4.13.18

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S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 04.13.2018 • $2.00

CALLS INTENSIFY FOR GOVERNOR TO RESIGN

CAN GREITENS GOVERN? Top donor urges Greitens to step down from oice

Defense team accuses Gardner of misconduct, incompetence

Ex-husband mum on who provided $15,000 for fees for his attorney

BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY KEVIN McDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A day after the release of a Missouri House investigative report on the invasion of privacy case against Gov. Eric Greitens, his attorneys accused St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner of misconduct and “gross incompetence.” Defense attorney Jim Martin told the court Thursday that it wasn’t until an hour after the release of the committee report that Gardner provided the defense with a videotaped interview of the woman with whom Greitens had an affair. The report, released in Jefferson City, presented new allegations that Greitens struck the woman during their sexual encounters. Greitens, through a public relations firm, issued a statement

Did a mysterious benefactor anonymously put up $15,000 to cover the legal fees of the man who exposed Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ extramarital afair? That appears to be the claim of the ex-husband of Greitens’ lover, according to transcripts of the man’s testimony last month before a Missouri House committee investigating the matter. “While I was talking with the Post, someone contacted my lawyer and said he was going to help with legal fees,” the man said in the newly released testimony. He was referring to the PostDispatch, which interviewed him more than three months ago about his allegations regarding his ex-wife and Greitens. He told the committee that,

See DEFENSE • Page A4

See MONEY • Page A4

BY SKY CHADDE • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Amid a scramble by lawmakers to decide whether and how to remove Gov. Eric Greitens from oice, a top donor to the embattled Republican joined a growing list of lawmakers and political leaders calling on the governor to resign. In a statement issued Thursday, Joplin businessman David Humphreys said he was deeply disappointed by the actions of the governor described in a blistering report issued Wednesday. The House report found that Greitens hit, groped and coerced sexual behavior out of a woman he admitted to having an afair with in 2015. “While these actions took place before his election and are otherwise arguably a private matter, the testimony reveals behavior that should not be tolerated anywhere but especially not by those holding public oice,” Humphreys said. “Governor Greitens should resign as these new revelations describe behavior that makes it impossible to retain confidence in his ability to govern wisely and well.” Greitens, who received more than $2 million from the Humphreys family during his 2016 run for governor, said Wednesday that he would not See GOVERNOR • Page A4

Embattled Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens

David Humphreys, CEO of Joplin’s Tamko Building Products

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner

BUDGET • State lawmakers may move to cut governor’s budget that could be used for legal defense. A4 TONY MESSENGER • Greitens emphasizes his right to trial, but that’s in peril under his stewardship. A2

Petition drive wants smoking out of the indoors

WE CHOOSE TO GO TO THE MOON We’ve had nearly five decades to understand the significance of the 1969 moon landing. “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission,” a traveling Smithsonian exhibition on view Saturday through Sept. 3 at the St. Louis Science Center, will help. Learn more about the artifacts, and about St. Louis’ role in space exploration. Go! Magazine

BY MARK SCHLINKMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • A coalition of health groups is gathering signatures to force a public vote Nov. 6 on snuing out exemptions for casinos and more than 90 bars allowed under St. Louis County’s seven-year-old indoor smoking ban. The proposed county charter amendment, covering both unincorporated areas and municipalities, also would get rid of exceptions allowed now for nursing homes, cigar bars and up to 20 percent of a hotel’s guest rooms. “We see it as a comprehensive health policy that the county has been missing,” See SMOKE • Page A10

Caution is urged before a decision on Syria response BY ROBERT BURNS AND CATHERINE LUCEY Associated Press

WASHINGTON • President Donald

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Trump put of on Thursday a final decision on potential military strikes against Syria after tweeting earlier that they could happen “very soon or not so soon at all.” The White House said he would consult further with allies. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned that such an attack carried the risk of spinning out of control, suggesting caution ahead of a decision on how to respond to an attack against civilians last weekend that U.S. oicials are increasingly certain involved the use of banned

Lisa Young, objects conservator of the National Air and Space Museum, cleans beneath the gloves and visor worn by astronaut Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin on the moon, at “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” at the St. Louis Science Center on Wednesday.

POMPEO’S HARD LINE ON RUSSIA

CARDINALS BLAST REDS’ BULLPEN

NEWS • A7

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See SYRIA • Page A7

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Space odyssey

NCAA women’s bowling rolls into town

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North County, city primed for tax breaks

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M 1 FRIDAY • 04.13.2018 • A2

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Under Greitens, right to trial is becoming a privilege in Missouri Governor wants his day in court — but denies that to others TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Gov. Eric Greitens wants his day in court. Minutes before a Missouri House committee released on Wednesday a damning report that paints the governor as a sexual predator, he stood in his second-floor Capitol office before a throng of reporters and television cameras and asked for the same constitution that guided the House’s actions to be his savior. “In 33 days this will all come to an end because in the United States of America you get your day in court,” Greitens said. He is right, of course. The governor, accused by a St. Louis grand jury of felony invasion of privacy for allegedly taking a photo of a seminude woman without her consent, deserves his day in court. And, if the case makes it to its May 14 trial date, he will get it. But his request is oddly timed. Because of the few things that the governor has accomplished in his time in oice, taking away a Missouri resident’s right to a day in court is one of them. The right to a trial by jury is one of Missouri’s oldest rights. It’s right there in Section 22 of Article 1 of the Bill of

Rights portion of the Missouri Constitution: “That the right of trial by jury as heretofore enjoyed shall remain inviolate,” it says. Inviolate is a strong word. It means “free or safe from injury or violation.” But it is not a word that Greitens or the Missouri Legislature has respected. Last year, Greitens signed Senate Bill 43, a bill that gutted Missouri human rights laws and made it easier for businesses to discriminate against employees. The new law contributed to a travel advisory issued by the NAACP. The civil rights organization told its members that coming to Missouri could put them in harm’s way. The Senate bill signed by Greitens was sponsored by Sen. Gary Romine, R-Farmington, who owns a rent-to-own business that was facing a discrimination lawsuit at the time he filed the bill. Black employees had alleged that the “N-word” was used toward them and customers, that the company wouldn’t rent to certain black neighborhoods. An employee who claimed to have brought these problems to the attention of company managers was fired. The new law makes it harder for such employees to have their day in court. By signing the law sponsored by a self-dealing lawmaker, Greitens did not hold their right of a trial by jury “inviolate.”

This year’s attempt to take away the right to a trial by jury — for those who can’t afford the sort of legal team Greitens can hire with dark-money donations — might even be worse. Romine is at it again with Senate Bill 578, which would, by its very definition, take away the right to a trial by jury for employees in the state. Pitched as a “pro-business” bill, the proposal would allow corporations to force arbitration on employees, meaning that if they were discriminated against or sexually harassed, they could not have their day in court, but instead would have to go to secret arbitration that would protect harassers, for instance, from public disclosure. The bill is being pushed by Hallmark Cards Inc., which lost an age discrimination lawsuit brought by a woman who wanted her day in court. A similar bill in the Missouri House, sponsored by Rep. Kevin Corlew, R-Kansas City, is stalled because of the actions of Attorney General Josh Hawley. Literally days before the House was poised to pass Corlew’s bill, Hawley signed on to a letter endorsed by every attorney general in the country to ask Congress to do the exact opposite of what Corlew and Romine are seeking to do in Missouri. The letter from the attorneys general sought an end to forced arbitration in sexual

harassment cases. It was one of the strongest political responses yet to the growing #MeToo movement that recognizes that women who are harassed, abused and raped have sufered in silence for too long. Ironically, both Hawley and Corlew have now called for Greitens to resign or face impeachment because of his predatory actions toward a woman outlined in the House report, actions that could have remained outside the public sphere if not for the House’s action, or, of course, Greitens’ impending day in court. Here’s how Hawley, a candidate for the U.S. Senate, and his fellow attorneys general, characterize the “inviolate” right to a trial by jury that is under attack by those who want to keep their sexual harassment under wraps: “Access to the judicial system, whether federal or state, is a fundamental right of all Americans,” they wrote. Sexual harassment victims, they said, “have a right to their day in court.” It’s a good sentiment. An American sentiment. In 32 days and counting, Missouri’s governor expects to take full advantage of that right. In the meantime, he and some of his Republican colleagues might well take it away from those he intends to serve. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE Former Disney star Thorne strikes gold on social media Bella Thorne is insta-rich thanks to social media. The former Disney star, 20, revealed that she makes $65,000 for a regular image post on Instagram — and anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000 for something on Snapchat. “Instagram is 100 percent a job to me,” Thorne says in a short documentary called “Inside the Life of Bella Thorne.” “I started at 18 with literally $200 in my bank account and I bought this house a year later, a year and a half. That’s all from social media.” It’s unclear if Thorne was referring to sponsored posts or her presence on the sites in general. Thorne was on the Disney series “Shake it Up” from 2010 to 2013. Another Kardashian is a mother • Khloe Kardashian has given birth to a daughter with Cleveland Cavaliers player Tristan Thompson. Kardashian’s representatives have not commented on the birth, which was first reported by TMZ. The birth comes amid a torrent of tabloid speculation about the couple after surveillance video showed the basketball star making out with other women. Locklear pleads not guilty in attack on deputies • Heather Locklear has pleaded not guilty to charges she attacked deputies who answered a domestic violence call at her home in Southern California. Locklear’s attorney entered on Thursday in Ventura County Superior Court the plea to four misdemeanor counts of battery on an oicer. A pretrial hearing is set for June 7. Authorities say Locklear kicked and shouted at deputies who were answering a report that she’d been violent with her boyfriend on Feb. 26. She was not charged with domestic violence. The actress, 56, is known for appearing on “Dynasty,” “T.J. Hooker” and “Melrose Place.”

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Actor Lyle Waggoner is 83. Actor Paul Sorvino is 79. Actor Tony Dow is 73. Musician Al Green is 72. Drummer Max Weinberg is 67. Actor Ricky Schroder is 48. Singer Lou Bega is 43. Rapper Ty Dolla $ign is 36. Actress Allison Williams is 30. From news services

Suspect arrested in 2010 murder of missing woman BY DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A man authorities have long believed was involved in the disappearance of a woman from Alton eight years ago was charged Thursday with murdering her after her burnt remains were found on his land, authorities said. Bonnie Woodward, 48, was last seen on June 25, 2010, talking to a man on the parking lot of a nursing home in Alton where she had worked for many years. Her Chevrolet Avalanche pickup was left Carroll on the lot with its windows down. Fingerprints found on Woodward’s truck matched those of Roger W. Carroll of Jerseyville. Police had searched 40 to 50 acres on his land with cadaver dogs with no results when Woodward first disappeared. New information prompted police to search in a specific area again, and Woodward’s burnt remains were recovered on Carroll’s property, Madison County State’s Attorney Tom Gibbons said at a news conference Thursday at the Alton police station.

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Julie LaFuria (facing the camera) hugs her friend Bobbie Valdes in 2010 just outside Jerseyville where police were searching a home and property for a missing woman, Bonnie Woodward.

Carroll was charged Thursday in Jersey County with two counts of first-degree murder and concealment of a homicidal death. He is being held in the Madison County Jail without bail. Carroll is accused of luring Woodward to his property, where he allegedly shot her multiple times with a Stoeger Cougar 9 mm Luger on or about the day she disappeared, then placed her body in a fire and burned it. Gibbons said Woodward’s remains were found close to Carroll’s home. “Her body was burned,” he said. “There was an extensive efort to conceal her death.”

Carroll was already in custody in Jersey County on a charge from a domestic-related incident involving his wife. That incident resulted in violation of a bail for a 2010 case in which he was charged with obstruction of justice related to allegations that he had harbored a runaway. That runaway was Woodward’s stepdaughter, Heather Woodward. H e a t h e r Wo o d w a r d , who was 17 at the time, had dropped out of sight a week before Bonnie Woodward’s disappearance. She had turned 18 before she walked into the East Alton Public Library on July 3 and identified

herself. In the obstruction of justice case, Carroll had given false information to an Alton detective when he claimed to have had no knowledge of the circumstances of Bonnie Woodward’s disappearance. Gibbons said Bonnie Woodward’s death was connected with the incident involving Heather Woodward. Carroll is also charged with kidnapping in Madison County. He will be tried in Jersey County on the murder charges. Search efforts began again last month when a new development prompted a new look at the case, he said. That led to searchers’ targeting a specific area , Gibbons said. “We are fortunate that we received new information that we didn’t have previously,” he said. “This collaborative efort got us to where we are today.” Gibbons said everyone who had worked on the cold case had worked relentlessly. He applauded the family for not giving up in their efort to find out what had happened to Woodward. “I just hope we can bring some comfort to the family and let justice be served,” Gibbons said. “The vigil the family kept up helped. They never stopped.”

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LOCAL

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3

Women’s college bowling inals roll into town McKendree seeks to defend title at Tropicana Lanes BY JOE HOLLEMAN St. Louis Post-dispatch

When the nation’s best young women bowlers roll into town this week, they may not know that they’re really just bringing it all back home. The 2018 NCAA Women’s Bowling Championship will be held Thursday through Saturday at the legendary Tropicana Lanes in Clayton — more than 100 years after women’s bowling was officially organized in St. Louis in 1916. “Bowling became quite popular in the 1890s, but women were dissuaded from participating,” said Jessica Bell, curator of the International Bowling Hall of Fame and Museum in Arlington, Texas. “Like other sports, it was associated with gambling and often took place either in drinking establishments or on outdoor lanes, so it was deemed to be too disreputable for women,” Bell said. But because women were enjoying the sport on private home lanes as the century turned, Bell said it was only a matter of time before small leagues began to form and the number of women bowlers blossomed. “Then in 1916 and 1917, the Women’s International Bowling Congress was formed, right in St. Louis,” she said. Truth be told, it was a man, Dennis J. Sweeney, who got the ball rolling. According to his Hall of Fame biography, Sweeney owned the Washington Bowling Alleys in the 700 block of Washington Avenue and had long wanted to open his lanes, and the sport, to women. Not that local women were not enthusiastic. According to the United States Bowling Congress, avid St. Louis bowler Ellen Kelly formed a local association in 1915. “Buoyed by her success, she wrote to proprietors across the country asking for names of women who might be interested in a national organization of their

PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

North Carolina A&T Aggies (from left) Hannah Williams and Brianna Boze unbraid their teammate Mia Pope’s hair as Candyce Bradley watches before their afternoon practice session Wednesday for the 2018 National Collegiate Women’s Bowling Championship at Tropicana Lanes in Richmond Heights.

McCayla Donna, of Lincoln Memorial University in Tennessee, bowls during a practice session Wednesday at Tropicana Lanes.

own,” the museum notes state. One person who answered was Sweeney, who in late 1916 organized a meeting of women bowlers to discuss the possibility of forming a national organization. Then in October 1917, the first oicial meeting of the WIBC was held and included 40 women from 11 cities. They set up an executive committee and drafted a constitution and bylaws. The first official women’s

Club where shootings have broken out will stay closed for now

tournament, however, was held in Cincinnati in early 1918. Like the first tourney in St. Louis, this weekend’s college roll-off is composed of eight teams that will compete in a single-elimination bracket style playof. Even better, a hometown team will compete to retain its U.S. crown. The McKendree University Bearcats from Lebanon are the

defending champions and the No. 2 seed in this year’s tournament. The top seed is the Nebraska Cornhuskers, who the Bearcats beat in the finals last year in Baton Rouge, La. The other teams are Arkansas State; Vanderbilt; Sam Houston State; North Carolina A&T; Lincoln Memorial (Tenn.); Texas Southern; Bowie State (Md.); and St. Francis (Pa.). But if there is an advantage to being the home team, Bearcats Coach Shannon O’Keefe is playing it way down. “We’re not real sure if it’s a good thing or not,” she said. “For most of the year, we travel to play and we don’t have a lot of followers, except for parents.” To handle the increased potential for distraction, O’Keefe said she had a sports psychologist meet with the team to discuss how to handle the hubbub. Although there are several area bowlers on the team, the 10 starters who will compete in the tourney for McKendree are imports. One of them, Sarah Wille, recently was named the bowler of the year in the Midwestern Intercollegiate Athletic Association.

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ST. LOUIS • A nightclub just west of downtown where

two separate shootings injured several people in recent weeks will close temporarily until it meets security measures prescribed by city oicials. The owners of Mood Ultra Lounge agreed to close the club’s doors indefinitely after a meeting Thursday evening with St. Louis Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards, City Hall spokesman Koran Addo said. He said they agreed the club could reopen in several months once it meets certain security measures, but he did not have more details Thursday night. The shootings just outside the club at 2001 Locust Street in the Downtown West neighborhood and March 2 and April 5 each injured three people. Witnesses in the latest shooting said they saw six gunmen who were kicked out of the club for causing a disturbance go to their cars and get guns before opening fire on patrons from outside. One of those injured in the latest shooting was club owner Arthur Chikeluba. Reached by phone Wednesday, he said the gunmen in both shootings were angry patrons who had been kicked out for causing disturbances. He said his nightclub had a metal detector and security guards checking bags at the front door, but in both shootings the gunmen left the club, grabbed guns from their cars and fired from outside. “We search people who come in, but those who are outside, we can’t control,” Chikeluba said. “I did what I’m supposed to do, I secured the building. I know people carry guns in cars, but I don’t know why these two incidents happened back to back. “It’s like crime all over St. Louis, it’s going up and up.” Chikeluba says the two shootings were outliers in the club’s three-year history. He said the club generally has at least two security guards on duty and rarely gets more than 40 patrons at one time. He said the gunmen last week were at his club for an open mic night and got into a dispute with other attendees. “I normally have an open mic event for diferent talents,” he said. “Whatever type of music you do, you just come to the stage. Never been more of a crowd than 30 people. “I do it for the kids, to give them a platform to showcase their talent.” A dispute broke out after one of the performances, and Chikeluba said he kicked out the troublemakers. “Ten minutes later bullets were flying,” he said. “I went to lock the door for the safety of people inside and I got shot in the leg.” In the shooting March 2, the club was closing at 1 a.m. when a disgruntled man who staf had repeatedly asked to stop smoking in the club got into an argument with security. He went back to his car, got a gun and opened fire. Chikeluba said all of the gunmen were people he’d never seen before. “Mood doesn’t stand for rifraf, street thugs coming to my doors,” he said. “I have responsible business professionals. It’s a very chill environment where people come to relax and have fun.” Chikeluba said that after the shooting last week he met with St. Louis police to discuss the incidents and potential safety and security measures, including hiring extra security and installing security cameras inside and outside the building.

Eric Breece, assistant director of NCAA championships, said a women’s tournament has been held since 2004 and takes in all three NCAA divisions. “We now have 80 teams competing in bowling, which is about double the number from 15 years ago. And we’ve seen the number of followers grow as well,” Breece said. “Hey, it’s exciting to watch good bowlers. And the players, coaches, fans are just as passionate about their sport” as other competitors are with the major competitions, he said. The event is in town for a second time (also 2015), with help from the St. Louis Sports Commission. And while it may not come close to drawing the crowds that come with larger college sporting events, like the recent Southeastern Conference basketball tourney, the commission’s Brent Shulman said he agrees with Breece’s approach. “We don’t treat any of them as being ‘minor.’ There will be a thousand or so avid fans enjoying the experience,” Shulman said. Same goes for Tropicana owner Tino DeFranco, who has been spitting and polishing his showplace for weeks. “We’ve been cleaning everything and checking everything twice. We’ve put up some bleachers to accommodate the crowd,” DeFranco said. “The NCAA runs a tight ship, so we want to look our best.” DeFranco said the lanes are actually the one thing he doesn’t need to worry about. “The NCAA brings in its own people and they’re in charge of inspecting the lanes and applying the oil,” he said. DeFranco readily conceded that he also wants his place to look good on television, because the finals will be carried at 5:30 p.m. Saturday on ESPNU. The Tropicana was a regular supporting character when it hosted Professional Bowling Association matches during the heyday of televised bowling in the 1960s and 1970s. “They run national ads about the event, that brings people to town, so you want to look your best,” he said. “It’s a matter of civic pride.”

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NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

Senators may cut Greitens’ budget after attorney hired BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The hiring of a Washington-based lawyer to defend the governor’s office against the threat of impeachment is costing Missouri taxpayers $320 an hour, the Post-Dispatch has learned. Although the hourly rate being paid to attorney Ross Garber is half of what he normally charges, the added cost has become an issue in the crafting of the state budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. In action Thursday, amid the release of a blistering investigative report about Greitens’ 2015 extramarital afair, members of the Senate Appropriations Committee moved to strip money out of the embattled governor’s office budget, in

part because of Garber’s hiring. Republican Sen. Rob Schaaf, a frequent critic of the governor, said the governor already has an attorney on his staf, Lucinda Luetkemeyer. He criticized Luetkemeyer for signing a letter from the governor’s office calling on the House special committee to delay the release of its report until after Greitens’ May 14 trial in St. Louis Circuit Court on a felony invasion of privacy charge. “There is no way that telling the House of Representatives to delay the release of the report is the business of the state. That’s the business of Eric Greitens,” Schaaf said. “For her to have signed that letter and use her position in that way, to me it violates the law.” Under normal circumstances, the Legislature provides money to the governor

through the annual budgeting process for the governor to hire a general counsel. Garber, however, was brought in to defend the oice of the governor — not Greitens personally — in legal proceedings associated with the governor’s felony invasion of privacy charge stemming from an extramarital afair that has roiled his administration and cast a cloud over his political future. Most of Garber’s work has been done behind the scenes, but he joined Luetkemeyer and Greitens’ criminal defense attorney Edward Dowd in signing the letter to the House investigative panel. The committee rejected that request and released its report Thursday. Although Schaaf remains mifed over Garber’s hiring, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Dan Brown, RRolla, said he is now comfortable with

the move. After saying last week that the hiring may have been improper, Brown said he is comfortable with the arrangement. “I did find out that it is typically done in a situation like this,” Brown said. “It would be inappropriate for the general counsel to represent the governor in these kinds of situations.” Brown said the issue likely will be resolved during hearings on the budget scheduled for next week. Garber said he was hired to help navigate the legal questions that come when a legislative body investigates the executive branch. Garber has defended three other governors facing impeachment proceedings: Robert Bentley of Alabama, Mark Sanford of South Carolina and John Rowland of Connecticut.

Defense questions prosecutors’ acts Greitens’ resignation widely sought DEFENSE • FROM A1

GOVERNOR • FROM A1

Thursday afternoon saying that he did not slap the woman and that the video would prove that. He also said the woman did not mention being coerced in the video. The defense attorneys said they were led to believe that the recording equipment used in the interview had malfunctioned and that no tape or handwritten notes of the interview existed. “The deposition tells an entirely different story about (the woman’s) interactions with the governor,” Martin told the judge. “This woman is not a victim. She was a willing participant in everything they did, and the video goes a long way to establish that.” The defense accused Gardner of withholding evidence and said it would ask for sanctions against Gardner and seek to depose the woman and her ex-husband again. In addition, the defense asked the judge to reconsider a defense motion to dismiss the indictment against Greitens. They also accused Gardner of allowing William Don Tisaby, the investigator she hired, to lie under oath in a March 19 deposition about whether he took notes during an interview with the woman. The defense showed screen grabs from the video of the interview that showed Tisaby taking notes with Gardner next to him. “I’ve never in my practice accused a prosecutor of incompetence or misconduct, but I’m doing that this morning,” defense attorney Scott Rosenblum said. “Ms. Gardner is guilty of gross incompetence or subornation of perjury. There is no middle ground.” Gardner told the judge that she didn’t know until Monday that the recording of the woman’s interview existed and had not seen it until this week. The interview took place at a St. Louis hotel in January with Gardner, Tisaby, the woman and her attorney Scott Simpson. “I never saw the tape because we were under the impression that it never recorded,” Gardner said. About 50 minutes into Thursday morning’s hearing, Circuit Judge Rex Burlison stopped it and said he wanted to resume arguments of “very serious allegations” against Gardner in chambers. When the parties returned to court about 20 minutes later, Gardner said that she took the video to an IT person Monday night to see if it could be salvaged. Some audio from the beginning of the video also was missing, she said. Nothing in the video indicated that the woman consented to having her photo taken, Gardner said. Gardner also accused the defense of calling the woman’s attorney in January seeking to persuade her to sign a document that said the woman’s March 2015 sexual encounter with Greitens was consensual. Burlison responded to Gardner’s accusation by saying, “Here’s the deal, you don’t diminish the speck that’s in one’s eye by pointing out the other.” First Assistant Robert Steele said Tisaby’s notes of the January interview contained no exculpatory evidence for Greitens. He said that nothing in the interview changed the woman’s account of what happened at Greitens’ home in March 2015 and that nothing in the notes disproved elements of the indictment. “The case should not be dismissed,”

resign and repeatedly derided the report as a “witch hunt.” On Thursday, a public relations firm representing Greitens issued a statement saying, in part: “The House report contained explosive, hurtful allegations of coercion, violence, and assault. They are false. Those allegations can be refuted with facts” that, the governor said, would come out at his criminal trial scheduled for May 14. Humphreys’ comments came after a top Senate Republican called for the governor to leave office and another Senate Republican declared the situation an “emergency” because Greitens has adamantly refused to resign. Senate Majority Leader Mike Kehoe, R-Jefferson City, who holds the No. 2 leadership post in the Legislature’s upper chamber, said the governor had lost the “moral authority” to lead the state. “Should the governor choose not to resign, I am persuaded that he has not only burned bridges, he has blown them up to where it will be impossible for him to efectively lead the state going forward,” Kehoe said in a statement. “Remaining in oice reeks of the self-serving actions of a ‘career politician’ the governor has mockingly derided since his inauguration.” But he stopped short of saying Greitens should be impeached. Sen. Scott Sifton, D-south St. Louis County, asked Kehoe if the House’s report contained enough impeachable information in his mind. “I still think we need to have two sides of the story before you say yes to that,” Kehoe said, referring to Greitens’ refusal to answer the House investigative committee’s questions. Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, a frequent critic of the governor, called on President Donald Trump to intervene in the state’s situation. “President Trump, I’m speaking to you,” he said on the Senate floor Thursday. “We have an emergency here in Missouri. I believe that there is one person who could get this soldier to stand down. He’s trained as a Navy SEAL. He’s trained not to walk away from battle. But he is also trained to listen to his Commanderin-Chief. If you give him the order, if you tell him to stand down, I believe that he will.” Schaaf said the governor’s remaining in oice would cost the state money, as House leaders have signaled they’ll convene a special session to continue investigating and potentially impeach Greitens. If lawmakers agree to a special session, they will continue receiving their daily expense checks, which amount to $115.60 per day. If all members are present for the special session, it would cost nearly $24,000 per day. They also are reimbursed for mileage, which would add to the overall cost. Debate on the Greitens report dominated action Thursday in the Senate. Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, stopped short of calling on Greitens to resign. But Richard said his wife, Patty, had read the 24-page report. “She was disgusted,” Richard said. “Those words — spanking, hitting — you can’t defend those actions.” He also criticized Greitens’ response to

Post-Dispatch did not pay man’s $15,000 legal bill MONEY • FROM A1

after that interview with the newspaper, “someone put something” in his lawyer’s account to “cover lawyer fees and all of the things that were about to happen to me financially because of the fallout.” The man’s testimony was confusing enough that one of the committee members asked him to specify if he was saying that the newspaper had paid him for his story. As a matter of policy, the Post-Dispatch does not pay sources for stories or interviews. The newspaper neither ofered nor paid the ex-husband anything in exchange for his story, as confirmed by the man’s testimony. “The Post didn’t give me anything, and I have not received any money,” he said. The Post-Dispatch was the first news

This still image made from video shows investigator Don Tisaby taking notes while interviewing the woman at the center of the case against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens in January. The defense says Tisaby committed perjury because he said he didn’t take notes during the interview.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • P-D

Attorneys (from left) Jack Garvey, Jim Martin and Edward Dowd Jr., representing Gov. Eric Greitens, converse after leaving the Carnahan Courthouse on March 26.

Steele said. “It should go forward because Mr. Greitens is guilty.” Robert Dierker, Gardner’s chief trial assistant, told the judge Gardner had fulfilled her duty by turning over the video to the defense. The judge asked why it hadn’t been turned over immediately. “I confess I can’t answer that,” Dierker said. Burlison did not immediately rule on the defense requests but questioned whether prosecutors were arguing that they decide what evidence should be released to the defense. Greitens faces a felony invasion-ofprivacy charge for allegedly taking and transmitting a semi-nude photo of the woman without her consent in the basement of his Central West End home in March 2015. The governor called the legislative investigation into the case a “witch hunt” Wednesday. The House committee’s report included new allegations of sexual encounters with Greitens’ hair stylist in the year before he was elected governor. They included that he struck her in the face, touched her crotch without her consent and called her a “whore.” She also claimed he struck her and shoved her to the ground as they became intimate in his Central West End home. During another encounter, she alleges, he physically restrained her from leaving his home and insisted she give him oral sex, even though she was crying. Christine Byers of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Joel Currier • 314-621-5804 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

outlet to interview the ex-husband of Greitens’ lover. Two of the newspaper’s journalists sat down with the man near the beginning of this year at the Clayton office of his attorney, Albert Watkins. The man provided the newspaper with an audio recording he’d made of his then-wife admitting to the afair. The Post-Dispatch has declined to identify the woman because she may be the victim of a sexually related crime and she hasn’t agreed to be interviewed. The paper also has declined to publicly identify her ex-husband, because naming him would in efect identify her. Despite having the recording, the paper didn’t initially report the story, because the woman in question refused to be interviewed to corroborate what was on the audio. Other media outlets subsequently received the same information from the ex-husband, and most made the same decision to hold of on publishing or airing anything. The exception was KMOV (Channel 4) of St. Louis. According to testimony, KMOV reporter Lauren Trager set up a hair appointment at Greitens’ lover’s business under a false name in December.

Upon arriving at the salon, according to testimony, Trager told the woman her real identity and that she wanted to talk with her about Greitens. Such a strategy would be a violation of ethics standards at the Post-Dispatch and most other mainstream media outlets, which prohibit journalists from misrepresenting their identities. The woman didn’t grant Trager an onthe-record interview. In fact, the woman testified, she cried and begged Trager not to run the story. KMOV aired the story on Jan. 10, shortly after Greitens’ annual State of the State speech. It might have presented a dilemma for other media outlets about whether to respond with their own coverage — except that, minutes before the KMOV story aired, Greitens issued a statement admitting the extramarital afair while denying the additional allegations. With Greitens’ statement clearly putting the issue in the realm of public information, the Post-Dispatch and other media quickly posted and printed material they had already gathered on the issue. Trager referred on Thursday questions

the report, in which the governor said the committee’s work was a “witch hunt.” He said the scandal had taken a toll on House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluf. “Have you seen the guy? Have you guys seen the speaker? I mean this guy has lost 20 pounds. He’s probably smoking 20 packs of cigarettes. And he’s taking this job very seriously,” Richard said. “I back him up 100 percent.” While GOP leaders are eyeing a special session on impeachment after the regular session ends May 18, Senate Minority Leader Gina Walsh, D-Bellefontaine Neighbors, said there was no reason to wait because Attorney General Josh Hawley said Wednesday the report had findings that were of an impeachable nature. “I have no faith in that man,” Walsh said of the governor. Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City, said the details in the report were diicult to read as a person who had experienced sexual harassment. “I started going through the documentation that was offered, and honestly I couldn’t get through it,” she said. “It was really hard for me to get through it. I had to take breaks.” Other female senators said Greitens was not fit for oice. Walsh said the report demonstrated a “predatory nature.” Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, agreed. “What we see in the report is a textbook case of an abuser,” she said. Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, questioned whether the governor should be the final voice on legislation afecting the entire state under the current circumstances. “I don’t think he needs to be signing any bills,” Nasheed said. “In fact, I don’t think he should be here. He shouldn’t even have the authority to sign anything. If he cannot rule his house, will he be able to rule this government? I say no.” U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, joined the chorus of Missouri oiceholders questioning Greitens’ ability to remain in oice. “I am disgusted, disheartened, and I believe Governor Greitens is unfit to lead our state,” she said in a written statement. The impact on the governor’s official duties during this crisis may have been illustrated Thursday when the Trump administration announced it would meet Friday with farm-state governors and members of Congress worried about the impact of Trump’s trade war threats with China. Those threats have rattled soybean and other markets for Missouri and other farm-state producers. The Republican governors of neighboring Iowa and Nebraska are among those invited. But Greitens — although he has ties with Vice President Mike Pence and welcomed Trump during recent visits to Missouri — was not on the invitation list released Thursday by the White House. The special investigative committee is going to continue its work. The focus will turn from the afair to an investigation into allegations that the governor improperly used a fundraising list from his former charity, The Mission Continues, to raise money for his gubernatorial campaign. Chuck Raasch and Kurt Erickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

about KMOV’s handling of the story to her news director, Scott Diener, who issued a statement saying the station stood by “our journalism and our journalist.” Watkins, the ex-husband’s attorney, confirmed to the Post-Dispatch on Wednesday that he had received payment of “about” $15,000 for his legal services. But Watkins flatly denied any knowledge of an anonymous third party providing the money. The committee’s report doesn’t clarify the issue. At a court hearing Thursday to determine whether the ex-husband had to answer questions about the money, the judge said he did. That won’t happen, though, until the man’s deposition resumes next week. The ex-husband’s motives for coming forward are more clear. “I’m going to get this guy one day,” was his response to his then-wife’s confession to him, in 2015, that she was having an affair with Greitens. “I’m going to get him.” Christine Byers of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

Senators may cut Greitens’ budget after attorney hired BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The hiring of a Washington-based lawyer to defend the governor’s office against the threat of impeachment is costing Missouri taxpayers $320 an hour, the Post-Dispatch has learned. Although the hourly rate being paid to attorney Ross Garber is half of what he normally charges, the added cost has become an issue in the crafting of the state budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. In action Thursday, amid the release of a blistering investigative report about Greitens’ 2015 extramarital afair, members of the Senate Appropriations Committee moved to strip money out of the embattled governor’s office budget, in

part because of Garber’s hiring. Republican Sen. Rob Schaaf, a frequent critic of the governor, said the governor already has an attorney on his staf, Lucinda Luetkemeyer. He criticized Luetkemeyer for signing a letter from the governor’s office calling on the House special committee to delay the release of its report until after Greitens’ May 14 trial in St. Louis Circuit Court on a felony invasion of privacy charge. “There is no way that telling the House of Representatives to delay the release of the report is the business of the state. That’s the business of Eric Greitens,” Schaaf said. “For her to have signed that letter and use her position in that way, to me it violates the law.” Under normal circumstances, the Legislature provides money to the governor

through the annual budgeting process for the governor to hire a general counsel. Garber, however, was brought in to defend the oice of the governor — not Greitens personally — in legal proceedings associated with the governor’s felony invasion of privacy charge stemming from an extramarital afair that has roiled his administration and cast a cloud over his political future. Most of Garber’s work has been done behind the scenes, but he joined Luetkemeyer and Greitens’ criminal defense attorney Edward Dowd in signing the letter to the House investigative panel. The committee rejected that request and released its report Thursday. Although Schaaf remains mifed over Garber’s hiring, Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Dan Brown, RRolla, said he is now comfortable with

the move. After saying last week that the hiring may have been improper, Brown said he is comfortable with the arrangement. “I did find out that it is typically done in a situation like this,” Brown said. “It would be inappropriate for the general counsel to represent the governor in these kinds of situations.” Brown said the issue likely will be resolved during hearings on the budget scheduled for next week. Garber said he was hired to help navigate the legal questions that come when a legislative body investigates the executive branch. Garber has defended three other governors facing impeachment proceedings: Robert Bentley of Alabama, Mark Sanford of South Carolina and John Rowland of Connecticut.

Defense questions prosecutors’ acts Greitens’ resignation widely sought DEFENSE • FROM A1

GOVERNOR • FROM A1

Thursday afternoon saying that he did not slap the woman and that the video would prove that. He also said the woman did not mention being coerced in the video. The defense alleged that the woman turned to her lawyer during the January interview and laughed when asked about being slapped by the governor. The defense attorneys said they were led to believe that the recording equipment used in the interview had malfunctioned and that no tape or handwritten notes of the interview existed. “The deposition tells an entirely different story about (the woman’s) interactions with the governor,” Martin told the judge. “This woman is not a victim. She was a willing participant in everything they did, and the video goes a long way to establish that.” The defense accused Gardner of withholding evidence and said it would ask for sanctions against Gardner and seek to depose the woman and her ex-husband again. In addition, the defense asked the judge to reconsider a defense motion to dismiss the indictment against Greitens. They also accused Gardner of allowing William Don Tisaby, the investigator she hired, to lie under oath in a March 19 deposition about whether he took notes during an interview with the woman. The defense showed screen grabs from the video of the interview that showed Tisaby taking notes with Gardner next to him. “I’ve never in my practice accused a prosecutor of incompetence or misconduct, but I’m doing that this morning,” defense attorney Scott Rosenblum said. “Ms. Gardner is guilty of gross incompetence or subornation of perjury. There is no middle ground.” In a court memo filed later Thursday, Gardner said the new allegations “appear to be an attempt to distract the Court’s and the public’s attention from the merits of this case.” “However, justice will not be served if the allegations against the Circuit Attorney become the focus of the case, instead of the defendant’s illegal and reprehensible conduct toward the victim,” Gardner’s memo says. “The Court should not be misled by the diversionary tactics of the defense. The drastic remedy of dismissal will not serve justice or fairness, but will unfairly reward the defendant.” In court, Gardner told the judge that she didn’t know until Monday that the recording of the woman’s interview existed and had not seen it until this week. The interview took place at a St. Louis hotel in January with Gardner, Tisaby, the woman and her attorney Scott Simpson. “I never saw the tape because we were under the impression that it never recorded,” Gardner said. About 50 minutes into Thursday morning’s hearing, Circuit Judge Rex Burlison stopped it and said he wanted to resume arguments of “very serious allegations” against Gardner in chambers. When the parties returned to court about 20 minutes later, Gardner said that she took the video to an IT person Monday night to see if it could be salvaged. Some audio from the beginning of the video also was missing, she said. Nothing in the video indicated that the woman consented to having her photo taken, Gardner said. Gardner also ac-

resign and repeatedly derided the report as a “witch hunt.” On Thursday, a public relations firm representing Greitens issued a statement saying, in part: “The House report contained explosive, hurtful allegations of coercion, violence, and assault. They are false. Those allegations can be refuted with facts” that, the governor said, would come out at his criminal trial scheduled for May 14. Humphreys’ comments came after a top Senate Republican called for the governor to leave office and another Senate Republican declared the situation an “emergency” because Greitens has adamantly refused to resign. Senate Majority Leader Mike Kehoe, R-Jefferson City, who holds the No. 2 leadership post in the Legislature’s upper chamber, said the governor had lost the “moral authority” to lead the state. “Should the governor choose not to resign, I am persuaded that he has not only burned bridges, he has blown them up to where it will be impossible for him to efectively lead the state going forward,” Kehoe said in a statement. “Remaining in oice reeks of the self-serving actions of a ‘career politician’ the governor has mockingly derided since his inauguration.” But he stopped short of saying Greitens should be impeached. Sen. Scott Sifton, D-south St. Louis County, asked Kehoe if the House’s report contained enough impeachable information in his mind. “I still think we need to have two sides of the story before you say yes to that,” Kehoe said, referring to Greitens’ refusal to answer the House investigative committee’s questions. Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, a frequent critic of the governor, called on President Donald Trump to intervene in the state’s situation. “President Trump, I’m speaking to you,” he said on the Senate floor Thursday. “We have an emergency here in Missouri. I believe that there is one person who could get this soldier to stand down. He’s trained as a Navy SEAL. He’s trained not to walk away from battle. But he is also trained to listen to his Commanderin-Chief. If you give him the order, if you tell him to stand down, I believe that he will.” Schaaf said the governor’s remaining in oice would cost the state money, as House leaders have signaled they’ll convene a special session to continue investigating and potentially impeach Greitens. If lawmakers agree to a special session, they will continue receiving their daily expense checks, which amount to $115.60 per day. If all members are present for the special session, it would cost nearly $24,000 per day. They also are reimbursed for mileage, which would add to the overall cost. Debate on the Greitens report dominated action Thursday in the Senate. Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, stopped short of calling on Greitens to resign. But Richard said his wife, Patty, had read the 24-page report. “She was disgusted,” Richard said. “Those words — spanking, hitting — you can’t defend those actions.” He also criticized Greitens’ response to

Post-Dispatch did not pay man’s $15,000 legal bill MONEY • FROM A1

after that interview with the newspaper, “someone put something” in his lawyer’s account to “cover lawyer fees and all of the things that were about to happen to me financially because of the fallout.” The man’s testimony was confusing enough that one of the committee members asked him to specify if he was saying that the newspaper had paid him for his story. As a matter of policy, the Post-Dispatch does not pay sources for stories or interviews. The newspaper neither ofered nor paid the ex-husband anything in exchange for his story, as confirmed by the man’s testimony. “The Post didn’t give me anything, and I have not received any money,” he said. The Post-Dispatch was the first news

This still image made from video shows investigator Don Tisaby taking notes while interviewing the woman at the center of the case against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens in January. The defense says Tisaby committed perjury because he said he didn’t take notes during the interview.

LAURIE SKRIVAN • P-D

Attorneys (from left) Jack Garvey, Jim Martin and Edward Dowd Jr., representing Gov. Eric Greitens, converse after leaving the Carnahan Courthouse on March 26.

cused the defense of calling the woman’s attorney in January seeking to persuade her to sign a document that said the woman’s March 2015 sexual encounter with Greitens was consensual. Burlison responded to Gardner’s accusation by saying, “Here’s the deal, you don’t diminish the speck that’s in one’s eye by pointing out the other.” First Assistant Robert Steele said Tisaby’s notes of the January interview contained no exculpatory evidence for Greitens. He said that nothing in the interview changed the woman’s account of what happened at Greitens’ home in March 2015 and that nothing in the notes disproved elements of the indictment. “The case should not be dismissed,” Steele said. “It should go forward because Mr. Greitens is guilty.” Robert Dierker, Gardner’s chief trial assistant, told the judge Gardner had fulfilled her duty by turning over the video to the defense. The judge asked why it hadn’t been turned over immediately. “I confess I can’t answer that,” Dierker said. Burlison did not immediately rule on the defense requests but questioned whether prosecutors were arguing that they decide what evidence should be released to the defense. Greitens faces a felony invasion-ofprivacy charge for allegedly taking and transmitting a semi-nude photo of the woman without her consent in the basement of his Central West End home in March 2015. The governor called the legislative investigation into the case a “witch hunt” Wednesday. The House committee’s report included new allegations of sexual encounters with Greitens’ hair stylist in the year before he was elected governor. They included that he struck her in the face, touched her crotch without her consent and called her a “whore.” Christine Byers of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

outlet to interview the ex-husband of Greitens’ lover. Two of the newspaper’s journalists sat down with the man near the beginning of this year at the Clayton office of his attorney, Albert Watkins. The man provided the newspaper with an audio recording he’d made of his then-wife admitting to the afair. The Post-Dispatch has declined to identify the woman because she may be the victim of a sexually related crime and she hasn’t agreed to be interviewed. The paper also has declined to publicly identify her ex-husband, because naming him would in efect identify her. Despite having the recording, the paper didn’t initially report the story, because the woman in question refused to be interviewed to corroborate what was on the audio. Other media outlets subsequently received the same information from the ex-husband, and most made the same decision to hold of on publishing or airing anything. The exception was KMOV (Channel 4) of St. Louis. According to testimony, KMOV reporter Lauren Trager set up a hair appointment at Greitens’ lover’s business under a false name in December.

Upon arriving at the salon, according to testimony, Trager told the woman her real identity and that she wanted to talk with her about Greitens. Such a strategy would be a violation of ethics standards at the Post-Dispatch and most other mainstream media outlets, which prohibit journalists from misrepresenting their identities. The woman didn’t grant Trager an onthe-record interview. In fact, the woman testified, she cried and begged Trager not to run the story. KMOV aired the story on Jan. 10, shortly after Greitens’ annual State of the State speech. It might have presented a dilemma for other media outlets about whether to respond with their own coverage — except that, minutes before the KMOV story aired, Greitens issued a statement admitting the extramarital afair while denying the additional allegations. With Greitens’ statement clearly putting the issue in the realm of public information, the Post-Dispatch and other media quickly posted and printed material they had already gathered on the issue. Trager referred on Thursday questions

the report, in which the governor said the committee’s work was a “witch hunt.” He said the scandal had taken a toll on House Speaker Todd Richardson, R-Poplar Bluf. “Have you seen the guy? Have you guys seen the speaker? I mean this guy has lost 20 pounds. He’s probably smoking 20 packs of cigarettes. And he’s taking this job very seriously,” Richard said. “I back him up 100 percent.” While GOP leaders are eyeing a special session on impeachment after the regular session ends May 18, Senate Minority Leader Gina Walsh, D-Bellefontaine Neighbors, said there was no reason to wait because Attorney General Josh Hawley said Wednesday the report had findings that were of an impeachable nature. “I have no faith in that man,” Walsh said of the governor. Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal, D-University City, said the details in the report were diicult to read as a person who had experienced sexual harassment. “I started going through the documentation that was offered, and honestly I couldn’t get through it,” she said. “It was really hard for me to get through it. I had to take breaks.” Other female senators said Greitens was not fit for oice. Walsh said the report demonstrated a “predatory nature.” Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, agreed. “What we see in the report is a textbook case of an abuser,” she said. Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, questioned whether the governor should be the final voice on legislation afecting the entire state under the current circumstances. “I don’t think he needs to be signing any bills,” Nasheed said. “In fact, I don’t think he should be here. He shouldn’t even have the authority to sign anything. If he cannot rule his house, will he be able to rule this government? I say no.” U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, joined the chorus of Missouri oiceholders questioning Greitens’ ability to remain in oice. “I am disgusted, disheartened, and I believe Governor Greitens is unfit to lead our state,” she said in a written statement. The impact on the governor’s official duties during this crisis may have been illustrated Thursday when the Trump administration announced it would meet Friday with farm-state governors and members of Congress worried about the impact of Trump’s trade war threats with China. Those threats have rattled soybean and other markets for Missouri and other farm-state producers. The Republican governors of neighboring Iowa and Nebraska are among those invited. But Greitens — although he has ties with Vice President Mike Pence and welcomed Trump during recent visits to Missouri — was not on the invitation list released Thursday by the White House. The special investigative committee is going to continue its work. The focus will turn from the afair to an investigation into allegations that the governor improperly used a fundraising list from his former charity, The Mission Continues, to raise money for his gubernatorial campaign. Chuck Raasch and Kurt Erickson of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.

about KMOV’s handling of the story to her news director, Scott Diener, who issued a statement saying the station stood by “our journalism and our journalist.” Watkins, the ex-husband’s attorney, confirmed to the Post-Dispatch on Wednesday that he had received payment of “about” $15,000 for his legal services. But Watkins flatly denied any knowledge of an anonymous third party providing the money. The committee’s report doesn’t clarify the issue. At a court hearing Thursday to determine whether the ex-husband had to answer questions about the money, the judge said he did. That won’t happen, though, until the man’s deposition resumes next week. The ex-husband’s motives for coming forward are more clear. “I’m going to get this guy one day,” was his response to his then-wife’s confession to him, in 2015, that she was having an affair with Greitens. “I’m going to get him.” Christine Byers of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com


NEWS

04.13.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A5

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

Trade war stirs echoes of 1980 grain embargo Decision by Carter had lasting, damaging efects on country’s agriculture industry CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • The ad-

ministration of President Donald Trump is seeking ways to compensate farmers hurt by a simmering trade war with China as annual federal deficits head toward $1 trillion. He’s working against a history showing international trade wars often launch unintended long-term trade consequences and immediate political payback. Trump met Thursday with Farm Belt governors and members of Congress to address trade-war worries with China that have rattled U.S. grain markets. The U.S. is a major exporter of soybeans and other agricultural commodities to China. Echoes of the 1980 grain embargo against the Soviet Union, imposed by thenPresident Jimmy Carter after the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, remain in farm country. That embargo reshuled global farm export patterns and contributed to Carter’s resounding defeat by Ronald Reagan in the 1980 election. It also was a contributing factor, some farmers believe, to a farm foreclosure crisis later in the 1980s. M issouri voted for Carter in 1976 and Reagan in 1980. Democrats had won seven of the 10 presidential races in the ShowMe state; they have won seven of the nine since. The nexus of agriculture and politics may be the least understood and most underestimated by American media. Much of the focus on Trump’s trade-war threats has been on the impact on farmers who voted for Trump, but agriculture’s ripple effect courses through the entire economy. While roughly one in every four bushels of soybeans grown in the ShowMe state ends up in China, everyone from tractor mechanics to global agri-giant Monsanto is afected. There is also little media understanding of how advances in farm technology have revolutionized that industry as much as the internet has launched communications into warp speed. In 1980, American soybean farmers produced an average of 26.5 bushels of soybeans per acre. That almost doubled to a record 52.1 in 2016 and was just under 50 last year. Peracre corn production also roughly doubled, to a record 176.6 bushels per acre last year, according to the Department of Agriculture. They’ve done it through revolutionary biotechnology advances in seeds, fertilizer and insecticides, and through satellite-based farming practices that have turned broadly plowed fields into micromanaged “no-till” food factories. The consensus in the wake of Trump’s backand-forth with China over trade is that many farmers are sticking with the president but wary of the next move. Will he actually escalate the war, or are these threats merely a negotiating move? Congressional Republicans are clearly worried about 1980 redux. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said farmers in his state were now borrowing money and planting amid a grain futures market that was already down considerably from recent years’ highs, and is further rattled with tradewar uncertainty. “We lost a lot of markets (from the 1980 embargo) that we never got back into as part of that,” Blunt said. “In terms of changing attitudes (about Trump or Republicans in farm country), I don’t see that we are there yet. “But we are going to have to wait and see what the end result is of where this actually takes us,”

Blunt said. “Maybe it will be much less than people think now. But the way to get there is pretty tricky, and if you are somebody in farm country, you are already borrowing money for this year based on current future commodity prices, which are terrible right now. “It is troublesome,” Blunt said. If past is prologue, the upcoming debate over a new farm bill will be

steeped in all these traderelated issues — and it probably will produce pushes to ofset the efect of trade wars on farm income. But with trilliondollar deficits looming and Republicans struggling to hold congressional majorities, there are serious questions about whether the government can respond. Robert Paarlberg, adjunct professor of public policy at Harvard Univer-

grain embargo that farmers in the U.S. tend to hold the federal government accountable for any sudden export losses that are caused by trade restrictions at the border, even those imposed by other governments that might have been triggered by something our government did.” So farmers “punished Carter by voting for Ronald Reagan in the general election on his promise to lift

sity, said that to compensate for the 1980 embargo, the government raised support prices, paid more for farmers to store grain, and tried other ways to buck up farm income. “Despite these measures,” Paarlberg concluded, “1980 farm prices did not keep up with production costs, and farm support for the embargo began to falter.” Today, Paarlberg said that “we learned from the

the grain embargo, which he did.” By then, Argentina, Australia, Canada and others had stepped into the Soviet market. U.S. farmers pivoted toward China. Since then, Brazil has expanded its soybean production to the point where it, not the U.S., is the prime supplier of soybeans to China, Paarlberg said. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

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LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Driver charged with DWI in fatal crash • Police say a driver in a fatal two-vehicle crash here Wednesday was drunk when he drove through on-coming traic and struck a motorcyclist, killing him. Ferguson Murrell Ferguson, 58, of south St. Louis County was charged Thursday with felony driving while intoxicated in connection with the crash that killed Jacob Kaiser, 20. The crash happened about 4 p.m. in the 3300 block of Lemay Ferry Road. Ferguson left a business on Lemay Ferry, tried to enter the northbound lanes and failed to yield to southbound traic, according to police. Kaiser, who was headed south on his motorcycle, struck Ferguson’s SUV, police said. He died of his injuries at a hospital. Kaiser lived in unincorporated south St. Louis County near Oakville. Ferguson’s SUV continued and struck gas pumps at a gas station at 3307 Lemay Ferry. He was taken to a hospital for treatment of what police said were moderate injuries. Lab tests showed Ferguson had a blood

alcohol level of 0.082 percent. The legal limit for driving is 0.08 percent. Ferguson, of the 13400 block of Garden Circle Court, was being held with bail set at $100,000. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Driver dies after striking back of tractor-trailer • A car slammed into the back of a tractor-trailer Thursday afternoon on Highway 40 (Interstate 64) just east of Highway 364, killing the driver of the car, Missouri Highway Patrol oicials said. Crews responded about 12:30 p.m. and were still on the scene, oicials said Thursday evening. The driver of the tractor-trailer was uninjured. The identity of the driver who died will be released after notiication of next of kin, oicials said. EUREKA > Driver killed in crash • A 75-year-old man was killed Thursday after he failed to yield to oncoming traic on Highway 109, according to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Richard Jonas, of Fenton, was attempting to turn left about noon on Interstate 44 from southbound Highway 109 in his Toyota Yaris, police said. The passenger side of his car was struck by an Ininiti G35X traveling north on 109, oicials stated.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Investigators examine where a car ran beneath a stopped tractor-trailer Thursday, killing the driver of the car, on Interstate 64 just east of Highway 364 in St. Charles County.

Jonas was pronounced dead at a hospital. The 19-year-old driver of the Ininiti was treated for minor injuries. Jonas was not wearing a seat belt, according to the Highway Patrol.

proile on the dating app Plenty of Fish as a robbery scheme. When a man came to Curry’s house in the 4600 block of Whisper Creek on Jan. 10, Curry was armed and tried to rob the man, according to St. Louis County

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Two accused of using dating site in robbery plot • St. Louis County police iled charges against a couple in connection to a January robbery and shooting of a man in Florissant they met through an online dating site. Donzell Curry, 24, of Florissant, and Roneka Jenkins, 24, of Belleville, who are dating, created a fake

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police spokesman Benjamin Granda. The victim was also armed, and the two men exchanged gunire. Both men were shot but survived. Curry gave inconsistent statements to police and

was eventually arrested and charged with attempted robbery, assault and two counts of armed criminal action. Jenkins was charged with attempted robbery and Jenkins tampering with evidence. Photos used in the Plenty of Fish proile were found on Jenkins’ Curry phone, and she had deleted the dating app and associated texts. Jenkins has admitted to the charges, Granda said. Police believe the couple could have attempted similar robberies in the area. Anyone with information is asked to call 314-615-8634.

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A car landed upside down in the River des Peres on Thursday after the car came down the exit ramp from southbound Interstate 55, crossed Germania, and then went down the embankment into the river. The driver was able to get out of the vehicle and was taken to a hospital by ambulance.

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A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 2 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Driver charged with DWI in fatal crash • Police say a driver in a fatal two-vehicle crash here Wednesday was drunk when he drove through on-coming traic and struck a motorcyclist, killing him. Ferguson Murrell Ferguson, 58, of south St. Louis County was charged Thursday with felony driving while intoxicated in connection with the crash that killed Jacob Kaiser, 20. The crash happened about 4 p.m. in the 3300 block of Lemay Ferry Road. Ferguson left a business on Lemay Ferry, tried to enter the northbound lanes and failed to yield to southbound traic, according to police. Kaiser, who was headed south on his motorcycle, struck Ferguson’s SUV, police said. He died of his injuries at a hospital. Kaiser lived in unincorporated south St. Louis County near Oakville. Ferguson’s SUV continued and struck gas pumps at a gas station at 3307 Lemay Ferry. He was taken to a hospital for treatment of what police said were moderate injuries. Lab tests showed Ferguson had a blood alcohol level of 0.082 percent. The legal limit for driving is 0.08 percent. Ferguson, of the 13400 block of Garden Circle Court, was being held with bail set at $100,000. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Driver dies after striking back of tractor-trailer • A car slammed into the back of a tractor-trailer Thursday afternoon on Highway 40 (Interstate 64) just east of Highway 364, killing the driver of the car, Missouri Highway Patrol oicials said. Crews responded about 12:30 p.m. and were still on the scene, oicials said Thursday evening. The driver of the tractor-trailer was uninjured.

The identity of the driver who died will be released after notiication of next of kin, oicials said. EUREKA > Driver killed in crash • A 75-year-old man was killed Thursday after he failed to yield to oncoming traic on Highway 109, according to the Missouri Highway Patrol. Richard Jonas, of Fenton, was attempting to turn left about noon on Interstate 44 from southbound Highway 109 in his Toyota Yaris, police said. The passenger side of his car was struck by an Ininiti G35X traveling north on 109, oicials stated. Jonas was pronounced dead at a hospital. The 19-year-old driver of the Ininiti was treated for minor injuries. Jonas was not wearing a seat belt, according to the Highway Patrol. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Two accused of using dating site in robbery plot • St. Louis County police iled charges against a couple in connection to a January robbery and shooting of a man in Florissant they met through an Jenkins online dating site. Donzell Curry, 24, of Florissant, and Roneka Jenkins, 24, of Belleville, Curry who are dating, created a fake proile on the dating app Plenty of Fish as a robbery scheme. When a man came to Curry’s house in the 4600 block of Whisper Creek on Jan. 10, Curry was armed and tried to rob the man, according to St. Louis County police spokesman Benjamin Granda. The victim was also armed, and the two men exchanged gunire. Both men were shot but survived. Curry gave inconsistent statements to police and

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Investigators examine where a car ran beneath a stopped tractor-trailer Thursday, killing the driver of the car, on Highway 40 (Interstate 64) just east of Highway 364 in St. Charles County.

was eventually arrested and charged with attempted robbery, assault and two counts of armed criminal action. Jenkins was charged with attempted robbery and tampering with evidence. Photos used in the Plenty of Fish proile were found on Jenkins’ phone, and she had deleted the dating app and associated texts. Jenkins has admitted to the charges, Granda said. Police believe the couple could have attempted similar robberies in the area. Anyone with information is asked to call 314-615-8634. O’FALLON, ILL. > Six hurt in deck collapse • A deck collapsed at a home here Thursday night while about 30 people were standing on it, O’Fallon police said. Six people sustained injuries. The injuries ranged from broken limbs to bruises and scratches, oicials said. Relatives were on the deck at the home in the 1300 block of Winding Creek Court for a family reunion on a night with mild weather when the collapse took place, oicials said. First responders arrived just after 9 p.m.

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NEWS

04.13.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A7

Pompeo vows to confront Russia as secretary of state CIA director is president’s pick to replace Tillerson, faces criticism from both parties BY MATTHEW LEE AND JOSH LEDERMAN associated Press

WASHINGTON • Aiming to quell

concerns before what is likely to be a close confirmation vote, Secretary of State-designate Mike Pompeo vowed on Thursday to ramp up efforts against Russia in “each place we confront them.” But he ducked and dodged when asked whether he supports President Donald Trump’s pounding criticism of the federal investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Pompeo, now Trump’s CIA chief, tread carefully when confronted with several of the president’s controversial statements, focusing instead on his plans to rebuild a depleted agency and restore its influence. Pompeo suggested he did not share all the president’s views — including his skepticism about Russia’s interference. “I take a back seat to no one” when it comes to standing up to Russia, Pompeo said.

However, when asked if he would resign if Trump moved to scuttle the probe by firing special counsel Robert Mueller or the deputy attorney general to whom Mueller reports, he said no. Pompeo’s nomination faces stiff opposition from a handful of Republicans and many Democrats as well as supporters of the Iran nuclear deal, environmentalists and minority rights groups, and his testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee appeared designed to blunt their criticism. The CIA chief told senators that he has been miscast as a “hawk” despite previous comments savaging the Iran accord and hinting at regime change in North Korea. He maintained he wants to improve the Iran deal and would continue eforts to do so even if Trump withdraws from it as he has threatened. In his testimony, Pompeo confirmed for the first time publicly that he’s been interviewed by the team of special counsel Mueller, who is investigating possible ties between Russia and Trump’s

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Secretary of State-designate Mike Pompeo is shown Thursday taking questions from the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

presidential campaign as well as possible obstruction of justice issues. But he wouldn’t answer questions about the nature of the interview, arguing it would be improper since, as CIA director in charge of overseas intelligence gathering, he has been a “participant” in Mueller’s probe. Under questioning, he said he would be unlikely to resign as secretary of state if Trump were to fire Mueller. Lawmakers are concerned the president may seek Mueller’s ouster to try to shut down the investigation, and the White House has said it believes Trump does have the authority to fire him if desired.

“My instincts tell me no,” Pompeo said about resigning. “My instincts tell me my obligation to continue to serve as America’s senior diplomat will be more important in times of domestic political turmoil.” Throughout the hearing, he drew a contrast between himself and Rex Tillerson, the former CEO of ExxonMobil who Trump fired last month. He lamented the “demoralizing” vacancies at the top echelons of the department during Tillerson’s brief tenure and said he planned to fill those vacancies. He cast his close connection to Trump as an advantage that would help him restore the significance of the department. “My relationship with President Trump is due to one thing: We’ve demonstrated value to him at the CIA. So, in turn, he has come to rely on us,” Pompeo said. “I intend to ensure that the Department of State will be just as central to the president’s policies and the national security of the United States.” His remarks before the committee were the first chance for lawmakers and the public to hear directly from the former Kansas congressman about his approach

Carter warns of catastrophe, urges Trump to avoid force

THE CRISIS IN SYRIA The Syrian war has been a slowly unfolding catastrophe, one that has embroiled nearly the whole world. Here’s a look at how it started, why it became so complicated and what might happen next. How did the war in Syria start? It’s hard to remember this now, but the unrest in Syria began on a hopeful note. In March 2011, peaceful protests broke out around the country as part of the Arab Spring uprisings. Organizers called on Syrian President Bashar Assad to make democratic reforms, but his government responded with violence. In response, some of the protesters teamed up with military defectors to form the Free Syrian Army, a rebel group that wanted to overthrow the government. By 2012, this armed struggle had devolved into a full-blown civil war. So how did this go from a civil war to an international crisis? For one, Syria is critical to Iran’s regional power plays. Iran needs Syria to move its weapons and proxy militias to other allies. So when Assad seemed threatened, Iranian leaders sent Hezbollah, its Shiite allies in Lebanon, to aid the Syrian government. At the same time, Iran’s Sunni rivals in the region — Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Turkey among them — began sending arms and money to anti-Assad rebels, including extremist militias. Russia, meanwhile, remained steadfast in its support for Assad’s government. According to one scholar, Russia helped build the modern Syrian military, and Assad is one of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s strongest allies in the Middle East. Russia has often blocked international action on Syria by vetoing proposals at the U.N. Security Council, and Moscow changed the course of the war in Assad’s favor with a military intervention in 2015. What has life been like in Syria? In short: a nightmare. Since the start of the war, more than 465,000 Syrians have been killed, 1 million more have been injured and 12 million — more than half the country’s population — have been forced to lee their homes. Why is the U.S. involved? The United States has been reluctant to become too entangled in Syria, but it has acted for two main reasons. First, the Islamic State began developing a foothold in the country in 2013. The next year, the United States formed an international coalition to launch airstrikes against the group. It eventually sent ground troops into the ight, and about 2,000 U.S. forces are now deployed there. The United States also has acted to punish Assad’s government for using chemical weapons. In 2012, President Barack Obama called the use of chemical weapons a “red line” that would prompt military intervention. But when a gas attack in the Damascus suburbs killed about 1,400 people a year later, Obama backed away from a strike. Instead, the U.N. Security Council ordered Assad to destroy his chemical-weapons stockpile and sign the Chemical Weapons Convention, which prohibits countries from producing, stockpiling or using chemical weapons. But there have been several reports of chemicalweapons attacks since then, including in the last week. Washington Post

to diplomacy and the role of the State Department, should he be confirmed. Pompeo’s views on global issues are well-known — he was questioned extensively by senators for his confirmation to run the CIA — but Democratic senators have raised questions about his fitness to be top diplomat, given his hawkish views and past comments about minorities. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., took Pompeo to task for saying previously that Muslims have a special obligation to denounce extremism and for his long-standing position that gays should not be able to marry. “I continue to hold that view,” Pompeo said of gay marriage. Pompeo said that his record at the CIA and elsewhere proves he treats everyone equally and with respect, regardless of religion, gender or sexual orientation. He sought to pre-empt concerns about Trump’s apparent unwillingness to challenge Russian President Vladimir Putin directly. He said a list of punitive actions taken under Trump show the U.S. takes the threat from Russia seriously, adding that “we need to push back in each place we confront them,” including economic and cyber arenas.

BY BILL BARROW associated Press

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Russian Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia (left) and Bolivian Ambassador Sacha Llorenty speak to reporters Thursday after United Nations Security Council consultations on the situation in Syria. Russia has warned the U.S. and its allies against the use of military force in Syria.

Allies agree on need to take action SYRIA • FROM A1

chemical weapons. British oicials said as many as 75 people were killed. The White House press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said after Trump met with Mattis and other members of his National Security Council: “No final decision has been made. We are continuing to assess intelligence and are engaged in conversations with our partners and allies.” Sanders said Trump would speak later with French President Emmanuel Macron and British Prime Minister Theresa May. Although Mattis noted that military action carried risks, he also emphasized that Syrian use of chemical weapons should not be tolerated. And he insisted it remained U.S. policy not to be involved directly in Syria’s civil war. “Our strategy remains the same as a year ago,” he said. “It is to drive this to a U.N.-brokered peace but, at the same time, keep our foot on the neck of ISIS until we suffocate it,” referring to Islamic State. Mattis’ remarks at a House Armed Services Committee hearing followed a series of Trump tweets this week that indicated he was committed to bombing Syria but later suggested he was awaiting further assessment. Trump wrote in a Thursday morning tweet that an attack could happen “very soon or not so soon at all.” Later Thursday he was noncommittal. “We’re looking very, very seriously, very closely at the whole situation,” he told reporters.

FRANCE CLAIMS PROOF The U.S., France and Britain have been in extensive consultations about launching a military strike as early as the end of this week, U.S. oicials have said. A joint operation, perhaps with France in the lead, could send a message of international unity about enforcing the prohibitions on chemical weapons. Macron said Thursday that France had proof that the Syrian government launched chlorine gas attacks and said France would not tolerate “regimes that think everything is permitted.” After May met with her Cab-

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis addresses the possibility of military action in Syria during a hearing of the House Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill on Thursday in Washington.

inet, a spokesperson issued a statement saying it was highly likely that Syria’s President Bashar Assad was responsible for Saturday’s attack outside Damascus. The Cabinet agreed on the need to “take action” to deter further chemical weapons use by Assad, but added that May would continue to consult with allies to coordinate an international response. Mattis said that although the United States had no hard proof, he believed the Syrian government was responsible for Saturday’s attack. Reports indicated the use of chlorine gas, possibly in addition to the nerve agent Sarin. Trump’s ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, told NBC News on Thursday that the administration had “enough proof” of the chemical attack.

FACT FINDERS EN ROUTE The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, based in the Netherlands, announced it was sending a factfinding team to the site of the attack outside Damascus, and it was due to arrive Saturday. It was not clear whether the presence of the investigators could afect the timing of any U.S. military action. At the House hearing, Democrats grilled Mattis on the wisdom and legality of Trump’s ordering an attack on Syria without explicit authorization from Congress. Mattis argued it would be justified as an act of self-defense, with 2,000 U.S. ground troops in Syria; he insisted he could not talk about military plans because an attack “is not yet in

the oing.” Mattis said he personally believed Syria was guilty of an “inexcusable” use of chemical weapons, while noting that the international fact-finding team would probably fall short of determining who was responsible. Asked about the risks of U.S. military retaliation, Mattis cited two concerns, starting with avoiding civilian casualties. “On a strategic level, it’s how do we keep this from escalating out of control, if you get my drift on that,” he said. Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., the ranking Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee, said he saw no legal justification for a U.S. strike in Syria, absent authorization by Congress. More broadly, he doubted the wisdom of bombing. “Until we have a more long-term strategy, until we have some idea where we’re going in Syria and the Middle East, it seems unwise, to me, to start launching missiles,” Smith said. At stake in Syria is the potential for confrontation, if not outright conflict, between the U.S. and Russia, former Cold War foes whose relations have deteriorated in recent years over Moscow’s intervention in Ukraine, its interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and its support for Syrian President Bashar Assad. Russian lawmakers have warned the United States that Moscow would view an airstrike on Syria as a war crime and that it could trigger a direct U.S-Russian military clash.

ATLANTA • Expressing pride in his own record of peace, former President Jimmy Carter warned that President Donald Trump should steer clear of any military action involving Syria or other world hot spots and avoid a nuclear attack at all costs. “I pray that he would keep our country at peace and not exaggerate or exacerbate the challenges that come up with North Korea, in Russia or in Syria,” Carter said in an interview Wednesday. “I hope he realizes very profoundly as I did, and as other presidents have done, that any nuclear exchange could involve catastrophe for all human beings.” The former president, 93, added that even a lesser military attack “is a dangerous thing” that can spiral out of control. His remarks come as Trump continues to threaten attacks on Syria in response to a suspected chemical attack on civilians. As recently as Thursday morning, Trump said on social media that an attack would come “very soon or not so soon at all.” Russia has countered that such a move would have “grave repercussions.” Trump has previously had threatening exchanges with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un but now is in talks about having a summit with Kim. Carter has for decades advocated that the U.S. deal more directly with the insular communist dictatorship. Carter made his comments as he touted a new book — “Faith: A Journey for All” — in an interview that touched on issues ranging from Trump and the economy to disputes within American Christianity. An outspoken Baptist, Carter argues that Americans are experiencing the long erosion not just of spiritual faith but of confidence in public institutions. “A lot of folks have lost faith in the superiority of democracy,” Carter told The Associated Press, noting widening wealth disparities, more open discrimination against minorities and immigrants, a political process controlled by money and an endless cycle of wars and international entanglements. Carter, a Democrat, has been critical of Trump, a Republican, on some fronts, and he said “a lot of people” have “realized they made a mistake” supporting Trump. Yet Carter made clear that his critique was not about the current occupant of the Oval Oice. In fact, he said, Trump’s election was a product of many ills Carter identifies, not their cause. “A lot of average Americans and working people in our country didn’t feel that we were getting a fair shake from government … and they wanted to see something new,” Carter said. As president, Carter established official diplomatic relations with China in 1978 — six years after President Richard Nixon made a landmark trip to Beijing. The same year, Carter drove peace negotiations between Israel and Egypt in the Camp David Accords.


NEWS

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

Gun rights supporters ready to speak up In Missouri, other states, rallies will counter perceived threat to Second Amendment BY RUSS BYNUM Associated Press

Organizers are encouraging gun rights supporters to bring unloaded rifles to rallies at state capitols across the U.S. this weekend, pushing back against a wave of student-led gun violence protests that some see as a threat to the Second Amendment. A group called the National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans spread word of the gatherings on social media. Organizers have permits for rallies Saturday outside 45 statehouses, said David Clayton, of West Virginia, one of the coalition’s founders. The rallies come less than a month after hundreds of thousands marched in Washington, New York and other U.S. cities to demand tougher gun laws after the February school shooting that killed 17 in Parkland, Fla. It’s unclear how many will show up — turnout predictions of national organizers are vastly higher than those of local planners. Clayton said a new gun law in Florida and similar measures being considered in other states threaten the rights of lawabiding gun owners. He said those attending rallies are encouraged to carry rifles — unloaded, with no magazines inserted — in states where it’s legal. “This is a very peaceful approach to a show of force,” Clayton said. “What that means is we’re not going to go there looking for a fight. We’re saying, ‘Look at all the people gathered here. We have a voice too.’” Most U.S. states allow long guns to be carried openly in public spaces, though other legal restrictions may apply. In Maine, for example, the statehouse grounds are a gun-free zone. The coalition describes itself as a collection of patriotic-based groups that “come from all walks of life, including Three Percent groups and local militias.” The Three Percent movement vows to resist any government that infringes on the U.S. Constitution. Its name refers to the belief that just 3 percent of colonists

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gun rights supporters gather outside the Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier, Vt., on March 31 to oppose tougher gun restrictions.

rose up to fight the British. Clayton leads a group called the Three Percent Republic. Such groups lack the following of more mainstream Second Amendment advocates such as the National Rifle Association. An NRA spokeswoman did not immediately return a call seeking comment. Other gun rights organizations said they’ve played minor roles. Gun Owners of America, one of the largest U.S. gun rights advocacy groups, plans to alert members but isn’t involved in organizing the rallies, said Erich Pratt, the group’s executive director. Jerry Henry, executive director of

anticipates 100 participants. Mississippi rally organizer Monty Reeves estimated 50 to 200 people. Reeves and Gulya said they have no ties to militias or other such groups. Reeves owns a bolt-action rifle and a shotgun for hunting doves and squirrels near his home in rural Whynot, Miss. Gulya is a truck driver in Blue Hill, Maine, who likes shooting targets with handguns and rifles. He worries gun rights are slowly getting chipped away. “As responsible, law-abiding gun owners, we seem to pay the price every time there’s one of these tragedies,” Gulya said. “We’ve stayed silent long enough.”

GeorgiaCarry.org, said a few of the group’s 8,000 members have emailed him asking for details about the rally in Atlanta. “We are not sponsoring it in any shape or form, but we’re not opposing it,” said Henry, who doesn’t plan to attend. “If we don’t have control of it, we don’t do a lot with it. If anything should go bad, we don’t want it to reflect on us.” Clayton said the organizers’ goal is for attendance to reach 1 million nationwide. That would require average turnout of 20,000 per state. Maine rally organizer Dave Gulya said he expects 500 to 1,500 people. The permit for Missouri’s rally

NASA spacecraft to prowl for planets as galactic scout BY MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA. • Look up at the sky to-

night. Every star you see — plus hundreds of thousands, even millions more — will come under the intense stare of NASA’s newest planet hunter. Set to lift off early next week, the Tess spacecraft will prowl for planets around the closest, brightest stars. These newfound worlds eventually will become prime targets for future telescopes looking to tease out any signs of life. It will be the most extensive survey of its kind from orbit, with Tess, a galactic scout, combing the neighborhood as never before. “We’re going to look at every single one of those stars,” said the mission’s chief scientist, George Ricker of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Scientists expect Tess to find thousands of exoplanets — the term for planets outside our solar system. “All astronomers for centuries to come are really going to focus on these objects,” Ricker said. “This is really a mission for the ages.” NASA’s a s t ro p hys ics director, Paul Hertz, said missions like Tess will help answer whether we’re alone — or just lucky enough to have “the best prime real estate in the galaxy.” Tess — short for Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite — is the heir apparent to the wildly successful Kepler Space Telescope, the pioneer of planetary census. Kepler’s fuel tank is running precariously low after nine years of flight, and NASA expects it to shut down within several months. Still on the lookout from on high, Kepler alone has discovered more than 2,600 confirmed exoplanets. The exoplanet count, from all observatories in space and on Earth over the past couple of decades, stands at more than 3,700 confirmed with 4,500 on the strong contender list. About 50 are believed to potentially habitable. They have the right size and the right orbit of their star to support surface water and, at least theoretically, to support life.

Most of the Kepleridentified planets are so far away that it would take monster-size telescopes to examine them more. So astronomers want to focus on stars that are vastly brighter and closer to home — close enough for NASA’s upcoming James Webb Space Telescope to scrutinize the atmospheres of planets lurking in their sun’s shadows. Powerful ground telescopes also will join in the detailed observations, as well as enormous observatories still on the drawing board. MIT’s Sara Seager, an astrophysicist who has dedicated her life to finding another Earth, imagines water worlds waiting

to be explored. Perhaps hot super Earths with lakes of liquid lava. Maybe even rocky or icy planets with thin atmospheres reminiscent of Earth. “It’s not ‘Interstellar’ or ‘Arrival.’ Not yet anyway,” she said, referring to the recent science-fiction films. The total mission price tag for Tess is $337 million. Fairly small as spacecraft go, the 800-pound, 4 footby-5-foot Tess will ride a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Liftoff is scheduled for Monday evening. Its eventual orbit of Earth will stretch all the way to the orbit of the moon.

“It packs a big punch, and that’s the part that we’re really excited about,” Ricker said. Tess’ four cameras will zoom in on red dwarf stars in our cosmic backyard — an average 10 times closer than the Kepler-observed stars. The majority of stars in the Tess survey will be 300 light-years to 500 light-years away, according to Ricker. (A light-year is about 6 trillion miles.) Red dwarfs are the most common stars around and, as their name implies, relatively small. So how do you spot a planet around such a small, faint star, from so far away? A planet should cause a slight, brief dip in

its star’s brightness as it passes right in front. Tess will detect any such blips. The spacecraft will sur-

vey the sky, starting with the Southern Hemisphere for a year, then the Northern Hemisphere for a year.

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ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A9

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04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

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LOCAL

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

DIGEST

Ban would cover casinos, bars, hotels

THE KING REIGNS AGAIN

ST. LOUIS > Nursing school gets $8.4 million gift for scholarships • The St. Louis University School of Nursing will use an $8.4 million alumni donation for need-based scholarships, the university announced last week. The bequest is the largest gift in the nursing school’s history and among the largest ever received by the university, according to a news release. It comes from the estate of SLU nursing school alumna Mary Hoppe, and the scholarship will be named in honor of her and her husband, Dr. Robert Hoppe, a SLU School of Medicine alumnus. “This posthumous gift will beneit students for generations to come,” SLU President Fred Pestello said in a news release. Both Hoppes were 1951 graduates of St. Louis University. The couple married and moved to their hometown of Houston after graduating. Dr. Hoppe died in 2002, and Mary Hoppe eventually moved to Charlotte, N.C., to live with her niece. She died in July 2017. FESTUS > Council ills open seat • David Boyer was appointed to ill the vacant seat on the City Council left by Paul Schafer, who resigned this year because he was moving out of the city. Mayor Ron Cage tried to appoint his replacement in March, but the council decided to wait until after the election. Boyer is a former city employee who worked for the parks, health and the street departments. He also worked in code enforcement and the public works department for Jeferson County. He is a current member of the band Cowboys and Outlaws. Bringing in big name entertainment to West City Park is one of the ways Boyer has suggested to promote economic growth in the city. But some council members were in support of former Councilman Earl Cook, who ran for oice on April 3 but lost to Brian Wehner. The vote was 3-3 with Cage breaking the tie in favor of Boyer. MAPLEWOOD > Urgent care center to open in plaza • Maplewood Commons, the

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

SMOKE • FROM A1

NIKOS FRAZIER • nfrazier@post-dispatch.com

A new, 20-foot-tall chess piece stands Thursday outside the World Chess Hall of Fame in St. Louis. The king breaks the record for world’s largest chess piece. It replaces another that had stood in its spot and held the crown until 2014, when Belgium unveiled a larger one.

large Walmart shopping center on Hanley Road, is getting an urgent care center. The City Council on Tuesday gave tentative approval to allowing a 3,000-square-foot GoHealth Urgent Care to open in a space formerly used by a mattress store. The GoHealth facility, which will be ailiated with Mercy health care system, will be the irst in Missouri. In a memo, Assistant City Manager/Public Works Director Anthony Traxler said Maplewood Commons has been “very successful” but that with recent trends of large retail chains closing and the popularity of online shopping, “many similar retail centers are becoming more lexible with the types of uses they permit.” He added: “Urgent care centers and itness clubs have started locating in vacant retail spaces traditionally reserved for strictly retail uses.” GoHealth, based in Atlanta, operates 80 urgent care centers in the New York and San Francisco Bay areas,

Portland, Ore., and Hartford, Conn. The company plans to open 30 urgent care centers in the Midwest in the next two years. ALTON > City sells wastewater treatment plant • The Alton City Council on Wednesday night approved selling the city’s wastewater collection, treatment and disposal facilities to Illinois American Water Co. for $53.8 million. Most of the proceeds from the sale will be used to shore up the ire and police pension funds, oicials said. The city has been delinquent in contributing to both funds and, with costs increasing annually, expected to owe more than $14 million in years to come. The agreement also stipulates that no current city wastewater employees will lose their jobs or face a pay cut. The sale is expected to close by the end of this year or early 2019. City oicials said as result of the sale, sewer rates are expected to go down. From staf and correspondent reports

said Karen Englert, Missouri governmental relations director for the American Heart Association. “Hopefully we’re finally going to transfer over to a smoke-free region rather than a smoke-filled region.” She said the St. Louis County effort began in February. It is being run in conjunction with a similar petition drive that cranked up in St. Charles County late last year. That also seeks to put a strict countywide ban on smoking in indoor public places on the November ballot, including bars and the Ameristar Casino in St. Charles. There is no countywide law now in St. Charles County, but two municipalities there — O’Fallon and Lake Saint Louis — have strict smoke-free ordinances. The heart association, which has pumped more than half a million dollars into the two petition eforts so far, and other backers say reducing exposure to secondhand smoke would reduce heart disease, cancer and strokes. Opponents of such governmentimposed restrictions say they unfairly limit the rights of businesses and their customers to make their own decisions on whether to allow smoking. “Privately owned businesses should be allowed the use of a legal product on their property, particularly in places which are restricted to adults,” said Bill Hannegan, of St. Louis, an outspoken opponent of such laws. Hannegan said he was especially concerned that such a ban could drive out of business some smaller familyowned bars. The limited smoking ban in St. Louis County was approved by voters in 2009 and went into efect in 2011. That measure had been put on the ballot by the County Council. The current law exempts gambling floors at the Hollywood Casino in Maryland Heights and the River City Casino in Lemay. The measure also exempts establishments with food sales that total less than 25 percent of total food and alcohol sales. As of Feb. 20, 92 bars across the county had such exemptions, according to the county health department. Included are several in bowling alleys, veterans group posts and fraternal lodges. The proposed charter amendments in both counties also would prohibit the use in indoor public places of electronic nicotine delivery devices such

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as e-cigarettes and vaping products. Englert, the heart association oicial, said three major area hospital systems — BJC, SSM and Mercy — were all supporting the two petition drives. Among other backers are the American Cancer Society and the March of Dimes. In the years since the limited ban went into efect in St. Louis County, smoke-free groups have tried unsuccessfully to convince the County Council to eliminate the exemptions. Tougher municipal bans with no exemptions for bars are in place in Clayton, Brentwood, Creve Coeur, Kirkwood and Ballwin. That’s also the case in O’Fallon and Lake Saint Louis. St. Louis began a limited smoking ban in 2011. Exemptions for about 100 bars expired in 2016. But remaining in place is an exception for the Lumière Place casino downtown. However, the St. Louis ordinance has a provision that says the Lumière exemption would expire if smoking was banned at the St. Louis County and St. Charles County casinos — as this year’s two petition-drive proposals would do. “They’re trying to get a three-fer,” said Carl Bearden, a former Republican state representative from St. Charles who has worked with Ameristar and various bar owners to fight smoking ban proposals in St. Charles County. Bearden said he expected that a joint campaign would emerge to oppose the propositions in the two counties should they make it to the ballot and possibly to educate people why they shouldn’t sign before then. He said he assumed that casino companies would be involved in opposing this year’s eforts, citing their previous opposition to smoking bans. But he had not been informed yet that that would happen this year. “Gamblers like to smoke,” he said. To get the new St. Louis County proposal on the ballot this year, signatures are required from registered voters equal to 5 percent of the total vote for governor in each of five of the seven County Council districts. Englert said that amounted to about 27,000 signatures. She said the petition efort involved both volunteers and paid workers. Campaign finance reports filed by Committee for a Healthy Community, the committee overseeing the effort, reported that AAP Holding Co. of the Los Angeles area had been paid $155,000 to do signature gathering. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @markschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

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NATION

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11

DIGEST Priebus won’t seek Ryan’s House seat Former White House Chief of Staf Reince Priebus took himself out of consideration Thursday as a candidate to replace retiring House Speaker Paul Ryan, as other Wisconsin Republicans contemplated whether to join the fray. Ryan abruptly announced Wednesday that he will not seek re-election in November. Priebus was one of several Republicans from Ryan’s southeast Wisconsin congressional district loated as a possible candidate. The deadline for candidates to ile is June 1, just seven weeks away. Priebus previously lived in Kenosha, Wis., but now resides near Washington, D.C. Michigan parents sue over unauthorized blood draws • A group of Michigan parents have iled a lawsuit alleging that the state didn’t obtain proper consent to draw or store their newborns’ blood for medical research. Saginaw County Attorney Philip Ellison iled the federal lawsuit on behalf of the parents, saying Michigan’s practice of drawing infant blood is unconstitutional. The lawsuit isn’t trying to stop newborn testing, but aims to better inform and return parents’ right to decide, he said. The state started newborn blood to test babies for ailments in the 1960s, the department said. The initial list started with six maladies and has grown to more than 50 conditions today.

