4.29.17

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METROLINK SECURITY UPGRADES

Bi-State adds potential $20 million to budget to address violent crimes

BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Amid public pressure to address violent crimes involving MetroLink, the board overseeing the light rail line added on Friday an extra $20 million for transit security to its planned budget for next year. B i - S ta te D eve l o p m e n t Agency officials say that would be enough to put a law enforcement officer on every MetroLink car and at each station, plus conduct a feasibility study

25 THE RODNEY KING RIOTS

“There is still a lot of work that we have to do in terms of law enforcement and police and community relations.”

Rules on drinking, driving are vague BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Almost every

AUREA MONTESRODRIGUEZ ON THE NEIGHBORHOOD TODAY

Thursday after work, interim Police Chief Lawrence O’Toole drives his department-issued SUV to Failoni’s, a favorite local restaurant on Manchester Avenue, for pizza and beer. It’s a long-standing ritual, he says. And it’s one that points to a gap in city policies. Police officials with the rank of captain and above are allowed to drive their take-home vehicles for personal use. But department policy is silent on the issue of drinking and driving a police car while off duty. City rules regarding cityowned vehicles prohibit police, firefighters, corrections officers, park rangers and deputy marshals from consuming alcohol “while operating a motor vehicle or heavy machinery,” whether on or off duty. The term “while” needs to be

LOS ANGELES TIMES/TNS

Officer Delwin Fields guards the intersection at Central Avenue and 46th Street on April 30, 1992. Los Angeles Police Department officials say the response to such a riot now would be much different. BY JOHN ROGERS Associated Press

TIM GOLDMAN ON HELPING ANOTHER MAN ESCAPE THE VIOLENCE

See METROLINK • Page A4

City revisits policy on off-duty use of vehicles by officers

YEARS LATER

“Bart credited me with saving his life, but I didn’t look at it that way. I just helped him get out of there.”

of installing turnstiles and other upgrades. However, Bi-State president John Nations said that whether those moves actually occured and how much was spent depended on what his agency and its three chief funding sources could agree on. The extra $20 million would have to come from those sources — St. Louis, St. Louis County and St. Clair County. “We don’t have a final plan

D

LOS ANGELES

ee Young remembers April 29, 1992, the way most Americans of a certain age recall Sept. 11 — it’s etched in his memory as the day his world and that of thousands of others changed forever. Young, then 27, a tow truck driver, had stopped for a hamburger at a popular south Los Angeles fastfood joint that afternoon when he saw hordes of shouting, angry people carrying armloads of booze from a liquor store next door. He soon learned he was witnessing the beginning

of one of the worst race riots in American history, and it was unfolding in the neighborhood where he rode bikes and flew kites during a childhood he remembers as idyllic. The violence erupted after four white police officers were acquitted of assault and other charges in the beating of black motorist Rodney King, which was captured on video the year before. The footage had showed officers repeatedly striking, kicking and using a stun gun on King, even after he was on the ground. Over the five days the riots lasted, more than 50 people died and at least 2,000 were injured. The See RIOTS • Page A5

See POLICY • Page A4

Man, mother reunite; his conviction was tossed after decades in prison BY ASHLEY LISENBY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FLORISSANT • After more than three decades behind bars for crimes he says he didn’t commit and prosecutors admit he didn’t get a fair trial on, Andrew Wilson made it back to Florissant this month for a much-longed-for reunion with his mother. As he talked about the ordeal that be-

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gan in 1984 and didn’t end until March, his mother, 96-year-old Margie Davis, sat by his side. They were at her home where her son had only recently rejoined her. “I just felt good. Unbelievable,” Davis said of her son’s release from prison. “When the judge called and said that they was releasing him, I didn’t believe it. I say, ‘I’ll wait and See REUNION • Page A4

Fowler’s hot streak continues in 7-5 win SPORTS

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Greitens buys lake home in Innsbrook Hackers target WU medical school U.S. economic growth stumbles

Margie Davis, 96, and her son Andrew Wilson, 62, in their home in Florissant on Friday. Wilson was imprisoned in California for 32 years. He was freed last month after prosecutors determined he did not receive a fair trial.

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Shutdown of government avoided

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1 M Vol. 139, No. 119 ©2017

OP 24 E /7 N

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M 1 SATURDAY • 04.29.2017 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

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JOE’S ST. LOUIS

Washington U. has big honors class JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HONORS CLASS • When Washington University holds its graduation ceremony next month, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Anna Quindlen will deliver the commencement address and pick up an honorary degree. But five others, all with STL ties, will pick up symbolic sheepskins at the event: • John W. Bachmann, senior partner at Edward Jones. • The Rev. Gary G. Braun, Steward director of the Catholic Student Center at Washington University. • Dr. Thomas F. Frist Jr., co-founder and chairman emeritus of Hospital Corporation of America. He is a graduate of the univerWeldon sity’s medical school. • David L. Steward, chairman of World Wide Technology, an information tech-

nology company based in Maryland Heights. • Dr. Virginia V. Weldon, a pediatric endocrinologist and Washington University administrator who was the first woman chair of the Association of American Medical Colleges. About 3,000 students will receive degrees at the ceremony at 8:30 a.m. May 19 in the Brookings Quadrangle at the school’s main campus. EXHAUST TUBE • A custom auto shop in STL will be at the center of a new show, “Speed is the New Black,” which makes its debut May 24 on the Velocity Channel. Noah Alexander (Ladue High, Class of ’99) and his team at Classic Car Studio are the peg for the show, which will highlight custom wheels being created at the garage in Brentwood. This first season, Alexander’s crew will customize several classic rides, including a 1962 Corvette, a 1990 Porsche 911 and, in the premiere, a 1965 Mustang. Another project has the gang adding a supercharger to a 1969 Chevelle to create a 1,200-horsepower engine. The show makes its debut at 8 p.m. May 24. Velocity is on Channel 778 on Charter Spectrum cable television.

BOOK END • Author David Grann will be in STL next week to discuss his latest book, “Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI.” The book examines the systematic murder in the 1920s of the oil-rich Osage Indians, crimes that helped push the fledgling Federal Bureau of Investigation into national prominence. The crimes, Grann and other historians contend, may have been aided by a landdivision policy that legendary St. Louis politico David Francis supported while serving as President Grover Cleveland’s interior secretary. Francis also was a former St. Louis mayor and Missouri governor. An athletic field at Washington University and a park in St. Louis Hills are named in his honor. The policy took tribal land and divided it up among individual families, which made each family more susceptible to intimidation. It began in the late 1890s, about the same time oil was discovered on tribal lands. Grann will speak at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the St. Louis County Library’s headquarters, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard. Joe Holleman • 314-340-8254 @stlsherpa on Twitter jholleman@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Correspondents’ dinner will soldier on without Trump Will Smith and George Clooney, step aside for Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Saturday’s White House Correspondents’ Association dinner — traditionally the most glittery night on the Washington social calendar, with A-list celebrities — will have a different vibe this year. With President Donald Trump staying away, organizers say the focus will be not on the red carpet but on the First Amendment and the crucial role of the press in a democracy. As opposed to last year, when guests at President Barack Obama’s final dinner included Smith, Emma Watson, Kerry Washington, Helen Mirren and the late Carrie Fisher, this year’s big stars seem to be Woodward and Bernstein, who’ll be presenting journalism awards. Vogue editor gets the scoop on Paltrow’s Goop • Gwyneth Paltrow and Vogue editor Anna Wintour are teaming up to take the actress’ Goop website to print through a partnership with publisher Condé Nast. Wintour, who is also the artistic director at Condé Nast, says that through the Goop brand, Paltrow has built a “thoroughly modern take on how we live today.” The first issue of Goop magazine is slated for September. It will be published quarterly and will revolve around wellness themes seen on Goop.com. The Oscar-winning actress launched Goop in 2008 as a newsletter.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS

CONCERT REVIEW

Hanging out with the perfect couple

Bluesman Otis Rush is 82. Singer Tommy James is 70. Comedian Jerry Seinfeld is 63. Actor Daniel Day-Lewis is 60. Actress Michelle Pfeiffer is 59. Actress Eve Plumb is 59. Actress Uma Thurman is 47. Rapper Master P is 47. Actress Megan Boone is 34. Actor Zane Carney is 32. From news services

BY AMANDA ST. AMAND St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Did you ever hang out with a couple who have it all — good looks, money, talent and chemistry to spare? Yeah. About 20,000 of us did that on Thursday night. Not in a living room or back yard; it was the Scottrade Center with country superstars Tim McGraw and Faith Hill and their “Soul2Soul” tour. A countdown clock projected toward the stage told us when we were only one minute away from their taking the stage, and from the opening lines of “I Knew You Were Waiting,” they brought the sizzle. And sex appeal — plenty of it. While McGraw and Hill have done several duets over the years, both flourished as solo artists. So some of us — well, I — wondered how they might combine their separate acts into one. The answer? Splendidly. From the set, which allowed them to pop up from beneath the stage, to the lasers and lights that rarely stopped swirling and pointing and rotating, to the 10-member band and backup group, the blend was as smooth as a Crown Candy malt. They sang and played (yes, Hill played guitar on several songs) together for eight songs, highlighted by “It Felt Good on My Lips,” “The Way You Love Me” and “Like We Never Loved at All.” They looked and sounded like a couple in love. And while I didn’t inspect everyone in the crowd, I think it’s fair to say Faith and Tim looked better than we did. I doubt many women in the crowd could wear a long black skirt with a slit and sequined panel like Hill, and I doubt most men could match the lean muscles McGraw displayed in tight black shirts. And we probably shouldn’t try. Leave it to the professionals. When Hill took over for a set of solo songs, she ably proved that a long lay-

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 06-13-18-20-31 Mega ball: 13 Megaplier: 4 Estimated jackpot: $61 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $113 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Faith Hill and Tim McGraw perform at Scottrade Center on Thursday.

off had not hurt her in the least. While her last studio album was released in 2005, she sang hits such as “This Kiss,” “Breathe” and her first big song, “She’s a Wild One.” And when she hit those long, belt-it-out notes, she nailed them. Not any noticeable difference from when Hill was at the peak of her career in 2000 or so. Her last solo song came with “Piece of My Heart” — always a crowd pleaser — and then McGraw returned to the stage with her for “Angry All the Time.” Then it was his solo turn with “One of Those Nights,” “Humble and Kind” and “Real Good Man.” Noted: Many of the women really like the line in that last one that says, “When it comes to loving you, I’ve got velvet hands.” If you judge by the cheers and squeals, which I do. McGraw’s last solo was “Live Like You Were Dying,” — to great applause and a near unanimous singalong — before Hill returned to do their new song, “Speak to a Girl.” That led to “It’s Your Love” and

then we got to see the couple who has it all each wade into the crowd — one at a time. Hill slapped hands and posed for a few selfies while singing “Mississippi Girl”; McGraw did the same with “Something Like That.” They vanished for a few minutes, but we knew the couple with it all would be back. And there they were, each perched on a chair and very much in the other’s personal space, rising up from the stage on an elevated platform while singing “I Need You.” And sounding like they meant every word. Sigh. Opening up for the tour was Seth Ennis, a Georgia singer who delivered a seven-song, 30-minute set that closed with his first single, “Woke up in Nashville.” He’ll be back this summer with Luke Bryan, so it will be another chance to hear how he does in another big venue. Amanda St. Amand • 314-340-8201 @mandystlpd on Twitter astamand@post-dispatch.com

INSIDE Business ................ A8 Editorial ............... A11 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor ... A11 Obituaries ........... A12 People ................... A2

LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 07-14-15-16-22 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $64,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 407 Evening: 848 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 6292 Evening: 6550

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 02-05-14-28-44 Evening: 04-18-26-30-37 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $4.25 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 824 FB: 2 Evening: 047 FB: 1 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 8815 FB: 0 Evening: 9390 FB: 2

CORRECTIONS • In Friday’s Business story about Task-

Rabbit, tasker Ken Bonser’s surname was misspelled.

CONTACT US Puzzles ................ EV2 Religion ............... A10 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks ................... A9 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A13

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LOCAL

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A3

Greitens buys lake home in Innsbrook BY KURT ERICKSON AND AUSTIN HUGUELET St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • A month after mov-

ing into the Governor’s Mansion, Missouri’s new chief executive bought a lakeside home in a Warren County resort community. Documents show Gov. Eric Greitens and his wife, Sheena, took out a loan for $675,000 to buy the six-bedroom, fourbathroom home in Innsbrook, which features lakes and a championship golf course. Online real estate listings show the home sold for $750,000 in February. Although the governor says he and the first lady and their two young children live in the capital city on a full-time basis, he told the Post-Dispatch they sometimes needed to get away from the mansion. “It is important for us to have places where we can go on the weekend,” Greitens said. Greitens, a Republican who has previously not held elected office, declined to

confirm the purchase or comment on his new home, saying the matter is a privacy issue. “We often have threats against me and my family. Their safety and security is my top priority,” Greitens said. In December, after Greitens won a hotly contested race against former Democratic Attorney General Chris Koster, Sheena Greitens was robbed of a laptop computer and mobile phone as she sat in her car in the parking lot of a coffee shop west of St. Louis University. Three male teenagers were arrested soon after. In an emotional news conference the following day, Greitens, a former Navy SEAL, told reporters, “I’m glad the men and women of law enforcement found these men before I did.” Although it remains unclear whether Greitens is putting his five-bedroom house in the Central West End neighborhood of St. Louis on the market, aides suggested that Greitens was looking for a home that was closer to Jefferson City. Innsbrook is about 80 miles from the

Capitol building, compared with about 140 miles to the Central West End. Greitens emphasized that he and his family were living in the governor’s mansion, which is open to public tours but also has a private living area. “We are living here. We’re here every day. Joshua is going to preschool here,” Greitens said in an interview in his Capitol office. “I wake up every morning. My routine is to go to the Missouri State Highway Patrol gym. I knock out a workout. I come home, get Joshua ready for preschool, get him ready for breakfast. Sheena or I take him to preschool. We have dinner right here in the residence every night. We’re living here,” Greitens said. Sheena Greitens is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Missouri’s Columbia campus, 30 minutes north of Jefferson City. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

Remembering the fallen

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

tristen Bromeier, 4, son of Lt. Kurtis Bromeier of St. Louis County Justice Services, watches Friday as his father and other honor guard members salute the playing of taps at the 40th annual memorial for fallen police and firefighters in Clayton. though the full ceremony was canceled because of poor weather, members of the St. Louis County Police Pipes and drums stayed to play.

LAW & ORDER ALTON > Man killed by train is identified • The Madison County Coroner’s Office identified a man killed Thursday night when he was struck by a train as Jeremiah J. Greene, 37, of Alton. Greene was pronounced dead at 11 p.m. by Madison County Corner Investigator Sakina T. Hall. He died of multiple traumatic injuries, according to officials. A routine toxicology test for the presence of alcohol and drugs will be performed. He had been struck about 10 p.m. at the Alton Steel Inc. location at No. 5 Cut Street. Greene is not an employee of Alton Steel, officials said. His death is being investigated by the Alton Police Department. ST. LOUIS > Motorcyclist killed in crash is identified • The motorcyclist who was killed in a collision with an off-duty police officer has been identified as Nicklaus Macke, 25, of the 2000 block of Washington Avenue. Macke was on a 2008 Honda CBR motorcycle about 4 p.m. Tuesday, heading east on Olive Street from North Compton Avenue. He was approaching the intersection of North Cardinal Avenue when the off-duty officer attempted to turn westbound on Olive from Cardinal. The motorcycle collided with the left side of the officer’s car, a 2003 Cadillac CTS, police said. The driver of the car was identified the next day as a 24-year-old off-duty St. Louis police officer. Police have not released the officer’s name. He was not injured. The investigation will not be complete until a toxicology report is completed, which could take up to 16 weeks, police said. ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Body is found in river • Police are asking the public the help identify a man whose body was pulled from the Mississippi River on Friday. The Illinois State Police said the body found near East Carondelet was apparently that of a 38-year-old white man. He was wearing a dark blue shirt. Anyone with information about the man’s identity is asked to contact Special Agent David Wargo of the Illinois State Police at 618-346-3765. PEMISCOT COUNTY, MO. > Festus woman killed in crash • A woman from Festus was killed Thursday in a three-vehicle crash on Interstate 55 in southeastern Missouri. The Missouri Highway Patrol identified the victim as Sonya J. Cherry, 56. Police say Cherry was a passenger in a car driven by Allison E. Venuto, 31, of Pevely, Mo. Venuto was seriously injured in the crash.

Southbound traffic on I-55 was stopped at about the 15-mile marker about 12:30 p.m. Thursday in Pemiscot County. Venuto’s 2016 Honda was stopped in traffic, as was a 2003 Kenworth tractor-trailer in front of Venuto’s car. The patrol didn’t say why the traffic had stopped. A 2015 GMC truck driven by Jeffery M. Bailey, 39, of Dyess, Ark., struck the back of Venuto’s car and pushed it into the tractortrailer. He was not listed among the injured. Cherry was taken by medical helicopter to a hospital in Memphis, Tenn., where she died. Cherry and Venuto were both wearing seat belts, police say. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Man charged with shooting in van • A man from Florissant was charged Thursday after authorities say he shot two people who were riding in a van with him in busy afternoon traffic on Lucas and Hunt Road. The victims crashed the van but survived. William Cordell Alexander, 37, of the 1800 block of Don Donna Drive, is being held on two counts each of first-degree assault and armed criminal action. His bail is set at $500,000, cash-only. Police say Alexander was high on meth when he shot a man and woman in the front seat of the van just before 1 p.m. Wednesday in Country Club Hills. The vehicle had been heading north in the 5700 block of Lucas and Hunt. Police say Alexander shot the male driver and female front-seat passenger from behind. Their injuries were not considered life-threatening, police said. After the shooting, the injured driver crashed the van. It hit two parked cars on the lot of a Walgreen’s pharmacy, at 5790 Lucas and Hunt Road, police said. CLAYTON > Man gets 10 years for molesting child • A man from Crestwood was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison after a jury found him guilty last month of child molestation. A St. Louis County jury March 3 found Andrew S. Bullard, 38, of the 900 block of Woodbine Drive in Crestwood, guilty of child molestation after a one-week trial. He was accused of having Bullard sexual contact with a 4-yearold girl between June 2011 and October 2012. St. Louis County Circuit Judge Ellen Ribaudo delivered the sentence. Bullard’s attorney, Rick Sindel, said Friday that Bullard planned to appeal the conviction.

DIGEST ST. LOUIS > Storms could lead to floods • Storms could dump 3 to 5 inches of rain across the St. Louis metro area this weekend. Southeastern Missouri and Southern Illinois could get even more. The National Weather Service warns that recent rainfall has “set the stage” for significant flooding in some areas this weekend. A flash flood watch will be in effect through late Sunday night. Forecasters say low-lying areas or those with poor drainage will probably flood, and they predict “ultimately dangerous flash flooding” on smaller creeks and streams. Larger streams and rivers could have moderate to major flooding. Severe thunderstorms remain in the forecast for Saturday and Sunday in the St. Louis area. (From staff reports) CREVE COEUR > Municipal League backs ‘smart grid’ legislation • Members of the Municipal League of Metro St. Louis voted unanimously Thursday night to support legislation that would allow utility rate increases to support “smart grid” development. An Ameren Missouri speaker said each dollar spent to modernize the distribution infrastructure generated $2.40 in benefits for customers, including new choices, convenience and controls to help manage energy usage and costs. The members also selected Chuck Caverly, a Hazelwood City Council member, as the league’s new president beginning in the fall. Mayor Norm McCourt of Black Jack will be vice president and Mayor Matt Robinson of Hazelwood will be finance chairman. Caverly replaces Barry Glantz, mayor of Creve Coeur, as the top elected official of the lobbying and service organization. It has membership of 85 of the 90 St. Louis County municipalities, as well as St. Louis City and St. Louis County. The league met in Creve Coeur. (Special to the PostDispatch) SPRINGFIELD, ILL. > State agency drops plan to lay off prison nurses • The Illinois Department of Corrections has withdrawn its plan to lay off 124 nurses while continuing to negotiate with the state employees’ union. Corrections spokeswoman Nicole Wilson said Thursday the department had informed the Illinois Nurses Association that it would not remove the nurses June 15. She said prison officials were available to meet any time, but the union is unavailable until May 8. Union spokesman Chris Martin said the Corrections Department decision was welcome news. He encouraged support for legislation to halt privatizing prison jobs sent to Gov. Bruce Rauner, a Republican. The Associated Press reported in March that Corrections announced it would replace the nurses with those hired by a private health care provider. The union says Rauner reneged on an obligation to keep negotiating an expired contract. (AP)

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

Deputy sheriff accused of groping inmate BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A St. Louis deputy

sheriff was accused on Friday of groping an inmate whom he’d had transferred to the St. Louis Justice Center. Christopher Lee Jones, 50, of the 500 block of Northland Avenue, faces a felony charge of sexual conduct with a prisoner. Charging documents say that

Jones

an inmate at the workhouse was transported to the Justice Center on April 20, “under the assumption that she had a scheduled court

date.” After she arrived, Jones told her that he’d had her transferred so that he could see her, then gave her a container of food, say-

ing it was a birthday present, charging documents say. Jones said, “You got yours, now where is mine,” before grabbing her breast and sticking his hand down her pants, the documents claim. The incident was captured on video surveillance, the documents say. Jones was arrested the next day. Jones has been suspended

without pay, a statement from the sheriff’s office said. The statement goes on to say, “Sheriff [Vernon] Betts wanted to make clear that he is already working to reform the culture and operations of the department.” “This latest embarrassing incident for the Department is one of many incidents over the years that led newly elected Sheriff Betts to call for higher standards

Bi-State increases anti-crime budget

CALVERTON PARK > Police officer injured in accident • A Hazelwood police vehicle stopped at a red traffic light here was hit by an oncoming car Friday afternoon, police said. The crash happened about 2:30 p.m. at the intersection of North Florissant Road and Connolly Drive, police said. The driver of the oncoming car, a man, was taken to a hospital in critical condition. The officer, a woman, was taken to a hospital with moderate injuries. She was driving a marked patrol car.

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Metro Public Safety officers ask a man in March why he is hanging around at the MetroLink Station at 18th and Clark streets. “We have to make this station safe for our grandparents and our kids,” one officer said.

ran Addo, declined to comment Friday other than to say such issues would be discussed at next week’s meeting. Stenger’s office did not respond to requests for a comment. Kern said Friday that his goal was to provide for a sheriff’s deputy on every train in his county but that he’d let Krewson and Stenger speak for themselves. “To me it’s going to take something like that … to make sure ridership grows instead of shrinks,” he said. Kern has already taken action locally, recently getting the St. Clair County Transit District to kick in an extra $300,000 a year to boost the number of sheriff’s deputies assigned to MetroLink. Sheriff Rick Watson said the extra dollars would allow his department to increase to nine from three the number of

deputies assigned to MetroLink during higher-crime evening hours. The extra contingent will start work Monday and be on duty from 5 p.m. to 1 a.m., he said. He said that was a significant increase but not enough to staff all train cars at all times. More than a year ago, St. Louis County nearly doubled the number of its officers patrolling MetroLink. Meanwhile, the $20 million system-wide security allocation was added by Bi-State’s board Friday as it passed its overall budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. Bi-State officials say that would be in addition to more than $14 million being spent this year on security for MetroLink and the Metro bus system by the agency and the local governments that fund it. The Metro budget estimate

Mother reunites with son whose conviction has been tossed REUNION • FROM A1

see.’ But, here he is.” Wilson, 62, was imprisoned on robbery and murder convictions in the stabbing death of a 21-year-old man in California. Wilson said he had been railroaded by dishonest and unlawful actions by a district attorney and detective. “I didn’t have a reason to tell a lie. You know, I didn’t do this. I didn’t do it,” Wilson said emphatically. Wilson maintained his innocence for decades. Davis championed her son’s case from afar, but it wasn’t until lawyers from the Loyola Law School’s Project for the Innocent got involved that his fortunes changed. Program leaders said a federal public defender for the Central District of California alerted the group to Wilson’s case. The public defender had been investigating a different case involving a detective Wilson had filed complaints about. In March, prosecutors determined Wilson did not receive a fair trial, citing “cumulative errors,” and he was released. The district attorney’s office has said it still believes Wilson was involved in the murder but wouldn’t refile charges, the Los Angeles Times reported. “You go through the moment of ‘Is this real?’” he said of the moment he was convicted. “I’m still going through that moment. Is it real? It’s unbelievable.” More than a month after he was freed and cleared to leave California, Wilson sat on a sofa in the living room of his mother’s home in Florissant this week. Davis sat beside him, mostly quietly in her pink bath robe. She strained to hear what she could of the conversation and occasionally added delayed interjections. She smiled tenderly at her son when he patted her knee. Davis told the Post-Dispatch in March that she had spent several years corresponding with lawyers about her son’s case, to no avail. But Wilson said his saving grace was his mother’s diligence, his commitment to proving his innocence and the aid of Project for the Innocent lawyers and stu-

dents. “Project for the Innocent made it right this time, but there are so many people that are still in my situation, that I was in, that haven’t been as lucky as me. What do we do for those people?” Wilson said. After his release, he attended an event with dozens of other people who had been cleared of convictions. That event highlighted a flaw he sees with the nation’s judicial system. “Any time you got 200 people who have been exonerated for crimes like that, it’s not a mistake. It’s not a mistake, a blunder, an, ‘Oops, I’m sorry.’ It’s just intentional,” Wilson said. He questions why, if a “crooked DA and crooked police” still receive retirement benefits after their wrongdoings are discovered — if they are discovered, he emphasizes — a person who has been wrongly convicted isn’t also provided for. “All I’m asking is for a fair shake for everybody,” Wilson said. Wilson grew up in St. Louis but left for Los Angeles in 1978 to live and work. Since arriving home, he said, he’s mostly been doing chores around his mother’s house, especially cleaning up the backyard. His mother mentions how she would like flowers in front of the house. He gets the hint. While he continues his bid for vindication and restitution, Wilson said he hoped to complete college courses he began in prison, find a job and volunteer. He has to make a trip back to Los Angeles next month for what he hopes will be a final hearing on his case, but he is looking well beyond that chapter of his life now. “I can’t look back like that. It’s not worth it,” he said. “I’m passed 60 years old and I think I got a lot longer to live and a lot to live for. So I can’t look back. I can’t do that.” Ashley Lisenby • 314-340-8344 @aadlisenby on Twitter alisenby@post-dispatch.com

refers to putting “law enforcement personnel” on each car and at each station. Nations said that phrase refered to police officers, Metro public safety officers and private security guards — all of which are currently deployed but not to the degree on which the budget figure was based. It was unclear Friday how close St. Louis County and BiState officials were to repairing ongoing disputes over the handling of MetroLink security. Stenger said earlier this month that Bi-State had refused to sign contracts, resisted new technology and spent money on security guards instead of sworn officers, as part of an effort to create its own police force. Nations has denied the allegations. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @mschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER

METROLINK • FROM A1

yet,” Nations said. “Everything is on the table.” He said he expected to meet next week with Mayor Lyda Krewson, St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger and St. Clair County Board Chairman Mark Kern to hash out the issue. Those three met April 12, without Nations, to try to come up with a plan to deal with recent violence on MetroLink, including two fatal shootings on or near MetroLink trains. Bi-State said the three elected officials recently submitted a preliminary outline of what they want. Nations wouldn’t say, however, what’s in the outline or whether it calls for an officer on each train car. Asked why Bi-State’s board put an amount in its budget to potentially do that, he said that “it’s been something that’s been talked about repeatedly” by the public and area leaders. “That is one option. I could not tell you today that will be the solution,” he said. However, the Bi-State budget item is similar to what was proposed last month by the agency’s best-known board member, former Mayor Vincent C. Schoemehl Jr. Schoemehl said then that he’d ask that Metro put an officer capable of making arrests and issuing tickets on every train car and every platform. Schoemehl wasn’t at the meeting Friday. The extra $20 million allocated by Bi-State’s board includes $17.8 million to put officers on every train car and at every station. The remainder would pay for the study of turnstiles and other potential upgrades. Stenger, Krewson and Kern have yet to detail their proposal but have said it does include adding turnstiles and more officers. Krewson’s spokesman, Ko-

and powers that would allow him to change an office badly in need of reform,” the statement continues. No attorney is listed for Jones, who could not be immediately reached for comment.

ST. CLAIR COUNTY > Woman killed by drunk driver, police say • A man was driving drunk with two children in his car when he caused a car crash here in December that killed a woman from Millstadt, police say. The crash happened about 11:40 p.m. midnight Dec. 19 on Illinois Route 158 near Roachtown Road in unincorporated St. Clair County. Jason E. Lamb, 33, of Belleville was northbound on Route 158 when his 2007 Toyota Rav4 crossed the center line and struck a southbound car head-on, police said. The other driver, Marlene A. Horn, 68, was pronounced dead at the scene. Lamb was charged Friday with aggravated DUI involving death, a felony, and two misdemeanor counts of child endangerment. ST. LOUIS > Woman charged in child’s death • A woman has been charged with beating a 3-year-old foster child who died of his injuries hours later in December 2015. Christina Denise Bell, 28, is charged with abuse or neglect of a child resulting in death, a felony, according to a court documents filed April 17. Emergency medical personnel were called to a home in the 3500 block of Illinois about 2:19 p.m. for a 3-year-old child who was having breathing difficulties and becoming unresponsive, a probable cause statement said. The child, identified in court documents as “D.B,” was found to be in cardiac arrest and was taken to Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital, where D.B. was pronounced dead about 9 p.m. The child had suffered “non-accidental” blunt force trauma and showed signs of injury to the body, head and extremities.

St. Louis policy vague on drinking and driving police vehicles off duty POLICY • FROM A1

clarified, city personnel director Richard Frank said. “Commanders are on call 24/7 and we’re also human and we’ve got to eat dinner, and I’m not going to say I haven’t had a few beers,” O’Toole said. “But just like any major corporation like AnheuserBusch or Schlafly says, it’s about drinking responsibly. “But if that’s a concern of the personnel director, and we need to tighten a policy, O’Toole then that’s what we’ll have to do.” St. Louis County faced this issue in 2012, when a driver who had been ticketed for speeding later saw the arresting officer drinking beer and getting behind the wheel of his take-home patrol car. He videotaped the officer at a mixed martial arts event in Fenton that they both happened to attend after the speeding incident, and then filed a complaint with St. Louis County Police. The incident spurred then-Chief Tim Fitch to revise the county’s take-home car policy forbidding driving under the influence to define it as a blood alcohol level of 0.04 percent or greater, in accordance with pilot and commercial truck driver standards. The only mention of blood alcohol levels in city policies refers to the 0.02 percent level that on-duty officers are allowed, which provides a cushion to those who may have been drinking long before reporting for duty. Frank said this week that he planned to meet with the city’s interim public safety director to amend the department’s takehome car policy and ban the practice, as well as make the city’s policy regarding government-owned vehicles less ambiguous. “To me, it does not seem appropriate to go into a bar, have a drink, get into a city vehicle and drive off; that’s not exercising good judgment,” Frank said. “That is something that needs to be reviewed. Even if you have two drinks, to have a police car

at a bar, I don’t support that.” Mayor Lyda Krewson said she was willing to “look into the issue.” “Police officers and city employees need to be held to the same standard,” she said. “It’s a valid thing to be concerned about.” O’Toole became the interim chief after Sam Dotson abruptly retired April 19 during a meeting on Krewson’s first full day in office. Nationally, most departments with take-home cars have policies that do not allow officers to drink and drive police cars, said Jim Bueermann, executive director of the Washington-based Police Foundation. “They’re not intended to be used to go bar hopping,” said Bueermann, who retired as chief of the Redlands, Calif., police department in 2011 after 33 years as an officer. “I can’t imagine any agency allowing officers to drink and drive a take-home vehicle, no matter the amount, because of the liability risk. “It can be argued that even under the legal limit of intoxication, there is a level of impairment, and if there is an accident, you’d better add a few zeroes to that settlement,” Bueermann said. St. Louis carries insurance on about 40 vehicles that police officers are allowed to use during off hours, and another 40 have to-and-from-work privileges. Frank said the police department’s history as a state-run agency before coming under city control in 2013 might have contributed to the lack of a clear policy. Up until then, city employees with takehome cars had been forbidden from using them for personal reasons, so the issue of drinking never came up. The policy was never revised when the police department came on board, Frank said. Bueermann said law enforcement agencies often generated policies as situations arose. “This is how policies evolve: You don’t know about a glaring omission until a situation like this occurs,” he said. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com


04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

1992 LOS ANGELES RIOTS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A5

Witnesses reflect on LA riots 25 years later RIOTS • FROM A1

financial toll topped $1 billion. The psychological toll on the city and entire nation was even greater. Although the uprising seemed to catch the nation and the Los Angeles Police Department by surprise, longtime residents say tension had been building in south Los Angeles for years and the King verdict was just the tipping point. Here are some of their stories:

THE TOW-TRUCK DRIVER

Young, who had stopped for food, quickly decided he’d better get out of there. Ironically, he drove to his family’s auto body shop about a mile away and just a couple of storefronts down from the intersection of Florence and Normandie avenues, streets whose names would become ubiquitous as the riot’s flashpoint.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Rodney King (right) pleads for an end to rioting in south-central Los Angeles on May 1, 1992. Over five days, more than 50 people were killed, and thousands injured.

He got there moments after black men dragged white truck driver Reginald Denny from his big rig and beat him nearly to death as millions watched in horror on live TV. One of those watching, a black truck driver named Bobby Green, rushed to the intersection and rescued him. “It was chaotic — cars running lights, people in the middle of the street throwing stuff at cars, people stopping to see what was going on and getting their windows broke,” Young recalled. The uprising, he realizes now, was the culmination of a downward spiral in south Los Angeles that started 20 years earlier with the rise of white flight, disinvestment and drug-dealing street gangs after the 1965 Watts riots, which began nearby. Residents of black neighborhoods on the city’s sprawling south side complained that police stopped them for no reason other than being black. They said white

people didn’t believe them, and store owners — many of them recently arrived Korean immigrants who bought modest businesses from the fleeing white owners — saw them more as shoplifters than shoppers. In the years since 1992, things have gotten “90 percent better,” Young said. Young, who never left south Los Angeles, has watched the community’s demographics change over the years. The number of Hispanic residents has increased steadily, while a smattering of whites have begun to return, and he believes that’s good. “People in the neighborhood need to work together — black, Hispanic, even white people — and they are coming back here, if slowly but surely,” he says. “If you all work together, if everybody works together, you can keep the peace.”

WALKING THROUGH FIRE

ONLY WHITE GUY IN SIGHT

There may have been rioting, but college-bound Aurea MontesRodriguez, then 16, had a field trip to Washington to prepare for, so she wasn’t about to miss class on April 30, 1992. That’s where she was when word came down that things had gotten so bad on the riot’s second day that the city was shutting down bus service. She’d have to walk 3 miles past scores of burning buildings to get home. That evening, she and her brother ventured out to look around, only to see a man park his truck outside an electronics store where he planned to steal a TV. Before he could return with it, somebody stole his truck. “It was that point we realized just how serious things were, and we made our way back home, and our mom didn’t let us out after that,” she recalled. Although it was frightening, she says now that the uprising didn’t really surprise her. “I felt that what I was seeing on TV the first night and when I walked through the fires the second day was a civil unrest by people who were fed up believing that the legal system, that the justice system, was going to work for our community,” she said. After earning a master’s degree from UCLA, Montes-Rodriguez decided to return to the neighborhood and do something about the conditions. She went to work 20 years ago for the Community Coalition of South Los Angeles, a publicly funded group working to mentor students for college and expose them to the arts, provide jobs and better food sources for area residents, and bring about better communication with police. Now the coalition’s executive vice president, she believes it has made a difference. “We as a community have not experienced the sense of hopelessness that we were seeing in the late ’80s and leading up to the ’92 unrest,” she said. “But there is still a lot of work that we have to do in terms of law enforcement and police and community relations.”

Photographer Bart Bartholomew was on a police ride-along on April 29, 1992, looking to photograph evidence for The New York Times of the presence of a Salvadoran street gang that reportedly was encroaching on local gangs’ drug-dealing territory. When word came that the Rodney King verdict was about to be announced, his escorts took him back to a police station. There, Bartholomew pulled a bulletproof jacket from the trunk of his car and put it on as he heard a cop on the station’s roof yell, “That’s a really good idea today.” Asked where police believed trouble might start, the officer replied, “A liquor store.” A few minutes later, Bartholomew found himself just a block from Tom’s. Police attempted to arrest a looter, area residents said they had the wrong guy, a scuffle ensued, and suddenly the officers were hugely outnumbered. They got in their patrol cars and left. “When they evacuated, I thought they were coming back in riot gear,” said Tim Goldman, who lived just a few blocks away and had stopped to see what was happening. “But I stayed, and they never came back.” Suddenly Bartholomew found himself the only white guy in a crowd of hundreds of angry black people. He was retreating to his car when someone hit him with a two-by-four, shattering his jaw, and others began pounding him and grabbing at his cameras and film. Then he felt the presence of someone else shadowing him. “I didn’t know who he was, but he felt like a football player. He was big, he was buff, and he was able to push people away from me, and I heard him say, ‘Let him go. Let him go. He’s only doing his job.’” Bartholomew’s protector shoved him into his car and implored him to leave immediately. “There is no doubt I could have easily been killed that day were it not for him getting me into my car,” he says.

Aurea Montes-Rodriguez, shown april 18 in Los angeles, is now executive vice president of Community Coalition. She returned to her neighborhood to help improve conditions and relations within the community.

James Oh (right), owner of tom’s Liquors, greets a customer at his store on april 18 in Los angeles. “at the time I think there was a lack of communication with the community,” Oh said about Korean-american-owned businesses before the riots.

THE BUBBLE BURSTS

When Katynja McCory thinks back to what she recalls of the Rodney King riots, she concludes she had been living in a bubble called childhood innocence. It was one that was shattered the day her mother told Katynja, then 13, to get on the floor of their home and stay there, lest she be hit by a stray bullet. For years, McCory was bused more than 40 miles to a predominantly white school in the Los Angeles suburb of Calabasas. It was the only place this granddaughter of Southern sharecroppers now realizes she ever saw white people in her early years. As for memories of the riot, “the first thing I can tell you I remember is smoke,” she said of the dirty gray haze produced by the hundreds of burning buildings. “In Los Angeles, you know how you go outside during wildfire season sometimes and you’ll see ash, you’ll see certain things in the air? But imagine that like a thousand times more intense.” She would get on with her life, earning a political science degree from UCLA before returning to her old neighborhood as a community organizer and political consultant. She has worked on the campaigns of President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, among others.

LIQUOR STORE OWNER

When the Community Coalition did a survey in the 1990s of what south Los Angeles residents thought was the biggest blight on their neighborhood, the assumption was that it would be the crack cocaine epidemic. Instead, it was liquor stores. The community hated them, so much so that rioters burned down about 200 and looted numerous others. Many people also were suspi-

BARTHOLOMEW’S RESCUER

Katynja McCory, lead docent for the “re-Imagine Justice” art exhibit, looks at riot photos in the show on april 18 in Los angeles. McCory said she had been living in a bubble of innocence before the riots.

Bart Bartholomew (right) who in 1992 was photographing the Los angeles riots, talks april 19 with Tim Goldman, a videographer who helped Bartholomew escape when the crowd they were both covering turned violent. cious of the Korean immigrants who ran many stores, particularly after one owner shot to death a black girl, 15, in a dispute over a bottle of juice weeks after King was beaten. So it seemed strange to some when Korean-American grocer James Oh, 68, decided eight years ago he’d take over a neighborhood liquor store. And not just any booze emporium either. He and partners bought Tom’s Liquor at the corner of Florence and Normandie. Oh, a retired Army veteran, decided he was not only going to make a living there but make a difference while erasing stereotypes about Korean-Americans. “If you invest your money in

the community, you have to be involved in the community. Communication is everything,” says the entrepreneur who greets every customer with a smile and seems to know them all. “Hey, dog. What’s up, homes?” he shouts cheerfully to Vernell Brown, who bellows back, “All right, man! You go, James,” as he picks up a sackful of groceries and the two talk about upcoming neighborhood events. Most of those groceries weren’t there when he took over the place, Oh says, so he moved out some of the booze to make room (although there’s still plenty available) and brought in necessities such as milk, eggs and sugar.

They wouldn’t meet formally for nearly 25 years, but soon after the riots ended, Goldman would learn Bartholomew was the man he shielded from attackers. “Bart credited me with saving his life, but I didn’t look at it that way,” he said with a chuckle. “I just helped him get out of there.” Goldman, an Air Force veteran, had recently returned to his childhood home after leaving the military. He was hoping he might land a job in Los Angeles with a major airline and was waiting for a call from United Airlines after a promising interview. “But then the riots happened, and I never heard back,” he said quietly. He was listening to a police scanner when he heard about trouble near Florence and Normandie and decided to grab his video camera and check it out. Soon after Bartholomew told reporters a big black guy with a video camera had saved his life, they tracked down Goldman, but he declined an interview. Eventually he left Los Angeles, moving to Florida where he worked for 20 years as an event planner. After recently returning home, and with the riot’s 25th anniversary approaching, he agreed with the makers of a documentary that it was finally time he and Bartholomew met. When they did, he was stunned to learn the photographer didn’t live in New York but in LA’s beachfront neighborhood of Pacific Palisades, where Goldman, now 57, had been bused to the largely white high school as a teenager. The pair found they shared a mutual affection for the area, as well as similar interests in college sports and other subjects. “We’ve become good friends,” Bartholomew said. CNN contributed to this report.

LOOKING BACK The riots lasted five days in the spring of 1992, leaving more than 50 people dead and more than 2,000 injured. The rioting destroyed or damaged more than 1,000 buildings in the Los Angeles area. The estimated cost of the damage was more than $1 billion. More than 9,800 California National Guard troops were dispatched to restore order. Nearly 12,000 people were arrested, though not all the arrests were related to rioting.

TIMELINE March 3, 1991 • Rodney King is beaten by LAPD officers after King leads police on a high-speed chase through Los Angeles County. George Holliday videotapes the beating from his apartment balcony. The video shows King being struck by police batons more than 50 times. more than 20 officers, most from the LAPD, were present at the scene. King suffered 11 fractures and other injuries due to the beating. March 4, 1991 • Holliday delivers the tape to local TV station KTLA. March 7, 1991 • King is released without being charged. March 15, 1991 • Sgt. Stacey Koon and Officers Laurence Michael Powell, Timothy Wind and Theodore Briseno are indicted by a Los Angeles grand jury in connection with the beating. May 10, 1991 • A grand jury refuses to indict 17 officers who stood by at the King beating and did nothing. Nov. 26, 1991 • Superior Court Judge Stanley Weisberg orders the trial of the four officers charged in the King beating moved to Simi Valley. April 29, 1992 • The four white LAPD officers are acquitted of beating King. Riots start at Florence and Normandie in southcentral Los Angeles. Reginald Denny, a white truck driver, is pulled from his truck and beaten. A news helicopter captures the beating on videotape. Mayor Tom Bradley declares a state of emergency, and Gov. Pete Wilson calls in National Guard troops. April 30-May 4, 1992 • Dusk-todawn curfews are enforced in the city and county of Los Angeles. May 1, 1992 • King makes an emotional plea for calm, stating, “People, I just want to say, can we all get along? Can we get along? Can we stop making it horrible for the older people and the kids?” May 3, 1992 • More than 1,100 Marines, 600 Army soldiers and 6,500 National Guard troops patrol the streets of Los Angeles. Aug. 4, 1992 • A federal grand jury returns indictments against Koon, Powell, Wind and Briseno on the charge of violating the civil rights of King. Feb. 25, 1993 • Trial begins. April 17, 1993 • The federal jury convicts Koon and Powell of violating King’s civil rights. Wind and Briseno are found not guilty. No disturbances follow. Aug. 4, 1993 • U.S. District Court Judge John Davies sentences Koon and Powell to 30 months in prison for violating King’s civil rights. April 19, 1994 • A U.S. District Court awards King $3.8 million in compensatory damages in a civil lawsuit against Los Angeles. King had sought $56 million, or $1 million for every blow by officers. June 1, 1994 • King is denied punitive damages in a civil trial against the police officers. April 2012 • King’s autobiography is published. June 17, 2012 • King, 47, is found dead in the swimming pool of his home in Rialto, Calif. Cause of death is ruled a drowning. SOURCE: CNN


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

GRANDFATHER TO HIT-AND-RUN DRIVER WHO KILLED GIRL, 6

‘WE ARE GOING TO FIND YOU’

BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Vince Parrish is appealing

to the public for help in finding the driver who struck and killed his 6-year-old granddaughter Thursday night. “She was a beautiful little girl, smart, with the prettiest smile you ever wanted to see,” he said softly about Janell Rice. He spoke Friday while standing in front of the apartment building where Janell his granddaughter lived in the 5100 block of Labadie Avenue with her parents, Jamal Rice, 27, and Ashley Hack-

ney, 26; and her brothers, ages 5 and 4 months. Police say a car racing in north St. Louis fatally struck Janell about 8 p.m. Thursday and took off afterward. The car is described as a four-door, light-colored Nissan Altima with black trim and tinted windows. Police have made no arrests. The hit-and-run driver had been speeding east on Labadie from East Norwood. Police say it appears the car was racing another vehicle. After it struck Janell, the Altima sped off east on Labadie, then south on Norwood. Janell died at a hospital. Parrish said she died before doctors could begin life-saving efforts. Parrish said his daughter had rarely let

her children play outside because of safety concerns in the neighborhood. When the speeding car came down the street, the little girl they called Nelly was with her four cousins, the oldest age 12, and standing on a curb. The driver swerved to avoid hitting another vehicle and drove onto the curb, striking Nelly. The child attended Hickey Elementary School, where she was set to graduate from kindergarten in a few weeks. Her parents went to the school on Friday and were given her cap and gown. “They will be buried with her,” her grandfather, 53, said. He is urging the public to help police bring the driver to justice. “The streets are going to talk,” Parrish

Making the best of rain

said. “We are working diligently to pass the information on to police. I have confidence in the community. Someone will give the information up that will lead us to that person.” CrimeStoppers is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for tips that lead to an arrest of the driver. Its hotline is 866-371-8477. Meanwhile, Parrish has a message for the driver who killed his grandchild: “We are going to find you.” Kim Bell and Nassim Benchaabane of the Post-Dispatch staff contributed to this report. Denise Hollinshed • 314-340-8319 @Hollinshed57 on Twitter dhollinshed@post-dispatch.com

WU Medical School notifies of data breach BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Despite the chilly on-and-off rain, Demetrice Brown, 17, skates through the water fountains at Citygarden in downtown St. Louis on Friday. “you only live once. Why not play around?” he said. The junior at Lift for Life Academy in Soulard often skates at the park after school, but he got to enjoy a little more time in the fountains after getting off early for parent-teacher conferences. WEATHER • A13

Woman allegedly encouraged man to kill baby BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The girlfriend of a St. Louis

man accused of smothering his 3-monthold son to death was charged Friday in the boy’s death. Emily Paul, 27, of 1900 block of East Walnut Street in Columbia, Mo., was charged Friday with first-degree murder in the death of Ayden Baker on April 8. The boy’s father, Jibri Baker, was charged April 9 with first-degree murder. Charges said he told detectives that the day before he had pushed the boy’s head into a bed at his home in the 4100 block of South Baker Compton Avenue. When the baby stopped moving several minutes later, Baker turned him over, believing he was dead, police said. Ayden took a breath, and Baker tried again, holding the boy’s nostrils and mouth closed until the child died, the charges say. Charges against Paul say police found “messages indicating Emily Paul aided and encouraged the suffocation death” of Ayden when they searched the cellphones of Paul and Baker. Paul was placed in custody Friday. Her bail was set at $400,000 cash-only. A search warrant for Baker’s cellphone said Baker had called Paul after killing

Ayden but before contacting police. Detectives questioned Paul but “she was vague in her responses and attempted to deceive the detectives by initially denying specific contact with Baker,” the search warrant said. Baker’s phone history shows Paul had sent Baker “information in regards to establishing conjugal visits with him in prison,” which she initially denied to police, the search warrant says. Relatives of Ayden’s mother, Erin Rideout, previously told the Post-Dispatch that she and Baker had two children together. Baker and Rideout had been together for three years but split up before Ayden’s birth. They shared custody of the boys, and Baker had them at his home for the weekend when Ayden died, according to Erin Rideout’s sister Mary Rideout. “They talked and stayed in touch for their kids,” she said. Mary Rideout has said Baker called her sister the morning of April 8 to report that Ayden wasn’t breathing. “She rushed over there and the ambulance had already taken him away,” she said. Mary Rideout described Baker as quiet and reserved. She said he was good with his sons and never showed any indications that he would hurt either one. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Washington University Medical School has notified patients that their medical information, including diagnosis and treatment plans, may have been exposed to hackers who gained access to employee emails. University officials did not respond to questions Friday about how many patients were notified about the incident. An undisclosed number of Washington University Medical School employees were sent an email Dec. 2, 2016, that was designed to look like a “legitimate email but tricks the recipient into taking some action, such as providing login credentials,” according to a letter sent to patients and posted on the school’s website. The practice is known as “phishing.” Officials said they learned of the incident on

Jan. 24, secured the email accounts and began an investigation. “The investigation could not rule out that an unauthorized third party may have gained access to some employees’ email accounts,” the letter said. Some of the email accounts contained patient information, including patient names, birth dates, diagnosis and treatment plans, and other clinical information, according to the letter, which was sent to patients beginning March 24. Officials said in the letter that they do not believe the patient information had been misused. Patients with questions about the incident are encouraged to call the group’s call center at 844-641-5630. The call center is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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WORLD

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A7

N. Korea signals defiance in missile test Failed launching comes amid diplomatic efforts to dial down tension between U.S., regime ASSOCIATED PRESS SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA • A North Ko-

rean midrange ballistic missile failed shortly after launching Saturday, South Korea and the United States said, the third test-fire flop this month but a clear message of defiance as a U.S. supercarrier conducts drills in nearby waters. North Korean ballistic missile tests are banned by the United Nations because they’re seen as part of the North’s push for a nuclear-tipped missile that can strike the U.S. mainland. The latest test came as U.S. officials pivoted from a hard line to diplomacy at the U.N. in an effort to address what may be Washington’s most pressing current foreign policy challenge. President Donald Trump said on Twitter, “North Korea disrespected the wishes of China & its highly respected President when it launched, though unsuccessfully, a missile today. Bad!” He did not answer reporters’ questions about the missile launching. The timing of the North’s test was striking: Only hours earlier the U.N. Security Council held a ministerial meeting on Pyongyang’s escalating weapons program. North Korean officials boycotted the meeting, which was chaired by U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said in a statement that the missile flew for several minutes and reached a maximum height of 44 miles before it failed. It didn’t immediately provide an estimate on how far the missile flew, but a U.S.

KRT VIA AP VIDEO

This image from video shows North Korean leader Kim Jong Un at a “Combined Fire Demonstration” held Wednesday to celebrate the 85th anniversary of the North’s army.

official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said it was probably a mediumrange KN-17 ballistic missile. It broke up a couple minutes after the launching, and the pieces fell into the Sea of Japan. Analysts say the KN-17 is a new Scudtype missile developed by North Korea. The North fired the same type of missile April 16, a day after a massive parade where it showed off its missile arsenal, but

In Egypt, pope urges rejection of violence in the name of God ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAIRO • Pope Francis demanded that Egypt’s Muslim leaders teach rejection of violence in God’s name during a delicate visit Friday to the Arab world’s most populous country, and he strongly backed Egypt’s uncompromising crackdown on political Islam and militancy. Brushing off security concerns after a series of attacks by Islamic militants on Egypt’s Coptic Christians, Francis rode through Cairo in a simple Fiat with his window rolled down — not the armored “popemobiles” of his predecessors. And at every stop on his first day, he issued variations on the same hard-hitting theme: “No civilized society can be built without repudiating every ideology of evil, violence and extremism that presumes to suppress others and to annihilate diversity by manipulating and profaning the sacred name of God.” Francis strongly backed the government’s response to the growing insurgency led by a local affiliate of Islamic

State, saying Egypt had a unique role in forging peace in the region and in “vanquishing all violence and terrorism.” His main event was a landmark visit to Cairo’s Al-Azhar, the revered, 1,000-year-old seat of Sunni Islam learning that trains clerics and scholars from around the world. There, he warmly embraced Sheikh Ahmed el-Tayeb, Al-Azhar’s grand imam who hosted the pope and other senior Muslim and Christian leaders, students and scholars at a peace conference. Francis reminded the crowd that Egypt’s ancient civilization valued the quest for knowledge and open-minded education, saying a similar commitment was needed today to combat the “barbarity” of religious extremism. While Al-Azhar has strongly condemned Islamic extremism, Egypt’s progovernment media has accused its leadership of failing to do enough to reform religious discourse and purge canonical books of outdated teachings and hatred for non-Muslims.

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U.S. officials called that launching a failure. Earlier launchings were conducted from an eastern coastal area, but the missile Saturday was fired in the west, north of the capital, Pyongyang. North Korea routinely test-fires a variety of ballistic missiles, despite U.N. prohibitions, as part of its weapons development. While shorter-range missiles are somewhat routine, there is strong outside

DIGEST Extremist leader killed in clash with Philippine marines Philippine marines have killed an Abu Sayyaf extremist commander and a notorious kidnapper who had sailed across the sea border into Malaysia to snatch tourists and sailors for ransom, the military chief said Saturday. Military chief Gen. Eduardo Ano said that Alhabsy Misaya was slain in a clash with marines late Friday in the jungles between the towns of Indanan and Parang in Sulu province. He said Misaya’s body was identified by captured Abu Sayyaf militants. Misaya has been blamed for abductions of dozens of Malaysians and Indonesian hostages, including one who was beheaded. The Philippine military has been undertaking a major offensive against the Abu Sayyaf, which is notorious for bombings, ransom kidnappings and beheadings. The group is blacklisted as a terrorist organization by the United States and the Philippines. Medicinal pot a step closer to law in Mexico • Mexico’s lower house overwhelmingly passed a bill Friday approving the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes, the latest in a series of legal changes and court rulings that have somewhat relaxed cannabis laws in Mexico. The measure does not allow smoking marijuana, but directs the Health Department to “design public policies to regulate the medicinal use of this plant and its derivatives.” The bill passed Friday by a 374-7 vote with 11 abstentions allows growing marijuana for medicinal or scientific purposes. The legislation now goes to President Enrique Pena Nieto to be signed into law. Venezuela initiates process to leave OAS • Venezuela formally notified the Organization of American States on Friday of its intention to leave the regional body amid sometimes violent protests at home and international calls for its embattled government to hold delayed elections and release prisoners. Venezuelan interim ambassador Carmen Velasquez submitted a letter announcing the move in Washington to OAS Secretary General Luis Almagro, a critic of socialist

worry about each longer-range North Korean ballistic test. Saturday’s launching comes at a point of particularly high tension. Trump has sent a nuclear-powered submarine and the aircraft supercarrier Carl Vinson to Korean waters, and North Korea this week conducted large-scale, live-fire exercises on its eastern coast. The U.S. and South Korea also started installing a missile defense system that is supposed to be partially operational within days. On Friday, the United States and China offered starkly different strategies for addressing North Korea’s escalating nuclear threat as Tillerson demanded full enforcement of economic sanctions on Pyongyang and urged new penalties. Stepping back from suggestions of U.S. military action, he even offered aid to North Korea if it ends its nuclear weapons program. The range of Tillerson’s suggestions, which over a span of 24 hours also included restarting negotiations, reflected America’s failure to halt North Korea’s nuclear advances despite decades of U.S.-led sanctions, military threats and stop-and-go rounds of diplomatic engagement. As the North approaches the capability to hit the U.S. mainland with a nuclear-tipped missile, the Trump administration feels time is short. No voice at Friday’s session was more important than that of China, a conduit for 90 percent of North Korea’s commerce and a country Trump is pinning hopes on for a peaceful resolution to the nuclear crisis.

