Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

Sunday • 04.14.2019 • $4.00 • EaRLy EdITIOn

AFTER MSD FLIPS, FIRMS GIVE $150K TO STENGER FUND District staff recommend giving $150 million tunnel contract to low bidder: Detroit-based Jay Dee FIRST

Local firm SAK complains to county executive’s office; MSD trustee changes vote, and SAK wins contract THEN

By daVId Hunn and JaCOB BaRKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOuIS • The contract to build the Deer

Creek tunnel was one of the largest the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District had awarded in years. Two big firms were competing hard in 2017 to land the $150 million project. Sewer district staff recommended awarding it to the low bidder, a joint venture led by an outof-town firm, Jay Dee Contractors. The district board’s practice, almost without exception, was to approve the professional staff’s recommendation. This time would be different. SAK Construction, a St. Charles County company that was competing with Jay Dee for the business, mounted a lobbying effort with district staff and board members. The company’s concerns reached St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger’s office, which appoints three of MSD’s six members on its Board of Trustees. A top aide to Stenger met with two key trustees to discuss the matter, the Post-Dispatch has learned. After the meeting with Stenger’s aide, one of those two MSD trustees switched his vote, and

SAK and a subcontractor have given more than $150,000 to Stenger’s campaign fund AFTER

See MSd • Page a4

Prison officer: It’s one of the most dangerous, difficult jobs in Missouri

Pay starts at $15 an hour

Push for ‘heartbeat bills’ divides activists New strategy Abortion opponents hope aggressive action will find way to Supreme Court Effort could backfire Others, even Catholic bishops, say drive could cost states millions in lawsuits By SaRaH PuLLIaM BaILEy Washington Post

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Correctional officer trainees pin on their new badges during a graduation ceremony last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds pavilion near Bowling Green, Mo. Jessica Hays (center), 23, said of choosing a career in corrections: “I wanted to see what I am made of.”

By JESSE BOGan St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BOWLInG GREEn, MO. • The first recruit

showed up at boot camp an hour early, wearing a 2014 letter jacket to keep warm. Then two pals pulled into the icy parking lot together, also eager to become correctional officers. One of them, after a short stint in the Army, craved routine. The other had a daughter to support and felt lucky to have survived an infection that cut his weight to 365 pounds. Bethany Henson, 22, was a third his size. She arrived determined to confront her fear of abusive men for the opportunity to earn enough money to have her own home. Had she not been starting a criminal justice career this day, she said, she’d be looking for a lawyer. “I want to show all these other single mothers out there who have had as much difficulty as I’ve had that they can do it,” said

As Department of Corrections struggles to retain officers, 46 people from different backgrounds begin boot camp seeking the same thing — a job Training officer Sgt. Dan Wiley (left) shows trainee Kasey Crisman how to take control of an inmate last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds. “This is just practice for when the real thing happens,” Wiley told the recruits.

See PRISOn • Page a14

TODAY

On guard

48°/38° RAIN AND WIND

TOMORROW

65°/52° MOSTLY SUNNY

WEATHER D10 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

View from Arsenal

Pot permit details

County’s lunatic asylum turns 150

What will it take to get license to grow?

STL LIFE • B1

BuSInESS • C1

WaSHInGTOn • For decades, established anti-abortion leaders pushed for incremental steps toward chipping away at abortion through state laws, such as making it harder for women to access abortion providers or requiring them to view ultrasounds. But many activists are pressing for a more aggressive strategy now that, they say, the Supreme Court could be on their side. Lawmakers in several GOP-led legislatures, including Missouri’s, have pushed “heartbeat bills” in hopes of getting the Supreme Court — including President Donald Trump appointees Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh — to pick up a case that would challenge Roe v. Wade. The bills have been proposed in at least 11 states and would ban almost all See aBORTIOn • Page a7

Messenger: Assault victim shocked by response • A2 Raasch: What Harry Truman teaches us •

A3

Ibur is all about ‘taking poetry to the people’ • B1 Cashless future hits a stumbling block • C1

1 M Vol. 141, No. 104 ©2019


S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • $4.00 • FINAL EDITION

AFTER MSD FLIPS, FIRMS GIVE $150K TO STENGER FUND District staff recommend giving $150 million tunnel contract to low bidder: Detroit-based Jay Dee

Local firm SAK complains to county executive’s office; MSD trustee changes vote, and SAK wins contract

FIRST

THEN

BY DAVID HUNN AND JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The contract to build the Deer

Creek tunnel was one of the largest the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District had awarded in years. Two big firms were competing hard in 2017 to land the $150 million project. Sewer district staff recommended awarding it to the low bidder, a joint venture led by an outof-town firm, Jay Dee Contractors. The district board’s practice, almost without exception, was to approve the professional staff’s recommendation. This time would be different. SAK Construction, a St. Charles County company that was competing with Jay Dee for the business, mounted a lobbying effort with district staff and board members. The company’s concerns reached St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger’s office, which appoints three of MSD’s six members on its Board of Trustees. A top aide to Stenger met with two key trustees to discuss the matter, the Post-Dispatch has learned. After the meeting with Stenger’s aide, one of those two MSD trustees switched his vote, and

SAK and a subcontractor have given more than $150,000 to Stenger’s campaign fund AFTER

See MSD • Page A4

IN THE HOLE Low pay, dangers drive exodus of Missouri correctional officers 46 recruits begin boot camp seeking the same thing — a job

Push for ‘heartbeat bills’ divides activists New strategy Abortion opponents hope aggressive action will find way to Supreme Court Effort could backfire Others, even Catholic bishops, say drive could cost states millions in lawsuits BY SARAH PULLIAM BAILEY Washington Post

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Correctional officer trainees pin on their new badges during a graduation ceremony last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds pavilion near Bowling Green, Mo. Jessica Hays (center), 23, said of choosing a career in corrections: “I wanted to see what I am made of.”

Shedding officers

BY JESSE BOGAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Overtime costs climb

The department has lost 5,267 officers over five years; 75% of those resigned.

BOWLING GREEN, MO. • The

Overtime paid to correctional officers has tripled since 2014.

Corrections officers lost, by year 0 -300 -600 -900 -1,200 -1,500

’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18

SOURCE: Missouri Department of Corrections

first recruit showed up at boot camp an hour early, wearing a 2014 letter jacket to keep warm. Then two pals pulled into the icy parking lot together, also eager to become correctional officers. One of them, after a short stint in the Army, craved routine. The other had a daughter to support and felt lucky to have survived an infection that cut his weight to 365 pounds. Bethany Henson, 22, was a third his size. She arrived determined to confront her fear of abusive men for the opportunity to earn enough money to See PRISON • Page A14

TODAY

On guard

47°/35° PERIODS OF RAIN

TOMORROW

68°/54° MOSTLY SUNNY

WEATHER D10

$30

See ABORTION • Page A7

Messenger: Assault victim shocked by response • A2

25

Blues’ Maroon ready for playoffs in hometown • D1

20 15 10 5 0

Training officer Sgt. Dan Wiley (left) shows trainee Kasey Crisman how to take control of an inmate last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds. “This is just practice for when the real thing happens,” Wiley told the recruits.

Cardinals drop one in Mexico SPORTS • D1

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

Overtime paid, in millions, by year

WASHINGTON • For decades, established anti-abortion leaders pushed for incremental steps toward chipping away at abortion through state laws, such as making it harder for women to access abortion providers or requiring them to view ultrasounds. But many activists are pressing for a more aggressive strategy now that, they say, the Supreme Court could be on their side. Lawmakers in several GOP-led legislatures, including Missouri’s, have pushed “heartbeat bills” in hopes of getting the Supreme Court — including President Donald Trump appointees Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh — to pick up a case that would challenge Roe v. Wade. The bills have been proposed in at least 11 states and would ban almost all

’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18

SOURCE: Missouri Department of Corrections

St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum turns 150 • B1 Cashless future hits a stumbling block • C1

Pot permit details What will it take to get license to grow? BUSINESS • C1

2 M Vol. 141, No. 104 ©2019


M 1 SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM THE BOTTOM TT LINE

GO TO PREP SCHOOL

UPCOMING CHATS

An inverted verted yield curve had some investors ve running for cover cove this spring. But David Nicklaus and Jim Da Gallagher don’t ’t tthink a recession is imminent. rece t. stltoday.com/watch y.com/watch

Check out our short video tips — from how to set a perfect table to making fabulous dip and spicy shrimp. Watch Daniel Neman’s Prep School. stltoday.com/watch

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

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Assault victim shocked by National Guard’s response TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch.com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday.com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

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Capt. Heather Sexton thought she was prepared for everything. When she filed a sexual assault complaint with the Missouri National Guard two years ago, she was prepared to be her own advocate. Sexton was prepared to push back her planned resignation to make sure the Guard investigated her complaint. She was prepared for a negative finding. From everything she had read and heard from other women in the military, sexual assault complaints rarely lead to any real discipline. She was not prepared for what the report actually said. “The Investigative Team finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that on or about 29 April 2017, there was physical contact between the reported perpetrator and victim involving the reported perpetrator grabbing the victim’s groin and breast and stomach,” reads the report prepared by the Army’s Office of Complex Investigations. “However, the Investigative Team found insufficient evidence to determine the reported perpetrator’s intent of the physical contact, thus, we were unable to establish that intentional sexual contact occurred.” The report, which she had to fight to get long after it had been filed, hit her “like a wall.” “I thought I was prepared for every scenario,” Sexton says. “I knew it was my word vs. his. I had mentally prepared for it to come back unsubstantiated. I hadn’t prepared for the report to actually say, yes, this happened to you, but it’s OK that it happened.” After 10 years in the Missouri Army National Guard, Sexton is no longer in active service. She and her husband live in west St. Louis County. She’s telling her story in part because of an email she received in March, shortly before she left the Guard. “Across the Total Army, we continue to focus on eradicating sexual harassment and sexual assault from our ranks,” wrote Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, and Secretary of the Army Mark Esper. It was an email sent to all senior Army leaders following years of criticism and congressional action seeking to force the military to take sexual assault more seriously. “We must do everything within our power to rid the Army of these crimes.”

A section from the investigative report into the sexual assault complaint filed by Capt. Heather Sexton.

The letter points out that sexual assault reports in the Army are increasing, an indication that “soldiers trust their leaders to address the situation in a professional manner.” What good is that, Sexton wonders, if the reports validate women’s complaints but do nothing to punish predators? “The perpetrators are not being held accountable,” she wrote in an email to the two military leaders.

THE ASSAULT Sexton’s assault happened in Utah. She and her unit were at Camp Williams for training. The local Guard unit hosted them for a social event. Alcohol was served. Afterward, as had been her practice, she had a male soldier walk her back to the women’s barracks, which was down a long, dark, secluded sidewalk. She was the only woman in the unit at the training exercise. She and the sergeant who walked her to the barracks engaged in a personal conversation about gender issues. He explained, according to the report, that he was “struggling” with questions of gender. “I felt he needed to talk,” Sexton says. The investigative report says he asked if he could “touch” her. She thought he was going to give her a hug. “He grabbed my vagina like a bowling ball and shook me back and forth,” she says. “I just kind of stood there in shock. I felt like I wasn’t even in my own body. He used my kindness as weakness.” The next day, Sexton says, she couldn’t stop crying. She visited with a chaplain, called her husband and flew home. Two days later she filed a report of her assault. She told her story over and over again to an ever-changing sexual assault response coordinator. LETTER OF CONCERN After the investigation determined that the sexual assault was “unsubstantiated” — even while finding that Sexton “did not consent to a violent touching” — every member of the unit, including Sexton, received a “letter of concern” from Gen. David Boyle, the Joint Task Force Commander of the Missouri National Guard

PEOPLE Nipsey Hussle is buried in LA Rapper Nipsey Hussle has been buried at a Los Angeles cemetery that is the final resting place of numerous celebrities. Hussle’s family was seen at the Forest Lawn-Hollywood Hills cemetery for the private burial Friday afternoon. The service was held a day after a public memorial at Los Angeles’ Staples Center drew thousands of mourners. The City Council voted unanimously Friday to name the intersection of Crenshaw Boulevard and Slauson Avenue after the slain rapper. Hussle, 33, grew up in the neighborhood and opened his clothing store, the Marathon, at that intersection, hoping it would become a hub of community rebuilding. It’s also the intersection where he was fatally shot outside the store March 31. Trivago actor arrested on DWI • The actor who has become something of a sex symbol as the scruffy-faced, somewhat

STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee; Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., 2020 presidential candidate; Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Sarah Sanders; Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md.

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

LAW AND ORDER rumpled star of ads for the travel booking site Trivago has been arrested in Texas on a misdemeanor driving while intoxicated charge. Court records show Timothy Williams, 52, was arrested Wednesday in Houston and freed on $100 bail. Capricorn studios to reopen • In the 1970s, Capricorn Sound Studios was synonymous with Southern rock. From the Allman Brothers to Wet Willie, Elvin Bishop to the Marshall Tucker Band, hordes of artists recorded at the building in downtown Macon, Ga. Mercer University plans to reopen Capricorn Sound Studios by the end of the year.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Country singer Loretta Lynn is 87. Actress Julie Christie is 79. Actor John Shea is 70. Actor Robert Carlyle is 58. Actor Claire Coffee is 39. Actor Nick Krause is 27. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president; Gov. Jay Inslee, D-Wash., 2020 presidential candidate

for violating the Guard’s alcohol and “fraternization” policies. “I hope going forward you will exercise better judgment and comport yourself appropriately,” Boyle wrote. The letter, and the lack of action taken against Sexton’s perpetrator, spurred a strong response from her special victims’ counsel to Gen. Stephen Danner, the adjutant general of the Missouri Guard. That letter takes issue with the legal conclusions in the investigative report, calling them “improper and unsupported by findings of fact.” It urges Danner to punish the perpetrator. “This intentional act violated Capt. Sexton’s reasonable expectation to be treated with dignity and respect while serving her country and state, and amounts to serious misconduct that should be addressed appropriately,” Sexton’s counsel wrote to Danner. The letter, apparently, fell on deaf ears. Sexton says Danner did not punish the accused. The National Guard Bureau, through a spokeswoman, declined to discuss the investigation. So did the Missouri National Guard. “Per legal counsel, both Maj. Gen. Danner and the Missouri National Guard are legally prohibited from commenting on administrative actions,” Maj. John Quin wrote in an email. “The Missouri National Guard takes all reports of sexual assault and harassment seriously.” Sexton believes her experience belies that last statement. She has sent letters to Gov. Mike Parson, Missouri U.S. Sens. Josh Hawley and Roy Blunt, and U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, alerting them to the results of her investigation. She’s speaking out, she says, because her military training as an officer taught her to stand up for others. “I’m an officer, and this happened to me,” Sexton says. “What happens when a private gets sexually assaulted? I felt a strong responsibility as a leader to make sure this doesn’t happen to other women.”

FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Conway; Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Democratic whip; Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., 2020 presidential candidate; Brad Parscale, campaign manager for President Donald Trump THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Sarah Sanders, White House press secretary; Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., Homeland Security panel chairman; Jennifer Robinson, attorney for Julian Assange Associated Press

JENNINGS > Man found shot dead on parking lot • St. Louis County police officers found a man dead from at least one apparent gunshot wound on the parking lot of an apartment complex Friday afternoon. At about 1:15 p.m., police were called to the area of Jacobi Avenue and Lucas and Hunt Road for a reported shooting. Once there, officers found the man dead on the parking lot of the nearby apartment complex. Police have not yet released any additional information but are asking anyone with information about the crime to call 636-529-8210. Tipsters can also contact CrimeStoppers online or at 1-866-371-8477 to remain anonymous. ST. LOUIS > Man robbed in Downtown West neighborhood • A man was robbed at gunpoint early Friday on a parking lot near Christ Church Cathedral. It happened about 1:30 a.m. Friday on a parking lot near the church, at 1210 Locust Street. It was not immediately clear which lot the crime took place on; police gave the address for the church, in the city’s Downtown West neighborhood. Police say a man, 22, told officers he was walking in the area when a dark sedan with tinted windows pulled up next to him. Two men inside the car pointed guns at him and demanded his property, police say. St. Louis police Officer Michelle Woodling said the robbers took the man’s cellphone and wallet. Then they drove off. The victim wasn’t hurt. He called police from a business in the 200 block of North 17th Street. Officers spotted the sedan in the area but it sped away before police could stop it.


M 2 SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM THE BOTTOM TT LINE

GO TO PREP SCHOOL

UPCOMING CHATS

An inverted verted yield curve had some investors ve running for cover cove this spring. But David Nicklaus and Jim Da Gallagher don’t ’t tthink a recession is imminent. rece t. stltoday.com/watch y.com/watch

Check out our short video tips — from how to set a perfect table to making fabulous dip and spicy shrimp. Watch Daniel Neman’s Prep School. stltoday.com/watch

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

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Assault victim shocked by National Guard’s response TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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Capt. Heather Sexton thought she was prepared for everything. When she filed a sexual assault complaint with the Missouri National Guard two years ago, she was prepared to be her own advocate. Sexton was prepared to push back her planned resignation to make sure the Guard investigated her complaint. She was prepared for a negative finding. From everything she had read and heard from other women in the military, sexual assault complaints rarely lead to any real discipline. She was not prepared for what the report actually said. “The Investigative Team finds, by a preponderance of the evidence, that on or about 29 April 2017, there was physical contact between the reported perpetrator and victim involving the reported perpetrator grabbing the victim’s groin and breast and stomach,” reads the report prepared by the Army’s Office of Complex Investigations. “However, the Investigative Team found insufficient evidence to determine the reported perpetrator’s intent of the physical contact, thus, we were unable to establish that intentional sexual contact occurred.” The report, which she had to fight to get long after it had been filed, hit her “like a wall.” “I thought I was prepared for every scenario,” Sexton says. “I knew it was my word vs. his. I had mentally prepared for it to come back unsubstantiated. I hadn’t prepared for the report to actually say, yes, this happened to you, but it’s OK that it happened.” After 10 years in the Missouri Army National Guard, Sexton is no longer in active service. She and her husband live in west St. Louis County. She’s telling her story in part because of an email she received in March, shortly before she left the Guard. “Across the Total Army, we continue to focus on eradicating sexual harassment and sexual assault from our ranks,” wrote Gen. Mark Milley, Army chief of staff, and Secretary of the Army Mark Esper. It was an email sent to all senior Army leaders following years of criticism and congressional action seeking to force the military to take sexual assault more seriously. “We must do everything within our power to rid the Army of these crimes.”

A section from the investigative report into the sexual assault complaint filed by Capt. Heather Sexton.

The letter points out that sexual assault reports in the Army are increasing, an indication that “soldiers trust their leaders to address the situation in a professional manner.” What good is that, Sexton wonders, if the reports validate women’s complaints but do nothing to punish predators? “The perpetrators are not being held accountable,” she wrote in an email to the two military leaders.

THE ASSAULT Sexton’s assault happened in Utah. She and her unit were at Camp Williams for training. The local Guard unit hosted them for a social event. Alcohol was served. Afterward, as had been her practice, she had a male soldier walk her back to the women’s barracks, which was down a long, dark, secluded sidewalk. She was the only woman in the unit at the training exercise. She and the sergeant who walked her to the barracks engaged in a personal conversation about gender issues. He explained, according to the report, that he was “struggling” with questions of gender. “I felt he needed to talk,” Sexton says. The investigative report says he asked if he could “touch” her. She thought he was going to give her a hug. “He grabbed my vagina like a bowling ball and shook me back and forth,” she says. “I just kind of stood there in shock. I felt like I wasn’t even in my own body. He used my kindness as weakness.” The next day, Sexton says, she couldn’t stop crying. She visited with a chaplain, called her husband and flew home. Two days later she filed a report of her assault. She told her story over and over again to an ever-changing sexual assault response coordinator. LETTER OF CONCERN After the investigation determined that the sexual assault was “unsubstantiated” — even while finding that Sexton “did not consent to a violent touching” — every member of the unit, including Sexton, received a “letter of concern” from Gen. David Boyle, the Joint Task Force Commander of the Missouri National Guard

PEOPLE Nipsey Hussle is buried in LA Rapper Nipsey Hussle has been buried at a Los Angeles cemetery that is the final resting place of numerous celebrities. Hussle’s family was seen at the Forest Lawn-Hollywood Hills cemetery for the private burial Friday afternoon. The service was held a day after a public memorial at Los Angeles’ Staples Center. The City Council voted unanimously Friday to name the intersection of Crenshaw Boulevard and Slauson Avenue after the slain rapper. Hussle, 33, grew up in the neighborhood and opened his clothing store, the Marathon, at that intersection, hoping it would become a hub of community rebuilding. He was fatally shot outside the store March 31. Hill launches ‘Unbothered’ podcast • Former ESPN host Jemele Hill has moved on, but not from speaking her mind. Hill, 43, best known to the nonsports world for tweets about President Donald

STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., chairman of the House Judiciary Committee; Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., 2020 presidential candidate; Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla. FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Sarah Sanders; Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md.

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

LAW & ORDER Trump that provoked the White House to unsuccessfully seek her firing, launches a weekly podcast Monday on Spotify. On the show, “Jemele Hill is Unbothered,” she’ll conduct interviews and give commentary on sports, politics and culture. Trivago actor arrested on DWI • The actor who has become something of a sex symbol as the scruffy-faced, somewhat rumpled star of ads for the travel booking site Trivago has been arrested in Texas on a misdemeanor driving while intoxicated charge. Court records show Timothy Williams, 52, was arrested Wednesday in Houston and freed on $100 bail.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Country singer Loretta Lynn is 87. Actress Julie Christie is 79. Actor John Shea is 70. Actor Robert Carlyle is 58. Actress Claire Coffee is 39. Actor Nick Krause is 27. From news services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Kellyanne Conway, counselor to the president; Gov. Jay Inslee, D-Wash., 2020 presidential candidate

for violating the Guard’s alcohol and “fraternization” policies. “I hope going forward you will exercise better judgment and comport yourself appropriately,” Boyle wrote. The letter, and the lack of action taken against Sexton’s perpetrator, spurred a strong response from her special victims’ counsel to Gen. Stephen Danner, the adjutant general of the Missouri Guard. That letter takes issue with the legal conclusions in the investigative report, calling them “improper and unsupported by findings of fact.” It urges Danner to punish the perpetrator. “This intentional act violated Capt. Sexton’s reasonable expectation to be treated with dignity and respect while serving her country and state, and amounts to serious misconduct that should be addressed appropriately,” Sexton’s counsel wrote to Danner. The letter, apparently, fell on deaf ears. Sexton says Danner did not punish the accused. The National Guard Bureau, through a spokeswoman, declined to discuss the investigation. So did the Missouri National Guard. “Per legal counsel, both Maj. Gen. Danner and the Missouri National Guard are legally prohibited from commenting on administrative actions,” Maj. John Quin wrote in an email. “The Missouri National Guard takes all reports of sexual assault and harassment seriously.” Sexton believes her experience belies that last statement. She has sent letters to Gov. Mike Parson, Missouri U.S. Sens. Josh Hawley and Roy Blunt, and U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, alerting them to the results of her investigation. She’s speaking out, she says, because her military training as an officer taught her to stand up for others. “I’m an officer, and this happened to me,” Sexton says. “What happens when a private gets sexually assaulted? I felt a strong responsibility as a leader to make sure this doesn’t happen to other women.”

FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Conway; Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., Democratic whip; Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., 2020 presidential candidate; Brad Parscale, campaign manager for President Donald Trump THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Sarah Sanders, White House press secretary; Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., Homeland Security panel chairman; Jennifer Robinson, attorney for Julian Assange Associated Press

ST. LOUIS > Highway pedestrian death • A pedestrian was struck and killed along Interstate 70 early Saturday, near Goodfellow Boulevard, police said. The incident happened about 4:45 a.m., according to St. Louis police. The department said that the victim died at the scene and that the driver of vehicle that struck the person stayed at the site. No further information was immediately available. ST. LOUIS > Loop trolley in accident • A car making a U-turn in front of a trolley car hit the front right side of the trolley on Saturday afternoon at Delmar Boulevard and Hamilton Avenue. No one was injured in the accident, according to Loop Trolley spokesperson Brittany Robbins. The accident happened about 1:10 p.m. on Saturday and St. Louis police responded to the scene. The driver who struck the 001 red trolley declined medical care. The trolley car is being inspected at trolley headquarters, 5875 Delmar Boulevard. The 2.2-mile trolley route between the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park and the western end of the Delmar Loop is now being serviced by one trolley, Robbins said. The 001 red trolley was also struck by a car on Jan. 10. MADISON COUNTY > Man dies in motorcycle crash • The county coroner identified a man who died after a motorcycle crash in Wood River on Friday. William Morales, 28, of Wood River, died at Alton Memorial Hospital of blunt trauma to the torso, officials said. The accident occurred Friday on Madison Avenue at Second Street and remains under investigation by Wood River and state police.


SATURDAY’S BEST

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Board of Aldermen poised to ban lobbyists from the floor

Man pleads guilty to manslaughter in killing at Show-Me’s

BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The Board of Aldermen

CLAYTON • After a jury deadlocked on a murder charge for a man who shot a fellow bar patron after an argument over a dog, the defendant struck a deal Friday and pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter. Pleading guilty, Neal Myers accepted a five-year prison term. Jurors deliberated more than seven hours but could not reach a verdict. Both sides in this week’s trial agreed that Myers shot Scott Beary twice after the drunken spat on Feb. 7, 2018, at the Florissant Show-Me’s Sports Bar & Grill. But jurors were tasked with determining whether it was murder or self-defense in a case that tested Missouri law, which says people may legally use deadly force if they reasonably believe it’s necessary to protect against death or serious injury, and hinges on who was the aggressor. Beary 43, was a construction worker, husband and father of three who lived in Winchester. Myers, 55, who also worked in construction, was charged with second-degree murder, armed criminal action and first-degree assault; police said he also wounded Beary’s friend in the encounter. Surveillance cameras inside Show-Me’s captured the run-up to and the shooting itself on video, which was played for the jury Tuesday. The shooting, about 3:45 p.m. that day, followed hours of drinking and a conversation among Beary, Myers and two other men about dogs. The discussion grew heated as Beary rejected a claim by one of the men that he owned and trained a German shepherd that was at least 290 pounds. The conversation continued for more than 20 minutes, even after the man who claimed to have the dog left. At some point, Myers moved his .38-caliber revolver from a holster to his pocket, prosecutors said. As Beary and his friend were leaving, Beary patted Myers’ shoulder and told him, “No hard feelings,” assistant prosecutor Ryan Kemper told the jury. Myers then responded as Beary walked toward the door by saying “(expletive) you, fat ass. Keep walking, you fat ass. You smell like pork,” while “secretly gripping” the gun in his pocket, Kemper said. “Those are fighting words,” Kemper told the jury Friday. “Provoking a deliberate confrontation with a deadly weapon cannot be self-defense.” Kemper said Neal’s blood-alcohol content was estimated at 0.187 percent after the time of the shooting, and that Beary’s was between 0.175 percent and 0.181 percent. (The legal limit to drive a vehicle in Missouri is 0.08 percent.) Beary turned around, rolled up his sleeves and charged at Myers and tried to hit him, prompting Myers to shoot several times, lawyers on both sides said. Myers fired several shots. One hit the ceiling. Another struck Beary’s friend in the arm. Beary was shot in the heart and the side. After the shooting, Myers announced to the bar that he was provoked and shot the men in self-defense. He set the gun down on a stainless steel cooler and waited for police to arrive. “I was in fear for my life,” he told officers. “The guy was coming at me. I thought he was going to kick my ass.” Defense lawyer Scott Rosenblum said in closing arguments Friday that Beary was the aggressor in the encounter and that Myers made a life-and-death decision to kill “a mammoth of a man” who charged at Myers “like an angry bull.” “He had an absolute right to defend himself,” Rosenblum said.

is poised to prohibit special-interest lobbyists from roaming the aldermanic floor during meetings and instead relegate them to an overhead gallery. But the rules change, endorsed by aldermen Friday at a Democratic caucus meeting, also could make it more difficult for the general public to watch aldermanic sessions from that same gallery. Instead of just showing up and walking into the gallery as under current practice, average citizens would have to get passes from individual aldermen to sit in any of those 86 gallery seats. If they couldn’t score a pass, they would have to watch via TV feed in a nearby hearing room. They’d in effect be competing for passes with lobbyists and various friends and associates of aldermen now allowed on the floor who would have to move to the gallery as well. The proposal’s sponsor, Alderman Jack Coatar of the 7th Ward, said the lobbyist floor ban is long overdue. “The perception of having lobbyists and other folks interested in legislation milling about the floor whispering in an alderman’s ear is just not right when the public is not allowed to do that,” Coatar said. “We’re going to start trying to act like every other deliberative body.” He added that people will still have plenty of opportunity to influence the legislative process “and that’s their right.” The proposed rules change will come up for formal adoption Tuesday at the first board meeting of its 2019-2020 session. Because all 29 board members in the coming session are Democrats and all but one was at Friday’s caucus meeting, the change is likely to pass. However, two members who strongly support the floor ban on lobbyists — Cara Spencer of the 20th Ward and Heather Navarro of the 28th — said Friday they also have concerns that public access could be limited. Navarro added that it’s possible that the policy would be somehow

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALDERMAN CARA SPENCER

From left, Alderman Jeffrey Boyd, 22nd Ward, discusses a bill with lobbyist Darryl Piggee in September 2018 on the floor of the Board of Aldermen. Seated behind them are lobbyists Chris Pickle and Lou Hamilton.

tweaked to make sure the general public isn’t shut out of the aldermanic chambers. However, Aldermanic President Lewis Reed, who said he worked closely with Coatar on the rule change, predicted that for most of the board’s weekly meetings all gallery seats wouldn’t be filled by people with aldermanic-issued passes. Thus, he said, residents who just appear at City Hall without checking with aldermen in advance probably will get gallery seats most weeks. “They just have to check in with my office and we will be able to get them passes,” Reed said. “People will be accommodated.” Navarro said another issue is how to make room for groups of schoolchildren. The board’s current rules say that “honored guests” of aldermen are allowed on the floor during board meetings. Lobbyists often have been among the “honored guests.” Coatar said the policy change would move most of the “honored guests” to the overhead gallery. Each of the 28 ward aldermen would be able to hand out two gallery passes and Reed’s office the rest, he said. Still allowed on the floor, Coatar

said, would be people who are subjects of praise in an aldermanic resolution and people accompanying them. So would members of aldermen’s families, said Reed’s chief of staff, Tom Shepard. Board staffers, the mayor or a designee, the comptroller or a designee and members of the press also would continue to have floor access. Alderman Carol Howard of the 14th Ward said the changes will make board meetings look more professional. “I think crowding people in on that floor, it looks sloppy,” she said. She said the change also will improve order and security on the floor. “We’re in a different climate than when I came down here 10 years ago,” she said. “There are a lot of angry people out there.” The general public already is required to go through metal detectors when entering City Hall. Howard also said she believed that the changes wouldn’t reduce public access. She pointed out that anyone will continue to be able to attend and speak at aldermanic committee meetings where ordinances are drafted.

Joel Currier • 314-340-8132 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

IAN’S STL 100 Critic Ian Froeb has revealed his picks for the 100 best restaurants in town for 2019. Sort by location, cuisine or price. stltoday.com/stl100

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LOCAL

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 2

BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-dispatch

N

aming close friends and family members killed by gunfire, seemingly everyone had personal stories of loss to share at The Move, a march against gun violence held Saturday in St. Louis. Kneeshe Parkinson was there to honor her cousin, Corey Smith Jr., gunned down last May. Roger Hunt thought of his son, Darius Hunt, killed on May 2 last year. Five months later, his brother, Leroy Hunt, was also shot to death. The same thing happened eight years earlier to another brother, Steven Hunt. And Patricia Newton was there just days after her son, Travon Richie, was killed in a shooting in south St. Louis. “I am about to bury my child,” Newton said. “I see this every day with other parents, but now it’s my turn.” Those individuals accounted for just a handful of the heartache among the hundreds of people in attendance, many of whom held pictures of loved ones taken by the city’s epidemic of gun violence, which disproportionately affects the black community. T h e m e s s a ge re p ea te d throughout the day was that people need to take greater initiative to re-establish neighborly bonds and speak out against the shootings that have come to characterize daily life. “What we tolerate, we teach,” said James Clark, vice president of community outreach for Better Family Life Inc., a nonprofit organization. “We’ve been too silent for too long.” He said that African-Americans in St. Louis could point to the harmful legacies of redlining and oppression but that residents must take more responsibility to police themselves and reject violence. “We have marched for what has been done to us. Now it is time that we march for what we have done to each other,” Clark said. “We’ve got to bring peace and love back to our neighborhoods. Nobody can do that for us, but us.” The march began in front of

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

‘WE’VE GOT TO BRING PEACE AND LOVE BACK TO OUR NEIGHBORHOODS’

PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Hundreds of people walk silently to the beat of drums along Page Boulevard on Saturday in a march against gun violence called The Move. The Move calls on black residents to support one another and stop tolerating the status quo of killing each other.

the office for the Save Our Sons program, run by the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis, and went approximately a mile, to the Better Family Life facility on Page Boulevard. Various speeches were made by attendees and organizers before and after the march, which was silent.

Most of the talk Saturday focused on personal connections and responsibility, as opposed to policy. But some marchers said that controversial gun laws recently enacted in the state were making matters worse. New policies adopted in 2016, for example, make it legal for gun owners to carry

concealed firearms without first requiring special training or fees that had previously been in place. “When that gun law went in, that messed up everything,” said attendee Markese Mull, describing the ease with which any 18-year-old can buy a gun. “No rules leads to chaos. No

rules definitely means more killing in the streets.” There were 187 homicides in the city of St. Louis in 2018, down from 205 killings in 2017. Both years, an overwhelming majority were shootings. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

“I have so many friends who have lost family to gun violence. When I look into their eyes I just see an emptiness. I wanted to come support everyone,” said Angela Harris, wiping a tear from her eye as she marches.

Chynell Boyd, 7, carries a photo of her uncle Quinnell “Skeets” Boyd in her backpack as she walks in The Move on Saturday.

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FROM A1

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

ABOVE • St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, shown here April 1, received more than $150,000 from associates of SAK Construction and Goodwin Brothers during his 2018 re-election campaign.

RIGHT • Employees for SAK Construction work on a storm sewer along Chouteau Avenue in this photo from 2012. CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

After winning contract, firms open wallet MSD • FROM A1

SAK ultimately won the contract. The board member did not explain why. And the controversial vote — which garnered headlines at the time — quietly receded from public notice. Then, not a month after that vote, SAK executives did something they’d never done before: They began pouring money into Stenger’s campaign. A review of campaign disclosure records by the Post-Dispatch shows that SAK, its executives, their family members and companies associated with them have since given at least $88,000 to Stenger. Executives of a subcontractor on the bid, Goodwin Brothers Construction, gave at least $65,000 more. Together, the donations account for more than 3 percent of Stenger’s record haul of almost $4.8 million during his successful 2018 reelection campaign. His spokesman, Cordell Whitlock, said many companies donated to the county executive’s campaign and referred questions about SAK’s donations to the company. An SAK executive, reached at his home in Lake Saint Louis last week, declined to say why he and his company have donated to Stenger. “I’m not going to comment,” SAK President Jerry Shaw said Wednesday. “We didn’t do anything wrong there. We don’t have a contract with the county.” Other SAK executives also declined to comment. A statement from the company pointed to a St. Louis Circuit Court decision on a lawsuit related to the contract. The court said the MSD board has broad discretion over awarding contracts. The office of the county executive is now embroiled in a federal investigation. In an April 4 letter, Assistant U.S. Attorney Hal Goldsmith asked the county to prioritize the location and production of certain records in the county’s response to a federal subpoena. Goldsmith then listed almost two dozen companies and organizations, most of which were both county contractors and Stenger donors. There is no suggestion that sewer district contracts are part of the federal investigation. An MSD spokesman said the district had not received a subpoena nor been contacted by the U.S. attorney’s office. Construction industry leaders first raised red flags about the Deer Creek contract two years ago. They worried that the decision was political. “For any public entity that has an ongoing program — whether it’s MoDOT, MSD, the city of St. Louis, down to the smallest municipality — consistency in that process is king,” said Len Toenjes, president of the Associated General Contractors of Missouri, which does not represent SAK. “And having a fully open, transparent, consistent process, it’s good business, it’s good for the public and it’s good for our construction industry.”

‘I HAVE MY REASONS’ In 2012, a judge approved the settlement of a federal lawsuit against the sewer district, requiring $4.7 billion in work to clean up local rivers and streams and prevent backups into basements and yards. The district estimates it will spend more than $1.5 billion on 25 miles of sewer tunnels alone. The Deer Creek project was one of the biggest in recent years: construction of a 4-milelong, 19-foot-diameter tunnel stretching from Clayton to Shrewsbury. In May 2016, MSD advertised the project. By September, it had bids in hand, including one from

DEER CREEK SEWER TUNNEL CONTRACT TIMELINE Sept. 29, 2016 • MSD staff recommends that the Deer Creek Sanitary Tunnel project be awarded to the low bidder, a joint venture led by out-of-town firm Jay Dee Contractors. Oct. 28, 2016 • Competing bidder SAK Construction files formal protest. Nov. 8, 2016 • MSD staff rejects SAK protest, says Jay Dee subcontractor A.L.L. is qualified. Nov. 11, 2016 • MSD board member Jim Singer meets with SAK executives. Nov. 21, 2016 • SAK appeals the protest ruling. Nov. 29, 2016 • MSD CEO Brian Hoelscher denies SAK’s appeal. Dec. 8, 2016 • MSD board votes against Jay Dee, 5-1, despite staff’s recommendation. Dec. 9, 2016 • MSD asks Jay Dee to substitute another subcontractor for A.L.L.

Feb. 9, 2017 • Board member Michael Yates introduces Jay Dee’s new bid; board votes 3-2 to advance it. April 13, 2017 • Yates flips, votes against Jay Dee’s bid, deadlocking the board, 3-3. April 19, 2017 • Staff recommends the nextlowest bidder: SAK. May 6, 2017 • SAK gives the Stenger campaign $2,500, the first donation ever by SAK to the county executive. May 24, 2017 • An executive at a SAK subcontractor, Goodwin Brothers Construction, adds another $2,500 to the Stenger campaign. Aug. 10, 2017 • MSD trustees approve awarding the contract to SAK. Sept. 15, 2017 to Nov. 1, 2018 • SAK and subcontractor give $150,000 more to Stenger’s campaign.

CONTRACTORS’ CONTRIBUTIONS SAK Construction and subcontractor Goodwin Brothers Construction, via their executives and related companies, gave more than $156,000 to County Executive Steve Stenger’s election campaign in 2017-2018. The donations came after the Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District awarded the $150 million Deer Creek Sanitary Tunnel Project to SAK. DONOR Charles Goodwin Larry W. Goodwin or Janet E. Goodwin Rev. Trt Brian Vestal TOTAL DONOR Robert Affholder A-Y-K-E, LLC E.L. Boatman Steve Hirtz Charles Kuhnmuench Pipenology LLC SAK Construction Cindy Shaw Jerome Shaw Jr. Yes Enterprise LLC TOTAL

RELATIONSHIP president, Goodwin Brothers Construction

AMOUNT $40,014

Larry Goodwin, CEO, Goodwin Brothers Construction vice president, Goodwin Brothers Construction

RELATIONSHIP vice chairman, SAK Construction an LLC managed by SAK vice chairman Robert Affholder senior vice president of government affairs, SAK Construction vice president, SAK Construction vice president, SAK Construction affiliate of SAK Construction O'Fallon, Mo.-based pipeline and tunnel contractor wife of Jerry Shaw, president, SAK Construction president, SAK Construction an LLC registered to the wife of SAK vice president Steve Hirtz

$15,000 $12,500 $67,514 AMOUNT $4,500 $10,000 $1,000 $1,000 $6,000 $15,000 $27,500 $15,000 $6,000 $2,500 $88,500

SOURCE: Missouri Ethics Commission

Detroit-based Jay Dee for $145.3 million, and from SAK, from O’Fallon, Mo., for $147.7 million. MSD staff recommended the low bidder. SAK immediately protested, arguing to MSD staff that some of Jay Dee’s minority subcontractors weren’t qualified, and that one, local company A.L.L. Construction, couldn’t do the work it was hired to do. Months before, A.L.L. had been removed from a different MSD program for small contractors after MSD staff flagged some al-

leged performance issues. But MSD staff denied SAK’s protest and still recommended Jay Dee’s bid with A.L.L. as a subcontractor. SAK appealed the denial, and MSD CEO Brian Hoelscher rejected the appeal, too, which sent the contract to the MSD board for final action. In the meantime, SAK had been contacting board members. At least one trustee, attorney Annette Mandel, refused to meet. “John, I would be happy to meet with you and or your brother, but in light of the protest of award filed by SAK, (I) feel it would be more appropriate once that issue has been resolved,” Mandel wrote to John Kalishman, brother of SAK CEO Tom Kalishman. Mandel declined to comment for this story. At least one board member did meet with SAK executives, days after MSD staff denied SAK’s formal protest and before the board voted to award the contract. Trustee James Singer, a Stenger appointee to the MSD board, met with Tom Kalishman, SAK President Jerry Shaw and

Jack Boatman, SAK’s senior vice president of government affairs, according to notes Singer took of the Nov. 11 meeting. The executives spent most of that meeting listing what they saw as A.L.L.’s lack of qualifications and job-site problems, the notes said. By December, despite staff’s recommendation, five MSD board members voted against the Jay Dee contract. It was a rare move by trustees. “In the five years preceding December 2016, MSD’s Board of Trustees ratified every single notice of award given by MSD staff for projects in excess of $10,000,000.00 — with the lone exception of Jay Dee,” according to a lawsuit A.L.L. filed against SAK late last year. Staff told Jay Dee to remove A.L.L. from its bid and submit a substitute. SAK objected again, arguing changing a subcontractor amounted to changing a bid. MSD staff again recommended approving the Jay Dee contract, this time without A.L.L. In February 2017, the board voted 3-2, with one member absent, to send the contract to a final vote. County trustee and union official Michael Yates introduced the measure and voted for the Jay Dee contract. Two months later, on April 13, the board considered it for a final vote. And, at that meeting, Yates voted against Jay Dee. “I have my reasons, and that’s all I’m saying,” he told the PostDispatch after the meeting. This month, Yates again declined to explain why he changed his vote. But in a sworn statement taken as part of a lawsuit Jay Dee filed against MSD in May 2017, Yates said he introduced the contract because “I believed

that it was appropriate to learn more about (Jay Dee).” Jay Dee’s inclusion of A.L.L. in its bid, however, “left me with some doubt.” “I did not believe they were as able to easily line up minority contractors and workers as they had suggested,” Yates said in the sworn statement. He said he decided shortly after the February meeting to oppose the contract in April. That summer, Gary Elliott, former business manager of the Eastern Missouri Laborers District Council, urged MSD to give the contract to SAK, telling trustees that the laborers had a strong working relationship with SAK and that it was “the most qualified contractor” for the Deer Creek tunnel. By July 2017, MSD staff decided that rather than rebidding the whole project, it would select the next-lowest bidder: SAK. A few months after that April vote, the county executive recommended Yates for another high-profile board — MetroLink operator Bi-State Development Agency. The recommendation went to Gov. Eric Greitens in August 2017; Greitens resigned nine months later without having made any appointments to the Bi-State board.

‘NOT THE KIND OF GUY’ Yates, who was appointed to the MSD board by then-County Executive Charlie Dooley, said no one in Stenger’s administration contacted him about his vote. “No. That’s been so long ago,” Yates said this month. “I had my own reasons for voting no.” He refused to elaborate. But MSD board chairman and city appointee Jim Faul said he attended a Clayton meeting

with Yates and Stenger aide Tom Malecek during deliberations on the Deer Creek tunnel. Malecek asked why the county executive’s office was getting calls about the contract. Faul, who voted for Jay Dee, said he felt no political pressure to change his vote in favor of SAK — nor did he witness any pressure being put on Yates. “Michael is not the kind of guy who is going to do what he doesn’t want to do,” Faul said. He said he could not recall the exact date of the meeting. Singer, who voted for SAK throughout the process, also said no one in Stenger’s camp asked him to. But, in an interview with a Post-Dispatch reporter, Singer refused multiple times to say whether Stenger officials had contacted him about the contract, referring the PostDispatch to MSD spokesman Sean Hadley. Hadley said Singer told him he had no meeting with Stenger or his aides about the contract — but did meet in March 2017, just before the board rejected Jay Dee, to talk about his reappointment. Whitlock, Stenger’s spokesman, said Malecek didn’t recall the meeting with Yates and Faul but that he was “often in contact with MSD on issues pertinent to the county.” Whitlock said Stenger’s office did not ask Yates to change his vote.

CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS While both SAK and its subcontractor, Goodwin Brothers, had given tens of thousands of dollars to support campaigns for MSD bond issues, neither had been prolific donors to politicians. SAK gave $5,000 to Dooley, the former county executive, in 2013. Goodwin is based in south St. Louis County and its CEO, Larry Goodwin, was an early supporter of Stenger’s first run for county executive. A trust in his name gave $1,000 in 2013 and $1,000 in 2014 to Stenger’s campaign. In 2016, the company and Larry Goodwin gave another $2,000 to Stenger. But after the critical vote, in April 2017, when the MSD board rejected Jay Dee’s bid, the checkbooks opened — and Stenger was the biggest beneficiary. On May 6, 2017, SAK gave the Stenger campaign $2,500, the first donation by SAK to the county executive, according to a Post-Dispatch review of Missouri Ethics Commission data. Around the same time, an executive at Goodwin Brothers gave $2,500 as well. In September 2017, just after the August vote in which the MSD board officially awarded SAK the Deer Creek tunnel contract, Goodwin executives and Larry Goodwin’s trust gave $27,500 to Stenger. Including subsequent donations through 2018, campaign contributions from Goodwin executives totaled more than $65,000. Goodwin Brothers did not respond to a request for comment. During the same time period, May 2017 through 2019, business entities tied to SAK and its executives gave more than $88,000 to the county executive’s campaign, including $15,000 from the company, $15,000 from an affiliated limited liability company, and $15,000 from Shaw’s wife, Cindy. Jerry Shaw, SAK’s president, said he didn’t know his wife had donated. Cindy Shaw could not be reached for comment. David Hunn • 314-340-8121 @davidhunn on Twitter dhunn@post-dispatch.com Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

04.14.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A5

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

What Truman, who stepped onto the world stage 74 years ago, teaches us months before Truman, then vice president, was sworn in as president on the April 12 day that Franklin Delano Roosevelt died at his Warm Springs, Ga., retreat. As historian David McCullough retold it, “what disturbed many people was that Truman appeared to be having a good time at the piano, which he was.” “Bess was furious,” McCullough continued. “She told him he should play the piano in public no more.” It was a troubling time for the country, so one can in retrospect understand why a politician having a good time with a movie star would have riled some. Gold Star Mothers were dreading the thought of that telegram or visit from

CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • There’s

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the clergy. The U.S. was in its fourth year of world war; the final push to destroy German Nazism was costing American and allied lives at a terrible rate; and the Japanese were fighting to the last man in the Pacific. Few, even Vice President Truman, knew the U.S. was close to coming up with an atomic bomb that would end the war. April 12 could be a Show-Me state holiday. It’s the day that its haberdasher-turned-senator, whose life was an often interrupted and often challenging path to power and fame, became president. He did not ascend as much as step up in the most treacherous moment in the country’s history since the death of Abraham Lincoln 80 years prior. In retrospect, Truman’s Middle American sensibilities, his measured fire, his plain-spokenness became just what the country needed as it transitioned from the bittersweet victories in Europe and the Pacific to the get-backto-work postwar days of the GI Bill and building the world’s most robust middle class. He was the accidental antidote. His generation survived the Depression, won a world war, and created the economic robustness in the 1940s and 1950s that afforded their children the basis to confront civil rights and other inequities in a struggle that continues today. Politicians arise in moments for reasons often unseen even by themselves. Truman and FDR had a distant relationship at best. The two men had little in common, culturally. FDR was the erudite man of wealth and tradition, his “fireside chats” a comforting reassurance from a man of means and place. Truman was the essence of hardscrabble, precinct Missouri politician; one citizen telling all the other citizens it would all be all right in the end. Although they are two of just 45 men to occupy the highest office in the land, Truman and Donald Trump would at first blush appear to have little in common except the first four letters of their last names. Trump is in constant communication with the public, although he sometimes calls it “my base,” a not-so-subtle reminder

he’s not trying to win everybody over. Trump pushes himself constantly into the body politic’s Twitter stream of consciousness. And so his Republican allies on Capitol Hill have largely been cowed by his ability to raise a ruckus, his turn-on-adime policy pronouncements, and most of all, his ability to draw crowds in places where Republicans need to pile up the votes to win elections. Trump’s Democratic opponents have been pushed into reactive corners ever since he announced his long-shot presidential run, one that was mocked and literally laughed at by politicians and some members of the media. Trump’s is the Ubiquitous Presidency, the lead player in the relentless, 24-7 fighting that goes on in the social media universe that this American experiment is still adjusting to. Truman was less known to the public and, like politicians of his age, more of a parser than a pronouncer. It’s hard to see Harry S. Truman tweeting about cultural topics or anything like Trump does on a seemingly hourly basis. That Midwestern modesty trait was deeply ingrained. But like Trump, Truman eventually saw Congress — and the Republicans who controlled it — as the chief impediment to his good intentions. It became Truman’s central re-election message in 1948. The “give ’em hell Harry” line that was shouted out of a campaign crowd in Bremerton, Wash. (yes, presidential candidates did at one time campaign on the West Coast), teed Truman up perfectly for the anti-Congress plank of his ’48 campaign. “I don’t give them hell,” Truman famously responded. “I just tell the truth about them, and they think it’s hell.” If, indeed, politicians become creations of the moment, what do we learn from these two men? That changes can come quickly and out of the blue; that the country often finds comfort in the opposite traits of those disliked in the current officeholder; and that in the end, it’s tried-and-true to say it’s all Congress’ fault. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

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FROM A1

04.14.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

Lower courts may find so-called ‘heartbeat laws’ unconstitutional ABORTION • FROM A1

abortions after a fetal heartbeat can be detected, usually about six to eight weeks into pregnancy. Heartbeat bills were signed into law in Ohio and Mississippi. In its Roe decision in 1973, the Supreme Court said states may not restrict abortion before the fetus is viable, usually about 23 or 24 weeks of pregnancy, so lower courts are expected to declare “heartbeat laws” unconstitutional. The strategy has been decried as reckless by some who fear that the attempts could backfire. In Tennessee, Catholic bishops last month opposed a heartbeat measure, warning that the state could have to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in attorney fees if Planned Parenthood sued and won. The bill, also opposed by anti-abortion group Tennessee Right to Life, is awaiting action in the state Senate. Bishops in states such as Florida and Georgia, on the other hand, support their states’ heartbeat measures. “Impatience and optimism have changed the rules of the game since Trump was elected,” said Mary Ziegler, a professor at Florida State College of Law who has written on abortion. “Republicans want something that will survive in the courts and show their purity on the issue.”

Clarke Forsythe, senior counsel for Americans United for Life, a Washington-based nonprofit that writes model legislation for state lawmakers opposing abortion, called the heartbeat bills well-intended but misguided. “The chance of enforcement for any of these laws is not very good,” he said. “The obstacles are substantial.” Shortly after a similar bill was signed into law in Kentucky this month, a federal judge temporarily blocked the measure from taking effect. A federal judge also struck down an Iowa heartbeat bill in January after it was passed last year. In a surprise move earlier this year, Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. joined with the Supreme Court’s liberals to block a Louisiana law that would have restricted abortion access. In 2016, the justices struck down Texas abortion clinic restrictions, and in 2007, the court upheld the federal ban on partial-birth abortion; after the decision, more states began to pass abortion regulations. Forsythe believes there’s no sign that the court is looking to hear cases on early-trimester abortions. In 2016, the Supreme Court declined to hear cases where lower courts blocked firsttrimester prohibitions from Arkansas and North Dakota.

Forsythe’s group recommends pursuing laws that reduce government support for abortion providers and create pregnancy discrimination protections. “You can do that with legislation that can be passed, approved and enforced in the immediate future,” he said. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops backed in 2011 a U.S. congressional proposal that would require abortion practitioners to make the fetal heartbeat audible and visible to pregnant women seeking an abortion. The proposal never passed the House. Now, the conference of bishops’ spokesman Judy Keane said, it defers to bishops in each state to decide their own strategies, which have varied across the country. Catholic bishops in Ohio, who declined to support a heartbeat measure in 2011 that was blocked in the state Senate, came out in favor of a new heartbeat bill that passed the Ohio legislature and was signed Thursday by the governor. Janet Porter, president of Faith2Action, which describes itself as a network of pro-family groups, is credited with crafting Ohio’s legislation in 2011 that has become so popular across the nation this year. She was previously legislative director for Ohio’s Right to Life chapter, one of the

most prominent anti-abortion groups in the nation, but she said the incremental strategy they were pursuing wasn’t working. She said her new effort was religiously motivated. “God gave me the idea, and I’ve been pursuing it ever since,” she said. Elizabeth Nash, senior state issue manager at Guttmacher Institute, a nonprofit research group that supports abortion rights, said most abortion opponents had traditionally focused on incremental strategies, such as making it harder to access abortion through waiting periods and counseling requirements or making it harder for the abortion clinics to stay open. Abortion opponents have been very successful in recent years at passing legislation at the state level restricting abortion. With the shift in the Supreme Court, she said, abortion opponents see a real opportunity to ban abortion. “We know the court has shifted to the conservative side,” she said. “The anticipation is that the court will be accepting some kind of abortion case. We don’t know what that case will necessarily be.” Observers say there are four justices who could cast votes to limit constitutional protections in favor of abortion and four who

would vote to uphold such protections, with Roberts serving as a potential swing vote. However, if someone left the bench because of death or another circumstance, Trump would be expected to nominate an antiabortion justice. James Bopp Jr., a lawyer based in Indiana who is general counsel to National Right to Life but did not speak for the organization, considers the heartbeat bills counterproductive. The Supreme Court, he said, is likely to consider cases that could eventually limit or overturn Roe v. Wade, but it won’t happen overnight. “Legislators will use it to say, ‘See how pro-life I am,’” he said. “It’s a completely futile effort that accomplishes nothing.” According to a 2018 Gallup poll, 6 in 10 Americans say abortion “should generally be legal” during the first three months of pregnancy. Support for abortion drops off during the second three months (28 percent) and during the last three months (13 percent). Support for abortion varies depending on the circumstances, such as whether the life of the mother is endangered. Of those polled, 45 percent say abortion should be legal for “any reason” in the first trimester compared with 20 percent who said this about the third trimester.

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Mother’s lawyer sues to get jail records Woman’s son died in custody of leukemia; she wants access to information on policies BY JEREMY KOHLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • The lawyer for a

woman whose son died of leukemia on March 1 in the St. Louis County Justice Center has filed a lawsuit accusing the jail director of violating the state’s open public records law by refusing to turn over public records concerning jail operations. And a lawyer for St. Louis County on Friday notified the County Council that the director, Julia Childrey, will not appear at the council’s public hearing scheduled for 4 p.m. on Tuesday to investigate the jail’s policies and procedures in the wake of three inmates’ deaths this year. It was not clear late Friday how the council would proceed with its inquiry, as Childrey had been slated to be the council’s main witness. Council members had been planning to exclude the public from part of the hearing to discuss sensitive issues with Childrey, although it was not clear how that might work if a large crowd appeared for a proceeding that had been billed as transparent and accountable. In the lawsuit, attorney Mark Pedroli, of Clayton, asked the court for declaratory and injunctive relief and to find that Childrey must pay civil damages and legal fees for knowingly and purposefully violating the

law. The Sunshine Law provides that “all public records of public governmental bodies … be open to the public for inspection and copying” unless they can remain closed under a specific exemption in the law. Pedroli represents Tashonda Troupe, the mother of Lamar Catchings, 20, who was the third person to die in the county jail this year, a sequence that has resulted in internal and external investigations — and the council’s inquiry. A report by the St. Louis County Medical Examiner, released on Thursday, found that Catchings died of acute leukemia. Catchings had been held in the jail for 11 months on charges of assault and armed criminal action. Catchings died before he was diagnosed with the illness. The report said the type of leukemia was probably acute promyelocytic leukemia, or APL. Because of advances in diagnosis and treatment of this disease, this form of leukemia is considered the most curable form of adult leukemia, according to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Cure rates of 90 percent have been reported from centers specializing in APL treatment. An inmate in an adjacent cell told a reporter in a jailhouse interview that Catchings had been extremely fatigued and sick for about two weeks before his

death. And courtroom video obtained by the newspaper through an open record request showed Catchings was taken to a Feb. 22 court date in a wheelchair and held his face in his hands or slumped over for much of his two hours in the courtroom. Dr. Steven Gore, an oncologist at Yale University, said in an interview on Friday that it was “unconscionable” that someone would die from APL, which he said is cured 97 percent of the time. “It should never happen.” “I’ve been asked to review medical malpractice cases usually by hospitals where a diagnosis of APL was delayed and the patient ended up dying, and when I’ve done so, I’ve always told the hospital they need to settle,” he said. “Of course, I have no access to the underlying interaction with the prison medical staff outside of what’s in your story,” he said. “I guess that’s the question: Was he sick and not telling anybody, or was he sick in a way that further investigations should have been warranted?” In all three recent deaths at the jail, there have been indications that jail staffers failed to act on serious health problems. An inmate told Clayton police that about an hour before Larry “Jay” Reavis was discovered facedown on his cell floor on Jan. 18, a guard shrugged off a report that Rea-

Man who fled police is charged in fatal crash

vis was having a seizure, saying, “I don’t know about that.” The medical examiner ruled Reavis died from alcohol abuse. As disclosed by the Post-Dispatch, the jail’s internal investigation into the death of John M. Shy, 29, on Feb. 23 was focusing on whether jail staffers disabled inmates’ call buttons in the infirmary while Shy, of the Oakville area, writhed in pain for hours, crying and screaming for help, according to a source familiar with the investigations. And investigators have asked why a nurse who peered into Shy’s cell and saw blood pooled and smeared around him told Shy to clean his cell and take a shower rather than helping him. The source said the jail’s internal investigation also had sought to explain why a jail nurse did not refer Catchings to the infirmary after noting that he had been staggering in a confused state and refusing to eat. After the medical examiner’s finding of leukemia, Troupe said Thursday that she felt the county had been criminally negligent for her son’s death. Pedroli sent a 24-point request on April 4 seeking an array of records from the jail. While some of the items involved information about patients or employees, many of the items were the types of records that government make freely available. For example, he

asked for the past three years of bids, contracts and invoices between the county and any medical provider, and any records showing the jail’s inmate population over the past year. Childrey responded that all the records were closed because they were confidential records about personnel or the jail’s security systems and structural plans, or because they were protected from disclosure by other laws she did not specify. Pedroli’s suit said Childrey’s department had documents that were “clearly not capable of being closed under the Sunshine Law.”

DIRECTOR WON’T APPEAR In an email to council members, assistant county counselor Maggie Hart-Mahon wrote that because of claims that have been made against the county in the deaths, including allegations of criminal conduct, public statements from Childrey may be “unreasonably prejudicial.” However, she wrote that Childrey would provide the council with all justice services policies, regulations, protocols and procedures related to the care and treatment of detainees with physical or mental health problems. Jeremy Kohler • 314-340-8337 @jeremykohler on Twitter jkohler@post-dispatch.com

Man shot by city officer was from St. Charles

After suspect sped off at more than 90 mph, officers ended the attempt to stop him due to safety concerns, documents say

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis police investigators work at the scene of an officerinvolved shooting in the 3400 block of Virginia Avenue on Thursday. Demetrious Brooks, 34, later died at a hospital.

Thursday night’s fatal shooting is the fourth involving police this year LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Emergency personnel work the scene of a fatal car crash on April 4 at Page Avenue and North Warson Road near Overland. Killed in the crash was Brett Korves, 30, of St. Jacob. He had worked as an on-call firefighter.

BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CLAYTON • A man who police now say had fled a traffic stop in St. Louis County just before a crash that killed an off-duty firefighter last week has been charged with second-degree murder. Nicholas Washington, 21, of St. Louis County, was charged Friday with second-degree murder. He was jailed with bail set at $500,000. Killed in the April 4 crash was Brett Korves, 30, of St. Jacob. He had worked as an on-call firefighter for the Swansea Fire Department, where he was a 10year veteran. The charge against Washington came hours after police for the first time said that a St. Louis County officer had tried to stop the Chevrolet Camaro Washington was driving. They provided information on the crash last week, but gave no indication of police involvement until Friday, after the Post-Dispatch began asking about a tip that an officer had tried to stop the car. St. Louis County police Sgt. Benjamin Granda said he did not know where the officer tried to stop the Camaro or whether the officer reported the attempted stop to supervisors, citing the ongoing investigation into what happened. The department said Korves was trying to make a left turn in his Chevrolet Cruze about 5:50 a.m. April 4 at Page Avenue and North Warson Road when it was struck by the Camaro, which was heading east on Page

at more than 100 mph. An officer had earlier tried to conduct a “lawful stop” after seeing Washington commit a “series of moving violations,” Detective Joseph Percich wrote in court documents. After Washington increased his speed to more than 90 mph, police ended the attempt to stop him due to safety concerns, according to the documents. After police “disengaged the attempt to stop,” Washington continued to drive at excessive rates of speed, drove erratically, and created a substantial risk of serious injury or death, the documents say. Multiple witnesses, supported by surveillance footage, said that the officer turned off his lights after the Camaro sped away from him, said Tim Swope, director of operations for St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Wesley Bell. Washington lives in the 10400 block of Forest Brook Lane, off North Lindbergh Boulevard, less than a mile from the crash scene. Korves was married and had an 18-month-old son. He was a paid, on-call firefighter for Swansea who, like the other firefighters in that capacity, had a full-time job elsewhere. Korves worked as a delivery driver for a company in north St. Louis County. He was on his way to work when he was fatally injured in the crash. His funeral was Wednesday. A GoFundMe page was set up to help his family and provide for his son’s care and education. A family spokesman said

they had been informed by St. Louis County police Friday of the attempted traffic stop that preceded the crash, but did not want to comment. Granda would not say when the department learned that one of its officers had tried to stop the car. “In any death investigation, all the facts and circumstances are not divulged,” Granda said. “These things take time. I understand everyone wants all of the answers right off the bat; that’s fair, but there are things we have to investigate and scrutinize so we have fair and impartial knowledge of what occurred.” Last year, two men died in a crash while fleeing St. Louis County police. In that case, the department also initially did not say their officers were involved. Granda said the two crashes are not comparable. A few days after the Aug. 10 crash, St. Louis County police said the men had fled from officers who turned their lights on to stop the vehicle. But police denied that there had been a pursuit. About a week later, the department launched an internal investigation after activists located surveillance footage that showed the officers chasing the car shortly before it crashed. The two St. Louis County police officers involved were fired in November for misleading investigators about the crash. Christine Byers • 314-340-8087 @christinedbyers on Twitter cbyers@post-dispatch.com

BY RACHEL RICE AND KIM BELL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • Authorities on Friday identified a man they say was killed by a St. Louis police officer as they struggled over a gun Thursday night. The dead man was identified as Demetrious Brooks, 34, of St. Charles. A police officer shot Brooks in the 3400 block of Virginia Avenue about 7:45 p.m. Thursday. He died at a hospital. No officers were injured. Speaking with reporters Thursday night, Hayden said two officers in a patrol car had stopped a vehicle with two men inside around Grand Boulevard and Gravois Avenue. Hayden said the officers thought the car was suspicious — after seeing the officers’ patrol car, the vehicle “immediately left one business parking lot and entered another nearby,” police say. The officers ran a computer check of the vehicle’s license plate and found that it wasn’t registered. Before they could stop the car, the passenger — Brooks — got out and ran. The driver drove away and had not been found. An officer ran after Brooks, chasing him to the rear of the 3400 block of Virginia, south of Cherokee Street. Both Brooks and the officer jumped over a fence into a backyard, and Brooks pulled a gun, Hayden said. The two struggled over the gun and the officer told Brooks to drop the weapon, but he refused, Hayden said. When Brooks didn’t comply, the officer shot him in the torso, Hayden said. The officer fired two shots. The other officer, who had been driving the patrol car, witnessed parts of the confrontation. He did not fire his weapon, police say.

A witness said he saw the injured man holding his abdomen as he was loaded into an ambulance. Brooks died at a hospital. He lived in the 100 block of Honey Locust Lane in St. Charles, police said. Hayden said police recovered a loaded Ruger .380-caliber gun that Brooks had. The gun had been reported stolen in Clayton in December, police say. The officer who shot Brooks is a 33-year-old male officer with about two years at the St. Louis Police Department. The officer with him is a 41-yearold male officer who has been with the department for about three years. The shooting was in Benton Park West, but the car was stopped at Grand and Gravois near the borders of the Tower Grove South, Tower Grove East and Gravois Park neighborhoods. Hayden said the officers initially went there because their commanders had told them to pay particular attention to an area he said was known for drug sales and robberies. Several businesses around Grand and Gravois have been robbed, Hayden added. This is the fourth deadly shooting this year involving police in St. Louis. The other shootings were: • On Jan. 15, a carjacking suspect was killed in a shootout with police in the parking lot of the Schnucks store on Union Boulevard and Natural Bridge Avenue, police say. • On Jan. 24, a St. Louis police officer was fatally shot by another officer while they allegedly were playing with a gun at a home in the 700 block of Dover Place in the Carondelet neighborhood, police say. • On March 25, a St. Louis police officer fatally shot a man who ran from an apartment with pistols and pointed them in the direction of an officer, in the 300 block of Walsh Street, police say. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NATION

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Migrant solution evades Trump, Democrats Issue is a policy conundrum that whoever is president in 2021 will have to deal with BY DAN BALZ Washington Post

ANALYSIS

President Donald Trump’s immigration policies have been a failure. His goal of sealing the border has come to naught, and a mass of asylum seekers has overwhelmed the system. Trump has sought to blame others, including the Democrats, for the problem. Democrats cry foul, but they too struggle for an effective answer. From the day Trump announced for president, immigration has been his political go-to issue. It is the most-used weapon in the president’s rhetorical arsenal and likely to be in the forefront of the 2020 campaign. Whenever he needs to rally his supporters, whenever he needs a diversion from other problems, he has turned back to immigration. His record speaks for itself. The man who calls himself a master dealmaker has never found a way to broker an agreement with Democrats to give him money for a border wall that, in 2016, he promised to build with funding from Mexico. Having lost the most recent appropriations battle with House Democrats after a 35-day government shutdown, he declared a national emergency as a way to unlock funds elsewhere. Last year, Trump and his Department of Homeland Security were responsible for one of the biggest policy debacles of his presidency, the decision to separate children from their parents at the border. The ensuing backlash, which cut across party lines, eventually forced a reversal. The government is still trying to sort out what it wrought. More recently, faced with

more lenient treatment than the current law prescribes. In practical terms it would be a return to the de facto policy that existed a couple of decades ago, but it could also play into Trump’s hands, vulnerable to criticism that it would result in a more porous border. Democrats in Congress and on the presidential campaign trail have been more reactive than proactive on immigration. They have few answers for what to do about the current humanitarian problem at the border, where a lack of resources — human and otherwise — has compounded the effect of the surge of asylum seekers. Other than Castro, Democrats have been better at saying what they would not do than what they would — or saying nothing at all. Immigration will continue to animate Trump’s core supporters and is likely to be one of two pillars of his re-election campaign. The other is the economy, the issue he will look to as a bridge to other voters whose support he will need to win what looks to be an extremely competitive election. Here too the Democrats appear to be struggling to find their own voice on what should be a central part of a presidential campaign message. The president has begun to set the themes for his re-election campaign. Democrats have vowed not to make the mistakes of 2016, of focusing too much on Trump’s fitness to be president. But they can’t ignore legitimate questions about how they would govern — or how they will credibly respond to the president’s attacks on his issues of choice.

LAS CRUCES SUN NEWS VIA AP

Migrants line up for something to drink Friday after being dropped off by the Border Patrol at the Gospel Rescue Mission in Las Cruces, N.M. The migrants were being temporarily housed at a homeless shelter, a city recreation center and a campus of social service agencies.

a border that has been overwhelmed with asylum seekers from Central America, he threatened to shut it all down. When businesses and his fellow Republicans protested that this would have damaging economic effects, he backed off. This past week, he ran a buzz saw through the upper ranks of Homeland Security, decimating the leadership there, including the ouster of Kirstjen Nielsen, the Homeland Security secretary he had appointed. Now he talks of busing detainees into sanctuary cities in retribution for Democratic opposition to his policies. For the president, immigration is a proxy for many issues — national security, domestic security, cultural change, nationalism, even nostalgia. The president’s rhetoric inflames the left as much as it energizes his loyalists, which is exactly his purpose. Democrats oppose

Trump’s policies and cry foul when he seeks to blame them. They also point out that Trump tried to use immigration during the closing weeks of last year’s midterm elections, only to see his party lose its majority in the House. Yet, for all the way he has manipulated the issue, immigration is also a policy conundrum, one that whoever is president in 2021 will have to deal with. As a political matter, both sides seem willing to have the fight. Meanwhile, Democrats are also struggling to articulate policies that would both solve the immediate problems at the border and insulate themselves from Trump’s charge that they are soft on illegal immigration. One Democratic presidential candidate has taken up the challenge. Last week, Julián Castro, the former mayor of San Antonio and former housing secre-

Trump’s ‘sanctuary city’ idea could help some immigrants

tary, released a comprehensive immigration plan. At a CNN Town Hall meeting, he said his approach represented “a completely different vision” than the president’s, one built on compassion rather than criminality. Castro’s plan includes some policies long favored by Democrats and in the past by some Republicans as well. He advocates a path to citizenship for the millions of undocumented immigrants who already reside in the country and also for the Dreamers (the young people brought in as undocumented immigrants by their parents) and those with temporary protected status. That would require bipartisan support in Congress, which does not seem realistic at the moment. Another proposal calls for a change in the law that would make illegal entry into the United States a civil rather than a criminal penalty, allowing for

As census approaches, many Arab Americans feel left out Choices of ethnicity don’t fit, they note

Meant as revenge on Democrats, plan may give migrants roots BY JOSEPH GEDEON Associated Press

BY ASTRID GALVAN Associated Press

PHOENIX • An idea floated

by President Donald Trump to send immigrants from the border to “sanctuary cities” to exact revenge on Democratic foes could end up doing the migrants a favor by placing them in locations that make it easier to put down roots and stay in the country. The plan would put thousands of immigrants in cities that are not only welcoming to them, but also more likely to rebuff federal officials carrying out deportation orders. Many of these locations have more resources to help immigrants make their legal cases to stay in the United States than smaller cities, with some of the nation’s biggest immigration advocacy groups based in places such as San Francisco, New York City and Chicago. The downside for the immigrants would be a high cost of living in the cities. The Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse at Syracuse University announced this week that an analysis found that the likelihood of an immigrant’s being arrested in public in sanctuary cities such as New York and Los Angeles is 20 percent less than in places without such policies. “With immigrants being less likely to commit crimes than the U.S.-born population, and with sanctuary jurisdictions being safer and more productive than nonsanctuary jurisdictions, the data damns this proposal as a politically motivated stunt that seeks to play politics with people’s lives,” said George Gascon, district attorney for San Francisco. Trump has grown increasingly frustrated over the situation at the border, where tens of thousands of immigrant families are crossing each month, many to claim asylum. His administration has made several efforts to stop the flow, and he recently shook up the top ranks of the Department of Homeland Security. The idea to ship immigrants to Democratic strongholds was considered twice in recent months, but the White House and Department of Homeland Security said the plan had been rejected. But Trump said Friday he was still considering the idea. “Due to the fact that Democrats are unwilling to change

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump participates in a discussion on immigration and border security in Calexico, Calif., this month.

our very dangerous immigration laws, we are indeed, as reported, giving strong considerations to placing Illegal Immigrants in Sanctuary Cities only,” Trump tweeted. He added that, “The Radical Left always seems to have an Open Borders, Open Arms policy — so this should make them very happy!” Wilson Romero is an immigrant from Honduras who chose to settle in the San Francisco Bay Area. Romero, 27, was separated from his daughter, now 7, by federal authorities at the U.S. border at El Paso, Texas, last year and jailed for three months before being released and making his way to live with his mother in San Jose, Calif. There he was reunited with his daughter, who attends public kindergarten. Romero says he goes about daily errands in public without worry of discrimination. His daughter has made friends and has playdates with the children of Mexican-American families. It’s a far cry from his hometown in the violence-plagued outskirts of San Pedro Sula, Honduras, that he fled after his brother-in-law was killed. To him, the biggest problem with being in the Bay Area is the high cost of living. Romero, a former textile factory worker, relies on his mother’s income from waitressing for food and clothing, and he’s started thinking about asking legal permission to move to North Carolina, where an uncle lives and says it’s cheaper to live and work. “To tell the truth, it’s a little tight now, financially speaking,” Romero said. He knows of no charities that may be willing to help.

The plan discussed by Trump would also have financial, logistical and legal issues. The transportation of immigrants who are arrested at the border to large and faraway cities would be burdensome and costly at a time when Immigration and Customs Enforcement is already stretched thin, having released more than 125,000 immigrants into the country pending their immigration court since Dec. 21. They are currently being released mainly in border states. Flights chartered by ICE cost about $7,785 per flight hour, according to the agency, and require multiple staffers, including an in-flight medical professional. The agency also uses commercial flights. Doing longer transports would increase liability for the agency, especially considering that many of the immigrants in its care are families with young children. And despite the consideration given to releasing the immigrants on the streets to sanctuary cities, the Trump administration actually has plenty of jail space to detain families. As of April 11, the nation’s three facilities to detain immigrant families were nowhere near capacity, including a Pennsylvania facility housing only nine immigrants. The Trump administration has long pushed back against cities with sanctuary policies, which generally prohibit local authorities from cooperating with federal immigration police, often by refusing to hold people arrested on local charges past their release date at the request of immigration officers. More than 100 local governments around the country have adopted a variety of these policies.

PHOENIX • Yousuf Abdelfatah already knows that the answer he’ll give about his race on the 2020 census questionnaire will be wrong. He’s an Arab American, but the only race options on the census are white, black, Asian and categories for American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander. Reluctantly, Abdelfatah will mark white. “If you look at me, my skin is darker, I’m visibly not white,” said Abdelfatah, 22, a research assistant. “I’ve lived my life as a person of color, but I’m categorized as white.” With the census going to printing presses later this year, Arab Americans are again feeling left out of a process that helps draw the nation’s political map and provide an accurate population count, which in turn can determine how much federal funding minority groups get for government programs and medical research. Organizations have long been pushing for a separate Middle Eastern or North African category but realize it’s probably too late for 2020 with questionnaires ready to be printed. “The census is in our Constitution, and it’s meant to count everyone,” said Maya Berry, the executive director of the Arab American Institution. According to census estimates, the Arab American population is measured at just over 2 million people. The Arab American Institute, however, says that number is closer to 3.6 million. Underreporting from the census has come amid a rapid growth of that population, which advocates say has increased by more than 72 percent between 2000 and 2010. Population data is a key factor in political redistricting, researching human rights, monitoring government programs and antidiscrimination laws, meaning Arab Americans are subject to a lack of representation and health and social services. “Right now we have that ‘white’ designation on paper, but we don’t benefit from it,” activist and organizer Naia Al-Anbar, 24, said. “The truth is we aren’t ever going to be white in their eyes and we will still be discriminated against.” Al-Anbar, who supports the idea of a new category, has a Saudi Arabian father and will mark “other” on the census if a

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Naia Al-Anbar, of Los Angeles, supports the idea of a new ethnicity category on the census.

more precise category isn’t offered. The Arab American Institute considers 22 countries to consist of Arabs, spanning Africa and Asia, meaning Arab Americans can fall into several categories provided in the survey. This creates an odd dilemma. Does someone from Egypt, for example, check the African American box because their home country is in Africa? Would someone from Iraq be expected to mark that they are Asian? “As an Egyptian, I considered marking ‘African American,’ but I’m not black,” Nashville resident Dina El-Rifai, 24, said. “However, marking ‘white’ doesn’t reflect who I am.” In another complicating factor, President Donald Trump’s administration wants to ask people on the census whether they are American citizens — an issue that is supposed to be resolved by the U.S. Supreme Court. Some fear it would stifle participation among immigrant groups, especially in the aftermath of the administration’s travel ban from Muslim countries. The Arab American Institute and other groups have worked for decades on getting an Arab category introduced in the census but have always been met with opposition. That was until 2009, when the Census Bureau concluded that it would introduce a Middle Eastern and North African category for the next cycle after years of trials and tests. But the momentum came to a halt after Trump was voted in. “After all that work, and all the millions spent, the Trump administration came in for what we believe are political reasons to put an end to it,” said Samer Khalaf, president of the American-Arab Anti-Defamation Committee. “Their reasoning was that additional testing would be required.”


NEWS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

Special needs children were getting validation through comments — then YouTube turned their comments off BY GENE PARK Washington Post

When you first meet 14-year-old Ruby, she just wants you to say “Hi.” It’s a standard answer from someone in a remarkable situation, as she’s one of about a dozen humans with an extremely rare genetic condition called Stromme syndrome. We learn this thanks to the gentle nudging of special education teacher Chris Ulmer, who runs Special Books by Special Kids, a disability advocacy nonprofit organization and YouTube channel with more than 1.4 million subscribers. And what do those million subscribers think of Ruby? They used to say encouraging, affirmative things to her, like how she’s wonderful or beautiful. But channels which focus on children with disabilities are bystanders in YouTube’s almost-blanket ban of comments under videos with minors. Social media companies are criticized every day for not doing enough. But when a YouTuber exposed pedophilic comments being made under wholesome videos of young children, Google deleted hundreds of channels and disabled the comments on “tens of millions of videos that include minors.” YouTube executives acknowledge that this nearterm decision was going “above and beyond.” It’s counter to the service’s second lesson in the YouTube Creators Academy syllabus, which asks creators to “connect with your community” through comments. “We’re giving people the platform to share their story and communicate whatever they want to communicate,” Ulmer said. “They share their story, and they see it’s met with warmth and love in the comments. They feel that confidence they lost a long time ago. With the comments gone, it takes away half our mission. It takes away that community.” Understanding that they’re dealing with a sensitive issue, Ulmer, his partner Alyssa Porter and another volunteer used to moderate the channel’s thousands of comments at least five hours a day. Ulmer and Porter say that although they’ve had their fair share of rude or discriminatory comments, they’re always deleted, and that they’ve never seen anything resembling sexual abuse. “I told YouTube, ‘If you show me that and you prove to me that’s a reality, I will accept this fate,’” Ulmer said, referring to the abusive comments. “They told us they don’t have access to that, only the higher-ups do. I don’t believe it, and I’ve never seen these comments myself. It makes no sense.” The Washington Post asked YouTube why channels featuring children with disabilities are turned off, whether that was a human-driven decision, and why comments for other channels, such as Nickelodeon, BabiezTV and Kyoot, remain active. A YouTube spokesperson responded with the same statement given to Ulmer and Porter, emphasizing that they focused on channels “at higher risk” or where a high incidence of sexually explicit comments were made. “We understand that comments are an important way creators build and connect with their audiences, we also know that this is the right thing to do to protect the YouTube community,” the spokesperson said. “Our goal is to protect creators and the broader ecosystem while we improve our systems.” Nickelodeon moderates its YouTube comments, and confirms that it does not have a previous agreement with YouTube as it pertains to its still-enabled

comments on its channels, which all include its original programming. YouTube’s application of this new ban appears inconsistent. Adalia Rose, a YouTube star with 2.1 million subscribers, also had her comments turned off. She’s a 12-year-old girl with progeria, a genetic condition that causes a

child’s body to age fast. However, another family vlog channel prominently featuring children on the autism spectrum still has its comments enabled. “They won’t even address why videos with adults in them have comments affected,” since the channel often interviews adults, too, Porter said.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9 the first time, we really feel like we had moved outside of our echo chamber and our channel is helping to model what inclusion and respect looks like.” YouTube assures creators that comments won’t affect their videos placement in the recommendation algorithm, which faces separate and broad controversies. But comments remain an intrinsic part of the YouTube experience, where viewers can tag others to share the video. In the meantime, the pair have started a petition, which has more than 370,000 signatures. They’re still uploading videos to YouTube and other platforms. They

“You’re not allowing us creators to have a conversation with you.” Ulmer’s dream project was to create a book written and illustrated by children with disabilities, hence the name of his channel. When he shopped the idea to publishers, he hit dead ends, so he started an interview series instead. He and Porter started a Facebook page, which now has 2 million fans. But it was jumping to YouTube where they felt like they were reaching people. “I really believed in YouTube as a platform. When we moved our channel and really began exploring it, it was one of the best things,” Porter said. “For

even debuted a new introduction to each video, animated by special needs children. Well-meaning supporters have advised that they just move all their videos to their website, but Porter says staying on YouTube fits their mission for larger representation. For Ulmer, this issue has become an existential threat. “Often, families would come to us with all these fears about how others would perceive them, but then they would see the thousands of comments giving reinforcement and positivity to these kids, and now it’s all gone,” said Ulmer, “I feel like I’ve had my purpose torn from me.”

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NATION

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A9

Democrats defend Rep. Omar after Trump retweets video York man recently was charged with threatening Omar’s life. “The video the president chose to send out today will only incite more hate,” Klobuchar said. “You can disagree with her words — as I have done before — but this video is wrong. Enough.” Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., said Omar “won’t back down to Trump’s racism and hate, and neither will we.” Omar repeatedly has pushed fellow Democrats into uncomfortable territory over Israel and the

Clip was edited to suggest freshman lawmaker was dismissive of 9/11 ASSOCIATED PRESS

WA S H I N G T O N • Top Democrats rushed on Saturday to defend Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., after President Donald Trump retweeted video that was edited to suggest she was being dismissive of the significance of the worst terrorist assault on U.S. soil. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., scolded Trump for using the “painful images of 9/11 for a political attack” against the first-term congresswoman. And presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., campaigning in New Hampshire, accused Trump of “trying to incite violence and to divide us, and every political leader should speak out against that.” T h e v i d e o Tr u m p retweeted Friday pulls a snippet of Omar’s recent speech to the Council on American-Islamic Relations in which she described the 2001 terrorist attack on the World Trade Center as “some people did something,” and includes news footage of the hijacked planes hitting the Twin Towers. Trump also tweeted, “WE WILL NEVER FORGET!” Omar’s remark has drawn criticism largely from political opponents and conservatives who say the lawmaker, one of the first Muslim women to serve in Congress, offered a flippant description of the assailants and the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people. Neither Trump’s tweet nor the video included her full quote or the context of her comments. Omar told CAIR in Los Angeles that many Muslims saw their civil liberties eroded after the attacks, and she advocated for activism. “For far too long we have lived with the discomfort of being a second-class citizen and, frankly, I’m tired of it, and every single Muslim in this country should be tired of it,” she said in the March 23 speech, according to video posted online. “CAIR was founded after 9/11 because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties.” CAIR was founded in 1994, according to its website, but its membership skyrocketed after the attacks. Many Republicans and conservative outlets expressed outrage at Omar’s remarks. Fellow Democrats, including some who have disagreed with Omar in the past, defended her. “First Member of Congress to ever describe terrorists who killed thousands of Americans on 9/11 as ‘some people who did something,’” tweeted Rep. Dan Crenshaw, RTexas. Crenshaw, a retired Navy SEAL, lost his right eye in 2012 in an explosion in Afghanistan. “Here’s your something,” the New York Post blared on its cover beneath a photograph of the flaming towers. Pelosi, who was in Germany visiting U.S. troops Saturday, said in a statement that “the memory of 9/11 is sacred ground” and should always be discussed “with reverence.” She said it was wrong for Trump to “fan the flames to make anyone less safe.” Omar didn’t appear to be backing down. She tweeted a quote from President George W. Bush, who said days after the attacks: “The people — and the people who knocked these buildings down will hear all of us soon!” “Was Bush downplaying the terrorist attack?” Omar tweeted. “What if he was a Muslim.” Several of the 2020 Democratic presidential candidates condemned Trump’s tweet. Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke said the Republican president’s tweet was an “incitement to violence” against Omar and others like her. O’Rourke,

campaigning in South Carolina, likened the tweet to Trump’s rhetoric about Mexicans, described in the past by Trump as murderers and rapists. O’Rourke said “there is a cost and there is a consequence” to Trump’s comments. Warren said Republican leaders in Congress “cannot take a pass on this, cannot look the other way and pretend it isn’t happening. It is happening. And those who don’t

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., has taken heat for describing the 9/11 terrorist attacks as “some people did something.”

speak out in the Republican leadership are complicit in what he is doing.

It’s wrong.” Sen. Amy Klobuchar, DMinn., noted that a New

strength of the Jewish state’s influence in Washington. She apologized for suggesting that lawmakers support Israel for pay and said she wasn’t criticizing Jews. But she refused to take back a tweet in which she suggested American supporters of Israel “pledge allegiance” to a foreign country. Her comments sparked an ugly episode among House Democrats after they responded with a resolution condemning anti-Semitism and the measure became a broader declaration against all forms of bigotry.

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NEWS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

At airports around the world, play spaces for young passengers take off BY VICKY HALLETT Special to Washington Post

PHOTO BY VICKY HALLETT

The Munich Airport includes play areas for children, including a park with vintage aircraft to explore. Airports around the world are including play spaces for kids who might otherwise be bored waiting for a flight.

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Something was missing at Washington Dulles International Airport, realized customer service manager Dennis Hazell. For grown-ups, the concourses offered sports bars and duty-free shops. For dogs, “pet-relief areas” beckoned with fake fire hydrants on artificial grass. But for the youngest travelers, there was zilch, nothing. “We had forgotten a huge part of our customer base,” says Hazell, who saw children getting out their preflight wiggles by crawling beneath seats and leaping over luggage. That changed with the arrival of the FunWay, an indoor play area sponsored by NASA that turns three years old in August. Thousands of visitors have hung out by gate B70 to scramble over its squishy foam airplanes and the smiling “Tommy Tower,” a control tower with a few improvements. “There are steps on one side, a slide on the other, and you can crawl through an opening underneath Tommy,” Hazell says. Parents have long seen the need for child-friendly spaces like these, and they’re finally taking off, according to Jeff Williamson, business development director for Playtime, the Denver company behind the Dulles FunWay. In the past 15 years, Playtime has installed more than 50 airport play areas in cities around the world, including Beijing, China, and Calgary, Canada. Chances are, the Tovmasyan family has spent time at many of them. “We travel a lot — more than we want to,” Mari Tovmasyan says. Her husband Hayk’s job with the U.S. Army means they’ve bounced around the world with their two sons, ages 3 and 5. For now, they’re based in Vicenza, Italy. They’re always on the lookout for ways to stay entertained, whether it’s a piano player at the Brussels Airport (in Belgium) or the taxidermy animals on display at the airport in Anchorage, Alaska. That’s why Mari Tovmasyan always researches kid stuff at each airport along the way whenever they book a trip.

“Connecting flights are the most important,” she says, noting that recent hits have included the play areas at BaltimoreWashington International Marshall and Warsaw Chopin in Poland. Knowing that families often select flights based on these offerings, some airports are going above and beyond. Take, for example, Germany’s Munich Airport, located next to a visitors park with a playground, mini golf and vintage aircraft to explore. Each November, a winter market pops up between its two terminals. “Kids love ice skating; parents love the gluhwein,” notes Philipp Ahrens, the airport’s head of center management. (Gluhwein is a mulled wine drink popular in Germany at Christmastime.) But the big draw for families, Ahrens says, is Kinderland, a dropoff day care facility for ages 3 to 10. Children can jump in a ball pit, build at a Lego station, make crafts or get a glitter tattoo. The world’s most child-friendly airport? It’s probably Changi in Singapore, where you can spend a layover wandering at a butterfly garden, creating a woodblock print, feeding koi, or climbing around Chandelier, a five-story red net structure. On Wednesday, the airport will open a new building with a 130-foot indoor waterfall, giant trampolines, hedge mazes and “foggy bowls,” where puffs of mist are meant to make it seem as if you’re playing in the clouds. For most airports, these kinds of projects are too expensive and take up too much space. But expect to see more innovation in play areas, Williamson says. For example, an upcoming Playtime project for Charlotte Douglas International in North Carolina will include a bench with built-in lights that react to touch. He also predicts more “vertical play” (translation: climbing!), as well as charging ports to power up devices. At Dulles, Hazell hopes to get the money to install two more play areas, possibly featuring interactive touch screens. “It’s on our wish list,” says Hazell, who hopes to have at least one added by the end of the year, just in time for family winter vacations.

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NEWS

04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 2

Britain must ensure Assange faces Swedish charges, lawmakers say to the Swedish extradition request. The U.S. Justice Department said later LONDON • Seventy British lawmak- Thursday that it had charged Assange ers urged the government on Saturday to for conspiring with former U.S. military prioritize WikiLeaks founder Julian As- intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to sange’s extradition to Sweden if prosecu- leak a trove of classified material in 2010. Swedish prosecutors dropped their intors reopen an investigation of an alleged vestigation of the rape allegation in 2017. rape there. Stella Creasy of the opposition Labour Assange has always denied the allegation. Meanwhile, a Swedish man with links Party said the group wanted to “stand to WikiLeaks who was arrested with victims of sexual violence,” in Ecuador on Thursday reamid concerns that the Swedmained in pretrial detention on ish case could be sidelined as the suspicion of planning a cyberatgovernment focuses on a U.S. tack, judicial authorities in Ecextradition request for Assange. uador said on Saturday. The rape allegation came afThe man, 36, was arrested as ter Assange’s visit to Sweden in he was attempting to leave on 2010. He left Sweden for Britain, a flight to Japan. His bank acand in 2012 he fled to the Ecuacounts have been frozen, and dorian embassy in London after Assange authorities have seized USB he lost a legal battle against extradition to Sweden. He feared he would sticks and other devices in his flat. The Swedish Foreign Ministry said Satbe handed over to U.S. authorities for Wikileaks’ publication of top-secret U.S. urday it was aware of the man’s arrest. Spokeswoman Sofia Nahringbauer told diplomatic cables. Assange, an Australian national, lived dpa “he has been offered consular asinside the embassy for seven years. But sistance and has access to an attorney.” his relationship with his hosts became Nahringbauer had no information about strained, and British police dragged him why the man, who has lived for several out of the building on Thursday after Ec- years in Ecuador, was arrested. The Swedish embassy in neighboring uador revoked his asylum status. The police initially charged Assange, Colombia was following the case, as was 47, with breaching bail conditions linked Sweden’s consulate in Ecuador. DPA

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ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A11

Rep. Neal, treasury chief spar over Trump tax returns Democrat sends second letter to IRS, citing U.S. law BY ANDREW TAYLOR associated Press

WASHINGTON • Rep. Richard Neal, the House Ways and Means Committee chairman, ratcheted up on Saturday his demand for access to President Donald Trump’s tax returns, telling the IRS that the law clearly gives Congress a right to them. The government’s failure to respond by an April 23 deadline could send the dispute into federal court. Trump’s treasury chief, who oversees the IRS, cited “complicated legal issues” and bemoaned “an arbitrary deadline” set by Congress, while saying he would answer in that time frame. Neal sent a new letter after Trump’s administration asked for more time to consider Neal’s initial request last week, when he requested six years of Trump’s personal and business tax returns. Neal, D-Mass., argues that a 1920-era law saying the IRS “shall furnish” any tax return requested by Congress “is unambiguous and raises no complicated legal issues” and that the Treasury Department’s objections lack merit. The letter to IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig is the latest exchange in a tug of war over Trump’s returns, which would give lawmakers far greater insight into the president’s business dealings and potential conflicts of interest as it exercises its oversight role. Asked about the letter Saturday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he would respond within the new deadline set by Neal but did not promise to produce Trump’s tax returns by that time. Mnuchin is the Cabinet secretary that oversees the IRS. Mnuchin took issue with Neal’s characterization of the dispute as a straightforward issue in light of the law governing the matter. “These are complicated legal issues and I think it is more important to the American taxpayers that we get this right than we hit an arbitrary deadline,” Mnuchin told reporters. “I would just emphasize this is a decision that has enormous precedence in terms of potentially weaponizing the IRS.” Mnuchin said that Treasury Department lawyers had been working “diligently” to research the issues involved

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., wants President Donald Trump’s tax returns.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin leaves after attending a G-20 meeting at the World Bank-IMF Spring Meetings in Washington on Thursday.

and have been in contact with Justice Department attorneys. But he said he had not personally discussed the issue with Attorney General William Barr. Mnuchin said he thought Neal was just picking arbitrary deadline and he refused to speculate how the administration would proceed if the issue goes to court. Trump declined to provide his tax information as a candidate in 2016 and as president, something party nominees have traditionally done in the name of the transparency. By withholding his tax returns, Trump has not followed the standard followed by presidents since Richard Nixon started the practice in 1969. During the campaign, Trump said he wanted to release his returns but said because he was under a routine audit, “I can’t.” Being under audit is no legal bar to anyone releasing his or her returns. And after the November midterm elections, Trump claimed that the filings were too complex for people to understand.

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M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

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NATION

04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A13

The study of an astronaut and his twin Scientists gain helpful information about how the body responds to long space travel “But it’s great we saw and we learned that the human body is pretty resilient and we can survive and to some extent maybe even thrive on these long-duration flights,” he added. As for trips to Mars, Mark Kelly said: “I hope it’s sooner rather than later, and hopefully, our participation in this study will help us get closer to making a mission like that a success.”

BY LAURAN NEERGAARD associated Press

WASHINGTON • From his eyes

to his immune system, astronaut Scott Kelly’s body sometimes reacted strangely to nearly a year in orbit, at least compared to his Earth-bound identical twin — but newly published research shows nothing that would preclude even longer space treks, like to Mars. The good news: Kelly largely bounced back after returning home, say scientists who released final results from NASA’s “twins study,” a never-before opportunity to track the biological consequences of spaceflight in genetic doubles. It marks “the dawn of human genomics in space,” said Dr. Andrew Feinberg of Johns Hopkins University. He led one of 10 teams of researchers that scrutinized the twins’ health down to the molecular level before, during and after Kelly’s 340-day stay at the International Space Station. More importantly, the study “represents more than one small step for mankind” by pointing out potential risks of longerduration spaceflight that need study in more astronauts, said Markus Lobrich of Germany’s Darmstadt University and Penny Jeggo of the University of Sussex, who weren’t involved in the work. The findings were published in Friday’s edition of the journal Science, on some notable space anniversaries — when Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first person in space in 1961, and the first launch of the space shuttle in 1981.

KEY FINDINGS NASA already knew some of the toll of space travel, such as bone loss that requires exercise to counter. This time, NASA-funded scientists looked for a gamut of physiologic and genomic changes that Scott Kelly experienced in space, comparing them to his DNA double on the ground, former astronaut Mark Kelly.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this March 4, 2016, file photo, astronaut Scott Kelly (left) and his identical twin, Mark, stand together before a news conference in Houston. From his eyes to his immune system, Scott Kelly’s body sometimes reacted strangely to nearly a year in orbit, at least compared to his Earth-bound brother. But research published on Thursday shows nothing that would preclude even longer space treks, like to Mars.

Some results had been reported in February. Possibly the weirdest finding had to do with something called telomeres, the protective ends of chromosomes. Those tips gradually shorten as we get older, and are thought to be linked to agerelated diseases including some cancers. But in space, Scott Kelly’s telomeres got longer. “We were surprised,” said Colorado State University telomere expert Susan Bailey. She can’t explain it, although it doesn’t mean Kelly got younger. Back on Earth, his telomeres mostly returned to preflight average although he did have more short telomeres than before. Next, Kelly’s DNA wasn’t mutated in space but the activity of many of his genes — how they switch on and off — did change, especially in the last half of the voyage, which ended in March 2016. Immune system genes especially were affected, putting it

“almost on high alert as a way to try and understand this new environment,” said study co-author Christopher Mason, a Weill Cornell Medicine geneticist in New York. Again, most gene expression returned to normal back home, but some of the immune-related genes were hyperactive six months later. “We learned that the human body is pretty resilient and we can survive and to some extent maybe even thrive on these longduration flights,” Mark Kelly said. Other findings: • Some changes in the structure of Kelly’s eye and thickening of his retina suggested that, like about 40 percent of astronauts, he experienced symptoms of “spaceflight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome.” It may be caused by fluids shifting in the absence of gravity. • He experienced some chromosomal instability that might reflect radiation exposure in space. • A flu shot given in space worked

as well as one on Earth. • Kelly aced cognitive tests in space but slowed down after his return, maybe as more things competed for his attention.

WHAT THE KELLYS SAY “It was a real privilege to be part of this study,” said Scott Kelly, who spent the year in space along with Russia’s Mikhail Kornienko. Kelly retired from NASA soon after his return. He said it probably took him six months once back on Earth before he felt 100 percent again, but acknowledged his wife said it seemed more like eight months. What was particularly hard, he said, was getting used to not having a schedule dictating his life in five-minute increments every single day, like there was in space. During a teleconference he joked with his twin, “I got all the glory and you got a lot of work.” “I got people coming to my house, right, for tubes of blood,” responded Mark Kelly.

ULTRA LONG-DISTANCE TESTING Researchers needed months’ worth of blood, urine and fecal samples, along with cognitive and physical tests and ultrasound scans. That meant getting creative: Some blood samples required analysis so rapidly that Kelly would time collection so the blood could travel on Russian Soyuz capsules carrying other astronauts back to Earth. That wouldn’t be an option on a three-year trip to Mars. One of the study’s technological advances: Portable DNAsequencing equipment that will let astronauts run some of their own genomic analyses on future missions, said Weill Cornell’s Mason. WHAT’S NEXT? Studying one pair of twins can’t prove risks of spaceflight, researchers cautioned. And longer missions, to the moon or Mars, will mean greater stress and radiation exposure. Colorado State’s Bailey plans to study 10 additional astronauts on yearlong missions, using the twin findings as a road map. More one-year missions are planned by NASA, officials said, but no details were given Thursday. “We need to get outside of low-Earth orbit and we need for the astronauts to spend longer periods of time to really evaluate some of these health effects,” she said. The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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FROM A1

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

‘Right now they need a job… And doggone it, we need them’

M 1 • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019

New corrections officer Andrew Preston studies his set of handcuffs during training this month at the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green, Mo.

Correctional trainee Michael Hagood sights down the barrel of a shotgun last month during training near Bowling Green, Mo. About a fourth of the recruits in this class had never fired a weapon.

Correctional trainee Bethany Henson practices last month the proper defensive stance for confronting an unruly inmate. Henson, 22, said she chose corrections to confront her fear of abusive men and to earn enough money to have her own home.

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

PRISON • FROM A1

Henson, who has three children. “When I was younger, I didn’t feel like dreams mattered.” In all, 46 people — ages 19 to 52 — started the four-week boot camp on March 4. Their backgrounds were diverse, but the reasons why they wanted to be on the front lines of the Missouri Department of Corrections were not. “Right now they need a job. That’s who is coming through the door,” said Jim Wiseman, head of training for the department, which has been hammered by turnover. “And doggone it, we need them.” Wiseman stood under the disco ball at the Pike County Fairgrounds, personally greeting each one of them. “Come on in, welcome,” he said. “You found us.” Under normal conditions, new recruits go to training academies in Jefferson City, Farmington or St. Joseph before being placed in one of the state’s 21 prisons. Staff departures have been so high at Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green — and the competition steep across the border for the same jobs in Illinois and Iowa — that the medium-security prison needed a lifeboat of its own. Shortages have depleted institutional knowledge statewide, while more and more officers quit. In 2018 alone, 1,262 correctional officers left, up from 823 in 2014. There were recently 776 openings for the lowest level of correctional officer, which has a full capacity of 4,773. Though the state’s largest agency operates on a $786 million annual budget, its 11,000 employees are among the lowest paid in the nation. The average salary last year for correctional officers and jailers in Missouri was $31,650, according to the U.S. Department of Labor — well below both Iowa, $50,750, and Illinois, $62,440. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, in his budget proposal, calls for pay raises that could be as much as 13 percent for some correctional officers, which officials say will help retention. But the job itself — being hemmed in by a “kill fence” with violent offenders — isn’t for everyone, no matter the pay. The so-called forgotten officers of law enforcement face a bruising cycle. Fewer hands and low morale cut into the quality of programs for the 30,000 inmates, which disrupts prison life and adds more stress for everyone. It’s also increasingly more costly for taxpayers. In 2018 alone, the department spent $26 million on overtime, more than three times as much as in 2014. That doesn’t include a mountain of unused comp time and more than $113 million that a Cole County court awarded correctional officers in 2018 for unpaid work that they performed before and after their shifts. A few officers said voluntary and mandatory overtime are nice for a while, but it’s gone on so long that workers get burned out by not seeing the families they are trying to support. Some call in sick rather than wait to be relieved from a long shift. One correctional officer getting ready to quit said inmates know staff can be too tired to deal

ABOVE • New corrections officers watch and learn how to search an inmate in one of the empty cell buildings during training after boot camp this month at the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green, Mo.

BELOW • Correctional trainee Derick Williams takes a turn at using pepper spray (in this case, just water, for a simulation) during training last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds.

with them, which makes it easier to plant and pass around contraband, such as drugs and homemade tattoo guns, hooch and knives. All the while, those who are stepping up to get hired tend to be younger and less experienced. The minimum age has dropped to 19 from 21. A driver’s license is no longer required. Nor are the agility and problem-solving tests once used to screen applicants. About a third of new hires don’t make it through the first year, which Director Anne Precythe is trying to improve in part through the training program. In Bowling Green, Wiseman encouraged the new class of recruits to ask questions and not give up if they get discouraged. He also promised cookies and punch in a month at a graduation ceremony that their families could attend, an event that had fallen out of practice in recent years. “We got you in the door right now,” he told them. “You are employees. Don’t go anywhere, folks.”

BIGGEST EMPLOYER Many of the recruits were starting the highest paying job of their lives: A base salary of $30,000, or $15 an hour, and benefits. A lot of them came from eastern Pike County, along the Mississippi River, where the loss of industry 85 miles north of St. Louis has made the economic situation look “Third World,” said Chris Gamm, presiding county commissioner. “The Department of Corrections is by far the largest employer in the county,” he said. Tracy Davis, 48, of Louisiana, Mo., said she’s gone through several jobs in recent years, including waitress, medication tech, and temp at the GM assembly plant. She liked the stability of

the prison industry. “I’ve been trying to find something that pays well and has good benefits, so I ended up here,” Davis said. She’s a grandmother with five grown children — one boy, four girls. “It will be OK,” she said about the challenges of dealing with prisoners. “The inmates have nothing on my girls.” Lisa Maxey most recently earned $8.35 an hour at a gas station and didn’t want to say why that job ended. “Bowling Green really doesn’t have any options, to be honest,” she said. “There are a few gas stations and restaurants, and there’s Walmart. You never know when they are going to be hiring. It’s nice to go where they actually need you and you aren’t just expendable.” When she was in high school, she wanted to be a mortician or work in a psych ward. Now 27, with the driver’s license requirement lifted, she was excited to get a flavor of that at the corrections department. Her family was proud of her. “They said I have the mentality for it,” she said. “I can shut off my emotions in a heartbeat.” Austin Borders, 23, was originally from the southeast Missouri town of Doniphan, where he said he grew up working at sawmills and later ran out of opportunity. In Bowling Green, he’s washed dishes at a café and most recently earned $9.25 an hour at McDonald’s, which cut his shift in half over winter. “I can’t get my bills paid on that,” he said. He looked forward to steady paychecks and all the overtime they’d give him. He’d recently put See PRISON • Page A15


FROM A1

A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

‘Right now they need a job… And doggone it, we need them’

M 2 • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019

New corrections officer Andrew Preston studies his set of handcuffs during training this month at the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green, Mo.

Correctional trainee Michael Hagood sights down the barrel of a shotgun last month during training near Bowling Green, Mo. About a fourth of the recruits in this class had never fired a weapon.

Correctional trainee Bethany Henson practices last month the proper defensive stance for confronting an unruly inmate. Henson, 22, said she chose corrections to confront her fear of abusive men and to earn enough money to have her own home.

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

PRISON • FROM A1

have her own home. Had she not been starting a criminal justice career this day, she said, she’d be looking for a lawyer. “I want to show all these other single mothers out there who have had as much difficulty as I’ve had that they can do it,” said Henson, who has three children. “When I was younger, I didn’t feel like dreams mattered.” In all, 46 people — ages 19 to 52 — started the four-week boot camp on March 4. Their backgrounds were diverse, but the reasons why they wanted to be on the front lines of the Missouri Department of Corrections were not. “Right now they need a job. That’s who is coming through the door,” said Jim Wiseman, head of training for the department, which has been hammered by turnover. “And doggone it, we need them.” Wiseman stood under the disco ball at the Pike County Fairgrounds, personally greeting each one of them. “Come on in, welcome,” he said. “You found us.” Under normal conditions, new recruits go to training academies in Jefferson City, Farmington or St. Joseph before being placed in one of the state’s 21 prisons. Staff departures have been so high at Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green — and the competition steep for the same jobs in Illinois and Iowa — that the medium-security prison needed a lifeboat of its own. Shortages have depleted institutional knowledge statewide, while more and more officers quit. In 2018 alone, 1,262 correctional officers left, up from 823 in 2014. There were recently 776 openings for the lowest level of correctional officer, which has a full capacity of 4,773. Though the state’s largest agency operates on a $786 million annual budget, its 11,000 employees are among the lowest paid in the nation. The average salary last year for correctional officers and jailers in Missouri was $31,650, according to the U.S. Department of Labor — well below both Iowa, $50,750, and Illinois, $62,440. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, in his budget proposal, calls for pay raises that could be as much as 13 percent for some correctional officers, which officials say will help retention. But the job itself — being hemmed in by a “kill fence” with violent offenders — isn’t for everyone, no matter the pay. The so-called forgotten officers of law enforcement face a bruising cycle. Fewer hands and low morale cut into the quality of programs for the 30,000 inmates, which disrupts prison life and adds more stress for everyone. It’s also increasingly more costly for taxpayers. In 2018 alone, the department spent $26 million on overtime, more than three times as much as in 2014. That doesn’t include a mountain of unused comp time and more than $113 million that a Cole County court awarded correctional officers in 2018 for unpaid work that they performed before and after their shifts. A few officers said voluntary and mandatory overtime are nice for a while, but it’s gone on so long that workers get burned out by not seeing

ABOVE • New corrections officers watch and learn how to search an inmate in one of the empty cell buildings during training after boot camp this month at the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green, Mo.

BELOW • Correctional trainee Derick Williams takes a turn at using pepper spray (in this case, just water, for a simulation) during training last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds.

the families they’re trying to support. Some call in sick rather than wait to be relieved from a long shift. One correctional officer getting ready to quit said inmates know staff can be too tired to deal with them, which makes it easier to plant and pass around contraband, such as drugs and homemade tattoo guns, hooch and knives. All the while, those who are stepping up to get hired tend to be younger and less experienced. The minimum age has dropped to 19 from 21. A driver’s license is no longer required. Nor are the agility and problem-solving tests once used to screen applicants. About a third of new hires don’t make it through the first year, which Director Anne Precythe is trying to improve in part through the training program. In Bowling Green, Wiseman encouraged the new class of recruits to ask questions and not give up if they get discouraged. He also promised cookies and punch in a month at a graduation ceremony that their families could attend, an event that had fallen out of practice. “We got you in the door right now,” he told them. “You are employees. Don’t go anywhere, folks.”

BIGGEST EMPLOYER Many of the recruits were starting the highest paying job of their lives: A base salary of $30,000, or $15 an hour, and benefits. A lot of them came from eastern Pike County, along the Mississippi River, where the loss of industry 85 miles north of St. Louis has made the economic situation look “Third World,” said Chris Gamm, presiding county commissioner. “The Department of Corrections is by far the

largest employer in the county,” he said. Tracy Davis, 48, of Louisiana, Mo., said she’s gone through several jobs in recent years, including waitress, medication tech, and temp at the GM assembly plant. She liked the stability of the prison industry. “I’ve been trying to find something that pays well and has good benefits, so I ended up here,” Davis said. She’s a grandmother with five grown children — one boy, four girls. “It will be OK,” she said about the challenges of dealing with prisoners. “The inmates have nothing on my girls.” Lisa Maxey most recently earned $8.35 an hour at a gas station and didn’t want to say why that job ended. “Bowling Green really doesn’t have any options, to be honest,” she said. “There are a few gas stations and restaurants, and there’s Walmart. You never know when they are going to be hiring. It’s nice to go where they actually need you and you aren’t just expendable.” When she was in high school, she wanted to be a mortician or work in a psych ward. Now 27, with the driver’s license requirement lifted, she was excited to get a flavor of that at the corrections department. Her family was proud of her. “They said I have the mentality for it,” she said. “I can shut off my emotions in a heartbeat.” Austin Borders, 23, was originally from the southeast Missouri town of Doniphan, where he said he grew up working at sawmills and later ran out of opportunity. In Bowling Green, he’s washed dishes at a café and most recently earned $9.25 an hour at McDonald’s, which cut his shift in half over winter. See PRISON • Page A15


04.14.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

FROM A1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

Looking forward to steady pay PRISON • FROM A14

$400 down on a $2,500 pickup and agreed to pay at least $150 a month. Now the transmission was going out and the truck needed other repairs. “My brakes are metal on metal,” he said.

KEEPING IT PROFESSIONAL A few of them had experience working with inmates. Ashley Treiber, 29, formerly worked as a correctional officer for St. Charles County. She had a lot of informed responses to questions in class. She also had a long commute and a 2-year-old son. She arrived late after lunch on the first day of boot camp, in tears. She said her grandfather died over the weekend. “I am trying to make this work,” she said. “I am going to keep trying.” A 5-hour energy drink helped get her through the afternoon session on discrimination, harassment, retaliation and unprofessional conduct. Scott Phillips, of the Office of Professional Standards Civil Rights Unit, told them that professionalism was expected of every employee of the department and that they could set the tone of worksite culture. “We work for the public, the citizens of Missouri,” he told them. “It’s important that we give them a good reason to continue to fund us. If we are behaving badly, do you think they are going to want to fund us the way that we think we need?” While he didn’t need a fake example, he put up a sample story from the “The Daily News” to show possible publicity from doing the wrong thing, like bringing contraband into prison, having sex with offenders or harassing peers. That same afternoon, a headline ran in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch about the state paying $600,000 to a corrections department employee to settle a sexual harassment claim. Shown the story, Jessica Hays, 23, said she hadn’t heard about the case, nor numerous other payouts and reports exposing a culture of harassment and retaliation in Missouri’s prisons. “They offer really good benefits. The pay is decent. I figured I might as well start something new I can build a career in,” said Hays. “I wanted to see what I am made of.” Other women in the class hadn’t heard about the scandal either. Phillips went through several scenarios to help notice improper behavior among staff and supervisors. For instance, what if a boss invites you out for beers to talk about a test? “Is that a request for sex?” Phillips asked. “Not yet,” said Treiber. DEALING WITH INMATES Two weeks later, Angela Nickelson went through more scenarios to prepare the recruits for inmates with special needs and those who will try to manipulate them. “You are going to take a lot of verbal abuse,” she warned. “We don’t care, do we?” Nickelson, 49, made a career out of corrections. She said in an interview that when she was hired in 1994, she was one of the smallest correctional officers in the department — and likely the only one with a fresh college degree in elementary education. “The brain is the most powerful tool you can have here,” she said. “We are not all out there wrestling inmates every day.” A year after being hired, she said, she was relieved to be assigned to a death row unit at Potosi Correctional Center. Compared to the general prison population, she said, they were laid back. One of them was serial killer Anthony Joe LaRette. “He was pretty interesting,” she said. “Super friendly. Great personality, which is what you should be leery of.” She said people who work in corrections “aren’t like normal people.” She admitted that she has a potty mouth from working in the industry and prison lingo permeated her household. Instead of being grounded, her kids went to “administrative segregation” at home when they got in trouble. Inmates and low pay don’t seem to scare her. She didn’t discourage her son, a former heavyweight wrestler, from the career. In 2018, his first full year of employment with the department, he made $35,679, according to a state database. Mom, the veteran employee, made $41,382. She specializes in training correctional officers. “Nothing about our job is about punishment, it’s about rehabilitation and treating people as human beings,” she told the class, assuring: “How you present yourself is how you will be perceived.” Many inmates have disabilities such as dementia, schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder. “Some don’t play well with others because of their mental illness,” she said. “Then they are

ABOVE • Badges with names on the back are ready to hand out during the correctional officers’ graduation ceremony near Bowling Green, Mo., last month. Out of the 46 who started boot camp, two dropped out.

RIGHT • New corrections officer Lindsaylee Webb gets a hug from her daughter, Charla Webb, 8, after the graduation ceremony. Training chief Jim Wiseman thanked the 150 people in attendance. “There are a lot of things that happen inside a prison that challenge employees, and they need the support of family and friends,” he said. “We can see, just from looking out here, that they have your support.”

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

locked up in a prison full of people they’d like to stay away from. They aren’t being rebellious. They don’t get it.” But inmates with antisocial personality disorder are some of the worst to look out for, she said, “(Even) if you have six kids, they will take you out and not care.” She went over how to notice and talk to inmates contemplating suicide. Before showing the recruits how to cut somebody down who tried to hang himself, she gave fair warning for the class exercise. Henson, the 22-year-old recruit with three kids, fled the room and missed hearing Nickelson say this: “When you walk in and see somebody hanging and you’ve never seen it, it’s pretty disturbing. You are going to see it a million more times in your head.”

REACTING TO VIOLENCE Defensive tactics seemed the most emotionally challenging to the class. One recruit, who’d impressed colleagues and instructors through coursework, broke down and cried while working on the mats. She said she’d been the victim of domestic violence. Another said she wasn’t comfortable having anybody even act like they were choking her. An older man in the class also struggled to learn various maneuvers. Sgt. Dan Wiley, an Army veteran with three lifesaver awards and another for valor from his work at Northeast Correctional Center, told recruits to breathe and keep trying until various techniques became muscle memory. “This is just practice for when the real thing happens,” he told them. Videos of real attacks weren’t shared at boot camp. Instead, they role-played attacking each other in slow motion with rubber knives and other devices. “Hand me your weapon,” one recruit said. “Why are you stabbing me?” asked another. In late 2017, an offender at the prison used a homemade knife to stab a correctional officer in the back of the head and hand multiple times as she tried to flee Housing Unit No. 8. The unprovoked “hit and run” happened in about 10 seconds, maybe less, said Jeff Kaufman, a Bowling Green detective. “I am sure it seemed like hours to her,” he said.

The injured officer was treated and released from the hospital and later testified that she had lingering injuries and mental anguish. She is still employed by the department. The trainee who was beside her at the time of the attack is not. Wiley was one of the first to respond. He saw the blood and heard the screams of what he said sounded like someone being murdered. He helped restrain the inmate who did it — Jeardin Hutchins, 31, of Bel-Ridge, who was in prison for robbing a Domino’s Pizza on Natural Bridge Road in 2011. Asked if the trainees were prepared to defend themselves, Wiley said: “Were you ready when your child was born? They are going to have to grow as officers before anybody is ready.”

‘PART OF OUR FAMILY’ As promised, there were cookies and punch on Graduation Day. Out of the 46 who started boot camp, two dropped out, including one recruit who described himself on his social media page as a “professional napper.” The rest graduated, but four of them were on provisional status until they passed defensive tactics and shooting a 12-gauge shotgun. About a fourth of them had never fired a weapon. “Wow! This is a big deal,” Wiseman, the training chief, said at the ceremony. “We do graduation ceremonies, and recognition ceremonies, but not this big.” He thanked the 150 people in attendance. “There are a lot of things that happen inside a prison that challenge employees, and they need the support of family and friends,” he said. “We can see, just from looking out here, that they have your support.” Dan Redington, the new warden in Bowling Green, also offered congratulations. “We truly are looking forward to getting you back to our facility, making you part of our family,” he said. Twenty-five years ago, he said, he was sitting where they were. He thought being a correctional officer was going to be temporary. “Lo and behold, it got into my skin and I loved this environment,” he said. “I loved the people I am working with. I can truly say this job has been a blessing because it has taken care of my family, and it’s something I enjoy to do. So I hope

ABOVE • Defensive tactics instructor Carl Lewis shows correctional recruits the proper way to subdue an inmate and put him in handcuffs during training last month. In all, 46 people — ages 19 to 52 — started the four-week boot camp on March 4.

See PRISON • Page A16

LEFT • Correctional trainee Jade Martin (left) polishes the boots of fellow trainee Bethany Henson before the correctional officers’ graduation ceremony last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds pavilion near Bowling Green, Mo. Watching in the background is trainee Brandon Mesey.


04.14.2019 • SUNDAY • M 2

FROM A1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

Looking forward to steady pay PRISON • FROM A14

“I can’t get my bills paid on that,” he said. He looked forward to steady paychecks and all the overtime they’d give him. He’d recently put $400 down on a $2,500 pickup and agreed to pay at least $150 a month. Now the transmission was going out and the truck needed other repairs. “My brakes are metal on metal,” he said.

KEEPING IT PROFESSIONAL A few of them had experience working with inmates. Ashley Treiber, 29, formerly worked as a correctional officer for St. Charles County. She had a lot of informed responses to questions in class. She also had a long commute and a 2-year-old son. She arrived late after lunch on the first day of boot camp, in tears. She said her grandfather died over the weekend. “I am trying to make this work,” she said. “I am going to keep trying.” A 5-hour energy drink helped get her through the afternoon session on discrimination, harassment, retaliation and unprofessional conduct. Scott Phillips, of the Office of Professional Standards Civil Rights Unit, told them that professionalism was expected of every employee of the department and that they could set the tone of worksite culture. “We work for the public, the citizens of Missouri,” he told them. “It’s important that we give them a good reason to continue to fund us. If we are behaving badly, do you think they are going to want to fund us the way that we think we need?” While he didn’t need a fake example, he put up a sample story from the “The Daily News” to show possible publicity from doing the wrong thing, like bringing contraband into prison, having sex with offenders or harassing peers. That same afternoon, a headline ran in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch about the state paying $600,000 to a corrections department employee to settle a sexual harassment claim. Shown the story, Jessica Hays, 23, said she hadn’t heard about the case, nor numerous other payouts and reports exposing a culture of harassment and retaliation in Missouri’s prisons. “They offer really good benefits. The pay is decent. I figured I might as well start something new I can build a career in,” said Hays. “I wanted to see what I am made of.” Other women in the class hadn’t heard about the scandal either. Phillips went through several scenarios to help notice improper behavior among staff and supervisors. For instance, what if a boss invites you out for beers to talk about a test? “Is that a request for sex?” Phillips asked. “Not yet,” said Treiber. DEALING WITH INMATES Two weeks later, Angela Nickelson went through more scenarios to prepare the recruits for inmates with special needs and those who will try to manipulate them. “You are going to take a lot of verbal abuse,” she warned. “We don’t care, do we?” Nickelson, 49, made a career out of corrections. She said in an interview that when she was hired in 1994, she was one of the smallest correctional officers in the department — and likely the only one with a fresh college degree in elementary education. “The brain is the most powerful tool you can have here,” she said. “We are not all out there wrestling inmates every day.” A year after being hired, she said, she was relieved to be assigned to a death row unit at Potosi Correctional Center. Compared to the general prison population, she said, they were laid back. One of them was serial killer Anthony Joe LaRette. “He was pretty interesting,” she said. “Super friendly. Great personality, which is what you should be leery of.” She said people who work in corrections “aren’t like normal people.” She admitted that she has a potty mouth from working in the industry and prison lingo permeated her household. Instead of being grounded, her kids went to “administrative segregation” at home when they got in trouble. Inmates and low pay don’t seem to scare her. She didn’t discourage her son, a former heavyweight wrestler, from the career. In 2018, his first full year of employment with the department, he made $35,679, according to a state database. Mom, the veteran employee, made $41,382. She specializes in training correctional officers. “Nothing about our job is about punishment, it’s about rehabilitation and treating people as human beings,” she told the class, assuring: “How you present yourself is how you will be perceived.” Many inmates have disabilities such as dementia, schizophrenia and post-traumatic

ABOVE • Badges with names on the back are ready to hand out during the correctional officers’ graduation ceremony near Bowling Green, Mo., last month. Out of the 46 who started boot camp, two dropped out.

RIGHT • New corrections officer Lindsaylee Webb gets a hug from her daughter, Charla Webb, 8, after the graduation ceremony. Training chief Jim Wiseman thanked the 150 people in attendance. “There are a lot of things that happen inside a prison that challenge employees, and they need the support of family and friends,” he said. “We can see, just from looking out here, that they have your support.”

PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

stress disorder. “Some don’t play well with others because of their mental illness,” she said. “Then they are locked up in a prison full of people they’d like to stay away from. They aren’t being rebellious. They don’t get it.” But inmates with antisocial personality disorder are some of the worst to look out for, she said, “(Even) if you have six kids, they will take you out and not care.” She went over how to notice and talk to inmates contemplating suicide. Before showing the recruits how to cut somebody down who tried to hang himself, she gave fair warning for the class exercise. Henson, the 22-year-old recruit with three kids, fled the room and missed hearing Nickelson say this: “When you walk in and see somebody hanging and you’ve never seen it, it’s pretty disturbing. You are going to see it a million more times in your head.”

REACTING TO VIOLENCE Defensive tactics seemed the most emotionally challenging to the class. One recruit, who’d impressed colleagues and instructors through coursework, broke down and cried while working on the mats. She said she’d been the victim of domestic violence. Another said she wasn’t comfortable having anybody even act like they were choking her. An older man in the class also struggled to learn various maneuvers. Sgt. Dan Wiley, an Army veteran with three lifesaver awards and another for valor from his work at Northeast Correctional Center, told recruits to breathe and keep trying until various techniques became muscle memory. “This is just practice for when the real thing happens,” he told them. Videos of real attacks weren’t shared at boot camp. Instead, they role-played attacking each other in slow motion with rubber knives and other devices. “Hand me your weapon,” one recruit said. “Why are you stabbing me?” asked another. In late 2017, an offender at the prison used a homemade knife to stab a correctional officer in the back of the head and hand multiple times as she tried to flee Housing Unit No. 8. The unprovoked “hit and run” happened in about 10 sec-

onds, maybe less, said Jeff Kaufman, a Bowling Green detective. “I am sure it seemed like hours to her,” he said. The injured officer was treated and released from the hospital and later testified that she had lingering injuries and mental anguish. She is still employed by the department. The trainee who was beside her at the time of the attack is not. Wiley was one of the first to respond. He saw the blood and heard the screams of what he said sounded like someone being murdered. He helped restrain the inmate who did it — Jeardin Hutchins, 31, of Bel-Ridge, who was in prison for robbing a Domino’s Pizza on Natural Bridge Road in 2011. Asked if the trainees were prepared to defend themselves, Wiley said: “Were you ready when your child was born? They are going to have to grow as officers before anybody is ready.”

ABOVE • Defensive tactics instructor Carl Lewis shows correctional recruits the proper way to subdue an inmate and put him in handcuffs during training last month. In all, 46 people — ages 19 to 52 — started the four-week boot camp on March 4.

‘PART OF OUR FAMILY’ As promised, there were cookies and punch on Graduation Day. Out of the 46 who started boot camp, two dropped out, including one recruit who described himself on his social media page as a “professional napper.” The rest graduated, but four of them were on provisional status until they passed defensive tactics and shooting a 12-gauge shotgun. About a fourth of them had never fired a weapon. “Wow! This is a big deal,” Wiseman, the training chief, said at the ceremony. “We do graduation ceremonies, and recognition ceremonies, but not this big.” He thanked the 150 people in attendance. “There are a lot of things that happen inside a prison that challenge employees, and they need the support of family and friends,” he said. “We can see, just from looking out here, that they have your support.” Dan Redington, the new warden in Bowling Green, also offered congratulations. “We truly are looking forward to getting you back to our facility, making you part of our family,” he said. Twenty-five years ago, he said, he was sitting where they were. He thought being a correctional officer was going to be temporary. “Lo and behold, it got into my skin and I loved this environment,” he said. “I loved the people I am working with. I can truly say this job has See PRISON • Page A16

LEFT • Correctional trainee Jade Martin (left) polishes the boots of fellow trainee Bethany Henson before the correctional officers’ graduation ceremony last month at the Pike County Fairgrounds pavilion near Bowling Green, Mo. Watching in the background is trainee Brandon Mesey.


FROM A1

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019

Department headed in right direction, lawmaker says PRISON • FROM A15

that you all will feel the same way about this.” After hearing many complaints as a Republican state representative from the area, Rep. Jim Hansen, vice chairman of the House Corrections Committee, said in a speech to the graduates that the department was moving in the right direction. “I am truly grateful for the work you are doing to keep our community safe, to help rehabilitate people,” he said. “That is the No. 1 mission, to get people back into society and be productive citizens. So I wish you the best.” That resonated with Stacey Strickland, 45, of Hannibal, whose daughter Ebony was among the graduates. One of his other daughters also works in the prison system. “If you can change one person — one individual — sometimes the flowers keep growing,” he said. Stacy Harrison said she was proud of her “headstrong and determined” daughter, Bethany Henson, for taking advantage of one of the biggest opportunities in the area. “It scares me a little bit, but I know the security there is something you can count on,” she said. Michael Davis, 20, of Louisiana, said he was proud of his mother, Tracy Davis — the grandmother with five children. “Over the last year and a half, she’s gone through so many jobs, it’s crazy,” he said.

ALWAYS OPPORTUNITIES The Northeast Correctional Center, built for 2,100 inmates, hunkers in a former cornfield between the Bowling Green water tower and a sewage treatment plant. A help-wanted sign on the edge of the property stays up all the time. After graduation, most of the new officers had two weeks of on-the-job training there. Armed with pepper spray, handcuffs, radios and rubber gloves, they were slowly introduced to the male inmate population by helping do roll calls and random pat-downs of people leaving the chow hall. “The prisoners don’t like us, but it’s bound to be like that anywhere we go,” said Sean Lambert, 20, who’d served in the Army. Tracy Davis didn’t used to give the prison much thought when she drove by it. “There’s people in here with real problems,” she said. “Some of these guys are 6-foot tall, or 7-foot tall.” Taller than her four daughters. “I want to go home at the end of the day, so I am going to treat them with respect if at all possible,” she said. “Then you have to stand your ground, too.” That same day, a job fair kicked off under the disco ball over at the Pike County Fairgrounds, where the boot camp was temporarily held. One hundred job seekers signed in to walk the 30 booths. The corrections department had a basket of peppermints set out. One recruiter touted the ease of being a correctional officer, while another hyped the benefits — three weeks of paid vacation and three weeks of paid sick leave earned in the first year of employment; a dozen paid holidays; health, dental and death benefits; and the opportunity to serve in as soon as two weeks. Neal and Chelsea Breting wandered up to the dangling carrot. They were in limbo, staying with family, after a burst pipe damaged their home. Their 20-month-old daughter didn’t like to be set down long. Neal regretted working so many hours previously selling cars. They needed income. “Money is money at this point,” said Chelsea, 22, who applied. As the department was poised to gain an employee, it lost another. Treiber, who had previous jail experience in St. Charles County, quit Thursday, right before the training wheels came off for the rest of her boot camp peers. She said she landed a job closer to home as a police records clerk. It pays $52,000 — a 73 percent bump.

RECRUIT OVERCOMES FEAR AT FIRING RANGE PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Ebony Strickland, 19, of Hannibal, was determined to become a corrections officer. One of her sisters was already working in the prison system. The problem was that Strickland had never fired a shotgun, much less any other weapon. She managed to make it through the initial classroom training with “fake” weapons and the help from her instructors. But, when it came time to actually fire a shotgun at the range next to the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green, Strickland had a panic attack. The other trainees did their best to encourage her. But emotions took over when it was time to hold a real weapon. Her instructors showed her patience and compassion and eased her fears. Soon, Strickland was back at the firing line, squeezing the trigger and hitting the target. Passing the shooting test was required before she could graduate as a correctional officer. A few days later, a smiling Strickland stood in line to receive her new officer’s badge.

Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

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FROM A1

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019

Boot camp ends, real work begins — and so do departures PRISON • FROM A15

been a blessing because it has taken care of my family, and it’s something I enjoy to do. So I hope that you all will feel the same way about this.” After hearing many complaints as a Republican state representative from the area, Rep. Jim Hansen, vice chairman of the House Corrections Committee, said in a speech to the graduates that the department was moving in the right direction. “I am truly grateful for the work you are doing to keep our community safe, to help rehabilitate people,” he said. “That is the No. 1 mission, to get people back into society and be productive citizens. So I wish you the best.” That resonated with Stacey Strickland, 45, of Hannibal, whose daughter Ebony was among the graduates. Another daughter also works in the prison system. “If you can change one person — one individual — sometimes the flowers keep growing,” he said. Stacy Harrison said she was proud of her “headstrong and determined” daughter, Bethany Henson, for taking advantage of one of the biggest opportunities in the area. “It scares me a little bit, but I know the security there is something you can count on,” she said. Michael Davis, 20, of Louisiana, said he was proud of his mother, Tracy Davis — the grandmother with five children. “Over the last year and a half, she’s gone through so many jobs, it’s crazy,” he said.

ALWAYS OPPORTUNITIES The Northeast Correctional Center, built for 2,100 inmates, hunkers in a former cornfield between the Bowling Green water tower and a sewage treatment plant. A help-wanted sign on the edge of the property stays up all the time. After graduation, most of the new officers had two weeks of on-the-job training there. Armed with pepper spray, handcuffs, radios and rubber gloves, they were slowly introduced to the male inmate population by helping do roll calls and random pat-downs of people leaving the chow hall. “The prisoners don’t like us, but it’s bound to be like that anywhere we go,” said Sean Lambert, 20, who’d served in the Army. Tracy Davis didn’t used to give the prison much thought when she drove by it. “There’s people in here with real problems,” she said. “Some of these guys are 6-foot tall, or 7-foot tall.” Taller than her four daughters. “I want to go home at the end of the day, so I am going to treat them with respect if at all possible,” she said. “Then you have to stand your ground, too.” That same day, a job fair kicked off under the disco ball over at the Pike County Fairgrounds, where the boot camp was temporarily held. One hundred job seekers signed in to walk the 30 booths. The corrections department had a basket of peppermints set out. One recruiter touted the ease of being a correctional officer, while another hyped the benefits — three weeks of paid vacation and three weeks of paid sick leave earned in the first year of employment; a dozen paid holidays; health, dental and death benefits; and the opportunity to serve in as soon as two weeks. Neal and Chelsea Breting wandered up to the dangling carrot. They were in limbo, staying with family, after a burst pipe damaged their home. Their 20-month-old daughter didn’t like to be set down long. Neal regretted working so many hours previously selling cars. They needed income. “Money is money at this point,” said Chelsea, 22, who applied. As the department was poised to gain an employee, it lost another. Treiber, who had previous jail experience in St. Charles County, quit Thursday, right before the training wheels came off for the rest of her boot camp peers. She said she landed a job closer to home as a police records clerk. It pays $52,000 — a 73 percent bump.

RECRUIT OVERCOMES FEAR AT FIRING RANGE PHOTOS BY J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Ebony Strickland, 19, of Hannibal, was determined to become a corrections officer. One of her sisters was already working in the prison system. The problem was that Strickland had never fired a shotgun, much less any other weapon. She managed to make it through the initial classroom training with “fake” weapons and the help from her instructors. But, when it came time to actually fire a shotgun at the range next to the Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green, Strickland had a panic attack. The other trainees did their best to encourage her. But emotions took over when it was time to hold a real weapon. Her instructors showed her patience and compassion and eased her fears. Soon, Strickland was back at the firing line, squeezing the trigger and hitting the target. Passing the shooting test was required before she could graduate as a correctional officer. A few days later, a smiling Strickland stood in line to receive her new officer’s badge.

Jesse Bogan • 314-340-8255 @jessebogan on Twitter jbogan@post-dispatch.com

WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS • BEST WINDOW • FREE, NO PRESSURE ESTIMATES • FREE, 18 Month NO INTEREST FINANCING*

D O N AT E YO U R C A R Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

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®

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Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 5/15/19.

$200

* 100% Tax Deductible * Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE * We Accept Most Vehicles Running or Not

*with approved credit * We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs

WheelsForWishes.org

40%

314-429-7000 25+

Call:(314) 499-1300

millswindow.com

* Car Donation Foundation d/b/a Wheels For Wishes. To learn more about our programs or financial information, call (213) 948-2000 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

Our Promise To You

yEa RS

OFF

WINDOWS Not valid with any other coupon or promotion. Does not apply to previous estimates. Call for details. Expires 5/15/19.

te Your Spring Wardrobe!

• We will strive to provide you with a high level of customer service • We will treat you with honesty and integrity • We will put your needs ahead of our own

for the whole family!

• We will tell you the truth regarding what to expect from your hearing loss

Clothing

• We will not over-fit you with technology you don’t need

Shoes

Accessories

Jewelry

Home Decor

• We will only promise something we can actually deliver

FF

• We will assist you to the best of our abilities • We will not push you to make a decision you are not comfortable with

tire purchase at TheResaleShop

In our community. For our community.

"Hear the Difference a Doctor of Audiology Can Make"

314-647-EARS (3277) 6651 Chippewa, Ste. Ste. 217 315 • St. Louis, MO MO 63109 63109 For more information, please visit www.southcityhearing.com

Nancy M. Richman, Au.D., CCC-A Doctor of Audiology

indbergh Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63141 314.692.8141

theresaleshop.org

All proceeds from The Resale Shop help support the programs of NCJW STL to improve the lives of women, children and families in our community


04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A17

ST. LOUIS’ BEST BRIDAL

Engagements stlouisbestbridal.com Spread the exciting word! Fill out the engagement form online, attach a photo and we do the rest! It’s easy and free. You also receive a package with a special T-shirt to help plan the special occasion.

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Evans

Hilary Rhodes and Kaleb Cheek announce their engagement. Ms. Rhodes is a graduate of the University of Missouri - St. Louis and works as a realtor for Realty Executives of St. Louis. Mr. Cheek graduated from Southern Illinois University - Carbondale and is a pilot for TransStates Airlines. The couple are set to wed October 10, 2020. 

& Williams

Kifer

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Falkler

Grubbs

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& Albers-Ashen

Wylie

& West

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! s t e k c i t e Fre t le a

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Jeff and Carrie Jones and Bill Ashen and Mary Albers announce the engagement of their children, Kaitlyn Jones and Corey Albers-Ashen. Ms. Jones graduated from St. Louis University with a masters degree in social work. She is currently employed by Our Lady’s Inn as a case manager. Mr. Albers-Ashen is an outside account manager for American Tire Distributor. The couple were high school sweethearts and plan to tie the knot May 9, 2020. 

ilab Ava

& Wisdom

Richard and Tonya Kifer of Warrenton announce the engagement of their daughter, Morgan Kifer, to Trey Wisdom, son of William Wisdom of Truesdale, Mo. and Heather DeFour of Wright City. The happy couple will wed June 6, 2020. 

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A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

❁ ❀

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WORLD

04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A19

Ancient shipwreck in Greece to be opened for visitors Site will be first there made accessible to the public, including recreational divers BY ELENA BECATOROS associated Press

STENI VALLA, GREECE • Near

the northern Greek island of Alonissos lies a remarkable ancient shipwreck: the remains of a massive cargo ship that changed archaeologists’ understanding of shipbuilding in antiquity. Now this spectacular find is to become the first ancient shipwreck to be made accessible to the public in Greece, including to recreational divers. Greece’s rich underwater heritage has long been hidden from view, off-limits to all but a select few, mainly archaeologists. Scuba diving was banned throughout the country except in a few specific locations until 2005, for fear that divers might loot the countless antiquities that still lie scattered on the country’s seabed. Ancient shipwrecks and even many more recent ones are still off-limits. Now that seems to be gradually changing, with a new project to create underwater museums. Divers will be able to tour certain shipwrecks and nondivers will experience the sites through virtual reality in information centers on land. The first of these sites is the Peristera shipwreck, named for the uninhabited Greek island opposite Alonissos where it was discovered in the early 1990s. The cargo ship was laden with thousands of amphoras, or vases, probably containing wine, when it sank in the late fifth century B.C. All that survives is the cargo, the exposed parts of the wooden ship having long since rotted away. But the sight is spectacular. Thousands of ancient vases, the vast majority intact, lie in layers. Fish, sponges and other sea creatures have made the amphoras their home, adding color and life to the site. In some places, the cargo towers above divers as they pass along the pe-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ancient amphoras lie at the bottom of the sea from a fifth-century B.C. shipwreck, the first to be opened to the public in Greece. Recreational divers will be able to visit the wreck near the coast of Peristera. Fish, sponges and other sea creatures have made the amphoras their home, adding color and life to the site. Greece’s rich underwater heritage has long been hidden from view, off-limits to all but a select few.

rimeter of the wreck. “It is very impressive. Even I, who have been working for years in underwater archaeology, the first time I dived on this wreck I was truly impressed,” said Dimitris Kourkoumelis, the lead archaeologist on the project preparing the site for visitors. “It’s different to see amphoras ... individually in a museum and different to see them in such concentration.” The wreck still holds mysteries. Only a small part has been excavated, and experts have yet to determine how or why it sank, or what other treasures it might have carried beneath the estimated 4,000 amphoras in its hold. There are indications a fire had broken out on board, but it’s unclear whether that contributed to its sinking. “Was it a piracy act? Was it overloaded?” said Elpida Had-

jidaki, the first archaeologist to excavate the site. These questions remain unanswered. The Peristera wreck is the largest ship of its time to have been found and its discovery was of major significance to historians. “Up to then, we thought that large ships that were carrying 1,500 amphoras and were up to 70 tons, they were built by the Romans in the first century B.C.,” Hadjidaki explained. “Well, now we have a ship that was not built in the first century B.C., it was built in the fifth century B.C., it carried 4,000 amphoras and God knows what else and it’s 126 tons.” Hadjidaki said she is thrilled the wreck is being opened to visitors. “It’s fantastic. Twenty-five years ago, I was the first person that proposed that and people were jumping at me, they thought I was crazy,” she said.

“Why should we keep it to ourselves? We have to give knowledge to people.” The first test for guided tours of the wreck, which lies at a depth of about 72 to 92 feet, was carried out recently with small groups of recreational and professional divers. A thorough briefing, complete with historical information and the rules of the dive, preceded the short boat ride from the tiny harbor of Steni Valla on Alonissos to the site. On the wreck itself, explanatory signs have been suspended along the perimeter. The initial feedback has been positive. “It was an amazing opportunity ... to dive at last on an ancient wreck,” said Kostas Menemenoglou, 39, a recreational diver from the central town of Volos. “It was a fantastic experience. It’s really like diving into history.”

Three other shipwrecks in the Pagasitic Gulf in central Greece are also included in the project, which is part of a European Commission-funded BlueMed program, which plans to expand the project to Italy and Croatia. More test dives will be held this summer and next year, with hopes of fully opening the sites to recreational diving in early 2021. “Accessible archaeological sites are one of the most interesting projects — not just a Greek project but a worldwide project,” said Kourkoumelis, who noted it has taken a long time to get to the point of allowing visitors to access an ancient wreck. “It took years. And that’s logical, because underwater ancient sites and particularly ancient shipwrecks are exposed ... and fragile,” he said, noting it was crucial to properly set up the project and the dive conditions.

BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

50 WWII missions and 100 years of life: A Missouri man’s journal is a witness to history BY LORI ROSE, BRAND AVE. STUDIOS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

But Bu he also chronicled the mundane tasks off daily life between flights: from getting a haircut to keeping his tent warm, dry an nd free of sand. He sketched drawings to o go along with some entries, jotted down do song lyrics and jokes, and wrote ab bout the ways he and his fellow airmen am mused themselves during downtime, su uch as volleyball games, movies and pa arties with Red Cross nurses. NUMBER 50 What W he remembers most about his time in n North Africa, he said, was that final mission m to bomb an airfield at Marseille, Frrance. He knew Number 50 meant he would w soon be going home. Sadly, that mission is remembered more for another m reason. re PHOTO PROVIDED BY EUGENE ULRICH

T

hrough 50 missions on a B-17 out of North Africa during World War II, a young Missourian named Eugene Ulrich carefully jotted down in his diary what he saw, heard and thought from December 1942 until September 1943. “I knew I was going to keep a record of everything I did,” said Ulrich, a Spanish Lake resident who recently celebrated his 100th birthday. “I thought it was important.” Ulrich, who grew up in Cape Girardeau, enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1941 and by Christmas 1942 was en route to North Africa as part of the 301st Bombardment Group. Over the next nine months, Lt. Ulrich chronicled each of his 50 missions as a navigator on a B-17 Flying Fortress nicknamed Dirty Gertie. His entries detailed the successes and failures as his crew dropped thousands of pounds of bombs on rail yards, shipping docks and airfields throughout Northern Africa and the Mediterranean.

“II lost one of my very best friends on my m last mission,” Ulrich said. “He was a navigator in another squadron. A shell hit and blew the whole nose off of his plane. “I’ll never forget that,” he said. “It was the hardest thing in the world for me to go tell his girlfriend in the Red Cross she wouldn’t see him anymore.” CHANCES ARE HOPELESS In his journal, he wrote: “Well, today was Number 50. This makes me a senior birdman. Our main target was really hit. I can say I was really sweating until the wheels of our plane were on the ground.

JOURNAL ENTRY PHOTO PROVIDED BY EUGENE ULRICH

STORIES OF HONOR IS PRESENTED BY:

I saw one of my best friends, Robert Michael, go down. Seven chutes were seen. Chances are very hopeless for Michael. I am so happy to have finished my missions, but so sorry about the bad luck today.” It was August 17, 1943, not quite seven months after Ulrich’s first bombing mission over Bizerte in Tunisia. Several days later the squadron ran into a “furious” fight with the German fighter planes. One of the bombers lost two motors, another lost its waist gunner to enemy fire. “Looking up the barrels of machine guns and 30 mm cannons that are puffing at you is not my idea of fun,” Ulrich wrote. “I just sit behind my gun as did all the other men, sweating out who would hit who first. Our top turret gunner is living on borrowed time. A 20 mm hit and exploded not 6 inches from his head, leaving a hole big enough to stick your fist through. He didn’t get a scratch and now has the end of the shell to wear around his neck.” A PURPLE HEART Ulrich had a close call of his own when he was injured while on a bombing raid to Palermo on the island of Sicily. “A shell exploded and all those little pebbles jumped out and hit me in the face,” Ulrich remembered recently. “I’ve still got a fragment in my upper lip. I can sttill feel it.” In n his journal, he wrote: ““Twenty minutes off ff the target we were attacked by ME110s. A plane was knocked out of the (squadron) th hat was trailing and he was gliding for th he water the last time I saw him. Flak Fl was w really heavy, 30 caliber bullets tore frrom one wing to the other. A piece of flak to ore through Sgt. Drewes’ foot and just as ou ur bombs were dropping, a 20 mm shell expl xploded and one fragment went through

my oxygen mask lodging in my upper lip. Blood really spurted out due to pressure. I tore off my oxygen mask and grabbed a spare. It would not fit due to not being adjusted. About this time an ME110 was in, so I fired the gun in his general direction with one hand, holding the mask on with the other hand.” The crew made it home, and after a few days in the hospital, Ulrich received his Purple Heart in a field ceremony. “The medal is really beautiful and I am very proud of it,” he wrote. Ulrich, who also earned a Distinguished Flying Cross for his service, arrived home to the States just a month after his final mission. He was stationed at Army air bases in Tennessee and New Mexico before being discharged in September 1945. He went on to a career as a custom home builder and later worked for the government helping to build missile silos at White Sands Missile Range and other facilities. He said he never really thought about the dangers he faced when he was overseas but was amazed by all that he was able to do and see. In his journal in March 1943, he summed up his adventures: “A person can sure do a lot of things in a few months. This old world has a lot of strange and interesting places for one to see. I’ve learned lots more since I have been out of school than I did in school.”

NOMINATE YOUR SOLDIER AT: STLtoday.com/StoriesOfHonor DEADLINE TO SUBMIT IS APRIL 15, 2019 Stories are told from the nominee’s point of view. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.


WORLD

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A19

DIGEST U.S. man accused of abusing orphans in Haiti Police in the Dominican Republic have arrested the founder of an orphanage in Haiti who’s accused of molesting boys in his care. National police spokesman Col. Frank Felix Duran Mejia confirmed Saturday that Michael Geilenfeld, a U.S. citizen, had been taken into custody. He did not say whether any charges had been filed and declined to specify whether Geilenfeld would be extradited to the U.S. or another country. Seven men have accused Geilenfeld of sexually abusing them as boys. Geilenfeld contends the assertions have ruined his reputation, cost the Hearts with Haiti charity millions in donations and led him to be falsely imprisoned for 237 days. Pompeo visits Paraguay, discusses Venezuela • U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met Saturday in Paraguay with President Mario Abdo Benítez to discuss the economic and political crisis in Venezuela, strengthening democracy in the region and combating transnational crime. Pompeo called Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro a “tyrant” who has caused the ruin of the South American country and its people. Pompeo is on a four-day Latin American tour. Kim gives U.S. deadline for nuclear terms • North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has said he’s willing to hold a third summit with President Donald Trump as long as the U.S. offers acceptable terms by the end of the year. In remarks carried by the state-run Korean Central News Agency on Saturday, Kim said he wouldn’t welcome a repeat of the meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam, in February, when Trump walked out. While Kim hailed his relationship with Trump, he also said the U.S. had been making unilateral demands and should abandon that approach. Palestinian Authority swears in new government • A new government for the West Bankbased Palestinian Authority was sworn in Saturday, led by a veteran peace negotiator and harsh critic of Gaza’s Hamas rulers. President Mahmoud Abbas picked Mohammed Ishtayeh as prime minister, a move that deepens the internal Palestinian divide at a time when prospects

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (left) listens to Paraguay’s Vice President Luis Castiglioni at “Palacio de Lopez” in Asuncion, Paraguay, on Saturday. Pompeo is on a tour of Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Colombia to address, mainly, the crisis in Venezuela.

for a peace deal with Israel are at perhaps their lowest point ever. A longtime adviser to Abbas and a senior member of his Fatah party, Ishtayeh and his 24-member Cabinet took the oath of office at Abbas’ headquarters in Ramallah. Serb defies facts, calls Srebrenica massacre a myth • A Bosnian Serb leader has wrongly called the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, where more than 8,000 Muslim men and boys were killed by Bosnian Serb troops, “a fabricated myth.” The comments defy international court rulings that say genocide was committed in the eastern Bosnian enclave. Milorad Dodik, who now heads Bosnia’s multi-ethnic joint presidency, has told a conference discussing war crimes during the Bosnian conflict that the Srebrenica massacre was “something that does not exist.” Quebec’s plan to ban religious clothing for public workers stirs outrage • A proposal to ban many public employees from wearing religious clothing is creating a fiery debate in the Canadian province of Quebec, where people are fighting to freely practice their religion — or to be free of it. The measure

TOP COAT

endangered species next month in Sri Lanka. Kenya’s Cabinet secretary for tourism, Najib Balala, said the march supported proposals that the country hoped to present at the CITES conference. Wildlife tourism is a major contributor to Kenya’s economy.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Elsa the Yorkshire gets her fur combed Saturday during a grooming competition at the Pet Expo 2019, a pet show in Bucharest, Romania. According to organizers, the show attracts more than 10,000 visitors every year.

introduced late last month would prohibit civil servants, teachers, nurses, bus drivers, lawyers and other people who interact with the public from wearing symbols of religion while at work. It would apply to Sikh turbans, Christian jewelry and Jewish yarmulkes, but the focus of the controversy has been over hijabs worn by many Muslim women in Quebec. Muslims

constitute about 3 percent of Quebec’s 8.3 million people. Kenyans rally to protect wildlife • Hundreds of Kenyans marched in the streets of the capital, Nairobi, to call for the ban of international wildlife markets that specialize in endangered species. The march comes ahead of a global meeting on international trade in

China to open massive new airport in Beijing • Beijing is opening a giant new airport soon. Crews are putting the final touches on what will be one of the world’s largest and busiest airports. Designed by the late British architect Zaha Hadid, the phoenix-shaped Beijing Daxing International Airport is due to open in September as the latest major Chinese project even as the country’s economy cools. Officials say the $12 billion Daxing airport could one day serve more than 100 million passengers a year. Pele undergoes surgery in Brazil • Brazilian soccer great Pele, 78, has undergone surgery for the removal of a kidney stone in a Sao Paulo hospital. The Albert Einstein Hospital said Saturday that Pele’s surgery went well, but it did not provide additional details. From news services

BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

50 WWII missions and 100 years of life: A Missouri man’s journal is a witness to history BY LORI ROSE, BRAND AVE. STUDIOS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

But Bu he also chronicled the mundane tasks off daily life between flights: from getting a haircut to keeping his tent warm, dry an nd free of sand. He sketched drawings to o go along with some entries, jotted down do song lyrics and jokes, and wrote ab bout the ways he and his fellow airmen am mused themselves during downtime, su uch as volleyball games, movies and pa arties with Red Cross nurses. NUMBER 50 What W he remembers most about his time in n North Africa, he said, was that final mission m to bomb an airfield at Marseille, Frrance. He knew Number 50 meant he would w soon be going home. Sadly, that mission is remembered more for another m reason. re PHOTO PROVIDED BY EUGENE ULRICH

T

hrough 50 missions on a B-17 out of North Africa during World War II, a young Missourian named Eugene Ulrich carefully jotted down in his diary what he saw, heard and thought from December 1942 until September 1943. “I knew I was going to keep a record of everything I did,” said Ulrich, a Spanish Lake resident who recently celebrated his 100th birthday. “I thought it was important.” Ulrich, who grew up in Cape Girardeau, enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1941 and by Christmas 1942 was en route to North Africa as part of the 301st Bombardment Group. Over the next nine months, Lt. Ulrich chronicled each of his 50 missions as a navigator on a B-17 Flying Fortress nicknamed Dirty Gertie. His entries detailed the successes and failures as his crew dropped thousands of pounds of bombs on rail yards, shipping docks and airfields throughout Northern Africa and the Mediterranean.

“II lost one of my very best friends on my m last mission,” Ulrich said. “He was a navigator in another squadron. A shell hit and blew the whole nose off of his plane. “I’ll never forget that,” he said. “It was the hardest thing in the world for me to go tell his girlfriend in the Red Cross she wouldn’t see him anymore.” CHANCES ARE HOPELESS In his journal, he wrote: “Well, today was Number 50. This makes me a senior birdman. Our main target was really hit. I can say I was really sweating until the wheels of our plane were on the ground.

JOURNAL ENTRY PHOTO PROVIDED BY EUGENE ULRICH

STORIES OF HONOR IS PRESENTED BY:

I saw one of my best friends, Robert Michael, go down. Seven chutes were seen. Chances are very hopeless for Michael. I am so happy to have finished my missions, but so sorry about the bad luck today.” It was August 17, 1943, not quite seven months after Ulrich’s first bombing mission over Bizerte in Tunisia. Several days later the squadron ran into a “furious” fight with the German fighter planes. One of the bombers lost two motors, another lost its waist gunner to enemy fire. “Looking up the barrels of machine guns and 30 mm cannons that are puffing at you is not my idea of fun,” Ulrich wrote. “I just sit behind my gun as did all the other men, sweating out who would hit who first. Our top turret gunner is living on borrowed time. A 20 mm hit and exploded not 6 inches from his head, leaving a hole big enough to stick your fist through. He didn’t get a scratch and now has the end of the shell to wear around his neck.” A PURPLE HEART Ulrich had a close call of his own when he was injured while on a bombing raid to Palermo on the island of Sicily. “A shell exploded and all those little pebbles jumped out and hit me in the face,” Ulrich remembered recently. “I’ve still got a fragment in my upper lip. I can sttill feel it.” In n his journal, he wrote: ““Twenty minutes off ff the target we were attacked by ME110s. A plane was knocked out of the (squadron) th hat was trailing and he was gliding for th he water the last time I saw him. Flak Fl was w really heavy, 30 caliber bullets tore frrom one wing to the other. A piece of flak to ore through Sgt. Drewes’ foot and just as ou ur bombs were dropping, a 20 mm shell expl xploded and one fragment went through

my oxygen mask lodging in my upper lip. Blood really spurted out due to pressure. I tore off my oxygen mask and grabbed a spare. It would not fit due to not being adjusted. About this time an ME110 was in, so I fired the gun in his general direction with one hand, holding the mask on with the other hand.” The crew made it home, and after a few days in the hospital, Ulrich received his Purple Heart in a field ceremony. “The medal is really beautiful and I am very proud of it,” he wrote. Ulrich, who also earned a Distinguished Flying Cross for his service, arrived home to the States just a month after his final mission. He was stationed at Army air bases in Tennessee and New Mexico before being discharged in September 1945. He went on to a career as a custom home builder and later worked for the government helping to build missile silos at White Sands Missile Range and other facilities. He said he never really thought about the dangers he faced when he was overseas but was amazed by all that he was able to do and see. In his journal in March 1943, he summed up his adventures: “A person can sure do a lot of things in a few months. This old world has a lot of strange and interesting places for one to see. I’ve learned lots more since I have been out of school than I did in school.”

NOMINATE YOUR SOLDIER AT: STLtoday.com/StoriesOfHonor DEADLINE TO SUBMIT IS APRIL 15, 2019 Stories are told from the nominee’s point of view. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAy • 04.14.2019 • A20 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

ClosetheWorkhouse? Calls to shut this city jail make great political fodder but belie the facts.

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Kristine Hendrix, an activist and vice president of the University City School Board, reads demands to a crowd outside the City Workhouse in St. Louis on Sept. 9, 2018.

S

t. Louis Comptroller Darlene Green has added her voice to the chorus of local progressive politicians calling for the closure of the city’s Medium Security Institution, known as the Workhouse, and to consolidate the inmate population elsewhere. The widespread assumption, articulated repeatedly by Democratic candidates before the April 2 local elections, is that most of the inmates are awaiting trial for nonviolent misdemeanors and shouldn’t be held in jail anyway. “This is probably the time to say: ... What you’ve been hearing perhaps has been exaggerated,” Public Safety Director Jimmy Edwards told the editorial board on Thursday. “Two years ago, I didn’t understand what I was talking about, either,” Mayor Lyda Krewson added. They were joined by Corrections Commissioner Dale Glass. Senior city officials insist that the jail population overwhelmingly consists of inmates accused — though not convicted — of serious felonies, and releasing them could pose substantial dangers to the citizenry. Even though the city has engaged in a concerted effort to reduce the jail population through cooperative programs that provide bail for lower-level, nonviolent offenders, they say the numbers of inmates at both the Workhouse and the downtown Criminal Justice Center remain too high to consider closing the Workhouse anytime soon. The jail population as of last week stood at 1,046, including more than 200 held on federal charges. Federal and local officials say a lack of state financial

resources, ambiguity in state laws and inattention to timely prosecution mean some inmates languish far longer than they should. When possible — especially when felonies involve the use of guns — federal authorities say they prefer to step in and prosecute cases, enabling inmates to be processed out of the jail as quickly as possible. The 53-year-old Workhouse has a long history problems — lack of air conditioning, spotty medical care and inability to control violence. Cockroach infestations are a common complaint. Krewson said that reductions in the inmate population had enabled the closure of an entire floor in the oldest part of the Workhouse, allowing more inmates to be housed in its more modern facilities. Glass has insisted that “10 beds does not equal 10 people.” Regulations require that certain inmates such as relatives or co-defendants be separated from each other. Men must have separate facilities from women. All of which means that excess capacity doesn’t necessarily mean space in the Workhouse is going to waste. The city has partnered with various groups to find alternatives to cash bail, allowing lower-level defendants to be released more quickly on bond with help from a national nonprofit, The Bail Project. The jail’s average daily population has also fallen every year since 2013. We’re all for criminal justice reform and ensuring that no defendant spends a day longer than necessary in jail. But the most persuasive arguments are those that let the facts speak for themselves.

Human pawns Trump’s plan to use migrants for political payback marks new low.

A

White House plan to bus migrant detainees into sanctuary cities and release them there as political punishment for Democrats is a stunningly malicious and inhumane idea, even by the standards of the Trump administration. The administration initially shrugged off the plan as something briefly considered but rejected. But President Donald Trump, as he is apt to do, contradicted his own people and announced on Twitter he still wants to carry it out. “The Radical Left always seems to have an Open Borders, Open Arms policy — so this should make them very happy!” he tweeted. House Democrats should convene hearings to determine whether actual steps were taken — and to send Trump a clear warning that any attempt to carry it out now will have consequences as bad or worse than the public-relations savaging he received for his family-separation debacle. This administration’s zeal for traumatizing migrants and asylum-seekers for political gain must be confronted. Sanctuary cities are those that declare a refusal to cooperate with federal authorities requesting extended detention of undocumented immigrants arrested by local police. This newspaper has argued that, however well-meaning the sanctuary movement might be, blind refusal to cooperate with federal law enforcement efforts is indefensible — whether the law pertains to immigration, gun control or any other topic. But that doesn’t justify White House attempts to punish the Democrats who tend to dominate in sanctuary cities. As first reported Thursday by The

Washington Post, the White House recently pressed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to transport detained immigrants to targeted sanctuary cities and release them, to send a message to Democrats who have opposed Trump on immigration. “It was retaliation, to show them, ‘Your lack of cooperation has impacts,’ ” said one source. The White House dismissed it as “just a suggestion that was floated and rejected.” In truth, ICE reportedly rejected it after concluding it was probably illegal. And the White House nonetheless pressed for it a second time, and was rebuffed again. Trump, responding to media reports about the shuttered plan, declared on Twitter it was still under consideration. “Due to the fact that Democrats are unwilling to change our very dangerous immigration laws,” he wrote, “we are indeed, as reported, giving strong considerations to placing Illegal Immigrants in Sanctuary Cities.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s California district was among those the administration wants to target. A statement from her office says it best: “Using human beings — including little children — as pawns in their warped game to perpetuate fear and demonize immigrants is despicable.” Indeed. This time, instead of mass detentions, Trump wants to drop immigrant families into distant cities where they have no connections, for the express purpose of agitating his political opponents. House Democrats must put a glaring spotlight on these twisted plans and keep it there.

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Allegations against Biden are likely to harm #MeToo cause

J.B. FORBES • P-D

A MetroLink train leaves the St. Louis downtown area in November.

MetroLink project is better than relying on ride-sharing Regarding Paul Dribin’s April 1 letter, “Expanding MetroLink would be a costly and bad decision”: He complains about “paying huge sums of money for a system that is obsolete.” What is his basis for this statement? Rail transit was removed because politicians believed it would be an impediment to the automobile and would improve traffic. It only made traffic worse as more people drove. Rail transit also gives an area a spine. People want to live in an area because of its presence. When you remove the spine, the area sprawls like a jellyfish. He also is under the notion that MetroLink only serves people working downtown. There are employment centers all along MetroLink, including the Galleria, retail and food establishments along Hanley Road and near Washington University, University of Missouri-St. Louis, St. Louis University, the airport, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and other sites. In fact, the Central West End station near Barnes may be the busiest station. He goes on to say, “It would be cheaper to subsidize rides for people on Uber or Lyft.” The projected ridership of the MetroLink expansion is 9,000. It would take 9,000 Uber vehicles to handle these riders. That would mean 9,000 more autos spewing pollution. He claims MetroLink is unsafe. It was fine until former St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney Bob McCulloch stopped enforcing fare violation laws. Prosecutor Wesley Bell is going to enforce the fares again. That should go a long way in addressing crime. Plus, are roads any safer? Not to mention, there have been people who have been victims of crimes committed by Uber drivers. Bill Heger • Rock Hill

Shady effort sprouts to help improve underused ‘wasteland’ In the interest of being able to take advantage of the wasteland that is now near the Interstates 270 and 64 cloverleaf exchange, the Scouts, Forest ReLeaf of Missouri and other volunteers are removing invasive plant species and then planting native bushes and trees. The effort started last fall, and will continue until late this month, with contributions of trees and bushes from Omni Tree Service and Ritter Landscaping. Vehicle emissions will be sucked up by the plants, while oxygen will be produced by the plants. There are numerous environmental groups in the state. Enjoy what you see being done, and see if you’d enjoy getting involved. John Milton • Ladue

Recent news has centered on former Vice President Joe Biden and what many women have called his inappropriate touching. While none of these women have claimed Biden’s actions could be classified as sexual assault, they have felt compelled, nonetheless, to make public statements about his making them feel uncomfortable. As a lifelong feminist and supporter of the #MeToo movement, these reports leave me feeling uncomfortable. When headlines are written about nonsexual assault allegations, it diminishes the validity and importance of the actual sexual assault that thousands of women have suffered in the workplace. Men like Harvey Weinstein have used their power for decades to blunt the progress of women by blocking upward mobility, paying women less for the same jobs as men, and often making the working environment so toxic, women end up leaving rather than continuing to put up with the harassment. I am not suggesting that Biden’s actions did not make these women feel uncomfortable. But as a woman who wants to have a seat in the boardroom and be treated as an equal, I believe these women should have taken control of the situation by telling Biden how he was making them feel. Opting to broadcast it publicly will likely do more harm to a legitimate movement than good. Jill Gaither • Richmond Heights

Vice president’s gestures are sign of decent, caring human As I embrace the “Me Too” movement, and amid the reports of Joe Biden being too touchy, weird and making people uncomfortable, I find that America could use a little more of what I consider Biden just being a great human being. When I interact with someone who I don’t want in my space, I don’t blame them for being less than an arm’s length away. I blame me for not moving back. People like the vice president are usually caring, decent humans who are simply trying to interact in the moment. I’d rather have a world of that than the noncaring, cold, ruthless, lying type that care only for themselves, like our current president. Steve Murphy • St. Louis

A bright idea for drivers: Use headlights when wipers are on Regarding the Post-Dispatch report “What’s with all those expired license tags in St. Louis?” (March 31): A related and vexing problem is drivers not turning on their headlights when using their windshield wipers. It is a state law in both Missouri and Illinois. It’s easily the most broken law in Missouri, although some may guess that would be rolling stops at stop signs. This law is seemingly not enforced, as I even see police cars from Chesterfield, Creve Coeur and St. Louis County with their headlights off while it’s raining. Add in professional drivers of trucks, taxis and delivery vans among those who drive this way. I called St. Louis County to ask if they are aware of state driving laws. When asked what my complaint was, I told the woman who answered the phone the issue and her response was “that’s a state law, not county.” So, I guess we can gather that St. Louis County does not abide by state driving laws. Brian Brinkmeyer • Chesterfield Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

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STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

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75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A21

IN SORRY CONTRAST • Gen. Douglas MacArthur, either as soldier or possible presidential candidate, deserves no cubits added to his stature for a publicized letter in which he seems to be engaging in smug self-pity over the decisions reached by his military superiors. Since when has it become proper for a general to question the grand strategy of the high command? Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Assange arrest creates First Amendment ‘twilight zone’ U.S. case sparks debate: Does the WikiLeaks founder deserve to be protected as a journalist? DAVID IGNATIUS Washington Post

Is Julian Assange a journalist? The Justice Department sidestepped that question in its indictment of Assange. But his case is still certain to stir a debate about whether the WikiLeaks founder deserves protection under the First Amendment. Assange was arrested in London on Thursday, as U.S. prosecutors unsealed an indictment accusing him of conspiring with Chelsea Manning to hack a Pentagon computer in 2010 to obtain secret documents that WikiLeaks hoped to publish. The indictment focuses on Assange’s alleged attempt to help Manning crack a password and gain special

“administrative-level privileges,” an effort that proved unsuccessful. But the underlying “purpose and object of the conspiracy” was “so that WikiLeaks could publicly disseminate the information on its website,” prosecutors said. Assange’s supporters describe his arrest and proposed extradition to America as an attack on press freedom. But there’s some skepticism about that claim, even from several of the country’s most prominent defenders of the First Amendment. “When you read the indictment, it doesn’t look like anything that turns on whether Assange is or is not a journalist,” said Bruce Brown, the executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, in an interview Thursday.“No newsroom lawyer would tell a reporter it’s OK to do what’s alleged

in the complaint — to help a source break a password and hack a computer.” Assange’s lawyer, Barry Pollack, countered that his client deserves to be treated as a journalist. He said in a statement that while the indictment alleges a conspiracy to commit computer crimes,“the factual allegations ... boil down to encouraging a source to provide him information and taking efforts to protect the identity of that source.” Pollack amplified his comment in an email: “I do not find the question of whether he is a journalist a tricky one. Mr. Assange publishes truthful information that is of public interest. I think that is a pretty good definition of ‘journalist.’” Actually, the federal legal meaning of what constitutes journalism is all but nonexistent. Garrett Epps, a professor of constitutional law at the University of Baltimore, describes it as “a strange twilight zone in terms of the Constitution,” because the Supreme Court

has never clearly explained who gets the Bill of Rights freedom afforded to “the press.” “The courts haven’t extended any protection to journalists that they haven’t extended to the public at large,” explained Jameel Jaffer, director of the Knight First Amendment Institute.“This is in part because extending special protections to journalists would require the court to say who’s a journalist and who isn’t.” Assange’s informationdumping actions make some First Amendment lawyers queasy.“There is a fundamental difference between someone who shines a spotlight on classified information and someone who turns on all the lights,” said David Kendall, who represented President Bill Clinton during his impeachment hearings and Hillary Clinton during the 2016 email investigation. Because Assange hasn’t shown “calibrated judgment” about what information to share with readers,

he isn’t acting as a journalist, Kendall told me. As for the prosecutors’ allegation that Assange facilitated Manning’s hacking of classified information, Kendall added: “People in the press typically are not burglars.” Lincoln Caplan, a Yale Law scholar who has written widely about journalism, said in an interview that there’s an important distinction between “curating” information, as reporters do, and “dumping” it, as has often been WikiLeaks’ practice. An intriguing footnote to the Assange case is that as part of a failed plea-bargain negotiation with the Justice Department in 2017, he offered to help vet some highly classified CIA files that WikiLeaks was publishing in a document dump known as “Vault 7.” As I wrote last September, this “risk mitigation” discussion collapsed after WikiLeaks revealed some especially sensitive CIA hacking techniques. Assange could argue that the 2017 offer showed that

he was sensitive to nationalsecurity concerns. Similarly, he could point to his cooperation with The New York Times and other news organizations that edited and vetted WikiLeaks files before publication. Complicating this case is WikiLeaks’ role in disseminating documents hacked by Russian intelligence from Democrats during the 2016 presidential campaign, where Assange appeared to be a tool of Russian meddling to support Donald Trump. Assange wants to fight his case under the banner of press freedom. His problem is that the Justice Department has drawn its indictment carefully enough that the issue is theft of secrets, rather than their publication. That’s why so many press advocates seemed to be distancing themselves from Assange after the news broke Thursday. David Ignatius Twitter: @IgnatiusPost Copyright The Washington Post

‘Tax the rich’? It sounds more like scapegoating America’s wealthy The assault on the so-called 1 percent is unreasonable; many already pay more than their fair share of income taxes.

JONAH GOLDBERG Los Angeles Times

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National Rifle Association Executive Vice President and CEO Wayne LaPierre speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Maryland in 2018.

Cease-fire? The struggling NRA doesn’t represent average gun owners. It represents mayhem. KEVIN McDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Is the National Rifle Association really on its deathbed? We can only hope. Media reports, and the firearms lobbying organization itself, have indicated it may be on life support for a host of reasons, from playing footsie with Russian operatives to legal problems in New York to fallout from mass shootings. It could be a fundraising ploy. But the fact remains, today’s NRA is less a representative of the gunowning public than the lobbying arm of the gun-manufacturing industry. There is myriad evidence it doesn’t speak for most gun owners. If this malevolent force in America’s political culture is indeed on the ropes, it’s a big opportunity, finally, for rational gun policy. But only if gun control advocates approach it with the goal not of vanquishing the tens of millions of American gun owners out there, but of coming to terms with them. It’s more possible than it might sound. The NRA has amassed so much political influence, and uses it to such unreasonable ends, that it warps our gun policy debate in ways that have precluded such a meeting of minds. It’s mythology that this influence is mostly about political purse strings or overwhelming numbers of voting members. Moneywise, the NRA isn’t anywhere near the biggest player in politics. And the organization’s claim of 5 million members is a drop in an estimated bucket of 75 million Americans who own guns. So where does all its power come from? The organization has a dark talent for grassroots organizing and picking its campaign battles. This magnifies the influence of its relative sliver of the voting population, especially in Republican

primaries, which tend to draw outsized proportions of true believers. The NRA may not be able to sway a competitive general election for a congressional seat, but in solid Republican districts, it can run the table during the primaries. This doesn’t so much win new seats for Republicans as ensure that the Republicans who do win are adequately irrational on guns. This is why the Republicancontrolled Senate is refusing to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act: because the party of “family values,” in terrified obedience to the NRA, is standing up for the rights of stalker-boyfriends to obtain firearms while they’re under restraining orders. It’s why the same Senate won’t allow a vote on a bill to mandate universal criminal background checks for all gun purchases — a measure supported by more than 90 percent of gun owners, but opposed by their supposed champions at the NRA. If in theory the NRA were to lose its vise grip over our national gun policy — due to a Democratic takeover of government, or its own legal and financial problems, or the rise of a competing entity more genuinely representative of gun-owning Americans — it wouldn’t end the debate. But it could open the possibility of common ground. For gun control advocates, that promise would come with a responsibility to understand what’s possible and what isn’t. After so long on opposite sides of that divide, the solutions will have to be maddeningly incremental. NRA extremists have railed for decades that anti-gun storm troopers are itching for a wholesale gun confiscation binge. Any gun control proposals that look anything like that will send otherwise reasonable gun owners running back to the bunker. Law-abiding gun owners aren’t primarily the problem anyway. It’s that so many guns are in circulation in the U.S. — more firearms than people — that keeping them

in law-abiding hands is like lassoing smoke. Gun buyback programs could reduce that saturation without triggering cries of “gun grabber.” And, since most gun owners agree with universal background checks, that would be an obvious step if and when the NRA roadblock is gone. Then there’s the recent, promising Connecticut Supreme Court ruling that, if it stands, could undercut the outrageous federal law that prohibits victims of gun violence from suing firearms manufacturers. Let Smith & Wesson or Remington start facing high-dollar court judgments for the bloodshed they enable, and see how quickly they join the fight to keep their products out of the wrong hands. And speaking of the wrong hands: Gun control advocates must stop pretending that guns are pulling their own triggers, and get behind tougher sentencing for gun crimes. The current bipartisan push toward sentencing reform is great — filling prisons with nonviolent drug offenders has always been ludicrous — but the drug dealer, conveniencestore robber or carjacker who employs a gun, or is even caught with one he’s not allowed to have, should be doing serious time. Period. Massive majorities of Americans, including many gun owners, support a raft of other ideas that the NRA has bullheadedly blocked, from a national gun database to purchase waiting periods to bans on high-capacity magazines. For decades, the NRA has stoked a profitable culture war between pro- and anti-gun Americans who might actually agree on more than we think. If that malignant entity really is on the verge of collapse, maybe both sides can finally stem the bleeding it has done so much to cause. kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com @kevinmcdermott (314) 340-8268

If I told you there was a movement to create a navy or air force, you might respond,“Don’t we already have those?” If I said we need a movement to convince bears to relieve themselves in the woods, you might say,“Wait. Isn’t that happening already?” But if I said we needed to tax the rich, a lot of people’s first reaction would be,“Yes! It’s about time!” In fact, there’s an “astroturf” movement based on precisely this notion. There was just a big conference, fittingly named the “Tax the Rich!” conference, hosted by a group called Patriotic Millionaires. “Tax the Rich. Save America. Yes, it really is that simple,” they explain in their mission statement. This slogan is simply dishonest; rich people do, in fact, pay taxes. Just under half (48 percent) of federal revenue comes from income taxes. If you define the rich as the top 1 percent — which is probably too narrow, depending on the region of the country — the rich pay a big chunk of that. In 2016, according to the Tax Foundation, the top 1 percent accounted for 37.3 percent of all income tax revenue, a share that was greater than the bottom 90 percent of all payers of income tax combined. The top half of taxpayers paid 97 percent of income taxes. The Tax Policy Center estimates that 44 percent of Americans won’t pay any federal income taxes for 2018. That doesn’t mean they don’t pay any taxes, of course. Payroll taxes eat up a big chunk of many Americans’ paychecks — a fact we all learn the first time we shout,“Who the hell is FICA!?” But the income tax is remarkably progressive. Once again citing the Tax Policy Center (a joint project of two left-of-center think tanks: the Brookings Institution and the Urban Institute), Americans in the top 20 percent paid an estimated 87 percent of income taxes for 2018. This was up from 84 percent in 2017, which means that the “Trump tax cuts” actually made the tax code more progressive. The folks shouting “Tax the rich!” know this, which is why, when they move beyond sloganeering, they say that what they really want is for the rich to “pay their fair share.” This is a more debatable claim because “fair” is in the eye of the beholder. It’s not preposterous to argue that the rich, however defined, should pay a few percentage points more in income tax in the name of fairness. But it’s also not preposterous to say that when 1 percent of the

people provide more than a third of income tax revenue, they’re already paying their fair share — and suggesting that people who don’t want to pay even more are “unpatriotic” is bullying nonsense. While we’re on the topic of fairness, there’s another common argument for hiking income taxes for the wealthy, or for even simply taxing wealth itself: The rich deserve it. Or, to be more generous, the super-rich don’t deserve their money, while the rest of the country does. The New York Times’ Farhad Manjoo recently argued for “abolishing” billionaires outright. Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren and Beto O’Rourke say we should make the rich less rich because income inequality is bad. Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (and many others) think that everything

Sen. Elizabeth Warren

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from Medicare for All to the Green New Deal can be financed largely — or entirely — by pillaging the bank accounts of the rich. This is populist insanity masquerading as public finance. According to the Manhattan Institute’s Brian Riedl, doubling the top tax brackets (from 35 and 37 percent to 70 and 74 percent) “would close just one-fifth of the longterm Social Security and Medicare shortfall. Even seizing all annual income earned over $500,000 would not come close.” You could literally confiscate 100 percent of the wealth of the entire 1 percent and not come close to paying for Sanders’ version of Medicare for All (price tag: $32 trillion). This points to my real problem with all of this “tax the rich” talk. It works from the assumption that the problems of ordinary Americans are the result of a tiny group of people refusing to do their part. Not only does this assume that the wealth of people who have paid considerable taxes still belongs to everyone, it’s also simple scapegoating. By my lights, it would be no less outrageous if the math added up. But it doesn’t, which makes it even more irresponsible. Jonah Goldberg goldbergcolumn@gmail.com Copyright Tribune Content Agency


NEWS

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

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History reinvents itself South of Nashville, a couple fashions a new home from remnants of the past. written by DEBRA ENGLE • photographed by ANTHONY-MASTERSON styled by ANNA FORKUM hen Sherri Lackey first saw the house her husband, Doug, wanted to renovate, her reaction couldn’t have been clearer. “We need a bulldozer,” she told him. The couple had taken on remodeling challenges before, but this 1815 home hadn’t been lived in for almost a decade. Tarps were draped over the roof to prevent leaks, and “it looked like hoarders had moved out,” Doug says. “You could hardly walk through the house.” He couldn’t resist the property’s 90 acres, though, including one of the highest spots in Williamson County, Tennessee. And the significance of the home—it was built by the father of the man for whom the town of Thompson’s Station was named—appealed to Doug and Sherri both. “We love history and bringing something back to life,” he says. Despite its crumbling countenance, the house had 12-foot-high ceilings in places and an 8×9-foot fireplace, indicating that it was grander than most in its day. Historical records revealed it took three years to build and used locally harvested timber and limestone. “Ironically,” Doug says, “it took us about the same amount of time to renovate it.” Adding on and doubling the original 1,500 square feet meant taking the old house apart and putting it back together again, repurposing as many original materials as possible. Damaged ash wood flooring from the kitchen was rescued and refashioned into the master bedroom ceiling. Scarred poplar beams were enlisted to support two sets of new bunk beds. The Lackeys sourced period building materials from other places, too, including an old smokehouse in another county that was dismantled and milled on-site to supply the logs for the parlor walls. The enormous cooking fireplace stayed where it was, updated with a gas range and pot filler. And original themes, like the arch of the fireplace, were replicated through the new foyer and custom mahogany doors. Sherri, an interior designer, chose a light palette to avoid jarring contrast that would distract from the home’s good bones. In keeping with the original wood and stone, she selected other natural elements, such as soapstone for countertops. To create continuity, materials repeat throughout the house, such as the tile for the laundry room floor and kitchen backsplash. Everything, including the iron lighting fixtures and the wallpaper pattern in the bathroom, was chosen with a nod to the history of the home. “We wanted it to be as timeless as possible,” THE STYLE Sherri says. During the three-year renovation, AUTHORITY more than 100 craftspeople, artisans, and Subscribe to Country contractors worked on the project. What would Home® magazine at the original builders say to them today? “Good magazine.store and get job,” Doug says simply. 4 issues for $10.

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The original limestone fireplace remains the focal point of the parlor even though the space was expanded by 6 feet. The Lackeys used 14- to 16-footlong smokehouse logs ripped lengthwise to dress the expanded space.

The history of the 1815 house appealed to both Sherri and Doug Lackey.

Added to one of the original rooms, bookshelves display Sherri’s collection of antique books. Existing shiplap walls were dismantled, sanded, and reinstalled and now are revealed behind new shelves.

Above: The bunk room features custom ironwork that’s as hefty as the poplar bedposts, made from the home’s original support beams. Left: Sherri designed the custom island, which was built by local carpenters.

The debate over reshaping STL Follow our coverage of the proposed city/county merger.

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04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 1

How flying cars could help in the fight against climate change

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A23

BY LEILA MILLER Los angeles Times

Have you ever been stuck in traffic and wished you could zoom above the gridlock in a flying car? A new study predicts these futuristic vehicles could be good for your commute and good for the environment — as long as they’re used on long-distance trips with several carpool buddies. The finding, published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, could help guide the development of flying cars so they’ll have more in common with a plugin electric vehicle than a gas-guzzling SUV. “We did not imagine that flying cars would have any role in a sustainable mobility system,” said study leader Akshat Kasliwal, a graduate student at the University of Michigan’s Center for Sustainable Systems. “We were surprised to see that they do.”

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These flying cars — known officially as vertical takeoff and landing aircraft, or VTOLs (pronounced “vtolls”) — won’t be getting off the ground regularly for a few more years, at least. But engineers already have a pretty good idea of how they would operate. Generally speaking, they would begin their flights by rising straight into the air like a helicopter, then climb to at least 1,000 feet. Once they reach cruising altitude, they are capable of flying about 150 miles per hour. When it’s time to land, the final descent would be vertical as well. A VTOL could get in and out of tight spaces. The amount of real estate needed to park four school buses side by side would be more than enough. But could a VTOL compete with traditional cars in terms of greenhouse gas emissions? This is an important consideration, because scientists say the world needs to begin reducing its total emissions within the next decade to avoid the worst effects of climate change. By 2050 or so, they say, net carbon emissions will need to be nearly zero. Cleaning up the transportation system will be a big part of that. Transportation is responsible for 28 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and 60 percent of those emissions come from light duty vehicles like passenger cars, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To see whether flying cars have a role to play in a sustainable future, Kasliwal and his co-authors from the University of Michigan and Ford Motor Co. compared a hypothetical battery-powered flying car to two vehicles that travel on the ground: a regular car powered by an internal combustion engine, and a battery-powered electric car. The researchers simulated a variety of scenarios. First, they considered the emissions that each kind of car would produce if it carried a single passenger. The regular car releases greenhouse gases through its tailpipe. The electric car and the flying car wouldn’t produce emissions directly, so the researchers considered the pollution associated with generating the electricity needed to power them. For short trips up to about 22 miles, the regular car produced fewer emissions than the flying car. For longer trips, the flying car was cleaner to operate. But in this analysis, the flying car could never match the low emissions of the electric car. In fact, it didn’t even come close unless the trip was more than about 75 miles. However, the researchers noted that people won’t always be traveling solo. So they redid their calculations assuming that the regular car and the electric car had 1.54 passengers (which is the actual average in the U.S.) and that the flying car had 3 passengers (not including the pilot). When they considered the greenhouse gas emissions per passenger for a trip lasting about 60 miles, they found that the flying car was 52 percent cleaner than the regular car and 6 percent cleaner than the electric car. The key for the flying car is to spend enough time in the air — and carry enough passengers — to justify the emissions produced during takeoff and landing. “You’re able to essentially spread out the emissions more per person,” said study co-author Jim Gawron, a graduate student at Michigan’s School for Environment and Sustainability and its Ross School of Business. Having multiple passengers also “allows you to take more vehicles off the road,” he said. These findings suggest that flying cars would be more sustainable if used as ride-share taxi services, the study authors said.

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04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A23

Clothing line’s name tests high court on free speech Century-old provision bars ‘scandalous’ and ‘immoral’ trademarks

Los Angeles artist Erik Brunetti (right) named his streetwear clothing company FUCT. On Monday, the Supreme Court will hear his challenge to a law that bans trademarks that are “scandalous” or “immoral.”

BY GREG STOHR Bloomberg

A clothing line with a vulgar-sounding name is about to test the U.S. Supreme Court’s commitment to free speech. The justices will hear arguments Monday from an attorney for Erik Brunetti, who was rejected when he

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sought federal protection for his “FUCT” trademark. Brunetti is asking the court to strike down a centuryold provision that bars the inclusion of “scandalous” and “immoral” trademarks on a U.S. government registry. Recent history suggests the justices will be skeptical about the prohibition.

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Two years ago, the court unanimously threw out a similar ban on disparaging trademarks, saying that provision violated the First Amendment. Critics of the vulgarity ban, part of the federal statute that governs trademarks, say it can’t be applied consistently. In other cases the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office allowed registration of “fcuk,” “wtf is up with my love life?!” and “fword,” as well as various scatological references and words describing sexual activity. “It’s inherent in the nature of this,” said Barton Beebe, a New York University law professor who analyzed the 6.7 million trademark applications filed from 1985 through 2016. “There’s no clear, administrable way to distinguish between something that’s too scandalous versus not-quite-so-scandalous.” Federal registration gives trademark owners protections on top of those they already have under state law. Registration can confer exclusive rights in parts of the country where no one was already using the name or image, help owners win lawsuits, and put would-be competitors on notice that a trademark is legally protected. President Donald Trump’s administration is defending the ban. U.S. Solicitor General Noel Francisco says Brunetti is free to use the FUCT label but doesn’t have the right to claim the legal benefits of federal registration. “The scandalous-marks provision does not restrict speech, but simply imposes a condition on the availability of a government benefit,” Francisco argued in court papers. Brunetti describes his clothes as “street fashion” and says his products have been sold at Urban Outfitters and small skate shops,

as well as online. In tossing out the ban, a federal appeals court in Washington said the First Amendment “protects private expression, even private expression which is offensive to a substantial composite of the general public.” The federal trademark office has suspended consideration of vulgar and lewd marks during the court fight. Among those on hold are applications by the all-women music groups Pussy Riot and Thunderpussy over their band names. Miramax is awaiting word on its bid to register “bad mother f---er,” without the hyphens, for use on Pulp Fiction-themed goods. The office rejected almost 2,000 applications for word trademarks as “immoral” or “scandalous” from 2003 to 2015, according to the study by Beebe and fellow New York University law professor Jeanne Fromer. The 2017 ruling on disparaging trademarks was a victory for an AsianAmerican dance-rock band called The Slants and helped the Washington Redskins football team defeat a challenge to its registered trademark. Although the eight justices taking part splintered in their reasoning, all said the provision was a form of unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination. Francisco contends the vulgarity ban is different because it doesn’t depend on the viewpoint of the applicant. “It bars registration of scandalous marks not because such marks are thought to convey offensive ideas, but because they reflect an offensive mode of expressing whatever idea the speaker wishes to convey,” the solicitor general argued. The court will rule by the end of June in the case, Iancu v. Brunetti, 18-302.

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NEWS

A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Doctors reportedly find four bees living in woman’s eye Singapore.

BY TIMOTHY BELLA Washington Post

The 29-year-old woman had no idea why her eye was swollen shut. She was in unbearable pain and could not stop tearing up. The Taiwanese woman said she was confused why what she thought was an infection kept getting worse, CTS News reported. But when the woman, identified by her surname He, received treatment at Fooyin University Hospital in Taiwan, doctors didn’t find a bacterial infection. While looking at He’s eyes through a microscope, Hung Chi-ting, the hospital’s head of ophthalmology, witnessed something he hadn’t seen before. Insect legs were wiggling from one of her eye sockets. He yanked out a small bee, known as Halictidae or a “sweat bee.” And it was alive. The doctor, however, wasn’t done. Soon he extracted a second sweat bee. And a third. And, finally, a fourth bee was pulled from the woman’s eyelid. Craving salt, the bees had been feeding off He’s tears, the doctor said recently at a news conference, later describing the odd medical diagnosis as a “world first.” The insects had made a new home inside the woman’s eyelid — that is, until they were all successfully removed alive. “I saw something that looked like insect legs, so I pulled them out under a microscope slowly, and one at a time without damaging their bodies,” Hung said, according to Business Insider

TRACK WEATHER CONDITIONS

TOMB SWEEPING DAY So, how did sweat bees end up camping out inside the woman’s eye? He suspects it all started the previous day. As He recounted in the news conference, she was taking part in the Qingming Festival, also known as Tomb Sweeping Day. “I was visiting and tidying a relative’s grave with my family,” He recently told reporters. “I was squatting down and pulling out weeds.” As CTS News reported, He said she felt something get in her eye. Thinking it was only dirt, she cleaned her eye out with water and did not rub her eyes much for the rest of the day. She didn’t think much of it until her eyes began to swell up that night and she experienced a stinging pain that made her tear up. It would have been very likely for sweat bees to be around He at the time, Hung told reporters, as they tend to nest near graves and in the mountains. At the hospital the following day, when Hung discovered that the sweat bees were feasting on He’s tears, the doctor was relieved that the woman, who wore contacts, had not rubbed her eyes excessively when the pain worsened, Hung told the BBC. If she had, it could have worsened her inflamed cornea or potentially led to blindness, Apple Daily Taiwan and other media outlets reported. Matan Shelomi, an associate professor of entomology at National Taiwan University, told The Washington Post that he had never heard of sweat bees infesting a person before the recent incident.

Time to Stain Your Deck

“To my knowledge, this is the first case of a bee or a wasp getting caught in a part of a person’s anatomy, as far as I know,” he said. “I’m sure the sweat bees got by the eye and got squished between the eye and eyelid. They were in the wrong place at the wrong time.”

SALT AND PROTEIN SOURCE In addition to needing pollen and nectar like other bees, Shelomi said, sweat bees, which are dark-colored and metallic, will occasionally need salt to supplement their diet. A study this month from the Kansas Entomological Society found that sweat bees also look to tears as a protein source. “They don’t seem to be bothered by people, so they will go to any source of salt,” Shelomi said. “I think they’re kind of dumb if they come to humans for their salt. They haven’t figured out what we are.” While there are more than 1,000 species of sweat bees in the United States, Canada and Central America, according to Terminix, they are almost painless, and only sting when they are provoked.

On the Schmidt Sting Pain Index, a scale of relative agony caused by sawflies, wasps, bees and ants, the sweat bee comes in at the lowest level of pain. Described by the index as “light, ephemeral, almost fruity,” the puny sting is compared to “a tiny spark [that] has singed a single hair on your arm.” “She couldn’t have asked for a better bee to sting her in her eye,” Shelomi said. He was discharged and is expected to make a full recovery, KRON-TV reported. The bees are also still alive, Hung told the BBC, and will now be studied. “This is the first time in Taiwan we’ve seen something like this,” the doctor said. Even though the case is probably the most unusual he’s heard about in his time studying entomology, Shelomi emphasized that what happened at the gravesite in Taiwan was a fascinating but not worrisome “freak occurrence.” “The woman will be fine. The bees will be fine,” Shelomi stressed. “This is not something that people need to concern themselves with. I don’t expect we’ll ever see it again.”

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

OBITUARIES Baucum, Vera M. - St. Louis Brennan, Theresa A. - St. Louis Bruning, Alma "Polly" - Crestwood, MO Cheney, Walter A. (SGT.) - St. Louis Dacey, Marie Catherine - Ballwin, MO Devine, William - Pacific, MO Doerner, Rita M. - St. Louis Grafeman, Debbie - St. Charles Griffin, Velma "Phyllis" - Hazelwood Gruebbeling, Harold N. - Morrison, MO Haefner, Gregory Lawrence - St. Louis Herzing, James J. - St. Louis

Celebrations of Life

Horrell, Kenneth Oliver - Upland, CA, formerly of St. Louis King, Thomas Morgan, Ph.D. - St. Louis Lambert, Ida Belle - St. Peters, MO Mattison, Terry A. - Fairview Heights, IL Murray - see Haefner Ottinger, Kurt - St. Louis Pellerito, Mary - Ballwin Phillips, Arthur F. - St. Charles Piontek, Anita F. - Washington, MO Reiter, Norman M. - St. Louis Royer - See Doerner Schimmer - See Doerner

Dacey, Marie Catherine

Baucum, Vera "Marie" August 5, 1928 - March 26, 2019 In loving memory, always beloved wife for 73 years to Omer (Bud); dear mother and mother-in-law of Rita (Darrell deceased) LaChance and Karen (Frank) McKeown; dear sister to h e r l a s t l i v i n g s ib l in g Tom Waltman; dear grandmother of Cami (John), Marc (Liz), Frank (Jessica), Susie (Dennis), Kevin (Darcy), Margi (Matt), Cassie (Alex), Joanie (Drew), and Ali; dear great-grandmother of Erin, Adam, Henry, Ruby, Teddy, Benny, Annie, Franklin, Leanora, Minta, Lydia, Eileen, Desmond, Maeve, Rosie, Remy, Dean, Bernadette, Dylan, Pierce and Vivienne; dear cousin, aunt, and friend to so many. Marie loved being a full time traveler, camper, fisherman, seamstress, country-western dancer and all-around treasure to everyone she encountered, while exuding happiness and energy in all that she did. Some of her most precious moments were with her many children, grandchildren and great grandchildren, but there was no mistaking the endless dedication to her Godchosen lifetime partner: "Bud". Everywhere he was, so was Marie. In later years she became his ears, eyes and even shaky hands, while they continued doing projects together as they always had. And, she continued placing those hands in his as they rested on the couch together after a busy day. Every man should be so fortunate. "MawMaw" will be missed so very much by all her loved ones. Services: Visitation April 19, 2019, at 10-11, Funeral at 11 am, Valhalla Cemetery Funeral Chapel, 7600 St. Charles Rock Road, St. Louis, MO 63133.

Brennan, Theresa A. (nee Leonard). Beloved wife of Gerald J. Brennan for 55 years; loving mother of Stephen (Cathy) Brennan, Barbara (Michael) Penn, Paul (Rebecca Pickens), Kenneth, and John (Marcie) Brennan; cherished grandmother of Elizabeth, Kimberly, Emily, Michael and Timothy Brennan; Bob Brennan-Pickens; Sean and Ella Brennan; and Lilith and Gordon Brennan; dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. After raising five children, Theresa attended and graduated from St. Louis University School of Law at age 43. She went on to become a partner at Greensfelder, Hemker, and Gale, PC. To give back to the community, she assisted people working to get their GED. She also enjoyed being a lector in her various parishes. Services: Funeral Wednesday, April 17th, 9:30 a.m. from Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd, Kirkwood, to St. Clement Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Memorial contributions appreciated to the American Parkinson Disease Association, Greater St. Louis Chapter. Visitation Tuesday, 4-8:00 p.m. www.boppchapel.com

Bruning, Alma "Polly" (n ee S h r u m ) of C r e s t w o o d , Missouri, Passed away on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Fred C B r u n i n g , l o v i n g mo t h e r o f Sharon Cooper, Patricia (John) Farinella, Fred (Mary) Bruning, Anthony (Cindy) Bruning, Michael (Janice) B ru n in g and Ken t (Virgie) Bruning, dear sister of the late Leroy "Wayne," grandmother of John, Rachel, Nathan, Joe, Bret, Becky, Michele, Sara, Jake, Toni Ann, Ryan, Nick, AJ, Amy and Emily, and great grandmother of twenty one great- grandchildren. Polly raised six kids and was the beloved wife of Fred C. Bruning for 63 years. She was a woman of a strong Christian faith. Polly was an avid gardener and was devoted to her family. She was a very joyful person who loved to dance and laugh. Polly never met anyone who she did not want to share her joy with. What a beautiful soul she had. She will be fondly remembered and dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Services: Visitation Saturday, April 13, 2019 from 11:00 a.m.2:00 p.m. followed by service at 2:00 p.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY, 10301 Big Bend rd. Kirkwood, MO. Interment Oak Hill Cemetery. Online guestbook www.stlfuneral.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Schmidt, Clarence Anton - Chesterfield Schmitz, Alex J. Jr. - St. Louis Schriefer, James H. - St. Louis Shannon, Dr. Anna Marian - Bozeman, Montana Terry, Elizabeth "Betsy" - Washington, DC Unverferth, Mary Arnett - St. Louis Usher, Tom - Sarcoxie, MO Weiner, Doris - St. Louis Weissmann, Andrea G. - St. Louis Weston, Waleen F. - St. Louis Wobbe, Rita - St. Louis Wood, Robert Eugene - St. Louis Zimmermann, Eunice C. - St. Louis

Horrell, Kenneth Oliver

passed away Wednesday, March our much loved father, grand27, 2019. First born daughter to father and great-grandfather Thomas and Catherine Corcoran peacefully went to be with our on February 27, 1925. She was L o r d a n d Sa vior o n Frid a y, preceded in death by her three February 15, 2019. He gave his sisters, Jane Moser, Patricia love unconditionally to his wife, Durkin, and Kathleen Phipps. Carol, for 55 wonderful years. Beloved Mother of Kathleen Also, blessed with his love were (Ray) Voigt, Timothy (Colette) their children: Barbara Boros Dacey, and Eileen McLaughlin. (John), John Horrell, Stephen W. B e s t gra n d ma Ree, greatHorrell, Cynthia Lane (Ron). Ken grandma Ree, aunt, great-aunt, leaves six grandchildren: Jamie, and friend. Lori, and Stephen C. Horrell, There will be no services. To Sarah Ewing, David Boros, Susan leave a condolence and view the full obituary, please visit Willemstein and eight great-grandchildren: Olivia, Cooper, w w w . s t l o u i s c r e m a t i o n . c o m . M e m o r i a l s t o Dylan, Zachary, Noah, Beckham, Elliott and Nash. Ken is also www.connorscause.com greatly appreciated. survived by his beloved brother Donald (Bud) Horrell (Carlene), sister Marlene Burkemper (Lee), brother-in-law Dave Lange (Sharon) and sister-in-law Joan Ferro (Roy), nieces, nephews, Devine, William cousins and numerous friends. He was preceded in death by his 71, April 11, 2019. Mass at St. Bridget's, Pacific, Wed loving wife Carol, sister Sharon Lange, brothers-in-law David (4/17), 10:30 am. Visit at Schrader Funeral Home-Eureka Dunham and Roy Ferro, nieces Susan Reznicek and Jordan Tues. 3-8 pm. For more info see Schrader.com Lange. Ken was a faithful, devout Christian and member of Grace Lutheran Church in Upland, California. He was also a staunch Doerner, Rita M. (nee Schmidt) entered into rest on Thursday April 10, 2019. patriot and a proud member of the Republican Party. His moral character and kindness were evident by his Beloved wife of the late Gus Doerner. Beloved mother of Terry (Mike) Schimmer, Bob (Annette) Royer, and the late Renee generous and regular contributions to over eighty charities. Over sixty six years, Ken held many positions in the Printing Sperandio. Dear grandmother of Lisa (Ben) Heisel, Chris (Vanessa) Schimmer, Robert III (Angela), Jeffrey (Lindsay) and Industry, earning great respect and national recognition. He Brian (Jenn) Royer. Our dear great-grandmother of 8 and one ultimately owned his own business and recently retired after a on the way. Dear sister of Emil (Rosemary) Schmidt and the late successful and gratifying career. In addition to his love of God, family and friends, Ken enjoyed Sandy (Paul) Jones. Our dear aunt and friend. Services: Visitation Sunday 4 to 8 pm at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & The St. Louis Cardinals, horse racing, John Wayne, Snickers and Wint-O-Green Mints. His warm, genuine smile will live in our SONS (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). hearts forever. Funeral service Monday 10:00 am with interment at Services: His service will be held at Our Lady of Sorrows Lakewood Park Cemetery. Catholic Church on Friday, April 26th at 11:00 a.m. The address is 5020 Rhodes Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63109. In lieu of flowers, Grafeman, Debbie the family has requested donations be given to the City of Hope, 61 on Tue. (4/9/19). Visit: Tue. 4/16 from 4-8 p.m. at Hutchens- 1500 E. Duarte Rd., Duarte, CA 91010. Tax exempt 501 (c)3. EIN Stygar. Services: 10 a.m. Wed. (4/17) at Hutchens-Stygar (St. 95-343591 and/or The Wholehearted Foundation, 1918 Belleville Charles). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com Dr. N.E., Leesburg, VA 20176. Tax exempt 501 (c)3, EIN 475490420

Griffin, Velma "Phyllis"

(nee Mulligan) Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection King, Thomas Morgan, Ph.D. on April 12, 2019. on Monday, April 8, 2019. Beloved wife of Harold R. Griffin Sr. of 65 years; dearest Beloved husband for 56 years of mother of Harold R. Griffin, Elizabeth Ann Gabbard and Cheryl Judith Carole King (nee Cox); Lynn (survived by Rick) Niewald; dear grandma of Joshua dear father of Carole Elizabeth (Jessie), Haley, Aaron Geno, Michelle and Jennifer Niewald; Olsen (Sturla) and Ashley Morgan great-grandma of Evan, Ella, Makenzie, Ethan, Anthony, Sophia, Snyder (Sam); dearest grandJerry Jr.; our dear sister of Joe, Melvin, Dorothy Mulligan and father of Sarah Elizabeth Olsen, Eurline; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend of many Christopher Thomas Olsen, and at Hazelwood Baptist Church. Madeleine Morgan Snyder; dear Phyllis taught Sunday School at Hazelwood Baptist and Bible brother of Margaret Elizabeth Study at Santa Maria Home. Craig (John) of Atlanta; our dear Services: Service Tuesday, April 16, 12 NOON at Hazelwood brother-in-law, uncle, and a Baptist Church, 6161 Howdershell Rd. (Hazelwood). Interment friend to many. Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Mr. King was a resident of St. memorial contributions may be given to American Cancer Louis since 1966 and worked thirty years at the Monsanto Society. Visitation 4:00 - 7:00 p.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Company, retiring as Director of Technology for the Plastics Graham Rd. (Florrisant). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com Division. He was born on August 28, 1940 in Morristown, TN to Thomas Clinton and Elizabeth Morgan King. He is a graduate of Carson-Newman University, Jefferson City, TN, and received a Gruebbeling, Harold N. Ph.D. in Chemistry, 1966, from the University of Tennessee, Harold N. Bruebbeling formerly of St. Louis on April 10, 2019. Knoxville. McDonnell Douglas/Boeing employee for 36 years. He was an elder in the Presbyterian Church, an active For complete obituary visit www.mortonchapel.com volunteer in community and neighborhood organizations. Both he and Judy enjoyed travel in the US and in Europe, particularly visits to museums and theater. Music was a love of his, and he Haefner, Gregory Lawrence was a longtime supporter of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. was born May 1, 1941 and went to be with his Lord and Savior Services: A visitation will be held on Monday, April 15 at Jesus Christ on April 5, 2019. A loving husband, father, grandpa, Kriegshauser West, 9450 Olive Blvd., from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. A brother, brother-in-law, uncle and cousin. Preceded in death by Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, April 16, 11:00 a.m. at his parents Ray and Viola Haefner, his sister Patsy Bommarito the Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church, 9450 Clayton Morell, and his brother Tom Haefner. Greg leaves behind his Rd. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be loving wife and best friend of 53 years Jane (nee Murray) made to the Ladue Chapel or the St. Louis Symphony Haefner; four children; Mike, Mark (Alyson), Bob (Jen) Haefner, Orchestra. www.kriegshausermortuary.com and Paula (Shafiq) Islam; 16 grandchildren; Aaron, Christopher, Sean, Brigid, Benjamin, Mary Catherine, Braden, Thomas, Lambert, Ida Belle Caoilainn, Eliana, Genevieve, Julia Bernadette, Francine, Charlie, Sabrina, and Chloe; sister Carol O'Brien (late Emmett); sisters- 96, of Saint Peters, April 10, 2019. Vis. Mon., April 15, 4-8 in-law; Sister Bonnie Murray, CSJ and Pat Haefner, and brother- pm, and Funeral Tues., April 16, 10 am, Baue 3950 West Clay. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com in-law Andre Morell. Greg donated his body to St. Louis University Medical School. Services: A Memorial Mass is scheduled at St. Bernadette's Church (68 Sherman Rd) on July 6 at 11 a.m. preceded by visitation starting at 10 a.m. All are welcome.

Herzing, James J. 84, passed on April 10, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Rosemary; loving father of Dorothy (Joe) Siegfried and Ed (Julie) Herzing; grandfather of Elizabeth, Emily, Owen, Griffin; dear brother, uncle, cousin and friend of many. Services: Visitation Thursday, April 18th 4-8 p.m. with a Service, Friday, April 19th, 10:30 a.m. at Hutchens Mortuary, Florissant. Interment Jefferson Barracks.

“To live in the hearts we leave behind is not to die.” THOMAS CAMPBELL

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THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

Cheney, Walter A. (SGT.) Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Beloved husband of Patricia A. Cheney (nee Reasons); dear father of Jeffrey Cheney and Janice CheneyBockstruck; dear grandfather of Tony and Tori Bockstruck, and Mackenzie Rucker; dear greatgrandfather of Lucas Bockstruck and Eda Rucker; our dear brotherin-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Retired St . Louis City Police Sergen t with 31 years of dedicated service. Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry, Tuesday, April 16, 12 noon. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m.

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

OBITUARIES Barbieri, Albert John - St. Louis Baucum, Vera M. - St. Louis Brennan, Theresa A. - St. Louis Bruning, Alma "Polly" - Crestwood, MO Cahow, Theodora "Teddy" Josephine - St. Louis Cheney, Walter A. (SGT.) - St. Louis Dacey, Marie Catherine - Ballwin, MO Devine, William - Pacific, MO Doerner, Rita M. - St. Louis Evans, Doris Else - St. Louis Grafeman, Debbie - St. Charles Griffin, Velma "Phyllis" - Hazelwood Gruebbeling, Harold N. - Morrison, MO Haefner, Gregory Lawrence - St. Louis Herzing, James J. - St. Louis Higgins - see Meyer Horrell, Kenneth Oliver - Upland, CA, formerly of St. Louis

Barbieri, Albert John Peacefully entered heaven on Friday, April 12, 2019 fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church; beloved son of Catarina Rebolini and Stefano Barbieri; cherished husband of Elizabeth M u l l a n p h y B o l a n d Barbieri; treasured father of Cecelia Clark Barbieri- Costantiello, Mariquita de Laureal Barbieri and James Emmett Dee Barbieri; dear fatherin-law of Thomas Lorenzo Costantiello; loyal and devoted son, brother, cousin, in-law, uncle, godfather and long-time friend of many. Returning from service in the US Army in St. Louis, he continued his 45-year career in consumer banking in executive roles from Senior Vice President, Vice President of Operations, Branch Manager, Auditor and Comptroller. He served as the President of the New Mexico Bankers' Association. He retired from First National Bank of Albuquerque before returning to St. Louis with his family and retired again from Bank of America. Albert was actively involved in all aspects of life and sought to make anything he was involved in better. He was an active contributor and parishioner of Immaculate Conception Church in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He played a vital role in the art community in Albuquerque, serving as the first president of the New Mexico Arts & Craft Fair as well as contributing to the State Fair by serving as a member of the New Mexico Racing Commission. In St. Louis, Albert served on the Finance Committee of St. Joseph's Church in Clayton, the ACA and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. He was a proud graduate of the University of New Mexico, proud Albuquerque New Mexican and proud Italian, whose family was a part of making Albuquerque a great city before making St. Louis home. There was no greater husband and father who was his family's rock and champion. His integrity, faith and love of life will continue to be an inspiration to all those who were blessed to cross his path. Albert will be greatly missed by his wife, children, son-in-law, sister, in-laws, nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Services: The Funeral Mass will be celebrated Tuesday, April 16, 2019, 10:00 a.m., at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Clayton, Missouri. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Family will receive friends on Monday, April 15 in the Great Hall of Ambruster Chapel, 6633 Clayton Road, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Baucum, Vera "Marie" August 5, 1928 - March 26, 2019 In loving memory, always beloved wife for 73 years to Omer (Bud); dear mother and mother-in-law of Rita (Darrell deceased) LaChance and Karen (Frank) McKeown; dear sister to h e r l a s t l i v i n g s ib l in g Tom Waltman; dear grandmother of Cami (John), Marc (Liz), Frank (Jessica), Susie (Dennis), Kevin (Darcy), Margi (Matt), Cassie (Alex), Joanie (Drew), and Ali; dear great-grandmother of Erin, Adam, Henry, Ruby, Teddy, Benny, Annie, Franklin, Leanora, Minta, Lydia, Eileen, Desmond, Maeve, Rosie, Remy, Dean, Bernadette, Dylan, Pierce and Vivienne; dear cousin, aunt, and friend to so many. Marie loved being a full time traveler, camper, fisherman, seamstress, country-western dancer and all-around treasure to everyone she encountered, while exuding happiness and energy in all that she did. Some of her most precious moments were with her many children, grandchildren and great grandchildren, but there was no mistaking the endless dedication to her Godchosen lifetime partner: "Bud". Everywhere he was, so was Marie. In later years she became his ears, eyes and even shaky hands, while they continued doing projects together as they always had. And, she continued placing those hands in his as they rested on the couch together after a busy day. Every man should be so fortunate. "MawMaw" will be missed so very much by all her loved ones. Services: Visitation April 19, 2019, at 10-11, Funeral at 11 am, Valhalla Cemetery Funeral Chapel, 7600 St. Charles Rock Road, St. Louis, MO 63133.

Brennan, Theresa A. (nee Leonard). Beloved wife of Gerald J. Brennan for 55 years; loving mother of Stephen (Cathy) Brennan, Barbara (Michael) Penn, Paul (Rebecca Pickens), Kenneth, and John (Marcie) Brennan; cherished grandmother of Elizabeth, Kimberly, Emily, Michael and Timothy Brennan; Bob Brennan-Pickens; Sean and Ella Brennan; and Lilith and Gordon Brennan; dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. After raising five children, Theresa attended and graduated from St. Louis University School of Law at age 43. She went on to become a partner at Greensfelder, Hemker, and Gale, PC. To give back to the community, she assisted people working to get their GED. She also enjoyed being a lector in her various parishes. Services: Funeral Wednesday, April 17th, 9:30 a.m. from Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd, Kirkwood, to St. Clement Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Memorial contributions appreciated to the American Parkinson Disease Association, Greater St. Louis Chapter. Visitation Tuesday, 4-8:00 p.m. www.boppchapel.com

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Celebrations of Life

Johnson, Alydia Jeannine - Kirkwood King, Thomas Morgan, Ph.D. - St. Louis Lambert, Ida Belle - St. Peters, MO Mattison, Terry A. - Fairview Heights, IL Meyer, Shirlene M. - St. Louis Murray - see Haefner O'Donnell, Edward A. - St. Louis Oldani, Joan Irene - Florissant Ottinger, Kurt - St. Louis Parrish, Marielen - St. Louis Pellerito, Mary - Ballwin Phillips, Arthur F. - St. Charles Piontek, Anita F. - Washington, MO Reiter, Norman M. - St. Louis Royer - See Doerner Schimmer - See Doerner Schmidt, Clarence Anton - Chesterfield

Schmitz, Alex J. Jr. - St. Louis Schriefer, James H. - St. Louis Shannon, Dr. Anna Marian - Bozeman, Montana Sieve, Gertrude M. - St. Louis Stevenson, Winnie M. - Eureka, MO Terry, Elizabeth "Betsy" - Washington, DC Unverferth, Mary Arnett - St. Louis Usher, Tom - Sarcoxie, MO Vaughn, Cecile Eileen - St. Louis Weiner, Doris - St. Louis Weissmann, Andrea G. - St. Louis Weston, Waleen F. - St. Louis Wiers, Lillian - Manchester, MO Wobbe, Rita - St. Louis Wood, Robert Eugene - St. Louis Zimmermann, Eunice C. - St. Louis

Bruning, Alma "Polly"

Grafeman, Debbie

(n ee S h r u m ) of C r e s t w o o d , Missouri, Passed away on Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Fred C B r u n i n g , l o v i n g mo t h e r o f Sharon Cooper, Patricia (John) Farinella, Fred (Mary) Bruning, Anthony (Cindy) Bruning, Michael (Janice) B ru n in g and Ken t (Virgie) Bruning, dear sister of the late Leroy "Wayne," grandmother of John, Rachel, Nathan, Joe, Bret, Becky, Michele, Sara, Jake, Toni Ann, Ryan, Nick, AJ, Amy and Emily, and great grandmother of twenty one great- grandchildren. Polly raised six kids and was the beloved wife of Fred C. Bruning for 63 years. She was a woman of a strong Christian faith. Polly was an avid gardener and was devoted to her family. She was a very joyful person who loved to dance and laugh. Polly never met anyone who she did not want to share her joy with. What a beautiful soul she had. She will be fondly remembered and dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Services: Visitation Saturday, April 13, 2019 from 11:00 a.m.2:00 p.m. followed by service at 2:00 p.m. at CHAPEL HILL MORTUARY, 10301 Big Bend rd. Kirkwood, MO. Interment Oak Hill Cemetery. Online guestbook www.stlfuneral.com

61 on Tue. (4/9/19). Visit: Tue. 4/16 from 4-8 p.m. at HutchensStygar. Services: 10 a.m. Wed. (4/17) at Hutchens-Stygar (St. Charles). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Cahow, Theodora "Teddy" Josephine (nee Dolinsky), Friday April 12, 2019, age 95. Beloved wife of the late Leland Ralph Cahow for 61 years; loving mother of Patricia (Keith Bester) Maupin, Linda Marie (Darrell) Langley, Leland Ralph Cahow, Jr., and Sonya Jean (David) Klopfleisch; cherished grandmother of Stacy Cody, Douglas (Kathy) Maupin, Daniel Edward (Elaine Rigazzi) Maupin; the late Scott Langley; Lindsay (Jason) Barrett, Leslie (D.J.) Glaser, An n a C a h o w ; J a mes (Morgan) and Sara Klopfleisch; proud great-grandmother of Calvin, Caden, Shelby, Claire, Tucker, Ryder, Brooks, Charliefinn, Grae, Brogan, Cruz, and Aspen. Services: Funeral Thursday, April 18th, 9:30 a.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Road, Kirkwood. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorial contributions preferred to the charity of one's choice. Visitation Wednesday 4-8:00 p.m. www.boppchapel.com

Cheney, Walter A. (SGT.) Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Beloved husband of Patricia A. Cheney (nee Reasons); dear father of Jeffrey Cheney and Janice CheneyBockstruck; dear grandfather of Tony and Tori Bockstruck, and Mackenzie Rucker; dear greatgrandfather of Lucas Bockstruck and Eda Rucker; our dear brotherin-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Retired St . Louis City Police Sergen t with 31 years of dedicated service. Services: Funeral from Kutis South County Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry, Tuesday, April 16, 12 noon. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m.

Griffin, Velma "Phyllis" (nee Mulligan) Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on April 12, 2019. Beloved wife of Harold R. Griffin Sr. of 65 years; dearest mother of Harold R. Griffin, Elizabeth Ann Gabbard and Cheryl Lynn (survived by Rick) Niewald; dear grandma of Joshua (Jessie), Haley, Aaron Geno, Michelle and Jennifer Niewald; great-grandma of Evan, Ella, Makenzie, Ethan, Anthony, Sophia, Jerry Jr.; our dear sister of Joe, Melvin, Dorothy Mulligan and Eurline; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend of many at Hazelwood Baptist Church. Phyllis taught Sunday School at Hazelwood Baptist and Bible Study at Santa Maria Home. Services: Service Tuesday, April 16, 12 NOON at Hazelwood Baptist Church, 6161 Howdershell Rd. (Hazelwood). Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be given to American Cancer Society. Visitation Monday 4:00 - 7:00 p.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd. (Florissant). www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Gruebbeling, Harold N. Harold N. Bruebbeling formerly of St. Louis on April 10, 2019. McDonnell Douglas/Boeing employee for 36 years. For complete obituary visit www.mortonchapel.com

Haefner, Gregory Lawrence was born May 1, 1941 and went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on April 5, 2019. A loving husband, father, grandpa, brother, brother-in-law, uncle and cousin. Preceded in death by his parents Ray and Viola Haefner, his sister Patsy Bommarito Morell, and his brother Tom Haefner. Greg leaves behind his loving wife and best friend of 53 years Jane (nee Murray) Haefner; four children; Mike, Mark (Alyson), Bob (Jen) Haefner, and Paula (Shafiq) Islam; 16 grandchildren; Aaron, Christopher, Sean, Brigid, Benjamin, Mary Catherine, Braden, Thomas, Caoilainn, Eliana, Genevieve, Julia Bernadette, Francine, Charlie, Sabrina, and Chloe; sister Carol O'Brien (late Emmett); sistersin-law; Sister Bonnie Murray, CSJ and Pat Haefner, and brotherin-law Andre Morell. Greg donated his body to St. Louis University Medical School. Services: A Memorial Mass is scheduled at St. Bernadette's Church (68 Sherman Rd) on July 6 at 11 a.m. preceded by visitation starting at 10 a.m. All are welcome.

Herzing, James J. 84, passed on April 10, 2019. Beloved husband of the late Rosemary; loving father of Dorothy (Joe) Siegfried and Ed (Julie) Herzing; grandfather of Elizabeth, Emily, Owen, Griffin; dear brother, uncle, cousin and friend of many. Services: Visitation Thursday, April 18th 4-8 p.m. with a Service, Friday, April 19th, 10:30 a.m. at Hutchens Mortuary, Florissant. Interment Jefferson Barracks.

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Dacey, Marie Catherine passed away Wednesday, March 27, 2019. First born daughter to Thomas and Catherine Corcoran on February 27, 1925. She was preceded in death by her three sisters, Jane Moser, Patricia Durkin, and Kathleen Phipps. Beloved Mother of Kathleen (Ray) Voigt, Timothy (Colette) Dacey, and Eileen McLaughlin. B e s t gra n d ma Ree, greatgrandma Ree, aunt, great-aunt, and friend. There will be no services. To leave a condolence and view the full obituary, please visit w w w .s t l o u i s c r e m a t i o n.c o m . M e m o r i a l s t o www.connorscause.com greatly appreciated.

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Devine, William 71, April 11, 2019. Mass at St. Bridget's, Pacific, Wed (4/17), 10:30 am. Visit at Schrader Funeral Home-Eureka Tues. 3-8 pm. For more info see Schrader.com

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Doerner, Rita M. (nee Schmidt) entered into rest on Thursday April 11, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Gus Doerner. Beloved mother of Terry (Mike) Schimmer, Bob (Annette) Royer, and the late Renee Sperandio. Dear grandmother of Lisa (Ben) Heisel, Chris (Vanessa) Schimmer, Robert III (Angela), Jeffrey (Lindsay) and Brian (Jenn) Royer. Our dear great-grandmother of 8 and one on the way. Dear sister of Emil (Rosemary) Schmidt and the late Sandy (Paul) Jones. Our dear aunt and friend. Services: Visitation Sunday 4 to 8 pm at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). Funeral service Monday 10:00 am with interment at Lakewood Park Cemetery.

Evans, Doris Else

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longtime resident of So. St Louis, predeceased by her husband Gene Allen Evans; mother of Steven H Reiss; beloved sister and aunt, will be missed by family and friends. Services: Burial services at Jefferson Barracks, April 18, 10:15 a.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The American Red Cross or an animal rescue association.

“It is not length of life, but depth of life.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON

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WORLD

04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A27

Russia puppet rumors, dubious donors plague far-right German party BY FRANK JORDANS associated Press

BERLIN • A series of potential scandals is

plaguing the far-right Alternative for Germany party, overshadowing the launch of its campaign for next month’s elections for the European Union’s legislature. Germany’s biggest opposition party, which swept into the national parliament two years ago after focusing its campaign on curbing migration, is struggling to explain a number of murky donations prominent party members received in recent months, some of them from abroad. In addition, Germany’s public broadcaster ZDF on Friday quoted emails between Russian officials appearing to predict the 2017 election of one of the party’s lawmakers, Markus Frohnmaier, to the German parliament and suggest-

ing he would act as a puppet for Moscow. Frohnmaier, who has publicly supported Russia’s annexation of Crimea, denies the claim. A poll published Sunday by the German weekly Bild am Sonntag found the party’s support has fallen to 12 percent — its lowest value in years. The survey of 2,355 respondents between March 28 and April 3 asked about national elections, but recent polls for the May 23-26 European vote have reflected similar or lower support. Over the weekend, Alternative for Germany’s lead candidate for the May 26 vote dismissed allegations against his party as conspiracy theories and insisted it has “many good allies” in other European countries. Speaking Saturday at an EU election rally in Offenburg, Joerg Meuthen said AfD would work with the Austrian Freedom

OBITUARIES

Party, Italy’s anti-migrant League party and the Fidesz party of Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban to create “a new alliance of conservative, freedom-minded and patriotic forces of reason” at the European level. Meuthen himself has come under scrutiny over free election ads he and others in the party received from a Swiss-based PR agency. AfD’s co-leader Alice Weidel received more than 130,000 euros ($146,500) from Switzerland ahead of the 2017 national election — a possible breach of German electoral law. German news agency dpa also quoted Meuthen calling the claims about Frohnmaier’s ties to Moscow “total nonsense” Saturday. Public broadcaster ZDF and weekly Der Spiegel on Friday cited a strategy paper supposedly written by Russian govern-

Celebrations of Life

ment officials to bolster Russia’s interests abroad. The 2017 paper describes Frohnmaier, 28, as an asset for Russia who “will be absolutely under our control,” according to the reports. ZDF and Der Spiegel said the document was provided to them by an organization close to exiled billionaire Mikhail Khodorkovsky, a fierce critic of the Kremlin. Its veracity couldn’t be independently verified. Frohnmaier told ZDF that he couldn’t imagine who might have written about him in that way. “I ran to represent German interests. And that’s what I’m doing,” he told the broadcaster. Since his election, Frohnmaier has vocally supported Moscow’s position on Crimea, which Russia seized in 2014 in a move that Ukraine and most of the world views as illegal.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Mattison, Terry A.

Schmitz, Alex J. Jr.

Weiner, Doris

age 74, of Fairview Heights, IL born on August 11, 1944, in East St. Louis, IL, died on Wednesday, April 10, 2019, at St. Joseph's Hospital, Highland, IL. Terry was a Principal, Senior Specification Writer at HOK, St. Louis, MO for the past 57 years. He enjoyed gardening, fishing and spending time with his sons and grandchildren. Terry was a terrific dad and grandpa. He was preceded in death by his wife, Bev Mattison, nee Urbas; his 3 sons in infancy, Timothy, Thomas and Ted Mattison; his parents, Mert and Eva, nee Kline, Mattison; and his niece, Tanna Knicker. Terry is survived by his sons, Tj (Jami) Mattison of Highland, IL and Travis (Knyree Holmes) Mattison of Collinsville, IL; his grandchildren, Ethan, Keylon and Zoe; his nephew, Jason; and his great-nephew, Devin. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice of Southern Illinois or to the charity of your choice. Condolences may be expressed to the family online at www.kasslyfuneral.com. Services: Visitation will be held on Monday, April 15, 2019 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at Kassly Mortuary, Ltd., Fairview Heights, IL. Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, April 16, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. at Kassly Mortuary, Ltd., Fairview Heights, IL. Interment will be held in Valhalla Gardens of Memory, Belleville, IL.

September 8, 1928 - March 25, 2019. Blessed with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Alex departed this life on March 25, 2019 at the age of 90. He was preceded in death by his parents Alex J. Schmitz, Sr. and Louise Becker Schmitz, siblings Jack and Don Schmitz, and Mary Frances Schmitz Campbell. His high school sweetheart and beloved wife of 59 years, Bettye Davis Schmitz, left his side on September 29, 2008. Two cherished children, Kristine Schmitz Dubuque and Steven A. Schmitz, also preceded him in death. Surviving Alex with memories of his love and care are children; Vicki (John) Chervenak, Michael (Karen) Schmitz, Matthew (Nancy) Schmitz and daughter-in-law Donna Mades Schmitz. Alex was blessed with 10 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. He delighted in visits, pictures and stories about what they were doing. He leaves nieces and nephews with fond memories of Uncle A.J., cousins and brother-in-law Larry Campbell. Alex served in the Navy and worked for Ameren (UE) for many years.He enjoyed many outdoor activities, cards and especially spending time with family and friends. Alex gifted his body to St. Louis University School of Medicine to aid in education and research. Services: A memorial Mass will be held for Alex on Saturday, May 11, 2019, 10 a.m. at St. Rose Philippine Duchesne Catholic Church at 2650 Parker Rd., Florissant, MO. 63033. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to American Cancer Society or American Heart Association appreciated.

nee Schlesinger, age 86, passed on April 8, 2019. She loved well and was well loved by her husband of 64 years, Ted Weiner, and her three children and their spouses, Kate Anderson (Ken), Jim Weiner (Britta), and Patricia Weiner Snook (David). She adored and was adored by her grandchildren Adam Snook, and Trixie and Joe Weiner. She opened her heart to Selina, Julian, and all the other children who joined our family through marriage. Very dear to her was her brother, Stanley (Gloria, both deceased) and his children; John (deceased), Nancy, and Tim (Wendy) Schlesinger, and their children Joe Reed and Annika. Hand in hand, Ted and Doris traveled here and abroad by plane, train, and boat; and built lives in new cities. Her kindness, warmth, humor, and love for a good conversation fostered lifelong friendships. And she drew the appreciation of all those she helped during her lifetime as a volunteer, crisis counselor, health educator, and senior-living activities director. Doris, you were strong, courageous, resilient to the end, and taught all of us how to carry those qualities with grace and a big heart. We miss you today and always. To honor Doris, please consider donations to your local Humane Society or other animal rights organizations. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL

Ottinger, Kurt 59, March 31, 2019. Dear husband of Maureen Ottinger; father to Kristen (Mike) Haftarczyk and Jessica Ottinger; brother to Bobby Ottinger, Brian (Amanda) Ottinger, Scott (Sandra) Ottinger, Tamie (Jimmy) Harris; grandfather to Bryden and Kellan; dear son of Rose (Buz) Schwend. Services: Visitation Sat., April 20, 11-2 p.m., HUTCHENS Mortuary, followed by 2 p.m. memorial service. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Pellerito, Mary 90, April 8, 2019. Visitation 9 a.m.; Service 10 a.m., Thursday at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin. For more info, see Schrader.com

Phillips, Arthur F. on Thursday, April 11, 2019, at the age of 76 years. Beloved husband of Beverly Phillips. Dear father of Sherry (Russell) Myers and Gary (Jeri) Behnke. Dear grandfather of Amber Myers, Jennifer Lash, and Jessica Thaller. Mr. Phillips was chief photographer at United Press International (U.P.I.) for many years traveling the world taking photographs for newspapers. S e r v i c e s : Visitation will be Wednesday, April 17, 2019 from 12 p.m.-3 p.m. at the Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Parkway, Wentzville. There will be no service. Memorials requested to University of Missouri-Columbia Journalism Dept. or American Heart Association.

Piontek, Anita F. (nee Sickmann) 92, on Fri., Apr. 12, 2019. Mother of James Piontek, MD (Kristine), Jerome Piontek, MD (Vicki), Phyllis Cassette (Dan), Mark Piontek (Lynette), Mike Piontek (Kris), Linda Piontek, and Barbara Rosenbloom (Michael Rosenbloom, MD); grandmother of 21; great-grandmother of 1; aunt, cousin, and friend. Services: Funeral Mass M on ., Apr. 15, 2019, 10 a.m. at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Union, MO. Interment St. Francis Borgia Catholic Cemetery. Visitation Sun, Apr 14, 4 8 p.m. at Nieburg-Vitt, Miller Funeral Home, 1206 Jefferson St., Washington, Missouri. Memorial donations appreciated to Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital or Immaculate Conception Catholic Church.

Reiter, Norman M. On Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Beloved husband of Dorothy Louise Reiter (nee Wenzelburger) Dear father of John Richard (Kim) Reiter, Sharon Marie (John) Keightley, Janet Louise (Terry) Loesch and Linda Ruth (Bret) Borlesch. Dear grandfather of 8, great-grandfather of 7. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle and friend to many. Services: Funeral from JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOME (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. Tuesday, April 16, 2019 9:30 am Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Monday 4 to 8 pm. Masonic service Monday 7 p.m.

Schmidt, Clarence Anton 83, April 10, 2019. Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Mon., 5 p.m. until time of service at 7 p.m. For more info, see Schrader.com

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Weissmann, Andrea G.

(nee Pertici), passed away at the age of 80 on Friday, April 5, 2019. She was born to the late Andrew and Isabel Pertici, March 10, 1939 in St. Louis, MO. Andrea "Andie" graduated from Xavier Schriefer, James H. High School in 1957. She was married to the late Gary Beloved husband of 45 years to Rosemary (nee Weissmann in 1990; mother to late Stephanie and James Rapisardo), father of Karl and Kristopher (Rebecca); Mohrmann, and surviving children: Karen Viviano, Julie grandfather of Gloria, June, and Andrew; dear brother, Anderson, and Nicole Collora; loving grandmother to Bianca, brother-in-law, uncle, and friend. Jim was a veteran of the Gabrielle, Isabella, Addyson, Stephanie, Allyson, and Nino; great United States Air Force, Treasurer of South Side Kiwanis, grandmother to Amelia. Andrea proudly retired from the MIMH Library after 25 years. member of Gravois Kiwanis, President of Southwest Housing Corporation, a board member of Tower Grove Neighborhood Andrea loved celebrating her life. She ensured Christmas and CDC, and a member of The Engineers Club. In lieu of flowers, Valentine's Day were always special, because of her genuine excitement and touches only she could provide. Nothing lit up memorial donations may be made to St. Jude's. Services: Visitation Tues. 4/16 from 3-8 p.m. at JOHN L. Andrea's life more than her grandchildren. She lit up the world with her beautiful smile. Andrea will be dearly missed by all ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois who knew and loved her. (63116), Funeral Mass Wed. 4/17, 10:00 a.m. at St. Ambrose Services: There will be a memorial Mass at St. Ambrose Catholic Church. Interment Jefferson Barracks. Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Avenue, on Saturday, May 11 at 2 p.m.

Shannon, Dr. Anna Marian

Dr. Anna Marian Shannon died in Bozeman, Montana on April 1, 2019, her 90th birthday. Anna, Dean Emeritus of the College of Nursing at Montana State University, received her R.N. from Missouri Baptist in 1950, B.S. from University of Missouri in 1955, M.S. from Washington University in St. Louis in 1957, and was one of the first nurses to earn a doctoral degree in nursing, a D.N.S. at University of California San Francisco in 1970. Anna was acting chair of Mental Health and Community Nursing at UCSF before returning to her beloved Montana in 1975 to be the Dean of Nursing at MSU, a position she held until her retirement in 1990. Her professional contributions and honors were many including Fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and a founding member of both the Western Society for Research in Nursing and Western Institute of Nursing. She was the recipient of the UCSF Distinguished Alumni Award, University of Missouri-Columbia Citation of Merit, and MSU Blue & Gold and Extraordinary Ordinary Women Award. While Anna received ample professional recognition, it is the awards given in her name that honor her enduring impact. In 1992, in recognition of her unselfish efforts to support and promote the professional growth of other nurses across the west, the Western Institute of Nursing established the Anna M. Shannon Mentorship Award given annually in her honor. Those who were lucky enough to be mentored by Anna often reflected that she saw more in them than they saw in themselves. Anna Shannon helped to change the face of nursing across the rural West. Anna was born in Dillon, MT to Rev. Richard Orwin and Dr. Mabel Wartig Shannon and grew up in Lewistown, MT and Perry, Missouri. She is survived by her nieces and nephews: Sarah Shannon of Bozeman; Gail (Mike) Gagnon of St Louis; Polly Shannon of Eugene, OR; Margaret (Errol Meidinger) Shannon of Rock Creek, MT; Craig (Peggy) Helsher of St. Louis; and many "grand" nieces and nephews. No memorial service is planned. Donations may be made in Anna's memory to either Western Institute of Nursing (www.winursing.org/donate/); MSU College of Nursing Anna M. Shannon Fund created to support faculty development and research (gifts@msuaf.org); or Yellowstone National Park which Anna considered 'her' park (www.yellowstone.org/).

Weston, Waleen F. (nee Unger) on April 12, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Norman R. Weston; loving mother of 7, grandmother of 15 and greatgrandmother of 18. Our dear sister, sister-in-law, mother-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at St. Paul U.C.C., 5508 Telegraph Rd., 63129, on Sunday April 14, 4-8 p.m.; Monday, April 15, 10 a.m. 8 p.m.; and Tuesday, April 16, from 10 am until time of service at 11 a.m. Interment St. Paul U.C.C. Cemetery. Memorials to American Cancer Society or Crohns and Colitis Foundation appreciated. A Kutis South County Chapel Service.

Wobbe, Rita (nee Becker), February 15, 2019. Memorial Mass at Seven Holy Founders Catholic Church on Friday, May 3 at 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. A KUTIS SERVICE.

Wood, Robert Eugene passed away on Thursday, April 11, 2019. Beloved husband of Verna (nee Hunt) and the late Ann (nee Tidwell) Wood; loving father of M. Robert (Darlene) Wood, Kenneth (Chelly) Wood, Alena (Odis) Pickens and Janna (Michael) Williams; dearest grandfather of Kayla, Rocky, Aronne, Adam, Justice, Kh a ya , Leiah, Makenna, Michael II, Noel, Quinn and River; dear brother of RoseMary Hall; dear brother-in- law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Robert proudly served with the U.S. Navy from 1960- 1964. Services: Funeral service at Apostolic Pentecostal Church, 901 Barracksview Rd., Tuesday, April 16, at 12 p.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, Monday, April 15, 4-8 p.m.

Zimmermann, Eunice C.

(nee Malke). Asleep in Jesus. May 10, 1925 to April 7, 2019, of Glendale. Beloved wife of the late Roger C. Zimmermann for 63 years; precious mother of Roger Terry, Elizabeth "Betsy" C., Jr. (former wife Karen) and of Washington, DC died peacefully at home April 9, 2019 after a Joan (Phil) Ces; beloved grandbrief illness. She was born in St. Louis, May 24, 1941. She mother of Alisha (Oliver) Davis, attended Mary Institute (MICDS) and graduated from Miss Mark (Sarah) Zimmermann, and Porter's School, Farmington, CT, and Briarcliff College. Matthew Ces; dear great-grandShe was predeceased by her parents, Julia Wells Terry and m o t h e r of Ca l eb a n d J a cob Whitelaw Todd Terry and her sister Julia Terry Barnes. She is Zimmermann; dear daughter of survived by her brother Whitelaw Todd Terry, Jr. (Val); her the late E. Bernard and Clara nephews Charles Le Forgee Barnes (Laura), of St. Louis, Michael Salzmann Malke; loving sister of Whitelaw Terry (Nancy) of Charlottesville, VA, and her nieces Julia (Cinnie) Barnes May (Herbert) of Harbor Springs, MI and the late E.B. "Bud" (Mildred) Malke Jr., Doris (Leslie) Zabel; and the late Robert Malke; dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin, and Elizabeth Jane Terry of Washington DC. She was buried in a private ceremony in Harbor Springs, MI. friend. Eunice was active in the Glendale Women's Club, Glendale Historical Society, Holy Cross Lutheran School Alumni, There will be a memorial service at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Little among many others. Traverse Conservancy, 3264 Powell Road, Harbor Springs, MI Services: Visitation at Bopp Chapel, Thursday, April 18, 4-8 49740-9469; The Art League of Alexandria, 105 N. Union St., p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd. in Kirkwood. Alexandria, VA 22314; Forest Park Forever, 5595 Grand Dr., St. Funeral Friday, April 19, 9:30 a.m. at Glendale Lutheran Church, 1365 N. Sappington Road. Interment private at Jefferson Louis, MO 63112 or the charity of your choice. Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials preferred to Glendale Lutheran Church. www.boppchapel.com

Unverferth, Mary Arnett

April 9, 2019. Vis. Mon., April 15, 10 am at St. Catherine Laboure Church, 9740 Sappington Rd., with funeral Mass at 11 am. See boppchapel.com for full obituary

Florists Dierbergs Florist

Usher, Tom Wednesday, April 3, 2019. 77, of Sarcoxie, MO. Memorial Visit. Sat., April 20, 2-3 p.m., Chapel Hill Mortuary. Memorial Service Sat., April 20, 3 p.m. at Chapel Hill Mortuary

STLtoday.com/obits

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04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

OBITUARIES

Celebrations of Life

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Horrell, Kenneth Oliver

Mattison, Terry A.

Reiter, Norman M.

our much loved father, grandfather and great-grandfather peacefully went to be with our L o r d a n d Sa vior o n Frid a y, February 15, 2019. He gave his love unconditionally to his wife, Carol, for 55 wonderful years. Also, blessed with his love were their children: Barbara Boros (John), John Horrell, Stephen W. Horrell, Cynthia Lane (Ron). Ken leaves six grandchildren: Jamie, Lori, and Stephen C. Horrell, Sarah Ewing, David Boros, Susan Willemstein and eight great-grandchildren: Olivia, Cooper, Dylan, Zachary, Noah, Beckham, Elliott and Nash. Ken is also survived by his beloved brother Donald (Bud) Horrell (Carlene), sister Marlene Burkemper (Lee), brother-in-law Dave Lange (Sharon) and sister-in-law Joan Ferro (Roy), nieces, nephews, cousins and numerous friends. He was preceded in death by his loving wife Carol, sister Sharon Lange, brothers-in-law David Dunham and Roy Ferro, nieces Susan Reznicek and Jordan Lange. Ken was a faithful, devout Christian and member of Grace Lutheran Church in Upland, California. He was also a staunch patriot and a proud member of the Republican Party. His moral character and kindness were evident by his generous and regular contributions to over eighty charities. Over sixty six years, Ken held many positions in the Printing Industry, earning great respect and national recognition. He ultimately owned his own business and recently retired after a successful and gratifying career. In addition to his love of God, family and friends, Ken enjoyed The St. Louis Cardinals, horse racing, John Wayne, Snickers and Wint-O-Green Mints. His warm, genuine smile will live in our hearts forever. Services: His service will be held at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church on Friday, April 26th at 11:00 a.m. The address is 5020 Rhodes Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63109. In lieu of flowers, the family has requested donations be given to the City of Hope, 1500 E. Duarte Rd., Duarte, CA 91010. Tax exempt 501 (c)3. EIN 95-343591 and/or The Wholehearted Foundation, 1918 Belleville Dr. N.E., Leesburg, VA 20176. Tax exempt 501 (c)3, EIN 475490420

age 74, of Fairview Heights, IL born on August 11, 1944, in East St. Louis, IL, died on Wednesday, April 10, 2019, at St. Joseph's Hospital, Highland, IL. Terry was a Principal, Senior Specification Writer at HOK, St. Louis, MO for the past 57 years. He enjoyed gardening, fishing and spending time with his sons and grandchildren. Terry was a terrific dad and grandpa. He was preceded in death by his wife, Bev Mattison, nee Urbas; his 3 sons in infancy, Timothy, Thomas and Ted Mattison; his parents, Mert and Eva, nee Kline, Mattison; and his niece, Tanna Knicker. Terry is survived by his sons, Tj (Jami) Mattison of Highland, IL and Travis (Knyree Holmes) Mattison of Collinsville, IL; his grandchildren, Ethan, Keylon and Zoe; his nephew, Jason; and his great-nephew, Devin. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Hospice of Southern Illinois or to the charity of your choice. Condolences may be expressed to the family online at www.kasslyfuneral.com. Services: Visitation will be held on Monday, April 15, 2019 from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at Kassly Mortuary, Ltd., Fairview Heights, IL. Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, April 16, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. at Kassly Mortuary, Ltd., Fairview Heights, IL. Interment will be held in Valhalla Gardens of Memory, Belleville, IL.

On Wednesday, April 10, 2019. Beloved husband of Dorothy Louise Reiter (nee Wenzelburger) Dear father of John Richard (Kim) Reiter, Sharon Marie (John) Keightley, Janet Louise (Terry) Loesch and Linda Ruth (Bret) Borlesch. Dear grandfather of 8, great-grandfather of 7. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle and friend to many. Services: Funeral from JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOME (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. Tuesday, April 16, 2019 9:30 am Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Monday 4 to 8 pm. Masonic service Monday 7 p.m.

Johnson, Alydia Jeannine 15, of K i r k w o o d , M is s ou ri tragically took her own life on April 10, 2019. She was a vibrant and talented young lady, with an unlimited capacity for love. Alydia was born in Carbondale, IL on June 10, 2003. She was a redheaded spitfire from day one, with an outstanding sense of humor and a laugh like none other. She was silly and creative, and leaves behind an extensive collection of artwork and doodles, which is fitting, when one considers that her nickname was "Lyddi-Doodles." Alydia was a sophomore at Kirkwood High School, and had attended school in Dupo, IL as well. She was also a student at School of Rock in Kirkwood. She found music to be an outlet, and was an incredible musician, who both sang and played guitar. Her favorite bands were the Beatles and Pink Floyd, but her taste in music spanned all genres. She was an eclectic, quirky girl who marched to the beat of her own drum, and wrote her own songs. As she grew up, she enjoyed her pets, especially her horse, Bob. When she was spending time with her father, she loved to visit Bob and help her Grandpa on the farm. When she was with her mom, they enjoyed concerts, musicals, and spending time at the cabin by the lake with her brothers. Alydia is survived by her mother Emmy (Chris) Hamlin (nee Taylor) and father Thomas Johnson of Metropolis, IL, as well as her brother Keegan Greenwood, and stepbrothers Luke, Andrew and Jacob Hamlin. Jim Greenwood of Dupo, IL helped to raise her for a large portion of her life, and she fondly referred to him as "Stepdad." She is also survived by her beloved stepsiblings Lyndi (Dusty) Thompson (nee Greenwood) of Clay City, IL, Logan Greenwood of Flora, IL and Alec Greenwood of Newton, IL. In addition, Alydia leaves behind grandparents Stephen and Linda Taylor (nee Bay) of Flora, IL; Terry and Wanda (nee Farris) Johnson of Metropolis, IL; Norelene Hamlin of Kirkwood, MO; Kevin and Gena Martin of Flora, IL; Dan and Deb Greenwood of Flora, IL, and aunts and uncles: Kate (Scott) Burmeister (nee Taylor) of Flora, IL; Zoe (Joe) Cangas (nee Taylor) of St Louis, MO; Kristie (Roger) Morgan (nee Johnson) of Evansville, IN; Jessica (Mason) Watkins (nee Johnson) of Paducah, KY. Services: Visitation will be held on Tuesday, April 16 from 3:006:00 p.m. at Bopp Chapel in Kirkwood, with service beginning at 6:00. Darryl Jones of Hope Christian Church will officiate. A family graveside service will take place at Elmwood Cemetery in Flora, IL on Monday, April 22 at 11:00 a.m., and Alydia's ashes will be planted as a flowering dogwood tree, so that her spirit can bloom for years to come. Dogwood was the perfect choice, as it is the Missouri state tree, it is known as "nature's little show-off", and was used to make arrows in England, Alydia's favorite place in the world she wished to visit. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in support of "Let Them Rock" Scholarship Foundation, or to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. Depression is a tricky beast, and often only those who suffer from it can feel its full power. Those who shine the brightest by day, sometimes endure the darkest of nights. www.letthemrock.org or https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ www.boppchapel.com

King, Thomas Morgan, Ph.D. on Monday, April 8, 2019. Beloved husband for 56 years of Judith Carole King (nee Cox); dear father of Carole Elizabeth Olsen (Sturla) and Ashley Morgan Snyder (Sam); dearest grandfather of Sarah Elizabeth Olsen, Christopher Thomas Olsen, and Madeleine Morgan Snyder; dear brother of Margaret Elizabeth Craig (John) of Atlanta; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, and a friend to many. Mr. King was a resident of St. Louis since 1966 and worked thirty years at the Monsanto Company, retiring as Director of Technology for the Plastics Division. He was born on August 28, 1940 in Morristown, TN to Thomas Clinton and Elizabeth Morgan King. He is a graduate of Carson-Newman University, Jefferson City, TN, and received a Ph.D. in Chemistry, 1966, from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He was an elder in the Presbyterian Church, an active volunteer in community and neighborhood organizations. Both he and Judy enjoyed travel in the US and in Europe, particularly visits to museums and theater. Music was a love of his, and he was a longtime supporter of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. Services: A visitation will be held on Monday, April 15 at Kriegshauser West, 9450 Olive Blvd., from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, April 16, 11:00 a.m. at the Ladue Chapel Presbyterian Church, 9450 Clayton Rd. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Ladue Chapel or the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. www.kriegshausermortuary.com

Lambert, Ida Belle 96, of Saint Peters, April 10, 2019. Vis. Mon., April 15, 4-8 pm, and Funeral Tues., April 16, 10 am, Baue 3950 West Clay. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

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Schmidt, Clarence Anton 83, April 10, 2019. Visitation at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin, Mon., 5 p.m. until time of service at 7 p.m. For more info, see Schrader.com

Schmitz, Alex J. Jr.

September 8, 1928 - March 25, 2019. Blessed with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Alex departed this life on March 25, 2019 at the age of 90. He was preceded in death by his parents Alex J. Schmitz, Sr. and Louise Becker Schmitz, siblings Jack and Don Schmitz, and Mary Frances Schmitz Campbell. His high school sweetheart and beloved wife of 59 years, Bettye Davis Schmitz, left his side on September 29, 2008. Two cherished children, Kristine Schmitz Dubuque and Steven A. Schmitz, also preceded him in death. Surviving Alex with memories of his love and care are children; Vicki (John) Chervenak, Michael (Karen) Schmitz, Matthew (Nancy) Schmitz and daughter-in-law Donna Mades Schmitz. Alex was blessed with 10 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. He delighted in visits, pictures and stories about what they were doing. He Meyer, Shirlene M. (nee Zamberlan), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother leaves nieces and nephews with fond memories of Uncle A.J., Church on Thursday, April 11, 2019 at the age of 81. Beloved cousins and brother-in-law Larry Campbell. Alex served in the Navy and worked for Ameren (UE) for many wife of Edmund "Ed" Meyer; dear mother of Cindy Meyer, Keith (Katie) Meyer, Laura Meyer and Diane (Tom) Higgins; loving years.He enjoyed many outdoor activities, cards and especially grandmother of Tommy, Andrew (Shannon), Anne and Mary spending time with family and friends. Kate Meyer, and Kate and Luke Higgins; special great-grand- Alex gifted his body to St. Louis University School of Medicine mother "GG" of Rosemary Meyer; dearest sister of Jean Rollings to aid in education and research. and Bob (late Gwen) Zamberlan; dear sister-in-law of Mary Services: A memorial Mass will be held for Alex on Saturday, May 11, 2019, 10 a.m. at St. Rose Philippine Duchesne Catholic Meyer; our dear aunt, great-aunt and friend to many. Service: From Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, Tuesday, April Church at 2650 Parker Rd., Florissant, MO. 63033. In lieu of 16th, 10 a.m. for Mass of Christian Burial at 11:30 a.m. at St. flowers, memorial contributions to American Cancer Society or Mary Margaret of Alacoque Catholic Church, 4900 Ringer Rd. American Heart Association appreciated. Interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Visitation Monday, from 4 p.m. - 8 p.m. at Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, Schriefer, James H. 6464 Chippewa St., St. Louis, MO 63109. In lieu of flowers, Beloved husband of 45 years to Rosemary (nee memorial donations in Shirlene's name may be made to Rapisardo), father of Karl and Kristopher (Rebecca); St. Mary Margaret Alacoque School Tuition Fund or Our grandfather of Gloria, June, and Andrew; dear brother, Lady's Inn. www.hoffmeistercolonial.com brother-in-law, uncle, and friend. Jim was a veteran of the United States Air Force, Treasurer of South Side Kiwanis, O'Donnell, Edward A. member of Gravois Kiwanis, President of Southwest Housing April 11, 2019, 84. Corporation, a board member of Tower Grove Neighborhood Visitation will be held April 16, CDC, and a member of The Engineers Club. In lieu of flowers, 4:00-7:00 pm Kriegshauser West memorial donations may be made to St. Jude's. M ort u a ry, 9 4 50 Olive B l vd . Services: Visitation Tues. 4/16 from 3-8 p.m. at JOHN L. Olivette, MO 63132. Funeral ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, 7027 Gravois Mass April 17, 10:00 am at Our (63116), Funeral Mass Wed. 4/17, 10:00 a.m. at St. Ambrose Lady of the Pillar Church at 401 Catholic Church. Interment Jefferson Barracks. S. Lindbergh Blvd., St Louis, MO 63131. Private interment will Shannon, Dr. Anna Marian follow at Calvary Cemetery. Dr. Anna Marian Shannon died in Remembrance and information Bozeman, Montana on April 1, at 2019, her 90th birthday. Anna, www.kriegshausermortuary.com. Dean Emeritus of the College of Nursing at Montana State University, received her R.N. from Missouri Baptist in 1950, B.S. from University of Missouri Oldani, Joan Irene in 1955, M.S. from Washington (nee Tabers), 83 years, Friday, April 12, 2019. Beloved wife of University in St. Louis in 1957, the late Claude S. Oldani of 54 years; dearest mother of Denis, and was one of the first nurses to Christopher, Ronald, Claudia and John; loving mother-in-law, earn a doctoral degree in nursgrandma, great-grandma. ing, a D.N.S. at University of Service Thursday, April 18, 9:30 a.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, California San Francisco in 1970. 675 Graham Rd. (Florissant). Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions Anna was acting chair of Mental Health and Community Nursing may be made to the American Cancer Society. Visitation at UCSF before returning to her beloved Montana in 1975 to be the Dean of Nursing at MSU, a position she held until her Wednesday, 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com retirement in 1990. Her professional contributions and honors were many including Fellow in the American Academy of Ottinger, Kurt Nursing and a founding member of both the Western Society for 59, March 31, 2019. Dear husband of Maureen Ottinger; father Research in Nursing and Western Institute of Nursing. She was to Kristen (Mike) Haftarczyk and Jessica Ottinger; brother to the recipient of the UCSF Distinguished Alumni Award, Bobby Ottinger, Brian (Amanda) Ottinger, Scott (Sandra) University of Missouri-Columbia Citation of Merit, and MSU Blue Ottinger, Tamie (Jimmy) Harris; grandfather to Bryden and & Gold and Extraordinary Ordinary Women Award. While Anna received ample professional recognition, it is the awards given Kellan; dear son of Rose (Buz) Schwend. Services: Visitation Sat., April 20, 11-2 p.m., HUTCHENS in her name that honor her enduring impact. In 1992, in recognition of her unselfish efforts to support and promote the Mortuary, followed by 2 p.m. memorial service. professional growth of other nurses across the west, the www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com Western Institute of Nursing established the Anna M. Shannon Mentorship Award given annually in her honor. Those who were Parrish, Marielen lucky enough to be mentored by Anna often reflected that she beloved mother, grandmother, saw more in them than they saw in themselves. Anna Shannon great-grandmother and friend, helped to change the face of nursing across the rural West. passed from this Earth on April Anna was born in Dillon, MT to Rev. Richard Orwin and Dr. 6, 2019. In her final hours, she Mabel Wartig Shannon and grew up in Lewistown, MT and was surrounded by her children Perry, Missouri. She is survived by her nieces and nephews: and loved ones. She was born Sarah Shannon of Bozeman; Gail (Mike) Gagnon of St Louis; July 3, 1940 at her parents St. Polly Shannon of Eugene, OR; Margaret (Errol Meidinger) Louis home. She is survived by Shannon of Rock Creek, MT; Craig (Peggy) Helsher of St. Louis; her brother Jim Stroup, her sister and many "grand" nieces and nephews. Barbara Ann Peer as well as her No memorial service is planned. Donations may be made in 5 children; Therese Schmitz, Anna's memory to either Western Institute of Nursing Michael Parrish, Mark Parrish, (www.winursing.org/donate/); MSU College of Nursing Anna M. Malcom Parrish and Cathy Dera. Shannon Fund created to support faculty development and She has 12 grandchildren and 11 research (gifts@msuaf.org); or Yellowstone National Park which great-grandchildren. Anna considered 'her' park (www.yellowstone.org/). Services start at noon on the 27th of April at First Free Church, located at 1375 Carman Rd., Ballwin, MO 63021, in the Chapel on Sieve, Gertrude M. the east side of the building on the corner of Dietrich and Carmen Rd. (nee Schmidt), On Saturday, April 13, 2019. Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, Tuesday, 5-8 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. John Paul II Church Wednesday, 10 a.m. A KUTIS SERVICE. Pellerito, Mary 90, April 8, 2019. Visitation 9 a.m.; Service 10 a.m., Thursday at Schrader Funeral Home, Ballwin. For more info, see Schrader.com

Stevenson, Winnie M.

(nee Hampton), passed away, Thursday, April 11, 2019. Beloved wife for 58 years of Troy H. Stevenson; loving mother of Alan (Tina) Stevenson and Eric (Scott Driver) Stevenson; dear grandPhillips, Arthur F. mother of Connor Stevenson and great-grandmother of Juniper on Thursday, April 11, 2019, at Stevenson. Beloved sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin, and friend the age of 76 years. Beloved to many. husband of Beverly Phillips. Dear Winnie was a devoted member of Eureka United Methodist father of Sherry (Russell) Myers Church for more than 40 years. and Gary (Jeri) Behnke. Dear Services: Memorial service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home grandfather of Amber Myers, Eureka, 108 N. Central Avenue, Friday, April 19, 2019, 11:00 a.m. J e n n i f e r L a s h , a n d J e s s i c a Inurnment to follow at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In Thaller. Mr. Phillips was chief lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimer's photographer at United Press Association or the American Stroke Association. Visitation International (U.P.I.) for many Thursday, 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's online years traveling the world taking guestbook at Schrader.com. photographs for newspapers. S e r v i c e s : Visitation will be Wednesday, April 17, 2019 from Terry, Elizabeth "Betsy" 12 p.m.-3 p.m. at the Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville of Washington, DC died peacefully at home April 9, 2019 after a Parkway, Wentzville. There will be no service. Memorials brief illness. She was born in St. Louis, May 24, 1941. She requested to University of Missouri-Columbia Journalism Dept. attended Mary Institute (MICDS) and graduated from Miss or American Heart Association. Porter's School, Farmington, CT, and Briarcliff College. She was predeceased by her parents, Julia Wells Terry and Whitelaw Todd Terry and her sister Julia Terry Barnes. She is Piontek, Anita F. survived by her brother Whitelaw Todd Terry, Jr. (Val); her (nee Sickmann) 92, on Fri., Apr. 12, 2019. Mother of James nephews Charles Le Forgee Barnes (Laura), of St. Louis, Michael Piontek, MD (Kristine), Jerome Piontek, MD (Vicki), Phyllis Whitelaw Terry (Nancy) of Charlottesville, VA, and her nieces Cassette (Dan), Mark Piontek (Lynette), Mike Piontek (Kris), Julia (Cinnie) Barnes May (Herbert) of Harbor Springs, MI and Linda Piontek, and Barbara Rosenbloom (Michael Rosenbloom, Elizabeth Jane Terry of Washington DC. MD); grandmother of 21; great-grandmother of 8; aunt, cousin, She was buried in a private ceremony in Harbor Springs, MI. and friend. There will be a memorial service at a later date. Services: Funeral Mass M on ., Apr. 15, 2019, 10 a.m. at In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Little Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Union, MO. Interment Traverse Conservancy, 3264 Powell Road, Harbor Springs, MI St. Francis Borgia Catholic Cemetery. Visitation Sun, Apr 14, 4 - 49740-9469; The Art League of Alexandria, 105 N. Union St., 8 p.m. at Nieburg-Vitt, Miller Funeral Home, 1206 Jefferson St., Alexandria, VA 22314; Forest Park Forever, 5595 Grand Dr., St. Washington, Missouri. Memorial donations appreciated to Louis, MO 63112 or the charity of your choice. Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital or Immaculate Conception Catholic Church. “A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.” MAYA ANGELOU

Unverferth, Mary Arnett

April 9, 2019. Vis. Mon., April 15, 10 am at St. Catherine Laboure Church, 9740 Sappington Rd., with funeral Mass at 11 am. See boppchapel.com for full obituary

Usher, Tom STLtoday.com/obits

Wednesday, April 3, 2019. 77, of Sarcoxie, MO. Memorial Visit. Sat., April 20, 2-3 p.m., Chapel Hill Mortuary. Memorial Service Sat., April 20, 3 p.m. at Chapel Hill Mortuary


NEWS

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Brain scans of living athletes may reveal disease BY MARILYNN MARCHIONE Associated Press

Researchers may be closing in on a way to check athletes while they’re alive for signs of a degenerative brain disease that’s been linked to frequent head blows. Experimental scans found higher levels of an abnormal protein tied to the disease in a study of former National Football League players who were having mood and thinking problems. It’s the first time a major study has tested these scans for detecting chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, which now is only diagnosed after death, with brain autopsies. Doctors are searching for a way to tell when players, veterans or others with concussions or other head injuries are at risk for permanent damage. It’s too soon to know if the scans will enable that — so far they only show that these athletes are different as a group; they can’t be used to say a particular player does or does not have CTE. “We’re not there yet,” said Boston University neuroscientist Robert Stern. “It is not ready to be used for individual diagnosis in the clinic.” He led the study, published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine. “It’s an encouraging advance. It looks like they have detected CTE in living players,” said Dr. Gil Rabinovici, a neurologist and imaging expert at the University of California, San Francisco, who is doing other research using the scans. “It’s hugely important to be able to detect the disease in living people” to know how common it is and to research treatments, he said. The study was done in Massachusetts and Arizona and involved 26 former NFL players with thinking, mood or behavior problems, and 31 similarly aged men without these symptoms or head injuries. They were given positron emission tomography, or PET scans, in which a radioactive tracer is injected that binds to various substances and makes them visible on the scans. Several of these tracers are used now to look for a protein called beta amyloid in the brains

Study shows promise signaling the degenerative brain condition CTE, which is linked to frequent head blows and is now diagnosed only after death

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE

This image shows an illustration based on brain scans of former professional football players. As a group, they were found to have higher levels of an abnormal protein than a comparison group of healthy men, indicated here by red patches. The protein is a hallmark of CTE, a degenerative brain disease that’s been linked to repeated blows to the head. The athletes had mood and thinking problems.

of people with Alzheimer’s disease. An experimental tracer that doctors are testing binds to another protein, tau, which is the key one that’s been implicated in CTE. Men in the study had both types of tracers. Tau levels were higher in the players compared to the others, but their amyloid levels were similar, confirming that CTE is a different disease than Alzheimer’s. Researchers also saw a relationship to years of play. “The more years of play in tackle football across all levels, the greater the amount of tau detected,” Stern said. However, there was no relationship between tau levels and the severity of mood and thinking symptoms. Researchers think the study may have been too small to detect a difference or that tau may not be the only factor involved. “There’s a lot more work to be done to develop a diagnostic” tool using these scans, said Dr. Michael Weiner an imaging expert at UCSF who is involved in other CTE research. Government grants and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, which makes the tracers, funded the study. Some authors work or consult for the company. A larger study of former NFL and college football players is underway; first results are expected early next year. Mike Adamle, a former running back for the Chicago Bears and sports announcer, has been told he has symptoms consistent with CTE, and has been evaluated by Stern at the Boston research center — though he was not part of the current study. “I had more than a few” concussions, Adamle said. “If you were running, everybody kind of led with their head. Back then, it was a test of your macho man stuff.” The illness has been devastating, said his wife, Kim. “He couldn’t remember his lunch or he couldn’t remember his lines on the air,” and lost multiple jobs, she said. If a test could have shown he was at risk and given him a chance to consider quitting play, “I would have definitely taken note,” Mike Adamle said.

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Retired Lt. Col. Richard ‘Dick’ Cole • The last of the 80 Doolittle Tokyo Raiders who carried out the daring U.S. attack on Japan in World War II, died Tuesday (April 9, 2019) at a military hospital in Texas. He was 103. Lt. Col. Cole’s daughter, Cindy Chal, said he was having some heart issues but had walked into the emergency room. Lt. Col. Cole, who lived in Comfort, Texas, had stayed active even in recent years, attending air shows and participating in commemorative events including April 18, 2017, ceremonies for the raid’s 75th anniversary at the National Museum of the Air Force near Dayton, Ohio. Chal said her father “enjoyed every minute” of his long, distinguished life. Lt. Col. Cole was mission commander Jimmy Doolittle’s co-pilot in the attack less than five months after the December 1941 Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. The Raiders launched their assault April 18, 1942, in B-25 bombers from the aircraft carrier Hornet. The raid inflicted scattered damage while providing a psychological lift back home. The stunned Japanese military diverted resources after a string of Pacific successes. Lt. Col. Cole continued to fly missions in the China-Burma-India theater until 1944. R.V. Burgin • The Marine sergeant, whose book about grueling jungle combat in WWII became a basis for the HBO miniseries “The Pacific,” has died at his home in Lancaster, Texas, a suburb of Dallas.

Cole

Burgin

Cassel

His daughter, Maggie Shepherd, said her father was 96 when he died in his sleep on April 6 (2019). Sgt. Burgin wrote “Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific.” Shepherd said it was among several books that inspired the HBO miniseries that premiered in 2010. Sgt. Burgin was portrayed in the miniseries by actor Martin McCann. Shepherd said her father never talked about his service in the war for about 35 years, until he was inspired to write a book after attending some military reunions. Seymour Cassel • The actor, who starred in “Faces” and several other John Cassavetes movies, has died. He was 84. The Oscar-nominated actor died April 7 (2019) in Los Angeles after complications from Alzheimer’s disease, his son, actor Matthew Cassel, said. Mr. Cassel made his acting debut in the 1958 romantic drama “Shadows,” the first movie by his friend and director Cassavetes. Mr. Cassel was nominated for an Oscar for his role as a hippie swinger in Cassavetes’ 1968 drama “Faces” and turned in critically acclaimed performances in six other Cassavetes movies, including “Minnie and Moskowitz,” “The Killing of a Chinese Bookie” and “Love Streams.”

Van Doren

His career peaked again in the 1990s when he won the first acting prize given at the Sundance Film Festival for his role in 1992’s “In the Soup,” which also won that year’s grand jury prize. Bill Isles • An original member of the chart-topping R&B group the O’Jays, has died at his Southern California Home. He was 78. Mr. Isles died of cancer in March at his home in Oceanside. Mr. Isles and his childhood friends in Canton, Ohio, formed the Mascots in 1958 before changing the name to the Triumphs and releasing a single in 1961. The band changed its name to the O’Jays after getting pivotal advice from a Cleveland DJ named Eddie O’Jay. Mr. Isles was featured on songs including “Lonely Drifter” and “Lipstick Traces” before he quit the group in 1965. Duane Isles says his father was the O’Jays’ tour manager between 1971 and 1974, when the group released its biggest hits, “Love Train” and “Back Stabbers.” The O’Jays were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005. Ly Tong • The former fighter pilot known as the “Vietnamese James Bond” for his daring stunts — including hijacking a plane to drop 50,000 political leaflets over his homeland, calling on citizens to overthrow the communist

government — died April 5 (2019) in San Diego. He was 74. Mr. Tong was hospitalized in March, Conley and doctors diagnosed him with lung disease. He slipped into a coma on March 21, with his stay at Sharp Memorial Hospital drawing hundreds of visitors, some of whom called him a hero for his constant attacks against Hanoi’s oppressive regime. Mr. Tong became famous in 1992 when he hijacked an Airbus A310 on a charter flight for Vietnam Airlines. The jet had left Bangkok and was about 80 miles from Ho Chi Minh City, formerly known as Saigon, when Mr. Tong flashed a plastic knife and coat hanger and claimed that he had a bomb, according to the Aviation Safety Network. He ordered a flight attendant to take him to the cockpit, where he directed the Bulgarian captain to fly low. Quickly, he released sacks stuffed with flyers out of the cockpit window. The leaflets urged Vietnamese to “build an independent, free and prosperous Vietnam.” He signed it: “Commander of the Uprising Forces.” He parachuted from an emergency exit into a swamp, where the Vietnamese government arrested him two hours later. No one aboard the aircraft was harmed. His sentence of 20 years in prison was cut short after the U.S. and Vietnam normalized relations. Mr. Tong was granted amnesty in

1998. Charles Van Doren • The academic whose meteoric rise and fall as a corrupt game show contestant in the 1950s inspired the movie “Quiz Show,” and served as a cautionary tale about the staged competitions of early television, has died. He was 93. He died of natural causes Tuesday (April 9, 2019) at a care center for the elderly in Canaan, Conn. Mr. Van Doren was the central figure in the TV game show scandals of the late 1950s and eventually pleaded guilty to perjury for lying to a grand jury that investigated them. He spent the following decades largely out of the public eye. “It’s been hard to get away, partly because the man who cheated on ‘Twenty-One’ is still part of me,” he wrote in a 2008 New Yorker essay, his first public comment in years. Mr. Van Doren refused to cooperate in the making of “Quiz Show.” Earl Thomas Conley • The country musician died Wednesday (April 10, 2017) in Nashville, Tenn. He was 77. His daughter Erinn Scates of Nashville said her father had died from an extended illness. The music website allmusic.com says Mr. Conley charted his first Top 40 hit in 1979 with “Dreamin’s All I Do.” He sang a number of other hits, including “Holding Her and Loving You,” “Right From the Start” and “What I’d Say.” From news services

Take a hike today

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NEWS

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Brain scans of living athletes may reveal disease BY MARILYNN MARCHIONE Associated Press

Researchers may be closing in on a way to check athletes while they’re alive for signs of a degenerative brain disease that’s been linked to frequent head blows. Experimental scans found higher levels of an abnormal protein tied to the disease in a study of former National Football League players who were having mood and thinking problems. It’s the first time a major study has tested these scans for detecting chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, which now is only diagnosed in autopsies. Doctors are searching for a way to tell when players, veterans or others with concussions or other head injuries are at risk for permanent damage. It’s too soon to know if the scans will enable that — so far they only show that these athletes are different as a group; they can’t be used to say a particular player does or does not have CTE.

Study shows promise signaling the degenerative condition CTE, which is linked to frequent blows to the head and is now diagnosed only after death “We’re not there yet,” said Boston University neuroscientist Robert Stern. He led the study, published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine. “It’s an encouraging advance. It looks like they have detected CTE in living players,” said Dr. Gil Rabinovici, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who is doing other research using the scans. “It’s hugely important to be able to detect the disease in living people” to know how common it is and to research treatments, he said. The study was done in Massachusetts and Arizona and involved 26 former NFL players with thinking, mood or behavior problems, and 31 similarly aged men without these symptoms or

head injuries. They were given positron emission tomography, or PET scans, in which a radioactive tracer is injected that binds to various substances and makes them visible on the scans. Several of these tracers are used now to look for a protein called beta amyloid in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. An experimental tracer that doctors are testing binds to another protein, tau, the key one that’s been implicated in CTE. Men in the study had both types of tracers. Tau levels were higher in the players compared to the others, but their amyloid levels were similar, confirming that CTE is a different disease than Alzheimer’s.

Researchers also saw a relationship to years of play. “The more years of play in tackle football across all levels, the greater the amount of tau detected,” Stern said. However, there was no relationship between tau levels and the severity of mood and thinking symptoms. Researchers think the study may have been too small to detect a difference or that tau may not be the only factor involved. “There’s a lot more work to be done to develop a diagnostic” tool using these scans, said Dr. Michael Weiner an imaging expert at UCSF who is involved in other CTE research. Government grants and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, which

makes the tracers, funded the study. Some authors work or consult for the company. A larger study of former NFL and college football players is underway; first results are expected early next year. Mike Adamle, a former running back for the Chicago Bears and sports announcer, has been told he has symptoms consistent with CTE, and has been evaluated by Stern at the Boston research center — though he was not part of the current study. “I had more than a few” concussions, Adamle said. “If you were running, everybody kind of led with their head.” The illness has been devastating, said his wife, Kim. “He couldn’t remember his lunch or he couldn’t remember his lines on the air,” and lost multiple jobs, she said. If a test could have shown he was at risk and given him a chance to consider quitting, “I would have definitely taken note,” Mike Adamle said.

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Retired Lt. Col. Richard ‘Dick’ Cole • The last of the 80 Doolittle Tokyo Raiders, who carried out the U.S. attack on Japan in World War II, died Tuesday (April 9, 2019) at a military hospital in Texas. He was 103. Lt. Col. Cole’s daughter, Cindy Chal, said he was having some heart issues but had walked into the emergency room. Lt. Col. Cole, who lived in Comfort, Texas, had stayed active even in recent years, attending air shows and participating in commemorative events including April 18, 2017, ceremonies for the raid’s 75th anniversary at the National Museum of the Air Force near Dayton, Ohio. Chal said her father “enjoyed every minute” of his long, distinguished life. Lt. Col. Cole was mission commander Jimmy Doolittle’s co-pilot in the attack less than five months after the December 1941 Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. The Raiders launched April 18, 1942, in B-25 bombers from the aircraft carrier Hornet. The raid inflicted scattered damage while providing a psychological lift back home. The stunned Japanese diverted resources after a string of successes.

Soup,” which also won that year’s grand jury prize.

Cole

Burgin

Lt. Col. Cole continued to fly missions in the China-Burma-India theater until 1944. R.V. Burgin • The Marine sergeant, whose book about grueling jungle combat in WWII became a basis for the HBO miniseries “The Pacific,” has died at his home in Lancaster, Texas, a suburb of Dallas. His daughter, Maggie Shepherd, said her father was 96 when he died in his sleep on April 6 (2019). Sgt. Burgin wrote “Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific.” Shepherd said it was among several books that inspired the HBO miniseries that premiered in 2010. Sgt. Burgin was portrayed in the miniseries by actor Martin McCann. Shepherd said her father never talked about his service in the war for about 35 years, until he was inspired to write a book after attending some military reunions.

Cassel

Van Doren

Seymour Cassel • The actor, who starred in “Faces” and several other John Cassavetes movies, has died. He was 84. The Oscar-nominated actor died April 7 (2019) in Los Angeles after complications from Alzheimer’s disease, his son, actor Matthew Cassel, said. Mr. Cassel made his acting debut in the 1958 romantic drama “Shadows,” the first movie by his friend and director Cassavetes. Mr. Cassel was nominated for an Oscar for his role as a hippie swinger in Cassavetes’ 1968 drama “Faces” and turned in critically acclaimed performances in six other Cassavetes movies, including “Minnie and Moskowitz,” “The Killing of a Chinese Bookie” and “Love Streams.” His career peaked again in the 1990s when he won the first acting prize given at the Sundance Film Festival for his role in 1992’s “In the

OBITUARIES Vaughn, Cecile Eileen (nee Swain), Passed away on Saturday, April 13, 2019 at age 81. Beloved wife of Gerald T. Vaughn for 62 years; loving mother of Scot (Bonnie) Vaughn, Cherie Vaughn, and the late Sherleen Vaughn; cherished grandmother of Megan and Morgan Vaughn; dear daughter of Eileen (nee McDonal) and the late Kenneth Swain; dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Longtime member of St. Louis Metro Singers and Des Peres Baptist Church. Services: Visitation 4-8:00 p.m. on Monday, April 15 at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd,. in Kirkwood, MO, Funeral 11:00 a.m. Tuesday, April 16 at Bopp Chapel. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Kirkwood Baptist Church. www.boppchapel.com

Bill Isles • An original member of the Conley chart-topping R&B group the O’Jays, has died at his Southern California Home. He was 78. Mr. Isles died of cancer in March at his home in Oceanside. Mr. Isles and friends in Canton, Ohio, formed the Mascots in 1958 before changing the name to the Triumphs and releasing a single in 1961. The band changed its name to the O’Jays after getting advice from a Cleveland DJ named Eddie O’Jay. Mr. Isles was featured on songs including “Lonely Drifter” and “Lipstick Traces” before he quit the group in 1965. Duane Isles says his father was the O’Jays’ tour manager between 1971 and 1974, when the group released its biggest hits, “Love Train” and “Back Stabbers.” The O’Jays were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005. Charles Van Doren • The academic whose meteoric rise and fall as a corrupt game show contestant in the 1950s inspired the movie “Quiz

Celebrations of Life

Wiers, Lillian 94, April 12, 2019. Funeral service: Manchester UMC, Manchester, Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. Visit: 1 hour prior to service. For more info, see Schrader.com

Wobbe, Rita (nee Becker), February 15, 2019. Memorial Mass at Seven Holy Founders Catholic Church on Friday, May 3 at 10 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. A KUTIS SERVICE.

Wood, Robert Eugene

passed away on Thursday, April 11, 2019. Beloved husband of Verna (nee Hunt) and the late Weiner, Doris nee Schlesinger, age 86, passed on April 8, 2019. She loved well Ann (nee Tidwell) Wood; loving and was well loved by her husband of 64 years, Ted Weiner, and father of M. Robert (Darlene) her three children and their spouses, Kate Anderson (Ken), Jim Wood, Kenneth (Chelly) Wood, Weiner (Britta), and Patricia Weiner Snook (David). She adored Alena (Odis) Pickens and Janna and was adored by her grandchildren Adam Snook, and Trixie (Michael) Williams; dearest grandand Joe Weiner. She opened her heart to Selina, Julian, and all father of Kayla, Rocky, Aronne, the other children who joined our family through marriage. Adam, Justice, Kh a ya , Leiah, Very dear to her was her brother, Stanley (Gloria, both Makenna, Michael II, Noel, Quinn deceased) and his children; John (deceased), Nancy, and Tim and River; dear brother of RoseMary Hall; dear brother-in- law, (Wendy) Schlesinger, and their children Joe Reed and Annika. Hand in hand, Ted and Doris traveled here and abroad by uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. plane, train, and boat; and built lives in new cities. Her kind- Robert proudly served with the U.S. Navy from 1960- 1964. ness, warmth, humor, and love for a good conversation fostered Services: Funeral service at Apostolic Pentecostal Church, 901 lifelong friendships. And she drew the appreciation of all those Barracksview Rd., Tuesday, April 16, at 12 p.m. Interment J.B. Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be she helped during her lifetime as a volunteer, crisis counselor, National made to Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Visitation at Kutis health educator, and senior-living activities director. Doris, you Affton Chapel, Monday, April 15, 4-8 p.m. were strong, courageous, resilient to the end, and taught all of us how to carry those qualities with grace and a big heart. We miss you today and always. “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen, To honor Doris, please consider donations to your local nor touched, but are felt in the heart.” Humane Society or other animal rights organizations. HELEN KELLER Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL

Weissmann, Andrea G. (nee Pertici), passed away at the age of 80 on Friday, April 5, 2019. She was born to the late Andrew and Isabel Pertici, March 10, 1939 in St. Louis, MO. Andrea "Andie" graduated from Xavier High School in 1957. She was married to the late Gary Weissmann in 1990; mother to late Stephanie and James Mohrmann, and surviving children: Karen Viviano, Julie Anderson, and Nicole Collora; loving grandmother to Bianca, Gabrielle, Isabella, Addyson, Stephanie, Allyson, and Nino; great grandmother to Amelia. Andrea proudly retired from the MIMH Library after 25 years. Andrea loved celebrating her life. She ensured Christmas and Valentine's Day were always special, because of her genuine excitement and touches only she could provide. Nothing lit up Andrea's life more than her grandchildren. She lit up the world with her beautiful smile. Andrea will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Services: There will be a memorial Mass at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, 5130 Wilson Avenue, on Saturday, May 11 at 2 p.m.

Weston, Waleen F. (nee Unger) on April 12, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Norman R. Weston; loving mother of 7, grandmother of 15 and greatgrandmother of 18. Our dear sister, sister-in-law, mother-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at St. Paul U.C.C., 5508 Telegraph Rd., 63129, on Sunday April 14, 4-8 p.m.; Monday, April 15, 10 a.m. 8 p.m.; and Tuesday, April 16, from 10 am until time of service at 11 a.m. Interment St. Paul U.C.C. Cemetery. Memorials to American Cancer Society or Crohns and Colitis Foundation appreciated. A Kutis South County Chapel Service.

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Show” has died. He was 93. He died of natural causes Tuesday (April 9, 2019) at a care center for the elderly in Canaan, Conn. Mr. Van Doren was the central figure in the TV game show scandals of the late 1950s and eventually pleaded guilty to perjury for lying to a grand jury that investigated them. He spent the following decades largely out of the public eye. “It’s been hard to get away, partly because the man who cheated on ‘Twenty-One’ is still part of me,” he wrote in a 2008 New Yorker essay, his first public comment in years. Mr. Van Doren refused to cooperate in the making of “Quiz Show.” Earl Thomas Conley • The country musician died Wednesday (April 10, 2017) in Nashville, Tenn. He was 77. His daughter Erinn Scates of Nashville said her father had died from an extended illness. The music website allmusic.com says Mr. Conley charted his first Top 40 hit in 1979 with “Dreamin’s All I Do.” He sang a number of other hits, including “Holding Her and Loving You,” “Right From the Start” and “What I’d Say.” From news services

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Zimmermann, Eunice C. (nee Malke). Asleep in Jesus. May 10, 1925 to April 7, 2019, of Glendale. Beloved wife of the late Roger C. Zimmermann for 63 years; precious mother of Roger C., Jr. (former wife Karen) and Joan (Phil) Ces; beloved grandmother of Alisha (Oliver) Davis, Mark (Sarah) Zimmermann, and Matthew Ces; dear great-grandm o t h e r of Ca l eb a n d J a cob Zimmermann; dear daughter of the late E. Bernard and Clara Salzmann Malke; loving sister of the late E.B. "Bud" (Mildred) Malke Jr., Doris (Leslie) Zabel; and the late Robert Malke; dear sister-in-law, aunt, cousin, and friend. Eunice was active in the Glendale Women's Club, Glendale Historical Society, Holy Cross Lutheran School Alumni, among many others. Services: Visitation at Bopp Chapel, Thursday, April 18, 4-8 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd. in Kirkwood. Funeral Friday, April 19, 9:30 a.m. at Glendale Lutheran Church, 1365 N. Sappington Road. Interment private at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials preferred to Glendale Lutheran Church. www.boppchapel.com

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NATION

04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A29

Gun rights counties vow to resist restrictions BY MATT VASILOGAMBROS Stateline.org

WA S H I N GTO N • There are

“sanctuary cities” that refuse to assist federal immigration enforcement. Now, there are “sanctuary counties” that refuse to enforce new gun control laws. Rural, conservative communities are pushing back against state legislatures that have been approving new firearm restrictions at a rapid rate since the February 2018 massacre at a high school in Parkland, Fla. More than 200 counties across nine states have vowed not to enforce new state measures that restrict gun access, and 132 have declared themselves to be Second Amendment “sanctuaries,” borrowing a term at the center of the immigration debate, according to a Stateline analysis. For gun rights supporters, it’s a defiant rebuff to state leaders they believe are attacking their communities’ gun heritage and way of life. So far, county leaders have not translated their rhetoric into action by, for example, defying a “red-flag” court order to confiscate guns from a person deemed to be dangerous to himself or others. But there is no doubt the movement is gaining momentum: Except for 52 counties in New York and three in Maryland, which acted in 2013 after their states passed new legislation following the Sandy Hook mass shooting, all of the counties have made their declarations since the Parkland shooting. In New Mexico, for example, the Democratic-controlled state government enacted a law in March requiring background checks for firearm purchases. But the month before, as state leaders considered the measure, 29 of 33 county sheriffs signed a letter declaring they would oppose any new state laws that “restrict the

rights” of New Mexicans to own firearms. The chairman of the New Mexico Sheriffs’ Association, Cibola County Sheriff Tony Mace, a Democrat, told Stateline both the newly enacted background check measure and other proposals being debated in New Mexico are “unenforceable, overreaching, unconstitutional and a gun grab.” Further, he said, they are a waste of taxpayer resources. “In my community, I have more authority than anybody else,” Mace said. “As a law enforcement officer, I have discretion to use the laws that I want to. That’s my decision. I’m not going to enforce that particular law.” In a series of tweets in February, Democratic New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham mocked and lambasted the sheriffs for their “political posturing and dangerous, cynical pandering.” “That’s not how laws work, of course,” she tweeted, “and it’s not how oaths of office work either.” Twenty-five New Mexico boards of county commissioners adopted sanctuary resolutions after their sheriffs took a public stance against the proposed gun control laws. Robert Spitzer, a professor of political science at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Cortland and the author of five books on gun control, suspects most of this is just “bluster.” “Because they are elected officials, they respond to electoral pressures,” Spitzer said of the sheriffs and commissioners. “There is still some space between these braggart statements from some sheriffs and getting to a point where there’s a direct confrontation over their refusal to enforce gun laws.” In Southern Illinois, Effingham County is known for its colossal, 200-foot metal cross that tow-

ers over the intersection of Interstates 57 and 70 — the largest cross in America. In April 2018, the conservative, rural county of 34,000 residents became known for something else: being the first county to use the “sanctuary” label to signal its determination to resist new state gun laws. Its Republican county leaders, worried that Democratic lawmakers who control the state’s legislature would pass laws restricting gun access, adopted a resolution that prohibits county employees “from enforcing the unconstitutional actions of the state government.” Around the same time, Chicago was in a legal battle with the administration of President Donald Trump over its role as a sanctuary city that had declined to participate in the federal crackdown on undocumented immigrants. David Campbell, the Republican member of the Effingham County Board who authored the gun rights resolution, wanted to “spice it up a little bit,” so he applied the “sanctuary” label to his measure too. “That’s a big buzzword these days,” Campbell said. “We’re flipping the script on Chicago.” There is a massive political divide between urban and rural areas in Illinois, especially when it comes to guns. Three new state gun measures went into effect at the beginning of this year, including a red-flag law, which rural state lawmakers strongly opposed. “Illinois is actually two states,” said Richard Pearson, the executive director of the Illinois State Rifle Association. “You have Chicago, and you have Illinois.” Sixty-two of the state’s 102 counties have followed Effingham County’s lead by declaring themselves to be Second Amendment sanctuaries. Campbell said

county leaders from other states, such as Oregon and Pennsylvania, have called him for advice on adopting their own resolutions. To be sure, these measures are not universally loved in the counties in which they’re enacted. Bruce Malone, a Democratic member of the Madison County Board in Illinois, voted against a successful sanctuary measure last year. He understands the county is “very pro-gun,” but he said he thinks county officials are not empowered to interpret the constitutionality of state laws. “That’s what the courts do,” Malone said. “In my mind, what we did here was all about politics. I don’t want to take anyone’s guns away, but why are we superseding the rule of law?” The power of big-city Democrats, most of whom favor stricter gun control, in state legislatures is fueling similar resolutions around the country. In Oregon, gun rights activist Rob Taylor is sick of seeing politicians from the Portland area creating land-use, tax and gun policies in the state legislature that he believes many rural residents oppose. “You’ve got a major metropolis ruling the rural areas, and you’re starting to see rural areas rebel,” the Coos County resident said. “They don’t have the same problems or logistics that we all have. We’re tired of getting ruled by them.” Taylor, who founded the Committee to Preserve the Second Amendment, a local political action committee, is working with counties across the state to put “Second Amendment Preservation Ordinances” on election ballots that would direct county officials not to use any resources to enforce federal or state gun laws. Law enforcement officers have a great deal of discretion in how

they do their daily jobs. If a sheriff’s deputy pulls you over for speeding, for example, she can either write you a ticket or let you go with a warning. Law enforcement officials, busy and with limited resources, can focus their energies on laws that they think are most important, said George Mocsary, a professor at the Southern Illinois University School of Law. Rural officials may not prioritize the enforcement of gun laws they think are more relevant to big cities, he said. But counties were created by state governments, so they are bound by state laws, SUNY at Cortland’s Spitzer said. And as the county’s top law enforcement officer, sheriffs should be enforcing those laws. State attorneys general have made that clear in recent weeks, threatening sheriffs who have said they would not enforce new state gun laws. In February, Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, a Democrat, wrote an open letter to law enforcement officials who said they would not enforce a new state law approved by voters that implements restrictions on semi-automatic weapons and expands background checks. Ferguson said “they could be held liable” if someone is harmed because of their failure to enforce these regulations. But holding a sheriff liable is “a fantasy,” said Mocsary, citing two cases in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that law enforcement officials were not liable for harm caused by their failure to enforce a law. Similarly, counties that reject state laws are following the same precedent of cities that have declared themselves to be sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants — not to mention states that have legalized marijuana in defiance of federal law.

Principals from schools with shootings forming a support network Collectively, members have lost more than 40 students and staff in deadly attacks BY KANTELE FRANKO associated Press

COLUMBUS, OHIO • In the days after a teenager shot and killed three fellow students at Ohio’s Chardon High School in 2012, then-Principal Andy Fetchik remembers getting a call from someone who knew just what he was experiencing. It was Frank DeAngelis, the principal of Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., during the deadly 1999 shooting. DeAngelis told him: It’s going to be OK. You’ll get through this. If you have questions, feel free to call me. Fetchik called, and he found DeAngelis to be a comfort and a resource as Chardon began its recovery. Now both men are part of a new network of current and former principals who hope to offer support to other school leaders in the aftermath of violence. “This is the network each of us wishes we had when the shooting occurred in our school,” DeAngelis said in a written statement. The Principals Recovery Network will also advocate for educational resources and policies to help schools prevent violence. It convened this month ahead of the 20th anniversary of the Columbine shooting. The group, organized by the National Association of Secondary School Principals, includes 17 current and former principals from schools in 11 states, including Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., the site of a shooting in 2018. Collectively, the participants have lost more than 40 students and staff and seen scores more wounded in shootings over the past two decades. “We’re not experts in recovery, but we’re experts in the fact that we lived through it,” Fetchik said, “and I think that it will provide a resource that kind of confirms to the school leader that there’s others out there and they’re not alone.” When a teenager shot and wounded a classmate at West Liberty-Salem High School in 2017, leaders from two other Ohio schools that experienced shootings reached out with valuable suggestions, such as having an open house before

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Paper cranes hang in the Columbine High School library last month. The school is preparing for the 20th anniversary of the April 20, 1999, shooting that killed 12 students and a teacher.

Former Columbine High School principal Frank DeAngelis reflects last month about the 20th anniversary of the mass shooting at the suburban Denver school. Seventeen principals impacted by shootings have formed a support network for the next colleagues who join their unenviable ranks.

resuming classes so students and staff could ease back into the building that some had fled, Principal Greg Johnson said. A year later, after two students were fatally shot and others wounded at Kentucky’s Marshall County High School, Johnson wanted to offer help

but had trouble connecting with the principal — understandable, he said, given the crush of communications, support and wellwishes that a school must sort through in such circumstances. Johnson waited months, tried again and eventually connected with the principal to share some

of what he’d learned with her, he said. The new network gives that kind of outreach structure and a centralized contact, participants said. “What better group of people to do it than the folks who have experienced it?” said Michael

Bennett, a former principal who was shot in the leg by a student in 2004 when he was a teacher at Columbia High School in East Greenbush, N.Y. Bennett said it would have been helpful back then to hear from a voice of experience about how the situation might impact him long term and how colleagues might have varying emotional responses. Principal Warman Hall, of New Mexico’s Aztec High School, eventually connected with DeAngelis after two students died in a 2017 shooting on the school’s campus. But Hall said he, too, felt a sense of isolation and could have used someone with prior experience as a sounding board while initially sorting out a recovery plan. Schools typically have protocols for the immediate response, he said, but it can be much more complicated to figure out what follows — how to restore a focus on learning, address mental health needs for both students and employees, and navigate anniversaries and commemorations, for example. “You’ve got to deal with all the issues of recovery, and that starts happening just as soon as you try to re-establish contact and get the kids back on campus and get the teachers back on campus,” he said. “There’s no template for that.”


NATION

04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A29

Gun rights counties vow to resist restrictions BY MATT VASILOGAMBROS Stateline.org

WA S H I N GTO N • There are

“sanctuary cities” that refuse to assist federal immigration enforcement. Now, there are “sanctuary counties” that refuse to enforce new gun control laws. Rural, conservative communities are pushing back against state legislatures that have been approving new firearm restrictions at a rapid rate since the February 2018 massacre at a high school in Parkland, Fla. More than 200 counties across nine states have vowed not to enforce new state measures that restrict gun access, and 132 have declared themselves to be Second Amendment “sanctuaries,” borrowing a term at the center of the immigration debate, according to a Stateline analysis. For gun rights supporters, it’s a defiant rebuff to state leaders they believe are attacking their communities’ gun heritage and way of life. So far, county leaders have not translated their rhetoric into action by, for example, defying a “red-flag” court order to confiscate guns from a person deemed to be dangerous to himself or others. But there is no doubt the movement is gaining momentum: Except for 52 counties in New York and three in Maryland, which acted in 2013 after their states passed new legislation following the Sandy Hook mass shooting, all of the counties have made their declarations since the Parkland shooting. In New Mexico, for example, the Democratic-controlled state government enacted a law in March requiring background checks for firearm purchases. But the month before, as state leaders considered the measure, 29 of 33 county sheriffs signed a letter declaring they would oppose any new state laws that “restrict the

rights” of New Mexicans to own firearms. The chairman of the New Mexico Sheriffs’ Association, Cibola County Sheriff Tony Mace, a Democrat, told Stateline both the newly enacted background check measure and other proposals being debated in New Mexico are “unenforceable, overreaching, unconstitutional and a gun grab.” Further, he said, they are a waste of taxpayer resources. “In my community, I have more authority than anybody else,” Mace said. “As a law enforcement officer, I have discretion to use the laws that I want to. That’s my decision. I’m not going to enforce that particular law.” In a series of tweets in February, Democratic New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham mocked and lambasted the sheriffs for their “political posturing and dangerous, cynical pandering.” “That’s not how laws work, of course,” she tweeted, “and it’s not how oaths of office work either.” Twenty-five New Mexico boards of county commissioners adopted sanctuary resolutions after their sheriffs took a public stance against the proposed gun control laws. Robert Spitzer, a professor of political science at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Cortland and the author of five books on gun control, suspects most of this is just “bluster.” “Because they are elected officials, they respond to electoral pressures,” Spitzer said of the sheriffs and commissioners. “There is still some space between these braggart statements from some sheriffs and getting to a point where there’s a direct confrontation over their refusal to enforce gun laws.” In Southern Illinois, Effingham County is known for its colossal, 200-foot metal cross that tow-

ers over the intersection of Interstates 57 and 70 — the largest cross in America. In April 2018, the conservative, rural county of 34,000 residents became known for something else: being the first county to use the “sanctuary” label to signal its determination to resist new state gun laws. Its Republican county leaders, worried that Democratic lawmakers who control the state’s legislature would pass laws restricting gun access, adopted a resolution that prohibits county employees “from enforcing the unconstitutional actions of the state government.” Around the same time, Chicago was in a legal battle with the administration of President Donald Trump over its role as a sanctuary city that had declined to participate in the federal crackdown on undocumented immigrants. David Campbell, the Republican member of the Effingham County Board who authored the gun rights resolution, wanted to “spice it up a little bit,” so he applied the “sanctuary” label to his measure too. “That’s a big buzzword these days,” Campbell said. “We’re flipping the script on Chicago.” There is a massive political divide between urban and rural areas in Illinois, especially when it comes to guns. Three new state gun measures went into effect at the beginning of this year, including a red-flag law, which rural state lawmakers strongly opposed. “Illinois is actually two states,” said Richard Pearson, the executive director of the Illinois State Rifle Association. “You have Chicago, and you have Illinois.” Sixty-two of the state’s 102 counties have followed Effingham County’s lead by declaring themselves to be Second Amendment sanctuaries. Campbell said

county leaders from other states, such as Oregon and Pennsylvania, have called him for advice on adopting their own resolutions. To be sure, these measures are not universally loved in the counties in which they’re enacted. Bruce Malone, a Democratic member of the Madison County Board in Illinois, voted against a successful sanctuary measure last year. He understands the county is “very pro-gun,” but he said he thinks county officials are not empowered to interpret the constitutionality of state laws. “That’s what the courts do,” Malone said. “In my mind, what we did here was all about politics. I don’t want to take anyone’s guns away, but why are we superseding the rule of law?” The power of big-city Democrats, most of whom favor stricter gun control, in state legislatures is fueling similar resolutions around the country. In Oregon, gun rights activist Rob Taylor is sick of seeing politicians from the Portland area creating land-use, tax and gun policies in the state legislature that he believes many rural residents oppose. “You’ve got a major metropolis ruling the rural areas, and you’re starting to see rural areas rebel,” the Coos County resident said. “They don’t have the same problems or logistics that we all have. We’re tired of getting ruled by them.” Taylor, who founded the Committee to Preserve the Second Amendment, a local political action committee, is working with counties across the state to put “Second Amendment Preservation Ordinances” on election ballots that would direct county officials not to use any resources to enforce federal or state gun laws. Law enforcement officers have a great deal of discretion in how

they do their daily jobs. If a sheriff’s deputy pulls you over for speeding, for example, she can either write you a ticket or let you go with a warning. Law enforcement officials, busy and with limited resources, can focus their energies on laws that they think are most important, said George Mocsary, a professor at the Southern Illinois University School of Law. Rural officials may not prioritize the enforcement of gun laws they think are more relevant to big cities, he said. But counties were created by state governments, so they are bound by state laws, SUNY at Cortland’s Spitzer said. And as the county’s top law enforcement officer, sheriffs should be enforcing those laws. State attorneys general have made that clear in recent weeks, threatening sheriffs who have said they would not enforce new state gun laws. In February, Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, a Democrat, wrote an open letter to law enforcement officials who said they would not enforce a new state law approved by voters that implements restrictions on semi-automatic weapons and expands background checks. Ferguson said “they could be held liable” if someone is harmed because of their failure to enforce these regulations. But holding a sheriff liable is “a fantasy,” said Mocsary, citing two cases in which the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that law enforcement officials were not liable for harm caused by their failure to enforce a law. Similarly, counties that reject state laws are following the same precedent of cities that have declared themselves to be sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants — not to mention states that have legalized marijuana in defiance of federal law.

Giant Stratolaunch jet stretches wings for first time Six-engine aircraft has world’s longest wingspan BY JOHN ANTCZAK associated Press

LOS ANGELES • A giant six-

engine aircraft with the world’s longest wingspan completed what company officials called a superb initial flight over California’s Mojave Desert, bringing to life a dream held by the late Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen. Stratolaunch Systems Corp. chief executive Jean Floyd said Saturday that the aircraft had made a “spectacular” landing that was on the mark. Stratolaunch, which was founded by Allen, is vying to be a contender in the market for air-launching small satellites. Allen died in October. “It was an emotional moment for me, to personally watch this majestic bird take flight, to see Paul Allen’s dream come to life in front of my very eyes,” Floyd told a teleconference briefing. Floyd said that as the plane lifted off, “I did whisper a ‘thank you’ to Paul for allowing me to be part of this remarkable achievement.” The behemoth, twin-fuselage Stratolaunch jet lifted off from Mojave Air and Space Port shortly before 7 a.m. Saturday and climbed into the desert sky 70 miles north of Los Angeles. The jet flew for 2½ hours, achieving a maximum speed of 189 mph and altitudes up to 17,000 feet, the company said. Test pilot Evan Thomas of Scaled Composites LLC, which built the aircraft, said the flight

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Stratolaunch, a giant six-engine aircraft with the world’s longest wingspan, makes its first flight from the Mojave Air and Space Port in Mojave, Calif., on Saturday. Founded by the late billionaire Paul G. Allen, Stratolaunch is vying to be a contender in the market for air-launching small satellites. Powered by engines used by Boeing 747s, the aircraft is designed to take off at a maximum weight of 1.3 million pounds.

overall was “fantastic” and for the most part the plane flew as predicted. “The airplane very nicely, smoothly rotated and really just lifted off the ground,” he said. “It definitely was ready to fly and wanted to fly and climbed out quickly.” Thomas said there were “a few little things that were off-nominal, but really for a first flight it was spot-on.” He did not specify what those things were, and briefing participants did not take questions. The aircraft is designed to carry as many as three satelliteladen rockets at a time under the center of its enormous wing,

which stretches 385 feet — longer than any other aircraft. At an altitude of 35,000 feet, the rockets would be released, ignite their engines and soar into space. The advantages of such airlaunch systems include being able to use numerous airports and avoid the limitations of fixed launch sites which can be impacted by weather, air traffic and ship traffic on ocean ranges. Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft, founded Stratolaunch Systems Corp. in 2011 after emerging in aerospace by funding the development of the experimental air-launched SpaceShipOne, which in 2004 became

DIGEST Cut melon sold here may carry salmonella Cut melon sold in Missouri, Illinois and 14 other states is being recalled after being linked to a salmonella outbreak. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday that the recall included cut watermelon, honeydew and cantaloupe produced by Caito Foods of Indianapolis. The fruit has been sold under various brands or labels at Kroger, Walmart, Trader Joe’s, Target and Whole Foods. Authorities say 93 people have been sickened, 23 of whom were hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. Salmonella symptoms include diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps. Storm kills 2 children in Texas • Two children were killed and

the first privately built crewed rocket to reach space. After Allen’s death in October 2018, Stratolaunch dropped plans to develop its own type of rocket engine and a family of launch vehicles, focusing instead on getting the giant plane airborne and launching Northrop Grumman’s proven Pegasus XL. The Stratolaunch aircraft emerged from its Mojave hangar for the first time in May 2017 and proceeded through ground tests, including taxiing and rolling down a runway at near-takeoff speeds. Powered by the same type of engines used by Boeing 747s, the aircraft is designed to take off at

a maximum weight of 1.3 million pounds. Its twin fuselages — sort of the airplane equivalent of a catamaran — are 238 feet long. The previous wingspan leader was Howard Hughes’ World War II-era eight-engine H-4 Hercules flying boat — nicknamed the Spruce Goose. Surviving in an aviation museum, it has an approximately 320-foot wingspan but is just under 219 feet long. While Stratolaunch calls its aircraft the world’s largest, other airplanes exceed it in length from nose to tail. They include the sixengine Antonov AN 225 cargo plane, which is 275.5 feet long, and the Boeing 747-8, which is just over 250 feet long.

the vehicle. Twenty-five people were injured in Alto, about 18 miles north of Pollok.

Twin Cities, pleaded guilty Friday to 13 counts of animal cruelty. Bregel was ordered to serve 200 hours of community service, two years of probation and 90 days of electronic home monitoring. She must also receive a psychological examination.

Boy thrown off mall balcony has serious injuries • A 5-year-old boy who was thrown from a third-floor balcony at the Mall of America near Minneapolis remains hospitalized with serious injuries, authorities said Saturday. Bloomington Police Chief Jeffrey Potts said the boy fell nearly 40 feet after a man who apparently didn’t know the boy or his family threw him off the balcony Friday. Authorities haven’t released the boy’s name. COLLEGE STATION EAGLE VIA AP

A tree lies on its side after a suspected tornado struck in Franklin, Texas, on Saturday. Storms will be heading east through Sunday.

dozens of people were injured Saturday during strong storms in eastern Texas, local media reported. The children, ages 3 and 8, were killed when a tree fell on

the car they were traveling in near Pollok, about 161 miles southeast of Dallas, the Angelina County sheriff’s office said. The children’s parents were able to climb out of

Animal hoarder sentenced in Minnesota • A Minnesota woman who was found to have 64 dead cats, 43 live cats, a 400-pound pig and other animals on her property has been sentenced. Caycee Bregel, 25, who ran a nonprofit animal rescue out of her home south of the

Potential twister reported in Mississippi • What may have been a tornado struck in western Mississippi. John Moore, a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Jackson, said a twister was reported Saturday in the Vicksburg area. No injuries were reported. Severe storms crossing a big swath of the South, including parts of Louisiana and Mississippi, knocked out power to thousands and caused some flash flooding. Damage was also reported near Satartia, Miss. From news services


NATION

A30 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

These ‘eggs’ are spying on whooping cranes to boost birds’ survival Electronic fakes record temperature, humidity and position within nest BY JANET MCCONNAUGHEY Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS • Scientists are using fake eggs to spy on

whooping cranes in hopes of learning why some chicks die in the egg, while others hatch. Data gathered by the spy eggs could help biologists in Louisiana and Canada preserve the endangered longlegged birds, which have made a tenuous rebound after dwindling almost to extinction in the 1940s. “It’s a fascinating way of spying on endangered species’ reproduction in a way that allows us to assist in the recovery,” said Dr. Axel Moehrenschlager, the Calgary Zoo’s director of conservation and science. The Calgary Zoo lent eight of the spy eggs, more properly known as “data loggers,” to Louisiana researchers. The Louisiana wildlife biologists swap the egg-shaped data loggers for one of the two eggs that many cranes lay. The real eggs come to Audubon Nature Institute’s Species Survival Center in New Orleans, where they’re incubated until they’re nearly ready to hatch ... or not. Then the biologists in Louisiana swap the real eggs back into the nests. The electronic data loggers use infrared connections to transfer information to nearby computers. It’s sent for analysis to scientists in Calgary, where the only remaining wild natural flock of whooping cranes is based. Whoopers are the tallest birds and rarest cranes in North America. They stand about 5 feet tall, with blacktipped wings that span nearly 7 feet. Overhunting and habitat loss cut their numbers to 21 in the 1940s, but with some help from humans the number

In this photo provided by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, biologist Eva Szyszkoski uses brooms to fend off a pair of nesting whooping cranes in Jefferson Davis, La., so biologist Sara Zimorski (right) can replace a data-logging egg with the cranes’ real egg. Louisiana is home to 74 whooping cranes in the wild.

had risen to about 850 at the end of 2018. Louisiana is home to 74 whooping cranes in the wild. “We’ve got some pairs that haven’t been successful, and we want to see if we could see what might be going on with them,” said Sara Zimorski, a biologist with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries . “In the bigger picture, we don’t know a lot about wild nest incubation,” she said. The new information may help improve provisions for captive pairs and settings for incubators. Richard Dunn, curator at the Species Survival Center, says he hopes to learn if he needs to tweak incubator settings to more closely mimic Louisiana’s climate, which is hotter and damper than the northern settings where previous studies were done. A crane expert who’s not affiliated with the Louisiana effort said those are entirely reasonable aims. Scott A. Shaffer, a San Jose State University professor, has been working with data logger eggs since 2010 to study a variety of birds in a number of places. He said the tiny, lowpower sensors that reorient tablet and smartphone displays as the devices are moved have helped drive technology that checks for egg turning, allowing second-by-

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second studies of eggs. The whooping crane data logger eggs record temperature, humidity and position once a minute. They can also detect when eggs are turned — an important part of keeping developing birds healthy. They were developed by a team of Canadian and U.S. scientists who compared nests of captive whooping cranes and sandhill cranes at the Calgary Zoo’s Devonian Wildlife Conservation Centre to incubators, hoping to improve the hatching rate of incubated eggs. Their study, published in 2012, helped people raising the cranes in Canada and the U.S. to adjust incubator temperature and humidity settings, Moehrenschlager said. The Species Survival Center on New Orleans’ west bank houses 36 of the 163 whooping cranes currently living in captivity, including 10 destined for a new facility under construction by the Dallas Zoo. None of the birds at Audubon has yet begun nesting, Dunn said. Zimorski and fellow Louisiana wildlife biologist Phillip Vasseur put a few data loggers out last year to be sure the birds would tolerate the intrusion of eggs being swapped in and out. Zimorski said the birds decide much of the wild deployment, since many this year are nesting in inaccessible swamps where biologists keep tabs on them through airplane flyovers. Both Zimorski and Dunn said there’s nowhere near enough data yet for any conclusions. “We need a couple more years so we can get additional pairs and some years of repeat data,” Zimorski said.

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STLTODAY.COM/LIFE • STLTODAY.COM/GO • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • B

STLLIFE ARTS + HOME + TRAVEL

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

The original St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum, built for 150 patients on the highest spot in St. Louis in 1869, will turn 150 years old this month. The windows in the dome, as photographed in February, offer a view up to 30 miles away. The winding staircase was used to reach the top of the structure designed by Old Courthouse architect William Rumbold.

The view from Arsenal Street 150 YEARS From Lunatic Asylum to St. Louis Psychiatric Rehabilitation Center FAR LEFT: The dome on the St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum was designed by Old Courthouse architect William Rumbold.

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

If you grew up in St. Louis, the building might have loomed as a threat. “When we misbehaved as children, our parents threatened to take us to Arsenal Street,” said Felix Vincenz, who grew up in Webster Groves. Now, all he has to do is push back from his desk a bit and look to the right; he can see the imposing, white dome from his office window in a newer building on the campus. Vincenz is the chief operating officer of the facility, now known as the St. Louis Psychiatric Rehabilitation Center. “It represents the ‘asylum’ and sometimes the best and the worst of what that word means,” he said. “For many people, it’s a source of sanctuary and a safe haven.” The building opened 150 years ago this month as the St. Louis

LEFT (TOP): Old records are stored in filing cabinets on the abandoned fifth floor of the original St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum, where doctors’ apartments were once located. LEFT (BOTTOM): Public works employees left their mark on the asylum’s upper storage floors where they helped build solariums and cleaned the building in 1934.

See ASYLUM • Page B4

Ibur is all about ‘taking poetry to the people’ St. Louis inducts its third poet laureate for a two-year term

What every student applying to college needs

BY JANE HENDERSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Jane Ellen Ibur has taught not only young would-be poets, but also killers, both legal and not. For decades, she went into the St. Louis County jail, where she met prisoners who later had no possibility of parole. More recently, she’s coached veterans with depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, one a former sniper. “Even when the subject of the poetry is horrifying, we have a good time,” she says. “It’s been fabulous. “My work has always been about taking poetry to people who weren’t expecting poetry to See IBUR • Page B6

AISHA SULTAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis Board of Aldermen President Lewis Reed (left) and Cheryl Walker, chair of the selection committee of the poet laureate task force, induct Jane Ellen Ibur (right) as St. Louis’ third poet laureate on Friday during a ceremony in City Hall.

In the fall of his senior year, Rico Beuford wasn’t sure if he was going to go to college. His mom had died in a car accident when he was in grade school. The deep sense of loss was hitting him again. He was filled with anger. He had moved out of his father’s house and was living with his aunt. He was lashing out at his teachers at Parkway North High School, where he was taking all Advanced Placement classes. His life felt chaotic. Then, a good friend’s mom intervened. Carla Feuer recognized what a promising student he was. She asked if See SULTAN • Page B2

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M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

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Friendly, smart and highly affectionate, 2-year-old basenji mix Queen is ready to wag her way into your heart. With all her playful youthful energy, she would love an active home with a family that will take her on all sorts of adventures. She enjoys giving kisses and may even jump up playfully for a hug. When it comes to house training and obedience, Queen prefers to do her business outside and already knows how to sit, stay and come on command. One of her favorite things to do is play, especially with kids. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Macklind Avenue headquarters in St. Louis.

Six-year-old Clive is an adorable male pot-bellied pig who came to the Humane Society’s Longmeadow Rescue Ranch with his mother, one sister and four other brothers. He is friendly and could be house-trained, as well as trained to walk on a harness. He enjoys treats, but his new human friends will need to limit his intake to keep his weight in balance. Clive, like all pigs, will need yearly vaccinations, regular hoof trimming and deworming, as well as lots of enrichment and time to play outside. To adopt • Apply in person at Longmeadow Rescue Ranch in Union. Visit longmeadowrescueranch.org for hours, directions and more information.

PETS OF THE WEEK

PREP SCHOOL Our food writer Daniel Neman shows you how to make a Moroccan Orange Salad. stltoday.com/food

DINNER AND A SHOW Go beyond popcorn with these St. Louis venues where you can catch a show and some good food. stltoday.com/go

NEW ON DVD MOVIES Coming Tuesday • “Glass”; “Dragon Ball Super: Broly”; “The Kid Who Would Be King”; “Replicas”; “Batman: Hush”; “Escape at Dannemora”; “Justice League vs. The Fatal Five” Coming April 23 • “Escape Room”; “Destroyer”

TELEVISION Coming April 23 • “A Place to Call Home,” Season 6; “Shameless,” Season 9

Five-month-old Esther came to the Humane Society from a partner shelter in Oklahoma, hoping to find a forever home in St. Louis. This lovely Labrador retriever mix would thrive having a nice balance of active play and peaceful cuddle time. Because she is still a puppy, Esther would love her new human friends to help with house training, obedience and all the other skills she needs to be a happy girl. She can be a little shy at first, but once she is settled, Esther will be so comfortable and happy in her new forever home. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights.

Last week’s pets • Dogs named Dexter, Honeysuckle and Rocket are still available for adoption. Hours and directions • hsmo.org

PARENT TO PARENT: JODIE LYNN

It’s important to strike a balance with kids and it’s now time for your husband to grow up. — Jack M. in Los Angeles

GARDENING Q&A

Remove outer growth on droopy arborvitae BY CHIP TYNAN Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • We have three arborvitae bushes on the east side of our house. All are within a span of 25 feet, so they have the same conditions. The bush closest to our side door (and closest to our underground downspout) is doing fantastic. The other two bushes have been drooping severely for a couple of years. The bentover ones have a secondary trunk. They have no needle discoloration, nor pests observed. Are these two “droopers” beyond repair?

A • It’s hard to comment without actually seeing the specimens in question. If your droopers are not suffering from dry soil/drought conditions, then the likeliest explanation for their appearance is that they were deformed by either a heavy wet snow or an ice load at some time in the past that sprung the trunks and branches so severely that they have not been able to right themselves. If it happened several years ago, then it’s probably too late to give them an assist by bracing their trunks into a vertical aspect. At this point, perhaps removing some of the outer growth might alleviate some of the weight load that is keeping them deformed and perhaps they will spring upright as a result. I would limit that pruning to the removal of no more than one-third the green needle growth on any individual branch. I would strongly caution against severe pruning into the interior “dead zone” where no green needles remain. Most conifers are not able to regenerate new green tissue from the dead zone. Pruning in that fashion will destroy whatever remaining aesthetic value the shrubs have at this present time and likely necessitate their removal. Write to Chip Tynan of the Missouri Botanical Garden at chip.tynan@mobot.org or Horticultural Answer Service, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, 63110.

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Keep your hoe sharp and don’t allow weeds to get an early start in your garden. • Birds eat many insect pests. Provide a varied mix of trees and shrubs to attract them to your garden. • Nectar feeders hung now may attract migrating ruby-throated hummingbirds to visit your garden. • Sow seeds of luffa and hard-shell gourds indoors in peat pots. Soak seeds overnight to improve germination. Plant outdoors next month. • Plant raspberries and blackberries for low-maintenance, high-yielding fruit crops.

Q • My husband thinks that we should not change our lives because we have kids. He says that we should not go overboard in changing our schedule and that the kids will learn to adjust and not be spoiled. I think that their lives, schedules and activities should come first. They didn’t ask to be born, and we owe it to them to be the best parents we can. Who is right and why?

From a reader • As a father of three, I feel that our children deserve to have their own activities and that parents need to support them. Your husband sounds pretty selfish to me. You are right in saying that they didn’t ask to be born,

From Jodie Lynn • While it’s important for you and your husband to continue having couple time and individual time, the heyday of just doing what you want whenever you want to has been changed with the birth of your children, especially if they are under the age of 5. The reasons for this should be obvious if your goal is to raise responsible, independent and caring children. I’m not sure how old your children are but regardless, parental commitment is extremely important. If you push them to the side because you’re too busy for them, they will certainly feel as if they are not significant to you but may also begin to feel that they are insignificant in general. There are ways to strike a balance in their lives as well as

you and your husband’s where everyone can feel loved and cared for but not necessarily spoiled or demanding a higher “rank” in the family. For example, as kids get older, it’s normal for them to want to participate in various activities, but it’s up to the parents to keep it under control. If it’s not kept under control, they will assume that they can do whatever and go wherever they want and think that it’s basically “owed” to them that you take care of their every whim. Everyone is going to have different needs as they grow older. And while the kids should come first in many situations, parents can still maintain plans of their own by having a doable schedule that does not cause a strain on their marriage or relationship with their kids. You can also remind him that usually when they start driving, they may not be around too much and perhaps

you can add more time for the two of you as a couple.

CAN YOU HELP? My daughter is 22 months old and doesn’t like to have company over at our house. She screams and pounds her fists. When my brother comes over, she really seems to not like him. He is the only family member and friend who has a beard. Does the beard scare her? How can we make things better between the two of them? I’m really at a loss and it’s quite frustrating. To share parenting tips or submit questions, write to: Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040. Email direct2contact@ parenttoparent.com, or go to parenttoparent.com which provides a secure and easy way to submit tips or questions. All tips must have city, state and first and last name or initials to be included in the column. Jodie Lynn is an award-winning parenting columnist, author of five books and mother to three children. She and her family live in Wildwood.

College admissions process is hard to navigate SULTAN • FROM B1

he wanted a mentor to help him through the application process. He did. She made sure he took his ACT on time. She kept him on track with application deadlines and suggested colleges for him to consider. She helped him navigate the financial aid quagmire. She read his essays for scholarship applications. She guided him on how to follow up on emails with college officials when he wasn’t getting a response to his questions. Next year, Beuford, now 24, will graduate from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. He was accepted into the accelerated medical school program right out of high school. “His success is his success,” Feuer said. “I was just fortunate enough to be there to give him the support he needed.” While the news headlines are dominated by wealthy parents cheating and bribing to get their kids into selective colleges, many low- and middle-income students don’t even have access to basic college counseling. High school counselors typically juggle hundreds of students and can’t provide the type of oneon-one counseling students need, especially those coming from families that have not recently been through the gantlet of college admissions. David and Lois Zuckerman, founders of Mentors 4 College, saw this gap in 2011 when they started an all-volunteer corps

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Actress Felicity Huffman arrives at federal court in Boston on April 3 to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal.

of mentors to guide students in the Parkway School District, where their three children graduated. They trained other volunteers to mentor families with the aim of building college-savvy communities. The recent college scandal didn’t surprise David Zuckerman because of the way the

system is set up to favor those with resources, connections and know-how. A bunch of very rich families abusing the system is not surprising in the least, he said. “It’s really about everyone else who is not getting any help,” he said. “There’s a much bigger problem that

we are busy ignoring.” Finding the best post-high school fit for a student, in terms of future goals and affordability, requires a few years of planning. “Sixteen- and 17-year-olds are not the best planners,” he said. This major life decision is often fraught with emotions that may override a student’s best long-term interests. The organization’s service is free to students within the district who request the help. How remarkable would it be if parents in districts throughout the country took a similar approach to the students in their communities? Imagine if parents with recent experience adopted a student unfamiliar or new to the process and offered to support them through it. Feuer said that when she offered to help Beuford her main thought was that he should have the same opportunities to succeed that her son had. She now laughs about how she wanted him to accept a full-ride scholarship that a different state school had offered him. He was dead-set on becoming a doctor and chose the program in Kansas City. “I was willing to gamble on myself,” he said. Next year, he will walk across the stage with his medical degree. Feuer plans to be there cheering him on. Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 Home and family editor @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com


04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

HOME NEWS

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

AT HOME WITH JAN HUNGERFORD

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

The soaking tub in the master bath overlooks a creek in the backyard 50 feet below. A beach theme was chosen for the master bath.

The kitchen was the first remodel project undertaken over a multiyear plan to renovate the home. Cabinets are cherry and feature wavy glass inserts. A cooktop was moved from the prior island to a side counter to provide space for guests to gather safely around the island. In the master bedroom, starfish lamps and pillows and a beach scene over the bed provide a subtle tie to the beach-themed master bath. The Van Gogh print over the chest of drawers was hung after a visit to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

The living room features a cherry wood floor, comfortable leather chairs and couch, and opens to the kitchen. The dark brick wall and curved brick fireplace are accented by a light-colored mantle.

Renovated home is her sanctuary Décor takes its cues from vacations, family and favorite pieces of art BY JIM WINNERMAN Special to the Post-dispatch

The gazebo off the kitchen overlooks a meandering creek. The design was selected by Jan to make conversation more personal as guests sit facing one another.

One of the spare bedrooms in the home of Jan Hungerford has a Murphy bed (at left) and is used by Jan for her morning devotions.

Read the latest in print or on your device.

By 2014, Jan Hungerford’s 1987 home was showing its age. The original buildergrade finishes were outdated, so she embarked on a five-year revitalization that has transformed the home into a showplace that is welcoming, unpretentious and stylish. The first project was the kitchen, which was gutted. “My husband and I planned and contracted for it on our own, and it was very difficult,” Jan recalls. The old island cooktop range was moved to a counter because Jan likes to cook with others, and she felt the hot cooktop in the midst of all the activity was a nuisance and dangerous. A beverage cooler was added under the new kitchen island, and a bay window was removed in favor of a large window flush with the wall.

Kitchen cabinets feature wavy glass panels, and a custom-built kitchen hutch includes a wine rack. “I am a wine lover and particular about my wine,” Jan says adding that she travels to Sonoma each year. After the death of her husband, Cliff, in a motorcycle accident in 2017, the planned renovation was put on indefinite hold. Then she met designer

Joyce Mathis of MJM Design. “She has become a family friend,” Jan says. “She has the ability to visualize what I think I want and turn it into results.” Part of the design process was to incorporate a theme into several rooms. The master bath has a subtle beach theme, which brings to mind many vacations spent in the Cayman Islands. Cabinet knobs are in the shapes of shells and starfish, and a piece of framed art was made by her daughter out of beach glass found over many years. The bath also contains a freestanding soaking tub and an 8-foot glass-enclosed shower with a pattern of beach stones inlaid into the wall. A small bedroom was transformed into what Jan describes as her “sanctuary room.” Finished in soft white tones, it contains a comfortable upholstered chair by the window and is

where she enjoys a peaceful and contemplative beginning to each day. The space also doubles as a guest bedroom. A wall that appears to be custombuilt cabinets is actually a Murphy bed that pulls down. The downstairs walkout basement was decorated to resemble a mountain lodge, with a floor-toceiling stone fireplace and oversized chairs upholstered in rustic and southwestern patterns. Large framed photographs of Colorado recall hiking holidays in Estes Park. Family is a subtle décor theme. Most cherished is a painting in her bedroom by her artist son depicting Jan’s mother shortly before her passing as she holds a newborn grandchild. A pen and ink sketch by her son of Jan’s daughter decorates a living room wall, and a side table by the front door displays vintage photos of family matriarchs and patriarchs. A recently purchased street scene of the oldest section of St. Charles includes the home where Jan’s great-grandfather once lived. Other artwork takes many forms. Several Van Gogh prints were recently hung after a visit to the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, where Jan says she was brought to tears by his work and life story. Colorful framed miniature beach scenes in the master bath are actually postcards. In her sanctuary room, art by Native American artist Catherine Nagy Moury was purchased at Cahokia Mounds and symbolically portrays the strength and spiritual guidance of native women. The most recent project completed in October takes advantage of the wooded scene in the backyard. Perched on the crest of a forested area of common ground with a meandering stream bed 50 feet below, a new two-level all-weather composite deck opens off the kitchen and includes a covered circular gazebo, a large open seating area and a fire pit on the lower level. The portion under the deck, frequently ignored in most two-story deck projects, has a flagstone floor and will soon be home to a porch swing. With the home now entirely renovated, Jan feels the residence “tells her story,” and she knows it brings contentment and joy. “I am grateful for where I am right now,” she says. She is also quick to credit a lot of the result to Mathis. “When we would agree on a décor that worked, we would get so excited we would laugh and get goosebumps,” Jan says. “There were a lot of things we eliminated and would agree were not ‘goosebump-worthy,’” Jan says laughing.

JAN HUNGERFORD Age • 58 Occupation • Retired oncology and hospice nurse Home • Maryland Heights Family • Two sons and a daughter, all in St. Louis, and three grandchildren (soon to be four) Pets • Milo is a 12-yearold Shih Tzu and Maltese mix, Tucker is a 2-year old rescued border collie, and Harley is a 16-year-old “crazy cat.”

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STL LIFE

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

‘IT REPRESENTS THE ‘ASYLUM’ AND SOMETIMES THE BEST AND THE WORST OF WHAT THAT WORD MEANS.

FOR MANY PEOPLE, IT’S A SOURCE OF SANCTUARY AND A SAFE HAVEN.’ FELIX VINCENZ OF THE ST. LOUIS PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION CENTER ASYLUM • FROM B1

County Lunatic Asylum. The dome rises above Arsenal Street, above the highest point in St. Louis. And while the anniversary is a milestone, it is also an opportunity to reflect on the building’s sometimes dark past, with patients Vincenz in cots in crowded hallways who were given drug treatments deemed ineffective or dangerous today. The 175 or so current patients, or clients as they are often called, now stay in a hospital building or in one of several “cottages” on campus set up as apartments. Nobody lives in the original building anymore, but about 75 state workers use offices occupying about half its floors. The building is obviously old and in need of some work. State officials have met in recent months to talk about the building and its “badly needed improvements and costs” though no decisions have been made about its fate, said Debra Walker, director of Public and Legislative Affairs at the Missouri Department of Mental Health. The department “is aware of how the building is valued in the St. Louis area,” she said in an email. Andrew Weil, executive director of the Landmarks Association of St. Louis, said that the building is one of the most visible in the city, and people know it even if they don’t know what happens inside. “It’s important as a great piece of the city’s architectural legacy, but also it’s important as a symbol of the spirit of St. Louis, which has arguably been stronger at various times in our history,” he said. “The driving force behind it is something that we as a community should take pride in.” Laurent Javois is the regional executive officer for the mental health department. He can also see the historic building from his office window. “We love the building,” he said. “We love the history, and we like the fact that so many people in the St. Louis community have had ties to that building. I can’t tell you how many people we have come across who have a historical or emotional connection to this building. A lot of people would hate to lose that.“

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

The narrow corridors in the basement of the original St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum serve as structure support.

of charred rooms burned by an arsonist patient. Hunyar, who has an easygoing personality and a dry wit, hunted down old records in maintenance closets and combed through libraries across the city to find material for her book.

The highest point of the dome is reachable by a rarely used narrow wooden ladder inside the original St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum.

A LANDMARK The building was designed by William Rumbold, the local architect who also designed what is now known as the Old Courthouse in downtown St. Louis. He also consulted on the design of the U.S. Capitol building. At that time, the land was considered to be countryside, with nearby Tower Grove Park in its planning stages. The land where the hospital sat was so barren that park founder Henry Shaw donated more than 200 shade trees to be planted on the grounds. When the hospital first opened on April 23, 1869,

HOSPITAL SESQUICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION Celebrate the hospital’s 150th anniversary with a party that includes food, speakers, local dignitaries, self-guided tours, a time capsule burial, and a sale and signings of Hunyar’s book. WHEN 1:30-3:30 p.m. April 23 • WHERE St. Louis Psychiatric Rehabilitation Center, 5300 Arsenal Street • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-877-6500

HELPING HANDS The nonprofit group Helping Hands for St. Louis Psychiatric Rehabilitation Center will host a companion event with food and drink to honor those who have helped the center through the years. WHEN 4-7 p.m. April 23 • WHERE Rose of the Hill, 2300 Edwards Street • HOW MUCH $25 • MORE INFO hhslprc150.eventbrite.com

it had 127 patients, with room for 150. That was the last time for 100 years it was below

census, said Amanda Hunyar, the facility’s librarian and archivist. Over the years, wings

were added onto either side of the building, and a midcentury-style building was constructed in front of the Rumbold building in the 1960s. In the late 1940s, the population was at its peak, with nearly 4,000 patients. Hunyar wrote a book, “St. Louis State Hospital: a 150 Year Journey Toward Hope” that reveals the compassionate, humorous and not-so-pleasant parts of the hospital’s history, complete with images of nurses’ scrapbooks, photos of the team of mules that helped patients farm the property, and even photos

A CLIMB INTO THE DOME Hunyar gives private tours of the main building, which reveals snippets of history: the wings on either ends of the fifth floor hold boxes of files and supplies and plaster peels from the walls, but a closer look reveals woodwork and transoms that were part of doctors’ apartments. In the late 1800s, superintendent Edward Runge and his wife used to host patients in their apartment for “social evenings” where they would listen to music and recite poetry, Hunyar explains. Runge once said: “In spending our days among them, we must be like the very sunshine to them, cheering and inspiring them with that essential element of human happiness — hope.” Round rooms on each floor support the heavy cast-iron frame of the dome. One round room contained a ballroom, the

site of dances with patients and members of the community. The round room in the basement contained a turntable for hand-powered railcars to transport trays of food and supplies. Despite the urban legends, patients were not chained to walls in the basement, said Hunyar. “I had someone stand here and argue with me that these rings were the ones that held the chains,” she said, pointing to rings on the ceiling. They simply supported pipes. She does believe ghosts lurk in the hallways, but she’s not afraid. She and others hear what they call “the conversations” — unintelligible talking nearby. Once, as she worked in the research library, she heard voices, and a book fell to the floor, open to an article about the importance of a library in a mental hospital. “I was like, ‘OK then,’” Hunyar said. Painted signatures mark brick walls in an attic area: “P.W. 1934” denotes the year public works employees came to make improvements on the site, some more skilled than others. Workers had to be rescued off the water tower and got tangled in their harnesses. Still, they gave the building a face-lift, cleaning its exterior and adding solariums for patients at the ends of the hallways. And yes, it is possible to climb up to the dome. The view is fantastic. One creaky, wooden spiral staircase leads to the indoor observation deck of the dome, with windows that allow for views as far as 30 miles on a clear day. Sometimes, you can see the bluffs of Illinois and the office buildings of Clayton. Another creaky, wooden spiral staircase leads into the dome itself, under the iron and wood frame. A beam with about two dozen wooden rungs nailed to it leads to windows at the dome’s pinnacle. “I like to call this the beehive. We are inside the cast-iron dome,” said Hunyar. The views from the observation deck continue to tell the building’s tale: you can see the railroad tracks that once brought patients and their families and supplies to the building, the campus entrance wide enough to accommodate horse-drawn carriages, the boulder on the front lawn to mark the spot of a time capsule buried in 1994, the 125th anniversary. Hunyar points out the paper snowflakes she made and taped to the window of her library in the center’s hospital building. “I think one of the things I was really happy to learn about was the humanity aspect of the place,” she said. “It’s so easy to demonize the place, or say people are crazy or whatever. I’ve learned that psychiatry is like any field of medicine: You just do what you know is best at the time, and it’s always evolving. There are more stories of people caring or going the extra mile.” Vincenz, the head of the facility, loves to show off the old building. It’s an educational tool to show how far they’ve come, he said. Not as many people live there today compared to 50 years ago because more treatment can be done as an outpatient. The most common illness for the clients today is schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. The average length of stay is about five to seven years, and the center releases about 35 to 50 patients a year because of the help those patients get on Arsenal. “To see someone turn their life around 180 degrees and to have a meaningful life in the community, that’s a profound experience,” said Vincenz. “Our patients get better and have better lives.” Hunyar will be making presentations and signing copies of her book at various events around town. For more information, visit reedypress.com To arrange a tour of the center, contact Hunyar at 314-877-5967 or Amanda.Hunyar@dmh.mo.gov

Few of the patient room features remain in the basement of the original St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum. Many of the rooms are used for storage on the campus now known as the St. Louis Psychiatric Rehabilitation Center.

The people who left their names as graffiti on the facility’s winding staircase were likely socialites attending ballroom parties at the old St. Louis County Lunatic Asylum.

Valerie Schremp Hahn 314-340-8246 @valeriehahn on Twitter vhahn@post-dispatch.com


STL LIFE

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Artist Laura Lloyd is fascinated by faces. As a child she drew faces on everything — animate and inanimate.

LLOYD FINE ART Artist • Laura Lloyd Age • 56 Family • Married to David Lloyd, her husband of 30 years; three sons, Owen, 27, Conrad, 22, and Michael, 20, and; two daughters, Dana Derby, 25, and Katherine Lloyd, 20; one grandson, Grey, 1. Home • St. Peters What she does • Lloyd is a painter and ceramic sculptor whose colorful, whimsical creations depict the human (and nonhuman) conditions in wry and witty ways. Where to buy • Artisans in the Loop (ceramics only); The Foundry Art Centre in St. Charles; at her Etsy shop and through her website, lloydfineart.com How much • Her ceramic sculptures range from $50 to $2,000; paintings range from $150 to $3,500 PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Artist and sculptor Laura Lloyd is shown with some of her work.

MADE IN ST. LOUIS

Artist captures emotion with a bit of whimsy BY PAT EBY • SPECIAL TO THE POST-DISPATCH

T

he offbeat, whimsical paintings and sculptures Laura Lloyd creates invite the viewer in for a closer look. The faces she captures in clay and paints in glorious color portray the human spirit in its foibles and in its triumphs with sharp humor and kind compassion. “I don’t want my art to be boring,” she says. “I want it to be fun, but with an edge, and not too cutesy.” Lloyd’s peripatetic art journey began in rural Wisconsin.

Handwork at home • Lloyd grew up in Browntown, Wis., in a home of makers who encouraged her talents. “My mother and my grandmother were always making things — they knitted, sewed and crocheted. It was a natural thing for me. When I saw something I liked, I’d think ‘Oh, I’ll make that’ rather than buy it.” She was always drawing as a child, mostly putting faces on things animate and inanimate. “I have always been fascinated by faces. I drew faces on everything when I was little — on flowers, clouds — everything had a face. I remember watching television just to watch all the faces.” Head, heart, hands and health • Her rural

community supported a strong 4-H club, where Lloyd exhibited her art and her crafts at fairs. “I would enter all the arts categories in 4-H — sewing, floral arranging, art, crochet and knitting. “Each first-place ribbon paid $3. I counted on the money from my wins.” Her early success led Lloyd to pursue a career in art. “I always thought, ‘I’ve got this in my back pocket — I’m gonna be an artist.’” Dream catcher, daydreamer, dream weaver • To make that dream come true, Lloyd earned a two-year associate degree in commercial art from Madison Area Technical College. “I worked in the commercial art department for a large silk screen company,” she says. Lloyd fell in love, married and moved to St.

Peters, a much larger metropolitan area than Browntown. When she and her husband started their family, she quit working full time and began her life as an independent artist. “I would do art during nap times and at night,” she says. “I entered lots of local shows, won prizes and learned to paint. My children were my models.” By 2016, when she was 54, Lloyd won the Emerging Artist award at the St. Louis Art Fair. “Through the fair, I learned how to present my art, and how to sell.” One the perks of winning the award was an automatic place in the 2017 show. In 2018, Lloyd submitted her work to the jury in two categories, in sculpture and in painting. She was accepted in both. Everyday moments of joy and daily dilemmas •

Lloyd’s accessible paintings and sculptures depict the everyday moments of her subjects’ lives with tonguein-cheek humor paired with deep insights. We see the moment of joy when music floods the headphones on a happy fellow. We recognize the resigned look on a teen’s face, her head shrouded in a flap-eared hat, the background rife with clues. The word “mad” in the upper right corner, with the words “You’re late,” and “Drink me” barely visible. Lloyd paints a rabbit on the run, a curious cat, a rabbit hole with a ladder. The teen springs to life, poised on the cusp of Wonderland. Debonair dogs and obliging beasts • In Lloyd’s world, we find real animals painted in doggy dreamscapes and sculpted imaginary animals, humanized. “Our dog, Monster, is on my Instagram site,” Lloyd says. The portrait shows a tiny black Pomeranian, sporting a perky white bow, with sunny eyes and a playful smile, and we realize Lloyd’s tongue-in-cheek descriptor isn’t even close. Pattern recognition • Throughout her artistic life, Lloyd has challenged herself to do more, and she has given herself permission to let her art develop. “It’s fun to start a new painting,” she says. “The middle part is always the hardest, but I would encourage artists to sit with the work for a while; don’t judge your work too soon. If you’re not satisfied you just try again.” Lloyd still sets up experiments in art, like when she painted a series of portraits on pre-printed patterned backgrounds that ranged from simple to complex. The ordered cadence of the patterns pops her portraits off the page. She’s thinking of a new challenge as well. “More and more I’ve been in a stuck place recently,” she says. “I’ve been thinking about abstract work.” With Lloyd, thoughts become deeds and actions make memorable art. Stay tuned for the next chapter.


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ARTS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

THEATER REVIEW

‘Dreamgirls’ is supremely entertaining BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Effie White (Ebony Easter) is a terrific singer, and she knows it. So she bristles at some of the compromises demanded in show business, such as performing as backup to a star and paying one’s dues. But her friends Deena Jones (Eleanor Humphrey) and Lorrell Robinson (Tateonna Thompson) are just happy to be on stage, regardless of whether they’re in the spotlight. The three won’t have to wait long for success. As the Dreams, they’ll become one of the biggest singing groups on the music scene — but not without setbacks. “Dreamgirls,” the musical running through April 20 in a thrilling and hugely entertaining Stray Dog

Theatre production, tells the story of an R&B/pop trio not unlike the Supremes, which achieved international success in the 1960s on the Motown label. Eventually, the group was known as Diana Ross & the Supremes before Ross struck out on her own. With music by Henry Krieger and book and lyrics by Tom Eyen, the show revolves around the fortunes of the Dreams as their career unfolds — and impacts their personal lives. Playing a significant role in their destinies is Curtis Taylor Jr. (Abraham Shaw), a car salesman turned record executive who’s determined to take black music into the mainstream (and obviously modeled on Motown mogul Berry Gordy Jr.). Director Justin Been keeps things moving, with particular

“DREAMGIRLS” When • Through April 20 Where • Tower Grove Abbey, 2336 Tennessee Avenue How much • $25-$30 More info • brownpapertickets. com

PHOTO BY JOHN LAMB

Ebony Easter (left), Eleanor Humphrey and Tateonna Thompson in “Dreamgirls.”

attention to creating stage pictures that capture the zing of showbiz life. The contributions of music director Jennifer Buchheit and choreographer Mike Hodges are first-rate, and the performances are excellent.

Easter gets to the essence of Effie, who’s as self-confident as she is self-destructive, and delivers a fiery rendition of “(And I Am Telling You) I’m Not Going.” Humphrey is also impressive as Deena, who comes

into her own as an artist as the story progresses. Ironically, “Dreamgirls” may be better known these days than the classic singing group that inspired it. But decades from now, audiences will probably continue to get caught up in the exuberance of this supremely entertaining musical. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 Theater critic @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

Poet laureate has goal to share poetry with many others IBUR • FROM B1

come to them.” She does that with a combination of humor and seriousness, qualities of her own writing. Now, as St. Louis’ official poet laureate, Ibur’s audience is the whole metro area. But there are probably few constituents who haven’t already been in her wheelhouse. On Friday, the 68-year-old St. Louisan became the city’s third poet laureate, whose role for the next two years is to promote literacy and the joy of poetry. Officially inducted by aldermanic President Lewis Reed at City Hall, Ibur told a crowd of former students, friends and poets that her job will be to “bring in new voices,” people never “expecting poetry to change their lives.” Ibur thanked her supporters, read poems by others and herself, drawing hearty laughter for “Mrs. Noah — Two Weeks Out.” Cheryl Walker, who led the task force that recommended Ibur for the post, spoke of Ibur’s “openness and willingness to help people.” Earlier in the week, Walker called Ibur a “thoughtful, energetic and prolific writer.” Walker, a lawyer and poet herself, said: “We can’t wait to see what she does with her term. The St. Louis region will benefit greatly from the passion and creativity she will bring to the role.” Their pick follows Shirley LeFlore, who was the city’s second poet laureate (and the subject of Ibur’s tribute “Mama Shirley.” The first city laureate, Michael Castro, was appointed in December 2014. He died last year. The appointment receives no stipend from the city. On Tuesday, Ibur talked about her career writing and teaching poetry. “This was my gift, and I’m devoting myself to it,” she said, sitting in her dining room. She and her spouse, Sondra Seiler, have lived in an elegant old home in Tower Grove East for decades. Together for 44 years, they married in Maui five years ago while on one of their many snorkeling trips. Hundreds of shells and pieces of sea-related décor fill their back porch, one of her visual “installations,” Ibur says. There’s also a “spaceship” in the basement and a cowboy room on the third floor. She loved TV’s horse-and-boy show “Fury,” even though she was annoyed that women were virtually absent from exciting Westerns. “It’s better to be a child as an adult,” she says. Ibur goes by “Janie,” mostly because she’s known a couple of unpleasant Janes. (This writer didn’t take it personally.) Growing up in Frontenac, Ibur was the second of six children and the first daughter for Leslie and Betty Ibur. At Ladue High School, Jane Ellen didn’t have an easy go of it, she says, even though she had many friends and was active in drama. “I didn’t know I was gay then,” she says. But that was less an issue than depression and some chronic pain, which would turn out to be ulcerative colitis. She was given paregoric, a tincture of opium available over the counter. She has said her family’s housekeeper, Mary R. Woodard, was a source of comfort. Later, Ibur would care for Woodard during the last years of her life and write about her in poems collected in the book “Both Wings Flappin’, Still Not Flyin’,” published in 2014 by PenUltimate Press. In “What Mary Said,” Ibur evokes her longtime friend’s voice: “You got to thank/the Lord for what you have. He

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Jane Ellen Ibur reads some of her poetry after becoming St. Louis’s third poet laureate on Friday. The appointment is a two-year term.

‘MRS. NOAH – TWO WEEKS OUT’

Jane Ellen Ibur will promote the joy of poetry as the city’s poet laureate.

(after David Leyner) Today I decide to inventory. I keep a strict log of everything, from rations to rashes, believing sanity comes from organization, routine, ritual, business as usual, once that’s established, which I did immediately. So much chaos and disorder, grief and fear reign, I choose chores to sandbag the tidal waves of emotion, and here we are, two weeks out, doing pretty well for ourselves, horses, oxen, hooved beasts working in the mill, bees build a hive, worms churning soil in the agricultural wing, goats donating for cheese in the dairy, antlered beasts in the kitchen for hanging utensils, pots and pans, my daughters-in-law in managerial positions; that’s a first. Noah sits fat and wet on the deck. Daily, he appears to be swelling. I never see him eating, but things turn up missing, like the dodos, the minotaurs, the harpies, unicorns, chimeras, nymphs, satyrs, gorgons, cyclopses, sirens, phoenixes, griffins, dinosaurs and dragons. Perhaps this accounts for the unbelievable foulness of his morning breath. Published in “The Little Mrs./Misses” (PenUltimate Press; 2017)

JANE ELLEN IBUR When • 1 p.m. April 20 Where • Julia Davis library, 4415 Natural Bridge Avenue How much • Free More info • 314-383-3021

Jane Ellen Ibur (left) is greeted before her induction ceremony Friday by (from left) her niece, Katy Ibur, and her sister, Betsy Ibur. Jane Ellen Ibur is the third poet to be named the city’s poet laureate.

didn’t promise/you every day it’s gonna be sunshine./’Cause some days it’s gonna rain.” At Webster College, Ibur graduated with a degree in English and earned a lifetime certificate to teaching it to secondary students. She lasted two years as a middle-school teacher, hating everything about it — the grades, the administration, the rules. Ibur would work at different jobs, including helping her insurance adjuster father assess damage from natural disasters. She went back to teaching, but in a more independent capacity, sometimes juggling 15 classes a month. Creating her own curricula, she’d wear a cape and carry a wand to visit young children and convince them of the “magic of poetry.” They learned that

when they saw her get-up, “it means poetry is in the house.”

POETRY FOR ALL Ibur’s students have included seniors, pregnant teens, abused women, cancer patients and homeless men. Some of her classes were funded by mental health grants, and she often talks with classes about depression. She tells people not to count themselves out: “You can learn to live with it.” For 19 years, she was co-host of “Literature for the Halibut” on KDHX radio. A founder of the Community Arts Training Institute, which focuses on art as an agent for social change, Ibur says she has contacts in many different communities. “Poetry is available for all of these people.” As poet laureate, she’s eager to

find even more converts. She’s thinking about parochial schools, East Indian or Latinx groups. Her decades of practice make her encouraging words natural, convincing. “My poetry’s not over your head,” she tells the fearful. If they can’t seem to find the right writer, she says,“there is other great stuff that is accessible for you.” Ibur still marvels over how jail inmates took to writing poetry. “I know I have men in every single state prison.” As students, they were strict about telling others in the class to stand up straight and read their work clearly. She’d suggest inventive prompts (rewrite a fairy tale), telling them she wasn’t interested in hearing about crimes or sex or bad language. Teaching forms such as villanelles and demanding exact language, Ibur pushed revision. “Your mind can be freer than it’s ever been if you learn to write.” When one told her “the writing saved his life,” that was no metaphor.

‘DANCING WITH THE DIVINE’ Ibur’s own work has been printed in some 60 anthologies, but

she’s only compiled poems for two books, finding it “brutal” to organize a volume. She’s never at a loss for subjects, even writing about her own pain and bout with breast cancer. She thinks of poetry as “dancing with the divine,” but Ibur says she’s terrible at the business side. Her second book, “The Little Mrs./Misses” (2017), was inspired by unnamed women (i.e. “Mrs. Noah,” “Mrs. Abraham”), fairy tales and past female characters often surrounded by men (Miss Kitty of “Gunsmoke,” for instance). Of “Mrs. Sandman,” Ibur imagines the title character finds a secret relationship between her husband and the Tooth Fairy. It could be a lucrative partnership — or perhaps Mrs. Sandman has competition from a woman with “wings who dazzles, sparkles.” As poet laureate, however, Ibur doesn’t just plan to stand before crowds and read her imaginative poetry about meetings between, say, Cinderella and a beached selkie (both out too late). “I’m not focused on how many readings I can do, but I want to see how many people I can get to stand up to read for the first time.” Like her student, Ibur feels beholden to poetry. “The bottom line is, it saved my life, and I couldn’t keep it to myself.” Jane Henderson • 314-340-8107 Book editor @STLbooks on Twitter jhenderson@post-dispatch.com


BOOKS NEWS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

NONFICTION

David Brooks tackles social contributions in his new book ‘The Second Mountain’ addresses effort to be relational, relentless BY HARRY LEVINS Special to the Post-dispatch

David Brooks has won a following as a moderate conservative on the op-ed page of The New York Times and also as the polite and thoughtful sparring partner of liberal Mark Shields on “PBS NewsHour” each Friday evening. Now, with his book “The Second Mountain,” Brooks may find still more fans — among philosophers, preachers, marriage counselors and other unlikely target audiences for book

publishers. About those mountains … Brooks sees two types in our lives, one bad, the other good. As he puts it: “If the first mountain is about building up the ego and defining the self, the second mountain is about shedding the ego and losing the self. If the first mountain is about acquisition, the second mountain is about contribution. If the first mountain is elitist — moving up — the second mountain is egalitarian — planting yourself amid those who need, and walking arm in arm with them.”

NBC

DAVID BROOKS When • 7 p.m. Thursday Where • St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard How much • Sold out More info • 314-994-3300

“The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life” By David Brooks Published by Random House, 384 pages, $28 On sale Tuesday

Now on view through June 9

British sculptor Rachel Whiteread casts the hidden spaces in-between, above, and beneath everyday objects, creating a range of monumental and evocative sculptures that make the invisible visible. Rachel Whiteread is the first comprehensive survey of the internationally acclaimed artist’s career. Members always free. For ticket information, visit slam.org/RachelWhiteread. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Tate Britain, London, in association with the Saint Louis Art Museum. Support for the St. Louis presentation is provided by E. Desmond Lee Family Endowment for Exhibitions; the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency; and the National Endowment for the Arts. Rachel Whiteread, English, born 1963; Line Up, 2007-2008; plaster, pigment, resin, wood and metal; overall: 6 11/16× 35 7/16×9 13/16 inches; Private collection, New York. Image courtesy the artist and Mike Bruce ©Rachel Whiteread

Slam.org/RachelWhiteread

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He adds: “On the first mountain you tend to be ambitious, strategic, and independent. On the second mountain you tend to be relational, intimate, and relentless.” In this book, which follows 2015’s “The Road to Character,” Brooks moves readers down that first mountain and up the second, reaching into history for some shining examples. One is Etty Hillesum, a Jewish woman in the Netherlands during World War II. Despite the peril, she stuck around to help others in need — until the Holocaust finally caught up with her. As a first-mountain example, he cites among others six Israeli day care centers in Haifa that “realized they had a problem. Parents kept arriving late at pick-up time, so the teachers had to hang around an extra hour or so until the kids were gone. To address the issue, the day care centers began imposing fines on parents who were late. The plan backfired. The share of parents who arrived late doubled. Before, picking up your kids on time was an act of consideration toward the teachers — a moral responsibility. Afterward, it became an economic transaction; you perform the service of looking after my kid and I pay you for it. In the former people are thinking in terms of right and wrong, being considerate or inconsiderate. In the latter, a costbenefit calculation kicks in. What’s best for me?” Brooks suggests that those who climb the second mountain build closer and better communities. Or something like that. Despite his skill with words, Brooks chooses to write most of this book in abstract prose — and despite the author’s strong

case for community, the reader’s eyes may start glazing over. A sample: “In the early 1960s our culture began to embrace a hyper-individualistic way of life to help it address the problems of that moment. But after a few decades, that culture, taken to the extreme, produced its own crisis. “The grand narrative of individual emancipation left us with what some have called ‘the great disembedding.’ Whereas before people tended to be enmeshed in tight communities with prescribed social norms that sometimes seemed stifling, now they are cut loose. Whereas once they served in hierarchical institutions with prescribed social norms that sometimes seemed stifling, now they have trouble thinking institutionally at all — how to live within an institution, steward an institution, and reform an institution — so the quality of our social organizations that make up our common life decays. “Most of all, hyperindividualism has led to a society when people live further and further apart from one another — socially, emotionally, even physically.” Three-hundred-plus pages of prose like that makes for a long, long sermon. (Still, grammatical purists can stay alert for slip-ups and remind Brooks, among other things, that “none” takes a singular verb.) Finally, some readers will be dismayed — while others will be relieved — that nowhere in this book does Brooks write the name “Trump.” Harry Levins of Manchester retired in 2007 as senior writer of the Post-Dispatch.


BOOKS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

BEST-SELLERS

FICTION

Here are the best-sellers from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended April 6.

Tennessee Williams’ life and loves featured center stage in new novel

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 2. “The Cornwalls Are Gone” • Patterson/DuBois 3. “The Savior” • J.R. Ward 4. “Run Away” • Harlan Coben 5. “Celtic Empire” • Cussler/Cussler 6. “Wolf Pack” • C.J. Box 7. “Cemetery Road” • Greg Iles 8. “The Chef” • Patterson/ DiLallo 9. “The Silent Patient” • Alex Michaelides 10. “Wild Card” • Stuart Woods

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Becoming” • Michelle Obama 2. “Girl, Stop Apologizing” • Rachel Hollis 3. “The Matriarch” • Susan Page 4. “The Right Side of History” • Ben Shapiro 5. “The Path Made Clear” • Oprah Winfrey 6. “A Love Letter Life” • Roloff/Roloff 7. “The Next Right Thing” • Emily P Freeman 8. “#IMomSoHard” • Hensley/Smedley 9. “Maybe You Should Talk to Someone” • Lori Gottlieb 10. “Ladies Who Punch” • Ramin Setoodeh

MASS MARKET 1. “The Good Fight” • Danielle Steel 2. “Come Sundown” • Nora Roberts 3. “Twisted Prey” • John Sandford 4. “The 17th Suspect” • James Patterson 5. “The Wyoming Kid” • Debbie Macomber 6. “The Fallen” • David Baldacci 7. “Marrying My Cowboy” • Palmer/McKenna/Pearce 8. “Dig Your Own Grave” • William W. Johnstone 9. “The Forbidden Door” • Dean Koontz 10. “The Sixth Day” • Coulter/Ellison

TRADE PAPERBACK 1. “Supermarket” • Bobby Hall 2. “A Gentleman in Moscow” • Amor Towles 3. “The Woman in the Window” • A.J. Finn 4. “The First Lady” • Patterson/DuBois 5. “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” • Heather Morris 6. “The Lost Girls of Paris” • Pam Jenoff 7. “My Hero Academia, Vol. 18” • Kohei Horikoshi 8. “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” • Gail Honeyman 9. “Pet Sematary” (movie tie-in) • Stephen King 10. “Hungry Girl: Simply 6” • Lisa Lillien Here are the best-sellers at area independent stores for the week that ended April 7. Stores reporting: The Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, the Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books.

ADULTS 1. “St Louis Sound: An Illustrated Timeline” • Steve Pick and Amanda E. Doyle 2. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 3. “The Immortalists” • Chloe Benjamin 4. “Becoming” • Michelle Obama 5. “Sapiens” • Yuval Noah Harari 6. “Educated” • Tara Westover 7. “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” • Gail Honeyman 8. “How Safe Are We” • Janet Napolitano 9. “The Huntress” • Kate Quinn 10. “Biased” • Jennifer L. Eberhardt

CHILDREN/ YOUNG ADULTS 1. “Don’t Let Them Disappear” • Chelsea Clinton 2. “Caterpillar Summer” • Gillian McDunn 3 “The Princess In Black” • Shannon and Dean Hale 4. “Goodnight St. Louis” • June Herman and Julie Dubray 5. “The Gollywhopper Games: The New Champion” • Jody Feldman 6. “On the Come Up” • Angie Thomas 7. “The Hazel Wood” • Melissa Albert 8. “Lovely War” • Julie Berry 9. “Narwhal’s Otter Friend” • Ben Clanton 10. “P Is for Pterodactyl: The Worst Alphabet Book Ever” • Raj Haldar

BY GAIL PENNINGTON Special to the Post-Dispatch

In 1947, Tennessee Williams met a young actor named Frank Merlo, who soon became the most important person in his life. Williams had already found success with “The Glass Menagerie,” and “A Streetcar Named Desire” was about to open on Broadway, but the decade he spent with Merlo would be the most productive of his career. Merlo was Williams’ lover and his nanny ... er, secretary. When Williams’ head was too full of words or booze to remember where he was supposed to be, Merlo organized his days, allowing Williams to turn out a string of acclaimed plays (including “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”), plus movie scripts, short stories and more. Plenty has been written about Williams, but author Christopher Castellani became more interested in Merlo. In a note to readers at the end of his new novel, “Leading Men,” Castellani tells how he spent years trying to craft the relationship of Merlo and Williams into a book, changing directions many times. In the end, Castellani settled on four “leading men,” Williams and Merlo plus (now mostly forgotten) author John Horne Burns and his lover, an Italian doctor named Sandro Nencini. There is a prominent “leading woman,” too, a Swedish actress named Anja Bloom, who becomes Merlo’s close friend. Castellani jigsaws facts together with plausible fiction. If many of the

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Playwright Tennessee Williams (right), shown with his brother, Dakin, in Chicago on Aug. 29, 1975, is featured in Christopher Castellani’s new book, “Leading Men.” The playwright grew up in St. Louis and is buried at Calvary Cemetery.

CHRISTOPHER CASTELLANI When • 7 p.m. Thursday Where • Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue How much • Free More info • 314-367-6731

THE WORK OF WILLIAMS The Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis is May 9-19. Find a schedule of plays and other events at twstl.org.

“Leading Men” A novel by Christopher Castellani Published by Viking, 368 pages, $27

scenarios depicted in the book didn’t necessarily happen, they might have.

Anja is made up, although inspired by a bit of Truman Capote gossip, as well as by actress Liv Ullmann. Nencini was just a name before Castellani fleshed him into a character. Don’t be fooled to think “Leading Men” is a straightforward, semihistorical novel, though. It’s a shape-shifting concoction, a fever dream that slides seamlessly through time and across

continents. Here Frank is emerging from a bar in Portofino, Italy, in 1953, after a party thrown by Truman Capote. There, without even a page break, it’s 10 years later, 1963, and he’s in a hospital, dying of lung cancer. (Not a spoiler; this comes on Page 22.) A big chunk of the book is devoted to Anja, who became a famous actress, grew old and is now living in seclusion in Hollywood,

until Sandro’s son looks her up. He and his friend Trevor have heard she has a copy of Williams’ last, unpublished play. “Call It Joy,” supposedly written in 1982, shortly before Williams’ death, is set in a bar in Key West and features Tennessee and Frank as characters. As Trevor says after reading it, “Wow. It’s even worse than you said.” (Judge for yourself. It’s reproduced in the book.) Trevor also gets the best line in “Leading Men,” declaring that “I kept wanting to feel something. For the first few pages, I almost did, but then, as it went on and on, I just wanted the guy to shut up and die already.” Readers might feel the same sentiment. Castellani, the author of several previous novels, also published a 2016 book of essays on the craft of fiction, “The Art of Perspective: Who Tells the Story.” “Leading Men” seems like an exercise in something similar, but the result here is too many perspectives, too many changes of scene, too many unnecessary characters and, frankly, too many words. It’s a long slog when it’s so difficult to connect with any of the protagonists. St. Louis, where Williams grew up and which he famously disliked, doesn’t get a mention in “Leading Men.” But insights into his working style, and more importantly his character, still make the novel intriguing for fans of the man who eagerly left this city, only to end up for eternity in Calvary Cemetery. Gail Pennington retired in 2017 as Post-Dispatch TV critic.

NONFICTION

Gates explores white supremacy and black resistance BY GENE SEYMOUR newsday

“Stony the Road” poses at its outset a curious rhetorical question that connects present-day realities to the book’s historical subject matter — the struggle of former slaves and their descendants for full American citizenship and respect after the Civil War. “Who could have predicted,” writes Henry Louis Gates Jr. in this cogent, urgently felt account, “that the election of the first black president would become a focal point for triggering a dramatic rise in the public expression of some of the oldest, nastiest, and most vulgar white supremacist animus about black people?” Gates’ question is a curious one: Any person of color who has lived through even a fraction of the perennially fraught history of black-white relations would find the current-day backlash not only predictable but sadly, maddeningly inevitable. Some believe the struggle Gates is writing about was won half a century ago with the end of legally sanctioned racial segregation. Others insist that it hasn’t ended — that it now appears to be getting worse after seeming to get better more than a decade ago when Barack Obama was elected president. Gates, arguably the nation’s “go-to” black public intellectual, is likely using such past-is-prologue devices to pry open a wider perspective on the dismally cyclical pattern of American race relations. The title of “Stony the Road” comes from James Weldon Johnson’s “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” black America’s unofficial “anthem,” and perhaps the book’s main insight is that as bad as things are today — think of 2017’s deadly “Unite the Right” rally” in Charlottesville, Va., and the 2015 slaughter of black

“Stony The Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow” By Henry Louis Gates Jr. Published by Penguin Press, 290 pages, $30

churchgoers in Charleston, S.C., by an avowed white nationalist — things were much, much worse for black people a century ago. Legally enforced segregation, commonly referred to under the rubric “Jim Crow” (the name inspired by a blackface act), is traced to the post-Civil War Reconstruction era, when federal troops occupying the vanquished

South were charged with enforcing civil rights and greater suffrage for newly freed slaves. This short-lived, but in Gates’ words “monumental effort to create a biracial democracy out of the wreckage of the rebellion,” met violent resistance not just from die-hard Confederate loyalists but from President Andrew Johnson, a white southerner who opposed slavery but remained prejudiced against blacks. The exslave and abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass identified this contradiction well before the war when he wrote, “Opposing slavery and hating its victims has become a very common form of abolitionism.” Once federal troops were withdrawn from the South after the 1876 election, Jim Crow was institutionalized through laws and customs that were rigidly and often violently enforced, making the descendants of slaves “as close as a person can be to being a slave without being legally defined as such.” Such oppression was

enabled by religious superstition (the “curse of Canaan” from Genesis used to endorse slavery) and pseudoscience (assertions that the shape of African skulls and other genetic attributes proved black intellectual inferiority). These holdovers from slavery days, Gates writes, were enhanced by a late-19th-century mass culture debasing black people as, at best, childlike, simple-minded and pathetically dysfunctional and, at worst, mindless sexual predators with unrestrained libidos. Widespread fear of blacks’ “‘natural’ propensity to rape” justified any number of reactions, many of which are illustrated throughout the book in demeaning cartoons of blackface stereotypes and grisly photographs of racially motivated lynchings. When Jim Crow reached its nadir 100 years ago — and it was clear that neither Congress nor the courts were going to intervene — black people pushed back. Gates characterizes this opposition

using a term that emerged after the First World War: “The New Negro.” He calls this archetype “Black America’s first superhero,” a model for political action, artistic sophistication and racial pride collectively fashioned by black artists, intellectuals, labor leaders and black nationalists. Alain Locke, a black aesthete, critic and unofficial father of the 1920s Harlem Renaissance, used “The New Negro” as the title for a groundbreaking anthology of black artwork and writing seeking transformation of the black American image. Jim Crow wasn’t dead yet, but the New Negro threw the first telling blows against it. Gates rousingly, persuasively contends that black resistance to racism embodied by the New Negro ideal remains as much a part of the cycle of race relations as white reaction to black progress. Still, one is left at the end wondering why this cycle exists at all — and what needs to be done to break it down and sweep away its wreckage for good.

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TRAVEL

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

BEER SPA IS A BARREL OF FUN BY JOSH NOEL Chicago Tribune (TnS)

CHICAGO • You’ve had beer. Maybe even enjoyed it. But you haven’t indulged in beer until you’ve indulged in beer: a 98-degree bath filled with hops, yeast, herbs and, yes, beer. The beer soak, as it is called at Piva Beer Spa, is a transcendental moment in a day of beer-fueled relaxation. It dazzles every sense: the warmth of the water, the wafting herbalfloral aroma, the cool 16 ounces of Pilsner Urquell sitting at your side, providing a refreshing counterpoint to the soak. Piva Beer Spa — “piva” means beer in many Slavic languages — offers an array of treatments, from facials to massage to a salt chamber meant to vitalize the respiratory system. But the highlight is undoubtedly the beer soak. It happens in one of eight larch wood tubs in the basement of the spa that opened late last year in Noble Square. Father-and-son founders Edin and Dino Sarancic launched Piva Beer Spa based simply on what they perceived as a hole in the market for a concept not uncommon in Europe. A handful of American spas claim to do beer treatments, usually invoking beer as an ingredient in a scrub or a facial. Piva is one of the few to go all in, just as you’d find in, say, Prague. Beer purportedly lends hydration and acts as an antioxidant for skin and hair. But mostly, it’s a novel getaway in the middle of Chicago. I booked a platinum package at Piva Beer Spa one chilly Monday afternoon. It was supposed to last three hours and 15 minutes but stretched

PHOTOS BY ABEL URIBE • Chicago Tribune (TnS)

The beer soak tubs room at Piva Beer Spa come complete with candlelight.

IF YOU GO Piva Beer Spa • 1052 North Milwaukee Avenue; 1-773-5709280; chicagobeerspa.com Packages • Available for singles and couples, ranging in price from $155 to $550. Salt room ($35 for 45 minutes or available cheaper as part of multisession packages) and massage (ranging between $45 and $120, depending on length) are available a la carte.

Piva Beer Spa also has several massage rooms and straw relaxing beds.

closer to four hours (at no extra charge). Dino Sarancic, burly and with a shaved head, greeted me from behind the counter as sounds of plucked acoustic guitar filled the spa. It’s not a large space, but enough has been squeezed in for a getaway: a gleaming new steam room, a handsome sauna, a couple of rooms for massage, four soaking

rooms (two tubs in each) and small changing rooms. Sarancic pointed to a sliding wood door. Behind it, he said, I would begin my day in the halotherapy room. He slid the door open to reveal a long narrow room, all white, but tinged violet from lights in the ceiling. A handful of reclining chairs were lined up on top of a couple of inches of salt spread across

THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

the floor. A machine on the wall pumped light, salty mist into the air. After a quick change from street clothes into Piva’s spa gear — a blue cotton waffle robe and plastic shower shoes — it was off to that salt chamber for 45 minutes. My busy 21st-century brain defaulted to the obvious question: Should I bring my phone? What will I do for 45 minutes if not checking Twitter?! I resisted the impulse. (Sarancic said many people don’t resist, and he doesn’t judge. “It’s whatever you want to do,” he said.) The salt room was

warm and comforting and only modestly salty. As I reclined in the violet haze, I could feel a light saltiness on my lips. The most memorable sensation was squishing my feet in the salt spilled across the floor — like sand, but cleaner and finer. I closed my eyes and nearly dozed off amid the gentle hum of the salt machine. I didn’t miss my phone for a moment. Next was the steam room for 15 minutes. Then the sauna for another 15. Then the highlight: the beer soak. Piva Beer Spa doesn’t say exactly how much beer is mixed into the tub

— a six-pack? 12-pack? A case? — but Sarancic pegs it as “about 15 to 20 percent” of the warm mixture. So, no, it’s not a pure beer bath. “It’s a fine balance between having the hydrating and antioxidant component, but not enough to make people feel sticky and nasty when they leave here,” Sarancic said. The beer? That he will reveal. Although father and son investigated partnering with a brewery from Chicago’s booming craft beer industry, they wound up aiming to replicate the Czech experience by employing that country’s most famous export: Pilsner Urquell. The spa technician led me to the lower level. The soaking tub waited on the other side of the wood door, filled with gray-green water where hops floated on the surface. Beside the tub was a plate of nibbles: apple slices, two kinds of cheese (Asiago and brie), dark rye bread and green olives. It was a delightful surprise, but the most delightful surprise of all was that glass of Pilsner Urquell, in a wood mug imported from Europe. I slid in and deeply inhaled the herbal-floral mix. Then sipped the beer and nibbled the cheese. And repeat. The 45 minutes ended far too soon. Next it was back upstairs for the relaxation room and application of a beer mask. The bed, oddly enough, was a wooden slat covered in hay — similar to what you’d find in Eastern Europe, Dino Sarancic said. It was blissfully comfortable — rustic, yet cozy. The spa technician covered my eyes and began dabbing a paste on my face made in the Czech Republic that, sure enough, features beer in the mix. Finally came the full body massage.

FOCUS St. Louis cordially invites you to attend

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What’s Right with the Region Awards Thursday, May 16, 2019 DO THE TWO OF YOU DEMAND DOUBLE TAKES? We’re looking for the ultimate doppelgänging mom-and-kid duos in the St. Louis area! You could win great prizes including a $250 gift card to Walter Knoll Florist. WINNERS WILL ALSO BE FEATURED IN THE MOTHER’S DAY EDITION OF THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Featuring Leadership Award honoree Bob Fox, Chair & Co-founder of the Clark-Fox Family Foundation Sheldon Concert Hall | 3648 Washington Blvd. 5-8 p.m. | Cocktail Reception and Awards Presentation $65 for FOCUS members | $75 for non-members | discount for Young Professionals

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Are you a mom/kid combo outside the carbon-copy category? Submit a photo capturing the essence of a mother’s love in our “Mom-umental Love” category.

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TRAVEL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Mermaid Academy leads classes at Disney World MIAMI HERALD (TNS)

School may not be the first thing you think of when you plan your vacation at Walt Disney World. But this type of school is different. The Orlando, Fla., theme park is offering fans of “The Little Mermaid” lessons on how to be like Ariel, the star of the classic tale, according to the Disney Parks blog. During the one-hour class, students will be fitted with a tail, and then taught how to move like a mermaid in the shallow end of a pool. In case your little one doesn’t know how to swim, life jackets will be available. The sessions, which

GUTTER

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Bob Dylan whiskey distillery to open fall 2020 ASSOCIATED PRESS

started last week, are being held at three hotels: Disney’s Art of Animation Resort, Disney’s Caribbean Beach Resort and Disney’s Yacht and Beach Club Resort. Classes will be held six days a week, not on Mondays, at 8 a.m. Eight people will be allowed in each class. Teachers hail from the Mermaid Academy, which also sells colorful tails from $109 on its website. The cost for the class is $53.25 a pop for guests ages “4 up to 100.” For reservations, call 1-407-939-7529 and inquire about Disney World’s “Enchanted Extras.” Agents are booking through the end of September.

NASHVILLE, TENN. • More

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Folk singer Bob Dylan (left) performs during a three-day festival at Woodside Bay, Isle of Wight, England, in August 1969. Dylan released “Nashville Skyline” on April 9 of that year.

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04.14.2019 • SunDay • M 1

TRAVEL

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • B11

PHOTOS BY THE ORLANDO SENTINEL (TNS)

Reporter Patrick Connolly tries out the microgravity simulator in the Astronaut Training Experience at Kennedy Space Center on March 13.

Ready for blastoff What to expect during Kennedy Space Center’s immersive Astronaut Training Experience BY PATRICK CONNOLLY Orlando Sentinel (TnS)

If you’ve ever wondered what the process of becoming an astronaut is like, Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex now has an experience that puts visitors in the shoes of a space explorer in training. The center’s Astronaut Training Experience, or ATX for short, features four different simulations, one of which involves microgravity simulation and another virtual reality. The common thread is that they all require teamwork and good communication. Dee Maynard, manager of education programs at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, said the experience was designed to keep visitors engaged the whole time. “When we were designing this, one of our primary concerns was that we wanted people to be having an experience and not waiting around,” Maynard said. “Also, astronaut training is very much a team effort.” Although astronauts go through thousands of hours of training before taking off for space, this training does include some components that resemble real NASA training. One simulation helps visitors learn what it takes to launch NASA’s Space Launch System, or SLS, rocket. Six people step into the role of launch control and communicate with six others who become the Orion capsule crew. Amateur astronauts take turns reading and relaying instructions and sets of data from both sides. In mission control, visitors step into roles including flight director and spacecraft systems officer. Inside the capsule, people try their hand at jobs such as flight engineer, commander and transit pilot. If there’s a breakdown in communication, the mission could fail. Across the room, the arms of a truss assembly stretch out above chairs that resemble the kind of zero gravity chair your uncle might have on his back porch. With the flip of a switch, the chairs hover across a frictionless floor, giving astronautsin-training an experience that somewhat resembles the no-gravity environment of space. While strapped into the chairs, visitors wear a helmet with a camera and microphone to talk with

Plants grow inside of Mars Base 1 at Kennedy Space Center.

Reporter Patrick Connolly tries out the “walk on Mars” simulator in the Astronaut Training Experience at Kennedy Space Center.

Astronauts in training are assigned various roles and tasks inside the Orion capsule simulator at Kennedy Space Center.

a partner at a computer. Working together, they communicate to fix broken wires and modules on the space station arms. This part of the experience also offers visitors a chance to learn about the logistics of space through demonstrations about sleeping, using the toilet and working in space. Two different simulations help participants get a glimpse of what life on Mars might look like. For the “land and drive on Mars” simulator, two brave individuals enter a tight capsule that either rocks gently or spins upside down, depending on the level of intensity. They, too, communicate with a partner back at a computer, who can give them the information they need to stop the spinning. Or, as a cruel prank, they can leave their partners’

stomachs to churn and let the capsule keep spinning indefinitely. The “walk on Mars” simulator lets one partner play the role of a Martian astronaut collecting rock samples by using a virtual reality headset and handheld controllers. Like the other simulators, the trainee back at the computer gives instructions to the person on Mars about which direction to head in and what to pick up, and communication is key. Occasionally, a sandstorm will roll in and force you to work extra quickly. In one task, the Mars Rover needs attending to and the partner in the VR headset needs to flip switches in the proper order to get things going again. Visitors wishing to experience all the simulations should allocate at least half a day — the full ATX takes five hours and costs $175 per person. Astronaut training sessions are available five to 13 days a month. Depending on the time of year, morning sessions start at 8:30 a.m. or 9:30 a.m. and afternoon sessions at 4:30 p.m, and some dates do not have a morning session. Select dates allow for guests to sign up for individual parts of the training at a reduced cost and time commitment. Visitors especially interested in the science of space can also travel to Mars Base 1, a program that takes students to the Red Planet for a day of experimentation and robotics. The base is geared toward school field trips and young STEM enthusiasts, but the general public is also invited to participate on select dates for $150 per person.

Reporter Patrick Connolly tries out the microgravity simulator at Kennedy Space Center on March 13.


TRAVEL

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

Read rental contract, ask about fees to avoid a hot mess BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT Special to The Washington Post

When I walked into my Hawaii vacation rental, I collided with a wall of hot, humid air. Instinctively, I scanned the house for a thermostat or air conditioner. I found a small wall unit, but I couldn’t plug it in. It had a lock on it. I called the owner, who said she’d be happy to remove the lock — if I paid her an extra $300. Seriously? Seriously. Apart from cleaning fees and insurance, vacation rentals used to be one of the last all-inclusive travel products. You could count on utilities, wireless internet, cable TV and other basic amenities being included. Not anymore. “There is nothing more maddening than when your expectations for your vacation are shattered just moments after you arrive,” says Steve Schwab, CEO of Casago, a property management and vacation rental company in Scottsdale, Ariz. Schwab and other industry experts say experiences like mine are becoming more common. Owners and managers are quietly instituting new fees to offset rising expenses or to meet increasing customer demands. You can easily spot most of these fees before you book — and it’s worth a careful look. Otherwise, you could be on the hook for something like overpriced air conditioning. The vacation rental owner in Hawaii said she started locking the wall unit after a previous tenant ran the air conditioning constantly, leaving her

with a costly utility bill. I assured her that we would run the AC only during the hottest hours of the day, but she wouldn’t release the lock unless I paid the $300. I refused. For the rest of our stay, we made plans to be out of the house during the early afternoon to escape the oppressive heat. It was a valuable lesson learned. Always — always — find out if air conditioning is included in the price of your rental. When I checked the property description, there was no mention of the airconditioning fee. I called the vacation rental site through which I’d booked the house, and it quickly refunded $280, the full amount of its commission. Kiedra Hinkle-Tyson, who co-owns vacation rentals in St. Louis and in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, explained the economics of vacation rentals. She says that there is a surcharge for electricity usage at both houses, and three additional fees at her St. Louis house: a cleaning fee, an “extra person” fee and a service fee. “We have additional fees because our vacation rental companies charge us fees,” she says. “Airbnb charges us 3 percent, and Booking. com charges us 15 percent. So to offset some of these charges, we pass those charges on to the customer because they are the ones staying and enjoying the home.” Sam Zuo specializes in Airbnb arbitrage, an emerging business that takes advantage of cost differences between home rental and home sale markets. He manages more than 10 vacation rental properties, and he

says fees are a big part of his business. Among his bestsellers: early and late check-ins (at $25 an hour) and items from the minibar, which he stocks with wine. Zuo says Airbnb has made it easier to add “resort” fees or “management” fees to reservations. “These are one-time fees that hosts can add to their listing for every new reservation,” Zuo says. Daniela Andreevska, the marketing director at Mashvisor, a real estate data analytics company, says many destinations also have introduced new taxes on short-term rentals. “Frequently, vacation rental owners have to pay the same taxes as hotels, in addition to income tax on their rental income as well as other fees,” she says. “This is a new trend as many local authorities are trying to regulate and control the short-term rentals business.” Another factor: guests’ expectations. For example, some homes in the Hawaii neighborhood where I rented didn’t have air conditioning. As a visitor from the mainland, I expected it. Avoiding extra charges takes a little sleuthing. That’s because there’s no standardized way of displaying rental amenities, much like with nutrition facts food labels. You have to read every line of the property description, including details rendered in “I-can’t-see-thiswithout-reading-glasses” type, in light gray. “The best way for renters to know about these fees is to ask,” says Jim Prugh, owner of Lindsborg Vacation Rentals in Lindsborg, Kan. Sometimes,

emailing the owner a simple question — “Is everything included?” — will clear up any misunderstandings. Prugh points out that travelers can also avoid booking fees from Airbnb, HomeAway and Booking. com by reserving a stay directly with an owner. “I steer my guests, whenever

possible, directly to my website,” he says. Typically, that can save you several hundred dollars per rental, depending on the length of the stay, although you also lose having an intermediary help you should something go wrong. Most important, though, is to read the contract

before you agree to pay a deposit. It should describe everything you thought you read in the property description, including any special terms — or conditions about air conditioning. Christopher Elliott is a consumer advocate, journalist and co-founder of the advocacy group Travelers United. Email him at chris@elliott.org.

BRING IT ON HOME: SWITZERLAND Who and where • From left: Julie Gettemeier of Wentzville, Suzanne Salmo of O’Fallon, Mo., Dianne Bickerton of New York, Francine Hobein of Black Jack and Christine Melton of Maryland Heights on top of the Santis Mountain in Switzerland. The trip • They traveled to Switzerland to visit a second cousin who lives in Zug. They also traveled to Magdenau, Stein am Rhein, Appenzell and Lucerne to visit places where their family is from. Travel tip • “Hostels are great places to stay when you are traveling with a group. They are typically close to public transportation, and breakfast is provided. At the hostel in Stein am Rhein they also offered to cook us dinner since we had arrived late in the day.”

Contribute • Email your photo to stlpost@gmail. com. Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including where they are from and where you are standing in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little about the trip and a travel tip. We’re

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • C

If stores want to go cashless, they must find ways to serve those without banks

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A shopper scans an Amazon Go app on a cellphone while entering an Amazon Go store in Seattle last year.

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

More than 1,000 people attended the MoCannBizCon and Expo at Union Station last month. The event offered information to people interested in getting into the forthcoming cannabis industry in Missouri. There will be many hoops to jump through.

SMOKING OUT DETAILS OF A POT PERMIT BY NASSIM BENCHAABANE St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Anyone wanting to grow or sell marijuana in Missouri should have hundreds of thousands in cash and be prepared to describe the minutiae of their business plans, from controlling odor from marijuana facilities to keeping the drug from entering the illegal market. That’s according to a longawaited draft of applications for marijuana business licenses posted Wednesday, the first time anyone hoping to win state approval to grow or sell marijuana could see what exactly they would need to provide to officials. Missouri has raked in at least $3.4 million in application fees from 481 groups hoping to apply for licenses to produce or sell marijuana or marijuana-infused products, Lyndall Fraker, director of Missouri’s medical marijuana program said Friday. Fraker spoke to a crowd of dozens at the Missouri Cannabis Industry Association’s two-day conference at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Bridgeton. The state is keeping the filers’ identities secret. The Post-Dispatch has sued the state to release the applicants’ names. Missouri is required by law to approve at least 60 commercial growers, 86 facilities that manufacture marijuana-infused products and 192 dispensary licenses — 24 dispensaries for each of Missouri’s eight congressional districts.

What will it take to win a license to grow or sell marijuana in Missouri? Well, for starters: PROOF OF FINANCING

$500,000 $300,000 in cash per cultivation facility

in cash per facility for dispensaries and infused products manufacturers

PROOF OF RESIDENCY

51%

of the company’s ownership must have lived in Missouri for at least one year before applying for a license

The metro area will probably see more than 48 dispensaries. Two congressional districts cover St. Louis and St. Louis County and parts of St. Charles and Jefferson counties. At least 57 groups have paid application fees in that area. Other Missouri counties in the metro area could receive some of the dispensaries allocated to two congressional districts that stretch west to Jefferson City and south to the state border. The application questions are available on the website of the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, the agency tasked with regulating the medical marijuana industry. The draft applications mirror standards for any other highly regulated industry, said Tim McCorkle, a pharmaceutical engineer who is part of a local group applying for licenses for a dispensary, infused products facility and two growing facilities in Fenton. His group includes chemists, pharmacists and other people with experience meeting strict regulations. “There is a fear factor in the application process because people have a lot of money on the line,” McCorkle said. “But we’ve had no reservations moving forward because we’re taking a very clinical approach.” Applicants can expect to answer dozens of questions that can earn up to 10 points each, and applications

NEW YORK • The day after former Wells Fargo & Co Chief Executive Tim Sloan told U.S. lawmakers he was transforming the bank’s high-pressure culture, Federal Reserve officials met privately with bank employees. At the meeting on March 13, which has not been previously reported, Fed officials were told by four bank employees that little had changed within the bank’s culture since the scandal that engulfed Wells Fargo almost three years ago. Among those present at the meeting was Fed Governor Lael Brainard, who is overseeing a decree requiring that Wells

Fargo fix its risk management before it can resume growing, two sources with direct knowledge of the matter said. The employees belonged to an advocacy group, Committee For Better Banks, which confirmed the meeting. Brainard told the group she was there to listen and get insight into the mood among Wells Fargo staff but declined to say if or how the Fed would respond, the sources said. While regulators occasionally meet with consumer advocacy or industry groups, it is unusual for a Fed board member to meet with an individual firm’s employees. It is not clear who asked for the meeting. Sloan abruptly departed the bank last month, making him the second CEO to

See NICKLAUS • Page C3

Owner of Illinois coal power plants supports bill to help repurpose sites Texas company hopes to avoid abrupt shutdown; critics are crying ‘bailout’ BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

leave Wells Fargo in the wake of its sales practice scandal. Sloan, who declined through a representative to comment on this story, has previously said he stepped down because he felt the external attention on him had become a distraction. His departure was at least partly the result of the board’s conclusion that Sloan had failed to convince regulators

The owner of economically challenged coal-fired power plants in Southern Illinois is supporting legislation that, if passed, would help transform those sites into facilities for utility-scale solar and energy storage projects. The Texas-based company, Vistra Energy, acquired the region’s fleet of coal plants when it completed its purchase of Dynegy Inc. last year. It says the facilities are beset by tough economic and policy conditions, and favors a bill before the state legislature that would provide funding to phase them out of production and repurpose the sites, instead of just shutting them down abruptly. But some environmental groups oppose the measure, characterizing it as a potential “$140 million a year coal bailout,” according to J.C. Kibbey, an Illinois clean energy advocate for the Natural Resources Defense Council in Chicago. Regardless of what becomes of the legislation in Springfield, the electric grid in downstate Illinois — a longtime bastion of coal production — faces major shifts in how it generates power. “We know that drastic changes are imminent,” said Meranda Cohn, Vistra’s director of media relations and corporate affairs. The company says 75 percent of its generating capacity in the region “at risk of being shut down” according to Cohn. Amid that backdrop, Vistra argues that the Illinois Coal to Solar and Energy Storage Act provides a way to more “responsibly

See SLOAN • Page C4

See VISTRA • Page C4

See APPLICATION • Page C4

How Wells Fargo’s regulators and employees drove out its CEO BY IMANI MOISE AND PETE SCHROEDER Reuters

The cashless future looks a bit more distant than it did a few weeks ago. Amazon announced last week that its automated Amazon Go stores, which have accepted only mobile payments since they opened last year, will soon begin taking cash. It was responding to pressure from Philadelphia’s city council and New Jersey’s legislature, which both voted last month to ban cashless stores. The lawmakers were concerned that low-income residents, some of whom don’t have bank accounts, would be treated as second-class consumers if the cashless retail model gained popularity. Their worries were mostly hypothetical: For every restaurant that has gone cashless, such as the Sweetgreen chain

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • P-D

Former Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan

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BUSINESS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019

Campus-sponsored debit cards cost students millions in fees At least 1.1 million are affected; bank deals are lucrative for universities BY DANIELLE DOUGLAS-GABRIEL Washington Post

College students paid nearly $25 million in fees on campus-sponsored debit cards last year as banks struck lucrative deals with universities to offer financial products to largely low-income populations, according to a new report by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group. The advocacy group combed through a U.S. Education Department database of hundreds of contracts between colleges and financial institutions, and found that some agreements left students vulnerable to high fees on checking accounts and debit and prepaid cards. Students who attend colleges that are paid to promote the accounts were charged 2.3 times more in fees than those at universities without such marketing deals, the report found. The findings reignite a long-standing debate about the responsibility colleges have to ensure that students are not steered into accounts with onerous terms. The administration under President Barack Obama imposed regulations that advocacy groups say curbed some of the worst practices, but universities are still allowed to partner with financial institutions that aggressively market products that may not be in students’ best interests. At least 1.1 million college students have campus-sponsored debit cards, according to the latest data from the Education Department. Colleges often use the cards to disburse money left over when a student’s financial aid award exceeds tuition and fees, known as credit balance refunds. They outsource the processing of that money to banks in exchange for millions of dollars paid to the schools. A number of colleges also accept money from financial firms to use their logo or to place checking or prepaid account features on student IDs. The trouble with these arrangements is that some campus cards are riddled with fees that can eat into what little money students hold. A 2015 regulation banned banks from imposing fees on students for overdrawing accounts carrying financial aid money but did not explicitly extend the restriction to other types of campus cards. As a result, those accounts tend to feature fewer protections and higher fees for monthly maintenance, use of out-of-network ATMs, wire transfers or overdrafts. Banks that pay colleges for the opportunity to market these cards to students can derive hefty profits. Wells Fargo earned $11.3 million by charging students an average of $44.84 in fees during a 12-month period, the report found. Although the bank held less than one-quarter of all campus debit card accounts, its customers racked up close to half of the total fees. “At each school, it’s completely optional — students decide if they want the convenience of using their campus ID cards or co-branded debit cards to access their Wells Fargo accounts,” Wells Fargo spokesman Jim Seitz said. “Students don’t pay extra for the services offered or pay higher fees through Wells Fargo’s Campus Card program.” Seitz said the bank began waiving certain fees for overdrafts, out-of-network ATM use and wire transfers on its campus cards in March. Students can have most of those fees waived once a month on their accounts. Wells Fargo expects that average costs incurred for its campus cardholders will be cut in half. Kaitlyn Vitez, a higher-education advocate at the Public Interest Research Group who wrote the new report, applauded Wells Fargo’s decision to reduce fees but said the bank needs to eliminate them. According to the report, Wells Fargo, PNC Bank and U.S. Bank are among institutions that give schools incentives to maximize the number of campus cards by providing colleges with royalty payments based on the percentage of students with accounts. Consumer advocates say having universities endorse financial products to impressionable students presents conflicts of interest too troubling to ignore. Advocacy groups, however, are heartened by what some consider a sea change in the campus card marketplace since the 2015 regulations took effect. Hundreds of colleges and universities have endorsed no-fee and low-fee accounts in the wake of the 2015 regulations. A recent Consumer Financial Protection Bureau report found students at most of the 573 colleges it reviewed paid no fees on campus cards in the 2016-17 academic year. Nevertheless, the bureau admonished banks with high fees for not acting in the best financial interest of students.

Nursing homes can cost $80,000 a year; coverage is expensive BY BETH PINSKER Reuters

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colleges often use credit cards to disburse money left over from financial aid awards.

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Health care expenses in retirement are huge savings drain

An inverted yield curve, a bond market indicator that is often a precursor to recession, had some investors running for cover this spring. David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher agree that it bears watching, but don’t think a recession is imminent. stltoday.com/watch

MARKETS • WEEK IN REVIEW Dow Jones

Nasdaq

S&P 500

-12.69

+45.37

+14.67

26,412.30

7,984.16

2,907.41

SOURCE: Reuters

MARKET WATCH: Page C5

A typical couple could potentially spend $285,000 on out-of-pocket health care costs in retirement. But that is hardly the scariest number you need to consider when it comes to medical costs as you age. This estimate, released this month by Fidelity Workplace Consulting, is based on Medicare premiums for Americans 65 and older, plus the deductibles and co-pays required for medical care and prescription drugs. It also accounts for inflation and investment growth. If you have $1 million in retirement savings and plan to spend a healthy 4 percent of that per year plus Social Security, your monthly health care budget would need to account for about $5,000 per year per person. These bulk figures sound large, yet what is not included may be even more worrisome:

LONG-TERM CARE Since Medicare, the government health plan for those over 65, does not cover long-term care costs, Fidelity’s average spend does not include it either. But this is where you find the big price tag. The average cost of nursing care is more than $80,000 per year, according to the Administration on Aging, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Home health care can be even more expensive at $20 an hour. While Medicaid is a government safety net for low-income individuals of any age, it does not work for all nursing homes, nor for home care. The only way to ensure against running out of money for private-pay nursing homes or home care is to get longterm care insurance. The problem? It is so expensive that even the companies selling long-term care policies are getting out of the business. Genworth, the biggest provider, just announced that it is not going to sell traditional individual policies and hybrid ones with annuities through brokers. While group policies and directsales will still be available, it is just one more contraction in an already shrinking market. There are still ways to protect yourself. Jesse Slome, executive director of the American Association for LongTerm Care Insurance, favors a someis-better-than-none approach. Limited long-term care policies, which have lower premiums and lower benefits, sold by companies such as New York Life and Mutual of Omaha, will at least pay some of your costs, he said.

DENTAL AND VISION Medicare does not cover dental and vision costs. The good news? “Those are things most people can anticipate and afford,” said Hope Manion, senior vice president, Fidelity Workplace Consulting. As Slome, 66, learned in a year on Medicare, it is hard to let go of savings you worked so hard to accumulate. Slome noted this as he was about to head out to the optometrist for a long-avoided update to his eyewear. “I was moving something in the garage and a hedge clipper scratched the glasses. I have distance glasses and computer glasses and reading glasses. All three pairs will be redone — this is a thousand-dollar visit,” Slome lamented. A smart way to leverage retirement savings for ad hoc medical costs is through health savings accounts, which allow triple-tax-free savings for health care costs, Manion said. You will need a high-deductible health plan to qualify, however. PRE-MEDICARE HEALTH CARE COSTS Americans between the ages of 50 and 64 are the ones who need to worry most about health care costs, because some people cannot keep working even if they want to. Fifty-four percent of people in this age group are worried about covering health care costs before Medicare kicks in, according to a recent survey from AARP. “That age band is really scary,” Manion said. “That’s when premiums skyrocket.” This is also typically the time when chronic health conditions worsen and doctors pile on prescriptions as well as procedures. Medicare does a better job managing these costs than private-pay insurance, Manion said. Last year Slome went into the hospital just a few weeks before he became eligible for Medicare. In three days, he blew through $6,500, all out-ofpocket costs because he had a highdeductible plan. “Three weeks later, it would have been zero!” Slome said.


BUSINESS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

Fewer people use cash, but some states protect those who do NICKLAUS • FROM C1

in several East Coast and West Coast cities, thousands of others remain willing to accept customers’ hard-earned greenbacks. Amazon Go’s handful of locations are vastly outnumbered by cash-friendly convenience stores. “We’re still pretty far away from a cashless society,” says Bill Hardekopf, chief executive of Lowcards.com. “We are moving in that direction, but I don’t think it will happen in my lifetime.” Still, a few high-profile locations are shunning bills and coins. MercedesBenz Stadium, home of Atlanta’s football and soccer teams, recently became the first cash-free professional sports venue. Cash usage is declining, not because retailers won’t take it but because consumers don’t find it convenient. Cash was used in 30 percent of transactions in 2017, according to Federal Reserve research, down from 40 percent five years earlier. For retailers, cash is a productivity killer and a security risk. Counting

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this photo from January 2018, a Seattle customer looks overhead in an Amazon Go store, where sensors and cameras are part of a system used to discern what people have purchased and charge their Amazon accounts.

bills and making change slows down service at a busy sandwich shop or hot-dog stand, and someone has to get the cash safely to the bank. IHL Services, a Tennessee consulting firm, estimates the cost of handling cash at between 4.7 percent and

15 percent of revenue, depending on the retail segment. It’s natural for retailers to try to reduce that cost, even if it means turning a few customers away. “We are in a time of tremendous innovation and change that affects the

way we pay for things, and almost nowhere is there more innovation and change than in retail,” says Mark Hamrick, a senior economic analyst at Bankrate.com. Still, Hamrick wonders whether Amazon Go went too far in alienating

the cash-only crowd. Its reversal “amounts to an acknowledgment that you need to understand your consumer is not only one profile,” he said. Efficiency-obsessed retailers must look longingly at countries like Sweden, where just 13 percent of

transactions involve cash, and Ikea is experimenting with a cashless store. Even the Swedish central bank, though, is worried that vulnerable members of society may be harmed. There, as in America, the debate centers on what to do about people who don’t have access to modern payment technologies. Lawmakers in New Jersey and Philadelphia chose to protect the right to pay cash, but their laws also create barriers to innovation. That can’t be good for any region that wants to be competitive in the 21stcentury economy. There must be better ways to bridge the gap between the needs of retailers and the needs of people who, for whatever reason, don’t have a credit or debit card. Kiosks at MercedesBenz Stadium, for instance, let fans convert cash into a prepaid debit card with no fee. If retailers want to preserve their right to innovate, they need to find similar solutions to make sure they don’t leave anybody behind. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

MOUND CITY MONEY From David Nicklaus’ blog about St. Louis business. stltoday.com/moundcitymoney Subpar bonus lowers Reinsurance Group CEO’s pay to $6.7 million • Reinsurance Group of America Chief Executive Anna Manning got a below-target bonus last year as her total compensation fell 5 percent to $6.7 million. The Chesterfield company’s proxy statement, which discloses details of executive pay, says 2018 performance fell short of targets for operating income and book Manning value, while exceeding goals for revenue and new business. The result was a bonus of $1.3 million, which was 87 percent of Manning’s target level and far short of the previous year’s $2.4 million. Manning’s salary last year was $992,308

after a 5 percent raise, and she’s already been handed a 3 percent raise for this year. She also got $1 million in stock appreciation rights, $2.8 million in performance-linked shares and a $375,734 increase in pension value. The $2.8 million in stock is linked to threeyear goals for return on equity and revenue growth. A similar plan from 2015 paid out at 107 percent of its target value. Manning earned 62 times as much as Reinsurance Group’s median employee last year, down from a 2017 pay ratio of 66. The company calculated median pay of $108,008 for its 3,002 worldwide employees. Reinsurance Group’s earnings per share fell 16 percent last year, excluding unusual items, and its stock price fell 10 percent. Stock price puts some of Belden CEO’s $6.3 million pay package at risk • Belden Chief Executive John Stroup’s compensation fell 10

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made $46,238. The pay ratio was down from 174 in 2017.

percent last year, and the company’s falling stock price means he may not collect the full $6.3 million. Belden’s proxy statement, filed Tuesday, points out that for 2016, Stroup collected about $3 million less than the $6.25 million in compensation it originally reported. That’s because a big chunk of his pay is in stock units that are tied partly to relative shareholder return over a three-year period. By the end of 2018, Stroup earned just 39 percent of the target amount of units, at a lower Stroup share price. Last year, $2.6 million of Stroup’s pay was in similar three-year stock awards. In addition, he got $2.1 million worth of stockappreciation rights, which also are at risk because Belden’s share price fell 46 percent last year. Stroup’s salary was $893,750. He also got a $620,100 bonus, which was 53 percent of the target amount. Belden says it set “challenging, realistic” goals for earnings, revenue and capital efficiency. Stroup’s perquisites included $28,400 for tax preparation costs. Belden is a Clayton-based manufacturer of wire, cable and technology products. It reported a 64 percent increase last year in earnings per share before unusual items. Last year, Stroup earned 146 times as much as the median Belden employee, who

Enterprise Financial CEO gets raise to $1.1 million • A double-digit raise and abovetarget bonus boosted James Lally’s pay as Enterprise Financial chief executive to $1.1 million last year, a 17 percent increase. Lally’s compensation is disclosed in a proxy statement that the Clayton-based bank filed this month. His salary was $491,667 after an 11 percent raise, and his $367,917 Lally bonus was 147 percent of the target amount. The bank beat targets for earnings, deposits and fee income. Lally also received stock valued at $249,952, but four-fifths of it depends on Enterprise’s earnings and shareholder return between 2018 and 2020. A similar stock award issued in 2016 paid out at 137 percent of its target value. Lally’s perquisites included a car allowance of $7,200 and club dues of the same amount. Lally has been Enterprise’s CEO since 2017. Lally made 17.7 times as much as the median Enterprise employee, up slightly from last year’s pay ratio of 16. The bank’s median employee earned $64,357. Enterprise’s earnings per share, before unusual items, rose 47 percent last year but its share price fell 17 percent.

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Deposit & Loan Guide

Institution

Synchrony Bank

Int Chking Money Acct Mkt Acct Min Min

NA

1.20

NA

0

3 mo CD Min

6 mo CD Min

0.75

1.00

12 mo CD Min

18 mo CD Min

2.80

2,000 2,000 2,000

24 mo CD Min

36 mo CD Min

60 mo CD Min

2.75

2.90

2.90

3.10

2,000

2,000

2,000 2,000

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TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FEATURE, CALL SALES DEPARTMENT @ 773-320-8492

Savings Update

Watch out for check overpayment scams By Sabrina Karl As sure as the sun rises, fraudsters will always try to separate people from their money. Bank accounts are particularly susceptible since they don’t carry the maximum liability protection that credit cards do. But knowing the most common scams can help you keep your account — and your money — safe.

appears very motivated to secure the deal and move the transaction quickly along. After reaching an agreement, the buyer will later tell the seller some reason why their check will be for more than the purchase amount. They may say it was an error, or that the extra funds will cover fees they’ll incur from an agent or shipping representative. They then request that, after you deposit their check, you wire the surplus to a certain account or Western Union location.

Various agencies accept and track consumer fraud complaints, including the Federal Trade Commission, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the Better Business Bureau. In addition, many states also have their The scam is that the check they’re providing will own consumer protection department. bounce, as it is counterfeit or forged. Your bank From the millions of complaints received by may not catch it immediately, but once they do, these agencies, we know what the most com- you will be out the full amount, and perhaps monly reported scams are, and one of these is also your sale item if you shipped it. the check overpayment scheme. Any check overpayment with a request to return The scam targets those who are selling some- the difference is a red flag, and you should thing via Craigslist, the classifieds, or another abruptly end the transaction. In addition, it’s public avenue. The seller will get an offer, recommended you report the experience to all sometimes a generous one, from someone who of the agencies above.

Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 04/09/19 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.


BUSINESS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Sites could be transformed for solar, energy storage VISTRA • FROM C1

transition” for plant employees, local communities, and the state’s ambitious clean energy goals. “What we’re trying to do is create a viable business in Illinois and the status quo does not present that,” said Cohn. “We think this gives us an opportunity to continue to operate in the state and at the same time help the state meet its goals.” Vistra says the concept would beneficially “reuse the substantial transmission infrastructure and available land at existing coal-fueled power plants.” The company said it is still assessing which types of projects would be best suited for specific plant sites. Vistra employs about 1,000 workers total across its eight Illinois coal plants, Cohn said. The proposal would rely on a combination of funding mechanisms, including renewable energy credits and state-awarded grants. “Transitionary assistance” would be capped at $140 million annually from 2020 through 2024, a five-year period during which given coal plants would remain in operation, with solar or energy storage joining the mix at each site in either 2021 or 2022. The legislation would allow the plants to retire if unforeseen capital expenditures of more than $10 million would be needed to satisfy environmental laws or regulations and keep them in operation. The company estimates that “up to 2,000 construction jobs

ROBERT ALLRED PHOTOGRAPHY

The Dynegy coal-fired power plant in Baldwin, Ill., is among those acquired by Vistra.

and support jobs” would directly be created through the process of repurposing its facilities. Opponents, though, are critical of the plan. One key reason they mention is that the struggles of coal plants stem from market forces — a tide the public shouldn’t be asked to counteract out of their own pocket. “The economics are changing and utilities are just making decisions accordingly,” said Kibbey. “We should look with a very critical eye at a plan that would keep a coal plant open longer.”

He lists a variety of concerns and counterpoints in response to Vistra’s arguments for the bill. For instance, the renewable energy credit payments the company would receive are about seven times the typical value, he said, and studies done by the NRDC and other organizations have shown that the region’s power grid would not face problems created by a widespread loss of coal power, as the company has suggested. To the contrary, the NRDC says that “cleaner power will save Illinoisans up to

$14 billion,” thanks to lower energy costs drawn from cheaper sources elsewhere. When it comes to ensuring a smooth transition for affected employees and communities, Kibbey says the measure has shortcomings, since it does not offer job training or address the question of property tax replacement for local communities. He said better approaches to issues like those are included in alternative policies such as the Clean Energy Jobs Act. “It’s not just, ‘Let’s build solar

on these sites,’ even though that’s great,” said Kibbey. “Let’s think more holistically about economic development in these communities.” Cohn said that she was not aware of similar plans being pursued by utilities other than Vistra. She was not sure of what the company would do if the legislation were to falter, though she said it would face the prospect of retiring plants sooner, and without any commitment to offset their loss with any solar or energy storage. “If the legislature doesn’t pass this, there’s going to be more uncertainty facing these plants and we’re likely to face some tough decisions,” she said. Kibbey, meanwhile, does say it’s a promising sign that companies like Vistra are having this conversation at all. “It is encouraging to see that even a fossil fuel company like Vistra is beginning to see the writing on the wall that coal is on the way out,” he said. “I think that’s a welcome change.” While that change is driven by economics, he doesn’t think “we can completely sit back” and allow the transition away from coal power to be left to the market, alone. “The science tells us that we need to do this incredibly rapidly,” he adds. “When you pair bold policy action with the shifting economics, I think that is a recipe to get where we need to go.” Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com

Missouri releases drafts of applications that will be used for cannabis business licenses APPLICATION • FROM C1

will be read by an independent, thirdparty scorer. Some questions are as simple as answering “yes” or “no.” Other questions are open-ended, such as: “What are the weaknesses of the business plan and how will you overcome them?” The questions correspond to 10 scoring criteria required by the constitutional amendment that cover an applicant’s proposed site security and the potential for the proposed facility to have a positive economic impact on the surrounding community. A committee on each of the 10 criteria will meet in Jefferson City over the month to review the applications and suggest any changes. The public can submit feedback online up to two days before each committee’s meeting. The first committees meet Wednesday. A full calendar is available on the department’s website. One of the criteria requires that officials score the applicant’s “character, veracity, background, qualifications, and relevant experience of principal officers or managers.” To do that, applicants will have to submit two letters of recommendation for their top three managers, one letter on the manager’s character and another on the manager’s “truthfulness.” They will also need to provide the managers’ résumés and experience in the legal marijuana industry or other relevant industries, as well as answer whether they owe taxes, have any legal judgments against them or had a marijuana license in another state that was revoked or disciplined in any way. The application will ask if the owners of the business currently have an ownership stake in any marijuana business outside Missouri. The law requires that at least 51 percent of the company’s ownership include people who lived in Missouri at least one year before applying for a license. All applicants will have to provide details of their general business plan: a market analysis, if they have insurance, expense and revenue projections through two years and a timeline for hiring and training employees. They’ll also be asked for details about how they will set their prices for marijuana, store it, dispose of their waste and keep records of it all. The businesses’ marketing and signage will have to comply with specific state and local regulations that have yet to be finalized. McCorkle said the state has helped applicants by formulating the questions in a way that is easy to understand, as well as releasing a draft of the questions months in advance. “This keeps the playing field level so everyone knows what’s expected of them,” he said.

NEED FOR CASH There’s one financial requirement somewhat unique to the marijuana industry: the need for cash. Large banks do not provide loans or financing to marijuana businesses because the drug is a federally prohibited substance.

Business applicants will have to specifically address how they’ll finance the business. Cultivation facility applications will need to prove they have at least $500,000 in liquid capital for a single facility. Dispensaries and infused products manufacturers will need at least $300,000 in liquid capital for a single facility.

SECURITY Security is a chief concern for the state. Dispensary and cultivation applicants will have to ensure the safety of patients and people in the surrounding community and prevent marijuana under their control from entering the illegal market. That includes screening and training employees and planning measures as specific as having a procedure in place for when employees lose cards giving access to the secured facility. Applicants will get extra points if their security measures go beyond the standards required by the state’s rules for each facility. IMPACT ON COMMUNITY Applicants will also have to describe their system to mitigate odor caused by the growing, handling and processing of marijuana. The state also wants to know how the business will impact the community, how many full-time jobs their businesses will create and what their hourly wages will average. They’ll also have to describe how their top managers “reflect the community” in which their business would be located and describe their plan to “address diversity” in their top management. Cultivation and dispensary applicants will also have to plan for making medical marijuana available to low-income patients. SITE SPECIFIC Each type of business license will have separate additional questions. Applicants seeking to grow marijuana will benefit from prior experience in agriculture or horticulture and genetic modification or breeding. They’ll have to describe how they’ll use clean growing rooms, whether they’ll consult or hire a physician or pharmacist, and detail any agreements they have with utility providers. People who want to make marijuanainfused products could get more points if they have experience in food or beverage production and extracting chemicals from plants. They’ll have to list their plans for waste storage and handling flammable materials and whether they’ll consult or hire a chemist, pharmacist or food scientist. Dispensaries will be asked to describe why and how they picked their proposed location, how accessible the space will be to patients, their planned hours of operation, plans to deliver marijuana to patients offsite, their experience in healthcare and whether they’ll have a physician or pharmacist whom their patients can consult. Nassim Benchaabane • 314-340-8167 @NassimBnchabane on Twitter nbenchaabane@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tim Sloan, then president and chief executive officer of Wells Fargo, testifies before the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs in Washington in 2017.

Next CEO will have uphill climb SLOAN • FROM C1

that he could transform the bank and rally a staff that had low confidence in its leadership, according to a source with knowledge of the board’s thinking. Wells Fargo spokesman Mark Folk declined to comment on regulatory matters but disputed the employee group’s characterization of the bank’s culture. Sloan’s struggles underscore the challenges faced by the bank’s next chief executive. They will not only have to transform the bank and its sales practices, but also persuade regulators and its 260,000 employees that they have done so. Finding a new CEO who can win over the bank’s employees is as important as finding someone who can charm regulators and Wall Street, said Russell Raath, president of management consulting firm Kotter. “The whole bank needs to know that this person cares about their contribution to the top and bottom line,” he said.

STRAINED RELATIONSHIP Wells Fargo’s relationship with regulators has been strained since 2016, when employee whistleblowers revealed the bank had opened potentially millions of unauthorized accounts. Internal and regulatory probes have since discovered other issues in the bank’s businesses, resulting in billions of dollars in fines and penalties. In February 2018, Wells Fargo signed a Fed consent order that required the bank to fix its risk-management and governance problems before it could grow its balance sheet. Two months later, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Wells Fargo’s other key regulator, ordered the bank to make similar fixes and repay customers to whom it had improperly sold mortgages and auto insurance. In December, Reuters reported that the Fed had rejected the bank’s initial remediation plan, putting it behind schedule. Days later, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told Congress the Fed would not lift the asset cap until it was satisfied that Wells Fargo had fixed its risk problems. An internal company-wide survey around that time also pointed to low morale, according to the Committee For Better Banks and other Wells Fargo employees. The bank internally published a writeup about the survey, saying Wells Fargo found itself at a “challenging and interesting” crossroads. Some employees felt that the description sugar-coated the findings, sources said.

That sparked dozens of comments from workers criticizing management for being out of touch, according to the sources and screenshots of the internal site reviewed by Reuters. A consumer loan underwriter complained on the internal site that the concerns about pay and employee benefits were falling on deaf ears. “For years (team members) have been expressing their concerns and frustrations,” the employee wrote. “The only response (if any) are canned answers and talking points which we all know is baloney.” An analysis of the survey Wells Fargo published publicly showed only 38 percent of employees felt senior management understood obstacles faced by frontline workers. The bank employs more than 5,100 people in St. Louis where its brokerage unit, Wells Fargo Advisors, is based. Wells Fargo’s Folk said the company seeks and values input from employees, and that the bank has already made a number of improvements based on the feedback. He pointed to other categories in the survey that showed employees believed in the bank’s values and were satisfied. For example, 72 percent of employees said they believe Wells Fargo is a good place to work.

REGULATORY REBUKE Sloan testified before Congress on March 12 in a hearing about the bank’s progress since 2016. As a gesture of goodwill, Wells Fargo took the unusual step of offering the OCC the opportunity to review his testimony in advance, according to a source with direct knowledge of the matter. It is unclear how the OCC responded. In his testimony, Sloan detailed Wells Fargo’s extensive transformation efforts, but regulators remained skeptical. Sloan had barely finished speaking when the OCC said it was still “disappointed” by the bank’s remediation efforts. The next day, after Wells Fargo disclosed Sloan had gotten a 5 percent pay raise, the Fed responded that it expects boards “to hold management accountable.” A week later, Powell told reporters the bank had suffered a “remarkably widespread series of breakdowns” that needed to be addressed in a “fundamental” way. These rebukes undermined Sloan’s position at the bank, the source with knowledge of the board’s thinking said. On March 26, Sloan told the board he had decided to resign, according to a regulatory filing. Three days later, he publicly stepped down. Moise reported from New York, Schroeder from Washington, D.C. Greg Roumeliotis and Michelle Price of Reuters contributed to this report.


MARKET WATCH

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

15 BEST LARGE-CAP STOCKS COMPANY Anadarko Petrol PG&E Corp Disney Pioneer Natural Marvell Tech Grp Yandex NV Fortinet Inc Okta Inc Cerner Corp Shopify Inc Sony Corp Sprint Corp Kroger Co Zebra Tech EOG Resources

15 BEST MID-CAP STOCKS

DIV

YLD

52-WEEK P/E HIGH LOW

FRIDAY CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

APC 1.20 PCG 2.12f DIS 1.76f PXD .64f MRVL .24 YNDX ... FTNT ... OKTA ... CERN ... SHOP ... SNE ... S ... KR .56f ZBRA ... EOG .88

1.9 9.2 1.4 .4 1.0 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 2.2 ... .8

22 34 17 cc 35 63 53 dd 33 dd ... 4 10 40 dd

61.78 23.08 130.06 168.32 23.74 38.90 92.71 95.24 62.80 214.83 46.99 6.10 25.67 233.74 105.31

14.77 3.71 15.06 17.64 2.44 3.69 8.60 8.41 5.48 18.18 3.92 0.47 1.77 15.41 6.68

TICKER

76.70 40.40 49.42 5.07 120.20 97.68 213.40 119.08 22.95 14.34 39.70 24.90 94.37 53.40 95.19 38.64 67.57 48.78 211.54 113.68 61.02 41.91 6.62 5.04 32.74 23.25 226.99 130.79 133.53 82.04

31.4 19.2 13.1 11.7 11.5 10.5 10.2 9.7 9.6 9.2 9.1 8.3 7.4 7.1 6.8

COMPANY

38.7 871| -24.2 17.5 98742| -57.3 13.1 8| 421 17.4 24.1 831| -16.7 17.9 |5431 3.7 8.1 |7 8.0 11.3 |9876543 63.6 20.2 |9996 135.5 8.4 |7421 9.4 4.3 |99763 76.5 1.6 65| -6.0 -4.5 2| -0.3 5.4 |75421 11.4 10.6 |98763 60.5 18.5 74| -9.0

TICKER

Crescent Point Engy Adient plc Scorpio Tankers In Baytex Energy Corp PPDAI Group Biohaven Pharma InflaRx NV Frontline Ltd Euronav NV Texas Pacific Land Legg Mason RH Mimecast Ltd Visteon Corp Nutanix Inc

DIV

CPG .12 ADNT 1.10 STNG .40 BTE ... PPDF .19p BHVN ... IFRX ... FRO .60e EURN 2.41e TPL 1.75 LM 1.36 RH ... MIME ... VC ... NTNX ...

10 WORST LARGE-CAP STOCKS COMPANY

TICKER

Anthem Inc Molina Healthcare Centrais Elec Brasil Unitedhealth Group Gen Electric Centrais El Brasil B Humana Suzaon Papele Celu Regeneron Pharm Incyte Corp

DIV

YLD

P/E

ANTM 3.00 MOH ... EBR ... UNH 3.60 GE .04 EBR/B ... HUM 2.20f SUZ ... REGN ... INCY ...

1.2 ... ... 1.6 .4 ... .9 ... ... ...

18 dd ... 18 dd ... 21 ... 18 dd

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 317.99 154.06 10.89 287.94 15.59 11.33 355.88 26.94 442.00 88.83

219.34 80.12 3.14 221.69 6.66 3.43 255.38 18.31 281.89 57.00

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 252.85 129.39 8.20 223.22 9.00 8.66 253.31 21.70 382.94 79.40

YLD P/E 2.8 5.3 1.7 ... ... ... ... ... ... .2 4.1 ... ... ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

24 9.20 2.43 ... 67.10 12.15 ... 32.50 14.75 dd 4.85 1.38 ... 8.45 2.85 ... 53.82 23.21 61 51.33 20.31 dd 8.33 4.24 dd 10.10 6.77 cc 915.66 409.00 dd 40.50 23.25 27 164.49 84.19 dd 51.66 29.67 16 139.45 56.59 ... 64.87 32.52

15 BEST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR 4.23 20.73 24.07 2.18 5.29 58.24 48.59 7.91 9.36 901.04 32.79 115.71 49.70 82.60 40.66

0.92 4.42 4.57 0.40 0.88 8.05 6.68 1.04 0.95 90.04 3.22 10.95 4.56 7.18 3.49

27.8 27.1 23.4 22.5 20.0 16.0 15.9 15.1 11.3 11.1 10.9 10.5 10.1 9.5 9.4

42.4 97652| -46.3 48.4 99654| -71.0 29.5 6| 541 7.2 29.8 95| -34.0 8.0 875| -26.1 16.2 |998754321 91.9 2.5 |97652 46.3 21.7 9 | 9653 70.5 16.6 7| 2 8.3 23.8 |9963 68.5 13.9 761| -12.2 -13.7 |962 36.3 7.9 8| 76 28.1 10.1 87652| -30.3 6.2 87| -24.0

COMPANY

TICKER

Coda Octupus Group Chimerix Inc Second Sight Medical Papa Murphy’s Hldgs Nordic Amer Offshore Airgain Inc Global Brass Copper Vermillion Inc Alkaline Water Co Faro Technologies Auryn Resources Inc Yangtze River Port DHI Group Inc Biofem Biosciences Greenpro Capital Cp

-13.8 -12.2 -11.4 -10.3 -10.1 -9.4 -8.4 -7.7 -6.4 -6.3

COMPANY

-16.6 |971 26.8 -7.2 |99984 75.4 -14.4 |998641 56.8 -11.2 |7543 7.7 -9.6 965432| -26.5 -13.4 | 8652 36.2 9 -9.6 75321| -7.3 -12.1 |753 7.0 -7.6 |932 21.9 -6.4 |9421 22.3

TICKER

Zogenix Inc Wave Life Sciences Intercept Pharm Myovant Sciences Ltd Weight Watchers US Steel Corp Hollysys Autom Tech Signet Jewelers Aerie Pharma Pentair plc

ZGNX WVE ICPT MYOV WTW X HOLI SIG AERI PNR

DIV ... ... ... ... ... .20 .18e 1.48 ... .72

YLD P/E ... ... ... ... ... 1.2 .9 6.4 ... 1.8

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

dd 62.75 ... 56.00 dd 133.74 dd 27.45 12 105.73 10 39.23 8 27.85 dd 71.07 dd 74.75 12 72.96

33.43 32.25 64.50 14.32 17.55 16.57 16.00 23.61 32.18 35.30

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

DIV

CODA ... CMRX ... EYES ... FRSH ... NAO .18 AIRG ... BRSS .36 VRML ... WTER ... FARO ... AUG ... YERR ... DHX ... EVFM ... GRNQ ...

YLD P/E

52-WEEK FRIDAY HIGH LOW CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

... ... ... ... 5.6 ... .8 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

13.39 5.22 2.25 6.44 4.80 16.19 43.65 1.42 5.56 70.20 1.75 12.44 3.54 8.35 22.70

3.29 0.64 0.26 1.35 0.66 3.31 8.84 0.26 0.45 9.00 0.28 0.25 0.48 0.62 0.33

... dd dd 14 ... 62 23 dd ... dd ... ... 9 dd ...

3.40 1.74 .64 4.28 .29 7.46 24.06 .27 2.08 37.58 .85 .30 1.25 1.79 1.70

13.75 2.69 1.11 6.44 3.19 15.99 43.74 1.33 2.59 55.71 1.74 1.55 3.17 4.10 2.30

31.5 31.2 29.8 26.5 26.1 26.1 25.3 24.3 21.0 19.3 19.2 19.2 17.8 17.7 16.8

48.6 |9986543 232.3 31.2 96321| -42.2 37.0 953| -39.5 9.9 |8743 29.2 24.1 987621| -69.1 25.7 | 9764 88.1 9 36.9 9 | 5 38.9 3.9 72| -9.5 -9.8 9 | 986543 130.8 16.4 732| -10.1 39.2 |8531 21.3 140.3 98642| -60.9 34.9 |9876432 70.6 9.3 9321| -37.6 -16.4 98653| -62.3

10 WORST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

10 WORST MID-CAP STOCKS

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

-40.46 -17.97 -1.06 -25.56 -1.01 -0.90 -23.17 -1.82 -26.00 -5.36

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

38.46 -13.54 -26.0 -25.9 3| -0.4 34.08 -8.30 -19.6 -25.5 865432| -19.0 95.21 -21.82 -18.6 -15.9 |9876432 49.4 20.44 -4.00 -16.4 -7.5 |521 1.9 17.70 -3.33 -15.8 -13.4 998654321| -70.3 16.74 -3.10 -15.6 -14.9 992| -51.4 19.49 -3.41 -14.9 -7.1 8742| -20.2 23.19 -3.66 -13.6 -14.5 974| -32.8 41.89 -6.08 -12.7 -10.8 85432| -15.8 40.06 -5.15 -11.4 -6.0 7541| -8.9

COMPANY

TICKER

Outlook Therapeutics X4 Pharmaceutical Homology Medicines Concert Pharmaceut BP Prudhoe Dermira Inc Forsight Energy LP PolarityTE Inc Rexahn Pharm Era Group

DIV

YLD P/E

OTLK ... ... XFOR ... ... FIXX ... ... CNCE ... ... BPT 4.14e 19.3 DERM ... ... FELP .13 ... PTE ... ... RNN ... ... ERA ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

... 10.96 2 148.38 dd 31.80 dd 21.00 4 37.23 dd 15.48 dd 4.10 dd 41.22 ... 28.56 6 14.23

1.50 6.90 15.07 9.59 17.00 6.00 1.68 9.01 5.16 8.11

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 1.64 12.57 22.39 10.09 21.50 11.67 1.60 8.81 5.61 9.83

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR -73.2 -27.3 -26.2 -22.7 -21.2 -19.8 -19.6 -18.6 ... -17.5

-4.48 -4.73 -7.95 -2.96 -5.77 -2.89 -0.39 -2.01 ... -2.09

-78.9 99764| -77.1 -35.3 998732| -88.8 -15.5 8| 321 16.9 -38.7 98| -48.0 -21.2 |6521 6.4 70.6 |98752 58.3 -43.9 97653| -46.5 -43.1 9853| -50.6 0.0 9965432| -71.8 -11.6 |87531 26.7

Note: Stocks classified by market capitalization, the product of the current stock price and total shares outstanding. Ranges are $100 million to $1 billion (small); $1 billion to $8 billion (mid); greater than $8 billion (large).

S&P 500

NAME

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Dividend: Expected cash payment to shareholders. PE ratio: Multiple of stock price to company earnings. 52-week high/low: Trading range over the past year. Last: Selling price at end of week. Net change: Dollar change in price of stock from previous week. Percent change: From the previous week.

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

AES Corp AFLAC s AT&T Inc AbbottLab AbbVie Abiomed Accenture ActivsBliz Acuity AdobeInc AdvAuto AMD AffilMgrs Agilent AirProd AkamaiT AlaskaAir Albemarle AlexREE Alexion lf AlignTech Allegion Allergan AlliData AlliantEg s Allstate Alphabet C Alphabet A Altria Amazon Ameren AmAirlines AEP AmExp AmIntlGrp AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen Amphenol Anadarko AnalogDev Ansys Anthem Aon plc Apache Apple Inc ApldMatl ArchDan Arconic AristaNetw Assurant ATMOS Autodesk AutoData AutoZone AvalonBay AveryD BB&T Cp

.55f 1.08f 2.04 1.28 4.28

14 18.52 11.25 18.02 -.25 -1.4 15 50.66 41.45 49.51 +.51 +1.0 6 36.39 26.80 32.20 +.36 +1.1 47 80.74 56.81 78.01 -.67 -.9 13 107.25 75.77 80.78 -1.60 -1.9 86 459.75 270.25 270.08 -14.83 -5.2 27 179.08 132.63 178.64 +1.95 +1.1 20 84.68 39.85 47.28 -.01 17 173.01 103.48 143.00 +4.01 +2.9 56 277.61 204.95 271.86 +4.41 +1.6 31 186.15 102.15 180.11 +3.33 +1.9 87 34.14 9.52 27.85 -1.13 -3.9 9 179.64 88.47 112.34 -3.19 -2.8 83 82.27 60.42 80.98 -.49 -.6 27 194.30 148.44 194.16 +.97 +.5 42 83.08 57.18 77.05 +2.98 +4.0 17 74.83 53.39 60.63 +2.09 +3.6 13 108.74 71.89 83.66 -2.48 -2.9 32 144.46 109.04 144.35 +.38 +.3 54 141.86 92.56 136.20 -5.00 -3.5 61 398.88 177.93 293.08 -2.80 -.9 ... 95.27 73.85 94.57 -.35 -.4 22 197.00 125.84 144.95 -4.69 -3.1 10 250.27 142.58 180.93 +3.82 +2.2 23 47.91 38.22 46.81 +.07 +.1 14 102.73 77.00 97.01 +.70 +.7 28 1273.89 970.11 1217.87+10.72 +.9 37 1291.44 977.66 1222.73+11.28 +.9 18 66.04 42.40 56.56 +1.79 +3.3 cc 2050.501307.00 1843.06 +5.78 +.3 25 74.91 55.01 71.98 -.41 -.6 11 50.86 28.81 34.69 +.63 +1.8 22 86.10 62.71 84.15 +.58 +.7 15 114.55 89.05 110.91 -.05 dd 56.79 36.16 46.19 +1.14 +2.5 74 198.19 133.53 197.96 +3.10 +1.6 45 107.71 77.73 104.16 -.76 -.7 11 153.15 95.69 142.54 +4.60 +3.3 9 95.00 69.36 74.74 -2.53 -3.3 36 84.87 63.14 85.81 +1.52 +1.8 16 210.19 165.22 191.42 -3.99 -2.0 27 102.97 74.95 103.79 +1.09 +1.1 22 76.70 40.40 61.78+14.77 +31.4 29 112.68 76.62 114.21 +2.75 +2.5 39 190.45 136.80 189.55 +3.72 +2.0 18 317.99 219.34 252.85 -40.46 -13.8 57 175.26 134.82 176.12 +3.53 +2.0 23 50.03 24.56 36.50 +.93 +2.6 20 233.47 142.00 198.87 +1.87 +.9 12 58.40 28.79 42.99 -.05 -.1 18 52.06 39.16 43.38 +.45 +1.0 16 24.07 15.63 20.71 +.60 +3.0 33 325.00 187.08 324.77+13.71 +4.4 47 111.43 82.31 95.84 -.03 19 104.07 82.53 101.19 -.34 -.3 dd 172.11 117.72 171.87 +5.54 +3.3 44 162.71 112.58 163.31 +2.97 +1.9 21 1070.92 590.76 1060.30+11.78 +1.1 34 203.57 156.93 204.08 +1.90 +.9 33 116.35 82.89 116.31 +2.27 +2.0 13 56.03 40.68 49.26 +.89 +1.8

2.92 .37f .52 .24 1.28f .66 4.64f 1.40f 1.47f 3.88 1.08 2.96f 2.52f 1.34 2.00f 3.20 1.90 .40 2.68 1.56 1.28 3.60f 1.82 3.60 1.60 .56 5.80 .92 1.20 2.16f 3.00 1.60 1.00 2.92 .84f 1.40f .08m 2.40 2.10f 3.16 6.08f 2.26 1.62

rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Split increased shares by at least 20% in last year. t Paid in stock. Approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of stock. un Unit, including more than one security. v Trading halted on primary market. vj In bankruptcy or receivership. x Ex-dividend.

j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year. Cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. lf Late filing with SEC. m Current annual rate, decreased by most recent dividend announcement. n New issue in the last year. p Initial dividend. Annual rate not known. Yield not shown. pf Preferred-stock issue. pr Preferences. r Declared or paid in last 12 months plus stock dividend. rs Reverse split decreased outstanding shares by at least 50% in last year.

FOOTNOTES a Extra dividends paid but not included. b Annual rate plus stock dividend. c Liquidating dividend. cc P/E greater than 99 cld Issue recalled for redemption by company. dd loss in last 12 months e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Annual rate, increased on most recent dividend announcement. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Doesn’t meet continued-listing standards. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split.

NAME

DIV

PE

BallCorp s BkofAm BkNYMel Baxter s BectDck BerkH B BestBuy Biogen BlackRock BlockHR Boeing BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BrMySq BrownFB s CBOE Glb CBRE Grp CBS B CF Inds s CH Robins CME Grp CMS Eng CSX CVS Health CabotO&G Cadence CampSp CapOne CardnlHlth CarMax Carnival Caterpillar Celanese Celgene Centene s CenterPnt CntryLink Cerner ChartCm n Chevron Chipotle ChubbLtd ChurchDwt s Cimarex CinnFin Cintas Cisco Citigroup CitizFincl CitrixSy s Clorox CocaCola CognizTch ColgPalm Comcast s Comerica ConAgra ConchoRes ConocoPhil ConEd

.40 .60 1.12 .76 3.08

30 12 13 37 100 29 23 13 17 10 35 12 40 29 15 34 39 20 12 dd 21 38 34 20 9 36 62 15 7 dd 17 12 13 10 19 15 22 5 33 77 25 cc 17 ... 10 14 32 25 10 10 26 26 88 21 25 20 11 16 17 54 17

2.00f 13.20f 1.00 8.22f .68 3.80 1.64 .66f 1.24 .20 .72 1.20 2.00 3.00f 1.54f .96f 2.00 .28f 1.40 1.60 1.90 2.00 3.44 2.16 1.11 1.00m 4.76f 2.92e .91f .80f 2.24f 2.05f 1.40f 1.80 1.78f 1.40 3.84 1.60f .80 1.72f .84f 2.40f .85 .13p 1.22 2.96f

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

58.95 31.91 58.22 82.25 265.87 224.07 84.37 388.67 557.00 29.81 446.01 54.35 139.41 41.00 63.69 59.58 115.11 51.60 59.59 56.51 101.20 197.08 56.30 77.15 82.15 27.57 65.45 43.98 101.26 66.45 81.67 67.69 161.60 119.29 95.30 74.49 31.42 24.20 67.57 368.02 131.08 721.21 141.59 73.72 103.91 87.46 217.34 55.95 75.24 43.62 116.82 167.70 50.84 83.35 72.61 41.29 101.05 39.43 163.11 80.24 85.87

34.71 22.66 43.67 61.05 208.62 184.75 47.72 216.12 360.79 22.45 292.47 32.46 107.84 27.39 44.30 44.57 87.87 37.45 41.38 36.55 78.83 153.90 42.52 54.36 51.77 20.95 36.03 32.04 69.90 42.17 55.24 45.64 112.06 82.91 58.59 49.56 24.81 11.52 48.78 250.10 100.22 315.77 119.54 44.87 55.62 66.33 155.98 40.25 48.42 27.62 92.15 113.57 41.45 59.47 57.41 30.43 63.69 20.22 93.31 56.75 71.12

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

58.03 -.08 30.17 +1.09 52.81 +1.63 79.32 -1.35 246.71 -4.57 210.56 +5.23 73.57 -1.20 234.50 -7.22 454.35 +9.25 25.79 +.86 379.64 -12.29 44.23 +2.08 137.89 -.49 37.73 -.43 45.57 -1.07 53.27 +.05 96.15 +.30 52.17 +.86 51.58 +1.21 42.58 -.90 90.79 +1.33 172.92 +2.83 54.98 -.13 76.66 +2.24 52.81 -1.25 27.30 +1.13 64.98 +.78 39.81 +1.90 87.83 +1.29 46.79 -.70 74.58 +2.54 53.57 +.50 141.20 +.84 105.30 -.46 94.14 -.66 52.92 -2.92 30.57 -.30 12.12 -.43 62.80 +5.48 356.05 +4.61 119.76 -6.66 712.44 +4.07 139.17 +1.58 73.89 +1.58 70.83 +2.00 87.49 +1.27 207.40 +1.03 56.29 +1.08 67.42 +1.87 35.06 +.48 102.27 +1.29 155.49 -.11 46.74 +.27 74.29 +.09 68.77 +.85 41.30 +.88 80.33 +2.70 29.75 +1.46 113.89 +4.06 67.37 +1.25 84.55 -.26

-.1 +3.7 +3.2 -1.7 -1.8 +2.5 -1.6 -3.0 +2.1 +3.4 -3.1 +4.9 -.4 -1.1 -2.3 +.1 +.3 +1.7 +2.4 -2.1 +1.5 +1.7 -.2 +3.0 -2.3 +4.3 +1.2 +5.0 +1.5 -1.5 +3.5 +.9 +.6 -.4 -.7 -5.2 -1.0 -3.4 +9.6 +1.3 -5.3 +.6 +1.1 +2.2 +2.9 +1.5 +.5 +2.0 +2.9 +1.4 +1.3 -.1 +.6 +.1 +1.3 +2.2 +3.5 +5.2 +3.7 +1.9 -.3

Mutual funds GL: Long Government GR: Global Real Estate GS: Short Government HM: High-Yield Muni HY: High-Yield Bond IB: World Bond IC: Trading-Inverse Commodities ID: Industrials IE: Trading-Inverse Equity IH: World Allocation IP: Inflation-Protected Bond IS: Trading-Miscellaneous JS: Japan Stock LB: Large Blend LC: Trading-Leveraged Commodities LE: Trading-Leveraged Equity LG: Large Growth LO: Long-Short Equity LP: Energy Limited Partnership LS: Latin America Stock LV: Large Value MA: Allocation - 50-70% Equity MB: Mid-Cap Blend MG: Mid-Cap Growth MI: Muni National Intermediate ML: Muni National Long MQ: Miscellaneous Region MR: Miscellaneous Sector MS: Muni National Short MU: Multisector Bond MV: Mid-Cap Value ND: Trading-Inverse Debt NE: Market Neutral NT: Nontraditional Bond PJ: Pacific/Asia ex-Japan Stock RI: Target-Date Retirement RR: Preferred Stock SB: Small Blend SC: Communications SF: Financial SG: Small Growth SH: Health SI: Muni Single State Intermediate SL: Muni Single State Long SN: Natural Resources SP: Equity Precious Metals

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Friday value: Price at which shares can be sold. Year-to-date return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Three-year and five-year annualized return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Objective: Fund’s investment category. 1-yr Rank: On a 1-to-5 scale, with 1 meaning the fund ranks in the top 20% of its category. FUND OBJECTIVES: AL: Allocation - 70-85% Equity AM: Multialternative BB: Commodities Broad Basket BL: Bank Loan BM: Bear Market CA: Allocation - 30-50% Equity CC: Consumer Defense CD: Consumer Cyclical CH: China Region CI: Intermediate-Term Bond CL: Long-Term Bond CR: Multicurrency CS: Short-Term Bond CV: Convertibles DP: Diversified Pacific/Asia EB: Emerging-Markets Bond EE: Equity Energy EI: India Equity EM: Diversified Emerging Markets ES: Europe Stock FA: Foreign Small/Mid-Value FB: Foreign Large-Blend FF: Managed Futures FG: Foreign Large-Growth FQ: Foreign Small/Mid-Blend FR: Foreign Small/Mid-Growth FV: Foreign Large-Value FX: Single Currency GI: Intermediate Government NAME

FRI NAV

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

AB DiversMunicipal 14.35 GlbBdAdv 8.38 -.01 ReltvValA m 5.42 +.05 AMG YacktmanI 20.85 +.11 Akre FocRetail m 41.49 +.43 AllianzGI NFJDivValA m 12.14 +.11 American Century EqIncInv 8.83 +.04 GrInv 33.89 +.25 HeritageA m 19.13 +.25 IntlGrA m 11.67 +.08 SelA m 72.39 +.43 UltraInv 48.72 +.28 American Funds AMCpA m 32.24 +.11 AmrcnBalA m 27.11 +.05 AmrcnHiIncA m 10.23 +.04 AmrcnMutA m 41.30 +.07 BdfAmrcA m 12.79 -.03 CptWldGrIncA m 48.93 +.12 CptlIncBldrA m 61.09 +.06 CptlWldBdA m 19.63 +.04 EuroPacGrA m 52.14 +.06 FdmtlInvsA m 60.00 +.35 GlbBalA m 32.57 +.02 GrfAmrcA m 49.87 +.16 IncAmrcA m 22.41 +.06 IntlGrIncA m 33.15 +.09 IntrmBdfAmrA m13.34 -.02 InvCAmrcA m 38.46 +.15 NewWldA m 66.52 +.05 NwPrspctvA m 44.04 +.21 SmCpWldA m 55.39 +.21 TheNewEcoA m 45.58 -.08 TxExBdA m 13.00 +.01 WAMtInvsA m 46.14 +.16 Angel Oak MltStratIncIns 11.03 Artisan IntlInstl 30.71 -.09 IntlSmMdInv 13.36 +.08 IntlValueInstl 35.35 +.12 SmCpInvs 33.04 +.30 Baird AggrgateBdInstl 10.77 -.01 CorPlusBdInstl 11.11 ShrtTrmBdInstl 9.66 BlackRock AlCpEngyRsInvA m10.46 +.14 EqDivInstl 20.97 -.03 GlbAllcIncInstl 18.84 -.02 GlbAllcIncInvA m18.71 -.03 HYBdInstl 7.61 +.02 LowDurBdInstl 9.54 StrIncOpIns 9.79 +.02 StratMuOpIns 11.61 +.04 TtlRetInstl 11.48 +.01 CGM Rlty 28.16 -.36 Calamos MktNetrlIncIns 13.07 +.02

+2.3 +3.5 +13.4

+1.4 +3.1 +12.1

+2.0 MS +3.5 IB +9.6 LV 2

+9.4

+12.2

+9.4 LV

1

+21.4 +16.4 LG

1

+22.3 +14.1

+10.2

+12.3 +19.2 +24.1 +15.9 +19.4 +20.5

+10.9 +17.0 +14.9 +7.6 +16.4 +19.0

+10.1 +13.6 +10.9 +3.2 +14.1 +15.4

LV LG MG FG LG LG

1 3 2 5 3 1

+15.6 +9.3 +8.5 +10.6 +2.4 +14.8 +9.4 +2.4 +15.7 +15.1 +9.6 +16.6 +9.4 +14.1 +1.4 +13.9 +16.0 +16.9 +18.1 +17.4 +2.6 +12.8

+14.2 +9.2 +8.4 +11.8 +1.8 +10.7 +5.9 +1.5 +9.6 +13.8 +6.2 +16.4 +8.0 +7.9 +.9 +11.9 +11.6 +13.7 +13.5 +16.6 +2.4 +13.5

+11.4 +8.2 +3.7 +9.9 +2.2 +6.9 +4.9 +0.7 +4.8 +11.6 +4.3 +12.9 +6.6 +2.2 +1.2 +10.1 +5.0 +10.1 +8.9 +11.4 +3.5 +10.8

LG MA HY LV CI WS IH IB FG LB IH LG AL FB CS LB EM WS SW LG MI LB

4 2 1 1 3 4 2 4 4 4 3 4 2 3 2 4 1 2 1 5 3 3

+1.4 +12.7 +17.8 +13.4 +26.6

+5.6

+6.6 LV

+3.9 MU

+7.7 +3.5 +6.6 +1.9 +8.2 +4.5 +23.1 +13.7

+2.9 +3.4 +1.5

+2.4 +3.0 +1.8

+16.8 +12.8 +8.2 +8.1 +8.3 +1.8 +2.9 +3.2 +3.3

+3.6 +12.1 +6.1 +5.8 +8.3 +2.0 +3.8 +3.7 +2.4

+11.3 +3.3

4

FG FR FB SG

+2.9 CI +3.1 CI +1.6 CS

1 1 2

-5.9 +9.5 +3.9 +3.6 +4.5 +1.6 +2.5 +4.2 +2.9

EE LV IH IH HY CS NT MI CI

1 3

+8.9

+7.6 LB

5

+4.9

+3.7 NE

4 3

NAME

FRI NAV

Causeway IntlValInstl d 15.38 ClearBridge AggresivGrA m 183.65 LgCpGrI 51.73 Cohen & Steers PrfrdScInc,IncI 13.59 Columbia DivIncIns 22.43 GlbDivOppA m 18.19 SelM/CValA m 10.73 DFA EMktCorEqI 21.43 EMktSCInstl 20.92 EmMktsInstl 28.65 EmMktsValInstl 29.44 FvYrGlbFIIns 10.72 GlbEqInstl 23.25 GlbRlEsttSec 11.62 InflProtSecIns 11.71 IntlCorEqIns 13.26 IntlRlEsttScIns 5.13 IntlSmCoInstl 18.05 IntlSmCpValIns 18.73 IntlValInstl 17.88 ItmGovtFIIns 12.33 LgCpIntlInstl 22.59 OneYearFIInstl 10.30 RlEsttSecInstl 38.57 ShTrmExQtyI 10.75 TAUSCorEq2Instl 18.79 TMdUSMktwdVl 30.25 TwYrGlbFIIns 9.93 USCorEq1Instl 24.06 USCorEqIIInstl 22.18 USLgCo 22.43 USLgCpValInstl 36.52 USMicroCpInstl 21.29 USSmCpInstl 34.64 USSmCpValInstl 34.89 USTrgtedValIns 23.22 USVectorEqInstl 18.68 Davis NYVentureA m 29.15 Delaware Inv ValInstl 21.95 Dodge & Cox Bal 99.76 GlbStk 12.57 Inc 13.65 IntlStk 42.00 Stk 189.66 DoubleLine CorFII 10.81 LowDurBdI 9.99 TtlRetBdI 10.50 TtlRetBdN b 10.49 Eaton Vance AtlntCptSMIDCI 35.98 FltngRtInstl 8.95 Edgewood GrInstl 34.63 FPA Crescent d 33.83 NewInc 9.91 USVal 10.51

SR: Real Estate SS: Muni Single State Short ST: Technology SU: Utilities SV: Small Value TA: Target-Date 2000-2010 TD: Target-Date 2015 TE: Target-Date 2020 TG: Target-Date 2025 TH: Target-Date 2030 TI: Target-Date 2035 TJ: Target-Date 2040 TK: Target-Date 2045 TL: Target-Date 2055 TN: Target-Date 2050 TW: Corporate Bond TV: Tactical Allocation UB: Ultrashort Bond VD: Trading-Leveraged Debt VL: Stable Value VO: Volatility WS: World Stock XM: Allocation - 85+% Equity XO: Infrastructure XQ: Target-Date 2060+ XR: Option Writing XS: Long-Short Credit XP: Emerging-Markets LocalCurrency Bond XY: Allocation - 15-30% Equity. FOOTNOTES b -Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d -Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f -front load (sales charges). m -Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA-not available. p -previous day´s net asset value. s -fund split shares during the week. x - fund paid a distribution during the week. WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.01 +13.0 +1.40 +15.2 +.42 +18.4 +.04 +7.8

+1.6 FV

2

+9.8 +6.7 LG +17.5 +15.4 LG

+7.2

5

+6.2

+6.0 RR

2

+.17 +14.6 +.02 +13.9 +.12 +20.8

+13.1 +11.4 LV 1 +7.1 +3.1 WS 4 +10.2 +7.3 MV 1

+.01 +.05 +.02 -.09

+10.4 +3.7 EM +9.0 +4.4 EM +10.9 +3.7 EM +12.1 +3.5 EM +1.5 +2.0 IB +11.9 +7.7 WS +6.4 +8.2 GR +1.8 +1.8 IP +8.4 +3.4 FB +4.0 +4.8 GR +7.7 +4.0 FQ +6.3 +2.5 FA +9.6 +2.0 FV +.7 +2.1 GI +8.5 +3.1 FB +1.3 +0.9 UB +7.5 +10.1 SR +1.7 +1.8 CS +13.4 +9.8 MB +12.5 +9.2 LV +1.4 +1.1 IB +14.1 +10.7 LB +13.3 +9.6 MB +14.4 +12.1 LB +12.6 +9.0 LV +12.8 +8.0 SB +11.6 +7.9 SB +10.5 +5.9 SV +10.7 +6.4 SV +12.0 +7.8 MV

3 5 3 3 1 3 1 1 4 4 3 4 3 1 2 3 1 1 3 3 3 3 3 1 5 4 3 3 3 4

+.39 +19.0

+13.9

+9.6 LB

5

+.15 +12.6

+11.5

+9.9 LV

2

+.14 +.06 +.07 +.05 +.10 +.09 +.10 -.04 +.09 +.11 +.14 +.17 +.01 +.17 +.16 +.12 +.13 +.08 +.17 +.22 +.21 +.15

+.61 +.09 +.01 +.09 +1.70

+11.5 +11.6 +11.1 +9.6 +1.6 +16.1 +16.2 +3.3 +13.6 +12.3 +13.3 +12.5 +12.6 +1.7 +13.4 +.8 +18.5 +1.7 +17.3 +15.4 +1.0 +17.5 +17.3 +16.7 +14.2 +15.4 +16.7 +16.5 +17.5 +17.1

+10.1 +14.0 +3.8 +13.8 +14.0

+3.0 +.01 +1.9 -.02 +1.9 -.02 +1.8

+11.2 +7.8 +12.8 +6.4 +3.6 +3.0 +9.1 +1.8 +15.4 +10.1 +2.8 +2.6 +2.5 +2.3

+3.1 +2.2 +3.1 +2.8

MA WS CI FV LV

2 4 1 2 2

CI CS CI CI

+.50 +20.6 +.03 +4.4

+15.4 +14.1 MG 2 +5.9 +3.8 BL 2

+.39 +19.5

+21.2 +18.0 LG

+.35 +14.6 +1.2 +.08 +18.9

+9.0 +2.7 +5.3

+6.1 MA 2 +1.9 CS 3 +4.8 LB 3

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

2.28 27 8 .12 68 1.76 21 .20 dd .64 7 10 1.60 26 cc .92 dd .56 27 .20 dd .20 ... 5.00f 14 .80 35 1.40 dd .88 66 .44 dd 1.48a 18 3.44f 21 2.40f 16 4.80 30 14 1.60 11 .64 33 27 3.12 50 2.60f 15 3.44f 52 .96f 56 3.80 12 1.92 21 1.65f 14 .15 14 1.28f 11 3.16 13 3.04 23 2.24 32 70 .72 12 .70 13 3.71 14 .28 38 .76 25 1.44f 17 4.56 21 3.20 8 2.95f 22 .64f cc 3.04f 19 2.16 11 2.12f 26 2.87 24 .10e 29 4.00f 11 1.80 21 6.80 24 .44f 17 47 2.48 dd .16 27 2.12 17 2.50 18 .08 11 .88f 13 3.77f 27 2.71f 40 cc 2.34f 25 18 .56 11 1.88f 36 1.48f 32 1.24f 25 3.88 27 43 1.85 33 1.02f 24 2.80 16 2.28f 31 cc 3.40 35 21 cc 2.00 28 .52 19 2.52 10 .64 23 3.87f 20 4.52f 34 8.20f 25 1.52 15 .88 28 3.40 15 3.80 15 2.40 25

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

144.94 42.50 43.66 96.84 49.08 15.03 106.00 88.08 423.21 29.55 41.98 16.65 16.80 195.55 28.85 34.86 88.59 37.76 67.75 194.63 115.61 359.88 58.09 68.84 292.76 409.33 87.67 78.75 71.99 54.65 152.98 116.73 32.88 169.22 72.89 124.70 193.19 81.59 107.77 72.96 19.37 123.19 103.00 84.85 46.47 103.55 123.97 97.27 213.40 127.43 62.07 73.93 105.14 73.78 108.92 60.36 234.90 33.04 86.50 76.50 39.98 116.49 147.79 18.60 102.17 229.75 74.14 183.58 68.99 442.00 19.99 81.20 118.50 79.91 198.23 42.95 350.91 104.35 133.60 217.31 203.64 106.54 333.74 166.99 75.43 60.22 62.70 46.87 128.95 479.64 191.49 104.20 66.21 126.86 189.46 52.65

143.23 +2.57 +1.8 26.97 -.66 -2.4 42.27 +.20 +.5 87.80 -.79 -.9 26.87 -1.33 -4.7 12.42 +.25 +2.1 35.15 -1.15 -3.2 75.63 +3.48 +4.8 351.14 -14.35 -3.9 15.39 -.46 -2.9 36.25 -.25 -.7 12.65 +.10 +.8 12.75 +.11 +.9 190.85 +.77 +.4 28.07 -.19 -.7 26.64 +.43 +1.6 86.24 +.84 +1.0 26.87 +1.14 +4.4 43.83 -1.81 -4.0 196.15 +3.96 +2.1 94.55 -.51 -.5 283.05 +6.75 +2.4 58.60 +1.47 +2.6 58.54 -2.15 -3.5 190.01 -.94 -.5 406.32 +5.19 +1.3 65.33 -2.71 -4.0 76.43 +1.27 +1.7 70.60 +.06 +.1 54.50 +.81 +1.5 132.70 +4.79 +3.7 115.60 +.64 +.6 31.86 -.29 -.9 129.15 +1.89 +1.5 70.50 +1.48 +2.1 103.33 +1.13 +1.1 188.64 +5.24 +2.9 82.16 +1.42 +1.8 108.48 +2.75 +2.6 40.06 -5.15 -11.4 17.20 +.28 +1.7 122.23 +.61 +.5 99.99 +.99 +1.0 50.37 -.09 -.2 41.71 -1.28 -3.0 85.77 +.33 +.4 97.17 -.62 -.6 95.31 +.67 +.7 168.32+17.64 +11.7 105.90 +1.46 +1.4 54.87 +1.68 +3.2 74.43 +1.37 +1.9 105.06 +1.41 +1.4 72.61 -.09 -.1 101.46 +2.99 +3.0 59.89 +.19 +.3 221.76 +3.19 +1.5 29.39 +.45 +1.6 77.19 +2.30 +3.1 56.95 -1.04 -1.8 40.39 +.88 +2.2 89.88 -.89 -1.0 128.15 +.56 +.4 10.32 -.50 -4.6 87.80 +2.60 +3.1 184.41 +5.72 +3.2 71.31 -.97 -1.3 182.37 -.88 -.5 68.86 382.94 -26.00 -6.4 15.60 +.46 +3.0 78.22 -1.54 -1.9 102.28 +1.37 +1.4 66.96 -.49 -.7 184.24 -1.10 -.6 42.93 +1.19 +2.9 351.26 +5.77 +1.7 97.37 -1.04 -1.1 121.94 +4.67 +4.0 214.93 +.40 +.2 204.24 +3.23 +1.6 90.49 -2.11 -2.3 243.74 +6.28 +2.6 160.71 +2.15 +1.4 45.65 +.65 +1.4 45.35 +.80 +1.8 49.67 +.44 +.9 46.70 +.38 +.8 129.85 +1.61 +1.3 441.53 -7.70 -1.7 185.52 +.72 +.4 90.68 +3.88 +4.5 55.51 +.34 +.6 118.34 +1.80 +1.5 155.97 -5.24 -3.3 52.50 +.85 +1.6

SwstAirl StanBlkDk Starbucks s StateStr Stryker SunTrst Symantec Synchrony Synopsys Sysco TE Connect TJX TakeTwo Tapestry Target Technip Teleflex TexInst Textron ThermoFis 3M Co Tiffany Torchmark TotalSys TractSupp TransDigm Travelers TripAdvis Twitter Tyson UDR UltaBeauty UndrArm s UnAr C wi UnionPac UtdContl UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp UtdTech UtdhlthGp UnivHlthS UnumGrp VF Corp ValeroE VarianMed Ventas Verisign Verisk VerizonCm VertxPh ViacomB Visa s Vornado VulcanM WEC Engy Wabtec WalMart WalgBoots WsteMInc Waters Wellcare WellsFargo Welltower WDigital WstnUnion WestRck Weyerhsr Whrlpl WmsCos WillisTwW Wynn XcelEngy Xilinx Xylem YumBrnds ZimmerBio ZionsBcp Zoetis

.64 2.64 1.44 1.88 2.08 2.00 .30 .84

12 32 35 11 33 11 11 9 41 27 11 13 cc 20 13 14 38 21 11 35 30 30 7 25 29 31 15 68 88 13 53 34 38 dd 21 10 19 10 12 21 18 17 2 26 24 36 55 41 42 7 28 6 53 42 26 25 24 58 10 22 33 32 11 17 19 10 12 21 dd 11 42 19 24 68 34 36 24 13 47

64.02 158.47 76.07 104.33 199.85 75.08 29.20 36.32 119.23 75.98 102.65 113.28 139.91 55.50 90.39 34.39 307.07 118.48 72.87 281.03 221.69 141.64 89.62 100.39 103.01 469.01 139.26 69.00 47.79 72.42 45.84 355.73 24.96 23.28 172.44 97.85 125.09 181.66 55.56 144.15 287.94 142.22 49.33 97.00 126.98 142.50 65.70 190.48 136.99 61.58 195.81 34.44 159.30 77.59 133.59 80.05 115.40 106.21 86.31 104.80 255.21 324.99 59.53 79.41 92.30 21.37 67.01 38.39 167.54 32.22 187.91 202.48 57.51 133.07 82.44 101.39 134.55 59.19 103.33

53.13 -.12 146.17 +3.38 76.65 +1.62 71.03 +2.46 192.67 -2.57 62.87 +1.22 23.96 +.97 33.00 +.69 118.19 +1.60 69.01 +1.87 87.95 +1.68 53.97 -.14 94.11 -.42 32.57 -1.68 80.73 -.21 24.67 -.51 305.13 +2.85 116.76 +3.13 51.64 +.18 280.65 +4.16 217.42 +2.01 106.18 -1.32 86.84 +1.52 99.22 +1.79 104.25 +3.12 463.38 +.60 137.72 +1.32 52.59 -.31 34.37 -.35 70.84 +1.04 45.80 +.52 344.83 -8.80 21.86 +.03 19.69 +.05 169.50 +.78 85.49 +.58 114.46 +.13 126.74 +3.40 50.22 +.52 135.30 +1.58 223.22 -25.56 132.80 -1.92 37.08 +2.14 90.71 +1.54 88.41 +1.72 141.50 +.74 62.03 -1.15 189.60 +.36 136.98 +1.46 58.74 +.25 182.78 -6.11 30.29 +.51 159.64 +1.99 68.34 -1.23 122.15 +1.94 77.82 -.40 76.78 +.54 101.56 +2.73 53.45 -1.24 101.79 -.41 250.88 -1.45 270.34 -12.88 46.49 -2.29 76.47 -.27 51.83 -.21 19.11 -.28 39.54 -.35 27.17 -.22 139.88 +3.77 28.94 -.17 180.72 +2.64 143.78 +2.84 55.87 +.16 134.41 +5.33 82.37 +2.03 101.40 +1.44 127.92 +.71 48.42 +.85 101.67 -.45

190.53 -2.77 -1.4 292.94 +3.50 +1.2 35.01 +.32 +.9 241.95 -3.92 -1.6 11.20 -.06 -.5 128.87 -.23 -.2 166.07 +2.80 +1.7 45.35 +1.80 +4.1 124.42 +.44 +.4 65.98 +.53 +.8 131.63 +.04 116.50 -1.73 -1.5 54.54 -1.41 -2.5 161.46 -3.57 -2.2 58.05 +.32 +.6 51.24 +.84 +1.7 33.48 +1.28 +4.0 106.28 +3.83 +3.7 122.73 +.32 +.3 76.21 +1.26 +1.7 30.02 +.54 +1.8 28.00 +.39 +1.4 34.30 -.40 -1.2 130.06+15.06 +13.1 122.38 +.12 +.1 104.45 -1.54 -1.5 76.44 -1.03 -1.3 97.13 +.59 +.6 58.30 +1.06 +1.9 90.45 -.08 -.1 30.86 -.11 -.4 49.29 +.52 +1.1 36.17 -1.67 -4.4 105.31 +6.68 +6.8 83.94 +1.56 +1.9 83.88 +.63 +.8 185.09 +3.38 +1.9 67.13 +3.30 +5.2 191.71 +3.40 +1.8 101.83 +2.40 +2.4 123.06 -3.93 -3.1 72.10 +.96 +1.3 95.24 +.77 +.8 125.06 +1.28 +1.0 463.38 -3.24 -.7 77.45 +1.84 +2.4 290.16 +.81 +.3 167.52 +4.02 +2.5 226.34+10.03 +4.6 70.68 -.40 -.6 49.70 -.20 -.4 125.79 +3.29 +2.7 79.04 +.93 +1.2 102.19 +.55 +.5 80.92 -1.57 -1.9 167.01 -.32 -.2 49.84 +1.50 +3.1 79.97 -.45 -.6 179.10 +3.38 +1.9 69.71 +3.04 +4.6 196.95 +7.05 +3.7 138.11 -.81 -.6 113.16 -.23 -.2 27.66 +.97 +3.6 101.80 -2.97 -2.8 41.37 +.40 +1.0 86.30 -3.56 -4.0 48.97 +1.01 +2.1 41.18 +.65 +1.6 61.90 -1.80 -2.8 9.45 +.20 +2.2 92.71 +8.60 +10.2 87.66 +.93 +1.1 49.13 -1.13 -2.2 35.46 +.58 +1.7 13.70 +.42 +3.2 80.52 +2.22 +2.8 25.78 -.22 -.8 88.95 +.78 +.9 159.38 +4.29 +2.8 174.93 +4.83 +2.8 9.00 -1.01 -10.1 51.58 +1.19 +2.4 39.71 +.77 +2.0 112.81 -2.33 -2.0 65.28 -2.26 -3.3 139.14 +2.24 +1.6 207.84 +5.46 +2.7 304.86 -11.64 -3.7 127.87 -6.21 -4.6 30.86 -.35 -1.1 20.21 +.42 +2.1 31.33 +.36 +1.2 18.52 +.06 +.3 40.22 -.09 -.2 167.84 +3.34 +2.0

HartfdFn 1.20 17 55.16 40.54 51.07 +1.14 +2.3 Hasbro 2.72f 51 109.60 76.84 87.57 +1.01 +1.2 HelmPayne 2.80f dd 74.36 44.56 60.32 +1.92 +3.3 HSchein s 18 71.61 52.04 61.78 -.95 -1.5 Hershey 2.89 25 116.73 89.10 116.11 +.24 +.2 Hess 1.00 dd 74.81 35.59 66.10 +3.10 +4.9 HP Ent n .45e 39 17.88 12.09 16.40 +.25 +1.5 Hilton .60 45 88.69 63.76 88.73 +1.29 +1.5 Hologic dd 48.82 35.10 47.54 +.41 +.9 HomeDp 5.44f 22 215.43 158.09 203.85 +1.79 +.9 HonwllIntl 3.28 46 167.72 123.48 162.47 +.77 +.5 Hormel s .84 22 46.26 34.12 41.15 -.57 -1.4 HostHotls 1.00a 47 22.47 15.94 19.22 -.11 -.6 Humana 2.20f 21 355.88 255.38 253.31 -23.17 -8.4 HuntJB 1.04f 23 131.74 88.38 106.68 +2.00 +1.9 HuntBncsh .56 13 16.53 11.12 13.69 +.38 +2.9 HuntgtnIng 3.44 20 267.73 173.80 219.28 +6.48 +3.0 IdexxLab s 56 256.22 176.11 225.32 -2.45 -1.1 IHS Mark 32 55.99 44.52 55.08 +.31 +.6 IPG Photon 26 261.77 104.64 168.92 +1.89 +1.1 ITW 4.00 28 160.21 117.75 156.40 +4.20 +2.8 Illumina 67 372.61 226.62 338.37+14.87 +4.6 Incyte dd 88.83 57.00 79.40 -5.36 -6.3 IngerRd 2.12 26 113.45 79.63 114.41 +1.81 +1.6 Intel 1.26 21 57.60 42.36 56.42 +.82 +1.5 IntcntlExc s 1.10f 18 82.65 67.70 77.28 +.02 IBM 6.28 14 162.00 105.94 144.35 +1.07 +.7 IntFlav 2.92 36 150.57 121.85 133.51 +1.29 +1.0 IntPap 1.90 16 59.57 37.55 47.76 +.39 +.8 Interpublic .94f 14 25.77 19.61 21.79 +.26 +1.2 Intuit 1.88 47 272.14 168.00 260.06 -1.17 -.4 IntSurg s 85 586.85 400.06 582.85 +7.13 +1.2 Invesco 1.16 9 31.53 15.38 21.32 +.83 +4.1 IronMtn 2.44 32 37.32 30.22 36.53 +.17 +.5 JPMorgCh 3.20 12 119.24 91.11 111.21 +5.90 +5.6 JackHenry 1.60f 40 163.68 116.79 144.12 +2.17 +1.5 JacobsEng .68f 28 82.24 55.17 77.00 +.29 +.4 JohnJn 3.60 22 148.99 118.62 135.98 -.20 -.1 JohnContl n 1.04 25 40.33 28.30 36.08 -.11 -.3 JnprNtwk .76f 14 30.80 23.61 27.80 +.77 +2.8 KLA Tnc 3.00 14 125.50 80.65 123.43 -.91 -.7 KC Southn 1.44f 19 120.34 90.55 118.38 +.99 +.8 Kellogg 2.24 14 74.98 53.14 57.57 +.77 +1.4 Keycorp .56 10 21.91 13.66 16.88 +.29 +1.7 Keysight 96 91.42 50.59 91.84 +2.40 +2.7 KimbClk 4.12 31 124.50 97.10 123.18 +1.26 +1.0 Kimco 1.12 19 18.64 13.16 18.24 -.21 -1.1 KindMorg .80 20 20.44 14.62 19.82 -.23 -1.1 Kohls 2.68f 12 83.28 57.89 69.73 -2.27 -3.2 KraftHnz n 1.60m 9 64.99 31.53 33.07 -.10 -.3 Kroger s .56f 10 32.74 23.25 25.67 +1.77 +7.4 L Brands 1.20m 10 38.62 23.71 25.83 -1.63 -5.9 3.40f 21 223.73 158.76 217.06 +4.28 +2.0 L-3 Tch LKQ Corp 18 39.51 22.74 30.82 +.77 +2.6 LabCp 19 190.36 119.38 157.45 -1.53 -1.0 LamResrch 4.40 19 212.85 122.64 194.08 -1.07 -.5 LambWst n .80 22 83.86 61.78 71.11 -.52 -.7 LeggPlat 1.52 20 46.71 33.48 43.25 -.31 -.7 LennarA .16 10 62.16 37.29 50.97 -.71 -1.4 LincNat 1.48 9 74.17 48.07 64.91 +1.88 +3.0 LockhdM 8.80f 38 361.99 241.18 309.70 +7.12 +2.4 Loews .25 14 53.04 42.06 49.28 +.68 +1.4 Lowes 1.92 26 117.70 81.16 116.26 +1.28 +1.1 LyonBas A 4.00 8 119.39 77.52 92.29 +1.23 +1.4 M&T Bk 4.00 13 188.80 133.78 167.76 +4.54 +2.8 MGM Rsts .48 8 36.80 21.62 27.35 -.09 -.3 MSCI Inc 2.32 39 217.03 134.28 217.99+11.00 +5.3 Macerich 3.00 24 60.95 40.90 43.52 -.70 -1.6 Macys 1.51 8 41.99 22.73 24.28 -1.21 -4.7 MarathnO .20 dd 24.20 12.57 17.76 +.06 +.3 MarathPt s 2.12 9 88.45 54.29 61.59 -1.88 -3.0 MarIntA 1.64 30 142.19 100.62 134.65 +.59 +.4 MarshM 1.66 26 95.43 74.30 94.67 +1.08 +1.2 MartMM 1.92 31 232.88 150.75 212.16 +6.34 +3.1 Masco .48 21 41.76 27.03 40.46 -.17 -.4 MasterCrd 1.32 55 240.93 170.14 238.83 +2.53 +1.1 Mattel .60 97 17.98 9.09 13.60 +.05 +.4 MaximIntg 1.84 25 63.68 46.64 59.30 +1.98 +3.5 McCorm 2.28 22 156.00 99.53 153.86 +1.97 +1.3 McDnlds 4.64 29 191.50 153.13 191.60 +.89 +.5 McKesson 1.56 10 160.84 106.11 116.05 -.65 -.6 Medtrnic 2.00 53 100.15 77.87 86.75 -2.18 -2.5 Merck 2.20 30 83.85 54.56 79.43 -1.72 -2.1 MetLife 1.68 10 48.92 37.76 45.86 +.80 +1.8 MettlerT 51 745.37 500.74 742.35 +7.51 +1.0 Microchp 1.46f 51 104.20 60.70 95.36 +2.44 +2.6 MicronT 3 64.66 28.39 42.01 -1.31 -3.0 Microsoft 1.84 28 120.85 90.28 120.95 +1.06 +.9 MidAApt 3.84 20 111.10 87.47 110.16 +1.26 +1.2 Mohawk 10 247.13 109.35 132.13 +.54 +.4 MolsCoorB 1.64 10 74.25 54.17 59.98 -.65 -1.1 Mondelez 1.04 13 50.05 37.42 49.79 +.11 +.2 MonstrBv s 30 66.38 47.61 53.02 +.14 +.3 Moodys 2.00f 28 188.51 129.26 187.11 -.13 -.1 MorgStan 1.20 10 55.64 36.74 46.69 +1.79 +4.0 Mosaic .10 42 37.37 24.06 26.80 -1.12 -4.0

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FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR Federated InsHYBdIns d 9.82 +.05 +9.0 +7.7 +5.0 HY 1 StratValDivIns 5.78 -.01 +11.6 +6.0 +7.9 LV 2 TtlRetBdInstl 10.70 -.01 +3.5 +2.9 +2.9 CI 2 Fidelity 500IdxInsPrm 101.04 +.56 +16.7 +14.4 +12.2 LB 1 AsstMgr20% 13.25 +.01 +4.8 +4.3 +3.4 XY 3 AsstMgr50% 17.94 +.04 +9.5 +7.5 +5.6 CA 3 AsstMgr70% 21.86 +.07 +12.4 +9.5 +6.8 MA 5 BCGrowth 100.87 +.59 +20.1 +20.5 +16.2 LG 1 BCGrowth 15.22 +.09 +20.0 +22.0 +17.1 LG 1 BCGrowthK 101.02 +.59 +20.1 +20.7 +16.3 LG 1 Balanced 23.24 +.10 +13.0 +10.5 +8.5 MA 1 BalancedK 23.24 +.10 +13.0 +10.6 +8.6 MA 1 Cap&Inc 10.05 +.07 +12.1 +9.0 +6.1 HY 2 ChinaRegion 36.23 -.09 +22.9 +16.4 +8.6 CH 2 CmdtyStrat 4.87 +.01 +8.2 +1.7 -9.3 BB 3 Contrafund 12.80 +.06 +17.3 +16.8 +13.8 LG 4 ContrafundK 12.80 +.05 +17.3 +16.9 +13.9 LG 4 ConvertibleSecs 28.63 +.19 +14.4 +10.4 +5.5 CV 1 CptlApprec 34.57 +.16 +16.5 +13.0 +11.0 LG 5 DivGro 28.89 +.07 +14.1 +11.3 +9.3 LB 4 DiversIntl 36.17 +.15 +14.3 +6.8 +4.0 FG 3 EmergMketsOpps19.10 +.01 +16.3 +13.3 +5.2 EM 2 EmergingAsia 44.20 +.28 +19.5 +15.2 +8.9 PJ 1 EqDividendInc 24.77 +.03 +13.5 +9.9 +8.3 LV 3 EqIncome 57.35 +.26 +14.3 +11.0 +7.9 LV 1 ExMktIdxInPr x 62.55 -.59 +19.6 +14.6 +9.6 MB 2 FltngRtHiInc 9.55 +.03 +5.3 +5.6 +3.4 BL 1 FourinOneIdx x 45.67 -.08 +13.8 +11.0 +8.1 AL 1 Frdm 2015 12.80 +.01 +8.1 +7.7 +5.8 TD 4 Frdm 2020 16.02 +.02 +9.2 +8.4 +6.2 TE 4 Frdm 2025 14.03 +.02 +10.0 +8.9 +6.7 TG 4 Frdm 2030 17.49 +.02 +11.5 +10.3 +7.5 TH 4 Frdm 2035 14.72 +.02 +13.2 +11.3 +8.1 TI 5 Frdm 2040 10.31 +.02 +13.9 +11.3 +8.1 TJ 4 GlbexUSIdxInsPr 12.85 +.05 +13.1 +9.1 +3.2 FB 2 GlobalexUSIdx 12.54 +.04 +13.2 +9.1 +3.2 FB 2 GrDiscv 37.15 +.30 +19.6 +19.1 +14.3 LG 2 GroCo 17.33 +22.6 +21.9 +16.9 LG 4 GroCo 19.62 +22.5 +21.4 +16.6 LG 4 GroCoK 19.64 +22.5 +21.5 +16.7 LG 4 Growth&Inc 38.22 -.02 +14.9 +12.4 +9.3 LB 4 IntlDiscv 41.71 +.15 +14.4 +7.1 +4.0 FG 5 IntlGr 15.65 +.07 +16.8 +10.0 +6.4 FG 1 IntlIdxInstlPrm x40.84 +.03 +12.6 +8.3 +3.2 FB 2 IntlVal 9.64 +.08 +12.1 +5.1 +1.3 FV 2 InvmGradeBd 11.14 +3.3 +2.8 +2.9 CI 1 InvmGradeBd 7.86 -.01 +3.3 +2.9 +2.7 CI 1 LowPrStk 48.98 -.18 +12.9 +9.8 +7.3 MV 4 LowPrStkK 48.93 -.19 +12.9 +9.9 +7.4 MV 4 Magellan 10.46 +.04 +16.6 +14.3 +12.3 LG 5 MidCapStock 34.97 +.09 +14.7 +12.8 +8.8 MG 5 NasdCmpIdx 103.82 +.60 +20.6 +18.9 +15.9 LG 3 NewMktsInc 15.02 -.08 +6.8 +5.8 +4.3 EB 3 OTCPortfolio 12.07 +.06 +21.3 +21.9 +17.5 LG 3 OTCPortfolioK 12.26 +.07 +21.4 +22.1 +17.7 LG 3 Overseas 46.68 +.31 +14.2 +8.4 +5.6 FG 3 Puritan 21.72 +.06 +11.2 +10.2 +8.6 MA 2 PuritanK 21.70 +.06 +11.2 +10.3 +8.7 MA 2 SCValue 15.15 +.14 +15.3 +9.4 +7.6 SV 3 ShTrmBd 8.60 +1.4 +1.4 +1.2 CS 3 SmCpOpps 13.80 +.03 +19.6 +13.4 +8.5 SB 1 StkSelorAllCp 45.40 +.20 +18.1 +14.3 +10.7 LG 5 TotalBond 10.53 +3.8 +3.2 +3.0 CI 1 TtlMktIdxF x 82.36 +.10 +17.2 +14.5 +11.7 LB 2 TtlMktIdxInsPrm x82.34 +.10 +17.2 +14.5 +11.7 LB 2 USBdIdxF 11.46 -.03 +2.4 +1.7 +2.4 CI 2 USBdIdxInsPrm 11.47 -.02 +2.4 +1.7 +2.4 CI 2 Value 10.56 +.11 +21.4 +9.6 +6.9 MV 3 Worldwide 26.91 +.12 +16.4 +13.8 +9.3 WS 1 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 30.98 +.06 +17.6 +15.4 +11.7 LG 5 NewInsC m 26.49 +.05 +17.3 +14.5 +10.9 LG 5 NewInsI 31.75 +.07 +17.6 +15.7 +12.0 LG 4 StgInc 12.27 +.02 +5.8 NA NA MU StgIncC m 12.07 +.02 +5.5 +4.3 +2.6 MU 4 StgIncI 12.27 +.02 +5.8 +5.4 +3.6 MU 4 TotalBondI 10.51 -.01 +3.8 +3.1 +3.0 CI 2 Fidelity Select Biotechnology 20.48 -.84 +19.6 +11.0 +11.0 SH 5 ConsumerStaples80.81 +.62 +17.4 +2.8 +5.8 CC 1 Energy 40.28 +1.09 +21.9 +3.0 -4.2 EE 2 HealthCare 23.84 -.95 +8.1 +12.7 +12.3 SH 3 MedTech&Devcs 52.96 -.60 +12.0 +21.1 +19.0 SH 1 NaturalRes 27.23 +.69 +21.1 +3.2 -4.7 EE 1 Swre&ITSvcs x 17.87 -1.66 +21.5 +25.5 +19.5 ST 1 Technology 16.72 +.18 +24.6 +24.4 +18.5 ST 5 First Eagle GlbA m 56.84 +.07 +11.7 +7.3 +5.3 IH 3 Franklin Templeton CATxFrIncA1 m 7.40 +.02 +3.3 +2.6 +4.3 MC 1 FdrTFIncA1 m 11.76 +.02 +2.5 +1.8 +3.1 ML 4 GlbBdA m 11.55 +.06 +3.7 +4.8 +1.9 IB 2 GlbBdAdv 11.50 +.06 +3.8 +5.0 +2.2 IB 2 Gr,IncA m 22.95 +.02 +10.7 +7.2 +1.9 WS 5 GrA m 106.73 +.94 +18.6 +16.2 +13.3 LG 3 IncA1 m 2.35 +.01 +11.8 +9.0 +4.2 CA 1 IncAdv 2.33 +.01 +11.9 +9.1 +4.4 CA 1 IncC m 2.38 +.01 +11.4 +8.4 +3.7 CA 1 MsrTxFrIncA1 m 11.59 +.02 +2.7 +2.0 +3.0 SL 1 MutBeaconA m 15.58 +.07 +13.4 +11.0 +7.0 WS MutBeaconC m 15.58 +.07 +13.1 +10.1 +6.2 WS MutBeaconZ 15.74 +.07 +13.4 +11.2 +7.3 WS MutEuropeanC m19.95 +.24 +12.6 +6.1 +1.2 ES MutGlbDiscvA m30.03 +.25 +13.0 +8.2 +4.6 WS MutGlbDiscvZ 30.67 +.26 +13.0 +8.5 +4.9 WS MutZ 27.46 +.28 +12.0 +8.7 +5.7 XM RisingDivsA m 64.48 +.01 +16.9 +13.2 +10.2 LB 1 UtlsA1 m 20.28 +.03 +12.5 +9.7 +9.9 SU 1 GE RSPUSEq 53.52 +.26 +16.2 +14.7 +11.0 LB 1 Gabelli SmCpGrAAA m 55.08 +.43 +16.8 +10.9 +7.1 SB 3 Goldman Sachs SmCpValA m 49.84 +.43 +16.7 +11.7 +7.4 SB 3 Guggenheim MgdFutsStratP b18.24 +.03 +3.2 -3.0 +0.4 4 Harbor CptlApprecInstl 74.64 +.31 +20.5 +19.4 +15.8 LG 3 Harding Loevner IntlEqInstl d 22.00 -.09 +13.9 +10.3 +5.6 FG

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR Hartford CptlApprecA m 35.76 +.30 +18.8 +13.6 +9.9 LB 1 Heartland SelValInv m 25.79 +.17 +13.7 +13.2 +8.1 MV 1 Hodges Retail m 39.24 +.30 +32.1 +8.8 +5.5 MG 5 INVESCO ComStkA m 24.77 +.18 +15.6 +12.7 +8.0 LV 5 DiversDivA m 19.68 +.11 +13.3 +7.1 +7.7 LV 2 EqandIncA m 10.20 +.08 +12.3 +9.2 +6.6 MA 5 HYMuniA m 10.05 +.01 +3.8 +4.2 +6.1 HM 1 IntlGrA m 32.64 +.08 +16.6 +5.6 +3.2 FG 2 IVA WldwideI d 17.36 +.10 +9.0 +6.7 +4.1 IH 4 Ivy GlbGrA m 44.13 +.13 +15.7 +10.6 +6.3 WS 2 JPMorgan CPBondR6 8.21 -.01 +3.3 +2.8 +3.1 CI CoreBondI 11.46 -.02 +2.5 +1.9 +2.5 CI CoreBondR6 11.47 -.02 +2.7 +2.0 +2.6 CI EqIncI 17.87 +.09 +12.7 +12.6 +10.3 LV HighYieldR6 7.27 +.04 +8.3 +7.5 +4.1 HY MCapValA m 38.19 +.26 +17.6 +9.3 +8.3 MB MCapValL 39.12 +.27 +17.7 +9.9 +8.8 MB USLCpCrPlsI 27.67 +.21 +15.4 +13.7 +10.7 LB USRsrchEnhEqR6 27.38 +.16 +15.8 +14.1 +10.8 LB Janus Henderson BalancedT 33.99 +.18 +9.6 +11.4 +8.3 MA EnterpriseT 132.73 +1.42 +21.2 +18.7 +14.9 MG FlexibleBondT 10.12 -.01 +3.0 +1.8 +2.0 CI GlobalLifeSciT 56.46 -1.73 +13.7 +13.0 +13.4 SH John Hancock BdR6 15.63 -.02 +4.1 +3.5 +3.3 CI DiscpValI 20.09 +.07 +12.2 +11.2 +8.0 LV 5 DiscpValMCI 20.66 +.22 +17.9 +10.3 +9.2 MB 4 DiscpValR6 20.12 +.07 +12.2 +11.3 +8.1 LV 5 FdmtlLgCpCorA m44.90 +.39 +21.3 +13.1 +10.4 LB 5 IntlGrI 27.39 +15.6 +10.6 +7.7 FG 3 MltMgLsBlA b 14.35 +.03 +11.0 +8.4 +5.7 MA 4 MltmgrLsGr1 b 14.92 +.04 +13.4 +10.0 +6.8 AL 4 Lazard EMEqInstl 17.97 +.02 +11.9 +8.8 +1.3 EM 4 GlbLtdInfrsIns 14.81 +.01 +10.2 +10.4 +11.3 XO 3 IntlStratEqIns 14.71 +.02 +14.1 +7.5 +3.7 FG 2 Leuthold CorInvmRetail d 18.33 -.05 +5.2 +5.6 +4.9 TV 4 Loomis Sayles BdInstl 13.56 +.06 +6.2 +5.2 +2.6 MU 4 GrY 16.98 +.14 +18.7 +17.8 +15.6 LG 2 Lord Abbett AffiliatedA m 14.87 +.11 +12.5 +11.8 +8.8 LV BdDebA m 7.92 +.02 +7.4 +7.5 +4.9 MU FltngRtF b 8.94 +.03 +4.4 +5.3 +3.7 BL ShrtDurIncA m 4.18 -.01 +2.3 +2.8 +2.1 CS ShrtDurIncC m 4.21 +1.9 +2.1 +1.5 CS ShrtDurIncF b 4.18 +2.1 +2.8 +2.2 CS ShrtDurIncI 4.18 +2.1 +2.9 +2.3 CS MFS GrA m 106.16 +.61 +20.2 +18.6 +14.8 LG 1 GrI 113.16 +.65 +20.3 +18.9 +15.1 LG 1 InstlIntlEq 25.47 +.07 +13.8 +10.2 +4.9 FG 2 TtlRetA m 18.85 +.08 +10.3 +7.3 +6.4 MA 2 ValA m 40.63 +.31 +15.4 +10.7 +9.1 LV 2 ValI 40.86 +.31 +15.5 +10.9 +9.4 LV 2 Mairs & Power BalInv 95.00 +.15 +10.1 +8.4 +6.9 MA 1 GrInv 123.08 +.71 +15.6 +11.6 +9.7 LB 1 MassMutual SelectMdCpGrI 22.89 +.27 +21.2 +16.3 +13.5 MG 2 Matthews AsianGrIncInv 15.68 -.02 +12.6 +5.9 +2.9 PJ 1 ChinaInv 18.54 -.05 +29.0 +19.5 +10.1 CH 4 Meridian ContrarianLgcy d 36.72 +.04 +18.8 +17.1 +11.3 MG 5 GrLegacy d 40.11 +.03 +21.0 +17.5 +12.6 SG 3 Metropolitan West TtlRetBdI 10.61 +3.0 +2.1 +2.5 CI TtlRetBdM b 10.61 +2.9 +1.8 +2.3 CI TtlRetBdPlan 9.99 +.01 +3.0 +2.2 +2.6 CI Northeast Investors NorthstInvTrust 4.32 -.06 +2.1 +9.7 -1.9 HY 5 Northern IntlEqIdx d 12.15 +.04 +12.9 +8.2 +3.0 FB 2 StkIdx 33.61 +.19 +16.6 +14.3 +12.0 LB 1 Nuveen HYMuniBdA m 17.42 +.03 +4.8 +5.2 +6.9 HM HYMuniBdI 17.42 +.03 +4.8 +5.4 +7.1 HM IntermDrMnBdI 9.30 +.01 +2.8 +2.6 +3.4 MI 1 Oakmark EqAndIncInv 30.05 +.27 +11.8 +9.3 +5.9 MA 5 IntlInv 23.73 +.35 +16.0 +9.5 +2.6 FB 5 Inv 80.64 +.88 +18.1 +14.2 +9.8 LB 5 SelInv 40.88 +.53 +19.5 +8.2 +5.6 LB 5 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCpStrat15.05 +.04 +14.9 +9.3 +6.4 SW 3 LgCpStrats 14.44 +.10 +14.2 +9.1 +7.1 WS 3 StratOpps 7.46 +10.1 +7.2 +4.3 IH Oppenheimer CptlIncA m 10.15 +.01 +6.6 +5.0 +3.7 CA DevMktsA m 44.22 +.42 +15.1 +12.8 +3.8 EM DevMktsY 43.58 +.41 +15.2 +13.1 +4.0 EM GlbA m 89.06 -.01 +19.7 +15.2 +8.9 WS GlbAllcA m 17.67 +.01 +8.4 +5.4 +3.7 IH GoldSpecMnralA m15.55 -.11 +9.0 +2.8 -0.3 SP IntlGrY 40.18 +.23 +15.8 +5.0 +2.4 FG 5 LtdTrmGvtA m 4.34 -.01 +1.0 +.9 +0.9 GS 2 MnStrA m 46.70 +.28 +17.8 +11.7 +10.5 LB 2 Osterweis StrInc 11.11 +.02 +4.2 +6.5 +3.6 HY 5 PGIM Investments TtlRetBdZ 14.31 +.01 +3.8 +3.5 +3.6 CI PIMCO AlAstInstl 11.57 -.01 +6.2 +7.3 +3.1 TV HYInstl 8.85 +.02 +8.5 +7.3 +4.7 HY IBdUSDHI 10.91 +.03 +3.1 +4.4 +5.0 IB IncA m 12.05 +.03 +3.5 +6.1 +5.1 MU IncC m 12.05 +.03 +3.3 +5.3 +4.3 MU IncI2 12.05 +.03 +3.6 +6.4 +5.4 MU IncInstl 12.05 +.03 +3.6 +6.5 +5.5 MU InvtGrdCdtBdI 10.35 +.02 +5.6 +4.8 +4.6 TW

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR LowDrInstl 9.75 +1.5 +1.7 +1.3 CS RlRetInstl 10.89 +.02 +3.4 +2.1 +1.5 IP ShrtTrmIns 9.80 +1.1 +2.6 +1.9 UB TtlRetA m 10.10 +2.6 +2.3 +2.3 CI TtlRetIns 10.10 +2.7 +2.6 +2.7 CI PRIMECAP Odyssey AgrsGr 45.16 +.14 +17.9 +19.4 +15.5 MG 5 Gr 40.32 +.06 +16.1 +18.2 +14.4 LG 5 Stk 33.13 +.29 +15.2 +15.1 +12.1 LB 4 Parnassus CorEqInv 45.25 +.43 +16.3 +13.7 +11.5 LB 1 Pioneer Am 28.46 +.29 +15.2 +14.1 +11.1 LB 1 CorEqA m 18.89 +.22 +18.6 +14.0 +10.3 LB 4 Putnam DiversIncA m 6.92 +.02 +5.7 +7.0 +2.3 NT 4 EqIncA m 24.34 +.28 +15.4 +12.4 +9.3 LV 2 GlbUtlsA m 12.92 -.02 +10.5 +7.8 +5.6 SU 5 IncA m 6.90 +3.4 +4.0 +2.3 CI 3 SustLeadersA m 89.84 +.75 +20.6 +19.1 +14.0 LG 2 Royce LowPricedStkSvc m7.23 -.02 +14.2 +10.4 +2.6 SB 4 SmlrCoGrSvc m 7.84 +.01 +17.2 +12.3 +7.2 SG 4 SpecEqInvm d 19.54 +.16 +12.1 +11.8 +6.0 SV 1 Schwab FdmtlUSLgCIdx 16.78 +.07 +15.3 +12.0 +9.8 LV 2 HC 24.11 -.55 +5.1 +9.3 +10.6 SH 3 IntlIdx 19.73 +.05 +12.5 +8.2 +3.1 FB 2 SP500Idx 44.69 +.25 +16.7 +14.4 +12.1 LB 1 Schwab1000Idx 65.30 +.39 +17.1 +14.3 +11.7 LB 2 TtlStkMktIdx 51.06 +.29 +17.2 +14.4 +11.6 LB 2 Segall Bryant & Hami PlusBdRtl 10.53 +2.9 +2.7 +2.8 CI 2 State Farm Gr 82.85 +.66 +13.7 +11.5 +9.2 LB 1 T. Rowe Price BCGr 114.03 +.13 +18.7 +20.9 +16.6 LG 2 Comm&TeInv 115.14 +1.47 +23.1 +20.5 +16.4 SC 1 CptlAprc 30.01 -.02 +12.9 +11.7 +10.7 MA DivGr 47.62 +.18 +15.2 +14.0 +12.2 LB 1 EMBd 11.66 -.04 +7.4 +5.7 +4.3 EB EMStk 44.03 +.16 +17.5 +14.1 +7.0 EM 2 EmergEurope 14.84 +.37 +14.4 +9.3 -0.5 MQ 4 EqIdx500 77.48 +.43 +16.6 +14.2 +11.9 LB 2 EqInc 30.87 +.09 +13.7 +11.5 +7.6 LV 4 FinclSvcs 25.81 +.31 +14.5 +16.4 +10.2 SF 1 GrStk 67.93 +.19 +18.9 +19.1 +15.4 LG 3 HY 6.52 +.01 +7.6 +7.3 +4.1 HY HlthSci 75.90 -2.61 +13.3 +14.0 +14.8 SH 2 InsLgCpGr 41.82 -.04 +17.1 +22.7 +16.9 LG 2 InsMdCpEqGr 58.34 +.71 +20.8 +17.1 +14.5 MG 2 InsSmCpStk 24.47 +.15 +20.5 +17.5 +11.5 SG 2 IntlDiscv 63.48 +.13 +14.4 +10.5 +7.5 FR 3 IntlStk 17.33 +.06 +15.8 +9.3 +5.3 FG 2 IntlValEq 13.47 +.02 +11.6 +3.9 +0.2 FV 4 LatinAmerica 23.87 -.76 +8.5 +11.2 +0.9 LS 2 MdCpGr 91.60 +1.09 +19.9 +16.3 +13.8 MG 2 MdCpVal 27.75 +.22 +13.7 +9.6 +8.4 MV 4 NewHorizons 59.28 +.41 +23.0 +23.8 +16.2 MG 1 NewInc 9.35 +.01 +3.0 +2.0 +2.4 CI OverseasStk 10.48 +.02 +12.7 +8.2 +3.5 FB 4 QMUSSmCpGrEq 37.49 +.20 +20.3 +16.3 +12.1 SG 3 RlEstt 29.07 +.10 +18.1 +4.7 +8.2 SR 5 Rtr2015 14.15 +8.8 +7.7 +5.8 TD Rtr2020 21.50 -.01 +10.1 +8.8 +6.5 TE Rtr2025 17.15 -.01 +11.1 +9.7 +7.1 TG Rtr2030 25.02 -.02 +12.2 +10.5 +7.6 TH Rtr2035 18.37 -.02 +13.0 +11.2 +8.0 TI Rtr2040 26.19 -.04 +13.7 +11.7 +8.3 TJ Rtr2045 17.86 -.03 +14.1 +11.9 +8.4 TK Rtr2050 15.06 -.03 +14.1 +11.9 +8.4 TN SciandTech 40.35 +.46 +28.5 +24.1 +18.4 ST 3 ShrtTrmBd 4.68 +1.4 +1.6 +1.2 CS 3 SmCpStk 49.73 +.30 +20.5 +17.2 +11.2 SG 2 SmCpVal 46.69 +.30 +17.2 +14.1 +8.2 SB 2 SpectrumInc 12.32 +4.9 +4.4 +3.2 MU SummitMnIntrInv11.89 +2.5 +1.8 +2.8 MI 3 TFInc 10.03 +.01 +2.5 +2.1 +3.5 ML 4 Val 35.02 +.10 +14.6 +10.9 +8.8 LV 3 TCW EMIncIns 8.17 -.04 +7.9 +7.2 +4.2 EB TtlRetBdI 9.75 -.02 +2.1 +1.8 +2.5 CI TIAA-CREF BdIdxIns 10.70 -.02 +2.4 +1.6 +2.4 CI 2 EqIdxIns 21.32 +.13 +17.1 +14.5 +11.7 LB 2 IntlEqIdxIns 19.05 +.05 +12.5 +8.3 +3.3 FB 2 LgCpGrIdxIns 32.66 +.19 +19.5 +17.5 +14.9 LG 2 LgCpValIdxIns 19.74 +.12 +14.7 +11.2 +8.8 LV 2 Thornburg LtdTrmMnI 14.32 +1.5 +1.2 +1.7 MS 1 Thrivent LgCpStkA m 25.89 +.12 +13.9 +10.8 +7.5 WS MidCpStkA m 23.76 +.20 +17.1 +16.8 +12.1 MB MnBdA m 11.20 +.01 +2.5 +1.7 +3.1 ML Torray Torray 49.22 +.44 +13.8 +8.5 +7.5 LV 3 Tweedy, Browne GlbVal d 27.54 +.05 +10.7 +8.8 +4.6 FV 1 USAA Gr 30.74 +.24 +19.1 +16.2 +14.1 LG 2 Inc 12.91 +3.9 +3.5 +3.1 CI 1 PrcMtlsMnral 12.56 -.11 +7.7 -1.6 -2.7 SP 1 TEIntermTrm 13.34 +.01 +2.6 +2.3 +3.1 MI 1 VALIC Co I StkIdx 41.37 +.23 +16.6 +14.1 +11.8 LB 2 Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl 268.51 +1.49 +16.7 +14.4 +12.1 LB 1 500IdxInv 268.51 +1.49 +16.6 +14.3 +12.0 LB 1 BalIdxAdmrl 36.44 +.11 +11.2 +9.4 +8.1 MA 1 BalIdxIns 36.44 +.10 +11.1 +9.4 +8.1 MA 1 CAITTxExAdm 11.80 +.01 +2.4 +2.1 +3.2 MF 1 CptlOppAdmrl 153.49 +.51 +16.3 +18.2 +14.4 LG 4 DevMIdxAdmrl 13.45 +.05 +12.9 +8.4 +3.5 FB 2 DevMIdxIns 13.47 +.05 +13.0 +8.4 +3.5 FB 2 DivGrInv 28.14 +.09 +15.1 +12.9 +11.4 LB 1 EMStkIdxInAdm 36.25 -.01 +14.4 +10.7 +3.9 EM 2 EMStkIdxIns 27.56 -.01 +14.3 +10.7 +3.9 EM 2 EngyAdmrl 96.17 +.84 +18.5 +6.3 -2.4 EE 1 EqIncAdmrl 74.69 +.28 +13.2 +11.8 +10.3 LV 2 EqIncInv 35.64 +.14 +13.2 +11.7 +10.2 LV 2 ExplorerAdmrl 94.25 +.65 +21.2 +18.6 +11.4 SG 2 ExtMktIdxAdmrl 90.33 +.58 +19.7 +14.6 +9.6 MB 2

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3.00f .06 .80f 2.28 .50 4.50 4.56 .50 3.78f .76 .68f 3.00 3.04 1.40 .35 .32 .50 4.32f 1.60

1.76f 1.28f 3.67f 1.92 .70p 3.71 .86 .56 .14p .88 2.48f 2.84f 1.84 2.45 2.58f 1.96f 3.64 1.56 9.84f 2.27f 7.80f 1.72f 5.60 2.14 1.45f 1.28 .90f 3.44 3.28 .68f 1.60 1.72 2.60 4.08 1.40f .88 .72 1.52 .76 .84 1.52f .60a .28 .88f 1.04 .20 1.72f .97 2.12 4.08f .04 1.96 1.52 2.88 2.52f .04 3.20f 5.44 1.60f 1.48 .64 .72 .60 1.50f 2.74

12 92 dd 37 ... 96 46 11 22 73 33 22 13 16 10 dd 21 16 59 10 15 14 11 17 18 14 16 20 ... 22 24 18 8 dd 11 19 39 14 64 23 dd 23 42 22 cc 49 51 55 9 23 20 57 23 25 15 22 27 15 34 26 11 24 21 10 21 9 37 cc 30 34 8 53 ... 17 12 9 31 11 25 48 18 dd 15 dd 24 10 47 8 22 19 17 6 17 9 14 30

236.62 302.36 36.56 247.09 18.56 130.60 172.08 46.91 126.07 96.75 134.50 124.00 79.11 167.82 61.32 51.13 46.54 140.78 125.10 80.36 34.89 31.55 39.66 120.20 123.50 106.90 77.50 97.65 60.52 91.67 31.07 66.46 43.00 133.53 110.17 89.46 183.41 71.00 197.86 151.26 132.13 79.70 96.87 138.69 467.99 76.92 294.61 168.32 261.89 72.26 50.85 139.77 79.25 102.78 87.36 199.71 63.88 81.01 218.62 69.20 266.67 139.29 115.56 34.67 106.75 42.13 91.19 56.86 62.08 68.00 12.15 94.37 88.34 59.61 35.41 19.70 81.09 34.21 89.33 161.21 229.74 15.59 51.96 45.00 115.20 79.61 139.40 262.50 372.06 147.42 32.23 27.08 54.91 22.57 46.79 175.50

150.37 217.15 26.11 182.17 5.91 98.85 124.40 32.39 94.25 49.19 94.59 84.37 48.25 128.32 45.08 33.93 20.37 85.19 100.05 54.36 20.60 19.25 23.22 97.68 86.87 78.78 61.53 65.83 54.30 71.96 24.67 40.41 26.01 82.04 67.40 64.46 135.77 45.50 123.00 73.91 76.33 55.39 75.45 88.68 335.29 59.29 226.22 121.47 201.09 52.76 37.45 105.87 61.24 83.70 64.65 139.68 40.52 60.10 123.02 47.37 150.94 110.66 93.87 22.12 79.42 32.93 68.43 35.88 29.78 40.02 7.41 53.40 62.89 35.27 27.34 9.60 64.54 24.25 57.01 114.40 143.87 6.66 36.42 30.56 86.89 60.32 94.81 151.70 265.00 93.03 21.80 18.46 24.70 11.57 31.36 123.24

104.55 26.00 29.85 75.49 24.27 8.23 29.22 54.50 231.23 14.73 29.06 10.65 10.85 155.06 23.23 20.53 64.99 17.11 42.54 128.74 75.96 223.63 39.36 49.79 124.46 217.64 56.83 65.85 50.26 42.40 108.45 94.37 25.30 86.46 53.43 77.90 140.82 59.55 70.22 35.30 13.66 95.94 70.83 36.28 34.37 64.67 78.44 73.41 119.08 84.59 40.42 55.21 70.73 56.71 75.61 49.02 192.02 20.64 54.74 48.56 27.90 78.95 95.63 9.22 69.11 144.27 48.80 115.31 55.38 281.89 12.39 64.13 90.64 52.79 141.46 32.08 245.59 75.91 89.48 156.68 146.13 76.77 177.70 113.60 34.99 37.83 35.38 30.22 100.49 355.28 145.78 60.12 40.34 91.32 135.29 42.42

1.56 1.76 .92f 1.35 2.56 .13 1.36 3.08 .08 .76f 5.76f 2.20 .69f .52 1.24 24.00 3.08f

1.50 1.37f

3.52f 3.84f 1.48 2.94 3.60 .40 1.04 2.04 3.60f 3.17 .25p 2.41 .80 1.00 2.64f 1.24f 2.21 .48 2.12f 1.76 2.05f

1.80f 1.68e 2.00 .80f 1.82 1.36 4.60 1.52f 2.60f 3.00 1.62f 1.44 .96f 1.68 .96 1.20 .66

FRI NAME NAV ExtMktIdxIns 90.32 ExtMktIdxInsPls222.90 FAWexUSIAdmr 31.94 FAWexUSIIns 101.25 GNMAAdmrl 10.33 GNMAInv 10.33 GlbEqInv 30.43 GrIdxAdmrl 83.08 GrIdxIns 83.09 GrandIncAdmrl 79.22 HCAdmrl 80.50 HCInv 190.89 HYCorpAdmrl 5.83 HYTEAdmrl 11.41 HiDivYldIdxInv 34.66 InTrBdIdxAdmrl 11.28 InTrInGdAdm 9.65 InTrTEAdmrl 14.15 InTrTrsAdmrl 11.00 InflPrtScAdmrl 25.16 InflPrtScIns 10.25 InsIdxIns 263.18 InsIdxInsPlus 263.20 InsTrgRt2020Ins 22.94 InsTtlSMIInPls 62.85 IntlGrAdmrl 94.27 IntlGrInv 29.63 IntlValInv 36.08 LTInGrdAdm 10.03 LTTEAdmrl 11.61 LfStrCnsrGrInv 19.99 LfStrGrInv 33.90 LfStrModGrInv 27.31 LgCpIdxAdmrl 67.29 LtdTrmTEAdmrl 10.96 MCpGrIdxAdm 63.34 MCpVlIdxAdm 57.92 MdCpIdxAdmrl 205.72 MdCpIdxIns 45.45 MdCpIdxInsPlus 224.13 MorganGrAdmrl103.66 PrmCpAdmrl 137.87 PrmCpCorInv 26.82 PrmCpInv 133.02 RlEstIdxAdmrl 124.82 RlEstIdxInstl 19.32 SCpGrIdxAdm 64.98 SCpValIdxAdm 57.29 STBdIdxAdmrl 10.39 STBdIdxIns 10.39 STBdIdxInsPlus 10.39 STInfPrScIdAdmr24.43 STInfPrScIdIns 24.44 STInfPrScIdxInv 24.40 STInvmGrdAdmrl 10.57 STInvmGrdIns 10.57 STInvmGrdInv 10.57 STTEAdmrl 15.78 STTrsAdmrl 10.49 SeledValInv 26.61 SmCpIdxAdmrl 75.61 SmCpIdxIns 75.60 SmCpIdxInsPlus 218.22 StarInv 26.44 StrEqInv 32.44 TMCapApAdm 149.78 TMSmCpAdm 64.19 TrgtRtr2015Inv 14.87 TrgtRtr2020Inv 31.23 TrgtRtr2025Inv 18.77 TrgtRtr2030Inv 34.32 TrgtRtr2035Inv 21.14 TrgtRtr2040Inv 36.62 TrgtRtr2045Inv 23.06 TrgtRtr2050Inv 37.10 TrgtRtr2055Inv 40.27 TrgtRtrIncInv 13.48 TtBMIdxAdmrl 10.62 TtBMIdxIns 10.62 TtBMIdxInsPlus 10.62 TtInBIdxAdmrl 22.22 TtInBIdxIns 33.34 TtInBIdxInv 11.11 TtInSIdxAdmrl 28.59 TtInSIdxIns 114.32 TtInSIdxInsPlus 114.34 TtInSIdxInv 17.09 TtlSMIdxAdmrl 72.35 TtlSMIdxIns 72.36 TtlSMIdxInv 72.32 TxMgBalAdmrl 32.22 ValIdxAdmrl 42.89 ValIdxIns 42.89 WlngtnAdmrl 70.16 WlngtnInv 40.63 WlslyIncAdmrl 62.98 WlslyIncInv 26.00 WndsrAdmrl 70.99 WndsrIIAdmrl 63.25 WndsrIIInv 35.64 Victory RSPtnrsA m 23.94 Virtus VontobelEMOppI 11.32 WCM FocIntGrIns d 16.25 Weitz ValInv 43.91 sHickory 48.68 Wells Fargo CommonStkA f 20.67 SpMCpValIns 38.79 Western Asset CorBdI 12.58 CorPlusBdI 11.57 CorPlusBdIS 11.57 Mgd Mns A m 16.06 iShares S&P500IdxK 345.24

44.28 106.41 47.37 57.87 144.75 46.05 17.43 21.78 79.14 59.26 69.84 41.49 84.41 30.69 60.15 18.20 226.02 87.70 43.27 202.83 176.87 73.04 69.68 75.58 58.27 302.98 111.08 36.75 26.19 49.77 34.48 206.17 15.91 13.90 126.37 64.80 89.89 94.28 43.14 100.48 221.69 109.37 26.77 67.18 68.81 101.42 46.55 116.15 95.21 46.09 144.07 23.31 118.63 59.48 82.52 58.48 65.09 81.78 53.32 79.96 167.94 190.92 43.02 49.58 33.83 16.42 35.20 20.52 99.40 20.36 134.50 90.06 41.99 62.54 60.65 77.09 96.99 38.08 77.00

-.2 +2.4 +2.2 +3.6 -1.3 +2.0 +4.2 +2.1 +1.4 +2.8 +1.9 -.3 -.4 -4.9 -.3 -2.0 +.9 +2.8 +.3 +1.5 +.9 -1.2 +1.8 +1.8 +3.1 +.1 +1.0 -.6 -1.0 +1.5 +1.1 -2.5 +.1 +.3 +.5 +.7 +.1 +2.8 +1.0 +1.2 -10.3 -1.4 +6.1 +1.7 +2.0 +.5 -1.8 +.2 +1.1 +.4 -3.2 +1.7 +1.3 -1.8 +1.6 -.5 +.7 +2.8 -2.3 -.4 -.6 -4.5 -4.7 -.4 -.4 -1.4 -.9 -.8 +2.8 -.6 +1.5 +2.0 +.3 +4.1 +2.5 +1.4 +.6 +1.8 -.4

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.58 +19.7 +14.6 +9.6 MB 2 +1.43 +19.7 +14.6 +9.6 MB 2 +.09 +13.0 +9.0 +3.5 FB 2 +.26 +13.0 +9.0 +3.6 FB 2 -.02 +1.7 +1.5 +2.4 GI 1 -.02 +1.6 +1.4 +2.3 GI 2 +.11 +16.0 +12.9 +8.4 WS 2 +.70 +20.6 +16.3 +13.8 LG 2 +.70 +20.6 +16.3 +13.9 LG 2 +.39 +16.2 +13.9 +12.1 LB 2 -2.54 +4.7 +7.6 +10.2 SH 4 -6.05 +4.7 +7.5 +10.1 SH 4 +.03 +9.1 +7.0 +4.8 HY 1 +.01 +3.3 +3.6 +4.8 ML 1 +.16 +13.1 +11.5 +10.5 LV 2 -.03 +3.2 +1.8 +2.9 CI 1 -.01 +3.7 +2.5 +3.1 TW 1 +.01 +2.5 +2.2 +3.1 MI 1 -.04 +1.5 +.7 +1.9 GI 1 +2.8 +1.6 +1.6 IP 2 +2.8 +1.6 +1.6 IP 2 +1.46 +16.7 +14.4 +12.1 LB 1 +1.47 +16.7 +14.4 +12.2 LB 1 +.04 +9.1 +7.8 NA TE 2 +.35 +17.2 +14.5 +11.7 LB 2 +.57 +19.0 +15.5 +7.8 FG 2 +.18 +18.9 +15.3 +7.7 FG 2 +.09 +12.4 +8.6 +2.7 FV 1 -.01 +6.1 +3.9 +5.3 TW 3 +.01 +3.1 +2.9 +4.2 ML 1 +.03 +7.6 +6.2 +5.3 CA 2 +.12 +12.8 +10.2 +7.6 AL 2 +.06 +10.1 +8.2 +6.5 MA 3 +.40 +16.8 +14.5 +12.0 LB 1 +1.5 +1.4 +1.5 MS 1 +.54 +23.2 +14.7 +11.7 MG 2 +.52 +18.0 +11.3 +9.2 MV 2 +1.80 +20.7 +13.0 +10.5 MB 1 +.40 +20.7 +13.1 +10.5 MB 1 +1.96 +20.7 +13.1 +10.5 MB 1 +.35 NA NA NA LG +.57 +14.0 +17.7 +14.2 LG 4 +.18 +14.6 +15.7 +13.0 LB 3 +.54 +14.0 +17.6 +14.1 LG 4 +.35 +18.9 +6.3 +9.1 SR 1 +.06 +18.9 +6.3 +9.2 SR 1 +.35 +22.9 +17.1 +10.6 SG 2 +.31 +17.4 +11.8 +8.7 SV 1 -.01 +1.4 +1.3 +1.4 CS 1 -.01 +1.4 +1.3 +1.4 CS 1 -.01 +1.4 +1.3 +1.4 CS 1 +.02 +1.7 +1.4 +0.8 IP 2 +.02 +1.7 +1.4 +0.8 IP 2 +.03 +1.7 +1.3 +0.7 IP 3 -.01 +2.1 +2.0 +2.0 CS 1 -.01 +2.1 +2.1 +2.0 CS 1 -.01 +2.1 +1.9 +1.9 CS 1 +.8 +1.2 +1.0 MS 4 -.01 +.9 +.9 +1.0 GS 1 +.39 +18.4 +9.2 +6.5 MV 5 +.42 +20.0 +14.2 +9.6 SB 1 +.41 +20.0 +14.2 +9.6 SB 1 +1.20 +20.0 +14.2 +9.6 SB 1 +.07 +11.4 +9.6 +7.2 MA 3 +.21 +19.4 +12.3 +9.5 MB 4 +.97 +17.3 +14.8 +12.1 LB 2 +.28 +15.6 +14.1 +10.0 SB 2 +.02 +7.3 +6.5 +5.4 TD 2 +.06 +9.1 +7.7 +6.2 TE 2 +.04 +10.3 +8.6 +6.7 TG 2 +.09 +11.4 +9.4 +7.1 TH 2 +.07 +12.3 +10.2 +7.5 TI 3 +.14 +13.3 +10.9 +7.9 TJ 3 +.10 +14.1 +11.2 +8.1 TK 3 +.14 +14.1 +11.2 +8.1 TN 3 +.16 +14.1 +11.2 +8.0 TL 3 +.02 +6.1 +5.0 +4.3 RI 2 -.02 +2.5 +1.7 +2.4 CI 2 -.02 +2.5 +1.7 +2.4 CI 2 -.02 +2.5 +1.8 +2.4 CI 2 -.01 +2.8 +3.1 +4.0 IB 1 -.02 +2.7 +3.1 +4.0 IB 1 -.01 +2.7 +3.0 +3.9 IB 1 +.09 +13.0 +8.8 +3.5 FB 3 +.34 +13.0 +8.9 +3.5 FB 3 +.33 +13.0 +8.9 +3.5 FB 3 +.05 +13.0 +8.8 +3.4 FB 3 +.41 +17.2 +14.5 +11.7 LB 2 +.41 +17.2 +14.5 +11.7 LB 2 +.41 +17.1 +14.4 +11.6 LB 2 +.11 +9.3 +8.1 +7.4 CA 1 +.14 +13.1 +12.9 +10.4 LV 2 +.14 +13.1 +12.9 +10.4 LV 2 +.23 +10.2 +9.9 +8.1 MA 1 +.13 +10.2 +9.8 +8.1 MA 1 +.10 +7.2 +6.2 +5.9 CA 1 +.04 +7.2 +6.1 +5.9 CA 1 +.75 +15.9 +11.6 +8.1 LV 5 +.16 +14.6 +11.2 +8.4 LV 2 +.09 +14.5 +11.2 +8.3 LV 2 +.19 +18.2

+14.0

+5.4 SB

-.02 +13.7

+9.1

+4.4 EM

1 1

+.21 +15.9

+12.2

+8.7 FG

+.56 +19.7 +.59 +21.2

+10.7 +6.9

+7.2 LG 3 +4.3 MB 2

+.21 +17.6 +.38 +19.5

+12.2 +11.2

+8.2 MB 3 +8.9 MV 2

-.01 +.01 +.01 +.01

+3.9 +4.4 +4.4 +2.6

+1.92 +16.6

+3.1 +3.9 +3.9 +2.2

+3.5 +3.9 +3.9 +3.4

CI CI CI ML

4

+14.4 +12.1 LB

1


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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • D

BLUES ARE HALFWAY HOME

THE CANADIAN PRESS

Blues center Oskar Sundqvist (70) celebrates after scoring against Jets goaltender Connor Hellebuyck during the second period Friday night in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Blues able to overcome the Whiteout

Win again to return with 2-0 series lead BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA • It’s doubtful

anyone saw this coming, including even the Blues. But they did it again Friday, defeating the Winnipeg Jets for the second time in three days at Bell MTS Place. This time it was 4-3, with Ryan O’Reilly providing the game-winner early in the third period, quelling all that White Noise. They’re now halfway home in their Western Conference playoff series, as they head home to St. Louis and Games 3 and 4 at Enterprise Center.

In the process, goalie Jordan Binnington became only the fourth goalie in NHL history to win each of his first two road playoff games. He’s only the second Blues goalie in franchise history to win his first two playoff starts as a rookie. The other was Curtis Joseph, who won his first two postseason starts as a rookie in 1990 against Toronto. The math now favors the Blues. Teams that have started 2-0 in Stanley Cup playoff series are 318-50 in terms of win See BLUES • Page D8

BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA • Their sud-

denly pathetic power play went pointless, netting nothing on four chances. They let nemesis Patrik Laine, the one opponent who can cripple them, find his groove and puff out his chest. From fruitless faceoffs, to a failure to even out the hits, there were more mis-

takes made than white towels distributed at Bell MTS Place. And? They overcame it. Your St. Louis Blues are headed home with a two-game lead over the Winnipeg Jets, and they still have not yet played their best hockey. Craig Berube’s team has now delivered two consecutive body blows to the heavyweight the hockey experts picked to claim this series. The hockey experts got it wrong. The Blues are a better team than the Jets. They have See FREDERICKSON • Page D8

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS • BLUES LEAD SERIES 2-0 > Blues are looking forward to coming back to Enterprise Center. D8

Game 1 Blues 2, Winnipeg 1 GWG: Bozak

Game 2 Blues 4, Jets 3 GWG: O’Reilly

Five are tied for lead in logjam at Augusta Right behind are Woods, D. Johnson

-7 -7 -7 -7 -7 -6 -1 -1 E

> Saturday’s TV • 2 p.m., KMOV (4)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Louis Oosthuizen of South Africa is among the leaders at the Masters at 7-under 137.

Tuesday, 8:30 at Enterprise, FSM, CNBC

*Thursday, TBA at Winnipeg, FSM

*April 20, TBA at Enterprise, TV TBA

> Blue Jackets win to take 2-0 series lead against NHLbest Lightning. D6

*April 22, TBA at Winnipeg, FSM * If necessary

‘It’s going to be awesome’ Cards await loud, buzzing atmosphere in Monterrey

ASSOCIATED PRESS

THE MASTERS LEADERS AFTER TWO ROUNDS Molinari Day Koepka Scott Oosthuizen NOTABLE Woods Reed Spieth McIlroy

Sunday, 6:30 at Enterprise, FSM, CNBC

AUGUSTA, GA. • Tiger Woods ran into the long leg of the law and escaped with a most unlikely birdie. He just couldn’t take the next step — one more birdie on a back nine filled with so many chances — to join the largest 36-hole logjam in Masters history. Golf’s best worked their way to the top Friday at Augusta National to set up a weekend pregnant with possibilities. Francesco Molinari, Jason Day, Brooks Koepka, Adam Scott and Louis Oosthuizen created the first five-way tie for the lead going into the weekend at the Masters. All of them are major champions. Three have been No. 1 in the world. Looming just as large was Woods, who made it look even more crowded at the top by making Augusta National sound as loud as ever. Despite missing two birdie chances inside 8 feet on the back nine, he holed consecutive 30-foot birdie putts for a 4-under 68. One of those big birdies followed a bizarre moment on the See MASTERS • Page D9

MEXICO SERIES Cardinals vs. Reds at Monterrey, Mexico > 6:10 p.m. Sat., FSM > 3:05 p.m. Sun., FSM Plus, ESPN BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MONTERREY, MEXICO • As he rocks back

DERRICK GOOLD • dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Adam Wainwright will start for the Cardinals on Saturday and says he will “try to play off the crowd” at Estadio de Beisbol.

and readies Saturday to throw the first regular-season pitch abroad ever by a Cardinal, starter Adam Wainwright has a sense of how the crowd, crammed into a cozy ballpark on the north side of this metroplex, will already be buzzing, singing, cheering. The festival won’t wait for something to happen. It is what’s happening. “I expect … crazy,” Wainwright said Friday, sitting in the dugout at Estadio de Beisbol Monterrey. “I expect it’s going to be loud and it’s going to be awesome. It’s going to be an experience. Yadi (Molina) and I were talking about it: They’re excited for us to be here, and we’re really excited to play for them. What’s neat: This game travels.” As many things as Molina and Wainwright have shared in their 15 years of double-helix careers with the Cardinals, from titles to All-Star nods, they will do Saturday against Cincinnati what no other Cardinals battery has outside of Canada: go international. The See CARDINALS • Page D5

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1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • D

MAROON BRINGS IT HOME Pietrangelo takes one for the team

Oakville grad’s slow start is far behind him BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Pat Maroon is no stranger to the playoffs. In his five previous full seasons in the NHL, he has made the postseason four times, with Anaheim, Edmonton and New Jersey. Sunday’s Blues game against Winnipeg will be his 50th postseason contest, not a bad run at all for the Oakville High product. Making No. 50 extra-special is the fact that it’s his first playoff contest in his hometown, playing for his hometown Blues. “Obviously, I can’t wait to hear all the St. Louis Blues fans that I heard growing up,” Maroon said. “So I’m excited. It’ll be fun to get my first one under the belt.”

GM’s moves look awfully good now BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CANADIAN PRESS

The Jets’ Dustin Byfuglien shoves the Blues’ Joel Edmundson Friday night in Winnipeg.

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS > Blues lead series 2-0 > Game 3 • 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Enterprise Center, FSM, CNBC > Blues shut out on seven power plays against the Jets. D7 > Predators top Stars in overtime. D8

See BLUES • Page D6

One can only wonder the color of the Blues’ bruise. Perhaps it actually is blue? Or maybe the inside side of Alex Pietrangelo’s right foot is that peculiar purple color of the seats at Enterprise Center? We won’t know — the Blues didn’t practice Saturday. And regardless, it’s the playoffs — Petro probably wouldn’t reveal a bruise to a bunch of reporters, whose news and videos could be seen by Winnipeg’s Jets. But all this just adds to the lore of Pietrangelo’s toughness. With 70 seconds left in Game 2 and the Blues up 4-3, he stuck out his skate boot to block a Patrick Laine shot. It hurt even just to watch. It led to a Blues icing — but

Doug Armstrong has a self-imposed rule that borders on superstition. The Blues’ general manager does not conduct media interviews during a postseason series. He will talk before them. He will talk after them. But while series are in the process of being decided, Armstrong prefers to watch. And pace. And pass those painstaking seconds during breaks in the action by taking a quick stroll by the candy station set up in the Bell MTS Place press box to see if there’s a chocolate or gummy that offers some sweet distraction while the wait for a more lasting satisfaction looms. While the Blues toiled with the Jets in a

See HOCHMAN • Page D6

See FREDERICKSON • Page D7

Waino bueno in defeat

THE MASTERS

Molinari has Tiger on his tail Leaders will tee off at 8:20 Central time

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION

Francesco Molinari hits a bunker shot to the 18th green Saturday in the third round of the Masters. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

The Cardinals’ Harrison Bader can’t make the catch on a triple by the Reds’ Phillip Ervin in center field during the eighth inning Saturday.

No-hit bid, then a loss in Mexico BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

MONTERREY, MEXICO • That flurry of hits that Estadio de Beisbol Monterrey seemed to invite with its swift infield and nearby walls didn’t happen for Cincinnati, but the few that did proved costly for the Cardinals. Adam Wainwright took a nohitter through five innings and Cincinnati had a difficult time getting the ball out of the infield. Two batters into the sixth inning that changed. One batter in the seventh, the Reds had a lead. Jesse Winker hit a home run to break up Wainwright’s shutout, and Derek Dietrich followed an inning later with a solo homer that snapped a tie and sent Cincinnati toward a 5-2 victory at

REDS

5 CARDINALS 2

MEXICO SERIES Cardinals vs. Reds at Monterrey, Mexico > 3:05 p.m. Sunday, FSM Plus, ESPN > Mikolas (1-1, 6.19) vs. DeSclafani (0-1, 6.75) > Cardinals are expanding brand. D5

See MASTERS • Page D9

THE MASTERS

Estadio de Beisbol Monterrey. A problematic eighth inning that featured two near-miss diving catches in the outfield for the Cardinals allowed the Reds to score three runs and pull away in what had been a tight game. The Cardinals got the tying run See CARDINALS • Page D5

AUGUSTA, GA. • Record scores on the white boards at Augusta National. Ground-shaking roars for Tiger Woods along the back nine. Francesco Molinari blocked out the buzz on a delirious day of nine players sharing space atop the leaderboard Saturday. He emerged with another rock-solid round that looked spectacular only on his scorecard. Molinari ran off four straight birdies on the back nine for a 6-under 66 that kept Woods and everyone else at a short arm’s length going into a Sunday unlike any other at the Masters — an early start because of storms forecast for Sunday afternoon, with threesomes going off the first and 10th tees. The leaders are to tee off at 9:20 a.m. Eastern time. That puts Woods in the final

The Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright pitches during the first inning against the Reds as he threw five no-hit innings before faltering.

LEADERS Molinari Finau Woods Koepka Simpson Poulter NOTABLE Spieth McIlroy Reed

-13 -11 -11 -10 -9 -9 -4 -1 +1

> Sunday’s TV • 8 a.m., KMOV (4) > Battle of Zingers • Mickelson throws a haymaker, but Kuchar landed a jab earlier. D9

SPORTS

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geico.com | 1-800-947-AUTO | Local Office Limitations apply. See geico.com for more details. Customer satisfaction based on an independent study conducted by Alan Newman Research, 2018. GEICO & affiliates. Washington, DC 20076 © 2019 GEICO

2 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 04.14.2019 • D

MAROON BRINGS IT HOME Pietrangelo takes one for the team

Oakville grad’s slow start is far behind him BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Pat Maroon is no stranger to the playoffs. In his five previous full seasons in the NHL, he has made the postseason four times, with Anaheim, Edmonton and New Jersey. Sunday’s Blues game against Winnipeg will be his 50th postseason contest, not a bad run at all for the Oakville High product. Making No. 50 extra-special is the fact that it’s his first playoff contest in his hometown, playing for his hometown Blues. “Obviously, I can’t wait to hear all the St. Louis Blues fans that I heard growing up,” Maroon said. “So I’m excited. It’ll be fun to get my first one under the belt.”

GM’s moves look awfully good now BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CANADIAN PRESS

The Jets’ Dustin Byfuglien shoves the Blues’ Joel Edmundson Friday night in Winnipeg.

STANLEY CUP PLAYOFFS > Blues lead series 2-0 > Game 3 • 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Enterprise Center, FSM, CNBC > Blues shut out on seven power plays against the Jets. D7 > Predators top Stars in overtime. D8

See BLUES • Page D6

One can only wonder the color of the Blues’ bruise. Perhaps it actually is blue? Or maybe the inside side of Alex Pietrangelo’s right foot is that peculiar purple color of the seats at Enterprise Center? We won’t know — the Blues didn’t practice Saturday. And regardless, it’s the playoffs — Petro probably wouldn’t reveal a bruise to a bunch of reporters, whose news and videos could be seen by Winnipeg’s Jets. But all this just adds to the lore of Pietrangelo’s toughness. With 70 seconds left in Game 2 and the Blues up 4-3, he stuck out his skate boot to block a Patrick Laine shot. It hurt even just to watch. It led to a Blues icing — but

Doug Armstrong has a self-imposed rule that borders on superstition. The Blues’ general manager does not conduct media interviews during a postseason series. He will talk before them. He will talk after them. But while series are in the process of being decided, Armstrong prefers to watch. And pace. And pass those painstaking seconds during breaks in the action by taking a quick stroll by the candy station set up in the Bell MTS Place press box to see if there’s a chocolate or gummy that offers some sweet distraction while the wait for a more lasting satisfaction looms. While the Blues toiled with the Jets in a

See HOCHMAN • Page D6

See FREDERICKSON • Page D7

Waino bueno in defeat

THE MASTERS

Molinari has Tiger on his tail Leaders will tee off at 8:20 Central time

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION

Francesco Molinari hits a bunker shot to the 18th green Saturday in the third round of the Masters. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

The Cardinals’ Harrison Bader can’t make the catch on a triple by the Reds’ Phillip Ervin in center field during the eighth inning Saturday.

No-hit bid, then a loss in Mexico BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

REDS

5 CARDINALS 2

MONTERREY, MEXICO • From

the way the ball bounced off the turf when the Cardinals tested it Friday to how the ball soared during batting practice Saturday, all the chatter coming into that evening’s game at Estadio de Beisbol Monterrey was how the only thing louder than the crowd could be the lineups. Adam Wainwright geared his approach accordingly. Play to the crowd. Tame the ballpark. For five stirring innings, Wainwright held Cincinnati without a hit until two swings flipped the game and sped the Reds toward a 5-2 victory in the first game of the Mexico Series. Jesse Winker snapped Wainwright’s no-hit

MEXICO SERIES Cardinals vs. Reds at Monterrey, Mexico > 3:05 p.m. Sunday, FSM Plus, ESPN > Mikolas (1-1, 6.19) vs. DeSclafani (0-1, 6.75) > Cardinals are expanding brand. D5

See MASTERS • Page D9

THE MASTERS

bid in the sixth, and one batter into the seventh Derek Dietrich broke a tie with a solo homer. Those were two of the three hits Wainwright allowed and two of the three balls put in the air against him. A series of near-miss plays in See CARDINALS • Page D5

AUGUSTA, GA. • Record scores on the white boards at Augusta National. Ground-shaking roars for Tiger Woods along the back nine. Francesco Molinari blocked out the buzz on a delirious day of nine players sharing space atop the leaderboard Saturday. He emerged with another rock-solid round that looked spectacular only on his scorecard. Molinari ran off four straight birdies on the back nine for a 6-under 66 that kept Woods and everyone else at a short arm’s length going into a Sunday unlike any other at the Masters — an early start because of storms forecast for Sunday afternoon, with threesomes going off the first and 10th tees. The leaders are to tee off at 9:20 a.m. Eastern time. That puts Woods in the final

The Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright pitches during the first inning against the Reds as he threw five no-hit innings before faltering.

LEADERS Molinari Finau Woods Koepka Simpson Poulter NOTABLE Spieth McIlroy Reed

-13 -11 -11 -10 -9 -9 -4 -1 +1

> Sunday’s TV • 8 a.m., KMOV (4) > Battle of Zingers • Mickelson throws a haymaker, but Kuchar landed a jab earlier. D9

SPORTS

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geico.com | 1-800-947-AUTO | Local Office Limitations apply. See geico.com for more details. Customer satisfaction based on an independent study conducted by Alan Newman Research, 2018. GEICO & affiliates. Washington, DC 20076 © 2019 GEICO

4 M


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 4/13 vs. Reds (in Mexico) 6:10 p.m., FSM

Sunday 4/14 vs. Reds (in Mexico), 3:05, FSM Plus, ESPN

Monday 4/15 at Brewers 6:40 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 4/16 at Brewers 6:40 p.m. FSM or FSM Plus

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 4/14 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg, 6:30, FSM, CNBC

Tuesday 4/16 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg, 8:30, FSM, CNBC

Saturday 4/20 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg (if nec.) Time, TV TBA

UPDATE Saturday 4/20 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

Harvick headlinewins Richmond pole Driver subhed will be in top starting spot for the 27th time wheelhouse for tracks you could say.” The Daytona 500 winner has plenty of reason to feel good heading into the weekend. He’s already won twice this year, but his last victory at Richmond came in the fall of 2016.

FROM NEWS SERVICES

Thursday 4/18 Playoffs at Winnipeg (if nec.) Time, TV TBA

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 4/13 vs. Birmingham 7:30 p.m.

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Saturday 4/27 vs. Kansas City 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 5/4 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. Saturday racing begins May 4 at 1 p.m. Subsequent Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING SATURDAY AUTO 2 p.m. RACING NHRA: Spring Nationals, KTVI (2) 8:30 a.m. Formula RacingPrix round 7, FS2 3:30 p.m. IndyCar:EGrand of Long Beach, NBCSN 1:45 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Long Beach qualifying, NBCSN BASEBALL 4 IMSA: Grand Prix at Long Beach, 12p.m. p.m. College: Clemson Florida State,NBCSN ESPN2 6:30 p.m. NASCAR: Toyota Owners 400, KTVI (2) 12 p.m. College: Louisiana State at Missouri, SEC Network 1:05 Formula One: Chinese Grand Prix, ESPN2 12:10a.m. p.m. (Sun.) White Sox at Yankees, MLB Network BASEBALL 1:30 p.m. College: Illinois at Minnesota, BTN 12:10 Orioles atAlabama Red Sox,atMLB NetworkState, SEC Network 3 p.m.p.m. College: Mississippi 23 p.m. College:Oklahoma Seton Hallat atBaylor, TCU, FSM Plus College: ESPNU 3:10 Rockies atvs. Giants, 3:05 p.m. Cardinals Reds,FS1 in Monterrey, Mexico, FSM Plus, ESPN, (1120 6:10 p.m. KMOX Cardinals vs.AM) Reds, in Monterrey, Mexico, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) FSM Plus channels: U-verse: 747, 1747; DirecTV: 671-1; Dish: 454, 412-42; 6:10 p.m. Mets at Braves, Spectrum (Charter): 75, 213,FS1 826; Cable America (Maryland Heights): 22; 7 p.m. College: Kentucky Mississippi, SEC Network Consolidated (Charleston, Ill.): at 181; Fidelity (Sullivan): 72, 472; Grafton Technologies (Jerseyville): 78, 789; Highland ESPNU (Ill.) Comm.: 51, 551; HomeTel 8 p.m. College: Arkansas at Vanderbilt, (Madison, Ill.): 1196; HTC Communications (Monroe, Ill.): 77, 1077; Madison 9 p.m. Brewers at Dodgers in progress), MLB Network Communications (Macoupin, Ill.):(joined 26; New Wave (Carlinville, Greenville, Jerseyville, Litchfield, Sparta, Taylorville, Ill.): 80, 208; Wabash Comm. (Salem, BASKETBALL Ill.): 97; Wave (DuQuion, Olney, Newton, 1:30 p.m.NewNBA playoffs: Nets at 76ers, ESPNIll): 80, 208 6:10 p.m. Mets at Braves, ESPN 4 p.m. NBA playoffs: Magic at Raptors, ESPN BASKETBALL 7:15 p.m. NBA playoffs: Clippers at Warriors, KDNL (30) 12:05 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pacers at Celtics, TNT 9:30 p.m. NBA playoffs: Spurs at Nuggets, ESPN 2:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Thunder at Trail Blazers, KDNL (30) BOWLING 6:10 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pistons at Bucks, TNT 5:30 p.m. College: Women’s NCAA championship, ESPNU 8:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Jazz at Rockets, TNT BOXING GOLF 7 p.m. Middleweights: Sergiy Derevyanchenko vs. Jack Culcay, FS2 1 p.m. Masters: final round, KMOV (4) 8:10 p.m. Middleweight: Claressa Shields vs. Christina Hammer, Showtime HOCKEY 9 p.m. Super middleweights: Peter Quillin vs. Caleb Truax, FS1 8 a.m. IIHF Women’s Worlds Bronze Medal: Teams TBA, NHL Network FOOTBALL 11 a.m. NHL playoffs: Islanders at Penguins, KSDK (5) 11 a.m. College: Ohio State spring game, BTN 12 p.m. IIHF Women’s Worlds final: Teams TBA, NHL Network 11:30 a.m. College: Notre Dame spring game, NBCSN 6:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues vs. Jets, FSM, CNBC, KYKY (98.1 FM), 1 p.m. College: Nebraska spring game, BTN KMOX (1120 AM) joins in progress following Cardinals coverage 16 p.m. College: Alabama spring game, p.m. NHL playoffs: Lightning at Blue ESPN2 Jackets, NBCSN 1 p.m.p.m. NHL College: Texas Blues A&M spring game, Network 6:30 playoffs: vs. Jets, FSM,SEC CNBC, KYKY (98.1 FM) 19 p.m. College: Mississippi State spring game, p.m. NHL playoffs: Sharks at Golden Knights,ESPNU NBCSN 3LACROSSE p.m. College: Auburn spring game, SEC Network 311p.m. College: spring game, ESPNUESPNU a.m. College: Missouri Ohio State at Johns Hopkins, 512p.m. College: Tennessee spring game, Network p.m. College: Villanova at Georgetown,SEC CBSSN GOLF 6 p.m. College: Maryland at Rutgers, BTN 2 p.m. Masters: Third round, KMOV (4) MOTORCYCLE RACING HOCKEY 3 p.m. MotoAmerica Superbike: Circuit of the Americas, Race 2, FS2 8 a.m. IIHF Women’s Worlds: Canada vs. Finland, NHL Network RODEO Noon IIHF Worlds: United States vs. Russia, NHL Network 3 p.m. PBR:Women’s Billings Invitational, CBSSN 2 p.m. NHL playoffs: Hurricanes at Capitals, KSDK (5) SOCCER 56:20 p.m.a.m. NHL playoffs:Hoffenheim Stars at Predators, CNBC Bundesliga: vs. Hertha Berlin, FS1 78 p.m. NHL playoffs: Maple LeafsCrystal at Bruins, KSDK a.m. English Premier League: Palace vs.(5) Man. City, NBCSN 7 p.m.a.m. Bundesliga: NCAA final: Massachusetts vs. Minnesota-Duluth, ESPN2 8:30 Fortuna DŸsseldorf vs. Bayern Munich, FS1 9:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Avalanche at Flames, NBCSN 10:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Chelsea, NBCSN HORSE 11 a.m. RACING Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Augsburg, FS1 6 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Derby (post time 6 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC Arkansas vs. New York, Fox Sports 1 6:43 p.m.), NBCSN LACROSSE 8:25 p.m. Primera Division: Monterrey vs. Santos Laguna, FS1 11 a.m. College: Virginia at Duke, ESPNU SOFTBALL Noon College women: at State, Navy, CBSSN 11 a.m. College: Rutgers Army at Penn BTN College: South Army at Navy, CBSSN 12:30 p.m.p.m. College: Carolina at Auburn, ESPNU ARTS 3MIXED p.m. MARTIAL College: Oregon at UCLA, ESPN2 7 p.m. UFC 236:Georgia Holloway Poirier SEC preliminary 6 p.m. College: at vs. Alabama, Networkbouts, ESPN MOTORCYCLE RACING 6 p.m. College: Cal State Fullerton at Long Beach State, ESPNU 7 p.m. Motocross Racing Monster Energy Supercross: Denver, NBCSN TENNIS RUGBY 2 p.m. U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship, singles final, Tennis Channel 9 a.m. PRO14 Rugby: Glasgow Warriors vs. Leinster Rugby, ESPN2 SOCCER 6:25 a.m. English Premier League: Tottenham Hotspur vs. Huddersfield Town FC, NBCSN ASSOCIATED PRESS 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Leipzig vs. Wolfsburg, FS1 8:55 a.m. English Premier League: Burnley FC vs. Cardiff City FC, NBCSN 9 a.m. English Premier League: Southampton vs. Wolverhampton, CNBC 10:55 a.m. Serie A: AS Roma vs. Udinese, ESPNews 11:30 a.m. English Premier League: Manchester United vs. West Ham United, KSDK (5) 11:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund vs. Mainz, FS1 4 p.m. MLS: New York City FC at Minnesota United FC, ESPN2 7:30 p.m. USL: St. Louis FC vs. Birmingham, KTRS (550 AM) SOFTBALL 11 a.m. College: Georgia at Alabama, ESPN2 11 a.m. College: South Carolina at Auburn, SEC Network TENNIS 6 a.m. ATP: Grand Prix Hassan II, semifinals, Tennis Channel 11 a.m. WTA: Claro Open Colsanitas, semifinals, Tennis Channel 1 p.m. ATP: U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship: Singles semifinals, doubles final, Tennis Channel

DIGEST

SUNDAY HIGHLIGHTS BASEBALL Noon College: Louisiana State at Missouri, SEC Network 12:10 p.m. White Sox at Yankees, MLB Network 1:30 p.m. College: Illinois at Minnesota, BTN 3:05 p.m. Cardinals at Reds, in Monterrey, Mexico, FSM Plus, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) 6:10 p.m. Mets at Braves, ESPN BASKETBALL 12:05 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pacers at Celtics, TNT 2:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Thunder at Trail Blazers, KDNL (30) 6:10 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pistons at Bucks, TNT 8:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Jazz at Rockets, TNT GOLF 1 p.m. Masters: Final round, KMOV (4) HOCKEY 11 a.m. NHL playoffs: Islanders at Penguins, KSDK (5) 6:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues vs. Jets, FSM, CNBC, KYKY (98.1 FM)

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RICHMOND, VA. • Kevin HarBY STEVE OVERBEY

vick won the pole for Saturday STLtoday.com night’s NASCAR Cup series race at Richmond Raceway. He turned a fast lap at 124.298 mph Friday for the 27th pole of his career and his second this season. He became the first driver with more than one pole position this season. Erik Jones will start on the outside of the front row, with Kurt Busch and Joey Logano in the second row. The top 10 also includes Kyle Busch, who will be seeking his third consecutive victory on the track, Martin Truex Jr., Chase Elliott, Austin Dillon, Daniel Suarez and Jimmie Johnson. “For me, all three rounds went really good and we had a good race practice,” Harvick said. A second scheduled practice was rained out. NASCAR set each round of qualifying at just 5 minutes, leading some drivers to worry that there would be too many cars on the 0.75-mile track at once. When qualifying was over, though, that proved not to have been much of an issue, several drivers said. “It was really just more congestion,” Harvick said. Despite a solid starting spot, Logano was not a fan of the format. “I think here it is not really a necessary thing because cars wanted to go out early and it doesn’t allow teams to cool off and go back out in the same round to improve their time,” he said. “I think you actually kind of lose a little bit of the drama of a car going back out and can that car knock the car that is on the bubble out.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kevin Harvick is all smiles after winning the pole for the Cup series race in Richmond, Va.

WHO’S HOT Joe Gibbs Racing drivers have won five of the first eight races of the season, with Kyle Busch winning three and Denny Hamlin two. Busch is trying to win his third straight race at Richmond. Team Penske teammates Brad Keselowski (two wins) and Logano have won the other three events. HAMLIN IS AT HOME Hamlin would love to think he has an advantage when it comes to racing at Richmond Raceway. The Joe Gibbs Racing star has won three times on the 0.75-mile, D-shaped oval and has been coming to the track for much of his life, even long before the Virginia racer became a driver in the Cup series. “I don’t know if there’s any advantage for sure, but I certainly feel like I know what I need out of the car to be successful here,” he said. “Certainly this is kind of our

TRUEX LIKES RICHMOND A stock-car racer need not have been born and bred in the Carolinas, like NASCAR’s famed Petty and Earnhardt clans, to appreciate the significance of short-track racing. Truex, NASCAR’s 2017 champion and who is if from New Jersey, can testify with equal conviction. “For our (elite) level of NASCAR, short-track racing is our connection to the grass-roots level,” said Truex, who raced gokarts as a child before progressing to modifieds. “It’s the connection to the kid that got hooked on racing at the local, short-track level. It’s where NASCAR started. Short tracks are what got us all here. That’s why fans love ’em.” That’s the set up at Richmond. It’s a track Truex loves because of the demands it places on drivers. “It’s a finesse track,” he said. “It’s not the guy who can necessarily go fastest for one lap (wins); it’s the guy who can go fastest for 40 laps. You’ve just got to be smooth and gentle, and you’ve got to go fast doing it. That’s the hard part.” WEATHER WATCH Rain fell intermittently Friday and more is in the forecast for Saturday. The uncertain weather took a huge toll on the crowd, which was very sparse under overcast skies.

MOTOR SPORTS NOTEBOOK

illheyd illheyd illheyd illheyd illheyd

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cole Custer does a burnout as he celebrates winning the Xfinity Series race Friday night in Richmond, Va.

Custer wins Xfinity event Cole Custer passed Austin Cindric with 20 laps to go and won the NASCAR Xfinity Series race at Richmond (Va.) Raceway on Friday night. Cindric had grabbed the lead on a restart with 25 laps to go, but Custer regained the lead five laps later and pulled away for his second victory of the season. The victory also earned Custer a $100,000 bonus asstory the top finisher among main four drivers who qualified for that. Justin Allgaier was third. Allgaier had the lead until Custer

passed him on the inside after he pitted for tires under a green flag and Allgaier stayed out. Allgaier won the first stage and was hoping that rain in the forecast might arrive in time to shorten the race with him in the lead. By rule, if the first two stages of a race are complete, it is official. But while some rain came, it was not enough to cause the race to be stopped. Another Andretti to race at Indy • Jarrett Andretti will fulfill his father’s wish to see him race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway when he becomes

the seventh Andretti to compete on the venerable track in his Indy Lights debut next month. He is a third-generation racer from one of the most famous racing families in the world. His father, John, is Mario Andretti’s nephew and Aldo Anderetti’s CAPTION_JUMP son. He will be the third Andretti entry in the Freedom 100, scheduled for “Carb Day” on May 26 — two days before the Indianapolis 500. His father recently said his Stage 4 colon cancer had returned. Associated Press

DIGEST STLFC set to entertain Birmingham St. Louis FC, which leads the United Soccer League Championship in wins (four) and points (13) after five games, faces Birmingham Legion FC (1-2) on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. at Soccer Park in Fenton. Birmingham’s only win this season came at Louisville. Its game last weekend against New York Red Bulls II was abandoned after 17 minutes because of severe storms. STLFC (4-0-1) has allowed just two goals, with goalie Jake Fenlason posting three shutouts. Russell Cicerone and Sam Fink lead the team in scoring, with two goals each. (Tom Timmermann) Mizzou’s Santos to transfer • Missouri basketball coach Cuonzo Martin has one more scholarship to use for his 2019 recruiting class. Forward K.J. Santos has entered the NCAA’s transfer portal, the team confirmed. Santos has been released from his scholarship and plans to move to a school closer to home, a source confirmed. Santos, a 6-foot-8 forward from Geneva, Ill., came to Mizzou last year after spending his freshman season at Illinois-Chicago. For the season, he averaged 1.3 points and 1.9 minutes in 19 games, though his role decreased late in the year. He didn’t play in three of MU’s final five games, including both games in the SEC tourney. (Dave Matter)

Cook in group entering NBA draft pool • Iowa junior forward Tyler Cook (Chaminade Prep) declared for the NBA draft. Also declaring were Florida guard Andrew Nembhard, and Kentucky guard Tyler Herro. (AP) NCAA hockey title on the line • Minnesota-Duluth and Massachusetts are set to play Saturday night in Buffalo, N.Y., in the NCAA Division I hockey championship game. Defending champion Duluth (28-11-2) is the seventh team to reach the final in three consecutive years. UMass (31-9) has one more win than it had in its previous three years combined. (AP) Querrey reaches tennis semis • Eighth-seeded Sam Querrey advanced to the semifinals in the U.S. Men’s clay court tennis championship, in Houston, by beating Janko Tipsarevic 7-6 (6), 7-6 (4). On Saturday Querrey will face Christian Garino, a 6-3, 6-2 winner over Henri Laaksonen. Casper Ruud also advanced beating Marcel Granollers 6-1, 6-0. Rudd will face the winner of the match between Jordan Thompson and Daniel Elahi, suspended until Saturday. (AP) Messi sidelined • Barcelona coach Ernesto Valverde has left forward Lionel Messi off his squad for this Saturday’s soccer match at Huesca, which is in last place in the Spanish soccer league, That gives him more rest before the visit of Manchester United. Messi suffered a bloody nose when he was hit in the face by United defender Chris Smalling in Barcelona’s 1-0 Champions League win at Old Trafford on Wednesday. (AP)

Pearl gets new contract • Auburn and basketball coach Bruce Pearl have agreed to a new five-year contract that through the 2023-24 season. Auburn didn’t CONTACT release US To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER For general information call 314-340-8222 McKendree falls in bowling • McKendree University, terms. Pearl led the Tigers to their first Final Four this MAIL Must which was hoping for a second consecutive trip to year,include turning around a program that went 15 years Roger Hensley Assistant Managing Editor | Sports 314-340-8301 name, address Sound Off the women’s NCAA national bowling title match, without making theSports tourney. (AP) for verification. Cameron Hollway Deputy Sports Editor 314-340-8392 St. Louis Post-Dispatch fell to Vanderbilt in the elimination bracket of this 900 North Tucker Boulevard Letters may be Don Reed year’s tourney, Deputy Sports Editor | Nights in Wickliffe, Ohio. Vanderbilt314-340-8313 won Ex-MUfor player to coach at Tennessee • Former St. Louis, MO 63101 edited lengthEnglish Mike Smith Assistant match Sports Editor | Online 314-340-8137 the traditional portion of the match-up but Missouri as and clarity.basketball player Kim English has been hired Chris Gove McKendree High School Sports 314-744-5725 won the five-game Baker total pin fall an assistant at Tennessee. English, 30, spent the last two portion. The Commodores then won 4-0 in the best-ofseasons as an assistant at Colorado. English scored more FAX E-MAILfor soundoff@post-dispatch.com • HOLE INseven ONE Golf courses Baker submit results postsports@post-dispatch.com decisive battle.to(From news services) than314-340-3070 1,500 career• points Mizzou from 2008-12. (AP)


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Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 4/14 vs. Reds (in Mexico), 3:05, FSM Plus, ESPN

Monday 4/15 at Brewers 6:40 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 4/16 at Brewers 6:40 p.m. FSM or FSM Plus

Wednesday 4/17 at Brewers 12:40 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 4/14 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg, 6:30, FSM, CNBC

Tuesday 4/16 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg, 8:30, FSM, CNBC

Thursday 4/18 Playoffs at Winnipeg (if nec.) Time, TV TBA

Saturday 4/20 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg (if nec.) Time, TV TBA

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 4/20 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

Saturday 4/27 vs. Kansas City 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 5/4 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 5/11 at Charleston 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. Saturday racing begins May 4 at 1 p.m. Subsequent Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 2 p.m. NHRA: Spring Nationals, KTVI (2) 3:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Long Beach, NBCSN BASEBALL Noon College: Clemson at Florida State, ESPN2 Noon College: Louisiana State at Missouri, SEC Network 12:10 p.m. White Sox at Yankees, MLB Network 1:30 p.m. College: Illinois at Minnesota, BTN 3 p.m. College: Alabama at Mississippi State, SEC Network 3 p.m. College: Oklahoma at Baylor, ESPNU 3:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Reds, in Monterrey, Mexico, FSM Plus, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) FSM Plus channels: U-verse: 747, 1747; DirecTV: 671-1; Dish: 454, 412-42; Spectrum (Charter): 75, 213, 826; Cable America (Maryland Heights): 22; Consolidated (Charleston, Ill.): 181; Fidelity (Sullivan): 72, 472; Grafton Technologies (Jerseyville): 78, 789; Highland (Ill.) Comm.: 51, 551; HomeTel (Madison, Ill.): 1196; HTC Communications (Monroe, Ill.): 77, 1077; Madison Communications (Macoupin, Ill.): 26; New Wave (Carlinville, Greenville, Jerseyville, Litchfield, Sparta, Taylorville, Ill.): 80, 208; Wabash Comm. (Salem, Ill.): 97; New Wave (DuQuion, Olney, Newton, Ill): 80, 208 6:10 p.m. Mets at Braves, ESPN BASKETBALL 12:05 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pacers at Celtics, TNT 2:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Thunder at Trail Blazers, KDNL (30) 6:10 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pistons at Bucks, TNT 8:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Jazz at Rockets, TNT GOLF 8 a.m. Masters: Final round, KMOV (4) HOCKEY 8 a.m. IIHF Women’s Worlds Bronze Medal: Canada vs. Russia, NHL Net. 11 a.m. NHL playoffs: Islanders at Penguins, KSDK (5) Noon IIHF Women’s Worlds final: United States vs. Finland, NHL Net. 6:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues vs. Jets, FSM, CNBC, KYKY (98.1 FM), KMOX (1120 AM) joins in progress following Cardinals coverage 6 p.m. NHL playoffs: Lightning at Blue Jackets, NBCSN 6:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues vs. Jets, FSM, CNBC, KYKY (98.1 FM) 9 p.m. NHL playoffs: Sharks at Golden Knights, NBCSN LACROSSE 11 a.m. College: Ohio State at Johns Hopkins, ESPNU Noon College: Villanova at Georgetown, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Maryland at Rutgers, BTN MOTORCYCLE RACING 3 p.m. MotoAmerica Superbike: Circuit of the Americas, Race 2, FS2 RODEO 3 p.m. PBR: Billings Invitational, CBSSN SOCCER 6:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Hoffenheim vs. Hertha Berlin, FS1 8 a.m. English Premier League: Crystal Palace vs. Man. City, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Fortuna Dusseldorf vs. Bayern Munich, FS1 10:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Chelsea, NBCSN 11 a.m. Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Augsburg, FS1 6 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC vs. New York, Fox Sports 1 8:25 p.m. Primera Division: Monterrey vs. Santos Laguna, FS1 SOFTBALL 11 a.m. College: Rutgers at Penn State, BTN 1 p.m. College: South Carolina at Auburn, ESPNU 3 p.m. College: Oregon at UCLA, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Georgia at Alabama, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Cal State Fullerton at Long Beach State, ESPNU TENNIS 2 p.m. U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship, singles final, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Review clears Illini basketball coach Underwood An internal University of Illinois investigation concluded that complaints about men’s basketball coach Brad Underwood were unfounded, according to a statement the athletic program released Friday. An unidentified individual or individuals made allegations of “verbal abuse, racial harassment and punitive use of physical activity” after the 2017-18 season. Six players left the program with remaining eligibility after that season, Underwood’s first at Illinois. The review was concluded before the 2018-19 season and determined that “Underwood’s coaching style, while intense and challenging, was not abusive or in violation of applicable university or (athletic department) policies,” the statement said. Athletics director Josh Whitman initiated the investigation, which was led by two faculty members and two members of the athletic executive staff, including the chief integrity officer. (Chicago Tribune) Virginia celebrates men’s hoops title • Thousands of fans turned out Saturday to celebrate Virginia’s first national championship in basketball. The crowd, estimated at 21,000 on the school’s Twitter account, filled one side of Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Va., five days after the Cavaliers beat Texas Tech 85-77 in overtime to win the title. “This is more than we expected,” coach Tony Bennett said of the crowd after he and the team emerged from a tunnel to wild cheering. (AP) U.S. women reach world hockey title game • The United States soared into the gold-medal game at the women’s world hockey championship by routing Russia 8-0 Saturday behind two goals each by Hilary Knight and Kelly Pannek in Espoo, Finland. The undefeated Americans will be going for their fifth straight title Sunday against Finland. The host nation jolted Canada 4-2 in the other semifinal. Goalie Alex Rigsby of the U.S. made 11 stops for her second shutout of the tournament. Canada will face Russia for the bronze medal Sunday. (AP) SLU’s Luther throws no-hitter • Cody Luther made history in St. Louis University’s 5-0 win over St. Bonaventure in game one of Saturday’s doubleheader. The senior threw the first nine-inning no-hitter at SLU since 1961. Luther struck out a career-high 11 opposing hitters, while scattering two walks in his dominant start over the Bonnies. (News sources) Ruud, Garin in Men’s Clay Court final • Trying to become the first Norwegian champion in ATP World Tour history, Casper Ruud beat qualifier Daniel Elahi Galan of Colombia 7-5, 6-2 on Saturday to reach the U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship in Houston. The 20-year-old Ruud will face Christian Garin of Chile. The 22-year Garin beat American Sam Querrey 7-6 (2), 6-2. Ruud’s father, Christian, won the River Oaks International exhibition tournament on these grounds in 1996. Christian Ruud was the last player from Norway to make an ATP final, at Bastad, Sweden, in 1995. (AP)

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Hurts takes change in stride QB comfortable in move to Sooners ASSOCIATED PRESS

NORMAN, OKLA. • New Oklahoma quarterback Jalen Hurts learned at a basketball game just how much Sooners fans already had embraced him. The week Oklahoma announced that Hurts was transferring from Alabama, he was watching halftime festivities during the Sooners’ game against Vanderbilt. Seemingly out of nowhere, a long line of admirers developed. He smiled, posed for photos and signed autographs, seemingly unfazed by the sudden surge of attention. “I definitely appreciate it,” he said. “I’m in a new place. I’m a new face around here. It’s cool and it’s all love to embrace those guys.” Sooners fans had grown to respect Hurts from afar. The native of suburban Houston won a national title at Alabama and played for another as a starter. Last season, as Tua Tagovailoa’s backup, he led a dramatic rally against Georgia in the SEC Championship Game. This has all prepared him for a role that would intimidate most people — following Heisman winners Baker Mayfield and Kyler Murray as Oklahoma’s quarterback. Hurts is unfazed by this, too. “I’m not your average Joe,” he said. “Kind of built for these types of situations. There’s never been really anything that’s been in my way that I couldn’t overcome or see through. I’m here. I’m going to do whatever I can to help this

team in whatever way to achieve the things we want to achieve as a team.” Hurts showed he’s becoming comfortable at Oklahoma’s Spring Game on Friday night when he led the Red Team to a touchdown drive on his first possession. He threw a touchdown pass to Kennedy Brooks later in the first half and ran for a score in the second half as his squad beat the White Team 35-14. Redshirt freshman Tanner Mordecai is trying to compete with Hurts, and incoming true freshman Spencer Rattler will jump into the mix in the fall. Hurts is 6-foot-2 and 225 pounds — bigger and stronger than Mayfield and Murray. He relies on moxie to escape trouble, much like Mayfield did, and he’s an effective runner like Murray. He’s an accurate passer, but he hasn’t been forced to use his arm as often as he likely will need to in the Sooners’ system. “The last two guys we’ve had had pretty unique skill sets, too,” Oklahoma coach Lincoln Riley said. “I like his skill set a lot. I wouldn’t have brought him in if I didn’t feel like it would work. I feel like at any point with a new quarterback, you’re going to get different feels with what they like and what they can do well.” Hurts, who was on the field briefly against the Sooners in last season’s playoff win by Alabama, just wants to be the best possible version of himself. “I don’t want to get into comparisons,” he said. “Baker’s Baker, Kyler’s Kyler and I’m me. I think the objective of all of this is, yeah, everybody wants to achieve their goals, everybody wants to do those things. But right now it’s

not about me. I’m stepping back from it. The biggest thing about this thing is achieving what we want as a team, getting what we want accomplished as a team.” Hurts will have plenty of firepower with him. CeeDee Lamb leads the receiving corps after grabbing 65 passes for 1,158 yards and 11 touchdowns last season. Lee Morris is back after hauling in eight scoring passes last season, and Grant Calcaterra returns after tallying six touchdown grabs. The running game should be strong, too. Brooks ran for 1,056 yards and 12 scores as a freshman last season, and Trey Sermon ran for 947 yards and 13 touchdowns. Hurts understands he’s new to Riley’s system, so he wants to progress quickly, yet remain patient. Riley said there are ways to adjust the system to fit a player’s skills, too. “What I think we were decent at with Kyler and Baker is you have to marry your schemes to them and find some common ground to where you’re still running your system, but you’re also tailoring it to what they do well,” Riley said. “We’ll certainly do that for Jalen and our other quarterbacks that will be here as well. I think he has an intriguing skill set that I’m excited to work with.” Hurts knows his past accomplishments alone won’t win the respect of his new teammates. What he does in their presence matters more. “A team, if you have the right leader, if you have the right guy doing what he’s supposed to do, taking care of his business, people let you lead,” he said. “It’s not mandatory of them to do that. But they’ll follow you.”

Illini defense shines in spring football game BY JOEY WAGNER Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • It was only fitting that when Lovie Smith walked into the recruiting lounge in the north end zone for interviews following Saturday’s spring football game that he positioned himself in front of a photo of Dick Butkus. It was no accident that Smith, Illinois’ head football coach, stood in front of the mural of the Illini legend after his defense turned in a stellar performance that included three interceptions — two returned for touchdowns. Team Butkus, as it turns out, was comprised of the first-team defense and beat Team Grange, which had the first-team offense. There was no tackling for the first team, which didn’t allow the offense to get in much of a rhythm in a game of glorified two-hand touch, but the defense also more than held its own. Nate Hobbs picked off quarterback M.J. Rivers II and took it all the way back for a touchdown. Walk-on Sean Coghlan intercepted Coran Taylor and took it for a touchdown after Taylor’s pass intended for tight end Bobby Walker was jarred loose on a big hit from defensive back Nick Walker and right into Coghlan’s hands. Then, at the end of the scrimmage, sophomore defensive back Quan Martin had a one-handed interception of Matt Robinson in the end zone. “Defensively, it’s always about taking the ball away and when you can take the ball away and score, I mean, that’s good,” Smith said. “We played good offense last year. We have to improve on the defensive side of the football. Everyone understands that. Some good things out there from our players today.” The players and coaching staff know what the defensive numbers looked like last season. They allowed the most points per game (39.4) in the Big Ten, the most yards per game (508.3) in the conference and allowed the most rushing yards in the conference per game (245.3). It’s fuel and a low point the group is not trying to re-visit. “Any type of success, when you’re as bad as we were last year, guys need to see that we can be good on that side of the football,” Smith said. “In order for us to be a good team, we have to play better (on defense).” Hobbs and Martin have been the recipients of praise from the coaching staff. They both turned

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Taiwan Deal (left) runs against Illinois defensive back Nate Hobbs last season. Hobbs had a big day at Saturday’s spring game.

in strong performances Saturday, as they have all spring. Both cited new cornerbacks coach Keynodo Hudson for helping take that group to a higher level — even before the arrival of highly touted freshman Marquez Beason in the summer. “We’re not just coming to play,” Hobbs said. “We’re coming to dominate. We break it down on, ‘Dominate’ and ‘Family.’ That’s what we want to do. We want to dominate on the field and outside the field be a family and fight for our brothers.” Smith has preached the need to take the ball away since arriving in Champaign. Usually, three takeaways per game is the benchmark the Illini try to reach. They did just that on Saturday. Not only did Martin come away with an interception late, but he also broke up a surefire touchdown for Caleb Reams in the end zone early in the scrimmage. He and Hobbs go back and forth with each other. If Hobbs comes up with a pick, Martin challenges himself to do the same and vice versa. That competition, combined with Hudson’s competitive fuel, has led to spring improvements. “Definitely a lot of confidence,” Martin said. “Coach tells us the corners have to be the best on the field. We take that and engrave it into our heads every down and every play and come out hard and play as a whole.” Offensive coordinator Rod Smith conceded it was hard to get into rhythm without tackling on the first team — particularly in the run game, which the offense is predicated on. But Rod Smith was also clear that he didn’t see many

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positives from his quarterbacks or the passing game as a whole — from protection to run blocking. He knows his offense is better than the performance it turned in. The quarterbacks also noticed a different feel from the defense. “They definitely got a different vibe,” Robinson said. “They’re playing pretty hard, I think. I think they’ve got that swagger. I thought they’ve looked really good though.” Said Rivers: “Everybody is trying to play with confidence and that’s what they’re bringing. In practice you want to just beat them down. It’s a good feeling knowing that when you go into the season that they’re going to have other teams having headaches. Hobbs said part of the defensive change is age and experience. The other part is the mentality to dominate the game, not simply play it. There’s still a lot of time between April 13 and Aug. 31 when Akron comes to town, but with three spring practices left, Smith said he likes the improvement of his team, though noted they’re not game-ready. Hobbs is as confident as anyone in the defensive secondary. “We definitely took a step forward today,” Hobbs said. “We’re going to put us on the map, but we’ve got to work harder and harder every day. We’re not going to be the best if we don’t work hard every day. You’ve got to work harder than the day before. “We can and we’re going to be the best defensive (backfield) in the nation. I have full faith in that and we’re going to keep going hard.”

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SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 4/14 vs. Reds (in Mexico), 3:05, FSM Plus, ESPN

Monday 4/15 at Brewers 6:40 p.m. FSM

Tuesday 4/16 at Brewers 6:40 p.m. FSM or FSM Plus

Wednesday 4/17 at Brewers 12:40 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Sunday 4/14 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg, 6:30, FSM, CNBC

Tuesday 4/16 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg, 8:30, FSM, CNBC

Thursday 4/18 Playoffs at Winnipeg (if nec.) Time, TV TBA

Saturday 4/20 Playoffs vs. Winnipeg (if nec.) Time, TV TBA

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 4/20 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

Saturday 4/27 vs. Kansas City 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 5/4 vs. Ottawa 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 5/11 at Charleston 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK • THOROUGHBRED RACING • Tuesdays at 1 p.m. Saturday racing begins May 4 at 1 p.m. Subsequent Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. Simulcasting: 11 a.m-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 2 p.m. NHRA: Spring Nationals, KTVI (2) 3:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Long Beach, NBCSN BASEBALL Noon College: Clemson at Florida State, ESPN2 Noon College: Louisiana State at Missouri, SEC Network 12:10 p.m. White Sox at Yankees, MLB Network 1:30 p.m. College: Illinois at Minnesota, BTN 3 p.m. College: Alabama at Mississippi State, SEC Network 3 p.m. College: Oklahoma at Baylor, ESPNU 3:05 p.m. Cardinals vs. Reds, in Monterrey, Mexico, FSM Plus, ESPN, KMOX (1120 AM) FSM Plus channels: U-verse: 747, 1747; DirecTV: 671-1; Dish: 454, 412-42; Spectrum (Charter): 75, 213, 826; Cable America (Maryland Heights): 22; Consolidated (Charleston, Ill.): 181; Fidelity (Sullivan): 72, 472; Grafton Technologies (Jerseyville): 78, 789; Highland (Ill.) Comm.: 51, 551; HomeTel (Madison, Ill.): 1196; HTC Communications (Monroe, Ill.): 77, 1077; Madison Communications (Macoupin, Ill.): 26; New Wave (Carlinville, Greenville, Jerseyville, Litchfield, Sparta, Taylorville, Ill.): 80, 208; Wabash Comm. (Salem, Ill.): 97; New Wave (DuQuion, Olney, Newton, Ill): 80, 208 6:10 p.m. Mets at Braves, ESPN BASKETBALL 12:05 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pacers at Celtics, TNT 2:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Thunder at Trail Blazers, KDNL (30) 6:10 p.m. NBA playoffs: Pistons at Bucks, TNT 8:40 p.m. NBA playoffs: Jazz at Rockets, TNT GOLF 8 a.m. Masters: Final round, KMOV (4) HOCKEY 8 a.m. IIHF Women’s Worlds Bronze Medal: Canada vs. Russia, NHL Net. 11 a.m. NHL playoffs: Islanders at Penguins, KSDK (5) Noon IIHF Women’s Worlds final: United States vs. Finland, NHL Net. 6:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues vs. Jets, FSM, CNBC, KYKY (98.1 FM), KMOX (1120 AM) joins in progress following Cardinals coverage 6 p.m. NHL playoffs: Lightning at Blue Jackets, NBCSN 6:30 p.m. NHL playoffs: Blues vs. Jets, FSM, CNBC, KYKY (98.1 FM) 9 p.m. NHL playoffs: Sharks at Golden Knights, NBCSN LACROSSE 11 a.m. College: Ohio State at Johns Hopkins, ESPNU Noon College: Villanova at Georgetown, CBSSN 6 p.m. College: Maryland at Rutgers, BTN MOTORCYCLE RACING 3 p.m. MotoAmerica Superbike: Circuit of the Americas, Race 2, FS2 RODEO 3 p.m. PBR: Billings Invitational, CBSSN SOCCER 6:20 a.m. Bundesliga: Hoffenheim vs. Hertha Berlin, FS1 8 a.m. English Premier League: Crystal Palace vs. Man. City, NBCSN 8:30 a.m. Bundesliga: Fortuna Dusseldorf vs. Bayern Munich, FS1 10:25 a.m. English Premier League: Liverpool vs. Chelsea, NBCSN 11 a.m. Bundesliga: Eintracht Frankfurt vs. Augsburg, FS1 6 p.m. MLS: Sporting KC vs. New York, Fox Sports 1 8:25 p.m. Primera Division: Monterrey vs. Santos Laguna, FS1 SOFTBALL 11 a.m. College: Rutgers at Penn State, BTN 1 p.m. College: South Carolina at Auburn, ESPNU 3 p.m. College: Oregon at UCLA, ESPN2 6 p.m. College: Georgia at Alabama, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Cal State Fullerton at Long Beach State, ESPNU TENNIS 2 p.m. U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship, singles final, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Review clears Illini basketball coach Underwood An internal University of Illinois investigation concluded that complaints about men’s basketball coach Brad Underwood were unfounded, according to a statement the athletic program released Friday. An unidentified individual or individuals made allegations of “verbal abuse, racial harassment and punitive use of physical activity” after the 2017-18 season. Six players left the program with remaining eligibility after that season, Underwood’s first at Illinois. The review was concluded before the 2018-19 season and determined that “Underwood’s coaching style, while intense and challenging, was not abusive or in violation of applicable university or (athletic department) policies,” the statement said. Athletics director Josh Whitman initiated the investigation, which was led by two faculty members and two members of the athletic executive staff, including the chief integrity officer. (Chicago Tribune) Virginia celebrates men’s hoops title • Thousands of fans turned out Saturday to celebrate the University of Virginia’s first national championship in basketball. The crowd, estimated at 21,000 on the school’s Twitter account, filled one side of Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Va., five days after the Cavaliers beat Texas Tech 85-77 in overtime to win the title. “This is more than we expected,” coach Tony Bennett said of the crowd after he and the team emerged from a tunnel to wild cheering. (AP) U.S. women reach world hockey title game • The United States soared into the gold-medal game at the women’s world hockey championship by routing Russia 8-0 Saturday behind two goals each by Hilary Knight and Kelly Pannek in Espoo, Finland. The undefeated Americans will be going for their fifth straight title Sunday against Finland. The host nation jolted Canada 4-2 in the other semifinal. (AP) Minnesota Duluth wins hockey title • Parker Mackay had a goal and an assist, Hunter Shepard stopped 18 shots and Minnesota Duluth won its second straight college hockey title, beating Massachusetts 3-0 on Saturday night in Buffalo, N.Y. The Bulldogs (29-11-2) became the ninth school to successfully defend a title, and first since Denver in 2004 and ’05. (AP) SLU’s Luther throws no-hitter • Cody Luther made history in St. Louis University’s 5-0 win over St. Bonaventure in game one of Saturday’s doubleheader. The senior threw the first nine-inning no-hitter at SLU since 1961. Luther struck out a career-high 11 hitters, while scattering two walks in his dominant start over the Bonnies. (News sources) Ruud, Garin in Men’s Clay Court final • Trying to become the first Norwegian champion in ATP World Tour history, Casper Ruud beat qualifier Daniel Elahi Galan of Colombia 7-5, 6-2 on Saturday to reach the U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship in Houston. The 20-year-old Ruud will face Christian Garin of Chile. The 22-year-old Garin beat American Sam Querrey 7-6 (2), 6-2. (AP)

M 3 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

STLFC logs season’s first loss Team remains atop Eastern Conference BY STEVE OVERBEY STLtoday.com

Sam Fink didn’t expect his St. Louis Football Club to go unbeaten this season. The defender knows that is unrealistic in the rugged 34-match United Soccer League campaign. Still, Saturday’s 3-2 loss to Birmingham Legion did not sit well with the Edwardsville native. “We’re still in a good place, thankfully,” Fink said. “But, I’ll never hang my hat on a pretty good job. I want it to be the best job.” JJ Williams scored twice in a six-minute span in the second half to break a tie and help Birmingham hand STLFC its first loss of the season in front of 3,635 at a rainy Soccer Park. Fink scored on a penalty kick in the 88th minute to bring his team to within 3-2. But Williams’ goals put the hosts in a hole that was simply too deep. Joaquin Rivas also scored for STLFC, tying the match 1-1 on a perfect cross from Matt Bahner in the 63rd minute. STLFC (4-1-1) still remains atop the table in the Eastern Conference and has outscored its opponents 9-5 in the fastest start in franchise history.

But Birmingham (2-2) took advantage of some sloppy defending to score twice on set pieces. STLFC was unbeaten in its previous 13 home matches — its last home loss prior to Saturday was a 1-0 setback to Real Salt Lake on June 16, 2018. Fink’s goal was his team-leading third of the season. Rivas, who grew up in Las Vegas, made a strong run in the box and took a nifty pass from Bahner to knot the score. The tally appeared to switch the momentum, but Williams exploded for two goals 12 minutes later. STLFC coach Anthony Pulis was pleased with the offensive effort, calling it one of the best of the season. Yet he was frustrated by the lack of marking on the set piece tallies. “We shot ourselves in the foot,” Pulis said. “The manner that we conceded the three goals was extremely disappointing.” Williams tallied in the 75th minute off a blast from the right wing to break a 1-1 tie. He then converted off a free kick to provide a two-goal cushion. Birmingham defender Mathieu Laurent gave his team the early lead by drilling in a header off a free kick from Kyle Culbertson in the 38th minute. The second half was played in a steady rain. STLFC is still in a good position after just six matches. The light-

ning-quick start to the campaign had ramped up the expectations. “This should have been a must win,” Rivas said. “We’ve just got to keep going and keep our heads up. And not dwell on this — it’s a long season.” STLFC, which reached the playoffs for the first-time last season, had several early chances but could not convert against Legion keeper Matt VanOekel. Bahner just failed to connect midway through the first half off a nifty through pass. Kyle Greig had a shot blocked by a defender with VanOekel out of position in the 30th minute. Russell Cicerone also had an early opportunity from the top of the box. STLFC keeper Jake Fenlason has played all 540 minutes this season. Tomas Gomez, who shared time with Fenlason last year, has been sidelined with a groin injury and is still two weeks away from returning. Birmingham (2-2) had 13 days off entering Saturday’s match after its April 6 contest with New York Red Bulls 2 was postponed due to rain. One of four expansion teams in the 18-team Eastern Conference, Birmingham featured 15 players with MLS experience. STLFC forward Guy Abend and Birmingham’s Mikey Lopez were each given yellow cards in a physical opening half.

Illini defense shines in spring football game

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wisconsin’s Taiwan Deal (left) runs against Illinois defensive back Nate Hobbs last season. Hobbs had a big day at Saturday’s spring game. BY JOEY WAGNER Decatur (Ill.) Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • It was only fitting that when Lovie Smith walked into the recruiting lounge in the north end zone for interviews following Saturday’s spring football game that he positioned himself in front of a photo of Dick Butkus. It was no accident that Smith, Illinois’ head football coach, stood in front of the mural of the Illini legend after his defense turned in a stellar performance that included three interceptions — two returned for touchdowns. Team Butkus, as it turns out, was comprised of the first-team defense and beat Team Grange, which had the first-team offense. There was no tackling for the first team, which didn’t allow the offense to get in much of a rhythm in a game of glorified two-hand touch, but the defense also more than held its own. Nate Hobbs picked off quarterback M.J. Rivers II and took it all the way back for a touchdown. Walk-on Sean Coghlan intercepted Coran Taylor and took it for a touchdown after Taylor’s pass intended for tight end Bobby Walker was jarred loose on a big hit from defensive back Nick Walker and right into Coghlan’s hands. Then, at the end of the scrimmage, sophomore defensive back Quan Martin had a one-handed interception of Matt Robinson in the end zone. “Defensively, it’s always about taking the ball away and when you can take the ball away and score, I mean, that’s good,” Smith said. “We played good offense last year. We have to improve on the defensive side of the football. Everyone understands that. Some good things out there from our players today.” The players and coaching staff know what the defensive numbers looked like last season. They allowed the most points per game

(39.4) in the Big Ten, the most yards per game (508.3) in the conference and allowed the most rushing yards in the conference per game (245.3). It’s fuel and a low point the group is not trying to re-visit. “Any type of success, when you’re as bad as we were last year, guys need to see that we can be good on that side of the football,” Smith said. “In order for us to be a good team, we have to play better (on defense).” Hobbs and Martin have been the recipients of praise from the coaching staff. They both turned in strong performances Saturday, as they have all spring. Both cited new cornerbacks coach Keynodo Hudson for helping take that group to a higher level — even before the arrival of highly touted freshman Marquez Beason in the summer. “We’re not just coming to play,” Hobbs said. “We’re coming to dominate. We break it down on, ‘Dominate’ and ‘Family.’ That’s what we want to do. We want to dominate on the field and outside the field be a family and fight for our brothers.” Smith has preached the need to take the ball away since arriving in Champaign. Usually, three takeaways per game is the benchmark the Illini try to reach. They did just that on Saturday. Not only did Martin come away with an interception late, but he also broke up a surefire touchdown for Caleb Reams in the end zone early in the scrimmage. He and Hobbs go back and forth with each other. If Hobbs comes up with a pick, Martin challenges himself to do the same and vice versa. That competition, combined with Hudson’s competitive fuel, has led to spring improvements. “Definitely a lot of confidence,” Martin said. “Coach tells us the corners have to be the best on the field. We take that and engrave it into our heads every down and every play and come out hard and

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play as a whole.” Offensive coordinator Rod Smith conceded it was hard to get into rhythm without tackling on the first team — particularly in the run game, which the offense is predicated on. But Rod Smith was also clear that he didn’t see many positives from his quarterbacks or the passing game as a whole — from protection to run blocking. He knows his offense is better than the performance it turned in. The quarterbacks also noticed a different feel from the defense. “They definitely got a different vibe,” Robinson said. “They’re playing pretty hard, I think. I think they’ve got that swagger. I thought they’ve looked really good though.” Said Rivers: “Everybody is trying to play with confidence and that’s what they’re bringing. In practice you want to just beat them down. It’s a good feeling knowing that when you go into the season that they’re going to have other teams having headaches. Hobbs said part of the defensive change is age and experience. The other part is the mentality to dominate the game, not simply play it. There’s still a lot of time between April 13 and Aug. 31 when Akron comes to town, but with three spring practices left, Smith said he likes the improvement of his team, though noted they’re not game-ready. Hobbs is as confident as anyone in the defensive secondary. “We definitely took a step forward today,” Hobbs said. “We’re going to put us on the map, but we’ve got to work harder and harder every day. We’re not going to be the best if we don’t work hard every day. You’ve got to work harder than the day before. “We can and we’re going to be the best defensive (backfield) in the nation. I have full faith in that and we’re going to keep going hard.”

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SPORTS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

Derby field set to take shape Saturday’s key prep race at Oaklawn will help clear cloudy picture morial. Between that victory and his performance in winning the Tampa Bay Derby on March 9, the Bill Mott-trained colt is clearly on the upswing.

BALTIMORE SUN

The field of leading Kentucky Derby contenders has shifted considerably in the past two weeks, with upsets in the Florida Derby and the Santa Anita Derby. Often, the Kentucky Derby favorite is clear coming out of the first weekend in April, but that’s not the case this year. An unusually loaded field will compete in Saturday’s Arkansas Derby, the season’s last major prep race for the Run for the Roses, and until that business is settled we can’t turn our eyes completely to Louisville and the first Saturday in May. With that in mind, here are the latest top 10 contenders to watch as we await things to become clearer after the big event at Oaklawn Park, in Hot Springs, Ark., and the final minor prep — the Lexington Stakes, at Keeneland. Roadster • Keep in mind that trainer Bob Baffert rated Roadster the most talented 2-year-old in his stable before throat surgery forced the colt out of training last year. So no one should have been overly surprised when Roadster roared from near the back of the pack to pass his more accomplished stablemate, Game Winner, in the Santa Anita Derby last Saturday. Improbable • He can push his way to the front of Baffert’s gifted stable with an impressive win against stacked competition in Saturday’s Arkansas Derby. He was caught and lost by a neck to Long Range Toddy in the March 16 Rebel Stakes, leading some handicappers to question his focus. But he had to make up a lot of ground after breaking outside, so it wasn’t as if he delivered a dud effort. Omaha Beach • The most likely candidate to derail the Baffert train. Handicappers fancied this rapidly improving colt even before he held off Game Winner in the Rebel Stakes. That win, his second in six career starts, stamped him as a legitimate contender and he can improve his stock in the Arkansas Derby. Trainer Richard

Game Winner • He’s now 0 for 2 in 2019. But you can’t really say the 2018 2-yearold champion ran poorly in either race. He’s yet to come up empty in any of his six career starts, so it’s hard to bump him too far down the list. Maximum Security • He was available for a $16,000 claim less than four months ago and went into his final prep, the Florida Derby, with zero Derby qualifying points. He exited as one of the top contenders after he easily took and held the lead in the most important race of his career.

THE ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE

Jon Court (left) celebrates after riding Long Range Toddy to victory in the Rebel Stakes, on March 16 at Oaklawn Park.

Long Range Toddy • He showed poise and great acceleration in the stretch when he chased down Improbable in the Rebel Stakes. But he’s divisive because nothing in his previous results suggested he was capable of such an effort. He’s set for the Arkansas Derby.

ARKANSAS DERBY $1,000,000, Stakes, 3-Year-Olds, One Mile and One Eighth. TV • 6 p.m., NBCSN. Post time • 6:43 p.m. Horse (Med Code), Wt. Trainer Odds 1. Improbable (L), 122 B. Baffert 8/5 2. Six Shooter (L), 122 P. Holthus 30/1 3. Omaha Beach (L), 122 R. Mandella 2/1 4. Tikhvin Flew (L), 118 S. Asmussen 30/1 5. Laughing Fox (L), 118 S. Asmussen 20/1 6. Gray Attempt (L), 122 W. Fires 8/1 7. Galilean (L), 122 J. Hollendorfer 10/1 8. Country House (L), 118 W. Mott 12/1 9. One Flew South (L), 118 D. O’Neill 50/1 S. Asmussen 30/1 10. Jersey Agenda (L), 118 11. Long Range Toddy (L), 122 S. Asmussen 5/1

Mandella might not be a familiar name to the casual fan, but he’s in the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame. Tacitus • He overcame an early bump to win as the favorite in the recent Wood Me-

Vekoma • He pushed his way into the top group with a decisive win in last Saturday’s Blue Grass Stakes. That race featured one of the least glamorous fields of the top Derby preps, and this George Weavertrained colt had an ideal trip. By My Standards • He existed on the periphery of the Derby discussion before surging to victory as a 22-1 underdog in the Louisiana Derby, on March 23. The 100 points from that victory guarantee him a spot in the Derby field, and the 97 Beyer speed figure he earned suggests his potential is up there with the best. Code of Honor • He was bumped early in the Florida Derby and failed to make a concerted charge down the stretch. But he still has plenty of points to qualify for the Derby and could be dangerous in Louisville if he’s handed a fast early pace to set up his late move.

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS

NCAA Frozen Four

English Premier League

BASEBALL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog American League YANKEES .................-$180 ................White Sox RED SOX................. -$230.....................Orioles TWINS......................-$170 ...................... Tigers Rays........................ -$160...............BLUE JAYS Indians ....................-$115.................... ROYALS A’s ............................-$125 ................ RANGERS Astros......................-$170 .............. MARINERS National League NATIONALS .............-$115......................Pirates GIANTS ....................-$120 ....................Rockies Phillies ....................-$155 .................MARLINS Cards.......................-$125 ....................... REDS BRAVES ...................-$125 ........................ Mets DBACKS...................-$110 .....................Padres DODGERS ................-$112....................Brewers Interleague CUBS........................-$170 ..................... Angels

BASEBALL OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF BASEBALL — Suspended free agent minor league RHP Jorge Baez, Detroit minor league C Moises Nunez (Connecticut-NYP) and Detroit minor league LHP Richard Terrero (GCL Tigers) 25 games each, following their violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League CHICAGO — Recalled LHP Josh Osich from Charlotte (IL). LOS ANGELES — Recalled RHP Jake Jewell from Salt Lake (PCL). NEW YORK — Placed C Gary Sánchez on the 10-day IL, retroactive to April 11. Recalled C Kyle Higashioka from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND — Agreed to terms with RHP Edwin Jackson on a minor league contract. SEATTLE — Recalled RHP Ruben Alaniz from Tacoma (PCL). Activated RHP Shawn Armstrong from 10-day IL. Optioned RHPs Matt Festa and Erik Swanson to Tacoma (PCL). National League CHICAGO — Placed C Victor Caratini on the 10-day IL. Recalled C Taylor Davis from Iowa (PCL).

At KeyBank Center, Buffalo, N.Y. National Semifinals | Thursday Minnesota Duluth 4, Providence 1 UMass 4, Denver 3, OT National Championship | Saturday Minnesota Duluth (28-11-2) vs. UMass (31-9-0), 7 p.m.

GP W D L GF GA Pts Liverpool 33 25 7 1 75 20 82 Man City 32 26 2 4 83 21 80 Chelsea 33 20 6 7 57 34 66 Tottenham 32 21 1 10 60 34 64 Arsenal 32 19 6 7 65 40 63 Man United 32 18 7 7 61 43 61 Leicester 34 14 5 15 46 45 47 Wolverhampton 32 13 8 11 40 39 47 Everton 33 13 7 13 46 42 46 Watford 32 13 7 12 47 47 46 West Ham 33 12 6 15 41 50 42 Crystal Palace 33 11 6 16 39 43 39 Newcastle 34 10 8 16 32 43 38 Bournemouth 33 11 5 17 44 61 38 Burnley 33 10 6 17 40 60 36 Brighton 31 9 6 16 32 46 33 Southampton 32 8 9 15 36 53 33 Cardiff 32 8 4 20 28 61 28 Fulham 33 4 5 24 30 76 17 Huddersfield 33 3 5 25 19 63 14 Friday Leicester 0, Newcastle 1 Saturday Tottenham vs. Huddersfield, 6:30 a.m. Fulham vs. Everton, 9 a.m. Burnley vs. Cardiff, 9 a.m. Southampton vs. Wolverhampton, 9 a.m. Brighton vs. Bournemouth, 9 a.m. Man United vs. West Ham, 11:30 a.m. Sunday Crystal Palace vs. Man City, 8:05 a.m. Liverpool vs. Chelsea, 10:30 a.m. Monday Watford vs. Arsenal, 2 p.m. Tuesday Brighton vs. Cardiff, 1:45 p.m.

NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog 76ERS........................6.5 ...........................Nets RAPTORS...................8.5 ........................ Magic WARRIORS ...............12.5.....................Clippers NUGGETS...................5.5 .........................Spurs Sunday CELTICS ...................... 7......................... Pacers BLAZERS .................... 3...................... Thunder BUCKS ......................12.5...................... Pistons ROCKETS...................6.5 ........................... Jazz Odds to win series: 76ERS -$700 .............vs.................Nets +$500 RAPTORS -$1400......vs.............. Magic +$800 WARRIORS -$50000.vs.......Clippers +$10000 NUGGETS -$220 ........vs................Spurs +$180 CELTICS -$600 ..........vs............. Pacers +$450 Thunder -$135...........vs...........BLAZERS +$115 BUCKS -$10000........vs..........Pistons +$2000 ROCKETS -$400........vs..................Jazz +$300 Odds to win the NBA Championship Team ...................Open................Current Warriors....................1/2 ............................. 1/2 Bucks.......................100/1 ...........................6/1 Raptors ....................15/1.............................8/1 Rockets .....................8/1 ............................12/1 Celtics........................5/1 ............................15/1 76ers ........................15/1............................15/1 Nuggets...................125/1.......................... 18/1 Thunder ...................30/1 ..........................30/1 Blazers ....................150/1 .........................40/1 Jazz...........................75/1 ..........................60/1 Spurs........................75/1 ..........................80/1 Pacers .....................125/1..........................80/1 Magic...................... 450/1.......................100/1 Nets........................ 450/1........................125/1 Pistons ................... 300/1....................... 150/1 Clippers...................250/1 ....................... 150/1 Odds to win the Eastern Conference Team ...................Open................Current Bucks........................25/1 ............................3/2 Raptors .....................4/1 ............................. 2/1 76ers .........................7/2 ............................. 7/2 Celtics........................1/2 .............................4/1 Pacers ......................30/1 ..........................30/1 Magic...................... 200/1.........................50/1 Nets........................ 200/1.........................60/1 Pistons .................... 80/1..........................80/1 Odds to win the Western Conference Team ...................Open................Current Warriors....................1/3 ............................. 1/4 Rockets .....................5/1 .............................6/1 Nuggets................... 60/1............................8/1 Thunder ...................15/1............................15/1 Blazers .....................75/1 .......................... 25/1 Jazz...........................35/1 ..........................30/1 Spurs........................35/1 ..........................40/1 Clippers...................100/1 ......................... 75/1 NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog CAPITALS ..........-$160/+$140 ........Hurricanes PREDATORS ...... -$155/+$135...................Stars BRUINS.............. -$145/+$125....... Maple Leafs FLAMES.............-$230/+$190 ......... Avalanche Grand Salami: Over/under 23.5 goals . Home team in CAPS © 2019 Benjamin Eckstein

BASKETBALL | NBA LOS ANGELES — Announced coach Luke Walton and the team have mutually agreed to part ways. FOOTBALL | National Football League NFL — Fined Washington LB Reuben Foster two game checks for violating the NFL’s personal conduct policy. CAROLINA — Signed WR Chris Hogan to a one-year contract. CHICAGO — Signed K Elliott Fry. MINNESOTA — Agreed to terms with WR Adam Thielen on a multiyear contract extension. NY GIANTS — Signed WR Sterling Shepard to a contract extension. SAN FRANCISCO — Signed OL Daniel Brunskill to a one-year contract. SOCCER | Major League Soccer COLUMBUS — Loaned G Jon Kempin and M Luis Argudo to Hartford (USLC) and F JJ Williams to Birmingham (USLC). COLLEGE AIR FORCE — Agreed to terms with men’s basketball coach Dave Pilipovich on a three-year contract extension through the 2022-23 season. EAST CAROLINA — Named Cory McNeill women’s associate basketball coach and Steve Pogue and Ali Heller women’s assistant basketball coaches. FLORIDA — Freshman G Andrew Nembhard declared for the NBA draft. IOWA — Junior F Tyler Cook declared for the NBA draft. KENTUCKY — Freshman G Tyler Herro will enter the NBA draft. NEBRASKA — Named Doc Sadler, Matt Abdelmassih and Bobby Lutz men’s assistant basketball coaches. VANDERBILT — Named Matt Weikert outside linebackers coach. Promoted Jovan Haye to defensive line coach. WAKE FOREST — Announced the resignation of men’s asst. basketball coach Jamill Jones.

COLLEGES Area results Softball Washington U. 5-7, Carnegie Mellon 3-3 (G2 6 inn.) Mississippi 7-1, Mizzou 5-0 UMSL 4-3, Maryville 2-2 Baseball Missouri S&T 17,-10 UMSL 7-7 Washington U. 12-5, NYU 2-4 St. Bonaventure 8, St. Louis U. 5

SOCCER Champions League (Home teams listed first)

QUARTERFINALS First Leg Tuesday, April 9 Liverpool 2, Porto 0 Tottenham 1, Manchester City 0 Wednesday, April 10 Ajax 1, Juventus 1 Manchester United 0, Barcelona 1 Second Leg Tuesday, April 16 Barcelona vs. Manchester United, 2 p.m. Juventus vs. Ajax, 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 17 Manchester City vs. Tottenham, 2 p.m. Porto vs. Liverpool, 2 p.m.

SEMIFINALS First Leg Tuesday, April 30 and Wednesday May 1 Manchester United-Barcelona winner vs. Liverpool-Porto winner, 2 p.m. Tottenham-Manchester City winner vs. Ajax-Juventus winner, 2 p.m. Second Leg Tuesday, May and Wednesday, May 8 Ajax-Juventus winner vs. TottenhamManchester City winner, 2 p.m. Liverpool-Porto winner vs, Manchester United-Barcelona winner, 2 p.m.

CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday, June 1 at Madrid 2 p.m.

GOLF Area hole in one Forest Park • Terry Stinson, hole No. 2 (Dogwood), 141 yards, 7-iron, April 12.

BOXING SCHEDULE

Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 4 1 1 13 7 4 D.C. United 3 1 2 11 9 5 Toronto FC 3 0 1 10 12 5 Philadelphia 3 2 1 10 9 7 Cincinnati 2 2 2 8 8 8 Orlando City 2 2 2 8 10 11 Montreal 2 2 2 8 7 11 Chicago 1 2 3 6 8 10 New York 1 3 1 4 6 6 New England 1 4 1 4 5 10 New York City FC 0 1 4 4 4 8 Atlanta 0 2 2 2 2 6 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles FC 5 0 1 16 19 5 Seattle 4 0 1 13 11 3 LA Galaxy 4 1 0 12 9 6 Houston 3 0 1 10 10 5 FC Dallas 3 2 1 10 10 7 Minnesota United 3 2 0 9 11 8 Sporting K.C. 2 1 2 8 12 5 Real Salt Lake 1 4 1 4 5 13 San Jose 1 4 0 3 5 14 Vancouver 0 4 2 2 5 10 Colorado 0 4 2 2 9 16 Portland 0 4 1 1 5 15 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Friday Vancouver 1, Chicago 1, tie Saturday Columbus at Montreal, Noon San Jose at Houston, 2 p.m. Toronto FC at Seattle, 3 p.m. New York City FC at Minnesota United, 4 p.m. Atlanta at New England, 6:30 p.m. Portland at FC Dallas, 7 p.m. D.C. United at Colorado, 8 p.m. Orlando City at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at Los Angeles FC, 9:30 p.m. Philadelphia at LA Galaxy, 9:30 p.m. Sunday New York at Sporting K.C., 6 p.m.

Saturday At Minneapolis Armory (FS1): Caleb Truax vs. Peter Quillin, 10, super middleweights; Sergiy Derevyanchenko vs. Jack Culcay, 12, middleweights; Chris Colbert vs. Mario Briones, 10, lightweights. At Monterrey, Mexico: Jaime Munguia vs. Dennis Hogan, 12, for Munguia’s WBO junior middleweight title; Patrick Teixeira vs. Dormedes Potes, 10, junior middleweights; Diego De La Hoya vs. Enrique Bernache, 10, featherweights. April 20 At Madison Square Garden, New York (PPV): Terence Crawford vs. Amir Khan, 12, for Crawford’s WBO welterweight title; Shakur Stevenson vs. Christopher Diaz, 10, featherweights; Teofimo Lopez vs. Edis Tatli, 10, lightweights; Felix Verdejo vs. Bryan Vasquez, 10, lightweights. At Dignity Health Sports Park, Carson, Calif. (FOX): Danny Garcia vs. Adrian Granados, 12, for the vacant WBC Silver welterweight title; Andy Ruiz Jr. vs. Alexander Dimitrenko, 10, heavyweights; Brandon Figueroa vs. Yonfrez Parejo, 12, for the vacant WBA interim junior featherweight title; Jeison Rosario vs. Jorge Cota, 10, middleweights; Alfredo Angulo vs. Juan Ubaldo Cabrera, 10, super middleweights. April 24 At Chonburi, Thailand: Wanheng Menayothin vs. Tatsuya Fukuhara, 12, for Menayothin’s WBC minimumweight title. April 25 At Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, Indio, Calif.: Yves Ulysse Jr. vs. Steve Claggett, 10, for the vacant WBA Gold Super lightweight title; Oscar Negrete vs. Joshua Franco, 10, for the NABF bantamweight title. April 26 At The Forum, Inglewood, Calif.: Daniel Roman vs. TJ Doheny, 12, for Roman’s WBA super bantamweight title and Doheny’s IBF/ WBA Super World super bantamweight titles;

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NFL NOTEBOOK Hall of Famer Gregg dies Forrest Gregg, the great Hall of Fame lineman for the mighty Green Bay Packers of the 1960s who Vince Lombardi called the “finest player I ever coached,” died Friday in Colorado Springs, Colo. He was 85. Barbara Gregg said he died from complications of Parkinson’s disease. Gregg, who earned the nickname “Iron Man” for playing in a then-record 188 consecutive games during his career, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s in 2011. Gregg never blamed football for his health ailments, however. He refused to join concussion lawsuits against the NFL and said he still would have chosen to play the sport if he’d known there would be a hefty price to pay later in life. A guard and tackle, Gregg is one of four NFL players to win a-half dozen NFL championships, including the first two Super Bowls with the Packers. He finished his career with another Super Bowl title with the Cowboys in 1971. The six-time AllPro and nine-time Pro Bowler was elected to the NFL’s all-decade team of the 1960s and to its 75th anniversary team. He went on to coach in the NFL for 11 years with the Browns (1975-77), Bengals (1980-83) and Packers (1984-87). Elsewhere • The NFL said it will not suspend Washington Redskins linebacker Reuben Foster for violating the league’s personal conduct policy — he was arrested twice last year for domestic violence. Instead, he’ll be fined two game checks. • Former Patriots wide receiver Chris Hogan signed a one-year deal with Carolina. The Panthers did not try to re-sign receiver Devin Funchess this spring, creating some need to replace Funchess’ 500-odd receiving yards. • The Vikings and wide receiver Adam Thielen agreed in principle to a four-year contract extension valued at $64 million. Thielen, 28, had 113 receptions last season. • The Bears signed former University of South Carolina kicker Elliott Fry, adding another candidate to replace Cody Parkey. He joins Redford Jones and Chris Blewitt in the competition. • Former Chiefs tight end Walter White has died at 67 because of pancreatic cancer. He played his entire five-season pro career with Kansas City. From news services

Srisaket Sor Rungvisai vs. Juan Francisco Estrada, 12, for Sor Rungvisai’s WBC junior bantamweight title; Jessie Vargas vs. Humberto Soto, 10, junior middleweights. April 27 At Cajun Dome, Lafayette, La.: Kiryl Relikh vs. Regis Prograis, 12, for Relikh’s WBA World junior welterweight title (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Zolani Tete vs. Nonito Donaire, 12, for Tete’s WBO and Donaire’s WBA Super World bantamweight title (World Boxing Super Series semifinals); Nikolai Potapov vs. Stephon Young, 10, bantamweights. At the Cosmopolitan, Las Vegas (SHO): Robert Easter Jr. vs. Rances Barthelemy, 12, for the vacant WBA-IBO lightweight titles; Viktor Postol vs. Mohamed Mimoune, 12, junior welterweights; Efe Ajagba vs. Michael Wallisch, 10, heavyweights.

MOTOR SPORTS NASCAR Cup Series | Richmond lineup Friday’s qualifying; Race sunday At Richmond Raceway Richmond, Va. (Car number in parentheses) 1. (4) Kevin Harvick Ford 124.298 2. (20) Erik Jones Toyota 124.081 3. (1) Kurt Busch Chevy 123.870 4. (22) Joey Logano Ford 123.672 5. (18) Kyle Busch Toyota 123.598 6. (19) Martin Truex Jr Toyota 123.400 7. (9) Chase Elliott Chevy 123.153 8. (3) Austin Dillon Chevy 122.962 9. (41) Daniel Suarez Ford 122.610 10. (48) Jimmie Johnson Chevy 122.166 11. (37) Chris Buescher Chevy 122.139 12. (2) Brad Keselowski Ford 122.061 13. (21) Paul Menard Ford 123.581 14. (42) Kyle Larson Chevy 123.542 15. (10) Aric Almirola Ford 123.485 16. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr Ford 123.451 17. (88) Alex Bowman Chevy 123.338 18. (11) Denny Hamlin Toyota 123.299 19. (24) William Byron Chevy 123.293 20. (36) Matt Tifft Ford 123.288 21. (14) Clint Bowyer Ford 123.147 22. (38) David Ragan Ford 123.097 23. (47) Ryan Preece Chevy 123.001 24. (8) Daniel Hemric Chevy 122.177 25. (34) Michael McDowell Ford 123.842 26. (43) Bubba Wallace Chevy 123.734 27. (95) Matt DiBenedetto Toyota 123.723 28. (32) Corey LaJoie Ford 123.609 29. (12) Ryan Blaney Ford 123.575 30. (13) Ty Dillon Chevy 123.440 31. (6) Ryan Newman Ford 123.299 32. (00) Landon Cassill Chevy 123.175 33. (52) Bayley Currey Chevy 122.471 34. (51) Jeb Burton Ford 121.561 35. (77) Quin Houff Chevy 120.622 36. (66) Joey Gase Toyota 119.195 37. (15) Ross Chastain Chevy 0.000

NASCAR Xfinity Series | Richmond results 32nd Annual ToyotaCare 250 Results Friday | Richmond Raceway Richmond, Va. (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (4) Cole Custer Ford 2. (5) Austin Cindric Ford 3. (7) Justin Allgaier Chevy 4. (2) Tyler Reddick Chevy 5. (13) Ryan Sieg Chevy 6. (10) Zane Smith Chevy 7. (11) John Hunter Nemechek Chevy 8. (9) Chase Briscoe Ford 9. (1) Riley Herbst Toyota 10. (14) Justin Haley Chevy 11. (15) Ross Chastain Chevy 12. (27) Elliott Sadler Chevy 13. (6) Michael Annett Chevy 14. (38) Kaz Grala Chevy 15. (33) Dillon Bassett Chevy 16. (3) Christopher Bell Toyota 17. (17) Gray Gaulding Chevy 18. (32) Stephen Leicht Chevy 19. (20) Garrett Smithley Chevy

250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250 250

20. (34) Brandon Brown Chevy 250 21. (19) Ray Black II Chevy 250 22. (12) Noah Gragson Chevy 249 23. (28) Joey Gase Toyota 249 24. (23) Tyler Matthews Chevy 248 25. (21) Donald Theetge Chevy 247 26. (24) Colin Garrett Toyota 247 27. (26) Vinnie Miller Chevy 246 28. (29) Matt Mills Chevy 245 29. (22) David Starr Chevy 245 30. (30) BJ McLeod Toyota 245 31. (35) Mike Harmon Chevy 243 32. (36) Kyle Weatherman Chevy 237 33. (8) Brandon Jones Toyota (e)175 34. (25) Chad Finchum Toyota (b)119 35. (18) Jeremy Clements Chevy (e)112 36. (16) Mason Diaz Chevy (e)63 37. (37) Timmy Hill Toyota (v)15 38. (31) Jeff Green Chevy (e)10 E=Engine. V=Vibration. B=Brakes Average Speed of Race Winner: 90.519 mph. Time of Race: 2 Hrs, 4 Mins, 17 Secs. Margin of Victory: 2.639 Seconds. Caution Flags: 7 for 44 laps. Lead Changes: 9 among 6 drivers. Lap Leaders: R. Herbst 1;C. Custer 2-19;J. Allgaier 20-36;C. Bell 37-67;M. Annett 68-69;C. Bell 70;J. Allgaier 71-139;C. Custer 140-223;A. Cindric 224-230;C. Custer 231-250. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Lead, Laps Led): Cole Custer 3 times for 122 laps; Justin Allgaier 2 times for 86 laps; Christopher Bell 2 times for 32 laps; Austin Cindric 1 time for 7 laps; Michael Annett 1 time for 2 laps; Riley Herbst 1 time for 1 lap.

NHRA qualifying Friday | Houston Raceway Park Baytown, Texas Qualifying will continue Saturday for Sunday’s final eliminations. Top Fuel 1. Brittany Force, 3.661 seconds, 332.18 mph. 2. Steve Torrence, 3.703, 324.67. 3. Leah Pritchett, 3.720, 326.40. 4. Doug Kalitta, 3.727, 316.45. 5. Terry McMillen, 3.732, 323.04. 6. Mike Salinas, 3.735, 321.27. 7. Austin Prock, 3.745, 322.42. 8. Jordan Vandergriff, 3.746, 317.72. 9. Billy Torrence, 3.754, 323.58. 10. Scott Palmer, 3.771, 321.81. 11. Richie Crampton, 3.780, 317.19. 12. Antron Brown, 3.782, 320.74. 13. Clay Millican, 3.805, 310.70. 14. Shawn Reed, 4.024, 236.63. 15. Cameron Ferre, 4.028, 291.89. 16. Jim Maroney, 4.054, 288.21. Not Qualified: 17. Kebin Kinsley, 5.132, 163.26. Funny Car 1. John Force, Chevy Camaro, 3.888, 319.29. 2. Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 3.895, 321.12. 3. J.R. Todd, Toyota Camry, 3.903, 326.08. 4. Matt Hagan, Dodge Charger, 3.916, 318.47. 5. Cruz Pedregon, Charger, 3.929, 324.67. 6. Jack Beckman, Charger, 3.932, 311.34. 7. Ron Capps, Charger, 3.940, 317.94. 8. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 3.958, 317.34. 9. Blake Alexander, Mustang, 3.978, 303.30. 10. Shawn Langdon, Camry, 3.979, 314.68. 11. Jim Campbell, Charger, 4.037, 311.92. 12. Jonnie Lindberg, Mustang, 4.090, 309.27. 13. Jeff Diehl, Camry, 4.118, 293.98. 14. Terry Haddock, Mustang, 4.182, 294.69. 15. Tommy Johnson Jr., Charger, 4.810, 168.43. 16. Todd Simpson, Charger, 5.169, 149.56. Not Qualified: 17. Robert Hight, 5.342, 158.26.

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SPORTS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

Bryant impresses in trial run New Mizzou QB moves the offense in Black and Gold game

MIZZOU NOTEBOOK

Odom’s faith in Banister is rewarded BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Barrett Banister

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Missouri quarterback Kelly Bryant looks for room to run Saturday in the team’s spring scrimmage at Memorial Stadium. BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • It was one out of 109 plays in a vanilla football scrimmage that’s no more important than the 14 other spring practices that aren’t broadcast on live TV, but a simple 11-yard pass on the third series of Saturday’s Black and Gold spring game said a lot about Missouri’s new offense. The Tigers haven’t completely redesigned their system under offensive coordinator Derek Dooley, but the driver is new. And obvious to anyone at Saturday’s scrimmage, the new guy’s strengths are different from his predecessor’s. On first and 10 from his 46-yard line, Kelly Bryant couldn’t find an open target, leaked out of the pocket to his right and kept his eyes looking and his legs churning as he pulled away from the nearest defender. He uncorked a strike to Barrett Banister, who ran parallel to the line of scrimmage 11 yards downfield and snagged the pass to complete a signature scramble drill. First down. What looked like the result of fortunate improvisation was all part of the Tigers’ new script: When Bryant scrambles, his receivers follow. For the few thousands of fans at Memorial Stadium and the untold number watching on ESPNU, this was their first impression of Mizzou Offense A.D. — After Drew. Drew Lock set records with his uniquely strong arm the last four seasons, and with Lock watching from the sideline Saturday, Bryant accurately threw the ball in his public debut and consistently moved the chains with his arm and his legs. Matched against the backup defense, the graduate transfer from Clemson completed his first eight passes and led the Black team into the red zone on his first three possessions. It wasn’t an overly prolific performance — in four series, he completed 12 of 17 passes for 150 yards and only once came close to throwing an interception — but a promising outing to take into the next stage of the offseason. The Black team, composed of starters and top backups, dominated the Gold team of reserves 21-3 and outgained them in yardage 433-95. Just like the new team facility in the south end zone, Mizzou’s offense is still under construction. But in the three months Bryant has been on campus, Dooley has already installed more plays

Missouri running back Tyler Badie tries to break free from defensive back Zion Sales. Badie was the Tigers’ third-leading runner last season, with 437 yards on 89 carries.

than he had this time last year, Tigers coach Barry Odom said. That’s the upside of landing an experienced quarterback from a winning program. “He’s got a high football IQ and he wants more,” Odom said. More than anything Saturday, Odom wanted to see how Bryant responded to the day’s ups and downs, how he bounced back from adversity and how he moved on from success. As he has all spring, Odom came away impressed. “He’s becoming more vocal with the team, which is good,” he said. “I think that’s important at quarterback. He prepares well enough and puts himself in position that the respect factor is there that he can get guys going and keep them going if things are going really well.” Mizzou’s opening drive Saturday was Bryant’s best, even though he didn’t have the luxury of playing with his two best receivers. Tight end Albert Okwuegbunam is still recovering from last year’s shoulder injury and slot receiver Johnathon Johnson has been nursing a sore hamstring. Bryant completed all three of his passes on the drive, including a 36-yard heave down the sideline, a back-shoulder fade to fellow grad transfer Jonathan Nance. Two plays later Larry Rountree III was in the end zone with a 4-yard run. Bryant led the Black offense inside the 10-yard line on the next two drives, but both series stalled. In a flashback to last year’s special teams woes, the Tigers missed 27-yard field goal attempts on each possession. As usual in scrimmages, the defense

wasn’t allowed to tackle quarterbacks, so all three of Bryant’s rushing attempts were whistled dead before he could absorb contact. He was credited with 8 yards. Teammates were confident he’ll earn more once the real games begin. “I know he can bring a lot,” said Nance, who caught three passes for 48 yards. “People can’t tackle him one-on-one. We’ll see in the game. You know how that goes. People think they’re tackling him, but they’re really not tackling him.” “Kelly’s a little different at the quarterback position when we’re not playing two-hand touch,” Odom said. “He’s a hard guy to bring down.” He was even harder to track down after the scrimmage. Still a rookie to the team’s postgame routine, Bryant didn’t stop at the team facility for media interviews after the scrimmage. His teammates were more than happy to talk about his debut, especially those potent scrambles. “We have rules in everything where we’re supposed to go anytime we see a scramble,” said Banister, a slot receiver who finished with a team-high eight catches for 73 yards. “First you’ve got to run with him and try to find the open spot. Then obviously if you don’t get the ball you’ve got to turn and block someone because he can run, too. That’s just one thing we’ve been really working on this spring, his ability to extend plays.” Soon enough, they’ll count for real.

broke the drought. “It meant a lot to me,” he said. He tried to make the most of his terrible stretch. “I said it a couple of weeks ago: ‘You have to embrace it at some point,’” he said. Davis walked to the plate in the first to what mostly appeared to be mock cheers. But many of those quickly changed when he hit a liner over the head of second baseman Dustin Pedroia, ending the longest hitless streak ever by a position player. It was his first hit since Sept. 14. Once he safely reached first, Davis tipped

his cap to the Orioles’ dugout and many of his teammates raised their arms and hollered in support. He smiled and made a motion that he wanted to ball, which he got. “Significant weight lifted off my shoulders,” he said later. Davis, a two-time major league home run champion, had been 0 for 33 this season. (Associated Press)

Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

was still on a high Jan. 21, the day after his beloved New England Patriots rallied to beat the Chiefs in Kansas City for another AFC championship. Banister had been at Arrowhead Stadium to witness the overtime victory, as always wearing his Julian Edelman jersey. Things got even better the next day, when Missouri coach Barry Odom called the walk-on receiver into his office. That’s when Odom told Banister he had a scholarship for him. “I’m super grateful and indebted to him for giving me that,” Banister said Saturday, a day spent proving his coach was right for the reward. Last season Banister became one of Mizzou’s trustiest targets: Of his eight catches for 88 yards, three came on third down, going for 51 yards. All three moved the chains for a first down. The redshirt freshman from Fayetteville, Ark., had earned quarterback Drew Lock’s faith, and in that January meeting with Odom turned faith into a tangible prize. With senior starter Johnathon Johnson nursing a hamstring injury for parts of the last five weeks, Banister took the bulk of the first-team reps at the slot receiver position and started there in Saturday’s Black and Gold spring game. To no one’s surprise, the sure-handed sophomore led all players with eight catches for 73 yards on 10 targets. “The same thing you saw today is what he does in every practice,” Odom said. “He runs really good routes. He comes up with the catch. He always gets a few yards after the catch. Dependable, accountable.” Banister came to Mizzou two years ago not only with the hope of a scholarship but with the expectation he’d earn one and contribute. Saturday was the latest step in that process. “I always want to prove to somebody that this is where I belong,” he said.

IN THE NICK OF TIME Nick Bolton has big shoes to fill as Mizzou’s new weakside linebacker, replacing two-year starter and team captain Terez Hall. On Saturday he was given every opportunity to prove he’s ready for the job, playing all 36 snaps for the Black team in MU’s spring game. Bolton shared the team lead with three tackles and helped hold the Gold team to 13 rushing yards on 15 attempts. “He stepped in and maybe exceeded what I thought he’d do this spring,” Odom said. “He’s got a chance to be a special player.” BACKUP QB RACE Missouri knows Kelly Bryant will be the starting quarterback in the Aug. 31 season opener at Wyoming. The backup is to be determined. Sophomore Taylor Powell played the entire second half with the Black team, working with MU’s top receivers and linemen, but mostly struggled, completing 10 of 20 passes for 142 yards, a touchdown and the day’s only turnover, an interception to walk-on safety Mason Pack. Powell’s competition for the No. 2 job, for now, is junior Lindsey Scott Jr., who completed 6 of 11 passes for 38 yards and was sacked twice for the Gold team. Shawn Robinson, a transfer from TCU, also played with the Gold team, completing 3 of 10 passes for 44 yards, but he’s not eligible until 2020.

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK Davis ends long hitless streak Chris Davis definitely kept the souvenir ball from this most elusive hit. Davis ended his record slump at 0 for 54 and drew applause from rival fans at Fenway Park, lining a single and two doubles while driving in four runs as the Baltimore Orioles beat the Boston Red Sox 9-5 Saturday to stop a four-game losing streak. “That’s a long time without getting a hit,” he said. “I don’t know what I’m going to do with it, but obviously something special.” Davis broke into a smile when his basesloaded, two-run single in the first inning

Health issues for Darling • Mets broadcaster and former Major Leaguer Ron Darling says he’ll take a leave of absence for health reasons.

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In an announcement during Saturday’s Mets game, he said, “A series of tests revealed a large mass in my chest which will require surgery to remove.” Absent complications, Darling hopes to return next month. (News services) Other news • Rangers second baseman Rougned Odor went on the 10-day injured list with a sprained right knee. ... Giants first baseman Brandon Belt was scratched from Saturday’s lineup with a stiff neck. (Associated Press)

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BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Milwaukee

8

5

.615

AMERICAN LEAGUE GB WCGB L10 —

-

Cardinals

8

5

.615

-

Pittsburgh

7

5

.583

½

½

Chicago

5

8

.385

3

Cincinnati

4

8

.333 3½

EAST

W

L

Pct

New York

9

4

.692

-

Philadelphia

8

4

.667

½

Atlanta

7

6

.538

2

Washington

6

6 .500 2½

Miami

3 11

WEST

W

San Diego

Pct

L-3

5-2

Away 3-3

7-3 W-5

5-2

3-3

W-1

4-2

3-3

3

4-6 W-2

3-1

2-7

3-7 W-3

4-4

0-4

Str Home

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7-3 W-3

2-3

7-1

6-4

W-1

6-3

2-1

1

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L-2

5-3

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6-4

L-1

2-4

4-2

1-9

L-5

2-6

1-5

Str Home

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GB WCGB L10

10

5

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8

6

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Arizona

6

Colorado

Str Home

6-4

Los Angeles

San Francisco 5

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GB WCGB L10

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L

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 Pittsburgh 6, Washington 3, 10 inn. Philadelphia 9, Miami 1 NY Mets 6, Atlanta 2 San Diego 2, Arizona 1 Milwaukee at LA Dodgers, late Colorado at San Francisco, late Thursday Cincinnati 5, Miami 0 Cardinals 11, LA Dodgers 7 NY Mets 6, Atlanta 3 Cubs 2, Pittsburgh 0 San Diego 7, Arizona 6 San Francisco 1, Colorado 0

CENTRAL

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Detroit

8

5

.615

-

7-3

L-1

4-2

4-3

Minnesota

6

4 .600

½

½

6-4

L-1

2-1

4-3

Chicago

4

8

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4-6

W-1

1-5

3-3

Kansas City

3 10

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3-7

0-3

Str Home

Away

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EAST

W

L

Pct

Tampa Bay

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8-2 W-5

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6-1

New York

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3

4-6

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2-5

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Baltimore

5

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Seattle

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Houston

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5

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7-3 W-6

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5-5

L-3

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Oakland

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5-5 W-4

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Los Angeles

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Texas

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6

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6

ROUNDUP

Saturday’s pitching matchups

ContrerasPRESS hits 2 HRs ASSOCIATED as Cubs beat Angels Willson Contreras homered twice on a blustery day at Wrigley Field as Cole Hamels and the Chicago Cubs stopped the Angels’ six-game win streak Friday with a 5-1 victory over shorthanded Los Angeles. Anthony Rizzo and David Bote also connected to help Chicago win for the third time in four games on its first homestand of the year. Hamels (2-0) pitched eight crisp innings in his second straight victory, improving to 5-2 with a 2.63 ERA in 12 career starts against Los Angeles. Albert Pujols went deep for Los Angeles in its first trip to Wrigley since 2016. It was Pujols’ 57th homer in 183 career games against Chicago, second only to his 58 long balls against Houston. But the Angels were unable to overcome a rough outing for Tyler Skaggs (1-2), who surrendered three long home runs in his four innings.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Phillies 9, Marlins 1 • Jake Arrieta allowed one run in seven innings to earn his 100th career victory and Philadelphia sent host Miami to a fifth consecutive loss. The Marlins have lost nine of their past 10 games. Mets 6, Braves 2 • Brandon Nimmo hit a two-run homer, Jeff McNeil added a two-run double and New York kept hitting even without Pete Alonso, beating host Atlanta. Pirates 6, Nationals 3 • Colin Moran had a pinchhit, three-run homer in the 10th inning and visiting Pittsburgh scored five runs off Washington’s struggling bullpen. Padres 2, D’backs 1 • Manny Machado homered and Chris Paddack limited host Arizona to three hits over 5 1/3 innings, leading San Diego past the Diamondbacks.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Tigers at Twins ppd. • The Minnesota Twins postponed their series opener against the Detroit Tigers because of cold, wintry weather, opting for a doubleheader in May. Rays 11, Blue Jays 7 • Austin Meadows and Brandon Lowe each hit two home runs, becoming the first teammates to hit upper-deck homers at Toronto in the same game, and Tampa Bay beat the Blue Jays. Red Sox 6, Orioles 4 • Gold Glove center fielder Jackie Bradley Jr. made two key catches and Boston beat visiting Baltimore, giving the World Series champs their first two-game winning streak of the season. White Sox 9, Yankees 6 • Eloy Jimenez hit his first two major league homers, including a tiebreaking shot in the fifth inning, and visiting Chicago ended a five-game skid by beating banged-up New York in a rain-shortened game. Athletics 8, Rangers 6 • Khris Davis hit his MLBleading 10th home run in the eighth inning as Oakland won in Texas. Royals 8, Indians 1 • Kansas City scored six times against Carlos Carrasco in the first inning at home as the Royals snapped a 10-game losing streak. Associated Press

Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 White Sox 9, NY Yankees 6, 7 inn. Tampa Bay 11, Toronto 7 Boston 6, Baltimore 4 Oakland 8, Texas, 6 Kansas City 8, Cleveland 1 Detroit at Minnesota, ppd. Houston at Seattle, late Thursday Oakland 8, Baltimore 5 Cleveland 4, Detroit 0 Seattle 7, Kansas City 6, 10 inn. Boston 7, Toronto 6

NL

Pitcher

StL Cin

Wainwright (R) Roark (R) 6:10

4.50 5.79

3:05

1-0 0-1

2.45 6.52

Freeland (L) Bumgarner (L) 3:05

1-2 0-2

5.40 3.32

2-0 0-0

0.75 4.09

NY Atl

Vargas (L) 1-0 Newcomb (L) 6:20 0-0

9.00 1.64

SD Ari

Strahm (L) Kelly (R)

7:10

0-2 1-1

7.04 2.57

Mil LA

Davies (R) TBA

8:10

1-0 1.69 0-0 0.00

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

Col SF

Phi Eflin (R) Mia Smith (L)

ERA

2-1 5.28 12:05 0-2 13.50

Chi NY

0-1 7.71 12:05 0-0 0.00

Nova (R) Sabathia (L)

Det Ross (R) Min Pineda (R)

1:10

1-1 1-0

TB Tor

Snell (L) Buchholz (R)

2:07

2-1 2.84 0-0 0.00

Cle KC

Rodriguez (R) Bailey (R) 6:15

0-0 0.00 0-1 9.00

2.25 2.00

7:05

0-1 0-1

4.87 1.86

Hou Verlander (R) Sea Hernandez (R) 8:10

1-0 1-0

4.24 4.26

Time W-L

ERA

IL

BOX SCORES BOX SCORES

5:10

Bal Cashner (R) Bos Porcello (R)

Oak Estrada (R) Tex Sampson (R)

The Orioles’ Dwight Smith Jr. makes the catch on a fly ball by Boston’s J.D. Martinez during the fourth inning Friday in Boston. xx

ERA

1-0 0-0

Pit Archer (R) Was Sanchez (R)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Time W-L

Pitcher

LAA Stratton (R) 0-1 6.48 ChC Hendricks (R) 1:20 0-2PRESS 6.48 ASSOCIATED Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Cubs 5, Angels 1

White Sox 9, Yankees 6

Red Sox 6, Orioles 4

Pirates 6, Nationals 3

Sunday’s Royals 8, Indians 1 pitching matchups

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fletcher lf-2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .297 Simmons ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .216 Pujols 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .239 Lucroy c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .279 Ward 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Calhoun rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Cozart 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .030 Jewell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .042 Skaggs p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Goodwin lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .323 Totals 31 1 4 1 0 6 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Almora Jr. cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .250 Bryant 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .231 Rizzo 1b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .204 Baez ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .232 Contreras c 4 2 3 2 0 1 .333 Bote 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .304 Zagunis rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .316 Schwarber lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .208 Hamels p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Kintzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 5 10 5 1 10 Los Angeles 000 100 000 — 1 4 1 Chicago 300 101 00x — 5 10 0 a-lined out for Skaggs in 5th. E: Ward (2). LOB: Los Angeles 3, Chicago 6. 2B: Fletcher (2). HR: Pujols (2), off Hamels; Rizzo (3), off Skaggs; Contreras (4), off Skaggs; Bote (1), off Skaggs; Contreras (5), off Ramirez. RBIs: Pujols (5), Rizzo 2 (10), Contreras 2 (9), Bote (4). SB: Almora Jr. (2). RLISP: Los Angeles 2 (Simmons, Cozart); Chicago 2 (Almora Jr., Baez). GIDP: Bote. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Simmons, Fletcher, Pujols). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Skaggs, L, 1-2 4 7 4 4 0 7 80 4.20 Ramirez 22/3 2 1 1 1 3 47 1.35 Jewell 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels, W, 2-0 8 4 1 1 0 6 106 3.79 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.05 Inherited runners-scored: Jewell 2-0. Umpires: Home, Gabe Morales; First, Jerry Meals; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Marty Foster. T: 2:29. A: 30,102.

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia rf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .341 Anderson ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .488 Abreu 1b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .204 Alonso dh 4 1 2 3 0 0 .162 Moncada 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .314 Jimenez lf 4 2 3 3 0 0 .319 McCann c 3 2 1 1 1 2 .318 Rondon 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .217 Engel cf 2 1 1 0 1 1 .176 Totals 31 9 12 9 3 8 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .200 Judge rf 2 1 0 1 0 1 .277 Voit dh 3 1 0 0 1 2 .184 Torres ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .300 Bird 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .194 LeMahieu 2b 2 1 2 2 1 0 .439 Frazier lf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .333 Urshela 3b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .308 Romine c 3 0 1 1 0 2 .222 Totals 24 6 7 6 4 7 Chicago 100 240 2 — 9 12 1 New York 220 101 x — 6 7 0 E: Anderson (3). LOB: Chicago 6, New York 6. 2B: Garcia 2 (4), Engel (2), Urshela (2). HR: Alonso (2), off Happ; Jimenez (1), off Holder; Jimenez (2), off Green; McCann (1), off Green; Gardner (3), off Giolito. RBIs: Garcia 2 (3), Alonso 3 (8), Jimenez 3 (6), McCann (1), Gardner (4), Judge (8), LeMahieu 2 (7), Urshela (2), Romine (3). SB: Anderson (5). SF: Judge. RLISP: Chicago 4 (Garcia 2, Anderson, Moncada); New York 2 (Voit 2). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Giolito 5 6 6 4 4 6 102 6.19 1/ 0 0 1 8 21.60 Ruiz 3 1 0 1/ Fry 0 0 0 4 12.60 3 0 0 1/ 0 0 0 9 5.06 Jones 3 0 0 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ 4 9 6 6 2 5 88 8.76 Holder 2 1 1 1 1 3 35 5.19 1/ Green 2 0 0 14 11.81 3 2 2 Happ pitched to 3 batters in 5th. Giolito pitched to 2 batters in 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Ruiz 2-1, Fry 2-0, Jones 2-0, Holder 1-1. HBP: Jones (Judge). Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Sean Barber; Third, Lance Barksdale. T: 2:43. A: 40,913.

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar 2b-ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .288 Rickard rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .189 Mancini 1b 3 2 1 0 1 2 .333 R.Nunez dh 4 1 1 2 0 1 .250 Smith Jr. lf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .278 Alberto 3b-2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Sucre c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .206 b-Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Martin ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .147 a-Ruiz ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .189 Mullins cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .114 Totals 32 4 4 4 2 12 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .278 Betts rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .226 Moreland 1b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .295 Martinez dh 4 1 1 0 0 0 .321 Bogaerts ss 4 2 3 1 0 0 .311 Devers 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 E.Nunez 2b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .206 Bradley Jr. cf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .149 Vazquez c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .194 Totals 33 6 11 5 1 4 Baltimore 000 000 202 — 4 4 0 Boston 001 200 12x — 6 11 1 a-struck out for Martin in 8th. b-lined out for Sucre in 9th. E: Bogaerts (1). LOB: Baltimore 3, Boston 6. 2B: Mancini (3), Moreland (5), Martinez (3), Bogaerts (5). HR: Smith Jr. (2), off Rodriguez; R.Nunez (2), off Thornburg; Benintendi (1), off Hess. RBIs: R.Nunez 2 (7), Smith Jr. 2 (6), Benintendi (6), Bogaerts (4), E.Nunez 2 (5), Bradley Jr. (2). SB: Betts (1). SF: Bradley Jr.. S: Devers. RLISP: Boston 3 (Moreland 2, Martinez). GIDP: Villar. DP: Boston 1 (E.Nunez, Bogaerts, Moreland). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hess, L, 1-2 52/3 6 3 3 0 3 81 3.32 Fry 1 2 1 1 0 0 21 2.70 Phillips 1 3 2 2 1 1 22 4.50 1/ Wright 5 12.15 3 0 0 0 0 0 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 2/ Rodriguez, W, 1-2 6 3 3 2 2 0 8 93 7.98 1/ Barnes 3 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.69 Workman 1 0 0 0 1 2 14 0.00 1/ Thornburg 1 0 12 5.68 3 1 2 2 2/ Brasier, S, 3-3 3 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.35 Inherited runners-scored: Fry 1-0, Phillips 2-1, Wright 1-0. WP: Barnes, Fry, Phillips. Umpires: Home, Mark Wegner; First, Jim Reynolds; Second, Ben May; Third, Stu Scheurwater. T: 2:55. A: 33,664.

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 4 2 1 0 0 1 .304 Marte cf 5 0 2 2 0 1 .245 Kang 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .108 e-Moran ph-3b 1 1 1 3 0 0 .278 Bell 1b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .295 Reyes lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .053 Shuck rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .263 Stallings c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Gonzalez ss 4 1 2 0 0 2 .222 Williams p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .167 b-Cervelli ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .237 d-Cabrera ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .394 1-Martin pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .385 Totals 39 6 10 6 2 14 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Rendon 3b 5 2 2 2 0 0 .426 Soto lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .267 Zimmerman 1b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .205 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .265 Difo ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .188 Corbin p 2 0 2 1 0 0 .400 a-Adams ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 c-Kendrick ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .625 Robles cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Totals 36 3 7 3 3 6 Pittsburgh 010 000 020 3 — 6 10 0 Washington 011 000 010 0 — 3 7 1 a-doubled for Corbin in 7th. b-flied out for Rodriguez in 8th. c-doubled for Doolittle in 9th. d-doubled for Burdi in 10th. e-homered for Kang in 10th. 1-ran for Cabrera in 10th. E: Grace (1). LOB: Pittsburgh 6, Washington 8. 2B: Cabrera (3), Soto (4), Adams (2), Kendrick (2). 3B: Shuck (1). HR: Bell (3), off Corbin; Moran (2), off Miller; Rendon (5), off Williams; Rendon (6), off Kela. RBIs: Marte 2 (7), Bell (10), Moran 3 (6), Rendon 2 (16), Corbin (1). SB: Gonzalez (2). CS: Marte (1). S: Frazier, Robles. RLISP: Pittsburgh 1 (Marte); Washington 4 (Eaton, Dozier, Zimmerman, Robles). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams 61/3 4 2 2 3 3 93 2.45 2/ Rodriguez 3 0 0 0 0 0 13 4.76 Kela 1 1 1 1 0 1 18 7.94 Burdi, W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 4.76 Vazquez, S, 4-4 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 0.00 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Corbin 7 4 1 1 1 11 106 2.84 1/ 6 18.00 Sipp 3 2 2 2 0 0 2/ Barraclough 3 1 0 0 0 2 14 1.50 Doolittle 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 Grace, L, 0-1 0 1 2 1 0 0 3 10.13 Miller 1 1 1 1 1 0 19 5.68 Grace pitched to 2 batters in 10th. Inherited runners-scored: Rodriguez 1-0, Barraclough 2-2, Miller 2-2. HBP: Williams (Dozier). WP: Corbin. Umpires: Home, Scott Barry; First, Nic Lentz; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Mark Carlson. T: 3:28. A: 27,084.

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martin cf 2 0 1 0 2 1 .250 Moroff 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .087 J.Ramirez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .146 Bauers lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Santana 1b 1 0 0 0 3 1 .415 H.Ramirez dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .194 Naquin rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .294 R.Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .148 Miller 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .207 a-Allen ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .045 Stamets ss 3 0 0 0 1 2 .059 Totals 31 1 4 1 6 12 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 5 2 3 0 0 0 .328 Mondesi ss 5 1 1 1 0 3 .296 Gordon lf 5 1 4 3 0 1 .390 Soler rf 4 1 0 0 1 2 .231 O’Hearn 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .212 Dozier 3b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .225 Duda dh 2 0 0 1 1 0 .118 Maldonado c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .167 Owings cf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .170 Totals 35 8 13 7 5 9 Cleveland 010 000 000 — 1 4 2 Kansas City 600 101 00x — 8 13 0 a-popped out for Miller in the 8th. E: J.Ramirez (1), Miller (2). LOB: Cleveland 10, Kansas City 10. 2B: J.Ramirez (3), Merrifield (3), Gordon 2 (5), Owings (3). 3B: Mondesi (4). HR: Naquin (1), off Keller; Gordon (3), off Carrasco. RBIs: Naquin (2), Mondesi (10), Gordon 3 (13), Duda (3), Owings 2 (4). SB: Merrifield (5), Owings (3). SF: Duda. RLISP: Cleveland 5 (H.Ramirez 4, Allen); Kansas City 7 (Merrifield, Soler, O’Hearn, Dozier 2, Maldonado, Owings). DP: Cleveland 1 (Santana, Stamets). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco, L, 1-2 2/3 6 6 6 1 1 28 12.60 Wittgren 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 18 0.00 Olson 2 2 1 1 0 2 29 1.50 Otero 1 2 1 0 1 0 21 0.00 O.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 5.40 Edwards 1 0 0 0 2 0 22 1.80 Ramirez 1 2 0 0 1 2 27 4.50 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Keller, W, 2-1 62/3 3 1 1 5 10 118 2.45 Diekman 11/3 1 0 0 1 1 27 3.86 Kennedy 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.29 Otero pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Wittgren 1-0, O.Perez 2-1, Diekman 1-0. HBP: Keller (J.Ramirez), Edwards (O’Hearn). WP: Keller. Umpires: Home, Paul Emmel; First, Bruce Dreckman; Second, Manny Gonzalez; Third, Mike Estabrook. T: 3:10. A: 11,950 (37,903).

Athletics 8, Rangers 6

Padres 2, Diamondbacks 1

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Semien ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .319 Canha 1b 2 1 0 0 1 2 .200 a-Morales ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Chapman 3b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .302 Davis dh 4 1 1 2 0 1 .265 Pinder lf 4 1 0 0 0 0 .308 Piscotty rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .235 Profar 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .197 Laureano cf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .258 Phegley c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .333 Totals 36 8 11 8 2 9 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Choo dh 5 1 3 0 0 2 .317 Forsythe 2b 4 2 1 1 0 1 .269 Andrus ss 4 1 2 3 0 1 .389 Mazara rf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .231 Gallo lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .171 Cabrera 3b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .190 Kiner-Falefa c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Wisdom 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .182 DeShields cf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .171 b-Pence ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Totals 36 6 10 6 1 12 Oakland 010 004 111 — 8 11 0 Texas 200 130 000 — 6 10 0 a-struck out for Canha in 7th. b-popped out for DeShields in 9th. LOB: Oakland 3, Texas 4. 2B: Piscotty (5), Profar (2), Choo (6), Forsythe (3), Mazara (1). HR: Laureano (3), off Kelley; Davis (10), off Martin; Cabrera (4), off Fiers; Andrus (2), off Fiers. RBIs: Chapman 2 (11), Davis 2 (19), Piscotty (10), Profar (9), Laureano (8), Phegley (8), Forsythe (3), Andrus 3 (10), Mazara (9), Cabrera (8). SB: Andrus (3). CS: Semien (1), Choo (1). RLISP: Oakland 3 (Profar, Laureano, Morales); Texas 3 (Choo, Cabrera, Kiner-Falefa). GIDP: Semien. DP: Texas 1 (Andrus, Forsythe, Wisdom). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers 5 7 6 6 1 6 100 7.06 Petit 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.45 Trivino, W, 1-0 11/3 2 0 0 0 2 22 1.64 1/ 0 1 5 5.40 Buchter 3 0 0 0 Treinen, S, 5-6 11/3 1 0 0 0 3 20 0.87 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smyly 5 4 4 4 2 5 93 7.15 Chavez 1 2 1 1 0 1 26 11.37 Kelley 1 1 1 1 0 1 21 2.57 Martin, L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 0 2 15 5.40 Springs 0 2 1 1 0 0 9 2.57 Gomez 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 4.91 Smyly pitched to 3 batters in 6th. Springs pitched to 2 batters in 9th. Inherited runners-scored: Buchter 1-0, Treinen 1-0, Chavez 3-3, Gomez 2-1. Umpires: Home, Jansen Visconti; First, Doug Eddings; Second, Chris Conroy; Third, Bill Miller. T: 3:16. A: 24,817.

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .208 Machado 3b 4 1 1 1 0 3 .245 F.Reyes rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .176 Myers lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .296 Tatis Jr. ss 3 0 1 1 1 0 .250 Hedges c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Urias 2b 2 0 1 0 1 1 .154 Paddack p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 G.Reyes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Renfroe ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Warren p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 5 2 2 12 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dyson cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .273 Flores 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .189 Peralta lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .359 Jones rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .327 Escobar 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Walker 1b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Ahmed ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .296 Kelly c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Weaver p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Hirano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Vargas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 1 3 1 1 9 San Diego 100 000 100 — 2 5 0 Arizona 001 000 000 — 1 3 0 a-flied out for G.Reyes in the 7th. b-grounded out for Lopez in the 8th. LOB: San Diego 5, Arizona 3. 2B: F.Reyes (2), Myers (3), Tatis Jr. (3), Dyson (1), Flores (3). HR: Machado (4), off Weaver. RBIs: Machado (8), Tatis Jr. (8), Peralta (7). RLISP: San Diego 2 (Tatis Jr., Renfroe); Arizona 1 (Jones). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paddack 51/3 3 1 1 1 5 88 1.29 G.Reyes, W, 1-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Warren 2 0 0 0 0 1 27 4.00 Yates, S, 8-8 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.00 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver, L, 0-1 61/3 5 2 2 0 8 92 5.17 2/ Hirano 1 0 9 5.40 3 0 0 0 Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 Holland 1 0 0 0 1 2 15 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Hirano 1-0. Umpires: Home, Rob Drake; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Tim Timmons. T: 2:38. A: 22,209.

Mets 6, Braves 2 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 3b 5 1 2 2 0 0 .359 Rosario ss 5 0 0 0 0 2 .255 Cano 2b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Conforto rf 4 0 1 1 1 0 .340 Ramos c 2 0 0 0 3 2 .350 Smith 1b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .438 Broxton cf-lf 4 1 0 0 1 3 .222 Nimmo lf 4 2 3 2 0 0 .205 Lagares cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Wheeler p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Alonso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .370 Lugo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 6 10 6 6 9 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Inciarte cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .159 Donaldson 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .213 Freeman 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .362 Acuna Jr. lf 3 0 2 1 1 1 .289 Markakis rf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .319 Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .293 Albies 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .302 Flowers c 4 0 2 0 0 2 .455 Wright p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Joyce ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Tomlin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Parsons p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Biddle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Minter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Camargo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .105 Totals 33 2 7 2 3 10 New York 020 400 000 — 6 10 0 Atlanta 100 010 000 — 2 7 0 a-grounded out for Venters in 4th. b-struck out for Tomlin in 6th. c-popped out for Wilson in 8th. d-grounded out for Minter in 9th. LOB: New York 10, Atlanta 8. 2B: McNeil (3), Cano (2), Conforto (5), Smith (1), Nimmo (3), Donaldson (4), Acuna Jr. (1). HR: Nimmo (2), off Wright. RBIs: McNeil 2 (8), Cano (6), Conforto (9), Nimmo 2 (6), Acuna Jr. (10), Markakis (10). SB: Conforto (1), Broxton (4). SF: Markakis. RLISP: New York 6 (Rosario, Smith, Broxton 4); Atlanta 4 (Acuna Jr., Markakis, Swanson, Joyce). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wheeler, W, 1-1 6 6 2 2 3 8 111 7.47 Wilson 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.35 Lugo 2 1 0 0 0 2 34 6.23 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wright, L, 0-2 32/3 8 6 6 4 3 76 7.07 1/ Venters 1 1 10 15.43 3 0 0 0 Tomlin 2 0 0 0 0 1 24 2.45 Parsons 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.70 Biddle 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.35 Minter 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 6.00 Inherited runners-scored: Venters 2-0. Umpires: Home, Chris Segal; First, Alfonso Marquez; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 3:07. A: 33,334.

Rays 11, Blue Jays 7 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows dh 5 2 3 2 1 0 .367 Pham lf 5 0 1 1 1 0 .278 Choi 1b 6 0 1 0 0 2 .267 Diaz 3b 4 2 1 0 2 2 .283 Lowe 2b 5 2 2 4 0 1 .289 Garcia rf 4 2 3 0 0 1 .349 Kiermaier cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .310 Heredia cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Zunino c 5 1 1 1 0 1 .103 Adames ss 3 1 2 2 1 1 .245 Totals 40 11 16 11 6 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McKinney rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .171 b-Jansen ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 4 .375 Smoak 1b 3 2 0 0 2 0 .194 Grichuk cf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .188 Hernandez lf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .209 Gurriel Jr. dh 3 1 1 2 0 0 .167 a-Tellez ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Urena 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Hanson 2b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .200 Maile c 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Totals 35 7 9 6 4 11 Tampa Bay 104 001 203 — 11 16 1 Toronto 000 000 610 — 7 9 0 a-struck out for Gurriel Jr. in 8th. b-struck out for McKinney in 9th. E: Choi (2). LOB: Tampa Bay 11, Toronto 5. 2B: Meadows (3), Choi (4), Garcia (2), Kiermaier (4), Zunino (2), Galvis (4), Hernandez (2), Gurriel Jr. (3). 3B: Kiermaier (2). HR: Meadows (5), off Thornton; Meadows (6), off Thornton; Lowe (3), off Thornton; Lowe (4), off Luciano; Adames (1), off Guerra; Maile (1), off Chirinos. RBIs: Meadows 2 (15), Pham (7), Lowe 4 (9), Kiermaier (8), Zunino (2), Adames 2 (4), Hernandez (5), Gurriel Jr. 2 (5), Hanson (1), Maile 2 (2). S: Heredia. RLISP: Tampa Bay 5 (Choi 2, Diaz, Lowe, Zunino); Toronto 2 (Maile 2). GIDP: Meadows, Pham. DP: Toronto 2 (Galvis, Hanson, Smoak), (Galvis, Urena, Smoak). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stanek 2 0 0 0 0 3 22 1.12 Yarbrough, W, 2-1 2 0 0 0 0 1 16 4.82 Chirinos 21/3 7 6 6 2 3 48 4.40 1/ 3 0.00 Kolarek 3 1 0 0 0 0 Castillo 11/3 1 1 0 2 2 33 0.00 Alvarado 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.00 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Thornton, L, 0-1 3 8 5 5 2 3 70 4.61 Gaviglio 3 2 1 1 0 2 36 1.80 Luciano 1 2 2 2 2 1 26 9.00 Hudson 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 6.75 Guerra 1 4 3 3 1 2 29 4.70 Thornton pitched to 2 batters in 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Castillo 1-0, Gaviglio 2-0. HBP: Gaviglio (Adames), Luciano (Garcia). WP: Castillo. Umpires: Home, Quinn Wolcott; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Ramon De Jesus; Third, Marvin Hudson. T: 3:21. A: 17,326.

Phillies 9, Marlins 1 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 4 2 3 3 1 1 .262 Segura ss 5 1 3 0 0 0 .333 Altherr rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Harper rf 5 1 2 1 0 2 .325 Arano p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hoskins 1b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .293 Realmuto c 5 2 2 1 0 1 .256 O.Herrera cf 5 0 1 2 0 1 .304 Hernandez 2b 5 0 1 1 0 0 .195 Franco 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .268 Arrieta p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Williams ph 0 1 0 0 0 0 .111 Kingery ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .375 Totals 40 9 14 9 3 8 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .176 Brice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Riddle ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .160 Kinley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Anderson 3b 2 0 1 0 2 1 .191 Walker 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .162 Castro 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Alfaro c 4 1 2 0 0 2 .286 Rojas ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .257 Dean rf 2 0 0 1 0 1 .000 R.Herrera cf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .156 Alcantara p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 a-Brinson ph-cf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .224 Totals 29 1 5 1 2 9 Philadelphia 005 010 030 — 9 14 0 Miami 000 000 100 — 1 5 2 a-struck out for Alcantara in 5th. b-hit by pitch for Arrieta in 8th. c-lined out for Brice in 8th. E: Castro (1), Alcantara (1). LOB: Philadelphia 8, Miami 5. 2B: Segura (4), Hoskins (3), O.Herrera (4), Rojas (3). HR: McCutchen (3), off Brice. RBIs: McCutchen 3 (8), Harper (9), Hoskins (16), Realmuto (6), O.Herrera 2 (6), Hernandez (5), Dean (1). SF: Dean. RLISP: Philadelphia 2 (Hoskins, Arrieta); Miami 2 (Walker, Brinson). GIDP: Realmuto, Walker, Rojas. DP: Philadelphia 2 (Arrieta, Segura, Hoskins), (Franco, Kingery, Hoskins); Miami 1 (Castro, Walker). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta, W, 2-1 7 5 1 1 1 8 108 2.25 Arano 2 0 0 0 1 1 25 0.00 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Alcantara, L, 1-1 5 11 6 6 2 6 93 4.24 Brice 3 3 3 3 1 2 46 3.00 Kinley 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 1.17 HBP: Arrieta (Rojas), Brice (Williams). WP: Brice. Umpires: Home, Jerry Layne; First, Vic Carapazza; Second, Ryan Additon; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T: 2:46. A: 9,322.


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE Pct

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Milwaukee

9

5 .643

Cardinals

8

6

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1

Pittsburgh

7

6 .538

Cincinnati

5

8 .385 3½

Chicago

5

9

.357

GB WCGB L10

Pct

4

Str Home

6-4

W-1

7-3

½

6-4

3

Away

5-2

4-3

L-1

5-2

3-4

L-1

4-2

3-4

4-6 W-4

5-4

0-4

4-6

3-2

2-7

Str Home

Away

GB WCGB L10

L-1

EAST

W

L

New York

9

4 .692

7-3

W-3

2-3

7-1

Philadelphia

8

5

.615

1

5-5

L-1

6-3

2-2

Atlanta

7

6 .538

2

½

7-3

L-2

5-3

2-3

6 .538

2

½

6-4

W-1

3-4

4-2

6

2-8

W-1

3-6

1-5

Str Home

Away

Washington

7

Miami

4 11

.267

WEST

W

L

Pct

San Diego

10

5 .667

7-3

W-3

4-3

6-2

7

2

½

5-5

L-5

5-3

3-4

San Francisco 7

9 .438 3½

2

5-5

W-3

5-4

2-5

Arizona

6

8 .429 3½

2

5-5

L-3

3-4

3-4

Colorado

3 12 .200

1-9

L-8

0-5

3-7

Los Angeles

8

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

GB WCGB L10

.533

7

Saturday Cincinnati 5, Cardinals 2 LA Angels 6, Cubs 5 Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 5, Colorado 2 Miami 10, Philadelphia 3 NY Mets at Atlanta, late San Diego at Arizona, late Milwaukee at LA Dodgers, late Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 Pittsburgh 6, Washington 3, 10 inn. Philadelphia 9, Miami 1 NY Mets 6, Atlanta 2 San Diego 2, Arizona 1 Milwaukee 8, LA Dodgers 5 San Francisco 3, Colorado 2, 18 inn.

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Minnesota

7

4

.636

GB WCGB L10 —

6-4

Str Home W-1

3-1

Away 4-3

Cleveland

8

6

.571

½

6-4

L-2

5-1

3-5

Detroit

8

6

.571

½

6-4

L-2

4-2

4-4

9 .308

4

3-7

L-1

1-5

3-4

.286 4½

4

2-8

W-2

4-7

0-3

Str Home

Away

Chicago

4

Kansas City

4 10

EAST

W

L

Pct

Tampa Bay

11

4

.733

GB WCGB L10 —

7-3

L-1

5-2

6-2

New York

6

8

.429 4½

2

4-6

W-1

3-5

3-3

Baltimore

6

9 .400

2-8

W-1

1-6

5-3 3-8

5

Boston

5 10

.333

6

4-6

L-1

2-2

Toronto

5 10

.333

6

3-7

W-1

4-5

1-5

Str Home

Away

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Seattle

13

3

.813

8-2

L-1

5-2

8-1

Houston

9

5

.643

3

8-2

W-7

6-0

3-5

Oakland

4-4

10

8

.556

4

5-5 W-4

6-4

Los Angeles

8

7

.533 4½

½

7-3

W-1

6-1

2-6

Texas

6

7

.462 5½

4-6

L-1

4-3

2-4

Saturday Baltimore 9, Boston 5 NY Yankees 4, White Sox 0 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 LA Angels 6, Cubs 5 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 1 Kansas City 3, Cleveland 0 Oakland at Texas, ppd. Houston at Seattle, late Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 White Sox 9, NY Yankees 6, 7 inn Tampa Bay 11, Toronto 7 Boston 6, Baltimore 4 Oakland 8, Texas 6 Detroit at Minnesota, ppd. Kansas City 8, Cleveland 1 Houston 10, Seattle 6

ROUNDUP Sabathia is solid in return to Yankees CC Sabathia began his 19th and final big league season with five stellar innings, pinch-hitter Luke Voit (Lafayette High) came through with a broken-bat RBI single in the seventh and the New York Yankees beat the Chicago White Sox 4-0 Saturday to end a four-game slide. Yankees manager Aaron Boone kept the 38-year-old Sabathia on a short leash in his first start following offseason operations on his heart and right knee. Twins 4, Tigers 3 • Michael Pineda labored through six innings, Eddie Rosario drove in two runs and host Minnesota beat Detroit. Byron Buxton and Jorge Polanco added RBI singles for Minnesota. Christin Stewart homered for Detroit, which has lost three of four. Blue Jays 3, Rays 1 • Lourdes Gurriel Jr. hit a tworun double in the seventh inning to help host Toronto overcome reigning AL Cy Young winner Blake Snell’s no-hit bid in a win over Tampa Bay, snapping the Rays’ five-game winning streak. Snell didn’t allow a hit until Luke Maile singled with one out in the sixth. Orioles 9, Red Sox 5 • Chris Davis ended his record slump at 0 for 54 and drew applause from rival fans at Fenway Park, getting three hits and driving in four runs as Baltimore won in Boston to end a four-game losing streak. Royals 3, Indians 0 • Homer Bailey pitched seven innings of two-hit ball and Kansas City beat visiting Cleveland for their second straight win after a 10-game skid. A’s-Rangers ppd. • The game was postponed by rain and rescheduled for June 8 as part of a doubleheader.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 3, Pirates 2 • Adam Eaton and Howie Kendrick homered on consecutive pitches in the eighth inning and host Washington rallied to beat Pittsburgh. Anthony Rendon doubled to break a Nationals record with at least one-extra base hit in 10 straight games. He had shared the mark with Ryan Zimmerman. Giants 5, Rockies 2 • Madison Bumgarner pitched into the eighth inning to give a weary bullpen much needed rest and San Francisco beat visiting Colorado to hand the Rockies their eighth straight loss. Recently acquired Kevin Pillar homered for the fourth time in six days for the Giants. Buster Posey got two hits and drove in his first run this season . Marlins 10, Phillies 3 • Austin Dean logged a home run, a triple and 5 RBIs as Miami snapped a losing streak to beat visiting Philadelphia.

INTERLEAGUE Angels 6, Cubs 5 • Zack Cozart broke out of a slump with three hits and Cody Allen wiggled out of a jam in the ninth inning, helping Los Angeles win at Chicago. Los Angeles won for the seventh time in its last eight games. Ty Buttrey earned his first major league win in his 23rd appearance. Associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yankees starting pitcher CC Sabathia delivers during the fifth inning against the White Sox on Saturday in New York.

Sunday’s pitching matchups

BOX SCORES Giants 5, Rockies 2

Blue Jays 3, Rays 1

Orioles 9, Red Sox 5

Yankees 4, White Sox 0

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .233 Hampson 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .163 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Story ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Reynolds 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .192 Desmond cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .151 Daza lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Iannetta c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .207 Freeland p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Fuentes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Valaika ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .118 c-Tapia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 6 2 0 10 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Duggar rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .238 Solarte ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .189 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pillar cf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .161 Posey c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .227 Longoria 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .190 Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Crawford ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Sandoval 1b-3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .304 Panik 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .231 Bumgarner p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Belt 1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Parra lf 3 1 2 1 0 1 .200 Totals 31 5 11 5 3 7 Colorado 000 001 100 — 2 6 0 San Francisco 002 010 02x — 5 11 1 a-struck out for Freeland in the 6th. b-pinch hit for Shaw in the 8th. c-struck out for Valaika in the 8th. E: Parra (1). LOB: Colorado 3, San Francisco 9. 2B: Hampson (1), Iannetta (2), Posey (4), Sandoval (6). 3B: Longoria (1). HR: Reynolds (2), off Bumgarner; Pillar (4), off Freeland. RBIs: Hampson (2), Reynolds (4), Duggar (6), Pillar 2 (13), Posey (1), Parra (3). SF: Duggar, Pillar, Parra. S: Solarte. RLISP: Colorado 2 (Hampson, Arenado); San Francisco 6 (Duggar, Solarte 2, Longoria, Sandoval, Bumgarner). LIDP: Pillar. DP: Colorado 1 (Hampson, Reynolds); San Francisco 1 (Sandoval, Longoria, Bumgarner). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland, L, 1-3 5 9 3 3 1 5 76 5.40 Shaw 2 1 0 0 1 1 20 0.87 Oh 0 1 2 2 1 1 9 7.20 Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.60 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner, W, 1-2 7 6 2 2 0 7 98 3.12 Moronta 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.52 Dyson, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 1.04 Bumgarner pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Oh pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Dunn 3-2, Moronta 1-0. WP: Oh. PB: Iannetta (1). T: 2:48. A: 32,607.

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows rf 3 0 2 1 1 0 .385 Pham lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Choi 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .271 a-Robertson ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Diaz 3b-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Lowe 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Garcia dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .319 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Zunino c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .119 1-Heredia pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Perez c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Adames ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Totals 33 1 8 1 1 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .346 Smoak dh 2 1 1 0 2 0 .211 Hernandez lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .213 Grichuk cf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .192 Gurriel Jr. 2b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .179 Drury 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .140 Tellez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .212 Hanson rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Brito rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Maile c 2 1 1 0 1 1 .313 Totals 28 3 5 3 3 14 Tampa Bay 000 001 000 — 1 8 0 Toronto 000 000 21x — 3 5 3 a-struck out for Choi in the 8th. 1-ran for Zunino in the 8th. E: Hernandez (2), Gurriel Jr. (1), Maile (1). LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 4. 2B: Adames (3), Grichuk (4), Gurriel Jr. (4). 3B: Zunino (1). RBIs: Meadows (16), Hernandez (6), Gurriel Jr. 2 (7). SB: Kiermaier (3). CS: Choi (1). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Diaz, Kiermaier, Zunino, Robertson); Toronto 2 (Grichuk, Tellez). LIDP: Kiermaier. GIDP: Pham, Galvis. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Lowe, Adames, Choi), (Diaz, Lowe, Choi); Toronto 2 (Gurriel Jr., Galvis, Tellez), (Hernandez, Maile). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell 6 1 0 0 1 9 82 2.16 2/ 2 0 2 19 5.40 3 3 2 Roe, L, 0-2 1/ Beeks 1 3 1 1 1 2 3 33 3.18 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz 6 6 1 1 0 2 69 1.50 Pannone, W, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.00 2/ 1 2 14 3.86 Biagini 3 1 0 0 1/ 0 1 5 4.26 Mayza 3 0 0 0 Giles, S, 4-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 2.57 Inherited runners-scored: Beeks 1-0, Mayza 2-0. WP: Giles. Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Ramon De Jesus; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 2:44. A: 20,771.

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss-2b 4 2 2 0 2 0 .302 Mancini rf 5 2 2 0 1 2 .339 Rickard rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .189 Smith Jr. lf 3 2 0 0 3 2 .263 R.Nunez dh 5 2 2 2 0 1 .265 Ruiz 3b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .220 Davis 1b 5 0 3 4 0 0 .079 Alberto 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Martin ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .147 Severino c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Mullins cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .132 Totals 39 9 13 8 8 8 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi lf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .286 Betts cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Moreland dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277 a-E.Nunez ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Martinez rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Pearce 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .100 b-Swihart ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Devers 3b 3 2 1 0 1 1 .259 Pedroia 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .182 Vazquez c 4 1 2 4 0 1 .229 Totals 31 5 6 4 5 6 Baltimore 200 014 200 — 9 13 0 Boston 002 001 200 — 5 6 2 a-flied out for Moreland in the 8th. b-struck out for Pearce in the 8th. E: Pearce (1), Walden (1). LOB: Baltimore 12, Boston 4. 2B: Mancini (4), Davis 2 (2), Benintendi (3), Vazquez (3). HR: Vazquez (2), off Cashner. RBIs: R.Nunez 2 (9), Ruiz 2 (6), Davis 4 (6), Vazquez 4 (6). CS: Villar (1), Benintendi (1). S: Mullins. RLISP: Baltimore 7 (Smith Jr., R.Nunez 2, Alberto, Mullins 3); Boston 2 (Betts, Swihart). GIDP: Moreland. DP: Baltimore 1 (Alberto, Villar, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner, W, 3-1 5 3 3 3 3 2 81 5.31 Yacabonis 12/3 2 2 2 1 0 28 3.72 2/ Scott 1 0 14 0.00 3 1 0 0 Givens 12/3 0 0 0 0 4 19 4.91 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello, L, 0-3 4 6 3 3 5 2 90 11.12 Hembree 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.38 Brewer 0 3 4 4 2 0 21 7.94 Walden 2 1 2 1 1 2 35 1.50 Thornburg 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 4.91 Velazquez 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 2.79 Porcello pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Brewer pitched to 5 batters in the 6th. Cashner pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. IRS: Yacabonis 2-1, Scott 1-0, Givens 1-0, Hembree 2-1, Walden 2-1. HBP: Hembree (Alberto). WP: Thornburg, Velazquez. PB: Severino (1). T: 3:39. A: 35,823.

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .313 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .444 Abreu 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Alonso dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Moncada 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .296 Jimenez lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Rondon 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 a-Sanchez ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .094 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Totals 29 0 1 0 0 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .204 Judge rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .275 LeMahieu 3b-2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .432 Torres ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .296 Bird 1b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .171 Frazier dh 3 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Tauchman lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 b-Voit ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 Urshela 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Higashioka c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .500 Wade 2b-lf 2 0 0 1 0 0 .176 Totals 29 4 7 4 1 7 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 1 1 New York 000 000 31x — 4 7 1 a-struck out for Rondon in the 6th. b-singled for Tauchman in the 7th. E: Sanchez (4), Wade (1). LOB: Chicago 2, New York 4. HR: Judge (4), off Burr. RBIs: Judge (9), Higashioka (1), Wade (1), Voit (13). SF: Higashioka. S: Wade. RLISP: New York 2 (Gardner, Bird). GIDP: Torres. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Rondon, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, L, 0-2 6 4 1 1 1 5 93 5.28 Fry 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 12.60 Burr 2 3 2 1 0 2 26 5.40 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 5 1 0 0 0 3 62 0.00 German, W, 3-0 2 0 0 0 0 4 25 1.38 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.05 Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.00 Nova pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Fry pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Fry 1-0, Burr 2-2. T: 2:28. A: 41,176.

Nationals 3, Pirates 2 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Cervelli c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Bell 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .292 Moran 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .273 Cabrera rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .432 1-Martin pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .385 Shuck lf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .286 Gonzalez ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .231 Archer p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Kang ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .105 Totals 34 2 8 2 2 3 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .286 Kendrick 2b 2 1 1 1 2 0 .600 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .412 Soto lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Adams 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Suzuki c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .263 Difo ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .171 Sanchez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Zimmerman 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Robles cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .267 Totals 28 3 6 3 2 10 Pittsburgh 000 101 000 — 2 8 0 Washington 000 100 02x — 3 6 1 a-struck out for Rodriguez in the 9th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 9th. E: Kendrick (1). LOB: Pittsburgh 8, Washington 3. 2B: Moran (2), Gonzalez (2), Rendon (8). 3B: Bell (1). HR: Cabrera (1), off Sanchez; Eaton (1), off Rodriguez; Kendrick (2), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Moran (7), Cabrera (4), Eaton (5), Kendrick (4), Suzuki (6). S: Shuck. RLISP: Pittsburgh 3 (Frazier, Marte, Gonzalez); Washington 1 (Soto). GIDP: Frazier, Rendon 2. DP: Pittsburgh 2 (Gonzalez, Frazier, Bell), (Gonzalez, Frazier, Bell); Washington 1 (Kendrick, Difo, Adams). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer 7 4 1 1 2 9 94 2.00 Rodriguez, L, 0-1 1 2 2 2 0 1 22 6.75 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez 7 7 2 2 1 2 100 4.86 Suero, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 6.35 Doolittle, S, 1-2 1 1 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 T: 2:22. A: 32,103.

Twins 4, Tigers 3 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 2b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .135 Candelario 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .184 Cabrera dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .260 Stewart lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Hicks 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .222 Peterson rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167 Greiner c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .158 Mercer ss 2 1 2 0 0 0 .233 1-Beckham pr-ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .154 Jones cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .286 Totals 35 3 10 3 1 9 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .277 Polanco ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .372 Cruz dh 2 0 0 0 2 2 .286 Rosario lf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .238 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Gonzalez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .133 Schoop 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .286 Castro c 1 1 0 0 2 1 .167 Buxton cf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .300 Totals 26 4 5 4 7 7 Detroit 002 001 000 — 3 10 0 Minnesota 004 000 00x — 4 5 1 1-ran for Mercer in the 5th. E: Castro (1). LOB: Detroit 7, Minnesota 6. 2B: Hicks 2 (3), Mercer (4). HR: Stewart (3), off Pineda. RBIs: Harrison (2), Candelario (3), Stewart (11), Polanco (4), Rosario 2 (9), Buxton (4). SB: Jones (1). CS: Polanco (1). SF: Harrison, Polanco. RLISP: Detroit 5 (Harrison, Candelario 2, Stewart, Greiner); Minnesota 3 (Rosario 2, Schoop). LIDP: Greiner. FIDP: Cron. DP: Detroit 1 (Jones, Harrison); Minnesota 1 (Schoop, Polanco). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ross, L, 1-2 6 5 4 4 4 3 92 3.50 VerHagen 0 0 0 0 2 0 11 4.50 1/ 0 1 1 14 0.00 3 0 0 Stumpf 2/ 0 0 1 13 1.93 Alcantara 3 0 0 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineda, W, 2-0 6 8 3 3 0 5 96 3.00 Hildenberger 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Rogers 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.35 Parker, S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 1.80 VerHagen pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Stumpf 2-0, Alcantara 3-0. WP: Parker. Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Bill Welke; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 3:07. A: 16,484.

Marlins 10, Phillies 3 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 2 0 1 0 2 1 .273 Dominguez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .309 Harper rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .302 Hoskins 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .295 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .239 g-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 O.Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Hernandez 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .178 Franco 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .256 d-Kingery ph-3b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .500 Eflin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Williams ph-lf 2 0 1 2 0 0 .182 Totals 33 3 6 3 4 11 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Riddle ph-ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .192 B.Anderson 3b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .231 Walker 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .190 Castro 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .233 Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Alfaro c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .316 b-Wallach ph-c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Rojas ss-2b 3 3 3 1 0 0 .316 Dean rf 4 3 4 5 0 0 .667 Brinson cf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .226 Smith p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 N.Anderson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-R.Herrera ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Totals 4010 18 10 0 7 Philadelphia 000 000 003 — 3 6 0 Miami 024 010 30x — 10 18 0 a-lined out for Eflin in the 5th. b-singled for Alfaro in the 7th. c-flied out for N.Anderson in the 7th. d-doubled for Franco in the 8th. e-flied out for Nicasio in the 8th. f-singled for Guerrero in the 8th. g-lined out for Realmuto in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 7, Miami 7. 2B: McCutchen (3), Hoskins (4), Kingery 2 (2), Williams (1), Rojas (4), Brinson (4). 3B: Dean (1). HR: B.Anderson (1), off Eflin; Walker (3), off Eflin; Dean (1), off Eflin. RBIs: O.Herrera (7), Williams 2 (3), B.Anderson (2), Walker (3), Rojas (6), Dean 5 (6), Brinson 2 (4). SB: B.Anderson (1). CS: Alfaro (2). SF: Rojas. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Harper 2, Realmuto, Dominguez); Miami 4 (Granderson, Castro, Smith, Wallach). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eflin, L, 2-1 4 10 6 6 0 4 81 3.94 Nicasio 3 6 4 4 0 2 44 6.75 Dominguez 1 2 0 0 0 1 24 7.20 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smith, W, 1-0 6 1 0 0 3 6 99 2.65 N.Anderson 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.35 Guerrero 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 0.00 Conley 1 4 3 3 0 1 26 8.44 WP: Guerrero. T: 3:01. A: 13,828.

Angels 6, Cubs 5 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 0 0 1 1 2 .151 Simmons ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Bour 1b 4 0 2 0 1 1 .186 Lucroy c 5 1 1 0 0 0 .271 Goodwin cf-lf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .333 Fletcher lf-2b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .300 La Stella 2b 0 1 0 0 3 0 .184 Allen p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Cozart 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .108 Stratton p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Pujols ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .239 1-Ward pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 c-Bourjos ph-cf 0 0 0 1 0 0 .042 Totals 33 6 9 5 8 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Descalso 2b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .316 Zobrist rf-2b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .308 Rizzo 1b 3 2 0 0 2 0 .192 Baez ss 5 0 3 2 0 0 .262 Heyward cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .375 Contreras c 5 1 1 0 0 3 .316 Schwarber lf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .192 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Hendricks p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Almora Jr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 d-Zagunis ph-rf 1 0 1 2 0 0 .350 Totals 35 5 9 5 7 11 Los Angeles 030 002 010 — 6 9 1 Chicago 001 010 021 — 5 9 1 a-walked for Buttrey in the 6th. b-popped out for Webster in the 6th. c-out on sacrifice fly for Jewell in the 8th. d-singled for Kintzler in the 8th. 1-ran for Pujols in the 6th. E: Goodwin (2), Contreras (3). LOB: Los Angeles 10, Chicago 11. 2B: Bour (2), Baez 3 (4), Heyward (1). RBIs: Calhoun (5), Fletcher (3), Cozart (2), Pujols (6), Bourjos (1), Baez 2 (12), Heyward (10), Zagunis 2 (4). CS: Descalso (1). SF: Bourjos, Heyward. RLISP: Los Angeles 7 (Calhoun, Simmons 3, Fletcher, Stratton, Allen); Chicago 7 (Descalso, Baez, Heyward, Contreras 2, Schwarber 2). GIDP: Stratton. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Lucroy, Simmons); Chicago 1 (Baez, Rizzo). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stratton 42/3 5 2 2 4 5 81 5.54 1/ Buttrey, W, 1-0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Garcia 1 0 0 0 1 1 22 1.29 Jewell 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 2/ 1 1 29 4.91 Robles 3 3 2 2 Allen, S, 4-4 11/3 1 1 1 1 3 33 1.42 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, L, 0-3 5 6 3 2 1 2 87 5.40 2/ Brach 3 0 25 4.05 3 1 2 2 Rosario 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 7.20 1/ Webster 2 3.00 3 0 0 0 0 0 Collins 1 2 1 1 1 0 25 4.50 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.52 Ryan 1 0 0 0 2 2 23 4.91 Rosario pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Collins pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. IRS: Buttrey 1-0, Allen 2-0, Rosario 3-1, Webster 3-0, Kintzler 2-1. T: 3:56. A: 38,755.

NL

Pitcher

StL Cin

Mikolas (R) DeSclafani (R) 3:10

Time W-L

ERA

1-1 0-1

6.19 6.75

Phi Velasquez (R) 0-0 Mia Urena (R) 12:10 0-3

3.00 9.22

Pit Taillon (R) Was Scherzer (R)

12:35

0-2 1-2

3.00 3.32

Col SF

Marquez (R) Holland (L)

3:05

1-1 1-1

3.00 3.38

SD Ari

Lauer (L) Greinke (R)

3:10

2-1 1-1

4.76 7.16

Mil LA

Chacin (R) Stripling (R)

3:10

2-1 0-1

4.24 3.78

NY Atl

deGrom (R) Teheran (R)

6:05

2-1 1-1

3.18 6.00

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bal Means (L) Bos Price (L)

1-1 12:05 0-1

2.08 6.00

Chi NY

Rodon (L) Tanaka (R)

1-2 12:05 1-0

3.38 1.47

TB Tor

Morton (R) Stroman (R)

2-0 12:07 0-2

2.25 2.41

Det Zimmermann (R) Min Berrios (R) 1:10

0-1 1-1

2.50 2.18

Cle KC

1:15

1-2 1-1

3.86 5.74

Oak Anderson (L) Tex Miller (R) 2:05

3-0 0-1

2.50 9.53

Hou Cole (R) Sea Gonzales (L)

3:10

0-2 4-0

3.32 3.16

IL

Time W-L

Kluber (R) Junis (R)

Pitcher

LAA Cahill (R) ChC Chatwood (R) 1:20

ERA

1-1 0-0

3.50 6.00

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Royals 3, Indians 0 Cleveland

AB R H BI BB SO Avg.

Martin cf

3 0 0 0

1

1

.233

J.Ramirez 3b

4 0 0 0

0

0

.135

Naquin rf

4 0 0 0

0

0 .263

Santana 1b

3 0 0 0

0

1 .386

H.Ramirez dh

3 0 0 0

0

1

.179

Bauers lf

3 0 0 0

0

1

.159

Plawecki c

2 0 0 0

1

0

.125

Miller 2b

3 0 2 0

0

1 .250

3 0 0 0

0

3 .077

28 0 2 0

2

8

Moroff ss Totals

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b

4 0 2

1

0

0 .339

Mondesi ss

4 0 1

1

0

0 .293

Gordon lf

4 0 0

0

0

0 .356

Soler rf

4 0 0

0

0

3

.214

O’Hearn 1b

3 1 1

1

0

0

.222

Dozier 3b

3 1 2

0

0

0 .256

Duda dh

2 0 0

0

1

0

Maldonado c

2 1 1

0

0

1 .184

Owings cf

.105

3 0 0

0

0

1 .160

Totals

29 3 7

3

1

5

Cleveland

000 000 000 — 0 2 0

Kansas City 001 100

10x — 3 7 0

LOB: Cleveland 3, Kansas City 4. 2B: Miller (3), Maldonado (2). HR: O’Hearn (2), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Merrifield (6), Mondesi (11), O’Hearn (5). S: Maldonado. RLISP: Cleveland 2 (Moroff 2). GIDP: Naquin. DP: Kansas City 1 (Merrifield, Mondesi, O’Hearn). Cleveland

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Rodriguez, L, 0-1 52/3 5 2 2 0 3 91 3.18 Perez Anderson

1/ 3

00 0 0 0

2 2 1 1

3 4.91

1 2 26 4.50

Kansas City

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Bailey, W, 1-1

7 2 0 0 2 6 102 5.29

Kennedy

1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.12

Peralta, S, 1-2

1 0 0 0 0 0 16 9.00

WP: Anderson. Umpires: Home, Bruce Dreckman; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Paul Emmel. T: 2:26. A: 15,188.


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE Pct

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Milwaukee

9

5 .643

Cardinals

8

6

.571

1

Pittsburgh

7

6 .538

Cincinnati

5

8 .385 3½

Chicago

5

9

.357

EAST

W

L

Pct

New York

9

5 .643

6-4

L-1

2-3

7-2

Philadelphia

8

5

.615

½

5-5

L-1

6-3

2-2

Atlanta

8

6

.571

1

7-3

W-1

6-3

2-3

GB WCGB L10

6 .538

4

Str Home

6-4

W-1

7-3

½

6-4

3

Away

5-2

4-3

L-1

5-2

3-4

L-1

4-2

3-4

4-6 W-4

5-4

0-4

4-6

3-2

2-7

Str Home

Away

GB WCGB L10

L-1

Washington

7

½

6-4

W-1

3-4

4-2

Miami

4 11

.267 5½

2-8

W-1

3-6

1-5

WEST

W

L

Pct

Str Home

Away

San Diego

10

5 .667

7-3

W-3

4-3

6-2

7

2

½

5-5

L-5

5-3

3-4

San Francisco 7

9 .438 3½

2

5-5

W-3

5-4

2-5

Arizona

6

8 .429 3½

2

5-5

L-3

3-4

3-4

Colorado

3 12 .200

1-9

L-8

0-5

3-7

Los Angeles

8

GB WCGB L10

.533

7

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Sabathia is solid in return to Yankees

Giants 5, Rockies 2

CC Sabathia began his 19th and final big league season with five stellar innings, pinch-hitter Luke Voit (Lafayette High) came through with a broken-bat RBI single in the seventh and the New York Yankees beat the Chicago White Sox 4-0 Saturday to end a four-game slide. Yankees manager Aaron Boone kept the 38-year-old Sabathia on a short leash in his first start following offseason operations on his heart and right knee. Twins 4, Tigers 3 • Michael Pineda labored through six innings, Eddie Rosario drove in two runs and host Minnesota beat Detroit. Byron Buxton and Jorge Polanco added RBI singles for Minnesota. Christin Stewart homered for Detroit, which has lost three of four. Blue Jays 3, Rays 1 • Lourdes Gurriel Jr. hit a tworun double in the seventh to help host Toronto overcome reigning AL Cy Young winner Blake Snell’s no-hit bid in a win over Tampa Bay, snapping the Rays’ fivegame winning streak. Snell didn’t allow a hit until Luke Maile singled with one out in the sixth. Orioles 9, Red Sox 5 • Chris Davis ended his record slump at 0 for 54 and drew applause from rival fans at Fenway Park, getting three hits and driving in four runs as Baltimore won in Boston to end a four-game losing streak. Royals 3, Indians 0 • Homer Bailey pitched seven innings of two-hit ball and Kansas City beat visiting Cleveland for their second straight win after a 10-game skid. A’s-Rangers ppd. • The game was postponed by rain and rescheduled for June 8 as part of a doubleheader.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 3, Pirates 2 • Adam Eaton and Howie Kendrick homered on consecutive pitches in the eighth and host Washington rallied to beat Pittsburgh. Anthony Rendon doubled to break a Nationals record with at least one-extra base hit in 10 straight games. He had shared the mark with Ryan Zimmerman. Giants 5, Rockies 2 • Madison Bumgarner pitched into the eighth inning to give a weary bullpen much needed rest and San Francisco beat visiting Colorado to hand the Rockies their eighth straight loss. Recently acquired Kevin Pillar homered for the fourth time in six days for the Giants. Marlins 10, Phillies 3 • Austin Dean logged a home run, a triple and 5 RBIs as Miami snapped a losing streak to beat visiting Philadelphia. Braves 11, Mets 7 • Freddie Freeman hit a go-ahead RBI single in the second, Ronald Acuña Jr. had his fifth straight multihit game and host Atlanta snapped New York’s three-game winning streak.

INTERLEAGUE Angels 6, Cubs 5 • Zack Cozart broke out of a slump with three hits and Cody Allen wiggled out of a jam in the ninth inning, helping Los Angeles win at Chicago. Associated Press

M 3 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .233 Hampson 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .163 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Story ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Reynolds 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .192 Desmond cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .151 Daza lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Iannetta c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .207 Freeland p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Fuentes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Valaika ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .118 c-Tapia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 6 2 0 10 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Duggar rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .238 Solarte ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .189 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pillar cf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .161 Posey c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .227 3 0 1 0 1 1 .190 Longoria 3b Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Crawford ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Sandoval 1b-3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .304 Panik 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .231 Bumgarner p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Belt 1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Parra lf 3 1 2 1 0 1 .200 Totals 31 5 11 5 3 7 Colorado 000 001 100 — 2 6 0 San Francisco 002 010 02x — 5 11 1 a-struck out for Freeland in the 6th. b-pinch hit for Shaw in the 8th. c-struck out for Valaika in the 8th. E: Parra (1). LOB: Colorado 3, San Francisco 9. 2B: Hampson (1), Iannetta (2), Posey (4), Sandoval (6). 3B: Longoria (1). HR: Reynolds (2), off Bumgarner; Pillar (4), off Freeland. RBIs: Hampson (2), Reynolds (4), Duggar (6), Pillar 2 (13), Posey (1), Parra (3). SF: Duggar, Pillar, Parra. S: Solarte. RLISP: Colorado 2 (Hampson, Arenado); San Francisco 6 (Duggar, Solarte 2, Longoria, Sandoval, Bumgarner). LIDP: Pillar. DP: Colorado 1 (Hampson, Reynolds); San Francisco 1 (Sandoval, Longoria, Bumgarner). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland, L, 1-3 5 9 3 3 1 5 76 5.40 Shaw 2 1 0 0 1 1 20 0.87 Oh 0 1 2 2 1 1 9 7.20 Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.60 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner, W, 1-2 7 6 2 2 0 7 98 3.12 Moronta 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.52 Dyson, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 1.04 Bumgarner pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Oh pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Dunn 3-2, Moronta 1-0. WP: Oh. PB: Iannetta (1). T: 2:48. A: 32,607.

Nationals 3, Pirates 2 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Cervelli c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Bell 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .292 Moran 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .273 Cabrera rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .432 1-Martin pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .385 Shuck lf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .286 Gonzalez ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .231 Archer p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Kang ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .105 Totals 34 2 8 2 2 3 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .286 Kendrick 2b 2 1 1 1 2 0 .600 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .412 Soto lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Adams 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Suzuki c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .263 Difo ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .171 Sanchez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Zimmerman 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Robles cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .267 Totals 28 3 6 3 2 10 Pittsburgh 000 101 000 — 2 8 0 Washington 000 100 02x — 3 6 1 a-struck out for Rodriguez in the 9th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 9th. E: Kendrick (1). LOB: Pittsburgh 8, Washington 3. 2B: Moran (2), Gonzalez (2), Rendon (8). 3B: Bell (1). HR: Cabrera (1), off Sanchez; Eaton (1), off Rodriguez; Kendrick (2), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Moran (7), Cabrera (4), Eaton (5), Kendrick (4), Suzuki (6). S: Shuck. RLISP: Pittsburgh 3 (Frazier, Marte, Gonzalez); Washington 1 (Soto). GIDP: Frazier, Rendon 2. DP: Pittsburgh 2 (Gonzalez, Frazier, Bell), (Gonzalez, Frazier, Bell); Washington 1 (Kendrick, Difo, Adams). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer 7 4 1 1 2 9 94 2.00 Rodriguez, L, 0-1 1 2 2 2 0 1 22 6.75 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez 7 7 2 2 1 2 100 4.86 Suero, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 6.35 Doolittle, S, 1-2 1 1 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 T: 2:22. A: 32,103.

Blue Jays 3, Rays 1 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows rf 3 0 2 1 1 0 .385 Pham lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Choi 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .271 a-Robertson ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Diaz 3b-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Lowe 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Garcia dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .319 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Zunino c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .119 1-Heredia pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Perez c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Adames ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Totals 33 1 8 1 1 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .346 Smoak dh 2 1 1 0 2 0 .211 Hernandez lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .213 Grichuk cf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .192 Gurriel Jr. 2b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .179 Drury 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .140 Tellez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .212 Hanson rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Brito rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Maile c 2 1 1 0 1 1 .313 Totals 28 3 5 3 3 14 Tampa Bay 000 001 000 — 1 8 0 Toronto 000 000 21x — 3 5 3 a-struck out for Choi in the 8th. 1-ran for Zunino in the 8th. E: Hernandez (2), Gurriel Jr. (1), Maile (1). LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 4. 2B: Adames (3), Grichuk (4), Gurriel Jr. (4). 3B: Zunino (1). RBIs: Meadows (16), Hernandez (6), Gurriel Jr. 2 (7). SB: Kiermaier (3). CS: Choi (1). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Diaz, Kiermaier, Zunino, Robertson); Toronto 2 (Grichuk, Tellez). LIDP: Kiermaier. GIDP: Pham, Galvis. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Lowe, Adames, Choi), (Diaz, Lowe, Choi); Toronto 2 (Gurriel Jr., Galvis, Tellez), (Hernandez, Maile). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell 6 1 0 0 1 9 82 2.16 2/ Roe, L, 0-2 2 0 2 19 5.40 3 3 2 1/ Beeks 1 3 1 1 1 2 3 33 3.18 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz 6 6 1 1 0 2 69 1.50 Pannone, W, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.00 2/ Biagini 1 2 14 3.86 3 1 0 0 1/ Mayza 0 1 5 4.26 3 0 0 0 Giles, S, 4-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 2.57 Inherited runners-scored: Beeks 1-0, Mayza 2-0. WP: Giles. Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Ramon De Jesus; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 2:44. A: 20,771.

Saturday Cincinnati 5, Cardinals 2 LA Angels 6, Cubs 5 Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 5, Colorado 2 Miami 10, Philadelphia 3 Atlanta 11, NY Mets 7 San Diego at Arizona, late Milwaukee at LA Dodgers, late Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 Pittsburgh 6, Washington 3, 10 inn. Philadelphia 9, Miami 1 NY Mets 6, Atlanta 2 San Diego 2, Arizona 1 Milwaukee 8, LA Dodgers 5 San Francisco 3, Colorado 2, 18 inn.

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Minnesota

7

4

.636

GB WCGB L10 —

6-4

Str Home W-1

3-1

Away 4-3

Cleveland

8

6

.571

½

6-4

L-2

5-1

3-5

Detroit

8

6

.571

½

6-4

L-2

4-2

4-4

9 .308

4

3-7

L-1

1-5

3-4

.286 4½

4

2-8

W-2

4-7

0-3

Str Home

Away

Chicago

4

Kansas City

4 10

EAST

W

L

Pct

Tampa Bay

11

4

.733

GB WCGB L10 —

7-3

L-1

5-2

6-2

New York

6

8

.429 4½

2

4-6

W-1

3-5

3-3

Baltimore

6

9 .400

2-8

W-1

1-6

5-3 3-8

5

Boston

5 10

.333

6

4-6

L-1

2-2

Toronto

5 10

.333

6

3-7

W-1

4-5

1-5

Str Home

Away

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Seattle

13

3

.813

8-2

L-1

5-2

8-1

Houston

9

5

.643

3

8-2

W-7

6-0

3-5

Oakland

4-4

10

8

.556

4

5-5 W-4

6-4

Los Angeles

8

7

.533 4½

½

7-3

W-1

6-1

2-6

Texas

6

7

.462 5½

4-6

L-1

4-3

2-4

Saturday Baltimore 9, Boston 5 NY Yankees 4, White Sox 0 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 LA Angels 6, Cubs 5 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 1 Kansas City 3, Cleveland 0 Oakland at Texas, ppd. Houston at Seattle, late Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 White Sox 9, NY Yankees 6, 7 inn. Tampa Bay 11, Toronto 7 Boston 6, Baltimore 4 Oakland 8, Texas 6 Detroit at Minnesota, ppd. Kansas City 8, Cleveland 1 Houston 10, Seattle 6

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yankees starting pitcher CC Sabathia delivers during the fifth inning against the White Sox on Saturday in New York. Twins 4, Tigers 3

Marlins 10, Phillies 3

Angels 6, Cubs 5

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 2b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .135 Candelario 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .184 Cabrera dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .260 Stewart lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Hicks 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .222 Peterson rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167 Greiner c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .158 Mercer ss 2 1 2 0 0 0 .233 1-Beckham pr-ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .154 Jones cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .286 Totals 35 3 10 3 1 9 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .277 Polanco ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .372 Cruz dh 2 0 0 0 2 2 .286 Rosario lf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .238 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Gonzalez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .133 Schoop 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .286 Castro c 1 1 0 0 2 1 .167 Buxton cf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .300 Totals 26 4 5 4 7 7 Detroit 002 001 000 — 3 10 0 Minnesota 004 000 00x — 4 5 1 1-ran for Mercer in the 5th. E: Castro (1). LOB: Detroit 7, Minnesota 6. 2B: Hicks 2 (3), Mercer (4). HR: Stewart (3), off Pineda. RBIs: Harrison (2), Candelario (3), Stewart (11), Polanco (4), Rosario 2 (9), Buxton (4). SB: Jones (1). CS: Polanco (1). SF: Harrison, Polanco. RLISP: Detroit 5 (Harrison, Candelario 2, Stewart, Greiner); Minnesota 3 (Rosario 2, Schoop). LIDP: Greiner. FIDP: Cron. DP: Detroit 1 (Jones, Harrison); Minnesota 1 (Schoop, Polanco). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ross, L, 1-2 6 5 4 4 4 3 92 3.50 VerHagen 0 0 0 0 2 0 11 4.50 1/ 0 1 1 14 0.00 Stumpf 3 0 0 2/ 0 0 1 13 1.93 Alcantara 3 0 0 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineda, W, 2-0 6 8 3 3 0 5 96 3.00 Hildenberger 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Rogers 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.35 Parker, S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 1.80 VerHagen pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Stumpf 2-0, Alcantara 3-0. WP: Parker. Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Bill Welke; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 3:07. A: 16,484.

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 2 0 1 0 2 1 .273 Dominguez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .309 Harper rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .302 Hoskins 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .295 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .239 g-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 O.Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Hernandez 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .178 Franco 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .256 d-Kingery ph-3b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .500 Eflin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Williams ph-lf 2 0 1 2 0 0 .182 Totals 33 3 6 3 4 11 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Riddle ph-ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .192 B.Anderson 3b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .231 Walker 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .190 Castro 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .233 Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Alfaro c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .316 b-Wallach ph-c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Rojas ss-2b 3 3 3 1 0 0 .316 Dean rf 4 3 4 5 0 0 .667 Brinson cf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .226 Smith p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 N.Anderson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-R.Herrera ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Totals 4010 18 10 0 7 Philadelphia 000 000 003 — 3 6 0 Miami 024 010 30x — 10 18 0 a-lined out for Eflin in the 5th. b-singled for Alfaro in the 7th. c-flied out for N.Anderson in the 7th. d-doubled for Franco in the 8th. e-flied out for Nicasio in the 8th. f-singled for Guerrero in the 8th. g-lined out for Realmuto in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 7, Miami 7. 2B: McCutchen (3), Hoskins (4), Kingery 2 (2), Williams (1), Rojas (4), Brinson (4). 3B: Dean (1). HR: B.Anderson (1), off Eflin; Walker (3), off Eflin; Dean (1), off Eflin. RBIs: O.Herrera (7), Williams 2 (3), B.Anderson (2), Walker (3), Rojas (6), Dean 5 (6), Brinson 2 (4). SB: B.Anderson (1). CS: Alfaro (2). SF: Rojas. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Harper 2, Realmuto, Dominguez); Miami 4 (Granderson, Castro, Smith, Wallach). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eflin, L, 2-1 4 10 6 6 0 4 81 3.94 Nicasio 3 6 4 4 0 2 44 6.75 Dominguez 1 2 0 0 0 1 24 7.20 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smith, W, 1-0 6 1 0 0 3 6 99 2.65 N.Anderson 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.35 Guerrero 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 0.00 Conley 1 4 3 3 0 1 26 8.44 WP: Guerrero. T: 3:01. A: 13,828.

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 0 0 1 1 2 .151 Simmons ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Bour 1b 4 0 2 0 1 1 .186 Lucroy c 5 1 1 0 0 0 .271 Goodwin cf-lf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .333 Fletcher lf-2b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .300 La Stella 2b 0 1 0 0 3 0 .184 Allen p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Cozart 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .108 Stratton p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Pujols ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .239 1-Ward pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 c-Bourjos ph-cf 0 0 0 1 0 0 .042 Totals 33 6 9 5 8 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Descalso 2b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .316 Zobrist rf-2b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .308 Rizzo 1b 3 2 0 0 2 0 .192 Baez ss 5 0 3 2 0 0 .262 Heyward cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .375 Contreras c 5 1 1 0 0 3 .316 Schwarber lf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .192 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Hendricks p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Almora Jr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 d-Zagunis ph-rf 1 0 1 2 0 0 .350 Totals 35 5 9 5 7 11 Los Angeles 030 002 010 — 6 9 1 Chicago 001 010 021 — 5 9 1 a-walked for Buttrey in the 6th. b-popped out for Webster in the 6th. c-out on sacrifice fly for Jewell in the 8th. d-singled for Kintzler in the 8th. 1-ran for Pujols in the 6th. E: Goodwin (2), Contreras (3). LOB: Los Angeles 10, Chicago 11. 2B: Bour (2), Baez 3 (4), Heyward (1). RBIs: Calhoun (5), Fletcher (3), Cozart (2), Pujols (6), Bourjos (1), Baez 2 (12), Heyward (10), Zagunis 2 (4). CS: Descalso (1). SF: Bourjos, Heyward. RLISP: Los Angeles 7 (Calhoun, Simmons 3, Fletcher, Stratton, Allen); Chicago 7 (Descalso, Baez, Heyward, Contreras 2, Schwarber 2). GIDP: Stratton. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Lucroy, Simmons); Chicago 1 (Baez, Rizzo). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stratton 42/3 5 2 2 4 5 81 5.54 1/ Buttrey, W, 1-0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Garcia 1 0 0 0 1 1 22 1.29 Jewell 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 2/ 1 1 29 4.91 Robles 3 3 2 2 Allen, S, 4-4 11/3 1 1 1 1 3 33 1.42 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, L, 0-3 5 6 3 2 1 2 87 5.40 2/ 3 0 25 4.05 Brach 3 1 2 2 Rosario 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 7.20 1/ 2 3.00 Webster 3 0 0 0 0 0 Collins 1 2 1 1 1 0 25 4.50 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.52 Ryan 1 0 0 0 2 2 23 4.91 Rosario pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Collins pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. IRS: Buttrey 1-0, Allen 2-0, Rosario 3-1, Webster 3-0, Kintzler 2-1. T: 3:56. A: 38,755.

Orioles 9, Red Sox 5 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss-2b 4 2 2 0 2 0 .302 Mancini rf 5 2 2 0 1 2 .339 Rickard rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .189 Smith Jr. lf 3 2 0 0 3 2 .263 R.Nunez dh 5 2 2 2 0 1 .265 Ruiz 3b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .220 Davis 1b 5 0 3 4 0 0 .079 Alberto 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Martin ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .147 Severino c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Mullins cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .132 Totals 39 9 13 8 8 8 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi lf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .286 Betts cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Moreland dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277 a-E.Nunez ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Martinez rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Pearce 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .100 b-Swihart ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Devers 3b 3 2 1 0 1 1 .259 Pedroia 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .182 Vazquez c 4 1 2 4 0 1 .229 Totals 31 5 6 4 5 6 Baltimore 200 014 200 — 9 13 0 Boston 002 001 200 — 5 6 2 a-flied out for Moreland in the 8th. b-struck out for Pearce in the 8th. E: Pearce (1), Walden (1). LOB: Baltimore 12, Boston 4. 2B: Mancini (4), Davis 2 (2), Benintendi (3), Vazquez (3). HR: Vazquez (2), off Cashner. RBIs: R.Nunez 2 (9), Ruiz 2 (6), Davis 4 (6), Vazquez 4 (6). CS: Villar (1), Benintendi (1). S: Mullins. RLISP: Baltimore 7 (Smith Jr., R.Nunez 2, Alberto, Mullins 3); Boston 2 (Betts, Swihart). GIDP: Moreland. DP: Baltimore 1 (Alberto, Villar, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner, W, 3-1 5 3 3 3 3 2 81 5.31 Yacabonis 12/3 2 2 2 1 0 28 3.72 2/ 1 0 14 0.00 Scott 3 1 0 0 Givens 12/3 0 0 0 0 4 19 4.91 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello, L, 0-3 4 6 3 3 5 2 90 11.12 Hembree 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.38 Brewer 0 3 4 4 2 0 21 7.94 Walden 2 1 2 1 1 2 35 1.50 Thornburg 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 4.91 Velazquez 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 2.79 Porcello pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Brewer pitched to 5 batters in the 6th. Cashner pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. IRS: Yacabonis 2-1, Scott 1-0, Givens 1-0, Hembree 2-1, Walden 2-1. HBP: Hembree (Alberto). WP: Thornburg, Velazquez. PB: Severino (1). T: 3:39. A: 35,823.

Yankees 4, White Sox 0 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .313 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .444 Abreu 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Alonso dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Moncada 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .296 Jimenez lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Rondon 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 a-Sanchez ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .094 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Totals 29 0 1 0 0 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .204 Judge rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .275 LeMahieu 3b-2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .432 Torres ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .296 Bird 1b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .171 Frazier dh 3 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Tauchman lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 b-Voit ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 Urshela 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Higashioka c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .500 Wade 2b-lf 2 0 0 1 0 0 .176 Totals 29 4 7 4 1 7 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 1 1 New York 000 000 31x — 4 7 1 a-struck out for Rondon in the 6th. b-singled for Tauchman in the 7th. E: Sanchez (4), Wade (1). LOB: Chicago 2, New York 4. HR: Judge (4), off Burr. RBIs: Judge (9), Higashioka (1), Wade (1), Voit (13). SF: Higashioka. S: Wade. RLISP: New York 2 (Gardner, Bird). GIDP: Torres. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Rondon, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, L, 0-2 6 4 1 1 1 5 93 5.28 Fry 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 12.60 Burr 2 3 2 1 0 2 26 5.40 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 5 1 0 0 0 3 62 0.00 German, W, 3-0 2 0 0 0 0 4 25 1.38 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.05 Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.00 Nova pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Fry pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Fry 1-0, Burr 2-2. T: 2:28. A: 41,176.

Royals 3, Indians 0 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martin cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .233 J.Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .135 Naquin rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .386 H.Ramirez dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .179 Bauers lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .159 Plawecki c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .125 Miller 2b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Moroff ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .077 Totals 28 0 2 0 2 8 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .339 Mondesi ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .293 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .356 Soler rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .214 O’Hearn 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .222 Dozier 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .256 Duda dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .105 Maldonado c 2 1 1 0 0 1 .184 Owings cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .160 Totals 29 3 7 3 1 5 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Kansas City 001 100 10x — 3 7 0 LOB: Cleveland 3, Kansas City 4. 2B: Miller (3), Maldonado (2). HR: O’Hearn (2), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Merrifield (6), Mondesi (11), O’Hearn (5). S: Maldonado. RLISP: Cleveland 2 (Moroff 2). GIDP: Naquin. DP: Kansas City 1 (Merrifield, Mondesi, O’Hearn). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodriguez, L, 0-1 52/3 5 2 2 0 3 91 3.18 1/ Perez 3 4.91 3 0 0 0 0 0 Anderson 2 2 1 1 1 2 26 4.50 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bailey, W, 1-1 7 2 0 0 2 6 102 5.29 Kennedy 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.12 Peralta, S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 9.00 WP: Anderson. Umpires: Home, Bruce Dreckman; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Paul Emmel. T: 2:26. A: 15,188.

Sunday’s pitching matchups NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

StL Cin

Mikolas (R) DeSclafani (R) 3:10

ERA

1-1 0-1

6.19 6.75

Phi Velasquez (R) 0-0 Mia Urena (R) 12:10 0-3

3.00 9.22

Pit Taillon (R) Was Scherzer (R)

12:35

0-2 1-2

3.00 3.32

Col SF

Marquez (R) Holland (L)

3:05

1-1 1-1

3.00 3.38

SD Ari

Lauer (L) Greinke (R)

3:10

2-1 1-1

4.76 7.16

Mil LA

Chacin (R) Stripling (R)

3:10

2-1 0-1

4.24 3.78

NY Atl

deGrom (R) Teheran (R)

6:05

2-1 1-1

3.18 6.00

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bal Means (L) Bos Price (L)

1-1 12:05 0-1

2.08 6.00

Chi NY

Rodon (L) Tanaka (R)

1-2 12:05 1-0

3.38 1.47

TB Tor

Morton (R) Stroman (R)

2-0 12:07 0-2

2.25 2.41

Det Zimmermann (R) Min Berrios (R) 1:10

0-1 1-1

2.50 2.18

Cle KC

1:15

1-2 1-1

3.86 5.74

Oak Anderson (L) Tex Miller (R) 2:05

3-0 0-1

2.50 9.53

Hou Cole (R) Sea Gonzales (L)

3:10

0-2 4-0

3.32 3.16

IL

Time W-L

Kluber (R) Junis (R)

Pitcher

LAA Cahill (R) ChC Chatwood (R) 1:20

1-1 0-0

ERA 3.50 6.00

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Braves 11, Mets 7 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b-3b 5 0 2 1 0 1 .364 Alonso 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .360 Conforto rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .340 Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Smith ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .471 Davis 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Nimmo lf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .217 d’Arnaud c 4 2 1 1 1 0 .091 Broxton lf-rf 4 1 1 0 1 3 .227 Rosario ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .255 Lagares cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .231 Vargas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Oswalt p 0 0 0 1 0 0 --Guillorme 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Totals 35 7 11 6 5 9 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Albies 2b 3 2 2 0 2 1 .321 Donaldson 3b 3 3 2 1 2 0 .240 Freeman 1b 5 2 2 1 0 0 .365 Acuna Jr. cf-lf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .300 Markakis rf 4 2 2 2 1 0 .333 Swanson ss 4 0 1 3 1 1 .289 Camargo lf 3 0 2 2 1 0 .182 Inciarte cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .159 Jackson c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Newcomb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Toussaint p 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 35 11 13 11 7 7 New York 040 000 012 — 7 11 1 Atlanta 440 101 10x — 11 13 1 a-doubled for Gsellman in the 9th. E: d’Arnaud (1), Freeman (1). LOB: New York 8, Atlanta 7. 2B: Alonso (7), Conforto (6), Lagares (1), Smith (2), Donaldson (5), Markakis (4). HR: Markakis (1), off Oswalt; Donaldson (1), off Gsellman. RBIs: McNeil (9), d’Arnaud (2), Lagares 2 (5), Oswalt (1), Nimmo (7), Donaldson (1), Freeman (7), Acuna Jr. 2 (12), Markakis 2 (12), Swanson 3 (18), Camargo 2 (6). SF: Oswalt. S: Oswalt. RLISP: New York 5 (Davis, d’Arnaud, Broxton, Guillorme 2); Atlanta 3 (Acuna Jr., Jackson 2). GIDP: Donaldson, Jackson. DP: New York 2 (Rosario, McNeil, Alonso), (Rosario, Guillorme, Alonso). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ 3 0 36 14.21 Vargas 3 2 4 4 Oswalt, L, 0-1 32/3 6 5 5 4 2 90 12.27 Avilan 2 4 1 1 0 1 33 12.71 Gsellman 2 1 1 1 0 4 35 4.00 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Newcomb 1 3 5 4 4 2 0 35 4.38 Toussaint, W, 1-0 6 4 1 0 2 7 85 0.00 Sobotka 12/3 2 2 2 1 2 35 7.36 Inherited runners-scored: Oswalt 3-2, Toussaint 1-0, Sobotka 2-1. WP: Avilan. Umpires: Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Alan Porter; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Chris Segal. T: 3:34. A: 40,117.


BASEBALL

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE Pct

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Milwaukee

10

5 .667

Cardinals

8

6

.571

Pittsburgh

7

6 .538

2

GB WCGB L10 —

Str Home

6-4

W-2

7-3

½

6-4

Away

5-2

5-3

L-1

5-2

3-4

L-1

4-2

3-4

4-6 W-4

5-4

0-4

4-6

3-2

2-7

Str Home

Away

Cincinnati

5

8 .385

4

Chicago

5

9

.357 4½

3

EAST

W

L

Pct

New York

9

5 .643

6-4

L-1

2-3

7-2

Philadelphia

8

5

.615

½

5-5

L-1

6-3

2-2

Atlanta

8

6

.571

1

7-3

W-1

6-3

2-3

Washington

7

6 .538

½

6-4

W-1

3-4

4-2

Miami

4 11 .267 5½

2-8

W-1

3-6

1-5

WEST

W

Str Home

Away

San Diego

11

5 .688

8-2 W-4

4-3

7-2

Los Angeles

8

8 .500

3

1

4-6

L-6

5-4

3-4

San Francisco 7

9 .438

4

2

5-5

W-3

5-4

2-5

Arizona

6

9 .400 4½

4-6

L-4

3-5

3-4

Colorado

3 12 .200 7½

1-9

L-8

0-5

3-7

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

GB WCGB L10

L-1

Saturday Cincinnati 5, Cardinals 2 LA Angels 6, Cubs 5 Washington 3, Pittsburgh 2 San Francisco 5, Colorado 2 Miami 10, Philadelphia 3 Atlanta 11, NY Mets 7 San Diego 5, Arizona 4 Milwaukee 4, LA Dodgers 1 Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 Pittsburgh 6, Washington 3, 10 inn. Philadelphia 9, Miami 1 NY Mets 6, Atlanta 2 San Diego 2, Arizona 1 Milwaukee 8, LA Dodgers 5 San Francisco 3, Colorado 2, 18 inn.

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Sabathia is solid in return to Yankees

Giants 5, Rockies 2

Twins 4, Tigers 3

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .233 Hampson 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .163 Arenado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .246 Story ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Reynolds 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .192 Desmond cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .151 Daza lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Iannetta c 3 0 2 0 0 1 .207 Freeland p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Fuentes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Valaika ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .118 c-Tapia ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 6 2 0 10 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Duggar rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .238 Solarte ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .189 Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pillar cf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .161 Posey c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .227 3 0 1 0 1 1 .190 Longoria 3b Moronta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Crawford ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Sandoval 1b-3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .304 Panik 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .231 Bumgarner p 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Belt 1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Parra lf 3 1 2 1 0 1 .200 Totals 31 5 11 5 3 7 Colorado 000 001 100 — 2 6 0 San Francisco 002 010 02x — 5 11 1 a-struck out for Freeland in the 6th. b-pinch hit for Shaw in the 8th. c-struck out for Valaika in the 8th. E: Parra (1). LOB: Colorado 3, San Francisco 9. 2B: Hampson (1), Iannetta (2), Posey (4), Sandoval (6). 3B: Longoria (1). HR: Reynolds (2), off Bumgarner; Pillar (4), off Freeland. RBIs: Hampson (2), Reynolds (4), Duggar (6), Pillar 2 (13), Posey (1), Parra (3). SF: Duggar, Pillar, Parra. S: Solarte. RLISP: Colorado 2 (Hampson, Arenado); San Francisco 6 (Duggar, Solarte 2, Longoria, Sandoval, Bumgarner). LIDP: Pillar. DP: Colorado 1 (Hampson, Reynolds); San Francisco 1 (Sandoval, Longoria, Bumgarner). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Freeland, L, 1-3 5 9 3 3 1 5 76 5.40 Shaw 2 1 0 0 1 1 20 0.87 Oh 0 1 2 2 1 1 9 7.20 Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.60 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner, W, 1-2 7 6 2 2 0 7 98 3.12 Moronta 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.52 Dyson, S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 1.04 Bumgarner pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Oh pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Dunn 3-2, Moronta 1-0. WP: Oh. PB: Iannetta (1). T: 2:48. A: 32,607.

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Harrison 2b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .135 Candelario 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .184 Cabrera dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .260 Stewart lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Hicks 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .222 Peterson rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167 Greiner c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .158 Mercer ss 2 1 2 0 0 0 .233 1-Beckham pr-ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .154 Jones cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .286 Totals 35 3 10 3 1 9 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kepler rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .277 Polanco ss 3 0 1 1 0 1 .372 Cruz dh 2 0 0 0 2 2 .286 Rosario lf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .238 Cron 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Gonzalez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .133 Schoop 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .286 Castro c 1 1 0 0 2 1 .167 Buxton cf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .300 Totals 26 4 5 4 7 7 Detroit 002 001 000 — 3 10 0 Minnesota 004 000 00x — 4 5 1 1-ran for Mercer in the 5th. E: Castro (1). LOB: Detroit 7, Minnesota 6. 2B: Hicks 2 (3), Mercer (4). HR: Stewart (3), off Pineda. RBIs: Harrison (2), Candelario (3), Stewart (11), Polanco (4), Rosario 2 (9), Buxton (4). SB: Jones (1). CS: Polanco (1). SF: Harrison, Polanco. RLISP: Detroit 5 (Harrison, Candelario 2, Stewart, Greiner); Minnesota 3 (Rosario 2, Schoop). LIDP: Greiner. FIDP: Cron. DP: Detroit 1 (Jones, Harrison); Minnesota 1 (Schoop, Polanco). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ross, L, 1-2 6 5 4 4 4 3 92 3.50 VerHagen 0 0 0 0 2 0 11 4.50 1/ Stumpf 0 1 1 14 0.00 3 0 0 2/ Alcantara 0 0 1 13 1.93 3 0 0 Farmer 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineda, W, 2-0 6 8 3 3 0 5 96 3.00 Hildenberger 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Rogers 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.35 Parker, S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 1.80 VerHagen pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Stumpf 2-0, Alcantara 3-0. WP: Parker. Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Bill Welke; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 3:07. A: 16,484.

CC Sabathia began his 19th and final big league season with five stellar innings, pinch-hitter Luke Voit (Lafayette High) came through with a broken-bat RBI single in the seventh and the New York Yankees beat the Chicago White Sox 4-0 Saturday to end a four-game slide. Yankees manager Aaron Boone kept the 38-year-old Sabathia on a short leash in his first start following offseason operations on his heart and right knee. Twins 4, Tigers 3 • Michael Pineda labored through six innings, Eddie Rosario drove in two runs and host Minnesota beat Detroit. Blue Jays 3, Rays 1 • Lourdes Gurriel Jr. hit a tworun double in the seventh to help host Toronto overcome reigning AL Cy Young winner Blake Snell’s no-hit bid in a win over Tampa Bay, snapping the Rays’ fivegame winning streak. Orioles 9, Red Sox 5 • Chris Davis ended his record slump at 0 for 54 and drew applause from rival fans at Fenway Park, getting three hits and driving in four runs as Baltimore won in Boston to end a four-game losing streak. Royals 3, Indians 0 • Homer Bailey pitched seven innings of two-hit ball and Kansas City beat visiting Cleveland for their second straight win after a 10-game skid. Astros 3, Mariners 1 • Jose Altuve homered for the fifth straight game, Justin Verlander struck out eight of the first 10 batters he faced and Houston won in Seattle. A’s-Rangers ppd. • The game was postponed by rain and rescheduled for June 8 as part of a doubleheader.

NATIONAL LEAGUE Nationals 3, Pirates 2 • Adam Eaton and Howie Kendrick homered on consecutive pitches in the eighth and host Washington rallied to beat Pittsburgh. Giants 5, Rockies 2 • Madison Bumgarner pitched into the eighth inning to give a weary bullpen much needed rest and San Francisco beat visiting Colorado to hand the Rockies their eighth straight loss. Marlins 10, Phillies 3 • Austin Dean logged a home run, a triple and 5 RBIs as Miami snapped a losing streak to beat visiting Philadelphia. Braves 11, Mets 7 • Freddie Freeman hit a go-ahead RBI single in the second, Ronald Acuña Jr. had his fifth straight multihit game and host Atlanta snapped New York’s three-game winning streak. Padres 5, D’backs 4 • Fernando Tatis Jr. hit a two-run homer and Franmil Reyes had a tiebreaking solo shot to lift San Diego in Arizona. Brewers 4, Dodgers 1 • Mike Moustakas and Orlando Arcia homered and Milwaukee won in LA.

INTERLEAGUE Angels 6, Cubs 5 • Zack Cozart broke out of a slump with three hits and Cody Allen wiggled out of a jam in the ninth inning, helping Los Angeles win at Chicago. Associated Press

M 4 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Nationals 3, Pirates 2 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Marte cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Cervelli c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Bell 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .292 Moran 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .273 Cabrera rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .432 1-Martin pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .385 Shuck lf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .286 Gonzalez ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .231 Archer p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Kang ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .105 Totals 34 2 8 2 2 3 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .286 Kendrick 2b 2 1 1 1 2 0 .600 Rendon 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .412 Soto lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Adams 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Suero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Doolittle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Suzuki c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .263 Difo ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .171 Sanchez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Zimmerman 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Robles cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .267 Totals 28 3 6 3 2 10 Pittsburgh 000 101 000 — 2 8 0 Washington 000 100 02x — 3 6 1 a-struck out for Rodriguez in the 9th. 1-ran for Cabrera in the 9th. E: Kendrick (1). LOB: Pittsburgh 8, Washington 3. 2B: Moran (2), Gonzalez (2), Rendon (8). 3B: Bell (1). HR: Cabrera (1), off Sanchez; Eaton (1), off Rodriguez; Kendrick (2), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Moran (7), Cabrera (4), Eaton (5), Kendrick (4), Suzuki (6). S: Shuck. RLISP: Pittsburgh 3 (Frazier, Marte, Gonzalez); Washington 1 (Soto). GIDP: Frazier, Rendon 2. DP: Pittsburgh 2 (Gonzalez, Frazier, Bell), (Gonzalez, Frazier, Bell); Washington 1 (Kendrick, Difo, Adams). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer 7 4 1 1 2 9 94 2.00 Rodriguez, L, 0-1 1 2 2 2 0 1 22 6.75 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez 7 7 2 2 1 2 100 4.86 Suero, W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 6.35 Doolittle, S, 1-2 1 1 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 T: 2:22. A: 32,103.

Blue Jays 3, Rays 1 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Meadows rf 3 0 2 1 1 0 .385 Pham lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Choi 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .271 a-Robertson ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Diaz 3b-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Lowe 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Garcia dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .319 Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Zunino c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .119 1-Heredia pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Perez c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Adames ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Totals 33 1 8 1 1 8 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .346 Smoak dh 2 1 1 0 2 0 .211 Hernandez lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .213 Grichuk cf 4 1 1 0 0 3 .192 Gurriel Jr. 2b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .179 Drury 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .140 Tellez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .212 Hanson rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Brito rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Maile c 2 1 1 0 1 1 .313 Totals 28 3 5 3 3 14 Tampa Bay 000 001 000 — 1 8 0 Toronto 000 000 21x — 3 5 3 a-struck out for Choi in the 8th. 1-ran for Zunino in the 8th. E: Hernandez (2), Gurriel Jr. (1), Maile (1). LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 4. 2B: Adames (3), Grichuk (4), Gurriel Jr. (4). 3B: Zunino (1). RBIs: Meadows (16), Hernandez (6), Gurriel Jr. 2 (7). SB: Kiermaier (3). CS: Choi (1). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Diaz, Kiermaier, Zunino, Robertson); Toronto 2 (Grichuk, Tellez). LIDP: Kiermaier. GIDP: Pham, Galvis. DP: Tampa Bay 2 (Lowe, Adames, Choi), (Diaz, Lowe, Choi); Toronto 2 (Gurriel Jr., Galvis, Tellez), (Hernandez, Maile). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell 6 1 0 0 1 9 82 2.16 2/ Roe, L, 0-2 2 0 2 19 5.40 3 3 2 1/ Beeks 1 3 1 1 1 2 3 33 3.18 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz 6 6 1 1 0 2 69 1.50 Pannone, W, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.00 2/ Biagini 1 2 14 3.86 3 1 0 0 1/ Mayza 0 1 5 4.26 3 0 0 0 Giles, S, 4-5 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 2.57 Inherited runners-scored: Beeks 1-0, Mayza 2-0. WP: Giles. Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Ramon De Jesus; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 2:44. A: 20,771.

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

Minnesota

7

4

.636

GB WCGB L10 —

6-4

Str Home W-1

3-1

Away 4-3

Cleveland

8

6

.571

½

6-4

L-2

5-1

3-5

Detroit

8

6

.571

½

6-4

L-2

4-2

4-4

9 .308

4

3-7

L-1

1-5

3-4

.286 4½

4

2-8

W-2

4-7

0-3

Str Home

Away

Chicago

4

Kansas City

4 10

EAST

W

L

Pct

Tampa Bay

11

4

.733

GB WCGB L10 —

7-3

L-1

5-2

6-2

New York

6

8

.429 4½

2

4-6

W-1

3-5

3-3

Baltimore

6

9 .400

2-8

W-1

1-6

5-3 3-8

5

Boston

5 10

.333

6

4-6

L-1

2-2

Toronto

5 10

.333

6

3-7

W-1

4-5

1-5

Str Home

Away

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Seattle

13

4

.765

7-3

L-2

5-3

8-1

Houston

10

5

.667

2

8-2 W-8

6-0

4-5

Oakland

4-4

10

8

.556 3½

5-5 W-4

6-4

Los Angeles

8

7

.533

4

½

7-3

W-1

6-1

2-6

Texas

6

7

.462

5

4-6

L-1

4-3

2-4

Saturday Baltimore 9, Boston 5 NY Yankees 4, White Sox 0 Minnesota 4, Detroit 3 LA Angels 6, Cubs 5 Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 1 Kansas City 3, Cleveland 0 Oakland at Texas, ppd. Houston 3, Seattle 1 Friday Cubs 5, LA Angels 1 White Sox 9, NY Yankees 6, 7 inn. Tampa Bay 11, Toronto 7 Boston 6, Baltimore 4 Oakland 8, Texas 6 Detroit at Minnesota, ppd. Kansas City 8, Cleveland 1 Houston 10, Seattle 6

Sunday’s pitching matchups

Orioles 9, Red Sox 5 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Villar ss-2b 4 2 2 0 2 0 .302 Mancini rf 5 2 2 0 1 2 .339 Rickard rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .189 Smith Jr. lf 3 2 0 0 3 2 .263 R.Nunez dh 5 2 2 2 0 1 .265 Ruiz 3b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .220 Davis 1b 5 0 3 4 0 0 .079 Alberto 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Martin ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .147 Severino c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Mullins cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .132 Totals 39 9 13 8 8 8 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Benintendi lf 2 1 1 0 2 0 .286 Betts cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Moreland dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .277 a-E.Nunez ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Martinez rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Bogaerts ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Pearce 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .100 b-Swihart ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Devers 3b 3 2 1 0 1 1 .259 Pedroia 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .182 Vazquez c 4 1 2 4 0 1 .229 Totals 31 5 6 4 5 6 Baltimore 200 014 200 — 9 13 0 Boston 002 001 200 — 5 6 2 a-flied out for Moreland in the 8th. b-struck out for Pearce in the 8th. E: Pearce (1), Walden (1). LOB: Baltimore 12, Boston 4. 2B: Mancini (4), Davis 2 (2), Benintendi (3), Vazquez (3). HR: Vazquez (2), off Cashner. RBIs: R.Nunez 2 (9), Ruiz 2 (6), Davis 4 (6), Vazquez 4 (6). CS: Villar (1), Benintendi (1). S: Mullins. RLISP: Baltimore 7 (Smith Jr., R.Nunez 2, Alberto, Mullins 3); Boston 2 (Betts, Swihart). GIDP: Moreland. DP: Baltimore 1 (Alberto, Villar, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner, W, 3-1 5 3 3 3 3 2 81 5.31 Yacabonis 12/3 2 2 2 1 0 28 3.72 2/ 1 0 14 0.00 Scott 3 1 0 0 Givens 12/3 0 0 0 0 4 19 4.91 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello, L, 0-3 4 6 3 3 5 2 90 11.12 Hembree 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.38 Brewer 0 3 4 4 2 0 21 7.94 Walden 2 1 2 1 1 2 35 1.50 Thornburg 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 4.91 Velazquez 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 2.79 Porcello pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Brewer pitched to 5 batters in the 6th. Cashner pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. IRS: Yacabonis 2-1, Scott 1-0, Givens 1-0, Hembree 2-1, Walden 2-1. HBP: Hembree (Alberto). WP: Thornburg, Velazquez. PB: Severino (1). T: 3:39. A: 35,823.

Marlins 10, Phillies 3 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCutchen lf 2 0 1 0 2 1 .273 Dominguez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Segura ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .309 Harper rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .302 Hoskins 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .295 Realmuto c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .239 g-Knapp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 O.Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Hernandez 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .178 Franco 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .256 d-Kingery ph-3b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .500 Eflin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Williams ph-lf 2 0 1 2 0 0 .182 Totals 33 3 6 3 4 11 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Guerrero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Riddle ph-ss 1 0 1 0 0 0 .192 B.Anderson 3b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .231 Walker 1b 5 1 2 1 0 1 .190 Castro 2b 5 1 1 0 0 3 .233 Conley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Alfaro c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .316 b-Wallach ph-c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Rojas ss-2b 3 3 3 1 0 0 .316 Dean rf 4 3 4 5 0 0 .667 Brinson cf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .226 Smith p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 N.Anderson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-R.Herrera ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Totals 4010 18 10 0 7 Philadelphia 000 000 003 — 3 6 0 Miami 024 010 30x — 10 18 0 a-lined out for Eflin in the 5th. b-singled for Alfaro in the 7th. c-flied out for N.Anderson in the 7th. d-doubled for Franco in the 8th. e-flied out for Nicasio in the 8th. f-singled for Guerrero in the 8th. g-lined out for Realmuto in the 9th. LOB: Philadelphia 7, Miami 7. 2B: McCutchen (3), Hoskins (4), Kingery 2 (2), Williams (1), Rojas (4), Brinson (4). 3B: Dean (1). HR: B.Anderson (1), off Eflin; Walker (3), off Eflin; Dean (1), off Eflin. RBIs: O.Herrera (7), Williams 2 (3), B.Anderson (2), Walker (3), Rojas (6), Dean 5 (6), Brinson 2 (4). SB: B.Anderson (1). CS: Alfaro (2). SF: Rojas. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Harper 2, Realmuto, Dominguez); Miami 4 (Granderson, Castro, Smith, Wallach). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eflin, L, 2-1 4 10 6 6 0 4 81 3.94 Nicasio 3 6 4 4 0 2 44 6.75 Dominguez 1 2 0 0 0 1 24 7.20 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Smith, W, 1-0 6 1 0 0 3 6 99 2.65 N.Anderson 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.35 Guerrero 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 0.00 Conley 1 4 3 3 0 1 26 8.44 WP: Guerrero. T: 3:01. A: 13,828.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Yankees starting pitcher CC Sabathia delivers during the fifth inning against the White Sox on Saturday in New York. Yankees 4, White Sox 0

Braves 11, Mets 7

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Garcia rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .313 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .444 Abreu 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Alonso dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Moncada 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .296 Jimenez lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Rondon 2b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 a-Sanchez ph-2b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .094 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Totals 29 0 1 0 0 9 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .204 Judge rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .275 LeMahieu 3b-2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .432 Torres ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .296 Bird 1b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .171 Frazier dh 3 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Tauchman lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 b-Voit ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 Urshela 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Higashioka c 2 0 1 1 0 0 .500 Wade 2b-lf 2 0 0 1 0 0 .176 Totals 29 4 7 4 1 7 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 1 1 New York 000 000 31x — 4 7 1 a-struck out for Rondon in the 6th. b-singled for Tauchman in the 7th. E: Sanchez (4), Wade (1). LOB: Chicago 2, New York 4. HR: Judge (4), off Burr. RBIs: Judge (9), Higashioka (1), Wade (1), Voit (13). SF: Higashioka. S: Wade. RLISP: New York 2 (Gardner, Bird). GIDP: Torres. DP: Chicago 1 (Moncada, Rondon, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova, L, 0-2 6 4 1 1 1 5 93 5.28 Fry 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 12.60 Burr 2 3 2 1 0 2 26 5.40 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 5 1 0 0 0 3 62 0.00 German, W, 3-0 2 0 0 0 0 4 25 1.38 Britton 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.05 Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.00 Nova pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Fry pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Fry 1-0, Burr 2-2. T: 2:28. A: 41,176.

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McNeil 2b-3b 5 0 2 1 0 1 .364 Alonso 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .360 Conforto rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .340 Gsellman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Smith ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .471 Davis 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Nimmo lf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .217 d’Arnaud c 4 2 1 1 1 0 .091 Broxton lf-rf 4 1 1 0 1 3 .227 Rosario ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .255 Lagares cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .231 Vargas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Oswalt p 0 0 0 1 0 0 --Guillorme 2b 2 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Totals 35 7 11 6 5 9 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Albies 2b 3 2 2 0 2 1 .321 Donaldson 3b 3 3 2 1 2 0 .240 Freeman 1b 5 2 2 1 0 0 .365 Acuna Jr. cf-lf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .300 Markakis rf 4 2 2 2 1 0 .333 Swanson ss 4 0 1 3 1 1 .289 Camargo lf 3 0 2 2 1 0 .182 Inciarte cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .159 Jackson c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Newcomb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Toussaint p 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Sobotka p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 35 11 13 11 7 7 New York 040 000 012 — 7 11 1 Atlanta 440 101 10x — 11 13 1 a-doubled for Gsellman in the 9th. E: d’Arnaud (1), Freeman (1). LOB: New York 8, Atlanta 7. 2B: Alonso (7), Conforto (6), Lagares (1), Smith (2), Donaldson (5), Markakis (4). HR: Markakis (1), off Oswalt; Donaldson (1), off Gsellman. RBIs: McNeil (9), d’Arnaud (2), Lagares 2 (5), Oswalt (1), Nimmo (7), Donaldson (1), Freeman (7), Acuna Jr. 2 (12), Markakis 2 (12), Swanson 3 (18), Camargo 2 (6). SF: Oswalt. S: Oswalt. RLISP: New York 5 (Davis, d’Arnaud, Broxton, Guillorme 2); Atlanta 3 (Acuna Jr., Jackson 2). GIDP: Donaldson, Jackson. DP: New York 2 (Rosario, McNeil, Alonso), (Rosario, Guillorme, Alonso). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ 3 0 36 14.21 Vargas 3 2 4 4 Oswalt, L, 0-1 32/3 6 5 5 4 2 90 12.27 Avilan 2 4 1 1 0 1 33 12.71 Gsellman 2 1 1 1 0 4 35 4.00 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Newcomb 11/3 5 4 4 2 0 35 4.38 Toussaint, W, 1-0 6 4 1 0 2 7 85 0.00 Sobotka 12/3 2 2 2 1 2 35 7.36 Inherited runners-scored: Oswalt 3-2, Toussaint 1-0, Sobotka 2-1. WP: Avilan. Umpires: Home, Alfonso Marquez; First, Alan Porter; Second, Dan Bellino; Third, Chris Segal. T: 3:34. A: 40,117.

Angels 6, Cubs 5 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 0 0 1 1 2 .151 Simmons ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Bour 1b 4 0 2 0 1 1 .186 Lucroy c 5 1 1 0 0 0 .271 Goodwin cf-lf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .333 Fletcher lf-2b 3 2 1 1 2 0 .300 La Stella 2b 0 1 0 0 3 0 .184 Allen p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Cozart 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .108 Stratton p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Pujols ph 0 0 0 1 1 0 .239 1-Ward pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 c-Bourjos ph-cf 0 0 0 1 0 0 .042 Totals 33 6 9 5 8 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Descalso 2b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .316 Zobrist rf-2b 3 0 0 0 2 1 .308 Rizzo 1b 3 2 0 0 2 0 .192 Baez ss 5 0 3 2 0 0 .262 Heyward cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .375 Contreras c 5 1 1 0 0 3 .316 Schwarber lf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .192 Bote 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .269 Hendricks p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Almora Jr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 d-Zagunis ph-rf 1 0 1 2 0 0 .350 Totals 35 5 9 5 7 11 Los Angeles 030 002 010 — 6 9 1 Chicago 001 010 021 — 5 9 1 a-walked for Buttrey in the 6th. b-popped out for Webster in the 6th. c-out on sacrifice fly for Jewell in the 8th. d-singled for Kintzler in the 8th. 1-ran for Pujols in the 6th. E: Goodwin (2), Contreras (3). LOB: Los Angeles 10, Chicago 11. 2B: Bour (2), Baez 3 (4), Heyward (1). RBIs: Calhoun (5), Fletcher (3), Cozart (2), Pujols (6), Bourjos (1), Baez 2 (12), Heyward (10), Zagunis 2 (4). CS: Descalso (1). SF: Bourjos, Heyward. RLISP: Los Angeles 7 (Calhoun, Simmons 3, Fletcher, Stratton, Allen); Chicago 7 (Descalso, Baez, Heyward, Contreras 2, Schwarber 2). GIDP: Stratton. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Lucroy, Simmons); Chicago 1 (Baez, Rizzo). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stratton 42/3 5 2 2 4 5 81 5.54 1/ Buttrey, W, 1-0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Garcia 1 0 0 0 1 1 22 1.29 Jewell 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 2/ 1 1 29 4.91 Robles 3 3 2 2 Allen, S, 4-4 11/3 1 1 1 1 3 33 1.42 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, L, 0-3 5 6 3 2 1 2 87 5.40 2/ 3 0 25 4.05 Brach 3 1 2 2 Rosario 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 7.20 1/ 2 3.00 Webster 3 0 0 0 0 0 Collins 1 2 1 1 1 0 25 4.50 Kintzler 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.52 Ryan 1 0 0 0 2 2 23 4.91 Rosario pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Collins pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. IRS: Buttrey 1-0, Allen 2-0, Rosario 3-1, Webster 3-0, Kintzler 2-1. T: 3:56. A: 38,755.

Royals 3, Indians 0 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martin cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .233 J.Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .135 Naquin rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .386 H.Ramirez dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .179 Bauers lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .159 Plawecki c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .125 Miller 2b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Moroff ss 3 0 0 0 0 3 .077 Totals 28 0 2 0 2 8 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Merrifield 2b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .339 Mondesi ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .293 Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .356 Soler rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .214 O’Hearn 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .222 Dozier 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .256 Duda dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .105 Maldonado c 2 1 1 0 0 1 .184 Owings cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .160 Totals 29 3 7 3 1 5 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Kansas City 001 100 10x — 3 7 0 LOB: Cleveland 3, Kansas City 4. 2B: Miller (3), Maldonado (2). HR: O’Hearn (2), off Rodriguez. RBIs: Merrifield (6), Mondesi (11), O’Hearn (5). S: Maldonado. RLISP: Cleveland 2 (Moroff 2). GIDP: Naquin. DP: Kansas City 1 (Merrifield, Mondesi, O’Hearn). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodriguez, L, 0-1 52/3 5 2 2 0 3 91 3.18 1/ 3 4.91 Perez 3 0 0 0 0 0 Anderson 2 2 1 1 1 2 26 4.50 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bailey, W, 1-1 7 2 0 0 2 6 102 5.29 Kennedy 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.12 Peralta, S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 9.00 WP: Anderson. Umpires: Home, Bruce Dreckman; First, Manny Gonzalez; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Paul Emmel. T: 2:26. A: 15,188.

Padres 5, Diamondbacks 4 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .318 F.Reyes rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .184 Stock p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wingenter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wieck p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Machado 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .246 Renfroe lf-rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .262 Hosmer 1b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .228 Tatis Jr. ss 4 1 1 2 0 3 .250 Kinsler 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .174 Hedges c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167 Strahm p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 G.Reyes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Myers ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .304 Totals 35 5 10 5 1 10 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jones rf 5 0 2 1 0 2 .333 Marte cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .237 Flores 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .200 Andriese p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Dyson ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .273 Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chafin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Locastro ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Peralta lf 2 1 1 0 2 1 .364 Walker 1b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .209 Escobar 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Ahmed ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .310 C.Kelly c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .208 M.Kelly p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Vargas 2b 2 0 0 1 0 0 .267 Totals 35 4 9 4 4 9 San Diego 202 000 100 — 5 10 1 Arizona 000 004 000 — 4 9 0 a-struck out for Stammen in the 7th. b-walked for Andriese in the 7th. c-struck out for Chafin in the 9th. E: Machado (1). LOB: San Diego 4, Arizona 10. 2B: Margot (4), Hosmer (3), Kinsler (2), Jones (5), Marte (2), Ahmed (6), C.Kelly (3). HR: Tatis Jr. (4), off M.Kelly; F.Reyes (3), off Andriese. RBIs: F.Reyes (6), Hosmer 2 (8), Tatis Jr. 2 (10), Jones (8), Ahmed (8), C.Kelly (5), Vargas (3). CS: Myers (2), Dyson (1). RLISP: San Diego 2 (F.Reyes, Tatis Jr.); Arizona 4 (Jones, Walker 2, Escobar). GIDP: Ahmed. DP: San Diego 1 (Wingenter, Hedges, Hosmer); Arizona 1 (Ahmed, Escobar, Walker). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strahm 5 4 0 0 0 4 89 4.26 1/ 1 1 23 36.00 3 3 4 4 G.Reyes Stammen, W, 2-0 2/3 1 0 0 0 0 8 0.96 Stock 0 0 0 0 2 0 9 9.00 Wingenter 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 2.57 Wieck 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 6.75 Yates, S, 9-9 1 1 0 0 0 3 21 0.90 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Kelly 5 8 4 4 1 5 95 3.79 Andriese, L, 2-1 2 1 1 1 0 3 35 5.19 Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Chafin 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 5.06 Stock pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Stammen 2-2, Wingenter 2-0. HBP: Strahm (Peralta), Wingenter (Escobar). WP: Stock. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Winters; Second, Nick Mahrley; Third, Rob Drake. T: 3:41. A: 27,256.

MLB CALENDAR May 4-5: Houston vs. Los Angeles Angels at Monterrey, Mexico. June 3: Amateur draft starts, Secaucus, N.J. June 13: Detroit vs. Kansas City at Omaha, Neb. June 15: International amateur signing period closes. June 19-20: Owners meeting, New York. June 29-30: New York Yankees vs. Boston at London. July 2: International amateur signing period opens. July 9: All-Star Game at Cleveland. July 21: Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown, N.Y. July 31: Last day during the season to trade a player. Aug. 18: Pittsburgh vs. Chicago Cubs at Williamsport, Pa. Aug. 31: Last day to be contracted to an organization and be eligible for postseason roster.

NL

Pitcher

StL Cin

Mikolas (R) DeSclafani (R) 3:10

Time W-L

ERA

1-1 0-1

6.19 6.75

Phi Velasquez (R) 0-0 Mia Urena (R) 12:10 0-3

3.00 9.22

Pit Taillon (R) Was Scherzer (R)

12:35

0-2 1-2

3.00 3.32

Col SF

Marquez (R) Holland (L)

3:05

1-1 1-1

3.00 3.38

SD Ari

Lauer (L) Greinke (R)

3:10

2-1 1-1

4.76 7.16

Mil LA

Chacin (R) Stripling (R)

3:10

2-1 0-1

4.24 3.78

NY Atl

deGrom (R) Teheran (R)

6:05

2-1 1-1

3.18 6.00

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Bal Means (L) Bos Price (L)

1-1 12:05 0-1

2.08 6.00

Chi NY

Rodon (L) Tanaka (R)

1-2 12:05 1-0

3.38 1.47

TB Tor

Morton (R) Stroman (R)

2-0 12:07 0-2

2.25 2.41

Det Zimmermann (R) Min Berrios (R) 1:10

0-1 1-1

2.50 2.18

Cle KC

1:15

1-2 1-1

3.86 5.74

Oak Anderson (L) Tex Miller (R) 2:05

3-0 0-1

2.50 9.53

Hou Cole (R) Sea Gonzales (L)

3:10

0-2 4-0

3.32 3.16

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Kluber (R) Junis (R)

Pitcher

LAA Cahill (R) ChC Chatwood (R) 1:20

1-1 0-0

3.50 6.00

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.

Astros 3, Mariners 1 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .283 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .333 Bregman 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .311 Brantley dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .281 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .311 Gurriel 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .302 Reddick lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Chirinos c 2 1 1 1 1 0 .265 Marisnick cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .346 Totals 32 3 6 3 1 8 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Smith cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .236 Haniger rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .278 Santana lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .338 Bruce 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .179 Vogelbach dh 3 0 2 0 0 1 .424 Beckham ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .339 Narvaez c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Healy 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Gordon 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .339 Totals 31 1 4 1 0 13 Houston 002 010 000 — 3 6 0 Seattle 000 100 000 — 1 4 0 LOB: Houston 4, Seattle 3. 2B: Gurriel (7), Beckham (6). HR: Chirinos (2), off Hernandez; Altuve (7), off Hernandez; Haniger (4), off Verlander. RBIs: Altuve (13), Brantley (9), Chirinos (5), Haniger (14). RLISP: Houston 2 (Brantley, Correa); Seattle 2 (Narvaez 2). GIDP: Marisnick. DP: Seattle 1 (Healy, Gordon, Bruce). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander, W, 2-0 6 2 1 1 0 11 105 3.52 Harris 1 2 0 0 0 0 21 0.00 Pressly 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Osuna, S, 6-6 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 1.23 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hernandez, L, 1-1 6 6 3 3 1 5 93 4.38 Brennan 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Sadzeck 2 0 0 0 0 2 25 0.00 HBP: Hernandez (Springer). WP: Hernandez. Umpires: Home, Jordan Baker; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Adam Hamari. T: 2:46. A: 30,533.

Brewers 4, Dodgers 1 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cain cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .317 Yelich rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .345 Braun lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .208 Grandal c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .395 Moustakas 2b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .235 Perez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Aguilar 1b 2 0 1 0 2 1 .143 Shaw 3b 4 0 2 2 0 1 .186 Arcia ss 4 1 1 1 0 2 .222 Davies p 2 0 0 0 1 2 .143 b-Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .208 Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 4 9 4 5 10 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pollock cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Seager ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Schultz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Turner 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .283 Bellinger rf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .422 Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .320 Muncy 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Taylor lf-ss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .139 Barnes c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .313 Ferguson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Santana p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .500 Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Verdugo ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .323 Alexander p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Pederson ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Totals 32 1 8 1 0 6 Milwaukee 010 120 000 — 4 9 0 Los Angeles 000 100 000 — 1 8 0 a-singled for Garcia in the 5th. b-struck out for Davies in the 8th. c-grounded out for Baez in the 8th. LOB: Milwaukee 10, Los Angeles 4. 2B: Grandal (2). HR: Moustakas (5), off Ferguson; Arcia (3), off Santana; Bellinger (9), off Davies. RBIs: Moustakas (9), Shaw 2 (5), Arcia (7), Bellinger (22). SB: Taylor (1). RLISP: Milwaukee 4 (Cain 2, Shaw 2); Los Angeles 3 (Hernandez, Barnes 2). GIDP: Moustakas, Seager 2, Barnes. DP: Milwaukee 3 (Arcia, Moustakas, Aguilar), (Davies, Arcia, Aguilar), (Aguilar, Arcia); Los Angeles 1 (Turner, Hernandez, Muncy). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies, W, 2-0 7 8 1 1 0 6 94 1.53 Guerra, S, 1-1 2 0 0 0 0 0 29 1.80 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ferguson, L, 0-1 22/3 4 1 1 2 2 51 1.00 Santana 11/3 3 3 3 3 4 45 7.20 Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 9.39 Alexander 2 1 0 0 0 1 21 1.35 Baez 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.50 Schultz 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Santana pitched to 4 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Santana 2-0, Garcia 2-0. HBP: Santana (Grandal). WP: Santana. Umpires: Home, Jeremie Rehak; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Pat Hoberg. T: 2:54. A: 53,922.


BASEBALL

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Cards inspect stadium’s ‘nooks ... crannies’ AVERAGES

B1 CARDINALS • FROM D1

Cardinals have never played a regularseason game anywhere other than the United States or Canada. Major League Baseball has long attempted to widen its geography, and this weekend’s two-game Cardinals-Reds series is one of three visits big-league teams will make this year to Monterrey. The 2019 season has already had a series in Tokyo, and in June the Yankees and Red Sox will play in London. The Cardinals recently caught the travel bug. They eagerly accepted the invitation to play the first big-league game at the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pa., in 2017. They did not have to give up a home game at Busch Stadium to be the Reds’ guests for the Mexico Series this weekend, and they are a favorite to be selected to play in London in 2020. This two-day excursion for the Cardinals comes at a time of heightened political attention, and some tension, along the Mexico-U.S. border, and the Cardinals will be playing a three-hour drive from Reynosa, Mexico and the border. Into the middle of this rhetorically saturated time the Cardinals plop down for something downright pastoral. A ball game. Two of them. On artificial turf. “Looks fast,” one Cardinal said Friday. Estadio de Beisbol Monterrey is a 21,900-seat stadium that opened in 1990 and has undergone an overhaul of its field, dugouts and clubhouses in the past 12 months to accommodate Major League Baseball. The ballpark is home to the Sultanes de Monterrey and proclaims as much above the scoreboard with the sign “Palacio Sultan.” The Sultanes have won 10 championships in the Mexican League, and their interlocking logo, dark blue colors, and pinstripes on their retired numbers aren’t subtle about their model. From the ballpark, beyond center field looms Cerro de la Silla, the saddle-like mountain that looms, sometimes shrouded by smog and 5,900 feet above sea level, and is an emblem of Mexico’s third-largest city. The elevation of the ballpark is a little more than 2,000 feet, the air is dry and hot, and the atmosphere appears inviting for offense. The outfield wall is symmetri-

Batting

AVG AB

DeJong

.346

Wieters

.333

3

Wong

.302

H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E 18

6

1

3

8

4

15

0

1

0

0

0

3

0

1

1 0 1 0

43

8

13

2

1

3

8

6

10

3 0 0 0

O’Neill

.273

22

2

6

2

0

0

3

0

8

Ozuna

.262

42

7

11

2

0

3

7

2

13

2 0

Martinez

.259

27

4

7

2

0

0

3

0

5

0 0

Carpenter

.213

47

7

10

4

0

1

3

7

14

0 1

Molina

.208

48

4

10

4

0

1

7

3

5

0 1

Gyorko

.200

5

1

1

0

0

0

1

1

1

0 0

Bader

.189

37

6

7

1

0

2

5

6

13

0 1

Goldschmidt .180

50 10

9

0

0

6

10

9

16

0 2

Fowler

.176

34

6

1

0

0

1

5

12

1 1

Team

.233 437 67 102 24

59 45 127

8 6

Pitching

PHOTOS BY DERRICK GOOLD • P-d

R

52 13

3

W L ERA G GS SV

2 19

IP H R ER HR BB SO

Brebbia

1 0 0.00 6

0

0

8.2

2 0

0

0

4 10

Gallegos

1 0 0.00

1

0

0

1.1

1 0

0

0

0

3

Gant

2 0 0.84 8

0

1

10.2

3

1

1

6

8

Mayers

0 0 1.35 6

0

0

6.2

6

1

1

1

3

6

CARDINALS VS. CINCINNATI

Leone

0 0 2.35

7

0

0

7.2

3

2

2

1

4

7

At Monterrey, Mexico

Hudson

0 1 2.79

3

2

1

9.2 13

4

3

3

7 10

Cardinals third baseman Matt Carpenter has a look at the home field of the Sultanes de Monterrey.

1

Flaherty

1 0 2.93

3

3

0

15.1 16

5

5

2

3 18

Hicks

1 1 3.18

5

0

2

5.2

3

2

2

0

3

Wainwright

1 0 4.50

2

2

0

10.0

9

5

5

0

4 12

Wacha

0 0 5.28

3

3

0

15.1 15

9

9

4 13 17

Webb

0 0 5.40

2

0

0

1

1

1

0

1

Sunday, 3:05 p.m. RH Miles Mikolas (1-1, 6.19) vs. RH Anthony DeSclafani (0-1, 6.75)

Mikolas

1 1 6.19

3

3

0

16.0 17 11 11

4

4

8

Miller

0 1 6.75 8

0

3

4

6

Team

8 5 3.77 13 13

cal — 325 feet down the line, 400 to dead center, and 360 in the alleys. The whole field is turf, and what a stadium official called “True Hope Triple Crown” turf gives way to a firm infield. Wainwright bounced a few baseballs to get a feel for the rebound. One Cardinal described how the ballpark is built for home runs and has a runway as an infield. Oh, and foul territory has no space to steal outs. “We’ll get to know the nooks and crannies of the park,” manager Mike Shildt said. Shildt and members of his coaching staff joined a handful of players for an informal workout Friday at the Palacio. John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations, grabbed a fungo bat and

joined coaches Willie McGee, Pop Warner and Bryan Eversgerd as they roamed the field’s perimeter to get a sense of how balls carom and ricochet off the wall. Mozeliak hit balls into the corner so McGee could see how they pinball. Warner and McGee threw baseballs against the backstop behind home plate to get a sense of where balls might stick — and where they might fire back at the catcher. Matt Carpenter stood and jumped at third base to get a feel for the turf there. Shildt explained how part of their batting practice Saturday will be familiarizing the players with the field — the caroms off the wall, the pool hall speed of the infield. This trip is new for the Cardinals, and that makes the Cardinals new to the crowds. Dodgers starter Julio Urias, who was born

PITCHING MATCHUPS Saturday, 6:10 p.m. RH Adam Wainwright (1-0, 4.50 ERA) vs. RH Tanner Roark (0-0, 5.79)

0

1.2

5.1

1

6

6

4

8

4 117.0 97 52 49 21 61 115

in Culiacan, Mexico, said so much attention is given the Dodgers and the Sultanes’ inspiration, the Yankees, that it’s good for fans and young players to see other teams. “I think the fans really appreciate when they see a lineup that is very talented,” Urias said this past week in St. Louis. “This is a good lineup in the case of the Cardinals, and to see a team like that ... Some of the people focus on the Yankees, the Dodgers, and Boston, especially when they have Mexican players, but seeing someone new like the Cardinals — that’s going to get the attention of the younger people.” The Cardinals will have the only Mexican-born player in the series, and Giovanny Gallegos is coming off his first major-league win. He pitched 1 1/3 scoreless innings Thursday to help the Cardinals complete a four-game sweep of LA and run their winning streak to five games. Gallegos, 27, came to the Cardinals from the Yankees this past July, and he saw early that Mexico was on the Cardinals’ schedule. His parents will make the seven-hour trip from his home in Obregon, Mexico, to see the games. His grandfather, Humberto, who taught him the game, will watch from home. “I think it’s good for the kids because so many people in Mexico — they can’t come to the USA to watch the big-league games right now,” Gallegos said. “It’s exciting for them.” He could get the loudest cheers during intros. Or, Cincinnati’s Yasiel Puig will. Or, it will be hard to tell at all. Urias came with the Dodgers to Monterrey a year ago for a series, and what he said the Cardinals can expect is “noise.” “A lot noisier than the game here,” Urias said. “I’m going to try to play off the crowd,” Wainwright said, looking out on the empty park Friday, imagining the fiesta that awaits him. “I love loud, rowdy crowds, and that always gets me fired up. But I’m going to try to use, ride it. For me, the first game is going to be all business and feeding off the crowd. The second game, I’ll get to take it in as a fan.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Monterrey’s ballpark is readied for this weekend’s Cardinals-Reds series. Opened in 1991, the ballpark was completely renovated and a new playing surface installed a year ago to accommodate Major League Baseball games.

BASEBALL NOTEBOOK

Angels’ Trout will miss weekend series with Cubs ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mike Trout has been ruled out for the Los Angeles Angels’ weekend series against the Chicago Cubs after he strained his right groin during the team’s last homestand. Trout visited Dr. Steve Yoon on Friday in Los Angeles. Angels general manager Billy Eppler said imaging showed a reduced amount of swelling. “Mike also reports daily improvement,” Eppler said in an emailed statement. “He will continue treatment in Anaheim and he will be re-evaluated on Sunday.” Trout first felt discomfort after working out Tuesday. The injury flared up while he was running to second base in the second inning of the Angels’ victory over Milwaukee that night. Manager Brad Ausmus said the team doesn’t think Trout will need a stint on the injured list. He could rejoin the Angels for their next series in Texas. “It’s just a matter of how he feels and what the doc thinks,” Ausmus said before the series opener against the Cubs. Trout signed a record $426.5 million, 12-year contract near the end of spring training. The two-time AL MVP is batting .406 with five homers and 12 RBIs in 12

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Angels’ Mike Trout will be re-evaluated Sunday, general manager Billy Eppler said.

games this year. The injury means one of baseball’s biggest stars will miss a rare trip for Los Angeles to one of the sport’s iconic venues in Wrigley Field. Trout is 5 for 15 in four career games at Chicago’s longtime home. Yankees’ Sanchez on IL • Gary Sanchez was as startled as anybody by the news announced Friday. The Yankees catcher has a strained left calf and became the 12th New York player on the injured list, a day after a precautionary MRI revealed the injury. Righthanded reliever Dellin Betances

will get a cortisone shot in his right shoulder Saturday, which will keep him out another 6 to 7 weeks. Sanchez said through a translator that he was “surprised” by the MRI result, believing the tightness he felt in his calf this week wouldn’t require him to miss more time. He had the MRI during a day off Thursday, and the Yankees decided the strain was severe enough to warrant placing him on the 10-day IL, retroactive to Thursday. More than half the Yankees starting lineup is hurt. Sanchez joined outfielders Giancarlo Stanton (strained left biceps) and Aaron Hicks (lower back strain), shortstop Didi Gregorius (recovering from Tommy John surgery last October), third baseman Miguel Andújar (torn labrum in right shoulder) and shortstop Troy Tulowitzki (strained left calf) on the IL. Cubs’ Caratini out 4-6 weeks • The Cubs placed Victor Caratini on the 10-day injured list Friday with a broken bone in his left hand, sidelining the backup catcher for four to six weeks. The 25-year-old Caratini is scheduled for surgery Monday. He had been a pleasant surprise for Chicago, batting .571 with a homer and five RBIs in six games.

He got hurt on a swing during Thursday night’s 2-0 victory over Pittsburgh. A CT scan confirmed a fracture. Taylor Davis was recalled from TripleA Iowa to replace Caratini on the roster. The 29-year-old Davis is a .278 hitter with three RBIs in 13 career games. Davis hitless streak at 54 • Chris Davis extended his record hitless streak to 0 for 54 when he lined out to end Baltimore’s 6-4 loss to the Red Sox on Friday night. Davis pinch-hit with two outs and none on, and hit a soft liner to second. The former home run champion is 0 for 33 this season. Davis’ drought is the longest ever by a position player. Jackson has minor-league deal with A’s • Edwin Jackson has agreed to a minor league deal with the Oakland Athletics, which last year became his record-matching 13th big league team. A’s manager Bob Melvin said Friday that the 35-year-old righthander will go to the club’s spring training facility in Arizona before pitching in some games for TripleA Las Vegas. Jackson also signed a minor league deal with the A’s last June, and then was 6-3 with a 3.33 ERA in 17 starts for Oakland.


CARDINALS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 2 REDS 5, CARDINALS 2 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 3b 4 0 2 0 1 0 .235 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 2 0 0 2 .200 DeJong ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .316 Ozuna lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .212 Fowler rf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .189 b-Martinez ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Mayers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wong 2b 2 1 1 1 0 0 .311 Bader cf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .179 Wainwright p 3 0 1 1 0 2 .200 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O’Neill rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Totals 34 2 9 2 3 9 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .162 c-Ervin ph-lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000 Votto 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .250 4 0 0 0 0 1 .132 Puig rf Suarez 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .282 Schebler cf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .200 Dietrich 2b 4 1 2 3 0 0 .233 Barnhart c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 J.Iglesias ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Kemp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .139 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --R.Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Roark p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Peraza ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .195 Totals 30 5 6 5 3 5 Cardinals 010 000 001 — 2 9 0 Cincinnati 000 001 13x — 5 6 0 a-flied out for Hughes in the 7th. b-grounded out for Fowler in the 8th. c-tripled for Winker in the 8th. LOB: Cardinals 10, Cincinnati 5. 2B: Ozuna (3), Fowler (2), Votto (5). 3B: Carpenter (1), Dietrich (1), Ervin (1). HR: Wong (4), off Duke; Winker (3), off Wainwright; Dietrich (4), off Wainwright. RBIs: Wong (9), Wainwright (1), Winker (5), Schebler (5), Dietrich 3 (11). SB: Wong (4). RLISP: Cardinals 6 (Carpenter, DeJong 2, Ozuna, Wainwright 2); Cincinnati 2 (Schebler, Barnhart). GIDP: Ozuna, Martinez. DP: Cincinnati 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wainwright 6 3 2 2 2 4 91 3.94 Brebbia 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Webb 0 1 2 2 1 0 7 16.20 Mayers 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 2.35 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark 5 1/3 6 1 1 1 5 95 4.30 Garrett 1 0 0 0 1 2 27 0.00 2/ 0 0 1 11 3.00 Hughes 3 0 0 Hernandez 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.50 2/ 1 0 0 7 9.00 Duke 3 1 1 R.Iglesias 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 4.05 Wainwright pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Webb pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Duke pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. W: Hughes 1-0. L: Wainwright 1-1. S: R.Iglesias 2-2. H: Hernandez 1, Duke 1. Inherited runners-scored: Mayers 2-2, Garrett 1-0, Duke 1-0. HBP: Roark (Wong), Garrett (Wong), Wainwright (Suarez). Umpires: Home, Dan Iassogna; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Chad Whitson; Third, Jim Wolf. T: 3:08. A: 16,886 (26,999).

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

NOTEBOOK

Cardinals are expanding brand Series in Mexico just part of what the club has coming

Cardinals fans pose for a photo in front of a sign before Saturday’s game in Monterrey, Mexico.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

MONTERREY, MEXICO • When Mike Shildt first joined the Cardinals in 2004 and began coaching and managing in the minors soon after, he quickly learned the geography the team’s fan base — it was not bound by state lines, time zone, or level. “It could be Corpus Christi, it could be Midland, Texas, it could be San Antonio, it could be Salt Lake (City) — it didn’t matter,” Shildt said. “There were always Cardinals fans. And not just a couple. Sometimes it would be several hundred to a thousand. It was consistent, wherever we went.” He realized “how vast Cardinal Nation is.” The Cardinals are exploring whether it could be more. With this weekend’s Mexico Series and pursuits of other international and alternative sites for the games, the Cardinals have become more aggressive to expand the regional brand that defined so much of their history. For the first six decades of Cardinals’ history, they were baseball’s farthest team south and farthest team west, and, boosted by KMOX, their broadcasts reached the entire continental United States. Yet, outside of Toronto and Montreal for games, the Cardinals had not ventured beyond the border until Saturday. “It’s a unique opportunity to recognize that our fans are more than just regional-based,” said John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations. “Sometimes giving your business a chance to have some organic growth elsewhere is something that seems exciting and as an organization we welcomed that. We certainly understand that the St. Louis Cardinals are about St. Louis and we want to make sure that product we put on the field there keeps that group engaged. We also see this as a way to connect people who might not have the opportunity to experience St. Louis.” Along with beer and the Gateway Arch, Cardinals baseball is an unofficial global ambassador — a brand as synonymous with St. Louis as Anheuser-Busch. Almost two decades ago the Cardinals declined an invitation to play in Japan, and then weren’t a factor in baseball’s trips abroad until recently. In 2015, Mozeliak and chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. began to pursue spots in baseball’s increasing outreach to other coun-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

AVERAGES Batting Wieters DeJong Wong Ozuna O’Neill Munoz Martinez Carpenter Molina Gyorko Goldschmidt Fowler Bader Team Pitching Brebbia Gallegos Gant Leone Mayers Hudson Flaherty Hicks Wainwright Wacha Mikolas Miller Webb Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .333 3 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 .316 57 13 18 6 1 3 8 4 16 1 0 .311 45 9 14 2 1 4 9 6 10 4 0 .261 46 7 12 3 0 3 7 2 13 2 0 .261 23 2 6 2 0 0 3 0 9 0 0 .250 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 .250 28 4 7 2 0 0 3 0 5 0 0 .235 51 7 12 4 1 1 3 8 14 0 1 .212 52 4 11 4 0 1 7 3 5 0 1 .200 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 .200 55 10 11 0 0 6 10 9 18 0 2 .189 37 4 7 2 0 0 1 5 14 1 1 .179 39 6 7 1 0 2 5 8 14 0 1 .236 471 69 111 26 3 20 61 48 136 9 6 W 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 8

L 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 6

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0.00 7 0 0 9.2 2 0 0 0 4 10 0.00 1 0 0 1.1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.84 8 0 1 10.2 3 1 1 1 6 8 2.35 7 0 0 7.2 3 2 2 1 4 7 2.35 7 0 0 7.2 8 2 2 1 3 7 2.79 3 2 1 9.2 13 4 3 3 7 10 2.94 3 3 0 15.1 16 5 5 2 3 18 3.18 5 0 2 5.2 3 2 2 0 3 8 3.94 3 3 0 16.0 12 7 7 2 6 16 5.28 3 3 0 15.1 15 9 9 4 13 17 6.19 3 3 0 16.0 17 11 11 4 4 8 6.75 8 0 0 5.1 6 6 4 3 4 6 16.20 3 0 0 1.2 2 3 3 1 1 1 3.89 14 14 4 125.0 103 57 54 23 64 120

tries. Bids to be the team that visited Cuba or participate in the first London series were unsuccessful, but the Cardinals did return to Montreal for an exhibition series a year ago and were selected to play in Mexico this summer. The Cardinals have shown a willingness to give up a home series to travel abroad, and they are favorites to play the Cubs in London in 2020. That series will officially be announced this summer. The Cardinals have also expressed to Major League Baseball an interest in traveling to Puerto Rico in the near future so that catcher Yadier Molina could play on his home island. “It’s fun, when you’re in a different (place),” Molina said Saturday before the game at Es-

tadio de Beisbol Monterrey. “I think for everybody, the whole MLB, is starting to do a good job (of broadening its reach).” Molina was a part of that this winter, traveling to Japan with an All-Star team. At the same time, the Cardinals have added to their Spanish-language coverage. For the first time, their Spanish broadcast team, Bengie Molina and Polo Ascensio, called a road game Saturday night. They will broadcast 53 games this season — a new high. That is all part of an attempt, Mozeliak said, to “reach new touchpoints for our fans.” Ownership is “more inclined to try.” Try to see how vast they can make Cardinals Nations. “Gates aren’t even opened here and, look around, you still see a lot of Cardinals jerseys,” Mozeliak said Friday afternoon, pointing to the concourse at Monterrey’s ballpark. “I think that’s positive reinforcement on how we’re thinking about it.”

GALLEGOS’ GIFT Cardinals reliever Giovanny Gallegos, the lone Mexican-born player on either team in this weekend series, pocketed the baseball Thursday from his first win in the majors and planned to give it to his father — in person. “It’s a gift for my dad,” Gallegos said. “He’s got a whole collection from when I was a young kid (till now). It’s a hard road to the big leagues.” Gallegos, who grew up in Obregon, Mexico, had his father, mother, sister, and aunt fly up to Monterrey to attend this weekend’s games in person, and he assured reporters that his grandfather would be watching on television. His visit to Mexico comes immediately after he got the win in Thursday’s rally against the Dodgers.

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Fowler doubles. Wong hit by a pitch. Wainwright singles, Fowler scores, Wong to second. One run. Cardinals 1, Reds 0. Reds sixth • Winker homers. One run. Cardinals 1, Reds 1. Reds seventh • Dietrich homers. One run. Reds 2, Cardinals 1. Reds eighth • Ervin triples. Votto walks. Schebler singles, Ervin scores, Votto to second. Dietrich triples, Votto and Schebler score. Three runs. Reds 5, Cardinals 1. Cardinals ninth • Wong homers. One run. Reds 5, Cardinals 2.

PLENTY OF GOOD SEATS Of the eight regular-season MLB games played at Monterrey’s stadium, Saturday’s was by far the most sparsely attended: April 13, 2018 CIN def. STL 5-2 16,886 May 6, 2018 SDP def. LAD 3-0 21,789 May 5, 2018 SDP def. LAD 7-4 21,791 May 4, 2018 LAD def. SDP 4-0 21,536 April 4, 1999 COL def. SDP 8-2 27,104 Aug. 18, 1996 SDP def. NYM 8-0 22,810 Aug. 17, 1996 NYM def. SDP 7-3 20,873 Aug. 16, 1996 SDP def. NYM 15-10 23,699 ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Reds’ Derek Dietrich hits a home run during the seventh inning for a 2-1 lead against the Cardinals on Saturday night in Mexico.

Wong homers in ninth but Cards rally falls short CARDINALS • FROM D1

to the plate twice in the ninth inning with the middle-order Pauls. Paul Goldschmidt flew out to right field, and No. 3 hitter Paul DeJong popped up. Yasiel Puig caught the ball sliding into shallow right field to end the game and DeJong’s hitting streak at a career-best 12 games. The loss in the first of two games in the Mexico Series against the Reds ended the Cardinals’ five-game winning streak. The big hops and bigger blasts that the Cardinals expected at the ballpark happened – just not in bunches. A few wonky hops led to three triples in the game, but only three of the seven runs scored came on home runs. Kolten Wong thumped Zach Duke for a solo homer in the eighth to give the Cardinals’ their second run. A paid attendance of 16,886 left portions of the outfield seating empty and came shy of the 21,900 capacity, but the festival atmosphere carried through the game – as Wainwright (1-1) toyed early with a no-hitter and the Reds answered late. The closeness of the seats, and

limited foul territory left Matt Carpenter to describe the ballpark, nicknamed Palacio Sultan for the Monterrey home team, as “the presence.” “Kind of engulfing,” he said. In the eighth, as the Cardinals’ bullpen tried to freeze the Reds’ one-run lead, Harrison Bader tracked down a ball in deep right-center field. He got his glove on the ball during a dive, but could not control it for a catch. From the warning track he threw a line to third base, but just barely behind the runner. That triple, by Phillip Ervin, put the three-run inning in motion, and Tyler O’Neill’s diving attempt five batters later led to a triple that scored two more runs. In the first start by a Cardinals pitcher outside of the United States and Canada, it took six innings for Wainwright to give up the first hit. The Cardinals’ veteran went two times through the Reds’ order and allowed only two baserunners, both on walks. Wainwright struck out two batters in the first inning and that set the tone for the first 2/3 of the game. It took the Reds until the fifth inning to get a ball beyond the reach of a Cardinals’ infielder,

and even that was a shallow fly ball that Marcell Ozuna caught near the left-field line. Wainwright closed out the fifth inning with a groundout and his third strikeout of the game. He got through five innings on 61 pitches, and the Cardinals’ bullpen barely stirred. Before the game, players and managers discussed how the warm temps, the close walls, and the trampoline-like turf would likely goose each team’s offense. One Cardinals pitcher wondered if they had the balls stored in a humidor to combat the altitude – the ballpark is more than 2,000 feet above sea level – in the same way Arizona and Colorado attempt to suppress superball offense at their ballparks. (The answer was no. The official game balls had just been flown in from Rawlings storehouse in Missouri in recent days, not stored in Mexico so they didn’t need the humidor to duplicate Missouri’s conditions.) Still, Matt Carpenter referred to the infield as “firm,” and other Cardinals described the turf as fast and the outfield seats as close. “Did you see batting practice?” asked one Cardinal, referring to the power show.

And yet it was unplugged for most of the game. That’s not to say the ballpark wasn’t a factor early. Matt Carpenter led off with a triple by skying the ball toward left field. The Reds used a fouroutfield alignment for the Cardinals’ leadoff hitter. With the second base shifted into shallow right field, the Reds started each pitch with five players in the grass, and at least once first baseman Joey Votto started with his cleats in the grass. Carpenter’s fly ball to left then had very few Reds to chase after it, especially when the left fielder lost it in the sun, and other players were on the other side of the field. Third baseman Eugenio Saurez got close but the ball fell beyond his reach – and then took a massive hop away from he and a teammate. Carpenter reached third without an issue. Then stood there and watched the inning end. The next three batters struck out and flew out twice. By the end of the second inning, six of the Cardinals’ first nine hitters had a plate appearance with a runner in scoring position. The only Cardinal with a hit in that stretch was Wainwright.

The Cardinals’ starter slashed a two-out single to left field to score Dexter Fowler for the game’s first run. Fowler had a one-out double off Reds starter Tanner Roark in the second inning. Roark then hit a batter and struck out a batter to get the inning to Wainwright. A former Silver Slugger winner, Wainwright turned on a pitch for the RBI and the lead. He would have a chance four innings later to extend that lead after some strategic work by reliever Amir Garrett. The lefty entered the game for Roark in the sixth inning and inherited Marcell Ozuna at second base. Garrett, a lefty, struck out switch-hitter Fowler. That allowed him to walk Wong and intentionally walk Bader to face Wainwright with the bases loaded. Manager Mike Shildt stuck with the veteran, who had a no-hitter going at the time, despite having an extra position player on the bench for this series and the chance, as he put it earlier in the day, to be “aggressive” with pinch-hitters. Wainwright struck out swinging to strand three batters. The next inning the Reds tied the game. The inning after that they had the lead. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


CARDINALS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 4 REDS 5, CARDINALS 2 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carpenter 3b 4 0 2 0 1 0 .235 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 2 0 0 2 .200 DeJong ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .316 Ozuna lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Molina c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .212 Fowler rf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .189 b-Martinez ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Mayers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wong 2b 2 1 1 1 0 0 .311 Bader cf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .179 Wainwright p 3 0 1 1 0 2 .200 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O’Neill rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .261 Totals 34 2 9 2 3 9 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Winker lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .162 c-Ervin ph-lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000 Votto 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .250 4 0 0 0 0 1 .132 Puig rf Suarez 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .282 Schebler cf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .200 Dietrich 2b 4 1 2 3 0 0 .233 Barnhart c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .267 J.Iglesias ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Kemp ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .139 Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Duke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --R.Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Roark p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Peraza ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .195 Totals 30 5 6 5 3 5 Cardinals 010 000 001 — 2 9 0 Cincinnati 000 001 13x — 5 6 0 a-flied out for Hughes in the 7th. b-grounded out for Fowler in the 8th. c-tripled for Winker in the 8th. LOB: Cardinals 10, Cincinnati 5. 2B: Ozuna (3), Fowler (2), Votto (5). 3B: Carpenter (1), Dietrich (1), Ervin (1). HR: Wong (4), off Duke; Winker (3), off Wainwright; Dietrich (4), off Wainwright. RBIs: Wong (9), Wainwright (1), Winker (5), Schebler (5), Dietrich 3 (11). SB: Wong (4). RLISP: Cardinals 6 (Carpenter, DeJong 2, Ozuna, Wainwright 2); Cincinnati 2 (Schebler, Barnhart). GIDP: Ozuna, Martinez. DP: Cincinnati 2. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wainwright 6 3 2 2 2 4 91 3.94 Brebbia 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Webb 0 1 2 2 1 0 7 16.20 Mayers 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 2.35 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark 5 1/3 6 1 1 1 5 95 4.30 Garrett 1 0 0 0 1 2 27 0.00 2/ 0 0 1 11 3.00 Hughes 3 0 0 Hernandez 1/3 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.50 2/ 1 0 0 7 9.00 Duke 3 1 1 R.Iglesias 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 4.05 Wainwright pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Webb pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Duke pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. W: Hughes 1-0. L: Wainwright 1-1. S: R.Iglesias 2-2. H: Hernandez 1, Duke 1. Inherited runners-scored: Mayers 2-2, Garrett 1-0, Duke 1-0. HBP: Roark (Wong), Garrett (Wong), Wainwright (Suarez). Umpires: Home, Dan Iassogna; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Chad Whitson; Third, Jim Wolf. T: 3:08. A: 16,886 (26,999).

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

NOTEBOOK

Cardinals are expanding brand Series in Mexico just part of what the club has coming

Cardinals fans pose for a photo in front of a sign before Saturday’s game in Monterrey, Mexico.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

MONTERREY, MEXICO • When Mike Shildt first joined the Cardinals in 2004 and began coaching and managing in the minors soon after, he quickly learned the geography the team’s fan base — it was not bound by state lines, time zone, or level. “It could be Corpus Christi, it could be Midland, Texas, it could be San Antonio, it could be Salt Lake (City) — it didn’t matter,” Shildt said. “There were always Cardinals fans. And not just a couple. Sometimes it would be several hundred to a thousand. It was consistent, wherever we went.” He realized “how vast Cardinal Nation is.” The Cardinals are exploring whether it could be more. With this weekend’s Mexico Series and pursuits of other international and alternative sites for the games, the Cardinals have become more aggressive to expand the regional brand that defined so much of their history. For the first six decades of Cardinals’ history, they were baseball’s farthest team south and farthest team west, and, boosted by KMOX, their broadcasts reached the entire continental United States. Yet, outside of Toronto and Montreal for games, the Cardinals had not ventured beyond the border until Saturday. “It’s a unique opportunity to recognize that our fans are more than just regional-based,” said John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations. “Sometimes giving your business a chance to have some organic growth elsewhere is something that seems exciting and as an organization we welcomed that. We certainly understand that the St. Louis Cardinals are about St. Louis and we want to make sure that product we put on the field there keeps that group engaged. We also see this as a way to connect people who might not have the opportunity to experience St. Louis.” Along with beer and the Gateway Arch, Cardinals baseball is an unofficial global ambassador — a brand as synonymous with St. Louis as Anheuser-Busch. Almost two decades ago the Cardinals declined an invitation to play in Japan, and then weren’t a factor in baseball’s trips abroad until recently. In 2015, Mozeliak and chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. began to pursue spots in baseball’s increasing outreach to other coun-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

AVERAGES Batting Wieters DeJong Wong Ozuna O’Neill Munoz Martinez Carpenter Molina Gyorko Goldschmidt Fowler Bader Team Pitching Brebbia Gallegos Gant Leone Mayers Hudson Flaherty Hicks Wainwright Wacha Mikolas Miller Webb Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .333 3 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 .316 57 13 18 6 1 3 8 4 16 1 0 .311 45 9 14 2 1 4 9 6 10 4 0 .261 46 7 12 3 0 3 7 2 13 2 0 .261 23 2 6 2 0 0 3 0 9 0 0 .250 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 .250 28 4 7 2 0 0 3 0 5 0 0 .235 51 7 12 4 1 1 3 8 14 0 1 .212 52 4 11 4 0 1 7 3 5 0 1 .200 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 .200 55 10 11 0 0 6 10 9 18 0 2 .189 37 4 7 2 0 0 1 5 14 1 1 .179 39 6 7 1 0 2 5 8 14 0 1 .236 471 69 111 26 3 20 61 48 136 9 6 W 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 8

L 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 6

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0.00 7 0 0 9.2 2 0 0 0 4 10 0.00 1 0 0 1.1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.84 8 0 1 10.2 3 1 1 1 6 8 2.35 7 0 0 7.2 3 2 2 1 4 7 2.35 7 0 0 7.2 8 2 2 1 3 7 2.79 3 2 1 9.2 13 4 3 3 7 10 2.94 3 3 0 15.1 16 5 5 2 3 18 3.18 5 0 2 5.2 3 2 2 0 3 8 3.94 3 3 0 16.0 12 7 7 2 6 16 5.28 3 3 0 15.1 15 9 9 4 13 17 6.19 3 3 0 16.0 17 11 11 4 4 8 6.75 8 0 0 5.1 6 6 4 3 4 6 16.20 3 0 0 1.2 2 3 3 1 1 1 3.89 14 14 4 125.0 103 57 54 23 64 120

tries. Bids to be the team that visited Cuba or participate in the first London series were unsuccessful, but the Cardinals did return to Montreal for an exhibition series a year ago and were selected to play in Mexico this summer. The Cardinals have shown a willingness to give up a home series to travel abroad, and they are favorites to play the Cubs in London in 2020. That series will officially be announced this summer. The Cardinals have also expressed to Major League Baseball an interest in traveling to Puerto Rico in the near future so that catcher Yadier Molina could play on his home island. “It’s fun, when you’re in a different (place),” Molina said Saturday before the game at Es-

tadio de Beisbol Monterrey. “I think for everybody, the whole MLB, is starting to do a good job (of broadening its reach).” Molina was a part of that this winter, traveling to Japan with an All-Star team. At the same time, the Cardinals have added to their Spanish-language coverage. For the first time, their Spanish broadcast team, Bengie Molina and Polo Ascensio, called a road game Saturday night. They will broadcast 53 games this season — a new high. That is all part of an attempt, Mozeliak said, to “reach new touchpoints for our fans.” Ownership is “more inclined to try.” Try to see how vast they can make Cardinals Nations. “Gates aren’t even opened here and, look around, you still see a lot of Cardinals jerseys,” Mozeliak said Friday afternoon, pointing to the concourse at Monterrey’s ballpark. “I think that’s positive reinforcement on how we’re thinking about it.”

GALLEGOS’ GIFT Cardinals reliever Giovanny Gallegos, the lone Mexican-born player on either team in this weekend series, pocketed the baseball Thursday from his first win in the majors and planned to give it to his father — in person. “It’s a gift for my dad,” Gallegos said. “He’s got a whole collection from when I was a young kid (till now). It’s a hard road to the big leagues.” Gallegos, who grew up in Obregon, Mexico, had his father, mother, sister, and aunt fly up to Monterrey to attend this weekend’s games in person, and he assured reporters that his grandfather would be watching on television. His visit to Mexico comes immediately after he got the win in Thursday’s rally against the Dodgers.

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals second • Fowler doubles. Wong hit by a pitch. Wainwright singles, Fowler scores, Wong to second. One run. Cardinals 1, Reds 0. Reds sixth • Winker homers. One run. Cardinals 1, Reds 1. Reds seventh • Dietrich homers. One run. Reds 2, Cardinals 1. Reds eighth • Ervin triples. Votto walks. Schebler singles, Ervin scores, Votto to second. Dietrich triples, Votto and Schebler score. Three runs. Reds 5, Cardinals 1. Cardinals ninth • Wong homers. One run. Reds 5, Cardinals 2.

PLENTY OF GOOD SEATS Of the eight regular-season MLB games played at Monterrey’s stadium, Saturday’s was by far the most sparsely attended: April 13, 2018 CIN def. STL 5-2 16,886 May 6, 2018 SDP def. LAD 3-0 21,789 May 5, 2018 SDP def. LAD 7-4 21,791 May 4, 2018 LAD def. SDP 4-0 21,536 April 4, 1999 COL def. SDP 8-2 27,104 Aug. 18, 1996 SDP def. NYM 8-0 22,810 Aug. 17, 1996 NYM def. SDP 7-3 20,873 Aug. 16, 1996 SDP def. NYM 15-10 23,699 ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Reds’ Derek Dietrich hits a home run during the seventh inning for a 2-1 lead against the Cardinals on Saturday night in Mexico.

Wong homers in ninth but Cards rally falls short CARDINALS • FROM D1

the outfield by the Cardinals unlocked a three-run eighth that allowed host Cincinnati to pull away once they started putting the ball in the air. “The air is thin here, and everyone knows that,” Wainwright said. “My job was to keep the ball on the ground. Everybody kept talking about there was going to be a lot of runs. That’s a slap in my face. If I go out and make pitches, they’re not going to go out and score a lot of runs. If I go out and make pitches like I did the rest of the year, I’ll take my chances.” The loss ended the Cardinals’ five-game winning streak, though the game represented a significant stride forward for the organization — and brand. Wainwright became the first Cardinal to throw a pitch in Mexico and the first Cardinal to start a regular-season game outside of the United States or Canada. A festive crowd of 16,886 — shy of the 21,900 capacity — was dotted with Cardinals merchandise, and for the first time in a Cincinnati home game, catcher Yadier Molina was cheered. As the game got later, the crowd got louder as

the offense did. Beer sales didn’t stop — and still hadn’t as a concert and party lasted at the ballpark at least 90 minutes after Yasiel Puig’s sliding catch in shallow right field ended the game. “You can hear it right now — it’s a fun place,” manager Mike Shildt said as he wedged his post-game press conference between a fireworks display and the band’s opening songs. “Look, we have a great game. One thing of many that I appreciate about our game is that it has no language barrier. The color of your skin doesn’t matter how much you can love the game, (nor does) where you’re from. There is genuine enthusiasm anytime you go play and obviously people are enjoying themselves here. It’s a great game to be enjoyed.” Leadoff hitter Matt Carpenter referred to the proximity of the fans and comfy dimensions of Monterrey’s ballpark as “a presence.” “It is kind of engulfing,” Carpenter said. Before the game, a Cardinals pitcher asked if they had a humidor to store the baseballs, as they do in Arizona and Colorado to combat the dry and high-al-

titude conditions there. (There was no humidor. The baseballs had been shipped in from Missouri and St. Louis-based Rawlings within the past few days, not stored in Monterrey.) Carpenter called the infield “firm,” another infielder called it quick, and Wainwright remarked how the turf had a “little trampoline effect.” Batting practice was a power show. Yet, while Wainwright was able to turn the ballpark against itself — the Reds didn’t have a ball beyond the reach of a Cardinals infield until the fifth inning — the ballpark turned some hitters against themselves. The first time through the Cardinals’ order, they had six plate appearances with a runner in scoring position. Wainwright had the only hit — a two-out single in the second for the Cardinals’ lone run in the first eight innings. Carpenter opened the game with four Reds in the outfield against him, and the second baseman shifted into shallow right field. He lofted a fly ball to left, leaving only third baseman Eugenio Suarez to have a good angle on the ball. Suarez twisted himself, but didn’t make the catch and that “little tram-

poline effect” bounded the ball far enough away that Carpenter cruised for a leadoff triple. And then he stood there. The Cardinals stranded five runners in scoring position before the Reds had a hit, and they finished the game one-for-12 with runners in scoring position. “I had a few and couldn’t come through,” said Paul DeJong, who finished zero-for-three with runners in scoring position and saw his career-best hitting streak end at 12 games. “I think, me personally, this park got me out of my normal swing. I was trying to create instead of just letting it happen and taking my same approach. A little over-swinging, a little underneath balls. Focus on hitting line drives and we’ll be just fine.” The Cardinals bumped Reds starter Tanner Roark from the game and loaded the bases in the sixth inning. Lefty Amir Garrett judiciously walked Kolten Wong and Harrison Bader to bring Wainwright to the plate with the bases loaded. Even with an extra batter on his bench, Shildt stayed with Wainwright — who had more hits (one) in that moment than he had allowed (none). “It was his game to win or lose

at that point,” Shildt said. “He was in complete control,” Reds manager David Bell said. Wainwright struck out and the next inning the no-hitter, the shutout, and the lead vanished with Winker’s homer to left field. The first batter of the seventh inning, Dietrich, shoved Wainwright (1-1) from his second consecutive quality start with a homer to right field. In the eighth, Bader attempted two plays — either of which would have been exceptional with an out. He had a ball glance off his glove in deep right-center that went for a triple, only because the runner barely beat his onthe-fly throw from the warning track. That led to the first run of the eighth. The other two came on Dietrich’s triple that Tyler O’Neill just missed with a diving catch. After Wong’s homer in the ninth, the Cardinals got the tying run to the plate in the Pauls — Goldschmidt and DeJong. The crowd was standing, swaying, and when Puig made the game-ending catch the ballpark nicknamed Palacio Sultan shook from the fireworks. “I enjoyed it quite a bit,” Shildt said, with a caveat. “Until the final out.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Walton out as coach in LA Blue Jackets do it again Lakers make the change after three losing seasons

NHL-best Lightning go down 2-0 in series at home

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Luke Walton is out as coach of the Los Angeles Lakers after three losing seasons. Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka announced Walton’s departure Friday, three days after the abrupt resignation of president of basketball operations Magic Johnson. Pelinka called Walton leaving a mutual decision. The former Lakers forward went 98-148 after getting his first permanent head coaching job with the 16-time NBA champions. The former Golden State assistant never led the Lakers to the playoffs, not even after the arrival of LeBron James last summer. Walton leaves three days after the Lakers’ final game of their 37-45 season was upstaged by the shocking pregame resignation of Johnson, who inherited Walton when he took over the Lakers’ front office in February 2017. Johnson attributed his decision in part to his desire and reluctance to fire Walton, who is close to Lakers owner Jeanie Buss. Instead, Pelinka announced the move in a possible sign of the increased power of Kobe Bryant’s former agent with the Lakers after Johnson’s departure. “I want to thank Jeanie Buss and the Buss family for giving me the opportunity to coach the Lakers,” Walton said in a statement issued by the Lakers. “This franchise and the city will always be special to me and my family.” Johnson had problems with Walton’s coaching style, his rotations and his reluctance to add additional assistants to his bench. After a tumultuous week, a potential power struggle instead ended with both men out of their jobs. James and the Lakers’ players have been uniformly supportive of Walton, who managed to keep together a disparate locker room playing under the

The Columbus Blue Jackets are making a serious bid to knock the team with the best regular-season record out of the playoffs. Matt Duchene had a goal and three assists, Sergei Bobrovsky made 23 saves, and the Blue Jackets stunned the Tampa Bay Lightning 5-1 on Friday night to take a 2-0 firstround series lead. Two down. Two more to go. “It’s half the wins that we need,” Duchene said. “We’re keeping our heads down and our eyes on the prize.” Columbus also got goals from Cam Atkinson, Zach Werenski, Riley Nash and Artemi Panarin. The Blue Jackets started the playoffs last season by winning the first two games of the first-round series with eventual Stanley Cup winner Washington, which won the next four games. Mikhail Sergachev had a goal and Andrei Vasilevskiy stopped 22 shots for the Lightning, who lost two games in a row just twice in the regular season. Tampa Bay matched the 1995-96 Detroit Red Wings for the most wins in a regular season with 62. “The regular season is different than the playoffs,” Lightning coach Jon Cooper said. “Things just happen so fast. Alarms are going off. This is a fivealarm fire. But it’s adversity and sometimes that’s good that you have to go through stuff like this to see how we respond. One thing I do know about being with this group is, they find a way.” Lightning right wing Nikita Kucherov, who led the NHL with 128 points, was held off the scoresheet for the second consecutive game and picked up tripping, boarding and 10-minute misconduct penalties late in the third period. It’s also likely that Kucherov will face disci-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Los Angeles Lakers coach Luke Walton was fired on Friday, three days after the team finished a 37-45 season.

Los Angeles microscope. “Want to thank Luke and the rest of the coaching staff for allowing me to be me from day 1,” forward Kyle Kuzma tweeted. “They say opportunity is everything in the league and they gave me that right from the jump.” Embiid doubtful • Joel Embiid could start the postseason on the bench. Embiid, the Philadelphia 76ers’ All-Star center, is doubtful to play Saturday in Game 1 of the first-round playoff series against the Brooklyn Nets because of tendinitis in his left knee that cost him most of the final month of the season. George might sit out • Oklahoma City forward Paul George could miss Sunday’s playoff opener at Portland with right shoulder soreness. Thunder coach Billy Donovan said Friday the All-Star is considered day-to-day. George finished second in the league with 28.0 points per game this season, and he led the league with 2.21 steals per contest. He shoots 39 percent from 3-point range and is the team’s No. 3 re-

bounder. Anunoby has surgery • Toronto Raptors forward OG Anunoby had an emergency appendectomy two days before his team begins the playoffs. There is no timetable for his return, although the 6-foot-8 forward is expected to miss at least the first round. The Raptors open at home Saturday against the Orlando Magic. Pelicans to hire Griffin • Three people familiar with the situation say the Pelicans have reached an agreement in principle to make former Cleveland Cavaliers general manager David Griffin New Orleans’ new executive vice president of basketball operations. The people spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because contract negotiations are ongoing and no announcement has been made. Griffin will take over for former Pelicans GM Dell Demps, who was fired in the middle of his ninth season with the club and a few weeks after All-Star Anthony Davis’ trade request in late January.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Blue Jackets center Riley Nash (left) celebrates his goal against the Lightning with center Brandon Dubinsky during the third period Friday night.

pline from the NHL. “I’m not going to give you any thoughts on it,” Columbus coach John Tortorella said. “It’s selfexplanatory.” The Blue Jackets rallied from a three-goal, first-period deficit to beat Tampa Bay 4-3 in Game 1 on Wednesday night as Seth Jones scored the goahead goal on the power play to cap Columbus’ three-goal third period. Tortorella said he’s not surprised about the 2-0 series advantage even after the early hole in Game 1. “No, and I’m serious about that,” Tortorella said. “I think we’re a good team. We’ve gone through a lot as a team. If we’re going to be successful as a team, we have to play as a team. So, even when we were down 3-0, I don’t think we got away as far as how we have to play.” Duchene assisted on both of Columbus’ goals during the first period and put the Blue Jackets ahead 3-0 on the power play when the center scored on the rebound at 1:28 of the second after Vasilevskiy had stopped his tip-in try. Columbus, 28th in the

NHL on the power play during the regular season, converted two of four chances and is 3 for 6 overall. Tampa Bay’s top-ranked power-play unit has failed in all five opportunities in the series. Islanders 3, Penguins 1 • Jordan Eberle and Josh Bailey scored in the third period and New York beat Pittsburgh for a 2-0 lead in their first-round playoff series in Uniondale, N.Y. Anthony Beauvillier also scored and Robin Lehner stopped 32 shots to help New York open a postseason series with two wins for the first time since sweeping Edmonton in the 1983 Stanley Cup Finals for the Islanders’ fourth straight championship. Mathew Barzal had two assists in a chippy, physical game that featured a lot of hard hits and some skirmishes, especially in the first two periods — and also after the final buzzer. Erik Gudbranson scored and Matt Murray finished with 31 saves for the Penguins, who lost the first two games of a series for the first time since 2013.

NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

*If necessary

WESTERN CONFERENCE

NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

WESTERN CONFERENCE

BUCKS VS. PISTONS

WARRIORS VS. CLIPPERS

Sunday

6 at Milwaukee, TNT

Saturday

7 at Golden State, KDNL-30

Wed.

7 at Milwaukee, NBA TV

Monday

9:30 at Golden State, TNT

April 20

7 at Detroit, ESPN

Thursday 9:30 at LA, TNT

April 22

7 at Detroit, TNT

April 21

2:30 at LA, KDNL-30

*April 24

TBA at Milwaukee, TV TBA

*April 24

TBA at Golden State, TV TBA

*April 26

TBA at Detroit, TV TBA

*April 26

TBA at LA, TV TBA

*April 28

TBA at Milwaukee, TV TBA

*April 28

TBA at Golden State, TV TBA

RAPTORS VS. MAGIC 4 at Toronto, ESPN

Saturday

9:30 at Denver, ESPN

Tuesday

7 at Toronto, TNT

Tuesday

8 at Denver, NBA TV

Friday

6 at Orlando, ESPN

Thursday 8 at San Antonio, NBA TV

April 21

6 at Orlando, TNT

April 20

4:30 at San Antonio, TNT

*April 23

TBA at Toronto, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at Denver, TV TBA

*April 25

TBA at Orlando, TV TBA

*April 25

TBA at San Antonio, TV TBA

*April 27

TBA at Toronto, TNT

*April 27

TBA at Denver, TNT

76ERS VS. NETS 1:30 at Philadelphia, ESPN

Sunday

2:30 at Portland, KDNL-30

Monday

7 at Philadelphia, TNT

Tuesday

9:30 at Portland, TNT

Thursday 7 at Brooklyn, TNT

Friday

8:30 at Oklahoma City, ESPN

April 20

2 at Brooklyn, TNT

April 21

8:30 at Oklahoma City, TNT

*April 23

TBA at Philadelphia, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at Portland, TV TBA

*April 25

TBA at Brooklyn, TV TBA

*April 25

TBA at Oklahoma City, TV TBA

*April 27

TBA at Philadelphia, TNT

*April 27

TBA at Portland, TNT

CELTICS VS. PACERS Sunday

8:30 at Houston, TNT

Wed.

6 at Boston, TNT

Wed.

8:30 at Houston, TNT

Friday

7:30 at Indiana, KDNL-30

April 20

9:30 at Utah, ESPN

April 21

Noon at Indiana, KDNL-30

April 22

9:30 at Utah, TNT

*April 24

TBA at Boston, TV TBA

*April 24

TBA at Houston, TV TBA

*April 26

TBA at Indiana, TV TBA

*April 26

TBA at Utah, TV TBA

*April 28

TBA at Boston, TV TBA

*April 28

TBA at Houston, TV TBA

Game 1

Blue Jackets 4, Lightning 3

Game 2

Blues 4, Jets 3

Game 2

Blue Jackets 5, Lightning 1

Sunday

6:30 at Enterprise, FSM, CNBC

Sunday

6 at Columbus, NBCSN

Tuesday

8:30 at Enterprise, FSM, CNBC

Tuesday

6 at Columbus, CNBC

*Thursday TBA at Winnipeg, FSM

*Friday

TBA at Tampa Bay, TV TBA

*April 20

TBA at Enterprise, FSM or KSDK-5

*April 21

TBA at Columbus, TV TBA

*April 22

TBA at Winnipeg, FSM

*April 23

TBA at Tampa Bay, TV TBA MAPLE LEAFS 1, BRUINS 0

Game 1

Stars 3, Predators 2

Game 1

Maple Leafs 4, Bruins 1

Saturday

5 at Nashville, CNBC

Saturday

7 at Boston, KSDK-5

Monday

8:30 at Dallas, NBCSN

Monday

6 at Toronto, NBCSN

Wed.

8 at Dallas, USA

Wed.

6 at Toronto, NBCSN

*April 20

TBA at Nashville, TV TBA

*Friday

TBA at Boston, TV TBA

*April 22

TBA at Dallas, TV TBA

*April 21

TBA at Toronto, TV TBA

*April 24

TBA at Nashville, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at Boston, TV TBA CAPITALS 1, HURRICANES 0

Game 1

Flames 4, Avalanche 0

Game 1

Capitals 4, Hurricanes 2

Saturday

9:30 at Calgary, NBCSN

Saturday

2 at Washington, KSDK-5

Monday

9 at Denver, CNBC

Monday

6 at Carolina, CNBC

Wed.

9 at Denver, NBCSN

Thursday 6 at Carolina

*Friday

TBA at Calgary, TV TBA

*April 20

TBA at Washington, TV TBA

*April 21

TBA at Denver, TV TBA

*April 22

TBA at Carolina, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at Calgary, TV TBA

*April 24

SHARKS 1, GOLDEN KNIGHTS 1

ROCKETS VS. JAZZ

Noon at Boston, TNT

Blues 2, Jets 1

FLAMES 1, AVALANCHE 0

TRAIL BLAZERS VS. THUNDER

Saturday

BLUE JACKETS 2, LIGHTNING 0

Game 1

STARS 1, PREDATORS 0

NUGGETS VS. SPURS

Saturday

Sunday

BLUES 2, JETS 0

*If necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

TBA at Washington, TV TBA ISLANDERS 2, PENGUINS 0

Game 1

Sharks 5, Knights 2

Game 1

Islanders 4, Penguins 3, OT

Game 2

Knights 5, Sharks 3

Game 2

Islanders 3, Penguins 1

Sunday

9 at Las Vegas, NBCSN

Sunday

11 a.m. at Pittsburgh, KSDK-5

Tuesday

9:30 at Las Vegas, NBCSN

Tuesday

6:30 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

Thursday TBA at San Jose, TV TBA

*Thursday TBA at New York, TV TBA

*April 21

TBA at Las Vegas, TV TBA

*April 20

TBA at Pittsburgh, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at San Jose, TV TBA

*April 22

TBA at New York, TV TBA

NHL SUMMARIES NBA LEADERS REGULAR SEASON FINAL Scoring G Harden, HOU 78 George, OKC 77 Antetokounmpo, MIL 72 Embiid, PHL 64 Curry, GOL 69 Leonard, TOR 60 Booker, PHX 64 Durant, GOL 78 Lillard, POR 80 Walker, CHA 82 Beal, WAS 82 Griffin, DET 75 Towns, MIN 77 Irving, BOS 67 Mitchell, UTA 77 LaVine, CHI 63 Westbrook, OKC 73 Thompson, GOL 78 Randle, NOR 73 Aldridge, SAN 81 FG Percentage Gobert, UTA Capela, HOU McGee, LAL Bryant, WAS Harrell, LAC

FG 476 474 400 309 546

FG 843 707 721 580 632 560 586 721 681 731 764 619 681 604 661 530 630 655 571 684

FT 754 453 500 522 263 364 393 448 468 380 362 414 376 214 319 312 296 129 356 349 FGA 712 732 641 502 888

PTS 2818 2159 1994 1761 1881 1596 1700 2027 2067 2102 2099 1841 1880 1596 1829 1492 1675 1680 1565 1727

AVG 36.1 28.0 27.7 27.5 27.3 26.6 26.6 26.0 25.8 25.6 25.6 24.5 24.4 23.8 23.8 23.7 22.9 21.5 21.4 21.3 PCT .669 .648 .624 .616 .615

Adams, OKC Sabonis, IND Allen, BRO Favors, UTA Ayton, PHX

481 413 335 363 509

Rebounds Drummond, DET Embiid, PHL Jordan, NYK Gobert, UTA Capela, HOU Antetokounmpo, MIL Towns, MIN Vucevic, ORL Whiteside, MIA Westbrook, OKC

G 79 64 69 81 67 72 77 80 72 73

Assists Westbrook, OKC Lowry, TOR Paul, HOU Young, ATL Holiday, NOR Simmons, PHL Harden, HOU Fox, SAC Jokic, DEN Russell, BRO

809 700 568 619 870 OFF 423 160 225 309 298 159 263 224 257 109

G 73 65 58 81 67 79 78 81 80 81

DEF 809 711 677 732 550 739 691 736 560 698 AST 784 564 473 653 518 610 586 590 580 563

.595 .590 .590 .586 .585 TOT 1232 871 902 1041 848 898 954 960 817 807

AVG 15.6 13.6 13.1 12.9 12.7 12.5 12.4 12.0 11.3 11.1 AVG 10.7 8.7 8.2 8.1 7.7 7.7 7.5 7.3 7.2 7.0

Blue Jackets 5, Lightning 1

Islanders 3, Penguins 1

Playoff points leaders

Columbus 2 1 2 — 5 Tampa Bay 0 0 1 — 1 First Period: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 1 (Duchene), 5:15. 2, Columbus, Werenski 1 (Duchene), 11:44 (pp). Penalties: Erne, TB, (delay of game), 7:08; Palat, TB, (hooking), 11:40; Werenski, CBJ, Major (fighting), 15:11; Point, TB, Major (fighting), 15:11. Second Period: 3, Columbus, Duchene 1 (Werenski, Panarin), 1:28 (pp). Penalties: Killorn, TB, (interference), 0:30; Columbus bench, served by Duchene (too many men on the ice), 4:21. Third Period: 4, Tampa Bay, Sergachev 1 (Miller, Cernak), 5:00. 5, Columbus, Nash 1 (Jenner), 9:06. 6, Columbus, Panarin 1 (Duchene, Bjorkstrand), 12:15. Penalties: Foligno, CBJ, (tripping), 5:51; Kucherov, TB, (tripping), 15:34; Kucherov, TB, Misconduct (misconduct), 15:34; Kucherov, TB, Major (boarding), 15:34; Hedman, TB, Misconduct (misconduct), 15:34; Anderson, CBJ, (roughing), 15:34; Anderson, CBJ, Misconduct (misconduct), 15:34. Shots : Columbus 10-7-10: 27. Tampa Bay 8-5-11: 24. Power-plays: Columbus 2 of 4; Tampa Bay 0 of 2. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 2-0 (24 shots23 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 0-2 (27-22). A: 19,092 (19,092). Referees: Francis Charron, Gord Dwyer. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Pierre Racicot.

Pittsburgh 0 1 0 — 1 NY Islanders 0 1 2 — 3 First Period: None. Penalties: Malkin, PIT, (hooking), 5:51; Malkin, PIT, (high sticking), 8:23; Komarov, NYI, (roughing), 8:23; Johnson, PIT, (high sticking), 13:38; Johnson, PIT, (interference), 15:47; Lee, NYI, (hooking), 16:52. Second Period: 1, Pittsburgh, Gudbranson 1 (Malkin), 10:36. 2, NY Islanders, Beauvillier 1 (Barzal, Eberle), 13:25. Penalties: Crosby, PIT, (hooking), 3:25; Gudbranson, PIT, (high sticking), 4:31; Barzal, NYI, served by Martin, (roughing), 13:25; Barzal, NYI, (roughing), 13:25; Pettersson, PIT, (roughing), 13:25. Third Period: 3, NY Islanders, Eberle 2 (Barzal, Boychuk), 7:54. 4, NY Islanders, Bailey 2 (Toews, Lee), 11:38 (pp). Penalties: Hornqvist, PIT, (tripping), 9:50. Shots: Pittsburgh 7-11-15: 33. NY Islanders 11-12-11: 34. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 2; NY Islanders 1 of 6. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 0-2 (34 shots-31 saves). NY Islanders, Lehner 2-0 (33-32). A: 13,917 (13,917). Referees: Wes McCauley, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Scott Cherrey.

Through Friday’s early games Name Team GP Eberle NYI 2 Duchene CBJ 2 Panarin CBJ 2 Malkin PIT 2 Werenski CBJ 2 Carlson WSH 1 Barzal NYI 2 Stone VGK 1 Marner TOR 1 Svechnikov CAR 1 Tkachuk CGY 1 Backstrom WSH 1 Bailey NYI 2 Tavares TOR 1 Kane SJS 1 Heiskanen DAL 1 Burns SJS 1 Vlasic SJS 1 Hertl SJS 1 Anderson CBJ 2 Sergachev TBL 2 Kessel PIT 2 Schultz PIT 2 Pacioretty VGK 1 Wallmark CAR 1 Karlsson SJS 1 Jenner CBJ 2 Miller TBL 2 Toews NYI 2 Lee NYI 2 Cernak TBL 2

G 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

A 2 3 2 2 2 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

P 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2


NHL PLAYOFFS

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 04.14.2019

SERIES STATISTICS BLUES 6 0 (0 for 7) 50 8 29 47 48.4 1/2/3

CATEGORY GOALS POWER PLAY PERCENTAGE PENALTY KILL PERCENTAGE PENALTY MINUTES SHOTS/GAME HITS FACEOFF WIN PERCENTAGE GOALS BY PERIOD

BLUES

JETS

Points (G, A): Sundqvist 3 (2, 1), Perron 2 (1, 1), Maroon 2 (1, 1), Pietrangelo 2 (0, 2), Parayko 2 (0, 2), Bouwmeester 2 (0, 2), O’Reilly 1 (1, 0), Bozak 1 (1, 0), Edmundson 1 (0, 1), Schwartz 1 (0, 1), Thomas 1 (0, 1). Penalty minutes: Bortuzzo 2, Bozak 2, O’Reilly 2, Thomas 2. Shots (min. 5): Tarasenko 9, Bozak 6, O’Reilly 6, Pietrangelo 6, Parayko 5. Hits (min. 5): Schenn 9, Edmundson 5. Faceoff win pct. (min. 10): Sundqvist 51.7 (15 wins, 14 losses), O’Reilly 50 (29, 29), Barbashev 40 (6, 9), Bozak 29.4 (5, 12). Average time on ice (min. 15): Pietrangelo 24:20, O’Reilly 22:48, Parayko 22:11, Bouwmeester 21:23, Schenn 20:09, Tarasenko 18:31, Perron 17:49, Dunn 17:44, Schwartz 17:36, Sundqvist 15:22. Save percentage: Bennington .926 (50 of 54).

CANADIAN PRESS PHOTOS

Blues center Ryan O’Reilly attempts to tip the puck past Jets goaltender Connor Hellebuyck as the Jets’ Bryan Little (18) defends during the third period of Game 2 on Friday in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

JETS 4 50 (2 for 4) 100 14 27 68 51.6 2/2/0

Points (G, A): Byfuglien 3 (0, 3), Laine 2 (2, 0), Scheifele 2 (1, 1), Wheeler 2 (1, 1), Little 1 (0, 1), Connor 1 (0, 1), Copp 1 (0, 1). Penalty minutes: Scheifele 6, Copp 2, Kulikov 2, Myers 2, Perreault 2. Shots (min. 5): Laine 8, Ehlers 6, Byfuglien 6, Myers 5, Wheeler 5. Hits (min. 5): Chiarot 12, Byfuglien 6, Kulikov 6, Lowry 6, Wheeler 6, Tanev 5. Faceoff win pct. (min. 10): Lowry 60.6 (20 wins, 13 losses), Little 53.8 (14, 12), Scheifele 44.7 (17, 21), Hayes 41.7 (5, 7). Average time on ice (min. 15): Byfuglien 25:58, Trouba 22:04, Connor 21:01, Chiarot 20:45, Scheifele 20:29, Wheeler 19:28, Morrissey 17:46, Laine 16:44, Myers 16:43, Little 16:01. Save percentage: Hellebuych .897 (52 of 58).

Blues left winger Pat Maroon (7) scores on Jets goaltender Connor Hellebuyck on Friday night. Until Sunday, Maroon’s only postseason game at Enterprise Center was in high school when the CBC Cadets beat his Oakville Tigers in the Mid-States finals.

‘It’s gonna be fun, and it’s gonna be exciting’ BLUES • FROM D1

Previously, the only postseason game Maroon had played at Enterprise Center came in high school when his Oakville Tigers lost to the CBC Cadets in the MidStates finals. “We all dream as a kid when you make it to the NHL, your ultimate goal’s to win the Stanley Cup,” Maroon said. “For me to play in the postseason with the team I grew up watching, it’s gonna be fun and it’s gonna be exciting.” The Blues signed Maroon in free agency for that exact reason — to help them make a long playoff run. Even with the NHL game going more toward skill and playmaking, the playoffs remain a different animal. Yes, the games are faster than the regular-season variety. But they’re also more physical. And when your nickname is Big Rig, your biggest asset probably isn’t speed. And so it is with Maroon. His style of play is tailor-made to the physical element of postseason hockey. “I think it fits the heavy, big-body game,” he said. “Greasy goals and getting intense and wearing ‘D’ down. ... As the (playoff) games go on I think big players are more valuable. They get to the net and they score the greasy goals.” Mirroring the team’s play at that time, Maroon’s early-season struggles are wellchronicled. From Nov. 3 through Dec. 16, a period of 20 games, he had only one goal. Zero assists. And was minus-9. He didn’t play in all 20; he was a healthy scratch for two of them in the final days of Mike Yeo as head coach, and missed four others in that stretch due to an upper-body injury. With the team struggling, the expectation was that Maroon might not make it past the February trade deadline. Or might not make it TO the February trade deadline. “For me, obviously it was a struggle at the start of the year,” Maroon said. But just like his style of play, Maroon kept grinding, kept working, and persevered. Over the final 19 games of the regular season, he rolled 6s. He had six goals, six

LATE FRIDAY

Blues Winnipeg

1 1

2 2

1 0

First period B: Sundqvist 1 (Bouwmeester, Schwartz), 5:23. W: Wheeler 1 (Scheifele, Copp), 12:01. Penalties: O’Reilly, STL, (tripping), 3:58; Scheifele, WPG, (interference), 4:55; Scheifele, WPG, (interference), 7:58; Copp, WPG, (cross checking), 9:41. Second period W: Laine 2 (Byfuglien, Wheeler), 2:49 (pp). B: Maroon 1 (Thomas, Pietrangelo), 6:42. B: Sundqvist 2 (Edmundson, Perron), 9:50. W: Scheifele 1 (Byfuglien, Connor), 18:55 (pp). Penalties: Bortuzzo, STL, (interference), 2:30; Thomas, STL, (hooking), 18:33. Third period B: O’Reilly 1 (Bouwmeester, Parayko), 3:46. Penalties: Myers, WPG, (roughing), 5:11. Shots on goal Blues 8 15 9 Winnipeg 8 6 15 Power-plays Blues 0 of 4; Winnipeg 2 of 3. Goaltenders Blues, Binnington 2-0 (29 shots-26 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 0-2 (32-28). A: 15,321. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Brad Kovachik.

— —

4 3

32 29

assists and was plus-6. (And we should mention, over the course of the season he led the team with six fights.) “The last few months I like where my game was going,” Maroon said. “I was moving in the right direction. I finally got some puck luck toward the end of the year and things started going my way. A little confidence can go a long way.” Craig Berube, who took over for Yeo on Nov. 19 while Maroon was at the height of his struggles, was asked after Friday’s 4-3 Blues win in Winnipeg about having the patience to stick with the big winger. Berube’s reply made it sound like his patience wasn’t really tested when it came to Maroon. “I don’t think he really struggled that badly,” Berube said. “I mean, he didn’t score like we thought he was going to score. But he was doing a lot of good things, and that line has found some chemistry over the last 1½ months and they’ve been a really good line for us. They scored again tonight.” Yes, they did. Maroon’s 14th career playoff goal, and first as a Blue, came at a critical moment of Friday’s game when it looked like the Jets would take control of the contest and even up the series at 1-1. Patrik Laine’s power play goal had given

Winnipeg a 2-1 lead less than three minutes into the second period, and the Jets were buzzing around goalie Jordan Binnington like vultures eyeing prey. “We knew we had to get some momentum back and I just heard ‘Rig’ coming off the bench,” Robert Thomas said. “He was screaming at me, and luckily it went to him and he was able to bury it.” Screaming? “He was screaming coming off the bench,” Thomas reiterated. “He wanted that puck real bad.” Thomas delivered. After goalie Connor Hellebuyck mishandled a dump-in by the Blues, Thomas swooped in for the loose puck, jetted around the net and threaded a backhand pass to Maroon. He knocked in a rebound of his own shot to tie the game 2-2 at the 6:42 mark of the period. “Thomas made a heckuva play of coming around the net,” Maroon said. “Good vision. Good pass. I just missed on the first one but I stuck with it, got the second opportunity. It was a huge goal. I think after that we had the momentum right away. We stuck with it and kept grinding down low, kept creating opportunities.” And pulled out the win to go up 2-0 in the series. In Wednesday’s 2-1 Game 1 victory over the Jets, Maroon was the setup man on Tyler Bozak’s game-winning goal. With Jets players seemingly draped all over him most of the way, Maroon took the puck into the offensive zone down right wing, circled to the back of the net and sent almost a no-look pass to Bozak’s stick for the shot and goal. Maroon, who signed a one-year freeagent deal last July to play in his hometown, very much wants to stay in St. Louis next season. On the day the Blues left for Winnipeg and the first two games of this Western Conference quarterfinal series, he talked about using the “second season” — the playoff season — to redeem himself. Two games into the postseason, he’s doing just that. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

Blues’ captain is his old self again HOCHMAN • FROM D1

really, it was the icing on the cake, a final big play on a night that encapsulated the captain. These are Alex Pietrangelo’s Blues, and they’re up 2-0 in the series, back home in St. Louis for Sunday’s Game 3. In a season that started off pathetically for Pietrangelo, the team captain ascended again. And in the past five overall games, he has seven assists. Paired with the rookie Vince Dunn, the defenseman Pietrangelo has epitomized the play of the playoffs, corralling Winnipeg’s best, sacrificing the body and effectively pinching up offensively. In Game 2, the Jets scored just one five-on-five goal. And Petro, who is plus-1 this postseason, had five shots ... only Ryan O’Reilly had more. “We’re trying to keep them on the outside as best we can, and guys are playing for each other,” O’Reilly said after Game 2. “It’s not going to get any easier. We have to get our rest. … If you look at our first periods, they haven’t been great, they’ve dominated us — but we’ve defended them well.” Seemingly every defenseman has had a game-changing moment in this series so far. Colton Parayko is plus-2 overall, and on Friday he strategically dragged his own right leg to block a shot in the final four minutes. Skating engine Jay Bouwmeester engineered the Blues’ first Game 2 goal with an assist. And in Game 2, Joel Edmundson whipped up an assist by keeping the puck in the offensive zone, and amid the sea of fans draped in white, his blue-clad parents popped up — the Edmundsons are from about two hours away from Winnipeg. “We’re doing a good job defensively with a lot of big blocked shots — and a lot of the little things you have to do,” Blues coach Craig Berube said after Game 2. And with home-ice advantage in Games 3 and 4, Berube will have the line-change advantage for matchups. Naturally, we’ll have to watch and see if Pietrangelo is slow. His right foot took a whacking with that puck, and Petro slowly skated back to the bench. We won’t know until Sunday morning whether Pietrangelo will play Sunday night for sure, but you’d have to think even if Laine’s shot had literally knocked his foot off the ankle, Petro would find a way to effectively flamingo his way around the defensive zone. He has led the Blues in ice time in each game, logging minutes on the power play, though incidentally, it would be nice if the Blues could score more on said power play. Pietraneglo actually had a chance in Game 2. In the first period — with the Blues already up 1-0 — he received a pass zipped a few feet parallel from the blue line. From the left side, No. 27 walked in and ripped a wrister from the left circle. It pinged the part where the post and crossbar met, far side. So close. And he did tally an important assist on St. Louis’ second goal. He carefully carried the puck through the neutral zone and then placed his dump-in so that it would probably ricochet. It did, right off the goalie, to Robert Thomas. And the kid found Patrick Maroon, “big-rigging” in front of the goal, for a goal. Now, Petro isn’t perfect. His turnover early in the second period, as he was hurried like a quarterback, led to a Winnipeg scoring chance. But goalie Jordan Binnington, ho-hum, made another playoff save. But overall, Pietrangelo has been superb. And while broadcaster Pierre McGuire doesn’t always know how to pronounce Alex’s last name, you know the Winnipeg Jets sure do at this point. Pietrangelo’s season included nine goals from Jan. 1 until the end of the season — only five defensemen in the National Hockey League tallied more goals in that time frame. And Petro finished with 41 points (13 goals, 28 assists), which meant he reached the 40-point mark for the seventh time in his career. It was a heck of a triumph for a player whose play was criticized in the early months of the season. He wasn’t that great out there. By late November, he was at minus-6, and when Doug Armstrong was asked about grading his leadership group, the general manager said: “Well, obviously below average.” Pietrangelo did become a father of triplets born last summer — a “fifth” line under the captain’s watch — and one would think that led to some sleepless nights for the parents last fall, when the Blues were bad. But now, all these months later, a quote from back then comes to mind. It came from the coach. Not Berube. Mike Yeo. On Halloween, a couple weeks before he was fired, Yeo was asked about Pietrangelo: “We need him to be the best version of himself. When he’s doing that, he’s leading our group, because when he steps over the boards, everybody’s watching him — and they’re seeing what he’s doing. And if the other team is having a press and their team has momentum, and he goes out and he breaks up that momentum? Everyone just kind of calms down a little bit — they execute in line the same way that he is.” And sure enough, that’s the Pietraneglo we’ve seen during this epic Blues turnaround. That’s the Pietrangelo who broke up that Jets momentum with his right foot. Benjamin Hochman @hochman on Twitter bhochman@post-dispatch.com


COLLEGE FOOTBALL

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

Tigers’ Bryant is ready for his close-up New quarterback will put skills on display at annual Black and Gold spring game BY DAVE MATTER St. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Missouri’s sales pitch to land Kelly Bryant wasn’t about how badly the Tigers needed the former Clemson quarterback. That much was obvious for every team recruiting him last fall. For Mizzou, it was the other way around: Bryant needed the Tigers. He had won games at the highest level at Clemson, guiding the ACC power to a conference championship in 2017 and into the College Football Playoffs. But when he lost his starting job a month into last season and decided to finish his career at another school, Missouri pounced with an ambitious promise: Let us make you the best version of yourself. “Nowadays in college football, especially at the quarterback position, you have to be extremely transparent and built out of trust,” said MU offensive quality control coach Austyn Carta-Samuels, who works closely with the team’s quarterbacks. “I told Kelly, ‘You’ve been very successful throughout your career, but to get to where you want to go with the goals you’ve set for yourself, there’s still a long way to go. There’s a lot of improvement left ahead.’” “He was very open to admitting that,” he added. “He’s very, very talented. But we all have things we need to learn in our transition to the next level.” For Bryant, that process started in January when he enrolled at Mizzou, and it continues Saturday with the Black and Gold spring scrimmage, when he’ll make his debut in front of MU fans at Memorial Stadium. With a 16-2 record as Clemson’s starter the last two years, Bryant came to Mizzou with more experience and better credentials than any other quarterback on the roster in the wake of Drew Lock’s departure. He’s far from a finished product, but in just three months he’s assimilated into Barry Odom’s program far more seamlessly than most expected. On the field, his arrival completely changes the complexion of Missouri’s offense. But what exactly should fans expect to see? For one, not Lock, as Mizzou center Trystan Colon-Castillo discovered the first time he bent over to snap the ball on Bryant’s count. “I’m not going to lie, the first week was a little different,” Colon-Castillo said. “Drew was mellow. He was, ‘Ready, set, hut, hut.’ Kelly is in here barking, ‘READY, SET, HUT, HUT!’” The differences hardly end there. It’s no secret Bryant doesn’t have the same downfield arm strength that will make Lock a first-round NFL draft pick in two weeks, but over the course of his career he’s been more accurate, posting a career completion percentage of 66.2. As a senior, Lock posted his best single-season mark at 62.9. As MU’s receivers quickly learned, Bryant’s passes don’t hum with the same velocity or deliver the same sting to their hands. “Drew has a different type of arm, so his passes come out faster and with more heat,” wide receiver Jalen Knox said. “You really have to lock in. Kelly’s balls, I wouldn’t say they’re easier (to catch), but you can adjust to them better.” Bryant doesn’t have the cleanest mechanics with a more looping, overhand delivery. It’s more catapult compared to Lock’s slingshot. But an accurate catapult. “His thing is he gets the job done every single time,” Carta-Samuels said. “The ball is going to be there. It’s going to be there on schedule. How it gets there is not to the standard that he or we want it yet. The way it looks, the pace on the ball, all of that factors in. But he gets the job done.” That’s where Mizzou coaches believe they’re suited to

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quarterback Kelly Bryant talks to a Clemson coach on the sidelines during a game last September.

develop the part of Bryant’s game that needs the most polish. “You’re good enough to win them all next year right now,” Carta-Samuels said he’s told Bryant. “We genuinely both believe that. ‘But, hey, if you want to go win it all two years from now (in the NFL), it’s going to take that next step.’ He knows it. We talk about it every day.” Then, the legs. When he started all 14 games for Clemson in 2017, Bryant ran for 665 yards and 11 touchdowns — 228 more yards than Lock gained in four seasons at Mizzou. The Tigers haven’t had a quarterback rush for more than 400 yards in a season since James Franklin in 2013. For the Tigers this fall, Bryant’s running ability — and the mere threat of his legs outside the pocket — can become a game-changer. Offensive coordinator Derek Dooley has added some wrinkles to create running space for Bryant. Over Dooley’s career, the quarterbacks on his teams have been mostly prototypical pocket passers who weren’t prolific runners, though his last two years on the Dallas Cowboys’ staff, quarterback Dak Prescott ran for more than 600 yards on designed runs and scrambles. Bryant could emerge as the same kind of running threat, a sidekick to tailback Larry Rountree III. “He’s going to create mismatches in the box because he’s just like an extra running back,” slot receiver Johnathon Johnson said. “You have to account for him in the run game as much as you can account for him throwing the ball down the field.” Missouri’s running backs should especially benefit from Bryant’s running threat, especially on option plays that allow Bryant to pass, hand off or keep the ball based on the defense’s alignment. “Being on the other side of the ball for 15 years, it’s really stressful on defenses when you’ve got a quarterback who can run and throw,” said MU running backs coach Cornell Ford, who for years coached the team’s cornerbacks. “He can extend plays, and it drives people crazy. That will help us. He’ll take a little bit of stress off the running backs.” While Lock’s arm power manipulated how opponents designed coverages, Bryant’s running threat could have the same impact but in other ways. Defenses will find out

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FIVE THINGS TO WATCH 1. NEW FORMAT, NEW LIDS In his fourth spring game as Missouri’s head coach, Barry Odom is changing the format. The starters on both offense and defense will make up one team and will be matched against the backup units on the other team. A few players will switch jerseys and see time on both sides, but for the most part the first-team offense should be able to move the ball and score points against the reserves. MU’s No. 1 offensive line should have its way against the backup defensive front to protect quarterback Kelly Bryant and open plenty of holes for running back Larry Rountree III. The Tigers will also debut new black helmets featuring the retro Tiger paw logo encased around the classic block M. Only a few players will sit out with injuries: tight ends Albert Okwuegbunam and Daniel Parker Jr., both recovering from shoulder injuries, plus cornerback Chris Shearin (hamstring) and safety Jalani Williams (foot surgery).

2. WHAT TO EXPECT FROM BRYANT? Bryant makes his Mizzou debut in Saturday’s scrimmage with plenty of questions to answer. How strong is his arm? How accurate? Which receivers does he favor? How much running will he do on designed calls and scrambles? Fans won’t get the full Bryant experience until the Tigers play a live game Aug. 31 at Wyoming. In Saturday’s controlled scrimmage, the defense won’t be able to tackle the quarterback. That kind of contact will come soon enough. “Kelly is a strong guy,” Odom said. “He’s got the ability to break through some of that stuff. That helps us out. But I don’t want to see him get tackled right now. I want to get him to the fall.”

3. GET YOUR FIRST LOOK Bryant is the obvious newcomer to watch but not the only transfer already promoted to the No. 1 offense. Jonathan Nance was Arkansas’ leading receiver in 2017 and as a graduate transfer has quickly climbed the depth chart for the Tigers as he’s built chemistry with Bryant, who doubles as his roommate. Other newcomers expected to see the field are freshman wideout C.J. Boone (Parkway North), freshman defensive end Darius Robinson, freshman cornerback Ish Burdine, junior college transfer defensive tackle Chris Daniels, junior college transfer offensive lineman Angel Matute and former TCU quarterback Shawn Robinson.

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Most starting jobs appear settled heading into the spring finale, but a few position battles figure to linger into preseason camp. At left guard, Larry Borom is fighting off Case Cook. At strong safety, Ronnell Perkins and Khalil Oliver are dueling for the top job. The defensive line is loaded with options, though the tackle spots appear set with Jordan Elliott and Akiel Byers, who can also shift over to defensive end. Chris Turner returns as a starter on the edge but should face competition from a pair of sophomores, Trajan Jeffcoat and Jatorian Hansford. It’s uncertain how much Mizzou will get into special teams Saturday, but kicker Tucker McCann is doubling as the team’s punter, though that could change before the season starts.

5. TWEAKS TO DEFENSE At first glance Odom’s defense won’t look too different, but the Tigers have officially gone to a base 4-2-5 defense, adding a third safety to replace an outside linebacker. On the back end, MU will use two traditional high safeties, free and boundary in the new lexicon. The idea behind the changes is to trade size for speed and versatility. Both players pushing for the strong safety job, Perkins and Oliver, are natural deep safeties and bring coverage ability closer to the line of scrimmage to match up with tight ends and slot receivers. At cornerback, the Tigers return one of the SEC’s best tandems in DeMarkus Acy and Christian Holmes, but they’re playing under a new assistant, former Texas Tech coordinator David Gibbs, whose specialty is producing takeaways. — Dave Matter

soon enough. “Good luck defenses playing us with a six-man box,” Carta-Samuels said. “You better bring that safety close to the party. If you don’t, he’s going to hold you accountable.” ilable

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NHL PLAYOFFS

04.14.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D7

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Special teams struggle Blues shut out on seven power plays against the Jets

CANADIAN PRESS

Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington moves into position as Winnipeg’s Tyler Myers drives for the net Friday night.

CANADIAN PRESS

The Blues celebrate a 4-3 win against the Winnipeg Jets in Game 2 on Friday in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Blues had three power play chances and once again managed only two shots. When you factor in shorthanded shots by Winnipeg, the Blues had only a 4-3 edge in shots during those six combined power plays in Games 1 and 2. The Blues were much crisper and more connected on their seventh power play of the series, and fourth in Game 2, when Tyler Myers was sent off for roughing Robert Thomas with 14.49 to play in the third period. The Blues had four shots on goal — matching their shot total of their first six power plays combined — but couldn’t score. As far as the Blues’ penalty kill, there’s no doubt the Jets have one of the league’s top power play units, particularly at home where they converted 31.4 percent of their chances in the regular season. But the Blues are no slouches on the PK, finishing ninth in the NHL during the regular season. But in this strength-on-strength matchup, the Jets got the best of it in Game 2, getting power-play goals by Patrik Laine and Mark Scheifele to keep them in the game. “Broken stick on the one play, so Laine, you give him that look, he’s probably going to score,” Berube said. Oskar Sundqvist was left defending without a stick after his broke on the Laine goal, obviously a disadvantage. “And then the other one, we’ve

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-dispatch

The Blues hold a 2-0 series lead over Winnipeg after a pair of one-goal victories in games that could’ve gone either way. When it comes to special teams, however, it has been no contest so far in this Western Conference quarterfinal series. Winnipeg has dominated. The Jets have scored on half their power plays in the series (two for four) and are batting 1.000 when it comes to the penalty kill, keeping St. Louis off the scoreboard on all seven Blues power plays. So while the Blues have a decisive edge in 5-on-5 play so far, if their special teams continue to struggle like this, the series can turn on a dime. “Well, we could have had two goals on the power play tonight,” interim coach Craig Berube said following Friday’s 4-3 win in Winnipeg. “Petro (Alex Pietrangelo) hit the post. That quick 5-on-3, I thought (the puck) just bounced on (Ryan) O’Reilly a little bit. We had some chances that didn’t go in.” True. But the Blues had early power play chances to seize control in both Games 1 and 2 and couldn’t. In the first 1½ periods of Game 1, the Blues had three power plays to none for the Jets, but managed only two shots on goal. In the first period of Game 2, the

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got to do a better for sure,” Berube said. Scheifele was left open in the slot on that one, beating Jordan Binnington with a one-timer. “I think we can take away that seam to Laine a bit better,” defenseman Joel Edmundson said. “Scheifele got that one right in the slot. ... We’ll look at video and we’ll be ready for Game 3 in St. Louis.”

UP TO THE TASK One of the major storylines entering this series was how Binnington would handle the pressure of NHL playoff hockey as a rookie. So far, so good. He’s 2-0, with a 2.00 goalsagainst average and a save percentage of .926. “We just try to stay even-keeled, stay composed and stay disciplined,” Binnington said. “That’s the thing that’s key in the playoffs. We’ve been doing a good job.” Bell MTS Place is one of the NHL’s loudest venues, and Binnington was booed loudly every time he touched the puck in Game 1. As Game 2 wound down, the fans at Bell MTS lost interest in booing Binnington. “I just focus on what I can control,” Binnington said. “The rest is just noise and you try to turn it down.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

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Everything coming up roses for Armstrong FREDERICKSON • FROM D1

Friday night thriller that tilted for good on another dominant third period that sent the Blues home from Winnipeg up 2-0 in this best-of-seven Western Conference quarterfinal, Armstrong offered a quick nod as he cruised by. No need for comment. His decisions are saying everything for him. Ryan O’Reilly, his eye blackened by a scrum, shared between wins in Winnipeg that this is the best team he’s had. The Blues’ best all-around player would not have been there to say it without Armstrong trading for him this offseason. During a roller-coaster season that is now steadily climbing, O’Reilly has been the constant. Adding him looks smarter by the game, the latest example arriving Friday, when his third-period goal further dented the confidence of the former Vezina Trophy runner-up Connor Hellebuyck. When Alex Pietrangelo reflected this week on his team’s rise, he mentioned the turn to interim coach Craig Berube as the switch that flipped the script. That plot twist was written by Armstrong. He saw the Blues were at risk of digging a hole too deep to escape. He decided he could not wait to see if this talented group he had assembled would mesh with former coach Mike Yeo. Hard decision. Right decision. Berube’s Blues have won more regular and postseason games (32) than any other team since Jan. 1. As he changed coaches, Armstrong resisted any urges to strip leadership roles from team captain Pietrangelo and alternates Vladimir Tarasenko and Alexander Steen. A statement move like that would have scored points with restless fans. It also would have undermined Berube’s decision-making powers as the interim. Instead Armstrong delivered a clear message without a needless poke in the chest. The team’s core had one more chance to click. If not, a shakeup would come. “There’s some character in that locker room,” Pietrangelo said this week. “We looked hard in the mirror there, especially after the coaching change, knowing that the only place was up from where we were. We felt like we did lose a lot of games early on in the season that were close games, games that maybe we had a chance to win. Games that, if we did, could have put us in a better position.” Their present position is suddenly a prime one. More than 85 percent of teams that take a 2-0 lead in a best-of-seven series go on to win it. The Blues just became the 93rd team to grab this advantage on the road. Of the 92 that accomplished it before them, 72 went on to win the series. We mentioned O’Reilly, but he was just one of four bigsplash additions Armstrong made over an offseason that was supposed to lead here all along, and eventually did, despite some unexpected twists. David Perron, who returned to the Blues as a free agent, scored the Blues’ first goal of the postseason. Tyler Bozak, another free-agent addition, netted the Game 1 winner. After setting up Bozak beautifully for a game-one goal, former free agent Patrick Maroon scored in Game 2. Maroon’s assist of Bozak in Game 1 and his powerful punchin to tie Game 2 might have been the biggest Blues plays of the postseason so far. Remember when there was chatter that Armstrong should release the slow-starting local to send a message? Armstrong stuck with Maroon, just like he stuck with veteran defenseman Jay Bouwmeester, who has been a plus-7 player since January. And don’t forget that Oskar Sundqvist is the Blues’ current leader in postseason goals (two) and points (three). He arrived in a 2017 Armstrong trade that flipped fan favorite Ryan Reaves to Pittsburgh in a deal that received mixed reviews, at best, at the time. At this season’s trade deadline, Armstrong did nothing of significance. Some hollered. But the Blues were rolling then, and they are fully healthy now. Not messing with a winning chemistry sure seems to have been the right call. Even Armstrong’s mistake of betting on goalie Jake Allen again entering the season has been sidestepped, thanks to the masked phoenix that is Jordan Binnington. How many other teams have a season-saver hiding on the fourth rung of the preseason depth chart? As impossible as it once seemed, everything is coming up Armstrong when it matters most. That’s gotta taste pretty sweet. Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

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NHL PLAYOFFS

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Sundqvist has two goals, O’Reilly winner headline

headline

B1 BLUES • FROM D1

ning the series, an 86.4 percent success rate. But the math also says the Blues still need two more wins before they can celebrate anything. It was a game of ebbs and flows, shifting momentum, and obviously a lot more offense than was on display in Game 1. O’Reilly snapped a 3-3 tie early in the third period when he beat Jets goalie Connor Hellebuyck far side for his first playoff goal. Hellebuyck might have been screened by his own defender on the play. Anyway, it was 4-3 Blues but there were still 16 minutes 14 seconds to navigate. The Blues started much stronger Friday than they did in period one Wednesday, but couldn’t capitalize on three power-play opportunities. That made them 0-for-6 in this series with the man advantage. It became 0-for-7 in the third period. Remember, they finished the season 10th in the league in power-play efficiency in the regular season. wild_art They even had a 5-on-3 advantage in the first period, albeit for only 17 seconds, when Winnipeg’s Andrew Copp was send off for cross-checking O’Reilly with 10:19 left in the ASSOCIATED PRESS period. The Blues already were on the power play because Mark Scheifele was in the box for an interference penalty drawn by ... O’Reilly. It was only the fourth time the Blues had any kind of 5-on-3 all season and the first time since Feb. 17 against Minnesota. The Blues had only two shots on goal wild_art Wednesday on their three power plays, and they had only two again on their three firstperiod power plays Friday. Factor in Winnipeg’s two shorthanded shots on goal WednesTHE CANADIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS PRESS PHOTOS day and one in the first period Friday, and dePatrick Maroon (left) celebrates with Alex Pietrangelo after Maroon’s goal during the second period tied Friday’s game at 2-2. spite six power plays in the first four periods of the series, the Blues had only a 4-3 shot BLUES 4, JETS 3 advantage with the man advantage. Blues 1 2 1 — 4 The Oskar Sundqvist line was buzzing in Winnipeg 1 2 0 — 3 the opening period and it turned that energy First period into Sundqvist’s first career playoff goal durB: Sundqvist 1 (Bouwmeester, Schwartz), 5:23. ing 4-on-4 play just 5:23 into the game. Jaden W: Wheeler 1 (Copp, Scheifele), 12:01. Schwartz chipped the puck out, leading to a Penalties: O’Reilly, STL, (tripping), 3:58; Scheifele, WPG, (interference), 4:55; Scheifele, WPG, (interfer2-on-1 rush with Jay Bouwmeester on left ence), 7:58; Copp, WPG, (cross checking), 9:41. wing and Sundqvist to the right. Second period Sundqvist looked and looked some more W: Laine 2 (Wheeler, Byfuglien), 2:49 (pp). B: Maroon 1 (Pietrangelo, Thomas), 6:42. Bouwmeester’s way and then sent a wrist shot B: Sundqvist 2 (Perron, Edmundson), 9:50. past Hellebuyck, stick side for a 1-0 St. Louis W: Scheifele 1 (Connor, Byfuglien), 18:55 (pp). Penalties: Bortuzzo, STL, (interference), lead. It almost became 2-0 but Alex Pietran2:30; Thomas, STL, (hooking), 18:33. gelo hit the post with 9:44 left in the period. Third period Despite all those power plays by St. Louis, B: O’Reilly 1 (Bouwmeester, Parayko), 3:46. Penalties: Myers, WPG, (roughing), 5:11. Winnipeg gradually gained the edge in play Shots on goal as the period wound down. In fact, St. Louis Blues 8 15 9 32 didn’t have a shot on goal over the last 10:34 of Winnipeg 8 6 15 29 Power-plays the first. And just 20 seconds after the last of Blues 0 of 4; Winnipeg 2 of 3. those three Blues power plays, the Jets tied the Goaltenders game by giving the Blues a taste of their own Blues, Binnington 2-0 (29 shots-26 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 0-2 (32-28). medicine. A: 15,321. In Game 1, the Blues continually worked the Jets center Adam Lowry (17) cannot jam the puck under Blues goaltender Jordan Binnington Referees: Kyle Rehman, Chris Rooney. low-to-high pass — from behind the net to during first-period action in Game 2 on Friday night. Linesmen: Ryan Daisy, Brad Kovachik. the slot. Well, Scheifele did just that, feeding a pass from behind the St. Louis net to Blake BLUES NOTEBOOK Wheeler in the near slot. Wheeler had crept in below Vladimir Tarasenko, and Binnington NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE *If necessary didn’t have a chance on Wheeler’s shot from WESTERN CONFERENCE EASTERN CONFERENCE in close. BLUE JACKETS 1, LIGHTNING 0 BLUES 1, JETS 0 Not surprisingly, the goal gave Winnipeg Game 1 Blue Jackets 4, Lightning 3 momentum. Momentum that carried over Game 1 Blues 2, Jets 1 NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE *If necessary Friday 6 at Tampa Bay, go CNBC into the second period, especially after Roboffs). Hopefully, (we’ll) back there the only Blue to play less than 10 minBY JIM THOMAS Friday 8:30 at Winnipeg, FSM, CNBC ert Bortuzzo sent off forTV interference just andSunday do some6more damage. ” utes. Sanford didn’t play at all over the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at Columbus, NBCSN *April 25 was TBA at Orlando, TBA Sunday 6:30 at Enterprise, FSM, CNBC EASTERN 2:30 into the frame. With other toCNBC worry about, last 11:42 seconds of the CONFERENCE third period. Tuesday 6 atthings Columbus, Tuesday 8:30 atMANITOBA Enterprise, FSM,•CNBC And just 19 seconds into that power play, as19the TBA Jets, O’Reilly won’t Nonetheless, Berube likes Sanford’s WINNIPEG, In terms such *April at Tampa Bay, TV TBA have *April 27 TBA at Toronto, TNT *April 18 TBA at Winnipeg, FSM and the freBUCKS VS. PISTONS Blues nemesis Patrik Laine beat Binnington to *April worry about snagging a couple of size and his defense, so he was back on of fan support, Winnipeg 21 TBA at Columbus, TV TBA with a technique the Blues have yet to masO’Reilly towels for himself. the Blues’ fourth line Friday night. quenters of Bell MTS Place set the bar *April 20 TBA at Enterprise, FSM *April 23 TBA at Tampa Bay, TV TBA 76ERS VS. NETS ter — the one-timer. Laine’s scorcher from “I have a ton of family in town, so I’m pretty high in Games 1 and 2 of the Sunday 6 at Milwaukee, TNT *April 22 TBA at Winnipeg, FSM BRUINS VS. MAPLE LEAFS TANEV RETURNS the left faceoff circle gave Winnipeg a 2-1 lead sure they’ll be racking them in, ” O’Reilly Western Conference playoff series beSTARS 1, PREDATORS 0 Thursday 6 at will Boston, NBCSN have a few One of the Jets’ most physical players Saturday 1:30 at Philadelphia, ESPN and sent the Whiteout-crazy Jets fans into a said. “My mom probably tween the Jets and the Blues. Wed. 7 at Game 1 Stars 3, Predators 2 frenzy. hundred for sure.” St. Louis, you’re up. returned to the lineup Friday, forward Saturday 5 at Nashville, CNBC Colton PaWinnipeg kinds of dangerous shots As Jordan Binnington will tell you, the Brandon Tanev. During the regular “Our crowd is so good,” sea- NBA Monday sent 7 atall Philadelphia, TNT Milwaukee, at Binnington and were skating circles around rayko said. fans are so loyal, so atmosphere at Bell MTS can be hostile son, Tanev scored a goal in the Jets’ 5-1 Monday 8:30“Our at Dallas, NBCSN the Blues for several minutes in the second. impressive. excited to get back and loud, but the Blues seem to enjoy it. season-opening win over St. TV Louis on Wed. 8 at We’re Dallas, USA Thursday 7 at Brooklyn, TNT But then the Big Rig — Patrick Maroon — “I think the white towels can be a lithome. ” Oct. 4 and a goal in the Jets’ 8-4 drub*April 20 TBA at Nashville, TV TBA parked in front of the Winnipeg net and tied The Blues are home for Games 3 and 4 tle intimidating for some people, but for bing of the Blues on Nov. 24. Both those April 20 7 at April 20 at Brooklyn, TNT *April 22best-of-seven TBA at Dallas, TV TBA the game 2-2 at26:42 with tip-in that trickled it kinda brought of this first-round series, meSaturday 7 at Boston,energy KSDK-5 to myself,” games were played in St. Louis. *April 24 TBAno at doubt Nashville, TV TBA through Hellebuyck. Dunn said. “Just to know that the and there’s fans at Enterprise Vince He had a team-high 278 hits during Monday 6 at Toronto, NBCSN Detroit, ESPN *Aprilmore 23 than TBA atthree Philadelphia, TV TBA A little minutes later, Suninto6it. When they’re really not the regular season, but had been sideCenter will kick VS. it up a notch in Game crowd’s FLAMES AVALANCHE Wed. at Toronto, NBCSN dqvist joined Laine as the only players in this 3 Sunday,9 which will be the first home cheering for me, it’s still kinda cool to lined since April 2 of the regular season Thursday at Calgary, NBCSN *April 19 TBA at Boston, TV TBA 22injury. 7 at Detroit, TNT series *April with 25 two goals heTV took have a building that’s that loud, that ex- with aApril playoff game in two years. hand TBA at when Brooklyn, TBAa pass from Saturday 9:30 at Calgary, NBCSN *April 21 TBA at Toronto, TV TBA David Perron and sent his sneaky-quick wrist “Oh yeah, they turn it up,” Parayko cited for two teams to be going at it.” Monday 9 at Denver, CNBC the rally towels *April 23 TBA at Boston, TV TBA BLUENOTES *April 24 TBA at Milwaukee, TV TBA shot past So St. Louis said. “We’ve been doing *AprilHellebuyck. 27 TBA at Philadelphia, TNT regained CAPITALS VS. HURRICANES Wed. 9 at Denver, the lead at 3-2 at the 9:50 mark. for a few years whenNBCSN we make the play- NO CHANGES Blues scratches Friday were Sammy Thursday at Washington, USA sport From 5 1/2 minutes into the period to a offs. Man, it’satfun. ” TV TBA Not many 6:30 coaches in any Blais, *April Michael Robby *April 19 TBA Calgary, 26 Del TBA Zotto, at Detroit, TV TBAFabbri, CELTICS VS. PACERS game-tying goal by Scheifele with 1:05 left Saturday 2 at Washington, KSDK-5 As part of its Whiteout theme, the mess with a good thing, so following Carl Gunnarsson, Mackenzie MacEach*April 21 TBA at Denver, TV TBA in the second, the Blues dominated. During Jets went with white rally towels for Wednesday’s Chris victoryCNBC over Winnipeg ern and Monday 6 2-1 at Carolina, *April 28 Thorburn. TBA at Milwaukee, TV TBA *April 23 TBA at Calgary, TV TBA Sunday at Boston, TNT34 seconds the that span, over Noon 13 minutes and Wednesday’s and Friday’s games. The in Game not surprising to see • Team consultant and NHL Hall of April 18 1 it6was at Carolina SHARKS 1, GOLDEN Blues outshot the Jets 12-0. Blues will counter with KNIGHTS — what0else? — interim Famer Larry Robinson accompanied coach Craig Berube go with the *April 20 TBA at Washington, TV TBA RAPTORS VS. MAGIC Game rally 1 Sharks Knights 2 6 at Boston, TNTon the power play But Wed. Scheifele’s one-timer blue towels5, for Sunday’s 6:30 p.m. exact same lineup in Game 2. the team on this trip and was on the ice *April 22 TBA at Carolina, TV TBA highlighted a problem area for the Blues on contest at Enterprise. with the coaching staff during Friday’s There was some speculation that Friday 9:30 at San Jose, NBCSN *April 24 TBA at Washington, TV TBA Saturday at Toronto, ESPN FridayApril — their normally stellar special teams And just any blue skate.4Robinson had filled an scratch Zach Sanford in morning 19 7:30 at Indiana, KDNL-30 Sunday 9 atnot Las Vegas, NBCSNrally towels. Berube might ISLANDERS 1, PENGUINS 0 were much less than stellar. Scheifele’s goal Ryan O’Reilly rally towels. Game 2. But that proved not to be the assistant coach role with the team from Tuesday 9:30 at Las Vegas, NBCSN Game 1 Islanders Penguins 3, OT Tuesday 7 athiring Toronto,until TNT right bemeantApril the21Blues’ ninth-ranked penalty kill “That’s cool,” O’Reilly said. “That will case. Nov. 19 Sanford played4,only 6 minutes 30 Berube’s Noon at Indiana, KDNL-30 *April 18 TBAtoatsee San that. Jose, TV TBAheard great Friday in Game 6:30 at 1, New York, NBCSN had yielded two goals. be exciting I’ve seconds which easily was a fore Christmas. *April 21 TBA at Las Vegas, TV TBA Sunday 11 a.m. at Pittsburgh, KSDK-5 things about our building (in the play- team low for that contest. In fact, he was April 19 6 at Orlando, ESPN

Blue rally towels will be out for Sunday

UPDATE

*April 23

TBA at San Jose, TV TBA

Tuesday

6:30 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN April 21

6 at Orlando, TNT

*April 24

TBA at Boston, TV TBA

*April 26

TBA at Indiana, TV TBA

Blues haven’t played their best but are getting it done *April 23

TBA at Toronto, TV TBA

*April 28

TBA at Boston, TV TBA

NHL SUMMARIES scorey score

B1 FREDERICKSON • FROM D1

been Montrealsince3 January. 0 0 And — if3there were any Edmonton about 0 1that, 3 they — were 4 doubts erased here First period: 1, Montreal, Gallagher 5 (Subban, Plekanec), 9:27 (pp). 2, Montreal,night Mitchell 5as (Smith-Pelly), 16:56.always 3, Montreal,found Galchenyuk Friday the Blues an 2 (Markov, Flynn), 17:51. Penalties: Emelin, Mon (hooking), :27; answer in a grueling, blood-soaked Pouliot, Edm (holding), 8:36; Subban, Mon (interference), 18:40.4-3 Secondthat period: 4, Edmonton, 1 (Hall,heading Klefbom), 19:08 win left some Draisaitl Jets fans for the (pp). Penalties: Gryba, Edm (holding), 14:55; Fleischmann, exits with four a half minutes to play. Mon (high-sticking), 18:31;and Pacioretty, Mon (tripping), 20:00. Third period: 5, Edmonton, Davidson 1 (Nurse, McDavid), They knew.Pouliot 3 (McDavid, Yakupov), 10:43. 7, 6:15. 6, Edmonton, Edmonton, Draisaitl 2 (Nugent-Hopkins), 18:58. Penalties: But goodness, the Blues made it hard on Subban, Mon (roughing), 4:13; Pouliot, Edm (roughing), 4:13. themselves. Shots: Montreal 11-5-5: 21. Edmonton 5-11-11: 27. Power-plays: Montreal 1 of 2; Edmonton 1 of 4. first-period They squandered a prime Goalies: Montreal, Price 7-2-0 (27 shots-23 saves). Edmonton, Talbot (21-18). opportunity to3-5-0 suck the soul out of this A: 16,839. Referees: Jean Hebert, TJ Luxmore. insane crowd, it really was insane, Linesmen: Ryan Galloway,and Steve Miller. folks. Think Cardinals opening day on Big scoreyspecial score sauce. A video feed from the Mac’s Anaheim outside 0 1 of0the—arena 1 showed fans streets Blues 0 1 1 — 2 First period who could not force their way into a sellNone. out of 15,000. They were Penalties: Rattie, StL (high-sticking), 4:56; partying shoulKesler,to Anashoulder, (holding stick), 5:38. der beers in hand. The game’s Second period late start added even more time for ManiA: Lindholm 2 (Perry, Bieksa), 2:33 (pp). B: Tarasenko 6 (Lehtera, Ott), 6:18. toba marination, and the that dusted Penalties: Pietrangelo, StL (holding), :49;snow Maroon, Ana (roughing), 8:31; Holzer, Anain (roughing), 8:31; Ott, StL (roughthe streets early the morning did nothing), 8:31; Kesler, Ana (hooking), 11:24; Perry, Ana, served by ing to dull the (holding, vibe. By the16:20; time Santorelli, minor-major fighting), Ott,the StL, Hoosli major (fighting), 16:20; Backes, StL (tripping), 17:16. its spineUkrainian Male Chorus sang Third period B: Parayko 4 (Rattie, Gomez), 10:31. tingling anthems, reminding everyone the Penalties: Cogliano, Ana (hooking), 7:51; Jets 5-0 while Lehtera,were StL (interference), 16:49.outscoring opponents Shots on goal 30-11 when they performed, this place Anaheim 12 7 4 23 was made noise-cancelling headphones

Blues 10 9 15 34 Power-plays Anaheim 1 of 4; Blues 0 of 5. pointless. Goaltenders Anaheim, Andersen 0-5-2Oskar (34 shots-32 But when Sundqvist calmed a saves). Blues, Allen 3-2-0 (23-22). puck and became the latest Blue A:bouncing 16,904. Referees: Steve Kozari, Mike Leggo. goalie Connor Helto exploit Winnipeg Linesmen: Andy McElman, Jay Sharrers.

lebuyck on the blocker side, that stunned silence the Blues created Wednesday night was back. It was as if a coffin had descended from the rafters. No one, not even the man and woman dressed as the KFC Colonel and a chicken, felt like partying. The scrambling Jets then handed the Blues a hammer and a sack of nails. How else would you describe back-toback moronic penalties that gave the Blues 17 seconds of a five-on-three advantage followed up by 1:43 of five-on-four? The result: Chicken scat. The Blues have had seven power plays in this series. Their next goal will be their first. Blake Wheeler netted the equalizer moments after the Jets returned to full strength, and the crowd was alive once more. As if the Blues’ toothless power play was not enough of a limitation, they handed the Jets a file for their sharpest tool. Both Robert Bortuzzo and Robert Thomas committed second-period penalties that ignited a lethal Winnipeg power play the Blues made a point to avoid entering this

series. Bortuzzo put himself in position to SUMMARIES beNBA called for an interference penalty early in the period. Call it a soft whistle if you Hawks Knicks 101 like, but 112, the officials had made it clear they Atlanta: Bazemore 2-6 0-0 5, Millsap 3-11 4-8 11, Horford 9-18 were going their close. 1-2 21, Teague 7-12to 9-10keep 23, Korver 6-8 0-0 whistles 15, Splitter 4-6 2-2 10, Holiday 1-2had 0-0 2,barely Schroder 6-11 0-0 13, Patterson 1-2 Bortuzzo perched in the3-5penalty 9, Scott 1-4 0-0 2, Tavares 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 42-83 18-26 112. box roughing Nikolaj when Newafter York: Anthony 10-27 5-5up 25, Porzingis 4-10Ehlers 2-2 10, Lopez 8-11 2-2 18, Calderon 0-5 2-2shattered, 2, Vujacic 2-8 0-0making 6, O’Quinn 5-9 Sundqvist’s stick Win0-0 10, Galloway 2-4 2-2 8, Williams 3-9 3-4 9, Grant 2-4 1-2 5, Thomas 2-6prime 2-2 8, Earlyopportunity 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-93 19-21 101. nipeg’s even sweeter. Atlanta 30 31 23 28 — 112 The Jet who made matters New York 20 25capitalized 27 29 — 101 3-point goals: Atlanta 10-24 the (Korver 3-5, Patterson Horford 2-5, even worse. Laine, power play2-3,assassin Bazemore 1-2, Millsap 1-2, Schroder 1-3, Holiday 0-1, Scott 0-1, Teague who scored a goal could have2-6,had at 0-2), New York 6-29 (Thomas— 2-3,and Galloway 2-4, Vujacic Calderon 0-2, Williams 0-3, Porzingis 0-4, Anthony 0-7). Fouled out: None. least twoAtlanta more game one —57gave Jets Rebounds: 49in (Millsap 11), New York (O’Quinnthe 10). Assists: Atlanta 26 (Teague 8), New York (Grant 7). Total fouls: Atlanta 18, the lead and raised the21 arena’s decibel level New York 24. Technicals: New York Coach Fisher. A: 19,812 (19,763). to something that would make a Metallica roadie wince. The Blues were down, and Grizzlies 112, Pacers 103 for a moment, they looked out. The Jets Memphis: T.Allen 4-11 1-2 9, Randolph 3-11 5-6 11, Gasol were and down the ice, 7-13 6-7suddenly 20, Conley 5-11flying 2-2 13, Leeup 4-9 2-2 10, Je.Green 5-6 0-0 12, Udrih 5-6 2-2and 13, Barnes 3-7 1-2 10, Wright 4-4 This dictating style hoarding shots. 1-2 9, Ja.Green 1-4 3-4 5. Totals 41-82 23-29 112. was notGeorge the 5-15 game Indiana: 6-6 18,the J.HillBlues 2-6 0-0 4,wanted Mahinmi to play 5-7 1-2 11, G.Hill 6-15 5-6 20, Ellis 3-12 2-3 9, Budinger against these guys. The player nicknamed 2-3 0-0 6, Stuckey 4-6 1-2 9, Turner 4-6 0-2 8, Miles 6-8 2-3 18,an L.Allen 0-0 0-0 0. Totalsreminded 37-78 17-24 103. us why. Big, after 18-wheeler Memphis 29 21 23 39 — 112 bruising, beautiful Patrick Indiana 20 29 26 28 — 103Maroon bul3-point goals: Memphis 7-16 Hellebuyck (Barnes 3-6, Je.Green Conley the lied the puck past to2-2,even 1-1, Udrih 1-2, T.Allen 0-1, Lee 0-4), Indiana 12-30 (Miles 4-6, score. than four2-8,minutes later, G.Hill 3-8,Less Budinger 2-3, George Ellis 1-4, Stuckey 0-1). SunFouled out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 49 (Randolph, Gasol dqvist picked a heck of a time for his sec8), Indiana 46 (Mahinmi 9). Assists: Memphis 26 (Conley 10), Indiana 23 (Stuckey, Georgeof 5). Total Memphis 25, ond two-goal game his fouls: career. Silence, Indiana 22. Technicals: George, G.Hill. A: 18,165 (18,165). restored. Yet another mistake loomed. After officials passed on what could have

been a slashing call against Sundqvist at the Blues’ end, they jumped on a hooking call against Robert Thomas at the opposite T’Wolves 112,22 Lakers 111 about the length side. It took seconds, Minnesota: Prince 0-0 2-4 2, Garnett 2-4 0-0 4, Towns 6-10 2-2 of time Berube ripped officials from 14, Rubio 10-17 6-7 28, Wiggins 2-10 5-6 the 9, Bjelica 3-6 0-0 8, Martin 6-15 11-12 23, Muhammad 3-5 3-4 10, LaVine 4-10 0-0 the bench, for Mark Scheifele to8, Dieng turn1-4the 2-2 4, Payne 0-1 0-0 0, Rudez 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 38-83 31-37 112. mistake into 8-24 a tie. L.A. Lakers: Bryant 5-5 24, Randle 5-13 5-6 15, Hibbert 1-4 10-10 12, Russell 2-7 0-0 4, Clarkson 5-12 4-6building 14, Forget the players. The entire Williams 6-14 7-7 21, Young 5-8 0-0 14, Kelly 1-5 1-1 3, Bass 1-4 0-0exhausted. 2, Huertas 1-2 0-0 2.All Totals 32-35 111. a 3-3 game was of35-93 this for Minnesota 22 29 37 24 — 112 entering third. L.A. Lakers the 31 29 35 16 — 111 3-point goals: Minnesota 5-20 (Bjelica 2-4, Rubio Muhammad Playoff teams that want to2-4, keep play1-2, Towns 0-1, LaVine 0-2, Wiggins 0-2, Martin 0-5), L.A. Lakers ing win 4-7, theBryant final Blues did 0-2, just 9-35 (Young 3-13,period. Williams 2-7,The Huertas 0-1, Clarkson Kelly 0-2, Russell 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota that for the second game in a row. 48 (Towns 12), L.A. Lakers 64 (Randle 11). Assists: Minnesota 24 (Rubio 14), L.A. Lakers 18 (Hibbert 4). Total Ryan O’Reilly, the first offouls: theMinnesota Blues’26, topL.A. Lakers 29. Technicals: Garnett, Minnesota Coach Mitchell, three regular-season goal to find L.A. Lakers defensive three second. A: 18,997scorers (18,997). the net, exploited the eroding confidence of Hellebuyck. “Go Jets Go,” the doubting crowd chanted. The Jets are going, all right. They are limping toward a raucous Enterprise Center down two games to none, riding a battered goalie and chewing on the knowledge that teams that start a best-of-seven playoff series 2-0 go on to win that series more than 85 percent of the time. They will say they have not yet played their best. We know the Blues haven’t either.


NHL PLAYOFFS

D8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Predators top Stars in overtime

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.14.2019

Magic upset Raptors in opener

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Predators right wing Craig Smith celebrates after scoring against the Stars in overtime for a 2-1 victory Saturday night in Nashville, Tenn. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Craig Smith scored five minutes into overtime to give the Nashville Predators a 2-1 victory over the Dallas Stars on Saturday, tying the first-round Western Conference series at 1-1. Smith scored his first this postseason from the inside edge of the left circle to snap a three-game playoff skid on home ice for Nashville. Rocco Grimaldi also scored for Nashville, and Pekka Rinne made 22 saves. The Predators had lost five of their last six postseason games in the place they call Smashville. Jamie Benn scored for Dallas The Stars were outshot 43-23. Game 3 is Monday night in Dallas. The teams went to overtime twice during their five-game series during the regular season, and Dallas won the opener 3-2. So it was no surprise they went past regulation yet again. The Stars went 0 of 6 on the man advantage after being the NHL’s 11th-best on the power play during the regular season. After losing Game 1, the Predators came into this game having lost five of their last six playoff games on home ice. The Stars came in trying to join both the Blues and Columbus as road teams taking a 2-0 advantage back home. The Predators lost forward Wayne Simmonds in the first period after he took a one-timer from teammate Roman Josi

off the inside of his left knee. He later tested his leg taking a lap during a TV timeout before going back to the locker room. Capitals 4, Hurricanes 3 • Brooks Orpik scored less than two minutes into overtime, Alex Ovechkin had two assists and host Washington beat Carolina to give the defending Stanley Cup champions a 2-0 lead in the first-round series. Ovechkin assisted on goals by Nicklas Backstrom and Tom Wilson. In perhaps his final NHL postseason, Orpik scored 1:48 into the extra period of the Capitals’ first overtime playoff game since they eliminated Pittsburgh in the second round a year ago.

NOTEBOOK Kucherov suspended • NHL leading scorer Nikita Kucherov has been suspended for Game 3 of the Tampa Bay Lightning’s first-round series against the Columbus Blue Jackets. Kucherov was suspended for boarding Columbus defenseman Markus Nutivaara late in Tampa Bay’s 5-1 loss Friday in Game 2 to trail 2-0 in the series. Kucherov was given a major penalty and ejected for hitting Nutivaara in a defenseless position with 4:26 remaining in the lopsided defeat. The Presidents’ Trophy winning Lightning also could be without banged-up Norris Trophy caliber defenseman Victor Hedman, who did not practice Saturday.

NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Magic guard D.J. Augustin (left) celebrates his game-winning 3-pointer with teammate Evan Fournier in Game 1 against the Raptors. ASSOCIATED PRESS

D.J. Augustin scored 25 points, including the tiebreaking 3-pointer with 3.5 seconds left, and the Orlando Magic beat the host Toronto Raptors 104-101 in Game 1 of their Eastern Conference first-round series on Saturday. Kawhi Leonard got a final shot for Toronto, but missed the rim with his 3-pointer from the top. Aaron Gordon had 10 points and 10 rebounds, Evan Fournier scored 16 points and Jonathan Isaac had 11 as the No. 7-seeded Magic became the latest team to beat Toronto in the opening game of a playoff series. The Raptors are 2-14 in playoff openers. Leonard scored 25 points, Pascal Siakam had 24 and Fred VanVleet had 14 for the second-seeded Raptors, who reclaimed the lead after trailing by 16 points in the second quarter, but couldn’t hold on down the stretch. Toronto got 13 points apiece from Danny Green and Marc Gasol, but guard Kyle Lowry finished scoreless, missing all seven of his attempts. Lowry did have eight assists and seven rebounds.

*If necessary

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Nets 111, 76ers 102 • D’Angleo Russell flashed some postseason magic, playing like the All-Star leader Brooklyn needed with 26 points, and Caris LeVert scored 23 to lead the Nets to a win over host Philadelphia in Game 1 of their Eastern Conference first-round playoff series. Jimmy Butler scored 36 points and saved the Sixers, widely considered a favorite to at least reach the East semis, from losing by 25. Joel Embiid played 24 minutes on his bum left knee and had 22 points and 15 rebounds.

NOTEBOOK Kings hiring Walton as coach • Luke Walton will become coach of the Sacramento Kings, securing another NBA head coaching job just a day after parting ways with the Los Angeles Lakers following three losing seasons. The 39-year-old Walton was dismissed by the Lakers on Friday after Los Angeles went 37-45. His move to the Kings was confirmed to The Associated Press on Saturday by a person who spoke on condition of anonymity because it hadn’t been finalized. A formal announcement from the Kings is expected in the next couple of days.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

BLUES 2, JETS 0

BLUE JACKETS 2, LIGHTNING 0

Game 1

Blues 2, Jets 1

Game 1

Blue Jackets 4, Lightning 3

Game 2

Blues 4, Jets 3

Game 2

Blue Jackets 5, Lightning 1

Sunday

6:30 at Enterprise, FSM, CNBC

Sunday

6 at Columbus, NBCSN

Tuesday

8:30 at Enterprise, FSM, CNBC

Tuesday

6 at Columbus, CNBC

*Thursday TBA at Winnipeg, FSM

*Friday

TBA at Tampa Bay, TV TBA

Sunday

6 at Milwaukee, TNT

Game 1

Warriors 121, Clippers 104

*Saturday TBA at Enterprise, FSM or KSDK-5

*April 21

TBA at Columbus, TV TBA

Wed.

7 at Milwaukee, NBA TV

Monday

9:30 at Golden State, TNT

*April 22

TBA at Winnipeg, FSM

*April 23

TBA at Tampa Bay, TV TBA

Saturday

7 at Detroit, ESPN

Thursday 9:30 at LA, TNT

MAPLE LEAFS 1, BRUINS 1

April 22

7 at Detroit, TNT

April 21

2:30 at LA, KDNL-30

Game 1

Stars 3, Predators 2

Game 1

Maple Leafs 4, Bruins 1

*April 24

TBA at Milwaukee, TV TBA

*April 24

TBA at Golden State, TV TBA

Game 2

Predators 2, Stars 1, OT

Game 2

Bruins 4, Maple Leafs 1

*April 26

TBA at Detroit, TV TBA

*April 26

TBA at LA, TV TBA

Monday

8:30 at Dallas, NBCSN

Monday

6 at Toronto, NBCSN

*April 28

TBA at Milwaukee, TV TBA

*April 28

TBA at Golden State, TV TBA

Wed.

8 at Dallas, USA

Wed.

6 at Toronto, NBCSN

*Saturday TBA at Nashville, TV TBA

*Friday

TBA at Boston, TV TBA

Game 1

Magic 104, Raptors 101

Game 1

Late Saturday at Denver

*April 22

TBA at Dallas, TV TBA

*April 21

TBA at Toronto, TV TBA

Tuesday

7 at Toronto, TNT

Tuesday

8 at Denver, NBA TV

*April 24

TBA at Nashville, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at Boston, TV TBA

Friday

6 at Orlando, ESPN

Thursday 8 at San Antonio, NBA TV

STARS 1, PREDATORS 1

FLAMES 1, AVALANCHE 0 Game 1

CAPITALS 2, HURRICANES 0

NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

*If necessary

EASTERN CONFERENCE

WESTERN CONFERENCE

BUCKS VS. PISTONS

WARRIORS 1, CLIPPERS 0

MAGIC 1, RAPTORS 0

NUGGETS VS. SPURS

April 21

6 at Orlando, TNT

Saturday

4:30 at San Antonio, TNT

Flames 4, Avalanche 0

Game 1

Capitals 4, Hurricanes 2

*April 23

TBA at Toronto, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at Denver, TV TBA TBA at San Antonio, TV TBA

Game 2

Late Saturday at Calgary

Game 2

Capitals 4, Hurricanes 3, OT

*April 25

TBA at Orlando, TV TBA

*April 25

Monday

9 at Denver, CNBC

Monday

6 at Carolina, CNBC

*April 27

TBA at Toronto, TNT

*April 27

Wed.

9 at Denver, NBCSN

Thursday 6 at Carolina

*Friday

TBA at Calgary, TV TBA

*Saturday TBA at Washington, TV TBA

Game 2

Nets 111, 76ers 102

Sunday

2:30 at Portland, KDNL-30

*April 21

TBA at Denver, TV TBA

*April 22

TBA at Carolina, TV TBA

Monday

7 at Philadelphia, TNT

Tuesday

9:30 at Portland, TNT

TBA at Calgary, TV TBA

*April 24

TBA at Washington, TV TBA

*April 23

SHARKS 1, GOLDEN KNIGHTS 1

NETS 1, 76ERS 0

TBA at Denver, TNT TRAIL BLAZERS VS. THUNDER

Thursday 7 at Brooklyn, TNT

Friday

8:30 at Oklahoma City, ESPN

ISLANDERS 2, PENGUINS 0

Saturday

2 at Brooklyn, TNT

April 21

8:30 at Oklahoma City, TNT

Game 1

Sharks 5, Knights 2

Game 1

Islanders 4, Penguins 3, OT

*April 23

TBA at Philadelphia, TV TBA

*April 23

TBA at Portland, TV TBA

Game 2

Knights 5, Sharks 3

Game 2

Islanders 3, Penguins 1

*April 25

TBA at Brooklyn, TV TBA

*April 25

TBA at Oklahoma City, TV TBA

Sunday

9 at Las Vegas, NBCSN

Sunday

11 a.m. at Pittsburgh, KSDK-5

*April 27

TBA at Philadelphia, TNT

*April 27

TBA at Portland, TNT

Tuesday

9:30 at Las Vegas, NBCSN

Tuesday

6:30 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN

CELTICS VS. PACERS

ROCKETS VS. JAZZ

Thursday TBA at San Jose, TV TBA

*Thursday TBA at New York, TV TBA

Sunday

Noon at Boston, TNT

Sunday

8:30 at Houston, TNT

*April 21

TBA at Las Vegas, TV TBA

*Saturday TBA at Pittsburgh, TV TBA

Wed.

6 at Boston, TNT

Wed.

8:30 at Houston, TNT

*April 23

TBA at San Jose, TV TBA

*April 22

9:30 at Utah, ESPN

TBA at New York, TV TBA

NHL SUMMARIES Capitals 4, Hurricanes 3, OT Carolina 1 1 1 0 — 3 Washington 2 0 1 1 — 4 First period: 1, Washington, Backstrom 3 (Ovechkin, Orlov), 3:37. 2, Washington, Oshie 1 (Niskanen, Kuznetsov), 9:26. 3, Carolina, Wallmark 1 (Foegele, Slavin), 15:54. Penalties: van Riemsdyk, CAR, (slashing), 4:52; Connolly, WSH, (interference), 10:32; Ovechkin, WSH, (elbowing), 16:24. Second period: 4, Carolina, Aho 1 (Williams, Slavin), 16:49. Penalties: Ferland, CAR, (hooking), 1:11; Ferland, CAR, served by Williams, Misconduct (misconduct), 4:09; Oshie, WSH, (hooking), 8:18; Dowd, WSH, (high sticking), 9:11; Hamilton, CAR, (elbowing), 11:36. Third period: 5, Washington, Wilson 1 (Ovechkin, Backstrom), 8:55. 6, Carolina, Staal 1 (Hamilton, Svechnikov), 15:00 (pp). Penalties: Dowd, WSH, (high sticking), 14:25. OT: 7, Washington, Orpik 1 (Vrana, Kuznetsov), 1:48. Penalties: None. Shots: Carolina 12-6-10: 28. Washington 7-16-9-1: 33. Power-plays: Carolina 1 of 5; Washington 0 of 4. Goalies: Carolina, Mrazek 0-2 (33 shots-29 saves).