Arizona teachers could see 20 percent raises • After weeks of protests by teachers, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey rolled out a proposal Thursday promising a net 20 percent raise by 2020. Teachers did not immediately react to the proposal. Thursday’s announcement came after more than a month of protests at the state Capitol and at schools across Arizona. Arizona teachers are among the lowest paid in the nation. Under the proposal, average teacher pay would go to over $58,000 by the start of 2020. No injuries after barrel of radioactive sludge ruptures • A barrel containing radioactive sludge ruptured at an eastern Idaho nuclear facility, federal oicials said Thursday, resulting in no injuries and no risk to the public. The U.S. Department of Energy said the 55-gallon barrel ruptured Wednesday at the 890-square-mile site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory, the nation’s top federal nuclear research lab. Federal oicials said it’s the irst known rupture of a barrel containing radioactive sludge at the site. A preliminary theory about the cause of the barrel rupture is that radioactive decay made the barrel heat up and ignite particles of uranium. An investigation is planned. Foundation severs ties with Michigan State • The MasterCard Foundation says it will stop supporting

programs with Michigan State University as the school deals with fallout from a former sports doctor convicted of molesting athletes. One $45 million program funds the education of students from sub-Saharan Africa. A $13 million efort helps young people access agricultural jobs in Tanzania and Nigeria. The Torontobased foundation says in a release that it will honor current commitments, but has “lost conidence in our partnership.” Larry Nassar is serving decades in prison after pleading guilty to molesting patients and possessing child pornography. Virginia boy missing more than a decade is buried • A Virginia boy whose body was found in the trunk of his mother’s car 11 years after he vanished has been laid to rest. Dozens of people illed the pews at a Newport News funeral home Thursday for a memorial service for Quincy Davis, which was followed by a burial. Davis’ body was found three years ago during a traic stop, and had been held ever since at the medical examiner’s oice as evidence. Quincy’s mother, Tonya Slaton, was recently sentenced to eight years in prison for his death after pleading guilty to voluntary manslaughter. Quincy was last seen alive in 2004 and is believed to have died at age 14 or 15. At least 700 Texas Guard members at border • Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says more than half of roughly

1,400 National Guard members the state wants to put on the U.S.-Mexico border are on the job. Abbott said Thursday in the Texas border city of Weslaco that morale is high among troops. The Republican defended President Donald Trump’s military deployment plan to ight illegal immigration and drug traicking. Abbott said 1,400 troops in Texas may be the inal size of the operation but that the number could change “depending on circumstances on the ground.” Anchorage voters reject transgender bathroom restrictions • Voters in Alaska’s largest city have become the irst in the U.S. to defeat a so-called bathroom bill referendum that asked them to require people to use public bathrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender at birth. Anchorage voters turned down a proposition that would have repealed part of a city ordinance that allowed people to use public bathroom and locker rooms according to their gender identity and would have instead required them to use facilities according to their gender at birth. Voting by mail and in person ended April 3 and the repeal efort was losing 53-47 percent as of Monday, with nearly 78,000 votes counted and only several hundred to be counted when tallying ends Friday. Supporters of the referendum conceded defeat. From news services

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Big boost in park fees won’t happen Interior oicials back down after outcry; modest increase planned

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Visitors check out El Capitan at Yosemite National Park in 2015. A plan to dramatically raise fees has been scrapped.

BY DARRYL FEAR Washington Post

Interior Department officials backed off Thursday from a proposal to dramatically increase entrance fees at some national parks, opting instead for an across-the-board $5 increase at parks that charge admission. The proposal marks a significant turn from a plan in December to increase peak-season entrance fees at 17 popular parks to $70 from $25 — the largest boost since World War II — to help pay for the National Park Service’s nearly $12 billion infrastructure backlog. But a wave of angry public comments on the proposal convinced officials that the fee increase might backfire and lead to a decline in visitation, causing revenue to crater. Two annual passes, including the popular “America the Beautiful” pass, would remain at $80. Under the updated increase, the Park Service stands to add about $60 million by year’s end. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced the new proposal in a statement that included a nod to Americans who rebuked the earlier plan. “I want to thank the American people who made their voices heard through the public comment process on the original fee proposal,” Zinke said. “Your input has helped us develop a balanced plan that focuses on modest increases at the 117 fee-charging parks as opposed to larger increases proposed for 17 highly visited national parks.”

The fees would take effect in June. Using Yosemite National Park as an example, the Park Service said its seven-day vehicle pass would increase to $35 from $30. Interior signaled in the first week in April that its earlier proposal was in trouble when a department oicial said: “We’re working to respond to those … thoughtful and well-put comments” that railed against the plan. “Our ultimate goal when it comes to entrance fees is to make sure the parks get 80 percent of that revenue ... but we also don’t want to put a burden on our visitors.” The official’s statement followed Zinke’s backpedaling on the plan in March. At a House hearing that week, he said the aim was to not hurt families. An analysis by the National Parks Conservation Association showed that 98 percent of 110,000 public comments opposed the dramatic increase. “Fees do have a role to play in our parks, and the administration’s move to abandon its original proposal in favor of more measured fee increases will put additional funds into enhancing park experiences without threatening visitation or local economies,” said Theresa Pierno, the association’s president and chief executive. NPCA was among the first groups to denounce the original plan in October. “This is a prime example that activism works,” said Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., the ranking member of the House Natural Resources Committee.

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NATION

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11

DIGEST Backpage executive agrees to plea deal The chief executive of a website that authorities have dubbed a lucrative nationwide “online brothel” pleaded guilty Thursday to state and federal charges including conspiracy and money laundering, and agreed to testify against others at Backpage, authorities said. Federal prosecutors say Backpage brought in a half-billion dollars since it began in 2004, mostly through risque advertising for escorts and massages. Authorities allege the site was used to traic underage victims, while company oicials said they tried to scrub the website of such ads. Chief Executive Oicer Carl Ferrer will serve no more than ive years in prison under a California agreement in which he pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy and three counts of money laundering. Michigan parents sue over unauthorized blood draws • A group of Michigan parents have iled a lawsuit alleging that the state didn’t obtain proper consent to draw or store their newborns’ blood for medical research. Saginaw County Attorney Philip Ellison iled the federal lawsuit on behalf of the parents, saying Michigan’s practice of drawing infant blood is unconstitutional. The lawsuit isn’t trying to stop newborn testing, but aims to better inform parents, he said. The state started drawing newborns’

blood to test babies for ailments in the 1960s, the department said. The list started with six maladies and has grown to more than 50 conditions today. No injuries after barrel of radioactive sludge ruptures • A barrel containing radioactive sludge ruptured at a nuclear plant in eastern Idaho, federal oicials said Thursday, resulting in no injuries and no risk to the public. The U.S. Department of Energy said the 55-gallon barrel ruptured Wednesday at the 890-square-mile site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory, the nation’s top federal nuclear research lab. Federal oicials said a preliminary theory about the cause of the barrel rupture was that radioactive decay made the barrel heat up and ignite particles of uranium. An investigation is planned. Foundation severs ties with Michigan State • The MasterCard Foundation says it will stop supporting programs with Michigan State University as the school deals with fallout from a former sports doctor convicted of molesting athletes. One $45 million program funds the education of students from sub-Saharan Africa. A $13 million efort helps young people access agricultural jobs in Tanzania and Nigeria. The Torontobased foundation says in a release that it will honor current commitments but has “lost conidence in our partnership.”

Larry Nassar is serving decades in prison after pleading guilty to molesting patients and possessing child pornography. Virginia boy missing more than a decade is buried • A Virginia boy whose body was found in the trunk of his mother’s car 11 years after he vanished has been laid to rest. Dozens of people illed the pews at a Newport News funeral home Thursday for a memorial service for Quincy Davis, which was followed by a burial. Davis’ body was found three years ago during a traic stop and had been held ever since as evidence. Quincy’s mother, Tonya Slaton, was recently sentenced to eight years in prison for his death after pleading guilty to voluntary manslaughter. Quincy was last seen alive in 2004 and is believed to have died at age 14 or 15. At least 700 Texas Guard members at border • Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, says more than half of roughly 1,400 National Guard members the state wants to put on the U.S.-Mexico border are on the job. Abbott said Thursday in the Texas border city of Weslaco that troop morale was high. Abbott defended President Donald Trump’s military deployment plan to ight illegal immigration. Abbott said that 1,400 troops in Texas might be the inal size of the operation but that the number could change “depending on circumstances on the ground.”

Arizona teachers could see 20 percent raises • After weeks of protests by teachers, Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey rolled out a proposal Thursday promising a net 20 percent raise by 2020. Teachers did not immediately react to the proposal. Thursday’s announcement came after more than a month of protests at the Capitol and at schools across Arizona. Arizona teachers are among the lowest paid in the nation. Under the proposal, average teacher pay would top $58,000 by the start of 2020. Anchorage voters reject transgender bathroom restrictions • Voters in Alaska’s largest city have become the irst in the U.S. to defeat a so-called bathroom bill referendum that asked them to require people to use public bathrooms and locker rooms consistent with their gender at birth. Anchorage voters turned down a proposition that would have repealed part of a city ordinance that allowed people to use public bathroom and locker rooms according to their gender identity and would have instead required them to use facilities according to their gender at birth. Voting by mail and in person ended April 3, and the repeal efort was losing 53-47 percent as of Monday, with nearly 78,000 votes counted and only several hundred to be counted when tallying ends Friday. Supporters of the referendum conceded defeat. From news services

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Big boost in park fees won’t happen Interior oicials back down after outcry; modest increase planned

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Visitors check out El Capitan at Yosemite National Park in 2015. A plan to dramatically raise fees has been scrapped.

BY DARRYL FEAR Washington Post

Interior Department officials backed off Thursday from a proposal to dramatically increase entrance fees at some national parks, opting instead for an across-the-board $5 increase at parks that charge admission. The proposal marks a significant turn from a plan in December to increase peak-season entrance fees at 17 popular parks to $70 from $25 — the largest boost since World War II — to help pay for the National Park Service’s nearly $12 billion infrastructure backlog. But a wave of angry public comments on the proposal convinced officials that the fee increase might backfire and lead to a decline in visitation, causing revenue to crater. Two annual passes, including the popular “America the Beautiful” pass, would remain at $80. Under the updated increase, the Park Service stands to add about $60 million by year’s end. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke announced the new proposal in a statement that included a nod to Americans who rebuked the earlier plan. “I want to thank the American people who made their voices heard through the public comment process on the original fee proposal,” Zinke said. “Your input has helped us develop a balanced plan that focuses on modest increases at the 117 fee-charging parks as opposed to larger increases proposed for 17 highly visited national parks.”

The fees would take effect in June. Using Yosemite National Park as an example, the Park Service said its seven-day vehicle pass would increase to $35 from $30. Interior signaled in the first week in April that its earlier proposal was in trouble when a department oicial said: “We’re working to respond to those … thoughtful and well-put comments” that railed against the plan. “Our ultimate goal when it comes to entrance fees is to make sure the parks get 80 percent of that revenue ... but we also don’t want to put a burden on our visitors.” The official’s statement followed Zinke’s backpedaling on the plan in March. At a House hearing that week, he said the aim was to not hurt families. An analysis by the National Parks Conservation Association showed that 98 percent of 110,000 public comments opposed the dramatic increase. “Fees do have a role to play in our parks, and the administration’s move to abandon its original proposal in favor of more measured fee increases will put additional funds into enhancing park experiences without threatening visitation or local economies,” said Theresa Pierno, the association’s president and chief executive. NPCA was among the first groups to denounce the original plan in October. “This is a prime example that activism works,” said Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., the ranking member of the House Natural Resources Committee.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING(S) AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT T h e Mi s s o u ri H o u s i n g D e ve lo p me n t C o mmis s io n (MHDC) is considering a request for financing and/or housing tax credits for the d e ve lo p me n t(s ) listed below: Development Information 18-018 Elm Ridge Senior 3746 Dunn Rd. Hazelwood, MO 63042 1204 Development Type New Construction Senior 55+ Unit / Rent Information Total Units: 32 Missouri Housing Development Commission will hold two public hearings in St. Louis. The first on Monday, April 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 , at 6 :0 0 pm at the Renaissance Hotel. The addre s s is 9 8 0 1 Natural Bridge Road, S t . Louis , MO 63134, and the phone number is (3 1 4 ) 4 2 9 1 1 0 0 . The second on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 pm at the St . Louis Union S tation Hotel. The address is 1 8 2 0 Marke t S tre e t, St . Louis , MO 63103, and the phone number is (314) 231 1234. At the public hearings, M H D C s t a f f w i l l d e s c ri b e t h e development(s) and accept and record public comments. Any interested party may attend the hearings to submit verbal or written comments. The public may also submit written comments directly to Missouri Housing Development C ommission, 9 2 0 Main S treet, Suite 1 4 0 0 , Kans as C ity, MO 64105, or through the office of the mayor or chief elected official of t h e lo c a lit y in w h ic h t h e development is located. All public comments must be received by May 11, 2018, in order to be considered. If you wish to attend this hearing and you require specific aids or services under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Lynn Sigler at 1 816 759 6600 at le as t 3 working days prior to the hearing.

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Public Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING(S) AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT T h e Mi s s o u ri H o u s i n g D e ve lo p me n t C o mmis s io n (MHDC) is considering a request for financing and/or housing tax credits for the d e ve lo p me n t(s ) listed below: Development Information 18-016 The Residences at Jennings Place III Middle River Rd. Jennings, MO 63136 Development Type New Construction Senior 62+ Unit / Rent Information Total Units: 54 Missouri Housing Development Commission will hold two public hearings in St. Louis. The first on Monday, April 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 , at 6 :0 0 pm at the Renaissance Hotel. The addre s s is 9 8 0 1 Natural Bridge Road, S t . Louis , MO 63134, and the phone number is (3 1 4 ) 4 2 9 1 1 0 0 . The second on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 pm at t h e S t . Lo u i s U n i o n Station Hotel. The address is 1820 Marke t S tre e t, St . Louis , MO 63103, and the phone number is (314) 231 1234. At the public hearings, M H D C s t a f f w i l l d e s c ri b e t h e development(s) and accept and record public comments. Any interested party may attend the hearings to submit verbal or written comments. The public may also submit written comments directly to Missouri Housing Development C ommission, 9 2 0 Main S treet, Suite 1 4 0 0 , Kans as C ity, MO 64105, or through the office of the mayor or chief elected official of t h e lo c a lit y in w h ic h t h e development is located. All public comments must be received by May 11, 2018, in order to be considered. If you wish to attend this hearing and you require specific aids or services under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Lynn Sigler at 1 816 759 6600 at le as t 3 working days prior to the hearing.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING(S) AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT T h e Mi s s o u ri H o u s i n g De ve lo p me n t C o mmis s io n (MHDC) is considering a request for financing and/or housing tax credits for the d e ve lo p me n t(s ) listed below: Development Information 18-015 Meadowood Estates SW Corner of TR Hughes Blvd. and Meadowland Estates Ln. O'Fallon, MO 63366 Development Type New Construction Senior 62+ Unit / Rent Information Total Units: 54 Missouri Housing Development Commission will hold two public hearings in St. Louis. The first on Monday, April 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 , at 6 :0 0 pm at the Renaissance Hotel. The addre s s is 9 8 0 1 Natural Bridge Road, S t . Louis , MO 63134, and the phone number is (3 1 4 ) 4 2 9 1 1 0 0 . The second on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 pm at t h e S t . Lo u i s U n i o n Station Hotel. The address is 1820 Marke t S tre e t, St . Louis , MO 63103, and the phone number is (314) 231 1234. At the public hearings, M H D C s t a f f w i l l d e s c ri b e t h e development(s) and accept and record public comments. Any interested party may attend the hearings to submit verbal or written comments. The public may also submit written comments directly to Missouri Housing Development C ommission, 9 2 0 Main S treet, Suite 1 4 0 0 , Kans as C ity, MO 64105, or through the office of the mayor or chief elected official of t h e lo c a lit y in w h ic h t h e development is located. All public comments must be received by May 11, 2018, in order to be considered. If you wish to attend this hearing and you require specific aids or services under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Lynn Sigler at 1 816 759 6600 at le as t 3 working days prior to the hearing.

Continued on Page C10


WORLD

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

‘Never again’: Leaders of Poland, Israel lead Holocaust memorial

DIGEST Use of nerve agent on ex-spy conirmed The international chemical weapons watchdog on Thursday conirmed Britain’s inding that a former Russian spy and his daughter were poisoned with a nerve agent, as Russia continued to deny suggestions that it was behind the attack. Investigators from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons said the nerve agent was “of high purity.” Britain says that means only a state with a sophisticated laboratory could have manufactured it. Britain blames Russia for the March 4 poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in the English city of Salisbury. Russia denies involvement. Death toll in Gaza protests rises to 34 • The Health Ministry in Gaza says a Palestinian man was shot and killed at a border protest campsite Thursday by Israeli ire. Witnesses said that Abdullah al-Shehri, 28, was throwing stones at soldiers stationed behind the fence with Israel. Israel’s military said it was unaware of the incident. Thursday’s fatality raises the number of Palestinians killed by Israeli ire over the past two weeks to 34. At least 26 were killed during protests. Gaza’s Islamic militant rulers Hamas have called for a mass rally at the border as part of protests against a decade-old blockade of the territory. Israel has warned it will not tolerate attempts to breach it. Extremists take blame for bombing at stadium • A bomb exploded at a packed soccer stadium in Somalia and killed ive spectators while wounding several others, police said Thursday evening. The al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab extremist group claimed responsibility for the explosion in the port town of Barawe. Witnesses said the bomb had been buried in the stadium and went of during the locallevel match. Most of the eight people wounded were in serious condition and were being treated at a local hospital, police Col. Abdirizak Ahmed said. At least 15 killed in Taliban assault • The Taliban stormed a government compound in central Afghanistan early Thursday, triggering an hourslong gunbattle that killed 15, including three

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A13

local oicials, police and government oicials said. The attack in the Khuja Omari district was the latest insurgent assault in Ghazni province, which is now largely under Taliban control. Woman, child stabbed to death at German train station • A woman and her 1-year-old daughter died after being stabbed at a busy subway station in Hamburg on Thursday, German police said. The suspected assailant, the woman’s ex-husband, was arrested. The knife attack happened at the Jungfernstieg station in Germany’s second-biggest city. The suspected assailant, a 33-year-old from Niger who was the girl’s father, called police himself after the stabbing and was arrested.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

People take part Thursday in the annual March of the Living to commemorate the Holocaust. The yearly march for Holocaust Remembrance Day takes place between the former death camps of Auschwitz and Birkenau in Poland.

Vatican leaders push for advancement of women • The Vatican’s commission of Latin American church leaders is demanding greater decision-making opportunities for women in the church and proposing that Pope Francis call a meeting of the world’s bishops to discuss women. The Pontiical Commission for Latin America said after its recent plenary that the church needs a radical “change of mentality” in the way it views and treats half of humanity. The commission members said it was “urgent” to increase opportunities for women at the parish, diocesan and Vatican level.

BY VANESSA GERA associated Press

WA R SAW, P O L A N D •

The presidents of Israel and Poland joined thousands of others Thursday for a Holocaust remembrance event at the former Nazi death camps of Auschwitz and Birkenau, hoping to put recent tension behind them. Presidents Reuven Rivlin of Israel and Andrzej Duda of Poland lit candles, bowed their heads and pressed their hands on the Death Wall, a site at Auschwitz where inmates, chiefly Polish resistance fighters, were executed by Nazi German forces during World War II. They then led thousands, including many Jews from around the world, in the March of the Living, which takes place

Magazine names ‘mercenaries’ threatening Hungary • A Hungarian magazine published Thursday the names of more than 200 people it claimed Prime Minister Viktor Orban had in mind when he alleged U.S.-Hungarian billionaire George Soros paid “mercenaries” to topple the government. Those listed in Figyelo included members of rights organizations such as Amnesty International, anti-corruption watchdog Transparency International, refugee advocates, journalists and faculty from the Sorosfounded Central European University. Figyelo is a formerly highly respected magazine that took on a progovernment slant after it was acquired by an Orban ally. Orban was re-elected to a fourth term as Hungary’s leader Sunday.

each year on Israel’s Holocaust Remembrance Day. The solemn march began at the main gate of Auschwitz and ended 2 miles away at Birkenau, where Jews from across Europe were transported by train and murdered in gas chambers. Duda said he and Rivlin were there to give testimony to the destruction of the Jewish people and warn about where antiSemitism, xenophobia and racism can lead. “Our common presence here shows the world: Never again anti-Semitism, never again genocide, never again Holocaust,” Duda said in a joint news conference. Rivlin recalled how Poland was the cradle of Jewish culture before the Holocaust. But he also referred to the “deep dis-

BY JULIE ZAUZMER Washington Post

Two-thirds of American millennials cannot identify what Auschwitz is, according to a study released on Holocaust Remembrance Day that found that knowledge of the genocide that killed 6 million Jews during World War II is rapidly fading among American adults, especially those ages 18 to 34. Twenty-two percent of millennials said they haven’t heard of the Holocaust or are not sure whether they’ve heard of it — twice the percentage of

From news services

U.S. adults as a whole who said the same. The study, conducted by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, interviewed 1,350 American adults in February. Asked to identify what Auschwitz is, 41 percent of American adults as a whole and 66 percent of millennials could not come up with a correct response identifying it as a concentration camp or extermination camp. The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum says that at least 1.3 million people were deported to the camp, run by Nazi Ger-

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Poland was home to 3.5 million Jewish Holocaust victims. Respondents indicated much more awareness of modern-day bias against Jews, with 68 percent saying anti-Semitism is present in America today. Despite the lack of historical knowledge, the survey found a desire for Holocaust education — 93 percent said in response to a question toward the end of the survey that students should learn about the Holocaust in school. About 58 percent said they believe something like the Holocaust could happen again.

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many in occupied Poland, from 1940 to 1945, and 1.1 million of them were killed. It was the largest concentration camp among many built by the Nazis during their campaign to wipe out the Jews and other groups. The survey found a low awareness of nations other than Germany where the Holocaust occurred: Just 5 to 6 percent of U.S. adults knew that Jews were killed in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, where 90 percent of the local Jewish populations were murdered. Just 37 percent of U.S. adults knew that Jews from Poland were killed;

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elimination and Poles considered a slave race. Many Poles were killed, tortured or forced into slave labor. Yet many bitter feelings remain today between Jews and Poles, as Jews remember Polish anti-Semitism that in some cases turned deadly. Many Poles, meanwhile, believe that wartime Polish eforts to help Jews are being forgotten. At Birkenau, the leaders paid tribute to the immense sufering that Germany inflicted both on Jews and Poles. Rivlin noted that Poland barely survived as a nation and acknowledged the thousands of Poles who put their own lives at risk to help Jews. Nazi Germany killed some 1.1 million people in the Auschwitz and Birkenau camps.

Majority of millennials unfamiliar with Auschwitz

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agreement” his country has had with Poland over its passage earlier this year of a Holocaust speech law. The law criminalizes blaming Poland for crimes committed by Nazi German forces during their wartime occupation. The Polish government says its aim is to prevent Poland from unfairly being blamed for Germany’s crimes. Israel fears the law’s intent is to whitewash Polish sins by repressing discussion about Poles who helped Germans kill Jews. Duda, whose wife has a Jewish father, insisted the disputed law never aimed to “ block testimony” about the Holocaust. The Jews of Europe and ethnic Poles were two of the groups that suffered most during the German wartime occupation, with Jews targeted for total

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

FRIDAy • 04.13.2018 • A14 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Radioactive fallout Our politically toxic governor doesn’t understand that it’s time to go.

G

Foremost among them is Missouri ov. Eric Greitens’ political toxAttorney General Josh Hawley, who icity is now obvious to all but him. Prominent Republicans are is vying for Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill’s seat. He wasted little time abandoning him in droves. The chorus of condemnation is growing louder with this statement Wednesday: “The House investigative committee’s report by the day. The only name-brand politicontains shocking, substantial, and corcian in Jeferson City who seems unable to hear it is Greitens, who seems to believe his roborated evidence of wrongdoing by Gov. Greitens. The conduct the report details is political future remains salvageable. certainly impeachThis is not able, in my judgment, rational behavior. and the House is well It’s up to those within its rights to closest to him to proceed on that front. bring Greitens But the people of back to reality, Missouri should not including the be put through that defense team in his ordeal. Gov. Greitens St. Louis criminal should resign immetrial, his top aides, diately.” and especially Hawley is more his wife, who is than a worried canenduring unfathdidate. As attorney omable humiliageneral,he is pursuing tion. legal action against Presumably Greitens for potential they can recognize campaign-law violaobjectively that tions. Legal scholars this is not the in Hawley’s position elaborate liberal plot the governor J.B. FORBES • Post-Dispatch don’t use words like “impeachable” casusays it is. It is the Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens ally. consequence of Greitens clearly his own reckless upset state House Speaker Todd Richardactions in the alleged violent sexual abuse son, R-Poplar Bluff, by denouncing the of his former hairdresser. report of the House Special Investigative Greitens’ attorneys insist that the Committee on Oversight as being “full of affair was consensual. But the testimony lies and falsehoods” and part of “an absurd released Wednesday makes clear that she political witch hunt.” Richardson signaled did not consent to being groped, slapped Wednesday the possibility of a special leghard, called a “whore” and forced, while islative session to pursue impeachment. crying, to perform oral sex on him if she One of Missouri’s most prominent wanted to be released from the basement of his St. Louis house, where he had blind- Republicans in Congress, Rep. Ann Wagner of Ballwin, labeled Greitens “unfit to folded and bound her in 2015. lead” shortly after standing with President Top Republicans clearly are growing Donald Trump for a White House billnervous about the damage Greitens is signing ceremony. inflicting on their party ahead of elections Even a not-guilty verdict in his St. Louis in November. President Donald Trump is trial will not erase the stain. Governor, millstone enough. Republicans struggling what does it take to make you understand? to maintain control of Congress do not It’s over. It’s time to go. need a scandal of this magnitude dragging them down.

TO VIEW MORE EDITORIAL CARTOONS ONLINE GO TO STLTODAy.COM/OPINION

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Allman comes of as violent, rambling, deranged Kudos to KDNL (Channel 30) for doing the right thing and removing Jamie Allman from the air (“Allman’s TV program pulled amid criticism over threatening tweet,” April 10). His tweet said: “When we kick their ass they all like to claim we’re drunk. I’ve been hanging out getting ready to ram a hot poker up David Hogg’s ass tomorrow. Busy working. Preparing.” Not only is it a violent and totally unnecessary attack on a school shooting victim, it doesn’t make any sense at all. Read that tweet carefully. “When we kick their ass”: Who’s ass is going to get kicked and why? “They all like to claim we’re drunk”: Who is claiming that you’re drunk and why would they think that? “I’ve been hanging out getting ready to ram a hot poker up David Hogg’s ass tomorrow”: Why would anyone make that kind of threat against a teenager for no reason? What was his crime? Being a victim of a horrific school shooting? Being a well-spoken young man? “Busy working. Preparing”: For what? Why would any TV station want to broadcast the ramblings of this deranged mind? Tom Rothwell • Chesterield

Big Brother is watching Government doesn’t need a database of journalists and ‘media inluencers.’

P

diverse society where all views can be op culture has turned former shared. Debating the news and criticizPresident Richard Nixon’s ing those who provide it is a well-prac“enemies list” into the butt of jokes 45 years after the famously ticed American pastime and symbolic of our free society. ruthless and paranoid president created One of the marks of authoritarit, in part, to monitor journalists. A new ian political leaders is their penchant Trump administration efort to compile for attacking legitimate news outlets a database of journalists and “media inthat cover them. Sowing divisions and fluencers” is not the least bit funny and undermining news media represents a clear threat to credibility help them conFirst Amendment rights. solidate control. That’s Congress should interwhy authoritarian leaders vene to stop the Departin Russia, Egypt, Turkey, ment of Homeland SecuMyanmar and Venezuela rity’s efforts to monitor so regularly arrest jour290,000 global news outnalists and put them on lets. The department has trial. advertised for a contractor When Trump tells baldto help compile a database faced lies, like saying he of journalists, editors, for“won in a landslide” or eign correspondents and had the “biggest audience bloggers to identify top ever” for his inaugura“media influencers,” and tion, he says the media said it wants the outlets’ “sentiment” to be included FILE is lying when they report facts that counter his in the data collected. President Richard Nixon false claims. His constant Sentiment apparently giving a thumbs up in drumbeat of fake-news refers to the contractor’s 1974 after announcing denunciation threatens to analysis of whether the his resignation from silence the truth. coverage represents prothe presidency. He was There can be no good Trump, neutral or antiinfamous for maintaining reason for Homeland administration coverage. an “enemies list” that Security to collect data It’s particularly threatincluded journalists. on news media operaening that this move tions. The solicitation comes from a president calls for monitoring of “media coverage who regularly uses the term “fake news” in terms of content, volume, sentiment, to discredit mainstream news outlets geographical spread, top publications, that practice nothing more dangermedia channels, reach, ... top posters, ous than reporting on Donald Trump’s influencers, languages, momentum, words and deeds. The fake-news label has been used to confuse citizens as they circulation.” Trampling on the First Amendment is try to inform themselves about what wrong and dangerous. Seeking to identheir government is up to. tify and label coverage is a slippery slope The importance of press freedom in a free and democratic society. Even at in this context cannot be overstated. a time of heightened vigilance against Democracy cannot survive if the public does not keep informed or is deliberately foreign meddling in U.S. elections, a government list of “media influencers” misinformed. can only serve to chill those who are Traditionally the United States has contributing to the marketplace of ideas. been a world model of press freedoms, providing fertile ground for a vast and

David Hogg and Jamie Allman

Liberalism’s tolerance for a satirical opposing view is dead The first victim of any budding fascist movement is humor. Those who are perpetually grim-faced will try to deny their fellow citizens the freedom to smile. No smirking allowed. The firing of conservative media personality Jamie Allman for using hyperbole to twitter-joke about teen gun-control proponent David Hogg is yet another sign that liberalism’s tolerance for a satirical opposing view is dead (“Allman’s TV program pulled amid criticism over threatening tweet,” April 10). Who would have imagined back in the glorious, freespirited 1960s that liberals would become narrow-minded prudes by 2018? The liberalism of the vaunted free speech movement has been supplanted by fragile followers of restrictive campus speech codes, boycotts and PC intolerance. For the past several years, it has been my observation that today’s liberals are the most intolerant partisans on the planet. Anyone who believes that Allman’s dumb twitter comment was not satire should have their “snowflake” scissors taken away. We, as freedom-loving Americans, must be very careful about the intensity of our condemnation concerning bad taste and inappropriate comments. I love America and free speech. I abhor liberal fanaticism. Interestingly, it seems that only conservative individuals are punished with firings and boycotts. For example, recall when liberal comedian and late-night host David Letterman joked about Sarah Palin’s underage daughter getting “knocked up” by Alex Rodriguez near the second base bag at Yankee Stadium. Outrageous statement. Letterman was not fired, though. There were no boycotts. Gee, what a surprise. I guess, being

a liberal inoculates one against mediadriven repercussions. Larry Blandino • O’Fallon, Mo.

State’s MAP test is more realistic measure for students The article “Variances in state, national tests skewing results” (April 10) dealt with the disparity between the percentage of students being proficient on the National Assessment of Educational Progress test and the state MAP test. Nothing in educational jargon is more misunderstood than the use of the word “proficient.” This comes from the NAEP dividing students into four levels: advanced, proficient, basic and below basic. Those grading divisions mean exactly what those words mean. Basic means fundamental; so, if a student scores in the basic range, he has a fundamental knowledge of the subject. Proficient means expert; so, when a student scores in the proficient range, he is an expert. Unfortunately, No Child Left Behind demanded all children be proficient in English and math, and over the past 15 years proficient has been used as false pass/fail mark instead of a goal. It is totally unrealistic to think 100 percent were going to be experts. As the article stated, 40 percent of Missouri fourth-graders are proficient in math on the latest NAEP, but that does not mean 60 percent failed. Another 39 percent had a basic knowledge of math; so, only 21 percent did poorly. In the first few years of No Child Left Behind, Missouri’s MAP test was mandated by the Legislature to mirror the NAEP. When it became evident even Missouri kids couldn’t all be experts, the test was changed to reflect a more realistic scoring. This led to the scoring difference between the idealistic NAEP and the realistic state MAP. Carl Peterson • Troy, lll.

Death penalty in Missouri is expensive, cruel Our state’s budget is imploding — school funding is being cut, safety net programs are being cut, the state refuses to accept Medicaid expansion — so why do we continue to have the death penalty, which has been shown in many states to be more expensive than not having it? In St. Louis, the homicide rate goes higher and higher. In addition to the obvious factor of so many people having guns, why does the state continue to provide a model — by the death penalty? The thing to do about problem people is kill them, right? Oy vey. Nobody wants innocent people to be executed, so why does Missouri keep opposing appeals filed on grounds of possible innocence? The Constitution forbids cruel and unusual punishment, so why did Missouri try so hard to kill Russell Bucklew, who has a blood condition that experts say could make the lethal injection excruciatingly painful? Fortunately the U.S. Supreme Court issued a stay for another look at the situation. When a sentencing jury can’t agree on the sentence (either death or life without parole), in most states the sentence automatically reverts to life. But why does Missouri allow a sentencing judge to override a split jury and sentence the defendant to death? This happened twice recently, in Springfield and St. Charles, where 11 voted for life, one voted for death — and the judge imposed death. It’s time to end the death penalty — long past time. Margaret Phillips • St. Louis Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

04.13.2018 • FRIDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A15

IRISH-AMERICAN INCONSISTENCY • A number of Irish, including in St. Louis, are loudly advising the Irish in Ireland to oppose conscription in

the war for democracy, thus efectively aiding Germany. But they do not, with good reason, advise men of Irish blood in the United Staes to oppose the draft. Whoever is not with America in this crisis is against her. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Education at a reasonable cost At Mizzou, we are helping students put learning irst. BY ALEXANDER N. CARTWRIGHT

In January, St. Louis television station KMOV (Channel 4) aired concerns in an editorial segment about the cost of education at the University of Missouri. In particular, the piece focused on the prices of textbooks and housing. I share this concern for the accessibility of higher education, and continuing to ensure afordability at Mizzou has been a major priority for me since I joined the university in Cartwright August. During the fall semester alone, we signed a number of major scholarship initiatives. The Missouri Land Grant allows Pell Grant-eligible students who qualify for admission to attend the university tuition-free (honors students also will receive free room

and board). This year, more than 700 students from rural Missouri have received Pell Grants here at Mizzou. From Camden to Pemiscot to Gentry and beyond, we are proud to serve communities across Missouri by working to ensure everyone has access to higher education. A new ROTC scholarship will also cover room and board for freshmen who have won a national scholarship from the Army, Air Force, Navy or Marines. Beyond our tuition-related efforts, the UM System recently introduced Affordable and Open Educational Resources, which include free open-source textbooks and other low-cost materials. Through AutoAccess, a program that provides students with low-cost digital course materials, McGraw-Hill Education now offers its entire eBook textbook catalog for $40 or less. The Open Textbook Library also contains an ever-expanding catalog of free textbooks that teachers or students can download with ease. We are recognized nationally for

our array of used, rental and digital options, which save students millions of dollars each year. Of course, making textbooks more economical is not just about saving students money. It’s also about ensuring access to highquality course materials. We know students will look for alternatives when faced with steep costs: They might buy outdated or dubious materials or simply go without textbooks entirely. Our mission is to educate students, not to encourage them to look for subpar options. In addition, Mizzou is introducing new low-cost housing and dining plans, which allow students to live and eat on campus for less than $1,000 per month. Dining plans have been overhauled to more accurately suit the needs of students, making for a more practical and cost-effective array of options. While students are free to choose costlier options on or off campus, we are committed to offering housing and dining plans that meet their needs while

Ryan has been driven by two priorities throughout his career: slashing taxes on the best-of Americans and eviscerating social-welfare and safety-net programs in the name of “entitlement reform.”

Paul Ryan’s curdled idealism

AP

he speaker is very much responsible for the ix he and his party are in. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

Paul Ryan started his political life hoping to be the champion of a sunny, forward-looking conservatism. He will step down from the House speakership as the personification of conservatism’s decline. One is tempted to call Ryan’s journey tragic, the tale of a young, idealistic family man transformed into an enabler for the most morally indifferent and utterly selfish president in our nation’s history. It’s hard to imagine that the 28-year-old who entered Congress in 1999 thought fate would lead him to protect a chief executive under scrutiny for an alleged payoff to a porn star, potential entanglements with Russian interference in our election, and efforts to derail legitimate investigations into his behavior. Yet tragedy often implies a protagonist who suffered because of forces beyond his own control. Ryan is very much responsible for the fix he and his party are in. This is why he had to push back against suspicions that he is leaving before a political deluge engulfs House Republicans this fall. Ryan has been driven by two priorities throughout his career: slashing taxes on the best-off Americans and eviscerating social-welfare and safetynet programs in the name of “entitlement reform.” Whatever advanced these objectives was worth doing. In announcing his retirement from Congress on Wednesday, he was thus reduced to repeating four times in response to questions that he was “grateful” to President Donald Trump for

creating the opportunity, as Ryan put it at one point,“to actually get this stuff done.” The “stuff” the speaker was obsessed with included a corporate tax cut that ballooned a deficit he has made a career out of denouncing. Despite Ryan’s rhetoric, deficits never counted for him if they were created by showering money on the country’s privileged sectors. At his news conference, Ryan was required by journalists to acknowledge the trillion-dollar annual budget holes that a supposedly conservative Congress and administration have helped create. He reiterated his stock response, mourning that the Senate never approved his plans to cut Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security and food stamps, which is the policy translation of the bloodless phrase “entitlement reform.” The many in Washington who personally like Ryan often wonder how he could so readily cozy up to Trump and empower House members — notably Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes — who have turned themselves into propagandists for Trump’s desperate quest to escape accountability. The answer lies paradoxically in Ryan’s idealism, rooted in his youthful fascination with the philosophy of Ayn Rand. She identified with society’s winners and regarded ordinary citizens as moochers and burdens on the creative and the entrepreneurial. Although Ryan gave warm speeches about compassion, his biggest fear was not that the poor might go without food or health care but, as he once said, that the “safety net” might “become a hammock that lulls able-bodied citizens into lives of complacency and dependency.” He later backed away from Rand and acknowledged that the hammock was “the wrong

analogy.” But his policies suggested that he never abandoned his core faith: If the wealthy did best when given positive incentives in the form of more money, the less fortunate needed to be prodded by less generous social policies into taking responsibility for their own fate. Given where Ryan’s passions lie, it is unsurprising that he would prop Trump up as long as the president was willing to embrace a modern-day Social Darwinism that married efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act with reductions in government’s impositions on the managers and owners of capital. The retiring speaker really does believe that this is the path to the good society. To pursue it, he’ll take help wherever he can get it. If Ryan has presidential ambitions, he is certainly wise to walk away now. The House Republican majority and Trump himself may well be wrecked by the president’s unscrupulous impulsiveness. Ryan’s departure will not only give him time with his family — those who know him see the politician’s proverbial excuse for leave-taking as having reality in his case — but also the opportunity to try to cleanse himself of the stain left by a low and dishonest political moment. In 2024, he will be just 54. Yet he has been propelled to the exits because his sort of conservatism hit a dead end. It’s why we have Trump, and why Ryan was forced to acquiesce to a man whose statements he once condemned as racist and whose personal life is the antithesis of his own. This is the part of Ryan’s legacy he’ll have great difficulty living down.

E.J. Dionne ejdionne@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

remaining economical. As a result of these efforts and more, Mizzou is more affordable than ever. In fact, 45 percent of our students graduate with no debt, while those who do have debt borrow 25 percent less than the national average for their college education. Paying for college is not a matter any working family or individual takes lightly, and I know firsthand the importance of an affordable, accessible education: Like so many others, I paid for attending community college — and then university — with wages I earned from various minimum-wage jobs. I believe strongly that wealth should not act as the gatekeeper to higher education, and at Mizzou, every new decision or initiative follows through on that principle. A college diploma, after all, is more than a name on a certificate or a checked box on a résumé. Education provides people with options, many of which they might not have considered before. That happened to me,

and it made me realize that if cost restricts access to education, then it also restricts opportunity. That’s not something Mizzou, as a land-grant university, should ever endorse. Along with so many others at Mizzou, I’m committed to ensuring Missourians have affordable access to the wealth of opportunity a high-quality college education can afford. As someone who paid my way through college by working and leveraging student grants, scholarships and loans, I understand KMOV’s concerns and those of parents and students who bear the burden of covering those costs. But if you take a look at what is happening at Mizzou, you’ll see we are creating options that allow students to focus less on finances and more on what is most important: their education.

Alexander N. Cartwright is the chancellor of the University of Missouri.

Republicans and Democrats just did something big together Senators overcome Big Tech’s lobbying campaign to pass sex traicking bill. MARC A. THIESSEN Washington Post

fought Backpage all the way to the Supreme Court to enforce their subpoenas. The subcommittee then published a voluminous report detailing its findings of their 20-month investigation, including evidence that Backpage knew it was facilitating child sex trafficking and that it was not simply a passive publisher of third-party content. Instead the company was automatically editing users’ child sex ads to strip them of words that might arouse suspicion (such as “lolita,” “teenage,” “rape,” “young,” “amber alert,” “little girl,” “fresh,” “innocent” and “school girl”) before publishing them and advised users on how to create “clean” postings. Then Portman, McCaskill and their co-authors used the result of their investigation to craft a narrow legislative fix that would allow bad actors such as Backpage to be held accountable. The bill they produced allows sex trafficking victims to sue the websites that facilitated the crimes against them and allows state law enforcement officials, not just the Justice Department, to prosecute websites that violate federal sex trafficking laws. The committee also turned over all its raw documents to the Justice Department last summer, urging them to undertake a criminal review, which Justice did. Despite all the Silicon Valley money against them, the senators never wavered. Through the sheer power of the testimony of trafficking survivors, Mary Mazzio’s documentary “I am Jane Doe,” the evidence of crimes committed by Backpage, and the support of law enforcement, anti-trafficking advocates, 50 state attorneys general, the civil rights community

Washington seems to be in the grip of hyperpartisan gridlock these days. Important bills are passed on party-line votes (when they are passed at all) and the investigative committees of Congress appear to be sideshows, unable to agree on basic facts. Many Americans despair that Republicans and Democrats seem incapable of coming together to do anything important. Take heart — the two parties just did do something big together. On Wednesday, President Donald Trump signed into law the Stop Enabling Sex Traffickers Act, a bill designed to crack down on websites that knowingly facilitate the online sex trafficking of vulnerable people, including underage boys and girls. And the FBI, informed by evidence collected during a nearly two-year bipartisan investigation by the Senate’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, just seized the website Backpage — which the Center for Missing and Exploited Children says is responsible for 73 percent of the 10,000 child sex trafficking reports it receives each year — and arrested seven of its top executives. You might think cracking down on child sex traffickers would be a legislative layup. You’d be wrong. The bill — authored by Republican Sens. Rob Portman (Ohio), John McCain (Arizona), and John Cornyn (Texas) and Democrats Richard Blumenthal (Connecticut) Claire McCaskill (Missouri) and Heidi Heitkamp (North Dakota) — was hard to pass. (Full disclosure: My wife works for Portman.) The act faced a wall of opposition from Silicon Valley because it amended Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which gave blanket immunity to online entities that publish third-party content from civil and AP criminal prosecution. Big Sen. Claire McCaskill Tech wanted to preserve and faith-based groups — as well that blanket immunity, even if it as carefully negotiated language — gave legal cover to websites that they wore down most of Big Tech’s were using it to sell children for opposition. In November, Facesex. When child sex trafficking book finally came on board. But survivors tried to sue Backpage, Google shamefully never relented and state attorneys general tried in its opposition. Despite this, the to prosecute the owners, federal act overwhelmingly passed both courts ruled against them, specifichambers of Congress. cally citing Section 230. This did Thanks to this bipartisan effort, not move Big Tech. Chief among the world’s largest online child sex the culprits was Google, which bazaar is shuttered, many of its apparently forgot its old corporate executives are under indictment motto of “Don’t Be Evil” and loband sex trafficking victims can bied fiercely against the bill. finally get justice in court. These How did the senators overcome senators have given hope not just to Big Tech’s lobbying campaign? the survivors but also to millions of First Portman and McCaskill, the Americans who had lost faith that chairman and ranking member of their elected leaders could put aside the permanent subcommittee on investigations, used their subpoena partisanship and resist the power of money in politics for the good of power to gather corporate files, the country. bank records and other evidence that Backpage knowingly facilitated Mark Thiessen criminal sex trafficking of vulnerwitter: @marcthiessen able women and children, and then Copyright The Washington Post covered up that evidence. They


A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

OBITUARIES Barnes, Diane Carling - Ladue Bochantin, Leonard J. - St. Louis Brogan, Timothy C., Sr. - St. Louis Brown, Betty LaRue - St. Louis Digar, James A. - House Springs Donovan, Nancy C. - Belleville Dunnermann, Marie Elizabeth - St. Louis

Celebrations of Life

Egeling, Danielle Lee - St. Louis Glik, Joseph Weston - Clayton Hallemeier, Lester A. "Les" - St. Charles Klingler, Patricia M. - St. Louis Midyett, Beverly - St. Louis Montes, Arturo C., M.D. - St. Charles Nelson, Shirley J. - St. Louis

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Pierce, Judith Ann - St. Louis Schilly, Joseph A. - St. Louis Waldhof, Lorraine T. - St. Louis Walterscheid, Kathryn Ann "Katie" - St. Louis Webb, Jerry L. - Wright City Wiesehan, Helen A. - Arnold

Barnes, Diane Carling

Egeling, Danielle Lee

Nelson, Shirley J.

Passed away on Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Beloved wife of t h e l a t e Wil l ia m E . B a r n e s ; dearest mother of Shepard E. B a r n e s (Ra n d i) , Ch a rl es M . B a rn es and William R u ms e y Barnes (Cynthia Lueck); stepsister of Joan Townshend; dear grandmother of Russell, Virginia and Scott Barnes; beloved aunt of M. CIndy Weddell. She was preceded in death by her parents Thomas Carling and Marian S. Elston. Mrs. Barnes was a generous donor of her time and resources to numerous St. Louis charitable and cultural institutions. Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Ladue, 110 N. Warson Rd,. at Ladue Rd., on Monday, April 16th at 2:30 p.m. A reception will follow in the Church Undercroft. Private interment Bellefontaine Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to the Missouri Botanical Garden or to the St. Louis Zoo. Condolences may be extended online at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

(nee Dagraedt) peacefully on Wednesday April 11, 2018, after a long heroic battle with cancer. Beloved wife of the late Roger Egeling; dear mother to Alex and Jack Egeling; loving daughter of Jeri Finch, the late Robert Finch and the late Richard Dagraedt; sister of Mollie Finch and the late David (Wanda) Dagraedt. Danielle was a loyal, generous, and trusted friend to many. Services: Visitation Sunday April 15th, 1pm - 4pm at Bopp Chapel, at the family's request there will be no receiving line. Memorials to American Association of University Women (AAUW) or American Cancer Society. See www.boppchapel for additional information.

(nee Fitch) Thursday, April 12, 2018. Beloved wife of Darold Nelson; dear mother of Janet (Craig) Nitcher and Peggy (Jim) Taylor; dear grandmother of Rebecca (Kevin) Pekkarinen, Lucas, Sky and Ben Nitcher, Adam Taylor, Andrea (Ryan) Baynes and Julie (Jared) Marling. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Saturday, April 14, 11 a.m. until service at 1 p.m. Donations may be made to Ninos de Mexico Children's Home, ninosdemexico.org

Glik, Joseph Weston

91, of Clayton, Missouri, died peacefully on April 10, 2018, surrounded by his family. He is survived by his wife, Judith S. Glik, four children, Robert M. Glik (div. Zoe McNamara) Jeffrey W. Glik (Rachel), James M. Glik (An gel a ) , and Judith L. Glik Bochantin, Leonard J. (Harvard M u h m) , three Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on stepchildren, Terence M. Berg Wednesday, April 11, 2018. Loving husband of Kathy Bochantin; (Karen), Dennis M. Berg, and loving brother of Kenneth (Lynn) Bochantin, Pricilla (Stanley) Nancy E. Ellman, and his Buckmiller and Murphy Giegerich; dear uncle of Liza (Vincent) grandchildren, Peter R. Glik, Skroska, Nancee (Frank) Hornburg, Beth (Bill) Dolejsi, April, Andrea G. Glik, William K. Glik, Savannah and Taylor Giegerich and the late Gregory (surviving Amber) Bochantin; dear great-uncle of Ellie and Will; our dear Elliot W. Glik, Jeremy A. Glik, Grace G. Muhm, H. Maximilian Muhm, Lillian B. Berg, and Olivia S. Ellman, his sister, Marilyn nephew, cousin and friend to all. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Joy Sandweiss, and nephews, nieces, and friends too numerous Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, April 16, 9:30 a.m. for 10:00 a.m. to name. Joe was predeceased by his parents, Morris and Elsie Mass at St. Matthias Catholic Church. Interment Memorial Park Glik, his first wife, Gussie Kapp Glik, and his grandson Charles J. Glik. Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Humane Upon his father's premature death, Joe assumed management Society or your favorite charity appreciated. Visitation of The Glik Company, expanding the retail clothing operation Sunday, 4-8 p.m. from one store to what now has more than 60 locations in 10 states, still family-owned and operated after 120 years. He was Brogan, Timothy C., Sr. a business leader, philanthropist, and an avid golfer and Wed., 4/11/18. Beloved husband of Veronica fisherman. Joe loved people and never met a stranger. His Brogan. Vis. KUTIS SOCO CHAPEL, Sun. 4/15, family, though, was his favorite pastime and greatest 4-8 pm. Funeral Mass Mon., 11: 30 am at achievement in a life of many accomplishments. He was a loyal Immaculate Conception Ch. (Arnold). Burial J.B. Nat. Cem. and supportive friend to many. Servi c es : Visitation Tuesday, April 17th 2:00 p . m. at Congregation Shaare Emeth, 11645 Ladue Road at Ballas Road, Brown, Betty LaRue followed by memorial service at 3:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, 96, passed away Tuesday, April memorial contributions are preferred to the Joe Glik Park Fund, 10, 2018. Daughter of Floyd and P.O. Box 102, Edwardsville, Illinois 62025 check made payable Hazel Black. Wife of the late t o E d w a r d s v i l l e C o m m u n i t y F o u n d a t i o n Arthur E. Brown. Mother of Jay http://www.edwardsvillecommunityfoundation.org/joe-glik.htm, M. (Dianne) Brown and Terry The Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, 975 N. Warson Rd. ( J o h n ) B r o w n R i d l i n g . St. Louis, MO, 63132 or the charity of your choice. Visit Gra n d mot h er to Ta ra (Tony bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. Bommarito) Brown and James BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE Ridling. Services: Private family services Hallemeier, Lester A. "Les" held by BUCHHOLZ Mortuary. 4/10/18, age 86. Svcs: Vis. Baue Cave Springs, Sun., 4/15, 4-8pm. Svc. Baue Cave Springs, Mon., 4/16, 10am. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Digar, James A. 81, of House Springs, April 10, 2018. Visitation Sunday, 2-6 p.m. Service Monday, 10 a.m at Jay. B. Smith Funeral Home Fenton.

Klingler, Patricia M.

(nee Rosener). Baptized in the hope of Christ's Resurrection on Wed., 4/11/18; loving wife of Jerry Klingler; loving mother of Andrew and Jeremy Klingler; dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SO. CO. Chapel on Mon., 4/16, Donovan, Nancy C. 9:30 a.m. for 10 a.m. Mass at St. Francis of Assisi. Interment n ee B yrn e, 91, of Belleville, Illinois, born November 23, 1926, Park Lawn. Visitation Sunday, 3-7 p.m. in St. Louis, MO, died Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at her residence. Midyett, Beverly She was preceded in death by (nee Heying) Wed., April 11, 2018 at age 78. Beloved wife of her First Husband, Dr. F. Patrick Dorman Lee Midyett; dear mother and mother-in-law of Michele Lamb, and her Husband, Harold (William) Krueger, Marla Chrisco and Melissa Midyett; loving A. Donovan, Sr. grandmother of Tara (Austin) Holsman and Grant and Hayden Surviving are her Children, Chrisco; our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Martha (Walter) Burke, Carol Services: Visitation at the ORTMANN STIPANOVICH Funeral (Melvin) McCartney, Maureen Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Sun., April 15 from 3-7 (James) Best, Madelyn (Peter p.m. Funeral at Parkway Baptist Church, 12465 Olive Blvd., Fiore, J r. ) L a mb , F. P a t rick Creve Coeur, Mon., April 16 at 10 a.m. followed by a graveside (Ka t h y) Lamb; 2 St ep -Son s , service at Callaway Memorial Gardens in Fulton, MO at 2 p.m. In Harold (Louisa) Donovan, Jr., Michael Donovan, Brother, Paul lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to (Jane) Byrne; Son-in-Law, Dr. Michael Firthl Brother-in-Law, Parkway Baptist Church. Edward Monteath; 18 Grandchildren, 4 Great-Grandchildren. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com Services: Visitation 10:00 am-11:00am Sat. April 14 at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church, Belleville, IL. Funeral 11:00 am Sat. April 14, at Church. Interment follows at Mount Carmel Montes, Arturo C., M.D. C e m e t e r y , B el l evil l e, IL . For more in forma t ion vis it of Saint Charles, MO, passed Wednesday, April 11, 2018, at the www.kurrusfh.com. age of 88. Beloved husband of Mary Etta Montes; cherished son of the late Dr. Luis and Gaspara Montes; devoted father of Michelle (Larry) Cowsert, Amelia (Daniel) Strawbridge, Maria Dunnermann, Marie Elizabeth (Mark) Cabonce, and Rebekkah Montes; loving grandfather of 5; 4/10/18. Services: Vis. Sun., 4/15, 4:30-8pm, Baue, 620 great-grandfather of 3. Also survived by two sisters and one Jefferson St., Serv. Mon., 4/16, 10am, St. Peters Catholic brother, preceded in death by 4 brothers and 3 sisters. Church, St. Charles. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 W. Clay St., St. Charles. Visitation on Monday, April 16 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the funeral home. Funeral Mass at St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church, 601 N. Fourth St, St. Charles, on Tuesday, April 17 at 10:30 a.m. Memorials to Little Sisters of the Poor. Visit Baue.com.

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Pierce, Judith Ann Sunday, April 8th, 2018. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Sunday, April 15th from 2:00 p.m. until the funeral service at 6:00 p.m. Private interment.

Schilly, Joseph A. Tues. April 10, 2018. Visitation at Bopp Chapel Fri. 4-8:00 pm. Funeral Mass Sat. 10:00 am at St. Mary Magdalen, Brentwood. www.boppchapel.com

Waldhof, Lorraine T. 88, April 3, 2018. Devoted and loving mother of Karen (Dave) Scharf and Kenneth M. Waldhof; dearest grandmother of Kelly (Ryan) Lemons, Laura (James) Yamamoto, and Ellen (Matt) McGuire. Loving great-grandmother of Wesley, Joseph, Connor, and Emmeline. Lorraine was preceded in death by Ken, her beloved husband of 63 years. Services: Visitation Saturday, April 14 from 9:00 a.m. until time of Funeral Mass at 10:30 a.m. at St. Norbert Catholic Church, 16455 New Halls Ferry Road, Florissant. Interment at Calvary Cemetery. Flowers may be sent to Stygar Florissant Chapel, 13980 New Halls Ferry Rd, Florissant (63033) by Friday. Online obituary may be found at www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Walterscheid, Kathryn Ann "Katie" (Steger) got her angel wings & entered heaven's gates March 26, 2018. Visitation 9 am & Mass 10:30 am, Sat. April 14, at St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Imperial MO. For more information www.stlouiscremation.com/obituary/kathryn-katie-walterscheid

Webb, Jerry L., Sr. of Wright City, MO, April 4, 2018. Devoted husband of Florence Webb (nee Grimes) of 59 years ; Loving father of Jerry (Angela) Webb, Annette Orf, Tina (Mark) Joerding, Terry (Scott) Blattel, Teresa (Joe) Lampe; Dear grandfather of 11, great-grandfather of 5; Dear brother of Orbie "Pete" W e b b , Eugene W e b b , Ved a C a r n a h a n , Ros et t a Gillihan, Radene Godfrey. Preceded in death by his parents, Homer and Novella W e b b (nee Turner), brothers, Floyd and Frank Webb, and sister Velta Rhodes. UPDATED Services: Visitation Sat., April 14, 9am till Service at 10:30am at Pitman Funeral Home, 1545 Wentzville Pkwy, Wentzville, MO 63385. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society. www.pitmanfuneralhome.com.

Wiesehan, Helen A. (nee Daniels) Tuesday, April 10, 2018. Loving wife, mother, grandmother, sister and aunt. Services: Visitation at Immaculate Conception Church (2300 Church Rd., Arnold, MO) Friday, April 13th, 12 Noon until funeral Mass at 1:00 p.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Kutis South County Service.

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04.13.2018 • FriDay • M 1

Rubio could ill void left by Trump at Summit of Americas ASSOCIATED PRESS

When presidents gather this week in Peru at the Summit of the Americas, they may be tempted to walk past Vice President Mike Pence and make a beeline for another person who has President Donald Trump’s ear on Latin America: Sen. Marco Rubio. In Trump’s absence from the meeting, Rubio, R-Fla., is playing a prominent role. He began the week presiding over a Senate hearing on the summit, lunched Thursday with Pence at the White House to discuss the trip, and starting Friday, when he arrives in Lima, will meet one-on-one with about a half-dozen heads of state — around the same number as Pence himself. The American president canceled what would have been his first presidential visit to Latin America as he weighs a possible U.S. military strike in Syria in retaliation for an apparent chemical attack on civilians. Rubio, in a phone interview from Washington, called Trump’s absence understandable but a nonetheless disappointing example of how Latin America often takes a back seat to more pressing national security challenges. In his absence, he said he and Pence, who was picked by Trump to lead the U.S. delegation and is the administration’s main envoy to the region, would work with leaders to take tougher action on Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who, at the U.S. administration’s urging, was the only Western Hemisphere leader barred from the gathering. For the region’s leaders, many of whom oppose the American president’s plans to build a wall on the Mexican border and renegotiate trade deals, there couldn’t be a better stand-in. Since Trump’s election, Rubio has exerted outside influence over U.S. policy toward Latin America. He drafted a list of Venezuelan officials accused of human rights abuses that became the basis for U.S. sanctions. He also urged Trump to roll back the U.S. opening to communist Cuba that led to President Raul Castro’s historic handshake with Obama at the last Summit of the Americas three years ago. Castro is again expected to attend this year, a farewell tour as he prepares to step down later this month. Now as Trump threatens crippling oil sanctions on Venezuela in retaliation for Maduro’s plowing ahead with what is widely seen as a sham presidential election, his insight is once against being sought. Rubio said that while the White House shouldn’t rule out such a dramatic escalation, he has yet to conclude that’s the right course of action. Rubio, 46, plays down his pull on Trump but says the two are “instinctively aligned” on the need to promote democracy in the Western Hemisphere. In Rubio’s case, he credits his Cuban heritage in teaching him to combat Venezuela’s “dictatorship” with strength.

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A17

Tabloid bought, then buried tip about rumored Trump afair National Enquirer says story lacked credibility; questions raised about similar payments BY JAKE PEARSON AND JEFF HORWITZ associated Press

NEW YORK • Eight months before the company that owns the National Enquirer paid $150,000 to a former Playboy Playmate who claimed she’d had an afair with Donald Trump, the tabloid’s parent made a $30,000 payment to a less famous individual: a former doorman at one of the real estate mogul’s New York City buildings. As it did with the ex-Playmate, the Enquirer signed the ex-doorman to a contract that in efect prevented him from going public with a tale that might have hurt Trump’s campaign for president. The payout to the former Playmate, Karen McDougal, stayed a secret until The Wall Street Journal published a story about it just ahead of Election Day. Since then, curiosity about that deal has spawned media coverage and, this week, in part prompted the FBI to raid the hotel room and oices of Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. The story of the ex-doorman, Dino Sajudin, had not been told until now. The Associated Press confirmed the details of the Enquirer’s payment through a review of a confidential contract and interviews with dozens of current and former employees of the Enquirer and its parent company, American Media Inc. Sajudin got $30,000 in exchange for signing over the rights, “in perpetuity,” to a rumor he’d heard about Trump — that the president had fathered a child with an employee at Trump World Tower, a skyscraper he owns near the United Nations. The contract subjected Sajudin to a $1 million penalty if he disclosed the rumor or the terms of the deal. Cohen, the longtime Trump attorney, acknowledged to the AP that he had discussed Sajudin’s story with the magazine when the tabloid was working

ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Donald Trump’s personal attorney, Michael Cohen, shown Wednesday in New York, faces questions about payments he has made.

on it. He said he was acting as a Trump spokesman when he did so and denied knowing anything beforehand about the Enquirer payment to the ex-doorman. The parallel between the exPlaymate’s and the ex-doorman’s dealings with the Enquirer raises questions about the roles that the Enquirer and Cohen may have played in protecting Trump’s image during a hardfought presidential election. Prosecutors are probing whether Cohen broke banking or campaign laws in connection with AMI’s payment to McDougal and a $130,000 payment to porn actress Stormy Daniels that Cohen said he paid out of his own pocket. Federal investigators have sought communications among Cohen, American Media’s chief executive and the Enquirer’s top editor, the New York Times reported. And on Thursday, the government watchdog group Common Cause filed complaints with the Justice Department and the Federal Election Commission, asking authorities to investigate whether Cohen’s payment violated campaign finance laws. Cohen’s attorney has called the raids “inappropriate and unnecessary.” American Media

hasn’t said whether federal authorities have sought information from it but said this week that it would “comply with any and all requests that do not jeopardize or violate its protected sources or materials pursuant to our First Amendment rights.” The White House didn’t respond to questions seeking comment. On Wednesday, an Enquirer sister publication, RadarOnline, published details of the payment and the rumor that Sajudin was peddling. The website wrote that the Enquirer spent four weeks reporting the story but ultimately decided it wasn’t true. The company released Sajudin from his contract only after the 2016 election amid inquiries from The Wall Street Journal. Asked about the payment last summer, Dylan Howard, the Enquirer’s top editor and an AMI executive, said he had made the payment to secure the former Trump doorman’s exclusive cooperation because the tip, if true, would have sold “hundreds of thousands” of magazines. Ultimately, he said, the information “lacked any credibility.” But four longtime Enquirer stafers familiar with the episode challenged Howard’s version of events. They said they were or-

dered by top editors to stop pursuing the story before completing promising reporting threads. The woman at the center of the rumor about Trump denied emphatically to the AP in August that she’d ever had an afair with Trump, saying she had no idea the Enquirer had paid Sajudin and pursued his tip. The AP has not been able to determine if the rumor is true and is not naming the woman. “This is all fake,” she said. “I think they lost their money.” The Enquirer stafers, all with years of experience negotiating source contracts, said the abrupt end to reporting combined with a seven-figure penalty to stop the tipster from talking to anyone led them to conclude that this was a so-called “catch and kill” — a tabloid practice in which a publication pays for a story to never run, either as a favor to the subject of the tip or as leverage over that person. The company said that AMI’s publisher, David Pecker, an unabashed Trump supporter, had not coordinated its coverage with Trump associates nor taken direction from Trump. It acknowledged discussing the former doorman’s tip with Trump’s representatives, which it described as “standard operating procedure.” The Enquirer staffers, like many of the dozens of other current and former AMI employees interviewed by the AP in the past year, spoke on condition of anonymity. All said AMI required them to sign nondisclosure agreements barring them from discussing internal editorial policy and decision-making. The Enquirer made its firstever endorsement by backing Trump for the White House. The company has said it paid McDougal, the former Playboy Playmate, to be a columnist for an AMI-published fitness magazine, not to stay silent. McDougal has said that she regrets signing the non-disclosure agreement and is suing to get out of it.

Comey comes out swinging at Trump in book ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON • Former FBI Director James Comey blasts President Donald Trump as unethical and “untethered to truth” and calls his leadership of the country “ego driven and about personal loyalty” in a forthcoming book. Comey reveals new details about his interactions with Trump and his own decisionmaking in handling the Hillary Clinton email investigation before the 2016 election. He casts Trump as a mafia boss-like figure who sought to blur the line between law enforcement and politics and tried to pressure him regarding his investigation into Russian election interference. The book adheres closely to Comey’s public testimony and written statements about his contacts with the president during the early days of the administration and his growing concern about the president’s integrity. It also includes personal jabs at Trump that appear likely to irritate the president. The 6-foot-8 Comey de-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former FBI director James Comey, shown in 2017, is likely to face scrutiny when his new book is released next week.

scribes Trump as shorter than he expected with “bright white half-moons” under his eyes that he suggests came from tanning goggles. He says he made a conscious efort to check the president’s hand size, saying it was “smaller than mine, but did not seem unusually so.” The book, “A Higher Loyalty,” is to be released next week. The Associated Press purchased a copy this week. Trump fired Comey in May, setting of a scramble at the Justice Department that led to the

appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel overseeing the Russia investigation. Mueller’s investigation has expanded to include whether Trump obstructed justice by firing Comey, an idea the president denies. Trump has assailed Comey as a “showboat” and a “liar.” Comey’s account lands at a sensitive moment for Trump and the White House. Officials there describe Trump as enraged over an FBI raid of his personal lawyer’s home and office, raising the prospect that he could fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller, or try to shut down the investigation. The Republican National Committee is poised to lead the charge against Comey, who is set to do interviews to promote the book, by launching a website and supplying surrogates with talking points that question the former director’s credibility. Trump has said he fired Comey because of his handling of the FBI’s investigation into Clinton’s email practices. Trump used the investigation as a cud-

gel in the campaign and repeatedly said Clinton should be jailed for using a personal email system while serving as secretary of state. Democrats, on the other hand, have accused Comey of politicizing the investigation, and Clinton herself has said it hurt her election prospects. Comey writes that he regrets his approach and some of the wording he used in his July 2016 press conference in which he announced the decision not to prosecute Clinton. But he says he believes he did the right thing. Every person on the investigative team, Comey writes, found that there was no prosecutable case against Clinton and that the FBI didn’t find that she lied under its questioning. Comey’s book will be scrutinized by the president’s legal team looking for inconsistencies between it and his public testimony, under oath, before Congress. They will be looking to impeach Comey’s credibility as a witness in Mueller’s obstruction investigation, which the president has cast as a politically motivated witch hunt.

Model alleges 1982 rape by ‘America’s Dad’ as Cosby trial continues BY MICHAEL R. SISAK associated Press

NORRISTOWN, PA. • A former

model told a jury Thursday that Bill Cosby raped her in 1982 after giving her a pill he claimed would ease her menstrual cramps but instead left her immobilized and unable to stop an assault she called “gross.” Janice Dickinson, the fourth of five accusers to take the witness stand at Cosby’s sex assault retrial, told jurors she was “rendered motionless” by the pill as Cosby got on top of her in his Lake Tahoe, Nev., hotel room. She said he smelled of cigars and espresso. “I didn’t consent to this. Here was ‘America’s Dad,’ on top of me. A married man, father of five kids, on top of me,” Dickinson said. “I was thinking how wrong it was. How very wrong it was.” Dickinson, 27 at the time, testified she felt vaginal pain and, after waking up the next morn-

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

ABOVE: Janice Dickinson walks through the Montgomery County Courthouse during a break in Bill Cosby’s sexual assault retrial on Thursday in Norristown, Pa. LEFT: Bill Cosby is seen as he arrives for trial Thursday. The judge is allowing ive other women who have accused Cosby of sexual assault to testify.

ing, noticed semen between her legs. She said Cosby looked at her “like I was crazy” when she confronted him about what had happened. A former TV personality, Dickinson became one of the first women to go public with her allegations against Cosby when she told her story on “Entertainment Tonight” in 2014. Another accuser said Cosby prodded her to drink two shots in his Las Vegas hotel suite, then had her sit between his knees and started petting her head. Lise-Lotte Lublin told jurors she lost consciousness and doesn’t remember anything else about that night in 1989 — a time when Cosby was at the height of his fame starring on America’s then-top-rated TV show, “The Cosby Show.” Dickinson and Lublin were among five additional accusers whom prosecutors called to the stand to show Cosby had a history of drugging and molest-

ing women long before he was charged with violating Andrea Constand at his suburban Philadelphia home in 2004. The comedian, 80, says his sexual encounter with Constand was consensual. His first trial ended in a hung jury. The defense has dismissed the other women’s testimony as “prosecution by distraction.” Dickinson parried with defense attorneys who seized on discrepancies between her testimony Thursday and what she wrote about their encounter in her 2002 autobiography. Prosecutors hope the five accusers’ testimony will help bolster Constand, the former women’s basketball administrator at Cosby’s alma mater, Temple University. Constand, who will take the stand later in the trial, alleges Cosby gave her pills and molested her. The defense says she set him up to score a big payday. Cosby settled her civil suit for $3.4 million.


NEWS

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

THEATER REVIEW

A passionate, intellectual drama opens at the New Jewish heatre BY JUDITH NEWMARK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The full title of the new production at the New Jewish Theatre — “New Jerusalem: The Interrogation of Baruch de Spinoza at Talmud Torah Congregation: Amsterdam, July 27, 1656” — has all the appeal of a hefty textbook. Even as you dislodge it from the shelf at the campus bookstore, you can feel your heart, and your eyelids, sink. Ignore that response (as David Ives should have). This is passionate, heady drama, rich in vivid characters, set in a time and place remote enough to entrance us but beset by contradictions not unlike those that communities confront today. Spinoza, one of the great Western philosophers, grew up in the insular Sephardic community in Amsterdam. Only a few generations earlier, Jews from Spain and Portugal, fleeing the Inquisition, had found tolerance in the Netherlands. But tolerance had its limits. Jews were forbidden to discuss religion with Christians. And Spinoza did more than talk. Even in his early 20s, he put his unusual ideas into writing. The drama takes place on the day when everything boiled over. A representative of the city fathers, Abraham van Valkenburgh (Jim Butz), comes to the synagogue demanding action. Accusing young Spinoza (Rob Riordan) of atheism and more, he asks the leaders of the community to help banish him from Amsterdam. Rabbi Saul Levi Mortera (John Flack) and Gaspar Rodrigues Ben Israel (Greg Johnston), a leader of the synagogue board,

PHOTO BY ERIC WOOLSEY

Rabbi Mortera (John Flack) tries to persuade Baruch de Spinoza (Rob Riordan) to return to traditional teachings in “New Jerusalem” at the New Jewish Theatre.

‘NEW JERUSALEM’ When • Through April 22 Where • Wool Studio Theatre, JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex, 2 Millstone Campus Drive How much • $36-$44 More info • 314-442-8283; jccstl.com

are appalled. They have known Spinoza all his life, his family much longer. Pressed by Valkenburgh to act, they concede that in an extreme case they could impose “herem,” a sentence something like excommunication. No Jew could speak with him or deal with him. But they don’t want that. Everyone admires Spinoza; they thought one day he would lead the congregation himself. And the rabbi loves him like a grandson. Much of the play is given over to the interrogation, not exactly a trial but similar. Spinoza is to answer questions posed by Valkenburgh, a welleducated man and a pillar of the Dutch Reformed Church. Mortera poses questions, too — questions designed to appeal to Spinoza’s afection for the aged rabbi, as well as to his vast Jewish learning. An atheist? Preposterous! Baruch is a Jew, period. But Spinoza won’t back

down. Knowing the risks, he argues for his position — which is not atheism, but isn’t a traditional idea of God, either — until Valkenburgh triumphs. The Jews will put him under herem, and the city will exile him. Whether Ives does justice to Spinoza’s ideas, scholars can decide. (Probably not; this is, after all, a play.) But it does justice to the idea of community, a community trying to protect each of its members yet simultaneously trying to determine what makes it a community to begin with. Under the direction of Tim Ocel, each member of the cast contributes fine work. Butz is sharp as a hawk’s talons; Johnston, avuncular and selfassured, promises Spinoza that the community will take care of him — until he’s heard too much and, red-faced, changes his mind. And as Spinoza, Riordan not only confounds the image of the

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melancholy thinker, he turns it on its (now-smiling) head. His Spinoza loves to draw, loves the sunlight on the canals, doesn’t even resent the fact that his love for sweet, Christian Clara van den Eden (Karlie Pinder) can never come to anything. But he might love thinking most of all. Riordan’s joyous delivery of his argument — that God is one with nature and with everything, even a chair — nails his portrayal of a fundamentally happy man. There’s more good work from Will Bonfiglio as Spinoza’s friend and from Jennifer Theby-Quinn as his sister. And Flack, as the rabbi, is simply sensational. In a wide-ranging, fiery performance, Flack embodies the contradiction at the core of the drama. He loves Spinoza with all his heart, and he loves the community in his care as well. He cannot reconcile the demands on him — demands that Flack plays out in the final scene, a ritual of haunting resonance. The production looks great. Costume designer Michele Friedman Siler combines mostly modern attire with pieces that evoke the period. Jon Ontiveros’ lighting imbues the action with drama. The set is itself a marvel. Designed by Peter and Margery Spack, it’s a formal square echoing the style of Sephardic synagogues, big enough to give the actors room and spare enough to focus on them entirely. The Spacks do the space generous justice, which is more than Spinoza found. Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com

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FRIDAY • 04.13.2018 • B

INVEST IN NORTH CITY OR COUNTY AND YOU COULD GET A TAX BREAK

ZONED FOR OPPORTUNITY Opportunity Zones are ‘another example of how tax reform is directly benefiting Missourians, and turning the page on years of slow growth and stagnant wages.’ Sen. Roy Blunt and Gov. Eric Greitens

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Carpenters John Schmidz (left) and Richard Hertsel install ceiling panels in the lobby of the newest Cortex building at 4220 Duncan Avenue on Thursday. Two more buildings and a garage are also on tap for the fast-growing innovation district.

Cortex booming; two more buildings on way New Microsoft facility opens this month BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

As the newest Cortex building — a $53 million tech facility anchored by Microsoft — is slated to open in the midtown innovation district this month, the building’s developer is already planning its next projects nearby. Mark Gorski, director of development at Wexford Sci-

ence and Technology, said the Baltimore firm has had master planning exercises with design firm HOK for two new buildings that would likely be similar to the new Microsoft building at 4220 Duncan Avenue and the @4240 facility Wexford developed for $73 million in 2014. “Because of the success we’ve seen with our other See CORTEX • Page B4

Post’s plans follow pattern of separating branded and private labels

Construction work continues on the newest building in the Cortex science and technology district in midtown.

City Foundry oice buildings coming soon on Vandeventer

Investors in certain areas of St. Louis and St. Louis County could soon be eligible for new federal tax benefits under the big tax overhaul passed by Congress last year. Missouri submitted a list of 161 census tracts to the U.S. Department of the Treasury that it wants designated as Opportunity Zones: areas with incomes below the median of the area and higher levels of poverty. People who reinvest their capital gains into projects there can defer taxes on those gains until 2027 and could ultimately avoid capital gains taxes on their new investments if they keep their money there for 10 years. “If you’re a real long-term hold investor and you pick your investment wisely enough that there’s a substantial appreciation, then you get that appreciation tax-free,” said Kristin DeKuiper, a lawyer at Holland and Knight in Boston who focuses on tax credits and community development. The Missouri Department of Economic Development solicited input from economic development agencies around the state about which areas to designate for the new program. The new law allowed states to nominate up to 25 percent of qualifying, low-income census tracts. See ZONES • Page B4

Pharmacies sue Express Scripts over claim it stole customers BY SAMANTHA LISS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Private-label and branded food products must be something like oil and water: Companies try to mix them together, but they keep separating. Post Holdings’ possible spinof of its private-brands business is the latest illustration of this tendency. Post, a maker of branded cereal, egg products and refrigerated side dishes, was itself a spinof in 2012 from private-label specialist Ralcorp. Ralcorp was bought shortly afterward by ConAgra, which See NICKLAUS • Page B5

the west. Lawrence Group’s plans call for it to eventually house three new oice buildings to complement the burgeoning tech district. “We’re working with

Six out-of-state pharmacies are suing Express Scripts over allegations the company stole business from them by forcing their customers to switch to Express Scripts’ mail-order pharmacy in an efort to boost sales and profits. The pharmacies allege that they are required to share certain patient information with Express Scripts or risk not getting paid for the medications they dispense. But it’s the sharing of this patient information that exposes them to losing customers to Express Scripts, they claim in a lawsuit filed March 28 in federal court in the Eastern District

See FOUNDRY • Page B5

See EXPRESS • Page B5

LAWRENCE GROUP

A rendering of the first oice building planned in the City Foundry development, near Cortex.

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The building across Vandeventer Avenue from Ikea will start coming down in a few weeks to make way for construction on the much-an-

ticipated City Foundry project. Developer Steve Smith of the Lawrence Group said he had the site at 242 South Vandeventer under contract from a group that includes the Cortex tech district to

BUSINESS

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Now through June 25, take advantage of competitive interest rates and a 1.25% introductory Annual Percentage Yield (APY) for 12 months. Open a new U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market savings account1 and maintain a balance between $10,000 and $499,999 to receive the introductory bonus rate. Visit any of our 103 St. Louis metro area U.S. Bank branches to open an account today. The Platinum Select Money Market Savings account requires an open Platinum Checking Package.3

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1. Minimum opening deposit of $25 required to open a U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market Savings account. A U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market Savings account requires you to maintain an open U.S. Bank Platinum Checking Package with at least one common account holder on each account. The Platinum Select Money Market Savings account will be converted to a U.S. Bank Standard Savings account if the Platinum Checking Package is closed or transferred to a different non-qualifying product. If another Silver or Gold Checking Package exists, the Platinum Select Money Market Savings account will be converted to a Package Money Market Savings account. All regular account opening procedures apply. Refer to the Consumer Pricing Information brochure for a summary of fees, terms and conditions that apply. This document can be obtained by contacting a U.S. Bank branch or calling 800.872.2657. 2. Until June 25, 2018, open a new U.S. Bank Platinum Select Money Market Savings account and receive an introductory bonus rate of 1.25% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) for 12 months from the date of account opening. The 1.25% APY will be applied to balances in your account when you maintain a balance between $10,000 and $499,999. The following balance tiers and standard APYs are accurate as of 3/26/2018. Under $1,500: 0.05%; $1,500 to $9,999: 0.05%; $10,000 to $49,999: 0.06%; $50,000 to $99,999: 0.10%; $100,000 to $499,999: 0.10%; $500,000 and above: 0.10%. Interest rates are determined at the bank’s discretion and can change at any time. Interest will be compounded daily and credited to your savings account monthly. At the end of the 12 month period, the introductory bonus will expire and the interest rate and APY will decrease to the standard variable interest rate and APY in effect at that time. Fees could reduce earnings on the account. Offer is not valid if you have an existing U.S. Bank consumer savings account, had a U.S. Bank consumer savings account in the last six months, or received other U.S. Bank bonus offers within the past six months. Current U.S. Bank employees are not eligible. Other restrictions may apply. 3. Minimum opening deposit of $25 required to open a U.S. Bank Platinum Checking Package. Deposit products offered by U.S. Bank National Association. Member FDIC. ©2018 U.S. Bank 171856c 12/17 “World’s Most Ethical Companies” and “Ethisphere” names and marks are registered trademarks of Ethisphere LLC.


NETWORKING

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Credit-card processor Clearent acquired, has merged

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

McGrath begins work to convert PolyAd’s warehouse in Earth City

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Tom Brooks named COO of Western Specialty Western Specialty Contractors promoted Tom Brooks to chief operating oicer. Previously, Brooks served as senior vice president of operations. He succeeds Jim Rechtin Sr., who retired after 46 years with Western. Brooks has more than 20 years of construction industry Brooks experience. He joined Western in 2012 as vice president of operations and business development and was promoted to senior VP of operations in 2016. Brooks served in the U.S. Marine Corps and has a degree in building construction management from Purdue University and an associate’s degree in electrical engineering technology from Southern Illinois University. He belongs to the Construction Management Association of America and Construction Users Round Table.

BY BRIAN FELDT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Clayton-based Clearent, a fast-growing credit-card processing company, has been acquired and is being merged with an Atlanta software provider company called FieldEdge. Clearent’s new owner, Advent International, announced in late March it had taken a majority stake in Clearent and subsequently merged it with FieldEdge, with Advent owning a majority of the combined business. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed. According to Advent’s website, the private equity firm typically makes investments of between $100 million and $1 billion in its portfolio companies. Clearent, with more than $200 million in annual revenue, reported processing more than $16 billion in credit card transactions last year. Clearent spokeswoman Amanda Chamov said the company will continue to be based in Clayton and led by CEO Dan Geraty. No jobs are expected to be subtracted from St. Louis, she said, and the company will still be hiring for open positions at all of its oices. Clearent also has operations in Louisville and West Palm Beach, Fla. FieldEdge, according to an Advent release, will retain its existing brand and operate as an independent subsidiary of Clearent. The deal follows Clearent’s acquisition in January of Utah-based SPOT Business Systems LLC, which provides software for the dry-cleaning industry. “Today’s announcement represents an exciting step forward for our customers, partners and employees,” Geraty said in a statement. “Advent is a leader in terms of facilitating growth and enabling execution in payments and software companies. I am confident they are the right partner for us as we look to continue to capitalize on the move toward integrated payments.” Over the last decade, Advent has invested $2.5 billion in six companies in the payments industry. Those companies have served as platform companies — companies that investment firm use as key portfolio assets to bolt on future acquisitions to — for Advent. Clearent, which was founded in 2005, previously raised $25 million from investment firm FTV Capital, which also invested alongside Advent in this most recent deal. Other existing investors and senior management of both companies have also rolled a meaningful minority stake in the combined company. Advent has $42 billion in assets under management. Its current investment fund, the Global Private Equity VIII fund, is worth $13 billion and focuses on investing in the financial services, health care, industrial, retail and consumer, and technology sectors. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

Part of PolyAd Services in Earth City will be converted to production and R&D space.

McGrath & Associates has begun work to convert warehouse space at the Earth City facility of PolyAd Services, a manufacturer of plastic additives. PolyAd was acquired last year by German specialty chemicals group Altana. The $8.4 million project will convert

NEW 2017

85,000 square feet of space to integrate PolyAd into Altana’s BYK North America Plastics team. The construction project is scheduled for completion in July. The new space will accommodate production and R&D space, headquarters and a conference center.

INFINITI

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WEDNESDAY FACILITY MANAGEMENT • The International Facility Management Association hosts a program and tour of Bunge North American headquarters. • 5:30 p.m. — 7:30 p.m., Bunge North American, 1391 Timberlake Manor Parkway, Chesterield • Free to members and one guest, $35 for nonmembers. Register: http://ifmastl. org/meetinginfo.php NETWORKING • Oice Supply Solutions sponsors Network-A-Thon, a free networking event. • 4 p.m. — 7 p.m., The Business Lodge inside Chesterield Mall, 416 Chesterield Parkway West, Chesterield • Free. Register: http://networkathon.com or text NAT at 63975. ECONOMICS • The Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis hosts a panel discussion on wealth recovery after the Great Recession. • 6 p.m. — 8 p.m., Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, One Federal Reserve Bank Plaza, Broadway and Locust Street, St. Louis • Free. Register: http://bit.ly/2HovBH8

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SALES • SCORE presents this workshop on improving your sales process. • 6 p.m. — 9 p.m., Fontbonne University, 6800 Wydown Boulevard, AnheuserBusch Hall, Room 208, St. Louis • $35 preregistered, $45 at the door. Register: https://conta.cc/2H4wKWp

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Walsh

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LISA BROWN JACOB BARKER MIKE FAULK BRIAN FELDT BRYCE GRAY SAMANTHA LISS DAVID NICKLAUS MARK SCHLINKMANN

Business editor Economic development Business of sports and civic agencies Retail and inancial institutions Energy and environment Business of health Business columnist Transportation and real estate

314-340-8127 314-340-8291 314-340-8656 314-340-8528 314-340-8307 314-340-8017 314-340-8213 314-340-8265

To e-mail a staf member, use the irst initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

YWCA Head Start named Luis Ortiz as assistant director. Julie Ahrling joined Enterprise Bank & Trust as vice president, treasury management. Leisure Care hired Debbie Nizborski as general manager of the Landing of O’Fallon, an assisted living and memory care community set to open this summer. Paul C. Rhea joined Anders CPAs + Advisors as director of advisory services. Frank Jacobs, business manager of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1, was named to the board of directors of the Regional Union Construction Center. Boys Hope Girls Hope of St. Louis hired Ryan McClure as president. Stealth Creative named Dan O’Saben executive creative director and Paul Petersky head of research.

SUBMIT AN ITEM

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF

Murphy Co. added the following: Michael Hughes as senior engineer, Trish Munsell as contract administrator, Steven Bruening as plumbing designer, and Sarah Sever as human resources coordinator. Joel Maevers was promoted to senior project manager.

Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

Argos Family Oice LLC added Kenneth W. Kingma. Oculus Inc. hired Heather Nauss as national director of business development. Jake Piel joined Osborn Barr as an associate director. Psychological Associates promoted Clay Hildebrand to president. Anchor Packaging Inc. appointed Richard Daniels as vice president, strategy and information technology.


MARKET WATCH

04.13.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks closed higher Thursday, adding to the market’s big gains from earlier in the week. Technology companies, banks and industrial stocks powered much of the market’s rally. Utilities and real estate stocks were among the laggards. Bond yields rose.

Delta Air Lines

50

J

F M 52-week range

F M 52-week range

55

26,000

2,600

Close: 2,663.99 Change: 21.80 (0.8%)

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

J

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

NASD 2,008 1,834 1815 986 69 23

3,008 3,005 1559 1306 51 31

M

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 24592.12 10408.40 688.26 12623.71 7166.00 2674.72 1896.48 27763.68 1562.46

388.75 1060.75 481

+1.75 +13 -6.25

CLOSE

CHG

2,700

Hogs

138.87 115.75 54.30 14.41 306.00

+3.60 +2.25 +1.00 +.01 -5.20

2,500

A

May 18 May 18 May 18 DATE

Copper

O

N

D

J

F

M

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 18 May 18 Jul 18

83.69 117.90 24.91

-.14 -.25

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

May 18 May 18 May 18 May 18

67.07 2.0546 208.38 2.686

+.25 -.0130 -.89 +.011

Cotton

A

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

F

CHG

Apr 18 Apr 18 Apr 18 Apr 18 Apr 18

ICE

D

CLOSE

CHICAGO MERC

Milk

LOW 24302.82 10221.47 676.54 12552.72 7105.09 2653.83 1884.61 27573.30 1548.03

CLOSE 24483.05 10360.41 678.16 12580.22 7140.25 2663.99 1890.00 27658.82 1557.33

CHG. +293.60 +167.59 -8.52 +65.63 +71.22 +21.80 +7.91 +191.14 +10.52

%CHG. WK +1.21% t +1.64% t -1.24% t +0.52% s +1.01% s +0.83% s +0.42% t +0.70% s +0.68% s

MO QTR t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t

YTD -0.96% -2.37% -6.25% -1.78% +3.43% -0.36% -0.56% -0.49% +1.42%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

TKR

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

AT&T Inc

T

32.55

40.56 35.16

Aegion Corp

AEGN

19.11

28.19 24.71 +.44 +1.8

-.09 -0.3

-2.8 +4.4 19

-9.6

-7.6 13 2.00f General Motors ... Home Depot

TKR GM HD

Amdocs

DOX

60.30

71.72 66.53 +.27 +0.4

+1.6 +9.8 18 1.00f Huttig Building Prod HBP

Ameren Corp

AEE

51.89

64.89 55.33

-6.2 +5.5 19

34.29

44.20 36.75 +.10 +0.3 -11.7 -11.9

-.68 -1.2

American Railcar

ARII

ABInBev

BUD

101.21 126.50 105.20 -1.05 -1.0

Arch Coal

ARCH

60.13 101.84 97.16 +1.41 +1.5

Avadel Pharma

AVDL

6.71

Bank of America

BAC

22.07

33.05 30.65 +.75 +2.5

Belden Inc

BDC

64.51

87.15 67.48

Boeing

BA

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

11.93

7.47

-.24 -3.1

1.83 Lee Ent

11.90

46.76 38.83

-.17 -0.4

-5.3 +19.5 dd

4.82

9.24

5.50 +.11 +2.0 -17.3 -33.6 dd

...

1.75

3.10

2.25 +.10 +4.7

5

...

-6.3 +7.1 20

1.64

-4.3 -15.7

MA

111.53 183.73 174.80 +2.44 +1.4 +15.5 +54.6 41

1.00

MCD

4.04

... McDonald’s

+6.5 +8.3 20

49.12 13.89 -1.01 -6.8 -38.4 -65.8

...

130.91 178.70 161.62 -1.72 -1.1

-6.1 +27.5 28

0.48 Monsanto Co

MON 114.19 126.80 125.31 +.11 +0.1

+7.3 +9.8 22

0.20 Olin

OLN

27.79

38.84 30.21 +.75 +2.5 -15.1

BTU

22.58

41.98 36.63 +.23 +0.6

SKIS

4.00

... Peak Resorts

6.10

4.95

...

...

-2.0

9

-7.0 +32.8 -8.3

2.16

0.28

CAL

22.39

36.00 34.80

-.21 -0.6

+3.9 +36.7 17

0.28 Perficient

PRFT

16.20

24.30 23.57 +.18 +0.8 +23.6 +36.2 45

...

CASS

53.23

65.00 58.52 +.12 +0.2

+0.5 +1.5 30

0.96 Post Holdings

POST

70.66

89.04 78.96

...

70.25 112.42 106.02 +.09 +0.1

+5.1 +46.7 20

... ReinsGrp

RGA

-8.8

... Reliv

RELV

CNC

CHTR 298.67 408.83 306.34 +3.01 +1.0

Citigroup

C

57.55

80.70 72.13 +2.24 +3.2

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

49.43

61.88 63.14 +3.76 +6.3 +13.1 +15.1 22 0.94f Stifel Financial

SF

Edgewell

EPC

46.04

78.04 47.68

TGT

Emerson

EMR

56.77

74.45 68.20 +1.12 +1.7

Energizer Holdings

ENR

40.64

Enterprise Financial EFSC Esco Technologies Express Scripts

-8.7 cc

-3.1 +20.3 14

-.37 -0.8 -19.7 -32.2 12

1.28 Spire Inc ... Target Corp.

SR

-.85 -1.1

121.93 165.12 151.94 +.93 +0.6 3.72

13.77

4.90

-.20 -3.9

-0.3

-9.6 cc

-2.6 +21.5 14 2.00f +2.7 -10.2 dd

-6.5 +7.7 20 2.25f

41.93

68.76 58.69 +.91 +1.6

-1.5 +21.9 18

0.40

48.56

78.70 72.43

-.39 -0.5 +11.0 +40.2 14

2.48

UPS

64.00 58.93 +.16 +0.3 +22.8 +3.6 21

1.16 US Bancorp

USB

49.03

58.50 51.24 +.69 +1.4

-4.4 +1.7 15

1.20

36.65

49.97 47.85 +.70 +1.5

+6.0 +13.3 19

0.44 US Steel

X

18.55

47.64 35.88 +1.14 +3.3

+2.0 +0.6 21

0.20

ESE

50.30

66.80 58.30 +.05 +0.1

-3.2 +0.0 19

0.32 Verizon

VZ

42.80

54.77 47.74 +.16 +0.3

-9.8 +2.5

2.36

ESRX

55.80

85.07 71.61 +1.89 +2.7

-4.1 +4.4

WMT

73.13 109.98 85.43

Foresight Energy

FELP

FutureFuel

FF

3.28 11.32

6.01

9

3.72 +.02 +0.5 -14.9 -34.0 dd

16.39 11.96

... WalMart 0.13 Walgreen Boots

-.04 -0.3 -15.1 -16.2 15 0.24a Wells Fargo

101.45 135.53 106.99 +.90 +0.8 -10.2 +3.5 18 3.64f

7

-.48 -0.6 -13.5 +19.8 19 2.08f

WBA

61.74

87.79 64.04

WFC

49.27

66.31 52.70 +.77 +1.5 -13.1

-.07 -0.1 -11.8 -20.6 14 -1.3 12

1.60 1.56

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

BUSINESS DIGEST Trump weighs rejoining TPP • President Donald Trump told top administration oicials Thursday to look at rejoining the Trans-Paciic Partnership, a major shift on the sprawling trade pact he rejected just days after taking oice. Rejoining the pact would come after Trump had been escalating a trade conlict with China. The Paciic Rim trade deal was intended by the Obama administration as a way to counter China’s inluence, but Trump criticized the pact and pulled the United States out of it in one of his earliest moves. Trump gave the new orders to U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow during a meeting with lawmakers and governors in the White House Cabinet Room on Thursday, according to several GOP senators in attendance. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., said that he and others at the table argued that “if you really want to get China’s attention, one way to do it is start doing business with all the people they’re doing business with in the region: their competitors.” Trump then told Lighthizer and Kudlow to “take a look at getting us back into that agreement, on our terms of course,” Thune said. “He was very, I would say, bullish about that.” Trump’s opposition to multinational trade pacts such as TPP and the North American Free Trade Agreement was a central part of his campaign for president in 2016 and accounted for some of his appeal to working-class voters. He argued the deals were terribly negotiated, ripping of the U.S. and hurting American workers and manufacturing. China denies comments aimed at settling dispute • China’s government on Thursday denied President Xi Jinping’s promise of market-opening measures this week was aimed at settling a tarif dispute with Washington and said negotiations are impossible under “unilateral coercion” by the United States. A commerce ministry spokesman, Gao Feng, complained U.S. President Donald Trump’s government has “shown no sincerity,” according to the oicial

Xinhua News Agency. Gao said the two sides have yet to start negotiations. Gao repeated complaints that Trump acted improperly when he responded to Beijing’s protest over his plan to raise tarifs on $50 billion of Chinese goods by saying he might add another $100 billion of imports to the list. “Under unilateral coercion, it is impossible for the Chinese side to conduct any negotiations,” Gao was paraphrased as saying. Trump’s proposed tarif hike was a response to complaints Beijing steals or pressures foreign companies to hand over technology. China has responded with its own $50 billion list of U.S. goods for retaliation if Washington goes ahead with the increase. Gao denied Xi was making an overture to Washington when he announced plans in a speech Tuesday to cut import duties on autos, ease restrictions on foreign ownership in China’s auto industry and make other market-opening changes. “The measures to increase opening announced by China are a major decision to open to the outside and have nothing to do with Chinese-U.S. trade frictions,” Gao was paraphrased as saying. Cultivation Capital invests in Indianapolis startup • St. Louis-based venture capital irm Cultivation Capital was part of a group of investors that helped Indianapolis-based startup DemandJump raise $6 million. DemandJump has developed a customer acquisition platform that can help clients determine the most powerful websites and sources for their business. Cultivation was joined by investors Rise of the Rest Seed Fund, Flyover Capital, 4G Ventures, Bob Davoli and Hyde Park Venture Partners in the deal. “We believe DemandJump’s platform provides a unique databased view of any irm and its competitor’s digital marketing footprint,” said Cultivation General Partner John True. “This insight signiicantly increases the eicacy of future digital marketing strategy and spend.” From staf and wire reports

Silver

-18.10 -.30 +.20

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.84 percent Thursday. Yields affect interest rates on mortgages and other loans.

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 7-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

1.75 1.93 2.08 2.35 2.67 2.78 2.84 3.05

+0.02 +0.01 +0.02 +0.01 +0.05 +0.05 +0.05 +0.06

.79 .93 1.02 1.20 1.77 2.05 2.24 2.89

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

1.63 1.13 .88

4.75 4.25 4.00

Barclays Glob Agg Bd Barclays USAggregate Barclays US High Yield Moodys AAA Corp Idx Barclays US Corp 10-Yr. TIPS

1.85 3.15 6.13 3.76 3.76 .68

-0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01 +0.04

1.58 2.54 5.78 3.85 3.26 .32

...

82.85 70.25 -1.60 -2.2

60.09

1.94 UPS B

-2.1 +15.5 26

CHG

CLOSE

1338.40 16.44 929.00

Gold

0.12p

-9.0 dd

Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp.

.0496 .7758 .2960 1.4172 .7949 .1598 1.2362 .0153 .2849 .009350 .054850 .0160 .0838 .000937 1.0435

PreciousMetals

0.80

Caleres Inc.

Charter

PREV

.0495 .7756 .2942 1.4225 .7945 .1590 1.2329 .0153 .2845 .009326 .054970 .0161 .0829 .000934 1.0393

NEW YORK

1.52

+4.3 +31.3 10 1.60f MasterCard 5

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

-8.5 +19.1 24 4.12f

70.76 108.98 87.04 +.39 +0.5

-.16 -0.2 -12.6 +0.5 13

9.80 +.05 +0.5

31.92

144.25 207.61 173.36 +.50 +0.3

13.64

-8.9 -20.9

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

LOW

175.47 371.60 337.48+10.12 +3.1 +14.4 +86.7 35 6.84f Peabody Energy 7.25

52-WK LO HI

A $58.50

Interestrates Interestrates

MNK

+3.8 +32.4 20

$49.03

Platinum

-5.7 +0.2 26 3.19e Mallinckrodt plc

5

1.60 Lowes

LEE

F M 52-week range

Vol.: 5.5m (0.8x avg.) PE: 14.5 Mkt. Cap: $84.6 b Yield: 2.3%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

J

ExchangeRates

DATE

Feeder cattle

2,600

N

$70.05

2,800

Live cattle

O

45

A

Vol.: 14.8m (1.9x avg.) PE: 99.7 Mkt. Cap: $96.2 b Yield: 2.7%

CHICAGO BOT

24,000

22,000

F M 52-week range

Futures

S&P 500

25,000

23,000

J

$51.56

Vol.: 38.4m (11.2x avg.) PE: 5.6 Mkt. Cap: $2.5 b Yield: 3.5%

2,900

27,000

50

55

A $40.33

2,680

2,520

10 DAYS

J

$17.19

$60.79

Close: 24,483.05 Change: 293.60 (1.2%)

23,320

A

Vol.: 12.7m (1.6x avg.) PE: 10.7 Mkt. Cap: $37.5 b Yield: 2.3%

Dow Jones industrials

23,980

$60

65 60

15

USB

Close: $51.24 0.69 or 1.4% Banks rose Thursday as interest rates turned higher.

$70

20

55

U.S. Bancorp

BMY

Close: $58.84 -1.34 or -2.2% A Citi Investment Research analyst said Pfizer isn’t interested in buying Bristol-Myers.

$25

60

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

Bristol-Myers Squibb

BBBY

Close: $17.21 -4.29 or -20.0% The home goods retailer forecast weaker-than-expected profits this year and next.

$65

$43.81

24,640

Bed Bath & Beyond

DAL

Close: $52.98 1.51 or 2.9% The airline had a better first quarter than analysts had anticipated.

GlobalMarkets INDEX S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

LAST 2663.99 12415.01 7258.34 30831.28 5309.22 48782.56 21660.28 85443.53 15269.27 8774.76

CHG

CHG

YTD

+21.80 +121.04 +1.20 -66.43 +31.28 +250.42 -26.82 +197.94 +11.37 +66.32

+0.83% +0.98% +0.02% -0.21% +0.59% +0.52% -0.12% +0.23% +0.07% +0.76%

-0.36% -3.89% -5.59% +3.05% -0.06% -1.16% -4.85% +11.83% -5.80% -6.47%

Tech, industrials and banks lead rally BY MARLEY JAY associated Press

Technology companies, banks and industrial companies all rose Thursday as investors got ready for big banks to announce their first-quarter results and let go of some of their concerns about the trade dispute between the U.S. and China. Big tech companies including Apple and Microsoft, the leaders over the last year, rose again. Industrial companies including Boeing and Caterpillar gained ground as well. Bond prices dropped and interest rates rose, which helped banks. Friday morning, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and PNC Financial Services will report their first batch of quarterly results since last year’s corporate tax cut went into effect. Alicia Levine, head of global investment strategy at BNY Mellon Investment Management, said

that’s giving investors something new to focus on after almost six weeks of worrying about a trade war. Levine said she thinks companies are likely to beat Wall Street’s expectations,thanks in part to the lower tax rate. The S&P 500 index gained 21.80 points, or 0.8 percent, to 2,663.99. The Dow Jones industrial average added 293.60 points, or 1.2 percent, to 24,483.05. The Nasdaq composite climbed 71.22 points, or 1 percent, to 7,140.25. The Russell 2000 index of smallercompany stocks advanced 10.52 points, or 0.7 percent, to 1,557.33. The S&P 500, a benchmark that is used by many index funds, has fallen for three of the last four weeks, but is up 2.3 percent so far this week. Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.84 percent from 2.79 percent.

England-based drugmaker Mallinckrodt, which runs its U.S. business from Hazelwood, dropped after a former employee filed a whistleblower lawsuit. Rasvinder Dhaliwal said Mallinckrodt asked her to mislead an insurance company so it would cover Acthar gel, a drug that brings in more than one third of Mallinckrodt’s revenue. She said an executive acknowledged the company misled payers about what Acthar is made of. The lawsuit says she had numerous other concerns about potentially illegal or improper behavior, but the company retaliated against her for bringing them up and ultimately fired her last month. Mallinckrodt said it “vehemently disagrees with the allegations” and will defend itself in court. Its stock fell 6.8 percent to $13.89.

12 senators seek FCC probe of Sinclair news BY DAVID SHEPARDSON reuters

WASHINGTON • Twelve U.S.

senators asked the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday to investigate Sinclair Broadcast Group for “deliberately distorting news” and asked the commission to pause its ongoing review of the company’s proposed $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media Co. Sinclair, which is already the largest U.S. broadcast station owner, announced in May 2017 plans to acquire Tribune’s 42 TV stations in 33 markets, extending its reach to 72 percent of American households. In a letter, the senators, 11 Democrats and independent Bernie Sanders, expressed concern about local news anchors at Sinclair-owned stations around the country being forced to read company-mandated scripts. The scripts criticized “the troubling trend of irre-

sponsible, one-sided news stories plaguing our country” and have drawn fire. “We are concerned that Sinclair is engaged in a systematic news distortion operation that seeks to undermine freedom of the press and the robust localism and diversity of viewpoint that is the foundation of our national broadcasting laws,” the senators wrote. They added that it “may have violated the FCC’s longstanding policy against broadcast licensees’ deliberately distorting news by staging, slanting or falsifying information.” In a letter to senators on Thursday, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai rejected their request, saying the agency had no authority to revoke a license based on the content of a particular newscast. Pai made similar comments last year when President Donald Trump suggested NBC’s licenses could be challenged over its news reporting.

In February, Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., said the FCC’s inspector general was investigating whether Pai was biased in Sinclair’s favor. Pallone asked the inspector general in November to investigate, citing a string of FCC decisions he said benefited Sinclair and a media report that Trump’s election campaign had struck a deal with Sinclair for favorable coverage. Pai has denied he has taken actions aimed at benefiting a single company, and Sinclair has denied improper conduct. Sinclair declined to comment on the senators’ letter. In St. Louis, Sinclair owns KDNL (Channel 30), the local ABC ailiate. Tribune owns KTVI (Channel 2), a Fox affiliate, and KPLR (Channel 11), part of the CW network. Sinclair has offered to divest KPLR if the deal is approved. The Post-Dispatch contributed to this report.


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BUSINESS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

New buildings could add IT, biotech lab space CORTEX • FROM B1

buildings, we’re anticipating future growth and are planning for that — we’re definitely in that (growth) mode,” he said. “We’re spending considerable dollars going down that road in terms of design and are exploring what the best use of that remaining space could be, but it’s too early to speculate on a timeline of when we may break ground.” Gorski said the new buildings would be built next to the 180,000-square-foot 4220 Duncan building on what is now a surface parking lot at the intersection of Duncan Avenue and Sarah Street. Ventas, a Chicagobased real estate investment trust that acquired all of Wexford’s real estate assets and partnered with Wexford to manage that portfolio, owns the property at 4200 Duncan Avenue. Cortex President and CEO Dennis Lower said the district also will start developing a 650car parking garage on the site over the summer. Cortex, the master developer of the entire 200-acre district about 4 miles west of downtown St. Louis, is eligible to receive up to $12.2 million in tax increment financing to help fund those projects. And while cost estimates weren’t provided, prior Cortex documents show total project costs within the Redevelopment Project Area 5, which includes the 4200 Duncan lot, to be an estimated $157 million. Plans for the garage were paused for most of last year after developers decided the initial plan for a larger garage and 220 connected apartments was not financially viable. The apartments portion of that project remains stalled, while the construction of a $28 million, 129room Aloft Hotel at 4245 Duncan Avenue is expected to begin soon. A new $13 million MetroLink station is also under construction nearby and should open later this year or early next. Gorski said the new buildings would be focused on adding

PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Matt Bafaro with Clay Piping Systems installs ductwork on the newest Cortex building located at 4220 Duncan Avenue on Thursday. The building, which is set to open this summer, has anchor tenants including Microsoft and a new Bissinger’s concept restaurant.

Carpenters Mike Short (left) and Joe Zakrzewski take measurements before installing the security desk in the lobby of the newest building in the Cortex district.

Opportunity Zones can help investing in certain districts ZONES • FROM B1

The Treasury still has to make the final designations. In a statement announcing the Missouri Opportunity Zone nominations, Gov. Eric Greitens called it “a new tool to bring businesses back to areas that need it the most.” In a joint statement with Greitens, Sen. Roy Blunt called it “another example of how tax reform is directly benefiting Missourians, and turning the page on years of slow growth and stagnant wages.” A large portion of north St. Louis was nominated for the Opportunity Zone program, including the north Mississippi riverfront and neighborhoods just north of Delmar Boulevard, on the periphery of much stronger areas. Also included was a large portion of downtown, the Grove and the Cortex tech district, along with areas to the east where big projects are planned at City Foundry and the Armory. Some south St. Louis neighbor-

hoods are also included. In St. Louis County, areas of Wellston, Jennings and other north St. Louis County suburbs along the Interstate 70 corridor are included in the Opportunity Zone program. Also included is the census tract containing St. Louis Lambert International Airport and an area around the University of Missouri-St. Louis and the North Hanley MetroLink station where the University Square Community Development Corp. hopes to spur development. Also included was a tract containing the plant science district near Monsanto’s headquarters, 39 North, that the St. Louis Economic Development Partnership is marketing as a hub for agricultural technology. St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger’s administration said it solicited feedback from the 53 municipalities that contained eligible census tracts. “We wanted to make sure we had a unified application and

more IT and biotech lab space to the district. Employment in the biotechnology research sector, along with money invested into such companies, has risen sharply since 2013, according to a study from real estate firm CBRE. Those trends have driven a shortage of available lab space in many metro areas. The need for more lab space in Cortex and other areas like the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center corridor has been an issue for the last several years. Responding to rising demand, Washington University and Cortex are spending $44 million to redevelop the 96,000-squarefoot Crescent building at 4340

OPPORTUNITY ZONES Under the new tax law, states propose designating census tracts with lower median incomes and higher poverty levels as Opportunity Zones, which ofer tax beneits to investors who put money there. To qualify, capital gains must be reinvested in an opportunity zone. Beneits include: • A deferral on capital gains taxes until the money is taken out of the zone or until Dec. 31, 2026. • A reduction of 10 percent in capital gains of the original investment if the money is held there for ive years. For instance, an investor who buys assets for $100 and sells them for $200 would owe taxes on $100 in gains. But if those gains were put into an Opportunity Zone fund for ive years, the investor will only owe taxes on $90 in capital gains. That percentage increases to 15 percent after seven years. Investors still owe taxes on the capital gains due to appreciation of the assets they invested in within the Opportunity Zone. • Opportunity Zone investments held for 10 years can qualify for a permanent exclusion of capital gains tax on gains from asset sales. That only applies to gains accrued after an Opportunity Zone investment. SOURCE: Economic Innovation Group

make sure everyone in our jurisdiction was represented,” said Stenger’s policy adviser Shannon Koenig. No areas of St. Charles or Jefferson County were nominated. It wasn’t clear whether Illinois had yet submitted the census tracts it wants to include in the program. Elissa Schauman, a vice president at U.S. Bank Community Development Corp. in St. Louis, said those in the tax and community development com-

munity are still waiting for the Treasury to flesh out many of the final rules. “There’s still a lot of unknowns about how this program is going to operate,” she said. But she added that the bank expects to discuss the program with customers and that it “could become a good vehicle for impact investments for individuals.” DeKuiper, the tax credit lawyer, said investors already using community development

Duncan into afordable lab space. Wexford, meanwhile, is filling the 4220 Duncan building. Tenants in the building will include Microsoft, the Cambridge Innovation Center, BJC’s WellAware Center, Venture Cafe’s Innovation Hall, Accenture and a new restaurant called the Chocolate Pig. Gorski said Wexford is in negotiations with a large global company about taking space in the building. If that lease is finalized, the building would be 80 percent leased, leaving approximately 36,000 square feet still available. Brian Feldt • 314-340-8528 @bfeldt on Twitter bfeldt@post-dispatch.com

tools such as New Markets Tax Credits, historic tax credits and low-income tax credits are interested in using the new zones along with the other incentives. Many of the new zones’ benefits will require keeping money in projects there for at least five years. At that point, the amount of an investor’s capital gains taxable gain is reduced by 10 percent. Further tax liability reductions on the original capital gain accrue after seven years and on the Opportunity Zone investment after 10 years. For those already using New Markets Credits or low income housing credits, which also require investors to commit their money for years, Opportunity Zones could become “a big benefit,” DeKuiper said. However, time will tell just how effective the program proves to be. One risk DeKuiper noted is that, with around 40 percent of the country’s census tracts technically eligible, some designated areas could already be gentrifying instead of truly distressed areas. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


BUSINESS

04.13.2018 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • B5

Uber will boost background checks for drivers BY TOM KRISHER associated Press

Uber will start doing annual criminal background checks on U.S. drivers and hire a company that constantly monitors criminal arrests as it tries to do a better job of keeping riders safe. The move announced Thursday is one of several actions taken by the ride-hailing company under new CEO Dara Khosrowshahi, who said that the changes weren’t being done just to polish the company’s image, which has been tarnished by driver misbehavior and a long string of other embarrassing failings. “The first thing that we want to do is really change Uber’s substance, and the image may follow,” he said. “The announcements that we’re making are just a step along the way of making Uber fundamentally safer for drivers and riders.” Other safety features include buttons in the Uber app that allow riders to call 911 in an emergency, as well as app refinements that make it easier for riders to share their whereabouts with friends or loved ones. Since it began operating in 2009, Uber has been dogged by reports of driv-

DAVID PAUL MORRIS • Bloomberg

A man enters the Uber Technologies Inc. headquarters building in San Francisco in 2017.

ers accosting passengers, including lawsuits alleging sexual assaults. Last year the company was fined $8.9 million by the state of Colorado for allowing people with serious criminal or motor vehicle offenses to work as drivers. The Public Utilities Commission said it found nearly 60 people were allowed to drive in the state despite having previous felony convictions or major traffic violations including drunken driving. Khosrowshahi, formerly CEO of the Expedia travel booking site, replaced hard-charging co-founder Travis Kalanick in August and faced problems almost from the start. Most re-

cently, he has had to grapple with his company’s autonomous vehicle program after one of its SUVs struck and killed a pedestrian last month in Tempe, Ariz. Khosrowshahi said the company’s exponentially fast growth prevented steps such as the annual background checks from being done sooner. “I can’t change the past, but I can change the things that we do going forward,” he said. Uber provides 15 million trips per day worldwide, and its drivers “reflect the good and the bad and the random events of the world,” Khosrowshahi said. It was bad policy for Uber to do just one background check for drivers

Nostalgia fails to translate into funds in efort to rejuvenate Toys R Us BY ANNE D’INNOCENZIO aP retail Writer

Nostalgia hasn’t translated into dollars in a long-shot effort to crowdfund a future for Toys R Us. Neither did efforts to recruit other toy makers. A campaign led by a billionaire toy executive who pledged $200 million with other investors in hopes of saving part of the bankrupt chain has foundered, with only $59,000 more raised in three weeks. Isaac Larian said Thursday that he was disappointed but still planned to formally

submit a bid this week for more than 300 stores in the U.S. and Canada. Larian, CEO of privately held MGA Enterprises, which makes the popular LOL Surprise dolls, said other toy companies initially were interested in joining the crowdfunding effort but backed down. Larian, who had said he would use his own money for the bid, said he was baffled and said they were public companies thinking about the short term. The liquidation of Toys R Us “is going to have a long-term effect on the toy business,” he said.

“The toy industry is going to sufer.” He said he planned to submit to the bankruptcy court on Friday a formal bid of $675 million to buy 274 Toys R Us stores and use the brand name. The money will come from his own cofers, other investors and bank financing. He, along with other investors, also plans to bid $215 million for the Canadian business of 82 stores. The Toys R Us crowdfunding efort was a long shot to start with, as Larian touted plans to try to save 400 U.S. stores, or more than half of those set to liquidate.

Dividing allows for iscal lexibility NICKLAUS • FROM B1

also failed to make the b ra n d e d - u n b ra n d e d c o m b i n a t i o n wo r k . ConAgra sold Ralcorp to TreeHouse Foods, now the largest manufacturer of private-label groceries. After Brentwood-based Post gained its independence, among its first acquisitions were makers of private-label granola, pasta and peanut butter. Those are the businesses that Post now wants to oload. Post filed confidential documents last month for an initial public ofering of the private-brands business, but analysts are divided on whether the IPO will happen. A research note from Wells Fargo Securities’ John Baumgartner says that an outright sale of the business “is more likely than not,” while a report by William Chappell of SunTrust Robinson Humphrey calls a spinof and IPO “the most likely option.” Some of Post’s moves hint at an intention to set up its private brands as a standalone company, not sell them to another food company. It put Jim Dwyer, former president of the Michael Foods unit, in charge of the smaller division, and Post Chief Ex-

ecutive Robert Vitale told analysts in January that Dwyer “is excited about executing this opportunity.” Vitale also said the unit has “a real opportunity to be a consolidator in private brands.” Post won’t be that consolidator because it is focusing on “fewer, larger transactions,” Vitale explained, rather than the small deals available in private-label foods. Last year’s big purchases were Bob Evans Farms and British cereal brand Weetabix. The strategy hasn’t been a hit with investors so far. Post’s shares have fallen 8 percent since Sept. 18, the day before it announced the Bob Evans purchase; the broader market is up 6 percent. Scott Harrison, portfolio manager at Argent Capital Management in Clayton, says that reflects broader forces affecting all food manufacturers, including slow growth and fierce price competition. Harrison, whose firm owns Post shares, likes the company’s about-face on private brands. “One of the things we love about the management team is that they are flexible,” he said. “The only thing they are wed-

ded to is creating shareholder value.” Post did a good job running the private-label businesses it acquired between 2012 and 2014, Harrison said, but remained a small player in that segment. “It was something they were either going to have to invest more capital to become larger, or look at other options,” he said. Post isn’t saying that one business is better than the other; it’s saying they are two diferent kinds of opportunities. Spinning of the private brands will let Post reduce debt, while either a buyer or Dwyer’s management team will probably borrow money to buy other private-label businesses. If the spinof doesn’t happen, a sale to private-equity investors is a possibility. Post says it wants to complete the separation by about October. One thing that probably won’t happen is a deal that moves Post’s private labels into another namebrand corporate family. “Within foods, branded and private label don’t work well together,” Harrison said. “It’s hard to find examples of where they successfully coexist.” David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

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and never follow up, said Thomas Mauriello, a senior lecturer of forensic science at the University of Maryland and former defense department agent who was involved in background checks. But he sees the changes as positive, potentially catching bad behavior after a driver is hired on. “Any check is better than no check,” he said. “Nobody should think that any check they do is going to be 100 percent foolproof and get all information.” Some governments now require background checks after drivers are hired, but the company’s policy makes it uniform nationwide, Uber said.

Uber will conduct its annual background checks through a company called Checkr starting in the next few weeks. It still does not intend to do FBI fingerprint background checks, saying its check of court records and other databases is robust, fair and “stacks up well against the alternatives.” A company, which Uber would not identify, has been hired to continually check arrest data, and that also will begin in a few weeks, Uber said. Most governments do not require annual background checks on taxi drivers, but they continually monitor arrest records and check them against drivers’ names, said John Boit, spokesman for the Taxicab, Limousine and Paratransit Association. Mauriello said that might be true because the FBI database includes only felonies. Many sex crimes and traffic violations that could disqualify driver candidates are misdemeanors and not in the database, he said. The app changes, which will take several weeks to become active, will roll out first in the U.S., then move to other countries. Riders will see a shield that they can touch, sending the app to another screen with safety tips, instructions on

how to easily share ride information with others, and a button to call 911. When the 911 button is pressed, riders will immediately get their location to relay to dispatchers, helping riders traveling in unfamiliar areas. Uber has been testing its new features with Denver’s 911 system, which automatically sends the rider’s location, as well as driver and car information, to the dispatch center. Uber said location information from smartphones was better than what’s used by 911 centers, which rely on triangulation off multiple cellular telephone towers. Evelyn Bailey, executive director of the National Association of State 911 Administrators, said there was no proof yet that smartphones provide closer location information than wireless carriers, but it’s under study by the Federal Communications Commission. She said Uber’s two-step calling through the app might not be intuitive for people, and she would prefer they call 911 with the keypad. She also said she would like to see test results. “If in fact it does deliver what it promises, then that could be very beneficial to the calling public,” she said. “But if it doesn’t, then I think that’s a problem.”

Express Scripts denies taking patients, says clients choose EXPRESS • FROM B1

of Missouri. St. Louis County-based Express Scripts uses the information, which includes the prescribed medication, to identify potential mail-order clients, the suit alleges. For example, if a patient was prescribed what’s described as a “maintenance medication,” or one that is used daily, Express Scripts would force that patient to use its own pharmacy that delivers drugs to the patients all across the country through the mail. The pharmacies bringing the suit provide prescriptions to consumers in Idaho, Tennessee, Oregon and Indiana. The six pharmacies named as plaintifs include Trone Health Services Inc., Reddish Pharmacy Inc., Jabos Pharmacy Inc., Oak Tree Pharmacy, Apex Pharmacy and Amrut Jal LLC. They allege they devoted considerable effort to retain customers over the years, who were ultimately stolen away by Express Scripts. Express Scripts’ actions are an attempt to “leverage its power over the Plaintifs and other pharmacies in order to significantly expand its own mail-order pharmacy business and monopolize the most profitable prescriptions,” typically generic drugs, the lawsuit claims.

Express Scripts vehemently denies the allegations contained in the lawsuit. “Express Scripts’ clients determine the structure of their prescription benefits, including whether and to what extent they will encourage or require their members to utilize Express Scripts’ mail order pharmacy for certain prescriptions,” spokesman Brian Henry said in a statement. Express Scripts is one of the nation’s largest pharmacy benefit managers. It serves as the middleman between drugmakers and patients by negotiating drug prices for its clients, employers and health plans. To fill prescriptions for Express Scripts members, pharmacies agree to pricing terms through contracts with Express Scripts. Express Scripts believes that patients are more adherent to their medication when they receive daily medications in a 90-day supply. Their clients, employers and health plans, can choose to have employees receive medications in this way. Express Scripts has long claimed that the way to reduce cost in the health care system is to increase adherence to medication. Henry said that the mail order improved safety by reducing errors in dispensing medication. Also, Express Scripts’

Demolition starts soon for City Foundry oices; phase two in the works FOUNDRY • FROM B1

(Cortex) as part of the master plan,” Smith said. “We want to develop office buildings as part of that site. ... What I think we’re collectively seeing is there’s a lot of oice demand around midtown and the general Cortex area.” When the building is down in a month or so, the site will initially serve as a staging area for the $187 million entertainment and oice first phase. Lawrence Group announced earlier this year tenants including the Alamo Drafthouse Theater as well as several local chefs to fill the food hall. That project, which includes turning the old Century Electric industrial

site last operated by Federal Mogul into a food hall, is expected to begin midyear, Smith said. He said his team is finalizing construction contracts and financing. St. Louis-based S.M. Wilson is the general contractor and CIBC Bank is the lead construction lender. The first phase already has “substantial office commitments,” Smith said, and he hoped to have space ready for some of them to move in by the middle of 2019. He declined to name them because of current leases but said he hoped to be able to announce some oice tenants by the end of next month. “We really don’t have much left,” Smith said of office space in the initial

job is to also monitor drug interactions that may put a patient at risk. Because the company manages the entire pharmacy benefit for patients, they can see what drugs patients are filling at numerous pharmacies and can flag potential harmful interactions, Henry said. But the plaintiffs claim that shipping drugs can put patients at risk. Exposing drugs to extreme temperatures and humidity through the shipping process can have detrimental effects to the effectiveness of the drug, the lawsuit claims. Plus, weather and other factors can prevent the maintenance medication from reaching the patient in time for their next dose, the lawsuit alleges. “There’s no evidence to support that at all, Henry said. “We take more care to ship a medication to a home than any retail pharmacy would take.” In 2017, Express Scripts generated $44.3 billion in revenue from its home delivery unit, according to the most recent annual filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. In 2015 the unit generated $41 billion in revenue, or about 42 percent of the company’s overall revenue. The pharmacies are seeking a jury trial. Samantha Liss • 314-340-8017 @samanthann on Twitter sliss@post-dispatch.com

phase, adding that that was “why we feel confident” about the second phase. The tract soon to be cleared could host as many as three built-to-suit office buildings, Smith said, with somewhere around 350,000 square feet of total space. He said there was a “reasonable chance” construction could start on one of those oices before the first phase started opening in mid-2019. “We’ve had interest in each of the phase two buildings, and if we could make a business arrangement, we’d start as soon as we could prelease one of those buildings,” he said. To support the project, St. Louis has approved about $36 million in tax increment financing, which lets developers use part of future tax revenues generated by a project to finance it. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

ADVANCING ST. LOUIS | DR. BETH STROBLE OF WEBSTER UNIVERSITY PRODUCED BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

Webster University’s strength is built on diversity and inclusion By Jennifer Mason Marketing Content Contributor

F

rom its roots as a small Catholic girls’ school with ive students to a comprehensive university with thriving undergraduate, graduate, doctoral and professional programs, Webster University is at the forefront of furthering innovative and impactful educational experiences. Under Dr. Beth Stroble’s leadership, 14,500 diverse students are inspired to take full advantage of an accessible higher education, and the St. Louis home campus remains the hub of this lurry of educational activity. “We welcome a large variety of students,” said Dr. Beth Stroble, president of Webster University. “These are students who want to carve out a unique future. They are individually very interesting people who aren’t cut out of a mold. We have musical performers, actors, inance students and classroom teachers — the academic variety is broad. Our Webster students are able to lourish as individuals while being true to themselves.” Stroble leads the mission for this worldwide institution to encourage and transform students for individual excellence and global citizenship. She expands partnerships locally and globally, strengthening the local university’s reach and impacting 60 cities in the U.S., eight countries and four continents. TELL US ABOUT YOUR CAREER PATH IN EDUCATION. After graduating from college, I began my career teaching high school English, speech and drama. I was very happy as a high school teacher; however, a life event caused me to rethink and take a new direction in my career. My irst husband died of cancer, and at that point, I took some time off from teaching to regroup and igure out next steps. During that time, I earned a second master’s degree. I then remarried, and my new husband and I decided to get our doctorate degrees and move into higher education. The path that led me to becoming president of Webster University goes back to wanting to remove barriers to success, whether you are a classroom teacher, a dean or a professor.

As president, I feel it’s my responsibility to remove those barriers for young people, students, alumni, faculty and staff, and for St. Louis and the communities we serve. It’s a broader way of impacting the community, but it’s still in the role of educator to be a champion for those who may have not had opportunities for success. FEW WOMEN ARE LEADING UNIVERSITIES. CAN YOU SPEAK TO THAT? It had been 40 years since Webster hired a woman as a president. The last woman before me would have been Jacqueline Grennan Wexler who was the nun who helped Webster transition from a Catholic institution to being independently governed. National data shows that 30 percent of college or university presidents are women. I’m deinitely in a minority among my peer group, there’s no question about that. In the St. Louis region, I know women colleagues who are presidents of community colleges, but not necessarily a four-year institution. HOW DOES A WEBSTER EDUCATION ADVANCE THE FUTURE OF ST. LOUIS? We help students realize their potential — and potential can mean many things. It can mean being engaged citizens contributing back to their families and communities. It can also mean having the earning power that makes St. Louis stronger economically. We strive to make higher education accessible to the greater community. It’s why we’ve had a downtown campus for over 40 years. This makes it easy for St. Louisans and corporate partners to educate their workforce. We also have an art gallery that is used for speakers and conferences. We recently hosted speaker Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement. Our students have been active tutors in the community for 25 years, reaching over 10,000 students. The Student Literacy Corps is a community service program through which Webster students are trained and placed as reading tutors in St. Louisarea schools. The program helps new and struggling readers to increase their literacy skills and provides tutors

NETWORKING AND EVENTS Networking opportunities to improve everything from your brand’s image to your business bottom line brought to you each Friday at STLtoday.com/events. One Day University Saturday, April 21, 2018, 9:30 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Doubletree by Hilton Hotel - Chesterield, 16625 Swingley Ridge Road, Chesterield, MO 63017 stltoday.com/events Entrepreneur Think Tank Saturday, April 28, 2018, 8:30 a.m.- 2 p.m. T-Rex Building, 911 Washington Avenue, 5th loor, St. Louis, MO 63101 stlblackmba.org XXII Annual Diversity Job Fair-STL Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. North County Recreation Complex, 2577 Redman Road, St. Louis, MO 63136 (314) 252-0306 or diversityjobsource@gmail.com What’s Right with the Region Awards Celebration Thursday, May 10, 2018, 5-8 p.m. The Sheldon, 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63108 focus-stl.org St. Louis Regional Chamber’s Public Affairs Network Meeting Friday, May 11, 10:15-11:30 a.m. Details forthcoming stlregionalchamberevents.com 2018 Midwest Women Business Owners’ Conference Thursday, May 17, 2018, 7 a.m.-5:30 p.m. The Ritz-Carlton St. Louis, 100 Carondelet Plaza, Clayton, MO 63105 blackdresspartners.com St. Louis Speakers Series Oct. 9, Oct. 30, Nov. 13, Jan. 22, Feb. 26, March 19, April 30 – each at 8 p.m. Powell Hall, 718 N. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63103 stlouisspeakersseries.org

KEY DATES April 13 SURVEY CLOSES June 21 WINNER’S CELEBRATION EVENT June 24 TOP WORKPLACES SECTION PUBLISHED

with meaningful teaching and community service experiences. WHY ARE TOPICS OF DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION IMPORTANT FOR WEBSTER? I think back to how Webster started. We were founded by women in 1915 before women could even vote. Today, we have students that come here from all over the world and have campuses with professors and students in Europe, Asia and Africa. We also serve students on 20 different military bases. For 26 years in a row, Webster has been cited as the number one university in the country for awarding master’s degrees to African-Americans. Our history and record say that we care about diversity. The only way to move forward and be better at understanding and valuing differences is to engage in learning more about each other. If universities and cities work together hand and glove, we’ll make faster progress. To be true partners, we need to struggle through the topics on which St. Louis needs to move forward — topics like diversity and inclusion.

Photo courtesy of Webster University

“If universities and cities work together hand and glove, we’ll make faster progress”

WHAT IS NEXT FOR WEBSTER? This time of year every university begins to look forward to commencement day. We will hold our 99th annual commencement at The Muny in Forest Park and our speaker this year is Michael McMillan, president and CEO of the Urban League of Metropolitan St. Louis. He will be very inspirational because his story is an indicator of how one person’s leadership can make a difference. Indeed, he has. We are also excited to celebrate the 50th anniversary of our Conservatory of Theatre Arts April 19-22. We’ve pro-

- Dr. Beth Stroble President, Webster University

vided 50 years of talent on the stage, behind the scenes, in local theatres, in ilm and on TV. We are so proud to claim Academy Award nominees, Broadway directors and choreographers, Tony Award winners, Emmy Award winners and other incredibly talented artists. The Conservatory is nationally renowned as a catalyst for success. Many alumni are coming into town that weekend, and we are eager to welcome them back here.

Advancing St. Louis highlights local leaders of small businesses and large corporations that are impacting the St. Louis region from a variety of industries. These leaders are Advancing St. Louis by inspiring change and starting conversations. Are you interested in having your story told? Contact Jennifer Mason, who coordinates marketing content, at jmason@stltoday.com.

Building a legacy: McCarthy celebrates 100 years of advancing St. Louis Sponsored content by

MCCARTHY BUILDING COMPANIES

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ince laying its foundation in St. Louis more than a century ago, McCarthy Building Companies has shaped many of the region’s most signiicant buildings, infrastructure projects and communities. The company’s expertise is clearly visible throughout the area — from iconic structures that deine the city skyline such as the Metropolitan Square building to cherished community assets that continually inspire their occupants. “McCarthy has done great things for the City of St. Louis,” said Mayor Lyda Krewson. “I look forward For more than a decade, McCarthy employees and their to seeing what’s in store for families have volunteered their time and expertise to build the start and finish-line areas for the annual GO! St. Louis the future.” Marathon & Family Fitness Weekend. From its home base in St. Louis, McCarthy has built a thriv- to sophisticated academic campuses, ing national practice that now ranks to world-class hospitality spaces. among the largest and most diversi“We’re a local builder with naied commercial construction compa- tional resources and expertise, so we nies in America. At the same time, it can bring unique value to every projhas developed specialized expertise in ect and provide our clients with an complex project types that range from exceptional experience,” said John state-of-the-art hospital expansions, Buescher, president of McCarthy’s to advanced research environments, Central Region. Read more at STLTODAY.COM/ADVANCINGSTL


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 04.13.2018 • C

Bilingual boss Matheny’s Spanish helps players adjust JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In his longtime quest to improve his solid Spanish skills, Cardinals manager Mike Matheny annually makes a deal with one of his players. He vows to correct the player’s English if the player promises to correct his Spanish. Without much fanfare, Matheny makes a diference and helps ease one of the big-

gest obstacles foreign players face when they adjust to life in the major leagues. If you’ve noticed the dramatic improvement Cardinals ace Carlos Martinez has made with his English skills just one season after needing a translator to conduct postgame interviews, you’ve seen Matheny’s handiwork. Considering that almost 30 percent of the players in the majors are foreign born — mostly from Latin America — the ability to speak Spanish is crucial for those who work in the baseball industry.

Mike Matheny and Yadier Molina chat during a spring training game. AP

See ORTIZ • Page C6

A BREAKOUT GAME Martinez has six RBIs and Cards have a seven-run 7th inning

Hightower is a rare ref breed He combined stellar skills with humor

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Basketball referee Ed Hightower worked close to 2,500 games. BE BEN FREDERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

464 feet

438 feet

6

11

As he recalled the funniest moment — well, it’s funny now — that came during his 36-year career as a respected college basketball oicial, Ed Hightower remained thankful Norm Stewart wasn’t there when No. 5 Oklahoma hosted No. 3 Missouri on Feb. 9, 1989. Stewart, known for his fire, had been hospitalized due to a bleeding ulcer before the game. That left no one to counter Billy Tubbs when the Sooners coach, microphone in hand, told Lloyd Noble Center’s rowdy fans to refrain from throwing debris onto the court — “regardless of how terrible the oiciating is.” “He (Stewart) has kidded me over the years,” Hightower said Monday night. “He says, ‘Hightower, there is no way in the world I would have allowed that little (Tubbs) to upstage me. You guys would have had to throw me out in the first five minutes of the game.’ I told him, ‘Norm, I said a prayer that you would not find some way to show up.’” Yet as he celebrated a night that added another line to his list of accomplishments, Hightower wished Stewart was by his side. Both men were honored with U.S. Basketball Writers Association lifetime achievement awards on Monday at the Missouri Athletic Club in downtown

Distance of Paul DeJong’s homer, the Cards’ third longest in the Statcast era.

Distance of Yadier Molina’s homer, his longest in the Statcast era.

RBIs by Jose Martinez, making him the first Card to do so in nearly two years.

Walks taken by the Cards, who entered in bottom third of the NL in walk rate.

See FREDERICKSON • Page C3

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

The Cardinals’ Jose Martinez watches his RBI double of Reds third baseman Clif Pennington, who pitched the ninth inning in the blowout.

CARDINALS 13 REDS 4 > 5:40 p.m. Friday at Reds, FSM > Weaver (1-0, 1.59) vs. Mahle (1-1, 4.22) > Notebook • Mayers is recalled and sees game action. C5 > 11: The Cards have won their last 11 games vs. the Reds when Michael Wacha starts.

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CINCINNATI • If confirmation from another source is required, Jose Martinez suggested the team trainers because they heard his prediction as Paul DeJong stepped into the batter’s box in the sixth inning about to hit one of the longest home runs in years for the Cardinals. To anyone nearby, Martinez said before the swing, “5-4, Cardinals win. Pow! Homer.” When it happened, Martinez told everyone he called it. “It’s Paul DeJong,” he shrugged. “Every time he hits the See CARDINALS • Page C5

Paul DeJong (left) is congratulated by Kolten Wong after a home run.

OFFENSE AWAKENS > Some key numbers from Thursday’s game:

Hutton:Willhestayorwillhego?

AP PHOTO

Blues’ backup goalie is free agent with stellar record BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Carter Hutton has long since proved that he is a solid backup goalie, someone an NHL team can put in the net 20 to 30 times a year and not worry about what will happen. This season, he took a big step toward proving he can be a No. 1 goalie as he was thrown into fairly regular duty by Jake Allen’s midseason slump. In one stretch, he started 13 of 16 games for the Blues and

went 10-2-1. How much people around the league are convinced Hutton can be a No. 1 may determine whether or not he’s back with the Blues next season. “I think for me the last two or three years,” Hutton said, “I’ve been a strong goalie in this league and I think the last two years, playing more games, I’ve proved that, whether it’s on a two-week basis, whether it’s on a nightly basis, I See BLUES • Page C6

SPORTS

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SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 4/13 at Reds 5:40 p.m. FSM

Saturday 4/14 at Reds 12:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 4/15 at Reds 12:10 p.m. FSM

Monday 4/16 at Cubs 6:05 p.m. FSM

M 1 • FRIDAY • 04.13.2018

Stewart, Ward family settle Jury trial of wrongful death case was to start May 7

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 4/14 vs. Los Angeles 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/28 Saturday 4/21 at Oklahoma City at Kansas City 7:30 p.m. 7 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 5/5 vs. Portland 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 11 a.m. NASCAR: Food City 500, practice, FS1 Noon NASCAR Xfinity Series: Fitzgerald Glider Kits 300, practice, FS1 2 p.m. NASCAR Xfinity Series: Fitzgerald Glider Kits 300, final practice, FS1 3:30 p.m. NASCAR: Food City 500, qualifying, FS1 9:55 p.m. Formula One: Chinese Grand Prix, practice, ESPNews 12:55 a.m. (Sat.) Formula One: Chinese Grand Prix, qualifying, ESPN2 BASEBALL 11 a.m. College: Oregon State at Missouri State, ESPNU 1:20 p.m. Braves at Cubs, MLB 5:40 p.m. Cardinals at Reds, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 6 p.m. Rockies at Nationals, MLB 6:30 p.m. College: Kansas State at Texas Tech, FSM Plus 7:30 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Auburn, SEC Network BASKETBALL 9 p.m. High school: Nike Hoop Summit, ESPN2 BOXING 8 p.m. Welterweights: Jamal James vs. Abel Ramos, FS1 FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. College: Kentucky Spring Game, SEC Network 11 p.m. AFL Premiership: Richmond vs. Brisbane, FS2 GOLF 9 a.m. European PGA: Spanish Open, second round, GOLF 11 a.m. Champions: Mitsubishi Electric Classic, first round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: RBC Heritage, second round, GOLF 6 p.m. LPGA: LOTTE Championship, third round, GOLF HOCKEY 6 p.m. NHL playofs: Flyers at Penguins, NBCSN 6:30 p.m. NHL playofs: Wild at Jets, USA 9 p.m. NHL playofs: Kings at Golden Knights, NBCSN MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 8 p.m. Bellator 197: From Family Arena, St. Charles, Paramount RUGBY 1:30 p.m. Premiership: Newcastle Falcons vs. Sale Sharks, NBCSN SOCCER 1:20 p.m. Bundesliga: Wolfsburg vs. Augsburg, FS2 7 p.m. MLS: Orlando at Philadelphia, ESPN SOFTBALL 3:30 p.m. College: Ohio State at Northwestern, BTN 9:30 p.m. College: UCLA at Arizona, ESPNU TENNIS Noon ATP: U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship, Tennis Ch.

DIGEST SLU adds two guards to bolster recruiting class St. Louis University added a pair of guards for the 2018-19 basketball season with the additions of Demarius Jacobs, who is from Chicago, and Ingvi Gudmundsson, who will be the second member of his family from Grindavik, Iceland, to play in the Atlantic 10. Jacobs played last season at Hillcrest Prep in Phoenix, where he averaged 13.3 points and made 43 percent of his 3-pointers. Gudmundsson, whose brother, Jon Axel, plays at Davidson, averaged 10.9 points playing in the Icelandic Domino’s League. SLU has signed five players who will be freshmen in the fall. The group includes Carte’Are Gordon, Fred Thatch and Mickey Pearson. (Stu Durando) Shamet declares for draft • Landry Shamet signed with an agent on Thursday, oicially ending his collegiate eligibility at Wichita State. Shamet, who just completed his redshirt sophomore season averaging 14.9 points and 5.2 assists, will be represented by Happy Walters and George Langberg of Catalyst Sports, which also has up-and-coming NBA clients like De’Aaron Fox and Marcus Smart. Shamet declared for the 2018 NBA draft two weeks ago. (The Wichita Eagle) Morgan won’t hire agent • Indiana forward Juwan Morgan has declared for this year’s NBA draft. The 6-foot-7 junior says he won’t hire an agent and is trying to gather information from NBA scouts to see what opportunities might exist. Morgan posted the most improved stats in the Big Ten last season. His scoring average of 16.5 points last season more than doubled his previous season’s total. (AP) Wilson WNBA’s top pick • A’ja Wilson was the top pick in the WNBA draft by the Las Vegas Aces. The South Carolina star post player will bolster the relocated franchise’s frontcourt. The Aces, who moved to Las Vegas from San Antonio this past winter, had the first pick for the second straight season. St. Louis University guard Jackie Kemph, who was invited to the WNBA combine two weeks ago, went undrafted. Ohio State’s Kelsey Mitchell went second to the Indiana Fever. Chicago selected Diamond DeShields and Gabby Williams with the third and fourth picks. (AP) Mladenovic retires with injury • Top seed Kristina Mladenovic retired with a back injury in the first round of the weather-afected Samsung Open in Switzerland. Mladenovic was trailing 7-6 (5), 3-2 against Tamara Korpatsch, a German qualifier ranked 157 places below the No. 19 Frenchwoman, when she withdrew. (AP) Fury returning to ring • Former world heavyweight champion Tyson Fury is returning to the ring after a doping ban. The 29-year-old Briton has signed with promoter Frank Warren and plans to fight on June 9 at the Manchester Arena against an opponent who is yet to be revealed. Fury has not fought since beating Wladimir Klitschko in November 2015 to win the WBA, IBF and WBO belts, a result that shocked boxing and revitalized the heavyweight division. The British Boxing Board of Control suspended Fury in 2016 for drug and medical issues, amid a separate U.K. Anti-Doping investigation. That UKAD case ended in December when the fighter accepted a backdated two-year doping ban. (AP)

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this Aug. 29, 2014, file photo, Tony Stewart reads a statement about the death of Kevin Ward Jr. ASSOCIATED PRESS

UTICA, N.Y. • Tony Stewart and

the parents of Kevin Ward Jr. have agreed to settle a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family against the former NASCAR champion for his role in the death of their son on a dirt track in New York more than three years ago. Minor stipulations remain to be settled and details of the agreement were not divulged at Thursday’s hearing in federal court before Judge David N. Hurd. The lawsuit sought unspecified damages and a jury trial had been set to begin May 7, but Hurd said the case would be dismissed once procedures regarding Ward’s estate were finalized. Ward’s mother, Pamela Ward, made it clear she was not satisfied. “I wanted to have a trial so he (Stewart) could be held accountable,” Pamela Ward said, adding that the cost of a trial would have been beyond the family’s means. “That was my goal.” Stewart and the Wards declined comment afterward as they walked through a light rain to their cars. The 20-year-old Ward was killed Aug. 9, 2014, during a sprint car race at Canandaigua

Motorsports Park in western New York, 30 miles southeast of Rochester. Ward spun and crashed after contact with Stewart’s car. He climbed out of the open-wheel car while the race was under caution and began walking down the dimly lit track in an apparent attempt to confront Stewart. One car appeared to swerve to avoid Ward, but he was struck by the back right tire of Stewart’s car and died of blunt force trauma. A grand jury heard testimony from more than two dozen witnesses, including accident reconstruction experts and drivers, and looked at photographs and video of the race. Two videos were viewed and enhanced, frames were isolated and viewed at different speeds and finally overlaid with grids and data, and showed Stewart had done nothing wrong. The panel decided against bringing criminal charges against Stewart. Authorities also determined that Ward was under the influence of marijuana the night he died and the levels were enough to impair judgment. Ward’s family said Stewart caused the fatal collision by improperly maneuvering toward the young driver after the race was

placed under caution. Hurd ruled in December that the Ward family could move ahead with their claims against Stewart. Hurd concluded it was inappropriate at that stage of the case to draw factual conclusions from competing evidence in Ward’s death, dismissed Stewart’s counterclaim and said the case was best left to a jury. The 46-year-old Stewart spent three weeks in seclusion at his Indiana home after Ward’s death and described those weeks as the darkest of his life. He was emotionally drained when he returned to Cup competition and retired after the 2016 season to focus on his NASCAR racing team, which he co-owns with Gene Haas. Stewart won Cup championships in 2002, 2005 and 2011 and an IndyCar title in 1997. He won two Brickyard 400s at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in his home state. Stewart has 48 Cup victories and is a lock for NASCAR’s Hall of Fame. Nicknamed “Smoke,” he was one of the most proficient drivers in racing, winning in every kind of series, from sprint cars to a dominant stretch in NASCAR where he reeled of at least one win in 15 straight seasons.

NFL NOTEBOOK

Seattle postpones Kaepernick meeting NEWS SERVICES

The Seahawks had plans to bring in former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick for a workout as they search for a backup to Russell Wilson but postponed the meeting when he said he did not know what his plan is for his off-field social activism going forward, including whether he would continue to kneel for the national anthem. The news was first reported Thursday by ESPN’s Adam Schefter and later confirmed by the Times. A source told the Times that the Seahawks asked Kaepernick what his plans would be for his of-field activities if he were to play football in 2018 and that Kaepernick — who kneeled for the anthem during his most recent season in the NFL with the 49ers in 2016 — said he didn’t know. The Seahawks were said to want a firmer plan from Kaepernick about all of his of-field activities — including but not solely limited to kneeling for the anthem — and how that might impact football. (The Seattle Times) Burfict’s appeal denied • Bengals linebacker Vontaze Burfict will be sidelined to start a season for the fourth year in a row, this time serving a four-game suspension for violating the NFL’s policy on performance-enhancers. The NFL rejected Burfict’s appeal without comment and upheld the full suspension on Thursday. It’s the third time the volatile linebacker has been suspended by the league in the past three years. (AP) Favre had concussion problem • Brett Favre says he might have had “thousands” of concussions during his Hall of Fame career. The three-time NFL MVP who played from 1992-2010 said Thursday on NBC’s “Megyn Kelly Today” that he is experiencing short-term memory issues. Favre, 48, has become an advocate for concussion research and said he had three or four known

Kaepernick

ASSOCIATED PRESS

concussions during his lengthy career. (AP) 49ers’ Foster charged • San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster has been charged with felony domestic violence after being accused of attacking his girlfriend, authorities said. The Santa Clara County District Attorney said Foster was charged Thursday and was scheduled to be arraigned later in the day in San Jose. Prosecutors said the 24-yearold Foster attacked his girlfriend in February at their Los Gatos home, leaving her bruised and with a ruptured ear drum. (AP) Incognito on retired list • The Buffalo Bills have placed Richie Incognito on their reserve/retired list in a move confirming the offensive guard’s intention to quit football after 11 seasons. The Bills announced the move Thursday, two days after Incognito indicated he was “done” in a series of interviews and messages

that were posted on his Twitter account. Incognito cited health concerns involving his liver and kidneys as the reasons to retire. He also expressed second thoughts over accepting a pay cut when restructuring the final year of his contract. (AP) Landry nears deal • Star wide receiver Jarvis Landry is close to finalizing a multiyear contract extension with the Cleveland Browns, who believe the threetime Pro Bowler can hasten their turnaround. The team and Landry’s representatives are closing in on a deal, a person with direct knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press on Thursday. The sides remain in talks but expect to complete the contract soon, according to the person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal has not been finalized. ESPN first reported Landry’s extension. (AP)


SPORTS

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3

MMA ighter comes back home

Hightower gets lifetime award

Chandler returns for main event at Bellator 197 in St. Charles

FREDERICKSON • FROM C1

Chandler continued: “Not everybody’s cut from the same cloth. (Since that loss) I beat (Goiti Yamauchi), the youngest and hungriest prospect in the lightweight division and now I’m fighting one of the scariest dudes in the division. But that’s what fulltime fighters do.” In Girtz, Chandler is up against a fighter known for his punching. “Brandon Girtz is a tough man who can really throw the leather, but I’m on a different level,” Chandler explained. “If I stand in front of him and exchange blows, it’d probably be the worst decision I could make. ... What you’ll see Friday is a veteran, a smart and composed fighter who’s going to pick him apart and finish him either by TKO or knockout or submission.” Chandler would love another shot at Primus, but he’s about to wait for it. “I’ve had the belt and it’s great. But at the end of the day it’s just 12 pounds of leather and gold,” he said. “At this point, my career isn’t about anything other than my legacy as a fighter and about continuing to prove myself and to push myself.” A state wrestling runner-up in high school, Chandler bucked the odds by walking on at Mizzou, where he went 10040, qualified for the NCAA championships four times and earned All-American honors as a senior with a fifth-place finish at Scottrade Center in 2009. Chandler, who celebrates his 32nd birthday on April 24, feels he has several good years of MMA in him. “This sport isn’t as much about age as it is the mileage on the body,” he said. “I’ve had some real wars, but I didn’t throw or take a punch until I was nearly 23. In college, I focused on preparing more than partying and I’ve carried that same approach into my pro career, choosing my calling over my comfort. And now, with a wife and a son, I just have so much more to fight for.” Other fights on the main card Friday include: • Pacific’s Justin Lawrence (11-4) vs. A.J. McKee (10-0) of Long Beach, Calif., in a co-main event bout at featherweight. • Miami’s Kevin “Baby Slice” Ferguson, Jr. (2-1) vs. Los Angeles’ Devon Brock (1-0) at welterweight. • St. Louis’ Joaquin Buckley (8-1) vs. Logan Storley (7-0) of Webster, S.D., at welterweight. The preliminaries are: • St. Charles’ A.J. Siscoe (2-2) vs. Justin Robbins (14-18-1) of Springfield, Ill. • Collinsville’s Jordan Doughty (5-4) vs. Jef Crotty (1-1) of Staunton, Ill. • Brazil’s Juliana Velasquez (6-0) vs. Rebecca Ruth (6-2) of Robertsville, Mo. • San Diego’s Derek Anderson (14-3) vs. Zak Bucia (18-7) of Lawrence, Kan. • St. Charles’ Josh Sampo (11-5) vs. Dominic Mazzotta (13-2) of New Kensington, Pa. • Jefferson City’s Jordan Howard (10-4) vs. Eric Ellington (4-0) of Mount Vernon, Ill. • St. Louis’ Dewayne Diggs (2-1) vs. St. Louis’ Adam Cella (8-8) • Overland’s Joe Roye (1-4) vs. Cort Wahle (2-3) of Godfrey, Ill.

St. Louis. But Stewart, 83, was recently out of a California hospital due to an undisclosed illness and unable to attend due to doctors’ orders. Former Tigers star Steve Stipanovich accepted the award on his coach’s behalf. Hightower’s stories stirred some of his favorite Stormin’ Norman memories. “Coach Stewart and I had a wonderful relationship,” Hightower said with a twinkle in his eye. “Great experiences.” There was the time Hightower became convinced Stewart encouraged The Antlers to refer to him as George Jefferson. And the time an argument between oicial Jim Bain and Stewart that stemmed from Bain’s pilot not receiving a ticket to a game resulted in the first five calls going against Mizzou. But nothing compares to the conversation that has lived on for decades. What would have happened if Stewart was on the sideline the night Tubbs took the mic? “We would have had a tough, tough night if Norm would have been at that game,” Hightower said. Stewart is one of many coaches who would stand to applaud Hightower. Like the coaches he sparred with, Hightower had flare. He also had professionalism, grace and humor under pressure, along with stellar oiciating chops. How many other oicials would start an acceptance speech by telling the crowd, “I have a confession to make,” before pulling a pair of glasses from his pocket? (Get it?) How many would say marrying Barbara, his wife of more than 40 years, was the best call of his life — then add that she often reminds him it was one of her worst? Some self-deprecation goes a long way in a sports world so often dominated by ego. Hightower’s whistle was heard in the Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, ACC and Missouri Valley. He worked 12 Final Fours, five national championships and somewhere close to 2,500 games. The 1992 Naismith college basketball oicial of the year honor is one of many awards he has received, and that list continues to grow since he retired from oiciating after the 2013-14 season. “Mr. Hightower officiated my father’s games, and then some of mine,” Virginia coach Tony Bennett pointed out as he accepted the Henry Iba coach of the year award. And here’s the thing. Officiating wasn’t the most important thing Hightower accomplished. The SIU Edwardsville alum and St. Louis University doctoral graduate was a long-time superintendent of the Edwardsville school district. He was the first African-American superintendent in the district’s history. His Golden Rule applied in the classroom and on the court. It should become an oath for oicials, and remembered by the rest of us. It’s short, but so easily forgotten. Here it is: It’s not about you. “It’s all about understanding your role,” Hightower said. “Understanding that every day, your role, your job, is to make a diference in the lives of young people. I talked to the players. I knew the players. I would say, from time to time, ‘I don’t think your mom and dad would be very happy with you tonight, and I’m not happy with you. Now, you have a choice. You have a choice, OK?’ That’s what this is about. It’s a life lesson. It’s a journey we all travel. It’s about making the people around you better.” Hightower practiced what he preaches on Monday night. Effortlessly, he found a way to congratulate the folks who congratulated him. He raved about Stewart and Bennett. He said that if he had sons, he would want them to grow into young men like Oscar Robertson player of the year award winner Jalen Brunson of Villanova, and Wayman Tisdale freshman of the year award winner Trae Young of Oklahoma. Hightower refused to let a night that honored him revolve around him. “I’m the luckiest person in the world,” he said. College basketball and the St. Louis area are lucky to have him.

Joe Lyons @joelyonspd on twitter jlyons@post-dispatch.com

Ben Frederickson @Ben_Fred on Twitter bfrederickson@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

MMA ighter Michael Chandler was a state wrestling runner-up at Northwest High and walked on at Mizzou, going 100-40. BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Mixed martial arts fighter Michael Chandler lives in Nashville with his wife and son. He trains in Florida and has fought all over North America. But St. Louis will always be home. “No matter where I’ve been or where I go, a piece of Missouri is always with me because this is where I’m from and where I grew up,” said Chandler, a 31-year-old from Northwest High and the University of Missouri. “Throughout my career, I’ve always had such great local support, and that’s what makes it so great when I get a chance to come back and fight here. “I’m excited about being home, and I’m looking forward to putting on a show Friday night.” Making his fourth hometown appearance since June 2015, Chandler (17-4) will take on Brandon Girtz (15-7) in the main event of Bellator 197, a 12-fight MMA card Friday night at Family Arena in St. Charles. Preliminaries begin at 5:30 p.m., with the four-fight main card, to be shown on Paramount Network, starting at 8 p.m. On Tuesday, Chandler took a break from training to throw out one the first pitches

before the Cardinals’ game with the Milwaukee Brewers. “It’s an honor, not only because I’m from here and enjoyed some success, but because of my family history,” said Chandler, who got a chance to play at Busch II as a youngster. “For as long as I can remember, our family has been huge Cardinals fans. My grandpa is a personal friend of Whitey Herzog’s; they were neighbors for decades. Our love and support of the Cardinals definitely runs deep.” Chandler was supposed to take on Brent Primus for the lightweight title Friday, but Primus pulled out with a knee injury. He hasn’t fought since being awarded Chandler’s title last June at Madison Square Garden, when the fight was stopped in the first round for medical reasons. Chandler sufered a nerve injury that wouldn’t allow him to put any weight on his left leg. “He’s a part-time fighter. He doesn’t deserve to be ... doesn’t deserve to step into the cage,” Chandler said of Primus. “He hasn’t fought since June. Tell me how he makes a living, provides for his family. Tell me what he’s doing to further himself on this earth besides just sitting around and holding onto a fake belt. It’s an embarrassment to the sport and to the organization.”

> MMA at Family Arena on Friday • Prelims begin at 5:30 p.m. Main card at 8 p.m. on Paramount Network

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BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W

L

Pittsburgh

9

3 .750

Milwaukee

7

Chicago

6

Cardinals

6

Cincinnati

2 10

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Pct GB WCGB L10

4-2

6 .538 2½

— 4-6

W-1

2-5

5-1

6 .500

3

½

5-5

L-1

1-2

5-4

7 .462 3½

1

5-5

W-1

2-4

4-3

2-8

L-5

1-4

1-6

Str Home

Away

W

L

New York

10

1 .909

7

Away

W-1

EAST

Str Home

7-3

.167

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

Pct GB WCGB L10 —

9-1 W-8

5-1

4-1

6-0

Atlanta

7

5 .583 3½

— 6-4

W-1

4-2

3-3

Philadelphia

6

5 .545

4

— 6-4 W-3

5-1

1-4

Washington

6

7 .462

5

1

3-7

L-2

2-5

4-2

Miami

3

9 .250 7½

2-8

L-3

2-7

1-2

WEST

W

L

Str Home

Away

Arizona

9

3 .750

7-3

W-1

5-1

Colorado

7

7 .500

3

½

5-5 W-2

2-4

San Francisco

5

6 .455 3½

1 4-6

L-1

Los Angeles

4

7 .364 4½

2 4-6

L-1

San Diego

4

9 .308 5½

3 4-6

L-1

Pct GB WCGB L10

Thursday Cardinals 13, Cincinnati 4 Pittsburgh 6, Cubs 1 Colorado 5, Washington 1 San Francisco at San Diego, late Wednesday Atlanta 5, Washington 3, 12 inn. Milwaukee 3, Cardinals 2 Colorado 6, San Diego 4 Arizona 7, San Francisco 3 Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 3, 12 inn. NY Mets 4, Miami 1 Cubs 13, Pittsburgh 5 Oakland 16, LA Dodgers 6

The losses are mounting quickly for the Texas Rangers, both in the standings and their starting lineup. By the time the Rangers inally had their irst of day of the season Thursday, the last team in the majors to get a break, they were the irst team with 10 losses. Then they found out that No. 3 hitter and 10-season starting shortstop Elvis Andrus will miss six to eight weeks after additional tests conirmed the fracture in his right elbow. Second baseman Rougned Odor (left hamstring) and center ielder Delino DeShields (left hand) were already on the disabled list, along with righthander Doug Fister (right hip strain). DeShields has been on the DL since March 31. Odor and Fister joined him Tuesday, a day after both aggravated previous issues in the opener against the Angels. “In the interim, there is a toughness that you have to have as a group, as a team, as an organization, to maneuver through things like this,” manager Jef Banister said. “Not just on the ield, but of the ield and where the mindset is at. ... We still have to go play, and we will.” Andrus got hit by a fastball from hardthrowing reliever Keynan Middleton in the ninth inning of a 7-2 loss to the Los Angeles Angels on Wednesday night. Kelly, Austin suspended • Red Sox reliever Joe Kelly and the Yankees’ Tyler Austin have been suspended for their roles in the brawl between the AL East rivals at Fenway Park. Kelly was suspended for six games and Austin received a ive-game penalty. Each player appealed their punishments, and they are eligible to play while their appeals are considered. Kelly, Austin, Red Sox manager Alex

GB WCGB L10

4 .636

Str Home

Away

7-3 W-3

4-2

3-2 2-4

Cleveland

8

5

.615

7-3 W-5

6-1

Chicago

4

8

.333 3½

2-8

L-1

1-5

3-3

Detroit

4

8

.333 3½

3½ 4-6

L-4

1-4

3-4

Kansas City

3

8

.273

L-3

1-5

2-3

EAST

W

L

Pct

Str Home

Away

Boston

10

2

.833

9-1

W-1

5-1

5-1

Toronto

8

5

.615 2½

7-3

L-1

4-3

4-2

New York

6

7 .462 4½

2 4-6

L-1

3-3

3-4

3 4-6

W-1

2-4

3-4

L-1

1-3

2-6

Str Home

Away

4

4

3-7

GB WCGB L10

5

8

.385 5½

9

.250

WEST

W

L

Pct

4-2

Los Angeles

11

3

.786

8-2 W-5

4-2

7-1

5-3

Houston

9

4

.692

7-3

5-1

4-3

3-4

2-2

Seattle

6

4 .600

3

3-3

1-4

Oakland

5

8

1-6

3-3

Texas

4 10 .286

7

2-8

GB WCGB L10

.385 5½ 7

L-2

½ 6-4 W-2 3 4-6 4½

3-7

2-1

4-3

W-1

3-5

2-3

L-4

2-8

2-2

AMERICAN LEAGUE Red Sox 6, Yankees 3 • Rick Porcello pitched seven scoreless innings, Mookie Betts drove in two runs and Boston beat New York at Fenway Park. Porcello (3-0) stayed in after a 45-minute rain delay and was working on a no-hitter before Aaron Judge’s leadof double in the seventh. The 2016 AL Cy Young Award winner struck out six and walked none in his third straight win to begin the year. One night after the benches cleared twice and the longtime rivals brawled during New York’s 10-7 win, there were no such incidents in the inale of the threegame set. Boston slugger Hanley Ramirez departed with a bruised wrist after he was hit by a pitch in the irst, but everyone stayed in their respective dugouts. Indians 9, Tigers 3 • Francisco Lindor hit a leadof homer and drove in three runs, helping host Cleveland post its 11th consecutive victory against Detroit. The Indians completed a four-game series sweep and improved to 31-10 against their AL Central rival since 2016. Jose Ramirez hit a two-run homer, and Trevor Bauer (1-1) struck out seven while pitching seven innings of two-run ball. Lindor, who entered the night batting .184 with one RBI, hit his fourth career leadof homer of Michael Fulmer (1-2). He added a two-run double in the second and also scored three of Cleveland’s seasonhigh nine runs. Associated Press

Cora and Yankees third base coach Phil Nevin also were ined. Four players on the disabled list also were ined for entering the ield during the skirmish: Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia, and Red Sox inielders Xander Bogaerts, Dustin Pedroia and Marco Hernandez. Zimmermann to return • Detroit Tigers pitcher Jordan Zimmermann is expected to make his next start after being hit on the jaw by a line drive against the Cleveland Indians on Wednesday night. Zimmermann said that the swelling in his jaw had gone down and he didn’t have a headache, and he planned on beginning his usual routine between starts. The righthander’s next scheduled start would be Tuesday against Baltimore. Zimmermann sustained the bruise when he was struck by a line drive hit by Jason Kipnis. MLB minority hiring better • A diversity report released on Major League Baseball inds the sport is showing improvement with its racial and hiring gender practices, particularly at the league’s central oice. The report card from The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at Central Florida inds a “signiicant” increase in racial hiring practices and a “slight” increase in gender hiring. The grade for racial hiring was a B-plus with 88 points, up six points from a year earlier. The grade for gender hiring was a C with 71 points, up one point. The combined score of 79, with a grade of C-plus/B-minus, was up three points. “In overall score, it’s trending well,” said Richard Lapchick, the institute’s director. “But I think when we look at gender, if you had a child that in high school came home with a C, you’d probably talk to them about raising that grade.” Associated Press

Pirates 6, Cubs 1

Indians 9, Tigers 3

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .292 Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Polanco rf 5 2 2 2 0 3 .262 Marte cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Bell 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .304 Dickerson lf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .341 Cervelli c 5 1 2 3 0 0 .250 Moran 3b 3 0 1 0 2 1 .343 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 2 1 .256 Williams p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000 a-Freese ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rodriguez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Totals 37 6 9 6 7 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Happ cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .216 Bryant 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .333 Zobrist 1b-2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Schwarber lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .270 Russell ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Caratini c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Baez 2b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Heyward rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Hendricks p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Navarro 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Totals 33 1 7 1 1 6 Pittsburgh 100 010 400 — 6 9 0 Chicago 000 100 000 — 1 7 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Williams in the 7th. b-grounded out for Cishek in the 8th. E: Bryant (4). LOB: Pittsburgh 11, Chicago 7. 2B: Bell (3), Dickerson (6), Happ (1), Schwarber (3). 3B: Cervelli (1). HR: Polanco (4), off Hendricks; Frazier (1), off Hendricks; Polanco (5), off Wilson; Cervelli (2), off Wilson; Schwarber (3), off Williams. RBIs: Frazier (2), Polanco 2 (15), Cervelli 3 (11), Schwarber (5). SB: Dickerson (2). RLISP: Pittsburgh 6 (Cervelli 2, Mercer, Williams 2, Freese); Chicago 4 (Zobrist, Russell 2, La Stella). LIDP: Baez. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Rodriguez, Bell). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, W, 3-0 6 4 1 1 1 5 94 1.56 Feliz 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 7.20 Kontos 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 6.00 Vazquez 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 6.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, L, 0-1 6 5 2 2 3 7 91 3.71 2/ 3 0 37 5.68 3 3 4 4 Wilson Cishek 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 17 1.35 Edwards 1 1 0 0 1 2 24 1.50 Inherited runners-scored: Cishek 2-0. HBP: Kontos (Bryant). WP: Edwards. Umpires: Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 2:57. A: 29,949.

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martin cf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .295 Candelario 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Cabrera 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .227 3-Goodrum pr-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Castellanos rf 5 0 2 2 0 0 .286 Martinez dh 5 0 1 0 0 1 .235 Hicks c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .111 Jones lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 Iglesias ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .057 Machado 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .233 Totals 38 3 9 3 2 7 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 3 2 3 0 0 .208 Kipnis 2b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .160 1-Gonzalez pr-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ramirez 3b 5 1 1 2 0 0 .152 Brantley lf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .286 2-Guyer pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .136 Encarnacion dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .136 a-Davis ph-dh 1 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Alonso 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .186 Perez c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .200 Naquin rf 4 2 1 0 0 1 .238 Zimmer cf 4 1 3 0 0 1 .250 Totals 40 9 15 8 1 5 Detroit 001 000 110 — 3 9 3 Cleveland 240 300 00x — 9 15 2 a-singled for Encarnacion in the 8th. 1-ran for Kipnis in the 5th. 2-ran for Brantley in the 6th. 3-ran for Cabrera in the 7th. E: Candelario (3), Hicks (1), Machado (2), Lindor (1), Gonzalez (1). LOB: Detroit 11, Cleveland 9. 2B: Martin (3), Hicks (1), Machado (7), Lindor (3), Kipnis (3), Brantley (1). HR: Lindor (1), off Fulmer; Ramirez (3), off Fulmer. RBIs: Castellanos 2 (5), Machado (8), Lindor 3 (4), Kipnis 2 (3), Ramirez 2 (7), Brantley (4). RLISP: Detroit 7 (Candelario 2, Martinez 2, Machado 3); Cleveland 4 (Ramirez, Perez 2, Naquin). GIDP: Lindor. DP: Detroit 1 (Iglesias, Goodrum). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fulmer, L, 1-2 3 8 9 6 0 2 72 3.86 Bell 4 6 0 0 1 3 57 0.00 Jimenez 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 0.00 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bauer, W, 1-1 7 7 2 2 2 7 105 2.25 Goody 1 2 1 1 0 0 27 1.59 Belisle 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Fulmer pitched to 4 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Bell 2-1. HBP: Bauer (Iglesias), Fulmer (Lindor). Umpires: Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:58. A: 12,901.

Red Sox 6, Yankees 3

Thursday Cleveland 9, Detroit 3 Boston 6, NY Yankees 3 Minnesota 4, White Sox 0 LA Angels 7, Kansas City 1 Wednesday Minnesota 9, Houston 8 White Sox 2, Tampa Bay 1 Seattle 4, Kansas City 2 Cleveland 5, Detroit 1 Baltimore 5, Toronto 3 NY Yankees 10, Boston 7 LA Angels 7, Texas 2 Oakland 16, LA Dodgers 6

Friday’s pitching matchups

BOX SCORES

NOTEBOOK Rangers’ early-season woes continue with losses, injuries

7

Pct

3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rockies 5, Nationals 1 • DJ LeMahieu hit two home runs and drove in a career-high four runs to lead Colorado to the win at Washington. Chad Bettis (2-0) allowed one run and three hits over seven innings of work as Colorado took the opener of a four-game series. LeMahieu’s four-hit game matched a career high. He provided most of the ofense, starting with the game’s irst at-bat. The second baseman deposited Washington starter Gio Gonzalez’s third pitch of the game into the Colorado bullpen in left ield.

Minnesota

L

Tampa Bay

Pittsburgh’s Gregory Polanco hits a home run during the seventh inning, one of his two home runs on the day.

Gregory Polanco homered twice at Wrigley Field to help back a third straight solid start by Trevor Williams, and the Pittsburgh Pirates pulled away from the Chicago Cubs 6-1 on Thursday. Francisco Cervelli lined a three-run shot in the seventh of Cubs reliever Justin Wilson as Pittsburgh scored four times in the inning to break open a tight game. Adam Frazier also went deep for Pittsburgh, which improved to 9-3. Kyle Schwarber homered, doubled and singled for three of the Cubs’ seven hits. Chicago’s Ian Happ had his irst two-hit game this season. Williams (3-0) was a touch better than Chicago starter Kyle Hendricks (0-1) in what began as a pitchers’ duel following Chicago’s 13-5 rout of Pittsburgh on Wednesday night.

W

Baltimore

ROUNDUP

Polanco homers twice to back third strong start by Williams

CENTRAL

Twins 4, White Sox 0

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Judge rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .347 Stanton lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .241 Gregorius ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .333 Sanchez c 4 0 1 3 0 2 .133 Hicks dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Walker 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Wade 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .097 Torreyes 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .353 Totals 32 3 4 3 2 10 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 0 0 2 0 1 .370 Benintendi lf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .231 Ramirez 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .357 1-Moreland pr-1b 3 0 2 1 0 1 .211 Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Devers 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Nunez 2b 3 2 2 0 0 0 .250 Lin ss 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Bradley Jr. cf 3 2 1 1 1 2 .216 Leon c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .143 Holt ss-2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .063 Totals 33 6 8 6 3 9 New York 000 000 003 — 3 4 1 Boston 042 000 00x — 6 8 2 1-ran for Ramirez in the 1st. E: Wade (1), Devers 2 (2). LOB: New York 5, Boston 8. 2B: Judge (3), Sanchez (3), Torreyes (3), Nunez (5), Bradley Jr. (3). RBIs: Sanchez 3 (10), Betts 2 (9), Benintendi (5), Bradley Jr. (1), Leon (1), Moreland (2). SB: Stanton (1). SF: Betts. RLISP: New York 3 (Gardner, Hicks, Wade); Boston 3 (Devers 3). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray, L, 1-1 3 7 6 6 2 3 68 6.92 German 3 1 0 0 0 3 39 4.76 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 6.14 Warren 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.86 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello, W, 3-0 7 2 0 0 0 6 99 1.83 Walden 1 2 3 2 2 2 25 6.00 Kimbrel, S, 4-4 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Gray pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. Walden pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: German 1-0, Kimbrel 1-0. HBP: Gray (Ramirez), Porcello (Stanton). WP: Gray 3. Umpires: Home, Chris Guccione; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T: 3:01. A: 36,341.

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .184 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Davidson dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Delmonico lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .281 Sanchez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .289 Anderson ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Narvaez c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .138 Totals 30 0 3 0 0 13 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 2 1 1 0 0 .289 Mauer 1b 3 0 2 3 1 1 .412 Sano 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Rosario lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .211 Morrison dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .088 Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .294 Kepler rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .257 Buxton cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .195 Castro c 3 1 0 0 1 1 .154 Totals 30 4 7 4 6 6 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 Minnesota 002 000 20x — 4 7 1 E: Anderson (2), Narvaez (1), Sano (3). LOB: Chicago 4, Minnesota 8. 2B: Dozier (2), Sano (4), Rosario (2). RBIs: Dozier (6), Mauer 3 (6). SB: Escobar (1), Buxton 2 (4). RLISP: Chicago 1 (Davidson); Minnesota 4 (Kepler, Castro 3). GIDP: Abreu, Kepler. DP: Chicago 2 (Abreu, Anderson), (Anderson, Abreu); Minnesota 1 (Escobar, Dozier, Mauer). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Giolito, L, 0-2 61/3 5 4 3 5 3 103 5.50 2/ 0 0 2 16 2.25 Bummer 3 1 0 Volstad 1 1 0 0 1 1 24 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Berrios, W, 2-1 7 3 0 0 0 11 99 2.18 Pressly 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 0.00 Moya 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.40 Inherited runners-scored: Bummer 2-2. HBP: Berrios (Garcia). WP: Giolito. Umpires: Home, Nic Lentz; First, Bill Welke; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 2:55. A: 15,474.

