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U.S. ACCUSES RUSSIA OF COVER-UP IN GAS ATTACK

PUTIN

ASSAD

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s government has shown a ‘clear pattern of deflecting blame’ for its actions and those of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s government, according to U.S. oicials.

BY MISSY RYAN AND GREG JAFFE Washington Post

The administration of President Donald Trump broadened on Tuesday its assault on Russia’s military involvement in Syria, ofering new evidence that U.S. oicials said showed that Moscow’s explanation for a deadly April 4 chemical attack was false. The new details from a declassified U.S. assessment add to tension with Russia just as Secretary of State Rex Tillerson makes his first visit to Moscow and presses the Kremlin to drop its support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. The release of new intelligence findings See RUSSIA • Page A8

KIENER PLAZA’S REOPENING CELEBRATION SET FOR MAY 19

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

BY MIKE FAULK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • All 3½ acres of Kiener Plaza

downtown will reopen May 19 after more than a year of construction and $23 million spent on remodeling. The revamp includes more open space, a grassy concert area west of the Old Courthouse, a large playground and multiple fountains. More than 140 trees were planted in the plaza as part of the project. The plaza has been closed since February 2016.

Gone is the sunken amphitheater on the park’s west end, which held about 500 people. The new concert area on the east end can hold 2,000 to 3,000 people, CityArchRiver spokesman Ryan McClure said. The fountain featuring the “Runner” statue has been made smaller to bring visitors closer to the park’s center rather than the edges, with LED lights added to change colors for special events. On the north side is a gravel-paved shady See KIENER • Page A9

Truman State tackles debate over controversial speaker Robert Spencer Identified by the Southern Poverty Law Center as an extremist and anti-Muslim ‘propagandist’

TODAY

A renovated Kiener Plaza is seen from the Three Sixty Rooftop Bar at the top of Hilton at the Ballpark on Tuesday. The project is part of a $380 million riverfront project to improve the Arch grounds. A playground, broken into three colorful sections, is a major addition to the plaza.

BY ASHLEY JOST St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Truman State University has become this week the latest of a long line of schools to become entangled in an intensifying debate over how students should respond to campus speakers whose views they find

objectionable. In the span of several weeks, protesters at three college campuses — Claremont McKenna College, the University of California, Los Angeles and Middlebury College — have either shut down or severely See SPEAKER • Page A7

Keen on Kiener

Senate advances Uber, Lyft rules, drops ingerprint checks for taxis Under a bill sponsored by Rep. Kirk Mathews, R-Eureka, the companies and their drivers would be exempt from most fees and rules such as those set by the St. Louis Metropolitan Taxicab Commission. Instead they would pay an annual

BY AUSTIN HUGUELET St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • After three years

of trying, the Missouri Senate passed a proposal Tuesday that would give ridehailing companies such as Uber and Lyft long-sought breaks from local regulation.

Spicer apologizes for Hitler comment

See UBER • Page A7

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M 1 WEDNESDAY • 04.12.2017 • A2

Court draws line in the sand on costs TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

William Fleming didn’t go to jail for domestic violence. He went to jail because he was poor. Last week, the Missouri Supreme Court set him free, and in doing so sent a message to judges throughout the state: Missouri has a court costs problem. “This issue has been lurking for a long time,” says public defender Amy Lowe, who works in the appellate division of the state public defender’s oice in St. Louis, and represents Fleming. “I think right now, (because of the court’s decision) we’re going to see people take this seriously for perhaps the first time. People are on notice that the situation of high court costs is a problem and the Supreme Court is paying attention.” Fleming’s court troubles started in July 2008. That’s when he pleaded guilty to two counts of domestic violence in St. Francois County, a rural county about an hour south of St. Louis. Circuit Court Judge Sandra Martinez sentenced Fleming to seven years in

prison but suspended the sentence. He was put on probation for five years with a few stipulations. He had to stay away from the victim in the case. He had to attend an anger management class. He couldn’t be in possession of a “bladed instrument in excess of 4 inches.” And he had to pay his court costs in the next three years. Fleming, who is bipolar, was living on federal disability checks of about $450 a month. His court costs, which included a bill for the time he was in the county jail after being arrested, came in at $4,263.50. Even if he paid 25 percent of his income every month, the bill would remain unpaid in the time allotted. The court record shows Fleming made payments every month, first in $10 installments set up by his probation oicer, then $50 payments requested by the court. He fulfilled the other requirements of his probation, but three years later there was still a balance due. The judge hauled him in and asked if he had paid the court costs in full. Fleming said no. Next stop: Algoa Correctional Center. It is the rural version of the story that brought Ferguson and the municipal courts in north St. Louis County to national attention for preying on poor people in order to fund city operations that have a

tax base that can’t keep up. The Missouri Legislature’s response to the problem was to pass Senate Bill 5 in 2015, a bill that put new limits on the amount of revenue municipalities could collect from traic fines. When the Legislature passed that proposal overwhelmingly — only three senators voted against it — lawmakers referred to the practice of using traic fines to raise money for struggling cities as “taxation by citation.” Now one of those senators, Ed Emery, a Republican from Joplin, wants to repeal the bill just two years later and replace it with one that will actually raise court costs significantly. The proposal hasn’t received a hearing yet, so it’s likely not going anywhere, but in light of the Supreme Court’s decision in the Fleming case, it’s a stark reminder that the battle over court costs has enemies in high places. One of the reasons, Lowe surmises, is that the people often saddled with them, people like William Fleming, aren’t the most sympathetic characters. They have, in most cases, broken the law. They are often poor. They are at the mercy of the court. “My clients can’t complain very much,” Lowe says. “It’s very easy to dehumanize them and use them to raise money for government services.”

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

It’s a problem older than the law itself. Since 2013, Overland Municipal Judge Frank Vatterott has been trying to get the Missouri Supreme Court to remove from municipal court costs a $3 fee to fund sherifs’ retirements. His legal argument goes all the way back to the Magna Carta, the English charter agreed to by King John in 1215 that tamped down a rebellion over high taxes. Article 40 of that document says simply that there will be no sale of justice. In other words, the courts cannot erect financial barriers that keep poor people from having access to the courts. That argument is also at the crux of the Fleming decision, written by Chief Justice Patricia Breckenridge. “If probation is doled out entirely on your ability to pay, then it seems you are discriminating against the poor,” Lowe says. In telling Missouri judges that they cannot send poor people to jail simply because they can’t afford ever-increasing court costs in the state, the Supreme Court stabs at the problem with a double-edged sword. It slices away a source of revenue for cash-strapped cities and counties, but cuts at the court’s own orders that justify the high court costs in the first place. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

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LOTTERY

MOVIE REVIEW

PEOPLE

MULTISTATE GAMES

‘Gifted’ is an engaging, intelligent family ilm

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MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 19-34-35-38-49 Mega ball: 08 Megaplier: 5 Estimated jackpot: $25 million POWERBALL Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $60 million

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STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

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BY CALVIN WILSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mary (McKenna Grace) isn’t the typical first-grader. She can perform complex math calculations in her head, and emotionally she appears to be at least as mature as her dumbfounded teacher, Bonnie (Jenny Slate). It’s an easy call to fast-track Mary to a school for gifted children, but her uncle and guardian, Frank (Chris Evans), disagrees. Frank understands that Mary is a genius, but he worries that singling her out as special might deprive her of a normal life. In his calculus, allowing her to attend an ordinary school is clearly the way to go. But he doesn’t have the last word on Mary’s future. His estranged mother, Evelyn (Lindsay Duncan), insists that her granddaughter has what it takes to be a game-changing figure in the world of mathematics. And if Frank refuses to hand Mary over to her, she’s prepared to take him to court. The ultimatum forces Frank to question his motives. As much as he believes that Mary is better of as she is, he can’t help but wonder if he’s being selfish. And his burgeoning relationship with Bonnie, who believes that Mary belongs in a gifted program, only complicates matters. Unquestionably, Frank loves his niece. But is love enough? “Gifted” is an engaging comedydrama that avoids becoming too much of a tearjerker. Working from a screenplay by Tom Flynn, director Marc Webb (“500 Days of Summer”) elicits strong performances and does a good job of keeping the outcome of the custody battle in doubt. But the film lacks the depth and nuance of the Oscar-win-

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

McKenna Grace and Chris Evans appear in a scene from “Gifted.”

‘GIFTED’ ★★★ out of four Run time • 1:40 Rating • PG-13 Content Thematic elements, language and suggestive material

ning “Kramer vs. Kramer.” Evans, who is best known as the resolutely dependable Captain America in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, brings a different kind of heroism to surrogate dad Frank. Grace delivers a performance that’s refreshingly free of childactor cutesiness. And Slate (“Obvious Child”) lends an appealing quirkiness to her role as romantic interest. “Gifted” is significantly smarter than the usual family film. Calvin Wilson • 314-340-8346 @calvinwilsonstl on Twitter calvinwilson@post-dispatch.com

INSIDE Business .............. A12 Editorial .............. A16 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A16 Obituaries ........... A18 People ................... A2

Mel Gibson, the actor who once drunkenly declared that “the Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world,” has been quietly donating to a project to help Holocaust survivors. Can you believe it? The Oscar-winning film director has been making amends for many ugly things he’s said and done, including his hate-filled rant after a 2006 traic stop in California. “He’s helped many, many people, especially Holocaust survivors,” said film and television director Zane Buzby, founder of the Survivor Mitzvah Project. ‘Daily Show’ comic to host Correspondents Dinner • “Daily Show” correspondent and comic Hasan Minhaj is this year’s host of the White House Correspondents Association Dinner on April 29. Reuters reporter Jef Mason, White House Correspondents Association president, made the announcement Tuesday. “It’s a diferent dinner. President Trump has said that he will not be coming, but we will still be celebrating the First Amendment and the importance of a free press, and Hasan brings all that,” Mason said. “He brings comedy chops but he also brings heart, and I think that we’re going to see that at the dinner.” Trump announced in February that he would not attend. Mason said that the WHCA was not looking for a comedian who would “roast” the president. Minhaj is “involved in actual fake news as a senior correspondent for the ‘Daily Show,’” Mason said.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Musician Herbie Hancock is 77. Musician John Kay is 73. Actor Ed O’Neill is 71. David Letterman is 70. Singer-actor David Cassidy is 67. Actor Andy Garcia is 61. Country singer Vince Gill is 60. Guitarist Will Sergeant is 59. Singer Amy Ray is 53. Actress Shannen Doherty is 46. Bassist Guy Berryman is 39. Actress Claire Danes is 38. Actress Jennifer Morrison is 38. Actor Matt McGorry is 31. From news services

CONTACT US Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... B2 Stocks ................. A13 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A21

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LOCAL

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A3

Student transfer bill, tax credit scholarships advance BY CELESTE BOTT st. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The Mis-

souri Senate has advanced a package of school choice legislation, including a tax credit scholarship program and a resurrected measure modifying a law that allows students in unaccredited schools to transfer to better-performing school districts. Lawmakers have sought to change the state’s transfer statute since 2014, when the Missouri Supreme Court upheld a statute giving thousands of students to the chance to transfer out of unaccredited Normandy and Riverview Gardens districts to higher-performing schools in the St. Louis area. The law requires unaccredited districts to foot the bill for transfer students’ tuition and transportation in the same or an adjoining district, which has drained the home districts’ savings. Legislators have since made several attempts to expand transfer options to nonreligious pri-

vate schools in the hopes of offering students options closer to home. That idea was revived in the bill the Senate debated for several days and passed Monday night. It allows individual schools — not just districts —to be evaluated for accreditation, and gives students in unaccredited schools the option of transferring first to charter or traditional public schools in their district or a nearby district. When those fill up, they’d be able to transfer to private schools. Sen. Scott Sifton, an Afftonarea Democrat who has sponsored previous attempts to reform the transfer law, said the language was “exceptionally similar to legislation this body has put on the governor’s desk twice.” Former Gov. Jay Nixon, also a Democrat, vetoed similar measures in 2014 and 2015, fearing they would drain resources from public schools and arguing that tax dollars shouldn’t go to private institutions.

Sifton contends that even though some districts, such as Riverview Gardens, have regained accreditation, the reform is no less urgent. “The issue is slightly less pressing than it was, because we’ve gotten some good news in our region,” Sifton said. “But the unfortunate reality is, we are going to have other instances in which other districts become unaccredited in different parts of the state, and I’m sorry, but the state of the law is currently woefully ill-equipped to further the interests of both transfer and other students.” The legislation would also offer up to $25 million in tax credits for private donations funneled through education assistance programs, awarded to parents of foster children, children with disabilities and children from military families through a debit account. Families can then spend money on certain approved expenses, including private school tuition.

hird suicide at Truman State in less than a year stirs campus discussion BY ASHLEY JOST st. Louis Post-dispatch

The death of a third Truman State University student in the same fraternity house since August is being investigated as a suicide. The Adair County coroner confirmed the investigation Tuesday. Josh Thomas, 18, of St. Peters, was found in the Alpha Kappa Lambda fraternity house in the early hours of April 6. Two other men, Alex Mullins of the Kansas City area, a junior, and Jake Hughes of Eureka, a sophomore, committed suicide inside the fraternity house within three weeks of each other in August. A visitation for Thomas was held Tuesday at Baue Funeral Home, and another was set for Wednesday, followed by a fu-

neral Mass at 12 p.m. Wednesday at All Saints Catholic Cemetery in St. Peters. Alumni of the Truman State AKL chapter started a GoFundMe page that has raised more than $7,500 in three days for a scholarship through the university in honor of the three lost members. The alumni organizer suggests that his peers not only donate, but reach out to current members and offer their support. In a Facebook post, the Truman State chapter of AKL posted a statement about Thomas’ death, saying that he “didn’t die as a result of hazing, or as a result of the culture and environment of the fraternity, but rather as a result of his mental condition.” His obituary suggests donations be made to the National Alliance on Mental Illness in his honor.

Critics such as Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, expressed fear that the change would “open the door” for vouchers to private schools. Some states including Arizona initially created tax credit scholarship programs limited to special needs students but quickly expanded the law. Similar initiatives throughout the country have held up to court challenges because the state doesn’t directly control how the money is spent — parents do. “I would put some trust in parents that they’re going to do what’s best for their kids,” sponsoring Sen. Andrew Koenig, RManchester, said. Democrats also negotiated an amendment to the bill that would mandate that the program can take effect only when the state fully funds the foundation formula and provides additional money for school transportation. Other senators attached their own education priorities to the bill, including an amendment

DIGEST

Truman State leaders organized events this week to address suicide and mental illness. On Monday, a local speaker addressed his own struggle with suicidal thoughts. Later this week, interactive training will cover the warning signs of suicide and how to respond. On Thursday, the university is offering memorial wristbands for students to wear. Truman also has a free online program called “Ask, Listen, Refer.” In the 2016 Missouri College Health and Behavior Survey — an annual survey state schools encourage students to take to gauge issues such as abuse of alcohol and drugs, as well as mental health — Truman students self-identified as experiencing depression, anxiety and panic attacks at rates higher than the state average.

WASHINGTON, MO. > Restroom petition sparks uproar at high school • A controversy broke out at Washington High School this week around a petition for a transgender student to use a girls’ restroom. On Monday, oicials say a petition was circulating in the school to allow the transgender student, who was born male but identiies as female, access to the girls’ restroom. The controversy was fanned by a TV news report on Monday that featured a diferent student and a few parents expressing concern that the transgender student might use the girls’ restroom. But district policy says transgender students can use only the restroom of the gender listed on their birth certiicate or a unisex facility, of which there are about three or four at the high school, said Washington Superintendent Lori VanLeer. VanLeer said that policy is meant to make sure the district is not discriminating against transgender students and to recognize that other students may feel uncomfortable. The policy was approved by the school board about a year ago.

#

that would allow students who have to travel a significant distance to school to apply for reassignment to a diferent school district, and another to help students in certain districts who read below their grade level. Since assuming oice in January, Gov. Eric Greitens, a Republican, has expressed support for school choice measures including virtual education and education savings accounts. He praised the Senate’s eforts on Twitter Tuesday morning. “Good work done by [Koenig] & MO Senate to put power in the hands of parents with education reform bill last night,” Greitens tweeted. The Senate bill requires one more vote before it can advance to the next chamber. The House debated a similar transfer bill on Tuesday. The Senate bill is HB 313. The House bill is HB 118. Celeste Bott • 573-556-6186 @celestebott on Twitter cbott@post-dispatch.com

“The district seeks to provide all students a safe and tolerant learning environment. This includes an environment free from discrimination and harassment,” the district wrote in a statement. VanLeer said the transgender student told the district that the petition is no longer in circulation. She said the district has been speaking with the student and the student’s parent. (Kristen Taketa) DES PERES > Aldermen move toward restrictions on e-cigarettes, tobacco • Des Peres oicials plan to follow suit with St. Louis County to prohibit the sale or distribution of electronic smoking devices and tobacco products to people under the age of 21. The ban parallels legislation approved by St. Louis County that went into efect in December, said Scott Schaefer, assistant city administrator. This will enable the local police department to handle the prosecution of ofenders locally through the municipal court, instead of the Circuit Court, he said. A current ban prohibits the sale of cigarettes to anyone under the age of 18. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

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LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Family ofers reward in fatal shooting • A $25,000 reward is being ofered for information in the fatal shooting of a St. Louis County man in January. The family of Maulik Patel put up the reward money for information that leads Patel to the arrest and conviction of the killer or killers. In addition to the family’s reward, CrimeStoppers ofers from $2,000 to $5,000 for a tip to the CrimeStoppers hotline that leads to a felony arrest in a homicide. Anyone with information is asked to call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-3718477. Callers can remain anonymous and still claim the reward. Patel, 31, lived in a subdivision near Page Avenue and North Lindbergh Boulevard. He was shot about 10 p.m. Jan. 11 as he was stopped in traic on northbound Goodfellow Boulevard at Interstate 70. He and several other drivers were waiting for the traic light to cycle when several people in another car began shooting at Patel while he was seated in his car, police say. Patel got out of his vehicle and was shot outside his car. Patel was hit multiple times and died at the scene. The suspects were in a newer-model, fourdoor vehicle with tinted windows. Authorities had no description of the suspects. Police have not released a possible motive for the attack. ST. LOUIS > Victim dies months after shooting • A man shot in St. Louis in August has died of his injuries, police said Tuesday. Anton Butts, 19, was shot in the 1000 block of South Tucker Boulevard just after 12:30 a.m. Aug. 26. The shooting was outdoors, but police released no

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Woods of the end of Breezy Point Lane facing west toward Village North Drive on Tuesday in North County. A mushroom hunter found a human skull Monday evening in the woods. Authorities have found further remains.

other details. They had no information on a suspect or suspects. Butts died March 14, and the medical examiner recently ruled he died of the gunshot wounds. The case has been reclassiied as a homicide. He lived in the 9700 block of Calumet Drive in Bellefontaine Neighbors, police said. ST. LOUIS > Death at care center is investigated • St. Louis police are investigating after a man was found dead at an assisted-living center early Tuesday. The man was discovered dead about 2:15 a.m. at Carondelet Retirement Manor, a center primarily for men. The building is at 6811 Michigan Avenue, in the city’s Carondelet neighborhood. Police haven’t released the name of the man, 44. He was found dead in his room. Police said the case was being classiied as a “sudden suspicious death.” They didn’t say what made it suspicious. Police say homicide detectives are handling the investigation, pending results of an autopsy. Police say the man died between 8 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Monday.

police say. The crash was at 1:45 p.m. Monday in the 6100 block of River Des Peres Boulevard. Police say the man, 24, was driving south in a Pontiac Grand Prix at high speeds. He lost control and hit a retaining wall. The vehicle went airborne, police say, and landed on its roof in River Des Peres. The man was thrown from the vehicle. He was in critical and unstable condition at a hospital. His name had not been released. ST. LOUIS > Man dies after shooting • Homicide detectives were called to St. Louis’ Kingsway East neighborhood after a man was fatally shot there Monday. Anthony Jackson, 47, was shot multiple times about 5 p.m. in the 4800 block of St. Louis Avenue, police said. He was taken to a hospital, where he died before midnight Monday. Police say Jackson lived in the 4700 block of St. Louis Avenue. Oicers patrolling in the area heard gunire near St. Louis and Marcus avenues. They found Jackson lying on the pavement, semiconscious. Jackson told police oicers that the person who shot him ran of. Police had no suspects.

ST. LOUIS > Driver badly hurt in crash • A man was critically injured Monday afternoon after crashing his car into the River Des Peres,

KANSAS CITY > Man found with missing girl faces sex charge • A Maryland man arrested with a suburban

Kansas City girl near Wentzville after an Amber Alert was issued Sunday now faces a federal sex charge. William Dela Cruz, 22, was charged in federal court in Kansas City with enticing a minor to engage in illicit sexual activity. Authorities allege the 12-year-old girl said she was in an online relationship with Dela Cruz since November, and Dela Cruz and his brother drove last Thursday from Maryland to pick her up with plans to drive her to Maryland. An Amber Alert was issued Sunday for the girl. She was found safe the same day with Dela Cruz in the Wentzville area. Dela Cruz’s brother hasn’t been charged. ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Mushroom hunter inds skull • A mushroom hunter walking in woods in North County discovered a human skull Monday night, and authorities found more remains when they searched the area Tuesday morning. Police say the body appears to have been there for several months. The mushroom hunter reported inding the skull about 5 p.m. in woods near a retirement community in the 11100 block of Village North Drive. That’s near Christian Hospital, northwest of the interchange between Interstate 270 and Lewis and Clark Boulevard (Highway 367). Authorities said further remains were found in the area, apparently adding up to a single body. St. Louis County police are handling the investigation. Authorities asked anyone with information about the ind to call police at 636529-8210 or CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477. Callers to CrimeStoppers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

3 are charged in thefts from pharmacies, ATMs BY CHRISTINE BYERS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON COUNTY •

Reports of a possible car accident Thursday in Jefferson County led police to three people now under arrest in connection with pharmacy burglaries and ATM thefts across the area. A Missouri Highway Patrol trooper found Vance Shearer, 46, slumped at the wheel of his car along Highway 67 near Highway V, sufering from a possible drug overdose. A trooper searched Shearer’s car and found pill bottles inside containers typically found at a pharmacy, according to Missouri Highway Patrol Sgt. Al Nothum. The trooper remembered two pharmacies had been recently burglarized in Jefferson County and called the Jeferson County Sheriff ’s Department, Nothum said. Deputies then headed to Shearer’s home in the 4400 block of Sunrise School Road. There, authorities say, they found evidence that connected him to the theft of about $32,000 worth of prescription drugs from a De Soto pharmacy. In February and March, thieves also stole about $70,000 worth of drugs from Prescriptions Plus in Festus during two break-ins, said Jefferson County Cpl. Matt Moore. Officers say they also found evidence, including ATM parts, connecting Shearer and his wife, Melissa Shearer, 37, to the thefts and attempted thefts of ATMs in Collinsville, St. Louis and Jeferson County, Moore said. On Friday, the Jefferson County prosecuting attorney charged the Shear-

Vance Shearer

Melissa Shearer

ers with stealing of a controlled substance. Bail was set at $50,000 for each. On Tuesday, Vance Shearer was also charged with three counts of burglary, three counts of stealing and three counts of property damage with an additional bail of $29,000. The Missouri Highway Patrol also has seven counts of possession of a controlled substance and unlawful use of a weapon pending against Vance Shearer for the pill bottles and a gun found in his car. Vance Shearer is a felon. Also Tuesday, Melissa Shearer was charged with two counts of burglary and two counts of stealing with an additional cash bail of $16,000 added. During interviews with the Shearers, Jefferson County police say the couple admitted to using some of the drugs they stole from the pharmacies and selling others, Moore said. Police still are working to determine how many of the hundreds of stolen pills were recovered. Jefferson County deputies also identified a third suspect, John Morris, 56, of Caseyville, who has been charged with two counts of burglary, one count of stealing and one count of property damage for his role in the theft of the ATMs. Collinsville police have arrested Morris for the theft of an ATM there. His bail has been set at $50,000.

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04.12.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A5

LETTER FROM WASHINGTON

In Havana, baseball is a common bond CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HAVANA, CUBA • The

baseball cap did it. In a country where poverty is the norm, where Fidel Castro’s revolution has faded into weathered slogans on broken fences, where curiosity about the United States is in the friendly faces of the people, and where the culture is vibrant but often stuck in the 1950s, the language of baseball transcends. St. Louis baseball fans, you’d be very much at home here. “Ah, Industriales,” says a 30-ish man minus a front tooth, pointing to a freshly purchased blue cap of one of Havana’s two baseball teams. It had been surprisingly difficult to buy an Industriales cap in this uncommercial country. In Cuba, one sees more New York Yankees hats than those of any Cuban team. The young man asks, “de donde eres” — “where are you from?” “Washington, D.C.” “Ah, Nacionales,” he says, grinning and immediately ticking of Nationals players: “Scherzer… Zimmerman… Strasburg... Rendon…” He takes an imaginary swing, a pleasant end to a brief encounter on a gritty Havana street. Reactions in three very different Cuban cities of Santiago, Cienfuegos and Havana, had been friendly but distant. The hat became an invitation to talk the international language of baseball, and many came forward to do so. As relations between the two nations have eased, and more Americans have shown up with currency and curiosity, there is a palpable combination of anticipation and worry about what kind of relationship the new president, Donald Trump, will offer after the warmth of predecessor Barack Obama. A sticker on the window of a ’58 Chevy taxi in Cienfuegos said: “Visit Cuba now — Before the American.” The reference is singular, but the meaning is subtly evasive, with multiple possible interpretations, like Cuba itself. It could mean the neighbor American. Or the rich, transformative American. Or the Ugly American, the one featured in the national revolutionary museum. It blames the CIA for foisting everything from the Bay of Pigs invasion to crop-killing and people-killing diseases on the island. Eugene Burdick’s and William Lederer’s seminal “Ugly American” came out just as Castro was rising to power almost 60 years ago. Which can seem like yesterday in the back seat of a ’50s-era taxi. “Chevy” is the most American word in Cuba, and old-car taxis are everywhere. Hulking, halfcentury-old foreign jobs are occasionally passed of as Cadillacs. But the occasional old Thunderbirds and the more plentiful pre-finned or fully finned Plymouths and Fords and Chevy Bel Airs and Biscaynes are authentic. An hourlong drive through Havana for four people in a 1932 Model A cost about 50 American dollars. Scores of these old, old cars have been brilliantly painted to their original luster, but they hide coughing engines billowing black smoke that make Americans immediately think “EPA.” Soviet cars from prePerestroika are long gone, a subtle but undeniable testament to American manufacturing that you pick up in snippets from the drivers. One Havana taxi driver kept patting his ancient steering wheel and saying with a broad smile, “Chevy, Chevy.” Cuba is a study in the extremes of communism, culture and commercial-

ism. Its magnificent architecture is rarely matched, the grandiose designs of Spanish and French rulers from the age of slavers and conquerors. But much of it is aging and decrepit, still quaint and pleasing, like oncehandsome old people who are way past prime. One of Havana’s finest restaurants is on the roof of a building with breathtaking views of the city, but its lower floors are falling apart or under

half-hearted restoration. Balconies of old Havana buildings with spectacular views of public squares are propped up by ugly braces made of untreated lumber. In other words, it’s a metaphor-rich country. The streets are safe, and pictures of the now-dead Fidel are surprisingly rare. Those of his surviving brother, Raul, are almost nonexistent. Images of Che Guevara are most noticeable, both on T-shirts and buildings.

Che will always be an emotion-evoking figure, especially to CubanAmericans. A retired Miami math teacher named Elena, who left Cuba as a pre-teenager 55 years ago, returned for the first time this spring for an emotional meeting with a half sister she had never met except through furtive Facebook exchanges. To Elena, Che remains a bloody mercenary, an opportunist, and the Cuban revolution led to a sham

government that divided, impoverished and oppressed, and still does. Elena did much soulsearching before returning to the streets she knew as beautiful and vibrant, but now seem left to a benign retro state. She even talked a fellow tourist out of buying a Che T-shirt. The Cuban people are outwardly proud of their country, giving public lip service to the government. But they cordon off whole avenues of talk as some-

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NATION

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

Democrats take Trump’s cue: Let curses ly Politicians may use bolder, blunter terms to connect with voters, but party must focus on issues, some warn BY ALEX ROARTY McClatchy Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON • An old politi-

cal maxim holds that politicians campaign in poetry but govern in prose. But after voters rewarded Donald Trump despite — or perhaps because of — his plain, often expletive-prone rhetoric, Democrats are suddenly quite eager to adopt the language of the nation’s president. From the party’s new chairman to a senator many believe will run for the White House in 2020, Democrats are letting loose four-letter words in public speeches and interviews, causing a small stir, at least in political circles, where swearing in public is usually of limits. “Republicans don’t give a (expletive) about people,” Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez said last month, drawing criticism from GOP officials not only for the sentiment but also for the word he employed to convey it. “If we’re not helping people, we should go the (expletive) home,” said Kirsten Gillibrand, a senator from New York who more than a few Democrats hope will run for president. Her un-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez, seen here in 2014, is among Democrats whose recent public expletives are drawing comment — and perhaps voter attention.

censored declaration appeared in New York Magazine, which quoted her twice more using a curse word. Swear words might not be the stuf to get worked up about in a country grappling with serious problems at home and abroad. But behind the rhetoric is a real struggle for a party still trying to find its way in the aftermath of last year’s electoral catastrophe. In the age of Trump, party strategists wonder, do Democrats need to start talking in bolder,

blunter terms to connect with voters — even if that means occasionally contributing to the swear jar? “It’s always been interesting to have a private conversation where a politician cusses like a sailor, and then you get out in the real world and they’re using words like ‘sugar’ and ‘gee golly,’ ” said John Morgan, a longtime Democratic donor from Florida who is considering entering next year’s governor’s race.

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People instinctively recognize the diference. “It’s just not authentic,” he said. “Most politicians are not authentic, which is why most people don’t like most politicians. They can see right through them.” Morgan is known for his candid manner. In an interview with McClatchy, he casually uttered a trio of on-the-record expletives — and made sure the reporter knew he was speaking on the phone while sitting poolside at his home. Would-be candidates such as Morgan are, if nothing else, primed to resonate with the Democratic base, which has been furious since Trump took oice. Many of the most fervent activists certainly haven’t worried about swear words so far: Madonna, for instance, said in a speech at the Women’s March on Washington in January that detractors of the protest could “buzz of.” Except, of course, she didn’t say “buzz.” The surge in anger has left many of the party’s leaders racing to catch up, hoping to prove they feel the same visceral disgust. It’s why someone such as Perez, who has been on the job less than two months, might

use a swear word — and why he might continue to do so. “What Tom has said over the last few weeks just shows his anger toward this administration and the policies they’re trying to push that will hurt the American people,” said Xochitl Hinojosa, DNC spokeswoman. “What you’re going to see from him in the months and years ahead is that he’s going to continue to speak out and fight for the American people.” Perez has repeated his foulmouthed criticism of Republicans in interviews and statements since, making it something of a catchphrase for the newly minted party leader. “In the age of Trump, you can get away with virtually everything,” said Ed Rendell, a former Democratic governor of Pennsylvania. Rendell and Morgan are united in one belief: However the Democratic Party finds its way back to power, it won’t be because they use bad language. The former Pennsylvania governor said the party should be spending more time talking about the Trump administration’s decision to repeal overtime rules for workers and other matters related to middle-class economics.

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04.12.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

LOCAL

Move pleases ride-hailing services but vexes professionals

School advocates ‘cordial discourse’

UBER • FROM A1

$5,000 fee to the state and conduct their own background checks and vehicle inspections. Uber and Lyft were both elated at the news, calling it a victory for drivers and riders alike. Uber has promised to create 10,000 new jobs if the measure is passed and approved by Gov. Eric Greitens, a Republican. But the commission and taxicab industry have criticized the measure, saying it gives ride-hailing services and part-time drivers an unfair advantage over professionals who drive for a living. Sen. Bob Onder, R-Lake Saint Louis, said he tried his best to even the playing field. Ride-hailing drivers would be required to join taxis in paying the city’s earnings tax and the $4 pickup fees at St. Louis Lambert International Airport. Uber has been accused of dodging both in recent years. The commission could also end extensive fingerprint background checks for taxi drivers, which Uber and Lyft called too onerous for their drivers, and audit the companies’ driver-background checks twice a year, something the House previously granted only to Kansas City. Uber or Lyft would pay up to $5,000 for audit costs and $500 fines if they allowed someone to drive who should have been turned away. But taxicab companies wanted more. They’ve asked throughout the session for the same breaks Uber and Lyft are getting. “We’re not even close to parity,” said Adam McNutt, president of Laclede Cab. “They don’t have to pay license fees and meter inspection fees or have a cap how much they can charge. I’ll still be paying tens of thousands of dollars and have this laundry list of regulations on me.” McNutt conceded that applying the measure’s regulations to taxis would make the taxicab commission unnecessary, but he said treating his company and ride-hailing services equally was the only way to foster fair competition. Commission president Tom Reeves said his organization was still processing the Senate’s move, and he didn’t have an immediate reaction. He did note that the House still needed to approve the Senate’s changes to the measure before it heads to the governor’s desk, though it’s likely the House will move quickly to pass one of House Speaker Todd

Richardson’s chief priorities. Uber has operated its low-cost service, UberX, in St. Louis in defiance of commission regulations since September 2015, so the bill’s final passage won’t be introducing anything new. But for taxi drivers and their companies, Tuesday’s vote confirmed they’ll get little help from the state in turning around falling revenues and declining dispatch calls. McNutt said companies could ask the commission to lower their fees, but his business is one of the larger ones in St. Louis and is partially insulated from ride-hailing competition thanks to contracts to ferry around business executives and take children to school. Raja Awas Naeem, one of the owners of the smaller United Cab, said he and his drivers relied much more on dispatch calls and pickups at hotels and bars. Since Uber’s arrival, calls have been cut nearly in half. “If things keep going like this,” he said, “taxis may go out of business.” The proposal’s passage was delayed for a month because of Sen. Paul Wieland’s concerns about insurance requirements for ride-hailing drivers. After negotiating with Onder, Wieland, R-Imperial, got the bill changed to allow ride-hailing companies to be notified if one of their drivers loses coverage. The company would then revoke that driver’s ability to give rides. Sen. Gina Walsh, D-Bellefontaine Neighbors, cast the sole vote against the proposal, which failed last year after then-Sen. Joe Keaveny, D-St. Louis, and two senators from Kansas City threatened filibusters. Walsh had previously expressed concern that driving taxicabs out of business would leave older people with disabilities or without smartphones out in the cold. The measure also would render a proposed charter amendment in St. Charles County establishing similar rules unnecessary. Uber already is cleared to operate in most of St. Charles County, but the company has held off doing so because the city of St. Charles hasn’t agreed to create different rules for ride-hailing firms than the city applies for taxicabs. Uber wants its service to begin countywide at the same time. Austin Huguelet • 573-556-6184 @ahuguelet on Twitter ahuguelet@post-dispatch.com

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ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

SPEAKER • FROM A1

interrupted speeches by controversial speakers. Critics view the incidents as an assault on academic freedom, often at the expense of those who espouse conservative views. They point to violent protests at the University of California, Berkeley earlier this year as an example of intolerance among some students. Tension at Truman State pales in comparison but nevertheless exists surrounding the appearance scheduled for Thursday by Robert Spencer, an author who runs the conservative website “Jihad Watch.” The Southern Poverty Law Center identifies Spencer as an extremist and anti-Muslim “propagandist.” Some Truman State students have circulated a petition seeking to have the event canceled even as the school looks to use the incident as a teaching moment. It’s all part of the tightrope that experts say schools must walk as they weigh matters of academic freedom against the rights of students to weigh in on hot-button issues, such as race. But in that process, many civil liberty advocates say, schools must respect free speech. “As a general rule, the answer to bad speech is more speech,” said Jefrey Mittman, executive director of ACLU of Missouri.

A NATIONAL TREND The controversy at Truman State flared up when the school’s College Republicans received just over $3,000 from the university’s student-led Funds Allotment Council to bring Spencer to campus. The council is an organization funded by student fees that accepts applications from all other student-led groups on campus for funding for activities such as speakers. Initially, the College Republicans filed an application to bring a different speaker. It’s not clear if students voted to approve the agreement to bring Spencer instead after the other speaker fell through. Robert Shibley, executive director for the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, said he was concerned about the number of schools canceling speeches, and he commended Truman State for not doing so. “The trend we’re seeing is increasing normalcy of the idea of using violence or threats of violence to try to silence a speaker, coupled with universities unwillingness to take steps necessary to speak as planned,” he said. “When you put those two things together, you have a very bad environment for free speech on campus.” Controversial far-right speaker Milo Yiannopoulos, former editor at the conservative website Breitbart, had speeches canceled at the University of California, Berkley, the University of California, Davis and North Dakota State University in recent months. Richard Spencer, another conservative speaker — who is no relation to Robert Spencer — drew protests in December during his

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speech at Texas A&M University. Richard Spencer is considered to be one of the founders of the “alt-right” movement and is often identified as a white supremacist. More recently, a speech by Charles Murray, the controversial author of the book “The Bell Curve,” which links intelligence and race, was prevented from speaking by shouting protesters at Middlebury College. Similar eruptions interrupted remarks in recent days by Heather Mac Donald at Claremont McKenna and UCLA. Mac Donald is the author of the book “The War on Cops.”

‘AN EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE’ Truman State spokesman Travis Miles said the university was hoping to create an essay contest and create “an educational experience” based on Thursday night’s speeches. Spencer speaks in a campus auditorium at 8 p.m. That same evening, at 6:30 p.m., the Muslim Student Association is bringing in Faizan Syed, executive director of the Council on American-Islam Relations in Missouri. Syed is based in St. Louis. In separate statements on Facebook, the College Republicans and Muslim Student Association both called for peaceful dialogue about both speakers Thursday. “We appreciate the solidarity for people who would like to speak against Robert Spencer, but we’d also appreciate it if there won’t be any disruptive protests,” the Muslim Student Association wrote on Facebook. “We do love the support and believe there’s a lot of genuine concern. We’d like to be part of the conversation. So please use your energy wisely. Because we will.” In a Facebook statement, College Republican leaders said “unsafe practices will not be tolerated” at Spencer’s speech. “[The Muslim Student Association has] called for civility and discussion in this issue, and we couldn’t agree more,” the group wrote on Facebook. But not all dialogue has been conciliatory. On Twitter, one student posted about Spencer’s visit. Another student responded, saying “PUNCH! HIS! FACE!” which Spencer wrote about in his blog. Spencer’s writing then generated hostile comments from readers, some of which have been deleted. In individual messages to some students and parents on social media, Truman State leaders made a point of saying Spencer’s speech isn’t sponsored by the university and doesn’t “reflect the values of Truman State University.” “As an institution of higher learning, the University supports the idea of an open dialogue on all topics. This often includes viewpoints many people strongly oppose. Cordial discourse on even the most contentious of topics is a fundamental tenet of a liberal arts education and a hallmark of a free society.” Ashley Jost • 314-340-8169 @ajost on Twitter ajost@post-dispatch.com

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A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

Spicer sorry after Holocaust ‘blunder’ Trump aide, trying to draw contrast to Assad, says Hitler didn’t use chemical weapons BY KEN THOMAS AND JILL COLVIN Associated Press

WASHINGTON • White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer apologized Tuesday for making an “inappropriate and insensitive” comparison to the Holocaust in earlier comments about Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons — remarks that drew instant rebuke from Jewish groups and critics. Spicer said in an interview with CNN that he was trying to make a point about Assad’s use of chemical weapons and gas against his people but “mistakenly made an inappropriate and insensitive reference to the Holocaust, for which there is no comparison. And for that I apologize. It was a mistake to do that.” During the daily White House briefing, Spicer told reporters that Adolf Hitler “didn’t even sink to using chemical weapons.” Critics noted the remark ignored Hitler’s use of gas chambers to exterminate Jews during the Holocaust. It was the second day in a row in which Spicer, President Donald Trump’s main spokesman, appeared to struggle to articulate the president’s foreign policy at a critical time. The White House generated criticism at the start of the year when a statement on international Holocaust Remembrance Day did not make any reference to Jews. In the CNN interview, Spicer said his comments did not reflect Trump’s views. “My comments today did not reflect the president’s, were a distraction from him and frankly were misstated, insensitive and wrong.” He added, “Obviously it was my blunder.” The interview capped several attempts by the White House to clarify Spicer’s statement. During the briefing, Spicer was asked about his initial statement

ASSOCIATED PRESS

White House press secretary Sean Spicer at the daily press brieing at the White House on Tuesday. Spicer was accused of engaging in Holocaust denial by Jewish groups after saying Adolf Hitler had not gassed Jews.

but delivered a garbled defense of his remarks in which he tried to diferentiate between Hitler’s actions and the gas attack on Syrian civilians last week. The attack in northern Syria left nearly 90 people dead, and Turkey’s health minister said tests show sarin gas was used. “I think when you come to sarin gas, there was no, he (Hitler) was not using the gas on his own people the same way that Assad is doing,” Spicer said. “There was clearly ... I understand your point, thank you. There was not ... He brought them into the Holocaust center, I understand that.” The comparison to World War II appeared to be part of a message the administration was trying to deliver as it explains its tactics in Syria. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis noted in a separate briefing that “the intent was

to stop the cycle of violence into an area that even in World War II chemical weapons were not used on battlefields.” After the briefing, Spicer emailed a statement to reporters: “In no way was I trying to lessen the horrendous nature of the Holocaust. I was trying to draw a distinction of the tactic of using airplanes to drop chemical weapons on population centers. Any attack on innocent people is reprehensible and inexcusable.” Democrats and Jewish organizations condemned the comments. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California said in a statement that Spicer was “downplaying the horror of the Holocaust” and should be fired. Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., said on Twitter, “Someone get @PressSec a refresher history course on

Tillerson’s Moscow talks hinge on new U.S. leverage over Syria RUSSIA • FROM A1

reflects a mounting determination by the White House to counter Russia’s explanation for the mass deaths in a rebel-held Syrian town and to justify last week’s decision to launch missile strikes on the air base officials say was used to mount the attack. Senior U.S. officials said that American signals and aerial intelligence, combined with local reporting and samples taken from victims of the incident, showed that a Russian-made, Syrian-piloted SU-22 aircraft had dropped at least one munition carrying the nerve gas sarin on the northwestern town of Khan Sheikhoun. At least 70 people, including numerous children, died from exposure to sarin gas in the attack. The oicials said that nothing from an array of publicly available and intelligence material provided any credence to the alternative account put forward by Syria and Russia, which claimed that routine bombing inadvertently struck an opposition chemical weapons depot. “We are very confident that terrorists or non-state actors did not commit this attack,” said one senior official who, like others, spoke to reporters on condition of anonymity. Oicials said the U.S. government had not yet reached a consensus on whether Russia, whose 2015 entry into the long Syrian conflict provided a lifeline for Assad, knew about the chemical attack ahead of time. But they suggested it was unlikely that Russian troops, stationed at the airbase singled out last week, would have been kept in the dark. “We do think it is a question worth asking the Russians, about how is it possible that their forces were co-located with the forces that planned, prepared and carried out the chemical weapons attack at the same installation and did not have foreknowledge?” another oicial said. The officials blamed the government of Russian President Vladimir Putin for a “clear pattern of deflecting blame” for its actions and those of Assad’s government and for trying to use disinformation to hide Syrian government’s role in what happened. “I think it’s clear that the Russians are trying to cover up what happened there,” the first oicial

Hitler stat #Icantbelievehereallysaidthat.” The New York-based Anne Frank Center for Mutual Respect called on Trump to fire Spicer, saying he denied that Hitler gassed Jews during the Holocaust. Rep. Lee Zeldin, a Jewish Republican from New York, said in a statement that “as far as comments being made and comparisons of various tactics and methods between now and World War II, you can make the comparison a little differently and it would be accurate, but it’s important to clear up that Hitler did in fact use chemical warfare to murder innocent people.” But Matt Brooks, executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition, said that while “using the issue of the Holocaust or Hitler is problematic on many

N. Korea decries U.S. dispatching of carrier as parliament meets BY ERIC TALMADGE Associated Press

PYONGYANG, NORTH KOREA • North Korea’s parlia-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (left) and U.S. Ambassador to Russia John Teft arrive Tuesday at Moscow’s Vnukovo airport.

said. The mounting public criticism of Russia takes place as Tillerson touches down in Moscow for talks with senior Russian officials, potentially including President Vladimir Putin. Signaling a step back from Trump’s earlier suggestions of warmer U.S.-Russia relations, Tillerson issued an ultimatum to Moscow ahead of his trip, asking it to choose between the West on one hand and its alliance with Assad and the Syrian leader’s other key backer, Iran, on the other. The Russian government stepped up its response to events in Syria on Tuesday, as Putin raised questions about the capabilities of U.S. intelligence agencies and asserted that provocateurs were planning to plant chemical materials elsewhere in Syria and blame Assad’s government. For the first time since last week’s attacks, the White House described what it said was the Syrian regime’s motivation for turning to chemical weapons. Though senior U.S. officials declined to say whether they had clear evidence that Assad himself had ordered the attacks, they said that the Syrian military had used the weapons to prevent the loss of a key airfield that was threatened by recent rebel advance on the strategic city of Hama. “They were losing in a particularly important area, and that’s what drove them,” said one of the senior oicials. U.S. intelligence showed that the opposition rebel forces were able to penetrate within a couple of miles of Hama and the key Syrian air base. The base, in

particular, has been critical for launching planes used to fend of rebel attacks throughout central Syria. “So that is an air base that the regime had to calculate that it could not lose,” said a third U.S. oicial. The Assad regime is down to as few as 18,000 soldiers, according to some estimates. U.S. oicials said the chemical weapons attack, launched against civilians in an area that has supported the rebels, were intended to help make up for those personnel deficiencies. Even as the oicials explained the regime’s strategy for using the weapons, they did not discount the possibility of Russian complicity. “We believe there was an operation calculus that the regime and perhaps its Russian advisers went through in terms of the decision making,” the oicial said. He described the use of the weapons as falling within the natural “punch-counterpunch” battle for Hama and the Syrian regime airfield. But the White House’s main focus was not on the Syrian regime but on increasing pressure on the Russians to reduce their support for Assad and the Syrian government. White House officials described their narrative of the attacks as “clear, concise and definitive.” “This is an opportunity for the Russians to choose to stop the disinformation campaign and make the commitment to accept what happened and work forward to eliminate WMDs from Syria all together,” one of the White House oicials said, referring to weapons of mass destruction.

levels,” he believed Spicer had “genuinely and sincerely apologized.” “He’s bent over backward to make clear those views are not his, not what he was trying to say,” Brooks said in a statement, adding, “We accept that and move on.” Spicer’s comments came on the first day of Passover and a day after the White House held a Seder dinner marking the emancipation of the Jewish people, a tradition started during the Obama administration. According to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Nazis experimented with poison gas in late 1939 with the killing of mental patients, which was termed “euthanasia.” Both mobile and stationary gas chambers were later used, with up to 6,000 Jews gassed each day at Auschwitz alone. On Monday, the White House clarified remarks Spicer made from the podium that the use of barrel bombs by Assad’s government might lead to further military action by the United States. In an exchange with reporters, Spicer appeared to draw a new red line for the Trump administration when he told reporters that if a country gases a baby or it puts “a barrel bomb into innocent people, I think you will see a response from this president.” Until Monday the administration had maintained that last week’s airstrikes were in response to the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons against its own citizens. A White House spokesman said later the president retains the option to act if it’s in the national interest. Spicer’s comments came on the first day of Passover and a day after the White House held a Seder dinner marking the emancipation of the Jewish people, a tradition started during the Obama administration.

ment convened Tuesday amid heightened tension on the divided peninsula, with the United States and South Korea conducting their biggest-ever military exercises and the aircraft carrier Carl Vinson heading to the area in a show of American strength. North Korea vowed a tough response to any military moves that might follow the U.S. decision to send the carrier and its battle group to waters off the Korean Peninsula. “We will hold the U.S. wholly accountable for the catastrophic consequences to be entailed by its outrageous actions,” a spokesman for its Foreign Ministry was quoted as saying by the state-run Korean Central News Agency. The statement followed an assertion by U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson that U.S. missile strikes against a Syrian air base in retaliation for a chemical weapons attack carried a message for any nation operating outside of international norms. He didn’t specify North Korea, but the context was clear enough. “If you violate international agreements, if you fail to live up to commitments, if you become a threat to others, at some point a response is likely to be undertaken,” Tillerson told ABC’s “This Week.” In Washington, White House spokesman Sean Spicer said President Donald Trump had been very clear that it was “not tolerable” for North Korea to have nuclear-armed missiles. “The last thing we want to see is a nuclear North Korea that threatens the coast of the United States, or, for that matter, any other country, or any other set of human beings,” Spicer said at the news briefing Tuesday. Trump spoke last week with China’s President Xi Jinping about the “shared national interest” in stopping its close ally, North Korea, from having nuclear capabilities, Spicer said, adding that it would be helpful if China were more outspoken on the matter. “He would welcome Presi-

dent Xi weighing in on this a little bit more,” Spicer said. Earlier Tuesday, Trump also said that he tried to persuade Xi to put pressure on North Korea in exchange for a good trade deal with the U.S. “I explained to the President of China that a trade deal with the U.S. will be far better for them if they solve the North Korean problem!” Trump tweeted. In a second tweet he wrote: “North Korea is looking for trouble. If China decides to help, that would be great. If not, we will solve the problem without them! U.S.A.” North Korea’s parliament, the Supreme People’s Assembly, nominally the highest organ of government, opened Tuesday with the country’s leader, Kim Jong Un, taking the center seat. Foreign media are not allowed to attend parliamentary sessions. Initial reports from state media said the meeting went through domestic issues, with Premier Pak Pong Ju making a speech about the latest five-year economic plan, which was announced last year. Another closely watched category on the oicial agenda is organizational issues, which can mean new appointments to senior positions. The North Korean parliament is often dismissed as rubber stamp because it tends to approve, rather than formulate, policies and laws, but its role is a bit more complex than the facade and spectacle presented to the nation by state-run media. For one thing, the regularity of its meetings — it usually meets once or twice a year — is, in itself, a sign of stability. “The SPA gatherings completely undercut any analysis or prognostications that the country is going to collapse. If they failed to convene an SPA session, that would be an indication that there is a fundamental problem among DPRK elites,” said Michael Madden, editor of the North Korea Leadership Watch website. “If there was an existential problem with the [ruling] Workers’ Party of Korea and the political culture, then they wouldn’t be convening so many people at one time in Pyongyang,” Madden said.


LOCAL

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A9

Kiener Plaza reopening date set; celebration planned

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Laborer Jon Neeley vacuums the entry to an underground fountain access door Tuesday at Kiener Plaza, which will reopen May 19. The plaza’s renovation is part of a $380 million riverfront project to improve the Gateway Arch grounds.

KIENER • FROM A1

picnic and rest area reminiscent of French garden pathways, and much of the park now features marble, granite and concrete pavers. “The only thing that really looks the same is the statue,” McClure said on a tour of the construction site Tuesday. The park was also expanded about 8 feet south toward Market Street,

where a median was removed to prevent the loss of traffic lanes. That stretch of Market Street also now has a 20-foot pedestrian walkway. The project was funded mostly with private money raised by the CityArchRiver Foundation and with about $8.2 million in public money, allocated by the trail-building public agency Great Rivers Greenway. The area remains fenced

off, but the barriers will come down ahead of the May 19 ribbon-cutting at noon, with live music and food trucks. The next day, a Saturday, bands will play and other entertainment will be ofered from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., according to CityArchRiver. McClure said the nonprofit hoped the celebration would be the first of many public events to be scheduled in the plaza year-round. Kiener Plaza

first opened in the 1960s and was expanded west to Seventh Street in the 1980s. The renovation was part of a $380 million improvement of the Gateway Arch grounds and surrounding public spaces. It includes $85 million from Great Rivers Greenway in sales tax revenue generated by Proposition P, which was approved by voters in St. Louis and St. Louis County in 2013.

An additional $69 million for the Arch project comes from other federal, state and local public funding sources such as grants, while $250 million comes from private donations. The entire project is expected to be finished by the end of this year after originally being scheduled for completion in 2015. In March, Great Rivers Greenway allocated an extra $2.8 million to the

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ST. LOUIS > Dispute escalated into shooting, police say • A woman pulled a gun outside an elementary school Monday afternoon after an argument escalated and four people attacked her and her son, 7, police say. The woman ired at one of the attackers, a 16-year-old boy, hitting him in the hip, according to authorities. They said the injury was not life-threatening. The shooting was about 4:15 p.m. outside Froebel Literacy Academy Elementary School, at 3709 Nebraska Avenue. Police had initially described the teen as a victim in the case and the woman as the suspect, but those labels reversed as

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investigators sorted out the shooting. They now say the woman, 27, was with her son in front of the school when an argument broke out between her and four people — two teenage boys, ages 16 and 17, and two women, 35 and 52. It’s not clear what sparked the argument, and police did not say if there was any connection to the school. The four people attacked the woman, punching and kicking her, police say. The woman’s son was also punched by the 35-year-old attacker, according to authorities. The woman told police she feared for her life and pulled out a gun. She ired a shot that hit the 16-year-old. He was taken to a hospital for treatment. The suspects were taken into custody.

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NATION

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Penn State president fed up with Greek life Amid alcohol violations, he threatens to pull the plug BY SUSAN SNYDER Philadelphia Inquirer

Penn State President Eric Barron warned Tuesday that “the end of Greek life at Penn State” was a possibility if students continue to flout rules laid out by the university in the wake of a student’s death at a fraternity house in February. Nine of the university’s 82 fraternities and sororities violated at least one rule during parents’ weekend in early April, Barron said in a blog post, and one fraternity, Sigma Alpha Mu, violated almost every rule, including underage drinking. “Even some parents were visibly intoxicated,” Barron wrote. The information about Sigma Alpha Mu was gathered by unannounced spot-checkers the university has been sending out since instituting the new rules following the death of New Jersey resident Tim Piazza, who was intoxicated and took a fatal fall down stairs at Beta Theta Pi during pledge night, said Lisa Powers, a university spokeswoman. The university in February announced a moratorium on serving alcohol at Greek parties through the end of the semester, but decided to allow

one social event during parents’ weekend where alcohol could be served as long as rules were followed. “Apparently this was a mistake,” Barron wrote. Sigma Alpha Mu was the worst offender, he wrote. “The drinking was excessive and was not restricted to beer and wine,” Barron wrote. “There was no third-party licensed server. The party was open to anyone and people with no formal association roamed freely in and out with access to handles of liquor. Those roaming in and out included some who were underage.” The fraternity faces sanctions, Powers said. “A lot of things are being weighed,” Powers said. “Given they have broken just about every restriction, I’m thinking there’s going to be some very deep conversation about it.” Barron also wrote that a member of Penn State’s Interfraternity Council sent an email to chapter houses advising them to move “the alcohol upstairs” where spot-checkers can’t go. The spot-checkers are restricted to public areas of the house. That council member, whom the university de-

clined to name, also used a derogatory term for women in the communication, Barron wrote. “If new rules can just be ignored, or behavior just goes underground, and if there is no willingness to recognize the adverse impact of excessive drinking, hazing, and sexual assault, then is there any hope?” Barron asked in his post. Dean Vetere, president of the Interfraternity Council, did not respond immediately to an email for comment. Neither did several other members of the council. The university last month announced sweeping new rules for its Greek system, including moving recruitment back to second semester freshman year, reducing the number and size of allowed parties and increased monitoring. The announcement came as authorities continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding Piazza’s death. Members of the fraternity didn’t call for help until the next morning, almost 12 hours after the 19-year-old sophomore engineering major had fallen. Piazza, who suffered a ruptured spleen, collapsed lung and nonrecoverable head injury, died on Feb. 4.

Bentley joins ranks of Alabama governors with legal problems BY TRAVIS M. ANDREWS Washington Post

DIGEST S.C. congressman gets a taste of his own medicine The South Carolina representative who shouted “you lie!” at President Barack Obama during a joint session of Congress was on the receiving end of the same words in his district this week. U.S. Rep. Joe Wilson, a Republican, heard plenty of boos and chants of “you lie” at a town hall meeting Monday in Graniteville, S.C. Many GOP lawmakers have run into protests during similar meetings during the Easter recess. Wilson drew yells from the crowd of about 200 people when he spoke about health care and violence against women. He said he supports local prosecutors in domestic violence cases, but he voted against extending the Violence Against Women Act in 2013.

Alabama Senate votes to allow church to form police department • The Alabama Senate has voted to allow a church to form its own police force. Lawmakers on Tuesday voted 24-4 to allow Briarwood Presbyterian Church in Birmingham to establish a law enforcement department. The church says it needs its own oicers to keep its school as well as its more than 4,000-person congregation safe. The state has given a few private universities the authority to have a police force, but never a church or nonschool entity. Police experts have said such a police department would be unprecedented in the U.S. A similar bill is also scheduled to be debated in the House on Tuesday. California acts to move up presidential primary • California lawmakers and the state’s chief elections oicer announced a new

efort Tuesday to move the state’s 2020 primary up by three months, even giving the governor power to accelerate the timeline in hopes of closely following elections in Iowa and New Hampshire. “A state as populous and diverse as California should not be an afterthought,” Secretary of State Alex Padilla said in a statement supporting Senate Bill 568. The bill’s author, Democratic state Sen. Ricardo Lara, plans to bring the proposal to a state Senate committee hearing next week. It is the second bill introduced in the Legislature this year that would move California’s presidential primary from June to the third Tuesday in March. “By holding our primary earlier, we will ensure that issues important to Californians are prioritized by presidential candidates from all political parties,” Padilla said. From news services

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Former Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley speaks after oicially resigning on Monday in lieu of impeachment.

2003. After leaving office, Siegelman was convicted on charges of bribery, conspiracy and mail fraud for actions that took place during his term as governor. Among other actions, he traded political favors for money and motorcycles. In August 2012, he was sentenced to 78 months in prison.

THE MOST RECENT Bentley’s finishing blow came Monday, when he resigned for using public resources to have and hide an afair with a former top aide. Dubbed the “Luv Guv,” he was caught after tapes emerged featuring him saying things such as, “If

we are going to do what we did the other day, we are going to have to start locking the door.” He also pleaded guilty Monday to two misdemeanor charges. Lt. Gov. Kay Ivey, who was then sworn in as the new governor, inherits a state that’s likely to cast a suspicious eye on its leaders. “Today is both a dark day in Alabama, but yet also it’s one of opportunity,” Ivey, 72, a Republican, said in a brief speech. “I ask for your help and patience as we together steady the Ship of State and improve Alabama’s image.”

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Former Alabama Republican governor Robert Bentley might be surprised to be leaving office in disgrace and with a criminal record, but the state’s residents have seen this before — many times over. Three of the state’s last six governors have been found guilty of various crimes. Only one was eventually pardoned. Among the disgraced governors were: • Harold Guy Hunt, a Baptist preacher, who served from 1987 to 1993. He was the first Alabama governor removed from office after a criminal conviction. Eventually, the governor was indicted on 13 felony counts. Though most charges were dropped, one stuck: Hunt had taken $200,000 from his 1987 inaugural fund to purchase a riding lawn mower, a cow and a marble shower for his home, among other things. In April 1993, Hunt was convicted on a felony charge of violating a state ethics law and removed from oice. • Don Siegelman, who served from 1999 to

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04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A11

United CEO calls incident ‘truly horriic’ Airline will review policies for seeking volunteers to give up seats, and for handling oversold lights BY DON BABWIN associated Press

CHICAGO • After people

were horrified by video of a passenger getting dragged off a full United Express flight by airport police, the head of United’s parent company said the airline was reaching out to the man to “resolve this situation.” Hours later on Monday, his tone turned more defensive. He described the man as “disruptive and belligerent.” By Tuesday, almost two days after the Sunday evening confrontation in Chicago, CEO Oscar Munoz issued his most contrite apology yet as details emerged about the man seen on cellphone videos recorded by other passengers at O’Hare Airport. “No one should ever be mistreated this way,” Munoz said. The passenger was identified as physician David Dao, 69, of Elizabethtown, Ky., who was convicted more than a decade ago of felony charges involving

his prescribing of drugs and spent years trying to regain his medical license. But while Dao’s history quickly became a focus of attention, there’s no indication that his past influenced how he was treated or that the airline or police were aware of his background. And it’s unlikely that officials would have known anything about him other than basic information such as his name and address, if that. Screaming can be heard on the videos, but nowhere is Dao seen attacking the oicers. In fact, he appears relatively passive both when he was dragged down the aisle of the jet and when he is seen standing in the aisle later saying quietly, “I want to go home, I want to go home.” When cellphone videos taken by other passengers first emerged, they generated widespread sympathy for Dao and sharp criticism of the airline. Munoz’s latest statement described the removal as “truly horrific.” He planned to review poli-

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

An image from a video provided by Audra D. Bridges shows a passenger being removed Sunday from a United Airlines light in Chicago.

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cies for seeking volunteers to give up their seats, for handling oversold flights and for partnering with airport authorities and local law enforcement. The company expected to share results of the review by April 30. An attorney who represents Dao said his client was being treated at a Chicago hospital. Dao’s family is focused only on his medical care and “wants the world to know that they are very appreciative of the outpouring of prayers, concern and support they have received,” attorney Stephen L. Golan said. According to records from the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure, Dao went to medical school at the University of Medicine of Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, graduating in 1974. He was licensed in Kentucky with a specialty in pulmonary disease. His legal troubles started in 2003, when his medical license was suspended after an undercover sting operation at a Louisville, Ky., motel for allegedly writing fraudulent prescriptions. According to the documents, the licensing board had learned that Dao had become sexually interested in a patient and hired the patient as his office manager. That man later said he quit his job because Dao “pursued him aggressively” and arranged to provide him with prescription drugs in exchange for sex. Dao was ultimately convicted in late 2004 of several counts of obtaining drugs by fraud or deceit and was placed on five years of supervised probation and surrendered his medical license. His longtime efort to get his license back finally succeeded in 2015, when the licensing board allowed him to practice medicine again. Airport officials have

said little about Sunday’s events and nothing about Dao’s behavior before he was pulled from the jet that was bound for Louisville. Likewise, the Chicago Aviation Department has said only that one of its employees who removed Dao did not follow proper procedures and has been placed on leave. No passengers on the plane have mentioned that Dao did anything but refuse to leave the plane when he was ordered to do so. Also Tuesday, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel called the altercation “completely unacceptable” and praised Aviation Commissioner Ginger Evans for taking “swift action.” He promised that a city investigation would “ensure nothing like this ever happens again.” The event stemmed from a common air travel issue — a full flight. United was trying to make room for four employees of a partner airline, meaning four people had to get of. At first, the airline asked for volunteers, offering $400 and then when that did not work, $800 to relinquish a seat. When no one voluntarily came forward, United selected four passengers at random. Three people got of the flight, but the fourth, Dao, said he was a doctor and needed to get home to treat patients on Monday. He refused to leave. Three Aviation Department police oicers got on the plane. Two oicers tried to reason with Dao before a third came aboard and pointed at Dao, “basically saying, ‘Sir, you have to get off the plane,’” said Tyler Bridges, a passenger whose wife, Audra D. Bridges, posted a video on Facebook. One of the oicers could be seen grabbing Dao from his window seat, across the armrest and dragging him down the aisle by his arms.

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M 1 WedneSday • 04.12.2017 • a12

Grocery planned for Dogtown Store would be on ground loor of proposed apartment building By JaCOB BaRKeR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Developers of an apartment project in St. Louis’ Dogtown neighborhood say they’re in talks to open a grocery on the ground floor of the proposed building. Pearl Companies of Indianapolis has already won neighborhood backing for the 100-unit apartment building at 6300 Clayton Avenue. Dogtown residents in January voted to support a zoning variance that would allow the five-story structure to be built at the site of a former lumberyard. Materials submitted to the St. Louis Tax Increment Financing Commission don’t identify the grocer but say the retailer is local and negotiations are ongoing. The project would include about 16,000 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor, a retail component residents wanted in a development of the site. They had opposed a prior plan four years ago. The developers say the gro-

Money would pay for system upgrades By BRyCe GRay St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Dogtown residents in January voted to support a zoning variance that would allow a 100-unit apartment building at 6300 Clayton Avenue, the site of a former lumberyard.

cery would occupy all of that ground-level space, according to documents submitted to the city. The company is seeking $3.8 million in TIF assistance for the $25.6 million project. That is just less than 15 percent of the project costs, the unoicial St. Louis ceiling for TIF assistance. TIF diverts increases in property and sales taxes to developers for use as project costs. The St. Louis TIF Commission is

scheduled to hear a developer presentation at 8 a.m. Wednesday at 1520 Market Street and set a full public hearing for May 31. The project also calls for 127 underground parking spaces for residents. Almost 90 of the 100 apartments would be onebedrooms or studios, with the remainder slated as two-bedroom apartments. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

New Luxco tequila distillery nearly ready By JaCOB BaRKeR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Liquor distributor and producer Luxco is finishing up a new tequila distillery with partner Destiladora González González outside the town of Arandas in central Mexico. Luxco, based in downtown St. Louis, is partnering with the González family on the new eight-acre DGL Destiladores (Destiladora González Luxco) distillery. “We are thrilled to once again join forces with the González family, our longtime tequila partners on this distillery, and continue servicing our collective need for high-quality, 100 per-

Laclede Gas iles for rate increase

cent agave tequila,” Luxco Chairman and CEO Donn Lux said in a statement. “Luxco has seen incredible growth in our tequila portfolio, especially in the Exotico and El Mayor brands, and this new distillery will allow us to further expand our production and enhance the brands.” Luxco works with the González family to grow and source the blue agave used in its tequila production. The new facility will employ 35 people and have cooking capacity for 60 tons of agave. “Our partnership with Luxco extends decades, and we are pleased to continue to share our legacy and tequila-crafting skills at DGL,” said Rodolfo González,

master distiller at Destiladora González González. Privately held Luxco is headquartered in downtown St. Louis and has a bottling and blending facility in south St. Louis. Luxco also is leasing a majority of the former Hostess Brands plant in north St. Louis, where its distribution was moved from Hazelwood last year. The company is also building a new bourbon distillery in Kentucky that is expected to be complete this year. Last year, it acquired Veev Spirits, a fast-growing vodka alternative. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Laclede Gas Co. is asking state regulators to approve a rate increase which it says would raise the average residential bill by $3.70 a month. The request — the St. Louisbased utility’s first push for a rate hike in four years — would provide an additional $29 million in revenue annually to pay for system upgrades and maintenance. Swapping out old, metal pipeline for polyethylene replacements is one of the main eforts outlined in the company’s plan. “A lot of what we’re talking about is pipeline upgrades,” said Laclede Gas CEO Steve Lindsey, who said many of the existing pipes are 50 to 100 years old. “They’re fairly expensive to maintain,” Lindsey said of the steel and cast-iron pipes. “A lot of these investments will lower our operating costs going forward.” Laclede has replaced more than 310 miles of pipeline over the last four years. Lindsey said the company has a little more than 600 miles of pipeline in the area that it still aims to upgrade — a goal he says is less than 15 years from completion. The company’s last request for a rate increase was filed in December 2012 and finalized in July 2013. In that case, the utility sought a revenue hike of $58.4 million, according to Kevin Kelly, the public information administrator for the PSC. Eventually, however, Laclede and the PSC agreed to a smaller increase of $14.8 million — an amount that was already being collected through an Infrastructure System Replacement Surcharge, but was made into a permanent part of customer base rates. Laclede representatives said

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that even if their new request goes through in full, customers will still be paying lower bills on average than 10 years ago, thanks largely to a roughly 40 percent decrease in the price of natural gas over that interval. Lindsey also said recent acquisitions by Laclede’s parent company, Spire, have helped cut operating costs. The PSC has 11 months to review rate changes requested by utilities and will likely establish a timeline for parties — including consumer advocates — to become involved in the process “within a couple weeks,” according to Kelly. “The rate request that the company is seeking seems unusually large and we will scrutinize it and do our due diligence,” said Geof Marke, an economist for the state Office of Public Counsel, which acts on behalf of consumers on utility issues. Last year, the office filed a complaint accusing Laclede of overearning. The OPC later withdrew the complaint in anticipation of the utility’s next rate case, which it said would be a more appropriate forum to address those concerns. Marke said the new rate request “mirrors” several bills in the Missouri Legislature, including measures that seek to modify ratemaking policies for gas companies or change rates applied to commercial and industrial users. He says the legislation does not allow for as critical of a look at the utility, compared to the PSC review process. “The end result is there’s less scrutiny involved because there’s less time to do an audit and properly look at the books,” Marke said. Public comment on Laclede’s rate case, Kelly said, can be submitted to the PSC right away. “We’ll also typically hold public hearings,” he said.

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MARKET WATCH

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A13

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS The major U.S. stock indexes barely budged Tuesday on another day of mostly light trading ahead of the Easter holiday weekend. Technology stocks declined, while real estate companies rose. Oil prices recovered after an early slide. Small-company stocks rose.

Supervalu

$4.5

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

United Continental

MTSC

Close: $46.70 -7.10 or -13.2% The maker of mechanical testing systems gave disappointing earnings and sales forecasts for the year. $60

Close: $4.00 0.21 or 5.5% The grocery store chain said it will buy grocery distributor Unified Grocers for $375 million.

55

75

10

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8

3.0

45

65

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F M 52-week range

20,700

Close: 20,651.30 Change: -6.72 (flat)

F M 52-week range

A $59.57

21,000

S&P 500

2,360

Close: 2,353.78 Change: -3.38 (-0.1%)

CHICAGO BOT

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

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A

NYSE

NASD

3,032 2,677 1820 1121 90 11

1,740 1,560 1561 1218 64 38

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

HIGH 20660.03 9142.52 701.54 11474.67 5878.94 2355.08 1719.99 24559.69 1377.22

366.50 939.25 433.25

-.50 -2.50 +4.50

CLOSE

CHG

2,200

Hogs

137.17 123.25 62.65 15.14 260.60

+1.87 +2.15 -.67 +.04 +.40

Copper

2,000

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CHG

May 17 May 17 Jul 17

75.01 140.20 28.82

-.14 +.35 +.32

NEW YORK

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Crude oil

May 17 May 17 May 17 May 17

53.40 1.7577 165.06 3.150

+.32 -.0004 +.33 -.088

Cotton

A

Coffee

StocksRecap Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

F

May 17 May 17 May 17 DATE

ICE

J

CHG

Apr 17 Apr 17 Apr 17 Apr 17 Apr 17

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D

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CHICAGO MERC

2,100

LOW 20512.56 9031.83 695.74 11393.38 5819.29 2337.25 1700.55 24379.35 1360.53

CLOSE 20651.30 9135.58 700.34 11473.62 5866.77 2353.78 1719.85 24559.69 1376.95

CHG. -6.72 -43.12 -0.18 +9.28 -14.16 -3.38 +9.48 -0.90 +9.87

%CHG. WK -0.03% t -0.47% s -0.03% s +0.08% s -0.24% t -0.14% t +0.55% s ...% t +0.72% s

MO QTR t s s s s s s s s s t s s s t s s s

YTD +4.50% +1.01% +6.17% +3.77% +8.98% +5.13% +3.57% +4.84% +1.46%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

52-WK LO HI

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR

AT&T Inc Aegion Corp Amdocs Ameren Corp American Railcar ABInBev Arch Coal Avadel Pharma Bank of America Belden Inc Boeing Build-A-Bear Wkshp Caleres Inc. Cass Info. Systems Centene Corp. Charter Citigroup Commerce Banc. Edgewell Emerson Energizer Holdings Enterprise Financial Esco Technologies Express Scripts Foresight Energy FutureFuel General Motors Home Depot Huttig Building Prod

T 36.10 43.89 40.31 -.07 -0.2 -5.2 +9.9 16 1.96 Isle of Capri AEGN 17.18 26.68 23.24 +.10 +0.4 -1.9 +13.8 26 ... LMI Aerospace DOX 54.12 62.65 61.17 +.08 +0.1 +5.0 +6.6 17 0.88f Lee Ent AEE 46.29 56.57 54.79 +.08 +0.1 +4.4 +15.7 20 1.76f Lowes ARII 35.43 51.10 43.42 -.20 -0.5 -4.1 +13.8 12 1.60 Mallinckrodt plc BUD 98.28 136.08 110.04 -.63 -0.6 +4.4 -5.7 3.19e MasterCard ARCH 59.05 86.47 74.01 -1.85 -2.4 -5.2 ... dd ... McDonald’s AVDL 8.61 15.45 9.75 -.29 -2.9 -6.2 -15.3 dd ... Monsanto Co BAC 12.05 25.80 22.92 -.10 -0.4 +3.7 +80.9 18 0.30f Olin BDC 54.97 81.33 67.48 +.74 +1.1 -9.7 +8.4 13 0.20 Panera Bread BA 122.35 185.71 178.57 +1.01 +0.6 +14.7 +42.5 21 5.68f Peabody Energy BBW 8.05 15.85 9.00 -.05 -0.6 -34.5 -26.7 29 ... Peak Resorts CAL 21.27 36.61 25.81 +.30 +1.2 -21.4 +2.1 13 0.28 Perficient CASS 46.06 74.83 64.27 +1.04 +1.6 -12.6 +30.3 30 0.92 Post Holdings CNC 50.00 75.57 72.20 +.43 +0.6 +27.8 +17.8 17 ... ReinsGrp CHTR 214.06 341.50 332.30 +.93 +0.3 +15.4 +47.9 21 ... Reliv C 38.31 62.53 59.03 -.25 -0.4 -0.7 +47.8 12 0.64 Spire Inc CBSH 41.43 60.61 54.97 +.17 +0.3 -4.9 +34.6 20 0.90b Stifel Financial EPC 69.63 88.00 70.85 -1.22 -1.7 -2.9 -11.6 27 ... EMR 48.45 64.36 59.73 +.11 +0.2 +7.1 +14.3 23 1.92 Supervalu Inc. ENR 41.62 58.21 57.80 +.01 ... +29.6 +35.6 22 1.10 Target Corp. EFSC 25.04 46.25 42.00 +.50 +1.2 -2.3 +64.4 18 0.44 UPS B ESE 37.32 58.95 58.55 +.55 +0.9 +3.4 +53.7 35 0.32 US Bancorp ESRX 63.22 80.02 66.77 -.13 -0.2 -2.9 -4.6 11 ... US Steel FELP 1.34 8.33 5.88 -.16 -2.6 -9.1+395.1 dd 0.68m Verizon FF 9.77 16.58 14.60 +.41 +2.9 +5.0 +63.1 11 0.24a WalMart GM 27.34 38.55 33.92 -.05 -0.1 -2.6 +20.8 6 1.52 Walgreen Boots HD 119.20 150.15 148.20 -.01 ... +10.5 +13.1 23 3.56f Wells Fargo HBP 3.83 9.02 8.12 ... ... +22.8 +91.1 6 ... World Point Term.

TKR

52-WK LO HI

ISLE

13.99 7.01

26.89 26.85 +.39 +1.5 13.94 13.79 3.92

+8.7 +84.4 17

... ...

2.55 +.05 +2.0 -12.1 +47.1

LEE

1.74 64.87

84.00 82.41

MNK

41.57

85.83 43.62 -1.20 -2.7 -12.4 -29.2

MA

86.65 113.50 112.11

-.01

7

...

... +15.9 +11.6 20

1.40 ...

-.21 -0.2

+8.6 +20.6 32

0.88

110.33 131.96 131.20 +1.22 +0.9

+7.8 +4.4 24

3.76

MON

88.04 116.56 116.00 +.07 +0.1 +10.3 +36.3 21

OLN

18.24

33.88 30.89

-.37 -1.2 +20.6 +87.7 48

PNRA 185.69 313.48 313.82 +.52 +0.2 +53.0 +49.4 51 BTU

27.01

SKIS

2.78

28.62 27.49 6.20

-.49 -1.8

5.75

...

-0.2

...

...

2.16 0.80

+3.6 +79.9 dd

0.28

14.15

22.66 17.17 +.15 +0.9

-1.8 -15.7 25

...

68.76

89.00 88.31

+9.9 +26.6 48

...

90.17 132.79 125.81 3.84

55.37

-.10 -0.1 -.41 -0.3

... +36.4 14 1.64f

5.68 +.18 +3.3 +22.4 +2.0

...

SR

59.54

71.21 68.75

-.05 -0.1

+6.5 +5.7 20

SF

28.49

56.62 47.65

-.01

-4.6 +73.4 18

TGT UPS

Toshiba’s future uncertain amid heavy losses • Toshiba Corp., whose U.S. nuclear unit Westinghouse Electric Co. has iled for bankruptcy protection, raised doubts Tuesday about its ability to survive as a company. In an unaudited inancial report, Toshiba projected a 1.01 trillion yen ($9.2 billion) loss for the iscal year that ended in March, a igure that ballooned from the 390 billion yen loss forecast in February because of the troubles at Westinghouse. Four nuclear reactors Westinghouse is helping to build in South Carolina and Georgia are behind schedule and billions of dollars over budget. Toshiba said its recent inancial losses have reduced its assets, resulting in downgrades by credit rating agencies and a breach in the terms of some loans. In addition, the Tokyo company said it counts on a special construction business license from the Japanese government and warned that a renewal after this year depends on meeting certain inancial criteria. Thus, Toshiba said, “there are material events and conditions that raise the substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.” Gymboree reportedly preparing bankruptcy iling • Children’s clothing retailer Gymboree Corp. is preparing to ile for bankruptcy as it faces a June 1 interest payment on its debt, Bloomberg reported Tuesday, citing people with knowledge of the matter. The Bain Capital-controlled retailer is seeking to reorganize its debt load and may transfer control to its lenders, including Searchlight Capital and Brigade Capital Management, Bloomberg said. Representatives for Bain, Gymboree, Brigade and Searchlight declined to comment. Gymboree, laboring under more than $1 billion in debt from its Bain buyout in 2010, warned last month that it’s running short on cash and may not survive if it can’t persuade creditors to reinance its debt. The retailer, which operates about 1,300 stores, including four in the St. Louis area, hasn’t posted an annual proit since 2011, with losses totaling more than $800 million.

Openings rose, hiring slipped in February • U.S. job openings rose to a seven-month high in February while the pace of hiring slipped, pointing to a growing skills mismatch and a further tightening of labor market conditions. Job openings, a measure of labor demand, increased 118,000 to a seasonally adjusted 5.7 million, the Labor Department said on Tuesday. That was the highest level since July and lifted the jobs openings rate to 3.8 percent after holding steady at 3.7 percent for four straight months. Hiring, however, slipped to 5.3 million from 5.4 million in January. The hiring rate dipped to 3.6 percent from 3.7 percent the prior month. Altice IPO to fuel growth • Cable operator Altice USA on Tuesday iled for an initial public ofering that seeks to raise $1 billion to $2 billion. Going public will allow Altice’s founder, French billionaire Patrick Drahi, to expand his budding U.S. cable empire by giving Altice USA public stock it can use to help inance more acquisitions. Altice USA became the fourthlargest U.S. cable provider after its parent company acquired Town and Country-based Suddenlink in 2015 and Cablevision the following year. Loews buys packaging company • Loews Corp., a hotel, energy and inancial services conglomerate, said Tuesday it would buy plastic packaging manufacturer Consolidated Container Co. from Bain Capital Private Equity for about $1.2 billion. VW ofers 6-year warranty on SUVs • Volkswagen AG is trying to win back American customers by ofering warranties on its SUVs that it says will be the longest in the United States. The world’s largest automaker said Tuesday it will ofer a six-year, 72,000 mile warranty on its new 2018 Atlas and 2018 Tiguan sport utility vehicles that go on sale later this year. From staf and wire reports

.0657 .7501 .3186 1.2412 .7500 .1448 1.0596 .0155 .2732 .009014 .053550 .0175 .0719 .000875 .9915

CHG

CLOSE

1271.20 18.23 965.90

Gold Silver

+20.10 +.34 +28.40

3.20 52.72

5.90

...

4.00 +.21 +5.5 -14.3 -29.8

84.14 53.71

100.05 120.44 105.75

...

-.08 -0.1 -25.6 -30.6 11

2.40

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.82 .94 1.05 1.24 1.84 2.32 2.93

+0.02 ... ... -0.04 -0.06 -0.04 -0.06

.21 .32 .50 .70 1.15 1.73 2.56

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

.88 .38 .38

AP Muni Bond Idx

2.48 -0.04

...

Barclays Glob Agg Bd

1.62

...

Barclays USAggregate

2.60 -0.01 2.12

Barclays US High Yield 5.78

...

... 8.07

Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.91 -0.02 3.61

Barclays US Corp

3.31 -0.02 3.15

10-Yr. TIPS

.37 -0.04

.14

GlobalMarkets

-7.8 +5.1 18 3.32f

USB

38.48

56.61 50.89 +.11 +0.2

-0.9 +31.7 16

1.12

INDEX

X

12.77

41.83 34.72 +.96 +2.8

+5.2+105.7 dd

0.20 2.31

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

VZ

46.01

56.95 48.70 +.16 +0.3

-8.8

WMT

62.72

75.19 73.43 +.37 +0.5

+6.2 +10.3 16 2.04f

WBA

75.74

88.00 82.68 +.17 +0.2

-0.1 +3.2 18

1.50

WFC

43.55

59.99 54.16

-.38 -0.7

-1.7 +19.1 13

1.52

WPT

14.25

17.90 16.90

-.14 -0.8

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The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 2.32 percent on Tuesday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

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300 luxury apartments are proposed for Shiloh Site would be along Cross Street and Scott Parkway extension BY MARK SCHLINKMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

SHILOH • A $35 million luxury

apartment complex with more than 300 units has been proposed for a 26-acre site along Cross Street and the planned extension of Frank Scott Parkway. If Shiloh village oicials approve a needed rezoning, the developer — Crevo Capital of Edwardsville — hopes to begin construction this fall. The first units could be ready for occupancy in early 2019. The apartments, which would be situated near a current lake on the vacant tract, may be built in phases, depending on market demand. Corey Wenzel, Crevo Capital’s president, said in a release that the complex could be attractive to people who now commute to the area from Missouri. “Some who work in the Metro East are commuting

The Savannah, a luxury apartment complex proposed for Shiloh. The $35 million, 300-unit-plus project still needs rezoning approval.

from St. Louis because they haven’t been able to find the type of environment here that we’ll soon be able to offer,” he said. Developers also hope to attract tenants associated with nearby Memorial Hospital East and the U.S. Transportation Command at Scott Air Force Base. The development would

include a health club and an indoor-outdoor community lounge with event space that would extend over the lake from the shoreline. The complex would offer units of one, two or three bedrooms, with some larger than 1,500 square feet. Mark Schlinkmann • 314-340-8265 @mschlinkmann on Twitter mschlinkmann@post-dispatch.com

Holten Meat workers approve contract BY BRYCE GRAY st. Louis Post-dispatch

Union workers at Holten Meat voted Tuesday morning to end a strike that lasted more than three weeks. The vote to approve a new three-year contract passed 125-2, according to Collin Reischman, communications director for Local 655 of the United Food and Commercial Workers, which represents the Sauget facility’s workforce. Employees were expected to return to work Wednesday. Reischman said the company presented the union with a con-

tract on Monday, after all-day negotiations with federal labor mediators. “That ofer addressed all our concerns,” Reischman said. “We essentially got two concessions to the workers on the issues that were most important to them.” Those “concessions,” he said, were contractual assurances that job openings will be given to the most senior employee who bids for them, and that workers will be guaranteed one weekend of each month during the plant’s peak season, when it shifts to a six-day weekly production schedule. Those issues, and not a wage dispute, were

cited as the main reasons for the strike, which began on March 18. The strike was the first in the approximately 30-year period that the plant’s workers have been represented by the union, according to Reischman. Moving forward, Reischman said the union is confident that it will have “a new relationship” with Holten, and that it will form a joint labor management committee with the company. “They don’t want to get that far apart again,” Reischman said. Holten Meat representatives could not be reached for comment.


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

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WORLD

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A15

DIGEST

Canadian judge denies bail to alleged Yahoo hacker

U.N. warns of starvation in East Africa, Yemen The U.N.’s refugee agency says the risk of mass deaths from starvation is growing in parts of east Africa, Yemen and Nigeria due to a combination of conlict, drought and a shortfall in humanitarian aid funding to help beleaguered populations cope. UNHCR says some 20 million people, more than one-ifth of them refugees, live in areas afected by drought. The agency is raising its projections for displacement from South Sudan and Somalia. Spokesman Adrian Edwards cited a “particularly pernicious combination” of factors in the areas, pointing to the “world’s biggest humanitarian crisis” in Yemen, conlicts in South Sudan and Somalia, and violence and instability caused by radical group Boko Haram in Nigeria and the Lake Chad basin. UNHCR said 7 million people in northern Nigeria are struggling with food insecurity.

Suspect has means, incentive to lee and ‘can ply his trade from anywhere’ BY ROB GILLIES associated Press

HAMILTON, ONTARIO • A

judge denied bail Tuesday to a Canadian man accused in a massive hacking of Yahoo emails, arguing he had the means and incentive to flee. Karim Baratov, 22, has alleged ties to Russian agents and access to significant amounts of cash, making him a serious flight risk if freed on bail, a prosecutor said. Baratov was arrested last month and faces extradition to the U.S. He was indicted in the United States for computer hacking along with three other people, including two alleged Russian intelligence agents. Justice Alan Whitten denied bail in a written decision, saying Baratov appeared to be highly skilled at hacking and calling the U.S. case extremely strong. “Baratov is a flight risk. He could instantaneously access the funds,” the judge wrote. “He can ply his trade from anywhere in the world.” Baratov looked at his parents and shrugged as he left the courtroom. U.S. law enforcement oicials call Baratov a “hacker for hire” paid by Russian Federal Security Service members. He has Kazakh origins, arriving in Canada in 2007 and becoming a citizen in 2011. “It would appear that Baratov’s activities were quite the cash cow: a million by age 15 and the array of extremely expensive sports cars,” the judge said in his ruling. “There is the potential for further income. ... Baratov would appear to be a valuable operative for the FSB.” Prosecutor Heather Graham noted earlier that Baratov owned a number of luxury cars and flaunted his lifestyle on social media. She also said he had webmail and PayPal accounts with “large unknown sums of money” accessible anywhere. Graham said police seized about $22,000 ($30,000 Canadian) cash from his home and another $670 ($900 Canadian) from his wallet when he was arrested.

CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP

Amedeo DiCarlo (left), an attorney for Karim Baratov, who is accused in a massive hacking of Yahoo emails, arrives Tuesday at the courthouse in Hamilton, Ontario. A judge has refused bail for Baratov.

She also said there was evidence that Baratov might have been trafficking in identity information. And there are allegations he continued hacking while on vacation in Jamaica. Graham also noted that Baratov faced up to 20 years in a U.S. prison. “The evidence of Mr. Baratov’s connections to Russian oicials exponentially elevate the flight risk in this case,’ Graham said. Baratov’s parents had offered to act as their son’s sureties and ofered their home, but the judge said that they “were obviously prepared to turn a blind eye to” his online activities. Baratov’s attorney, Deepak Paradkar, said the father had agreed to turn of the internet in the family home. The breach at Yahoo affected at least half a billion user accounts, but Paradkar said Baratov was accused of hacking only 80 to 100 accounts. He said the charges against his client had been “inflated” and said Baratov had financed many of his luxury cars. Paradkar maintains an Instagram account under the name “Cocaine Lawyer” and has often used the hashtag #bestcocainelawyer. Baratov’s other attorney, Amedeo DiCarlo, has arrived at the courthouse in a chaufeured Rolls-Royce. In a scheme that prosecutors say blended intelligence gathering with old-fashioned financial greed, the four suspects targeted

the email accounts of Russian and U.S. government officials, Russian journalists and employees of financial services and other private businesses, American oicials said. In some cases using a technique known as “spear-phishing” to dupe Yahoo users into thinking they were receiving legitimate emails, the hackers broke into at least 500 million accounts in search of personal information and financial data such as gift card and credit card numbers, prosecutors said. The case, announced amid continued U.S. intelligence agents’ skepticism of their Russian counterparts, comes as American authorities investigate Russian interference through hacking in the 2016 presidential election. Oicials said those investigations were separate. Alexsey Belan, one of the others accused, is on the list of the FBI’s most wanted cybercriminals and has been indicted multiple times in the United States. It’s not clear whether he or the two other defendants, Dmitry Dokuchaev and Igor Sushchin, will ever step foot in an American courtroom, because there’s no extradition treaty with Russia. The indictment identifies Dokuchaev and Sushchin as oicers of the Russian Federal Security Service, or FSB. Belan and Baratov were paid hackers directed by the FSB to break into the accounts, prosecutors said.

China leads world in executions • China’s use of the death penalty remains shrouded in secrecy and still outpaces the rest of the world combined, even after the nation’s execution rate fell sharply over the past decade, human rights activists said Tuesday. Amnesty International reported 1,032 state-sponsored executions worldwide in 2016, excluding China, where the true number is unknown because the government considers it a state secret. The group said it believes China executed thousands. The human rights group Dui Hua estimates about 2,000 executions took place in China last year, down from 6,500 a decade ago, said the group’s executive director, John Kamm. The tally was based on research into lower-level court cases and contacts with government oicials and Chinese and Western legal scholars, Kamm said. Amnesty said its igure for worldwide executions excluding China represents a 37 percent drop from 2015. The United States recorded 20 executions, its fewest in 25 years, in part because of court rulings and shortages of chemicals used in execution by injection. China’s chief justice, Zhou Qiang, told the national legislature last month that over the past decade, executions were limited to “an extremely small number of criminals for extremely serious ofenses.”

Greece completes airport transfers to German-led consortium • Greece has formally completed the transfer of 14 regional airports to a consortium led by Germany’s Fraport AG, in a privatization that is a key element of the country’s bailout program. The Greek state privatization agency says that under the deal signed Tuesday the consortium has paid a 1.23 billion-euro ($1.3 billion) lump sum. It said additional state revenue from an annual lease and a share in airport earnings will reach a total 10 billion euros ($10.62 billion) over the 40-year concession period. The deal has already been cleared by the European Commission. It had been initially due to come into efect last year. U.N. supports reduction of Haiti peacekeepers • The United Nations’ Security Council is welcoming a call by SecretaryGeneral Antonio Guterres to move to a new type of U.N. presence in Haiti by withdrawing peacekeepers after nearly 13 years and scaling back its $346 million-a-year stabilization mission to focus more on police, human rights and justice. “Haiti is turning the corner after several months of uncertainty and deferrals of electoral timelines,” France’s Deputy Permanent Representative Alexis Lamek said, voicing a point of view shared by most member states who met Tuesday in New York to discuss Guterres’ recommendations. Canadian provinces to oversee marijuana laws • Canada is set to detail its plans for legalized recreational marijuana, with the industry expecting a rush of mergers as companies seek a national footprint amid a patchwork of diferent rules in each province. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government will unveil its proposed law as early as this week but is likely to leave many facets — potentially including distribution and the legal age — up to individual provinces, as recommended by a federal panel. That suggests Canada’s pot market could be similar to its ad-hoc system of restrictions on the sale and shipment of alcohol. The development may spark further consolidation as companies seek to expand their geographic footprint as the shape of the market becomes clear. From news services

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

WEDNESDAy • 04.12.2017 • A16 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER •

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR •

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Scales of justice Missouri’s latest ethical dilemma: high-tech truck-weighing.

W

hat with legislators becoming lobbyists, utility regulators crossing over to become utility executives and gubernatorial aides being rewarded with court appointments, it’s no wonder that less-exalted Missouri state employees look for a soft spot to land, too. As the Post-Dispatch’s Tony Messenger reported last week, the FBI is now poking around in the relatively obscure corner of Missouri government where the trucking industry is regulated. So is state Auditor Nicole Galloway.“Missourians are fed up with the appearance of insider games and political favors in Jefferson City,” Galloway said in a statement Friday. At the center of the storm is an Arizona company called Heavy-vehicle Electronic License Plate — HELP Inc. Founded in the early 1990s, HELP is organized under IRS regulations as a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) charitable organization. It styles itself as a public-private partnership serving the public good by making highways safer. In its 2014 tax filings, it showed revenues of nearly $88 million against expenses of $71.5 million. HELP develops and deploys “intelligent transportation systems” that enable trucks to bypass weigh stations and toll booths. Time is money, and if a truck’s weight can be checked remotely, its driver doesn’t have to idle at roadside checkpoints. HELP isn’t the only company in the ITS business, but it’s the only one allowed to operate in Missouri. That’s what the FBI apparently is interested in. House Bill 306, by state Rep. T.J. Berry, R-Kearney, would

open up the business to other firms. A Canadian firm called Drivewyze had an app-based pilot program in the state for two years, but it claims to have been stymied by the close relationships Missouri regulators had with HELP. Col. Bret Johnson, then-superintendent of the Highway Patrol, and Scott Marion, head of the Motor Carrier Services for MoDOT, were on HELP’s board of directors in 2014, when the Drivewyze pilot program began. In building its business, HELP added public and industry officials from many states to its board. HELP’s tax returns show that they weren’t compensated. However, Johnson now does consulting work for the the company. Jan Skouby, Marion’s predecessor as head of motor carrier services, and former Highway Patrol Maj. Greg Kindle also work for HELP. One issue is the $20 million worth of sensors that HELP set up in Missouri highway rights-of-way. Current state law says only trucks equipped with HELP’s “PrePass” technology can bypass weigh stations. HELP’s status as a tax-exempt “charity” means that technology was developed with a public subsidy. If access to it is proprietary, that’s an issue the IRS may want to look into. In the meantime, public employees shouldn’t be riding shotgun to stifle competition. A job in public service should be an end in itself, not a steppingstone to the next gig.

Re-accommodated United Airlines inds itself in a disaster of its own making.

U

nited Airlines brought itself a world of hurt with its disastrous handling of a seat-shortage problem Sunday that led to an Asian-American passenger being beaten bloody and dragged, apparently unconscious, of a plane by security personnel at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. A potentially costly lawsuit by the passenger is probably the least of United’s worries. The self-inflicted public relations wounds could be catastrophic. The airline’s stock price took a nosedive Tuesday. In China, one of the airline’s major markets, reaction has been volcanic, largely because the abused passenger was reported to be ethnically Chinese. Within 36 hours of Sunday night’s incident, a video of the man being dragged off the Flight 3411 to Louisville, Ky., had been viewed more than 210 million times. Outraged viewers in China called for an international boycott. United claims “This is an to offer more upsetting nonstop flights event to all to China than of us here any other airline. at United. I The airline cannot afford to apologize for put that lucrahaving to retive market in accommodate jeopardy. Deft these handling of this customers.” incident was an United CEO absolute requireOscar Munoz ment. United blew it badly. In a statement, chief executive Oscar Munoz offered an Orwellian apology: “This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United. I apologize for having to reaccommodate these customers.” He revised it Tuesday into a full-throated apology. What’s worse is the reason why the battered passenger and three others were forced off the flight. The airline said it had overbooked — common in air travel — and had offered up to $800 and a free night’s hotel accommodation for passengers willing to give up their seats. None volunteered. In desperation, the airline said four passengers were selected at random by

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS U.S. severely damages its relations with Russia To round acclaim of the political class, the mass media and, sad to say, the Post-Dispatch, President Donald Trump ordered the firing of 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles at a Syrian air base (editorial “Cruise missile diplomacy,” April 9). For what? To punish President Bashar Assad for allegedly attacking Syrian civilians with nerve gas. Why would Assad court world opprobrium and risk American military intervention when the war was turning in his favor with the liberation of Aleppo in December? And didn’t President Trump just state that he was no longer seeking to remove Assad from oice? Certainly Assad did not want to give Trump a reason to change this position. Where is the proof? Syria’s chemical stockpiles had been destroyed or removed after the 2013 release of sarin nerve gas. Russia states that the building struck by the Syrian plane turned out to contain nerve gas stored by the rebels. At this point there is no evidence to the contrary. Russia asked the U.S. to wait until there had been an investigation, but Trump ignored the request, and impulsively ordered the strike without congressional or U.N. authorization. Relentlessly pursuing the policy of regime change, the U.S. has severely damaged its relations with Russia — a country with over a thousand nuclear weapons on alert and a country faced with the everthreatening expansion of NATO on its borders. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists has set the Doomsday Clock at two and onehalf minutes to midnight. We threw away an opportunity for continued cooperation in an area of real national interest. Pity. Raymond F. Buckley Jr. • St. Louis

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This image made from a video provided by Audra D. Bridges shows a passenger being removed Sunday from a United Airlines light in Chicago. Video of police oicers dragging the passenger from an overbooked United Airlines light sparked an uproar.

computer and then ordered off — but not to make room for other paying passengers. It was to clear seats so that four United employees could travel to Louisville as relief crew members for another flight. The airline later acknowledged there was never any overbooking. The airline made a conscious decision to put its own operational priorities ahead of the needs and rights of its paying passengers. No matter how urgent it was for ticketed passengers to get to Louisville, United decided seats for its four employees were more important. Equally incomprehensible was the airline’s decision to board passengers before the overbooking problem had been resolved. It’s far easier to deny entry when passengers are in the waiting area than when they’re already buckled into their seats. Various news reports identified the battered passenger as David Dao, a Louisville physician. Witnesses quoted him as saying that he needed to return to Louisville Sunday night because he had appointments with patients on Monday morning. The Louisville Courier-Journal reports that Dao had been in legal trouble from drug-related offenses more than a decade ago. His past should have no bearing on the appalling way he was treated Sunday night. This is one case where the airline deserves all the rough re-accommodation customers can bestow upon it.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The U.S. destroyer Porter launches a Tomahawk missile on Friday.

U.S. intervention in Middle East won’t help I disagree with the editorial “Cruise missile diplomacy” (April 9) that Donald Trump did the right thing in Syria. What Syrian President Bashar Assad did was horrific, but when has our intervention in the Middle East yielded anything that fostered peace or stability? Both sides will continue to escalate hostilities until all-out war ensues. It’s like poking at a hornet’s nest expecting them to just fly away. When will we ever learn from history that intervention in a country with so many factions never works? I have three nephews in the Air Force, and I lie awake wondering when they’re going to have to be deployed. Everything I feared about Trump is sadly becoming reality. Diane Burkard • Manchester

Charter schools have demonstrated little innovation In the column “Expand school choice to help our students succeed” (April 7), once again Stacy Washington is calling to allow charter schools statewide. She quotes the testimony of Robbyn Wahby, executive director of the Missouri Charter Public School Commission, before Missouri’s House: “Missouri is ready to expand choice and innovation outside the two

urbans.” My question is: What innovation? We know charter schools here in St. Louis have one-third fewer handicapped children, one-fifth the number of homeless children and are free to expel any disruptive students back to conventional public schools. That’s not innovation; that’s selection. We know about 40 percent of the first 39 charter schools in Missouri have closed their doors, and over 60 percent of the current charter children are in charters performing at a level less than the St. Louis Public Schools. That’s not innovation; that’s incompetence. So, charter school proponents, what is the innovation? Is it having only 12 kids in a class like high-performing North Side Community charter school? That’s hardly an innovation; teachers in at-risk schools have been asking for and denied lower class size for decades. Is the answer having half as many minority and free lunch students like City Garden Montessori? Sorry, but that’s against the real public school maxim of taking all children. So, what is this innovation that the best minds in public education don’t know about? Carl Peterson • St. Charles County

Important to uphold the separation of church and state In the letter “Providing religion, moral lessons isn’t the problem with our schools” (April 8), Scott Rakonick asks,“Why is religion in school so bad?” It is of utmost importance that this country upholds the fundamental principle of separation of church and state. It is a deep and abiding practice that has distinguished and guided our nation’s history and place as a world leader. Organizations like Thrive advocate and teach from a specific religious point of view and agenda. The group works to influence students in an institution, public education, that is supported with taxes paid by citizens representing all religious and nonreligious backgrounds. The constitutional principle of church-state separation, a safe haven for all, is the only way to ensure religious freedom for all Americans. It is upheld when any group with a specific religious agenda is prohibited from using the institutions of government to influence citizens. Although public school students may legally pray before or after school with no official sponsor, it is imperative that they are not formally educated or mentored in this manner. Helene J. Sherman • Creve Coeur Board member, St. Louis Chapter of Americans United for Separation of Church and State

Vegetarianism is the compassionate and moral choice Just a big endorsement of the letter by Elaine Livesey-Fassel,“Escaped cattle article offers food for thought on going meatless” (April 7). Kudos to Adam Brewer, who raised the funds to purchase their freedom so they can stay at Gentle Barn animal sanctuary. I hope this fortuitous escape will resonate with all of us to reconsider our unexamined meat-eating habits. Jay Weiner of Gentle Barn is quoted as finding them “clearly frightened, breathing deeply and backed into a corner.” These six symbolize the millions of intelligent animals who feel fear, joy and emotional attachment. Vegetarianism is the compassionate and moral choice — plus you’ll be healthier and probably live longer. William Ash • University City Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN Deputy Editorial Page Editor • khorrigan@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8135

I know that my retirement will make no diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


OTHER VIEWS

04.12.2017 • WEDNESDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

“SLACKER” CONGRESSMEN • We must be thoroughly prepared not only to make our entrance into war efective as a moral influence but to be

ready to meet any foe. The United States are now in the focus of the world’s attention. What we do in action and preparation will have a potent influence. Shall we hearten and strengthen our friends or our enemies? Access the full item at stltoday.com/news/opinion

Public media: A national investment paying local dividends

Sessions, Pepsi choose to be blind

Federal funding provides essential seed money for communities like ours. BY MAXINE K. CLARK

Jef Sessions

Signs of division and disagreement seem to fill the news these days, but at the Nine Network (KETC/Channel 9) we see signs of hope in public media. This small taxpayer investment pays real dividends, creating more than just high-quality television content. Our shared mission is grounded in engagement of our community around the things that matter most, including education, the economy and the arts. I have seen the impact of our mission right here in St. Louis, in the work of American Graduate for example. American Graduate is public media’s commitment to improving Clark outcomes for young people. This national initiative is led by the Nine Network, but it’s our work with more than 70 partners in our region that’s paying dividends for our community and for our young people. Missouri’s high school graduation rate was 87.8 percent for the 2014-2015 school year, up from 81 percent in 2011 when Nine Network began this essential work. According to the Alliance for Excellent Education, Missouri would have added $700 million in tax revenue in 2013 had the high school graduation rate been 90 percent, clear evidence that these investments provide real returns for our community. At the Nine Network, we often hear about the progress being made in more personal terms. Like the case of a South County woman who was sufficiently inspired by our coverage of the state of education in St. Louis to write a $10,000 check to a local scholarship fund. Or that of a dropout recruiter who said his job was preserved by the public school system in part because we’d reported on his efforts. Funding The quality and for public impact of our chilbroadcasting dren’s programming is a drop in is unparalleled. the bucket, A recent survey representing ranks PBS Kids first 0.01 percent among children’s TV networks in of total promoting school expenditures. readiness, and parents credit PBS Kids with their children showing more positive behavior. It makes a particular difference for children in low-income communities who don’t attend or have access to high-quality preschool. Our commitment to children’s programming can be found in our 32.5 hours of programs each day — 8.5 hours per day on Nine PBS and our recently launched Nine PBS Kids, which broadcasts the most trusted children’s programming 24/7 and can be streamed anytime, anywhere on any internet-connected device. Additionally, we receive an average of more than 550,000 visitors to our local PBSKids.org web portal per year, generating more than 1.5 million page views. At a time when funding for music and arts within our schools is being cut, PBS provides access to the most sought-after performances for all Americans in every community — urban, suburban and rural. Across the St. Louis region,the Nine Network produces local programs across broadcast, web and mobile platforms that help our community connect to what matters in our region. Balanced programs like PBS Newshour, informative voter guides for statewide ballots, and broadcasts dedicated to local races, like the St. Louis mayoral forum, are instrumental in combating pervasive fears of “fake news” polluting key local and national issues. And data show that support among Americans for public media is bipartisan. One recent poll by the respected team of Hart Research (Democratic) and American Viewpoint (Republican) shows that more than 7 in 10 voters say public television is a good or excellent value for their tax dollars, on par with investments in highways, roads and bridges. Eighty-three percent of all voters would tell Congress to look for cuts somewhere other than public television. Meanwhile, Rasmussen Reports has revealed that just 21 percent of Americans overall believe federal support for public broadcasting should be discontinued, with Republicans only somewhat higher at 32 percent. In the context of the federal budget, funding for public broadcasting is a drop in the bucket, representing 0.01 percent of total expenditures. Yet this investment provides essential seed money for communities like ours, enabling programs like American Graduate to contribute to improved high school graduation rates and enhance career readiness. PBS stations like the Nine Network exist to educate, inspire and connect our viewers to what ignites the spirit of possibility. In an age of increasing polarization, public media provide rare common ground for people who come from different backgrounds and have varying perspectives. It offers elected leaders an opportunity to engage with the majority of Americans. If our leaders in Washington want to serve their constituents, they will act to protect this fundamental American institution and strengthen it for future generations. Maxine K. Clark is CEO of the Clark-Fox Family Foundation and founder of Build-A-Bear Workshop.

Attorney general shows that protecting black folks from police excesses will not be a priority. LEONARD PITTS Miami Herald

Yes, that Pepsi ad was an insult. But if you think it was the worst insult Black Lives Matter suffered last week, then you weren’t paying attention. Not that the ad wasn’t revolting. Imagine that, three years after the police shooting of a black teenager in Ferguson, Mo., ignited protests by African-Americans sick of seeing their sons and daughters killed without cause or consequence, you turn on the television and see a protest march. Except, it’s a curiously color-coordinated crowd carrying curiously color-coordinated signs that say almost literally nothing.“Join the conversation!?” What does that even mean? Then Kendall Jenner, a junior member of the famously vapid Kardashian clan, joins in. She plucks a Pepsi from a convenient cooler. (Because, yeah, they have Pepsi coolers at all the great protests. If you look closely, you can even see one in footage from the Edmund Pettus Bridge — an Alabama state trooper knocks it over while clubbing an old woman who wants the right to vote. Sigh.) So anyway, Jenner approaches a police line and hands the pop to a cop. He takes a long swig. The crowd cheers. Understanding and tolerance ensue. It was a naked attempt to co-opt the methods and message of Black Lives Matter to sell carbonated sugar water and the internet, predictably, went guano.“If only daddy would have known about the power of #Pepsi,” tweeted Martin Luther King’s daughter, Bernice. Pepsi was forced to yank the ad and apologize. But if many of us were angered and energized by that, comparatively few noticed as, at roughly the same time, Attorney General Jeff Sessions ordered a sweeping review of consent decrees reached by the Obama Department of Justice with police departments around the country.

Pepsi faced a social media backlash over this ad it released April 4.

These decrees are agreements for federally monitored reform of training, policy and procedure of troubled cop shops. They are in effect in 14 cities, including Ferguson and Cleveland. Four other cities — Miami is one — made agreements to reform without federal oversight. In a memo released last week, Sessions worries about tarring police with the actions of a few “bad actors.” Yet DOJ investigations repeatedly found that, far from being isolated events, police abuse — unlawful stops, searches, harassment and beatings targeting African-American citizens — were endemic to the very culture of these departments. They were not flaws in the system. They were the system. Sessions also frets over how consent decrees affect the “morale” of these departments. The morale of AfricanAmerican people goes unmentioned. It is unclear what, if anything, he can do to reverse the agreements. But the very fact that he has placed them under review is an ominous sign that, henceforth, protecting black folks from police excesses will not be

a priority. That sobering truth makes even more jarring the sight of Jenner flouncing up to a cop with a Pepsi in hand. Did the last three years not actually happen? Did the primal scream rising from the streets of Baltimore, Ferguson and Any Black Neighborhood, USA, reach human ears or was it just flung into the indifferent ether? The words of 17th-century theologian Matthew Henry seem apropos: “They know not because they will not understand,” he wrote.“None so blind as those that will not see.” He could have been speaking about Sessions or Pepsi. Once again, in response to black folks’ fears, people choose to be ignorant. They choose to be blind. Now African-Americans must make some choices of their own. Leonard Pitts Jr. lpitts@miamiherald.com Copyright The Miami Herald Distributed by Tribune Content Agency

he struggle to provide the soul for a soulless presidency Trump places an unsettling randomness at the heart of America’s global role. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

In a conversation with an ambassador from Asia a few years ago, I asked why her country was still more favorably disposed to the United States than to a rising China. “Because we know what you believe in,” she responded. Since World War II the United States has operated in the Pacific with a certain set of interests and values. Both, she said, are “less clear” with respect to China. It is predictability that builds and maintains alliances. It is constancy that enforces red lines, allowing others to accurately calculate the limits of American patience. It is vagueness and impulsiveness that invite testing and the possibility of deadly miscalculation. President Trump has now placed his own line in the Syrian sand: At the very least, the Assad regime must not use chemical weapons against civilians in its showdown assault on Idlib. But is this commitment the expression of a set of values with broader implications? Does it reflect an expansive interpretation of America’s global role, including the responsibility to protect civilians when feasible? Or is it the enforcement of a narrow norm against the use of weapons of mass destruction? We have no idea which interpretation is correct, because Trump himself is unlikely to know. Like on health care, he seems to be encountering these issues for the very first time. It is unlikely that he played through the scenarios of humanitarian intervention and regime change during campaign policy briefings with national security experts. Trump’s Steve Bannon-ridden inaugural address claimed that the world’s troubles are not America’s problem. But then there are the “babies” killed by nerve gas. On Syria, Trump’s message has gone from mixed to pureed. Apparently, engagement in Syria is both a stupid move and a moral necessity. On foreign policy, Trump

“Watching them (Kushner and Bannon) work was frankly terrifying. They fear each other, they hate each other, they are paranoid beyond belief, and it doesn’t work.” — A Republican with recent White House interaction

Jared Kushner

Steve Bannon

is ideologically rootless. He seems to have no considered views about the world, just confidence about his own abilities as a leader. And this places an unsettling randomness at the heart of America’s global role. This inconsistency is the most consistent theme of Trump’s young presidency. During the campaign, he opposed entitlement reform, yet his health care bill contained the most fundamental entitlement reform — moving federal Medicaid spending from an open-ended match for state spending to a capped amount per person — that Congress has recently considered. He campaigned as a tribune for the working class, yet his economic approach seems heavily tilted toward the interests of the wealthy. This has been attacked as lying. It also indicates a complete unfamiliarity with the issues and debates at the heart of American politics. He never encountered these matters during previous government service (which he did none of). He was not forced to explain his views during primary or general election debates (a few lines from the

stump speech more than sufficed). Trump was not hiding an inner sophistication. His ignorance was presented as part of an antiestablishment package — as contempt for the quibbles of smaller men. In this context, the current palace intrigue between Bannon and Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner actually matters. This is not the normal circumstance in which a president with developed policy views is influenced at the margins by a diverse group of advisers. What we are seeing is a president without settled or tested policy convictions, influenced by advisers with sharp knives and fundamentally different views of the world. On Breitbart this is described as a conflict between “national populists” and “liberal, NYC Democrats.” It is the high-stakes struggle to provide the soul for a soulless presidency. This inbuilt discord has turned normal West Wing tension into a red-carpeted cage fight. A Republican with recent White House interaction told me: “Watching them work was frankly terrifying. They fear each other, they hate each other, they are paranoid beyond belief, and it doesn’t work.” And it should concern conservatives that neither side in the main White House conflict — ethno-nationalists or moderates related to the president — is actually conservative. It would be better for the Republican Party (and for the world) if the family were to win this contest, as it almost certainly will. That change would make the administration marginally more humane. But it would not, for the most part, be a victory for conservative policy ideas. More importantly: Would this divided, chaotic White House, as it stands, be ready for a major shock such as a terrorist attack or a serious military move by a rival power? There is every reason to think it would not be ready. And that makes a major West Wing personnel shakeup, costing Bannon his role, both likely and desirable. Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

OBITUARIES

Celebrations of Life

Gilley, George Thomas - Ballwin Grose, Charles W. - St. Louis Howey, Charles D. - St. Louis Jordan, Connie Denise - Sullivan Krull, Robert J., Jr. - St. Louis Lewis, Thomas E. Jr. - Elilsville Misuraca, Shirley Ann - St. Louis Thielemann, Karl F. - St. Louis

Blecha, Harry A. - St. Louis Bloom, Bernadine "Bunny" - St. Louis Combs, John Jr. - Arnold De Francesco, Frank J. "Bud" - Ballwin Dueing, Marjorie L. - St. Louis Fischer, Ellis Mark - St. Louis Ford, Jr., Prather A. - St. Charles Frangel, Donald J. - O'Fallon, MO

Blecha, Harry A. passed away Monday April 10, 2017. Loving brother of Robert Blecha and the late Marilyn Dachsteiner; dearest uncle of Christina Ray, Tony Ray, Dominic Ray, Tracey (Diane) Ray, Stacey (Claire) Ray; our dear great uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd., Friday April 14, 9 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Lung Association. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 pm.

De Francesco, Frank J. "Bud" passed away, Monday, April 10, 2017 at the age of 75. Beloved husband of Joan "Wurth" De Francesco for 56 years. D ea r fa t h er of J ea n (David) Van Gels, Denise (D a rl a ) DeFrancesco, and Sandra (Steve) Hattemar. Loving grandfather of Trina (Brett) Arb, Heather (Ben) Van Gels, Sarah Van Gels, Gina Hattemar and great-grandfather of Kayla & Hailey Arb. Beloved brother, uncle, cousin and dear friend of many. Bud attended Beaumont High School and Washington University. He worked for Boeing Aircraft as an Engineer. He was a traveler visiting all 50 states, all the countries and provinces in North, Central and South America and visiting a total of 103 countries. He was an avid bowler his entire life and was inducted into the St. Louis Bowling Hall of Fame in 1998. Services: Visitation Thursday April 13th at 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. at Schrader Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Hollway, Ballwin, MO 63011. Services will be held at 10:00 a.m. Friday April 14. Contributions in his memory can be made to St. John's Church, 15800 Manchester Rd., Ellisville, MO 63011 or to the charity of your choice. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Dueing, Marjorie L. Sat., April 8, 2017. Visitation Fri., April 14, 4-8 p.m. at Collier's Funeral Home. Service Sat., April 15, 10:00 a.m. at Collier's. Interment Zion Cemetery. www.colliersfuneralhome.com

Fischer, Ellis Mark April 10, 2017. Beloved husband of June T. Fischer; dear father and father-in-law of Noah Fischer and Charlie (Tara) Lordo; dear son of the late Irv and late Henrietta Fischer; dear brother and brother-in-law of Kenny (Rachel) Fischer, Gary (Ellen) Fischer and Jeff Fischer; dear grandfather of Connor Lordo; dear son-in-law of Theodore (Evelyn) Tahan; dear brother-in-law of Elaine (Larry) Robertson, Carol (Jim) Moriarity and Ted (Kathy) Tahan; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. Funeral service Friday, April 14, 10:00 a.m. at Central Reform Congregation, 5020 Waterman Ave. Interment at B'nai Amoona Cemetery, University City, MO. Memorial contributions preferred to Lewy Body Dimension Association (www.lbda.org/donate) or to APDA Parkinson's Association, 1415 Elbridge Payne Rd., Suite 150, Chesterfield, MO 63017. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Ford, Jr., Prather A.

Warnecke, Warren W. - St. Louis Warner, Bernice Lillian - St. Louis Will, Edgar W. - St. Charles Yanczer, Joshua David - St. Louis

Lewis, Thomas E. Jr.

Will, Edgar W. of St. Charles, Missouri, passed away Friday, April 7, 2017, at the age of 87. Loving husband of Patricia M. Will; beloved son of the late Wilhelm F. and Elsa Will; devoted father of Richard Will and the late Michael J. Will; dearest father-in-law of Brenda Will; and treasured grandfather of Forrest W o o d w a r d , B e n j a mi n Wil l , C h a n c e W o o d w a r d , B rit n ee Woodward, Presley Will, Kennedy Deville, and Kylie Will; dear brother-in-law of Barbara Will. He was also preceded in death by his siblings, Leroy Will and Dolores Swanson. Ed proudly served as an officer in the U.S. Marines during the Korean War. He retired from Southwestern Bell/ AT&T after more than 35 years as a tax accountant. Services: Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO. Memorial Service on Friday, April 14, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. Burial at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorials to University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Visit Baue.com

Misuraca, Shirley Ann

Thielemann, Karl F. age 82, of Arnold, on Saturday, April 8, 2017. Worked at Prince Gardener. Visitation at Kutis So. Co. (Lemay Ferry), Thurs., April 13, 4-7 p.m. Interment Thayer Cemetery, 1 p.m.

Tracy, Loraine - Palm Beach Gardens, FL VanDerTuin, Andrew - St. Louis

baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Saturday April 8, 2017. Beloved husband of the late Patricia "Patti" Lewis; loving father of Mark Kevin (Pam) Lewis, Matthew Thomas (Carla) Lewis, Thomas E. (Holly) Lewis III, the late Debra Karen Libey and Michael Johnathan Lewis; fatherin-law of Gene Libey; brother of Rev. Leo Lewis; loving grandfather of 7 and great-grandfather of 2; dear uncle, cousin, and friend of many. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Friday, 1:00 p.m. Private interment Holy Cross Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Association. Visitation Friday, 12:00 p.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

(nee Doerrer) Saturday, April 8, 2017. Fortified with the Sacraments Of Holy Mother Church. Loving wife of the late Sam Misuraca. Beloved daughter of the late Henry and Emma Doerrer. Dearest mother of William (Karen), Vincent (Treesa), Thomas, and Mark (Kelly). Dearest mother-in-law of Christine Bloom, Bernadine "Bunny" Misuraca. Loving grandmother of Jami (Geoff), Timothy, April 9, 2017. Candice(Matt), Melinda, William, Mark(Jaime), Samuel (Katie), Beloved wife of the late Bernard D. Bloom for 60 years. Dear and Nicholas. Dear great grandmother of Kayla, Dominick, mother of Scott (Cecilia Morales) Bloom and Cheri (Dr. Ronald) Noah, Macy, Brandon, Landon, Kylie, Henry, and Savannah. Chod. Loving grandmother of Alex, Austin and Clayton Chod. Dearest sister of Laverne Buthe, and the late Dorine Buthe, and Dear sister of Marlene (the late Leonard) Petrofsky and Elaine Emmett Doerrer. Our dear aunt, great aunt, great great aunt, (the late Jerry) Shapiro. Beloved sister-in-law of Anita (Martin) cousin, and friend to many. Malter. Our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral Tuesday, April 18 9:00 a.m. from the Stygar Services: Graveside service Thursday, April 13, 11:00 a.m. at Florissant Funeral Chapel and Cremation Center, 13980 New New Mt. Sinai Cemetery, 8430 Gravois Road. Contributions in Halls Ferry Rd. Florissant to Our Lady Of The Holy Cross Catholic her memory may be made to the Alzheimer's Association, 9370 Church, 8115 Church Rd. Baden for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Olive Blvd., St. Louis, MO, 63132 or to the charity of the donor's Memorial Park Cemetery. Visitation Monday, April 17, 3:00 p.m. choice. A very special thank you to the extraordinary care and until 8:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, Memorial Contributions may loving kindness of the ladies from Elizabeth's Helping Hands be made to Easter Seals or to St. Jude's. Online condolences at and BJC Hospice. www.stygar.com. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

Combs, John Jr.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday April 11, 2017. Beloved husband of the late Helena E. Thielemann (nee Schumacher); loving dad of Robert (Kelley) Thielemann, Helga (Chuck) Hintze and Monika (Jeff) DeRouse; adoring opa of Stephenie, Stephen (Crystal), Rebecca and Matthew; great opa of Austyn, Jayden, Brooklynn, Piper and Arya; dear brother-inlaw, uncle and friend to many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Friday April 14, at 10:30 am. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Memorials to American Cancer Society appreciated. Visitation Thursday, 4-8 pm.

Yanczer, Joshua David Sunday, April 9, 2017. Beloved son of Diane Harris Yanczer and Michael Yanczer; loving brother of Sabrina (Paul) Eakins; dearest gra n d s on of Joyce (the late George) Harris; dear nephew of Paula Harris, Linda Huelsmann, Alison (Marty Hernandez) and Jaclyn Harris and Bob Huels mann; dear uncle of Jaiden Diane and Gianni; dear cousin of Alec, Robby and Darrius; a special friend of Lauren and Rylan; a dear friend to many. Services: Visitation at KUTIS CITY Chapel, 2906 Gravois, on Thursday, April 13 from 4 - 8 p.m. then to The Pilgrim Congregational UCC Church, 826 Union Blvd. 63108 for visitation Friday 10 a.m. until service at 11 a.m. Interment Lakewood Park Cemetery. A free spirit now at peace.

Fraternal Notices Plumbers & Pipefitters Local 562 Please be advised of the death of Edward B. Adkins Jr. 47 Year Member PF/BTJ Retired April 9, 2017 Date of death John J. O'Mara Bus. Mgr. - Michael T. O'Laughlin Asst. Bus. Mgr.- Brian Chumley, Asst. to Bus. Mgr.

In Memoriam

Tracy, Loraine Loraine Doris (Meier) Tracy went home to be with the Lord and her beloved husband, Dan on April 9, 2017, at the age of 95. Daughter of Walter F. Meier and Mildred (nee Kuhn) Meier, she was born and spend most of her life in St. Louis, MO. Sister of Audrey E. M e i t z a n d Gil b ert W. M e i e r (dec'd). Beloved wife of Daniel P. Tracy (dec'd). Dear mother of Deborah Tabor (James), Kevin Tracy (Kathleen), Bryn Tracy (Heather, Sean Tracy (Judy) and Glenys Rebecca Taillon (James). Beloved grandmother, greatgrandmother, aunt, great-aunt, cousin, friend, and sister in Christ. She obtained her Master's Degree in Deaf & Hard of Hearing Education at Washington University and later went to Fontbonne University for continuing Special Education in the late 1960s. She taught at Central Institute for the Deaf and at St. Joseph's Institute for the Deaf. She took great pride in being made a lay nun by the Sisters of Divine Providence through her association with St. Joseph's. In St. Louis she was active for many years at Southampton Presbyterian Church, where she served as a Deacon, Elder and on many committees. Upon moving to Florida in 1999, she became an active member of First Presbyterian Church in North Palm Beach. A memorial service and celebration of Loraine's life will be held on Thursday, May 11th at 1:00pm at First Presbyterian Church in North Palm Beach, 717 Prosperity Farms Road, North Palm Beach, FL 33408. A graveside service will be held on August 4th at 2:15pm at Jefferson Barracks National Military Cemetery in St. Louis County, MO. Donations in her memory can be made to First Presbyterian Church in North Palm Beach or Trustbridge Hospice, 5300 East Ave., West Palm Beach, FL 33407. HOWARD-QUATTLEBAUM FUNERAL, CREMATION and Event Center

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April 12, 2017

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VanDerTuin, Andrew

85, of St. Charles, MO, died on Monday, April 10, 2017. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Frangel, Donald J. Age 84, of O'Fallon, MO, died on Monday, April 10, 2017. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Gilley, George Thomas died peacefully at home surrounded by loved ones. See www.stlouiscremation.com for details.

Andrew (Andy) VanDerTuin died peacefully on April 3, 2017, at the age of 101. He is survived by his children, Andrew Baker VanDerTuin (Connie Van Fleet), Peggy Johnson (Clyde), and Laurie Bunkers (Bill), as well as seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. He is predeceased by his wife of 44 years, Leona (nee Baker) VanDerTuin. Private services will be held. In lieu of flowers, the family requests Memorial Donations to the St. Louis Society for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 8770 Manchester Road, St. Louis, MO 63144, www.slsbvi.org.

REDISCOVER YOUR PAST IN OUR ARCHIVES | STLtoday.com/archives

CREMATION SOCIETY OF Missouri ST LOUIS CREMATION

Warnecke, Warren W.

Grose, Charles W. 98, passed Sat., April 08, 2017. VISITATION: Thurs, 1011 a.m. SERVICE: 11:00 a.m., Thurs, April 13, 2017 at Hutchens Mortuary. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery, Florissant. Memorials to American Heart Association. www.HutchensMortuary.com

Howey, Charles D. Monday, April 10, 2017. Visitation Thurs. April 13, 6-9 p.m., KUTIS SO. CO. Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry with Funeral Fri. 9:30 a.m. Interment J. B. National Cemetery.

Jordan, Connie Denise Monday, April 10, 2017. Visitation Kutis So. Co. Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry, Wed. April 12, 4-8 p.m. Funeral service Thurs. April. 13, 11 a.m. at funeral home. Interment Memorial Park Cemetery.

Krull, Robert J., Jr.

on April 10, 2017. Service 9:30 a.m., Friday, April 14, HEILIGTAG-LANG-FENDLER, 1081 Jeffco, Arnold, MO. Visitation 4-8 p.m., Thursday, April 13.

Warner, Bernice Lillian ( n e e B a s s ) b e l o v e d w ife of Clarence W. Warner; dear daughter of the late Fabian and Edna Bass; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great aunt, great great aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois Rd., Saturday April 15, 9 am until service at 10:30 am. Interment St. Paul Churchyard. In lieu of flowers, contributions to the Alzheimer's Association appreciated.

April 7, 2017. Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON, Thursday, April 13, 4-8 p.m. Funeral at Webster Gardens Lutheran Church, Friday, April 14, 1 p.m. www.kutisfuneralhomes.com “A great soul serves everyone all the time. A great soul never dies. It brings us together again and again.”

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04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

NEWS

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A19

Terrorism trial could unmask NY oicer Attorneys can circulate photo of woman who mixed with Muslims to root out cells BY TOM HAYS associated Press

• For years, a woman named “Mel” mingled with young Muslims in New York, telling them she was a Turkish convert to the faith looking for friends. In reality, she was a New York police oicer. Her true identity and the full nature of her work remain a guarded secret, but, thanks partly to social media, she may be unmasked as part of an upcoming trial of two women accused of plotting a homemade bomb attack. By combing the web, attorneys for the two defendants, Noelle Velentzas and Asia Siddiqui, say they have obtained the agent’s photograph and learned her real name. And in recent weeks, they got a judge’s permission for a plan to circulate her picture at area mosques in order to build a case that their clients were entrapped by someone fishing for harmless people to lure into a phony plot. The defense has an obligation “to investigate the case fully,” defense attorney Charles Swift said, including probing the activities and background of the police department’s mole. That plan has dismayed police oicials, who have been working to scrub any trace of “Mel” from the web. The NYPD’s top counterterrorism oicial, John Miller, said in a court filing that revealing her identity and widely circulating her picture could jeopardize ongoing undercover investigations. The case could provide a rare glimpse into how the police department uses informers and undercover investigators to smoke out Islamic extremists. The tactic has long troubled civil rights groups and was the subject of an Associated Press investigation in 2012 about how the nation’s largest police department systematically catalogued Muslim neighborhoods, infiltrated Muslim student NEW YORK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

In this courtroom sketch, defendants Noelle Velentzas (left) and Asia Siddiqui appear at federal court in New York after they were arrested for plotting to build a homemade bomb and wage jihad in New York City.

groups and put paid informants in mosques. From a law enforcement perspective, the stakes are high for other reasons. Investigators with blown covers are often pulled off the street for good as a precaution. That’s because risks of exposure are real, said a former NYPD undercover in major drug and gun trafficking cases and subject of the recent book “Gunz and God: The Life of an NYPD Undercover” who still uses an alias, Stevie Stryker. “There are people out there who would do anything to take revenge on you,” said Stryker, who testified only when courtrooms were closed to the public. “Protecting your identity goes to

your house. It’s about protecting your wife and family.” Police and prosecutors have revealed in court filings that the undercover agent befriended Velentzas, 29, and Siddiqui, 33, in 2013 and sometimes wore a hidden microphone to record their conversations. On some of those recordings, made in 2014, Velentzas ranted against the United States and praised the Islamic State militant group. Prosecutors said the pair studied bomb-making and shopped for bomb components, eventually purchasing propane gas tanks, fertilizer and a pressure cooker. The undercover oicer played along, prosecutors said, and

talked with them about potential targets. Velentzas, despite taking the woman into her confidence, still had suspicions, prosecutors said in court filings. She used her smartphone to search for the fake name the oicer was using, as well as sites with titles such as “How to Spot Undercover Police” and “Informants, Bombs and Lessons.” It’s unclear how or why the undercover oicer sought to befriend the defendants in the first place. After news reports on their arrests, several students at Brooklyn College took to Facebook to share their suspicions — later confirmed by a professor — that

the same undercover oicer, using the name “Melike Ser” or “Mel,” had been showing up at student political meetings, former organizer Tom DeAngelis said Monday. Other students told the news site Gothamist that she took a public profession of faith and also circulated at Muslim community centers. DeAngelis, 23, who graduated last year, said he had encountered her twice and recalled how she once had an exchange in Turkish with one of his friends. Otherwise, “I didn’t think anything of it,” he said. “She was just there. A lot of us were a little bit naive at that point.” Using news reports and online searches, defense attorneys said they uncovered photos of the woman, her real name, her alma mater and even the names and pictures of some of her close friends. The police department conceded it was aware of two compromising internet posts: one on Facebook by someone who had a photo of the woman and warned she was an undercover officer, and another on a website with a photo of a wedding she attended in her real life. The department took immediate steps to have them removed. U.S. District Judge Sterling Johnson ruled late last month that, though he has concerns about the undercover’s safety, he can’t legally prohibit the defense from using information about her that was found in the public domain. He also rejected prosecutors’ request to close the courtroom to the public if she ends up testifying at trial that hasn’t yet been scheduled. The judge instead came up with another protection he said he considered more appropriate: allowing the undercover officer to wear traditional Muslim dress that covers a woman’s face. DeAngelis doesn’t remember if she was wearing a hijab or some other covering when he met her. Either way, he said knowing now that “Mel” was a police officer “really messes with you.”

Chief Justice Roberts decries ‘partisan hostility’ He tells students: Gorsuch ‘is not a Republican or a Democrat; he’s a member of the Supreme Court’ BY MARY ESCH associated Press

• The “partisan hostility” surrounding the confirmation of Justice Neil Gorsuch is of concern because it could undermine public confidence in the apolitical nature of the judicial system, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts said Tuesday during an appearance at a college in upstate New York. Roberts’ appearance a day after Gorsuch was sworn in by President Donald Trump at the White House was billed as a conversation with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute President Shirley Ann Jackson. Jackson talked with Roberts onstage before about 1,200 students, faculty and guests, some of whom asked him questions. “The Supreme Court currently does operate in a highly political environment, one that some feel has come about because of the refusal of the U.S. Senate to consider Judge Merrick Garland, President Barack

TROY, N.Y.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts, seen here on Feb. 1, said Tuesday that the “partisan hostility” over Justice Neil Gorsuch

Obama’s nominee for the seat that opened up after the death of

Justice Antonin Scalia,” Jackson said.

After most Democrats refused to support Gorsuch, Republicans resorted to using the “nuclear option” to eliminate the 60-vote filibuster threshold for Gorsuch and all future high court nominees. But Roberts said the political turmoil didn’t carry over to the court’s work. “We in the judiciary do not do our business in a partisan, ideological manner,” Roberts said. “The new justice is not a Republican or a Democrat; he’s a member of the Supreme Court. But it’s hard for people to understand that when they see the process that leads up to it.” Of Gorsuch’s nomination and its potential efect on the public, he said: “That partisan hostility is a matter of great concern.” Roberts added that it could undermine the public’s appreciation of the nonpartisan nature of the judicial system. A student asked if the makeup of the court should reflect the diversity of groups in society. “It’s important to have a broad range of different experiences

and interests represented, but it should never get to the position where you have identity politics coming into the court,” Roberts said. “It’s not our job to represent the people of the United States. Our job is to interpret the law to the best of our ability.” Asked how the court maintained an atmosphere of collegiality despite difering opinions on hotly contested issues, Roberts said he strictly enforced rules when the judges dined together. “There’s no talking about business. We talk about books, opera, baseball, children. We get to know each other pretty well,” Roberts said. “We hope we’re serving with Justice Gorsuch for the next 25 years,” Roberts said. “It’s kind of like a marriage. If you’re going to be with someone that long, you can’t have knock-down, dragout fights over a case.” Roberts was nominated as chief justice by President George W. Bush in 2005 after the death of Chief Justice William Rehnquist.

DEATHS ELSEWHERE J. Geils • The guitarist and founder of The J. Geils Band — known for such peppy early ’80s pop hits as “Freeze Frame” and “Centerfold” — was found dead Tuesday (April 11, 2017) in his home in Massachusetts. He was 71. Groton, Mass., police said oicers responded to Mr. Geils’ home about 4 p.m. Tuesday for a well-being check and found him unresponsive. He was pronounced dead at the scene. “A preliminary investigation indicates that Geils died of natural causes,” police said. The J. Geils Band was founded in 1967 in Worcester, Mass., while Mr. Geils, whose full name was John Warren Geils Jr., was studying at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The band, whose music bridged the gap between disco and new wave, released 11 studio albums before breaking up in 1985. The band reunited of and on over the years. Hans Dehmelt • The German army veteran, who served at Stalingrad and in the Battle of the Bulge during World War II, studied physics in his postwar civilian life and won the Nobel Prize for making possible the trapping of single electrons, died March 7 (2017) in Seattle. He was 94. Mr. Dehmelt’s major scientiic contribution was developing a technique for isolating a single electron, pinning it down and ixing it in a place where its properties could be carefully studied without interference from the environment. The technique is also used for trapping other charged particles or ions. For his work, Mr. Dehmelt shared the 1989 Nobel Prize in physics. From news services


WORLD

A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

G7 foreign ministers make new push to end Syrian war Oicials support U.S. airstrikes but struggle to identify U.S. policy

BY JEAN-BAPTISTE GUILBERT AND ANGELA CHARLTON Associated Press

GRANDE-SYNTHE, FRANCE • Authorities and

BY JILL LAWLESS AND COLLEEN BARRY Associated Press

LUCCA, ITALY • The Group of

Seven industrialized nations urged Russia on Tuesday to pressure the Syrian government to end the sixyear civil war, but rejected a British call to impose new sanctions on Moscow over its support of President Bashar Assad. Foreign ministers from the seven countries said Moscow must change its attitude to Assad if there is to be hope of ending the brutal conflict that has destabilized the Middle East, driven millions to escape Syria and further frayed relations between the West and Russia. “Russia can be a part of that future and play an important role,” U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said. Or, he added, it could maintain its alliance with Syria, Iran and militant group Hezbollah, “which we believe is not going to serve Russia’s interests’ longer term.” Tillerson flew straight from the summit in Italy to Moscow, carrying the G-7’s strong desire for a new start in Syria but few concrete proposals to make it happen. The G-7 blames Assad’s military for a deadly chemical attack last week that killed more than 80 people. Ministers meeting in the walled Tuscan city of Lucca strongly supported U.S. missile strikes that targeted a Syrian air base believed to have been used to launch the attack. But they were divided about how to deal with Syria and Moscow. Italian Foreign Minister Angelino Alfano, who hosted the G-7 gathering, said that “there is no consensus for further new sanctions.” “We must have a dialogue with Russia,” he said. “We must not push Russia into a corner.” Instead of sanctions, the meeting’s final communique called for an investigation by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons to determine who was re-

Hundreds missing after ire at migrant camp

ANSA VIA AP

Foreign ministers from the Group of Seven nations met this week in Lucca, Italy. The group included oicials from France, the EU, Canada, Italy, Japan, the U.K. and U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

sponsible for the “war crime.” The U.S. and Britain say there is little doubt Assad’s forces are culpable. The group’s stance was a rebuf to British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, who said Monday the G-7 was considering new sanctions on Russian military figures to press Moscow to end military support for the “toxic” Assad government. U.S. officials in Washington have also raised that prospect. Others argued for a more conciliatory approach. German Foreign Minister Sigmar Gabriel said Russia, and Assad ally Iran, must be involved in any peace process to end Syria’s civil war. “Not everyone may like it, but without Moscow and without Tehran there will be no solution for Syria,” he said. Johnson put a positive spin on the outcome, saying there could still be sanctions on Russian military oicers if an independent investigation into the chemical attack identified perpetrators. The G-7 members — Germany, France, Britain, Canada, Japan and current president Italy, as well as the U.S. — are also trying to grasp what the U.S. administration’s foreign policy is, amid conflicting signals from Washington. Tillerson’s trip comes after an American oicial said the U.S. had drawn a preliminary conclusion that Russia knew in advance of the

chemical attack — an allegation that heightens already acute tension between Washington and Moscow. Until Trump ordered U.S. missile strikes in response to the April 4 nerve gas attack, the president had focused on defeating the Islamic State group and had shown no appetite for challenging Assad — and, by extension, his Russian supporter President Vladimir Putin. After the chemical attack, Trump said his attitude toward Assad “has changed very much,” and Tillerson said “steps are underway” to organize a coalition to remove him from power. But Tillerson also said that the top U.S. priority in the region remained the defeat of Islamic State militants. On Monday, Tillerson raised fresh expectations for aggressive U.S. action — and not only in Syria — as he visited the site of a World War II Nazi massacre in central Italy, saying the U.S. would hold to account “all who commit crimes against the innocents anywhere in the world.” Though such comments hint at a more activist U.S. foreign policy focused on preventing humanitarian atrocities, Trump’s administration has generally downplayed human rights concerns while promoting an “America First” strategy de-emphasizing the concerns of foreign nations.

aid workers are searching for several hundred migrants who disappeared after a fire ravaged their camp in northern France, a shocking blaze that exposed anew the challenges and tension around Europe’s migrants just 12 days before France’s presidential election. Police cordoned off the largely destroyed camp in the Dunkirk suburb of Grande-Synthe on Tuesday and investigators inspected the site to try to determine the cause of the Monday night fire, which broke out following a fight between rival groups of migrants. Three mobile police units were deployed in the area to head off tensions prompted by the camp’s demise, the government said in a statement. The interior and housing ministers headed to the scene in a sign of the government’s concern about the issue. Most of the camp near the English Channel has been reduced to the charred remains of wooden shelters and sparse belongings of the migrants, who converged on northern France in hopes of

reaching Britain as part of waves of recent migration to Europe. As many as 1,600 people were in the camp when the blaze broke out, according to Grande-Synthe Mayor Damien Careme and prefect Michel Lalande, the top government oicial for the region. Some 500 were taken to three local gymnasiums, including one set aside for children and families — but most of the other migrants remain unaccounted for, the mayor and prefect told reporters Tuesday. Doctors Without Borders, which set up the site a year ago to replace filthy makeshift camps in the region, was holding meetings Tuesday to decide what to do next. Other aid groups were planning to distribute meals Tuesday to migrants in the gymnasiums and anywhere else they were found around town. The first priority was to find migrants dispersed by the blaze, said Corenne Torre, head of the humanitarian group in France. “We just don’t know where they are,” she told The Associated Press. She estimated that at least 600 migrants remained unaccounted for. Some were believed to be hiding because they fear the authorities or because they fear rejoining a camp with rival gangs, she said.

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NEWS

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

WEATHER • Low 45, High 74• Winds SE 5-10 mph

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A21 National Extremes High: 94° McAllen, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: 12° Stanley, Utah

Another dry day High pressure will slide to the east of the region today. As a result, dry conditions along with milder temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area. Highs will top out in the low-to-mid 70s. A few storms are possible on Thursday and Friday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

48°

67°

73°

64°

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

Increasing clouds

40s

46 46 44 43 43 47 47 42 45 46 44 43 45

75 73 75 74 76 75 74 71 74 74 73 74 72

W

partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

60s

4-DAY FORECAST

Flood Stage

Current Level

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

55°/78° 60°/79°

70s

SUNDAY

Snow

Partly cloudy

Wintry Mix

Chance of storms

90s Alaska Low: 5°

Chicago 38 / 59

H

W

40 45 38 41 42 40 44 41 42 37 42 39

68 73 59 68 67 70 71 69 71 64 70 67

partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Kirksville 42 / 71 Kansas City 47 / 74

Springfield 42 / 70

St. Louis 45 / 74 Carbondale 45 / 73

Joplin 47 / 75

Poplar Bluff 48 / 74

Very unhealthy

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Apr. 11th Tree - 248 (high), Mold - 5,604 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS 9 Yesterday 77 Month (Total) 3277 Season 3355 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

- 0.30 + 0.03 + 0.21 - 0.18 - 0.51 - 0.50 - 0.22

Last Apr 19 Sunrise

New Apr 26

First May 2

Full May 10

6:29 AM Sunset

7:35 PM

Moonrise 9:04 PM Moonset 7:31 AM

The first space shuttle named Columbia launched on this date in 1981. Also on this date back in 1961, Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.13 + 0.16 358.06 - 0.06 494.37 - 0.31 655.88 - 0.03 710.06 - 0.24 655.36 - 0.06 912.36 - 0.01 841.45 - 0.11 595.83 + 0.23 407.01 + 0.12 609.86 - 0.41 444.59 + 0.01

+ 0.16

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Russia parrots Trump’s intelligence accusations

Jet Stream

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 58 Albuquerque 52 Anchorage 28 Atlanta 60 Atlantic City 56 Baltimore 57 Billings 37 Biloxi, Ms. 63 Birmingham 61 Bismarck 34 Boise 47 Boston 55 Buffalo 43 Burlington, Vt. 48 Charleston, S.C. 56 Charleston, W.V. 54 Charlotte 57 Cheyenne 38 Chicago 38 Cincinnati 46 Cleveland 42 Colorado Spgs. 41 Concord, N.H. 56 Dallas 61 Daytona Beach 62 Denver 43 Des Moines 41 Destin, Fl. 64 Detroit 39 El Paso 62 47 Evansville 19 Fairbanks 35 Fargo 28 Flagstaff 62 Fort Myers 33 Great Falls 31 Green Bay 56 Hartford 71 Honolulu 65 Houston 43 Indianapolis 60 Jackson, Ms. 32 Juneau 73 Key West 59 Las Vegas 55 Little Rock 56 Los Angeles 47 Louisville

64 75 50 79 76 75 64 79 82 62 66 69 49 60 80 71 80 66 59 69 56 73 64 78 77 71 71 78 59 85 73 47 62 67 85 58 56 71 83 81 66 81 52 82 85 77 73 73

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

38 49 28 59 44 45 40 61 58 35 49 43 35 38 57 45 55 37 44 47 41 41 40 63 64 43 53 65 42 58 51 22 37 30 66 41 39 41 71 64 49 58 33 73 61 59 56 51

59 82 49 79 59 67 76 82 85 66 58 60 50 53 76 75 78 70 62 72 57 72 57 79 76 73 70 80 56 86 77 49 66 68 86 66 51 61 84 82 72 87 50 82 79 82 69 78

partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly sunny showers showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

Today L H

56 Macon 71 McAllen, Tx. 56 Memphis 70 Miami 37 Milwaukee Minneapolis 38 Missoula, Mt. 36 59 Mobile Montgomery 61 54 Nashville New Orleans 65 New York City 61 Norfolk, Va. 59 Oklahoma City 51 Omaha 44 Orlando 61 Palm Springs 60 Philadelphia 60 Phoenix 61 Pittsburgh 48 Portland, Me. 51 Portland, Or. 46 Providence 52 Raleigh 57 Rapid City 37 Reno 38 Richmond, Va. 59 Sacramento 54 St. Petersburg 67 Salt Lake City 46 San Antonio 64 San Diego 55 San Francisco 54 Santa Fe 48 Savannah 57 Seattle 45 Shreveport 63 38 Sioux Falls 44 Syracuse 57 Tallahassee 64 Tampa 55 Tucson 49 Tulsa 63 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 69 46 Wichita Wilmington, De. 57 62 Yuma

81 88 77 80 53 60 57 81 84 78 81 70 78 74 68 82 88 76 91 61 60 57 70 80 58 64 79 67 81 74 80 69 63 71 80 55 80 56 49 83 83 90 77 76 79 72 75 92

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny

56 70 61 72 41 45 38 59 59 53 63 47 56 60 51 64 62 48 63 40 42 45 43 55 39 37 50 50 68 55 65 57 52 41 57 44 62 42 36 58 66 55 59 51 71 58 45 64

82 88 81 79 49 61 54 81 85 82 83 61 64 74 71 82 83 66 92 64 54 55 61 75 70 49 71 62 84 77 81 68 58 72 79 53 83 64 55 83 84 93 76 68 78 71 65 89

partly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

69 46 50 68 82 77 45 45 37 55 45 29 70 61 46 41

82 53 70 89 95 86 77 55 64 65 79 44 82 73 58 65

sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

41 71 41 75 61 55 48 43 52 80 59 41 39 72 57 71

69 75 60 88 83 69 76 62 79 104 81 51 45 83 80 103

W

sunny showers partly cloudy showers cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly sunny thunderstorms cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 22.73 18 21.25 Peoria 14 19.72 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.55 Sullivan 16 7.99 Valley Park 24 25.52 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 3.63 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 40.52

24-Hr Change

SUN & MOON

Hawaii High: 87°

Parts of New England will see a few showers in association with a frontal boundary. Showers are forecast to develop across parts of the upper Midwest. Portions of the south-central Plains and west Texas will see thunderstorms. Another frontal system will bring wet weather to the Pacific Northwest and northern California.

City

L

80s

80s

62°/83° 61°/74°

Partly sunny, Few storms isolated storms possible

Good

- 0.31 - 0.32 - 0.33 - 0.31 - 0.22 - 0.70 - 0.50 - 0.54 - 0.32 - 0.03

80s 70s

90s

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

- 0.01 - 1.10 - 0.78 - 0.88 - 0.73

70s

70s 60s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 16.54 23 18.04 Jefferson City 21 19.12 Hermann 20 16.64 Washington 25 22.32 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 16.33 Louisiana 15 15.59 Dam 24 25 26.16 Dam 25 26 26.60 Grafton 18 20.45 M.Price, Pool 419 418.00 M.Price, Tail. 21 21.68 St Louis 30 27.73 Chester 27 30.30 Cape Girardeau 32 34.73

60s T-storms

60s

50s 70s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

24-Hr Change

70s

50s

50s

60s

80s

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 2.44” 1.32” 8.97” 9.28”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

63° 48° 66° 46° 90° 24° 59° 43°

50s

60s

40s 60s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:45 p.m.) Low (6:51 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1930) Record Low (1973) High Last Year Low Last Year

50s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

Rain

50s 50s 40s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

40s

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

37 43 40 71 52 73 45 43 29 58 64 48 42 45 41 38

50 65 62 87 72 84 82 59 43 69 70 66 51 52 64 61

cloudy mostly sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy

Gay marriage under ire in Texas

Questioning comes back to haunt president BY VIVIAN SALAMA associated Press

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump’s frequent questioning of the integrity of his spy agencies is coming back to haunt him. As his administration used U.S. intelligence to pressure Moscow over its support for Syrian President Bashar Assad, Russian President Vladimir Putin parroted back Trump’s doubts about the reliability of U.S. spy agencies. “It reminds me of the events in 2003 when U.S. envoys to the Security Council were demonstrating what they said were chemical weapons found in Iraq,” Russian President Vladimir Putin told reporters Tuesday, in response to U.S. agencies’ blaming Syria’s government for using chemical weapons. “We have seen it all already.” Trump used the same argument in December, when intelligence experts issued an official assessment that Russia had in-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks Tuesday at the Kremlin in Russia. Putin is casting doubt on U.S. intelligence about Russian involvement in the recent Syrian chemical attack, using President Donald Trump’s own argument against U.S. spy agencies’ integrity.

terfered with the U.S. election. Rejecting the assessment, Trump comparing the analyses to the false claims in the lead-up to the Iraq War. “These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,” the Trump transition team said in a statement. Trump has picked other fights with intelligence agencies, blaming them for the leaks about his associates’ ties with Russia. During the transition, he ripped agencies for being behind the leaks and even compared them to Nazi

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propaganda. Lately, he has blamed Democrats, suggesting that they were using the leaks as an excuse for Hillary Clinton’s defeat. “Intelligence agencies should never have allowed this fake news to leak into the public. One last shot at me. Are we living in Nazi Germany?” he tweeted in January. T h ose s ta te m e n ts threaten to undermine the Trump administration’s recent efort to isolate Assad in the wake of a chemical attack that killed dozens of Syrians. U.S. officials have accused Russia of knowing about the attack ahead of time and trying to help cover it up. Putin has called for a formal United Nations investigation. “Putin knows that Trump personally degraded U.S. intelligence credibility by attacking it over the Russian hacking and essentially going to war with the CIA and NSA,” said Malcolm Nance, a veteran intelligence oicer. He said that Putin, a former director of Russian intelligence, “is now taking full advantage of the damage Trump caused with those attacks.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Gerald Gaford (right) and Jef Sralla leave the Travis County courthouse in 2015 following the Supreme Court ruling allowing same-sex marriage in the U.S.

Oicials could cite religion, avoid handing out licenses BY WILL WEISSERT associated Press

AUSTIN,

TEXAS

Legislators in Texas sought Tuesday to chip away at the landmark Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage, voting to let county judges and other elected oicials recuse themselves from issuing marriage licenses if they have personal religious objections. The bill won preliminary approval in the Senate, 21-10, with full Republican support and all but one Democrat opposing it. A final vote, expected to come Wednesday, sends it to the state House. Texas’ Republicancontrolled Legislature meets only every two years, meaning state lawmakers weren’t able to respond to the high court’s June 2015 samesex marriage decision until now. Should the bill become law, however, it will almost certainly be challenged as unconsti-

tutional by federal lawsuits. “If we don’t do this, we are discriminating against people of faith,” said the sponsor, Sen. Brian Birdwell, a Republican from Granbury, about 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth. He was referring to clerks, judges, justices of the peace and other elected oicials empowered to issue marriage licenses in Texas’ 254 counties. Opponents say it sanctions discrimination and defies the nation’s highest court. “The Texas Senate today said it has no problem with public oicials picking and choosing which taxpayers they will serve,” Kathy Miller, president of the progressive activist group the Texas Freedom Network, said in a statement. “This bill opens the door to taxpayer-funded discrimination against virtually anyone who doesn’t meet a public official’s personal moral standards.” Birdwell’s hotly debated proposal only applies in cases where other oicials without objections agree to step in for the recusing party. If the substituting official is located outside the county where the

marriage license is being sought, documents could be sent electronically so as not to unduly delay the process. Republican Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton initially caused confusion by issuing a nonbinding opinion following the 2015 Supreme Court ruling, suggesting that county clerks statewide who objected to gay marriage for religious reasons could refuse marriage licenses to same-sex couples. But, after civil groups threatened lawsuits, same-sex couples soon were being married across the state without incident. Sen. Sylvia Garcia, a Houston Democrat and a former judge, said Tuesday that the law was unnecessary because Texas officials have been issuing marriage licenses for nearly two years without objection. She said the bill will let many Republican officials now stop doing so, not because they have legitimate, religiousbased problems with gay marriage but because they want to take ideological stands that will impress local primary voters.


NEWS

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 2

WEATHER • Low 45, High 74• Winds SE 5-10 mph

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • A21

National Extremes High: 94° McAllen, Texas

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

Low: 12° Stanley, Utah

Another dry day High pressure will slide to the east of the region today. As a result, dry conditions along with milder temperatures can be expected across the St. Louis area. Highs will top out in the low-to-mid 70s. A few storms are possible on Thursday and Friday. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

48°

67°

73°

64°

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy Partly cloudy

Increasing clouds

40s

46 46 44 43 43 47 47 42 45 46 44 43 45

75 73 75 74 76 75 74 71 74 74 73 74 72

W

partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

60s

4-DAY FORECAST

Flood Stage

Current Level

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

55°/78° 60°/79°

70s

SUNDAY

Partly cloudy

Wintry Mix

Chance of storms

90s Alaska Low: 5°

Chicago 38 / 59

H

W

40 45 38 41 42 40 44 41 42 37 42 39

68 73 59 68 67 70 71 69 71 64 70 67

partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

Kirksville 42 / 71 Kansas City 47 / 74

Springfield 42 / 70

St. Louis 45 / 74 Carbondale 45 / 73

Joplin 47 / 75

Poplar Bluff 48 / 74

Very unhealthy

Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Tuesday, Apr. 11th Tree - 248 (high), Mold - 5,604 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS 9 Yesterday 77 Month (Total) 3277 Season 3355 Year Ago Flood Stage

Current Level

- 0.30 + 0.03 + 0.21 - 0.18 - 0.51 - 0.50 - 0.22

Last Apr 19 Sunrise

New Apr 26

First May 2

Full May 10

6:29 AM Sunset

7:35 PM

Moonrise 9:04 PM Moonset 7:31 AM

The first space shuttle named Columbia launched on this date in 1981. Also on this date back in 1961, Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space.

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

LAKE LEVELS Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.13 + 0.16 358.06 - 0.06 494.37 - 0.31 655.88 - 0.03 710.06 - 0.24 655.36 - 0.06 912.36 - 0.01 841.45 - 0.11 595.83 + 0.23 407.01 + 0.12 609.86 - 0.41 444.59 + 0.01

+ 0.16

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Russia parrots Trump’s intelligence accusations Questioning comes back to haunt president

Jet Stream

Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 58 Albuquerque 52 Anchorage 28 Atlanta 60 Atlantic City 56 Baltimore 57 Billings 37 Biloxi, Ms. 63 Birmingham 61 Bismarck 34 Boise 47 Boston 55 Buffalo 43 Burlington, Vt. 48 Charleston, S.C. 56 Charleston, W.V. 54 Charlotte 57 Cheyenne 38 Chicago 38 Cincinnati 46 Cleveland 42 Colorado Spgs. 41 Concord, N.H. 56 Dallas 61 Daytona Beach 62 Denver 43 Des Moines 41 Destin, Fl. 64 Detroit 39 El Paso 62 47 Evansville 19 Fairbanks 35 Fargo 28 Flagstaff 62 Fort Myers 33 Great Falls 31 Green Bay 56 Hartford 71 Honolulu 65 Houston 43 Indianapolis 60 Jackson, Ms. 32 Juneau 73 Key West 59 Las Vegas 55 Little Rock 56 Los Angeles 47 Louisville

64 75 50 79 76 75 64 79 82 62 66 69 49 60 80 71 80 66 59 69 56 73 64 78 77 71 71 78 59 85 73 47 62 67 85 58 56 71 83 81 66 81 52 82 85 77 73 73

W

Tomorrow L H W

mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

38 49 28 59 44 45 40 61 58 35 49 43 35 38 57 45 55 37 44 47 41 41 40 63 64 43 53 65 42 58 51 22 37 30 66 41 39 41 71 64 49 58 33 73 61 59 56 51

59 82 49 79 59 67 76 82 85 66 58 60 50 53 76 75 78 70 62 72 57 72 57 79 76 73 70 80 56 86 77 49 66 68 86 66 51 61 84 82 72 87 50 82 79 82 69 78

partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly sunny showers showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks Tuesday at the Kremlin in Russia. Putin is casting doubt on U.S. intelligence about Russian involvement in the recent Syrian chemical attack, using President Donald Trump’s own argument against U.S. spy agencies’ integrity.

terfered with the U.S. election. Rejecting the assessment, Trump comparing the analyses to the false claims in the lead-up to the Iraq War. “These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,” the Trump transition team said in a statement. Trump has picked other fights with intelligence agencies, blaming them for the leaks about his associates’ ties with Russia. During the transition, he ripped agencies for being behind the leaks and even compared them to Nazi

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propaganda. Lately, he has blamed Democrats, suggesting that they were using the leaks as an excuse for Hillary Clinton’s defeat. “Intelligence agencies should never have allowed this fake news to leak into the public. One last shot at me. Are we living in Nazi Germany?” he tweeted in January. T h ose s ta te m e n ts threaten to undermine the Trump administration’s recent efort to isolate Assad in the wake of a chemical attack that killed dozens of Syrians. U.S. officials have accused Russia of knowing about the attack ahead of time and trying to help cover it up. Putin has called for a formal United Nations investigation. “Putin knows that Trump personally degraded U.S. intelligence credibility by attacking it over the Russian hacking and essentially going to war with the CIA and NSA,” said Malcolm Nance, a veteran intelligence oicer. He said that Putin, a former director of Russian intelligence, “is now taking full advantage of the damage Trump caused with those attacks.”

Today L H

56 Macon 71 McAllen, Tx. 56 Memphis 70 Miami 37 Milwaukee Minneapolis 38 Missoula, Mt. 36 59 Mobile Montgomery 61 54 Nashville New Orleans 65 New York City 61 Norfolk, Va. 59 Oklahoma City 51 Omaha 44 Orlando 61 Palm Springs 60 Philadelphia 60 Phoenix 61 Pittsburgh 48 Portland, Me. 51 Portland, Or. 46 Providence 52 Raleigh 57 Rapid City 37 Reno 38 Richmond, Va. 59 Sacramento 54 St. Petersburg 67 Salt Lake City 46 San Antonio 64 San Diego 55 San Francisco 54 Santa Fe 48 Savannah 57 Seattle 45 Shreveport 63 38 Sioux Falls 44 Syracuse 57 Tallahassee 64 Tampa 55 Tucson 49 Tulsa 63 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 69 46 Wichita Wilmington, De. 57 62 Yuma

81 88 77 80 53 60 57 81 84 78 81 70 78 74 68 82 88 76 91 61 60 57 70 80 58 64 79 67 81 74 80 69 63 71 80 55 80 56 49 83 83 90 77 76 79 72 75 92

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny showers showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny

56 70 61 72 41 45 38 59 59 53 63 47 56 60 51 64 62 48 63 40 42 45 43 55 39 37 50 50 68 55 65 57 52 41 57 44 62 42 36 58 66 55 59 51 71 58 45 64

82 88 81 79 49 61 54 81 85 82 83 61 64 74 71 82 83 66 92 64 54 55 61 75 70 49 71 62 84 77 81 68 58 72 79 53 83 64 55 83 84 93 76 68 78 71 65 89

partly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD City Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

L

H

W

69 46 50 68 82 77 45 45 37 55 45 29 70 61 46 41

82 53 70 89 95 86 77 55 64 65 79 44 82 73 58 65

sunny mostly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

41 71 41 75 61 55 48 43 52 80 59 41 39 72 57 71

69 75 60 88 83 69 76 62 79 104 81 51 45 83 80 103

W

sunny showers partly cloudy showers cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly sunny thunderstorms cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

37 43 40 71 52 73 45 43 29 58 64 48 42 45 41 38

50 65 62 87 72 84 82 59 43 69 70 66 51 52 64 61

cloudy mostly sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny mostly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy rain partly cloudy partly cloudy

Court gave FBI the OK to monitor Trump adviser WASHINGTON POST

BY VIVIAN SALAMA associated Press

City

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 22.73 18 21.25 Peoria 14 19.72 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.55 Sullivan 16 7.99 Valley Park 24 25.52 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 3.63 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 40.52

24-Hr Change

SUN & MOON

Hawaii High: 87°

Parts of New England will see a few showers in association with a frontal boundary. Showers are forecast to develop across parts of the upper Midwest. Portions of the south-central Plains and west Texas will see thunderstorms. Another frontal system will bring wet weather to the Pacific Northwest and northern California.

City

L

TODAY’S UV INDEX

WASHINGTON • President Donald Trump’s frequent questioning of the integrity of his spy agencies is coming back to haunt him. As his administration used U.S. intelligence to pressure Moscow over its support for Syrian President Bashar Assad, Russian President Vladimir Putin parroted back Trump’s doubts about the reliability of U.S. spy agencies. “It reminds me of the events in 2003 when U.S. envoys to the Security Council were demonstrating what they said were chemical weapons found in Iraq,” Russian President Vladimir Putin told reporters Tuesday, in response to U.S. agencies’ blaming Syria’s government for using chemical weapons. “We have seen it all already.” Trump used the same argument in December, when intelligence experts issued an official assessment that Russia had in-

Snow

80s

80s

62°/83° 61°/74°

Partly sunny, Few storms isolated storms possible

Good

- 0.31 - 0.32 - 0.33 - 0.31 - 0.22 - 0.70 - 0.50 - 0.54 - 0.32 - 0.03

80s 70s

90s

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY

- 0.01 - 1.10 - 0.78 - 0.88 - 0.73

70s

70s 60s

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 16.54 23 18.04 Jefferson City 21 19.12 Hermann 20 16.64 Washington 25 22.32 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 16.33 Louisiana 15 15.59 Dam 24 25 26.16 Dam 25 26 26.60 Grafton 18 20.45 M.Price, Pool 419 418.00 M.Price, Tail. 21 21.68 St Louis 30 27.73 Chester 27 30.30 Cape Girardeau 32 34.73

60s T-storms

60s

50s 70s

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

24-Hr Change

70s

50s

50s

60s

80s

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

RIVER STAGES

0.00” 2.44” 1.32” 8.97” 9.28”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

63° 48° 66° 46° 90° 24° 59° 43°

50s

60s

40s 60s

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField TEMPERATURES High (3:45 p.m.) Low (6:51 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1930) Record Low (1973) High Last Year Low Last Year

50s

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

H

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

Rain

50s 50s 40s

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

40s

The FBI obtained a secret court order last summer to monitor the communications of an adviser to presidential candidate Donald Trump, part of an investigation into potential links between Russia and the campaign, law enforcement and other U.S. oicials said. The FBI and the Justice Department obtained the warrant targeting Carter Page’s communications after convincing a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court judge that there was probable cause to believe Page was acting as an agent of a foreign power, in this case Russia, according to the oicials. This is the clearest evidence so far that the FBI had reason to believe during the 2016 presidential campaign that a Trump campaign adviser was in touch with Russian agents. Such contacts are now at the center of an investigation into whether the campaign coordinated with the Russian government to swing the election in Trump’s favor. Page has not been accused of any crimes, and it is unclear whether the Justice Department might later seek charges against him or others in connection with Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election. The counterintelligence investigation into Russian efforts to influence U.S. elections began in July, oicials have said. Most such investigations don’t result in criminal charges. The oicials spoke about the court order on the condition of anonymity. In an interview with the Washington Post editorial page staf in March 2016, Trump identified Page, who had previously been an investment banker in Moscow, as a foreign policy adviser to his campaign. Campaign spokeswoman Hope Hicks later described Page’s role as “informal.” Page has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing in his dealings with the Trump campaign or Russia. “This confirms all of my suspicions about unjustified, politically motivated government surveillance,” Page said in an interview Tuesday. “I have nothing to hide.” He compared surveillance of him to the eavesdropping that the FBI and Justice Department conducted against civil rights leader the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The White House, FBI and Justice Department declined to comment. FBI Director James Comey disclosed in public testimony to the House Intel-

ligence Committee last month that the bureau was investigating eforts by the Russian government to interfere in the 2016 presidential election. Comey said this included investigating the “nature of any links between individuals associated with the Trump campaign and the Russian government and whether there was any coordination between the campaign and Russia’s efforts.” Comey declined to comment during the hearing about any individuals, including Page, who worked in Moscow for Merrill Lynch a decade ago and who has said he invested in Russian energy giant Gazprom. In a letter to Comey in September, Page had said he had sold his Gazprom investment. During the hearing last month, Democratic lawmakers repeatedly singled out Page’s contacts in Russia as a cause for concern. The judges who rule on Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act requests oversee the nation’s most sensitive national security cases, and their warrants are some of the most closely guarded secrets in the world of U.S. law enforcement and intelligence gathering. Any FISA application has to be approved at the highest levels of the Justice Department and the FBI. Applications for FISA warrants, Comey said, are often thicker than his wrists, and that thickness represents all the work Justice Department lawyers and FBI agents have to do to convince a judge that such surveillance is appropriate in an investigation. The government’s application for the surveillance order targeting Page included a lengthy declaration that laid out investigators’ basis for believing that Page was an agent of the Russian government and knowingly engaged in clandestine intelligence activities on behalf of Moscow, oicials said. Among other things, the application cited contacts that he had with a Russian intelligence operative in New York City in 2013, oicials said. Those contacts had earlier surfaced in a federal espionage case brought by the Justice Department against another Russian agent. In addition, the application said Page had other contacts with Russian operatives that have not been publicly disclosed, oicials said. An application for electronic surveillance under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act need not show evidence of a crime. But the information obtained through the intercepts can be used to open a criminal investigation and may be used in a prosecution.


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crowds, while several opposition leaders have been roughed up and bloodied while participating in demonstrations. Government officials blame the opposition for inciting violence and detained 18 people Monday. Human rights organizations and countries including the United States are calling on Venezuela to allow protesters to gather and refrain from unnecessary use of force, adding to mounting international pressure for the Andean nation’s government to hold elections and respect democratic institutions. “The existence of isolated acts of violence during protests cannot justify a blank restriction of the rights to peaceful assembly and freedom of expression or the indiscriminate and disproportionate use of force against demonstrators,” the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights said Tuesday. Queliz’s father told local media his son was at Monday’s demonstration “like any other youth,” when gunshots were fired and people began running.

BY FABIOLA SANCHEZ Associated Press

CARACAS, VENEZUELA •

Venezuelan authorities on Tuesday were investigating the death of a university student killed by gunfire at a protest against President Nicolas Maduro, as opposition leaders mapped out their next steps to push for new elections and government oicials held a gathering to drum up state support. Daniel Queliz, 20, was killed late Monday after being shot in the neck in Valencia, a city east of Caracas where students have actively participated in the protests that erupted April 1 following a Supreme Court decision to strip Congress of its last remaining powers — a decision later reversed. It was not immediately clear where the bullet came from, though opposition leaders quickly decried the death as another example of the Venezuelan government’s excessive use of force in countering protests. Security forces have been using tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse

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WEDNESDAY • 04.12.2017 • B

JAKE ALLEN 33-20-5 SAVE PERCENTAGE

.915 GOALS AGAINST AVERAGE

2.42 SHUTOUTS

4 ASSOCIATED PRESS

ON ALLEN’S SHOULDERS Yeo’s focus is on playofs, not revenge against Wild JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mike Yeo had been among the fortunate ones in hockey. He was one of the few blessed with enough foresight and good fortune to leave jobs on his own terms throughout his professional career. As a player, he didn’t need

a map out the door when his dreams of playing in the National Hockey League faded. He merely headed for the exit ramp before he was sent there. As a coach, whether in the American Hockey League as the head man or in the NHL as an assistant, he also charted his own path without being let go before finally drinking from that bitter lake when the Minnesota Wild fired him on Feb. 13, 2016. See ORTIZ • Page B7

NHL PLAYOFFS: FIRST ROUND

BLUES VS. WILD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8:30 p.m. Wednesday at Minnesota, NBCSN, FSM 7 p.m. Friday at Minnesota, NBCSN, FSM 2 p.m. Sunday at Scottrade, KSDK (Ch. 5) 8:30 p.m. April 19 at Scottrade, NBCSN, FSM TBA April 22 at Minnesota, TV TBA* TBA April 24 at Scottrade, TV TBA* TBA April 26 at Minnesota, TV TBA* *If necessary

Blues goalie inds consistency, conidence after rough start BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was mid-January and Jake Allen couldn’t top anything coming his way — not the puck or the questions. There may have been some desire for the Blues’ starting goaltender to spew off about Ken Hitchcock’s penchant for pulling the netminder. Or perhaps say something about a goalie coach in Jim Corsi that was dedicated to the job, but

brought a dated approach to the position that didn’t suit Allen. In the back of his mind, he, too, might have been thinking about the little help that he was getting from teammates in the defensive zone. But Allen knew that he wasn’t playing as well as he had to earn the four-year, $17.4 million contract the club had awarded him last summer or to blame others. And so while his glove side See BLUES • Page B6

> Barbashev moves up. B6 > How the Blues fared in five games against the Wild this season. B6 > Pietrangelo finding groove as leader. B7 > Five of Canada’s seven teams make playofs. B8

Cards still can’t turn the page Loss to Nationals has echoes of last season

Tilmon, Pickett given release from Illini letters

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • The familiar caveats

and catchphrases about small sample sizes and long seasons would be easier for the Cardinals to argue if this first week was the first time they had me- NATIONALS 8 andered through games like this. CARDINALS 3 It’s harder when > 3:05 p.m. Wednesday it’s a continuation at Nationals, FSM of an entire season. > Leake (0-1, 1.13) vs. Starting 2017 a Scherzer (1-0, 2.70) lot like they spent 2016, the Cardinals lost for the sixth time in seven days because their defense complicated an already diicult start by Lance Lynn. A close game early tore apart on the Cardinals in the middle as three home runs against Lynn powered Washington to an 8-3 victory Tuesday at Nationals Park. Before they’ve completed their first road series of this season, the Cardinals have already revisited last year’s defensive See CARDINALS • Page B5

Decision time for Smith, other top recruits BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina walks back to the home plate after talking to pitcher Lance Lynn during the third inning Tuesday night in Washington.

On a shady street a stone’s throw from Edwardsville’s Dunlap Lake, college basketball royalty comes to pay its respects. Tucked away from the bustling, beaten path, Mark Smith’s home is easy to find. It’s the one with the basketball hoop in the driveway. Smith There was a time it was known only to mid-majors with keen senses and up-and-coming Power Five programs. Now it’s among the hottest stops on the national recruiting trail. Michigan State’s Tom Izzo and Kentucky’s John Calipari made the trip last week. They joined a growing list that includes Shaka Smart of Texas and Thad Matta of Ohio State. See RECRUITS • Page B10

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WEDNESDAY • 04.12.2017 • B

JAKE ALLEN 33-20-5 SAVE PERCENTAGE

.915 GOALS AGAINST AVERAGE

2.42 SHUTOUTS

4 ASSOCIATED PRESS

ON ALLEN’S SHOULDERS Yeo’s focus is on playofs, not revenge against Wild JOSE de JESUS ORTIZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Mike Yeo had been among the fortunate ones in hockey. He was one of the few blessed with enough foresight and good fortune to leave jobs on his own terms throughout his professional career. As a player, he didn’t need

a map out the door when his dreams of playing in the National Hockey League faded. He merely headed for the exit ramp before he was sent there. As a coach, whether in the American Hockey League as the head man or in the NHL as an assistant, he also charted his own path without being let go before finally drinking from that bitter lake when the Minnesota Wild fired him on Feb. 13, 2016. See ORTIZ • Page B7

NHL PLAYOFFS: FIRST ROUND

BLUES VS. WILD

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8:30 p.m. Wednesday at Minnesota, NBCSN, FSM 7 p.m. Friday at Minnesota, NBCSN, FSM 2 p.m. Sunday at Scottrade, KSDK (Ch. 5) 8:30 p.m. April 19 at Scottrade, NBCSN, FSM TBA April 22 at Minnesota, TV TBA* TBA April 24 at Scottrade, TV TBA* TBA April 26 at Minnesota, TV TBA* *If necessary

Blues goalie inds consistency, conidence after rough start BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It was mid-January and Jake Allen couldn’t stop anything coming his way — not the puck or the questions. There may have been some desire for the Blues’ starting goaltender to spew off about Ken Hitchcock’s penchant for pulling the netminder. Or perhaps say something about a goalie coach in Jim Corsi that was dedicated to the job, but

brought a dated approach to the position that didn’t suit Allen. In the back of his mind, he, too, might have been thinking about the little help that he was getting from teammates in the defensive zone. But Allen knew that he wasn’t playing as well as he had to earn the four-year, $17.4 million contract the club had awarded him last summer or to blame others. And so while his glove side See BLUES • Page B6

> Barbashev moves up. B6 > How the Blues fared in five games against the Wild this season. B6 > Pietrangelo finding groove as leader. B7 > Five of Canada’s seven teams make playofs. B8

Cards still can’t turn the page Loss to Nationals has echoes of last season

Tilmon, Pickett given release from Illini letters

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • The familiar caveats

and catchphrases about small sample sizes and long seasons would be easier for the Cardinals to argue if this first week was the first time they had me- NATIONALS 8 andered through games like this. CARDINALS 3 It’s harder when > 3:05 p.m. Wednesday it’s a continuation at Nationals, FSM of an entire season. > Leake (0-1, 1.13) vs. Starting 2017 a Scherzer (1-0, 2.70) lot like they spent 2016, the Cardinals lost for the sixth time in seven days because their defense complicated an already diicult start by Lance Lynn. A close game early tore apart on the Cardinals in the middle as three home runs against Lynn powered Washington to an 8-3 victory Tuesday at Nationals Park. Before they’ve completed their first road series of this season, the Cardinals have already revisited last year’s defensive See CARDINALS • Page B5

Decision time for Smith, other top recruits BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals catcher Yadier Molina walks back to the home plate after talking to pitcher Lance Lynn during the third inning Tuesday night in Washington.

On a shady street a stone’s throw from Edwardsville’s Dunlap Lake, college basketball royalty comes to pay its respects. Tucked away from the bustling, beaten path, Mark Smith’s home is easy to find. It’s the one with the basketball hoop in the driveway. Smith There was a time it was known only to mid-majors with keen senses and up-and-coming Power Five programs. Now it’s among the hottest stops on the national recruiting trail. Michigan State’s Tom Izzo and Kentucky’s John Calipari made the trip last week. They joined a growing list that includes Shaka Smart of Texas and Thad Matta of Ohio State. See RECRUITS • Page B10

SPORTS

In O’Fallon, MO. We’re closer than you think. PlazaMotorsWest.com

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SPORTS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Wednesday 4/12 G1: at Wild, 8:30 p.m. NBCSN, FSM

Friday 4/14 G2: at Wild, 7 p.m. NBCSN, FSM

Sunday 4/16 G3: vs. Wild, 2 p.m. KSDK (Ch. 5)

Wednesday 4/19 G4: vs. Wild, 8:30 p.m. NBCSN, FSM

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

Volesky leading the way for STLFC SIUE product recently named USL player of the week

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Wednesday 4/12 at Nationals 3:05 p.m. FSM

Friday 4/14 at Yankees 6:05 p.m. FSM Plus

Saturday 4/15 at Yankees 12:05 p.m. FSM

Sunday 4/16 at Yankees 7:05 p.m. ESPN

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Wednesday 4/12 Saturday 4/15 at Cincinnati at Pittsburgh 6 p.m. 6 p.m. KPLR (11)

Saturday 4/22 vs. Charlotte 7:30 p.m.

Thursday 4/27 at Orlando 6:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals Blues SLU Raiders Fairmount

314-345-9000 Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 314-622-2583 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 314-977-4758 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 636-294-9662 STL FC 636-680-0997 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ON THE AIR BASEBALL 12 p.m.

Rays at Yankees, MLB

3:05 p.m. Cardinals at Nationals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m.

Dodgers at Cubs, MLB

BASKETBALL 7 p.m.

NBA: Hawks at Pacers, ESPN, FSM Plus

9:30 p.m. NBA: Pelicans at Trail Blazers, ESPN GOLF 6 p.m.

LPGA: LOTTE Championship, irst round, GOLF

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

5:30 a.m. European PGA: Trophee Hassan II, irst round, GOLF

STLFC forward Christian Volesky reacts after scoring the irst goal of the game against Ottawa on April 1.

HOCKEY 6 p.m.

NHL Playofs: Rangers at Canadiens, NBCSN

6 p.m.

NHL Playofs: Bruins at Senators, NHL Network

BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

6:30 p.m. NHL Playofs: Blue Jackets at Penguins, USA 8:30 p.m. NHL Playofs: Blues at Wild, FSM, NBCSN, KMOX (1120 AM) 9 p.m.

NHL Playofs: Sharks at Oilers, USA

SOCCER 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Bayern Munich vs. Real Madrid, FS1 1:30 p.m. UEFA Champions League: Atletico Madrid vs. Leicester City, FS2 SOFTBALL 3 p.m.

College: Nebraska at Iowa, BTN

5:30 p.m. College: Nebraska at Iowa, BTN 6 p.m.

College: Florida State vs. Florida, SEC Network

TENNIS 5 a.m. Channel

(Thu.) ATP: Grand Prix Hassan II: Early round, Day 4, Tennis

DIGEST Bauza out after eight months as Argentina coach Argentina has ired its newly appointed national head coach, Edgardo Bauza, after just eight months in the job, as the team struggles in qualifying matches for next year’s World Cup in Russia. The Argentine Football Association conirmed that Bauza’s reign was over. “Bauza has been informed that he is no longer the coach of the national team,” AFA President Claudio Tapia told reporters. Bauza, 59, only started the job last August when Gerardo Martino departed after Argentina’s loss in the inal of Copa America Centenario. World Cup champions twice before, and beaten inalists in 2014, Argentina is currently ifth in the South American qualifying standings with four matches left. The top four qualify automatically with the ifth team advancing to a playof. (AP) Neymar to miss game vs. Real Madrid • Barcelona forward Neymar has been handed a two-game suspension for sarcastically applauding an assistant referee and will miss Barcelona’s ‘clasico’ game against Real Madrid in the Spanish league. The two-match ban announced Tuesday comes in addition to a one-game suspension he was automatically required to serve after being sent of in a 2-0 loss at Malaga on Sunday. A highlight of the Spanish season, the game between the league leaders is on April 23 at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium. A victory by Madrid could all but secure its irst league title since 2012. (AP) Extension for Huskies’ Peterson • Washington football coach Chris Petersen has signed a contract extension that goes through the 2023 season and averages out to nearly $5 million per season in total compensation. Washington announced Petersen’s extension Tuesday, although the deal was signed late last month. Petersen is 27-14 in his three seasons at Washington after going 92-12 in eight seasons at Boise State. (AP) Blashill to coach U.S. team • Detroit Red Wings coach Jef Blashill has been named coach of the U.S. men’s hockey team that will compete in the world championships next month in a key tuneup ahead of next year’s Winter Olympics. The tournament runs May 5-21 in Germany and France. Blashill has coached the Red Wings the last two seasons and led its AHL ailiate, the Grand Rapids Griins, three seasons. (AP) Gonzaga’s Collins, others declare for draft • Gonzaga announced that freshman center Zach Collins has declared for the NBA draft. Collins said Tuesday he is exploring his options without hiring an agent at this time, but intends to hire an agent at a later date. • OG Anunoby and three of his Indiana teammates declared for the draft. Anunoby plans to hire an agent and will not return for his junior year. Junior guards James Blackmon Jr. and Robert Johnson and sophomore center Thomas Bryant will not hire agents, making them eligible to return. • LSU guard and leading scorer Antonio Blakeney declared for the draft. (AP) MU wins in baseball, sweeps in softball • The Missouri baseball team pounded Arkansas-Pine Bluf 13-1 in the irst of a two-game home series. Andy Toelken (2-1) earned the win, Kameron Misner drove in four runs and Trey Harris hit his team-leading seventh home run for the Tigers (24-9) • The MU softball team swept Western Illinois at home, 10-2 and 6-5. Cheyenne Baxter (10-4) was the winner in the opening game as Chloe Rathburn and Natalie Fleming both drove in three runs. The Tigers (2316) had to rally with two runs in the seventh to win the second game, getting a walk-of two-run single by Kolby Romaine. (Dave Matter)

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Christian Volesky joined St. Louis FC midway through training camp, after a trial with Sporting KC of Major League Soccer. “Everything happens for a reason, right?” said Volesky, a 24-year-old forward who starred at Southern Illinois Edwardsville. “At my age, the thing I need most is an opportunity to play regularly and to hopefully keep improving. Kansas City has Dom Dwyer playing up top, so my chances there would’ve been limited. They used me in more of a wide spot and honestly, it just didn’t work out.” After being waived in late February, one of the first calls Volesky made was to new STLFC coach Preki Radosavljevic. “I seriously considered St. Louis before deciding on Kansas City,” said Volesky, who first contacted Preki in the fall during a drive home after finishing up his second season with the United Soccer League’s Rochester Rhinos. “The two main reasons I’m here are Preki and the time I spent at SIUE. St. Louis is almost a second home to me and being able to be part of the franchise here is something I’m still very excited about. “The fans and the atmosphere (at the Soccer Park) is unique. We know the fans are behind us 100 percent and we’re doing everything we can to get results for them.” Coming off back-to-back 3-2 thrillers at home, STLFC (2-0-1) has a pair of road games this week: Wednesday against the Pittsburgh Riverhounds (1-1-1) and Saturday against FC Cincinnati (1-2). Due to injury, Volesky had only a few days of training before making the start in STLFC’s scoreless draw in Louisville to open the season. “Considering my limited time with the guys, I felt like I did OK,” he recalled. “We got a result, but I don’t think any of us were real

happy with the way we played. But since then ...” STLFC opened its home schedule with a thrilling 3-2 win over Ottawa Fury FC and then rallied on Saturday to knock of the defending USL champion New York Red Bulls II by the same score. Volesky helped get the home team going early in both games. Against Ottawa, he pushed the ball past the last Fury defender and then ran down the loose ball to score in the fifth minute and set up Mats Bjurman for a 2-0 lead four minutes later. After Ottawa tied it, Volesky helped set up the game-winning goal in the 88th minute with a strong run after winning a challenge near midfield. After drawing the defense, Volesky played the ball to his right for Max Alvarez, whose shot was knocked into the net by a defender. For his efforts, Volesky was named USL player of the week. A week later, against powerful New York, Volesky was at it again, putting the home team on top in the third minute when he stripped the ball from a defender and scored on a sliding shot to the far corner. Then, with his team down 2-1 in the 75th minute, Volesky drew a penalty kick when he was pulled down in the box. Jose Angulo converted and the home team finished of another 3-2 thriller on a goal from Belleville West High product Seth Rudolph in the 84th minute. “Christian gives us a different look, a different dimension, and he’s scored a couple of nice goals,” Preki said. “It’s important for forwards to find the net and it’s important for them to be confident on the field.” Volesky, who stands 6 feet 1 and weighs 170 pounds, is among the USL league leaders with two goals and an assist. But those aren’t the stats he’s concerned with. “The key is getting results, getting wins, and building as a team,”

he said. “It’s early and we’re still learning Preki’s system, but this is a team that can be successful. The talent’s here, so it’s really just a matter of working hard and continuing to develop that team chemistry. Coming back the way we have the last two weeks, that shows our character and our fight and it’s also given us a great deal of confidence moving forward.” Volesky grew up in suburban Las Vegas, where he split time between soccer and basketball. He settled on soccer during high school and, after leading Denver University in scoring as a freshman, transferred to SIUE. In three seasons with the Cougars, Volesky scored 23 times. As a senior, he was the Missouri Valley Conference player of the year after leading the league in goals (eight), points (20) and shots (53). After earning MVP honors at the MLS Combine, he was selected 32nd overall in the 2015 SuperDraft by the Portland Timbers but never signed. He spent the last two summers in Rochester, N.Y., finishing as leading scorer as the Rhinos won the USL title in 2015 and reached the conference semifinals a year ago. “The main thing I try to bring to the game is hard work,” said Volesky, who cites fishing as his main interest away from soccer. “I pride myself on the ofseason work I do to prepare for each season and for the efort I try to put in day to day. That’s probably what I love most about playing for Preki: the fact that he’s constantly pushing us to become better players. “I’m a guy who likes to pressure defenders and hopefully create some mistakes, but I also like to think I have the skills to knock the ball around, to try to set up my teammates and to play the game the way it’s supposed to be played.” Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

CHAMPIONS LEAGUE

Pregame blasts hit Borussia Dortmund’s bus residents, for their part, used social media to ofer accommodation to stranded Monaco supporters ahead of their rescheduled match.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Three explosions went of near the team bus of Borussia Dortmund, one of Germany’s top soccer clubs, as it set of for a Champions League quarterfinal match on Tuesday. One of Dortmund’s players was injured. Police said they were working on the assumption that the blasts were directed at the Dortmund team and caused by “serious explosive devices,” which may have been hidden in a hedge near a parking garage. The explosions happened as the team was departing its hotel for a first-leg match against Monaco. The game was called off shortly before kickof and rescheduled for Wednesday. A letter claiming responsibility was found near the site of the blasts, prosecutor Sandra Luecke told a late evening news conference. She said investigators are examining the authenticity of what was written in the letter, but wouldn’t reveal more about its contents, citing the ongoing investigation. The case is being investigated as attempted homicide, Luecke said. There were three explosions near the Dortmund bus as the team left the L’Arrivee Hotel and Spa on the outskirts of Dortmund for the stadium at 7:15 p.m. local time (12:15 p.m. St. Louis time), police said. A window on the bus was dam-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dortmund players check their phones outside after their team bus was damaged in an explosion.

aged and defender Marc Bartra was injured. Club spokesman Sascha Fligge said Bartra was operated on late Tuesday for a broken bone in his right wrist and to remove “foreign objects” from his arm. Dortmund goalie Roman Buerki said the team bus had just pulled out of the hotel driveway when an explosion — a “huge bang” — happened and sent glass flying. Bartra was hit by shards from the broken back window, he added. Players ducked for cover, wondering whether there would be more explosions. Inside the packed stadium, supporters of Monaco chanted “Dortmund, Dortmund” in sympathy for the German side. Dortmund

Dybala nets 2 as Juventus beats Barcelona • Paulo Dybala outshone his more famous compatriot Lionel Messi by scoring two goals to help Juventus beat Barcelona 3-0 in the first leg of their Champions League quarterfinal in Turin, Italy. Dybala broke the deadlock in the seventh minute and doubled his tally in the 22nd. Giorgio Chiellini added the third, 10 minutes after the break. The result will give Juventus plenty of confidence heading into the second leg on April 19, but it will be wary of another fantastic comeback from Barcelona, which beat Paris Saint-Germain 6-1 in its last match to become the first team to overturn a 4-0 first-leg loss in the history of the competition. “The sensation is that we are living through another nightmare,” Barcelona coach Luis Enrique said. “We gave away two goals in the first half and against a team like Juventus you pay for it. As a coach it’s very difficult to explain, Juventus was superior to us in every way. I’m responsible 101 percent ... (and) I don’t want to talk about a comeback.” But he added: “Certainly, if we get back to our level we can score four goals against anyone.”


SPORTS

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B3

Tight end tandem ready to emerge

MLB NOTEBOOK

MU’s Scales, Okwuegbunam expected to take on expanded roles BY DAVE MATTER st. Louis Post-dispatch

COLUMBIA, MO. • Finding steady work as

an aspiring but unproven Missouri offensive player isn’t easy this spring. The Tigers return 10 starters from a unit that led the Southeastern Conference in total ofense last year. All seven ofensive linemen who started a game last fall are back, along with the team’s leading passer, top three running backs and its four most productive wide receivers. Fortunately for redshirt freshmen Brendan Scales and Albert Okwuegbunam, their meeting room is adorned with a “help wanted” sign. Mizzou’s only departed regular starter on ofense is tight end Sean Culkin, who stayed healthy last season and gave the Tigers a valuable dual-threat as a blocker and receiver with 24 catches for 282 yards. Culkin, a possible late-round pick in this month’s NFL draft, was Mizzou’s second-most prolific receiver on third down with nine catches for 142 yards, with eight of those grabs moving the chains. With junior Kendall Blanton (16 catches, 161 yards, three touchdowns) and senior Jason Reese (eight, 97, two) back from last year’s tight end rotation, the Tigers figure to use another committee approach to fulfill the variety of roles the position plays in coordinator Josh Heupel’s ofense. Ankle surgery has sidelined Blanton this spring, giving the two redshirt freshmen valuable experience with the first and second units. “They’re a really strong point for us ofensively,” Missouri coach Barry Odom said after Tuesday’s practice. “They’ve taken a lot of reps. We’ve lined them up everywhere.” Last year, Heupel’s version of the spread ofense employed tight ends as blockers attached to the line of scrimmage, as receivers

split wide of the formation and as blockers in the backfield. Scales, a multipurpose AllMetro player at Lafayette High, has tried to capitalize on the added exposure with Blanton injured. “It’s not something I want to see, but it’s given me an opportunity to get more reps and just to see how spring goes,” the 6-4, 240-pound redshirt freshman said. “He already knows how it goes. For him to be on the side he’s been able to coach us more and I’ve gotten more tips from him that I wouldn’t have gotten from him if he was out there playing.” Scales was a late addition to Odom’s first recruiting class last year after being committed to Alabama for nine months, but Odom immediately reached out to the St. Louis native when he landed Mizzou’s head-coaching job. Missouri’s previous staff under coach Gary Pinkel had initially favored Scales as a defensive player, but Odom and newly hired Heupel made him a priority as an offensive recruit. When Scales told Alabama’s coaches that he wanted to visit Mizzou shortly before signing day, they said they preferred him as a grayshirt recruit, meaning he’d have to pay for tuition as a freshman and join the Crimson Tide as a scholarship player as sophomore. He quickly changed his commitment to Mizzou. “They showed that they wanted me more,” he said. “I always wanted to come here more. … When Coach Odom was hired he said, ‘We want you here.’ I don’t think I’ve lived up to what he expects of me, but I know I will. I’ve really bought into their program and love it a lot.” Mizzou radio broadcasters Mike Kelly and Howard Richards better have a few more months to work on the pronunciation of Mizzou’s other new tight end: OH-coo-AYEboo-nom.

Others around the program prefer a shortcut: Albert O. The 6-5, 240-pound tight end has been one of the breakout playmakers of the spring, an inviting downfield threat who can run past and overpower defenders in the open field. Okwuegbunam never put his hand down in a three-point stance before coming to college having exclusively played wide receiver at Sacred Heart Griin High in Springfield, Ill. As a junior and senior, 28 of his 75 receptions went for touchdowns. “Albert can do anything for this ofense, anything they ask him to do,” Scales said. “He can catch the ball and he can run. I know he’s going to be lethal outside for sure.” The two newest additions to Mizzou’s otherwise veteran ofense should get plenty of snaps in Saturday’s spring finale, the 1 p.m. Black and Gold scrimmage.

BROKEN ARM SIDELINES FRAZIER Marcell Frazier, the team’s most experienced defensive end, will miss the rest of spring practices after sufering a broken right arm in Saturday’s scrimmage, Odom said. Frazier, a senior, broke his right radius and will be sidelined until June. He underwent surgery Tuesday. The Portland, Ore., native who transferred from College of the Siskiyous, had 7.5 sacks last season among his 33 tackles. Odom also confirmed that Spencer Williams, another defensive end with game experience, has left the team and plans to transfer. Williams, who would have been a redshirt junior this fall, made five starts last year and appeared in all 12 games, making 15 tackles with four hurries. Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

San Francisco’s Buster Posey falls to the ground after being hit by a pitch Monday night.

Posey is on disabled list Catcher Buster Posey was placed on the seven-day disabled list with concussion symptoms Tuesday, a day after he was struck in the helmet by a 94 mph fastball from Arizona’s Taijuan Walker. While manager Bruce Bochy said following Monday’s victory that Posey was doing ine, the Giants planned to check in with him overnight and re-evaluate him Tuesday. The 0-1 fastball with two outs in the irst inning sent the Gold Glove catcher immediately to the ground. Trainer Dave Groeschner sprinted toward the plate and Bochy was right behind. Posey got up on his own but exited the game, with Nick Hundley entering to pinch run and stay in the game behind the plate. Catcher Tim Federowicz had his contract purchased from Triple-A Sacramento to take Posey’s place, while righthander Clayton Blackburn was designated for assignment. Kemp is sidelined • Atlanta Braves outielder Matt Kemp has been placed on the 10-day disabled list retroactive to Saturday because of a right hamstring strain. Inielder Johan Camargo was recalled from Triple-A Gwinnett to take Kemp’s roster spot before Tuesday’s game at Miami. Kemp hasn’t played since Friday. He took batting practice Sunday and though the injury isn’t believed to be serious, he went on the DL as a precaution. Marlins have suitors • Miami Marlins President David Samson says talks with multiple parties interested in buying the team are in the “fourth inning,” leaving lots of uncertainty about the future of the franchise. Hours before the Marlins’ home opener, Samson said owner Jefrey Loria might sell before the end of the season — or not at all.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri defensive end Marcell Frazier (right) tries to tackle South Carolina quarterback Jake Bentley in a game last season. Frazier will miss the rest of spring practices after sufering a broken right arm in Saturday’s scrimmage.

NFL NOTEBOOK

Longtime Rams LB Laurinaitis is retiring STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS

Linebacker James Laurinaitis, a secondround draft pick by the St. Louis Rams in 2009 and the franchise’s career tackling leader, is retiring. Laurinaitis made the announcement Tuesday on his certified Twitter account. “I still love the game, but the body says it’s time to move on,” Laurinaitis said via Twitter. “I’m really looking forward to transitioning into what’s next with my wife and (two) daughters.” After an All-American college career at Ohio State, Laurinaitis started 112 games over seven years with the Rams. In the 21 seasons for the team in St. Louis, only Isaac Bruce (179), Orlando Pace (154), Torry Holt (146), and Steven Jackson (119) started more games. Laurinaitis led the team in tackles in each of his first four seasons, rarely missed a snap, and was voted team captain multiple times. Several former Rams teammates saluted

the middle linebacker via Twitter after Laurinaitis’ announcement. Among them: Chris Long: “140 characters doesn’t sum up how lucky I was to play football with a dude of this caliber for 7 yrs.” Zac Stacy: “Ultimate pro. Ultimate teammate. All blessings your way big bro.” Johnny Hekker: “One of my favorite teammates as a young Ram. Owe a lot of my success to the example he set.” In a move related both to salary cap savings and what the Rams felt was declining performance, the team released Laurinaitis on Feb. 19, 2016. He subsequently signed with New Orleans, He started the first three games of the 2016 season for the Saints, but sufered a quad injury in Game 3, then was benched, and eventually released. Even before the season ended, some close to Laurinaitis were aware that he was considering retirement. He made it official Tuesday. “With offseason programs starting back

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up, the thing I’m going to miss most is the locker room,” Laurinaitis tweeted. “The conversations, my relationships I built with all that I’ve battled with will be my favorite memories. ...I’ve been blessed way more through the sport of football than I could’ve ever imagined.” (Jim Thomas) Rams sign three linemen, waive Bailey • The Los Angeles Rams have signed defensive linemen Ethan Westbrooks, Matt Longacre and Louis Trinca-Pasat. The Rams also waived receiver Stedman Bailey on Tuesday. Westbrooks signed his franchise tender with the Rams after spending the previous three seasons with the club. Bailey was a third-round pick in 2013, but he was shot in the head in November 2015 while he sat in a car in his native Miami. He spent last season on the Rams’ reserve non-football injury list while working as a student assistant coach at West Virginia, his alma mater. Longacre spent the past two seasons with the Rams, playing in 11 games. Trinca-Pasat signed in 2015 as a free agent and spent that season on the practice squad, then missed last season due to a knee injury. (AP) Jaguars release Skuta • Continuing its purge of defensive players, Jacksonville has released veteran linebacker Dan Skuta. Skuta, 30, appeared in 26 games with the Jaguars after signing a five-year contract worth $20.5 million in 2015. He totaled 55 tackles and 1½ sacks in two seasons with the Jaguars. His role was reduced after the team drafted linebacker Myles Jack last year. In another move, the Jaguars traded fourth-year defensive end Chris Smith to Cincinnati for a conditional pick in the 2018 draft. (AP) Galette arrested • Redskins linebacker Junior Galette was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct and failure to comply after a weekend fight at a spring break event in Biloxi, Miss. (AP)

Wahoo protesters seek role • Organizers protesting the Cleveland Indians’ use of the Chief Wahoo logo have asked to be involved in talks with Major League Baseball about changes to the contentious symbol. A group asking the Indians to abolish the red-faced, smiling logo and their nickname gathered outside Progressive Field before the club’s home opener against the Chicago White Sox. The movement to replace the Wahoo logo has gained momentum in recent years. The Indians have reduced its usage, but the logo, which has been part of the team’s history for more than 60 years, still appears on some of Cleveland’s game caps and jerseys. Donaldson out of lineup • Josh Donaldson has a sore calf and was not in the lineup Tuesday night for the struggling Toronto Blue Jays for their home opener. The team also said closer Roberto Osuna was activated of the 10-day disabled list and was available to play against the Milwaukee Brewers. He had been out with a sore neck. With Donaldson sidelined, Ryan Goins was starting at third and batting ninth. Yankees No. 1, Cardinals No. 7 • Forbes ranks the New York Yankees as baseball’s most valuable team for the 20th straight year and lists the Tampa Bay Rays with the lowest valuation. Forbes said it estimates the Yankees are worth $3.7 billion, up 9 percent from last year. The Dodgers are next at $2.75 billion, a 10 percent increase. Boston was third at $2.7 billion, followed by the Chicago Cubs ($2.675 billion), San Francisco ($2.65 billion) and New York Mets ($2 billion). The Cardinals were seventh at $1.8 billion. At the bottom were the Rays ($825 million), Oakland ($880 million), Cincinnati ($915 million) and Cleveland ($920 million). Mariners’ Segura on DL • The Seattle Mariners placed shortstop Jean Segura on the 10-day disabled list with a strained right hamstring. Seattle was hoping to avoid the DL stint for Segura, but manager Scott Servais said it was better to give his starting shortstop a few extra days to recover. Associated Press


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W L

Pct

Cincinnati

6 2

.714

6-2 W-3

2-1

4-1

Chicago

5 2

.714

5-2 W-3

1-0

4-2

Pittsburgh

3 4 .429 2½

L-2

3-2

0-2

Milwaukee

3 5

.375

3

3

3-5 W-1

2-5

1-0

Cardinals

2 6 .250

4

4

2-6

2-4

0-2

Str Home

Away

EAST

GB WCGB L10

3-4

L-3

Away

W L

Pct

New York

5 3

.625

5-3 W-3

3-3

2-0

Washington

5 3

.625

½

5-3 W-2

4-1

1-2

Miami

4 3

.571

½

1

4-3 W-1

1-0

3-3

Philadelphia

3 5

.375

2

3-5

L-2

2-3

1-2

Atlanta

1 6

.143 3½

4

1-6

L-5

0-0

1-6

WEST

W L

Str Home

Away

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

GB WCGB L10

Tuesday Washington 8, Cardinals 3 Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 2 NY Mets 14, Philadelphia 4 Milwaukee 4, Toronto 3 Miami 8, Atlanta 4 Colorado 3, San Diego 2 Arizona at San Francisco, late Monday San Francisco 4, Arizona 1 Cincinnati 7, Pittsburgh 1 NY Mets 4, Philadelphia 3 Washington 14, Cardinals 6 Cubs 3, LA Dodgers 2 San Diego 5, Colorado 3

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL

W L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Detroit

5

2

.714

5-2 W-2

4-1

1-1

Minnesota

5

2

.714

5-2

L-1

3-0

2-2

Cleveland

4

3

.571

1

½

4-3

W-1

1-0

3-3

Chicago

2 4

.333 2½

2

2-4

L-2

2-3

0-1

Kansas City

2

.286

2-5

L-2

0-1

2-4

Str Home

Away

5

EAST

W L

Baltimore

4

2

.667

4-2

L-2

4-1

0-1

Tampa Bay

5

3

.625

5-3

L-1

5-2

0-1

Boston

4

3

.571

½

½

4-3

W-1

3-0

1-3

New York

3 4

.429

3-4 W-2

1-0

2-4

1 6

.143 3½

1-6

0-1

1-5

Str Home

Away

Toronto WEST

Pct

3

W L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

GB WCGB L10

L-4

Arizona

6 2

.750

6-2

L-1

6-1

0-1

Los Angeles

5

.714

5-2 W-3

3-0

Colorado

6 3

.667

½

6-3 W-1

3-2

3-1

Oakland

4 4 .500

1

4-4

W-1

2-2

2-2

Los Angeles

4 4 .500

2

4-4

L-1

3-1

1-3

Houston

4 4 .500

1

4-4

L-1

4-3

0-1

San Diego

4 5 .444 2½

2

4-5

L-1

2-1

2-4

Texas

2 4

.333 2½

2

2-4

W-1

2-4

0-0

3-5 W-2

1-0

2-5

Seattle

2 6

.250 3½

3

2-6

W-1

1-0

1-6

San Francisco 3 5

.375

3

ROUNDUP Mets’ Cespedes hits three home runs Yoenis Cespedes hit three of New York’s seven homers to back Matt Harvey, and the Mets beat the Philadelphia Phillies 14-4 Tuesday night. Harvey (2-0) left with tightness in his left hamstring after allowing two runs and ive hits and striking out six in 52/3 innings. Phillies starter Clay Buchholz (0-1) also exited because of an injury, a strained right forearm. He gave up six runs and eight hits in 21/3 innings. Lucas Duda hit two homers and Asdrubal Cabrera and Travis d’Arnaud also went deep for New York, which has 46 homers in its last 21 games at Citizens Bank Park. Rockies 3, Padres 2 • Nolan Arenado hit a go-ahead homer in the seventh, Antonio Senzatela threw seven sharp innings for his irst major league win and host Colorado beat the San Diego. Marlins 8, Braves 4 • Marcell Ozuna homered twice and had a career-high six RBIs to help Miami win its home opener.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Red Sox 8, Orioles 1 • Drew Pomeranz struck out six in his season debut and Dustin Pedroia drove in four runs to help Boston beat visiting Baltimore. Christian Vazquez added a two-run triple in the eighth, capping of a four-for-four game, as the Red Sox tagged Baltimore pitchers for 15 hits and had back-to-back threerun innings in the seventh and eighth to blow the game open. Indians 2, White Sox 1 • Michael Brantley doubled home Francisco Lindor with two outs in the 10th inning as Cleveland celebrated its 2016 AL championship and then beat Chicago in its home opener. Brantley could only watch and cheer for his teammates last October during their postseason run after having two operations on his right shoulder. But he’s healthy now, and after playing in just 11 games last season, Brantley made the most of his irst home game since May 10 with his gamewinning hit. Tigers 2, Twins 1 • Matthew Boyd allowed one hit in six outstanding innings, and James McCann homered in the ifth to lift Detroit to a win at home. Boyd (1-1) took a no-hitter into the sixth before Robbie Grossman broke it up by lining a clean single to left ield with two out. The Detroit lefthander struck out six and walked two before turning the game over to the bullpen. Tigers relievers have struggled so far this season, but they were able to close this game out.

INTERLEAGUE Brewers 4, Blue Jays 3 • Keon Broxton and Domingo Santana hit solo home runs, Wily Peralta pitched six innings for his second victory in two starts and Milwaukee handed slumping Toronto its sixth straight home opening loss. Troy Tulowitzki went two for three with three RBIs, but the last-place Blue Jays fell to 1-6, the worst start in franchise history. Three of Toronto’s six losses have been one-run decisions. Associated Press

2

Tuesday Detroit 2, Minnesota 1 Cleveland 2, White Sox 1, (10) Milwaukee 4, Toronto 3 Boston 8, Baltimore 1 Texas at LA Angels, late Houston at Seattle, late Monday NY Yankees 8, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 2, Boston 1 Oakland 2, Kansas City 0 Seattle 6, Houston 0 Wednesday Tampa Bay at NY Yankees, 12:05 Minnesota at Detroit, 12:10 White Sox at Cleveland, 5:10 Milwaukee at Toronto, 6:07 Baltimore at Boston, 6:10 Oakland at Kansas City, 7:15 Texas at LA Angels, 9:07 Houston at Seattle, 9:10

Away

2-2

Wednesday’s pitching matchups

BOX SCORES Indians 2, White Sox 1 (10) Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Saladino 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .294 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .192 Cabrera lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Frazier 3b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .143 Asche dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .077 A.Garcia rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .435 Soto c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .267 May cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Davidson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .444 1-L.Garcia pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 35 1 6 1 0 12 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 4 0 0 0 1 1 .233 Lindor ss 2 2 1 1 2 0 .308 Brantley lf 3 0 1 1 2 1 .250 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .185 Ramirez 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .200 Diaz 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Naquin cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .056 Almonte rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .273 Totals 31 2 5 2 7 12 Chicago 000 010 000 0 — 1 6 1 Cleveland 100 000 000 1 — 2 5 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-doubled for May in the 8th. 1-ran for Davidson in the 8th. E: Anderson (1). LOB: Chicago 4, Cleveland 8. 2B: Saladino (2), Frazier (1), Davidson (1), Brantley (1), Ramirez (2), Almonte (1). HR: Frazier (1), off Carrasco; Lindor (4), off Shields. RBIs: Frazier (1), Lindor (8), Brantley (4). CS: A.Garcia (2). S: Lindor. RLISP: Chicago 4 (Anderson 2, Cabrera, A.Garcia); Cleveland 3 (Gomes 3). GIDP: Encarnacion 2. DP: Chicago 2 (Frazier, Saladino, Abreu), (Frazier, Saladino, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields 51/3 2 1 1 2 6 92 1.69 Jennings 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0.00 Putnam 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Jones 1 0 0 0 3 0 19 5.40 Robertson 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 Kahnle L, 0-1 2/3 1 1 1 1 2 19 3.38 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco 7 4 1 1 0 7 95 2.13 Miller 1 2 0 0 0 1 21 0.00 Allen 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.45 1/ Logan 0 0 0 4 9.00 3 0 0 Shaw W, 1-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.25 Jennings pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 2-0, Putnam 3-0. WP: Putnam. Umpires: Home, Will Little; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, James Hoye. T: 3:37. A: 35,002 .

Tigers 2, Twins 1 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .214 Grossman dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278 Polanco ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Sano 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .333 Castro c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .353 Gimenez 1b 1 0 0 0 2 1 .333 a-Mauer ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .211 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .069 b-Kepler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Santana rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Totals 31 1 5 1 4 8 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .318 Castellanos 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Cabrera 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .125 Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Upton lf 2 1 0 0 0 0 .125 Mahtook rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 McCann c 3 1 1 2 0 0 .235 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Machado ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 2 4 2 2 2 Minnesota 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 Detroit 000 020 00x — 2 4 0 a-singled for Gimenez in the 9th. b-popped out for Buxton in the 9th. E: Polanco (1). LOB: Minnesota 7, Detroit 5. 2B: Sano (3). HR: McCann (3), off Santiago. RBIs: Castro (6), McCann 2 (5). RLISP: Minnesota 2 (Grossman, Kepler); Detroit 1 (Martinez). GIDP: Rosario, Mahtook. DP: Minnesota 1 (Dozier, Polanco, Gimenez); Detroit 1 (Machado, Kinsler, Cabrera). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santiago L, 1-1 61/3 3 2 2 1 1 84 2.38 Tonkin 12/3 1 0 0 1 1 27 0.00 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd W, 1-1 6 1 0 0 2 6 97 5.40 1/ Greene 1 0 9 6.75 3 1 0 0 2/ Ryan 0 0 7 3.38 3 0 0 0 Wilson 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Rodriguez S, 3-4 1 3 1 1 0 1 19 4.15 Inherited runners-scored: Tonkin 1-0, Ryan 2-0. HBP: Santiago (Upton). WP: Wilson. Umpires: Home, Ed Hickox; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Ron Kulpa. T: 2:39. A: 21,237 .

Red Sox 8, Orioles 1 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gentry rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 a-Smith ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .357 Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .261 Machado 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Davis 1b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .333 Castillo c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .353 b-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mancini lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .167 Schoop 2b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .105 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .105 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 9 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 4 0 0 .310 Benintendi cf 5 0 3 1 0 0 .250 Betts rf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .200 Ramirez dh 4 1 1 0 1 0 .250 Moreland 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .321 Bogaerts ss 3 1 0 0 1 2 .167 Sandoval 3b 2 1 0 1 1 1 .120 Young lf 4 3 2 0 0 1 .250 Vazquez c 4 2 4 2 0 0 1.000 Totals 35 8 15 8 3 5 Baltimore 000 000 100 — 1 5 2 Boston 010 010 33x — 8 15 0 a-struck out for Gentry in the 8th. b-flied out for Castillo in the 9th. E: Gentry (1), Hardy (1). LOB: Baltimore 6, Boston 8. 2B: Jones (2), Mancini (1), Moreland (6), Vazquez (2). 3B: Vazquez (1). RBIs: Schoop (1), Pedroia 4 (5), Benintendi (5), Sandoval (5), Vazquez 2 (2). SB: Vazquez (1). CS: Ramirez (1). SF: Pedroia, Sandoval. RLISP: Baltimore 3 (Trumbo, Hardy 2); Boston 7 (Benintendi, Betts, Ramirez 4, Young). GIDP: Betts, Moreland. DP: Baltimore 3 (Schoop, Hardy, Davis), (Castillo, Schoop), (Machado, Hardy, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy L, 1-1 61/3 7 3 3 2 3 106 2.70 2/ O’Day 1 0 0 20 16.87 3 3 2 Drake 1 5 3 3 1 2 36 8.10 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz W, 1-0 6 4 1 1 1 6 91 1.50 Hembree 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 5.40 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Kelly 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 Pomeranz pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: O’Day 1-1, Hembree 1-1. Umpires: Home, Eric Cooper; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Gary Cederstrom. T: 3:15. A: 37,497 .

NL

Pitcher

SD Col

Perdomo (R) Freeland (L)

Time W-L

ERA

2:10

0-0 1-0

8.44 1.50

StL Leake (R) Was Scherzer (R)

3:05

0-1 1-0

1.13 2.70

Cin Pit

Garrett (L) Nova (R)

6:05

1-0 0.00 1-0 0.00

NY Phi

Wheeler (R) Velasquez (R) 6:05

0-1 11.25 0-1 9.00

Atl Garcia (L) Mia Koehler (R)

0-1 0-0

6:10

6.00 1.80

LA Chi

McCarthy (R) Lackey (R) 7:05

1-0 3.00 0-0 0.00

Ari SF

Miller (R) Cain (R)

9:15

1-0 0-0

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

TB NY

Snell (L) TBD

0-1 12:05

5.40 0-0

()

5.06 8.31

Min Gibson (R) Det Fulmer (R)

0-0 5.40 12:10 0-0 0.00

Chi Cle

Holland (L) Salazar (R)

5:10

0-1 0-0

Bal Jimenez (R) Bos Wright (R)

6:10

0-0 10.39 0-0 5.40

Oak Triggs (R) KC Hammel (R)

7:15

1-0 0.00 0-0 5.40

Tex Griffin (R) LA Chavez (R)

9:07

0-0 10.80 1-0 1.59

Hou Fiers (R) Sea Gallardo (R)

9:10

0-1 0-1

1.50 5.40

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Mil Tor

Anderson (R) 0-0 Stroman (R) 6:07 1-0

1.50 1.42

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cleveland’s Michael Brantley watches his game-ending double of Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Tommy Kahnle. Marlins 8, Braves 4

Brewers 4, Blue Jays 3

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 0 1 0 0 1 .152 Inciarte cf Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 1 2 .156 Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .333 Markakis rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .296 Garcia 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .185 Phillips 2b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .333 Flowers c 3 1 0 0 1 1 .294 Bonifacio lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .143 Colon p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Peterson ph 1 0 0 1 0 0 .300 Foltynewicz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Camargo ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Krol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-d’Arnaud ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Totals 34 4 7 3 3 12 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .286 Realmuto c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .462 Yelich cf 4 3 3 1 0 0 .281 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .250 Bour 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .130 Ozuna lf 2 2 2 6 1 0 .423 Dietrich 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .263 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Riddle ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Straily p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Moore ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Phelps p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rojas 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Totals 30 8 10 8 3 7 Atlanta 000 121 000 — 4 7 0 Miami 303 020 00x — 8 10 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Colon in the 5th. b-struck out for Ziegler in the 6th. c-advanced to 1st on strikeout for Foltynewicz in the 7th. d-struck out for Krol in the 9th. E: Straily (1). LOB: Atlanta 7, Miami 3. 2B: Phillips 2 (3). HR: Markakis (1), off Straily; Ozuna (2), off Colon; Ozuna (3), off Foltynewicz. RBIs: Markakis (3), Garcia (2), Peterson (2), Yelich (3), Bour (2), Ozuna 6 (12). SB: Inciarte (1), Phillips 2 (3), Yelich (2). SF: Bour, Ozuna. RLISP: Atlanta 4 (Markakis 2, Flowers, Bonifacio); Miami 1 (Riddle). GIDP: Inciarte, Realmuto, Dietrich. DP: Atlanta 2 (Swanson, Phillips, Freeman), (Freeman, Swanson); Miami 1 (Riddle, Gordon, Bour). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon L, 0-1 4 7 6 6 2 2 75 6.30 Foltynewicz 2 3 2 2 0 4 34 6.35 O’Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 6.75 Krol 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 7.36 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily W, 1-1 5 3 3 2 2 5 79 7.56 Ziegler 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 2.25 Barraclough 1 1 0 0 1 3 27 2.25 Phelps 1 1 0 0 0 2 22 5.40 Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 HBP: Straily (Phillips). WP: Barraclough. Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third, Lance Barksdale. T: 2:54. A: 36,519 .

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Villar 2b Broxton cf 5 2 2 1 0 3 .188 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .250 Shaw dh 5 1 1 1 0 0 .267 Santana rf 4 1 2 2 0 2 .182 Aguilar 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .400 Perez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .120 Pina c 4 0 3 0 0 1 .429 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .158 Totals 39 4 11 4 1 13 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .111 Bautista rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .120 Morales dh 4 1 3 0 0 0 .286 Tulowitzki ss 3 0 2 3 0 0 .185 Martin c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Pearce lf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .158 Pillar cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Goins 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000 a-Donaldson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Totals 31 3 5 3 5 10 Milwaukee 201 010 000 — 4 11 1 Toronto 101 010 000 — 3 5 0 a-struck out for Goins in the 9th. E: Villar (3). LOB: Milwaukee 9, Toronto 7. 2B: Aguilar (2), Pina (2), Tulowitzki 2 (3). 3B: Shaw (1). HR: Broxton (1), off Happ; Santana (2), off Happ. RBIs: Broxton (1), Shaw (7), Santana 2 (3), Tulowitzki 3 (9). SB: Broxton (2), Braun (1). CS: Pillar (1). SF: Tulowitzki. RLISP: Milwaukee 5 (Broxton, Shaw, Santana, Perez, Arcia); Toronto 5 (Tulowitzki, Martin, Smoak 2, Goins). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peralta W, 2-0 6 5 3 3 4 7 112 2.45 Barnes 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 Knebel 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 Feliz S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.38 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ L, 0-2 42/3 9 4 4 0 8 102 5.40 1/ Leone 0 0 0 2 3.00 3 0 0 Smith 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.25 Biagini 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 1.42 Grilli 1 1 0 0 0 0 23 2.45 Osuna 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Leone 1-0. HBP: Knebel (Smoak). Umpires: Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 3:31. A: 48,456 .

Mets 14, Phillies 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson cf 4 2 1 0 2 3 .214 Cabrera ss 6 3 4 2 0 1 .353 Conforto lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Cespedes lf 6 3 4 5 0 0 .250 Edgin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bruce rf 6 0 1 2 0 1 .276 Walker 2b 5 1 2 0 1 0 .194 Duda 1b 6 2 4 2 0 1 .333 Reyes 3b-ss 6 1 1 0 0 0 .061 d’Arnaud c 4 1 3 3 1 1 .278 Harvey p 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Robles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Rivera ph-3b 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Totals 47 14 20 14 5 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .286 Kendrick lf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .407 Nava lf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .667 Herrera cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .345 b-Altherr ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Franco 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .207 Saunders rf 4 0 0 1 0 0 .222 Joseph 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .087 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blanco 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Rupp c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .143 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Buchholz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Morgan p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Stassi 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Knapp ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals 35 4 8 4 2 8 New York 321 211 031 — 14 20 0 Philadelphia 010 100 020 — 4 8 0 a-walked for Robles in the 8th. b-grounded out for Herrera in the 8th. c-singled for Gomez in the 9th. LOB: New York 11, Philadelphia 6. 2B: Granderson (2), Cabrera (2), Cespedes (2), Walker (2), Duda (2), Reyes (1), d’Arnaud (2), Hernandez (3), Nava (1). HR: Cespedes (2), off Buchholz; Cabrera (1), off Morgan; Cespedes (3), off Morgan; Cespedes (4), off Morgan; Duda (2), off Morgan; d’Arnaud (1), off Rodriguez; Duda (3), off Gomez; Franco (1), off Harvey. RBIs: Cabrera 2 (4), Cespedes 5 (6), Bruce 2 (8), Duda 2 (6), d’Arnaud 3 (5), Franco 2 (4), Saunders (5), Nava (4). RLISP: New York 6 (Cespedes, Bruce, d’Arnaud, Harvey 3); Philadelphia 3 (Hernandez, Herrera 2). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey W, 2-0 52/3 5 2 2 1 6 92 2.92 Robles 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 17 4.15 Edgin 1 2 2 2 0 0 19 4.50 Sewald 1 1 0 0 1 0 21 13.50 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz L, 0-1 21/3 8 6 6 1 2 67 12.27 Morgan 32/3 7 4 4 2 5 76 10.50 Rodriguez 12/3 4 3 3 2 2 48 11.81 Gomez 11/3 1 1 1 0 0 15 12.46 Inherited runners-scored: Gomez 2-0. Umpires: Home, Joe West; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:38. A: 28,659 .

Rockies 3, Padres 2 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .343 Jankowski lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .148 Myers 1b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .378 Solarte 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .303 1-Cordoba pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Schimpf 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .130 Renfroe rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Hedges c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Aybar ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .217 Weaver p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Sardinas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Diaz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 5 2 2 10 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .229 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Gonzalez rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .188 Arenado 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .324 Parra lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .375 Reynolds 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .323 Adames ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wolters c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .278 Senzatela p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 b-Story ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Totals 29 3 4 3 2 7 San Diego 100 001 000 — 2 5 2 Colorado 000 101 10x — 3 4 0 a-out on fielder’s choice for Weaver in the 7th. b-struck out for Senzatela in the 7th. 1-ran for Solarte in the 9th. E: Margot (1), Diaz (1). LOB: San Diego 5, Colorado 4. 2B: Wolters (1). 3B: Myers (2). HR: Margot (3), off Senzatela; Gonzalez (1), off Weaver; Blackmon (2), off Weaver; Arenado (3), off Diaz. RBIs: Margot (5), Myers (8), Blackmon (6), Gonzalez (2), Arenado (5). SF: Myers. RLISP: San Diego 3 (Schimpf, Hedges, Sardinas); Colorado 3 (Blackmon, Arenado, Story). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver 6 3 2 2 0 5 74 4.91 Diaz L, 1-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 20 2.08 Stammen 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Senzatela W, 1-0 7 5 2 2 1 5 94 1.50 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 1.93 Holland S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 0.00 WP: Holland. Umpires: Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 2:24. A: 20,664 .

Monday box scores

Cubs 3, Dodgers 2 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Forsythe 2b-3b 5 1 2 0 0 3 .276 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Seager ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Turner 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .357 Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barnes 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Gutierrez lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Van Slyke lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Dayton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Utley ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Puig rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .259 Gonzalez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Grandal c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .200 Pederson cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Wood p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Stripling p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Toles ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Totals 32 2 6 1 3 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 1 1 0 0 3 0 .222 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Uehara p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bryant 3b 4 0 1 1 1 2 .267 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 1 1 0 .172 Zobrist rf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .174 Russell ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .290 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Heyward cf-rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .292 Baez 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .176 Lester p 2 0 0 1 0 1 .000 Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Grimm p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Almora ph-cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .625 e-Jay ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .417 Totals 32 3 6 3 7 10 Los Angeles 000 001 010 — 2 6 2 Chicago 001 100 001 — 3 6 3 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Stripling in the 6th. b-grounded out for Fields in the 7th. c-doubled for Grimm in the 7th. d-out on fielder’s choice for Dayton in the 8th. e-singled for Almora in the 9th. f-grounded out for Davis in the 9th. E: Puig (1), Wood (1), Bryant (1), Russell (1), Contreras (1). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Chicago 10. 2B: Seager (3), Bryant (3), Almora (1). RBIs: Seager (8), Bryant (4), Rizzo (1), Lester (1). SB: Jay (1). CS: Gutierrez (1). RLISP: Los Angeles 3 (Forsythe, Van Slyke 2); Chicago 4 (Bryant 2, Zobrist 2). GIDP: Toles. DP: Chicago 2 (Contreras, Baez), (Baez, Russell, Rizzo). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wood 32/3 3 2 1 5 4 70 1.59 Stripling 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.93 Fields 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Dayton 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Romo L, 0-1 11/3 1 1 1 1 1 29 2.70 1/ Jansen 0 0 1 7 7.71 3 1 0 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester 6 4 1 1 1 7 100 1.64 Edwards 0 0 0 0 2 0 11 0.00 Grimm 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.40 1/ Strop 0 0 1 16 4.91 3 1 1 2/ Uehara 0 0 1 10 0.00 3 0 0 Davis W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Edwards pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Stripling 3-0, Jansen 1-1, Grimm 3-0, Uehara 2-1. HBP: Strop (Turner). Umpires: Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Dan Iassogna. T: 3:37. A: 41,166 .

Mets 4, Phillies 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .037 Cabrera ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .286 Cespedes lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .154 Bruce rf 3 3 2 3 1 0 .304 Granderson cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .208 Walker 2b 2 0 0 1 1 0 .154 Duda 1b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .222 d’Arnaud c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .143 deGrom p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Flores ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Smoker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Robles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reed p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 4 4 4 5 8 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .267 Kendrick lf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .400 Herrera cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .346 Franco 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .200 Saunders rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .261 Rupp c 3 0 0 1 1 0 .167 Stassi 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .125 Galvis ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Eickhoff p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Nava ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .600 Totals 34 3 10 3 4 6 New York 000 100 120 — 4 4 0 Philadelphia 200 000 001 — 3 10 2 a-lined out for deGrom in the 7th. b-grounded out for Eickhoff in the 7th. c-singled for Rodriguez in the 9th. E: Hernandez (1), Rupp (1). LOB: New York 4, Philadelphia 8. 2B: Cabrera (1). HR: Bruce (3), off Eickhoff; Bruce (4), off Rodriguez; Stassi (1), off Reed. RBIs: Bruce 3 (6), Walker (2), Saunders (4), Rupp (2), Stassi (1). SF: Walker. RLISP: New York 2 (Bruce, Flores); Philadelphia 2 (Rupp 2). GIDP: d’Arnaud, Rupp, Stassi. DP: New York 2 (deGrom, d’Arnaud, Duda), (Cabrera, Walker, Duda); Philadelphia 1 (Galvis, Hernandez, Stassi). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA deGrom 6 6 2 2 2 3 96 1.50 2/ Smoker 0 1 0 14 7.71 3 1 0 Blevins W, 1-0 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 2/ Robles 0 0 0 3 6.00 3 0 0 Reed S, 2-2 1 2 1 1 0 2 25 2.25 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eickhoff 7 3 2 2 4 7 94 2.63 Ramos L, 0-1 2/3 0 1 1 1 1 12 2.08 1/ Rodriguez 1 3 1 1 1 0 0 15 9.82 Inherited runners-scored: Blevins 2-0, Robles 2-0. PB: Rupp (1). Umpires: Home, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:59. A: 33,359 .

3.00 6.35

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Padres 5, Rockies 3 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 3 1 2 0 1 1 .323 Jankowski lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .130 Myers 1b 4 2 4 2 0 0 .382 Solarte 2b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .333 Schimpf 3b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .150 Renfroe rf 4 1 2 2 0 0 .281 Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Torrens c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Hedges c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cosart p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Cordoba ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Diaz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Blash ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Buchter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hand p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Sardinas ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Maurer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 5 9 5 3 10 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .219 LeMahieu 2b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .214 Gonzalez rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .179 Arenado 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .333 Parra lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .414 Story ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .148 Reynolds 1b 3 1 1 2 1 0 .345 Wolters c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .267 c-Garneau ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Chatwood p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Estevez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Cardullo ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Oberg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 3 8 3 3 8 San Diego 001 003 010 — 5 9 0 Colorado 000 001 002 — 3 8 0 a-singled for Cosart in the 5th. b-struck out for Torres in the 7th. c-struck out for Wolters in the 7th. d-struck out for Dunn in the 8th. e-struck out for Hand in the 9th. LOB: San Diego 4, Colorado 5. 2B: Myers (3), LeMahieu (1). 3B: Myers (1). HR: Myers (3), off Chatwood; Renfroe (2), off Chatwood; LeMahieu (1), off Torres; Reynolds (4), off Maurer. RBIs: Myers 2 (7), Solarte (9), Renfroe 2 (4), LeMahieu (2), Reynolds 2 (10). CS: Cordoba (1). SF: Solarte. RLISP: San Diego 2 (Schimpf, Cosart); Colorado 2 (Gonzalez, Parra). GIDP: Jankowski, Solarte, LeMahieu, Parra, Reynolds. DP: San Diego 3 (Aybar, Solarte, Myers), (Aybar, Solarte, Myers), (Cosart, Aybar, Myers); Colorado 3 (LeMahieu, Story, Reynolds), (Wolters, Story), (LeMahieu, Story, Reynolds). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cosart 4 5 0 0 1 2 70 3.86 Diaz W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Torres 1 1 1 1 0 1 11 5.06 Buchter 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 4.91 Hand 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 0.00 Maurer 1 2 2 2 0 2 19 6.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chatwood L, 0-2 51/3 7 4 4 3 7 101 6.35 Estevez 12/3 2 1 1 0 1 24 1.80 Dunn 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Oberg 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.25 Estevez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Dunn 1-1. WP: Chatwood. Umpires: Home, Cory Blaser; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Doug Eddings. T: 2:53. A: 20,504 .

Mariners 6, Astros 0 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Bregman 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .179 Altuve 2b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .188 Correa ss 4 0 3 0 0 1 .310 Beltran dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Gattis c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Gonzalez lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .278 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Gurriel 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .125 Totals 32 0 6 0 3 10 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .313 Motter ss 3 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Haniger rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .242 Cano 2b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .258 Cruz dh 4 1 3 2 0 0 .172 Seager 3b 3 0 2 1 0 1 .192 Valencia 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .129 Martin cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .107 Zunino c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .208 Dyson lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .160 Totals 32 6 11 5 3 7 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 Seattle 000 032 10x — 6 11 0 E: Reddick (1). LOB: Houston 8, Seattle 8. 2B: Gurriel (1), Haniger (2), Cano (3), Seager (2), Dyson (2). RBIs: Haniger (5), Cruz 2 (4), Seager (4), Valencia (2). SB: Martin (2). SF: Seager, Valencia. RLISP: Houston 4 (Beltran 3, Reddick); Seattle 5 (Cano, Cruz, Zunino 3). LIDP: Haniger. DP: Houston 1 (Gurriel); Seattle 1 (Valencia, Zunino). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton L, 0-1 5 7 3 3 2 6 89 4.09 1/ Sipp 1 1 0 20 9.00 3 1 2 Feliz 12/3 3 1 1 0 0 34 2.08 Gustave 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 10.12 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton W, 1-0 7 4 0 0 2 8 104 0.00 Altavilla 1 2 0 0 1 2 18 0.00 Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 13.50 Inherited runners-scored: Feliz 2-2. HBP: Morton (Dyson). Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Bill Welke; Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 2:56. A: 44,856 .


BASEBALL

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL

W L

Pct

Cincinnati

6 2

.714

6-2 W-3

2-1

4-1

Chicago

5 2

.714

5-2 W-3

1-0

4-2

Pittsburgh

3 4 .429 2½

L-2

3-2

0-2

Milwaukee

3 5

.375

3

3

3-5 W-1

2-5

1-0

Cardinals

2 6 .250

4

4

2-6

2-4

0-2

Str Home

Away

EAST

GB WCGB L10

3-4

L-3

Away

W L

Pct

New York

5 3

.625

5-3 W-3

3-3

2-0

Washington

5 3

.625

½

5-3 W-2

4-1

1-2

Miami

4 3

.571

½

1

4-3 W-1

1-0

3-3

Philadelphia

3 5

.375

2

3-5

L-2

2-3

1-2

Atlanta

1 6

.143 3½

4

1-6

L-5

0-0

1-6

WEST

W L

Str Home

Away

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

GB WCGB L10

Tuesday Washington 8, Cardinals 3 Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 2 NY Mets 14, Philadelphia 4 Milwaukee 4, Toronto 3 Miami 8, Atlanta 4 Colorado 3, San Diego 2 Arizona at San Francisco, late Monday San Francisco 4, Arizona 1 Cincinnati 7, Pittsburgh 1 NY Mets 4, Philadelphia 3 Washington 14, Cardinals 6 Cubs 3, LA Dodgers 2 San Diego 5, Colorado 3

M 2 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

AMERICAN LEAGUE CENTRAL

W L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

Str Home

Detroit

5

2

.714

5-2 W-2

4-1

1-1

Minnesota

5

2

.714

5-2

L-1

3-0

2-2

Cleveland

4

3

.571

1

½

4-3

W-1

1-0

3-3

Chicago

2 4

.333 2½

2

2-4

L-2

2-3

0-1

Kansas City

2

.286

2-5

L-2

0-1

2-4

Str Home

Away

5

EAST

W L

Baltimore

4

2

.667

4-2

L-2

4-1

0-1

Tampa Bay

5

3

.625

5-3

L-1

5-2

0-1

Boston

4

3

.571

½

½

4-3

W-1

3-0

1-3

New York

3 4

.429

3-4 W-2

1-0

2-4

1 6

.143 3½

1-6

0-1

1-5

Str Home

Away

Toronto WEST

Pct

3

W L

Pct

GB WCGB L10

GB WCGB L10

L-4

Arizona

6 2

.750

6-2

L-1

6-1

0-1

Los Angeles

5

.714

5-2 W-3

3-0

Colorado

6 3

.667

½

6-3 W-1

3-2

3-1

Oakland

4 4 .500

1

4-4

W-1

2-2

2-2

Los Angeles

4 4 .500

2

4-4

L-1

3-1

1-3

Houston

4 4 .500

1

4-4

L-1

4-3

0-1

San Diego

4 5 .444 2½

2

4-5

L-1

2-1

2-4

Texas

2 4

.333 2½

2

2-4

W-1

2-4

0-0

3-5 W-2

1-0

2-5

Seattle

2 6

.250 3½

3

2-6

W-1

1-0

1-6

San Francisco 3 5

.375

3

ROUNDUP Mets’ Cespedes hits three home runs Yoenis Cespedes hit three of New York’s seven homers to back Matt Harvey, and the Mets beat the Philadelphia Phillies 14-4 Tuesday night. Harvey (2-0) left with tightness in his left hamstring after allowing two runs and ive hits and striking out six in 52/3 innings. Phillies starter Clay Buchholz (0-1) also exited because of an injury, a strained right forearm. He gave up six runs and eight hits in 21/3 innings. Lucas Duda hit two homers and Asdrubal Cabrera and Travis d’Arnaud also went deep for New York, which has 46 homers in its last 21 games at Citizens Bank Park. Reds 6, Pirates 2 • Scooter Gennett homered for the second straight night to help Cincinnati overcome the early departure of injured starter Rookie Davis and win at Pittsburgh. Davis, a rookie righthander, left in the ifth inning with a bruised right forearm after being struck by a pitch. Rockies 3, Padres 2 • Nolan Arenado hit a go-ahead homer in the seventh, Antonio Senzatela threw seven sharp innings for his irst major league win and host Colorado beat San Diego. Marlins 8, Braves 4 • Marcell Ozuna homered twice and had a career-high six RBIs to help Miami win its home opener.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Red Sox 8, Orioles 1 • Drew Pomeranz struck out six in his season debut and Dustin Pedroia drove in four runs to help Boston beat visiting Baltimore. Christian Vazquez added a two-run triple in the eighth, capping of a four-for-four game, as the Red Sox tagged Baltimore pitchers for 15 hits and had back-to-back threerun innings in the seventh and eighth to blow the game open. Indians 2, White Sox 1 • Michael Brantley doubled home Francisco Lindor with two outs in the 10th inning as Cleveland celebrated its 2016 AL championship and then beat Chicago in its home opener. Tigers 2, Twins 1 • Matthew Boyd allowed one hit in six outstanding innings, and James McCann homered in the ifth to lift Detroit to a win at home. Boyd (1-1) took a no-hitter into the sixth before Robbie Grossman broke it up by lining a clean single to left ield with two out. The Detroit lefthander struck out six and walked two before turning the game over to the bullpen. Tigers relievers have struggled so far this season, but they were able to close this game out.

INTERLEAGUE Brewers 4, Blue Jays 3 • Keon Broxton and Domingo Santana hit solo home runs, Wily Peralta pitched six innings for his second victory in two starts and Milwaukee handed slumping Toronto its sixth straight home opening loss. Troy Tulowitzki went two for three with three RBIs, but the last-place Blue Jays fell to 1-6, the worst start in franchise history. Three of Toronto’s six losses have been one-run decisions. Associated Press

2

Tuesday Detroit 2, Minnesota 1 Cleveland 2, White Sox 1, (10) Milwaukee 4, Toronto 3 Boston 8, Baltimore 1 Texas at LA Angels, late Houston at Seattle, late Monday NY Yankees 8, Tampa Bay 1 Detroit 2, Boston 1 Oakland 2, Kansas City 0 Seattle 6, Houston 0 Wednesday Tampa Bay at NY Yankees, 12:05 Minnesota at Detroit, 12:10 White Sox at Cleveland, 5:10 Milwaukee at Toronto, 6:07 Baltimore at Boston, 6:10 Oakland at Kansas City, 7:15 Texas at LA Angels, 9:07 Houston at Seattle, 9:10

Away

2-2

Wednesday’s pitching matchups

BOX SCORES Indians 2, White Sox 1 (10) Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Saladino 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .294 Anderson ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .192 Cabrera lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Abreu 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Frazier 3b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .143 Asche dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .077 A.Garcia rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .435 Soto c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .267 May cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Davidson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .444 1-L.Garcia pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 35 1 6 1 0 12 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Santana dh 4 0 0 0 1 1 .233 Lindor ss 2 2 1 1 2 0 .308 Brantley lf 3 0 1 1 2 1 .250 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .185 Ramirez 2b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .200 Diaz 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Naquin cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .235 Gomes c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .056 Almonte rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .273 Totals 31 2 5 2 7 12 Chicago 000 010 000 0 — 1 6 1 Cleveland 100 000 000 1 — 2 5 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-doubled for May in the 8th. 1-ran for Davidson in the 8th. E: Anderson (1). LOB: Chicago 4, Cleveland 8. 2B: Saladino (2), Frazier (1), Davidson (1), Brantley (1), Ramirez (2), Almonte (1). HR: Frazier (1), off Carrasco; Lindor (4), off Shields. RBIs: Frazier (1), Lindor (8), Brantley (4). CS: A.Garcia (2). S: Lindor. RLISP: Chicago 4 (Anderson 2, Cabrera, A.Garcia); Cleveland 3 (Gomes 3). GIDP: Encarnacion 2. DP: Chicago 2 (Frazier, Saladino, Abreu), (Frazier, Saladino, Abreu). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields 51/3 2 1 1 2 6 92 1.69 Jennings 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0.00 Putnam 12/3 1 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Jones 1 0 0 0 3 0 19 5.40 Robertson 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 Kahnle L, 0-1 2/3 1 1 1 1 2 19 3.38 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carrasco 7 4 1 1 0 7 95 2.13 Miller 1 2 0 0 0 1 21 0.00 Allen 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.45 1/ Logan 0 0 0 4 9.00 3 0 0 Shaw W, 1-0 2/3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.25 Jennings pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Jennings 2-0, Putnam 3-0. WP: Putnam. Umpires: Home, Will Little; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, James Hoye. T: 3:37. A: 35,002 .

Tigers 2, Twins 1 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .214 Grossman dh 3 0 1 0 1 0 .278 Polanco ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Sano 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .333 Castro c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .353 Gimenez 1b 1 0 0 0 2 1 .333 a-Mauer ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .211 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Buxton cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .069 b-Kepler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Santana rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Totals 31 1 5 1 4 8 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .318 Castellanos 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Cabrera 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .125 Martinez dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Upton lf 2 1 0 0 0 0 .125 Mahtook rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .077 McCann c 3 1 1 2 0 0 .235 Jones cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Machado ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 2 4 2 2 2 Minnesota 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 Detroit 000 020 00x — 2 4 0 a-singled for Gimenez in the 9th. b-popped out for Buxton in the 9th. E: Polanco (1). LOB: Minnesota 7, Detroit 5. 2B: Sano (3). HR: McCann (3), off Santiago. RBIs: Castro (6), McCann 2 (5). RLISP: Minnesota 2 (Grossman, Kepler); Detroit 1 (Martinez). GIDP: Rosario, Mahtook. DP: Minnesota 1 (Dozier, Polanco, Gimenez); Detroit 1 (Machado, Kinsler, Cabrera). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santiago L, 1-1 61/3 3 2 2 1 1 84 2.38 Tonkin 12/3 1 0 0 1 1 27 0.00 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Boyd W, 1-1 6 1 0 0 2 6 97 5.40 1/ Greene 1 0 9 6.75 3 1 0 0 2/ Ryan 0 0 7 3.38 3 0 0 0 Wilson 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Rodriguez S, 3-4 1 3 1 1 0 1 19 4.15 Inherited runners-scored: Tonkin 1-0, Ryan 2-0. HBP: Santiago (Upton). WP: Wilson. Umpires: Home, Ed Hickox; First, Chris Conroy; Second, Jerry Meals; Third, Ron Kulpa. T: 2:39. A: 21,237 .

Red Sox 8, Orioles 1 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gentry rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 a-Smith ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .357 Jones cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .261 Machado 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Trumbo dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Davis 1b 3 1 1 0 1 2 .333 Castillo c 3 0 2 0 0 0 .353 b-Flaherty ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mancini lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .167 Schoop 2b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .105 Hardy ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .105 Totals 32 1 5 1 2 9 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 4 0 0 .310 Benintendi cf 5 0 3 1 0 0 .250 Betts rf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .200 Ramirez dh 4 1 1 0 1 0 .250 Moreland 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .321 Bogaerts ss 3 1 0 0 1 2 .167 Sandoval 3b 2 1 0 1 1 1 .120 Young lf 4 3 2 0 0 1 .250 Vazquez c 4 2 4 2 0 0 1.000 Totals 35 8 15 8 3 5 Baltimore 000 000 100 — 1 5 2 Boston 010 010 33x — 8 15 0 a-struck out for Gentry in the 8th. b-flied out for Castillo in the 9th. E: Gentry (1), Hardy (1). LOB: Baltimore 6, Boston 8. 2B: Jones (2), Mancini (1), Moreland (6), Vazquez (2). 3B: Vazquez (1). RBIs: Schoop (1), Pedroia 4 (5), Benintendi (5), Sandoval (5), Vazquez 2 (2). SB: Vazquez (1). CS: Ramirez (1). SF: Pedroia, Sandoval. RLISP: Baltimore 3 (Trumbo, Hardy 2); Boston 7 (Benintendi, Betts, Ramirez 4, Young). GIDP: Betts, Moreland. DP: Baltimore 3 (Schoop, Hardy, Davis), (Castillo, Schoop), (Machado, Hardy, Davis). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bundy L, 1-1 61/3 7 3 3 2 3 106 2.70 2/ O’Day 1 0 0 20 16.87 3 3 2 Drake 1 5 3 3 1 2 36 8.10 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz W, 1-0 6 4 1 1 1 6 91 1.50 Hembree 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 5.40 Barnes 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Kelly 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 Pomeranz pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: O’Day 1-1, Hembree 1-1. Umpires: Home, Eric Cooper; First, Adrian Johnson; Second, Gabe Morales; Third, Gary Cederstrom. T: 3:15. A: 37,497 .

NL

Pitcher

SD Col

Perdomo (R) Freeland (L)

Time W-L

ERA

2:10

0-0 1-0

8.44 1.50

StL Leake (R) Was Scherzer (R)

3:05

0-1 1-0

1.13 2.70

Cin Pit

Garrett (L) Nova (R)

6:05

1-0 0.00 1-0 0.00

NY Phi

Wheeler (R) Velasquez (R) 6:05

0-1 11.25 0-1 9.00

Atl Garcia (L) Mia Koehler (R)

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cleveland’s Michael Brantley watches his game-ending double of Chicago White Sox relief pitcher Tommy Kahnle. Marlins 8, Braves 4

Brewers 4, Blue Jays 3

Reds 6, Pirates 2

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 0 1 0 0 1 .152 Inciarte cf Swanson ss 4 0 0 0 1 2 .156 Freeman 1b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .333 Markakis rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .296 Garcia 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .185 Phillips 2b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .333 Flowers c 3 1 0 0 1 1 .294 Bonifacio lf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .143 Colon p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Peterson ph 1 0 0 1 0 0 .300 Foltynewicz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Camargo ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Krol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-d’Arnaud ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Totals 34 4 7 3 3 12 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .286 Realmuto c 4 1 1 0 0 0 .462 Yelich cf 4 3 3 1 0 0 .281 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .250 Bour 1b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .130 Ozuna lf 2 2 2 6 1 0 .423 Dietrich 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .263 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Riddle ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Straily p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Moore ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Barraclough p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Phelps p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rojas 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Totals 30 8 10 8 3 7 Atlanta 000 121 000 — 4 7 0 Miami 303 020 00x — 8 10 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Colon in the 5th. b-struck out for Ziegler in the 6th. c-advanced to 1st on strikeout for Foltynewicz in the 7th. d-struck out for Krol in the 9th. E: Straily (1). LOB: Atlanta 7, Miami 3. 2B: Phillips 2 (3). HR: Markakis (1), off Straily; Ozuna (2), off Colon; Ozuna (3), off Foltynewicz. RBIs: Markakis (3), Garcia (2), Peterson (2), Yelich (3), Bour (2), Ozuna 6 (12). SB: Inciarte (1), Phillips 2 (3), Yelich (2). SF: Bour, Ozuna. RLISP: Atlanta 4 (Markakis 2, Flowers, Bonifacio); Miami 1 (Riddle). GIDP: Inciarte, Realmuto, Dietrich. DP: Atlanta 2 (Swanson, Phillips, Freeman), (Freeman, Swanson); Miami 1 (Riddle, Gordon, Bour). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon L, 0-1 4 7 6 6 2 2 75 6.30 Foltynewicz 2 3 2 2 0 4 34 6.35 O’Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 6.75 Krol 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 7.36 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Straily W, 1-1 5 3 3 2 2 5 79 7.56 Ziegler 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 2.25 Barraclough 1 1 0 0 1 3 27 2.25 Phelps 1 1 0 0 0 2 22 5.40 Ramos 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 HBP: Straily (Phillips). WP: Barraclough. Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third, Lance Barksdale. T: 2:54. A: 36,519 .

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Villar 2b Broxton cf 5 2 2 1 0 3 .188 Braun lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .250 Shaw dh 5 1 1 1 0 0 .267 Santana rf 4 1 2 2 0 2 .182 Aguilar 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .400 Perez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .120 Pina c 4 0 3 0 0 1 .429 Arcia ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .158 Totals 39 4 11 4 1 13 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Travis 2b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .111 Bautista rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .120 Morales dh 4 1 3 0 0 0 .286 Tulowitzki ss 3 0 2 3 0 0 .185 Martin c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Pearce lf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .158 Pillar cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Goins 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000 a-Donaldson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Totals 31 3 5 3 5 10 Milwaukee 201 010 000 — 4 11 1 Toronto 101 010 000 — 3 5 0 a-struck out for Goins in the 9th. E: Villar (3). LOB: Milwaukee 9, Toronto 7. 2B: Aguilar (2), Pina (2), Tulowitzki 2 (3). 3B: Shaw (1). HR: Broxton (1), off Happ; Santana (2), off Happ. RBIs: Broxton (1), Shaw (7), Santana 2 (3), Tulowitzki 3 (9). SB: Broxton (2), Braun (1). CS: Pillar (1). SF: Tulowitzki. RLISP: Milwaukee 5 (Broxton, Shaw, Santana, Perez, Arcia); Toronto 5 (Tulowitzki, Martin, Smoak 2, Goins). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peralta W, 2-0 6 5 3 3 4 7 112 2.45 Barnes 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 Knebel 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 Feliz S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.38 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ L, 0-2 42/3 9 4 4 0 8 102 5.40 1/ Leone 0 0 0 2 3.00 3 0 0 Smith 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.25 Biagini 1 0 0 0 1 2 23 1.42 Grilli 1 1 0 0 0 0 23 2.45 Osuna 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Leone 1-0. HBP: Knebel (Smoak). Umpires: Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 3:31. A: 48,456 .

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. 5 0 1 1 0 1 .323 Hamilton cf Peraza ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Votto 1b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .161 Duvall lf 3 2 2 1 1 1 .367 Suarez 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .375 Schebler rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Gennett 2b 4 2 3 3 0 0 .263 Barnhart c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .263 Davis p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Cingrani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Alcantara ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Kivlehan ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Iglesias p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 6 10 6 1 8 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Marte cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Bell 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Williams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Hanson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 McCutchen rf 4 0 2 0 1 1 .214 Polanco lf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .241 Freese 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .294 Cervelli c 3 1 0 0 0 1 .182 Harrison 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .286 Mercer ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .192 Taillon p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Frazier ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Jaso 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 34 2 6 0 5 6 Cincinnati 010 100 130 — 6 10 1 Pittsburgh 001 001 000 — 2 6 0 a-reached on error for Taillon in the 6th. b-struck out for Storen in the 7th. c-struck out for Peralta in the 8th. d-lined out for Williams in the 9th. E: Peraza (1). LOB: Cincinnati 6, Pittsburgh 11. 2B: Peraza (1), Gennett (1). HR: Duvall (3), off Taillon; Gennett (3), off Williams. RBIs: Hamilton (2), Duvall (7), Suarez (5), Gennett 3 (8). SB: Peraza (3), Marte (1), Polanco (2). S: Barnhart. RLISP: Cincinnati 1 (Peraza); Pittsburgh 5 (Marte, Polanco, Freese, Cervelli, Jaso). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davis 4 2 1 1 4 3 88 6.43 Cingrani 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Storen W, 1-0 1 1 1 0 0 0 16 2.25 Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 1/ Wood 0 0 1 8 2.08 3 2 0 Iglesias S, 3-3 12/3 1 0 0 0 0 19 0.00 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Taillon 6 4 2 2 1 4 82 1.38 Nicasio L, 0-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 2.25 Williams 2 4 3 3 0 3 37 6.75 Inherited runners-scored: Iglesias 2-0. HBP: Taillon (Davis), Storen (Cervelli). WP: Davis. Umpires: Home, Mike DiMuro; First, Tripp Gibson; Second, Brian Gorman; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 3:04. A: 11,027 .

Mets 14, Phillies 4 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson cf 4 2 1 0 2 3 .214 Cabrera ss 6 3 4 2 0 1 .353 Conforto lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Cespedes lf 6 3 4 5 0 0 .250 Edgin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Sewald p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bruce rf 6 0 1 2 0 1 .276 Walker 2b 5 1 2 0 1 0 .194 Duda 1b 6 2 4 2 0 1 .333 Reyes 3b-ss 6 1 1 0 0 0 .061 d’Arnaud c 4 1 3 3 1 1 .278 Harvey p 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Robles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Rivera ph-3b 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Totals 47 14 20 14 5 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .286 Kendrick lf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .407 Nava lf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .667 Herrera cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .345 b-Altherr ph-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Franco 3b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .207 Saunders rf 4 0 0 1 0 0 .222 Joseph 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .087 Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blanco 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Rupp c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .143 Galvis ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Buchholz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Morgan p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Stassi 1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Knapp ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals 35 4 8 4 2 8 New York 321 211 031 — 14 20 0 Philadelphia 010 100 020 — 4 8 0 a-walked for Robles in the 8th. b-grounded out for Herrera in the 8th. c-singled for Gomez in the 9th. LOB: New York 11, Philadelphia 6. 2B: Granderson (2), Cabrera (2), Cespedes (2), Walker (2), Duda (2), Reyes (1), d’Arnaud (2), Hernandez (3), Nava (1). HR: Cespedes (2), off Buchholz; Cabrera (1), off Morgan; Cespedes (3), off Morgan; Cespedes (4), off Morgan; Duda (2), off Morgan; d’Arnaud (1), off Rodriguez; Duda (3), off Gomez; Franco (1), off Harvey. RBIs: Cabrera 2 (4), Cespedes 5 (6), Bruce 2 (8), Duda 2 (6), d’Arnaud 3 (5), Franco 2 (4), Saunders (5), Nava (4). RLISP: New York 6 (Cespedes, Bruce, d’Arnaud, Harvey 3); Philadelphia 3 (Hernandez, Herrera 2). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harvey W, 2-0 52/3 5 2 2 1 6 92 2.92 Robles 11/3 0 0 0 0 2 17 4.15 Edgin 1 2 2 2 0 0 19 4.50 Sewald 1 1 0 0 1 0 21 13.50 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchholz L, 0-1 21/3 8 6 6 1 2 67 12.27 Morgan 32/3 7 4 4 2 5 76 10.50 Rodriguez 12/3 4 3 3 2 2 48 11.81 Gomez 11/3 1 1 1 0 0 15 12.46 Inherited runners-scored: Gomez 2-0. Umpires: Home, Joe West; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Andy Fletcher; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:38. A: 28,659 .

Rockies 3, Padres 2 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Margot cf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .343 Jankowski lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .148 Myers 1b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .378 Solarte 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .303 1-Cordoba pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Schimpf 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .130 Renfroe rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Hedges c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Aybar ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .217 Weaver p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Sardinas ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Diaz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 5 2 2 10 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .229 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Gonzalez rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .188 Arenado 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .324 Parra lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .375 Reynolds 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .323 Adames ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wolters c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .278 Senzatela p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 b-Story ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Totals 29 3 4 3 2 7 San Diego 100 001 000 — 2 5 2 Colorado 000 101 10x — 3 4 0 a-out on fielder’s choice for Weaver in the 7th. b-struck out for Senzatela in the 7th. 1-ran for Solarte in the 9th. E: Margot (1), Diaz (1). LOB: San Diego 5, Colorado 4. 2B: Wolters (1). 3B: Myers (2). HR: Margot (3), off Senzatela; Gonzalez (1), off Weaver; Blackmon (2), off Weaver; Arenado (3), off Diaz. RBIs: Margot (5), Myers (8), Blackmon (6), Gonzalez (2), Arenado (5). SF: Myers. RLISP: San Diego 3 (Schimpf, Hedges, Sardinas); Colorado 3 (Blackmon, Arenado, Story). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver 6 3 2 2 0 5 74 4.91 Diaz L, 1-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 20 2.08 Stammen 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Senzatela W, 1-0 7 5 2 2 1 5 94 1.50 Ottavino 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 1.93 Holland S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 0.00 WP: Holland. Umpires: Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Doug Eddings; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 2:24. A: 20,664 .

Monday box scores

Cubs 3, Dodgers 2 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Forsythe 2b-3b 5 1 2 0 0 3 .276 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Seager ss 4 0 1 1 0 1 .300 Turner 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .357 Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barnes 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Gutierrez lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .231 Van Slyke lf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Dayton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Utley ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Puig rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .259 Gonzalez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Grandal c 3 0 2 0 1 0 .200 Pederson cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Wood p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Stripling p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Fields p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Toles ph-lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Totals 32 2 6 1 3 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schwarber lf 1 1 0 0 3 0 .222 Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Uehara p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Davis p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-La Stella ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bryant 3b 4 0 1 1 1 2 .267 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 1 1 0 .172 Zobrist rf-lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .174 Russell ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .290 Contreras c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Heyward cf-rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .292 Baez 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .176 Lester p 2 0 0 1 0 1 .000 Edwards p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Grimm p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Almora ph-cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .625 e-Jay ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .417 Totals 32 3 6 3 7 10 Los Angeles 000 001 010 — 2 6 2 Chicago 001 100 001 — 3 6 3 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for Stripling in the 6th. b-grounded out for Fields in the 7th. c-doubled for Grimm in the 7th. d-out on fielder’s choice for Dayton in the 8th. e-singled for Almora in the 9th. f-grounded out for Davis in the 9th. E: Puig (1), Wood (1), Bryant (1), Russell (1), Contreras (1). LOB: Los Angeles 8, Chicago 10. 2B: Seager (3), Bryant (3), Almora (1). RBIs: Seager (8), Bryant (4), Rizzo (1), Lester (1). SB: Jay (1). CS: Gutierrez (1). RLISP: Los Angeles 3 (Forsythe, Van Slyke 2); Chicago 4 (Bryant 2, Zobrist 2). GIDP: Toles. DP: Chicago 2 (Contreras, Baez), (Baez, Russell, Rizzo). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wood 32/3 3 2 1 5 4 70 1.59 Stripling 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.93 Fields 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Dayton 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Romo L, 0-1 11/3 1 1 1 1 1 29 2.70 1/ Jansen 0 0 1 7 7.71 3 1 0 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester 6 4 1 1 1 7 100 1.64 Edwards 0 0 0 0 2 0 11 0.00 Grimm 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 5.40 1/ Strop 0 0 1 16 4.91 3 1 1 2/ Uehara 0 0 1 10 0.00 3 0 0 Davis W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Edwards pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Stripling 3-0, Jansen 1-1, Grimm 3-0, Uehara 2-1. HBP: Strop (Turner). Umpires: Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Dan Iassogna. T: 3:37. A: 41,166 .

6:10

0-1 0-0

6.00 1.80

LA Chi

McCarthy (R) Lackey (R) 7:05

1-0 3.00 0-0 0.00

Ari SF

Miller (R) Cain (R)

9:15

1-0 0-0

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

TB NY

Snell (L) TBD

0-1 12:05

5.40 0-0

()

5.06 8.31

Min Gibson (R) Det Fulmer (R)

0-0 5.40 12:10 0-0 0.00

Chi Cle

Holland (L) Salazar (R)

5:10

0-1 0-0

Bal Jimenez (R) Bos Wright (R)

6:10

0-0 10.39 0-0 5.40

Oak Triggs (R) KC Hammel (R)

7:15

1-0 0.00 0-0 5.40

Tex Griffin (R) LA Chavez (R)

9:07

0-0 10.80 1-0 1.59

Hou Fiers (R) Sea Gallardo (R)

9:10

0-1 0-1

1.50 5.40

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Mil Tor

Anderson (R) 0-0 Stroman (R) 6:07 1-0

1.50 1.42

3.00 6.35

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Mets 4, Phillies 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .037 Cabrera ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .286 Cespedes lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .154 Bruce rf 3 3 2 3 1 0 .304 Granderson cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .208 Walker 2b 2 0 0 1 1 0 .154 Duda 1b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .222 d’Arnaud c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .143 deGrom p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Flores ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 Smoker p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Robles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Reed p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 4 4 4 5 8 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hernandez 2b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .267 Kendrick lf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .400 Herrera cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .346 Franco 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .200 Saunders rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .261 Rupp c 3 0 0 1 1 0 .167 Stassi 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .125 Galvis ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .280 Eickhoff p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Altherr ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Nava ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .600 Totals 34 3 10 3 4 6 New York 000 100 120 — 4 4 0 Philadelphia 200 000 001 — 3 10 2 a-lined out for deGrom in the 7th. b-grounded out for Eickhoff in the 7th. c-singled for Rodriguez in the 9th. E: Hernandez (1), Rupp (1). LOB: New York 4, Philadelphia 8. 2B: Cabrera (1). HR: Bruce (3), off Eickhoff; Bruce (4), off Rodriguez; Stassi (1), off Reed. RBIs: Bruce 3 (6), Walker (2), Saunders (4), Rupp (2), Stassi (1). SF: Walker. RLISP: New York 2 (Bruce, Flores); Philadelphia 2 (Rupp 2). GIDP: d’Arnaud, Rupp, Stassi. DP: New York 2 (deGrom, d’Arnaud, Duda), (Cabrera, Walker, Duda); Philadelphia 1 (Galvis, Hernandez, Stassi). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA deGrom 6 6 2 2 2 3 96 1.50 2/ Smoker 0 1 0 14 7.71 3 1 0 Blevins W, 1-0 2/3 1 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 2/ Robles 0 0 0 3 6.00 3 0 0 Reed S, 2-2 1 2 1 1 0 2 25 2.25 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eickhoff 7 3 2 2 4 7 94 2.63 Ramos L, 0-1 2/3 0 1 1 1 1 12 2.08 Rodriguez 11/3 1 1 1 0 0 15 9.82 Inherited runners-scored: Blevins 2-0, Robles 2-0. PB: Rupp (1). Umpires: Home, Alan Porter; First, Joe West; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Andy Fletcher. T: 2:59. A: 33,359 .

Mariners 6, Astros 0 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Springer cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Bregman 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .179 Altuve 2b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .188 Correa ss 4 0 3 0 0 1 .310 Beltran dh 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Gattis c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Gonzalez lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .278 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Gurriel 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .125 Totals 32 0 6 0 3 10 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .313 Motter ss 3 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Haniger rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .242 Cano 2b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .258 Cruz dh 4 1 3 2 0 0 .172 Seager 3b 3 0 2 1 0 1 .192 Valencia 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .129 Martin cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .107 Zunino c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .208 Dyson lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .160 Totals 32 6 11 5 3 7 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 Seattle 000 032 10x — 6 11 0 E: Reddick (1). LOB: Houston 8, Seattle 8. 2B: Gurriel (1), Haniger (2), Cano (3), Seager (2), Dyson (2). RBIs: Haniger (5), Cruz 2 (4), Seager (4), Valencia (2). SB: Martin (2). SF: Seager, Valencia. RLISP: Houston 4 (Beltran 3, Reddick); Seattle 5 (Cano, Cruz, Zunino 3). LIDP: Haniger. DP: Houston 1 (Gurriel); Seattle 1 (Valencia, Zunino). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton L, 0-1 5 7 3 3 2 6 89 4.09 1/ Sipp 1 1 0 20 9.00 3 1 2 Feliz 12/3 3 1 1 0 0 34 2.08 Gustave 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 10.12 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paxton W, 1-0 7 4 0 0 2 8 104 0.00 Altavilla 1 2 0 0 1 2 18 0.00 Scribner 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 13.50 Inherited runners-scored: Feliz 2-2. HBP: Morton (Dyson). Umpires: Home, Mike Everitt; First, Bill Welke; Second, Bruce Dreckman; Third, Jordan Baker. T: 2:56. A: 44,856 .


04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1 NATIONALS 8, CARDINALS 3 Cardinals AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .161 Diaz ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .278 Molina c 2 0 0 1 0 0 .292 Piscotty rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .176 Gyorko 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Peralta 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Socolovich p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Oh p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Carpenter ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .208 Grichuk lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .194 Martinez 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .429 Lynn p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Garcia 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 31 3 7 3 1 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .310 Difo ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Harper rf 2 2 1 0 3 0 .393 Murphy 2b 5 2 4 5 0 0 .472 Zimmerman 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .367 Werth lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .345 Drew 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Rendon 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .115 Wieters c 3 1 2 1 0 1 .435 Gonzalez p 2 1 0 0 1 0 .000 a-Heisey ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blanton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Treinen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 8 11 7 4 5 Cardinals 100 100 010 — 3 7 2 Washington 002 220 11x — 8 11 1 a-out on fielder’s choice for Gonzalez in the 7th. b-walked for Oh in the 9th. E: Diaz 2 (2), Zimmerman (2). LOB: Cardinals 5, Washington 9. 2B: Fowler (1), Harper (2), Murphy 2 (5), Wieters (4). HR: Grichuk (2), off Gonzalez; Diaz (3), off Blanton; Werth (3), off Lynn; Wieters (1), off Lynn; Murphy (2), off Lynn. RBIs: Diaz (5), Molina (5), Grichuk (5), Murphy 5 (9), Werth (7), Wieters (4). SF: Molina. S: Lynn. RLISP: Cardinals 3 (Fowler, Gyorko, Lynn); Washington 4 (Harper, Zimmerman 2, Heisey). GIDP: Grichuk. DP: Washington 1. Cardinals IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lynn 5 5 6 4 4 4 101 5.23 Socolovich 2 4 1 0 0 1 36 1.80 Oh 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 12.27 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez 7 6 2 1 0 6 103 0.69 Blanton 1 1 1 1 0 1 14 3.18 Treinen 1 0 0 0 1 0 9 6.23 W: Gonzalez 1-0. L: Lynn 0-1. HBP: Gonzalez (Molina), Socolovich (Wieters). Umpires: Home, Jim Reynolds; First, Brian Knight; Second, Lance Barrett; Third, Dale Scott. T: 2:55. A: 30,663 (41,418).

HOW THEY SCORED Cardinals irst. Fowler doubles. Aledmys Diaz pops out. Fowler to third. Error by Zimmerman. Molina out on a sacriice ly. Fowler scores. Piscotty lies out. 1 run, 1 hit, 1 error. Cards 1, Nats 0. Nationals third. Wieters called out on strikes. Gonzalez walks. Eaton reaches on a ielder’s choice to shortstop. Gonzalez to second. Error by Diaz. Difo strikes out. Harper walks. Eaton to second. Gonzalez to third. Murphy singles. Harper to third. Eaton and Gonzalez score. Zimmerman lies out. 2 runs, 1 hit, 1 error, 2 left on. Nats 2, Cards 1. Cardinals fourth. Peralta lies out. Grichuk homers to center ield. Martinez singles. Lynn out on a sacriice bunt. Martinez to second. Fowler called out on strikes. 1 run, 2 hits, 1 left on. Cards 2, Nats 2. Nationals fourth. Werth homers to center ield. Drew grounds out. Wieters homers to center ield. Gonzalez lines out. Eaton singles. Difo lines out. 2 runs, 3 hits, 1 left on. Nats 4, Cards 2.

Nationals ifth.

CARDINALS

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B5

NOTEBOOK

Cecil is no stranger to poor starts Bad performances in April are standard for lefthander

CARDINALS AVERAGES Batting AVG AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB E Fryer .333 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 J. Martinez .333 3 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 Molina .318 22 2 7 1 0 0 4 4 3 0 0 Diaz .250 32 5 8 2 0 2 4 0 3 2 0 Garcia .250 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 Piscotty .231 13 2 3 0 0 0 2 3 5 0 0 Gyorko .214 14 2 3 1 0 1 3 2 4 0 0 Carpenter .208 24 3 5 0 0 0 1 4 4 0 0 Wong .200 20 0 4 2 0 0 3 4 1 0 1 Grichuk .185 27 1 5 1 0 1 4 1 9 0 2 Adams .182 11 1 2 0 0 0 1 3 5 0 0 Peralta .176 17 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 2 Fowler .148 27 5 4 0 0 0 0 4 9 1 0 Team .216 231 25 50 9 0 4 24 30 57 3 5

BY DERRICK GOOLD st. Louis Post-dispatch

WASHINGTON • What the Cardinals have

seen in their first looks at Brett Cecil this past week is nothing new for the lefty reliever. An unkind April is something he’s weathered before. Finding a fix other than April running out is the trick. “There is a very thin line for a pitcher, especially, as to what to try differently in the offseason and spring training to get you past that hump at the beginning of the year if you’re a guy like this,” Cecil said. “I think there is really that fine line between, ‘Should I start earlier, should I start later, should I throw more? How can I get this to maybe take just less time? How can I speed that up, to take less time to figure things out?’” Before Cecil’s Monday appearance, another in a string of problematic outings, manager Mike Matheny and Cecil spoke about how his schedule could be manipulated — now and in the future — to speed up the feel Cecil cannot find for his curveball. Already this season, Cecil has allowed five runs in three innings, and all four of the runners he’s inherited have scored. It’s a continuation of a trend he acknowledged Tuesday in the clubhouse. In his career, Cecil has a 5.08 ERA in April. The only month more difficult for him has been June, and his April split is inflated by the past two Aprils. A year ago, he appeared in 13 games, lost five and had a 5.79 ERA with a .900 OPS against. He had a 5.14 ERA the April before, and in his past 191/3 innings in 27 April appearances, Cecil is 1-8 with a 6.98 ERA. Turning the calendar page is a start. Before that, he and the manager decided he has to pitch to find his rhythm. That’s easier in spring training, when games aren’t on the line when he pitches. “We’re going to throw him in big situations,” Matheny said. “That’s why we got him. Look at a lineup like (Washington’s). He should (be busy). That is nothing new for him. He knows that is what he does. He’s one outing away from getting in that good rhythm.” The Cardinals are, publicly, saying the

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Cardinals relief pitcher Brett Cecil has a career earned-run average of 5.08 in the month of April.

same thing about their bullpen, at large. Their relievers allowed eight runs in Monday’s drubbing, and no bullpen in the National League has a higher ERA than the Cardinals’ 8.86. Only Matt Bowman and Trevor Rosenthal have not allowed a run, and Rosenthal had his first appearance of the season Monday. The team does not discount the smattering of games in the first week — they did not play consecutive games until Thursday and Friday — or some of the relievers’ unusual schedules. For Cecil’s spring schedule, the Cardinals took their cues from the lefty. For Seung Hwan Oh’s, the club had to adjust for the World Baseball Classic. Like Cecil, Oh said that the feel for his ofspeed pitches isn’t as sharp as needed at this point. “You have a point there,” Oh said, through interpreter Eugene Koo. “Everyone says that you get the feel for the breaking ball when you pitch more. You always get a better feel for it during the season. But the season has already started and right now that would just be another excuse from me.” Oh paused as Koo translated, then interjected, in Korean. “You won’t have to ask these questions again,” Oh said. Cecil said it’s as much a timing glitch for him as a feel. The coordination between his lead foot landing and his torso snapping forward is of. That has caused his arm to drag,

Pitching W L ERA G GS SV IP H R ER HR BB SO Bowman 0 0 0.00 4 0 0 3.2 2 0 0 0 0 3 Rosenthal 0 0 0.00 1 0 0 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Leake 0 1 1.13 1 1 0 8.0 6 1 1 0 1 6 Wacha 1 0 1.50 1 1 0 6.0 3 1 1 0 1 6 Socolovich 0 0 3.00 2 0 0 3.0 3 1 1 0 1 1 Tuivailala 0 0 3.00 3 0 0 3.0 3 1 1 1 1 2 Lynn 0 0 3.38 1 1 0 5.1 5 2 2 0 1 4 C. Martinez 0 1 3.65 2 2 0 12.1 12 6 5 1 1 13 Wainwright 0 2 7.00 2 2 0 9.0 14 8 7 0 4 9 Oh 1 0 13.50 2 0 0 2.2 4 4 4 2 1 2 Cecil 0 1 15.00 4 0 0 3.0 7 5 5 1 2 3 Broxton 0 0 16.88 3 0 0 2.2 4 5 5 1 4 2 Siegrist 0 0 19.29 3 0 0 2.1 4 5 5 1 4 1 Team 2 5 5.37 7 7 0 62.0 67 39 37 7 21 55

his velocity to drop, and his curveball to sweep more than it darts. May, in many ways his best month by career splits, is still a few weeks away. “We know he’s the kind of pitcher that he is,” Matheny said. “Just got to get him started. Hopefully sooner rather than later.”

CARPENTER OUT The matchup made it likely and the tightness made it certain. Matheny held No. 3 hitter Matt Carpenter out of the lineup Tuesday for the first time this season. The manager said his first baseman experienced some tightness in his back that the team wants to avoid aggravating. Just as compelling were Carpenter’s career numbers against Washington starter Gio Gonzalez, a lefty. Carpenter entered the game two for 16 (.125) with four strikeouts. “When he’s swinging it really good, we’re going to ride him,” Matheny said. “There are other times when we see something. This will be a good matchup for (Jose) Martinez. Let him go play.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

Harper walks. Murphy homers to right ield. Harper scores. Zimmerman grounds out. Werth lines out to shortstop. Drew grounds out. 2 runs, 1 hit. Nats 6, Cards 2. Nationals seventh. Murphy doubles. Zimmerman singles, advances to 2nd. Murphy scores. Error by Diaz. Werth pops out. Rendon strikes out swinging. Wieters hit by pitch. Heisey reaches on a ielder’s choice to shortstop. Wieters out at second. 1 run, 2 hits, 1 error, 2 left on. Nats 7, Cards 2. Cardinals eighth. Diaz homers to center ield. Molina lines out. Piscotty grounds out. Gyorko strikes out swinging. 1 run, 1 hit. Nats 7, Cards 3. Nationals eighth. Eaton pops out. Difo grounds out. Harper doubles. Murphy doubles Bryce Harper scores. Zimmerman lines out. 1 run, 2 hits, 1 left on. Nationals win 8-3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Aledmys Diaz is congratulated by third base coach Chris Maloney as he rounds the bases after hitting a home run during the eighth inning.

Homers hurt Lynn as Cards can’t hold leads again CARDINALS • FROM B1

missteps, starter troubles and bullpen uncertainties. All of the facets the Cardinals pledged to sharpen all winter and through spring have led to the dullest start of manager Mike Matheny’s tenure. “We probably talked too much about last year because it’s a different team, a different year,” Matheny said. “Just what we’re doing right now isn’t good enough. We’ve got to get better. That’s all there is to it.” For the second time in as many nights against the Nationals, the Cardinals took two early leads and misplaced place both of them. An error on a ground ball preceded Daniel Murphy’s tworun single, which gave the Nats their first lead. Home runs did the rest. Jayson Werth and Matt Wieters hit solo home runs in the fourth of Lynn, and Murphy followed with a two-run homer that clinched the win in the fifth. A night after Bryce Harper tied a career high with four hits, the guy batting behind him, Murphy, trumped that with a career high for hits (four) and RBIs (five). Even before the Cardinals’ embattled bullpen got involved, the

Nats had six runs. Their eight meant the Cardinals have allowed 30 runs total in three games. More than half the teams in baseball hadn’t scored 30 runs. Total. So far this season. The Nats, who have 22 runs on 30 hits in two games so far in the series, have “a good offense. They’re rolling and they’re rolling in a good direction right now,” Matheny said. “We need to be better. That’s all there is to it. All the way around.” Before Washington lefty Gio Gonzalez found the feel that carried him to seven innings and six strikeouts, the Cardinals manufactured a lead by taking advantage of a Nats error. Dexter Fowler led of the game with a double, took third when Ryan Zimmerman mishandled a popup, and then scored for a 1-0 lead on Yadier Molina’s sacrifice fly. The Cardinals answered Murphy’s first two RBIs with Randal Grichuk’s solo home run in the fourth. That knotted the game, 2-2, but it was an echo of a team the Cardinals would rather not be. A power-mad lineup gave the Cardinals a 100-run bump from

2015 to 2016, but slipshod defense undermining erratic starting pitching meant they allowed more than a run a game. This winter, the Cardinals promised to reunite with their run-prevention ways. Athleticism. Defense. These were the buzzwords of improvement. They didn’t recognize the team they became, and they didn’t intend to relive it. And then April started. “We’ve got to pitch better. We’ve got to score runs. We have got to play defense,” Lynn said. “If we start doing that, we’ll be fine.” In the third inning, a ground ball toward third base from leadoff hitter Adam Eaton offered a chance for a double play that would clear the bases. Lynn (01) had invited trouble by walking Gonzalez (1-0) to lead off the inning. The grounder was his mulligan. Two Cardinals had a chance to field it. Neither did. The grounder went past Jhonny Peralta’s reach, and then behind him to Aledmys Diaz, who was screened. Diaz didn’t control the ball of the bounce. Diaz recovered and threw to second for a forceout — but wide. Gonzalez arrived before Diaz’s throw did, and after a replay review the of-

ficials in New York vetoed the out call in D.C. One out and another walk to Harper later, Lynn’s pitch count had started to bloat and lefthanded-hitting Murphy came up. Peralta said he wasn’t sure if it was a double play, “but one out is something that works.” The Nationals’ lineup is laced with All-Star lefthanded batters, and while Lynn was judicious with Harper (three walks), he was aggressive with others. This spring, he worked on a changeup to help balance his splits against lefthanded batters, and he navigated around them in the first inning. All Murphy saw in his first at-bat were fastballs, and the second one from Lynn he lined to left field for an out. Three more fastballs came in Murphy’s second at-bat. The third he lined into right for a two-run single. Murphy’s next time up he homered, on a changeup. “When you see that lineup you know that they’re capable of it,” Lynn said. “I made three mistakes and it cost me three home runs. That was pretty much the gist of what happened. Three mistakes. Three mistakes left the yard.”

Murphy added to his evening — and compounded the runs foisted on the bullpen so far this season — with a double and a run in the seventh and a double and an RBI in the eighth. After a successful spring that was roundly praised, internally and externally, for a crispness of play, the Cardinals are eight games in and have already taken some detours. The devotion to defense has been mitigated by a want for offense, leading to new positions for some players. The bullpen’s struggles have influenced decisions beyond the late-game maneuvering. And the starters, after a blazing first turn through the rotation, have allowed 18 runs (six each) in the past three starts. The Cardinals have had five leads in two days against the Nats. Not one lasted a second inning. “It’s only one week, two weeks,” Peralta said. “I know a lot of things can change.” They just haven’t. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

With help of Brodeur, Allen has bounced back

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Since Feb. 1, Blues goaltender Jake Allen has a 1.85 goals-against average and .938 save percentage, which is tops in the league.

BLUES • FROM B1

might have been open, his mouth stayed shut. “It’s always difficult to explain what’s going on,” Blues forward Alexander Steen said. “You don’t want it to sound like excuses. It’s part of the business. I think he handled himself perfectly. He worked almost harder than he normally does, which is hard because he’s an extremely hard worker, and he got through a tough time.” For the first time in his career, Allen is the clear-cut starter heading into the postseason, and the fact that St. Louis is supportive of the idea that he’ll be in the net when the Blues open the first round against Minnesota Wednesday confirms just how long the NHL season is and how fickle fans can be. The 26-year-old was yanked four times in a six-game stretch — twice in a 7-3 loss to Washington on Jan. 19 — and was told to stay home for the team’s trip to Winnipeg on Jan. 30. But since Mike Yeo took over for Hitchcock on Feb. 1, Allen has been statistically the best goaltender in the league (among those with more

than seven starts) with a 1.85 goals-against average and a .938 save percentage. “Yeah, I’m sure everyone wanted me out the door and onto another team, but I knew deep down that I was going to be fine,” Allen said. “It was really hard on me. Away from the rink, I’m usually a pretty cool, calm, collected guy and as soon as I leave the rink doors I don’t think about hockey. But at that point in my life, it was really tough to not go home and not worry about what was going to happen the next game. But I fixed it, I straightened it out and I felt I played my best hockey in my NHL career from that point on, and hopefully can bring it (in the playofs).” If you were a Blues fan and you had a pulse, you had a theory as to why Allen struggled. The popular one was the birth of his daughter, Lennon Everly, on Jan. 6, in the middle of the four times he was removed. “That was just a coincidence in timing,” Allen said. Allen admits now that he was miffed with the frequency of which Hitchcock pulled him. The third time it happened was after he gave up three goals in a 4-0

loss to Boston on Jan. 10. “Hitch had a short leash, probably shorter than most coaches in the league,” Allen said. “That’s just the way he is; he was never going to change. That wasn’t something that I was going to be able to talk him out of. But at the same time, I rightfully needed to work my way out of that. I’d personally like to stay in there if I let nine goals (in).” It didn’t get that out of hand, although Allen did allow three goals on 11 shots in Boston, three on 15 in Los Angeles and four on 10 in Boston. But while things got ugly, his teammates stuck by him. “’Cause I know what he’s like, I know his personality,” Steen said. “His biggest attribute is his hockey sense. So, when you have that, it was just a matter of time.” And a coaching change. Yeo took over and the first words out of his mouth were “Allen is our guy.” “‘Yeozie’ came in and displayed a lot of confidence in him right away,” Blues backup goalie Carter Hutton said. In Yeo’s first game as head coach, Allen stopped 26 of 27 shots in a 5-1 win over Toronto

on Feb. 2. He won five of his first six decisions after the change. “Mike instills a lot of confidence in everyone,” Allen said. “He’s very easy to talk to, he’s very easy to understand. He tells you what he wants out of you and it’s pretty straight forward. I really respect that and he’s a guy that I love to play for. He always comes to the rink with the right mindset, the right attitude, and it rubs of on us. It rubs of on me.” Yeo deferred any pat on the back Tuesday to Martin Brodeur, the Blues’ assistant general manager who stepped down from the management booth to take over for Corsi. “I think that at that time having Marty Brodeur around and being able to watch video with him, to be able to point to some areas — not weaknesses but areas where he’s getting beaten — it gave him an opportunity to go out and correct those things,” Yeo said. “It put the feeling of control back on Jake.” Said Allen: “Marty has just been a good sounding board for me ... just keeping things simple, being square to pucks, handling pucks, just keeping yourself in the game. Just being consistent.

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Barbashev moves up to top line vs. Wild In addition to Stastny, Robert Bortuzzo (upper body) and Nail Yakupov (dinged up) didn’t skate. Zach Sanford and Dmitrij Jaskin look to be the healthy scratches.

Steen moves to third line as Blues face deep Minnesota BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Paul Stastny didn’t skate on Tuesday, which likely means he won’t play Wednesday when the Blues start their playof series with the Minnesota Wild, but the arrival of Vladimir Sobotka is giving coach Mike Yeo a chance to get creative with his lines. It looks as though the Blues will start with rookie Ivan Barbashev centering Jaden Schwartz and Vladimir Tarasenko on the top line. Magnus Paajarvi, Patrik Berglund and David Perron are reunited on the second line, which allows Yeo to use Sobotka on the left wing, Jori Lehtera at center and Alexander Steen at right wing on the third line. (The fourth line stays the same: Scottie Upshall, Kyle Brodziak, Ryan Reaves.) “To be honest, I’m really excited,” Barbashev said, “especially with those guys in the playofs. It’s awesome.” Steen had been, until recently, centering Schwartz and Tarasenko on the top line. “You know me, I’m up for anything,” Steen said. “It’s a good line. I think throughout this series, you’ll probably see some diferent looks. It depends on whether we’re on the road or at home. We’ll start getting into details on possible matchups and stuff, but I’m excited. ‘Sobie’ looked good in his first game. Jori is an extremely smart centerman, very good on faceoffs, so hopefully we start with the puck more often than not and of we go.” With the Wild having the final change in Games 1 and 2, Yeo feels these lines allow the team

ROAD BLUES

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Ivan Barbashev will center the top line of Jaden Schwartz and Vladimir Tarasenko on Wednesday night when the Blues face the Wild.

to match up well regardless of who the Wild put on the ice. “That was part of the thought process there,” he said. “We thought Magnus played real well with ‘Bergie’ and Perron; that line was really efective for

us and we feel that group with Lehtera and Sobotka now, not only do they have the ability to be defensive and tough to play against, but obviously we need everybody contributing at different points.”

The Blues will start their playoff series with the Wild on the road at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minn., which is a significant change from their recent past. In the previous five seasons, the Blues had eight playof series and in all but one of them they had home-ice advantage. This series and last season’s conference semifinal with Dallas are the only times the Blues haven’t started at home. “I don’t feel really different because the way fans are pumped up, it makes you pumped up even on the road,” Tarasenko said, “but if you play one or two games on the road, it makes the advantage turn the other way. It’s no thinking about losing this series. We’re thinking about only winning. We believe in each other, believe in our stuf and our team.” At some points in this season, not having home ice would have seemed a death knell for the team. Since Yeo took over as coach, the Blues went 14-4-1 on the road. It was their play on the road that got them into the postseason. “We didn’t start the year good on the road, but it’s great recently,” Perron said. “We’ve been playing unreal on the road. I think for us not having to go in the other division like playing Anaheim or Edmonton, I think it’s another key as we work towards our goal to win the Cup. A little bit less travel early on. We’re not thinking too far.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

I think that’s why he was so good for such a long time.” And now after sticking with it, Allen is showing a lot more consistency. “It shows his mental toughness,” Hutton said. “He came out the other side playing great and he’s a huge reason why we’re in this position we’re in. He’s playing his best hockey heading into when we need him the most.” “I knew I had the capability of being one of the best in the league,” Allen said. “Everyone from the outside has an opinion and they’re rightful to that. But I knew deep down, as long as I kept working and just trusted myself, didn’t quit on myself, didn’t quit on the guys, I knew it was going to turn itself around. It’s not going to be perfect, I know that that’s part of being a goaltender. You signed up for this position, you’ve got to take the scrutiny. But I bounced back really well from it and it put me in a really good position.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

HOW THE BLUES FARED AGAINST MINNESOTA THIS SEASON OCT. 13 AT SCOTTRADE CENTER

BLUES 3, WILD 2 After opening the season the night before with a win in Chicago, the Blues opened their home season with goals from Alexander Steen, Nail Yakupov and Magnus Paajarvi while the Blues held the Wild to just 21 shots on goal and Jake Allen got the win. NOV. 26 AT SCOTTRADE CENTER

BLUES 4, WILD 3 (SO) Jaden Schwartz scored twice just over a minute apart in the third period to give the Blues the lead, but Charlie Coyle scored with 1:08 to play to send it to overtime. David Perron scored the only goal in a four-round shootout for the win. DEC. 11 AT XCEL ENERGY CENTER

WILD 3, BLUES 1 In a game that marked the beginning of their midseason malaise, the Blues fell behind 2-0 and couldn’t catch up, giving up an empty-net goal in the inal minute to seal it. It was the start of a 1-3-1 run for the Blues. JAN. 26 AT XCEL ENERGY CENTER

WILD 5, BLUES 1 In the last game before the AllStar break, Carter Hutton gave up four goals in less than 10 minutes and was pulled early in the third period in favor of Jake Allen, who was coming of two games as a healthy scratch. One game later, Ken Hitchcock was ired as coach of the Blues. MARCH 7 AT XCEL ENERGY CENTER

BLUES 2, WILD 1 In Mike Yeo’s irst game against the team that ired him last season, the Blues got goals from David Perron and Vladimir Tarasenko and 32 saves from Jake Allen in the win. The victory gave the Blues a twogame win streak, a big deal in the wake of a ive-game losing streak, and marked the start of their lateseason renaissance. — Tom Timmermann


04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

BLUES

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B7

Pietrangelo inding groove as leader After sluggish irst half, Blues captain excelling as part of top power-play unit BY TOM TIMMERMANN st. Louis Post-dispatch

When David Backes left as a free agent in the offseason, Alex Pietrangelo was the obvious choice to step into Backes’ spot as captain. When Kevin Shattenkirk was traded by the Blues on Feb. 27, the Blues turned to Pietrangelo again, putting him in Shattenkirk’s spot on the first powerplay unit. Both moves have worked out well. Pietrangelo had a challenging debut season as captain, helping navigate the team through a long series of ups and downs and the firing of coach Ken Hitchcock, and the Blues finished the season stronger than they started. On the power play, Pietrangelo has found a home there, and it’s spread throughout his game, with his ofensive production almost doubling its rate from the first three-quarters of the season while his defensive play remained as dominant as ever. “He’s been a guy that down the stretch here has led the way,” his defensive partner, Jay Bouwmeester, said, “and that’s the way we’ve got to be. Our top guys have to be our top guys this time of year. He’s been doing real well.” Pietrangelo closed the regular season with 14 goals, a career high, and 34 assists for 48 points, which was just three of his career high. As has been the norm throughout the career, he’s among the league leaders in ice time (25:16 on average per game, eighth most) and those aren’t always easy minutes. He’s averaging 3:02 per game on the penalty kill, the 10th most in the league. Even before the Shattenkirk trade, coach Mike Yeo saw Pietrangelo’s game getting better, and when Shattenkirk was sent to Washington, Pietrangelo stepped up. “I definitely think it was trending upwards,” Yeo said, “and obviously the timing of (the trade) threw ‘Petro’ into the spotlight a little bit more and some more roles, some more situations that he was maybe not in earlier.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo (left) competes for the puck against Islanders right winger Cal Clutterbuck on March 11 at Scottrade Center.

No question from our part on a coaching standpoint that he was ready for that. “His game, really from the time that I’ve taken over, I feel like he’s stepped up his leadership, the way he’s contributing at both ends of the ice. There’s just a lot of confidence when a player like that goes on the ice and obviously when your leaders are doing that, they’re stepping over the boards, they’re doing things the right way. That filters

through to the rest of the group.” Being on the first power-play unit seems to have spread goodwill throughout Pietrangelo’s game. In 20 games since the trade, Pietrangelo had five goals (sixth most among defensemen), 13 assists (second most) for 18 points (second most). At the time of the trade, he was a minus-7 in plus-minus. Since then, he’s been plus-10. In his first 60 games, he had nine goals and 21 assists.

“I like to feel the puck,” Pietrangelo said. “I like to play with the puck. Those offensive zone draws on the power play, and on five on five, gives you a little extra boost ofensively, feeling the puck. We have pretty good balance now on the D corps, so if I can lead the charge and chip in ...” Pietrangelo has had more to think about of the ice after being named captain on Aug. 25. He had been briefed on what it would entail from his good buddy

Backes, but Yeo knew first hand from when he was named captain during his minor-league career that it can afect a player’s on-ice performance. “You get focused and wrapped up a little bit on trying to be a real good captain, and along the way, you forget to be a good player,” Yeo said. “That’s the most important part. We talked about that a couple times and no matter what you say, it’s still an adjustment. It still takes time for the player to get used to that and to remember that there’s an element of preparation for him that needs to go in him to be at his best and that’s the most important quality of a good captain.” “It was certainly a learning process,” Pietrangelo added. “I had a lot of guys that guided me through and helped me. Now, the second half, after the coaching change, things started to settle down and I found my groove and how I want to be. … I really grew as a leader as the year went on. “I think the one thing I really tried to do from the start of the year was worry about the on-ice product. That’s how I want to lead. I’ve got a lot of guys in here that can take care of being vocal in the locker room constantly. I will when I need to be. I’ll worry about the on-ice.” Ultimately, Pietrangelo doesn’t look at his late-season numbers as being indicative of much, though it’s hard to imagine the Blues closing the season the way they did without Pietrangelo’s ofense. “I feel like I’ve played the same way (all year),” he said. “You may look at the statistics and see some things, but I think a lot of that’s opportunity. Shatty’s gone so I’ve had to pick up the slack, fill that void. Being on the first power-play unit really gives you an opportunity to step in and create some stuff, but I’m more worried about my all-around games. ... I guess the bounces started going my way in the second half.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

Yeo more conident leading Blues after leaving Minnesota ORTIZ • FROM B1

Time has soothed that devastating rejection, but rest assured that Yeo won’t soon forget the raw emotions he felt when he was fired by the team his Blues will face in the first round of the Stanley Cup Playofs. “The emotions of what happened at that time it was gut wrenching, to be perfectly honest,” Yeo said. “You have a job where you put in your heart and soul. It’s not just a job where you show up and you punch a ticket and you work hard. I mean you put literally your heart and soul. “And then (when) that gets taken away from you, it’s a tough thing to deal with. That was my first experience. But I believe that, that has made me a better coach. Looking back at it I’m not disappointed that I went through it.” Although he had led Minnesota to three consecutive playof appearances, including consecutive trips to the second round, Yeo was fired with 27 games remaining in the 2015-16 season. He was 23-22-10 and suddenly unemployed. Yeo, who was 173-132-44 in five years with the Wild, didn’t stay unemployed long. The Blues hired him as Ken Hitchcock’s associate head coach and so-called coach in waiting initially set to take over at the start of next season. That wait proved to be short after goaltender Jake Allen and a sputtering defense cost Hitchcock his job. Yeo led the Blues to a 22-8-2 record, securing third place in the Western Conference’s Central Division to set up a homecoming against the Wild in the first round. Yeo, 43, would rather keep the focus on the two veteran squads. The players, after all, are the ones who will have the biggest impact once the best-of-seven series starts Wednesday night at Xcel Energy Center. Yeo and Wild coach Bruce Boudreau will match wits, but their game plans will go only so far if their goaltenders aren’t up to the challenge. In Allen of the Blues and Devan Dubnyk of the Wild, the series features two goaltenders who have been among the best in the NHL at times this year. Allen was arguably the best in the final third of the season after being one of the worst for a stretch. Dubnyk was one of the league’s best this season, but he wasn’t nearly as dominant in the final third of the season. Whatever the case, Yeo is confident that he’s a better coach in many ways than he was with the Wild. He says he has improved in a lot of ways, including how he deploys his players and how he prepares the team. “There’s certainly a different confi-

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Blues went 22-8-2 after Mike Yeo took over and placed third in the division.

dence when you come into your second job,” he said. “You’ve learned, obviously, a lot of the good things. That’s easy, but when you have to really dig in and look at the things you didn’t do well enough, to me that’s your real opportunity to grow. Nothing like getting fired to give you that opportunity.” When asked to elaborate what things he didn’t do well enough in Minnesota, Yeo politely declined. More importantly, the Blues player who has known Yeo the longest is adamant that his coach won’t let the sting of last year’s firing cloud his judgment during the firstround series. “Our goal as a group, and I’m sure his is the same, it’s to win a Stanley Cup,” said Kyle Brodziak, who played for the Wild during Yeo’s first four seasons in Minnesota. “Yeah, obviously there’s a storyline behind it. But his focus and our team’s focus is the same. It’s about playing our best game every night and giving ourselves the best chance to win. “Going to play against the team you used to coach I’m sure deep down there’s some emotions about that, but at the end of the day his focus is going to be the same as ours. And that is to win the series.” Yeo is 195-140-46 in the regular season in his career for a .572 winning percentage. He is only 11-17 all-time in the postseason for a .393 winning percentage. He must improve that postseason winning percentage for the Blues to return to the Western Conference Finals after getting within two victories of the Stanley Cup Finals last year. He cannot aford to dwell on the heartache he felt when the Wild told him he was no longer good enough to lead them. “There’s just too much at stake and I will not allow it to get personal because my team, they need me to have the right mindset, to have the right focus, to have the right composure,” he said. “So for me this is playof hockey. There’s something much more at stake, something that’s way bigger in my eyes than a little revenge here. “It’s the pursuit of winning the Stanley Cup. That’s our focus. We have a real tough opponent in our way, and we’ll be ready for that.” Jose de Jesus Ortiz @OrtizKicks on Twitter jortiz@post-dispatch.com


SPORTS

B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

Johnson starts recovery from back bruise He already had planned to take of the next three weeks

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

From top left: Calgary Flames’ Johnny Gaudreau; Montreal Canadiens defenseman Paul Byron; Ottawa Senators’ Chris Neil; Toronto Maple Leafs center Nazem Kadri (left) and William Nylander; and Edmonton Oilers’ goalie Laurent Brossoit.

Canada back in NHL playofs

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dustin Johnson walks of the 1st tee last week after deciding not to play in the Masters golf tournament at the Augusta National Golf Club.

After being shut out last year, ive teams make appearance ASSOCIATED PRESS ASSOCIATED PRESS

The hockey world has resumed revolving on its normal axis north of the border. A year after being shut out, Canada is making a return to the NHL playofs in a big way. O Canada, is the buzz ever back across the Great White North: From Calgary’s Red Mile bar district to Montreal’s rue Sainte-Catherine to Parliament Hill in Ottawa, the landscape for the playoffs includes the big-stage debuts of such young stars as Edmonton’s Connor McDavid and Toronto’s Auston Matthews. “When players get traded here and they talk about how great the Bell Centre is, we always say, ‘Wait ’til the playoffs,” American-born Montreal Canadiens captain Max Pacioretty said. “There’s nothing like it. It’s like the Super Bowl every day.” Multiply that by five because that’s how many of the hockey-mad nation’s seven franchises are in the playofs, which open Wednesday. There’s an Original Six showdown between Montreal and the New York Rangers. Boston Bruins captain Zdeno Chara will face his former team in Ottawa . The youth-laden Maple Leafs make just their second playoff appearance in 13 years by opening against Alex Ovechkin and the Presidents’ Trophy-winning Washington Capitals. In ending a 10-year playoff drought, the Oilers christen their new downtown arena against the defending Western Conference champion San Jose Sharks. And let’s not forget Johnny Gaudreau and the Flames making just their second playoff appearance in eight years by opening against Anaheim.

The bars will be packed, the fans jacked and so will Canada’s most prominent TV hockey executive Scott Moore. A year ago, the Rogers Sportsnet cable network president joked about stepping out on the ledge of his third-floor Toronto oice after having no Canadian teams to showcase two years into a 12-year, $5.2 billion (Canadian) TV rights deal. Last week, Moore was giddily trying to determine whether it was better to have two Canadian teams meet in the first round — because it guaranteed one advancing — before eventually concluding it didn’t matter. “While I was on the ledge last year, perhaps I knew it was not worth jumping,” Moore said. “There’s lots of peaks and valleys in the world of sports, and it’s never as bad as you think and never as good as you think.” Through the first five days of the playofs last year, Rogers drew an average of just 513,000 viewers. That marked a 61 percent drop from the previous year when five Canadian teams made the postseason. A significant uptick is expected this week, especially with Canadian TV ratings heavyweights such as Toronto and Montreal in the picture. “Internally, my IQ has gone up 20 points,” Moore said. “I’m not any smarter, but people think I am.” What’s compelling this year is the emergence of MVP candidate McDavid and Matthews, the rookie No. 1 draft pick. Both have the potential of making Edmonton and Toronto regular playof fixtures for many years to come, and left Moore dreaming of an Oilers-Maple Leafs Stanley Cup Final. “I think I just fainted at the mere mention,” Moore said. Even NBC Sports executive pro-

ducer Sam Flood looks forward to introducing McDavid and Matthews to U.S. audiences (Matthews is from Scottsdale, Ariz.). “Last year, everyone was saying there are no Canadian teams. Was that great for the U.S.? No,” Flood said. “What’s great for the U.S. is great hockey and great stars. It doesn’t matter where they play,” he added. “I think it’s a great opportunity to expose these two young stars.” No Canadian team has won the Cup since Montreal in 1993. And no Canadian team has a longer Stanley Cup Final drought than Toronto, which hasn’t been there since winning the title in 1967. That’s why the buzz in Canada is peaking in Toronto, where the Mike Babcock-coached team has captured the imaginations of fans like 54-year-old David Menzies. “I have now come to realize that over the past half-century that it’s way too easy being a Canadiens or a Yankees fan or a Patriots fan in which those teams routinely win championships,” Menzies wrote in an email. “Toronto’s NHL team is that nerdy, awkward goofball that hasn’t scored for 50 years. But you know something? Every dog has its day.” Just look to Chicago, Menzies said, where the Cubs are World Series champs. For now, fans will enjoy a first round full of Canadian teams. “To have a year like last year where none of the teams were in, it was strange and odd,” said Bufalo Sabres forward Tyler Ennis, an Edmonton native. “Playoff hockey is what every Canadian wants to watch, and there’ll be a lot of excitement across the border for sure.”

NHL NOTEBOOK

Capitals feel much fresher for the playofs FROM NEWS SERVICES

Tired of rolling over the NHL in the regular season and falling short in the playoffs, the Washington Capitals went to great lengths to make sure their best players won’t be tired this time around. Alex Ovechkin saw the lowest ice time of his career, Nicklas Backstrom the lowest since his rookie year and Braden Holtby played fewer minutes than he ever has as a starting goaltender in an 82-game season. Balancing out the minutes and workload was an organizational effort to gear up for the playofs and give the stacked Capitals the best chance to finally lift the Stanley Cup. “We tried diferent things,” Ovechkin said Tuesday. “I think right now we’re in better shape than we were last year and mentally-wise, as well, because you can see we have four lines who can create and four lines who can be out there and get the job done, it doesn’t matter which situation.” To prove the plan worked, the Capitals will have to get the job done against the Toronto Maple Leafs in the first round beginning Thursday and advance past the second round for the first time in the Ovechkin era. But two months before the Cup is handed out, there’s already evidence

that Washington is primed to win the first title in franchise history. After averaging 21:18 in his first 11 NHL seasons, Ovechkin played 18:22 and ramped that up over the course of the year. His 1,506 total minutes were the fewest he’s played in an 82game season, and yet he played in all of them. The Russian superstar had 14 points in his final 15 regular-season games and contributed with some big hits and plays that don’t show up on the scoresheet. “The biggest thing is that he looks fresh, he looks fast and he looks like Alex,” coach Barry Trotz said. “When he sets the tone and he’s saying, ‘OK, I’m here and you’re going to have to play against me all night,’ the guy on the other side is going: ‘Oh boy. He’s engaged and he’s going to be a handful.’ And when he’s a handful, that’s really good for the Washington Capitals.” What’s really good for the Capitals is that Ovechkin has helped Backstrom and fellow linemate T.J. Oshie play better along the way. At even strength and on the power play, with the trade-deadline addition of Kevin Shattenkirk, the Capitals have the high-end skill to deserve being favored to come out of the Eastern Conference. To do that they’ll need the best from Holtby, the reigning Vezina

Trophy winner with the best playof numbers of any active goaltender. He started 63 games this season, three fewer than last year and nine fewer than 2014-15. Holtby faced 112 fewer shots, and less wear and tear could be the diference if the Capitals make an extended run. Malkin to be in lineup • Pittsburgh Penguins coach Mike Sullivan minced no words when addressing Evgeni Malkin’s status for the team’s first game of the Stanley Cup playofs. “‘Geno’ will be in the lineup and full-go,” Sullivan said after the Penguins’ practice Tuesday. Malkin also said he will play in Game 1 of the team’s first round series Wednesday against Columbus at PPG Paints Arena. He missed the final 13 games of the regular season with an upper-body injury. Rozsival has surgery • Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Michal Rozsival has undergone surgery to repair facial fractures. The team says Rozsival is expected to make a full recovery from Tuesday’s operation. The Blackhawks did not say how long he will be out. Rozsival was injured when Anaheim’s Nick Ritchie punched him during a game last week.

Dustin Johnson was back on the stationary bike, moving forward without really going anywhere. The good news for golf’s No. 1 player is that an MRI showed only a deep bruise on the left side of his lower back. If doctors had taken images a little higher up the torso, they also might have seen a slight tear in his heart. “One thing I never want to have to do again,” Johnson said Tuesday, “is watch a major from my couch.” At least he watched. And it wasn’t all bad. He was thrilled to see Sergio Garcia overcome a twoshot deficit in the Masters and two decades of frustrations in the majors. Johnson could relate to that, having been in position to win a major four times before winning the U.S. Open last summer at Oakmont. Good luck finding someone who can relate to Johnson’s experience at the 81st Masters. Sure, there have been times when a No. 1 player had to withdraw from a major. But not when the player was coming of three straight victories against the strongest fields of the year. Not when that player was five minutes and 20 yards from the first tee. And never has an injury to a No. 1 player been so bizarre on so many levels. He had finished his final nine holes of practice Wednesday before the storms rolled in. Johnson had gone to the gym and had just returned to his rented house at Augusta when it started raining and he wanted to move his car. Wearing only socks, he slipped down the staircase, crashing onto his back and left elbow. “It was terrible,” Johnson said. “And the weirdest part is, I never walk around in socks. For some reason if I walk around barefooted, my left foot starts to hurt. That’s why I always have shoes on. But I just got back from the gym and wanted to run down and move the car over. And I slipped.” Johnson said it was the worst pain he has ever felt. “I thought I broke my back in half,” he said. “I really thought my back was broken.” He still thought about playing when he left the practice range Thursday, only to realize on the putting green that he couldn’t. Johnson said he was hitting his 4-iron about 200 yards in the air (it usually flies 235 yards) and he had no idea which direction the ball was going until he hit it. Over the next 15 minutes, on the cart ride to the putting green and a few more full swings between putts, reality won out. “The more I thought about it, there was no chance,” he said. “It just took a while to convince myself.” There was a small measure of relief that tests revealed only a bruise. When he flew home to Florida, he said, his lower back hurt for two days. Now it’s in a confined area near the bruise. He has returned to a routine, which includes work in the gym. “I’m not really doing much,” Johnson said. “Today I started moving a little bit. Yesterday I did a little bit of chest and arms. Moving up and down, I’m fine. If I’m twisting, it’s a little sore. And I’m making some swings, but I’m not hitting any balls.” As bad as the timing was, it could have been worse. Johnson had scheduled the next three weeks of, so there will be no temptation to play before he is fully recovered. His next tournament is the Wells Fargo Championship that starts May 4. And while it hurt to watch the Masters on TV, it felt good to see Garcia win. “Sergio and I are friends,” he said. “I was rooting for him. It was cool to see him get that first one. I know a little bit of what he’s been through. He’d been close quite a few times, just like I had been close. It took him a lot longer.” People talk about how it takes time for that first major to sink in. Johnson might never grasp his unfortunate turn of events, even for someone who has dealt with his share of setbacks. In a 2015 interview, when asked his biggest disappointment, Johnson said, “I’ve had a lot of (stuf) happen to be me, but I came out better on the other side.” His short memory might be one of his great assets. For all blunders on the golf course that he quickly forgets about, this one shouldn’t be much diferent. He is still playing the best golf of his life. He still has a chance at his next tournament for a fourth straight PGA Tour victory, which would be the longest streak since Tiger Woods, who won five straight over six months. “One reason I’m good at golf is because I try not to let it bother me,” Johnson said. “It sucks. It sucks right now. But I woke up this morning, and it was a good day.” And he still has a large collection of trophies at home. Johnson laughed. “That doesn’t hurt,” he said.


SPORTS

04.12.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

NBA playof scenarios going down to wire ASSOCIATED PRESS

There will be final-night intrigue in the NBA. The two remaining playoff berths will be decided, along with the No. 1 seed in the Eastern Conference and the site for Game 1 of the series that starts this weekend between the Utah Jazz and Los Angeles Clippers. Most individual stat races are already sewn up, barring something that would be most improbable. Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook will become the 16th player in NBA history to win two scoring titles, Houston’s James Harden will lead the league in assists for the first time and Miami’s Hassan Whiteside

should be able to wrap up his first rebounding crown. Golden State’s Stephen Curry is a lock to lead the league in 3-pointers made for the fifth straight year.

usual playof preparedness, since he hasn’t appeared in a regularseason finale in a decade. Cleveland can still be No. 1 with a win and a Boston loss.

TOP OF THE EAST

Dwyane Wade helped Miami win three championships. Now, he might help keep the Heat out of the playofs. It’s three teams — Indiana, Chicago and Miami — for the last two spots in the East field. Indiana and Chicago control their destinies. If the Pacers win, they’re in. If the Bulls win, they’re in. If either loses, the door opens for Miami. The Heat would reach the playoffs with a win over Wash-

Boston controls the race for the top seed in the East playofs. The Celtics will be No. 1 in the East if they beat Milwaukee, or if Cleveland loses to Toronto. The Cavaliers won’t have LeBron James on Wednesday night, and are 0-7 this season when he doesn’t play. Depending on perspective, James will either be resting, recovering or revving for the start of the playoffs. It’s part of his

BOTTOM OF THE EAST

Hawks wrap up No. 5 seed

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hornets guard Treveon Graham (front) and Hawks forward Paul Millsap battle for a loose ball during the irst half of Tuesday night’s game in Atlanta.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dwight Howard had 19 points and 12 rebounds as the host Atlanta Hawks won their fourth straight game, routing the listless Charlotte Hornets 103-76 on Tuesday night to wrap up the No. 5 seed in the Eastern Conference. The Hawks will face the Washington Wizards in the opening round of the playofs. A week ago, Atlanta’s playoff hopes were in jeopardy after a dismal stretch that included two losses to Brooklyn, the worst team in the NBA. Then, in a sudden turnaround that epitomized the team’s maddening inconsistency this season, the Hawks knocked of East-leading Boston and recorded two straight stunning victories over the defending NBA champion Cleveland Cavaliers, including Sunday’s comeback from a 26-point deficit. This one was never in doubt. Charlotte played its regular-season finale already eliminated and without its best player, Kemba Walker (knee injury). Jeremy Lamb led the Hornets with 21 points. Nuggets spoil ‘Romo Night’ • Gary Harris scored 20 points and the Denver Nuggets beat host Dallas 109-91 with the Mavericks honoring retiring Cowboys quarter-

back Tony Romo as a ceremonial player. With nothing at stake in a lost season that will be the worst for Dallas (32-49) since going 20-62 in 1997-98, the Mavericks followed through with an idea hatched in part by star Dirk Nowitzki weeks ago. Romo, 36, was honored exactly a week after announcing he was leaving football to become the No. 1 NFL analyst at CBS. The crowd was on its feet in the final minute hoping he could play, but Romo wasn’t on the roster or under contract. The Mavericks let Romo go through shootaround and pregame warmups before introducing him with the starters, his white jersey with “Dallas” across the front and his football No. 9.

NOTEBOOK James to sit out • LeBron James will sit out Cleveland’s regular-season finale in Toronto, resting a strained right calf in preparation for the playoffs. The Cavaliers have prioritized health and rest over getting the No. 1 seed in the East.

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed OF Jackie Bradley Jr. on the 10-day DL. Optioned INF Deven Marrero to Pawtucket (IL). Reinstated SS Xander Bogaerts from the bereavement list and LHP Drew Pomeranz from the 10-day DL. SEATTLE MARINERS — Placed SS Jean Segura on the 10-day DL. Selected INF Mike Freeman from Tacoma (PCL). Designated LHP Paul Fry for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Claimed INF Ty Kelly off waivers from the N.Y. Mets. Transferred RHP Glenn Sparkman to the 60-day DL. Activated RHP Roberto Osuna from the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Casey Lawrence to Buffalo (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Motte on a minor league contract. Placed OF Matt Kemp on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Saturday, April 8. Recalled INF Johan Camargo from Gwinnett (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES — Sent RHP Jairo Diaz to Lancaster (Cal) for a rehab assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Sent RHP Odrisamer Despaigne to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Assigned RHP Michael Blazek outright to Colorado Springs (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Sent OF Juan Lagares to St. Lucie (FSL) for a rehab assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed C Buster Posey on the seven-day DL. Purchased the contract of C Tim Federowicz from Sacramento (PCL). Designated RHP Clayton Blackburn for assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Joe Nathan on a minor league contract. American Association CLEBURNE RAILROADERS — Signed C Shawn Zarraga. Released INF Gerardo Avila. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Released OF Matt Kianka. KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed RHP Kamakani Usui. ST. PAUL SAINTS — Signed RHP Seth Rosin. Traded OF Alonzo Harris to York for a player to be named. TEXAS AIRHOGS — Signed OF Charley Thurber. WICHITA WINGNUTS — Signed INF Matt Chavez. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed 1B Shawn Pleffner and C Conor Sullivan. Released INF Stefan Sabol. Can-Am League OTTAWA CHAMPIONS — Signed INF Ricky Oropesa. TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Signed RHP Chris Murphy.

Underdog

-$112 -$147 -$230 -$140 -$118 -$132 -$118

Rays Twins White Sox Orioles A’s Rangers MARINERS

National League ROCKIES -$142 NATIONALS -$200 PIRATES -$152 PHILLIES -$110 MARLINS -$122 CUBS -$138 GIANTS -$125

Padres Cards Reds Mets Braves Dodgers D’backs

Interleague BLUE JAYS

-$185

Brewers

NBA Favorite ROCKETS GRIZZLIES THUNDER CAVALIERS PACERS CELTICS MAGIC 76ers HEAT BULLS JAZZ BLAZERS WARRIORS CLIPPERS

Points 8 6.5 NL NL 7 13.5 2 3 NL 9.5 NL NL 14 16

Underdog T’Wolves Mavericks Nuggets Raptors Hawks Bucks Pistons KNICKS Wizards Nets Spurs Pelicans Lakers Kings

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CANADIENS -$145/+$125 Rangers Bruins -$125/+$105 SENATORS PENGUINS -$155/+$135 Blue Jackets WILD -$150/+$130 Blues OILERS -$140/+$120 Sharks Grand Salami: Over/under 26.5 goals. Thursday CAPITALS -$220/+$180 Maple Leafs BLACKHAWKS -$170/+$150 Predators DUCKS -$155/+$135 Flames Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

GOLF Holes in One Birch Creek • Larry Frank, hole No. 16, 130 yards, 9-iron. Acorns • Phil Wahlig, hole No. 6, 109 yards, pitching wedge, April 9.

EAST MATCHUPS The 1-8 and 2-7 matchups in the East cannot be finalized until Wednesday. Toronto is the No. 3 seed and will face either Milwaukee or Indiana. Washington is the No. 4 seed and will open the playoffs against No. 5 Atlanta. Everything else is up in the air. Depending on results Tuesday and Wednesday, any of four teams — Indiana, Milwaukee, Chicago or Miami — could wind up getting the No. 7 spot. And the Pacers might be No. 6, No. 7, No. 8 or out of the playoffs entirely at No. 9.

CLIPPERS-JAZZ Utah hasn’t started the playofs at home since 2001. The Jazz could change that this year, if they beat San Antonio on Wednesday while the Clippers lose at home to Sacramento. That’s the only scenario where the Jazz would be seeded No. 4 in the Western Conference playofs. Otherwise, the Clippers will get home-court for the firstround series against Utah. All the other seeds and matchups out West for the first round are set: No. 1 Golden State vs. No. 8 Portland, No. 2 San Antonio vs. No. 7 Memphis, and No. 3 Houston vs. No. 6 Oklahoma City.

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L y-Boston 52 29 x-Toronto 50 31 New York 30 51 Philadelphia 28 53 Brooklyn 20 61 Southeast W L y-Washington 49 32 x-Atlanta 43 38 Miami 40 41 Charlotte 36 46 Orlando 28 53 Central W L y-Cleveland 51 30 x-Milwaukee 42 39 Indiana 41 40 Chicago 40 41 Detroit 37 44

Pct .642 .617 .370 .346 .247 Pct .605 .531 .494 .439 .346 Pct .630 .519 .506 .494 .457

GB — 2 22 24 32 GB — 6 9 13½ 21 GB — 9 10 11 14

L10 7-3 8-2 3-7 2-8 5-5 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 4-6 6-4 5-5 7-3 3-7

Str W-2 W-3 L-3 L-7 L-1 Str W-1 W-4 W-2 L-5 L-2 Str L-3 W-2 W-4 W-1 L-1

Home 29-11 28-13 18-22 17-24 13-28 Home 30-11 23-18 22-18 22-19 15-25 Home 31-9 23-18 28-12 24-16 24-17

Away 23-18 22-18 12-29 11-29 7-33 Away 19-21 20-20 18-23 14-27 13-28 Away 20-21 19-21 13-28 16-25 13-27

Conf 35-16 33-18 21-30 19-32 11-40 Conf 32-19 30-21 26-25 22-30 19-32 Conf 35-16 27-24 25-26 27-24 21-30

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 61 20 .753 — x-Houston 54 27 .667 7 x-Memphis 43 38 .531 18 New Orleans 33 47 .413 27½ Dallas 32 49 .395 29 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Utah 50 31 .617 — x-Oklahoma City 47 34 .580 3 x-Portland 41 40 .506 9 Denver 39 42 .481 11 Minnesota 31 50 .383 19 Paciic W L Pct GB z-Golden State 66 15 .815 — x-LA Clippers 50 31 .617 16 Sacramento 31 49 .388 34½ LA Lakers 25 55 .313 40½ Phoenix 24 57 .296 42 x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 4-6 1-9 L10 7-3 6-4 8-2 5-5 3-7 L10 9-1 8-2 4-6 5-5 2-8

Str L-2 L-1 L-1 L-4 L-5 Str W-1 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-5 Str L-1 W-6 L-2 W-4 W-2

Home 31-10 29-11 24-16 21-20 21-20 Home 28-12 28-12 25-15 22-19 20-21 Home 35-5 28-12 16-24 16-24 15-26

Away 30-10 25-16 19-22 12-27 11-29 Away 22-19 19-22 16-25 17-23 11-29 Away 31-10 22-19 15-25 9-31 9-31

Conf 36-15 35-16 28-23 19-31 18-33 Conf 30-21 29-22 28-23 23-28 18-33 Conf 41-10 30-21 20-30 15-35 11-40

Tuesday Atlanta 103, Charlotte 76 Oklahoma City 100, Minnesota 98 Denver 109, Dallas 91 New Orleans at LA Lakers, late Phoenix at Sacramento, late Monday Indiana 120, Philadelphia 111 Boston 114, Brooklyn 105 Miami 124, Cleveland 121, OT Chicago 122, Orlando 75 Milwaukee 89, Charlotte 79 Washington 105, Detroit 101 Portland 99, San Antonio 98 LA Clippers 125, Houston 96 Utah 105, Golden State 99 Wednesday Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Chicago, 7 p.m. Dallas at Memphis, 7 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Detroit at Orlando, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Boston, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 8 p.m. LA Lakers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. New Orleans at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m.

NBA SUMMARIES Nuggets 109, Mavericks 91

Hawks 103, Hornets76

Denver: Chandler 3-6 2-4 9, Plumlee 8-14 0-0 16, Jokic 3-6 0-0 7, Murray 4-14 0-0 10, G.Harris 6-10 4-6 20, Hernangomez 5-9 1-2 14, Arthur 3-9 0-0 9, Miller 3-4 0-0 8, Beasley 6-12 2-2 16. Totals 41-84 9-14 109. Dallas: Finney-Smith 2-7 0-0 5, Noel 4-6 0-1 8, Nowitzki 9-20 2-2 21, Barea 5-14 0-0 13, Ferrell 4-12 1-1 10, Brussino 2-5 0-0 5, Uthoff 2-2 0-0 5, Powell 3-9 2-2 10, Hammons 0-1 1-2 1, Mejri 1-2 0-0 2, D.Harris 3-10 3-3 11. Totals 35-88 9-11 91. Denver 23 34 26 26 — 109 Dallas 26 18 31 16 — 91 3-point goals: Denver 18-42 (G.Harris 4-7, Hernangomez 3-5, Arthur 3-7, Miller 2-3, Beasley 2-7, Murray 2-8, Chandler 1-2, Jokic 1-3), Dallas 12-40 (Barea 3-8, Powell 2-7, D.Harris 2-7, Uthoff 1-1, Brussino 1-4, Finney-Smith 1-4, Nowitzki 1-4, Ferrell 1-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Denver 53 (Plumlee 9), Dallas 42 (Nowitzki 8). Assists: Denver 31 (Murray 10), Dallas 24 (Barea 9). Total fouls: Denver 14, Dallas 11. A: 20,333 (19,200).

Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 4-10 2-2 10, Williams 2-9 2-2 7, Zeller 1-3 2-2 4, Roberts 2-7 0-0 4, Batum 0-3 0-0 0, Wood 2-3 0-2 4, Plumlee 0-5 0-0 0, Kaminsky 3-11 0-1 6, Weber 3-9 3-4 10, Graham 5-10 0-0 10, Lamb 7-18 6-6 21. Totals 29-88 15-19 76. Atlanta: Prince 4-7 0-1 8, Millsap 5-10 0-0 10, Howard 7-9 5-7 19, Schroder 3-5 2-2 8, Hardaway Jr. 3-7 2-2 9, Sefolosha 2-5 0-0 4, Bazemore 3-6 0-0 8, Humphries 1-4 2-2 5, Ilyasova 3-9 3-4 10, Muscala 4-4 0-0 8, Delaney 2-4 0-0 4, Calderon 3-4 0-0 7, Dunleavy 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 41-79 14-18 103. Charlotte 26 18 17 15 — 76 Atlanta 38 25 21 19 — 103 3-point goals: Charlotte 3-23 (Weber 1-3, Williams 1-4, Lamb 1-7, Batum 0-1, Graham 0-2, Roberts 0-3, Kaminsky 0-3), Atlanta 7-27 (Bazemore 2-4, Humphries 1-2, Calderon 1-2, Ilyasova 1-4, Dunleavy 1-4, Hardaway Jr. 1-4, Millsap 0-1, Prince 0-2, Sefolosha 0-2, Delaney 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 40 (Plumlee 7), Atlanta 50 (Howard 12). Assists: Charlotte 16 (Batum 4), Atlanta 30 (Schroder 9). Total fouls: Charlotte 17, Atlanta 17. Technicals: Millsap. A: 14,205 (18,118).

Thunder 100 T’Wolves 98 Oklahoma City: Singler 4-12 2-2 11, Sabonis 6-16 6-6 19, Adams 5-6 0-0 10, Christon 1-5 0-0 2, Oladipo 8-16 3-3 20, Grant 2-5 1-2 6, Collison 2-2 0-0 4, Kanter 3-10 4-8 10, Cole 4-11 3-4 12, Abrines 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 37-86 19-25 100. Minnesota: Wiggins 7-22 3-6 18, Towns 10-20 4-4 26, Dieng 9-11 1-1 19, Rubio 4-13 5-5 14, Rush 0-4 1-2 1, Casspi 3-4 0-2 7, Muhammad 3-6 3-4 9, Jones 1-3 0-1 2, Dunn 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 38-86 17-25 98. Oklahoma City 33 23 15 29 — 100 Minnesota 16 27 29 26 — 98 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 7-22 (Abrines 2-2, Grant 1-2, Cole 1-3, Singler 1-4, Sabonis 1-5, Oladipo 1-5, Christon 0-1), Minnesota 5-20 (Towns 2-6, Casspi 1-1, Rubio 1-3, Wiggins 1-4, Jones 0-1, Muhammad 0-2, Rush 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 54 (Sabonis, Oladipo 9), Minnesota 35 (Towns 12). Assists: Oklahoma City 22 (Christon, Oladipo 6), Minnesota 24 (Rubio 10). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Minnesota 17. Technicals: Oklahoma City team. A: 19,356 (19,356).

Monday box scores

Clippers 125, Rockets 96 Houston: Ariza 3-11 0-0 6, R.Anderson 4-9 2-2 12, Onuaku 1-2 0-0 2, Harden 2-9 9-14 14, Gordon 5-13 5-5 17, T.Williams 5-10 4-4 15, Harrell 7-12 1-2 15, Brown 6-15 0-0 15, Taylor 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 33-84 21-27 96. L.A. Clippers: Griffin 6-11 6-6 18, Mbah a Moute 6-8 2-2 15, Jordan 6-9 2-6 14, Paul 5-12 7-7 19, Redick 4-12 0-0 9, W.Johnson 1-3 0-0 2, Pierce 4-5 0-1 10, Speights 1-5 0-0 3, Bass 4-5 2-2 10, B.Johnson 1-3 0-0 2, Felton 2-4 0-0 4, Crawford 6-14 4-4 19. Totals 46-91 23-28 125. Houston 35 22 12 27 — 96 L.A. Clippers 35 26 36 28 — 125 3-point goals: Houston 9-40 (Brown 3-8, R.Anderson 2-7, Gordon 2-7, T.Williams 1-4, Harden 1-6, Harrell 0-1, Ariza 0-7), L.A. Clippers 10-26 (Crawford 3-7, Pierce 2-3, Paul 2-3, Mbah a Moute 1-1, Speights 1-3, Redick 1-6, Felton 0-1, W.Johnson 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 41 (Harrell 13), L.A. Clippers 49 (Jordan 11). Assists: Houston 23 (Brown 9), L.A. Clippers 29 (Paul 9). Total fouls: Houston 23, L.A. Clippers 16. Technicals: Harrell, Jordan, Paul. A: 19,163 (19,060).

Cavs to sign Jones • For the second straight year, Cleveland will sign swingman Dahntay Jones on the final day of the regular season, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The sides are finalizing the deal and Jones is expected to be signed Wednesday.

BASEBALL Favorite American League YANKEES TIGERS INDIANS RED SOX ROYALS ANGELS Astros

Odds

ington, and a loss by either Indiana or Chicago.

BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS — Promoted Malik Rose to general manager of Erie (NBADL).

SOCCER

Champions League

English Premier League

FOOTBALL National Football League GREEN BAY PACKERS — Released CB Makinton Dorleant. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Traded DE Chris Smith to Cincinnati for a conditional 2018 draft pick. Released LB Dan Skuta. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Signed QB Myles Carr and WR Quinshad Davis.

Chelsea Tottenham Liverpool Man. City Man. Utd. Arsenal Everton West Brom. Southampton Watford Leicester Burnley Stoke West Ham Bournemouth Crystal Palace Hull Swansea Middlesbrough Sunderland

(Home teams listed first) QUARTERFINALS First Leg Tuesday, April 11 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) vs. Monaco, ppd., explosion Juventus (Italy) 3, Barcelona (Spain) 0 Wednesday, April 12 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) vs. Monaco, 1:45 p.m. Atletico Madrid (Spain) vs. Leicester (England), 1:45 p.m. Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Second Leg Tuesday, April 18 Leicester (England) vs. Atletico Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Real Madrid (Spain) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 19 Barcelona (Spain) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Monaco vs. Borussia Dortmund (Germany), 1:45 p.m.

HOCKEY USA HOCKEY — Named Jeff Blashill coach of the 2017 U.S. Men’s IIHF National Team. National Hockey League NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned G Magnus Hellberg and F Taylor Beck to Hartford (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Reassigned F Chandler Stephenson to Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League AHL — Suspended San Jose F Zack Stortini two games and Grand Rapids D Dan Renouf one game. BAKERSFIELD CONDORS — Signed LWs Evan Campbell and Evan Polei to amateur tryout agreements. BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS — Agreed to terms with F Jeff Kubiak on an amateur tryout agreement. MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS — Signed F Tyler Moy to an amateur tryout agreement. SPRINGFIELD THUNDERBIRDS — Returned Fs Matt Leitner and Tony Turgeon and D Colton Saucerman to Manchester (AHL). Recalled F Rihards Bukarts from Manchester. ECHL MANCHESTER MONARCHS — Announced F Matt Leitner, D Colton Saucerman and D Tony Turgeon were returned to the team by Springfield (AHL). Announced LW Rihards Bukarts was recalled by Springfield. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Suspended Orlando City M Matias Perez Garcia one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for violent conduct during an April 9 match against New York. COLLEGE CALIFORNIA — Named Chris Walker men’s assistant basketball coach and Keith Brown director of men’s basketball operations. LOUISVILLE — Announced junior men’s basketball C Matz Stockman will transfer to Minnesota. WASHINGTON — Signed football coach Chris Petersen to a contract extension through the 2023 season.

GP 31 31 32 31 30 29 32 32 30 31 31 32 32 32 32 31 32 32 31 31

W 24 20 18 18 15 16 15 12 11 10 10 10 9 10 9 10 8 8 4 5

D 3 8 9 7 12 6 9 8 7 7 6 6 9 6 8 4 6 4 12 5

L 4 3 5 6 3 7 8 12 12 14 15 16 14 16 15 17 18 20 15 21

GF 65 64 68 60 46 61 57 39 37 36 39 32 34 42 45 42 33 37 22 24

GA 25 22 40 35 24 36 36 41 37 52 51 44 47 57 59 50 64 67 37 56

Pts 75 68 63 61 57 54 54 44 40 37 36 36 36 36 35 33 30 28 24 20

Sunday Sunderland 0, Manchester United 3 Everton 4, Leicester 2 Monday Crystal Palace 3, Arsenal 0

MLS Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 3 2 1 10 9 7 Orlando City 3 1 0 9 4 3 Atlanta United FC 2 1 2 8 13 5 Chicago 2 1 2 8 6 7 New England 2 2 1 7 9 6 New York City FC 2 2 1 7 8 5 New York 2 3 1 7 5 9 D.C. United 2 2 1 7 4 8 Toronto FC 1 0 4 7 6 4 Montreal 0 2 3 3 5 8 Philadelphia 0 3 2 2 5 9 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Portland 4 1 1 13 16 8 FC Dallas 3 0 1 10 6 2 Houston 3 2 0 9 11 9 Sporting K.C. 2 0 3 9 5 2 San Jose 2 2 1 7 7 7 Los Angeles 2 3 0 6 7 8 Seattle 1 1 3 6 7 6 Real Salt Lake 1 3 2 5 6 8 Colorado 1 2 1 4 4 6 Vancouver 1 3 1 4 6 10 Minnesota United 1 4 1 4 10 22 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Friday New York City FC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Seattle at Vancouver, 9 p.m. FC Dallas at San Jose, 10 p.m.

AREA COLLEGES Tuesday scores Baseball College of the Ozarks 3, MoBap 1 SW Illinois 12, John A. Logan 11 John A. Logan 3, SW Illinois 1 Southern Indiana 5, UMSL 3 McKendree 5, SLU 3 Softball Eastern Illinois 2, Butler 0 College Men’s Tennis Final Illinois College 5 Webster University 4

MOTOR SPORTS IndyCar Schedule April 23 — Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama, Birmingham April 29 — Phoenix Grand Prix, Avondale May 13 — IndyCar Grand Prix, Indianapolis May 28 — 101st Running of the Indianapolis 500, Indianapolis June 3 — Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix 1, Detroit June 4 — Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix 2, Detroit June 10 — Rainguard Water Sealers 600, Fort Worth June 25 — KOHLER Grand Prix, Elkhart Lake July 9 — Iowa Corn 300, Newton July 16 — Honda Indy Toronto, Toronto July 30 — Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio, Lexington August 20 — ABC Supply 500, Long Pond August 26 — Gateway 500, Madison September 3 — INDYCAR Grand Prix at The Glen, Watkins Glen September 17 — GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma, Sonoma

NASCAR Monster Energy Cup Schedule-Winners Feb. 19 — x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey Logano) Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1 (Chase Elliott) Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2 (Denny Hamlin) Feb. 26 — Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch) March 5 — Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Brad Keselowski) March 12 — Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr) March 19 — Camping World 500 (Ryan Newman) March 26 — Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson) April 2 — STP 500 (Brad Keselowski) April 9 — O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie Johnson) April 23 — Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. April 30 — Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va. May 7 — GEICO 500, Talladega, Ala. May 13 — Go Bowling 400, Kansas City, Kan. May 19 — x-The Showdown, Concord, N.C. May 20 — x-All-Star Race, Concord, N.C. May 28 — Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. June 4 — AAA 400 Drive for Autism, Dover, Del. June 11 — Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. June 18 — FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich. June 25 — Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. July 1 — Coke Zero 400 Powered by Coca-Cola, Daytona Beach, Fla. July 8 — Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. July 16 — New Hampshire 301, Loudon, N.H. July 23 — Crown Royal 400 at The Brickyard, Speedway, Ind. July 30 — Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa. Aug. 6 — Watkins Glen 355, Watkins Glen, N.Y. Aug. 13 — Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Aug. 19 — Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. Sept. 3 — Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. Sept. 9 — Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va. Sept. 17 — Chicago 400, Joliet, Ill. Sept. 24 — New England 300, Loudon, N.H. Oct. 1 — Delaware 400, Dover, Del. Oct. 7 — Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C. Oct. 15 — Alabama 500, Talladega, Ala. Oct. 22 — Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 29 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500, Martinsville, Va. Nov. 5 — AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 12 — Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 19 — Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla. x-non-points race


SPORTS

04.12.2017 • WedneSday • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

NBA playof scenarios going down to wire ASSOCIATED PRESS

There will be final-night intrigue in the NBA. The two remaining playoff berths will be decided, along with the No. 1 seed in the Eastern Conference and the site for Game 1 of the series that starts this weekend between the Utah Jazz and Los Angeles Clippers. Most individual stat races are already sewn up, barring something that would be most improbable. Oklahoma City’s Russell Westbrook will become the 16th player in NBA history to win two scoring titles, Houston’s James Harden will lead the league in assists for the first time and Miami’s Hassan Whiteside

should be able to wrap up his first rebounding crown. Golden State’s Stephen Curry is a lock to lead the league in 3-pointers made for the fifth straight year.

usual playof preparedness, since he hasn’t appeared in a regularseason finale in a decade. Cleveland can still be No. 1 with a win and a Boston loss.

TOP OF THE EAST

Dwyane Wade helped Miami win three championships. Now, he might help keep the Heat out of the playofs. It’s three teams — Indiana, Chicago and Miami — for the last two spots in the East field. Indiana and Chicago control their destinies. If the Pacers win, they’re in. If the Bulls win, they’re in. If either loses, the door opens for Miami. The Heat would reach the playoffs with a win over Wash-

Boston controls the race for the top seed in the East playofs. The Celtics will be No. 1 in the East if they beat Milwaukee, or if Cleveland loses to Toronto. The Cavaliers won’t have LeBron James on Wednesday night, and are 0-7 this season when he doesn’t play. Depending on perspective, James will either be resting, recovering or revving for the start of the playoffs. It’s part of his

BOTTOM OF THE EAST

Hawks wrap up No. 5 seed

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hornets guard Treveon Graham (front) and Hawks forward Paul Millsap battle for a loose ball during the irst half of Tuesday night’s game in Atlanta.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dwight Howard had 19 points and 12 rebounds as the host Atlanta Hawks won their fourth straight game, routing the listless Charlotte Hornets 103-76 on Tuesday night to wrap up the No. 5 seed in the Eastern Conference. The Hawks will face the Washington Wizards in the opening round of the playofs. A week ago, Atlanta’s playoff hopes were in jeopardy after a dismal stretch that included two losses to Brooklyn, the worst team in the NBA. Then, in a sudden turnaround that epitomized the team’s maddening inconsistency this season, the Hawks knocked of East-leading Boston and recorded two straight stunning victories over the defending NBA champion Cleveland Cavaliers, including Sunday’s comeback from a 26-point deficit. This one was never in doubt. Charlotte played its regular-season finale already eliminated and without its best player, Kemba Walker (knee injury). Jeremy Lamb led the Hornets with 21 points. Nuggets spoil ‘Romo Night’ • Gary Harris scored 20 points and the Denver Nuggets beat host Dallas 109-91 with the Mavericks honoring retiring Cowboys quarter-

back Tony Romo as a ceremonial player. With nothing at stake in a lost season that will be the worst for Dallas (32-49) since going 20-62 in 1997-98, the Mavericks followed through with an idea hatched in part by star Dirk Nowitzki weeks ago. Romo, 36, was honored exactly a week after announcing he was leaving football to become the No. 1 NFL analyst at CBS. The crowd was on its feet in the final minute hoping he could play, but Romo wasn’t on the roster or under contract. The Mavericks let Romo go through shootaround and pregame warmups before introducing him with the starters, his white jersey with “Dallas” across the front and his football No. 9.

NOTEBOOK James to sit out • LeBron James will sit out Cleveland’s regular-season finale in Toronto, resting a strained right calf in preparation for the playoffs. The Cavaliers have prioritized health and rest over getting the No. 1 seed in the East.

AMERICA’S LINE

TRANSACTIONS BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Placed OF Jackie Bradley Jr. on the 10-day DL. Optioned INF Deven Marrero to Pawtucket (IL). Reinstated SS Xander Bogaerts from the bereavement list and LHP Drew Pomeranz from the 10-day DL. SEATTLE MARINERS — Placed SS Jean Segura on the 10-day DL. Selected INF Mike Freeman from Tacoma (PCL). Designated LHP Paul Fry for assignment. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Claimed INF Ty Kelly off waivers from the N.Y. Mets. Transferred RHP Glenn Sparkman to the 60-day DL. Activated RHP Roberto Osuna from the 10-day DL. Optioned RHP Casey Lawrence to Buffalo (IL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES — Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Motte on a minor league contract. Placed OF Matt Kemp on the 10-day DL, retroactive to Saturday, April 8. Recalled INF Johan Camargo from Gwinnett (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES — Sent RHP Jairo Diaz to Lancaster (Cal) for a rehab assignment. MIAMI MARLINS — Sent RHP Odrisamer Despaigne to Jupiter (FSL) for a rehab assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Assigned RHP Michael Blazek outright to Colorado Springs (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Sent OF Juan Lagares to St. Lucie (FSL) for a rehab assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS — Placed C Buster Posey on the seven-day DL. Purchased the contract of C Tim Federowicz from Sacramento (PCL). Designated RHP Clayton Blackburn for assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Agreed to terms with RHP Joe Nathan on a minor league contract. American Association CLEBURNE RAILROADERS — Signed C Shawn Zarraga. Released INF Gerardo Avila. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS — Released OF Matt Kianka. KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed RHP Kamakani Usui. ST. PAUL SAINTS — Signed RHP Seth Rosin. Traded OF Alonzo Harris to York for a player to be named. TEXAS AIRHOGS — Signed OF Charley Thurber. WICHITA WINGNUTS — Signed INF Matt Chavez. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES — Signed 1B Shawn Pleffner and C Conor Sullivan. Released INF Stefan Sabol. Can-Am League OTTAWA CHAMPIONS — Signed INF Ricky Oropesa. TROIS-RIVIERES AIGLES — Signed RHP Chris Murphy.

Underdog

-$112 -$147 -$230 -$140 -$118 -$132 -$118

Rays Twins White Sox Orioles A’s Rangers MARINERS

National League ROCKIES -$142 NATIONALS -$200 PIRATES -$152 PHILLIES -$110 MARLINS -$122 CUBS -$138 GIANTS -$125

Padres Cards Reds Mets Braves Dodgers D’backs

Interleague BLUE JAYS

-$185

Brewers

NBA Favorite ROCKETS GRIZZLIES THUNDER CAVALIERS PACERS CELTICS MAGIC 76ers HEAT BULLS JAZZ BLAZERS WARRIORS CLIPPERS

Points 8 6.5 NL NL 7 13.5 2 3 NL 9.5 NL NL 14 16

Underdog T’Wolves Mavericks Nuggets Raptors Hawks Bucks Pistons KNICKS Wizards Nets Spurs Pelicans Lakers Kings

NHL Favorite Odds Underdog CANADIENS -$145/+$125 Rangers Bruins -$125/+$105 SENATORS PENGUINS -$155/+$135 Blue Jackets WILD -$150/+$130 Blues OILERS -$140/+$120 Sharks Grand Salami: Over/under 26.5 goals. Thursday CAPITALS -$220/+$180 Maple Leafs BLACKHAWKS -$170/+$150 Predators DUCKS -$155/+$135 Flames Grand Salami: Over/under 16.5 goals. Home team in CAPS © 2017 Benjamin Eckstein

GOLF Holes in One Birch Creek • Larry Frank, hole No. 16, 130 yards, 9-iron. Acorns • Phil Wahlig, hole No. 6, 109 yards, pitching wedge, April 9.

EAST MATCHUPS The 1-8 and 2-7 matchups in the East cannot be finalized until Wednesday. Toronto is the No. 3 seed and will face either Milwaukee or Indiana. Washington is the No. 4 seed and will open the playoffs against No. 5 Atlanta. Everything else is up in the air. Depending on results Tuesday and Wednesday, any of four teams — Indiana, Milwaukee, Chicago or Miami — could wind up getting the No. 7 spot. And the Pacers might be No. 6, No. 7, No. 8 or out of the playoffs entirely at No. 9.

CLIPPERS-JAZZ Utah hasn’t started the playofs at home since 2001. The Jazz could change that this year, if they beat San Antonio on Wednesday while the Clippers lose at home to Sacramento. That’s the only scenario where the Jazz would be seeded No. 4 in the Western Conference playofs. Otherwise, the Clippers will get home-court for the firstround series against Utah. All the other seeds and matchups out West for the first round are set: No. 1 Golden State vs. No. 8 Portland, No. 2 San Antonio vs. No. 7 Memphis, and No. 3 Houston vs. No. 6 Oklahoma City.

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L y-Boston 52 29 x-Toronto 50 31 New York 30 51 Philadelphia 28 53 Brooklyn 20 61 Southeast W L y-Washington 49 32 x-Atlanta 43 38 Miami 40 41 Charlotte 36 46 Orlando 28 53 Central W L y-Cleveland 51 30 x-Milwaukee 42 39 Indiana 41 40 Chicago 40 41 Detroit 37 44

Pct .642 .617 .370 .346 .247 Pct .605 .531 .494 .439 .346 Pct .630 .519 .506 .494 .457

GB — 2 22 24 32 GB — 6 9 13½ 21 GB — 9 10 11 14

L10 7-3 8-2 3-7 2-8 5-5 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 4-6 6-4 5-5 7-3 3-7

Str W-2 W-3 L-3 L-7 L-1 Str W-1 W-4 W-2 L-5 L-2 Str L-3 W-2 W-4 W-1 L-1

Home 29-11 28-13 18-22 17-24 13-28 Home 30-11 23-18 22-18 22-19 15-25 Home 31-9 23-18 28-12 24-16 24-17

Away 23-18 22-18 12-29 11-29 7-33 Away 19-21 20-20 18-23 14-27 13-28 Away 20-21 19-21 13-28 16-25 13-27

Conf 35-16 33-18 21-30 19-32 11-40 Conf 32-19 30-21 26-25 22-30 19-32 Conf 35-16 27-24 25-26 27-24 21-30

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Pct GB y-San Antonio 61 20 .753 — x-Houston 54 27 .667 7 x-Memphis 43 38 .531 18 New Orleans 33 48 .407 28 Dallas 32 49 .395 29 Northwest W L Pct GB y-Utah 50 31 .617 — x-Oklahoma City 47 34 .580 3 x-Portland 41 40 .506 9 Denver 39 42 .481 11 Minnesota 31 50 .383 19 Paciic W L Pct GB z-Golden State 66 15 .815 — x-LA Clippers 50 31 .617 16 Sacramento 32 49 .395 34 LA Lakers 26 55 .321 40 Phoenix 24 58 .293 42½ x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 1-9 L10 7-3 6-4 8-2 5-5 3-7 L10 9-1 8-2 5-5 6-4 2-8

Str L-2 L-1 L-1 L-5 L-5 Str W-1 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-5 Str L-1 W-6 W-1 W-5 L-1

Home 31-10 29-11 24-16 21-20 21-20 Home 28-12 28-12 25-15 22-19 20-21 Home 35-5 28-12 17-24 17-24 15-26

Away 30-10 25-16 19-22 12-28 11-29 Away 22-19 19-22 16-25 17-23 11-29 Away 31-10 22-19 15-25 9-31 9-32

Conf 36-15 35-16 28-23 19-32 18-33 Conf 30-21 29-22 28-23 23-28 18-33 Conf 41-10 30-21 21-30 16-35 11-41

NBA SUMMARIES Nuggets 109, Mavericks 91 Denver: Chandler 3-6 2-4 9, Plumlee 8-14 0-0 16, Jokic 3-6 0-0 7, Murray 4-14 0-0 10, G.Harris 6-10 4-6 20, Hernangomez 5-9 1-2 14, Arthur 3-9 0-0 9, Miller 3-4 0-0 8, Beasley 6-12 2-2 16. Totals 41-84 9-14 109. Dallas: Finney-Smith 2-7 0-0 5, Noel 4-6 0-1 8, Nowitzki 9-20 2-2 21, Barea 5-14 0-0 13, Ferrell 4-12 1-1 10, Brussino 2-5 0-0 5, Uthoff 2-2 0-0 5, Powell 3-9 2-2 10, Hammons 0-1 1-2 1, Mejri 1-2 0-0 2, D.Harris 3-10 3-3 11. Totals 35-88 9-11 91. Denver 23 34 26 26 — 109 Dallas 26 18 31 16 — 91 3-point goals: Denver 18-42 (G.Harris 4-7, Hernangomez 3-5, Arthur 3-7, Miller 2-3, Beasley 2-7, Murray 2-8, Chandler 1-2, Jokic 1-3), Dallas 12-40 (Barea 3-8, Powell 2-7, D.Harris 2-7, Uthoff 1-1, Brussino 1-4, Finney-Smith 1-4, Nowitzki 1-4, Ferrell 1-5). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Denver 53 (Plumlee 9), Dallas 42 (Nowitzki 8). Assists: Denver 31 (Murray 10), Dallas 24 (Barea 9). Total fouls: Denver 14, Dallas 11. A: 20,333 (19,200).

Thunder 100 T’Wolves 98 Oklahoma City: Singler 4-12 2-2 11, Sabonis 6-16 6-6 19, Adams 5-6 0-0 10, Christon 1-5 0-0 2, Oladipo 8-16 3-3 20, Grant 2-5 1-2 6, Collison 2-2 0-0 4, Kanter 3-10 4-8 10, Cole 4-11 3-4 12, Abrines 2-3 0-0 6. Totals 37-86 19-25 100. Minnesota: Wiggins 7-22 3-6 18, Towns 10-20 4-4 26, Dieng 9-11 1-1 19, Rubio 4-13 5-5 14, Rush 0-4 1-2 1, Casspi 3-4 0-2 7, Muhammad 3-6 3-4 9, Jones 1-3 0-1 2, Dunn 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 38-86 17-25 98. Oklahoma City 33 23 15 29 — 100 Minnesota 16 27 29 26 — 98 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 7-22 (Abrines 2-2, Grant 1-2, Cole 1-3, Singler 1-4, Sabonis 1-5, Oladipo 1-5, Christon 0-1), Minnesota 5-20 (Towns 2-6, Casspi 1-1, Rubio 1-3, Wiggins 1-4, Jones 0-1, Muhammad 0-2, Rush 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 54 (Sabonis, Oladipo 9), Minnesota 35 (Towns 12). Assists: Oklahoma City 22 (Christon, Oladipo 6), Minnesota 24 (Rubio 10). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 21, Minnesota 17. Technicals: Oklahoma City team. A: 19,356 (19,356).

Hawks 103, Hornets76

Cavs to sign Jones • For the second straight year, Cleveland will sign swingman Dahntay Jones on the final day of the regular season, a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press. The sides are finalizing the deal and Jones is expected to be signed Wednesday.

BASEBALL Favorite American League YANKEES TIGERS INDIANS RED SOX ROYALS ANGELS Astros

Odds

ington, and a loss by either Indiana or Chicago.

Charlotte: Kidd-Gilchrist 4-10 2-2 10, Williams 2-9 2-2 7, Zeller 1-3 2-2 4, Roberts 2-7 0-0 4, Batum 0-3 0-0 0, Wood 2-3 0-2 4, Plumlee 0-5 0-0 0, Kaminsky 3-11 0-1 6, Weber 3-9 3-4 10, Graham 5-10 0-0 10, Lamb 7-18 6-6 21. Totals 29-88 15-19 76. Atlanta: Prince 4-7 0-1 8, Millsap 5-10 0-0 10, Howard 7-9 5-7 19, Schroder 3-5 2-2 8, Hardaway Jr. 3-7 2-2 9, Sefolosha 2-5 0-0 4, Bazemore 3-6 0-0 8, Humphries 1-4 2-2 5, Ilyasova 3-9 3-4 10, Muscala 4-4 0-0 8, Delaney 2-4 0-0 4, Calderon 3-4 0-0 7, Dunleavy 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 41-79 14-18 103. 26 18 17 15 — Charlotte Atlanta 38 25 21 19 —

3-point goals: Charlotte 3-23 (Weber 1-3, Williams 1-4, Lamb 1-7, Batum 0-1, Graham 0-2, Roberts 0-3, Kaminsky 0-3), Atlanta 7-27 (Bazemore 2-4, Humphries 1-2, Calderon 1-2, Ilyasova 1-4, Dunleavy 1-4, Hardaway Jr. 1-4, Millsap 0-1, Prince 0-2, Sefolosha 0-2, Delaney 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Charlotte 40 (Plumlee 7), Atlanta 50 (Howard 12). Assists: Charlotte 16 (Batum 4), Atlanta 30 (Schroder 9). Total fouls: Charlotte 17, Atlanta 17. Technicals: Millsap. A: 14,205 (18,118).

Lakers 108, Pelicans96 New Orleans: Cunningham 4-6 0-0 10, Hill 3-8 1-2 8, Ajinca 5-8 4-6 14, Frazier 1-7 3-4 6, Holiday 6-9 2-2 14, Diallo 9-10 1-2 19, Motiejunas 2-7 4-4 8, Cook 1-7 0-0 3, Crawford 5-13 0-0 11, Toupane 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 37-79 15-20 96. L.A. Lakers: Ingram 6-16 3-5 15, Nance 2-7 2-2 7, World Peace 7-17 0-0 18, Randle 4-7 3-4 11, Clarkson 5-8 2-2 15, Brewer 3-6 1-2 7, Robinson 4-5 2-4 10, Black 3-9 0-0 6, Ennis 2-5 1-2 5, Nwaba 6-8 2-2 14. Totals 42-88 16-23 108. New Orleans 25 28 20 23 — 96 L.A. Lakers 26 31 28 23 — 108 3-point goals: New Orleans 7-22 (Cunningham 2-4, Frazier 1-1, Toupane 1-3, Cook 1-3, Hill 1-3, Crawford 1-5, Motiejunas 0-1, Holiday 0-2), L.A. Lakers 8-22 (World Peace 4-10, Clarkson 3-5, Nance 1-2, Ingram 0-2, Ennis 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: New Orleans 39 (Diallo 11), L.A. Lakers 47 (Black 9). Assists: New Orleans 29 (Crawford, Holiday 7), L.A. Lakers 24 (Ingram 6). Total fouls: New Orleans 16, L.A. Lakers 18. A: 18,997 (19,060).

Kings 129, Suns 104 Phoenix: Warren 6-19 1-2 14, Jones 3-9 3-5 10, Chriss 8-19 4-8 22, Len 2-7 0-0 4, Ulis 10-25 4-6 27, Millsap 1-2 1-2 3, Williams 7-10 0-0 14, Bender 2-11 1-1 5, Price 2-7 0-0 5. Totals 41-109 14-24 104. Sacramento: Labissiere 3-7 6-8 12, Cauley-Stein 6-12 1-2 13, Lawson 6-10 9-10 22, McLemore 3-7 7-9 13, Hield 12-20 2-3 30, Tolliver 2-4 6-7 12, Papagiannis 5-9 3-4 13, Galloway 2-7 0-0 4, Temple 4-7 0-0 10. Totals 43-83 34-43 129. Phoenix 25 14 38 27 — 104 Sacramento 28 30 39 32 — 129 3-point goals: Phoenix 8-30 (Ulis 3-8, Chriss 2-6, Warren 1-2, Jones 1-3, Price 1-4, Bender 0-7), Sacramento 9-19 (Hield 4-8, Temple 2-2, Tolliver 2-4, Lawson 1-1, McLemore 0-2, Galloway 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 48 (Williams 11), Sacramento 55 (Lawson 11). Assists: Phoenix 19 (Ulis 6), Sacramento 28 (Lawson 12). Total fouls: Phoenix 23, Sacramento 23. Technicals: Phoenix defensive three second, Bender, Chriss, Phoenix team, Papagiannis. A: 17,608 (17,500).

76 103

BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS — Promoted Malik Rose to general manager of Erie (NBADL).

SOCCER

Champions League

English Premier League

FOOTBALL National Football League GREEN BAY PACKERS — Released CB Makinton Dorleant. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — Traded DE Chris Smith to Cincinnati for a conditional 2018 draft pick. Released LB Dan Skuta. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS — Signed QB Myles Carr and WR Quinshad Davis.

Chelsea Tottenham Liverpool Man. City Man. Utd. Arsenal Everton West Brom. Southampton Watford Leicester Burnley Stoke West Ham Bournemouth Crystal Palace Hull Swansea Middlesbrough Sunderland

(Home teams listed first) QUARTERFINALS First Leg Tuesday, April 11 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) vs. Monaco, ppd., explosion Juventus (Italy) 3, Barcelona (Spain) 0 Wednesday, April 12 Borussia Dortmund (Germany) vs. Monaco, 1:45 p.m. Atletico Madrid (Spain) vs. Leicester (England), 1:45 p.m. Bayern Munich (Germany) vs. Real Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Second Leg Tuesday, April 18 Leicester (England) vs. Atletico Madrid (Spain), 1:45 p.m. Real Madrid (Spain) vs. Bayern Munich (Germany), 1:45 p.m. Wednesday, April 19 Barcelona (Spain) vs. Juventus (Italy), 1:45 p.m. Monaco vs. Borussia Dortmund (Germany), 1:45 p.m.

HOCKEY USA HOCKEY — Named Jeff Blashill coach of the 2017 U.S. Men’s IIHF National Team. National Hockey League NEW YORK RANGERS — Assigned G Magnus Hellberg and F Taylor Beck to Hartford (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Reassigned F Chandler Stephenson to Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League AHL — Suspended San Jose F Zack Stortini two games and Grand Rapids D Dan Renouf one game. BAKERSFIELD CONDORS — Signed LWs Evan Campbell and Evan Polei to amateur tryout agreements. BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS — Agreed to terms with F Jeff Kubiak on an amateur tryout agreement. MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS — Signed F Tyler Moy to an amateur tryout agreement. SPRINGFIELD THUNDERBIRDS — Returned Fs Matt Leitner and Tony Turgeon and D Colton Saucerman to Manchester (AHL). Recalled F Rihards Bukarts from Manchester. ECHL MANCHESTER MONARCHS — Announced F Matt Leitner, D Colton Saucerman and D Tony Turgeon were returned to the team by Springfield (AHL). Announced LW Rihards Bukarts was recalled by Springfield. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS — Suspended Orlando City M Matias Perez Garcia one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for violent conduct during an April 9 match against New York. COLLEGE CALIFORNIA — Named Chris Walker men’s assistant basketball coach and Keith Brown director of men’s basketball operations. LOUISVILLE — Announced junior men’s basketball C Matz Stockman will transfer to Minnesota. WASHINGTON — Signed football coach Chris Petersen to a contract extension through the 2023 season.

GP 31 31 32 31 30 29 32 32 30 31 31 32 32 32 32 31 32 32 31 31

W 24 20 18 18 15 16 15 12 11 10 10 10 9 10 9 10 8 8 4 5

D 3 8 9 7 12 6 9 8 7 7 6 6 9 6 8 4 6 4 12 5

L 4 3 5 6 3 7 8 12 12 14 15 16 14 16 15 17 18 20 15 21

GF 65 64 68 60 46 61 57 39 37 36 39 32 34 42 45 42 33 37 22 24

GA 25 22 40 35 24 36 36 41 37 52 51 44 47 57 59 50 64 67 37 56

Pts 75 68 63 61 57 54 54 44 40 37 36 36 36 36 35 33 30 28 24 20

Sunday Sunderland 0, Manchester United 3 Everton 4, Leicester 2 Monday Crystal Palace 3, Arsenal 0

MLS Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 3 2 1 10 9 7 Orlando City 3 1 0 9 4 3 Atlanta United FC 2 1 2 8 13 5 Chicago 2 1 2 8 6 7 New England 2 2 1 7 9 6 New York City FC 2 2 1 7 8 5 New York 2 3 1 7 5 9 D.C. United 2 2 1 7 4 8 Toronto FC 1 0 4 7 6 4 Montreal 0 2 3 3 5 8 Philadelphia 0 3 2 2 5 9 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Portland 4 1 1 13 16 8 FC Dallas 3 0 1 10 6 2 Houston 3 2 0 9 11 9 Sporting K.C. 2 0 3 9 5 2 San Jose 2 2 1 7 7 7 Los Angeles 2 3 0 6 7 8 Seattle 1 1 3 6 7 6 Real Salt Lake 1 3 2 5 6 8 Colorado 1 2 1 4 4 6 Vancouver 1 3 1 4 6 10 Minnesota United 1 4 1 4 10 22 NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie. Friday New York City FC at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Seattle at Vancouver, 9 p.m. FC Dallas at San Jose, 10 p.m.

Tuesday Atlanta 103, Charlotte 76 Oklahoma City 100, Minnesota 98 Denver 109, Dallas 91 LA Lakers 108, New Orleans 96 Sacramento 129, Phoenix 104 Wednesday Atlanta at Indiana, 7 p.m. Brooklyn at Chicago, 7 p.m. Dallas at Memphis, 7 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Detroit at Orlando, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Boston, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Washington at Miami, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 8 p.m. LA Lakers at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. New Orleans at Portland, 9:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Thursday No games scheduled.

AREA COLLEGES Tuesday scores Baseball College of the Ozarks 3, MoBap 1 SW Illinois 12, John A. Logan 11 John A. Logan 3, SW Illinois 1 Southern Indiana 5, UMSL 3 McKendree 5, SLU 3 Softball Eastern Illinois 2, Butler 0 College Men’s Tennis Final Illinois College 5 Webster University 4

MOTOR SPORTS IndyCar Schedule April 23 — Honda Indy Grand Prix of Alabama, Birmingham April 29 — Phoenix Grand Prix, Avondale May 13 — IndyCar Grand Prix, Indianapolis May 28 — 101st Running of the Indianapolis 500, Indianapolis June 3 — Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix 1, Detroit June 4 — Chevrolet Detroit Belle Isle Grand Prix 2, Detroit June 10 — Rainguard Water Sealers 600, Fort Worth June 25 — KOHLER Grand Prix, Elkhart Lake July 9 — Iowa Corn 300, Newton July 16 — Honda Indy Toronto, Toronto July 30 — Honda Indy 200 at Mid-Ohio, Lexington August 20 — ABC Supply 500, Long Pond August 26 — Gateway 500, Madison September 3 — INDYCAR Grand Prix at The Glen, Watkins Glen September 17 — GoPro Grand Prix of Sonoma, Sonoma

NASCAR Monster Energy Cup Schedule-Winners Feb. 19 — x-Advance Auto Parts Clash (Joey Logano) Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 1 (Chase Elliott) Feb. 23 — x-Can-Am Duel at Daytona 2 (Denny Hamlin) Feb. 26 — Daytona 500 (Kurt Busch) March 5 — Folds of Honor QuikTrip 500 (Brad Keselowski) March 12 — Kobalt 400 (Martin Truex Jr) March 19 — Camping World 500 (Ryan Newman) March 26 — Auto Club 400 (Kyle Larson) April 2 — STP 500 (Brad Keselowski) April 9 — O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 (Jimmie Johnson) April 23 — Food City 500, Bristol, Tenn. April 30 — Toyota Owners 400, Richmond, Va. May 7 — GEICO 500, Talladega, Ala. May 13 — Go Bowling 400, Kansas City, Kan. May 19 — x-The Showdown, Concord, N.C. May 20 — x-All-Star Race, Concord, N.C. May 28 — Coca-Cola 600, Concord, N.C. June 4 — AAA 400 Drive for Autism, Dover, Del. June 11 — Pocono 400, Long Pond, Pa. June 18 — FireKeepers Casino 400, Brooklyn, Mich. June 25 — Toyota/Save Mart 350, Sonoma, Calif. July 1 — Coke Zero 400 Powered by Coca-Cola, Daytona Beach, Fla. July 8 — Quaker State 400, Sparta, Ky. July 16 — New Hampshire 301, Loudon, N.H. July 23 — Crown Royal 400 at The Brickyard, Speedway, Ind. July 30 — Pennsylvania 400, Long Pond, Pa. Aug. 6 — Watkins Glen 355, Watkins Glen, N.Y. Aug. 13 — Pure Michigan 400, Brooklyn, Mich. Aug. 19 — Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race, Bristol, Tenn. Sept. 3 — Bojangles’ Southern 500, Darlington, S.C. Sept. 9 — Federated Auto Parts 400, Richmond, Va. Sept. 17 — Chicago 400, Joliet, Ill. Sept. 24 — New England 300, Loudon, N.H. Oct. 1 — Delaware 400, Dover, Del. Oct. 7 — Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C. Oct. 15 — Alabama 500, Talladega, Ala. Oct. 22 — Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City, Kan. Oct. 29 — Goody’s Fast Relief 500, Martinsville, Va. Nov. 5 — AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas Nov. 12 — Can-Am 500, Avondale, Ariz. Nov. 19 — Ford Ecoboost 400, Homestead, Fla. x-non-points race


SPORTS

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

Top area recruits still have big decisions RECRUITS • FROM B1

Smith’s basketball career at Edwardsville ended in March, but the storm it created lives on. The newly named Illinois Mr. Basketball and Illinois Gatorade Player of the Year, the 17-yearold Smith is a 6-foot-4 blue chip point guard who has college basketball’s top programs salivating. Smith averaged 22 points, eight rebounds and eight assists and was a first-team Post-Dispatch All-Metro selection as he led Edwardsville to a 30-2 mark this winter. “It’s special. You always dream about Kentucky, Michigan State, the blue bloods to come in and watch you,” Smith said. “Coach Calipari is sitting in your living room and offers you a scholarship. It leaves you speechless.” Wednesday is the first day high school senior basketball players can sign binding national letters of intent during the regular signing period. The final day seniors can sign with Division I programs is May 17. Division II recruits have until Aug. 1. Typically, high school basketball players take advantage of the early signing period in the second week of November before their senior season. It puts the recruiting process to bed and allows them to focus on playing. But there is nothing typical about this season around the area. Smith went from a fire-balling Missouri pitching recruit to mid-major basketball prospect to Calipari pulling up in an Escalade and ofering him a scholarship. When Illinois fired coach John Groce in March, it opened the door for its loaded recruiting class to look elsewhere. East St. Louis center Jeremiah Tilmon and Belleville East shooting guard Javon Pickett asked for and were granted their releases from the national letters of intent they signed with Illinois in the early period. Missouri hired East St. Louis’ own Cuonzo Martin, a move which on its own piqued the interest of unattached area recruits. Adding Michael Porter Jr. as Martin’s first verbal commitment at Mizzou took things up a notch. At a time when basketball recruiting is generally quiet, three

PAUL HALFACRE • STLhighschoolsports.com

Edwardsville coach Mike Waldo talks with Mark Smith in the irst half of a game March 14 against Chicago Simeon at Redbird Arena in Normal, Ill.

of the best players in the Midwest are on the market. Things should only get crazier in what is expected to be a flurry of activity the next few weeks. “I’m just really enjoying it. No matter where I go to college it’s going to be like a job. I’m having fun with it,” Smith said. “I talk to Javon and Jeremiah. I think they’re going to have fun with it, too.” Each recruit is allotted five official visits to colleges or univer-

sities. An oicial visit allows the school to provide transportation, food and other accommodations that are not allowed during an unoicial visit. Pickett’s only official visit was to Illinois, where he was the first recruit in his class to pledge to Groce and the Illini. Pickett took himself of the board just as his national profile began to grow. After a senior season in which he averaged 26 points, seven rebounds, three assists and two steals, the 6-foot-5 silky

THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MOM & ME 2017 LOOK-ALIKE CONTEST

smooth scorer will be in high demand. “(Pickett) will be one of the most coveted Midwest recruits out there,” Scott Burgess of Prep Hoops Illinois said. “He’ll probably have 10 to 15 high-major offers.” Granted his release Tuesday morning, Pickett garnered ofers from St. Louis U. and Western Kentucky before noon. Tilmon’s recruitment at Illinois was a roller coaster from

the start. He verbally committed in July, but questions remained until the day he signed his letter. Now granted his release, there is rampant speculation Mizzou is the leader to land the 6-foot-11 five-star center. “He’s the best prospect in Illinois,” Burgess said. “His upside in three years is a first-round pick.” Smith’s upside is hard to gauge because his situation is so unusual. After injuring his pitching arm last summer, Smith put his glove away and went all in on basketball. His brief play on the AAU circuit landed him a slew of scholarship offers from smaller Division I programs. Smith used his first three official visits on Northern Illinois, Wright State and SIU Edwardsville. But he believed with more time in the gym he could go bigger. “He got a lot of (mid-majors) looking. We talked to them. We figured that’s where we’re going to go,” said Anthony Smith, Mark’s father and the boys basketball coach at Metro-East Lutheran. “We had a conversation one night, he said, ‘Dad, what if I just play?’ We rolled the dice and here we are, as I like to say, one Calipari later.” Smith spent his fourth official visit on Michigan State last weekend and walked away impressed. He has one more to use on his myriad of options, and Kentucky and Ohio State appear to be the leaders. Smith will be in Louisville on Thursday, Friday and Saturday to take part in the Kentucky Derby Festival Basketball Classic, the oldest high school all-star basketball game in the nation. But there won’t be time to slip away to see Calipari or Kentucky. Smith’s mother, Yvonne, wants to be home for Easter Sunday. “After the game we’re driving right back,” Mark Smith said. Smith will take his last oicial visit, maybe an unofficial visit or two, then sit down and hash things out with his parents. The time to end this process is rapidly approaching. Smith would only say that his timeline to make a decision is “soon.” “I’ve got some tough decisions to make the next couple of weeks,” he said.

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STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

SOFTBALL

TUESDAY’S RESULTS

ON A MISSION Exton’s battle with cancer provides inspiration for unbeaten Highland BY STEVE OVERBEY sTLhighschoolsports.com

Highland junior outfielder Addison Rinderer heard the rumblings. So did senior pitcher Aubrey Hacke. But the players were still shocked when coach Greg Exton showed up minutes before their seasonopening game March 17 at O’Fallon High. Just 25 days earlier, Exton had a cancerous tumor the size of a half-dollar removed from the right side of his brain. “We all just stopped what we were doing,” Hacke said. “The game was just about to start and we all just ran over to give him a great big hug.” Rinderer, like most of her teammates, greeted their ailing coach with tears streaming down her cheeks. “Everyone was crying, but we were just so happy to see him,” Rinderer said. “I can’t explain how great it made all of us feel.” The emotional moment brought a smile to the face of the hard-nosed Exton in the absolute toughest of times. “I wasn’t going to miss (the game),” Exton said. “I had to be there. These are my girls.” That Exton has been there every step of the way is nothing short of a miracle. He is currently undergoing both radiation and chemotherapy treatments for Glioblastoma, an extremely aggressive form of brain cancer. Yet he has attended every one of the Bulldogs 10 games this season — all wins. “He is always in our thoughts and our prayers,” said Hacke, who has played under Exton on the high school and club levels the past five years. “When we break every huddle before games and practices, it’s not 1-2-3, Bulldogs any more. It’s

PAUL KOPSKY • sTLhighschoolsports.com

Highland coach Greg Exton hasn’t missed a game this season while battling cancer.

1-2-3 play for Greg.” The outpouring of support for Exton from the softball community has been overwhelming. At O’Fallon, Panthers players made a get-well sign and put it above the Bulldogs dugout before the Highland players arrived for the game. The Collinsville High team and coaching staff sent a card and well wishes. “It’s so great the way everyone has gotten behind him,” said Madi Exton, Greg’s daughter and one of the interim coaches when Greg is out for treatments. “Sometimes we wonder how much influence we have with these players. This just goes to show how much everyone really cares.” Exton took over the program last season and guided the Bulldogs to a 25-9 record and their third successive regional championship. He was looking forward to another stellar campaign when he suddenly became ill in mid-February. Exton had been having headaches and trouble concentrating when he finally gave in and, at the

urging of his daughter, went to the emergency room at St. Anthony’s Medical Center in St. Louis on Feb. 19. A CAT scan showed the tumor. He underwent surgery two days later. Doctors removed the tumor and Exton was allowed to go home Feb. 24. His immediate thoughts were not about his health. “He was worried about practice and how the girls were doing,” said Madi, a former player at Edwardsville High. Madi Exton took pictures at the workouts and brought them to her father so he could gauge the team’s progress. Two weeks after the surgery, Greg Exton had the staples removed from his head. He was cleared to drive in late March. Exton continues to make regular trips to St. Louis for the radiation and chemotherapy treatments. But he arranges his entire health schedule around the Bulldogs games. For now, Exton has not been cleared to take part in on-field activities. He keeps the scorebook in the dugout in addition to providing his usual leadership

and wisdom. He hopes to return to the third-base coaching box soon. But Madi isn’t quite sure her father is ready for that step. “If the doctors clear him, we’ll think about it,” she says. Softball always has been a huge part of Exton’s life. Which is why the game has played a big part in his mental strength during this painful process. “He just loves the game and being around us,” Hacke said. “And we love that he’s back.” It shows in the Bulldogs’ record. They have outscored their opponents 82-18 and recently swept a doubleheader from Belleville West. Hacke, one of the players closest to Exton, is of to a strong start. She sports a 4-0 record with a 2.19 ERA while sharing the duties with junior Kirsten Plocher. The Bulldogs (10-0) are a team on a mission. And the reason is obvious. “He’s an inspiration to all of us,” Hacke said. “And if we can make him happy by winning games and playing the way he wants us to — that’s just great.”

DeMatteis takes over at Windsor; Herring grabs helm at Westminster In one 24-hour period, Alex DeMatteis’s life changed forever. On the evening of Feb. 6, DeMatteis was informed he would be the next football coach at Windsor. Just past midnight, he received a call that his grandmother died. Just past noon, DeMatteis’s wife Jenn gave birth to twins. “I’m going to have a pretty interesting life when it’s all said and done,” DeMatteis said with a chuckle. DeMatteis, 34, takes over at Windsor after serving one hard season with Grandview in Jeferson County. The Eagles mustered enough players for just a varsity roster. They made it through Week 7 before injuries decimated them. Grandview went 0-9, forfeiting its Week 7 game after injuries left it without enough players to compete. It canceled the remainder of its season. It’s one school year DeMatteis will never forget. He stepped away from St. Mary’s after three years in the top job and 15 on staf. He took the position at Grandview with visions of more family time. He and Jenn have a 4-year-old son, Xander. The commute from Oakville to Grandview was lengthy, he enrolled at William Woods to earn a specialist certification in administration and he and Jenn welcomed the twins, a baby boy

BASEBALL Bayless 001 401 1 7 8 Hancock 021 000 0 3 1 W-Tommy Pratt. Soldan 440 44 16 12 Northwest Ac. 010 00 1 3 W-J. Saunders. McCluer North 6(15)3 7 31 25 Riverview 010 0 1 0 W-Brandon Wilke. Haz. West 200 3(15) 20 7 McCluer 000 20 2 4 W-Justin Woods. Crystal City 000 00 0 1 St. Pius X 543 20 14 11 L-Nolan Mangan. Haz. East 000 20 2 5 Haz. Central 554 10 15 6 W-Jacob Busch. L-Amori Brooks. Chicago Char 040 01 5 5 SLUH 133 (11)0 18 13 W-Teddy Washington. FZ West 000 000 0 0 6 Troy 010 010 0 2 4 W-Eric Tipton. L-Patrick Connor. Holt 000 211 0 4 7 FZ South 000 000 0 0 2 W-Jacob Thompson. Warrenton 003 007 6 16 9 Orchard Farm 003 000 2 5 10 L-Jacob Hanns. Northwest-CH 000 00 0 2 Oakville 240 (11)0 17 14 W-Andrew Leise. HR-O Dylan Mooney FZ East 300 000 0 3 3 Liberty 020 020 0 4 4 W-Chase Hoeber. L-Donovan Shanks. Pky. Central 000 000 0 0 1 Pky. West 002 001 0 3 10 W-Junior Lopez. FH North 000 050 0 5 6 FH Central 130 000 2 6 6 W-Jake Davey. Priory 000 00 0 1 Westminster 000 91 10 11 W-DJ Stewart. L-Christian Witte. HR-W Weston Schad Fox 100 000 0 1 5 Lindbergh 100 020 0 3 7 W-Niko Marshall. Lafayette 001 040 0 5 8 Pky. South 002 100 0 3 5 W-Alec Byous. Marquette 000 000 0 10 12 Mehlville 000 000 0 2 10 W-Carter DeFoe. L-Zach Moore. Howell 000 100 0 1 5 Timberland 000 101 0 2 4 W-Zach Ploch. L-Ben Holsclaw. Brentwood 000 001 0 1 1 Valley Park 000 014 0 5 7 W-Ethan Schmitt. MICDS 000 100 00 1 8 John Burroughs 000 001 01 2 5 W-Henry Abbott. L-Grayson Senn. Highland 000 000 0 0 2 Waterloo 000 000 1 1 5 W-Erik Kaiser. Eureka 300 100 203 9 14 Seckman 100 030 200 6 9 L-Brendan Briggs. Southwestern 002 600 2 10 9 Litchield 002 001 4 7 11 W-Ben Lowis. Luth. South 406 13 14 9 Luth. North 000 00 0 3 W-Brad Hennen. L-Tim Branneky. Edwardsville 100 012 0 4 7 Bellvl. East 000 000 1 1 1 W-Kade Burns. L-Ben Cruikshank. Civic Mem. 112 302 0 9 7 A. Marquette102 020 2 7 12 W-Christian Stawar. Granite City 000 00 0 2 O’Fallon 022 70 11 9 W-Heath Zuber. L-Andy Halley. Alton 740 31 15 11 Collinsville 000 01 1 5 W-Robby Taul. L-Ryan Siverly. FZ North 000 001 0 1 5 Washington 012 000 0 3 5 L-Jake Gentry. E. St. Louis 000 00 0 1 Bellvl. West 140 05 10 8 W-Sam Bernosky. Linn 000 00 3 3 Hermann 000 00 13 13 W-Matt Wade. New Athens 200 000 2 4 Valmeyer 500 331 12 16 W-Ryan Brinkman. Carlyle 101 000 0 2 5 Red Bud 400 000 0 4 10 W-Lucas Tobin. L-Conner Humes. Columbia 300 002 2 7 8 Freeburg 200 010 0 3 5 W-Luke Watson. L-Jordan Fritz. HR-C Kyle Steve -Shane Wilhelm Vianney 001 000 0 1 1 De Smet 010 010 0 2 8 L-Noah Niznik. Breese C. 005 000 1 6 7 Wesclin 001 001 0 2 7 W-Dylan Wilson. L-Zach Swaim. Dupo 005 002 0 7 9 Lebanon 100 000 0 1 8 W-Taylor Stanek. Borgia 101 020 0 4 6 St. Mary’s 100 000 0 1 2 W-Zach Stahlman. HR-B Drew Piontek Marissa 000 000 3 3 7 Steeleville 001 014 0 6 7 L-James Inman. CBC 106 000 1 8 12 Chaminade 002 010 0 3 7 L-Henry Gladson.

0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 0 1 6 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 4 0 0 0 1 1

SOFTBALL

FOOTBALL • COACHING MOVES

BY DAVID KVIDAHL sTLhighschoolsports.com

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • B11

and girl, in February. His plans for more family time evaporated like cotton candy in the rain. DeMatteis is moving into a significantly more stable situation at Windsor. The school will employ a full-time athletics director next season. The community just passed a multi-million dollar bond issue that is expected to help pay for upgrades to some of the athletic facilities. “It’s pretty awesome,” DeMatteis said. DeMatteis takes over for Greg Westermayer who guided the Owls to a 4-6 mark last season. Windsor went 21-50 in his seven seasons.

HERRING TO WESTMINSTER When the time comes for Keith Herring to hang up his whistle, he will be able to say he did it all. In the winter, Herring was hired to coach Westminster’s football team. He steps away from Brentwood after a successful six-year run. “I’m really excited,” Herring said. “The timing couldn’t have been better.” Herring takes over for Chris Pederson, who had the top job for one season after Cory Snyder took over at Francis Howell. Westminster was 3-7 last season. This will be the third stop for Herring, 55. He spent 22 years at Hazelwood West, a Class 6 program, be-

fore moving to Brentwood, a Class 2 program. The Eagles went 58-11 under Herring. Last season, they finished 11-2 and lost to eventual Class 2 champion Lamar in the semifinals while churning out yards in their run-based offense, the Wing T.

SIMMONS LEAVES DUBOURG Brian Simmons resigned as DuBourg’s football coach in February after two seasons. A DuBourg graduate, Simmons accepted an assistant coaching position with Benedictine College in Kansas. Simmons, 49, said it wasn’t an easy choice, but ultimately decided he wanted to try his hand at the college level. “It was always on my bucket list to coach at college,” Simmons said. “I didn’t want the opportunity to pass me up.” DuBourg was 0-10 this season and 2-8 last season. The Cavaliers struggled to fill out a varsity roster this season. Simmons insisted the program is on the rebound with a healthy number of returning players and an influx of incoming freshmen that have expressed interest in playing football. DuBourg also formed a co-op with Hancock, which does not ofer football. That means Hancock students can play for the Cavaliers. “They will still have a team,” Simmons said.

Roxana 10 14 0 Bunker Hill 6 8 0 W-Taylor Nolan. HR-R Abigail Stahlhut Highland 012 202 3 10 11 0 Waterloo 100 003 0 4 6 3 W-Hacke. L-Merritt. HR-H Garbett 2- Miener -Addison Rinderer -; W Hannah King Civic Mem. 441 24 15 13 0 Cahokia 002 00 2 2 0 W-Aubrey Hall. Collinsville 021 110 0 5 10 0 Alton 102 512 0 11 11 4 W-Abby Scyoc. HR-A Ashlyn Betz Columbia 001 330 0 7 11 0 Freeburg 010 001 1 3 4 0 W-Mikaela Kossina. L-Miranda Schulte. New Athens 400 201 0 7 8 0 Valmeyer 002 000 4 6 9 0 W-Haley Kohnen. L-Cierra Goldschmidt. Gibault 000 00 0 1 0 A. Marquette032 21 10 16 0 W-Taylor Whitehead. L-Lexi Poepper.

LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school 1. Edwardsville 2. Belleville East 3. Alton 4. Triad 5. Mascoutah SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school 1. Highland 2. Jerseyville 3. Gillespie 4. Columbia 5. Alton Marquette

GIRLS SOCCER RANKINGS

Record 9-1 10-1 7-4 8-4 6-6

LW 1 4 2 3 5

Record 9-0 9-0 10-1 8-1 7-2

LW 2 NR NR 3 NR

LARGE SCHOOLS Rank, school Record 1. Webster Groves 8-0 2. Granite City 8-0 3. Summit 8-2-1 4. St. Joseph’s 7-2 5. Westminster 7-0 6. Triad 8-2 7. Alton 8-1-1 8. Collinsville 6-3-1 9. Nerinx Hall 8-1 10. Ladue 5-2

LW 2 5 1 3 10 4 9 NR NR NR

SMALL SCHOOLS Rank, school Record LW 1. Incarnate Word 11-1-1 1 2. Columbia 8-2-1 2 3. Althof 7-2-1 3 4. Union 7-3 4 5. O’Fallon Christian 7-0 8 6. St. Charles West 6-1 NR 7. Villa Duchesne 5-2 7 8. Windsor 6-2 6 9. Roxana 5-1 10 10. St. Dominic 4-4 5

3 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

GIRLS SOCCER Crossroads 6, Valley Park 0 (C: Charlotte Vieth 2, Elysse Price 2, Catherine Birch, Malasia Taylor ; shutout by Kieran Uhlamsiek) St. Joseph’s 7, A. Marquette 0 (S:EmilyBurton2,GabbyLawlor2,MalloryHolzer, KarsenKohl,JaneNester ;shutoutbyEmilyMeara) Metro 6, Tower Grove 2 (M:AvaFarrar3,ShanyaDorsey2,GracePanicola) McCluer 4, Haz. East 0 (M: Jalisa Smith, Madison Evans, Adrionna Peoples, Asia Thomas ; shutout by Briona Turner) Notre Dame 4, Kennedy 0 (N: Mallory Campbell, Grace Garner, Kailey Pagano, Bridget Turney ; shutout by Mary Beers, Julia Love) Ladue 2, Pattonville 1 (L: Cytron, Hardester; P: Madison Utley) V. Duchesne 7, Luth. North 0 (V: Brooke Cytron 3, Audrey Fusz, Lauren Gast, Marissa Menendez, Emily Knopf ; shutout by Anna Keady, Emma St. John) MICDS 6, Luth. South 0 (M: Delaney Schultz 3, Naomi Ferguson 2, Izzy Critchield-Jain ; shutout by Carolyn Botz) Westminster 8, Principia 0 (W: Kirsten Davis 3, Sydney Walker, Kelly Bradley, Natalie Bunton, Riley Merriield, Alexis Turner ; shutout by Taylor French) Troy 3, Liberty 0 (T: Anika Kallash, Morgan Bova, Kennedy Thompson ; shutout by Ashton Lindsley) MS-Berkeley 3, Jennings 0 (M: Deja Funches 2, Iyanah Westbrook) Roxana 5, Pana 1 (R: Emma Lucas 3, Haley Milazzo 2) Breese C. 2, Fath.McGivney 1 (B: Allyson Fehrmann, Alyssa Robke) Wesclin 7, Salem 0 (W: Casey Bell 3, Claire Gruenke 3, Elena Fridley ; shutout by Kaylee Thaler) Borgia 4, Lutheran SC 0 (B: Anya Castelli, Anna Eckelkamp, Elizabeth Hellebusch, Sophia Landwehr ; shutout by Chelsea Pohl) DuBourg 2, Rosati-Kain 1 (D: Madison Galczynski, Maria Gerth) Litchield 7, Gillespie 0 (L: Jade Taylor 4, Elli Holan 2, Jordan Morgan) FH Central 2, FZ West 1 (Fr: Angel Ikeda, Mariah Johnson; Fo: Jamie Cohen) Orchard Farm 5, Warrenton 0 (O: Shannon Dahl 3, Kayla Hedges, Lily Dahl ; shutout by Haleigh Schroer) St.Chas. West 2, St. Charles 1 (S : Abbie Gilblair, Meagan Papin ; shutout by Savannah Gilblair) Pky. South 1, Lafayette 0 (P: Sarah Sodoma ; shutout by Amber Hayes) Marquette 3, Mehlville 0 (Ma: Bridgit Barker, Caitie Chismarach, Megan Price ; shutout by Jalin Stelzer) Eureka 3, Seckman 0 (E: Beldner 2, Mocker; shutout by JJ Schoch) FH North 2, Howell 1 (F : Samantha Cary, Bria Hamilton) Sullivan 6, St. Louis Pat 0 (Su: Emma Randolph 3, Jenna Lochner, McKenna McCoy, MaKenzie Martin ; shutout by Lauren Hofman) St. Dominic 4, O’F Christian 1 (S: Kirsten Lepping, Madison Ballard, Maddie Bauer, Mary Cate Sommerhof; O: Eylesa Kellam) Duchesne 6, Trinity 0 (D: Amy Jung 3, Maria Wilder, Maddie Goeke, Emma Varvera ; shutout by Payton Bodden) Edwardsville 2, Althof 1 (E: Allysiah Belt, Abigail Crabtree) Collinsville 6, O’Fallon 2 (C: Emily Holten 2, Alynnah O’Leary, Tayler Devine, Courtney Marten, Jalyn Richardson ; O: Tessa Nesch, Sam Stutsman) In. Word 2, Bellvl. East 1 (I: Emily Groark 2; B: Cecilia Maue)

BOYS VOLLEYBALL Bellvl. West def. Granite City 25-11, 25-14 Chaminade def. Luth. South 25-17, 25-15 Webster def. Summit 25-16, 27-25 Marquette def. Mehlville 25-11, 25-15 Lindbergh def. Fox 25-13, 25-9 Afton def. Pattonville 25-22, 30-32, 25-21 Kirkwood def. Pky. West 25-19, 25-17 St. Mary’s def. CBC 25-15, 25-22 FH Central def. FH North 25-21, 29-27 SLUH def. De Smet 25-21, 25-20

BOYS LACROSSE JohnBurroughs 10, Marquette 3 Lafayette 17, Pky. South 2

GIRLS LACROSSE Cor Jesu 15, Barat 0 In. Word 10, Haz. Central 5 Kirkwood 15, O’Fallon 7

BOYS TENNIS Waterloo 6, Granite City 3 Webster Groves 9, Ritenour 0 DuBourg 8, Luth. St. Charles 1 Marquette 9, Mehlville 0 Fort Zumwalt South 7, Fort Zumwalt West 2 Chaminade 5, De Smet 4

WATER POLO Pky. North 14, Summit 6 De Smet 15, CBC 10 Pky. West 13, Kirkwood 5

BOYS GOLF Fort Zumwalt West 168, Troy Buchanan 178 Borgia 158, St. Dominic 174 Ritenour 314, McCluer North 318 Mehlville 270, Oakville 271, Seckman 291

WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE BASEBALL DuBourg at St. Mary’s, 4 p.m. Hazelwood West at Hazelwood Central, 4 p.m. St.PiusXvs.Herculaneum,atSennThomasM,4p.m. McCluer vs. University City, at Heman Park, 4 p.m. Trinity at Duchesne, 4 p.m. Troy at Fort Zumwalt West, 4:15 p.m. Parkway North at Summit, 4:15 p.m. Fort Zumwalt South at Holt, 4:15 p.m. Orchard Farm at Warrenton, 4:15 p.m. Liberty at Fort Zumwalt East, 4:15 p.m. FH Central at FH North, 4:15 p.m. Westminster at Priory, 4:15 p.m. Seckman at Lindbergh, 4:15 p.m. Triad at Waterloo, 4:15 p.m. North Tech at Bayless, 4:15 p.m. Timberland at Francis Howell, 4:15 p.m. Ritenour at Kirkwood, 4:15 p.m. Mascoutah at Highland, 4:15 p.m. Pattonville at Webster Groves, 4:15 p.m. St. Charles at St. Charles West, 4:15 p.m. Hancock at Kennedy, 4:15 p.m. De Soto vs. Ste. Gen., at Yanks Field, 4:30 p.m. Chaminade at Lutheran South, 4:30 p.m. Okawville at Alton Marquette, 4:30 p.m. Windsor at Jeferson, 4:30 p.m. Civic Memorial at Jerseyville, 4:30 p.m. Fox at Paciic, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Fort Zumwalt North, 4:30 p.m. De Smet at Ladue, 4:30 p.m. John Burroughs at MICDS, 4:30 p.m. Gillespie at Pana, 4:30 p.m. Centralia (Ill.) at Mater Dei, 4:30 p.m. Mount Olive at ME Lutheran, 4:30 p.m. Luth. St. Charles at Borgia, 4:30 p.m. Union at North County, 4:30 p.m. O’F Christian vs. Patriots, at BMAC, 4:30 p.m. Helias Catholic at St. Dominic, 5 p.m. Belleville West at St. Louis U. High, 6:30 p.m.

SOFTBALL Mount Olive at ME Lutheran, 4:30 a.m. Belleville East at Mater Dei, 4 p.m. Waterloo at Triad, 4:15 p.m. Jerseyville at Civic Memorial, 4:15 p.m. Highland at Mascoutah, 4:15 p.m. Althof at Granite City, 4:15 p.m. Alton at Carrollton, 4:30 p.m. Gillespie at Pana, 4:30 p.m. Valmeyer at Gibault, 4:30 p.m. Collinsville at Okawville, 4:30 p.m.

GIRLS SOCCER

SOFTBALL RANKINGS

Bellvl. East 031 001 0 5 11 Edwardsville 403 102 0 10 11 W-Henricks. L-Bettis. HR-B Krausz 2-; DuQuoin 000 501 1 7 12 Nashville 204 112 0 10 14 W-Guinzy. L- Jackson. HR-N Alli Liske 2O’Fallon 210 002 0 5 12 Granite City 000 000 0 0 2 W-Hayleigh Juenger. Carlyle 003 001 0 4 6 Red Bud 100 040 0 5 7 W-Sophia Koesterer. Marissa 000 000 0 0 1 Steeleville 120 021 0 6 8 W-Sydney Hood. HR-S Haley Troue Althof 003 000 0 3 6 Mt Vernon 001 001 0 2 0 W-Kennedy Sims. Bellvl. West 493 2 18 6 E. St. Louis 010 0 1 5 W-Mackenzie Skaer.

Ritenour vs. Kelly, at Hillsboro, 6:15 a.m. Crossroads vs. Metro, at Gateway Mid., 4 p.m. Nerinx Hall at Incarnate Word, 4 p.m. St. Dominic at Notre Dame, 4 p.m. Ursuline at Visitation, 4:15 p.m. Gillespie at Jerseyville, 4:15 p.m. Westminster at Parkway North, 4:15 p.m. Oakville vs. Liberty, at Troy, 4:15 p.m. Holt at Troy, 4:15 p.m. Lift For Life at Bayless, 4:15 p.m. Trinity at Whitield, 4:15 p.m. Freeburg at Breese Central, 4:30 p.m. Mater Dei at Columbia, 5 p.m. Fox at Paciic, 5 p.m. Desota Park at Lutheran South, 5 p.m. Rolla at Union, 5 p.m. Festus at Hancock, 5 p.m. Mascoutah at Civic Memorial, 5:30 p.m. St. Pius X at Windsor, 6 p.m. Orchard Farm at Afton, 6 p.m.

WATER POLO Mehlville at Eureka, 4:30 p.m. Parkway South at Lindbergh, 5:30 p.m. Clayton at Ladue, 5:30 p.m. St. Louis U. High at Kirkwood, 5:30 p.m. Oakville at Pattonville, 5:30 p.m.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL Cape Notre Dame at Bayless, 4:30 p.m. Granite City at Belleville East, 4:30 p.m.

Borgia at Fox, 5 p.m. DuBourg at Duchesne, 5 p.m. Vianney at Westminster, 5:15 p.m. Parkway North at Parkway Central, 5:30 p.m. FH North at Ritenour, 5:30 p.m. Marquette at St. Louis U. High, 5:30 p.m. Gibault at Chaminade, 5:30 p.m. CBC at De Smet, 6 p.m. St. Mary’s at St. Dominic, 6 p.m. Gibault at Duchesne, 6 p.m.

BOYS LACROSSE Webster Groves at Chaminade, 4 p.m. Kirkwood at Ladue, 4:30 p.m. Priory at St. Louis U. High, 7 p.m. Francis Howell at Seckman, 7:30 p.m. MICDS at CBC, 7:30 p.m. Summit at Eureka, 8 p.m.

GIRLS LACROSSE FH North at FH Central, 4:15 p.m. Cor Jesu at Ursuline, 4:15 p.m. Webster Groves at Hazelwood West, 4:15 p.m. MICDS at Westminster, 4:15 p.m. John Burroughs at Nerinx Hall, 4:15 p.m. Ladue at Clayton, 4:15 p.m. St. Joseph’s at Lafayette, 4:15 p.m. Parkway West at Villa Duchesne, 4:15 p.m. Barat at Parkway North, 6 p.m.

BOYS TENNIS Luth. St. Charles at FZ East, 3:30 p.m. FZ South at FH Central, 3:30 p.m. St. Charles West at FZ West, 3:30 p.m. Alton at Edwardsville, 3:30 p.m. Troy at Liberty, 3:30 p.m. Metro vs. Univ. City, at Willmore Park, 4 p.m. Triad at Jerseyville, 4 p.m. Vianney at Chaminade, 4 p.m. Parkway West at Ladue, 4:15 p.m.

BOYS GOLF TOURNAMENTS St. James Tournament at St. James CC Teams: Owensville, Paciic, Salem, St. Clair, St. James, Sullivan, Union Camdendton’s Laker Invitational at Old Kinderhook Teams: Battle, Blue Springs, Blue Springs South, Camdenton, Clinton, Farmington, Fox, Francis Howell, Helias, Hickman, Jeferson City, Ladue, Lebanon, Lee’s Summit, Lee’s Summit North, Lindbergh, Marquette, Marshield, Moberly, Olathe Northwest, Poplar Bluf, Rock Bridge, Rockhurst, Rolla, SLUH, Smith-Cotton, Waynesville, West Plains. DUAL, TRI MATCHES (Course sites listed as provided by schools) Summit vs. Lafayette at St. Albans Afton, University City vs. Webster Groves at Sunset Hills De Smet at Vianney Lutheran St. Charles vs. St. Dominic at Golf Club of Wentzville Troy vs. Timberland at Lake Forest Parkway Central vs. Pattonville at Quarry at Crystal Springs Westminster vs. MICDS Parkway South vs. Oakville Warrenton vs. Washington at Wolf Hollow Windsor vs. Ste. Genevieve John Burroughs vs. Lutheran South at Sunset Hills Valley Park vs. St. Albans at Country Club of St. Albans CBC vs. Chaminade

BOYS TRACK AND FIELD Henle Holmes Invitational, 4:15 p.m. Public High League Meet, 4:15 p.m.

GIRLS TRACK AND FIELD St. Charles West Invitational, 3:30 p.m. Edwardsville Tiger Relays, 4 p.m.


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continued inside

CELEBRATING

4 CAR CARE MONTH:

cassenscan.com

EXTERIOR CLEANING Content and Photos provided by Green Shoot Media

2017 Jeep

2017 Jeep

CHEROKEE LATITUDE 4X4

RENEGADE LATITUDE FWD

STK#17S524

MSRP LESS

STK#17R316

$35,575 - 7,826

MSRP LESS

$24,920 - 3,738

Cassens Price

Cassens Price

$27,247* $

$21,182* $

2017 Jeep

2017 Jeep

PATRIOT LATITUDE FWD

GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

STK#17X243

MSRP LESS

STK#17N485

$27,605 - 4,692

MSRP LESS

$40,380 - 3,634

Cassens Price

Cassens Price

$22,913* $

$36,746* $

2017 Jeep

2017 Jeep

WRANGLER UNLIMITED SPORT

WRANGLER SAHARA 4X4

STK#17W318

MSRP LESS

$38,345 - 1,150

Cassens Price

$37,195 $

*

STK#17W267

MSRP LESS

$35,725 - 1,071

Cassens Price

$34,654* $

*Vehicles based on inventory. Price includes rebates and discounts. Everyone qualiies for Cassens price, customers may qualify for additional rebates. See dealer for details. Tax,title license & doc fees extra. Expires 4/30/17.

YOUR AUTOMOTIVE SUPERSTORE 2 Miles North of I-270 on Hwy. 159

cassenscan.com 618-656-6070

CASSENS

4

Most Americans are familiar with the term “spring cleaning” when it comes to their homes. You also should spring clean the exterior of your vehicle. The underbody of your vehicle is where you should focus most of your attention. Roads that experience winter weather are often exposed to high levels of salt used to make roads safer. Once spring arrives, take the time to give your underbody a deep cleanse and remove any salt buildup. Cleaning Your Underbody While there is no certain solution that will immediately dissolve salt buildup, a highpressure sprayer is the best tool to use. If you don’t have access to a pressure washer, you can typically find these sprayers at do-ityourself car washes in your area. Whether you decide to tackle this project yourself or choose to hire a local detailer, releasing salt buildup on your car’s underbody is a necessary part of spring cleaning. Examine for Rust Once you have alleviated your vehicle of all buildups caused by winter’s rough road conditions, you should examine your vehicle for any rust spots. The AAA suggests your vehicle’s bumpers and wheel wells are the most susceptible to rust because of the amount of saltinfused snow that is likely to build up there. Salt from the roads can contribute to the rusting process on your vehicle. Even a small rust spot will grow if left untreated. You can lose the integrity of your vehicle’s chassis, body and even components such as exhaust systems and brake lines. Sealing the Underbody Take advantage of spring’s warm weather by applying a protective sealant to your vehicle’s underbody. By doing this, you can have peace of mind your vehicle is protected when the cold weather rolls around again. Before applying sealant, make sure the underbody is completely clean and free of rust. While it is possible to complete this task at home, you may benefit from having a professional seal your vehicle’s underbody.


Classified

C2

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

APRIL 12, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

ALL REMAINING NEW 2016 FORD F-150 XLT ECO BOOST ENGINE UP TO

$

13,500* OFF MSRP!

®

NEW 2016 FORD FIESTA

NEW 2017 FORD FOCUS SE STK# 237300

STK# G208132

19,673*

11,988*

$

$

NEW 2017 FORD ESCAPE S

STK# HC49603

$

NEW 2016 FORD TAURUS SEL

STK# G147284

19,995

*

$

NEW 2017 FORD FOCUS

STK# H205251

23,815

*

$

16,816*

*Prices exclude tax,title, license & $197 administrative fee. Additional discounts to pricing may apply. See dealer for details. Expires 4/16/17

NEW 2017 KIA SPORTAGE

20,678*

$

STK# K47433

®

2016 Sportage “Highest Ranked Small SUV in Initial Quality”

KIA

The Kia Soul and Sportage received the lowest number of problems per 100 vehicles among compact MPVs and Small SUVs, respectively, in the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Initial Quality Study. 2016 study based on 80,157 total responses, evaluating 245 models, and measures the opinions of new 2016 vehicle owners after 90 days of ownership, surveyed in February-May 2016. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.

2016

2016

KIA OPTIMA LX

KIA SOUL STK# K501145

$

18,988*

STK# KTE17806

$

“Highest Ranked Compact Multi-Purpose Vehicle in Initial Quality”

15,478*

2016 Soul “Highest Ranked Compact Multi-Purpose Vehicle in Initial Quality” 2016 Sportage “Highest Ranked Small SUV in Initial Quality” The Kia Soul and Sportage received the lowest number of problems per 100 vehicles among compact MPVs and Small SUVs, respectively, in the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Initial Quality Study. 2016 study based on 80,157 total responses, evaluating 245 models, and measures the opinions of new 2016 vehicle owners after 90 days of ownership, surveyed in t-May 2016. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com. +Price includes financing through Kia Motors, Military and college grad rebates included. Tax, title, license extra. See dealer for details. Expires 4/15/17.

EREE HWOHM ET GE OYFOUTH

NO CHARGE LIFETIME MAINTENANCE CTION SALE Tax, title, license extra. See dealer for details.

on new & pre-owned vehicles

Lower Cost of Ownership

CONSTRU NTS AT DISCOU

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10YEAR / 200,000MILE NATIONWIDE WARRANTY + 2 YEARS FREE MAINTENANCE++ 2017 FORD F-150 REG. CAB XL 2016 FORD TRANSIT CONNECT

0%

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APR

0%

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

20,777

$ BUY UY FOR OR

2016 F-150 SUPER CREW XL

*

$ BUY UY FOR OR

17,777

*

APR

$ BUY FOR

24,977

*

*Sale Price Includes $2,000 Retail Customer Cash, $1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $250 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,500 Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

*Sale Price Includes $3,500 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Commercial Vehicle Spring Season Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

*Sale Price Includes $2,150 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,500 Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $1,500 Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2016 FORD FOCUS SE

2017 FORD FUSION S ACT NOW!

2016 FORD TAURUS SE

W/AUTO TRANS

0

% APR

AVAILABLE See Dealer For Details

13,277

$ BUY Y FOR R

*

BUY UY FOR R

*Sale Price Includes Dealer Cash Incentive and $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2017 FORD ESCAPE S 30

MPG**

0

$

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE

See Dealer For Details

See Dealer For Details

*

APR FOR

30

MPG**

18,977

*Sale Price Includes $3,900 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

BommaritoADVANTAGE

APR

19,977

$ BUY Y FOR R

*Sale Price Includes $3,000 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

%

$

2017 FORD EXPLORER

0% APR FOR

0% APR FOR

23,977

$ BUY Y FOR R

MONTHS

*

*Sale Price Includes $3,000 Retail Customer Cash, $750 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

2Year Maintenance,Oil Changes, Tire Rotations (NO EXTRA CHARGE) ComplimentaryTank of Gas (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

Hablamos Español llama

SALES - SERVICE - PARTS - COLLISION REPAIR

72

MONTHS

*

*

*Sale Price Includes $3,900 Retail Customer Cash, $1,000 Ford Credit Retail Bonus Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

72

Ivette Kincade 314-642-5895 o Dennis Olson 314-814-5580

We Are A Union Shop

0%

2017 FORD EDGE SE

MONTHS

Police And Fire Department Discounts - Union Labor Discounts

APR

17,777

72 BUY Y FOR R

0%

$ BUY FOR

27,977

*

*Sale Price Includes $3,000 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. See Dealer For Details.

$500 More ForYourTrade If GivenThe Opportunity Nitro InTheTires For LongerTire Life (NO EXTRA CHARGE)

636-346-9640

Saturday Service ASKYOUR SALESPERSON FOR MORE DETAILS.

Bommarito N

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

1-888-696-4066 • 314-731-1222

E

W

S

675 Dunn Rd. - AT THE BIG CORNER I-270 & N. LINDBERGH *Available with approved credit. All units subject to availability. Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit Financing. 0% APR Financing available in lieu of any other offers or discounts. See dealer for qualifications and complete details.†0% apr for 72 months = $13.89 per $1,000 financed. **Highway miles. =See dealer for details, new cars only, standard rates apply, cannot be combined with other offers, restriction may apply. ++Bommarito advantage offer with every new Ford purchase. Special financing in lieu of any other offers or discounts. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 4/30/17. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 4/30/17.

• ILLINOIS BUYERS WE WILL PROCESS SALES TAX, TITLE AND LICENSE PLATES

www.bommaritoford.com


Classified CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

APRIL 12, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C3

RIDES

2018 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE TRACKHAWK

DRIVING WITH DAN

IT’S LOVE AT FIRST FLIGHT

By Dan Wiese - Automotive Writer

continued from the front

system, but you won’t find a “Rock Crawl” choice among its offerings. Instead, your options are Auto, Sport, Track, Custom, Snow and Tow, each tailoring the 4WD system, transmission, suspension and electric power steering to the situation at hand. Slowing things down — hey, ya gotta eventually — is a Brembo brake package that includes the largest standard front discs ever installed on a Jeep vehicle. Despite some eye candy — Gloss Black background for headlights, “Black Chrome” exhaust tips and specific badging — styling changes are, for the most part, made with an eye to improving performance: dual heat extractors in the hood, a 1-inch-lower ride height, jettisoned fog lamps for enhanced engine-cooling air flow and speed-rated Pirelli rubber hugging 20-inch wheels.

for some, but for everyone,” Trackhawk in 2018 is just for some. Its price, though not yet revealed, is likely to be well north of the nearly 70-grand Jeep asks for its closest sibling, the 475-hp Grand Cherokee SRT. Look for Trackhawk to arrive this fall. Inside is Nappa leather, carbonfiber trim, a 200-mph speedometer that’s secondary to the front-andcenter tachometer and an 8.4-inch, Apple CarPlay- and Android Autofriendly Uconnect touch screen,

which includes a Trackhawk-exclusive Performance Pages section to register top speed, 0-60 time, skid pad adhesion and more. Finally, while Ms. DeShannon back in ‘65 wanted love “not just

Dan Wiese is a freelance automotive writer. He is a regular contributor to the Post-Dispatch and to AAA Midwest Traveler magazine’s online Web Bonus. You can email him at drivingwithdan@gmail. com

OLIVER C JOSEPH Best Prices in All of Metro Area on All Inventory 2017 CHRYSLER

2017 DODGE JOURNEY

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877-215-4650 3795 West State Route 15, Belleville, IL 62226 SHARE YOUR FAVORITE MOTORCYCLE ROUTE Everyone has a favorite ride they can’t wait to hit again and again! Whether it’s a well-traveled route, a ride way off the beaten path, or a course somewhere between a main drag and a back street, tell us all about it at STLtoday.com/Rides. Each month, we’ll proile one lucky reader’s route…and they’ll speed off into the sunset with a $100 gift card from Doc’s Harley-Davidson.®

RIDE OF THE MONTH

SUBMIT YOUR STORY TODAY AT

STLtoday.com/RIDES

You could win a $100 gift card from Doc’s Harley-Davidson.®

PRESENTED BY

Submit your ride for consideration, vote for the latest contenders – and check out this month’s ride – at STLtoday.com/RIDES.


C4

Classified

M 1 ●

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

APRIL 12, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

Antique/Classic Special Interest

Chevrolet

Corvette

Honda

Hyundai

Kia

WE BUY CARS Cash Paid Today 636-940-9969 fastlanecars.com

'15 Chevrolet Cruze LTZ: Auto Temp control, $14,950 #P8763 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '05 Chevrolet Colbalt: Cloth Seats, Power Locks, $4,440 #P8645A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'04 Corvette: Convertible, Torch Red, Only 48K Miles, 5.7L V8, Only $21,000 #H170719M

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

'11 Hyundai Sonata GLS: 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Radiant Silver Metallic, $8,490 #96541B

'14 Chevy Corvette: Convertible, 6K Miles, Loaded, $48,990 #B8212

'14 Chevy Spark LS $10,280 #46523A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '12 Dodge Challenger: SRT-8, 392 Pkg, 18K Miles, $31,990 #B7838C

'15 Kia Optima EX $13,911 #45842A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '15 Kia Forte EX $9,995 #46457A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '12 Kia Optima LX: CD Player, Remote Entry, $12,022 #46351A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '14 Kia Optima S: 2 to Choose, Black, 35K Miles, Starting at $13,300 #X3139

Acura '06 Acura TSX: Silver/Grey, Leather, $8,679 #P40621 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '10 Acura ZDX $15,397 #47072-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Acura ILX: Premium, Heated Leather, Moonroof, Alloys, 26K Miles, Silver $17,500 #X3203

'09 Acura RDX: AWD, Tech, Silver, 85K Miles, Call Now! $12,300 #H170779A

'13 Acura TL: Gray, 31K Miles, Will Sell Fast!Call Now $18,500 #X3152

'11 Acura TL 3.5: Technology Pkg, Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $15,490 #P8828A

'10 Acura TSX 2.4: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $10,990 #11066A

Audi '14 Audi R8: Audi Exclusive Color, 11K Miles, #B8428 Call Today

'13 Audi A3: Hatchback, AWD, Auto, Black, $19,290 #B8384

'11 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, $13,990 #27510A

'12 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium Plus, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $16,490 #27501A

BMW '09 BMW 528 Xi, 67K mi., Black onBlackExc. Cond., NADA Dealer Retail $13,900 (w/ options). You won't find a cleaner, well cared for 5 series. $11,750. (314)973-1188 '13 BMW 328i xDrive: Black on Black Leather, $21,990 #B8395

'01 BMW 324ci: Coupe, Auto, Silver, Well Serviced, $6,490 #B8215A

'14 BMW X3 $29,697 #46630-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '13 BMW 328I $18,995 #67848-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '16 BMW 328i $30,548 #E44047 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

Buick

'14 Chevy Camaro: Sunroof, Leather, 19K Miles $29,900 #P3658 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '14 Chevy Malibu LS: 32K Miles, GM Certified, $13,499 #C11042P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Malibu LT: FWD, GM Certified Warranty, $14,798 #C11054P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Malibu LS: 32K Miles, GM Certified Warranty,$13,499 #C11042P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Malibu LT: 35K Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $14,660 #C11038P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Malibu LT: 35K Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $14,660 #C11038P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Malibu LS: 16K Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $14,365 #C11043P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Malibu LT: 2.5L 4ci, GM Certified Warranty, $12,799 #C11032P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '09 Chevy Aveo: Red, 4 Door Hatchback, 10K Miles, $6,930 Stk# P06060 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Malibu: Grey, 55K Miles, $13,969 Stk# 170556A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Chevy Equinox: 38K Miles, White $15,990 #P06062 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala: LT w/2LT, 4 Door, 45K Miles, $19,286 Stk# P06036 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Chevy Impala: 22K Miles, $18,732 Stk# P06039 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '00 Chevy Malibu: 77K Miles, 3.1L SFI V6 $3,990 Stk# P05999A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '03 Chevy Malibu: 3.1L V6 SFI, 196K Miles Stk# 170705B Please Contact for Pricing DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '07 Chevy Cobalt LT: $5,995 Stk #67914-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '09 Chevy Cobalt LT: $6,995 #46536-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Chevy Impala: $5,997 #67529-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 17 Chevy Cruze LS $15,997 Stk #46352-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '16 Chevy Cruze Lmtd $14,099 #KE00330 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Chevy Cruze 1LT: $15,371 #E28666 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Chevy Equinox $19,600 #KTE72971 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Chevy Camero $20,922 #E62651 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Chevy Camaro 1LS: 3.5L V6, RWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Silver, $14,490 #77534B

SPRING CLEANING EVENT!

Dodge

'14 Dodge Avenger SE: Flex Fuel, $13,950 #46530A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '16 Dodge Charger $19,303 #P8657 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '12 Dodge Challenger: $20,997 #66782-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '16 Dodge Challenger $21,415 #KE30820 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Dodge Dart SXT $14,190 #E65920 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '13 Dodge Charger SE: 3.6L V6, RWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Low Miles, $16,990 #11063A

'16 Dodge Journey SXT $19,583 #TE24627 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

''11 Ford Fusion SE: $9,995 #47250-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Ford Focus SEL: Red, 72K Miles, Call Today, $8,200 #DL1440

'15 Ford Edge $26,182 #KT2048E 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Fiesta SE $11,571 #L95892 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Focus: Titanium, Hatchback, Leather, Sunroof, #16,490

'14 Ford Focus SE: 22K Miles, $11,500 #P3557 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '15 Ford Focus SE $12,426 #P8739A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '16 Ford Fusion: Cloth Seats, Keyless Entry, $16,615 #P8802 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '11 Ford Mustang: Convertible, Black, Auto, $17,990 #C8243A

'16 Ford Mustang ECO $23,621 #E47233 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Ford Taurus SEL: 35K Miles, $17,900 #24090-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '13 Ford Edge SE $14,968 #TE17925 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Ford Expedition EL $39,087 #TE40825 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Ford Fusion SE: 26K Miles, Gray Metallic, $16,000 #X3205

'12 Buick LaCrosse: V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Remote Start, $14,990 #39050A

'16 Chevy Cruze LS: Limited, 1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, One owner Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, $11,990 #38173A

'12 Buick LaCrosse: Premium, AWD, Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated & Cooled Front Seats, Bluetooth, $16,990 #38074A

'16 Chevy Cruze $14,707 #P20536 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Chevy Equinox $19,851 #KTE52682 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Chevy HHR LT: FWD, Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Low Miles, $8,990 #8992A

'08 Cadillac CTS: 3.6L V6, Auto, AWD, White Diamond Tricoat, Cashmere Leather Interior, $10,990 #27495A

'14 Civic LX: 6 to Choose, Gray, 29K Miles, Starting at $13,700 #X3156 '14 Accord EXL: 2 Door Coupe, V6, Modern Steel Metallic, Fully Loaded, $18,500 #X3148 '14 CRV LX: AWD, 5 Remain, Bluetooth, Camera, Black, Starts at $17,700 #X3157 '14 Civic LX: 2 Door Coupe, White, 29K Miles, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $14,800 #X3201 '14 Honda Accord LX: 3 To Choose, Gray, Bluetooth, Camera, 35K Miles, $16,000 #X3198 '15 Pilot LX: 4WD, White, 3rd Row, Bluetooth, Camera, 26K Miles $25,500 #H170574A

Infiniti '08 Infiniti G35: Journey, V6, RWD, One owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $12,990 #94489M

'08 Infiniti EX35: Black, Loaded, $11,990 #P3568-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '15 Infiniti Q50: Premium, 10K Miles, Loaded $31,990 #C17045RA

'09 Infiniti M35 $15,995 #94618-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Infiniti G37 X: Premium, V6, AWD, Clean Carfax, AWD, Heated Front Seats, sunroof, Bluetooth, $14,990 #94426N

'14 Honda Civic LX: 8 To Choose, Honda Certified, Gray, 29K Miles, $13,700 #X3156

'13'14 Honda Civic LX: 2 Door Coupe, White, 29K Miles, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $14,800 #X3201

'16 Civic LX: 4 Doors, 3 To Choose, Black, 12K Miles, Honda Certified Used Car, Starting at $17,500 #X3180

Hyundai

'09 Infiniti G37x Sport: 3.7L V6, AWD, Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, BU Camera, $11,990 #94677M

'03 Infiniti QX4 6cyl 4WD, loaded, alloy whls, tow pkg, Pearl, nonsmoker $3,000 314-398-1533

Jaguar '98 Jaguar L U XU R Y SEDAN , Great Cond., Priced to sell fast $4400. Call 636-256-7410

Jeep '14 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Lmtd, Sunroof, 4x4, Navigation, $29,490 #B8399

'14 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Lifted, Wheels & Tires, Lots Of Extras, $35,980 #B8381

'15 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Sport Package, 11K Miles, 4WD, $29,950 #C170764A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '11 Jeep Liberty: 4WD, Limited $13,895 Stk# P06063 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Jeep Cherokee Latitude FWD $17,609 #TE94624 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Jeep Patriot Sport: 2.4L 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, Clean Carfax, Bright Silver Metallic, Dark Slate Interior, $9,990 #96523C

'12 Hyundai Elantra: Auto, Power Group Pkg, Certified, $10,490

'11 Kia Sportage: 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Silver, Gray Interior, 73K Miles, Clean Carfax, $12,990 #75452A

Lexus

'08 Lexus IS250: Auto, Leather, Sunroof, Just Arrived, $11,990 #B8251A

'07 Lexus ES 350: Smart Access Entry, $11,624 #46446A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '14 Lexus ES350: Black, 36K Miles, Luxury Pkg, Navigation, Call Now, $25,500 #X3188

'15 Lexus CT 200H: Hybrid, 17" Alloys, Leather, Loaded, 21K Miles, #X3124 $21,000

'08 Lexus ES 350: 3.5L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, sunroof, Bluetooth, $13,490 #27270B

'12 Lexus RX 350: AWD, Sunroof, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $17,490 #96042A

Lincoln '15 Lincoln MKS: Silver, 23K Miles, Call Today Only $22,300 X3119

Mazda Kia

'13 Hyundai Elantra: $12,997 #47727-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '03 Hyundai Sonata, 4 dr., auto, AC, PW, PL, Pwr. Sunroof, $900. (636)578-0529

'12 Kia Optima EX: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera, $12,490 #38232A

'07 Lexus RX350: AWD, Sunroof, DVD, Auto, $11,990 #C8355A

Ford

Honda

'13 Cadillac XTS: Premium, Navigation/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, $17,990 #27025A

'14 Accord Sport: Gray, 33K Miles, 18" Alloys, Fog Lights, Dual Chrome Exhaust, Backup Camera, Bluetooth, $17,700 #X3202

'04 Honda Accord EX-L: FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $6,990 #96382A

'10 Chevy Cobalt LT: Coupe, 2.2L 4 Cyl, FWD, Red, One Owner Clean Carfax, Remote Start, Nice Car, $6,490 #27337A

'05 Cadillac CTS $7,659 #45984AA WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 14 Cadillac CTS $27,997 #47817-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '10 Cadillac SRX: Premium, One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Heated Lthr Front Seats, Rear DVD, $14,990 #78402A

'16 Pilot: Touring, New Body, Loaded, Navigation, Rear DVD, Blue, $38,000 #H170878A

Fiat

'13 Ford Taurus SEL. Extremely clean. 72,000 miles. New Tires. $12,250. (314)403-9157 '10 Taurus SEL Stk #45592A, $9,125 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

Cadillac

'13 Civic LX: White, Backup Camera Bluetooth, 75K Miles, $11,000 #H170751A

'15 Fiat 500L: Only 9K Miles $14,777 #P3577-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426

'10 Chevy Cobalt LT: Red, 91K Miles, 4 Door, Call Now, $7,000 #H170612C

'11 Cadillac CTS: Coupe, Performance Collection, $18,990 #C8209

7 Year/100K Mile Warranty

'16 Civic LX: 3 to Choose, 9K Miles, Black, Starting at $18,000 #X3178

'13 Buick Verano: 14K Miles, $12,300 #24209-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Buick Lacrosse: 68K Miles, Crystal Red Tint $14,765 Stk# 170524N DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Buick Encore: Quicksilver Metallic, 25K Miles, $18,747 Stk# 170559A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Buick Enclave $34,827 #TE29321 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Buick Regal $20,022 #E51379 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Buick Verano: 4 Cyl, FWD, Silver, Power Door Locks, Cruise Control, CD Player, $16,990 #38092

'16 Buick LaCrosse $20,852 #E74608 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '88 Regal Ltd, Award Wining Showcar! 62K pwr, red, grey int, exc cond. $4500. 636-282-1505

LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN THE MIDWEST

'16 Kia Forte: LX, White, 13K Miles, $13,849 Stk# P06074 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Kia Sportage $15,398 #45978A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'14 Mazda 6: Grand Touring, White, Auto, Certified, $19,990

'14 Mazda CX-5: $17,397 #67384-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

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'12 Honda Civic EX: Blue, 68K Miles, Sunroof, Alloys, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, $11,200 #DL1509

'15 Honda Accord:Sport, 16K Miles, #23933-1 $18,990 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Honda Civic LX $9,995 #675662 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '04 Honda Civic $4,995 #67847-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Honda Accord Sport $14,397 #47009-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Honda Accord EXL: Coupe, Modern Steel Metallic, Fully Loaded, $18,500 #X3148

'06 Chevy Malibu LT: 3.5L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Remote Start, $5,990 #78450B

Chrysler '07 Chrysler 300C: Leather, Chrome $10,900 #P3592-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Chrysler 200: 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Touring, Black, Black Interior, Bluetooth, 88K Miles, $9,990 #77717A

'15 Chrysler 200 S $16,619 #E65486 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 Chrysler 200 $15,294 #E43762 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '10 Chrysler Town & Country $9,549 #E02195A 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com

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Classified CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

APRIL 12, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

C5

RIDES

2017 JEEP COMPASS

HANDSOME COMPACT SETS IMPRESSIVE DIRECTION FOR BRAND RATINGS

continued from the front

If your dealer stocks both, drive the two and compare. The difference is striking. Jeep is banking on the all-new Compass being a home run, as it’s replacing two vehicles in the brand’s lineup: the Patriot and the old Compass. It needs to be a high-volume seller. And after spending a lot of time behind the wheel, both at an off-road course near San Antonio and a week running errands at home, I suspect this new Compass will be flying off Jeep lots in record numbers. It’s that impressive. The new Compass’ cabin is a dramatic improvement over For one thing, it looks gorgeous. With a front its two predecessors, the Patriot and the aging, outgoing end that seems like a scaled-down version of Compass. the Grand Cherokee and a sleek back end that traction control to tackle dirt roads with ease. tapers aggressively like the eye-catching Land If you need serious capability, the Trailhawk Rover Evoque, it looks like a high-dollar machine version is beefed up to do the job. A taller, speat first glance. cially tuned suspension, solid skid plates and You can see where Jeep kept the costs in advanced 4x4 system let it tackle terrain where check when you look a bit closer. The interior, while a dramatic improvement over the outgoing few vehicles can venture. A four-wheel low mode with a 20:1 crawl ratio, rear locker and a SelecCompass and Patriot, still has more plastic surTerrain setting to handle rock climbing are all faces than I’d like to see in a modern crossover. custom engineered for extreme off-roading. Its back seat also feels more cramped than its It has red tow hooks, too. That’s become a gigantic-SUV lines make it appear in pictures. Trailhawk signature that makes my heart race But the driving feel is spectacular. when I see it. Driving on the highways and back roads of Power comes from the 2.4-liter Tigershark the Texas Hill Country in a Compass Limited four-cylinder engine, which delivers a best-inshows off just how quiet and refined this small class 4x4 fuel economy rating of 31 mpg on the Jeep can feel. It’s impressively silent for the money (under $29,000 for this luxury trim level), highway with a manual transmission. Front-wheel-drive versions are rated for 32 while still having enough off-road clearance and

Mazda '11 Mazda 3i $7,995 Stk #94837-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Mazda3 S: Grand Touring, Hatchback, $11,990

'16 Mazda CX-5: AWD, Touring, Gray, 29K Miles, Loaded, Only $20,500 #H170166A

'08 Mazda Mazda3 i: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sunlight Silver Metallic, $7,490 #11150A

'10 Mazda Mazda3 i: 2.0L 4 Cyl, FWD, Black Mica, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, $8,490 #10556A

'07 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, Clean Carfax, 4 Cyl, FWD, Sunroof, $4,990 #11079A

'13 Mazda Mazda3 i: 2.0L 4 Cyl, FWD, Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Call Today, $12,990 #78110B

'12 Ford Edge: LTD, Ecoboost, 80K Miles $15,875 #P40681 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '08 Mercedes-Benz E350: 4Matic, White $11,990 #C8378A

'14 Mercedes-Benz CLA-250: AMG Special Edition, 26K, Auto $26,490 #B8451

'13 ML350: 43xxx Miles, Black/Black Stk #186232 $31,880 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Mini Cooper '11 Mini Cooper Countryman: Blue/Black, $14,850 #186201 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '06 Mini Cooper: Hatchback $6,397 #45643-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

Quality: 7 Overall: 8

The all-new Jeep Compass looks like a smaller version of the Grand Cherokee, the brand’s most prestigious model.

mpg on the highway and 23 in town. All 4x4 packages are available with a ninespeed automatic transmission which, thank goodness, seems tuned to perfection at the outset. In the versions I drove, the nine-speed never felt like it was hunting for gears or struggling to find the right ratio. It shifted seamlessly and predictably, something you couldn’t say about it when it first hit the market a few years ago. Technology offerings are just right for a contemporary car. It comes with either a 5-inch, 7-inch or 8.4-inch touchscreen running the fourth-generation Uconnect system, including Apple CarPlay and Android Auto functionality for seamlessly linking to your smartphone. Even for a brand that’s been seeing fast growth and record sales in recent years, driving the allnew Compass was an eye-opening surprise. I expected it to be good. It turned out to be great.

Mazda Trucks

Sport Utilitiy

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'16 Dodge Durango: Limited, 4x4, 18K Miles, Navigation, Leather, DVD, $31,900 #P3578 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '14 Ford Explorer: Limited, 4x4, Quad Seats, Navigation, $31,990 #B8424

CADILLAC SUPERSTORE 1-866-244-9085 '16 ATS Coupe: AWD, Navigation, Just Arrived!! '15 Escalade Premium: White Diamond, AWD, Certified

'13 CTS: Luxury, AWD, Navigation, White Diamond, Certified, $23,490 '14 SRX: Performance, Chrome Wheels, AWD, 30K Miles, $31,990 '15 Cadillac CTS-V: 10K Miles, Auto, Every Option, Black, Call!

'14 Nissan Juke SL: 4 Cyl, AWD, Clean Carfax, Navigation/GPS, Bluetooth, BU Camera, Heated Front Seats, $17,490 #96068B

'14 CTS: Performance: AWD, Black, Certified, $31,990 '17 XT5: Platinum, AWD, 5K Miles, Has It All!!

'12 Nissan Maxima 3.5 SV: 3.5L V6, FWD, Super Black, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Sunroof, $14,990 #P8717

'16 XTS: Black on Black, AWD, Navigation, 18K Miles '16 Escalade ESV: Platinum, AWD, Black, Local Trade, $81,990 '14 SRX: Premium Collection, AWD, Chrome Wheels, Black Raven, $32,990

'13 Nissan Maxima 3.5: 3.5L V6, FWD, Pearl White, Bluetooth, Leather Seats, $14,990 #8854A

BOMMARITO ST. PETERS

'16 Versa Note S: $11,397 #94470SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

NEW ARRIVALS!! 1-866-244-9085

Pontiac

'11 Toyota 4-Runner SRS: Leather, Sunroof, White $25,990

'16 Lincoln Navigator: White Platinum, DVD, Sunroof, $47,990

'14 Chevy Suburban LTZ: White Diamond, 32K Miles, 4x4, Loaded '14 Subaru XV Crosstrek: Premium Package, Sunroof, 38K $22,490 '15 Infiniti Q50: Premium, 10K, Local Trade, Like New $31,990 '06 Nissan 350Z: Touring, 70K Miles, Local Trade, $12,490

'01 Pontiac Aztek: All Purpose FWD, 103K Miles, Red #P06067A Please Contact for Pricing DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '02 Pontiac Firebird: 2 Door Coupe, Trans Am, 86K Miles $12,900 Stk# P05955A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841

Porsche '17 Porsche Macan: "S" Pkg, 8K, Premium Pkg Plus $60,990 #C16369A

Scion '14 Scion tC Stk #P8794 $15,699 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '07 Scion tC $5,697 stk #67069-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

STLtoday.com/classiieds

Mitsubishi

Subaru

'08 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT: Keyless Entry, CD Player, $8,317 #46237A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

'13 Subaru Imprezza: AWD, 42K, Silver, $17,850 #186371 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Subaru WRX STI: Blue, 17K Miles, $34,000 Stk# 170871A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Subaru WRX: Rally Blue, Manual, Summer Fun, Only 5,493 Miles, Like New, $26,000 #H170476A

Nissan/Datsun '06 Nissan 350Z: Touring, 70K, Red, Certified $12,490 #M16492A

'13 Nissan Cube: 66K Miles, Auto, Certified, Power Package, $10,990 #V16442B

'14 Nissan Juke: White #170834A Please Contact for Pricing2 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 Nissan Sentra SV: Under 4K Miles! $16,250 #46329A WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

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Comfort: 7

'03 Mazda B3000 DS: 3.0L V6, 5 Speed Manual, Regular Cab, Short Bed, One Owner Clean Carfax, $6,990 #9078A

'12 Nissan Armana: Platinum, 4WD, White, Loaded $20,000 #C16369B1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NEWS APP

Ride: 7

Volkswagen

'08 Toyota Tacoma: 62K, Auto, 4WD, TRD Sport $19,990

Mercedes Benz

Handling: 6

'09 VW GTI: 2 Door Hatchback, 2.0L 4 Cyl, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, $10,990 #27542A

'14 Audi R8: 11K Miles, Audi Exclusive Orange, Call Today '11 Mazda Mazda CX-9: Sport, 3.7L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Crystal White Pearl Mica, $11,490 #8836A

Price: 8

Nissan/Datsun

'17 Porsche Macan S: 8K Miles, Black, Navigation, Panoramic Roof, Call! '14 Mazda Mazda3 i: Mazda Certified Pre-Owned, Bluetooth, Navigation/GPS, Backup Camera, $13,990 #P8850

Performance: 9

17 Nissan Versa 1.6S $10,697 #94636SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Nissan Altima 2.5: $7,397 #67614-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Altima $14,397 #94833 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Sentra SL: $14,997 #94836 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Nissan Altima 2.5 SL: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, $15,490 #27533A

'13 XTS: Luxury, Nav, Pano Roof, Radiant Silver '08 Mazda MX-5: Sport, Convertible, 4 Cyl, RWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, $11,990 #11149A

Style: 9

Misc. Autos

'15 SRX Premium Collection: AWD, Certified, Black $34,990 '16 Mazda Mazda3 i: Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Factory Warranty, Bose System, $17,990 #10292L

Cargazing by Derek Price

'17 Nissan Versa: $10,697 #94637SL ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Nissan Altima $9,995 #47466-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '16 Nissan Sentra $16,697 #94482-5 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

STLtoday.com/homes

Toyota '13 Toyota Camry #45891A $14,984 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '07 Toyota Corolla: $5,995 #944262 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '09 Toyota Yaris: $4,397 Stk #47278-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Toyota Prius V: 5 Door Hatchback, Level 3, Black, 39K Miles, $19,500 #X3210

'05 Toyota Camry LE: High Quality, Low Price! State & Emissions Tested, Included! 132K Miles, #H170632B $6,000

'12 VW Tiguan LE: 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Deep Black, Black Interior, $14,490 #P8856

'12 VW Passat 2.5L SEL: One Owner Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #26552M

Volvo '16 Volvo XC70: 32K Miles, White/Black $29,990 #P4107 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '08 FX35: Black/Black, $12,850 Stk #186991 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '06 Volvo XC90: AWD, Silver/Black, 7 Passenger $8,995 #185891 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Volvo S60: Certified, Beige/Beige $20,993 #L1239 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Toyota Trucks '14 Toyota Tundra Stk #45331B, $27,567 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696

Sport Utilitiy '12 Buick Enclave: Leather, $16,990 #48453-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '16 Buick Enclave $34,827 #4V14526 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '08 Buick Enclave CX: $8,397 #67071-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '05 Buick Terraza CXL: 3.5L V6, Rear Entertainment/DVD, AWD, $5,490 #77642B

'14 Buick Enclave: AWD, Gray Metallic, Only 33K Miles, Premium Pkg, $29,500 #H170687A

Chevrolet Trucks '11 Avalanche LTZ: White Diamond, Sunroof, DVD, $26,990 #C6194RA

'16 Chevy Silverado: Crew Cab, 4x4, 10K Miles, $43,219 #C171552A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '15 Toyota Tundra: Limited, Double Cab, 4WD, 5.7 V8 $38,347 #C170700A LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Silverado: 65K Miles, White $28,500 Stk# P06053 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Tahoe: Red, 50K Miles, Ecotec3 5.3L V8 Stk# P05886A Please Contact for Pricing DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Chevy Colorado: 44K Miles $22,500 Stk# 170833A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '05 Silverado: 4x4 LS, 6.2L, $8,855 Stk #185214 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822

Dodge Plymouth Trucks '15 Ram1500 $27,049 #ET61517 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Ram 1500: 4WD, Quad Cab, Silver, 25K Miles $26,500 #X3151

'12 Ram 1500: Big Horn, 71K, C/C $23,900 #48499-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '12 Ram 2500: Crew Cab, Diesel, Auto $35,490 $C16310B2

Ford Trucks '06 Ford F-150: Extended Cab, Short Bed, 96K Miles $12,969 Stk# 160554B DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 Ford F-250 Lariat $38,679 #T3786E 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '09 Ford F-150: Lariot, 4x4, Supercab, Value Priced at $15,500 #X3138A

GMC Trucks '16 GMC Sierra 1500: Double Cab Standard Box, 4WD Stk# P06014A Please Contact for Pricing DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '16 GMC Sierra 1500: $40,397 #47737-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

'13 Cadillac Escalade: 34K Miles, Auto, Certified, Black, $42,490 #C8252

'14 Chevy Suburban LTZ: Black, Nav, 4WD, Chrome 22" $46,490 #B8473

'08 Chevy Avalanche: LTZ, Black, Local Trade, 4x4 $20,490 #C8361B

'14 Chevy Traverse LTZ: Nav, Sunroof, Lthr, $28,900 #P3645 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '13 Chevy Tahoe LTZ: 4WD, Sunroof, DVD, $39,990 #B8330A

'16 Ford Escape: Titanium, $22,901 #P3580-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Ford Edge: Sunroof, V6, Auto, Silver, $11,990 #M16717A

'14 Ford Edge Limited: White, Chromes Wheels, $26,490 #C8333A

'16 Ford Edge Titanium: Silver/Beige, Leather $26,939 #P4145 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '12 Ford Explorer LTD: $24,890 #186881 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '16 Ford Explorer Ltd $34,749 #TE45305 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '16 Ford Explorer $31,499 #ET10660 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '14 Ford Explorer XLT $23,297 Stk #47163-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '07 Ford Edge SE: Silver, Only 115K Miles, Sharp, Call Now, $8,500 #H170732A

'10 Ford Escape XLT: 2.5L 4 Cyl, Auto, 4x4, Clean Carfax, AWD, White Suede, Camel Interior, $9,990 #78226A

'11 Ford Explorer: Clean Carfax, AWD, Navigation/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, 3rd Row, $17,990 #P8795

'14 GMC Terrain Denali: Navigation, Sunroof, Silver $24,990 #C17297A

'15 Chevy Equinox LTZ: V6 , GM Certified Warranty, Leather $22,987 #C11065FIT LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Traverse LT: FWD, GM Certified Warranty, $21,240 #C11037P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Equinox LS: 17K Miles, GM Certified Warranty, $16,157 #C11041P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 Chevy Equinox: Blue, 36K Miles $18,605 Stk# P06057 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Captiva; 83K Miles, White $11,277 Stk# P06037A DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '13 Chevy Equinox: $11,997 #47400-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '16 Chevy Trax $16,640 #TE41239 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '11 Chevy Traverse: $9,995 #47067-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Chevy Equinox $11,995 #46622-2 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Cadillac Escalade: AWD, Black, 103K Miles, 22" Chromes, Navigation, $24,500 #H161170B

'14 GMC Terrain SLE: FWD, GM Certified Warranty, $15,586 #C11001P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 GMC Terrain SLE: GM Certified Warranty, 37k Mi, $15,855 #C11035P LOU FUSZ CHEVY 866-602-1770 '14 GMC Terrain: 25K Miles, AWD, SLE $18,000 Stk# P06061 DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '15 GMC Terrain $24,239 #TE57015 866-311-8350 For details go to www.cerame.com '15 GMC Sierra $37,995 #67711-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '09 GMC Acadia: $13,397 Stk #47357-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 GMC Terrain SLE-2 $12,997 #66922-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '13 GMC Yukon Denali: AWD, Silver Metallic, 62K Miles, Loaded, DVD, Navigation, $34,500 #H170653A

'12 Chevy Equinox LTZ: V6, FWD, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, Remote Start, BU Camera, $16,490 #78425B

'11 GMC Terrain SLE-2: 3.0L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Black, $12,490 #P8842A

'12 Chevy Equinox 2LT: AWD, Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Bluetooth, Backup Camera, Remote Start, $13,990 #78245A

'14 Honda CR-V EX: Local Trade, AWD, Certified, $17,990 #M16744A

'04 Trailblazer LT, Exc. Cond., 4WD, Pwr Moonroof, All Options, $5800. (314)971-2341

STLtoday.com/rides

'13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Leather, Quad Seats, Sunroof, $27,490

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ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

APRIL 12, 2017

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Sport Utilitiy

Sport Utilitiy

Mini vans

'08 Honda CR-V: AWD, Black, Just Arrived! $9,990 #M17110A

'07 Mazda MX-5: Grand Touring Convertible, RWD, Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Low Miles, $13,990 #11070A

'12 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT: Black, Only 71K Miles, Ready For Vacation, Call Today, $11,500 #DL1566

WEDNESDAY

Dogs Lhasapoos, Cavalier King Charles, Mini Schnauzers, Maltese, Cockapoos, Others Poos & Cuties !

636-240-3647 '03 Hummer H2: One Owner, Local Trade, Sunroof, $17,990 #B8313A

'09 Hyundai Santa Fe: LTD $9,870 Stk #186062 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Hyundai Tucson: $15,397 #45673-5 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Hyundai Veracruz: $16,997 #67844-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Hyundai Veracruz: $11,597 #46164-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '08 Hyundai Santa Fe: $8,995 #67652-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '08 Honda CRV EXL: AWD, Blue, 92K Miles, Heated Leather, Moonroof, Loaded, $12,000 #H170632M

lovencarepets.org '13 Mazda Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Nav/GPS, Bluetooth, $10,990 #9025A

'16 Kia Sedona LX: Hurry!Just Arrived, Silver, 24K Miles, Starting at $18,900 X3164

Poodle Puppies, Standard, AKC, Males & Females, Cream, Apricot & Red. Ready 4/22, Asking $750. Call (573)619-3357

'13 Mazda Mazda CX-5: Sport, One owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Bluetooth, Black Mica, Black Interior, $13,990 #9029A

'12 Nissan Quest SL: Quad Seats, Power Doors, DVD, $17,490 #B8338

WANTED: Historian will pay top $$ for German-Japanese WW II relics 314-438-8665

Merchandise Wanted

Craft Fairs/Flea Markets '08 Mazda Tribute s: Sport, 3.0L V6, FWD, Clean Carfax, Light Sage - Gold, Low Miles, $7,990 #9041A

'08 Nissan Pathfinder: 4x4, Leather, Roof, Navigation, 3rd Row, $14,490 #B8411

'12 Nissan Murano SL: AWD, 47K Miles, Panoramic Roof, $20,490 #B8407

'16 Nissan NV: SL, 3500 Series, 12 Passenger Van, Blue/Beige, Leather, 193K Miles, $35,800 #H162286A

Belleville Flea Market April 15, 2017 ONLY Saturday 9am-4pm Sunday 9am-3pm

'15 Toyota Sienna XLE: 18K Miles, Time To Save Some Cash, $31,990 #C8311A

at the

BELLE-CLAIR FAIRGROUNDS Belleville, IL 618-233-0052 www.bcfairgrounds.net

ATV/Dune Buggies Trailers '05 Kawasaki, Runs Good, Looks Good, Make Offer. Call (314)651-3908

Public Notices

'16 Honda Pilot: Touring, New Body, Loaded, Nav, Rear DVD, Blue, $38,000 #H170878A

'15 Jeep Wrangler: 14K Miles, Willy's Edition, Auto, H-Top $33,490 #V17273A

'07 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, 4WD, Automatic $17,990 #B8120B

'11 Jeep Grand Cherokee: Overland, Red, 4WD, 52K, $25,990 #C17063RA

'12 Jeep Wrangler: Unlimited, Orange!Lifted, Wheels & Tires $27,990 #C8440A

'09 Jeep Wrangler: Sahara $19,990 #48553-1 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '06 Jeep Liberty Sport $6,397 #67682-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '14 Jeep Grand Cherokee $30,995 #47039-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 14 Kia Sorento $11,997 #46455-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Kia Sorento EX: Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, $10,990 #78355D

'14 Kia Soul: 6-Speed Manual Transmission, Black, Only 23K Miles, Reduced! $10,500 #SC1458

'11 Kia Sportage: 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Silver, Gray Interior, 73K Miles, Warranty, $12,990 #75452A

'15 Lexus GX 460: 43K, White/Grey $42,850 #187321 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Lincoln MKX: 31K, AWD, White, Pano Roof $28,990 #B8448A

'16 Mazda CX-3: Touring Pkg, AWD $20,490 #M16424A

STLtoday.com/jobs

'08 Nissan Pathfinder SE: 4.0L V6, 4x4, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Call Today, $12,990 #P8847A

'12 Nissan Rogue SV: 4 Cyl, AWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Bluetooth, Silver, $14,990 #11082B

'12 Subaru Outback 2.5i: Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, $15,990 #96000A

'04 Lexus RX 330: 3.3L V6, FWD, Flint Mica, Heated Leather Seats, Premium Sound, $6,990 #95427A

'14 HD Street Glide $20,000, 512 miles, 120R engine 913-484-8822

Boats '94 Nitro 18', Dual Console, 115 Motor. Selling Boat, Motor & Trailer. Good Price, Very Clean, Runs Good.(314)651-3908

Help Wanted Warehouse: HIRING EVENT: Friday, 4/14 7am-6pm & Saturday, 4/15 7am-6pm @ DoubleTree Inn 1973 Craigshire Rd, St. Louis, MO 63146. 1st, 2nd & 3rd Shift, Full-time! Excellent Hourly Pay, Full Benefits, Pension & MORE! Opportunities for Advancement! Warehouse Exp a Plus. For First Priority,

Pre-register by Applying: gopenske.com/careers, Job #1703874 Penske Logistics: 855-971-7417rs

Dogs ACA shihtzu puppies.Happy healthy babies.Vet checked, Puppy shots.Text or call for more info. $500 5732864921 Afghan Hound, 5-mo AKC female puppies, cream & tan, raised in home, very sweet. $1250 (573) 825-2611 AKC golden retriever pups parents onsite pickup Easter weekend $100 deposit to hold pup $450 618 363 4524 Australian Shepherd Puppies, AKC, Reg., Blue Merle, 1 Girl, $700, 1 Boy $800. Cash Only! Call 314691-9338 DOBERMAN PUPPIES 9 Weeks, AKC, 2 Black & Tan Females. Call (314)540-5492

DOODLES & RETRIEVERS: '11 Toyota 4-Runner: SR5, Leather, Sunroof, 4WD $25,990 #B8431

Puppies Ready Now

'15 Toyota 4Runner: V6, SR5, 36K Miles, $29,385 Stk# P05889B DON BROWN CHEVROLET 866-883-8841 '14 Toyota RAV4 LE #P8612 $18,564 WEISS OF SOUTH COUNTY 855-903-8696 '07 Toyota FJ Cruiser: $14,995 #47100-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

All Colors & Sizes, Health Guarantee. Top Rated Breeder

Mini vans '16 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT:$19,990 #P3593 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '16 Dodge Journey SXT: $17,900 #P3625 SUNTRUP BUICK/GMC 877-262-8426 '11 Dodge Grand Caravan $9,397 #94567-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020

LABRADOODLES GOLDADORS, & LABS

On March 20, 2017, an application was filed with the Federal Communications Commission requesting consent to the transfer of control of the broadcast license of KEZKFM, St. Louis, MO, 1 0 2 .5 MHz, KMOX, St. Louis, MO, 1120 kHz, KYKY, St. Louis, MO, 98.1 MHz, in connection with the merger of CBS Radio Inc. and Entercom Communications Corp. The transferor is CBS Broadcasting Inc. The officers, directors, and other attributable parties to the transferor are: CBS Westinghouse Holding Company, Inc., CBS Corporation, National Amusements, Inc., Adam Townsend, Alissa Makower, Andrew Siegel, Anne Kelly, Anne L u c e y , Anne O' G r a d y , Anthony A m b r o s i o , Anthony Bongiorno, Armando Nunez, Arnold Kopelson, Bruce Gordon, Bruce Taub, Bryon Rubin, Charles Gifford, Craig Brill, Darin Bassin, David Andelman, David Berson, David Hillman, David Pill, David Rhodes, Deanna O'Toole, Deborah Barak, Dorothy Alke, Doug Morris , Eric S o b c z a k , G a ry Countryman, Gary Silver, George Schweitzer, Gil Schwartz, Glenn Geller, Harry Isaacs, James Morrison, Javier Avitia, Jeff Fager, Jo A n n R o s s , Jo h n B a g w e l l , Jonathan Anschell, Joseph Califano, Jr., Joseph Ianniello, Julie Behuniak, Kenneth Koen, Kenneth S ilver, Kimberly Pittman, Laura Franco, Laura Kreda, Lawrence Liding, Lawrence Tu, Leonard Goldberg, Leslie Moonves, Linda Griego, Lura Burton, Mallory Levitt, Mark Engstrom, Mary Diaz-Albertini, Matthew Morgeson, Michael Klausman, Michael Koczko, Michele Scaringella, Mindy Greene, Nicole Paolini-Subramanya, Paul Franklin, Peter Dunn, Ray Hop kins, Rebecca Borden, Richard Jones, Robert Ross, Roni Mueller, Sandra Williams, Sean McManus, Shari Redstone, Sumner R e d stone, Susanna Lowy, Trupti Patel, William Cohen. T h e t ra n s f e re e s a re t h e shareholders of Entercom Communications Corp. The proposed officers, directors, and other attributable parties to Entercom Communications C o r p. are: David Field, Joseph Field, Leslie Moonves, Joseph Ianniello, S tephen Fisher, Andrew Sutor, Eugene Levin, Michael Dash, Louise Kramer. A copy of the application and relate d mate rials are available at fcc.gov.

618.396.2494

C7

Bids/Proposals

The Francis Howe ll School District will be accepting proposals for the following projects: alarm monitoring upgrade, additional access control, entrance doors, and tuck-pointing. For information, please call 6 3 6 -8 5 1 6300.

WENTZVILLE RIV SCHOOL DISTRICT Accepting Bids for Multimedia Equipment Specifications Available Online: www.wentzville.k12.mo.us Departments/Business/ Purchasing/Open Bids Or greglawrence@wsdr4.org Sealed Bids & Opening due May 8, 2017 - 11:30 AM CST

Bids/Proposals

OWNER: The Board of Governors for the Missouri State University Sealed bids for the A SB EST O S REMOVAL, HILL HALL will be received at the Office of Planning, Design & Construction, Missouri State University, 901 S. National, Springfield, MO 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on APRIL 25, 2017 and then publicly opened and read aloud. With each proposal, a certified check or bid bond properly executed by the bidder in the amount of five percent (5%) of the bid shall be submitted. Plans and specifications can be obtained from the Office of Planning, Design & Construction upon receipt of a $25.00 refundable deposit for documents returned within thirty days from date of bid. All sets of specifications required other than in person will be mailed at bidder's expense. Electronic sets of plans and specifications are also available at www.plans.missouristate.edu. Attention of bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to the conditions of employment to be observed. Bidders must agree to comply with the prevailing wage rate provisions and other statutory regulations as referred to in the specifications. MSU is an AA/EO institution.

WENTZVILLE RIV SCHOOL DISTRICT Accepting Bids for District Laptops Specifications Available Online: www.wentzville.k12.mo.us Departments/Business/ Purchasing/Open Bids Or greglawrence@wsdr4.org Sealed Bids & Opening due May 8, 2017 - 11:00 AM CST

S e ale d bids for Ne w S torage Building, Jacksonville Veterans Cemetery, Jacksonville, Missouri, Project No. U1601-01 will be received by FM DC, S tate of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 5/11/2017. For specific project information and orde ring plans , go to: h t t p : //oa.mo.gov/facilities

S ealed bids for New Generator and Kitchen Flooring, Camp Avery Park Camp, Troy, MO; Project No. H1 6 0 1 -0 1 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 5/18/2017. For specific proje ct information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov /facilities

Sealed bids for Roof Replacement, Various, Missouri School for the Deaf, Fulton, Missouri, Project No. E1607-01 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 PM, 5/11/2017. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http: //oa.mo.gov/facilities

Sealed bids for the Replacement of Fan Coil Units, Employment Security Central Office, Jefferson City, MO; Project No. O1610-02 will be received by FMDC, State of MO, U N T IL 1:30 PM , 5/11/2017. For specific project information and ordering plans, go to: http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities

sieversretrievers.com English Bulldog Puppies, AKC, Vet checked UTD shots and wormedfor sale $1700 to $2000 618-610-2309 Englis h B u l l d o g Pups , A K C , champ.bloodlines & sired, guaranteed health, delivery available $2500 217-440-7899 German Shepherd Puppies, AKC, Black & Tan and Sable, Licensed Kennel. $400. Call (224)401-7370 Lab pups, AKC/OFA, yellow males, 9 wks, shots, Ch. lines, top quality, $500, 314-795-9041 www.povertyhilllabradors.com LABS - AKC Silver and Charcoal, Born 2/11. Ready now! $1000.00 217-370-5394

STLTODAY.COM

Public Notices

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

Motorcycles '07 Nissan Murano: White, 136K Miles, $6,995 #P41501 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Nissan Rogue: AWD, Silver, $17,990 #18260-2 SUNTRUP W COUNTY VOLVO 636-200-2822 '14 Nissan Rogue S: $17,995 #47493-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '12 Nissan Pathfinder: $19,995 #67885-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '11 Nissan Rogue $11,995 #47646-1 ST. CHARLES NISSAN/HYUNDAI 866-672-4020 '08 Nissan Pathfinder S: 4.0LV6, Silver Lightning Metallic, Clean Carfx, $9,990 #78182A

APRIL 12, 2017

YOLO O

Classified

You Only List Once STLtoday.com/homes

Write Your Own Best Seller

Separate and sealed bids for St. Louis Community College on Bid No. B0003626 for a contract for Automotive & Diesel Truck Parts & Supplies will be received until 3:00 P.M. (local time) on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at the Dept. of Purchasing, 300 So. Broadway, St. Louis, M O 63102-2810, and immediately thereafter opened and read. Bid documents can be acc e s s e d o n o u r w e b s i t e at w w w.stlcc.edu/purchasing. Call (314) 539-5225 for additional information. EOE/AA Employer.

@stltoday ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

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314-621-6666 STLtoday.com/classiieds

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ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEDNESDAY

APRIL 12, 2017

STLTODAY.COM

Bommarito AT THE BIG CORNER OF I-270 & LINDBERGH AND A SECOND NISSAN LOCATION IN WEST COUNTY MISSOURI’S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP-THERE CAN ONLY BE ONE #1

BEST BACKED CARS IN AMERICA

10 YEAR/200,000 MILE NATIONWIDE WARRANTY

*

OVER 10,000 VEHICLES TO CHOOSE FROM $25,145 MSRP -5,146 OFF MSRP

Nissan 2 Locations

Hazelwood & Ballwin

661 Dunn Rd. 314-731-2228

19,999 Bommarito

$

2017 NISSAN ROGUE

17,999

$

14747 Manchester Rd. 2017 NISSAN ALTIMA 636-394-0330 Nissan.com

Rogue Model #22117, Vin. #5N1AT2MT5HC744324 Altima Model #13017, Vin. #1N4AL3APXHC131462. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. 2 or More At This Price At Each Location. Sale on in stock units only. Prior sales excluded. Includes all rebates and incentives with approved credit. Dealer added options additional. No dealers while supplies last. Tax, title, destination & license not included in sale prices. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 4/30/17.

Honda 330 Brookes Drive

314-731-9777

159

$

2017 Honda CIVIC LX Automatic

BommaritoHonda.com 2016 Honda

36 Month Lease

189

$

CR-V SE

Automatic, FWD

36 Month Lease

36 month lease, 12K miles per year, more miles available, 2017 Civic LX total cost of lease $7,224 with $1,500 down cash or trade. 2016 CR-V SE total cost of lease $8,304 with $1,500 down cash or trade. Taxes, title, license dealer fee & accessories extra. Price includes all factory and dealer incentives with approved credit. Available w/approved credit excludes leases new Hondas only. On select models. Deferred payments on finance deals only. Excludes leases. See dealer for details. Bommarito Honda Superstore. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 4/30/17.

Volkswagen V Vo Hazelwood

400 Brookes Drive

314-731-7777

Bommaritovwhazelwood.com

2017 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA S

14,895

$

*

18,836

$

2017 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT S

*

*Includes any and all applicable rebates and incentives through Volkswagen with approved credit. In stock only. See dealer for details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 4/30/17.

Ford 675 Dunn Road

314-731-1222

17,777

$

2017 FORD FUSION S

BommaritoFord.com

18,977

$

2017 FORD ESCAPE S

Available with approved credit. 2017 Fusion S price includes $3,000 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. 2017 Escape S price includes $3,900 Retail Customer Cash, $500 Bommarito Trade-In Assistance. Available with approved credit. All units subject to availability. Not all buyers qualify for Ford Credit Financing. See Dealer For Details. Artwork for Illustration only. Sale ends 4/30/17.

Toyota 9095 Dunn Road

149

$

2017 TOYOTA COROLLA L

314-731-0911

199

BommaritoToyota.net 2017 TOYOTA

36 Month Lease

$

RAV 4 LE FWD

36 Month Lease

270

Nissan

Ballwin

Sulphur Spring Rd.

Ellisville

I70 64

r Rd. ancheste

M

44 55

Nissan In Ballwin

Nissan, Honda, VW, Ford, Toyota In Hazelwood

*Bommarito advantage offer with every new vehicle purchase. Excludes Nissan Leaf & Nissan GT-R. See dealer for details. †Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2016.

Ford

270

270

ber

Toyota Nissan

ind

N. Lindbergh

Clarkson

40

370

N. L

"WHERE PRICE SELLS CARS"

270

gh

Lease example for a new 2017 Toyota Corolla L model. Security deposit waived. Plus tax, title and license and $199 administrative fee. Lease is for 36 months, 12,000 miles a year at $149 a month with $2,500 due at signing with approved credit. Due at signing does not include first payment. Includes $1,000 lease subvention cash provided by TFS. Payment may vary depending on model and equipment choice. Lease example for a new 2017 Toyota RAV 4 LE FWD model. Security deposit waived. Plus tax, title and license and $199 administrative fee. Lease is for 36 months, 12,000 miles a year at $199 a month with $2,779 due at signing with approved credit. Due at signing does not include first payment. new car stock by 4-30-17. **Sale price includes all rebates. See dealer for details. Expires 4-30-17.

Honda

255

VW

I70 40

64 44

55


STLTODAY.COM/FOOD • WEDNESDAY • 04.12.2017 • L

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

HAM IT UP Leftover ham from Easter? Here’s what to do with it RECIPES ON PAGE L4

BY DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

T

rue fact: Nearly 70 percent of all Americans who eat ham have served it at Easter. And that can mean only one thing: Nearly 70 percent of all Americans who eat ham have found themselves with leftover ham the next day. Leftover ham lends its distinctive flavor to any number of dishes. The combination of salt and smoke have enlivened untold acres of quiche, oceans of soup and fields of beans. But what if you’re tired of quiche/soup/ beans? What if one more plate of scalloped potatoes and ham will make you scream? Easter is Sunday, which means Monday is Leftover Ham Day. This is the year to do something a little more fun with your ham. Do you like a ham sandwich? Make it better. Enjoy a quesadilla? Try one with ham. Caught up in the Brussels sprouts fad? See what ham can add. Fond of spicy, cheesy breakfast sandwiches? Ham it up.

SHAVED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH FRIZZLED HAM (PICTURED) HAM AND CHEDDAR GREEN CHILE BREAKFAST SANDWICH LAYERED HAM AND CHEESE QUESADILLA HAM BAGUETTE WITH CHEESE BUTTER

Let’s start with that somewhat spicy, cheesy breakfast sandwich. If you kind of squint at it, it resembles a certain egg, cheese and English muffin sandwich available at a very popular fast-food restaurant. Let’s call it an Egg O’Muffin. But a homemade Ham and Cheddar Green Chile Breakfast Sandwich is so much better than an Egg O’Muffin. The difference is the loving care with which you make it, the ingredients selected to best match your personal taste, the time and effort you put into crafting the perfect sandwich. Also, it has hash browns in it. Sandwiches

SPECIAL REQUEST

Love of cumin, black beans drives recipe at the Fountain on Locust

with fried eggs in them may be the latest trend right now, but sandwiches with fried eggs and hash browns are where it’s at. At its heart, the Ham and Cheddar Green Chile Breakfast Sandwich — admittedly, not as good a name as Egg O’Muffin — is just a clever way to repackage the classic combination of ham and eggs. Nothing goes better with ham and eggs than an English muffin, and melted cheese helps pretty much everything it is on. But it is the mild green chiles that bring everything together. They add a little spice, but not too much, along with the highly pleasing flavor of green pepper. They were so good, I had two. But I was still hungry (well, not really), so I made a Ham Baguette With Cheese Butter. This raises the humble ham-and-cheese sandwich to unsuspected new heights. It’s not just the arugula tossed lightly with a lemon vinaigrette, although you could argue that arugula with a lemon vinaigrette is perhaps the key to lifelong happiness. It’s not even the strawberry jam, which, let’s face it, See HAM • Page L4

he thrill of getting lunch from a vending machine

BY PAT EBY Special to the Post-Dispatch

Q • The vegetarian black bean soup at the Fountain on Locust was outstanding. I’m sure readers would be interested in the recipe. The ingredients seemed simple, but the flavor was superb! — James Cooper, Manchester A • The Fountain on Locust is known for its flavorful soups for good reason. Owner Joy Grdnic Christensen and general manager Barbara Schulz personally develop and tweak each soup on the menu until the blend of flavors and textures exceeds See REQUEST • Page L5

DANIEL NEMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

The Cuban Black Bean Soup, with green and red bell peppers, onions, carrots and garlic, in a broth with a cumin kick and a dollop of sour cream, as served at the Fountain on Locust.

O’FALLON, ILL., MAN ROASTS JALAPEÑOS FOR HOT SAUCE RECIPE. PAGE L2

The newspaper cafeteria recently closed, the result of changing times. It was replaced by a vending machine. This calls to mind one of the great, seminal events of my childhood: The day the building my father worked in (the bottom floors, coincidentally, were occupied by a newspaper) brought refrigerated vending machines into its break room. My brother and I were enthralled. Was there anything as exciting as being able to get lunch out of a machine? At the time, we were heavily into pinball. OK, mildly into pinball. But this was

even better. With pinball, you put what was probably a dime into the slot and you got to whack around a little metal ball for a couple of minutes. But with a vending machine, for a little more money you actually got something of value. There was a visual element to it, too, though not as exciting as the flashing lights and dinging sounds of pinball. The machine had a glass window, through which you could see maybe a dozen circular racks with food on them. You could spin the racks to see all of the various options just by pushing a button. I loved pushing buttons. The new machine at the newspaper has the same basic design as the one in my father’s old building. I pushed the button for old time’s sake and watched the See NEMAN • Page L4

NEW VINTAGE DRY ROSÉS ARE PERFECT FOR EASTER DINNER. PAGE L2 LET’S EAT

1 M


LET’S EAT

L2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ON OUR RADAR

M 1 • WEDNESDAY • 04.12.2017

AMY BERTRAND Let’s Eat and features editor • abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284 DANIEL NEMAN food writer • dneman@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8133 DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising • dbischof@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

WINE FINDS

BEST BITES

Welcome to the new vintage dry rosés

Triscuit Fig & Honey crackers

BY GAIL APPLESON • Special to the Post-Dispatch

When it comes to celebrating Easter and the beginning of spring, it’s hard to beat a dry rosé. These pink charmers are beautiful when resting on a table decorated in seasonal pastels. More important, they’re quite versatile and can be sipped alone or with a variety of foods, including ham, chicken and vegetarian dishes. Rosés are made from red grapes, and their individual colors, which can vary from a hint of blush to deep fuchsia, are determined by the type of grape and how long the juice is in contact with the skins. The following two Italian rosés are very diferent in style and color. Morisfarms 2016 Mandriolo, Maremma Toscana Denominazione di Origine Controllata Bought • Parker’s Table, 7118 Oakland Avenue, in March for $14.99 Description • This is a lovely rosé, both in its taste and striking pink color. Elegant, fresh and lively, it comes from one of the top producers in Maremma Toscana, a denomination in coastal Tuscany. The Mandriolo is a delicious fruity wine that’s made from 100 percent sangiovese grapes. It has an inviting floral aroma, tastes of juicy cherries and other red fruit and ends with a crisp and refreshing finish.

Tenuta Sant’Antonio 2016 Scaia Rosato, Veneto Indicazione Geografica Tipica Bought • Parker’s Table, 7118 Oakland Avenue, in March for $12.99 Description • The Scaia Rosato, which comes from the large wine-producing Veneto region in northeastern Italy, is pale salmon to light orange in color. It’s more of a spicy and citrusy wine rather than tasting of red fruit like the Mandriolo. Made from the rondinella grape, which is used in red wines such as Valpolicella and Bardolino, it has hints of ginger and finishes clean and tart.

Some crackers are meant for snacking, some are meant for cheese. Some, like the original Triscuit, are great for both. One of Triscuit’s newest flavors, Fig & Honey, is meant for cheese. Lightly sweet, and with an even lighter hint of fig, these crackers would be superb with creamy cheeses (I had them with brie) or cheese with fruit, such as Wensleydale. Size • 9.5 ounces Price • $3.15 Available • Grocery stores everywhere — Daniel Neman

PREP SCHOOL

Alfredo sauce Few things are as richly satisfying as a good Alfredo sauce. We revisit a favorite Prep School video with Daniel Neman showing how to make a fast and exceptionally delicious version. He also makes a bit of a mess. It happens.

stltoday.com/food

Follow Gail on Twitter @GailAppleson

WHAT’S COOKING

DINNER IN MINUTES

Hot sauce recipe is staple for O’Fallon, Ill., man

Italian soup needs a special technique

Mixture starts with the right char on roasted jalapeños BY PAT EBY Special to the Post-Dispatch

Gonzalo J. Vargas has never bought a bottle of hot sauce or a jar of salsa in his life. “My family always made our own hot sauce,” he says. “It’s something I’ve always done. I like it on eggs at breakfast, or on tacos for lunch or dinner. It clings to tortilla chips for a good snack.” Vargas uses roasted jalapeños for both the quiet fire and full flavor they deliver. “My son sometimes uses habañeros, which are very hot, for his salsa, but I like a sauce that isn’t so hot. This is a very simple recipe that depends on technique to get the best results; roasting the peppers to a good char and blending the sauce to the right consistency,” he says. How did you learn to make this hot sauce? I grew up with two brothers and two sisters, and we’ve always made our own hot sauce. I don’t know if it came from my mom’s side or my dad’s side of the family. My dad, Gonzalo Vargas, came to the United States when he was 12 years old from Piedras Negras, or Black Rock, Mexico. My mother, Lucy Rios Varga, was a wonderful cook. This sauce was always on our table. I started making it when I was 20 years old. My late wife, Linda, and I changed it a little bit — the original was a very thin sauce that started with tomato juice. We switched to using whole tomatoes for a slightly thicker sauce. She was a wonderful cook, who learned Mexican dishes from my mother. I had the best of both — wonderful American and Mexican food. What other Mexican specialties did your parents teach you to make? My mother made tamales the old fashioned way, starting with 10 pounds of dried corn — a multicolored corn we would call field corn. We boiled the dried corn just until the skin slips off the kernels. Next, the corn sits overnight. It expands to twice or three times in volume. Then we’d set up the grinder and hand-turn the crank. My mom would add lard until it was the right consistency. She’d cook the meat, flavoring it with garlic, chili powder and spices. She would spread the masa on prepared corn husks then add the meat. My job was to fold the tamales. We would freeze them at that point and cook them fresh, as needed. Ten pounds of corn made 400 tamales. Christmas and New Year’s, we ate tamales for dinner. Your mother also helped her brother open a Mexican restaurant in St. Louis over 50 years ago.

PAT EBY

GONZALO J. VARGAS Age • 77 Family • Three sons, Gonzalo, Michael and Jefrey Occupation • Retired welder and combustion engineer Neighborhood • O’Fallon, Ill.

How did that happen? When her brother, Joe (José) Ruiz decided to open a restaurant in Florissant, my mother contributed some of her recipes and our family name was on one of the rooms — the Vargas room. We had some wonderful times with the Ruiz family. Do you cook at home today? I make breakfast and simple lunches, and I always make the hot sauce. I am teaching my grandson Jeffrey — he’s 21 — to make it, but he says his doesn’t turn out like mine. I say it’s practice. My granddaughter Hannah, who is 14, has breakfast with me every weekend. I’ll be teaching her as well.

WANT TO BE IN WHAT’S COOKING? Send your favorite recipe (or nominate a friend or relative), plus your name, address, email and telephone number to: abertrand@post-dispatch.com or What’s Cooking, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 North Tucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

BY BONNIE S. BENWICK The Washington Post

The next time you’re frustrated by a dish that doesn’t turn out picture-perfect, the proper attitude is: So what? Refer to Exhibit A: a third and rather hurried attempt to re-create the Italian egg drop soup called stracciatella, which has cheese in it but is not to be confused with the Italian buffalo’s-milk cheese or the Italian ice cream of the same name (“stracciare” means to rip up; shreds of some kind are involved). It takes just five or six ingredients to make this quick and healthful soup, but technique is key. You must blend — not whisk — the peppery egg and Parm mixture so the yolks and whites marry well without becoming frothy. Then, you must stir the heated, spinach-y broth as you pour in the mixture; the whirl of liquid should lengthen the eggy additions into tender strands that cook almost on contact. If the broth is too hot or the eggs are overbeaten, you could wind up with a milky-looking brew and more chunky bits of egg white. It might be easier to execute those silky strands if they were just beaten egg, but then the cheese would clump on its own or largely melt from view. Does the soup we photographed on that particular day taste just as good as the ideal? I can offer an honest affirmative, as I was able to produce the shredded egg-and-cheese effect on the fourth try — and the one after that.

DEB LINDSEY • for The Washington Post

THE VARGAS FAMILY HOT SAUCE

STRACCIATELLA WITH SPINACH (EGG DROP SOUP)

Yield: 4 ½ cups hot sauce

Yield: 4 servings About 8 ounces (4 cups packed) fresh spinach 2 large eggs 6 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, plus more for garnish Freshly cracked black pepper 4 cups no-salt-added vegetable broth (may substitute chicken broth) Kosher salt (optional)

2 medium jalapeño peppers 1 (28-ounce) can whole tomatoes ½ teaspoon garlic salt or 1 whole clove garlic, peeled and minced, plus ½ teaspoon salt Notes: This recipe can be made in a smaller quantity by using a 15 ½-ounce can of whole tomatoes, 1 jalapeño pepper and ¼ teaspoon of garlic salt or minced garlic. • Wear gloves when handling the peppers at all stages of preparation. Carefully discard used gloves without getting the oils from the peppers on skin. 1. Roast whole, washed and thoroughly dried peppers on the stovetop, on the grill, on a comal, in a heavy skillet or in the oven. The peppers should be charred but not scorched. 2. Place roasted peppers in a paper bag or small container and close. Allow the peppers to steam in the closed bag or container for 15 minutes. Rub the charred skins of the peppers, break of the top and set aside. 3. Place half the tomatoes in the bowl of a food processor. Add both jalapeños, seeds included, and the garlic in the bowl. Top with remaining tomatoes. 4. Pulse until the hot sauce is fine. 5. Store in the refrigerator. Serve with chips or as a hot sauce for eggs, vegetables, meats or on potatoes. Per ½ cup serving: 16 calories; no fat; no saturated fat; no cholesterol; 16g protein; 4g carbohydrate; 2g sugar; 2g fiber; 186mg sodium; 31mg calcium

1. Stack and roll the spinach, then cut crosswise into thin ribbons (chifonade). 2. Crack the eggs into a medium bowl, then use a fork to gently break up the yolks; do not whisk so vigorously that they become frothy. Gently stir in the cheese, then season lightly with pepper. 3. Bring the broth to barely a boil in a medium saucepan over medium heat, then reduce the heat to low. Add the spinach and cook for about a minute, or until it has wilted. Remove from the heat and let it sit for a few minutes. 4. Gradually pour in the egg mixture in a thin stream from about 8 inches above the saucepan, stirring with a wooden spoon in one direction, until the eggs turn into ribbons. If you introduce the mixture too quickly or stir too vigorously, the eggs will turn into rubbery clumps. Also, if the broth is too hot, the egg mixture will difuse into the liquid. (And if this doesn’t work for you, it’s OK; the soup will taste just as good.) 5. Taste and add salt and/or more pepper, as needed. Ladle into individual warmed bowls. Garnish with a bit more cheese and serve right away. Per serving: 110 calories; 9g protein; 7g carbohydrates; 5g fat; 3g saturated fat; 100mg cholesterol; 260mg sodium; 1g fiber; 5g sugar ”My Master Recipes: 165 Recipes to Inspire Confidence in the Kitchen, With Dozens of Variations,” by Patricia Wells


04.12.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • L3

Summer at last! View our full listing of classes and register today at Dierbergs.com/School. Or pick up the NEW May/June School of Cooking brochure in stores.

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POSTCARDS FROM… 5-Day Camp

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Day 1 Monte Cristo Sandwiches • Mixed Greens with Homemade Ranch Dressing • Tomato Basil Soup • Parmesan Cheese Crisps • Fresh Peach Cobbler

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LET’S EAT

L4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WEDnESDAy • 04.12.2017

Tasty sandwich mixes brie, butter HAM • FROM L1

is a great addition to any food, anywhere. The real secret to this sandwich’s success is the cheese butter. Picture this: brie and butter that have both been softened are mixed together and smeared on the bottom half of a baguette. The only thing that could be better than that is a couple of slices of ham on top of it. And arugula with lemon vinaigrette. And a top half of the baguette that has been spread with strawberry jam. Next up was a side dish, Shaved Brussels Sprouts With Frizzled Ham, which I decided to make in no small part due to the fact that I like the word “frizzled.” Brussels sprouts, of course, are as trendy these days as sandwiches with fried eggs in them. This method of preparing the sprouts involves sautéing a lot of shallots and garlic and mixing in a bit of fresh orange juice for a hint of contrasting sweetness. The original recipe’s insistence on adding orange zest turned out to be a bitter mistake, so I left it out of my version. A splash of vinegar lends just the right acidic counterpoint to the Brussels sprouts, while pine nuts add a touch of class. And the whole thing is topped with strips of salty ham that have been fried until they are crisp. Frizzled, you might say. Finally, I made Layered Ham and Cheese Quesadillas. They are kind of like Tex-Mex club sandwiches with two layers of refried beans, ham, melted Monterey jack cheese and chopped chiles separated by toasted flour tortillas and topped with salsa. How was it? How do you think? It’s two layers of refried beans, ham, melted Monterey jack cheese and chopped chiles separated by toasted flour tortillas and topped with salsa. Yeah, it’s that good.

SHAVED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH FRIZZLED HAM

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

HAM AND CHEDDAR GREEN CHILE BREAKFAST SANDWICH Yield: 4 servings 4 (½-inch-thick) slices of cooked ham, cut to it an English muin 4 large eggs ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper 4 whole canned green chiles, drained, split open and trimmed to it an English muin 4 slices cheddar cheese 4 English muins, split, toasted and lightly buttered ½ cup cooked hash brown potatoes (homemade or frozen), warm

LAYERED HAM AND CHEESE QUESADILLAS Yield: 8 servings

Yield: 8 servings 1¾ pounds Brussels sprouts, ends trimmed, outer leaves removed 2 tablespoons olive oil 6 slices cooked ham (about 3 ounces), cut in half, then cut crosswise into ¼-inch strips 2 tablespoons butter 2 cups shallots, thinly sliced (about 8 to 10) 6 cloves garlic, thinly sliced ¼ cup fresh orange juice ¼ cup pine nuts 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar or white wine vinegar Salt and pepper 1. Slice the Brussels sprouts thin, either in a food processor itted with a thin slicing disc or with a knife. Set aside. 2. In a large saucepan or small stockpot over medium heat, warm the olive oil. Add the ham and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisped and golden, 3 to 4 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a plate and set aside. 3. Add butter to the same pan and melt over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until almost translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, for 1 minute. Stir in the Brussels sprouts and orange juice and cook, stirring occasionally, until Brussels sprouts are tender, about 8 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the pine nuts and vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. 4. Transfer to a serving bowl, top with the ham and serve. Per serving: 236 calories; 10g fat; 3g saturated fat; 13mg cholesterol; 9g protein; 31g carbohydrate; 13g sugar; 8g iber; 203mg sodium; 94mg calcium Adapted from a recipe by the National Pork Board

12 (8-inch) lour tortillas ¼ cup oil 1 (15-ounce) can refried black or pinto beans, warmed Note: To roast chiles, preheat oven to 400 degrees and line a baking sheet with foil. Place chile or chiles on prepared sheet and bake 15 minutes. Turn the chile over and bake another 15 minutes (these times are for a poblano; smaller peppers will take less time). Allow to cool for a couple of minutes, then wrap chile in plastic wrap. Let sit 10 to 15 minutes, then unwrap and peel of the skin (wear disposable gloves). 1. Preheat broiler. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Put tortillas in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet, brush with oil and broil until toasted, about 3 minutes. Turn and set aside. 2. Spread a thin layer of the warmed beans on one of the tortillas. Top with a few tablespoons of shredded

selections circle around. There weren’t many of them on the day I tried. A few oranges and an apple on the top shelf, a solitary fruit cup on the shelf below that. A few sandwiches, a bottle of chocolate milk, a handful of boxes of chicken salad and one of tuna salad. What it was most stocked with was cereal. Individual-sized boxes of Cheerios and corn flakes

cheese, a sprinkle of cubed ham and some of the green chiles. Repeat process one more time and then top with another tortilla so there are 3 tortillas per stack, with the top tortilla plain. Repeat this process with the remaining tortillas and ingredients. 3. Once you have 4 stacks of quesadillas, drizzle salsas over each of the stacks and sprinkle with a bit of cheese. Place quesadillas back into the oven for a few minutes to melt the cheese. Then, cut each into 4 wedges. Per serving: 484 calories; 20g fat; 6g saturated fat; 44mg cholesterol; 24g protein; 50g carbohydrate; 6g sugar; 5g iber; 1,888mg sodium; 217mg calcium Recipe by the National Pork Board

Recipe by Jerry Flake, via National Pork Board

HAM BAGUETTE WITH CHEESE BUTTER Yield: 4 servings 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature 2 tablespoons spreadable brie cheese or other triple-crême cheese (rind removed), room temperature Salt and pepper to taste

2 small baguettes 2 cups arugula, lightly packed 2 teaspoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 4 tablespoons strawberry jam 8 ounces cooked ham, thinly sliced

1. With a fork, mash together the butter and brie until thoroughly mixed. Season with salt and pepper to taste. This cheese butter will hold in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. 2. Slice baguettes in half and place under a broiler, cut side up, and toast until golden brown. Lightly dress the arugula with lemon juice and olive oil, and hold. Spread the cheese butter evenly on the bottom half of each toasted baguette and spread the strawberry jam evenly

Vending machine even better than pinball NEMAN • FROM L1

1 cup Monterey jack cheese, shredded 1 pound cooked ham, cut into ½-inch cubes ¼ cup roasted green chiles, chopped, see note 2 cups salsa

1. In a large, nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat the ham until browned, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate, cover to keep warm an set aside. 2. If necessary, wipe out the skillet. Return it to medium heat and coat with nonstick spray. One at a time, add the eggs and sprinkle with the salt and pepper. Cook until set on one side, 1½ to 2 minutes. Carefully turn the eggs, then top with the chiles and cheese. Cover and cook until the eggs are set and the cheese is melted, about 1 minute. Remove pan from the heat. 3. Arrange the bottoms of the English muins on plates or a platter. Top with the hash browns, ham and eggs. Add the muin tops and serve. Per serving: 451 calories; 22g fat; 11g saturated fat; 122mg cholesterol; 27g protein; 35g carbohydrate; 4g sugar; 3g iber; 1,660mg sodium; 326mg calcium

filled an entire rack. This fact probably says more about the eating habits of reporters than anything else. In my fond memory, the offerings in the break room at my father’s building were more enticing. I don’t remember anything specific that it had, but I do remember getting a little can of something — like Dinty Moore Beef Stew, but that wasn’t it — and heating it up in a toaster oven.

on the top half. Place half of the ham slices on each bottom half, top with the lightly dressed arugula and the top half of the baguette. Per serving: 506 calories; 20g fat; 8g saturated fat; 56mg cholesterol; 23g protein; 59g

As I recall, it tasted awful. I can still almost kind of taste it. But that fact did not diminish the wonder of buying a meal out of a vending machine or keep us from going back again. My brother, who is three years older than I, was not yet old enough to drive. So we had to take a bus downtown just to go to an office-building break room so we could get indifferent food from a machine. And that would be the whole purpose of our trip. We probably also stopped in to see our father when we were there, but maybe not. The thrill is that it came from a machine, which is a thrill that still thrills me. Ask yourself: Which is better, a candy bar from

carbohydrate; 13g sugar; 2g iber; 1,223mg sodium; 77mg calcium Adapted from a recipe by Chef Cosmo Gross, via the National Pork Board

a store or one from a vending machine? Yes, they may taste the same, but the bar that came from the vending machine is more fun. Which brings up the tiniest sort of conundrum. Which is better, soft drinks from a fountain or a vending machine? Both, after all, are machines. This is a conversation I had the other day with a colleague who was firmly on the side the fountain. But I like it better from a vending machine. The reason I gave her is that fountains are prone to getting the mix wrong and you can end up with a drink that has too much soda water or too much syrup. But there is more to it than

that. I like soft drinks best from a can, perhaps because they recall nostalgic college memories of late-night studying powered by cans of Coca-Cola caffeine. Putting the money in a slot and pushing a button only reinforced the whole pinball-machine nature of the exchange. This morning, I put a quarter in a parking meter near the post office. It ate the quarter and showed no time on the meter. Sometimes, I hate machines. Daniel Neman • 314-340-8133 Food writer @dnemanfood on Twitter dneman@post-dispatch.com


LET’S EAT

04.12.2017 • WEdnEsday • M 1

A ’shroom made for stuing

sT. LOUIs POsT-dIsPaTCH • L5

Cooks make perfect black bean soup FOUNTAIN ON LOCUST’S CUBAN BLACK BEAN SOUP Yield: 6 large servings or 8 medium bowls

BY JOE YONAN The Washington Post

I’ve made no secret of my mushroom love. As I’ve written, I like to divide them into two categories: the interesting varieties (oysters, shiitakes, morels, puffballs and the like) that I find at the farmers market or forage; and the less-interesting ones (buttons, creminis) I buy at the supermarket. The former I showcase in the kitchen; the latter I use in sauces, soups or the like. I didn’t mention one of the most ubiquitous varieties in vegetarian cooking: the portobello. I eat these too, usually when I want a dish that calls for something meaty. I don’t find their flavor as captivating as, say, maitakes or chanterelles, but they serve a purpose, as that huge cap is perfect for stuffing. Stuffed mushrooms are a retro appetizer when the smaller fungi is used as finger food. But plant-focused cooks can serve a couple portobellos with a hearty filling, and it’s dinner. My latest inspiration comes from Zita Steyn’s new book, “Eat More Greens”. The result is something you can tuck into with a knife and fork rather than your fingers, which makes it even more substantial — and satisfying.

PORTOBELLO MUSHROOMS WITH TUSCAN KALE AND SWEET POTATO

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

REQUEST • FROM L1

expectations. Both women enjoy soups, and it shows. “Everything we do here Barbara and I try several times,” Christensen says. “In this soup, we looked for THE FOUNTAIN a balance of salty, ON LOCUST sweet and sour 3037 Locust Street touches. We have 314 535-7800; always thought of fountainonlocust.com menu items for our vegetarian customers, and this one really fits.” This recipe is not only flavorful, it’s downright easy to make. The Fountain starts with high-quality canned black beans instead of dry. “Canned beans are one thing that’s just as good as made from scratch,” Christensen says. “Cuban Black Bean was one of our first soups,” Schulz says. “Joy’s love of cumin and beans drove the recipe development.” Over time, these two creative cooks perfected the popular black bean soup. They used carrots, onions and two kinds of peppers, roasted and fresh, for sweetness. Garlic adds balance while crushed tomatoes create a just-right texture. Malt vinegar provides a pleasant sour note. A dash of red

Adapted from “Eat More Greens,” by Zita Steyn

4 cups, drained and rinsed 4 cups vegetable broth 1 cup crushed tomatoes ¾ teaspoon ground cumin ½ to 1 teaspoon red pepper lakes, to taste ½ teaspoon ground black pepper ¼ teaspoon chili powder 1 tablespoon malt vinegar 2 cups cooked rice ½ cup sour cream (optional)

Notes: At the Fountain on Locust, most soups are made a day ahead of serving to allow the lavors to blend. • Don’t add salt without tasting the soup. If needed, add at the end of the cook time to avoid toughening the beans. • The Fountain serves this soup over rice and garnishes it with sour cream. The soup is vegetarian; vegan if no sour cream is added.

pepper flakes gives the soup a little kick. Each day, the Fountain serves its signature Polish Dill Pickle soup, a soup-of-theday and a vegetarian soup, all available by the cup or bowl. Cuban Black Bean is one of the soups in rotation on the menu. Customers often pair a soup with one of the restaurant’s inventive sandwiches or salads. In 2016, the food and drink website Foursquare named Fountain sandwich the Royal Grill the best grilled cheese in Missouri. “We use a special blend of white cheddar and mozzarella on quality whole grain bread,” Christensen says. “We butter the bread, not the skillet, so every part of our sandwich toasts perfectly. We also add thin slices of Fuji apple.” While the art deco décor, lights and murals created by the multitalented Christensen add visual delights to each visit, the delicious ice cream creations, adult boozy shakes and ice cream martinis and more provide a sweet ending.

1. Pour olive oil into a large 4- or 5-quart heavybottom pan. Swirl to coat the bottom, then place over medium-high heat until the oil begins to shimmer. 2. Add chopped green pepper, onions, carrots and roasted red peppers, stir to blend, reduce heat to medium and cook until vegetables begin to soften. Add minced garlic, stir, and cook 1 minute longer. 3. Add drained and rinsed beans, broth, tomatoes, cumin, red pepper lakes, black pepper and chili powder. Stir to blend and simmer until done. If needed, add more broth to the soup to achieve desired consistency. 4. Remove from heat and allow to cool a little. Stir in the malt vinegar. 5. Divide rice evenly into bowls. Ladle soup over the rice. If desired, add a dollop of sour cream for garnish and serve. Per serving (based on 6, including rice): 267 calories; 5g fat; 1g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 12g protein; 44g carbohydrate; 3g sugar; 11g iber; 707mg sodium; 76mg calcium

To request a recipe • Would you like to request a recipe from a restaurant that is still open in the St. Louis area? Send your request along with your full name and the city you live in to reciperequest@ post-dispatch.com.

Closed Easter

Yield: 2 to 3 servings maincourse servings or 4 to 6 appetizer servings 9 ounces sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch dice ½ teaspoon ine sea salt, plus more as needed 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped (about 1 cup) 1 large clove garlic, chopped 4 ounces Tuscan kale, thick stalks removed, leaves rinsed and coarsely chopped (about 2 cups packed; may substitute another variety of kale) ½ cup grated sharp cheddar cheese (may substitute vegan cheese) ¾ cup fresh or frozen/ defrosted corn kernels 5 large or 6 medium portobello mushroom caps (about 2 ounces each) 1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. 2. Put the diced sweet potato in a steamer basket set over a small saucepan with an inch or 2 of water over medium heat. Cover and steam until just tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer the sweet potatoes to a mixing bowl, add ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and mash with a fork. 3. Meanwhile, pour the oil into a deep saute pan, over medium heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the onion, garlic and the remaining ¼ teaspoon of salt; cook, stirring frequently, until they have softened. Stir in the chopped kale; cook until wilted and tender and any water clinging to their leaves has evaporated, 2 to 3 minutes. 4. Scrape the kale mixture into the bowl with the sweet potatoes. Stir in the grated cheese, if using, and the corn. Taste, and add more salt, as needed. 5. Arrange the mushroom caps, gill sides up, in a baking dish that’s just large enough to hold them. Divide the sweet potato-kale mixture equally among the mushrooms, mounding it as needed; you’ll want to use it all. Bake for 30 minutes, until the mushrooms are tender and the illing is slightly crisped and lightly browned on top. Serve hot. Per serving (based on 3): 190 calories; 7g protein; 32g carbohydrates; 6g fat; 1g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 420mg sodium; 6g iber; 10g sugar

2 tablespoons olive oil ½ medium green pepper, seeded and diced in a 3/8-inch cut ½ yellow or white onion — not sweet — peeled and diced in a 3/8-inch cut ½ cup diced carrot pieces (3/8-inch cut) ¼ cup diced red roasted peppers 1 ½ teaspoons minced garlic 2 (15-ounce) cans black beans, approximately

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L6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

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Wednesday • 04.12.2017 • eV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

BREAKING CAT NEWS • By Georgia Dunn

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES North-South vulnerable, South deals NORTH ♠9 3 ♥K Q 10 7 ♦K 9 8 ♣Q 7 4 3 WEST EAST ♠K Q 10 ♠8 7 6 ♥8 6 2 ♥A 5 4 ♦Q 7 6 5 4 ♦J 10 3 2 ♣K 10 ♣J 6 5 SOUTH ♠A J 5 4 2 ♥J 9 3 ♦A ♣A 9 8 2 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♠ Pass 1NT Pass 2♣ Pass 3♣ Pass 3♥ Pass 4♥ All pass Opening lead: King of ♠ Today’s deal is from a recent match pitting a team from Ireland against a team from England. West was English star Tony Forrester. East-West were playing “upside-down signals,” so East’s play of the eight at trick one was easily read as discouraging. That method showed well on this deal as it would be impossible to clearly read the play of the six as discouraging. South’s opening bid added additional discouragement and Forrester shifted to the queen of diamonds, in case South held the singleton jack.

Declarer won in hand with the ace perforce and led a trump to dummy’s king. When that was allowed to hold the trick, South ruffed dummy’s low diamond as East played the 10, and then led another heart. Needing 3-3 hearts in any event, he overtook the jack with the queen. East won with the ace and led the jack of diamonds to the board’s king. Declarer had to find discards from his hand on the king of diamonds and the ensuing 10 of hearts. Both black suits were behaving well for him, but he chose to discard two spades and go after clubs. When he next led a club to his ace, Forrester smoothly played the king! Declarer was certain that East started with 3-3-3-4 distribution, so he cashed the ace of spades, ruffed a spade, and exited with a low club. This would have end-played East had he started with the J-10-6-5 of clubs. East stepped up with the jack of clubs and led his carefully preserved low diamond to Forrester, who cashed another diamond for down one.

CRYPTOQUIP

Across 1 Condé ___ (magazine publisher) 5 Ending with Lenin or Stalin 9 Mixed ___ 14 Wedge or pump 15 Princess of Alderaan 16 Shackles 17 “How’s it goin’, Washington?” 19 Retreats 20 Event presided over by a king and queen 21 Cobbler’s tool 23 Museumfunding org. 24 “To your health!” 26 ER worker who sprained an ankle? 29 Sgt. Friday’s org. 30 Sri Lanka’s capital

WORD GAME April 12 WORD — SIBILANT (SIBILANT: SIB-ih-lent: Of, characterized by or producing a hissing sound.) Average mark 25 words. Time limit 40 minutes. Can you find 35 or more words in SIBILANT? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — INTENDS ides dine indent dint inset send nest sennit nine sent tend side tennis sine edit sinned deist site dent snide dentin snit diet stein RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

31 Inseparable 32 How many TV movies can be seen 33 Diminish 37 Prescription for a prehistoric carnivore? 41 Got wind of 42 Many wine barrels come from them 43 Car wash option 44 The Geneva Conventions prohibit it 47 Empire State Building style, informally 48 “Keep that record in its case!”? 51 Out of bed 52 Sean ___ Lennon 53 Slugger’s stat 54 [Shocking!] 55 “Hamlet” courtier

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

57 Mistake a shiny disc for a cookie? 62 Mental bloc? 63 Vegetable with curly leaves 64 Loosen 65 Pub selection 66 A knee sock covers it 67 Scrape, as the knee

Down 1 Sydney’s state: abbr. 2 “___, that feels good!” 3 Endless melodrama 4 Group of four 5 Down in the dumps 6 Good name, for short 7 A helping hand 8 From the beginning, in music 9 Atmospheric pressure units 10 Competitor of Tide 11 “Nothing ___!” 12 Against a thing, legally 13 Syrian strongman 18 Roman counterpart of the Greek Helios 22 Typist’s stat 24 A deadly sin 25 West with Roc-A-Fella records 26 Christmas cheer?

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

If April 12 is your birthday • This year you make headway in pursuing whatever is important to you. To some people, your conversations seem conlicted. Extremes often occur as a result of your independence. Scorpio understands your intensity well. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★★★ One-on-one relating is key to success and well-being. A misunderstanding might seem inevitable. Make it OK for others to have diferent perspectives. These diferences are what make life interesting. Tonight: Help a partner feel special. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★ You’ll feel inclined to go along with someone else’s wishes. Tap into your imagination when dealing with a group of people who have very diferent ideas. You could have diiculty maintaining a cohesive conversation. Tonight: Where your friends are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★★★ You could be in a position where you don’t know which way you should go. As you rethink your path, an older associate might ofer swisdom. Listen to what this person shares, but know that you don’t need to take his or her advice. Tonight: Time to relax! CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★★ Your thoughts might be on a special relationship. The emotional content of your life is important to you. Emphasize the importance of friendship. If you don’t understand what someone is saying, ask a question. Tonight: Let the fun and games begin! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★★ Confusion marks what is going on. You see the big picture, but might not understand what someone is saying in reference to the situation. Perhaps the two of you don’t communicate the same way. A partner sparks your imagination with just a few words. Tonight: Head home. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) ★★★★ You can’t seem to get your message across. Your thoughts and ideas are practical, but you are not being heard, especially right now. A loved one

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

seems to have an aura around him or her that seems ethereal. Tonight: Hang out with friends. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You might wonder which way to go with a personal matter. If you follow your ego and your desires, you could experience a backire. If you remain open and caring, the response you get is likely to be much better. Confusion surrounds a meeting. Tonight: Where the fun is. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★ Don’t push to achieve goals that seem impossible. Understand that you can’t always get what you want. Rather than cause a disagreement, listen. Try to understand where others are coming from. Tonight: As you like it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ Don’t hesitate to step back and take a break from a heated situation where there seems to be a misunderstanding. Clearly, you are not on the same page as someone with whom you want to have a conversation. Let it go for now. Tonight: Postpone any big decisions for now. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★ You might not be as clear as you’d like to be about an emotional matter. You tend to have a grin-and-bear-it attitude when you don’t want to talk about feelings. Emphasize a friendship and your long-term desires. Have a chat when the timing is right. Tonight: Where your friends are. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ If you’re feeling misunderstood, consider taking a new approach. Try to screen your calls as you attempt to sort through someone else’s true intentions, especially with regards to shared inances. Tonight: Be on your best behavior; many people will be noticing you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ Deal with a partner directly in order to avoid a misunderstanding. Clearly, this person feels as if the two of you are not on the same page. Convincing him or her otherwise will take considerable talent. Don’t get hung up on details. Tonight: Go where you can be entertained!

Puzzle by Paula Gamache

27 One who leads a quiet, measured life 28 Celebrity chef Matsuhisa 30 Anderson Cooper’s TV home 32 Animal that might be found curled up on a windowsill 34 Right now 35 Tiniest bit

36 Competitor of BP 38 Pretentious 39 Advocate for seniors 40 Maui music maker, informally 45 Chafe 46 Bridge units 47 Gossips 48 Some camera lenses

49 50 51 54 56 58 59 60 61

Map feature XXX stuff Maze runner Rocker Stefani The Cyclones of the NCAA, for short “As if!” QB Manning Sin City forensic drama Place for a trophy cabinet

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0308

WORD SCRIMMAGE

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

WORDY GURDY

STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

04.12.2017 • WedneSday • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-dISPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

She cheated, has been punished enough

Dear Needs • I do not mean to minimize your infidelity, but you had better take a stand and give your husband an ultimatum: Heal the marriage through marriage counseling, or you leave. Be prepared to follow through, because without professional intervention nothing will change. The situation you describe is unhealthy not only for you and your

unborn child, but also for your little girl. Your daughter should not be raised to think that this toxic environment is normal. Dear Abby • I’m a lesbian and have been in a relationship with a woman for two months now. She never ofers to pay for dates, and she hasn’t planned one, either. We’re both very feminine, although she is slightly more so than I am. I feel this is important because I’m somehow the more dominant one. How can I address this concern without hurting her? — Dominant in California Dear Dominant • Address the imbalance in your relationship by being straightforward about it. Good manners dictate that when someone has been asked out, treated, etc., that person should reciprocate. Because that’s not happening, you need to discuss it with her. Dear Abby • I have been with the same man for six months. He has been separated from his wife for

10 years — but not legally. When he finally decided to tell her there is someone else and he’s moving on, she went crazy. She said she wants alimony, plus the house will have to be sold because she will not allow “the new woman” to live in “her” house. It’s been a month since he told her. We talked to a lawyer about a divorce, but all he is worried about is paying alimony and losing the house. I am getting sick of hearing about it. All he keeps saying is, “I love you, but I don’t want to lose my house or pay her money.” — Fight or Flight in Massachusetts Dear Fight or Flight • Your boyfriend appears to be unwilling to pay the price for a divorce. So what you should do is flee. The longer you stick around, the deeper you will become enmeshed in his drama. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Pocket is moved. 2. Stethoscope is diferent. 3. Bed is wider. 4. Mouth is diferent. 5. Window panes are diferent. 6. Pillow is diferent.

Dear Abby • I have been with my husband for 12 years, married for three. I had an affair a little over a year ago that he found out about. He has let me back into the house, but he demeans my character at every opportunity. I don’t fight back because I know I am the cause of his pain. We have a 3-year-old daughter, and I am now six weeks pregnant with his child. I do not want to argue with him, because if I had been a better wife, he would not be so angry. But the hurt I feel from his words is weighing heavy on me. Should I leave? How can I get him to a counselor? — Needs Counseling

CAROLYN HAX

TV WEDNESDAY

Timeout: Aunt can skip the kids’ games

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Carolyn • My husband and I have been married 12 years and have no kids. Prior to getting married, my husband was aware that I did not want kids, and he expressed the same sentiment. Throughout our marriage, we have had the conversation and agreed we do not want kids. That has not changed. We don’t want kids. My husband has three nephews and one niece. My husband tries to attend all the nephews’ games. I have no interest in spending my weekends or weeknights attending children’s soccer matches, tennis matches or basketball games. If I did, I would have had kids. My husband gets upset when I refuse to go. He thinks it looks bad and he has to constantly make excuses. His niece is a few months old. Whenever I’m around her, her mother places her in my hands

and then disappears. I get stuck holding the baby for long periods of time. I don’t mind a few minutes. I know I sound horrible, and I probably am. But, should I just suck it up? Is there a good compromise? — Anonymous Answer • Your down times aren’t just his, they’re yours, too. His family, though, has no ownership stake. That’s the gist of it regardless of the nature of the events he’s trying to foist on you. But — kids’ sports? Really? You’re not horrible. Your husband doesn’t sound horrible either, so please phrase it kindly when you tell him I said he is completely deranged. People routinely miss their own kids’ games. Coaches miss. I love watching my kids play. I go to lengths to get to their games that some might call contortion-

ist. And my kids love it when their aunties come watch. But the idea that any adult is tethered to a youth schedule is an idea not bred to survive in the wild. That the idea has taken root in your marriage says one of three things (or all of them): that your husband is OK with serving priorities outside the marriage; his family insists on being his priority; that you aren’t comfortable standing up for your priorities. This is the basic layout of what you and your husband really need to talk about. You are in this for each other, not you for him and him for his siblings’ kids. Compromise is a fine impulse but the kowtowing has me concerned, and may warrant deeper attention for you both. “Make excuses” for your absence? What happened to, “Oh, she’s home — she says good luck”? tellme@washpost.com

4/12/17

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

FOX Shots Fired Cory con2 fesses to what he witnessed. (N)

Empire Hakeem throws Fox 2 News at 9:00pm an epic birthday party. (N) (cc) (N)

CBS Survivor: What Hap4 pened on Exile, Stays on Exile. (N)

Criminal Minds: Beyond Criminal Minds: Beyond Borders (N) (cc) Borders: La Huesuda. (N) (cc)

NBC Law & Order: Special 5 Victims Unit: Decline and Fall.

Law & Order: Special Chicago P.D. Severide’s Victims Unit: Motherly car is linked to a crash. Love. (cc)

PBS Feast TV: SciTech 9 Local Wine. Now

American Experience: The Great War. The Meuse-Argonne Offensive. (Part 3 of 3) (N) (cc)

CW 11

News 11 at 7:00PM (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Hatchett (cc)

Arrow: Fighting Fire Whose Line Whose Line With Fire. Vigilante at- Is It Any- Is It Anyway? way? tacks Oliver. (cc)

Justice for Daniel Boone All

ABC The Gold- Speechless Modern 30 bergs Family (cc)

blackish (8:31)

The Andy Griffith Show

The Lone Ranger

Designated Survivor: Party Lines. (N) (cc)

Law & Order: Darkness. Law & Order Explosion MYTV Law & Order: Called 46 Home. Detective Cyrus A blackout. (cc) injures pregnant guard. Lupo returns. (cc)

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Fine Stringed Instruments ❏ Violins ❏ Mandolins ❏ Guitars ❏ Banjos

WANTED: Memorabilia ❏ Swords ❏ Knives ❏ Rifles ❏ Photos


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • WeDneSDAy • 04.12.2017

DR.KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Feel sleepy after eating? You’re not the only one Dear Dr. Roach • After I eat breakfast, I feel really tired and just want to take a nap. I am a 71-year-old woman in good health. Any ideas? — D.M.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

Answer • We use the Latinderived term “postprandial somnolence” (which just means “feeling sleepy after eating’’) to describe this common situation. Eating changes the mode of the autonomic nervous system from sympathetic (often called the “fight or flight” mode) to parasympathetic (“rest and digest’’). So, it is normal to feel a bit sleepy after eating. Some people are affected more than others, and meal size (but not meal composition) is a determinant of how powerful this response will be. What is unusual is that you have this at breakfast, which is a time that most people are having a hormonal surge that tends to keep us awake, especially if you have just had a good night’s sleep. The fact that you are having these symptoms after breakfast makes me concerned that you might not be sleeping well, and whenever I see that, I worry about medical conditions like obstructive sleep apnea. This is where people have very poor sleep due to frequent awakenings that they may be unaware of. So, although I think you are just having a somewhatg rea te r- t h a n - n o r m a l physiological response, the next time you visit your doctor, just have a chat about your sleeping habits. Chest pain after eating, especially in people at risk for blockages in the arteries, is a much more serious and potentially dangerous condition requiring urgent evaluation. From a pharmacological standpoint, many people use cafeine to get over any morning sleepiness.

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

Dear Dr. Roach • I’m a female in my 60s who gets about one cold sore a year. My mother had them, but my father did not, and neither did my brother. My two children never get them, either. Is this an inherited condition that I got from my mother? — B.K.O.

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

Answer • What most people mean by “cold sore” is an outbreak of oral herpes (it’s also called a “fever blister’’). They aren’t an inherited condition, but most children will acquire the virus from their parents or siblings. It is possible to transmit the virus even when there are no symptoms. Some people never get outbreaks after the initial infection; some people get them once or twice a year; still others may get them once or twice a month. Sunlight, fever, stress and menstruation in women may cause them to recur. It’s possible there may be a family predisposition toward greater recurrence frequency.

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu or request an order form of available health newsletters at 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, Fla. 32803. Health newsletters may be ordered from rbmamall.com.


Explore Indigo Dyeing Techniques

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Cook with Tasty Morels

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Make a Smart Workstation

® ®

The Beauty of Edible Blooms

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SPRING 2017

Fresh ideas to make the most of the season

For the Love of Lilacs The timeless, swoonworthy lilac is the symbol of spring—in the garden and in the vase. written by debra prinzing

produced by karen reinecke

photos by ed gohlich

8 HOME AND GARDEN

4 Host a Pinterest-ing Party Let social media spark a fun theme party.

5 Tangled Up in Blue Dye fabric with this DIY technique.

8 Shrub Club Switch up your containers with shrubs.

10 Lighting Trends Find the perfect ixture for your update.

18 Square Space Turn a sliver of space into a workstation.

22 Style Reborn Big ideas for a small bathroom remake.

Whether you have childhood memories of playing beneath Grandmother’s overgrown lilacs or you first noticed Syringa vulgaris at a local nursery or botanical garden, one thing is certain: The best way to celebrate springtime is by inhaling the intoxicating fragrance of lilacs.

6 FOOD

3 Eat More Veg! Chefs cook up delicious spring produce.

6 Ham (or Lamb!) It Up 9 Morel Fever New ways to cook up a spring delicacy.

11 The 1,500-Calorie Day See what a day of healthy eating looks like. Learn how to prepare seafood and ish. Fancy French toast makes breakfast special.

19 The Power of Flowers Embellish foods with edible lowers.

20 Make to Take

12 2017 Travel Awards Use this planner for your next family trip.

16 Optimism: Harness Its Real Power Follow this approach for a happier you.

23 The Skills Your Kids Will Learn Best from You A few fun things to teach your child.

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HO & GARDEN MES S TEST GARDEN

SPRING’S B BLOOMEERSST LI LACS PRIMROSE TRILLIUMSS

ITTY-BITT VEGGIE Y

CUTE & HEA S LTHY

CONTAINE

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BETTER LIVING

EXCLUS TOUR! IVE BETTER

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Recycle This

Slow cooker dishes perfect for a potluck.

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ENS

17 Propose a Toast

OUR

COUNTRY GARD

14 A Healthy Catch

SPRING 2017

These dishes will make your spring feast.

Most of us associate the small, woody ornamental tree or shrub with northern regions—places such as New England, Michigan, or Spokane, Washington—all of which are home to seasonal lilac festivals. But you might be surprised to learn that lilacs also grow in the higher elevations throughout California. Kilcoyne Lilac Farm is one such place. Located in the Antelope Valley in Acton, about 50 miles north of Los Angeles at an elevation of nearly 2,800 feet, this bucolic acreage is owned and cared for by Elizabeth and Dennis Kilcoyne. Six of the property’s 10 acres are devoted solely to the cultivation of lilacs, more than 3,000 of them at recent count. Lilac season is a special time here— leeting but unforgettable. This area is considered “high desert,” meaning winters are cold with snowfall common. Those chilly conditions help ensure that come March, tens of thousands of tiny lavender-hue lorets come into bloom, forming plump clusters that include pure white and pale pink as well as lavender, periwinkle, and plum. “Lilacs need suicient chill time during dormancy to produce lowers in the spring,” Elizabeth says. “That’s why people are so shocked to ind out that they can be grown so close to Los Angeles.” Elizabeth and Dennis planted their irst 200 lilac shrubs in 1994, not far from the

•12 Deer-Resis RS MADE EA SY •Fun & Funky tant Combinations •Succulent GarThrift Store Finds •Mosquito-Re den in a Pot pellent Herbs

COUNTRYGAR

DENS.COM SPRIN VOL. G 2017

26, NO. 2 DISPLAY UNTIL MAY 9

ABOVE: Jenny Gasca, left, and daughter Emma Avalos are partners in Poppy Design Co., a loral studio that sources cut lowers from local farms. Their passion for lilacs lures them to Kilcoyne Lilac Farm, where they collaborate with Elizabeth Kilcoyne to promote her blooms to the loral trade.

GARDEN WITH HEART Plan a beautiful garden with seasonal inspiration from Country Gardens® magazine, on sale now. To subscribe, go to TheMeredithStore.com.


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‘MONGE’

‘BEAUTY OF MOSCOW’

‘FIRMAMENT’

‘PARADISE’

‘SNOW SHOWER’

‘LUDWIG SPAETH’

continued from page 1

restored 1917 farmhouse where they live and raised their children, Joseph, Patrick, Tim, and Meghan. And like growing children, growing lilacs became a lifestyle enterprise for Elizabeth, who retired early from a career in the fashion industry to become a lower farmer. She learned the value of hard work as a girl in Florida, the daughter of a commercial isherman. “I worked on his boat in the summers; we farmed the waters,” she says. “People think lower farming is romantic, but it is a lot of physical work. Without the background my parents gave me, I don’t think I could do this.” Elizabeth was inspired to try growing lilacs after seeing established shrubs that bloomed in the area. She quizzed other growers and met collectors, such as the late Reva Ballreich, a past president of the International Lilac Society known as “The Lilac Lady.” Over two decades, Elizabeth built her lilac assortment into one coveted by lower lovers and loral designers across Southern California. “Reva was a great mentor to me, and I’m trying to preserve part of her collection here,” Elizabeth says of 125 plants she inherited from the lilac-illed garden Reva cultivated while living in Idyllwild, California, another high-desert area in the mountains between Los Angeles and Palm Springs. The attention Elizabeth lavishes on her lilacs all year long pays of come mid- to late March through early April, when the farm plays host to a wild three-week period of lilac harvesting and sales. With her small crew, including seasonal workers, Elizabeth cuts and bunches thousands of lilac stems by variety to sell at local farmers markets, through wholesale lorists in Los Angeles, and to the many visitors who make the drive to Acton just to take home lilacs. “When somebody knows about lilacs, you better get out of the way,” she says jokingly. “It’s the best feeling I get from growing these lowers—making somebody happy and watching people smile when they see lilacs.” Two of those lilac-lovers arrived last year and are hooked. Jenny Gasca and Emma Avalos of Poppy Design Co., based in nearby Lancaster, are a motherdaughter loral design team who went crazy for Elizabeth’s lilacs. They have embraced the ethos of sourcing from local lower growers and are convinced that the best designs begin with farmfresh, seasonal lowers. The women are enthralled with the varieties available for their studio and wedding commissions, and they love to spend time on the farm. Emma worked with Elizabeth last season to boost her lilac knowledge, and, she says, just to be close to the luscious lowers: “I learned how to cut in the ield, how to bundle the stems, how to talk about lilacs with people who came from far and wide to buy them. It is my purest form of enjoyment, working with lowers.” Cultivating the relationship among lower farmer, loral designer, and customer is an important one for all three women. “Our worlds are intersecting as people become aware of where their lowers are coming from,” Emma says. “It’s really great to source local. Lilacs are a ‘leeting miracle’ to us—and we have to remind ourselves how special that is.”

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EDITORIAL Contributing Editor KATHY BARNES Contributing Designer WATERBURY PUBLICATIONS, INC. Contributing Copy Editor CARRIE TRUESDELL Contributing Proofreader AUDRA KINCART Contributors KELLY ROBERSON, CASEY GREEN/BA-REPS. COM FOR KEVIN MURPHY, JESSI BUTTERFIELD/EXCLUSIVE ARTISTS FOR CHANEL ROUGE ALLURE

SUCCESS WITH LILACS: Elizabeth Kilcoyne’s Tips • Plant bare-root lilacs after thoroughly soaking roots for 24 hours. Place roots of multiple lilacs 5 feet apart. The planting holes should be 50 percent wider than the root system. Water every three days for the irst few years to establish, especially in a dry area.

• Water with a soaker hose to provide moisture directly to the root area. At Kilcoyne Lilac Farm, drip lines are employed to deliver water deeply once a week. Watering is tapered by September as the lilacs begin to drop their leaves and go dormant through winter.

• Fertilize sparingly before fall • Prune after harvesting lowers or winter precipitation. Kilcoyne uses a controlled fertilizer such as 0–15–10 nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). For young plants, 0–25–0 NPK is recommended.

in spring. This is when the lilacs start setting their buds for the following season, so if pruning doesn’t take place by summer, postpone until after the next bloom cycle. Lilacs need new growth to set good blooms. Overgrown lilacs need to have a third of the old growth pruned back every season for three years to rejuvenate.

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plant at a glance LILAC

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COMMON NAME: Common lilac; French hybrid lilac BOTANICAL NAME: Syringa species, hybrids, and cultivars FAMILY: Oleaceae HARDINESS: Zones 4–9 CONDITIONS: Lilacs require cold winter temperatures and six-plus hours of full sun daily. They prefer fertile, welldrained soil (neutral to alkaline pH). BLOOM TIME: Spring to early summer, depending on Zone. HEIGHT: Up to 20 feet tall and wide. BEST FEATURE: Lilacs are deciduous shrubs and tall trees prized for their beautiful, fragrant spring blossoms. Flowers are conical or panicle-shape and range in hue from white to deep purple. When not in bloom, the lilac is somewhat of a generic green shrub that can be enlivened with the addition of summer-lowering vines such as clematis.

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One dozen varieties, arranged in a circle, illustrate the pale-to-deep pigments of lilac lorets. Clockwise, from top: 1. ‘St. Joan’ 2. ‘Monge’ 3. ‘Ludwig Spaeth’ 4. ‘Firmament’

5. ‘Tom Taylor’ 6. ‘Old Fashioned’ 7. ‘Michel Buchner’

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Editorial Content Director DOUG KOUMA Executive Editor KARMAN WITTRY HOTCHKISS Assistant Managing Editor JENNIFER SPEER RAMUNDT Senior Associate Art Director KIMBERLY MORGAN METZ Business Manager, Editorial CINDY SLOBASZEWSKI Lead Business Office Assistant GABRIELLE RENSLOW Business Office Assistant KIM O’BRIEN-WOLETT Associate Business Director JENNA BATES

Vice President and Group Publisher SCOTT MORTIMER Executive Account Director DOUG STARK Director of Sales and Marketing SARAH MILLER sarahj.miller@meredith.com National Account Manager ERIC MARZEN eric.marzen@meredith.com Group Business Development Director CURT BLADES curt.blades@meredith.com Advertising Sales Director AMY GATES amy.gates@meredith.com

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8. ‘Beauty of Moscow’ 9. ‘Jesse Gardner’ 10. ‘Spokane’ 11. ‘Beauty of Moscow’ 12. ‘Professor Robert B. Clark’

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer STEPHEN M. LACY President, Meredith National Media Group TOM HARTY President, Meredith Local Media Group PAUL KARPOWICZ Chief Financial Officer JOSEPH CERYANEC Chief Development Officer JOHN ZIESER Vice Chairman MELL MEREDITH FRAZIER In Memoriam E. T. MEREDITH III, 1933–2003 © MEREDITH CORP. 2017. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE USA.

TO SUBSCRIBE TO FEATURED MAGAZINES AND MORE, VISIT THEMEREDITHSTORE.COM. FOR QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS, E-MAIL SPOON@MEREDITH.COM.


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spring 2017

Eat More Veg! Spring produce is here, and the editors of Eating Well® magazine are celebrating the season with a new cookbook of vegetable recipes from hot chefs. photos by helen norman

Sugar Snap Pea Salad active 25 min total 25 min

by Seamus Mullen

SUGAR SNAP PEA SALAD

As soon as sugar snap peas show up at the farmers market, I’m instantly happy. Sweet, crisp, snappy, and sugary! This salad is all about the sugar snaps, plus a little Aleppo pepper for some heat, some creamy sheep- or goat’s-milk cheese for richness, and edible lowers for color. It’s gorgeous, delicious, and really tough not to love. 4 cups sugar snap peas (about 1 pound), trimmed 1 bunch radishes, trimmed 1/4 cup torn fresh mint 1/2 cup soft sheep’s-milk cheese, such as MitiCrema, or soft goat cheese 1/2 teaspoon salt Ground pepper to taste 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Aleppo pepper for garnish Edible lowers for garnish Cut snap peas in half lengthwise. Very thinly slice radishes into coin shapes or half-moons. Toss the peas, radishes, mint, and cheese in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper, then toss with lemon juice and oil. Serve garnished with a sprinkle of Aleppo pepper and lowers, if desired. Serves 5: about 1 cup each Cal 135 / Fat 9g (sat 3g) / Chol 7mg / Carbs 9g / Total sugars 4g (added 0g) / Protein 6g / Fiber 3g / Sodium 316mg / Potassium 294mg.

ASPARAGUS TABBOULEH

Serve topped with feta. Serves 6: 3/4 cup each Cal 193 / Fat 13g (sat 3g) / Chol 11mg / Carbs 17g / Total sugars 5g (added 0g) / Protein 4g / Fiber 3g / Sodium 218mg / Potassium 228mg.

Peruvian Corn Gratin active 35 min total 1 hr

Asparagus Tabbouleh active 20 min total 1 hr 40 min to make ahead Refrigerate, without feta,

for up to 8 hours.

by Michael Solomonov Asparagus has a short window of perfect ripeness, so I’m especially excited to make it sing in the spring. This tabbouleh recipe is very heavy on the parsley, a preparation often found in the Galilee in Israel. 1/2 cup bulgur 8 ounces asparagus, trimmed, very inely chopped 1 cup pomegranate seeds 3/4 cup inely chopped fresh parsley 1/4 cup inely diced red onion 1/4 cup lemon juice 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese, preferably Bulgarian 1. Place bulgur in a medium bowl and cover with several inches of cold water. Let soak for 1 hour. Drain. 2. Combine the bulgur, asparagus, pomegranate seeds, parsley, onion, lemon juice, oil, and salt in a large nonreactive bowl. Let stand at room temperature for 20 minutes or refrigerate for up to 8 hours.

by Lorena Garcia Peruvian corn, also known as choclo—a large-kernel, starchy (not sweet) variety of corn from the Andes—is one of my favorite ingredients. The kernel size and irm, chewy texture work so well in a creamy gratin. This recipe calls for fresh sweet corn because it is more readily available. If you ind Peruvian corn at a Latin market, use it instead. 2/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1/4 cup panko bread crumbs, preferably whole wheat 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup minced shallots 1 teaspoon minced garlic 4 cups fresh corn kernels or Peruvian corn 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt 1/3 cup dry white wine 1/2 cup whole milk 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese 1 cup packed fresh spinach, chopped 1 cup sliced hearts of palm (1/2-inch-thick rounds) Zest of 1 lemon 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon ground white pepper

PERUVIAN CORN GRATIN 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. 2. Combine Parmesan and panko in a small bowl; set aside. 3. Heat oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add shallots and garlic and cook, stirring, until soft and fragrant, about 1 minute. 4. Add corn and salt; cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Add wine and reduce heat to medium-low. Add milk and mascarpone; stir until the mascarpone is melted. Stir in spinach, hearts of palm, lemon zest, lemon juice, and white pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook for 2 minutes. 5. Remove from heat and top with the Parmesan mixture. Transfer the pan to the oven. Bake until the cheese is starting to brown, 20 to 25 minutes. Serves 8: about 2/3 cup each Cal 282 / Fat 20g (sat 9g) / Chol 42mg / Carbs 20g / Total sugars 6g (added 0g) / Protein 8g / Fiber 2g / Sodium 304mg / Potassium 311mg.

VEGETABL ES THE ESSE NTI

AL REFER EN

CE

SPRING’S BEST FLAVORS Pick up a copy of EatingWell Vegetables: The Essential Reference™ where books are sold.

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5 Easy Steps to Hosting a Pinterest-ing Party Gather your friends and a few supplies, and prepare to make your favorite crafts as seen on Pinterest! photos by adam albright and dean schoeppner

HAVE ON H

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Butcher p painter’s aper and tape to c over tabletops

Extra scis sors

Paper tow els and m oist wipes for quick cle anups A hand b room and dust pan for su pply spills Extra ma te something rials in case an unexp goes awry or ec arrives on ted crafter the scene

Download our invitation template! BHG.com/ MIYCraftParty

1 Invite Calling all crafty friends! Invitees really don’t need lots of skill. Half the fun is learning together! Choose a time that works best for your group. Working or stay-at-home moms might like a night away. If friends have school-age kids, plan to start as soon as the bus pulls away with brunch and a day of crafting. Are your crafting buddies also workmates? Find a space in your building you can use at the end of the day. It’s great team-building time! Keep your numbers small, and set a time limit for your party. It’s tempting for latecomers to want to stay and inish what they missed. Use technology to your advantage. Send an e-mail invitation to track RSVPs. Or set up a private crafts party group on Facebook. You can create an event with RSVP functions to easily communicate details to your guests. If you feel you lack some crafting skills, pick a crafts-savvy friend to be your cohostess.

• •

Check out the great ideas at pinterest.com/miymag /host-a-pinterest-party/.

Cull ideas from Pinterest boards

Don’t get carried away Limit yourself to three to ive projects, depending on their complexity and the amount of space they’ll need. Better to start and inish three things than begin ive and inish none. Consider the amount of time and money each project will take to complete. It’s easiest if one person does the shopping from a checklist. But divvy up the total expenses, asking each crafter to pay a nominal fee up front to cover crafts supplies. Choose projects that vary in the skill

Sweet Button Cookies Tint sugar cookie dough with food coloring gel to devise an assortment of button cookies. Use a variety of circle cookie cutters to cut out shapes. Use a straw to poke buttonholes, adding details with a fork by gently pressing into dough before baking.

Got It Covered Mason jars turn into perky beverage holders when you slip a few colorful cupcake wrappers beneath the metal ring. Cut a small slit in the top to insert a paper straw, and create a washi-tape name lag.

Knit One Delish Treat Pipe crisscrossing layers of tinted frosting onto the top of a cupcake. Slide and glue small wooden beads onto ends of bamboo skewers, and clip any remaining skewer that might poke through to create “knitting needles.”

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guests to pin projects that are interesting to them. This can be a good resource if you decide to host subsequent events. Use the comments section under each pin to vote for favorites. Add treats to your board, and ask guests to choose an item to make and bring along.

3 Set Up & Decorate Once you have your pals and projects picked out, set the mood with crafty decor and a plan for how the event will low. Set up stations for each craft, and let guests rotate among them. Make a how-to project sheet for each craft. It’s easier than trying to explain the steps when you have multiple crafts being made at once. Use acrylic picture frames to hold directions upright. Stand them on the table so everyone can see. Limited on space? Remove chairs and put tables on bed risers so guests can stand while they craft. Pull out vintage trays to organize the tools at each table. Place a large lazy Susan in the center of the table so guests can spin it and easily reach tools and supplies. Pour glitter into salt or cheese shakers, depending on how coarse it is. It makes the glitter easier to control with less waste. Use paper plates under glittery crafts to catch excess. Purchase glassine bags from a crafts store, write guests’ names on the bags, and use them to send the crafts home. Designate an extra table for completed crafts.

• •

to choose from, how do you decide which projects to make? One rule: Keep it simple.

with your crafty party theme.

• Set up a secret board, and invite your

2 Select Projects With so many ideas

4 Sips & Nibbles Round out your party with fun and tasty goodies to coordinate

SPRING/SUM

level required, from beginner to intermediate, so everyone feels conident—of course, adjust as needed to the average skill level of your invitees.

No- Sew Succulents

Yourself 65+ ON-TRE

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Plants You Can't Kill! Make Mini Gardens Usi ng Felt, Wool, Paper & More

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Join THE CLUB ! A Free Cros s-Stitch Pattern Ever y Month page 108 gazine.com

G ro

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p Craft Camp - Pr i nt P rojects

GET YOUR CRAFT ON!

5 Create Once the party is prepared, you’re ready to start the fun and make it yourself!

Looking for a new project? You’ll find how-to help and ideas galore in Make It Yourself™ magazine, on sale where magazines are sold.


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spring 2017

Japanese indigo dyeing colors an Indiana couple’s lives as they devotedly take blue from seed to cloth. by luann brandsen photos victoria pearson

Rowland Ricketts bounds into his studio dressed in blue, his red sneakers the only dissenting hue. He lifts a screen from atop a concrete vat and uncovers an inky pool with a pungent, earthy smell. One sweep of his hand across the surface turns his fingers to sapphire. “It’s all good,” he says, thrilled that this carefully nurtured mixture of fermenting indigo leaves is ready to transform whatever cloth he submerges. For Rowland and his wife, Chinami, indigo dyeing is their passion. At Rowland’s studio at Indiana University, where he teaches textile art, and on their nearby farm, they not only create striking fabric designs but also grow, harvest, and process indigo plants to make organically sourced dye. The couple’s mastery of the age-old techniques of cultivation and dyeing began nearly two decades ago in Japan.

Circle Compression

Clipping

Wrapping

Rowland and Chinami were each in search of something deeper when they met as apprentices to an indigo dyer in the city of Tokushima, where indigo dyeing dates to the 10th century. Chinami had left her oice work to ind a job she’d “never want to retire from.” Rowland was teaching English and wanted to learn a Japanese art before moving back to the States. “In the early 1900s, every Japanese community had at least one indigo dyer, and there were thousands of people involved in growing and processing the dye. Today, only six or seven families

Triangle Compression

Square Compression

continue to process indigo commercially,” Rowland says. “I was drawn to the history and working with my hands.” Now 18 years (and three boys) later, they’re happily tangled up in blue. Chinami weaves dyed yarns into fabrics; Rowland oversees the composting, fermenting, and dyeing. Calling on years of muscle memory, he jiggles a hanger of serpentine cloth as he lowers it into the vat to prevent dye lines. When he pulls the cloth up three minutes later, the greenish fabric becomes blue as the dye oxidizes.

“Dyeing dark shades requires several immersions and is quite meditative,” Rowland says. “I’ll spend hours just putting things in and out. It has a nice rhythm to it.” Most of his fabrics end up in museum art installations, but the couple also sell scarves, runners, and towels online. “Indigo is really trendy right now, but its roots are deep,” Rowland says. “Hopefully our work both growing and dyeing with indigo carries this historical knowledge forward and allows us to share its beauty with others.”

MAR CH/APR

Using white natural fabrics (we used linen napkins from a home store, but cotton works, too), create diferent designs by folding, twisting, wrapping, and binding with a variety of items like twine, rubber bands, clips, and clothespins.

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1 Triangle Compression 1 5

Accordion-fold the cloth lengthwise, as if you were making a paper fan, then fold the resulting strip like you would a lag so you inish with a triangle. Place the triangle between two square pieces of wood. Sandwich between wooden crafts sticks. Secure with rubber bands.

IT’S FINALLY

spring!

3 Square Compression Accordion-fold as in No. 1, except instead of a triangle, fold the strip into a rectangle, then a square. Place the cloth square between two square pieces of wood. Wrap with twine.

4 Circle Compression Follow the folding method of No. 3, and place the square between two wood circles sandwiched between wood crafts sticks and dowels. Secure with rubber bands.

5 Clipping Make four big accordion folds (quartering the fabric), then fold the strip in half. Clip folded edge with as many clothespins as you like (we used eight).

CAN’T-MISS MIDWEST PLANTS!

RICH ER HERE

FOLDING

estliv ing.com

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the diagonal, wrap the fabric around a wooden dowel or PVC pipe. Tie string at one end of the pole, and wrap it up the length of fabric. Tie to secure. (The twine creates a wave efect.)

/ APRIL

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shibori (she-BOR-ee) is the Japanese term for binding, then dyeing cloth indigo.

IL 2017

T LIV

shibori Hot on the DIY scene,

2 Wrapping Working on

Our experts name their go-to bloo ms GREAT RIVE ROAD TRIP R A Mississip pi journey from Huck Finn to Elvis

THIS IS A POTLUCK

Tips & recip es to brighten up any mea l with friends

THE SECRET TO GREAT CARBONARA TV chef Mich Symon dish ael on classic es pasta

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STYLISH SOLUTIONS Pick up a copy of Midwest Living® magazine, on newsstands now, or subscribe at MidwestLiving.com.

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spring 2017

Ham(orLamb!) It Up Mix and match these ham or lamb dishes for an easy spring feast. Plus, side dishes that make vegetables memorable—roasted potatoes and artichokes, wild mushrooms and shallots, kale soulé, and an asparagus-white cheddar tart. by melissa knific

photos by kate mathis

Glazed Ham prep 10 minutes stand 45 minutes bake at 325° for 2 hours, then at 425°

for 15 minutes 1 spiral-cut ham (about 8 lbs) 1 recipe glaze 1. Remove ham from packaging and place in

a roasting pan itted with a rack. Let stand at room temperature for 45 minutes. 2. Heat oven to 325°. Pour 2 cups water in bottom of roasting pan. Cover ham tightly with foil. Bake at 325° for 2 hours. 3. Meanwhile, prepare one of the glazes, below. 4. Carefully remove roasting pan from oven and discard foil. Increase heat to 425°. Brush half of glaze on ham and save the rest to serve alongside. Return ham to oven and bake at 425° for 15 minutes, until glaze darkens. Makes 16 servings

Apricot-Mustard Glaze 3/4 cup apricot jam 1/4 cup Dijon mustard 2 tbsp apricot juice, apple juice, or water In a pot over medium-high heat, combine ingredients. Bring to a simmer; cook 2 minutes. Cover and remove from heat. per serving 270 cal; 11 g fat; 36 g pro; 4 g carb; 0 g iber

Spicy Honey Glaze 1 cup honey 2 tbsp unsalted butter 3/4 tsp red pepper lakes In a pot over medium-high heat, combine ingredients and 2 tbsp water. Bring to a simmer; cook 2 minutes. Cover and remove from heat. per serving 330 cal; 13 g fat; 36 g pro; 18 g carb; 0 g iber

Maple-Bourbon Glaze 3/4 1/3 1/2 1/4 2

cup pure maple syrup cup bourbon tsp black pepper tsp salt tbsp unsalted butter

In a pot over medium-high heat, combine ingredients. Bring to a simmer; cook 2 minutes. Cover and remove from heat. per serving 310 cal; 13 g fat; 36 g pro; 10 g carb; 0 g iber

Roasted Lamb prep 15 minutes stand 45 minutes roast at 400° for 1 hour 15 minutes rest 10 minutes

1 butterlied leg of lamb (about 3 lbs) 1 recipe rub 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1. Pat lamb dry. Let stand at room

temperature for 45 minutes. 2. Heat oven to 400°. 3. Choose one of the rubs, right, to season lamb. Roll lamb tightly and secure with butcher’s twine. Place on a baking sheet itted with a wire rack. Brush outside of lamb with olive oil. Continue seasoning as directed in each rub recipe. 4. Roast at 400° for 1 hour 15 minutes to 1 hour 30 minutes, until temperature reaches 130° with an instant-read thermometer. Let rest 10 minutes (temperature will increase to 135°, medium-rare). Makes 8 servings

Paprika–Brown Sugar Rub 2 11/2 1 1 1 1 1/4

tbsp packed brown sugar tsp kosher salt tsp smoked paprika tsp sweet paprika tsp onion powder tsp garlic powder tsp cayenne pepper

Rub 1 tbsp brown sugar on inside of lamb (butterlied side). In a bowl, combine 1 tbsp brown sugar with the other ingredients. Rub

GLAZED HAM half on inside of lamb and half on outside. per serving 230 cal; 9 g fat; 30 g pro; 4 g carb; 0 g iber

ROASTED LAMB

Rosemary-Garlic Rub 11/2 1/2 3 1

tsp kosher salt tsp black pepper large cloves garlic, minced tbsp chopped rosemary

Season inside of lamb (butterlied side) with 1/2 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. Sprinkle on garlic and rosemary. Season outside of lamb with 1 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper. per serving 210 cal; 9 g fat; 30 g pro; 0 g carb; 0 g iber

Ras el Hanout Rub 4 tsp ras el hanout (such as Frontier) 11/2 tsp kosher salt 1 tsp lemon zest Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Rub half on inside of lamb (butterlied side) and half on outside. per serving 220 cal; 10 g fat; 16 g pro; 0 g carb; 0 g iber

Ras el hanout is a Moroccan spice blend containing up to 50 ingredients, including ginger, black pepper, cumin, cinnamon, cloves, cayenne, and allspice.

GRILLED CHICKEN SALAD WITH FREEKEH, PRESERVED LEMON & DRIED CHERRIES


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7

spring 2017

ROASTED POTATOES AND ARTICHOKES

For crispy mushrooms, don’t crowd the pan or stir too often. Less movement equals more char.

WILD MUSHROOMS AND SHALLOTS

Asparagus-White Cheddar Tart prep 10 minutes cook 3 minutes bake at 400° for 20 minutes

1 lb asparagus, ends trimmed 1 sheet puf pastry (from a 17.3-oz box), thawed 1 egg 1 tsp Dijon mustard 8 oz shredded sharp white cheddar (2 cups) 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil Freshly ground black pepper (optional) 1. Heat oven to 400°. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Add asparagus and cook 3 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water. 2. Roll out puf pastry on a lightly loured surface to 10×16 inches. Place on a baking sheet. Beat egg with mustard. Brush on pastry. Bake at 400° for 12 minutes. 3. Carefully remove pastry from oven and sprinkle with 13/4 cups cheese. Top with asparagus, followed by 1/4 cup cheese. Return to oven and bake 8 minutes, until pastry is browned and cheese is melted. 4. Drizzle tart with oil and season with pepper. Makes 8 servings per serving 270 cal; 20 g fat; 11 g pro; 13 g carb; 1 g iber

ASPARAGUSWHITE CHEDDAR TART

Roasted Potatoes and Artichokes prep 10 minutes roast at 400° for 20 minutes cook 8 minutes

11/2 lbs ingerling potatoes, cut crosswise into 2-inch pieces 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 tsp salt 1/2 tsp black pepper 1 small yellow onion, diced 2 boxes (10 oz each) frozen artichoke hearts, thawed 1/2 tsp lemon zest 1 tsp lemon juice 1. Heat oven to 400°. On a rimmed baking

sheet, toss potatoes with 1 tbsp oil, 1/2 tsp salt, and 1/4 tsp pepper. Roast at 400° for 20 minutes; turn once. 2. Meanwhile, heat 1 tbsp oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and cook 3 minutes. Increase heat to medium-high and stir in 1 tbsp oil and the artichokes. Cook 5 minutes, stirring a few times, until browned. Mix in lemon zest and juice, 1/2 tsp salt, and 1/4 tsp pepper. Toss artichokes with potatoes in a serving bowl. Makes 8 side-dish servings

Kale Soulé prep 15 minutes cook 2 minutes bake at 375° for 35 minutes

4 3/4 3 1 10 1/2 1/4 1/4 5 1/8

tbsp unsalted butter cup grated Parmesan tbsp all-purpose lour cup milk oz frozen chopped kale, thawed, squeezed dry tsp plus 1/8 tsp salt tsp nutmeg tsp black pepper large eggs, separated, plus 1 large egg white tsp cream of tartar

1. Heat oven to 400°. Spread 1 tbsp butter

on bottom and sides of a 6-cup soulé dish. Sprinkle in 1/4 cup Parmesan, turning to coat completely. 2. Melt 3 tbsp butter in a small pot over medium heat. Stir in lour; cook 1 minute. Whisk in milk and bring to a simmer; cook

1 minute, until thickened. Stir in kale, 1/2 tsp salt, nutmeg, and pepper. 3. Whisk egg yolks in a large bowl. Slowly stir a third of warm kale mixture into yolks. (Mixing too quickly could cause eggs to scramble.) Stir in remaining mixture and 1/2 cup Parmesan. 4. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites, cream of tartar, and 1/8 tsp salt on low speed for 1 minute. Increase speed to high and beat 1 to 2 minutes, until stif peaks form. 5. Gently fold egg whites into yolk mixture. Don’t overmix or the soulé won’t rise properly. 6. Transfer to prepared dish. Place in oven and reduce heat to 375°. Bake 35 to 40 minutes, until soulé has risen and is browned. Quickly insert an instantread thermometer into center of soulé; temperature should register at least 140°. Serve immediately. Makes 8 servings per serving 170 cal; 12 g fat; 10 g pro; 6 g carb; 1 g iber

KALE SOUFFLÉ

per serving 140 cal; 5 g fat; 3 g pro; 21 g carb; 5 g iber

Wild Mushrooms and Shallots prep 15 minutes cook 18 minutes

3 1/2 4 2 11/2 1 2 3/4 1/4

tbsp extra-virgin olive oil cup sliced shallots cloves garlic, sliced tbsp unsalted butter lbs mixed wild mushrooms, sliced tsp chopped fresh thyme tbsp brandy or dry sherry tsp salt tsp black pepper

SUPER FO

ODS THAT

MAKE YOU

SLIMMER ®

Best New Cleaning Products

20+ PAG GREAT RECESIPOF ES New Orleans– Style Weeknight Party Dinners

spring!

1. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a large skillet over

medium heat. Stir in shallots and garlic; cook 3 minutes. Remove to a bowl. 2. Increase heat to medium-high. Add butter and 2 tbsp oil. Stir in mushrooms. Cook 15 to 18 minutes, stirring occasionally, until mushrooms are browned. 3. Return shallots and garlic to pan. Add thyme. Pour in brandy, scraping bottom of pan to release any browned bits. Season with salt and pepper. Makes 8 side-dish servings per serving 60 cal; 5 g fat; 0 g pro; 1 g carb; 0 g iber

Ideas for All Those Eggs! APRIL familycircle 2017 .com

MORE RECIPES For more dinner ideas, subscribe to Family Circle® magazine for just $5.99 a year at BHG.com/Mag.


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8 spring 2017

THE SHRUB CLUB Shrubs cost more than annuals, but you can’t beat them when it comes to value. Grow these high-drama plants in containers for several years. by jane austin miller

photos by laurie black

designs by barbara libner, ravenna gardens

GOT THE BLUES Select large, frostproof containers (such as high-ired ceramic) so shrubs can remain year-round.

A SMALL (OR SLOWGROWING) SHRUB CAN LIVE IN A POT FOR TWO OR THREE YEARS BEFORE IT NEEDS TO BE TRANSPLANTED.

1

Dwarf Pine 1 nana dwarf himalayan pine Long two-tone needles. 4 feet, Zones 5–7

2 olivia hypericum Berries follow blooms. 36 inches, Zones 5–9

3 dolce key lime pie heuchera Stunning chartreuse foliage. 8–16 inches, Zones 4–9 8

4 pansy Cheerful blooms match pots.

2

8 inches, Zones 7–11

5 silver falls dichondra Trailing 3

foliage spills over edges. 3–6 feet, annual

6

4

6 under the sea yellowfin tuna coleus Crustacean-shape leaves tolerate sun. 12–18 inches, annual

7 blue star juniper Textural aqua

5

needles. 1–3 feet, Zones 4–8

7

8 lacey blue russian sage Won’t lop like taller types. 12–18 inches, Zones 4–10 9

9 fubuki hakonechloa Compact variety, perfect in pots. 10–14 inches, Zones 5–9

10 aurea scotch moss Soft,

10

carpetlike texture. 1 inch, Zones 3–9

1

2

3

Rosy Glow

4

5 6

CHOOSE A COLOR PALETTE AND KEEP IT CONSISTENT. CONSIDER HOW HUES EVOLVE, SPRING TO FALL.

1 orange rocket barberry Wine red foliage in fall. 4½ feet, Zones 4–9

2 purple fountaingrass Burgundy-tipped foliage and seed heads. 30–36 inches, annual

3 cheyenne spirit echinacea A range of bloom hues from purple to cream. 18–24 inches, Zones 5–9

4 pinocchio hebe Violet summer

1

blooms. 10 inches, Zones 7–10

5 sweet caroline bronze sweet potato vine Bronze-purple foliage on trailing vines. 36 inches, annual

Showy Cypress

6 nonstop apricot begonia Blooms all summer. 8–12 inches, annual

1 thoweil hinoki cypress

7 streibs findling cotoneaster

Narrow, sculptural habit. 3–4 feet, Zones 5–8

2 fuchsiade 88 fuchsia Pink

Red berries follow white blooms. 6 inches, Zones 6–8

3 2

petals resemble wings. 4½ feet, annual

3 euonymus happiness Small golden leaves. 16–24 inches, Zones 6–9 4

5

double blooms. 12–24 inches, annual

5 lava rose coleus Leaves take sun

COLO R IN EVE RY ROO M P. 112

6 golden spikemoss Low,

WINTER CARE FOR SHRUBS Live in a region where winter temps dip below freezing? Follow our cold-weather tips. BHG.com/WinterCare

$3.99

FAM ILY STYLE

or shade. 6–10 inches, annual creeping carpet. 2–4 inches, Zones 7–9

AP RIL 2017 BHG.C OM

HOMES & GAR

4 berseba begonia Nonstop

81 WAYS TO AD D EAS Y, LIVAB LE CO LOR OU R 201 7 PAL ETT E OF THE YEA R

6

GOOD CENTS Annuals must be replaced each year, but potted shrubs grow many years. You can switch up the other plants every season to suit your likes.

7

plus

SPRING EN TERTAINI

NG & SMAL

L-SPACE GA

RDENING

MAKE A HAPPY HOME Subscribe at BHG.com/Mag for just $5.99 a year and get inspiration every month.


better

spring 2017

9

Morel Fever Whether you hunt for them in the woods or at your local farmers market, the morel mushroom is a spring delicacy. field photos by greg scheidemann

food photos by marty baldwin

food styling by greg luna

Morel Frittata prep 30 minutes broil 2 minutes

MOREL FRITTATA

2 Tbsp. butter 1 medium yellow onion, chopped (about ½ cup) Salt and freshly ground black pepper 4 oz. fresh morel mushrooms,* cleaned (see tip, below right), trimmed, and halved lengthwise 1 small bunch fresh spinach, washed and stems trimmed 4 eggs 1 cup half-and-half, light cream, or milk 2 sprigs Italian parsley (optional) 1. Melt the butter in a large nonstick

ovenproof skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, season to taste with salt and pepper, and cook for 5 minutes, stirring often. Add the morels and cook until onion is translucent and morels are tender, about 5 minutes more. Add the spinach to the skillet; cook and stir about 3 minutes or until spinach has wilted. 2. Preheat broiler. Meanwhile, whisk the eggs and half-and-half together in a large bowl. Season with additional salt and pepper. Reduce heat to medium and pour eggs into skillet with mushroom mixture. Stir to ensure the mushrooms and spinach are evenly arranged in the pan. As the frittata cooks, lift the cooked edges, allowing the uncooked eggs to low underneath. Cook until eggs are just set; the center will still be runny. 3. Place skillet under broiler, about 4 inches from heat. Cook until golden, about 2 minutes. Remove from oven, slide frittata onto a serving plate (if desired), and cut into pieces. If desired, garnish with parsley. Makes 4 to 6 servings. *Note: If fresh morel mushrooms are not available, substitute 1 oz. dried morel mushrooms. Soak dried mushrooms in warm water for 30 minutes. Drain and pat dry with paper towels.

SAUTÉED MOREL MUSHROOMS

Asparagus and Morels start to finish 20 minutes

MOREL MUSHROOM CREAM SAUCE WITH PASTA

1 lb. thick asparagus spears 3 Tbsp. butter 6 to 8 oz. fresh morel mushrooms,* cleaned (see tip, right), trimmed, and halved lengthwise Salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 Tbsp. lemon juice Snipped fresh chives Lemon wedges (optional) 1. Snap of and discard woody bases of

Sautéed Morel Mushrooms

1 lb. fresh morel mushrooms, cleaned (see tip, right), trimmed, and halved lengthwise All-purpose lour ½ cup butter Salt 1. Toss morels with lour to coat. In a 12-inch

skillet melt butter over medium heat. Add mushrooms and cook for 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown, gently stirring occasionally. Sprinkle with salt and serve warm. Makes 10 to 12 side-dish servings.

ASPARAGUS AND MORELS

prep 20 minutes cook 7 minutes

¼ 1/3 1 1 ½ ¼ ¼ 1 8

cup unsalted butter cup inely chopped shallots Tbsp. all-purpose lour cup chicken broth tsp. snipped fresh thyme tsp. kosher salt tsp. ground white pepper cup whipping cream or heavy cream oz. fresh morel mushrooms, cleaned (see tip, right), trimmed, and halved lengthwise ¼ cup snipped fresh Italian parsley Hot cooked pasta Snipped fresh Italian parsley (optional) Shaved Parmesan cheese (optional)

CLEANING FRESH MORELS Place mushrooms in a bowl. Cover with water; gently stir in a dash of salt. Soak for 10 to 15 minutes. Drain, rinse, and repeat two more times; pat dry.

f so or dit eE th

prep 10 minutes cook 3 minutes

Morel Mushroom Cream Sauce with Pasta

om Fr

Morel mushroom hunters say the biggest reward comes when you taste the tender delicacies after they’ve been loured and sautéed in butter.

asparagus. If desired, scrape of scales. Place a steamer basket in a saucepan. Add water to just below the bottom of the basket. Bring water to boiling. Add asparagus to basket. Cover and reduce heat; steam for 3 to 5 minutes or until crisptender. Remove basket; discard liquid. 2. Meanwhile, heat 2 Tbsp. of the butter in a large skillet. Add morels and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Season to taste with salt and pepper. 3. In a large bowl toss hot asparagus with remaining 1 Tbsp. butter and lemon juice to coat. Arrange asparagus and morels on a serving platter and sprinkle with chives. If desired, serve with lemon wedges. Makes 6 servings. *Note: If fresh morel mushrooms are not available, substitute 1½ to 2 oz. dried morel mushrooms. Soak dried mushrooms in warm water for 30 minutes. Drain and pat dry.

54

1. For sauce, in a large skillet melt butter

over medium heat; add shallots. Cook and stir for 3 to 5 minutes or until shallots are tender. Sprinkle lour over shallots; stir to combine. Slowly add broth, stirring until smooth. Reduce heat to low. Cook, uncovered, for 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in thyme, salt, and white pepper. Slowly whisk in the cream. Cook, whisking constantly, over medium heat for 7 minutes more or until the mixture thickens. Stir in morels and 1/4 cup parsley. Cook and stir until heated through. 2. Serve sauce over pasta. If desired, sprinkle with additional parsley and top with Parmesan shavings. Makes 4 to 6 main-dish servings.

FRESH RECIPES for Veggies, Fruits, Herb & Flowers s

DRIED TR

UE Preserve Your Harve st GARDEN FRESH -

Cocktails EASY

2017

STEP

-BY-STEP Jams and Pickles

GROW YOUR OWN Find new ways to cook and enjoy what you grow. Pick up a copy of From Garden to Plate™ magazine, on newsstands now.


better

10 spring 2017

LIGHTING TRENDS When it comes to picking a new light, the days of matching a ixture to your decor are gone. Check out these contemporary, cottage, and modern looks for inspiration.

COTTAGE TREND WATCH Style means diferent things to diferent people. For those who embrace a more relaxed aesthetic, that may mean a touch of romance: cozy rooms illed with loral prints and overstufed chairs. But to others, a more relaxed style equals a pared-down yet still casual and refreshing approach to livable rooms. WOOD Rich grains and muted stain colors ofer textural contrast for these wood-forward ixtures.

wood + metal Repetition of the curved element creates design consistency. Lofty, Varaluz

MODERN TREND WATCH This look has shown remarkable resilience, even as it has endured the ever-ickle style enthusiasms of the American homeowner. Although its exact “birth” date is often debated, the irst forms, materials, and general aesthetic started to ilter into homes in the late 1920s and ’30s.

wood + nostalgic Five bulbs hang from slim metal stems. Denton, Hinkley Lighting

SCREENS A constellation of dots—bent, cutout, colored—gives visual power to these standout lighting ixtures.

screens + chandelier Interesting shapes cut from screens intersect with metal elements. Linden, Artcraft

COOL COLORS Lighting hops on the color wheel for a fabulous spin that deals out hues bright and bold in the blue and green families.

BARN AESTHETIC Form and materials from our agricultural past make an appearance in these rustic-yet-thoroughly-contemporary ixtures.

barn + finish Polished to a brilliant sheen, this ixture recalls handmade materials and forms. Boswell, Westinghouse

TRADITIONAL TREND WATCH These ixtures often rely on metal, glass, and crystals, as well as generously curved yet classic forms. Within traditional and classic lighting, you will ind a wide-ranging collection of ixtures. They may be more spare or more lavish, such as multilayer chandeliers.

green + blue Dollops of yellow-green accent a swirling hue of cool colors. Adara, Surya Lighting

DARK ACCENTS Deep and rich metal elements create focus and grounding for diverse ixtures.

blue + shape Visual interest comes from both color and shape—here, an intersecting collection of pentagons. Reece, Tech Lighting

black + stained glass black + drum shades Graceful curves dress up this two-light sconce. Lenola, Westinghouse

lighting

®

TM

FASHIONFORWARD FIXTURES TO UP

CRYSTALS These sparkling additions remain an enduring element of light ixtures. Today’s trendforward options continue to mix materials and sizes for additional contrast.

DA TE AN Y RO OM

7mhoett alnew m ixes

2017

p. 87

Ch oo se th e Ri gh t

BU LB

LIGHT IT UP Get your free digital copy of Lighting™ magazine from the American Lighting Association at AmericanLightingAssoc.com.

crystals + minimalism Pared-down curves still look elegant thanks to a vintage gold inish and unfaceted crystals. Chantelle, Quoizel

Tifany-style glass places this lamp squarely in the Arts and Crafts tradition. Sunrays, Quoizel


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spring 2017

11

THE 1,500-CALORIE DAY Ever wonder what minding your calories for gradual weight loss might look like? We put together a day’s worth of recipes to keep you energized and healthy. by caitlyn diimig, rd

recipes by jennifer stack, m.s., rd, cde

photos by adam albright

styling by jennifer peterson

BREAKFAST

DINNER

Coconut-Oat Granola

Lasagna Soup

prep 15 minutes bake 35 minutes at 325°F

prep 20 minutes cook 20 minutes

1/3 3 2 2 1 2 1 1/2 1/2 3 1/2 1/2

1 lb. bulk Italian-lavor turkey sausage or lean ground beef 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup chopped green sweet pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth 1 15-oz. can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained 2 8-oz. cans no-salt-added tomato sauce 2 tsp. dried Italian seasoning, crushed 10 oz. whole wheat lasagna noodles, broken into bite-size pieces 3/4 cup part-skim ricotta cheese 6 Tbsp. inely shredded Parmesan cheese 3 Tbsp. snipped fresh basil 1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper

cup unsweetened applesauce Tbsp. laxseed meal Tbsp. chia seeds Tbsp. pure maple syrup Tbsp. coconut oil tsp. orange zest tsp. vanilla tsp. salt tsp. ground cinnamon cups regular rolled oats cup raw pumpkin seeds (pepitas) cup unsweetened laked coconut, toasted if desired

1. Preheat oven to 325°F. Line a 15×10-

inch baking pan with foil or parchment paper. In a bowl stir together the irst nine ingredients (through cinnamon). Add oats and pepitas; stir to coat. Spread oat mixture in prepared pan; pat lightly. 2. Bake about 35 minutes or until golden, stirring and spreading evenly halfway through. While still warm, stir in coconut. Cool completely. Makes 8 servings (2/3 cup each). To Store Store in an airtight container up to 1 week.

1. In a large pot cook the irst four ingredients (through garlic) over mediumhigh heat until sausage is browned. Drain of fat. Add the next four ingredients (through Italian seasoning). Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 20 minutes. 2. Meanwhile, cook pasta according to package directions; drain. Stir into soup. 3. To serve, spoon ricotta into six bowls. Top with soup. Stir together Parmesan, basil, and crushed red pepper. Sprinkle over soup. Makes 6 servings (13/4 cups each). Simple Swap Go vegetarian by using 3 cups sliced fresh mushrooms for the sausage and vegetable broth for the chicken broth.

per serving 280 cal., 15 g fat (5 g sat. fat), 0 mg chol., 184 mg sodium, 30 g carb., 7 g iber, 5 g sugars, 10 g pro.

MIDMID-MORNING SNACK ½ of an avocado stuffed with ¼ cup tuna salad 207 calories

per serving 415 cal., 11 g fat (4 g sat. fat), 64 mg chol., 840 mg sodium, 49 g carb., 6 g iber, 9 g sugars, 28 g pro.

COCONUT-OAT GRANOLA

LASAGNA SOUP

LUNCH LUNC Chic Chicken, Pineapple, Avocado, and Rice Salad Avoc start to finish 30 minutes star

0||400||500 c || 30

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NUTRITION INFO with Every Recipe

LIVE HEALTHY

You’ll find 200-, 300-, and 500-calorie recipes in Calorie-Smart Recipes™ magazine. Pick up a copy on newsstands today.

1 1/2 1/2 1/4 1 1 2 4

Tbsp. lime juice tsp. canola oil cloves garlic, minced tsp. crushed red pepper lb. skinless, boneless chicken breast, cut into 1/2- to 3/4-inch pieces Nonstick cooking spray tsp. sugar tsp. ground ginger tsp. salt tsp. black pepper ripe avocado, halved, seeded, and peeled 8.8-oz. pkg. cooked brown and wild rice or 2 cups cooked brown rice cups fresh or juice-pack canned pineapple chunks, drained cups fresh spinach

1. In a medium bowl whisk together 1 Tbsp. of

the lime juice, 2 tsp. of the oil, the garlic, and crushed red pepper. Add chicken; toss to coat. 2. Coat a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray. Add chicken and marinade to skillet; cook over medium-high heat 5 to 7 minutes or until browned and done (165°F). Remove from heat.

3. In a medium bowl whisk together the remaining lime juice, remaining oil, the sugar, ginger, salt, and black pepper. Chop half of the avocado. Gently stir chopped avocado into mixture. 4. In a large bowl combine cooked rice, pineapple, cooled chicken, and avocado mixture. Slice the remaining avocado half. Serve rice mixture with sliced avocado and fresh spinach. Makes 4 servings (11/2 cups rice mixture + 1 cup spinach each). per serving 426 cal., 16 g fat (2 g sat. fat), 103 mg chol., 665 mg sodium, 34 g carb., 5 g iber, 10 g sugars, 36 g pro.

AFTERNOON SNACK ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese + ½ cup halved grape tomatoes 108 calories


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spring 2017

From campgrounds to cruises, beaches to big cities, these chart-topping destinations— all approved by families like yours—promise priceless memories. by rani arbo

BEST FOR THEME-PARK FANS Walt Disney World Orlando, Florida How do our readers love you, Walt Disney World? Let us count just a few of the ways. “Nothing compares!” they write. “It never disappoints...excellent customer service…makes us instantly happy to be there...our favorite vacation ever!” To this outpouring of love, veteran park visitor Kristin Harbulak of Stillwater, MN, adds important advice: “Don’t try to it it all in, or you’ll go crazy.” That’s true—and it’s also good to remember that Walt Disney World is as action-illed as your family wants it to be. Harbulak prefers to move slowly and follow her young children’s lead. Other families don’t waste a minute, using the My Disney Experience app to keep track of wait times for big rides, FastPasses to skip lines, and advance reservations for dinners, character breakfasts, and more to bypass the masses. Harbulak recommends starting to plan at least six months ahead to get the reservations you hope for. This summer, Disney’s Animal Kingdom is sure to draw crowds with the opening of Pandora: The World of Avatar. A Star Wars Land is also in progress at Disney’s Hollywood Studios. Park passes start at about $100 per day, but combo packages that include multiday tickets, accommodations, and dining options are often the best way to go. WHERE TO STAY You’ll certainly save money outside the park. But on-resort lodging brings convenience and perks, like use of the park’s transport system (buses, boats, and a monorail) and extra “Magic Hours” for resort guests. Onresort options include a campsite at Fort Wilderness Campground (from $53 a night), a savannah-view deluxe room at Animal Kingdom Lodge (from $319 a night), and the Art of Animation Resort (standard rooms from $124 a night; family suites from $306). GET MORE INFO disneyworld.com RUNNERS-UP Disneyland, Anaheim, CA; Cedar Point, Sandusky, OH; Hersheypark, Hershey, PA

National Park; drive Maui’s winding, 64-mile Hana road with its eagle-eye lookouts; or visit the Maui Ocean Center aquarium. Then spend the evening enjoying music, dancing, storytelling, and heaps of food at the Old Lahaina Luau ($120 for adults and $78 for kids 3–12). WHERE TO STAY Top resorts for families include the Hyatt Regency Maui Resort and Spa (from $321 a night); and Napili Kai Beach Resort (from $442 a night). For a local Hawaiian feel, try the Kaanapali Beach Hotel (from $195) or the Maui Coast Hotel (from $215). GET MORE INFO gohawaii.com/maui RUNNERS-UP Amelia Island, FL; Cape Cod, MA; Grand Haven, MI

BEST FOR CRUISE FANS

Royal Caribbean to the Caribbean

BEST FOR BEACH BUMS

Maui, Hawaii “My kids ask to go back to Hawaii every single year,” says Caryn Bailey of Rancho Santa Margarita, CA. “They’ll frequently say, ‘Remember the sea turtles? Remember the ice cream we got in the coconut shell?’” Hawaii’s tastes, smells, lora, fauna, culture—and, of course, beaches—are a true sensory immersion, and Maui is a great place to dive into it all. The best kid-friendly beaches are Kaanapali Beach by Black Rock, Kapalua Beach, and Napili Beach. When you get enough of hanging by the shore, there are plenty of expeditions to consider. Snorkelers should charter a boat to Molokini crater, a coral reef with 100-foot visibility; good choices for families are Pride of Maui or FourWinds II, which feature glass bottoms and waterslides ($95–$124 per adult, $65–$93 for kids, for a ive-hour excursion). On land, enjoy a sunrise atop the volcano in Haleakala

Allure of the Seas, Oasis of the Seas, and Harmony of the Seas are the largest cruise ships in the world. Almost a quarter-mile long and some 20 stories high, they ofer an activity menu as full as your adrenaline tank: zip lines, climbing walls, waterslides, discos, ice skating, mini golf, pools, suring and skydiving simulators, and encounters with Shrek, Kung Fu Panda, and other DreamWorks movie heroes. If your cruise dreams involve hot tubs, formal dinners, shopping, and Broadway shows, Royal Caribbean’s renowned youth programs put those adult amenities in easy reach. It’s just that activity spread— and the convenience of an all-inclusive vacation at an average of $100 per day, per traveler—that makes cruising so tempting for families. “We spent the days with our kids at the pools and all over the ship,” says Mitzi Morgan of Edmond, OK. “After dinner, the kids insisted on going straight to the Adventure Ocean club, and wanted to stay until it closed at 10 o’clock. They told us not to pick them up!” THE PACKAGE DEAL A seven-night cruise for a family of four on Harmony of the Seas (the leet’s newest and biggest ship) starts at $2,750, including lodging, meals, youth programs, and entertainment. For the best prices, book from January to late March, when Royal Caribbean (along with other cruise lines) rolls out its new itineraries. GET MORE INFO royalcaribbean.com

RUNNERS-UP Disney Cruise Line, Norwegian Cruise Line, Carnival Cruise Line

BEST FOR BUDGET TRAVELERS

Asheville, North Carolina If your perfect Saturday starts on a mountain trail and ends with a locavore dinner and a free outdoor bluegrass concert, then hipster, historic Asheville, NC, is the place for you. Smack in the middle of the wildest stretches of the Southern Appalachians, Asheville brims with easy adventures on the cheap, like hiking trails that start at the Blue Ridge Parkway National Park Visitor Center, exploring lora and fauna at The North Carolina Arboretum, and visiting with black bears, wolves, foxes, and otters at the Western North Carolina Nature

Center. Older kids can try tubing the French Broad River, which runs right through downtown. In summer, Asheville hops with free fun, such as the downtown Pack Square splash pad, art gallery events, crafts demonstrations, festivals, and the Western North Carolina Farmers’ Market. If it rains, head to the Asheville Museum of Science or splurge on a tour of the opulent, 250-room Biltmore Estate ($40–$75 for adults; kids 10–16 are half-price; 9 and under are free). WHERE TO STAY Lodging in Asheville’s high summer season isn’t a particularly great deal, but it’s ofset by a smorgasbord of bargain fun. Weekend rates are quoted here; an early-week visit can net a major discount. Family options include Crowne Plaza Resort (from $230 a night), which is next door to the Adventure Center of Asheville, with zip lines, a mountain bike park, and ropes course; Brookstone Lodge (from $181 a night with a three-night minimum stay), near Asheville’s Fun Depot, with go-karts, mini golf, and Lazer Tag; and the Omni Grove Park Inn (from $350 a night, plus a daily $25 resort charge), with golf, tennis, and children’s programs. Chains like Super 8 and Days Inn ofer budget options. Or check out Airbnb, Homeaway, and VRBO for area rentals. GET MORE INFO exploreasheville.com RUNNERS-UP The Catskills, NY; Clearwater Beach, FL; Door County, WI


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BEST FOR ADVENTURE SEEKERS

Big Sky, Montana “It’s just incredible how many adventures you can pack into a day at Big Sky, and then, to top it of, you’re just an hour from Yellowstone,” says Barbara Rowley, a local resident and veteran FamilyFun contributor. On the slopes of Lone Peak, the privately owned resort also known as Big Sky hits high season in wintertime, when skiers relish more than 5,800 uncrowded acres of slopes. In summer, the area amps up the fun with zip lines, a giant swing, a bungee trampoline, and a climbing wall in the center of town; swimming, paddleboarding, and kayaking on Lake Levinsky; and a mountain ropes course and lift-served biking (try Otter Trail with kids). For adventures on foot, pack a picnic and try the gentle 1.6-mile trail to Ousel Falls or the longer Beehive Basin trail, which climbs steeply to mountain meadows (keep your eyes peeled for foxes, mountain goats, eagles, bears, and wildlowers). River rats can ly-ish the Gallatin River or raft with Geyser Whitewater Expeditions (raftmontana .com). Horse-lovers can ride (and lodge) at 320 Guest Ranch (320ranch.com) or Lone Mountain Ranch (lonemountainranch.com). WHERE TO STAY To save on lodging, stay near the river, about 15 minutes from Mountain Village, at Whitewater Inn (from $215 a night) or Buck’s T-4 (from $229 a night including breakfast). A one-bedroom condo at Village Center starts at $647 a night including resort fees. Reserve at bigskyresort.com. GET MORE INFO bigskyresort.com RUNNERS-UP Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, MN; Blue Mountain Ski Area, Palmerton, PA; Sevierville, TN

CityPass and New York City Explorer Pass for bargains on multiple attraction tickets. WHERE TO STAY Moderate Manhattan hotel rooms range from $150 to $300 a night. The Watson Hotel, with its outdoor rooftop pool, is convenient to Central Park and Times Square. Hampton Inn ofers moderately priced facilities (with free breakfast) all around the Big Apple, including at South Street Seaport (convenient to Ellis Island ferry, The Tenement Museum, Brooklyn Bridge, the inancial district, and Chinatown). GET MORE INFO nycgo.com RUNNERS-UP San Diego; San Francisco; Austin

daily 90-minute lesson costs just $169; a full-day ski or snowboard program (for ages 4–12) costs $127 per day ($157 with rentals). One-day weekend lift tickets are $83 for adults, $65 for teens, $46 for ages 7–12, and free for ages 6 and under. WHERE TO STAY Try Gore Mountain Lodge (from $200 a night weekdays, $252 weekends), The Alpine Lodge (from $179 a night, plus $15 per child), or an apartment with a kitchen at Summit at Gore Mountain, which ofers an indoor pool ($888 for two nights). GET MORE INFO goremountain.com RUNNERS-UP Boyne Mountain, Boyne Falls, MI; Crested Butte, CO; Snowshoe, WV

BEST FOR HISTORY BUFFS

Washington D.C.

BEST FOR AVID INSTAGRAMMERS

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona To capture the most awe-inspiring images, bring a preschooler! “My four-year-old woke up at 5 a.m.,” reported Jen Canning of Pittsford, NY. “I laid there wishing I could go back to sleep, and then thought, no, we should get up and see the sunrise!” And get up they did, making it to Mather Point in time for a spectacular dawn. Bringing her preschooler and 7-year-old to the edge of a mile-deep chasm made Canning’s stomach lutter, but she took things slowly and easily, and was surprised at how safe it felt. Her kids rocked a 1.5-mile hike to Ooh Ahh Point, spotted mountain goats and elk, learned about local Native American culture, heard a ranger talk at Yavapai Geology Museum, and earned Junior Ranger badges. Entrance is $30 per car, or $15 per person if arriving by foot, shuttle bus, railway, or bike (purchase tickets in Tusayan, Williams, or at the park). WHERE TO STAY South Rim options include El Tovar (from $263 a night), Thunderbird Lodge (from $225 a night), Kachina Lodge (from $225 a night), and Maswik Lodge (from $112 a night); book all four at grandcanyonlodges.com. GET MORE INFO nps.gov/grca RUNNERS-UP Hawaii; Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, MI; Big Sur, CA

BEST FOR SKI BUMS Gore Mountain Ski Resort, North Creek, New York This one was the big surprise—and the hidden gem—of our 2017 survey. A state-owned ski resort on 439 acres within the Adirondack Wilderness Preserve, New York’s Gore Mountain feels like a local hangout while ofering some of the largest, wildest, and emptiest terrain in the East. You won’t ind slopeside condos, an après-ski scene, or fancy food here, but you will ind uncrowded trails on four peaks, gorgeous Adirondack views, excellent glade skiing (for experts), low prices, and nonexistent lift lines. While only 10 percent of the mountain is ranked for beginners, ski and snowboard schools get newbies onto the blue trails (where the mountain really shines) quickly and cheaply. A three-day intro program (ages 13 and up) with rentals, lift tickets, and a

A day in Washington, D.C., is the best sort of history lesson, the kind that whizzes by before you even realize you’ve learned something. For starters, it’s where government actually happens. Take a White House tour to see where the president lives (book through your congressperson 21 days to three months in advance) or choose a touchscreen tour at the National Park’s free White House Visitor Center next door. Other tours include the Capitol (book online at visitthecapitol.gov), the Library of Congress, the National Archives (home to the Declaration of Independence), and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (watch stacks of bills roll through the printers). As if that weren’t enough, the city’s spectacular and (mostly) free museums and public monuments ofer a great way to dig deep into topics from astronomy to African-American history. Top picks include the National Museum of Natural History, the National Museum of the American Indian, and the National Postal Museum. The new National Museum of African American History & Culture is so popular that you’ll need a timed ticket to enter (book on the museum’s website the day of your visit). Then check out nps.gov/nama for a map and guide to the monuments on the National Mall. When your crew is full up on history, head to the National Zoo to meet three of D.C.’s most famous residents: the giant pandas Mei Xiang, Tian Tian, and Bei Bei.

WHERE TO STAY For a hotel near the Mall and Capitol, try Holiday Inn Capitol or Residence Inn Capitol, both with pools (rooms range from $109 to $399 a night). GET MORE INFO washington.org RUNNERS-UP Mackinac Island, MI; Boston; San Simeon, CA

BEST FOR CAMPERS

Yellowstone National Park In the northwest corner of Wyoming sits Yellowstone’s bubbling landscape of geysers, mud pots, and sulfurous vents. “I have hilarious photos of my kids holding their noses because of the smell by Mammoth Hot Springs,” laughs Sara Kearsley of Portland, OR. They irst visited when her kids were 7 and 8 years old, good ages to safely navigate boardwalks near geothermal features and to earn their Junior Ranger badges by soaking up facts about park wildlife and geology. The family savored ice cream cones while Old Faithful erupted; explored Artist Point and the waterfalls at Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, and marveled at the big game that inally showed up in the Lamar Valley. “I told them in advance about all the animals we’d see,” Kearsley says. “But on our irst day, we didn’t see a single one, until 7 in the evening, when everything came out: elk, bison, bear, and moose. It was amazing!” WHERE TO STAY With a 142-mile driving loop prone to bison- and bear-induced traic jams, you’ll be spending time on the road to park highlights, no matter where you stay. Campsites at the seven parkservice campgrounds cost $15–$20 a night and are irst-come, irst served (and ill by early morning). Sites at four privately run campgrounds and one RV park cost $24–$48 a night, which includes access to grocery stores, gas stations, showers, and laundry facilities. Reserve those sites—as well as park cabins (from $90 to $210 a night) and lodge rooms (from $90 to $428 a night)—up to 12 months in advance at yellowstonenationalparklodges.com. GET MORE INFO nps.gov/yell RUNNERS-UP Great Smoky Mountains National Park, NC and TN; Acadia National Park, Mount Desert, ME; Custer State Park, Custer, SD

BEST FOR CITY SLICKERS V E L AWA

GRE AT MEM ORIES

10 BEST EVER

STA RT HER E

VACATIONS!

EASTER DESSER TS T H D AYINS PIRED C RAFTS F O O L’ S IDEAS MONEY

BUNNY COOKIES! PINK PUNC H!

SWEET REC IPES PERFECT FOR EASTER

4 COOL UPCYCL CR AFTS ED

GA

It just doesn’t get more iconic than New York City, whether you’re downing a giant pastrami sandwich at Katz’s Delicatessen on the Lower East Side, riding the subway, sampling dim sum in Chinatown, visiting the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, or staring down an Egyptian mummy at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. New York is a cosmopolitan, international feast for all the senses. Scottie Vosburgh of Loudoun County, VA, visits regularly with her four kids (ages 6–20) for the museums and Broadway shows. “People say New York isn’t friendly, but it is. Someone is always willing to give you directions! We also ask the locals where they like to eat—their suggestions are always diferent, and they are all good,” she notes. If your family plans to hit top tourist spots like the Empire State Building and the 9/11 Memorial & Museum, check out

2017

New York City

NOVEM2017 APRIL BER

2017 FamilyFun Travel Awards!

5-MINU APRIL FOOLTE ’S TRICKS YOU CAN TOTALLY PU LL THESE OFF !

PL AYFUL WAYS TO TEACH MONEY SMARTS

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KEEP KIDS IN MIND For travel, crafts, and holiday fun, subscribe to Family Fun® magazine at BHG.com/Mag for just $5.99 a year, or pick up a copy on newsstands.


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A HEALTHY CATCH Don’t let preparing seafood and ish intimidate you and landlock your cooking. Try one of these coastal classics from the Northeast. The omega-3 fats will boost your heart health and lower your risk of type 2 diabetes with each bite. by caitlyn diimig, rd

recipes by jennifer stack, m.s., rd, cde

photos by adam albright

styling by jennifer peterson

Crispy Fish and Chips hands on 25 min. total 50 min.

1/2 1/4 2 3 1 1 4

1 21/2

cup plain fat-free Greek yogurt cup sliced green onions tsp. lime juice cups packaged shredded coleslaw mix lb. sweet potatoes, cut into 1/2-inch wedges tsp. chili powder 4-oz. fresh or thawed frozen whiteish illets, such as haddock or cod, 1 inch thick egg, lightly beaten cups pufed corn cereal or cornlakes, crushed

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. For slaw, in a

medium bowl combine yogurt, green onions, lime juice, 1/2 tsp. kosher salt, and 1/4 tsp. black pepper. Stir in coleslaw mix. Cover and chill. 2. Line a 15×10-inch baking pan with foil; lightly coat with nonstick cooking spray. Place sweet potatoes in the prepared pan. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp. olive oil and sprinkle with chili powder and 1/4 tsp. kosher salt; toss to coat. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until tender and browned. 3. Meanwhile, rinse ish; pat dry. In a shallow dish combine egg and 1 Tbsp. water. In another shallow dish combine crushed cereal, 1/4 tsp. kosher salt, and 1/4 tsp. black pepper. Dip ish in egg mixture, then in cereal mixture, turning to coat. 4. In a 10-inch oven-going skillet heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil over medium-high. Add ish; cook just until golden. Turn ish. Transfer skillet to oven; bake 15 minutes or until ish lakes easily. Serve with potatoes and slaw. Makes 4 servings.

CRISPY FISH AND CHIPS

per serving (1 ish illet + 4 oz. potato wedges + 1/2 cup slaw each) cal 366, fat 10 g (2 g sat. fat), chol 103 mg, sodium 564 mg, carb 40 g (6 g iber, 9 g sugars), pro 29 g

NEW ENGLAND-STYLE HEARTY CLAM CHOWDER

New England-Style Hearty Clam Chowder total 35 min.

2 1 1 2 1/2 1/2 1/4 2 1/2 2 1 1/2 4

Tbsp. unsalted butter cup chopped onion cup chopped celery cloves garlic, minced tsp. dried thyme, crushed cup dry white wine or 2 Tbsp. lemon juice cup all-purpose lour cups low-fat (1%) milk cup unsalted vegetable stock or reduced-sodium chicken broth cups frozen baby lima beans, thawed 10-oz. can whole baby clams, undrained cup snipped fresh Italian parsley slices lower-sodium, less-fat bacon, crisp-cooked and coarsely crumbled

1. In a large saucepan melt butter over

medium. Add onion and celery; cook 5 minutes or until tender, stirring occasionally. Add garlic, thyme, and 1/4 tsp. black pepper; cook and stir 2 minutes. If using wine, remove pan from heat and carefully add to saucepan. Return to heat and cook until nearly evaporated. 2. Sprinkle with lour; cook and stir 1 minute. Stir in milk and stock. Bring just to boiling. Cook and stir until sightly thick. Stir in beans, clams, 1/4 cup of the parsley, and, if using, the lemon juice; heat through. 3. Top servings with bacon and the remaining 1/4 cup parsley. Makes 4 servings. per serving (11/3 cups each) cal 378, fat 10 g (5 g sat. fat), chol 76 mg, sodium 577 mg, carb 42 g (7 g iber, 9 g sugars), pro 26 g

SALMON AND CRAB CAKES

Salmon and Crab Cakes total 45 min.

1/2 1 3/4 1/2 1/2 1/4 1 2 1 1/2 1

cup regular rolled oats lemon cup panko bread crumbs cup inely chopped onion cup inely chopped celery cup light mayonnaise egg, lightly beaten Tbsp. snipped fresh dill tsp. Dijon-style mustard tsp. black pepper 6-oz. pouch refrigerated lump crabmeat, drained and laked 2 2.5-oz. pouches skinless, boneless pink salmon, laked

4 1/2 2 1

cups baby arugula cup plain fat-free Greek yogurt Tbsp. snipped fresh chives Tbsp. fat-free milk Dash salt

1. Grind oats in a food processor. Remove 1 tsp. zest and squeeze juice from lemon. In a large bowl stir together ground oats, 1 tsp. of the lemon juice, 1/4 cup of the bread crumbs, and the next seven ingredients (through pepper). Add crab and salmon; stir gently just until combined (do not over mix). 2. Place the remaining 1/2 cup bread crumbs in a shallow dish. Shape crab mixture into eight patties. Dip patties in bread crumbs, turning to coat.

3. In a 10-inch skillet heat 2 tsp. olive oil

over medium. Add half of the patties; cook 6 minutes, turning once. Remove from skillet; keep warm. Repeat with another 2 tsp. olive oil and remaining patties. 4. In a large bowl whisk together 1 Tbsp. of the lemon juice and 2 tsp. olive oil. Add arugula; toss to coat. In a bowl combine lemon zest and the remaining ingredients. Serve cakes with arugula and yogurt sauce. Makes 4 servings. per serving (2 cakes + 1 cup arugula + 2 Tbsp. yogurt sauce each) cal 308, fat 15 g (3 g sat. fat), chol 107 mg, sodium 535 mg, carb 20 g (2 g iber, 4 g sugars), pro 22 g


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SCALLOPS AND SUCCOTASH

SEAFOOD BOIL

Seafood Boil hands on 30 min. total 40 min.

8 oz. fresh or thawed frozen shrimp in shells 8 oz. fresh or thawed frozen skinless salmon illets 2 Tbsp. olive oil 3 oz. cooked Italian-style chicken sausage, halved lengthwise and sliced 1/2 inch thick 11/2 cups sliced celery 1 cup coarsely chopped red onion 1 cup water 1 cup dry white wine or 3/4 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth + 2 Tbsp. white wine vinegar 2 sprigs fresh parsley 1 tsp. celery seeds 1/2 tsp. paprika 1/2 tsp. black pepper 1/4 tsp. kosher salt 1/4 tsp. cayenne pepper 12 live clams in shells, scrubbed and soaked* 2 large ears of corn, each cut into 3 chunks 3 Tbsp. snipped fresh parsley 6 1-oz. slices French bread, toasted

SHRIMP LETTUCE ROLLS

1. Devein shrimp, but do not peel. Rinse shrimp and salmon; pat dry. Cut salmon into six pieces. 2. In a 5-qt. Dutch oven heat oil over medium. Add sausage; cook and stir 3 minutes. Add celery and onion; cook 5 minutes or just until tender, stirring occasionally. 3. Stir in the next eight ingredients (through cayenne pepper). Bring to boiling. Add clams and corn. Return to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 4 minutes. Stir in shrimp and salmon. Simmer, covered, 4 to 5 minutes more or until clam shells open, shrimp are opaque, and salmon lakes easily. Discard any clams that do not open. 4. Top servings with parsley and, if desired, additional paprika. Serve with toasted bread. *Tip To clean live clams, scrub clams in shells under cold running water. In a large container combine 8 cups cold water and 21/2 Tbsp. salt; add clams. Soak 15 minutes; drain and rinse. Discard water. Repeat soaking, draining, and rinsing twice. Makes 6 servings. per serving (2 cups each) cal 334, fat 10 g (2 g sat. fat), chol 101 mg, sodium 566 mg, carb 28 g (3 g iber, 6 g sugars), pro 27 g

Scallops and Succotash hands on 25 min. total 50 min.

2 3 2 1

medium red sweet peppers Tbsp. lemon juice cloves garlic, minced cup each thawed frozen cut green beans and baby lima beans 1/2 cup each thawed frozen edamame, peas, and whole kernel corn 8 fresh or thawed frozen sea scallops (about 1 lb.) 2 Tbsp. snipped fresh basil 1. Preheat broiler. Cut sweet peppers in half lengthwise; remove stems, seeds, and membranes. Place peppers, cut sides down, on a foil-lined baking sheet. Broil 6 inches from heat 10 minutes or until charred. Wrap foil around peppers. Let stand 15 minutes or until cool enough to handle. Peel and discard skins. 2. For vinaigrette, in a jar combine lemon juice, 2 Tbsp. olive oil, the garlic,

Shrimp Lettuce Rolls total 45 min.

per serving (2 lettuce rolls each) cal 197, fat 7 g (2 g sat. fat), chol 169 mg, sodium 359 mg, carb 9 g (1 g iber, 3 g sugars), pro 23 g

ring 2017

Real Food.

Simple Ingr edients.

35 LOW-CARB RECIPES

BOOST YOUR

HEALTH

EAT MORE SEAFOOD

Crispy Fish and Chips, p. 76

10

ways to PROTECT YOUR HEART

Spring 2017

$5.99 U.S.

om

Display until May Vol. 14, No. 9 1

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medium bowl toss bread with melted butter and dash black pepper. Spread in a 15×10-inch baking pan. Bake 30 minutes or until bread is golden and crisp, stirring once. Cool in pan on a wire rack. 2. Peel and devein shrimp. Rinse shrimp; pat dry. In a large saucepan combine 1 cup water, 1/2 cup of the celery, 1/4 cup of the fennel, the wine, bay leaf, and garlic. Bring to boiling. Stir in shrimp; reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 3 to 4 minutes or until shrimp are opaque. Remove shrimp; cool. Coarsely chop shrimp.

3. In a blender or food processor combine the next six ingredients (through mustard). Cover and blend until smooth. In a bowl combine chopped shrimp, the remaining 1/2 cup celery and 1/4 cup fennel, and the carrot. Stir in tofu mixture. Spoon onto lettuce leaves and top with croutons and fennel fronds. Makes 4 servings.

DiabeticLiv

1. Preheat oven to 300°F. For croutons, in a

per serving (2 scallops + 2/3 cup succotash + 1/4 cup sauce each) cal 340, fat 13 g (2 g sat. fat), chol 37 mg, sodium 439 mg, carb 29 g (7 g iber, 6 g sugars), pro 27 g

DIABETIC LIVI NG

1 cup 1/4- to 1/2-inch cubes Italian bread (1 oz.) 1 Tbsp. butter, melted 1 lb. fresh or thawed frozen medium shrimp in shells 1 cup inely chopped celery 2 Tbsp. coarsely snipped fennel fronds (set aside) 1/2 cup inely chopped fennel 1/2 cup dry white wine or 2 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 bay leaf 1 clove garlic, sliced 1/2 of a 12-oz. pkg. soft silken-style tofu 2 Tbsp. light mayonnaise 1 Tbsp. cider vinegar 1 tsp. reduced-sodium seafood seasoning, such as Old Bay 1 tsp. honey 1/2 tsp. Dijon-style mustard 1/4 cup shredded carrot 8 butterhead lettuce leaves

and1/4 tsp. each kosher salt and black pepper; cover and shake. For sauce, in a blender combine sweet peppers and 3 Tbsp. of the vinaigrette; blend until smooth. 3. For succotash, coat a 10-inch skillet with nonstick cooking spray; heat over medium-high. Add green beans, lima beans, edamame, peas, and corn. Cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the remaining vinaigrette; heat through. Transfer to a bowl; cover. 4. Rinse scallops; pat dry. Sprinkle with 1/2 tsp. kosher salt and 1/4 tsp. black pepper. In skillet heat 1 Tbsp. olive oil over mediumhigh. Add scallops; cook 4 minutes or until opaque and golden, turning once. Serve scallops on sauce with succotash and basil. Makes 4 servings.

TABLE FOR

TWO Italian Clas sics

LIVE YOUR LIFE Take charge of your diabetes. Subscribe at DiabeticLivingOnline.com/Sub and get 2 years for the price of 1, plus a free cookbook. Or pick up a copy of Diabetic Living® magazine, on newsstands today.


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OPTIMISM: Harness Its Real Power The old thinking that always looking through rose-color glasses will make life blissful is just that—old. And it can backire. This modern, saner, smarter approach will make you healthier, happier, and more successful. by mirel ketchiff

You’ve heard that being positive is good for you. When your mood is upbeat, you feel happy and energized. You’re healthier, too: Recent research shows that optimists recover from illness faster, have stronger immune systems, and live longer. That’s probably because “they deal better with stress than other people,” says Carsten Wrosch, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Psychology at Concordia University. “When pessimists are more tense or anxious than usual, their levels of damaging cortisol—a stress hormone— shoot up. But that doesn’t happen for optimists. Their resiliency protects them.” Yet sometimes looking on the bright side just feels wrong. If you get a traic ticket on your way to work, spill cofee all over your favorite shirt, and show up late to an important meeting, it seems impossible (and even a little ridiculous) to try to maintain a positive frame of mind. On this your instincts are spot-on. Experts are inding that Pollyanna-ish, think-happy-thoughts-no-matter-what optimism is not only fake but can also be bad for your health. Tal Ben-Shahar, Ph.D., a lecturer on positive psychology, calls the phenomenon detached optimism—as in detached from reality. “Detached optimism is the belief that in challenging situations, everything will just work out. Problem is, many times it doesn’t,” he says. It’s the equivalent of wanting to get it, joining a gym, then just expecting the muscles to appear. What you should be striving for is grounded optimism: the belief that with efort and dedication, you can overcome most challenges, Ben-Shahar says. Grounded optimists know how to use their positive expectations as fuel to achieve their goals, making them happier, healthier, and more successful than other people. The good news is that while studies show 25–30 percent of optimism is genetic, the rest comes from upbringing and life experiences, which means you can learn to become a grounded optimist. Now get started.

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Map out your goals “One of the easiest ways to increase grounded optimism is to plan out speciic events to anticipate in the future,” says Tali Sharot, Ph.D., author of The Optimism Bias. They can be as small as signing up for a fun weekend workout class or organizing drinks with friends.

But bigger milestones are equally important: Schedule next year’s vacation or commit to a long-term itness goal, like learning how to rock climb. “You should always be looking forward to something,” Sharot says. It’s good for your mood, keeps your motivation strong, and helps you bounce back from setbacks. Imagine yourself enjoying your achievement, too. Having a clear mental picture of your experience makes you more likely to put the work into getting there. But be OK with plan B—and C While optimists are tenacious, “if it becomes clear that a goal can’t be attained, they disengage and cut their losses faster than pessimists,” Wrosch says. “Since optimists expect good things to happen in the future, when they realize that something is unrealistic, they identify the alternatives and feel OK with deviating from their original goal,” he explains. To set yourself up for success, it can help to build in alternatives early on. Rather than focusing on achieving one speciic goal, create A, B, and C goals for yourself. Your A goal is your ideal (go to the gym ive times a week), your B goal is something that falls short but that you would still be happy with (do at least 20 minutes of yoga at home), and your C goal is the betterthan-nothing option (do something active once a day, even if it’s just a ive-minute walk). That way, if it becomes clear halfway through the week that goal A isn’t happening, B and C are within easy reach. Look for opportunities, not silver linings A dark cloud is a dark cloud. Instead of trying to see every obstacle as a blessing in disguise, accept it for what it is, but remind yourself that it’s temporary and that eventually things will get better. “If you expect a situation to work out in a way that ultimately beneits you, you’ll be willing to invest a lot of efort and resources in it even if you experience some bumps along the way,” Wrosch says. For instance, say an injury keeps you out of the gym for weeks, derailing your training goals. A pessimist would give up then and there. But a grounded optimist reminds herself that while she feels disappointed, she’ll reach her goal—just a little later than planned. Then she igures out what she can do to get past the problem, like seeing a specialist, signing up for physical therapy, or doing low-impact workouts like swimming. In essence, your mind-set is always forward-thinking and driven, keeping you excited for a future success.


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Propose a Toast Whether you need a showstopping breakfast or simply want to make Mom feel special on Mother’s Day, we’ve got three versions that we guarantee will surprise everyone at the table. photos by quentin bacon

Raspberry CheesecakeStufed French Toast armagazine.com/raspberrycheesecake-stufed-french-toast 4 11/2 11/2 1/4 11/2 1/4 1/4 4 12

3 3 11/2 1/4 1

RASPBERRY CHEESECAKESTUFFED FRENCH TOAST

large eggs cups milk tsp. vanilla extract cup white sugar tsp. cinnamon tsp. salt cup raspberry jam oz. cream cheese, softened (11/4-inch-thick) diagonal slices French bread [From our kitchen: We found that an inexpensive supermarket loaf works best.] Tbsp. butter Tbsp. vegetable oil Tbsp. powdered sugar to 1/2 tsp. nutmeg (6-oz.) container fresh raspberries or blackberries

1. Preheat oven to 300°F. Whisk eggs

well in a deep bowl, then whisk in milk, vanilla, sugar, cinnamon, and salt until well blended. 2. Stir together jam and cream cheese in a small bowl until smooth. Cut a horizontal slit into the side of each piece of bread to make a pocket. Spread a scant tablespoon raspberry-cheese mixture in each pocket. 3. Submerge 1 stufed bread slice in egg mixture, turning over several times, until saturated, 10 to 15 seconds, then transfer to a rimmed baking sheet. Repeat with remaining stufed slices. Pour any remaining egg mixture over bread and let sit 10 minutes to absorb. [From our kitchen: Bread can be soaked overnight, covered, and chilled. Bring to room temperature before cooking.] 4. Heat 1 Tbsp. each butter and oil in a large skillet over medium heat until foam subsides. Working in batches of 4, cook bread slices until well-browned on both sides, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a clean baking sheet and keep warm in oven. Cook remaining bread slices in remaining butter and oil. 5. To serve, dust with powdered sugar and nutmeg and top with berries. per 2-piece serving: 533 cal; 26g fat (10.8g sat); 14.6g pro; 61g carb; 3.7g iber; 666mg sodium; 164mg chol

French toast can be made 1 hour ahead and kept at room temperature, then reheated in a 350°F oven for 10 to 15 minutes. over several times, until saturated, 5 to 10 seconds, then transfer to a rimmed baking sheet. Pour remaining egg mixture over top of sandwiches and let sit 10 minutes to absorb. [From our kitchen: Sandwiches can be soaked overnight, covered, and chilled. Bring to room temperature before cooking.] 3. Heat 1 Tbsp. each butter and oil in a large skillet over medium heat until foam subsides. Working in batches of 2, cook sandwiches until cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a clean baking sheet and keep warm in oven.

ALMOND FRENCH TOAST

per 1-sandwich serving: 508 cal; 26.8g fat (7.8g sat); 14.2g pro; 54g carb; 4g iber; 522mg sodium; 163mg chol

PBJ FRENCH TOAST

Almond French Toast armagazine.com/almond-frenchtoast 3/4 4 11/2 1/4

1/4 1 1/2 12 3 3 11/2

cup sliced almonds large eggs cups milk cup white sugar (optional) [From our kitchen: We found that a little bit of sugar enhanced the almond lavor, but if you like to use a lot of maple syrup on your French toast, you’ll probably want to omit.] tsp. salt tsp. vanilla extract tsp. almond extract (11/4-inch-thick) diagonal slices French bread Tbsp. butter Tbsp. vegetable oil Tbsp. powdered sugar

1. Preheat oven to 300°F. Spread almonds

on a plate.

2. Whisk eggs well in a deep bowl, then whisk in milk, white sugar (if using), salt, vanilla, and almond extract. Submerge each slice of bread in mixture, turning over several times, until saturated, 10 to 15 seconds. Press 1 side of each soaked bread slice in almonds to coat, then transfer, almond side up, to a rimmed baking sheet. Fill any blank spots on top of bread with remaining almonds. Pour remaining egg mixture over bread and let sit 10 minutes to absorb. [From our kitchen: Bread can be soaked overnight, covered, and chilled. Bring to room temperature before cooking.] 3. Heat 1 Tbsp. each butter and oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Working in batches of 4, invert bread slices, starting with almond sides down, in skillet and cook until cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Transfer to a clean baking sheet and keep warm in oven. Cook remaining bread slices in remaining butter and oil in same manner. Dust with powdered sugar before serving.

per 2-piece serving: 480 cal; 25g fat (7.3g sat); 15.5g pro; 49g carb; 2.8g iber; 602mg sodium; 145mg chol FROM

®

THE WORLD’S

19 MILLION

MEMBERS &

COUNTING!

LARGEST FOO D COMMUN

ITY

PBJ French Toast armagazine.com/pbj-french-toast 6 12 6 4 1 1/4 1/2 1/4 3 3

Tbsp. peanut butter slices challah or brioche bread Tbsp. mixed berry jam large eggs cup milk cup sugar tsp. vanilla extract tsp. salt Tbsp. butter Tbsp. vegetable oil

1. Preheat oven to 300°F. Spread 1 Tbsp. peanut butter onto 1 side of 6 bread slices, then 1 Tbsp. jam onto 1 side of remaining 6 bread slices. Make 6 sandwiches. 2. Whisk eggs in a deep bowl, then whisk in milk, sugar, vanilla, and salt. Submerge each sandwich into egg mixture, turning

MAGAZIN® E

strawberry from cake todesserts cookies

p.90

fast & fresh!

power salad simple soupss, stir-fries, & more

5 twists on french toast

p.39

let your foo make dinnerd processor tonight APRIL / MAY

2017

THE BEST FLAVORS FROM HOME COOKS For more delicious recipes for special meals, pick up Allrecipes® magazine where magazines are sold.


better

18 spring 2017

Square Space Sneak a workstation into a sliver of space with this slim setup created from wooden wine boxes and a do-it-yourself desk mounted to the wall. story and projects by meredith ladik

photos by adam albright

Recruit a bare wall as a light-duty workstation and storage hub. Anchor the space with a wall-hung desk built from shelf brackets and MDF (see below for how-to). Use it as a perch for crafting, bill paying, and more. Plot storage on the wall horizontally and vertically and position one to hold a desk lamp. For sliding-door pulls, equip a drill with a 28-inch hole saw and bore holes in a lid’s corner.

Check out this link to learn how to rabbet. WoodMagazine.com/ RabbetEdges

No-Build Cabinets Slide-top wooden boxes (10×5×5 inches; $20; woodthings.com) used to ship wine bottles morph into wall storage for lightweight supplies. Adapt the boxes to it your stash: Use the box’s slat dividers as shelves, or remove the dividers to store tall items. Install a curtain tension rod, below, to prop up writing supplies. To hang each box, drill holes into the corners and screw through holes and into the wall using drywall anchors.

Hang your desk at a comfortable height—27–46 inches from the loor is best.

DESKTOP HOW-TO A

4-inch medium-density iberboard (MDF) cut into the following pieces in your desired dimensions (our inished desk is 44×12×5 inches). Rabbeted edges, as shown, are optional. 2 sides, each with its short back edge cut with a rabbeted proile 2 long boards for the top and bottom, each with rabbeted proiles along the long back edges and sides 1 long, slim board for the back, cut to the dimensions of the rabbeted opening 1 center divider Wood glue, nails, hammer 3 shelf brackets Sandpaper or sanding block Primer and paint

• •

SPRING 2017

B

Materials

®

ID E AS UN DE R $2 0

D

A hole in the desk bottom and a wallhung cord clip tame cables.

Step 2 Join sides (B) and center divider (C) to base using glue and nails.

Step 3 Install back (D), followed by the top. Sand, prime, and paint. Install brackets into wall studs. Place desktop on brackets, and screw up and into place.

DO IT YOUR SELF

a snug it, make recessed rabbet cuts along the edges of the pieces as noted. Using a hole saw, cut an opening for cables in the base, if desired. Cut a channel for the divider in the center of top and bottom pieces.

Special Interes t Publications

Step 1 Cut MDF to desired sizes (A). For

& Gardens

C

• • • •

BYE-BYE, BORING

TM

Hello, Beautiful! BEFORE

& AFTER

EASY PROJ ECTS TO MAKE OV ANY ROOM ER THIS WE EKEN

REVIVE OUTDOOR FURNITURE

EMB ELLIS H A BA S I C FR A M E

D

ON A BU DGET

GIVE P I L LOWS A CO LOR DIP

15 THRIFTY KITCHEN UPGRADES

S T RIP & PA I N T A DAT E D B E N CH

Spring 2017 Vol. 24/Issue 1

BHG.com/

DIY

MORE PROJECTS! Create a personal look with the fresh ideas and know-how in Do It Yourself™ magazine. Subscribe at BHG.com/ DIYMag, or buy it on newsstands now.


better

spring 2017

THE POWER OF FLOWERS Their brilliant colors and textures perk up your garden and your tabletop, but what about your food? We’ll show you which blooms can be used to add style and spark to everything from ice cubes to desserts.

1

1 Butter-Lover Snip the petals of

2

3

bright lowers such as edible orchids, and stir them into softened butter with honey or spices. Spread onto crostini or crackers.

2 Ready to Roll Soften rice papers and ill them with cooked rice noodles, cut-up veggies, and colorful blooms and petals. If desired, serve with soy sauce for dipping.

3 Sky High Just before presenting a tall layer cake, arrange fresh blooms such as edible hibiscus on the top and trailing down the sides.

4 Pretty Pops Pour lemonade or another beverage into frozen pop molds. Push an edible lower into each mold. Freeze as directed for a cool treat.

4

5

6

5 Cheers Float colorful lowers in cocktails, lemonade, or any other celebratory drink.

6 Morning Meal Top (or layer) a fruit parfait with pretty lowers such as violas.

7 Iced Over Fill an ice cube tray with water (or lemonade or tea), and press one or two small blooms into each section. Freeze until solid. Use the cubes in any cocktail or drink. 7

Eat Your Blooms

C CO OO OK KIN ING GW WIT ITH H

FRESH HER BS 80 FLA AVORFUL W AYS

totoCo Cook ok, ,Ba Bake ke,,D Drrin k& ink &FrFree eeze zeHe rbrb He ss

& Gardens

NEW W IDE NE IDEAS AS::

Special Intere st Publications

Cook okies ies, Co Jams ms , &Ja More! & re! mo p. 87

Gr Grow ow aaPo Pottof of Pesto sto Pe p.

COOKING WITH

p. 1858

S

FRESH HERB

You can grow an assortment of edible lowers in your own garden (never use toxic sprays, pesticides, or fertilizers if you intend to snack on the blossoms), or you can order them from reputable dealers—such as gourmetsweetbotanicals.com— who ship clamshell packages of both speciic lowers and assorted blooms. Important to note: While many blooms are considered edible, not all of them taste great (like common marigolds, which are slightly bitter). So before you add petals to any dishes, sample them irst to decide which ones you like best. Here are our top picks for edible blooms:

2017 Display until July

10

BHG.com

Roses Violas and pansies Edible hibiscus Nasturtium Calendula Lavender The lowers of edible herbs Orchids Daylilies Squash blossoms Borage

$9.99 U.S.

• • • • • • • • • • •

FRESH FLAVORS! Pick up Cooking with Fresh Herbs™ magazine, on newsstands now, for more recipes and ideas.

®

TM

19


better

20 spring 2017

Make to Take It’s potluck season, and you’re on the hook to bring a dish. Sound familiar? Don’t stress. These slow cooker recipes—both sides and mains—are road-tested and party-approved to guarantee an empty dish for the ride home. Spicy Spring Picnic Pork prep 15 minutes slow cook 8 to 10 hours

(low) or 4 to 5 hours (high) 2

1 1 1 8

to 21/2-lb. boneless pork shoulder, trimmed of fat Salt and black pepper large sweet onion, cut into thin wedges 18- to 20-oz. bottle hot and spicy barbecue sauce (about 13/4 cups) cup Dr Pepper carbonated beverage (not diet) hamburger buns, toasted Desired toppings, such as prepared coleslaw, pickles, and/or mustard

SPICY SPRING PICNIC PORK

1. If necessary, cut meat to it into a 31/2- or 4-qt. slow cooker. Sprinkle meat with salt and pepper. Place onion wedges in cooker; top with meat. In a medium bowl stir together barbecue sauce and carbonated beverage; pour over meat in cooker. 2. Cover and cook on low 8 to 10 hours or high 4 to 5 hours. Transfer meat to a cutting board. Shred meat using two forks. Using a slotted spoon, remove onions from cooking liquid and add to meat. Pour cooking liquid from slow cooker into a glass measuring cup or bowl; skim fat from cooking liquid. Return pork and onions to slow cooker; add enough cooking liquid to moisten meat mixture. 3. To serve, use a slotted spoon to pile meat mixture onto buns; add toppings. Makes 8 sandwiches. per sandwich 378 cal., 8 g fat (3 g sat. fat), 73 mg chol., 1,355 mg sodium, 45 g carb., 1 g iber, 27 g pro.

SPICY CREAMED CORN

Spicy Creamed Corn prep 20 minutes slow cook 3 to 32 hours

+ 20 minutes (low) 3 16-oz. pkg. frozen whole kernel corn 2 7-oz. cans mild ire-roasted whole green chile peppers, drained and chopped 1 8-oz. tub cream cheese spread with jalapeño 4 oz. plain cream cheese, softened 1 cup chopped onion 2 Tbsp. sugar 4 cloves garlic, minced 11/2 tsp. salt 3/4 tsp. black pepper 2 cups shredded Chihuahua cheese (8 oz.) 2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar 1 Tbsp. olive oil 2 tsp. sugar 21/2 cups halved cherry tomatoes 3 Tbsp. snipped fresh cilantro 1. In a 5-qt. slow cooker combine the irst six ingredients (through the 2 Tbsp. sugar), 3 of the garlic cloves, 1 tsp. of the salt, and 1/2 tsp. of the black pepper. 2. Cover; cook on low 3 to 31/2 hours or until heated through, stirring once halfway through cooking. Stir in Chihuahua cheese until combined. Cover and cook on low 10 minutes more. Stir to combine. 3. Meanwhile, for tomato relish, in a medium bowl combine the next three ingredients (through the 2 tsp. sugar) and the remaining garlic clove, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. black pepper. Stir in tomatoes and cilantro. 4. To serve, top creamed corn with tomato relish and, if desired, additional cilantro leaves. Makes 12 servings.

per ¾-cup serving 312 cal., 17 g fat (9 g sat. fat), 51 mg chol., 646 mg sodium, 33 g carb., 4 g iber, 10 g pro.

MEDITERRANEAN WHEAT BERRY SALAD

1/2 1/4 1 1/4

tsp. ground cumin tsp. garlic salt lb. chopped cooked chicken cup crumbled feta cheese (1 oz.)

1. In a 4- to 5-qt. slow cooker combine broth, tomatoes, and wheat berries. Cover and cook on low 71/2 to 8 hours or until wheat berries are tender. 2. Using a slotted spoon, transfer wheat berry mixture to a large bowl. Cool to room temperature. Stir in the next four ingredients (through mint). 3. For dressing, in a screw-top jar combine the next four ingredients (through garlic salt). Cover and shake well. Pour dressing over wheat berry mixture; toss gently to coat. Top with chopped cooked chicken. Cover and chill 4 to 24 hours. Sprinkle with cheese before serving. Makes 8 servings. per ½-cup serving 294 cal., 9 g fat (2 g sat. fat), 55 mg chol., 339 mg sodium, 29 g carb., 5 g iber, 24 g pro.

Verde Pulled Chicken prep 20 minutes slow cook 7 to 8 hours

Mediterranean Wheat Berry Salad prep 20 minutes slow cook 72 to 8 hours (low) chill 4 hours

3 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth 1 14.5-oz. can no-salt-added diced ire-roasted tomatoes, undrained 11/2 cups wheat berries 3/4 cup chopped cucumber 1/2 cup snipped fresh parsley 1/4 cup thinly sliced green onions 1 Tbsp. snipped fresh mint 1/4 cup lemon juice 2 Tbsp. olive oil

(low) or 32 to 4 hours (high) 2

to 21/2 lb. skinless, boneless chicken breast halves or thighs 1 14.5-oz. can reduced-sodium chicken broth 1 recipe Verde Garlic Sauce 16 lour tortillas or slider or cocktail buns, split and toasted Desired toppings, such as pico de gallo, shredded Monterey Jack cheese, and/or sliced avocado 1. Place chicken in a 31/2- or 4-qt. slow cooker. Stir together chicken broth and half of the Verde Garlic Sauce (chill remaining sauce).

VERDE PULLED CHICKEN 2. Cover and cook on low 7 to 8 hours or high 31/2 to 4 hours. 3. Remove chicken from cooker. Shred chicken using two forks. Pour cooking liquid into a bowl. Return chicken to slow cooker. Stir in the remaining Verde Garlic Sauce. If necessary, add enough reserved cooking liquid to moisten chicken. 4. To serve, use a slotted spoon to spoon chicken mixture onto tortillas; add desired toppings. Makes 16 wraps. Verde Garlic Sauce In a blender or food processor combine one 16-oz. jar salsa verde; 3/4 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves; 2 Tbsp. lime juice; 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil; 4 cloves garlic, peeled; and 1/2 tsp. ground cumin. Cover and blend or process until smooth. per wrap 289 cal., 13 g fat (5 g sat. fat), 61 mg chol., 518 mg sodium, 20 g carb., 2 g iber, 22 g pro.


better

21

spring 2017

Cuban-Style Sloppy Joes prep 30 minutes slow cook 6 to 8 hours

(low) or 3 to 4 hours (high) 3 2 4 2

BBQ CHICKEN MAC ’N’ CHEESE

BBQ Chicken Mac ’n’ Cheese prep 20 minutes slow cook 6 hours

(low) or 3 hours (high) + 20 minutes (high) stand 5 minutes 1 lb. skinless, boneless chicken thighs, cut into 1-inch pieces 21/2 cups water 1/2 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup chopped dill pickles 1 Tbsp. yellow mustard 12 slices lower-sodium bacon, crisp-cooked and crumbled 1 12-oz. pkg. no-boil, no-drain rotini pasta (such as Barilla Pronto) 8 oz. sliced American cheese, torn into bite-size pieces 1/4 to 1/2 cup whole milk 3/4 cup bottled barbecue sauce 1/3 cup inely chopped red onion

SMOKED TURKEY AND CREAMY POTATOES

Smoked Turkey and Creamy Potatoes

Peppery Italian Beef Sandwiches

prep 25 minutes slow cook 8 to 10 hours

prep 30 minutes cook 10 to 12 hours (low)

(low) or 4 to 5 hours (high) + 15 minutes (high)

or 5 to 6 hours (high)

2 lb. medium round red-skin potatoes, quartered 1/2 cup sliced celery 1/2 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. black pepper 1 bunch green onions (6), thinly sliced, green and white parts separated 1 smoked turkey drumstick (about 13/4 lb.) 3/4 cup half-and-half 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 2 Tbsp. all-purpose lour 1 Tbsp. dry sherry (optional) 1/2 cup frozen green peas, thawed

1 21/2- to 3-lb. boneless beef chuck pot roast, trimmed of fat 1 tsp. garlic pepper seasoning 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil 1 14.5-oz. can reduced-sodium beef broth 1 0.5- to 0.75-oz. envelope Italian dry salad dressing mix 2 tsp. dried Italian seasoning, crushed 1 12- to 16-oz. jar pepperoncini salad peppers, drained and stems removed 8 hoagie buns or kaiser rolls, split and toasted 2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese (8 oz.)

1. In a 5- to 6-qt. slow cooker combine the irst ive ingredients (through pepper) and the white parts of the green onions. Place turkey drumstick on top of potato mixture in cooker. 2. Cover and cook on low 8 to 10 hours or high 4 to 5 hours or until potatoes are tender. 3. Remove drumstick from cooker. Let cool slightly. When cool enough to handle, remove meat from bone; discard skin and bone. Coarsely chop turkey and return to cooker. 4. In a medium bowl whisk together halfand-half, Parmesan cheese, lour, and, if desired, sherry. Stir half-and-half mixture and peas into potato mixture in cooker. If using low, turn cooker to high. Cover and cook 15 minutes more. 5. To serve, top servings with green parts of green onions. Makes 18 side-dish servings.

1. If necessary, cut meat to it into a 31/2- or 4-qt. slow cooker. Sprinkle meat with garlic pepper seasoning; rub in with your ingers. In a 4-qt. Dutch oven heat oil over medium heat. Cook meat in hot oil until browned on all sides. 2. Place meat in slow cooker. In a medium bowl whisk together broth, salad dressing mix, and Italian seasoning. Pour over meat in cooker. Top with peppers. 3. Cover and cook on low 10 to 12 hours or high 5 to 6 hours. Transfer meat to a cutting board. Shred meat using two forks. Pour cooking liquid through a strainer, reserving peppers. Skim fat from cooking liquid. Return beef and peppers to slow cooker. Add enough of the liquid to moisten meat. 4. To serve, use a slotted spoon to spoon shredded meat and peppers into buns; sprinkle with cheese. Makes 8 sandwiches.

per ½-cup serving 111 cal., 4 g fat (2 g sat. fat), 25 mg chol., 356 mg sodium, 10 g carb., 1 g iber, 9 g pro.

1. In a 4-qt. slow cooker combine the irst ive ingredients (through mustard) and half of the bacon. Cover and cook on low 6 hours or high 3 hours. 2. If using low, turn cooker to high. Stir in the pasta. Cover and cook 10 minutes. Stir. Cover and cook 10 minutes more; stir again. Top with cheese (do not stir). Cover and let stand 5 minutes. Add milk to desired consistency; stir to combine. 3. To serve, drizzle each serving with barbecue sauce. Top with remaining bacon and chopped red onion. Makes 18 servings. per ½-cup serving 194 cal., 8 g fat (4 g sat. fat), 42 mg chol., 452 mg sodium, 20 g carb., 0 g iber, 11 g pro.

2/3 4 2 2 1 1/2 1 24 1/4 12 12

lb. ground pork cups chopped onions cloves garlic, minced fresh jalapeño chile peppers, seeded and inely chopped cup reduced-sodium chicken broth tsp. snipped fresh thyme tsp. ground cumin tsp. ground coriander tsp. salt tsp. black pepper recipe Mojo Sauce slider or cocktail buns or 16 rolls or hamburger buns, split cup coarse ground mustard to 16 slices country ham, halved to 16 slices Swiss cheese, halved Sliced pickles and sliced jalapeños (optional)

1. In a large skillet cook the irst four ingredients (through jalapeños) over medium-high heat until meat is browned and onions are tender. Drain of fat. Transfer meat mixture to a 31/2- or 4-qt. slow cooker. Stir in the next six ingredients (through black pepper). 2. Cover and cook on low 6 to 8 hours or high 3 to 4 hours. Stir Mojo Sauce into meat mixture in cooker. 3. To serve, spread buns with mustard. Top with half a slice of ham and half a slice of cheese. Use a slotted spoon to spoon meat mixture onto cheese slices. Add bun tops. If desired, serve with sliced pickles and sliced jalapeños. Makes 24 sliders. Mojo Sauce In a medium skillet cook 6 cloves garlic, minced, in 2 Tbsp. olive oil over medium heat just until garlic starts to brown. Remove from heat. Carefully add 1/3 cup orange juice, 1/3 cup lemon juice, 1 tsp. ground cumin, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/2 tsp. black pepper; return to heat. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, about 5 minutes or until slightly reduced; cool. Whisk before using. per slider 338 cal., 20 g fat (8 g sat. fat), 60 mg chol., 627 mg sodium, 19 g carb., 1 g iber, 19 g pro.

CUBAN-STYLE SLOPPY JOES

per sandwich 480 cal., 14 g fat (5 g sat. fat), 110 mg chol., 1,308 mg sodium, 39 g carb., 2 g iber, 47 g pro.

PEPPERY ITALIAN BEEF SANDWICHES

SLOW COOKER

®

TM

LEMONPOPPY SEE CAKE D P. 132

FARMERS MARKET SOUPS & STEWS P. 24

MEXICAN & ASIAN TAKE-OUT FAVORITE MADE OV S ER

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND:

SECOND PRINTIN G OF SLOW COOKER SPRING 2016

SPRING 2017 BHG.com

MAKE IT EASY Find new recipes for dinners, sides, and desserts in Slow Cooker™ magazine, on sale now where magazines are sold.


better

spring 2017

22

Style Reborn Fresh thinking and budget-friendly planning bring new life to a dated bath. by katelyn soults

photos julie soefer

field editor anna molvik

STYLE Modern Eclectic

PROBLEM Sitting in a fun Austin neighborhood, this old-fashioned bathroom felt out of place in a young family’s home due to piled-up layers of looring, old pipes in need of an upgrade, and a lack of personality.

SOLUTION The homeowners turned to interior designer Erin Williams to replace their bathroom’s decades-old look. Function and family were top of mind as Williams refreshed the space through fresh accessories and hardware in contrasting colors, customizing an inexpensive vanity, building in extra storage space, and introducing patterned looring.

1

Key Features FAMILY-FRIENDLY CHOICES A new tub its family needs for this shared bathroom while maintaining classic cast-iron appeal. An adjustable showerhead ofers versatility. BUDGET-SAVVY An IKEA vanity, outitted with custom walnut drawer fronts to add warmth to black-and-white tones, introduces clean lines and a modern look to the bathroom. SIGNATURE TILE Patterned concrete tile in a graphic black-and-white color combination provides an eye-catching focal point for the space. An early decision in the renovation process, the looring set the tone for the design.

2

“I mix and match common items but search out unique ones to make it look like it couldn’t be in anyone else’s home.” —Erin Williams, interior designer 3

1 Out with the Old The general layout and octagonal window are all that remain from the original bath. This version of the window boasts frosted glass instead of a stained-glass look. White subway tile creates a clean look above a new tub.

BEFORE

5

6

2 Space-Saving Choosing an IKEA vanity saved on cost. Williams added an extra dose of interest by ordering custom wood drawer fronts. The loating aspect of the unit makes the room appear larger by letting the eye see more of the loor.

3 Bold Attraction The geometric graphics in this small concrete-tile pattern stand out among neutral tones and inishes. Concrete tile “has so many design options you won’t ind in ceramic,” Williams says.

4 Shelf Life A recessed niche makes

kiAtNcDhens BATHS

use of an awkward bump-out and ofers a landing spot for products and stylish accessories near the sink.

5 First Impressions On the hunt for a one-of-a-kind light ixture to mix with easily accessible pieces, the homeowners connected with this gold-and-black vintage piece.

®

TM

REAL- LIFE MAKEOV ERS! OR

6

GANIZE YOUR PANT RY UPDATE LIGHTING & FLOORING

6 Black-Tie Affair A matte-black inish on the faucet and showerhead button up the sharp black-and-white palette in this contemporary small bath.

HOW TO SAVE AND SPLURGE P. 5

ADD COLOR TO YOUR BATH THIS WEEKEND P. 6

4

201 7 BHG.com

SO MANY SOLUTIONS! Find inspiration to remake every room in your home with Before & After Kitchens and Baths™ magazine, on sale where magazines are sold.


better

spring 2017

23

The Skills Your Kids Will Learn Best from You In honor of Father’s Day, here are a few of the things— some frivolous, some essential—you’ll want to teach your child. by l. jon wertheim

There were bumps and bruises. There was trial and (much) error. There were growing pains, dizzying highs, and far too much Top 40 music. But I recently reached a benchmark when my daughter, following my son, hit double digits. I used the occasion to reset some parenting goals and take stock of what I’d imparted thus far. I view these life skills as my body of work as a dad (though moms can obviously teach them as well). Feel free to adopt them as your own.

Play blackjack Start little kids of with War, which is easy to play (lip the top card from each of your piles, and the higher number wins). But by second grade they’re ready to learn the basics of blackjack. Explain that the object is for your cards to add up to as close to 21 as possible without going over. Face cards count for 10, and aces can be either 1 or 11. (If you’ve ever been in a casino, though, you know there’s plenty of nuance.) The fun disguises this game’s other virtues. Your child can play it with Grandpa as readily as with her buddies. It’s also a surprising means of improving math skills, teaching the laws of probability, and instilling this ever-true lesson: The deck is always stacked in favor of the dealer.

Throw a baseball You should despise the phrase “throw like a girl,” not only because it’s sexist and unkind, but also because tossing a ball the right way is a matter of technique. While some kids—regardless of gender—are naturals and others aren’t, it’s crucial to teach the motion early either way so that it becomes second nature to your child.

1. Form “bunny ears” across the seams of the ball with the index and middle ingers.

2. Turn your body sideways to the target, feet parallel to each other and hip distance apart.

17

25

ALLERGY-F RIENDLY FO S AL L KIDS WIOD LL LOVE

ALLERGY-FR IENDLY FOOD S HANDLE TIME-

GOT CHA !

APRIL FO TR ICKS OL’S PL AY ONTO KIDS

THE CHILL WAY TO HA ND TIME-OUTLE S COM E ON

The book that just might save your marriage! page 18

OVER

! COLORFUL , YU EASTER BRUMMY NCH

plus

PIN-WORTH Y PEEPS CREAT ION S APRIL 201

4. Shift the weight to the front foot as you bring the shoulder and arm forward, straight over the top.

5. Snap the hand as you release the ball, and then follow through across the body.

2

3

4

5

6

Stand up to a bully

healthy kids, happ y families

RAISE OPT IM AN CHILD ISTIC

3. Bring your child’s throwing arm straight back behind the head, then transfer weight to the back foot.

1

7 PARENTS.COM

LEARN AND PLAY Subscribe to Parents® magazine at BHG.com/Mag for just $5.99 a year.

You can sign your child up for tae kwon do lessons, but the key to warding of most tormentors is depriving them of what they’re truly looking for: a reaction. Show your kid how to portray positive, forceful, yet quiet body language. To a bully, lack of attention is akin to lack of oxygen. Also coach your child to call him out if necessary— simply saying, “You’re being a bully.”

Make a paper airplane

Tell a good (clean) joke Childhood has its share of potentially awkward moments. Help your kid lay them to rest by having an ageappropriate riddle at the ready. “What did zero say to eight? Nice belt.” “What starts with an ‘e,’ ends with an ‘e,’ and has a letter in it? Envelope.” “What’s the diference between mashed potatoes and pea soup? Anyone can mash potatoes.” Find more at prongo.com/ jokes. Once your child picks out a few favorites, practice for a punchy delivery.

Technology can evolve as fast as it wants. No matter. Paper airplanes remain pure magic. They’re a great way to introduce kids to geometry, symmetry, and spatial relations. Beyond this, transforming a sheet of paper into a soaring object with a few strategic folds shows it’s possible to creatively reimagine our world. 1. Start with an 82×11-inch piece of paper. 2. Fold it in half the long way. Then unfold it. 3. Fold in the two top corners to form a triangle. 4. Fold in the sides of the triangle again, forming a narrower triangle. 5. Turn the triangle on its side, and fold it in half. 6. Now fold the top edges on each of the sides down halfway to form the wings. Then take of!


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Summer Magic Roselily Mix Add color and perfume to summer gardens with this stunning combination of 4 different Oriental varieties. Their beauty, extended season of bloom, exquisite fragrance, and graceful stature reflect years of selective breeding. Each variety is a standout by itself. Together, they are absolutely spectacular, and your garden should not be without them. 3 bulbs of each, 12 total ranging in colors from deep pink to white. Not labeled. Your Lily bulbs will be shipped in spring at the proper planting time for your hardiness zone. Recommended for zones 5-8S/9W. Item MM920620, $29.95 each plus shipping.

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please mention source code BHG31 when you place your order

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