President Nicolas Maduro. The notice begins a two-year exit process from a Western Hemisphere bloc that had become a forum for neighbors to exert pressure on Venezuela. The decision to leave the OAS comes amid daily clashes between security forces and anti-government protesters that have left at least 28 people dead and hundreds injured. On Friday, hundreds marched to a military prison outside Caracas to demand the release of jailed activists. The march was part of an intensifying campaign by the opposition to force Maduro from office. Transportation strike turns violent in Brazil • Protesters lit buses on fire, blocked roads and clashed with police on Friday during a general strike that brought transportation to a halt in many cities across Latin America’s largest nation. The strike was to protest changes to labor law and the pension system being considered by Congress, but it was also a display of anger by Brazilians fed up with corruption and worried about the future amid a deep recession and rising unemployment. In Rio de Janeiro, after hours of clashes with police in front of the legislative building, several buses were torched. In Sao Paulo, thousands marched toward the home of President Michel Temer. Temer’s administration argues that more flexible labor rules will revive a moribund economy and warns the pension system will go bankrupt without changes. Quake reported in ‘Ring of Fire’ • A powerful earthquake with a magnitude of 7.2 struck off a southern Philippine province Saturday and prompted a local tsunami warning, but there were no reports of damage or injuries. Renato Solidum of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said the pre-dawn quake was centered at sea off Sarangani province. The quake roused people from sleep, but there were no reports of casualties. Coastal towns were warned of potential small tsunami waves, Solidum said. The Philippines sits on the Pacific “Ring of Fire,” where earthquakes and volcanoes are common. A magnitude 7.7 quake killed nearly 2,000 people in the northern Philippines in 1990. From news services


M 1 Saturday • 04.29.2017 • a8

Midas Hospitality plans Element hotel near SLU

U.S. economy grew at weakest pace in 3 years in first quarter aSSOCIatEd PrESS

By JaCOB BarKEr St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The headquarters of Habitat for Humanity St. Louis will eventually make way for a new Element by Westin hotel, the first in the St. Louis market. Maryland Heights-based Midas Hospitality is buying the Habitat for Humanity’s property at 3763 Forest Park Avenue for $2.4 million with plans to open by late 2019 a $25 million, 153room hotel on the Midtown site. Plans include 10,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor of the hotel and a rooftop lounge in the 8-story building. Guests would have access to a fitness center, pool and “borrowa-bike” program. Midas CEO David Robert said demolition of the current buildings wouldn’t start for nine to 12 months while it continued leasing the property to Habitat for Humanity so the nonprofit has time to find a new spot for its administrative offices, construction warehouse and the ReStore donation center. Habitat put its property on the market in the summer. Midas has been looking at the neighborhood for a couple of years, seeking to capitalize on the area’s momentum. Across Forest Park Avenue, Lawrence Group has begun work on the large City Foundry retail and food hall redevelopment of the former Federal-Mogul industrial site. South of Highway 40 (Interstate 64), Green Street Properties plans to rehab the old Armory building and St. Louis University and SSM Health are building a new, $550 million SLU Hospital. “It was really the market and the demand generators,” Robert said. To the west is the expanding Cortex innovation district, which also includes plans for an Aloft

HANDOUT

Midas Hospitality plans a 153-room Element by Westin hotel on the site of Habitat for Humanity St. Louis’ Forest Park Avenue headquarters.

Hotel. Robert said the Element by Westin brand typically catered to extended-stay guests. Element rooms, for instance, all have full kitchens, and guests stay an average of five nights. The Aloft planned in Cortex, on the other hand, has shorter stays. “The Element guest is a little bit different customer than the Aloft guest, so we think they actually complement each other,” Robert said. The project falls within the footprint of SLU’s new Midtown Redevelopment Corporation, which gives the university broad authority to control what is built around its academic and medical campuses. Approved by the city last year, the redevelopment corporation is similar to entities that guide development in Cortex and around the Washington University Medical Center.

Midas will need to work with SLU on the design of its project and could ask the university for up to 25 years of tax abatement, the maximum SLU can grant within the redevelopment footprint. The hotel project is planned in a portion of the SLU redevelopment area identified as mixed-use and eligible for up to 25 years of tax abatement. Roberts said financing was still being finalized and he had no comment on whether the firm would ask for development incentives. Midas owns and operates 30 hotels in 13 states. Its sister company, MC Hotel Construction, is building the Element. Maplewood-based Gray Design is the architect. Carrolton Bank is financing the project. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

WaSHINGtON • The U.S. economy turned in the weakest performance in three years in the January-March quarter as consumers sharply slowed their spending. The result fell far short of President Donald Trump’s ambitious growth targets and underscores the challenges of accelerating economic expansion. The gross domestic product, the total output of goods and services, grew by just 0.7 percent in the first quarter after a gain of 2.1 percent in the fourth quarter, the Commerce Department reported Friday. The slowdown primarily reflected slower consumer spending, which grew at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 0.3 percent after a growth rate of 3.5 percent in the fourth quarter, the poorest quarterly showing in seven years. Despite the anemic firstquarter performance, the U.S. economy’s prospects for the rest of the year appear solid. A revival in consumer spending, supported by continued strong job growth, accelerating wage gains and record stock levels, is expected to fuel growth. Weakness in the first quarter followed by a stronger expansion in the spring has become a pattern in recent years. The government’s difficulty with seasonal adjustments for the first quarter has been a chronic problem and may have shaved as much as 1 percent off growth this year. The sharp slowdown in consumer spending in the first quarter was attributed to a collection of temporary factors: warmer weather, which shrank spending on heating bills, a drop-off in auto sales after a strong fourth quarter and a delay in sending out tax refund

checks. Sal Guatieri, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets, said he expected consumer and government spending to bounce back, leading to a much stronger second quarter. “Still, the report will mark a rough start to the administration’s high hopes of achieving 3 percent or better growth, not the kind of news it was looking for to cap its first 100 days in office,” Guatieri said in a note to clients. Trump had repeatedly attacked the weak GDP rates during the campaign as an example of the failed economic policies of President Barack Obama’s administration. Trump said his program of tax cuts for individuals and businesses, deregulation and tougher enforcement of trade agreements would double growth to 4 percent or better. In presenting an outline of the administration’s tax proposals on Wednesday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he believed growth above 3 percent would be achievable. Many economists are forecasting growth this year of about 2.2 percent. That would be an improvement from last year’s 1.6 percent, the weakest showing in five years, but far below Trump’s goal. Many analysts believe that the impacts of Trump’s economic program will not be felt until 2018 because they are not expecting Congress to approve some version of Trump’s tax program until late this year. The GDP report released Friday was the first of three estimates the government will make of first-quarter growth. The 0.7 percent increase was the worst showing since GDP contracted by 1.2 percent in the first quarter of 2014.

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It is buying Habitat for Humanity headquarters


MARKET WATCH

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A9

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks ended slightly lower on Wall Street, narrowly missing a fourth record high close this week for the Nasdaq. Phone companies fell the most Friday. Several technology companies bucked the downward trend and moved higher after reporting solid results.

Time

900

900

850

850

Vol.: 3.8m (2.5x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $274.69 b

Futures

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

19,000 18,000 N

D

J

StocksRecap NYSE

NASD

3,549 3,951 1129 1816 162 29

1,910 1,793 1006 1789 147 50

F

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 20987.76 9211.24 707.97 11579.31 6074.04 2393.68 1751.66 24993.35 1419.20

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 17 May 17 May 17

358 945.25 418.50

-4 -.50 +5

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Feeder cattle

2,200

Hogs

2,100

Copper

May 17 Apr 17 May 17 Apr 17 May 17

148.47 138.00 66.97 15.17 259.65

-1.08 +2.40 +.07 -.01 +1.65

2,000

A

LOW 20926.75 9077.34 702.18 11531.89 6040.71 2382.36 1732.10 24867.02 1399.74

ICE

N CLOSE 20940.51 9097.63 704.35 11536.07 6047.61 2384.20 1732.76 24878.48 1400.43

D

J

CHG. -40.82 -96.36 -3.23 -42.44 -1.33 -4.57 -16.65 -77.32 -16.70

F

%CHG. WK -0.19% s -1.05% t -0.46% t -0.37% s -0.02% s -0.19% s -0.95% s -0.31% s -1.18% s

M MO QTR s s t t s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 17 May 17 Jul 17

80.23 131.05 28.58

+.91 +3.95 +.25

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

Jun 17 May 17 May 17 Jun 17

49.33 1.5480 150.40 3.276

+.36 -.0020 -.32 +.037

Cotton

A

Coffee

YTD +5.96% +0.59% +6.78% +4.33% +12.34% +6.49% +4.35% +6.20% +3.19%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

NAME

TKR

TKR

AT&T Inc Aegion Corp Amdocs Ameren Corp American Railcar ABInBev Arch Coal Avadel Pharma Bank of America Belden Inc Boeing Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres Inc. Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp. Charter Citigroup Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy FutureFuel General Motors Home Depot Huttig Building Prod

T 36.10 43.89 39.63 -.28 -0.7 -6.8 +8.1 15 1.96 Isle of Capri AEGN 17.18 26.68 22.82 -.85 -3.6 -3.7 +10.0 25 ... LMI Aerospace DOX 54.12 62.65 61.24 -.26 -0.4 +5.1 +8.8 17 0.88f Lee Ent AEE 46.30 56.57 54.69 -.34 -0.6 +4.3 +20.1 20 1.76 Lowes ARII 35.43 51.10 41.95 -1.19 -2.8 -7.4 +4.9 11 1.60 Mallinckrodt plc BUD 98.28 136.08 113.24 +1.01 +0.9 +7.4 -9.5 3.19e MasterCard ARCH 59.05 86.47 70.24 +.29 +0.4 -10.0 ... dd ... McDonald’s AVDL 8.61 15.45 9.49 -.33 -3.4 -8.7 -18.7 dd ... Monsanto Co BAC 12.05 25.80 23.34 -.31 -1.3 +5.6 +59.3 15 0.30f Olin BDC 54.97 81.33 69.70 -1.53 -2.1 -6.8 +9.7 13 0.20 Panera Bread BA 122.35 185.71 184.83 +1.61 +0.9 +18.7 +37.1 21 5.68f Peabody Energy BBW 8.05 15.85 10.40 +.80 +8.3 -24.4 -25.6 34 ... Peak Resorts CAL 21.27 36.61 28.82 +.02 +0.1 -12.2 +11.1 14 0.28 Perficient CASS 46.06 74.83 66.47 +.57 +0.9 -9.7 +31.2 30 0.92 Post Holdings CNC 50.00 75.57 74.40 +1.45 +2.0 +31.7 +11.4 17 ... ReinsGrp CHTR 214.06 350.38 345.16 -3.64 -1.0 +19.9 +52.8 22 ... Reliv C 38.31 62.53 59.12 -.27 -0.5 -0.5 +26.9 12 0.64 Spire Inc CBSH 42.44 60.61 54.95 -1.10 -2.0 -4.9 +26.3 20 0.90b Stifel Financial EPC 69.63 88.00 71.49 -.14 -0.2 -2.1 -12.3 27 ... EMR 48.45 64.36 60.28 -.55 -0.9 +8.1 +11.5 24 1.92 Supervalu Inc. ENR 41.62 60.07 59.23 -.29 -0.5 +32.8 +38.4 22 1.10 Target Corp. EFSC 25.76 46.25 42.25 -1.35 -3.1 -1.7 +61.7 18 0.44 UPS B ESE 37.32 60.95 58.85 -1.45 -2.4 +3.9 +54.8 35 0.32 US Bancorp ESRX 57.80 80.02 61.34 -.06 -0.1 -10.8 -19.3 10 ... US Steel FELP 1.34 8.33 5.21 +.09 +1.8 -19.5+148.5 dd 0.68m Verizon FF 9.77 16.58 15.46 -.35 -2.2 +11.2 +61.4 12 0.24a WalMart GM 27.34 38.55 34.64 +.10 +0.3 -0.6 +12.1 6 1.52 Walgreen Boots HD 119.20 156.27 156.10 -.02 ... +16.4 +17.2 24 3.56f Wells Fargo HBP 4.29 9.24 8.80 -.23 -2.5 +33.1 +96.3 7 ... World Point Term.

ISLE

14.30

LMIA

7.01

27.04 23.06

-6.6 +55.2 14

... ...

3.92

2.60

-.06 -0.3

LEE

1.74 64.87

85.76 84.88

8

...

-.39 -0.5 +19.3 +12.6 21

-.20 -7.1 -10.3 +28.4

1.40

85.83 46.92 +.54 +1.2

MNK

41.57

MA

86.65 117.31 116.32

-.78 -0.7 +12.7 +19.9 33

-5.8 -29.1

0.88

...

MCD

110.33 142.79 139.93

-.94 -0.7 +15.0 +12.7 26

3.76

MON

88.76 117.33 116.61 +.11 +0.1 +10.8 +26.2 21

2.16

OLN

18.24

0.80

33.88 32.13

-.45 -1.4 +25.5 +50.1 49

PNRA 185.69 316.21 312.68

-.71 -0.2 +52.5 +46.9 47

...

BTU

-.80 -3.1

...

22.61

28.62 25.41

3.02

PRFT

14.15

22.66 17.42

POST

68.76

89.04 84.19 +.04

...

+4.7 +17.2 46

...

RGA

90.26 132.79 125.04 -4.55 -3.5

-0.6 +35.3 14

1.64

55.37

5.60

6.37

SR

59.54

71.21 68.55

SF

28.49

56.62 48.87

SVU

3.20

TGT

52.72

UPS

5.74

4.10

80.51 55.85

...

...

SKIS

3.84

6.20

-7.8

...

+0.9 +85.2 dd

0.28

-.15 -0.9

-0.4 -17.6 25

...

-.21 -3.2 +37.3 +20.5 -.70 -1.0 ...

...

...

+6.2 +10.7 20

2.10

-2.2 +43.2 19

...

-.07 -1.7 -12.2 -24.2

7

...

-.24 -0.4 -22.7 -29.8 11

2.40

100.05 120.44 107.46 -1.37 -1.3

McBride proposes 549-lot subdivision • Plans are in the works for a 549-lot subdivision just south of Eureka in Jefferson County. Chesterfield-based McBride & Son Homes is seeking to develop 173 acres as single-family homes, according to a report from the Jefferson County Planning Division. The 549-lot subdivision called Windswept would be just west of the Mirasol subdivision, a 350-lot subdivision that McBride also developed. The property is at Highway 109 and Highway W. Single-family home permits in Jefferson County have jumped this year. There were 184 singlefamily building permits issued in the first quarter of 2017, compared to 118 in the first quarter of 2016, according to the Home Builders Association of St. Louis and Eastern Missouri. Meanwhile, permit numbers are running at about the same pace as last year in St. Louis and St. Charles counties. McBride & Son also recently announced plans for a 223-house subdivision in Chesterfield, and next month it is scheduled to open a 102-home subdivision in Maryland Heights. FTC approves Emerson’s acquisition of Pentair with conditions • The Federal Trade Commission gave its blessing on Friday to Ferguson-based Emerson’s acquisition of industrial valve manufacturer Pentair PLC on condition that it sells Pentair’s switchbox business to Crane Co. The requirement was aimed at easing competitive concerns. The FTC said Emerson, a factory automation equipment maker, and Pentair together control 60 percent of the U.S. switchbox market. The agreement is subject to a 30-day comment period, after which the FTC said it would decided whether to make the proposed consent order final. GM earnings hit record • General Motors CEO Mary Barra said Friday that the automaker’s first-quarter results showed the company’s strategy of focusing on profitable areas and pulling back on others was making a

difference. The automaker’s profits soared 33 percent during the first three months of the year to $2.6 billion — a first-quarter record for the company since it emerged from bankruptcy in 2009. That compares with $1.93 billion GM earned during the same period a year ago. The profits are notable because industry sales in North America are beginning to fall after a seven-year period of sustained growth. During the first quarter, the automaker’s performance translated into earnings of $1.70 per share, easily beating Wall Street’s expectations. Analysts, on average, thought GM would earn $1.48 per share. Apple, Qualcomm patent feud heats up • Apple is refusing to pay any royalties owed to mobile chip maker Qualcomm for some of the features in the iPhone, escalating a patent feud that has turned the former business partners into bitter adversaries. The latest twist in the dispute represents a major blow for Qualcomm, which depends on licensing fees for a large portion of its revenue. Apple’s decision to withhold royalties will cost Qualcomm up to $500 million in the current quarter alone, based on revised revenue estimates that Qualcomm released Friday. As retaliation, Qualcomm could seek a court order halting iPhone sales until Apple pays the royalties that Qualcomm contends it’s owed, Moorhead said. Time says it’s not for sale • Shares of Time Inc. fell 17 percent on Friday after the magazine publisher said it would not sell itself but instead pursue a strategic plan to boost growth. The decision ended months of speculation about a potential buyout and brings into focus the company’s efforts to revitalize its stagnating revenue. The strategic plan will include revamping its cost structure and focusing on its digital business, the publishing company said. From staff and wire reports

4.00 3.50 3.50

38.48

56.61 51.28

-.64 -1.2

-0.2 +21.8 15

1.12

INDEX

X

12.77

41.83 22.32

-.92 -4.0 -32.4 +26.6 dd

0.20

VZ

46.01

56.95 45.91

-.76 -1.6 -14.0

2.31

WMT

62.72

75.77 75.18

-.26 -0.3

WBA

75.74

88.00 86.54 +.65 +0.8

+4.6 +7.1 18

1.50

WFC

43.55

59.99 53.84

-.60 -1.1

-2.3 +9.9 13

1.52

WPT

14.25

17.90 16.70

-.01 -0.1

+0.9 +16.5 16

1.20

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

-5.3 11

.0648 .7470 .3148 1.2903 .7342 .1451 1.0882 .0156 .2753 .008990 .052511 .0175 .0748 .000882 1.0064

PreciousMetals Silver

+1.40 -.08 -.10

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.80 .97 1.07 1.27 1.81 2.29 2.96

... ... +0.01 +0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01

.21 .39 .55 .79 1.29 1.83 2.68

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

.88 .38 .38

CHG

CLOSE

1266.10 17.19 948.70

Gold

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.46 -0.01

...

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.58 -0.02

...

Barclays USAggregate

2.54 -0.02 2.20

Barclays US High Yield 5.66 +0.01 7.53 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.87 -0.01 3.59

Barclays US Corp

3.25 -0.01 3.12

10-Yr. TIPS

.36 -0.01

.09

GlobalMarkets

USB

+8.8 +11.6 17 2.04f

PREV

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Camping World-led group wins auction for Gander Mountain Fate of the retailer’s three St. Louis-area stores is unknown REUTERS

The largest U.S. recreational vehicle dealer, Camping World Holdings Inc., and a group of liquidators won a bankruptcy auction for sporting goods retailer Gander Mountain Co. on Friday, according to a bankruptcy court filing. The value of the winning bid was about $390 million, according to people familiar with the matter who requested anonymity to discuss the details of the auction results. The Camping World-led group bested a going-concern bid for Gander Mountain from rival Sportsman’s Warehouse Holdings Inc., the sources said. Camping World, which is run by Marcus Lemonis, a star on CNBC TV’s reality show “The Profit,” plans to operate at least 17 Gander Mountain stores as a going concern, the sources said.

An auction for Gander Mountain’s remaining more than 100 leases will be held later, the sources said. It is not known what will happen with the three Gander Mountain stores in the St. Louis area. Those stores are in Fenton, Chesterfield and O’Fallon, Ill. The consortium also won all of Gander Mountain’s intellectual property and its Overton’s boating business, the sources said. Gander Mountain, which is based in St. Paul, Minn., bills itself as “America’s Firearm Superstore.” Gander Mountain declined to comment, and Lincolnshire, Ill.based Camping World did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The auction results will require final approval from a U.S. bankruptcy court judge. Gander Mountain filed for bankruptcy in March with a plan to quickly sell itself after struggling with excess inventory and

seeing its approximately 160 stores underperform. It listed assets and liabilities each worth up to $1 billion. Within the retail sector, sporting goods is going through a period of consolidation and distress. Gander Mountain competitors, including Sports Authority Inc. and Eastern Mountain Sports, also have filed for bankruptcy. Financially healthy rivals Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s Inc. plan to merge this year in an approximately $5 billion deal. Camping World, which has 120 R.V. SuperCenters across the U.S., raised $251 million last fall in an initial public offering. Camping World sees synergies between its business, Gander Mountain and Overton’s, one of the people said.

Used-car retailer Carvana’s shares skid in market debut REUTERS

Shares of Carvana Co., which uses vending machine-like towers to sell used cars, plunged in their debut on Friday, closing down 26 percent. The company’s shares, which were priced at $15, opened at $13.50, giving the company a market value of about $2 billion. They ended the day at $11.10. Carvana sells cars through its website and allows customers to pick them up from automated “vending machine” towers situated in U.S. cities such as Austin and Dallas in Texas, and Nashville, Tenn. The company announced its expansion into St. Louis two weeks ago.

The company’s IPO comes amid mounting evidence that the six-year recovery in the U.S. auto industry may be losing steam. Industry officials and Wall Street analysts have raised concerns that values for used sedans were dropping as more vehicles were turned in when leases ended. Founded in 2013, Carvana is one of a handful of companies trying to disrupt how cars are traditionally bought in dealerships and to take on Carmax Inc., the largest used-car retailer in the United States. However, Carvana stands to benefit from consumers’ increasing comfort with buying vehicles online.

TrueCar Inc., an online service that matches car buyers with dealers, has seen its shares nearly double since their debut in May 2014. Carvana’s sales surged ninefold in 2014, more than tripled in 2015, and nearly tripled in 2016 to $365.1 million. However, the company’s net loss widened to $93.1 million in 2016 from $36.8 million in 2015 as it invests heavily in growth. The company sold all the 15 million shares in the offering, raising about $2 billion. Carvana is backed by DriveTime Automotive Group, a network of used-car dealerships and car refurbishment centers.


J O I N T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N

A P L AC E F O R N E W S A N D V I E W S O N FA I T H

W W W . S T L T O D A Y. C O M / R E L I G I O N

M 1 Saturday • 04.29.2017 • a10

JUDGMENT DAY?

TRUMP AND RELIGION AT THE FIRST 100 DAYS funds to a religious organization through a grant for playground equipment. Its implications are vast — a ruling in favor of Trinity Lutheran could lead to government funding of religious schools through school voucher programs, which Trump favors. A decision is expected in late June.

By KIMBErLy WINStON Religion News Service

This Saturday marks the end of that artificial construct between politics and media known as the “first 100 days.” Though both sides agree the period is essentially meaningless, neither is willing to ignore it. One thing that is clear so far: White evangelical Christians, who helped put Donald Trump in the White House and who will be affected by many of his policies, both promised and delivered, remain his staunchest allies. Three-fourths of them approve of his actions to date, according to the Pew Research Center. That is nearly twice as high as the president’s approval rating among the general public, which hovers just below 40 percent. Here’s a look at Trump’s accomplishments in his first 100 days in office as they relate to religion and people of faith.

tHE JOHNSON aMENdMENt

Candidate Trump pledged to repeal a 1954 law that prohibits religious institutions from campaigning for political candidates. President Trump placed that promise front and center in one of his first official appearances. “I will get rid of, totally destroy the Johnson Amendment and allow our representatives of faith to speak freely and without fear,” Trump told 3,500 faith leaders, politicians and global dignitaries at his first National Prayer Breakfast on Feb. 2. “I will do that, remember.” Conservative faith-based groups, including the Alliance Defending Freedom, cheered. Others wanted nothing to do with politics in the pulpit; about 100 faith-based organizations, including many Jewish and Baptist groups, sent a letter to Congress urging it to keep the amendment.

IMMIGratION aNd rEFuGEES

As a candidate, Trump called for a ban on all Muslims entering the U.S. As a newly minted president, he signed an executive order that temporarily suspended entry of refugees to the U.S., halted the entry of Syrian refugees entirely and restricted travel by residents of several predominantly Muslim countries.

aBOrtION rEStrICtIONS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump speaks Tuesday on Capitol Hill at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s National Days of Remembrance ceremony.

The order also gave priority to refugees claiming religious persecution, which Trump promised in an interview with Christian media would reward “persecuted Christian” refugees. Some faith-based religious liberty groups were ecstatic. Many have long held that Christians are among the most persecuted religious groups in the world — a claim many others dispute. Other religious groups that work with refugees were thrown into chaos. World Relief announced layoffs and the closing of several offices, as did Church World Service. Judges blocked that first order — and a second one issued on March 6 — on the grounds, partly, that it discriminated on the basis of religion. Trump’s administration is appealing the rulings.

MISStEPS ON JEWISH MattErS

In January, the new administration raised eyebrows when its official statement on International Holocaust Remembrance Day (Jan. 27) failed to mention the Jews. Then came further missteps: The president, under pressure to denounce antiSemitism after several white supremacist groups and leaders endorsed him, did so

only belatedly; press secretary Sean Spicer wrongly asserted Hitler never used chemical weapons in his “Holocaust centers”; Sebastian Gorka, a Trump adviser, has ties to anti-Semitic groups. But this week, at an observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day held in the Capitol rotunda, Trump seemed to hit the reset button: “Two out of every 3 Jews in Europe were murdered in the genocide,” Trump said in his remarks to Holocaust survivors and dignitaries. “… Those who deny the Holocaust are an accomplice to this horrible evil.”

SuPrEME COurt PICK

When Neil Gorsuch became an associate justice on April 17, he fulfilled the president’s promise to fill the Supreme Court seat left vacant by Antonin Scalia’s death. Michael Farris, president of Alliance Defending Freedom, a Christian legal organization, said Gorsuch would “affirm our most fundamental freedom — religious liberty.” Farris’ prediction was tested in Gorsuch’s first week when justices heard oral arguments in Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Comer. The case centers on whether the state may provide

One of Trump’s first actions as president was to reinstate the Ronald Reagan-era “Mexico City policy” barring U.S. aid to overseas health care providers that include abortion as a family planning option. The move was seen as a reward to conservative religious groups. The Susan B. Anthony List made the reinstatement of the Mexico City policy, also referred to as the gag rule, one of its six “pro-life accomplishments made by the Trump Administration in the first 100 days.” Also on the SBAL’s list are the “strong pro-life appointments to key positions” of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, presidential counselor Kellyanne Conway and Gorsuch.

rELIGIOuS LIBErty OrdEr

One of Trump’s main campaign promises — and one many religious leaders rallied around — was to “restore” religious liberty. Many pundits considered this a political “dog whistle” — a signal to Trump’s conservative Christian base that he would scale back protections under Barack Obama for LGBTQ Americans. This week, 51 Republican lawmakers urged the president to sign an executive order that would do just that, according to USA Today. They want the president to roll back workplace protections for LGBTQ workers, eliminate the contraceptive mandate requiring religious organizations to provide birth control in their health insurance plans and repeal the Johnson Amendment, among other things. More than 400 religious leaders sent the president a letter in early February asking him not to sign a similar executive order then in the works. The president did not, and this week, a White House official told USA Today that “some sort of policy to protect religious liberty is still in the works, but that the president is trying to find middle ground.”

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SATURDAy • 04.29.2017 • A11 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

Short takes

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

POSTCARD FROM MOUND CITy • By DAN MARTIN

Park and pay ... and pay

Two transportation development districts on Washington Avenue didn’t pass state Auditor Nicole Galloway’s smell test, so the St. Louis Development Corp. is going to investigate further. Galloway says an audit of the districts shows they were collecting sales tax at Washington Avenue businesses to pay for public parking lots, but then charging the public an additional fee to use them. One of the districts, formed to provide access to the 1100 Washington Avenue parking lot next to the Vangard Lofts, is led by representatives of Kansas Citybased Maxus Properties. The other, the 1225 Washington Avenue district, collects sales taxes to pay for a gated parking lot north of the Washington and 13th Street intersection. It is made up of representatives of McGowan Brothers property developers. Otis Williams, executive director of the SLDC, said his agency and the St. Louis mayor’s office will investigate the districts and try to determine how to manage them better. St. Louis taxpayers would appreciate that. Paying for parking is one thing. Paying twice is a rip-off.

El Chapo, prison reformer Joaquín Guzmán Loera, the Mexican drug lord known as “El Chapo,” is unhappy with his living conditions, The New York Times reports. He has been confined at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York City since January, after he was recaptured and extradited from Mexico after his latest escape from a Mexican prison. U.S. authorities say that Guzman’s history of escapes and of running his drug operation from inside prison make it necessary to keep him locked down tight. So he’s behind bars for 23 hours a day and never gets outdoors. A solitary hour a day in the recreation room is the best he can expect. He’s allowed no visitors, except for his lawyers, whom he keeps busy filing motions for relief. One motion seeks bottled water, because Guzman complains tap water hurts his throat. Others are more serious, including one that asks a judge to allow Amnesty International representatives to visit the prison to judge its conditions. It’s hard to feel sympathy for a man who may be responsible for thousands of deaths in Mexico’s ongoing drug wars. But it should be possible to keep someone confined without sinking to his level.

Down and (fake) dirty On Tuesday, a not-so-fashion-forward Twitter user discovered that Nordstrom is selling fake-muddied blue jeans. For $425. The jeans, made by fashion company Prps, also have been for sale at Saks and Neiman Marcus for a while, but they didn’t become a thing until Twitter discovered them on the Nordstrom website. There it says the jeans “embody rugged Americana workwear that’s seen some hard-working action with a crackled, caked-on muddy coating that shows you’re not afraid to get down and dirty.” The rugged Americana workwear is made in Japan and China. Mike Rowe, who works at tough jobs a day at a time on the TV reality show “Dirty Jobs,” called the jeans “something to foster the illusion of work. The illusion of effort. Or perhaps, for those who actually buy them, the illusion of sanity.” Thus did a fake working man call out fake-muddy jeans. Only in America.

Free speech, even for Ann Coulter We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: Free speech is a two-way street. Regardless of how college-campus progressives might feel about the firebrand conservatism of Ann Coulter, that doesn’t give them a right to threaten, bully and terrorize her into silence. She was scheduled to speak at the University of California at Berkeley on Thursday, but an earlier postponement because of security threats, and continued threats Thursday, prompted her to stay away. The hard-line left must understand: The First Amendment only works when it applies equally to all points of view, not just the ones you agree with.

Opiate of the masses, literally A Missouri appeals court had little trouble ruling on a defendant’s claim that his religious calling required him to heal “the sick, lost, blind, lame, deaf and dead members of God’s kingdom” by selling heroin to them. Just as the original trial judge summarily rejected the ridiculous claim by Timothy Anderson that he sold heroin out of a “sincerely held religious belief,” the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals didn’t buy the argument either. A 27-year prison sentence will help Anderson rethink his justification for helping fill the ranks of the sick, lost and dead with his heroin sales.

Ride and rate As Missouri gives the green light to ride-hailing companies such as Uber and Lyft, allowing them to operate free from much local regulation, St. Louis taxicab companies want a level playing field. It’s understandable that cab companies don’t want to pay license and meter inspection fees or set caps on charges when the competition doesn’t. But the part about extensive fingerprint background checks for taxi drivers but not for Uber and Lyft drivers is a concern. Uber and Lyft are app-based services that allow users to immediately rate drivers. While not a foolproof method to ensure good drivers, Uber drivers suffer serious consequences, including deactivation by the company, if their ratings dip. That technology is unavailable for rating taxicab drivers. A passenger can call the company or use social media to post about a driver, but that is not as reliable a method as the one used by ride-hailing companies. Until that’s available for cab passengers, continuing to use extensive fingerprint background checks will help ensure rider safety.

dmartin@post-dispatch.com

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Do not condemn pit bulls because of human mismanagement I want to tell Jessica Loh how sorry I am that her dog died so brutally (“Turn the tide on laws that favor the beasts,” April 26). Losing a pet is devastating, but watching your dog be attacked is unbearable. However, her commentary was biased, used inflammatory language and gave inadequate proof of her assertion, “Pit bulls devastate lives or end them.” Thousands of pit bulls live in the U.S., and they are not killing anyone. I volunteer in a shelter that rescues pit bulls and other dogs. If I want to see a dog smile, give me a kiss that will soak my face, or roll over for a tummy rub, I visit the pitties. The attack on Loh’s dog was instigated by a bad owner who did not control his dogs and lied to the authorities. Pit bull attacks have not “tremendously increased all over the United States.” Loh uses as a source a group that relies on media accounts of dog attacks. Media people are not dog experts. Not every dog who looks like a pit bull, has a big head or is muscular is a pittie. Boxers and certain terriers are often mistaken for pit bulls. The only way to identify a true pit bull is to do a DNA test. Pit bulls were originally bred to be “nanny dogs” to watch over children on the farm. Today pit bulls work as search and rescue dogs, therapy dogs, service dogs and police dogs. Temperament evaluations by the American Temperament Test Society give pit bull terriers a passing rate of 82.6 percent. The average passing rate for the other 121 breeds of dogs tested was 77 percent. No dog of any breed should be condemned out of prejudice, misinformation or human mismanagement. Patricia Noland • Ballwin

Missouri should not expand Medicaid managed care Missouri stands on the brink of prematurely expanding Medicaid managed care statewide. It does so through a process that raises many red flags. The Missouri Legislature in 2015 used the appropriations process to expand managed care, rather than a bill with public hearings. Gov. Jay Nixon wrote in a veto letter on a different budget bill, “It is well-settled that ‘to inject general legislation of any sort into an appropriation act is repugnant to the constitution.’ ” He raised no objection, however, to statewide managed care. The chairman of Senate Appropriations in 2015 advocated statewide managed care. He also was the recipient of several large campaign donations from managed care insurance companies. That senator’s chief of staff is now executive director of the Missouri Association of Health Plans, which represents the managed care companies operating in our state. Too often in Missouri, those who legislate in specific issue areas or who regulate certain industries become well-paid executives in those companies shortly after leaving government employment. This kind of action feeds the public perception of corruption, and voters have been demanding change. One of the managed care companies that may soon receive customers from our state has not submitted an annual access plan to the Department of Insurance to show they have an adequate

network statewide. They may technically not be bound to do so by law since they did not have managed care clients in Missouri as of Jan. 1, 2017. However, is it prudent to allow a company to have access to millions of taxpayer dollars without demonstrating an adequate network? The Missouri HealthNet Oversight Committee has voted multiple times against statewide expansion of managed care, but the Department of Social Services has doggedly moved forward. Given all these danger signals, Missouri should reverse course instead of endangering vulnerable patients. Sen. Rob Schaaf • R-St. Joseph Jeanette Mott Oxford • Jefferson City Executive director, Empower Missouri

Explain rationale for supporting women’s right to choose In the editorial reporting that the Democratic Party will not officially support any Democrat candidate who opposes abortion rights (“Circular firing squad,” April 25), the Post-Dispatch acknowledges, “This newspaper has a long history of advocating a woman’s right to choose.” What one rarely, if ever, hears from abortionrights advocates is what do they believe the entity in the womb to be? Is the fetus an innocent human being? If so, what is the intellectual and/or moral justification for its destruction? Or, is the fetus not a human being? This position seems to be scientifically contradicted by the fetus’s DNA, the unique and exclusive hallmark of a human being that is identifiable from the moment of conception. Or, as some argue, whether the fetus is human or not cannot be known, thus leaving its fate solely up to the mother. Moral relativism? When a newspaper takes a position on an issue that always involves life and death, it is incumbent on it to explain to its readers its rationale on the core issue. John Wiltrakis • Ballwin

Paper actually runs a cartoon critical of Democrats Mark down April 27, 2017, on the calendar. The Post-Dispatch ran an editorial cartoon that was kind of anti-Democrat. Didn’t think I would ever see this happen, when they showed something like this. I am shocked and surprised. Bill Reed • St. Charles

Try other solutions instead of tax credit for poor families Regarding the commentary “Provide Missouri’s families tools they need to move ahead” (April 25) by Orvin Kimbrough of United Way of Greater St. Louis: Missouri does not need an earned income tax credit. Illinois has it and it has not helped, plus that state is in terrible financial crisis. But that is not why I am against the EITC for our state. It would not lift people or families out of poverty. Families with children under the age of 17 are already getting $1,000 per child from the federal government plus the federal EITC of thousands of dollars. Some people get $6,000 or $7,000 refunds, or more. The issue is when they get this huge chunk of money, they do not know how to budget it or handle it for the whole year. If you want to help, offer free financial counseling, more daycare services. These families do not need handouts of money. And Missouri does not need EITC. Another government entitlement program is not what the good people of Missouri need either. Children in these families do not need to grow up expecting government handouts. B. Philipp • Bridgeton Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial E-MAIL MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, letters@post-dispatch.com 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


NEWS

A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

Congress settles for a 1-week spending bill Stopgap measure offers time to negotiate longer-term deal; health care overhaul stalls BY ERICA WERNER AND ALAN FRAM Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Congress took

the easy way out to keep the government open on the eve of Donald Trump’s 100th day in office, passing a weeklong stopgap spending bill Friday. Lawmakers cleared the measure easily with just hours to spare before the shutdown deadline at midnight. But with Trump marking his presidency’s milestone Saturday, he did not wring any major legislation out of Congress, despite a renewed White House push to revive the House GOP’s health care bill in time for a vote that could give him bragging rights. House leaders are still short of votes for the revised health bill, though they could bring it to the floor next week if they find the support they need. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said the plan was to pass the bill “as soon as possible.”

Also next week lawmakers plan to pass a $1 trillion package financing the government through Sept. 30, the end of the 2017 fiscal year. The temporary spending bill keeps the government functioning through next Friday, to allow lawmakers time to wrap up negotiations on the larger measure. The Senate sent the stopgap bill to Trump by voice vote Friday after the House approved it by a lopsided 382-30 margin. “Today’s measure shows the American people that we are making a good-faith effort to keep our government open,” said Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas. “While this is not ideal, I support this effort to provide our colleagues with more time to reach a final agreement on legislation to fund the government through the fiscal year.” The fight over both bills was embarrassing to the GOP, which has Trump in the White House and majorities in Congress. Yet even with unified control,

NRA’s ‘champion in the White House’ vows his support for group

ASSOCIATED PRESS

it’s proving an uphill fight for Republicans to make good on seven years’ worth of promises to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, former President Barack Obama’s health care law. “I’m disappointed that it doesn’t go quicker,” Trump said of his interactions with Congress, in an interview that aired Friday on Fox News Channel. At least 18 Republicans, most of them moderates, said they opposed the health care legislation, and many others remained publicly uncommitted. That puts party elders in an uncomfortable spot because if 22 Republicans defect, the bill will fail, assuming all Democrats oppose it. House Speaker Paul Ryan, RWis., wants to avoid an encore of last month’s embarrassment, when he abruptly canceled a vote on a health care overhaul because of opposition from moderates and conservatives alike. Republicans have recast the health bill to let states escape a requirement under the 2010 ACA

that insurers charge healthy and seriously ill customers the same rates. The overall legislation would cut the Medicaid program for the poor, eliminate the ACA’s fines for people who don’t buy insurance and provide skimpier subsidies. Centrist Republicans were the primary target of lobbying by the White House and GOP leaders. Meanwhile negotiations moved ahead on the longer-term spending bill, which would fund the day-to-day operations of virtually every federal agency. Most core decisions about agency budgets have been worked out, but policy issues — such as a Democratic request to help the cash-strapped government of Puerto Rico with its Medicaid burden — are hold-ups. Democrats denied Trump a win on obtaining an initial down payment for his often-promised border wall with Mexico, while anti-abortion lawmakers steered clear of even attempting to use the measure to try to cut off fed-

Obama order limiting drilling off U.S. coasts reversed by president

ASSOCIATED PRESS

eral funds for Planned Parenthood. But Trump and defense hawks have procured a $15 billion infusion for the Pentagon and funds for border security such as detention beds for people entering the country illegally. Republicans also are pressing for policy wins on blocking environmental regulations such as Obama’s major expansion of the Clean Water Act. But Democrats, whose votes are needed to pass the measure, are pushing back. Democrats praised a $2 billion funding increase for the National Institutes of Health — rejecting steep cuts proposed by Trump — as well as additional funds to combat opioid abuse and fund Pell Grants for summer school. A provision extending health care for 22,000 retired Appalachian coal miners and their families had yet to be finalized.

Immigration groups seize upon May Day to fight Trump’s policies

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump speaks to NRA members Friday at their convention in Atlanta. He is the first sitting president to address the group since Ronald Reagan.

This offshore oil drilling platform, seen in 2009, is near Santa Barbara, Calif. President Donald Trump wants to make more federal waters eligible for drilling.

Artemio Arreola, of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights, addresses supporters in Chicago on April 24. The group plans to march Monday in Chicago.

WASHINGTON POST

WASHINGTON POST

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTA • On the eve of his 100th day in office, Presi-

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Friday that aims to expand offshore drilling in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans, as well as assess whether energy exploration can take place in marine sanctuaries in the Pacific and Atlantic. The “America-First Offshore Energy Strategy” will make millions of acres of federal waters eligible for oil and gas leasing, just four months after President Barack Obama withdrew these areas from potential development. In late December, Obama used a little-known provision in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to bar energy exploration in large portions of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas, and a string of canyons in the Atlantic stretching from Massachusetts to Virginia. At the signing, Trump emphasized that the U.S. had abundant offshore oil and gas reserves, “but the federal government has kept 94 percent of these offshore areas closed for exploration and production, and when they say closed, they mean closed.” Still, even Trump administration officials said it would take years to rewrite federal leasing plans and open up areas to drilling. And global energy prices may deter investors from moving ahead with additional drilling in the Arctic Ocean in the near term. Vice President Mike Pence described the order as “an important step toward American energy independence” that would generate additional U.S. jobs. Environmental groups decried the policy shift as reckless and possibly illegal. Kristen Miller, interim executive director of the Alaska Wilderness League, said in a statement: “In no point in history has a president challenged another administration’s permanent withdrawals. Trump’s action could set a dangerous precedent, which will only undermine the powers of the office of the president.” Jamie Williams, of the Wilderness Society, said that when it came to the Arctic, “the chance of a tragic spill in those remote, icy waters is simply too high, and the impacts to marine life and the pristine coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge could be devastating.” He said the order “amounts to another brazen power grab for the oil lobby” that would be opposed.

CHICAGO • Immigrant groups and their allies have joined forces to carry out marches, rallies and protests in cities nationwide next week to mark May Day, saying there’s renewed momentum to fight back against polices of President Donald Trump’s administration. Activists in major cities including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles expect tens of thousands of people to participate in Monday’s demonstrations, starting with morning neighborhood protests and culminating in rush-hour events downtown. Activists also plan an overnight vigil in Phoenix, a farm workers demonstration outside Miami and a rally near the White House. In Seattle, pro-immigrant events are expected to give way to rowdier, anti-capitalist marches led by protesters who said they planned to shut down a freeway. “We’re seeing an unprecedented amount of enthusiasm and activity,” said New York Immigration Coalition executive director Steven Choi. “It’s driven by the fact that the Trump administration has made immigration the tip of the spear.” Around the world, union members have traditionally marched on May 1 for workers’ rights. In the United States, the event became a rallying point for immigrants in 2006 when more than 1 million people marched against a proposed immigration enforcement bill. Though the climate surrounding immigration may be similar to 2006 amid Trump’s hard-line views on it, the immigrant rights movement has changed since then. Advocacy groups that in 2006 were united in determination to flood the streets to make a statement have fractured since then and pursued other efforts, such as voter registration, lobbying and fighting deportations. However, activists expect a surge this year, in part because immigrant rights groups have worked with Women’s March participants, Black Lives Matter and Muslim civil rights groups who are united by opposition to Trump. Also, businesses with immigrant ties are allowing employees to take the day off without penalty. Trump has aggressively pursued immigration enforcement, including executive orders for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and a ban on travelers from six predominantly Muslim countries.

dent Donald Trump made a triumphant return before members of the National Rifle Association, promising a group that was one of his earliest and most enthusiastic supporters that he will “never infringe on the right of the people to bear arms.” “Freedom is not a gift from government, freedom is a gift from God,” Trump said. Trump, the first sitting president to address the NRA since Ronald Reagan, delivered a fiery speech in which he recounted his election victory and early actions from his administration that are friendly to the gun rights group, and he promised there would be more to come. “You came through big for me, and I am going to come through for you,” Trump told thousands of members attending the NRA’s annual convention. “The eight-year assault on your Second Amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end. You have a true friend and champion in the White House.” Trump marked the coming 100-day milestone in much the same way he has governed thus far: by appealing to his base. While his job approval numbers have been low, Trump’s most enthusiastic supporters are standing by him, polls show. The NRA claims 5 million members, including many white rural voters, a demographic that helped tip the electoral college in Trump’s favor. And many of its members were visibly elated by Trump’s speech Friday. NRA chief lobbyist Chris Cox recalled the group’s endorsement at its convention last year, saying Trump was “the most proudly Second Amendment nominee in American history.” In the months ahead, the NRA will be looking for Trump to put the weight of his office behind a bill that would make concealed-carry permits valid across state lines. Trump endorsed the concept during the campaign.Trump’s speech brought a rebuke from Gabrielle Giffords, a former Democratic congresswoman who survived a 2012 attack and has become an outspoken gun control advocate. A large anti-NRA protest featuring Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., is scheduled here for Saturday.

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NEWS

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

WEATHER • Low 59, High 72• Winds E/SE 8-17 mph Wet weekend

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

Showers/ storms likely

Chance of storms

Chance of storms

Storms likely

62°

66°

71°

69°

77 80 62 75 65 71 54 51 70 73 49 72 74

W

thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms showers showers thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

H

52 65 43 54 56 48 62 49 52 42 54 54

59 79 47 65 71 52 79 52 55 45 63 65

4-DAY FORECAST

70s

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

67°/76° 50°/60°

Flood Stage

0.88” 5.23” 3.43” 11.76” 11.39” Current Level

WEDNESDAY

Chicago 43 / 47

thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms showers showers thunderstorms thunderstorms

Kansas City 50 / 54

Kirksville 48 / 51

Joplin 61 / 71

Springfield 54 / 63

St. Louis 59 / 72 Poplar Bluff 68 / 80

Carbondale 65 / 79

Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, Apr. 28th Tree - 177 (high), Grass - 30 (high), Mold - 28,224 (high) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 10 Month (Total) 136 Season 3336 Year Ago 3396

+ 0.23 + 0.31 + 0.47 + 0.24 + 0.08 0.00 + 0.25 + 0.37 + 0.48 + 1.33

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 15.84 18 15.34 Peoria 14 15.72 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 9.40 Sullivan 16 11.13 Valley Park 24 21.25 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 11.79 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 41.05

24-Hr Change

- 0.76 - 0.41 - 0.41 + 1.03 + 6.27 + 1.15 + 7.25 + 2.47

Maps and weather data provided by:

First May 2 Sunrise

Full May 10

Last May 18

New May 25

6:06 AM Sunset

7:51 PM

Moonrise 8:58 AM Moonset 11:38 PM

Celebrate Astronomy Day at the St. Louis Science Center today with free activities or by going out into your own backyard and looking at the moon in the west around 9 p.m. tonight. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.82 368.52 517.31 657.16 710.93 665.53 919.44 845.12 596.07 407.07 604.92 443.32

- 0.75 + 3.03 + 6.82 + 0.06 + 0.46 + 1.09 + 0.62 - 0.10 + 0.11 + 0.19 - 0.01 + 0.09

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

BRENTWOOD, N.Y. • Late

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Elizabeth Alvarado (left) and Evelyn Rodriguez meet Friday with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions about gangs that killed their daughters in their Long Island neighborhood.

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at night, when helicopters thrum overhead and spotlights hit lawns, many people here know exactly what’s going on. “You just think, ‘Oh, God, whose child is it now?’” said Stephanie Spezia, a longtime resident of this suburb in the heart of Long Island that’s caught in the grip of a violent street gang with Central American ties, MS-13. MS-13 has been blamed for a trail of 11 corpses, most of them of young people, discovered in woods and lots in Brentwood and neighboring Central Islip since the start of the school year. The bloodshed has gotten the attention of President Donald Trump, who says it’s the result of lax immigration policies that let too many criminal “scum” slip through. Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave a speech on Friday about the violence to law enforcement officials near a park where the bodies of four young men were found this month bearing MS-13’s hallmarks: repeated slashes from a blade that left them nearly unrecognizable. Some parents say they’re afraid to let children go to school. Teens say any perceived slight to a gang member, especially refusal to join, can mean death. After one high school warned parents not to let their children wear anything gang-affiliated, gang members started deciding what colors were offlimits, leaving students to guess what not to wear. “Kids are losing their childhoods,” said Jennifer Suarez, whose niece, 15, was hacked to death last year. “You can see the stress on their faces as they get ready. It’s like, you know, they’re suiting up

Snow

80s

80s Wintry Mix

Hawaii High: 86°

Jet Stream

A stalled frontal boundary will trigger clusters of showers and thunderstorms from parts of the southern Great Lakes down to portions of the lower Mississippi Valley and east Texas. Some severe storms are possible from parts of the Midwest down to east Texas. A few showers and storms are also expected to develop across portions of the Mid-Atlantic, Ohio Valley, and Tennessee Valley. Dry conditions will be in place across much of the western United States. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 57 Albuquerque 34 Anchorage 36 Atlanta 69 Atlantic City 64 Baltimore 65 Billings 33 Biloxi, Ms. 78 Birmingham 70 Bismarck 27 Boise 36 Boston 62 Buffalo 52 Burlington, Vt. 54 Charleston, S.C. 71 Charleston, W.V. 64 Charlotte 68 Cheyenne 23 Chicago 43 Cincinnati 64 Cleveland 55 Colorado Spgs. 26 Concord, N.H. 55 Dallas 74 Daytona Beach 72 Denver 26 Des Moines 40 75 Destin, Fl. 50 Detroit 61 El Paso 66 Evansville 31 Fairbanks 29 Fargo 29 Flagstaff 73 Fort Myers 32 Great Falls 36 Green Bay 59 Hartford 68 Honolulu 78 Houston 60 Indianapolis 72 Jackson, Ms. 37 Juneau 79 Key West 54 Las Vegas 73 Little Rock 64 Los Angeles 66 Louisville

76 39 50 87 88 89 56 81 89 62 61 81 63 69 86 91 89 36 47 83 60 35 76 82 85 37 45 82 53 65 85 53 57 51 91 56 48 80 80 86 75 90 55 85 77 83 89 89

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Tomorrow L H W

cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms snow showers showers thunderstorms showers snow showers mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy snow showers mostly sunny rain windy thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms showers partly cloudy rain sunny sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms

46 30 37 69 61 67 36 75 69 32 47 50 44 39 70 67 68 24 42 66 52 24 44 54 73 24 40 75 44 44 67 31 33 24 71 38 39 50 67 62 64 72 34 79 58 68 61 69

62 61 50 85 67 80 63 79 86 62 62 56 63 53 84 89 83 49 57 86 81 49 61 67 86 52 49 79 63 75 83 57 58 61 91 59 45 64 80 76 81 80 51 85 83 72 86 89

showers sunny showers mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms showers thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms windy showers thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly sunny showers sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny showers showers mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms showers thunderstorms rain mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms

City

Today L H

67 Macon 78 McAllen, Tx. 71 Memphis 77 Miami 40 Milwaukee Minneapolis 34 Missoula, Mt. 33 74 Mobile Montgomery 71 68 Nashville New Orleans 76 New York City 66 Norfolk, Va. 70 Oklahoma City 55 Omaha 40 Orlando 71 Palm Springs 61 Philadelphia 64 Phoenix 57 Pittsburgh 62 Portland, Me. 52 Portland, Or. 41 Providence 60 Raleigh 70 Rapid City 27 Reno 37 Richmond, Va. 71 Sacramento 51 St. Petersburg 75 Salt Lake City 34 San Antonio 75 San Diego 59 San Francisco 53 Santa Fe 29 Savannah 71 Seattle 44 75 Shreveport 32 Sioux Falls 54 Syracuse 69 Tallahassee 74 Tampa 54 Tucson 63 Tulsa 71 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 75 48 Wichita Wilmington, De. 64 62 Yuma

90 102 88 85 44 53 56 86 90 90 87 85 93 57 45 92 91 88 82 75 76 63 78 91 52 67 93 80 89 54 89 85 75 34 87 57 85 51 66 88 92 76 72 91 85 52 88 86

W

thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms rain partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny thunderstorms showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny sunny snow showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy rain thunderstorms sunny

Tomorrow L H W

67 70 72 77 38 38 40 73 68 71 75 56 71 44 39 71 62 64 59 60 43 48 52 69 30 42 71 52 75 38 57 58 53 24 70 47 61 37 45 69 73 48 49 70 75 41 65 61

89 86 77 85 46 44 54 81 88 88 82 62 88 54 42 90 93 70 87 83 56 59 59 87 58 76 91 82 88 63 78 77 71 53 85 57 73 42 65 86 89 82 58 83 84 47 72 91

partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms windy thunderstorms rain showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms rain thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers thunderstorms showers rain mostly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

70 37 50 69 81 78 59 39 40 56 66 28 77 66 43 39

81 55 81 100 97 86 89 52 60 73 90 53 86 92 54 58

W

sunny cloudy mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy

Gang violence grips Long Island: ‘Kids are losing their childhoods’ ASSOCIATED PRESS

80s

for battle.” So how does a street gang with ties to Central America gain such an aggressive foothold in the suburbs of Long Island? MS-13, or the Mara Salvatrucha, is believed by federal prosecutors to have thousands of members across the U.S., primarily immigrants from Central America. It has a stronghold in Los Angeles, where it emerged in the 1980s. But its true rise began after members were deported back to El Salvador in the 1990s. There, the gang thrived and spread to Honduras. MS-13 and rivals control entire towns there, rape women, kill competitors and massacre students and merchants who refuse to pay extortion. T h a t v i o l e n ce h a s prompted a migration of people, especially children, trying to escape who have streamed north because of a U.S. policy allowing people under 18 who arrive without parents to stay temporarily with relatives or friends. Since the fall of 2013, the U.S. has placed 165,000 unaccompanied minors. Long Island has been a frequent landing spot. Sessions, speaking at a courthouse in Central Islip, said he believed gang members used this system to come north, too. In a recent roundup of 13 MS-13 gang suspects accused of murder and other crimes, seven had entered as unaccompanied minors. MS-13 is recruiting these children, Suffolk County police Commissioner Timothy Sini said. Nearly 200 MS-13 gang suspects have been rounded up since September. Among the tactics Sini has employed have been stepped-up patrols, renewed cooperation with an FBI task force and helicopter sweeps of areas where gang members gather.

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

32 69 51 75 53 48 48 44 43 81 57 51 42 76 59 78

62 78 80 90 78 75 73 60 60 100 84 61 69 86 76 103

W

sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

+ 0.05 - 0.22 + 0.74 + 0.55 + 0.57

Flood Stage

SUN & MOON

70s

90s

City

W

50s

T-storms

80s

90s

47°/67° 50°/64°

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 14.21 23 11.76 Jefferson City 21 14.95 Hermann 20 12.29 Washington 25 18.36 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 16.45 Louisiana 15 15.26 Dam 24 25 25.63 Dam 25 26 25.44 Grafton 18 18.02 M.Price, Pool 419 413.40 M.Price, Tail. 21 17.31 St Louis 30 22.78 Chester 27 25.33 Cape Girardeau 32 30.52

50s 60s 70s

Alaska Low: -5°

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

24-Hr Change

30s

Showers and Mostly cloudy Partly cloudy Slight chance storms likely and cooler of showers

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

RIVER STAGES

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

60° 55° 72° 52° 92° 32° 74° 56°

40s

60s

80s

50s

40s

50s

60s

40s

40s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:39 p.m.) Low (5:57 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1970) Record Low (1874) High Last Year Low Last Year

40s 50s

70s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs L

Rain

60s

50s

60s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

66 68 53 60 55 61 50 48 61 62 47 58 66

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

Low: 7° Gothic, Colorado

50s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

National Extremes High: 104° Zapata, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

A stalled frontal boundary will slowly lift northward across the St. Louis area today. Periods of showers and thunderstorms are likely. Locally heavy rainfall and a few severe storms are possible. More wet weather is expected on Sunday.

24-HOUR FORECAST

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • A13

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

32 38 36 69 45 76 41 50 32 52 63 52 47 44 40 52

51 63 53 75 72 83 82 75 48 73 77 73 57 50 59 55

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy rain

NATION DIGEST Court again blocks Anthem-Cigna deal A federal appeals court on Friday left in place a decision blocking Blue Cross-Blue Shield insurer Anthem’s bid to buy rival Cigna, saying that a bigger company is not better for consumers. The 2-1 decision upholds a federal judge’s ruling in February that said the proposed $48 billion acquisition would further reduce competition in the already concentrated health insurance market. Anthem argued the combination would save $2.4 billion in medical costs and lead to lower consumer premiums. But the Justice Department said Anthem had no plan to reach those savings, and sued last summer. The ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit probably dooms the bid. Man with machete cuts 2 in Kentucky • A man armed with a machete asked about political affiliations of people at a university coffee shop Friday before injuring two women in Lexington, Ky., a witness said. The assailant at Transylvania University was armed with a machete and knives and is thought to be a former student, Lexington police Sgt. Jervis Middleton said. Police later identified the arrested man as Mitchell W. Adkins, 19, of Cincinnati. He was charged with first- and fourthdegree assault. Police said the two victims suffered non-lifethreatening injuries. Videos show abuse of slain child • Videos and photos from a home in Kansas City, Kan., where a 7-year-old boy’s remains were found in a pigsty show the boy suffered horrific abuse in the months before he died, the child’s grandmother said. Judy Conway said she threw up when she watched DVDs containing images of her grandson,

Adrian Jones, being abused by his father and stepmother, Mike and Heather Jones, who both pleaded guilty in the boy’s 2015 death. Conway said the videos came from cameras in the home, The Kansas City Star reported. The videos and photos were given to Conway by a landlord. Mike Jones will be sentenced Wednesday in Wyandotte County for firstdegree murder in Adrian’s death. Heather Jones was sentenced in November to life with no chance of parole for 25 years. Building burns for five days • A huge fire that burned for days in a sixstory apartment building under construction in the Maryland suburbs of the nation’s capital has been extinguished. A fire official said Friday that the fire that started Monday in a building near the University of Maryland campus in College Park is out. Damage was estimated at $39 million. Investigators say the fire appeared accidental but haven’t determined how or where it started. Execution investigation not needed, governor says • Arkansas’ governor said Friday that he saw no reason for anything beyond a routine review of the state’s execution procedures after a condemned inmate lurched and convulsed 20 times during a lethal injection. Attorneys for Kenneth Williams called for a full investigation after Williams became the fourth convicted killer executed in eight days as the state sought to carry out as many executions by injection as possible before its supply of midazolam expires. “I think it’s totally unjustified,” Gov. Asa Hutchinson said. Williams’ attorneys asked a judge to order all physical evidence to be preserved. From news services


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

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Hyundai '12 Hyundai Elantra: Auto, Power Group Pkg, Certified, $10,490

'13 Hyundai Elantra: 4 Door, 48K Miles $12,812 Stk# P06086 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Hyundai Sonata: 34K Miles, Black $14,990 Stk# P06090 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Hyundai Sonata: 4 Door, 2.4L, 33K Miles $14,990 Stk# P06089 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Hyundai Sonata: 36K Miles, 4 Door, 2.4L, Auto, GLS $14,408 #P06079 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '12 Hyundai Veloster: Sunroof, 50K Miles, $10,990 #P3685 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Hyundai Sonata GLS: 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Radiant Silver Metallic, $8,490 #96541B

Infiniti '08 Infiniti G35: Journey, V6, RWD, One owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $12,990 #94489M

'15 Infiniti Q50: Premium, 10K Miles, Loaded $31,990 #C17045RA

'04 Infiniti FX35 Leather Trimmed Seats, Sunroof, AWD, $9,990 #27203B

'11 Infiniti G37 X: Premium, V6, AWD, Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Front Seats, sunroof, Bluetooth, $14,990 #94426N

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Jeep '14 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Lmtd, Sunroof, 4x4, Navigation, $29,490 #B8399

'14 Lexus ES350: Black, 36K Miles, Luxury Pkg, Navigation, Call Now, $25,000 #X3188

'15 Lexus CT 200H: Hybrid, 17" Alloys, Leather, Loaded, 21K Miles, #X3124 $20,000

'08 Lexus ES 350: 3.5L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, sunroof, Bluetooth, $13,490 #27270B

'14 Lexus RX 350: Black, 30K Miles, Fully Loaded, $34,000 #X3249

'12 Lexus RX 350: AWD, Sunroof, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $17,490 #96042A

Lincoln '11 Lincoln MKS Clean Carfax, Leather Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $15,490 #26622B

Mazda '14 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, White, Auto, Certified, $19,990

'11 Mazda3 S: Grand Touring, Hatchback, $11,990

'16 Mazda CX-5: AWD, Touring, Gray, 29K Miles, Loaded, Only $20,000 #H170166A

'16 Mazda Mazda3 i: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Factory Warranty, Bose System, $17,990 #10292L

'08 Mazda Mazda3 i: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sunlight Silver Metallic, $7,490 #11150A

'13 Mazda Mazda3 i: 2.0L 4 Cyl, FWD, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Call Today, $12,990 #78110B

'14 Mazda 6 One Owner, Leather, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $15,990 #94604M

'07 Mazda CX-9: Sport, Sunroof, White, $9,490 #M16762B

'11 Mazda Mazda CX-9: Sport, 3.7L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Crystal White Pearl Mica, $11,490 #8836A

'11 Mazda CX-9 Carfax One Owner, Back Up Camera, Bluetooth, Leather, $15,990 #8823A

'12 Ford Edge: LTD, Ecoboost, 80K Miles $15,875 #P40681 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '11 Mercedes E550: Navigation, Sunroof, 72K Miles, $21,900 #24166-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '08 Mercedes-Benz E350: 4Matic, White $11,990 #C8378A

'14 Mercedes-Benz CLA-250: AMG Special Edition, 26K, Auto $26,490 #B8451

'13 ML350: 43xxx Miles, Black/Black Stk #186232 $31,880 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Mini Cooper

'14 Honda Civic LX: 7 To Choose, Honda Certified, Gray, 24K Miles, $14,500 #X3212

'15 Mini Cooper: Convertible, Navigation, Auto, 15K Miles, $23,990 #B8487

'14 Honda Accord: Sport, 3 To Choose, Gray, 18" Alloys, Fog Lights, Dual Chrome Exhaust, $17,000 #X3226

'13 Honda FIT Sport Carfax One Owner, Low Miles, Hatchback $12,990 #78268A

'05 Honda Accord: Hybrid, Leather, Sunroof, One Owner, $6,990 #B8504

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Lifted, Wheels & Tires, Lots Of Extras, $35,980 #B8381

'17 Jeep Patriot X: FWD, Gray, 20K Miles, One Owner Clean Carfax, $17,500 #X3234

'11 Mini Cooper Countryman: Blue/Black, $14,850 #186201 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'14 ATS: Luxury, 31K Miles, AWD, Navigation, Sunroof, $25,490 '15 SRX: Premium Collection, AWD, Certified, Black $34,990 '15 SRX: Performance, White, AWD, Certified, Call '14 SRX: Performance, Chrome Wheels, AWD, 30K Miles, $31,990 '15 Cadillac CTS-V: 10K Miles, Auto, Every Option, Black, Call! '16 Escalade: Platinum, 5K Miles, Loaded, Every Option, Call Today '14 CTS: Performance, AWD, Black, Certified, $31,990

Kia

'07 Escalade: AWD, Chrome Wheels, Power Running Boards, $22,990

Volkswagen '09 VW GTI: 2 Door Hatchback, 2.0L 4 Cyl, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, $10,990 #27542A

'09 Volkswagen Touareg 4 Wheel Drive, Leather Seats, Sunroof, $12,990 #96519A

'12 VW Tiguan LE: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Deep Black, Black Interior, $14,490 #P8856

'14 VW Beetle: 2.0 Turbo, R-Line, Sunroof, $17,990 #V17298A

'14 XTS: Luxury, Red, Sunroof, Navigation, Certified, Call '15 CTS: Premium, Certified, Black Diamond

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'13 VW Beetle: Convertible, 23K Miles, Auto, Certified, $19,490 #V17029A

'13 VW Jetta SEL: Metallic Beige, 47K Miles, $14,000 #H162347A

'15 Nissan Pathfinder: Platinum, 4WD, 26K Miles, White Diamond '13 VW Beetle: Convertible, 23K Miles, Auto, Certified, $19,490 '14 Audi R8: 11K Miles, Audi Exclusive Orange '16 Lincoln Navigator: White Platinum, DVD, Sunroof, $47,990

Volvo '16 Volvo XC70: 32K Miles, White/Black $29,990 #P4107 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Volvo S60: Certified, Beige/Beige $20,993 #L1239 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'08 Toyota Tacoma: 62K, Auto, 4WD, TRD Sport $19,990

Chevrolet Trucks

'14 Chevy Suburban LTZ: White Diamond, 32K Miles, 4x4, Loaded

'05 Chevy Silverado: LS, 6.2 V8 $10,800 #185214 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '06 Chevy Silverado: 150K Miles Stk# P06053B Please Contact for Pricing DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '05 Silverado: 4x4 LS, 6.2L, $8,855 Stk #185214 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

'14 Subaru XV Crosstrek: Premium Package, Sunroof, 38K Miles, $22,490 '15 Infiniti Q50: Premium, 10K Miles, Local Trade, $31,990 '06 Nissan 350Z: Touring, 70K Miles, Local Trade, $12,490

Nissan/Datsun '06 Nissan 350Z: Touring, 70K, Red, Certified $12,490 #M16492A

'13 Nissan Cube: 66K Miles, Auto, Certified, Power Package, $10,990 #V16442B

'12 Nissan Armana: Platinum, 4WD, White, Loaded $20,000 #C16369B1

'14 Nissan Altima 2.5 SL: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, $15,490 #27533A

'13 Nissan Altima Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $13,990 #2581848

'14 Nissan Juke SL: 4 Cyl, AWD, Clean Carfax, Navigation/GPS, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Heated Front Seats, $17,490 #96068B

'12 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV: 3.5L V6, FWD, Super Black, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, $14,990 #P8717

'13 Nissan Maxima 3.5: 3.5L V6, FWD, Pearl White, Bluetooth, Leather Seats, $14,990 #8854A

'12 NIssan Rogue Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, AWD $14,990 #11082B

'10 Nissan Versa CarFax One Owner, Cloth Seats, Low MIles, $7,990 #39045A

Pontiac '09 Pontiac G8: 83K Miles $13,321 Stk# P06080 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Scion '08 Scion XB: Auto, Black, Only 133K Miles, Toyota Quality, $6,000 #X3171A

Toyota '16 Toyota Camry: Gray, 42K Miles, $16,822 Stk# P06092 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Toyota Prius V: 5 Door Hatchback, Level 3, Black, 39K Miles, $18,500 #X3210 ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

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'09 Toyota Highlander Carfax One Owner, Sport Package, Leather Seats, Sunroof, $15,990 #27510B

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'13 Kia Optima: Black, 70K Miles $17,000 Stk# 170327A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Kia Optima S: 2 to Choose, Black, 35K Miles, Starting at $12,700 #X3139

'12 Kia Optima EX: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera, $12,490 #38232A

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Mercedes Benz

Honda

'14 Honda Accord EXL: Coupe, Modern Steel Metallic, Fully Loaded, $18,300 #X3148

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'16 Civic LX: 4 Doors, 3 To Choose, Black, 9K Miles, Honda Certified Used Car, Starting at $17,000 #X3183

Lexus '07 Lexus RX350: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, Auto, $11,990 #C8355A

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'06 Toyota Camry LE: White, 135K Miles, Hurry In, Only $6,800 #DL1596

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '16 Ram 1500: 4WD, Quad Cab, Silver, 25K Miles $26,000 #X3151

'12 Ram 2500: Crew Cab, Diesel, Auto $35,490 $C16310B2

Ford Trucks '12 Ford F-150: Platinum, 4x4, Loaded, 53K Miles, $30,775 #48527-2 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

GMC Trucks '14 GMC Sierra 1500: Extended Cab, 48K Miles, Double Cab $27,693 Stk# 170141A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '09 GMC Acadia Clean Carfax One Owner, Low Miles, 3rd Row Seating, $13,490 #P8824A

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See More Rides Ads On Page B11


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 04.29.2017 • B

LOUD AND CLEAR

Tarasenko scores a pair of goals as Blues even series

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Vladimir Tarasenko reacts after scoring the go-ahead goal, his second of the game, in the third period Friday night against the Nashville Predators.

No. 91 saves the day with his big late goal

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

These moments are so quick, these moments that stick. A guy makes a play, and before he can comprehend that he made the play, the moment is over and the moment is preserved for history. What it comes down to is — it all happens so fast, that the great ones do greatness instinctively. And Friday at the rink, with the season on the brink, Vladimir Tarasenko See HOCHMAN • Page B5

BLUES VS. PREDATORS

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Second round | Series tied 1-1

G7 TBD May 9 at St. Louis, NBCSN*

Joel Edmundson can’t recall how Blues teammate Vladimir Tarasenko called for the puck. But he knew it was NHL’s fourth-leading scorer begging for it with time running down in a tie game Friday between the Blues and Nashville Predators. “I know his voice,” Edmundson said. The defenseman was planning to stop the puck with his skate and move it to his stick, but upon hearing the Russian inflection, Edmundson instead guided it to Tarasenko, who put his second goal of the night past Nashville’s Pekka Rinne for the game-winner in a 3-2 victory over the Predators. It was also unintelligible what the crowd of 19,506 at

*If necessary

See BLUES • Page B4

G1 Predators 4, Blues 3 G2 Blues 3, Predators 2 G3 2 p.m. Sun. at Nashville, KSDK-5 G4 8:30 Tue. at Nashville, NBCSN G5 TBD May 5 at St. Louis, NBCSN G6 TBD May 7 at Nashville*

INSIDE > Lineup change: Paajarvi scratched from Game 2. B4 > Around the league: Blackhawks trade backup goalie. B8

A lot of Lynn and a little trickery lead to victory Righthander picks up his third win with a big assist from Molina to escape a jam BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The month of April is named after Aphrodite, the goddess of love. And there are few baseball pitchers who have more fondness for this fourth month than the Cardinals’ lovable lug, Lance Lynn. Not that Lynn hasn’t won games in other twelfths of the calendar year, but in the last six seasons, he has won more games than just three other pitchers in April, even including CARDINALS 7 last season when he even play. When REDS 5 didn’t he beat the Cincinnati Reds 7-5 Friday at Busch Stadium, Lynn, who permitted just one run in six innings, scored his 16th victory in April in 20 decisions since the start of the 2012 campaign. Lynn’s third win in a row this season was the Cardinals’ third in a row overall and pushed them over the .500 mark for the first time since opening night. If you’re used to seeing Lynn pitch in

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dexter Fowler celebrates with teammates after hitting a two-run home run in the third inning Friday night against the Reds.

April, you’re not surprised. If you’re used to seeing Lynn bat, you would at least have raised an eyebrow when he singled in the fifth inning. The .084 career hitter hadn’t had a hit since Sept. 23, 2015, when he also had a single against the Reds. Ordinarily, this might have been the most surprising aspect of the night, except for the base on balls that ended the Cincinnati sixth. Lynn, facing his last hitter and throwing his 101st pitch, walked Devin Mesoraco on a 3-2 pitch which, ostensibly, loaded the bases. Eugenio Suarez, who had been running on the full-count pitch, slowed as he approached third and then took a couple of steps as he rounded the bag, presuming the play virtually to be dead. But, if you thought the Cardinals’ baserunning had been bad, check this one out. Lynn walked in from the mound to confer with catcher Yadier Molina. But Molina had unfinished business. He calmly got up from his crouch and lobbed a throw See CARDS • Page B6

UP NEXT • 1:15 Saturday vs. Reds, FSM INSIDE • McGwire and McCarver voted to Cardinals Hall of Fame. B6

SPORTS

1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SATURDAY • 04.29.2017 • B

LOUD AND CLEAR

Tarasenko scores a pair of goals as Blues even series

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues right winger Vladimir Tarasenko reacts after scoring the go-ahead goal, his second of the game, in the third period Friday night against the Nashville Predators.

A huge night for No. 91 in must-win situation

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

These moments are so quick, these moments that stick. A guy makes a play, and before he can comprehend that he made the play, the moment is over and the moment is preserved in perpetuity. So what it comes down to is — it all happens so fast, that the great ones do greatness instinctively and with fire. And Friday at the rink, with the season on the brink, Vladimir Tarasenko rose. See HOCHMAN • Page B5

BLUES VS. PREDATORS

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Second round | Series tied 1-1

G7 TBD May 9 at St. Louis, NBCSN*

Joel Edmundson can’t recall how Blues teammate Vladimir Tarasenko called for the puck. But he knew it was NHL’s fourth-leading scorer begging for it with time running down in a tie game Friday between the Blues and Nashville Predators. “I know his voice,” Edmundson said. The defenseman was planning to stop a pass from Jaden Schwartz with his skate and move the puck to his stick, but upon hearing the Russian inflection, Edmundson instead guided it to Tarasenko, who put his second goal of the night past Nashville’s Pekka Rinne for the game-winner in a 3-2 victory over the Predators. It was also unintelligible what the crowd of 19,506 at

*If necessary

See BLUES • Page B4

G1 Predators 4, Blues 3 G2 Blues 3, Predators 2 G3 2 p.m. Sun. at Nashville, KSDK-5 G4 8:30 Tue. at Nashville, NBCSN G5 TBD May 5 at St. Louis, NBCSN G6 TBD May 7 at Nashville*

INSIDE > Lineup change: Paajarvi scratched from Game 2. B4 > Won’t stay down: Parayko bounces back from hit on knee to make a big play. B5

A lot of Lynn and a little trickery lead to victory Righthander picks up his third win with a big assist from Molina to escape a jam BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The month of April is named after Aphrodite, the goddess of love. And there are few baseball pitchers who have more fondness for this fourth month than the Cardinals’ lovable lug, Lance Lynn. Not that Lynn, 64-40 for his career, hasn’t won games in other twelfths of the calendar year. But in the last six seasons, he has won more games than just three other pitchers in CARDINALS 7 April, even including last season, when he REDS 5 didn’t even play. When he beat the Cincinnati Reds 7-5 Friday at Busch Stadium, Lynn, who permitted just one run in six innings, scored his 16th victory in April in 20 decisions since the start of the 2012 campaign. “I like the cold weather,” said Lynn, smiling. “That’s probably what it means.” Lynn’s third win in a row this season was the Cardinals’ third in a row overall and pushed them over the .500 mark for

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dexter Fowler celebrates with teammates after hitting a two-run home run in the third inning Friday night against the Reds.

the first time since opening night. If you’re used to seeing Lynn pitch in April, you’re not surprised. If you’re used to seeing Lynn bat, you would at least have raised an eyebrow when he singled in the fifth inning. The .084 career hitter hadn’t had a hit since Sept. 23, 2015, when he also had a single against the Reds. “I think it took the energy out of him,” Matheny said. Ordinarily, Lynn’s hit might been the most surprising aspect of the night, except for the base on balls that ended the Cincinnati sixth. Lynn, facing his last hitter and throwing his 101st pitch, walked Devin Mesoraco on a 3-2 pitch which, ostensibly, loaded the bases. Eugenio Suarez, who had been running on the full-count pitch, slowed as he approached third and then took a couple of steps as he rounded the bag, presuming the play virtually to be dead. But if you thought the Cardinals’ baserunning had been bad, check this one out. See CARDS • Page B6

UP NEXT • 1:15 Saturday vs. Reds, FSM INSIDE • McGwire and McCarver voted to Cardinals Hall of Fame. B6

SPORTS

2 M


SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 4/30 G3: at Predators, 2 p.m. KSDK (5)

Tuesday 5/2 G4: at Predators, 8:30 p.m. NBCSN

Friday 5/5 G5: vs. Predators, TBA NBCSN

Sunday 5/7 G6: at Predators, (if nec.) Time, TV TBA

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 4/29 vs. Reds 1:15 p.m. FSM

Sunday 4/30 vs. Reds 1:15 p.m. FSM

Monday 5/1 vs. Brewers 7:15 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 5/2 vs. Brewers 7:15 p.m. FSM

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 5/6 vs. Rochester 7:30 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 5/13 at Charleston 6 p.m.

Saturday 5/27 at Tampa Bay 6:30 p.m.

Friday 6/2 vs. Toronto 7:30 p.m.

Two top Derby contenders get on track at Churchill Draw is set for Wednesday, race on May 6

OTHER EVENTS

BY JOHN CLAY Lexington Herald-Leader

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing starts May 2: 1 p.m. Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

LOUISVILLE, KY. • Two of the

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR SATURDAY

AUTO RACING 7 a.m. Formula One: Russian Grand Prix, qualifying, CNBC 8 a.m. NASCAR: Toyota Owners 400, practice, FS1 NASCAR Xfinity: ToyotaCare 250, qualifying, FS1 9 a.m. 10:30 a.m. NASCAR: Toyota Owners 400, final practice, FS1 12 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity: ToyotaCare 250, FS1 8:30 p.m. IndyCar: Phoenix Grand Prix, NBCSN BASEBALL College: Bucknell at Navy, CBSSN 10 a.m. 12 p.m. Mets at Nationals, MLB 1:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Reds, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 1 p.m. College: Bucknell at Navy, CBSSN 3 p.m. Cubs at Red Sox, FS1 3 p.m. College: TCU at Texas Tech, ESPNU 4 p.m. College: Tennessee vs. Vanderbilt, SEC Network 6 p.m. LA Angels of Anaheim at Rangers, FS1 6 p.m. College: Texas at Oklahoma State, ESPNU 7 p.m. College: Auburn at Mississippi State, SEC Network 9 p.m. College: UC Irvine at Cal State Fullerton, ESPNU 9 p.m. Phillies at Dodgers (joined in progress), MLB BOXING 3:15 p.m. Heavyweights: Anthony Joshua vs. Wladimir Klitschko, Showtime 7:30 p.m. Premier Boxing Champions, Prelims, FS2 9 p.m. Featherweights: Carlos Zambrano vs. Claudio Marrero, FS1 FOOTBALL NFL draft: rounds four to seven, ESPN, NFL Network 11 a.m. 12 p.m. College: Arkansas spring game, SEC Network 6 p.m. Arena: Baltimore Brigade at Philadelphia Soul, CBSSN GOLF PGA: Zurich Classic of New Orleans, GOLF 12 p.m. 2 p.m. PGA: Zurich Classic of New Orleans, KMOV (4) 2 p.m. LPGA: Volunteers of America Texas Shootout, GOLF HOCKEY NHL playoffs: Rangers at Senators, KSDK (5) 2 p.m. 7 p.m. NHL playoffs: Penguins at Capitals, KSDK (5) HORSE RACING 3 p.m. Belmont Park Live, FS2 LACROSSE 3:30 p.m. College: Denver at Marquette, CBSSN 7 p.m. College: Johns Hopkins at Maryland, BTN MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 2:30 p.m. Kickboxing Glory 40, ESPN2 MOTORCYCLE RACING Monster Energy Supercross: East Rutherford, KTVI (2) 4 p.m. RUGBY NRL: St. George Illawarra Dragons vs. Melbourne Storm, FS2 1 a.m. SOCCER 8:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund vs. Cologne, FS2 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Southampton vs. Hull City AFC, NBCSN 9 a.m. English Premier League: West Bromwich vs. Leicester City, CNBC 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Crystal Palace vs. Burnley FC, KSDK (5) 11:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Wolfsburg vs. Bayern Munich, KTVI (2) 3 p.m. NWSL: Chicago Red Stars at Portland Thorns. LIFE 7:30 p.m. MLS: Real Salt Lake at Sporting KC, FSM Plus SOFTBALL 12 p.m. College: Purdue at Minnesota, BTN 1 p.m. College: Longwood at Radford, ESPNU 2 p.m. College: Indiana at Michigan, BTN College: Texas A&M at Kentucky, SEC Network 2 p.m. 7 p.m. College: Missouri at LSU, ESPN TENNIS College: Big 12 Championships, FSM Plus 11 a.m. 8 p.m. Match for Africa: Seattle Exhibition, Tennis Channel TRACK AND FIELD 11:30 a.m. Penn Relays, NBCSN 2 p.m. Drake Relays, NBCSN

SUNDAY’S HIGHLIGHTS

AUTO RACING 6:30 a.m. Formula One: Russian Grand Prix, NBCSN 1 p.m. NASCAR: Toyota Owners 400, KTVI (2) BASEBALL 12 p.m. Orioles at Yankees, MLB 1:15 p.m. Cardinals vs. Reds, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. Cubs at Red Sox, ESPN BASKETBALL 12 p.m. NBA playoffs: Wizards at Celtics, KDNL (30) GOLF 12 p.m. Women’s Big Ten Championship, BTN 12 p.m. PGA: Zurich Classic of New Orleans, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Zurich Classic of New Orleans, KMOV (4) 2 p.m. LPGA: Volunteers of America Texas Shootout, GOLF HOCKEY 2 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues at Predators, KSDK (5), KYKY (98.1 FM) 6 p.m. NHL playoffs: Ducks at Oilers, NBCSN SOCCER 6 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester Utd. vs. Swansea City, CNBC 8 a.m. English Premier League: Everton vs. Chelsea, CNBC 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: FC Augsburg vs. Hamburg SV, FS1 10:20 a.m. Bundesliga: TSG Hoffenheim vs. Eintracht Frankfurt, FS2

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M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

Kentucky Derby’s top contenders, possibly the two favorites, went to the track Friday morning at Churchill Downs and their trainers couldn’t have been happier with what they saw. “I thought he was exceptional,” said Todd Pletcher, who handles Florida Derby winner Always Dreaming. “It gave me chills,” said Mark Casse after watching Arkansas Derby winner Classic Empire. That pair was among several horses that put in final works in preparation for the 143rd running of the Derby on May 6. Classic Empire was the early bird, going to the track at 6 a.m. and working 5 furlongs in 59.60 seconds, according to Churchill’s clockers. “This was big, and I don’t think we could have asked for any better,” said Casse, who had spent more than a month trying to pull his Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner back on track after a third-place finish in the Holy Bull Stakes in February. “The Classic Empire you’re always looking for was there today.” He sure looked like the Classic Empire of old in overcoming obstacles to win the Arkansas Derby at Oaklawn on April 15. The horse was then moved to Casse’s base at Churchill Downs, but the trainer had been in Florida for the Ocala Breeders Sale this past week and flew home Thursday night. “I hadn’t seen him in about a week and I thought his flesh looked good,” he said Friday. “I don’t see how he couldn’t move forward (off the Arkansas Derby win).” Meanwhile, Always Dreaming burst on the Derby scene with an impressive five-length Florida Derby win in the dazzling time of 1:47.47. He shipped into Louisville on Tuesday and Pletcher had said he was interested to see how the horse handled the Churchill Downs track, which the trainer said is often “quirky.” Turned out, no problem. “He seemed like he handled the track great,” said Pletcher, who is on the verge of passing D. Wayne

OAKLAWN PARK PHOTO

Classic Empire is draped with flowers after winning the Arkansas Derby on April 15 at Oaklawn Park in Hot Springs, Ark.

Lukas for most career Derby starters. “He did everything we were hoping he would do, everything we expected him to do.” Tapwrit, who finished fifth in the Toyota Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland on April 8 after winning the Tampa Bay Derby, turned in “a little more enthusiastic breeze than we’ll see sometime from Tapwrit,” Pletcher said. Louisiana Derby runner-up Patch, the horse who lost his left eye last year, was, “as typical with him, a little more of a lazy work horse,” said the trainer. Tapwrit and Patch worked together and went 5 furlongs in 1:00.20. “They went a little bit slower than Always Dreaming,” Pletcher said, “but I like the way they did it.” Battalion Runner, who finished second in the Wood Memorial to Irish War Cry, did not handle the track as well as his stablemates. He worked 4 furlongs in 48 2/5. “I didn’t think Battalion Runner breezed quite as well as the other ones,” Pletcher said. “It

wasn’t the powerful work I was hoping for from him, so we’ll see how he comes out of it and make a decision after that.” Casse also worked Florida Derby runner-up State of Honor on Friday. He worked 4 furlongs in 48.80. “He worked spectacular this morning,” Casse said. “He looks good. He tries really hard.” Trainer Antonio Sano also worked Fountain of Youth winner Gunnevera, who went 5 furlongs in 1:03.60. Sano said afterward he was happy with the work. Gunnevera is coming off a third-place finish in the Florida Derby. Practical Joke, second in the Blue Grass to Irap, worked 5 furlongs in 1:01.60 for trainer Chad Brown. Meawhile, at Keeneland, Blue Grass Stakes winner Irap worked a mile in 1:44 1/5, reported the Daily Racing Form. The draw for post positions for the Kentucky Derby will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday.

DIGEST

NFL NOTEBOOK

Sharapova keeps winning in comeback

Browns release tight end Barnidge

Maria Sharapova won again to move into the Porsche Grand Prix semifinals after beating Anett Kontaveit of Estonia 6-3, 6-4 on Friday in Stuttgart, Germany. In her third match following a 15-month doping ban, Sharapova converted five of her six break points. “I’m really enjoying myself,” she said. The five-time Grand Slam champion will next face Kristina Mladenovic of France, who overcame Carla Suarez Navarro of Spain 6-3, 6-2. Last year’s runner-up and home favorite, Laura Siegemund, upset second-seeded Karolina Pliskova 7-6 (3), 5-7, 6-3 in a match that lasted over three hours. The wild card from Stuttgart next faces the fourthseeded Simona Halep, who progressed against Anastasija Sevastova of Latvia 6-3, 6-1. Mladenovic ousted two-time defending champion Angelique Kerber on Thursday and is one of several players who has criticized Sharapova for her doping violation, but the Russian said she will not use it as added motivation in their semifinal Saturday. “I’m not someone that uses that as part of my comeback,” Sharapova said, adding she prefers her tennis do her talking. “My results have spoken for everything that I should speak for. And that’s all that matters. The biggest part of my comeback is what’s out on the court and I will leave it at that.” Nadal and Murray move on • Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray advanced together again, reaching the Barcelona Open semifinals in Spain in the same manner they have won all week: Nadal cruised and Murray labored. Defending champion Nadal eased past Hyeon Chung of South Korea 7-6 (1), 6-2. Murray fought hard to beat Albert Ramos-Vinolas of Spain 2-6, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Ramos-Vinolas had chances to beat Murray for the second straight time, but the top-ranked British player controlled the decisive points. The 19th-ranked Ramos-Vinolas eliminated Murray in the third round at the Monte Carlo Masters last week before eventually losing to Nadal in the final. Vettel leads F1 practice • Formula One leader Sebastian Vettel recovered after a spin in the first practice session Friday and set the fastest time of the day ahead of this weekend’s Russian Grand Prix in Sochi. On a track which had been widely expected to favor Mercedes because of its long straights, Vettel set a time of 1 minute, 34.120 seconds in the second session. That was 0.263 seconds faster than Ferrari teammate Kimi Raikkonen and 0.670 seconds ahead of the first Mercedes of Valtteri Bottas. Lewis Hamilton was further back on a warm, dry day. Associated Press

Gary Barnidge provided production, leadership and a community presence for some brutally bad Browns teams the past four years. On Friday, they cut him. A former Pro Bowler, Barnidge was released in a surprising move by Cleveland, which used one of its three picks in the first round Thursday night to select Miami tight end David Njoku. Following the pick, Barnidge, who made 134 catches for 1,655 yards over the past two seasons, went on social media to greet his new teammate. “Welcome to the TE room @David_Njoku80 looking forward to getting started,” Barnidge posted on Twitter. Just 14 hours later, he wrote a thank-you note to Cleveland fans after being let go. “I want to thank the Cleveland Browns for giving me my opportunity and looking forward to seeing the change,” he said. “Time for the next step.” The Browns did not give any reasons for cutting Barnidge. Nor did Cleveland try to get something for him on draft weekend when teams are willing to deal. Barnidge signed a three-year extension with the club late in his 2015 Pro Bowl season, when he had 79 receptions for 1,043 yards and nine touchdowns. “We’d like to thank Gary for all he has done for the Browns and the Cleveland community in his four seasons with our organization,” said Sashi Brown, the team’s executive vice president of football operations. “He has been a fine representative of our team, and we wish him the best going forward.” (AP) NFL staying tough on marijuana • The NFL has come under a sizable amount of scrutiny of late over its overreliance on prescription painkillers, with many calling for drastic changes in the way teams treat player injuries. Among the ideas being bandied about is the use of medicinal marijuana, which the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine says can be “an effective treatment for chronic pain in adults.” There’s just one problem with that: Marijuana is banned in the NFL, with players facing fines and suspensions for multiple drug-test violations. And based on what Roger Goodell told ESPN’s “Mike & Mike” on Friday, that isn’t going to change anytime soon, at least if he has anything to say about it. “I think you still have to look at a lot of aspects of marijuana use,” Goodell said. “Is it something that can be negative to the health of our players? Listen, you’re ingesting smoke, so that’s not usually a very positive thing that people would say. It does have an addictive nature. There are a lot of compounds in marijuana that may not be healthy for the players long-term. All of those things have to be considered. And it’s not as simple as someone just wants to feel better after a game. We really want to help our players in that circumstance but I want to make sure that the negative consequences aren’t something that is something that we’ll be held accountable for some years down the road.” (The Washington Post)


04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1 DRAFT SELECTIONS At Philadelphia, Friday SECOND ROUND 33. Green Bay (from Cleveland), Kenny King, db, Washington. 34. Jacksonville (from San Francisco through Seattle), Cam Robinson, ot, Alabama. 35. Seattle (from Jacksonville), Malik McDowell, dt, Michigan State. 36. Arizona (from Chicago), Budda Baker, s, Washington. 37. Buffalo (from LA Rams), Zay Jones, wr, East Carolina. 38. Los Angeles Chargers, Forrest Lamp, g, Western Kentucky. 39. New York Jets, Marcus Maye, s, Florida. 40. Carolina, Curtis Samuel, rb, Ohio State. 41. Minnesota (from Cincinnati), Dalvin Cook, rb, Florida State. 42. New Orleans, Marcus Williams, s, Utah. 43. Philadelphia, Sidney Jones, cb, Washington. 44. Los Angeles Rams (from Buffalo), Gerald Everett, te, South Alabama. 45. Chicago (from Arizona), Adam Shaheen, te, Ashland. 46. Indianapolis, Quincy Wilson, cb, Florida. 47. Baltimore, Tyus Bowser, lb, Houston. 48. Cincinnati (from Minnesota), Joe Mixon, rb, Oklahoma. 49. Washington, Ryan Anderson, lb, Alabama. 50. Tampa Bay, Justin Evans, s, Texas A&M. 51. Denver, DeMarcus Walker, de, Florida State. 52. Cleveland (from Tennessee), DeShone Kizer, qb, Notre Dame. 53. Detroit, Jalen Tabor, cb, Florida. 54. Miami, Raekwon McMillan, lb, Ohio State. 55. New York Giants, Dalvin Tomlinson, dt, Alabama. 56. Oakland, Obi Melifonwu, s, UConn. 57. Houston, Zach Cunningham, lb, Vanderbilt. 58. Seattle, Ethan Pocic, c, LSU. 59. Kansas City, Tanoh Kpassagnon, de, Villanova. 60. Dallas, Chidobe Awuzie, cb, Colorado. 61. Green Bay, Josh Jones, s, NC State. 62. Pittsburgh, JuJu Smith-Schuster, wr, Southern Cal. 63. Buffalo (from Atlanta), Dion Dawkins, g, Temple. 64. Carolina (from New England), Taylor Moton, g, Western Michigan. THIRD ROUND 65. Cleveland, Larry Ogunjobi, dt, Charlotte. 66. San Francisco, Ahkello Witherspoon, cb, Colorado. 67. New Orleans (from Chicago through San Francisco), Alvin Kamara, rb, Tennessee. 68. Jacksonville, Dawuane Smoot, de, Illinois. 69. Los Angeles Rams, Cooper Kupp, wr, Eastern Washington. 70. Minnesota (from NY Jets), Pat Elflein, c, Ohio State. 71. Los Angeles Chargers, Dan Feeney, g, Indiana. 72. Tennessee (from Carolina through New England), Taywan Taylor, wr, Western Kentucky. 73. Cincinnati, Jordan Willis, lb, Kansas State. 74. Baltimore (from Philadelphia), Chris Wormley, de, Michigan. 75. Atlanta (from Buffalo), Duke Riley, lb, LSU. 76. New Orleans, Alex Anzalone, lb, Florida. 77. Carolina (from Arizona), Daeshon Hall, de, Texas A&M. 78. Baltimore, Tim Williams, lb, Alabama. 79. New York Jets (from Minnesota), ArDarius Stewart, wr, Alabama. 80. Indianapolis, Tarell Basham, de, Ohio. 81. Washington, Fabian Noreau, cb, UCLA. 82. Denver, Carlos Henderson, wr, Louisiana Tech. 83. New England (from Tennessee), Derek Rivers, de, Youngstown State. 84. Tampa Bay, Chris Godwin, wr, Penn State. 85. New England (from Detroit), Antonio Garcia, ot, Troy. 86. Kansas City (from Miami through Minnesota), Kareem Hunt, rb, Toledo. 87. New York Giants, Davis Webb, qb, California. 88. Oakland, Eddie Vanderdoes, dt, UCLA. 89. Houston, D’Onta Foreman, rb, Texas. 90. Seattle, Shaquill Griffin, db, UCF. 91. Los Angeles Rams (from Kansas City through Buffalo), John Johnson, s, Boston College. 92. Dallas, Jourdan Lewis, cb, Michigan. 93. Green Bay, Montravius Adams, dt, Auburn. 94. Pittsburgh, Cameron Sutton, cb, Tennesee. 95. Seattle (from Atlanta), Delano Hill, s, Michigan. 96. Detroit (from New England), Kenny Golladay, wr, Northern Illinois. 97. x-Miami, Cordrea Tankersley, cb, Clemson. 98. x-Arizona (from Carolina), Chad Williams, wr, Grambling State. 99. x-Philadelphia (from Baltimore), Rasul Douglas, cb, West Virginia. 100. x-Tennessee (from LA Rams), Jonnu Smith, te, FIU. 101. x-Denver, Brendan Langley, cb, Lamar. 102. x-Seattle, Nazir Jones, dt, North Carolina. 103. x-New Orleans (from Cleveland through New England), Trey Hendrickson, lb, FAU. 104. x-San Francisco (from Kansas City), C.J. Beathard, qb, Iowa. 105. x-Pittsburgh, James Conner, rb, Pittsburgh. 106. x-Seattle, Amara Darboh, wr, Michigan. 107. x-Tampa Bay (from New York Jets), Kendall Beckwith, lb, LSU.

NFL DRAFT

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

Kizer goes — finally — to Browns

Bengals’ pick of Oklahoma’s Mixon draws boos; Rams take TE BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-dispatch

DeShone Kizer finally got picked. The Los Angeles Rams finally made a pick. And somebody took a chance on Joe Mixon. Those were the headlines Friday in Day 2 of the NFL draft, with the second- and third-round selections made in Philadelphia. And one other thing. Once again, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell got booed loudly and repeatedly. Kizer, the Notre Dame quarterback with the big arm and prototype size, had to wait until the middle of the second round before his name was called by the Cleveland Browns. “It was definitely a different experience,” Kizer said on a conference call with Cleveland reporters. “Obviously being in Philly (Thursday) was a unique experience. I had a great time, but to sit there and wait and try to figure out where you were going to land was definitely new to me.” Kizer, who is from Toledo, Ohio, was among 22 players invited to the draft in Philadelphia. But after waiting around in the “green room” all night Thursday without his name being called, he didn’t stick around for Round 2 on Friday. He spent Friday in Toledo. Kizer was chosen No. 52 overall, the 20th player selected in the second round, and the fourth quarterback taken overall in the 2017 draft behind first-rounders Mitchell Trubisky of North Carolina, Patrick Mahomes of Texas Tech and Deshaun Watson of Clemson. Eight picks before Watson, the Rams finally got in the game at No. 44 overall, selecting tight end Gerald Everett of South Alabama. In their second draft since leaving St. Louis, the Rams were without a first-round pick this year as a result of the 2016 trade for quarterback Jared Goff. They were originally set to pick earlier in the second round at No. 37 overall but traded out of the spot with Buffalo for Everett, who’s the first player drafted out of South Alabama, which began its program in 2009. By the time the Rams made their pick, 30 of the other 32 NFL squads had already made at least one selection. Only Super Bowl champion New England, which traded its first-round pick earlier in the offseason to New Orleans for wide receiver Brandin Cooks, had yet to pick when the Rams turned in their card on Everett. Halfway between the Rams’ and Browns’ picks, Cincinnati took the draft’s most controversial pick, Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon at No. 48 overall. In 2014, he was charged with misdemeanor assault for punching a woman in the face

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Notre Dame quarterback DeShone Kizer runs the ball during a game in November against Southern California in Los Angeles. Many felt Kizer had a disappointing season for the 4-8 Irish.

in a Norman, Okla., cafe. Mixon was suspended for the ’14 season, received one year’s probation with mandatory community service and counseling. Some teams took Mixon off their board entirely, but the Bengals made him the fourth running back taken in this draft behind LSU’s Leonard Fournette, Stanford’s Christian McCaffrey and Florida State’s Dalvin Cook. Cook, who like Mixon was thought to have first-round talent, was taken earlier in the second round by Minnesota at No. 41 overall. At 6-4, 233 pounds, Kizer has a quick release and the aforementioned arm strength that all make some draft analysts feel he has the highest ceiling of any quarterback in this year’s draft. But his pocket presence and decision-making left something to be desired last season in South Bend. He was benched briefly during Notre Dame’s abysmal 4-8 season, and at the NFL Scouting Combine took full responsibility. “Going into that season, we were very confident,” he said. “I was pretty confident in my abilities. But after the end of the year, and after a lot of film study and reflecting on the season, the ball’s

in my hands every play. I’ve just gotta make more plays.” Whether or not Kizer is ready to play right away in the NFL certainly is debatable, but the competition in Cleveland is hardly formidable, with Cody Kessler, Brock Osweiler and Kevin Hogan on the depth chart at quarterback. As for the Rams, new coach Sean McVay is hoping Everett can be a Jordan Reed-type performer at tight end. As offensive coordinator in Washington, McVay had Reed among his receiving options. Everett is 6-3, 239, and is fast for the position, running a 4.60 in the 40. He caught 49 passes for 717 yards and four touchdowns last season, and projects as a “move” tight end who can go in motion and even line up wide. “I think I bring the complete package of a tight end,” Everett said on his conference call with Rams reporters. “Definitely a vertical threat first, but also being a willing blocker in the run game. Just being able to create a mismatch at any point in the game.” The Rams went for offense again in the third round, selecting Eastern Washington wide receiver Cooper Kupp five picks into the round at No. 69 overall. Kupp was

highly productive in the Big Sky Conference, catching 428 passes for 6,464 yards and a whopping 73 career receiving touchdowns. His speed is a little below average, however, at 4.62 in the 40, and it remains to be seen how productive he will be at the NFL level. The thousands of fans in attendance in Philly didn’t grow weary of booing Goodell. They had some boos left when Mixon’s pick was announced.. According to Bengals.com, Mixon fought tears during his conference call with reporters. “I wanted to be honest and look them in the eye,” Mixon said of his pre-draft visit to Cincinnati, “I’m very grateful and honored to be part of the Bengals.” Coupled with the selection of speedy Washington wide receiver John Ross in the first round Thursday, the Bengals have added elite playmaking potential on offense. But veteran coach Marvin Lewis was aware that the selection of Mixon may not be popular with everyone in Cincinnati. “Some of our fans are pausing for a second,” Lewis said. “I understand that. ... We feel really comfortable about how to handle it.”

> NFL draft • Rounds four to seven, 11 a.m. Saturday, ESPN, NFL Network

NOTEBOOK

Jacksonville Jaguars take Illinois’ Smoot He says year with Smith, former pro coaches, improved his game BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Dawuane Smoot’s sack total dropped from eight in 2015 to five last season, and that probably contributed to the fact that he was still available at No. 68 overall — the fourth pick in the third round when Jacksonville called. But his body of work with the University of Illinois was enough to make him a Day 2 selection for a team that continues to load up on defense. Smoot, a 6-foot-3, 264-pound defensive end, will begin his NFL career backing up free-agent Calais Campbell, the former Arizona Cardinal. “I was getting a little stressed because I didn’t get picked up yet,” Smoot said on his conference call with Jacksonville reporters. “But you guys came at the right time. “I felt like with my talent, I should have went a lot higher, but I’m just happy that I was able to get picked.” Smoot was a two-year starter for the Illini and took part in the Senior Bowl in January. He had 15 tackles for loss in both of those seasons, and finished in the school’s top 10 career list in both categories. Even though his sack total dropped last season, Smoot felt 2016 still may have been his best college season, working with new head coach Lovie Smith and a staff full of coaches with NFL experience. “I was able to learn from pro coaches and was able to work

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Illinois defensive end Dawuane Smoot (right) celebrates with linebacker Tre Watson after a tackle against Michigan State in November.

my craft more by working on my hands and stuff,” said Smooth, who met with the Jaguars at the NFL Scouting Combine.

DRAFT BITS

Former St. Louis Cardinals great Jim Hart, the strong-armed quarterback out of Southern Illinois, announced the Arizona pick early in the second round — safety

Budda Baker of Washington. • Wide receiver Corey Davis, who went No, 5 overall to Tennessee, joined linebacker Jason Babin (No. 27 to Houston in 2004) as the only Western Michigan players ever drafted. • When LSU’s Leonard Fournette and Stanford’s Christian McCaffrey went No. 4 and No. 8 Thursday, it marked the first time since

2005 that two or more running backs went in the top 10. • Wisconsin linebacker T.J. Watt went 30th overall to Pittsburgh; brother J.J. Watt went 11th overall to Houston in 2011. They are the eighth set of brothers since 1990 to get drafted in Round 1. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 2 DRAFT SELECTIONS At Philadelphia, Friday SECOND ROUND 33. Green Bay (from Cleveland), Kenny King, db, Washington. 34. Jacksonville (from San Francisco through Seattle), Cam Robinson, ot, Alabama. 35. Seattle (from Jacksonville), Malik McDowell, dt, Michigan State. 36. Arizona (from Chicago), Budda Baker, s, Washington. 37. Buffalo (from LA Rams), Zay Jones, wr, East Carolina. 38. Los Angeles Chargers, Forrest Lamp, g, Western Kentucky. 39. New York Jets, Marcus Maye, s, Florida. 40. Carolina, Curtis Samuel, rb, Ohio State. 41. Minnesota (from Cincinnati), Dalvin Cook, rb, Florida State. 42. New Orleans, Marcus Williams, s, Utah. 43. Philadelphia, Sidney Jones, cb, Washington. 44. Los Angeles Rams (from Buffalo), Gerald Everett, te, South Alabama. 45. Chicago (from Arizona), Adam Shaheen, te, Ashland. 46. Indianapolis, Quincy Wilson, cb, Florida. 47. Baltimore, Tyus Bowser, lb, Houston. 48. Cincinnati (from Minnesota), Joe Mixon, rb, Oklahoma. 49. Washington, Ryan Anderson, lb, Alabama. 50. Tampa Bay, Justin Evans, s, Texas A&M. 51. Denver, DeMarcus Walker, de, Florida State. 52. Cleveland (from Tennessee), DeShone Kizer, qb, Notre Dame. 53. Detroit, Jalen Tabor, cb, Florida. 54. Miami, Raekwon McMillan, lb, Ohio State. 55. New York Giants, Dalvin Tomlinson, dt, Alabama. 56. Oakland, Obi Melifonwu, s, UConn. 57. Houston, Zach Cunningham, lb, Vanderbilt. 58. Seattle, Ethan Pocic, c, LSU. 59. Kansas City, Tanoh Kpassagnon, de, Villanova. 60. Dallas, Chidobe Awuzie, cb, Colorado. 61. Green Bay, Josh Jones, s, NC State. 62. Pittsburgh, JuJu Smith-Schuster, wr, Southern Cal. 63. Buffalo (from Atlanta), Dion Dawkins, g, Temple. 64. Carolina (from New England), Taylor Moton, g, Western Michigan. THIRD ROUND 65. Cleveland, Larry Ogunjobi, dt, Charlotte. 66. San Francisco, Ahkello Witherspoon, cb, Colorado. 67. New Orleans (from Chicago through San Francisco), Alvin Kamara, rb, Tennessee. 68. Jacksonville, Dawuane Smoot, de, Illinois. 69. Los Angeles Rams, Cooper Kupp, wr, Eastern Washington. 70. Minnesota (from NY Jets), Pat Elflein, c, Ohio State. 71. Los Angeles Chargers, Dan Feeney, g, Indiana. 72. Tennessee (from Carolina through New England), Taywan Taylor, wr, Western Kentucky. 73. Cincinnati, Jordan Willis, lb, Kansas State. 74. Baltimore (from Philadelphia), Chris Wormley, de, Michigan. 75. Atlanta (from Buffalo), Duke Riley, lb, LSU. 76. New Orleans, Alex Anzalone, lb, Florida. 77. Carolina (from Arizona), Daeshon Hall, de, Texas A&M. 78. Baltimore, Tim Williams, lb, Alabama. 79. New York Jets (from Minnesota), ArDarius Stewart, wr, Alabama. 80. Indianapolis, Tarell Basham, de, Ohio. 81. Washington, Fabian Noreau, cb, UCLA. 82. Denver, Carlos Henderson, wr, Louisiana Tech. 83. New England (from Tennessee), Derek Rivers, de, Youngstown State. 84. Tampa Bay, Chris Godwin, wr, Penn State. 85. New England (from Detroit), Antonio Garcia, ot, Troy. 86. Kansas City (from Miami through Minnesota), Kareem Hunt, rb, Toledo. 87. New York Giants, Davis Webb, qb, California. 88. Oakland, Eddie Vanderdoes, dt, UCLA. 89. Houston, D’Onta Foreman, rb, Texas. 90. Seattle, Shaquill Griffin, db, UCF. 91. Los Angeles Rams (from Kansas City through Buffalo), John Johnson, s, Boston College. 92. Dallas, Jourdan Lewis, cb, Michigan. 93. Green Bay, Montravius Adams, dt, Auburn. 94. Pittsburgh, Cameron Sutton, cb, Tennesee. 95. Seattle (from Atlanta), Delano Hill, s, Michigan. 96. Detroit (from New England), Kenny Golladay, wr, Northern Illinois. 97. x-Miami, Cordrea Tankersley, cb, Clemson. 98. x-Arizona (from Carolina), Chad Williams, wr, Grambling State. 99. x-Philadelphia (from Baltimore), Rasul Douglas, cb, West Virginia. 100. x-Tennessee (from LA Rams), Jonnu Smith, te, FIU. 101. x-Denver, Brendan Langley, cb, Lamar. 102. x-Seattle, Nazir Jones, dt, North Carolina. 103. x-New Orleans (from Cleveland through New England), Trey Hendrickson, lb, FAU. 104. x-San Francisco (from Kansas City), C.J. Beathard, qb, Iowa. 105. x-Pittsburgh, James Conner, rb, Pittsburgh. 106. x-Seattle, Amara Darboh, wr, Michigan. 107. x-Tampa Bay (from New York Jets), Kendall Beckwith, lb, LSU.

NFL DRAFT

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B3

Kizer goes — finally — to Browns

Bengals’ pick of Oklahoma’s Mixon draws boos; Rams take TE BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-dispatch

DeShone Kizer finally got picked. The Los Angeles Rams finally made a pick. And somebody took a chance on Joe Mixon. Those were the headlines Friday in Day 2 of the NFL draft, with the second- and third-round selections made in Philadelphia. And one other thing. Once again, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell got booed loudly and repeatedly. Kizer, the Notre Dame quarterback with the big arm and prototype size, had to wait until the middle of the second round before his name was called by the Cleveland Browns. “It was definitely a different experience,” Kizer said on a conference call with Cleveland reporters. “Obviously being in Philly (Thursday) was a unique experience. I had a great time, but to sit there and wait and try to figure out where you were going to land was definitely new to me.” Kizer, who is from Toledo, Ohio, was among 22 players invited to the draft in Philadelphia. But after waiting around in the “green room” all night Thursday without his name being called, he didn’t stick around for Round 2 on Friday. He spent Friday in Toledo. Kizer was chosen No. 52 overall, the 20th player selected in the second round, and the fourth quarterback taken overall in the 2017 draft behind first-rounders Mitchell Trubisky of North Carolina, Patrick Mahomes of Texas Tech and Deshaun Watson of Clemson. Eight picks before Watson, the Rams finally got in the game at No. 44 overall, selecting tight end Gerald Everett of South Alabama. In their second draft since leaving St. Louis, the Rams were without a first-round pick this year as a result of the 2016 trade for quarterback Jared Goff. They were originally set to pick earlier in the second round at No. 37 overall but traded out of the spot with Buffalo for Everett, who’s the first player drafted out of South Alabama, which began its program in 2009. By the time the Rams made their pick, 30 of the other 32 NFL squads had already made at least one selection. Only Super Bowl champion New England, which traded its first-round pick earlier in the offseason to New Orleans for wide receiver Brandin Cooks, had yet to pick when the Rams turned in their card on Everett. Halfway between the Rams’ and Browns’ picks, Cincinnati took the draft’s most controversial pick, Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon at No. 48 overall. In 2014, he was charged with misdemeanor assault for punching a woman in the face

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Notre Dame quarterback DeShone Kizer runs the ball during a game in November against Southern California in Los Angeles. Many felt Kizer had a disappointing season for the 4-8 Irish.

in a Norman, Okla., cafe. Mixon was suspended for the ’14 season, received one year’s probation with mandatory community service and counseling. Some teams took Mixon off their board entirely, but the Bengals made him the fourth running back taken in this draft behind LSU’s Leonard Fournette, Stanford’s Christian McCaffrey and Florida State’s Dalvin Cook. Cook, who like Mixon was thought to have first-round talent, was taken earlier in the second round by Minnesota at No. 41 overall. At 6-4, 233 pounds, Kizer has a quick release and the aforementioned arm strength that all make some draft analysts feel he has the highest ceiling of any quarterback in this year’s draft. But his pocket presence and decision-making left something to be desired last season in South Bend. He was benched briefly during Notre Dame’s abysmal 4-8 season, and at the NFL Scouting Combine took full responsibility. “Going into that season, we were very confident,” he said. “I was pretty confident in my abilities. But after the end of the year, and after a lot of film study and reflecting on the season, the ball’s

in my hands every play. I’ve just gotta make more plays.” Whether or not Kizer is ready to play right away in the NFL certainly is debatable, but the competition in Cleveland is hardly formidable, with Cody Kessler, Brock Osweiler and Kevin Hogan on the depth chart at quarterback. As for the Rams, new coach Sean McVay is hoping Everett can be a Jordan Reed-type performer at tight end. As offensive coordinator in Washington, McVay had Reed among his receiving options. Everett is 6-3, 239, and is fast for the position, running a 4.60 in the 40. He caught 49 passes for 717 yards and four touchdowns last season, and projects as a “move” tight end who can go in motion and even line up wide. “I think I bring the complete package of a tight end,” Everett said on his conference call with Rams reporters. “Definitely a vertical threat first, but also being a willing blocker in the run game. Just being able to create a mismatch at any point in the game.” The Rams went for offense again in the third round, selecting Eastern Washington wide receiver Cooper Kupp five picks into the round at No. 69 overall. Kupp was

highly productive in the Big Sky Conference, catching 428 passes for 6,464 yards and a whopping 73 career receiving touchdowns. His speed is a little below average, however, at 4.62 in the 40, and it remains to be seen how productive he will be at the NFL level. The thousands of fans in attendance in Philly didn’t grow weary of booing Goodell. They had some boos left when Mixon’s pick was announced.. According to Bengals.com, Mixon fought tears during his conference call with reporters. “I wanted to be honest and look them in the eye,” Mixon said of his pre-draft visit to Cincinnati, “I’m very grateful and honored to be part of the Bengals.” Coupled with the selection of speedy Washington wide receiver John Ross in the first round Thursday, the Bengals have added elite playmaking potential on offense. But veteran coach Marvin Lewis was aware that the selection of Mixon may not be popular with everyone in Cincinnati. “Some of our fans are pausing for a second,” Lewis said. “I understand that. ... We feel really comfortable about how to handle it.”

> NFL draft • Rounds four to seven, 11 a.m. Saturday, ESPN, NFL Network

NOTEBOOK

Jacksonville Jaguars take Illinois’ Smoot He says year with Smith, former pro coaches, improved his game BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Dawuane Smoot’s sack total dropped from eight in 2015 to five last season, and that probably contributed to the fact that he was still available at No. 68 overall — the fourth pick in the third round when Jacksonville called. But his body of work with the University of Illinois was enough to make him a Day 2 selection for a team that continues to load up on defense. Smoot, a 6-foot-3, 264-pound defensive end, will begin his NFL career backing up free agent acquisition Calais Campbell, the former Arizona Cardinal. “I was getting a little stressed because I didn’t get picked up yet,” Smoot said on his conference call with Jacksonville reporters. “But you guys came at the right time. “I felt like with my talent, I should have went a lot higher, but I’m just happy that I was able to get picked.” Smoot was a two-year starter for the Illini and took part in the Senior Bowl in January. He had 15 tackles for loss in both of those seasons, and finished in the school’s top 10 career list in both sacks and tackles for loss. Even though his sack total dropped last season, Smoot felt 2016 still may have been his best college season, working with new head coach Lovie Smith and a staff full of coaches with NFL experience. “I was able to learn from pro

Kareem Hunt. Kpassagnon, whose mother is from Uganda and father from the Ivory Coast, stands a shade under 6 feet 7 and weighs 289 pounds. He’s considered an athletic developmental player and had 11 sacks and 21 1/2 tackles for loss last season. Hunt led the Mid-American Conference twice in rushing at Toledo, including the 2016 season when he gained 1,475 yards and averaged 5.6 yards per carry. Hunt, 5-11, 216, fumbled only once in 855 touches in college.

DRAFT BITS

Former St. Louis Cardinals great Jim Hart, the strong-armed quarterback out of Southern Illinois, announced the Arizona pick early ASSOCIATED PRESS in the second round — safety Budda Baker of Washington. Illinois defensive end Dawuane Smoot (right) celebrates with linebacker • Wide receiver Corey Davis, who Tre Watson after a tackle against Michigan State in November. went No, 5 overall to Tennessee, coaches and was able to work starts for Florida State and won joined linebacker Jason Babin (No. my craft more by working on my the Jacobs Blocking Trophy twice 27 to Houston in 2004) as the only hands and stuff,” said Smoot, who as the top offensive lineman in the Western Michigan players ever met with the Jaguars at the NFL Atlantic Coast Conference. drafted. Scouting Combine. • When LSU’s Leonard Fournette CHIEFS’ PICKS and Stanford’s Christian McCafWAIT ANOTHER DAY After making one of the first frey went No. 4 and No. 8 ThursTwo other area players who round’s boldest moves in trad- day, it marked the first time since looked like they had Day 2 cre- ing up for Texas Tech quarter- 2005 that two or more running dentials, Carroll Phillips and Rod- back Patrick Mahomes on Thurs- backs went in the top 10. erick Johnson, must wait until day, the Chiefs went with a pass • Wisconsin linebacker T.J. Watt rusher and running back on Day 2. went 30th overall to Pittsburgh; Saturday to get the call. Late in the second round at No. brother J.J. Watt went 11th overall Phillips, 6-3, 242, was a fulltime starter only one season at Il- 59 overall, the Chiefs selected to Houston in 2011. They are the linois but had nine sacks and 20 Villanova defensive end Tanoh eighth set of brothers since 1990 Kpassagnon (pronounced tawn- to get drafted in Round 1. tackles for loss last season. Johnson, a Post-Dispatch Su- o pass-N-yo). In the third round, Jim Thomas per 30 recruit at Hazelwood Cen- they traded up 18 spots to No. 86 @jthom1 on Twitter tral High, made 31 consecutive overall for Toledo running back jthomas@post-dispatch.com


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Paajarvi out of lineup, Barbashev back in Yeo is using healthy scratches as a method to prod players he believes are slipping BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD AND TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Magnus Paajarvi, the hero of Game 5 of the Blues’ first-round series with the Wild by scoring the overtime goal that gave the Blues the series, was a healthy scratch for Game 2 of the conference semifinals on Friday night. Ivan Barbashev, who had been a healthy scratch the past two games, was back in the lineup, skating on a line with Jori Lehtera and Vladimir Sobotka. Paajarvi had just two points in the five games with the Wild, an assist in Game 2 and the overtime winner. Blues coach Mike Yeo had spoken with Paajarvi before Game 5 about being more active. “He bounced back, he had a great Game 5,” Yeo said. “There’s obviously parts of our last game where a number of guys we didn’t feel were quite up to the speed and battle level that we need, but he’ll be fine. That was Game 1 after a bit of a layoff, and so we still have tons of confidence in Magnus and know he’s a guy that can come back at any time and help us.” The Blues were hoping to get the same kind of boost from Barbashev that they got when they put Jori Lehtera back in the

lineup after he had been a healthy scratch. Barbashev played in the first four games of the Wild series, then was sat for Game 5, with Yeo saying that there had been some slipping in his play. “Just a good learning thing for me just to be out of the lineup for a couple games and it’s good to be back,” Barbashev said. “Maybe when I got here at first, I was winning every battle. In the last couple games, especially in the series against Minnesota, I was losing a lot of (battles) and that’s probably why I was out of the lineup.” “We like to give players a chance to respond and a chance to get back in there when they come out of the lineup,” Yeo said. “We saw what it did for (Lehtera). This is in no way anything against Magnus. … Barbie’s been a good player for us for a long time, too. He brings a physical element but there’s more to his game than just that. He has the ability to make plays, he plays with a conscience as far as how he plays without the puck. But when he gets the puck in the offensive zone, he has a chance to create something.”

POWER-PLAY FUTILITY

The Blues entered Game 2 with the NHL’s least productive power play in the post-

season. Through six games, the unit had scored just once on 16 opportunities (6.3 percent), though it put up a goal by Vladimir Tarasenko in the first period Friday night. The previous power-play goal was scored by Jaden Schwartz in a 3-1 win over Minnesota in Game 3 of the first round. “We’ve got to find ways to score goals, simple as that,” Blues captain Alex Pietrangelo said. “One for 16, that’s not good enough on our side. It’s been a topic of conversation here the past couple of days. I think we need a little more urgency.” The Blues had registered just 28 shots on goal with a 5-on-4 advantage in the playoffs before Game 2. “Yeah, we’ve got to shoot the puck,” Pietrangelo said. “I think with more shots, you might get some bounces like (Nashville) got on their goals. Just got to create more opportunities.” The Blues would also benefit from forcing opponents to take penalties and thus create more power-play chances. Of the eight teams remaining in the playoffs, they are tied for the second-fewest chances, trailing only Nashville (11). “That’s part of it, but you know what, if we’re only going to get one power play

tonight, then we have to be a little bit more aggressive and execute better on it,” Yeo said. “If we’re not getting enough, no matter what we have to be sharper.”

BORTUZZO REFLECTS

Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo had a closeup view of the horrific injury to Kevin Fiala in Game 1. It was Bortuzzo who was defending the Nashville forward and was on his back as he slid into the wall, breaking his left femur. “It happens incredibly fast out there,” Bortuzzo said. “I’m looking to end his progress, poke the puck off his stick. I wasn’t really focused on whether he was falling. Just mostly trying to impede progress. Like I said, it was an incredibly unfortunate result.” Bortuzzo wished Fiala the best. “You never want to see something like that,” he said. “It’s a terribly unfortunate result to a play. You kind of just have to put it behind you. You wish him the best in his recovery, but you have to move forward and put it behind you. It’s a tough sport out there.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Blues fall behind twice but edge Nashville 3-2

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jake Allen blocks a shot by the Predators’ Ryan Johansen during the first period Friday night. Allen helped the Blues tie the second-round series at a game apiece. BLUES • FROM B1

Scottrade Center was screaming when the goal happened with 3 minutes, 51 seconds left in regulation, but like Tarasenko, it was distinctly understood to be Blues fans celebrating a win that evened the best-ofseven Western Conference semifinal series with Predators at one game apiece. Game 3 is Sunday in Nashville at 2 p.m. Just as some in St. Louis were beginning to question the contributions of Tarasenko, he became their hero once again, scoring his second and third goals of the postseason. “It’s not about my goals,” Tarasenko said. “We can’t lose this one, so it’s a tied series. If you don’t score some games, you need to help your team, you can’t get a night off. It’s playoff and I don’t really care who scored and who not score. We just need the wins to win the Cup.” Tarasenko had some help in Game 2. Goalie Jake Allen finished with 22 saves Friday, including a few in the final minute with Rinne pulled for an extra attacker that shook the building with every stop. “The guys did a great job again, really battled hard the last five minutes,” Allen said. “It was impressive.” The Blues’ fifth win of the playoffs and first in this series didn’t come easy. They trailed Nashville 2-1 with 16:53 left in regulation but tied the score 2-2 on Jori Lehtera’s first goal of the playoffs and then went on ahead on Tarasenko’s second of the game. Lehtera, who had been a popular pick

to be a healthy scratch among many fans, poked a loose puck past Rinne, tying the score with 12:21 left in regulation. Tarasenko also had been under some pressure for not delivering much offense in the playoffs, but after taking a pass from Schwartz that was kicked up to him by defenseman Edmundson, he buried the game-winner. So on just 20 shots, the Blues scored three for the second straight game against Rinne. The second game of the series began much like the first with the Blues dominating the play and Nashville coming up with the first goal. Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo failed to clear the puck, and on just the Predators’ second shot, Ryan Ellis’ blast from the point brushed off Colton Sissons and James Neal on the way past Allen. It was the sixth straight goal by the opposition in which Pietrangelo was on the ice, including all five by Nashville at that point and the last one against Minnesota. The game appeared headed to the first intermission with the Predators leading, but with 1:32 left in the first period, Vernon Fiddler initiated a knee-on-knee hit on Colton Parayko that opened the door for the Blues. Parayko lay on the ice briefly in pain, while defensive partner Edmundson gave Fiddler a shove. Parayko and Fiddler both went to their respective locker rooms, Parayko for further evaluation and Fiddler for a shower after being assessed a fiveminute kneeing major and a game mis-

Blues 3, Predators 2 Nashville

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First period N: Neal 1 (Ellis, Sissons), 7:49. B: Tarasenko 2 (Steen, Pietrangelo), 19:40 (pp). Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (high sticking), 8:42; Fiddler, NSH, served by Salomaki, Major (kneeing), 18:28; Fiddler, NSH, Misconduct (misconduct), 18:28. Second period None. Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (tripping), 9:14. Third period N: Ellis 3:07. B: Lehtera 1 (Berglund, Parayko), 7:39. B: Tarasenko 3 (Edmundson, Schwartz), 16:09. Penalties: Forsberg, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:31; Berglund, STL, (interference), 13:55; Ellis, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 13:55. Shots on goal Nashville 3 6 15 24 Blues 6 8 6 20 Power-plays Nashville 0 of 0; Blues 1 of 5. Goaltenders Nashville, Rinne 5-1 (20 shots-17 saves). Blues, Allen 5-2 (24-22). A: 19,506. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Pierre Racicot.

conduct. The Blues would only see 1½ minutes of their five-minute power play before the first intermission, and they wouldn’t need all of that. A unit that was just one for 17 in the postseason on the man-advantage scored on its first shot, a wrister from Tarasenko that with Paul Stastny screening in front beat Rinne to the far side. So with 19 seconds left in the period, the Blues tied the score 1-1, and they got Parayko back to start the second period. And for the second straight game, following Kevin Fiala’s departure in Game 1 after

a serious leg injury, Nashville was down to just 11 forwards with a lot of game left to play. Tarasenko’s second goal of the postseason, which was his first on the power play since March 16, was the only offense the Blues managed on the man-advantage. In fact, they had just two shots in the five minutes. That was theme of the night for the Blues, who after two periods Friday had nine minutes of power-play time and just four attempts. The Predators, meanwhile, still hadn’t had a power play and were limited to just nine shots overall through 40 minutes. Allen saw more action than that between TV timeouts in Game 1 against Minnesota, his 51-save performance, but he didn’t have the night off completely. There were saves on Viktor Arvidsson and Filip Forsberg early in the third period to keep it a 1-1 game. But moments later, Nashville picked up the go-ahead goal after another Blues turnover in the defensive zone. This time, Vladimir Sobotka tried to make a quick outlet pass to Patrik Berglund, but it was intercepted by Ellis, who skated deeper into the offensive zone and ripped a gloveside shot past Allen with 16:53 left. But the Blues tied the score on Lehtera’s goal and then got the game-winner from Tarasenko, sending the Blues to the Music City all square at one game apiece. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Paajarvi out of lineup, Barbashev back in Yeo is using healthy scratches as a method to prod players he believes are slipping BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD AND TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Magnus Paajarvi, the hero of Game 5 of the Blues’ first-round series with the Wild by scoring the overtime goal that gave the Blues the series, was a healthy scratch for Game 2 of the conference semifinals on Friday night. Ivan Barbashev, who had been a healthy scratch the past two games, was back in the lineup, skating on a line with Jori Lehtera and Vladimir Sobotka. Paajarvi had just two points in the five games with the Wild, an assist in Game 2 and the overtime winner. Blues coach Mike Yeo had spoken with Paajarvi before Game 5 about being more active. “He bounced back, he had a great Game 5,” Yeo said. “There’s obviously parts of our last game where a number of guys we didn’t feel were quite up to the speed and battle level that we need, but he’ll be fine. That was Game 1 after a bit of a layoff, and so we still have tons of confidence in Magnus and know he’s a guy that can come back at any time and help us.” The Blues were hoping to get the same kind of boost from Barbashev that they got when they put Jori Lehtera back in the

lineup after he had been a healthy scratch. Barbashev played in the first four games of the Wild series, then was sat for Game 5, with Yeo saying that there had been some slipping in his play. “Just a good learning thing for me just to be out of the lineup for a couple games and it’s good to be back,” Barbashev said. “Maybe when I got here at first, I was winning every battle. In the last couple games, especially in the series against Minnesota, I was losing a lot of (battles) and that’s probably why I was out of the lineup.” “We like to give players a chance to respond and a chance to get back in there when they come out of the lineup,” Yeo said. “We saw what it did for (Lehtera). This is in no way anything against Magnus. … Barbie’s been a good player for us for a long time, too. He brings a physical element but there’s more to his game than just that. He has the ability to make plays, he plays with a conscience as far as how he plays without the puck. But when he gets the puck in the offensive zone, he has a chance to create something.”

POWER-PLAY FUTILITY

The Blues entered Game 2 with the NHL’s least productive power play in the post-

season. Through six games, the unit had scored just once on 16 opportunities (6.3 percent), though it put up a goal by Vladimir Tarasenko in the first period Friday night. The previous power-play goal was scored by Jaden Schwartz in a 3-1 win over Minnesota in Game 3 of the first round. “We’ve got to find ways to score goals, simple as that,” Blues captain Alex Pietrangelo said. “One for 16, that’s not good enough on our side. It’s been a topic of conversation here the past couple of days. I think we need a little more urgency.” The Blues had registered just 28 shots on goal with a 5-on-4 advantage in the playoffs before Game 2. “Yeah, we’ve got to shoot the puck,” Pietrangelo said. “I think with more shots, you might get some bounces like (Nashville) got on their goals. Just got to create more opportunities.” The Blues would also benefit from forcing opponents to take penalties and thus create more power-play chances. Of the eight teams remaining in the playoffs, they are tied for the second-fewest chances, trailing only Nashville (11). “That’s part of it, but you know what, if we’re only going to get one power play

tonight, then we have to be a little bit more aggressive and execute better on it,” Yeo said. “If we’re not getting enough, no matter what we have to be sharper.”

BORTUZZO REFLECTS

Blues defenseman Robert Bortuzzo had a closeup view of the horrific injury to Kevin Fiala in Game 1. It was Bortuzzo who was defending the Nashville forward and was on his back as he slid into the wall, breaking his left femur. “It happens incredibly fast out there,” Bortuzzo said. “I’m looking to end his progress, poke the puck off his stick. I wasn’t really focused on whether he was falling. Just mostly trying to impede progress. Like I said, it was an incredibly unfortunate result.” Bortuzzo wished Fiala the best. “You never want to see something like that,” he said. “It’s a terribly unfortunate result to a play. You kind of just have to put it behind you. You wish him the best in his recovery, but you have to move forward and put it behind you. It’s a tough sport out there.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Blues fall behind twice but edge Nashville 3-2

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Jake Allen blocks a shot by the Predators’ Ryan Johansen during the first period Friday night. Allen helped the Blues tie the second-round series at a game apiece. BLUES • FROM B1

Scottrade Center was screaming when the goal happened with 3 minutes, 51 seconds left in regulation, but like Tarasenko, it was distinctly understood to be Blues fans celebrating a win that evened the best-ofseven Western Conference semifinal series with Predators at one game apiece. Game 3 is Sunday in Nashville at 2 p.m. Just as some in St. Louis were beginning to question the contributions of Tarasenko, he became their hero once again, scoring his second and third goals of the postseason to jump both Red Berenson and Brian Sutter into third on the franchise’s all-time list with 22. “It’s not about my goals,” Tarasenko said. “We can’t lose this one, so it’s a tied series. If you don’t score some games, you need to help your team, you can’t get a night off. It’s playoff and I don’t really care who scored and who not score. We just need the wins to win the Cup.” Tarasenko had some help in Game 2, which was the first loss of the postseason for Nashville after five straight victories. Blues goalie Jake Allen bounced back from a tough-luck game-winning goal for the Predators in their 4-3 victory in Game 1, finishing with 22 saves Friday. Nashville had 15 of its 24 shots in the game in the third period, but the Blues also had 12 of their 24 blocks in the final frame. “The guys did a great job again, really battled hard the last five minutes,” Allen said. “It was impressive.” Allen had a few saves in the final minute that had Scottrade Center shaking, including a hair-raising stop on the Preda-

tors’ James Neal with 37 seconds remaining. Well, for those who have hair. “It’s plays like that that I have the barber that I do,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. The Blues wouldn’t have even been in that position without a game-tying goal from Jori Lehtera, who was a healthy scratch in three of the five games in the team’s first-round series and a popular pick to remain in the pressbox. But there was Lehtera, less than five minutes after Ryan Ellis handed Nashville’s a 2-1 lead early in the third period, poking in his first of the posteason for a 2-2 score with 12:21 left in regulation. “What it came down to basically was that we know what (Lehtera) is capable of and that we believe in him,” Yeo said. “We didn’t feel it was quite there to that level. And we were happy to give him a chance to respond. Very happy for him. It shows up on the score sheet, but his competitive level right now is very high.” Tarasenko also had been under some pressure for not delivering much offense in the playoffs. He eased some of that burden with a power-play goal late in the first period, tying the score 1-1 after Neal had netted the game’s first goal. The Blues went on a five-minute power-play with 1:32 left in the first period when Nashville’s Vernon Fiddler delivered a knee-on-knee hit on Colton Parayko. The defenseman briefly lay on the ice in pain before he and Predators forward both went to their respective locker rooms — Parayko for further evaluation and Fiddler for a shower after being assessed a five-minute kneeing major and a

Blues 3, Predators 2 Nashville

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First period N: Neal 1 (Ellis, Sissons), 7:49. B: Tarasenko 2 (Steen, Pietrangelo), 19:40 (pp). Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (high sticking), 8:42; Fiddler, NSH, served by Salomaki, Major (kneeing), 18:28; Fiddler, NSH, Misconduct (misconduct), 18:28. Second period None. Penalties: Johansen, NSH, (tripping), 9:14. Third period N: Ellis 2 (unassisted), 3:07. B: Lehtera 1 (Berglund, Parayko), 7:39. B: Tarasenko 3 (Edmundson, Schwartz), 16:09. Penalties: Forsberg, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:31; Berglund, STL, (interference), 13:55; Ellis, NSH, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 13:55. Shots on goal Nashville 3 6 15 24 Blues 6 8 6 20 Power-plays Nashville 0 of 0; Blues 1 of 5. Goaltenders Nashville, Rinne 5-1 (20 shots-17 saves). Blues, Allen 5-2 (24-22). A: 19,506. Referees: Steve Kozari, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Matt MacPherson, Pierre Racicot.

game misconduct. A Blues power-play unit that was just one for 17 in the playoffs answered with its second goal of the postseason, a wrist shot from Tarasenko with 19 seconds remaining in the opening period. The Blues joined Parayko in the locker room, where Edmundson glanced at Tarasenko sitting in his stall. “He had a different look in his eye like I knew he was going to do something special,” Edmundson said. “Actually, I saw that look yesterday, to be honest with you,” Yeo said. That special moment didn’t happen during the second period — a sluggish,

scoreless part of Friday’s game — but instead it came with the game on the line. After the pass from Schwartz that was kicked up to him by defenseman Edmundson, Tarasenko shot the puck off Predators defenseman Roman Josi past Rinne. “It ended up actually going off a stick and in, but I’m not taking anything away from him (Tarasenko),” Rinne said. “He has a great shot for a reason.” The Blues have seen it even more often from Tarasenko, but continue to marvel. “He’s really got his stick going now,” Allen said. “He was a little frustrated with himself in the first series. He is a premier goal scorer. Not being able to score in the first few games was tough on him. He took it to heart. He’s been practicing really had the last couple of days, shooting pucks in practice, and it’s paying off.” “He’s a guy that I think what he’s done in the playoffs speaks for itself,” Yeo said. “It’s a tough challenge. It’s tougher; it’s not tougher, but it’s tough on a guy like that when you have to answer the questions — ‘You’re not scoring’ — and obviously the pressure that you have to deal with it, the matchups that you face, the focus that the other team puts on you. It’s a mental toughness that he’s been battling through real hard and real impressively and obviously did a great job for us tonight.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com


STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

Tarasenko’s two goals keep Blues out of a big hole

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues left winger David Perron (left) is taken down by Predators center Ryan Johansen in the second period Friday night. Johansen was penalized for tripping on the play. HOCHMAN • FROM B1

rose. The guy saved the season. Yeah, it was tied in the third period — Game 2 could’ve gone to overtime, and some unlikely Joel Edmundson-type could’ve won it — but look. Nashville is nasty. This is a hockey team better than their wild-card label. If the Blues blew Game 2, they would then have been, well, the Wild — heading to the opposing arena down 0-2. Instead? Salvation. “He’s doing things that winners do,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. Oh, Vladi. What a goal. Ninety-one turned the series upside down with his snipe. The goal — St. Louis 3, Nashville 2, 3:51 remaining — immediately made lore. It was cool, it was funky, it was hairraising, it was Ari-raising — his 11-yearold friend Arianna “Ari” Dougan, a cancer patient, was in the building for Game 2, after missing the previous series while hospitalized. “When he’s got it on his stick,” teammate Scottie Upshall said in the winning dressing room, “the chances are endless. And he’s getting pucks on net. Shooting so well.” Yes, I know. These days, some stats say that being the road team isn’t the doomsday scenario it once was in sports. Last season, these very Blues won some vital playoff games on the road, so even down 0-2, the fellows would’ve scrapped. But this? It feels like a series refresh. A doover. And Tarasenko and his Blues should be thrilled at their efforts — they outshot the Predators and stayed out of the danged penalty box that doomed them in Game 1. Can you believe they caused one Nashville power play the whole night? Just so impressive. “If you believe in your teammates — the guys next to you — and your coaches, you always fight to the last second,” Tarasenko said. Which we saw from Vladimir himself. During the raucous final minute of play, and the Nashville sixth attacker looming in the Blues’ zone, it was the forward Tarasenko who sprawled on the ice to alter a shot that, otherwise, would’ve been clean and close. That play was instinctual, too, but of a different variety — one of sacrifice. “It’s not like he’s been playing poorly,” Yeo said. “Now all of a sudden, he has three goals in the last three games, but it’s more than that. It’s the way he played through it. You see him diving to break up a play.” Now, No. 91 hadn’t been playing poorly, though it’s fair to say the Wild’s scheme swallowed him at times in the first round. But one thing he hadn’t done well was, oddly, with an advantage. He had stunk on the power play. Before the game, Yeo was asked how to generate more from his power play, and

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko shoots the puck at the goal and catches the Predators’ Roman Josi in the throat during the second period.

the coach put it on himself: “That’s up to us. We can ask Vladi to be better and to do things better, but if we keep giving him the same plan, then I don’t think we’re helping him out. So we’ve got to do our part on that. We’ll see what we can do there.” But he did net the first Blues goal of the game on the power play, tying this one up. It was important at the time, but soon overlooked for the Blues’ woes on the power play, including those of No. 91. They say you can’t score if you don’t shoot, which is accurate, sure, but there’s a difference between shooting because you have the puck and shooting because you have a plan. That being said, man, Blues — shoot the puck! They were on the power play for approximately two eons and couldn’t get much going. They were given the golden ticket of power plays, a five-minute five-on-four, after the kneeing penalty by Game 1 fluke-hero Vernon Fiddler. Five power play minutes. One goal. Then later, no goals on a power play. But after the Game 1 loss, the Blues said they match up well against Nashville when it’s five-on-five. Sure enough, with 3:51 left, five Nashville skaters dropped their heads as the Blues celebrated the great Tarasenko. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com

CHRIS LEE • P-d

Blues right winger Scottie Upshall (left) reacts after being hit by Predators left winger Austin Watson in the second period of Game 2 at Scottrade Center.


04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 2

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B5

Parayko again proves to be unstoppable Defenseman leaves game after being kneed but returns to help Blues net tying goal BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

You can slam into his knee at high speed, you can twist him around like a pretzel, you can hit him in the face with a puck. It’s going to take more than that to knock Colton Parayko out of a game. Parayko did two things Friday night in Game 2 of the Blues’ conference semifinal series with Nashville that he has become well-known for in his brief time in the NHL. He took a hit that looked like it would knock him out of the game and he came back, and then he used his shot to create a goal for the Blues. It was Parayko’s shot that led to a rebound that ended with Jori Lehtera’s tap-in to tie the score with 12:21 to go in the second period, a key stop on the Blues’ way to a 3-2 win that allowed them to even their series at one game apiece. “It gives you more confidence, gives you more positive emotions when you see a guy fighting like this,” Blues forward Vladimir Tarasenko said. “To come back and play his game more desperate, it helped us. I think it was a big bump.” “He’s a gamer,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. “He’s a competitor. … To come back and play well, to come back and play fearless, that’s impressive.” For a while, it looked like he wouldn’t get a chance for any he-

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Colton Parayko was briefly injured when he was kneed Friday during the first period, but he returned to the game.

roics. With 1:32 to go in the first period, Parayko was skating with the puck behind the Blues net when Nashville’s Vernon Fiddler skated by, sticking out his knee and hitting Parayko’s left knee. Parayko crumpled to the ice and couldn’t get up, crawling toward his stick as play continued. Finally, the play was whistled dead, Fiddler got a five-minute kneeing penalty and a game misconduct and Parayko had to be helped to the dressing room, his future very much uncertain. “I saw him as soon as I came around the net,” Parayko said. “Then I went to play the puck and it bobbled off me. I don’t know if he took a different route or I went a different way, it hap-

pens so fast. It’s just one of those things. I’m assuming he wasn’t trying to do it. It’s hockey and the game’s so fast. “It got turned around. Just a weird hit. It’s all good. I’m just glad to be back out there.” Parayko got checked out and very early in the intermission knew he would be able to continue, and when he came back on the ice for the start of the second period, the Scottrade Center crowd, which had been nervously watching the players’ tunnel, roared. It should not have been a surprise, since this is only the latest installment in “You Can’t Stop Colton Parayko.” Last season, in a game in New York, Parayko got

bent over backward and everyone feared the worst, even him. (“That one was pretty scary,” he admitted.) But he showed his Gumby-like skills by being on the ice for the next game. Later in the season, in Denver, he took a puck to the face in the third period. He left the ice, got about 12 stitches, missed 13 minutes of game time, but was back on the ice and playing at the end of the game. “So far, so good,” Parayko said. “I’m very lucky, very fortunate I guess, that they weren’t worse than they could be. It’s a matter of inches between it being a lot worse. When we saw the replay, my skate just got off the ice. If it had stayed it could have been a lot different scenario, it could have really turned my knee. It’s very nice I’m able to continue to play when something like that happens. It’s obviously scary also.” “That’s a dangerous play,” center Paul Stastny said. “We’re fortunate he didn’t get too banged up. Tomorrow he’ll be a little sore but he’ll be fine for Sunday. For such a big guy, he’s a fluid mover so that when he does get into positions like that he doesn’t stiffen up. That’s a credit to him. He can take different hits from different positions and keep battling through it.” The penalty on Fiddler gave the Blues a five-minute power play, which even for their strug-

gling unit was long enough for them to get the tying goal. Getting it early in the power play made the first intermission a little better for the Blues. “Obviously when we were able to generate something on that,” Parayko said, “especially at the end of the first period. Coming into the locker room tied, it was a good opportunity for us to regroup and get back out there and continue to push.” The final push needed Parayko. He got the puck on the right side and, in a play similar to his goal in Game 1, he skated in from the point and let loose a shot that Pekka Rinne saved. The puck bounced around in the crease before Lehtera slid it in. Parayko has become wellknown for his booming shots from the point, but he’s finding that if he’s got a chance to get closer, it’s not a bad thing. “They keep working out,” he said. “So far so good. I’m going to try to take as much space as I can to make it difficult on their defense.” Parayko makes it hard just by being there, and, knowing his history, it’s going to take a lot for him to be somewhere else. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Tarasenko’s two goals keep Blues out of a big hole

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues left winger David Perron (left) is taken down by Predators center Ryan Johansen in the second period Friday night. Johansen was penalized for tripping on the play. HOCHMAN • FROM B1

The guy saved the season. Yeah, it was tied in the third period — Game 2 could’ve gone to overtime, and some unlikely Joel Edmundson-type could’ve won it — but look, Nashville is nasty. This is a hockey team better than their wild-card label. If the Blues blew Game 2, they would then have been, well, the Wild — heading to the opposing arena down 0-2. Instead? Salvation. “He’s doing things that winners do,” Blues coach Mike Yeo said. Oh, Vladi. What a goal. Ninety-one turned the series upsidedown with his snipe. The goal — St. Louis 3, Nashville 2, 3:51 remaining — immediately made lore. It was cool, it was funky, it was hairraising, it was Ari-raising — his 11-yearold friend Arianna “Ari” Dougan, a cancer patient, was in the building for Game 2, after missing the previous series while hospitalized. “When he’s got it on his stick,” teammate Scottie Upshall said in the winning dressing room, “the chances are endless. And he’s getting pucks on net. Shooting so well.” Yes, I know. These days, some stats say that being the road team isn’t the doomsday situation it once was in sports. Last season, these very Blues won some vital playoff games on the road, so even down 0-2, the fellows would’ve scrapped. But this? It feels like a series refresh. A do-

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Vladimir Tarasenko shoots the puck at the goal and catches the Predators’ Roman Josi in the throat during the second period.

over. Tarasenko and his Blues should be thrilled at their efforts — and they stayed out of the danged penalty box that doomed them in Game 1. Can you believe they didn’t cause one Nashville power play the whole night? Just so impressive. “If you believe in your teammates — the guys next to you — and your coaches, you always fight to the last second,” Tarasenko said. Which we saw from Vladimir himself. During the raucous final minute of play, with the Nashville sixth attacker looming in the Blues’ zone, it was the forward Tarasenko who sprawled on the ice to al-

ter a shot that, otherwise, would’ve been clean and close. That play was instinctual, too, but of a different variety — one of sacrifice. “It’s not like he’s been playing poorly,” Yeo said. “Now all of a sudden, he has three goals in the last three games, but it’s more than that. It’s the way he played through it. You see him diving to break up a play.” But one thing he hadn’t done well was, oddly, with an advantage. He had stunk on the power play. “That’s up to us (coaches),” Yeo said before Game 2. “We can ask Vladi to be better and to do things better, but if we keep

giving him the same plan, then I don’t think we’re helping him out. So we’ve got to do our part on that. We’ll see what we can do there.” But he did net the first Blues goal of the game on the power play, tying this one up. It was important at the time, but soon overlooked … because of the Blues’ woes on the power play, including those of No. 91. They say you can’t score if you don’t shoot, which is accurate, sure, but there’s a difference between shooting because you have the puck and shooting because you have a plan. That being said, man, Blues — shoot the puck! They were on the power play for approximately two eons and couldn’t get much going. They were given the golden ticket of power plays, a five-minute five-on-four, on the kneeing penalty by Game 1 fluke-hero Vernon Fiddler. Eleven total power play minutes. One goal. At times, the power play looked like the team in the first day of camp — tentative and out of sync. But after the Game 1 loss, the Blues asserted that they match up well against Nashville when it’s five-on-five. Sure enough, with 3:51 left, five Nashville skaters dropped their heads as the Blues celebrated the great Tarasenko. “He’s a superstar,” teammate Colton Parayko said. “He’s a player that we rely on for pretty much everything.” Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NOTEBOOK

CARDINALS 7, REDS 5 Cincinnati

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Hamilton cf

5 0 1 0

0

2

Cozart ss

5 1 1 0

0

1 .379

.211

Votto 1b

5 1 2

2

0

2 .247

Duvall lf

5 0 0 0

0

0 .214

Suarez 3b

3 0 1 0

1

1 .333

Schebler rf

3 2 2

1

1

0 .221

Mesoraco c

3 1 1 0

1

1 .333 0 .286

Gennett 2b

4 0 2

2

0

Adleman p

1 0 0 0

0

0 .250

Wood p

0 0 0 0

0

0

b-Alcantara ph 1 0 0 0

0

0 .158

Peralta p

0 0 0 0

0

0

c-Kivlehan ph

0 0 0 0

1

0 .300

Iglesias p

0 0 0 0

0

0 1.000

4

7

5

-----

Totals

35 5 10

Cardinals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Fowler cf

4 1 2

2

1

1 .236

Diaz ss

5 0 1 0

0

0 .227 0 .224

Carpenter 1b

4 0 0 0

0

Gyorko 3b

4 2 2

1

0

1 .321

Piscotty rf

3 1 2 0

1

0 .235

Molina c

3 1 1

1

0

0 .284

Socolovich p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Siegrist p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Oh p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Grichuk lf

4 1 1

1

0

1 .250

Wong 2b

2 1 1

1

2

0 .258

Lynn p

2 0 1 0

0

1

a-Adams ph

0 0 0

1

0

0 .242

Cecil p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Fryer c

1 0 0 0

0

0 .200

4

4

Totals

32 7 11

7

.111 ---

Cincinnati 010 000 040 — 5 10 1 Cardinals 003 003 10x — 7 11 0 a-out on sacrifice fly for Lynn in the 6th. b-grounded out for Wood in the 7th. c-walked for Peralta in the 8th. E: Suarez (1). LOB: Cincinnati 8, Cardinals 7. 2B: Gennett (4), Piscotty (4), Wong (6). HR: Schebler (8), off Lynn; Votto (8), off Socolovich; Fowler (4), off Adleman; Gyorko (4), off Adleman. RBIs: Votto 2 (18), Schebler (16), Gennett 2 (12), Fowler 2 (7), Gyorko (8), Molina (8), Grichuk (12), Wong (9), Adams (5). CS: Piscotty (3). SF: Molina, Adams. S: Adleman. RLISP: Cincinnati 3 (Hamilton, Cozart, Mesoraco); Cardinals 4 (Diaz 3, Grichuk). GIDP: Carpenter. DP: Cincinnati 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Adleman Wood

5 1/3 8 6

5

1

3 86 4.70

1 0

0

2

0 17 5.23

2/ 3

Peralta

1 2 1

1

0

1 17 1.69

Iglesias

1 0 0

0

1

0 16 1.46

Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Lynn

6 6 1

1

2

Cecil

1 0 0

0

0

1

3 4

4

1

0 24 8.71

0 1 0

0

1

0 16 7.56

1 1/3 0 0

0

0

1 10 4.50

Socolovich Siegrist Oh,

2/ 3

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

5 101 2.45 9 4.66

Siegrist pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.

McGwire, McCarver voted to Hall Pepper Martin also will join shrine devoted to Cardinals BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mark McGwire, who accomplished much in a little time here and Tim McCarver, who handled the pitching staff for three Cardinals World Series teams in a five-season span in the 1960s and then returned to play for the Cardinals in the next decade, too, were announced Friday as the fans’ online selections as new members of the Cardinals Hall of Fame. Joining McGwire, who has the two highest home-run totals in Cardinals history at 70 and 65 in 1998-99, and McCarver, is the “Wild Horse of the Osage,” infielder-outfielder Pepper Martin, who epitomized the style of play displayed by the “Gas House Gang” Cardinals, who won the World Series in 1934. Martin was chosen by a special “Red Ribbon” committee of Cardinals Hall of Fame managers Red Schoendienst, Whitey Herzog and Tony La Russa and media members who cover the team. The ceremony for the fourth Hall of Fame class will be Aug. 26 at Ballpark Village, and it is hoped that McGwire will be able to remain in town a couple of extra days after the San Diego Padres, for whom he is the bench coach, play the Cardinals here. McGwire and McCarver, now a Cardinals television analyst, were the top two vote-getters in the fan balloting among seven candidates. The others were Steve Carlton, Keith Hernandez, Jason Isringhausen, Edgar Renteria and Scott Rolen. Cardinals manager Mike Matheny, a teammate of McGwire’s here in 2000-01 and an opponent with Milwaukee before that, said he marveled at how McGwire handled all the attention that his home-run binges had commanded. “There was a time, specifically in ’98, when, outside of our political leaders, he was maybe the most recognizable face on the planet,” Matheny said. “To watch how he treated people when everybody wanted something from him all the time ... he handled it with as much class as I think you could handle it. The state of the game should be grateful for how he handled that.”

DIAZ UNCOMFORTABLE AT PLATE

Shortstop Aledmys Diaz was hitting just .229

at game time Friday and admitted he wasn’t “comfortable” at bat. “I have to keep working on it but I don’t feel my timing is good right now,” Diaz said. “ “It’s a tough game. Right now, I just have to focus on what I can do right — play good defense, run the bases — and when I do get my timing back, I’m going to be a better player.” Diaz has had just one walk this year — “I asked for the ball,” he joked — and admitted he had expanded his vision of the strike zone more than he had needed. “When you’re struggling, then you get anxious and you start swinging at bad pitches and you get bad results,” he said.

ROSENTHAL ON FIRE

Trevor Rosenthal topped 100 miles an hour twice in the second game Thursday night as he breezed through a 1-2-3 ninth. “I felt good. I was just hitting my spots,” said Rosenthal. Despite chiding from veteran Jonathan Broxton, Rosenthal insisted he hadn’t seen the numbers on the board. “I heard the crowd a couple of times, though,” said Rosenthal. Rosenthal, who had two occasions with a lat issue this spring, hasn’t been used on back-to-back days yet although he said, “I really haven’t been too sore. I was good all last week and the off day coming into Tuesday. I pitched in four games and I got hot (warmed up). That’s five out of seven. That’s a pretty good workload.” After 61/3 innings, Rosenthal still hasn’t walked anybody while striking out 13. The Cardinals seem to have two closers with Rosenthal and the staff leader in saves, Seung Hwan Oh, who has five after a slow start. “Trevor looked great (Thursday),” said Matheny. “Oh hasn’t been as good as he’s wanted to be and still has been good.” As to whether Rosenthal could still throw over 100 if he pitched more often, Matheny said, “That’s a great question. “You’re going to be tempted to use Trevor as often as you can. But there’s a plan and the plan basically starts with the medical team. So far, we’ve been very conservative and it’s paid off. Unfortunately, there’s a whole bunch of other arms down there (in the bullpen) that need taken care of also.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mark McGwire smiles as he rounds the bases after hitting his 70th home run of 1998.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Garcia Gyorko Molina Grichuk Wong Adams Carpenter Diaz Fowler Piscotty Fryer Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .342 38 6 13 2 0 1 4 3 4 1 1 .316 38 1 12 3 0 0 2 5 9 2 1 .308 52 8 16 4 1 3 7 6 16 1 1 .281 64 6 18 4 0 1 7 5 10 1 1 .250 76 12 19 6 0 3 11 6 24 1 2 .250 60 7 15 5 2 1 8 8 8 2 4 .242 33 1 8 2 0 0 4 4 13 0 0 .238 63 9 15 1 0 3 11 14 19 0 2 .229 83 8 19 4 0 4 7 1 8 3 3 .224 85 15 19 3 1 3 5 8 24 1 0 .215 65 7 14 3 0 2 11 11 15 1 1 .211 19 2 4 2 0 0 1 2 4 0 0 .246 741 88 182 39 4 22 85 75 177 13 21

Pitching W L ERA Leake 3 1 1.32 Bowman 1 0 1.54 Wacha 2 1 2.55 Lynn 2 1 2.70 Rosenthal 0 0 2.84 Tuivailala 0 0 3.00 Lyons 0 0 4.50 C. Martinez 0 3 4.71 Oh 1 0 5.06 Cecil 0 1 5.19 Socolovich 0 1 5.59 Wainwright 2 3 6.12 Siegrist 0 0 7.56 Broxton 0 0 9.45 Team 11 11 3.99 Prior to Friday’s game

G GS SV IP H R ER HR 4 4 0 27.1 20 4 4 0 13 0 0 11.2 6 2 2 0 4 4 0 24.2 21 8 7 3 4 4 0 23.1 16 9 7 3 7 0 2 6.1 7 2 2 1 3 0 0 3.0 3 1 1 1 1 0 0 2.0 1 1 1 0 5 5 0 28.2 28 17 15 4 10 0 5 10.2 14 6 6 2 12 0 0 8.2 9 6 5 1 7 0 0 9.2 12 8 6 0 5 5 0 25.0 39 18 17 3 9 0 0 8.1 7 7 7 2 8 0 0 6.2 10 7 7 2 22 22 7 196.0 193 96 87 22

BB SO 4 20 2 10 6 23 8 20 0 13 1 2 1 2 14 39 2 9 5 10 3 6 7 26 10 7 6 5 69 192

W: Lynn, 3-1. L: Adleman, 0-1. S: Oh, 6-7. Inherited runners-scored: Wood 2-2, Siegrist 2-2, Oh 2-0. Umpires: Home, Clint Fagan; First, Alfonso Marquez; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Dave Rackley. T: 3:08. A: 42,722 (43,975).

HOW THEY SCORED Reds second Schebler homers. One run. Reds 1, Cards 0. Cards third Grichuk reaches second on an error. Wong doubles, Grichuk scores. Fowler homers, Wong scores. Three runs. Cards 3, Reds 1. Cards sixth Gyorko homers. Piscotty walks. Molina singles, Piscotty to second. Grichuk singles, Piscotty scores, Molina to second. Wong walks, Molina to third, Grichuk to second. Adams hits a sacrifice fly, Molina scores. Three runs. Cards 6, Reds 1. Cards seventh Gyorko singles. Piscotty doubles, Gyorko to third. Molina hits a sacrifice fly, Gyorko scores. One run. Cards 7, Reds 1. Reds eighth Cozart singles. Votto homers, Cozart scores. Schebler walks. Mesoraco singles, Schebler to second. Gennett doubles, Schebler and Mesoraco score. Four runs. Cards 7, Reds 5.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Cardinals starter and winning pitcher Lance Lynn delivers in the first inning Friday night. The victory was his third of the season.

Cardinals hold off Reds to go back above .500 mark CARDS • FROM B1

to third, where third baseman Jedd Gyorko had walked in behind Suarez. The Reds’ runner, realizing he had been had, desperately tried to stab at the base but umpire David Rackley, who also was alert on the play, called Suarez out once Gyorko applied the tag and the game turned as the Cardinals put up three more runs in their sixth. Gyorko homered with one out in the inning off starter Tim Adleman. Randal Grichuk, hitting safely for the seventh straight game, singled in another run and pinch hitter Matt Adams drove in his third run in the last two games with a deep sacrifice fly as the Cardinals won for the ninth time in their last 11 games despite some late bullpen problems that were straightened out by Seung Hwan Oh in a four-out save, his sixth rescue of the season. Lynn (3-1), who struck out five for the night, fanned four Cincinnati hitters in the first two innings, including all three batsmen he faced in the first. But, with two out in the second, the Reds’ Scott Schebler struck his eighth homer of the season, a 407-foot drive to right, and the Reds had the first lead. It was Schebler’s fourth hit and third homer against the Cardinals in eight at-bats this season. Lynn helped himself on defense in the third. With Scooter Gennett at second and one out, speedy Billy Hamilton, who usually steals the Cardinals blind, bunted

for a hit on a 3-2 pitch. But Hamilton got the ball too close to the mound and Lynn moved quickly to make the pickup and threw strongly to first to nip Hamilton. Zack Cozart then flied out to end the inning. A two-base throwing error by third baseman Suarez and a two-base hit by hot-hitting Kolten Wong, who extended his hitting streak to five games, tied the game in the Cardinals’ third. Briefly. Dexter Fowler’s fourth homer, a 390foot drive to right, gave the Cardinals a 3-1 edge. It was Fowler’s eighth hit over 16 atbats in his last four games. Schebler nearly put the Reds back ahead in the fourth. Batting with two on and one out, he flied to deep right center, where right fielder Stephen Piscotty caught the ball on the warning track. Lynn then made Mesoraco his fifth strikeout victim. Schebler was troublesome again in the sixth when he singled with two out to put the tying runs on base for the Reds. But Lynn, facing his final hitter of the night, walked Mesoraco to fill the bases. Briefly. It isn’t often that a baserunner is thrown out on a walk, but nothing much seems beyond Molina. Lynn thus had finished 19 innings over his last three starts, allowing only two runs. The Cardinals’ catcher, before coming out for two innings of rest, drove in the Cardinals’ final run in the seventh with a sacrifice fly after Gyorko singled and Piscotty doubled.

Cardinals third baseman Jedd Gyorko throws to first to get Cincinnati’s Adam Duvall out in the second inning Friday night at Busch Stadium.

That made it 7-1 but it wouldn’t be quite that easy. Cincinnati made a dent against Miguel Socolovich in the eighth when Joey Votto launched his eighth homer, a two-run piece to right. When Socolovich allowed a walk and a single later in the inning, he was relieved by lefthander Kevin Siegrist, who al-

lowed a two-run double to Gennett. After Siegrist walked pinch hitter Patrick Kivlehan, he was lifted for Oh, who got Hamilton to pop up on the first pitch he threw. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NOTEBOOK

CARDINALS 7, REDS 5 Cincinnati

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Hamilton cf

5 0 1 0

0

2

Cozart ss

5 1 1 0

0

1 .379

.211

Votto 1b

5 1 2

2

0

2 .247

Duvall lf

5 0 0 0

0

0 .214

Suarez 3b

3 0 1 0

1

1 .333

Schebler rf

3 2 2

1

1

0 .221

Mesoraco c

3 1 1 0

1

1 .333 0 .286

Gennett 2b

4 0 2

2

0

Adleman p

1 0 0 0

0

0 .250

Wood p

0 0 0 0

0

0

b-Alcantara ph 1 0 0 0

0

0 .158

Peralta p

0 0 0 0

0

0

c-Kivlehan ph

0 0 0 0

1

0 .300

Iglesias p

0 0 0 0

0

0 1.000

4

7

5

-----

Totals

35 5 10

Cardinals

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Fowler cf

4 1 2

2

1

1 .236

Diaz ss

5 0 1 0

0

0 .227 0 .224

Carpenter 1b

4 0 0 0

0

Gyorko 3b

4 2 2

1

0

1 .321

Piscotty rf

3 1 2 0

1

0 .235

Molina c

3 1 1

1

0

0 .284

Socolovich p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Siegrist p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Oh p

0 0 0 0

0

0

---

Grichuk lf

4 1 1

1

0

1 .250

Wong 2b

2 1 1

1

2

0 .258

Lynn p

2 0 1 0

0

1

a-Adams ph

0 0 0

1

0

0 .242

Cecil p

0 0 0 0

0

0

Fryer c

1 0 0 0

0

0 .200

4

4

Totals

32 7 11

7

.111 ---

Cincinnati 010 000 040 — 5 10 1 Cardinals 003 003 10x — 7 11 0 a-out on sacrifice fly for Lynn in the 6th. b-grounded out for Wood in the 7th. c-walked for Peralta in the 8th. E: Suarez (1). LOB: Cincinnati 8, Cardinals 7. 2B: Gennett (4), Piscotty (4), Wong (6). HR: Schebler (8), off Lynn; Votto (8), off Socolovich; Fowler (4), off Adleman; Gyorko (4), off Adleman. RBIs: Votto 2 (18), Schebler (16), Gennett 2 (12), Fowler 2 (7), Gyorko (8), Molina (8), Grichuk (12), Wong (9), Adams (5). CS: Piscotty (3). SF: Molina, Adams. S: Adleman. RLISP: Cincinnati 3 (Hamilton, Cozart, Mesoraco); Cardinals 4 (Diaz 3, Grichuk). GIDP: Carpenter. DP: Cincinnati 1. Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Adleman Wood

5 1/3 8 6

5

1

3 86 4.70

1 0

0

2

0 17 5.23

2/ 3

Peralta

1 2 1

1

0

1 17 1.69

Iglesias

1 0 0

0

1

0 16 1.46

Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Lynn

6 6 1

1

2

Cecil

1 0 0

0

0

1

3 4

4

1

0 24 8.71

0 1 0

0

1

0 16 7.56

1 1/3 0 0

0

0

1 10 4.50

Socolovich Siegrist Oh,

2/ 3

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

5 101 2.45 9 4.66

Siegrist pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.

McGwire, McCarver voted to Hall Pepper Martin also will join shrine devoted to Cardinals BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mark McGwire, who accomplished much in a little time here and Tim McCarver, who handled the pitching staff for three Cardinals World Series teams in a five-season span in the 1960s and then returned to play for the Cardinals in the next decade, too, were announced Friday as the fans’ online selections as new members of the Cardinals Hall of Fame. Joining McGwire, who has the two highest home-run totals in Cardinals history at 70 and 65 in 1998-99, and McCarver, is the “Wild Horse of the Osage,” infielder-outfielder Pepper Martin, who epitomized the style of play displayed by the “Gas House Gang” Cardinals, who won the World Series in 1934. Martin was chosen by a special “Red Ribbon” committee of Cardinals Hall of Fame managers Red Schoendienst, Whitey Herzog and Tony La Russa and media members who cover the team. The ceremony for the fourth Hall of Fame class will be Aug. 26 at Ballpark Village, and it is hoped that McGwire will be able to remain in town a couple of extra days after the San Diego Padres, for whom he is the bench coach, play the Cardinals here. McGwire and McCarver, now a Cardinals television analyst, were the top two vote-getters in the fan balloting among seven candidates. The others were Steve Carlton, Keith Hernandez, Jason Isringhausen, Edgar Renteria and Scott Rolen. Cardinals manager Mike Matheny, a teammate of McGwire’s here in 2000-01 and an opponent with Milwaukee before that, said he marveled at how McGwire handled all the attention that his home-run binges had commanded. “There was a time, specifically in ’98, when, outside of our political leaders, he was maybe the most recognizable face on the planet,” Matheny said. “To watch how he treated people when everybody wanted something from him all the time ... he handled it with as much class as I think you could handle it. The state of the game should be grateful for how he handled that.”

DIAZ UNCOMFORTABLE AT PLATE

Shortstop Aledmys Diaz was hitting just .229

at game time Friday and admitted he wasn’t “comfortable” at bat. “I have to keep working on it but I don’t feel my timing is good right now,” Diaz said. “ “It’s a tough game. Right now, I just have to focus on what I can do right — play good defense, run the bases — and when I do get my timing back, I’m going to be a better player.” Diaz has had just one walk this year — “I asked for the ball,” he joked — and admitted he had expanded his vision of the strike zone more than he had needed. “When you’re struggling, then you get anxious and you start swinging at bad pitches and you get bad results,” he said.

ROSENTHAL ON FIRE

Trevor Rosenthal topped 100 miles an hour twice in the second game Thursday night as he breezed through a 1-2-3 ninth. “I felt good. I was just hitting my spots,” said Rosenthal. Despite chiding from veteran Jonathan Broxton, Rosenthal insisted he hadn’t seen the numbers on the board. “I heard the crowd a couple of times, though,” said Rosenthal. Rosenthal, who had two occasions with a lat issue this spring, hasn’t been used on back-to-back days yet although he said, “I really haven’t been too sore. I was good all last week and the off day coming into Tuesday. I pitched in four games and I got hot (warmed up). That’s five out of seven. That’s a pretty good workload.” After 61/3 innings, Rosenthal still hasn’t walked anybody while striking out 13. The Cardinals seem to have two closers with Rosenthal and the staff leader in saves, Seung Hwan Oh, who has five after a slow start. “Trevor looked great (Thursday),” said Matheny. “Oh hasn’t been as good as he’s wanted to be and still has been good.” As to whether Rosenthal could still throw over 100 if he pitched more often, Matheny said, “That’s a great question. “You’re going to be tempted to use Trevor as often as you can. But there’s a plan and the plan basically starts with the medical team. So far, we’ve been very conservative and it’s paid off. Unfortunately, there’s a whole bunch of other arms down there (in the bullpen) that need taken care of also.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mark McGwire smiles as he rounds the bases after hitting his 70th home run of 1998.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Gyorko Garcia Molina Wong Grichuk Adams Fowler Piscotty Diaz Carpenter Fryer Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .342 38 6 13 2 0 1 4 3 4 1 1 .321 56 10 18 4 1 4 8 6 17 1 1 .316 38 1 12 3 0 0 2 5 9 2 1 .284 67 7 19 4 0 1 8 5 10 1 1 .258 62 8 16 6 2 1 9 10 8 2 4 .250 80 13 20 6 0 3 12 6 25 1 2 .242 33 1 8 2 0 0 5 4 13 0 0 .236 89 16 21 3 1 4 7 9 25 1 0 .235 68 8 16 4 0 2 11 12 15 1 1 .227 88 8 20 4 0 4 7 1 8 3 3 .224 67 9 15 1 0 3 11 14 19 0 2 .200 20 2 4 2 0 0 1 2 4 0 0 .250 773 95 193 41 4 24 92 79 181 13 21

Pitching Leake Bowman Lynn Wacha Rosenthal Tuivailala Lyons Oh Cecil C. Martinez Wainwright Siegrist Socolovich Broxton Team

W 3 1 3 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 12

L 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 0 1 0 11

ERA 1.32 1.54 2.45 2.55 2.84 3.00 4.50 4.50 4.66 4.71 6.12 7.56 8.71 9.45 4.04

G GS SV IP H R 4 4 0 27.1 20 4 13 0 0 11.2 6 2 5 5 0 29.1 22 10 4 4 0 24.2 21 8 7 0 2 6.1 7 2 3 0 0 3.0 3 1 1 0 0 2.0 1 1 11 0 6 12.0 14 6 13 0 0 9.2 9 6 5 5 0 28.2 28 17 5 5 0 25.0 39 18 10 0 0 8.1 8 7 8 0 0 10.1 15 12 8 0 0 6.2 10 7 23 23 8 205.0 203 101

ER HR BB SO 4 0 4 20 2 0 2 10 8 4 10 25 7 3 6 23 2 1 0 13 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 2 6 2 2 10 5 1 5 11 15 4 14 39 17 3 7 26 7 2 11 7 10 1 4 6 7 2 6 5 92 24 73 199

W: Lynn, 3-1. L: Adleman, 0-1. S: Oh, 6-7. Inherited runners-scored: Wood 2-2, Siegrist 2-2, Oh 2-0. Umpires: Home, Clint Fagan; First, Alfonso Marquez; Second, Chad Fairchild; Third, Dave Rackley. T: 3:08. A: 42,722 (43,975).

HOW THEY SCORED Reds second Schebler homers. One run. Reds 1, Cards 0. Cards third Grichuk reaches second on an error. Wong doubles, Grichuk scores. Fowler homers, Wong scores. Three runs. Cards 3, Reds 1. Cards sixth Gyorko homers. Piscotty walks. Molina singles, Piscotty to second. Grichuk singles, Piscotty scores, Molina to second. Wong walks, Molina to third, Grichuk to second. Adams hits a sacrifice fly, Molina scores. Three runs. Cards 6, Reds 1. Cards seventh Gyorko singles. Piscotty doubles, Gyorko to third. Molina hits a sacrifice fly, Gyorko scores. One run. Cards 7, Reds 1. Reds eighth Cozart singles. Votto homers, Cozart scores. Schebler walks. Mesoraco singles, Schebler to second. Gennett doubles, Schebler and Mesoraco score. Four runs. Cards 7, Reds 5.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Cardinals starter and winning pitcher Lance Lynn delivers in the first inning Friday night. The victory was his third of the season.

Cardinals hold off Reds to go back above .500 mark CARDS • FROM B1

Lynn walked in from the mound to confer with catcher Yadier Molina. But Molina, still holding ball four in his glove, had unfinished business. He calmly got up from his crouch and lobbed a throw to third, where third baseman Jedd Gyorko had walked in behind Suarez. The Reds’ runner tried to stab at the base but umpire David Rackley, who also was alert on the play, called Suarez out once Gyorko applied the tag. “That was a big opportunity for that game to swing,” said Cardinals manager Mike Matheny. “Lance was at 100 pitches and we were probably going to have to make a move. Heads-up by Jedd also. Looking for it. Not giving it away. No, I’ve never seen that before. Man, great timing. “I love watching when these guys go about it like it’s a backyard pick-up game and looking for fun things or something out of the box to do. Yadi’s eyes are always looking for that. That’s part of what makes him special. He’s always looking for that next play.” Molina actually had pulled something similar in the World Baseball Classic while playing for Puerto Rico when he picked off the Netherlands’ Jurickson Profar at first base after the latter had been celebrating a single. “You’ve got to watch that guy behind the plate,” said Lynn. “He’s sneaky. “I got myself in trouble. You get two

outs on two pitches and the next thing you know you load the bases. Can’t happen. It cost me a couple of innings actually. I don’t like being a six-inning pitcher. “But he bailed me out there and we scored a bunch of runs in the bottom of the sixth, so it was kind of a game-changing play.” Gyorko hit his fourth homer with one out in the home sixth to stir the three-run pot. “He’s been our most consistent hitter,” Matheny said. “To be able to sit back and watch a changeup and let it get that deep and have that kind of power ... (and) I just love watching him defensively right now. He’s playing as good a defense as anyone we’re seeing. Making all the plays, coming in, going side to side, heads-up play on the pickoff. He’s doing everything we could ask of him.” Randal Grichuk, hitting safely for the seventh straight game and scoring for the eighth straight game, singled in another run in the sixth. And pinch hitter Matt Adams drove in his third run in the last two games with a deep sacrifice fly as the Cardinals won for the ninth time in their last 11 games despite some late bullpen problems that were straightened out by Seung Hwan Oh, who retired the last four hitters. The Korean closer posted his sixth rescue of the season and second save of at least four outs in his career. Lynn (3-1) allowed only a second-inning homer by Scott Schebler. It was Schebler’s

Cardinals third baseman Jedd Gyorko throws to first to get Cincinnati’s Adam Duvall out in the second inning Friday night at Busch Stadium.

fourth hit and third homer against the Cardinals in eight at-bats this season. It also was the first homer Lynn had given up here since Sept. 7, 2015, when he surrendered one to current teammate Dexter Fowler, who was playing with the Chicago Cubs then. Lynn helped himself on defense in the third. With a man at second and one out, speedy Billy Hamilton bunted for a hit on a 3-2 pitch. But Hamilton got the ball too close to the mound and Lynn moved

quickly to make the pickup. “You don’t see that every day,” said Matheny of the full-count bunt. “Lance moves better than people give him credit for.” Lynn explained that “I grew up in Indiana, so I played a lot of basketball growing up. I’m sneaky athletic.” But Lynn said, “If it had been a good bunt, it might have been a different story.” A two-base throwing error by third baseman Suarez and a two-base hit by hot-hitting Kolten Wong, who extended his hitting streak to five games, tied the game in the Cardinals’ third. Briefly. Fowler’s fourth homer, a two-run shot, gave the Cardinals a 3-1 edge. It was Fowler’s eighth hit over 16 at-bats in his last four games. The Cardinals ultimately went ahead 7-1, but it wasn’t quite that easy as the Reds clipped Miguel Socolovich and Kevin Siegrist for four runs in the eighth. Matheny probably didn’t want to use Oh for a four-out save but he said, “More importantly we needed a win.” After a 3-9 start, that’s 12 wins compared to 11 losses, one-half game behind the division-leading Chicago Cubs — if you’re keeping score this early in the season. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


BASEBALL

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1 NATIONAL LEAGUE L

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Chicago

12 10 .545

— 6-4

Cardinals

12

.522

½

½

Milwaukee

12 12 .500

1

1 4-6

L-1

Pittsburgh

10 12

.455

2

2 4-6 W-2

6-6

4-6

Cincinnati

10 13

.435 2½

5-8

5-5

Str Home

Away

11

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home L-2

8-2 W-3

2-8

GB WCGB L10

L-4

Away

4-5

8-5

8-5

4-6

6-9

6-3

EAST

W

L

Washington

16

7 .696

8-2

L-1

6-4

10-3

Philadelphia

11

9 .550 3½

8-2 W-6

7-4

4-5

Miami

10

11 .476

5

1½ 4-6

L-3

4-3

6-8

9 12 .429

6

2½ 4-6 W-3

4-3

5-9

Atlanta

Pct

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

New York

9 13 .409 6½

WEST

W

L

Pct

3

2-8

Arizona

15

9

.625

— 6-4

W-1

11-3

4-6

Colorado

14

9 .609

½

— 6-4

L-3

7-6

7-3

Los Angeles

11 12 .478 3½

1½ 4-6

W-1

6-4

5-8

San Diego

9 15

4 4-6

L-1

5-4

4-11

L-1

5-6

3-9

GB WCGB L10

.375

6

San Francisco 8 15 .348 6½

3-7

W-1

4-10

5-3

Str Home

Away

Friday Cardinals 7, Cincinnati 5 NY Mets 7, Washington 5 Pittsburgh 12, Miami 2 Boston 5, Cubs 4 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 8 Colorado at Arizona, late Philadelphia at LA Dodgers, late San Diego at San Francisco, late Thursday Philadelphia 3, Miami 2 Atlanta 7, NY Mets 5 Cardinals 8, Toronto 4, 11 inn. Washington 16, Colorado 5 Dodgers 5, San Fran. 1, 10 inn. Cardinals 6, Toronto 4 Arizona 6, San Diego 2

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Chicago

12

9

.571

Cleveland

12 10 .545

Detroit

11

11 .500

Minnesota

11

11 .500

Kansas City

7 15

GB WCGB L10 —

½ 1½

Str Home

Away

6-4 W-5

6-5

6-4

7-3

L-1

4-6

8-4

1

3-7

L-3

6-5

5-6

1

4-6

W-1

5-7

6-4

.318 5½

5

1-9

L-8

5-4

2-11

Str Home

Away

EAST

W

L

Pct

Baltimore

14

7

.667

New York

14

7

.667

7-3 W-3

9-1

5-6

Boston

12 10 .545 2½

5-5

W-1

8-4

4-6

Tampa Bay

12 12 .500 3½

1

6-4

W-1

9-4

3-8

4-6

L-3

2-8

4-9

Str Home

Away

Toronto

6 17

GB WCGB L10

.261

9

6-4

8-3

6-4

WEST

W

L

Pct

Houston

15

8

.652

6-4

W-1

8-4

7-4

Los Angeles 13 12 .520

3

½

6-4 W-5

9-4

4-8

11 13 .458 4½

2

5-5 W-3

6-3

5-10

Seattle

GB WCGB L10

L-1

Oakland

10 13

.435

5

5-5

L-5

7-6

3-7

Texas

10 13

.435

5

5-5

L-1

7-7

3-6

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Red Sox strike early in victory over Cubs

Red Sox 5, Cubs 4

Twins 6, Royals 4

Mariners 3, Indians 1

Rays 7, Blue Jays 4

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber dh 5 0 1 0 0 4 .212 Bryant 3b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .281 Rizzo 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .273 Zobrist lf-2b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .215 Russell ss 5 0 2 0 0 2 .281 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .254 Heyward rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .282 Baez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .203 a-Jay ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .394 Almora cf 2 2 1 1 1 0 .282 b-Montero ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .379 c-Szczur ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Totals 38 4 11 3 3 14 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bogaerts ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .313 Benintendi lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .325 4 1 1 0 0 0 .307 Betts rf Ramirez dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .250 Moreland 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .296 Pedroia 2b 3 1 2 0 1 1 .261 Bradley Jr. cf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .229 Vazquez c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .481 Hernandez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .289 Totals 33 5 13 5 3 10 Chicago 101 000 200 — 4 11 0 Boston 500 000 00x — 5 13 2 a-singled for Baez in the 8th. b-pinch hit for Almora in the 8th. c-struck out for Montero in the 8th. E: Pomeranz (1), Moreland (2). LOB: Chicago 10, Boston 7. 2B: Zobrist (3), Betts (6), Moreland (12). HR: Bryant (3), off Pomeranz; Almora (2), off Pomeranz; Benintendi (2), off Arrieta. RBIs: Bryant (13), Zobrist (9), Almora (8), Benintendi (12), Ramirez (8), Moreland (10), Bradley Jr. (5), Vazquez (4). CS: Ramirez (2). RLISP: Chicago 5 (Schwarber, Rizzo, Russell, Heyward, Baez); Boston 1 (Bogaerts). LIDP: Betts. GIDP: Baez, Benintendi, Bradley Jr.. DP: Chicago 3 (Bryant), (Baez, Rizzo), (Baez, Russell, Rizzo); Boston 1 (Bogaerts, Pedroia, Moreland). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chicago Arrieta, L, 3-1 41/3 10 5 5 3 5 98 4.66 Montgomery 12/3 2 0 0 0 0 19 1.88 Strop 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.70 Edwards 1 1 0 0 0 3 17 0.00 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz, W, 2-1 6 6 2 2 2 7 95 4.15 1/ 1 1 1 11 2.08 Scott, 3 0 1 2/ 1 0 1 17 2.13 Kelly, 3 2 1 1/ 3 1.42 Hembree, 3 2 0 0 0 0 2/ 2 12 3.86 Abad, 3 0 0 0 0 Kimbrel, S, 8-9 1 1 0 0 0 3 19 1.74 Inherited runners-scored: Montgomery 2-0, Kelly 1-1, Abad 2-0. WP: Arrieta 2, Kelly. Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Bill Welke; Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 3:28. A: 37,054.

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Kepler rf 3 2 1 0 1 1 .278 4 2 2 4 0 2 .297 Sano 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .237 Mauer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .267 Grossman dh Castro c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .200 Polanco ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Rosario lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .260 Buxton cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .138 Totals 34 6 6 6 3 10 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 1 0 0 0 .233 Merrifield 2b Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Cain cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .224 Perez c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .247 Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .181 Escobar ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Moss dh 4 1 1 1 0 0 .143 Bonifacio rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .300 34 4 8 4 3 2 Totals Minnesota 000 200 040 — 6 6 0 Kansas City 021 000 100 — 4 8 1 E: Bonifacio (1). LOB: Minnesota 4, Kansas City 6. 2B: Sano (6), Mauer (4), Perez (2). HR: Sano (6), off Kennedy; Perez (6), off Gibson; Moss (4), off Boshers. RBIs: Sano 4 (20), Mauer 2 (8), Hosmer (6), Perez 2 (11), Moss (6). RLISP: Minnesota 1 (Castro); Kansas City 3 (Merrifield, Hosmer, Gordon). GIDP: Cain. DP: Minnesota 1 (Polanco, Dozier, Mauer). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minnesota Gibson 51/3 5 3 3 3 1 85 8.06 2/ 1 0 0 12 3.00 Boshers 3 1 1 2/ 0 0 1 10 8.31 Pressly 3 0 0 Breslow, W, 1-0 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.45 2/ 0 0 0 14 6.52 Belisle, 3 1 0 1/ 0 0 0 3 5.40 Rogers, 3 0 0 Kintzler, S, 6-6 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 51/3 2 2 2 2 6 100 2.30 Kennedy 1/ 0 0 1 4 5.59 Moylan, 3 0 0 Strahm, 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 21 15.75 2/ 3 1 1 25 2.53 Soria, L, 1-1, 3 3 4 Alexander 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.74 Boshers pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Rogers 1-0, Moylan 1-0, Strahm 1-0, Alexander 1-0. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Mark Carlson. T: 3:20. A: 27,911.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .346 Gamel rf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .333 Cano 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .253 Motter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Heredia lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .310 Vogelbach dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .177 Dyson cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .235 Totals 31 3 6 3 0 8 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cleveland Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Lindor ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .314 Guyer lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .121 Encarnacion dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .205 Ramirez 3b 4 1 1 1 0 3 .337 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .174 Jackson cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .267 a-Chisenhall ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .297 Almonte rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .240 Gomes c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Totals 32 1 4 1 2 14 Seattle 000 201 000 — 3 6 1 Cleveland 000 100 000 — 1 4 0 a-struck out for Jackson in the 9th. E: Seager (4). LOB: Seattle 1, Cleveland 6. 2B: Segura (2), Gamel (1), Lindor (7). HR: Cano (4), off Carrasco; Gamel (1), off Carrasco; Ramirez (6), off Miranda. RBIs: Gamel (3), Cano 2 (17), Ramirez (19). CS: Dyson (2). RLISP: Seattle 1 (Motter); Cleveland 2 (Encarnacion, Ramirez). GIDP: Vogelbach. DP: Cleveland 1 (Santana, Lindor). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Seattle Miranda, W, 2-2 51/3 2 1 1 2 7 96 3.81 Pazos, 21/3 2 0 0 0 4 29 1.64 Diaz, S, 4-5 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 18 3.60 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco, L, 2-2 8 6 3 3 0 7 106 2.04 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.32 Otero Inherited runners-scored: Pazos 1-0, Diaz 1-0. WP: Miranda. Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Ed Hickox. T: 2:36. A: 20,842.

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson dh 5 2 2 1 0 1 .329 Kiermaier cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Longoria 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .226 Miller 2b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .217 Souza Jr. rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .326 Morrison 1b 4 1 1 2 0 2 .243 Beckham ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .282 Peterson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .294 Bourjos lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Norris c 4 1 2 2 0 1 .185 Totals 37 7 10 6 3 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pillar cf 4 3 4 1 1 0 .326 Barney 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .326 b-Coghlan ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .240 Bautista rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .167 Morales dh 5 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Smoak 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Pearce lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .176 a-Carrera ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .305 Travis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .137 Maile c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Goins ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Totals 37 4 11 3 3 5 Tampa Bay 010 000 042 — 7 10 1 Toronto 000 020 101 — 4 11 2 a-grounded out for Pearce in the 6th. b-singled for Barney in the 9th. E: Beckham (3), Travis 2 (2). LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 10. 2B: Dickerson (9), Pillar 2 (7), Travis (2). 3B: Beckham (2). HR: Dickerson (6), off Stroman; Longoria (4), off Grilli; Morrison (5), off Leone; Norris (1), off Leone; Pillar (4), off Pruitt. RBIs: Dickerson (10), Longoria (13), Morrison 2 (14), Norris 2 (8), Pillar (8), Barney (5), Bautista (6). SF: Bautista. RLISP: Tampa Bay 3 (Dickerson, Morrison, Peterson); Toronto 6 (Smoak 2, Maile, Goins 3). GIDP: Longoria, Miller, Morales. DP: Tampa Bay 1 (Beckham, Miller, Morrison); Toronto 2 (Barney, Travis, Smoak), (Travis, Goins, Smoak). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell 5 6 2 2 3 3 96 3.42 Pruitt, W, 3-0 3 3 1 1 0 1 40 5.71 1/ Diaz 1 0 0 7 4.09 3 2 1 Whitley, S, 1-1 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman 71/3 5 2 2 2 10 100 2.97 1/ Grilli, L, 1-3, 2 1 1 22 7.27 3 1 2 1/ Leone 3 0 0 15 5.06 3 4 3 Howell 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 20.25 Leone pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Whitley 1-0, Leone 1-1, Howell 1-1. WP: Howell. Umpires: Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:16. A: 36,256.

Andrew Benintendi hit a solo homer off Jake Arrieta during a five-run first inning and the host Boston Red Sox held on to beat the Chicago Cubs 5-4 Friday night. Every Boston starter had at least one hit, and Hanley Ramirez, Mitch Moreland, Jackie Bradley Jr. and Christian Vazquez also drove in a run each. Lefthander Drew Pomeranz (2-1) got the win with six innings of two-run ball, surrendering solo homers to Kris Bryant and Albert Almora Jr. in the early innings before settling in. He allowed six hits and two walks while striking out seven. Boston has won its last nine interleague games at Fenway Park. Arrieta (3-1) logged his shortest start since Aug. 28, 2014, lasting only 4 1/3 innings and giving up 10 hits and three walks with five strikeouts.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pirates 12, Marlins 2 • Francisco Cervelli drove in three runs and Pittsburgh scored eight times in the second inning to win at Miami. Jordy Mercer homered and had two RBIs, Josh Harrison had three hits and knocked in two, and Andrew McCutchen also drove in a pair of runs for the Pirates, who snapped a six-game losing streak to the Marlins. Mets 7, Nationals 5 • Josh Edgin relieved Mets closer Jeurys Familia with the bases loaded in the ninth inning and got Bryce Harper to hit into a game-ending double play, finishing a victory over host Washington that stopped New York’s six-game losing streak.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 14, Orioles 11 • Matt Holliday hit a three-run homer in the 10th inning and host New York completed a stunning rally from an eightrun deficit. Starlin Castro tied it with a two-run drive that capped a three-run burst in the ninth off Brad Brach. Then in the 10th, Holliday hit the eighth home run of the evening — five by the Yankees — with one out off Jayson Aquino. Manny Machado launched a 470-foot homer, the longest in the majors this year, for Baltimore. Rays 7, Blue Jays 4 • Logan Morrison hit a two-run homer, Evan Longoria and Corey Dickerson added solo shots and Tampa Bay connected three times in the eighth inning to beat host Toronto. Derek Norris added a solo homer in the ninth. He had two hits and two RBIs. Kevin Pillar homered and reached base five times for the Blue Jays, who lost their third straight. Toronto’s 6-17 start is the worst in franchise history. Mariners 3, Indians 1 • Ariel Miranda allowed two hits and pitched into the sixth inning, Robinson Cano and Ben Gamel homered and Seattle won at Cleveland. White Sox 7, Tigers 3 • Geovany Soto broke open a tie game with a two-run single in the eighth inning, helping Chicago beat host Detroit. Anthony Swarzak (2-0) pitched two scoreless innings for the White Sox, who won their fifth straight. Associated Press

Yankees 14, Orioles 11 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rickard lf 5 2 2 0 1 0 .182 Jones cf 5 2 2 0 1 2 .286 Machado 3b 5 2 3 3 1 0 .231 Trumbo dh 6 1 3 4 0 0 .212 Davis 1b 5 1 0 0 0 3 .247 Castillo c 4 2 1 2 1 0 .297 Mancini rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .256 1-Gentry pr-rf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .154 Schoop 2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .288 Hardy ss 5 0 2 0 0 1 .214 Totals 45 11 15 11 4 10 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .188 Higashioka c 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Headley 3b 4 2 1 0 2 1 .324 Holliday dh 5 3 3 3 1 2 .263 Ellsbury cf 5 2 1 5 0 0 .295 Castro 2b 5 2 3 2 0 0 .361 Gregorius ss 5 0 2 1 0 0 .400 Judge rf 4 2 2 3 1 2 .282 Bird 1b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .109 Romine c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .277 a-Hicks ph-lf 1 1 0 0 1 0 .316 Totals 41 14 14 14 7 7 Baltimore 002 214 200 0 — 11 15 0 New York 000 013 403 3 — 14 14 0 One out when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Romine in the 8th. 1-ran for Mancini in the 7th. LOB: Baltimore 9, New York 6. 2B: Machado (4), Mancini (2), Headley (7), Holliday (3), Gregorius (1). HR: Castillo (1), off Sabathia; Machado (4), off Sabathia; Trumbo (2), off Mitchell; Judge (8), off Gausman; Judge (9), off Gausman; Ellsbury (3), off Nuno; Castro (5), off Brach; Holliday (3), off Aquino. RBIs: Machado 3 (13), Trumbo 4 (10), Castillo 2 (5), Schoop 2 (15), Holliday 3 (13), Ellsbury 5 (9), Castro 2 (16), Gregorius (1), Judge 3 (18). RLISP: Baltimore 4 (Jones, Trumbo 3); New York 1 (Bird). GIDP: Romine. DP: Baltimore 1 (Hardy, Schoop, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman 6 8 5 5 2 3 106 7.50 1/ 3 1 0 12 6.00 Nuno 3 2 3 2/ 0 1 6 1.50 Givens, 3 1 0 0 O’Day, 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.66 Brach, 1 2 3 3 2 1 30 2.08 1/ 3 2 1 17 7.11 Aquino, L, 1-1 3 1 3 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 52/3 9 7 7 2 6 83 4.34 2/ 2 1 26 4.82 Mitchell 3 5 4 4 Holder 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.57 Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.08 Chapman, W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 1.08 Gausman pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Nuno 1-1, Mitchell 2-2, Holder 3-0. HBP: Sabathia (Davis). Umpires: Home, Brian Knight; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Stu Scheurwater; Third, Jim Reynolds. T: 3:41. A: 36,912.

Pirates 12, Marlins 2 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 3b 5 1 3 2 0 0 .329 3 2 1 2 1 0 .216 Mercer ss Barbato p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1 0 0 0 0 1 .150 c-Gosselin ph-2b McCutchen cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .263 b-Jaso ph-rf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .111 Polanco lf-cf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .225 5 2 2 3 1 2 .211 Cervelli c Osuna rf-lf 5 2 4 1 1 0 .333 Bell 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .242 Ngoepe 2b-ss 3 2 3 1 2 0 .800 Taillon p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .111 a-Hanson ph-2b-3b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .176 41 12 18 12 8 6 Totals Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 1 0 0 1 .356 Realmuto c McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Gordon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Prado 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .290 Rojas 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .256 5 1 4 0 0 0 .303 Yelich cf Stanton rf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .284 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .178 Ozuna lf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .272 Ellis c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Dietrich 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .227 4 1 2 0 0 0 .268 Hechavarria ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Urena p Suzuki lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Totals 37 210 2 3 8 Pittsburgh 180 101 010 — 12 18 0 Miami 001 000 010 — 2 10 0 a-tripled for Taillon in the 6th. b-walked for McCutchen in the 7th. c-struck out for Barbato in the 8th. d-struck out for McGowan in the 9th. LOB: Pittsburgh 12, Miami 11. 2B: Yelich (1). 3B: Cervelli (1), Ngoepe (1), Hanson (1), Hechavarria (1). HR: Mercer (2), off Conley. RBIs: Harrison 2 (6), Mercer 2 (8), McCutchen 2 (12), Cervelli 3 (10), Osuna (2), Ngoepe (1), Hanson (1), Prado (3), Stanton (16). SF: Harrison. RLISP: Pittsburgh 6 (Harrison, Cervelli 2, Taillon 2, Gosselin); Miami 5 (Stanton, Bour 2, Suzuki 2). GIDP: Mercer, Cervelli, Bell. DP: Miami 3 (Prado, Dietrich, Bour), (Dietrich, Bour), (Dietrich, Hechavarria, Bour). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pittsburgh Taillon, W, 2-0 5 5 1 1 2 4 95 2.08 Barbato 2 0 0 0 1 0 23 0.00 2 5 1 1 0 4 34 3.38 LeBlanc Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Conley, L, 1-2 12/3 5 9 9 3 2 60 6.86 Urena 41/3 12 2 2 1 1 87 2.92 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 5.87 2/ 1 2 0 21 1.69 Barraclough 3 1 1 1/ McGowan 1 3 0 0 0 1 2 21 4.50 Inherited runners-scored: Urena 1-1, McGowan 2-0. HBP: Conley (Polanco). Umpires: Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Tim Timmons; Second, James Hoye; Third, Will Little. T: 3:31. A: 19,690.

Mets 7, Nationals 5 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Conforto lf 4 0 1 1 1 3 .298 Cabrera ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .256 Bruce rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .284 Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .215 5 0 0 0 0 1 .138 Granderson cf Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edgin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reyes 3b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .156 Rivera 1b 4 3 2 0 1 0 .176 d’Arnaud c 3 2 2 5 1 1 .240 deGrom p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .091 b-Plawecki ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .250 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reed p Lagares cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Totals 38 7 12 7 5 9 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .297 3-Heisey pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 T.Turner ss 5 1 2 0 0 2 .352 Harper rf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .405 Zimmerman 1b 4 2 2 3 0 1 .392 Murphy 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .347 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .235 Werth lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .266 Wieters c 4 1 2 2 0 1 .279 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1-Ross pr Scherzer p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Perez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 J.Turner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Romero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Lind ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 2-Taylor pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .095 Totals 38 5 13 5 1 15 020 300 020 — 7 12 0 New York Washington 030 000 020 — 5 13 2 a-lined out for Perez in the 7th. b-singled for deGrom in the 8th. c-singled for Romero in the 9th. 1-ran for Wieters in the 9th. 2-ran for Lind in the 9th. 3-ran for Eaton in the 9th. E: Zimmerman 2 (4). LOB: New York 9, Washington 7. 2B: Bruce (4), Reyes (3), Rivera (1). HR: d’Arnaud (3), off Scherzer; d’Arnaud (4), off Scherzer; Zimmerman (9), off deGrom; Wieters (2), off deGrom; Zimmerman (10), off Reed. RBIs: Conforto (9), d’Arnaud 5 (15), Plawecki (1), Zimmerman 3 (24), Wieters 2 (8). SB: Cabrera 2 (3), Reyes (3), Rivera (1). RLISP: New York 7 (Bruce 2, Walker 2, Granderson, Rivera, deGrom); Washington 1 (Werth). GIDP: Cabrera 2, Harper, Zimmerman. DP: New York 2 (Cabrera, Walker, Rivera), (Edgin, d’Arnaud, Rivera); Washington 2 (Murphy, T.Turner, Zimmerman), (Zimmerman, Wieters, Murphy). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA New York deGrom, W, 1-1 7 6 3 3 1 12 112 2.84 2/ 1 0 1 14 1.04 3 1 1 Blevins 1/ 1 0 1 15 3.75 Reed 3 3 1 1/ 0 0 1 16 2.25 Familia, 3 3 0 2/ 0 0 0 3 2.79 Edgin, S, 1-1 3 0 0 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, L, 3-2 6 9 5 5 1 7 97 2.94 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 4.50 Perez 1 2 2 1 2 0 21 5.14 J.Turner Romero 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 5.40 Inherited runners-scored: Reed 1-1, Edgin 3-0. WP: deGrom. Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, John Tumpane; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Angel Hernandez. T: 3:24. A: 34,562.

White Sox 7, Tigers 3 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 2 0 0 0 .233 Saladino dh 5 2 2 2 0 2 .224 Anderson ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .250 Cabrera lf Frazier 3b 5 2 1 1 0 2 .167 5 2 3 2 0 0 .388 A.Garcia rf Davidson 1b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .292 Sanchez 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 4 0 1 2 0 1 .207 Soto c L.Garcia cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .314 39 7 12 7 3 7 Totals Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 1 0 0 1 0 .221 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .300 Collins cf Castellanos 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .233 3 0 1 1 1 0 .218 Martinez dh Upton lf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .270 2 0 0 0 2 0 .344 Avila c Adduci rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .412 4 0 1 0 0 2 .444 Hicks 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Iglesias ss 33 3 7 3 4 7 Totals Chicago 021 000 022 — 7 12 0 Detroit 200 010 000 — 3 7 3 E: Castellanos 3 (5). LOB: Chicago 8, Detroit 7. 2B: Saladino (3), Anderson (3). HR: Frazier (2), off Boyd; A.Garcia (5), off Boyd; Anderson (2), off Jimenez. RBIs: Anderson 2 (6), Frazier (8), A.Garcia 2 (19), Soto 2 (7), Martinez (10), Upton 2 (13). SB: Adduci (1), Iglesias (3). CS: Saladino (3), Sanchez (1). RLISP: Chicago 4 (Saladino, Soto 2, L.Garcia); Detroit 3 (Kinsler, Collins, Avila). GIDP: Davidson, Adduci. DP: Chicago 1 (Frazier, Anderson, Davidson); Detroit 1 (Iglesias, Avila, Hicks). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 42/3 6 3 3 4 2 90 5.00 Pelfrey 1/ 0 0 5 0.93 Jennings 3 1 0 0 Swarzak, W, 2-0 2 0 0 0 0 2 28 0.00 Jones, 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.31 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.12 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd 7 7 3 3 2 5 97 3.86 Wilson, L, 0-1 1 2 2 0 1 0 22 2.89 Jimenez 1 3 2 2 0 2 26 12.46 Jennings pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 2-0, Swarzak 1-0. Umpires: Home, Laz Diaz; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Jeff Nelson. T: 3:25. A: 26,049.

Astros 9, Athletics 4 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Decker cf Joyce rf 3 1 0 0 0 2 .161 Lowrie 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .296 4 2 2 4 0 1 .276 Davis lf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .286 Alonso 1b Healy dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 4 0 0 0 0 3 .203 Vogt c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .213 Plouffe 3b Rosales ss 2 0 0 0 0 2 .265 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 a-Pinder ph 35 4 7 4 0 14 Totals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Houston 4 2 2 1 1 1 .228 Springer cf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .309 Reddick rf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .305 Altuve 2b Correa ss 5 0 2 2 0 2 .231 Beltran dh 5 2 1 1 0 0 .238 4 2 3 2 0 0 .347 Gurriel 1b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .327 Gattis c Bregman 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .247 4 0 0 0 0 2 .321 Aoki lf Totals 36 9 14 9 2 5 Oakland 301 000 000 — 4 7 3 Houston 300 120 12x — 9 14 2 a-flied out for Rosales in the 9th. E: Lowrie (1), Vogt 2 (3), Altuve (2), Giles (1). LOB: Oakland 6, Houston 8. 2B: Healy (7), Correa (3), Gurriel (6), Gattis 2 (4). HR: Davis (8), off Morton; Davis (9), off Morton; Gurriel (2), off Valdez. RBIs: Davis 4 (16), Springer (14), Correa 2 (7), Beltran (8), Gurriel 2 (7), Gattis 2 (13), Bregman (6). CS: Bregman (2). SF: Bregman. RLISP: Oakland 3 (Decker, Healy, Vogt); Houston 4 (Altuve, Beltran, Bregman 2). GIDP: Beltran. DP: Oakland 2 (Alonso, Rosales), (Vogt, Lowrie). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oakland Cotton, L, 2-3 4 1/3 10 6 3 1 4 93 5.00 2/ 0 0 1 10 4.82 Dull 3 0 0 Valdez 3 4 3 3 1 0 37 6.48 IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Houston Morton, W, 2-2 7 5 4 4 0 12 101 4.50 Gregerson, 1 2 0 0 0 2 16 5.23 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 4.50 Giles Inherited runners-scored: Dull 2-1. HBP: Morton 2 (Joyce,Rosales). Umpires: Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Joe West; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:58. A: 28,472.

Braves 10, Brewers 8 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 2 2 3 0 2 .217 4 2 2 1 1 0 .222 Garcia 3b Freeman 1b 5 1 1 2 0 0 .368 5 0 1 3 0 2 .298 Kemp lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Markakis rf Flowers c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .341 0 1 0 0 0 0 .200 1-Teheran pr Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Bonifacio ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .105 Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Peterson 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .261 Swanson ss 2 2 0 0 2 1 .134 Colon p 2 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Adams ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Collmenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Suzuki ph-c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .207 Totals 38 10 12 10 4 8 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Thames 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .364 Braun lf 5 1 3 2 0 1 .309 Shaw 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .258 Perez rf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .296 Bandy c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .348 Broxton cf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .175 Arcia ss 4 2 2 3 0 1 .243 Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Santana ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .182 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 8 13 8 2 11 Atlanta 004 000 312 — 10 12 0 Milwaukee 040 022 000 — 8 13 1 a-homered for Anderson in the 6th. b-singled for Motte in the 7th. c-singled for Collmenter in the 8th. d-flied out for Torres in the 8th. e-grounded out for Ramirez in the 9th. 1-ran for Flowers in the 8th. E: Arcia (3). LOB: Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 5. 2B: Inciarte (4), Garcia (2), Kemp (5), Markakis (5), Peterson (3), Villar (3), Perez 2 (5), Broxton (4), Arcia (3). HR: Freeman (8), off Feliz; Arcia (3), off Colon; Braun (7), off Colon; Santana (3), off Motte. RBIs: Inciarte 3 (11), Garcia (7), Freeman 2 (12), Kemp 3 (10), Suzuki (8), Braun 2 (18), Broxton (3), Arcia 3 (9), Santana 2 (7). SB: Swanson (1), Adams (1), Perez (2), Bandy (1). RLISP: Atlanta 2 (Inciarte, Markakis); Milwaukee 4 (Shaw, Broxton 3). GIDP: Freeman, Braun, Shaw. DP: Atlanta 2 (Swanson, Peterson, Freeman), (Colon, Swanson, Freeman); Milwaukee 1 (Shaw, Arcia, Thames). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Atlanta 5 10 6 6 2 5 91 5.59 Colon Motte 1 3 2 2 0 0 23 18.00 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.57 Collmenter Ramirez, W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 1.50 Johnson, S, 4-6 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.66 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson 6 4 4 4 3 2 86 2.10 1/ 3 1 1 25 2.13 3 3 3 Barnes 2/ 0 0 1 7 1.64 Knebel, 3 0 0 Torres, 1 3 1 1 0 3 17 4.20 Feliz, L, 0-3 1 2 2 2 0 1 20 6.52 Inherited runners-scored: Knebel 1-0. Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Brian O’Nora. T: 3:18. A: 26,453.

Friday Yankees 14, Baltimore 11, 10 inn. Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 4 Seattle 3, Cleveland 1 Boston 5, Cubs 4 White Sox 7, Detroit 3 LA Angels 6, Texas 3 Houston 9, Oakland 4 Minnesota 6, Kansas City 4

Angels 6, Rangers 3

Thursday Seattle 2, Detroit 1 Cardinals 8, Toronto 4, 11 inn. Cleveland 4, Houston 3 NY Yankees 3, Boston 0 Cardinals 6, Toronto 4 LA Angels 2, Oakland 1

Saturday’s pitching matchups NL

Pitcher

Cin StL

Arroyo (R) Leake (R)

Time W-L

ERA 6.86 1.32

1:15

2-2 3-1

NY Wheeler (R) Was Strasburg (R)

12:05

1-2 2-0

5.40 2.89

Pit Nova (R) Mia Straily (R)

6:10

2-2 1-1

2.00 3.92

Atl Mil

Garcia (L) Nelson (R)

6:10

0-1 1-1

4.24 4.56

Col Ari

Anderson (L) Greinke (R)

7:10

1-3 2-2

7.11 2.93

SD SF

Chacin (R) Cain (R)

8:05

2-3 2-0

6.21 2.42

Phi LA

Eflin (R) McCarthy (R)

8:10

0-0 3-0

2.25 2.25

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bal NY

Jimenez (R) Pineda (R)

12:05

1-0 2-1

5.95 3.86

TB Tor

Andriese (R) Liriano (L)

12:07

1-0 1-2

3.86 4.59

Chi Holland (L) Det Fulmer (R)

12:10

2-2 2-1

3.57 2.88

Sea Gallardo (R) Cle Salazar (R)

3:10

1-2 1-2

4.84 4.37

Oak Triggs (R) Hou Musgrove (R)

6:10

3-1 1-1

2.42 5.91

LA Chavez (R) Tex Darvish (R)

6:15

2-3 2-2

4.50 3.03

Min Hughes (R) KC Hammel (R)

6:15

3-1 0-2

4.71 5.30

IL

Time W-L

ERA

1-3 1-2

4.88 8.66

Pitcher

ChC Lackey (R) Bos Wright (R)

3:05

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NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Escobar 3b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .235 Calhoun rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .237 Trout cf 4 2 3 2 1 1 .355 Pujols dh 5 1 1 3 0 2 .247 Cron 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .233 1-Marte pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Simmons ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .287 Maybin lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .219 Espinosa 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 Maldonado c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Totals 37 6 10 6 3 7 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields lf 4 2 2 0 0 1 .280 Andrus ss 4 1 2 1 0 2 .284 Gomez cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .205 Odor 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .191 Napoli dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .155 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Rua 1b 3 0 1 0 0 2 .189 Gallo 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Lucroy c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .203 Totals 32 3 7 3 0 11 Los Angeles 100 002 030 — 6 10 1 Texas 100 002 000 — 3 7 2 1-ran for Cron in the 8th. E: Petit (1), Gallo 2 (3). LOB: Los Angeles 7, Texas 3. 2B: Andrus (5), Rua (1). HR: Escobar (2), off Martinez; Trout (7), off Martinez; Pujols (3), off Jeffress. RBIs: Escobar (7), Trout 2 (17), Pujols 3 (21), Andrus (9), Gomez (8), Napoli (9). SF: Gomez. RLISP: Los Angeles 3 (Cron, Maldonado 2); Texas 1 (Lucroy). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Skaggs 5 4 1 1 0 6 76 3.99 Petit, 1 3 2 2 0 1 22 3.14 Guerra, W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 6.75 Hernandez, 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Alvarez, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.08 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Martinez 6 5 3 3 0 7 84 2.77 Barnette 1 0 0 0 1 0 23 3.38 Jeffress, L, 0-2 1 4 3 3 2 0 29 5.59 Dyson 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 21.94 Umpires: Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 3:12. A: 28,968.

BATTING: Harper, Washington, .405; Cozart, Cincinnati, .393; Zimmerman, Washington, .392; Freeman, Atlanta, .380; Thames, Milwaukee, .370; Turner, Los Angeles, .363; Realmuto, Miami, .356; Phillips, Atlanta, .352; Murphy, Washington, .347; DPeralta, Arizona, .342; 1 tied at .333.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS

PITCHING: Hellickson, Philadelphia, 4-0; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 4-1; WPeralta, Milwaukee, 4-1; 10 tied at 3-0.

BATTING: Garcia, Chicago, .388; Castro, New York, .361; Haniger, Seattle, .338; Ramirez, Cleveland, .337; Trout, Los Angeles, .337; Dickerson, Tampa Bay, .329; Pillar, Toronto, .326; Souza Jr., Tampa Bay, .326; Benintendi, Boston, .325; Headley, New York, .324; 1 tied at .324. RUNS: Haniger, Seattle, 20; Judge, New York, 18; Headley, New York, 17; Kinsler, Detroit, 17; Lindor, Cleveland, 17; Gallo, Texas, 16; Castellanos, Detroit, 15; Davis, Oakland, 15; Garcia, Chicago, 15; Trout, Los Angeles, 15; 2 tied at 14. RBI: Cruz, Seattle, 19; Garcia, Chicago, 19; Ramirez, Cleveland, 19; Judge, New York, 18; Pujols, Los Angeles, 18; Cano, Seattle, 17; Mazara, Texas, 17; Souza Jr., Tampa Bay, 17; 5 tied at 16. HITS: Garcia, Chicago, 31; Pillar, Toronto, 31; Castro, New York, 30; Souza Jr., Tampa Bay, 30; Trout, Los Angeles, 30; Ramirez, Cleveland, 28; Benintendi, Boston, 27; Dickerson, Tampa Bay, 27; Haniger, Seattle, 27; Lindor, Cleveland, 27; 2 tied at 25. DOUBLES: Moreland, Boston, 12; Dickerson, Tampa Bay, 9; Trout, Los Angeles, 8; Haniger, Seattle, 7; Headley, New York, 7; Lindor, Cleveland, 7; Lowrie, Oakland, 7; Motter, Seattle, 7; Pillar, Toronto, 7; CSantana, Cleveland, 7; 6 tied at 6. TRIPLES: Castellanos, Detroit, 3; Miller, Tampa Bay, 3; Beckham, Tampa Bay, 2; Trout, Los Angeles, 2; 21 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Judge, New York, 9; Davis, Oakland, 7; Gallo, Texas, 7; Moustakas, Kansas City, 7; Springer, Houston, 7; Dickerson, Tampa Bay, 6; Lindor, Cleveland, 6; Ramirez, Cleveland, 6; Trout, Los Angeles, 6; 10 tied at 5. STOLEN BASES: Dyson, Seattle, 8; Altuve, Houston, 7; Cain, Kansas City, 6; Ellsbury, New York, 6; Andrus, Texas, 5; Dozier, Minnesota, 5; Gardner, New York, 5; Mondesi, Kansas City, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; 5 tied at 4. PITCHING: Keuchel, Houston, 4-0; ESantana, Minnesota, 4-0; 10 tied at 3-0. ERA: ESantana, Minnesota, 0.77; Sale, Boston, 1.20; Keuchel, Houston, 1.22; Paxton, Seattle, 1.39; Vargas, Kansas City, 1.40; Bundy, Baltimore, 1.65; Holland, Chicago, 1.99; Gonzalez, Chicago, 2.00; Carrasco, Cleveland, 2.04; 3 tied at 2.08. STRIKEOUTS: Sale, Boston, 52; Paxton, Seattle, 39; Kluber, Cleveland, 37; McCullers, Houston, 36; Salazar, Cleveland, 36; Carrasco, Cleveland, 34; Estrada, Toronto, 33; Severino, New York, 33; 4 tied at 32.

RUNS: Harper, Washington, 28; Thames, Milwaukee, 27; Eaton, Washington, 24; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 20; Yelich, Miami, 20; Freeman, Atlanta, 18; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 18; Pollock, Arizona, 18; Suarez, Cincinnati, 18; Zimmerman, Washington, 18; 1 tied at 17. RBI: Harper, Washington, 25; Murphy, Washington, 25; Zimmerman, Washington, 24; Blackmon, Colorado, 23; Ozuna, Miami, 21; Franco, Philadelphia, 20; Reynolds, Colorado, 20; Lamb, Arizona, 19; Owings, Arizona, 19; Thames, Milwaukee, 19; 3 tied at 18. HITS: Harper, Washington, 34; Murphy, Washington, 34; Myers, San Diego, 31; Zimmerman, Washington, 31; Pollock, Arizona, 30; Turner, Los Angeles, 29; Blackmon, Colorado, 28; DPeralta, Arizona, 28; 7 tied at 27. DOUBLES: Turner, Los Angeles, 9; Bryant, Chicago, 8; Harper, Washington, 8; Murphy, Washington, 8; Pollock, Arizona, 8; Shaw, Milwaukee, 8; 8 tied at 7. TRIPLES: Cozart, Cincinnati, 4; Blackmon, Colorado, 3; Galvis, Philadelphia, 2; Gordon, Miami, 2; Myers, San Diego, 2; Osuna, Pittsburgh, 2; Perez, Milwaukee, 2; Wong, Cardinals, 2; 17 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Thames, Milwaukee, 11; Zimmerman, Washington, 10; Harper, Washington, 8; 8 tied at 7. STOLEN BASES: Hamilton, Cincinnati, 10; Nunez, San Francisco, 7; Pollock, Arizona, 7; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 6; Owings, Arizona, 6; Peraza, Cincinnati, 6; Broxton, Milwaukee, 5; Phillips, Atlanta, 5; Polanco, Pittsburgh, 5; 6 tied at 4.

ERA: Anderson, Milwaukee, 1.13; Leake, Cardinals, 1.32; Gonzalez, Washington, 1.62; Syndergaard, New York, 1.73; Hellickson, Philadelphia, 1.80; Nova, Pittsburgh, 2.00; Taillon, Pittsburgh, 2.08; McCarthy, Los Angeles, 2.25; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 2.29; 2 tied at 2.55. STRIKEOUTS: deGrom, New York, 44; Scherzer, Washington, 40; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 39; Martinez, Cardinals, 39; Arrieta, Chicago, 34; Walker, Arizona, 33; Greinke, Arizona, 31; 4 tied at 30.

This Date In Baseball April 29 1918: Center fielder Tris Speaker executed the fourth unassisted double play of his career in the Cleveland Indians’ 8-4 loss to the Chicago White Sox. 1922: The New York Giants hit four inside-the-park home runs at Braves Field in Boston. George Kelly hit two and Ross Youngs and Dave Bancroft hit the others. 1931: Wes Ferrell of the Cleveland Indians pitched a 7-0 no-hitter over the St. Louis Browns, including his brother Rick. Wes also knocked in four runs with a homer and a double. 1933: In a strange play at home plate, catcher Luke Sewell of the Washington Senators tagged out two Yankees runners on the same play. Lou Gehrig had held up, thinking a fly ball would be caught. Dixie Walker closed up on him, and both were tagged out trying to score. 1981: Steve Carlton struck out Montreal’s Tim Wallach in the first inning of the Philadelphia Phillies’ 6-2 victory over the visiting Expos to become the sixth major league pitcher — and first lefthander — to strike out 3,000 batters. 1986: Roger Clemens set a major league record by striking out 20 batters as the Boston Red Sox defeated the Seattle Mariners 3-1. 1987: Andre Dawson had five hits and hit for the cycle to lead the Chicago Cubs to an 8-4 victory the San Francisco Giants. 1988: The Baltimore Orioles ended their 21-game losing streak by winning their first game of the season, 9-0 over the Chicago White Sox on a combined four-hitter by Mark Williamson and Dave Schmidt. 1994: Kirk Rueter of Montreal became the first major league pitcher since Fernando Valenzuela in 1981 to start his career with a 10-0 record as the Expos beat the Pittsburgh Pirates 3-2.


BASEBALL

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 2 NATIONAL LEAGUE L

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

Chicago

12 10 .545

Cardinals

12

.522

½

Milwaukee

12 12 .500

1

Pittsburgh

10 12

.455

2

Cincinnati

10 13

.435 2½

11

Pct

EAST

W

L

Washington

16

7 .696

Philadelphia

11 10

Miami

10

Atlanta

Pct

GB WCGB L10 — 6-4 —

Str Home L-2

8-2 W-3

Away

4-5

8-5

8-5

4-6

L-1

6-9

6-3

1½ 4-6 W-2

6-6

4-6

5-8

5-5

Str Home

Away

½ 4-6 2

2-8

GB WCGB L10

L-4

8-2

L-1

6-4

10-3

.524

4

7-3

L-1

7-4

4-6

.476

5

1 4-6

L-3

4-3

6-8

9 12 .429

6

2 4-6 W-3

4-3

5-9

11

New York

9 13 .409 6½

WEST

W

L

Pct

Colorado

15

9

.625

— 6-4 W-1

Arizona

15 10 .600

½

5-5

Los Angeles

12 12 .500

½

5-5 W-2

7-4

5-8

3½ 4-6 W-1

6-6

3-9

5-4

4-12

San Francisco 9 15 San Diego

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B7

2-8 W-1

GB WCGB L10

.375

3 6

9 16 .360 6½

4 4-6

4-10

5-3

Str Home

Away

L-1

L-2

7-6

8-3

11-4

4-6

Friday NY Mets 7, Washington 5 Pittsburgh 12, Miami 2 Boston 5, Cubs 4 Atlanta 10, Milwaukee 8 Cardinals 7, Cincinnati 5 Colorado 3, Arizona 1 LA Dodgers 5, Philadelphia 3 San Francisco 4, San Diego 3 Thursday Philadelphia 3, Miami 2 Atlanta 7, NY Mets 5 Cardinals 8, Toronto 4, 11 inn. Washington 16, Colorado 5 Dodgers 5, San Fran. 1, 10 inn. Cardinals 6, Toronto 4 Arizona 6, San Diego 2

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Chicago

12

9

.571

Cleveland

12 10 .545

Detroit

11

11 .500

Minnesota

11

11 .500

Kansas City

7 15

GB WCGB L10 —

½ 1½

Str Home

Away

6-4 W-5

6-5

6-4

7-3

L-1

4-6

8-4

1

3-7

L-3

6-5

5-6

1

4-6

W-1

5-7

6-4

.318 5½

5

1-9

L-8

5-4

2-11

Str Home

Away

EAST

W

L

Pct

Baltimore

14

7

.667

New York

14

7

.667

7-3 W-3

9-1

5-6

Boston

12 10 .545 2½

5-5

W-1

8-4

4-6

Tampa Bay

12 12 .500 3½

1

6-4

W-1

9-4

3-8

4-6

L-3

2-8

4-9

Str Home

Away

Toronto

6 17

GB WCGB L10

.261

9

6-4

8-3

6-4

WEST

W

L

Pct

Houston

15

8

.652

6-4

W-1

8-4

7-4

Los Angeles 13 12 .520

3

½

6-4 W-5

9-4

4-8

11 13 .458 4½

2

5-5 W-3

6-3

5-10

Seattle

GB WCGB L10

L-1

Oakland

10 13

.435

5

5-5

L-5

7-6

3-7

Texas

10 13

.435

5

5-5

L-1

7-7

3-6

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Red Sox strike early in victory over Cubs

Red Sox 5, Cubs 4

Twins 6, Royals 4

Mariners 3, Indians 1

Rays 7, Blue Jays 4

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber dh 5 0 1 0 0 4 .212 Bryant 3b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .281 Rizzo 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .273 Zobrist lf-2b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .215 Russell ss 5 0 2 0 0 2 .281 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .254 Heyward rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .282 Baez 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .203 a-Jay ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .394 Almora cf 2 2 1 1 1 0 .282 b-Montero ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .379 c-Szczur ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Totals 38 4 11 3 3 14 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bogaerts ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .313 Benintendi lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .325 4 1 1 0 0 0 .307 Betts rf Ramirez dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .250 Moreland 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .296 Pedroia 2b 3 1 2 0 1 1 .261 Bradley Jr. cf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .229 Vazquez c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .481 Hernandez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .289 Totals 33 5 13 5 3 10 Chicago 101 000 200 — 4 11 0 Boston 500 000 00x — 5 13 2 a-singled for Baez in the 8th. b-pinch hit for Almora in the 8th. c-struck out for Montero in the 8th. E: Pomeranz (1), Moreland (2). LOB: Chicago 10, Boston 7. 2B: Zobrist (3), Betts (6), Moreland (12). HR: Bryant (3), off Pomeranz; Almora (2), off Pomeranz; Benintendi (2), off Arrieta. RBIs: Bryant (13), Zobrist (9), Almora (8), Benintendi (12), Ramirez (8), Moreland (10), Bradley Jr. (5), Vazquez (4). CS: Ramirez (2). RLISP: Chicago 5 (Schwarber, Rizzo, Russell, Heyward, Baez); Boston 1 (Bogaerts). LIDP: Betts. GIDP: Baez, Benintendi, Bradley Jr.. DP: Chicago 3 (Bryant), (Baez, Rizzo), (Baez, Russell, Rizzo); Boston 1 (Bogaerts, Pedroia, Moreland). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chicago Arrieta, L, 3-1 41/3 10 5 5 3 5 98 4.66 Montgomery 12/3 2 0 0 0 0 19 1.88 Strop 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.70 Edwards 1 1 0 0 0 3 17 0.00 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz, W, 2-1 6 6 2 2 2 7 95 4.15 1/ 1 1 1 11 2.08 Scott, 3 0 1 2/ 1 0 1 17 2.13 Kelly, 3 2 1 1/ 3 1.42 Hembree, 3 2 0 0 0 0 2/ 2 12 3.86 Abad, 3 0 0 0 0 Kimbrel, S, 8-9 1 1 0 0 0 3 19 1.74 Inherited runners-scored: Montgomery 2-0, Kelly 1-1, Abad 2-0. WP: Arrieta 2, Kelly. Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Bill Welke; Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 3:28. A: 37,054.

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Kepler rf 3 2 1 0 1 1 .278 4 2 2 4 0 2 .297 Sano 3b 4 0 1 2 0 0 .237 Mauer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .267 Grossman dh Castro c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .200 Polanco ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .243 Rosario lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .260 Buxton cf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .138 Totals 34 6 6 6 3 10 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 1 0 0 0 .233 Merrifield 2b Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Cain cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .224 Perez c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .247 Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .181 Escobar ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Moss dh 4 1 1 1 0 0 .143 Bonifacio rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .300 34 4 8 4 3 2 Totals Minnesota 000 200 040 — 6 6 0 Kansas City 021 000 100 — 4 8 1 E: Bonifacio (1). LOB: Minnesota 4, Kansas City 6. 2B: Sano (6), Mauer (4), Perez (2). HR: Sano (6), off Kennedy; Perez (6), off Gibson; Moss (4), off Boshers. RBIs: Sano 4 (20), Mauer 2 (8), Hosmer (6), Perez 2 (11), Moss (6). RLISP: Minnesota 1 (Castro); Kansas City 3 (Merrifield, Hosmer, Gordon). GIDP: Cain. DP: Minnesota 1 (Polanco, Dozier, Mauer). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minnesota Gibson 51/3 5 3 3 3 1 85 8.06 2/ 1 0 0 12 3.00 Boshers 3 1 1 2/ 0 0 1 10 8.31 Pressly 3 0 0 Breslow, W, 1-0 1/3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.45 2/ 0 0 0 14 6.52 Belisle, 3 1 0 1/ 0 0 0 3 5.40 Rogers, 3 0 0 Kintzler, S, 6-6 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 51/3 2 2 2 2 6 100 2.30 Kennedy 1/ 0 0 1 4 5.59 Moylan, 3 0 0 Strahm, 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 21 15.75 2/ 3 1 1 25 2.53 Soria, L, 1-1, 3 3 4 Alexander 11/3 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.74 Boshers pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Rogers 1-0, Moylan 1-0, Strahm 1-0, Alexander 1-0. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Fieldin Culbreth; Third, Mark Carlson. T: 3:20. A: 27,911.

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .346 Gamel rf 4 2 2 1 0 0 .333 Cano 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .253 Motter 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .235 Seager 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Heredia lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .310 Vogelbach dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .177 Dyson cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .235 Totals 31 3 6 3 0 8 AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cleveland Santana 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Lindor ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .314 Guyer lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .121 Encarnacion dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .205 Ramirez 3b 4 1 1 1 0 3 .337 Kipnis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .174 Jackson cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .267 a-Chisenhall ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .297 Almonte rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .240 Gomes c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Totals 32 1 4 1 2 14 Seattle 000 201 000 — 3 6 1 Cleveland 000 100 000 — 1 4 0 a-struck out for Jackson in the 9th. E: Seager (4). LOB: Seattle 1, Cleveland 6. 2B: Segura (2), Gamel (1), Lindor (7). HR: Cano (4), off Carrasco; Gamel (1), off Carrasco; Ramirez (6), off Miranda. RBIs: Gamel (3), Cano 2 (17), Ramirez (19). CS: Dyson (2). RLISP: Seattle 1 (Motter); Cleveland 2 (Encarnacion, Ramirez). GIDP: Vogelbach. DP: Cleveland 1 (Santana, Lindor). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Seattle Miranda, W, 2-2 51/3 2 1 1 2 7 96 3.81 Pazos, 21/3 2 0 0 0 4 29 1.64 Diaz, S, 4-5 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 18 3.60 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco, L, 2-2 8 6 3 3 0 7 106 2.04 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.32 Otero Inherited runners-scored: Pazos 1-0, Diaz 1-0. WP: Miranda. Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Ed Hickox. T: 2:36. A: 20,842.

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson dh 5 2 2 1 0 1 .329 Kiermaier cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Longoria 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .226 3 1 0 0 2 1 .217 Miller 2b Souza Jr. rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .326 Morrison 1b 4 1 1 2 0 2 .243 Beckham ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .282 Peterson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .294 Bourjos lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Norris c 4 1 2 2 0 1 .185 Totals 37 7 10 6 3 11 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pillar cf 4 3 4 1 1 0 .326 Barney 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .326 1 0 1 0 0 0 .240 b-Coghlan ph Bautista rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .167 Morales dh 5 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Smoak 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Pearce lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .176 a-Carrera ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .305 Travis 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .137 Maile c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Goins ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Totals 37 4 11 3 3 5 Tampa Bay 010 000 042 — 7 10 1 Toronto 000 020 101 — 4 11 2 a-grounded out for Pearce in the 6th. b-singled for Barney in the 9th. E: Beckham (3), Travis 2 (2). LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 10. 2B: Dickerson (9), Pillar 2 (7), Travis (2). 3B: Beckham (2). HR: Dickerson (6), off Stroman; Longoria (4), off Grilli; Morrison (5), off Leone; Norris (1), off Leone; Pillar (4), off Pruitt. RBIs: Dickerson (10), Longoria (13), Morrison 2 (14), Norris 2 (8), Pillar (8), Barney (5), Bautista (6). SF: Bautista. RLISP: Tampa Bay 3 (Dickerson, Morrison, Peterson); Toronto 6 (Smoak 2, Maile, Goins 3). GIDP: Longoria, Miller, Morales. DP: Tampa Bay 1 (Beckham, Miller, Morrison); Toronto 2 (Barney, Travis, Smoak), (Travis, Goins, Smoak). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell 5 6 2 2 3 3 96 3.42 Pruitt, W, 3-0 3 3 1 1 0 1 40 5.71 1/ 1 0 0 7 4.09 3 2 1 Diaz Whitley, S, 1-1 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stroman 71/3 5 2 2 2 10 100 2.97 1/ 2 1 1 22 7.27 Grilli, L, 1-3, 3 1 2 1/ 3 0 0 15 5.06 Leone 3 4 3 Howell 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 20.25 Leone pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Whitley 1-0, Leone 1-1, Howell 1-1. WP: Howell. Umpires: Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Jim Wolf; Third, Chad Whitson. T: 3:16. A: 36,256.

Andrew Benintendi hit a solo homer off Jake Arrieta during a five-run first inning and the host Boston Red Sox held on to beat the Chicago Cubs 5-4 Friday night. Every Boston starter had at least one hit, and Hanley Ramirez, Mitch Moreland, Jackie Bradley Jr. and Christian Vazquez also drove in a run each. Lefthander Drew Pomeranz (2-1) got the win, surrendering solo homers to Kris Bryant and Albert Almora Jr. in the early innings. Arrieta (3-1) logged his shortest start since Aug. 28, 2014, lasting 4 1/3 innings.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pirates 12, Marlins 2 • Francisco Cervelli drove in three runs and Pittsburgh scored eight times in the second inning to win at Miami Mets 7, Nationals 5 • Josh Edgin relieved Mets closer Jeurys Familia with the bases loaded in the ninth inning and got Bryce Harper to hit into a game-ending double play as New York won at Washington. Braves 10, Brewers 8 • Freddie Freeman’s two-run home run snapped a tie in the ninth as Atlanta won at Milwaukee. Rockies 3, D’backs 1 • Trevor Story homered and rookie Kyle Freeland pitched six innings as Colorado won at Phoenix. Giants 4, Padres 3 • Rookie Christian Arroyo homered, Brandon Belt had three hits and host San Francisco won. Dodgers 5, Phillies 3 • Justin Turner had three hits, including a two-run double in the sixth, as host Los Angeles won.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Yankees 14, Orioles 11 • Matt Holliday hit a three-run homer in the 10th inning and host New York completed a stunning rally from an eightrun deficit. Starlin Castro tied it with a two-run drive in a threerun ninth. Then in the 10th, Holliday hit the eighth home run of the evening — five by the Yankees — with one out. Angels 6, Rangers 3 • Albert Pujols hit a tiebreaking three-run home run in the eighth inning as Los Angeles beat host Texas. Rays 7, Blue Jays 4 • Logan Morrison hit a two-run homer, Evan Longoria and Corey Dickerson added solo shots and Tampa Bay connected three times in the eighth inning to beat host Toronto. Mariners 3, Indians 1 • Ariel Miranda allowed two hits and pitched into the sixth inning, Robinson Cano and Ben Gamel homered and Seattle won at Cleveland. White Sox 7, Tigers 3 • Geovany Soto broke open a tie game with a two-run single in the eighth inning, helping Chicago beat host Detroit for a fifth straight victory. Astros 9, A’s 4 • Charlie Morton struck out a careerhigh 12, George Springer singled home the tying run in his return from a leg injury and host Houston won. Twins 6, Royals 4 • Miguel Sano and Joe Mauer hit consecutive two-run doubles in the eighth and Minnesota handed host Kansas City its eighth straight loss. Associated Press

Yankees 14, Orioles 11 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rickard lf 5 2 2 0 1 0 .182 Jones cf 5 2 2 0 1 2 .286 Machado 3b 5 2 3 3 1 0 .231 Trumbo dh 6 1 3 4 0 0 .212 Davis 1b 5 1 0 0 0 3 .247 Castillo c 4 2 1 2 1 0 .297 Mancini rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .256 1-Gentry pr-rf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .154 Schoop 2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .288 Hardy ss 5 0 2 0 0 1 .214 Totals 45 11 15 11 4 10 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .188 Higashioka c 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Headley 3b 4 2 1 0 2 1 .324 Holliday dh 5 3 3 3 1 2 .263 Ellsbury cf 5 2 1 5 0 0 .295 Castro 2b 5 2 3 2 0 0 .361 Gregorius ss 5 0 2 1 0 0 .400 Judge rf 4 2 2 3 1 2 .282 Bird 1b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .109 Romine c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .277 a-Hicks ph-lf 1 1 0 0 1 0 .316 Totals 41 14 14 14 7 7 Baltimore 002 214 200 0 — 11 15 0 New York 000 013 403 3 — 14 14 0 One out when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Romine in the 8th. 1-ran for Mancini in the 7th. LOB: Baltimore 9, New York 6. 2B: Machado (4), Mancini (2), Headley (7), Holliday (3), Gregorius (1). HR: Castillo (1), off Sabathia; Machado (4), off Sabathia; Trumbo (2), off Mitchell; Judge (8), off Gausman; Judge (9), off Gausman; Ellsbury (3), off Nuno; Castro (5), off Brach; Holliday (3), off Aquino. RBIs: Machado 3 (13), Trumbo 4 (10), Castillo 2 (5), Schoop 2 (15), Holliday 3 (13), Ellsbury 5 (9), Castro 2 (16), Gregorius (1), Judge 3 (18). RLISP: Baltimore 4 (Jones, Trumbo 3); New York 1 (Bird). GIDP: Romine. DP: Baltimore 1 (Hardy, Schoop, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gausman 6 8 5 5 2 3 106 7.50 1/ 3 1 0 12 6.00 Nuno 3 2 3 2/ 0 1 6 1.50 Givens, 3 1 0 0 O’Day, 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.66 Brach, 1 2 3 3 2 1 30 2.08 1/ 3 2 1 17 7.11 Aquino, L, 1-1 3 1 3 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 52/3 9 7 7 2 6 83 4.34 2/ 2 1 26 4.82 Mitchell 3 5 4 4 Holder 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.57 Clippard 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.08 Chapman, W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 1.08 Gausman pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Nuno 1-1, Mitchell 2-2, Holder 3-0. HBP: Sabathia (Davis). Umpires: Home, Brian Knight; First, Lance Barrett; Second, Stu Scheurwater; Third, Jim Reynolds. T: 3:41. A: 36,912.

Pirates 12, Marlins 2 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 3b 5 1 3 2 0 0 .329 3 2 1 2 1 0 .216 Mercer ss Barbato p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1 0 0 0 0 1 .150 c-Gosselin ph-2b McCutchen cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .263 b-Jaso ph-rf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .111 Polanco lf-cf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .225 5 2 2 3 1 2 .211 Cervelli c Osuna rf-lf 5 2 4 1 1 0 .333 Bell 1b 3 1 1 0 2 1 .242 Ngoepe 2b-ss 3 2 3 1 2 0 .800 Taillon p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .111 a-Hanson ph-2b-3b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .176 41 12 18 12 8 6 Totals Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 1 0 0 1 .356 Realmuto c McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Gordon ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Prado 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .290 Rojas 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .256 5 1 4 0 0 0 .303 Yelich cf Stanton rf 4 0 1 1 1 1 .284 Bour 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .178 Ozuna lf 1 0 0 0 2 0 .272 Ellis c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Dietrich 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .227 4 1 2 0 0 0 .268 Hechavarria ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Urena p Suzuki lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Totals 37 210 2 3 8 Pittsburgh 180 101 010 — 12 18 0 Miami 001 000 010 — 2 10 0 a-tripled for Taillon in the 6th. b-walked for McCutchen in the 7th. c-struck out for Barbato in the 8th. d-struck out for McGowan in the 9th. LOB: Pittsburgh 12, Miami 11. 2B: Yelich (1). 3B: Cervelli (1), Ngoepe (1), Hanson (1), Hechavarria (1). HR: Mercer (2), off Conley. RBIs: Harrison 2 (6), Mercer 2 (8), McCutchen 2 (12), Cervelli 3 (10), Osuna (2), Ngoepe (1), Hanson (1), Prado (3), Stanton (16). SF: Harrison. RLISP: Pittsburgh 6 (Harrison, Cervelli 2, Taillon 2, Gosselin); Miami 5 (Stanton, Bour 2, Suzuki 2). GIDP: Mercer, Cervelli, Bell. DP: Miami 3 (Prado, Dietrich, Bour), (Dietrich, Bour), (Dietrich, Hechavarria, Bour). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pittsburgh Taillon, W, 2-0 5 5 1 1 2 4 95 2.08 Barbato 2 0 0 0 1 0 23 0.00 2 5 1 1 0 4 34 3.38 LeBlanc Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Conley, L, 1-2 12/3 5 9 9 3 2 60 6.86 Urena 41/3 12 2 2 1 1 87 2.92 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 5.87 2/ 1 2 0 21 1.69 Barraclough 3 1 1 1/ McGowan 1 3 0 0 0 1 2 21 4.50 Inherited runners-scored: Urena 1-1, McGowan 2-0. HBP: Conley (Polanco). Umpires: Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Tim Timmons; Second, James Hoye; Third, Will Little. T: 3:31. A: 19,690.

Mets 7, Nationals 5 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Conforto lf 4 0 1 1 1 3 .298 Cabrera ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .256 Bruce rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .284 Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .215 5 0 0 0 0 1 .138 Granderson cf Familia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Edgin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reyes 3b 4 2 2 0 1 0 .156 Rivera 1b 4 3 2 0 1 0 .176 d’Arnaud c 3 2 2 5 1 1 .240 deGrom p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .091 b-Plawecki ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .250 Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reed p Lagares cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Totals 38 7 12 7 5 9 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .297 3-Heisey pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 T.Turner ss 5 1 2 0 0 2 .352 Harper rf 5 0 1 0 0 3 .405 Zimmerman 1b 4 2 2 3 0 1 .392 Murphy 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .347 Rendon 3b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .235 Werth lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .266 Wieters c 4 1 2 2 0 1 .279 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 1-Ross pr Scherzer p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .091 Perez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 J.Turner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Romero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Lind ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 2-Taylor pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .095 Totals 38 5 13 5 1 15 020 300 020 — 7 12 0 New York Washington 030 000 020 — 5 13 2 a-lined out for Perez in the 7th. b-singled for deGrom in the 8th. c-singled for Romero in the 9th. 1-ran for Wieters in the 9th. 2-ran for Lind in the 9th. 3-ran for Eaton in the 9th. E: Zimmerman 2 (4). LOB: New York 9, Washington 7. 2B: Bruce (4), Reyes (3), Rivera (1). HR: d’Arnaud (3), off Scherzer; d’Arnaud (4), off Scherzer; Zimmerman (9), off deGrom; Wieters (2), off deGrom; Zimmerman (10), off Reed. RBIs: Conforto (9), d’Arnaud 5 (15), Plawecki (1), Zimmerman 3 (24), Wieters 2 (8). SB: Cabrera 2 (3), Reyes (3), Rivera (1). RLISP: New York 7 (Bruce 2, Walker 2, Granderson, Rivera, deGrom); Washington 1 (Werth). GIDP: Cabrera 2, Harper, Zimmerman. DP: New York 2 (Cabrera, Walker, Rivera), (Edgin, d’Arnaud, Rivera); Washington 2 (Murphy, T.Turner, Zimmerman), (Zimmerman, Wieters, Murphy). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA New York deGrom, W, 1-1 7 6 3 3 1 12 112 2.84 2/ 1 0 1 14 1.04 3 1 1 Blevins 1/ 1 0 1 15 3.75 Reed 3 3 1 1/ 0 0 1 16 2.25 Familia, 3 3 0 2/ 0 0 0 3 2.79 Edgin, S, 1-1 3 0 0 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer, L, 3-2 6 9 5 5 1 7 97 2.94 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 4.50 Perez 1 2 2 1 2 0 21 5.14 J.Turner Romero 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 5.40 Inherited runners-scored: Reed 1-1, Edgin 3-0. WP: deGrom. Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, John Tumpane; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Angel Hernandez. T: 3:24. A: 34,562.

White Sox 7, Tigers 3 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 1 2 0 0 0 .233 Saladino dh 5 2 2 2 0 2 .224 Anderson ss 5 0 2 0 0 0 .250 Cabrera lf Frazier 3b 5 2 1 1 0 2 .167 5 2 3 2 0 0 .388 A.Garcia rf Davidson 1b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .292 Sanchez 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 4 0 1 2 0 1 .207 Soto c L.Garcia cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .314 39 7 12 7 3 7 Totals Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 1 0 0 1 0 .221 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .300 Collins cf Castellanos 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .233 3 0 1 1 1 0 .218 Martinez dh Upton lf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .270 2 0 0 0 2 0 .344 Avila c Adduci rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .412 4 0 1 0 0 2 .444 Hicks 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Iglesias ss 33 3 7 3 4 7 Totals Chicago 021 000 022 — 7 12 0 Detroit 200 010 000 — 3 7 3 E: Castellanos 3 (5). LOB: Chicago 8, Detroit 7. 2B: Saladino (3), Anderson (3). HR: Frazier (2), off Boyd; A.Garcia (5), off Boyd; Anderson (2), off Jimenez. RBIs: Anderson 2 (6), Frazier (8), A.Garcia 2 (19), Soto 2 (7), Martinez (10), Upton 2 (13). SB: Adduci (1), Iglesias (3). CS: Saladino (3), Sanchez (1). RLISP: Chicago 4 (Saladino, Soto 2, L.Garcia); Detroit 3 (Kinsler, Collins, Avila). GIDP: Davidson, Adduci. DP: Chicago 1 (Frazier, Anderson, Davidson); Detroit 1 (Iglesias, Avila, Hicks). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 42/3 6 3 3 4 2 90 5.00 Pelfrey 1/ 0 0 5 0.93 Jennings 3 1 0 0 Swarzak, W, 2-0 2 0 0 0 0 2 28 0.00 Jones, 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.31 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 1.12 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd 7 7 3 3 2 5 97 3.86 Wilson, L, 0-1 1 2 2 0 1 0 22 2.89 Jimenez 1 3 2 2 0 2 26 12.46 Jennings pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 2-0, Swarzak 1-0. Umpires: Home, Laz Diaz; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Cory Blaser; Third, Jeff Nelson. T: 3:25. A: 26,049.

Astros 9, Athletics 4 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Decker cf Joyce rf 3 1 0 0 0 2 .161 Lowrie 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .296 4 2 2 4 0 1 .276 Davis lf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .286 Alonso 1b Healy dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 4 0 0 0 0 3 .203 Vogt c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .213 Plouffe 3b Rosales ss 2 0 0 0 0 2 .265 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 a-Pinder ph 35 4 7 4 0 14 Totals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Houston 4 2 2 1 1 1 .228 Springer cf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .309 Reddick rf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .305 Altuve 2b Correa ss 5 0 2 2 0 2 .231 Beltran dh 5 2 1 1 0 0 .238 4 2 3 2 0 0 .347 Gurriel 1b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .327 Gattis c Bregman 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .247 4 0 0 0 0 2 .321 Aoki lf Totals 36 9 14 9 2 5 Oakland 301 000 000 — 4 7 3 Houston 300 120 12x — 9 14 2 a-flied out for Rosales in the 9th. E: Lowrie (1), Vogt 2 (3), Altuve (2), Giles (1). LOB: Oakland 6, Houston 8. 2B: Healy (7), Correa (3), Gurriel (6), Gattis 2 (4). HR: Davis (8), off Morton; Davis (9), off Morton; Gurriel (2), off Valdez. RBIs: Davis 4 (16), Springer (14), Correa 2 (7), Beltran (8), Gurriel 2 (7), Gattis 2 (13), Bregman (6). CS: Bregman (2). SF: Bregman. RLISP: Oakland 3 (Decker, Healy, Vogt); Houston 4 (Altuve, Beltran, Bregman 2). GIDP: Beltran. DP: Oakland 2 (Alonso, Rosales), (Vogt, Lowrie). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oakland Cotton, L, 2-3 4 1/3 10 6 3 1 4 93 5.00 2/ 0 0 1 10 4.82 Dull 3 0 0 Valdez 3 4 3 3 1 0 37 6.48 IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Houston Morton, W, 2-2 7 5 4 4 0 12 101 4.50 Gregerson, 1 2 0 0 0 2 16 5.23 1 0 0 0 0 0 17 4.50 Giles Inherited runners-scored: Dull 2-1. HBP: Morton 2 (Joyce,Rosales). Umpires: Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Joe West; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:58. A: 28,472.

Braves 10, Brewers 8 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 2 2 3 0 2 .217 4 2 2 1 1 0 .222 Garcia 3b Freeman 1b 5 1 1 2 0 0 .368 5 0 1 3 0 2 .298 Kemp lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .291 Markakis rf Flowers c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .341 0 1 0 0 0 0 .200 1-Teheran pr Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Bonifacio ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .105 Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Peterson 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .261 Swanson ss 2 2 0 0 2 1 .134 Colon p 2 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Adams ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Collmenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Suzuki ph-c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .207 Totals 38 10 12 10 4 8 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Thames 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .364 Braun lf 5 1 3 2 0 1 .309 Shaw 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .258 Perez rf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .296 Bandy c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .348 Broxton cf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .175 Arcia ss 4 2 2 3 0 1 .243 Anderson p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Santana ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .182 Barnes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Knebel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Aguilar ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 8 13 8 2 11 Atlanta 004 000 312 — 10 12 0 Milwaukee 040 022 000 — 8 13 1 a-homered for Anderson in the 6th. b-singled for Motte in the 7th. c-singled for Collmenter in the 8th. d-flied out for Torres in the 8th. e-grounded out for Ramirez in the 9th. 1-ran for Flowers in the 8th. E: Arcia (3). LOB: Atlanta 5, Milwaukee 5. 2B: Inciarte (4), Garcia (2), Kemp (5), Markakis (5), Peterson (3), Villar (3), Perez 2 (5), Broxton (4), Arcia (3). HR: Freeman (8), off Feliz; Arcia (3), off Colon; Braun (7), off Colon; Santana (3), off Motte. RBIs: Inciarte 3 (11), Garcia (7), Freeman 2 (12), Kemp 3 (10), Suzuki (8), Braun 2 (18), Broxton (3), Arcia 3 (9), Santana 2 (7). SB: Swanson (1), Adams (1), Perez (2), Bandy (1). RLISP: Atlanta 2 (Inciarte, Markakis); Milwaukee 4 (Shaw, Broxton 3). GIDP: Freeman, Braun, Shaw. DP: Atlanta 2 (Swanson, Peterson, Freeman), (Colon, Swanson, Freeman); Milwaukee 1 (Shaw, Arcia, Thames). IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Atlanta 5 10 6 6 2 5 91 5.59 Colon Motte 1 3 2 2 0 0 23 18.00 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.57 Collmenter Ramirez, W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 1.50 Johnson, S, 4-6 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.66 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson 6 4 4 4 3 2 86 2.10 1/ 3 1 1 25 2.13 3 3 3 Barnes 2/ 0 0 1 7 1.64 Knebel, 3 0 0 Torres, 1 3 1 1 0 3 17 4.20 Feliz, L, 0-3 1 2 2 2 0 1 20 6.52 Inherited runners-scored: Knebel 1-0. Umpires: Home, Tom Hallion; First, Quinn Wolcott; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Brian O’Nora. T: 3:18. A: 26,453.

Friday Yankees 14, Baltimore 11, 10 inn. Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 4 Seattle 3, Cleveland 1 Boston 5, Cubs 4 White Sox 7, Detroit 3 LA Angels 6, Texas 3 Houston 9, Oakland 4 Minnesota 6, Kansas City 4

Angels 6, Rangers 3 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Escobar 3b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .235 Calhoun rf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .237 Trout cf 4 2 3 2 1 1 .355 Pujols dh 5 1 1 3 0 2 .247 Cron 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .233 1-Marte pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Simmons ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .287 Maybin lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .219 Espinosa 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 Maldonado c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Totals 37 6 10 6 3 7 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields lf 4 2 2 0 0 1 .280 Andrus ss 4 1 2 1 0 2 .284 Gomez cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .205 Odor 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .191 Napoli dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .155 Mazara rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Rua 1b 3 0 1 0 0 2 .189 Gallo 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Lucroy c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .203 Totals 32 3 7 3 0 11 Los Angeles 100 002 030 — 6 10 1 Texas 100 002 000 — 3 7 2 1-ran for Cron in the 8th. E: Petit (1), Gallo 2 (3). LOB: Los Angeles 7, Texas 3. 2B: Andrus (5), Rua (1). HR: Escobar (2), off Martinez; Trout (7), off Martinez; Pujols (3), off Jeffress. RBIs: Escobar (7), Trout 2 (17), Pujols 3 (21), Andrus (9), Gomez (8), Napoli (9). SF: Gomez. RLISP: Los Angeles 3 (Cron, Maldonado 2); Texas 1 (Lucroy). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Skaggs 5 4 1 1 0 6 76 3.99 Petit, 1 3 2 2 0 1 22 3.14 Guerra, W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 6.75 Hernandez, 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Alvarez, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.08 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Martinez 6 5 3 3 0 7 84 2.77 Barnette 1 0 0 0 1 0 23 3.38 Jeffress, L, 0-2 1 4 3 3 2 0 29 5.59 Dyson 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 21.94 Umpires: Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Adam Hamari; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Kerwin Danley. T: 3:12. A: 28,968.

Rockies 3, Diamondbacks 1 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 4 0 1 1 0 0 .302 Blackmon cf 4 1 1 1 0 3 .179 Story ss Arenado 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .315 Gonzalez rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .225 3 0 0 0 1 2 .306 Reynolds 1b Parra lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Valaika 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .333 Garneau c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .171 2 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Freeland p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 a-LeMahieu ph Rusin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 c-Adames ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holland p Totals 32 3 6 3 3 12 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 3 1 1 0 1 0 .316 Pollock cf Owings ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .325 Goldschmidt 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .321 Tomas lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 4 0 1 0 0 0 .307 Drury 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .326 Peralta rf Iannetta c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Descalso 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .128 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Ray p Delgado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Herrmann ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Wilhelmsen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 0 0 0 --McFarland p Totals 32 1 6 1 3 6 Colorado 101 000 100 — 3 6 1 Arizona 001 000 000 — 1 6 0 a-flied out for Freeland in the 7th. b-struck out for Delgado in the 7th. c-struck out for Ottavino in the 9th. E: Ottavino (1). LOB: Colorado 6, Arizona 7. 2B: Arenado (8), Gonzalez (5), Garneau (4). HR: Story (5), off Ray. RBIs: Blackmon (24), Story (12), Gonzalez (6), Goldschmidt (19). SB: Pollock 2 (9), Owings (7). S: Garneau. RLISP: Colorado 5 (Story, Reynolds, Parra 2, Adames); Arizona 4 (Owings, Tomas 3). GIDP: Peralta. DP: Colorado 1 (Valaika, Story, Reynolds). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland, W, 3-1 6 6 1 1 2 2 96 2.93 2/ 0 2 8 4.50 3 0 0 0 Rusin, Ottavino, 11/3 0 0 0 1 1 24 1.69 Holland, S, 10-10 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.64 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ray, L, 2-1 62/3 5 3 3 3 9 101 3.56 1/ 0 1 6 7.82 Delgado 3 0 0 0 Wilhelmsen 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.66 McFarland 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Delgado 1-0. WP: Delgado. Umpires: Home, Jon Byrne; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Marvin Hudson. T: 2:53. A: 19,300.

Thursday Seattle 2, Detroit 1 Cardinals 8, Toronto 4, 11 inn. Cleveland 4, Houston 3 NY Yankees 3, Boston 0 Cardinals 6, Toronto 4 LA Angels 2, Oakland 1

Saturday’s pitching matchups NL

Pitcher

Cin StL

Arroyo (R) Leake (R)

Time W-L

ERA 6.86 1.32

1:15

2-2 3-1

NY Wheeler (R) Was Strasburg (R)

12:05

1-2 2-0

5.40 2.89

Pit Nova (R) Mia Straily (R)

6:10

2-2 1-1

2.00 3.92

Atl Mil

Garcia (L) Nelson (R)

6:10

0-1 1-1

4.24 4.56

Col Ari

Anderson (L) Greinke (R)

7:10

1-3 2-2

7.11 2.93

SD SF

Chacin (R) Cain (R)

8:05

2-3 2-0

6.21 2.42

Phi LA

Eflin (R) McCarthy (R)

8:10

0-0 3-0

2.25 2.25

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bal NY

Jimenez (R) Pineda (R)

12:05

1-0 2-1

5.95 3.86

TB Tor

Andriese (R) Liriano (L)

12:07

1-0 1-2

3.86 4.59

Chi Holland (L) Det Fulmer (R)

12:10

2-2 2-1

3.57 2.88

Sea Gallardo (R) Cle Salazar (R)

3:10

1-2 1-2

4.84 4.37

Oak Triggs (R) Hou Musgrove (R)

6:10

3-1 1-1

2.42 5.91

LA Chavez (R) Tex Darvish (R)

6:15

2-3 2-2

4.50 3.03

Min Hughes (R) KC Hammel (R)

6:15

3-1 0-2

4.71 5.30

IL

Time W-L

ERA

1-3 1-2

4.88 8.66

Pitcher

ChC Lackey (R) Bos Wright (R)

3:05

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Giants 4, Padres 3 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .205 Myers 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .304 Solarte 2b 2 1 0 0 0 0 .289 Schimpf 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .132 Spangenberg lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .286 Hedges c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .188 Blash rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .059 Perdomo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Buchter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 3 5 3 1 6 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .320 Belt lf-1b 3 2 3 0 1 0 .265 Pence rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .281 Morse 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .250 Law p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Arroyo ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Gillaspie 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .154 Hundley c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .083 Samardzija p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Tomlinson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .500 Hernandez lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Totals 32 4 8 3 1 7 San Diego 000 030 000 — 3 5 1 San Francisco 200 010 01x — 4 8 2 a-singled for Samardzija in the 7th. b-popped out for Hand in the 8th. E: Aybar (1), Belt (2), Hundley (1). LOB: San Diego 3, San Francisco 7. 2B: Spangenberg (1), Belt (6). HR: Schimpf (6), off Samardzija; Arroyo (2), off Buchter. RBIs: Schimpf 2 (12), Hedges (14), Morse (2), Arroyo (4), Gillaspie (3). SB: Aybar (3). SF: Morse. RLISP: San Diego 3 (Myers, Blash 2); San Francisco 5 (Morse 3, Arroyo, Hundley). GIDP: Blash. DP: San Francisco 1 (Gillaspie, Panik, Morse). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Perdomo 6 6 3 1 0 5 69 4.96 1 1 0 0 1 2 19 0.82 Hand Buchter, L, 1-1 1 1 1 1 0 0 16 3.72 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija 7 4 3 2 1 5 88 6.32 Law, W, 3-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 3.18 Melancon, S, 5-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 2.08 HBP: Perdomo (Pence), Samardzija 2 (Solarte,Solarte). WP: Perdomo. Umpires: Home, Mark Wegner; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Marty Foster; Third, Mike Winters. T: 2:26. A: 41,436.

Dodgers 5, Phillies 3 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Hernandez 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .318 Galvis ss 4 1 2 2 0 0 .269 Herrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .256 Franco 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .213 Saunders rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .261 Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Altherr lf-rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .317 Joseph 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .190 Rupp c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .180 Eickhoff p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .111 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Kelly ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Leiter Jr. p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Nava lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .346 Totals 33 3 7 3 1 12 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Toles cf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .222 Seager ss 2 2 0 0 2 0 .310 Turner 3b 4 0 3 2 0 0 .381 Gonzalez 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Grandal c 3 0 0 1 0 1 .206 Utley 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .105 Bellinger lf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .231 K.Hernandez rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .238 Maeda p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Taylor ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .368 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 5 10 4 3 5 Philadelphia 002 000 010 — 3 7 1 Los Angeles 001 112 00x — 5 10 0 a-struck out for Garcia in the 7th. b-struck out for Avilan in the 8th. E: Galvis (1). LOB: Philadelphia 5, Los Angeles 8. 2B: Galvis (4), Rupp (5), Turner (10), K.Hernandez (5). RBIs: Galvis 2 (12), Franco (21), Turner 2 (10), Grandal (7), K.Hernandez (7). SF: Franco, Grandal. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Herrera, Saunders, Joseph, Kelly); Los Angeles 4 (Toles, Gonzalez 2, Maeda). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eickhoff, L, 0-2 52/3 9 5 5 3 3 101 3.56 1/ Garcia 0 0 0 10 0.00 3 1 0 Leiter Jr. 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 8.59 Gomez Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maeda, W, 2-2 7 5 2 2 1 8 101 6.58 2/ Fields, 1 0 0 17 1.29 3 2 1 1/ Avilan, 0 0 1 9 2.45 3 0 0 Jansen, S, 6-6 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 1.93 Inherited runners-scored: Garcia 2-2, Avilan 1-0. WP: Eickhoff 2, Fields. PB: Grandal (3). Umpires: Home, Adrian Johnson; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Tom Woodring; Third, Eric Cooper. T: 3:02. A: 46,729 .


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

Blackhawks trade Darling Wizards eliminate Hawks

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington’s Bradley Beal and John Wall celebrate a victory over Atlanta on Friday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blackhawks goalie Scott Darling (33) celebrates with teammate Marian Hossa on Dec. 11.

NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Carolina Hurricanes have acquired goalie Scott Darling from the Chicago Blackhawks in exchange for a draft pick. The Blackhawks will receive a third-round pick in this summer’s draft from the deal announced Friday night. Darling can become an unrestricted free agent July 1, and the Hurricanes have exclusive negotiating rights with him until then. Darling, 28, had a career-best 18 wins with a 2.38 goals-against average in 32 games, helping the Blackhawks post the best record in the Western Conference. His .924 save percentage tied for fourth among goalies with more than 25 starts. With Cam Ward and Eddie Lack in net, the Hurricanes ranked 18th in the league, allowing 2.8 goals per game, while facing the fifth-fewest shots on goal. Hagelin will be game-time decision for Penguins • Carl Hagelin will be a game-time decision to return to the Pittsburgh Penguins’ lineup for Game 2 against the Washington Capitals on Saturday night. Coach Mike Sullivan says Hagelin has progressed far enough in his recovery from a lower-body injury to be an option to play for the first time since March 10. Hagelin took part in a full-contact practice Friday, opening the door for the speedy winger’s return. Hagelin called it a “step in the right direction,” but it’s difficult to determine if he’ll feel good enough to play. Pittsburgh leads the best-of-seven secondround series 1-0. Friends Bonino, Shattenkirk on opposite sides of rivalry • Should their schedules ever align to where Capitals defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk could host his best friend for a long weekend in Washington, it might be best to order in. Capitals fans don’t seem to care much for Penguins center Nick Bonino, the result of a couple of big playoff goals he’s scored against Washington, including the winner in Thursday’s Game 1 victory for the Penguins. Everyone associated with the Capitals was frustrated at falling into an early series deficit, but Bonino doing the damage was a double whammy for former Blues defenseman Shattenkirk, who knows he’ll surely hear about this one again on the golf course. “It ticked me off even more that it was him because he’s someone who I have to see later on in the summer,” Shattenkirk said. A round after Mike Sullivan was opposite one of his best friends in Columbus coach John Tortorella, there’s now Round 2 in Shattenkirk versus Bonino. At least with this one they’re actually going to be on the ice together, as they were during Bonino’s goal. Shattenkirk was the best man in Bonino’s wedding. They met freshman year at Boston University, then became roommates the rest of the way through college. Bonino said they compete in everything from golf to hockey to video games. “It’s a pretty competitive friendship,” Bonino said.

> SECOND ROUND

* if necessary

WESTERN CONFERENCE BLUES 1, PREDATORS 1 Game 1

Predators 4, Blues 3

Game 2

Blues 3, Predators 2

Sunday

2 at Nashville, KSDK (5)

Tuesday

8:30 at Nashville, NBCSN

May 5

TBA at Scottrade, NBCSN

*May 7

TBA at Nashville

*May 9

TBA at Scottrade, NBCSN

OILERS 1, DUCKS 0 Game 1

Oilers 5, Ducks 3

Game 2

Late Friday at Anaheim

Sunday

6 p.m. at Edmonton, NBCSN

Wed.

9 p.m. at Edmonton, NBCSN

*May 5

TBA at Anaheim, NBCSN

*May 7

TBA at Edmonton, TV TBA

*May 10

TBA at Anaheim, NBCSN

EASTERN CONFERENCE SENATORS 1, RANGERS 0 Game 1

Ottawa 2, Rangers 1

Saturday 2 at Ottawa, KSDK (5) Tuesday

6 at New York , NBCSN

Thursday 6:30 at New York , NBCSN *May 6

TBA at Ottawa, TV TBA

*May 9

TBA at New York , NBCSN

*May 11

TBA at Ottawa , NBCSN

PENGUINS 1, CAPITALS 0 Game 1

Penguins 3, Capitals 2

Saturday 7 at Washington, KSDK (5) Monday

6:30 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

Wed.

6:30 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

*May 6

TBA at Washington, TV TBA

*May 8

TBA at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

*May 10

TBA at Washington, NBCSN

NHL SUMMARIES THURSDAY

Penguins 3, Capitals 2 Pittsburgh 0 2 1 — 3 Washington 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Ovechkin, WSH, (interference), 3:38. Second period: 1, Pittsburgh, Crosby 3 (Guentzel, Hornqvist), 0:12. 2, Pittsburgh, Crosby 4 (Maatta, Hornqvist), 1:04. 3, Washington, Ovechkin 4 (Oshie, Eller), 18:17. Penalties: S.Wilson, PIT, (roughing), 19:41; Shattenkirk, WSH, (roughing), 19:41. Third period: 4, Washington, Kuznetsov 2 (Niskanen), 8:05. 5, Pittsburgh, Bonino 2 (S.Wilson, Schultz), 12:36. Penalties: Niskanen, WSH, (slashing), 12:45. Shots: Pittsburgh 4-11-6: 21. Washington 6-13-16: 35. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 2; Washington 0 of 0. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Fleury 5-1 (35 shots-33 saves). Washington, Holtby 4-3 (21-18). A: 18,506. Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Brad Kovachik.

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Bumgarner is out until mid-July

San Francisco Giants ace Madison Bumgarner, who earlier this month injured his left throwing shoulder in a dirt-biking accident, started rehab for the injury and is expected to be out until after the July 10-13 All-Star break, the team said Friday. The 27-year-old suffered a Grade 2 AC joint sprain in the crash on the team’s day off April 20 in Colorado. Bumgarner started rehab Friday and focused on improving his range of motion, Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. Bumgarner, who’s in the last year of a five-year, $35 million contract extension he signed in 2012, is 0-3 with a 3.00 ERA. Cespedes goes on DL • The New York Mets placed outfielder Yoenis Cespedes on the 10-day disabled list because of a strained left hamstring. His absence is another blow to a team that going into Friday had lost six straight, nine of 10 and fallen into last place in the NL East. He is hitting .270 with six homers and 10 RBIs. “They didn’t really see a lot” on Cespedes’ MRI, manager Terry Collins said. The Mets also said Friday they have recalled lefthander Sean Gilmartin from Triple-A Las Vegas. Collins also said pitcher Noah Syndergaard tossed Friday and could potentially pitch again as early as Sunday if the righthander reported no discomfort. Syndergaard was scratched from his start Thursday because of biceps and shoulder discomfort. Mariners’ Hernandez out 3-4 weeks • Seattle ace Felix Hernandez is expected to miss three to four weeks because of bursitis in his right shoulder. Hernandez, 31, was placed on the 10-day disabled list Wednesday after he pitched only two innings in his start at Detroit the previous night. He allowed four runs and threw 48 pitches. Hernandez is 2-2 with a 4.73 ERA in five starts this season. Outfielder Mitch Haniger, also injured

Tuesday, has a Grade 2 sprain of a right oblique and is expected to be out three to four weeks. He’s batting .338 with four homers and 16 RBIs. Both players underwent testing Friday in Seattle. Thames plays for Brewers • Eric Thames, who leads the majors with 11 home runs, was back in the starting lineup for Milwaukee on Friday night after leaving Wednesday’s game with left hamstring tightness. Gregorius in Yankees lineup • New York shortstop Didi Gregorius was activated from the disabled list after recovering from a strained right shoulder, an injury sustained while playing for the Netherlands in last month’s World Baseball Classic. He was in the lineup at shortstop and batting sixth against Baltimore on Friday night. To clear a roster spot, infielder Pete Kozma, a former Cardinals player, was designated for assignment. He was one for nine in 11 games with the Yankees. Dodgers to honor Scully • Retired Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully will be inducted into the team’s Ring of Honor. The ceremony will be May 3 before a game against the rival San Francisco Giants. Scully will join Roy Campanella, Don Drysdale, Junior Gilliam, Sandy Koufax, Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Don Sutton and former managers Walter Alston and Tom Lasorda in the Ring of Honor. The 89-year-old Hall of Fame broadcaster retired in October after 67 years of calling Dodgers games in Brooklyn and Los Angeles. Other news • The Baltimore Orioles activated outfielder Joey Rickard (sprained finger) from the 10-day disabled list. ... Sam Dyson was back in the Texas Rangers bullpen for the first time since losing his closer role and going on the DL with a bruised right hand. Associated Press

John Wall scored 42 points, Bradley Beal (Chaminade) added 31 and the visiting Washington Wizards withstood a furious Atlanta comeback to close out the Hawks with a 11599 victory Friday night, winning the openinground playoff series 4-2. The Hawks fell behind by 22 early in the third quarter before making a game of it down the stretch. But the home team never led, and Wall stymied the rally with huge plays at both ends of the court. Wall’s block of Dennis Schroder’s layup kept the Hawks from closing within a single point, and Wall hit every big shot in the closing minutes. He scored 19 points in the fourth quarter, ensuring that Washington picked up the first road victory by either team in the series. The Wizards advanced to face Boston in the Eastern Conference semifinals. Game 1 is Sunday. Paul Millsap led the Hawks with 31 points, and Schroder had 26. After losing three close games in Washington, the Hawks seemed to run out of steam in the return to Philips Arena, ending a disappointing season. Washington pushed out to a double-digit lead late in the first quarter, and closed the first half on a 19-4 run to take a 65-46 lead at the break. The Hawks turned the ball over six times during that five-minute stretch, making things easy for the Wizards. Atlanta finished with 22 turnovers, including seven by Kent Bazemore. But it was Wall, still seething over a secondround loss to the Hawks two years ago in which he was sidelined with a broken hand, taking control in the final period. The turning point came with Atlanta on the brink of coming all the way back. With his team trailing 93-90, Schroder came up with a steal and took off for what looked like an uncontested layup. But Wall swooped in from behind and batted the ball off the backboard. At the other end, Wall somehow got a stumbling drive to fall, further silencing a crowd that was in a frenzy as the home team rallied. Atlanta’s Jose Calderon missed a 3-pointer, and Wall knocked down a pullup jumper to stretch the lead back to 97-90. The Hawks called timeout, and Wall stared down the fans at courtside before heading to the Washington bench. After Wall’s huge block, Washington outscored Atlanta 22-9 to win going away. Wizards front-court reserve Jason Smith was able to play after leaving Game 5 with a sprained left knee. Smith went 12 minutes, failing to score. Celtics 105, Bulls 83 • Avery Bradley scored 23 points, and hot-shooting Boston pounded host Chicago to win their first-round series 4-2. The top-seeded Celtics simply torched Chicago to finish off a tougher-than-anticipated series and advance in the playoffs for the first time since 2012. Boston regrouped after dropping the first two games at home. Bradley finished one point shy of a playoff career high he set in Game 5. He nailed three 3-pointers and the Celtics hit 16 of 39 from long range. Gerald Green scored 16 and Isaiah Thomas had 12 before heading home to Washington state for his sister Chyna’s funeral on Saturday. Her death in a car accident the day before the playoff opener dealt a blow to the Celtics. But Boston rallied around its star player and regrouped when it looked like the series might slip from reach. Jimmy Butler led Chicago with 23 points. But the Bulls never really found their rhythm over the final four games with point guard Rajon Rondo sidelined by a broken right thumb. Dwyane Wade shot just one of 10 in a twopoint effort that could be his final appearance for the Bulls. He has a $23.8 million option on the two-year deal he signed last summer to leave Miami and come home to Chicago.

NOTEBOOK

Bird out as Pacers president • Larry Bird started the week by driving an IndyCar down Fifth Avenue in Manhattan to stump for the NBA’s AllStar weekend returning to Indiana. He ended it by stepping down as president of basketball operations for the Pacers, a stunningly abrupt decision that has become a hallmark of the NBA great’s post-playing career. Bird made the call Friday and general manager Kevin Pritchard will be elevated to take his place, a person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the team has not announced the move, which was first reported by Yahoo! Sports. Bird is stepping down from a major role with the Pacers for a third time.Bird coached the Pacers from 1997-2000, leading them to the NBA Finals in 2000 before walking away from the job. He returned as team president in 2003, helping construct a club that was among the best in the league, won 61 games and advanced to the Eastern Conference finals in 2003-04. That team fell apart the following season after the “Malice at the Palace,” the ugly scene in Detroit in which players Ron Artest, Stephen Jackson and Jermaine O’Neal fought with Pistons fans. The French Lick, Ind., native methodically reshaped the team into a contender again, building a promising core around George and Danny Granger and helping to mold Lance Stephenson from a troublemaker into a force. He was named NBA executive of the year in 2012, then stepped down a few months later.

NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE > FIRST ROUND

* if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE CELTICS def. BULLS 4-2 Game 1

Bulls 106, Celtics 102

Game 2

Bulls 111, Celtics 97

Game 3

Celtics 104, Bulls 87

Game 4

Celtics 104, Bulls 95

Game 5

Celtics 108, Bulls 97

Game 6

Celtics 105, Bulls 83

WIZARDS def. HAWKS 4-2 Game 1

Wizards 114, Hawks 107

Game 2

Wizards 109, Hawks 101

Game 3

Hawks 116, Wizards 98

Game 4

Hawks 111, Wizards 101

Game 5

Wizards 103, Hawks 99

Game 6

Wizards 115, Hawks 99

> Celtics vs. Wizards, G1: Noon Sun., KDNL RAPTORS def. BUCKS 4-2 Game 1

Bucks 97, Raptors 83

Game 2

Raptors 106, Bucks 100

Game 3

Bucks 104, Raptors 77

Game 4

Raptors 87, Bucks 76

Game 5

Raptors 118, Bucks 93

Game 6

Raptors 92, Bucks 89

CAVALIERS def. PACERS 4-0 Game 1

Cavaliers 109, Pacers 108

Game 2

Cavaliers 117, Pacers 111

Game 3

Cavaliers 119, Pacers 114

Game 4

Cavaliers 106, Pacers 102

> Cavs vs. Raptors, G1: 6 Mon., TNT WESTERN CONFERENCE SPURS def. GRIZZLIES 4-2 Game 1

Spurs 111, Grizzlies 82

Game 2

Spurs 96, Grizzlies 82

Game 3

Grizzlies 105, Spurs 94

Game 4

Grizzlies 110, Spurs108

Game 5

Spurs 116, Grizzlies 103

Game 6

Spurs 103, Grizzlies 96

ROCKETS def. THUNDER 4-1 Game 1

Rockets 118, Thunder 87

Game 2

Rockets 115, Thunder 111

Game 3

Thunder 115, Rockets 113

Game 4

Rockets 113, Thunder 109

Game 5

Rockets 105, Thunder 99

> Rockets vs. Spurs, G1: 8:30 Mon., TNT JAZZ 3, CLIPPERS 2 Game 1

Jazz 97, Clippers 95

Game 2

Clippers 99, Jazz 91

Game 3

Clippers 111, Jazz 106

Game 4

Jazz 105, Clippers 98

Game 5

Jazz 96, Clippers 92

Game 6

Late Friday at Utah

*Sunday

2:30 at Los Angeles, KDNL

WARRIORS def. TRAIL BLAZERS 4-0 Game 1

Warriors 121, Blazers 109

Game 2

Warriors 110, Blazers 81

Game 3

Warriors 119, Blazers 113

Game 4

Warriors 128, Blazers 103

> Warriors face Clippers-Jazz winner

NBA SUMMARIES Wizards 115, Hawks 99 Washington: Porter 3-5 0-0 8, Morris 7-14 1-3 17, Gortat 1-4 0-0 2, Wall 16-25 9-10 42, Beal 11-17 7-8 31, Oubre 1-4 2-2 5, Ochefu 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Jennings 0-2 0-0 0, Mac 0-0 0-0 0, Bogdanovic 3-6 2-2 10, Satoransky 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-78 21-25 115. Atlanta: Prince 2-5 0-0 4, Millsap 13-23 4-4 31, Howard 3-4 3-3 9, Schroder 8-18 7-8 26, Hardaway Jr. 5-18 1-2 13, Bazemore 4-6 0-0 9, Muscala 0-0 0-0 0, Ilyasova 0-0 1-2 1, Calderon 2-4 0-0 6, Dunleavy 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 16-19 99. Washington 30 24 26 — 115 35 Atlanta 23 23 36 17 — 99 3-pointers: Washington 10-24 (Beal 2-3, Morris 2-4, Porter 2-4, Bogdanovic 2-5, Oubre 1-2, Wall 1-4, Jennings 0-1, Smith 0-1), Atlanta 9-32 (Schroder 3-8, Calderon 2-3, Hardaway Jr. 2-11, Bazemore 1-2, Millsap 1-5, Prince 0-3). Rebounds: Washington 33 (Morris, Porter 8), Atlanta 35 (Millsap 10). Assists: Washington 21 (Wall 8), Atlanta 26 (Schroder 10). Total fouls: Washington 22, Atlanta 22. Technicals: Smith, Beal, Bazemore, Hardaway Jr.. A: 18,849 (18,118).

Celtics 105, Bulls 83 Boston: Crowder 4-8 1-2 12, Green 6-13 1-1 16, Horford 5-5 1-2 12, Thomas 4-11 3-4 12, Bradley 9-12 2-4 23, Brown 3-7 0-1 6, Jerebko 1-4 0-0 3, Zeller 0-1 0-0 0, Olynyk 3-8 0-0 6, Smart 2-6 0-0 6, Rozier 2-4 3-4 9, Young 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-80 11-18 105. Chicago: Mirotic 2-4 0-0 5, Lopez 5-9 0-0 10, Canaan 3-5 2-2 9, Butler 9-17 5-5 23, Wade 1-10 0-0 2, Zipser 3-9 0-0 7, Felicio 0-0 0-0 0, Portis 2-7 0-0 5, Lauvergne 1-4 6-6 8, Carter-Williams 3-6 2-4 8, Grant 2-3 0-0 4, Morrow 0-2 0-0 0, Valentine 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 32-81 15-17 83. Boston 30 24 34 17 — 105 Chicago 24 — 23 18 18 83 3-pointers: Boston 16-39 (Bradley 3-4, Crowder 3-6, Green 3-8, Rozier 2-2, Smart 2-3, Horford 1-1, Jerebko 1-3, Thomas 1-7, Young 0-1, Brown 0-2, Olynyk 0-2), Chicago 4-19 (Canaan 1-2, Portis 1-2, Mirotic 1-3, Zipser 1-3, Carter-Williams 0-1, Grant 0-1, Butler 0-2, Wade 0-2, Valentine 0-3). Rebounds: Boston 43 (Horford, Olynyk 6), Chicago 45 (Portis 11). Assists: Boston 28 (Horford 7), Chicago 13 (Wade 3). Total fouls: Boston 14, Chicago 16. Technicals: Boston defensive three second, Boston team, Crowder, Mirotic. LATE THURSDAY

Spurs 103, Grizzlies 96 San Antonio: Leonard 8-19 12-13 29, Lee 3-4 1-2 7, Aldridge 7-17 3-3 17, Parker 11-14 4-4 27, D.Green 2-6 1-2 7, Bertans 0-1 0-0 0, P.Gasol 0-6 0-0 0, Dedmon 1-1 0-0 2, Mills 4-6 0-0 10, Simmons 0-1 0-0 0, Ginobili 1-2 1-1 4. Totals 37-77 22-25 103. Memphis: Ennis 4-7 0-0 11, Randolph 6-14 1-3 13, M.Gasol 5-12 7-8 18, Conley 7-18 9-10 26, Carter 4-9 2-2 12, J.Green 2-5 1-1 5, Harrison 2-3 0-0 6, Selden 1-2 0-0 2, Daniels 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 32-71 20-24 96. 21 24 30 28 — 103 San Antonio Memphis 22 28 24 22 — 96 3-pointers: San Antonio 7-20 (Mills 2-3, D.Green 2-5, Parker 1-2, Ginobili 1-2, Leonard 1-5, Bertans 0-1, P.Gasol 0-1, Aldridge 0-1), Memphis 12-27 (Ennis 3-4, Conley 3-9, Harrison 2-2, Carter 2-6, Daniels 1-1, M.Gasol 1-2, Randolph 0-1, J.Green 0-2). Rebounds: San Antonio 46 (Aldridge 12), Memphis 28 (Randolph 11). Assists: San Antonio 13 (Parker, Leonard 4), Memphis 15 (M.Gasol 6). Total fouls: San Antonio 20, Memphis 26. A: 18,119 (18,119).


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

Blackhawks trade Darling Wizards eliminate Hawks

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington’s Bradley Beal and John Wall celebrate a victory over Atlanta on Friday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blackhawks goalie Scott Darling (33) celebrates with teammate Marian Hossa on Dec. 11.

NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Carolina Hurricanes have acquired goalie Scott Darling from the Chicago Blackhawks in exchange for a draft pick. The Blackhawks will receive a third-round pick in this summer’s draft from the deal announced Friday night. Darling can become an unrestricted free agent July 1, and the Hurricanes have exclusive negotiating rights with him until then. Darling, 28, had a career-best 18 wins with a 2.38 goals-against average in 32 games, helping the Blackhawks post the best record in the Western Conference. His .924 save percentage tied for fourth among goalies with more than 25 starts. With Cam Ward and Eddie Lack in net, the Hurricanes ranked 18th in the league, allowing 2.8 goals per game, while facing the fifth-fewest shots on goal. Hagelin will be game-time decision for Penguins • Carl Hagelin will be a game-time decision to return to the Pittsburgh Penguins’ lineup for Game 2 against the Washington Capitals on Saturday night. Coach Mike Sullivan says Hagelin has progressed far enough in his recovery from a lower-body injury to be an option to play for the first time since March 10. Hagelin took part in a full-contact practice Friday, opening the door for the speedy winger’s return. Hagelin called it a “step in the right direction,” but it’s difficult to determine if he’ll feel good enough to play. Pittsburgh leads the best-of-seven secondround series 1-0. Friends Bonino, Shattenkirk on opposite sides of rivalry • Should their schedules ever align to where Capitals defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk could host his best friend for a long weekend in Washington, it might be best to order in. Capitals fans don’t seem to care much for Penguins center Nick Bonino, the result of a couple of big playoff goals he’s scored against Washington, including the winner in Thursday’s Game 1 victory for the Penguins. Everyone associated with the Capitals was frustrated at falling into an early series deficit, but Bonino doing the damage was a double whammy for former Blues defenseman Shattenkirk, who knows he’ll surely hear about this one again on the golf course. “It ticked me off even more that it was him because he’s someone who I have to see later on in the summer,” Shattenkirk said. A round after Mike Sullivan was opposite one of his best friends in Columbus coach John Tortorella, there’s now Round 2 in Shattenkirk versus Bonino. At least with this one they’re actually going to be on the ice together, as they were during Bonino’s goal. Shattenkirk was the best man in Bonino’s wedding. They met freshman year at Boston University, then became roommates the rest of the way through college. Bonino said they compete in everything from golf to hockey to video games. “It’s a pretty competitive friendship,” Bonino said.

> SECOND ROUND

* if necessary

WESTERN CONFERENCE BLUES 1, PREDATORS 1 Game 1

Predators 4, Blues 3

Game 2

Blues 3, Predators 2

Sunday

2 at Nashville, KSDK (5)

Tuesday

8:30 at Nashville, NBCSN

May 5

TBA at Scottrade, NBCSN

*May 7

TBA at Nashville

*May 9

TBA at Scottrade, NBCSN

OILERS 2, DUCKS 0 Game 1

Oilers 5, Ducks 3

Game 2

Oilers 2, Ducks 1

Sunday

6 p.m. at Edmonton, NBCSN

Wed.

9 p.m. at Edmonton, NBCSN

*May 5

TBA at Anaheim, NBCSN

*May 7

TBA at Edmonton, TV TBA

*May 10

TBA at Anaheim, NBCSN

EASTERN CONFERENCE SENATORS 1, RANGERS 0 Game 1

Ottawa 2, Rangers 1

Saturday 2 at Ottawa, KSDK (5) Tuesday

6 at New York , NBCSN

Thursday 6:30 at New York , NBCSN *May 6

TBA at Ottawa, TV TBA

*May 9

TBA at New York , NBCSN

*May 11

TBA at Ottawa , NBCSN

PENGUINS 1, CAPITALS 0 Game 1

Penguins 3, Capitals 2

Saturday 7 at Washington, KSDK (5) Monday

6:30 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

Wed.

6:30 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

*May 6

TBA at Washington, TV TBA

*May 8

TBA at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

*May 10

TBA at Washington, NBCSN

NHL SUMMARIES THURSDAY

Penguins 3, Capitals 2 Pittsburgh 0 2 1 — 3 Washington 0 1 1 — 2 First period: None. Penalties: Ovechkin, WSH, (interference), 3:38. Second period: 1, Pittsburgh, Crosby 3 (Guentzel, Hornqvist), 0:12. 2, Pittsburgh, Crosby 4 (Maatta, Hornqvist), 1:04. 3, Washington, Ovechkin 4 (Oshie, Eller), 18:17. Penalties: S.Wilson, PIT, (roughing), 19:41; Shattenkirk, WSH, (roughing), 19:41. Third period: 4, Washington, Kuznetsov 2 (Niskanen), 8:05. 5, Pittsburgh, Bonino 2 (S.Wilson, Schultz), 12:36. Penalties: Niskanen, WSH, (slashing), 12:45. Shots: Pittsburgh 4-11-6: 21. Washington 6-13-16: 35. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 2; Washington 0 of 0. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Fleury 5-1 (35 shots-33 saves). Washington, Holtby 4-3 (21-18). A: 18,506. Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Brad Kovachik.

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Bumgarner is out until mid-July

San Francisco Giants ace Madison Bumgarner, who earlier this month injured his left throwing shoulder in a dirt-biking accident, started rehab for the injury and is expected to be out until after the July 10-13 All-Star break, the team said Friday. The 27-year-old suffered a Grade 2 AC joint sprain in the crash on the team’s day off April 20 in Colorado. Bumgarner started rehab Friday and focused on improving his range of motion, Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. Bumgarner, who’s in the last year of a five-year, $35 million contract extension he signed in 2012, is 0-3 with a 3.00 ERA. Cespedes goes on DL • The New York Mets placed outfielder Yoenis Cespedes on the 10-day disabled list because of a strained left hamstring. His absence is another blow to a team that going into Friday had lost six straight, nine of 10 and fallen into last place in the NL East. He is hitting .270 with six homers and 10 RBIs. “They didn’t really see a lot” on Cespedes’ MRI, manager Terry Collins said. The Mets also said Friday they have recalled lefthander Sean Gilmartin from Triple-A Las Vegas. Collins also said pitcher Noah Syndergaard tossed Friday and could potentially pitch again as early as Sunday if the righthander reported no discomfort. Syndergaard was scratched from his start Thursday because of biceps and shoulder discomfort. Mariners’ Hernandez out 3-4 weeks • Seattle ace Felix Hernandez is expected to miss three to four weeks because of bursitis in his right shoulder. Hernandez, 31, was placed on the 10-day disabled list Wednesday after he pitched only two innings in his start at Detroit the previous night. He allowed four runs and threw 48 pitches. Hernandez is 2-2 with a 4.73 ERA in five starts this season. Outfielder Mitch Haniger, also injured

Tuesday, has a Grade 2 sprain of a right oblique and is expected to be out three to four weeks. He’s batting .338 with four homers and 16 RBIs. Both players underwent testing Friday in Seattle. Thames plays for Brewers • Eric Thames, who leads the majors with 11 home runs, was back in the starting lineup for Milwaukee on Friday night after leaving Wednesday’s game with left hamstring tightness. Gregorius in Yankees lineup • New York shortstop Didi Gregorius was activated from the disabled list after recovering from a strained right shoulder, an injury sustained while playing for the Netherlands in last month’s World Baseball Classic. He was in the lineup at shortstop and batting sixth against Baltimore on Friday night. To clear a roster spot, infielder Pete Kozma, a former Cardinals player, was designated for assignment. He was one for nine in 11 games with the Yankees. Dodgers to honor Scully • Retired Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully will be inducted into the team’s Ring of Honor. The ceremony will be May 3 before a game against the rival San Francisco Giants. Scully will join Roy Campanella, Don Drysdale, Junior Gilliam, Sandy Koufax, Pee Wee Reese, Jackie Robinson, Duke Snider, Don Sutton and former managers Walter Alston and Tom Lasorda in the Ring of Honor. The 89-year-old Hall of Fame broadcaster retired in October after 67 years of calling Dodgers games in Brooklyn and Los Angeles. Other news • The Baltimore Orioles activated outfielder Joey Rickard (sprained finger) from the 10-day disabled list. ... Sam Dyson was back in the Texas Rangers bullpen for the first time since losing his closer role and going on the DL with a bruised right hand. Associated Press

John Wall scored 42 points, Bradley Beal (Chaminade) added 31 and the visiting Washington Wizards withstood a furious Atlanta comeback to close out the Hawks with a 115-99 victory Friday night, winning the opening-round playoff series 4-2. The Hawks fell behind by 22 early in the third quarter before making a game of it down the stretch. But the home team never led, and Wall stymied the rally with huge plays at both ends of the court. Wall’s block of Dennis Schroder’s layup kept the Hawks from closing within a single point, and Wall hit every big shot in the closing minutes. He scored 19 points in the fourth quarter, ensuring that Washington picked up the first road victory by either team in the series. The Wizards advanced to face Boston in the Eastern Conference semifinals. Game 1 is Sunday. Paul Millsap led the Hawks with 31 points, and Schroder had 26. After losing three close games in Washington, the Hawks seemed to run out of steam in the return to Philips Arena, ending a disappointing season. Washington pushed out to a double-digit lead late in the first quarter, and closed the first half on a 19-4 run to take a 65-46 lead at the break. The Hawks turned the ball over six times during that five-minute stretch, making things easy for the Wizards. Atlanta finished with 22 turnovers, including seven by Kent Bazemore. But it was Wall, still seething over a secondround loss to the Hawks two years ago in which he was sidelined with a broken hand, taking control in the final period. The turning point came with Atlanta on the brink of coming all the way back. With his team trailing 93-90, Schroder came up with a steal and took off for what looked like an uncontested layup. But Wall swooped in from behind and batted the ball off the backboard. At the other end, Wall somehow got a stumbling drive to fall, further silencing a crowd that was in a frenzy as the home team rallied. Atlanta’s Jose Calderon missed a 3-pointer, and Wall knocked down a pullup jumper to stretch the lead back to 97-90. The Hawks called timeout, and Wall stared down the fans at courtside before heading to the Washington bench. After Wall’s huge block, Washington outscored Atlanta 22-9 to win going away. Celtics 105, Bulls 83 • Avery Bradley scored 23 points, and hot-shooting Boston pounded host Chicago to win their first-round series 4-2. The top-seeded Celtics simply torched Chicago to finish off a tougher-than-anticipated series and advance in the playoffs for the first time since 2012. Boston regrouped after dropping the first two games at home. Bradley finished one point shy of a playoff career high he set in Game 5. He nailed three 3-pointers and the Celtics hit 16 of 39 from long range. Gerald Green scored 16 and Isaiah Thomas had 12 before heading home to Washington state for his sister Chyna’s funeral on Saturday. Her death in a car accident the day before the playoff opener dealt a blow to the Celtics. But Boston rallied around its star player and regrouped when it looked like the series might slip from reach. Jimmy Butler led Chicago with 23 points. But the Bulls never really found their rhythm over the final four games with point guard Rajon Rondo sidelined by a broken right thumb. Dwyane Wade shot just one of 10 in a twopoint effort that could be his final appearance for the Bulls. He has a $23.8 million option on the two-year deal he signed last summer to leave Miami and come home to Chicago. Clippers 98, Jazz 93 • Chris Paul had 29 points, DeAndre Jordan added 18 assists, and visiting Los Angeles came back to beat Utah and force Game 7.

NOTEBOOK

Bird out as Pacers president • Larry Bird started the week by driving an IndyCar down Fifth Avenue in Manhattan to stump for the NBA’s AllStar weekend returning to Indiana. He ended it by stepping down as president of basketball operations for the Pacers, a stunningly abrupt decision that has become a hallmark of the NBA great’s post-playing career. Bird made the call Friday and general manager Kevin Pritchard will be elevated to take his place, a person with knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the team has not announced the move, which was first reported by Yahoo! Sports. Bird is stepping down from a major role with the Pacers for a third time. Bird coached the Pacers from 1997-2000, leading them to the NBA Finals in 2000 before walking away from the job. He returned as team president in 2003, helping construct a club that was among the best in the league, won 61 games and advanced to the Eastern Conference finals in 2003-04. That team fell apart the following season after the “Malice at the Palace,” the ugly scene in Detroit in which players Ron Artest, Stephen Jackson and Jermaine O’Neal fought with Pistons fans. The French Lick, Ind., native methodically reshaped the team into a contender again, building a promising core around George and Danny Granger and helping to mold Lance Stephenson from a troublemaker into a force. He was named NBA executive of the year in 2012, then stepped down a few months later.

NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE > FIRST ROUND

* if necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE CELTICS def. BULLS 4-2 Game 1

Bulls 106, Celtics 102

Game 2

Bulls 111, Celtics 97

Game 3

Celtics 104, Bulls 87

Game 4

Celtics 104, Bulls 95

Game 5

Celtics 108, Bulls 97

Game 6

Celtics 105, Bulls 83

WIZARDS def. HAWKS 4-2 Game 1

Wizards 114, Hawks 107

Game 2

Wizards 109, Hawks 101

Game 3

Hawks 116, Wizards 98

Game 4

Hawks 111, Wizards 101

Game 5

Wizards 103, Hawks 99

Game 6

Wizards 115, Hawks 99

> Celtics vs. Wizards, G1: Noon Sun., KDNL RAPTORS def. BUCKS 4-2 Game 1

Bucks 97, Raptors 83

Game 2

Raptors 106, Bucks 100

Game 3

Bucks 104, Raptors 77

Game 4

Raptors 87, Bucks 76

Game 5

Raptors 118, Bucks 93

Game 6

Raptors 92, Bucks 89

CAVALIERS def. PACERS 4-0 Game 1

Cavaliers 109, Pacers 108

Game 2

Cavaliers 117, Pacers 111

Game 3

Cavaliers 119, Pacers 114

Game 4

Cavaliers 106, Pacers 102

> Cavs vs. Raptors, G1: 6 Mon., TNT WESTERN CONFERENCE SPURS def. GRIZZLIES 4-2 Game 1

Spurs 111, Grizzlies 82

Game 2

Spurs 96, Grizzlies 82

Game 3

Grizzlies 105, Spurs 94

Game 4

Grizzlies 110, Spurs108

Game 5

Spurs 116, Grizzlies 103

Game 6

Spurs 103, Grizzlies 96

ROCKETS def. THUNDER 4-1 Game 1

Rockets 118, Thunder 87

Game 2

Rockets 115, Thunder 111

Game 3

Thunder 115, Rockets 113

Game 4

Rockets 113, Thunder 109

Game 5

Rockets 105, Thunder 99

> Rockets vs. Spurs, G1: 8:30 Mon., TNT JAZZ 3, CLIPPERS 3 Game 1

Jazz 97, Clippers 95

Game 2

Clippers 99, Jazz 91

Game 3

Clippers 111, Jazz 106

Game 4

Jazz 105, Clippers 98

Game 5

Jazz 96, Clippers 92

Game 6

Clippers 98, Jazz 93

Sunday

2:30 at Los Angeles, KDNL

WARRIORS def. TRAIL BLAZERS 4-0 Game 1

Warriors 121, Blazers 109

Game 2

Warriors 110, Blazers 81

Game 3

Warriors 119, Blazers 113

Game 4

Warriors 128, Blazers 103

> Warriors face Clippers-Jazz winner

NBA SUMMARIES Wizards 115, Hawks 99 Washington: Porter 3-5 0-0 8, Morris 7-14 1-3 17, Gortat 1-4 0-0 2, Wall 16-25 9-10 42, Beal 11-17 7-8 31, Oubre 1-4 2-2 5, Ochefu 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Jennings 0-2 0-0 0, Mac 0-0 0-0 0, Bogdanovic 3-6 2-2 10, Satoransky 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-78 21-25 115. Atlanta: Prince 2-5 0-0 4, Millsap 13-23 4-4 31, Howard 3-4 3-3 9, Schroder 8-18 7-8 26, Hardaway Jr. 5-18 1-2 13, Bazemore 4-6 0-0 9, Muscala 0-0 0-0 0, Ilyasova 0-0 1-2 1, Calderon 2-4 0-0 6, Dunleavy 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 16-19 99. Washington 30 24 26 — 115 35 Atlanta 23 23 36 17 — 99 3-pointers: Washington 10-24 (Beal 2-3, Morris 2-4, Porter 2-4, Bogdanovic 2-5, Oubre 1-2, Wall 1-4, Jennings 0-1, Smith 0-1), Atlanta 9-32 (Schroder 3-8, Calderon 2-3, Hardaway Jr. 2-11, Bazemore 1-2, Millsap 1-5, Prince 0-3). Rebounds: Washington 33 (Morris, Porter 8), Atlanta 35 (Millsap 10). Assists: Washington 21 (Wall 8), Atlanta 26 (Schroder 10). Total fouls: Washington 22, Atlanta 22. Technicals: Smith, Beal, Bazemore, Hardaway Jr.. A: 18,849 (18,118).

Celtics 105, Bulls 83 Boston: Crowder 4-8 1-2 12, Green 6-13 1-1 16, Horford 5-5 1-2 12, Thomas 4-11 3-4 12, Bradley 9-12 2-4 23, Brown 3-7 0-1 6, Jerebko 1-4 0-0 3, Zeller 0-1 0-0 0, Olynyk 3-8 0-0 6, Smart 2-6 0-0 6, Rozier 2-4 3-4 9, Young 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-80 11-18 105. Chicago: Mirotic 2-4 0-0 5, Lopez 5-9 0-0 10, Canaan 3-5 2-2 9, Butler 9-17 5-5 23, Wade 1-10 0-0 2, Zipser 3-9 0-0 7, Felicio 0-0 0-0 0, Portis 2-7 0-0 5, Lauvergne 1-4 6-6 8, Carter-Williams 3-6 2-4 8, Grant 2-3 0-0 4, Morrow 0-2 0-0 0, Valentine 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 32-81 15-17 83. Boston 30 24 34 17 — 105 Chicago 24 — 23 18 18 83 3-pointers: Boston 16-39 (Bradley 3-4, Crowder 3-6, Green 3-8, Rozier 2-2, Smart 2-3, Horford 1-1, Jerebko 1-3, Thomas 1-7, Young 0-1, Brown 0-2, Olynyk 0-2), Chicago 4-19 (Canaan 1-2, Portis 1-2, Mirotic 1-3, Zipser 1-3, Carter-Williams 0-1, Grant 0-1, Butler 0-2, Wade 0-2, Valentine 0-3). Rebounds: Boston 43 (Horford, Olynyk 6), Chicago 45 (Portis 11). Assists: Boston 28 (Horford 7), Chicago 13 (Wade 3). Total fouls: Boston 14, Chicago 16. Technicals: Boston defensive three second, Boston team, Crowder, Mirotic.

Clippers 98, Jazz 93 L.A. Clippers: Mbah a Moute 5-8 2-4 13, Jordan 5-8 3-11 13, Paul 10-20 7-8 29, Redick 1-4 1-1 4, Rivers 5-10 0-0 13, W.Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Pierce 1-3 0-0 3, Speights 4-6 0-0 9, Felton 1-4 0-0 2, Crawford 5-12 2-2 12. Totals 37-75 15-26 98. Utah: Hayward 9-20 10-11 31, Ingles 0-4 0-0 0, Gobert 5-10 5-10 15, Diaw 2-2 0-0 5, Hill 8-13 5-9 22, J.Johnson 3-9 2-3 9, Favors 1-6 0-0 2, Neto 2-4 0-0 5, Hood 2-10 0-0 4. Totals 32-78 22-33 93. 20 27 31 20 — 98 L.A. Clippers Utah 22 23 25 23 — 93 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 9-21 (Rivers 3-7, Paul 2-6, Mbah a Moute 1-1, Speights 1-1, Redick 1-2, Pierce 1-2, Felton 0-1, Crawford 0-1), Utah 7-27 (Hayward 3-9, Neto 1-1, Diaw 1-1, Hill 1-2, J.Johnson 1-4, Favors 0-1, Ingles 0-3, Hood 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 41 (Jordan 18), Utah 38 (Gobert 9). Assists: L.A. Clippers 17 (Paul 8), Utah 18 (Hayward 4). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 24, Utah 20. Technicals: Ingles.


SPORTS

04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B9

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES

Odom’s plan to shift Tigers to west meets some resistance

Spanberger powering up for Arkansas

Sideline switch hits a glitch BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Missouri football

coach Barry Odom wants to switch the team sidelines on Faurot Field, but his proposal is meeting resistance. Odom believes the Tigers will have a competitive edge if they move from the east to the west sideline, but a Southeastern Conference rule would require some seating changes that has students upset. Odom favors the west sideline, for one, because it’s on the shady side of the field for day games. Also, Odom believes opposing coaches in the press box along the west side of the stadium have a better view of coaches’ signals and personnel moves that come from the east sideline. “There’s an opportunity from a signal standpoint and formation standpoint and even with players entering and exiting the game that it gives you a better (chance to) disguise, for the lack of a better word, when you’re on the press box side as opposed to being more open on the east side,” MU athletics spokesman Nick Joos said. But there’s one holdup. An SEC rule states that home student sections are prohibited between the 30-yard lines and through the first 25 rows behind the visiting team’s bench. In the stadium’s current seating design, student seating takes up the sections directly behind the east team sideline. Under Odom’s proposal, those seats behind the visitors bench would be filled by fans from the visiting team. “By SEC rule you have to give the visiting team 1,000 seats in the lower bowl,” Joos said. “They would fill in 1,000 of those (seats).” MU’s proposal includes a section for young alumni behind the area designated for the visiting fans. That arrangement would displace some student sections to the outer margins of the front sections along the east side. Odom and members of the athletics department met with student lead-

ers from nine campus organizations April 20 to discuss the proposal. Only one student group, Tiger’s Lair, was resistant to the proposal, Joos said. The Tiger’s Lair is the school’s “official student cheering section for the Missouri Tigers,” according to the organization’s website. The Tiger’s Lair later released a statement this week, saying the proposal will result in “a dramatic disinterest in Mizzou Football” and cited the section’s challenges related to lower enrollment numbers and “a reduced desire for season tickets from current students due to the performance of the team.” Mizzou’s athletics staff will meet with campus groups to discuss the proposal again this week, Joos said. MU hopes to have the seating arrangement resolved before the spring semester ends next month. “If a move like this can get two or three more wins over the course a year, you just don’t know,” Joos said, “but it’s obviously something (Odom) believes is important enough to bring to the administration to discuss. We’re trying to gather all the feedback we can and then we’ll make the best decision possible.”

BASKETBALL CLASS IN FLUX

Basketball coach Cuonzo Martin is trying to put the final touches on his first recruiting class, and this week hosted a pair of visitors: Canisius College guard Kassius Robertson, a graduate transfer who will be eligible to play immediately with one year of eligibility, and 6-9 high school prospect Mamoudou Diarra, who has spent time at St. Louis Christian Academy. Diarra, who signed with Washington last fall and asked out of his letter of intent, visited Mizzou on Thursday but committed to Cincinnati on Friday. Mizzou continues to pursue East St. Louis forward Jeremiah Tilmon, though it’s unclear when the 6-10, four-star prospect plans to choose a school. A source close to the player said Tilmon wants to stay silent during the recruiting

process. With three recruits already signed, the Tigers have two available scholarships for the upcoming season.

TIGERS CLIMB RANKINGS

Despite losing seasons by its two most high-profile teams, football and men’s basketball, Mizzou is in position to have its strongest finish in the Learfield Directors’ Cub standings, which measure all Division I athletic programs by their teams’ national rankings. Strong years by Mizzou wrestling, women’s indoor track and both swimming teams pushed the Tigers to No. 15 in the latest standings at the end of the winter sports season. MU finished the 2015-16 season ranked No. 43 in the final standings and has averaged 46th place over the last five years. MU’s best finish was No. 36 in 2008-09. This year, though, nine teams have finished their respective season among their sport’s top 25 by national ranking or national tournament finish, led by No. 5 wrestling, No. 8 women’s indoor track and No. 9 men’s swimming. The year’s final standings will be released at the conclusion of the spring sports season.

TIGER TALES

Texas A&M’s baseball team pounded Mizzou 11-1 in the first game of Friday’s doubleheader at Taylor Stadium. … MU’s softball team dropped its series opener at Louisiana State 3-2 after leaving eight runners stranded. The teams play a doubleheader Saturday. … Freshman golfer Jessica Yuen was chosen as one of six individuals to compete at the NCAA regional May 8-10 in Albuquerque, N.M. … At the Drake Relays, MU cross country national champion Karissa Schweizer finished eighth in the 1,500 meters Friday but first among collegiate runners. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

Kenseth will make rare start on pole He leads qualifying for just the 19th time going into 623rd race of his career

BY STEVE EIGHINGER Special to the Post-dispatch

Chad Spanberger can take a deep breath now. The former Metro East standout at Granite City worked for 2½ seasons to reach this point in his college baseball career and is finally enjoying his time in the Southeastern Conference. Spanberger is entrenched as a regular in the lineup at Arkansas (33-10), the nation’s 15th-ranked program. “The past two years and the beginning of this year were really stressful,” Spanberger told KFSM-TV in Fayetteville, Ark. Spanberger’s batting average and power have spiked as a junior, especially since late March, helping Arkansas climb in the rankings and contend in the SEC. He has hit nine home runs and driven in 45 — both team highs — while raising his batting average to .314. A 6-foot-3, 235-pound lefthanded slugger, Spanberger is going more the opposite way and reaping the dividends. “You have to to trust yourself and don’t worry about pulling the ball,” he said. “I’ve been hitting the ball to left field more than before.”

REED SPARKS KENTUCKY

Sophomore shortstop Katie Reed (Oakville) is helping Kentucky softball make a statement by making one herself. Reed, who leads the No. 18 Wildcats (31-13) with a .346 batting average, banged out three hits in a recent 5-1 win over No. 1 Florida (443). Reed enjoyed her big day at the plate against Florida ace Delanie Gourley, a member of the U.S. national team. Reed has been a fixture in the lineup since she arrived at the SEC school, having started 104 consecutive games. She says patience is the key to attacking a pitching a pitcher like Gourley. “I was really just trying to stay calm at the plate,” Reed told the Lexington (Ky.) WorldLeader. “I was looking to hit her change-up, and my first hit I didn’t really square up on it, but on the last at-bat I was still trying to sit on it and I did a good job.” Kentucky’s victory over Florida should help cement the Wildcats’ quest for a ninth NCAA Tournament bid in the last 10 seasons.

NETEMEYER ON STOPPER WATCH LIST

SIU Carbondale junior closer Ryan Netemeyer (Mascoutah) is one of 40 players named to the Midseason Stopper of the Year watch list, as compiled by baseball writers. He has 13 saves this season and 26 for his career. He has not allowed an earned run since February. Over his last 19 innings he has a 0.00 earned-run average with 12 saves and 19 strikeouts. Netemeyer enters the weekend with the third-most saves among NCAA Division I relievers and needs one more to break SIUC’s single-season record. At Mascoutah, Netermeyer led the Indians to the 2014 Mississippi Valley Conference title, their first in 14 years. As a senior, he paced the MVC in victories (9-1), ERA (1.29) and strikeouts (92) while helping Mascoutah to a 32-7 record, the third-most victories by an MVC team in the past 20 years.

AROUND THE AREA

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Matt Kenseth (left) watches qualifying results with his crew for Sunday’s NASCAR race at Richmond International Raceway. ASSOCIATED PRESS

RICHMOND, VA. • Matt Kenseth won the pole position for Sunday’s Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series race at Richmond International Raceway. The 2003 series champion needed only four laps in three rounds of qualifying Friday, outrunning final-round qualifiers like Joey Logano, who was fastest in each of the first two rounds, and Dale Earnhardt Jr., who made it to the final round but will start 12th. “I don’t get a lot of poles so any time I get a pole, it’s pretty special,” Kenseth said. The pole was just the 19th for Kenseth, who will make his 623rd career start this weekend, and his second at Richmond. He and teammates Denny Hamlin, Kyle Busch and rookie Daniel Suarez will be trying to give Joe Gibbs Racing its first victory of the season at a track where they have been dominant in recent years. Gibbs cars have won the last three races on the 0.75-mile oval. “I was reminded last week that I’ve led zero laps this year and I think I have like negative two stage points, or whatever they are,” said Kenseth, who arrived 20th in the points standings after eight races. “They took some away because we’ve been so bad early in races, so hopefully we can turn that around Sun-

day and stay up front and hopefully be in the mix at the end of the day.” Kenseth has won twice at Richmond, the last in the fall race in 2015. Hamlin, who grew up about 20 miles from the track, will start 28th, while Busch will start seventh and Suarez 11th. Ryan Blaney, driving for the Wood Brothers, will start second, followed by Martin Truex Jr., Ricky Stenhouse Jr. and Logano. “It’s so frustrating when you win the first two rounds and the one that pays the money you are not there,” Logano said. For Blaney, it will mark the third time he starts on the front row this season, again leaving him one spot shy of qualifying for the Clash at Daytona, the season-opening exhibition race before the Daytona 500.

PRESSURE’S OFF

Earnhardt says the pressure is gone, not only about his future, but also his results. “I certainly did feel a lot more relaxed now,” NASCAR’S most popular driver said at Richmond, where he came back to work three days after announcing that this season will be his last. “I don’t know whether it’s because I finally got to tell everybody and let everybody know what we’re doing, get that over with, but

I certainly felt real relaxed today in the garage during practice. “I felt like there was less pressure from somewhere, and a large amount,” he said. “A lot different.” That doesn’t mean that Earnhardt won’t be trying to end a 27-race winless drought when the green flag drops Sunday. “The fans are going to want you to do as best as you can, so they’re still going to have expectations, per usual,” he said. “The team, the guys, myself, we’d love to win some races. I’m going to say a race, but some races would be great going out in your last season to get some victories. We just want to go to Victory Lane one more time. Just to get that experience one more time would be awesome for me and I think the guys would love it.” Earnhardt has struggled this season. He’s 24th in points through eight races and has finished 30th or lower four times. In the past, if his car was balky in practice, there was tension. Now, “I am not going to get so spun out if something is just not perfect on the car or the car is not exactly what we need or we are a little slow. I guess I won’t be as panicky about it and the frustration won’t jump in there as quickly as it usually does,” he said.

Missouri Baptist junior setter Kyle Foley (Vianney) is the repeat NAIA national player of the year, as selected by volleyball coaches. Foley, who ranked second in the nation in assists per game (10.8) and was first in service aces (62), helped Missouri Baptist (27-3) reach the semifinals of the national invitation tournament. • SIUE Edwardsville senior lefthander Haley Chambers-Book (Coatesville, Ind.) was a thirdround pick in the National Pro Fastpitch college draft, the 14th player selected. The career strikeouts leader at SIUE, Chambers-Book was drafted by the Texas Charge, but she has unfinished business in college. She is fifth in the nation in wins (22-6) among Division I pitchers, and her 220 strikeouts rank 10th. She has a career .325 batting average with 13 home runs. The NPF consists of five teams – the Akron Racers, Chicago Bandits, Scrap Yard Dawgs (Conroe, Texas), Texas Charge (San Marcos, Texas) and USSSA Pride (Kissimmee, Fla.). • Louisville senior Emmonnie Henderson (Edwardsville) holds the school’s shot put record after a recent 59-foot throw, which ranks No. 3 in the nation. • The McKendree softball team (30-19) is zeroing in on the program’s first winning season since 2011. Senior outfielder Jamie Doggendorf (Northwest), a former Suburban West player of the year, is hitting .348 with 40 stolen bases. Senior pitcher Holly Magre (St. Pius X) is 15-7. • Westminster senior outfielder Tanner Branneky (Lutheran North) leads the Blue Jays (16-8) in hitting (.415), home runs (seven) and RBIs (28). Freshman righthander Sam Huesgen (Timberland) is tied for the team lead in victories (6-2). • Missouri-St. Louis tennis player Ben-Hur Kasprzak is the Great Lakes Valley Conference freshman of the year. In singles play, he was 7-3 at No. 1 singles during the spring dual season, adding to a 7-5 mark from the fall. He played No. 1 and 2 doubles en route to a 13-9 record. • St. Louis Community College (35-8) is playing this weekend in the Region XVI tournament at Cottey College in Nevada, Mo. Sophomore outfielder Madison Sundling leads the Archers in home runs (nine), RBIs (54) and hitting (.481). • SIUE’s Luke Long is the Ohio Valley Conference freshman golfer of the year. He entered the conference tournament with a 73.7 scoring average. • Sophomore Serena Olson is UMSL softball’s new single-season RBI record-holder with 58.


SPORTS

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

Blixt, Smith team up for a one-shot lead Scores much lower on second day of Zurich Classic with switch to four-ball format

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jonas Blixt hits a putt for eagle on the seventh green to team with Cameron Smith for a 62 and the lead in the Zurich Classic.

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League YANKEES .................-$162 .....................Orioles BLUE JAYS ...............-$120 ........................ Rays TIGERS.....................-$158 ................White Sox INDIANS ..................-$180 ................. Mariners ASTROS ...................-$145 ............................A’s RANGERS ................-$165 ..................... Angels ROYALS ...................-$112........................Twins National League NATIONALS ............ -$230........................ Mets CARDS .....................-$168 ........................ Reds MARLINS.................-$110 .....................Pirates BREWERS................-$120 .....................Braves D’BACKS ..................-$142 ....................Rockies GIANTS ................... -$140.....................Padres DODGERS ................-$215 .................... Phillies Interleague Cubs ........................-$115...................RED SOX NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Rangers..............-$110/-$110 ..........SENATORS CAPITALS .......... -$145/+$125............Penguins Grand Salami: Over/under 10.5 goals. NFL Favorite Open/current Underdog September 7 PATRIOTS ............... 7..... 7...................... Chiefs September 10 BILLS .................... 6.5 ..6.5........................Jets Falcons...................6..... 6..................... BEARS TEXANS ................ 4.5 ..4.5................. Jaguars WASHINGTON........2.5...2.5 ....................Eagles LIONS ....................2.5...2.5 .....................Cards TITANS...................PK... PK ..................Raiders DOLPHINS.............1.5... 1.5 ...................... Bucs BENGALS................ 1 ......1.................... Ravens Steelers.................9.5...9.5 ............... BROWNS Colts .......................3..... 3...................... RAMS PACKERS ...............2.5...2.5 ..............Seahawks Panthers ................4..... 4..................... 49ERS COWBOYS...............6..... 6......................Giants September 11 VIKINGS..................4..... 4...................... Saints BRONCOS ..............3.5...3.5 ............... Chargers SOCCER • UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE Tuesday REAL MADRID...........................................-$115 Atletico Madrid...................................... +$340 Draw: +$265 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Wednesday Juventus...................................................+$135 AS MONACO ............................................ +$210 Draw: +$245 | Over/under: 2.5 goals Odds to win the UEFA Champions League Team ................................................Odds Juventus....................................................... 7/5 Real Madrid .................................................8/5 Atletico Madrid............................................4/1 AS Monaco...................................................8/1 Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL Major League Baseball OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER — Suspended Seattle minor league INF Miguel Gamboa (Arizona) 56 games after testing positive for a metabolite of Nandrolone, a performance-enhancing substance in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BALTIMORE — Reinstated OF Joey Rickard from the 10-day DL. Optioned Sent RHP Chris Tillman to Frederick (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. BOSTON — Optioned LHP Robbie Ross Jr. and OF/INF Steve Selsky to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled RHP Ben Taylor from Pawtucket. MINNESOTA — Placed LHP Hector Santiago on the bereavement list. Recalled LHP Buddy Boshers from Rochester (IL). NEW YORK — Designated INF Pete Kozma for assignment. Reinstated SS Didi Gregorius from the 10-day DL. TAMPA BAY — Optioned OF Mallex Smith to Durham (IL). TEXAS — Optoned RHP Anthony Bass to Round Rock (PCL). Reinstated RHP Sam Dyson and C Brett Nicholas from the 10-day DL and optioned Nicholas to Round Rock. Sent RHP A.J. Griffin to Round Rock for a rehab assignment. TORONTO — Recalled RHP Danny Barnes from Buffalo (IL). National League ARIZONA — Recalled LHP T.J.McFarland from Reno (PCL). Transferred RHP Shelby Miller to the 60-day DL. MIAMI — Claimed RHP Joe Gunkel off waivers from the L.A. Dodgers. NEW YORK — Placed OF Yoenis Cespedes on the 10-day DL. Recalled LHP Sean Gilmartin from Las Vegas (PCL). CARDINALS — Recalled RHP Sam Tuivailala from Memphis (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO — Assigned INF Chris Marrero outright to Sacramento (PCL).

American Association ST. PAUL — Signed LHP Kramer Sneed. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND — Signed RHP Tyler Levine. Placed LHP Eury De La Rosa on the inactive list. Can-Am League ROCKLAND — Signed RHP Alex Farina. Re-signed OF Jared McDonald and INF Aaron Wilson. TROIS-RIVIERES — Signed OF Trevor Gretzky. FOOTBALL National Football League CLEVELAND — Released TE Gary Barnidge. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO — Acquired a third-round pick in the 2017 National Hockey League Draft from the Carolina Hurricanes for G Scott Darling. NY ISLANDERS — Reached an affiliation agreement with Worcester (ECHL) for next season. WASHINGTON — Reassigned F Chandler Stephenson to Hershey (AHL). OLYMPIC SPORTS U.S. SKI TEAM — Announced the retirement of nordic combined coach Dave Jarrett. COLLEGE BIG EAST CONFERENCE — Named Michael Coyne senior director for men’s basketball operations, Michael Sainte director of compliance and membership services and Ujash Patel coordinator of digital production. BYU — Announced men’s senior basketball F Jamal Aytes and freshman basketball G Steven Beo will transfer. Announced men’s junior basketball G Davin Guinn is leaving basketball to focus on law school. DELAWARE — Announced the retirement of women’s basketball coach Tina Martin. STANFORD — Named Collin Audley volunteer assistant men’s soccer coach.

SOCCER

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Pts Chelsea 33 25 3 5 69 29 78 Tottenham 33 22 8 3 69 22 74 Liverpool 34 19 9 6 70 42 66 Man. City 33 19 8 6 63 35 65 Man. United 33 17 13 3 50 24 64 Arsenal 32 18 6 8 64 40 60 Everton 34 16 10 8 60 37 58 West Brom. 33 12 8 13 39 42 44 Southampton 32 11 7 14 39 44 40 Watford 33 11 7 15 37 54 40 Stoke 34 10 9 15 37 50 39 Crystal Palace 34 11 5 18 46 54 38 Bournemouth 34 10 8 16 49 63 38 West Ham 34 10 8 16 44 59 38 Leicester 33 10 7 16 41 54 37 Burnley 34 10 6 18 33 49 36 Hull 34 9 6 19 36 67 33 Swansea 34 9 4 21 39 68 31 Middlesbrough 34 5 12 17 24 43 27 Sunderland 33 5 6 22 26 59 21 Saturday Stoke vs. West Ham, 9 a.m. West Bromwich Albion vs. Leicester, 9 a.m. Sunderland vs. Bournemouth, 9 a.m. Southampton vs. Hull, 9 a.m. Crystal Palace vs. Burnley, 11:30 a.m. Sunday Manchester United vs. Swansea, 6 a.m. Middlesbrough vs. Manchester City, 8:05 a.m. Everton vs. Chelsea, 8:05 a.m. Tottenham vs. Arsenal, 10:30 a.m. Monday Watford vs. Liverpool, 2 p.m.

Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Orlando City 5 1 0 15 8 5 Columbus 4 3 1 13 11 10 New York 4 3 1 13 9 9 Toronto FC 3 1 4 13 12 7 Atlanta United FC 3 2 2 11 17 8 Chicago 3 2 2 11 10 10 New York City FC 3 3 1 10 11 7 New England 2 3 3 9 11 11 D.C. United 2 3 2 8 6 12 Montreal 1 2 4 7 10 12 Philadelphia 0 4 3 3 8 14 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Portland 5 2 1 16 18 10 4 0 2 14 8 3 FC Dallas Houston 4 3 1 13 15 13 3 1 3 12 6 3 Sporting K.C. Seattle 2 2 3 9 11 8 San Jose 2 3 3 9 8 10 2 4 2 8 9 12 Real Salt Lake Minnesota United 2 4 2 8 13 24 Vancouver 2 4 1 7 9 13 Los Angeles 2 5 0 6 8 13 Colorado 1 4 1 4 5 9 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Friday Toronto FC 2, Houston 0 Saturday Vancouver at Montreal, 2 p.m. Colorado at Orlando City, 2:55 p.m. Chicago at New York, 6:30 p.m. New York City FC at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Portland at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. San Jose at Minnesota United, 7 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. New England at Seattle, 9 p.m. Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m. Sunday D.C. United at Atlanta United FC, 2 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROUNDUP

AVONDALE, LA. • Jonas Blixt

Nomura leads LPGA stop after second-round 65

and Cameron Smith posted a 10-under 62 in Friday’s four-ball format to move into the lead at the Zurich Classic, which is in its first year of a new team format. Blixt and Smith have a twoday total of 15-under 129 to lead by one over Patrick Reed and Patrick Cantlay. The K.J ChoiCharlie Wi and Troy MerrittRobert Streb teams are tied for third at 13 under. The four-ball format has each member of a two-man team playing his own ball throughout a round, with only the best score on each hole recorded. The same format will be used Sunday. The first and third rounds have an alternate-shot format. “Jonas is playing really well at the moment,” Smith said. “You know he’s going to make a birdie or par, so I’m just playing aggressive and letting it all fall into play.” The change from the alternateshot approach the first day produced much lower scores Friday, even as heavy wind impacted the TPC Louisiana course. The Blixt-Smith, ReedCantlay and Merritt-Streb duos were among five teams to post a 62. Tyrone Van Aswegen and Retief Goosen teamed up for a 60 to get to 11 under for the tournament. “We just blended so well today,” Van Aswegen said. “I made birdie and then he made birdie. It was great. It was a privilege out there.” Those extraordinary low scores caused the two first-round leaders to fall off the pace a bit. Jordan Spieth and Ryan Palmer had posted a 66 in the first round to share the lead with the Ryan Ruffels-Kyle Stanley duo. Both

United Soccer League Eastern Charleston Louisville St. Louis Tampa Bay Orlando Cincinnati New York Harrisburg Richmond Charlotte Pittsburgh Rochester Toronto Ottawa Bethlehem

W 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1

L 1 0 2 2 3 2 2 1 3 1 3 1 2 2 3

T 0 2 2 1 3 2 2 1 0 2 2 2 2 1 0

PTS 12 11 11 10 9 8 8 7 6 5 5 5 5 4 3

GD 8 4 -2 4 -1 2 1 1 -1 -1 -2 -4 -5 -1 -2

Western San Antonio Salt Lake City Kansas City Colo. Springs Sacramento Vancouver Orange County Rio Grande Valley Phoenix Tulsa Seattle Okla. City Portland Los Angeles Reno

W 5 4 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 0

L 0 1 1 1 3 2 1 3 2 2 4 2 5 3 3

T 2 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 2

PTS 17 12 9 9 9 7 7 6 6 6 6 4 4 4 2

GD 10 6 3 2 2 1 -1 0 -1 -2 -5 -2 -3 -3 -8

Friday San Antonio at Portland, late Saturday Cincinnati at Bethlehem, 4 p.m. Kansas City at Salt Lake City, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Vancouver, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Rochester, 5:05 p.m. Ottawa at Charleston, 6 p.m. Harrisburg at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Toronto at Louisville, 6:30 p.m. Richmond at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Seattle at Colo. Springs, 7 p.m. Okla. City at Rio Grande Valley, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday Toronto at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m.

MOTOR SPORTS

NASCAR: Toyota Owners 400 Lineup

Friday’s qualifying; race Sunday At Richmond International Raceway Richmond, Va. (Car number in parentheses) 1. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 121.076 mph. 2. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 120.854. 3. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 120.681. 4. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 120.471. 5. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 120.380. 6. (4) Kevin Harvick, Ford, 120.326. 7. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 120.171. 8. (14) Clint Bowyer, Ford, 120.144. 9. (41) Kurt Busch, Ford, 120.027. 10. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 119.691. 11. (19) Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 119.090. 12. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 119.000. 13. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 119.697. 14. (24) Chase Elliott, Chevrolet, 119.670. 15. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 119.670. 16. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 119.665. 17. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 119.638. 18. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 119.379. 19. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 119.226. 20. (77) Erik Jones, Toyota, 118.948. 21. (10) Danica Patrick, Ford, 118.896. 22. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 118.640. 23. (37) Chris Buescher, Chevrolet, 118.437. 24. (13) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 117.025. 25. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 119.079. 26. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 119.011. 27. (95) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 118.917. 28. (34) Landon Cassill, Ford, 118.864. 29. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 118.796. 30. (38) David Ragan, Ford, 118.369. 31. (23) Gray Gaulding, Toyota, 118.131. 32. (32) Matt DiBenedetto, Ford, 117.940. 33. (15) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 117.386. 34. (83) Corey LaJoie, Toyota, 117.096. 35. (33) Jeffrey Earnhardt, Chevrolet, 116.995. 36. (72) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 116.939. 37. (51) Timmy Hill, Chevrolet, 116.189. 38. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 82.792.

NHRA Qualifying Friday at zMax Dragway, Concord, N.C. Qualifying will continue Saturday for Sunday’s final eliminations. Top Fuel 1. Clay Millican, 3.716 seconds, 325.77 mph. 2. Doug Kalitta, 3.718, 322.73. 3. Antron Brown, 3.720, 328.06. 4. Steve Torrence, 3.723, 329.10. 5. Troy Coughlin Jr., 3.729, 321.73. 6. Tony Schumacher, 3.740, 324.51. 7. Brittany Force, 3.745, 324.75. 8. Shawn Langdon, 3.760, 318.84. 9. Leah Pritchett, 3.770, 322.73. 10. Terry McMillen, 3.797, 323.81. 11. Pat Dakin, 3.828, 317.12. 12. Scott Palmer, 3.841, 322.27. 13. Dom Lagana, 3.883, 311.63. 14. Ike Maier, 3.959, 301.47. 15. Chris Karamesines, 4.059, 291.57. 16. Smax Smith, 8.043, 74.68. Not Qualified: 17. Luigi Novelli, 10.172, 83.65.

Haru Nomura shot a 6-under 65 on Friday for a two-round total of 9-under 133 and a one-shot lead in the North Texas LPGA Shootout. Ariya Jutanugarn was second following a 67, with Suzann Pettersen (65) another shot behind at 7 under. Moriya Jutanugarn, Ariya’s older sister, shot 66 and was in a tie for fourth at 6 under with two-time tournament winner Inbee Park (67) and Marina Alex (69). Lexi Thompson, playing in her first tournament since a rules violation cost her a likely victory in the season’s first major three weeks ago, shot a 72 after birdieing three of the first five holes and was at 1 under. First-round leader M.J. Hur also shot a 72 and trails by four strokes. Hur, who lives in McKinney, about 40 miles from the Las Colinas Country Club course in Irving, led

teams posted a 66 again Friday and fell into a six-way tie for fifth place at 12 under. With strong wind expected again as the tournament returns to alternate shots Saturday, the scores probably won’t be nearly as favorable. “Certainly off of (Thursday’s) round, we know that we can have success in that format,” Spieth said. “We also know we need to set expectations a bit different. We had prime scoring conditions yesterday, and tomorrow it will be a bit like today or even more challenging. Anything under par in alternate-shot is a great score tomorrow.” The Zurich Classic was a standard individual tournament until

Funny Car 1. Courtney Force, Chevy Camaro, 3.851, 323.27. 2. Robert Hight, Camaro, 3.873, 333.91. 3. John Force, Camaro, 3.889, 328.54. 4. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.898, 331.28. 5. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 3.903, 319.07. 6. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.904, 324.12. 7. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 3.922, 319.52. 8. J.R. Todd, Toyota Camry, 3.956, 321.19. 9. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 3.962, 323.35. 10. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.970, 323.12. 11. Del Worsham, Camry, 3.981, 320.51. 12. Bob Bode, Charger, 4.027, 294.69. 13. Chad Head, Camry, 4.030, 292.90. 14. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.083, 309.20. 15. Jeff Diehl, Toyota Solara, 4.232, 277.09. 16. Dale Creasy Jr., Chevy Impala, 5.644, 128.81. Not Qualified: 17. Dave Richards, 6.387, 99.54. 18. Cruz Pedregon, 7.771, 86.80. 19. Jonnie Lindberg, 7.936, 80.61. Pro Stock 1. Jeg Coughlin, Chevy Camaro, 6.578, 210.24. 2. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.583, 210.37. 3. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.587, 209.79. 4. Chris McGaha, Camaro, 6.591, 209.95. 5. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.593, 210.31. 6. Bo Butner, Camaro, 6.594, 209.98. 7. Tanner Gray, Camaro, 6.595, 209.85. 8. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.612, 209.59. 9. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.617, 209.14. 10. Alex Laughlin, Camaro, 6.617, 208.68. 11. Shane Gray, Camaro, 6.631, 208.91. 12. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Dart, 6.651, 208.59. 13. Allen Johnson, Dart, 6.657, 208.23. 14. Deric Kramer, Dart, 6.704, 207.91. 15. Shane Tucker, Camaro, 6.803, 202.27. 16. John Gaydosh Jr, Chevrolet Camaro, 6.853, 203.00. Not Qualified: 17. Wally Stroupe, 7.185, 192.85. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1. Jerry Savoie, Suzuki, 6.824, 196.24. 2. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.835, 196.93. 3. Chip Ellis, Buell, 6.852, 194.69. 4. Joey Gladstone, Suzuki, 6.869, 194.69. 5. Hector Arana Jr, Buell, 6.879, 194.52. 6. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 6.880, 194.83. 7. Hector Arana, Buell, 6.886, 195.45. 8. Scotty Pollacheck, Suzuki, 6.899, 192.49. 9. Matt Smith, Victory, 6.913, 193.90. 10. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, 6.915, 195.22. 11. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 6.916, 193.60. 12. Angie Smith, Buell, 6.917, 192.80. 13. Cory Reed, Victory, 6.928, 192.14. 14. Shawn Gann, Buell, 6.952, 192.44. 15. Steve Johnson, Suzuki, 6.972, 193.16. 16. Melissa Surber, Buell, 6.982, 191.62. Not Qualified: 17. Joe DeSantis, 7.018, 188.83. 18. Gunner Courtney, 7.092, 183.74. 19. John Hall, 7.233, 183.34. 20. James Surber, 7.334, 181.52. 21. Angelle Sampey, 10.155, 80.88. 22. Andy Simon, 16.113, 44.73.

GOLF

PGA | Zurich Classic Friday at TPC Louisiana, Avondale, La. Purse: $7.1 million; Yards: 7,425; Par: 72 Second Round 67-62 — 129 Blixt/Smith 68-62 — 130 Reed/Cantlay Choi/Wi 67-64 — 131 69-62 — 131 Merritt/Streb Stuard/Stroud 68-64 — 132 70-62 — 132 Cejka/Kjeldsen C. Hoffman/Watney 67-65 — 132 Spieth/Palmer 66-66 — 132 68-64 — 132 Schauffele/Ridings Stanley/Ruffels 66-66 — 132 70-63 — 133 Cabrera/Etulain Van Aswegen/Goosen 73-60 — 133 69-64 — 133 Dufner/Kizzire M. Hoffmann/Villegas 72-62 — 134 Lingmerth/Lee 72-62 — 134 Thomas/Cauley 70-64 — 134 Stricker/Kelly 68-66 — 134 71-63 — 134 Jacobson/Wilcox B. Koepka/C. Koepka 69-65 — 134 Kisner/Brown 70-64 — 134 Martin/Crane 67-67 — 134 Kraft/Tway 71-63 — 134 Harman/Wagner 71-64 — 135 Ogilvy/Poulter 69-66 — 135 Matsuyama/Tanihara 69-66 — 135 Loupe/Peterson 71-64 — 135 M. Kim/Hagy 72-64 — 136 Hubbard/Randolph 69-67 — 136 Henry/Hoge 69-67 — 136 Bryan/Blaum 71-65 — 136 Bozzelli/Poston 70-66 — 136 Barnes/Jones 70-67 — 137 Reavie/Glover 69-68 — 137 Hearn/DeLaet 71-66 — 137 Watson/Holmes 73-64 — 137 Swafford/English 70-67 — 137 Thompson/Wilkinson 71-66 — 137 Schniederjans/Werenski 70-67 — 137 Flores/Fdez-Castano 72-65 — 137 Grace/Oosthuizen 70-67 — 137 Murray/Percy 70-67 — 137 Reifers/Johnston 71-66 — 137

-15 -14 -13 -13 -12 -12 -12 -12 -12 -12 -11 -11 -11 -10 -10 -10 -10 -10 -10 -10 -10 -10 -9 -9 -9 -9 -8 -8 -8 -8 -8 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -7

Failed to make the cut Bradley/Steele Rodgers/Tringale Henley/Barber Rose/Stenson W. Kim/Owen Power/Alker V. Taylor/Gonzales Gomez/Vegas Horschel/Every Chappell/Woodland Hatton/Donaldson Spaun/Brehm Levin/Mediate Lovemark/Donald Day/Fowler Finau/Summerhays Blair/Pan Stefani/Rollins Noh/An Castro/Stallings Marino/MacKenzie Berger/Pieters Gribble/Herman DeChambeau/Sabbatini S. Kim/Kang Kaufman/Varner III Duke/Collins Fathauer/Saunders Kirk/Todd Knox/Streelman Bowditch/Weekley Hughes/N. Taylor Carballo/Campbell Pettersson/Bohn McGirt/Garrigus Malnati/Wilson Mullinax/Wyatt Ramey/Schmitt

70-68 72-66 73-65 72-66 70-68 70-68 71-68 70-69 73-66 74-65 72-67 72-67 73-66 75-64 71-68 71-68 73-66 74-66 73-67 73-67 74-66 73-67 73-67 74-66 74-67 76-65 73-68 75-66 74-67 73-68 75-66 75-67 74-68 73-70 75-68 76-67 77-67 75-72

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

after 18 holes last year and tied for second place. Nomura’s best finish of the season is a tie for third at the opening Women’s Australian Open. She has two career wins in seven seasons on the tour. She was 10 under Friday going into the par-5 18th but put her second shot left of the fairway under some trees and made bogey. Larrazabal on top in China • Pablo Larrazabal fired a 6-under 66 to take a three-stroke lead halfway through the China Open in Beijing. Larrazabal, who started the second round one stroke off the lead, offset a lone bogey with five birdies and had an eagle on the par-4 11th to finish at 14 under. Dylan Frittelli had the lowest score of the round with a 63 and was tied for second at 11 under with first-round leader Alexander Levy, who shot a 70 in the second round. Associated Press

changing formats this year. This marks the PGA Tour’s first official team event since the 1981 Disney Classic. Two of the higher-profile teams in this new format weren’t able to advance to Saturday’s third round. Justin Rose and Henrik Stetson shot 72-66 for 6 under to miss the cut by one shot. Jason Day and Rickie Fowler shot 71-68 and missed the cut at 5 under. “I think the format is a unique format,” Day said. “Missing the cut is not what we wanted, but walking away from this, I think they’re heading in the right direction with regards to a different format that adds more flavor to the PGA Tour.”

138 138 138 138 138 138 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 139 140 140 140 140 140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 143 143 143 144 147

-6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -6 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 E +3

LPGA | Texas Shootout Friday at Las Colinas CC, Irving, Texas Purse: $1.3 million; Yards: 6,441; Par 71 Second Round a-denotes amateur Haru Nomura 68-65 — 133 -9 Ariya Jutanugarn 67-67 — 134 -8 Suzann Pettersen 70-65 — 135 -7 Moriya Jutanugarn 70-66 — 136 -6 Inbee Park 69-67 — 136 -6 Marina Alex 67-69 — 136 -6 Charley Hull 71-66 — 137 -5 68-69 — 137 -5 Cristie Kerr Angela Stanford 68-69 — 137 -5 65-72 — 137 -5 Mi Jung Hur 70-68 — 138 -4 Nelly Korda Jacqui Concolino 69-69 — 138 -4 a- Eun Jeong Seong 69-69 — 138 -4 Jessica Korda 68-70 — 138 -4 Minjee Lee 68-70 — 138 -4 Dori Carter 76-63 — 139 -3 Mel Reid 73-66 — 139 -3 68-71 — 139 -3 Amy Yang Chella Choi 68-71 — 139 -3 Sung Hyun Park 67-72 — 139 -3 Annie Park 72-68 — 140 -2 Karine Icher 71-69 — 140 -2 Lindy Duncan 70-70 — 140 -2 Amy Anderson 69-71 — 140 -2 Sarah Jane Smith 69-71 — 140 -2 Pornanong Phatlum 69-71 — 140 -2 P. Thanapolboonyaas 69-71 — 140 -2 Candie Kung 69-71 — 140 -2 Marissa L Steen 69-71 — 140 -2 Gerina Piller 69-71 — 140 -2 Amelia Lewis 68-72 — 140 -2 67-73 — 140 -2 Katherine Kirk Michelle Wie 67-73 — 140 -2 Olafia Kristinsdottir 74-67 — 141 -1 Angel Yin 74-67 — 141 -1 Brooke Pancake 73-68 — 141 -1 Danielle Kang 73-68 — 141 -1 Brittany Lang 73-68 — 141 -1 Joanna Klatten 72-69 — 141 -1 Wei-Ling Hsu 72-69 — 141 -1 Nontaya Srisawang 70-71 — 141 -1 Lexi Thompson 69-72 — 141 -1 Eun-Hee Ji 68-73 — 141 -1 Stacy Lewis 71-71 — 142 E Paula Reto 71-71 — 142 E Laura Gonzalez Escallon 71-71 — 142 E So Yeon Ryu 74-69 — 143 +1 Giulia Molinaro 73-70 — 143 +1 73-70 — 143 +1 Cydney Clanton 72-71 — 143 +1 Jane Park Kris Tamulis 71-72 — 143 +1 Jodi Ewart Shadoff 71-72 — 143 +1 Lizette Salas 71-72 — 143 +1 Jenny Shin 71-72 — 143 +1 Lydia Ko 70-73 — 143 +1 Gaby Lopez 69-74 — 143 +1 Mirim Lee 69-74 — 143 +1 Sun Young Yoo 69-74 — 143 +1 Sandra Changkija 67-76 — 143 +1 67-76 — 143 +1 Jennifer Song 75-69 — 144 +2 Morgan Pressel Brittany Lincicome 75-69 — 144 +2 Caroline Masson 73-71 — 144 +2 72-72 — 144 +2 Christina Kim 71-73 — 144 +2 Mika Miyazato Alena Sharp 70-74 — 144 +2

75-70 — 145 +3 Demi Runas 74-71 — 145 +3 Mina Harigae 74-71 — 145 +3 Brooke M. Henderson Becky Morgan 74-71 — 145 +3 Azahara Munoz 73-72 — 145 +3 73-72 — 145 +3 Anna Nordqvist 72-73 — 145 +3 Ilhee Lee Laetitia Beck 72-73 — 145 +3 72-73 — 145 +3 Thidapa Suwannapura 72-73 — 145 +3 Shanshan Feng 71-74 — 145 +3 Ashleigh Buhai Mo Martin 71-74 — 145 +3 70-75 — 145 +3 Catriona Matthew 70-75 — 145 +3 Beatriz Recari Failed to make the cut 75-71 — 146 +4 Therese O’Hara 74-72 — 146 +4 Dana Finkelstein 73-73 — 146 +4 Kim Kaufman Simin Feng 73-73 — 146 +4 73-73 — 146 +4 Madelene Sagstrom Ally McDonald 72-74 — 146 +4 Pavarisa Yoktuan 72-74 — 146 +4 71-75 — 146 +4 Jackie Stoelting 77-70 — 147 +5 Sandra Gal Mariajo Uribe 76-71 — 147 +5 Lauren E Coughlin 75-72 — 147 +5 74-73 — 147 +5 Min Seo Kwak 74-73 — 147 +5 Karen Chung Na Yeon Choi 73-74 — 147 +5 Maude-Aimee Leblanc 73-74 — 147 +5 73-74 — 147 +5 Kelly W Shon Peiyun Chien 73-74 — 147 +5 Pernilla Lindberg 71-76 — 147 +5 71-76 — 147 +5 Hee Young Park 70-77 — 147 +5 Megan Khang Mi Hyang Lee 79-69 — 148 +6 77-71 — 148 +6 Sei Young Kim Julie Yang 75-73 — 148 +6 Cheyenne Woods 74-74 — 148 +6 a- Gina Kim 72-76 — 148 +6 72-76 — 148 +6 Wichanee Meechai Jaye Marie Green 76-73 — 149 +7 Beth Allen 75-74 — 149 +7 75-74 — 149 +7 a-Anne Chen 75-74 — 149 +7 Ha Na Jang Lee Lopez 75-74 — 149 +7 Maria Parra 74-75 — 149 +7 73-76 — 149 +7 Perrine Delacour Kelly Tan 80-70 — 150 +8 76-74 — 150 +8 In-Kyung Kim Vicky Hurst 76-74 — 150 +8 In Gee Chun 76-74 — 150 +8 75-75 — 150 +8 Alison Lee 74-76 — 150 +8 Celine Herbin S. Santiwwtthnphng 73-77 — 150 +8 Regan De Guzman 80-71 — 151 +9 79-72 — 151 +9 Yani Tseng P.K. Kongkraphan 79-72 — 151 +9 Juli Inkster 78-73 — 151 +9 78-73 — 151 +9 Katherine Perry 77-74 — 151 +9 a-Maddie McCrary Austin Ernst 77-74 — 151 +9 Xiyu Lin 77-74 — 151 +9 75-76 — 151 +9 Karrie Webb Julieta Granada 78-74 — 152 +10 Brittany Altomare 75-77 — 152 +10 Tiffany Joh 74-78 — 152 +10 Sadena A Parks 78-75 — 153 +11 Min Lee 78-75 — 153 +11 Dani Holmqvist 77-76 — 153 +11 Su Oh 77-76 — 153 +11 Nasa Hataoka 80-74 — 154 +12 Stephanie L Meadow 79-75 — 154 +12 Ssu-Chia Cheng 78-76 — 154 +12 Belen Mozo 77-77 — 154 +12 Jennifer Ha 75-80 — 155 +13 Jing Yan 79-77 — 156 +14 Ryann O’Toole 77-79 — 156 +14 Paula Creamer 75 — WD

Euro | China Open Friday at Topwin Golf & Country Club, Beijing Purse: $2.9 million; Yards: 7,261; Par: 72 Second Round Pablo Larrazabal, Spain 64-66 — 130 Alexander Levy, France 63-70 — 133 Dylan Frittelli, S. Africa 70-63 — 133 Lee Soomin, South Korea 69-65 — 134 Thomas Detry, Belgium 70-66 — 136 George Coetzee, S. Africa 67-69 — 136 Bernd Wiesberger, Austria 69-68 — 137 Graeme Storm, England 69-68 — 137 Y.E. Yang, South Korea 69-68 — 137 Joost Luiten, Netherlands 68-69 — 137 Jaco van Zyl, S. Africa 68-69 — 137 Dean Burmester, S. Africa 67-70 — 137 Bernd Ritthammer, Germany 70-67 — 137 Paul Peterson, U.S. 69-69 — 138 Jorge Campillo, Spain 68-70 — 138 Pep Angles, Spain 68-70 — 138 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 71-67 — 138 Peter Hanson, Sweden 67-71 — 138 Paul Uihlein, U.S. 72-66 — 138 Nicolas Colsaerts, Belgium 72-66 — 138 Fabrizio Zanotti, Paraguay 71-67 — 138 67-71 — 138 Raphael Jacquelin, France Also David Lipsky, U.S. 69-71 — 140 Ross Fisher, England 73-70 — 143 Missed cut Mark Baldwin, U.S. 77-73 — 150 Ryan Dillon, U.S. 77-73 — 150 73-80 — 153 Blake Snyder, U.S.

COLLEGES Area scores

Men’s tennis Webster 5, Fontbonne 2 Principia 6, Webster 0 Baseball Missouri S&T 6, UMSL 5 Missouri S&T 8, UMSL 3 Webster 11, Westminster 3 Webster 4, Westminster 1 Softball Washington U. 4, New York 3 Washington U. 9, New York 1 (six inn.) LSU 3, Mizzou 2


04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • B11

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'16 Ford Escape: Titanium, $21,900 #P3580-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '16 Ford Edge Titanium: Silver/Beige, Leather $26,939 #P4145 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 Ford Explorer LTD: $24,890 #186881 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Ford Escape SE: 4WD, 39K Miles, Black $19,089 #P06088 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '10 Ford Escape XLT: 2.5L 4 Cyl, Auto, 4x4, Clean Carfax, AWD, White Suede, Camel Interior, $9,990 #78226A

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'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Leather, Quad Seats, Sunroof, $27,490

'08 GMC Yukon Denali: DVD, Navigation, AWD, $19,490 #B8493

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'12 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Orange!Lifted, Wheels & Tires $27,990 #C8440A

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'15 Lexus GX 460: 43K, White/Grey $42,850 #187321 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Lincoln MKX: 31K, AWD, White, Pano Roof $28,990 #B8448A

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'13 Mazda Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Nav/GPS, Bluetooth, $10,990 #9025A

'08 Mazda Tribute s: Sport, 3.0L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Light Sage - Gold, Low Miles, $7,990 #9041A

'08 Nissan Pathfinder: 4x4, Leather, Roof, Navigation, 3rd Row, $14,490 #B8411

'07 Nissan Murano: White, 136K Miles, $6,995 #P41501 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Nissan Rogue: AWD, Silver, $17,990 #18260-2 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Nissan Pathfinder: SE, 23K Miles $22,995 #P4133 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '07 Nissan Xterra Low Miles, V-6 Engine, $8,990 #27140B

'09 Nissan Murano SL: AWD, V6, Black, Only 81K Miles, Call Now, $13,000

'08 Nissan Pathfinder S: 4.0LV6, Silver Lightning Metallic, Clean Carfx, $9,990 #78182A

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Garage Sales 63025: Emerald Forest Multi-Family S ubdivision wide Garage Sale. Typically have many of our 1 4 2 homeowner's participating. Wed. Ma y 3 rd a n d S a t. Ma y 6 th. Subdivision is located north of Eureka H.S. on Hwy 109.

Bids/Proposals NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Lincoln University of Missouri is accepting sealed bids for Renovations to Dwight T. Reed Stadium on the campus of Lincoln University. Bids will be received Thursday, May 11, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. A pre-bid meeting will be held Thursday, May 4, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. at Reed S tadium, 1 1 1 0 Chestnut Street, Jefferson City, MO. A full copy of the bid notice is available a t h t t p s : / / bluetigerportal.lincolnu.edu/ web/design-and-construction/ notice-tocontractors

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Public Notice Pursuant to the provisions of Title 42 Section 441.304(f), Code of Federal Regulations, public notice is given regarding the submission of the AIDS Waiver application renewal. The Centers for Medicare and M edicaid Services (CM S) requires states to obtain public input during the development of a w aiver, a w aiver renew al or a waiver amendment with substantive changes. Stakeholders are being asked to provide public input and comment in order to allow Missouri to submit this waiver application renewal. Please see complete draft of the waiver application on the MO HealthNet website under Alerts and Notifications at: http://dss.mo.gov/mhd/ and on the Department of Health and S e n i o r Se r v ic e s w e b s it e at: http://health.mo.gov/living/healthco ndiseases/communicable/ hivaids/casemgmt.php .

The City of Webster Groves is accepting sealed bids for the Shelter & Entry S ign Improvements at S outhwest Park at the Webster Groves City Hall, 4 East L o c k wood, Webster Groves, MO 63119 until 10:00 AM Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Bid packages are available for review starting May 1, 2017 at County Blue, 1449 Strassner Drive, St. Louis, MO 63144 for the non- refundable cost of reproduction, or on the City of Webster Groves' website. A five (5 ) percent security in the form specified must accompany each bid. A pre-bid meeting will be held at 1:00 PM , M ay 9, 2017 at Southwest Park, 1155 S. Rock Hill Rd. All rights reserved.

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The MO HealthNet Division (MHD) and the Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) Bureau of HIV, STD and Hepatitis (BHSH) have developed the AIDS Waiver to provide Home and CommunityBased Services to M HD participants ages 21 and older with diagnoses of AIDS or HIV related illnesses. Written Public Comments

MO HealthNet will accept written public comments within 30 days from April 29, 2017. Written public comments may be mailed or emailed to: MO HealthNet Division P.O. Box 6500 Jefferson City, MO 651026500 Attn: MO HealthNet Director Email: Ask.MHD@dss.mo.gov Public Hearing

There will be a public hearing in which the public is invited to comment on the AIDS Waiver renewal application. The public hearing is scheduled: May 22, 2017 9:30 to 11:30 am James C. Kirkpatrick State Information Center Interpretive Center 600 West Main Street Jefferson City, MO 65101 Public may call 573-526-5504 or 866-630-9347 toll free for teleconference. Verbal or written comments will be accepted. Complete copies of the AIDS Waiver application are available at Department of Health and Senior Services, Bureau of HIV, STD and Hepatitis by request and at the public hearing. Comments will be summarized for CMS.

C

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B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

TRACK AND FIELD

FRIDAY’S RESULTS

Miller blazes to 800 title by winning duel against Lafayette’s Hindman BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

CLAY TON • Brandon Miller’s

spikes were in his hands. They must have been too hot on his feet. A freshman runner for the John Burroughs boys track and field team, Miller crushed the 800-meter race in 1 minute and 53.87 seconds Friday to win at the 87th Marion Freeman Invitational at Clayton High’s Gay Field. And he beat the most accomplished senior track athlete in Missouri to do it. Lafayette senior standout Austin Hindman has a resume that few can match. He’s the two-time defending 3,200-meter champion in Class 5. He set the state record in the 3,200 when he finished in 8 minutes and 43 seconds at the Arcadia Invitational on April 8. Hindman won the Junior Triathlon World Championship in September. Hindman rarely sees the back of someone’s jersey on a track, especially in his home state. He saw Miller’s back all the way around. Hindman finished in 1:55.62 for the rare local runner-up finish. “Running with Brandon, that kid’s an animal. What a talent,” Hindman said. “He’s so young and running at such a high level already. It was fun to run against him.” Miller comes with his own pedigree. Known among area track fans for years, Miller set a world record for his age group when he won the AAU Jr. Olympics 800 in 1:51.23 last summer. His debut on the area track scene was an anticipated event. But it took until the last meet in April for him to run his best event. “It’s not really new. I never run the 800 at the beginning of the year,” Miller said. “I focused on my

400s and ran a couple miles here and there.” Miller gave Hindman an idea of what to expect during the 3,200-meter relay, the first race of the day. Miller manned the anchor leg and took the stick six seconds after the leader. By the time the first lap was over Miller was four seconds behind the leader. By the time he hit the straightaway, Miller was in front and would not be caught. Burroughs won the race in 8:11. Miller finished his leg in 1:53.56 and left jaws hanging open while he did it. “I just try to give it all for my team,” Miller said. “We were blessed to come out with the win.” Miller wasn’t the only Burroughs star Friday. Senior hurdler and jumper Lailah Elliott won three gold medals and etched her name into the meet record book twice. Elliott won the 100 hurdles in 15.05 seconds to break the previous record of 15.34 set by Affton’s Hali Ford in 2012. She eked out the victory over Hazelwood Central junior Aisha Southern, who finished in 15.12. “Coming in she had the fastest time. I’m pretty competitive. I got out fast,” Elliott said. “I knew my start had to be good.” Elliott tied her own record set last year in the high jump after she went over the bar at 5 feet, 4 inches. She ended her day with a win in the triple jump with a leap of 36-6. Elliott was about three feet better than runner-up Aniyah Stiles of Hazelwood Central. The only part of the meet that didn’t go right for Burroughs was who did not compete. Sophomore Madison Fuller was expected to make her season debut, but her nagging injury would not let her compete. The defending Class 3 champion in the 100 and 200, Fuller’s status for the remainder of

UNION • A pair of secondhalf goals Friday night propelled Troy past co-host Union 2-0 for the championship of the UnionWashington girls soccer tournament. Senior forward Anika Kallash scored one of the goals for the Trojans (13-71), which wasn’t a surprise. Kallash now has 21 goals this season. But the ice-breaking strike just two minutes into the second half was a different story. That came on a blast from roughly 20 yards off the foot of freshman midfielder Mackenzie Caldwell and just under the crossbar for a 1-0 lead. The goal was the first at the varsity level for Caldwell, who primarily is Troy’s backup goalkeeper. “This feels real good because I haven’t played in the field since third grade,” Caldwell said. “Coming on to varsity as a freshman,

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

John Burroughs Brandon Miller (5) finishes the 800-meter race at Gay Field on Friday.

the season is up in the air. The Marion Freeman Invitational is typically a two-day meet with preliminary races on Friday and finals on Saturday. Saturday’s expected severe weather forced Clayton to move everything up to Friday night. The cooler weather is usually not ideal conditions for sprinters, but records fell nonethe-

less. Pattonville’s Jada Moore set a new mark in the 100 (12.04). Hazelwood Central’s girls relay teams were sensational. The Hawks broke records in the 400 relay (47.95) and 800 relay (1:41). Central’s Destiney Nash set a new mark in the 300s in 45.44. Ladue sophomore Lila Bensky won the 1,600 in 5:12 to set a new record, too.

RANDY KEMP • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Union’s Mariah Nowak (left) deflects a pass to Troy’s MacKenzie Caldwell (5) during the Washington - Union soccer Tournament on Friday.

chance to play. It was important, I got a great ball and I finished it.” While Kallash continued to add to her scoring total, one player notably absent from finding the back of the net was Karlie

Peth. The Union senior forward, who entered the game with 21 goals of her own, was held in check by the Troy defense. Ashton Lindsley got the goalkeeping shutout for

Troy. “It all comes down to our effort,” Troy coach Nicole Williams said. “If we work hard, we can compete with just about anybody. We really had that great effort tonight.”

SATURDAY’S SCHEDULE North Tech vs. Hancock, at Heine Meine, 9 a.m. Parkway North at Fort Zumwalt West, 10 a.m. Piasa Southwestern at Hardin Calhoun, 10 a.m. Collinsville at Highland, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Jerseyville, 10 a.m. Gateway STEM vs. Soldan, 10 a.m. Francis Howell at Liberty North, 10 a.m. Gillespie at Hardin Calhoun, 10 a.m. Parkway South at MICDS, 10 a.m. Gibault at Vianney, 10 a.m. Parkway Central at Eureka, 10 a.m. Chaminade at Orchard Farm, 10 a.m. Alton at Valmeyer, 11 a.m. Brentwood at Whitfield, 11 a.m. St. Charles at FH North, 11 a.m. North Tech vs. Herculaneum, at Heine Meine, 11:30 a.m. Piasa SW vs. Gillespie, at Hardin C., noon Summit at Eureka, noon Collinsville at Highland, noon Jacksonville at Jerseyville, noon Battle vs. Parkway South, at MICDS, noon Gibault vs. Luth. South, at Vianney, 12:15 p.m. Parkway North vs. Liberty, at FZ West, 12:15 p.m. Francis Howell at Blue Springs, 12:30 p.m. CBC vs. Valle, at Alumni Field , 12:30 p.m. St. Charles at FH North, 1 p.m. Alton at Valmeyer, 1:30 p.m. Battle at MICDS, 2 p.m. Herculaneum vs. Hancock, at Heine Meine, 2 p.m. Lutheran South at Vianney, 2:30 p.m. Pkwy Central vs. Summit, at Eureka, 2:30 p.m. Liberty at Fort Zumwalt West, 3 p.m. Greenville vs. John Burroughs, at Busch Stadium, 5 p.m.

SOFTBALL

ME Lutheran vs. Winnebago Lutheran, at Plymouth, 9 a.m. Brussels at Alton, 10 a.m. Columbia at Centralia (Ill.), 10 a.m. Belleville West at Civic Memorial, 10 a.m.

GIRLS SOCCER

Hillsboro vs. Warrensburg, at Osage, 8 a.m. Granite City at Batavia, 9:45 a.m. Mater Dei at Breese Central, 10 a.m. Salem vs. Freeburg, at Centralia IL, 10 a.m. Kirkwood at Helias, 11 a.m. Collinsville vs. St. Charles North, at Burlington, I, 1:30 p.m. Freeburg at Centralia (Ill.), 2 p.m. Wesclin at ME Lutheran, 4:30 p.m.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL

LAFAYETTE INVITATIONAL Pool A Eureka vs SLUH, 8:30 a.m. Belleville West vs Marquette, 9:15 a.m. Belleville West vs SLUH, 10 a.m. Eureka vs Marquette, 10:45 a.m. Marquette vs SLUH, 11:30 a.m. Belleville West vs Eureka, 12:15 p.m. Pool B Fort Zumwalt South vs Lafayette, 8:30 a.m. Lindbergh vs O’Fallon, 9:15 a.m. Lindbergh vs Lafayette, 10 a.m. Fort Zumwalt South vs O’Fallon, 10:45 a.m. O’Fallon vs Lafayette, 11:30 a.m. Lindbergh vs Fort Zumwalt South, 12:15 p.m. Pool C Francis Howell vs Vianney, 8:30 a.m. Belleville East vs Wheaton Warrenville South, 9:15 a.m. Belleville East vs Vianney, 10 a.m. Howell vs Wheaton Warrenville South, 10:45 a.m. Wheaton Warrenville South vs Vianney, 11:30 a.m. Belleville East vs Francis Howell, 12:15 p.m.

TRIAD INVITATIONAL 1. Edwardsville 81, 2. Normal U. High 36, 3. Belleville West 35, 4. Burlington Central 34, 5. Metamora 31, 6. Cahokia 26, 7. Morgan Park 23, 8. DuQuoin 19, 9. Triad 8, 10. Mount Vernon, Illinois 8, 11. Collinsville 5 3200 meters: 1. Jack Franklin, Normal U. High, 9:25.7; 2. Jack Pifer, Edwardsville, 10:05.94; 3. Brian Gichuru, Belleville West, 10:06.99; 110 meter hurdles: 1. Daval Torres, Edwardsville, 15.23; 2. Juwan Denton, Morgan Park, 15.63; 3. Jordan Lewis, Edwardsville, 15.96; 400 relay: 1. Morgan Park, 43.3; 2. Edwardsville, 43.32; 3. Belleville West, 43.95; 3,200 relay: 1. Normal U. High, 7:56.51; 2. Metamora, 8:11.91; 3. Edwardsville, 8:20.49; Long jump: 1. DeVonte Tincher, Edwardsville, 22-07; 2. Myles Aldridge, Normal U. High, 21-11.75; 3. Andra Ward, Cahokia, 20-09; Discus: 1. AJ Epenesa, Edwardsville, 17806; 2. Devin Jones, DuQuoin, 158-06; 3. Bruce Wachowski, Edwardsville, 148-10; JIM SCHMUCK INVITATIONAL 1. Marquette 100, 2. Parkway North 90, 3. Parkway Central 77.5, 4. Eureka 63.5, 5. Fox 59.5, 6. Parkway West 58, 7. McCluer North 55, 8. Lindbergh 48, 9. Mehlville 42, 10. Parkway South 27.5, 11. University City 18, 12. Hazelwood East 14, 13. McCluer 13, 14. Francis Howell 12, 15. Riverview Gardens 9, 16. Summit 8 100 meters: 1. Lance Lang, McCluer North, 10.96; 2. Arther Green, Parkway Central, 11.3; 3. Henry Volkmann, Lindbergh, 11.4; 200 meters: 1. Lance Lang, McCluer North, 22.18; 2. Momoh Brema, Riverview Gardens, 22.61; 3. Jeremiah Guittar, Mehlville, 22.82; 400 meters: 1. Cetris Ivy, McCluer North, 50.64; 2. Christopher Bass, Parkway West, 50.74; 3. Mason Walters, Marquette, 51.14; 800 meters: 1. Thomas Penney, Marquette, 1:59.57; 2. Matyas Csiki-Fejer, Parkway West, 2:01.41; 3. Zachary Long, Eureka, 2:01.8; 1600 meters: 1. Thomas Penney, Marquette, 4:28; 2. Nick Warmann, Marquette, 4:29.54; 3. Connor Kingsland, Lindbergh, 4:32.06; 3200 meters: 1. Charlie McIntyre, Parkway Central, 9:29.03; 2. Nick Warmann, Marquette, 9:46.81; 3. Andrew Lofgren, Parkway West, 9:53.6; 110 meter hurdles: 1. Jalani Williams, Parkway North, 14.83; 2. Darius Ramsey, Parkway Central, 14.95; 3. Isaiah Bynum, Mehlville, 15.1; 300 intermediate hurdles: 1. Jakeel Suber, Parkway North, 39.32; 2. Darius Ramsey, Parkway Central, 40.27; 3. Caleb Perkins, University City, 41.04; 400 relay: 1. Parkway Central, 43.52; 2. Marquette, 44.16; 3. McCluer North, 44.35; 800 relay: 1. Parkway North, 1:29.94; 2. Marquette, 1:30.04; 3. McCluer North, 1:31.88; 1,600 relay: 1. Marquette, 3:24.4; 2. Parkway West, 3:27.26; 3. Parkway North, 3:28.02; 3,200 relay: 1. Marquette, 8:08.45; 2. Lindbergh, 8:12.06; 3. Eureka, 8:13.29; Triple jump: 1. Nathaniel Moore, Parkway Central, 41-01; 2. Kevon McMiller, Parkway North, 40-11; 3. Patrick Gibbs, Mehlville, 40-05.5;

GIRLS TRACK AND FIELD

Stats • Look online for complete results from today’s games and track and field meets. Photos • Troy vs. Union soccer; Marion Freeman Invitational track

Hardin Calhoun at Piasa SW, 10 a.m. Gibault at Freeburg, 11 a.m. ME Lutheran vs. Martin Luther (Wis, at Plymouth, 11:30 a.m. Columbia vs. Collinsville, at Centralia IL, 11:45 a.m. Gibault at Freeburg, 1 p.m.

St. Thomas Aq 2, Collinsville 1 (C: Destiny Johnson) Timberland 4, Duchesne 3 (D: Amy Jung 2, Maria Wilder) Granite City 5, Bay Port 1 (G: Grace Neidhardt, Lexi Grote, Megan Jones, Rian Hutson, Abigail Reeves) Pacific 4, Owensville 0 (P: Caramia Fiedler, Maddie King, Abby Layton, Emma Plante ; shutout by Megan Meyers) Westminster 7, MICDS 0 (W: Kirsten Davis 4, Sarah Shoemaker 2, Riley Merrifield ; shutout by Taylor French) U. City 10, North Tech 0 (U: Justice Corn 2, Cheyenne Hawkins 2, Hayle Jones, Ma’Kaya Johnson, Nicole Kellogg, Fumilola Adewale, Gillian Blount, Eboni McAtee ; shutout by Fumilola Adewale; shutout by Fumilola Adewale, Kalyssa Graham, Kathleen Murphy) Clayton 2, Pky. North 1 (C: Katherine Owings) Carlinville 8, Gillespie 0 (C: Karley Dixon 2, Rory Drew, Lexi Egelhoff, Skylar Nickel, Taylor Wills, Marissa Woolfolk, Grace Zachary ; shutout by Sarah DeNeve) FH North 3, O’Fallon 1 (F: Samantha Cary, Abbie Miller, Madelyn Wood; O: Gabby Goerke) Columbia 2, Quincy 0 (C: Kennedy Jones 2 ; shutout by Rylee Iorio) Washington 3, Borgia 0 (W: Sarah Becszlko, Cassidy Nurnberger, Caitlyn Vodnansky ; shutout by Katie Baer) Fox 1, Kirkwood 0 (F: Anya Sprogoe ; shutout by Erica Lengyel) St. Charles 2, Winfield 0 (S: Emma Booker, Brooke Schneider ; shutout by Riley Beerman, Gracie Farmer) Troy 2, Union 0 (T: Anika Kallash, MacKenzie Caldwell ; shutout by Ashton Lindsley)

BOYS TRACK AND FIELD

MORE COVERAGE ONLINE AT STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

BASEBALL

GIRLS SOCCER

BOYS VOLLEYBALL

Caldwell scores first goal, sparks Troy to tournament title I’d played a little goalie but this is awesome.” The win was Troy’s fourth in a row while Union (11-4, No. 4 in STLhighschoolsports.com smallschools rankings) had a five-game win streak snapped. The Wildcats also fell short of capturing their own tournament title. “It wasn’t meant for us tonight, but I was proud of the way the girls played,” Union coach Matt Fennessey said. “You could tell we were getting gassed at the end. We had chances in the first half and, if we finish one of those, this is a different game.” While Caldwell put Troy (13-7-1) on top, the team’s best finisher made that opening goal stand up with one of her own. On a corner kick, Kallash finished the goal off with a header. It was her sixth consecutive game with a goal. “That was big,” Kallash said. “It helped us relax a little bit and gave us a

2 6 3 6 8 0

Webster def. Westminster 25-17, 26-24 Summit def. Seckman 25-19, 25-15 Pky. South def. Pky. West 26-24, 25-16

GIRLS SOCCER

BY JIM FAASEN STLhighschoolsports.com

BASEBALL

St. Dominic 100 100 0 Troy 033 000 0 W-Chasen Anderson.

Pool D De Smet vs Francis Howell Central, 8:30 a.m. Kirkwood vs Marist, 9:15 a.m. Kirkwood vs Francis Howell Central, 10 a.m. De Smet vs Marist, 10:45 a.m. Marist vs Francis Howell Central, 11:30 a.m. Kirkwood vs De Smet, 12:15 p.m. 13th-place semifinals: 1:30 p.m. 9th-place semifnials: 2:30 p.m. 5th-place semifinals: 2:30 p.m. Championship semifinals: 1:30 p.m. 15th place: 3:30 p.m. 13th place: 3:30 p.m. 11th place: 4:30 p.m. 9th place: 4:30 p.m. 7th place: 4:30 p.m. 5th place: 4:30 p.m. 3rd place: 3:30 p.m. Championship: 3:30 p.m. CAPE NOTRE DAME SHOWCASE Round robin Seckman vs Cape Notre Dame, Noon Parkway Central vs Parkway North, Noon Althoff vs Cape Notre Dame, 1 p.m. Parkway Central vs Seckman, 1 p.m. Parkway North vs Althoff, 2 p.m. Parkway North vs Seckman, 3 p.m. Parkway Central vs Cape Notre Dame, 3 p.m. Parkway Central vs Althoff, 4 p.m. Althoff vs Seckman, 4 p.m. Parkway North vs Cape Notre Dame, 5 p.m. Championship: 6:15 p.m.

BOYS LACROSSE

Francis Howell at Rock Bridge, 11 a.m. John Burroughs at Priory, 11 a.m. Belleville Twsp. vs. Hazelwood Central, at MMA, 1:30 p.m. St. Louis U. High at De Smet, 4 p.m. Belleville Twsp. at Missouri Military, 4 p.m. Clayton at Eureka, 5 p.m.

GIRLS LACROSSE

Marian Catholic at Webster Groves, 9 a.m. Eureka at Webster Groves, 10 a.m.

WATER POLO

LINDBERGH INVITATIONAL Pool A Lindbergh 15, Kirkwood 3 Parkway Central vs Lindbergh, (n) Parkway Central vs Kirkwood, (n) Pool B Parkway West 10, MICDS 3 St. Xavier (Ohio) vs MICDS, (n) St. Xavier (Ohio) vs Parkway West, 8:25 a.m. Pool C Ladue 13, Pattonville 7 De Smet vs Ladue, (n) Pattonville vs De Smet, (n) Pool D SLUH 12, Parkway South 1 Chicago St. Patrick vs Parkway South, (n) Chicago St. Patrick vs SLUH, 7:30 a.m. 9th-place semifinals 9:20 a.m. and 10:15 a.m. Saturday. 5th-place semifinals 11:10 a.m. and 12:05 p.m. Saturday. Championship semifinals 1 p.m. and 1:55 p.m. Saturday. 11th place: 2:50 p.m. Saturday. 9th place: 3:45 p.m. Saturday. 7th place: 4:40 p.m. Saturday. 5th place: 5:35 p.m. Saturday. 3rd place: 6:30 p.m. Saturday. Championship: 7:25 p.m. Saturday. SUMMIT INVITATIONAL Pool A John Burroughs vs Oakville, (n) Summit 7, Mehlville 3 Oakville vs Summit, (n) Mehlville vs John Burroughs, (n) Oakville vs Mehlville, 8 a.m. Saturday. John Burroughs vs Summit, 11 a.m. Sat.

Pool B CBC 16, Eureka 8 Parkway North 11, Fort Zumwalt West 4 Parkway North vs Eureka, (n) CBC vs Fort Zumwalt West, (n) Parkway North vs CBC, 9 a.m. Saturday. Fort Zumwalt West vs Eureka, 10 a.m. Sat. Guaranteed games Noon and 3 p.m. Saturday. Semifinals 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday. Championship 4 p.m. Saturday.

BOYS TRACK AND FIELD

Eureka Kimball/Wintermeyer Invitational 1. Lindbergh 139, 2. Lafayette 132, 3. MICDS 105, 4. Northwest Cedar Hill 55, 5. Marquette 54, 6. Parkway West 53, 7. Eureka 51, 8. McCluer North 43, 9. Mehlville 32, 10. McCluer South-Berkeley 11, 11. Oakville 11 100 meters: 1. Alex Rosenberger, Lindbergh, 12.39; 2. Zionn Pearson, MICDS, 12.72; 3. Mar’keyia Chambers, Marquette, 12.99; 200 meters: 1. Alex Rosenberger, Lindbergh, 25.54; 2. Jhordin Galmore, MICDS, 25.97; 3. Marissa Gianino, Lafayette, 26.36; 400 meters: 1. Aly Vancardo, Lindbergh, 59.82; 2. Jhordin Galmore, MICDS, 1:00.13; 3. Palmer Mihalevich, MICDS, 1:01.35; 800 meters: 1. Aly Vancardo, Lindbergh, 2:18.58; 2. Alexandra Walsh, MICDS, 2:23.8; 3. Chloe May, MICDS, 2:24.98; 1600 meters: 1. Abigail Juedemann, Lindbergh, 5:09.81; 2. Mollie Rogan, Lafayette, 5:16.64; 3. Margaret Nicholson, Lafayette, 5:19.07; 3200 meters: 1. Josie Korenak, Lindbergh, 11:30.19; 2. Mollie Rogan, Lafayette, 11:31.68; 3. Colleen Sliney, MICDS, 11:39.07; 100 meter hurdles: 1. Michelle Owens, McCluer North, 14.81; 2. Nature Williams-Harkins, Parkway West, 15.58; 3. Ava Raymond, Lindbergh, 15.62; 300 meter hurdles: 1. Michelle Owens, McCluer North, 46.49; 2. Natalie White, Lafayette, 47.36; 3. Ja’nia Lewis, Eureka, 47.43; 400 meter relay: 1. Lindbergh, 50.25; 2. McCluer North, 50.51; 3. Lafayette, 50.58; 800 meter relay: 1. Lafayette, 1:47.64; 2. Marquette, 1:48.97; 3. McCluer North, 1:49.95; 1,600 meter relay: 1. Lindbergh, 4:07.27; 2. MICDS, 4:12.73; 3. Lafayette, 4:15.08; High jump: 1. Claire Schamel, Northwest Cedar Hill, 4-10; 1. Lejla Hajderovic, Mehlville, 4-10; 3. Kerri Newcomer, Lafayette, 4-08; Long jump: 1. Zionn Pearson, MICDS, 1700; 2. Adison Balderston, Lafayette, 16-11; 3. Amirah Al-Sagr, MICDS, 16-04; Discus: 1. Amalia Seigel , Parkway West, 104-00; 2. Brittany Hawthorne, Lafayette, 101-02; 3. Mckenzie Miller, Eureka, 98-06;

BOYS LACROSSE

Marquette 16, Pky. South 3 (PS: Blake Donnelly 2, Vince Zerega)

WATER POLO

Lindbergh 9, Pky. Central 1 (L: Mason White 3, Casey Natsch 2, Ethan Schneider 2, Will Doyle, Sam Deeter) Ladue 9, De Smet 5 (L: Cedrick Everaert 4, Noah Douaihy 3, Reid Rogers, Brandon Murdock) Pky. Central 10, Kirkwood 8 (K: Alex Hughes 3, Drew Tucker 2, Ben Backer 2, David Shengelia)

Troy Throwers Meet, 8:30 a.m. Teams: Fort Zumwalt West, Francis Howell Central, Troy Buchanan Jokisch-Grandone Invitational, 9 a.m. Teams: Carlinville, Jerseyville Rolla Meet, 9 a.m. Teams: Rolla, St. James

GIRLS TRACK AND FIELD

Troy Throwers Meet, 8:30 a.m. Teams: Francis Howell Central, Troy Buchanan Vicki Reeves Invitational, 9 a.m. Teams: Lindbergh, McCluer, Parkway South, Summit, Washington Jokisch-Grandoe Invitational, 9 a.m. Teams: Carlinville, Jerseyville Rolla Meet, 9 a.m. Teams: Rolla, St. James

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F

See Inside for Details

N

HWY 141

Calling All Grill Enthusiasts!

G

N Manchester Rd. 1/4 mi. East of 141

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

Saturday • 04.29.2017 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau

MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES North-South vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠Q 7 3 2 ♥A K 7 6 ♦A Q 4 ♣4 2 WEST EAST ♠K 9 ♠6 5 ♥10 4 ♥Q J 9 8 5 ♦9 7 6 3 ♦K J 8 ♣A 9 7 5 3 ♣10 8 6 SOUTH ♠A J 10 8 4 ♥3 2 ♦10 5 2 ♣K Q J The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♠ Pass 2NT* Pass 4♠** All pass *Game-forcing spade raise, at least four-card support **Minimum opening bid with no singleton Opening lead: Nine of ♦ Today’s deal is from an important tournament in Europe some years ago. East was Roy Welland, who lives in Germany today, but represented the USA with distinction for many years in international play. West found the best opening lead of a diamond. Declarer ducked in dummy and Welland won the first trick with his jack. Welland reasoned that his partner might

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD have led a heart with a singleton, and therefore had at least two hearts. South had denied a singleton in the auction, so Welland decided that declarer’s most likely distribution was 5-2-3-3. Most defenders in this position would shift to a club, but Welland saw the danger in that. The defense was going to need a second diamond trick to defeat the contract, and South’s clubs might be good enough to provide a discard for dummy’s queen of diamonds. Welland, therefore, shifted accurately to a spade. Declarer would have made his contract had he risen with his ace and forced out the ace of clubs, but he ducked this to West’s king, and the ensuing return to diamonds by West sealed declarer’s fate. The defense had to come to one more diamond and the ace of clubs for down one. Nice play! When you come up against opponents using high-tech modern bidding tools, just keep your eyes and ears open. They can’t tell their partner anything about their hand without also telling you. You are just as entitled to use that information as they are. (04/29/17)

Across

1 2016 #1 Kanye West album, with “The” 2 Rave’s opposite 15 Treat on a stick 16 Time of one’s life, maybe 17 Coffee, in military slang 18 Container whose letters appear in “container” 19 Abbr. for a two-striper 20 False modesty, e.g. 21 Torrent 23 Gray matter 24 “Get a ___!” 25 Cry of denial 26 Running slowly 28 Move 30 Finished elegantly 31 Seder celebration

33 Classic case of making life choices? 35 Rate of speed 37 Have a bad view? 38 Raised sharply 42 Diving athlete 46 Company investing in self-driving cars 47 Literary waiter 49 Aid package component 50 Locale in two James Bond films 52 British ends 54 ___ big 55 Freebie at a rally 56 Director DuVernay 57 Text ___ 58 Printer setting: abbr. 59 “Frankenstein,” e.g.

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If April 29 is your birthday • This year you can be cold and intellectual or warm and emotional. If you are single, you could meet someone who could be significant to your life. If you are attached, the two of you seem to naturally surprise each other. Cancer has feelings that make sense to you.

WORD GAME April 29 WORD — BLUNDERS (BLUNDERS: BLUN-ders: Serious mistakes often caused by ignorance or confusion.) Average mark 34 words. Time limit 45 minutes. Can you find 50 or more words in BLUNDERS? The list will be published Monday. YESTERDAY’S WORD — REGALES sale alee ease rage seal lager easel rale sealer large else rase sear lase erase real seer laser gale reel sere lease gear regal serge leaser glare resale slag leer glee reseal lees grease eager sage ager eagle sager agree earl

RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

63 Exotic jerky meat 64 Species of the Liberty Tree 65 Wiz Khalifa’s “We ___ Boyz” 66 “Just stop talking already”

Down

1 Justin Trudeau’s party: abbr. 2 “Got it” 3 Gets 4 Prefix with -derm 5 Extractions are made from it 6 Unbroken 7 Bad job news 8 ___ hour 9 Media inits. since 1922 10 Failed ignominiously 11 Group of families 12 Tobacco flower relative 13 Movie agent on “Entourage” 14 Broadway title character who runs off to Atlantic City 22 Hose and such 23 It may raise its hood 24 Washer/dryer unit? 27 Hoarder 29 Joey of children’s literature

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You add snap, crackle and pop to others’ days. Conversations flow with most people, except a loved one who seems to have withdrawn from you. Tonight: You could go a little wild and overindulge. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Do some shopping and errands that can’t be put off any longer. You’ll see a situation differently when a confidant shares his or her viewpoint. Tonight: Out on the town. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Do not overthink your plans; just be spontaneous. The more adventurous you are, the better your day will be. A friend surprises you with news that seems to come from out of left field. Tonight: Make it your treat. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH If you don’t want to be part of what is happening, just make a call and let others know you will not be showing up. You might need some downtime, which you do not get enough of. Tonight: The world is your oyster. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Take your time making a decision, as it could have longterm implications. News from a distance will encourage you to detach a bit from a difficult friendship. Tonight: Focus on what you want. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Emphasis is on what you want from a parent or boss. Handle your responsibilities early on in the day. As a result, you will feel better and have some time to yourself later.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Sam Ezersky and David Steinberg

32 Pitcher who was the 1995 NL Rookie of the Year 34 Some YouTube uploads 36 “Horse voice,” e.g. 38 Mixed up 39 Introduction to bio? 40 Supplement brand

41 Conqueror of Cuzco 43 Part of many international flights 44 Banished 45 Supposed end of a flight, for short 48 Missing, with “of” 51 Subject of the 1942 film

53 57 60 61 62

musical “Yankee Doodle Dandy” Proud “Pride and Prejudice” character ___ fide Fort Sumter victor, informally Bub What moms have that dads don’t?

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0325

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Know that you might have to deal with someone who is withholding his or her feelings. Tonight: Out and about. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH If you’re feeling uncomfortable during a conversation with a certain friend or relative, detach. Go through the process of taking a step back and getting an overview. Tonight: Excess marks your evening. You might have too good of a time. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Deal directly with a close friend or loved one. This person enjoys his or her time with you. You both often surprise each other with your attitude. Tonight: Let a loved one make the first move for once.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH If you decide that a situation is going to be difficult, you can count on it being problematic. You see life very differently from how many other people do. Tonight: An invitation is simply too tempting to turn down. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Clear out what you must as soon as you can. A loved one has plans for you. At first, you might have a negative reaction, but once you process your feelings, you are likely to discover that what you are projecting has nothing to do with the situation. Tonight: Dinner for two. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Immerse yourself in the daylight hours, when you can let out your inner child. Be aware that a friend might feel disappointed and cop an attitude. Tonight: Know when to calm down.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH A respected relative might tell you that what you want is close to impossible. This person could be very demanding, and you will want to stand up for yourself. Just complete your plans as quickly as possible. Tonight: Go with the flow. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


04.29.2017 • Saturday • M 1

EVERYDAY

St. LOuIS POSt-dISPatCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six differences between the panels.

Daughter in doghouse because of pets 40s and should know better. I feel they have no respect for us or the way we choose to live. Must I keep my mouth shut to keep the peace, like my husband says? I told him to speak up, but he won’t. This is physically and emotionally wearing on me. — DRAINED IN PENNSYLVANIA Dear Drained • How your daughter and son-in-law choose to live in their own home is their business, as long as the disarray doesn’t endanger the health of their children. Because you agreed to let them bring their dogs over on the condition that they vacuum up any hair their animals shed and they failed to comply, you are within your rights to tell them their pets must be left at home. Your house, your conditions. Messy grandchildren, yes. Messy dogs, no. Dear Abby • I recently had a baby. Two of my friends became mothers five and nine months ago. We are all first-time stayat-home moms, which has been

great except they constantly offer unwanted advice every time I see them and try to come off like they’re experts. I agree that they sometimes offer helpful advice, but it’s getting old because I’m becoming confident in my parenting skills and judgment. How do I politely let them know that if I want advice, I’ll ask for it? — UNWANTED ADVICE IN TENNESSEE Dear Tennessee • Do it by first acknowledging them for being such good friends and wanting to be helpful. Then add that, as you have told me, you are now more confident with your own parenting skills and would prefer they wait to be asked before offering any more unsolicited advice. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Differences: 1. Hole is smaller. 2. Leg is moved. 3. Sculpture is different. 4. Hat is larger. 5. Nose on painting is lower. 6. Paper is smaller.

Dear Abby • When my daughter and her family come to visit, they are very messy. They have a 3and a 4-year-old and two large, long-haired dogs. I can deal with the children’s messiness — but the dogs, no. I agreed to let them bring their dogs if they cleaned up after them, but it hasn’t happened. The dogs shed terribly. The hair needs to be vacuumed daily. They don’t practice it at home and don’t do it here, even after being told the dog hair is everywhere in my house. We are 70 and active, but a lot of cleaning must be done when they leave. I especially don’t like it around food. I told my husband I have decided to tell them they can no longer bring their dogs here. He goes around and tries to clean up after them so I won’t get upset instead of letting them take responsibility. He says he’s afraid they will quit coming. Abby, they don’t pick up after themselves at all. In their home, clothes are thrown everywhere on the floor. They are in their

MISS MANNERS

Noisy computer workers in coffee shops Dear Miss Manners • My husband and I went to a bookstore/coffee place and looked forward to a relaxing moment. Within seconds, we realized we were not sitting in the right area. A woman was hooked up to her computer with a headset and was speaking above a normal level to explain her publishing company’s products and ask for feedback. We gently looked her way, but she was in full work mode. We tried moving, and only on our third move were we able to get away from really distracting noise. In your gentle way of restoring civility to our culture, could you please comment on this? Gentle Reader • Yes, but you may not like it. If Miss Manners banned people who worked on their computers or talked on their phones in public places, she would do little else. Is it the volume of the call or

its content to which you object? For either, you could say, “I am so sorry, but we do not want to disturb your phone call with our chatter. Perhaps a quiet corner would be more conducive to your getting things done.” If that does not work — and if moving and throwing glances are also not effective — then you may ask the establishment to create and enforce rules that request a limit to the time spent there. Dear Miss Manners • In a few months, my family will be relocating from a very large home in the Midwest to what we anticipate will be a much smaller home in a busy East Coast city. My husband and I are both in our 40s, and our daughter is in elementary school. Over the years, we have acquired many nice things, including furniture, toys, books, household items, etc., which we realize we cannot take

with us. I wonder if I might have an “indoor downsizing party” with my friends, during which they could come over and select items. My thought was not to price items, but rather to allow them to contribute what they felt was appropriate. What are your thoughts? Gentle Reader • That this is unfortunately the worst of all possible combinations. It is neither a yard sale with price tags nor a generous donation of items for which you no longer have use. Miss Manners feels certain that what your friends will likely feel is “appropriate” is to know what kind of party they are attending. And not to have to put a value on their friends’ belongings. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

TV SATURDAY For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv. 4/29/17

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MasterChef Ramsay’s FOX MasterChef The first 2 mystery box challenge. favorite moments and (cc) meals.

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

CBS Training Day Several of 48 Hours (N) (cc) 4 Holly’s call girls disappear. (N) (cc)

48 Hours (N) (cc)

NBC NHL Hockey: Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA. NHL playoff action from 5 the conference semifinals. (N) (cc) Death in Paradise DI PBS Antiques Roadshow 9 John Wayne mug collec- Goodman’s aunt is a tion. (cc) witness. (cc) CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Leverage The team 24 tries to rob a Boston vault. (cc)

Í AFTER THE THIN MAN (’36) HHH (William Powell)

Rizzoli & Isles The mur- Elementary: Miss der of a wealthy couple. Taken. A retired FBI (cc) agent is murdered. Mr. Box Of- The First NLEC Wor- News & Views fice (cc) Family (cc) ship

ABC DREAMGIRLS (’06) HHH (Jamie Foxx) Three singers learn that fame has a 30 high price. MYTV Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special 46 Victims Unit: Hell. (cc) Victims Unit: Baggage. Victims Unit: Selfish. (cc) (cc)

5 0 + Ye a r s o f G r i l l i n g S u c c e s s ! S e e O u r Va s t S e l e c t i o n o n D i s p l a y N o w

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • SATUrDAy • 04.29.2017

CAROLYN HAX

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Warding off that double ‘baby clap’ Adapted from a recent online discussion.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Carolyn • My stepmother-in-law is coming to visit soon. We have a new arrival in the house and I’m dreading a repeat of her baby-rabies that we experienced with the first two. And really, it’s just one thing that bothers me — the double baby clap. This is where she stands in front of me, claps her hands twice and expects the baby in return. She doesn’t ask to hold the baby, she doesn’t even acknowledge me. She just claps. It makes me feel like a dog. My husband gets that it bothers me but wants me to just suck it up. I don’t think I can and still have a positive visit with her. What do you recommend? — The Baby Clap?

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

Answer • “Are you asking me for the baby?” Repeat each time. Maybe the first time say, “Please don’t — I feel like a trained dog when you do that.” The best way to stop the clap is to make sure it never works. And also keep in mind that you dislike her doing this because you dislike her, and not the other way around. Right? Because it sure seems that way. Maybe reframing it will unlock some motivation to look for things you do like about her, just to make her mannerisms less annoying and her visits less taxing. I.e., do it for your own selfish reasons. It can feel easier to take it on that way. Congrats on the new baby.

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Re: Clap • Man, that woman had better stop clapping or she’d never be holding my kid. “When you want to hold the baby, please ask to. Never clap for her again. Thank you.” — Nick the Cartoonist, Breaking the Fourth Wall

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

Re: Clap • The baby clap isn’t directed to the mother. It’s to catch the baby’s attention. And then the baby will reach her chubby arms out to Grandma, Grandma will take her, and Mom will get a break. I’ve seen plenty of older women doing this in the Midwest. Maybe it was a “thing” back when. Are there more artful ways of asking to hold the baby these days? Certainly. But it’s likely a generational or geographic tic. Please don’t take immediate offense; instead, try seeing a grandma ready to love her grandchild. — Anonymous

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

Answer • That’s a compassionate view, thank you. Mom and Grandma still can talk about it like adults, though — and, can we agree that abrupt moves and loud noises annoy more than they entice?

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

tellme@washpost.com

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott

Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

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