Rockies 5, Nationals 1

Angels 7, Royals 1

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 5 2 4 4 0 0 .351 Iannetta c 3 1 1 0 2 0 .333 Arenado 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .306 Story ss 5 0 0 0 0 4 .192 Desmond cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .213 C.Gonzalez rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Valaika 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McGee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Parra lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .238 Bettis p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .143 b-McMahon ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059 Totals 37 5 9 4 3 10 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .286 Zimmerman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .103 Adams lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .227 Kendrick 2b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .349 Wieters c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .111 G.Gonzalez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Sierra ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Grace p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gott p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Taylor cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .174 Totals 29 1 4 1 2 7 Colorado 210 002 000 — 5 9 0 Washington 000 010 000 — 1 4 1 a-doubled for G.Gonzalez in the 5th. b-grounded out for Bettis in the 8th. c-struck out for Gott in the 8th. E: Kendrick (3). LOB: Colorado 8, Washington 3. 2B: LeMahieu 2 (5), Arenado (4), Sierra (1). HR: LeMahieu (3), off G.Gonzalez; LeMahieu (4), off Grace; Kendrick (1), off Bettis. RBIs: LeMahieu 4 (8), Kendrick (6). RLISP: Colorado 6 (Iannetta, Story, C.Gonzalez 3, Valaika); Washington 2 (Taylor 2). GIDP: Kendrick 2. DP: Colorado 2 (Story, LeMahieu, Valaika), (LeMahieu, Story, Valaika). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bettis, W, 2-0 7 3 1 1 2 5 94 2.04 Shaw 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 3.52 McGee 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.70 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA G.Gonzalez, L, 1-1 5 5 3 2 3 7 106 2.20 Grace 1 3 2 2 0 1 19 3.86 Gott 2 0 0 0 0 1 19 6.23 Kelley 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 1.80 WP: G.Gonzalez. Umpires: Home, Ben May; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 2:43. A: 24,213.

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .222 Trout cf 4 2 3 1 1 0 .273 Upton lf 5 1 3 0 0 0 .296 Pujols 1b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .274 1-Marte pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .440 Calhoun rf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .250 Simmons ss 4 1 2 0 1 0 .356 Valbuena 3b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .260 Ohtani dh 4 0 1 3 1 1 .346 Maldonado c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Totals 42 7 15 7 3 3 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Soler rf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .207 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .341 Duda 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .219 Merrifield dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Almonte cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Goins 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .333 Escobar ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .158 Butera c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Totals 34 1 9 1 2 8 Los Angeles 100 000 510 — 7 15 0 Kansas City 000 000 010 — 1 9 0 1-ran for Pujols in the 8th. LOB: Los Angeles 11, Kansas City 8. 2B: Pujols (3), Simmons (3), Moustakas (3), Goins (1). 3B: Ohtani (1). HR: Kinsler (1), off Kennedy; Trout (5), off Maurer. RBIs: Kinsler (1), Trout (11), Calhoun 2 (9), Ohtani 3 (11), Duda (8). RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Pujols 2, Calhoun, Maldonado 2); Kansas City 3 (Butera 3). LIDP: Goins. GIDP: Duda. DP: Los Angeles 2 (Kinsler, Simmons, Pujols), (Valbuena, Pujols). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tropeano, W, 1-0 62/3 6 0 0 2 6 88 0.00 Johnson 11/3 2 1 1 0 1 16 3.12 Parker 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 5.40 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy, L, 1-1 6 7 1 1 2 3 100 1.00 2/ Boyer 1 0 25 23.14 3 4 5 5 Maurer 11/3 3 1 1 0 0 29 12.46 2/ Herrera 3 1 0 0 0 0 16 0.00 1/ Smith 1 6.75 3 00 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Johnson 2-0, Maurer 3-3, Smith 1-0. Umpires: Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Chris Segal; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:00. A: 14,714.

NL

Pitcher

StL Cin

Weaver (R) Mahle (R)

Time W-L

ERA

5:40

1-0 1-1

1.59 4.22

Atl Chi

Sanchez (R) Darvish (R)

1:20

0-0 0-0

2.25 5.23

Col Freeland (L) Was Roark (R)

6:05

0-2 1-0

5.56 4.50

Pit Kuhl (R) Mia Peters (L)

6:10

1-0 1-1

5.06 9.35

Mil NY

Davies (R) Matz (L)

6:10

0-1 0-1

5.40 3.00

Ari LA

Greinke (R) Maeda (R)

9:10

0-1 5.06 1-0 0.00

SF SD

Blach (L) Ross (R)

9:10

1-1 1-1

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

4.11 5.25 ERA

Bal Tillman (R) Bos Rodriguez (L) 6:10

0-2 0-0

8.68 7.36

Tor Cle

0-1 1-0

8.38 0.71

Stroman (R) Clevinger (R)

6:10

NY Montgomery (L) Det Fiers (R) 6:10

0-0 4.82 1-0 0.00

Chi Lopez (R) Min TBD

7:10

0-1 —

0.69 —

Tex Hamels (L) Hou Cole (R)

7:10

1-2 1-0

5.06 0.64

LA KC

7:15

0-0 0.00 0-1 4.09

Oak Triggs (R) Sea Leake (R)

9:10

1-0 2-0

2.53 3.00

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Phi TB

Velasquez (R) Faria (R) 6:10

Heaney (L) Hammel (R)

1-1 5.19 0-1 14.29

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NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Posey, San Francisco, .389; Grandal, Los Angeles, .375; Hoskins, Philadelphia, .364; Martinez, Cardinals, .364; LeMahieu, Colorado, .351; Kendrick, Washington, .349; Swanson, Atlanta, .348; Moran, Pittsburgh, .343; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .341; 4 tied at .333. RUNS: Harper, Washington, 13; Albies, Atlanta, 12; Harrison, Pittsburgh, 12; Pham, Cardinals, 12; Freeman, Atlanta, 11; Polanco, Pittsburgh, 11; Baez, Chicago, 10; Cabrera, New York, 10; Eaton, Washington, 10; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10. RBI: Polanco, Pittsburgh, 15; Martinez, Cardinals, 14; Franco, Philadelphia, 12; Harper, Washington, 12; Cervelli, Pittsburgh, 11; Freeman, Atlanta, 11; Baez, Chicago, 10; Cespedes, New York, 10; 6 tied at 9. HITS: LeMahieu, Colorado, 20; Pirela, San Diego, 18; Hosmer, San Diego, 17; Ozuna, Cardinals, 17; Bryant, Chicago, 16; Dietrich, Miami, 16; Martinez, Cardinals, 16; Swanson, Atlanta, 16; 7 tied at 15. DOUBLES: Hosmer, San Diego, 7; Pollock, Arizona, 7; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 6; Freeman, Atlanta, 6; Kendrick, Washington, 6; 8 tied at 5. TRIPLES: Baez, Chicago, 2; KMarte, Arizona, 2; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 2; 22 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Harper, Washington, 6; Polanco, Pittsburgh, 5; Thames, Milwaukee, 5; Albies, Atlanta, 4; Blackmon, Colorado, 4; Baez, Chicago, 4; DeJong, Cardinals, 4; LeMahieu, Colorado, 4; Molina, Cardinals, 4; 8 tied at 3. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 5; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 4; Inciarte, Atlanta, 4; Pollock, Arizona, 4; Taylor, Washington, 4; Cain, Milwaukee, 3; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 3; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 3; 14 tied at 2. PITCHING: Williams, Pittsburgh, 3-0; 19 tied at 2. ERA: Godley, Arizona, 0.64; Cueto, San Francisco, 0.69; Scherzer, Washington, 0.90; Garcia, Miami, 1.13; Taillon, Pittsburgh, 1.26; Williams, Pittsburgh, 1.56; Butler, Chicago, 1.64; Lucchesi, San Diego, 1.72; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.90; Nola, Philadelphia, 1.96. STRIKEOUTS: Corbin, Arizona, 29; Scherzer, Washington, 27; Ray, Arizona, 23; Syndergaard, New York, 22; Strasburg, Washington, 21; Gonzalez, Washington, 20; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 19; Martinez, Cardinals, 19; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 19; Smith, Miami, 19.

AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Mauer, Minnesota, .412; Cano, Seattle, .406; Betts, Boston, .370; Bogaerts, Boston, .368; Ramirez, Boston, .357; Simmons, Los Angeles, .356; Altuve, Houston, .353; Chapman, Oakland, .347; Judge, New York, .347; Moustakas, Kansas City, .341. RUNS: Betts, Boston, 14; Trout, Los Angeles, 14; Gardner, New York, 13; Simmons, Los Angeles, 13; Dozier, Minnesota, 12; Judge, New York, 12; Chapman, Oakland, 11; Gregorius, New York, 11; Upton, Los Angeles, 11; 7 tied at 10. RBI: Gregorius, New York, 12; Ramirez, Boston, 12; Chapman, Oakland, 11; Lowrie, Oakland, 11; Ohtani, Los Angeles, 11; Trout, Los Angeles, 11; 9 tied at 10. HITS: Simmons, Los Angeles, 21; Altuve, Houston, 18; Lowrie, Oakland, 18; Andrus, Texas, 17; Betts, Boston, 17; Chapman, Oakland, 17; Judge, New York, 17; MMachado, Baltimore, 17; Pujols, Los Angeles, 17; Upton, Los Angeles, 16. DOUBLES: Bogaerts, Boston, 7; DMachado, Detroit, 7; Betts, Boston, 6; Gregorius, New York, 6; Beltre, Texas, 5; Escobar, Minnesota, 5; Nunez, Boston, 5; Smoak, Toronto, 5; 10 tied at 4. TRIPLES: Castellanos, Detroit, 2; Cozart, Los Angeles, 2; Fisher, Houston, 2; Sanchez, Chicago, 2; 21 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Davidson, Chicago, 5; Trout, Los Angeles, 5; Chapman, Oakland, 4; Dozier, Minnesota, 4; 21 tied at 3. STOLEN BASES: Anderson, Chicago, 6; Gordon, Seattle, 5; Buxton, Minnesota, 4; Davis, Cleveland, 3; Gentry, Baltimore, 3; Goodrum, Detroit, 3; Lindor, Cleveland, 3; Pillar, Toronto, 3; Ramirez, Boston, 3; 12 tied at 2. PITCHING: Carrasco, Cleveland, 3-0; Porcello, Boston, 3-0; 13 tied at 2. ERA: Chirinos, Tampa Bay, 0.00; Junis, Kansas City, 0.00; Cole, Houston, 0.64; Lopez, Chicago, 0.69; Clevinger, Cleveland, 0.71; Kennedy, Kansas City, 1.00; Sale, Boston, 1.06; Bundy, Baltimore, 1.35; Boyd, Detroit, 1.39; Verlander, Houston, 1.45. STRIKEOUTS: Kluber, Cleveland, 27; Bundy, Baltimore, 25; Berrios, Minnesota, 24; Hamels, Texas, 23; Happ, Toronto, 23; McCullers, Houston, 23; Sale, Boston, 23; Verlander, Houston, 23; Archer, Tampa Bay, 22; Cole, Houston, 22.


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct GB WCGB L10

Pittsburgh

9

3

.750

Milwaukee

7

6

.538 2½

Chicago

6

6 .500

3

½

5-5

Cardinals

6

7 .462 3½

1

Cincinnati

2 10

.167

EAST

W

L

New York

10

1 .909

M 2 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

7

.583 3½

Away

7-3

W-1

4-2

— 4-6

W-1

2-5

5-1

L-1

1-2

5-4

5-5

W-1

2-4

4-3

2-8

L-5

1-4

1-6

Str Home

Away

Pct GB WCGB L10 —

Str Home

9-1 W-8

5-1

4-1

6-0

W-1

4-2

3-3

— 6-4 W-3

5-1

1-4

Atlanta

7

5

— 6-4

Philadelphia

6

5 .545

4

Washington

6

7 .462

5

1

3-7

L-2

2-5

4-2

Miami

3

9 .250 7½

2-8

L-3

2-7

1-2

WEST

W

L

Str Home

Away

Arizona

9

3

.750

7-3

W-1

5-1

Colorado

7

7 .500

3

½

5-5 W-2

2-4

San Francisco 6

6 .500

3

½ 4-6

W-1

3-4

Los Angeles

4

7 .364 4½

2 4-6

L-1

3-3

San Diego

4 10 .286

3½ 4-6

L-2

1-7

Pct GB WCGB L10

6

Thursday Pittsburgh 6, Cubs 1 Cardinals 13, Cincinnati 4 Colorado 5, Washington 1 San Francisco 7, San Diego 0 Wednesday Atlanta 5, Washington 3, 12 inn. Milwaukee 3, Cardinals 2 Colorado 6, San Diego 4 Arizona 7, San Francisco 3 Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 3, 12 inn. NY Mets 4, Miami 1 Cubs 13, Pittsburgh 5 Oakland 16, LA Dodgers 6

Giants 7, Padres 0 • Chris Stratton and reliever Derek Law combined on a onehitter, and Hunter Pence’s broken-bat, two-run bloop single highlighted a threerun irst inning as San Francisco won in San Diego.

The losses are mounting quickly for the Texas Rangers, both in the standings and their starting lineup. By the time the Rangers inally had their irst of day of the season Thursday, the last team in the majors to get a break, they were the irst team with 10 losses. Then they found out that No. 3 hitter and 10-season starting shortstop Elvis Andrus will miss six to eight weeks after additional tests conirmed the fracture in his right elbow. Second baseman Rougned Odor (left hamstring) and center ielder Delino DeShields (left hand) were already on the disabled list, along with righthander Doug Fister (right hip strain). DeShields has been on the DL since March 31. Odor and Fister joined him Tuesday, a day after both aggravated previous issues in the opener against the Angels. “In the interim, there is a toughness that you have to have as a group, as a team, as an organization, to maneuver through things like this,” manager Jef Banister said. “Not just on the ield, but of the ield and where the mindset is at. ... We still have to go play, and we will.” Andrus got hit by a fastball from hardthrowing reliever Keynan Middleton in the ninth inning of a 7-2 loss to the Los Angeles Angels on Wednesday night. Kelly, Austin suspended • Red Sox reliever Joe Kelly and the Yankees’ Tyler Austin have been suspended for their roles in the brawl between the AL East rivals at Fenway Park. Kelly was suspended for six games and Austin received a ive-game penalty. Each player appealed their punishments, and they are eligible to play while their appeals are considered. Kelly, Austin, Red Sox manager Alex

GB WCGB L10

Minnesota

7

4

.636

-

Str Home

Away

7-3 W-3

4-2

3-2 2-4

Cleveland

8

5

.615

-

7-3 W-5

6-1

Chicago

4

8

.333 3½

2-8

L-1

1-5

3-3

Detroit

4

8

.333 3½

4-6

L-4

1-4

3-4

Kansas City

3

8

.273

4

3-7

L-3

1-5

2-3

EAST

W

L

Pct

Str Home

Away

Boston

10

2

.833

9-1

W-1

5-1

5-1

Toronto

8

5

.615 2½

7-3

L-1

4-3

4-2

New York

6

7

.462 4½

2

4-6

L-1

3-3

3-4

3

4-6

W-1

2-4

3-4

2-8

L-1

1-3

2-6

Str Home

Away

4

GB WCGB L10

5

8

.385 5½

9

.250

WEST

W

L

Pct

4-2

Los Angeles

11

3

.786

8-2 W-5

4-2

7-1

5-3

Houston

9

4

.692

7-3

5-1

4-3

3-2

Seattle

6

4 .600

3

½

6-4 W-2

2-1

4-3

1-4

Oakland

5

8

.385 5½

3

4-6

W-1

3-5

2-3

3-3

Texas

4 10

3-7

L-4

2-8

2-2

.286

7

GB WCGB L10

7

L-2

Stratton (1-1) kept the Padres mostly of the bases through seven. He allowed their only hit, a one-out single in the third by pitcher Clayton Richard, who was pinchhitting for starter Bryan Mitchell.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Red Sox 6, Yankees 3 • Rick Porcello pitched seven scoreless innings, Mookie Betts drove in two runs and Boston beat New York at Fenway Park. Porcello (3-0) stayed in after a 45-minute rain delay and was working on a no-hitter before Aaron Judge’s leadof double in the seventh. The 2016 AL Cy Young Award winner struck out six and walked none in his third straight win to begin the year. Boston slugger Hanley Ramirez departed with a bruised wrist after he was hit by a pitch in the irst, but everyone stayed in their respective dugouts. Indians 9, Tigers 3 • Francisco Lindor hit a leadof homer and drove in three runs, helping host Cleveland complet a fourgame sweep and post its 11th consecutive victory against Detroit Angels 7, Royals 1 • Shohei Ohtani hit a bases-loaded triple in a ive-run seventh inning to help Los Angeles win at Kansas City for its ifth straight victory. Twins 4, White Sox 0 • Joe Mauer reached 2,000 career hits and Jose Berrios struck out 11 in seven innings as host Minnesota beat Chicago. Mauer had two hits and three RBIs. Minnesota has won three in a row. Associated Press

Cora and Yankees third base coach Phil Nevin also were ined. Four players on the disabled list also were ined for entering the ield during the skirmish: Yankees pitcher CC Sabathia, and Red Sox inielders Xander Bogaerts, Dustin Pedroia and Marco Hernandez. Zimmermann to return • Detroit Tigers pitcher Jordan Zimmermann is expected to make his next start after being hit on the jaw by a line drive against the Cleveland Indians on Wednesday night. Zimmermann said that the swelling in his jaw had gone down and he didn’t have a headache, and he planned on beginning his usual routine between starts. The righthander’s next scheduled start would be Tuesday against Baltimore. Zimmermann sustained the bruise when he was struck by a line drive hit by Jason Kipnis. MLB minority hiring better • A diversity report released on Major League Baseball inds the sport is showing improvement with its racial and hiring gender practices, particularly at the league’s central oice. The report card from The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at Central Florida inds a “signiicant” increase in racial hiring practices and a “slight” increase in gender hiring. The grade for racial hiring was a B-plus with 88 points, up six points from a year earlier. The grade for gender hiring was a C with 71 points, up one point. The combined score of 79, with a grade of C-plus/B-minus, was up three points. “In overall score, it’s trending well,” said Richard Lapchick, the institute’s director. “But I think when we look at gender, if you had a child that in high school came home with a C, you’d probably talk to them about raising that grade.” Associated Press

Pirates 6, Cubs 1

Indians 9, Tigers 3

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Frazier 2b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .292 Kontos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Vazquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Polanco rf 5 2 2 2 0 3 .262 Marte cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .234 Bell 1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .304 Dickerson lf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .341 Cervelli c 5 1 2 3 0 0 .250 Moran 3b 3 0 1 0 2 1 .343 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 2 1 .256 Williams p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .000 a-Freese ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Feliz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rodriguez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Totals 37 6 9 6 7 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Happ cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .216 Bryant 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .333 Zobrist 1b-2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .282 Schwarber lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .270 Russell ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Caratini c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Baez 2b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Heyward rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .225 Hendricks p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Navarro 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Totals 33 1 7 1 1 6 Pittsburgh 100 010 400 — 6 9 0 Chicago 000 100 000 — 1 7 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Williams in the 7th. b-grounded out for Cishek in the 8th. E: Bryant (4). LOB: Pittsburgh 11, Chicago 7. 2B: Bell (3), Dickerson (6), Happ (1), Schwarber (3). 3B: Cervelli (1). HR: Polanco (4), off Hendricks; Frazier (1), off Hendricks; Polanco (5), off Wilson; Cervelli (2), off Wilson; Schwarber (3), off Williams. RBIs: Frazier (2), Polanco 2 (15), Cervelli 3 (11), Schwarber (5). SB: Dickerson (2). RLISP: Pittsburgh 6 (Cervelli 2, Mercer, Williams 2, Freese); Chicago 4 (Zobrist, Russell 2, La Stella). LIDP: Baez. DP: Pittsburgh 1 (Rodriguez, Bell). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams, W, 3-0 6 4 1 1 1 5 94 1.56 Feliz 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 7.20 Kontos 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 6.00 Vazquez 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 6.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hendricks, L, 0-1 6 5 2 2 3 7 91 3.71 2/ 3 0 37 5.68 3 3 4 4 Wilson Cishek 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 17 1.35 Edwards 1 1 0 0 1 2 24 1.50 Inherited runners-scored: Cishek 2-0. HBP: Kontos (Bryant). WP: Edwards. Umpires: Home, Ramon De Jesus; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tom Hallion; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 2:57. A: 29,949.

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Martin cf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .295 Candelario 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Cabrera 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .227 3-Goodrum pr-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Castellanos rf 5 0 2 2 0 0 .286 Martinez dh 5 0 1 0 0 1 .235 Hicks c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .111 Jones lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .231 Iglesias ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .057 Machado 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .233 Totals 38 3 9 3 2 7 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Lindor ss 4 3 2 3 0 0 .208 Kipnis 2b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .160 1-Gonzalez pr-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ramirez 3b 5 1 1 2 0 0 .152 Brantley lf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .286 2-Guyer pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .136 Encarnacion dh 3 0 0 0 1 1 .136 a-Davis ph-dh 1 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Alonso 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .186 Perez c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .200 Naquin rf 4 2 1 0 0 1 .238 Zimmer cf 4 1 3 0 0 1 .250 Totals 40 9 15 8 1 5 Detroit 001 000 110 — 3 9 3 Cleveland 240 300 00x — 9 15 2 a-singled for Encarnacion in the 8th. 1-ran for Kipnis in the 5th. 2-ran for Brantley in the 6th. 3-ran for Cabrera in the 7th. E: Candelario (3), Hicks (1), Machado (2), Lindor (1), Gonzalez (1). LOB: Detroit 11, Cleveland 9. 2B: Martin (3), Hicks (1), Machado (7), Lindor (3), Kipnis (3), Brantley (1). HR: Lindor (1), off Fulmer; Ramirez (3), off Fulmer. RBIs: Castellanos 2 (5), Machado (8), Lindor 3 (4), Kipnis 2 (3), Ramirez 2 (7), Brantley (4). RLISP: Detroit 7 (Candelario 2, Martinez 2, Machado 3); Cleveland 4 (Ramirez, Perez 2, Naquin). GIDP: Lindor. DP: Detroit 1 (Iglesias, Goodrum). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fulmer, L, 1-2 3 8 9 6 0 2 72 3.86 Bell 4 6 0 0 1 3 57 0.00 Jimenez 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 0.00 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bauer, W, 1-1 7 7 2 2 2 7 105 2.25 Goody 1 2 1 1 0 0 27 1.59 Belisle 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Fulmer pitched to 4 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Bell 2-1. HBP: Bauer (Iglesias), Fulmer (Lindor). Umpires: Home, Manny Gonzalez; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:58. A: 12,901.

Red Sox 6, Yankees 3

Thursday Cleveland 9, Detroit 3 Boston 6, NY Yankees 3 Minnesota 4, White Sox 0 LA Angels 7, Kansas City 1 Wednesday Minnesota 9, Houston 8 White Sox 2, Tampa Bay 1 Seattle 4, Kansas City 2 Cleveland 5, Detroit 1 Baltimore 5, Toronto 3 NY Yankees 10, Boston 7 LA Angels 7, Texas 2 Oakland 16, LA Dodgers 6

Friday’s pitching matchups

BOX SCORES

NOTEBOOK Rangers’ early-season woes continue with losses, injuries

Pct

3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rockies 5, Nationals 1 • DJ LeMahieu hit two home runs and drove in a career-high four runs to lead Colorado to the win at Washington. Chad Bettis (2-0) allowed one run and three hits over seven innings of work as Colorado took the opener of a fourgame series. LeMahieu’s four-hit game matched a career high.

L

Baltimore

Pittsburgh’s Gregory Polanco hits a home run during the seventh inning, one of his two home runs on the day.

Gregory Polanco homered twice at Wrigley Field to help back a third straight solid start by Trevor Williams, and the Pittsburgh Pirates pulled away from the Chicago Cubs 6-1 on Thursday. Francisco Cervelli lined a three-run shot in the seventh of Cubs reliever Justin Wilson as Pittsburgh scored four times in the inning to break open a tight game. Adam Frazier also went deep for Pittsburgh, which improved to 9-3. Kyle Schwarber homered, doubled and singled for three of the Cubs’ seven hits. Chicago’s Ian Happ had his irst two-hit game this season. Williams (3-0) was a touch better than Chicago starter Kyle Hendricks (0-1) in what began as a pitchers’ duel following Chicago’s 13-5 rout of Pittsburgh on Wednesday night.

W

Tampa Bay

ROUNDUP

Polanco homers twice to back third strong start by Williams

CENTRAL

Twins 4, White Sox 0

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Judge rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .347 Stanton lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .241 Gregorius ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .333 Sanchez c 4 0 1 3 0 2 .133 Hicks dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Walker 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Wade 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .097 Torreyes 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .353 Totals 32 3 4 3 2 10 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts rf 4 0 0 2 0 1 .370 Benintendi lf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .231 Ramirez 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .357 1-Moreland pr-1b 3 0 2 1 0 1 .211 Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Devers 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .233 Nunez 2b 3 2 2 0 0 0 .250 Lin ss 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Bradley Jr. cf 3 2 1 1 1 2 .216 Leon c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .143 Holt ss-2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .063 Totals 33 6 8 6 3 9 New York 000 000 003 — 3 4 1 Boston 042 000 00x — 6 8 2 1-ran for Ramirez in the 1st. E: Wade (1), Devers 2 (2). LOB: New York 5, Boston 8. 2B: Judge (3), Sanchez (3), Torreyes (3), Nunez (5), Bradley Jr. (3). RBIs: Sanchez 3 (10), Betts 2 (9), Benintendi (5), Bradley Jr. (1), Leon (1), Moreland (2). SB: Stanton (1). SF: Betts. RLISP: New York 3 (Gardner, Hicks, Wade); Boston 3 (Devers 3). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray, L, 1-1 3 7 6 6 2 3 68 6.92 German 3 1 0 0 0 3 39 4.76 Kahnle 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 6.14 Warren 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.86 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello, W, 3-0 7 2 0 0 0 6 99 1.83 Walden 1 2 3 2 2 2 25 6.00 Kimbrel, S, 4-4 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Gray pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. Walden pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: German 1-0, Kimbrel 1-0. HBP: Gray (Ramirez), Porcello (Stanton). WP: Gray 3. Umpires: Home, Chris Guccione; First, Dave Rackley; Second, Larry Vanover; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T: 3:01. A: 36,341.

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Moncada 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .184 Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Davidson dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .211 Delmonico lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .281 Sanchez 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .289 Anderson ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Narvaez c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Engel cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .138 Totals 30 0 3 0 0 13 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 2 1 1 0 0 .289 Mauer 1b 3 0 2 3 1 1 .412 Sano 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Rosario lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .211 Morrison dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .088 Escobar ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .294 Kepler rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .257 Buxton cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .195 Castro c 3 1 0 0 1 1 .154 Totals 30 4 7 4 6 6 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 Minnesota 002 000 20x — 4 7 1 E: Anderson (2), Narvaez (1), Sano (3). LOB: Chicago 4, Minnesota 8. 2B: Dozier (2), Sano (4), Rosario (2). RBIs: Dozier (6), Mauer 3 (6). SB: Escobar (1), Buxton 2 (4). RLISP: Chicago 1 (Davidson); Minnesota 4 (Kepler, Castro 3). GIDP: Abreu, Kepler. DP: Chicago 2 (Abreu, Anderson), (Anderson, Abreu); Minnesota 1 (Escobar, Dozier, Mauer). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Giolito, L, 0-2 61/3 5 4 3 5 3 103 5.50 2/ 0 0 2 16 2.25 Bummer 3 1 0 Volstad 1 1 0 0 1 1 24 0.00 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Berrios, W, 2-1 7 3 0 0 0 11 99 2.18 Pressly 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 0.00 Moya 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.40 Inherited runners-scored: Bummer 2-2. HBP: Berrios (Garcia). WP: Giolito. Umpires: Home, Nic Lentz; First, Bill Welke; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 2:55. A: 15,474.

Rockies 5, Nationals 1

Angels 7, Royals 1

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. LeMahieu 2b 5 2 4 4 0 0 .351 Iannetta c 3 1 1 0 2 0 .333 Arenado 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .306 Story ss 5 0 0 0 0 4 .192 Desmond cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .213 C.Gonzalez rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Valaika 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McGee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Parra lf 4 2 2 0 0 0 .238 Bettis p 3 0 0 0 0 3 .143 b-McMahon ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .059 Totals 37 5 9 4 3 10 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Turner ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Rendon 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Harper rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .286 Zimmerman 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .103 Adams lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .227 Kendrick 2b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .349 Wieters c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .111 G.Gonzalez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Sierra ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Grace p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gott p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Difo ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Taylor cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .174 Totals 29 1 4 1 2 7 Colorado 210 002 000 — 5 9 0 Washington 000 010 000 — 1 4 1 a-doubled for G.Gonzalez in the 5th. b-grounded out for Bettis in the 8th. c-struck out for Gott in the 8th. E: Kendrick (3). LOB: Colorado 8, Washington 3. 2B: LeMahieu 2 (5), Arenado (4), Sierra (1). HR: LeMahieu (3), off G.Gonzalez; LeMahieu (4), off Grace; Kendrick (1), off Bettis. RBIs: LeMahieu 4 (8), Kendrick (6). RLISP: Colorado 6 (Iannetta, Story, C.Gonzalez 3, Valaika); Washington 2 (Taylor 2). GIDP: Kendrick 2. DP: Colorado 2 (Story, LeMahieu, Valaika), (LeMahieu, Story, Valaika). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bettis, W, 2-0 7 3 1 1 2 5 94 2.04 Shaw 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 3.52 McGee 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 2.70 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA G.Gonzalez, L, 1-1 5 5 3 2 3 7 106 2.20 Grace 1 3 2 2 0 1 19 3.86 Gott 2 0 0 0 0 1 19 6.23 Kelley 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 1.80 WP: G.Gonzalez. Umpires: Home, Ben May; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Jerry Meals. T: 2:43. A: 24,213.

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .222 Trout cf 4 2 3 1 1 0 .273 Upton lf 5 1 3 0 0 0 .296 Pujols 1b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .274 1-Marte pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .440 Calhoun rf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .250 Simmons ss 4 1 2 0 1 0 .356 Valbuena 3b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .260 Ohtani dh 4 0 1 3 1 1 .346 Maldonado c 5 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Totals 42 7 15 7 3 3 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 Soler rf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .207 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .341 Duda 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .219 Merrifield dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .256 Almonte cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Goins 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .333 Escobar ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .158 Butera c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Totals 34 1 9 1 2 8 Los Angeles 100 000 510 — 7 15 0 Kansas City 000 000 010 — 1 9 0 1-ran for Pujols in the 8th. LOB: Los Angeles 11, Kansas City 8. 2B: Pujols (3), Simmons (3), Moustakas (3), Goins (1). 3B: Ohtani (1). HR: Kinsler (1), off Kennedy; Trout (5), off Maurer. RBIs: Kinsler (1), Trout (11), Calhoun 2 (9), Ohtani 3 (11), Duda (8). RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Pujols 2, Calhoun, Maldonado 2); Kansas City 3 (Butera 3). LIDP: Goins. GIDP: Duda. DP: Los Angeles 2 (Kinsler, Simmons, Pujols), (Valbuena, Pujols). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tropeano, W, 1-0 62/3 6 0 0 2 6 88 0.00 Johnson 11/3 2 1 1 0 1 16 3.12 Parker 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 5.40 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kennedy, L, 1-1 6 7 1 1 2 3 100 1.00 2/ Boyer 1 0 25 23.14 3 4 5 5 Maurer 11/3 3 1 1 0 0 29 12.46 2/ Herrera 3 1 0 0 0 0 16 0.00 1/ Smith 1 6.75 3 00 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored: Johnson 2-0, Maurer 3-3, Smith 1-0. Umpires: Home, Jeff Kellogg; First, Chris Segal; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:00. A: 14,714.

NL

Pitcher

StL Cin

Weaver (R) Mahle (R)

Time W-L

ERA

5:40

1-0 1-1

1.59 4.22

Atl Chi

Sanchez (R) Darvish (R)

1:20

0-0 0-0

2.25 5.23

Col Freeland (L) Was Roark (R)

6:05

0-2 1-0

5.56 4.50

Pit Kuhl (R) Mia Peters (L)

6:10

1-0 1-1

5.06 9.35

Mil NY

Davies (R) Matz (L)

6:10

0-1 0-1

5.40 3.00

Ari LA

Greinke (R) Maeda (R)

9:10

0-1 5.06 1-0 0.00

SF SD

Blach (L) Ross (R)

9:10

1-1 1-1

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

4.11 5.25 ERA

Bal Tillman (R) Bos Rodriguez (L) 6:10

0-2 0-0

8.68 7.36

Tor Cle

0-1 1-0

8.38 0.71

Stroman (R) Clevinger (R)

6:10

NY Montgomery (L) Det Fiers (R) 6:10

0-0 4.82 1-0 0.00

Chi Lopez (R) Min TBD

7:10

0-1 —

0.69 —

Tex Hamels (L) Hou Cole (R)

7:10

1-2 1-0

5.06 0.64

LA KC

7:15

0-0 0.00 0-1 4.09

Oak Triggs (R) Sea Leake (R)

9:10

1-0 2-0

2.53 3.00

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Phi TB

Velasquez (R) Faria (R) 6:10

Heaney (L) Hammel (R)

1-1 5.19 0-1 14.29

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Giants 7, Padres 0 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Panik 2b 5 2 1 0 1 0 .295 Belt 1b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .235 McCutchen rf 4 2 1 0 1 2 .220 Hernandez rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .455 Posey c 4 0 1 2 1 0 .375 Law p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Longoria 3b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .163 Crawford ss 3 0 1 0 2 1 .225 Pence lf 5 1 2 2 0 2 .220 Blanco cf 4 1 2 0 1 0 .368 Stratton p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Hundley c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Totals 36 7 10 5 8 7 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Cordero cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Pirela rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .300 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .309 Villanueva 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .212 Spangenberg lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Galvis ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .304 Asuaje 2b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Hedges c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .158 Mitchell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 a-Richard ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Lyles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Szczur ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Brewer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Erlin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Totals 27 0 1 0 3 6 San Francisco 300 004 000—7 10 0 San Diego 000 000 000—0 1 1 a-singled for Mitchell in the 3rd. b-out on fielder’s choice for Lyles in the 5th. E: Villanueva (2). LOB: San Francisco 12, San Diego 3. 2B: Posey (3), Blanco (2). RBIs: Posey 2 (8), Longoria (3), Pence 2 (3). S: Stratton. RLISP: San Francisco 5 (McCutchen, Posey, Pence 2, Blanco); San Diego 1 (Szczur). LIDP: Cordero. DP: San Francisco 1 (Crawford, Belt); San Diego 1 (Hedges, Hosmer). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stratton, W, 1-1 7 1 0 0 3 4 101 2.60 Law 2 0 0 0 0 2 25 0.00 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mitchell, L, 0-2 3 4 3 3 5 2 61 5.27 Lyles 2 0 0 0 0 2 28 1.93 2/ Brewer 2 1 38 0.00 3 4 4 0 Erlin 31/3 2 0 0 1 2 44 2.38 Inherited runners-scored: Erlin 3-0. HBP: Lyles (Belt). Umpires: Home, Mike Winters; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Mike Muchlinski. T: 2:47. A: 22,288 (42,445).

NATIONAL LEAGUE LEADERS BATTING: Posey, San Francisco, .389; Grandal, Los Angeles, .375; Hoskins, Philadelphia, .364; Martinez, Cardinals, .364; LeMahieu, Colorado, .351; Kendrick, Washington, .349; Swanson, Atlanta, .348; Moran, Pittsburgh, .343; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, .341; 4 tied at .333. RUNS: Harper, Washington, 13; Albies, Atlanta, 12; Harrison, Pittsburgh, 12; Pham, Cardinals, 12; Freeman, Atlanta, 11; Polanco, Pittsburgh, 11; Baez, Chicago, 10; Cabrera, New York, 10; Eaton, Washington, 10; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 10. RBI: Polanco, Pittsburgh, 15; Martinez, Cardinals, 14; Franco, Philadelphia, 12; Harper, Washington, 12; Cervelli, Pittsburgh, 11; Freeman, Atlanta, 11; Baez, Chicago, 10; Cespedes, New York, 10; 6 tied at 9. HITS: LeMahieu, Colorado, 20; Pirela, San Diego, 18; Hosmer, San Diego, 17; Ozuna, Cardinals, 17; Bryant, Chicago, 16; Dietrich, Miami, 16; Martinez, Cardinals, 16; Swanson, Atlanta, 16; 7 tied at 15. DOUBLES: Hosmer, San Diego, 7; Pollock, Arizona, 7; Dickerson, Pittsburgh, 6; Freeman, Atlanta, 6; Kendrick, Washington, 6; 8 tied at 5. TRIPLES: Baez, Chicago, 2; KMarte, Arizona, 2; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 2; 22 tied at 1. HOME RUNS: Harper, Washington, 6; Polanco, Pittsburgh, 5; Thames, Milwaukee, 5; Albies, Atlanta, 4; Blackmon, Colorado, 4; Baez, Chicago, 4; DeJong, Cardinals, 4; LeMahieu, Colorado, 4; Molina, Cardinals, 4; 8 tied at 3. STOLEN BASES: Turner, Washington, 5; Hamilton, Cincinnati, 4; Inciarte, Atlanta, 4; Pollock, Arizona, 4; Taylor, Washington, 4; Cain, Milwaukee, 3; Hernandez, Philadelphia, 3; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 3; 14 tied at 2. PITCHING: Williams, Pittsburgh, 3-0; 19 tied at 2. ERA: Godley, Arizona, 0.64; Cueto, San Francisco, 0.69; Scherzer, Washington, 0.90; Garcia, Miami, 1.13; Taillon, Pittsburgh, 1.26; Williams, Pittsburgh, 1.56; Butler, Chicago, 1.64; Lucchesi, San Diego, 1.72; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.90; Nola, Philadelphia, 1.96. STRIKEOUTS: Corbin, Arizona, 29; Scherzer, Washington, 27; Ray, Arizona, 23; Syndergaard, New York, 22; Strasburg, Washington, 21; Gonzalez, Washington, 20; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 19; Martinez, Cardinals, 19; Pivetta, Philadelphia, 19; Smith, Miami, 19.


CARDINALS

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1 CARDINALS 13, REDS 4 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler rf 5 3 2 1 1 1 .176 Pham cf 4 2 2 1 2 0 .277 Carpenter 3b 2 1 0 1 2 2 .167 Pena c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Ozuna lf 6 1 1 1 0 1 .293 Martinez 1b 5 1 4 6 1 0 .364 Molina c 5 1 2 2 0 0 .271 Mayers p 0 0 0 0 1 0 --DeJong ss 5 2 1 1 1 2 .286 Wong 2b 3 1 0 0 2 1 .152 Wacha p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Bader ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Brebbia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Garcia ph-3b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .214 Totals 39 13 12 13 11 8 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hamilton cf 4 2 1 0 1 1 .167 Peraza ss 5 2 3 0 0 0 .286 Winker lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .250 Duvall 1b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .103 Garrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Weiss p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pennington 3b-p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Gennett 2b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .300 Ervin rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Barnhart c 2 0 0 0 2 0 .276 Blandino 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Rainey p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reed p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Mesoraco ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .133 Romano p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Brice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gosselin 1b-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Totals 34 4 7 3 4 9 Cardinals 201 011 701 — 13 12 1 Cincinnati 202 000 000 — 4 7 3 a-hit by pitch for Wacha in the 6th. b-walked for Brebbia in the 7th. c-struck out for Reed in the 8th. E: Ozuna (1), Peraza (2), Ervin (1), Gosselin (1). LOB: Cardinals 12, Cincinnati 7. 2B: Martinez 2 (2), Peraza 2 (3). HR: Ozuna (2), off Romano; DeJong (4), off Brice; Martinez (3), off Weiss; Molina (4), off Weiss. RBIs: Fowler (5), Pham (4), Carpenter (7), Ozuna (8), Martinez 6 (14), Molina 2 (8), DeJong (6), Winker (4), Gennett 2 (4). SB: Gennett (1). SF: Carpenter. RLISP: Cardinals 5 (Ozuna 2, Molina, DeJong 2); Cincinnati 5 (Winker, Ervin, Blandino 2, Mesoraco). GIDP: Molina. DP: Cincinnati 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wacha 5 5 4 3 3 5 93 5.52 Brebbia 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Mayers 3 2 0 0 1 2 46 1.80 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Romano 4 1/3 5 4 3 4 4 95 5.87 Brice 1 1 1 1 0 0 16 5.40 2/ Garrett 0 0 1 14 0.00 3 2 0 Weiss 0 2 4 4 2 0 15 0.00 Rainey 1 1 3 3 3 0 37 31.50 Pennington 1 1 1 1 2 1 29 9.00 Reed 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 6.75 Weiss pitched to 4 batters in the 7th. W: Wacha 2-1. L: Brice 0-2. S: Mayers 1-1. H: Brebbia 1. Inherited runners-scored: Brice 3-0, Garrett 1-0, Rainey 2-2. HBP: Brice (Bader). Umpires: Home, Bill Miller; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:32. A: 11,128 (42,319).

HOW THEY SCORED

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

NOTEBOOK

Mayers gets in game after call-up Tuivailala is placed on DL with a left knee injury BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-dispatch

Cardinals did not see any signs of injury concern from Tuivailala’s velocity dip and that the righthander passed strength tests with his arm and didn’t “show signs of injury at that point,” the manager said.

VOTTO, AT REST CINCINNATI • Cardinals prospect Mike

Mayers spent 24 hours with Class AAA Memphis after his demotion earlier this week and had just enough time to put on a Redbirds jersey twice, attend two games, and not throw a single pitch. Still. The Cardinals brought Mayers back unexpectedly from the minors Thursday and placed reliever Sam Tuivailala on the 10-day disabled list with a left knee strain. Tuivailala injured his knee before throwing two scoreless innings Monday against Milwaukee. The cause and severity of the injury were not known Thursday, manager Mike Matheny said, but the righthander was scheduled for a magnetic resonance imagining scan to determine. With access to a 10-day DL, the Cardinals used it. The U-turn back to the majors after being demoted Monday allowed Mayers to return close to home. He grew up on the southern side of Columbus, Ohio, and while he was a Cleveland fan, he saw the Reds and Cincinnati more often because of the shorter drive. He said he could have several dozen friends and family attend the weekend game. What role they’ll see him in remains the question. He was used twice in the first two weeks of the season, and settling into a long-relief role could free up others, like John Brebbia, for short-burst appearances. “I don’t know if we had him in a designated spot,” Matheny said. “It was day to day. We had a lot of similar games. Sure enough as soon as he left we had opportunities in games where we were down and we needed innings. You’ve got to have a plan, if you’re ahead these are the go-to guys. If we’re not, these are some go-to guys. If we need multiple innings these are our go-to guys.” They got to Mayers in the seventh inning Thursday after the Cardinals had unleashed a seven-run inning and opened an eightrun lead. He allowed just two hits over three scoreless innings to get the save. Tuivailala had experienced a decline in his velocity to start the season — a trend he attributed to being asked to work on a slide step right as spring training ended. He found that sapped some of his power because he felt like he was throwing “all arm.” Matheny said the

The only player in the National League not to miss a game last year did Thursday. Joey Votto, the Reds’ perennial MVP candidate, did not start for the first time in more than a season — a streak of 202 consecutive games back to Sept. 2016. That game was also against the Cardinals, and the Reds’ first baseman that game was Ivan De Jesus Jr. Reds manager Bryan Price said the move was rest. In a way, it’s also a relenting. Votto’s streak was the longest for the Reds’ since Pete Rose started 370 consecutive games from 1973-76, according to Elias Sports Bureau. Votto’s streak is the longest in the NL and second in baseball to Royals’ shortstop Alcides Escobar, at 342. It’s the third 200-game streak of Votto’s career — but fewer and fewer teams and players are seeing the benefit of what once was a defining chase of baseball: The Ironman. “I think Cal’s record is safe,” Matheny said, referencing Cal Ripken Jr. “Certainly, we have more information. Now we’re paying close attention and we’re putting value on rest. I’ll guarantee that (Jef) Bagwell and Cal and everybody else that want to throw into that, (Lou) Gehrig, they would contend that this game is about going out there every single day. I think there is more pressure on the modern-day player. In the past, it was a badge of honor that you’re a durable player that is just going to be out there every single day. “Now,” he continued, “it seems like they’re constantly being fed if they take that mentality they’re probably going to set themselves up for failure or injury.”

GREGERSON STRIDES FORWARD One of the final hurdles the Cardinals wanted veteran reliever Luke Gregerson to clear before he returned from a hamstring injury was appearing in back-to-back games. By that measure, he’s halfway to Wrigley Field. Gregerson threw a scoreless seventh inning Thursday night for High-A Palm Beach, and if he recovers well from the outing Friday he’ll get another inning or so of work that night for the PB-Cards.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Michael Wacha throws a pitch against the Reds on Thursday night.

AVERAGES Batting J. Martinez Ozuna DeJong Pham Molina Pena Garcia Fowler Carpenter Wong Bader Munoz Team

AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E .364 44 4 16 2 0 3 14 6 4 0 1 .293 58 5 17 2 0 2 8 0 16 0 1 .286 49 8 14 1 0 4 6 2 21 0 1 .277 47 12 13 2 0 2 4 9 12 2 0 .271 48 6 13 1 0 4 8 1 5 1 0 .250 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 14 2 3 1 0 0 1 1 5 0 0 .176 51 8 9 2 0 1 5 6 12 1 1 .167 42 8 7 1 0 2 7 13 16 0 1 .152 33 2 5 0 0 0 1 5 6 0 0 .100 10 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 5 0 0 .083 12 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 8 0 1 .241 444 60 107 13 0 19 58 49 122 5 7

Pitching Brebbia Hicks Norris Weaver Flaherty Mayers C. Martinez Lyons Wainwright Wacha Bowman Mikolas Leone Holland Team

W 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 6

L 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 7

ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO 0.00 2 0 0 2.0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 6 0 0 7.1 3 1 0 0 5 5 1.59 6 0 1 5.2 5 1 1 0 0 9 1.59 2 2 0 11.1 8 2 2 0 4 10 1.80 1 1 0 5.0 6 1 1 0 1 9 1.80 3 0 1 5.0 5 1 1 1 1 3 2.41 3 3 0 18.2 14 6 5 1 10 19 3.60 7 0 0 5.0 6 2 2 0 2 7 5.06 2 2 0 10.2 12 6 6 2 4 7 5.52 3 3 0 14.2 14 10 9 2 10 12 5.68 7 0 0 6.1 8 4 4 0 4 6 6.00 2 2 0 12.0 15 8 8 3 0 10 6.35 6 0 0 5.2 8 4 4 3 0 10 6.75 2 0 0 1.1 0 1 1 0 5 0 3.59 13 13 2 117.2 113 50 47 12 51 113

Cardinals irst • Fowler singles. Pham grounds out, Fowler to second. Carpenter walks. J.Martinez singles, Fowler scores, Carpenter to third on an error. Molina singles, Carpenter scores. Two runs. Cardinals 2, Reds 0. Reds irst • Hamilton walks. Peraza doubles, Hamilton to third. Winker singles, Hamilton scores, Peraza scores on an error. Two runs. Cardinals 2, Reds 2. Cardinals third • Ozuna homers. One run. Cardinals 3, Reds 2. Reds third • Hamilton singles. Peraza singles, Hamilton to second. Duvall walks, Hamilton to third, Peraza to second. Gennett singles, Hamilton and Peraza score. Two runs. Reds 4, Cardinals 3. Cardinals ifth • Fowler reaches on an error. Pham singles, Fowler to second. Carpenter walks, Fowler to third, Pham to second. J.Martinez walks, Fowler scores. One run. Cardinals 4, Reds 4. Cardinals sixth • DeJong homers. One run. Cardinals 5, Reds 4. Cardinals seventh • J.Martinez homers. Molina homers. DeJong walks. Wong walks, DeJong to second. Garcia walks, DeJong to third, Wong to second. Fowler walks, DeJong scores, Wong to third, Garcia to second. Pham walks, Wong scores, Garcia to third, Fowler to second. Carpenter hits a sacriice ly, Garcia scores, Fowler to third. J.Martinez doubles, Fowler and Pham score. Seven runs. Cardinals 12, Reds 4. Cardinals ninth • Pham walks. Ozuna grounds out, Pham to second. J.Martinez doubles, Pham scores. One run. Cardinals 13, Reds 4. ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Harrison Bader is hit by a pitch by Reds reliever Austin Brice during the sixth inning Thursday night.

Wacha gets the win with ive innings and bullpen cleans up CARDINALS • FROM C1

ball in the air, he homers.” DeJong wasn’t alone. In a torrent of offense several weeks in the waiting and one garish inning in the making, the Cardinals unloaded for a 13-4 victory against the Reds on Thursday at Great American Ball Park. DeJong’s homer snapped a 4-4 tie and made a winner of Michael Wacha, and then the jubilee really began. Martinez had three of his six RBIs after DeJong’s homer, and all three came in the Cardinals’ seven-run seventh inning. Yadier Molina and Marcell Ozuna also added home runs against the hapless, last-place Reds, and each swing seemed to offer a bonanza of high-tech stats. Martinez’s homer was one of the fastest off the bat. DeJong’s was one of the farthest. And all of that offense was something that Cardinals had been saying would happen sometime, somehow. Cincinnati happened to be somewhere, predictably. “Been kind of the buzz, especially back home,” manager Mike Matheny said after the seasonhigh gush of runs. “Everybody is kind of wondering about the

lineup. Wondering about who is doing what, where. You have a good day when you throw 13 up there. It gives you that kind of bump. Still a lot of things to work out. We’ve got a long season ahead of us. We know when this ofense gets going it can be as good as any offense in the league.” In the first dozen games of the season, the Cardinals had most been stymied by strikeout pitchers and their own strikeouts. They finished this week’s home stand on a one-for-20 spiral with runners in scoring position, and in six games at Busch Stadium the Cardinals struck out 60 times. They had been neutralized by everything from Noah Syndergaard’s fastball to Robbie Ray’s slider to whatever it was Junior Guerra came out of Class AAA on Wednesday to chuck at them. Five of the Cardinals’ starters Thursday entered the game with an average of .256 or less. The Reds are good for what ails them. Few pitching staffs have been as hospitable as Cincinnati’s. Before Thursday’s thumping, the Reds had the highest ERA in the majors (5.59), and moribund Miami was second-worst at 5.29.

They had allowed 65 runs in their first 11 games, and teams had a NL-high .786 OPS and .455 slugging percentage against the Reds. The Cardinals jumped on starter Sal Romano for two runs in the first; Ozuna followed with a solo homer in the third. An error led to Martinez’s bases-loaded walk in the fifth. But even with the hunt-and-peck ofense producing four runs, Wacha (2-1) offered them back. He walked Billy Hamilton to lead of the first on four pitches, and two batters later, the game was tied. Hamilton’s single keyed another two-run rally in the third and Romano was pitching with a lead. “Trying to throw up zeroes after we were scoring, and I wasn’t doing that,” said Wacha, who retired the final seven batters he faced before DeJong’s tiebreaker. “Ofense had to come through.” It took a few times through the order for the Cardinals to find their footing and the gooey, pliant center of the Reds’ pitching staff. But when they did, they didn’t have to do much. Martinez and Molina ignited the seventh inning with back-toback home runs off Zack Weiss in his major-league debut. What

followed was five consecutive walks to loaded the bases and force home two runs. Seven batters into the seventh inning the Cardinals had four runs — and there had yet to be a ball put in play in on the playing surface. The fielders could have taken the first half of the inning of and the outcome wouldn’t have been different. The first out came on a sacrifice fly, and the third out should have come on a fly ball to right field. Phillip Ervin chased after only the third ball put in play of the inning — and let it dip to the grass just ahead of his glove. Martinez turned that into a double and collected his second and third RBIs of the inning. “I’m just trying to hit the ball hard, man,” Martinez said. “That’s all I’m trying to do. If you hit the ball hard a lot of stuf can happen. Somebody is going to get out of the way or that ball is going to find a hole or it’s going to go for a homer.” The Cardinals’ breakout was adorned with all sorts of glistening, modern-age statistics. DeJong’s solo homer in the sixth traveled 464 feet into the leftfield seats, according to Statcast. It’s the third longest home run

hit by a Cardinal since 2015, the advent of Statcast. The only two longer belonged to Matt Holliday (466 feet) and Marcell Ozuna’s 479-foot blast in Milwaukee earlier this season. Molina’s homer in the seventh inning traveled 438 feet — his longest home run of the Statcast era. Martinez’s home run had an exit velocity of 113.7 mph, one of the top three fastest ever in the Statcast era. “Killed,” Matheny said. That’s how he got here, Martinez explained. Before he reinvented his swing and embraced launch angle, the Cardinals’ lanky first baseman was “literally a 6-foot-7 slap hitter,” he said Thursday night. Not that everything swung Martinez’s way Thursday. A few days removed from a bruised Achilles’ tendon, Martinez fouled a ball of his other leg Thursday on his way to four hits. He wore an ice pack around the shin and shrugged, “I hit the other leg.” But he’s not sitting. “This is the opportunity of my life,” Martinez said. “I’m going to be out there.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Matheny speaks Spanish, has studied culture

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

Sabbatini shoots a 64 for Hilton Head lead

BY THE BALTIMORE SUN

ORTIZ • FROM C1

Fortunately for Matheny and the Cardinals, he has worked on his Spanish skills since high school in the late 1980s and, to a greater extent, since his college coach told him and his academic counselor in 1990 to start using his electives on Spanish courses at the University of Michigan. Matheny also realized early on in his career that knowing Spanish wasn’t nearly enough to understand players from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Mexico and Panama. He began learning about the culture in 1994 when the Brewers encouraged him to play winter ball in the Dominican Republic, where he got a glimpse of the numerous obstacles Dominican players overcome on their way to the majors. “It was such an eye-opening experience,” Matheny said. “I even remember saying more American players need to go experience this to understand where these guys came from to understand the culture, to understand your teammates better. “How am I going to communicate with a guy from two different worlds apart? Not that you’re ever going to completely empathize or you’re ever going to completely put yourself in their shoes, but you have a better understanding.” Matheny gained a better appreciation for his Dominican teammates when the team bus drove into their impoverished neighborhoods to pick them up on the way to the winter ball games in 1994. “You see some of the neighborhoods these guys came from and realize what they’ve had to overcome, how little they’ve been given to get where they are,” Matheny said. “I have huge respect for them. It really kicked in gear for me to learn Spanish a little bit better. “They appreciated the fact that I was trying. I felt the Latin players whether it was the Dominican or Puerto Rico — I didn’t play in Venezuela or Mexico — they appreciated the fact that we came down there and had taken in their culture.” A year later, Matheny immersed himself in the local culture while playing winter ball in Puerto Rico. Instead of living at a hotel full of English speakers, he rented a place in the local community where he needed to speak Spanish when he returned home or went shopping. Matheny has made several trips back to Puerto Rico and the Dominican over the years, either with groups or individually, to visit some of his players. The value of Matheny’s strong Spanish skills or cultural understanding was on full display during the first home series against the Diamondbacks. He granted an interview in Spanish that ran on the Cardinals’ Spanish broadcast on 880 AM. The importance of cultural understanding was also on display Sunday when Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo set off Yadier Molina by flippantly using a curse word that is considered one of the worst insults in Latin American culture. If Lovullo is to be taken at his word, he somehow assumed he was complimenting Molina’s ability to frame pitches while using a curse word Molina took literally. Regardless of a player’s culture, Lovullo should never have used the word he used while describing Molina’s ability to frame pitches. He should be held to a higher standard. His mistake was worse, though, because much can be lost in translation when dealing with different cultures. What can be explained away as a warped sense of a compliment in one culture can be fighting words in another. That’s why it’s important to have managers who care enough to learn about the cultural diferences. Matheny caught a major break in 1990 when his University of Michigan coach Bill Freehan, a former Detroit Tigers All-Star catcher, pulled him into his oice before his sophomore season. Freehan invited Matheny’s academic adviser into that meeting. “I brought her in here because as of right now every one of your electives is going to be Spanish,” Matheny remembers Freehan telling him. “I see you getting a chance to play pro ball. One day I see you coaching too just from watching how you go about your business and what I’ve heard about you.” That was the first time anybody told Matheny he had the potential to coach or manage in the majors. He embraced the Spanish classes even though he would have enjoyed easier electives. When Matheny eventually became the first person in his family to receive a college degree, he earned one in sports management and communications with an emphasis in Spanish. The Cardinals benefit greatly from Matheny’s ability to communicate with players such as Martinez in their native language. He has made the same deal with Yairo Munoz this season, but the entire organization benefits from his commitment. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

Justify likely favorite in wide-open Derby

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rory Sabbatini, show here from earlier this year, shot his lowest round ever at Harbour Town to take the lead. ASSOCIATED PRESS

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. • Rory Sabbatini shot a 7-under

64 for his lowest round ever at Harbour Town Golf Links and a two-stroke lead Thursday in the RBC Heritage, with top-ranked Dustin Johnson five shots behind. The talk leading up to the tournament was of the return of Johnson, the South Carolina native who grew up about three hours northwest of here yet had not played in the Palmetto State’s lone PGA Tour stop since 2009. But it was Sabbatini who quickly moved to the top in perfect, windless conditions on what’s typically one of the most windswept layouts of the year. Matt Kuchar, Billy Horschel, Chesson Hadley and John Huh shot 66s. Johnson had a run of four straight birdies in the middle of his round, but ended up with a 69. He was tied for 20th. Sabbatini, starting on No. 10, birdied four holes on his front nine. He made a 52-foot putt on the par-3 14th and put his approach on No. 18 — the Pete Dye course’s signature hole with the lighthouse in the backdrop — to about 7 feet to set up another birdie. “I think anytime you can birdie 18 on this golf course, it’s key because 18 is not a very forgiving hole,” he said. Sabbatini, the last of whose

six PGA Tour wins came in 2011, kept up the strong play with three more birdies coming in. He closed the round with consecutive birdies. Sabbatini wasn’t sure he’d even tee it up after hurting his back Sunday while working on his stance. He received treatment every day since. Sabbatini got a bonus on his final tee box when he finally got his back to pop after stretching on No. 9. Sabbatini surpassed his previous Harbour Town low of 66 in the 2009 final round when he tied for eighth, his best showing in eight previous appearances. Johnson, ranked No. 1 for more than a year, won at Kapalua and has four other top 10s since January including last week at the Masters where he tied for 10th in the year’s first major. He looked to continue his strong play at Harbour Town where he posted 10 birdies in Wednesday’s pro-am. However, things did not come as easily for Johnson. Johnson took bogey on his second hole, the 11th. He caught fire in mid-round, starting a run of four straight birdies on the 18th hole. But Johnson missed 8-foot par putts on the fifth and sixth holes and took one more bogey on his closing hole, the ninth. “I haven’t played here in a while, so it’s definitely a little bit different being here,” Johnson said.

GOLF ROUNDUP Woods enters U.S. Open Tiger Woods has iled his entry to play in the U.S. Open for the irst time since 2015. The USGA says Woods oicially entered on Thursday, four days after he tied for 32nd in the Masters. Even exempt players have to formally enter the U.S. Open. Woods hasn’t played the U.S. Open since he missed the cut at Chambers Bay with rounds of 80-76. The U.S. Open is June 14-17 at Shinnecock Hills on Long Island, where Woods made his U.S. Open debut in 1995 as the U.S. Amateur champion. He opened with a 74 and withdrew the next day with a wrist injury. He tied for 17th at

Shinnecock in 2004 when he was in the midst of changing his swing. Woods is in the last year of a 10-year exemption from winning the 2008 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines. Rahm one behind in Spain • Home favorite Jon Rahm shot a 5-under 67 to inish one of the lead after the irst round of the Spanish Open Thursday in Madrid. Marc Warren of Scotland and Paul Dunne of Ireland shot 66 at the Centro Nacional de Golf. Spanish amateur Victor Pastor was in a group of 10 other players tied with Rahm. Defending champion Andrew Johnston had a 68. Associated Press

With less than a month to go before the first Saturday in May, we’re solidly within range for speculation on this year’s top Triple Crown contenders. Last year’s class of 3-year-olds never did sort itself out. And we’re going into another Kentucky Derby without a pre-eminent favorite. The good news is that many potential contenders have acquitted themselves well during prep season, so the parity comes from a place of strength rather than weakness. With only Saturday’s Arkansas Derby left among the final round of prep races, here’s a look at the top 10 Derby horses to follow. • Justify: The likely Derby favorite, after he bested Bolt d’Oro in the most anticipated showdown of the prep season last weekend. He’s undefeated, trained by Bob Bafert and ridden by Mike Smith — a pretty ideal résumé. Some traditionalists will always be wary of a Derby contender who didn’t run as a 2-year-old. But with the modern trends in scheduling, we’re going to see more and more lightly raced stars. Other skeptics will note that Justify moved to the lead too easily in the Santa Anita Derby and has little shot of repeating such a comfortable trip at Churchill Downs. But his talent is unquestionable. • Audible: Versatile horse trained by Todd Pletcher wins the Florida Derby and looks set to peak at Churchill Downs. That was the story for 2017 Derby champion Always Dreaming, and it appears to be the scenario for Audible as well. He’s done everything right this year and shown he can win big races by stalking the pace or coming from well back. He might be the second or third betting choice on Derby day. • Mendelssohn: An intriguing wild card. We’ve learned to be skeptical of Derby contenders coming of superficially impressive victories in Dubai. But Mendelssohn opened a lot of eyes with the 106 Beyer Speed Figure he earned for his March 31 romp (by 18½ lengths) in the UAE Derby. Trainer Aidan O’Brien is one of the best in the world. • Bolt d’Oro: This California contender hasn’t lived up to expectations thrust on him as the favorite in last fall’s Breeders’ Cup Juvenile. He finished third there, then second to the since-injured McKinzie in the March 10 San Felipe Stakes (he was pushed to first by a disqualification) and second to Justify at Santa Anita. On the other hand, he’s run well enough against the best competition to suggest he cannot be written of at the Derby. • Magnum Moon: Pletcher’s other top contender, Magnum Moon did not run as a 2-year-old, but he’s already won three races this year including an extremely promising efort in the March 17 Rebel Stakes. If he’s as good or better at the Arkansas Derby, he could vault up the list of contenders. • Good Magic: The 2017 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner came out flat in his first race as a 3-year-old, the March 3 Fountain of Youth Stakes. But he put himself back on track with a solid win in the Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland. The Blue Grass didn’t feature the best field of the prep season, and skeptics will note that Good Magic has not shown the brilliance of some contenders above him on this list. But trainer Chad Brown does an excellent job of having his horses ready to run in the big races. • Vino Rosso: Yet another Pletcher-trained contender, and no one’s better at steering his horses through Derby prep season. Vino Rosso stamped his candidacy with an upset victory over Enticed in the Wood Memorial. A disappointing start to his 3-year-old campaign had pushed him of many Derby buzz lists, but Pletcher felt his talent was always there in training and that he would thrive at longer distances. • Noble Indy: The fourth contender in Pletcher’s Derby quartet. His victory in the March 24 Louisiana Derby was a mixed bag. He showed great guts in taking the race by a neck. But should he have needed to fight so hard to beat middling competition? His owners had previously described him as a “brat” on race day, so the victory was a step in the right direction. • Solomini: Bafert lost his second elite contender when McKinzie was sidelined with a leg injury. But Solomini should join Justify in the field at Churchill Downs, assuming he performs well in Arkansas. He’s inconsistent in training but Mr. Consistency in his results — always pretty good, not good enough to win against top competition. He’ll need to step forward at Oaklawn for anyone to take him seriously in the Derby. • Quip: Another horse who could move up with a good performance in Arkansas. He’s run only once in 2018 but delivered an easy career best in winning the March 10 Tampa Bay Derby. He’s part of a loaded Derby crew from WinStar Farm that also includes Justify, Audible and Noble Indy.

Hutton is now an unrestricted free agent BLUES • FROM C1

can sustain it. So now it’s just a matter of what teams want, what teams need.” The Blues would love to have him come back for an encore performance as Allen’s partner — with the numbers he put up, who wouldn’t want him back? — but if some team is going to give Hutton a No. 1 job and the corresponding salary, the Blues’ ofer will be lacking. Hutton is an unrestricted free agent and is coming off a season where he led the league in both save percentage (.931) and goals-against average (2.09) — “If they’re going to keep track, it’s obviously a good thing to be in first,” he said — which is a great example of really good timing. Less good timing is the way his season ended. The Blues looked to have given the starter’s job over to Hutton after some struggles by Allen. Hutton was about to make his third consecutive start, in a game at San Jose on March 8, when a herniated disc in his neck knocked him out of the lineup and kept him from playing for three weeks. In that time, Allen found his game and he got all but one start in the final 16 games of the season. “It’s never a good time to get hurt, but that’s the way it goes,” Hutton said. “I was sore in the morning (at San Jose) and then I made a save (in

practice), a quick look up to my right, and that’s when it went, all of a sudden. We were optimistic and I went to the hotel that day and when I got up, I couldn’t even move. “They thought it was little tears over time and then I just ruptured it. It was hitting into my spinal cord so then they just needed it to heal. Every day I would leave the rink, get treatment, come back, play the games or practice. It was a hectic schedule but now I’ve made a full recovery. I don’t have issues. It’s more, I think, a training thing moving forward. I’ll just have to adjust some things the way I take care of myself, training in the gym and being cautious with it.” Hutton made $1.125 million last season (Allen made $4.35 million) and if a team is willing to make him its starter, he could be getting paid in the $3-4 million range. While Hutton likes St. Louis and the Blues like Hutton, that’s likely more than the Blues would want to pay their backup goalie, though if he stays, a raise is certainly in order. At the same time, Ville Husso, the next goalie up in the system, played in only 38 games in the AHL this season because of the Blues’ convoluted minor-league setup. The Blues would like him to get at least one more season in the minors before moving to the NHL, so the team has to take

some steps to fill that spot if Hutton doesn’t return. “There’s such a unique market,” Hutton said. “I think this year there isn’t a ton of goalies available. I thought the No. 1 guy was (Antti) Raanta and he just signed (with Arizona for $4.25 million) and a couple of similar guys signed backup deals like (Aaron) Dell (for $1.9 million with San Jose) and (Darcy) Kuemper (for $1.85 million with Arizona), so maybe I’m like a hybrid of those two. Raanta’s played more minutes and sustained time in Arizona, where Kuemper and Dell haven’t played a ton of minutes and I think I have more experience. It’s going to be interesting to see what teams want and need from my perspective. “I want to be back but there’s so many other things to consider and I think time right now is what it’s going to take to figure that out. But right now I’m very optimistic for sure.”

PIECE OF BLUES FOR SALE An unspecified share of the Blues will be going on the market soon as Sports Capital Holdings, the former ownership group headed up by Dave Checketts, is putting up for sale the minority interest it retained after selling the team to Tom Stillman in 2012. Stillman and his group will remain in control.

“It is important to understand that the Blues are not for sale,” Stillman said in a statement released by the team. “Only a minority interest in the club will be sold and the new investors will become part of our ownership group. Control of the Blues will remain in local hands and it will be business as usual, both on and of the ice.” SCH, which owned the team from 2006 to 2012, retained an interest in the franchise when it sold the team to Stillman in May 2012. At that time, the group’s intention was to sell that share at a later date.

FIVE BLUES TO WORLDS Five members of the Blues will play for Canada at the world championships in Denmark starting on May 4. Brayden Schenn, Jaden Schwartz, Colton Parayko, Joel Edmundson and Vince Dunn will be on the team, which will also have two members of the Blues organization in administration positions. Coach Mike Yeo will serve as the associate head coach, and assistant general manager Martin Brodeur is the co-general manager. For Schwartz, Edmundson and Dunn, this is the first time they’ve represented Canada at the senior level. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Matheny speaks Spanish, has studied culture

M 2 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

Sabbatini shoots a 64 for Hilton Head lead

BY THE BALTIMORE SUN

ORTIZ • FROM C1

Fortunately for Matheny and the Cardinals, he has worked on his Spanish skills since high school in the late 1980s and, to a greater extent, since his college coach told him and his academic counselor in 1990 to start using his electives on Spanish courses at the University of Michigan. Matheny also realized early on in his career that knowing Spanish wasn’t nearly enough to understand players from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Venezuela, Mexico and Panama. He began learning about the culture in 1994 when the Brewers encouraged him to play winter ball in the Dominican Republic, where he got a glimpse of the numerous obstacles Dominican players overcome on their way to the majors. “It was such an eye-opening experience,” Matheny said. “I even remember saying more American players need to go experience this to understand where these guys came from to understand the culture, to understand your teammates better. “How am I going to communicate with a guy from two different worlds apart? Not that you’re ever going to completely empathize or you’re ever going to completely put yourself in their shoes, but you have a better understanding.” Matheny gained a better appreciation for his Dominican teammates when the team bus drove into their impoverished neighborhoods to pick them up on the way to the winter ball games in 1994. “You see some of the neighborhoods these guys came from and realize what they’ve had to overcome, how little they’ve been given to get where they are,” Matheny said. “I have huge respect for them. It really kicked in gear for me to learn Spanish a little bit better. “They appreciated the fact that I was trying. I felt the Latin players whether it was the Dominican or Puerto Rico — I didn’t play in Venezuela or Mexico — they appreciated the fact that we came down there and had taken in their culture.” A year later, Matheny immersed himself in the local culture while playing winter ball in Puerto Rico. Instead of living at a hotel full of English speakers, he rented a place in the local community where he needed to speak Spanish when he returned home or went shopping. Matheny has made several trips back to Puerto Rico and the Dominican over the years, either with groups or individually, to visit some of his players. The value of Matheny’s strong Spanish skills or cultural understanding was on full display during the first home series against the Diamondbacks. He granted an interview in Spanish that ran on the Cardinals’ Spanish broadcast on 880 AM. The importance of cultural understanding was also on display Sunday when Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo set off Yadier Molina by flippantly using a curse word that is considered one of the worst insults in Latin American culture. If Lovullo is to be taken at his word, he somehow assumed he was complimenting Molina’s ability to frame pitches while using a curse word Molina took literally. Regardless of a player’s culture, Lovullo should never have used the word he used while describing Molina’s ability to frame pitches. He should be held to a higher standard. His mistake was worse, though, because much can be lost in translation when dealing with different cultures. What can be explained away as a warped sense of a compliment in one culture can be fighting words in another. That’s why it’s important to have managers who care enough to learn about the cultural diferences. Matheny caught a major break in 1990 when his University of Michigan coach Bill Freehan, a former Detroit Tigers All-Star catcher, pulled him into his oice before his sophomore season. Freehan invited Matheny’s academic adviser into that meeting. “I brought her in here because as of right now every one of your electives is going to be Spanish,” Matheny remembers Freehan telling him. “I see you getting a chance to play pro ball. One day I see you coaching too just from watching how you go about your business and what I’ve heard about you.” That was the first time anybody told Matheny he had the potential to coach or manage in the majors. He embraced the Spanish classes even though he would have enjoyed easier electives. When Matheny eventually became the first person in his family to receive a college degree, he earned one in sports management and communications with an emphasis in Spanish. The Cardinals benefit greatly from Matheny’s ability to communicate with players such as Martinez in their native language. He has made the same deal with Yairo Munoz this season, but the entire organization benefits from his commitment. Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com

Justify likely favorite in wide-open Derby

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rory Sabbatini, show here from earlier this year, shot his lowest round ever at Harbour Town to take the lead. ASSOCIATED PRESS

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, S.C. • Rory Sabbatini shot a 7-under

64 for his lowest round ever at Harbour Town Golf Links and a two-stroke lead Thursday in the RBC Heritage, with top-ranked Dustin Johnson five shots behind. The talk leading up to the tournament was of the return of Johnson, the South Carolina native who grew up about three hours northwest of here yet had not played in the Palmetto State’s lone PGA Tour stop since 2009. But it was Sabbatini who quickly moved to the top in perfect, windless conditions on what’s typically one of the most windswept layouts of the year. Matt Kuchar, Billy Horschel, Chesson Hadley and John Huh shot 66s. Johnson had a run of four straight birdies in the middle of his round, but ended up with a 69. He was tied for 20th. Sabbatini, starting on No. 10, birdied four holes on his front nine. He made a 52-foot putt on the par-3 14th and put his approach on No. 18 — the Pete Dye course’s signature hole with the lighthouse in the backdrop — to about 7 feet to set up another birdie. “I think anytime you can birdie 18 on this golf course, it’s key because 18 is not a very forgiving hole,” he said. Sabbatini, the last of whose

six PGA Tour wins came in 2011, kept up the strong play with three more birdies coming in. He closed the round with consecutive birdies. Sabbatini wasn’t sure he’d even tee it up after hurting his back Sunday while working on his stance. He received treatment every day since. Sabbatini got a bonus on his final tee box when he finally got his back to pop after stretching on No. 9. Sabbatini surpassed his previous Harbour Town low of 66 in the 2009 final round when he tied for eighth, his best showing in eight previous appearances. Johnson, ranked No. 1 for more than a year, won at Kapalua and has four other top 10s since January including last week at the Masters where he tied for 10th in the year’s first major. He looked to continue his strong play at Harbour Town where he posted 10 birdies in Wednesday’s pro-am. However, things did not come as easily for Johnson. Johnson took bogey on his second hole, the 11th. He caught fire in mid-round, starting a run of four straight birdies on the 18th hole. But Johnson missed 8-foot par putts on the fifth and sixth holes and took one more bogey on his closing hole, the ninth. “I haven’t played here in a while, so it’s definitely a little bit different being here,” Johnson said.

GOLF ROUNDUP Woods enters U.S. Open Tiger Woods has iled his entry to play in the U.S. Open for the irst time since 2015. The USGA says Woods entered on Thursday, four days after he tied for 32nd in the Masters. Woods hasn’t played the U.S. Open since he missed the cut at Chambers Bay with rounds of 80-76. The U.S. Open is June 14-17 at Shinnecock Hills on Long Island, where Woods made his U.S. Open debut in 1995. Rahm one behind in Spain • Home favorite Jon Rahm shot a 5-under 67 to inish one of the lead after the irst round of the Spanish Open Thursday in Madrid.

Marc Warren of Scotland and Paul Dunne of Ireland shot 66 at the Centro Nacional de Golf. Spanish amateur Victor Pastor was in a group of 10 other players tied with Rahm. Henderson takes Lotte lead • Brooke Henderson remained bogey-free Thursday to take the second-round lead in the Lotte Championship in Kapolei, Hawaii. Henderson, the 20-year-old Canadian ranked 14th in the world, birdied four of her irst six holes to surge into the lead. She inished with a 6-under 66 at Ko Olina Golf Club to get to 10 under. Associated Press

With less than a month to go before the first Saturday in May, we’re solidly within range for speculation on this year’s top Triple Crown contenders. Last year’s class of 3-year-olds never did sort itself out. And we’re going into another Kentucky Derby without a pre-eminent favorite. The good news is that many potential contenders have acquitted themselves well during prep season, so the parity comes from a place of strength rather than weakness. With only Saturday’s Arkansas Derby left among the final round of prep races, here’s a look at the top 10 Derby horses to follow. • Justify: The likely Derby favorite, after he bested Bolt d’Oro in the most anticipated showdown of the prep season last weekend. He’s undefeated, trained by Bob Bafert and ridden by Mike Smith — a pretty ideal résumé. Some traditionalists will always be wary of a Derby contender who didn’t run as a 2-year-old. But with the modern trends in scheduling, we’re going to see more and more lightly raced stars. Other skeptics will note that Justify moved to the lead too easily in the Santa Anita Derby and has little shot of repeating such a comfortable trip at Churchill Downs. But his talent is unquestionable. • Audible: Versatile horse trained by Todd Pletcher wins the Florida Derby and looks set to peak at Churchill Downs. That was the story for 2017 Derby champion Always Dreaming, and it appears to be the scenario for Audible as well. He’s done everything right this year and shown he can win big races by stalking the pace or coming from well back. He might be the second or third betting choice on Derby day. • Mendelssohn: An intriguing wild card. We’ve learned to be skeptical of Derby contenders coming of superficially impressive victories in Dubai. But Mendelssohn opened a lot of eyes with the 106 Beyer Speed Figure he earned for his March 31 romp (by 18½ lengths) in the UAE Derby. Trainer Aidan O’Brien is one of the best in the world. • Bolt d’Oro: This California contender hasn’t lived up to expectations thrust on him as the favorite in last fall’s Breeders’ Cup Juvenile. He finished third there, then second to the since-injured McKinzie in the March 10 San Felipe Stakes (he was pushed to first by a disqualification) and second to Justify at Santa Anita. On the other hand, he’s run well enough against the best competition to suggest he cannot be written of at the Derby. • Magnum Moon: Pletcher’s other top contender, Magnum Moon did not run as a 2-year-old, but he’s already won three races this year including an extremely promising efort in the March 17 Rebel Stakes. If he’s as good or better at the Arkansas Derby, he could vault up the list of contenders. • Good Magic: The 2017 Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner came out flat in his first race as a 3-year-old, the March 3 Fountain of Youth Stakes. But he put himself back on track with a solid win in the Blue Grass Stakes at Keeneland. The Blue Grass didn’t feature the best field of the prep season, and skeptics will note that Good Magic has not shown the brilliance of some contenders above him on this list. But trainer Chad Brown does an excellent job of having his horses ready to run in the big races. • Vino Rosso: Yet another Pletcher-trained contender, and no one’s better at steering his horses through Derby prep season. Vino Rosso stamped his candidacy with an upset victory over Enticed in the Wood Memorial. A disappointing start to his 3-year-old campaign had pushed him of many Derby buzz lists, but Pletcher felt his talent was always there in training and that he would thrive at longer distances. • Noble Indy: The fourth contender in Pletcher’s Derby quartet. His victory in the March 24 Louisiana Derby was a mixed bag. He showed great guts in taking the race by a neck. But should he have needed to fight so hard to beat middling competition? His owners had previously described him as a “brat” on race day, so the victory was a step in the right direction. • Solomini: Bafert lost his second elite contender when McKinzie was sidelined with a leg injury. But Solomini should join Justify in the field at Churchill Downs, assuming he performs well in Arkansas. He’s inconsistent in training but Mr. Consistency in his results — always pretty good, not good enough to win against top competition. He’ll need to step forward at Oaklawn for anyone to take him seriously in the Derby. • Quip: Another horse who could move up with a good performance in Arkansas. He’s run only once in 2018 but delivered an easy career best in winning the March 10 Tampa Bay Derby. He’s part of a loaded Derby crew from WinStar Farm that also includes Justify, Audible and Noble Indy.

Hutton is now an unrestricted free agent BLUES • FROM C1

can sustain it. So now it’s just a matter of what teams want, what teams need.” The Blues would love to have him come back for an encore performance as Allen’s partner — with the numbers he put up, who wouldn’t want him back? — but if some team is going to give Hutton a No. 1 job and the corresponding salary, the Blues’ ofer will be lacking. Hutton is an unrestricted free agent and is coming off a season where he led the league in both save percentage (.931) and goals-against average (2.09) — “If they’re going to keep track, it’s obviously a good thing to be in first,” he said — which is a great example of really good timing. Less good timing is the way his season ended. The Blues looked to have given the starter’s job over to Hutton after some struggles by Allen. Hutton was about to make his third consecutive start, in a game at San Jose on March 8, when a herniated disc in his neck knocked him out of the lineup and kept him from playing for three weeks. In that time, Allen found his game and he got all but one start in the final 16 games of the season. “It’s never a good time to get hurt, but that’s the way it goes,” Hutton said. “I was sore in the morning (at San Jose) and then I made a save (in

practice), a quick look up to my right, and that’s when it went, all of a sudden. We were optimistic and I went to the hotel that day and when I got up, I couldn’t even move. “They thought it was little tears over time and then I just ruptured it. It was hitting into my spinal cord so then they just needed it to heal. Every day I would leave the rink, get treatment, come back, play the games or practice. It was a hectic schedule but now I’ve made a full recovery. I don’t have issues. It’s more, I think, a training thing moving forward. I’ll just have to adjust some things the way I take care of myself, training in the gym and being cautious with it.” Hutton made $1.125 million last season (Allen made $4.35 million) and if a team is willing to make him its starter, he could be getting paid in the $3-4 million range. While Hutton likes St. Louis and the Blues like Hutton, that’s likely more than the Blues would want to pay their backup goalie, though if he stays, a raise is certainly in order. At the same time, Ville Husso, the next goalie up in the system, played in only 38 games in the AHL this season because of the Blues’ convoluted minor-league setup. The Blues would like him to get at least one more season in the minors before moving to the NHL, so the team has to take

some steps to fill that spot if Hutton doesn’t return. “There’s such a unique market,” Hutton said. “I think this year there isn’t a ton of goalies available. I thought the No. 1 guy was (Antti) Raanta and he just signed (with Arizona for $4.25 million) and a couple of similar guys signed backup deals like (Aaron) Dell (for $1.9 million with San Jose) and (Darcy) Kuemper (for $1.85 million with Arizona), so maybe I’m like a hybrid of those two. Raanta’s played more minutes and sustained time in Arizona, where Kuemper and Dell haven’t played a ton of minutes and I think I have more experience. It’s going to be interesting to see what teams want and need from my perspective. “I want to be back but there’s so many other things to consider and I think time right now is what it’s going to take to figure that out. But right now I’m very optimistic for sure.”

PIECE OF BLUES FOR SALE An unspecified share of the Blues will be going on the market soon as Sports Capital Holdings, the former ownership group headed up by Dave Checketts, is putting up for sale the minority interest it retained after selling the team to Tom Stillman in 2012. Stillman and his group will remain in control.

“It is important to understand that the Blues are not for sale,” Stillman said in a statement released by the team. “Only a minority interest in the club will be sold and the new investors will become part of our ownership group. Control of the Blues will remain in local hands and it will be business as usual, both on and of the ice.” SCH, which owned the team from 2006 to 2012, retained an interest in the franchise when it sold the team to Stillman in May 2012. At that time, the group’s intention was to sell that share at a later date.

FIVE BLUES TO WORLDS Five members of the Blues will play for Canada at the world championships in Denmark starting on May 4. Brayden Schenn, Jaden Schwartz, Colton Parayko, Joel Edmundson and Vince Dunn will be on the team, which will also have two members of the Blues organization in administration positions. Coach Mike Yeo will serve as the associate head coach, and assistant general manager Martin Brodeur is the co-general manager. For Schwartz, Edmundson and Dunn, this is the first time they’ve represented Canada at the senior level. Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

Blue Jackets score in OT for upset win over Caps

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

Hornacek is ired as coach of Knicks

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Knicks went 29-53 this season and missed the playofs both seasons with Jef Hornacek as coach. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Columbus left wing Artemi Panarin (bottom left) celebrates with teammates after scoring the winning goal in a 4-3 victory at Washington. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lighning 5, Devils 2 • Tampa Bay got early goals from four players — none of them named Nikita Kucherov or Steven Stamkos — before holding of the visiting New Jersey Devils in Game 1. Ondrej Palat, Tyler Johnson and Yanni Gourde scored, helping the Lightning build a 3-0 lead that New Jersey trimmed to one goal before Alex Killorn and Kucherov, who added an empty-netter with 1:12 remaining, finished of the win. Taylor Hall and Travis Zajac scored for the Devils.

Artemi Panarin scored 6:02 into overtime to give the Columbus Blue Jackets a 4-3 victory over the host Washington Capitals on Thursday night in Game 1 of their first-round playof series. Panarin made an incredible individual move to drive by fellow Russian Dmitry Orlov and went backhand-to-forehand to beat Philipp Grubauer top shelf. Alexander Wennberg, Thomas Vanek and Seth Jones scored in regulation, and Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 27 shots for Columbus. Wennberg left the game with an upperbody injury in the third period and didn’t return. Washington got two goals from Evgeny Kuznetsov and one by Devante SmithPelly.

NOTEBOOK Kings’ Doughty suspended • Los Angeles defenseman Drew Doughty was suspended for one game Thursday for an illegal check to the head of Vegas Golden Knights forward William Carrier during Game 1 of the first-round playof series.

Bruins 5, Maple Leafs 1 • Brad Marchand, David Backes and David Krejci each scored a power-play goal, and Tuukka Rask stopped 26 shots to lead host Boston over Toronto in Game 1. David Pastrnak and Sean Kuraly also scored for Boston. Toronto’s Nazem Kadri was thrown out of the game and given a five-minute major for an elbow to Tommy Wingels’ head. Zach Hyman scored Toronto’s goal.

Oilers GM to return • Edmonton Oilers CEO and vice chair Bob Nicholson said general manager Peter Chiarelli is still the right guy to lead the Oilers’ front office and isn’t going anywhere. When asked about coach Todd McLellan or his assistants returning for 201819, Nicholson would only say the organization still has some thinking to do heading into the ofseason.

NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

NHL SUMMARIES

*if necessary

Blue Jackets 4, Capitals 3, OT Columbus 0 1 2 1 — Washington 2 0 1 0 — First period: 1, Washington, Kuznetsov 1 (Backstrom, Carlson), 17:52 (pp). 2, Washington, Kuznetsov 2 (Backstrom, Carlson), 18:21 (pp). Penalties: Foligno, CBJ, (interference), 4:52; Cole, CBJ, (hooking), 9:01; Oshie, WSH, (hooking), 14:42; Anderson, CBJ, served by Bjorkstrand, Major (boarding), 17:23; Anderson, CBJ, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:23. Second period: 3, Columbus, Wennberg 1 (Jenner, Vanek), 4:48. Penalties: Panarin, CBJ, (hooking), 16:09. Third period: 4, Columbus, Vanek 1 (Panarin, Dubois), 1:31 (pp). 5, Washington, Smith-Pelly 1 (Carlson, Vrana), 5:12. 6, Columbus, Jones 1 (Panarin, Atkinson), 15:34 (pp). Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (charging), 1:18; Kuznetsov, WSH, (slashing), 11:19; Burakovsky, WSH, (tripping), 14:55. Overtime: 7, Columbus, Panarin 1 (Cole, Dubois), -8:-58. Penalties: None. Shots: Columbus 4-12-9-2: 27. Washington 9-16-5: 30. Power-plays: Columbus 2 of 4; Washington 2 of 6. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 1-0 (30 shots-27 saves). Washington, Grubauer 0-1 (27-23). A: 18,506. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Marc Joannette. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Jonny Murray.

4 3

BRUINS 1, MAPLE LEAFS 0 Game 1 Bruins 5, Maple Leafs 1 Saturday 7 at Boston, KSDK-5 Monday 6 at Toronto, NBCSN April 19 6 at Toronto, NBCSN April 21 TBA at Boston* April 23 TBA at Toronto* April 25 TBA at Boston*

Bruins 5, Maple Leafs 1 Toronto 1 0 0 — Boston 1 2 2 — First period: 1, Boston, Marchand 1 (Krug, Pastrnak), 5:28 (pp). 2, Toronto, Hyman 1 (Brown, Rielly), 16:52. Penalties: van Riemsdyk, TOR, (hooking), 5:04; Krejci, BOS, (hooking), 5:54. Second period: 3, Boston, Backes 1 (Krejci, McAvoy), 15:43 (pp). 4, Boston, Pastrnak 1 (Bergeron, Marchand), 19:22. Penalties: Chara, BOS, (holding stick), 0:59; Heinen, BOS, (slashing), 6:49; Marleau, TOR, (hooking), 13:59. Third period: 5, Boston, Kuraly 1 (Pastrnak, Chara), 7:41. 6, Boston, Krejci 1 (Krug, DeBrusk), 11:29 (pp). Penalties: Toronto bench, served by Marner (too many men on the ice), 1:54; Kadri, TOR, (boarding), 4:44; Kadri, TOR, served by van Riemsdyk, Major (charging), 8:18; Kadri, TOR, Misconduct (misconduct), 8:18. Shots: Toronto 7-11-9: 27. Boston 9-16-15: 40. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 3; Boston 3 of 6. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 0-1 (40 shots-35 saves). Boston, Rask 1-0 (27-26). A: 17,565. Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Mark Shewchyk.

1 5

Lightning 5, Devils 2 New Jersey 0 1 1 — Tampa Bay 2 1 2 — First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Palat 1 (Johnson, McDonagh), 15:00. 2, Tampa Bay, Johnson 1 (Palat, Point), 19:31. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Gourde 1 (Palat, Sergachev), 1:54 (pp). 4, New Jersey, Hall 1, 13:55. Penalties: Wood, NJ, (slashing), 0:05; Point, TB, (tripping), 9:28. Third period: 5, New Jersey, Zajac 1 (Butcher, Hall), 9:35 (pp). 6, Tampa Bay, Killorn 1 (Gourde), 12:14. 7, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 1, 18:48. Penalties: Miller, TB, (slashing), 9:11. Shots: New Jersey 11-15-5: 31. Tampa Bay 13-7-12: 32. Power-plays: New Jersey 1 of 2; Tampa Bay 1 of 1. Goalies: New Jersey, Kinkaid 0-1 (31 shots-27 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 1-0 (31-29). A: 19,092. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Brian Murphy.

2 5

Golden Knights 1, Kings 0 0 1

Playof points leaders Player Guentzel Crosby Pastrnak Panarin Palat Carlson Kuznetsov Hagelin Vanek Marchand Hall Gourde Krejci Johnson Dumoulin Krug Dubois Backstrom

Tm PIT PIT BOS CBJ TBL WSH WSH PIT CBJ BOS NJD TBL BOS TBL PIT BOS CBJ WSH

GP 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

G 1 3 1 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

A 3 0 2 2 2 3 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2

BLUE JACKETS 1, CAPITALS 0 Game 1 Blue Jackets 4, Capitals 3, OT Saturday 6:30 at Washington, NBCSN Tuesday 6:30 at Columbus, NBCSN April 19 6:30 at Columbus, USA April 21 TBA at Washington* April 23 TBA at Columbus* April 25 TBA at Washington* PENGUINS 1, FLYERS 0 Game 1 Penguins 7, Flyers 0 Friday 6 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN Thursday 2 at Philadelphia, KSDK-5 Wed. 6 at Philadelphia, NBCSN April 20 TBA at Pittsburgh* April 22 TBA at Philadelphia* April 24 TBA at Pittsburgh* WESTERN CONFERENCE PREDATORS VS. AVALANCHE Game 1 Late Thursday at Nashville Saturday 2 at Nashville, KSDK Monday 9 at Colorado, NBCSN Wed. 9 at Colorado, NBCSN April 20 TBA at Nashville* April 22 TBA at Colorado* April 24 TBA at Nashville*

LATE WEDNESDAY

Los Angeles 0 0 0 — Vegas 1 0 0 — First period: 1, Vegas, Theodore 1 (Nosek), 3:23. Penalties: McNabb, VGK, (hooking), 4:21; Carter, LA, (holding stick), 12:47; Nosek, VGK, (boarding), 15:46. Second period: None. Penalties: Neal, VGK, (tripping), 4:19; Lewis, LA, (interference), 10:30; Brown, LA, (interference), 15:20. Third period: None. Penalties: None. Shots: Los Angeles 12-8-10: 30. Vegas 8-11-9: 28. Power-plays: Los Angeles 0 of 3; Vegas 0 of 3. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 0-1 (28 shots-27 saves). Vegas, Fleury 1-0 (30-30). A: 18,479. Referees: Eric Furlatt, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: David Brisebois, Brad Kovachik.

EASTERN CONFERENCE LIGHTNING 1, DEVILS 0 Game 1 Lightning 5, Devils 2 Saturday 2 at Tampa Bay, CNBC Monday 6:30 at New Jersey, CNBC Wed. 6:30 at New Jersey, Golf April 21 TBA at Tampa Bay* April 23 TBA at New Jersey* April 25 TBA at Tampa Bay*

Pts 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

JETS 1, WILD 0 Game 1 Jets 3, Wild 2 Friday 6:30 at Winnipeg, USA Thursday 6 at Minnesota, USA Tuesday 7 at Minnesota, CNBC April 20 TBA at Winnipeg* April 22 TBA at Minnesota* April 25 TBA at Winnipeg* GOLDEN KNIGHTS 1, KINGS 0 Game 1 Golden Knights 1, Kings 0 Friday 9 at Las Vegas, NBCSN Thursday 9:30 at Los Angeles, NBCSN Tuesday 9:30 at Los Angeles, NBCSN April 19 9 at Las Vegas, NBCSN* April 21 TBA at Los Angeles* April 23 TBA at Las Vegas* DUCKS VS. SHARKS Game 1 Late Thursday at Anaheim Saturday 9:30 at Anaheim, NBCSN Monday 9:30 at San Jose, CNBC Wed. 9:30 at San Jose, Golf April 20 TBA at Anaheim* April 22 TBA at San Jose* April 24 TBA at Anaheim*

The New York Knicks are preaching patience but looking for progress. Jef Hornacek got caught in the middle. The Knicks fired their coach early Thursday, shortly after finishing a 29-53 season. They lost more than 50 games and missed the playofs both seasons under Hornacek. “We looked out and we have a plan for what this team should look like over the next three years or so,” Knicks President Steve Mills said. “We just thought this was an opportunity where we thought it was the right time to make a change.” Mills and general manager Scott Perry said they didn’t see enough improvement on the court and enough communication and accountability of it. They informed Hornacek of their decision at the airport after flying home from a season-ending victory in Cleveland. Associate head coach Kurt Rambis also was fired. Hornacek went 60-104 and had a year left on his contract. The ouster sends the Knicks in search of their 11th coach since Jeff Van Gundy resigned in the 2001-02 season. Magic ire Vogel • Frank Vogel was brought to Orlando two years ago with hopes he could get the Magic back to the playofs, and stop the spinning of the revolving door to their coaches’ oice. Neither of those things happened. Vogel was fired by the Magic on Thursday about 10 hours after the team wrapped up a 25-57 season, its sixth consecutive losing year. Vogel, who had one year left on his contract, went 54-110 in his two years with Orlando. NBA sets attendance marks • The NBA set an attendance record for the fourth straight season, surpassing 22 million for the first time. The league says 22.1 million fans attended games in the regular season, eclipsing 21.9 million during the 2016-17 season. The NBA also announced Thursday a record for average attendance at 17,987, improving from last season’s high of 17,884. Other news • Free agent guard Ty Lawson has signed a contract with the Washington Wizards, giving them additional depth heading into their first-round playoff series against the Toronto Raptors. ... DeAndre Bembry’s season full of injury woes ended with the Atlanta Hawks’ second-year forward being diagnosed with his second fractured right wrist.

NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE *if necessary EASTERN CONFERENCE RAPTORS VS. WIZARDS Saturday 4:30 at Toronto, ESPN Tuesday 6 at Toronto, NBA April 20 7 at Washington, ESPN2 April 22 5 at Washington, TNT April 25 TBA at Toronto* April 27 TBA at Washington* April 29 TBA at Toronto* CELTICS VS. BUCKS Sunday Noon at Boston, TNT Tuesday 7 at Boston, TNT April 20 8:30 at Milwaukee, ESPN April 22 Noon at Milwaukee, KDNL-30 April 24 TBA at Boston* April 26 TBA at Milwaukee* April 28 TBA at Boston, TNT* 76ERS VS. HEAT Saturday 7 at Philadelphia, ESPN Monday 7 at Philadelphia, TNT April 19 6 at Miami, TNT April 21 1:30 at Miami, TNT April 24 TBA at Phila.* April 26 TBA at Miami* April 28 TBA at Philadelphia, TNT* CAVALIERS VS. PACERS Sunday 2:30 at Cleveland, KDNL-30 Wed. 6 at Cleveland, TNT April 20 6 at Indiana, ESPN April 22 7:30 at Indiana, TNT April 25 TBA at Cleveland* April 27 TBA at Indiana* April 29 TBA at Cleveland* WESTERN CONFERENCE ROCKETS VS. TIMBERWOLVES Sunday 8 at Houston, TNT Wed. 8:30 at Houston, TNT April 21 6:30 at Minnesota, ESPN April 23 7 at Minnesota, TNT April 25 TBA at Houston* April 27 TBA at Minnesota* April 29 TBA at Houston* WARRIORS VS. SPURS Saturday 2 at Golden State, KDNL-30 Monday 9:30 at Golden State, TNT April 19 8:30 at San Antonio, TNT April 22 2:30 at San Antonio, KDNL-30 April 24 TBA at Golden St.* April 26 TBA at San Antonio* April 28 TBA at Golden St., TNT* TRAIL BLAZERS VS. PELICANS Saturday 9:30 at Portland, ESPN Tuesday 9:30 at Portland, TNT April 19 8 at New Orleans, NBA April 21 4 at New Orleans, TNT April 24 TBA at Portland* April 26 TBA at New Orleans* April 28 TBA at Portland, TNT* THUNDER VS. JAZZ Sunday 5:30 at Okla. City, TNT Wed. 7 at Okla. City, NBA April 21 9 at Utah, ESPN April 23 9:30 at Utah, TNT April 25 TBA at Okla. City* April 27 TBA at Utah* April 29 TBA at Okla. City*

FINAL NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L z-Toronto 59 23 x-Boston 55 27 x-Philadelphia 52 30 New York 29 53 Brooklyn 28 54 Southeast W L x-Miami 44 38 x-Washington 43 39 Charlotte 36 46 Orlando 25 57 Atlanta 24 58 Central W L y-Cleveland 50 32 x-Indiana 48 34 x-Milwaukee 44 38 Detroit 39 43 Chicago 27 55 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L z-Houston 65 17 x-New Orleans 48 34 x-San Antonio 47 35 Dallas 24 58 Memphis 22 60 Northwest W L x-Portland 49 33 x-Utah 48 34 x-Oklahoma City 48 34 x-Minnesota 47 35 Denver 46 36 Paciic W L y-Golden State 58 24 LA Clippers 42 40 LA Lakers 35 47 Sacramento 27 55 Phoenix 21 61

Wednesday

Pct .720 .671 .634 .354 .341 Pct .537 .524 .439 .305 .293 Pct .610 .585 .537 .476 .329

GB — 4 7 30 31 GB — 1 8 19 20 GB — 2 6 11 23

L10 6-4 6-4 10-0 3-7 5-5 L10 5-5 3-7 5-5 4-6 3-7 L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 7-3 3-7

Str L-1 W-1 W-16 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-4

Home 34-7 27-14 30-11 19-22 15-26 Home 26-15 23-18 21-20 17-24 16-25 Home 29-12 27-14 25-16 25-16 17-24

Away 25-16 28-13 22-19 10-31 13-28 Away 18-23 20-21 15-26 8-33 8-33 Away 21-20 21-20 19-22 14-27 10-31

Conf 40-12 33-19 34-18 17-35 19-33 Conf 31-21 28-24 22-30 15-37 12-40 Conf 35-17 32-20 27-25 24-28 21-31

Boston 110, Brooklyn 97 Detroit 119, Chicago 87 Miami 116, Toronto 109, OT Minnesota 112, Denver 106, OT New Orleans 122, San Antonio 98 New York 110, Cleveland 98 Oklahoma City 137, Memphis 123 Orlando 101, Washington 92 Philadelphia 130, Milwaukee 95 Lakers 115, Clippers 100 Portland 102, Utah 93 Sacramento 96, Houston 83 Tuesday Charlotte 119, Indiana 93 Philadelphia 121, Atlanta 113 Washington 113, Boston 101 Phoenix 124, Dallas 97

Pct .793 .585 .573 .293 .268 Pct .598 .585 .585 .573 .561 Pct .707 .512 .427 .329 .256

GB — 17 18 41 43 GB — 1 1 2 3 GB — 16 23 31 37

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 2-8 3-7 L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 6-4 7-3 L10 4-6 4-6 3-7 4-6 2-8

Str L-1 W-5 L-1 L-4 L-2 Str W-1 L-1 W-3 W-3 L-1 Str L-1 L-4 W-1 W-1 W-1

Home 34-7 24-17 33-8 15-26 16-25 Home 28-13 28-13 27-14 30-11 31-10 Home 29-12 22-19 20-21 14-27 10-31

Away 31-10 24-17 14-27 9-32 6-35 Away 21-20 20-21 21-20 17-24 15-26 Away 29-12 20-21 15-26 13-28 11-30

x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

Conf 41-11 27-25 29-23 14-38 18-34 Conf 31-21 34-18 28-24 34-18 28-24 Conf 34-18 24-28 19-33 14-38 15-37

Utah 119, Golden State 79 Houston 105, LA Lakers 99 FINAL SCORING LEADERS PLAYER AVG Harden, HOU 30.4 Davis, NOR 28.1 James, CLE 27.5 Lillard, POR 26.9 Antetokounmpo, MIL 26.9 Durant, GOL 26.4 Westbrook, OKC 25.4 Irving, BOS 24.4 Aldridge, SAN 23.1 Oladipo, IND 23.1 DeRozan, TOR 23.0 Embiid, PHL 22.9 Beal, WAS 22.6 Williams, LAC 22.6 Butler, MIN 22.2 Walker, CHA 22.1 George, OKC 21.9 Griffin, DET 21.4 McCollum, POR 21.4 Towns, MIN 21.3 Mitchell, UTA 20.5 Middleton, MIL 20.1 Thompson, GOL 20.0

WEDNESDAY’S LATE NBA SUMMARIES Lakers 115, Clippers 100

Trail Blazers 102, Jazz 93

Kings 96, Rockets 83

L.A. Lakers: Hart 9-15 5-5 30, Randle 2-3 2-2 6, Lopez 4-7 3-3 14, Caruso 5-11 2-4 15, Caldwell-Pope 0-1 0-0 0, Wear 1-2 0-0 2, Zubac 2-5 2-2 6, Bryant 3-8 0-0 6, Ennis 3-8 0-0 6, A.Ingram 2-9 0-0 5, Payton II 11-19 0-0 25. Totals 42-88 14-16 115. L.A. Clippers: Johnson 3-4 2-3 9, Harris 9-15 3-3 23, Jordan 3-3 0-5 6, Rivers 0-9 1-2 1, Thornwell 3-9 3-4 12, Dekker 5-6 0-1 10, Harrell 7-14 1-5 15, Marjanovic 5-7 2-5 12, Wallace 2-6 0-0 4, C.Williams 4-10 0-0 8. Totals 41-83 12-28 100. L.A. Lakers 39 25 28 23 — 115 L.A. Clippers 32 21 21 26 — 100 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 17-39 (Hart 7-9, Caruso 3-4, Lopez 3-5, Payton II 3-7, A.Ingram 1-4, Zubac 0-1, Caldwell-Pope 0-1, Randle 0-1, Ennis 0-2, Bryant 0-5), L.A. Clippers 6-18 (Thornwell 3-3, Harris 2-5, Johnson 1-2, Wallace 0-2, C.Williams 0-2, Rivers 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 49 (Payton II 12), L.A. Clippers 41 (Marjanovic 10). Assists: L.A. Lakers 25 (A.Ingram 6), L.A. Clippers 27 (Rivers 6). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 23, L.A. Clippers 17. Technicals: Bryant, Dekker. A: 19,068 (18,997).

Utah: Ingles 2-7 0-0 5, Favors 4-8 2-2 10, Gobert 5-11 3-4 13, Rubio 5-12 6-6 17, Mitchell 6-23 4-6 17, Crowder 4-11 2-2 12, O’Neale 2-6 0-0 6, Jerebko 2-3 0-0 5, Udoh 1-1 0-0 2, Exum 2-6 2-2 6, Neto 0-1 0-2 0. Totals 33-89 19-24 93. Portland: Turner 2-6 0-0 4, Aminu 2-4 0-0 5, Nurkic 6-16 1-5 13, Lillard 13-25 6-6 36, McCollum 8-18 1-2 19, Layman 0-0 0-0 0, Swanigan 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 2-4 0-0 4, Collins 1-3 0-0 2, Napier 3-7 2-2 9, Connaughton 2-3 0-0 5, Baldwin IV 2-3 1-1 5. Totals 41-89 11-16 102. Utah 21 20 18 34 — 93 Portland 28 27 25 22 — 102 3-point goals: Utah 8-23 (O’Neale 2-3, Crowder 2-5, Jerebko 1-1, Rubio 1-1, Ingles 1-2, Mitchell 1-8, Exum 0-1, Neto 0-1, Favors 0-1), Portland 9-24 (Lillard 4-10, McCollum 2-4, Connaughton 1-2, Aminu 1-2, Napier 1-3, Collins 0-1, Turner 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 53 (Gobert 13), Portland 46 (Nurkic, Aminu 9). Assists: Utah 18 (Rubio, Mitchell 5), Portland 19 (Lillard 10). Total fouls: Utah 19, Portland 22. Technicals: Portland coach Trail Blazers (Defensive three second), Nurkic. A: 20,186 (19,393).

Houston: Green 11-22 2-2 31, Tucker 1-7 0-0 3, Black 4-8 3-6 12, Hunter 7-16 2-2 19, Johnson 2-10 0-0 4, Qi 1-5 0-0 2, Onuaku 2-5 0-0 4, A.Jackson 3-9 1-2 8. Totals 31-82 8-12 83. Sacramento: J.Jackson 0-8 0-0 0, Sampson 5-8 1-1 11, Cauley-Stein 9-12 4-6 22, Fox 5-10 0-2 11, Bogdanovic 5-12 0-0 12, Hayes 2-5 0-0 4, Cooley 1-4 8-10 10, Hield 6-13 0-1 14, Carter 5-8 0-0 12. Totals 38-80 13-20 96. Houston 22 22 19 20 — 83 Sacramento 28 24 27 17 — 96 3-point goals: Houston 13-46 (Green 7-17, Hunter 3-11, Black 1-2, A.Jackson 1-4, Tucker 1-7, Johnson 0-2, Qi 0-3), Sacramento 7-26 (Carter 2-3, Hield 2-4, Bogdanovic 2-7, Fox 1-4, Hayes 0-2, J.Jackson 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 40 (Black 11), Sacramento 48 (Cauley-Stein 11). Assists: Houston 11 (Johnson 5), Sacramento 22 (Hield, Bogdanovic 5). Total fouls: Houston 24, Sacramento 14. A: 17,583 (17,608).


SPORTS

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 2

Blue Jackets score in OT for upset win over Caps

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

Hornacek is ired as coach of Knicks

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Knicks went 29-53 this season and missed the playofs both seasons with Jef Hornacek as coach. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Columbus left wing Artemi Panarin (bottom left) celebrates with teammates after scoring the winning goal in a 4-3 victory at Washington.

Toronto’s Nazem Kadri was thrown out of the game and given a five-minute major for an elbow to Tommy Wingels’ head. Zach Hyman scored Toronto’s goal.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Artemi Panarin scored 6:02 into overtime to give the Columbus Blue Jackets a 4-3 victory over the host Washington Capitals on Thursday night in Game 1 of their first-round playof series. Panarin made an incredible individual move to drive by fellow Russian Dmitry Orlov and went backhand-to-forehand to beat Philipp Grubauer top shelf. Alexander Wennberg, Thomas Vanek and Seth Jones scored in regulation, and Sergei Bobrovsky stopped 27 shots for Columbus. Wennberg left the game with an upper-body injury in the third period and didn’t return.

Lightning 5, Devils 2 • Tampa Bay got early goals from four players — none of them named Nikita Kucherov or Steven Stamkos — before holding of the visiting New Jersey Devils in Game 1. Ondrej Palat, Tyler Johnson and Yanni Gourde scored, helping the Lightning build a 3-0 lead that New Jersey trimmed to one goal before Alex Killorn and Kucherov, who added an empty-netter with 1:12 remaining, finished of the win.

Predators 5, Avalanche 2 • Filip Forsberg scored twice in the third and host Nashville rallied to beat Colorado in Game 1. Pekka Rinne made 25 saves, including a handful on Colorado’s Hart Trophy candidate Nathan MacKinnon. Austin Watson, Craig Smith and Colton Sissons also scored for Nashville.

Sharks 3, Ducks 0 • Evander Kane scored two goals in his first career playof game and Martin Jones made 25 saves as San Jose won Game 1 in Anaheim. Brent Burns also scored and captain Joe Pavelski had two assists during a threegoal second period. John Gibson stopped 30 shots for the Ducks.

Bruins 5, Maple Leafs 1 • Brad Marchand, David Backes and David Krejci each scored a power-play goal, and Tuukka Rask stopped 26 shots to lead host Boston over Toronto in Game 1. David Pastrnak and Sean Kuraly also scored for Boston.

NOTEBOOK Kings’ Doughty suspended • Los Angeles defenseman Drew Doughty was suspended for one game for an illegal check to the head of Vegas Golden Knights forward William Carrier on Wednesday.

NHL PLAYOFF SCHEDULE

NHL SUMMARIES

*if necessary

Blue Jackets 4, Capitals 3, OT Columbus 0 1 2 1 — Washington 2 0 1 0 — First period: 1, Washington, Kuznetsov 1 (Backstrom, Carlson), 17:52 (pp). 2, Washington, Kuznetsov 2 (Backstrom, Carlson), 18:21 (pp). Penalties: Foligno, CBJ, (interference), 4:52; Cole, CBJ, (hooking), 9:01; Oshie, WSH, (hooking), 14:42; Anderson, CBJ, served by Bjorkstrand, Major (boarding), 17:23; Anderson, CBJ, Misconduct (misconduct), 17:23. Second period: 3, Columbus, Wennberg 1 (Jenner, Vanek), 4:48. Penalties: Panarin, CBJ, (hooking), 16:09. Third period: 4, Columbus, Vanek 1 (Panarin, Dubois), 1:31 (pp). 5, Washington, Smith-Pelly 1 (Carlson, Vrana), 5:12. 6, Columbus, Jones 1 (Panarin, Atkinson), 15:34 (pp). Penalties: Wilson, WSH, (charging), 1:18; Kuznetsov, WSH, (slashing), 11:19; Burakovsky, WSH, (tripping), 14:55. Overtime: 7, Columbus, Panarin 1 (Cole, Dubois), -8:-58. Penalties: None. Shots: Columbus 4-12-9-2: 27. Washington 9-16-5: 30. Power-plays: Columbus 2 of 4; Washington 2 of 6. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 1-0 (30 shots-27 saves). Washington, Grubauer 0-1 (27-23). A: 18,506. Referees: Trevor Hanson, Marc Joannette. Linesmen: Trent Knorr, Jonny Murray.

4 3

BRUINS 1, MAPLE LEAFS 0 Game 1 Bruins 5, Maple Leafs 1 Saturday 7 at Boston, KSDK-5 Monday 6 at Toronto, NBCSN April 19 6 at Toronto, NBCSN April 21 TBA at Boston* April 23 TBA at Toronto* April 25 TBA at Boston*

Bruins 5, Maple Leafs 1 Toronto 1 0 0 — Boston 1 2 2 — First period: 1, Boston, Marchand 1 (Krug, Pastrnak), 5:28 (pp). 2, Toronto, Hyman 1 (Brown, Rielly), 16:52. Penalties: van Riemsdyk, TOR, (hooking), 5:04; Krejci, BOS, (hooking), 5:54. Second period: 3, Boston, Backes 1 (Krejci, McAvoy), 15:43 (pp). 4, Boston, Pastrnak 1 (Bergeron, Marchand), 19:22. Penalties: Chara, BOS, (holding stick), 0:59; Heinen, BOS, (slashing), 6:49; Marleau, TOR, (hooking), 13:59. Third period: 5, Boston, Kuraly 1 (Pastrnak, Chara), 7:41. 6, Boston, Krejci 1 (Krug, DeBrusk), 11:29 (pp). Penalties: Toronto bench, served by Marner (too many men on the ice), 1:54; Kadri, TOR, (boarding), 4:44; Kadri, TOR, served by van Riemsdyk, Major (charging), 8:18; Kadri, TOR, Misconduct (misconduct), 8:18. Shots: Toronto 7-11-9: 27. Boston 9-16-15: 40. Power-plays: Toronto 0 of 3; Boston 3 of 6. Goalies: Toronto, Andersen 0-1 (40 shots-35 saves). Boston, Rask 1-0 (27-26). A: 17,565. Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Mark Shewchyk.

1 5

Lightning 5, Devils 2 New Jersey 0 1 1 — Tampa Bay 2 1 2 — First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Palat 1 (Johnson, McDonagh), 15:00. 2, Tampa Bay, Johnson 1 (Palat, Point), 19:31. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Tampa Bay, Gourde 1 (Palat, Sergachev), 1:54 (pp). 4, New Jersey, Hall 1, 13:55. Penalties: Wood, NJ, (slashing), 0:05; Point, TB, (tripping), 9:28. Third period: 5, New Jersey, Zajac 1 (Butcher, Hall), 9:35 (pp). 6, Tampa Bay, Killorn 1 (Gourde), 12:14. 7, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 1, 18:48. Penalties: Miller, TB, (slashing), 9:11. Shots: New Jersey 11-15-5: 31. Tampa Bay 13-7-12: 32. Power-plays: New Jersey 1 of 2; Tampa Bay 1 of 1. Goalies: New Jersey, Kinkaid 0-1 (31 shots-27 saves). Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 1-0 (31-29). A: 19,092. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Brian Murphy.

EASTERN CONFERENCE LIGHTNING 1, DEVILS 0 Game 1 Lightning 5, Devils 2 Saturday 2 at Tampa Bay, CNBC Monday 6:30 at New Jersey, CNBC Wed. 6:30 at New Jersey, Golf April 21 TBA at Tampa Bay* April 23 TBA at New Jersey* April 25 TBA at Tampa Bay*

2 5

Predators 5, Avalanche 2 Colorado 1 1 0 — 2 Nashville 0 2 3 — 5 First period: 1, Colorado, Zadorov 1 (Rantanen, MacKinnon), 6:36. Penalties: Ekholm, NSH, (holding), 16:38; Watson, NSH, (cross checking), 18:19. Second period: 2, Nashville, Watson 1 (Sissons, Johansen), 3:16. 3, Colorado, Comeau 1 (Nieto, Soderberg), 4:51. 4, Nashville, Smith 1 (Johansen), 8:50 (pp). Penalties: MacKinnon, COL, (slashing), 8:40. Third period: 5, Nashville, Forsberg 1 (Arvidsson, Josi), 6:08. 6, Nashville, Forsberg 2, 12:10. 7, Nashville, Sissons 1 (Watson), 18:03. Penalties: Barberio, COL, (slashing), 7:58; Turris, NSH, (slashing), 12:22; Zadorov, COL, (cross checking), 20:00; Zadorov, COL, Misconduct (misconduct), 20:00. Shots: Colorado 11-6-10: 27. Nashville 10-11-10: 31. Power-plays: Colorado 0 of 3; Nashville 1 of 2. Goalies: Colorado, Bernier 0-1 (30 shots-26 saves). Nashville, Rinne 1-0 (27-25). A: 17,301. Referees: Brad Meier, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Ryan Gibbons, Steve Miller.

Sharks 3, Ducks 0 San Jose 0 3 0 — 3 Anaheim 0 0 0 — 0 First Period: None. Penalties: Pettersson, ANA, (holding), 4:57; Meier, SJ, (interference), 11:28; Kesler, ANA, (interference), 13:43. Second Period: 1, San Jose, Kane 1 (Hertl, Pavelski), 7:07 (pp). 2, San Jose, Kane 2 (Dillon, Pavelski), 13:51. 3, San Jose, Burns 1 (Meier), 15:15. Penalties: Dillon, SJ, (slashing), 1:44; Cogliano, ANA, (slashing), 6:41; Getzlaf, ANA, (slashing), 6:57; Perry, ANA, (roughing), 15:41. Third Period: None. Penalties: Kesler, ANA, (interference), 11:40; Braun, SJ, (slashing), 19:10; Perry, ANA, (slashing), 0:00; Dillon, SJ, (cross checking), 20:00. Shots: San Jose 8-17-9: 34. Anaheim 4-9-12: 25. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 7; Anaheim 0 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Jones 1-0 (25 shots-25 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 0-1 (34-31). A: 17,174. Referees: Jean Hebert, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Pierre Racicot, Tony Sericolo.

BLUE JACKETS 1, CAPITALS 0 Game 1 Blue Jackets 4, Capitals 3, OT Saturday 6:30 at Washington, NBCSN Tuesday 6:30 at Columbus, NBCSN April 19 6:30 at Columbus, USA April 21 TBA at Washington* April 23 TBA at Columbus* April 25 TBA at Washington* PENGUINS 1, FLYERS 0 Game 1 Penguins 7, Flyers 0 Friday 6 at Pittsburgh, NBCSN Thursday 2 at Philadelphia, KSDK-5 Wed. 6 at Philadelphia, NBCSN April 20 TBA at Pittsburgh* April 22 TBA at Philadelphia* April 24 TBA at Pittsburgh* WESTERN CONFERENCE PREDATORS 1, AVALANCHE 0 Game 1 Predators 5, Avalanche 2 Saturday 2 at Nashville, KSDK Monday 9 at Colorado, NBCSN Wed. 9 at Colorado, NBCSN April 20 TBA at Nashville* April 22 TBA at Colorado* April 24 TBA at Nashville* JETS 1, WILD 0 Game 1 Jets 3, Wild 2 Friday 6:30 at Winnipeg, USA Thursday 6 at Minnesota, USA Tuesday 7 at Minnesota, CNBC April 20 TBA at Winnipeg* April 22 TBA at Minnesota* April 25 TBA at Winnipeg* GOLDEN KNIGHTS 1, KINGS 0 Game 1 Golden Knights 1, Kings 0 Friday 9 at Las Vegas, NBCSN Thursday 9:30 at Los Angeles, NBCSN Tuesday 9:30 at Los Angeles, NBCSN April 19 9 at Las Vegas, NBCSN* April 21 TBA at Los Angeles* April 23 TBA at Las Vegas* SHARKS 1, DUCKS 0 Game 1 Sharks 3, Ducks 0 Saturday 9:30 at Anaheim, NBCSN Monday 9:30 at San Jose, CNBC Wed. 9:30 at San Jose, Golf April 20 TBA at Anaheim* April 22 TBA at San Jose* April 24 TBA at Anaheim*

The New York Knicks are preaching patience but looking for progress. Jef Hornacek got caught in the middle. The Knicks fired their coach early Thursday, shortly after finishing a 29-53 season. They lost more than 50 games and missed the playofs both seasons under Hornacek. “We looked out and we have a plan for what this team should look like over the next three years or so,” Knicks President Steve Mills said. “We just thought this was an opportunity where we thought it was the right time to make a change.” Mills and general manager Scott Perry said they didn’t see enough improvement on the court and enough communication and accountability of it. They informed Hornacek of their decision at the airport after flying home from a season-ending victory in Cleveland. Associate head coach Kurt Rambis also was fired. Hornacek went 60-104 and had a year left on his contract. The ouster sends the Knicks in search of their 11th coach since Jeff Van Gundy resigned in the 2001-02 season. Magic ire Vogel • Frank Vogel was brought to Orlando two years ago with hopes he could get the Magic back to the playofs, and stop the spinning of the revolving door to their coaches’ oice. Neither of those things happened. Vogel was fired by the Magic on Thursday about 10 hours after the team wrapped up a 25-57 season, its sixth consecutive losing year. Vogel, who had one year left on his contract, went 54-110 in his two years with Orlando. NBA sets attendance marks • The NBA set an attendance record for the fourth straight season, surpassing 22 million for the first time. The league says 22.1 million fans attended games in the regular season, eclipsing 21.9 million during the 2016-17 season. The NBA also announced Thursday a record for average attendance at 17,987, improving from last season’s high of 17,884. Other news • Free agent guard Ty Lawson has signed a contract with the Washington Wizards, giving them additional depth heading into their first-round playoff series against the Toronto Raptors. ... DeAndre Bembry’s season full of injury woes ended with the Atlanta Hawks’ second-year forward being diagnosed with his second fractured right wrist.

NBA PLAYOFF SCHEDULE *if necessary EASTERN CONFERENCE RAPTORS VS. WIZARDS Saturday 4:30 at Toronto, ESPN Tuesday 6 at Toronto, NBA April 20 7 at Washington, ESPN2 April 22 5 at Washington, TNT April 25 TBA at Toronto* April 27 TBA at Washington* April 29 TBA at Toronto* CELTICS VS. BUCKS Sunday Noon at Boston, TNT Tuesday 7 at Boston, TNT April 20 8:30 at Milwaukee, ESPN April 22 Noon at Milwaukee, KDNL-30 April 24 TBA at Boston* April 26 TBA at Milwaukee* April 28 TBA at Boston, TNT* 76ERS VS. HEAT Saturday 7 at Philadelphia, ESPN Monday 7 at Philadelphia, TNT April 19 6 at Miami, TNT April 21 1:30 at Miami, TNT April 24 TBA at Phila.* April 26 TBA at Miami* April 28 TBA at Philadelphia, TNT* CAVALIERS VS. PACERS Sunday 2:30 at Cleveland, KDNL-30 Wed. 6 at Cleveland, TNT April 20 6 at Indiana, ESPN April 22 7:30 at Indiana, TNT April 25 TBA at Cleveland* April 27 TBA at Indiana* April 29 TBA at Cleveland* WESTERN CONFERENCE ROCKETS VS. TIMBERWOLVES Sunday 8 at Houston, TNT Wed. 8:30 at Houston, TNT April 21 6:30 at Minnesota, ESPN April 23 7 at Minnesota, TNT April 25 TBA at Houston* April 27 TBA at Minnesota* April 29 TBA at Houston* WARRIORS VS. SPURS Saturday 2 at Golden State, KDNL-30 Monday 9:30 at Golden State, TNT April 19 8:30 at San Antonio, TNT April 22 2:30 at San Antonio, KDNL-30 April 24 TBA at Golden St.* April 26 TBA at San Antonio* April 28 TBA at Golden St., TNT* TRAIL BLAZERS VS. PELICANS Saturday 9:30 at Portland, ESPN Tuesday 9:30 at Portland, TNT April 19 8 at New Orleans, NBA April 21 4 at New Orleans, TNT April 24 TBA at Portland* April 26 TBA at New Orleans* April 28 TBA at Portland, TNT* THUNDER VS. JAZZ Sunday 5:30 at Okla. City, TNT Wed. 7 at Okla. City, NBA April 21 9 at Utah, ESPN April 23 9:30 at Utah, TNT April 25 TBA at Okla. City* April 27 TBA at Utah* April 29 TBA at Okla. City*

FINAL NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L z-Toronto 59 23 x-Boston 55 27 x-Philadelphia 52 30 New York 29 53 Brooklyn 28 54 Southeast W L x-Miami 44 38 x-Washington 43 39 Charlotte 36 46 Orlando 25 57 Atlanta 24 58 Central W L y-Cleveland 50 32 x-Indiana 48 34 x-Milwaukee 44 38 Detroit 39 43 Chicago 27 55 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L z-Houston 65 17 x-New Orleans 48 34 x-San Antonio 47 35 Dallas 24 58 Memphis 22 60 Northwest W L x-Portland 49 33 x-Utah 48 34 x-Oklahoma City 48 34 x-Minnesota 47 35 Denver 46 36 Paciic W L y-Golden State 58 24 LA Clippers 42 40 LA Lakers 35 47 Sacramento 27 55 Phoenix 21 61

Wednesday

Pct .720 .671 .634 .354 .341 Pct .537 .524 .439 .305 .293 Pct .610 .585 .537 .476 .329

GB — 4 7 30 31 GB — 1 8 19 20 GB — 2 6 11 23

L10 6-4 6-4 10-0 3-7 5-5 L10 5-5 3-7 5-5 4-6 3-7 L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 7-3 3-7

Str L-1 W-1 W-16 W-1 L-1 Str W-1 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-4

Home 34-7 27-14 30-11 19-22 15-26 Home 26-15 23-18 21-20 17-24 16-25 Home 29-12 27-14 25-16 25-16 17-24

Away 25-16 28-13 22-19 10-31 13-28 Away 18-23 20-21 15-26 8-33 8-33 Away 21-20 21-20 19-22 14-27 10-31

Conf 40-12 33-19 34-18 17-35 19-33 Conf 31-21 28-24 22-30 15-37 12-40 Conf 35-17 32-20 27-25 24-28 21-31

Boston 110, Brooklyn 97 Detroit 119, Chicago 87 Miami 116, Toronto 109, OT Minnesota 112, Denver 106, OT New Orleans 122, San Antonio 98 New York 110, Cleveland 98 Oklahoma City 137, Memphis 123 Orlando 101, Washington 92 Philadelphia 130, Milwaukee 95 Lakers 115, Clippers 100 Portland 102, Utah 93 Sacramento 96, Houston 83 Tuesday Charlotte 119, Indiana 93 Philadelphia 121, Atlanta 113 Washington 113, Boston 101 Phoenix 124, Dallas 97

Pct .793 .585 .573 .293 .268 Pct .598 .585 .585 .573 .561 Pct .707 .512 .427 .329 .256

GB — 17 18 41 43 GB — 1 1 2 3 GB — 16 23 31 37

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 2-8 3-7 L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 6-4 7-3 L10 4-6 4-6 3-7 4-6 2-8

Str L-1 W-5 L-1 L-4 L-2 Str W-1 L-1 W-3 W-3 L-1 Str L-1 L-4 W-1 W-1 W-1

Home 34-7 24-17 33-8 15-26 16-25 Home 28-13 28-13 27-14 30-11 31-10 Home 29-12 22-19 20-21 14-27 10-31

Away 31-10 24-17 14-27 9-32 6-35 Away 21-20 20-21 21-20 17-24 15-26 Away 29-12 20-21 15-26 13-28 11-30

x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

Conf 41-11 27-25 29-23 14-38 18-34 Conf 31-21 34-18 28-24 34-18 28-24 Conf 34-18 24-28 19-33 14-38 15-37

Utah 119, Golden State 79 Houston 105, LA Lakers 99 FINAL SCORING LEADERS PLAYER AVG Harden, HOU 30.4 Davis, NOR 28.1 James, CLE 27.5 Lillard, POR 26.9 Antetokounmpo, MIL 26.9 Durant, GOL 26.4 Westbrook, OKC 25.4 Irving, BOS 24.4 Aldridge, SAN 23.1 Oladipo, IND 23.1 DeRozan, TOR 23.0 Embiid, PHL 22.9 Beal, WAS 22.6 Williams, LAC 22.6 Butler, MIN 22.2 Walker, CHA 22.1 George, OKC 21.9 Griffin, DET 21.4 McCollum, POR 21.4 Towns, MIN 21.3 Mitchell, UTA 20.5 Middleton, MIL 20.1 Thompson, GOL 20.0

WEDNESDAY’S LATE NBA SUMMARIES Lakers 115, Clippers 100

Trail Blazers 102, Jazz 93

Kings 96, Rockets 83

L.A. Lakers: Hart 9-15 5-5 30, Randle 2-3 2-2 6, Lopez 4-7 3-3 14, Caruso 5-11 2-4 15, Caldwell-Pope 0-1 0-0 0, Wear 1-2 0-0 2, Zubac 2-5 2-2 6, Bryant 3-8 0-0 6, Ennis 3-8 0-0 6, A.Ingram 2-9 0-0 5, Payton II 11-19 0-0 25. Totals 42-88 14-16 115. L.A. Clippers: Johnson 3-4 2-3 9, Harris 9-15 3-3 23, Jordan 3-3 0-5 6, Rivers 0-9 1-2 1, Thornwell 3-9 3-4 12, Dekker 5-6 0-1 10, Harrell 7-14 1-5 15, Marjanovic 5-7 2-5 12, Wallace 2-6 0-0 4, C.Williams 4-10 0-0 8. Totals 41-83 12-28 100. L.A. Lakers 39 25 28 23 — 115 L.A. Clippers 32 21 21 26 — 100 3-point goals: L.A. Lakers 17-39 (Hart 7-9, Caruso 3-4, Lopez 3-5, Payton II 3-7, A.Ingram 1-4, Zubac 0-1, Caldwell-Pope 0-1, Randle 0-1, Ennis 0-2, Bryant 0-5), L.A. Clippers 6-18 (Thornwell 3-3, Harris 2-5, Johnson 1-2, Wallace 0-2, C.Williams 0-2, Rivers 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Lakers 49 (Payton II 12), L.A. Clippers 41 (Marjanovic 10). Assists: L.A. Lakers 25 (A.Ingram 6), L.A. Clippers 27 (Rivers 6). Total fouls: L.A. Lakers 23, L.A. Clippers 17. Technicals: Bryant, Dekker. A: 19,068 (18,997).

Utah: Ingles 2-7 0-0 5, Favors 4-8 2-2 10, Gobert 5-11 3-4 13, Rubio 5-12 6-6 17, Mitchell 6-23 4-6 17, Crowder 4-11 2-2 12, O’Neale 2-6 0-0 6, Jerebko 2-3 0-0 5, Udoh 1-1 0-0 2, Exum 2-6 2-2 6, Neto 0-1 0-2 0. Totals 33-89 19-24 93. Portland: Turner 2-6 0-0 4, Aminu 2-4 0-0 5, Nurkic 6-16 1-5 13, Lillard 13-25 6-6 36, McCollum 8-18 1-2 19, Layman 0-0 0-0 0, Swanigan 0-0 0-0 0, Davis 2-4 0-0 4, Collins 1-3 0-0 2, Napier 3-7 2-2 9, Connaughton 2-3 0-0 5, Baldwin IV 2-3 1-1 5. Totals 41-89 11-16 102. Utah 21 20 18 34 — 93 Portland 28 27 25 22 — 102 3-point goals: Utah 8-23 (O’Neale 2-3, Crowder 2-5, Jerebko 1-1, Rubio 1-1, Ingles 1-2, Mitchell 1-8, Exum 0-1, Neto 0-1, Favors 0-1), Portland 9-24 (Lillard 4-10, McCollum 2-4, Connaughton 1-2, Aminu 1-2, Napier 1-3, Collins 0-1, Turner 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 53 (Gobert 13), Portland 46 (Nurkic, Aminu 9). Assists: Utah 18 (Rubio, Mitchell 5), Portland 19 (Lillard 10). Total fouls: Utah 19, Portland 22. Technicals: Portland coach Trail Blazers (Defensive three second), Nurkic. A: 20,186 (19,393).

Houston: Green 11-22 2-2 31, Tucker 1-7 0-0 3, Black 4-8 3-6 12, Hunter 7-16 2-2 19, Johnson 2-10 0-0 4, Qi 1-5 0-0 2, Onuaku 2-5 0-0 4, A.Jackson 3-9 1-2 8. Totals 31-82 8-12 83. Sacramento: J.Jackson 0-8 0-0 0, Sampson 5-8 1-1 11, Cauley-Stein 9-12 4-6 22, Fox 5-10 0-2 11, Bogdanovic 5-12 0-0 12, Hayes 2-5 0-0 4, Cooley 1-4 8-10 10, Hield 6-13 0-1 14, Carter 5-8 0-0 12. Totals 38-80 13-20 96. Houston 22 22 19 20 — 83 Sacramento 28 24 27 17 — 96 3-point goals: Houston 13-46 (Green 7-17, Hunter 3-11, Black 1-2, A.Jackson 1-4, Tucker 1-7, Johnson 0-2, Qi 0-3), Sacramento 7-26 (Carter 2-3, Hield 2-4, Bogdanovic 2-7, Fox 1-4, Hayes 0-2, J.Jackson 0-6). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 40 (Black 11), Sacramento 48 (Cauley-Stein 11). Assists: Houston 11 (Johnson 5), Sacramento 22 (Hield, Bogdanovic 5). Total fouls: Houston 24, Sacramento 14. A: 17,583 (17,608).


STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

SOFTBALL • EDWARDSVILLE 8, BELLEVILLE EAST 1

Tigers continue dominance against Lancers BY STEVE OVERBEY STLhighschoolsports.com

BELLEVILLE • Jordyn Henrichs wouldn’t

call it a jinx. Or a spell. The Edwardsville High senior pitcher says her softball team simply loves to play — and beat — Belleville East. “For us, it’s always a big game and we’re always ready for them,” Henricks said. The Tigers were ready as usual on Thursday afternoon. Edwardsville turned in one of its finest efforts of the season in dispatching Belleville East 8-1 in an early-season showdown between Southwestern Conference powers at East. The Tigers recorded their 12th successive win over East to get a leg up in their attempt to win the SWC title for the sixth successive season. They have outscored the Lancers 102-25 during the 12-game run. East’s last win in the series was a 4-2 triumph on May 29, 2013. “It comes down to the small things,” Edwardsville senior shortstop Anna Burke said. “Against them, we always seem to get a bunt down, or move a runner over. The little things make a diference.” The Lancers came into the contest determined to change the trend. They carried a 9-2 mark and had won eight of their previous nine contests. Edwardsville, on the other hand, lost two of its previous three and appeared on a downward slide after dropping a decision to Triad on April 6. But the Tigers woke up at the right time and capitalized on seven East errors to get the job done once again. “We executed today much better than what we have been,” Edwardsville coach

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to SThighschoolsports.com

Edwardsville senior outielder Lauren Taplin bunts Thursday against Belleville East in a Southwestern Conference softball game at Belleville East. Edwardsville’s commitment to small ball put pressure on the Lancers and led the way to an 8-1 victory.

Lori Blade said. “We had the right mental approach today. This is what I expected us to be the whole time.” Edwardsville played small ball the entire afternoon, using an array of bunts to force East into one fielding mistake after another. Six of the Tigers’ runs were unearned. “Edwardsville is all about going on runs,” East coach Natalie Peters said. “If we let them go on one of their runs with

BASEBALL • LUTHERAN ST. CHARLES 8, WINFIELD 1

Cougars stay hot behind Hurayt’s complete game BY GREG UPTAIN STLhighschoolsports.com

ST. PETERS • The Lutheran St. Charles baseball team seems to be turning the corner. After a 1-6 start, the Cougars have reeled off four consecutive wins, the latest an 8-1 victory Thursday against Winfield in a nonconference game at the Cougars’ Alice Achelpohl Memorial Field. “We’re young. Our top five or six guys we returned and after that we didn’t return much experience from last year,” Lutheran St. Charles coach Andy Lueck said. “This is the seventh top 15 team — whether it be Class 2, 4 or 5 — we’ve played out of 11 games so far. So, our guys are battle tested. We’ve grown each week, which we keep on harping on. They’re starting to buy in, but we’ve still got a long way to go.” Junior right-hander Sam Hurayt (1-2) tossed his second complete game of the season. Hurayt allowed just an unearned run on only three hits and a walk with six strikeouts in 95 pitches. “I felt great,” Hurayt said. “I knew coming out I had to pump the zone with my defense in the back. And I knew our ofense was gonna get going. They got me a lead and I settled in.” That offense — which scored in single digits for the first time during the current win streak — was led by its middle-of-theorder hitters.

Three-hole hitter Zack Floyd was a home run short of a cycle and reached base all four times. He also scored two times and drove in a run. Cleanup man Chase Gibson also was on base all four times, including two hits and two RBI. “I was just looking to attack the ball,” said Floyd, a junior third baseman. “Anything that was a strike, I was planning on attacking really hard. That was my approach.” Winfield (9-4) came into the game as the No. 6 team in the Missouri High School Baseball Coaches Association Class 4 rankings and the No. 8 team in the STLhighschoolsports. com small-schools rankings, but suffered just its second loss to an area team. “Everything’s not gonna go your way all the time. What we have to do a little better is stay in the game. When things don’t go our way, let it go and do better on the next play,” Warriors coach Justin Rodgers said. “Somewhere midway through the game, as a team, we had some guys get down on themselves about the way things were going.” Winfield put the game’s first two batters on base but had nothing to show for it when Hurayt induced a forceout and then a 6-3 double play to escape the mini-jam. “That was awesome,” Hurayt said. “That’s what defense is for. I knew they were gonna make a play.”

horrible defense, it’s going to be a long night like it turned into tonight.” The Tigers (4-2, 3-0), the No. 1 team in the STLhighschoolsports.com largeschool rankings, pushed across three runs in the fourth inning by hitting just one ball out of the infield. A trio of errors and some heads-up baserunning did the trick. Henricks started the uprising with a leadoff single. Two runs came around on a throwing error before Maria Smith added a sac-

rifice fly to cap the blitz. Burke and Moe Kastens doubled in a five-run seventh inning. Burke’s basesloaded two-bagger pushed the lead to 6-1. Brooke Webber added a run-scoring single. Edwardsville pitchers Henricks and Meghan Gorniak combined to allow just six hits. East plated its only run in the fourth on hits by Jackie Belzer and Jasmine Poore and Stephanie Bigham’s bases-loaded walk. “I think we know we can be better than we have been,” Henricks said. “Today, we finally showed it.” The Lancers (9-3, 2-1), No. 2 among large schools, played excellent defense during the first three innings including web gems from Alyssa Krausz at short and Mackynzee Dalle in right field. But that defense failed them over the final four innings. “A lot of times, they don’t beat us, we beat ourselves,” East standout catcher Alex Boze said. The Tigers, who have won 43 of 45 league games over the past three-plus seasons, are in the early-season drivers’ seat for now. But Blade, the veteran coach, still feels East is the team to beat. “I think that’s the best team in the area, I really do,” Blade said. “Their lineup, the pitching and defense they have, they’re as good as anybody else around.” Peters remains frustrated by the Lancers inability to play well against the Tigers. “I wish I knew the answer,” Peters said. “If I did, I’d be a really happy person.” The teams are scheduled to meet again May 8 at Edwardsville.

THURSDAY’S RESULTS BASEBALL

BOYS TENNIS

Okawville 301 302 0 9 11 0 Gibault 032 512 0 13 11 0 W-Cameron Kincheloe. Winield 001 000 0 1 5 0 Lutheran SC 110 402 0 8 8 2 W-Sam Hurayt. L-Collin Sutton. McClr North (10)(10)0 00 20 9 0 Riverview 000 00 0 0 0 W-Isaac Roberson. L-Brian Thurman. MS-Berkeley 000 00 0 3 0 U. City 400 15 10 3 0 W-Henry Giles. Brentwood 000 23 5 4 6 Principia (10)05 00 0 11 0 HR-B Jordan Mitchell -; P Jack Adler St. James 030 100 0 4 6 1 Union 002 006 0 0 10 0 HR-U Trevor Kelly Hillsboro, Il 003 00 3 5 0 Mater Dei 412 51 13 12 0 W-Logan Johnson. HR-M Brock Timmermann Pky. Central 220 130 9 17 15 0 Pky. West 000 207 0 9 8 0 W-Ben Prywitch. HR-PC Tyler James STL Pat 318 72 21 20 0 Maplewood 000 00 0 3 0 W-Zachary Witaschek. HR-S Ian McClellan 2-Patrick Baalman -David Olejnik -Charlie Schark -Rocco Tornatore Wood River 222 012 6 15 11 0 Madison 200 000 0 2 1 0 W-Brett Carter. Afton 200 001 0 3 6 0 Clayton 040 008 0 12 13 0 W-William Laakko. Ritenour 100 20 3 3 0 Kirkwood 240 52 13 10 2 W-Ricky Maddock. De Smet 040 010 4 9 10 2 Chaminade 000 302 1 6 13 0 L-Luke Gilliam. Collinsville 000 035 6 14 19 3 Alton 321 030 0 9 13 1 W-Carson Richardson. L-Charlie Erler. HR-C Devon Bovinett -Hunter Counton Duchesne 000 1 1 3 3 St. Dominic 101 0 2 6 2 W-Ryan Foley. L-Jake Korba. Salem 100 102 0 4 8 0 Wesclin 000 111 0 3 9 2 L-Seth Nast. HR-W Mick Stephens Hermann 101 010 3 6 8 0 St. Clair 140 001 1 7 9 0 W-Blaine Downey. L-Cameron Michel. Bellvl. East 004 022 0 8 14 1 Edwardsville 000 010 0 1 4 3 W-Ryan Culley. L-Chase Gockel. Freeburg 331 003 0 10 11 0 Carlyle 030 221 3 11 11 0 W-Josh Guthrie. L-Zach Muir. HR-F Jack Lugge -Brady Schmitz -; C Jacob Eversgerd -Benji VonBurg Valmeyer 111 213 0 9 18 0 Dupo 000 110 0 2 7 0 W-Drew Maus. Red Bud 300 200 0 5 7 0 New Athens 000 320 1 6 7 2 W-Joel Mattingly. Festus 000 000 0 0 2 0 Perryville 011 200 0 4 6 0 L-Charlie Pratt. CBC 000 054 0 9 10 0 Triad 810 022 0 13 10 0 W-Chase Bertelsmann. HR-T Mack Langdon -Josh Mesenbrink Steeleville 011 013 0 6 9 0 Marissa 020 002 0 4 5 0 L-Drew Smith. Odin 021 05 8 11 0 Mascoutah 457 40 20 16 3 W-Tyler Jowett.

EUREKA DOUBLES TOURNAMENT Pool A At Kirkwood Marquette def. Kirkwood 3-1 Marquette def. Lafayette 4-0 Marquette def. Parkway South 4-0 Kirkwood def. Lafayette 4-0 Parkway South def. Lafayette 4-0 Kirkwood 3, Parkway South 1 FInal scores: Marquette, 11; Kirkwood, 8; Parkway South, 5; Lafayette, 0 OTHER SCORES Edwardsville 9, Granite City 0 Fort Zumwalt South 9, St. Charles West 0 St. Louis U. High 6, CBC 3 Festus 8, DuBourg 1

BOYS VOLLEYBALL Pattonville def. Webster 25-21, 21-25, 25-13 Pky. Central def. Pky. West 25-11, 25-22 Lafayette def. Marquette 25-17, 25-22 Afton def. Kirkwood 25-19, 17-25, 25-20 Pky. North def. Ritenour 25-17, 25-21 Luth. South def. Bayless 25-13, 25-21 Eureka def. Northwest-CH 25-11, 25-14 Edwardsville def. Alton 25-10, 25-8 St. Mary’s def. Lutheran SC 25-8, 25-10 FH Central def. FZ North 25-9, 25-16 FH North def. FZ South 20-25, 25-16, 25-23

SOFTBALL Alton 221 340 0 12 11 Collinsville 200 020 0 4 8 W-Abby Scyoc. L-Maddy Lautz. Wood River 100 000 0 1 6 Jerseyville 130 020 0 6 6 W-Claire Anderson. O’Fallon 211 401 1 10 13 Granite City 010 000 1 2 5 W-Kaitlin Moore. Freeburg 000 431 4 12 20 Carlyle 000 211 3 7 8 W-Miranda Schulte. HR-F Chasity Hill Edwardsville 000 300 5 8 8 Bellvl. East 000 100 0 1 6 W-Jordyn Henricks. L-Stephanie Bigham. Lebanon 17 23 MulGrove 12 10 W-Abigail Reinneck. HR-L Katie Fertig -Brittany Ogden -Emily Reinneck Waterloo 022 53 12 12 Gibault 000 00 0 3 W-Skyler Barker. L-Melissa Bernal. HR-W Lindsey Merritt Red Bud 003 002 0 5 9 New Athens 005 001 0 6 9 W-Julia Drake. L-Sophia Koesterer. Bre. Central 220 000 0 4 2 Columbia 211 101 0 6 7 W-Kaelyn Rheinecker. Gillespie 310 000 0 4 7 Highland 300 200 0 5 6 L-Sydney Henrichs. HR-G Rylee Sarti Valmeyer 403 202 11 14 Dupo 312 102 9 10 W-Lilly Schlemmer.

1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 7 0 0

3 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

GIRLS SOCCER Metro 6, Gateway STEM 0 M: Ava Farrar 3, Zari Anderson 2, Kyra Collins; shutout by Corinne Papes Haz. West 10, Riverview 0 H: Hannah Friedrich 2, McKayla Giles 2, Riley Nilges 2, Savana Pestka 2, Alex Bustamante, Grace Winters ; shutout by Riley Nilges, Alexis Cain. Hillsboro 8, Kelly 0 H: Abby Schacht 3, Breanna Sebaugh 2, Payton Kuehn 2, Hannah Vaughn; shutout by Shea Luby McCluer North 8, Luth. North 0 M: Skyla Koch 3, Kira McGrellis 2, Lynnya Simmons, Navone Armstrong, Ella Cosentino; shutout by Karina DuFour Orchard Farm 3, Brentwood 2 O: Kayla Hedges 2, Payton Dill U. City 10, MS-Berkeley 0 U: Zakija Goree 4, Hayle Jones 3, Merrick Hoel, Nicole Kellogg, Jayla Fitch ; shutout by Fumilola Adewale MICDS 4, JohnBurroughs 1 M: Delaney Schultz 3, Naomi Ferguson J: Madeline Dornfeld Oakville 1, Lindbergh 0 (OT) O: Ashley Guardado; shutout by Lynzie Shaneberger CSOMB 5, Carnahan 1 M: Zahra Ashkar 3, Caroline Reifsteck, Janiz Rodriguez Wood River 2, ME Lutheran 1 W: Kara Crutchley, Lora Ruyle M: Reagan Guerra Clayton 1, Principia 0 C: Rachel Markenson; shutout by Olivia Zindel

Bellvl. East 5, O’Fallon 2 B: Grace Brauer 3, Cecilia Maue, Alexandra Mueller St. James 6, Sullivan 2 St. James: Quinn Paulus 6 Roxana 1, Litchield 0 R: Emma Lucas; shutout by Braeden Lackey Carlinville 9, Gillespie 0 C: Rory Drew 2, Taylor Wills 2, Lexi Egelhof, Gabby Marchiori, Riann McClain, Skylar Nickel, Adriann Welte; shutout by Sarah DeNeve, Mitilda Mitchell. Mascoutah 2, Gibault 1 M: Destiny Strong 2 FZ West 1, FH North 0 FZW: Kaitlyn Nichols; shutout by Camielle Day Pattonville 5, Pky. North 0 Pat: Cameryn McGee 2, Jordyn Lodes, Kendall Battle, Kaeli Benedict; shutout by Morgan Kaemmerer) Lafayette 2, Papillion-LVS 0 L: Kendra Erickson, Brynn Jefries; shutout by Natalie Phelps St. Charles 10, Warrenton 0 S: Brooke Schneider 3, Maggie Skeen 2, Reagan Gould 2, Emma Booker, Aubrey Finnegan, Anna Meyer; shutout by Riley Beerman, Faith Davis.) Mehlville 2, Fox 1 M: Jenna Benson 2 F: Raven Robbins St.Chas. West 7, Winield 0 S: Kaitlyn Weinrich 3, Abbie Gilblair, Maggie Miller, Alyssa Pavlacic, Kayla Van Booven; shutout by Savannah Gilblair Holt 3, Troy 1 H: Jae Crandall 2, Tori Kuhlmann T: Siera Zemek Bellvl. West 3, Althof 0 B: Taylor Mathenia 2, Courtney Vollmer; shutout by Bailey Redden Mater Dei 1, Bre. Central 0 M: Meredith Innes; shutout by Quinn Cutler Wesclin 7, Fath.McGivney 0 W: Tori Calvert 4, Sydney Christopher 2, Makenna Glover; shutout by Lydia Schorfheide) Granite City 1, Columbia 0 G: Abby Reeves; shutout by Viktoria Johnson Zumwalt East 2, Washington 1 W: Rebekah Lewis ) St. Dominic 2, Duchesne 0 S: Jessica Grayek, Madison Miller; shutout by Alli Palmatier) St. Joseph’s 3, FZ South 0 SJ: Maria Haro 2, Elle Mundwiller; shutout by Emily Meara, Emily Puricelli. Other scores Alton 3, Collinsville 0 Alton Marquette 2, Civic Mem. 0 Pky. Central 3, Afton 0

BOYS LACROSSE MICDS 17, De Smet 7 )

GIRLS LACROSSE Francis Howell 9, Ursuline 5 F: Marissa Guenther 5, Danielle Robinson 2, Allison Boczkiewicz, Emily Eberwine) John Burroughs 5, Pky. West 4 J: Eavan Guirl 3, Riley King 2 Pattonville 16, Pky. South 1 Pat: Bianca Johnson 4, Leslie Azwell 4, Victoria Loland 4, Mikayla Bridges 3, Kacie Baniak Ladue 19, Clayton 4 L: Kaylon Buckner 8, Maggie Lawton 4, Courtney Christ 2, Zoe Zucker, Alice Birchield, Sarah Friedman, Grace Hensley, Katie Muchnick

WATER POLO MICDS 14, Lafayette 9 M: Chris Swanson 4, Harrison Thomas 3, Davis Johnson 2, Nick Jones 2, John Curylo 2, David Shapshovich De Smet 8, Lindbergh 4 L: Mason White 3, Will Doyle ) Ladue 12, Kirkwood 5 L: Brandon Yan 3, Joel Hsieh 3, Reid Rogers 2, Matt Allen, Avery Fredman, Michael Raskin, Alex Sterling

K: Tanner Whitson 3, Alex Hughes, Aaron Autry Lindbergh 11, Pky. South 7 L: Mason White 4, Will Doyle 2, Sam Hunter 2, Sam Deeter 2, Matt Deutschmann Other scores Chaminade 3, Clayton 3 Pky. South 13, SLAP 7 Pky. Central 10, SLAP 2

BOYS GOLF TOURNAMENTS Warrenton Invitational-Red Division Teams: 1. St. Charles 310, 2. Warrenton 329, 3. Montgomery County 335, 4. Timberland JV 338, 5. St. Clair 378, 6. Wright City 421, 7. Clopton 431, 8. St. Charles West JV 446 Leading individuals: Ben Bohr, St. Charles, 73; Travis Toebben, Warrenton, 74; Cory Harrison, St. Charles, 75; Justin Hofman, St. Clair, 78; Jacob Estrell, Timberland JV, 80; Tyler Birke, St. Charles, 80; Aubrey Nelson, Montgomery County, 80; Devin Lindhof, Orchard Farm, 82; Skyler Hutcheson, Montgomery County, 82; Josh Hooper, St. Charles, 82; Brendan Schanuel, Warrenton, 83 Warrenton Invitational-White Division Teams: 1. Borgia 301, 2. Timberland 305, 3. Liberty 322, 4. Lutheran South 326, 5. Fort Zumwalt South 332, 6. O’Fallon Christian 339, 7. Francis Howell 340, 8. Washington 341, 9. Francis Howell Central 360, 10. St. Charles West 396, 11. Francis Howell North 406, 12. Holt 443 Leading individuals: 1. Bennett Tiefenbrunn, Sullivan, 72; 2. Tommy Alferman, Borgia, 72; Zach Shirley, Lutheran South, 73; Mark Maguire, Borgia, 74; David Meindl, Timberland, 75; Logan McPherson, Washington, 75; Hunter Niles, Timberland, 76; Matthew Hahs, O’Fallon Christian, 76; Sam Schriner, Liberty (Wentzville), 76; Zach Unnerstall, Borgia, 77; Grant Wolfe, Timberland, 77; Sam Heppermann, Timberland, 77; Jacob Chapman, Fort Zumwalt South, 77; DUAL/TRI MATCHES Parkway South 267, Oakville 269 Parkway South: Paul Dannegger, 41; Oakville: Carson King, 41; 1. Will Lorenz, 41 Score only St. Pius X 189, Ste. Genevieve 189, Windsor 200 Lafayette 242, Eureka 292, Mehlville 295 Lafayette: Max Kreikemeier, 37 Eureka: Jack Moran, 44 Mehlville: Westrich, 46 Parkway Central 219, University City 272 Parkway Central: James Shertshof, 38 University City: Shostak, 43 Ladue 261, Clayton 292 Ladue: Hadley Kramer, 41 Clayton: David Cramer, 43; Daniel Cho, 43 Perryville 192, De Soto 207, Herculaneum 240 Perryville: Sam Wright, 47 De Soto: Jared Gardner, 47 John Burroughs 238, St. Dominic 264 John Burroughs: Beecher Baldwin, 33; St. Dominic: Paul Schneider, 41 Kirkwood 255, Parkway West 299 Kirkwood: Carson Postal, 36 Parkway West: Jack Geiseking, 45 Clayton 86, Afton 94 Clayton: David Cramer, 43; Daniel Cho, 43 Afton: Klein, 44; Note: Two players per team

FRIDAY’S SCHEDULE BASEBALL DINGER WOOD BAT CLASSIC Lake County vs. Windsor (2-9) at Mayfield Ky., 4 p.m. Wood River (4-5) at St. Mary’s Ky., 4 p.m. Benton vs. SLUH (6-3) at Graves Co. Ky, 4:30 p.m. Windsor (2-9) at Mayfield Ky., 6:30 p.m. Dyersburg vs. Fox (3-3), at Marshall Co., 6:45 p.m. Wood River (4-5) vs. Grayson County at St. Mary’s Ky., 6:45 p.m. OTHER GAMES Luth. St. Charles (5-6) at Waynesville, noon Borgia (6-3) at Rock Bridge (1-0), noon FZ West (6-7) vs. Troy (6-5) at Lindenwood, 2 p.m. Borgia (6-3) vs. Staley at Rock Bridge, 2:30 p.m. Vianney (15-0) at Lindbergh (9-2), 3:30 p.m. Carnahan (3-0) vs. Gateway Science (0-3) at Affton, 3:30 p.m. Hancock (2-5) at Bayless (3-5), 3:45 p.m. Granite City (4-8) at Cahokia (0-5), 4 p.m. Hazelwood East (0-5) at McCluer (3-2), 4 p.m. DuBourg (4-4) at St. Pius X (6-2), 4 p.m. Brentwood (3-5) vs. Crossroads (0-2) at Cool Papa, 4 p.m. Helias vs. Luth. St. Charles (5-6), at Waynesville, 4 p.m. Mehlville (1-7) at Festus (6-3), 4:15 p.m. Pattonville (1-8) at Webster Groves (4-6), 4:15 p.m. Westminster (12-1) at Principia (3-1), 4:15 p.m. Alton (5-5) at Civic Memorial (9-3), 4:15 p.m. Triad (5-4) at Chatham Glenwood (2-0), 4:15 p.m. St. Mary’s (3-1) at John Burroughs (5-2), 4:15 p.m. Dupo (2-8) at Madison, 4:15 p.m. Parkway South (8-6) at Ladue (2-5), 4:15 p.m. Hermann (2-6) at Warrenton (8-2), 4:15 p.m. Marion (0-1) at Highland (6-2), 4:15 p.m. Carlinville (2-1) at Piasa Southwestern (3-9), 4:30 p.m. Wesclin (4-6) at Gibault (2-8), 4:30 p.m. Freeburg (7-4) at Marissa (3-6), 4:30 p.m. Potosi at Sullivan (5-6), 4:30 p.m. Carlyle (6-5) at Okawville (1-5), 4:30 p.m. Winfield (9-4) vs. Liberty (8-5) at Lindenwood, 4:30 p.m. Staunton (5-1) at Roxana (2-5), 4:30 p.m. Jerseyville (4-4) at Hardin Calhoun (7-6), 4:30 p.m. Gillespie (4-3) at Greenville (1-2-1), 4:30 p.m. Kingston at Grandview (2-6), 4:30 p.m. Nashville (10-2) at Anna-Jonesboro, 4:30 p.m.

O’Fallon (14-0-1) at Our Lady of Provid, 5:30 p.m. Vianney (15-0) at Lindbergh (9-2), 5:30 p.m. Mead.Heights vs. Herculaneum (3-0-1) at Jackson, 6 p.m. Brentwood (3-5) vs. Crossroads (0-2) at Cool Papa, 6:15 p.m. Holt (10-2) vs. Timberland (10-2) at Lindenwood, 7 p.m. Parkway Central (6-4) vs. Parkway North (7-5) at Busch Stadium, 7 p.m. Collinsville (8-3) vs. Alton Marquette (8-3) at Rent One Park, 7 p.m. Borgia (6-3) vs. Battle (3-2), at Hickman, 7 p.m.

GIRLS SOCCER 9TH ANNUAL HILLSBORO TOURNAMENT Kelly vs. Fredericktown, 4:30 p.m. MATER DEI TOURNAMENT Wesclin (7-4) vs. Highland (5-1-1), 4:30 p.m. Breese Central (2-5) vs. Murphysboro (3-1-1), 6:30 p.m. HANNIBAL TOURNAMENT Southern Boone vs. Parkway Central (3-5), 3 p.m. Burlington, Iowa vs. St. Charles West (6-4), 4 p.m. Rosati-Kain (4-6) vs. Maryville, 5 p.m. Warrenton (1-3) at Hannibal, 6 p.m. FRALISH CUP At Carbondale Sikeston vs. Waterloo (7-1-3), 4 p.m. Anna-Jonesboro vs. Cape Notre Dame, 5:30 p.m. Harrisburg vs. Marion, 5:30 p.m. Massac County at Carbondale, 7 p.m. KICKAPOO TOURNAMENT Incarnate Word (10-2) vs. Kearney at Nixa, 7:30 p.m. St. Joseph’s (6-2) vs. Jackson at Kickapoo, 7:30 p.m. OTHER GAMES MICDS (3-4) at Ladue (6-4-1), 4 p.m. Brentwood (5-0) at Hancock (2-4), 4 p.m. Parkway West (5-1-1) at Nerinx Hall (10-0), 4 p.m. McCluer North (5-4) at McCluer S-Berkeley (3-2), 4 p.m. Borgia (3-6) at Villa Duchesne (4-4), 4 p.m. Clayton (2-2) at University City (3-5), 4 p.m. Bayless (6-4) at McKinley (1-2), 4 p.m. Notre Dame (6-3) at Westminster (6-1), 4:15 p.m. Trinity (3-5-1) at Lutheran North (1-7), 4:15 p.m. Christian Acad. at North County Chr. (2-2), 4:30 p.m. Lafayette (6-1) vs. Papillion-La Vista at Omaha, 5 p.m.

O’Fallon Christian (4-1) at FZ North (6-4), 5 p.m. Hazelwood Central (4-3-1) at Waynesville, 5 p.m. Helias (0-3) at Union (8-0), 5 p.m. Elsberry (0-2) at Luth. St. Charles (3-6-1), 5 p.m. Visitation (3-3) at St. Dominic (7-1), 5:45 p.m. Fort Zumwalt East (4-5-1) at FH North (3-3-1), 6 p.m. Pacific (3-6) at Rolla (0-3), 6:30 p.m.

Staunton (1-2) at Roxana (4-7), 4:30 p.m. Lebanon (3-6) at O’Fallon (7-3), 4:30 p.m. Red Bud (7-4) at Waterloo (3-7), 4:30 p.m. Freeburg (9-0) at Marissa (3-5), 4:30 p.m. Gillespie (7-2) at Greenville (1-2), 4:30 p.m. New Athens (9-1) at Breese Central (2-3), 4:30 p.m. Nashville (7-2) at Anna-Jonesboro, 4:30 p.m.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL

BOYS GOLF

PARKWAY CENTRAL CLASSIC Pool A Parkway North (4-4-2) vs. Lafayette (13-0), 4:30 p.m. De Smet (8-4-1) vs. Parkway South (7-5-1), 4:30 p.m. Losers, 5:30 p.m. Winners, 5:30 p.m. Pool B O’Fallon Christian (3-3) at Parkway Central (10-3), 4:30 p.m. Lindbergh (7-6-1) vs. FZ West (7-4-1), 6:30 p.m. Losers, 7:30 p.m. Winners, 7:30 p.m. Pool C Parkway West (2-6) vs. Marquette (3-5), 4:30 p.m. Duchesne vs. Kirkwood (6-1), 4:30 p.m. Losers, 5:30 p.m. Winners, 5:30 p.m. Pool D Ritenour (0-9) vs. St. Louis U. High (9-0), 6:30 p.m. Oakville (5-0) vs. Pattonville (7-5-1), 6:30 p.m. Losers, 7:30 p.m. Winners, 7:30 p.m. OTHER MATCHES Bayless (1-12) at East St. Louis (1-2), 4:30 p.m. Westminster (1-6) at Chaminade (5-7-2), 5:15 p.m.

TOURNAMENTS Sullivan Invitational at Sullivan CC, 8 a.m. Teams: Borgia, Hermann, Lutheran South, St. James, Sullivan DUAL MATCHES Kirkwood at Mehlville, 3:30 p.m. John Burroughs vs. MICDS at Forest Park, 3:45 p.m.

SOFTBALL Collinsville (12-3) at Civic Memorial (4-3), 4 p.m. Mater Dei (5-3) at Edwardsville (4-2), 4 p.m. Alton Marquette (11-0) at Highland (5-2), 4 p.m. Belleville West (2-5) at Mascoutah (9-3), 4:15 p.m. Grandview (2-3) at Bismarck High (0-1), 4:30 p.m. Carlyle (2-5) at Okawville (1-9), 4:30 p.m. Columbia (10-0) at Granite City (1-6), 4:30 p.m. ME Lutheran (1-3) at Brussels (0-2), 4:30 p.m. Carlinville (2-2) at Piasa Southwestern (6-4), 4:30 p.m.

WATER POLO DE SMET INVITATIONAL At St. Peters Rec-Plex Houston Strake Jesuit vs. Fenwick, 3 p.m. De La Salle vs. De Smet (10-5), 3:50 p.m. Lindbergh (8-6) vs. Sycamore (Ohio), 4:40 p.m. St. Louis U. High (10-1) vs. Stevenson (Ill.), 5:30 p.m. Sycamore (Ohio) vs. Parkway Central (10-8), 6:20 p.m. Fenwick vs. Parkway South (6-3), 7:10 p.m. Houston Strake vs. Chicago De La Salle, 8 p.m. De Smet (10-5) vs. Stevenson (Ill.), 8:50 p.m. LAFAYETTE-MICDS INVITATIONAL At MICDS Oakville (2-3) at MICDS (2-2), 4 p.m. Hinsdale South vs. Pattonville (0-8), 4:55 p.m. St. Rita vs. Lafayette (5-9), 5:50 p.m. Chaminade (4-5-1) vs. Pattonville (0-8), 6:45 p.m. Hinsdale South vs. Clayton (0-6-1), 7:40 p.m. St. Rita vs. Oakville (2-3), 8:35 p.m. OTHER GAMES Marquette (6-5) at Eureka (0-2), 4:30 p.m.

BOYS LACROSSE Lafayette (5-2) at Marquette (1-2), 4:30 p.m. Missouri Military at St. Mary’s (0-5), 5 p.m. Ladue (2-3) at John Burroughs (2-6), 5:30 p.m. Lindbergh (2-3) at Seckman (0-5), 7 p.m.

Parkway West (3-2) at Webster Groves (5-2), 7 p.m.

GIRLS LACROSSE FH North (3-4) at Whitfield (3-1), 4 p.m. Summit (3-5) at Hazelwood West (0-2), 4:15 p.m. Notre Dame de Sion at Villa Duchesne (5-0), 4:15 p.m. MICDS (4-2) at O’Fallon (4-1), 4:15 p.m. Clayton (0-4) at Eureka (2-6), 4:15 p.m. Incarnate Word (3-7) at Pattonville (3-3), 4:15 p.m. Lafayette (6-1) vs. Lee’s Summit North, at Westminster, 5:30 p.m. Parkway Central (2-5) at Belleville West (1-0), 7:30 p.m.

BOYS TENNIS TOURNAMENTS Columbia Duals, 9:30 a.m. Teams: Edwardsville, Rock Bridge DUAL MATCHES Holt at Francis Howell, 3:30 p.m. McCluer North at Francis Howell Central, 3:30 p.m. Fort Zumwalt West at Timberland, 3:30 p.m. Lutheran St. Charles vs. St. Charles West at McNair Park, 3:30 p.m. CBC at Chaminade, 4 p.m. Clayton at John Burroughs, 4 p.m. Webster Groves at Oakville, 4 p.m. Lutheran North vs. Whitfield at St. Joseph’s, 4:15 p.m.

TRACK & FIELD COED Farmington Simpson Relays, 1 p.m. Teams: Farmington, Ste. Genevieve, Windsor (Imperial) Fort Zumwalt East Invitational, 3:30 p.m. Teams: Fort Zumwalt East, Fort Zumwalt West, Francis Howell Central, St. Charles West, Troy Buchanan BOYS Granite City Invitational, 4 p.m. Teams: Alton, Belleville West, Collinsville, Edwardsville, Granite City, Jerseyville, Mascoutah GIRLS O’Fallon Invitational, 4 p.m. Teams: Belleville West, Carbondale, Collinsville, Edwardsville, O’Fallon, Triad


FOR THE RECORD

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1 NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog PENGUINS.........-$210/+$175................. Flyers JETS.................. -$200/+$170...................Wild VEGAS KNIGHTS-$150/+$130 ................. Kings Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Yankees...................-$130 .................... TIGERS INDIANS ..................-$135 .................Blue Jays RED SOX..................-$182 .....................Orioles TWINS......................-$170 ................White Sox ASTROS .................. -$240...................Rangers Angels .....................-$130 ................... ROYALS MARINERS...............-$110 ............................A’s National League CUBS........................-$210 .....................Braves Cards.......................-$150 ....................... REDS NATIONALS .............-$170 ....................Rockies METS .......................-$125 ...................Brewers Pirates.....................-$135 .................MARLINS Giants......................-$110 ...................PADRES DODGERS ................-$128 ................... D’backs Interleague Phillies ....................-$112.........................RAYS

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Boston RHP Joe Kelly six games and N.Y. Yankees 1B Tyler Austin five games, pending appeals, for their parts in a bench-clearing incident during Wednesday’s game. American League BOSTON — Placed LHP Bobby Poyner on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Marcus Walden from Pawtucket (IL). CHICAGO — Transferred LHP Carlos Rondon to the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Chris Volstad from Charlotte (IL). DETROIT — Recalled LHP Chad Bell from Toledo (IL). LOS ANGELES — Optioned RHP Eduardo Paredes and INF Ryan Schimpf to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHPs Jaime Barria and Nick Tropiano from Salt Lake. Reinstated INF Ian Kinsler from the 10-day DL. NEW YORK — Designated OF Shane Robinson for assignment. Reinstated OF Aaron Hicks from the 10-day DL. National League CARDINALS — Placed RHP Sam Tuivailala on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Recalled RHP Mike Mayers from Memphis (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO — Optioned LHP Andrew Suarez to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Derek Law from Sacramento. American Association FARGO-MOORHEAD — Signed RHP DJ Brown. Released RHP Carson Goldsmith. ST. PAUL — Signed RHP Matt Solter. TEXAS — Signed LHP Tyler Matzek. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND — Signed C Audie Afenir and INF Alec Sole. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY — Released OF Marcus Lemon and INF Josh Silver. QUEBEC — Signed INF Josh Vitters. ROCKLAND — Signed OF Nick Sinay. WINNIPEG — Traded RHP Jordan Wellander to New Jersey for a player to be named. Frontier League LAKE ERIE — Released UT Carlos Garcia. TRAVERSE CITY — Signed RHP Jordan Desguin. WASHINGTON — Signed RHP Doug Willey.

NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog Saturday WARRIORS ................. 8...........................Spurs RAPTORS.................... 8.......................Wizards 76ERS........................6.5 .......................... Heat BLAZERS ...................5.5 .................... Pelicans Sunday CELTICS ...................... 4.......................... Bucks CAVALIERS ................6.5 ....................... Pacers THUNDER..................3.5 ........................... Jazz ROCKETS....................11 .................... T’Wolves Odds to win series: Warriors -$1500 vs. Spurs +$900 Raptors -$700 vs. Wizards +$500 76ers -$500 vs. Heat +$400 Blazers -$220 vs. Pelicans +$180 Celtics -$150 vs. Bucks +$130 Cavaliers -$700 vs. Pacers +$500 Thunder -$145 vs. Jazz +$125 Rockets -$5000 vs. T’Wolves +$1500 Odds to win the NBA Championship Team ...................Open................Current Warriors....................1/2 ............................. 7/5 Rockets ....................10/1 ............................8/5 Cavaliers ...................5/1 ............................. 5/1 Raptors ....................50/1 ............................8/1 76ers ....................... 80/1...........................15/1 Thunder ...................20/1 .......................... 25/1 Blazers ....................150/1 .........................30/1 Jazz..........................150/1 .........................40/1 Spurs........................12/1...........................60/1 Celtics........................8/1 ...........................70/1 Wizards ....................35/1 ........................100/1 Timberwolves ......... 40/1........................100/1 Bucks........................50/1 ........................100/1 Pelicans...................100/1 .......................100/1 Pacers .....................250/1 .......................100/1 Heat.........................100/1 ........................125/1 Odds to win the Eastern Conference Team ...................Open................Current Cavaliers ...................2/3 .............................6/5 Raptors ....................20/1 ............................8/5 76ers ........................25/1 ............................ 5/1 Celtics........................2/1 ........................... 25/1 Bucks........................20/1 .......................... 25/1 Wizards ....................12/1...........................30/1 Pacers ..................... 80/1..........................30/1 Heat......................... 40/1..........................40/1 Odds to win the Western Conference Team ...................Open................Current Warriors....................1/3 .............................4/5 Rockets .....................6/1 .......................... even Thunder ...................10/1 ...........................15/1 Blazers .................... 80/1..........................20/1 Jazz.......................... 80/1.......................... 25/1 Spurs.........................7/1............................30/1 Timberwolves ..........25/1 ..........................50/1 Pelicans....................50/1 ..........................60/1

SOCCER | Major League Soccer MLS — Added a second-game suspension to Seattle F Clint Dempsey for violent conduct. FC DALLAS — Signed D Chris Richards. COLLEGE CLEMSON — Named Amanda Butler women’s basketball coach. COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON — Promoted assistant women’s volleyball coach Katelyn Harrison to associate head coach. INDIANA — Junior F Juwan Morgan declared for the NBA draft. LSU — Announced graduate CB Terrence Alexander is transferring from Stanford. MARQUETTE — Named Dwayne Killings assistant men’s basketball coach. NEBRASKA — Announced sophomore QB Patrick O’Brien has been granted a release so he can transfer. PURDUE — Announced junior men’s basketball F Evan Boudreaux is transferring from Dartmouth. TCU — Named Scott Cross assistant men’s basketball coach.

COLLEGES Area results Baseball Frontier 10, SW Illinois 8 Softball Washington 11-11, Greenville 4-3

Major League Soccer

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HOCKEY | National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Los Angeles Kings D Drew Doughty for one game for an illegal check to the head of Vegas Golden Knights F William Carrier during Game 1 of the first-round playoff series. ARIZONA — Signed D Jordan Gross to a two-year, entry-level contract. BUFFALO — Assigned G Jonas Johansson from Rochester (AHL) to Cincinnati (ECHL). TAMPA BAY — Recalled D Matt Spencer from Adirondack (ECHL) to Syracuse (AHL). WASHINGTON — Recalled G Pheonix Copley from Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League LEHIGH VALLEY — Assigned G John Muse to Reading (ECHL). SYRACUSE — Recalled F Shane Conacher from Adirondack (ECHL). TEXAS — Assigned F Tommy Thompson to Idaho (ECHL).

SOCCER

BASKETBALL | NBA NEW YORK — Fired coach Jeff Hornacek and associate head coach Kurt Rambis. ORLANDO — Fired coach Frank Vogel. WASHINGTON — Signed G Ty Lawson. Women’s NBA ATLANTA — Traded F Bria Holmes to Connecticut for the 15th pick in the 2018 draft and a 2019 second-round pick.

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FOOTBALL | National Football League NFL — Rejected the appeal of Cincinnati LB Vontaze Burfict’s four-game suspension for violating the league’s policy on performance-enhancers. ARIZONA — Released OL Max Tuerk. BUFFALO — Placed G Richie Incognito on the reserve/retired list. CLEVELAND — Terminated the contract of TE Gavin Escobar. Waived LB Max Bullough, WRs Bug Howard and Larry Pinkard, TE Matt Lengel, DB C.J. Smith and RB Kelvin Taylor. HOUSTON — Released OT Derek Newton.

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EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York City FC 5 0 1 16 14 4 Atlanta United FC 4 1 0 12 13 6 New England 3 1 1 10 10 5 Columbus 3 2 1 10 9 6 Orlando City 2 2 1 7 9 10 New York 2 2 0 6 10 5 Montreal 2 3 0 6 5 9 Philadelphia 1 1 2 5 3 4 Chicago 1 2 1 4 7 8 Toronto FC 1 2 0 3 3 4 D.C. United 0 3 2 2 5 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Sporting K.C. 4 1 1 13 12 9 Vancouver 3 2 1 10 8 9 LA Galaxy 2 2 1 7 7 8 Real Salt Lake 2 3 1 7 6 14 Los Angeles FC 2 2 0 6 9 10 Minnesota United 2 3 0 6 6 9 FC Dallas 1 0 3 6 6 3 Colorado 1 1 2 5 7 5 Houston 1 2 1 4 7 6 San Jose 1 2 1 4 7 8 Portland 0 3 2 2 6 12 Seattle 0 3 0 0 0 5 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Friday Orlando City at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Los Angeles FC at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Saturday Montreal at New York, Noon Toronto FC at Colorado, 2 p.m. LA Galaxy at Chicago, 2:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at New England, 6:30 p.m. Houston at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Sporting K.C., 3 p.m. New York City FC at Atlanta United FC, 5 p.m.

WEATHER • Low 61, High 78 • Winds S 12-22 mph

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9 Marc Leishman D.A. Points Harold Varner III J.J. Henry Colt Knost Dylan Frittelli Mackenzie Hughes Rod Pampling Charley Hoffman Ted Potter, Jr. Emiliano Grillo Anirban Lahiri Robert Garrigus Geoff Ogilvy Byeong Hun An Francesco Molinari Chris Stroud Graeme McDowell Kevin Chappell Nick Taylor Satoshi Kodaira Robert Streb Ollie Schniederjans Matt Every Davis Love III Aaron Baddeley Ryan Palmer Tyrone Van Aswegen Corey Conners Ryan Blaum Kevin Na Sung Kang Ben Martin Steve Marino Blayne Barber Grayson Murray Lucas Glover Billy Hurley III Bob Estes Michael Thompson Scott Stallings Carl Pettersson Hudson Swafford Cody Gribble Martin Flores Paul Casey James Hahn Vaughn Taylor Tyrrell Hatton Michael Kim Brandon Harkins Luke Donald Greg Chalmers Jeff Maggert Chad Campbell Ross Fisher Glen Day Dru Love Jon Curran Charl Schwartzel Chris Couch Steve Scott David Hearn Derek Fathauer

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Man City 32 27 3 2 90 24 Man United 32 22 5 5 63 25 Liverpool 33 19 10 4 75 35 Tottenham 32 20 7 5 64 27 Chelsea 32 17 6 9 54 31 Arsenal 32 16 6 10 61 43 Burnley 32 13 10 9 31 28 Leicester 32 11 10 11 48 45 Everton 33 11 8 14 38 53 Newcastle 32 10 8 14 33 41 Bournemouth 33 9 11 13 41 53 Watford 33 10 7 16 42 59 Brighton 32 8 11 13 29 43 West Ham 32 8 10 14 40 58 Swansea 32 8 8 16 26 45 Huddersfield 33 8 8 17 26 54 Crystal Palace 33 7 10 16 33 52 Southampton 32 5 13 14 31 50 Stoke 33 6 9 18 30 63 West Brom 33 3 12 18 26 52 Saturday Southampton vs. Chelsea, 6:30 a.m. Swansea vs. Everton, 9 a.m. Burnley vs. Leicester, 9 a.m. Crystal Palace vs. Brighton, 9 a.m. Huddersfield vs. Watford, 9 a.m. Liverpool vs. Bournemouth, 11:30 a.m. Tottenham vs. Man City, 1:45 p.m. Sunday Newcastle vs. Arsenal, 7:30 a.m. Man United vs. West Brom, 10 a.m. Monday West Ham vs. Stoke, 2 p.m. Tuesday Brighton vs. Tottenham, 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 18 Bournemouth vs. Man United, 1:45 p.m. Thursday, April 19 Leicester vs. Southampton, 1:45 p.m. Burnley vs. Chelsea, 1:45 p.m.

Pts 84 71 67 67 57 54 49 43 41 38 38 37 35 34 32 32 31 28 27 21

GOLF PGA | RBC Heritage Thursday | Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $6.7 million | Yards: 7,099 | Par 71 First Round Rory Sabbatini 33-31 — 64 John Huh 30-36 — 66 Billy Horschel 35-31 — 66 Matt Kuchar 32-34 — 66 Chesson Hadley 34-32 — 66 Harris English 34-33 — 67 Martin Laird 33-34 — 67 Patrick Cantlay 33-34 — 67 Jonas Blixt 34-33 — 67 Charles Howell III 36-32 — 68 Fabian Gomez 33-35 — 68 Peter Malnati 33-35 — 68 Bryson DeChambeau 35-33 — 68 Nick Watney 34-34 — 68 Si Woo Kim 34-34 — 68 Xander Schauffele 36-32 — 68 Cameron Smith 35-33 — 68 Brice Garnett 34-34 — 68 Whee Kim 33-35 — 68 K.J. Choi 35-34 — 69 Bill Haas 35-34 — 69 Kevin Kisner 34-35 — 69 Dustin Johnson 35-34 — 69 Wesley Bryan 37-32 — 69 Webb Simpson 32-37 — 69 John Senden 35-34 — 69 Andrew Landry 34-35 — 69 Brian Stuard 36-33 — 69 Ryan Moore 34-35 — 69 Martin Kaymer 36-33 — 69 Ian Poulter 36-33 — 69 Matthew Fitzpatrick 36-33 — 69 Danny Lee 35-34 — 69 C.T. Pan 33-37 — 70 Scott Brown 37-33 — 70 Luke List 33-37 — 70 Dominic Bozzelli 35-35 — 70 Brian Harman 35-35 — 70 Zach Johnson 37-33 — 70 Stewart Cink 34-36 — 70 Jim Furyk 34-36 — 70 Chris Kirk 38-32 — 70 Beau Hossler 35-35 — 70 Sam Saunders 33-37 — 70 Tom Hoge 37-33 — 70 Russell Knox 35-35 — 70 Brandt Snedeker 34-36 — 70 Kevin Streelman 34-36 — 70 Keith Mitchell 34-37 — 71 Jonathan Byrd 36-35 — 71 Richy Werenski 36-35 — 71 Ryan Armour 35-36 — 71 Jason Dufner 34-37 — 71 Austin Cook 36-35 — 71 Sam Ryder 39-32 — 71 David Lingmerth 35-36 — 71 J.J. Spaun 34-37 — 71 Jason Kokrak 34-37 — 71 Philip Knowles 35-36 — 71 Sean O’Hair 36-35 — 71 Scott Piercy 35-36 — 71 Bud Cauley 37-34 — 71 Patton Kizzire 35-36 — 71 William McGirt 36-35 — 71 Brian Gay 36-35 — 71 Kelly Kraft 37-34 — 71 Doc Redman 36-35 — 71 Kevin Tway 34-37 — 71

-7 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E

33-39 35-37 35-37 36-36 35-37 37-35 37-35 38-34 37-35 35-37 36-36 37-35 35-37 36-37 36-37 36-37 37-36 37-36 33-40 36-37 39-34 37-36 37-36 37-36 38-35 37-36 37-36 36-37 39-35 37-37 39-35 34-40 39-35 36-38 37-37 39-35 38-36 37-37 38-36 37-37 39-35 35-40 39-36 39-36 36-39 38-37 40-35 38-37 35-40 39-37 39-37 38-38 38-38 41-35 41-35 37-40 38-39 36-41 37-41 41-38 38-41 38-42 39-42 42-39

Allison Emrey Ji Hyun Kim Ayako Uehara Kris Tamulis Benyapa Niphatsophon Cristie Kerr Madelene Sagstrom Robynn Ree Hannah Green Moriya Jutanugarn Ryann O’Toole So Yeon Ryu Alexandra Newell Nasa Hataoka Katelyn Dambaugh Tiffany Chan Ilhee Lee Brittany Marchand Pornanong Phatlum Michelle Wie Mariajo Uribe Rebecca Artis Sarah Jane Smith Ariya Jutanugarn Maude-Aimee Leblanc Daniela Iacobelli Thidapa Suwannapura So Young Lee Katherine Kirk Danielle Kang Jenny Shin Chella Choi Aditi Ashok Camilla Lennarth Yu Liu Gemma Dryburgh Katie Burnett Celine Boutier Paula Reto Azahara Munoz Hee Young Park Jennifer Song Bronte Law Sandra Changkija Mina Harigae Angel Yin Peiyun Chien Mariah Stackhouse Hyo Joo Kim Cydney Clanton In Gee Chun Emma Talley Amy Olson Beatriz Recari Sei Young Kim Christina Kim Luna Sobron Kendall Dye Kelly Shon Maria Torres Lauren Coughlin Wichanee Meechai Caroline Inglis Tiffany Joh Angela Stanford Nannette Hill Maddie McCrary S. Santiwiwatthanaphong Jaye Marie Green Lee Lopez Anna Nordqvist Brittany Altomare Jeong Eun Lee Brittany Benvenuto P. Thanapolboonyaras Dori Carter P.K. Kongkraphan Madeleine Sheils Dottie Ardina Ashleigh Buhai Simin Feng Vicky Hurst Lydia Ko a-Suzuka Yamaguchi Dani Holmqvist Giulia Molinaro Min Song Ha Brittany Lang Alison Walshe Lindsey Weaver Jeongeun Lee6 Jackie Stoelting Daniela Darquea Mind Muangkhumsakul

— 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 77 +6 — 77 +6 — 77 +6 — 78 +7 — 79 +8 — 79 +8 — 80 +9 — 81 +10 — 81 +10

Euro | Spanish Open Thursday | Madrid Purse: $1.86 million | Yards: 7,096 | Par: 72 First Round Marc Warren, Scotland 35-31 — 66 Paul Dunne, Ireland 35-31 — 66 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 33-34 — 67 Henric Sturehed, Sweden 34-33 — 67 Callum Shinkwin, England 33-34 — 67 Aaron Rai, England 37-30 — 67 Jason Norris, Australia 34-33 — 67 Jon Rahm, Spain 33-34 — 67 Jonathan Thomson, England 35-32 — 67 Julien Guerrier, France 35-32 — 67 Erik van Rooyen, South Africa 35-32 — 67 Matthias Schwab, Austria 33-34 — 67 a-Victor Pastor, Spain 35-32 — 67 Trevor Fisher Jnr, South Africa 35-33 — 68 Nacho Elvira, Spain 35-33 — 68 Paul Waring, England 34-34 — 68 Brett Rumford, Australia 34-34 — 68 Sebastian Heisele, Germany 34-34 — 68 Richard Sterne, South Africa 34-34 — 68 Pedro Oriol, Spain 34-34 — 68 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 35-33 — 68 Andrew Johnston, England 34-34 — 68 Also Sihwan Kim, United States 35-34 — 69 David Lipsky, United States 34-35 — 69 Seungsu Han, United States 35-35 — 70 Rafa Cabrera Bello, Spain 37-36 — 73 Daniel Im, United States 38-37 — 75 Chase Koepka, United States 37-38 — 75

LPGA | Lotte Championship Wednesday | Kapolei, Hawaii Purse: $2 million | Yards: 6,419 | Par 72 First Round | a-denotes amateur Shanshan Feng 33-34 — 67 Martina Edberg 33-35 — 68 Brooke M. Henderson 33-35 — 68 Haeji Kang 33-35 — 68 Mo Martin 33-36 — 69 Inbee Park 36-33 — 69 Julieta Granada 36-33 — 69 Alena Sharp 34-35 — 69 Eun-Hee Ji 33-36 — 69 Lizette Salas 34-35 — 69 Lindy Duncan 38-32 — 70 Pernilla Lindberg 33-37 — 70 Kim Kaufman 34-36 — 70 Minjee Lee 35-35 — 70

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

71 71 71 71 71 71 71 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 72 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 74 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 75 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76 76

-1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4

Area holes in one

-5 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2

National Extremes High: 102° Childress, Texas

35-36 35-36 35-36 35-36 36-35 34-37 36-35 36-36 35-37 36-36 35-37 36-36 36-36 37-35 34-38 37-35 34-38 36-36 33-39 36-36 36-36 36-37 37-36 35-38 37-36 35-38 35-38 34-39 34-39 36-37 35-38 35-38 38-35 34-39 35-39 36-38 36-38 38-36 37-37 37-37 35-39 37-37 36-38 36-38 37-37 38-36 39-35 38-36 38-36 37-37 38-36 36-38 34-40 37-37 36-38 37-37 39-35 38-36 39-36 36-39 36-39 38-37 36-39 36-39 36-39 39-36 37-38 36-39 35-40 37-38 40-35 39-36 37-38 35-40 37-38 37-38 38-37 37-38 38-37 37-39 39-37 38-38 37-39 36-40 38-38 36-40 37-39 37-39 38-38 40-36 36-40 39-37 39-37 36-40

Las Sendas CC (Mesa, Ariz.) • Brian Boehle, hole No. 16, 169 yards, 8 iron, April 8. Whitmoor CC • Craig Collins, hole No. 14 South, 135 yards, wedge, April 8. Old Hickory • Jim Hennessey, hole No. 8, 133 yards, 9-iron, April 6. Forest Hills • Barry Power, hole No. 4, 153 yards, 8-iron, April 5. Forest Hills • Hayden Somach, hole No. 2 (Valley), 159 yards, 8-iron. Aberdeen • Jim Swinnie, hole No. 3, 156 yards, 9-iron.

Low: 13° Mt. Washington, New Hampshire

Warm again, storms coming It will be another warm and windy day across the St. Louis area today. Highs will top out in the upper 70s. Showers and storms are likely later today into tonight. A few of these storms could be severe. Cooler air will move into the region by Sunday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

64°

74°

77°

66°

Partly sunny Mostly cloudy Slight chance of storms

Storms likely

40s

50s 30s

40s

50s

4-DAY FORECAST

40s

73 75 75 75 75 74 76 76 75 72 77 76 73

thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

56 61 43 56 55 57 60 57 60 44 57 55

H

SUNDAY

MONDAY

57°/66° 41°/48°

60s

TUESDAY

Chicago 43 / 66

90s

Kirksville 62 / 76

Springfield 57 / 74

Kansas City 6 6 / 76 St. Louis 61 / 78 Joplin 65 / 74

Carbondale 61 / 74 Poplar Bluff 62 / 75

Flood Stage

Current Level

+ 0.03 - 0.05 + 0.40 - 0.30 - 0.10 + 0.40 - 0.24 - 0.57 - 0.56 - 0.28

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, April 12th Tree - 127 (high), Mold - 1,740 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 0 Month (Total) 255 Season 4400 Year Ago 3284 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.34 Peoria 18 11.57 Beardstown 14 13.01 MERAMEC RIVER Sullivan 15 3.87 Valley Park 16 0.36 Arnold 24 10.82 BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.49 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 45.38 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.02 - 0.34 - 0.15 - 0.08 - 0.27 - 0.60 - 0.05

SUN & MOON

New Apr 15 Sunrise

First Apr 22

Full Apr 29

6:28 AM Sunset

Last May 7 7:36 PM

Moonrise 5:28 AM Moonset 5:13 PM

Look to the north at 9 p.m. and you will find the Big Dipper. If you follow the curve of its handle it will point you to the bright red giant star Arcturus. This star is about 25 times larger than the sun. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

356.99 + 0.09 363.68 - 0.70 508.06 - 1.59 655.78 0.00 707.70 - 0.19 663.74 - 0.12 915.49 - 0.14 841.28 - 0.16 603.01 - 0.26 410.13 - 0.09 607.01 - 0.29 451.90 - 0.35

+ 0.07 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Albany, N.Y. 47 Albuquerque 38 Anchorage 34 Atlanta 53 Atlantic City 54 Baltimore 55 Billings 30 Biloxi, Ms. 65 Birmingham 54 Bismarck 25 Boise 33 Boston 46 Buffalo 42 Burlington, Vt. 40 Charleston, S.C. 57 Charleston, W.V. 53 Charlotte 54 Cheyenne 31 Chicago 42 Cincinnati 55 Cleveland 53 Colorado Spgs. 33 Concord, N.H. 43 Dallas 69 Daytona Beach 64 Denver 35 Des Moines 57 63 Destin, Fl. 41 Detroit 55 El Paso 58 Evansville 28 Fairbanks 30 Fargo 26 Flagstaff 64 Fort Myers 27 Great Falls 35 Green Bay 46 Hartford 72 Honolulu 71 Houston 57 Indianapolis 59 Jackson, Ms. 34 Juneau 76 Key West 49 Las Vegas 65 Little Rock 52 Los Angeles 59 Louisville

56 51 50 78 73 82 40 77 82 31 53 64 53 49 78 86 80 34 54 76 77 42 62 84 80 39 72 77 61 66 77 41 36 45 88 46 39 71 83 83 74 85 51 84 70 79 79 81

W

Tomorrow L H W

showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny rain and snow mostly sunny sunny snow sunny mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow showers showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers rain thunderstorms partly cloudy snow showers thunderstorms mostly sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly sunny snow rain mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain showers sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy

42 31 33 60 54 59 26 73 65 16 43 48 38 33 62 58 59 21 40 60 53 23 44 49 67 27 40 70 43 44 60 20 23 24 69 31 30 52 73 59 59 66 34 77 52 56 59 61

44 61 48 79 73 80 53 75 76 36 62 54 39 34 80 81 80 45 45 69 59 51 48 63 83 52 46 76 44 69 70 37 38 57 88 53 32 72 83 70 67 73 51 85 77 66 83 73

rain sunny sunny showers sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy drizzle rain rain and snow partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy windy showers showers showers windy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy windy rain thunderstorms showers sunny showers sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy rain and snow showers showers thunderstorms showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms sunny showers

City

Today L H

52 Macon 74 McAllen, Tx. 60 Memphis 71 Miami 37 Milwaukee 37 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 29 60 Mobile Montgomery 51 57 Nashville New Orleans 63 New York City 53 Norfolk, Va. 55 Oklahoma City 67 Omaha 58 Orlando 64 Palm Springs 55 Philadelphia 56 Phoenix 55 Pittsburgh 54 Portland, Me. 41 Portland, Or. 43 Providence 46 Raleigh 50 Rapid City 30 Reno 30 Richmond, Va. 54 Sacramento 41 St. Petersburg 68 Salt Lake City 34 San Antonio 70 San Diego 56 San Francisco 48 Santa Fe 33 Savannah 56 Seattle 43 67 Shreveport 41 Sioux Falls 39 Syracuse 55 Tallahassee 66 Tampa 50 Tucson 69 Tulsa 56 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 70 66 Wichita Wilmington, De. 56 53 Yuma

81 95 79 84 39 40 48 80 82 80 82 77 79 80 73 85 82 81 79 77 60 55 66 81 30 61 82 71 84 47 86 76 65 48 79 53 80 42 49 79 86 71 80 82 83 78 79 81

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain rain mostly cloudy sunny snow sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain thunderstorms rain showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny

59 67 62 73 35 27 33 69 64 63 69 60 58 37 37 66 60 60 53 57 42 47 50 57 15 39 59 46 70 33 54 58 51 23 62 46 56 27 41 61 69 38 39 61 73 33 58 53

83 83 70 88 37 32 53 75 80 73 75 73 80 51 40 88 86 80 84 73 42 56 63 81 36 70 81 77 85 58 74 79 66 57 81 54 64 31 43 80 86 78 51 81 87 43 79 86

mostly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms showers rain snow showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy windy rain partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny showers rain rain showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy rain thunderstorms blizzard rain partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers windy partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

71 47 52 59 82 75 45 58 57 55 66 26 74 63 44 50

84 61 77 77 94 84 52 68 72 66 82 49 85 82 53 62

mostly sunny cloudy mostly sunny rain partly cloudy showers showers showers partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers showers

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

42 75 50 79 52 50 42 46 41 67 53 37 31 73 60 70

62 81 68 91 77 66 72 57 55 96 76 49 53 84 73 95

showers sunny sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy showers sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

0.00 - 0.02 - 0.33 - 0.02 + 0.10

Very unhealthy

Good

Today L H

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER 32 12.73 Kansas City Jefferson City 23 9.14 Hermann 21 9.29 Washington 20 7.07 St. Charles 25 13.45 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 11.92 Hannibal 15 12.00 Louisiana 25 19.02 Dam 24 26 18.90 Dam 25 18 15.25 Grafton 419 416.70 M.Price, Pool 21 10.11 M.Price, Tail. 30 12.90 St Louis 27 17.23 Chester Cape Girardeau 32 24.52

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

Hawaii High: 82°

A strong area of low pressure will slowly move eastward across the central Plains. An associated cold front will trigger showers and thunderstorms from the Missouri Valley down to the lower Mississippi Valley and east Texas. Some severe storms are possible. Portions of the northern Great Lakes, upper Midwest, and north-central Plains will see a mix of rain and snow. Warm and dry conditions will be in place throughout the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast. City

mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Wintry Mix

80s

Partly sunny, Slight chance Partly cloudy Mostly sunny iso. showers of showers

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.93” 1.43” 14.53” 9.39”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

85° 60° 66° 46° 89° 24° 73° 45°

80s

34°/52° 38°/62°

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:46 p.m.) Low (5:59 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1971) Record Low (1940) High Last Year Low Last Year

Snow

50s 70s

SATURDAY

W

73 74 66 72 72 74 73 73 75 62 74 73

70s

70s

60s

80s

70s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

L

T-storms

50s

30s

60s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

62 61 62 58 62 65 66 62 62 62 67 60 60

W

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

60s 70s

40s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

40s

40s

Alaska Low: 3°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

30s

30s

20s

Rain

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

30 46 56 74 51 74 46 45 29 72 73 52 37 43 56 51

52 64 63 88 68 83 79 64 51 90 86 68 40 49 71 76

sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny showers rain mostly sunny thunderstorms


FOR THE RECORD

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 2 NHL Favorite .............. Odds .............Underdog PENGUINS.........-$210/+$175................. Flyers JETS.................. -$200/+$170...................Wild VEGAS KNIGHTS-$150/+$130 ................. Kings Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2018 Benjamin Eckstein

AMERICA’S LINE BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog American League Yankees...................-$130 .................... TIGERS INDIANS ..................-$135 .................Blue Jays RED SOX..................-$182 .....................Orioles TWINS......................-$170 ................White Sox ASTROS .................. -$240...................Rangers Angels .....................-$130 ................... ROYALS MARINERS...............-$110 ............................A’s National League CUBS........................-$210 .....................Braves Cards.......................-$150 ....................... REDS NATIONALS .............-$170 ....................Rockies METS .......................-$125 ...................Brewers Pirates.....................-$135 .................MARLINS Giants......................-$110 ...................PADRES DODGERS ................-$128 ................... D’backs Interleague Phillies ....................-$112.........................RAYS

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended Boston RHP Joe Kelly six games and N.Y. Yankees 1B Tyler Austin five games, pending appeals, for their parts in a bench-clearing incident during Wednesday’s game. American League BOSTON — Placed LHP Bobby Poyner on the 10-day DL. Recalled RHP Marcus Walden from Pawtucket (IL). CHICAGO — Transferred LHP Carlos Rondon to the 60-day DL. Selected the contract of RHP Chris Volstad from Charlotte (IL). DETROIT — Recalled LHP Chad Bell from Toledo (IL). LOS ANGELES — Optioned RHP Eduardo Paredes and INF Ryan Schimpf to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHPs Jaime Barria and Nick Tropiano from Salt Lake. Reinstated INF Ian Kinsler from the 10-day DL. NEW YORK — Designated OF Shane Robinson for assignment. Reinstated OF Aaron Hicks from the 10-day DL. National League CARDINALS — Placed RHP Sam Tuivailala on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Recalled RHP Mike Mayers from Memphis (PCL). SAN FRANCISCO — Optioned LHP Andrew Suarez to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Derek Law from Sacramento. American Association FARGO-MOORHEAD — Signed RHP DJ Brown. Released RHP Carson Goldsmith. ST. PAUL — Signed RHP Matt Solter. TEXAS — Signed LHP Tyler Matzek. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND — Signed C Audie Afenir and INF Alec Sole. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY — Released OF Marcus Lemon and INF Josh Silver. QUEBEC — Signed INF Josh Vitters. ROCKLAND — Signed OF Nick Sinay. WINNIPEG — Traded RHP Jordan Wellander to New Jersey for a player to be named. Frontier League LAKE ERIE — Released UT Carlos Garcia. TRAVERSE CITY — Signed RHP Jordan Desguin. WASHINGTON — Signed RHP Doug Willey.

NBA Favorite ............. Points ............Underdog Saturday WARRIORS ................. 8...........................Spurs RAPTORS.................... 8.......................Wizards 76ERS........................6.5 .......................... Heat BLAZERS ...................5.5 .................... Pelicans Sunday CELTICS ...................... 4.......................... Bucks CAVALIERS ................6.5 ....................... Pacers THUNDER..................3.5 ........................... Jazz ROCKETS....................11 .................... T’Wolves Odds to win series: Warriors -$1500 vs. Spurs +$900 Raptors -$700 vs. Wizards +$500 76ers -$500 vs. Heat +$400 Blazers -$220 vs. Pelicans +$180 Celtics -$150 vs. Bucks +$130 Cavaliers -$700 vs. Pacers +$500 Thunder -$145 vs. Jazz +$125 Rockets -$5000 vs. T’Wolves +$1500 Odds to win the NBA Championship Team ...................Open................Current Warriors....................1/2 ............................. 7/5 Rockets ....................10/1 ............................8/5 Cavaliers ...................5/1 ............................. 5/1 Raptors ....................50/1 ............................8/1 76ers ....................... 80/1...........................15/1 Thunder ...................20/1 .......................... 25/1 Blazers ....................150/1 .........................30/1 Jazz..........................150/1 .........................40/1 Spurs........................12/1...........................60/1 Celtics........................8/1 ...........................70/1 Wizards ....................35/1 ........................100/1 Timberwolves ......... 40/1........................100/1 Bucks........................50/1 ........................100/1 Pelicans...................100/1 .......................100/1 Pacers .....................250/1 .......................100/1 Heat.........................100/1 ........................125/1 Odds to win the Eastern Conference Team ...................Open................Current Cavaliers ...................2/3 .............................6/5 Raptors ....................20/1 ............................8/5 76ers ........................25/1 ............................ 5/1 Celtics........................2/1 ........................... 25/1 Bucks........................20/1 .......................... 25/1 Wizards ....................12/1...........................30/1 Pacers ..................... 80/1..........................30/1 Heat......................... 40/1..........................40/1 Odds to win the Western Conference Team ...................Open................Current Warriors....................1/3 .............................4/5 Rockets .....................6/1 .......................... even Thunder ...................10/1 ...........................15/1 Blazers .................... 80/1..........................20/1 Jazz.......................... 80/1.......................... 25/1 Spurs.........................7/1............................30/1 Timberwolves ..........25/1 ..........................50/1 Pelicans....................50/1 ..........................60/1

SOCCER | Major League Soccer MLS — Added a second-game suspension to Seattle F Clint Dempsey for violent conduct. FC DALLAS — Signed D Chris Richards. COLLEGE CLEMSON — Named Amanda Butler women’s basketball coach. COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON — Promoted assistant women’s volleyball coach Katelyn Harrison to associate head coach. INDIANA — Junior F Juwan Morgan declared for the NBA draft. LSU — Announced graduate CB Terrence Alexander is transferring from Stanford. MARQUETTE — Named Dwayne Killings assistant men’s basketball coach. NEBRASKA — Announced sophomore QB Patrick O’Brien has been granted a release so he can transfer. PURDUE — Announced junior men’s basketball F Evan Boudreaux is transferring from Dartmouth. TCU — Named Scott Cross assistant men’s basketball coach.

COLLEGES Area results Baseball Frontier 10, SW Illinois 8 Softball Washington 11-11, Greenville 4-3

Major League Soccer

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HOCKEY | National Hockey League NHL — Suspended Los Angeles Kings D Drew Doughty for one game for an illegal check to the head of Vegas Golden Knights F William Carrier during Game 1 of the first-round playoff series. ARIZONA — Signed D Jordan Gross to a two-year, entry-level contract. BUFFALO — Assigned G Jonas Johansson from Rochester (AHL) to Cincinnati (ECHL). TAMPA BAY — Recalled D Matt Spencer from Adirondack (ECHL) to Syracuse (AHL). WASHINGTON — Recalled G Pheonix Copley from Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League LEHIGH VALLEY — Assigned G John Muse to Reading (ECHL). SYRACUSE — Recalled F Shane Conacher from Adirondack (ECHL). TEXAS — Assigned F Tommy Thompson to Idaho (ECHL).

SOCCER

BASKETBALL | NBA NEW YORK — Fired coach Jeff Hornacek and associate head coach Kurt Rambis. ORLANDO — Fired coach Frank Vogel. WASHINGTON — Signed G Ty Lawson. Women’s NBA ATLANTA — Traded F Bria Holmes to Connecticut for the 15th pick in the 2018 draft and a 2019 second-round pick.

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

FOOTBALL | National Football League NFL — Rejected the appeal of Cincinnati LB Vontaze Burfict’s four-game suspension for violating the league’s policy on performance-enhancers. ARIZONA — Released OL Max Tuerk. BUFFALO — Placed G Richie Incognito on the reserve/retired list. CLEVELAND — Terminated the contract of TE Gavin Escobar. Waived LB Max Bullough, WRs Bug Howard and Larry Pinkard, TE Matt Lengel, DB C.J. Smith and RB Kelvin Taylor. HOUSTON — Released OT Derek Newton.

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA New York City FC 5 0 1 16 14 4 Atlanta United FC 4 1 0 12 13 6 New England 3 1 1 10 10 5 Columbus 3 2 1 10 9 6 Orlando City 2 2 1 7 9 10 New York 2 2 0 6 10 5 Montreal 2 3 0 6 5 9 Philadelphia 1 1 2 5 3 4 Chicago 1 2 1 4 7 8 Toronto FC 1 2 0 3 3 4 D.C. United 0 3 2 2 5 10 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Sporting K.C. 4 1 1 13 12 9 Vancouver 3 2 1 10 8 9 LA Galaxy 2 2 1 7 7 8 Real Salt Lake 2 3 1 7 6 14 Los Angeles FC 2 2 0 6 9 10 Minnesota United 2 3 0 6 6 9 FC Dallas 1 0 3 6 6 3 Colorado 1 1 2 5 7 5 Houston 1 2 1 4 7 6 San Jose 1 2 1 4 7 8 Portland 0 3 2 2 6 12 Seattle 0 3 0 0 0 5 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Friday Orlando City at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Los Angeles FC at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Saturday Montreal at New York, Noon Toronto FC at Colorado, 2 p.m. LA Galaxy at Chicago, 2:30 p.m. Columbus at D.C. United, 6 p.m. FC Dallas at New England, 6:30 p.m. Houston at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Minnesota United at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Sporting K.C., 3 p.m. New York City FC at Atlanta United FC, 5 p.m.

WEATHER • Low 61, High 78 • Winds S 12-22 mph

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9 Marc Leishman D.A. Points Harold Varner III J.J. Henry Colt Knost Dylan Frittelli Mackenzie Hughes Rod Pampling Charley Hoffman Ted Potter, Jr. Emiliano Grillo Anirban Lahiri Robert Garrigus Geoff Ogilvy Byeong Hun An Francesco Molinari Chris Stroud Graeme McDowell Kevin Chappell Nick Taylor Satoshi Kodaira Robert Streb Ollie Schniederjans Matt Every Davis Love III Aaron Baddeley Ryan Palmer Tyrone Van Aswegen Corey Conners Ryan Blaum Kevin Na Sung Kang Ben Martin Steve Marino Blayne Barber Grayson Murray Lucas Glover Billy Hurley III Bob Estes Michael Thompson Scott Stallings Carl Pettersson Hudson Swafford Cody Gribble Martin Flores Paul Casey James Hahn Vaughn Taylor Tyrrell Hatton Michael Kim Brandon Harkins Luke Donald Greg Chalmers Jeff Maggert Chad Campbell Ross Fisher Glen Day Dru Love Jon Curran Charl Schwartzel Chris Couch Steve Scott David Hearn Derek Fathauer

English Premier League GP W D L GF GA Man City 32 27 3 2 90 24 Man United 32 22 5 5 63 25 Liverpool 33 19 10 4 75 35 Tottenham 32 20 7 5 64 27 Chelsea 32 17 6 9 54 31 Arsenal 32 16 6 10 61 43 Burnley 32 13 10 9 31 28 Leicester 32 11 10 11 48 45 Everton 33 11 8 14 38 53 Newcastle 32 10 8 14 33 41 Bournemouth 33 9 11 13 41 53 Watford 33 10 7 16 42 59 Brighton 32 8 11 13 29 43 West Ham 32 8 10 14 40 58 Swansea 32 8 8 16 26 45 Huddersfield 33 8 8 17 26 54 Crystal Palace 33 7 10 16 33 52 Southampton 32 5 13 14 31 50 Stoke 33 6 9 18 30 63 West Brom 33 3 12 18 26 52 Saturday Southampton vs. Chelsea, 6:30 a.m. Swansea vs. Everton, 9 a.m. Burnley vs. Leicester, 9 a.m. Crystal Palace vs. Brighton, 9 a.m. Huddersfield vs. Watford, 9 a.m. Liverpool vs. Bournemouth, 11:30 a.m. Tottenham vs. Man City, 1:45 p.m. Sunday Newcastle vs. Arsenal, 7:30 a.m. Man United vs. West Brom, 10 a.m. Monday West Ham vs. Stoke, 2 p.m. Tuesday Brighton vs. Tottenham, 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 18 Bournemouth vs. Man United, 1:45 p.m. Thursday, April 19 Leicester vs. Southampton, 1:45 p.m. Burnley vs. Chelsea, 1:45 p.m.

Pts 84 71 67 67 57 54 49 43 41 38 38 37 35 34 32 32 31 28 27 21

GOLF PGA | RBC Heritage Thursday | Hilton Head, S.C. Purse: $6.7 million | Yards: 7,099 | Par 71 First Round Rory Sabbatini 33-31 — 64 John Huh 30-36 — 66 Billy Horschel 35-31 — 66 Matt Kuchar 32-34 — 66 Chesson Hadley 34-32 — 66 Harris English 34-33 — 67 Martin Laird 33-34 — 67 Patrick Cantlay 33-34 — 67 Jonas Blixt 34-33 — 67 Charles Howell III 36-32 — 68 Fabian Gomez 33-35 — 68 Peter Malnati 33-35 — 68 Bryson DeChambeau 35-33 — 68 Nick Watney 34-34 — 68 Si Woo Kim 34-34 — 68 Xander Schauffele 36-32 — 68 Cameron Smith 35-33 — 68 Brice Garnett 34-34 — 68 Whee Kim 33-35 — 68 K.J. Choi 35-34 — 69 Bill Haas 35-34 — 69 Kevin Kisner 34-35 — 69 Dustin Johnson 35-34 — 69 Wesley Bryan 37-32 — 69 Webb Simpson 32-37 — 69 John Senden 35-34 — 69 Andrew Landry 34-35 — 69 Brian Stuard 36-33 — 69 Ryan Moore 34-35 — 69 Martin Kaymer 36-33 — 69 Ian Poulter 36-33 — 69 Matthew Fitzpatrick 36-33 — 69 Danny Lee 35-34 — 69 C.T. Pan 33-37 — 70 Scott Brown 37-33 — 70 Luke List 33-37 — 70 Dominic Bozzelli 35-35 — 70 Brian Harman 35-35 — 70 Zach Johnson 37-33 — 70 Stewart Cink 34-36 — 70 Jim Furyk 34-36 — 70 Chris Kirk 38-32 — 70 Beau Hossler 35-35 — 70 Sam Saunders 33-37 — 70 Tom Hoge 37-33 — 70 Russell Knox 35-35 — 70 Brandt Snedeker 34-36 — 70 Kevin Streelman 34-36 — 70 Keith Mitchell 34-37 — 71 Jonathan Byrd 36-35 — 71 Richy Werenski 36-35 — 71 Ryan Armour 35-36 — 71 Jason Dufner 34-37 — 71 Austin Cook 36-35 — 71 Sam Ryder 39-32 — 71 David Lingmerth 35-36 — 71 J.J. Spaun 34-37 — 71 Jason Kokrak 34-37 — 71 Philip Knowles 35-36 — 71 Sean O’Hair 36-35 — 71 Scott Piercy 35-36 — 71 Bud Cauley 37-34 — 71 Patton Kizzire 35-36 — 71 William McGirt 36-35 — 71 Brian Gay 36-35 — 71 Kelly Kraft 37-34 — 71 Doc Redman 36-35 — 71 Kevin Tway 34-37 — 71

-7 -5 -5 -5 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E

33-39 35-37 35-37 36-36 35-37 37-35 37-35 38-34 37-35 35-37 36-36 37-35 35-37 36-37 36-37 36-37 37-36 37-36 33-40 36-37 39-34 37-36 37-36 37-36 38-35 37-36 37-36 36-37 39-35 37-37 39-35 34-40 39-35 36-38 37-37 39-35 38-36 37-37 38-36 37-37 39-35 35-40 39-36 39-36 36-39 38-37 40-35 38-37 35-40 39-37 39-37 38-38 38-38 41-35 41-35 37-40 38-39 36-41 37-41 41-38 38-41 38-42 39-42 42-39

Christina Kim Ariya Jutanugarn Martina Edberg Cydney Clanton Sei Young Kim Jennifer Song Aditi Ashok Camilla Lennarth Allison Emrey Azahara Munoz Angel Yin Jenny Shin Brittany Marchand Hannah Green Ryann O’Toole So Yeon Ryu

— 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 72 +1 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 73 +2 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 74 +3 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 75 +4 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 76 +5 — 77 +6 — 77 +6 — 77 +6 — 78 +7 — 79 +8 — 79 +8 — 80 +9 — 81 +10 — 81 +10

142 142 142 143 143 143 143 143 143 144 144 144 144 144 144 144

BOXING SCHEDULE Friday At The Armory, Minneapolis (FS1), Jamal James vs. Abel Ramos, 10, welterweights; Edner Cherry vs. Dennis Galarza, 10, lightweights. Saturday At The O2 Arena, London, Billy Joe Saunders vs. Martin Murray, 12, for Saunders’ WBO middleweight title; Terry Flanagan vs. Maurice Hooker, 12, for the vacant WBO super lightweight title; Darryll Williams vs. Lennox Clarke, 10, super middleweights. Sunday At Yokohama, Japan, Ryota Murata vs. Felice Blandamura, 12, for Murata’s WBA World middleweight title; Daigo Higa vs. Cristopher Rosales, 12, for Higa’s WBC flyweight title; Ken Shiro vs. Ganigan Lopez, 12, for Shiro’s WBC junior flyweight title. April 19 At Coliseo de Puerto Rico, San Juan (ESPN2), Lamont Roach, Jr. vs. Orlando Cruz, 10, super featherweights; Jose Lopez vs. Miguel Gonzalez, 10, lightweights. April 21 At Belfast, Northern Ireland (SHO), Carl Frampton vs. Nonito Donaire, 12, for the interim WBO featherweight title; Zolani Tete vs. Omar Narvaez, 12, for Tete’s WBO bantamweight title; Jono Carroll vs. Marco McCullough, 12, junior lightweights; Tyrone McKenna vs. Anthony Upton, 10, junior welterweights; Conrad Cummings vs. Luke Keeler, 10, middleweights. At Echo Arena, Liverpool, England, Amir Khan vs. Phil Lo Greco, 12, welterweights; San Dodd vs. Tommy Coyle, 12, for Dodd’s Commonwealth lightweight title. At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (SHO), Adrien Broner vs. Jessie Vargas, 12, junior welterweights; Jermall Charlo vs. Hugo Centeno Jr., 12, for interim WBC middleweight title; Gervonta Davis vs. Jesus Cuellar, 12, for the vacant WBA junior lightweight title. April 28 At Philadelphia (ESPN), Jessie Magdaleno vs. Isaac Dogboe, 12, for Magdaleno’s WBO junior featherweight title; Jesse Hart vs. Demond Nicholson, 10, super middleweights; Bryant Jennings vs. Joey Dawejko, 10, heavyweights. At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (HBO), Daniel Jacobs vs. Maciej Sulecki, 12, middleweights; Jarrell Miller vs. Johann Duhaupas, 12, heavyweights; Shohjahon Ergashev vs. Zhimin Wang, 10, junior welterweights. May 2 At Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand, Wanheng Menayothin vs. Leroy Estrada, 12, for Menayothin’s WBC minimumweight title. May 5 At London, Tony Bellew vs. David Haye, 12, heavyweights; Martin J. Ward vs. James Tennyson, 12, for Ward’s European junior lightweight title; John Ryder vs. Jamie Cox, 12, super middleweights. May 11 At Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, Oleksandr Usyk vs. Murat Gassiev, 12, for IBF-WBA-WBC cruiserweight title (World Boxing Super Series final). At 2300 Arena, Philadelphia (SHO), Devin Haney vs. Mason Menard, 10, lightweights. May 12 At New York (ESPN), Jorge Linares vs. Vasiliy Lomachenko, 12, for Linares’ WBA lightweight title; Carlos Adames vs. Alejandro Barrera, 10, welterweights. At Turning Stone Resort Casino, Verona, N.Y. (HBO), Sadam Ali vs. Liam Smith, 12 for Ali’s WBO junior middleweight title; Rey Vargas vs. Azat Hovhannisyan, 12, for Vargas’ WBC super bantamweight title.

LPGA | Lotte Championship Thursday | Kapolei, Hawaii Purse: $2 million | Yards: 6,419 | Par 72 Second Round | a-denotes amateur Brooke M. Henderson 68-66 — 134 -10 Mo Martin 69-67 — 136 -8 Shanshan Feng 67-69 — 136 -8 Lindy Duncan 70-68 — 138 -6 Pernilla Lindberg 70-68 — 138 -6 Inbee Park 69-69 — 138 -6 Mariajo Uribe 72-68 — 140 -4 Moriya Jutanugarn 72-68 — 140 -4 Lizette Salas 69-71 — 140 -4 Daniela Iacobelli 73-68 — 141 -3 Nasa Hataoka 72-69 — 141 -3 Ji Hyun Kim 71-70 — 141 -3 Eun-Hee Ji 69-72 — 141 -3 Haeji Kang 68-73 — 141 -3

Low: 13° Mt. Washington, New Hampshire

Warm again, storms coming It will be another warm and windy day across the St. Louis area today. Highs will top out in the upper 70s. Showers and storms are likely later today into tonight. A few of these storms could be severe. Cooler air will move into the region by Sunday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

64°

74°

77°

66°

Partly sunny Mostly cloudy Slight chance of storms

Storms likely

40s

50s 30s

40s

4-DAY FORECAST

40s

73 75 75 75 75 74 76 76 75 72 77 76 73

thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

56 61 43 56 55 57 60 57 60 44 57 55

H

50s 70s

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

57°/66° 41°/48°

60s

TUESDAY

Chicago 43 / 66

90s

Kirksville 62 / 76

Springfield 57 / 74

Kansas City 6 6 / 76 St. Louis 61 / 78 Joplin 65 / 74

Carbondale 61 / 74 Poplar Bluff 62 / 75

Flood Stage

Current Level

+ 0.03 - 0.05 + 0.40 - 0.30 - 0.10 + 0.40 - 0.24 - 0.57 - 0.56 - 0.28

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, April 12th Tree - 127 (high), Mold - 1,740 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 0 Month (Total) 255 Season 4400 Year Ago 3284 Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 13.34 Peoria 18 11.57 Beardstown 14 13.01 MERAMEC RIVER Sullivan 15 3.87 Valley Park 16 0.36 Arnold 24 10.82 BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.49 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 45.38 Maps and weather data provided by:

24-Hr Change

- 0.02 - 0.34 - 0.15 - 0.08 - 0.27 - 0.60 - 0.05

SUN & MOON

New Apr 15 Sunrise

First Apr 22

Full Apr 29

6:28 AM Sunset

Last May 7 7:36 PM

Moonrise 5:28 AM Moonset 5:13 PM

Look to the north at 9 p.m. and you will find the Big Dipper. If you follow the curve of its handle it will point you to the bright red giant star Arcturus. This star is about 25 times larger than the sun. SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

356.99 + 0.09 363.68 - 0.70 508.06 - 1.59 655.78 0.00 707.70 - 0.19 663.74 - 0.12 915.49 - 0.14 841.28 - 0.16 603.01 - 0.26 410.13 - 0.09 607.01 - 0.29 451.90 - 0.35

+ 0.07 Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Jet Stream

Albany, N.Y. 47 Albuquerque 38 Anchorage 34 Atlanta 53 Atlantic City 54 Baltimore 55 Billings 30 Biloxi, Ms. 65 Birmingham 54 Bismarck 25 Boise 33 Boston 46 Buffalo 42 Burlington, Vt. 40 Charleston, S.C. 57 Charleston, W.V. 53 Charlotte 54 Cheyenne 31 Chicago 42 Cincinnati 55 Cleveland 53 Colorado Spgs. 33 Concord, N.H. 43 Dallas 69 Daytona Beach 64 Denver 35 Des Moines 57 63 Destin, Fl. 41 Detroit 55 El Paso 58 Evansville 28 Fairbanks 30 Fargo 26 Flagstaff 64 Fort Myers 27 Great Falls 35 Green Bay 46 Hartford 72 Honolulu 71 Houston 57 Indianapolis 59 Jackson, Ms. 34 Juneau 76 Key West 49 Las Vegas 65 Little Rock 52 Los Angeles 59 Louisville

56 51 50 78 73 82 40 77 82 31 53 64 53 49 78 86 80 34 54 76 77 42 62 84 80 39 72 77 61 66 77 41 36 45 88 46 39 71 83 83 74 85 51 84 70 79 79 81

W

Tomorrow L H W

showers sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny rain and snow mostly sunny sunny snow sunny mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy snow showers showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy snow showers rain thunderstorms partly cloudy snow showers thunderstorms mostly sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy sunny mostly sunny snow rain mostly cloudy showers thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain showers sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy

42 31 33 60 54 59 26 73 65 16 43 48 38 33 62 58 59 21 40 60 53 23 44 49 67 27 40 70 43 44 60 20 23 24 69 31 30 52 73 59 59 66 34 77 52 56 59 61

44 61 48 79 73 80 53 75 76 36 62 54 39 34 80 81 80 45 45 69 59 51 48 63 83 52 46 76 44 69 70 37 38 57 88 53 32 72 83 70 67 73 51 85 77 66 83 73

rain sunny sunny showers sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy drizzle rain rain and snow partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy windy showers showers showers windy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy windy rain thunderstorms showers sunny showers sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy rain and snow showers showers thunderstorms showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms sunny showers

City

Today L H

52 Macon 74 McAllen, Tx. 60 Memphis 71 Miami 37 Milwaukee 37 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 29 60 Mobile Montgomery 51 57 Nashville New Orleans 63 New York City 53 Norfolk, Va. 55 Oklahoma City 67 Omaha 58 Orlando 64 Palm Springs 55 Philadelphia 56 Phoenix 55 Pittsburgh 54 Portland, Me. 41 Portland, Or. 43 Providence 46 Raleigh 50 Rapid City 30 Reno 30 Richmond, Va. 54 Sacramento 41 St. Petersburg 68 Salt Lake City 34 San Antonio 70 San Diego 56 San Francisco 48 Santa Fe 33 Savannah 56 Seattle 43 67 Shreveport 41 Sioux Falls 39 Syracuse 55 Tallahassee 66 Tampa 50 Tucson 69 Tulsa 56 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 70 66 Wichita Wilmington, De. 56 53 Yuma

81 95 79 84 39 40 48 80 82 80 82 77 79 80 73 85 82 81 79 77 60 55 66 81 30 61 82 71 84 47 86 76 65 48 79 53 80 42 49 79 86 71 80 82 83 78 79 81

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain rain mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy rain rain mostly cloudy sunny snow sunny sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain thunderstorms rain showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny

59 67 62 73 35 27 33 69 64 63 69 60 58 37 37 66 60 60 53 57 42 47 50 57 15 39 59 46 70 33 54 58 51 23 62 46 56 27 41 61 69 38 39 61 73 33 58 53

83 83 70 88 37 32 53 75 80 73 75 73 80 51 40 88 86 80 84 73 42 56 63 81 36 70 81 77 85 58 74 79 66 57 81 54 64 31 43 80 86 78 51 81 87 43 79 86

mostly cloudy mostly sunny thunderstorms showers rain snow showers thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy windy rain partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny showers rain rain showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy rain thunderstorms blizzard rain partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers windy partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

71 47 52 59 82 75 45 58 57 55 66 26 74 63 44 50

84 61 77 77 94 84 52 68 72 66 82 49 85 82 53 62

mostly sunny cloudy mostly sunny rain partly cloudy showers showers showers partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers showers

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

42 75 50 79 52 50 42 46 41 67 53 37 31 73 60 70

62 81 68 91 77 66 72 57 55 96 76 49 53 84 73 95

showers sunny sunny mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny cloudy showers sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms mostly sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

0.00 - 0.02 - 0.33 - 0.02 + 0.10

Very unhealthy

Good

Today L H

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER 32 12.73 Kansas City Jefferson City 23 9.14 Hermann 21 9.29 Washington 20 7.07 St. Charles 25 13.45 MISSISSIPPI RIVER 16 11.92 Hannibal 15 12.00 Louisiana 25 19.02 Dam 24 26 18.90 Dam 25 18 15.25 Grafton 419 416.70 M.Price, Pool 21 10.11 M.Price, Tail. 30 12.90 St Louis 27 17.23 Chester Cape Girardeau 32 24.52

24-Hr Change

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 0.93” 1.43” 14.53” 9.39”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

85° 60° 66° 46° 89° 24° 73° 45°

Hawaii High: 82°

A strong area of low pressure will slowly move eastward across the central Plains. An associated cold front will trigger showers and thunderstorms from the Missouri Valley down to the lower Mississippi Valley and east Texas. Some severe storms are possible. Portions of the northern Great Lakes, upper Midwest, and north-central Plains will see a mix of rain and snow. Warm and dry conditions will be in place throughout the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast. City

mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Wintry Mix

80s

Partly sunny, Slight chance Partly cloudy Mostly sunny iso. showers of showers

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:46 p.m.) Low (5:59 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1971) Record Low (1940) High Last Year Low Last Year

80s

34°/52° 38°/62°

W

73 74 66 72 72 74 73 73 75 62 74 73

Snow

80s

70s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

L

70s

70s

60s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

62 61 62 58 62 65 66 62 62 62 67 60 60

W

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

T-storms

50s

30s

60s

40s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

60s 70s

Alaska Low: 3°

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

40s

40s 50s

Rain

30s

30s

20s

-2 -2 -2 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 E E E E E E E

Las Sendas CC (Mesa, Ariz.) • Brian Boehle, hole No. 16, 169 yards, 8 iron, April 8. Whitmoor CC • Craig Collins, hole No. 14 South, 135 yards, wedge, April 8. Old Hickory • Jim Hennessey, hole No. 8, 133 yards, 9-iron, April 6. Forest Hills • Barry Power, hole No. 4, 153 yards, 8-iron, April 5. Forest Hills • Hayden Somach, hole No. 2 (Valley), 159 yards, 8-iron. Aberdeen • Jim Swinnie, hole No. 3, 156 yards, 9-iron.

Thursday | Madrid Purse: $1.86 million | Yards: 7,096 | Par: 72 First Round Marc Warren, Scotland 35-31 — 66 Paul Dunne, Ireland 35-31 — 66 Alexander Bjork, Sweden 33-34 — 67 Henric Sturehed, Sweden 34-33 — 67 Callum Shinkwin, England 33-34 — 67 Aaron Rai, England 37-30 — 67 Jason Norris, Australia 34-33 — 67 Jon Rahm, Spain 33-34 — 67 Jonathan Thomson, England 35-32 — 67 Julien Guerrier, France 35-32 — 67 Erik van Rooyen, South Africa 35-32 — 67 Matthias Schwab, Austria 33-34 — 67 a-Victor Pastor, Spain 35-32 — 67 Trevor Fisher Jnr, South Africa 35-33 — 68 Nacho Elvira, Spain 35-33 — 68 Paul Waring, England 34-34 — 68 Brett Rumford, Australia 34-34 — 68 Sebastian Heisele, Germany 34-34 — 68 Richard Sterne, South Africa 34-34 — 68 Pedro Oriol, Spain 34-34 — 68 Thorbjorn Olesen, Denmark 35-33 — 68 Andrew Johnston, England 34-34 — 68 Also Sihwan Kim, United States 35-34 — 69 David Lipsky, United States 34-35 — 69 Seungsu Han, United States 35-35 — 70 Rafa Cabrera Bello, Spain 37-36 — 73 Daniel Im, United States 38-37 — 75 Chase Koepka, United States 37-38 — 75

National Extremes High: 102° Childress, Texas

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Area holes in one

Euro | Spanish Open

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

74-68 73-69 68-74 74-69 74-69 74-69 73-70 73-70 71-72 74-70 74-70 73-71 72-72 72-72 72-72 72-72

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

30 46 56 74 51 74 46 45 29 72 73 52 37 43 56 51

52 64 63 88 68 83 79 64 51 90 86 68 40 49 71 76

sunny mostly sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny showers rain mostly sunny thunderstorms


C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

CLASSIFIED Public Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING(S) AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT T h e Mi s s o u ri H o u s i n g D e ve lo p me n t C o mmis s io n (MHDC) is considering a request for financing and/or housing tax credits for the d e ve lo p me n t(s ) listed below:

Public Notices

Public Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING(S) AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING(S) AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT

T h e Mi s s o u ri H o u s i n g D e ve lo p me n t C o mmis s io n (MHDC) is considering a request for financing and/or housing tax credits for the d e ve lo p me n t(s ) listed below:

T h e Mi s s o u ri H o u s i n g D e ve lo p me n t C o mmis s io n (MHDC) is considering a request for financing and/or housing tax credits for the d e ve lo p me n t(s ) listed below:

Development Information 18-074 Reserve at Spencer SW corner of Spencer Rd. and Executive Centre Pkwy St. Peters, MO 00000

Development Information 18-060 Affordable Homes of Berkeley Scattered sites Berkeley, MO 63134

Development Type New Construction Senior 55+

Development Information 18-027 West Clay Senior Living Phase 2 2800 W Clay Valley Dr. St. Charles, MO 63301 2541 Development Type New Construction Senior 55+ Unit / Rent Information Total Units: 38 Missouri Housing Development Commission will hold two public hearings in St. Louis. The first on Monday, April 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 , at 6 :0 0 pm at the Renaissance Hotel. The addre s s is 9 8 0 1 Natural Bridge Road, S t . Louis , MO 63134, and the phone number is (3 1 4 ) 4 2 9 1 1 0 0 . The second on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 pm at t h e S t . Lo u i s U n i o n Station Hotel. The address is 1820 Marke t S tre e t, St . Louis , MO 63103, and the phone number is (314) 231 1234. At the public hearings, M H D C s t a f f w i l l d e s c ri b e t h e development(s) and accept and record public comments. Any interested party may attend the hearings to submit ve rbal or written comments. The public may also submit written comments directly to Missouri Housing Development C ommission, 9 2 0 Main S treet, Suite 1 4 0 0 , Kans as C ity, MO 64105, or through the office of the mayor or chief elected official of t h e lo c a lit y in w h ic h t h e development is located. All public comments must be received by May 11, 2018, in order to be considered. If you wish to attend this hearing and you require specific aids or services under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Lynn Sigler at 1 816 759 6600 a t le as t 3 working days prior to the hearing.

Unit / Rent Information Total Units: : 50 Total Market Units: 10 Mis s ouri Housing De ve lopment Commission will hold two public hearings in St. Louis. The first on Monday, April 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 , at 6 :0 0 pm at the Renaissance Hotel. The addre s s is 9 8 0 1 Natural Bridge Road, S t . Louis , MO 63134, and the phone number is (3 1 4 ) 4 2 9 1 1 0 0 . The second on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 pm at t h e S t . Lo u i s U n i o n Station Hotel. The address is 1820 Marke t S tre e t, St . Louis , MO 63103, and the phone number is (314) 231 1234. At the public hearings, M H D C s t a f f w i l l d e s c ri b e t h e development(s) and accept and record public comments. Any interested party may attend the hearings to submit verbal or written comments. The public may also submit written comments directly to Missouri Housing Development C ommission, 9 2 0 Main S treet, Suite 1 4 0 0 , Kans as C ity, MO 64105, or through the office of the mayor or chief elected official of t h e lo c a lit y in w h ic h t h e development is located. All public comments must be received by May 11, 2018, in order to be considered. If you wish to attend this hearing and you require specific aids or services under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Lynn Sigler at 1 816 759 6600 at le as t 3 working days prior to the hearing.

Development Type New Construction Family Unit / Rent Information Total Units: : 30 Missouri Housing Development Commission will hold two public hearings in St. Louis. The first on Monday, April 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 , at 6 :0 0 pm at the Renaissance Hotel. The addre s s is 9 8 0 1 Natural Bridge Road, S t . Louis , MO 63134, and the phone number is (3 1 4 ) 4 2 9 1 1 0 0 . The second on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 pm at t h e S t . Lo u i s U n i o n Station Hotel. The address is 1820 Marke t S tre e t, St . Louis , MO 63103, and the phone number is (314) 231 1234. At the public hearings, M H D C s t a f f w i l l d e s c ri b e t h e development(s) and accept and record public comments. Any interested party may attend the hearings to submit ve rbal or written comments. The public may also submit written comments directly to Missouri Housing Development C ommission, 9 2 0 Main S treet, Suite 1 4 0 0 , Kans as C ity, MO 64105, or through the office of the mayor or chief elected official of t h e lo c a lit y in w h ic h t h e development is located. All public comments must be received by May 11, 2018, in order to be considered.

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

Bids/Proposals

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

NOTICE TO BIDDERS: DISTRICTWIDE TUCK-POINTING PROJECTS FY18 (Bl)

The Kirkwood School District R-7 is seeking qualified bids for the District –Tuckpointing 2 0 1 8 project. Ple a s e vis it our w e b s i t e @ http://www.kirk woodschools.org and click on RFPs within the Links section.

Sealed Bid Proposals for: Technical Education Center OTC Table Rock Campus Owner: O z a r k s T e c h n i c a l Community College 1001 E. Chestnut Expressway Springfield, MO 65802 All endorsed "Proposals" shall be mailed to or delivered to the office of the College Project Manager, Blayne Radford, Operations Center, Ozarks Technical Community College, 933 E. Central A v e ., Springfield, Missouri 65802, no later than 3:00 p.m., CST, April 26, 2018, (time shall be determined by the clock in the College Project Manager's office). All received and qualified proposals will be opened and read aloud publicly. Construction Drawings and Specifications will be available on April 3, 2018 and may be purchased or dow nloaded through Engineers Reprographics' Online Plan room, 1600 E St Louis, Springfield, Missouri 65802. (417) 869-2222. Direct all questions to the Architect: N-FORM Architecture Attention: Danielle Palmer, 417873-2255 or dpalmer@nformarc.com The bidder understands that Ozarks Technical Community College reserves the right to award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder and to reject any or all bids and / or to waive any technicalities or informalities in the bidding. PREVAILING WAGES: Prevailing wages shall be paid in accordance with the Missouri Division of Labor Standards, Annual Wage Order in effect at the time of bidding. SUBSTANTIAL COMPLETION: All Work for this project shall be substantially complete by August 10, 2018.

If you wish to attend this hearing and you require specific aids or services under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Lynn Sigler at 1 816 759 6600 at le as t 3 working days prior to the hearing.

The Rockwood School District invite s yo u to s u b mit a b id according to Rockwood School District's DISTRICTWIDE TUCKPOINTING PROJECTS FY18 (Bl) specifications. For further proje ct de tails and information regarding the mandatory Pre-Bid meeting, etc., please visit http:// findrfp.com , or www.rsdmo.org or call the Construction Secretary at 636-733-3270.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the EXTERIOR IMPROVEMENTS, HILL HALL will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on APRIL 24, 2018 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $50.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder's expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at https://plans. missouristate.edu/. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications. MSU is an AA/EO institution.

Great Rivers Greenway is soliciting bids for demolition of three residential properties. Check https:// greatrivers greenw ay .org/jobsbids/ and submit by April 23, 2018.

YOLO O

Continued from Page A12

You Only List Once STLtoday.com/homes

STLtoday.com/readerrewards Substantial sum of currency was located in the City of Manchester, MO in mid-August 2017. Please contact Manchester Police at 314227-1410 to make claim.

STLtoday.com/readerrewards STLtoday.com/classiieds

STLtoday.com/homes

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING(S) AND REQUEST FOR PUBLIC COMMENT The Missouri Housing Development Commission (MHDC) is considering a request for financing and/or housing tax credits for the development(s) listed below: Unit / Rent Information

Development Information

Development Type

18-082 Ferguson Senior Living 800 Block of S Florissant Ferguson, MO 63135

New Construction Senior 62+

18-110 Maryland Heights Senior 2225 Rule Ave. Maryland Heights, MO 63043

New Construction Senior 55+

Total Units: 41

18-112 Arbor Hill 145 Apple Ave. Maryland Heights, MO 63043

New Construction Family

Total Units: 66

18-024 Preservation Square Phase 1 1405 North 16th St. St. Louis, MO 63106

New + Rehab Family Total Market Units: 37

18-055 Marquette Homes 4021 California and scattered sites St. Louis, MO 63118

Acquisition/Rehab Family

Total Units: 50

18-056 Fairview Village II 2100 Switzer Ave. St. Louis, MO 63136

Rehabilitation Senior 62+

Total Units: 34

18-057 Hancock Place Senior Living 9800 S Broadway St. Louis, MO 63125

New Construction Senior 62+

Total Units: 50

18-058 The Bluffs at Charles Park 1610 S Florissant Rd. St. Louis, MO 63121 1130

New Construction Senior 55+

Total Units: 45

18-059 Crossroads Senior Living at Bevo Mill 4914 Gravois Ave. St. Louis, MO 63116

New Construction Senior 62+

Total Units: 50

18-062 Grand Oaks Preservation 3716 Garfield and scattered sites St. Louis, MO 63113 3627

Acquisition/Rehab Family

Total Units: 39

18-080 STAR Residences, Phase II 6327 Lalite Ave. St. Louis, MO 63136 4726

New Construction Senior 55+

18-083 Bellefontaine Villas 10700 Bellefontaine Rd. St. Louis, MO 63137 2314

New Construction Senior 55+

Total Units: 41

18-097 Cottages on Gravois 8363 Gravois Rd. and a part of 8430 Gravois Rd. St. Louis, MO 63123

New Construction Senior 55+

Total Units: 54

18-098 Sylvan Springs Senior Apartments 2845 Telegraph Rd. St. Louis, MO 63125

New Construction Senior 62+

Total Units: 50

18-102 Crown Center Phase 1 8350 Decrest Dr. St. Louis, MO 63124

New Construction Senior 62+

Total Units: 52

Total Units: 50 Total Market Units: 8

Total Units: 131

INVITATION TO BID #18-055 WWTP ROOF REPAIRS ñ ABF OFFICE CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids to furnish material and labor for roof repairs at the Waste Water Treatment Plant. Specifications are available at w w w.ofallon.mo .us under Bid Opportunities. Interested vendors should submit s e ale d b id s c le arly marke d “WWTP Roof Repairs ñ ABF Office“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 1 0 0 North Main S treet, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 1 0 :0 0 A.M. CDT, April 30, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in th e C o u n c i l m a n ’ s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

INVITATION TO BID #18-039 RENTAL ITEMS FOR FESTIVALS AND SPECIAL EVENTS CITY OF O’FALLON, MISSOURI The City of O’Fallon, Missouri is soliciting sealed bids for rental ite ms for festivals and spe cial events held throughout the year. S pecifications are available at www.ofallon.mo.us under Bid Opportunities. Interested vendors should submit sealed bids clearly marked ìRental Items for Festivals and Special Events“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie Moellering 1 0 0 North Main Street, O’Fallon, MO 63366 by 2:00 P.M. CDT, April 25, 2018. Bids will be publicly opened at that time in the Councilman’s Conference Room. The City of O’Fallon reserves the right to reject any and all bids and waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also reserves the right to select the lowest and/or best bidder as determined by the City in its sole discretion.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 2, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the special use described below. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244. Petition 18-07 St. Clair’s Hearts Foundation c/o Cissell Mueller Construction, Inc. requests a special use permit in the S-D Special Old Town District to permit a social service agency/boarding house for veterans on a .45 +/acre parcel. The property is located on the north side of Main Street, east of Depot Ave. - 301 Main Street. LOCATION MAP

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on ile at the City of St. Peters Planning Department.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Planning and Zoning Commission of the City of St. Peters will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 2, 2018 at the St. Peters Justice Center. The St. Peters Justice Center is located at the intersection of Suemandy Drive and Grand Teton Drive. The Planning and Zoning Commission may recommend and the Board of Aldermen may enact by ordinance the rezoning as described below or an alternate zoning category. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, MO, 63376, 477-6600 or 278-2244. Petition 18-06 King Cong Holdings, LLC d/b/a The Watering Bowl requests a special use permit for a kennel on a .71 acre +/- acre tract in the I-1 Light Industrial District. The subject site is located on the west side of Harvestowne Industrial Drive, south of South St. Peters Parkway- 1409 Harvestowne Industrial Drive. LOCATION MAP

LETTING No. #8662

Total Units: 30

TERMINAL 1 TICKETING DRIVE STAIRCASE AND BAGGAGE CLAIM DRIVE RECOATING At St. Louis Lambert International Airport

Total Market Units: 4

Total Market Units: 5

Missouri Housing Development Commission will hold two public hearings in St. Louis. The first on Monday, April 23, 2018, at 6:00 pm at the Renaissance Hotel. The address is 9801 Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, MO 63134, and the phone number is (314) 429 1100. The second on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 6:00 pm at the St. Louis Union Station Hotel. The address is 1820 Market Street, St. Louis, MO 63103, and the phone number is (314) 231 1234. At the public hearings, MHDC staff will describe the development(s) and accept and record public comments. Any interested party may attend the hearings to submit verbal or written comments. The public may also submit written comments directly to Missouri Housing Development Commission, 920 Main Street, Suite 1400, Kansas City, MO 64105, or through the office of the mayor or chief elected official of the locality in which the development is located. All public comments must be received by May 11, 2018, in order to be considered. If you wish to attend this hearing and you require specific aids or services under the Americans with Disabilities Act, please notify Lynn Sigler at 1 816 759 6600 at least 3 working days prior to the hearing.

Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of Public Service in Room 208 City Hall, 1200 Market Street, St. Louis, M o . Until 1:45 PM , C T, on Tuesday Ma y 15, 2018, then publicly opened and read. Plans and Specifications may be examined on the Board of Public Service w ebsite h t t p : / / w w w .s t l - b p s .o r g / planroom.aspx (BPS On Line Plan Room) and may be purchased directly through the BPS website from INDOX Services at cost plus s h ip p in g . N o r e f u n d s w ill be made. Bidders shall comply with all applicable City, State and Federal laws (including MBE/WBE policies). ). Mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 10:00 AM in the Training Room a t t h e Airport Office Building, 11495 Navaid Rd., Bridgeton, MO 63044. All bidders must regard Federal Executive Order 11246, "Notice of Requirement for Affirmative Action to Ensure Equal Employ ment Opportunity ", the "Equal Opportunity Clause" and the "Standard Federal Equal Employment Specifications" set forth within and referenced at w w w .stl-bps.org (Announcements).

STLtoday.com/jobs

A detailed legal description of this property is available at St. Peters City Hall, One St. Peters Centre Boulevard.

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ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 04.13.18–04.19.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

‘BEIRUT’ MAKES THE MOST OF JON HAMM

To the moon!

COLUMBIA M GIANT LEAP OON LANDING CAPSU FROM SMITH L SONIAN TOESMAKES A T. LOUIS

RAMSEY LEWIS PUTS A JAZZY SPIN ON MUSIC OF THE BEATLES

BLACK REP TELLS STORIES OF FAMILIES DESTROYED BY SLAVERY


04.13.18–04.19.18

TONIGHT!

FRIDAY, APR. 13

MONDAY, APR. 23

SATURDAY, MAY 12

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BECOME A PROUD MEMBER OF THE BLUES FAMILY WITH A BE

2018-19 SEASON TICKET PLAN! FULL SEASON · HALF SEASON · 12-GAME DEPOSITS AS LOW AS $100 · STLOUISBLUES.COM/TICKETS

13 Moon men “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission,” on view through Sept. 3, helps tell the story of St. Louis’ role in the space race. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

PEABODY OPERA HOUSE UPCOMING EVENTS CALENDAR

SATURDAY, OCT. 20

SUNDAY, APR. 15

ON SALE TODAY AT 10AM!

24•7 4 Best Bets Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Art Up Late at the Contemporary, “Cinderella” at St. Louis Ballet, Kevin Hart at Scottrade Center and Todrick Hall at Delmar Hall. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks.

MUSIC+CLUBS 6 Jazz tribute Jazz musician Ramsey Lewis does the Beatles his way in concert at the Sheldon Concert Hall. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SUNDAY, APR. 22

WEDNESDAY, APR. 25

SATURDAY, APR. 28

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit PeabodyOperaHouse.com

ScottradeCenter.com · PeabodyOperaHouse.com SCOTTRADE CENTER GROUP SALES 314.622.5454

2

TICKETMASTER 800.745.3000

PEABODY OPERA HOUSE GROUP SALES 314.499.7676

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

8 Vintage sound The HamilTones, Anthony Hamilton’s background singers, are stepping into the spotlight. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

11 Taking the lead Grammy-nominated producer Jay E has linked up with a slew of St. Louis rappers for his new project, “Jay E Presents.”

21 On-the-nose Every plot turn in “Finding Your Feet” will be as clear as the nose on your face.

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

FUEL

SEE+DO 16 Untold stories The Black Rep world premier “Torn Asunder” is inspired by the work of Heather Andrea Williams, a specialist in families ripped apart by slavery. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

24 Pig out Hop House Southern Eatery’s massive menu includes barbecue, fried chicken, burgers, pizza and more. BY IAN FROEB

ON THE COVER THE BIG SCREEN 18 Poltical thriller “Beirut” portrays espionage as an amoral mess, making the most of St. Louis native Hamm. BY CALVIN WILSON 19 Animal rescue Dwayne Johnson lifts CGIheavy “Rampage” above mediocrity. BY CALVIN WILSON 20 Tiresome process With “Final Portrait,” Stanley Tucci delivers a character study that’s low on character development. BY CALVIN WILSON

‘BEIRUT’ MAKES THE MOST OF JON HAMM

RAMSEY LEWIS PUTS A JAZZY SPIN ON MUSIC OF THE BEATLES

BLACK REP TELLS STORIES OF FAMILIES DESTROYED BY SLAVERY

To the moon!

COLUMBIA MOON LANDIN GIANT LEAP FROM SMITHSG CAPSULE MAKES A ONIAN TO ST. LOUIS

Buzz Aldrin’s visor used in the Apollo 11 moon landing mission in 1969 is part of “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” at the St. Louis Science Center. HANDOUT

COPYRIGHT 2018 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT.

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P H O T O : H A N D O U T F R O M T H E S T. L O U I S S C I E N C E C E N T E R

COVER STORY

ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit

MONDAY, MAY 21

04.13.18–04.19.18 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

FRIDAY, MAY 4

Buzz Aldrin’s gloves, used during the July 1969 moon landing


Here’s what we’re looking forward to in the coming week

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig • Go! Magazine editor, 314-340-8353, ghartwig@post-dispatch.com

“I’m going to take a road trip in my new car. Haven’t decided where yet.” •

“Kevin Hart on Friday at Scottrade Center and Todrick Hall on Saturday at Delmar Hall.” •

“I’ll be at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., with other members of the Music Critics Association of North America.” •

Amy Bertrand • Post-Dispatch features editor, 314-340-8284, abertrand@post-dispatch.com Frank Reust • copy editor, 314-340-8356, freust@post-dispatch.com Hillary Levin • photo editor, 314-340-8118, hlevin@post-dispatch.com Elaine Vydra • online news editor and audience development manager, 314-340-8917, evydra@post-dispatch.com Emily Tintera • event & sponsorship manager, 314-340-8510, etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischof • Post-Dispatch vice president of advertising, 314-340-8529, dbischof@post-dispatch.com CONTRIBUTORS Cara DeMichele • designer Ian Froeb • restaurant critic Valerie Schremp Hahn • feature writer Jane Henderson • book editor Kevin C. Johnson • pop music critic Norma Klingsick • designer Sarah Bryan Miller • classical music critic Daniel Neman • food writer Judith Newmark • theater critic Aisha Sultan • feature writer Calvin Wilson • arts writer

“Drew Lynch on Friday at Helium, the new ‘Bacon & L’Eggs’ brunch show Saturday at Hamburger Mary’s and Todrick Hall on Saturday night at Delmar Hall.” •

Offering home decor worthy of a repeat performance...

Spring Sofa Sale Markdowns have been taken throughout the store

“My husband and I are helping chaperone 55 fourth-graders on a field trip to Jeferson City. I’m sure we’ll experience more than a few teaching moments.” •

CONTACT US Tell us about your events ae@post-dispatch.com • events.stltoday.com Advertise with us 314-340-8500 • stltoday.com/advertise Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 • stltoday.com/subscribe

“Seeing two of St. Louis’ top actors, Kari Ely and Jerry Vogel, in ‘A Tree, Falling’ at Upstream.” •

Write to us Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101 stltoday.com/apps

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OVERHEARD ONLINE On Gioia’s Deli pulling its hot-salami sandwiches from Busch Stadium JAMES GEIGER “Why is it that most sports venues ofer terrible quality at ripof prices? Who allows this?” ➙ BOB KANYOK “From national parks to stadiums around the country, I cringe whenever I see ‘operated by Delaware North Corporation.’” ➙ ED FARREL “Good job, Alex (Donley, Gioia’s owner). Nice to know someone still cares about quality over profits!” ➙ ERIC EYSTER “God forbid people should just show up to watch the baseball game that sometimes happens at these events.” ➙ NICK GIUNTA “Nothing better than a hot salami sandwich, combined with a team destined to give everyone indigestion.”

Get our free app for daily Best Bets, reviews and more ➙ stltoday.com/apps

20% OFF 287 Lamp and Lantern Village Town and Country, MO 63017

636-220-9092

All Sofas 4/6-4/8. Other Specials throughout the store

Open Monday-Friday 10am - 6pm Saturday 9am - 6pm Sunday 11am - 4pm

www.encorestl.net 04.13.18-04.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


love for the stage. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ WHEN Friday through April 28 • WHERE Tower Grove Abbey, 2348 Tennessee Avenue • HOW MUCH $25-$30 • MORE INFO 314-865-1995; straydogtheatre.org

Omega Jones, who just won a St. Louis Theater Circle Award for his starring role last year in “Ragtime” at Stray Dog, plays the title role in Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rock opera. Directed by Justin Been, the big cast includes Heather Matthews as Mary Magdalene, Phil Leveling as Judas Iscariot and Lavonne Byers as Pontius Pilate.

BEST

BETS FRIDAY World Chess Hall of Fame exhibits WHEN Through Feb. 24 • WHERE World Chess Hall of Fame, 4652 Maryland Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-3679243; worldchesshof.org

Three new exhibits from around the world will highlight the history, art and culture behind chess. “Painted Pieces: Art Chess From Purling London” includes multimedia chess sets, pieces, boards and interactive experiences produced by artists worldwide. “The Sinquefield Efect: The Resurgence of American Chess” commemorates the last decade of chess growth led by the St. Louis Chess Club. “The Staunton Standard: Evolution of the Modern Chess Set” displays dozens of chess sets from the company, which are the standard in tournament play since they were introduced to the public

events are ✔ These Editor’s Picks

in 1949. The Purling and Staunton exhibits close Sept. 16; the Sinquefield exhibit closes Feb. 24. BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN

Art Up Late: Faster WHEN 9 p.m.-midnight Friday • WHERE Contemporary Art Museum, 3750 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35, which includes two drinks and valet • MORE INFO 314-5354660; camstl.org/artuplate

BY JUDITH NEWMARK

‘A Tree, Falling’ WHEN Friday through April 29 • WHERE Kranzberg Arts Center, 501 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$35 • MORE INFO 314534-1111; metrotix.com

up for this ✔ Buckle one: The second installment of Art Up Late in CAM’s current season is inspired by “Salvatore Scarpitta: Racing Cars,” now on view. The after-hours event includes music by James Biko (formerly known as Nappy DJ Needles), a performance by Consuming Kinetics Dance Company, lots of photo ops, vintage racing video games, a silent auction and more. Proceeds benefit CAM’s education programs. BY GABE HARTWIG

SATURDAY Todrick Hall

After nearly 30 years in front of Brookings Hall, Washington University’s student-run ThurtenE Carnival finds a new home nestled between Simon Hall and Francis Field. The annual event features carnival rides, live performances and

there. Expect Hart to address the turmoil in his personal life last year and much more.

WHEN 7:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Delmar Hall, 6133 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$35 • MORE INFO 1-800-745-3000; ticketmaster.com

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

talent Todrick Hall has made a name for himself by ✔ Multifaceted conquering a variety of platforms. We first saw him years ago on the

‘The Dresser’

old “American Idol,” where he was eliminated long before he could make it to the top. Hall has been a YouTube sensation for his music medleys, had his own MTV show, acted on Broadway, made guest appearances on “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” produced his own musical, “Straight Outta Oz,” and more. His new visual album “Forbidden” is accompanied by his “America: The Forbidden Tour.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

WHEN Friday through April 29 • WHERE Gaslight Theater, 358 North Boyle Avenue • HOW MUCH $30-$35 • MORE INFO 1-800-9822787; ticketmaster.com

Contini and ✔ John David Wassilak

ThurtenE Carnival WHEN 4-8 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday-Sunday • WHERE Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive • HOW MUCH Free admission • MORE INFO thurtene.org

A thoughtful social worker turns her attention to an elderly physician sufering from loss of memory. The Australian author, Ron Elisha, is both a prolific playwright and a practicing physician. Michael Dorsey directs the Upstream Theater production. BY JUDITH

fried goodies of all kinds. On Friday, enjoy unlimited carnival rides by purchasing a $20 wristband. BY GABE HARTWIG

St. Louis Ballet: ‘Cinderella’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Blanche M. Touhill Performing Arts Center, University of Missouri-St. Louis • HOW MUCH $25-$69 •

MORE INFO touhill.org

Kevin Hart

ballet tells ✔ This the story of an

WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE Scottrade Center, 1401 Clark Avenue • HOW MUCH $35-$150 • MORE INFO 1-800745-3000; ticketmaster.com

overworked and underappreciated young woman who meets the prince of her dreams. It’s a fairy tale that was virtually made for dance — and for St. Louis Ballet. BY CALVIN WILSON

When Kevin Hart isn’t mugging his way through any number of mediocre films, he’s showcased on the live concert stage. His manic, memorable performances are among the best out

star as an aged actor and his devoted assistant, trying to make it through a performance of “King Lear.” The actor isn’t as sure of his lines as he should be, and the Luftwafe’s bombs make an inconsiderate interruption, but the drama plays on to the last moment. Bobby Miller directs the often comic, often touching piece, imbued with a

NEWMARK

SATURDAY 3LAU WHEN 9 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Ryse Nightclub at Ameristar Casino, 1 Ameristar Boulevard, St. St. Charles • HOW MUCH $20-$35 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

Dance music artist 3LAU (Justin Blau, a Washington University graduate) returns to his old stomping grounds for a headlining show at Ryse Nightclub. He just released his debut album, “Ultraviolet,” which features the singles “On My Own,”

“Walk Away” and “Star Crossed.” All money raised through the streaming of his album will be donated to FCancer. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Abdullah Ibrahim & Ekaya WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $15-$45 • MORE INFO thesheldon.org

Once known as Dollar Brand, South African pianist Ibrahim is a jazz great whose music represents the spirit of freedom that led to the end of apartheid. At the Sheldon, the pianist and his combo will perform in tribute to a legendary South African ensemble, the Jazz Epistles. BY CALVIN WILSON

St. Louis Symphony Orchestra: Rachmaninof Piano Concerto No. 2 WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$131, $30 for standing room (Sunday is sold out) • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; slso.org

St. Louis ✔ The Symphony Orchestra celebrates the tenure of music director David Robertson with a melodic program that includes soloist Simon Trpceski in Rachmaninof’s Piano Concerto No. 2, Copland’s stirring “Fanfare for the Common Man” and Hanson’s Symphony No. 2, “Romantic.” The mood will be festive and the music-making of a high order. Tickets may be hard to come by on Saturday night, but you can hear the same great program on Sunday afternoon. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

FAST FORWARD Leslie Jones, April 27 at the Touhill: The comedian known for her work on “Saturday Night Live” performs in a show presented by UMSL’s University Program Board • St. Louis Teen Talent Competition, April 28 at the Fox Theatre: Fifteen acts, selected from rounds of competition at area high schools, will compete onstage for scholarships, prizes and performance opportunities • The Go! List, April 29 in the Post-Dispatch: You voted, and our critics have had their say — find our list of the best people, places and things in St. Louis • “My Brother, My Brother and Me,” May 3 at the Peabody Opera House: Justin, Travis and Griin McElroy — the siblings behind a successful podcasting empire — bring their Q&A show to a live audience Leslie Jones

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P H O T O S : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S

Todrick Hall


Lumberlend Co. WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Old Rock House, 1200 South Seventh Street • HOW MUCH $16-$18 • More info 314534-1111; metrotix.com

Guitarist Tim Reynolds is well-known for his long-running gig with the Dave Matthews Band, but he also has carved out a deep niche as an artist in his own right. His versatility allows him to teeter between rock, jazz, blues, classical and reggae sounds. His own band is TR3, and their show is a mix of Reynolds’ songs with wild covers including the likes of James Brown, Led Zeppelin and King Crimson. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Missouri River Music Festival WHEN 6:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Family Arena, 2002 Arena Parkway • HOW MUCH $40-$85 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Enjoy a night of classic rock in St. Charles, with the Guess Who, Ambrosia, Bill Champlin, Stephen Bishop and John Ford Coley. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

St. Louis Classical Guitar Society: Manuel Barrueco WHEN 8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road • HOW MUCH $28 • MORE INFO 314-5675566; guitarstlouis.net

The St. Louis Classical Guitar Society ends its 2017-18 season Saturday evening with a recital by CubanAmerican guitarist Manuel Barrueco. He’s been performing for three decades, giving recitals and concerts throughout the United Sates and Latin America. (He’s also appeared on “CBS Sunday Morning,” A&E’s “Breakfast With the Arts,” in a Lexus commercial and on “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.”) He’ll also give a master

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class for young area guitar students from 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday at the 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City. Admission for the class is $5 at the door.

Compensation Fund for December, a St. Louis-based nonproit literary magazine. BY

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘A Closer Walk With Patsy Cline’

SUNDAY ‘Set It Of’ WHEN 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $69.50-$125 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

Fans of urban crime movies of the 1990s embraced “Set It Of,” right along with other genre staples of the era such as “Boyz n the Hood,” “Menace II Society” and “New Jack City.” What distinguished “Set It Of” was the fact that its four leads were women. Jada Pinkett Smith, Queen Latifah, Vivica A. Fox and Kimberly Elise portrayed a crew drawn into bank robbery. Now the movie comes to the stage with rapper/ radio personality Da Brat in the leading role. The play is written, directed and produced by Je’Caryous Johnson, who was also behind “Two Can Play That Game,” another movie brought to the stage. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

MONDAY

GABE HARTWIG

TUESDAY

WHEN Tuesday through May 6 • WHERE Playhouse @ Westport Plaza, 635 West Port Plaza • HOW MUCH $65 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Julie Johnson stars as the famed vocalist whose own life sounded like a country song. The show includes 21 of Patsy Cline’s hits, among them “Walkin’ After Midnight,” “I Fall to Pieces” and “Crazy.” BY JUDITH NEWMARK

Sarah Kendzior WHEN 7 p.m. Tuesday • WHERE Left Bank Books, 399 North Euclid Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-367-6731

St. Louis trans✔ Aplant whose Twitter followers number in the hundreds of thousands is a ierce critic of many things, including President Trump, the mainstream media, racism, labor inequities and more. She collected her commentary in a self-published book that has now been expanded and published by a New York publisher. Kendzior will discuss “The View From Flyover Country.” BY JANE HENDERSON

Mandy Gonzalez WHEN 7 p.m. Monday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $100 • MORE INFO 314-5341111; metrotix.com

Gonzalez ✔ Mandy is one busy actor. On Broadway, she stars as Angelica Schuyler in a little show called “Hamilton.” On TV, she plays Lucy Knox in CBS’ White House drama “Madam Secretary.” And on Monday night, she makes a trip to St. Louis for a concert that will beneit the Writers and Artists

WEDNESDAY Willie Nelson & Family WHEN 7:30 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $51-$126.50 • MORE INFO 1-800-7453000; ticketmaster.com

next week to the Peabody, and he’s set to release a new album, “Last Man Standing.” The album includes the latest single, “Something to Get Through” and follows “God’s Problem Child” (2017). BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SHAKE 38: ‘Reclamation: Contemporary Fashion and the Canon’ WHEN 5 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE St. Louis Fashion Fund Incubator, 1533 Washington Avenue • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO sfstl.com

Shakespeare Festival St. Louis kicks of its ninth annual SHAKE 38 celebration with a fashion show. (Why 38? For the number of plays Shakespeare wrote.) Designer Sarah Stallman designed some very unusual ensembles to portray a number of Shakespeare’s characters in punk style, from anarchist nuns (“Measure for Measure”) to androgynous rebels (“The Taming of the Shrew”). Interactive entertainment ranges from tarot card readings to photo ops with your favorite models to personal sonnet performances. “Reclamation” kicks of the ive-day, communitybased marathon of Shakespeare’s work. Performances — amateur and professional, traditional and ofbeat — will be staged at locations all over town, among them a brew house, a chapel, and outdoors at the corner of Delmar and Grand. For a complete list of events with times and locations, visit sfstl.com. BY

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04.13.18-04.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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MOST-SHAZAMED SONGS FOR APRIL 10 1 “Psycho” (Post Malone feat. Ty Dolla $ign) 2 “Boo’d Up” (Ella Mai) 3 “King’s Dead” (Jay Rock & Kendrick Lamar & Future & James Blake) 4 “Never Be the Same” (Camila Cabello) 5 “The Middle” (Zedd, Maren Morris & Grey) 6 “Powerglide” (Rae Sremmurd feat. Juicy J) 7 “Whatever it Takes” (Imagine Dragons) 8 “Let You Down” (NF) 9 “Mine” (Bazzi) 10 “Get You” (Daniel Caesar)

Ramsey Lewis

Jazz tribute Ramsey Lewis does the Beatles his way at the Sheldon Concert Hall BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

ackling the Beatles’ material is nothing new for jazz great Ramsey Lewis. Over his decades of recording, the Grammy-winning pianist has put his stamp on two albums of Beatles reinterpretations: “Mother’s Son” (1968) and “Ramsey Lewis Plays the Beatles Songbook” (2010). And all these years later, Lewis is still doing the Beatles his way. He’s bringing his “Ramsey Lewis Plays the Beatles” concert to the Sheldon this weekend. Lewis’ interest in the Beatles is unusual, considering he was underwhelmed when the group first exploded in the 1960s.

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“Everybody went crazy. I said,‘Why, why, why? ... I should have looked at the audience. They were drawing mostly girls to baseball stadiums and doing these bubble-gum songs. I thought that was it for them,” Lewis recalls. “And then something happened to their songs. They evolved, which tells you something. They started writing more interesting songs. I said, ‘Oh, now they have a catalog of songs that can stand up as standards that are fun to play, fun to solo on, and the band likes to play them.’” Lewis says he never caught a Beatles concert back in the day. “I prefer to stay away from places that hold 40,000 people. I go the other way. And they

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

didn’t stay on the scene long, though they made a ton of money. They broke up on their way to the bank.” His concerts, including the one coming to the Sheldon, are a mixture of Beatles songs, his own songs and choice jazz standards such as John Coltrane’s “Dear Lord.” “The Beatles songs go over so well,” he says. “Those songs are internationally known and loved. Their music has been recorded by symphonies and orchestras, and I’m not the only jazz guy to record their music. I don’t know any other pop act whose music has been recorded across the board like this.” Lewis’ own staples that’ll make the show include “The ‘In’ Crowd” and his versions of “Wade in the Water” and “Sun Goddess.” “If I didn’t play those, people would get pretty upset,” he says. “I found out the hard way.” At a show years ago, Lewis figured he’d been playing the same songs nightly for so long that the audience

Post Malone

would probably feel relieved if he omitted one or two of the classics. “I thought fans, after all these years, would say ‘Oh, we’ve heard that.’ But we closed the show, and people kept applauding and applauding. Thank God these are songs people love to hear.” He had to remind himself that, as a jazz player, he’s allowed and expected to improvise and bring a newness to a song no matter how many times it’s performed. “Whatever song we’re playing, we use that song to solo in the moment,” Lewis says. “We’re not playing the same solo we played last night, last week, last month, last year. It’s a nobrainer. “Some groups (in R&B and pop) play their solos the same. Good for them. We can’t do that. We play enough of the melody so the audience picks up on it, but when it gets to the solo, we go of.” Lewis, who has released more than 75 albums, wants to do something diferent on his next one: a solo album of just himself and his piano. “I always played with a group; I’m more comfortable with a group,” he says. “And I’d never had the experience of playing solo,” he says, except for his formative years when he played someone else’s material in a solo recital. A few years ago, at the Ravinia Festival near Chicago, he was asked to play a solo recital, but he was reluctant. “They said I should do it, that people would really love it, so I worked up a solo recital,” he says. “And I’ll be darned, I loved working it up, practicing it, and I loved the performance. I connected with the audience, and the audience loved it. And afterward, lo and behold, playing solo was great.” WHAT Sheldon Gala with “Ramsey Lewis Plays the Beatles” • WHEN 8:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall & Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $35-$45 • MORE INFO 314-534-1111; metrotix.com

Find more music events, photos and concert news ➙ stltoday.com/music stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : M . S P E N C E R G R E E N ( L E W I S ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( M A L O N E )

SHAZAM ST. LOUIS TOP 10


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04.13.18-04.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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The HamilTones

Vintage sound Anthony Hamilton’s HamilTones step out from the background with their own material and tour BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

ackground singers forming their own working group while still holding their background roles isn’t the normal course, but when there’s as much talent in the room as there is with the HamilTones, it’s hard to contain. The HamilTones, made up of Tony Lelo, 2E and J. Vito, are the oicial background singers of Grammy-winning soul singer Anthony Hamilton. They even share a nomination with him for “What I’m Feelin’” from Hamilton’s 2016 album by the same name. Now, the group is recording its own material and touring on its own with a show Thursday at BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups.

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“When we came to the forefront it was really exciting, and Anthony really opened that door to the world for us,” J. Vito says. “He understood who we are and saw us as much more than background singers. For an artist to humble themselves and let you do your thing ... we were just doing our jobs, and he loved the sound, and the rest has been history.” J. Vito says Hamilton is supportive of his background singers, opening doors for new opportunities. “He includes us in a lot,” he says. “We have shows as the HamilTones, and he supports there. Sometimes he’s right there beside us. We plan HamilTones dates around him, and he books his dates around us.”

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

He says the HamilTones came together organically in their native Charlotte, N.C. “We had no intentions of being in a group, to come up with our own music. That was something we woke up to.” Hamilton’s musical director spotted the three singers individually at a popular open-mic joint in downtown Charlotte in 2008 and thought they could be a good fit. “He liked what he heard and gave us an opportunity to step up to the plate,” J. Vito says. “That’s how we came to be.” One of the singers, 2E, previously sang backup for Fantasia, Jodeci and K-Ci & JoJo. Tony Lelo and J. Vito grew up singing gospel. Since joining forces with Hamilton, the HamilTones have slowly begun to soar. The group found social media success by making songs about current events. One of the biggest was a 2016 song riing on rapper Birdman’s tense interview with morning radio program

“The Breakfast Club.” The HamilTones, who call their sound “young vintage,” name acts such as the Temptations, the Four Tops, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, Al Green, Bob Marley, Tank, Tyrese and Kirk Franklin as influences. “It’s young fellows with a vintage sound,” J. Vito says. “We have that young look but the vintage swag and sound.” The group is gearing up for the release of its debut album, featuring the single “Money Can’t Buy You Love” featuring Ricco Barrino (Fantasia’s brother). Though the details are still being worked out, he says, “it’s coming sooner than you think. Everybody is looking for it, and they definitely won’t be disappointed. We understand what making a first impression means.” WHAT The HamilTones, Theresa Payne, Tifany Elle • WHEN 6:30 p.m. Thursday • WHERE BB’s Jazz, Blues & Soups, 700 South Broadway • HOW MUCH $25-$35 • MORE INFO 618-509-0308

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T SSANCIL 2018IES I R O FL COUN E SER ARTSAPPLAUS E N I F AUSE L P P A MAINSTAGE ARTISTS MANAGEMENT PRESENTS:

BABY BOOMER COMEDY SHOW STARRING KENT RADER AND JAN MCINNIS

CLEAN COMEDY FOR PEOPLE BORN BEFORE SEATBELTS, SAFETY HELMETS AND FACEBOOK

Sunday, April 15 at 3:00 pm

NATIONAL PLAYERS PRESENT:

OTHELLO

Directed by Jason King Jones Othello is a celebrated general returning home from the wars, but his dark skin and foreign origin inspire hatred from several people, especially the man he trusts most: lago. As lago twists Othello’s love for his wife Desdemona, everyone becomes pawns in lago’s devious plots.

Sunday, April 29 at 1:30 pm At the Florissant Civic Center Theatre Parker Road and Waterford Drive To purchase tickets call the Theatre Box Ofice 314-921-5678 or go to www.lorissantmo.com

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04.13.18-04.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Atomic Cowboy Pavilion ticketweb.com • Matisyahu & Stephen Marley, 7 p.m. June 3, $25-$30. Delmar Hall ticketmaster.com • Tory Lanez’s “Memories Don’t Die” tour, 8 p.m. June 26, $35-$40. • The Get Up Kids, Racquet Club, Ageist, 8 p.m. July 21, $20-$24. Duck Room at Blueberry Hill ticketmaster.com • Magic Giant, 8 p.m. June 3, $15, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Brendan Mayer, 8 p.m. June 7, $12-$15. • An Evening With Peter Mayer, 8 p.m. July 20, $23. • David Ramirez’s “Bootleg Tour” with Matt Wright, 8:30 p.m. June 26, $16-$19. Event Center at River City Casino ticketmaster.com

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• Sweet Crude, 8 p.m. July 17, $10-$13, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. Old Rock House metrotix.com • Cedric Burnside, 8 p.m. May 24, $15. • Red Sun Rising, Troy, 8 p.m. May 29, $12-$15, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

The Firebird ticketly.com

• Bone Thugs-NHarmony, 8 p.m. May 20, $35-$55.

• Wayback Pointfest

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• Joan of Arc, 8 p.m. July 5, $10-$13.

The Pageant ticketmaster.com

• Rascal Flatts’ “Back to Us Tour” with Dan + Shay, Carly Pearce, 7:30 p.m. Aug. 4, $33.75-$98.50.

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The Monocle ticketly.com

• Ted Nugent, 7:30 p.m. July 22, $45-$55.

Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre livenation.com

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• Counting Crows’ “25 Years and Counting” tour with Live, 6:30 p.m. Sept. 9, $19-$125.

• Easton Corbin, Friday, canceled.

• Day26 20th anniversary tour, 8 p.m. May 9, $20-$40.

KEN PAGE • APRIL 4 • FERRING JAZZ BISTRO 1 Carrie and Matt Becker of O’Fallon, Mo. 2 Nathaniel and Lorry Mahone of Wildwood 3 John and Monica Drake of St. Louis 4 Daniel and Debbie Nelson Linck of St. Louis 5 Ryan Marshall (left) and Shawn Reeser, both of St. Louis 6 Jeanne and Jef Remelius of St. Louis LITTLE BIG TOWN • APRIL 7 • CHAIFETZ ARENA 7 D.J. and Loreley Smith of Warson Woods 8 Bailey Wood and Brett Elliott, both of Kansas City, Mo. 9 From left: Grace McKee, Jessi Zink and Kayla Runyan, all of Iberia, Mo. 10 Zane and Gabby Bowen of Grafton 11 Christopher and Toni Remmenga of Richland, Mo. 12 Susan and Emily Scott of Wentzville

• Kid Rock’s “Red Blooded Rock ’n’ Roll Redneck Extravaganza Tour” with Brantley Gilbert, Wheeler Walker Jr., 6:30 p.m. Sept. 7, $39.50$129.50, on sale at noon Friday.

• Plain White T’s, Ocean Park Standof, 8 p.m June 19, $25-$30, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday.

• Ravyn Lenae, April 11, postponed, refunds at point of purchase.

iPARTY

• moe, 8 p.m. July 15, $25-$30, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Goo Goo Dolls’ “Dizzy Up the Girl 20th Anniversary Tour,” 8 p.m. Oct. 5, $49.50-$59.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. Peabody Opera House ticketmaster.com • Alice Cooper’s “Paranormal Evening,” 8 p.m. Oct. 20, $29.75-$179.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday.

Find iParty photos from this event and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/iparty

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

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P H O T O S : J O N G I T C H O F F ( I PA R T Y )

TICKET TRACKER

with 311, the Ofspring, the Toadies, Gym Class Heroes, Buckcherry, P.O.D., Lit, Alien Ant Farm, Sponge, Modern Day Zero, 1 p.m. Sept. 3, $29$89.75, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday.


Taking the lead

and what those guys did to it. It’s good they’re on the same record. It’s really big for the city.” The Blender Producer Jay E debuts his Murphy Lee is on “It’s On,” and City own St. Louis star-studded project Spud is on “Bad Girl.” Ali comes through with “Way Back.” “Ali is my big brother,” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM Jay E says.“He always mentored me. didn’t do enough to further the St. Louis He’s the one who introduced me to the Grammy-nomcrew.” music scene. inated St. LouisKyjuan is featured on “Faded,” where “I’m doing it because St. Louis has area producer Jay E he gets a chance to shine; he wasn’t a lot of talent and a lot of possibilities has linked up with often cast as the lead rapper in the past. of being the next Motown or Atlanta, a slew of St. Louis “He’s an amazing artist who’s always rappers for his new if we all work together,” he says.“Egos featured on everyone else’s albums,” don’t have to clash. It doesn’t have to project,“Jay E Presents.” Jay E says.“He had a couple of his own be cutthroat. And I feel like I can be the The upcoming compilation album songs here and there, but they middleman. It’s just a matter of from the“Country Grammar,” “E.I.” and were never released. I wanted “Ride Wit Me”producer is his solo debut helping each other.” him to have his own lane.” The reunion of Jay E and as a lead artist; he’d previously released Some astute hip hop fans Nelly was a long time coming mixtapes and a joint album with rapper will note that while Nelly, Ali, Murphy Lee in 2015,“Back to the Basics.” after years of working apart. Murphy Lee, Kyjuan and City As Nelly broadened his “This is my own project,” he says.“It’s Spud of the St. Lunatics are sound, he went on to other all my own content, and I’m totally the Jay E accounted for, they’re not on the producers outside St. Louis (the one in control. Now I’m doing everysame track. Neptunes, Jazze Pha, Jermaine Dupri, thing the way I want it done. I’ve always There have been rumors that St. Polow da Don, Dr. Luke, Rico Love and had a vision. I didn’t realize how much Louis’ first family of hip-hop fractured others), while Jay E produced artists power I actually have as an artist.” years ago.“Everyone’s got their own including Joss Stone, Plies and Three 6 (Producers and DJs from DJ Khalid situation going on, their own lives, their Mafia. to Zedd sometimes put out albums on own responsibilities,” Jay E says.“But “Nothing negative happened, though which they’re considered the lead artist, we’re all family.” though they employ singers and rappers.) a lot of people made it negative,” Jay E Jay E says he was glad to work with Tef says.“He wanted to try new things, and On “Jay E Presents,” to be released Poe on “Smoker’s Anthem.” “He knows I wanted to try new things.” this spring, he employs a number of what he wants, and he’s very lyrical, a “Bottles,” a song Nelly debuted last rappers and musicians, many of whom really good poet. He’s very intelligent year with the St. Louis Symphony Orhe worked with before, including Nelly, and hip to the streets of St. Louis.” chestra at Powell Hall, could be one of Chingy, Tef Poe, the Knuckles, Murphy He says the Knuckles’ contribution the songs to make the project. Lee, City Spud, Kyjuan, Ali and Keem. is on a song to be determined.“I had so Nelly and Chingy are together on a “These are artists I’ve heard, artmuch fun with those guys. It wasn’t a rare collaboration,“2 Da Side.” ists I think have talent, that I listen to serious vibe. It was like a ’90s vibe type “That was Nelly’s idea to get Chin general, who are serious about their of thing.” ingy on there,” he says.“I love the song craft and who put 100 percent into their work,” he says.“A lot of people come up to me with one song and expect me stltoday.com/blender @kevincjohnson @blenderpd @kevincjohnson to bite. If you don’t believe in yourself, what makes you think I will?” With this album, he says, he’s keeping the focus on St. Louis artists in an Exmark 780cc TAKING THE INDUSTRY BY STORM. 24.5 HP Engine Developed from the ground up, Radius delivers the durability and cut quality landscape efort to give others the same opportuprofessionals demand with an innovative commercial design. nities he had. RADIUS MOWERS STARTING AT 0%–42 MONTHS* “I know how this thing works,” he $ LIMITED TIME OFFER says.“Nelly and all of us went into it On purchases of $4,500 or more when you use the Exmark Credit Based on RAE708GEM48300 with 48” deck and Card. A Major Purchase Plan fee of $149 will be added to the Exmark 708cc 24.5 HP engine. Limited time offer. Major Purchase Plan purchase amount.Valid between now and blind. It was all new. If we knew then See your dealer for details. 7/31/18. Certain restrictions apply. See your dealer for details. what we know know, we would have Milbradt Lawn Equipment had better deals and more money. We 11700 Olive Blvd • 314-432-8949 • https://www.milbradtlawn.com/ went from zero to 100 very quickly.” M-F 8am-5pm • Sat. 8am-1pm exmark.com Jay E (Jason Lee Epperson) makes it clear he’s not making the album to appease those who felt his work with Nelly

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*0% Monthly Interest for 42 Months* *Example: On a purchase where the Amount Financed is $7,500, your Down Payment is $0 with 42 monthly payments of $179.77 each. Interest rate is 0% [ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE is 0.37% (E)]. Note: The above inancing programs are offered by Shefield Financial, a Division of Branch Banking and Trust Company, Member FDIC. Subject to credit approval. Approval, and any rates and terms provided, are based on credit worthiness. Other inancing offers are available. See your local dealer for details. Rate advertised is based on minimum bureau risk score of 700. Minimum Amount Financed $4,500; Maximum Amount Financed $50,000. Other qualiications and restrictions may apply. An origination fee of $50** will be added to the amount inanced in the above example. Financing promotions void where prohibited. Offer effective on eligible and qualiied units purchased from a participating Shefield dealer. See dealer for product eligibility and qualiications between 2/1/2018 and 7/31/2018. Offer subject to change without notice. [“E” means estimate.] **For commercial customers, the origination fee is $150. Commercial customers may be offered No Payment for 120 Days.

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Columbia, the command module for the historic Apollo 11 mission

o t y d a e R h c n u a l Columbia moon landing capsule takes a giant leap from Smithsonian to St. Louis Science Center P H O T O : S T. L O U I S S C I E N C E C E N T E R

BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN / VHAHN@POST-DISPATCH.COM

It was July 21, 1969, the day after St. Louisans gathered around their television sets to watch men step onto the moon for the first time. A newspaper vendor at Eighth and Locust streets downtown said he observed something unusual when people bought papers as souvenirs. • “Some people walk up, look at the headlines and seem unable to comprehend them,” he told a Post-Dispatch reporter at the time. “I think it will take us a little time to understand the significance of the moon landing.”

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We’ve had nearly five decades to understand. “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission,” on view Saturday through Sept. 3 at the St. Louis Science Center, will help. The science center is one of four museums that will host the traveling exhibition by the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington. The Apollo 11 command module Columbia, which completed the first mission to land on the moon, will be part of the exhibition. Other artifacts — used by the Apollo 11 crew of Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin — include Aldrin’s helmet and gloves, a star chart, flight plans, a medical kit and the “rock box” used to bring the first samples of the moon back to Earth. Visitors first will pass through the

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science center’s own exhibit about St. Louis’ contributions and response to the space program. Then, before picking up entry passes at a ’60s-era ticket booth, they’ll pass replica storefronts, including a newsstand not unlike the ones moonstruck St. Louisans visited in 1969. “We wanted to set people back in the era and send them back to the ’60s,” says Kristina Hampton, the science center’s collections and projects manager, who put together this part of the exhibit. She was able to draw from the science center’s extensive collection of spacethemed memorabilia, including tin toy space capsules, copies of Life magazine chronicling the space race and a “Countdown to the Moon” board game. A replica of a ’60s-era living room, ready for a moon-landing watch party, includes a space-age Kuba Komet television console with an angled, wooden sail that looks ready to launch into space itself. The screen displays footage from the moon landing, which visitors can watch from an avocado-green couch. There’s fake food on starburst platters and a burnt-orange ashtray — minus the smoke. Next, there’s a short film about St. Louis’ role in the space program. In 1957, the Soviet Union successfully launched Sputnik, sending Americans scrambling to join the space race. In 1959, McDonnell Aircraft Corp. (now Boeing, based in Berkeley) announced it had won the government contract to build the Mercury capsule, America’s first manned space vehicle. John Glenn (after Alan Shepard made the first U.S. manned flight) circled the

Earth three times in a Mercury capsule. A few months later, McDonnell won the contract to build the two-person Gemini capsule. The science center already has test capsules of Mercury and Gemini on display at its James S. McDonnell Planetarium, which is named for the company’s founder. With the Apollo 11 command module here, the science center will be one of the few places in the country with craft from all three space programs. “Everything we learned from Mercury and Gemini helped us get to the moon,” Hampton says. Another gallery tells personal stories of individual contributions to the space race, including mission control operators and cartographers from the St.

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P H O T O S : S T. L O U I S S C I E N C E C E N T E R ( C A P S U L E I N T E R I O R ) ; VA L E R I E S C H R E M P H A H N ) / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( FA M I LY R O O M ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( J E F F E R S O N C I T Y )

View of the interior of Apollo 11 command module Columbia


Louis-based Aeronautical Chart and Information Center, which later folded into the Defense Mapping Agency. The ACIC made maps of the moon that were used in the Apollo. Gene “Woody” Woodford, 78, of Manchester, was a physical scientist for the ACIC then and now volunteers in the fossil prep lab at the science center. Back then, he studied the light reflection of the moon to determine the texture of the moon’s surface. He says the astronauts needed a smooth surface on which to land. “We all had our part back then,” Woodford says. “You put all these parts together, and we landed 12 men on the moon and got them back safely.” Visitors will cross a rumbling gantry, as if they were boarding a spacecraft.

A replica of a ’60s-era family room at the St. Louis Science Center, which will be set up like a lunar landing watch party.

But this walkway will lead to the Smithsonian portion on the exhibit, which includes the Columbia module, gloves and other items. Incidentally, this isn’t the module’s first stop in Missouri. But this tour is the first time it has left the Smithsonian since 1971. In 1970, Columbia embarked on a tour of all 50 state capitals, landing a stop in Jeferson City that July. More than 7,000 people gathered at the Missouri Capitol building to see Aldrin, Armstrong and Collins at ceremonies exactly one year after the moon landing. That August, the capsule made another stop at the Illinois State Fair. “Its red, white and blue cavalcade became a familiar sight to thousands of motorists and pedestrians in each state,” according to a NASA report about the tour. This voyage, which started at Space Center Houston in the fall, is much more controlled. The capsule arrived in an unmarked truck from Houston, and only a few people at the St. Louis Science Center knew the exact delivery time. The capsule, considered a national treasure to be protected, was analyzed and conserved before leaving on its tour. After St. Louis, it will travel to Pittsburgh and Seattle until finally landing in a revamped exhibit space at the National Air and Space Museum. Of course, visitors won’t be able to climb inside the real thing. After leaving the Smithsonian portion of the exhibit at the science center, visitors can explore a replica of the Columbia and the Lunar Module, named “Eagle,” and experience what it is like to communicate with Mission Control.

There’s also a moon rock from the Apollo 15 mission, on loan from NASA, and a replica of the moon’s surface with life-size cutouts of the astronauts. That’ll make it easier for visitors to picture themselves at the moon landing. That’s one of the goals, says Christian Greer, the science center’s chief oicer of science, education and experience: to spark imaginations and ideas. He says astronauts often credit childhood experiences at museums and science centers for launching their own exploration careers. “Wouldn’t that be great,” he says, “if the first person who walked on Mars was a kid who saw this in St. Louis?” WHAT “Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission” • WHEN Saturday through Sept. 3; hours are 9:30

a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE St. Louis Science Center, 5050 Oakland Avenue • HOW MUCH Free for members, $10 for nonmembers, $8 for seniors and children • MORE INFO 314-289-4400; slsc.org

OTHER AREAS TO EXPLORE • A new planetarium show, “Live Sky: Magniicent Moon,” opens Saturday and is shown at 2:30 p.m. daily. The show explores moon myths, phenomena, phases and more. It also discusses what drove humans to explore the moon. Afterward, an educator will lead a discussion. The show is free for members, $7 for adults, and $6 for children and seniors. • “Science at Sunset,” a new space-themed movie series, runs 5 to 8 p.m. Thursdays, from June 7 through Aug. 9. The events feature food and drink specials and live music in the outdoor GROW gallery, and visitors can explore exhibits and galleries after hours. • Take a virtual reality ride on VR Transporter: Spacewalk-Danger in Orbit and be “transported” into space, where you’ll learn about the dangers of living and working at the International Space Station. Riders must be at least 42 inches tall. $9 for members, $10 for nonmembers • Look at the newly illuminated interior cabin of Gemini Spacecraft 3A, already on display at the science center. The Smithsonian helped the center with a new LED-based iber optic system to light the control panels and interior cabin. The craft was built in St. Louis in 1962 by the McDonnell Aircraft Corp.

From left: Mike Collins, Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin and Neil Armstrong on July 20, 1970, in Jeferson City, where they look at the command module that carried them to the moon and back.

making its TRIUMPHANT RETURN TO ST. LOUIS! May 9 -20 fabulous fox 314-534-1111 • metrotix.com stltoday.com/go

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SO FETCH

NEW BEGINNINGS

Use our guide to more than 40 St. Louis-area dog parks to fi find nd the perfect spot for your next puppy play date. stltoday.com/dogparks

Life as a Plastic is fantastic for Broadway “Mean Girls” star Taylor Louderman of Bourbon, Mo. stltoday. com/cultureclub

“Roseanne” isn’t the only recent TV reboot that asked viewers to disregard its weird series finale. stltoday.com/tv

A former slave (Carl Overly Jr.) confronts the onetime slave owner (Graham Emmons) in the Black Rep’s world premiere of “Torn Asunder.”

Unfinished histories ‘Torn Asunder’ at the Black Rep tells stories of families ripped apart by slavery BY JUDITH NEWMARK / THEATER CRITIC / JNEWMARK@POST-DISPATCH.COM

P

eople often ask historian Heather Andrea Williams how she could bear to do her research. In researching and writing “Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for

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Family Lost in Slavery” (UNC press, $24.95), Williams devoted years to the struggle to reunite relatives after the Civil War. Drawing on a host of disparate documents, she sought out stories of men and women who searched, against

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all odds and with little help, for their wives or husbands, parents or children, sisters or brothers. The material is heartbreaking. Nevertheless, she persisted with dry eyes. “I am not a crier,” said Williams, a professor of Africana studies at the University of Pennsylvania. She didn’t cry until she attended a workshop of a drama based on her book, “Torn Asunder” by playwright Nikkole Salter. It makes its world premiere Friday at the Black Rep, under the direction of the troupe’s founder,

Ron Himes. “I love Nikkole’s work,” Williams says. “I loved it when I recognized (real people). “I write in a narrative style because I want people who are descended from slaves to read this book, not just professors. But Nikkole created full characters and whole stories from scraps of history.” The formerly enslaved men and women searching for relatives knew that their chances were terrible. In an age of communication by letter, many were illiterate, and virtually all were poor. Travel was diicult, and the telephone had not yet been invented. Social service agencies along the lines of the Hebrew International Aid Society (which sought to reunite Holocaust survivors with their relatives) belonged to the future, too. “It was daunting,” Williams says. “People walked hundreds of miles to find relatives — and found that they were dead or simply gone.” The best chance for reunification often lay in the pages of black newspapers that flourished after the Civil War. They ran “personals” from people looking for their relatives, ads that included whatever information they recalled. Williams found 400 such ads in the first summer she dedicated to her research; by now, she’s read thousands of them. It doesn’t take much imagination to read each one as a poignant mystery — often a mystery without an ending. Williams could rarely find out what happened next. How could it have been otherwise? The relative may not have had a surname, and by the end of the Civil War he or she may have moved more than once, sold of to another slave-owner. Perhaps the ad writer remembered distinctive physical characteristics, but those could have changed. They could have changed a great deal

Find more events, reviews and blogs by our critics ➙ stltoday.com/arts stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: PHILIP HAMER

DAY IN THE PARK DA


AN EVENING WITH the Ku Klux Klan, then continued to if the ad was placed by a parent looking for a child he or she had not seen in work on civil rights as the assistant to New York’s attorney general. years, maybe in decades. But law never felt quite right. She Williams — who raised her own switched to teaching (including a stint nephew and “could not love him at St. Ann’s) before she became a stuany more if I’d given birth to him” — dent again, earning her doctorate in imagines a little boy sold to a slave American Studies at Yale. trader when he is too young to realize “That’s when I realized that I was that he, himself, is enslaved. “He must think, ‘I am not seeing my drawn to this period,” she said. “Slavery was so intriguing to me.” She mother. When will I see my mother published her first two books — “Selfagain?’” She sighed; she found letters Taught: African American Education dealing with just such a child, but the in Slavery and Freedom” and “Help trail goes cold. “I can’t tell you any Me To Find My People” — while she more. What am I supposed to do? I was a professor at the University of can only tell you what happened to North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Now at other children like him.” Penn, Williams and her husband live When couples who had been enin Philadelphia. slaved looked for one another other But a North Carolina friend and after the war, the situation was colleague encouraged her to send fraught. “Separation was like death,” the book in a new direction. Kathy explained Williams, and “widows” Perkins, the longtime lighting who were found by their first designer for the Black Rep partners responded in indibefore she joined the UNC vidual ways. faculty, felt sure that Wil“In one case, the wife had liams’ book could succeed told her second husband in a stage adaptation. The when she married him (after two women commissioned the war) that her first husWilliams Salter, whose plays have been band would always be her true staged by the Black Rep in seasons love. And when he did find her, she past, to write the script. went with him. Williams says that people who are “But another woman had built a interested in African-American genenew life with her second husband. When her first husband found her, she alogy have found the book useful, and she hopes they will embrace the play, told him that this was her life now. He too. It may not give them more data, had to leave. but at least it will help them under“These are painful stories in many stand the issues. “African-American diferent ways.” genealogy is very, very hard to do,” The marriages made under slavery Williams said. “This is why. weren’t even recognized as legal, she “I tell my students, if you want to added, because “marriage is a constudy enslaved people, you really need tract.” Slaves couldn’t enter into contracts, even with other slaves, because to make a commitment. You have that would erode the absolute author- to dig. You will be tempted to write about the slave-owners instead. They ity of the slave owner. kept records.” Williams is keenly sensitive to that Records of course are invaluable issue because she is a lawyer. Born to historians. But they don’t include in Jamaica, she grew up in Brooklyn, everybody. Williams devotes her work where her mother, worried about to the ones who were left out — and to drugs, enrolled her in a progressive their descendants. private school, St. Ann’s. After that she went to Harvard, then WHAT “Torn Asunder” • WHEN Friday to Harvard Law. She went to work for through April 29 • WHERE Washington the department of justice in Washing- University’s Edison Theatre, 6465 Forsyth Boulevard • HOW MUCH $10-$45 • MORE ton, concentrating on criminal civil INFO 314-534-3807; theblackrep.org rights cases, such as those involving

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BILL + CARL NYE POPE THE SCIENCE GUY

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APRIL 23, 7 PM

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CHAIFETZ ARENA

$15 General Admission $7.50 All Area

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HOSTED BY SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY

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RENT

THIS!

TOP REDBOX RENTALS FOR APRIL 2 1 “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” (Sony) 2 “Father Figures” (Warner) 3 “Insidious: The Last Key” (Sony) 4 “Justice League” (Warner) 5 “Ferdinand” (Fox) 6 “Pitch Perfect 3” (Universal) 7 “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” 8 “Downsizing” (Paramount) 9 “Thor: Ragnarok” (Disney) 10 “Coco” (Disney) TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE

OUR MOVIE RATINGS ★ Skip it ★★ So-so ★★★ Good ★★★★ Excellent

Political thriller ‘Beirut’ portrays espionage as an amoral mess, making the most of St. Louis native Hamm ★★★ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

M

ason Skiles (Jon Hamm) is a labor mediator in Boston who’s never far away from a barstool and a drink. The alcohol can’t possibly erase a painful incident in his past, when he was stationed in Beirut as a diplomat. But it can make the memory blurry enough to tolerate. It’s 1982, and the last thing Skiles wants to do is return to that war-torn

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city. So he’s less than enthusiastic about an ofer to lecture at a university there. Skiles suspects that the ofer is a ruse — that his presence in Beirut is required for some other reason. And he’s right. An old friend, CIA agent Cal Riley (Mark Pellegrino), is being held hostage by terrorists who demand that an imprisoned colleague be freed in exchange for his release. Skiles has a connection to their leader,

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

which makes him the perfect person to negotiate on Riley’s behalf. The problem is that Riley’s associates in espionage aren’t necessarily as committed to his health and safety as Skiles is. The ex-diplomat finds an ally in cultural attaché Sandy Crowder (Rosamund Pike), who shares his interest in rescuing Riley — and rising above the political maneuvering that threatens his life. “Beirut” is a solid political thriller that makes the most of St. Louis native Hamm, who is still best known for his starring role in TV’s “Mad Men.” Working from a screenplay by Tony Gilroy (the “Bourne” franchise), director Brad Anderson

(“Transsiberian”) delivers a film that portrays espionage as an amoral mess, in much the same spirit as the works of novelist John le Carré (“The Spy Who Came in From the Cold”). Hamm brings a poignant worldweariness to Skiles, and Pike (“Gone Girl”) brings to her role a persuasive grittiness. “Beirut” attracted controversy for a trailer that was interpreted as reinforcing stereotypes of Arabs and Muslims. The filmmakers would have been better of sticking with its original and more fitting title, “High Wire Act.” WHAT “Beirut” • RUN TIME 1:49 • RATING R • CONTENT Language, violence and a nude image

Find more reviews, theaters and movie news ➙ stltoday.com/movies stltoday.com/go

PHOTO: BLEECKER STREET

From left: Rosamund Pike, Jon Hamm and Dean Norris in “Beirut”


George and Dwayne Johnson in “Rampage”

Animal rescue Dwayne Johnson lifts CGI-heavy ‘Rampage’ above mediocrity ★★½ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

P H O T O : WA R N E R B R O S . P I C T U R E S

D

avis Okoye (Dwayne Johnson) is a primatologist who enjoys a rapport with George, a gorilla who knows sign language and apparently has a wicked sense of humor. Despite his imposing presence, George is a gentle soul, and Davis couldn’t be more protective of his hairy buddy. But their friendship is challenged when George begins to act strangely.

Not only is he uncharacteristically irritable and aggressive, but also inexplicably larger — and in danger of being killed by authorities who see him not as an ape who’s having a bad day but as a formidable threat. Determined to keep George from being killed, Davis finds himself at odds with government agent Russell (Jefrey Dean Morgan), who makes the huge mistake of putting the ape on a plane and expecting the flight to go smoothly.

Davis must also deal with Dr. Kate Caldwell (Naomie Harris), a geneticist with insight into George’s transformation — but also a shady past that she would just as soon not talk about. It’s not long before George is on the loose — along with a giant wolf and a humongous reptile. Amid massive property damage, Davis struggles to restore the status quo — and stay alive in the process. Yet another film based on a video game, “Rampage” starts out interestingly but makes a steep drop into stupidity. It’s as if carrying through intelligently on its premise would have required too much efort. And that’s unfortunate, because the film could

have been something more ambitious than a cynical cash grab. Working from a screenplay credited to four writers, director Brad Peyton (“San Andreas”) delivers an action flick that goes for visceral thrills that are too dependent on computer-generated imagery that’s laughably unbelievable. Clearly, this is a star vehicle — and the eminently likable Johnson is unquestionably a star. Through sheer force of personality, he elevates “Rampage” into something reasonably entertaining. If only he’d choose projects more deserving of his talents. WHAT “Rampage” • RUN TIME 1:47 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Violence, action and

destruction, language and crude gestures

COMING SUNDAY • WE LOOK BACK AT OTHER BEASTS THAT HAVE WREAKED HAVOC IN THE MOVIES. A&E ★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

04.13.18-04.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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Tiresome process With ‘Final Portrait,’ Stanley Tucci delivers a character study that’s low on character development HH BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

lberto Giacometti (Geofrey Rush) is a scrufy painter who seems never to be entirely satisfied with his work. And if it really displeases him, it might wind up burning in a garbage can. Giacometti isn’t exactly a perfectionist, but he sets a high standard for himself. Just how high? Unless you’ve got a

A

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lot of time to kill, you might not accept his invitation to sit for a portrait. Or you could find yourself in the same situation as the dapper James Lord (Armie Hammer), a writer who is only too happy to be Giacometti’s subject. At first, anyway. Lord is so fascinated with Giacometti’s process that it takes a while before he realizes just what he’s gotten himself into. Again and again, the writer is

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

forced to postpone his travel plans in order to fulfill his obligation to remain motionless as Giacometti takes brush to canvas. He also gets to witness Giacometti’s questionable behavior. The painter has a wife (Sylvie Testud) whom he takes for granted and a mistress (Clémence Poésy) with whom he’s so smitten that he prioritizes her portrait over Lord’s. So maybe Giacometti isn’t such a nice guy. But is he worth putting up with? The fact-based “Final Portrait” should please the art-film audience, but its chances of reaching beyond that demographic would appear to be minimal. Not that the film is particularly

cerebral — it’s basically a buddy flick — but what it’s trying to say is unclear. That artists can be egocentric? That Hammer looks good in a suit? Didn’t we already know that? Working from his own screenplay, Stanley Tucci (best known as an actor) delivers a character study that’s low on character development. Giacometti is pretty much the same guy at the end of the film as he is at the beginning. And what does Lord learn? That posing for a portrait can be really tiresome? This film might give you the urge to check out a comic-book movie. WHAT “Final Portrait” • RUN TIME 1:30 • RATING R • CONTENT Language, sexual references and nudity

H Skip it H H So-so H H H Good Hstltoday.com/go H H H Excellent

PHOTO: SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

Armie Hammer (left) and Geofrey Rush in “Final Portrait”


Imelda Staunton and Timothy Spall in “Finding Your Feet”

On-the-nose Every plot turn in ‘Finding Your Feet’ will be as clear as the nose on your face ★★½ BY JANE HORWITZ / SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

or a movie whose title refers to the extremities, “Finding Your Feet” sure is on-thenose. There is nary a turn of plot that moviegoers of a certain age won’t be able to predict. (If they also happen to enjoy British TV series, they can probably improvise some of the dialogue, too.) And yet this dramedy about middleclass Londoners in their 60s and 70s getting on with life has a genial watchability — even a stubborn relevance — thanks to its crackerjack ensemble cast, who play characters just eccentric enough to keep things tasty. All are rebounding (whether from divorce, widowhood or loneliness) and aiming

P H O T O : R O A D S I D E AT T R A C T I O N S

F

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

to keep their minds looking forward, their hearts open to romance and their regrets at bay. If, reading this, you are experiencing flashbacks to “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” and its sequel, you should be. “Finding Your Feet” shares much of the same concept and a bit of the same cast. One good lady is in sore need of some eccentricity: Sandra (Imelda Staunton), a snooty suburbanite who we meet in the posh mansion she shares with her husband, Mike (John Sessions). Sandra has organized a party to celebrate Mike’s recent knighthood, capping his long career in law enforcement. But when she walks in on him

and her best friend (Josie Lawrence) canoodling, she discovers, to her chagrin, that they’ve been conducting a long afair. Sandra makes an uncustomary scene and moves in with her estranged older sister, Elizabeth. Elizabeth (Celia Imrie) — or Bif, as she is known — is the free spirit to Sandra’s Miss Priss: an aging hippie with a free-love past who lives in a cluttered subsidized apartment in East London and who smokes pot with her buddy Charlie (Timothy Spall), who lives on a houseboat. Bif’s colorful circle of friends gradually draws Sandra in, convincing her to join the dance class they attend at a nearby community center. Charlie doesn’t much care for Sandra at first, but after they waltz together — well, you can see where this is going. Director Richard Loncraine (“5 Flights Up”) wisely gets out of the way for the most part, letting his cast breathe life into the limp cliches that

have been woven by screenwriters Meg Leonard and Nick Moorcroft. But no performance, no matter how fine, can quite peel the mold of an old joke about Viagra — not to mention another about the sexual endowments of a man of color. The first gag is stale; the second a tasteless throwback. Eventually, the dance class decides to stage a flash-mob performance in Piccadilly Circus for charity. Predictably, they are invited to do a recital in Rome, where all roads — and so many movie plotlines — lead. At one point, Bif gives her baby sister a piece of advice: “It’s one thing being scared of dying, Sandra. It’s a whole other thing being scared of living.” It’s not that the sentiment isn’t true. It’s just that, like so much of “Finding Your Feet,” it’s as plain as the nose on your face. WHAT “Finding Your Feet” •RUN TIME 1:51 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Suggestive material,

brief drug use and brief strong language

04.13.18-04.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

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‘Sherlock Gnomes’ PG • 1:26 • Garden gnomes Gnomeo and Juliet and their family and friends return, aided by the famous detective in this animated sequel. Voiced by James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Maggie Smith, Michael Caine, Johnny Depp. Directed by John Stevenson. Not reviewed. LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Spinning Man’ R • 1:40 • An academic falls under suspicion when a female student goes missing. With Guy Pearce, Pierce Brosnan, Minnie Driver, Jamie Kennedy. Directed by Simon Kaijser. Not reviewed.

J. Michael Finley (left) and Dennis Quaid in “I Can Only Imagine.”

LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘1945’ NR • 1:31 • Two

mysterious strangers appear at the railway station of a Hungarian village. Within a few hours, everything changes. Directed by Ferenc Török. No star rating. LOS ANGELES TIMES ‘Acrimony’ R • 2:00 • Taraji P. Henson stars as a woman wronged by her husband. With Lyriq Bent, Crystle Stewart, Ajiona Alexus, Antonio Madison. Written and directed by Tyler Perry. Not available for review.

★★½

African king, his adventures and his adversaries. A huge step forward for black cinema and a terrific time at the movies. Directed by Ryan Coogler (“Creed”). CW ‘Blockers’ ★★½ R • 1:42 • Leslie Mann and John Cena star as parents determined to interfere with their daughters’ prom. Directed by Kay Cannon. TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

‘Blumhouse’s Truth or Dare’ PG-13 • 1:40 •

‘Black Panther’

Repercussions befall friends when they don’t play the notorious game correctly. With Lucy Hale, Tyler Posey, Violett Beane. Written by Michael Reisz and Jillian Jacobs & Chris Roach & Jef Wadlow, story by Michael Reisz. Directed by Wadlow. Not reviewed.

★★★★

LOS ANGELES TIMES

LOS ANGELES TIMES

‘Annihilation’ ★★★ R • 1:55 • Natalie Portman and Oscar Isaac star in this highly imaginative science fiction flick. Directed by Alex Garland (“Ex Machina”). CALVIN WILSON

PG-13 • 2:15 • Chadwick

Boseman, Michael B. Jordan and Lupita Nyong’o star in this thrilling tale of an

PG-13 • 1:41 • Jason Clarke and Kate Mara star in this fact-based drama about a political scandal. Directed by John Curran. ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Coco’ ★★★½ PG • 1:45 • The latest

from Pixar tells the heartwarming story of a young boy in a rural Mexican town searching for his roots in the Land of the Dead. With voices of Benjamin Bratt and Gael García Bernal. Written and directed by Lee Unkrich. JODY MITORI ‘The Death of Stalin’ ★★★ R • 1:47 • Armando Iannucci (“Veep”) directed and co-wrote this satire about political turmoil in the Soviet Union. With Steve Buscemi and Andrea Riseborough. CW ‘Death Wish’ ★½ R • 1:47 • A remake

of a 1974 Charles Bronson film, the new Bruce Willis version as a vigilante shooter is awkward amid today’s serious gun debates. TNS

‘Foxtrot’ ★★★½ R • 1:48 • Lior Ashkenazi plays a father coping with bad news about his soldier son. Directed by Samuel Maoz. CW ‘Game Night’ ★★½ R • 1:40 • Rachel McAdams and Jason Bateman lead this comedy about a night that goes horribly wrong. TNS ‘Gemini’ ★★ R • 1:32 • Zoe Kravitz and Lola Kirke star in this neo-noir misfire. Directed by Aaron Katz. ASSOCIATED PRESS ‘The Greatest Showman’ ★★★ PG • 1:45 • Hugh Jackman makes a dazzling P.T. Barnum in this movie musical loosely based on the showman’s life. But the rest of the film is utterly forgettable. With Michelle Williams. Directed by Michael Gracey. CW ‘I Can Only Imagine’ PG • 1:50 • Uplifting faith-based film aims to tell the story behind MercyMe’s hit song, also titled “I Can Only Imagine.” With J. Michael Finley,

Dennis Quaid, Cloris Leachman. No star rating provided. VARIETY

by Paolo Virzi. No star rating provided.

‘Isle of Dogs’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 1:41 • Bryan Cranston, Greta Gerwig and Bill Murray are among the actors lending their voices to this brilliant animated comedy about exiled canines. Directed by Wes Anderson (“The Grand Budapest Hotel”). CW

‘Love, Simon’ ★★★★ PG-13 • 1:49 • Nick Robinson stars in this gay teenage romance. With Jennifer Garner and Josh Duhamel. Directed by Greg Berlanti. TNS

‘Itzhak’ ★★★★ NR • 1:22 • Classical violinist Itzhak Perlman is the subject of this documentary directed by Alison Chernick. PLAIN DEALER

‘Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:59 • With its smart casting (Jack Black, Kevin Hart, Dwayne Johnson and Karen Gillan) and lively action sequences, this new version of the game is an overall upgrade. JM ‘The Leisure Seeker’ R • 1:52 • Helen Mirren and Donald Sutherland star as a road-tripping couple coping with Alzheimer’s. Directed

BOSTON HERALD

‘Midnight Sun’ ★½ PG-13 • 1:31 • Bella Thorne and Patrick Schwarzenegger star in this romance about a young woman alicted with a rare disease. Directed by Scott Speer. TNS ‘The Miracle Season’ ★★ PG • 1:39 • Oscar winners Helen Hunt and William Hurt are wasted in this true story of a high school volleyball team facing a crisis. Directed by Sean McNamara. CW ‘Pacific Rim Uprising’ ★½ PG-13 • 1:51 • John Boyega (“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”) stars in this loud, dumb sciencefiction sequel about a reluctant soldier who takes on alien invaders. Directed by Steven S. DeKnight. CW

‘Pandas’ ★★★½ G • 0:39 • A researcher bonds with a panda in this documentary directed by David Douglas and Drew Fellman. JM ‘A Quiet Place’ ★★★½ PG-13 • 1:30 • Emily Blunt and John Krasinski star in this tale of a family stalked by terrifying creatures. Horror of the first order. Directed by Krasinski. CW ‘Ready Player One’ ★★★ PG-13 • 2:20 • Steven Spielberg returns to popcorn flicks with this tale largely set in the realm of virtual reality. Too long and overly complicated, but bursting with eye candy. With Tye Sheridan and Olivia Cooke. CW ‘Red Sparrow’ ★★ R • 2:19 • Jennifer

Lawrence is a Russian spy in this mediocre thriller from her “Hunger Games” collaborator, director Francis Lawrence. The torture scene alone makes this film worth avoiding. CW

‘Tomb Raider’ ★★★ PG-13 • 1:58 • Alicia Vikander takes over from Angelina Jolie in this reboot of the franchise. Much improved, with its video game origins less obvious. Directed by Roar Uthaug (“The Wave”). CW ‘Unsane’ ★★★ R • 1:38 • Claire Foy

(“The Crown”) stars as a woman who may be going insane in the latest film from director Steven Soderbergh (“Traic”). ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘A Wrinkle in Time’ ★★ PG • 1:49 • Oprah Winfrey, Mindy Kaling and Reese Witherspoon appear as otherworldly beings in this mediocre adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s beloved novel. Directed by Ava DuVernay (“Selma”). CW

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Before you go out, check restaurant critic Ian Froeb’s guide to the 100 best spots in St. Louis. You’ll find great options for every taste and price range.

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23


2018

DINING ADVICE

BALLPARK UPDATES

TRENDY TOAST

Search for restaurants by cuisine, price, location and more with Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s guide to the best places in St. Louis. stltoday.com/stl100

Craft beer, a Schnucks grab-and-go kiosk with sandwiches and salads, and another location for El Birdo’s Nachos are new at Busch Stadium this season. stltoday.com/ofthemenu

The avocado toast fad shows no signs of fading. In “Prep School,” food writer Daniel Neman shares the tips you need to make this wholesome, surprisingly tasty treat. stltoday.com/food

“Dynamite-fried” chicken at Hop House Southern Eatery

Pig out Small Bites Hop House Southern Eatery’s massive

menu includes barbecue, burgers, pizza and more

BY IAN FROEB / RESTAURANT CRITIC / IFROEB@POST-DISPATCH.COM

A selection from restaurant critic Ian Froeb’s recent Small Bites reviews, which are published Tuesdays at stltoday.com/ofthemenu: HOP HOUSE SOUTHERN EATERY

I

don’t know where to begin with Hop House Southern Eatery, the O’Fallon, Ill., restaurant that promises a “gigantic” menu on its website and delivers a multiple-page hardcover tome featuring barbecue, fried chicken, burgers, pizza and more (so very much more). Maybe the best place to start is the fact that Hop House opened back in 2016, and I somehow missed it until stltoday.com/ofthemenu

24

recently when, having finally finished researching and writing this year’s edition of the STL 100, I was searching online restaurant listings for any little spots I might have overlooked. Hop House isn’t little. Located near a Texas Roadhouse and a Gold’s Gym just of Interstate 64, Hop House looks like another generic chain on the outside. Inside, the vibe is ... rustic sports bar? A barn but hipster? Looking for the restroom, I kept walking into bonus dining rooms. The food menu sprawls across eight pages, though, granted, one page is the “Express Lunch Menu” (which also includes breakfast, because why not). On my first visit, I went to the Smoke-

stltoday.com/stl100

@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

house Classics, a full barbecue menu, which takes up only one-third of one page. I figured if anything would expose Hop House as too ambitious, if not cynical in its a-little-ofeverything approach, it would be barbecue. Now, Beast Craft BBQ Co. or Pappy’s Smokehouse this isn’t. But both meats on my plate of beef brisket and pulled pork were tender (the pork more so than the brisket) and deeply flavored with woodsmoke. Both, unfortunately, were served slathered in the toosweet house barbecue sauce. Ask for it on the side. The “dynamite-fried” chicken isn’t especially spicy (unless I misunderstood the meaning of dynamite; there was a lot of information to process while reading this menu), but the breading was thin and crisp, and the pressure-fried meat, both white and dark, was juicy. Hop House doesn’t merely serve pizza, but wood-fired pizza because of course Hop House installed a woodfired oven. Anyway, the pizza’s crust is doughy rather than airy, so while the pies are small, they still might be too much for a single diner. The pizza sauce provides a welcome kick; it should lend some of its spice to the barbecue sauce. I don’t even know where to end this review. I haven’t mentioned the avocado burger (two 5-ounce patties with bacon, pepper jack cheese and a thick piece of avocado), the shrimp bisque (any thicker and it could have been a dip) or the Stufed Pig. OK. I should probably mention the Stufed Pig, an appetizer that reads on the page like an order of potato skins but looks on the plate like an order of loaded baked potatoes: pulled pork,

★ Fair ★★ Good ★★★ Excellent ★★★★ Extraordinary

sausage and bacon topped with cheddar cheese and a cilantro-cream sauce. The Stufed Pig is bonkers.Hop House is bonkers.I kinda want to go back. WHERE Hop House Southern Eatery, 1214 Central Park Drive, O’Fallon, Ill. • MORE INFO 618-726-2740; hheatery.com • MENU Literally everything • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

NEW AND NOTABLE

The past month has seen a notable number of restaurant openings. Here are some of the new establishments I’m watching especially closely. • The Benevolent King (7268 Manchester Road, Maplewood) is the latest venture from chef-restaurateur Ben Poremba of Elaia, Olio, Parigi and Nixta. Poremba himself is back in the kitchen at the Benevolent King, cooking food inspired by Moroccan cuisine (his mother is from Morocco) and also by what he likes to eat at home. • Good Fortune (1641D Tower Grove Avenue) is slated to open Friday, some two years after Strange Donuts cofounder Corey Smale and chef Ryan McDonald first announced the project. Per press materials, the menu of Chinese cuisine will feature a “healthful yet distinctly Midwestern take on Asian cuisine.” • Hofbräuhaus (123 St. Eugene Drive, Belleville) has finally opened after multiple delays. The restaurant and beer hall features schnitzel, sauerbraten, pretzels and more German cuisine. • J. Devoti’s Trattoria (5100 Daggett Avenue) is chef Anthony Devoti’s reboot of his acclaimed Hill restaurant Five Bistro. J. Devoti’s is more casual with a focus on Italian dishes, including pizza and pasta, but Devoti has retained his devotion to seasonal, mostly local produce. • Kiin Essentially Thai (550 North Seventh Street) brings khao soi and more of the acclaimed northern Thai fare from Delmar Loop standout Fork & Stix to downtown.

Find more restaurant news and reviews ➙ stltoday.com/dining stltoday.com/go

P H O T O : I A N F R O E B / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

IN RESTAURANTS ST. LOUIS

OUR FOOD RATINGS


malls and shopping plazas, the location of Local Chef Kitchen in Ballwin stands out as, well, not standing out. Inside, chef Rob Uyemura serves an often-changing menu of dishes highlighting local (some grown by Uyemura himself) produce.

Goat curry at Signature India Restaurant and Bakery in Ballwin (below)

Nathaniel Reid Bakery • Acclaimed pastry chef Nathaniel Reid set up his bakery two years ago in a quiet Kirkwood shopping strip. Inside, the display case features rows of jewel-like desserts.

20 shopping-strip restaurants that are serving amazing food BY IAN FROEB / IFROEB@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Nudo House • Qui Tran and Marie-Anne Velasco chose a sprawling Creve Coeur shopping plaza for Nudo House, their ramen and pho restaurant. Nudo House also serves dishes like a mashup of a French dip and a traditional Vietnamese banh mi.

ome of St. Louis’ best restaurants occupy cool old buildings renovated into gorgeous modern spaces. Others are impressive standalone structures. But some terriic restaurants occupy shopping-strip storefronts that are unassuming — or even, honestly, ugly. Here are 20 shopping-strip restaurants and examples of the delicious food you can ind inside them.

P H O T O S : S I D H A S T I N G S ( S I G N AT U R E I N D I A ) ; L A U R I E S K R I VA N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( L O C A L C H E F K I T C H E N )

S

Berix • The Bosnian restaurant anchors a small shopping strip at the corner of Reavis Barracks and Lemay Ferry roads. Among the standout dishes are cevapi, small beef sausages served on airy somun bread. Big Baby Q and Smokehouse • At Big Baby Q and Smokehouse at 11658 Dorsett Road in Maryland Heights, Ben Welch serves up top-notch beef brisket, pastrami and more barbecue in a small, awkwardly situated shopping plaza. The smoker is right there in the parking lot. Blink as you pass, and you might miss its

brisket sandwich. Cate Zone Chinese Cafe • Cate Zone is one of the many shoppingplaza storefronts along Olive Boulevard in University City that house terriic regionalChinese fare. The specialty of Cate Zone is the cuisine of China’s northeast. Its signature dish is sweet-sour pork. El Toluco Taqueria & Grocery • El Toluco Taqueria & Grocery isn’t simply located in a shopping plaza. Its entrance is perpendicular to Manchester Road, making it diicult to spot from the road. Oversize tortas are a highlight of the menu.

Katie’s Pizza & Pasta Osteria • Katie Collier brought excellent pasta and Neapolitaninspired pizza to a Rock Hill shopping plaza with Katie’s Pizza & Pasta Osteria, which now ofers its pizza and pasta at a second location, also in a shopping plaza, in Town and Country. La Taqueria Tejana • This is one of several related storefronts on a stretch of North Lindbergh Boulevard in Bridgeton. Inside, La Tejana Taqueria ofers such specialties as tacos, carnitas and goat soup. Local Chef Kitchen • Even among a collection of strip

★ Fair ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ Excellent ★ ★ ★ ★ Extraordinary stltoday.com/go

Mai Lee • The great Vietnamese restaurant Mai Lee irst opened in a University City shopping plaza. Its current Brentwood location is in a row of storefronts on the ground level of a parking garage. The current location, though unusual, has not kept the restaurant from seeming perpetually packed with diners enjoying dishes like saltand-pepper calamari.

Pho Long • Jefrey Plaza at Olive Boulevard and Interstate 170 in University City is home to several storefront gems, including Nobu’s Japanese Restaurant, De Palm Tree and Chicken sausage with chanterelle mushrooms and heirloom tomatoes at Local Chef Kitchen (above)

STL 100 stalwart Pho Long. The traditional Vietnamese beefnoodle soup pho is its specialty, though the menu does ofer other dishes. Private Kitchen and Soup Dumplings STL • Lawrence Chen now occupies two restaurant storefronts in a small University City shopping strip, one for his reservations-only Private Kitchen and one for its casual spinof, Soup Dumplings STL. At both restaurants, Shanghai-style soup dumplings (meat and broth inside a steamed dumpling) are the must-order dish. Rice Thai Bistro • Rice Thai Bistro is a small restaurant in a small shopping strip along Manchester Road in Winchester, but it’s home to some of the best Thai food in town. Owners Bryan and Nina Prapaisilpa deliver perfectly calibrated versions of familiar Thai curries and stir-fries. Signature India • Manchester Road is home to several of the area’s standout shopping-plaza restaurants. Signature India is tucked into one of the strips between Interstate 270 and Highway 141, setting itself apart from many other Indian restaurants in town with specialties like Gongura curry and horse-gram soup. Spice-n-Grill • Spice-nGrill, in a tiny University City shopping strip north of the Loop, must be the smallest (or at least one of the smallest) Indian and Pakistani restaurants in town. If you try only one dish, it should be the nihari, a traditional Pakistani beef stew. Tai Ke • Tai Ke hits the double whammy: Not only is the restaurant located in a rather bland storefront in University City, its strip is tucked back from Olive Boulevard behind a larger shopping strip. The odd location

hasn’t kept diners away from the Taiwanese restaurant’s standout fare, including braisedbeef noodle soup and Three Cup Chicken. Taqueria Durango • Like Tai Ke, Taqueria Durango is set back from the road (Page Avenue in Overland). But that hasn’t kept it from being one of the area’s best, most consistent Mexican restaurants for more than a decade now. The signature dishes are the tacos (distinguished by the variety of illings) and the torta ahogada, a carnitas sandwich “drowned” in chile sauce. The Tavern Kitchen & Bar • The OG Hospitality Group holds down three shoppingplaza restaurants at the corner of Big Bend and Dougherty Ferry roads in Valley Park: the Corner Pub & Grill, the Shack and the Tavern Kitchen & Bar. The Tavern Kitchen & Bar’s specialty is upscale, unfussy and sometimes over-thetop American fare. Veritas • Veritas, at the corner of Clayton and Clarkson roads in Ellisville, is the rare upscale shoppingplaza restaurant — not merely upscale, but part of the STL 100’s Top 25. Chef Mathis Stitt’s dinner menu changes weekly but always features creative modern-American fare. Yolklore • Yolklore occupies a Shrewsbury storefront that is on the upper level of a twolevel shopping strip (a squat shopping strip? a shopping squat?). Chef Mary Bogacki serves creative breakfast and lunch dishes such as the Nest Egg, bacon, eggs and cheese inside a biscuit crust with pickled red onion and preserved lemon. View more photos of these restaurants and their food, and ind their locations, at stltoday.com/ ofthemenu.

04.13.18-04.19.18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

25


The 48th

St. Louis Antique Festival $1 of $6 admission with this ad. 80 Dealer Spaces in 30,000 Sq. Ft. Merchandise

APRIL 28 & 29, 2018 Sat. 10-5 • Sun. 10-4 Belle-Clair Fairgrounds 200 South Belt East Belleville, IL 62220 For information call:

608-346-3797 or email: hippiwigal@yahoo.com Pork chop with shishito and chermoula at Louie

The Clover and the Bee ★★

RECENTLY REVIEWED Historic Charm on the Mississippi River Since 1859

1764 Public House ★½ WHERE 39 North Euclid Avenue • MORE INFO 314405-8221; 1764pub.com • MENU Upscale St. Louis- and New Orleans-inluenced fare • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Bing Bing ★★

HAPPY TAILS PETFEST

WHERE 567A Melville Avenue, University City • MORE INFO 314-669-9229; facebook.com/ bingbingstl • MENU Jianbing and other Chinese fare • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily

The Blue Duck ★

Spring/Summer 2018 Events April 28 Happy Tails Petfest 9am-3pm Pet Parade! Demos! Rescue Groups! Contests! Award Ceremony for Arnold Police k9 Units For more info...gokimmswick.com May 5 Derby Days @ Port of Call May 12 & 13 Mother’s Day Weekend June 2 & 3 Strawberry Festival 636.464.6464 ~ GoKimmswick.com Facebook.com/GoKimmswickMo

26

WHERE 2661 Sutton Boulevard, Maplewood • MORE INFO 314-769-9940; blueduckstl.com • MENU Contemporary American food • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday (closed Monday)

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.13.18-04.19.18

Cafe Piazza ★★ WHERE 1900 Arsenal Street • MORE INFO 314-343-0294; cafepiazza.com • WHAT Pizza as well as panini and breakfast fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Charleville Brewing Co. & Tavern ★★ WHERE 2101 Chouteau Avenue • MORE INFO 314241-4677; charlevillebeer. com • MENU Hearty pub fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Cibare Italian Kitchen ★½ WHERE 777 River City Casino Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-388-3777; www. rivercity.com/dining/cibareitalian-kitchen • MENU Pasta, pizza and more Italian fare • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

WHERE 100 West Lockwood Avenue, Webster Groves • MORE INFO 314-9421216; thecloverandthebee. com • MENU Casual bistro fare • HOURS Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wednesday-Sunday

Club Taco ★½ WHERE 200 North Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood • MORE INFO 314-858-1488; clubtacostl. com • MENU Tacos with a variety of illings drawn from various cuisines • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

Cork & Barrel Chophouse ★½ WHERE 7337 Mexico Road, St. Peters • MORE INFO 636-387-7030; corkandbarrel. com • MENU Steaks, chops and pizza • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sunday

Das Bevo ★★ WHERE 4749 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314832-2251; dasbevo.com • MENU German fare with contemporary lair HOURS Dinner Monday-Saturday,

lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

El Toluco Taqueria & Grocery ★★ WHERE 14234 Manchester Road, Manchester • MORE INFO 636-6865444; facebook.com/ eltolucotaqueria • MENU Tacos, tortas and more taqueria fare • HOURS 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday (no restaurant service on Tuesday)

Grace Meat + Three ★★★ WHERE 4270 Manchester Avenue • MORE INFO 314-533-2700; stlgrace. com • MENU Traditional Southern main dishes and sides • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday (closed Monday and Tuesday)

Handcrafted by Bissinger’s ★ WHERE 32 Maryland Plaza • MORE INFO 314-367-7750; handcraftedbybissingers. com • MENU Light breakfast, lunch and dinner fare, plus chocolate • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily

Herbie’s ★★½ WHERE 8100 Maryland Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-769-9595; herbies. com • MENU Classic American and French bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Saturday-Sunday

The Humble Pie ★★

Hi-Pointe Drive-In ★★

WHERE 2130 Macklind Avenue • MORE INFO 314499-7488; jsmugsgastropit. com • MENU Barbecue, including pork ribs and beef brisket • HOURS 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, noon-7 p.m. Sunday

WHERE 1033 McCausland Avenue • MORE INFO 314-3492720; hipointedrivein.com • MENU Fast-casual burgers, sandwiches and milkshakes • HOURS 10 a.m.-10 p.m. daily

Himalayan Yeti ★★ WHERE 3515 South Kingshighway • MORE INFO 314-354-8338; himalayanyetistlouis.com • MENU Indian and Nepalese cuisine • HOURS Lunch bufet and dinner daily Hugo’s Pizzeria ★★½ WHERE 3135 Olive Street • MORE INFO 314-896-4846; hugospizzeria.com • MENU Pizzas both conventional and creative • HOURS Lunch and dinner daily

WHERE 9783 Clayton Road, Ladue • MORE INFO 314997-7070; eatthehumblepie. com • MENU Thin-crust and Sicilian-style pan pizzas • HOURS 4-9 p.m. daily

J. Smugs GastroPit ★★½

Kalbi Taco Shack ★★ WHERE 2301 Cherokee Street • MORE INFO 314240-5544; kalbitacoshack. com • MENU Korean-Mexican fusion • HOURS 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday

Lemmons by Grbic ★★½ WHERE 5800 Gravois Avenue • MORE INFO 314-899-9898; lemmonsrestaurant.com • MENU American fare with a Balkan accent • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Sunday,

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Inquire for dealer space which may be available


Squab Squab Squab (breast, croquette and liver sauce) at Privado

Looking for a specific cuisine, price range or location? Check Ian Froeb’s STL 100, our critic’s guide to essential St. Louis restaurants.

lunch Saturday-Sunday (closed Monday)

Like Home French Cafe & Pastry ★★½ WHERE 3855 Lindell Boulevard • MORE INFO 314319-0099; likehomecommeal amaison.com • MENU French cafe fare and pastries • HOURS 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday (closed Monday-Tuesday)

Louie ★★★ WHERE 706 DeMun Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314300-8188; louiedemun.com • MENU Rustic Italian fare • HOURS Dinner MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

P H O T O : I A N F R O E B / P O S T- D I S PAT C H

Mac’s Local Eats ★★ WHERE Inside Tamm Avenue Bar, 1225 Tamm Avenue • MORE INFO 314-479-8155; macslocalbuys.com • MENU Burgers and fries • HOURS 3-9 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday, 3-10 p.m. Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday, noon-9 p.m. Sunday (Tamm Avenue Bar open 3 p.m.-1 a.m. Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-1 a.m. Saturday, 11 a.m.-midnight Sunday) The Mad Crab ★★ WHERE 8080 Olive Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-801-8698; facebook.com/madcrabstl • MENU Seafood boils featuring shrimp, crab and crawfish • HOURS 3-10 p.m. Monday-Friday, noon-10 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Nudo House ★★★ WHERE 11423 Olive Boulevard, Creve Coeur • MORE INFO 314-2748046; facebook.com/ nudohousestl • MENU Ramen and pho • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. MondaySaturday (closed Sunday)

Pangea ★★½ WHERE 3245 Rue Royale, St. Charles • MORE INFO 636757-3579; pangeaworldfusion. com • MENU Contemporary bistro fare with global accents • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Sunday (closed Tuesday)

Parigi ★★★ WHERE 8025 Bonhomme Avenue, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-899-9767; parigistl. com • MENU Elegant versions of classic Italian dishes • HOURS Breakfast, lunch and dinner MondaySaturday, brunch Sunday

Pizza Head ★★ WHERE 3196 South Grand Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-266-5400; pizzaheadstl. com • MENU New York-style pizza by the slice or whole pie • HOURS Lunch TuesdaySaturday, dinner TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Polite Society ★★★ WHERE 1923 Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314-3252553; politesocietystl.com • MENU Contemporary and classic bistro fare • HOURS Dinner daily, brunch Saturday-Sunday

Privado ★★★★ WHERE 6665 Delmar Boulevard, University City • MORE INFO 314-899-9221;

privadostl.com • MENU A ticketed tasting menu of progressive American cuisine • HOURS Dinner Friday and Saturday

Sardella ★★★½ WHERE 7734 Forsyth Boulevard, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-773-7755; sardellastl.com • MENU Contemporary fare with Italian and Californian influences • HOURS Dinner daily, breakfast and lunch Monday-Friday

Sister Cities Cajun ★★½ WHERE 3550 South Broadway • MORE INFO 314-405-0447; sistercitiescajun.com • MENU Gumbo, po’boys and more • HOURS Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday, brunch Sunday (closed Monday)

Snax Gastrobar ★★ WHERE 3500 Watson Road • MORE INFO 314353-9463 • MENU Casual American fare • HOURS Dinner Tuesday-Saturday Squatter’s Cafe ★★½ WHERE 3524 Washington Boulevard • MORE INFO 314-925-7556; squatterscafe. com • MENU Creative modern breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday-Friday (limited menu available 2-4 p.m.) The Stellar Hog ★★ WHERE 5623 Leona Street • MORE INFO 314-4818448; thestellarhog.com • MENU Barbecue featuring beef brisket and pork ribs • HOURS 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 11

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Turn ★★½ WHERE 3224 Locust Street • MORE INFO 314-240-5157; davidkirklandcatering.com/ turn • MENU Casual breakfast and lunch fare • HOURS Breakfast and lunch TuesdaySunday (closed Monday)

Vicia ★★★★ WHERE 4260 Forest Park Avenue • MORE INFO 314553-9239; viciarestaurant. com • MENU Modern, progressive cuisine with an emphasis on vegetables • HOURS Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday The Wood Shack ★★½ WHERE 1862 South 10th Street • MORE INFO 314-8334770; thewoodshacksoulard. com • MENU Sandwiches featuring smoked meats • HOURS 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday (closed Sunday-Monday)

(With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Drink not included) Valid Monday thru Thursday only. With purchase of an adult dinner entree and a beverage. Kids meal up to a $9/= value per entrée. No Cash Value. Must present paper coupon. Cannot combine with any other offers. One coupon per order ONLY. Dine In Only. Expires 5/11/18 Not Valid on Mother’s Day

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COLLEGE CONNECTION APRIL 2018 | stltoday.com/collegeconnection

•Online registration saves time at college fairs •Tips for attending a college fair •Why it’s important to seek scholarships

SPECIAL TO THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MOACAC St. Louis Spring College Fair April 22 @ Maryville University 1 to 3 p.m.


COLLEGE CONNECTION CONTENTS COLLEGE CONNECTION

3 4

Exhibitors list Help to find everything at the fair Timing is everything Start early on your college search

9 13

Financial Aid What to do when the financial aid letter arrives Money for college Six tips for winning scholarships

stltoday.com/collegeconnection REGIONAL/METRO DIVISION CONTENT MARKETING SALES MANAGER MANAGER Charles Mems Jennifer Mason cmems@post-dispatch.com jmason@stltoday.com 314-340-8033 314-340-8988 EDITOR Greg Uptain guptain@yourjournal.com 314-744-5728

CONTENT PRODUCTION MANAGER Sarah Gerrein sgerrein@stltoday.com 314-340-8014

Train your b r a i and body at n UMSL. Stay acade mically and physically fit with the University o f Missouri– St. Louis. N amed one of “Americ Best Colle a’s ges” by Fo rb e s M agazine, and now b oasting a 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 -s quarefoot facility and a wide v a ri e ty of cardio a nd strength -training equipment, UMSL is w here you can truly g o the dista nce.

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MOACAC St. Louis Spring College Fair Colleges attending the Missouri Association for College Admission Counseling Spring College Fair, from 1-3 p.m. April 22, include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Adelphi University American University Arizona State University Avila University Baker University Ball State University Belmont University Benedictine College Bradley University Brescia University Butler University Central Christian College of the Bible Admissions Department Central Methodist University Chamberlain College of Nursing Christian Brothers University College of Charleston Columbia College Columbia College — Chicago Cornell College Cottey College Creighton University Culver-Stockton College

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

DePaul University DePauw University Dominican University (Chicago) Drake University Drury University Earlham College Eastern Illinois University Fontbonne University Furman University Grand Canyon University Hannibal-LaGrange College Harris-Stowe State University Illinois State University Illinois Wesleyan University Indiana State University Iowa State University IUPUI Johns Hopkins University Kansas State University Kettering University Knox College Lake Forest College Lewis University

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Lindenwood University Lindenwood University — Belleville Logan University Inc Loras College Loyola University — Chicago Lynn University Lyon College Marian University Maryville University McKendree University MidAmerica Nazarene University Millikin University Mississippi State University Missouri Baptist University Missouri Southern State University Missouri State University Missouri University of Science and Technology Missouri Western State University Monmouth College Murray State University Northwest Missouri State University Ohio University Park University Purdue University Quincy University

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Ranken Technical College Rockhurst University Saint Louis University Samford University Seton Hall University Southeast Missouri State University Southern Illinois University Carbondale Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Southern Methodist University Southwest Baptist University St. Ambrose University St. Charles Community College St. Louis College of Pharmacy St. Louis Community College St. Mary’s University State Technical College of Missouri Stephens College The University of Alabama The University of Mississippi The University of Tampa Truman State University University of Arkansas University of Central Missouri University of Chicago

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

University of Dayton University of Denver University of Evansville University of Indianapolis University of Iowa University of Kansas University of Kentucky University of Missouri University of Missouri-Kansas City Office of Admissions University of Missouri-St. Louis University of Nebraska-Lincoln University of Oklahoma University of Oregon University of Southern California University of Tulsa University of Wisconsin — Madison University of Wyoming Washington University in St. Louis Webster University Western Illinois University Western Kentucky University Westminster College Wichita State University William Jewell William Woods University Xavier University

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Timing is everything: W

hether you’re a high school junior or an undecided senior, it’s important to keep college top of mind each semester by starting with a plan and the right goals in mind. Students should select a favorite calendar tool to keep track of important dates and deadlines, standardized testing dates and any scholarship reminders. Once it’s all set up, it’s much easier to get into the habit of continually updating as necessary. In the end, it’s the student that will be attending college, not the parents or the college counselor. Don’t let your junior and senior year sneak up on you. Planning for college early can help ensure students are ready come graduation day.

to meet both the graduation requirements and help them look good on college applications. “High school college counselors are the student’s greatest resource,” said Joann Elliott, licensed professional counselor and owner of College Counseling Tutoring. “They often know the student well, have the knowledge and can advocate for them.” If the school doesn’t have a set schedule or policy, students should stop and check in with the college counselor to make sure they are on the right path to achieving their goals, at the very minimum, each semester.

Start the search early By junior year, students should be getting out on college visits and college fairs. “Ideally, freshman year should be Check in with the guidance left to getting settled in to their new or college counselor A guidance counselor can help keep school, locating their locker, making new friends and enjoying everything a student on track with the college admissions process and ensure the stu- about being a freshman,” Elliott said. “From sophomore year on, it will be dent graduates with the right courses

Quick tips to keep your plans on track

baby steps in the beginning, but parents need to start having those baseline conversations and build from there.” Students should create a list of what schools they are interested in, begin researching and thinking about the schools they want to apply to without getting stuck on one type of college. There are a wide variety of colleges from small liberal arts to large public universities to community colleges. “One of the biggest mistakes I see students and parents make is putting all of their eggs in one basket — academically, financially and geographically,” Elliott said. Attend college fairs Imagine a gym or cafeteria filled with a sea of college representatives standing behind tables loaded with brochures and parents and students roaming around. Most students attending college fairs in the spring will be in their junior year. There could be a few undecided seniors, but the

deadline for seniors to decide in most cases is May 1. “I would also encourage freshman and sophomores to attend if they are ready, because it gives them time to stick their toe in the water and take a look at how it all works,” Elliott said. It’s important for the student to create a list of colleges to visit in order of priority and to do their homework before they arrive. The student should make a list of questions beforehand and stay away from simple questions that could be found online. Elliott suggests asking for advice or recommendations or make them sell the school. “I highly recommend connecting with the admissions representative,” Elliott said. The rep is so overlooked! They are an advocate for the student through the whole process — a link to the school. They are the ones who answer the emails — all of your questions. People overlook the admissions rep and have no idea what a goldmine they are.”

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APRIL 2018 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

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Maryville’s innovative Save time, register life coach program online before going helps students succeed to college fairs

M

entor. Advisor. Career counselor. Cheerleader. Confidante. Maryville University students find all these valuable relationships in one dynamic resource: a life coach. Maryville’s innovative Life Coach program has revolutionized the way students transition to college and create personal goals for lifelong learning and success. “Whether it’s to celebrate acing their latest test or to discuss new study strategies, their life coach is a student’s go-to resource — both day and night,” says Jen McCluskey, PhD, Maryville’s vice president for Student Success. Helping students identify and build on their key strengths is an important component of the Life Coach program. Using proven learning assessments, including Gallup’s StrengthsFinder, students also discover their individual learning styles and explore how to

leverage them for success in academics and beyond. Maryville’s life coaches also provide assistance with resume development, test taking, time management, becoming more involved on campus, coping with stress, refining a class schedule and other strategies and tools for success. “No matter what the individual goal or need, a student’s life coach is here for one thing and for everything — the student’s success,” McCluskey says.

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The information form — a staple of college fairs across the country — has gone digital in St. Louis. Instead of students filling out a card for every college representative they talk to, students can visit gotocollegefairs.com whenever they have time before a college fair. At this site, students register one time, then print a barcode for college representatives to scan. The registration allows students to create a user name to edit their profile if their information changes. The website allows students to let colleges know their academic and extracurricular interests, if they play sports, what types of college they’re interested in and what factors (such as college location or size) are important to them. The form is a virtual mirror of the

cards found at college fairs. Instead of spending their time at a college fair filling out several similar interest cards at the college tables they visit, students can spend their time actually talking to college representatives. The program streamlines the process for those representatives as well. The online program is free for the student and the school district. Many school counselors use the website to see if students are signing up for local college fairs. The Missouri Association of College Admission Counseling, a nonprofit organization of admissions professionals, high school counselors and educational institutions, is using the system for its Sunday, April 22 Spring College Fair.

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20 THINGS TO KNOW (to survive at college)

E

very student who attends a university desires a “successful” college experience. While successful means different things to different people, there are certain pieces of advice that are universal. Here is what you need to know. 1. The television lied. Dorm rooms are nothing like Dawson’s Creek and Gilmore Girls. They are more like matchstick boxes with scary use of vertical space. 2. Always get the warranty. Even if you think you won’t need it. You probably will. 3. Cheating isn’t worth the risk. This applies to tests and relationships. You will get caught. Also, the instinct to cheat is telling you something. Listen. 6

APRIL 2018 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

4. Food is expensive. All food. Be forewarned. Use the meal plan. 5. You will have no money. You have no idea how much living with your parents saves you. 6. Learning where the “specials” are can fund your social life. Figure out where the food specials are in town and make the rounds for at least half the cost. 7. You have the time. Everyone has to manage their time. It’s all in how you use it. Own how you choose to use your time. It’s a life skill. 8. Avoid extensions. They breed laziness. Plus, procrastinators will always procrastinate, no matter the deadline. 9. You will get lonely.

10. You will get bored. 11. You don’t have to buy all your books. Learn which books to buy and which to borrow or rent. 12. Don’t fully depend on your advisor. Ultimately, it’s up to you to fully understand where you are in your program. 13. Go to the review sessions. This is where professors reveal what you should focus on (read: what will be on the exam). 14. Plan communication with your parents. Set up a weekly time to chat so they can catch up on your college life. 15. Companies are already looking at you. Keep this in mind as you post about Friday night on social media. 16. Don’t be one of those students

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whose parents fund their entire existence. Find a job to at least make your own spending money. 17. A scholarship is like a job. Athletic, academic — it doesn’t matter. Treat it with the respect it deserves. 18. Study abroad if at all possible. 19. University health centers are one of the best healthcare options for the price. Take advantage of $6 teeth cleanings while you have them. 20. Get to the gym. You won’t want to. You will make excuses. But you have access to state-of-the-art equipment that, once you’ve graduated, you won’t have without an expensive gym membership.

Content and photo by Green Shoot Media Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch


Learn. Teach. Inspire.

SIUE invites you to explore the world I magine traveling to Costa Rica to study medicinal plants in the rainforest, monitor and preserve sea turtle nesting areas along the coast, or provide essential health care screenings to people in need. This experience became a reality for students of Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Over their spring break, pharmacy, public health and nursing students exchanged their week off for once-in-a-lifetime learning opportunities in Costa Rica while earning credit toward their degrees. This trip was only one of over 300 study abroad opportunities available at SIUE. Whether you spend one week to a full semester studying abroad in one

of 30 different countries, this experience can change your perception of the global community. “In Costa Rica, I learned more than I could’ve imagined. It was an experience of a lifetime and a great way to spend my spring break,” said Jaylyn Lowrance, senior nursing student. Study abroad is an investment in your future as both a potential employee and a global citizen. Step outside your comfort zone, embark on exciting adventures and make unforgettable memories by studying abroad during your time at SIUE.

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5 things to do before graduation 1. Enjoy the rest of your high school or college experience. You won’t ever get this time back and nothing will compare to your time in school. Try to really soak in the sights and sounds of a normal school day. Soon they will be replaced by completely new experiences. 2. Take a language class. Learning a new language forces you to think differently. Plus, you never know when even a base knowledge of another language will come in handy. 3. Build a list of mentors to contact when you graduate. This is your introduction to networking. These should be people you admire and who have helped you. Keep in touch with these people. You never know how they could help you or you can help them in the future. Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

4. Set up a few informal interviews. If you’re graduating from college, take a look at your industry and identify a few movers and shakers. Connect with these people on LinkedIn, introduce yourself and meet them for coffee. You are not looking for a job, so this isn’t a formal interview but a great way to get your face and name in the minds of others in your industry. 5. Understand that you are leaving the comfort of “regulated time.” You and your peers likely track your time and progress class by class, semester by semester. After graduation, people will progress and move through life at different paces. If you find yourself “behind” others, don’t be jealous. If you find yourself “ahead,” don’t be judgmental.

For Libby, an early childhood education major at SIUE, student teaching provided transformative— and sometimes surprising—lessons. Hands-on learning opportunities exist in virtually every program at SIUE. Libby has already made a positive impact in the lives of children. The training and experience she received at SIUE will lead her to inspire others in her future teaching career.

Watch Libby’s story. siue.edu/learn-teach-inspire

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COLLEGE CONNECTION | APRIL 2018 7


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hoosing where to apply to college is a big decision that can affect the lives of young students for years to come. The college application process can have more immediate impacts as well, as U.S. News reported that the average college application fee was $41 in the spring of 2015, meaning families can expect to spend several hundred dollars just to apply to colleges. The rising cost of a college education coupled with a competitive job market only serve to emphasize the importance high school students and their families must place when deciding where to apply. The following are a handful of strategies families can employ to make students’ decisions regarding where to apply to college a little easier.

1. Don’t hesitate from applying to a dream school The Princeton Review defines dream schools as those colleges or universities where a student’s academic credentials fall in the low end or below the school’s averages for students accepted the year prior. But even students who meet the academic requirements established by their dream schools may be hesitant to apply to such schools because of the cost of tuition. Students whose academic records fall just short of their dream schools’ criteria or whose stltoday.com/collegeconnection

financial means make attending their dream schools seem impossible should still apply to those schools. Financial aid might be available, and schools might look at more than just academic performance.

2. Don’t be deterred by application fees Stanford University’s application fee for 2017 was $90, making the school one of the more expensive colleges or universities to apply to. But many schools, including Stanford, waive those fees for certain applicants. Students should not expect each school to waive their application fees, but they also should not let those fees deter them from applying, especially if they meet or exceed the application requirements. 3. Choose the right safety school Safety schools are those colleges or universities where applicants’ academic credentials make them a near certainty to gain admission. But when choosing safety schools, students should pick schools that they would enjoy attending. Applying to a school simply because you can get in and not because you want to enroll there can make for an unpleasant college experience should you ultimately end up attending that college.

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What to do when the inancial aid letter arrives Take these steps to ease the decisionmaking process

T

he last year of high school is a whirl of activity, and it’s no different when it comes to the final leg of college selection. Once the acceptance notifications arrive, it will soon be time to sit down with a different stack of mail: financial aid letters. As you undoubtedly know, the cost of college is no small investment. In the 2017-18 academic year, the average tuition and fees for four-year public colleges is $25,620, while for private colleges, the costs are $33,520, and public two-year colleges cost $3,570, according to the College Board. At the same time, the College Board reports that more than 70 percent of students receive grants to help pay for college. Hopefully, those financial letters contain some good news. For most families, analyzing the letters is a process of uncovering the college that can offer the best education at the best value for your student. One way to get there is to parse the details of the letter itself so you understand the net cost of your student’s education. Still, it’s critical to look at other factors and opportunities around higher education costs. Taking a deeper look at these can help you and your student reach the best possible decision. Deciphering free aid vs. other options Take a close look at each line in the aid column. Key words, such as scholarships, grants and fellowships, signal no-strings money for school. Workstudy and student loan packages are options that will need students to find a job or pay the money back.

Cost-of-living expenses Think about those extra costs that come up over the weeks and months Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

of any college year, such as meals, phone, transportation and laundry. Don’t forget entertainment. After all, they’re not going to spend all their time studying in their dorm room. Does the campus and community offer plenty of low-cost and no-cost attractions and entertainment so they can have fun with their friends without breaking the bank? Local economy One thing worth considering is the local economy of the first-choice school, especially if your student may want to pick up a part-time job along the way. Even better, look for local employers that are compatible with your child’s career goals. An entrylevel job at one of these workplaces can help make ends meet, while making your student more marketable when it’s time to graduate.

Student achievement Do a little digging on the success rate for students and graduates, so you have an idea on whether the school has a high job placement rate after graduation. Know the school’s graduation rate, along with the average first-year salary for graduates. Ongoing costs The financial aid letter describes the student’s first year. As much as you can, do some forecasting for the next three to four years. It’s especially important to understand whether awards are renewable, or if they’re available only to first-year students. Negotiation If the college isn’t coming through with enough aid to make college affordable for your student and family, don’t give up. You might be able

stltoday.com/collegeconnection

to negotiate more aid. Submit a letter and ask for a follow-up appointment. Be specific about what you are requesting, and be sure to explain if you have specific circumstances such as medical costs or a job loss that may have affected your ability to meet the expected family contribution. If you find the amount of financial aid provided isn’t enough (including the amount offered in federal loans), families may want to research and explore private student loans as an option to cover the additional expenses. Look for competitive interest rates and flexible repayment options that match your budget. College Ave Student Loans also offers a calculator that showcases how much families can save with various loan options at collegeavestudentloans. com.

Content and photo by BrandPoint COLLEGE CONNECTION | APRIL 2018 9


140 YEARS OF HISTORY AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

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SCHOOLS RETHINK GRADING Emphasis on learning G Grades are more heavily based o on subject mastery, rather than homework or participation. A tough transition Parents, teachers worry that kids won’t put in the work

OPEN YOUR DOOR TO HISTORY IN OUR PAST EDITIONS AT: STLtoday.com/archives

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APRIL 2018 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

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LINDENWOOD UNIVERSITY

Southeast Missouri leads in providing career-readiness S outheast Missouri State University wants students to do their dream jobs before landing their dream jobs. Ask Jon Berbling, Faizel Khan, Chandrashekhar Singh and Kara Hartnett — students armed with the knowledge, drive and experience to hit the ground running when they enter the workforce. Berbling, a marine biology major, saw the effect of climate change firsthand at the Churchill Northern Study Centre, a Canadian field station, while studying environmental variables that affect wood frogs and arctic foxes in a subartic environment. Khan and Singh are partnering on a tech start-up at Southeast’s Catapult Creative House to create an online

Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

platform in the native languages of Third World country teenagers to help them learn computer languages like Java and Python. Hartnett, The Arrow student newspaper editor, sees how the classroom complements reality. She works with University partner, the Southeast Missourian, on content, advertising and marketing. “Another cool thing is that [the work] is so closely tied to the curriculum,” she said. “I’m going to have a better future because of it.” To learn how to become careerready at Southeast, visit semo.edu/ resume.

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COLLEGE CONNECTION | APRIL 2018 11


Southern Illinois University Carbondale becomes a university without borders

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outhern Illinois University Carbondale has a long history of opening doors. As of this fall, we are a university without borders — all United States residents pay the same tuition as Illinois residents. We are all about opportunity. From one-on-one faculty mentoring to hands-on learning in everything from the arts to the sciences, SIU puts students on career paths they care about with the skills and confidence they need to excel. We’re a university where the students know their professors and the professors know their students.

What can you do at SIU? You can get your hands dirty at the student-run organic farms. You can help manage $1.8 million of the SIU Foundation’s portfolio. You can star on stage or in the orchestra, you can track deer, improve food safety, or contribute to research in hyperpolarization or biomedical technology. You can even earn an Emmy for news coverage. Come for a visit, let us show off our beautiful campus. We’d love to talk about what SIU can do for you.

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College is the perfect time to organize personal inances

Y

ou are probably familiar with the financial stories making headlines across the country: billions of dollars in student loan debt. Millennials are “entitled” and “spend selfishly.” Millennials delay getting married, purchasing homes and starting families at a historically unprecedented rate. The list goes on. Millennials in fact, are a generation dealing with higher debt and lower wages. But this does not mean you have to be disadvantaged by the system. With the right strategy and due diligence, financial freedom is yours for the taking. Make a Budget Budgets help us understand our fiscal responsibility. It is one thing to know that you have to pay rent and utilities every month. It is quite another to see those amounts listed on a spreadsheet and see the pittance left over. Making and sticking to a budget means living within your means — a lesson that will help you later in life.

Find a Job Any job. Whether you are graduating high school or graduating college, finding a job and making money should be high on your priority list. You also should accept that this job will most likely have nothing to do with what you really want to do. Welcome to adulthood. While you should always keep your passions in sight, you also have to provide the basics for yourself: food, a roof over your head and clothes on your body. Don’t Ignore Student Loans There is no faster way to tank your credit score than to ignore the massive amounts of money you borrowed to help you earn that degree. Even small loans can become big problems if shoved to the side and ignored. Get on a payment plan and start knocking your loan out little by little. Increase the amount you pay as you grow in your career.

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FROM UNDECIDED TO UNSTOPPAB UNSTOPPABLE. THAT’S A SALUKI.

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APRIL 2018 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

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Finding money for college C

ollege is a significant investment and millions of families each year face the question of how to pay for it. One way students can position themselves for success is by seeking out various forms of financial assistance. Earning scholarships can be one way to offset the financial burden, but winning a scholarship can sometimes be as competitive as gaining admission to the college of your choice. While most scholarships don’t entirely cover college tuition, they can be useful tools to help cover educational expenses such as room and board, tuition and books. Some scholarships can be earned by meeting or exceeding certain standards, such as academic performance, while other scholarships are based on financial need or personal interests of the applicant. There’s also a wealth of opportunities that support students in specific areas, whether it be from companies, professional organizations or foundations. For example, the America’s Farmers Grow Ag Leaders program offers industry-specific scholarships each year for those looking to study agriculture-related fields. While your academic performance, character and extracurricular resume all play a part, knowing where to look for scholarships can make all the difference when it comes time to pay for your education. These tips can help you identify and apply for scholarships that match your interests and credentials.

require essays, videos or additional assets that promote their accomplishments outside of submitting an application and a copy of their transcripts. This typically leads to a smaller candidate pool. Due to the added requirements, these scholarships can oftentimes come with larger monetary values, as well.

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applications to high school counselors. Many institutions also offer specific awards by major for both new and returning students that can be applied for through the school’s financial aid office. These resources, as well as newsletters and bulletin boards outside of these offices, can help you identify scholarships for which you may be eligible to apply.

Apply for Scholarships in Your Field of Interest Many job sectors have scholarship opportunities available through related clubs, organizations, small businesses and other benefactors. For example, the America’s Farmers Grow Ag Leaders program, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund in conjunction with the FFA, provides $1,500 scholarships to students endorsed by local farmers for continuComplete the FAFSA ing their education at two- or fourCompleting the Free Application year universities and trade schools in for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) may agriculture-related fields of study. This be required to apply for a number of year, the program will award more than scholarships, particularly scholarships $500,000 in scholarships to students in offered by most colleges and universifields such as mathematics, computer ties based on need. It is also required for other forms of financial aid, such as science, business, communications, subsidized or unsubsidized loans. While engineering, farming, agronomy, education and more. Students can learn you can begin filling out the FAFSA on more about the program by visiting Oct. 1 of the year prior to needing aid, GrowAgLeaders.com. many need-based scholarships give priority to students who complete the FAFSA by their state’s application dead- Don’t Overlook Smaller Award Amounts line. It is important to note that some When it comes to paying for your colleges and universities have earlier education, every scholarship you deadlines. receive – even those that come with smaller, one-time award amounts Talk to Your Counselor Colleges or universities and scholar- – can help defray the costs beyond tuition for books, supplies and living ship providers often supply informaexpenses. Many times, scholarships tion about their award offerings and Special to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch

with smaller award amounts have fewer additional requirements that must be satisfied outside of materials traditionally required for submission such as transcripts, letters of reference and an application. Look for Essay Applications Students are often more likely to forgo applying to scholarships that

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Use a Scholarship Search Engine While a simple search for “college scholarships” on any search engine is likely to elicit plenty of options, there are sites available that are dedicated to helping students identify college scholarship opportunities. While paid options exist, there are also several free sites, such as Scholarships.com, Fastweb and Scholarship America, that can provide local, regional and national options based on the information you provide. Other, more industry-specific websites, such as FFA.org, can provide scholarship opportunities that pertain to a certain field of interest.

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COLLEGE CONNECTION | APRIL 2018 13


CMU’s Digital U: A Expert advice on step ahead of the rest student loan repayment

I

t’s proficient. It’s innovative. It’s top-of-the-line. Central Methodist University’s Digital U enhances the classroom experience so students can learn the way they live. All undergraduate College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) students at CMU’s main campus in Fayette are provided their own Apple iPad Pro free of charge — but the perks don’t end there. Possibilities are limitless with strategically chosen apps and other features that advance skills while catering to students’ majors and interests. Digital U provides instant connection between students, clubs, athletics, fine arts, and campus activities. Inside the classroom, users learn faster and smarter. With the advantage of CMU’s Apple TVs – featured in every classroom and laboratory — students can sync their iPads for interactive presentations and lectures. Note-taking apps and opportunities to use printed textbooks or “e-texts” instead of hard-copy textbooks are other convenient advantages.

14

APRIL 2018 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

There’s no denying it; Digital U gives CMU students the cutting-edge, realworld experience top companies look for in the candidates they seek. After taking advantage of its access, connective learning, collaboration, and unlimited learning capabilities, students will graduate a step ahead of the rest as they begin their professional careers.

Sponsored content and photo by Central Methodist University

(NAPS) Here are two bits of good news for recent and soon-to-be college graduates — and those planning for college — with student loans: • You probably have a six-month grace period after graduation before you have to start making payments. • While adding a new payment of any kind into your life can be daunting, the vast majority of Americans with student loans do successfully pay them off, due, in part, to the value of their college education. These student loan repayment tips can help you be among them: • Contact your servicer. Some students have more than one loan, so it’s best to contact each servicer to discuss your payment options. The servicer can also help identify alternatives if you’re experiencing difficulty. • Pay every month, and pay extra when you can. Make payments every month. Options to postpone payments typically mean you’ll pay more

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over the life of the loan, so tackle your payments now. Whenever you can, pay extra to reduce your interest costs and pay off faster. • Create a budget. Know how much is due every month and create a budget that’s in sync with the amount due. Get the big picture when creating your budget. Put together a snapshot of all your financial obligations, including your credit cards, car loan, student loans and rent. • Pay yourself. Build an emergency savings fund of $500 to $1,000 to be prepared for car expenses, an emergency trip or life’s other unexpected expenses. • Sign up for auto-pay. Automatic payments not only make sure you never miss a payment, but servicers such as Sallie Mae, the nation’s No. 1 financial services company specializing in education, may reduce your interest rate if you pay by automatic debit. To learn more, visit SallieMae.com.

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COLLEGE CONNECTION | APRIL 2018 15


At Southeast Missouri State University,

RESUMÉS ARE BUILT, NOT WRITTEN. Build Yours Here. At Southeast, you’ll actually do your dream job before you get your dream job. That’s because we believe in making your education a partnership between what you learn in class and real experience. In addition to internships and clinicals, we ofer the facilities and programs to ensure your resumé includes your degree plus actual experience, so you’re career ready and confident. Opportunities await. Let’s talk!

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APRIL 2018 | COLLEGE CONNECTION

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APRIL 13, 2018 • STLTODAY.COM/RIDES

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FEATURES

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2018 Mazda CX-9 AWD DETAILS DESIGNED TO MAKE DRIVING BETTER When it comes to driving, there’s no such thing as a “minor” detail. That’s why we considered every single one when we crafted the CX-9’s indulgent Signature Trim. Supple Nappa leather, sculpted aluminum and genuine Rosewood deliver a multi-sensory driving experience of sophistication and indulgence. THE DRIVER-CENTRIC SUV The grocery run. The cross-country excursion. The evening out. With its indulgent interior and a multitude of cargo conigurations, the CX-9 is equipped to handle every kind of drive in style. But while comfort and sophistication are evident in each of its 7 seats, we’d like to recommend the one with the steering wheel. MORE CONFIDENCE FOR MORE DRIVING ENJOYMENT Weather and road conditions can change in an instant. That’s why Mazda’s available predictive i-ACTIV AWD® all-wheel drive system monitors everything from outside temperature to throttle input and braking patterns. Using that information, it adjusts power delivery to help give you optimal traction before your wheels can slip. Even when the weather’s perfect, i-ACTIV AWD helps stabilize and improve the CX-9’s overall road grip by sensing changes in steering effort and traction.

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2018 Mazda CX-9 AWD

DRIVING WITH DAN By DAN WIESE Contributing Automotive Writer

It's an anomaly among family haulers: good looking and fun to drive The 2018 Mazda CX-9 igures that it doesn't have to wear bib overalls, even if it is designed to work for a living. A big, three-row, seven-passenger, family-hauling crossover, CX-9, offered with front- or all-wheel drive, is, for all intents and purposes, a minivan surrogate. Nonetheless, it refuses to go out in public looking like the hired help. Available in Sport, Touring, Grand Touring and Signature trims, the shapely CX-9 wears a sharply drawn shark-nose grille whose slight overbite is now a signature look for Mazda. It also shows bird-of-prey headlight eyes, a sleek lank -- a particularly surprising attribute considering the room inside -- and a rump with an I'm- ahead-of-you convex tailgate. Inside, the fashion show continues -- at least, it did in our Grand Touring AWD -- with two-tone leather, satin- and bright-metal trim and classy piano-black accents. Under the hood is another surprise: a forcefed four. While most large crossovers use six-cylinder power, CX-9 opts for a 250-hp turbocharged four that delivers a torquey demeanor and enhanced mpg compared with larger-displacement engines. With all of its 310 lb.-ft. of available grunt onboard at a low 2,000 rpm, this one feels lively around town, though it plays its acceleration hand early, so plan two-lane passing maneuvers in advance. Our 2018 AWD edition returned 22 mpg in mixed city/hwy driving. While all the modern active safety nannies are available, newly standard in all trims for 2018 are blind-spot monitor, rear cross-trafic alert and Smart City Brake Support, which provides low-speed auto braking. Most interesting for enthusiasts, however, is the now-standard sorcery of Mazda's G-Vectoring Control. In an oversimpliication, G-Vectoring mon-

drivingwithdan@gmail.com

with the 50/50-split third row dropping via pull handles on the seat backs and the 60/40-split middle row -- fore/aft adjustable when accommodating passengers -- folds with a lever. With looks, utility, frugality and athleticism, CX-9 is a delightful iconoclast among three-row people haulers.

2018 Mazda CX-9 DRIVE FORMAT: Front- or all-wheel drive BASE PRICE (add $1,800 for AWD): Sport: $33,070; Touring: $35,900; Grand Touring: $41,410; Signature (AWD std.): $45,255 PRICE AS DRIVEN: $43,905; a Grand Touring AWD with $595 metallic paint upgrade; $100 cargo mat CX-9 employs a turbo four-cylinder to deliver an EPA rating of 22 city/28 hwy/24 combined in front-drivers, 20/26/23 with all-wheel drive.

ENGINE: 2.5-liter turbocharged SkyActiv I-4 HORSEPOWER: 227 (Premium fuel:

itors steering input and, in corners, imperceptibly reduces applied engine torque in order to shift weight to the front axle. The result is more precise steering response, Mazda says, with no perceived decrease in performance. To the driver, who already is enjoying a serene cabin, it contributes to surprisingly athletic handling in a big family hauler. Sure, the six-speed automatic's shifts are sometimes noticeable and the exhaust note 04

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from the turbo four is coarse under provocation, but the overall experience is engaging -- a characteristic enhanced by the chassis's driver-selectable Sport mode, which boosts throttle response and raises the automatic transmission's shift points. Room is ine up front. In the middle row, head and leg room also are excellent while access to that space is easy through big rear doors that open nearly 90 degrees. Those doors, along with a tilt-and-scoot middle row, make third-row access easier than expected, though it still helps to be lexible. In any event, two average-stature adults can actually occupy the third row. Folding the seats for cargo is a no-brainer,

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250) TORQUE: 310 lb.-ft. RECOMMENDED FUEL: Premium (regular acceptable) TRANSMISSION: Six-speed automatic EPA MPG: FWD: 22 city/28 hwy/24 combined; AWD: 20/26/23 WHERE BUILT: Hiroshima, Japan CARGO (behind 3rd, 2nd, 1st rows): 14.4 cu. ft./38.2 cu. ft./71.2 cu. ft. TOWING MAX: 3,500 lbs.


Improperly towing an all-wheel-drive vehicle can cause many problems DEAR CAR TALK: I had my 2000 Cadillac Escalade towed to the mechanic, and he determined that my battery needed to be replaced. After the new battery was installed, I was informed that the “4-wheel” light on the dash was constantly on, and that the mechanic could not determine the cause. He referred me to a dealership that specializes in Cadillacs. When I mentioned to the mechanic there that my vehicle had been hitched from the rear and towed approximately 15 miles riding on the front wheels, he suggested that that could be the cause of the light not turning off, because the vehicle should have been transported riding on top of the tow truck bed rather than being towed with the front wheels on the ground. Could this actually be the cause of the light constantly being on, or could it be a module that needs replacing? -- Henry

faults. For instance, a scan could reveal that it’s a faulty solenoid, a failed transfer case actuator motor or a bad computer. Or, as I said earlier, you could have lunched the center differential when you got towed. That’s thousands of dollars. In that case, you probably could just apply the “black tape solution” to the light and drive the car until it drops. A car that’s old enough to vote is hardly worth putting a new allwheel-drive transmission in. If the differential is cooked, the towing took place recently and you know who

towed you, you can try making a claim against them in small claims court — if they haven’t closed up shop and led to Saskatchewan. That’s assuming you didn’t tow it yourself, Henry, or give the driver permission to tow it on the front wheels because there was no latbed available and you really wanted to get home in time to watch “60 Minutes.” I’ll cross my ingers for a bad switch for you. *** If it ain’t broke, you won’t have to ix it! Order Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways

DEAR HENRY: The dealer is right that all-wheel-drive cars are never supposed to be towed from one end on a hook — they always should be lat-bedded. Any non-knuckleheaded tow truck driver would know that. So it’s possible that the towing did do some serious damage. But before you conclude that, there are a lot of other — and much cheaper — things to check. The irst thing I’d check is the switch. There’s a push-button switch on your dashboard that selects between 2WD and 4WD modes. You can try replacing that yourself for about $50. If the light goes off, go out and buy a lottery ticket, because it’s your lucky day, Henry. If it’s not the switch, you really need to have the car’s computer scanned for stored 05

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CAR TALK By RAY MAGLIOZZI Contributing Automotive Writer cartalk@gmail.com

You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Car Talk/Ruin, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. Got a question about cars? Write to Ray in care of King Features, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803, or visit www.cartalk. com. (c) 2018 by Ray Magliozzi and Doug Berman. Distributed by King Features Syndicate, Inc.


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$15,490

$15,990

Bommarito "WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

$15,990

St. Peters Pre-Owned Super Center 4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs

(636) 928-2300

Bommaritostpeters.com 09

RIDES MAGAZINE

$17,990

Sale prices cannot be combined with any other offers. ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


Find your next certiied pre-owned vehicle at

Lou Fusz Chevrolet PRE-OWNED SUPER CENTER Over 900 Pre-owned to choose from at Fusz.com $

$

18,999

$

17,583

16,351

13,390

$

2016 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE LT

2016 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LS

2016 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT

2017 CHEVROLET SONIC LT

23K Miles, #C11592P

17K Miles, #C180521M

Backup Camera, Stk# C18002FIU

Only 7K Miles, #C11585P

14,983

$

14,991

$

$

25,583

$

26,497

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

2016 CHEVROLET MALIBU LIMITED

2017 CHEVROLET IMPALA PREMIER

2018 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT

One Owner, Clean Carfax, Stk# C11603P

One Owner, Clean Carfax, Stk# C11605P

14K Miles, #C11568Q

Stk# C11520P

$

$

16,704

17,331

2014 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT

2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX LT

One Owner, 21K Miles, #C11552P

33K Miles, #C11590P

$

21,299

$

40,573

$

$

14,460

2014 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500HD LT

2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

35K Miles, Stk# C180091B

36K Miles, #C11595P

$

11,116

17,991

$

32,520

2015 CHEVROLET IMPALA LTZ

2014 CHEVROLET IMPALA LIMITED

2016 CHEVROLET MALIBU LT

2016 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 1500

44K Miles, #C11593P

65K Miles, #C180025M

9K Miles, #C181305A

4,495 Miles, #C181378A

5120 N Service Rd. St. Peters, MO

CALL (636) 875-5374

www.LouFuszChevrolet.com 10

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

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2009 Mercury Grand Marquis LS

2008 Pontiac G6

2009 Ford Fusion SE

#11300C

#27228M

2006 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT

#79328A

#11337A

#97265A

#79150A

SALE PRICE

$

4,963

2012 Chevy Malibu 2LZ

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

6,500

5,550

SALE PRICE

$

5,500

2008 Mitsubishi Lancer GTS

2010 Ford Fusion Sport

#97119B

#11691A

#27444C

$

$

SALE PRICE

$

6,963

SALE PRICE

$

7,500

SALE PRICE

$

5,700

SALE PRICE

$

5,850

2006 Buick Lucerne CXL

#12220A

#79432A

#40113A

SALE PRICE

$

7,963

SALE PRICE

$

7,963

2010 Hyundai Veracruz GLS

2012 Chrysler Town & Country

2015 Jeep Patriot Sport

#79107A

#79187A

#95534A

#40138A

#P8975B

SALE PRICE

8,963

2015 Dodge Dart SXT

SALE PRICE

2014 Hyundai Veloster

SALE PRICE

10,963

2011 Toyota Sienna

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

11,963

2012 Audi S4

SALE PRICE

15,963

11,500

SALE PRICE

$

12,700

2016 Kia Sorento 2.4L L

SALE PRICE

16,000

SALE PRICE

$

11,700

SALE PRICE

2011 GMC Terrain SLT-1

SALE PRICE

12,700

2009 Ford F-150 Supercab

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

16,550

$

12,450

2013 Buick Encore Leather

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

13,963

2013 Cadillac SRX

SALE PRICE

16,500

9,700

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

12,500

2014 Mazda 3 i Touring

SALE PRICE

14,400

2015 Honda Civic EX-L w/Navi

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

16,963

• We'll buy every car we appraise regardless of year, make, model or condition.

$

10,500

2007 Chevy Tahoe #97267B

SALE PRICE

$

12,500

2013 Mercedes Benz C 300 #P9143A

SALE PRICE

$

14,700

2015 Dodge Journey Crossroad

#11278A

$

8,963

#27339M

#P9189

$

$

2011 Audi A6

#96608A

#28591A

$

$

2011 Audi A5 Cabriolet

#40166A

#79454A

$

9,700

#P9184A

#96486M

$

$

2006 Toyota 4Runner Limited

#78720B

#12213A

$

9,500

2015 Kia Optima LX

#96173M

#28388B

$

$

2008 Acura MDX 3.7L

#39239A

$

SALE PRICE

#P9175

#11561A

$

9,000

$

5,963

2011 Nissan Cube

2011 Chevy Traverse 1LT

$

$

2011 Scion tC

2012 Chrysler Town & Country

$

SALE PRICE

#P9133

SALE PRICE

$

17,500

*Excludes model year 2008 and older and any vehicle with 80,000 or more miles.

Bommarito

2007 Ford Escape Limited

West County Pre-Owned Center

AND FACTORY CERTIFIED

CERTIFIED VEHICLES

2008 Ford Taurus SEL

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. • 636-391-7200 11

RIDES MAGAZINE

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04-13-18

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2012 FORD ESCAPE $ Stk. #50297-1 FWD XLT

10,995

$

2001 FORD F-250 Stk. #95249-1, 4X4, SUPERDUTY

9,995

2015 HYUNDAI ELANTRA $ Stk. #95430-1, SE

2013 DODGE CHARGER $

2016 CHEVY MALIBU $

12,697

2014 CHEVY CRUZE $

2016 NISSAN SENTRA $

2014 NISSAN MAXIMA $

Stk. #50247-1, LT

Stk. #95251-5, S

Stk. #48189-1

10,995

12,597

11,397

2015 HYUNDAI ELANTRA $

2014 CHEVY CRUZE $

2016 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GT $

Stk. #95430, SE

Stk. #69015-1, LT

Stk. #69270-1, Hatchback

12,697

2012 CHEVY EQUINOX $

2012 NISSAN ROGUE

Stk. #50310-1, FWD, LT

Stk. #49514-2 SV

12,995 ST. CHARLES HYUNDAI

11,397

$

9,995

2015 HYUNDAI SONATA Stk. #67444-1, SE

$

2016 JEEP PATRIOT

13,297

270

HYUNDAI 40/64

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

12,995

2014 HYUNDAI TUCSON $

70

RIDES MAGAZINE

Stk. #69265-1, LT

13,297

12,995

370

12

Stk. #67074-1, SE

stltoday.com/RIDES

Stk. #49059-1 AWD,LIMITED

Stk. #68453-1, FWD Sport

14,995

$

13,995


844-467-9452

StCharlesHyundai.com

Family Owned and Operated Since 1979!

2011 CHEVROLET CAMARO SS

2010 CHRYSLER 300 LIMITED

$8,995

Stk. #68369-1

Stk. #50519-1

2013 FORD FUSION SE

2010 INFINITI G37 X

$14,995

$9,995

Stk. ##50201-1

Stk. #69200-1

2013 GMC TERRAIN SLE

2008 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS

$5,995

Stk. #69049-1, 2WD

Stk. #50542-1, AWD

$8,995

2017 KIA FORTE LX

$8,995

Stk. #47256-1

2013 NISSAN ROGUE S Stk. #50423-1, AWD

$9,995

#47608-2

2010 HONDA ODYSSEY EX Stk. #50592-1

$13,597

2009 TOYOTA VENZA

2014 TOYOTA PRIUS Stk. #69120-1, C

$9,995

$8,397

2011 KIA SORENTO AWD EX

$10,397

Stk. #68127-1

$9,997

844-467-9452

StCharlesHyundai.com 2014 MAZDA CX-5 Stk. #48808-1

$11,397

2012 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY Stk. #50166-1,TOURING

$10,995 13

5701 Veterans Memorial Pkwy Saint Peters, MO 63376

2014 HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS Stk. 49264-2, AWD

$10,995

RIDES MAGAZINE

2015 HYUNDAI ELANTRA SE Stk. #95504

2013 HONDA PILOT EX

2015 JEEP COMPASS LATITUDE Stk. #69204-1, 4WD

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

$10,995

04-13-18

$12,995

#Stk. 50301-1, 4WD

stltoday.com/RIDES

$13,995


SUNTRUP PRE-OWNED Visit us online for complete inventory

www.SuntrupBuickGMC.com

SAVE $1,000’S ON YOUR NEXT PRE-OWNED VEHICLE!!! $

5,990

$

11,900

$

$

11,990

2006 NISSAN ALTIMA

2012 CHRYSLER 200

2014 CHEVY CRUZE LS

2013 CHEVY EQUINOX 1LT

2.5 S 4DR SEDAN W/AUTOMATIC Stk # 24678-1

AUTOMATIC Stk # 49127-1

1.8L 4 Cyl, 31K Miles, Stk # P3803

Remote Starter, 89K Miles, Stk # 24195-1

13,900

$

16,900

2016 CHEVROLET CRUZE

2014 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2015 BUICK ENCORE

Manual Stk # 24517-1

36mpg Stk # P3806

FWD, 19K Miles Stk # P3809

17,900

$

$

$

13,900

$

WEY BUU SED!!

6,995

$

17,900

$

18,900

2016 NISSAN ROGUE S

2015 NISSAN ROGUE SL

2016 BUICK REGAL

AWD, 18K Miles Stk # P3785

AWD, 46K Miles Stk # 49314-1

Sport, Touring, FWD, 26K Miles, Stk # 24376-1

21,900

22,900

$

2016 CHEVY EQUINOX LT

2017 GMC ACADIA SLE-1

FWD, 13K Miles Stk # P3831

FWD, 15K Miles Stk # 48740-1

26,888

$

16,900

$

2017 CHEVY MALIBU 1LT 22K Miles Stk # P3808

20,477

$

2015 CHEVY EQUINOX 1LT FWD, 13K Miles Stk # P3833

26,900

$

2016 BUICK CASCADA

2015 FORD MUSTANG GT

4 Cyl, FWD, Only 7,998 Miles, Stk # P3819

Fastback, 8 Cyl, 19K Miles Stk # 48684-5

NEARLY 500 NEW & USED VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM!

S

CAR

* With down payment of $2,500 cash or trade, With Approved Credit, based on 4.9% APR for 72 months.

866-420-7771 14

RIDES MAGAZINE

Credit Problems? CALL STACEY Specializing in Bankruptcies

636-939-0800

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

4200 N. SERVICE RD. I-70 & CAVE SPRINGS stltoday.com/RIDES

W BUE Y

US CARESD !!


Bommarito

South County Pre-Owned Center

2017 Chevy Suburban LT

2017 Chevy Traverse LT

2018 Chevy Equinox LS

Stk. #P6446, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certiied

Stk. #P6294, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certiied

Stk. #42555A, Loaded, Only 3,000 Miles

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$39,969

$23,990

$19,990

2016 Chevy Cruze Limited

2017 Chevy Sonic Premier

2017 Chevy Impala LT

Stk. #P6367, One Owner, Clean Carfax, GM Certiied

Stk. #P6314, Auto, Loaded, GM Certiied

Stk. #P6387, Loaded, Clean Carfax, GM Certiied

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$11,990 UNDER $10,000 2002 Mazda Protege 43K Miles, Stk. #35337A SALE PRICE $4,990 2007 Chrysler Town & Country Stk. #P6334A SALE PRICE $5,990 2006 Nissan Altima S Stk. #42290A... SALE PRICE $5,990 2003 Nissan Pathinder Stk. #42711A SALE PRICE $6,990 2006 Buick Rendezvous Stk. #42321A SALE PRICE $6,990 2008 Nissan Sentra Stk. #33767A .......... SALE PRICE $6,990 2009 Ford Focus SE Auto, Stk. #42294A SALE PRICE $6,997 2005 Ininiti G-35 Black, Stk. #P6361A...... SALE PRICE $7,696 2008 Chevy Equinox LTZ Stk. #P6449A SALE PRICE $8,469 2005 Honda Pilot EX 4x4, Stk. #42144A SALE PRICE $8,696 2011 Chevy Cruze LS 1 Owner, Stk. #42537A SALE PRICE $8,770 2010 Toyota RAV4 Black, Stk. #P6319A . SALE PRICE $8,969 2008 Honda Civic EX Auto, Stk. #42591A SALE PRICE $8,990 2010 Chevy Equinox LT Stk. #42680A SALE PRICE $8,990 2010 Chevy Malibu LT Stk. #42575A.... SALE PRICE $8,992 2009 Chrysler Town & Country Stk. #42224A SALE PRICE $9,322 2011 Mazda 3 i Gr. Touring Stk. #33083A SALE PRICE $9,890 2011 Chevy Malibu 1LT Stk. #42611A . SALE PRICE $9,990 2012 Mazda 3 i Hatchback Stk. #33759A SALE PRICE $9,990

UNDER $15,000

2013 Hyundai Sonata Stk. #442545A SALE PRICE $10,569 2015 VW Jetta S Auto, Stk. #42574A... SALE PRICE $10,569 2014 VW Beetle 2.5L Stk. #35351A... SALE PRICE $10,869

$11,770 2015 Chevy Spark LT Stk. #42316A.. SALE PRICE $10,990 2014 Chevy Cruze 1LT Stk. #P6359. SALE PRICE $11,222 2012 Ford Edge SEL Stk. #P6397A... SALE PRICE $11,869 2013 Chevy Equinox LS Stk. #42606A SALE PRICE $11,969 2017 Chevy Sonic Stk. #P6314 ......... SALE PRICE $11,770 2013 Dodge Gr. Caravan SXT Stk. #P6320A SALE PRICE $11,990 2016 Chevy Cruze Ltd. Stk. #42316A SALE PRICE $12,469 2012 Hyundai Tucson Stk. #42189AA SALE PRICE $12,469 2015 Chevy Malibu LTStk. #P6412 ... SALE PRICE $12,569 2014 Mini Cooper Stk. #P6330........... SALE PRICE $12,669 2015 Chevy Cruze 1LT Stk. #P6330. SALE PRICE $12,769 2014 Dodge Dart Ltd. Stk. #33541A . SALE PRICE $12,769 2014 Mazda 3 i SV Stk. #P6416.......... SALE PRICE $12,973 2015 Chevy Cruze 2LT Stk. #P6385A SALE PRICE $13,269 2013 Honda CR-V LX Stk. #P6357A . SALE PRICE $13,569 2013 Chevy Equinox 1LT Stk. #42512A SALE PRICE $13,659 2013 Hyundai Azera Stk. #42704A .... SALE PRICE $13,669 2015 Mazda 3 i Touring Stk. #35445B SALE PRICE $13,763 2015 Nissan Altima Stk. #P6408 ....... SALE PRICE $13,881 2016 Chevy Cruze LTD. Stk. #P6420 SALE PRICE $13,969 2016 Jeep Compass Latitude Stk. #P6447 SALE PRICE $14,932

UNDER $20,000

2018 Chevy Cruze LS Stk. #42242A. SALE PRICE $15,222 2012 Ford Escape LTD 56K Miles, Stk. #42540A SALE PRICE $15,469

$16,990 2016 Jeep Patriot Latitude Stk. #P6445 SALE PRICE $15,769 2014 GMC Terrain SLE-1Stk. #P6351 SALE PRICE $15,990 2013 Lincoln MKX Stk. #P6270A .... SALE PRICE $16,760 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Stk. #33640A SALE PRICE $16,969 2017 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6399. SALE PRICE $16,990 2016 Chevy Impala LT Stk. #P6387 SALE PRICE $17,569 2015 Jeep Renegade Limited Stk. #33338A SALE PRICE $18,680 2015 Nissan Rogue Stk. #35474A .. SALE PRICE $18,969 2010 Dodge Ram SLT Stk. #42631A SALE PRICE $18,990

UNDER $25,000

2017 Chevy Camaro 1LT Stk. #P6322 SALE PRICE $21,221 2017 Dodge Gra. Caravan Stk. #P6401 SALE PRICE $21,469 2010 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT Stk. #42426A SALE PRICE $21,769 2016 Chevy Express 3500 LT Stk. #P6406 SALE PRICE $23,969 2016 Mazda CX-5 Gr. Touring Stk. #P6417 SALE PRICE $24,463 2016 Chevy Traverse LT Stk. #P6439 . SALE PRICE $24,969 2017 Mazda CX-5 Touring Stk. #33449A SALE PRICE $24,993

OVER $25,000

2017 Mazda CX-5 Touring Stk. #33551A SALE PRICE $25,473 2017 Chevy Impala w/2LZ Stk. #P6443 SALE PRICE $25,769 2017 Nissan Pathinder Stk. #P6407 . SALE PRICE $26,576 2013 Chevy Silverado 2500HD Stk. #42613A SALE PRICE $26,973 2014 Honda Pilot Touring Stk. #42634A SALE PRICE $28,969 2016 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT Stk. #42712A SALE PRICE $30,998 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Stk. #P6303 SALE PRICE $32,969

6127 S. Lindbergh Blvd. • BommaritoChevy.com • 314-487-9800 15

RIDES MAGAZINE

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14410 MANCHESTER ROAD MANCHESTER, MO 63011 SALES (636) 200-2822 SERVICE (877) 589-2738 • PARTS (877) 606-3265 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE

Suntrup 100k Warranty 0.9% Financing On all 2013 & 2014 certiied Volvos

$5,000

$10,000

$13,775

$13,785

2005 VOLVO V70 WagOn

2010 hOnda OdySSey exL

2010 LexuS hS 250h

2012 VOLVO S50 T5

Stk # P42341

Stk # L13691

Stk #P42871

65K Miles, Stk #P4282

$13,800

$15,000

$15,000

$19,500

2016 nISSan SenTra Sr

2013 VOLVO S60 T5

2011 cheVy TahOe 4x4

67K Miles, Stk # 189522

Stk # P42511

2010 BmW x3 xdrIVe SaV Interior Sand Beige, Stk # P42501

Heated Leather, Only 6k miles, Stk # P4272

$20,000

$20,000

$27,980

$28,800

2009 LexuS LS 460

2015 mInI cOOper

2013 LexuS gx460

V8 Stk # 188381

Hard Top, Hatchback, 19k mi, Stk # P41751

83K Miles, Stk # P42411

2015 LexuS IS350

$28,925

$31,800

$32,000

$34,800

2013 audI q7 3.0T S LIne preSTIge

2012 WrangLer unLImITed

2017 Jeep grand cherOkee LImITed

2016 FOrd expLOrer pLaTInum SuV

Stk # 190811

Lift Kit, 36K Miles, Stk # 192991

Leather, 4x4, Stk # P4254

Stk # 189561

www.wcvolvo.com 16

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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stltoday.com/RIDES

Awd, Stock # 188491


PROVEN LOW PRICE AND HIGH QUALITY* We Service All Major Brands

&

CALL 314-896-2022 & 618-744-1900 stldunnheating.com

Air Conditioner and Coil Installed

1999

00

$

All offers limited to supply and could expire at any time.

+

+Offer is for Ameristar Air Conditioner M4AC3018. 18k BTU. Price shown is to connect to existing piping, ductwork, electrical and pad. Other sizes and conigurations can be purchased at the discounted rate shown plus an additional discounted upgrade charge. Ameristar A.C. with Trane coil approved match.

99

29

$

$

Service Fee

NEW HVAC FINANCING • LOW RATES

With repair purchase

Furnace & AC Tune-up Together

To be performed during normal business hours. May not be combined with other offers. One coupon per customer. Additional diagnostic charges may apply. Expires 4/30/18.

To be performed during normal business hours. May not be combined with other offers. One coupon per customer. Customer can elect to do A/C or Furnace only for a discounted rate. Expires 4/30/18.

• NO CREDIT SCORE MINIMUM • NO INCOME NEEDED CALL FOR DETAILS

*According to a recent study comparing the price of furnace and air conditioning installation between Dunn Heating and Cooling, LLC and 22 other major, reputable companies holding a HVAC license in the St. Louis County area.

GET IT DUNN RIGHT OR YOUR MONEY BACK! Now Hiring Experienced Technicians 17

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More

Savings


To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2015 CADILLAC CTS LUXURY Stk# C9101

SALE PRICE

2016 CADILLAC CTS LUXURY

$

29,990

2011 BMW 5 SERIES 535I XDRIVE Stk# C8974A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

$

17,990

SALE PRICE

34,990

Stk# V18115B

SALE PRICE

$

16,990

Stk# B8988A

SALE PRICE

$

7,990

10,990

Stk# B9106

SALE PRICE

$

SALE PRICE

30,990

Stk# V9080

SALE PRICE

11,490

$

2006 DODGE CHARGER

$

9,990

2012 FORD FOCUS TITANIUM

$

Stk# B9084

2013 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA SE

2013 DODGE DART SE

2004 MAZDA RX-8

Stk# M9105

SALE PRICE

$

2006 NISSAN PATHFINDER LE

2013 VOLKSWAGEN GTI

Stk# V17402A

Stk# C9096

2015 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT

7,990

$

Stk# M18146A

SALE PRICE 2013 CADILLAC SRX PERFORMANCE

11,790

$

Stk# C18073A

SALE PRICE

20,990

$

BommaritoSt. Peters PRE-OWNED CENTER 4190 N. Service Rd. • I-70 & Cave Springs View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritostpeters.com 18

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

TOLL FREE

1-866-244-9085

stltoday.com/RIDES


To Check Out These Great Cars and More!

Visit stltoday.com/RIDES

2007 HONDA ACCORD EXL

2004 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED EDITION

5,963

$

Stk# 40192A

SALE PRICE

2006 TOYOTA 4RUNNER LIMITED EDITION Stk# P9184A

SALE PRICE

SALE PRICE

Stk# 40157A

SALE PRICE

10,250

$

2008 INFINITI EX35 JOURNEY

12,450

$

2015 AUDI A8 L

Stk# P9206

2001 MAZDA MIATA BASE

49,700

2003 HONDA CR-V LX

Stk# 96687A

SALE PRICE

12,150

$

6,175

$

SALE PRICE

$

6,963

Stk# 79031A

SALE PRICE

$

6,450

$

7,800

2009 INFINITI G37

Stk# 79481A

SALE PRICE

15,850

$

2012 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE LT LT2

Stk# 11654B

SALE PRICE

2010 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT

2014 GMC TERRAIN SLE SLE-1

$

Stk# 11584A

Stk# 78423C

SALE PRICE

2008 CHEVROLET TAHOE LTZ

Stk# 11495A

SALE PRICE

11,550

$

Stk# 79477A

SALE PRICE

14,550

$

BommaritoWest County PRE-OWNED CENTER

15736 MANCHESTER AT CLARKSON RD. TOLL

View Additional Vehicles At: Bommaritowestcounty.com FREE 19

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES


great minds like a think

presents

ONE DAY UNIVERSITY

Yes, you read that correctly. A great mind enjoys thinking, and loves to learn.

SATURDAY, APRIL 21 | 9:30 AM – 1:15 PM Doubletree by Hilton Hotel St. Louis - Chesterield | 16625 Swingley Ridge Rd | Chesterield

One Day University creates fascinating days of learning designed to invigorate your mind. We work with over two hundred award-winning professors from the country’s top colleges - from tenured chairs of academic departments to rising stars on campus - to create remarkable events that are always educational, entertaining and unforgettable. No matter what your passion, you’ll ind that every One Day U event is illed with thought-provoking talks that will challenge you as if you were back in college once again! At One Day U, there’s no homework and no grades. Just learning for the pure joy of learning!

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HISTORY 9:30 AM 10:35 AM

The Impossible Presidency: From Washington and Jefferson to Obama and Trump Jeremi Suri / University of Texas Class of 1955 Distinguished Teaching Award

FILM 10:50 AM 11:55 AM

Three Films That Changed America Marc Lapadula / Yale University Award for Outstanding Teaching

PSYCHOLOGY 12:10 PM 1:15 PM

Positive Psychology: The Science of Happiness Catherine Sanderson / Amherst College Princeton Review’s Best 300 Professors

Next 90 registrants use code SL109

Visit OneDayU.com or Call 800-300-3438 20

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PREOWNED VEHICLES 2004 Acura MDX

2018 Audi A3

2017 Audi A4

2018 Audi A6

2017 Audi Q3

2018 Audi Q5

4WD, Navigation, Very Sharp #B8880A

Premium, 2.0L TFSI 4 Cyl, 5K Miles, Cosmos Blue Metallic, #28200L

2.0L TFSI 4 Cyl, 15K Miles, Glacier white Metallic, #P9186

Premium, 3.0L TFSI V6 Quattro #28129L

#P06705

$26,471

Carfax One Owner, 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl, 6K Miles, Moonlight Blue #28241L

$33,300

$34,700

$49,963

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2011 Acura MDX

2018 Audi A4

2017 Audi A4

2014 Audi A7 Hatchback

2018 Audi Q5

2016 Audi Q5

Tech Pkg, AWD, #M17551A

2.0T Premium, #28134L

2.0Turbo Premium Plus, S-Line, Quattro #V18351A

3.0L TFSI V6 engine, 29K Miles, Phantom Black Pearl, #P9205

Utopia Blue Metallic, 2.0L TFSI 4 Cyl #28148L

2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl, 24K Miles, Ibis white #28612A

$9,990

$42,963

$47,700

$12,890

$37,963

$33,490

$42,700

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2014 Acura RDX

2018 Audi A4 2.0T Premium

2014 Audi A4

2014 Audi A7 Hatchback

2016 Audi Q5

2016 Audi Q5

Sunroof, Leather, AWD #49436-1

$18,900

2.0L TFSI four-cylinder engine, Quattro, 8K Miles, Ibis white #28134L

2.0 Turbo Premium Plus Quattro #V17383A

Mythos Black Metallic, 3.0L TFSI V6, Quattro, #28454A

$17,990

Scuba Blue Metallic, 3.0L TDI Clean Diesel V6, 32K Miles, #P9106

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$37,963

Daytona Gray Pearl, 3.0T, 38K Miles #P9157

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2014 Acura TL

2018 Audi A4

2018 Audi A6

2015 Audi A8 L

2018 Audi Q5

2018 Audi Q5

Navigation, Sunroof, Leather, 47K Miles #49173-2

2.oT Premium, Mythos Black Metallic, 4 cyl #28125L

3.0L V-6, Quattro #28152L

4.0T, Phantom Black Pearl, #P9093

2.0T, Sportback, #28099L

Carfax One Owner, 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl, 7K Miles, Manhattan Gray, #28240L

$39,400

$30,000

$45,963

$36,350

$34,700

$19,900

$37,963

$47,963

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2018 Audi A3

2017 Audi A4 Premium

2017 Audi A6 2.0T Premium

2015 Audi A8 L

2017 Audi Q5 2.0T

2017 Audi Q7 2.0T Premium

Premium, 2.0L TFSI 4-Cyl, 4K Miles, Monsoon Gray Metallic #28202L

Mythos Black Metallic, 2.0L TFSI 4Cyl Quattro #28465A

Plus, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof #27540L

4.0L TFSI V8, Quattro, 36K Miles, Phantom Black Pearl #P9206

1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Panorama Sunroof, #P9080

Glacier White Metallic, #P9110

$33,700 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$44,000

$37,500

$38,250

$49,700

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

21

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

$32,700 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES

$47,700

$48,700 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Audi Q7 3.0T Premium

2016 Audi S7

2015 BMW M3

2014 Buick LaCrosse

2016 Cadillac CTS

2012 Cadillac SRX

Plus, Clean Carfax, Panorama Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating #P9081

4.0L TFSI V8, 44K Miles, Power Moonroof, Bluetooth, #P9158

Sakhir Orange Metallic, 3.0L I-6 Cyl, RWD, #P9154

Stock # P06576

$20,499

3K Miles, Savings #C16150R

49K, Pano Roof, Mocha, Certified #C17416RA

$46,500

$58,500

$46,000

$18,490

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$35,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2013 Audi Q7

2017 Audi SQ5 3.0T

2017 BMW X3

2016 Buick LaCrosse

2014 Cadillac CTS

2012 Cadillac SRX

70K, Black #190811

Premium Plus, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, #P9095

xDrive28i SAV, 2.0L I-4 cyl, AWD, 22K Miles #P9114

Premium, Black, Local Trade, Nav! #C17220RA

Luxury, Certified, 31K, Loaded #C17284A

31K #P41871

$30,500

$28,925

$22,820

$25,490

$27,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2016 Audi S3

2007 BMW 335i

2010 BMW X3 M

2008 Buick Lucerne CXL

2014 Cadillac CTS-V

2014 Cadillac XTS

Prestige, Quattro, Red, 28K, Local Trade #M17475B

2 Door Convertible, Auto, 59K, #V18226B

Sport #P42501

White Diamond, Heated Front Seats, Carfax 1 Owner #C180565A

6.2L V-8 cyl, 40K Miles, RWD, #P9199

#P06610

$12,990

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

$44,850 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Cadillac SRX

1966 Chevelle 2 dr

#P06633

$24,500

hard top parts car w/title. Ask about Extra parts

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$36,990

$47,700

$13,800

$6,551

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2016 Audi S4

2010 BMW 335i

2016 Buick Cascada

2006 Buick Rendezvous

3.0L TFSI V6 engine, 4x4, 35K Miles, Mythos Black Metallic, #28577A

xDrive, Coupe, Sunroof, Nav #M17475A

Premium, Only 7K Miles #P3819

One Owner, Loaded #42321A

$39,250

$26,888

$15,490

$6,990

$18,180

$500.

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

By Owner 636-697-4048

2016 Audi S5 3.0T

2018 BMW 430i

2015 Buick LaCrosse

1991 Cadillac Allante

2013 Cadillac SRX

2017 Chevrolet Suburban

Cabriolet, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats #28074A

Convertible, 2.0L I-4 Cyl RWD, 25K Miles #P9183

Stock # P06581

Coupe, Heated Front Seats #C17020R2

Premium Collection, AWD, 52K Miles, One Owner, #C17148A1

1 Owner Clean Carfax, Backup Camera, Remote Start, #P9026

$45,500

$36,000

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

22

$15,555

RIDES MAGAZINE

$9,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

$26,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

stltoday.com/RIDES

$47,700 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Chevrolet Tahoe

2015 Chevy Colorado

2012 Chevy Cruze

2016 Chevy Cruze

2010 Chevy Equinox

2014 Chevy Equinox

LT, 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth GM Certified Pre-Owned, #P9027

Z71, Crew Cab, Long Box, 4WD #P06387

#P06697

Limited, Champagne Silver, 24K, One Owner, Fuel Efficient #C11614P

LT, Loaded, Very Clean #42680A

Stock #P06703

$8,660

$13,710

$8,990

$12,909 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$43,700

$22,999

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2015 Chevy Camaro

2017 Chevy Colorado

2017 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Cruze

2015 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Equinox

LT, Stock #P06628

7K, Local Trade, Crew Cab #M9021A

1LT, Stock #180610A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$14,873

$16,597

Black, Black, Wheels, 7K, Sunroof #V18245A

$29,990

$9,990

LTZ, Black Granite, 46K Miles, One Owner, Backup Camera #C11611P

1LT Stock #P06667

$18,900

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 Chevy Camaro

2014 Chevy Corvette

2017 Chevy Cruze LT

2016 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Equinox

2015 Chevy Equinox

LT, Stock #P06627

7K Miles, z-51 Pkg, Black #B9074

#P06680

$17,114

Champagne Silver, 52K, Carfax One Owner, Flex Fuel #C11616P

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$49,990

$15,498

Red Hot, 29K Miles, Certified, Fuel Efficient #C180867A

LTZ #P06470

$18,400

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,348

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2017 Chevy Camaro

1997 Chevy Corvette

2016 Chevy Cruze

2008 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Express LT

Convertible, 11K, Yellow, SS Package #B8979

Arctic White, 65K Miles, Targa Roof #C172198B

1LT, Stock #P06677

LTZ, AWD, Loaded #P6449A

Stock #P06681

$19,555

15 Passenger Van, Unlimited, 32K Miles, #P6406

$8,469 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2013 Chevy Equinox

2016 Chevy Equinox

2017 Chevy Impala LT

LS, Loaded, Very Clean #42606A

Stk #P06678

Stk# P06520

$11,969

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$29,990

$12,699

$13,500 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

2017 Chevy Camaro

2011 Chevy Cruze

2014 Chevy Cruze

SS, Convertible, 11K, Automatic #B9056

LS, One Owner, Clean Carfax #42537A

LTZ, Roof, Auto, White #C17461D

$30,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$8,770

$13,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

23

RIDES MAGAZINE

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

$19,900

stltoday.com/RIDES

$23,990

$15,280

$23,969

$17,802 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Chevy Impala

2015 Chevy Impala

2014 Chevy Malibu 2 LTZ

2014 Chevy Silverado

2013 Chevy Silverado

2014 Chevy Spark

#P06641

Jet Black, 1 Owner, Backup Camera, Remote Start #C11596P

Stk #180347A

LT, Crew Cab, Diamond White, Leather, Loaded #42712A

LTZ, 4WD, 39K, Local Trade #V17159A

Stock #180226A

$16,235

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$30,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$19,250

$16,000

$30,990

$9,400

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Impala

2010 Chevy Malibu

2018 Chevy Malibu

2016 Chevy Silverado 1500

2006 Chevy Silverado

2017 Chevy Tahoe

Stock #P06682

LT, One Owner, Clean Carfax #42575A

1LT, Stock #P06689

Crew Cab, LTZ, 5.3L V-8, 4x4 #28423B

Stock #P06592

$8,992

2500HD, LTI, Silver Birch, One Owner #C180771A

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$15,990 Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$23,287

$20,400

$35,500

$46,500

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2017 Chevy Impala

2011 Chevy Malibu

2008 Chevy Malibu

2016 Chevy Silverado 1500

2013 Chevy Silverado

2015 Chevy Traverse

#P06657

Loaded, Only 67K Miles, #42611A

Clean Carfax, Local Trade, Automatic, #V17398B

Crew Cab, Standard Box, 4WD, LTZ Z71, Only 24K Miles, Stk# 171156A

1LT, Stock #P06619

$9,990

3500 Diesel, LTZ, C/C, 63K Miles #P3818

$5,490

$44,777

$19,200

$37,600

$21,200

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2016 Chevy Impala

2017 Chevy Malibu LT

2012 Chevy Malibu

2014 Chevy Silverado 1500

2015 Chevy Sonic

2015 Chevy Traverse

2LT Stock #P06662

#P06695

$14,600

LS, 50K Miles #49491-1

Stock #P06674

$17,696

LT, #P06669

1LT, #180421A

$11,888

$23,200

$11,054

$20,300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Chevy Impala

2016 Chevy Malibu

2013 Chevy Silverado

2015 Chevy Silverado

2015 Chevy Spark

2013 Chevy Traverse

LTZ, Auto, Sunroof, V6, Leather #C8884A

Stk #P06664

$17,500

2500HD, Crew Cab, White, #42613A

LTZ Package, 4WD, 30K #B8861

LT, Hatchback, GM Certified, #42316A

LTZ, Crystal Red, New Front Brakes, Heated Front Seats #C180712A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

$10,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

24

$26,973

RIDES MAGAZINE

$37,990

$10,990

$17,991

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Lou Fusz Chewy (866) 602-1770

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Chevy Traverse

2006 Dodge Charger

1996 F350 XLT SUPER CAB

2012 Ford Escape

2017 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford F-150

White, 96K Miles, One Owner, 3rd Row Seating #C181387A

SXT, Autmatic, Priced to Sell #M18146A

Dually 7.3 Diesel, 165K, A/C, pw, cassette. loaded, runs great.

LTD, 4x4, One Owner, 56K Miles #42540A

EL, Limited, 4WD, Black, Well Equiped Stk #B9070

XLT, 4x4 #P3810

$8,990

$7,500

$15,469

$37,990

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

CALL 314 322-7024.

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

2016 Chrysler 300C

2014 Dodge Dart

2013 Fiat 500 Sport

2017 Ford Escape SE

2015 Ford Explorer

2008 Ford F-250 Super Duty

Stock #P06636

Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start #33541A

Hatchback, Heated Front Seats #B8799B

Stock #P06600

$18,000

Sport, Quad Seats, Nav, Pano Roof #B9079

$24,495

$15,729

$21,500

$36,990

$26,900

#P06172

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$12,769

$7,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2007 Chrys Town & Country

2013 Dodge Grand Caravan

2014 Fiat 500c

2017 Ford Explorer

2017 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford F-250

Won't Last!! #P6334A

SXT, Clean Carfax, Loaded! #P6320A

22K #188041

Stock #P06624

LTD, #P4244

$11,990

$9,500

$24,000

$33,500

27K, 4WD, 6.2 V8, Automatic #B9055A

$28,790

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2009 Chrys Town & Country

2017 Dodge Journey

2012 Ford Edge

2016 Ford Explorer

2014 Ford F-150

2016 Ford Focus

Loaded, Very Clean, #42224A

SXT , Billet, 3.6L V-6, FWD, 18K Miles #P6323

SEL, Loaded, Very Clean #P6397A

XLT, FWD, Black w/ Black Wheels #B8557A

XL #P06686

"ST", Local Trade,l Priced Aggressively #V17767A

$28,490

$15,400

$5,990

$16,990

$11,869

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 Chrys Town & County

2010 Dodge Ram

2014 Ford Edge

2017 Ford Explorer

2008 Ford F-150

2015 Ford Focus

Touring, DWD, Leather, #48769-1

SLT, Crew Cab, 4x4, Chromes #42631A

SEL, Leather, Heated Seats, 44K Miles #P3812

XLT, FWD, 9K, Local Trade #B8963A

4WD, Crew Cab, Local Trade #V18081B

SE, Hatchback, Sunroof, Auto #V17535A

$9,322

$14,900 Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

$18,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

25

$19,477

$31,490

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

$13,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

stltoday.com/RIDES

$17,490

$12,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2015 Ford Taurus

2015 GMC Terrain

2017 GMC Yukon Denali

2008 Honda Civic

30K, #P3826

#P06655

$13,888

$13,049

GM Certified, Only 21K Miles #P6335

XL, 7K Miles, 6.2L V-8, 4x4 #79287A

EX, Coupe, Black, Loaded #42591A

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$61,963

$8,990

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2011 Ford Focus SEL

2016 Ford Mustang

2015 Ford Taurus

2012 GMC Terrain

2016 GMC Yukon Denali

2016 Honda Civic

White Suede, 89K Miles, Heated Front Seats #C180768A

GT, Premium #B9064

Lmtd, Stk #P06594

$17,700

SLT-2 Stk# P06570

Carfax One Owner, 6.2L V-8 cyl, 41K Miles, #79419A

EX-T, 17K, Local Trade #V18243A

$32,490

2012 Ford Focus

2015 Ford Fusion

Titanium, 52K, Auto, Certified #B9106

$11,790 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$16,990

$19,990

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$53,850

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2006 Ford Freestar SEL

2016 Ford Mustang

2017 GMC Acadia

2015 GMC Terrain

2014 GMC Yukon XL 1500

2013 Honda CR-V

39,900 miles

Convertible, #M17544A

FWD, SLE, #180324A

SLE-2 #P06666

Denali, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Heated & Cooled Front Seats #79254A

LX One Owner, Local Trade #P6357A

$18,490

$7,121

$12,499

$23,689

$17,885 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,569

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$31,000

Call 314-323-8568

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2017 Ford Fusion

2017 Ford Shelby GT350

2016 GMC Sierra 1500 SLT

2013 GMC Yukon

2015 GMC Yukon

2013 Honda CR-V

SE, Stock #P06609

5.2L V-8 cyl, Rear Wheel Drive, 9K Miles, #28661A

Crew Cab, 5.3L V-8 cyl, 4x4, 41K Miles, Carfax One Owner #79260A

XL, SLT, Black, Loaded #P6199A

XL, Denali, Loaded, Certified #C17441B

EXL, 62K Miles, #193711

$15,420 Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$57,963

$39,250

$44,990

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$21,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2011 Ford Fusion

2017 Ford T-350

2016 GMC Sierra 1500

2015 GMC Yukon XL 1500

2013 GMC Yukon

2016 Honda HR-V

Automatic, Just Arrived #M18157A

15 Pass, High Roof, 2 to Choose #B9072

Stock #P06593

SLT, 5.3L V-8, 56K Miles, #79408A

Denali, Loaded #49263-1

$20,097

$26,888

LX, Auto, 14K, Local Trade #V18381A

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$45,250 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$ 9,000 obo

$7,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$32,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

26

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$16,995

$19,990


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 Honda Pilot

2018 Hyundai Santa Fe

2013 Hyunda Sonata

2017 Infiniti QX80

2016 Jeep Cherokee

2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Touring, 4x4, Navigation, Loaded, Very Clean, #42634A

#P06708

SE, Loaded #42545A

$28,969

Liquid Platinum, 5.6L V-8, AWD #P9169

#180621A

$21,583

Limited, 4WD, White, Sunroof #B9042

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

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2005 Honda Pilot

2018 Hyundai Santa Fe

2005 Infiniti G35

2014 Infiniti QX80

2014 Jeep Cherokee

2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee

EX, 4x4, One Owner, Clean Carfax, #42144A

#P06709

Black, Loaded #P6361A

Moonlight White, Theater Package, 5.6L V-8 4x4, #P9166

Limited, Navigation, Sunroof, Leather #49404-1

$8,696

$21,183

LTD, 4WD, Nav, Sunroof, Black, 32K Miles #B9073

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$7,696

$33,963

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2015 Honda Pilot

2017 Hyundai Sonata

2017 Infiniti Q60

2014 Infiniti QX80

2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

EX-L, Sunroof, 4WD, 44xxx Miles, Stk #V18180A

SE #P06617

Premium Coupe, 2.0L I-4 cyl, Hagane Blue #96326L

Theater Package, 5.6L V-8 cyl, 4x4, 48K Miles, #P9201

Laredo, 4x4, M/R, Loaded #33604A

LTD, #P4254

$26,490

$16,584

$33,700

$16,969

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2016 Hyundai Accent

2009 Hyundai Sonata

2017 Infiniti Q70 3.7X

2017 Jaguar F-Pace S

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2017 Jeep Patriot

#170026A

Limited, Auto, Sunroof, 1 Owner #V18142B

Power Moonroof, Majestic White, 3.7L V-8 #96437L

British Racing Green Metallic , 3.0L V-6 Cyl #P9109

Trailhawk, 3.6L V-6 cyl 4x4, 15K Miles, #79406A

Sport 4x4, Stock #P06643

$37,963

$53,000

$37,550

$11,498

$10,569

$7,490

$40,850

$15,900

$28,990

$30,890

$32,000

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Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

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Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2012 Hyundai Genesis

2012 Hyundai Tuscon

2016 Infiniti QX70

2004 Jaguar Vanden

2017 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2016 Jeep Patriot

Coupe, 65K Miles, #L13372

LTD, Loaded! #42189AA

AWD, Sunroof, Leather, 36K Miles #49358-1

White, Loaded, Well Serviced #C8785A

3.6L, V-6, 4x4, Bright White, Limited #12067B

Sport Stk# P06468

$28,900

$7,490

$32,500

Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

$13,855 Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

$9,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

27

RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES

$11,400


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2014 Jeep Patriot Sport

2011 Jeep Wrangler

2013 Kia Soul

2015 Lexus IS

2013 Lincoln MKX

2017 Maserati Levante

Bright White, 85K, New Rear Brakes, Roof Rack #C172181B

Unlimited, Rubicon, 1 Owner, Automatic #M17474B

Hatchback, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, #C8795B

350, F-Sport, AWD, #B9087

Loaded, Very Clean #P6270A

7K Miles, 3.0L V-6, AWD #P9149

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$8,990

$32,990

$16,760

$62,500

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2015 Jeep Wrangler

2011 Jeep Wrangler

2015 Kia Soul

2009 Lexus LS 460

2016 Lincoln MKX

2015 Mazda CX-5

Unlimited, Rubicon, Loaded #P6303

Silver #L14081

Carribean Blue, 40K Miles, Carfax 1 Owner, Fuel Efficient #C180987A

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Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

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2016 Jeep Wrangler

2015 Kia Optima LX

2014 Land Rover

2016 Lexus NX 200t

2013 Lincoln MKX

2016 Mazda CX-5

Unlimited Sahara, 4x4, One Owner Clean Carfax, 4WD, Low Mi. #P9020A

Stk# P06451

Range Rover, 5.0L V8 Supercharged, 4x4, #P9120

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96K Miles, #P42491

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$12,900

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

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Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

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2016 Jeep Wrangler

2011 Kia Sedona LX

2013 Land Rover

2015 Lexus RX350

2013 Lincoln MKZ

2012 Mazda 3

Unlimited, Rubicon, 4x4, Clean Carfax 1 Owner, Firecracker Red, #79310C

White, 125K Miles, 3rd Row Seating, New Arrival #C11569Q

5 Door #191842

$6,991

AWD, Black on Black, Loaded, 28K #B8879

AWD, #P06535

$31,500

Range Rover, SE, 5.0L V-8 cyl, 63K Miles, Firenze Red Metallic #P9203

$30,990

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$17,955

$12,991

$51,500

$55,550

$15,800

$16,999

$14,958

$18,990

$7,955

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2016 Kia Sorento

2016 Lexus GS-F

2016 Lincoln MKC

2017 Lincoln Navigator

2016 Mazda 3

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SX, Navigation, Sunroof, Leather #P3814

20K Miles, Molten Pearl, Loaded #B9059

Premier, Loaded!! #48741-1

Ingot Silver, Bluetooth, Backup Cam, Sunroof, 3rd Row Seating, #P9025

Grand Touring, Auto, Nav, Tech Pkg, Stk #M8949

$40,900

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

$31,000 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$25,900 Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

28

$59,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

RIDES MAGAZINE

$20,888 Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

stltoday.com/RIDES

$18,990


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2017 Mazda Mazda CX-9

2008 Mazda Tribute

2009 Merc Grand Marquis

2006 Nissan Altima S

2014 Nissan Maxima

2016 Nissan Rogue

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#P06693

Stock #P06660

$8,100

$20,500

$16,000

$34,500

$5,225

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Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

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Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

2014 Mazda Mazda3

2017 Mercedes-Benz AMG

2014 Mini Cooper

2017 Nissan Altima SE

2017 Nissan Murano

2013 Nissan Rogue

#P06702

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2012 Mazda Mazda3i

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$9,990

$5,990

#P06710

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$21,967

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Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2013 Mercedes-Benz G63

2011 Mini Cooper "S"

2015 Nissan Altima

2014 Nissan Murano

2008 Nissan Sentra

AMG, Automatic, Black, 25K Miles #P9126

Pano Roof, White, Manual #V17651A

SV #P06692

$17,041

LE, AWD, Nav, Power Roof #B8835

Auto, Great on Gas! #33767A

$12,669

$54,700

$13,490

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

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$7,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

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Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

2002 Mazda Protege

2017 Mercedes-Benz GLS550

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander

2011 Nissan Armada

2003 Nissan Pathfinder

2017 Nissan Titan XD

One Owner, Clean Carfax, 43K Miles #35337A

4MATIC, 4.7L V-8 Cyl, AWD, Black, 45K Miles #28672A

ES Stock #P06685

SL, Stock #180583A

$15,900

Loaded, Very Clean, #42711A

Crew Cab, Magnetic Black, 1K Miles, 5.0L V-8, #96719A

$69,550

$18,400

$4,990 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

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Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

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Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

2004 Mazda RX8

2011 Mercedes-Benz ML350

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander

2017 Nissan Armada

2016 Nissan Rogue

2015 Nissan Titan

55K, 1 Owner, Well Serviced #M9105

Stock #P06184A

#P06688

$10,990

$18,000

SL, AWD, Silver #V18235A

S, Stock #P06621

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$15,485

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

29

RIDES MAGAZINE

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04-13-18

stltoday.com/RIDES

$31,990


PREOWNED VEHICLES 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera

2017 Toyota 4Runner

2015 Toyota Rav-4

2016 Volkswagen CC

2014 Volkswagen Passat

2012 Volvo S60

4S, Cabriolet, White, 3.8L H-6 Cyl, AWD, #79457A

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AWD, XLE, One Owner #P6331A

2.0Turbo Sport, 6K, White #V8362

Stock #P06704

Black, 78K Miles #L14011

$65,500

$35,963

$19,756

$22,990

$14,123

$12,800

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Don Brown Chevrolet (866) 883-8841

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2015 Porsche Macan

2016 Toyota Avalon

2017 Toyota Rav4

2017 Volkswagen Golf

2013 Volkswagen Passat

2012 Volvo S60

Turbo, 3.6L V-6 Cyl, AWD, Black, 12K Miles #P9116

XLE Stk #P06706

XLE #P3788

Sportwagon, 4K, Auto, Time to Save $ #V8228

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$19,900

Leather, Roof, Red, 65K #P4282

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Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

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Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

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Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

2015 Porsche Panamera 2

2014 Toyota FJ Cruiser AT

2016 Toyota Sequoia

2013 Volkswagen GTI

2011 Volkswagen Tiguan

2017 VW Jetta

Hatchback, AWS, Navigation, Sunroof, Sport Chrono Package #28180A

Black, 4.0L V-6 4x4 #P9155

Platinum, 5.7L V8, 4WD, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, DVD, #28439A

36K, Local Trade, 1 Owner #V17402A

S, 4motion, 80K, Local Trade #M18093A

12xxx Miles, Automatic, One Owner, Stk #V8583

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$13,785

$49,500

$33,500

Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

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Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

2016 Ram Sport

2016 Toyota Highlander

2011 Toyota Sienna XLE

2015 Volkswagen Jetta

2006 Volvo S40

2014 VW Passat

Lifted, Nav, Roof, V8, 39K Miles #B9067

Limited, Navigation, Sunroof, 18K Miles, #P3815

Pre-Dawn Gray Mica, Backup Camera, One Owner #C180117A

S, Clean Carfax, Auto #42574A

2.4I, #P4288

Sport, Stock #P06637

$38,990

$38,900

$12,991

$10,569

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Suntrup Buick GMC 1-877-262-8426

Lou Fusz Chevy (866) 602-1770

Bommarito South 866-721-7269

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

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2013 Toyota 4Runner

2010 Toyota Rav-4

2013 Volkswagen Beetle

2012 Volkswagen Jetta

2013 Volvo S60

2017 VW Tiguan

One Owner Clean Carfax, Limited, Motor Trend Certified #78806A

Black, Loaded, Stock # P6319A

CVT, Manual 40K #192711

2.5L, SE, FWD, Motor Trend Certified #V18123A

T5, Premier, 6 Speed Automatic #C17354B

5K Miles, FWD, Like New, Save, #V8226

$31,100 Bommarito West 1-866-726-4126

$15,825

$8,969 Bommarito South 866-721-7269

30

Suntrup West County Volvo 1-877-557-2352

RIDES MAGAZINE

$11,990

$6,855

$9,490 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

$11,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300

stltoday.com/RIDES

$13,490

$15,900

$21,990 Bommarito St. Peters 636-928-2300


2014 VW PASSAT

2015 MAZDA CX-5

One Owner, Clean Carfax, 44K Miles

$13,465*

STK# P06546

2017 FORD FUSION SE

2016 NISSAN ROGUE Heated Leather, Bluetooth,

Hybrid, One Owner, 34K Miles

Remote Start, 103K Miles,

$15,420*

STK #P06621

2017 FORD ESCAPE SE

2015 BUICK LACROSSE FWD, Leather

Turbocharged, One Owner, 39K Miles

$16,499*

STK #P06600

2015 FORD TAURUS LMTD

2015 CHEVY CAMARO LT

One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, 45K Miles

One Owner Clean Carfax, 75K Miles

$18,458*

STK# P06594

STK# P06627

2015 CHEVY CAMARO LT

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*Tax, Title, License Fees Extra. Photos may not be actual representation.

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RIDES MAGAZINE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

04-13-18

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HWY 40

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

FridaY • 04.13.2018 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

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THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES East-West vulnerable, West deals NORTH ♠10 7 3 ♥K 8 5 ♦A Q J 4 3 ♣8 6 WEST EAST ♠J ♠K 9 8 4 ♥Q J 7 6 4 3 ♥10 ♦9 8 2 ♦6 5 ♣A J 4 ♣K 10 9 7 3 2 SOUTH ♠A Q 6 5 2 ♥A 9 2 ♦K 10 7 ♣Q 5 The bidding: WEST NORTH EAST SOUTH 2♥ Pass Pass 2♠ Pass 3♠ Pass 4♠ All pass Opening lead: Eight of ♦ South escaped the killing heart lead, but the contract was far from cold even with the friendlier diamond lead. There were two probable club losers, so declarer had to hold his trump losers to one. All would be well with a 3-2 trump split and the king onside, plus some other combinations that included a doubleton jack. Declarer gave some thought to possible 4-1 trump splits and what he might be able to do about them. There was no chance if West had four

spades, but what about East? South decided to win the opening diamond lead with dummy’s queen and lead the 10 of spades. This would be the winner should West hold the singleton nine or eight. East would cover the 10, South covering whatever honor East played, and a low spade would be led to dummy’s seven. Dummy would be re-entered later for a finesse through East’s remaining trumps. Although West didn’t have a singleton nine or eight, the lead of the 10 proved to be a winner for an unexpected reason. East covered the 10 of spades! This is not the foolish play it might seem to be. Failing to cover would make the hand a breeze for South if South’s trumps included the ace-queen-jack. East thought he was protecting a trump trick when he covered. It cost a trump trick instead. South won with the ace and led a low spade to dummy’s seven and picked up the trumps just as if West did indeed start with a singleton nine or eight. (04/13/18)

Across 1 Group in the original “Ocean’s 11” 8 Classic arcade game with lots of shooting 14 Like Istanbul 16 Emphatic admission 17 First world capital, alphabetically 18 Like clothes buttons, generally 19 Unexciting poker holding 20 2008 Bond girl Kurylenko 22 Bedevil 23 Car once promoted with the line “The thrill starts with the grille” 25 Speaker units 27 Prefix with -gon

28 Nocturnal acronym 29 Strange things 32 Super 8, e.g. 33 Group of female seals 34 Powerhouse in Olympic weightlifting 36 Gradually 39 Animated character who graduated from Dogwarts University 40 The “R” of 28-Across 41 Circular parts 42 Formidable opponents 44 Campaign aid 47 “The Old Curiosity Shop” girl 49 Touched 50 Rail center?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

If April 13 is your birthday • This year you open up to more spiritual or mystical ideas. You also can be quite imaginative. If you are single, someone from a diferent culture could enter your life. If you are attached, you and your sweetie are so busy that you have to make more time for each other. A fellow Aries is much more impulsive and erratic.

WORD GAME April 13 WORD — PREVIEWS (PREVIEWS: PREE-vyooz: Advance viewings or displays of something to come.) Average mark 30 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 42 or more words in PREVIEWS? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — MASONRY norm anomy mano nosy arms manor ransom army many rayon arson mason roam soar mayor roan sonar moan roman sora moray rosy soya morn yarn nary myna RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

52 Express stress, in a way 54 Gulf of ___ 56 Santa ___, Calif. 57 Juiced (up) 59 Jacob’s partner in “A Christmas Carol” 61 City nicknamed “The Old Pueblo” 62 So-so, as support 63 Acropolis figure 64 Spots

Down 1 One going against the grain? 2 Poem greeting the dawn 3 “What’s past is past,” e.g. 4 Giant competitor 5 Last name of cosmetics giant Mary Kay 6 “See ya” 7 Bad way to go 8 Buffalo’s home: abbr. 9 Has-___ 10 Source of stone used to build the ancient Egyptian pyramids 11 Flag-waving and such

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★ You respond directly to the diferent people and elements of the day. You feel empowered yet sensitive. As a result, you learn to identify with others. Imagine what it is like to walk in someone else’s shoes. Tonight: Don’t hesitate to celebrate. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★ You might be swinging from one extreme to the other. Emphasize what is positive about a situation. You will notice that the attitudes of those involved become more easygoing. Tonight: You make all the diference. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ Your perspective about a certain someone will change. What you felt was a good situation at the beginning of the week could evolve into a power play later on, forcing you to re-examine your involvement with someone. Tonight: Make the most of the moment. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Your ability to see through a problem allows greater lexibility. Your creativity comes up with solutions, but a key person involved might not want to go along with them. Tonight: Let your hair down. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ You could be put of by a demand that a partner makes. You might wonder if you could handle the issue diferently in order to avoid getting into a tense or diicult situation. Consider approaching the matter with a totally new outlook. Tonight: Go for what you want.

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Neville Fogarty and Doug Peterson

12 Musical “girl who cain’t say no” 13 Joe known as “The Comeback Kid” 15 Cause of bad dreams, in modern lingo 21 Follower of bon or mon 24 Show immediately preceding another 26 Scuffle

30 For adults only 31 Specialeducation challenge 33 Bottom line? 35 Tom Sawyer’s half brother 36 Request for food delivery 37 Someone who’s pretty darn good 38 It could be on the tip of your tongue

39 ___ rap 43 More, in México 44 OCD fighter, maybe 45 Put forth 46 Enamors 48 Small slip 51 “___ done now?” 53 Superbright 55 “The Wizard of Oz” farmhand 58 Helicases split it 60 Court divider

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay. No. 0309

WORD SCRIMMAGE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★★ You will want to hop right over a problem and ignore it. Though this might work in the short term, you probably need to ind the appropriate solution eventually. Tonight: As you wish. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★★ You could be too tired for your own good. You have pushed very hard to accomplish a lot; however, you still might feel as if you have the lion’s share of work to do. Tonight: TGIF! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ You could be in a position where you feel as if you must go along with a loved one’s idea. The situation will remain tenuous until you feel assured that you have made the right choice. Tonight: Head home early.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You might have diiculty feeling grounded right now. You might want to consider pulling back and/or trying a diferent approach. Your sense of humor carries you past a limitation or problem. Tonight: Speak your mind. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★ You might want to defer to someone else in order to get a problem resolved quickly. The questions you ask will help you zero in on what needs to change. Honor the feedback you get. Tonight: Where the action is. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ Recognize what a friend might be suggesting, and know the inancial implications involved. This person seems to be an encyclopedia of ideas, as he or she keeps coming up with idea after idea. Tonight: Let the fun and games begin!

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ You could be in the midst of many diferent situations, all of which could be confusing for various reasons. Slow down and accept the fact that there might be an issue that you are trying to avoid. Confusion often prevents you from seeing reality. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

04.13.2018 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Girl partied during a breakup

Dear Unworthy • You are acting like you have something to feel guilty about. You don’t. At the time you visited your college girlfriend, your boyfriend had broken things off with you. You do not owe him an explanation or a confession as long as you haven’t given him an STD. Contact your

physician and be checked to be sure. Dear Abby • I’m vegan and make a point of being polite to servers in restaurants. I carefully describe what I would like to eat from their menu. Although they appear to be attentive, half the time they serve me a meal with an added touch — a scoop of sour cream or sprinkle of cheese on the top. When it happens, is it fair to send the food back to the kitchen? Or is it better to painstakingly scrape the unrequested item off of my dinner? — VEGAN IN THE WEST Dear Vegan • You have every right to send a meal back if it wasn’t prepared the way you requested. You, as the customer, are paying for your food, and you should not have to painstakingly scrape anything of it. Some people with dietary restrictions carry a laminated card with them that lists the foods they cannot eat. It is shown to the chef by the server at the time your order is placed.

Dear Abby • My husband died recently. We didn’t have children. His family keeps contacting me and inviting me to lunch, movies, etc. The problem is, I have nothing in common with them and no longer want to spend time with them. When I make an excuse to politely bow out, they suggest another date. How can I get them to leave me alone? — ENJOYING MY SOLITUDE Dear Solitude • Your former inlaws mean well, and many would consider you fortunate that they try so hard to be supportive and remain close. Keep in mind that you are their last tie to their son. However, because your refusals aren’t getting through, tell them that while you appreciate their gesture, you are not lonely. In fact, you enjoy being “alone with your memories” and you will contact them if you change your mind. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Roof is smaller. 2. Door handle is higher. 3. Case is larger. 4. Tree trunk is thicker. 5. Patch on sleeve is missing. 6. Arm is longer.

Dear Abby • I am a 17-year-old senior and have been dating the same boy for two years. A month ago, he told me he wanted to break up “because he needed some time to figure out what he wanted.” I was devastated but agreed. Two weeks later, he told me he was sorry and he loves me. We are back together now, but the weekend after our breakup, I went to visit a college girlfriend. We went to a party and I ended up having sex with a boy I didn’t even know. I feel guilty and unworthy. What should I do? If I tell my boyfriend, I’m sure I’ll lose him for good. If I don’t tell him, I’ll always worry that he will find out from someone else. — UNWORTHY IN THE MIDWEST

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Take personal number of business card

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • At my company, we have our personal cellphone numbers on our business cards, which is fine. Nowadays it would seem like burying our heads in the sand to pretend that it’s impossible to reach us outside the oice. However, I think it should be an unwritten rule that business acquaintances should only use that number when there’s a time-sensitive issue and they can’t reach me at the oice. The vast majority of people who have my card do treat it that way. However, there are a few who simply call my cell number freely, for reasons that aren’t urgent. Is there a polite way to let people know that for ordinary business, they should really only call me at the oice? Or should I just accept that since I’ve given them my cellphone number, they get to use it? Gentle Reader • How would they

know any better? With the lines blurred between business and social situations and their respective calling cards, callers have no choice but to use the number that they are ofered. Miss Manners recommends that you create new business cards with only your oice phone number listed. Then, if you find yourself with clients who will need more direct access to you, you may invite them to use your mobile telephone number and scribble it in by hand. Dear Miss Manners • When friends or family cancel after accepting an invitation, who bears the burden of rescheduling? A friend canceled plans for lunch at our home — the morning of the lunch. A family we know canceled a long-planned day trip because an event that their child had to attend came up after they accepted our invitation.

Last summer, my brother and his family, who live about two hours away, canceled a holiday-weekend visit to our home — the day before we expected them. I completely understand that life happens, but none of these people suggested an alternative plan when they canceled. I have always thought the burden of rescheduling lies with the canceling party, but since no one has done it, I question my judgment. I also question whether it’s worth reinviting them to new events. Gentle Reader • You may stop issuing invitations to ungracious friends. To family, you may only stop issuing them with enthusiasm. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

4/13/18

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FOX MasterChef: Junior Edition: Room Service; 2 Junior Edition: Tag Team. The cooks run room service at a hotel. (N) (cc)

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Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

Hawaii Five-0 Uranium Blue Bloods Danny and CBS MacGyver A billion4 aire’s son is kidnapped. must be found on an Baez must find a miss(N) (cc) island. (N) ing girl. (N) Dateline NBC (N) (cc) NBC Taken: Password. A 5 bomb goes off in Washington D.C. (N) PBS Washing9 ton Week (N) (cc) CW 11

In Principle Father Brown FlamSoundbreaking MTV (N) (cc) beau is incarcerated for and music videos transmurder. (cc) form music.

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

METV The Andy 24 Griffith Show

The Andy Griffith Show

ABC Once Upon a Time: 30 Chosen. (N) (cc)

Penn & Teller: April Jane The Virgin Jane Fool Us Day Behind-the- and Rafael try to save scenes footage. money. (N) Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.

WKRP in Hogan’s Hogan’s Cincinnati Heroes (cc) Heroes (cc) (cc)

Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (8:01) (N) (cc)

20/20 (9:01) (cc)

ION CSI: Crime Scene Inves- CSI: Crime Scene Inves- CSI: Crime Scene In46 tigation: Big Shots. (cc) tigation: Lab Rats. (cc) vestigation A has-been boxer is killed.

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EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.13.2018

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Cough syrup likely a factor in dementia FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Dear Dr. Roach • My 60-year-old husband is a longtime alcoholic. He is also bipolar. His current drug of choice is cough syrup. He drinks a bottle a day or more of generic cough syrup without alcohol. At age 59, he was diagnosed with early dementia, which I attribute to the cough syrup abuse, as he doesn’t have the other risk factors of age or family history. When he has abstained while in in-patient rehabs, his memory and cognition show marked improvement. He also takes daily thyroxine, lithium, duloxetine, high-dose gabapentin, trazodone, naproxen and famotidine. He gave up alcohol in 1999, after 30-plus years of drinking, by his account. At that time and until a couple of years ago, he was abusing prescription opioids and benzos (sedatives), along with cough syrup at some point. He lost his access to the prescriptions, and now it’s only cough syrup. The dementia symptoms began to appear after that point. He is following with a neurologist who has performed cognitive and memory testing, and said his condition is worsening. I personally witnessed him unable to subtract 7 from 100. There is very little research on the effects of cough syrup abuse, at least that I have been able to find. This may be partly due to the fact that it isn’t widely abused, and generally abusers are teenagers, not senior citizens. — A.S.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Answer • Dextromethorphan, one of the active ingredients in most cough syrups, is well-described as a drug of abuse. It indeed is most commonly used by teens and young adults, and there are medical issues in your husband that make this drug particularly dangerous for him, even potentially life-threatening. DXM is safe and has no psychological efects when taken at the usual doses to suppress cough. However, when large amounts are taken, the effects are dramatic and may resemble intoxication with phencyclidine (PCP, or “angel dust”). These may include hallucinations and psychosis. With chronic use, there are clear reports of progressive cognitive deterioration, exactly as you describe. DXM itself acts on the neurotransmitter serotonin, and when combined with certain other drugs — including the duloxetine, gabapentin and trazodone — can cause serotonin syndrome, which is potentially fatal. Symptoms of serotonin syndrome include muscle stifness or twitching, fever and mental status changes. The cough syrup is at least partially responsible for his dementia, and there is a significant likelihood that he will do himself severe damage with continued use.

INTELLIGENT LIFE • By David Reddick

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics