision Garage Sale May 4, 7am, 756 Napa Ln. 63304

'11 GMC Acadia SUV $6,822, #198211 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 GMC Yukon SLE, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, black, 27k mi, #P9894 $38,200

'15 GMC YUKON DENALI: Loa de d, Cle a n Carfax, GM Ce rtifie d! #42629A, $37 ,990

63341

SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE Saturday, May 4th, 2019 7 am - 12 pm Directions: 94 S FROM 40 TO West ON Hwy D TO South ON DD 1.5 MILES; SUBDIVISION ON RIGHT

Sponsored by: Rebecca Lewis, Coldwell Banker Gundaker Cell: 314.369.9680 or Office: 636.939.8015

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, AWD, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, 5K Miles, $38,992 #98023L

'16 LR Range Rover: Sport V6 HSE, AWD, Clean Carfax $37,992 #79760A

Lexus '16 RC 300 Coupe: 16xxx Miles, Auto, AWD, Keyless Start, $28,992, #P9644

'16 Lexus GS 350: 4 Door Sedan, 34K Miles, Clean Carfax $32,992 #P9588

'19 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, cre w ca b, 8 cyl., 4 WD, 2k mi., $38,994 #42936A

'18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, 4 cyl., FWD, auto, white , 5k mi., $31,473 #35139A '16 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT, 8 cyl., 4WD, a uto, bla ck, 28k mi., $30,290 #P 6784 '18 Mazda CX-9 Touring, 4 cyl., FWD, a uto, re d, 5k mi., $32,463 #35396A

'16 Lexus RC350, coupe, 6 cyl., RWD, auto, orange, 45k mi., #97451A $27,992

'16 Silverado 1500 LT 4WD, 5.3L, Auto, 35K Mi., $27,990 #P 6752

'14 Lexus GX 460 Luxury, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, silver, 41k mi., #29153A $34,333

'16 Chevy Tahoe LT, SUV, 8 cyl., 4wd, a uto, s ilve r, 51k mi., #P 6797 $41,385

'17 Mazda MX-5 Miata, RF Gra nd Touring, coupe , 4 cyl., RWD, 6 spd ma nua l, re d, 25k mi., #P 6674 $24,973

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665 WANTED - Top Dollar Paid for Old Beer Cans or Beer Related Items! Soda items as well. Call 618-444-5440.

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets BELLEVILLE, IL FLEA MARKET Sat., May 4, 9am-4pm Sun., May 5, 9am-3pm Free Parking & Admission First full weekend of every month featuring all kinds of vendors with antiques, collectibles, craft items, vintage Items, tools, variety of foods and MUCH MORE! St. Clair County Event Center 1550 E. State Rt 15 Belleville, IL 62221 618-830-7552

Come early for breakfast at the Country Cafe! www.scceventcenter.com

Public Notices As o f Ap r il 5 , 2 0 1 9 , Daniel's Moving and Storage, Inc., located at 1600 Park 370 Place Ste. 7, Hazelwood, MO, 63042, no longer represents Atlas Van Lines, Inc.

Bids/Proposals ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sealed bids will be received by Wentzville R-IV School District, at the Wentzville Central Office, 280 Interstate Drive, Wentzville, MO 63385, until WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5, 2019 AT 2 P.M. CDT, for the Barfield Early Learning Center Addition. Bids w ill be opened publicly at that time. Drawings and specifications for this project are on file at the office of the Architect, Hoener Associates, Inc., 6707 Plainview Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63109, (314) 781-9855, FAX (314) 7810163. Information as to bidding instructions and requirements for p r o c u r in g bidding documents may be obtained from the Architect. Not less than the prevailing hourly wage rates, as determined by the State of Missouri, Division of Labor Standards, shall be paid all workers employ ed on this project. The Board of Education reserves the right to waive technicalities, to select any contractor filing a proposal, and to reject any or all bids. THERE IS NO PRE-BID MEETING SCHEDULED FOR THIS PROJECT.

'16 Lincoln MKZ: Loa de d, Full P owe r, Ve ry Cle a n $17,750 #44323A

'18 GMC Acadia Denali, 4 dr., 6 cyl., awd, auto, white, 21k mi., #97319A $36,200

'12 MAZDA 3 S P ORT: Loa ded, Cle a n Carfax, $6,770, #37065A

Dodge

'17 GMC Acadia Denali, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 10k mi., #P9839 $35,000

Vans

'19 Infiniti QX50: Essential, 6K Mi, Clean Carfax, 1 Ownr, Cert, AWD $37,992 #98000L

'08 SIERRA DENALI 2500: Cre w Ca b Die s e l, Only 400 Mile s ! GM Ce rtifie d! #44550A, $58,5 00

Mercedes Benz '09 S 550 4Matic: Bla ck, Only 55xxx Mile s , #44675A, $24,869

'13 C300 4MATIC: #196422, $11,220 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'11 HONDA ODYS S EY EX-L: Loa de d, Full P owe r, Cle a n Carfax, #42365A, $11,469

'18 Chevy Expre s s Ca rgo Va n, 24K Mile s , Ce rtifie d, RWD, $22,475 #P 6649

'15 CANYON SLE: Loa de d, Ext Ca b, Only 6xxx Mile s ! #37170AA, $21,469

'19 GMC Sierra 2500 H D Denali, 8 cyl., 4wd, auto, white, 4k mi., #80444A $62,963

STLtoday.com/readerrewards

The City of Fenton, Missouri (the "City") seeks bids from qualified contractors for 6 7 1 Larkin Wil liams Road Demolition Services (the "Project"). Sealed bids addressed to the Fenton City Hall at 625 New Smizer Mill Road, Fenton Missouri, will be accepted by the City until 10: 00 a.m. (prevailing local time) on the 8 th day of May 2 0 1 9 at which time all bids re ce ive d will be opened and read aloud. The Bid Documents are on file at Fenton City Hall. Bidders must contact the City directly to receive copies of the bid documents and provide the City contact information so that the City can ensure that all bidders are notified of any addendums. Any submission to the City of bid documents received from any source other than directly by the City may result in disqualification for failure to comply with these bidding procedures. Copies of the Bid Documents may be obtained at a cost of $0. Bids should be clearly marked "BID OPENING: 671 Larkin Williams Road Demolition Services - ATTENTION PROJECT MANAGER". Bids shall be submitted on the Bid Proposal form provided. All w o rk s h a ll b e p e rf o rme d according to City specifications. A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on the 2nd day of May 2019 at 10: 00 a.m. at 625 New Smizer Mill Road, Fenton, MO 63026 (City Hall).

63366:Brook Hollow Neighborhood Sale, May 3 & 4. Preview Fri. 3a7p; Sale Sat. 8a-1p 63368

The City of Fenton is an Equal Opportunity Employer and invites the submission of bids from minority and women owned firms.

100+ Family Sale WingHaven Subd., at Hwy 40 and WingHaven Blvd. in O'Fallon MO. Sat May 4, 7am-1pm. For info: Kathy Kilo Peterson State Farm Agency 636-561-6460 63368

SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE

TWIN CHIMNEY BLVD

O'FALLON, MO 63368 Preview 5/3/19, 4pm-9pm Spring Garage Sale 5/4/19, 7am-1pm LOTS OF EVERYTHING!

SUBDIVISION GARAGE SALE

Ford Trucks

GMC Trucks

CITY OF FENTON, MISSOURI NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

"Sealed Proposals for B19-1171 Elevator Maintenance & Repair will be received at Lincoln University Purchasing Dept 1002 Chestnut St, RM 101 Shipping & Receiving Bldg, JCMO 65101 until 2PM CT on 14M ay 2019 . Download Proposal Request at http://www.lincolnu.edu/web/ purchasing/bids"

63368

Mini vans

'18 Mazda CX-9 Sport, 4 cyl., awd, auto, 2k mi., #12044L $29,077

'16 CHARGER R/T: Loa de d, Bla ck, One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax, #44589A, $24,990

'17 RX350: Clean Carfax, One Owner, AWD $37,992, #P9626

German Shepherd Pups - AKC, Protection & Friendship. Asking $500. Call (573)756-2494 Golden Doodle pups - 8 weeks old on April 25th, will be up to date on shots and ready for your home. $875 618-664-2942 Great Dane pups AKC, M/F, 16wks, blk/fawn. All shots, worm'd. Fam. raised. Parents on site. $500. 559708-8918 MO # Pembroke Corgi pups, Reg., shots, guar.. Delivery avail. to StL for fee. $700.00 417-574-6470 kara012@centurytel.net Poodles, Toy, AKC, 8 Mos., Males, smart, no shedding, health guar. W ill H O L D f o r M other's D ay or Graduation $650, Call 6 3 6 537-3797 Soft Coated WheatenPups, shots, guar. Delivery avail. to StL for fee. $500, 417-574-6470 kara012@centurytel.net St Bernard pups, AKC, 9 weeks & 6 weeks $700 636-333-2814

'16 Chevy Silverado 1500, a uto, bla ck, 45k mi., $29,500 #P 6780

'15 Chevy Corve tte Z51 3LT, conve rtible , 8 cyl., RWD, 7spd ma nua l, 51k mi., #44573A $43,770

'13 Dodge Challenger SRT8, coupe, 8 cyl., RWD, manual, black, 9k mi., #12808A $29,000

sieversretrievers.com

Ridgefield Farms

Jeep '16 Jeep Wrangler, Loaded, Soft Top, 30k miles $20,500. Call 314-800-4057 '15 J e e p Wra ngle r Manua l, Bla ck $26,990 #37069A

Mazda

Corvette

618.396.2494

Sponsored by: Susie O. Johnson Team Coldwell Banker Gundaker

'17 Infiniti Q50, 3.0t Premium, Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, platinum, 12k mi., #96195L $27,992

Lincoln

'11 MALIBU LT: Le a the r, Loa de d, #44595, $8,770

All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

'11 Sentra S R, Auto, Loa de d, $6,750 #44404

'19 CAMARO LT: Only 400 Mile s ! Loa de d! #44654A, $3 0,990

'12 CRUZE ECO: One Owne r, Cle a n Carfax, #37041A, $7,990

'17 Toyota Tacoma SR5/TRD Sport/TRD Off Road, double cab, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 12k mi., #P9875 $34,200

LABRADOODLES, GOLDENDOODLES, GOLDADORS, GOLDEN RETRIEVERS & LABS

Merchandise Wanted

Saturday, May 4th, 2019 7 am - 12 pm

Buick

'17 Buick LaCrosse Premium Sedan, 6 cyl., awd, auto, 17k mi., #P9893 $28,200

Nissan/Datsun '17 Nissan Armada Platinum, #192411 $35,000 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '17 Nissan Armada Platinum, 8 cyl., awd, auto, 45k mi., #P9862 $38,200

Chevrolet Trucks '19 Infiniti QX60 PURE, 6 cyl., awd, 13k mi., $39,000 #P9817

2016 Lexus GS 350 4 door, 34k miles, clean carfax #P9588 $32,992

'18 Buick Enclave Essence, 6 cyl., awd, auto, red, 2k mi., $38,000, #41129A

Puppies Ready Now !

Crossovers

'17 Audi A7 Prestige, quattro sportback, 6 cyl., awd, auto, blue, 24k mi, #P9899 $49,200

'17 Ford Explorer Platinum, 6 cyl., 4wd, auto, 62k mi., #41002A $30,000

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS:

Honda '15 Honda Accord EX-L, one owne r, loa de d, cle a n carfax $13,750, #44443A

2019 Infiniti QX50 Essential, AWD, 5k mi #98051L $41,992

'16 Audi Q5 Premium, quattro Sport Utility, 4 cyl., awd, auto, white, 22k mi., #P9901 $28,200

Dogs

Motorcycles '12 Ultra: 3800 mi, flawless, never wrecked, mech. perfect, 1 owner $13800 (623)444-0228.

Boats 1 9 9 9 CHARGER, 1 9 5 VS, 1999 Mercury 200 HP Motor, Call for details: (636)294-3756

Business Opportunities

Friday, May 3, 2019 4:30 pm Saturday, May 4, 2019 7:30 am Hutchings Farm Subd. Directions: Interstate 70 to Hwy K south, to left into Hutchings Farm

Sponsored by: Stacy Sutterer

"Sealed Proposals will be received at Lincoln University Purchasing Dept 1002 Chestnut St, RM 101 Shipping & Receiving Bldg, JCMO 65101 as follows: B19-1173 Auditing Services until 2PM CT on 14May2019. B19-1174 International Student H e a lt h I nsurance 2 P M C T o n 16May2019 Dow nload Proposal Request at http://www.lincolnu.edu/web/ purchasing/bids"

Announcements

314-308-6991 Coldwell Banker Gundaker 636-441-1360

Multi-Subdivision Spring Garage Sale! Saturday May 4th, 2019 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM

ATTENTION If you or someone you know worked for Lyons Sheet Metal or Sheet Metal Local 36 in St. Louis between 1950 and 1970 please call Rebecca at Simmons Hanly Conroy toll-free at (855) 9882537. You can also email Rebecca at rcockrell@simmonsfirm.com

Westglen Farms Manchester Road, west of Clarkson to right on Westglen Farms Dr.

Family Rest aur ant 30yrs, 175 seats, 5,000 sq ft. $700K yearly sales. $99,000. 618-946-2999

Tall Oaks, Winding Trails and Village of Winding Trails, Manors of Winding Trails

Dogs

Clayton west of Strecker Rd., FOLLOW THE SIGNS

Airedale Terrier AKC Male pups Born 03/27. Parents on site in Taylorville, IL 100 miles north. $750, (217)820-0129 Boston Terrier Puppies, 5 females, home-raised, 5wks, 618-967-2774

Sponsored by Sharon Hutson BHHS Alliance, Real Estate 17050 Baxter Rd, Ste 200 Chesterfield, Mo 63005 Office 636-227-3456 Cell 314-614-4575

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH


B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

BUILT

PROUD

11400 New Halls Ferry rd. • 314-838-2400

CHECK OUT OUR PREOWNED DEALS 2017 FORD FOCUS SE HATCHBACK I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE STK# P64064

2014 FORD FOCUS ST BASE HATCHBACK I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE STK# J172237A

2015 FORD EXPLORER XLT SUV V-6 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE STK# TJC54598A

2016 FORD ESCAPE TITANIUM SUV I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE STK# TP26584

2016 FORD EDGE SEL SUV I-4 CYL ALL-WHEEL DRIVE STK# TP14246

2017 FORD EXPLORER XLT SUV I-4 CYL STK# TP46760

$11,375

$11,737

$18,690

$18,715

$24,255

$24,290

2016 FORD FORD EXPORER LTD STK# TP92209

2016 FORD F-150 LARIAT TRUCK SUPER CAB V-8 CYL 4X2 STK# T54980

2018 FORD EDGE SPORT SUV V-6 CYL ALL-WHEEL DRIVE STK# TP51472

2018 FORD EDGE SPORT SUV V-6 CYL ALL-WHEEL DRIVE STK# TP44240

2018 FORD EDGE SPORT SUV V-6 CYL ALL-WHEEL DRIVE STK# TP51471

2016 FORD F-150 XLT TRUCK SUPERCREW CAB V-6 CYL 4X4 STK# TP81966

$29,331

$35,758

$38,352

$38,352

$38,352

$38,640

YEAR

MAKE

MODEL

STK#

PRICE

YEAR

MAKE

MODEL

STK#

PRICE

2015

LEXUS

RX 350 SUV V-6 CYL ALL-WHEEL DRIVE

TP98555

$22,940

2012

CHRYSLER

300 RWD SEDAN V-6 CYL REAR-WHEEL DRIVE

P98722

$13,118

2012

KIA

RIO LX (A6) SEDAN I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P83313

$8,990

2014

DODGE

AVENGER SE SEDAN I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P96742

$9,539

2014

DODGE

AVENGER SE SEDAN I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P96742

$9,539

2015

FORD

EXPLORER BASE SUV V-6 CYL 4X4

TKA08726A

$14,590

2015

KIA

SOUL BASE FWD HATCHBACK I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P70062

$11,253

2017

CHEVROLET

TRAVERSE LT W/2LT SUV V-6 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

TP06367

$24,637

2015

LEXUS

ES 350 SEDAN V-6 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P92812

$23,163

2015

DODGE

CHARGER R/T SEDAN V-8 CYL REAR-WHEEL DRIVE

P53765

$27,290

2017

CADILLAC

XTS LUXURY SEDAN V-6 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P40061

$22,690

2016

GMC

ACADIA SLT-1 SUV V-6 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

TP12589

$24,171

2018

FORD

FLEX LIMITED W/ECOBOOST SUV V-6 CYL ALL-WHEEL DRIVE

TP15601

$33,914

2013

FORD

ESCAPE SE SUV I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

PS93302

$13,500

2017

JEEP

GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED 4X4 SUV V-6 CYL 4X4

TP07031

$26,708

2014

JEEP

GRAND CHEROKEE SUMMIT 4X4 SUV V-6 CYL 4X4

TP33159

$27,794

2015

KIA

SOUL BASE FWD HATCHBACK I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P70062

$11,253

2017

NISSAN

ROGUE SL SUV I-4 CYL ALL-WHEEL DRIVE

ET82032

$22,294

2015

FORD

EXPLORER SPORT SUV V-6 CYL 4X4

TP10985

$26,998

2016

FORD

EXPLORER SPORT SUV V-6 CYL 4X4

TP41981

$31,618

2012

MAZDA

MX-5 MIATA GRAND TOURING HARD TOP (A6) CONVERTIBLE I-4 CYL REAR-WHEEL DRIVE

J232311A

$14,740

2015

HYUNDAI

SONATA LIMITED I-4 CYL FRONT-WHEEL DRIVE

P03857

$18,235

WWW.CERAME.COM ST. LOUIS FIVE-DAY FORECAST

NATIONAL OUTLOOK

.com

A storm in the Great Lakes today will bring periods of rain while a front brings showers and thunderstorms all the way to Texas. Storms from southern Missouri will fire in the afternoon and could turn severe. Snow will persist from Colorado to the Dakotas. The Southeast and much of the mid-Atlantic will feel like it is summertime.

TODAY

TONIGHT

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Cloudy, a thunderstorm WIND SW 8-16 mph

Showers and thunderstorms WIND S 6-12 mph

Cloudy with thunderstorms WIND SW 7-14 mph

Mainly cloudy

Nice with clouds and sun WIND N 4-8 mph

Partly sunny, a t-storm WIND WSW 6-12 mph

77°

65°

Shown are noon positions of precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

WIND NE 7-14 mph

80

Peoria 55 74 Macomb 70/55 70/56 Bloomington Urbana 71/56 74/61

Kirksville 70/54

Quincy 71/58

Decatur 74/62

Springfield 57 73/61 Effingham 70 55 74/62

35

Columbia 77/60 St. Louis Mount Jefferson Vernon 77/65 City 76/62 78/61 Union 55 78/63 57 44 Rolla Carbondale 77/62 76/63 Farmington 76/62 Cape Girardeau 77/63 Springfield 77/63 Poplar Bluff West Plains 77/65 55 77/63 70

44

RIVER AND LAKE LEVELS Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

Missouri River Kansas City Jefferson City Hermann Washington St. Charles Mississippi River Hannibal Louisiana Dam 24 Dam 25 Grafton M.Price, Pool M.Price, Tail. St. Louis Chester Cape Girardeau Illinois River La Salle Peoria Beardstown

32 23 21 20 25

Meramec River Sullivan Valley Park Arnold Bourbeuse River Union Ohio River Cairo Lake Levels Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

22.09 +0.34 17.49 -0.05 18.25 -0.37 15.19 -0.42 21.84 -0.21

16 21.75 +0.54 15 19.90 +0.30 25 30.28 +0.36 26 30.59 +0.03 18 23.48 -0.22 419 420.33 -0.29 21 24.05 -0.27 30 30.58 -0.36 27 33.57 -0.51 32 37.73 -0.33 20 18 14

Flood Stage 24 hour Stage (ft.) Tue. Change

Location

19.14 +2.69 15.38 +0.02 17.36 -0.23

15 16 24

4.74 -0.45 9.98 -0.89 27.57 -0.51

15

3.11

-0.35

40

48.27

-0.47

359.24 368.86 507.28 656.52 709.04 663.03 915.45 841.22 597.16 410.65 607.11 445.43

+0.04 -0.12 -0.14 none -0.09 +0.11 -0.09 -0.02 -0.03 -0.10 +0.41 -0.21

TEMPERATURE TRENDS Daily Temperature

Forecast Temperature

Average High

Average Low

Pollen Yesterday Trees Weeds Grass Mold

Source: St. Louis County

Cooling Degree Days Degree days are an indicator of energy needs. The more the total degree days, the more energy is necessary to cool.

Tuesday Month to date Normal month to date Since January 1 Normal since January 1

0 31 42 31 44

RealFeel Temperature® Today An exclusive index of effective temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure and elevation on the human body.

65° 8 a.m.

70° noon

74° 4 p.m.

71° 8 p.m.

UV Index Today Shown is the highest value of the day.

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11+

79 63

60

56

61 52

40

W

75

68

T

73

57 49

F

43 S

41 S

77

72

78 66

65 53

56

M

T

W

79

81

63

62

71

54

55

52

T

F

S

56

S

M

T

Washington 75/67

Atlanta 85/65 El Paso 85/59

Houston 85/73

Chihuahua 88/54

-10s -0s

0s

Miami 83/76

Monterrey 99/68

10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Warm front

Stationary front

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Anchorage Atlanta Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Charleston, S.C. Charleston, W.Va. Charlotte Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Dallas Daytona Beach Denver Des Moines Destin, Fla. Detroit Hartford Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock

54/47/r 74/48/s 54/41/pc 85/65/pc 83/71/t 69/62/c 87/67/pc 60/41/pc 55/44/pc 84/65/pc 89/62/pc 86/65/pc 63/43/r 81/64/c 80/62/c 78/68/t 83/69/pc 51/31/c 61/48/c 79/66/c 74/56/t 58/47/r 83/70/s 85/73/pc 73/62/t 66/51/c 76/57/pc 80/65/c

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

62/49/c 75/48/s 49/39/r 85/67/pc 86/69/t 88/66/pc 86/67/pc 66/40/pc 49/44/r 84/68/pc 83/61/t 86/67/pc 54/43/r 77/61/t 72/60/r 80/66/t 82/69/t 60/34/pc 63/44/c 80/68/pc 70/51/r 60/46/r 83/69/sh 87/71/t 72/55/t 63/46/sh 83/63/s 75/61/t

Showers

T-storms

Rain

City

Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Montgomery Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Sacramento Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Seattle Tampa Tucson Washington, D.C. Wichita

69/53/pc 85/67/c 81/69/c 83/76/sh 52/41/r 51/43/r 88/64/t 86/66/c 84/71/c 56/52/sh 77/55/c 60/45/c 88/70/pc 60/58/sh 87/66/s 83/64/pc 53/40/c 70/44/s 78/49/s 54/38/pc 80/72/t 68/58/pc 70/49/s 64/46/s 90/73/pc 87/58/s 75/67/c 71/52/c

National Extremes Tuesday in the 48 contiguous states

Today’s Air Quality

High: 96 Zapata, Texas

Skywatch Rise

Sun Moon

Set

6:04 a.m. 4:47 a.m.

7:53 p.m. 4:46 p.m.

New Moon

First Quarter

Full Moon

Last Quarter

May 4

May 11

May 18

May 26

©2019; forecasts and graphics, except for the KTVI forecasts, provided by

Snow

Ice

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

72/55/pc 82/63/t 81/66/t 84/77/t 50/40/r 59/42/r 88/65/pc 85/62/c 84/70/sh 71/50/sh 68/57/t 65/45/pc 84/71/t 85/58/t 91/69/s 77/64/t 46/39/r 66/45/pc 81/49/s 63/44/pc 85/70/c 69/59/pc 68/48/pc 61/45/pc 87/75/t 87/60/s 88/70/pc 66/52/c

Low: 11 Ryegate, Mont.

WORLD FORECAST

Forecast index based on presence of manmade particulates affecting aspects of human health.

Good Moderate Unhealthy Unhealthy Very Hazardous (sensitive) Unhealthy

Flurries

Today Hi/Lo/W

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. airnow.gov

New York 56/52

Detroit 74/56

Kansas City 66/51

Los Angeles 69/53

Cold front

High - 550 Absent Low - 2 Moderate - 12641

Toronto 48/43

Denver 51/31

Statistics through 5 p.m. Tuesday

100

80

Chicago 63/43

San Francisco 70/49

Temperature High/low 73°/56° Normal high/low 72°/52° Last year high/low 80°/43° Record high 91° (2007) Record low 35° (1907) Precipitation 24 hrs through 5 p.m. Tue. 0.36” Month to date (normal) 4.74” (3.69”) Year to date (normal) 16.86” (11.65”) Record for this date 2.86” (1893)

Montreal 44/35

Minneapolis 51/43

Billings 52/37

ALMANAC

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Heavy rain and strong thunderstorms will continue to be a threat right though Thursday night. We will get a little dry time today, but watch for more storms, especially late afternoon and evening.

Joplin 79/60

Winnipeg 46/35

72° 54° 66° 55° 71° 52° 78° 56°

REGIONAL OUTLOOK

Kansas City 66/51

Seattle 64/46

Chief Meteorologist Glenn Zimmerman

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Cancun Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem Johannesburg London Madrid Mecca

57/45/pc 71/55/pc 96/68/s 99/81/s 82/51/s 63/46/sh 68/52/s 101/75/s 87/74/s 58/44/pc 83/71/t 83/62/s 74/48/s 62/46/pc 79/53/pc 106/76/s

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

57/43/sh 72/55/pc 99/71/s 101/82/s 86/58/s 62/42/pc 75/57/pc 95/65/pc 88/75/pc 56/41/sh 80/72/sh 82/59/pc 74/47/s 60/44/sh 75/49/s 107/80/s

City

Today Hi/Lo/W

Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

80/56/pc 44/35/c 59/41/pc 82/71/t 79/58/pc 109/78/pc 66/48/pc 87/73/pc 66/47/s 85/74/sh 78/48/s 72/46/s 76/66/pc 69/58/r 48/43/r 59/43/pc

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

81/57/pc 53/43/c 55/45/r 83/72/t 80/61/pc 108/80/pc 60/45/sh 91/77/pc 66/53/pc 88/77/s 77/51/pc 70/45/s 78/68/s 69/58/sh 53/42/c 56/44/c

W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, i-ice, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow


STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019 • L

PHOTOS BY CHRIS WALKER, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

SALAD SECRETS Must-have elements: Freshness, crunch, balance and a surprise BY JEANMARIE BROWNSON

Chicago Tribune (TNS)

I

love salad. What makes a salad great? Fresh, crisp produce. What makes a salad extraordinary? Balance and surprise. As in a stunning salad made from four citrus fruits, hearty endives and colorful chicories on the menu at the Progress in San Francisco. There, chef-owners Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski shave ricotta salata in thin curls over the salad to transport it well beyond any predictable bowl of greens. Of course, salads prove best when composed with in-season produce. The neat and tidy piles of red and green radicchios, endives and chicories we spied on a visit to the San Francisco farmers market help demystify the chefs’ creation. Likewise, the inspiring variety of fresh, seasonal citrus at nearby stalls. Back home, I am happy to find a wide selection of citrus in large supermarkets. That

means I can add wedges of satsuma mandarins, slices of Oro Blanco grapefruit and blood orange to my salad and Meyer lemon in the dressing. As for the greens, I turn to Deborah Madison for help understanding endive. In her “Vegetable Literacy,” Madison writes of the confusing nomenclature of chicories and endive. She gives their Latin names, Chichorium intybus and Chichorium endivia. What really matters to me is that these are greens with sturdy leaves and slightly bitter flavors. Delicious for pairing with the citrus. Most of us can find plump heads of Belgian endive and magenta-red Chioggia radicchio. It’s more unusual to find Treviso — those oblong heads that taste milder than Chioggia radicchio. Curly endive and escarole tend to be readily available but require just the right dressing to counter their bitter toughness. I employ vinegars with deep flavor, strong See SALAD • PAGE L4

Recipes, page L4 ! Classic All-Purpose Vinaigrette, Citrus

Salad With Endives and Ricotta Salata (top) ! Roasted Chicken and Romaine Salad With Creamy Basil Chipotle Dressing (above)

A marketing failure and a couple of fires Pig-in-a-Blanket Day,” they posted on Facebook, along with DANIEL NEMAN a string of hashtags: #kosher St. Louis #kosherfood #allbeef #kosherPost-Dispatch cooking #NationalPigsinaBlanketDay #PigsinaBlanketDay. As I said, this was last Wednesday. Which is to say it It’s a May Day column special was smack dab in the middle of today — two topics for the price Passover. During Passover, Jews are supof one. posed to refrain from eating any First up, a tale of marketing leavened baked good, such as gone spectacularly awry: bread or muffins — or the biscuit Last Wednesday, as you are that is wrapped around a hot dog no doubt aware, was National to make a pig in a blanket. Pig-in-a-Blanket Day. The Hebrew National specififolks who make kosher hot dogs cally uses what they call a “puff and meats at Hebrew National decided to hop on the marketing pastry blanket.” That, too, is forbidden. bandwagon. As far as I’m concerned, there “We’re keeping it Kosher with Beef-In-A-Blanket this National is no schadenfreude like the

schadenfreude that comes when marketers mess up in a big and ugly way (food writers who make similar mistakes, however, are much less delightful). So I really relished this goof. But how could they possibly make it? How could a company called Hebrew National not know that Passover is absolutely the worst time to try to push pigs in blankets, or even beef in blankets? Perhaps it happened because the company has been owned by ConAgra Foods since 1993. The Chicago-based ConAgra is the home of 80 brands, from Vlasic pickles to Mrs. Paul’s fish sticks, from Bird’s Eye frozen foods to

TRY A WINE MADE FROM LESSER-KNOWN MÜLLER-THURGAU GRAPE. PAGE L2

HILLARY LEVIN, POST-DISPATCH

Goody Goody Diner co-owner Charlie Mustafa stands outside his business See NEMAN • PAGE L4 the day after a fire destroyed the kitchen.

CHIPOTLE MARINADE IS HEART OF MISSION TACO’S SOUTH BEACH BURRITO. PAGE L5 LET’S EAT

1 1


ON OUR RADAR

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

DANIEL NEMAN food writer dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 05.01.2019

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES

Müller-Thurgau grapes from Oregon

Rice Krispies Treats Snap Crackle Poppers Cookies ‘n’ Creme

BY GAIL APPLESON • SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

The Müller-Thurgau grape, a cross between riesling and Madeleine royale varieties, is found predominately in Germany where it’s widely planted. Because Müller-Thurgau often lacks flavor when produced in high-yield vineyards, it’s often snubbed by wine critics. However, when the grapes are grown in yield-restricted vineyards, the flavors can become very concentrated resulting in delicious white wines. Below is a fine example from the well-regarded Anne Amie Vineyards, located in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. The winery’s Müller-Thurgau is compared below with a pinot blanc from the Alsace region of France. Anne Amie Vineyards 2016 Cuvée A Müller-Thurgau, Yamhill-Carlton, Oregon Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in April for $11.99

Pierre Sparr 2016 Pinot Blanc, Alsace, France Bought • Wine Merchant, 7817 Forsyth Boulevard, in April for $14.99

Description • This crisp and delightful dry white is made from estate-grown MüllerThurgau grapes grown on vines first planted in 1979. Light- to medium-bodied, this wine has an inviting fresh and floral aroma that just says springtime. It’s refreshing and tangy, tasting of lime and other citrus flavors along with juicy green apples. This is an interesting wine with lots of character that would go well with flavorful food like paella and mildly spicy Asian cuisine.

Description • Elegant and beautifully balanced, this lovely, pale dry white comes from an Alsatian winery that was founded in 1680. Aged in stainless steel tanks without skin contact, this fragrant white is more delicate and finer than the Müller-Thurgau. It has good acidity and minerality and tastes of fresh stone fruit and apples with refreshing lemony notes. An easy-to-drink wine, it can be enjoyed on its own as an aperitif wine or with shellfish and other light fare.

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson.

It was inevitable that those Rice Krispies Treats that were a part of everyone’s childhood (except mine) should find their way to the grocery store snack aisle. These are little nuggets the size of large dice with all the chewy marshmallow goodness you’d expect and a cookies ‘n’ creme coating to provide extra sweetness and a not unpleasant flavor. They’re kind of pricey, though. Size • 7.1 ounces Price • $5.49 Available • Grocery stores — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Satan’s Whiskers cocktail One of those classic, Prohibition-era cocktails that has all but been forgotten, the Satan’s Whiskers is as devilishly elegant as ever. In a new Prep School video, Daniel Neman reminds you how to make one. stltoday.com/food

Rethinking pasta primavera BY AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

You’d never know that pasta primavera, a pseudo-Italian dish that appears on virtually every chain restaurant menu, actually has roots in French haute cuisine. The usual reproduction — a random jumble of produce tossed with noodles in a heavy, flavordeadening cream sauce — tastes nothing like spring. Surprisingly, when we dug up the original recipe from New York’s famed Le Cirque restaurant, our colleagues found it wasn’t all that inspiring either, despite taking about two hours to prepare and dirtying five pans. First, the vegetables (which had been painstakingly blanched one by one) were bland. Second, the cream-, butter- and cheese-enrichedsaucedulledflavoranddidn’t really unify the dish. If we wanted a truespring-vegetablepasta—witha few thoughtfully chosen vegetables and a light but full-bodied sauce that clung well to the noodles and brought the dish together — we’d have to start from the beginning.

CRISTINA M. FLETES, CFLETES@POST-DISPATCH.COM.

WHAT’S FRESH

Find radishes, rhubarb and more This week at area farmers markets you’ll find radishes, rhubarb, lettuce, spring mix greens, spinach, kale, carrots, chard, asparagus, strawberries, sweet potatoes, morel mushrooms, garden plants, hanging baskets, fresh herbs, fresh eggs and more. To use those radishes, try this recipe from last year’s Let’s Eat section for an OpenFaced Radish Tartine. Information provided by the Lake Saint Louis Farmers and Artists Market.

Find our guide to area farmers markets at stltoday.com/ farmersmarkets CARL TREMBLAY, AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

Spring Vegetable Pasta

Open-Faced Radish Tartine Serving: 1 (but can be multiplied to make as many as you like)

Yield: 4 to 6 servings 1 ½ pounds leeks, white and light green parts halved lengthwise, sliced ½ inch thick, and washed thoroughly, plus 3 cups coarsely chopped dark green parts, washed thoroughly 1 pound asparagus, tough ends trimmed, chopped coarse, and reserved; spears cut on bias into ½ inch lengths 2 cups frozen peas, thawed, divided 4 cups vegetable broth 1 cup water 4 garlic cloves, minced, divided

2 tablespoons minced fresh mint 2 tablespoons minced fresh chives ½ teaspoon grated lemon zest plus 2 tablespoons juice 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Salt and pepper ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 pound campanelle (farfalle and penne are acceptable substitutes) 1 cup dry white wine 1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated (½ cup), plus extra for serving

1. Bring leek greens, asparagus trimmings, 1 cup peas, broth, water and half of garlic to boil in a large saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer gently for 10 minutes. While broth simmers, combine mint, chives and lemon zest in a bowl; set aside. 2. Strain broth through a fine-mesh strainer into an 8-cup liquid measuring cup, pressing on solids to extract as much liquid as possible (you should have 5 cups broth; add water as needed to equal 5 cups). Discard solids and return broth to saucepan. Cover and keep warm. 3. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in Dutch oven over medium heat until shimmering. Add leeks and pinch salt and cook, covered, stirring occasionally, until leeks begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Add asparagus spears and cook until asparagus is crisp-tender, 4 to 6 minutes. Add pepper flakes and remaining garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add remaining 1 cup peas and continue to cook for 1 minute longer. Transfer vegetables to bowl and set aside. Wipe out pot with paper towels. 4. Heat remaining ¼ cup oil in now-empty pot over medium heat until shimmering. Add pasta and cook, stirring often, until just beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Add wine and cook, stirring constantly, until absorbed, about 2 minutes. 5. When wine is fully absorbed, add warm broth and bring to boil. Cook, stirring frequently, until most of liquid is absorbed and pasta is al dente, 8 to 10 minutes. Off heat, stir in Parmesan, lemon juice, vegetables and half of herb mixture. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and serve immediately, passing extra Parmesan and remaining herb mixture separately. Per serving (based on 6): 605 calories; 17g fat; 4mg cholesterol; 436mg sodium; 88g carbohydrate; 10g fiber; 13g sugar; 18g protein.

Ditch the pan

Braised Cod With Leeks and Cherry Tomatoes

1 thick slice of rustic bread 1 tablespoon unsalted highquality European-style butter 3 to 4 radishes, cleaned and sliced thin, but not too thin. Fleur de sel or other coarse sea salt 1. Toast a slice of rustic bread and let cool on the rack of the toaster so that it won’t steam on itself. You want it to cool so that it will be crunchy but not melt the butter. Once cool, spread the butter and layer the sliced radishes over the whole surface. If you want the radishes to be at maximum crunchiness, soak in ice water for about 30 minutes before making the tartine. You can add fresh herbs to the butter if you like, but I prefer the simplicity of the butter, salt and radishes. 2. Just before eating, sprinkle fleur de sel on top and enjoy. Per serving : 215 calories; 13g fat; 31mg cholesterol; 1,169mg sodium; 23g carbohydrate; no fiber; 3g sugar; 3g protein.

Yield: 4 servings

BY AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

You may be used to pan-searing thick-cut white fish fillets any time you take them home from the market and want a quick dinner, but it’s worth it to try a different technique. Braising is a great way to add flavor to mild-tasting fish, it’s a mess-free alternative to cooking in oil in a skillet, and it doesn’t take much longer to execute with fish. Using cherry tomatoes and making a white wine sauce in the pan made the dish fresh and bright —perfect for pristine white fish. Cooking the fillets among sauteed leeks imparted a subtle sweet flavor to the fish. To ensure the fish cooked through gently and evenly, we turned down the heat and covered the skillet so the fish both

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided 1 pound leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise, sliced thin and washed thoroughly Salt and pepper

DANIEL J. VAN ACKERE, AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN

simmered and steamed. A pat of butter swirled into the resulting sauce contributed richness. Haddock, snapper, tilapia, bluefish, monkfish and sea bass fillets are good substitutes for the cod.

4 garlic cloves, minced 12 ounces cherry tomatoes, halved ½ cup dry white wine or dry vermouth 4 (6- to 8 ounce) skinless cod fillets, 1 to 1 ½ inches thick

1. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over mediumhigh heat. Add leeks and ¼ teaspoon salt and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in tomatoes, wine and ¼ teaspoon pepper and bring to simmer. 2. Pat cod dry with paper towels and season with salt and pepper. Nestle cod into skillet and spoon some vegetables and sauce over top. Cover and reduce heat to medium-low. Cook until fish flakes apart when gently prodded with paring knife and registers 140 degrees, 10 to 12 minutes. 3. Carefully transfer cod to a platter. Stir remaining 1 tablespoon butter into vegetables, season with salt and pepper to taste, and spoon vegetables and sauce over cod. Serve. Per serving: 372 calories; 11g fat; 120mg cholesterol; 443mg sodium; 20g carbohydrate; 3g fiber; 7g sugar; 43g protein.

ELIZABETH KARMEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS


05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • L3 B r A N D Av E ST U D I O S C O N T E N T

D O O IN G

H

WIT

Sponso

red Co

y Brand ntent b

ud Ave. St

ios

[OH , W H AT F U NG I ] BuTTon

cHanTerelle

enoki

They aren’t frilly or exotic or expensive or hard to pronounce, but that’s part of the charm of button (or white) mushrooms. For starters, they’re incredibly versatile and last much longer in the fridge than other varieties — up to a week in their original packaging. Buttons are high in protein and potassium, can help fight inflammation and they’re good for the immune system — doubly so when cooked in red wine. Slide them onto kebobs, toss them onto pizzas or simply sauté them in oil to add a mild, earthy counterpoint to any meal.

When they come into season in September, goldenhued chanterelles announce the arrival of fall like a trumpet blast. They’re shaped like the instrument, too. Full of vitamins B and D, chanterelles’ tart and woody flavor sings in simple dishes like frittatas and salads. Though they flourish in forests all over the state, it’s probably best to leave the finding to the pros: A lookalike species known as the false chanterelle also grows in the wild, and it can be poisonous.

Most mushrooms are known for their caps, gills or frills, but enokis bring something entirely different. White, long and slender, they artfully punctuate ramen and beckon from bibimbap. They are delicate — in looks and in taste — and lend a slightly fruity flavor to stir-frys and salads alike. Use enokis to complement noodles in miso soup, or replace the noodles with them altogether if you’re feeling particularly adventurous. Though enokis’ effectiveness in fighting cancer is under debate, their high antioxidant levels are without question.

Hen of THe wooDS

PorToBello

This bewitchingly named mushroom with feather-like ruffles grows at the base of trees, often in large clusters. They can reach up to 50 pounds, which also explains their “king of mushrooms” nickname. In Eastern cultures they’re revered for their medicinal qualities — thought to improve fertility, kidney and liver function — and they’re quickly gaining popularity in Western cooking, too. Chefs prize them for their strong, funky taste.

Young portobellos (commonly known as crimini mushrooms) have a nutty flavor, but as they grow the flavor mellows, making them perfect for entrees — and if ever a mushroom could be described as meaty, it’s this one. Low-calorie portobellos are high in potassium and excellent swaps for ground-beef burgers. They’re especially delicious when grilled; see below for a terrific recipe. Portobellos’ healthy doses of potassium and niacin hold even more good news for the body

GRILLED MUSHROOM BURGERS

How MuSHrooMS work THeir Magic wiTH Dr. aDeTunji Toriola Washington University assistant professor of surgery at Siteman Cancer Center

Though mushrooms are usually grouped under vegetables in pizza places and supermarkets, they aren’t vegetables. Nor are they fruit. And — biologically speaking, anyway — they aren’t really even plants. Mushrooms are fungi, a kingdom so vast it encompasses more than 2 million species. These prolific growers flourish in unlikely places all over the world. They push out of the soft earth in densely forested areas, wriggle out of sand dunes, grow on decaying wood, in open meadows or on horse (or elk, or deer or moose) dung. These curious organisms hold surprises at just about every turn: Some have more potassium than bananas. Some glow in the dark. They’re great sources of naturally occurring vitamin D. Some are infamously poisonous. Many are loaded with essential vitamins, such as riboflavin and niacin, which are crucial for good health. “Essential vitamins are vitamins that your body really needs for regular cell function,” says Dr. Adetunji Toriola, a Washington University assistant professor of surgery at Siteman Cancer Center. “Your body can produce non-essential vitamins, so if you don’t get them from food sources, you’ll be OK. But essential vitamins, you need to get from food.” Mushrooms are densely packed with many other vitamins and nutrients, including zinc, folate, copper and magnesium. And for vegans, they are a particularly important source of fiber and protein — all while remaining very low in calories, sodium, fat and cholesterol. Mushrooms also contain antioxidants — biochemical compounds such as proteins, vitamins or minerals that are found in food and dietary supplements. “Antioxidants prevent or delay cellular damage, and they help the body recover,” Dr. Toriola says. “During the aging process, there’s a lot of breakdown in the body. Tissues wear out, and the rate of cellular turnover is higher. Antioxidants mop up free radicals — which cause damage to cells — and keep us in good health.” Mushrooms are also high in selenium, an antioxidant that may strengthen the immune system. The more vibrant a fruit or vegetable is, the healthier it tends to be. That isn’t the case with mushrooms, which are often bland in color. Still, they brim with nutrients. And because they can be eaten raw, grilled, microwaved, baked or fried, there are plenty of ways to incorporate them into your diet. But remember that not all mushrooms are edible. “Some can be poisonous, so be wary about eating any you find in the wild,” Dr. Toriola says. Consider checking out local farmers’ markets to find unusual, off-the-beaten path mushrooms rather than trekking through the woods in search of your own.

YIELDS | 4 BURGERS

Mushroom marinade: 4 portobello mushroom caps 2 sprigs thyme 2 Tbsp canola oil 2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar ½ tsp onion powder 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp salt ½ tsp ground black pepper Cucumber-tomato topping: 1 small tomato, diced ¼ cucumber, diced

Garlic aioli: ¼ cup light mayonnaise ½ lemon, juiced 1 clove garlic ¼ tsp ground black pepper Other: ½ Tbsp canola oil 4 onion buns 4 slices provolone cheese Red onion, sliced about 1” thick Lettuce, for topping

| preparation | Heat grill to medium high. Combine mushroom marinade ingredients in a pie dish (or other container that will allow for full coverage of marinade) and let sit for 15 to 30 minutes. Dice tomatoes and cucumbers and set aside. Combine ingredients for garlic aioli. Stir aioli ingredients until well mixed and refrigerate until ready to use. Remove mushrooms from marinade and place directly on grill, cap-side down, for 5 minutes. Flip and brush mushrooms with marinade and cook for another 5 minutes. Remove mushroom caps from direct to indirect heat, cap-side up, and brush with marinade again. Place onions on grill over indirect heat. Cook onions for 7 minutes on each side, then remove from grill. Lightly brush buns with remaining canola oil. Place buns facedown on grill until toasted (about 5 minutes). Spread aioli on buns. Assemble mushroom burger with cucumber-tomato topping, onion and lettuce. Enjoy! Nutrition Information (1 burger): 382 calories, 23g fat, 36g carbohydrate, 840mg sodium, 15g protein


L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LET’S EAT

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

Homemade dressing, fresh in-season produce elevate salads SALAD • from L1

Better is homemade roasted chicken — there’s cheese and rich toppings no prep time, just oven such as toasted nuts, time. So, when I’m roasting smoked ham and hard- chicken for Sunday dinner, cooked eggs. I make an extra for weekAnother favorite salad night cooking. One small combines roast chicken chicken yields about 4 cups with pickles. A bit of smoky of shredded meat. chipotle in the dressing For super moist chicken, warms up everything. I poach boneless skinless The key to good chicken pieces in chicken broth. It salad is using top-notch takes less than 15 minutes chicken,ofcourse.Inapinch, to poach chicken this way I’ll use a rotisserie chicken and the texture is worth CHRIS WALKER, CHICAGO TRIBUNE (TNS) from the grocery store and the time. A bonus: Flavorpull the meat away from the ful poaching liquid to use in skin and bones. However, soups or stews later or sea- Yield: 6 servings, 4 as a main dish most rotisserie chickens tend son with salt and a pinch of 1 small kohlrabi bulb (about 5 ounces), peeled, cut into to have a mushy texture and curry powder for a liquid, For the dressing ½-inch pieces (or ½ cup diced radishes) dry meat. 1 peeled shallot low-calorie snack. 5 green onions, trimmed, thinly sliced (2/3 cup) 1 peeled garlic clove 2/3 cup diced dill pickles, pickled green beans or pickled 1/3 cup olive oil ¼ cup creme fraiche or mascarpone okra (from a jar) Homemade dressing. The single best way to improve 2 tablespoons aged sherry vinegar (or white balsamic ½ cup halved or sliced green or Castelvetrano olives your salads is to blend a few ingredients in a jar for a suvinegar) 4 cups diced or coarsely shredded roasted or poached perior-tasting, low-sugar, no-preservative topping. Dress1 teaspoon pureed chipotle in adobo chicken (boneless and skinless) ings can range from vinegar and oil to more elaborate 1 tablespoon dried basil 1 small head (7 ounces) romaine, quartered lengthwise, concoctions with cream, fresh herbs or interesting spices. ½ teaspoon salt then cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces (about 4 cups Homemade vinaigrettes and salad dressings keep well in ½ teaspoon granulated sugar loosely packed) the refrigerator — a week or so for cream-based, longer For the salad 2 to 3 tablespoons chopped fresh or dehydrated parsley, for simple vinaigrettes. Use them at room temperature for ¼ to 1/3 cup pecan halves chives or a combination maximum flavor and palatability. 2 to 4 tablespoons crumbled Cotija or Romano cheese 1 medium Honeycrisp apple, quartered, cored, cut into Freshness. Think freshness from crisp salad greens, ½-inch pieces (1 ½ cups) crunchy green onions and perfectly ripe tomatoes when in season. 1. Make the dressing. With the blender running, drop 1 peeled shallot and 1 peeled garlic clove into the machine to chop it. Crunch. Nuts and croutons, obviously, but other options Turn off blender and add olive oil and creme fraiche or mascarpone. Add sherry vinegar (or white balsamic vinegar) and include crisp apples, raw root vegetables such as diced pureed chipotle in adobo; blend smooth. Add dried basil and salt and sugar. Process to mix. Transfer to a container with a kohlrabi, shredded beets, carrot curls and paper-thin rad- lid; refrigerate covered up to several days. Use at room temperature. ish slices. 2. Put pecans into a small dry skillet. Set over medium heat. Cook and stir until toasted and fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Do not Richness. This could come from a delicious olive oil walk away or they may burn. Transfer to a cutting board. When cool, cut into small pieces. drizzle, shreds or cubes of cheese, avocado chunks or bits 3. Put apple, kohlrabi, green onions, pickles and olives into a large bowl; toss to mix. Add chicken and dressing. Toss to mix of cooked bacon. A tiny portion of cream, yogurt or sour again. Let stand, 10 minutes. cream added to a vinaigrette enriches a salad with mini4. Add romaine and herbs. Toss to mix. Arrange on serving plates. Top with pecans and sprinkle with cheese. Serve. mal calories. Per serving (based on 6): 419 calories; 32g fat; 9g saturated fat; 95mg cholesterol; 11g carbohydrates; 6g sugar; 24g Acid. Brighten any salad, any season, with delicious vinprotein; 911mg sodium; 3g fiber egar. I change it up a bit by keeping a stash of cider, malt, sherry, red and white wine vinegars and balsamic vinegars (affordable bottles of red and white as well as a more Yield: 4 servings expensive aged balsamic for judicious drizzling). Fresh lemon, lime and grapefruit juices and bottled yuzu can 1 large head or 2 small heads Belgian endive, ends 3 to 4 tablespoons classic all-purpose vinaigrette (see also form the base of a great vinaigrette. trimmed recipe) made with walnut oil and Meyer lemon zest, Salt. Yes, salt can make or break a salad. Most vegetables ½ small head red radicchio, thinly sliced divided benefit from a little salt to enhance their natural flavors. 2 cups torn small leaves of escarole or curly endive 1 Oro blanco grapefruit or pomelo Salt can also come in the form of shredded or grated aged 2 blood oranges 1 chunk (about 2 ounces) ricotta salata (or pecorino cheese, such as Romano or Parmesan. Romano) 1 Satsuma mandarin or 2 clementines, peeled, sectioned, Protein. Even a side salad offers more long-lasting satis¼ cup roasted and salted pistachio nuts each section cut into thirds faction with a bit of protein added. This can be as simple Freshly ground black pepper 1 large ripe avocado, halved, pitted, diced as a few nuts or shreds of cheese. Wedges of hard cookedegg and canned beans, along with their low cost, have the 1. Make the vinaigrette. benefit of adding unique texture too. With a bit of plan2. Peel the grapefruit with a knife as follows: Slice the ends off. Put the grapefruit on the cutting board, cut side down. Use ning, diced or shredded fully-cooked meat, poultry and a large knife to cut away all the rind and white pith, curving the knife with the curve of the fruit. Then use the knife to slice seafood make a salad a main-dish contender the grapefruit horizontally into ¼-inch thick slices. Do the same with the blood oranges. Surprise. One surprising ingredient can ward off salad 3. Arrange the grapefruit and blood orange slices in alternate colors in a ring on a large serving platter. Sprinkle with boredom no matter the season. In winter months, clemen- mandarin segment pieces and then the diced avocado. tine or grapefruit segments, sliced olives and diced pickled 4. Cut the endive in halve lengthwise, then cut crosswise into ½-inch-wide slices. Put into a large bowl with radicchio and vegetables prove welcome in just about any salad. Durescarole. Add 2 to 3 tablespoons of the vinaigrette and toss to mix. Drizzle remaining 1 or 2 tablespoons vinaigrette over the ing the growing season, I add slices of ripe tomatoes and citrus. peaches, asparagus tips and sliced stalks, fresh peas in or 5. Arrange the dressed lettuces in the center of the citrus. Use a vegetable peeler to shave the ricotta over the whole plate. out of the pod, ripe berries and shaved summer squash. Sprinkle with nuts and pepper. Serve immediately.

Roasted Chicken and Romaine Salad With Creamy Basil Chipotle Dressing

Tips for salad greatness

Citrus Salad With Endives and Ricotta Salata

How to poach a chicken Put 1 pound of boneless skinless chicken thighs and 2 cups chicken broth into a shallow pan. Heat over medium-low heat to a simmer. Reduce heat to low, cover loosely and let chicken cook until the meat feels almost firm when pressed, usually 10 to 14 minutes. Remove with tongs to a board to cool. Add 1 pound boneless skinless chicken breasts to the poaching liquid and add water if needed so the breasts are mostly immersed in liquid. Heat to a very gentle simmer; cover loosely and let poach until nearly firm, usually 8 to 12 minutes. Remove with tongs to the board and let cool. When cool, pull the chicken into large shreds (or dice with a knife). Refrigerate covered up to several days. Strain the poaching liquid and use it in soups or stews within a few days; or freeze and use later to poach more chicken.

Per serving: 329 calories; 23g fat; 5g saturated fat; 15mg cholesterol; 27g carbohydrates; 10g sugar; 9g protein; 367mg sodium; 8g fiber

Classic All-Purpose Vinaigrette Yield: Generous ½ cup ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 tablespoons mild-tasting oil, such as safflower oil, or bold-flavored oil, such as walnut oil, hazelnut oil 3 tablespoons vinegar, such as Banyuls wine vinegar, red wine vinegar or white wine vinegar

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon agave syrup or ¼ teaspoon sugar, optional ¼ teaspoon grated lemon rind, optional ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Note: Change the types of oil, vinegar and mustard for flavor variations. Use the agave syrup for a hint of sweetness. Put oils, vinegar, mustard and salt into a jar with a tight-fitting lid. Shake well. Add pepper and mix again. Refrigerate covered up to 2 weeks. Use at room temperature. Per tablespoon: 91 calories; 1g saturated fat; no cholesterol; no carbohydrates; no sugar; no protein; 161mg sodium; no fiber

A kosher marketing failure and a couple of fires NEMAN • from L1

Swiss Miss cocoa. It’s a huge and generally wellrespected corporation. But you have to figure that the families that originally owned Hebrew National would know enough not to promote anything in a blanket during Passover. Several hours after the post was made (and after a call from me asking for a comment that was not returned), the company offered an apology on its website. By the next day, the entire post was taken down. ••• Also last week, the

North City landmark Goody Goody Diner caught fire. The damage was extensive. No one was hurt, which of course is the most important thing. But the restaurant says it will be closed “until further notice.” The news hit the city like a knife wound — maybe not fatal, because the restaurant will reopen, but painful. And it comes just a couple of months after another popular breakfastand-lunch spot, Hilary’s Roadhouse Diner in Maryland Heights, was also damaged by a kitchen fire. In the restaurant world,

fires happen. There are open flames, high temperatures and grease plus the electrical wiring and other hazards that exist for any other business or residence. In addition, the buildings that housed both Goody Goody and Hilary’s were relatively old, which can make a small fire worse. It is true that insurance, presumably, will pay for the damages. But that is only part of the story. For an unknown number of months, the staffs will be without jobs — or will be scrambling to find them — and the owners will be without income.

That is a major financial assault on the people who own and work at the restaurants. But it is more than that. A restaurant is a family, particularly at diners and especially at longestablished diners. Some

employees at Hilary’s have worked at the location longer than the owner has owned it. Fires like these break up the family, and they will never be able to come together in quite the same way again.

That’s something to think about the next time you’re at a restaurant. They’re in a tenuous business. Maybe you could add a little extra to the tip. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com

We Specialize in Area Rugs! More Selection at Sale Prices!

Over 8,400 Rugs!

60-70% Off Suggested retail

Volume Rug Gallery St. Louis’ Best Kept Secret

8994 Manchester (2 blocks West of Brentwood) VolumeCarpet.com

314-963-7847

Your Hometown Locksmith 314-961-2444 FixMyLock.com

SHOP ON WHEELS Service to Your Door Since 1974

9012A Manchester Store M-W-F 9-3 Service on Wheels M-F 8-6

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included)

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 5/31/19

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

Valid Monday thru Thursday only. Cannot combine with any other coupon, special, discount or promotion. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires on 5/31/19

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd


LET’S EAT

05.01.2019 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • L5

SPECIAL REQUEST

Chipotle marinade is key to Mission Taco’s South Beach Burrito BY PAT EBY

Special to the Post-Dispatch

Q • Get us that marinade recipe for the South Beach Burrito! — Bill Burge, St. Louis

At Mission Taco, the chipotle chicken marinade is not served in a glass, as it is shown here, but it is used to marinate chicken (seen right rear) before it is chopped and used in menu items such as the South Beach burrito (left). HILLARY LEVIN, HLEVIN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A • We got it, Bill Burge, and just in time for grilling season. This marinade imparts a smoky, sweet, mellow and slightly spicy flavor to the chicken Mission Taco Joint uses in its South Beach burrito and in its chicken street tacos. “We wanted the chipotle flavor to profile the chicken,” and Mission chef co-owner Taco Jason Tilford Joint says. ChiCentral West potles are End: 398 North smokeEuclid Avenue dried ripe jalapeno Delmar Loop: peppers. 6235 Delmar When Boulevard fully Soulard: 908 ripened, Lafayette jalapenos Avenue change from Streets of St. vibrant Charles: 1650 green to Beale Street a bright missiontacojoint. red. Once smoked, com the peppers appear brown, wrinkled and ridged. Chipotles provide a piquancy to dishes that isn’t sharp and intense, but well-rounded and flavorful with a little heat and a nice slow fade. This recipe uses chipotles packed in adobo, a tangy, slightly sweet purée of tomatoes, vinegar, garlic and spices, which gives the marinade its gorgeous color. Mission Taco Joint uses boneless, skinless chicken thighs, marinated for a full day, then grilled over a wood fire. “Skinless chicken thighs take the marinade well, they’re easy to grill, plus the meat remains moist and flavorful,” Tilford says. The smoke of the wood fire adds to the flavor as well. “More home cooks today use wood grills, but adding wood chips to a charcoal will give some of the smoke flavor.” Tilford gladly shared not only the marinade, but also how to construct a home version of South Beach burritos, which is detailed at the end of the marinade recipe. “Even though we make everything in the burrito in-house, people can buy some things, like the 12-inch tortillas, and make others to come pretty close,” he says. Generosity to community, staff and guests, in addition to genuine hospitality, are hallmarks of the Mission Taco restaurants. When Jason Tilford and his brother, Adam Tilford, opened the first Mission Taco Joint in 2013 in the Delmar Loop, they wanted to share their love of the California street food and showcase the fun of the free-wheeling, skateboard and surf culture they grew up with in California. At Mission Taco, everything is made from scratch, even the tortillas, which accounts for the full, fresh flavors of their food. Colorful murals at each location by different artists illustrate aspects of the Baja street culture of their youth. We asked Jason Tilford what he would recommend to first-time guests at Mission. “That’s like asking ‘who’s your favorite child?’” he says. “Try the margaritas. We make them with fresh lime juice, plus we use a high-quality tequila that’s not bitter, but smooth. Our salsas, red and green, and chips. Street corn, off the cob. The carne asada fries. Empanadas. For tacos — barbecued duck, spicy chorizo and our grilled portabello. Finish with churros. It’s our only dessert.” To request recipe • Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@ post-dispatch.com.

Mission Taco Joint Marinade for Chicken in the South Beach Burrito Yield: 3 cups marinade Notes: ! Canned chipotles in adobo sauce are available in most

1 tablespoon sea salt 2 cups vegetable or vegetable/olive oil blend (see notes)

1 cup puréed chipotles in adobo sauce 2 tablespoons peeled and finely chopped fresh garlic

1. Whisk all the ingredients together in a medium mixing bowl. 2. Store in a lidded glass container, in the refrigerator, until ready to use. To assemble a home version of the South Beach Burrito: Lay out a 12-inch flour tortilla. Spread with canned or cooked black beans, mashed. Add a layer of cilantro rice or plain cooked rice. Add grilled chicken (marinated in this sauce) chopped in ½-inch cubes. Top with shredded Chihuahua cheese or shredded Chihuahua cheese with jalapenos. Squeeze chipotle aioli over the top. Roll up burrito. Grill or pan fry the finished burrito to lightly brown and crisp. Top with guacamole and serve. Per serving (based on 32): 127 calories; 14g fat; 11g saturated fat; no cholesterol; no protein; 1g carbohydrate; no sugar; no fiber; 180mg sodium; no calcium

!

! !

!

large grocery stores, usually in the section with Mexican foods. Purée the sauce and the peppers together for this recipe, stems removed if needed. Mission Taco Joint uses a blend of 70 percent vegetable oil blended with 30 percent olive oil. Tilford recommends a second-press oil (not extra virgin) with a flavor to the soft, buttery side. The marinade may be stored, refrigerated, for 4 days. Mission Taco uses skinless, boneless chicken thighs with this marinade. Tilford says they readily absorb the marinade and remain tender and juicy after grilling. Mission Taco marinates the chicken for a full day. Tilford suggests the thighs marinate at least 8 hours before grilling.

Serving St. Louis for over 100 years

Store Hours: Mon.-Sat. 9am-8pm Sun. 9am-5:30pm

VINCENT’S MARKET VINCENT’S MARKET We Reserve the Right to Limit

• Full Line of Groceries • Chauvin Whole Bean Coffee • Butcher Shop • Fine Wine…200 + Varieties

.

PRICES GOOD MAY 5, 2019

• Fresh Baked Fazio's Breads • Produce & Health Food Sections • Meat Custom Cut to Your Order • Beer - Imports & MicroBrews

USDA Choice

4

lb.

Polska Kielbasa

7

2

4

$ 99

lb.

14 oz. pkg.

Daily's

Sirloin Tip Steak

$ 59

Thick Peppered Bacon

6

$ 29

lb.

$ 99

lb.

GROCERIES/HEALTH FOOD

DELI DEPT.

599 $ 99 Turkey Pastrami............. 4 $ 59 Cotto Salami................... 4 $ 29 Hot Pepper Cheese......... 6 $ 29 Colby Longhorn .............. 6 $

lb. lb. lb. lb. lb.

PRODUCE Hass

¢ 99 Mexican ¢ Cilantro .......................... 99 Fresh $ Limes ............................ 3/ 1 Roma ¢ Tomatoes ........................ 69 ea. Avocados ........................ bunch

lb.

FROZEN FOODS 56 oz. sqr. Ice Cream ................. 3/ 10

$

Stouffer's

8-12 oz. var French Bread Pizza ............. 2/

5

$

DAIRY

3 $ Shredded Cheese ............3/ 5 Cheese Dip ....................

$ 99

Dutch Farms

8 oz. bag

24 oz. pkg.

BEER Mexico

1299 Mexico $ 99 Urbana.......................... 8 Abinbev $ 99 Taco Bell Lime A Rita .................... 4 $ Seasoning Mix ..............3/ 2 Belleville $ 99 Taco Bell 4204 Salted Kolsch............ 7 $ Refried Beans...............5/ 5 WINE RoTel $ Diced Tomatoes ............5/ 5 Arindo $ 99 Verdejo .................... 10 Taco Bell $ Taco Shells ....................2/ 3 Vall Major $ 99 7 White Blend ................ Mario $ 99 Fazzio $ 99 Pitted Olives.................. 1 Malbec...................... 10 Taco Bell Aragus $ Sauce.............................2/ 3 Garnacha..................... $799 Taco Bell $ 99 SPIRITS Salsa ............................... 1 Taco Bell Jose Cuervo $ $ OFF Dinner Kit .....................2/ 5 Gold .................................... 1 Bounty $ 99 SODA Paper Towels .................. 8 Sparkling Kingsford $ 99 ¢ Charcoal.......................... 5 Ice ................................99 12 pak btl. Corona .......................

$

6 pak btl.

4 pak can

1.25 oz. pkg

6 pak can

16 oz. can

10 oz. can

750 ml.

12 ct. pkg.

750 ml.

6 oz. can

7-8 oz. btl.

Prairie Farms

16 oz. bwl.

Eckrich

USDA Choice Boneless

T-Bone Steak

Gordo's

www.vincentsmarket.biz

$ 19

USDA Choice

Sandwich Pepperoni ...........

2400 S. 12th Street • 314-772-4710

Sirloin Tip Roast

$ 99

We Accept Food Stamps

A real neighborhood store In Historic Soulard... Since 1912

USDA Choice Boneless

Porterhouse Steak

7

• Liquor • Draft Beer • Propane Refilled

Vincent’s 12TH Street Market

750 ml.

750 ml.

16 oz. jar

8-14 oz. var

750 ml.

6 big rolls

8 lb. bag

17 oz. btl.

FRESH MEAT ORDERS STOCK-UP & SAVE!! MEAT ORDER #2 ALL PORK!!! 3 lb Pork Steak 2 lb Pork Sausage 1 lb Bacon

$

2 lb Boneless Pork Chops 1 Slab Spare Ribs (3.5lb avg)

34.99

MEAT ORDER #6 3 lb Pork Chops 3 lb Pork Steaks 3 lb Chicken Wings 5 lb Chicken Leg Quarters

$

5 lb Ground Beef 2 lb Slab Bacon 2 (12oz Pkg) Hot Dogs

64.99

MEAT ORDER #4 2 lb Pork Steak 2 lb Pork Chops 2 lb Ground Beef 2 lb Chicken Wings

$

3 lb Chicken Leg Quarters 2 lb Bacon 2 lb Beef Roast

45.99

MEAT ORDER #8 5 lb Ground Beef 2 lb Bologna 4 lb Pork Steaks 4 lb Pork Chops 1 lb American Cheese

$

1 lb Swiss Cheese 3 lb Chuck Roast 3 lb Pork Shoulder Roast 4 lb Chicken Wings

89.99

Vincent’s Market Is Proud To Carry

HACIENDA TORTILLA CHIP/SALSA


L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

e m d o a c o y

ci n

®

WRITTEN BY

JORDAN BARANOWSKI Throw the best fiesta around, and stock up on your favorite tequila, Mexican beer and red wine to help you mix up fuego Cinco de Mayo drinks like sangria, Margaritas and Coronaritas.

ese h t y tr or f s a l tequi timate l the u rita a marg EL PADRINO EXTRA AÑEJO The blue agave in this tequila is roasted in brick ovens for up to 42 hours, which helps it maintain its delicate sweetness.

LEGADO REPOSADO Beverage Testing Institute - 90 This oaky, herbal tequila is excellent as a mixer or on its own.

1800 SILVER TEQUILA Resting ting in mostly American oak – with a quick rest in French ench oak – lends 1800 Silver er Tequila its delicate flavor or and balance.

Mexico, 1.75 L, $27.99

Mexico, exico, 750 mL, $21.99

PATRÓN SILVER It’s tough to celebrate Cinco de Mayo without the original luxury tequila.

JOSE CUERVO GOLD Smooth with a touch of sweetness, the world’s No. 1 tequila is a perfect garita base. Margarita Mexico, exico, 1.75 L, $26.99

Mexico, 750 mL, $34.99

Mexico, 750 mL, $49.99

PACIFICO CLARA Made in Sinaloa, Mexico, Pacifico Clara is a lager-style, refreshing beer with a smooth finish.

MODELO ESPECIAL Skip the lime on this one, and drink it ice cold. “Especial” means it’s a bit more full-bodied than other Mexican beers.

Mexico, 12-12oz bottles, $14.49

Mexico, 12-12oz bottles, $13.49

TECATE A crisp malt flavor and a mild bitterness will finish clean in Tecate, which has been around more than 60 years.

DOS EQUIS LAGER ESPECIAL, AMBAR Balanced, smooth and golden in color, this Pilsner-style beer is perfect for a warm spring night.

Mexico, 12-12oz cans, $9.99

Mexico, 12-12oz bottles, $11.99

red & white wines for the best sangria

COURTNEY BENHAM CABERNET SAUVIGNON NAPA Intense black currant and chocolate flavors develop a deep complexity during oak aging.

CORONA EXTRA Mexico’s leading beer is always a good choice on Cinco de Mayo. Mexico, 24-12 oz bottles, $24.99

BOGLE MERLOT This Merlot punches in flavor way above its price point. California, 750 mL, $6.47

California, 750 mL, $19.99

WITH COUPON

WITH COUPON

Portugal, 750 mL, $8.99

$7.64

MATUA SAUVIGNON BLANC MARLBOROUGH Gooseberry, passion fruit and a hint of lime are the primary flavors in this unique Sauvignon Blanc. New Zealand, 750 mL, $8.97

WITH COUPON

California, 750 mL, $15.59

$13.25

$16.99

NOBILIS VINHO VERDE Made from Alvarinho grapes, this youthful wine has a slight effervescence.

VERADA PINOT NOIR TRI-COUNTY Handpicked grapes help showcase the extra care that goes into this bottle.

TESORO DELLA REGINA PINOT GRIGIO Pour this at a party – subtle minerality, white fruit flavors and floral aromas make this wine a crowd pleaser. Italy, 750 mL, $16.49

$14.02

WITH COUPON

WINERY DIRECT® COUPON VALID 5/1/2019-5/5/2019

Earn 10X points on all glassware and accessories

Online Code 1789

15% Off Wine Save 15% on the purchase of 6 or more 750ml and/or 1.5L Winery Direct® WINES.

now until 5/5/2019

40000001789 Excludes items with prices ending in 7. Cannot be combined with any other Total Wine & More WINE Coupon or in combination with the Mix 6 Discount. Coupon valid in MO locations only. Not valid on previous purchases or delivery orders, where applicable. Offer valid 5/1/2019-5/5/2019. Valid in-store and online. Limit one online code per web order. For in-store purchases, must present coupon at time of purchase. One-timeuse coupon.

Valid on all Glassware & Accessories excluding Cigars, Food and Non Alcoholic Beverages. Points calculated based on dollar amount spent on qualifying items. Must present phone number or member number in store at time of purchase. Not valid on previous purchases. Offer intended for people of legal drinking age only. Offer valid in MO only. Valid through 5/5/2019.

Shop Missouri's largest selection of wine, spirits, beer and more online, and pick up your order in store! Start filling your cart at TotalWine.com. The Promenade at Brentwood 90 Brentwood Promenade Court Brentwood, MO 63144 314.963.3265

Manchester Meadows 13887 Manchester Road Ballwin, MO 63011 636.527.0482

Clarkson Square 1781 Clarkson Road Chesterfield, MO 63017 636.536.9869

Prices valid from 5/1/2019 through 5/5/2019 in Missouri stores only. Total Wine & More is not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. Total Wine & More reserves the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. ©2019 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.


NEW

ANNIVERSARY

r Styles! Spring/Summe

SHOE SALE! TH

12

Your Headquarters For Comfort Shoes!

COME CELEBRATE & ENJOY THE SAVINGS

MONDAY, APRIL 22ND THROUGH SATURDAY, MAY 4TH

Sale Excludes Birkenstock Brand Shoes, Custom & Repair Items. Some exclusions apply apply.

Mon.-Fri. 9:30 AM-5:30 PM, Sat. 9:00 AM-4:00 PM, Sunday - Closed

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Wednesday • 05.01.2019 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

SUDOKU

4225 S St. Rt. 159, Suite 1 Glen Carbon, IL 62034

618-288-9297


EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CRYPTOQUIP

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign.

WORD GAMES

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

CROSSWORD

HAPPY BIRTHDAY FOR WEDNESDAY, MAY 1, 2019: This year, you know what you want and you go for it. You’ll also handle the word “no” well, but you’re likely to get more nods. If single, you meet people with ease but choose to be somewhat distant until you’re sure of yourself. If attached, you spend a lot of quality time with your sweetie, enhancing your caring and closeness. ARIES makes a great confidant. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 19) HHHHH You have the ability to sleuth through any hassle that could appear. The key will be deciding that what appears to be an obstacle really isn’t. When you understand the nature of the blockage, you’ll be able to bypass it. Tonight: As you like. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 20) HHH Pulling back and saying very little could be critical. You’ll hear a lot of feedback, which you may want to ignore. Don’t feel as though you must make any decisions at this point in time. Tonight: Play it cool. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 20) HHHH Reach out for someone who adds to the moment. This is a person who most likely fulfills the role of a close confidant and friend. Don’t make any agreement over finances or luxury items today. Tonight: Sick of working? Pretend it’s the weekend. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 22) HHHH You could be feeling a bit off and wondering what’s happening around you. The waiting game has its pluses. The less you do, the more others act up. You might have a change of heart over a personal matter. Avoid acting on any thought or decision for now. Tonight: Out and about. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 22) HHHH Reach out to a person at a distance. You could be tired and withdrawn. Let others do what they enjoy most: running the show. As a result, you could receive an interesting piece of information that could color your thoughts and decisions. Tonight: Keep it low-key.

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22) HHHH One-on-one relating takes you down a new path. You’re fiery and want to defend a major cause or interest. At the moment, you’ll tend to go to extremes. Pull back and say nothing to others at a distance. Tonight: Find a favorite friend. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 22) HHHHH If possible, defer to others. You have a lot on your mind, which you’ll choose to share at a later date. You could be in your head about a matter that involves your domestic life or a personal issue. Be more direct than you usually are. Tonight: At home. SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 21) HHHH Listen to the news; pace yourself. You’ll have more to do than you originally anticipated. You’ll be able to cover all bases and accomplish what you want. You’ll make a difference, but you need to take the next few days a little more slowly. Tonight: Say little. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 21) HHHHH You seem to be very close to making a dynamic change. Understand more of what’s happening behind the scenes. If you don’t make solid decisions, your finances could be worrisome. Tonight: Where the fun happens. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 19) HHH You stay anchored and you know what’s going on. You might wonder how to maximize your energy and time. Because you might be more bound to reality than you’re aware of, others might seem very odd. Make sure to take good care of yourself. Tonight: Head home. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 18) HHHH Speak your mind clearly and with greater creativity. Others like your unusual thinking and uniqueness, in general. Nevertheless, you could be concerned about offending others. On some level, you might refuse to integrate what’s being said. Tonight: Hang out. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 20) HHH Curb a tendency to go overboard and lose sense of your finances. You might want to gain more out of your personal life and are willing to be less uptight than you have been in the past. Loosen up, but at the same time, discriminate. Tonight: Treat a friend to munchies. BORN TODAY Director Wes Anderson (1969), singer Tim McGraw (1967), folk hero Calamity Jane (1852)

SOLUTION AT BOTTOM

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

.com Find more free

games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday. com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

VRLAA GTURN BARNET SCOHOM ©2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

Yesterday’s

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

EVERYDAY

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: FUNKY MAMBO PARDON SUNKEN Answer: The baboons rode the carousel at the amusement park because they wanted to — MONKEY AROUND


05.01.2019 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

EVERYDAY

WHAT’S THE DIFF?

DEAR ABBY

She’s trapped in sham marriage Dear Abby • I’m married to a man 21 years my senior. “Joe” and I have been married six years. I have recently realized I’m gay and have fallen in love with another woman. Joe has a hard time making decisions on his own. He’ll read something, hand it to me and ask me what I think. God forbid you challenge an opinion he DOES have. Over the course of our marriage, he has become “crotchety” and burned all his bridges. He got fired from his job three years ago and has never actively tried to find another one. I have carried the family on my own financially. He literally has no one but me. He’s past retirement age, and I’m half that. I have more life to live being who I really AM, but I feel guilty leaving him high and dry. I love my girlfriend. I want to be out and proud. — Trapped in California Dear Trapped • Before telling

your husband anything, discuss this with a divorce lawyer. Leaving him may be complicated because you have been his sole support for a while. Once you know what your financial responsibilities may be, you will be in a better position to give your husband the news. When you do, a way to start would be to tell him you have realized that you are a lesbian. Dear Abby • My boyfriend, “Mason,” and I have been dating for eight months, and it has been going well. However, there is one thing standing in our way — his mom and sisters. Mason is the only boy. His parents divorced when he was young. His mom never remarried, but his father did. His two sisters (one older, one younger) don’t have boyfriends. The three of them make comments whenever Mason and I go out — that he’s spending too much money or isn’t at home enough. It’s like they’re obsessed with him.

They plan vacations while I’m around and don’t invite me. I haven’t been invited over for holidays or family functions. I love Mason, but I can’t continue dealing with the nonsense from his jealous mom and sisters. Mason knows how upset I am. He says he has talked to them, but their behavior hasn’t changed. If he won’t take matters into his own hands, should I? — Competing in New Jersey Dear Competing • No! Until Mason is mature enough to put his foot down, his mother and sisters will continue to decide for him who he dates, how much time he spends with her and whether he is earning “enough” money to be seeing anyone. Remember, Mason will likely always be a package deal, and if you can’t accept it, you should end things. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

CAROLYN HAX

Meddling parents want son to marry Adapted from a recent online discussion.

Dear Carolyn • My husband and I have a 34-year-old son who has been in a relationship with a woman for about seven years. About two years ago, he unceremoniously began referring to her as his “fiancee” and she began wearing a ring, so we asked if there was a wedding date planned. He bit our heads off about the “pressure” he was under to set a date and we dropped the subject. A few weeks after that, after a conversation with the woman about her wedding plans, we sent them a four-figure sum of money with a note indicating it should be used to help with wedding expenses. That was the last we heard of any wedding for the last two years. We don’t expect our money back — he’s our son; money flows in one direction and we have no misapprehensions about that — but we do feel mis-

led and are wondering what’s up. Is it appropriate to ask for more definitive information about whether he is going to marry this lovely woman we already consider family? Or would that be “pressure” in a category that makes us a meddling nuisance? — Meddling? Answer • Their not announcing an engagement and their not marrying and his not talking about it and his being rude about asking you not to talk about it seem awfully definitive to me. Why are you resisting this as a complete answer? They’re not getting married. It is going to stay that way unless and until your son comes to you and announces otherwise. There is obviously baggage here, both in this seven-year pairing and in his relationship with you — and not just because a one-direction possibly-big-

money flow to a 34-year-old arouses suspicions. Your son’s overreaction says there’s history. You also talked to the fiancee about the wedding after your son asked you to drop it, which means you didn’t actually drop it, you just moved it to someone else, and then changed your language from English to cash. That is overstepping. The best place for your energy, therefore, is not in pinning down a wedding date, but instead in figuring out what role you play in this baggage. Do you step in too quickly and too far, not just here, but as a rule? Is your son both dependent on and resentful of you? Is this stalled wedding a microcosm of your son’s stalled adulthood? The answer could be no, but it’s still a question worth asking yourself as you take care to leave your son’s business to him. tellme@washpost.com

TV WEDNESDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 5/1/19

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

FOX Empire Becky, Hakeem Star Carlotta makes a 2 discovery. (N) (cc) and Andre put on a show. (N) CBS Survivor: Awkward. 4 (N) (cc)

9:00

9:30

FOX 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

SEAL Team The tenThe Amazing Race: Here Fishy, Fishy, Fishy. sions rise between Jason and Ray. (N) (N) (cc)

NBC Billboard Music Awards Honoring the year’s artists and more. (N) (cc) 5

NOVA: Building the PBS Nature Connections 9 between plants and ani- Great Cathedrals. Gothic cathedrals. mals. (N) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC The Gold- Schooled 30 bergs (N) (N) (cc) ION 46

Breakthrough: The Ideas That Changed the World (N) (cc)

Riverdale Betty learns Jane The Virgin: Chapsome unsettling news. ter Eighty-Seven. (N) (cc) (N) (cc) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

Hogan’s WKRP in Hogan’s Heroes (cc) Cincinnati Heroes: Heil Klink. (cc)

Modern Single Par- Whiskey Cavalier An Family (N) ents (8:31) unexpected murder shocks everyone. (N) (N)

Blue Bloods An underBlue Bloods A college Blue Bloods A cop is professor is murdered. accused of killing a sus- cover detective is killed. pect. (cc) (cc) (cc)

W E N Summer

/ g n i Spr Styles!

ANNIVERSARY

SHOE SALE! COME CELEBRATE & ENJOY THE SAVINGS

MONDAY, APRIL 22ND TH THROUGH SATURDAY, MAY 4 Sale Excludes Birkenstock Brand Shoes, Custom & Repair Items. Some exclusions apply.

Your Headquarters For Comfort Shoes!

Mon.-Fri. 9:30 AM-5:30 PM, Sat. 9:00 AM-4:00 PM,

4225 S St. Rt. 159, Suite 1 • Glen Carbon, IL 62034

618-288-9297


EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

EVERYDAY

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 05.01.2019

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

DR. KEITH ROACH

Assessing efficacy and safety of SAM-e Dear Dr. Roach • I am a 52-year-old woman coming out the other side of menopause. I’ve had a smooth ride through it, with the exception of occasional mood swings. I’ve been taking SAM-e since I found out about it on the internet. I did not want to take a prescription medicine, nor did I feel my mood swings were strong enough to warrant doing so. I just wanted to be a little more upbeat, positive and energetic. I have found it to be very helpful. Recently, I have had a few people tell me that SAM-e can cause various issues, most notably thyroid malfunctions and cancers. Can you please speak to both the efficacy and potential harm of SAM-e for women in my situation? — J.A. Answer • S-adenosyl methionine is a naturally occurring substance commonly used as a supplement in the U.S. for arthritis and depression. The evidence on SAM-e is mixed, but there are small studies that show SAM-e to be effective for depression, about as effective as some prescription drugs, but with fewer side effects. However, larger studies were not as hopeful, and my opinion is that while it is a lot better than nothing, SAM-e is not as effective as the better-studied prescription drugs for depression. This may not be applicable to mood swings. Since it does seem to be working for you, I can reassure you on one point: There is no reliable evidence that SAM-e increases risk of cancers or thyroid disease. Dear Dr. Roach • My husband is 72 and suffers from heart disease, kidney disease and diabetes. Almost daily, he chokes, with extreme coughing and loss of breath, when eating or drinking. This is getting worse as time goes on. Is there a relationship between this constant choking and heart disease? — S.T. Answer • The word “choking” is nonspecific. I can’t be sure what you mean exactly. However, in a 72-year-old person with medical issues, the most common problem that is described as choking while eating or drinking is a swallowing issue, the medical term for which is dysphagia. There are many concerns for frequent choking, gagging and coughing, but the one that is most concerning to me is aspiration, when food or liquids go into the trachea and lungs instead of into the esophagus and stomach. This can lead to infection and damage to the lungs. Because of this, it’s very important to get him evaluated. Evaluation of suspected aspiration is complicated and may require multiple professionals. I don’t have enough room to discuss all the possible reasons for your husband’s symptoms. Treatment will depend on the findings of the workup.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Wayno and Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

NANCY • By Olivia Jaimes

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell. edu or send mail to 628 Virginia Dr., Orlando, FL 32803.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics