Page 1

1 DAY UNTIL THE C ARDINAL S HOME OPENER REDS’ SPEEDY HAMILTON RUNS PAST CARDS • C1 UP TO

$244 OF COUPONS INSIDE

SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • $2.50 • EARLY EDITION

GOLF GUIDE Can nine-hole rounds cure golf’s woes? Plus: Course listings, charity tournaments and more. SPECIAL SECTION • INSIDE THIS NEWSPAPER

Traic ine limits could turn screws on cities’ budgets Reform push

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Post-Ferguson, support is growing for bills that cap revenue cities can reap from court ines, fees Potential consequences Smaller cities may be forced to cut back services, raise taxes — or even disincorporate Compare municipalities’ general revenue and court/fee revenue. CHART • A10

Calverton Park’s new tax on utility and cellphone bills couldn’t have passed at a better time. Approved by voters last week, the tax is one of the few revenue options left for a municipality that last fiscal year raised a quarter of its revenue from traic fines. “The gross receipts tax will help,” Calverton Park Mayor James Paunovich said last month. “How much, I don’t know.” Like other St. Louis County cities, Calverton Park is preparing for a new political reality post-Ferguson, one where too large a stream of court fines and fees is a liability. The unrest last year has fueled new interest in how St. Louis County’s 90 municipalities fund their operations, and political and popular support seems to be growing to rein in the most See MUNICIPALITIES • Page A10

RADICALIZED IN ST. LOUIS? What motivated Ramo Pazara? He left St. Louis 11 days after becoming a U.S. citizen, on a journey that ended in Syria, where he took up arms with the Islamic State terrorist group. SIX ARRESTS

BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • In one picture,

RAMO PAZARA After 17 months in St. Louis, Pazara left to fight in Syria. He is believed to have died last fall.

Ramo Pazara is the picture of casual cool. He straddles a gleaming Suzuki motorcycle, wearing torn jeans, a long-sleeved black T-shirt and a necklace. He sports a scruf of hair on his chin, and his collarlength blond hair is tucked beneath a black stingy-brim hat. But something changed. Dramatically. After his marriage and trucking business in Michigan both failed, Pazara cut his hair short and grew his beard long. He began wearing a white Arabicstyle thawb and head covering, See TERRORISM • Page A5

What Pazara did is the linchpin of a case that led to the arrest of six on charges of supporting overseas terrorists, including three with ties to St. Louis.

RAMIZ AND SEDINA HODZIC Married couple living in south St. Louis County, accused of buying uniforms, rifle scopes and gear. ARMIN HARCEVIC Charged with providing material support to terrorists, conspiracy.

WAGES REBOUND AS JOB MARKET TIGHTENS But rise in pay here has been slow and uneven BUSINESS • E1

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Matt Bay of the Saline Valley Fire Protection District helps Maverick Duran, 4, of Wentzville, try on a jacket last month at the firehouse in Fenton. Maverick breathes through a tracheotomy tube.

FEMININE AND FIERCE

‘GAME OF THRONES’

Today’s ‘power suit’ doesn’t need to be a suit at all

Beloved HBO show covers new ground in Season 5

LIFESTYLE • H1

A&E • D1

TODAY

Watch the birdie

73°/58° PARTLY CLOUDY

TOMORROW

69°/47°

First-responders picking up special skills Program ofers training for taking emergency calls for the growing number of children with disabilities.

How to avoid inancial goofs on life’s journey Jim Gallagher shares inancial gurus’ tips for making good choices at every stage

STORMS POSSIBLE

WEATHER A24

BUSINESS • E1 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

BY MICHELE MUNZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Nathaniel Rankin’s airway is the size of a pinhole. The 2-year-old breathes through a tracheotomy — a tube inserted into his windpipe through an incision in his throat. Caregivers must clean it several times an hour and watch

him constantly, even while he sleeps, to make sure it does not get blocked or pulled out. He will immediately sufocate without it. What if the active boy is hurt in a bad accident? What if his mother is in a panic? What if his caregivers are incapacitated? See SPECIAL NEEDS • Page A13

WIN BLUES PLAYOFF TICKETS! Activate your digital subscription www.stltoday.com/readerrewards

1 M Vol. 137, No. 102 ©2015


1 DAY UNTIL THE C ARDINAL S HOME OPENER WACHA LOOKS STRONG AS CARDS BEAT REDS, 4-1 • C1 UP TO

$244 OF COUPONS INSIDE

SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • $2.50 • FINAL EDITION

GOLF GUIDE Can nine-hole rounds cure golf’s woes? Plus: Course listings, charity tournaments and more. SPECIAL SECTION • INSIDE THIS NEWSPAPER

OBAMA, CASTRO HERALD NEW ERA U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro meet Saturday during the Summit of the Americas in Panama City. The talks represented the first formal meeting between the leaders of the two nations in more than half a century, clearing the way for a normalization of relations that had seemed unthinkable for generations. STORY • A4

RADICALIZED IN ST. LOUIS? What motivated Ramo Pazara? He left St. Louis 11 days after becoming a U.S. citizen, on a journey that ended in Syria, where he took up arms with the Islamic State terrorist group. SIX ARRESTS

BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • In one picture,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Traic ine limits could turn screws on cities’ budgets Reform push Post-Ferguson, support is growing for bills that cap revenue cities can reap from court ines, fees Bitter pill Smaller cities may be forced to cut back services, raise taxes — or even disincorporate Compare municipalities’ general revenue and court/fee revenue. CHART • A10

Team wraps up regular season with a win, faces either Wild or Jets in irst round of playofs SPORTS • C1

Watch the birdie

PARTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

71°/49°

‘GAME OF THRONES’ Beloved show covers new ground in Season 5

STORMS POSSIBLE

WEATHER A24

A&E • D1 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

See TERRORISM • Page A5

ARMIN HARCEVIC Charged with providing material support to terrorists, conspiracy.

First-responders picking up special skills

Calverton Park’s new tax on utility and cellphone bills couldn’t have passed at a better time. Approved by voters last week, the tax is one of the few revenue options left for a municipality that last fiscal year raised a quarter of its revenue from traic fines. “The gross receipts tax will help,” Calverton Park Mayor James Paunovich said last month. “How much, I don’t know.” Like other St. Louis County cities, Calverton Park is preparing for a new political reality post-Ferguson, one where too large a stream of court fines and fees is a liability. The unrest last year has fueled new interest in how St. Louis County’s 90 municipalities fund See MUNICIPALITIES • Page A10

73°/59°

After 17 months in St. Louis, Pazara left to fight in Syria. He is believed to have died last fall.

RAMIZ AND SEDINA HODZIC Married couple living in south St. Louis County, accused of buying uniforms, rifle scopes and gear.

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues beat Wild, 4-2

TODAY

RAMO PAZARA

Ramo Pazara is the picture of casual cool. He straddles a gleaming Suzuki motorcycle, wearing torn jeans, a long-sleeved black T-shirt and a necklace. He sports a scruf of hair on his chin, and his collarlength blond hair is tucked beneath a black stingy-brim hat. But something changed. Dramatically. After his marriage and trucking business in Michigan both failed, Pazara cut his hair short and grew his beard long. He began wearing a white Arabicstyle thawb and head covering,

What Pazara did is the linchpin of a case that led to the arrest of six on charges of supporting overseas terrorists, including three with ties to St. Louis.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Matt Bay of the Saline Valley Fire Protection District helps Maverick Duran, 4, of Wentzville, try on a jacket last month at the firehouse in Fenton. Maverick breathes through a tracheotomy tube.

Program ofers training for taking emergency calls for the growing number of children with disabilities.

BY MICHELE MUNZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Nathaniel Rankin’s airway is the size of a pinhole. The 2-year-old breathes through a tracheotomy — a tube inserted into his windpipe through an incision in his throat. Caregivers must clean it several times an hour and watch

Rapper Nelly held on drug charges • Women blend feminine and fierce

A2

• H1

him constantly, even while he sleeps, to make sure it does not get blocked or pulled out. He will immediately sufocate without it. What if the active boy is hurt in a bad accident? What if his mother is in a panic? What if his caregivers are incapacitated? See SPECIAL NEEDS • Page A13

WIN BLUES PLAYOFF TICKETS! Activate your digital subscription www.stltoday.com/readerrewards

How to avoid life’s financial goofs

• E1

2 M

Helping hands renovate old school •

B1 Vol. 137, No. 102 ©2015


1 DAY UNTIL THE C ARDINAL S HOME OPENER WACHA LOOKS STRONG AS CARDS BEAT REDS, 4-1 • C1 UP TO

$244 OF COUPONS INSIDE

SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • $2.50 • FINAL EDITION

GOLF GUIDE Can nine-hole rounds cure golf’s woes? Plus: Course listings, charity tournaments and more. SPECIAL SECTION • INSIDE THIS NEWSPAPER

OBAMA, CASTRO HERALD NEW ERA U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro meet Saturday during the Summit of the Americas in Panama City. The talks represented the first formal meeting between the leaders of the two nations in more than half a century, clearing the way for a normalization of relations that had seemed unthinkable for generations. STORY • A4

RADICALIZED IN ST. LOUIS? What motivated Ramo Pazara? He left St. Louis 11 days after becoming a U.S. citizen, on a journey that ended in Syria, where he took up arms with the Islamic State terrorist group. SIX ARRESTS

BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • In one picture,

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Traic ine limits could turn screws on cities’ budgets Reform push Post-Ferguson, support is growing for bills that cap revenue cities can reap from court ines, fees Bitter pill Smaller cities may be forced to cut back services, raise taxes — or even disincorporate Compare municipalities’ general revenue and court/fee revenue. CHART • A10

Team wraps up regular season with 4-2 win, will face Minnesota again in irst round of playofs SPORTS • C1

Watch the birdie

PARTLY SUNNY

TOMORROW

71°/49°

‘GAME OF THRONES’ Beloved show covers new ground in Season 5

STORMS POSSIBLE

WEATHER A24

A&E • D1 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

See TERRORISM • Page A5

ARMIN HARCEVIC Charged with providing material support to terrorists, conspiracy.

First-responders picking up special skills

Calverton Park’s new tax on utility and cellphone bills couldn’t have passed at a better time. Approved by voters last week, the tax is one of the few revenue options left for a municipality that last fiscal year raised a quarter of its revenue from traic fines. “The gross receipts tax will help,” Calverton Park Mayor James Paunovich said last month. “How much, I don’t know.” Like other St. Louis County cities, Calverton Park is preparing for a new political reality post-Ferguson, one where too large a stream of court fines and fees is a liability. The unrest last year has fueled new interest in how St. Louis County’s 90 municipalities fund See MUNICIPALITIES • Page A10

73°/59°

After 17 months in St. Louis, Pazara left to fight in Syria. He is believed to have died last fall.

RAMIZ AND SEDINA HODZIC Married couple living in south St. Louis County, accused of buying uniforms, rifle scopes and gear.

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Blues to get Wild

TODAY

RAMO PAZARA

Ramo Pazara is the picture of casual cool. He straddles a gleaming Suzuki motorcycle, wearing torn jeans, a long-sleeved black T-shirt and a necklace. He sports a scruf of hair on his chin, and his collarlength blond hair is tucked beneath a black stingy-brim hat. But something changed. Dramatically. After his marriage and trucking business in Michigan both failed, Pazara cut his hair short and grew his beard long. He began wearing a white Arabicstyle thawb and head covering,

What Pazara did is the linchpin of a case that led to the arrest of six on charges of supporting overseas terrorists, including three with ties to St. Louis.

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Matt Bay of the Saline Valley Fire Protection District helps Maverick Duran, 4, of Wentzville, try on a jacket last month at the firehouse in Fenton. Maverick breathes through a tracheotomy tube.

Program ofers training for taking emergency calls for the growing number of children with disabilities.

BY MICHELE MUNZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Nathaniel Rankin’s airway is the size of a pinhole. The 2-year-old breathes through a tracheotomy — a tube inserted into his windpipe through an incision in his throat. Caregivers must clean it several times an hour and watch

Rapper Nelly held on drug charges • Women blend feminine and fierce

A2

• H1

him constantly, even while he sleeps, to make sure it does not get blocked or pulled out. He will immediately sufocate without it. What if the active boy is hurt in a bad accident? What if his mother is in a panic? What if his caregivers are incapacitated? See SPECIAL NEEDS • Page A13

WIN BLUES PLAYOFF TICKETS! Activate your digital subscription www.stltoday.com/readerrewards

How to avoid life’s financial goofs

• E1

3 M

Helping hands renovate old school •

B1 Vol. 137, No. 102 ©2015


LOCAL

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

GO! ST. LOUIS MARATHON AND HALF MARATHON ROUTES Union

Races begin at 7 a.m. Sunday. Both the Eads and Martin Luther King Jr. bridges will be closed to traic from 5 to 9 a.m. Sunday. 70

MISSOURI

FOREST PARK Jewel Box

l

Fores t Par k

22 23

Grand

16

40

Chou teau

h

9t

2

nut Arch

Busch Stadium

44

th 10

ri ou

on

Eads Bridge

Chest

ss Mi

Russell

55

3

Mark 7 et

12

64

4

8

Poplar St. Bridge

fayette

64

55

nd Bo

Missouri Botanical Garden

Lafayette Square Park La

M.L.King Bridge

y wa

44

Edward Jones Dome

1

Half marathon ends here

Jefer s

er Manchest

14

ILLINOIS

5 6

d oa Br

Va nd ev en te

r

Science Center

25

15

17

on

24 Planetarium

Comp t

18 Hampto n

M.L.K ing Wash ingto n City Museum Olive 26 M arke t F S Union 13 64 Station

Saint Louis University

70

1st

19

Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge

Cass

2nd

Kingshighw ay

Muny

Zoo

Linde l

Broad way

21

14th

20

Tucke r

History Museum

11 Mississippi River 3

Tower Grove Park

9

s voi Gra 55

Marathon route continues

Arse

X Mile markers

nal

S Starting line F Finish line

10

7th

Vict or

Marathon and half marathon route

AnheuserBusch Brewery

Post-Dispatch

1/2 MILE

INTERSTATE LANE CLOSINGS

Oicials expect legal battle over Missouri River supply to drag on

ST. CHARLES ST COUNTY CO

MADISON COUNTY CO

370

4

70

270

13

61

Missouri sued in 2009 over concerns that river water was being depleted; inal report was recently released BY BLAKE NICHOLSON Associated Press

BISMARCK, N.D. • North Dakota

oicials believe a federal study of a large Missouri River water project in the state has adequately addressed fears of environmental harm in the state of Missouri and the Canadian province of Manitoba. However, they’re still resigned to the likely continuation of a drawnout legal fight that has already delayed the Northwest Area Water Supply project for more than a decade. “I’d like for it to be concluded in the near future, but I’m not optimistic enough to think that that would be the case,” said Tim Freije,

manager of the project for the State Water Commission. The project was first authorized by Congress in 1986. It is projected to bring Missouri River water to 82,000 people in northwestern North Dakota by 2060, if it is built. But Manitoba sued in 2002, when construction began, over fears that it would result in the transfer of harmful organisms to its waters, and Missouri sued in 2009 over concerns about a depletion of river water. The river provides water to 3 million people in Missouri and is vital to the state’s shipping and agriculture industries. U.S. District Judge Rosemary Collyer in Washington, D.C., later combined the lawsuits and ordered more environmental study. The final environmental report released by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation this month calls for the addition of filtration to previously recommended river water treatment methods of chlorination and ultraviolet disinfection. It also concludes

7

the project would use less than 1 percent of the storage capacity in the Missouri River basin, and that potential effects of climate change on the river would more than ofset project water withdrawals. Manitoba water oicials said they are still reviewing the report, but Missouri appears ready to continue fighting. “We remain committed to protecting the rights of Missourians who rely upon the river to transport agricultural products,” Eric Slusher, spokesman for Missouri Attorney General Chris Koster, said in a statement. The lawsuit has not completely stopped the project. Collyer has allowed some construction to take place, including pipeline construction up until about two years ago. After a 30-day public comment period on the government’s environmental report, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell will issue a final decision to Collyer, who will then proceed with the lawsuit.

64

170 Lo Louis

2 1 8 6 255

All construction is weather permitting

New project

64

10

ST. CLAIR ST COUNTY CO

MISSOURI

JEFFERSON COUNTY CO

70

55

12

44

ILLINOIS

55

MONROE COUNTY

Continuing project

Change in project

MISSOURI 64

44

64

270

44

ROCKWOOD SCHOOLS > District OKs contracts two days after bond issue passes • The Rockwood School Board has approved five contracts for work on projects related to the $68.95 million bond issue that passed Tuesday. The largest contract was to Byrne and Jones Construction for more than

3

ST LOUIS ST. COUNTY

DIGEST $4.26 million to install new synthetic turf athletic fields and replace running tracks at all four high schools. The district will use an organic infill instead of the typical crumb-rubber for the synthetic field installations, Superintendent Eric Knost said. Dickinson Hussman Architects was awarded a $310,000 contract for the architectural and engineering services for the fields. Facility Solutions Group was awarded contracts of $46,000 and $45,000 for services related to HVAC system improvement and districtwide stadium lights replacements. Foresight Services, Inc. was awarded a $36,300 contract for other districtwide improvements. This summer, the district also will begin safety projects, such as installing classroom door locks. The approval comes after controversy in the last few years that included two failed bond issues and a critical state audit, which found the district had overpaid its longtime construction management firm. Voters rejected a $43.2 million package of projects in April 2012 and $38.4 million for renovations, security measures and other updates in April 2013. At this time, the district does not plan to use the construction manager

St. St

40

170

ST. CHARLES > Bench mysteriously returns • An heirloom bench that was stolen from the brick sidewalk in front of Memories in the Attic, on historic Main Street, has been returned. Owner Paul Dunivan said his wife came to the store Friday and the bench was in the spot it had been taken from. “She couldn’t believe it,” he said. It was not damaged. Dunivan is the son of business founder Rosena Dunivan. He and his wife, Mandy, took over the store last year. They noticed the bench missing on March 11. The wooden seat had been on the brick sidewalk in front of the store for 34 years, and news of its theft garnered much attention on Facebook. Dunivan said his mother, whose father built the bench, has a plan for making sure a similar theft doesn’t happen again. “I’m sure she’s going to take it home,” he said. (Leah Thorsen)

11

9

5

approach for Prop 4 projects, according to a press release. Instead, Chief Financial Oicer Tim Rooney will evaluate each project on a case-by-case basis determining the appropriate need for oversight. The 74 percent of voters approving the measure was the highest in Rockwood history, Knost said. The first projects are slated to begin on May 26. (From staf and correspondent reports)

64

1. Interstate 64 on the Poplar Street Bridge One westbound lane closed through midyear. 2. Interstate 44 through depressed section in downtown St. Louis Expect one westbound lane to be closed daily from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 3. Interstate 64 between Timberlake Manor and Chesterfield Parkway East Westbound auxiliary lane to be closed until spring. 4. Interstate 270 between Lindbergh and Interstate 170 Two westbound lanes closed from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. 5. Interstate 170 between Page Avenue and Natural Bridge Road Two northbound lanes closed each night from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. 6. Interstate 44 between the Poplar Street Bridge and 7th Street Two lanes closed from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. A third lane is closed between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. 7. Interstate 64 from Research Park across the Boone Bridge Two right lanes closed eastbound from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ILLINOIS 64

270

RITENOUR SCHOOLS > Preschool tuition will go up • Tuition for Ritenour’s Early Childhood Education program will rise in 2015-16, although oicials say the increase keeps rates competitive with other programs. The new schedule was approved by the board of education Thursday night. Weekly full-day tuition will rise $3 for resident children to $143, and $4 for nonresidents to $159. Half-day programs will rise $2 to $72 for residents and $1.50, to $79, for nonresidents. Before- and after-school care will go up $1 to $51 and $2 to $67; children who are served in one time slot or the other will pay $1 extra to $36 and $1 extra to $51. (Special to the PostDispatch)

64

70

255

270

8. Interstate 64 between 18th Street and east of Illinois Route 111 Expect some lane closures in both directions during nonpeak hours. 9. Interstate 270 between Illinois Route 3 and Interstate 55-70 Expect lane closures in both directions from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. every night to install new guardrails. 10. Interstate 64 between Greenmount Road and Illinois Route 4 Expect lane restrictions in the eastbound direction during ofpeak hours from Tuesday through Friday. 11. Interstate 70 between Interstate 55 and Illinois Route 143 One lane restricted through October 2015 to perform pavement patching, widening and surface removal. 12. Interstate 255 between Illinois Routes 157 and 15 Expect lane restrictions in both directions Monday through Thursday. 13. Interstate 270 between Chain of Rocks Canal Bridge and Illinois Route 3 Reduced from two lanes to one in both diretions from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. Monday and Tuesday.

SOURCES: Missouri Department of Transportation, Illinois Department of Transportation | Post-Dispatch

MULTISTATE GAMES

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 06-11-32-46-68 Mega Ball: 09 Megaplier: 2 Estimated jackpot: $39 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $80 million

LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.3 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 04-09-22-32-33 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $65,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 047 Evening: 465 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 9401 Evening: 1660

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 03-12-15-29-32 Evening: 01-07-10-13-43 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $5.75 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 077 FB: 4 Evening: 907 FB: 5 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 7203 FB: 0 Evening: 2019 FB: 8

INSIDE A&E ............................. D1 Bill McClellan ............ A17 Books ......................... D7 Business ...................... E1 Community calendar A17 Editorial .................... A18 Horoscopes .............. EV4 Movies ........................ D5 Obituaries ................ A20 Puzzles .................. EV3-4 Sports calendar .......... C2 Stocks ......................... E5 Weather .................... A23

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LOCAL

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

GO! ST. LOUIS MARATHON AND HALF MARATHON ROUTES Union

Races begin at 7 a.m. Sunday. Both the Eads and Martin Luther King Jr. bridges will be closed to traic from 5 to 9 a.m. Sunday. 70

MISSOURI

FOREST PARK Jewel Box

l

Fores t Par k

22 23 24

r

Chou teau

Arch

Busch Stadium

on Jefer s

h

9t

2

nut

44

th 10

ri ou

Russell

Eads Bridge

Chest

8

Poplar St. Bridge

fayette

64

55

nd Bo

Missouri Botanical Garden

55

3

Mark 7 et

12

64

4 1

Half marathon ends here Lafayette Square Park La

M.L.King Bridge

ss Mi

44

Edward Jones Dome

y wa

Va nd ev en te

40

ILLINOIS

5 6

d oa Br

er Manchest

14

Comp t

16

Science Center

25

15

17

Grand

Planetarium

on

18 Hampto n

M.L.K ing Wash ingto n City Museum Olive 26 M arke t F S Union 13 64 Station

Saint Louis University

70

1st

19

Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge

Cass

2nd

Kingshighw ay

Muny

Zoo

Linde l

Broad way

21

14th

20

Tucke r

History Museum

11 Mississippi River 3

Tower Grove Park

9

s voi Gra 55

Marathon route continues

Arse

X Mile markers

nal

S Starting line F Finish line

10

7th

Vict or

Marathon and half marathon route

AnheuserBusch Brewery

Post-Dispatch

1/2 MILE

DIGEST ST. CHARLES > Bench mysteriously returns • An heirloom bench that was stolen from the brick sidewalk in front of Memories in the Attic, on historic Main Street, has been returned. Owner Paul Dunivan said his wife came to the store Friday and the bench was in the spot it had been taken from. “She couldn’t believe it,” he said. It was not damaged. Dunivan is the son of business founder Rosena Dunivan. He and his wife, Mandy, took over the store last year. They noticed the bench missing on March 11. The wooden seat had been on the brick sidewalk in front of the store for 34 years, and news of its theft garnered much attention on Facebook. Dunivan said his mother, whose father built the bench, has a plan for making sure a similar theft doesn’t happen again. “I’m sure she’s going to take it home,” he said. (Leah Thorsen)

INTERSTATE LANE CLOSINGS

Nelly is arrested on drug charges

ST. CHARLES ST COUNTY CO 370

4

70

270

13

61

11

9

5

7

St. St

40

3

64

170 Lo Louis

ST LOUIS ST. COUNTY

2 1 8 6 255

All construction is weather permitting

New project

64

10

ST. CLAIR ST COUNTY CO

MISSOURI

JEFFERSON COUNTY CO

70

55

12

44

ILLINOIS

55

MONROE COUNTY

Continuing project

Change in project

MISSOURI ASSOCIATED PRESS

ROCKWOOD SCHOOLS > District OKs contracts two days after bond issue passes • The Rockwood School Board has approved five contracts for work on projects related to the $68.95 million bond issue that passed Tuesday. The largest contract was to Byrne and Jones Construction for more than $4.26 million to install new synthetic turf athletic fields and replace running tracks at all four high schools. The district will use an organic infill instead of the typical crumbrubber for the synthetic field installations, Superintendent Eric Knost said. Dickinson Hussman Architects was awarded a $310,000 contract for the architectural and engineering services for the fields. Facility Solutions Group was awarded contracts of $46,000 and $45,000 for services related to HVAC system improvement and districtwide stadium lights replacements. Foresight Services, Inc. was awarded a $36,300 contract for other district-wide improvements. This summer, the district also will begin safety projects, such as installing classroom door locks. The approval comes after controversy in the last few years that included two failed bond issues and a critical state audit, which found the district had overpaid its longtime construction management firm. Voters rejected a $43.2 million package of projects in April 2012 and $38.4 million for renovations, security measures and other updates in April 2013. At this time, the district does not plan to use the construction manager approach for Prop 4 projects, according to a press release. Instead, Chief Financial Oicer Tim Rooney will evaluate each project on a case-by-case basis determining the appropriate need for oversight. The 74 percent of voters approving the measure was the highest in Rockwood history, Knost said. The first projects are slated to begin on May 26. (From staf and correspondent reports)

MADISON COUNTY CO

64

Rapper Nelly approaches the stage for a concert in Irbil, northern Iraq, on March 13. He was arrested Saturday in Tennessee on drug charges.

44

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASHVILLE, TENN. • Rapper,

hip-hop artist and reality TV star Nelly is facing felony drug charges after being arrested in Tennessee. About 9:20 a.m. on Saturday, Tennessee Highway Patrol Trooper Michael Loftis stopped a Prevost motor coach bus on Interstate 40 near the 275 mile marker, east of Nashville, for failure to display a U.S. Department of Transportation and International Fuel Tax Association sticker on the vehicle. On the bus were six people including Nelly, whose real name is Cornell Haynes. The trooper was planning to conduct an inspection of the bus when he smelled marijuana. Loftis and another trooper, Sgt. Donald Jennings, said they then conducted a probable cause search. In the sleeper area, the troopers said they discovered a plastic bag that contained five colored crystal-type rocks that tested positive for methamphetamine,

as well as a small amount of marijuana and other drug paraphernalia. They said they also found approximately 100 small plastic bags commonly associated with the sale of narcotics; and numerous handguns, including a goldplated .50-caliber Desert Eagle pistol, a .45-caliber Taurus pistol and a .500 Magnum Smith & Wesson. Nelly, 40, a St. Louis native, was charged with felony possession of drugs, simple possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Also on the bus was Brian Jones, 44, of St. Louis, a convicted felon. He had a handgun and was charged accordingly. Nelly and Jones were taken to the Putnam County Jail. The four others on the bus were not charged. Nelly’s reality show “Nellyville” is scheduled to return for a second season on cable’s BET with new episodes beginning on May 5.

64

270 170

44

64

1. Interstate 64 on the Poplar Street Bridge One westbound lane closed through midyear. 2. Interstate 44 through depressed section in downtown St. Louis Expect one westbound lane to be closed daily from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 3. Interstate 64 between Timberlake Manor and Chesterfield Parkway East Westbound auxiliary lane to be closed until spring. 4. Interstate 270 between Lindbergh and Interstate 170 Two westbound lanes closed from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. 5. Interstate 170 between Page Avenue and Natural Bridge Road Two northbound lanes closed each night from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. 6. Interstate 44 between the Poplar Street Bridge and 7th Street Two lanes closed from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. A third lane is closed between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. 7. Interstate 64 from Research Park across the Boone Bridge Two right lanes closed eastbound from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ILLINOIS 64

270

64

The Chattanooga Times Free Press contributed to this report. 70

LAW & ORDER 255

ST. LOUIS > Man found fatally shot in his home identified • A man found fatally shot Friday evening inside his home in the 5700 block of Maple Avenue has been identified as Cameron Wilson, 36. Wilson was shot once in the back, according to St. Louis police. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Police said an unidentified man knocked on Wilson’s door and entered. He shot Wilson in the back and ran out. Anyone with information about the shooting should call CrimeStoppers at 1-866-371-8477.

270

8. Interstate 64 between 18th Street and east of Illinois Route 111 Expect some lane closures in both directions during nonpeak hours. 9. Interstate 270 between Illinois Route 3 and Interstate 55-70 Expect lane closures in both directions from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. every night to install new guardrails. 10. Interstate 64 between Greenmount Road and Illinois Route 4 Expect lane restrictions in the eastbound direction during ofpeak hours from Tuesday through Friday. 11. Interstate 70 between Interstate 55 and Illinois Route 143 One lane restricted through October 2015 to perform pavement patching, widening and surface removal. 12. Interstate 255 between Illinois Routes 157 and 15 Expect lane restrictions in both directions Monday through Thursday. 13. Interstate 270 between Chain of Rocks Canal Bridge and Illinois Route 3 Reduced from two lanes to one in both diretions from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. Monday and Tuesday.

SOURCES: Missouri Department of Transportation, Illinois Department of Transportation | Post-Dispatch

MULTISTATE GAMES

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

POWERBALL Saturday: 01-12-32-42-58 Powerball: 12 Power play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $80 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 06-11-32-46-68 Mega Ball: 09 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $47 million

LOTTO Saturday: 20-22-28-31-36-41 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.4 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 08-11-29-30-39 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $83,000 PICK-3 Midday: 660 Evening: 221 PICK-4 Midday: 3897 Evening: 3729 TRIPLE PLAY: 09-21-26-49

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 20-22-24-25-45 Evening: 04-05-15-26-34 LOTTO Saturday: 18-22-36-38-39-52 Extra shot: 09 Estimated jackpot: $5.75 million PICK-3 Midday: 676 FB: 3 Evening: 611 FB: 9 PICK-4 Midday: 6407 FB: 8 Evening: 7018 FB: 1

INSIDE A&E ............................. D1 Bill McClellan ............ A17 Books ......................... D7 Business ...................... E1 Community calendar A17 Editorial .................... A18 Horoscopes .............. EV4 Movies ........................ D5 Obituaries ................ A20 Puzzles .................. EV3-4 Sports calendar .......... C2 Stocks ......................... E5 Weather .................... A23

Megaplier: 2

CONTACT US

MAIN NUMBER

For news tips only, phone • 314-340-8222

LOCAL NEWS & BUSINESS Adam Goodman 314-340-8258

Submit news tips • metro@post-dispatch.com Submit events for our calendar • events.stltoday.com Share your photos • iwitness.stltoday.com Share your videos • mystltoday.com

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The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS:476-580. Postmaster send address changes to: St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday through Sunday $6.90, Sunday through Friday $6.86, Monday through Friday $5.54, Thursday through Sunday $5.34, Sat-Sun-Mon Only $4.59, Fri-Sat-Sun Only $4.59, Sun-Mon Only $3.97, Sat-Sun Only $3.97, Sunday Only $3.22. All prices include applicable sales tax, delivery and premium editions delivered on 4/4/15, 5/16/15, 6/21/15, 7/4/15, 8/30/15, 9/5/15, 9/6/15, 10/31/15, 11/22/15, 11/26/15, 12/25/15, 1/16/16, 2/13/16,3/20/16,3/26/16 and may afect your subscription paid through date. Subscribers who wish not to receive premium editions or would like to avoid delivery fees (.22 daily and .53 Sunday) by picking up their paper should call our customer care center for information.


LOCAL

A2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 3 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

GO! ST. LOUIS MARATHON AND HALF MARATHON ROUTES Union

Races begin at 7 a.m. Sunday. Both the Eads and Martin Luther King Jr. bridges will be closed to traic from 5 to 9 a.m. Sunday. 70

MISSOURI

FOREST PARK Jewel Box

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Busch Stadium

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Poplar St. Bridge

fayette

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Missouri Botanical Garden

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Mark 7 et

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4 1

Half marathon ends here Lafayette Square Park La

M.L.King Bridge

ss Mi

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Edward Jones Dome

y wa

Va nd ev en te

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5 6

d oa Br

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Comp t

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Science Center

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Planetarium

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M.L.K ing Wash ingto n City Museum Olive 26 M arke t F S Union 13 64 Station

Saint Louis University

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1st

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Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge

Cass

2nd

Kingshighw ay

Muny

Zoo

Linde l

Broad way

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14th

20

Tucke r

History Museum

11 Mississippi River 3

Tower Grove Park

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s voi Gra 55

Marathon route continues

Arse

X Mile markers

nal

S Starting line F Finish line

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7th

Vict or

Marathon and half marathon route

AnheuserBusch Brewery

Post-Dispatch

1/2 MILE

DIGEST ST. CHARLES > Bench mysteriously returns • An heirloom bench that was stolen from the brick sidewalk in front of Memories in the Attic, on historic Main Street, has been returned. Owner Paul Dunivan said his wife came to the store Friday and the bench was in the spot it had been taken from. “She couldn’t believe it,” he said. It was not damaged. Dunivan is the son of business founder Rosena Dunivan. He and his wife, Mandy, took over the store last year. They noticed the bench missing on March 11. The wooden seat had been on the brick sidewalk in front of the store for 34 years, and news of its theft garnered much attention on Facebook. Dunivan said his mother, whose father built the bench, has a plan for making sure a similar theft doesn’t happen again. “I’m sure she’s going to take it home,” he said. (Leah Thorsen) ROCKWOOD SCHOOLS > District OKs contracts two days after bond issue passes • The Rockwood School Board has approved five contracts for work on projects related to the $68.95 million bond issue that passed Tuesday. The largest contract was to Byrne and Jones Construction for more than $4.26 million to install new synthetic turf athletic fields and replace running tracks at all four high schools. The district will use an organic infill instead of the typical crumbrubber for the synthetic field installations, Superintendent Eric Knost said. Dickinson Hussman Architects was awarded a $310,000 contract for the architectural and engineering services for the fields. Facility Solutions Group was awarded contracts of $46,000 and $45,000 for services related to HVAC system improvement and districtwide stadium lights replacements. Foresight Services, Inc. was awarded a $36,300 contract for other district-wide improvements. This summer, the district also will begin safety projects, such as installing classroom door locks. The approval comes after controversy in the last few years that included two failed bond issues and a critical state audit, which found the district had overpaid its longtime construction management firm. Voters rejected a $43.2 million package of projects in April 2012 and $38.4 million for renovations, security measures and other updates in April 2013. At this time, the district does not plan to use the construction manager approach for Prop 4 projects, according to a press release. Instead, Chief Financial Oicer Tim Rooney will evaluate each project on a case-by-case basis determining the appropriate need for oversight. The 74 percent of voters approving the measure was the highest in Rockwood history, Knost said. The first projects are slated to begin on May 26. (From staf and correspondent reports)

INTERSTATE LANE CLOSINGS

Nelly is arrested on drug charges

ST. CHARLES ST COUNTY CO

MADISON COUNTY CO

370

4

70

270

13

61

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASHVILLE, TENN. • Rapper, hip-hop artist and reality TV star Nelly is facing felony drug charges after being arrested in Tennessee. About 9:20 a.m. on Saturday, Tennessee Highway Patrol Trooper Michael Loftis stopped a Prevost motor coach bus on Interstate 40 near the 275 mile marker, east of Nashville, for failure to display a U.S. Nelly Department of Transportation and International Fuel Tax Association sticker on the vehicle. On the bus were six people including Nelly, whose real name is Cornell Haynes. The trooper was planning to conduct an inspection of the bus when he smelled marijuana. Loftis and another trooper, Sgt. Donald Jennings, said they then conducted a probable cause search. In the sleeper area, the troopers said they discovered a plastic bag that contained five colored crystal-type rocks that tested positive for methamphetamine, as well as a small amount of

7

marijuana and other drug paraphernalia. They said they also found approximately 100 small plastic bags commonly associated with the sale of narcotics; and numerous handguns, including a gold-plated .50-caliber Desert Eagle pistol, a .45-caliber Taurus pistol and a .500 Magnum Smith & Wesson. Nelly, 40, a St. Louis native, was charged with felony possession of drugs, simple possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Also on the bus was Brian Jones, 44, of St. Louis, a convicted felon. He had a handgun and was charged accordingly. Nelly and Jones were taken to the Putnam County Jail. The four others on the bus were not charged. Nelly’s reality show “Nellyville” is scheduled to return for a second season on cable’s BET with new episodes beginning on May 5.

11

9

5 St. St

40

3

64

170 Lo Louis

ST LOUIS ST. COUNTY

2 1 8 6

55

255

JEFFERSON COUNTY CO All construction is weather permitting

10

ST. CLAIR ST COUNTY CO

MISSOURI

New project

64

12

44

70

ILLINOIS

55

MONROE COUNTY

Continuing project

Change in project

MISSOURI 64

44

64

270 170

The Chattanooga Times Free Press contributed to this report.

44

64

LAW & ORDER

1. Interstate 64 on the Poplar Street Bridge One westbound lane closed through midyear. 2. Interstate 44 through depressed section in downtown St. Louis Expect one westbound lane to be closed daily from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 3. Interstate 64 between Timberlake Manor and Chesterfield Parkway East Westbound auxiliary lane to be closed until spring. 4. Interstate 270 between Lindbergh and Interstate 170 Two westbound lanes closed from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. 5. Interstate 170 between Page Avenue and Natural Bridge Road Two northbound lanes closed each night from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. 6. Interstate 44 between the Poplar Street Bridge and 7th Street Two lanes closed from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. A third lane is closed between 11 p.m. and 5 a.m. 7. Interstate 64 from Research Park across the Boone Bridge Two right lanes closed eastbound from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ILLINOIS 64

ST. LOUIS > Man found fatally shot in his home identified • A man found fatally shot Friday evening inside his home in the 5700 block of Maple Avenue has been identified as Cameron Wilson, 36. Wilson was shot once in the back, according to St. Louis police. He was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Police said an unidentified man knocked on Wilson’s door and entered. He shot Wilson in the back and ran out. Anyone with information about the shooting should call CrimeStoppers at 866-371-8477.

270

64

ST. LOUIS COUNTY > Man charged with home break-in at gunpoint • An 18-year-old Velda Village Hills man has been charged with multiple felonies for allegedly breaking into a home in Hanley Hills and holding the owners at gunpoint. Carlos Cotton, 18, of the 6700 block of Edison Avenue, was arrested Friday after police say he broke into the Cotton home that morning in the 7900 block of Underhill Drive. St. Louis County prosecutors have charged him with one count of firstdegree burglary, one count of first-degree assault, one count of felonious restraint, and three counts of armed criminal action. He is being held in lieu of $200,000 cash-only bail. St. Louis County police began searching for the suspect after receiving a report of the home invasion about 8:30 a.m. During the search, police say, a metro bus was stopped at Page Avenue and Hanley Road for about 12 minutes while it was being searched. Cotton was not on the bus, but he was arrested elsewhere a short time later.

70

255

270

8. Interstate 64 between 18th Street and east of Illinois Route 111 Expect some lane closures in both directions during nonpeak hours. 9. Interstate 270 between Illinois Route 3 and Interstate 55-70 Expect lane closures in both directions from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m. every night to install new guardrails. 10. Interstate 64 between Greenmount Road and Illinois Route 4 Expect lane restrictions in the eastbound direction during ofpeak hours from Tuesday through Friday. 11. Interstate 70 between Interstate 55 and Illinois Route 143 One lane restricted through October 2015 to perform pavement patching, widening and surface removal. 12. Interstate 255 between Illinois Routes 157 and 15 Expect lane restrictions in both directions Monday through Thursday. 13. Interstate 270 between Chain of Rocks Canal Bridge and Illinois Route 3 Reduced from two lanes to one in both diretions from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. Monday and Tuesday.

SOURCES: Missouri Department of Transportation, Illinois Department of Transportation | Post-Dispatch

MULTISTATE GAMES

MISSOURI LOTTERIES

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES

POWERBALL Saturday: 01-12-32-42-58 Powerball: 12 Power play: 2 Estimated jackpot: $80 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 06-11-32-46-68 Mega Ball: 09 Tuesday’s estimated jackpot: $47 million

LOTTO Saturday: 20-22-28-31-36-41 Wednesday’s estimated jackpot: $2.4 million SHOW ME CASH Saturday: 08-11-29-30-39 Sunday’s estimated jackpot: $83,000 PICK-3 Midday: 660 Evening: 221 PICK-4 Midday: 3897 Evening: 3729 TRIPLE PLAY: 09-21-26-49

LUCKY DAY LOTTO Saturday Midday: 20-22-24-25-45 Evening: 04-05-15-26-34 LOTTO Saturday: 18-22-36-38-39-52 Extra shot: 09 Estimated jackpot: $5.75 million PICK-3 Midday: 676 FB: 3 Evening: 611 FB: 9 PICK-4 Midday: 6407 FB: 8 Evening: 7018 FB: 1

INSIDE A&E ............................. D1 Bill McClellan ............ A17 Books ......................... D7 Business ...................... E1 Community calendar A17 Editorial .................... A18 Horoscopes .............. EV4 Movies ........................ D5 Obituaries ................ A20 Puzzles .................. EV3-4 Sports calendar .......... C2 Stocks ......................... E5 Weather .................... A23

Megaplier: 2

CONTACT US

MAIN NUMBER

For news tips only, phone • 314-340-8222

LOCAL NEWS & BUSINESS Adam Goodman 314-340-8258

Submit news tips • metro@post-dispatch.com Submit events for our calendar • events.stltoday.com Share your photos • iwitness.stltoday.com Share your videos • mystltoday.com

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888 homedelivery@post-dispatch.com To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

SUBSCRIBE PLACE DEATH NOTICES PLACE CLASSIFIED ADS ALL OTHER ADVERTISING FAX AD INFORMATION BUY REPRINTS

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201 STLtoday.com 800-365-0820 ext. 8600 STLtoday.com 314-621-6666 STLtoday.com 314-340-8500 314-340-8664 STLtoday.mycapture.com

314-340-8000

NEWS Ron Wade

314-340-8229

SPORTS Roger Hensley

314-340-8301

ONLINE Bob Rose

314-340-8333

FEATURES Jody Mitori

314-340-8240

PROJECTS Jean Buchanan

314-340-8111

OPINION PAGES Tony Messenger 314-340-8382

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS:476-580. Postmaster send address changes to: St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday through Sunday $6.90, Sunday through Friday $6.86, Monday through Friday $5.54, Thursday through Sunday $5.34, Sat-Sun-Mon Only $4.59, Fri-Sat-Sun Only $4.59, Sun-Mon Only $3.97, Sat-Sun Only $3.97, Sunday Only $3.22. All prices include applicable sales tax, delivery and premium editions delivered on 4/4/15, 5/16/15, 6/21/15, 7/4/15, 8/30/15, 9/5/15, 9/6/15, 10/31/15, 11/22/15, 11/26/15, 12/25/15, 1/16/16, 2/13/16,3/20/16,3/26/16 and may afect your subscription paid through date. Subscribers who wish not to receive premium editions or would like to avoid delivery fees (.22 daily and .53 Sunday) by picking up their paper should call our customer care center for information.


saturdaY’s best

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Revenue rise may spare Missouri social programs Senate plan calls for broad cuts to such services By ALex Stuckey St. Louis Post-dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri senators have passed a plan subjecting social programs such as psychiatric hospitals and developmental disabilities support to cuts next year — a move that Gov. Jay Nixon said Friday was unnecessary because of growing state revenue. The Senate passed early Wednesday morning a $26.1 billion budget for the 2016 fiscal year that begins July 1. That budget includes a cut of about $140 million in general revenue to social programs, a number that State Budget Director Linda Luebbering said could reach $300 million when taking matching federal funds into account. Nixon and some lawmakers are concerned about this cut, especially because it’s accomplished by lumping numerous programs in the departments of Mental Health, Health and Senior Services and Social Services into two large groups and then cutting 6 percent from the total in the Social Services group and 4 percent from the total in the group containing programs from the other two departments. Senate Appropriations Chairman Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, says the cuts are an efort to rein in spending in areas that continue to grow each year. The House version of the budget does not include these cuts. Any differences between the versions must be reconciled before landing on the governor’s desk. Nixon penned a letter Friday to lawmakers explaining why he believes the cuts are unnecessary. In March, 2015, fiscal year-to-date general revenue was up 6.8 percent — or $379 million — compared to last year. This is higher than was anticipated and means there will be an additional $80 million of general revenue for next year. But the problem is there are still three months left in the fiscal year that ends June 30, said House Budget Vice Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick, R-Shell Knob. Revenue could fall significantly in that amount of time, he added.

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Nixon also noted lawmakers sent tax amnesty to his desk, a measure that would allow Missourians to pay delinquent taxes without facing penalties or interest and result in an estimated additional $60 million of general revenue. Revenue generated from that measure, however, already is earmarked for Medicaid adult dental benefits, a promise made to persuade Sen. Rob Schaaf, R-St. Joseph, not to filibuster tax amnesty. On Tuesday night, Schaaf tried to remove programs such as the state psychiatric hospitals and the developmental disabilities community support from the group to receive a 4 percent cut. He says he has a “special passion in his heart” for those programs. Under the plan, the Department of Mental Health estimates that state psychiatric hospitals, with 1,200 psychiatric hospital beds including those at Fulton State Hospital, could receive a $7.4 million cut; community support, which serves 13,000 individuals, could receive a $11.9 million cut. But state psychiatric hospitals could not sustain a 4 percent cut because they operate at or above 100 percent capacity already, said Debra Walker, department spokeswoman. Schaefer said the cuts wouldn’t have to be distributed evenly. It would be up to each department to find eiciencies and decide where to make cuts. Other programs subject to these cuts include: • Traumatic brain injury program. • Missourians with HIV-AIDS who don’t have health care coverage or financial resources to cope. • Services and care for abused and neglected children. • Services for children in the juvenile justice system. Lawmakers must send the 13 bills to Nixon by May 8, but Republican leaders have said they hope to finish earlier than that.

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The bills are House Bills 1-13. Alex Stuckey • 573-556-6186 @alexdstuckey on Twitter astuckey@post-dispatch.com

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hEalth

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

Salk polio vaccine changed the world

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

THe BoTTom LIne • President Obama has proposed a student loan bill of rights. Go to stltoday.com/video to watch this week’s “The Bottom Line” and see why David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher say it won’t do much to alleviate students’ growing debt burden.

By VirGiniA Linn Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

PITTSBURGH • Sixty years ago Sunday,

the Salk polio vaccine was declared “safe, efective and potent,” an announcement cheered with the fervor of a national holiday. At the time, the dreaded disease was infecting more than 50,000 children in the United States a year, killing many and leaving some so paralyzed they could breathe only with the help of an iron lung. And 60 years later, the triumphs of this vaccine — the U.S. had its last case of indigenous polio in 1979 — are being used as a teaching tool for health providers and consumers who recently watched measles cases explode across seven states from a single infected person visiting Disneyland late last year. A low vaccination rate among children, particularly in Southern California, allowed the highly infectious disease to quickly spread, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The discovery of the polio vaccine in 1955 by a University of Pittsburgh research team led by Jonas Salk is “a story that has to be retold or people forget,” said Carl Kurlander, president and CEO of Steeltown Entertainment Project, which produced a 2010 documentary about Pittsburgh’s involvement in the discovery, “A Shot Felt ’Round the World.” Since the measles outbreak, Kurlander said he’s been fielding calls from health providers, rabbis and other religious leaders seeking DVDs of the documentary and more information so they can share with patients and congregations about the importance of vaccination. “It’s very topical,” Kurlander said. “It’s more pertinent than ever.” While there are still three countries where transmission of polio has never been interrupted — Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan — great strides have been made elsewhere since 1955, when 600,000 people around the world were infected with poliomyelitis. India, with its 1 billion people, was oicially removed from the list of countries with active transmission in 2012. “There’s no technical reason why there should be cases anywhere in the world by the end of this year,” said Oliver Rosenbauer, communications officer for the World Health Organization’s Global Polio Eradication Initiative. “It’s a question of political will and societal will.” WHO is progressing on a five-year

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Dr. Jonas Salk outside the White House on April 22, 1955.

plan that ends in 2018 that would not only wipe out all cases, but also ensure that a framework is in place to prevent any resurgence of the disease, he said. This year, 21 cases have been reported in the world — 20 in Pakistan, where there has been a flare-up, and one in Afghanistan, according to the latest figures compiled by the World Health Organization. Nigeria — where an 11-month boycott in the northern Islamic states against polio vaccination in 2003-04 caused cases to swell and spread to 14 previously polio-free countries — has not had a reported case in more than six months. There were six cases of wild polio reported there in all of 2014 (and an additional 30 derived from the vaccine). Attention is now focused on an emergency situation in Pakistan, where an outbreak occurred in 2014 of 306 wild polio cases. Most of the country is poliofree, with cases concentrated in a northern tribal areas of the country. The vaccination initiative in Pakistan is no longer overseen by just the ministry of health, but by the prime minister’s oice. Health volunteers are trying to immunize 35 million children under age 5 in Pakistan, and while communities are quite receptive to vaccination, Rosenbauer said, there has been violence against some health workers in the past who have been targeted by anti-government militants.

just change your bra! If your straps slip, the back rides up or your bra is just uncomfortable, come in and be fitted by an expert. Our certified bra fitters will help you find the perfect bra. In addition, Dillard’s will donate $2 for every regular price bra or shapewear purchase to the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

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Selection varies by size and store. Call 1-800-345-5273 to find a Dillard’s store near you.

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saturdaY’s best

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Lincoln is a still-evolving icon Historians take fresh look at the president as the 150th anniversary of his death nears EvENTS COmmEmORATE LINCOLN ASSASSINATION

By ChuCk RAASCh St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum in Springield, which is commemorating its 10th anniversary on April 19, will note Lincoln’s death on Tuesday with an afternoon performance of “One Destiny,” a play about Lincoln’s assassination. An evening vigil of Lincoln readings is scheduled to end at 10:15 p.m., coinciding with the time Booth shot him. Springield will mark the end of Lincoln’s cross-country funeral procession on May 1-3 with three days of symposiums, lag ceremonies, Civil War encampments and historic home tours. Howard University historian Edna Greene Medford will speak there about “Lincoln’s Legacy of Justice and Opportunity: Our Challenge a Century and a Half Later.” For more information, go to illinois.gov/alplm/ tenthanniversary.

WASHINGTON • Abraham Lin-

coln, the great emancipator from Illinois who was shot by assassin John Wilkes Booth 150 years ago Tuesday, has been evolving in myth and memory. As recent scholarship and events have shown, the Civil War and Lincoln’s struggle to abolish slavery are part of a continuum that exends to today’s struggles over equality and race. With the anniversary of his death approaching, historians and moviemakers are taking a fresh look at Lincoln’s words, actions, his considerable abilities as a communicator and his unique relationship to black Americans. Racial flashpoints in Ferguson and in North Charleston, S.C., where white police oicers fatally shot black men, demonstrated that the same racial divisions confronting Lincoln in 1865 continue to plague Americans today. Ceremonies commemorating the assassination’s anniversary are planned at the Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum in Springfield, Ill., and at Ford’s Theater and the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. The election of Barack Obama, another son of Illinois who frequently quoted Lincoln in his 2008 campaign, was supposed to mark a pivot into post-racial politics. But Obama’s presidency has rehashed many of the same issues that confronted Lincoln. “All generations rethink Lincoln, and for this generation, it’s about rethinking the meaning of freedom in a moment that is decidedly not the post-racial moment some expected with the election and re-election of the nation’s first black president,” said Martha Hodes, an author and professor of history at New York University. Hodes said Lincoln’s memory was hitched to “resonating current events” and “renewed calls for justice.” Other historians agree, pointing to ongoing political fights over voting rights. “Lincoln was murdered not because he issued the Emancipation Proclamation nor because he expedited the passage of the 13th Amendment abolishing slavery throughout the land, but because on April 11, 1865, he publicly called for black voting rights,” said Michael Burlingame, Naomi B. Lynn Distinguished

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RobeRt Cohen • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

In 2012, visitors to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springield, Ill., view the president pondering moving forward with his Emancipation Proclamation. The 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s assassination will be commemorated this week.

Chair in Lincoln Studies, at University of Illinois at Springfield. Booth, in the audience for that speech, vowed then to kill Lincoln, said Burlingame, author of the 2008, two-volume: “Lincoln: A Life.” “It seems to me appropriate that we consider Lincoln as much a martyr to black civil rights as Martin Luther King, Medgar Evers ... or any of the other champions of the civil rights movement of the 1960s,” Burlingame said. Lincoln has not always been viewed that way, as Lincoln scholars explained during a lateMarch symposium at Ford’s Theater. After the adulatory “cult of Lincoln” in the 1950s, “a big change took place,” said Richard Wightman Fox, a history professor at the University of Southern California. In the 1960s and 1970s Lincoln’s memory was pushed aside. Historians and civil rights activists questioned whether Lincoln was fervent enough in his push to abolish slavery. Liberal scholars began viewing Lincoln as “unfortunately linked to the warfare state and so Vietnam and other factors entered into this declining adulation,” Fox said.

“Lincoln never faded from view,” Fox said, “it is just that opinion about him became entirely less favorable.” For African-Americans, that devaluing of the Lincoln legacy began during the Great Depression, when blacks were disproportionately sufering, said Edna Greene Medford, chair of the history department at the historically black Howard University. Lincoln suddenly became a symbol of disappointment. “These former slaves recalled what life was supposed to be and what it was not,” Medford said. “They were saying, ‘Lincoln freed us, but he didn’t give us anything but our freedom. We needed land, we needed more opportunity.’ ” But the connection with Lincoln “never totally dies out,” Medford continued. “Because remember in 1963 and Martin Luther King, and that march to the [‘I Have a Dream’] speech goes to the Lincoln Memorial. And [King] talks about emancipation and how people are still sufering.”

LINCOLN TODAy Medford said that today, many black Americans “understand the complexity of the man and are understanding more what

Lincoln was about, why he did what he did” as a leader in a more overtly racist era in American history. James Cornelius, curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Lincoln Museum and Library in Springfield said recent scholarship on letters Lincoln wrote to families of soldiers had deepened a sense that the man from Illinois “cared deeply, individually, about each man he sent of to war, and possible death.” “It’s only in the last five years or so that we’ve begun to grasp the extent of his paperwork on this point, as a reflection of his understanding of his duty as commander in chief to every soldier,” Cornelius said. The Lincoln Library museum is commemorating its 10th anniversary April 19 and has broken presidential library attendance records with 3.7 million visitors in that time. Steven Spielberg’s 2012 movie “Lincoln,” starring Daniel DayLewis, familiarized new generations with everything from Lincoln’s epic struggles over the war and abolition, to the way he walked, talked and used humor to achieve political goals. Reflecting that interest, Ford’s Theater has had months of exhibits, forums and speeches.

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The restored, working theater seven blocks from the White House will host a 36-hour stretch of candlelight vigils with actors in period costume giving tours and speeches beginning Tuesday and lasting through the night. A wreath-laying ceremony on the steps of the Peterson Boarding House will take place precisely at 7:22 a.m. Wednesday to mark the time of Lincoln’s death. Bells throughout Washington will peal shortly thereafter, just as they did on April 15, 1865. Six days later, a two-week funeral train procession began retracing much of the 1,650-mile trip through seven states that Lincoln took from Springfield to Washington to take oice in 1861. Fox said Obama and Spielberg brought Lincoln back “to a kind of centrality in our culture as the emancipator, and that is an historically decisive and significant development.” “We have to protect (that legacy) if we care about equality, as Lincoln did,” Fox said. “That is Lincoln in a nutshell. He is a zealot for equality. He just thinks it has to take time to happen.”

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A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Obama, Castro turn the page Two nations’ leaders meet for irst time in more than 50 years, vow to abandon enmities By JOSH LEDERMAN AND JIM KUHNHENN Associated Press

PANAMA CIT Y • President

Barack Obama and Cuba’s Raul Castro sat down together Saturday in the first formal meeting of the two countries’ leaders in a half-century, pledging to reach for the kind of peaceful relationship that has eluded their nations for generations. In a small conference room in a Panama City convention center, the two sat side by side in a bid to inject fresh momentum into their months-old efort to restore diplomatic ties. Reflecting on the historic nature of the meeting, Obama said he felt it was time to try something new and to engage with both Cuba’s government and its people. “What we have both concluded is that we can disagree with a spirit of respect and civility,” Obama said. “And over time, it is possible for us to turn the page and develop a new relationship between our two countries.” Castro, for his part, said he agreed with everything Obama had said — a stunning statement in and of itself for the Cuban leader. But he added the caveat that they had “agreed to disagree” at times. Castro said he had told the Americans that Cuba was willing to discuss issues such as human rights and freedom of the press, maintaining that “everything can be on the table.” “We are disposed to talk about everything — with patience,” Castro said in Spanish. “Some things we will agree with, and others we won’t.” Not since 1958 have a U.S. and Cuban leader convened a substantial meeting; at the time, Dwight Eisenhower was in the White House and Fulgencio Batista in charge in Cuba. But relations quickly entered into a deep freeze amid the Cold War, and the U.S. spent decades trying to either isolate or actively overthrow the Cuban government. In a stroke of coincidence, Eisenhower’s meeting with Batista in 1958 also took place in Panama, imbuing Saturday’s session between Obama and Castro with a sense of having come full circle. The historic gathering played out on the sidelines of the Summit of the Americas, which this year included Cuba for the first time. Although the meeting

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AssociAted Press

U.S. President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro shake hands Saturday at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama.

wasn’t publicly announced in advance, White House aides had suggested the two leaders were looking for an opportunity to meet while in Panama and to discuss the ongoing eforts to open embassies in Havana and Washington, among other issues. At the start of their hourlong meeting, Obama acknowledged that Cuba, too, would continue raising concerns about U.S. policies — earning a friendly smirk from Castro. Obama described the sit-down later as “candid and fruitful” and said he and Castro were able to speak about their diferences in a productive way. Even so, raw passions were on vivid display earlier in the day when Castro, in a meandering, nearly hourlong speech to the summit, ran through an exhaustive history of perceived Cuban grievances against the U.S. dating back more than a century. Then, in an abrupt about-face, he apologized for letting his emotions get the best of him. He

said many U.S. presidents were at fault for that troubled history — but that Obama isn’t one of them. Obama agreed. “The Cold War has been over for a long time,” he said. The flurry of diplomacy kicked of Wednesday when Obama and Castro spoke by phone — only the second known call between U.S. and Cuban presidents in decades. It continued Friday evening when Obama and Castro traded handshakes and small talk at the summit’s opening ceremonies. Obama and Castro sent shock waves throughout the hemisphere in December when they announced the plan for rapprochement, and their envoys have spent the ensuing months working through thorny issues such as sanctions, the reopening of embassies, and the island nation’s place on the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. Although earlier in the week Obama suggested a decision to

remove Cuba from the list was imminent, he declined to take that step Saturday, citing the need to study a recently completed State Department review. Lawmakers briefed on that review have said it resulted in a recommendation that Cuba be delisted. Removal from the terrorism list is a top priority for Castro because it would not only purge a stain on Cuba’s pride but also ease its ability to conduct simple financial transactions. “Yes, we have conducted solidarity with other peoples that could be considered terrorism — when we were cornered, when we were strongly harassed,” Castro conceded earlier Saturday. “We had no other choice but to give up or to fight back.” Yet Obama’s delay in delisting Cuba comes as the U.S. seeks concessions of its own — namely, the easing of restrictions on American diplomats’ freedom of movement in Havana and bet-

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ter human rights protections. Obama met with Cuban dissidents Friday, and on Saturday he said the U.S. would continue pressing Cuba on issues such as democracy and human rights. “We have very diferent views about how society should be organized,” Obama told reporters just before returning to Washington. A successful detente would form a cornerstone of Obama’s foreign policy legacy. But it’s an endeavor he can’t undertake alone: Only Congress can fully lift the onerous U.S. sanctions on Cuba, and there are deep pockets of opposition in the U.S. to taking that step. As he sat down with the American president, Castro observed that nothing is truly static. Today’s profound disagreements could turn into areas of consensus tomorrow. “The pace of life at the present moment in the world,” he said, “it’s very fast.”

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LOCAL

04.12.2015 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A5

DEFENDANTS AND CHARGES All face charges of providing material support to terrorists and conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists. Ramiz Hodzic and Rosic also face a charge of conspiracy to kill and maim persons in a foreign country.

Ramiz Hodzic 40, St. Louis County

SEdina Hodzic 35, St. Louis County

niHad RoSic 27, Utica, N.Y.

mEdiHa mEdy SalkicEvic 34, Schiller Park, Ill.

aRmin HaRcEvic 37, San Jose, Calif.

JaSminka Ramic 42, Germany

Photo courteSy of the NatioNal Park Service

LEFT • An undated Facebook page photograph of Ramo Pazara. RIGHT • Ramo Pazara (center, second row) is pictured bearded and wearing white during the naturalization ceremony on May 17, 2013, at the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site.

Pazara climbed extremist ranks TERRORISM • fROM A1

and moved to St. Louis. After 17 months here, in 2013, Pazara left to fight in Syria, where he reportedly would rise to be a deputy to a top commander of the murderous, apocalyptic Islamic State terrorist group. He was one among a tiny number of Americans fighting with extremists in Syria, perhaps a dozen by one FBI estimate in September. What Pazara did is the linchpin of a federal criminal case here that led in February to the arrest of six people — three of them current or former St. Louis-area residents — on charges of supporting overseas terrorists. The indictments claim they knowingly provided funds for Pazara and others in Syria, Iraq and elsewhere who engaged in violence “with and in support of” the Islamic State group, al-Qaida in Iraq and the Nusra Front. Ramiz and Sedina Hodzic, a married couple living in south St. Louis County, also bought uniforms, rifle scopes and other gear, the indictments say. Nihad Rosic, of Utica, N.Y., allegedly was stopped on his way to Syria. It is unclear what motivated Pazara, believed to have died last fall in Syria at age 37 or 38. His Facebook postings from overseas are gone. Friends, relatives and employers won’t talk. Court hearings for the others revealed little. But those hearings did hint at a possible defense. Did lingering hatred over the brutal war that split their Bosnian homeland in the 1980s lead the defendants to support enemies of the Syrian regime without regard for whether the same groups also are enemies of the U.S.? Did they just intend to help some of the hundreds of groups believed to be involved in the conflict, many of which are not extremists? And legally, would it matter? The case sparked anger and confusion in the St. Louis Bosnian community, the largest outside the home country.

BOSNIANS DECRY EXTREMISTS Mensur Hatic, a businessman who has a radio show and Bosnian TV news channel, said, “Every group of people has to have a couple of idiots. These are our share.” He said Pazara and the Hodzics kept to themselves. “I have talked to so many people,” he said, “and nobody knows them.” And he inferred that as natives of Teslic, in a poor area, Pazara and Ramiz Hodzic may have been relatively uneducated and more susceptible to recruitment by radicals. Muhamed Sacirbey, a former ambassador to the United Nations from Bosnia and Herzegovina, wrote in an email interview that radical recruiters play on the dissatisfaction of Bosnian Muslims over what they see as an inadequate response to “ethnic cleansings” and the outcome of the war. Adil Imdad, the social services committee chair of the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis, blamed online videos “that portray (extremists) as brave and bold soldiers of Islam.” “We, of course, condemn that,” Imdad said, adding that he knows of no St. Louis area imams

who preach such views. Dr. Ghazala Hayat, chair of the foundation’s public affairs committee, said the charges are at odds with her experiences with Bosnian immigrants. “The American dream — that’s what they’re focused on,” Hayat said. Interviews, court records and documents show that Pazara and Ramiz Hodzic struggled to find that dream.

RAMO PAZARA The Bosnian news magazine Slobodna Bosna reported after the charges that Pazara, who they dubbed an “Islamic fanatic,” briefly fought for the Serbs in the war before coming to the U.S. His deep past is murky. He pops up in available records in 2003, living in an apartment just north of Detroit. He registered a company called R&A Express Trucking, and with his thenwife, Amela Pazara, bought a small brick house. The company made just $10,000 in 2006, and $4,000 in 2007, records show. The couple divorced and lost the house. Pazara filed for bankruptcy in 2008, listing more than $36,000 in debts. He claimed his only income was money from his family, and that his ex-wife was taking over the company. Pazara spent some time in New York, where he has relatives. On Dec. 15, 2011, he rented a one-bedroom, $520-a-month apartment in the Oakbrook Gardens complex in south St. Louis County. By then, his beard was long, and his clothing ethnic. Lisa Albert, Oakbrook’s former manager, said Pazara was late several times with his rent but “always very, very friendly.” She added, “You never would have suspected anything.” She said the news about him “gave me chills.” A former Oakbrook maintenance worker, Izet Fejzic, said Pazara stood out because of his clothing. Fejzic, also Bosnian, speculated that Pazara might have fallen for a pitch from foreigners who fought for Bosnians during their war, something like: “We helped you guys, now you have to help us.” Or, he said, Pazara might have gone to help a different group and ended up on the wrong side. Pazara left Oakbrook at the end of April 2012. It’s not clear where he stayed then.

CITIZENSHIP TO SLAUGHTER On May 17, 2013, Pazara became a U.S. citizen and changed his name to Abdullah Ramo Pazara. Yara Holt, who also became a citizen that day, remembered Pazara as someone who came alone, was perhaps the only one who didn’t get a picture with the judge and “kind of took his certificate and ran.” Eleven days later, according to the indictment, Pazara traveled to Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina before arriving in Syria that July. According to court testimony, Pazara posted Facebook pictures of himself in military clothing, holding a rifle in front of the black flag associated with Islamic State. Authorities began tracking him, using social media along with wiretaps, search warrants

and other tactics authorized by the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court process. The indictments claim that on March 20, 2014, Pazara told an unidentified person about a mission in which he and others killed 11 people and captured one, whom they intended to “slaughter” the next day. Pazara also allegedly said Islamic State was “spreading every day.” Media reports say that at the time Pazara died, he was a deputy to Omar al-Shishani, one of Islamic State’s top commanders. The FBI briefed some St. Louis-area Muslim leaders shortly after the arrests. Agents claimed that some images from an infamous Islamic State massacre of Iraqi soldiers were traced to Pazara, indicating he was there, Imdad said. “That was pretty alerting — shocking to me that he was standing right there ... as the massacre was happening,” Imdad said. Hayat said she left the briefing with the impression that Pazara was the leader of the group that included the Hodzics and that there was a recent “ideological” change in Pazara and the Hodzics. The FBI declined to comment about the briefing.

RAMIZ AND SEDINA HODZIC The indictment claims Hodzic was a conduit for money and supplies to Pazara and others. Paul D’Agrosa, the lawyer for Sedina Hodzic, said that Ramiz Hodzic and Pazara were friends in Bosnia. Both were from Teslic, but U.S. Attorney Richard Callahan said they grew closer in St. Louis. In a series of articles about the charges, the Bosnian news website Saf said Ramiz Hodzic was a Bosnian war hero who joined the fight against the Serbs at 16 and won the highest Bosnian army medal, the Golden Lily. The website disputed claims by another Bosnian news site, Avaz, that Hodzic belonged to a radical Islamic group during the war. Avaz speculated that Hodzic made terrorist connections in Bosnia that endured when he came to the U.S. The Hodzics told neighbors that they arrived in Washington roughly 16 years ago with nothing. Sedina Hodzic was pregnant. The couple soon left for St. Louis after finding Washington too expensive. They moved into a brick-fronted duplex in the 4800 block of Milentz Avenue in south St. Louis. Next-door neighbor Bob Bayer said Ramiz Hodzic “wouldn’t hardly say hello to you.” Their wives talked, mostly about the Hodzics’ baby, Bayer said, and Sedina Hodzic would share coffee “strong enough to make you stand up.” Bayer said he recalled Ramiz Hodzic as a “fool” because he used to barbecue in the backyard, inebriated, recklessly pouring lighter fluid onto the flames.

‘GOOD PEOPLE’ AND CAMOUFLAGE Court filings show that the Hodzics, like Pazara, struggled financially. He was sued in 2008 for three months of back rent, and later

for unpaid credit card bills. Liens claimed the Hodzics failed to pay $347,000 in state and federal taxes dating to 2004. The Hodzics next lived in a two-bedroom apartment on Calley Drive until June 2013. A neighbor, who refused to let her name be used, said “they were good people” who were always nice and never caused problems. She said that when she read about the charges, “My heart broke.” The Hodzics’ youngest child was born in 2013, the neighbor said, and the family moved to a three-bedroom condo in the 4300 block of Chateau de Ville Drive, in South County. Joyce Sorth, whose husband is a property manager there, said she was told that Ramiz Hodzic was a Bosnian war hero. Sorth had only a nodding acquaintance with him, however, and said Sedina Hodzic never talked much about her husband. Sedina Hodzic began wearing a veil three to four months ago, she noted. Sedina Hodzic’s lawyer has said the couple have three children, ages 16, 12 and almost 2, and no other relatives in America. The Hodzics occasionally attended several area mosques. None of the imams said that they knew the Hodzics or Pazara well. Saff, the news website, said Ramiz Hodzic began supporting the Syrian opposition at the same time America did — which was before the named terrorist groups emerged or were recognized. Some of the other defendants were simply helping Syrian refugees, Saf suggested. Beginning in August 2013, Ramiz Hodzic made a series of trips to Uncle Sam’s, a surplus store on Watson Road in Marlborough, according to the indictment and assistant manager Brady Patullo. Patullo said Hodzic spent a total of roughly $2,000 to $3,000 on used camouflage-style military uniforms, “which will get you a lot of used camo.” Patullo called Hodzic “a man of few words.” The indictment says that on April 1, 2014, Hodzic told Rosic that he had watched videos of a beheading and of Pazara’s group fighting, and said “good snipers could do wonders” in Syria. Later that month, he promised to supply everything Rosic would need if he went to Syria — including a night-vision camera to record kills, the indictment claims.

QUESTIONING THE CHARGES Saff isn’t alone in raising questions about what the defendants knew or thought about Pazara’s activities. In a Feb. 24 hearing in California, a lawyer for co-defendant Armin Harcevic said his client made just one transfer, of $1,500, to Hodzic. Harcevic has family in St. Louis but left looking for construction work in California, his then-lawyer, Graham Archer, said in court. Harcevic is a lawful permanent resident who fled ethnic cleansing, Archer said. JoAnn Trog, the lawyer for Rosic, denied that his client planned to fight overseas. She said the former mixed martial

arts fighter was only going to visit family in Bosnia. She also said that Rosic’s $500 donation was to help his countrymen, not a war. But Assistant U.S. Attorney Matt Drake countered in court that Rosic had exchanged messages with Pazara, writing that he “cannot wait to encounter the enemies” and asking Pazara to set aside an assault rifle or sniper rifle for him. Defendant Mediha Salkicevic, 34, is the mother of four girls, ages 6 to 15, and works the third shift at a shipping company seven days a week to support the family, lawyer Andrea Gambino said in a bail hearing. Gambino said she merely collected money for food, blankets, clothing and other items for the needy in Bosnia and elsewhere. Salkicevic is a war refugee who, as a child, “witnessed the brutal deaths” of her brother, a 4-year-old cousin and a pregnant woman and her baby, according to Gambino. “Mediha Salkicevic is a victim of war — not a perpetrator of violence,” Gambino wrote. She said Salkicevic believed that Hodzic was doing the same thing she was — donating to the needy overseas. Although FBI Special Agent Jeremy Francis said in court that Salkicevic was praising Pazara and his activities in Bosnian on Facebook, Gambino countered that the comments actually were blessings, scripture, or qualified by smiling emoticons. Gambino also argued that the allegations involve conduct in 2013, before Islamic State hit the news, and that there has been no evidence about what acts were committed overseas and by whom. Under questioning by Gambino, Francis testified that Salkicevic could only identify the flag behind Pazara in one picture as belonging to a group fighting in Syria. Gambino then asked whether Francis was aware of Bosnian Muslims who had gone to fight for the Free Syrian Army, another group. Francis said he didn’t know. Jordan J. Paust, a professor at the University of Houston who teaches international criminal law, told the Post-Dispatch that prosecutors don’t have to prove the defendants knew that the groups for which Pazara and the others were fighting were designated foreign terrorist organizations. They can use circumstantial evidence, he said. The term “material support” in the charge is vague, Paust said. And even if donations were intended for bread or blankets, “the organization can take other money and use it for weaponry. Some of the courts have focused on that, and said indirectly you’re providing them funds so they can use other money for weaponry.” The defendants could argue that Pazara had been forced to fight for Islamic State, or that their money was going to a diferent group. But, Proust said, if Pazara was posting Islamic State pictures, “Then, you’re in trouble.” Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com


LOCAL

04.12.2015 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A5

DEFENDANTS AND CHARGES All face charges of providing material support to terrorists and conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists. Ramiz Hodzic and Rosic also face a charge of conspiracy to kill and maim persons in a foreign country.

Ramiz Hodzic 40, St. Louis County

SEdina Hodzic 35, St. Louis County

niHad RoSic 27, Utica, N.Y.

mEdiHa mEdy SalkicEvic 34, Schiller Park, Ill.

aRmin HaRcEvic 37, San Jose, Calif.

JaSminka Ramic 42, Germany

Photo courteSy of the NatioNal Park Service

LEFT • An undated Facebook page photograph of Ramo Pazara. RIGHT • Ramo Pazara (center, second row) is pictured bearded and wearing white during the naturalization ceremony on May 17, 2013, at the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site.

Pazara climbed extremist ranks TERRORISM • fROM A1

and moved to St. Louis. After 17 months here, in 2013, Pazara left to fight in Syria, where he reportedly would rise to be a deputy to a top commander of the murderous, apocalyptic Islamic State terrorist group. He was one among a tiny number of Americans fighting with extremists in Syria, perhaps a dozen by one FBI estimate in September. What Pazara did is the linchpin of a federal criminal case here that led in February to the arrest of six people — three of them current or former St. Louis-area residents — on charges of supporting overseas terrorists. The indictments claim they knowingly provided funds for Pazara and others in Syria, Iraq and elsewhere who engaged in violence “with and in support of” the Islamic State group, al-Qaida in Iraq and the Nusra Front. Ramiz and Sedina Hodzic, a married couple living in south St. Louis County, also bought uniforms, rifle scopes and other gear, the indictments say. Nihad Rosic, of Utica, N.Y., allegedly was stopped on his way to Syria. It is unclear what motivated Pazara, believed to have died last fall in Syria at age 37 or 38. His Facebook postings from overseas are gone. Friends, relatives and employers won’t talk. Court hearings for the others revealed little. But those hearings did hint at a possible defense. Did lingering hatred over the brutal war that split their Bosnian homeland in the 1980s lead the defendants to support enemies of the Syrian regime without regard for whether the same groups also are enemies of the U.S.? Did they just intend to help some of the hundreds of groups believed to be involved in the conflict, many of which are not extremists? And legally, would it matter? The case sparked anger and confusion in the St. Louis Bosnian community, the largest in the United States.

BOSNIANS DECRY EXTREMISTS Mensur Hatic, a businessman who has a radio show and Bosnian TV news channel, said, “Every group of people has to have a couple of idiots. These are our share.” He said Pazara and the Hodzics kept to themselves. “I have talked to so many people,” he said, “and nobody knows them.” And he inferred that as natives of Teslic, in a poor area, Pazara and Ramiz Hodzic may have been relatively uneducated and more susceptible to recruitment by radicals. Muhamed Sacirbey, a former ambassador to the United Nations from Bosnia and Herzegovina, wrote in an email interview that radical recruiters play on the dissatisfaction of Bosnian Muslims over what they see as an inadequate response to “ethnic cleansings” and the outcome of the war. Adil Imdad, the social services committee chair of the Islamic Foundation of Greater St. Louis, blamed online videos “that portray (extremists) as brave and bold soldiers of Islam.” “We, of course, condemn that,” Imdad said, adding that he knows of no St. Louis area imams

who preach such views. Dr. Ghazala Hayat, chair of the foundation’s public affairs committee, said the charges are at odds with her experiences with Bosnian immigrants. “The American dream — that’s what they’re focused on,” Hayat said. Interviews, court records and documents show that Pazara and Ramiz Hodzic struggled to find that dream.

RAMO PAZARA The Bosnian news magazine Slobodna Bosna reported after the charges that Pazara, who they dubbed an “Islamic fanatic,” briefly fought for the Serbs in the war before coming to the U.S. His deep past is murky. He pops up in available records in 2003, living in an apartment just north of Detroit. He registered a company called R&A Express Trucking, and with his thenwife, Amela Pazara, bought a small brick house. The company made just $10,000 in 2006, and $4,000 in 2007, records show. The couple divorced and lost the house. Pazara filed for bankruptcy in 2008, listing more than $36,000 in debts. He claimed his only income was money from his family, and that his ex-wife was taking over the company. Pazara spent some time in New York, where he has relatives. On Dec. 15, 2011, he rented a one-bedroom, $520-a-month apartment in the Oakbrook Gardens complex in south St. Louis County. By then, his beard was long, and his clothing ethnic. Lisa Albert, Oakbrook’s former manager, said Pazara was late several times with his rent but “always very, very friendly.” She added, “You never would have suspected anything.” She said the news about him “gave me chills.” A former Oakbrook maintenance worker, Izet Fejzic, said Pazara stood out because of his clothing. Fejzic, also Bosnian, speculated that Pazara might have fallen for a pitch from foreigners who fought for Bosnians during their war, something like: “We helped you guys, now you have to help us.” Or, he said, Pazara might have gone to help a different group and ended up on the wrong side. Pazara left Oakbrook at the end of April 2012. It’s not clear where he stayed then.

CITIZENSHIP TO SLAUGHTER On May 17, 2013, Pazara became a U.S. citizen and changed his name to Abdullah Ramo Pazara. Yara Holt, who also became a citizen that day, remembered Pazara as someone who came alone, was perhaps the only one who didn’t get a picture with the judge and “kind of took his certificate and ran.” Eleven days later, according to the indictment, Pazara traveled to Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina before arriving in Syria that July. According to court testimony, Pazara posted Facebook pictures of himself in military clothing, holding a rifle in front of the black flag associated with Islamic State. Authorities began tracking him, using social media along with wiretaps, search warrants

and other tactics authorized by the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act court process. The indictments claim that on March 20, 2014, Pazara told an unidentified person about a mission in which he and others killed 11 people and captured one, whom they intended to “slaughter” the next day. Pazara also allegedly said Islamic State was “spreading every day.” Media reports say that at the time Pazara died, he was a deputy to Omar al-Shishani, one of Islamic State’s top commanders. The FBI briefed some St. Louis-area Muslim leaders shortly after the arrests. Agents claimed that some images from an infamous Islamic State massacre of Iraqi soldiers were traced to Pazara, indicating he was there, Imdad said. “That was pretty alerting — shocking to me that he was standing right there ... as the massacre was happening,” Imdad said. Hayat said she left the briefing with the impression that Pazara was the leader of the group that included the Hodzics and that there was a recent “ideological” change in Pazara and the Hodzics. The FBI declined to comment about the briefing.

RAMIZ AND SEDINA HODZIC The indictment claims Hodzic was a conduit for money and supplies to Pazara and others. Paul D’Agrosa, the lawyer for Sedina Hodzic, said that Ramiz Hodzic and Pazara were friends in Bosnia. Both were from Teslic, but U.S. Attorney Richard Callahan said they grew closer in St. Louis. In a series of articles about the charges, the Bosnian news website Saf said Ramiz Hodzic was a Bosnian war hero who joined the fight against the Serbs at 16 and won the highest Bosnian army medal, the Golden Lily. The website disputed claims by another Bosnian news site, Avaz, that Hodzic belonged to a radical Islamic group during the war. Avaz speculated that Hodzic made terrorist connections in Bosnia that endured when he came to the U.S. The Hodzics told neighbors that they arrived in Washington roughly 16 years ago with nothing. Sedina Hodzic was pregnant. The couple soon left for St. Louis after finding Washington too expensive. They moved into a brick-fronted duplex in the 4800 block of Milentz Avenue in south St. Louis. Next-door neighbor Bob Bayer said Ramiz Hodzic “wouldn’t hardly say hello to you.” Their wives talked, mostly about the Hodzics’ baby, Bayer said, and Sedina Hodzic would share coffee “strong enough to make you stand up.” Bayer said he recalled Ramiz Hodzic as a “fool” because he used to barbecue in the backyard, inebriated, recklessly pouring lighter fluid onto the flames.

‘GOOD PEOPLE’ AND CAMOUFLAGE Court filings show that the Hodzics, like Pazara, struggled financially. He was sued in 2008 for three months of back rent, and later

for unpaid credit card bills. Liens claimed the Hodzics failed to pay $347,000 in state and federal taxes dating to 2004. The Hodzics next lived in a two-bedroom apartment on Calley Drive until June 2013. A neighbor, who refused to let her name be used, said “they were good people” who were always nice and never caused problems. She said that when she read about the charges, “My heart broke.” The Hodzics’ youngest child was born in 2013, the neighbor said, and the family moved to a three-bedroom condo in the 4300 block of Chateau de Ville Drive, in South County. Joyce Sorth, whose husband is a property manager there, said she was told that Ramiz Hodzic was a Bosnian war hero. Sorth had only a nodding acquaintance with him, however, and said Sedina Hodzic never talked much about her husband. Sedina Hodzic began wearing a veil three to four months ago, she noted. Sedina Hodzic’s lawyer has said the couple have three children, ages 16, 12 and almost 2, and no other relatives in America. The Hodzics occasionally attended several area mosques. None of the imams said that they knew the Hodzics or Pazara well. Saff, the news website, said Ramiz Hodzic began supporting the Syrian opposition at the same time America did — which was before the named terrorist groups emerged or were recognized. Some of the other defendants were simply helping Syrian refugees, Saf suggested. Beginning in August 2013, Ramiz Hodzic made a series of trips to Uncle Sam’s, a surplus store on Watson Road in Marlborough, according to the indictment and assistant manager Brady Patullo. Patullo said Hodzic spent a total of roughly $2,000 to $3,000 on used camouflage-style military uniforms, “which will get you a lot of used camo.” Patullo called Hodzic “a man of few words.” The indictment says that on April 1, 2014, Hodzic told Rosic that he had watched videos of a beheading and of Pazara’s group fighting, and said “good snipers could do wonders” in Syria. Later that month, he promised to supply everything Rosic would need if he went to Syria — including a night-vision camera to record kills, the indictment claims.

QUESTIONING THE CHARGES Saff isn’t alone in raising questions about what the defendants knew or thought about Pazara’s activities. In a Feb. 24 hearing in California, a lawyer for co-defendant Armin Harcevic said his client made just one transfer, of $1,500, to Hodzic. Harcevic has family in St. Louis but left looking for construction work in California, his then-lawyer, Graham Archer, said in court. Harcevic is a lawful permanent resident who fled ethnic cleansing, Archer said. JoAnn Trog, the lawyer for Rosic, denied that his client planned to fight overseas. She said the former mixed martial

arts fighter was only going to visit family in Bosnia. She also said that Rosic’s $500 donation was to help his countrymen, not a war. But Assistant U.S. Attorney Matt Drake countered in court that Rosic had exchanged messages with Pazara, writing that he “cannot wait to encounter the enemies” and asking Pazara to set aside an assault rifle or sniper rifle for him. Defendant Mediha Salkicevic, 34, is the mother of four girls, ages 6 to 15, and works the third shift at a shipping company seven days a week to support the family, lawyer Andrea Gambino said in a bail hearing. Gambino said she merely collected money for food, blankets, clothing and other items for the needy in Bosnia and elsewhere. Salkicevic is a war refugee who, as a child, “witnessed the brutal deaths” of her brother, a 4-year-old cousin and a pregnant woman and her baby, according to Gambino. “Mediha Salkicevic is a victim of war — not a perpetrator of violence,” Gambino wrote. She said Salkicevic believed that Hodzic was doing the same thing she was — donating to the needy overseas. Although FBI Special Agent Jeremy Francis said in court that Salkicevic was praising Pazara and his activities in Bosnian on Facebook, Gambino countered that the comments actually were blessings, scripture, or qualified by smiling emoticons. Gambino also argued that the allegations involve conduct in 2013, before Islamic State hit the news, and that there has been no evidence about what acts were committed overseas and by whom. Under questioning by Gambino, Francis testified that Salkicevic could only identify the flag behind Pazara in one picture as belonging to a group fighting in Syria. Gambino then asked whether Francis was aware of Bosnian Muslims who had gone to fight for the Free Syrian Army, another group. Francis said he didn’t know. Jordan J. Paust, a professor at the University of Houston who teaches international criminal law, told the Post-Dispatch that prosecutors don’t have to prove the defendants knew that the groups for which Pazara and the others were fighting were designated foreign terrorist organizations. They can use circumstantial evidence, he said. The term “material support” in the charge is vague, Paust said. And even if donations were intended for bread or blankets, “the organization can take other money and use it for weaponry. Some of the courts have focused on that, and said indirectly you’re providing them funds so they can use other money for weaponry.” The defendants could argue that Pazara had been forced to fight for Islamic State, or that their money was going to a diferent group. But, Proust said, if Pazara was posting Islamic State pictures, “Then, you’re in trouble.” Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

saturdaY’s best

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

RobeRt Cohen • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Mike Butler, owner of Landmark Sign Co., moves some of his work Friday from behind his business that was destroyed in Thursday night's storms near Spirit of St. Louis Airport in Chesterield. "I anticipate being in business as soon as I can get somewhere," said Butler, who has six employees.

Microburst cited in destructive storm Fifteen buildings in Chesterield were damaged, but there were no reports of injuries FROM STAFF REPORTS

CHESTERFIELD • The powerful wind that damaged several buildings near Spirit of St. Louis Airport on Thursday night came from a four-minute microburst, a downward burst of wind from

the base of a thunderstorm, the National Weather Service said. The damaged buildings — about 15 in total — were along Spirit of St. Louis Boulevard, Goddard Avenue and Wings of Hope Boulevard. There were no reports of

damage at the Spirit of St. Louis Airport, oicials said. There were also no reports of injuries related to the storm. On Friday morning, cleanup was underway but people were still being kept out of the hardest-hit buildings until engineers

could inspect them to make sure they were structurally sound, Monarch Fire Protection District spokesman Roger Herin said. S to r m s T h u r s d a y a n d Wednesday knocked out power to 26,000 customers of Ameren

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throughout its coverage area, which extends to southeastern Missouri. All but a handful had their power restored by late Friday evening.


A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

natiOn

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Crowd gathers to mourn leeing man shot by oicer Family says Scott feared being jailed over missed child support

DIGEST Protester’s suicide prompts lockdown at Capitol A precautionary lockdown of the U.S. Capitol was lifted after about two hours Saturday after a suicide by a man carrying a protest sign. The man died after shooting himself on the west front of the Capitol building just after 1 p.m., Capitol Police spokeswoman Kimberly Schneider said. No one else was hurt. Capitol Police Chief Kim Dine said the man had a backpack and a rolling suitcase and a sign that said something about social justice. Robert Bishop of Annapolis, Md., said he was biking near the steps of the Capitol when the suicide happened. Bishop said another witness said the man had held up a protest sign about taxation just before pulling the trigger. The lockdown came during Washington’s annual Cherry Blossom Festival, which attracts thousands of tourists during Washington’s busy season. Congress has been on spring recess for two weeks, and lawmakers are set to return to work Monday. Armed man shot by Pennsylvania trooper dies • An armed man shot by a Pennsylvania state trooper after a standof outside a county prison has died. The York County coroner’s oice says Jess Leipold, 31, was pronounced dead Friday afternoon. Leipold was shot Thursday afternoon at Adams County Prison. Authorities say Leipold was dressed in camoulage when he rode his bicycle to the prison near Gettysburg and displayed a gun to a guard in the lobby. District Attorney Shawn Wagner says Leipold ired six or eight times into the air and onto the ground during a half-hour standof just outside the prison entrance and was shot after he shouldered a rile and pointed it at the entrance.

AssociAted Press

Mourners look on as the casket of Walter Scott is removed from a hearse before his funeral on Saturday at W.O.R.D. Ministries Christian Center in Summerville, S.C. Scott was killed by a North Charleston police oicer, Michael Slager, who has been ired and charged with murder.

By BRUCE SMITH And PHILLIP LUCAS Associated Press

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. • Walter Scott — the black driver who was fatally shot while running away from a white police oicer during a traic stop — was remembered at his funeral Saturday in South Carolina as a gentle soul who fell victim to an act of racism. H u n d re d s o f m o u r n e rs crowded into W.O.R.D. Ministries Christian Center for a twohour service in memory of Scott, a father of four and Coast Guard veteran whose death sparked outrage as another instance of a white law enforcement officer’s fatally shooting an unarmed black man under questionable circumstances. The Rev. George Hamilton, a minister at W.O.R.D. Ministries, told the overflow crowd as Scott’s funeral ended that the shooting “was an act motivated by overt

racism,” and that the oicer who shot him, Michael Slager, was a disgrace to the North Charleston Police Department. “We will not indict the entire law enforcement community for the act of one racist,” Hamilton said. Police initially said Scott was shot on April 4 during a tussle over Slager’s department-issued Taser. But a video taken by a bystander surfaced, showing Scott running away as Slager shoots him eight times. Slager was fired and charged with murder. Scott was driving a 1991 Mercedes that he had bought from a neighbor and was headed to an auto parts store when he was stopped, his brother Rodney Scott said. Police said Walter Scott had a broken taillight. Video from the police car’s dashboard camera shows Slager asking Scott for his license and registration, then heading back to his cruiser before Scott gets out

of the car and runs. Scott’s relatives have said they suspect he fled Slager out of fear of being jailed again over missed child support payments. At the time he was stopped, Scott, a father of four who worked as a warehouse forklift operator, owed more than $18,000 in child support and court fees, according to Charleston County records. He last paid child support in 2012 and a bench warrant for his arrest was issued in early 2013. Scott had been in jail three times since 2008. “His mission was to avoid the police as much as possible,” Rodney Scott said. Those who knew Scott remember him as lighthearted and gentle. They describe a laidback, fun-loving man who took his girlfriend dancing on weekends. Scott had been married twice, and proposed to his girlfriend Charlotte Jones about a week before he was killed.

Second Kansan charged in bomb plot • A second Kansas man has been charged in connection with an alleged plot to detonate a vehicle bomb at the Fort Riley military base on behalf of Islamic State, federal prosecutors said. Alexander Blair, 28, of Topeka, was charged Friday with one count of failing to report a felony. Prosecutors said Blair knew of co-defendant John Booker’s plan to detonate a suicide bomb at Fort Riley near Manhattan, Kan., and to “kill as many soldiers as possible.” Blair chose not to report what he knew to the authorities, according to the criminal complaint. Blair faces up to three years in prison if convicted. Hawaii halts telescope project • Hawaii Gov. David Ige said Saturday that a nonproit company planning to build one of the world’s largest telescopes atop a mountain many Native Hawaiians consider sacred will maintain a freeze on construction for another week. Ige initially announced what he called a timeout on construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope at Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano on the Big Island, on Tuesday after law enforcement arrested more than 30 protesters opposing the project. Avian lu strikes more turkeys • A bird lu outbreak has spread to three more Midwest turkey farms, bringing the number of farms infected to 23 and raising the death toll to more than 1.2 million birds killed by the disease or by authorities scrambling to contain it. The U.S. Department of Agriculture conirmed on Saturday that the H5N2 strain of avian inluenza was found at a commercial farm in Kandiyohi County in west-central Minnesota. This was after the USDA conirmed late Friday that bird lu was found at two more farms in South Dakota. Woman is killed in police chase in San Francisco • A pedestrian was killed and another injured when they were struck by a car leeing police during a chase through San Francisco, and the suspects involved were still on the loose Saturday. Oicers tried to stop a stolen car about 10 p.m. Friday just moments after the latest in a series of armed robberies. But the car sped of with police in pursuit and struck a woman in a crosswalk, fatally injuring her. The San Francisco medical examiner’s oice identiied the woman on Saturday as Bridget Klecker, 42, of San Francisco. The car later struck a second pedestrian and then crashed into a parked car before speeding away. From news services

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E-visits treat these non-urgent medical symptoms: • Cough • Heartburn • Back pain • Diarrhea • Headache • Red eye • Sinus problems

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saturdaY’s best

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

As police leave, what’s ahead for Brooklyn? (from residents) when I worked there,” said Tomlinson, now the chief of nearby Alorton. “And it was true: late at night, residents wouldn’t see us patrolling. “And it shouldn’t be like that, but the fact is the strip clubs are where we needed to be.”

By PAul HAmPel St. Louis Post-dispatch

BROOKLYN • First, the Brooklyn Police Department lost its reputation. Then, it lost most of its cops. Nine of Brooklyn’s 12 fulltime oicers, including its chief, have either resigned or been placed on leave since St. Clair County State’s Attorney Brendan Kelly began last month to question the department’s credibility. The depleted force has residents wondering about the future of this tiny burg just minutes east of downtown St. Louis, which counts five strip clubs, one other nightclub and one adult bookstore among its eight businesses. “As long as I can remember, there’s always been some kind of controversy with (the department),” longtime resident Dwight Hamilton Jr., 55, said this week as he worked on his car on Washington Street. “A big part of the problem is that none of our cops have lived in this town for a long, long time. It’s like a training ground for rookies. The ones that get hired never stick around long enough for anyone here to get to know them. And vice versa.” Kelly announced last week that he would no longer press any cases that Brooklyn’s officers bring to his office, saying the department had “gone from dysfunctional to nonfunctional.” He cited botched investigations, mishandled evidence and complaints about drunken officers’ drawing weapons on civilians in Brooklyn’s notorious strip clubs. Kelly had been at loggerheads with the department since late March, when he alleged that one officer had mishandled a rifle from the evidence vault. The prosecutor later raised concerns that the town’s policy of aggressively towing vehicles could be linked to an officer with a relative in the towing business. Kelly said the department couldn’t account for cash and drugs referenced in police reports and failed to document chain of custody for 35 guns found in the evidence vault.

SySTemIC PROBlemS

Christian Gooden • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Willie Paulette, 86, clears yard debris from a home on Canal Street in Brooklyn on Friday, just blocks away from a cluster of strip clubs in the city. Paulette grew up in Brooklyn but now lives in Madison. He only comes back for yard work at homes and at the church where he attended for more than 40 years.

The oicer who took control of the rifle, Christopher Heatherly, has resigned. Meanwhile, Oicer Dean Anderson, whose uncle owns a tow company, was put on unpaid leave pending an investigation, Kelly said. The village’s former chief, Steve Mitchell, resigned days after sherif’s deputies and state troopers raided the police station on March 25, carrying out computers, weapons and boxes of paper. In the meantime, five other officers have cut ties with the department. “I think those other officers no longer wanted to be a part of that situation,” Kelly said Friday. “I think they could not continue to operate there ethically and professionally and made the choice to leave.” Kelly said the St. Clair County Sherif’s Department and the Illinois State Police had stepped up patrols in Brooklyn in recent weeks. State police detectives already investigate the town’s violent crimes, and Kelly said he would continue to prosecute cases they handle.

Mayor Vera Glasper-Banks did not return calls and messages for comment. Police last week referred questions to village attorney Eric Evans, who could not be reached for comment on Friday.

QuIeT By DAy Brooklyn was officially founded in 1873, but the community was first settled in the late 1820s by black families fleeing the slave state of Missouri. The village bills itself as “America’s Oldest African-American city.” Its demographics have not changed: 99 percent of its 700 residents are black. By day, Brooklyn is quiet, if not bucolic, and almost devoid of traffic. Residents on a recent afternoon were seen cutting the grass, installing window screens, walking children home from school or conversing in the shade behind Smitty’s convenience store, the only business in this town that’s not clustered with the strip clubs along Illinois Route 3. “Brooklyn has a reputation for being dangerous, but that’s only at night up there by the

clubs,” Hamilton said, taking a break from repairing his car. “It’s peaceful and quiet back here in the neighborhood.” A group of young men sipping beer outside Smitty’s, who would identify themselves only as “The Breakfast Crew,” said police were mostly a nonpresence beyond the clubs. “They roll through the neighborhood now and then. But they are basically just security for the clubs,” one young man said. Another concurred, “They don’t really serve the residents. They harass the residents and serve the club owners.” One woman leaving Smitty’s defended the police. “I called them a while back to report suspicious people in a vehicle in front of my house and (the police) were on the scene in about 30 seconds,” said the woman, who would not give her name. However, a former Brooklyn police chief, Tony Tomlinson, agreed that oicers tended to bypass the residential areas late at night in favor of patrolling near the clubs. “I used to hear that complaint

As a case in point, Tomlinson said he remembered crime stats that showed St. Clair County had confiscated seven guns in one month. “And the same month, we confiscated 15 — all of them related to patrons of the clubs. “It can get very dangerous around the clubs.” Indeed, at least five people have been fatally shot inside or just outside one strip club, the Pink Slip, since 2005, including one man fatally shot there Wednesday. While the sex industry has been the source of most of the village’s trouble, it’s also its top tax source, accounting for about 75 percent of the city’s budget. Tomlinson left the department in December, saying he did so because the city could not aford to pay for his professional liability insurance. Kelly said that, under Tomlinson, the department had been making strides to comply with Metro East Police District Commission regulations set last year for four troubled departments regarding evidence, weapons, inventory control and other issues. In addition to Brooklyn, the rules applied to East St. Louis, Alorton and Washington Park. “We had a good working relationship with Tomlinson,” Kelly said. “But the problem with the Brooklyn department is systemic; it’s about more than one chief or one group of oicers.” Asked whether the city should be officially dissolved and its governance turned over to St. Clair County, Kelly said, “It’s not up to me to tell the city of Brooklyn what to do. The future of Brooklyn is entirely within the hands of the people of Brooklyn. “But hopefully, this will be an opportunity to break a cycle of dysfunction.” Paul Hampel • 314-340-8104 @phampel on Twitter phampel@post-dispatch.com

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NatiON

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A7

Potential rivals to Clinton plug away in Iowa to Iowa for the past three years, first meeting with the Iowa delegation at the Democratic National Convention in 2012 before speaking at then-Sen. Tom Harkin’s annual picnic fundraiser that fall. O’Malley has visited Iowa six times since the start of last year. He put 14 stafers to work on Iowa campaigns during last year’s election and has hired one for his potential campaign. Even with Clinton in the race, many of the party loyalists who will brave a winter night in Iowa in February to choose a candidate at caucus sites say they want a contest, not a coronation. “I’m going to see what they all have to say,” said Geri Frederiksen of Council Blufs. She waited three hours on Thursday to see a flight-delayed Webb at the western Iowa city’s public library. Iowa is expected to be among the most contested states in the general election. Surveys of voters this far ahead of the February caucuses have limited value, but Clinton did lead by more than 50 percentage points in a recent Iowa poll. Both Webb and O’Malley were rated the first choice of 3 percent and 1 percent of voters, respectively, in a poll with a margin of error of 4.9 percentage points. But Clinton had a big lead in 2007, too, before she was upset by then-Illinois Sen. Obama in the 2008 caucuses.

By THOMAS BEAUMONT ANd CATHERINE LUCEy associated Press

DES MOINES, IOWA • The Hillary Rod-

ham Clinton juggernaut is coming to Iowa. Martin O’Malley already has beaten her to the early-voting state. O’Malley, a former Maryland governor, was in a Des Moines tavern this past week, playing guitar and singing Irish folk tunes. He had a lunch with Democratic activists in the college town of Ames, and spent Friday night talking up his populist economic message at a party banquet in the capital. For months, O’Malley has largely had Iowa to himself as Clinton slow-played her entry into the 2016 race for race. O’Malley’s Iowa advantage, if there was one at all, should be coming to an end Sunday when Clinton planned to make her much-anticipated announcement that she’s running for the nomination for a second time. Clinton fell short in 2008 against Barack Obama. A trip to Iowa is expected to follow soon afterward. “I think the people of Iowa wake up every morning looking toward the future, and they believe inherently that we’re served by new leadership,” O’Malley said Friday night in Des Moines.

AssociAted Press

Ex-Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia speaks at the public library in Council Blufs, Iowa, Thursday. Webb and Martin O’Malley are stumping for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Technically, Clinton would be the first Democrat to enter the race. Others, including Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, former Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia and for-

mer Gov. Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, are exploring whether to run. O’Malley has done the most as a potential Clinton challenger. He has reached out

Break done, Congress to ight over Medicare, Iran, Lynch Lawmakers return from recess Monday with big tasks, deadlines ahead By ALAN FRAM associated Press

WASHINGTON • Racing the calendar, Senate leaders are pushing toward congressional approval of a bipartisan compromise that reshapes how Medicare pays physicians as lawmakers return from a spring break tangled up in domestic and foreign policy disputes. Republican and Democratic senators are trying to influence an emerging nuclear deal with Iran, and there’s a fight over abortion. Also, President Barack Obama is awaiting Senate action on his long-delayed nomination of federal prosecutor Loretta Lynch to become attorney general. For Senate Democrats, the two-week break proved tumultuous. Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., announced he will not run for re-election in 2016. Reid anointed Sen. Chuck

Schumer, D-N.Y., to succeed him, creating uncertainty over the rest of their leadership posts. New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez was indicted on federal corruption charges and relinquished his job as top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, just as it plays a pivotal role on Iran. The Medicare doctors legislation presents Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., with his most pressing problem. The $214 billion package would permanently retool how Medicare reimburses physicians and also would provide money for children’s health, community health centers, low-income patients and rural hospitals. The measure would block a 21 percent cut in physicians’ Medicare reimbursements that technically took effect April 1. By law, the federal agency that writes those checks can’t do so until 14 days after it receives a claim, and it plans to start making payments at the lower rate on Wednesday. The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services makes roughly 4 million Medicare payments to doctors daily.

curbing Iran’s nuclear program will hamper negotiations among Tehran, the U.S. and other world powers. The committee plans to vote on legislation by the chairman, Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., and Menendez that for 60 days would block Obama from waiving Iran sanctions imposed by Congress. The White House wants lawmakers to hold of until the June 30 deadline for a nuclear deal passes. Lynch’s nomination as attorney general is backed up behind the trafficking legislation. McConnell says the bill must be cleared before he will hold a confirmation vote. Lynch appears to have a narrow majority in her quest to succeed Attorney General Eric Holder and become the first black woman to hold the job. The chairmen of the House and Senate Budget committees said formal negotiations to resolve disputes over defense spending and complete a compromise budget-balancing plan could start this week. A deal is crucial because it would let Republicans send filibuster-proof legislation repealing Obama’s 2010 health care law to his desk later this year.

The Senate returns to work Monday, which gives leaders two days to finish the bill or risk fielding complaints from physicians and seniors. McConnell’s biggest problem is that senators from both parties are clamoring to amend the legislation, which was a rare compromise between House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California. Congressional aides and lobbyists say conservatives, including GOP Sens. Jeff Sessions of Alabama, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Mike Lee of Utah, want to require savings so the measure will not add a projected $141 billion to federal deficits over the coming decade. Democrats, including Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon, want to expand the bill’s two years of extra money for the Children’s Health Insurance Program to four years and offer other amendments, though Wyden said Thursday that he would support the measure without changes. On Tuesday, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee takes center stage, debating whether a push by lawmakers of both parties to influence a potential deal

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M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Sinqueields donate $10 million to MU By SArAh BryAn Miller St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The University of Missouri-Columbia announced Friday the largest gift for the arts in the school’s history. The donors are Jeanne and Rex Sinquefield, who gave Mizzou $10 million for the lead gift for a new $74 million School of Music Building. “I joke that we started in with a penny, and ended up (in) with a pound,” Jeanne Sinquefield said in a telephone interview. Sinquefield noted that “I’m not typically into buildings. I’m into the program.” But MU’s music department is spread over five campus buildings, “and it doesn’t make it as attractive as you’d like for attracting new students. It was time to go forward with a first-rate building.” The university is in the initial phase of fundraising for the building. Tom Hiles, vice chancellor for advancement, hopes to receive other private gifts and matching state funds. Construction is projected to start next year. The Sinquefields, who have homes in Westphalia, Mo., and the Central West End, began their involvement with music at MU more than a decade ago. They have a strong interest in music composition — Jeanne Sinquefield is the principal double bass in the Columbia Civic Orchestra — and began by funding a high school sum-

mer camp. Their commitment grew from there to include a K-12 competition, scholarships and other music-related programs, all under the umbrella of the Mizzou New Music Initiative. The new gift brings their total contribution to MU to $13 million. “Jeanne has great insights and a strong business perspective,” Hiles said. “She’s a musician and a supporter of the arts, and her passion is for making Missouri a mecca for composition. You don’t always get a donor’s big idea that’s also a priority for the university.” “No major university has a fine arts and performing arts center that’s worse than ours right now,” said Michael O’Brien, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “It’s just havoc,” with mediocre spaces — classroom, rehearsal, studio and office — scattered through other buildings. The new building will not only bring it all together under one spacious roof, but free up space elsewhere on campus for other departments. In 2014, the university bought the Missouri Theatre, a historic movie palace that had been updated and rehabbed. By adding an acoustical shell to the stage, the music department gained a good performance space, and thus reduced the costs of the music building project by $50 million, O’Brien said.

That, in turn, will allow the college to go forward with the new building and with rehabbing the 1960 Fine Arts Building. That building has about 60,000 square feet of usable space in all; the new music building will add 54,000 just for music. “It was built when the theater department had four faculty” members, said O’Brien; the number is now in the teens. The music and visual art departments have expanded similarly. “The number of students has just blossomed,” he said. The renovated fine arts facility will have costume shops, art studios and rehearsal space. “It’s inspiring to see someone give an eight-figure gift,” Hiles said. “It also inspires everybody else to give.” Sinquefield called the new building plans “necessary, but not very exciting.” She does have some ideas for the new building, including a second-floor exterior balcony for the student musicians. “It’ll be nice for the students to have a place to go outside and play,” she said. “I get credit for all these good ideas,” she added, “but a lot of the time, they’re the kids’ ideas. I’d rather work with ideas than just throw money at a project and walk away. They know I’m not walking away.” Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 Classical music critic @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com

An artist’s rendering of the new School of Music building planned for the University of Missouri-Columbia. The building is estimated to cost $74 million.

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M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Tax Day is tough on same-sex marrieds In some states, couples must still untangle their inances as if single By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER Associated Press

WASHINGTON • A necessary burden for most Ameri-

cans, Tax Day is an accounting nightmare for thousands of gay and lesbian couples as they wrestle with the uneven legal status of same-sex marriage in the United States. They live in a country that recognizes their marriages, but some reside in the 13 states that do not, an issue that will be argued before the Supreme Court later this month. At tax time — and Wednesday is the filing deadline — it gets complicated because most state income tax returns use information from a taxpayer’s federal return. Straight couples simply copy numbers from one form to another. But that doesn’t work for same-sex couples reporting combined incomes, deductions and exemptions on their federal tax returns. These couples must untangle their finances on their state returns, where they are still considered single. “We’re adults, we’re contributing to the welfare of society and yet, here’s this one thing that just reaches up every year and kind of slaps us in the face,” said the Rev. Brian Wilbert, an Episcopal priest who lives in Oberlin, a small college town in northern Ohio. Wilbert married his husband, Yorki Encalada, in 2012, at a ceremony in upstate New York. He is filing a joint federal tax return for the second time this year. But Ohio, which doesn’t recognize same-sex marriages, requires the couple to file their state tax returns as if they were single. “It may not be the most burning thing,” Wilbert said. “But as we think about equality and marriage equality, this is an important thing because it’s part of what couples do.” The number of states that recognize same-sex marriages has grown to 37, plus the District of Columbia, since the Supreme Court struck down part of the federal Defense of Marriage Act in 2013. After the ruling, the IRS announced that it would recognize same-sex marriages for federal tax purposes, even if couples lived in states that did not. The Supreme Court is scheduled to hear arguments in another same-sex marriage case April 28. Advocates hope the court will compel the remaining states to recognize gay and lesbian marriages. Opponents of same-sex marriage want the court to send the issue back to the states. They note that recognition of same-sex marriage has spread largely through court orders, rather than the ballot box. “It’s not about the rights of a handful of people who want to change the institution of marriage,” said Phil Burress of Citizens for Community Values, an Ohio group. “It’s about the will of the people.” The benefits of marriage are a mixed bag when it comes to taxes. Some couples, especially those with disparate incomes, can lower their combined tax bills by getting married. Others pay a marriage penalty. Missouri doesn’t recognize same-sex marriages, but Gov. Jay Nixon issued an executive order requiring gay

AssociAted Press

and lesbian couples to file joint state tax returns if they file a joint federal return. This is much simpler than in other states. But what if filing as a married couple causes your taxes to go up? “For the people it hurts, how unfair,” said Janis Cowhey, a law partner at the Marcum accounting firm in New York. “You won’t recognize my marriage, but you’re going to make me pay more in taxes because I got married somewhere else.” The vast majority of married couples in the U.S. file joint federal tax returns in which they combine their incomes, exemptions, deductions and credits to calculate their tax liability. But same-sex couples are not allowed to file joint tax returns in most states that don’t recognize their marriages. Instead, they have to unravel their finances and file separate state returns. With the tax filing deadline approaching on Wednesday, states that don’t recognize same-sex marriages are dealing with these issues in diferent ways. Five states require same-sex couples to fill out multiple federal tax returns, sometimes called dummy returns, so they can come up with the appropriate numbers for their state returns. This is how it works in Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan and Nebraska. Kansas, North Dakota and Ohio take a different approach. These states provide worksheets that same-sex couples must complete to separate their finances. In Ohio, the form has 31 lines, though most couples don’t need to fill out every line. The issue is moot in South Dakota because there is no state income tax. It’s less of an issue in Arkansas and Mississippi because these states don’t use information from federal returns on their state income tax forms. Alabama has same-sex married couples divide the income and taxes they report on their federal returns, based on each spouses’ share of their combined income.

Yorki Encalada (left) and his husband, the Rev. Brian Wilbert, of Oberlin, Ohio, can ile a joint federal tax return but must ile their state tax returns as if they were single.

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04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

Pine Lawn store owner tells of payments to mayor BY Stephen Deere St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The manager of a Pine Lawn convenience

store testified Friday that he repeatedly complied with Mayor Sylvester Caldwell’s requests for money, and that he once helped frame Caldwell’s political opponent for a minor crime. The witness was Akram Samed, of the Pine Lawn Food Market. He told a jury in U.S. District Court in St. Louis that then-Pine Lawn police Lt. Steven Blakeney once instructed him to call 911 to falsely claim that Nakisha Ford, who was running against Caldwell for mayor in 2013, had illicitly taken down one of Caldwell’s campaign signs. The witness said Blakeney then returned to the store to take the report, which led to Ford’s arrest. Caldwell then told Samed he needed to testify in court against Ford, Samed said. Caldwell won re-election. The city fired Blakeney late last year. “I was telling people all the time it was bogus. I’m glad it’s come out now,” Ford said when reached by phone Friday evening. She said Samed gave her permission to take down a nasty campaign sign targeted at her that hung in the store in the spring of 2013. She said that Blakeney, Rickey Collins, then the city’s police chief, and other oicers came to her door that night and arrested her for misdemeanor theft for taking the sign, which was just a piece of paper. Court records show that she pleaded guilty to a littering charge and was fined $500. Samed said in his testimony Friday that when Caldwell asked him for money, he would pay $200 to $300 at a time, usually with a MoneyGram sold at the store with the name of the payee left blank. He said it happened about 14 times. Asked why he had made the payments, Samed said: “I was scared. He would say, ‘I’m in charge of Pine Lawn and the police and the whole city.’” Samed said Blakeney once asked for a payment, but Samed refused and called the mayor to complain. Caldwell then brought Blakeney to the store to apologize. Samed’s brother, Mazen, who owns the store with a business partner, said Caldwell often took items such as meat, liquor and canned goods without paying for them. The brothers allowed him to do so because they were afraid, they said.

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The prosecution rested its case on Friday. It is expected to go to the jury on Monday. On Thursday, defense lawyers told jurors from the trial’s beginning that Caldwell had taken bribes, but they insisted he had not committed the crime with which he was charged: extortion. Assistant U.S. Attorney Reggie Harris told jurors Thursday that Caldwell threatened to use another towing company if he didn’t receive payments from the owner of Eddie’s Towing, in Wellston.

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Leah Thorsen of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Robert Patrick • 314-621-5154 @rxpatrick on Twitter RPatrick@post-dispatch.com

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04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

WORLD DIGEST Americans in Yemen want help to get out Dozens of U.S. citizens stranded by the ighting in Yemen have asked the White House to help them lee the country, according to a lawsuit iled in federal court seeking to compel an American rescue operation. The suit was iled as Houthi militants appear to be gaining ground against the government’s security forces, and as Saudi-led airstrikes against the Houthis have halted most air travel and blocked seaports. Russia, India, China and ive other countries helped their citizens leave Yemen in recent weeks. The State Department and the Pentagon lew American diplomats and special operations troops from the country this spring, but did not evacuate other U.S. citizens, and now say doing so would be too risky. Meanwhile, a plane loaded with badly needed aid landed in Yemen’s rebel-held capital Saturday as a Saudi-led air campaign continued to target the Shiite Houthi rebels and their allies in the military. Photos posted on the oicial Twitter account of the International Committee of the Red Cross show aid workers unloading the supplies. Maldives divers want ex-president released • A hundred scuba divers in the Maldives held an underwater protest on Saturday demanding the release of jailed ex-president Mohamed Nasheed, who became popular as an environmental activist during his presidency. Nasheed is serving a 13-year prison sentence for ordering the arrest and detention of a senior judge when he was in power three years ago.

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Aid workers found dead in Afghanistan • Five aid workers kidnapped by unknown gunmen two months ago have been found dead in a volatile region of southern Afghanistan, an oicial said Saturday. The ive Afghan men, who worked for the Save the Children charity, were abducted nearly eight weeks ago in Uruzgan province. They were found fatally shot. Nobody has claimed responsibility, but local media cited family members as saying Taliban militants had demanded a prisoner exchange.

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Eastern Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter • Thousands of Christians have gathered in Jerusalem for an ancient ire ceremony that celebrates Jesus’ resurrection. In a ritual dating back at least 1,200 years, they crowded Saturday into the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, where Christian tradition holds that Jesus was cruciied, buried and resurrected. Roman Catholics and Protestants marked Easter last Sunday, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. Eastern Orthodox churches celebrate Easter using the older Julian calendar.

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Iranians protest alleged abuse by Saudi Arabia • Defying a government ban, hundreds of Iranians protested against Saudi Arabia on Saturday over the alleged abuse of two Iranian pilgrims visiting the Sunni kingdom. More than 300 protesters gathered in front of the Saudi Embassy in Tehran to call for its closure. Demonstrators shouted: “Shame on you!” and “Death to House of Saud!” in reference to the ruling family.

Assailants fatally shoot workers in Pakistan • Gunmen in southwestern Pakistan shot and killed at least 20 workers early Saturday at a dam construction site, the deadliest recent attack targeting civilians in a region facing a lowlevel insurgency, authorities said. The violence targeted the Gobdan area of the Turbat district in southwestern Baluchistan province, a region where nationalist and separatist Baluch groups have fought against the Islamabadbased government for years. However, no group immediately claimed responsibility for the attack.

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POST0412

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A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 1 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

Municipal court ines and fees

Chris Lee •clee@post-dispatch.com

a St. ann billboard along eastbound Interstate 70 near lambert-St. louis International airport advertises a traic-ticket handling service last month.

Cash-strapped cities have tough decisions MUNICIPALITIES • froM A1

ticket-happy among them. Bills that would cap the revenue cities can reap from traic fines appear to have momentum in Jefferson City. The Missouri Senate passed a bill that would by 2017 lower the existing cap of 30 percent to 10 percent for municipalities in urban counties, including St. Louis County, and Missouri House leaders have signaled they may follow suit. “There’s a significant level of concern, particularly among smaller cities where it might be a larger portion of their budget,” said Stephen Ables of the St. Louis County Municipal League. But fixing a court system that critics say preys on the poor could create a new problem, especially for cities with struggling tax bases. Cash-strapped cities that formerly counted on police to balance budgets might have to make a choice: Cut back services or raise taxes or fees. Either could hurt quality of life and investment in some of the region’s most vulnerable areas. “Obviously this is not the way to raise revenue, but if you don’t substitute other revenue for this, you can’t get blood out of a turnip,” said Todd Swanstrom, a professor of public policy at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, adding: “I am definitely concerned that this could lead to a downward spiral.” In Calverton Park, a residential enclave with little control over its sales tax receipts, Paunovich worries that services for his town’s 1,300 residents could be hurt if the cap drops to 10 percent. “To me, that’s just punitive,” he said. Of $929,000 in revenue collected by Calverton Park through June 2014, $234,000 of it came through traffic tickets, its attorney said in its most recent financial report filed with the state auditor’s oice. All revenue generated through the court totaled $379,000. If new budget restrictions are enacted, jurisdictions most reliant on traffic ticket and court revenue could be forced to look at options their independentminded leaders would rather not entertain: consolidation, or even disincorporation. C o o l Va l l ey ge n e ra te d $653,000 of $1.3 million in general fund revenue through court receipts during the fiscal year that ended in September 2013, though it claims only $49,000 came from traffic fines. Mayor Viola Murphy said the Legislature has given no thought to how residents will continue to receive municipal services if there’s a percentage cap on traffic revenue. “If it’s 10, a lot of our communities, I can just say, will not make it, and I don’t know what the plan is and neither do they,” she said. “You’re getting ready to make decisions about our cities, but you’re not concerned about the people we serve.”

BALANCING ACT Most cities in St. Louis County won’t be able to count on new sales tax receipts to make the numbers pencil out. Much of the sales tax generated in the county and its cities is divvied up among municipalities through a sales tax pool, said Jim Brasfield, a professor at Webster University who wrote a paper this year on the sales tax system. “Unless you were going to drastically change the current system, I don’t see a sales tax solution for those cities,” Brasfield said. The other big option is to raise the property tax rate — “the least

popular tax,” according to many public opinion polls, said Terry Jones, a political science professor at UMSL. And beyond the political difficulty of selling it to voters, a property tax rate increase doesn’t necessarily yield additional revenue if property values are falling. “Some of the (cities) that are struggling the most also have a situation where the assessed valuation is going down,” Jones said. In St. Ann, where $3.2 million of $9.1 million in general revenue came from court fines and fees in 2013, Mayor Michael Corcoran said the recession already prompted cities to trim the fat of local government. “The city cut a lot back then,” he said. “There’s not a whole lot else to cut in other departments. They’re pretty lean.” Still, Corcoran maintains his town of 13,000 is in better shape than most. As one of 34 pointof-sale cities in the sales tax pool, it can retain more of the sales taxes generated within its borders. A new Menards store, with an expected opening later this year, will help plug a potential hole left by limits on traffic fines. “Luckily, we’re in a position where we do have new development coming in,” Corcoran said. “But it’s going to affect a lot of cities, especially some of our neighboring cities. They may struggle to survive.” Edmundson Mayor John Gwaltney said all of the money his city raises from traffic fines and fees goes right back into the police department. In the fiscal year that ended in June, 30 percent of its general revenue — $479,000 of $1.6 million — came from municipal court fines, while it spent $901,000 on its police force. Gwaltney said reductions in traic fines will probably afect police budgets. “It will make it more diicult to provide services,” Gwaltney said. “But like I said, 100 percent of the revenue we get off fines goes back into the police department. ... We don’t have that coming in, we’ll have to pull money from somewhere else to fund my police department.” Some question why a city of 800 needs a police department, but Gwaltney credited his officers with making Interstate 70 and the roads near the main terminal of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport much safer. Revenue restrictions will mean fewer oicers, he said. “I’d just hate to see us go that direction, because it was really unsafe there,” Gwaltney said. Several city leaders said the legislation moving through Jefferson City appears designed to force small cities to merge or disincorporate. “Some of the small cities that are real high on their court fines and fees, I just don’t see how they’re going to continue to exist,” Corcoran said.

CONSOLIDATION COMING? The answer to more revenue restrictions, say some observers, need not be cut, tax or die. Some cities could find efficiencies through service-sharing contracts — or even mergers. “In dire financial circumstances, that would be a reasonable discussion to have,” Brasfield said. “If you’re in dire financial straits, then you’ve got to look at more radical solutions often.” Even County Executive Steve Stenger, while disavowing a push for St. Louis to re-enter the county, told the Post-Dispatch in December that “the consolidation of North County municipalities is what we should be talking about.” But Swanstrom isn’t optimis-

tic that cities, defensive of their turf, will go willingly. He worries that funding for municipal services will just continue to fall. “The big issue is whether this will lead to more mergers and consolidations, and I’m just not sure,” Swanstrom said. “I think it’s probably unlikely in the short term unless there was some state program that set a floor where services could not fall below.” Cool Valley’s Murphy said she thinks her constituents would be willing to consider tax increases, service cuts or more servicesharing “if we were trying to survive as a city.” But she and leaders of other small cities won’t go quietly, she said. “Service is going to change,” Murphy said. “How long we can stay cities, I don’t know. But I’m going to fight to the bitter end with my colleagues.” For those municipal leaders who are interested in consolidating, Brasfield said, a county or state program that ofered legal, planning or other staf help could go a long way. It’s a complicated endeavor, and one that probably shouldn’t be forced. “Basically, people tend to be pleased with the services they get from their local government,” he said. A new paper from Mark Tranel, head of UMSL’s Public Policy Research Center, surveyed how other states approached municipal consolidation. Often, they provided grants or other assistance for those voluntarily willing to examine mergers or service-sharing. “One of the things that appears to be making these things work is there’s nobody dictating the process,” Tranel said. But municipal consolidation doesn’t necessarily reduce costs, said Jones, the UMSL professor. Labor-intensive services don’t lend themselves to economies of scale — St. Louis County would probably want as many police officers even if it were one political subdivision. Activities such as buying salt or asphalt are cheaper for larger organizations, but many St. Louis County cities have already teamed up for bulk purchases, he said. “I think it’s not sufficiently appreciated that many municipalities have already taken many steps down that road,” Jones said. Cool Valley is one of the smaller cities that has been collaborating with nearby municipalities in the 24:1 Initiative, sharing services such as police and combining purchasing power. “We’re already partnering and collaborating, so why do we have to do anything different if it’s working?” Murphy said. “If we’re here partnering and collaborating and saving an abundance of money and putting that money in our community, what the heck do they want?” But small cities often don’t have the power or resources to fund significant economic development initiatives that might bring new employers to town or stave off a downward spiral in property values, said Patrick Owens, a former St. Louis County economic development specialist who focused on North County. Adequate municipal services are already a problem in some of them, he said. “They turned to this mechanism (court fines) because it’s one of the few they can actually control,” Owens said. “These people in these cities still deserve services, and they’re not getting them.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

The Post-Dispatch used igures from each government’s most recent comprehensive annual inancial report iled with the Missouri auditor to calculate court ines and fees as a percentage of general fund revenue. The proposed Missouri Senate bill capping court revenue and the existing Macks Creek Law both limit traic ines as a percentage of general operating revenue. This table shows all court ines and fees as a percentage of general fund revenue. Some cities count all municipal court revenue, including nontraic ines, toward the Macks Creek calculation. Others exclude a signiicant portion of municipal court revenue because their accountants and attorneys don’t consider it to be derived from traic-violation ines. Beverly Hills, for example, reported $402,636 in court ines and costs, but it maintained only $168,899 of that amount was generated by traic-related ines. When possible, the Post-Dispatch attempted to use only revenue from court ines and fees, but some cities include bond forfeitures and other sources in their reporting of court revenue. In some cases, those additional revenue sources are included because they were not broken down. The Post-Dispatch’s igures use all revenues collected in the general fund, which may include grants and other sources not included in the state’s deinition of general operating revenue. It is a potentially larger pool of revenue than would be used in the calculation limiting traic ines. However, some cities used the same calculation method as the Post-Dispatch. The Post-Dispatch chose to use a broader measure of court revenue and general fund revenue because igures for those categories can be better compared across cities with varying accounting practices and revenue calculations. Court revenue also captures ines and fees that some cities may not consider traic enforcement revenue. Many, but not all, cities ile similarly formatted general revenue inancial disclosures. General fund revenue Pine Lawn $3,532,167 Bella Villa $702,969 Vinita Terrace $211,150 Cool Valley $1,259,770 Beverly Hills $794,975 Moline Acres $1,619,488 Flordell Hills $515,057 Calverton Park $928,799 St. Ann $9,115,012 Normandy $4,140,792 Country Club Hills $1,009,882 Bellerive $245,032 Edmundson $1,622,147 Hillsdale* $834,036 Bel Ridge $1,658,201 St. John $3,835,573 Velda City $969,631 Breckenridge Hills $2,199,781 Northwoods $2,620,992 Charlack $1,012,798 Bellefontaine Neighbors $5,746,515 Marlborough $575,062 Jennings** $7,887,841 Clarkson Valley $867,350 Ferguson $12,340,153 Pagedale $2,057,766 Kinloch $265,891 Rock Hill $3,452,720 Vinita Park $2,384,148 Greendale $346,022 Hanley Hills $800,219 Bel Nor $754,680 Oakland $688,415 Riverview $887,357 Town and Country $10,040,227 Wellston $2,826,475 Berkeley $9,326,398 Maplewood $8,924,667 Ellisville $5,905,836 Florissant $23,581,746 Sycamore Hills $160,639 Dellwood* $3,434,353 Uplands Park $162,363 Creve Coeur $16,352,542 Grantwood Village $420,777 Maryland Heights $22,820,884 Velda Village Hills $396,735 Fenton $5,607,923 Frontenac $6,148,260 Hazelwood $23,979,714 Shrewsbury $5,997,095 Richmond Heights $10,548,042 Winchester $658,963 Woodson Terrace $3,774,919 Chesterield $21,125,292 Webster Groves $14,955,343 Wildwood $9,051,444 Ballwin $17,620,540 Clayton $21,674,819 Glendale $3,882,706 Manchester $8,202,013 Overland $8,394,209 Sunset Hills $7,248,485 Valley Park $3,312,589 Black Jack $2,601,267 Brentwood $11,780,199 Des Peres $9,782,524 Ladue $11,775,575 Lakeshire $554,181 Olivette $7,377,466 Paciic $3,987,612 University City $26,713,926 Bridgeton $12,887,494 Crestwood $7,866,416 Eureka $5,428,551 Kirkwood $19,671,604 Pasadena Hills $384,979 Pasadena Park $155,496 Warson Woods $1,503,438 St. Louis $440,155,000 St. Louis County $352,526,448 Champ $46,094 Country Life Acres $81,083 Crystal Lake Park $222,147 Glen Echo Park* $46,224 Green Park $1,431,632 Huntleigh $135,199 MacKenzie $48,462 Norwood Court $192,033 Twin Oaks $572,292 Wilbur Park $131,916 Westwood N/A ToTal $1,272,477,647 City

Court/ine revenue $2,237,196 $416,373 $116,190 $652,979 $402,636 $737,438 $224,621 $379,368 $3,418,735 $1,502,614 $326,823 $73,696 $478,807 $251,969 $478,946 $1,126,763 $270,693 $602,015 $681,545 $234,601 $1,162,779 $114,007 $1,505,064 $146,601 $2,096,617 $351,583 $43,336 $540,665 $387,317 $50,981 $121,142 $106,889 $93,113 $127,288 $1,420,096 $394,267 $1,131,435 $1,075,639 $654,856 $2,589,988 $16,920 $355,042 $15,606 $1,546,944 $36,820 $2,077,689 $33,961 $453,338 $510,188 $1,847,704 $509,224 $700,189 $42,852 $248,247 $1,272,870 $917,953 $547,349 $952,511 $1,027,932 $195,253 $438,464 $435,424 $389,869 $155,249 $110,868 $459,007 $424,981 $522,134 $21,954 $282,012 $161,502 $1,079,278 $445,171 $267,343 $176,426 $599,254 $12,353 $3,423 $31,966 $8,688,000 $4,397,769 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A $61,138,710

*Did not break out general fund revenue **Includes $621,588 in “jail operations” budget line item

Pct. of gen. fund rev. 63% 59% 55% 52% 51% 46% 44% 41% 38% 36% 32% 30% 30% 30% 29% 29% 28% 27% 26% 23% 20% 20% 19% 17% 17% 17% 16% 16% 16% 15% 15% 14% 14% 14% 14% 14% 12% 12% 11% 11% 11% 10% 10% 9% 9% 9% 9% 8% 8% 8% 8% 7% 7% 7% 6% 6% 6% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% N/A 5%


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

LOCAL

M 2 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

Municipal court ines and fees

Chris Lee •clee@post-dispatch.com

a St. ann billboard along eastbound Interstate 70 near lambert-St. louis International airport advertises a traic-ticket handling service last month.

Cash-strapped cities have tough decisions MUNICIPALITIES • froM A1

their operations, and political and popular support seems to be growing to rein in the most ticket-happy among them. Bills that would cap the revenue cities can reap from traic fines appear to have momentum in Jefferson City. The Missouri Senate passed a bill that would by 2017 lower the existing cap of 30 percent to 10 percent for municipalities in urban counties, including St. Louis County, and Missouri House leaders have signaled they may follow suit. “There’s a significant level of concern, particularly among smaller cities where it might be a larger portion of their budget,” said Stephen Ables of the St. Louis County Municipal League. But fixing a court system that critics say preys on the poor could create a new problem, especially for cities with struggling tax bases. Cash-strapped cities that formerly counted on police to balance budgets might have to make a choice: Cut back services or raise taxes or fees. Either could hurt quality of life and investment in some of the region’s most vulnerable areas. “Obviously this is not the way to raise revenue, but if you don’t substitute other revenue for this, you can’t get blood out of a turnip,” said Todd Swanstrom, a professor of public policy at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, adding: “I am definitely concerned that this could lead to a downward spiral.” In Calverton Park, a residential enclave with little control over its sales tax receipts, Paunovich worries that services for his town’s 1,300 residents could be hurt if the cap drops to 10 percent. “To me, that’s just punitive,” he said. Of $929,000 in revenue collected by Calverton Park through June 2014, $234,000 of it came through traffic tickets, its attorney said in its most recent financial report filed with the state auditor’s oice. All revenue generated through the court totaled $379,000. If new budget restrictions are enacted, jurisdictions most reliant on traffic ticket and court revenue could be forced to look at options their independentminded leaders would rather not entertain: consolidation, or even disincorporation. C o o l Va l l ey ge n e ra te d $653,000 of $1.3 million in general fund revenue through court receipts during the fiscal year that ended in September 2013, though it claims only $49,000 came from traffic fines. Mayor Viola Murphy said the Legislature has given no thought to how residents will continue to receive municipal services if there’s a percentage cap on traffic revenue. “If it’s 10, a lot of our communities, I can just say, will not make it, and I don’t know what the plan is and neither do they,” she said. “You’re getting ready to make decisions about our cities, but you’re not concerned about the people we serve.”

BALANCING ACT Most cities in St. Louis County won’t be able to count on new sales tax receipts to make the numbers pencil out. Much of the sales tax generated in the county and its cities is divvied up among municipalities through a sales tax pool, said Jim Brasfield, a professor at Webster University who wrote a paper this year on the sales tax system. “Unless you were going to drastically change the current system, I don’t see a sales tax solution for those cities,” Brasfield said.

The other big option is to raise the property tax rate — “the least popular tax,” according to many public opinion polls, said Terry Jones, a political science professor at UMSL. And beyond the political difficulty of selling it to voters, a property tax rate increase doesn’t necessarily yield additional revenue if property values are falling. “Some of the (cities) that are struggling the most also have a situation where the assessed valuation is going down,” Jones said. In St. Ann, where $3.2 million of $9.1 million in general revenue came from court fines and fees in 2013, Mayor Michael Corcoran said the recession already prompted cities to trim the fat of local government. “The city cut a lot back then,” he said. “There’s not a whole lot else to cut in other departments. They’re pretty lean.” Still, Corcoran maintains his town of 13,000 is in better shape than most. As one of 34 pointof-sale cities in the sales tax pool, it can retain more of the sales taxes generated within its borders. A new Menards store, with an expected opening later this year, will help plug a potential hole left by limits on traffic fines. “Luckily, we’re in a position where we do have new development coming in,” Corcoran said. “But it’s going to affect a lot of cities, especially some of our neighboring cities. They may struggle to survive.” Edmundson Mayor John Gwaltney said all of the money his city raises from traffic fines and fees goes right back into the police department. In the fiscal year that ended in June, 30 percent of its general revenue — $479,000 of $1.6 million — came from municipal court fines, while it spent $901,000 on its police force. Gwaltney said reductions in traic fines will probably afect police budgets. “It will make it more diicult to provide services,” Gwaltney said. “But like I said, 100 percent of the revenue we get off fines goes back into the police department. ... We don’t have that coming in, we’ll have to pull money from somewhere else to fund my police department.” Some question why a city of 800 needs a police department, but Gwaltney credited his officers with making Interstate 70 and the roads near the main terminal of Lambert-St. Louis International Airport much safer. Revenue restrictions will mean fewer oicers, he said. “I’d just hate to see us go that direction, because it was really unsafe there,” Gwaltney said. Several city leaders said the legislation moving through Jefferson City appears designed to force small cities to merge or disincorporate. “Some of the small cities that are real high on their court fines and fees, I just don’t see how they’re going to continue to exist,” Corcoran said.

CONSOLIDATION COMING? The answer to more revenue restrictions, say some observers, need not be cut, tax or die. Some cities could find efficiencies through service-sharing contracts — or even mergers. “In dire financial circumstances, that would be a reasonable discussion to have,” Brasfield said. “If you’re in dire financial straits, then you’ve got to look at more radical solutions often.” Even County Executive Steve Stenger, while disavowing a push for St. Louis to re-enter the county, told the Post-Dispatch in December that “the consolidation of North County municipalities is what we should be talking about.”

But Swanstrom isn’t optimistic that cities, defensive of their turf, will go willingly. He worries that funding for municipal services will just continue to fall. “The big issue is whether this will lead to more mergers and consolidations, and I’m just not sure,” Swanstrom said. “I think it’s probably unlikely in the short term unless there was some state program that set a floor where services could not fall below.” Cool Valley’s Murphy said she thinks her constituents would be willing to consider tax increases, service cuts or more servicesharing “if we were trying to survive as a city.” But she and leaders of other small cities won’t go quietly, she said. “Service is going to change,” Murphy said. “How long we can stay cities, I don’t know. But I’m going to fight to the bitter end with my colleagues.” For those municipal leaders who are interested in consolidating, Brasfield said, a county or state program that ofered legal, planning or other staf help could go a long way. It’s a complicated endeavor, and one that probably shouldn’t be forced. “Basically, people tend to be pleased with the services they get from their local government,” he said. A new paper from Mark Tranel, head of UMSL’s Public Policy Research Center, surveyed how other states approached municipal consolidation. Often, they provided grants or other assistance for those voluntarily willing to examine mergers or service-sharing. “One of the things that appears to be making these things work is there’s nobody dictating the process,” Tranel said. But municipal consolidation doesn’t necessarily reduce costs, said Jones, the UMSL professor. Labor-intensive services don’t lend themselves to economies of scale — St. Louis County would probably want as many police officers even if it were one political subdivision. Activities such as buying salt or asphalt are cheaper for larger organizations, but many St. Louis County cities have already teamed up for bulk purchases, he said. “I think it’s not sufficiently appreciated that many municipalities have already taken many steps down that road,” Jones said. Cool Valley is one of the smaller cities that has been collaborating with nearby municipalities in the 24:1 Initiative, sharing services such as police and combining purchasing power. “We’re already partnering and collaborating, so why do we have to do anything different if it’s working?” Murphy said. “If we’re here partnering and collaborating and saving an abundance of money and putting that money in our community, what the heck do they want?” But small cities often don’t have the power or resources to fund significant economic development initiatives that might bring new employers to town or stave off a downward spiral in property values, said Patrick Owens, a former St. Louis County economic development specialist who focused on North County. Adequate municipal services are already a problem in some of them, he said. “They turned to this mechanism (court fines) because it’s one of the few they can actually control,” Owens said. “These people in these cities still deserve services, and they’re not getting them.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

The Post-Dispatch used igures from each government’s most recent comprehensive annual inancial report iled with the Missouri auditor to calculate court ines and fees as a percentage of general fund revenue. The proposed Missouri Senate bill capping court revenue and the existing Macks Creek Law both limit traic ines as a percentage of general operating revenue. This table shows all court ines and fees as a percentage of general fund revenue. Some cities count all municipal court revenue, including nontraic ines, toward the Macks Creek calculation. Others exclude a signiicant portion of municipal court revenue because their accountants and attorneys don’t consider it to be derived from traic-violation ines. Beverly Hills, for example, reported $402,636 in court ines and costs, but it maintained only $168,899 of that amount was generated by traic-related ines. When possible, the Post-Dispatch attempted to use only revenue from court ines and fees, but some cities include bond forfeitures and other sources in their reporting of court revenue. In some cases, those additional revenue sources are included because they were not broken down. The Post-Dispatch’s igures use all revenues collected in the general fund, which may include grants and other sources not included in the state’s deinition of general operating revenue. It is a potentially larger pool of revenue than would be used in the calculation limiting traic ines. However, some cities used the same calculation method as the Post-Dispatch. The Post-Dispatch chose to use a broader measure of court revenue and general fund revenue because igures for those categories can be better compared across cities with varying accounting practices and revenue calculations. Court revenue also captures ines and fees that some cities may not consider traic enforcement revenue. Many, but not all, cities ile similarly formatted general revenue inancial disclosures. General fund revenue Pine Lawn $3,532,167 Bella Villa $702,969 Vinita Terrace $211,150 Cool Valley $1,259,770 Beverly Hills $794,975 Moline Acres $1,619,488 Flordell Hills $515,057 Calverton Park $928,799 St. Ann $9,115,012 Normandy $4,140,792 Country Club Hills $1,009,882 Bellerive $245,032 Edmundson $1,622,147 Hillsdale* $834,036 Bel Ridge $1,658,201 St. John $3,835,573 Velda City $969,631 Breckenridge Hills $2,199,781 Northwoods $2,620,992 Charlack $1,012,798 Bellefontaine Neighbors $5,746,515 Marlborough $575,062 Jennings** $7,887,841 Clarkson Valley $867,350 Ferguson $12,340,153 Pagedale $2,057,766 Kinloch $265,891 Rock Hill $3,452,720 Vinita Park $2,384,148 Greendale $346,022 Hanley Hills $800,219 Bel Nor $754,680 Oakland $688,415 Riverview $887,357 Town and Country $10,040,227 Wellston $2,826,475 Berkeley $9,326,398 Maplewood $8,924,667 Ellisville $5,905,836 Florissant $23,581,746 Sycamore Hills $160,639 Dellwood* $3,434,353 Uplands Park $162,363 Creve Coeur $16,352,542 Grantwood Village $420,777 Maryland Heights $22,820,884 Velda Village Hills $396,735 Fenton $5,607,923 Frontenac $6,148,260 Hazelwood $23,979,714 Shrewsbury $5,997,095 Richmond Heights $10,548,042 Winchester $658,963 Woodson Terrace $3,774,919 Chesterield $21,125,292 Webster Groves $14,955,343 Wildwood $9,051,444 Ballwin $17,620,540 Clayton $21,674,819 Glendale $3,882,706 Manchester $8,202,013 Overland $8,394,209 Sunset Hills $7,248,485 Valley Park $3,312,589 Black Jack $2,601,267 Brentwood $11,780,199 Des Peres $9,782,524 Ladue $11,775,575 Lakeshire $554,181 Olivette $7,377,466 Paciic $3,987,612 University City $26,713,926 Bridgeton $12,887,494 Crestwood $7,866,416 Eureka $5,428,551 Kirkwood $19,671,604 Pasadena Hills $384,979 Pasadena Park $155,496 Warson Woods $1,503,438 St. Louis $440,155,000 St. Louis County $352,526,448 Champ $46,094 Country Life Acres $81,083 Crystal Lake Park $222,147 Glen Echo Park* $46,224 Green Park $1,431,632 Huntleigh $135,199 MacKenzie $48,462 Norwood Court $192,033 Twin Oaks $572,292 Wilbur Park $131,916 Westwood N/A ToTal $1,272,477,647 City

Court/ine revenue $2,237,196 $416,373 $116,190 $652,979 $402,636 $737,438 $224,621 $379,368 $3,418,735 $1,502,614 $326,823 $73,696 $478,807 $251,969 $478,946 $1,126,763 $270,693 $602,015 $681,545 $234,601 $1,162,779 $114,007 $1,505,064 $146,601 $2,096,617 $351,583 $43,336 $540,665 $387,317 $50,981 $121,142 $106,889 $93,113 $127,288 $1,420,096 $394,267 $1,131,435 $1,075,639 $654,856 $2,589,988 $16,920 $355,042 $15,606 $1,546,944 $36,820 $2,077,689 $33,961 $453,338 $510,188 $1,847,704 $509,224 $700,189 $42,852 $248,247 $1,272,870 $917,953 $547,349 $952,511 $1,027,932 $195,253 $438,464 $435,424 $389,869 $155,249 $110,868 $459,007 $424,981 $522,134 $21,954 $282,012 $161,502 $1,079,278 $445,171 $267,343 $176,426 $599,254 $12,353 $3,423 $31,966 $8,688,000 $4,397,769 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 N/A $61,138,710

*Did not break out general fund revenue **Includes $621,588 in “jail operations” budget line item

Pct. of gen. fund rev. 63% 59% 55% 52% 51% 46% 44% 41% 38% 36% 32% 30% 30% 30% 29% 29% 28% 27% 26% 23% 20% 20% 19% 17% 17% 17% 16% 16% 16% 15% 15% 14% 14% 14% 14% 14% 12% 12% 11% 11% 11% 10% 10% 9% 9% 9% 9% 8% 8% 8% 8% 7% 7% 7% 6% 6% 6% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% N/A 5%


wOrld

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

U.S. scientists are mapping Caribbean sealoor 12-year project aims to help protect rich reef ecosystem around U.S. Virgin Islands BY DANICA COTO associated Press

SAN JUAN, PUerto rico •

U.S. scientists completed on Tuesday a nearly two-week mission to explore waters around the U.S. Virgin Islands as part of a 12-year project to map the Caribbean seafloor and help protect its reefs. A team with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration studied an area of 270 square miles, using equipment including underwater gliders and a remotely operated vehicle to help map the seafloor and locate areas where fish spawn. They focused mostly on the southern coast of St. Croix and the northwestern coast of St. Thomas. “It’s a relatively unexplored but believed to be rich ecosystem,” lead researcher Tim Battista said by telephone. “We’re able to map large areas that you couldn’t do with just divers.” The information will be used in eforts to conserve coral reefs as well as to update navigational charts and help government officials manage and better protect fish populations. Reefs across the Caribbean have shrunk by more than 50

percent since the 1970s, with experts blaming climate change as well as a drop in the populations of parrotfish and sea urchins. Part of the mission focused on studying the habitat and number of deep-water snappers that have become increasingly popular with fishermen in the area, scientist Chris Taylor said. Researchers currently know very little about the status and habitat of the silk snapper, which has golden eyes and is almost iridescent pink in color, he said. About two-thirds of the survey was conducted in deep water, in depths up to 7,500 feet, researchers said. Among the more interesting discoveries was an underwater landslide about 6 square miles in size as well as hundreds of cylindrical sea floor structures that were packed closely together and featured hard and soft coral on top, Battista said. “It was really kind of unique,” he said. “I hadn’t seen that before.” Researchers also found a collection of sea anemones in purple, green, white and black; gray sea cucumbers with stubby green spines; and white starfish with red stripes.

AssociAted Press

A coral reef and ish on a snorkeling trail of Buck Island near St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands in 2005. U.S. scientists recently completed a nearly two-week mission to explore waters around the U.S. Virgin Islands as part of a 12-year project to map the Caribbean sealoor and help protect its reefs.

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A12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Ambassador: U.S. abandoned Cambodia 40 years later, Dean says he feels shame, anger over leaving country to Khmer Rouge By DENIS D. GRAy Associated Press

PARIS • Twelve helicopters, bristling with guns and U.S. Marines, breached the morning horizon and began a daring descent toward Cambodia’s besieged capital. Residents believed the Americans were rushing in to save them, but at the U.S. Embassy, in a bleeding city about to die, the ambassador wept. Forty years later, John Gunther Dean recalls one of the most tragic days of his life — April 12, 1975, the day the United States “abandoned Cambodia and handed it over to the butcher.” “We’d accepted responsibility for Cambodia and then walked out without fulfilling our promise. That’s the worst thing a country can do,” he says in an interview in Paris. “And I cried because I knew what was going to happen.” Five days after the dramatic evacuation of Americans, the U.S.-backed government fell to communist Khmer Rouge guerrillas. They drove Phnom Penh’s 2 million inhabitants into the countryside at gunpoint. Nearly 2 million Cambodians — one in every four — would die from executions, starvation and hideous torture. Many foreigners present during the final months remain haunted to this day by Phnom Penh’s death throes, by the heartbreaking loyalty of Cambodians who refused evacuation and by what Dean calls Washington’s “indecent act.” I count myself among those foreigners, a reporter who covered the Cambodian War for The Associated Press and was whisked away along with Dean and 287 other Americans, Cambodians and third-country nationals. I left behind more than a dozen Cambodian reporters and photographers — about the bravest, may I say the finest, colleagues I’ve ever known. Almost all would die. The pullout, three weeks before the end of the Vietnam War, is largely forgotten, but for historians and political analysts, it was the first of what then-U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger termed “bug-outs.” “It was the first time Americans came anywhere close to losing a war. What worries me and many of us old guys who were there is that we are still seeing it happen,” says Frank Snepp, a senior CIA oicer in Saigon and author of “Decent Interval,” which depicts the final years of the Vietnam War. After Cambodia and Vietnam came Laos; there would be other conflicts with messy endings, like Central America in the 1980s, Iraq and — potentially — Afghanistan. Today, at 89, Dean and his French wife reside in an elegant Paris apartment graced by statues of Cambodian kings from the glory days of the Angkor Empire. A folded American flag lies across his knees, the same one he clutched under his arm in a plastic bag as he sped to the evacuation site. Captured by a photographer, it became one of the most memorable images of the Vietnam War era. In the apartment’s vestibule hangs a framed letter signed by President Gerald R. Ford and dated Aug. 14, 1975. It highlights that Dean was “given one of the most diicult assignments in the history of the Foreign Service and carried it out with distinction.” But Dean says: “I failed.” “I tried so hard,” he adds. “I took as many people as I could, hundreds of them, I took them out, but I couldn’t take the whole nation out.” The former ambassador to four other countries is highly critical of America’s violation of Cambodian neutrality by armed incursions from neighboring Vietnam and a secret bombing campaign in the early 1970s. The U.S. bombed communist Vietnamese sanctuaries and supply lines along the Vietnam-Cambodia border, keeping Cambodia’s Lon Nol government propped up as an anti-communist enclave, but it provided World War II aircraft and few artillery pieces to Phnom Penh forces fighting the Khmer Rouge. In his memoirs, Kissinger says the U.S. had no choice but to expand its eforts into the neighboring country that the North Vietnamese were using as a staging area and armory, and that anti-war sentiment prevented it from giving Cambodia more assistance. Dean is bitter that Washington did not support his quest to persuade ousted Cambodian King Norodom Sihanouk to return from exile and forge a coalition between the Khmer Rouge and Lon Nol. It was Dean’s “controlled solution.” “Ambassador Dean never had (President Richard) Nix-

AssociAted Press

In this April 12, 1975, ile photo, U.S. Marines provide cover as Americans and Cambodians board Marine helicopters in Phnom Penh during the inal U.S. pullout of Cambodia.

on’s or Kissinger’s support because both of them wanted out of Indochina,” Snepp says, though he, and some historians, doubt that Dean’s plan could have worked. By early 1975, the embassy’s cables, most of them declassified in 2006, were becoming increasingly frantic. Meeting me one day, a haggard Dean, who had lost 15 pounds, asked rhetorically: “Isn’t there any sense of human decency left in us?” The Khmer Rouge were tightening their stranglehold on the capital, shutting down its airport from which the embassy had flown out several hundred Cambodians. An April 6 cable from Dean said the Cambodian government and army “seem to be expecting us to produce some miracle to save them. You and I know there will be no such miracle.” Congress was cutting the aid lifeline to Phnom Penh. The American public had had enough of the war. Among Cambodians in-the-know, some anti-American feeling was growing. “We in Cambodia have been seduced and abandoned,” Chhang Song, a former information minister, said one night in early 1975. But among Phnom Penh residents I found only smiles — “Americans are our fathers,” one vegetable vendor told me — along with a never-never-land mindset that things would turn out to be all right. Somehow. The morning of the evacuation, Dean sat in his office one last time and read a letter from Prince Sirik Matak in which the respected former deputy prime minister declined evacuation and thus sealed his own death. It read: “I never believed for a moment that you have this sentiment of abandoning a people which has chosen liberty. I have only

committed this mistake of believing in you the Americans.” Dean today describes it as the “greatest accusation ever made by foreigners. It is wrenching, no?” His embassy closed down at 9:45 a.m., the evacuees driven to a soccer field. The “Jolly Green Giant” helicopters were setting down. The Marines fanned out to form a security cordon, but fears of Cambodian reprisals proved unfounded. Children and mothers scrambled over fences to watch. They cheered, clapped and waved. A Cambodian military policeman smartly saluted Alan Armstrong, the assistant defense attache. Disgusted and ashamed, Armstrong dropped his helmet and rifle, leaving them behind. I tried to avoid looking into faces of the crowd. Always with me will be the children’s little hands aflutter and their singsong “OK, Bye-bye, bye-bye.” Five days later we received a cable from Mean Leang, an ever-jovial, baby-faced AP reporter who had refused to seek safety. He wrote about the brutal entry of the Khmer Rouge into the city, its surrender and its gunpoint evacuation. “I alone in oice, losing contact with our guys. I feel rather trembling,” he messaged. “Do not know how to file our stories now ... maybe last cable today and forever.” Barry Broman, then a young diplomat, remembers a Cambodian woman who worked upcountry monitoring the war for the embassy who had also refused evacuation. “One day she said, ‘They are in the city,’ and her contact said ‘OK, time to go.’ She refused. Later she reported, ‘They are in the building,’ and again refused to leave her post. Her last transmission was, ‘They are in the room. Good-bye.’ The line went dead.”

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LOCAL

04.12.2015 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

More children are living with special needs today SPECIAL NEEDS • from A1

The first to respond to an emergency call at his home would be the firefighters and EMTs at the Saline Valley Fire Protection District’s station in Fenton. They must know what to do. “Nathaniel literally lives around the corner from you,” Shelby Cox told the uneasy group of firefighters. “You guys will respond to that call. You will be the first to take care of him.” The firefighters were participating in a new program co-founded by Cox, EMS liaison for Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center, to train first-responders to care for the unique and challenging conditions of a growing number of children with special needs. Over the past 50 years, the number of children living with disabilities has tripled, largely because health care advances have helped children survive with conditions that used to mean death, according to a 2011 report by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Children and adolescents have had the highest growth rate of disability of any age group during the past decade: About one of every seven children younger than 18 in the U.S. can be classified as having special health care needs. These include developmental delays, seizure disorders, cerebral shunts, heart problems, autism or any other atypical disease or syndrome. Historically, hospital-based or institutional care was the only option for most children with complex medical conditions or significant emotional needs. But more recently, community-based programs provide care for children in their homes. While this has many benefits, the report said, it has brought new challenges. Many may assume first-responders are experts at handling any type of emergency, Cox said, but the reality is training has not caught up with the advances keeping children alive and living at home. Cox showed the firefighters a video of a “standard trache change.” It was a mother replacing her toddler’s tracheotomy tube with a clean one — routine care for her, but frightening for anyone else to watch as the child squirms and seems to choke. “That is not standard, I will tell you right now,” said Saline Valley fire Capt. Kevin Wissman. Cox told them to imagine if it were an

RobeRt Cohen • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Jessica Duran (center) shows ireighters from the Saline Valley Fire Protection District her son Maverick’s tracheotomy tube during training last month at the irehouse in Fenton. Kim Rankin and her son Nathaniel were also part of the training.

emergency, if that child had not been able to breathe for a while.

CURRICULUM OUTDATED The first thing parents hear when calling their pediatrician is, “If this is an emergency, hang up and dial 9-1-1.” “Parents are under the impression that we are as comfortable as specialists taking care of them in hospitals, yet we are not,” said Cox, also a part-time paramedic with the Rock Township Ambulance District. Cox asked the group at the Saline Valley firehouse if anyone had ever cared for a patient with a tracheotomy, and the response was silence. “A lot of us are not comfortable with adult tracheotomies,” she said. “And when it comes to pediatrics, we are really uncomfortable.” Tricia Casey, a paramedic with Rock Township who founded the training program with Cox, said demands on emergency medical services have changed dramatically since the ’70s, and the curriculum has not caught up. For example, she was taught if a pregnant woman is in labor before 26 weeks, she should be taken to the emergency room instead of labor and delivery. “But now these kids are surviving,” Casey said, “and they are surviving with traches,

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ports and shunts that we are not so familiar with.” Doctors and staf at Cardinal Glennon sounded the alarm when patients with tracheotomies suffered complications as they were transported to the hospital. They asked Cox to see how care could be improved. She found that paramedics needed detailed information and preparation before an emergency takes place. “The pre-hospital personnel take pride in the care they deliver and don’t want to feel uncomfortable in any situation,” said Dr. Steven Lafey, a pediatrician at Cardinal Glennon. “As they saw more of these cases, they were asking for the education and information.” Cox worked with Casey, who also has a special-needs child, to develop STARS — Special Need Tracking and Awareness Response System. Each special-needs child within a district is identified by a number, which emergency dispatchers can relay to ambulance crews. First-responders can look up information by the child’s number and quickly learn the child’s diagnosis, medications, baseline vital signs, common emergencies, effective management and what procedures to avoid. The information can be as detailed as needed — even including a typical hiding place, a favorite stufed animal or whether sirens cause anxiety. Cox and Casey have come across a few similar programs in other states, but they involve caregivers giving responders an information sheet. “You can’t just get handed a piece of paper when going in,” Casey said. “It’s too late.” A $28,000 grant through the city and county health departments is covering the cost of supplies and training. “It is imperative that appropriate care for these children begins when paramedics arrive,” Lafey said.

UTMOST IMPORTANCE Cox and Casey created the system last summer, and already a dozen St. Louis area districts have signed on. “As emergency providers, we need to be well informed and ready for anything, even the unexpected, and we need to be able to provide care for all the members of our community,” said Sabine Sagner, clinical supervisor for Christian Hospital EMS, which is identifying special-needs children in the area it serves. When a patient leaves Cardinal Glennon, Cox — with the family’s permission — notifies the appropriate ambulance district about the child’s unique health care needs. Then she’ll inform the district about the special-needs database and training. “The common response is, ‘Please come here and tell us everything about STARS,’” she said. Each district can find other specialneeds children they serve, and a coordinator will meet with their families to get information. Cox and Casey will provide

STEPS TO TAkE American Academy of Pediatrics recommends several steps to be better prepared when children with special needs require emergency care: • Caregivers and health care providers should create a summary of information important in managing a child’s emergency, and it should be updated regularly. • Mechanisms to quickly identify children with special health care needs in an emergency should be established and available to local EMS and hospital personnel. • A standardized form should be used for summaries, including emergency contacts, major chronic illnesses and disabilities, baseline physical and mental status, baseline vital signs, medications, allergies and advanced directives. • Rapid, 24-hour access to the summary is necessary. Copies should be accessible at home, school, during transportation and in the emergency department. • Obtain parental permission to distribute the form to appropriate agencies. Maintain conidentiality of the form. For districts wanting to learn more about the STARS program, email Shelby Cox at shelby_cox@ssmhc.com Parents of special needs children can contact the ambulance district where they live to see if it participates in STARS or provide the district with emergency information. STARS has a community Facebook page: STARS for Special Needs Pediatric Patients

whatever specialized training a district wants. It’s a lot of extra work, but many districts are willing to put in the time. “It’s of the utmost importance,” said Scott Keller, a paramedic with the St. Charles County Ambulance District, the largest in Missouri, with 370,000 residents in 592 square miles. Districts across the state and small community hospitals have asked to learn more about the program, Cox said. “It’s really catching on, and we are excited about that.” Cox said their goal is to have a statewide database of children with special needs for dispatchers and first-responders. Currently, each district has access to information only on children living within their district. Back at the Saline Valley firehouse, Cox explains how to flush a trache tube with saline. If that doesn’t work, the tube needs to be replaced. If the responder can’t get in a new tube, the last option involves placing an oxygen mask over the throat incision. “We don’t have the training. We need to push this,” said Wissman, the fire captain. “We need to do whatever it takes.” Michele Munz • 314-340-8263 @michelemunz on Twitter mmunz@post-dispatch.com

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A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Webster University’s hailand campus blasted by professor BY KorAn Addo St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A Webster University English professor who has spent time at the school’s Thailand campus recently blasted the overseas campus in a 21-page letter to his dean, criticizing the school’s academics, its facilities’ finances, and calling it an “American university in name only.” Michael Erickson’s criticism was reported by the online publication Inside Higher Ed in a comprehensive look at problems plaguing the Thailand campus as told by faculty and students. Inside Higher Ed reports that Erickson attacked the campus for having only a shoddy library, no writing center, a lack of academic tutors, poor athletic facilities and no faculty governing body. Erickson also criticized the campus for recruiting low-performing students and not supporting them and a culture where faculty firings and high turnover rate among faculty has damaged morale.

Erickson, who could not be reached for comment Friday, wrote in his letter that top administrators “do not know what a real American university education consists of, and have no interest in finding out.” Webster Provost Julian Z. Schuster is quoted as acknowledging a need to upgrade the Thailand campus’ facilities, but denying that Webster had purposefully skimped on any of Webster’s several dozen campuses in the U.S. or abroad. Webster operates more than 60 campuses in the U.S. and 12 overseas. Webster’s St. Louis location is considered the university’s main campus. Webster’s administrators did not respond in detail to specific questions asked by the Post-Dispatch on Friday, but spokesman Patrick Giblin said the issue of faculty criticizing the university “is an issue of academic freedom.” Koran Addo • 314-340-8305 @KoranAddo on Twitter kaddo@post-dispatch.com

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A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Filmmakers propose Russian alternative to Western fast food AssocIAted Press

MOSCOW • Two of Russia’s best-known

movie directors are aiming to create a chain of fast-food restaurants that would be an alternative to Western-style operations such as McDonald’s. The move by Nikita Mikhalkov and Andrei Konchalovsky, who are brothers, comes amid growing animosity toward the West, especially the United States, over the conflict in Ukraine. But even before that tension emerged, many Russians watched uneasily as Western fast-food outlets spread vigorously. Mikhalkov and Konchalovsky proposed the project, called “Eat at Home,” in a letter to President Vladimir Putin last month that said the goal was “the creation of an alternative to Western fastfood chains,” the newspaper Kommersant reported. The business news agency RBC reported that the government would back a bank loan of $13 million for the project. Mikhalkov directed the 1994 movie

“Burnt by the Sun,” which won the 1994 Academy Award for best foreign movie. In recent years he has been a vocal supporter of Putin. Konchalovsky spent years in the United States, and his Hollywood movies include “Tango & Cash.” They are sons of Sergei Mikhalkov, who wrote the lyrics for the Soviet national anthem, and for the Russian national anthem when the Soviet-era music was restored in 2001. As tension with the United States grew in the Ukraine crisis, several McDonald’s outlets were temporarily closed on the grounds of health violations, including the vast unit on Moscow’s Pushkin Square that had been a huge sensation when it was the first of the company’s restaurants in the Soviet Union. After the USSR’s collapse, many other Western fast-food chains entered the Russian market, aiming to tap pent-up consumer demand. Although some local chains have established strong operations, foreign chains such as KFC, Burger King and Cinnabon are widespread in shopping-center food courts.

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04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A15

Rio squatters emblematic of housing concerns Building was to become a luxury hotel for Olympics By JENNy BARCHFIELD associated Press

RIO DE JANEIRO • A vast Art Deco residential building in Rio de Janeiro that Brazil’s one-time richest man was supposed to transform into a luxury hotel ahead of the 2016 Olympics has been invaded by squatters. About 100 people moved into the building overnight Monday and Tuesday, slipping through a breach in the wrought-iron fence. The squatters, many recently evicted from another site in downtown Rio, said they were determined to remain in the building until city oicials agreed to provide them housing. “We’re only leaving here with a house. If not, we’re staying right here,” said Alexandre Pereira da Silva, an unemployed father of three, one of several squatters who spoke to reporters across the iron fence, their faces shrouded from cameras by blankets. Long owned by Rio soccer team Flamengo, the building was part of a deal by a company belonging to former Brazilian billionaire Eike Batista, who pledged to turn it into a hotel in return for paying millions of dollars in back taxes owed on the property. More than 20 stories high, the commanding structure looks over Guanabara Bay as well as the city’s two landmarks, Sugarloaf Mountain and the Christ the Redeemer statue. Former residents of the apartment building were evicted in late 2012, about the time when Batista’s oil, mining, logistics and ship-making empire began to crumble. He now is on trial, accused of insider trading. The company responsible for the renovation declared bankruptcy, and construction never began. The building remained empty, becoming a breeding ground for mosquitoes and cockroaches. Residents of the surrounding middleclass neighborhood complain it has attracted vandals, contributing to a surge in muggings nearby. City Councilwoman Leila do Flamengo said she thought legal proceedings to expel the squatters soon would be taken. Afordable housing has become increasingly hard to find as this sprawling seaside city of 12 million people has experienced an economic boom, in part linked to the discovery of huge, offshore oil deposits as well as speculation ahead of last year’s

AssocIAted Press Photos

People stand behind a gate recently at the entrance of an abandoned residential apartment building in the middle-class Flamengo neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. Squatters were demanding city oicials provide more housing.

The abandoned apartment building held by squatters recently in Rio de Janeiro. The squatters had been ejected from another building in Rio.

World Cup and the upcoming Olympics. Poor residents have been pushed to distant suburbs or sometimes onto the

streets. Veronica Castro, one of the squatters at the Flamengo building, questioned the

government’s spending priorities, particularly for the high-profile sporting events. “That’s the only thing that occurs to them to spend money on,” said Castro, a mother of four. “They don’t provide affordable housing, health care, education or security.” Batista’s downfall also has left another renovation project, the nearby Hotel da Gloria, unfinished. Once considered a modern mid-century gem, the hotel was gutted before work ground to a halt. The hotel’s shell has remained abandoned for more than a year. The renovation projects were meant to ease Rio’s hotel room shortage, long considered a critical issue heading into the Olympics. When the city won the Olympic bid in 2009, it had just half the 40,000 beds required for the games. While thousands of beds have been added since then, the local Olympic organizing committee recently announced a partnership with the online home-share service AirBnB to help Olympic visitors find lodging in private homes.

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Oil bust, sanctions over Ukraine have wrecked economy By CARoL J. WILLIAmS Los angeles Times

TVER, RussIA • Andrei Miller’s sallow

skin and gaunt visage betray a serious affliction as he sits outside an X-ray unit of Tver Regional Hospital, the tattooed fingers of his slender hands gripping a flimsy onion-skin appointment slip like a lifeline. The welder, 42, has been of work since just after New Year’s, sufering from a lung disorder that impairs his breathing, clouds his eyesight and leaves him too weak to do more than limp from chair to chair. In the time that he has been on disability leave, the buying power of his 20,000-ruble salary has continued to slip; it’s now worth about $330 a month, or half what it was a year ago. His wife is on maternity leave from a day care job that will earn them an additional $100 a month when she returns to work this spring, but the needs of their four children haven’t yet adjusted to Russia’s sudden economic downturn. “The girls are teenagers,” he says of the two older children, a sense of panic rising as he contemplates his family’s shaky financial status. “They need everything — coats, boots, money to go out with their friends. And now we are lucky if we can buy enough food.” Miller spent 12 hours on trains and buses to get to his fluoroscopy appointment from his home in Bologoye, 150 miles by road from Tver and about halfway between Moscow and St. Petersburg. The main hospital in his hometown lacks the equipment to diagnose his respiratory problem, he said, and cutbacks in rural transport service have lengthened what was already an all-day undertaking to get to Tver into costly two-day journeys. Like many Russians who climbed into an emerging middle class in recent years, Miller is watching his relative prosperity vanish. The plummet in global oil prices since last summer and Western sanctions imposed on Russia over its seizure of Ukrainian territory last year have cut deeply into the national budget, which depends on hydrocarbon exports for more than half of its revenue. For Miller, his worsening and still undiagnosed illness amplifies the distress felt by all but the wealthiest Russians. Many in provincial cities such as Tver appear ready to ride out the hard times in the short term, fueled by a nationalist euphoria over President Vladimir Putin’s defiant pos-

ture toward old Cold War adversaries. But those such as Miller who have been confronted with the unexpected costs of infirmity are haunted by the prospect of never recovering the modest economic stability to which they had become accustomed. Fear for the future is rising in Russian provinces, though anger at declining living conditions seems to remain in check. Many Russians readily accept state-controlled media reports blaming their hard times on a purported Saudi-U.S. conspiracy to suppress oil prices and bankrupt Russia. Living standards in Moscow have been less afected because of the capital city’s concentration of well-heeled government oicials and industry captains; the decline in the provinces is more palpable.

ECoNomy NoT DIVERSIFIED Average income for Russian workers fell over the last year, as layofs from bloated government payrolls have gradually boosted unemployment. Still low in comparison with most European countries at 5.5 percent, the jobless rate is nonetheless spreading misery among those who can least bear it. Independent economists, Russian and foreign alike, have been warning since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union that the country needs to diversify its economy from its dependence on oil and gas sales. It is a lesson learned too little and too late in a country where private business growth is stunted by corruption, unpredictable property rights and access to financing dependent on political connections more than a borrower’s ability to repay. Calls for deep investment of commodity sales income in transportation, technology, manufacturing and support for small businesses have been ignored to the economy’s detriment. Kremlin budget drafters counted on an oil price of at least $70 a barrel for 2015, leaving the central cofers short of funds to be doled out to political allies in the provinces. Last year, regions got $70 billion more in subsidies from Moscow than they paid into the federal cofers. This year, local and regional governments and state-owned enterprises are struggling to comply with the Kremlin’s order that they make across-the-board budget cuts of 10 percent, exempting only defense spending and some social services such as pensions and health care. Last month, Russian Finance Minister Anton Siluanov said that the crash in oil prices would deprive the treasury of at least $180 billion this year, forcing the government to continue tapping its sovereign wealth fund and hard currency reserves.


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M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

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M 1 SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • A17

On O’Fallon, Mo., council, popular kids rule the roost

INSIDE THIS SECTION A17 A18 A19 A20 A23

• • • • •

Heads Up Opinion Other views Funeral notices Weather

COLUMNIST SCHEDULE Sunday • Bill McClellan Monday • Bill McClellan Wednesday • Bill McClellan Friday • Bill McClellan Saturday • Joe Holleman’s “Joe’s St. Louis”

BILL McCLELLAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WHAT’S UP • FROM EVENTS.STLTODAY.COM Remembering the Easter Uprising • Members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians of St. Louis and St. Charles, along with Irish Northern Aid, will hold a wreath-laying ceremony in remembrance of the 99th anniversary of the famous Easter Uprising in Dublin, Ireland. The free ceremony will be at 11:45 a.m. Sunday at Calvary Cemetery, 5239 West Florissant Avenue. The event will commemorate actions of a group of Irishmen who took control of a number of government buildings in Dublin, declaring Ireland an independent country. The Uprising lasted seven days but failed to drive the British from Ireland. Ireland eventually won its independence in a 1921 treaty. stlhibernians.com

04.12

Veterans hiring fair • The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation, along with lead sponsor the University of Phoenix, will host Hiring Our Heroes, a free job fair for veterans and military spouses, from 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday at the Machinists Building, 12365 St. Charles Rock Road in Bridgeton. More than 80 employers are expected to participate, with jobs available for veterans and military spouses of all levels of experience. The event will also include a free Hiring Our Heroes employment workshop at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Machinists Building, focusing on résumé writing, interview skills and job search techniques for veterans, transitioning service members and military spouses. Interested job seekers are asked to pre-register online at hiringourheroes.org.

04.14

Improving Highways K and M • The City of O’Fallon, Mo., will host two forums to allow residents and business owners to ofer input on how to make the busy Highway K and M corridor more accommodating for cyclists and walkers. The Highway K forum will be from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at the Renaud Spirit Center, 2650 Tri Sports Circle. The Highway M forum will be from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday at the O’Fallon Municipal Centre, 100 North Main Street. The forums will be hosted by city staf and the city’s contractor on the project. The focus will be on developing a plan to better integrate pedestrian, bicycle and automobile facilities. For more information, visit ofallon. mo.us.

04.15

To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

HEADS UP Taxpayer tips • With Wednesday as the deadline for paying income taxes, WalletHub and CardHub are ofering these last-minute tax tips: • Don’t try to hide. The IRS has proved willing to work with people when they’re straightforward about their inability to pay. • From fraudulent returns to phishing and illegitimate tax servicing companies, there are myriad scams to watch out for. • Seek free advice. Having someone to bounce questions of can help you avoid making mistakes. To submit items, email them to headsup@post-dispatch.com or fax them to 314-340-3050.

The Board of Adjustment for the city of O’Fallon, Mo., met Wednesday night, and the most contentious item on the agenda had to do with a request for a reduction in the required setback from a street. In other words, a building was supposed to be 25 feet from the street. Would the board approve a building being 12 feet from the street? The supporters spoke. Then the opponents spoke. Then the supporters spoke again. Finally, the board voted. Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes and yes. The vote was no surprise. Small-town governments are like high schools. The popular kids always win. That is not good news for Mick and Tina Bridgins. I wrote about their situation earlier this month. They own a three-bedroom brick house at Second and Park streets. They bought it in 2006 for $172,000. There was a house behind them and a house next to them. Behind the house next door was a Knights of Columbus Hall. The hall is an old building. It was built in 1932. The Knights want a new hall. The new building will have more than twice the square footage of the current building. With the new hall, the Knights will be able to book private parties. The expanded operation will need more parking. Fortunately for the Knights, they own the house next to the Bridginses’ house. That house will be torn down and its space will become part of the new parking lot. The house behind the Bridginses’ house is already gone. It will become a horseshoe pit. According to city code, a project like this needs 5 acres.

The Knights have only 1.29 acres. Last year, the Board of Adjustment agreed to give the Knights a variance. The project then went to the City Council for approval. The vote was 4-4, and Mayor Bill Hennessy cast the tie-breaking vote in favor of the Knights. By the way, the mayor is a Knight. Before the celebration could begin, somebody noticed something in the city charter. A supermajority on the council was needed to change the zoning. The Knights had lost. It was a temporary defeat. The Knights are the popular kids, and understandably so. This particular Knights council has been in operation for 94 years. That’s 94 years of charitable endeavors. In fact, in last year’s vote, one of the City Council members recused himself because his daughter had received a scholarship from the Knights. Speaking of recusals, Stan Patton, chairman of the Board of Adjustment, is a Knight. I asked after the meeting if he had considered recusing himself. He said the city attorney had told him that Knights didn’t have to recuse themselves because they weren’t making a personal profit on the matter. I asked how many other members of the board were Knights. “I can’t say,” said Patton. Safe to say, though, that the Knights are embedded in the community. Earlier at the meeting, former legislator Bill Luetkenhaus — a Knight himself but from a different council — spoke in favor of the variance and of the project in general. He said he had signatures from more than 250 residents of the community in favor of the project. Truth is, he could probably get 1,000 signatures. The Bridginses cannot stop the project. The popular kids will win. The best the couple can hope for is a fair buyout.

Luetkenhaus is handling negotiations for the Knights. He originally ofered the Bridginses $150,000. Plus, they would have to pay him a 5 percent commission. He eventually raised the ofer to $170,000 and agreed to waive his commission. T h e B r i d g i n s e s wa n t $230,000. They currently owe $146,886 on their home. They say a real estate agent has said a similar house in the same neighborhood — they have two kids and don’t want to have to change schools — would cost $200,000. They say there will be moving costs, legal fees and closing costs. They would like to end up in a similar home owing about what they owe now. I don’t know about the exact numbers, but the general idea sounds fair to me. Their attorney suggested a priest serve as a mediator. Luetkenhaus rejected that idea. He said the Bridginses bought at the top of the market, and they should not expect to reap a big profit. He said their house is not worth even $170,000. Of course, value is in the eye of the beholder. I remember in 2007 when Luetkenhaus was a member of the Missouri Housing Development Commission. He bought a piece of property in Wentzville for $932,000, and sold it two months later for $1.7 million. I only heard about it because he sold it to a developer who received tax credits and other subsidies from the commission. Then-Attorney General Jay Nixon said the transaction raised “serious questions about conflicts of interest,” and promised an investigation. Nothing came of it. Things always work out for the popular kids. Not so for everybody else. I fear for the Bridginses. Bill McClellan • 314-340-8143 @Bill_McClellan on Twitter bmcclellan@post-dispatch.com

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A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • A18

WHAT THE TWIN CITIES KNOW Our view • Minneapolis-St. Paul prospering from a regional approach. It’s instructive when outside experts weigh in on St. Louis issues. Unburdened by local history, politics and expectations, such experts see a stripped-down version of our problems, freeing them to propose rational solutions that would make perfect sense in a perfect world. Which St. Louis very definitely is not. However, the conversation must start somewhere. St. Louis can’t continue to do things the same old way, not if it hopes to avoid becoming further “detached from the more dynamic parts of the [U.S.] economy.” The phrase is from an important article published in the March edition of The Atlantic. Derek Thompson, one of the magazine’s senior editors, looked at what American cities have best been able to combine affordable housing and vibrant economies. Where is a young person most able to find a challenging career-track job that will help him move up the economic ladder and a house he can afford to buy? His top answer: Minneapolis-St. Paul. The reasons are particularly daunting for St. Louis. Mr. Thompson writes: “The answers appear to involve a highly unusual approach to to regional governance, one that encourages high-income communities to share not only their tax revenues but also their real estate with the lower and middle classes.” About that approach, more shortly, but first let’s note that two outside experts from the Brookings Institution suggested earlier this month that there are lessons for post-Ferguson St. Louis in the Twin Cities experiment. “Many suburban communities dealing with rising poverty and new populations are ill-equipped to address growing and changing needs. That’s particularly true in places like Ferguson, where population and jobs have declined over the years,” wrote Bruce Katz and Elizabeth Kneebone of Brookings’ Metropolitan Policy Program.” They cite new Brookings research showing that residents of Ferguson lived near 14 percent fewer jobs in 2012 than they did in 2000.“The resulting strains on local tax bases amount to one reason that local governments throughout the St. Louis region came to rely heavily on revenue-raising tactics like traffic fines and court fees,” Mr. Katz

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Nobody is saying St. Louisans could go windsurfing on lakes near downtown like they do in Minneapolis if we adopted its approach to regional tax-sharing. But there would be other benefits.

and Ms. Kneebone said. “Part of the mandate of the Ferguson Commission convened by Missouri Governor Nixon is to address the issue of governance, which will require confronting the region’s fragmented landscape. The commission can learn from states that have encouraged the sharing of services across municipalities or regions that are pursuing more collaborative approaches to respond to shared challenges around issues like housing, transportation, or community development.” In particular, they point to regional revenue sharing as practiced in MinneapolisSt. Paul. Since 1971, municipalities in the seven-county metropolitan area have been obliged by state law to contribute 40 percent of annual growth in commercial-industrial tax revenue to a regional pool. Growing

cities subsidize those that aren’t growing so fast, thus “filling local budget gaps where they exist without undermining local autonomy.” Cities are less likely to cannibalize each other by giving incentives to developers. Minneapolis and St. Paul have been able to invest more in public services like policing and education. There’s a recognition that sharing the prosperity means better quality of life, more growth and opportunity for everyone. On top of the so-called Fiscal Disparities program, Minnesota in 1976 enacted a law requiring cities to accept a fair share of affordable housing. In the 1970s and early 1980s, some 70 percent of affordable housing was built in wealthier suburbs. That practice has slowed down in recent decades, but it meant fewer people trapped in pockets of poverty. People were

able to live where the jobs were. “One reason the American dream has come apart is that too few cities have shared their resources — and real estate — between the rich and the rest,” Mr. Thompson wrote in The Atlantic.“This isn’t a fact of nature, like the mountains and oceans that restrain our coastal metros. It is a policy of our own choosing. The lesson of Minneapolis is that even our richest cities are free to make a different choice.” Blue sky? You bet. It’s considerably easier to make policy prescriptions for St. Louis from the East Coast than it is on the ground here. It’s hard enough to put a senior citizens home in Town and Country or Oakville. Imagine trying to convince them to build affordable housing. The mayor of Chesterfield has threatened to secede from St. Louis County over the issue of sharing sales taxes. In St. Louis, too many of us, individuals and communities alike, are in it for ourselves. If that’s not working too well for the future of the region, well, that’s the future’s problem. The mere thought of getting a Twin Cities-like revenue sharing plan through the Missouri Legislature does not compute. This is not a bunch of Scandinavianheritage, good-government, DemocratFarmer-Labor Party types meeting at a state capitol in the middle of a big city that also houses the flagship state university and 48,000 students. And then there’s the elephant in the room: In the 1970s, when Minnesota enacted its shared-burden legislation, the population of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area was 95 percent white. It’s easier to share when people look like you. The Twin Cities metro area is still about 70 percent white; the non-white population is mostly concentrated in a few high poverty areas in central cities. This is not a postracial paradise. But it’s growing, and St. Louis is not. It has 19 Fortune 500 companies, and it’s keeping them. It’s keeping its college-educated young people, and offering them good jobs and affordable housing in places where there are good schools. There’s something to be learned upriver, if we’re open to the lesson and willing to admit we need to learn it.

YOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS Editorial wrongly juxtaposes two shootings On Tuesday, the Post-Dispatch ran a frontpage article about the investigation into the Rolling Stone article concerning the now-discredited story about a gang rape at the University of Virginia. The investigation revealed the “reckless nature in which the Rolling Stone researched and failed to verify facts in its article that erroneously accused Phi Kappa Psi of crimes its members did not commit.” What could be a more fitting description of the continued false narrative the PostDispatch reprehensibly and inaccurately tells about the shooting of Michael Brown? In a half-page editorial Thursday, the PostDispatch points to the similarities between the Brown shooting and the Walter Scott shooting in South Carolina, with the grand title “Ferguson comes to South Carolina.” In great sanctimonious style, the two stories are juxtaposed with the appearance of agreement, even though the editorial grudgingly admits Oicer Wilson is “a free man” and forensic evidence backs Wilson’s story of self-defense. Add the ballistic evidence, and the stories are totally unalike. I would suggest that the writer of the editorial shows a conflicted mind in this matter, with repeated “on the one hand, on the other” throughout the piece. And yet the article still trumpets an entirely false editorial the day after the Brown shooting. It is time for the Post-Dispatch to regain some sense of credibility and fairness by noting that the careful investigations by the prosecutor and the federal Justice Department showed conclusively the “Hands up, don’t shoot” political slogans were all lies. Officer Wilson especially needs this stated after the continued vilifications and humiliations he has suffered to a great extent by the Post-Dispatch. Dale Coleman • Belleville

Treat city’s vacant lots as a public health challenge When I moved to St. Louis three years ago, brick, parks and neighborhoods shaped

quarterbacks with inefective front fours? Once again insanity plays out its ritual dance: Keep doing the same thing with the same sorry results in hopes the outcome changes. Oh, wait. Let’s build the stadium, keep a team (maybe even the sorry Rams), then we will have winning seasons from then on! Watch out New England, here we come! Jack McCartney • Richmond Heights

Rauner launches irresponsible attack on state judiciary

my perspective of the city. On daily bicycle commutes from Soulard to University City, I weaved through neighborhoods whose painted fire hydrants and street banners made me, a passer-by, feel pride. I treasured this “on the ground” experience of the city’s built environment. While I am still captivated by the daily charm of red brick and tall oak trees, my perspective of the city has grown to encompass things like glass shards and littered vacant blocks. I totter between two distinct realities — one is inhabited and vibrant and the other hides between remnants. I am not alone in my dual experience; most city residents know the disappointment of seeing a trashed lot or collapsing building. There are more than 11,000 vacant lots in our city. Despite glimpses of revitalization in the form of sunflower fields, chess parks and community gardens, vacancy rates are not declining. Vacant lots are “more than just an eyesore,” according to one University of Pennsylvania researcher. The public health challenges associated with vacant lots — crime rates, litter, poor mental health and a lack of

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well-being — are common, but they are not often addressed as multisector problems. City officials, developers, academia, nonprofits, banks and corporations need to come together in one cohesive and ongoing effort to address our vacant landscapes. We need to work together to address not only the core causes of disparity in our city, but also its physical manifestations. So, how about a vacant lot council? Lindsay Elliott • St. Louis

New football palace won’t create winning seasons So Civic Progress and the Regional Business Council wrote to the NFL their desires to have a football presence in St. Louis, and hang the cost! It’s my guess they did not write a check to Gov. Jay Nixon to cover the cost of the new stadium, yet. They must be waiting for Stan Kroenke to pony up, first. But, maybe Mr. Kroenke spent all his ready cash in LA, his new home away from home! Why would we want another palace on the riverfront, just to watch a team stumble through more seasons, ruining promising

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diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

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MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101

Last week, Gov. Bruce Rauner pointedly and unfairly attacked the integrity of the Illinois Supreme Court and Illinois’ entire justice system. He labeled the system “corrupt” and said he did not “trust the Supreme Court to be rational” in its decisions. As lawyers, we know Gov. Rauner’s attack is without foundation. We read the opinions authored by the supreme and appellate courts. We know they are decided without bias, based on the facts and evidence presented and the applicable law. We respect them as intelligent, well-reasoned decisions even when we don’t agree with them. We also know the hard work judges do every day on behalf of those who seek access to justice. We see the diicult cases they decide. We know Illinois’ judicial system is not corrupt and that judicial decisions are rational. As lawyers, we can appreciate the governor’s interest in the justice system and the election of judges. It is a legitimate topic of debate. In fact, since the early 1980s, the Illinois State Bar Association has worked with political leaders on both sides of the aisle to promote merit selection and retention of judges and public financing of judicial elections. That makes it all the more disappointing that the governor has launched an irresponsible attack without merit on the integrity of the entire judicial system. Instead, he should engage in constructive dialogue or propose legislation to work on these issues. Richard D. Felice • Chicago President, Illinois State Bar Association

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TONY MESSENGER tmessenger@post-dispatch.com Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8382 KEVIN HORRIGAN khorrigan@post-dispatch.com Deputy Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8135 FRANK REUST freust@post-dispatch.com Letters Editor • 314-340-8356 DEBORAH PETERSON dpeterson@post-dispatch.com Editorial writer • 314-340-8276


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Diane Jennings of St. Ann says, “Everyone needs to honor their job, the faith their community places in them and the badge they wear every day in a way that makes us want to write good letters that stand up for our city and police oicers. Don’t handle things in a way that makes our city, police oicers and citizens have to deal with bad press.”

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Rand Paul’s grand deception 2016 election • Candidate tries to cloak libertarian positions in Republican rhetoric. MICHAEL GERSON Washington Post

In March 2013, Rand Paul occupied the Senate floor for a 13-hour filibuster, promising to “speak until I can no longer speak” in the cause that “no American should be killed by a drone on American soil without first being charged with a crime.” Enthused Ted Cruz: “You’re standing here today like a modern ‘Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.’” Marco Rubio also rose in support, with a speech that will be long remembered for its quotes from rappers Wiz Khalifa and Jay-Z. This was probably the high point of hip-hop-based Senate discourse (though who knows what the future might bring). It was certainly the center-stage moment for libertarian foreign policy — appealing to a concern for civil liberties, an exhaustion with the global war on terrorism and a suspicion among elements of the right that President Obama

is capable of anything, including missile strikes against citizens at cafes. But the greatest enemy of ideology is history, which tends to pick apart political abstractions bit by bit. Military aggression by Russia, a regional power grab by Iran and the rise of the Islamic State as the most dangerous terror state in modern times have all highlighted the risks of American passivity. The main GOP charge against Obama is weakness, not executive overreach. And the three musketeers from that day in 2013 have had a nasty breakup.“I don’t agree” with Paul on foreign policy, says Cruz. Rubio, should he run, would be the field’s foremost exponent of muscular internationalism. Paul himself has beat a tactical retreat from the front lines of libertarian foreign policy. Having previously proposed slashing defense spending, he now awkwardly embraces increases. Having tracked closely with Obama’s position on Iran, he now prefers negotiation from “a position of strength.” This movement from paranoia

to platitudes highlights the tension at the heart of the Paul campaign. He must send signals of sympathy to the extensive Paul libertarian field organization assembled by his father. He must also show indications of evolution to mainstream Republicans in order to be imaginable as commander in chief. Every word Paul says on foreign policy must pass through this balancing test. The result is a tap dance on a tightrope. Paul is either abandoning his deepest beliefs on foreign policy or playing a libertarian long game. The latter is much more likely. Paul often uses policy and proposals, not to reveal his deepest beliefs, but to advance a set of unstated beliefs. His drone filibuster was not really about the lunchtime vulnerability of Americans to Hellfire missiles.

Paul was using the issue strategically, to advance his opposition to the global war on terrorism. His proposed restrictions on the war against the Islamic State — involving yearly congressional reauthorization of the use of force — is couched as constitutionalism. But his plan would make it practically impossible for a chief executive to conduct a war. Which, we can fairly assume, is the larger goal. Paul opposes aid to Syrian rebels because, he says, arms might fall into the wrong hands and be used against Syrian Christians. But what, then, is his plan to save Christians and fight jihadists? That really isn’t the point. The objective of his argument is to reinforce a policy of nonintervention. Or take Paul’s “Stand with Israel Act,” which would end all foreign aid to the Palestinian Authority. But Paul’s broader, libertarian agenda is the gradual elimination of all foreign aid, period, including to Israel.“All nations should be free of foreign aid,” he recently said. In case after case, Paul is attempting to cloak libertarian

positions in Republican rhetoric. And sometimes he goes much too far. The emotional center of Paul’s presidential announcement speech was the story of conducting a cataract operation on a man in Guatemala, who was then able to see his wife for the first time in years.“As I saw the joy in their eyes, I thought,‘This is why I became a doctor.’” But Paul, of course, would eventually cut off funding for the USAID Child Blindness Program. And for vaccinations, and AIDS drugs and malaria treatments. Freeing nations from foreign aid, after all, is one reason he became a politician. All politicians are selective in their treatment of issues. Paul is deceptive, because he can’t talk frankly about his breathtakingly ambitious ideology, which is fundamentally unsuited to the strategic and moral challenges of our time. This has made him the candidate who peaked two years too early. Michael Gerson michaelgerson@washpost.com Copyright the Washington Post

Misdemeanor becomes capital ofense, again Scott’s killing • When police automatically classify black men as suspects, the opportunity for tragedy grows exponentially.

THE SCIENCE OF IDEOLOGY

EUGENE ROBINSON Washington Post

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Who knew this 2009 tea party rally at Kiener Plaza was a biological imperative?

Politics • For those on the wings, beliefs are baked in. KEVIN HORRIGAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Barry Goldwater, the father of modern conservatism, ran for president in 1964 as “A choice, not an echo.” Now science is discovering that conservatism is not a choice, but a biological imperative for those on the right wing. Does this mean that the socalled “right-wing gene” has been identified? No, but it does mean that those “conservative conversion therapy” programs are a waste of time. It means that businesses that refuse for religious reasons to cater or photograph conservatives’ weddings are out of line. Except for the last paragraph, this all true. The relatively new hard “science of politics” is real. Hard science — quantifiable experiments that can be replicated and are peer-reviewed, like climate science — has been studying the differences between right-wingers and left-wingers. Volunteers are hooked up to exotic machines that measure physiological responses to various stimuli. Brain waves, sweat reactions, eye-gaze patterns, MRIs and other suspiciously sciencey stuff. Bottom line: Conservatives have a “negativity bias,” that is, they react with more alarm to things that are perceived as threatening and disgusting. They find safety in the familiar. Some, but by no means all, scientists say that from an evolutionary point of view, this is the correct biological response. Protoliberals might see a saber-toothed tiger and think, “Nice kitty.” Prehistoric conservatives, with their heightened threat-recognition response, run for cover. Of course, some modern-day conservatives reject evolution because it threatens their religious beliefs. You have to like the irony that evolution has prepared them to reject evolution. You can read about this in a highly technical study by John Hibbing and Kevin B. Smith of the University of Nebraska and John R. Alford of Rice University. Or you can read the plain English version published in a 2013 book called. “Predisposed: Liberals,

Conservatives, and the Biology of Political Differences.” Here is the key (but very long) paragraph from their study: “Conservatives are less open to new experiences and are more conscientious. As a result, conservatives are less likely both to solicit new, potentially harmful information and to retain positive information concerning an object or perhaps a person or group. Consequently, not only do political positions favoring defense spending, roadblocks to immigration, and harsh treatment of criminals seem naturally to mesh with heightened response to threatening stimuli, but those fostering conforming unity (school children reciting the pledge of allegiance), traditional lifestyles (opposition to gay marriage), enforced personal respon-

Bottom line: Conservatives have a “negativity bias,” that is, they react with more alarm to things that are perceived as threatening and disgusting. They find safety in the familiar. sibility (opposition to welfare programs and government provided healthcare), longstanding sources of authority (Biblical inerrancy; literal, unchanging interpretations of the Constitution), and clarity and closure (abstinence-only sex education; signed pledges to never raise taxes; aversion to compromise) do, as well. Heightened response to the general category of negative stimuli fits comfortably with a great many of the typical tenets of political conservatism.” Liberals, on the other hand, score higher on personality tests for openness. They’re less rigid and harder to categorize, but in general they’re willing to try new things and meet new people. They’re more willing to take risks. The world is a less scary place for them. For liberals, the modern world is unlike the one described by Hobbes as “nasty, brutish and

short.” People of color do not present a threat, nor people of different sexual or religious preferences. They’ll give kale a try, or veganism, or soccer. Reinforcing these differences is the fact that people tend to mate with those whose minds are as open, or as closed, as their own. Hibbing and his colleagues report that about 40 percent of political beliefs are rooted in DNA. These include core beliefs on how society should function. Add nurture to nature, and kids tend to share their parents political beliefs. You throw in the silo effect — people tend to associate with like-minded people and get their information from sources that affirm their beliefs — the miracle is that polarization isn’t worse than it already is. Luckily political beliefs run along a continuum. The people on the wings may be hard core, but elsewhere on the continuum, changes of mind and changes of behavior are possible. Out on the wings, conservatives and liberals don’t just have different beliefs, they’re different people. They perceive the world in different ways. The lessons of all of this are clear, if disturbing. If you’re a Republican politician, you can’t go wrong stoking the base’s fears: Of immigrant children carrying Ebola across the border, of jackbooted Obama administration Sharia-pounding thugs coming for their guns, of their taxes going to steak-eating welfare queens on cruise ships. You can sell them on economic ideas that run contrary to their interests by wrapping them in negativity (i.e., the “death tax”). They’re programmed from birth to believe these things. The more contrary evidence they’re confronted with, the harder they dig in. This makes them happy. Hibbing and his colleagues find conservatives tend to be happier and more satisfied with their lives, as scary as they are, perhaps because they’re not plagued with doubt or troubled by ambiguity. To quote a line from “Bull Durham”: “The world is made for people who aren’t cursed with self-awareness.” Kevin Horrigan • 314-340-8135 @oldsport on Twitter khorrigan@post-dispatch.com

You thought, perhaps, that we were making this stuff up? That the whole “Black Lives Matter” thing was probably overblown? That the idea of African-American men having to fear routine encounters with the police was being exaggerated by self-serving activists? Let’s go to the videotape. In North Charleston, S.C., on April 4, a bystander happened to be watching — and taking video with his cellphone — as police officer Michael Slager killed a man named Walter Scott in cold blood. The images are stomachturning. The 50-year-old Scott, apparently unarmed, is running away. Slager draws his weapon and aims at Scott’s back, firing again and again. The eighth bullet brings him down. “Shots fired,” Slager reported to the police dispatcher, according to authorities.“Subject is down. He grabbed my Taser.” In the cellphone video, Slager makes no attempt to revive the dying man. Instead, he goes back to the place where the encounter began, picks up an object and returns to drop it next to Scott’s body. The object, difficult to identify in the video, is believed to be Slager’s police Taser. Imagine the narrative that might have emerged if the bystander, a man named Feidin Santana, hadn’t happened along. A violent suspect struggled with Officer Slager, wrested control of the officer’s Taser and threatened him with it.Fearful of his own safety and that of the community,Slager had no choice but to fire.The officer regrets the loss of Mr. Scott’s life but did what he had to do. After Ferguson, such an account might not have been taken at face value — especially, I should note, in South Carolina, which has been much more aggressive in holding police officers accountable for fatal shootings. The most basic forensic examination would have shown that Scott was some distance from Slager — and fleeing — when he was shot. Investigators from the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division likely would have been skeptical of any claim that the officer feared for his life. But what could anyone prove? In the end, detectives would have had the word of a police officer against that of a corpse. The truism is true:

Dead men tell no tales. Thanks to Santana’s video — and the testimony he likely will give — justice has a chance. By midweek, Slager had been arrested and charged with murder. Santana has said in interviews that initially there was a struggle between Slager and Scott, but Slager quickly “had control” of Scott and the situation. Scott “never grabbed the Taser of the police. He never got the Taser,” Santana told NBC’s Matt Lauer. What started the whole thing? Slager pulled Scott over because he had a broken taillight on his aging Mercedes. Michael Brown was walking in the middle of the street. Eric Garner was selling loose cigarettes. For three black men, these misdemeanors became capital offenses. We don’t know what happened before Santana arrived to bear witness, but I have to assume that Scott might have given him lip or otherwise expressed his displeasure. And given subsequent events — eight shots fired at Scott’s back — I have to doubt that Slager initiated the encounter with an Officer Friendly approach. Why wouldn’t Scott just cooperate and do anything the officer ordered, however unjust or humiliating he felt it might be? I doubt we’ll ever know. He reportedly owed back child support, and there was speculation that he wanted to avoid being jailed for that. I’m sure we’ll soon learn of everything Scott ever did wrong in his five decades on earth. The fact is that not everyone who is ever stopped by a police officer is going to be happy about the experience. Yet black men run a tragically greater risk than others of having the encounter turn deadly. How much more risk? As I wrote in a column last year, no one really knows. Incredibly, there are no authoritative, comprehensive statistics on police killings nationwide — not even in the aggregate, let alone broken down by race. But it doesn’t take data analysis to realize that when police treat communities like occupied territory — and routinely automatically classify black men as suspects — the opportunity for tragedy grows exponentially. Walter Scott’s broken taillight was an excuse, not an offense. Slager knew that Scott had to be guilty of something. It was just a matter of finding out what that black man’s crime might be. Eugene Robinson eugenerobinson@washpost.com Copyright the Washington Post


A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Crancer, Rosemary

To Our Readers To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index Allen - see Leyhe Baker, Rebecca - St. Louis Bamberger - see Kavanaugh

Banks, Judith Goodenough - Bluffton, SC, formerly St. Louis Bayers - see Kavanaugh Brodbeck-Steitz, Mildred C. - St. Louis Buraszeski - see Nesser Burke - see Leyhe Burr, Carolyn E. - Manchester Callahan, Paul C. - St. Louis Cohen, Rita Marie - St. Louis Crancer, Rosemary - St. Louis Cropper - see Lewi Day, Betty R. - St. Louis Delaplain, Jeffrey B. - St. Louis Deranja, Frank - St. Louis Dollard, Mary A. - St. Louis

Fagyal, Edward, Sr., Lt Col, USAF, Ret. - Sun City, AZ, formerly St. Louis Fobian, Charles - Kirkwood Fore, Marvin - Florissant, formerly Rolla, MO Frank, Mary Ann - St. Louis Freese - see Reutzel

Grapperhaus, Sandra Kay "Sandy" - St. Peters Harris - see Nesser Hennekes, Loretta, CSJ aka John Bernard St. Louis Higgins, Jacqueline - St. Louis Hittler, Marion - St. Louis Horton, Kenneth J. - St. Louis Hunter, Jean Laverne - Moscow Mills, MO Johnson, Robert S. "Bob" - St. Louis Kavanaugh, Dolores M. - Ballwin Kinzel, Jeffrey James - St. Louis Kirkman, Stella Marie - St. Louis Klearman, Joan - St. Louis Knoll - see Hittler Kumming - see Pfeifer

Lamping, John "Jack" Thomas, Sr. - St. Louis Lewi, LTG (Ret) Kenneth Edward - Wildwood Leyhe, Louise Kraus - St. Louis

Death Notice Index Llewellyn, Dovie Christine - St. Louis Lund, Carol A. - St. Charles Mace, Lorraine A. - St. Louis Matheis, Richard Anthony - St. Louis Mathis, Vernon - Wentzville McCarthy - see Lewi McGuire, Virginia S. - St. Charles McMichael, Donald F. - St. Charles Mehringer - see Nesser Moore, Jean - St. Louis Murphy - see Hittler Nesser, Shirley M. - St. Louis Niemann - see Kavanaugh Novak, Daniel E. - St. Louis Oldani, Louis Charles - St. Louis Pearce - see Nesser Pedroli - see Moore Pfeifer, Wanda Ruth - St. Louis Rawlings, Richard II - Webster Groves Re - see Hittler Reutzel, Lawrence F. "Larry" - St. Louis Roberts, Ellen Langtree Gordon - St. Louis Roche, Mary Lou - St. Louis Rogers, Starling B. - Wentzville Schraudner, Elizabeth "Liz" - St. Louis Sidoti, Gloria "Ginny" - St. OLouis Siebert - see Hittler Siegner, Allan M. - Tempe, AZ Speeler - see Hittler Stratos, Voula - St. Louis Sweeney, Anita M. - St. Louis Tatro, Paul L. - St. Peters Temoral, Adelaide Almeda M.D. - St Louis Valley, Lawrence L. Jr. - Harlingen, TX Vomund, C. Nick - St. Paul, MO Williams, Robert P. (Willie) - St. Louis Wilson - see Higgins Wirick - see Johnson Witthaus, Raymond A., Sr. - St. Louis Wolf, June J. - St. Louis

Woratzeck, Jerome C. - Charlotte, NC, formerly St. Louis Worley - see Pfeifer

Elegant Sprays, Wreaths and Baskets. Same-Day delivery. Baker, Rebecca (nee Robb), passed away, Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Raymond Baker. Loving mother of Bonnie (Brad) Atkinson and Daniel Baker. Grandmother of Randy and Jeremy Burnett. Great-grandmother of Madison, Riley and Mason Burnett. Sister of Charles Robb and the late Richard Robb. Sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral service from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. to Oak Hill Cemetery for a 11 a.m. Graveside Service. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Circle of Concern, 112 St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, MO 63088. Visitation Tuesday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Brodbeck-Steitz, Mildred C. Burr, Carolyn E.

(nee: Ottenad) passed away Friday, April 10, 2015 at the age of 97. Beloved wife of the late William Brodbeck and Martin Steitz; dear mother of Roger (Vernell) Brodbeck; cherished grandmother of Renee' Volz, Michael Brodbeck, Lisa Kochner, Joe Brodbeck and Jennifer Brodbeck; great-grandmother of 12 and great-great-grandmother of 8; loving sister of the late Faye Drewer, Sissy Vien, Beverly Sinclair, Edmond Blum and Robert Blum. Our dear aunt, niece, cousin and friend. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Hancock Alumni Association, 454 Bridget Dr., St. Louis, MO 63125. Services: A Funeral Service will be held at Hoffmeister South County Chapel on Tuesday, April 14th at 11:30 A.M. Visitation on Monday from 4 to 8 P.M. Burial at Mount Hope Cemetery.

Banks, Judith Goodenough April 7, 2015 in Bluffton, South Carolina at the age of 69. Judy was born and raised in St. Louis. Beloved wife of 42 years of the late John L. Banks who preceded her in death in 2012. Mother of Jennifer (Gwynn Spearman) Banks of South Carolina, Joanne (Aaron) Smith of Wisconsin; sister of Pam Gaudet of St. Louis, sister-in-law of Pamela (Jack) Wilder of Tennessee, sister-in-law of Susan Banks of St. Louis. She was a dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Preceded in death by her parents, Helen (Faulkner) and Paul Richard Goodenough and her brother-in-law Bill Banks. In 1969 Judy met John in the Webster Groves Presbyterian Church choir marrying later that year. After raising their children they traveled the world. Judy loved spending time with her friends and family, St. Louis sports, going to the theater and playing cards. Judy had a gentle soul and an infectious smile. She had a kind and generous heart making friends everywhere she went. She will be greatly missed. Services: Funeral services will be held Friday, April 17, 11:00 a.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Road, Kirkwood. Visitation Thursday 4-7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made to CurePSP or Tidewater Hospice. Our deepest gratitude to NHC Bluffton and Tidewater Hospice for their loving care of their friend Miss Judy. We can still hear her now, "I love you, too. Bye!"

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(nee Elsik), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Saturday, March 28, 2015 at age 78. Loving wife of George Burr of Manchester, daughter of the late Joseph and Olga Elsik, sister of Jo Ann Bradshaw of Houston, TX, aunt of Joey Samford of Pineville, LA, greataunt of Jerad Samford of Lake Jackson, TX, niece of Lydia Jamail of Conroe, TX and Irene Kovar of Houston, TX, friend of Paul and Molly Mugnier of Houston, TX, and Dorthea Jackson of Baldwin City, KS. Carolyn was past-president of the African Violet Society of Missouri and an active member of the Circle of Concern in Valley Park, MO. Services: Funeral Mass at Christ, Prince of Peace Catholic Church, 415 Weidman Road, Manchester, 63021 Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to Circle of Concern, P. O. Box 444, Valley Park, MO 63088, Christ, Prince of Peace Catholic Church or charity of choice. Visitation at the church, Tuesday, 10-11 a.m. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Callahan, Paul C. 83, passed away Wed. April 8, 2015. Dear husband of LaVerne (nee Theiss) Callahan; dear father to Dennis (Rose) Callahan and the late Terry L. Callahan; dear grandfather of Julie (Darin) Tucker and Andy (Kelly) Callahan; dear great-grandfather to Camryn, Ethan, Brendan and Austin; dear brother to the late Bill Callahan. Private services. The family is being served by HUTCHENS Mortuary. In lieu of flowers memorials to Alzheimer's Association.

Cohen, Rita Marie (nee: Weslick) March 31, 2015, age 95. Private Memorial. Donations to Forest Park Forever and The Society for the Blind.

(nee Thoene) Passed away Thursday, April 9, 2015. Dear ex-wife of the late David Arthur Crancer Sr.; dear mother of David (Sandy) Crancer Jr., Michael (Sharron) Crancer, Jeff (Beth) Crancer, Joseph (Fay) Crancer and Holly (Vernon) CrancerHendrickson; dear grandmother of Kelly (Jason), Tyler, Jeffrey Jr., Hannah, Emily, Anna, Kaitlyn and Joe; dear great-grandmother of Josie; dear sister of Eleanore (Robert) Young; dear aunt of Kathryn (Joseph) Young-Paradis; our dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, April 17 from 4-9 p.m. and Saturday, April 18, from 8-10:15 a.m. Funeral procession to St. Lucas UCC for 11:00 a.m. Funeral Service. Burial at St. Lucas Cemetery.

Day, Betty R. 3/15/15. Beloved relative and friend. Memorial visitation at St. Vincent de Paul Church, Mon. Apr. 13, 9 a.m. until Mass at 10 a.m. Kutis City Service.

Delaplain, Jeffrey B. Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband of Janice Delaplain (nee Cloonan); dear father of Dr. J. Scott (Anne Marie) Delaplain and Michele Shaw; dear grandfather of Erin and Emily Delaplain, Evan and Sydney Shaw; our dear brotherin-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. Monday, April 13, 11 a.m. Services conclude at Funeral Home. Jeff was an avid golfer and bowler. Visitation Sunday 5-9 p.m.

Fagyal, Edward, Sr., Lt Col, USAF, Ret.

Died age 95, March 5, 2015; born St. Louis, MO, 1919 to Emma (Nagy) and John Fagyal. Ed graduated Central HS (1937). In 1942, Ed married his beloved Jeanne (Gagnon). He served on active duty during WW II and the Korean War. Ed graduated St Louis University (BA Commerce). After a long, successful career at McDonnell-Douglas from auditor to first Director Systems & Procedures, Ed retired with Jeanne to Sun City West, AZ, where he attended Crown of Life Lutheran Church, serving faithfully in leadership roles. Ed is survived by his two sons, Ed, Jr., (Peggy) and Bob; grandkids Chris, Jennifer, Paul and Kim and greatgrandkids Zoë, Brooke, Isaac and Paige. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, donations to Crown of Life Lutheran Church, Sun City West, AZ; Hospice of the Valley (Phoenix, AZ).

Fobian, Charles

Deranja, Frank

baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband for 64 years to Maria Deranja (nee Tscheppi); loving father and father-in-law of Pamela (Alan) Seder; son of the late Matija and Ruza (nee Kariz) Deranja; cherished grandfather of Ashley and Nicolette Seder; dearest Pa-pa to Skylar Potts; brother of Philipina, Ruzica and Ivica Deranja; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin, Godfather and friend. Special thanks to caregivers Lejla and Stanka. Frank immigrated to America from Novi Vinodolski, Croatia in 1949. A 50-year member of Novi Vinodol Club and a long-time member of Laborers Union Local 110. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Tuesday, April 14, 9:15 a.m. to St. Joseph Croatian Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations preferred to St. Louis Croatian Junior Tamburitzans or APDA (American Parkinson's Disease Association) or American Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Visitation Monday 3-8 p.m.

April 6, 2015, at peace in the arms of Jesus, at age 87. Beloved husband of Margaret Jane (nee' Griebel) for 67 years; devoted father to Steven (Linda), Clark (Rita), Susan (Charles) Jansen, Linda (Richard) Puchta, and James (Yvette); proud grandfather of 10 and great-grandfather of 10. He was a member of Concordia Lutheran Chruch - Kirkwood for 61 years, serving as Deacon, Elder, Usher and volunteer for Feed My People. Services: Memorial Service at Concordia Lutheran Church (505 S. Kirkwood Rd.) at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 13.

Fore, Marvin

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Marvin Fore, of Florissant, MO, formerly of Rolla, MO, beloved husband, father, grandfather, greatgrandfather, brother, uncle, and dear friend, passed away April 8, 2015 at the age of 76. Marvin retired as a Journeyman Wireman Electrician and was a proud member of the I.B.E.W. Local 1 for 58 years. Services: A graveside service for Marvin Fore will be held at 2 pm. Monday, April 13, 2015 at the Pilot Knob Cemetery in rural Rolla. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are suggested to the Pilot Knob Cemetery. Online condolences may be offered at www.nullandsonfuneralhome.com All arrangements are under the direction of the Null & Son Funeral Home in Rolla.

Frank, Mary Ann Wed. April 8, 2015. Visitation Tues 4/14, 4-8 pm. Mass St. Andrew Catholic Church, Wed., 11 am. Burial following, JB National Cemetery. feyfuneralhome.com

Grapperhaus, Sandra Kay "Sandy" (nee: O'Neill), Age 64, of Saint Peters, MO, died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Hennekes, Loretta, CSJ aka John Bernard

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(nee Lehmkuhl) Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Ray J. Higgins since October 1947. Mother of Ray F. (Debbie) Higgins and Suzanne (William) Wilson; grandmother of Lindsay Marie (Jeff) Barnes and Ryan Patrick Higgins. Mrs. Higgins was a most dedicated school teacher for 17 years and was most generous to her alma mater Notre Dame High School. She will be extremely missed by the many who loved her. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, April 14, 9:30 a.m. to St. George Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Sunset Cemetery. Donations may be sent to Notre Dame High School. Visitation Monday, 6-9 p.m.

Hittler, Marion Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Friday, April 10, 2015. Preceded in death by her parents William and Katherine Setchfield; beloved wife of the late Andrew Hittler Jr.; dear mother of Susan (Patrick) Knoll, Arthur (fiancée Penny Bryant) Hittler, Drew (Dean) Hittler, Michael (Robin) Hittler and the late Joseph (surviving Mary) Hittler and Cindy (surviving Clayton) Speeler; dear grandmother of Jennifer (Jim) Marr, Katie (Dan) Wiseman, Betsey (Slade) Stratton, Beth (John) O'Leary, Chrissy (Connor) Clune, Joey Hittler, Timmy (fiancée Katie Siebenberger) Hittler, Andrew (Robin) Hittler IV, Carrie (fiancé William Elledge) Hittler, Ashley (Jason) Selby, Josh (Jennifer) Speeler, Nicole (Daniel) Sapp, Jessica (Nick) Sexton, Emily Hittler and the late Lynn Hittler; dear great-grandmother of 21; dear sister-in-law of Shirley "Sis" (the late John) Re, Rose (Rev. Mr. Jim) Murphy and Floss Siebert; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, April 14, 10:30 a.m. to Annunciation Catholic Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment Lakewood Park Cemetery. Contributions to Friends of Kids with Cancer appreciated. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m.

Horton, Kenneth J.

Dollard, Mary A. April 4, 2015, she was loved and will be missed by two brothers-in-law, William Millman and Carl Debrecht, by nephews Stephen, Gregory, Kevin, James and Mark, and by twenty grand-nieces and nephews. Going before her were one brother, Msgr. John Dollard, two sisters, Victoria Debrecht and Celeste Millman and nephew John. Mary was a longtime employee of Carter Carburetor Company. Services: Funeral Mass will be held Mon. April 13 at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 5821 Pernod at 10 a.m. KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS www.k-brothers.com

Higgins, Jacqueline

Of Nazareth Living Center. April 6, 2015. Beloved daughter of the late John and Wilhemena Hennekes (nee Warnick); dear sister of Grace Schweitzer and Paul Hennekes; dear aunt, great-aunt, great-great aunt, cousin, friend and Sister in Christ. Services: Funeral Mass Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at Nazareth Living Center at 10 a.m. Visitation 9 a.m. until time of Mass. Memorials may be given to Sisters of St. Joseph Retirement Fund, 6400 Minnesota Ave., St. Louis, MO 63111. Fey Service.

Sun. March 29, 2015. Dear son of the late Charles Horton and Margaret Horton Burks. Dear brother and uncle. Ken was a Sergeant in the US Army Air Force during WWII. Services: Memorial service, 11 a.m. Sat., May 2, at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Private interment was at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Hunter, Jean Laverne

Age 83, passed away April 7, 2015 after a courageous battle with dementia with her husband of 63 years by her side. She was born September 15, 1931 to Leonard & Leona Duff who preceded her in death. She is survived by siblings Virginia Reed, Ruth Ann Lombardo and Leonard Duff. In 1951 she married John "Jack" Hunter and is survived by their 4 daughters; Gail (Dr. William) Wright; Jackie (Kip) Poling; Judy Hunter; Jill (Steve) Diestel who will always cherish their countless memories of mom. Jean will always be remembered by family & friends as an avid reader, bridge player, a compassionate nurse assistant and veterinary assistant & animal lover and rescuer. She leaves behind grandchildren, Tiffany Rehg, Ken (Christine) Poling, Tabitha Hunter, Dr. Amberle Wright, Trevor (Jenea) Wright, Jeffrey (Melanie) Westmoreland & 5 greatgrandchildren. Donations in her memory can be made to PALS Animal Shelter in Hawk Point, MO (www.pals-pets.com). Memories & condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com. Services: Visitation: Sun., April 12, 2015 12-1pm and Funeral: 1pm Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville, MO.

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A20 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Crancer, Rosemary

To Our Readers To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index Allen - see Leyhe Baker, Rebecca - St. Louis Bamberger - see Kavanaugh

Banks, Judith Goodenough - Bluffton, SC, formerly St. Louis Bayers - see Kavanaugh Bichel, Russell D. "Russ" - St. Charles Brodbeck-Steitz, Mildred C. - St. Louis Buraszeski - see Nesser Burke - see Leyhe Burr, Carolyn E. - Manchester Callahan, Paul C. - St. Louis Cohen, Rita Marie - St. Louis Crancer, Rosemary - St. Louis Cropper - see Lewi Davis Sr., Ervin D. - O'Fallon, MO Day, Betty R. - St. Louis Delaplain, Jeffrey B. - St. Louis Deranja, Frank - St. Louis Dollard, Mary A. - St. Louis Ehlers, Max G. - Pacific Everett, Ruth Lynn - Ste. Genevieve

Fagyal, Edward, Sr., Lt Col, USAF, Ret. - Sun City, AZ, formerly St. Louis Fobian, Charles - Kirkwood Fore, Marvin - Florissant, formerly Rolla, MO Frank, Mary Ann - St. Louis Freese - see Reutzel

Grapperhaus, Sandra Kay "Sandy" - St. Peters Harris - see Nesser Hatfield, Dorothy - Fairview Heights, IL Hennekes, Sister Loretta, CSJ aka John Bernard - St. Louis Higgins, Jacqueline - St. Louis Hittler, Marion - St. Louis Horton, Kenneth J. - St. Louis Humphrey, Mildred M. - O'Fallon Hunter, Jean Laverne - Moscow Mills, MO Johnson, Robert S. "Bob" - St. Louis Jovanovic - see Slavkovic Kavanaugh, Dolores M. - Ballwin Ketcherside, Raymond R. - St. Louis Kinzel, Jeffrey James - St. Louis Kirkman, Stella Marie - St. Louis Klearman, Joan - St. Louis Knoll - see Hittler Korte, William "Bill" - Des Peres Kumming - see Pfeifer

Lamping, John "Jack" Thomas, Sr. - St. Louis Lewi, LTG (Ret) Kenneth Edward - Wildwood Leyhe, Louise Kraus - St. Louis Llewellyn, Dovie Christine - St. Louis

Death Notice Index Lund, Carol A. - St. Charles Macare, Alfred - Ferguson Mace, Lorraine A. - St. Louis Matheis, Richard Anthony - St. Louis Mathis, Vernon - Wentzville McCarthy - see Lewi McGuire, Virginia S. - St. Charles McMichael, Donald F. - St. Charles Mehringer - see Nesser Moore, Jean - St. Louis Murphy - see Hittler Nesser, Shirley M. - St. Louis Niemann - see Kavanaugh Novak, Daniel E. - St. Louis Oldani, Louis Charles - St. Louis Pearce - see Nesser Pedroli - see Moore Pfeifer, Wanda Ruth - St. Louis Rawlings, Richard II - Webster Groves Re - see Hittler Reutzel, Lawrence F. "Larry" - St. Louis Roberts, Ellen Langtree Gordon - St. Louis Roche, Mary Lou - St. Louis Rogers, Starling B. - Wentzville Schraudner, Elizabeth "Liz" - St. Louis Scuito, Annie - De Soto Shore, Louis Roy - Nixa, MO Sidoti, Gloria "Ginny" - St. OLouis Siebert - see Hittler Siegner, Allan M. - Tempe, AZ Slavkovic, Lisbeth - St. Louis Speeler - see Hittler Stiles, Barbara Ann - Dardenne Prairie Stout, Jane M. - St. Louis Stratos, Voula - St. Louis Street, Alison S. - Chesterfield Stuart - see Humphrey Sweeney, Anita M. - St. Louis Tatro, Paul L. - St. Peters Temoral, Adelaide Almeda M.D. - St Louis Tienes, Gertrud E. - St. Louis Valley, Lawrence L. Jr. - Harlingen, TX Vomund, C. Nick - St. Paul, MO Vuckovich - see Slavkovic Walker, Mary Ann, Ph.D. - Shrewsbury Williams, Robert P. (Willie) - St. Louis Wilson - see Higgins Wirick - see Johnson Witthaus, Raymond A., Sr. - St. Louis Wolf, June J. - St. Louis

Woratzeck, Jerome C. - Charlotte, NC, formerly St. Louis Worley - see Pfeifer Young, Loye E. - Cedar Hill

Elegant Sprays, Wreaths and Baskets. Same-Day delivery. Baker, Rebecca

Bichel, Russell D. "Russ"

(nee Robb), passed away, Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Raymond Baker. Loving mother of Bonnie (Brad) Atkinson and Daniel Baker. Grandmother of Randy and Jeremy Burnett. Great-grandmother of Madison, Riley and Mason Burnett. Sister of Charles Robb and the late Richard Robb. Sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral service from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. to Oak Hill Cemetery for a 11 a.m. Graveside Service. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Circle of Concern, 112 St. Louis Ave., Valley Park, MO 63088. Visitation Tuesday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Age 82, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Banks, Judith Goodenough April 7, 2015 in Bluffton, South Carolina at the age of 69. Judy was born and raised in St. Louis. Beloved wife of 42 years of the late John L. Banks who preceded her in death in 2012. Mother of Jennifer (Gwynn Spearman) Banks of South Carolina, Joanne (Aaron) Smith of Wisconsin; sister of Pam Gaudet of St. Louis, sister-in-law of Pamela (Jack) Wilder of Tennessee, sister-in-law of Susan Banks of St. Louis. She was a dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Preceded in death by her parents, Helen (Faulkner) and Paul Richard Goodenough and her brother-in-law Bill Banks. In 1969 Judy met John in the Webster Groves Presbyterian Church choir marrying later that year. After raising their children they traveled the world. Judy loved spending time with her friends and family, St. Louis sports, going to the theater and playing cards. Judy had a gentle soul and an infectious smile. She had a kind and generous heart making friends everywhere she went. She will be greatly missed. Services: Funeral services will be held Friday, April 17, 11:00 a.m. at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Road, Kirkwood. Visitation Thursday 4-7 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made to CurePSP or Tidewater Hospice. Our deepest gratitude to NHC Bluffton and Tidewater Hospice for their loving care of their friend Miss Judy. We can still hear her now, "I love you, too. Bye!"

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Burr, Carolyn E.

Brodbeck-Steitz, Mildred C. (nee: Ottenad) passed away Friday, April 10, 2015 at the age of 97. Beloved wife of the late William Brodbeck and Martin Steitz; dear mother of Roger (Vernell) Brodbeck; cherished grandmother of Renee' Volz, Michael Brodbeck, Lisa Kochner, Joe Brodbeck and Jennifer Brodbeck; great-grandmother of 12 and great-great-grandmother of 8; loving sister of the late Faye Drewer, Sissy Vien, Beverly Sinclair, Edmond Blum and Robert Blum. Our dear aunt, niece, cousin and friend. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Hancock Alumni Association, 454 Bridget Dr., St. Louis, MO 63125. Services: A Funeral Service will be held at Hoffmeister South County Chapel on Tuesday, April 14th at 11:30 A.M. Visitation on Monday from 4 to 8 P.M. Burial at Mount Hope Cemetery.

Reflect ...on their life with the story of your loved one in our obituaries.

(nee Elsik), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Saturday, March 28, 2015 at age 78. Loving wife of George Burr of Manchester, daughter of the late Joseph and Olga Elsik, sister of Jo Ann Bradshaw of Houston, TX, aunt of Joey Samford of Pineville, LA, greataunt of Jerad Samford of Lake Jackson, TX, niece of Lydia Jamail of Conroe, TX and Irene Kovar of Houston, TX, friend of Paul and Molly Mugnier of Houston, TX, and Dorthea Jackson of Baldwin City, KS. Carolyn was past-president of the African Violet Society of Missouri and an active member of the Circle of Concern in Valley Park, MO. Services: Funeral Mass at Christ, Prince of Peace Catholic Church, 415 Weidman Road, Manchester, 63021 Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 11:00 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If desired, contributions may be made to Circle of Concern, P. O. Box 444, Valley Park, MO 63088, Christ, Prince of Peace Catholic Church or charity of choice. Visitation at the church, Tuesday, 10-11 a.m. A service of the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Callahan, Paul C.

We can assist you! Call us at 314-340-8600 or visit us online: /obituaries

83, passed away Wed. April 8, 2015. Dear husband of LaVerne (nee Theiss) Callahan; dear father to Dennis (Rose) Callahan and the late Terry L. Callahan; dear grandfather of Julie (Darin) Tucker and Andy (Kelly) Callahan; dear great-grandfather to Camryn, Ethan, Brendan and Austin; dear brother to the late Bill Callahan. Private services. The family is being served by HUTCHENS Mortuary. In lieu of flowers memorials to Alzheimer's Association.

Cohen, Rita Marie (nee: Weslick) March 31, 2015, age 95. Private Memorial. Donations to Forest Park Forever and The Society for the Blind.

(nee Thoene) Passed away Thursday, April 9, 2015. Dear ex-wife of the late David Arthur Crancer Sr.; dear mother of David (Sandy) Crancer Jr., Michael (Sharron) Crancer, Jeff (Beth) Crancer, Joseph (Fay) Crancer and Holly (Vernon) CrancerHendrickson; dear grandmother of Kelly (Jason), Tyler, Jeffrey Jr., Hannah, Emily, Anna, Kaitlyn and Joe; dear great-grandmother of Josie; dear sister of Eleanore (Robert) Young; dear aunt of Kathryn (Joseph) Young-Paradis; our dear aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Friday, April 17 from 4-9 p.m. and Saturday, April 18, from 8-10:15 a.m. Funeral procession to St. Lucas UCC for 11:00 a.m. Funeral Service. Burial at St. Lucas Cemetery.

Davis Sr., Ervin D. Age 84, of O'Fallon, Missouri, died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Day, Betty R. 3/15/15. Beloved relative and friend. Memorial visitation at St. Vincent de Paul Church, Mon. Apr. 13, 9 a.m. until Mass at 10 a.m. Kutis City Service.

Delaplain, Jeffrey B. Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband of Janice Delaplain (nee Cloonan); dear father of Dr. J. Scott (Anne Marie) Delaplain and Michele Shaw; dear grandfather of Erin and Emily Delaplain, Evan and Sydney Shaw; our dear brotherin-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. Monday, April 13, 11 a.m. Services conclude at Funeral Home. Jeff was an avid golfer and bowler. Visitation Sunday 5-9 p.m.

Everett, Ruth Lynn

Fore, Marvin

fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Fri, Apr. 10, 2015. Loving wife of John F. Everett for 64 years; mother of Carol (Bill) Breckle, Barbara Heidenreich, Susan Everett (Jeff Wiggs), John (Diane) Everett, Tom Everett, Dan (Kathryn) Everett and the late Mike (Nina survives) Everett; dear grandmother of 28 and great-grandmother of 35; dear sister of Carol (Paul) Penberthy and the late Harold (Bernice) Hertz; our dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: VISITATION Mon., 4-8 p.m. at BUCHHOLZ Math Hermann Mortuary Cremation Center, 837 Mid Rivers Mall Drive. Friends and family will meet Tues., 10 am until time of Mass 11 a.m. at St. Robert Bellarmine, 1424 S. 1st Capital Dr. 63303. Interment Our Lady Cemetery, Lake St. Louis. In lieu of flowers, donations to American Heart Assn or Masses appreciated. Online guestbook at buchholzmortuary.com

Marvin Fore, of Florissant, MO, formerly of Rolla, MO, beloved husband, father, grandfather, greatgrandfather, brother, uncle, and dear friend, passed away April 8, 2015 at the age of 76. Marvin retired as a Journeyman Wireman Electrician and was a proud member of the I.B.E.W. Local 1 for 58 years. Services: A graveside service for Marvin Fore will be held at 2 pm. Monday, April 13, 2015 at the Pilot Knob Cemetery in rural Rolla. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions are suggested to the Pilot Knob Cemetery. Online condolences may be offered at www.nullandsonfuneralhome.com All arrangements are under the direction of the Null & Son Funeral Home in Rolla.

Fagyal, Edward, Sr., Lt Col, USAF, Ret.

Frank, Mary Ann (nee Gadell) Wednesday April 8, 2015. Visitation Tuesday, April 14, 4-8 p.m. Mass St. Andrew Catholic Church, Wednesday, 11 a.m. Burial following at JB National Cemetery. feyfuneralhome.com

Grapperhaus, Sandra Kay "Sandy" (nee: O'Neill), Age 64, of Saint Peters, MO, died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Hatfield, Dorothy (nee Brokaw) 72, Fairview Hghts, IL. April 10, 2015. Visitation Mon, 4/13, 4-7pm & service 7pm at Irwin Chapel, Granite City. irwinchapel.com

Deranja, Frank

Hennekes, Sister Loretta, CSJ aka John Bernard

baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband for 64 years to Maria Deranja (nee Tscheppi); loving father and father-in-law of Pamela (Alan) Seder; son of the late Matija and Ruza (nee Kariz) Deranja; cherished grandfather of Ashley and Nicolette Seder; dearest Pa-pa to Skylar Potts; brother of Philipina, Ruzica and Ivica Deranja; dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin, Godfather and friend. Special thanks to caregivers Lejla and Stanka. Frank immigrated to America from Novi Vinodolski, Croatia in 1949. A 50-year member of Novi Vinodol Club and a long-time member of Laborers Union Local 110. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Tuesday, April 14, 9:15 a.m. to St. Joseph Croatian Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations preferred to St. Louis Croatian Junior Tamburitzans or APDA (American Parkinson's Disease Association) or American Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Visitation Monday 3-8 p.m.

Died age 95, March 5, 2015; born St. Louis, MO, 1919 to Emma (Nagy) and John Fagyal. Ed graduated Central HS (1937). In 1942, Ed married his beloved Jeanne (Gagnon). He served on active duty during WW II and the Korean War. Ed graduated St Louis University (BA Commerce). After a long, successful career at McDonnell-Douglas from auditor to first Director Systems & Procedures, Ed retired with Jeanne to Sun City West, AZ, where he attended Crown of Life Lutheran Church, serving faithfully in leadership roles. Ed is survived by his two sons, Ed, Jr., (Peggy) and Bob; grandkids Chris, Jennifer, Paul and Kim and greatgrandkids Zoë, Brooke, Isaac and Paige. Interment private. In lieu of flowers, donations to Crown of Life Lutheran Church, Sun City West, AZ; Hospice of the Valley (Phoenix, AZ).

Fobian, Charles

Dollard, Mary A. April 4, 2015, she was loved and will be missed by two brothers-in-law, William Millman and Carl Debrecht, by nephews Stephen, Gregory, Kevin, James and Mark, and by twenty grand-nieces and nephews. Going before her were one brother, Msgr. John Dollard, two sisters, Victoria Debrecht and Celeste Millman and nephew John. Mary was a longtime employee of Carter Carburetor Company. Services: Funeral Mass will be held Mon. April 13 at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church, 5821 Pernod at 10 a.m. KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS www.k-brothers.com

Ehlers, Max G. of Pacific, MO on April 9, 2015. Dear husband of Peggy Ehlers; dear father of Megan Ronnau and Meribeth Ehlers; dear grandfather of Savannah Ronnau; dear brother and friend. Visitation 4-7 p.m. Sunday at Nieburg-Vitt, Thiebes Funeral Home. Service 11 a.m., Monday at Pacific United Methodist Church.

April 6, 2015, at peace in the arms of Jesus, at age 87. Beloved husband of Margaret Jane (nee' Griebel) for 67 years; devoted father to Steven (Linda), Clark (Rita), Susan (Charles) Jansen, Linda (Richard) Puchta, and James (Yvette); proud grandfather of 10 and great-grandfather of 10. He was a member of Concordia Lutheran Chruch - Kirkwood for 61 years, serving as Deacon, Elder, Usher and volunteer for Feed My People. Services: Memorial Service at Concordia Lutheran Church (505 S. Kirkwood Rd.) at 10 a.m. on Monday, April 13.

Of Nazareth Living Center. April 6, 2015. Beloved daughter of the late John and Wilhemena Hennekes (nee Warnick); dear sister of Grace Schweitzer and Paul Hennekes; dear aunt, great-aunt, great-great aunt, cousin, friend and Sister in Christ. Services: Funeral Mass Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at Nazareth Living Center at 10 a.m. Visitation 9 a.m. until time of Mass. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery. Memorials may be given to Sisters of St. Joseph Retirement Fund, 6400 Minnesota Ave., St. Louis, MO 63111. Fey Service.

Higgins, Jacqueline

(nee Lehmkuhl) Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Ray J. Higgins since October 1947. Mother of Ray F. (Debbie) Higgins and Suzanne (William) Wilson; grandmother of Lindsay Marie (Jeff) Barnes and Ryan Patrick Higgins. Mrs. Higgins was a most dedicated school teacher for 17 years and was most generous to her alma mater Notre Dame High School. She will be extremely missed by the many who loved her. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, April 14, 9:30 a.m. to St. George Catholic Church for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Sunset Cemetery. Donations may be sent to Notre Dame High School. Visitation Monday, April 13, 6-9 p.m.

Reflect ...on their life with the story of your loved one in our obituaries. We can assist you! Call us at 314-340-8600 or visit us online:

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04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

Johnson, Robert S. "Bob"

on Fri, April 10, 2015, after a courageous battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Anne M. Johnson, dear father of Kimberly (Kyle) Anderson, Chris (Tammy), Dave (Michelle), Tim (Michele) and Terry (Erin) Wirick, dear grandfather of twenty, dear great-grandfather of Shalyn, Brody, Julian, Owen, Leo, Willow and August. Bob began his career as a St. Louis City Firefighter and retired in 1998 after 30 years with Des Peres Public Safety as a Lieutenant. Services: Visitation Sat., April 18, from 3 -5 pm at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, with Memorial Service at 5 pm. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Wings, a pediatric supportive care program. Make check payable to BJC Hospice, write "Wings Program" on check memo), c/o BJC Hospice, PO Box 957421, St. Louis, MO 63195, or at bjchospice.org. (boppchapel.com)

Kavanaugh, Dolores M. (nee Flanagan), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Dolores was the daughter of the late John E. and Mary C. Flanagan and beloved sister of the late Mary B. (the late Dale) Hare. A very loving family. Dolores was the wife of John (Jack) F. Kavanaugh, who was her only true love. Jack and Dolores were blessed with 3 dearly devoted children; John F. (Susan) Kavanaugh, Steven (Barbara) Kavanaugh, and Patrice A. (Paul) Niemann; Loving grandmother of John Kavanaugh III, Scott Kavanaugh, Julie Stevens, Kimberly DeMerit, Kathryn Hamlin, Amy Norton, Paul Niemann, Patrick Niemann, and Gavin Niemann; Loving Great-grandchildren, Erin O'Malley, Delaney Kavanaugh, Ethan Kavanaugh, Dylan and Ashlynn Stevens, Ryan Niemann, Cole Niemann, Natalie Hamlin, Andrew Hamlin, Emery Kavanaugh, Elynn Kavanaugh, Jack DeMerit, and Sam DeMerit. Dolores was equally devoted to her sister's children, Kathy Martin (Donald) Rogers and Gary S. (Patti) Hare. In addition to the love of family, she had many close friends especially Debbie Hare. Through the years she volunteered with St. Vincent DePaul, White House Retreat, The Uandi Club GFWC, Daily World Missionaries and many others. She was a life long card player and taught many of her grandchildren to play card games. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday, 9:45 a.m. to St. Joseph Catholic Church, Manchester for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Masses or Boys Town National Headquarters, 200 Flanagan Blvd., P. O. Box 8000, Boys Town, NE 68010. Visitation Sunday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Kinzel, Jeffrey James asleep in Jesus on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved father of Jared Kinzel and Terah Kitcher; loving grandfather of Kolton Kinzel; dear son of the late Byron and Doris Kinzel; dear brother of Cindy Kinzel, Kevin Kinzel, Karen McHugh and the late Greg Kinzel; our dearest uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Monday, April 13 at 1 p.m. Interment at Park Lawn Cemetery. Visitation Sunday 5-9 p.m.

Kirkman, Stella Marie 93, of St. Louis, MO, passed away on April 9, 2015. Beloved mother of Nicholas G. Kreitler, Robert (Linda) Kreitler, Rose M. (the late Michael) Stevens and Ronald F. (Terri) Kreitler; dear grandmother, great grandmother and great-great grandmother and friend to many. Services: Visitation 2-5p.m Sun., April 12, at Hoffmeister South County, Funeral 1 p.m. Mon. in the funeral home. Interment Mt Hope Cemetery. www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

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Klearman, Joan (nee Waldman), April 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late David Klearman. Mother and mother-in-law of Susan Meltz, Sally (Ken) Katzif, and Dr. Micki Klearman. Grandmother of Amy (David) Bell and Laura Katzif, Karyn Meltz Steinberg and Lindsey (Kenny) James, Brian (Dr. Jessica) Neil and Alex Neil. Greatgrandmother of Jake, Aaron and Zoe. Sister of Etele (Louis) Kohn. Sister-inlaw of Nancy (Dick) Greenblatt and Barbara (Dr. Alan) Bisno. Dear aunt, cousin and friend. Joan will be remembered for her smile and her sense of humor, her love of family and her commitment to community. Our family wishes to extend a warm thanks to the wonderful people of BJC Hospice, especially Dana Jones who gave so much time and personal care. Services: Funeral service Sunday, April 12, 1:30 pm at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Blvd. Visitation Sunday after 1:00 pm at Berger Memorial Chapel. Private Interment. Contributions to Harvey Kornblum Jewish Food Pantry, 10601 Baur Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132; BJC Hospice Foundation, P.O. Box 957421, St. Louis, MO 63195 or the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Lamping, John "Jack" Thomas, Sr. passed away peacefully at Mercy Hospital in St. Louis on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at age 76 with his wife and other family members at his side. Mr. Lamping is survived by his loving wife of 53 years, Mary Jane Lamping. He was the devoted father of John (Caryn) T. Lamping, Jr. of St. Louis, MO; Brian (Melinda) Lamping of St. Louis, MO; Beth (John) Tiffin of St. Louis, MO; Stephanie (Ian) Mutchnick of Louisville, KY; and Sarah (Scott) Suda of Alameda, CA. Jack was the loving grandfather of seventeen: Rachel, Charlotte, Jackson, Dmitri, Emma and Shelby Lamping; David, Michael and Jessica Lamping; Claire, Mary Jane, Grace and Campbell Tiffin; Gabe and Mimi Mutchnick; and Frances and Eliot Suda. He also leaves his sister, Sharon (Ed) Rickert, of Granite City, IL; his brother, Jim (Debby) Lamping, of New Orleans, LA; his brother-in-law, Larry (Kathy) Stilinovic, of Seattle, WA; and many friends both past and present. He was predeceased by his brother, William "Bill" Lamping, Jr. Mr. Lamping was born in St. Louis, the son of William "Bill" and Grace Lamping. He was a graduate of St. Louis University High (1956) and St. Louis University (Engineering 1960 and MBA 1967). From 1960 to 1961, he served as a seismologist researcher at the South Pole for the United States Antarctic Research Program. After a brief stint in engineering, Jack spent his career in investment management working primarily for Mercantile Trust Company, Boatmen's Trust Company and A.G. Edwards. Dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge, Mr. Lamping was previously recognized for his support of the Missouri Teacher of the Year program and for the past nine years had volunteered his time with Oasis reading to young students. He was a beloved husband, father and friend who will be remembered for being a model parent, for his love of the game of golf, for his keen sense of humor, as well as for his quiet humility. Services: Mr. Lamping has donated his body for scientific research to St. Louis University. There will be a memorial mass at Assumption Catholic Church on Friday, May 22nd at 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to the Society of St. Vincent DePaul at Assumption Parish (Mattese).

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Lewi, LTG (Ret) Kenneth Edward

Lund, Carol A.

McMichael, Donald F.

Rawlings, Richard II

of St. Charles, Missouri, died on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, at the age of 86. Beloved husband of Elizabeth "Betty" McMichael; cherished son of the late Archiebald Joseph and Minnie Elizabeth McMichael; devoted father of Mark (Suzanne) McMichael, Gary (Vicki Nelsen) McMichael, and Kevin (Joyce) McMichael; treasured brother of Margie Schneiders, Richard (Charlotte) McMichael, Henry (Mert) McMichael, Alice (Dave) Bonnott, and the late James "Jimmy" McMichael; loving grandfather of Jason, Jacob, Jenna, Ainslei, Jessica, and Garrett. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO. Visitation will be held on Monday, April 13, 2015 at 9:00 am at St. Cletus Catholic Church. Funeral Mass to follow at 10:00 am. Interment will be held at St. Charles Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. Vincent DePaul Society of St. Cletus.

52, of Webster Groves, MO, born August 14, 1962, died April 9, 2015 at his residence. Richard worked as a Director of Financial Planning & Analysis for Emerson Electric since 1988. He was preceded in death by his Mother, Patricia nee Gower, Rawlings. Surviving are his Children, Ryan and Richard Rawlings Glendale, MO, Fiancee, Janet Varner and her son Andrew, Belleville, IL, Father, Richard (Carolyn) Rawlings, Fairview Heights, IL, Sister, Danielle (Glenn) Heil, Woodlands, TX, Mother of his children, Mary nee Moskoff, Rawlings, Glendale, MO, Step-Sister, Linda Brown, St. Charles, MO, Nephews, Nicholas, Brett and Mitchell Heil. Condolences at www.kurrusfh.com. Mem. may be made to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes or the Humane Society of Macklind or Belleville. Services: Vis. 4-8pm Sun. April 12, 2015 at Kurrus F.H. in Belleville, IL and from 10-11am Mon., April 13, 2015 at Signal Hill UMC in Belleville, IL. Funeral 11am Mon., April 13, 2015 at Church. Burial at Lake View Memorial Gardens, Fairview Heights, IL.

Age 71, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Mace, Lorraine A.

of Wildwood, passed away, Tuesday April 7, 2015. Loving husband of Jeanne Behrens Lewi. Dear father of Karen (Brian) Cropper, Kathryn Lewi, Christopher McCarthy, Jennifer McCarthy, and Matthew (Susan) McCarthy. Loving grandfather of Samantha (Jason), Kyle, Zachary, Danielle, Meghan, Nicholas, Matthew, Cooper, and Joshua. Kenneth was born on August 1, 1930 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He graduated from Texas A&M University in 1953 with a degree in Education. In 1967, he received an MBA degree from the University of Alabama, and in 1976 he attended a two-month advanced management and business course at Pennsylvania State University. His military schooling includes graduation from the Army's Command and General Staff College and graduation from the Joint Services' Industrial College of the Armed Forces. General Lewi's military duty was principally as a logistician in the Quartermaster Corps. In his thirtyfour year active duty career he commanded at every level, beginning as a Second Lieutenant Platoon Leader and ending his career as a Lieutenant General commanding the United States Army Europe's Theater Army Area Logistics Command. When he was a Major General in St. Louis, he commanded the 3,000 person Troop Support Command (TROSCOM). The Command was responsible for providing maintenance and supply support to the Armed Forces for the items TROSCOM managed, and for Ft. Belvoir and Natick Research and Development Laboratories. In his last assignment, General Lewi commanded 34,000 civilian and military personnel located in six countries to provide supply, maintenance, transportation, and administrative support to the U.S. Army Forces and their families in Europe. Since his retirement in September 1989, General Lewi was involved in a number of activities. He was a member of the James S. McDonnell USO's Board of Directors; served as the Chairman of the Times Beach Environmental Committee; was elected President of the local chapter of the 900-member Association of the United States Army; acted as the military advisor for a St. Louis television station; and worked as a consultant for several firms and for the Army. General Lewi was chosen to represent the Quartermaster Corps as the Colonel of the Regiment and selected for the Quartermaster Hall of Fame. An auditorium at Ft. Lee, Virginia was named in his honor. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday, 11:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Wyman Center, Army Emergency Relief Fund, Texas A&M Band Scholarship Fund, or a charity of your choice. Visitation Monday 10:30 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Leyhe, Louise Kraus

97, Born November 6, 1917, died Tuesday, March 31, 2015, peacefully at home, surrounded by family. Louise was the beloved wife of the late Fred Henry Leyhe, a loving mother to her two daughters, Mary L. Burke (Richard) and Nancy L. Allen (Chris), and adored grandmother of Michael Leyhe Burke, Sarah Anne Burke, John Christopher Allen, Jr. and Elizabeth Allen Rogers, and great grandmother of 10, Ane, Clara, Luke, Tom and Finn Burke, Ellie, Lila and Polly Allen, Abby and Carter Rogers and sister of J. Robert Kraus and the late Eleanor Kraus Hoffman. As her granddaughter Beth Rogers wrote, "On Tuesday morning, heaven gained another angel, our sweet grandma. She will be deeply missed by all of us. An amazing lady with style, grace, humility and a heart full of gold. We are so thankful for our relationships and getting to have her in our life for so many years. Grandma, we will forever love you and miss you dearly." Louise grew up in Webster Groves, MO, a graduate of Webster Groves High School and Washington University where she met the love of her life, Fred Leyhe. Elected the "Most Popular Freshman" by her university peers, Louise excelled as a student and served as President of the Gamma Iota Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. Louise, together with Fred, valued close relationships with friends, especially with their dear friends in the "Potluck Group". She scored her first Hole in One at 70, and was an avid Cardinals fan waiting for the 2015 season to start on Sunday, 4/5/2015. She lived her life to the fullest to the very end. As all would attest, she was "sharp as a tack" until her last moment. Louise Leyhe will be missed by all who had the privilege of sharing in her life. Services: A Memorial Service will be held in the Fellowship Hall at Ladue Chapel, 9450 Clayton Road, Ladue, Missouri on Friday, May 15, at 4 pm. A reception will follow. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Washington University, Whitfield School, John Burroughs School, or to the charity of one's choice. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel in Kirkwood.

Llewellyn, Dovie Christine (nee Dickens) on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. Beloved wife of the late William D. Llewellyn; loving mother of Barbara (Gary) Pinson, Suzan (Larry) Bachuss, Nancy (Don Gunther) Aubuchon, Terry (Sheri) and Billie Llewellyn and the late Joseph Garcia; cherished grandmother of Michele (the late Frank) Thiel, Tisha Pinson, James and Christine Doza, Denise (Craig) Stellhorn, Joseph Sanfillipo, Kyle and Gene Worley, Tiffany and the late Mindy Llewellyn and greatgrandmother of Isabella, Gabriella, Shaynee, Tianna, Sofia, Dane, Luke and Brooke; our dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Monday, April 13 at 10 a.m. Interment at J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Sunday 4-8 p.m.

(nee Lahmann) Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thur. Apr. 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late James D. Mace. Loving mother of the late Mary T. Mace. Cherished friend of Chris, Mary, Ashley Scanio, Nicole and great-great grand baby Emma Rau-Scanio. Services: Visitation on Mon. Apr. 13, 2015 from 9-11:00am at Our Lady Queen of Peace, 4696 Notre Dame Ln., House Spring, MO. with Mass immediately following at 11:00am. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Donations to St. Jude appreciated. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Matheis, Richard Anthony

Moore, Jean passed away peacefully on April 8, 2015 surrounded by Sandra, his beloved wife of 38 years, his daughter Terri, and his sons Todd and Mike. Richard was born on November 18, 1923 in New York City. He was the oldest of five children, who remain to this day each other's very best friends. He attended Garden City High School in Garden City, New York and went on to study at the Virginia Military Institute. He had residences in St. Louis, Missouri and Naples, Florida. He was an executive with the Trane Company in St. Louis for over forty years. Richard proudly served our country during World War II as a B-24 navigator in the 8th Air Force Division, 453rd Bomber Group and flew multiple missions over Germany. On July 14, 1944 he was shot down and spent fourteen months in a German POW camp. As many from the Greatest Generation, he did not speak a great deal of his WWII experience, but with much prodding by Sandra and his grandchildren, eventually wrote of his military days in a cherished memoir entitled "Captured; A WWII Experience of Air Force POW's in Germany". At the time of his passing, he was VMI Alumni Class Chairman and planning its 70th Reunion at the Institute. His military service prompted a life-long love of flying, and he was an active pilot for many years, which included trips around the world and a Trans-Atlantic flight. He was also a nearly forty year resident of Naples, Florida where his love of boating flourished. He and Sandra spent many hours on the Gulf, and taking excursions around the Caribbean in their aptly named boat "Que Sera". One of his favorite ships in his fleet was a Duffy that he kept mainly for his fourteen grandchildren who adored taking trips around Naples' canals with "Captain Rich." What Richard cherished the most was his family. His marriage of 38 years to Sandra included much travel and happiness. On each anniversary, they would take a trip to celebrate which included an Around the World adventure for their 25th. He was immensely proud of his five children, two step-children and their spouses, Scott Matheis (predeceased), Terri Matheis, Todd and Anne Matheis, Linn and Rich Johnston, Wesley J. Geissal all of St. Louis, Mike and Dana Matheis of Darien, Connecticut, Bruce and Leslie Hoffmeister of Ellicott City, Maryland. In addition to his immediate family, his best friends have always been his brothers and sisters and their spouses, Alice and John Deegan of Huntington, NY, Robert and Janet Matheis, and Doris Matheis of Punta Gorda, Florida, and Roy and Ginny Matheis of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He will be deeply and forever missed by his fourteen grandchildren who adored everything about their beloved Rich. They are Jimmy, Ryan, and Michael Kennedy, Molly Lamping, Alex and Cole Matheis, and Hunter Johnston all of St. Louis, Missouri, Case, Mariah, Campbell, and Holt Matheis of Darien, Connecticut, and Stephen, Tom, and Kevin Hoffmeister of Ellicott City, Maryland. Dick touched the lives of so many. His quick wit, sense of humor and incredible smile always brightened the room. He was guided by his deep faith and was a profoundly kind man, who always put others before himself. His grace and calming presence made all around him better, and his memory will inspire all who knew him to live life to its fullest. That is exactly what he did. Services: Visitation will be Thursday, April 16, 5:00 -7:00 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd, Kirkwood, MO 63122. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held April 17, 11:00 a.m., St. Clements Church, 510 Bopp Rd, St. Louis, MO 63131. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be sent to the charity of your choice.

Mathis, Vernon 59, Wentzville, April 8, 2015. Visitation Sunday, April 12, 2015, 10am to 12noon & Tuesday, April 14, 2pm to 4pm, with Funeral Tuesday, 4pm, Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville, MO. Pitmanfuneralhome.com

McGuire, Virginia S. (nee: Sattler), age 91, passed away on March 7th, 2015. Loving wife of the late Glen S. McGuire Sr. Beloved special mother of Ellen Glisan and Becky (Chuck) Brem; dear grandmother of Mitch and Dylan Brem; cherished aunt, great aunt and friend. Virginia was preceded in death by her parents William and Ella Sattler; siblings Helen Hollander, Margaret Kirchoff, Dorothy Schulte and William "Bud" Sattler. Virginia enjoyed spending time with her family, gardening and making lap quilts for the veterans and nursing care facilities. She donated her body to science at St. Louis University Medical School. Services: A memorial service will be held at St. Charles Borromeo Church in St. Charles, MO on May 16th at 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, Masses or contributions to the charity of your choice are appreciated.

age 94, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, April 7, 2015. Former wife of Ambrose Pedroli; loving wife of the late Robert Moore; loving mother of David (Debbie) Pedroli, Leslie (Dan) Barker, and the late Janet (Jim) Wiseman, Stephen (Mary) Moore, David (Darcie) Moore, Laurie (Jim) Skinner, Carol Kerr, and the late Faye Stevens; beloved grandmother of 18 and great-grandmother of 23. Memorials can be made in Jean's memory to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Services: Memorial Gathering Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 11-1 p.m., Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 Chippewa, St Louis, MO 63109. Inurnment to follow at Resurrection Cemetery. Please send condolences to www.hoffmeistercolonial.com.

Nesser, Shirley M. (nee Pearce) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Raymond Nesser Jr.; dear mother of Karen (Stan) Buraszeski, Geralyn Harris, Raymond J. (Donna) Nesser III, Charles F. Nesser and Beth (Alan) Mehringer; loving grandmother of Joe (Nikki) Harris, Mary Alice Harris, Kayli Nesser and Raymond J. Nesser IV; dear great-grandmother of Tori Harris and Mitchell Harris; dear sister of Carol Williams; dear aunt of Kimberly Williams, Pamela Goldfeld, Tamara Reding and James Williams Jr.; our dear step-grandmother, step-great-grandmother, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS CITY CHAPEL, 2906 Gravois on Monday, April 13, 10 a.m. to Incarnate Word Catholic Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Sunday 3-8 p.m.

Novak, Daniel E. April 4, 2015. Visit. Sat Apr 18, 10am. Memorial Service at 11 at Valhalla. Inurnment Valhalla Mausoleum. valhallafunerals.net

Oldani, Louis Charles age 103, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Evelyn Hilda (nee Berra) Oldani; loving father of Judy (the late Voya) Ognyanov and Louis Oldani Jr.; cherished grandfather of Lara (Adam) Evans; devoted great-grandfather of Ethan and Ryan. Louis was the proud inventor of the toasted ravioli at Oldani's Restaurant, on The Hill. Services: Visitation followed by Funeral Mass from 11:30 until Mass at 1:00 p.m. Thursday, April 16, 2015 at the Church of the Immaculata, 8900 Clayton Rd., 63117. Interment Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Masses preferred. Online condolences at Ambrusterchapel.com

Pfeifer, Wanda Ruth

(nee Blagg) was born October 13, 1928 in Harviell, MO to Beulah (nee Harty) and Adolphus "Dolph" Blagg, both deceased. Wanda passed away peacefully Thursday, April 9, 2015, in St. Louis, MO, in the warm and loving enbrace of her family after a brief illness. Beloved wife of 67 years to Norman Pfeifer; dearly loved mother and mother-in-law of Michael (Pamela) Pfeifer, Deborah (Mark) Kumming, Sue Worley and Davis (Tracy) Pfeifer; beloved grandmother of Brittany Wilhite (nee Worley), Benjamin Kumming, Anna Coleman (nee Kumming), the late Molly Kumming, Emily Pfeifer, Jack Pfeifer and Andrew Payne; beloved greatgrandmother of Kaylee Walden, Bella Wilhite, Blake Coleman, Ewan Coleman and Ingrid Payne; dear sister of Sherron Brooks. Preceded in death by beloved brothers, Norman Blagg and Kenith Blagg and beloved sisters, Dortha Fowler, Veleta Hemby and Bobbie Ann Schneiderheinze; dear aunt to 13 nieces and 13 nephews; cousin, great-aunt, and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, April 14, 11:30 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Shriner's Hospital of St. Louis. Visitation Monday, 3-9 p.m.

Reutzel, Lawrence F. "Larry"

On Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband of Patricia A. Reutzel (nee Gochenour) for 47 years; dearest father of Rachelle (Paul) Freese and Kimberly (Jason) Wright; loving grandfather of Jeremy and Ryan Freese & Isabelle and Camilla Wright; dear brother of Janice (Leroy) Trease; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. Tuesday, April 14, 10 a.m. until time of Funeral at 12 noon. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Memorials to Shriners Hospital for Children appreciated.

Roberts, Ellen Langtree Gordon Died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Hugh Evan Roberts; dearest mother of Ellen Langtree Roberts, Daniel Evan Roberts, Robert Gordon Roberts (Vicki) and the late Glynis Ann Roberts; dear grandmother of Johanna and Mayellen, Ryan, Sally and Katie; dear sister of the late Ruth Gordon Noone. Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at Saint Peter's Episcopal Church in Ladue, 110 North Warson Road at Ladue Road on Tuesday, April 14 at 2 p.m. The family will receive friends in the Church Undercroft following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to Central Institute for the Deaf, 825 S Taylor Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110. Condolences may be extended online at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Rogers, Starling B. Age 75, of Wentzville, MO, died on Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Schraudner, Elizabeth "Liz" (nee Schmid) passed away March 19, prior to her 99th birthday. Beloved wife to the late William (Bud) Schraudner for almost 65 years. Beloved mother of Donna Tracey (William) and Susan Mauzy (Steve). Cherished grandmother to Brian (Lisa) Scott (Colleen) Tracey and Christopher (Adria), Matthew, and Bradley (Kara) Mauzy. Loving great-grandmother to Nigel, Cailin, Maggie, Colin, Luke, John and Annabell. Also, Giavanna Elizabeth who came into this world after her passing. Our Mom was a giving caring person all of her life to whoever crossed her path. Hopefully, dancing with the love of her life now. Services: Memorial Mass on Friday, April 17th, 11:30 a.m. Our Lady of Pillar Church, St. Louis MO 63131 In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Louis Children's Hospital and Shriners Hospital.

Sidoti, Gloria "Ginny" Died peacefully on Friday, March 27, 2015. She is preceded in death by her beloved husband Daniel R. Sidoti and her daughter Lisa. Services: Private through Bopp Chapel in Kirkwood, MO.

Siegner, Allan M. 63, passed away on Friday, March 13, 2015, in Tempe, AZ. He was preceded in death by his parents, Eugene and Charlotte Siegner (nee Ruhrer) and brother William. He is survived by his sister Pamela Siegner, brothers James (Joan) Siegner, Richard Siegner, and Jeffrey Siegner; two nephews, three nieces, two grandnieces and a grandnephew. Allan graduated from St. Paul High School in Highland, Illinois, in 1969. He served in the Navy from 1974 to 1982, where he started his career as a Cytotechnologist, in which he worked for 15 years. He then studied and became certified as a computer technician and programmer. He moved from Illinois to the Phoenix area in 1984.

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04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

Hittler, Marion Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Friday, April 10, 2015. Preceded in death by her parents William and Katherine Setchfield; beloved wife of the late Andrew Hittler Jr.; dear mother of Susan (Patrick) Knoll, Arthur (fiancée Penny Bryant) Hittler, Drew (Dean) Hittler, Michael (Robin) Hittler and the late Joseph (surviving Mary) Hittler and Cindy (surviving Clayton) Speeler; dear grandmother of Jennifer (Jim) Marr, Katie (Dan) Wiseman, Betsey (Slade) Stratton, Beth (John) O'Leary, Chrissy (Connor) Clune, Joey Hittler, Timmy (fiancée Katie Siebenberger) Hittler, Andrew (Robin) Hittler IV, Carrie (fiancé William Elledge) Hittler, Ashley (Jason) Selby, Josh (Jennifer) Speeler, Nicole (Daniel) Sapp, Jessica (Nick) Sexton, Emily Hittler and the late Lynn Hittler; dear great-grandmother of 21; dear sister-in-law of Shirley "Sis" (the late John) Re, Rose (Rev. Mr. Jim) Murphy and Floss Siebert; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, April 14, 10:30 a.m. to Annunciation Catholic Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment Lakewood Park Cemetery. Contributions to Friends of Kids with Cancer appreciated. Visitation Monday 4-8 p.m.

Horton, Kenneth J. Sun. March 29, 2015. Dear son of the late Charles Horton and Margaret Horton Burks. Dear brother and uncle. Ken was a Sergeant in the US Army Air Force during WWII. Services: Memorial service, 11 a.m. Sat., May 2, at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood. Private interment was at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery.

Humphrey, Mildred M. 87, of O'Fallon, died on Friday, April 10, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

Hunter, Jean Laverne

Kavanaugh, Dolores M. (nee Flanagan), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Dolores was the daughter of the late John E. and Mary C. Flanagan and beloved sister of the late Mary B. (the late Dale) Hare. A very loving family. Dolores was the wife of John (Jack) F. Kavanaugh, who was her only true love. Jack and Dolores were blessed with 3 dearly devoted children; John F. (Susan) Kavanaugh, Steven (Barbara) Kavanaugh, and Patrice A. (Paul) Niemann; Loving grandmother of John Kavanaugh III, Scott Kavanaugh, Julie Stevens, Kimberly DeMerit, Kathryn Hamlin, Amy Norton, Paul Niemann, Patrick Niemann, and Gavin Niemann; Loving Great-grandchildren, Erin O'Malley, Delaney Kavanaugh, Ethan Kavanaugh, Dylan and Ashlynn Stevens, Ryan Niemann, Cole Niemann, Natalie Hamlin, Andrew Hamlin, Emery Kavanaugh, Elynn Kavanaugh, Jack DeMerit, and Sam DeMerit. Dolores was equally devoted to her sister's children, Kathy Martin (Donald) Rogers and Gary S. (Patti) Hare. In addition to the love of family, she had many close friends especially Debbie Hare. Through the years she volunteered with St. Vincent DePaul, White House Retreat, The Uandi Club GFWC, Daily World Missionaries and many others. She was a life long card player and taught many of her grandchildren to play card games. Services: Funeral from the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday, 9:45 a.m. to St. Joseph Catholic Church, Manchester for 10:00 a.m. Mass. Interment Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Masses or Boys Town National Headquarters, 200 Flanagan Blvd., P. O. Box 8000, Boys Town, NE 68010. Visitation Sunday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guest book at Schrader.com.

Ketcherside, Raymond R. passed into the arms of God on Friday, April 10, 2015. Raymond was born in St. Louis to Claude and Agnes Ketcherside and was a graduate of Mehlville High School. He was the beloved husband for 56 years of Lorraine and dear brother of the late Louise (survived by Kenneth) Herrick. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., on Tuesday, April 14, 11 a.m. until time of funeral at 1 p.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A21

Lamping, John "Jack" Thomas, Sr. passed away peacefully at Mercy Hospital in St. Louis on Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at age 76 with his wife and other family members at his side. Mr. Lamping is survived by his loving wife of 53 years, Mary Jane Lamping. He was the devoted father of John (Caryn) T. Lamping, Jr. of St. Louis, MO; Brian (Melinda) Lamping of St. Louis, MO; Beth (John) Tiffin of St. Louis, MO; Stephanie (Ian) Mutchnick of Louisville, KY; and Sarah (Scott) Suda of Alameda, CA. Jack was the loving grandfather of seventeen: Rachel, Charlotte, Jackson, Dmitri, Emma and Shelby Lamping; David, Michael and Jessica Lamping; Claire, Mary Jane, Grace and Campbell Tiffin; Gabe and Mimi Mutchnick; and Frances and Eliot Suda. He also leaves his sister, Sharon (Ed) Rickert, of Granite City, IL; his brother, Jim (Debby) Lamping, of New Orleans, LA; his brother-in-law, Larry (Kathy) Stilinovic, of Seattle, WA; and many friends both past and present. He was predeceased by his brother, William "Bill" Lamping, Jr. Mr. Lamping was born in St. Louis, the son of William "Bill" and Grace Lamping. He was a graduate of St. Louis University High (1956) and St. Louis University (Engineering 1960 and MBA 1967). From 1960 to 1961, he served as a seismologist researcher at the South Pole for the United States Antarctic Research Program. After a brief stint in engineering, Jack spent his career in investment management working primarily for Mercantile Trust Company, Boatmen's Trust Company and A.G. Edwards. Dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge, Mr. Lamping was previously recognized for his support of the Missouri Teacher of the Year program and for the past nine years had volunteered his time with Oasis reading to young students. He was a beloved husband, father and friend who will be remembered for being a model parent, for his love of the game of golf, for his keen sense of humor, as well as for his quiet humility. Services: Mr. Lamping has donated his body for scientific research to St. Louis University. There will be a memorial mass at Assumption Catholic Church on Friday, May 22nd at 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions be made to the Society of St. Vincent DePaul at Assumption Parish (Mattese).

Lewi, LTG (Ret) Kenneth Edward

Leyhe, Louise Kraus

Matheis, Richard Anthony

McMichael, Donald F.

97, Born November 6, 1917, died Tuesday, March 31, 2015, peacefully at home, surrounded by family. Louise was the beloved wife of the late Fred Henry Leyhe, a loving mother to her two daughters, Mary L. Burke (Richard) and Nancy L. Allen (Chris), and adored grandmother of Michael Leyhe Burke, Sarah Anne Burke, John Christopher Allen, Jr. and Elizabeth Allen Rogers, and great grandmother of 10, Ane, Clara, Luke, Tom and Finn Burke, Ellie, Lila and Polly Allen, Abby and Carter Rogers and sister of J. Robert Kraus and the late Eleanor Kraus Hoffman. As her granddaughter Beth Rogers wrote, "On Tuesday morning, heaven gained another angel, our sweet grandma. She will be deeply missed by all of us. An amazing lady with style, grace, humility and a heart full of gold. We are so thankful for our relationships and getting to have her in our life for so many years. Grandma, we will forever love you and miss you dearly." Louise grew up in Webster Groves, MO, a graduate of Webster Groves High School and Washington University where she met the love of her life, Fred Leyhe. Elected the "Most Popular Freshman" by her university peers, Louise excelled as a student and served as President of the Gamma Iota Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. Louise, together with Fred, valued close relationships with friends, especially with their dear friends in the "Potluck Group". She scored her first Hole in One at 70, and was an avid Cardinals fan waiting for the 2015 season to start on Sunday, 4/5/2015. She lived her life to the fullest to the very end. As all would attest, she was "sharp as a tack" until her last moment. Louise Leyhe will be missed by all who had the privilege of sharing in her life. Services: A Memorial Service will be held in the Fellowship Hall at Ladue Chapel, 9450 Clayton Road, Ladue, Missouri on Friday, May 15, at 4 pm. A reception will follow. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Washington University, Whitfield School, John Burroughs School, or to the charity of one's choice. Arrangements by Bopp Chapel in Kirkwood.

passed away peacefully on April 8, 2015 surrounded by Sandra, his beloved wife of 38 years, his daughter Terri, and his sons Todd and Mike. Richard was born on November 18, 1923 in New York City. He was the oldest of five children, who remain to this day each other's very best friends. He attended Garden City High School in Garden City, New York and went on to study at the Virginia Military Institute. He had residences in St. Louis, Missouri and Naples, Florida. He was an executive with the Trane Company in St. Louis for over forty years. Richard proudly served our country during World War II as a B-24 navigator in the 8th Air Force Division, 453rd Bomber Group and flew multiple missions over Germany. On July 14, 1944 he was shot down and spent fourteen months in a German POW camp. As many from the Greatest Generation, he did not speak a great deal of his WWII experience, but with much prodding by Sandra and his grandchildren, eventually wrote of his military days in a cherished memoir entitled "Captured; A WWII Experience of Air Force POW's in Germany". At the time of his passing, he was VMI Alumni Class Chairman and planning its 70th Reunion at the Institute. His military service prompted a life-long love of flying, and he was an active pilot for many years, which included trips around the world and a Trans-Atlantic flight. He was also a nearly forty year resident of Naples, Florida where his love of boating flourished. He and Sandra spent many hours on the Gulf, and taking excursions around the Caribbean in their aptly named boat "Que Sera". One of his favorite ships in his fleet was a Duffy that he kept mainly for his fourteen grandchildren who adored taking trips around Naples' canals with "Captain Rich." What Richard cherished the most was his family. His marriage of 38 years to Sandra included much travel and happiness. On each anniversary, they would take a trip to celebrate which included an Around the World adventure for their 25th. He was immensely proud of his five children, two step-children and their spouses, Scott Matheis (predeceased), Terri Matheis, Todd and Anne Matheis, Linn and Rich Johnston, Wesley J. Geissal all of St. Louis, Mike and Dana Matheis of Darien, Connecticut, Bruce and Leslie Hoffmeister of Ellicott City, Maryland. In addition to his immediate family, his best friends have always been his brothers and sisters and their spouses, Alice and John Deegan of Huntington, NY, Robert and Janet Matheis, and Doris Matheis of Punta Gorda, Florida, and Roy and Ginny Matheis of Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He will be deeply and forever missed by his fourteen grandchildren who adored everything about their beloved Rich. They are Jimmy, Ryan, and Michael Kennedy, Molly Lamping, Alex and Cole Matheis, and Hunter Johnston all of St. Louis, Missouri, Case, Mariah, Campbell, and Holt Matheis of Darien, Connecticut, and Stephen, Tom, and Kevin Hoffmeister of Ellicott City, Maryland. Dick touched the lives of so many. His quick wit, sense of humor and incredible smile always brightened the room. He was guided by his deep faith and was a profoundly kind man, who always put others before himself. His grace and calming presence made all around him better, and his memory will inspire all who knew him to live life to its fullest. That is exactly what he did. Services: Visitation will be Thursday, April 16, 5:00 -7:00 p.m. at Bopp Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd, Kirkwood, MO 63122. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held April 17, 11:00 a.m., St. Clements Church, 510 Bopp Rd, St. Louis, MO 63131. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be sent to the charity of your choice.

of St. Charles, Missouri, died on Wednesday, April 8, 2015, at the age of 86. Beloved husband of Elizabeth "Betty" McMichael; cherished son of the late Archiebald Joseph and Minnie Elizabeth McMichael; devoted father of Mark (Suzanne) McMichael, Gary (Vicki Nelsen) McMichael, and Kevin (Joyce) McMichael; treasured brother of Margie Schneiders, Richard (Charlotte) McMichael, Henry (Mert) McMichael, Alice (Dave) Bonnott, and the late James "Jimmy" McMichael; loving grandfather of Jason, Jacob, Jenna, Ainslei, Jessica, and Garrett. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO. Visitation will be held on Monday, April 13, 2015 at 9:00 am at St. Cletus Catholic Church. Funeral Mass to follow at 10:00 am. Interment will be held at St. Charles Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to St. Vincent DePaul Society of St. Cletus.

Kinzel, Jeffrey James Age 83, passed away April 7, 2015 after a courageous battle with dementia with her husband of 63 years by her side. She was born September 15, 1931 to Leonard & Leona Duff who preceded her in death. She is survived by siblings Virginia Reed, Ruth Ann Lombardo and Leonard Duff. In 1951 she married John "Jack" Hunter and is survived by their 4 daughters; Gail (Dr. William) Wright; Jackie (Kip) Poling; Judy Hunter; Jill (Steve) Diestel who will always cherish their countless memories of mom. Jean will always be remembered by family & friends as an avid reader, bridge player, a compassionate nurse assistant and veterinary assistant & animal lover and rescuer. She leaves behind grandchildren, Tiffany Rehg, Ken (Christine) Poling, Tabitha Hunter, Dr. Amberle Wright, Trevor (Jenea) Wright, Jeffrey (Melanie) Westmoreland & 5 greatgrandchildren. Donations in her memory can be made to PALS Animal Shelter in Hawk Point, MO (www.pals-pets.com). Memories & condolences may be expressed at www.pitmanfuneralhome.com. Services: Visitation: Sun., April 12, 2015 12-1pm and Funeral: 1pm Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville, MO.

Johnson, Robert S. "Bob"

on Fri, April 10, 2015, after a courageous battle with cancer. Beloved husband of Anne M. Johnson, dear father of Kimberly (Kyle) Anderson, Chris (Tammy), Dave (Michelle), Tim (Michele) and Terry (Erin) Wirick, dear grandfather of twenty, dear great-grandfather of Shalyn, Brody, Julian, Owen, Leo, Willow and August. Bob began his career as a St. Louis City Firefighter and retired in 1998 after 30 years with Des Peres Public Safety as a Lieutenant. Services: Visitation Sat., April 18, from 3 -5 pm at BOPP Chapel, 10610 Manchester Rd., Kirkwood, with Memorial Service at 5 pm. In lieu of flowers, memorials to Wings, a pediatric supportive care program. Make check payable to BJC Hospice, write "Wings Program" on check memo), c/o BJC Hospice, PO Box 957421, St. Louis, MO 63195, or at bjchospice.org. (boppchapel.com)

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asleep in Jesus on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved father of Jared Kinzel and Terah Kitcher; loving grandfather of Kolton Kinzel; dear son of the late Byron and Doris Kinzel; dear brother of Cindy Kinzel, Kevin Kinzel, Karen McHugh and the late Greg Kinzel; our dearest uncle, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Monday, April 13 at 1 p.m. Interment at Park Lawn Cemetery. Visitation Sunday 5-9 p.m.

Kirkman, Stella Marie 93, of St. Louis, MO, passed away on April 9, 2015. Beloved mother of Nicholas G. Kreitler, Robert (Linda) Kreitler, Rose M. (the late Michael) Stevens and Ronald F. (Terri) Kreitler; dear grandmother, great grandmother and great-great grandmother and friend to many. Services: Visitation 2-5p.m Sun., April 12, at Hoffmeister South County, Funeral 1 p.m. Mon. in the funeral home. Interment Mt Hope Cemetery. www.hoffmeistersouthcounty.com

Klearman, Joan (nee Waldman), April 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late David Klearman. Mother and mother-in-law of Susan Meltz, Sally (Ken) Katzif, and Dr. Micki Klearman. Grandmother of Amy (David) Bell and Laura Katzif, Karyn Meltz Steinberg and Lindsey (Kenny) James, Brian (Dr. Jessica) Neil and Alex Neil. Greatgrandmother of Jake, Aaron and Zoe. Sister of Etele (Louis) Kohn. Sister-inlaw of Nancy (Dick) Greenblatt and Barbara (Dr. Alan) Bisno. Dear aunt, cousin and friend. Joan will be remembered for her smile and her sense of humor, her love of family and her commitment to community. Our family wishes to extend a warm thanks to the wonderful people of BJC Hospice, especially Dana Jones who gave so much time and personal care. Services: Funeral service Sunday, April 12, 1:30 pm at BERGER MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 9430 Olive Blvd. Visitation Sunday after 1:00 pm at Berger Memorial Chapel. Private Interment. Contributions to Harvey Kornblum Jewish Food Pantry, 10601 Baur Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63132; BJC Hospice Foundation, P.O. Box 957421, St. Louis, MO 63195 or the charity of your choice. Please visit bergermemorialchapel.com for more information. BERGER MEMORIAL SERVICE

Korte, William "Bill" passed away, Saturday, April 11, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Marsha Korte (Czuj). Dear father of Scott (Rachel) Korte and Beth (Paul Koebbe) Korte. Grandfather of Andrew and Kate Korte. Brother of Carol (Mike) Maag. Uncle, brother-inlaw, cousin and friend. Bill was a long time Administrator of the St. Louis Special School District and Principal of Ritenour High School. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Wednesday, 10:00 a.m. Interment Arthur Cemetery, Arthur IL. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Marsha Korte Scholarship Fund at Rosati Kain High School or Ritenour Pride and Promise Foundation. Visitation Tuesday 4-8 p.m. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

Llewellyn, Dovie Christine

of Wildwood, passed away, Tuesday April 7, 2015. Loving husband of Jeanne Behrens Lewi. Dear father of Karen (Brian) Cropper, Kathryn Lewi, Christopher McCarthy, Jennifer McCarthy, and Matthew (Susan) McCarthy. Loving grandfather of Samantha (Jason), Kyle, Zachary, Danielle, Meghan, Nicholas, Matthew, Cooper, and Joshua. Kenneth was born on August 1, 1930 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He graduated from Texas A&M University in 1953 with a degree in Education. In 1967, he received an MBA degree from the University of Alabama, and in 1976 he attended a two-month advanced management and business course at Pennsylvania State University. His military schooling includes graduation from the Army's Command and General Staff College and graduation from the Joint Services' Industrial College of the Armed Forces. General Lewi's military duty was principally as a logistician in the Quartermaster Corps. In his thirtyfour year active duty career he commanded at every level, beginning as a Second Lieutenant Platoon Leader and ending his career as a Lieutenant General commanding the United States Army Europe's Theater Army Area Logistics Command. When he was a Major General in St. Louis, he commanded the 3,000 person Troop Support Command (TROSCOM). The Command was responsible for providing maintenance and supply support to the Armed Forces for the items TROSCOM managed, and for Ft. Belvoir and Natick Research and Development Laboratories. In his last assignment, General Lewi commanded 34,000 civilian and military personnel located in six countries to provide supply, maintenance, transportation, and administrative support to the U.S. Army Forces and their families in Europe. Since his retirement in September 1989, General Lewi was involved in a number of activities. He was a member of the James S. McDonnell USO's Board of Directors; served as the Chairman of the Times Beach Environmental Committee; was elected President of the local chapter of the 900-member Association of the United States Army; acted as the military advisor for a St. Louis television station; and worked as a consultant for several firms and for the Army. General Lewi was chosen to represent the Quartermaster Corps as the Colonel of the Regiment and selected for the Quartermaster Hall of Fame. An auditorium at Ft. Lee, Virginia was named in his honor. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Monday, 11:30 a.m. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Wyman Center, Army Emergency Relief Fund, Texas A&M Band Scholarship Fund, or a charity of your choice. Visitation Monday 10:30 a.m. until time of service. Friends may sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com.

(nee Dickens) on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. Beloved wife of the late William D. Llewellyn; loving mother of Barbara (Gary) Pinson, Suzan (Larry) Bachuss, Nancy (Don Gunther) Aubuchon, Terry (Sheri) and Billie Llewellyn and the late Joseph Garcia; cherished grandmother of Michele (the late Frank) Thiel, Tisha Pinson, James and Christine Doza, Denise (Craig) Stellhorn, Joseph Sanfillipo, Kyle and Gene Worley, Tiffany and the late Mindy Llewellyn and greatgrandmother of Isabella, Gabriella, Shaynee, Tianna, Sofia, Dane, Luke and Brooke; our dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Monday, April 13 at 10 a.m. Interment at J.B. National Cemetery. Visitation Sunday 4-8 p.m.

Lund, Carol A. Age 71, of Saint Charles, MO, died on Tuesday, April 7, 2015. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com

Macare, Alfred 88, Ferguson, April 1, 2015 Alfred was retired from the City of University City Central Garage, as an accountant. He is survived by his wife, Willemina; daughters, Felicia, Yvonne (William) and Denise (Todd) and grandchildren. Details online at www.stlfuneral.com

Mace, Lorraine A. (nee Lahmann) Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thur. Apr. 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late James D. Mace. Loving mother of the late Mary T. Mace. Cherished friend of Chris, Mary, Ashley Scanio, Nicole and great-great grand baby Emma Rau-Scanio. Services: Visitation on Mon. Apr. 13, 2015 from 9-11:00am at Our Lady Queen of Peace, 4696 Notre Dame Ln., House Spring, MO. with Mass immediately following at 11:00am. Interment Calvary Cemetery. Donations to St. Jude appreciated. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

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Mathis, Vernon 59, Wentzville, April 8, 2015. Visitation Sunday, April 12, 2015, 10am to 12noon & Tuesday, April 14, 2pm to 4pm, with Funeral Tuesday, 4pm, Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville, MO. Pitmanfuneralhome.com

McGuire, Virginia S. (nee: Sattler), age 91, passed away on March 7th, 2015. Loving wife of the late Glen S. McGuire Sr. Beloved special mother of Ellen Glisan and Becky (Chuck) Brem; dear grandmother of Mitch and Dylan Brem; cherished aunt, great aunt and friend. Virginia was preceded in death by her parents William and Ella Sattler; siblings Helen Hollander, Margaret Kirchoff, Dorothy Schulte and William "Bud" Sattler. Virginia enjoyed spending time with her family, gardening and making lap quilts for the veterans and nursing care facilities. She donated her body to science at St. Louis University Medical School. Services: A memorial service will be held at St. Charles Borromeo Church in St. Charles, MO on May 16th at 10:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, Masses or contributions to the charity of your choice are appreciated.

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/obituaries

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Moore, Jean age 94, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, April 7, 2015. Former wife of Ambrose Pedroli; loving wife of the late Robert Moore; loving mother of David (Debbie) Pedroli, Leslie (Dan) Barker, and the late Janet (Jim) Wiseman, Stephen (Mary) Moore, David (Darcie) Moore, Laurie (Jim) Skinner, Carol Kerr, and the late Faye Stevens; beloved grandmother of 18 and great-grandmother of 23. Memorials can be made in Jean's memory to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Services: Memorial Gathering Wednesday, April 15, 2015, 11-1 p.m., Hoffmeister Colonial Mortuary, 6464 Chippewa, St Louis, MO 63109. Inurnment to follow at Resurrection Cemetery. Please send condolences to www.hoffmeistercolonial.com.

Nesser, Shirley M. (nee Pearce) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Raymond Nesser Jr.; dear mother of Karen (Stan) Buraszeski, Geralyn Harris, Raymond J. (Donna) Nesser III, Charles F. Nesser and Beth (Alan) Mehringer; loving grandmother of Joe (Nikki) Harris, Mary Alice Harris, Kayli Nesser and Raymond J. Nesser IV; dear great-grandmother of Tori Harris and Mitchell Harris; dear sister of Carol Williams; dear aunt of Kimberly Williams, Pamela Goldfeld, Tamara Reding and James Williams Jr.; our dear step-grandmother, step-great-grandmother, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from KUTIS CITY CHAPEL, 2906 Gravois on Monday, April 13, 10 a.m. to Incarnate Word Catholic Church for 11 a.m. Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation Sunday 3-8 p.m.

Novak, Daniel E. April 4, 2015. Visit. Sat Apr 18, 10am. Memorial Service at 11 at Valhalla. Inurnment Valhalla Mausoleum. valhallafunerals.net

Oldani, Louis Charles

age 103, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband of the late Evelyn Hilda (nee Berra) Oldani; loving father of Judy (the late Voya) Ognyanov and Louis Oldani Jr.; cherished grandfather of Lara (Adam) Evans; devoted great-grandfather of Ethan and Ryan. Louis was the proud inventor of the toasted ravioli at Oldani's Restaurant, on The Hill. Services: Visitation followed by celebration of Mass from 9:00 until Mass at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, April 16, 2015 at the Church of the Immaculata, 8900 Clayton Rd., 63117. Interment Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Masses preferred. Online condolences at Ambrusterchapel.com

Pfeifer, Wanda Ruth

(nee Blagg) was born October 13, 1928 in Harviell, MO to Beulah (nee Harty) and Adolphus "Dolph" Blagg, both deceased. Wanda passed away peacefully Thursday, April 9, 2015, in St. Louis, MO, in the warm and loving enbrace of her family after a brief illness. Beloved wife of 67 years to Norman Pfeifer; dearly loved mother and mother-in-law of Michael (Pamela) Pfeifer, Deborah (Mark) Kumming, Sue Worley and Davis (Tracy) Pfeifer; beloved grandmother of Brittany Wilhite (nee Worley), Benjamin Kumming, Anna Coleman (nee Kumming), the late Molly Kumming, Emily Pfeifer, Jack Pfeifer and Andrew Payne; beloved greatgrandmother of Kaylee Walden, Bella Wilhite, Blake Coleman, Ewan Coleman and Ingrid Payne; dear sister of Sherron Brooks. Preceded in death by beloved brothers, Norman Blagg and Kenith Blagg and beloved sisters, Dortha Fowler, Veleta Hemby and Bobbie Ann Schneiderheinze; dear aunt to 13 nieces and 13 nephews; cousin, great-aunt, and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Tuesday, April 14, 11:30 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Shriner's Hospital of St. Louis. Visitation Monday, 3-9 p.m.


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A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

he Navy’s sea creatures

Salk polio vaccine changed the world 60 years later, discovery still resonates By VirginiA Linn Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

PITTSBURGH • Sixty years ago Sunday, the Salk polio vaccine was declared “safe, effective and potent,” an announcement cheered with the fervor of a national holiday. At the time, the dreaded disease was infecting more than 50,000 children in the United States a year, killing many and leaving some so paralyzed they could breathe only with the help of an iron lung. And 60 years later, the triumphs of this vaccine — the U.S. had its last case of indigenous polio in 1979 — are being used as a teaching tool for health providers and consumers around the country who recently watched measles cases explode across seven states from a single infected person visiting Disneyland late last year. A low vaccination rate among children, particularly in Southern California, allowed the highly infectious disease to quickly spread, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The discovery of the polio vaccine in 1955 by a University of Pittsburgh research team led by Jonas Salk is “a story that has to be retold or people forget,” said Carl Kurlander, president and CEO of Steeltown Entertainment Project, which produced a 2010 documentary about Pittsburgh’s involvement in the discovery, “A Shot Felt ’Round the World.” Since the measles outbreak, Kurlander said he’s been fielding calls from health providers, rabbis and other religious leaders from around the country seeking DVDs of the documentary and more information so they can share with patients and congregations about the importance of vaccination. “It’s very topical,” Kurlander said. “It’s more pertinent than ever.” While there are still three countries where transmission of polio has never been interrupted — Nigeria, Pakistan and Afghanistan — great strides have been made elsewhere since 1955, when 600,000 people around the world were infected with poliomyelitis. India, with its 1 billion people, was of-

Stratos, Voula

Beloved Voula Stratos, aged 89, fell asleep in the Lord on April 8, 2015. Voula was born in Greece and made her home in St. Louis, MO with her loving husband, John Stratos. She had many friends and loved to cook, bake, crochet and spend time with her family. She will always be known for her sweet personality and loving nature. She is survived by her two children, Harry (Robin) Stratos and Fotina (William) Shisko; her brother in Greece, Themio; sister-in-law Arestea (Pete) Georges and Rosalie (George) Koulouriotis; dear yia yia of Demetra, Patricia, Louie, Tricia and Jeanne; beloved big yia yia to Fofie, William, Jack, Michael, and Christian; a friend to all that knew her. Memory eternal. Services: Visitation Tues., April 14, 9 a.m. with funeral service at 11:30 a.m. at Assumption Greek Orthodox Church, 1755 Des Peres Rd. Interment St. Matthews Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Assumption Greek Church or St. Nicholas Greek Church. www.boppchapel.com.

Sweeney, Anita M. (nee Schaeffer) on Wed. Mar. 25, 2015. Wife of the late Charles H. Sweeney. Mother of Patricia Cummings, Sharon (Mike) Barkey, Deborah (David) Fazekas, Robert G. (Nadine) Stephens, Michael E. Sweeney and the late James V. Stephens III. Mother in law of Deborah Stephens. Grandmother of Paul, Katie, Nick, Meghan, Jenifer, Julie, Rebecca, Laura, Paula, Maggie, Betsy, the late Sara and Brandon. Great-grandmother of Mason, Jason, Andrea, Audrey, David, Caroline, Francine, Sylvie, and Levitt. Our dear sister of 16, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation on Sat. Apr. 18, 2015 from 10-11:30 a.m. at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr., Fenton, MO to St. Paul Catholic Church, 15 Forrest Knoll Dr., for a 12:00 p.m. Mass. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Donations to the American Heart Assoc. or the Wounded Warriors Project appreciated. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

Tatro, Paul L. age 94 of St. Peters, MO, April 04, 2015. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636 498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Dolphins and sea lions train for deployment

ficially removed from the list of countries with active transmission in 2012. “There’s no technical reason why there should be cases anywhere in the world by the end of this year,” said Oliver Rosenbauer, communications oicer for the World Health Organization’s Global Polio Eradication Initiative. “It’s a question of political will and societal will.” WHO is progressing on a five-year plan that ends in 2018 that would not only wipe out all cases, but also ensure that a framework is in place to prevent any resurgence of the disease, he said. This year, 21 cases have been reported in the world — 20 in Pakistan, where there has been a flare-up, and one in Afghanistan, according to the latest figures compiled by the World Health Organization. Nigeria — where an 11-month boycott in the northern Islamic states against polio vaccination in 2003-04 caused cases to swell and spread to 14 previously polio-free countries — has not had a reported case in more than six months. There were six cases of wild polio reported there in all of 2014 (and an additional 30 derived from the vaccine). Attention is now focused on an emergency situation in Pakistan, where an outbreak occurred in 2014 of 306 wild polio cases. Most of the country is polio-free, with cases concentrated in a northern tribal areas of the country. The vaccination initiative in Pakistan is no longer overseen by just the ministry of health, but by the prime minister’s office. Health volunteers are trying to immunize 35 million children under age 5 in Pakistan, and while communities are quite receptive to vaccination, Rosenbauer said, there has been violence against some health workers in the past who have been targeted by anti-government militants. Eradication efforts worldwide have been spearheaded by a public-private partnership of the WHO, United Nations Children’s Fund, Rotary International, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — and the hundreds of volunteers who have run vaccination clinics or gone door-to-door to inoculate children.

Temporal, Adelaide Almeda M.D. Baptized in the hope of the resurrection, Adelaide Almeda Temporal, M.D., 89, died peacefully at her son's Montana home February 20, 2015 after a brief illness. Preceded in death by her husband, Jose Temporal M.D., they are together in the presence of the Lord. Born in Manila Philippines, the eldest daughter of Mariano Almeda and Valeriana Fernandez-Almeda, Adelaide was a survivor of the Japanese occupation of World War II. From her experience, she had the ambition and commitment to live a life of service and compassion, and to maintain strong family relationships. Academically gifted, she graduated with her future husband in the Class of 1952 from Manila Central University School of Medicine. She sought additional training in general practice and obstetrics and gynecology in the United States, married, and returned to the Philippines. She returned to the US in 1963 permanently with her family and settled in St. Louis, Missouri. After a successful period as an OB-Gyn at St. Joseph's Hospital in Kirkwood, she transitioned to women's health and the emerging field of geriatrics with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks. She was a trailblazing woman physician who inspired many people, including her children, to pursue careers in healthcare. She was an active member of the Philippine Medical Association and served as the first elected president of the PMA Auxiliary. Dely, as she was known by her friends, enjoyed art and music. An accomplished pianist who chose medicine over a performing career, she was an avid gardener who maintained a beautiful collection of orchids. She had a love of art and enjoyed making ceramics as gifts for family. She was passionate about her faith. She loved her friends and family and was energized by her church community, her walking group at South County Mall, and her "Perlas" woman's fellowship. Her passion for medicine was eclipsed only by her love for family. Ate Dely was able to help her family in the Philippines and encouraged many family members to find success in the US. As a mom (and Lola to her "apo"), Adelaide instilled the values of service, stability, strong faith, and charity. She inspired her family to strive to always make a difference. She is survived by her sons Joseph (Christine) Temporal of Columbia, MO, Michael (Vonda) Temporal of Laurel, MT; her grandchildren Kelly, Helen, Anna, and Ricky; cousins, nieces and nephews and their children in St. Louis, Chicago, Seattle, the Bay Area, Michigan, Wisconsin, and New York, as well as her sister, Carmen Almeda-Vinas and countless family in the Philippines. Services: A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on April 25th, 11 a.m., at St. Catherine Laboure Church, 9750 Sappington Rd, 63128. Inurnment will follow privately by her family at Resurrection Cemetery, St. Louis. All family, friends, and colleagues of Adelaide Temporal are invited to add their memories of her life well lived at www.SmithFuneralChapels.com

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

los anGeles times

A trained bottlenose dolphin slides onto a beaching tray in preparation for transport to the open sea last month in San Diego. The animal wears a camera and sonar devices for its mission to ind enemy mines.

By Tony Perry Los Angeles Times

SAN DIEGO • For a moment, the

mammal and the machine are side by side on a Navy dock. The dolphin and the drone — and their respective handlers — will spend the morning training for a possible order to deploy to the Persian Gulf or some other international trouble spot to detect underwater mines, or maybe to guard a port against a terrorist threat. The mammal is Puanani, a bottlenose dolphin, a sleek 7 feet, 10 inches long and 427 pounds. The machine is an unmanned underwater vehicle, or UUV, Kingfish version, 11 feet long, 600 pounds. Puanani was born in the Gulf of Mexico and received initial training from the Navy in Hawaii. The cigar-shaped UUV was built by Hydroid Inc., a Massachusetts military contractor. Both are assigned to a mission that Navy oicials say is increasingly critical: maintaining “underwater dominance” and the ability to thwart attacks aimed at the home front or at U.S. and allied ships in foreign locations. Among potential targets, oicials warn, is the port at Long Beach. The U.S. has submarines, advanced sonar aboard surface ships and high-tech scanning capability aboard aircraft — as well as listening devices beneath the waves and an untold number of technological and intelligence-gathering assets that are classified.

Valley, Lawrence L. Jr. 80, passed March 29, 2015. Memorial service April 19 at 3pm at Pacific United Methodist Church, 1516 W. St. Louis St., Pacific, MO.

In San Diego, with a budget of $28 million a year, the Navy has 90 dolphins and 50 California sea lions in a program run by the Space and Naval Warfare System Pacific. Nearly every day the animals train in San Diego Bay or in the ocean beyond Point Loma. There are also several UUVs. The dolphins and the sea lions, using their keen eyesight and “biological sonar,” are expert at finding mines. The sea lions are trained to detect any swimmer who is in a restricted area. The animal clamps a “bite plate” onto the swimmer’s leg and takes the attached tether back to his handler. That’s the exercise that veteran trainer Chris Harris is conducting with Joe, a sea lion who has made multiple deployments, including to the Persian Gulf. Harris signals Joe to begin his dive. Within a minute, Joe has surfaced, followed by a Navy diver playing the part of a wouldbe terrorist. The diver gives a thumbs-up. Joe has done his job. Harris gives Joe an enthusiastic attaboy and throws him a fish. “He’s robust, and he’s reliable,” Harris said. Puanani was sent to the Persian Gulf in the invasion of Iraq. “She is deployable any time, anywhere,” said Mark Patefield, Puanani’s lead trainer. “All we need is the word ‘go.’” Sea lions are amphibious and can essentially hop into a small boat. The dolphins are lifted in a sling. On a transport plane or ship,

the sea lions are kept in specially designed enclosures that are cool and wet. The dolphins travel in fleece-lined stretchers suspended in fiberglass containers filled with water. The UUVs are deployed to the Persian Gulf and to the area patrolled by the Japan-based 7th Fleet. They have also assisted in search missions, including the Challenger disaster and Hurricane Katrina. Sea lions and dolphins guard bases at Kings Bay, Ga., and Bangor, Wash., where the Navy’s Trident submarines that carry nuclear weapons are located. The Persian Gulf is a particular focus of the U.S. because of threats by the Iranians to mine the waterway. Someday the UUVs may replace the mammals in the minedetection mission. Until then the two share the assignment. “The mammals are the best at what they do,” said Mike Rothe, manager of the marine mammals program. “They’ve evolved over thousands of years to have a remarkable sonar. We’ve been developing the UUVs for several decades.” The first dolphin trained in mine detection was Notty in 1960. President John F. Kennedy liked the idea of using sea creatures for military purposes, and the program expanded. Dolphins and sea lions helped guard the ammunition piers at Cam Ranh Bay during the Vietnam War. Sharks and whales were found to be untrainable.

Woratzeck, Jerome C.

Vomund, C. Nick Age 93, of Saint Paul, MO, died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Contact (636) 240-2242 or visit baue.com

Williams, Robert P. (Willie) 76, passed away on Wed April 8, 2015. Visitation will be Thurs, April 16, 4-8pm HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd, Florissant.

Witthaus, Raymond A., Sr. 78, passed away April 8, 2015. He was born in St. Louis to the late Vervia and Raymond E. Witthaus, and was a 14 year veteran of the US Army, the 82nd Airborne, serving in Korea and Vietnam. Ray was a proud lifetime member of Ironworker Local 22, Indianapolis, IN of Intl Assoc. of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers. Raymond is survived by his wife Pat, son Ray "Tony" [Tammy] Witthaus, Jr.; daughter Vervia [Ron] Mahurin; four step children: Mary [Floyd] Hawes, Barbara Criddle, Faye Kane, and Loretta Hawes; 12 grandchildren and many great grandchildren; sister Judy Yarborugh and former wife Carol. He loved life and his love and humor will be missed. Services: Visitation will be held Friday April 17 from 9-11 am at Valhalla Chapel; Memorial Service at 11:00; followed by Full Military Honors. Interment will be private at Jefferson Barracks. Memorial contributions to Local 22 Joint Apprentice Program, 5600 Dividend Rd., Indianapolis, IN. 46241. www.valhallafunerals.net

Wolf, June J.

age 79 years, of Charlotte, NC, passed away Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at Novant Medical Center. Jerry was born September 24, 1935 in St. Louis, MO the son of Charles and Alice Redel Woratzeck. He was married on July 5, 1958 in St. Louis, MO to Mary Danzeisen who preceded him in death on May 7, 2012. Survivors include: one daughter, Laura Quillin and her husband Shawn of Charlotte, NC; one son, Erik Woratzeck and his wife Lori of California, MO; one sister-in-law, Dixie Danzeisen of Fenton, MO; two brothers-in-law, Lee Wisniewski of St. Louis, MO and David Levy of Boston, MA; and three grandchildren, Molly Quillin, Allyson Quillin, and Jake Woratzeck. He was preceded in death by his sister, Charlotte Wisniewski and a sister-in-law, Jennie Levy. Services: Graveside services will be conducted at 11:00 a.m. Friday, April 24, 2015 at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to ASPCA by visiting their website at www.aspca.org/team/woratzeck or a charity of the donor's choice.

"Hair Bear" 2/5/1955 - 4/12/2012 Bubbie, Hosey, Squid

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Young, Loye E. age 74, of Cedar Hill Visitation Sunday 3-7, Chapel Hill Mortuary. Service Mon 10 a.m., Morse Mill Baptist Church

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Honor (nee Weiss) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Simon Wolf; loving mother of Karen (John) Blase, Barbara (Joe) Gurney, Cheryl (Ron) Astroth, Linda (Tom) Bokel and Glenn (Rose) Wolf; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, April 13, 9-11 a.m. then to St. Paul Catholic Church (Fenton) for 11:30 a.m. Mass. Interment Sunset Cemetery.

Honor

...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: LOCAL 1 I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Marvin Fore Journeyman Wireman Member 58 Years Retired April 8, 2015 Graveside Service Mon, April 13, 2:00 p.m. Pilot Knob Cemetery Vida, MO Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

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Obituaries

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Memorial scheduled Sunday for Singield, aide to Clay By Kevin McDerMott St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A memorial service for Aly-

son Rose Singfield, longtime community outreach director for U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-St. Louis, will be held Sunday in Clayton. Singfield, who was on Clay’s staff in the St. Louis region for 14 years until she retired for health reasons last year, died Tuesday in her University City home after a battle with breast can- Singield cer. She was 57. As Clay’s community outreach director, Singfield created and directed programs including Clay’s Congressional Art Competition, which recognizes high school artists in the First Congressional District; the Congressio-

Rawlings, Richard II

52, of Webster Groves, MO, born August 14, 1962, died April 9, 2015 at his residence. Richard worked as a Director of Financial Planning & Analysis for Emerson Electric since 1988. He was preceded in death by his Mother, Patricia nee Gower, Rawlings. Surviving are his Children, Ryan and Richard Rawlings Glendale, MO, Fiancee, Janet Varner and her son Andrew, Belleville, IL, Father, Richard (Carolyn) Rawlings, Fairview Heights, IL, Sister, Danielle (Glenn) Heil, Woodlands, TX, Mother of his children, Mary nee Moskoff, Rawlings, Glendale, MO, Step-Sister, Linda Brown, St. Charles, MO, Nephews, Nicholas, Brett and Mitchell Heil. Condolences at www.kurrusfh.com. Mem. may be made to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes or the Humane Society of Macklind or Belleville. Services: Vis. 4-8pm Sun. April 12, 2015 at Kurrus F.H. in Belleville, IL and from 10-11am Mon., April 13, 2015 at Signal Hill UMC in Belleville, IL. Funeral 11am Mon., April 13, 2015 at Church. Burial at Lake View Memorial Gardens, Fairview Heights, IL.

Reutzel, Lawrence F. "Larry"

nal Youth Cabinet, a program that allows top students in the district to interact with Clay and his staf on national and local issues; and a congressional internship program for students to serve in Clay’s St. Louis and Washington oices. Singfield also was Clay’s personal representative on the Regional Health Commission, where she advocated for increased access to quality primary care. In a statement last week, Clay called Singfield’s death “a huge loss for me, my staf, and for the community that Alyson loved and served so well for many years.” The family will receive friends Sunday (April 12, 2015) in the Great Hall of Ambruster Chapel, 6633 Clayton Rd. from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. with a memorial service at 4:30 p.m. Interment will be private. Kevin McDermott • 314-340-8268 @kevinmcdermott on Twitter kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com

Schraudner, Elizabeth "Liz" (nee Schmid) passed away March 19, prior to her 99th birthday. Beloved wife to the late William (Bud) Schraudner for almost 65 years. Beloved mother of Donna Tracey (William) and Susan Mauzy (Steve). Cherished grandmother to Brian (Lisa) Scott (Colleen) Tracey and Christopher (Adria), Matthew, and Bradley (Kara) Mauzy. Loving great-grandmother to Nigel, Cailin, Maggie, Colin, Luke, John and Annabell. Also, Giavanna Elizabeth who came into this world after her passing. Our Mom was a giving caring person all of her life to whoever crossed her path. Hopefully, dancing with the love of her life now. Services: Memorial Mass on Friday, April 17th, 11:30 a.m. Our Lady of Pillar Church, St. Louis MO 63131 In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Louis Children's Hospital and Shriners Hospital.

Scuito, Annie 93, April 7, 2015 Service 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Resurrection Cemetery Chapel Dietrich Funeral Home, De Soto

Shore, Louis Roy age 81, of Nixa passed away at his home Thursday, April 9, 2015. Louis is formerly of St. Louis and Kimberling City. Services: Funeral services will be at 12:00 Noon, Tuesday, April 14, 2015 in Adams Funeral Home, Nixa. A visitation will be held from 10:00 A.M. to 12:00 Noon, at the funeral home, prior to the funeral service. Burial will follow at Missouri Veterans Cemetery, Springfield, with full military honors. Arrangements are under the direction of Adams Funeral Home, Nixa.

Sidoti, Gloria "Ginny" Died peacefully on Friday, March 27, 2015. She is preceded in death by her beloved husband Daniel R. Sidoti and her daughter Lisa. Services: Private through Bopp Chapel in Kirkwood, MO.

Siegner, Allan M.

On Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved husband of Patricia A. Reutzel (nee Gochenour) for 47 years; dearest father of Rachelle (Paul) Freese and Kimberly (Jason) Wright; loving grandfather of Jeremy and Ryan Freese & Isabelle and Camilla Wright; dear brother of Janice (Leroy) Trease; our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY CHAPEL, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd. Tuesday, April 14, 10 a.m. until time of Funeral at 12 noon. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. Memorials to Shriners Hospital for Children appreciated.

63, passed away on Friday, March 13, 2015, in Tempe, AZ. He was preceded in death by his parents, Eugene and Charlotte Siegner (nee Ruhrer) and brother William. He is survived by his sister Pamela Siegner, brothers James (Joan) Siegner, Richard Siegner, and Jeffrey Siegner; two nephews, three nieces, two grandnieces and a grandnephew. Allan graduated from St. Paul High School in Highland, Illinois, in 1969. He served in the Navy from 1974 to 1982, where he started his career as a Cytotechnologist, in which he worked for 15 years. He then studied and became certified as a computer technician and programmer. He moved from Illinois to the Phoenix area in 1984.

Roche, Mary Lou (nee Meagher) fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Richard "Dick" Roche; dear mother of Michael (Claudia) and Patrick (Kathleen) Roche and Kimberly (Joe) Kauth; dear grandmother of Kaitlin, Daniel, Jack, Chris, Amanda, Kirsten, Lauren, Reagan and Austin; dear sister of Mickey Schreiner and the late James A. "Jimmy" Meagher Jr.; our dear sister-in-law, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Monday, April 13, 8:45 a.m. to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque Catholic Church for 9:30 a.m. Mass. Interment St. Paul Churchyard. In lieu of flowers, contributions to St. Anthony's Hospice Program appreciated. Visitation Sunday 3-9 p.m.

(nee Egeling) Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Dragomir Slavkovic; dearest mother of Maria (Peter) Jovanovic and Katarina "Katy" Vuckovich; dear mother-inlaw, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, and dear friend of the late Nick Veljkovich. Lisbeth was a lifelong member of Holy Trinity Serbian Eastern Orthodox Church and a member of the Kolo Sestara. Services: Visitation Wednesday, 4-8 p.m., POMEN 7 p.m., at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons, 7027 Gravois, 63116. Family and friends will meet Thursday, 10:15 a.m., at Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Church, 1910 Serbian Dr. (McNair) for 10:30 a.m. funeral service. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Kolo Sestara or Holy Trinity Sunday School.

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website

Rogers, Starling B. Age 75, of Wentzville, MO, died on Wednesday, April 8, 2015. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com

nee: Butcher, of Dardenne Prairie, MO, died on Thursday April 9, 2015, at the age of 72. Loving wife of Lawrence Edward "Larry" Stiles; beloved daughter of Meredith and Vera Butcher; devoted mother of Cindy (David) Link and Lisa Stiles; cherished grandmother of Joshua Morrison, Benjamin Morrison, Luke Morrison and Matt (Heather) Link; treasured greatgrandmother of Ethan Link and Hannah Link; cousin of Alice and Guy Young, sister-in-law to James and Betty Stiles, beloved aunt, cousin, and friend to all she met. Barbara was a member of Morning Star Methodist Church. She led the establishment of Alpha Ministries at two churches. She was an avid St. Louis Cardinal Baseball fan. Barbara will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved her. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral Home, 311 Wood Street, O'Fallon, MO where a visitation will be held Sunday, April 12, 2015 4:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Funeral Service Monday, April 13, 2015, 10:00 a.m. Morning Star Church with a visitation 1 hour prior. Interment Mt. Zion Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Alpha USA, American Cancer Society or Cardinals Care. Visit Baue.com

Stout, Jane M. (nee Kercher), on Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Donald Stout; dear mother of Ronald (Leona) Stout and the late Linda; dear grandmother of Danielle, Michael, Matthew, Mason, Mitchell and the late Courtney; our dear aunt, great-aunt, great-great-aunt, cousin and friend of many. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, on Wednesday, April 15 at 11:30 a.m. Interment St. John's Cemetery (Arnold). Donations to Salem Lutheran Church appreciated. Visitation Tuesday, 5-9 p.m.

Stratos, Voula

Slavkovic, Lisbeth

Roberts, Ellen Langtree Gordon Died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Hugh Evan Roberts; dearest mother of Ellen Langtree Roberts, Daniel Evan Roberts, Robert Gordon Roberts (Vicki) and the late Glynis Ann Roberts; dear grandmother of Johanna and Mayellen, Ryan, Sally and Katie; dear sister of the late Ruth Gordon Noone. Services: A Memorial Service will be conducted at Saint Peter's Episcopal Church in Ladue, 110 North Warson Road at Ladue Road on Tuesday, April 14 at 2 p.m. The family will receive friends in the Church Undercroft following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorials appreciated to Central Institute for the Deaf, 825 S Taylor Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110. Condolences may be extended online at www.luptonchapel.com A SERVICE OF THE LUPTON CHAPEL

Stiles, Barbara Ann

Beloved Voula Stratos, aged 89, fell asleep in the Lord on April 8, 2015. Voula was born in Greece and made her home in St. Louis, MO with her loving husband, John Stratos. She had many friends and loved to cook, bake, crochet and spend time with her family. She will always be known for her sweet personality and loving nature. She is survived by her two children, Harry (Robin) Stratos and Fotina (William) Shisko; her brother in Greece, Themio; sister-in-law Arestea (Pete) Georges and Rosalie (George) Koulouriotis; dear yia yia of Demetra, Patricia, Louie, Tricia and Jeanne; beloved big yia yia to Fofie, William, Jack, Michael, and Christian; a friend to all that knew her. Memory eternal. Services: Visitation Tues., April 14, 9 a.m. with funeral service at 11:30 a.m. at Assumption Greek Orthodox Church, 1755 Des Peres Rd. Interment St. Matthews Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Assumption Greek Church or St. Nicholas Greek Church. www.boppchapel.com.

Street, Alison S.

(nee Brooks), Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection, Fri., April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of Keith E. Street; dear mother of Colin, Tessa and Grady; dear daughter of Pat and Barbara (Volk) Brooks; dear sister of Donald (Jen) Brooks, Theodore (Heidi) Brooks and Nathaniel Brooks; dear daughter-in-law of Francis and Therese Street; dear sister-in-law of Christine (Phil) Dunbar, Jim (Laura) Street and Julie (Philippe Kassouf) Street, our dear aunt, cousin and friend. Alison was a proud angel of St. Josephs Academy. Services: from the ORTMANN-STIPANOVICH Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Tues., April 14, 9:30 a.m. to Ascension Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Visitation from 3-8 p.m., Monday.

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Richard Post • The prominent scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, who researched how to store renewable energy, has died. He was 96. Mr. Post died Tuesday (April 7, 2015) in Walnut Creek, Calif., after a sudden illness, the Los Angeles Times reported. He was an avid inventor who had his name on 34 patents. In recent years, he focused on the goal of storing energy in a lywheel. He believed lywheels could be used to hold vast quantities of renewable energy, helping to combat global warming by making the generating of renewable energy more afordable. Because “green” energy from wind and solar farms is produced intermittently depending on the availability of wind and the sun, it has to be backed up by fossil-fuel plants, adding signiicantly to its cost. Mr. Post envisioned a lywheel system that could store energy at more than 90 percent eiciency, which is better than any current battery. He was among a relatively small number of scientists working on the technology, according to the Los Angeles Times. His work will continue at Livermore, with plans to build a new lywheel moving

Sweeney, Anita M. (nee Schaeffer) on Wed. Mar. 25, 2015. Wife of the late Charles H. Sweeney. Mother of Patricia Cummings, Sharon (Mike) Barkey, Deborah (David) Fazekas, Robert G. (Nadine) Stephens, Michael E. Sweeney and the late James V. Stephens III. Mother in law of Deborah Stephens. Grandmother of Paul, Katie, Nick, Meghan, Jenifer, Julie, Rebecca, Laura, Paula, Maggie, Betsy, the late Sara and Brandon. Great-grandmother of Mason, Jason, Andrea, Audrey, David, Caroline, Francine, Sylvie, and Levitt. Our dear sister of 16, aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Memorial visitation on Sat. Apr. 18, 2015 from 10-11:30 a.m. at Jay B. Smith Funeral Home, 777 Oakwood Dr., Fenton, MO to St. Paul Catholic Church, 15 Forrest Knoll Dr., for a 12:00 p.m. Mass. Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Donations to the American Heart Assoc. or the Wounded Warriors Project appreciated. Tributes at jaybsmith.com

forward. Mr. Post was the father of actress Markie Post, who was in the 1980s sitcom “Night Court.” Robert Kirkland • The entrepreneur and philanthropist, who built a national chain of home decor stores and donated $100 million to found the Discovery Park of America education center and tourist attraction in northwestern Tennessee, has died at age 77. Mr. Kirkland’s son, Chris Kirkland, said that his father died Saturday morning (April 4, 2015) at his home in Union City, Tenn., of complications stemming from kidney failure. A memorial service is scheduled for Wednesday at Discovery Park, which will be closed to the general public on that day. In 1966, he and cousin Carl Kirkland founded the Kirkland’s home decor stores, which expanded into a chain of more than 300 locations in 35 states. By the late 1990s, Robert Kirkland and his wife, Jenny, had sold their business holdings and began to concentrate on philanthropic eforts. From news services

Valley, Lawrence L. Jr.

Vomund, C. Nick Age 93, of Saint Paul, MO, died on Thursday, April 9, 2015. Contact (636) 240-2242 or visit baue.com

Walker, Mary Ann, Ph.D.

Tatro, Paul L. age 94 of St. Peters, MO, April 04, 2015. Alternative Funeral & Cremation Services. 636 498-5300. Alternativefuneralcremation.com

Temporal, Adelaide Almeda M.D. Baptized in the hope of the resurrection, Adelaide Almeda Temporal, M.D., 89, died peacefully at her son's Montana home February 20, 2015 after a brief illness. Preceded in death by her husband, Jose Temporal M.D., they are together in the presence of the Lord. Born in Manila Philippines, the eldest daughter of Mariano Almeda and Valeriana Fernandez-Almeda, Adelaide was a survivor of the Japanese occupation of World War II. From her experience, she had the ambition and commitment to live a life of service and compassion, and to maintain strong family relationships. Academically gifted, she graduated with her future husband in the Class of 1952 from Manila Central University School of Medicine. She sought additional training in general practice and obstetrics and gynecology in the United States, married, and returned to the Philippines. She returned to the US in 1963 permanently with her family and settled in St. Louis, Missouri. After a successful period as an OB-Gyn at St. Joseph's Hospital in Kirkwood, she transitioned to women's health and the emerging field of geriatrics with the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks. She was a trailblazing woman physician who inspired many people, including her children, to pursue careers in healthcare. She was an active member of the Philippine Medical Association and served as the first elected president of the PMA Auxiliary. Dely, as she was known by her friends, enjoyed art and music. An accomplished pianist who chose medicine over a performing career, she was an avid gardener who maintained a beautiful collection of orchids. She had a love of art and enjoyed making ceramics as gifts for family. She was passionate about her faith. She loved her friends and family and was energized by her church community, her walking group at South County Mall, and her "Perlas" woman's fellowship. Her passion for medicine was eclipsed only by her love for family. Ate Dely was able to help her family in the Philippines and encouraged many family members to find success in the US. As a mom (and Lola to her "apo"), Adelaide instilled the values of service, stability, strong faith, and charity. She inspired her family to strive to always make a difference. She is survived by her sons Joseph (Christine) Temporal of Columbia, MO, Michael (Vonda) Temporal of Laurel, MT; her grandchildren Kelly, Helen, Anna, and Ricky; cousins, nieces and nephews and their children in St. Louis, Chicago, Seattle, the Bay Area, Michigan, Wisconsin, and New York, as well as her sister, Carmen Almeda-Vinas and countless family in the Philippines. Services: A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on April 25th, 11 a.m., at St. Catherine Laboure Church, 9750 Sappington Rd, 63128. Inurnment will follow privately by her family at Resurrection Cemetery, St. Louis. All family, friends, and colleagues of Adelaide Temporal are invited to add their memories of her life well lived at www.SmithFuneralChapels.com

Woratzeck, Jerome C.

(80) - passed quietly March 29, 2015. He is survived by his wife Linda, and his daughters, Deborah (John) Bethea, Michelle (Noni) Valley, and Julia Valley. He was proceeded in death by his mother Freida R. Valley. He was a beloved stepfather, grandfather, great-grandfather, greatgreat-grandfather, uncle and friend. A Memorial will be held April 19th 2015 at 3:00 pm at the Pacific United Methodist Church, Pacific, MO.

Dr. Walker, a resident of Shrewsbury, died at age 80 on February 7, 2015. She graduated from Southern Methodist University and received a M.Ed. and a Ph.D. from St. Louis University. Mary Ann was a teacher at Bishop DuBourg High School and a teacher/counselor in the Lindbergh School District (1961-90). An avid athlete, she participated in the Senior Olympics, setting local records in swimming. She enjoyed sailing and water-skiing at her home at Lake Wappapello. During retirement, she traveled in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America. Mary Ann volunteered with the Criminal Justice Ministry, ministering to prisoners in local penal institutions. She also visited the homebound in St. Dominic Savio Parish. Mary Ann was a loving aunt and a special, adopted "aunt" to the children of her many friends. Mary Ann is survived by her brother Wayne (Mary) Walker of Glendale; sister-in-law Jackie Walker of Lake St. Louis; nieces Linda (Walker) Buatte, Dr. Michelle Walker, Anne (Tim Heston) Walker; nephews Michael (Karen) Walker, Dr. Robert Walker Jr., and Christopher Walker; and several great-nieces and nephews. William Robert Walker, her brother, preceded her in death. Services: A memorial Mass will be held Sunday, April 19, at 4:00 pm at the Mercy Retreat and Conference Center, 2039 N. Geyer Rd., Frontenac, MO. Memorial gifts may be made to Whole Health Outreach, 180 County Road 700, Ellington, MO 63638 or to Criminal Justice Ministry, P.O. Box 15160, St. Louis, MO 63110.

age 79 years, of Charlotte, NC, passed away Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at Novant Medical Center. Jerry was born September 24, 1935 in St. Louis, MO the son of Charles and Alice Redel Woratzeck. He was married on July 5, 1958 in St. Louis, MO to Mary Danzeisen who preceded him in death on May 7, 2012. Survivors include: one daughter, Laura Quillin and her husband Shawn of Charlotte, NC; one son, Erik Woratzeck and his wife Lori of California, MO; one sister-in-law, Dixie Danzeisen of Fenton, MO; two brothers-in-law, Lee Wisniewski of St. Louis, MO and David Levy of Boston, MA; and three grandchildren, Molly Quillin, Allyson Quillin, and Jake Woratzeck. He was preceded in death by his sister, Charlotte Wisniewski and a sister-in-law, Jennie Levy. Services: Graveside services will be conducted at 11:00 a.m. Friday, April 24, 2015 at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to ASPCA by visiting their website at www.aspca.org/team/woratzeck or a charity of the donor's choice.

Young, Loye E. age 74, of Cedar Hill Visitation Sunday 3-7, Chapel Hill Mortuary. Service Mon 10 a.m., Morse Mill Baptist Church

LOCAL 1 I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Marvin Fore Journeyman Wireman Member 58 Years Retired April 8, 2015 Graveside Service Mon, April 13, 2:00 p.m. Pilot Knob Cemetery Vida, MO Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

Williams, Robert P. (Willie) 76, passed away on Wed April 8, 2015. Visitation will be Thurs, April 16, 4-8pm HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd, Florissant.

Witthaus, Raymond A., Sr. 78, passed away April 8, 2015. He was born in St. Louis to the late Vervia and Raymond E. Witthaus, and was a 14 year veteran of the US Army, the 82nd Airborne, serving in Korea and Vietnam. Ray was a proud lifetime member of Ironworker Local 22, Indianapolis, IN of Intl Assoc. of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Ironworkers. Raymond is survived by his wife Pat, son Ray "Tony" [Tammy] Witthaus, Jr.; daughter Vervia [Ron] Mahurin; four step children: Mary [Floyd] Hawes, Barbara Criddle, Faye Kane, and Loretta Hawes; 12 grandchildren and many great grandchildren; sister Judy Yarborugh and former wife Carol. He loved life and his love and humor will be missed. Services: Visitation will be held Friday April 17 from 9-11 am at Valhalla Chapel; Memorial Service at 11:00; followed by Full Military Honors. Interment will be private at Jefferson Barracks. Memorial contributions to Local 22 Joint Apprentice Program, 5600 Dividend Rd., Indianapolis, IN. 46241. www.valhallafunerals.net

"Hair Bear" 2/5/1955 - 4/12/2012 Bubbie, Hosey, Squid

Joanne It has been a long five years We Love You and Miss You April 12, 2010

Wolf, June J. Tom, Kids and Grandkids Sisters, Family and Friends

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Tienes, Gertrud E. (nee Gartmann), baptized into the hope of Christ's resurrection, on Saturday, April 11, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Daniel Tienes; our dearest mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, aunt , great-aunt, cousin, friend to many. Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, on Saturday, April 17 at 11 a.m. Interment at Resurrection Cemetery, Visitation Friday, 5-8 p.m.

Valley, Lawrence L. Jr. 80, passed March 29, 2015. Memorial service April 19 at 3pm at Pacific United Methodist Church, 1516 W. St. Louis St., Pacific, MO.

(nee Weiss) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Friday, April 10, 2015. Beloved wife of the late Simon Wolf; loving mother of Karen (John) Blase, Barbara (Joe) Gurney, Cheryl (Ron) Astroth, Linda (Tom) Bokel and Glenn (Rose) Wolf; our dear grandmother, great-grandmother, sister, sister-in-law, aunt, friend. Services: Visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, April 13, 9-11 a.m. then to St. Paul Catholic Church (Fenton) for 11:30 a.m. Mass. Interment Sunset Cemetery.

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444 800-286-9557

(2 ) Lots in Mount Lebanon Cemetery. Located in Garden of Peace, section K, Lot 1 3 6 A, S paces 1 & 2 . $ 3 5 0 0 for both. 417-934-6232 lve msg


weaTher

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

Best Time To Buy Is NOW!

Weather • LoW 50, HigH 73 > Winds ssE 5-15 mpH Storms possible later on Sunday Scattered storms will move across mainly central and western Missouri on Sunday. Some of these storms are expected to move into the St. Louis area Sunday night into Monday morning. Highs on Sunday will be in the lower 70s. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

52°

67°

72°

64°

Partly sunny

Partly cloudy Partly sunny

Few storms possible

4-DAY FORECAST

MONDAY

TUESDAY

58°/69°

47°/72°

AM storms possible

H

W

76 72 70 72 71 76 74 69 73 74 72 72 72

mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy

____________________________________________________________________

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

50 47 50 46 50 54 54 48 48 50 51 48 47

49°/71°

52°/72°

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy

Partly sunny

Shown are Sunday morning’s lows and Sunday afternoon’s highs.

SUNDAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

L

H

W

44 46 42 44 43 47 44 45 48 41 46 42

67 72 65 68 68 69 71 67 69 64 69 67

partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Chicago 42 / 65

Kirksville 48 / 69 Kansas City 54 /74

Springfield 46 / 69

St. Louis 50 / 73 Carbondale 46 / 72

Joplin

Poplar Bluff 49 / 73

54 / 76

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 71° 45° 65° 45° 93° 26° 84° 55°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.43” 4.30” 1.20” 10.25” 10.19”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, April 10th Tree - 68 (moderate), Mold - 10,236 (moderate) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 7 Month (Total) 50 Season 4421 Year Ago 4843

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 10.66 23 8.60 Jefferson City 21 11.38 Hermann 20 9.08 Washington 25 15.78 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 10.84 Louisiana 15 11.90 Dam 24 25 16.56 Dam 25 26 16.34 Grafton 18 15.73 M.Price, Pool 419 417.90 M.Price, Tail. 21 9.56 St Louis 30 14.38 Chester 27 20.35 Cape Girardeau 32 25.56

24-Hr Change

Flood Stage

Current Level

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 15.16 18 12.11 Peoria 14 10.51 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.45 Sullivan 16 16.31 Valley Park 24 19.70 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 8.43 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 40.85

- 0.19 + 0.10 - 1.24 - 1.51 - 1.18 - 0.03 - 0.27 + 0.17 - 0.52 - 0.88 - 0.90 - 0.96 - 0.85 + 3.19 + 3.08

0% Financing for 12 Months** Rebate Stimulus Package $2195.00 Rebates For You!

*On Select Models Only-Call for Details. **With Approved Credit $150 - $770

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $225

Laclede Gas Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

$2195.00

Potential Savings

BUY NOW - GOOD FOR YOU - GOOD FOR AMERICA! Offer expires 4/30/15

SUN & MOON

A/C PREVENTATIVE TUNE-UP Last Apr 11 Sunrise

New Apr 18

First Apr 25

6:31 AM Sunset

Full May 3 7:34 PM

Moonrise 1:26 AM Moonset 11:50 AM

Looking toward the center of the sky around 10 p.m. tonight you will see a group of stars that look like a backward question mark. This pattern is called the sickle and is the head of Leo the Lion.

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 1.80 + 0.41 + 0.21 - 0.63 + 1.96 + 2.37 + 1.08

Current Level

24-Hr Change

356.89 358.38 500.20 655.64 706.10 667.05 915.53 841.44 594.81 410.68 606.86 443.80

- 0.27 - 0.41 - 1.74 - 0.44 - 0.06 + 0.04 - 0.20 0.00 + 0.27 - 0.03 + 0.06 + 0.11

+ 1.84

Maps and weather data provided by:

SPRING IS HERE!

MAKE SURE YOUR SYSTEM IS Offer Expires 4/30/15 WORKING PROPERLY!

75

$

per Unit

Reg. $105

Total Comfort Heating & Cooling • 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 Valid only with coupon. Not valid with any other offers or on prior purchase. Residential Units Only.

EMERGENCY SERVICE Mention this ad and receive $30 Off of your repair.

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

We Service All Brands

7 DAYS A WEEK, 8AM-9PM NO OVERTIME CHARGES!

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

Must purchase a complete* Amana System 14-Seer A/C or better, and a 95% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace

Total Comfort Heating & Cooling • 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:35 p.m.) Low (5:55 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1930) Record Low (1960) High Last Year Low Last Year

• Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $260*)

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Owners: The Donahue & Ross Families Residential & Commercial

314-991-COOL(2665) 636-923-COOL(2665) 618-248-6400 www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 92° Winter Haven, Florida

Download the FREE Post-Dispatch Baseball app for your Android,™ iPhone® or iPad.®

Low: 11° Jeffrey City, Wyoming

Rain

60s

40s

50s

40s

60s

40s

70s

40s 50s

50s

T-storms

60s 60s

60s

50s

60s

70s

Snow

60s 80s

70s

70s 70s 80s

Alaska Low: -7°

Wintry Mix

80s

80s

ONLY BASEBALL ALL THE TIME

Jet Stream

Hawaii High: 85°

A frontal boundary will trigger scattered showers and thunderstorms across parts of the Gulf Coast and Texas. Another frontal system will bring wet weather to the northern Rockies and Pacific Northwest. Dry conditions are forecast throughout the Midwest, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, Ohio Valley, and Tennessee Valley as a ridge of high pressure will be in control. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 45 Albuquerque 44 Anchorage 30 Atlanta 54 Atlantic City 47 Baltimore 48 Billings 42 Biloxi, Ms. 69 Birmingham 51 Bismarck 36 Boise 45 Boston 46 Buffalo 36 Burlington, Vt. 44 Charleston, S.C. 65 Charleston, W.V. 46 Charlotte 54 Cheyenne 33 Chicago 37 Cincinnati 38 Cleveland 37 Colorado Spgs. 37 Concord, N.H. 39 Dallas 55 Daytona Beach 68 Denver 38 Des Moines 39 70 Destin, Fl. 38 Detroit 57 El Paso 42 Evansville 25 Fairbanks 34 Fargo 26 Flagstaff 70 Fort Myers 42 Great Falls 31 Green Bay 45 Hartford 70 Honolulu 64 Houston 38 Indianapolis 58 Jackson, Ms. 34 Juneau 78 Key West 57 Las Vegas 48 Little Rock 56 Los Angeles 43 Louisville

54 76 43 75 62 63 70 77 75 73 60 56 46 52 76 64 75 69 60 61 52 70 52 74 86 72 68 77 57 84 65 35 72 63 88 58 59 57 84 78 61 78 42 85 81 74 73 66

W

Tomorrow L H W

windy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny windy thunderstorms sunny sunny cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain and snow windy partly cloudy thunderstorms windy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny sunny

33 46 29 55 39 39 39 69 55 43 34 40 33 35 55 39 49 35 42 40 38 43 34 63 67 42 52 68 36 54 45 25 52 29 69 32 42 35 70 67 41 59 34 78 59 55 57 45

65 73 40 75 60 66 55 76 78 59 56 62 58 62 76 74 71 61 65 69 64 71 62 78 82 68 68 78 64 68 73 38 64 65 88 49 64 66 84 78 66 78 41 85 84 77 76 77

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny windy thunderstorms mostly cloudy windy sunny sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms windy windy sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms showers partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

City

Today L H

61 Macon 73 McAllen, Tx. 49 Memphis 74 Miami 36 Milwaukee 35 Minneapolis Missoula, Mt. 37 64 Mobile Montgomery 61 46 Nashville New Orleans 70 New York City 47 Norfolk, Va. 56 Oklahoma City 49 Omaha 40 Orlando 69 Palm Springs 58 Philadelphia 46 Phoenix 61 Pittsburgh 39 Portland, Me. 37 Portland, Or. 45 Providence 46 Raleigh 54 Rapid City 36 Reno 39 Richmond, Va. 56 Sacramento 44 St. Petersburg 73 Salt Lake City 44 San Antonio 64 San Diego 59 San Francisco 49 Santa Fe 33 Savannah 67 Seattle 43 51 Shreveport 35 Sioux Falls 38 Syracuse 69 Tallahassee 72 Tampa 53 Tucson 49 Tulsa 51 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 75 45 Wichita Wilmington, De. 45 61 Yuma

78 88 74 85 59 66 50 78 79 70 78 59 70 72 71 90 90 62 86 55 51 56 58 73 77 67 72 76 84 70 77 68 67 72 78 53 77 73 48 80 85 84 74 67 86 73 62 86

W

Tomorrow L H W

partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy showers partly cloudy windy mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy

56 74 54 73 43 49 29 64 58 46 69 42 45 59 54 67 59 39 64 36 35 41 38 44 42 41 40 47 73 40 68 59 51 37 58 40 60 51 33 66 72 57 57 43 73 56 40 62

78 89 79 85 61 67 45 78 79 80 79 67 64 78 69 87 93 65 85 66 59 60 65 71 57 72 71 78 84 59 80 70 68 71 78 55 75 72 63 81 86 74 78 69 85 77 64 87

mostly cloudy partly sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny sunny mostly cloudy cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny windy partly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny

Everything you need to keep you cheering for your favorite team.

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

W

Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

76 48 43 65 77 76 47 45 45 66 52 33 74 66 38 47

90 55 61 86 93 84 70 69 70 74 74 55 86 77 52 65

sunny showers mostly sunny sunny thunderstorms showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy showers

City

L

H

W

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

43 65 40 75 43 51 52 50 48 73 58 40 38 73 59 68

66 72 57 90 52 73 69 57 69 93 77 50 59 84 80 95

partly cloudy rain partly cloudy thunderstorms showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

the POST-DISPATCH BASEBALL app

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

42 48 41 61 49 73 52 43 37 59 60 48 36 41 44 38

55 72 68 86 70 83 88 70 60 72 65 57 50 52 69 68

cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy showers showers showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy partly cloudy

• • • • • • •

In-depth stories Photos Scoreboards Schedules Stats Rosters Standings

CH

DISPATCH N YOUR APP STORE!

Android is a Trademark of Google Inc.; iPhone and iPad Are registered trademarks of Apple Inc.


weaTher

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A23

Best Time To Buy Is NOW!

Weather • LoW 50, HigH 73 > Winds ssE 3-8 mpH Storms possible later today A few showers and thunderstorms are expected, mainly across parts of central and western Missouri today. These showers and storms will spread eastward into the St. Louis area tonight into early Monday morning. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

52°

67°

72°

65°

Partly sunny Mostly cloudy Partly sunny

Slight chance of storms

4-DAY FORECAST

MONDAY

H

75 75 73 72 73 75 76 70 73 73 74 74 72

W

mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

50 47 50 46 50 51 55 50 50 50 54 48 48

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

49°/70° 50°/69° 54°/72°

Few early AM Partly cloudy showers

Partly sunny

Few storms possible

Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

TUESDAY

59°/71°

L

H

W

42 45 44 42 41 46 43 44 49 41 45 39

69 73 66 70 71 68 72 69 69 65 71 69

mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy thunderstorms mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy

Chicago 44 / 66

Kirksville 50 / 70 Kansas City 55 / 76

Springfield 45 / 71

Carbondale 45 / 73

Joplin

Poplar Bluff 48 / 75

51 / 75

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

0.00” 4.30” 1.32” 10.25” 9.28”

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Friday, April 10th Tree - 68 (moderate), Mold - 10,236 (moderate) HEATING DEGREE DAYS Yesterday 9 Month (Total) 59 Season 4430 Year Ago 4844

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 10.66 23 7.82 Jefferson City 21 9.67 Hermann 20 7.82 Washington 25 14.77 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 10.90 Louisiana 15 11.89 Dam 24 25 16.77 Dam 25 26 16.39 Grafton 18 15.83 M.Price, Pool 419 418.80 M.Price, Tail. 21 8.64 St Louis 30 12.37 Chester 27 18.44 Cape Girardeau 32 25.65

24-Hr Change

Current Level

Flood Stage

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 15.28 18 12.72 Peoria 14 10.63 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.10 Sullivan 16 10.17 Valley Park 24 16.76 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 5.43 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 40.85

0.00 - 0.78 - 1.71 - 1.26 - 1.01 + 0.06 - 0.01 + 0.21 + 0.05 + 0.10 + 0.90 - 0.92 - 2.01 - 1.91 + 0.09

Rebate Stimulus Package $2195.00 Rebates For You!

*On Select Models Only-Call for Details. **With Approved Credit $150 - $770

Ameren Rebate

$150 - $225

Laclede Gas Rebate

$400 - $1200

Total Comfort Rebate

$2195.00

Potential Savings

BUY NOW - GOOD FOR YOU - GOOD FOR AMERICA! Offer expires 4/30/15

SUN & MOON

A/C PREVENTATIVE TUNE-UP New Apr 18 Sunrise

First Apr 25

Full May 3

6:30 AM Sunset

Last May 11 7:35 PM

Moonrise 2:15 AM Moonset 12:52 PM

The space shuttle was first launched on this date in 1981. Space Shuttle Columbia carried astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen for a two day and six hour flight.

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

+ 0.12 + 0.61 + 0.12 - 0.35 - 6.14 - 2.94 - 3.00

Current Level

24-Hr Change

356.93 359.37 498.71 655.65 706.09 667.11 915.47 841.41 595.23 410.76 606.72 444.21

+ 0.04 + 0.99 - 1.49 + 0.01 - 0.01 + 0.06 - 0.06 - 0.03 + 0.42 + 0.08 - 0.14 + 0.41

- 1.22

Maps and weather data provided by:

SPRING IS HERE!

MAKE SURE YOUR SYSTEM IS Offer Expires 4/30/15 WORKING PROPERLY!

75

$

per Unit

Reg. $105

Total Comfort Heating & Cooling • 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665 Valid only with coupon. Not valid with any other offers or on prior purchase. Residential Units Only.

EMERGENCY SERVICE Mention this ad and receive $30 Off of your repair.

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

We Service All Brands

7 DAYS A WEEK, 8AM-9PM NO OVERTIME CHARGES!

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

0% Financing for 12 Months**

Total Comfort Heating & Cooling • 314-991-2665 • 636-923-2665

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

68° 43° 66° 46° 90° 24° 74° 54°

Must purchase a complete* Amana System 14-Seer A/C or better, and a 95% Gas Heater. *A/C and Furnace

St. Louis 50 / 73

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (2:39 p.m.) Low (6:02 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1930) Record Low (1973) High Last Year Low Last Year

• Best warranty over all other brands* • Best Quality installation • Best 10 year parts & labor warranty (value $700*) • Best 2 year maintenance agreement (value $260*)

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

Owners: The Donahue & Ross Families Residential & Commercial

314-991-COOL(2665) 636-923-COOL(2665) 618-248-6400 www.totalcomfort-hvac.com

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

National Extremes High: 93° Death Valley, California Low: 15° Mount Washington, New Hampshire

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S. 50s

Download the FREE Post-Dispatch Baseball app for your Android,™ iPhone® or iPad.®

Rain

40s

50s

50s 50s 60s

60s

T-storms

60s

60s

60s 70s

70s 70s

60s

Snow

70s

80s 60s

80s 70s

Wintry Mix

80s

ONLY BASEBALL ALL THE TIME

80s Alaska Low: 0°

Jet Stream

Hawaii High: 85°

Clusters of showers and thunderstorms are expected across portions of the upper Midwest, Missouri Valley, and south-central Plains in association with a frontal boundary. Parts of the Gulf Coast will also see scattered storms develop. Dry conditions are expected across the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic as a ridge of high pressure will be in control. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 31 Albuquerque 46 Anchorage 32 Atlanta 58 Atlantic City 34 Baltimore 38 Billings 39 Biloxi, Ms. 70 Birmingham 54 Bismarck 47 Boise 32 Boston 41 Buffalo 33 Burlington, Vt. 32 Charleston, S.C. 60 Charleston, W.V. 38 Charlotte 49 Cheyenne 37 Chicago 43 Cincinnati 40 Cleveland 36 Colorado Spgs. 42 Concord, N.H. 31 Dallas 63 Daytona Beach 67 Denver 42 Des Moines 53 68 Destin, Fl. 34 Detroit 57 El Paso 43 Evansville 26 Fairbanks 53 Fargo 28 Flagstaff 68 Fort Myers 34 Great Falls 41 Green Bay 34 Hartford 70 Honolulu 68 Houston 40 Indianapolis 56 Jackson, Ms. 34 Juneau 78 Key West 60 Las Vegas 53 Little Rock 56 Los Angeles 45 Louisville

64 73 44 74 65 68 52 76 75 62 55 65 61 62 75 75 72 61 65 70 66 70 66 76 83 69 70 77 63 66 74 40 65 66 89 46 67 69 84 75 69 78 39 84 86 77 73 77

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly cloudy rain and snow partly cloudy sunny sunny windy thunderstorms partly cloudy windy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy windy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms thunderstorms partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms windy partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy showers rain and snow partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy

39 51 30 61 38 44 33 72 63 33 37 49 47 40 62 51 54 30 51 57 50 42 35 65 70 37 45 68 49 51 58 24 39 30 70 32 49 41 72 68 55 65 31 77 62 63 56 58

71 66 40 71 67 70 71 77 73 64 75 65 70 71 76 77 72 64 64 70 71 61 71 76 82 69 66 76 70 67 71 40 62 68 88 66 62 68 84 79 69 77 47 85 88 73 72 74

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

partly cloudy windy partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms thunderstorms sunny sunny sunny showers sunny cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms showers partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy windy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy thunderstorms showers thunderstorms mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny thunderstorms partly cloudy showers

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PEOPLE Celebrity deaths inspire Tamblyn’s book of poetry Actress Amber Tamblyn writes about dead Hollywood actresses in her new book of poems. But “Dark Sparkler” is more than that. “The book is about the lives and deaths of celebrity women in a certain way, but it’s also about voyeurism, it’s also about projection, it’s also (about) ... what it’s like to be an object for a living,” Tamblyn, 31, said. Each poem is about a female celebrity who died before age 40, including Marilyn Monroe, Jayne

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Mansield and Rebecca Shaefer. Tamblyn said it began with a poem she wrote for Brittany Murphy, who died in 2009 from pneumonia, anemia and multiple drug intoxication. “Dark Sparkler” is the third book of poetry by Tamblyn, who starred in “The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants” ilms and in “House” and “Joan of Arcadia.”

“I was approached (for the role) because of Gina,” Moreno said. “She told me some wonderful things about how I inspired her, great stuf that made me feel very proud.” Moreno, 83, is one of the rare performers to win Oscar, Tony, Grammy and Emmy trophies. “I’m humbled by it and thrilled by it,” Moreno said.

‘Virgin’ actress stars alongside her inspiration • Rita Moreno’s gueststarring turn on “Jane the Virgin” represents a tribute from the comedy’s young star, Gina Rodriguez, to the trailblazer who helped pave her way.

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Sunday • 04.12.2015 • B

BEAUTIFY YOUR LIFE The 37th annual Art Fair at Queeny Park in west St. Louis County features more than 130 local and national juried artists. The fair runs from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. For more information, visit artfairatqueenypark.com. Photos by Cristina Fletes-boutte • cfletes-boutte@post-dispatch.com

Randal Spangler waits as customers look at his artwork on Friday during the 37th annual Art Fair at Queeny Park. Admission to the art fair, which continues Saturday and Sunday, is $5.

Jon Biscan of St. Louis puts price tags on his blown and sculpted glass items Friday before the start of the 37th annual Art Fair at Queeny Park. At the art fair, the public can see and purchase original works directly from the artists who create them.

Modest neighborhood seeks to stay diverse

TULIPS PAINT A COLORFUL PICTURE Last week's warm, wet weather brought out the bright colors of a tulip tree, or saucer magnolia, surrounded by tulips on the edge of Forest Park, at the corner of Lindell and West Pine boulevards.

Women's group works to keep Forest Park Southeast open to those of limited means By Margaret gillerMan St. Louis Post-Dispatch

St. lOuiS • Ernestine Isaiah was a young mother with a 6-month-old baby 43 years ago when she decided she wouldn’t let anyone stop her from moving into the mostly white neighborhood where she wanted to live. “I cashed in my savings bonds, and I bought a four-family flat,” said Isaiah. After raising a family with her husband and working 42 years as a nurse, Isaiah still lives in her same flat on Gibson Avenue in Forest Park Southeast, and she still has a strong sense of mission. She’s part of a group of lowincome, mainly African-Ameri-

can women who want to keep the part of the neighborhood that’s south of Manchester Avenue affordable for low-income families. They call their group Voices of Women, or VOW. Forest Park Southeast occupies a convenient spot about halfway between downtown and Clayton. It's at the southeast corner of Forest Park, south of the Washington University Medical School, Barnes-Jewish Hospital area and north of the Missouri Botanical Garden. VOW grew out of a social group called Midtown Mamas, which formed at the busy Midtown Catholic Community Center, across from St. Cronan’s See VOW • Pa9e B2

J.b. Forbes • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

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SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • B

HELPING HANDS

PHOTOS BY HUY MACH • hmach@post-dispatch.com

Kaylee Williams, 8, of Troy, Mo., provides some of the artwork Saturday on the walls of a vacant school in north St. Louis County that will be used for the JSO Summer Learning Enrichment Program. Hundreds of volunteers, organized by Project Greatness, helped beautify the building.

Volunteers ix up school near Ferguson as a summer haven BY ELISA CROUCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Lexi Williams

could have spent Saturday playing outside. Instead, Saturday found the 4-year-old and her little sister, Macie, in the lobby of a vacant school building, pressing their hands into trays of paint and decorating the walls with their colorful handprints. They were surrounded by a couple hundred volunteers who were laying mulch, painting and doing gutter work at an unused school that has big plans for the summer. In June, it will open its doors to more than 125 children who live in and around Ferguson. From this building, they will go on field trips, have cultural experiences, leadership training and entrepreneurship opportunities. And they will be able to eat breakfast and lunch — a crucial benefit to thousands of low-income families once the school year ends in north St. Louis County. “It’s amazing when a community comes together and does something, especially for children,” said Jenni Williams, of Troy, Mo., who supervised her young daughters as they made

ABOVE • Lillian Curlett, executive director of the Jamison Memorial Human Resource & Development Agency, prepares the old St. Sebastian Catholic School in north St. Louis County for a new program this summer. “We want it to be inspirational for the kids,” Curlett said. “We just want to give them a safe, fun, empowering summer.” LEFT • Amber Learned of Barnhart and her son, Eli, 4, help clean one of the 11 classrooms Saturday of the vacant school that will be used for the JSO Summer Learning Enrichment Program. In June, the building will open its doors to more than 125 children who live in and around Ferguson.

See SCHOOL • Page B5

ADD SOME COLOR AT THE ART FAIR Jon Biscan of St. Louis puts price tags on his blown and sculpted glass items Friday before the start of the 37th annual Art Fair at Queeny Park. At the art fair, the public can see and purchase original works directly from the artists who create them. The fair continues from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday.

Modest neighborhood seeks to stay diverse Women's group works to keep Forest Park Southeast open to those of limited means BY MARGARET GILLERMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CRISTINA FLETES-BOUTTE • cfletes-boutte@post-dispatch.com

ST. LOUIS • Ernestine Isaiah was a young mother with a 6-month-old baby 43 years ago when she decided she wouldn’t let anyone stop her from moving into the mostly white neighborhood where she wanted to live. “I cashed in my savings bonds, and I bought a four-family flat,” said Isaiah. After raising a family with her husband and working 42 years as a nurse, Isaiah still lives in her same flat on Gibson Avenue in Forest Park Southeast, and she still has a strong sense of mission. She’s part of a group of lowincome, mainly African-Ameri-

can women who want to keep the part of the neighborhood that’s south of Manchester Avenue affordable for low-income families. They call their group Voices of Women, or VOW. Forest Park Southeast occupies a convenient spot about halfway between downtown and Clayton. It's at the southeast corner of Forest Park, south of the Washington University Medical School, Barnes-Jewish Hospital area and north of the Missouri Botanical Garden. VOW grew out of a social group called Midtown Mamas, which formed at the busy Midtown Catholic Community Center, across from St. Cronan’s See VOW • Page B2

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CommunitY

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

he Grove has added a new vibe to area VOW • frOm B1

Catholic Church and near the center of the neighborhood. The women proudly wear their purple Midtown Mamas shirts. In December, VOW incorporated as a not-for-profit development corporation largely to deal with housing issues. In February, the Washington University Medical Center Redevelopment Corp. moved forward with its plans for more housing. It issued guidelines for developers interested in building on about 85 Forest Park Southeast properties. VOW says it wants to be part of the redevelopment project. “We want our voices heard,” says Bobbie Sykes, 63, who is VOW’s chair. Another member, Willa Mae Phillips, 79, bought a home on Oakland Avenue about 35 years ago “so our children would have a stable place to stay.” For many years, she said, “it was a very quiet settled neighborhood, and I could have my two big dogs sleeping on the porch. Then the drugs started coming, and I had dope dealers on each corner.” Now, she said, the neighborhood is “coming back.” She has been pleased to see it rebound and thrive but wants it to remain welcoming to people of limited income. “I’d like to see all the races entwined and living here together,” she said. A main reason for the rebirth is the Grove, a hip entertainment section within the neighborhood area along Manchester Avenue. It boasts a new Urban Chestnut Brewery, ethnic restaurants and venues for nightlife. A new hotel is going up and oice buildings are planned. An upscale apartment complex has opened on the northern border of the neighborhood along Chouteau Avenue. “It’s a hot spot,” said Brooks Goedeker, executive director of the Park Central Community Development Corp., which works with residents, businesses, potential businesses and the alderman, Joe Roddy. The neighborhood has drawn new residents and higher income housing into the mix, mostly north of Manchester. The properties in the new Washington University redevelopment area are south of Manchester and mainly west of Newstead Avenue. Some are vacant or boarded up. Executive director Brian Phillips said the Washington Univer-

VOW

The Voices of Women maintain City Green, a community garden at 1311 South Boyle Avenue maintained by volunteers. Last summer, produce from the garden fed more than 50 families and older residents.

sity redevelopment corporation is committed to the preservation of low-income housing. “Forest Park Southeast always will be a mixed-economy neighborhood that’s diverse and very vibrant,” he said. The redevelopment corporation, also known as Forest West Properties, is a partnership between the medical school and BJC. “We are asking respondents to abide by the standards set by the community, and we are asking them to have a plan for at least 20 percent of their units for lowand moderate-income families,” Phillips said. VOW plans to partner on a proposal with Urban Improve-

would design and build market rate homes and a lesser amount of low-rental apartments with Rise and low-income owner-occupied homes with VOW. “Our goal at UIC is to create a stable, integrated community with economic diversity,” Crittenden said. His team’s proposal will be one of several submitted. Goedeker, with Park Central,

ment Construction, an architectural firm focusing on urban environments and green design with offices along Tower Grove Avenue. Brent Crittenden, an architect and managing principal at UIC, said he plans to submit the joint proposal to Washington University with VOW and Rise, a nonprofit group focused on neighborhood revitalization. His firm

OPEN HOUSE

said, “Our goal is to fill every vacant property and we want to be up from 3,000 people to 5,000 by 2020. There’s plenty of room for everyone.” For those with limited incomes, Goedeker said, “We want good, managed afordable housing. We don’t want absentee landlords letting people live in deplorable conditions.” Forest Park Southeast and nearby neighborhoods — Botanical Heights, Shaw and Tifany — have had a decline in low-income residents and an increase in those with incomes over $100,000. That was a subject of a workshop on afordable housing organized by Christy Huck, executive director of the City Garden Montessori school that serves those neighborhoods. Joellen McDonald of Richmond Heights, a co-chair of VOW and one of several board members who live outside the neighborhood, worries that the new development in Forest Park Southeast could push out more residents who are the low end of the income scale. “VOW’s niche is to try to develop properties for the lowest incomes of the working poor,” said McDonald. VOW is interested in developing five or 10 properties. Jack Parres, a retired lawyer from south St. Louis County and a VOW board member, said: “This is an opportunity for some people in Forest Park Southeast to have a chance at something they never thought they’d have — home ownership.” In addition to housing, VOW also runs three other programs: • Women in Leadership, which trains women to become leaders in their communities. • Helping Hands, which offers banking and financial advice. • City Garden, a community garden for the neighborhood. VOW members also volunteer at City Greens grocery, a project of Midtown Catholic Community Center. Margaret Gillerman • 314-340-8126 mgillerman@post-dispatch.com

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CommunitY

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

Angry weather springs trouble Storms passing through the St. Louis area hursday night heavily damaged several buildings in Chesterield and looded roads in Madison County. Fireighters inspect damage to a business in the 700 block of Spirit of St. Louis Boulevard in Chesterield after an early evening storm on Thursday. about 15 buildings on and near the Spirit of St. Louis airport were damaged, but no one was hurt, according to Monarch Fire Marshal Roger n. Herin.

Cristina FLetes-BouttÉ • cfletes-boutte@post-dispatch.com

Two Canada geese swim in one of the athletic ields at the Afton Athletic ields in Afton last week, after heavy rain pushed the creek next to the ields out of its banks, causing heavy damage to the park.

J.b. FoRbes • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

RobeRt Cohen • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

This air conditioner unit was blown across four lanes and a grassy median of Spirit of St. Louis Boulevard, landing inside a parked Subaru in Chesterield on Friday.

DaviD CaRson • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Hail stones slightly smaller than a tennis ball fell in downtown Farmington on Wednesday. Numerous cars sustained broken windows from the hail.


04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

CommunitY

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

READ, RIGHT AND RUN Kids participate in the GO! St. Louis Read, Right and Run Marathon in Forest Park on Saturday. The program was launched in 2001 to develop reading-proicient, community-minded and physically it children in kindergarten through ifth grade by challenging them to read 26 books, “right” the community with 26 good deeds, and run 26.2 miles over a six-month period. The program culminated Saturday when the students ran their inal 1.2 miles in Forest Park.

Photo By Jon GitChoFF

Angry weather springs trouble Storms passing through the St. Louis area hursday night heavily damaged several buildings in Chesterield and looded roads in Madison County. Fireighters inspect damage to a business in the 700 block of Spirit of St. Louis Boulevard in Chesterield after an early evening storm on Thursday. about 15 buildings on and near the Spirit of St. Louis airport were damaged, but no one was hurt, according to Monarch Fire Marshal Roger n. Herin.

CriStina FleteS-BouttÉ • cfletes-boutte@post-dispatch.com

DaviD Carson • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Hail stones slightly smaller than a tennis ball fell in downtown Farmington on Wednesday. Numerous cars sustained broken windows from the hail.

Two Canada geese swim in one of the athletic ields at the Afton Athletic ields in Afton last week, after heavy rain pushed the creek next to the ields out of its banks, causing heavy damage to the park. J.B. ForBes • jforbes@post-dispatch.com


B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

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What treatments are used?

Neuropathy, Weakness, Pain, Tingling, Numbness, Low Back Pain, Neck Pain, Hip Pain, Failed Back-Surgery, Herniated, Bulging or “Slipped” Disc, Disc Degeneration and Spinal Stenosis

after 10 years of treating patients with neuropathy and pain, speciic combinations of treatments are found to be highly successful. these include lasers that stimulate healing at a deep level, decompression therapy to give more space for the nerves to low, and other instruments that stimulate and help support the relief process. Speciic procedures and recommendations can only be given after a proper evaluation by dr. Birkenmeier, but rest assured, all of the details are discussed.

Enhanced Relief of:

Cervical (Neck) Pain

Is the Treatment Successful? yes, treatment is successful for a large majority of people. Well over 87% of people who come in for treatment get signiicant relief from their ongoing neuropathy, numbness, tingling, and pain… even really bad cases.

How Long Will it Take to Feel Better?

Muscle Spasm

Lumbar (low back) and Scistic Pain

Wrist Pain

Many people report feeling better in the irst few weeks of treatment. cases are closely monitored by dr. Birkenmeier to make sure the person is responding to treatment.

How does someone know if the treatments are right for them?

Elbow and Joint Pain

Lower Extremity Pain

Knee and Joint Pain

a thorough evaluation to determine if the person has the problems that can be treated is the only way to know. Bottom line, if dr. Birkenmeier cannot help a person, he will refer them to the correct provider to get help. Foot and Ankle Pain

Is there a Guarantee? Is there 100% relief? unfortunately, in healthcare there are no guarantees. realistically, there are too many factors that go into a person’s health. the best thing to do is properly evaluate the person, treat them with time-tested, effective treatments for a period of time while closely monitoring the progress, then re-evaluate to see what their progress is. there are people who do experience 100% relief of their symptoms.

Where are you located? We are located at 11720 old Ballas road in creve coeur, Missouri 63141 …. near the olive and i-270 area.

Do you accept insurance? Does Insurance cover the treatments? yes, insurance is accepted. Most of the time there is insurance coverage for the treatments, including Medicare. as you know in today’s world of insurance, policies and coverage may vary, so we check into all of that in detail prior to getting treatment. the most important thing is determining what speciic treatments will provide the best results and that can only be determined by a proper evaluation.

Joint Pains, Whiplash Injury to the Neck, Headaches, Shoulder, Elbow, Hip and Knee Pain, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

BREAKING the standard care MOLD at the neuropathy and pain relief institute, we are using tools that break the mold in diagnostic care, with computerized X-ray analysis and high-tech treatment techniques. We have practiced new and natural methods for many years. our new treatments are based on engineering methods designed from doctors who are scientiically grounded and who have treated hundreds of patients, discovered secrets, treated the worst conditions and rescued patients from shear misery. these doctors use distinctly cutting-edge and uniquely-effective technologies and, profoundly altering the way, truth and light for chronic pain and neuropathy relief.

Special Introductory Offer for the First 20 Callers: Get Started With the Neuro-Laserplex Neuropathy and Pain Relief System for Just $37. Here’s what you’ll get…

Off medications and sleeping much better

1. Consultation with Dr. Birkenmeier 2. Neuropathy & Pain Examination 3. EMG to measure nerve and pain problems

Walking without pain

AND for a limited time...

“nerve damage, causing leg numbness. i had trouble sleeping, sitting in a chair for long periods of time and was on strong medication which had me constantly drowsy. after 17 treatments, i can say i improved about 70%, off medications, sleeping much better, and can sit without discomfort….look forward to a better lifestyle. i am happy with my improvement at this time. i just wish i had come to the institute much sooner.” al S., St. louis, age 68

“Severe pain in the left foot brought me to the neuropathy and pain relief institute. helped to stand and walk without pain. Sleep better.” – Wayne d., Wentzville, age 73

Playing tennis again

“his therapy has made walking easier. also starting to play tennis again. i can now walk very far without dificulty. Swelling is reduced. i would refer a friend to dr. Birkenmeier.” - ron d., pierron, age 63

No more tingling in my feet “he (dr. Birkenmeier) immediately started treatment on my feet and within 2 – 3 visits i was able to tell tremendous relief and feeling in my feet. i walk with more conidence and can get a good nights sleep without the tingling in my feet.” - Shirley d., Wentzville, age 69

Pain relief without shots

“pain in my lower back and not being able to stand for any length of time brought me to the neuropathy and pain relief institute. he (dr. Birkenmeier) has helped by the treatments he has given me and i didn’t have to have shots. i’m able to stand without bending over when i walk, i’m not in pain. his Staff is wonderful and the honesty and concerns of dr. Birkenmeier. i’m glad i found him in the newspaper that i kept for about a month.” - Vivian l., St. louis, age 68

4. Therapeutic Laser Treatment to Start the Relief Process (WHERE APPLICABLE)

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314-485-2790


CommunitY

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Disabled animals ind a loving home Illinois couple come to the rescue for creatures unable to fend for themselves BY Chris hottensen Southern Illinoisan

MAKANDA, Ill. • Disabled

animals are finding love, affection and a second chance at life on a one-acre animal sanctuary in Makanda. Beginning with a couple of Pomeranian dogs rescued from puppy mills, Dawn and Rhys Prince have taken in a crippled duck, a blind mini-horse and a hobbled sheep, along with an assortment of other animals including rabbits, chickens and a pig that was being starved. Growing up on Cedar Creek Road in Makanda with her parents, who took in injured birds and rabbits, Dawn, 51, has always loved animals and has practiced animal rescue for 30 years, working at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle in their veterinary department. She also worked with Jane Goodall at one time and wrote “Songs of the Gorilla Nation,” which chronicled how her experience working with gorillas helped her connect with animals and human beings alike. Five years ago, she used the book proceeds to buy the home and land on Old Route 51 in Southern Illinois, and returned to her roots to realize her life-long dream of operating an animal sanctuary. “I did a lot of traveling around the world and worked with apes all over the place and just thought I wanted to do something for the animals that aren’t as sexy — the opossums, the dogs and specifically the disabled ones that nobody wants,” Dawn said. Since then, her days have been anything but normal, and that’s just how she likes it. She doesn’t need an alarm to wake up. Her blind horse Whinny takes care of that, knocking with his hoof on the back door until she comes out to feed her. Feeding the animals is about a two-hour process that is repeated twice a day. After feeding the animals, she gives a bath

Byron Hetzler • The Southern Illinoisan

ABOVE • Rhys Prince carries June Bug, a duck sufering from porosis, to help the duck exercise its wings. LEFT • Shawn the sheep; Baby Bear, a Pomeranian; and Whinny, a blind miniature horse, stand in the pen behind the Princes house in Makanda. Shawn often acts as a guide for Whinny

to June Bug, a duck who sufers from porosis, which causes her legs and feet to curl up over her back. She isn’t able to fly or move on her own, but they support her, and she flaps her wings as she is

carried to the bathtub. “The first time I put her in the bathtub, it was amazing because she could take of — not real fast — but she could finally move where she wanted to go and she just swam around, ducked under

the water and flapped her wings. I had to dry the whole bathroom of,” Dawn said. June Bug can’t dry or preen herself, so once the bath is over she has to be dried with a towel and sometimes a hair dryer.

$

She has her own box on a chair in the living room, but she prefers to sit with Dawn and Rhys, sometimes pecking at their mouths to get them to sing to her. “She’s just amazing,” Dawn said. “I’ve never had a duck before, and she’s so affectionate. Her favorite thing is to get on the couch in the evening and hug me. She uses her head, cuddles up really tight and makes happy noises.” Sharing the house with June Bug are a free-ranging tortoise and five rescued Pomeranian dogs, including Baby Bear, who suffered brain damage possibly from being poisoned, and Peanut, who was thrown out of a moving vehicle. “He was left by the side of the road,” Dawn said. “Some of his face is gone. Somebody stopped. I think they saw him being thrown out of the car. They were going to pick him up and bury him, but he was still alive.” Caring for disabled animals can be an expensive proposition. One veterinary bill for one of their dogs totaled $4,000 last year. But Dawn and Rhys, who got married in Canada four years ago, would rather see their animals eat than having something special like pizza themselves. “We just go without,” Dawn said. “The animals come first. We need a car. There are lots of things we need, but the animals come first. It’s just the right thing to do. They’re like family.” It isn’t all about sacrifice, though. Rhys, who used to work in debt management, said the animals give her a sense of fulfillment she didn’t find in the corporate world. “They get me out of bed every morning,” Rhys said. “It gives me a purpose. I really believe in what I’m doing, which is really diferent than how I felt in the past.” Dawn and Rhys, who will soon be getting another blind horse, hope to get their wildlife rehabilitation permit so they can also rescue opossums. “I have a fondness for them because they get such a bad rap,” Rhys said. “They’re the only marsupial in the North America area. I feel like they need an advocate.”

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CommunitY

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5

Meals will help ill gap once school year ends School • from B1

artwork in the lobby from their handprints. Outside, her oldest daughter, Kaylee, 8, was doing yardwork. Her husband was laying mulch. A group called Project Greatness brought the volunteers together in one of several projects it plans to undertake in the St. Louis area. Volunteers filled every classroom. Some provided supplies. They repaired floors, painted empowering messages on walls, painted the gym and the hallways too. Others constructed raised beds for vegetable gardens in an outdoor enclosed area behind the school. “It’s perfect,” said Kim Biedscheid, project director for JSO Summer Learning Enrichment Program, as she surveyed the outdoor space. The school, 1826 Chambers Road, has changed hands multiple times over the years. It began as St. Sebastian Catholic School. The Riverview Gardens School District bought the building in 2005 and used it as an alternative school. It is now owned by Greater St. Mark Family Church. The church is allowing Jamison Memorial Human Resource & Development Agency to use the building for its summer program for children in kindergarten through ninth grade. Most will come from Ferguson, Florissant, Jennings and Moline Acres. “We want it to be inspirational for the kids,” said Lillian Curlett, executive director of Jamison. “We just want to give them a safe, fun, empowering summer. It needs to contrast with what happened last summer.” But, “We need everything under the sun to make this happen,” she said. The building, “It needs a face-lift.” So a group of eight St. Louisans stepped in. They recently attended a leadership course in California and formed an efort called Project Greatness. They went online to recruit volunteers and solicited donations needed to fix up the building. “We wanted to collaborate with community leaders and ed-

Photos by huy Mach • hmach@post-dispatch.com

Matthew Spoon of St. Louis and Tracy Gerrara of St. Charles clean up the gym Saturday in the vacant school on Chambers Road in north St. Louis County that will be used for the JSO Summer Learning Enrichment Program. The program will serve children in kindergarten through ninth grade.

ucators to create spaces for kids and help them feel affirmed,” said Kathie Thomas, the group’s project leader. The group is just getting started. “We want to in the next 10 years reach 1 million kids and support them in their greatness.” Fixing up the school was an effort that Renea Williams, 29, of St. Louis, felt strongly about being part of. Sure, she could have spent Saturday at the park, she said. But she saw preparing a school to help children this summer as a way to the region’s future. “Anything we can do to unify the city by coming together only makes St. Louis stronger,” she said, standing on ladder painting a classroom wall. “It takes projects like this to send a message that we’re all in this together.” Elisa Crouch • 314-340-8119 @elisacrouch on Twitter ecrouch@post-dispatch.com

John Hart (front) of St. Charles and Dave Henry of Florissant help paint Saturday, in an efort organized by Project Greatness. The group went online to solicit donations and volunteers for the project.

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B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Duchesne High School

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All proceeds benefit Duchesne High School students!

20 chances to win! only 3,500 tickets will be sold! In the past 19 years, we have awarded all prizes, given away a total of $2,872,300 and had 562 winners!

Purchase your $100 ticket by phone: (636) 946-2603 | OR | duchesne-hs.org/dreamhome Void where prohibited by law. Need not be present to win. Receipts will be mailed. All prizes are subject to federal and state income taxes. House winner assumes closing costs, if any. If a minimum of 2,750 tickets are not sold, Duchesne High School may award 20 pro-rated cash prizes. *GROUP ENTRIES: Participants in a group entry must identify a single person as the prize recipient and that individual’s name and address must be listed as purchaser on the ticket. Group participants must be listed on a separate sheet (name, address and phone number for each) and attached to the ticket. It is the responsibility of the group’s participants to allocate the prize.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • C

INJURED BLUES RETURNING Rally to win Central Division says a lot for team’s resilience BERNIE MIKLASZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY BERNIE MIKLASZ St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Stanley Cup playoffs begin next week, and it will be an exciting but nervous time for Blues fans. Let’s just say that overconfidence won’t be an issue here, not with the Blues’ postseason history.

But while three will be back, Hitchcock will hold others out

But for now, let’s focus on the moment. And the Blues’ surge to clinch first place in the Central Division is admirable. It’s a praiseworthy achievement for multiple reasons: • The Central is the toughest division in the circuit, with four 100-point teams in St. Louis, Nashville, Chicago and Minnesota. That hasn’t happened in the Central since the 2011-2012 season (STL, Nashville, Detroit, Chicago). • The Blues demonstrated

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHRIS LEE • Post-Dispatch

Blues winger Vladimir Tarasenko has missed five games since being injured March 30.

> 2 p.m. Saturday vs. Minnesota, KSDK (Channel 5)

See MIKLASZ • Page C15

The uncertainty of when Alexander Steen, Vladimir Tarasenko and Robert Bortuzzo will return to the Blues’ lineup is over. The three players, who have been recovering from various injuries, will suit up Saturday when the club hosts Minnesota at 2 p.m. at Scottrade Center in the final game of the regular season. For the recently crowned Central Division champions,

Speed burns Cards

being at full force comes just in the nick of time as the Blues still have a chance to claim the No. 1 seed in the Western Conference playoffs, which would give them home-ice advantage in the first three rounds of the postseason. The club is knotted with Anaheim atop the conference with 107 points, and if the Blues earned one more point Saturday than the Ducks, who will visit Arizona at 8 p.m. (St. Louis time), then they would receive See BLUES • Page C15

Gaul set for home opener St. Louis FC features former MLS champ BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cincinnati’s Joey Votto is congratulated by Devin Mesoraco after Votto hit a two-run home run of John Lackey in the first inning.

Untimely walk Hamilton scores after free pass Reds muscle up Votto hits a pair of two-run homers

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CINCINNATI • Before Billy Hamilton could run, he had to walk. The Cardinals gave him that head start. The Reds’ flash turned a one-out walk in the eighth inning into havoc on the bases and a sacrifice fly that

sent Cincinnati speeding off with a 5-4 victory against the Cardinals on Friday night at Great American Ball Park. Hamilton received a four-pitch walk from setup man Jordan Walden and he was off. He stole second. He took third on a wild pitch that catcher Yadier Molina See CARDINALS • Page C5

REDS 5 CARDINALS 4 > 12:10 p.m. Saturday at Cincinnati, FSM > Grichuk shows good eye with first home run. C5

SPIETH IS IN CONTROL AT MASTERS BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AUGUSTA, GA. • As you prob-

He shoots 66 on Friday to reach 14 under for best 36-hole total and a ive-shot lead

ably know, the Masters Tournament is underway this week and a new ideology is circling the aristocratic grounds of Augusta National: Spieth softly and carry a big lead. Soft-spoken Jordan Spieth, a 21-year-old Dallas native playing in only his second Masters,

followed a sensational 64 on Thursday with a seamless 66 on Friday to post the best 36 holes in the 82-year history of this revered contest. “It’s cool,” Spieth said. “Any time you can set a record here is pretty awesome. I’m very excited about today and the way

I struck the ball. I struck it, I thought, better than yesterday. Didn’t rely on the breaks as much.” Spieth’s 6-under walk included six birdies and no bogeys while surpassing the 36hole low of 131 shot by Raymond Floyd in the 1976 Mas-

Bryan Gaul of St. Louis FC made his professional soccer debut with Los Angeles in May 2012. A few months later, he was part of a star-studded Galaxy squad that defeated the Houston Dynamo 3-1 for the 2012 MLS Cup. “I kidded my parents that I might as well retire and go out as a champion,’’ said Gaul, who will play a key role for St. Louis FC (11) as it opens its home schedule Saturday against the Pittsburgh Riverhounds (1-1) in a 7:30 p.m. start at St. Louis Soccer Park in Fenton. “It was fantastic. Playing with guys you dream about playing with, guys like David Beckham, Landon Donovan, Robbie Keane, Omar Gonzalez, I learned a lot that first year and ended up with a championship as well. It was just an incredible experience.’’ Gaul, 25, played in 14 games and made seven starts with the Galaxy that season. In 2013, he played on loan with both the Fort Lauderdale Strikers and Carolina RailHawks of the North American Soccer League. “It’s tough to make it in MLS and it’s even tougher to stay there, especially in LA because they’re constantly bringing in top players from all over the world,’’ he said. “I left LA and went to Toronto and the first day I was there, I tore my MCL and meniscus, which put me out for 5½, 6 See SOCCER • Page C2

> 7:30 p.m. Saturday vs. Pittsburgh

Jordan Spieth

ters. Floyd won that championship, becoming the fourth to go wall to wall. Craig Woods (1941), Arnold Palmer (1960) and Jack Nicklaus (1975) also won by leading every round. In ’76, Floyd had a fiveshot lead on Nicklaus after See MASTERS • Page C7

> Leaders: Jordan Spieth 64-66 (-14), Charley Hofman 67-68 (-9). Notables: P. Mickelson 70-68 (-6), T. Woods 73-69 (-2), TV: 2 p.m., KMOV (4)

SPORTS

DC en Chiacyks... S

"Gear Up for the Home Opener ... Open up a Cold One on the CHEAP!" Check out our weekly specials inside!

1 M


CHECK OUT OUR ANNUAL GOLF GUIDE • INSIDE THIS EDITION J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • C

CARDS’ WIN IS A RELIEF

SHINING SEND-OFF

Five relievers combine to preserve victory for Wacha

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Michael Wacha throws against the Reds in the first inning Saturday in Cincinnati.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Jori Lehtera (left), who had just scored in the third period, is congratulated by teammate Vladimir Tarasenko.

Blues go to playofs on high note

Club will open against Minnesota or Winnipeg BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The Blues wrapped up the regular season with a 4-2 victory over Minnesota Saturday afternoon at Scottrade Center. Jori Lehtera scored twice and BLUES 4 Brian Elliott made 23 saves, as the Blues ended with a record WILD 2 of 51-24-7 for 109 points, tying for the third-most in franchise history in an 82-game season. “We had a bad first period today and then we played good hockey,” Lehtera said. “I think it’s good to end the game like this. We’re ready for playofs.” The Blues know they’ll be at home when their first-round series in the NHL postseason begins Wednesday or Thursday — probably Thursday — but the club didn’t immediately know its opponent. The Blues’ win Saturday ended the possibility

A look at Michael Wacha’s season debut: > It was his longest outing since May 26. > Fewest number of pitches thrown per batter faced in his career (3.04 pitches per batter faced).

the various ways to shepherd the one-run lead Michael Wacha’s assertive regular-season debut provided, CARDINALS 4 C a r d i n a l s REDS 1 manager M i ke M a > 12:10 p.m. Sunday at theny had a Cincinnati, FSM fully stocked > Martinez (2-4, 4.03 b u l l p e n in 2014) vs. Iglesias brimming (rookie, no stats) with springtime fresh arms. They were ready for use. He had to provide the reasons. Matheny deployed five relievers to get the final eight outs of the Cardinals’ 4-1 victory Saturday against Cincinnati at Great American Ball Park. The bullpen See CARDINALS • Page C5

INSIDE > Notebook: Pitchers boosting pace to slow running game. C5 > MLB Insider: Braves, Reds, Rockies defying critics. C6

Spieth continues his record-breaking run His third-round total at Masters sets lowest score for 54 holes BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AUGUSTA, GA. • Another day,

See STRAUSS • Page C8

See MASTERS • Page C7

It’s a new vibe for Blues entering postseason

Toting tangible evidence momentum, depth and a Central Division title, the Blues entered the same room following Saturday’s afternoon’s

CINCINNATI • As he considered

ing the Central title and any sense of momentum while dooming them to a first-round playoff series against the defending Stanley Cup champion Chicago Blackhawks. We all know how that one turned out. To watch the 4-2 victory over Minnesota on Saturday at Scottrade Center, one came away impressed

See BLUES • Page C8

JOE STRAUSS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROUNDING BACK INTO FORM?

another record for Jordan Spieth at the Masters. His 2-under-par 70 on Saturday established a new standard for the lowest 54-hole score. The sporting world is fresh out of superlatives at this point, so the performance will speak for itself. But in the end, what Spieth did to protect his score might be more important than what he did to shoot it. If the young Jedi is to do what he’s promised to do — grab the Masters by the jugular and never let go — he will have to get through a tense Sunday. There will be incidents and accidents, moments where things might get away from him, moments like he had late Saturday.

ELLIOTT SHOWS HE’S STILL AN OPTION • C9

regular-season finale with everything except the paint on the walls diferent from last April 13. The Blues faked it when they mouthed encouraging words to their fans after winning 50 games last season. They were pulling a Milli Vanilli, moving their mouths to words belonging to some other team. The locals concluded last season with six consecutive losses, cost-

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LEADERS Spieth Rose Mickelson Hofman Notables Woods McIlroy D. Johnson Haas Els B. Watson

"Gear Up for the Home Opener ... Open up a Cold One on the CHEAP!" Check out our weekly specials inside!

-6 -6 -6 -4 -2 -1

Notebook • Woods, McIlroy stall after hot starts in third round. C7 Sunday’s TV • 1 p.m., KMOV (4)

SPORTS

DC en Chiacyks... S

-16 -12 -11 -10

2 M


CHECK OUT OUR ANNUAL GOLF GUIDE • INSIDE THIS EDITION J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 04.12.2015 • C

CARDS’ WIN IS A RELIEF

A SHINING SEND-OFF

Five relievers combine to preserve victory for Wacha

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Cardinals starter Michael Wacha throws against the Reds in the first inning Saturday in Cincinnati.

CHRIS LEE • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Jori Lehtera (left), who had just scored in the third period, is congratulated by teammate Vladimir Tarasenko.

Blues go to playofs on high note

Club to face Minnesota, which it beat Saturday BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

When the Blues open the first round of the NHL playofs this week, their opponent will be the same team that was at Scottrade Center on Saturday afternoon. BLUES 4 The Blues wrapped up their regular season with a 4-2 vicWILD 2 tory then over Minnesota, which will return to St. Louis for an opening-round Western Conference matchup in a series that is expected to start Thursday. Anaheim’s 2-1 win over Arizona in a game that ended late Saturday clinched the No. 1 seed in the West for the Ducks. The Blues and Ducks finished with 109 points and Anaheim got the better seeding because it owned the tie-breaker, closing with 43 regulation or overtime victories to the Blues’ 42. Thus, the Blues will face the best wild card team in the West, the Wild. The Ducks will face the worst, Winnipeg.

A look at Michael Wacha’s season debut: > It was his longest outing since May 26. > Fewest number of pitches thrown per batter faced in his career (3.04 pitches per batter faced).

the various ways to shepherd the one-run lead Michael Wacha’s assertive regular-season debut provided, CARDINALS 4 C a r d i n a l s REDS 1 manager M i ke M a > 12:10 p.m. Sunday at theny had a Cincinnati, FSM fully stocked > Martinez (2-4, 4.03 b u l l p e n in 2014) vs. Iglesias brimming (rookie, no stats) with springtime fresh arms. They were ready for use. He had to provide the reasons. Matheny deployed five relievers to get the final eight outs of the Cardinals’ 4-1 victory Saturday against Cincinnati at Great American Ball Park. The bullpen See CARDINALS • Page C5

INSIDE > Notebook: Pitchers boosting pace to slow running game. C5 > MLB Insider: Braves, Reds, Rockies defying critics. C6

Spieth continues his record-breaking run His third-round total at Masters sets lowest score for 54 holes BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AUGUSTA, GA. • Another day,

See STRAUSS • Page C8

See MASTERS • Page C7

It’s a new vibe for Blues entering postseason

Toting tangible evidence momentum, depth and a Central Division title, the Blues entered the same room following Saturday’s afternoon’s

CINCINNATI • As he considered

ing the Central title and any sense of momentum while dooming them to a first-round playoff series against the defending Stanley Cup champion Chicago Blackhawks. We all know how that one turned out. To watch the 4-2 victory over Minnesota on Saturday at Scottrade Center, one came away impressed

See BLUES • Page C8

JOE STRAUSS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ROUNDING BACK INTO FORM?

another record for Jordan Spieth at the Masters. His 2-under-par 70 on Saturday established a new standard for the lowest 54-hole score. The sporting world is fresh out of superlatives at this point, so the performance will speak for itself. But in the end, what Spieth did to protect his score might be more important than what he did to shoot it. If the young Jedi is to do what he’s promised to do — grab the Masters by the jugular and never let go — he will have to get through a tense Sunday. There will be incidents and accidents, moments where things might get away from him, moments like he had late Saturday.

ELLIOTT SHOWS HE’S STILL AN OPTION • C9

regular-season finale with everything except the paint on the walls diferent from last April 13. The Blues faked it when they mouthed encouraging words to their fans after winning 50 games last season. They were pulling a Milli Vanilli, moving their mouths to words belonging to some other team. The locals concluded last season with six consecutive losses, cost-

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

LEADERS Spieth Rose Mickelson Hofman Notables Woods McIlroy D. Johnson Haas Els B. Watson

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Playofs TBA NHL playofs begin Wednesday 4/15

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

St. Louis is bidding to host Olympic swim trials in 2020

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 4/11 at Cincinnati 12:10 p.m. FSM

Sunday 4/12 at Cincinnati 12:10 p.m. FSM

Monday 4/13 vs. Milwaukee 3:15 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 4/15 vs. Milwaukee 7:15 p.m. FSM

Sports commission wants to bring event to Edward Jones Dome By STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

OTHER EVENTS FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily. UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS FC Sat. 4/11: vs. Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Sat. 4/18: vs. Rochester, 7:30 p.m.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 Mizzou 800-228-7297 Ambush 636-477-6363 Fairmount 314-436-1516

Rascals 636-240-2287 Rams 314-425-8830 SLU 314-977-4758 Attack 636-477-6363 • 618-345-4300

Grizzlies Illinois SIUE STL FC

618-337-3000 217-333-3470 855-748-3849 636-680-0997

ON THE AIR SATURDAY BASEBALL 11 a.m. College: Missouri at Tennessee, SEC Network Noon American League: Boston at New York, Fox Sports 1 12:10 p.m. National League: Cardinals at Cincinnati, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 2 p.m. College: Baylor at Texas Tech, FSM Plus 3:05 p.m. American League: Seattle at Oakland, MLB Network 6:10 p.m. National League: New York at Atlanta, MLB Network 8 p.m. American League: Kansas City at Los Angeles, Fox Sports 1 9:30 p.m. College: Arizona at Arizona State, ESPNU HOCKEY 2 p.m. NHL: Minnesota at St. Louis, KSDK (5), KMOX (1120 AM) 6:30 p.m. NHL: Boston at Tampa Bay, NBCSN 6:30 p.m. NCAA Championship: Providence vs. Boston University in Boston, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. NBA: Toronto at Miami, NBA TV 9 p.m. NBA: Memphis at Los Angeles Lakers, FSM, NBA TV BOWLING 7 p.m. College: NCAA women’s championship, ESPNU HORSE RACING 3:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Jenny Wiley Stakes and Lexington Stakes, Fox Sports 1 GOLF 11 a.m. The Masters, WXOS (101.1 FM) 2 p.m. The Masters, KMOV (4) LACROSSE 3 p.m. College men: Syracuse at North Carolina, ESPNU 5 p.m. College men: Penn State at Johns Hopkins, ESPNU MOTOR SPORTS 4 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Louisiana (qualifying), NBCSN 5 p.m. NHRA: SummitRacing.com Nationals (qualifying, taped), ESPN2 6:30 p.m. Sprint Cup: Duck Commander 500, KTVI (2) 12:30 a.m. (Sun.) Formula One: Chinese Grand Prix, NBCSN SOCCER 6:40 a.m. Premier League: Everton at Swansea, NBCSN 8:55 a.m. Premier League: Aston Villa at Tottenham, NBCSN 11:30 a.m. Premier League: Arsenal at Burnley, KSDK (5) SOFTBALL 1 p.m. College: Auburn at Texas A&M, ESPNU 4 p.m. College: Louisiana State at Tennessee, ESPN TENNIS Noon WTA: Family Circle Cup (semiinal), ESPN2 1 p.m. ATP: U.S. Men’s Clay Court (semiinal), Tennis Channel 5:30 p.m. ATP: U.S Men’s Clay Court (doubles inal), Tennis Channel BOXING 7:30 p.m. Middleweights: Andy Lee vs. Peter Quillin, KSDK (5)

SUNDAY BASEBALL Noon College: Purdue at Illinois, BTN 12:10 p.m. National League: Cardinals at Cincinnati, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 12:10 p.m. American League: Detroit at Cleveland, MLB Network 3 p.m. College: Campbell at Liberty, ESPNU 7 p.m. American League: Boston at New York, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 5 p.m. NBA: Oklahoma City at Indiana, FSM 5 p.m. NBA: Atlanta at Washington, NBA TV 8:30 p.m. NBA: Dallas at Los Angeles Lakers, NBA TV BOWLING 1 p.m. PBA: Elias Cup semiinal matches, ESPN GOLF 11 a.m. The Masters, WXOS (101.1 FM) 1 p.m. The Masters, KMOV (4) FIGURE SKATING 2 p.m. ISU: World Championship, KSDK (5) LACROSSE 11 a.m. College men: Virginia at Duke, ESPNU 1 p.m. College men: Ohio State at Michigan, ESPNU 4 p.m. MLL: Denver at Boston, FSM Plus MOTOR SPORTS 6 a.m. FIA: 6 Hours of Silverstone, Fox Sports 1 Noon MotoGP Moto 3: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1 p.m. MotoGP Moto 2: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Louisiana, NBCSN 2 p.m. MotoGP World Championship: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 7 p.m. NHRA: SummitRacing.com Nationals (taped), ESPN2 SOCCER 7:25 a.m. Premier League: Chelsea at Queens Park, NBCSN 9:55 a.m. Premier League: Manchester City at Manchester United, NBCSN 4 p.m. MLS: Orlando at Portland, ESPN2 6 p.m. MLS: Seattle at Los Angeles, Fox Sports 1 SOFTBALL 2:30 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Missouri, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Florida State at Louisville, ESPNU TENNIS 9:30 a.m. WTA: Katowice Open (doubles inal), Tennis Channel Noon WTA: Family Circle Cup (inals), ESPN2 2 p.m. ATP: U.S. Men’s Clay Court (singles inal), Tennis Channel 4 p.m. WTA: Katowice Open (singles inal), Tennis Channel WRESTLING 8 p.m. Freestyle: World Cup, NBCSN

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St. Louis is taking another shot at bringing the Olympic swimming trials, including 1.3 million gallons — more than 10 million pounds of water — to the Edward Jones Dome with a bid already completed for the 2020 event. The St. Louis Sports Commission was one of three finalists for the 2016 trials, which ended up going to Omaha, Neb., for the third consecutive cycle, and president Frank Viverito wants to make another run at putting the eightday competition in a dome. “It’s on such a grand scale and gets so much national attention,” Viverito said. “It hits all the targets. It’s men’s and women’s competition. It’s a dream event for us. It’s the biggest Olympic event we could produce.” The bid will ofer various seating capacities, and Viverito said as many as 200,000 fans could witness the trials in St. Louis. Hosting the event would require installing two Olympic pools, one in the dome and one possibly in the convention space that is accessible from the dome. Omaha has a similar setup, but

with a standard arena and convention center that are connected. The CenturyLink Center holds 18,975, and Viverito said the dome could be configured for a comparable capacity or something larger than 20,000. “From what I understand we finished second to Omaha in the last bid process,” he said. “The setup in Omaha mirrors what we have. The only difference is an arena opposed to a dome. If they’re looking for the same setup in a more spacious, versatile venue, then St. Louis would be perfect.” Viverito said the St. Louis Fire Department and engineering experts have conducted tests that have determined the floor of the facility can hold the weight of the pools, about 660,000 gallons of water each. That’s more than five million pounds of water per pool. The bid is due this spring, and Viverito hopes a decision is announced before the 2016 trials. The latest attempt is an expansion of the commission’s continuing effort to bring Olympics-related events to St. Louis. After failing to land the swim trials for 2016, the group bid on and was awarded the men’s gymnastics trials for

DIGEST Lauren Hill dies after inspirational battle Lauren Hill’s teammates and coaches are remembering the 19-year-old college basketball player with her own inspiring words: “Never give up.” An example she lived by as she fought a brain tumor and rallied those around her to help her achieve her dream of playing in a game. Several hundred students gathered on the grassy quad at Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati on Friday, spelling out Hill’s No. 22 with blue plastic cups on a chain-link fence a few hours after she died at a local hospital. Her death was conirmed Friday morning by the co-founder of her nonproit foundation, The Cure Starts Now. Hill attended the Division III school and played after being diagnosed with the inoperable tumor. She spent her inal year polishing a layup and inspiring others to live fully. “She taught us that every day is a blessing, every moment is a gift,” school President Tony Aretz said. She appeared in four games, making ive layups, before the tumor’s efects forced her to stop. Players cried on each other’s shoulders while the crowd sang ive verses of “Amazing Grace” in the half-hour vigil. Coach Dan Benjamin hugged each player after they attached lowers to the fence in Hill’s honor. Hill helped to raise roughly $1.5 million for research into pediatric cancer. Steelers’ Polamalu retires • His lowing locks bouncing of the top of his No. 43 jersey, Troy Polamalu spent more than a decade lying across football ields as the heady but humble backbone of a defense that fueled the Pittsburgh Steelers’ return to the NFL’s elite. Now, his singular career is a part of franchise lore. Move over Joe Greene, Jack Lambert and Mel Blount. You’ve got company. Polamalu, an eight-time Pro Bowler and 2010 NFL defensive player of the year, is retiring after 12 seasons, telling the only team he’s ever played for that it’s time for the next phase of his life. “Troy is a shining example of a football man in the way he loved the game, the way he respected the game and the way he played the game,” Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said in a statement. “It’s a shining example of the window into who he is. He is a legendary Steeler and a legendary man.” Other NFL news • Miami Dolphins ofensive lineman Mike Pouncey has agreed to a multiyear contract extension. Terms weren’t disclosed. ... The NFL suspended New York Giants linebacker Victor Butler without pay for the irst four games of the regular season for violating the league’s policy on performance enhancing substances. Butler is eligible to participate in all ofseason and preseason practices and games. ... Jameis Winston has lashed enough Heisman Trophy talent on the ield to become worthy of the No. 1 pick in the NFL draft. It’s his dubious behavior of the ield that has put his readiness for the pro lifestyle into question. “I doubt that he is the irst NCAA athlete to demonstrate that he’s immature and a knucklehead,” Winston family adviser David Cornwell said Friday. “Jameis is ready to be an NFL quarterback on the ield, but he is not ready to be an NFL player of the ield.” Tennis • Madison Keys and Lucie Hradecka are inding their games on clay and are surprise seminalists at the Family Circle Cup in Charleston, S.C. Keys, the seventh seed, put on a dominating show to beat fellow American and one-time training partner Lauren Davis, 6-2, 6-2. Hrdecka, a qualiier from the Czech Republic, topped her second seeded player in as many days, knocking out No. 4 seed Sara Errani, 6-2, 6-4. The two will square of Saturday for a spot in their irst championship inal of the year.

2016 at Chaifetz Arena. They will coincide with the women’s P&G Championships, the USA Gymnastics’ national championship. Viverito and his staf have been building connections at these events since the sports commission’s early days, and those eforts are paying dividends. He also is interested in the 2018 U.S. Figure Skating Championships, although the bid specifications have not been released for that event. Viverito said that upgrades at Scottrade Center might be necessary in coming years for the sports commission to be competitive for events at the venue. “The facility is 21 years old and it’s great,” he said. “But to remain competitive in bidding for events we’d love to see improvements, and we’ll work with the facility. We’re not talking about massive projects, but we’re looking for upgrades that keep us competitive.” Viverito sees a need for an upgraded video board, new seating in the lower bowl, improved space for media and locker rooms and technological upgrades for high definition capabilities. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Gaul, St. Louis FC have home opener soccer • from c1

months. Then all the coaches in Toronto got fired. Let’s just say it was a rough year.’’ But Gaul’s comeback season here in the United Soccer League is of to a strong start. He had a goal and an assist as St. Louis FC defeated the host Tulsa Roughnecks 2-0 last week for the first win in franchise history. “I don’t think any of us felt very good about the first game (a 2-0 loss in Louisville); we just didn’t play anywhere near to our abilities, so coming back strong in Tulsa was huge for us,’’ Gaul said. “And now that we have that first win under our belts, I think we’re all pretty excited about opening the home schedule and hopefully putting on a good show for our fans.’’ Gaul grew up in suburban Chicago and was coached by St. Louis FC general manager Jeremy Alumbaugh as an Under-12 player with the Chicago Magic. “Jeremy’s a big reason I’m here,’’ Gaul said. “There’s a comfort level, a trust, that I feel here. I know they’re looking to build something special here and I’m excited to be a part of it. My goal is to eventually get back to MLS or maybe Europe, but right now, my focus is on helping this team hopefully win a USL championship.’’ Gaul starred at Bradley University, where he finished fifth in career points (75), fourth in goals (31) and second in game-winning goals (15). He was a two-time Missouri Valley Conference first-teamer who led the Braves to the league tournament title in 2010 and to back-to-back NCAA trips (2010, 2011) for the first time in school history. He was selected by Los Angeles in the first round (19th overall) of the 2012 MLS supplemental draft as a defender and saw most of his action with the Galaxy in the backfield. “At the MLS combine, a central defender on my team got hurt and I filled in for something like 10 minutes. And I end up getting drafted as a centerback,’’ Gaul explained. “At that level, you play wherever you can get on the field. I’m willing to play wherever I’m needed, but I’m an attacking player at heart and I’m excited about getting that chance here.’’ St. Louis FC coach Dale Schilly likes what Gaul brings to the club. “You just don’t find a lot of attacking players who have his sort of mobility, his touch and his size. It’s certainly an asset for us,’’ the coach said. “We knew of Bryan from Bradley and the Galaxy, knew he was a good player coming of knee surgery. We were on the lookout for guys who were flying under the radar a little bit and we feel like we’ve got a very good one in Bryan.’’

HOME OPENER SOLD OUT College basketball • Wisconsin junior forward Sam Dekker says he will skip his inal season of eligibility and enter the NBA draft. ... Iowa State coach Fred Hoiberg, 42, is scheduled to have open heart surgery next week to replace his aortic valve. The school said Hoiberg, who retired from the NBA following the 2004-05 season because of heart issues, will have the procedure Friday at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Hoiberg replaced his aortic valve 10 years ago. He says the time has come to get the valve replaced, adding that he’s hopeful this will be his inal heart surgery. ...Bobby Hurley says he’s excited about taking over as coach of Arizona State. “This is a destination job for me,” he said at news conference Friday. “A place that I want to spend a lot of time and be a ixture in the community and be a big part of the success of this entire athletic department.” ... Frank Kaminsky of national runner-up Wisconsin and Breanna Stewart of three-time national champion Connecticut have won John R. Wooden Awards as national college basketball players of the year. Baseball • Texas Rangers starting pitcher Derek Holland pitched only one inning in the home opener Friday, and now will be out at least six weeks with a shoulder problem. Holland exited against Houston because of tightness in his left shoulder that was later diagnosed as a sprain. Outielders Shin-Soo Choo and Ryan Rua also left the 5-1 loss early because of injuries. Associated Press

A sellout crowd of better than 5,100 is expected for Saturday’s home opener at the new-look Soccer Park. “It’s definitely a sprint to the finish,’’ Alumbaugh said. “We still have a few things to finalize — the Biergarten was put in Wednesday — but there’s a buzz around St. Louis FC right now and we’re excited to get things going.’’ In addition to the Biergarten, the main field at the Soccer Park has new lighting and chair backs were added to the VIP seating area. And the locker rooms have been renovated. Schilly said he and his staff have some tough decisions to make. “The guys have really been working hard in training, trying to earn spots in the group of 18 who’ll get to represent on Saturday,’’ the coach said. “That’s the toughest part of this job, sorting out the levels of the players and deciding who’s going to most efective for you on the weekend.’’ Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com


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Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Playofs TBA NHL playofs begin Wednesday 4/15

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 4/12 at Cincinnati 12:10 p.m. FSM

Monday 4/13 vs. Milwaukee 3:15 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 4/15 vs. Milwaukee 7:15 p.m. FSM

Thursday 4/16 vs. Milwaukee 12:45 p.m. FSM

Defense dominates again in Mizzou’s scrimmage But ofense is depleted and QB Mauk not concerned

OTHER EvENTS

By DAvE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

COLUMBIA, MO. • After an-

UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS FC Sat. 4/18: vs. Rochester, 7:30 p.m. Sat. 4/25: at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon College: Purdue at Illinois, BTN 12:10 p.m. National League: Cardinals at Cincinnati, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 12:10 p.m. American League: Detroit at Cleveland, MLB Network 3 p.m. College: Campbell at Liberty, ESPNU 7:05 p.m. American League: Boston at New York, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 5 p.m. NBA: Oklahoma City at Indiana, FSM 5 p.m. NBA: Atlanta at Washington, NBA TV 8:30 p.m. NBA: Dallas at Los Angeles Lakers, NBA TV BOWLING 1 p.m. PBA: Elias Cup semiinal matches, ESPN GOLF 11 a.m. Masters, WXOS (101.1 FM) 1 p.m. Masters, KMOV (4) FIGURE SKATING 2 p.m. ISU: World Championship, KSDK (5) LACROSSE 11 a.m. College men: Virginia at Duke, ESPNU 1 p.m. College men: Ohio State at Michigan, ESPNU 4 p.m. MLL: Denver at Boston, FSM Plus MOTOR SPORTS 6 a.m. FIA: Six Hours of Silverstone, Fox Sports 1 Noon MotoGP Moto 3: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1 p.m. MotoGP Moto 2: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Louisiana, NBCSN 2 p.m. MotoGP World Champ.: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 7 p.m. NHRA: SummitRacing.com Nationals (taped), ESPN2 SOCCER 7:25 a.m. Premier League: Chelsea at Queens Park, NBCSN 9:55 a.m. Premier League: Manchester City at Manchester United, NBCSN 4 p.m. MLS: Orlando at Portland, ESPN2 6 p.m. MLS: Seattle at Los Angeles, Fox Sports 1 SOFTBALL 2:30 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Missouri, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Florida State at Louisville, ESPNU TENNIS 9:30 a.m. WTA: Katowice Open (doubles inal), Tennis Channel Noon WTA: Family Circle Cup (inals), ESPN2 2 p.m. ATP: U.S. Men’s Clay Court (singles inal), Tennis Channel 4 p.m. WTA: Katowice Open (singles inal), Tennis Channel WRESTLING 8 p.m. Freestyle: World Cup, NBCSN

DIGEST World Selects beat U.S. at Nike Hoop Summit Canada’s Jamal Murray had 30 points and Italy’s Frederico Mussini scored the go-ahead points on three free throws with 2:04 remaining to help the World Selects beat the United States 103-101 on Saturday in the annual Nike Hoop Summit in Portland. Skal Labissieri, a 7-foot forward from Haiti who is bound for Kentucky, scored 21 points. Louisiana State-bound Ben Simmons of Australia had 13 points and nine assists. Luke Kennard, who has signed at Duke, had 22 points to lead the United States, which had ive players score in double igures. Villanova-bound Jalen Brunson and Stephen Zimmerman scored 12 points each for the Americans. Georgia, Ole Miss have QB battles • Coach Mark Richt said Georgia’s quarterback competition “is still a race” after watching Brice Ramsey and Faton Bauta share time with the irst-team ofense in Georgia’s G-Day spring game Saturday. Ramsey, who was the top backup to 2014 senior starter Hutson Mason, opened the scrimmage with the irst-team ofense for the Red team. That doesn’t mean he’s leading the race. Richt said it was Ramsey’s turn to open the day with the starters in the continuing spring rotation by the quarterbacks. Meanwhile, the three-man race to be Mississippi’s quarterback will likely continue into preseason camp. Ole Miss went through its spring game on Saturday with most of the focus on Chad Kelly, Ryan Buchanan and Devante Kincade, who are competing to replace Bo Wallace under center. Querrey, Sock in clay inal • Sam Querrey and Jack Sock set up the irst all-American inal in a dozen years in the U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship. The eighth-seeded Querrey dominated on his crushing serve in the rain-interrupted third set Saturday to upset defending champion Fernando Verdasco of Spain 7-5, 2-6, 6-4. Sock knocked of third-seeded Kevin Anderson of South Africa 7-6 (3), 6-3 to advance to his irst ATP World Tour inal. The last time two U.S. players squared of in the inal, Andre Agassi beat Andy Roddick in 2003. Rodriguez wins Tour of Basque • Joaquim Rodriguez of Spain won the Tour of Basque Country after inishing second in the decisive time trial on Saturday. Dutch rider Tom Dumoulin of Giant-Alpecin won the 18.3-kilometer (11.4-mile) ride in and around Aia, Spain, in 28 minutes, 46 seconds. Rodriguez entered the sixth and inal stage level on time with Sergio Henao of Colombia, but the Katusha rider broke the deadlock by inishing four seconds behind Dumoulin. Boston hearings on Olympic bid • A special City Council panel looking into the pros and cons of Boston’s bid to win the 2024 Summer Olympics will hold four more public hearings. City Council president Bill Linehan says the Special Committee on the 2024 Olympics felt a need to get more public input after its irst hearing in March lasted more than four hours. Associated Press

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M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

other one-sided spring scrimmage, Missouri linebackers Kentrell Brothers and Michael Scherer played a diferent kind of defense on Saturday. They’ve helped smother their offensive counterparts this spring and perhaps set off alarms about the state of the Mizzou passing game, but the veteran defenders threw caution to those concerns Saturday. “The offense isn’t doing bad,” Brothers said after Mizzou’s defense allowed only two scoring drives on Faurot Field, both ending with field goals. “The defense is just playing really well. We have a lot of people coming back and we just have that connection, that communication that helps us be better. “They’re a great offense. They’ve got a great (offensive) line. They’ve got great young guys coming up. They just haven’t put it together yet.” “They’re beat up,” Scherer added. “And they’re young.” Neither of which will earn sympathy from Southeastern Conference opponents this fall. But for now, the advantages are stacked in the defense’s favor as three injured offensive starters sat out Saturday, further depleting a group already thin at receiver and tailback. The Tigers were without starting slot receiver Nate Brown (knee ailment), tight end Sean Culkin (shoulder) and ofensive lineman Connor McGovern (knee) and were missing tailbacks Ish Witter, who was attending a funeral, and Trevon Walters, out for the spring because of a torn knee ligament. With so many players unavailable, coach Gary Pinkel cut the spring’s second scrimmage in half, saving the rest of the plays for Tuesday’s practice. The spring concludes next Saturday, with the Black and Gold game at 4 p.m.. Just like last week, the defense was in control from start to finish on Saturday. Unlike last week, the Tigers didn’t commit any turnovers — the quarterbacks threw seven interceptions then — but also failed to visit the end zone. Overall, the various ofensive units produced 286 yards in 68 plays. The first-team ofense netted just 25 yards in 24 snaps while quarterback Maty Mauk completed two of nine passes for 9 yards. The No. 1 ofensive line, rotating three players at the tackle positions, gave up a pair of sacks and committed two false-start penalties. “Thank heavens it’s (only) spring ball,” Pinkel said. If Mauk is worried about the scrimmage struggles, he’s show-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tigers linebacker Kentrell Brothers, playing last season against Toledo, is part of a defense that has shined this spring but says the ofense will be OK.

ing his best poker face. The scrimmages are only a snapshot of the entire spring, though they’re the only 11-on-11 drills reporters are allowed to watch. Mauk insisted the offense has looked better outside of the open scrimmages. Is he concerned? “Not at all,” he said. “Yeah, you guys only do get to see the scrimmages. That’s kind of a bad thing. We are going against our defense … and those stats, yeah, those stats look horrible, the QB (rating). But that stuf means nothing to any of us. That’s just for people to see, to talk about and start stuff. That’s a distraction to us. We’re getting better. We’re where we need to be right now.” Of Mauk’s seven incomplete passes, two were dropped by his intended receiver. Scherer burst into the backfield and batted down another attempt. “I’m not worried about it,” Mauk said. “Yeah, I missed a couple throws, but other than that, it was a good scrimmage for us. This is the one of the best defenses we’re going to face all year.” Mauk could have some help on the way. Redshirt freshman Raymond Wingo made his scrimmage debut as a slot receiver and caught two passes for 20 yards with the No. 3 ofense, including an 18-yard grab from Corbin Berkstresser. Wingo had been playing cornerback since arriving at Mizzou last summer. He’s familiar with changing positions, having played quarterback, tailback, receiver and cor-

nerback during a prolific career at St. Louis University High. Wingo said he and the coaches came to a mutual decision to move to receiver last week, but they started mulling the possibility right after last season ended at the Citrus Bowl. “To be honest, it doesn’t matter to me,” Wingo said. “I can play wherever I can get on the field as fast as possible.” Pinkel said Wingo will stay at receiver for the remainder of the spring, after which the staff will decide where he plays this season. “We need to get his feedback,” Pinkel said. “I think he likes it. By the same token, as a staf we want to put him in a place where we think he can help us the most ..., whether it’s corner or receiver.” Wingo described the move to receiver as “going back to my love.” “To be completely honest, when I first changed I went back (and watched) my high school highlight tape and remembered how I was doing ofensive things,” Wingo said. “That got me back into the ofensive mindset.” The 5-foot-11, 180-pounder could be a solution to the sluggish attack. Wingo owns the team’s fastest 40-yard dash time from offseason testing, getting clocked in the 4.2-second range. Mauk compared Wingo to departed all-purpose threat Marcus Murphy. “But,” Mauk said, “a lot faster.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

> Black and Gold Game • 4 p.m. Saturday, SEC Network (alternate channel)

Illinois in midst of facility upgrades Golf facility unveiled as work progresses at State Farm Center By MARk TUppER Decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • It was fit-

ting that on Saturday, as the third round of the Masters was playing out in Augusta, Ga., a near replica of the Augusta National Golf Club practice range was being unveiled on the University of Illinois campus. Dedicated Saturday was the 24acre Lauritsen-Wohlers Outdoor Golf Practice Facility, which was inspired by and patterned after the practice area at the site of the Masters. The facility will allow players from the men’s and women’s teams to practice any shot in golf from various lies and grass types and features target fairways and greens, fairway and greenside bunkers and putting greens. The design was overseen by men’s head coach Mike Small and Illini golf alum and PGA veteran Steve Stricker. It adjoins the Demirjian Indoor Facility and gives Illinois what Director of Athletics Mike Thomas called, “the finest and most complete golf training facility in the nation.” There’s no question the men’s team has earned a state-of-theart facility. Small is the six-time Big Ten coach of the year and he led Illinois to a runnerup finish in the 2013 NCAA championships. The current team is ranked No. 2 in the nation by Golfweek.com, trailing only Florida State. Illinois has produced the individual NCAA champion twice with Scott Langley winning in

2010 and Thomas Pieters winning in 2012. Golf isn’t the only facilities upgrade on Thomas’ plate. The most obvious project is the on-going State Farm Center renovation project that is currently in the middle of a dramatic tear-down and recreation of the arena’s entire lower bowl. Sections A and B were demolished down to bare dirt and the building of two new tunnels, one of which will lead the Illini team to their locker room area, are well underway. Building of new seating levels and suites will follow as the current phase aims for a Dec. 1 completion date. “There are 300 people working six days a week, 20 hours a day right now,” Thomas said. “And we’re on time and on budget.” Because the builders have been given until Dec. 1, it means the Illini men’s and women’s teams will be playing their November games at alternate sites. The men will be playing a handful of games at the Prairie Capital Convention Center in Springfield while the women will be using Parkland College in Champaign as their temporary home away from home. But two additional projects are now getting attention. One is a major addition to Memorial Stadium that will impact the football team and other sports. Basically, a multi-story building would be constructed at the south end of the stadium and the entire football operation would relocate there. That includes the football of-

fices, weight room, recruiting lounge, training room, dining facilities and meeting rooms. Thomas has talked in terms of a four-story complex that would dramatically change the look of the area that now includes the “horseshoe” and scoreboard. The current weight training area located beneath the north end zone would then be used by many of the school’s Olympic sports. Another project is in the “talking” stage and would involve the Illini basketball teams. That’s the creation of a new practice facility on the north side of the State Farm Center that would house practice gyms, offices and a training facility including weight room. It would adjoin the State Farm Center. Currently, the basketball teams are headquartered at the Ubben facility east of the State Farm Center and that would be converted into a home for other yetto-be-named sports. “Right now, everything is a blank canvas,” Thomas said, indicating that a number of conceptual ideas are in play. Yes, upgrading the wins and losses on the field and on the court is the primary goal. But Thomas can’t aford to put facilities upgrades on hold, not when Illinois is recruiting football players who visit facilities that now include amenities like a waterfall and a barber shop. Ohio State’s eforts to upgrade their facilities were helped with a Toledo family won the Ohio Lottery and donated $5 million to the cause.


spOrts

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 TBA Game 1 vs. Minnesota, TBA

TBA Game 2 vs. Minnesota, TBA

TBA Game 3 at Minnesota, TBA

TBA Game 4 at Minnesota, TBA

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 4/12 at Cincinnati 12:10 p.m. FSM

Monday 4/13 vs. Milwaukee 3:15 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 4/15 vs. Milwaukee 7:15 p.m. FSM

Thursday 4/16 vs. Milwaukee 12:45 p.m. FSM

Defense dominates again in Mizzou’s scrimmage But ofense is depleted and QB Mauk not concerned

OTHER EvENTS

By DAvE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

COLUMBIA, MO. • After an-

UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS FC Sat. 4/18: vs. Rochester, 7:30 p.m. Sat. 4/25: at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon College: Purdue at Illinois, BTN 12:10 p.m. National League: Cardinals at Cincinnati, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 12:10 p.m. American League: Detroit at Cleveland, MLB Network 3 p.m. College: Campbell at Liberty, ESPNU 7:05 p.m. American League: Boston at New York, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 5 p.m. NBA: Oklahoma City at Indiana, FSM 5 p.m. NBA: Atlanta at Washington, NBA TV 8:30 p.m. NBA: Dallas at Los Angeles Lakers, NBA TV BOWLING 1 p.m. PBA: Elias Cup semiinal matches, ESPN GOLF 11 a.m. Masters, WXOS (101.1 FM) 1 p.m. Masters, KMOV (4) FIGURE SKATING 2 p.m. ISU: World Championship, KSDK (5) LACROSSE 11 a.m. College men: Virginia at Duke, ESPNU 1 p.m. College men: Ohio State at Michigan, ESPNU 4 p.m. MLL: Denver at Boston, FSM Plus MOTOR SPORTS 6 a.m. FIA: Six Hours of Silverstone, Fox Sports 1 Noon MotoGP Moto 3: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1 p.m. MotoGP Moto 2: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Louisiana, NBCSN 2 p.m. MotoGP World Champ.: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 7 p.m. NHRA: SummitRacing.com Nationals (taped), ESPN2 SOCCER 7:25 a.m. Premier League: Chelsea at Queens Park, NBCSN 9:55 a.m. Premier League: Manchester City at Manchester United, NBCSN 4 p.m. MLS: Orlando at Portland, ESPN2 6 p.m. MLS: Seattle at Los Angeles, Fox Sports 1 SOFTBALL 2:30 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Missouri, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Florida State at Louisville, ESPNU TENNIS 9:30 a.m. WTA: Katowice Open (doubles inal), Tennis Channel Noon WTA: Family Circle Cup (inals), ESPN2 2 p.m. ATP: U.S. Men’s Clay Court (singles inal), Tennis Channel 4 p.m. WTA: Katowice Open (singles inal), Tennis Channel WRESTLING 8 p.m. Freestyle: World Cup, NBCSN

DIGEST World Selects beat U.S. at Nike Hoop Summit Canada’s Jamal Murray had 30 points and Italy’s Frederico Mussini scored the go-ahead points on three free throws with 2:04 remaining to help the World Selects beat the United States 103-101 on Saturday in the annual Nike Hoop Summit in Portland. Skal Labissieri, a 7-foot forward from Haiti who is bound for Kentucky, scored 21 points. Louisiana State-bound Ben Simmons of Australia had 13 points and nine assists. Luke Kennard, who has signed at Duke, had 22 points to lead the United States, which had ive players score in double igures. Villanova-bound Jalen Brunson and Stephen Zimmerman scored 12 points each for the Americans. Garcia wins decision against Peterson • Uniied junior welterweight champion Danny Garcia beat light welterweight Lamont Peterson by majority decision Saturday night at the Barclays Center in a non-title ight in New York. Garcia (30-0) remained unbeaten by getting two scores of 115-113. A third judge ruled the ight to be a draw at 114-114. In the other televised non-title ight, middleweight Peter Quillin (31-0-1) returned to the ring for the irst time in nearly a year and fought Ireland’s Andy Lee (34-2-1) to a draw. Judge Guido Cavalleri awarded the ight to Lee with a 113-112 score, judge Eric Marlinski gave it to Quillin by the same score and judge Glenn Feldman’s 113-113 ruling led to the draw. Querrey, Sock in clay inal • Sam Querrey and Jack Sock set up the irst all-American inal in a dozen years in the U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship. The eighth-seeded Querrey dominated on his crushing serve in the rain-interrupted third set Saturday to upset defending champion Fernando Verdasco of Spain 7-5, 2-6, 6-4. Sock knocked of third-seeded Kevin Anderson of South Africa 7-6 (3), 6-3 to advance to his irst ATP World Tour inal. The last time two U.S. players squared of in the inal, Andre Agassi beat Andy Roddick in 2003. Rodriguez wins Tour of Basque • Joaquim Rodriguez of Spain won the Tour of Basque Country after inishing second in the decisive time trial on Saturday. Dutch rider Tom Dumoulin of Giant-Alpecin won the 18.3-kilometer (11.4-mile) ride in and around Aia, Spain, in 28 minutes, 46 seconds. Rodriguez entered the sixth and inal stage level on time with Sergio Henao of Colombia, but the Katusha rider broke the deadlock by inishing four seconds behind Dumoulin. Boston hearings on Olympic bid • A special City Council panel looking into the pros and cons of Boston’s bid to win the 2024 Summer Olympics will hold four more public hearings. City Council president Bill Linehan says the Special Committee on the 2024 Olympics felt a need to get more public input after its irst hearing in March lasted more than four hours. Associated Press

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Of St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

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To e-mail editors, use irst initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Don Reed Cameron Hollway Mike Smith Mike Reilly

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Deputy Sports Editor | Colleges/Preps Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights

FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

314-340-8301 314-340-8313 314-340-8392 314-340-8137 314-340-8178

M 3 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

other one-sided spring scrimmage, Missouri linebackers Kentrell Brothers and Michael Scherer played a diferent kind of defense on Saturday. They’ve helped smother their offensive counterparts this spring and perhaps set off alarms about the state of the Mizzou passing game, but the veteran defenders threw caution to those concerns Saturday. “The offense isn’t doing bad,” Brothers said after Mizzou’s defense allowed only two scoring drives on Faurot Field, both ending with field goals. “The defense is just playing really well. We have a lot of people coming back and we just have that connection, that communication that helps us be better. “They’re a great offense. They’ve got a great (offensive) line. They’ve got great young guys coming up. They just haven’t put it together yet.” “They’re beat up,” Scherer added. “And they’re young.” Neither of which will earn sympathy from Southeastern Conference opponents this fall. But for now, the advantages are stacked in the defense’s favor as three injured offensive starters sat out Saturday, further depleting a group already thin at receiver and tailback. The Tigers were without starting slot receiver Nate Brown (knee ailment), tight end Sean Culkin (shoulder) and ofensive lineman Connor McGovern (knee) and were missing tailbacks Ish Witter, who was attending a funeral, and Trevon Walters, out for the spring because of a torn knee ligament. With so many players unavailable, coach Gary Pinkel cut the spring’s second scrimmage in half, saving the rest of the plays for Tuesday’s practice. The spring concludes next Saturday, with the Black and Gold game at 4 p.m.. Just like last week, the defense was in control from start to finish on Saturday. Unlike last week, the Tigers didn’t commit any turnovers — the quarterbacks threw seven interceptions then — but also failed to visit the end zone. Overall, the various ofensive units produced 286 yards in 68 plays. The first-team ofense netted just 25 yards in 24 snaps while quarterback Maty Mauk completed two of nine passes for 9 yards. The No. 1 ofensive line, rotating three players at the tackle positions, gave up a pair of sacks and committed two false-start penalties. “Thank heavens it’s (only) spring ball,” Pinkel said. If Mauk is worried about the scrimmage struggles, he’s show-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tigers linebacker Kentrell Brothers, playing last season against Toledo, is part of a defense that has shined this spring but says the ofense will be OK.

ing his best poker face. The scrimmages are only a snapshot of the entire spring, though they’re the only 11-on-11 drills reporters are allowed to watch. Mauk insisted the offense has looked better outside of the open scrimmages. Is he concerned? “Not at all,” he said. “Yeah, you guys only do get to see the scrimmages. That’s kind of a bad thing. We are going against our defense … and those stats, yeah, those stats look horrible, the QB (rating). But that stuf means nothing to any of us. That’s just for people to see, to talk about and start stuff. That’s a distraction to us. We’re getting better. We’re where we need to be right now.” Of Mauk’s seven incomplete passes, two were dropped by his intended receiver. Scherer burst into the backfield and batted down another attempt. “I’m not worried about it,” Mauk said. “Yeah, I missed a couple throws, but other than that, it was a good scrimmage for us. This is the one of the best defenses we’re going to face all year.” Mauk could have some help on the way. Redshirt freshman Raymond Wingo made his scrimmage debut as a slot receiver and caught two passes for 20 yards with the No. 3 ofense, including an 18-yard grab from Corbin Berkstresser. Wingo had been playing cornerback since arriving at Mizzou last summer. He’s familiar with changing positions, having played quarterback, tailback, receiver and cor-

nerback during a prolific career at St. Louis University High. Wingo said he and the coaches came to a mutual decision to move to receiver last week, but they started mulling the possibility right after last season ended at the Citrus Bowl. “To be honest, it doesn’t matter to me,” Wingo said. “I can play wherever I can get on the field as fast as possible.” Pinkel said Wingo will stay at receiver for the remainder of the spring, after which the staff will decide where he plays this season. “We need to get his feedback,” Pinkel said. “I think he likes it. By the same token, as a staf we want to put him in a place where we think he can help us the most ..., whether it’s corner or receiver.” Wingo described the move to receiver as “going back to my love.” “To be completely honest, when I first changed I went back (and watched) my high school highlight tape and remembered how I was doing ofensive things,” Wingo said. “That got me back into the ofensive mindset.” The 5-foot-11, 180-pounder could be a solution to the sluggish attack. Wingo owns the team’s fastest 40-yard dash time from offseason testing, getting clocked in the 4.2-second range. Mauk compared Wingo to departed all-purpose threat Marcus Murphy. “But,” Mauk said, “a lot faster.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

> Black and Gold Game • 4 p.m. Saturday, SEC Network (alternate channel)

Illinois in midst of facility upgrades Golf facility unveiled as work progresses at State Farm Center By MARk TUppER Decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • It was fit-

ting that on Saturday, as the third round of the Masters was playing out in Augusta, Ga., a near replica of the Augusta National Golf Club practice range was being unveiled on the University of Illinois campus. Dedicated Saturday was the 24acre Lauritsen-Wohlers Outdoor Golf Practice Facility, which was inspired by and patterned after the practice area at the site of the Masters. The facility will allow players from the men’s and women’s teams to practice any shot in golf from various lies and grass types and features target fairways and greens, fairway and greenside bunkers and putting greens. The design was overseen by men’s head coach Mike Small and Illini golf alum and PGA veteran Steve Stricker. It adjoins the Demirjian Indoor Facility and gives Illinois what Director of Athletics Mike Thomas called, “the finest and most complete golf training facility in the nation.” There’s no question the men’s team has earned a state-of-theart facility. Small is the six-time Big Ten coach of the year and he led Illinois to a runnerup finish in the 2013 NCAA championships. The current team is ranked No. 2 in the nation by Golfweek.com, trailing only Florida State. Illinois has produced the individual NCAA champion twice with Scott Langley winning in

2010 and Thomas Pieters winning in 2012. Golf isn’t the only facilities upgrade on Thomas’ plate. The most obvious project is the on-going State Farm Center renovation project that is currently in the middle of a dramatic tear-down and recreation of the arena’s entire lower bowl. Sections A and B were demolished down to bare dirt and the building of two new tunnels, one of which will lead the Illini team to their locker room area, are well underway. Building of new seating levels and suites will follow as the current phase aims for a Dec. 1 completion date. “There are 300 people working six days a week, 20 hours a day right now,” Thomas said. “And we’re on time and on budget.” Because the builders have been given until Dec. 1, it means the Illini men’s and women’s teams will be playing their November games at alternate sites. The men will be playing a handful of games at the Prairie Capital Convention Center in Springfield while the women will be using Parkland College in Champaign as their temporary home away from home. But two additional projects are now getting attention. One is a major addition to Memorial Stadium that will impact the football team and other sports. Basically, a multi-story building would be constructed at the south end of the stadium and the entire football operation would relocate there. That includes the football of-

fices, weight room, recruiting lounge, training room, dining facilities and meeting rooms. Thomas has talked in terms of a four-story complex that would dramatically change the look of the area that now includes the “horseshoe” and scoreboard. The current weight training area located beneath the north end zone would then be used by many of the school’s Olympic sports. Another project is in the “talking” stage and would involve the Illini basketball teams. That’s the creation of a new practice facility on the north side of the State Farm Center that would house practice gyms, offices and a training facility including weight room. It would adjoin the State Farm Center. Currently, the basketball teams are headquartered at the Ubben facility east of the State Farm Center and that would be converted into a home for other yetto-be-named sports. “Right now, everything is a blank canvas,” Thomas said, indicating that a number of conceptual ideas are in play. Yes, upgrading the wins and losses on the field and on the court is the primary goal. But Thomas can’t aford to put facilities upgrades on hold, not when Illinois is recruiting football players who visit facilities that now include amenities like a waterfall and a barber shop. Ohio State’s eforts to upgrade their facilities were helped with a Toledo family won the Ohio Lottery and donated $5 million to the cause.


spOrts

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 TBA Game 1 vs. Minnesota, TBA

TBA Game 2 vs. Minnesota, TBA

TBA Game 3 at Minnesota, TBA

TBA Game 4 at Minnesota, TBA

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 4/12 at Cincinnati 12:10 p.m. FSM

Monday 4/13 vs. Milwaukee 3:15 p.m. FSM

Wednesday 4/15 vs. Milwaukee 7:15 p.m. FSM

Thursday 4/16 vs. Milwaukee 12:45 p.m. FSM

Defense dominates again in Mizzou’s scrimmage But ofense is depleted and QB Mauk not concerned

OTHER EvENTS

By DAvE MATTER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Live racing 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

COLUMBIA, MO. • After an-

UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS FC Sat. 4/18: vs. Rochester, 7:30 p.m. Sat. 4/25: at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m.

ON THE AIR BASEBALL Noon College: Purdue at Illinois, BTN 12:10 p.m. National League: Cardinals at Cincinnati, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 12:10 p.m. American League: Detroit at Cleveland, MLB Network 3 p.m. College: Campbell at Liberty, ESPNU 7:05 p.m. American League: Boston at New York, ESPN, WXOS (101.1 FM) BASKETBALL 5 p.m. NBA: Oklahoma City at Indiana, FSM 5 p.m. NBA: Atlanta at Washington, NBA TV 8:30 p.m. NBA: Dallas at Los Angeles Lakers, NBA TV BOWLING 1 p.m. PBA: Elias Cup semiinal matches, ESPN GOLF 11 a.m. Masters, WXOS (101.1 FM) 1 p.m. Masters, KMOV (4) FIGURE SKATING 2 p.m. ISU: World Championship, KSDK (5) LACROSSE 11 a.m. College men: Virginia at Duke, ESPNU 1 p.m. College men: Ohio State at Michigan, ESPNU 4 p.m. MLL: Denver at Boston, FSM Plus MOTOR SPORTS 6 a.m. FIA: Six Hours of Silverstone, Fox Sports 1 Noon MotoGP Moto 3: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1 p.m. MotoGP Moto 2: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 1:30 p.m. IndyCar: Grand Prix of Louisiana, NBCSN 2 p.m. MotoGP World Champ.: Grand Prix of the Americas, Fox Sports 1 7 p.m. NHRA: SummitRacing.com Nationals (taped), ESPN2 SOCCER 7:25 a.m. Premier League: Chelsea at Queens Park, NBCSN 9:55 a.m. Premier League: Manchester City at Manchester United, NBCSN 4 p.m. MLS: Orlando at Portland, ESPN2 6 p.m. MLS: Seattle at Los Angeles, Fox Sports 1 SOFTBALL 2:30 p.m. College: Mississippi State at Missouri, SEC Network 6 p.m. College: Florida State at Louisville, ESPNU TENNIS 9:30 a.m. WTA: Katowice Open (doubles inal), Tennis Channel Noon WTA: Family Circle Cup (inals), ESPN2 2 p.m. ATP: U.S. Men’s Clay Court (singles inal), Tennis Channel 4 p.m. WTA: Katowice Open (singles inal), Tennis Channel WRESTLING 8 p.m. Freestyle: World Cup, NBCSN

DIGEST World Selects beat U.S. at Nike Hoop Summit Canada’s Jamal Murray had 30 points and Italy’s Frederico Mussini scored the go-ahead points on three free throws with 2:04 remaining to help the World Selects beat the United States 103-101 on Saturday in the annual Nike Hoop Summit in Portland. Skal Labissieri, a 7-foot forward from Haiti who is bound for Kentucky, scored 21 points. Louisiana State-bound Ben Simmons of Australia had 13 points and nine assists. Luke Kennard, who has signed at Duke, had 22 points to lead the United States, which had ive players score in double igures. Villanova-bound Jalen Brunson and Stephen Zimmerman scored 12 points each for the Americans. Garcia wins decision against Peterson • Uniied junior welterweight champion Danny Garcia beat light welterweight Lamont Peterson by majority decision Saturday night at the Barclays Center in a non-title ight in New York. Garcia (30-0) remained unbeaten by getting two scores of 115-113. A third judge ruled the ight to be a draw at 114-114. In the other televised non-title ight, middleweight Peter Quillin (31-0-1) returned to the ring for the irst time in nearly a year and fought Ireland’s Andy Lee (34-2-1) to a draw. Judge Guido Cavalleri awarded the ight to Lee with a 113-112 score, judge Eric Marlinski gave it to Quillin by the same score and judge Glenn Feldman’s 113-113 ruling led to the draw. Querrey, Sock in clay inal • Sam Querrey and Jack Sock set up the irst all-American inal in a dozen years in the U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship. The eighth-seeded Querrey dominated on his crushing serve in the rain-interrupted third set Saturday to upset defending champion Fernando Verdasco of Spain 7-5, 2-6, 6-4. Sock knocked of third-seeded Kevin Anderson of South Africa 7-6 (3), 6-3 to advance to his irst ATP World Tour inal. The last time two U.S. players squared of in the inal, Andre Agassi beat Andy Roddick in 2003. Rodriguez wins Tour of Basque • Joaquim Rodriguez of Spain won the Tour of Basque Country after inishing second in the decisive time trial on Saturday. Dutch rider Tom Dumoulin of Giant-Alpecin won the 18.3-kilometer (11.4-mile) ride in and around Aia, Spain, in 28 minutes, 46 seconds. Rodriguez entered the sixth and inal stage level on time with Sergio Henao of Colombia, but the Katusha rider broke the deadlock by inishing four seconds behind Dumoulin. Boston hearings on Olympic bid • A special City Council panel looking into the pros and cons of Boston’s bid to win the 2024 Summer Olympics will hold four more public hearings. City Council president Bill Linehan says the Special Committee on the 2024 Olympics felt a need to get more public input after its irst hearing in March lasted more than four hours. Associated Press

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER Must include name, address for veriication. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Of St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use irst initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Don Reed Cameron Hollway Mike Smith Mike Reilly

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Deputy Sports Editor | Colleges/Preps Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights

FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

314-340-8301 314-340-8313 314-340-8392 314-340-8137 314-340-8178

M 4 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

other one-sided spring scrimmage, Missouri linebackers Kentrell Brothers and Michael Scherer played a diferent kind of defense on Saturday. They’ve helped smother their offensive counterparts this spring and perhaps set off alarms about the state of the Mizzou passing game, but the veteran defenders threw caution to those concerns Saturday. “The offense isn’t doing bad,” Brothers said after Mizzou’s defense allowed only two scoring drives on Faurot Field, both ending with field goals. “The defense is just playing really well. We have a lot of people coming back and we just have that connection, that communication that helps us be better. “They’re a great offense. They’ve got a great (offensive) line. They’ve got great young guys coming up. They just haven’t put it together yet.” “They’re beat up,” Scherer added. “And they’re young.” Neither of which will earn sympathy from Southeastern Conference opponents this fall. But for now, the advantages are stacked in the defense’s favor as three injured offensive starters sat out Saturday, further depleting a group already thin at receiver and tailback. The Tigers were without starting slot receiver Nate Brown (knee ailment), tight end Sean Culkin (shoulder) and ofensive lineman Connor McGovern (knee) and were missing tailbacks Ish Witter, who was attending a funeral, and Trevon Walters, out for the spring because of a torn knee ligament. With so many players unavailable, coach Gary Pinkel cut the spring’s second scrimmage in half, saving the rest of the plays for Tuesday’s practice. The spring concludes next Saturday, with the Black and Gold game at 4 p.m.. Just like last week, the defense was in control from start to finish on Saturday. Unlike last week, the Tigers didn’t commit any turnovers — the quarterbacks threw seven interceptions then — but also failed to visit the end zone. Overall, the various ofensive units produced 286 yards in 68 plays. The first-team ofense netted just 25 yards in 24 snaps while quarterback Maty Mauk completed two of nine passes for 9 yards. The No. 1 ofensive line, rotating three players at the tackle positions, gave up a pair of sacks and committed two false-start penalties. “Thank heavens it’s (only) spring ball,” Pinkel said. If Mauk is worried about the scrimmage struggles, he’s show-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tigers linebacker Kentrell Brothers, playing last season against Toledo, is part of a defense that has shined this spring but says the ofense will be OK.

ing his best poker face. The scrimmages are only a snapshot of the entire spring, though they’re the only 11-on-11 drills reporters are allowed to watch. Mauk insisted the offense has looked better outside of the open scrimmages. Is he concerned? “Not at all,” he said. “Yeah, you guys only do get to see the scrimmages. That’s kind of a bad thing. We are going against our defense … and those stats, yeah, those stats look horrible, the QB (rating). But that stuf means nothing to any of us. That’s just for people to see, to talk about and start stuff. That’s a distraction to us. We’re getting better. We’re where we need to be right now.” Of Mauk’s seven incomplete passes, two were dropped by his intended receiver. Scherer burst into the backfield and batted down another attempt. “I’m not worried about it,” Mauk said. “Yeah, I missed a couple throws, but other than that, it was a good scrimmage for us. This is the one of the best defenses we’re going to face all year.” Mauk could have some help on the way. Redshirt freshman Raymond Wingo made his scrimmage debut as a slot receiver and caught two passes for 20 yards with the No. 3 ofense, including an 18-yard grab from Corbin Berkstresser. Wingo had been playing cornerback since arriving at Mizzou last summer. He’s familiar with changing positions, having played quarterback, tailback, receiver and cor-

nerback during a prolific career at St. Louis University High. Wingo said he and the coaches came to a mutual decision to move to receiver last week, but they started mulling the possibility right after last season ended at the Citrus Bowl. “To be honest, it doesn’t matter to me,” Wingo said. “I can play wherever I can get on the field as fast as possible.” Pinkel said Wingo will stay at receiver for the remainder of the spring, after which the staff will decide where he plays this season. “We need to get his feedback,” Pinkel said. “I think he likes it. By the same token, as a staf we want to put him in a place where we think he can help us the most ..., whether it’s corner or receiver.” Wingo described the move to receiver as “going back to my love.” “To be completely honest, when I first changed I went back (and watched) my high school highlight tape and remembered how I was doing ofensive things,” Wingo said. “That got me back into the ofensive mindset.” The 5-foot-11, 180-pounder could be a solution to the sluggish attack. Wingo owns the team’s fastest 40-yard dash time from offseason testing, getting clocked in the 4.2-second range. Mauk compared Wingo to departed all-purpose threat Marcus Murphy. “But,” Mauk said, “a lot faster.” Dave Matter @dave_matter on Twitter dmatter@post-dispatch.com

> Black and Gold Game • 4 p.m. Saturday, SEC Network (alternate channel)

Illinois in midst of facility upgrades Golf facility unveiled as work progresses at State Farm Center By MARk TUppER Decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. • It was fit-

ting that on Saturday, as the third round of the Masters was playing out in Augusta, Ga., a near replica of the Augusta National Golf Club practice range was being unveiled on the University of Illinois campus. Dedicated Saturday was the 24acre Lauritsen-Wohlers Outdoor Golf Practice Facility, which was inspired by and patterned after the practice area at the site of the Masters. The facility will allow players from the men’s and women’s teams to practice any shot in golf from various lies and grass types and features target fairways and greens, fairway and greenside bunkers and putting greens. The design was overseen by men’s head coach Mike Small and Illini golf alum and PGA veteran Steve Stricker. It adjoins the Demirjian Indoor Facility and gives Illinois what Director of Athletics Mike Thomas called, “the finest and most complete golf training facility in the nation.” There’s no question the men’s team has earned a state-of-theart facility. Small is the six-time Big Ten coach of the year and he led Illinois to a runnerup finish in the 2013 NCAA championships. The current team is ranked No. 2 in the nation by Golfweek.com, trailing only Florida State. Illinois has produced the individual NCAA champion twice with Scott Langley winning in

2010 and Thomas Pieters winning in 2012. Golf isn’t the only facilities upgrade on Thomas’ plate. The most obvious project is the on-going State Farm Center renovation project that is currently in the middle of a dramatic tear-down and recreation of the arena’s entire lower bowl. Sections A and B were demolished down to bare dirt and the building of two new tunnels, one of which will lead the Illini team to their locker room area, are well underway. Building of new seating levels and suites will follow as the current phase aims for a Dec. 1 completion date. “There are 300 people working six days a week, 20 hours a day right now,” Thomas said. “And we’re on time and on budget.” Because the builders have been given until Dec. 1, it means the Illini men’s and women’s teams will be playing their November games at alternate sites. The men will be playing a handful of games at the Prairie Capital Convention Center in Springfield while the women will be using Parkland College in Champaign as their temporary home away from home. But two additional projects are now getting attention. One is a major addition to Memorial Stadium that will impact the football team and other sports. Basically, a multi-story building would be constructed at the south end of the stadium and the entire football operation would relocate there. That includes the football of-

fices, weight room, recruiting lounge, training room, dining facilities and meeting rooms. Thomas has talked in terms of a four-story complex that would dramatically change the look of the area that now includes the “horseshoe” and scoreboard. The current weight training area located beneath the north end zone would then be used by many of the school’s Olympic sports. Another project is in the “talking” stage and would involve the Illini basketball teams. That’s the creation of a new practice facility on the north side of the State Farm Center that would house practice gyms, offices and a training facility including weight room. It would adjoin the State Farm Center. Currently, the basketball teams are headquartered at the Ubben facility east of the State Farm Center and that would be converted into a home for other yetto-be-named sports. “Right now, everything is a blank canvas,” Thomas said, indicating that a number of conceptual ideas are in play. Yes, upgrading the wins and losses on the field and on the court is the primary goal. But Thomas can’t aford to put facilities upgrades on hold, not when Illinois is recruiting football players who visit facilities that now include amenities like a waterfall and a barber shop. Ohio State’s eforts to upgrade their facilities were helped with a Toledo family won the Ohio Lottery and donated $5 million to the cause.


cardiNals

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

CARDS ReguLAR-SeASon SCHeDuLe Day

Date

Opponent

Saturday

April 11

at Reds

12:10 p.m.

Time

Sunday

April 12

at Reds

12:10 p.m.

Monday

April 13

Brewers

3:15 p.m.

Wednesday

April 15

Brewers

7:15 p.m.

Thursday

April 16

Brewers

12:45 p.m.

Friday

April 17

Reds

Saturday

April 18

Reds

1:15 p.m.

Sunday

April 19

Reds

7:05 p.m.

Tuesday

April 21

at Nationals

6:05 p.m.

Wednesday

April 22

at Nationals

6:05 p.m.

Thursday

April 23

at Nationals

3:05 p.m.

Friday

April 24

at Brewers

7:10 p.m.

Saturday

April 25

at Brewers

6:10 p.m.

Sunday

April 26

at Brewers

1:10 p.m.

Monday

April 27

Phillies

7:15 p.m.

Tuesday

April 28

Phillies

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday

April 29

Phillies

7:15 p.m.

Thursday

April 30

Phillies

12:45 p.m.

Friday

May 1

Pirates

7:15 p.m.

Saturday

May 2

Pirates

1:15 p.m.

Sunday

May 3

Pirates

1:15 p.m.

Monday

May 4

Cubs

7:10 p.m.

Sunday

June 14

Royals

1:15 p.m.

Thursday

July 30

Rockies

Tuesday

May 5

Cubs

7:15 p.m.

Monday

June 15

Twins

7:15 p.m.

Friday

July 31

Rockies

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday

May 6

Cubs

7:15 p.m.

Tuesday

June 16

Twins

12:45 p.m.

Saturday

August 1

Rockies

6:15 p.m.

Thursday

May 7

Cubs

12:45 p.m.

Wednesday

June 17

at Twins

7:10 p.m.

Sunday

August 2

Rockies

1:15 p.m.

Friday

May 8

at Pirates

6:05 p.m.

Thursday

June 18

at Twins

12:10 p.m.

Tuesday

August 4

at Reds

6:10 p.m.

Saturday

May 9

at Pirates

6:05 p.m.

Friday

June 19

at Phillies

6:05 p.m.

Wednesday

August 5

at Reds

6:10 p.m.

Saturday

June 20

at Phillies

2:05 p.m.

Thursday

August 6

at Reds

11:35 a.m.

7:15 p.m.

Huy MacH • hmach@post-dispatch.com 6:15 p.m.

Sunday

May 10

at Pirates

12:35 p.m.

Tuesday

May 12

at Indians

5:05 p.m.

Sunday

June 21

at Phillies

12:35 p.m.

Friday

August 7

at Brewers

7:10 p.m.

Wednesday

May 13

at Indians

5:05 p.m.

Tuesday

June 23

at Marlins

6:10 p.m.

Saturday

August 8

at Brewers

6:10 p.m.

11:05 a.m.

1:10 p.m.

Thursday

May 14

at Indians

Wednesday

June 24

at Marlins

6:10 p.m.

Sunday

August 9

at Brewers

Friday

May 15

Tigers

7:15 p.m.

Thursday

June 25

at Marlins

6:10 p.m.

Tuesday

August 11

Pirates

7:15 p.m.

Saturday

May 16

Tigers

1:15 p.m.

Friday

June 26

Cubs

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday

August 12

Pirates

7:15 p.m.

Sunday

May 17

Tigers

7:05 p.m.

Saturday

June 27

Cubs

6:15 p.m.

Thursday

August 13

Pirates

6:15 p.m.

6:10 p.m.

Sunday

June 28

Cubs

1:15 p.m.

Friday

August 14

Marlins

7:15 p.m.

6:10 p.m.

Tuesday

June 30

White Sox

7:10 p.m.

Saturday

August 15

Marlins

6:15 p.m.

Monday

May 18

at Mets

Tuesday

May 19

at Mets

Wednesday

May 20

at Mets

6:10 p.m.

Thursday

May 21

at Mets

12:10 p.m.

Friday

May 22

at Royals

7:10 p.m.

Friday

Saturday

May 23

at Royals

6:15 p.m.

Saturday

Sunday

May 24

at Royals

1:10 p.m.

Sunday

July 5

Monday

May 25

D’backs

3:15 p.m.

Monday

July 6

Tuesday

May 26

D’backs

7:15 p.m.

Tuesday

July 7

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday

July 8

Wednesday

July 1

White Sox

7:15 p.m.

Sunday

August 16

Marlins

1:15 p.m.

Thursday

July 2

Padres

6:15 p.m.

Monday

August 17

Giants

7:15 p.m.

July 3

Padres

7:15 p.m.

Tuesday

August 18

Giants

7:15 p.m.

July 4

Padres

1:15 p.m.

Wednesday

August 19

Giants

6:15 p.m.

Padres

1:15 p.m.

Friday

August 21

at Padres

9:10 p.m.

at Cubs

7:05 p.m.

Saturday

August 22

at Padres

7:40 p.m.

at Cubs

7:05 p.m.

Sunday

August 23

at Padres

3:10 p.m.

at Cubs

7:05 p.m.

Monday

August 24

at D’backs

8:40 p.m.

Wednesday

May 27

D’backs

Friday

May 29

Dodgers

7:15 p.m.

Thursday

July 9

at Pirates

6:05 p.m.

Tuesday

August 25

at D’backs

8:40 p.m.

Saturday

May 30

Dodgers

6:15 p.m.

Friday

July 10

at Pirates

6:05 p.m.

Wednesday

August 26

at D’backs

8:40 p.m.

Sunday

May 31

Dodgers

1:15 p.m.

Saturday

July 11

at Pirates

6:15 p.m.

Thursday

August 27

at D’backs

8:40 p.m.

Monday

June 1

Brewers

7:10 p.m.

Sunday

July 12

at Pirates

7:05 p.m.

Friday

August 28

at Giants

9:15 p.m.

Tuesday

June 2

Brewers

7:15 p.m.

Friday

July 17

Mets

7:15 p.m.

Saturday

August 29

at Giants

3:05 p.m.

Wednesday

June 3

Brewers

12:45 p.m.

Thursday

June 4

at Dodgers

Saturday

July 18

Mets

6:15 p.m.

Sunday

August 30

at Giants

3:05 p.m.

9:10 p.m.

Sunday

July 19

Mets

1:15 p.m.

Monday

August 31

Nationals

7:15 p.m.

Tuesday

July 21

at White Sox

7:10 p.m.

Tuesday

September 1

Nationals

7:15 p.m. 7:15 p.m.

Friday

June 5

at Dodgers

9:10 p.m.

Saturday

June 6

at Dodgers

9:10 p.m.

Sunday

June 7

at Dodgers

TBD

Monday

June 8

at Rockies

7:40 p.m.

Tuesday

June 9

at Rockies

7:40 p.m.

Sunday

July 26

Wednesday

June 10

at Rockies

2:10 p.m.

Monday

July 27

Friday

June 12

Royals

7:15 p.m.

Tuesday

July 28

Saturday

June 13

Royals

3:10 p.m.

Wednesday

July 29

Wednesday

July 22

at White Sox

7:10 p.m.

Wednesday

September 2

Nationals

Friday

July 24

Braves

7:15 p.m.

Friday

September 4

Pirates

7:15 p.m.

Saturday

July 25

Braves

6:15 p.m.

Saturday

September 5

Pirates

3:05 p.m.

Braves

1:15 p.m.

Sunday

September 6

Pirates

1:15 p.m.

Reds

7:15 p.m.

Monday

September 7

Cubs

1:15 p.m.

Reds

7:15 p.m.

Tuesday

September 8

Cubs

7:15 p.m.

Reds

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday

September 9

Cubs

12:45 p.m.

Thursday

September 10

at Reds

6:10 p.m. 6:10 p.m.

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

My Dr. Laughed When I Told Him I Went to The St. Louis Men’s Clinic… Until He Heard My Results St. LouiS - You’ve heard the ads on radio or have seen them in the paper. This St. Louis Men’s Clinic claiming their doctors can solve erectile dysfunction; even if others failed in the past. Frankly, i ind these claims hard to believe. I’ve been with the same family doctor 30 years. My urologist is the best in Missouri.

After discussing it with my wife, I igured what do I have to lose? Frankly, part of me wanted to prove those doctors wrong and blow the cover on the entire scam. My wife booked an appointment – the day came – I was nervous and angry. I didn’t want to be disappointed again. To my amazement, the ofice staff was professional, medically trained, and helped me relax. I met with the doctor and his trained medical staff. He gave me the test dose.

When my prostate cancer hit 5 years ago, my family doctor and urologist recommended removal. I didn’t argue. They are doctors after all. They assured i Felt Something i Hadn’t Felt me I’d be able to perform in the bedroom in 5 Years! after the surgery.

In 12 minutes, “it” worked. My wife was in the room and saw the results for herself. We were speechless and excited! The doctor came back into the room and I looked at him in disbelief. He explained it’s not my doctor’s fault they failed in the My Family Doctor Said My E.D. Was incurable, there Was past. Since this is the clinic’s specialty they are able to help thousands of men Nothing Anyone Could Do! perform again, where others have failed, My wife was supportive. She told no matter the cause of ED or PE issues. me it wasn’t important to her and there were other “things” we could do. Deep Sure the medications are extra, but down inside I felt like less of a man and it’s cheaper than the pills your doctor husband. prescribes for you... And this works!

After the surgery, that was not the case. My urologist gave me Viagra, Cialis and nothing worked. I tried the pump and Caverject. Again no results just lots of physical and emotional pain.

For 6 months, I heard the ads for the St. Louis Men’s Clinic and thought to myself. “How can those doctors at that St. Louis Men’s Clinic, who don’t know me, make these claims to solve my E.D. in 12 minutes or less… for only $199?”

My advice to you...call The St. Louis Men’s Clinic at 314.282.8080. Tell them John sent you and be prepared for one of the biggest and best surprises of your life. FOR INFORMATION AND TO SCHEDULE YOUR PRIVATE EXAM WITH OUR DOCTORS CALL

314.282.8080

777 SoutH NEW BALLAS RD., SuitE 119 W St. LouiS, Mo 63141 WWW.StLMENSCLiNiC.CoM

Friday

September 11

at Reds

Saturday

September 12

at Reds

TBD

Sunday

September 13

at Reds

12:10 p.m.

Tuesday

September 15

at Brewers

7:10 p.m.

Wednesday

September 16

at Brewers

7:10 p.m.

Thursday

September 17

at Brewers

7:10 p.m.

Friday

September 18

at Cubs

1:20 p.m.

Saturday

September 19

at Cubs

12:05 p.m.

Sunday

September 20

at Cubs

Monday

September 21

Reds

7:15 p.m.

TBD

Tuesday

September 22

Reds

7:15 p.m.

Wednesday

September 23

Reds

7:15 p.m.

Thursday

September 24

Brewers

6:15 p.m.

Friday

September 25

Brewers

7:15 p.m.

Saturday

September 26

Brewers

6:15 p.m.

Sunday

September 27

Brewers

1:15 p.m.

Monday

September 28

at Pirates

6:05 p.m.

Tuesday

September 29

at Pirates

6:05 p.m.

Wednesday

September 30

at Pirates

6:05 p.m. 6:35 p.m.

Friday

October 2

at Braves

Saturday

October 3

at Braves

6:10 p.m.

Sunday

October 4

at Braves

12:35 p.m.

Gift Certiicates Available

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soccEr

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

St. Louis FC plays to draw in debut CBC grad Barklage scores for hometown USL club in front of sellout crowd U.S. oPen CUP

By Joe LyonS St. Louis Post-dispatch

FENTON • The Pittsburgh Riverhounds put a bit of a damper on St. Louis FC’s big night, rallying for a 1-1 draw before a before a sellout crowd of 5,280 at Soccer Park on Saturday night. It was the United Soccer League home opener for St. Louis FC. Both teams are 1-1-1. St. Louis FC dominated the first half and grabbed the lead just before halftime when St. Louis native Brandon Barklage knocked in a corner kick from Patrick Doody. Barklage played high school soccer at CBC and finished up his college career at St. Louis University. But the Riverhounds turned up the pressure in the second half and pulled even in the 73rd minute when Vini Dantas knocked in a rebound from about 8 yards out. St. Louis FC came on as the opening half progressed, outshooting Pittsburgh 9-1. In the 20th minute, the home team’s Jermie Lynch, a 24-yearold from Jamaica, headed a free kick from Doody on goal for the game’s first scoring chance. Ten minutes later, St. Louis FC’s Richard Dixon forced Pittsburgh keeper Ryan Thompson to make a diving stop on a low shot ticketed for the lower right corner. Seconds later, a shot from Parker Maher was blocked at the Pittsburgh defense. Seven or so minutes later, Lynch ran onto a well-played ball over the top for a breakaway, but his first touch was too strong, allowing Thompson to come of his line to end the threat. Less than three minutes after halftime, the home team nearly added to its lead. Jamiel Hardware made a strong run down the left side and cut to the middle. His shot was blocked en route to teammate Lynch, who had his shot from point-blank range stuffed by the Riverhounds’ Thompson. Midway though the second half, after receiving a cross from Doody, Bryan Gaul made a quick turn and whipped a shot by the goal post.

DaviD Carson • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis FC forward Jermie Lynch (center) shoots the ball in the irst half Saturday against the Pittsburgh Riverhounds at the Soccer Park in Fenton. St. Louis FC played to a 1-1 draw in its home debut. STLFC up next • 7:30 p.m. Saturday vs. Rochester

Pittsburgh came on to even the score in the 73rd minute after applying some pressure in the St. Louis FC zone. Not long after a diving stop by St. Louis FC goalkeeper Mark Pais and a block from Greg Cochrane on the rebound, the Riverhounds’ Dantas scored following a blocked shot. Five minutes later, Pittsburgh’s Tyler Pasher tested Pais with a shot headed for the upper-left corner. Saturday marked the first road game for the Riverhounds, a franchise founded in 1999. They opened the season with a 5-2 win over Harrisburg but then dropped a 2-1 decision to the Rochester (N.Y.) Rhinos. The Riverhounds will meet St. Louis FC again June 6 in Pittsburgh.

LoCAL TIeS The 25-man St. Louis FC roster features nine players from the area: starting goalkeeper Pais (Ladue, St. Louis U./Tulsa), starting defender Sam Fink (Edwardsville, Wake Forest), starting midfielders Barklage (CBC, New Mexico/SLU) and Charles Renken (Edwardsville) as well as reserves Mike Ambersley (De Smet, Indiana), Mike Roach (Chaminade, Indiana/SLU), Kent Kobernus (Belleville West, SIUE), Jack Mathis (De Smet, Drury) and Chad Vandegriffe (Chaminade, SLU). Roach, Kobernus, Mathis and Vandegrife were among the inactives for Saturday’s game. Others not included on the 18man game roster were Bryan Cielsiulka, Nick Bibbs and Jordan

Roberts. Joining Pais, Fink, Barklage and Renken in Saturday’s starting lineup were defenders James Musa, Richard Dixon and Doody, midfielders Maher and Hardware and forwards Gaul and Lynch.

neXT UP St. Louis FC returns to action next Saturday, when it hosts the Rochester Rhinos in a 7:30 p.m. match at the Soccer Park. The Rhinos (2-0-1) posted a 3-0 road win over FC Montreal Saturday and will play Thursday in Louisville before heading to St. Louis. After opening the season with a pair of road games, Saturday marked the start of a stretch in which St. Louis FC will play five of its next six games at home.

St. Louis FC will host the Des Moines Menace/Madison Fire winner in the second round of the 2015 Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup on Wednesday, May 20, in a 7 p.m. game at THE Soccer Park. Des Moines, of the Premier Development League, will host Madison on May 13. Madison is one of 11 teams to qualify through the U.S. Adult Soccer Association. The 102nd edition of the U.S. Open Cup, which includes a record 91 teams this year, is the oldest ongoing national soccer competition in the country and the world’s third-oldest open soccer event. Teams from St. Louis FC’s USL Pro division will join the single-elimination tournament in the second round, with teams from the North American Soccer League joining in the third and squads from Major League Soccer added in the fourth round. MLS teams have dominated the competition, winning 18 of 19 titles since the league opened play in 1996. In 1999, The ALeague’s Rochester Rhinos stunned the Colorado Rapids of MLS 2-0 in the championship match. In last year’s title game featuring two MLS squads, the Seattle Sounders won 3-1 in extra time over the Philadelphia Union.

TWo FRoM ST. LoUIS FC HonoReD Following the team’s inaugural win, a 2-0 road victory over the Tulsa Roughnecks, Pais and Lynch were named to the USL team of the week. Pais finished with five saves, including some late in the match to preserve the victory, while Lynch scored the first goal in franchise history late in the first half against Tulsa and later assisted on the insurance tally from fellow forward Bryan Gaul. “They both played important roles in us coming away with the victory in Tulsa,” St. Louis FC coach Dale Schilly said. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

My Dr. Laughed When I Told Him I Went to The St. Louis Men’s Clinic… Until He Heard My Results St. LouiS - You’ve heard the ads on radio or have seen them in the paper. This St. Louis Men’s Clinic claiming their doctors can solve erectile dysfunction; even if others failed in the past. Frankly, i ind these claims hard to believe. I’ve been with the same family doctor 30 years. My urologist is the best in Missouri.

After discussing it with my wife, I igured what do I have to lose? Frankly, part of me wanted to prove those doctors wrong and blow the cover on the entire scam. My wife booked an appointment – the day came – I was nervous and angry. I didn’t want to be disappointed again. To my amazement, the ofice staff was professional, medically trained, and helped me relax. I met with the doctor and his trained medical staff. He gave me the test dose.

When my prostate cancer hit 5 years ago, my family doctor and urologist recommended removal. I didn’t argue. They are doctors after all. They assured i Felt Something i Hadn’t Felt me I’d be able to perform in the bedroom in 5 Years! after the surgery.

In 12 minutes, “it” worked. My wife was in the room and saw the results for herself. We were speechless and excited! The doctor came back into the room and I looked at him in disbelief. He explained it’s not my doctor’s fault they failed in the My Family Doctor Said My E.D. Was incurable, there Was past. Since this is the clinic’s specialty they are able to help thousands of men Nothing Anyone Could Do! perform again, where others have failed, My wife was supportive. She told no matter the cause of ED or PE issues. me it wasn’t important to her and there were other “things” we could do. Deep Sure the medications are extra, but down inside I felt like less of a man and it’s cheaper than the pills your doctor husband. prescribes for you... And this works!

After the surgery, that was not the case. My urologist gave me Viagra, Cialis and nothing worked. I tried the pump and Caverject. Again no results just lots of physical and emotional pain.

For 6 months, I heard the ads for the St. Louis Men’s Clinic and thought to myself. “How can those doctors at that St. Louis Men’s Clinic, who don’t know me, make these claims to solve my E.D. in 12 minutes or less… for only $199?”

My advice to you...call The St. Louis Men’s Clinic at 314.282.8080. Tell them John sent you and be prepared for one of the biggest and best surprises of your life. FOR INFORMATION AND TO SCHEDULE YOUR PRIVATE EXAM WITH OUR DOCTORS CALL

314.282.8080

777 SoutH NEW BALLAS RD., SuitE 119 W St. LouiS, Mo 63141 WWW.StLMENSCLiNiC.CoM

DaviD Carson • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louligans member Jack Burton, from Belleville, chants Saturday as the St. Louligans section of the crowd iles into their seats before the irst USL home game of St. Louis FC at the Soccer Park in Fenton.

Gift Certiicates Available

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soccEr

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

St. Louis FC plays to draw in debut CBC grad Barklage scores for hometown USL club in front of sellout crowd after following up on a blocked shot in the St. Louis FC penalty area. Just before that, St. Louis keeper Mark Pais came up with a diving stop and teammate Greg Cochrane blocked the rebound. “They changed their formation, turned up the pressure and I’m not sure we dealt with it properly,” Barklage said. “But it’s all part of the learning process. We’re a young team adjusting to a new league, and hopefully we’ll learn from this.” Ambersley added: “We clearly had enough chances to win tonight, but you have put those chances away and we just didn’t get it done.” The USL Eastern Conference foes will meet again June 6 in Pittsburgh.

By Joe Lyons St. Louis Post-dispatch

FENTON • The Pittsburgh Riverhounds put a bit of a damper on St. Louis FC’s home debut, rallying for a 1-1 draw before a sellout crowd of 5,280 at the Soccer Park Saturday night. Both teams are 1-1-1. “I think they pushed an extra number forward, they really pressed up against us and we had a difficult time getting a hold of it,” St. Louis FC coach Dale Schilly said. “Jamiel (Hardware) just ran his legs of. He played a helluva game in the midfield; he was a guy who picked up a lot of those 50-50 balls for us and helped get things going for us in the front half of the field. I think we just ran out of gas from that perspective and then we just lost our rhythm. And whenever you lose your rhythm, you start to chase the game a little bit and you get put on your heels. “Overall, I thought it was a good performance. We would’ve loved to get the three points. But this is our first time through this league. We have to learn what it takes to get results.” St. Louis FC survived a pair of early giveaways to settle down and dominate the opening half with a 9-1 edge in shots. In the 20th minute, the home team’s Jermie Lynch headed a free kick from Patrick Doody on goal for the game’s first scoring chance. Ten minutes later, St. Louis FC’s Richard Dixon forced Pittsburgh keeper Ryan Thompson to make a diving stop on a low shot ticketed for the lower-right corner. Seconds later, a shot from Parker Maher was blocked at the Pittsburgh defense. Seven or so minutes later, Lynch ran onto a well-played ball over the top for a breakaway, but his first touch was too strong, allowing Thompson to come of his line to end the threat. Just before halftime, native St. Louisan Brandon Barklage put the home team on top when he knocked in a corner kick from Doody. “Very special night for me and

LoCAL TIes

DaviD Carson • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

St. Louis FC forward Jermie Lynch takes a shot in the irst half Saturday against the Pittsburgh Riverhounds at the Soccer Park in Fenton. St. Louis FC played to a 1-1 draw in its home debut. STLFC up next • 7:30 p.m. Saturday vs. Rochester

also for the club,” said Barklage, a CBC High product who finished up his college career at St. Louis University. “The result wasn’t what we wanted — we got a little sloppy in the second half — but that’s definitely something we can and will improve on.” Barklage continued: “The crowd was unbelievable. The Hooligans were incredible. It was a special night for St. Louis and I really believe there’s a lot more fun to come.” Schilly echoed that: “What I love about St. Louis fans is their appreciation for something that’s

really quality. We had a moment where we did a little one-two combination that ended up ofside. But the moment was really, really good and the fans were really into it. When I saw that, it really felt special to me, knowing that these fans get it.” Less than three minutes after halftime, the home team nearly added to its lead. Hardware made a strong run down the left side and cut to the middle. His shot was blocked en route to teammate Lynch, who had his shot from point-blank range stuffed by Thompson.

Midway though the second half, after receiving a cross from Doody, Bryan Gaul made a quick turn and whipped a shot by the goal post. But Pittsburgh came on strong midway through the second half and eventually came up with the equalizer. “You could see it coming,” said Mike Ambersley, a De Smet product who came of the bench in the second half. “We did a lot of good things tonight, but once that momentum swung, we just couldn’t seem to get it back.” The Riverhounds tied it in the 73rd minute when Vini Dantas scored from about 8 yards out

The 25-man St. Louis FC roster features nine players from the area: starting goalkeeper Pais (Ladue, St. Louis U./Tulsa), starting defender Sam Fink (Edwardsville,Wake Forest), starting midfielders Barklage (CBC, New Mexico/SLU) and Charles Renken (Edwardsville) as well as reserves Ambersley (De Smet, Indiana), Mike Roach (Chaminade, Indiana/SLU), Kent Kobernus (Belleville West, SIUE), Jack Mathis (De Smet, Drury) and Chad Vandegriffe (Chaminade, SLU). Roach, Kobernus, Mathis and Vandegrife were among the inactives for Saturday’s game.

neXT UP St. Louis FC returns to action next Saturday, when it hosts the Rochester (N.Y.) Rhinos in a 7:30 p.m. match at the Soccer Park. The Rhinos (2-0-1) posted a 3-0 road win over FC Montreal Saturday and will play Thursday in Louisville before heading to St. Louis. After opening the season with a pair of road games, Saturday marked the start of a stretch in which St. Louis FC will play five of its next six games at home. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

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St. Louligans member Jack Burton, from Belleville, chants Saturday as the St. Louligans section of the crowd iles into their seats before the irst USL home game of St. Louis FC at the Soccer Park in Fenton.

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C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIoNAL LEAGUE

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Cincinnati

4

0

1.000

4-0

W-4

4-0

0-0

Cardinals

1

2

.333

1-2

L-2

0-0

1-2

Chicago

1

2

.333

1-2

L-1

1-1

0-1

Pittsburgh

1

3

.250

3

1-3

W-1

0-0

1-3

Milwaukee

0

4

.000

4

0-4

L-4

0-4

0-0

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Atlanta

4

0

1.000

4-0

W-4

1-0

3-0

New York

2

2

.500

2

2-2

L-1

0-0

2-2

Philadelphia

2

2

.500

2

2-2

W-1

2-2

0-0

Miami

1

3

.250

3

1-3

W-1

1-3

0-0

Washington

1

3

.250

3

1-3

L-2

1-2

0-1

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Colorado

4

0

1.000

4-0

W-4

1-0

3-0

San Francisco

3

2

.600

3-2

L-2

0-0

Arizona

2

2

.500

2

2-2

W-1

Los Angeles

2

2

.500

2

2-2

L-1

San Diego

2

3

.400

2-3

W-1

Friday Cincinnati 5, Cardinals 4 Colorado 5, Chicago Cubs 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 1 Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 2 Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Atlanta 5, NY Mets 3 Arizona 4, LA Dodgers 3 (10) San Diego 1, San Francisco 0 Thursday Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh 2 NY Mets 6, Washington 3 S. Francisco 1, San Diego 0 (12) Boston 6, Philadelphia 2

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Toronto

3

1

.750

3-1

W-2

0-0

3-1

Boston

2

1

.667

½

2-1

W-1

0-0

2-1

Baltimore

2

2

.500

1

2-2

L-2

0-1

2-1

New York

1

2

.333

1-2

L-1

1-2

0-0

Tampa Bay

1

3

.250

2

1-3

L-1

1-2

0-1

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Detroit

4

0

1.000

4-0

W-4

3-0

1-0

Kansas City

3

0

1.000

½

3-0

W-3

3-0

0-0

Cleveland

2

2

.500

2

2-2

L-1

0-1

2-1

Minnesota

1

3

.250

3

1-3

W-1

0-0

1-3

Chicago

0

4

.000

4

0-4

L-4

0-1

0-3

WEST

Away

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Los Angeles

2

1

.667

2-1

W-2

0-0

2-1

3-2

Oakland

3

2

.600

3-2

W-1

3-2

0-0

2-2

0-0

Houston

2

2

.500

½

2-2

W-1

1-2

1-0

2-1

0-1

Texas

2

3

.400

1

2-3

L-1

0-1

2-2

1-1

1-2

Seattle

1

3

.250

1-3

L-3

1-3

0-0

Saturday’s games pitching matchups

RoUNdUp

box SCoRES

Pittsburgh posts irst win of season

Blue Jays 12, Orioles 5

Astros 5, Rangers 1

Pirates 6, Brewers 2

Diamondbacks 4, Dodgers 3

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 5 1 3 1 0 1 .353 Pompey cf 6 2 2 2 0 0 .143 Bautista rf 3 4 3 2 1 0 .200 St.Tolleson rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Encarnacion dh 4 0 0 1 0 2 .313 Donaldson 3b 3 1 2 3 1 0 .286 D.Navarro c 4 0 1 3 0 0 .250 Smoak 1b 4 2 2 0 1 1 .375 Pillar lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .294 Travis 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .385 Totals 39 12 16 12 3 6 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. E.Cabrera ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .222 Pearce lf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .188 A.Jones cf 4 2 4 2 0 0 .333 C.Davis 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .200 D.Young dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .125 Machado 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Snider rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .462 Schoop 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .300 Joseph c 3 1 1 0 1 0 .200 Totals 36 5 13 4 2 2 Toronto 401 501 001 — 12 16 1 Baltimore 100 010 021 — 5 13 1 E: D.Navarro (1), B.Norris (1). LOB: Toronto 8, Baltimore 6. 2B: Reyes (1), Pompey 2 (2), Bautista (1), Donaldson (1), D.Navarro (1), Pillar (1), Travis (1), A.Jones (2), C.Davis (1), Joseph (2). HR: A.Jones (1), off Buehrle; Schoop (1), off Estrada. RBIs: Reyes (2), Pompey 2 (2), Bautista 2 (2), Encarnacion (4), Donaldson 3 (3), D.Navarro 3 (3), A.Jones 2 (4), D.Young (1), Schoop (1). SF: Reyes, Encarnacion, Donaldson, D.Navarro. RLISP: Toronto 6 (Pillar 2, D.Navarro, Pompey 3); Baltimore 4 (E.Cabrera 2, D.Young, Schoop). GIDP: Pearce, D.Young, Machado. DP: Toronto 3. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle W, 1-0 6 8 2 2 2 1 84 3.00 Hendriks 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 0.00 Hynes 1 3 2 2 0 1 13 18.00 Estrada 1 1 1 1 0 0 19 9.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Norris L, 0-1 3 7 8 8 1 1 66 24.00 Brach 2 5 2 2 0 3 30 12.00 Jas.Garcia 22/3 2 1 1 2 2 47 2.45 1/ W.Wright 1 3 2 1 1 0 0 19 5.40 B.Norris pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Brach 3-3. HBP: by B.Norris (Travis). Umpires: Home, Todd Tichenor; First, Tim Welke; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Tim Timmons. T: 2:45. A: 45,936 .

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .125 Springer rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Lowrie ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .308 Carter 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .067 Gattis dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Villar 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 J.Castro c 3 2 1 0 1 1 .250 Grossman lf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .333 Col.Rasmus lf 1 1 1 2 0 0 .250 Marisnick cf 3 0 3 2 0 0 .429 Totals 34 5 10 5 2 7 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. L.Martin cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Choo rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Smolinski rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Beltre 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .150 Fielder 1b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .421 1-Rosales pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Rua lf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .235 DeShields lf 2 0 0 1 0 1 .333 Moreland dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Odor 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .143 Chirinos c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Totals 32 1 6 1 2 8 Houston 100 010 102 — 5 10 0 Texas 000 001 000 — 1 6 2 1-ran for Fielder in the 9th. E: Chirinos (1), Fielder (2). LOB: Houston 5, Texas 6. 2B: Grossman (1), Marisnick (1), Beltre (1), Fielder (2), Odor (1). HR: Lowrie (2), off D.Holland; Col.Rasmus (1), off Feliz. RBIs: Lowrie (2), Col.Rasmus 2 (2), Marisnick 2 (3), DeShields (1). SB: Marisnick (1). CS: Andrus (1). S: Marisnick. RLISP: Houston 4 (Springer, Altuve 3); Texas 3 (L.Martin, Moreland, Andrus). DP: Texas 2. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McHugh W, 1-0 6 5 1 1 2 4 85 1.50 Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 4.50 Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Holland L, 0-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 9 9.00 Bass 5 4 1 1 1 2 63 1.29 Mendez 1 2 1 1 0 2 19 6.00 Sh.Tolleson 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 0.00 2/ 3 2 2 2 1 1 22 10.80 Feliz 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 11.57 Klein Inherited runners-scored: Klein 1-0. PB: J.Castro. Umpires: Home, Cory Blaser; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Laz Diaz; Third, Chris Guccione. T: 2:45. A: 48,885 .

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Harrison 3b 3 0 0 0 1 3 .200 Polanco rf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .222 McCutchen cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .125 Lambo lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 N.Walker 2b 5 1 3 0 0 1 .313 Marte lf-cf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .125 P.Alvarez 1b 4 2 2 2 0 2 .357 S.Rodriguez 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Cervelli c 4 1 2 0 0 1 .364 Mercer ss 2 0 1 1 0 0 .231 Locke p 3 0 1 1 0 0 .333 J.Hughes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Caminero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 6 10 6 2 12 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Gomez cf-2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .176 Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 1 1 .063 Braun rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .286 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .188 K.Davis lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .313 Lind 1b 3 0 2 2 1 0 .615 Segura ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .385 Gennett 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Blazek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Fiers p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-L.Jimenez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Thornburg p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-H.Gomez ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Jeffress p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-L.Schafer ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Cotts p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --G.Parra cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Totals 35 2 9 2 2 6 Pittsburgh 030 110 010 — 6 10 0 Milwaukee 000 200 000 — 2 9 0 a-grounded out for Fiers in the 5th. b-was announced for Thornburg in the 6th. c-struck out for Jeffress in the 7th. LOB: Pittsburgh 8, Milwaukee 9. 2B: N.Walker 2 (3), Cervelli (2), Locke (1), K.Davis 2 (2), Lind (3), Segura (1). 3B: Lucroy (1). HR: P.Alvarez (2), off Fiers; Marte (1), off Cotts. RBIs: Marte 2 (2), P.Alvarez 2 (4), Mercer (1), Locke (1), Lind 2 (4). SB: N.Walker (1). CS: Gennett (1). S: Marte, J.Hughes. SF: Marte, Mercer. RLISP: Pittsburgh 5 (J.Harrison, Marte, P.Alvarez, Polanco 2); Milwaukee 5 (Segura, Gennett 2, Ar.Ramirez, Braun). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Locke W, 1-0 6 7 2 2 1 2 90 3.00 J.Hughes 1 1/3 2 0 0 0 2 19 3.00 Bastardo 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 0.00 2/ Caminero 3 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers L, 0-1 5 7 5 5 1 8 89 9.00 Thornburg 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.00 Jeffress 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Cotts 1 3 1 1 1 2 24 3.00 Blazek 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.38 Bastardo pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Bastardo 1-0, Caminero 2-0. IBB: off Cotts (J.Harrison). HBP: by Locke (Gennett), by Jeffress (J.Harrison), by Fiers (Mercer). Umpires: Home, Mike Estabrook; First, Dana DeMuth; Second, Toby Basner; Third, Paul Nauert. T: 3:13. A: 27,373 .

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 5 0 1 2 0 1 .278 Puig rf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .118 A.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 1 0 2 0 .688 H.Kendrick 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .333 Grandal c 4 1 1 1 0 2 .111 C.Crawford lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .357 Uribe 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .231 Pederson cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .214 B.Anderson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Van Slyke ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Y.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Ethier ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jo.Peralta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 3 8 3 3 8 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pollock cf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .154 Inciarte lf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .357 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 3 3 0 0 .462 Trumbo rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .188 Hill 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Owings 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Gosewisch c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .182 Ahmed ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .111 C.Anderson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Pacheco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Chafin p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Reed p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O.Perez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Pennington ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .250 Totals 35 4 7 4 3 10 Los Angeles 000 120 000 0 — 3 8 1 Arizona 003 000 000 1 — 4 7 0 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for C.Anderson in the 5th. b-grounded out for B.Anderson in the 7th. c-grounded out for Y.Garcia in the 9th. d-walked for O.Perez in the 10th. E: Uribe (1). LOB: Los Angeles 6, Arizona 6. 2B: Rollins (2). HR: Grandal (1), off C.Anderson; Goldschmidt (1), off B.Anderson. RBIs: Rollins 2 (6), Grandal (1), Inciarte (1), Goldschmidt 3 (3). SB: Pennington (1). S: B.Anderson. RLISP: Los Angeles 3 (Grandal, H.Kendrick, Ethier); Arizona 1 (Owings). GIDP: A.Gonzalez, H.Kendrick. DP: Arizona 2. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA B.Anderson 6 5 3 3 1 4 94 4.50 Y.Garcia 2 1 0 0 0 4 23 2.25 Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 0.00 1/ Howell L, 0-1 3 1 1 1 2 0 15 5.40 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Anderson 5 5 3 3 3 6 100 5.40 Chafin 3 0 0 0 0 1 33 0.00 Reed 1 2 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 O.Perez W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 IBB: off C.Anderson (A.Gonzalez). WP: Howell. Umpires: Home, Chris Conroy; First, Ted Barrett; Second, Angel Hernandez; Third, Scott Barry. T: 3:01. A: 27,404 .

Pedro Alvarez homered and drove in two runs, Neil Walker had three hits and visiting Pittsburgh avoided its irst 0-4 start in nine years with a 6-2 win Friday night over the Milwaukee Brewers. Jef Locke (1-0) allowed seven hits and two runs in six solid innings for Pittsburgh, which rebounded after getting swept in three games in Cincinnati to open the season. The Pirates roughed up Mike Fiers (0-1) for ive runs in ive innings. Rockies 5, Cubs 1 • Host Colorado tied its best start in franchise history, beating the Chicago Cubs behind Troy Tulowitzki’s two-run double and Justin Morneau’s solo homer. Phillies 4, Nationals 1 • Cesar Hernandez had a go-ahead, two-run single in a wild four-run seventh and Freddy Galvis had three hits and an RBI, leading Philadelphia to a victory over visiting Washington. Braves 5, Mets 3 • Phil Gosselin had a tiebreaking two-run single in the eighth, Cameron Maybin homered and Atlanta won its home opener with a victory over the sloppy New York Mets. Padres 1, Giants 0 • Wil Myers hit an RBI double of the right-ield wall with one out in the eighth and Craig Kimbrel got his irst save with host San Diego. D’backs 4, Dodgers 3 • Ender Inciarte had a gameending single with one out in the bottom of the 10th, leading the Arizona to a win over visiting Los Angeles.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Astros 5, Rangers 1 • Jed Lowrie and former Cardinal Colby Rasmus homered for Houston, which beat injuryplagued Texas to spoil the home debut of new Rangers manager Jef Banister. Blue Jays 12, Orioles 5 • Jose Bautista broke out of an early-season slump by going three for three and scoring four runs as Toronto ruined Baltimore’s home opener. Mark Buehrle (1-0) earned his 200th career victory. Twins 6, White Sox 0 • Tommy Milone allowed two hits in 7 2/3 innings and Minnesota got its irst win under manager Paul Molitor, beating the White Sox to spoil Chicago’s home opener. Tigers 8, Indians 4 • Alfredo Simon took a shutout into the sixth in his debut for Detroit and Nick Castellanos hit a two-run homer as the Tigers won their fourth straight, beating Cleveland in the opener at its remodeled ballpark. A’s 12, Mariners 0 • Drew Pomeranz and two relievers combined on a three-hit shutout and host Oakland shut out Seattle.

INTERLEAGUE Marlins 10, Rays 9 • Christian Yelich drove in three runs, including a game-ending RBI single in the bottom of the 10th to lift host Miami to its irst win of the season. Giancarlo Stanton also had three RBIs and Michael Morse drove in two for the Marlins, who led 8-1 before Tampa Bay scored seven runs in the seventh to tie it. Associated Press

Twins 6, White Sox 0 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 6 1 2 1 0 1 .176 Edu.Escobar ss 4 2 1 0 0 2 .222 Mauer 1b 2 0 1 1 3 1 .333 Tor.Hunter rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .125 K.Vargas dh 4 0 1 0 1 1 .231 Plouffe 3b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .083 Arcia lf 3 0 1 0 2 1 .222 1-S.Robinson pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 K.Suzuki c 4 1 2 1 1 0 .231 J.Schafer cf 5 0 1 2 0 2 .231 Totals 36 6 10 5 9 9 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .125 Me.Cabrera lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Abreu 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .214 A.Garcia rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .273 LaRoche dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .071 Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .083 G.Beckham 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Flowers c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .250 M.Johnson 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Totals 28 0 3 0 2 7 Minnesota 100 011 003 — 6 10 0 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 1-ran for Arcia in the 9th. E: Al.Ramirez (1). LOB: Minnesota 13, Chicago 3. 2B: Edu.Escobar (1), Eaton (1), Flowers (1). HR: Dozier (1), off Albers. RBIs: Dozier (1), Mauer (1), K.Suzuki (1), J.Schafer 2 (2). SB: Tor.Hunter (1). CS: M.Johnson (1). RLISP: Minnesota 7 (Arcia 2, Tor.Hunter 2, K.Suzuki 2, J.Schafer); Chicago 2 (LaRoche, M.Johnson). DP: Minnesota 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Milone W, 1-0 72/3 2 0 0 2 7 100 0.00 Duensing S, 1-1 11/3 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Noesi L, 0-1 42/3 4 2 2 6 6 110 3.86 Albers 11/3 1 1 1 1 0 26 3.86 Da.Jennings 2 2 0 0 1 2 27 10.13 Putnam 1 3 3 2 1 1 27 18.00 Inherited runners-scored: Duensing 1-0, Albers 3-0. IBB: off Noesi (Arcia), off Putnam (Arcia), off Da.Jennings (K.Suzuki). HBP: by Noesi (Edu.Escobar). WP: Noesi 2. Balk: Noesi. Umpires: Home, James Hoye; First, John Hirschbeck; Second, Sam Holbrook; Third, Bill Welke. T: 3:01. A: 38,533 .

Marlins 10, Rays 9 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 4 2 2 2 1 1 .385 Souza Jr. rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Andriese p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-DeJesus ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .500 Yates p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Beliveau p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --B.Wilson c 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 A.Cabrera ss 5 1 3 2 0 0 .294 Longoria 3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .231 De.Jennings lf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .286 Dykstra 1b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .000 Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Forsythe 2b-1b 3 1 0 1 2 0 .167 Rivera c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Frieri p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-T.Beckham ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Geltz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Mahtook ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 E.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Balfour p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Guyer ph-rf 2 2 2 1 1 0 .250 Totals 38 910 9 6 8 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon 2b 5 4 3 0 1 0 .353 Yelich lf 5 2 2 3 1 1 .313 Stanton rf 3 1 2 3 1 0 .273 Morse 1b 4 0 2 2 1 1 .313 Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .200 A.Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-I.Suzuki ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mathis c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ozuna cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Saltalamacchia c 3 1 1 0 2 1 .100 Morris p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hechavarria ss 5 1 1 1 0 1 .067 Haren p 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Phelps p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Solano 3b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Totals 4010 13 9 6 8 Tampa Bay 000 100 701 0 — 9 10 0 Miami 101 600 010 1 — 10 13 0 One out when winning run scored. a-lined out for Geltz in the 3rd. b-singled for Balfour in the 6th. c-doubled for Andriese in the 7th. d-grounded out for A.Ramos in the 8th. e-grounded out for Frieri in the 10th. LOB: Tampa Bay 5, Miami 9. 2B: DeJesus (1), Guyer (1), D.Gordon (1), Stanton (1), Saltalamacchia (1), Hechavarria (1). HR: Kiermaier (2), off Haren. RBIs: Kiermaier 2 (4), DeJesus 3 (3), A.Cabrera 2 (3), Forsythe (4), Guyer (1), Yelich 3 (3), Stanton 3 (3), Morse 2 (2), Hechavarria (1). SB: De.Jennings (1), D.Gordon 2 (3), Stanton (1). RLISP: Tampa Bay 2 (Souza Jr., Rivera); Miami 3 (Prado, D.Gordon, I.Suzuki). GIDP: Souza Jr., Morse. DP: Tampa Bay 1, Miami 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Geltz 2 2 1 1 1 1 35 2.08 E.Ramirez 2 6 7 7 3 2 50 31.50 Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Andriese 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 0.00 Yates 1 1 1 1 0 2 18 9.00 2/ Beliveau 3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.00 Frieri 11/3 1 0 0 1 0 18 4.50 Boxberger L, 0-1 1/3 2 1 1 0 1 9 3.86 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren 6 4 1 1 0 2 79 1.50 1/ Phelps 3 2 4 4 2 0 21 36.00 1/ 3 0 2 2 2 1 14 11.57 S.Dyson A.Ramos 11/3 2 1 1 1 2 31 2.70 Cishek 1 2 1 1 0 1 19 33.75 Morris W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 0.00 Yates pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Beliveau 1-0, Frieri 1-1, S.Dyson 3-2, A.Ramos 3-3. HBP: by E.Ramirez (Stanton). WP: Geltz. Umpires: Home, Will Little; First, Gerry Davis; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Tony Randazzo. T: 3:36. A: 17,375 .

Friday Toronto 12, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Texas 1 Detroit 8, Cleveland 4 Minnesota 6, Chicago (A) 0 Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Oakland 12, Seattle 0 Boston at NY Yankees, (n) Kansas City at LA Angels, (n) Thursday Detroit 7, Minnesota 1 Kansas City 4, Chicago (A) 1 Cleveland 5, Houston 1 Texas 10, Oakland 1 Boston 6, Philadelphia 2 Toronto 6, NY Yankees 3

Rockies 5, Cubs 1 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Soler rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .200 Rizzo 1b 2 1 2 0 0 0 .333 S.Castro ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Olt 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .125 Szczur lf 2 0 0 1 1 0 .000 Castillo c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 T.Wood p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Coghlan ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Schlitter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --E.Jackson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-J.Herrera ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Alcantara 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Totals 30 1 5 1 4 7 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dickerson lf 4 1 1 1 1 1 .375 Tulowitzki ss 4 0 2 2 0 1 .444 Arenado 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .438 C.Gonzalez rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .353 Rosario 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 B.Brown p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Descalso ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Logan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stubbs cf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Bergman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Morneau 1b 2 1 1 1 0 0 .133 Hundley c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .353 Matzek p 1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000 Blackmon cf 2 1 0 0 1 1 .125 LeMahieu 2b 4 1 3 1 0 0 .471 Totals 34 5 11 5 3 7 Chicago 001 000 000 — 1 5 1 Colorado 010 022 00x — 5 11 0 a-grounded out for Motte in the 6th. b-grounded out for B.Brown in the 7th. c-flied out for E.Jackson in the 9th. E: S.Castro (1). LOB: Chicago 9, Colorado 8. 2B: Tulowitzki (5), Matzek (1). HR: Morneau (1), off Schlitter. RBIs: Szczur (1), Dickerson (7), Tulowitzki 2 (4), Morneau (1), LeMahieu (2). SB: Szczur (1). SF: Szczur. RLISP: Chicago 6 (Fowler 2, Castillo 2, Olt, Alcantara); Colorado 4 (Rosario 2, Tulowitzki, Dickerson). GIDP: S.Castro. DP: Colorado 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Wood L, 0-1 42/3 7 3 3 2 5 90 5.79 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Motte Schlitter 1 3 2 2 1 0 26 18.00 E.Jackson 2 1 0 0 0 2 31 0.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matzek 4 4 1 1 3 4 84 2.25 Bergman W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 B.Brown 2 1 0 0 1 2 25 0.00 Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Logan 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Matzek pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Motte 2-0, Bergman 2-0. IBB: off T.Wood (Arenado). HBP: by Matzek (Rizzo, Rizzo). WP: Matzek. Umpires: Home, Quinn Wolcott; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Rob Drake. T: 3:01. A: 49,303 .

Tigers 8, Indians 4 Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gose cf 6 1 2 1 0 3 .471 Kinsler 2b 6 1 2 1 0 1 .353 Mi.Cabrera 1b 5 0 3 1 0 1 .313 V.Martinez dh 5 0 3 1 0 1 .333 J.Martinez rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Cespedes lf 5 2 3 0 0 0 .444 Castellanos 3b 4 2 2 2 1 0 .214 1-Romine pr-3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Avila c 3 1 0 0 2 2 .364 J.Iglesias ss 4 1 3 1 0 0 .600 Totals 43 8 18 7 3 9 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 2 2 0 1 2 .294 Kipnis 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .313 Brantley lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .125 C.Santana 1b 3 0 2 2 1 1 .308 Moss dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .071 Y.Gomes c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .188 Dav.Murphy rf 1 0 1 0 1 0 .333 a-Aviles ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .400 Chisenhall 3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .182 b-Raburn ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 J.Ramirez ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .214 Totals 34 4 10 4 3 7 Detroit 010 220 300 — 8 18 0 Cleveland 000 003 010 — 4 10 1 a-flied out for Dav.Murphy in the 7th. b-flied out for Chisenhall in the 7th. 1-ran for Castellanos in the 9th. E: Rzepczynski (1). LOB: Detroit 12, Cleveland 6. 2B: Cespedes (2), Brantley (1), C.Santana (1). 3B: Kinsler (1). HR: Castellanos (1), off McAllister. RBIs: Gose (4), Kinsler (5), Mi.Cabrera (3), V.Martinez (2), Castellanos 2 (3), J.Iglesias (1), Brantley (1), C.Santana 2 (4), Moss (1). SB: Mi.Cabrera (1). CS: Gose (1), Bourn (1). S: J.Iglesias. RLISP: Detroit 6 (J.Martinez 2, Kinsler 2, Castellanos, Mi.Cabrera); Cleveland 4 (Chisenhall, Y.Gomes, Moss, Bourn). GIDP: J.Iglesias, Moss, Y.Gomes. DP: Detroit 2, Cleveland 1. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Simon W, 1-0 51/3 7 3 3 2 3 76 5.06 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Alburquerque B.Hardy 2 1 1 1 1 1 31 4.50 2/ 3 2 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 Chamberlain 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Soria S, 1-1 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister L, 0-1 4 13 5 5 1 5 92 11.25 Crockett 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 0.00 Swarzak 11/3 2 1 1 0 0 16 6.75 1/ 3 1 2 0 0 1 11 0.00 Rzepczynski 1/ 3 1 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Shaw Atchison 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 Hagadone 1 1 0 0 1 1 20 4.50 McAllister pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored: Alburquerque 2-0, Soria 2-0, Rzepczynski 1-1, Shaw 1-1. WP: Simon, Rzepczynski. Umpires: Home, Lance Barrett; First, Dale Scott; Second, Dan Iassogna; Third, CB Bucknor. T: 3:35. A: 35,789 .

Phillies 4, Nationals 1 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Taylor cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .294 Y.Escobar 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .214 Harper rf 4 0 1 0 0 3 .333 Zimmerman 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .143 W.Ramos c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .167 Desmond ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .214 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .143 T.Moore lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 G.Gonzalez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Cedeno p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-den Dekker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Treinen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 6 1 1 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere cf-lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .133 Galvis ss 3 0 3 1 1 0 .385 Utley 2b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .071 Giles p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ruf 1b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Francoeur rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .231 Sizemore lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .200 1-O.Herrera pr-cf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Rupp c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .000 A.Blanco 3b 2 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Williams p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 L.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-C.Hernandez ph-2b 1 1 1 2 0 0 .333 Totals 27 4 7 4 4 5 Washington 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 Philadelphia 000 000 40x — 4 7 0 a-singled for L.Garcia in the 7th. b-popped out for Stammen in the 8th. 1-ran for Sizemore in the 7th. LOB: Washington 5, Philadelphia 6. 2B: Y.Escobar (1), Galvis (1), A.Blanco (1). HR: M.Taylor (1), off Williams. RBIs: M.Taylor (3), Galvis (1), Utley (3), C.Hernandez 2 (2). CS: Revere (1). SF: Utley. RLISP: Washington 3 (Desmond, Uggla, Harper); Philadelphia 3 (Francoeur, Utley, Ruf). GIDP: Utley. DP: Washington 2. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA G.Gonzalez L, 0-1 61/3 5 3 3 4 4 95 4.26 Cedeno 0 1 1 1 0 0 6 9.00 2/ Stammen 3 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Treinen 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Williams 6 5 1 1 1 6 93 1.50 L.Garcia W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Giles 1 1 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 Papelbon S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Cedeno pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Cedeno 3-2, Stammen 3-2. HBP: by G.Gonzalez (A.Blanco), by Cedeno (Revere). Umpires: Home, David Rackley; First, Jerry Layne; Second, Hunter Wendelstedt; Third, Bob Davidson. T: 2:30. A: 19,047.

Padres 1, Giants 0 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .429 Panik 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Pagan cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .300 Posey 1b 2 0 2 0 1 0 .353 B.Crawford ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .238 McGehee 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .250 G.Blanco rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .188 H.Sanchez c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Lincecum p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Maxwell ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Y.Petit p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 27 0 5 0 3 7 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Myers cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .217 Spangenberg 3b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Solarte ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kemp rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .238 Upton lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 De.Norris c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .300 Alonso 1b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .471 Gyorko 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .125 Amarista ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .143 Middlebrooks ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Morrow p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Benoit p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Barmes ph-ss 0 1 0 0 1 0 .333 Totals 26 1 5 1 4 6 San Francisco 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 San Diego 000 000 01x — 1 5 0 LOB: San Francisco 3, San Diego 5. 2B: Myers (1). RBIs: Myers (2). SB: Upton (1), Alonso (1). CS: Myers (1). RLISP: San Francisco 2 (B.Crawford, McGehee); San Diego 4 (Upton, Morrow, Gyorko, Kemp). GIDP: Pagan, B.Crawford, McGehee, Alonso, Gyorko. DP: San Francisco 3; San Diego 4. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincecum 7 4 0 0 3 5 96 0.00 Affeldt L, 0-1 2/3 1 1 1 1 0 14 5.40 1/ Y.Petit 3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morrow 7 4 0 0 3 7 88 0.00 Benoit W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.00 Kimbrel S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Y.Petit 1-0. IBB: off Lincecum (Amarista, Alonso). Umpires: Home, Vic Carapazza; First, Larry Vanover; Second, Ron Kulpa; Third, Brian Knight. T: 2:31. A: 40,015.

NL

Pitcher

Time W-L

StL

Wacha (R)

12:10

Cin

Cueto (R)

Was Fister (R) Hamels (L)

6:05

NY

Gee (R)

6:10

Atl

Teheran (R)

Pit

Worley (R) Nelson (R)

Chi

Hammel (R)

Col

Kendrick (R)

ERA ----

0-0 0.00

Phi

Mil

---

6:10

7:10

---

----

0-1

7.20

---

----

1-0

1.50

---

----

---

----

---

----

1-0 0.00

LA

Kershaw (L)

Ari

Bradley (R)

SF

Bumgarner (L)

SD

Shields (R)

7:40

AL

Pitcher

Bos Kelly (R)

---

----

---

----

NY

Warren (R)

Min Pelfrey (R) Chi

0-0 7:10

----

1-0

1.29

0-0

3.00

Time W-L

ERA

12:05 1:10

Smardzija (R)

Sea Happ (L)

3:05

Oak Gray (R) Det Price (L) Cle

Sanchez (R)

Bal

Jimenez (R)

---

----

0-1

7.50

---

----

1-0 0.00 3:10

Kluber (R)

Tor

4.50

---

1-0 0.00 0-1

2.45

---

----

6:05

---

----

Hou Hernandez (R) 7:05

---

----

Tex Gallardo (R)

0-1

9.00

KC

Guthrie (R)

LA

Weaver (R)

IL TB

8:05

---

----

0-1

6.00

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

Archer (R)

3:10

0-1

4.76

---

----

Mia Cosart (R)

Braves 5, Mets 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .077 D.Wright 3b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .353 Mayberry lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .250 Cuddyer 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Dan.Murphy 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .133 Lagares cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .188 d’Arnaud c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .400 Flores ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 d-Duda ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Niese p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Nieuwenhuis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gilmartin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --R.Montero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 3 8 3 2 11 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Maybin cf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Gosselin 2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .200 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Markakis rf 5 1 0 0 0 2 .188 Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .353 J.Gomes lf 2 1 1 1 2 1 .286 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .556 1-Peterson pr-2b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .200 Bethancourt c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .167 A.Simmons ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .235 Stults p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Co.Martin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-E.Young ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Cunniff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ji.Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Callaspo ph-3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .571 Totals 35 5 9 4 3 7 New York 000 300 000 — 3 8 2 Atlanta 201 000 02x — 5 9 0 a-grounded out for Co.Martin in the 6th. b-struck out for Goeddel in the 7th. c-was intentionally walked for Ji.Johnson in the 8th. d-struck out for Flores in the 9th. 1-ran for C.Johnson in the 8th. E: Flores 2 (3). LOB: New York 5, Atlanta 10. 2B: C.Johnson 2 (3), A.Simmons (1). HR: D.Wright (1), off Stults; Mayberry (1), off Stults; Maybin (1), off Niese. RBIs: D.Wright 2 (4), Mayberry (1), Maybin (3), Gosselin 2 (2), J.Gomes (1). SB: D.Wright (1), Maybin (1), Gosselin (1). S: Stults. RLISP: New York 2 (Flores, Cuddyer); Atlanta 8 (Bethancourt 2, Gosselin, A.Simmons 3, Markakis 2). GIDP: Granderson, Dan.Murphy. DP: Atlanta 2. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA New York Niese 5 7 3 1 2 2 86 1.80 Goeddel 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.00 Gilmartin R.Montero L, 0-1 1 2 2 2 1 3 40 6.00 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 Blevins Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stults 5 7 3 3 1 3 86 5.40 Co.Martin 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Cunniff 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 Avilan Ji.Johnson W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 3 15 0.00 Grilli S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 1 1 28 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Blevins 2-0. IBB: off R.Montero (Callaspo). Umpires: Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Jim Reynolds. T: 3:01 (Delay: 1:09). A: 46,279 .

Athletics 12, Mariners 0 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Weeks lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .091 A.Jackson cf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .313 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .200 B.Miller ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .364 N.Cruz dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Seager 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .154 Ruggiano rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Bloomquist ss-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 0 3 0 2 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fuld cf-rf 5 2 3 1 0 0 .412 Canha lf 5 3 3 2 0 0 .500 Zobrist rf 3 2 2 1 1 1 .263 Ladendorf cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .400 B.Butler dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .300 a-C.Ross ph-dh 0 0 0 0 1 0 .200 I.Davis 1b 5 2 3 4 0 0 .286 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Vogt c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .357 Semien ss 5 1 2 2 0 1 .333 Sogard 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Totals 40 12 16 12 4 6 Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Oakland 320 600 01x — 12 16 0 E: Ruggiano (1). LOB: Seattle 4, Oakland 8. 2B: Zobrist 2 (3), I.Davis 2 (2), Semien (2). HR: Canha (1), off T.Walker. RBIs: Fuld (1), Canha 2 (6), Zobrist (3), B.Butler (2), I.Davis 4 (4), Vogt (4), Semien 2 (5). RLISP: Seattle 1 (Bloomquist); Oakland 8 (Semien 4, Sogard 2, I.Davis 2). GIDP: Cano. DP: Oakland 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Walker L, 0-1 3 1/3 9 9 9 2 3 77 24.30 2/ Wilhelmsen 1 3 5 2 2 1 1 38 6.75 Furbush 12/3 0 0 0 0 0 18 0.00 Medina 11/3 2 1 1 1 2 31 3.38 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz W, 1-0 7 2 0 0 0 6 92 0.00 Abad 1 1 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 R.Alvarez 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.00 Inherited runners-scored: Wilhelmsen 3-3. IBB: off Wilhelmsen (Vogt), off T.Walker (Zobrist). WP: T.Walker. Umpires: Home, Brian Gorman; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Tripp Gibson III. T: 2:44. A: 30,114 .

(THURSDAY)

Royals 4, White Sox 1 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Me.Cabrera lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Abreu 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 LaRoche dh 3 1 0 0 0 2 .091 A.Garcia rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .333 Al.Ramirez ss 3 0 1 1 0 0 .111 Gillaspie 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Soto c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Bonifacio ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Flowers c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 M.Johnson 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals 30 1 4 1 1 7 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Escobar ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Moustakas 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .300 L.Cain cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .417 Hosmer 1b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .357 K.Morales dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .273 Rios rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .417 S.Perez c 3 1 1 2 1 0 .455 Orlando lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .333 Infante 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .091 Totals 31 4 8 4 2 2 Chicago 000 000 100 — 1 4 1 Kansas City 100 003 00x — 4 8 0 a-grounded out for Soto in the 8th. E: Gillaspie (1). LOB: Chicago 4, Kansas City 7. 2B: Abreu (2), M.Johnson (1), A.Escobar (2), L.Cain (1), K.Morales (2). 3B: Orlando (1). HR: S.Perez (1), off Danks. RBIs: Al.Ramirez (2), L.Cain (4), K.Morales (2), S.Perez 2 (4). SB: Hosmer (1), Rios (2). S: A.Escobar, Moustakas. RLISP: Chicago 3 (LaRoche, Gillaspie, Me.Cabrera); Kansas City 4 (L.Cain 2, Moustakas, Orlando). DP: Kansas City 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Danks L, 0-1 52/3 7 4 4 1 1 75 6.35 1/ Guerra 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Albers 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Robertson 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 0.00 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volquez W, 1-0 8 4 1 1 1 5 95 1.13 G.Holland S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 0.00 HBP: by Volquez (LaRoche). WP: Robertson. Umpires: Home, Bob Davidson; First, David Rackley; Second, Jerry Layne; Third, Hunter Wendelstedt. T: 2:37. A: 20,236 .

Red Sox 6, Phillies 2 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Pedroia 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Ortiz 1b 2 1 1 0 2 1 .143 Napoli 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 H.Ramirez lf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .308 Sandoval 3b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .167 Victorino rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Hanigan c 3 1 0 1 2 0 .125 Bogaerts ss 4 1 3 3 1 0 .364 Masterson p 3 0 2 1 0 1 .667 Craig ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Breslow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Layne p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Holt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 6 11 6 6 7 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere cf 4 1 0 0 0 0 .083 Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .375 Utley 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .091 Howard 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .083 Ruf lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Asche 3b 3 0 2 0 1 1 .300 Francoeur rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Galvis ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .200 Buchanan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O.Herrera ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000 McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --C.Hernandez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 De Fratus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Blanco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 L.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 5 1 3 10 Boston 006 000 000 — 6 11 0 Philadelphia 002 000 000 — 2 5 3 E: Galvis 2 (2), Buchanan (1). LOB: Boston 12, Philadelphia 6. 3B: Bogaerts (1). RBIs: Victorino (1), Hanigan (1), Bogaerts 3 (4), Masterson (1), Utley (2). RLISP: Boston 5 (Sandoval 3, Betts, Craig); Philadelphia 2 (Howard, Revere). GIDP: Hanigan. DP: Philadelphia 1. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Masterson W, 1-0 6 3 2 2 2 7 95 3.00 Breslow 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 0.00 Layne 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Mujica 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buchanan L, 0-1 3 7 6 6 4 1 79 18.00 McGowan 2 1 0 0 1 1 42 0.00 De Fratus 2 1 0 0 1 4 50 0.00 L.Garcia 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 0.00 Diekman 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 27.00 WP: Masterson. PB: Ruiz. Umpires: Home, Tony Randazzo; First, Will Little; Second, Gerry Davis; Third, Phil Cuzzi. T: 3:08. A: 23,418.


basEball

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH national league

aMeriCan league

CENTRAL

W

L

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Str

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Away

Cincinnati

4

1

.800

4-1

L-1

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2

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Chicago

1

2

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L-1

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Milwaukee

1

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3

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Pittsburgh

1

4

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3

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EAST

W

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Atlanta

5

0

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W-5

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Philadelphia

3

2

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2

3-2

W-2

3-2

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New York

2

3

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3

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1

4

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M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

1

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Colorado

4

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San Francisco

3

2

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Arizona

2

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Los Angeles

2

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San Diego

2

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W-1

1-1

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Saturday Cardinals 4, Cincinnati 1 Tampa Bay 2, Miami 0 Phila. 3, Washington 2 (10) Atlanta 5, NY Mets 3 Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0 Chicago Cubs at Colorado, (n) LA Dodgers at Arizona, (n) San Francisco at San Diego, (n) Friday Cincinnati 5, Cardinals 4 Colorado 5, Chicago Cubs 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 1 Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Atlanta 5, NY Mets 3 Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 2 Arizona 4, LA Dodgers 3 (10) San Diego 1, San Francisco 0

EAST

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Boston

4

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4-1

W-3

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Baltimore

3

2

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1

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1-1

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Toronto

3

2

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1

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L-1

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2

3

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W-1

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1

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Detroit

5

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1.000

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Kansas City

4

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Cleveland

2

3

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3

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L-2

0-2

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Chicago

1

4

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W-1

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1

4

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Oakland

3

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Houston

2

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Los Angeles

2

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L-1

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Seattle

2

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Texas

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WEST

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Brewers inally get in the win column

Tigers 9, Indians 6

Red Sox 8, Yankees 4

Phillies 3, Nationals 2

Brewers 6, Pirates 0

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gose cf 3 1 1 1 0 2 .450 b-R.Davis ph-cf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Kinsler 2b 5 3 4 2 0 1 .455 Mi.Cabrera 1b 5 1 4 1 0 0 .429 V.Martinez dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .316 1-H.Perez pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Martinez rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .217 Cespedes lf 5 0 1 2 0 1 .391 Castellanos 3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .167 2-J.Iglesias pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .600 Avila c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .308 a-J.McCann ph-c 2 1 1 1 1 0 .667 Romine ss-3b 2 2 1 0 3 1 .500 Totals 39 9 14 8 6 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Aviles lf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .333 Kipnis 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .333 C.Santana 1b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .313 Y.Gomes c 4 1 0 0 0 2 .150 R.Perez c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Raburn dh 2 0 0 1 0 1 .000 c-Moss ph-dh 0 1 0 0 1 0 .071 Sands rf 4 0 3 4 0 1 .750 Chisenhall 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .133 J.Ramirez ss 3 0 1 0 1 2 .235 Totals 34 6 8 6 5 8 Detroit 200 000 304 — 9 14 1 Cleveland 000 003 021 — 6 8 0 a-singled for Avila in the 7th. b-lined out for Gose in the 7th. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 7th. 2-ran for Castellanos in the 9th. E: Price (1). LOB: Detroit 9, Cleveland 7. 2B: Cespedes (3), Sands 2 (2). HR: Gose (1), off Kluber. RBIs: Gose (5), Kinsler 2 (7), Mi.Cabrera (4), V.Martinez (3), Cespedes 2 (3), J.McCann (2), Kipnis (2), Raburn (1), Sands 4 (4). SB: Romine 2 (2). CS: Romine (1). SF: Raburn. RLISP: Detroit 4 (Gose, J.Martinez, Romine 2); Cleveland 3 (Chisenhall 2, C.Santana). GIDP: V.Martinez, Aviles. DP: Detroit 1, Cleveland 1. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Detroit Price 52/3 4 3 0 3 6 104 0.00 Gorzelanny 12/3 1 0 0 0 1 18 0.00 Alburquerque 1/3 0 1 1 1 0 9 5.40 1/ 3 1 1 1 1 0 16 6.75 Krol W, 1-0 Soria 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 5.40 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Kluber 6 3 7 2 2 1 10 107 2.63 Rzepczynski 0 1 2 2 1 0 9 18.00 1/ 3 3 1 1 0 0 12 5.40 Shaw 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Atchison Swarzak 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.86 2/ 3 3 4 4 3 0 37 21.60 Allen L, 0-1 1/ 3 0 0 0 1 1 11 0.00 Crockett Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Gorzelanny 1-0, Krol 1-1, Shaw 2-2, Atchison 2-0, Crockett 3-1. IBB: off Allen (Castellanos). Umpires: Home, Dale Scott; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 4:16. A: 23,161 .

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Holt cf 5 1 4 3 0 0 .667 Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 2 0 0 .240 Ortiz dh 5 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Napoli 1b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Sandoval 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .269 Craig rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .143 Nava lf 3 1 2 2 1 0 .400 Bogaerts ss 4 2 1 0 0 0 .391 Hanigan c 2 2 0 1 2 0 .091 Totals 37 8 9 8 5 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 C.Young cf 4 1 1 3 0 0 .222 Beltran dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .100 A.Rodriguez 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .278 Headley 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .136 G.Jones rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .286 J.Murphy c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .286 Gregorius ss 2 0 0 1 0 1 .133 G.Petit 2b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .167 Totals 31 4 5 4 2 11 Boston 010 100 330 — 8 9 0 New York 010 000 030 — 4 5 3 E: A.Rodriguez (1), Headley (2), J.Murphy (1). LOB: Boston 7, New York 3. 2B: Holt (1), Pedroia (1), Nava (1), G.Jones (1). HR: C.Young (1), off Ogando. RBIs: Holt 3 (3), Pedroia 2 (4), Nava 2 (4), Hanigan (2), C.Young 3 (3), Gregorius (2). SB: Napoli (1), Bogaerts (2). SF: Gregorius. RLISP: Boston 6 (Bogaerts 2, Ortiz, Napoli, Pedroia, Craig); New York 2 (G.Petit, J.Murphy). GIDP: Pedroia 2. DP: New York 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Kelly W, 1-0 7 1 1 1 2 8 93 1.29 2/ Ogando 3 3 3 3 0 1 20 10.13 1/ Varvaro 3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Ross Jr. 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Warren L, 0-1 5 3 5 2 1 2 1 98 1.69 2/ 3 0 1 1 1 1 13 3.00 J.Wilson Ch.Martin 1 2 2 2 0 0 24 4.91 Tracy 2 2 3 0 2 1 39 0.00 J.Wilson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Ch.Martin 1-1. WP: J.Kelly. PB: J.Murphy. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Winters; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Marty Foster. T: 3:13. A: 46,678 .

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .286 Y.Escobar 3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .263 Harper rf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .278 Zimmerman 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .105 Roark p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Ramos c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .188 Desmond ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .167 R.Johnson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Espinosa 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Fister p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Thornton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-C.Robinson ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 1-den Dekker pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Treinen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-T.Moore ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 36 2 7 2 4 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Utley 2b-1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .111 Howard 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .188 2-C.Hernandez pr-2b 1 1 0 0 0 1 .250 Ruiz c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .385 Sizemore rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .200 O.Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 1 0 .111 A.Blanco 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .375 Hamels p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .333 a-Asche ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 b-Ruf ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Francoeur ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 41 3 13 3 2 5 Washington 000 100 010 0 — 2 7 1 Philadelphia 000 000 020 1 — 3 13 0 One out when winning run scored. a-was announced for Hamels in the 7th. b-fouled out for Asche in the 7th. c-singled for Thornton in the 8th. d-doubled for Papelbon in the 9th. e-flied out for Stammen in the 10th. 1-ran for C.Robinson in the 8th. 2-ran for Howard in the 8th. E: Desmond (4). LOB: Washington 8, Philadelphia 12. 2B: Espinosa (1), Howard 2 (3), Sizemore (1), O.Herrera (1), Francoeur (1). HR: W.Ramos (1), off Hamels. RBIs: W.Ramos (1), C.Robinson (1), Howard (1), Ruiz (1), O.Herrera (1). SB: M.Taylor (1). RLISP: Washington 3 (W.Ramos, Zimmerman 2); Philadelphia 4 (Howard, Utley, A.Blanco, C.Hernandez). RISP: Washington 2 for 8; Philadelphia 2 for 13. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister 61/3 6 0 0 1 1 95 0.00 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Thornton Treinen 1 4 2 2 0 1 21 6.00 Stammen 1 1 0 0 1 3 22 0.00 1/ 3 2 1 1 0 0 10 3.86 Roark L, 0-1 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels 7 2 1 1 2 5 104 3.75 1/ 3 3 1 1 0 0 20 4.50 J.Gomez 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 2 10 18.00 Diekman Papelbon 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 McGowan W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 2 1 27 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Thornton 1-0, Diekman 2-0. IBB: off Stammen (Utley), off McGowan (Harper). WP: J.Gomez. Umpires: Home, Jerry Layne; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, David Rackley. T: 3:25. A: 23,740 .

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Harrison 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Cervelli c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .357 N.Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Marte cf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .167 P.Alvarez 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .313 Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hart rf-1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Lambo lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Kang ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Worley p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 S.Rodriguez rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Totals 26 0 2 0 2 11 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Gomez cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .190 Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .050 Braun rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .200 Lind 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .529 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .200 L.Jimenez 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 K.Davis lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .300 Segura ss 2 2 1 2 1 1 .400 H.Gomez 2b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .667 Nelson p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 a-L.Schafer ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 W.Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Broxton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 6 7 6 2 6 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Milwaukee 030 200 10x — 6 7 0 a-sacrificed for Nelson in the 7th. LOB: Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 3. 2B: C.Gomez (2), Ar.Ramirez (1), K.Davis (3), H.Gomez 2 (2). HR: Segura (1), off Worley. RBIs: C.Gomez (3), K.Davis (1), Segura 2 (2), H.Gomez 2 (2). CS: Cervelli (1). S: L.Schafer. RLISP: Pittsburgh 1 (Lambo); Milwaukee 2 (C.Gomez, Braun). RISP: Pittsburgh 0 for 2; Milwaukee 3 for 8. Runners moved up: Lucroy, K.Davis. GIDP: N.Walker, Hart. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Nelson, Segura, Lind), (Ar. Ramirez, Lind). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley L, 0-1 61/3 7 6 6 2 4 89 8.53 2/ Scahill 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nelson W, 1-0 7 2 0 0 2 9 88 0.00 W.Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 6.00 Inherited runners-scored: Scahill 1-0. HBP: by Nelson (Cervelli). Umpires: Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Toby Basner; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Mike Estabrook. T: 2:26. A: 41,108 .

Jimmy Nelson struck out a career-high nine in seven innings, Jean Segura hit a two-run homer and the Milwaukee Brewers became the last team in the majors to win this season by beating the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-0 on Saturday. Hector Gomez added a two-run single for Milwaukee, which stopped a four-game losing streak by tagging Vance Worley (0-1) for six runs and seven hits in 6 1/3 innings. Braves 5, Mets 3 • Julio Teheran pitched efectively into the seventh inning and Atlanta stayed hot to beat visiting New York, which learned earlier that injured closer Jenrry Mejia was suspended 80 games for a positive drug test. The Braves improved to 5-0 for the irst time since the 1994 season.

aMeriCan league White Sox 5, Twins 4 • Pinch-hitter J.B. Shuck had a go-ahead RBI single in the eighth inning to give host Chicago its irst win. Shuck lined a 1-1 pitch from reliever Blaine Boyer (0-1) with two outs, scoring Alexei Ramirez. Conor Gillaspie was thrown out at the plate as he tried to score from second. Former Yankees closer David Robertson struck out the side for his irst save with Chicago. The White Sox lost their irst four. Mariners 5, A’s 4 • Nelson Cruz hit his irst home run for Seattle and Brad Miller threw out a runner at the plate in the 10th inning and doubled in the go-ahead run in the 11th to lift Seattle on the road. Cruz, signed to a $57 million, four-year contract as a free agent, hit a three-run drive in the eighth of Dan Otero to put the Mariners in front 4-2. Oakland tied the score in the bottom half on RBI doubles by Ben Zobrist of Danny Farquhar and Brett Lawrie against Carson Smith. Tigers 9, Indians 6 • Ian Kinsler hit an RBI single and Yoenis Cespedes doubled in two runs during Detroit’s four-run top of the ninth as the Tigers stayed unbeaten. Kinsler’s fourth hit — a single of closer Cody Allen (0-1) — snapped a 5-all tie and helped the Tigers improve to 5-0 for the irst time since 2006. Red Sox 8, Yankees 4 • Joe Kelly pitched one-hit ball for seven innings and visiting Boston ran over New York. The game started at 1:08 p.m. following Friday night’s game that took 19 innings. Matt Tracy (CBC) made his major league debut for New York. Orioles 7, Blue Jays 1 • Ubaldo Jimenez struck out eight and allowed one single over seven sparkling innings, Jonathan Schoop hit a grand slam to lead Baltimore at home.

interleague Rays 2, Marlins 0 • Chris Archer pitched seven crisp innings, and visiting Tampa Bay beat Miami. Archer (1-1) allowed one hit and one walk, with the latter runner erased trying to steal, while throwing only 84 pitches. Two relievers completed the two-hitter, with Brad Boxberger pitching the ninth for his second save. Associated Press

Mariners 5, Athletics 4 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 6 1 1 0 0 2 .273 S.Smith dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .833 c-Ruggiano ph-dh 2 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Cano 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .150 N.Cruz rf 5 1 3 3 0 1 .200 Seager 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Morrison 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .158 Ackley lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .300 B.Miller ss 4 0 1 1 1 1 .333 Sucre c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Weeks ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Zunino c 1 0 0 0 1 0 .071 Totals 42 5 10 5 3 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gentry cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Fuld ph-cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .350 Canha 1b-lf 6 1 1 0 0 1 .400 Zobrist lf-rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .292 B.Butler dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .348 1-Sogard pr-dh 1 1 0 0 0 1 .200 C.Ross rf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .250 d-I.Davis ph-1b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .313 Lawrie 3b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .261 Phegley c 3 0 2 1 0 0 .444 e-Vogt ph-c 0 0 0 0 2 0 .357 Semien ss 5 0 2 1 0 0 .348 Ladendorf 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Totals 42 4 12 4 3 6 Seattle 001 000 030 01 — 5 10 0 Oakland 000 000 220 00 — 4 12 1 a-popped out for Gentry in the 7th. b-flied out for Sucre in the 8th. d-struck out for C.Ross in the 8th. e-was intentionally walked for Phegley in the 8th. 1-ran for B.Butler in the 7th. E: Semien (2). LOB: Seattle 8, Oakland 10. 2B: B.Miller (1), Zobrist (4), I.Davis (3), Lawrie (2). HR: Ackley (2), off Gray; N.Cruz (1), off Otero. RBIs: N.Cruz 3 (3), Ackley (2), B.Miller (2), Zobrist (4), Lawrie (1), Phegley (1), Semien (6). SB: B.Miller (1). S: Ackley, Sogard, Lawrie. RLISP: Seattle 3 (B.Miller, A.Jackson 2); Oakland 6 (Ladendorf 2, Fuld, Semien 3). GIDP: Cano. DP: Oakland 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ 61/3 7 2 2 0 1 82 2.84 Farquhar 1 2 2 2 0 0 17 7.71 C.Smith 12/3 1 0 0 1 3 26 0.00 Olson W, 1-0 1 2 0 0 2 1 26 0.00 Rodney S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 71/3 6 2 1 1 4 96 0.59 1/ 3 0 1 0 0 0 7 0.00 O’Flaherty 1/ 3 1 1 1 0 0 6 6.75 Otero Clippard 1 0 0 0 2 1 32 0.00 Abad L, 0-1 11/3 3 1 1 0 2 27 3.00 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Chavez Inherited runners-scored: Farquhar 2-0, C.Smith 1-1, O’Flaherty 1-0, Otero 2-2, Chavez 1-0. IBB: off C.Smith (Vogt), off Olson (Lawrie). WP: Farquhar. Umpires: Home, Mark Carlson; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Tripp Gibson III; Third, Brian Gorman. T: 3:39. A: 24,355 .

White Sox 5, Twins 4 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Santana ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .125 Dozier 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .190 Mauer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 K.Vargas dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .176 Plouffe 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .133 Arcia lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 a-Tor.Hunter ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .118 Herrmann c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .200 S.Robinson rf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .200 J.Schafer cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Totals 35 4 8 4 1 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Me.Cabrera lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .150 Abreu dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .176 LaRoche 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .118 A.Garcia rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .333 Al.Ramirez ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .125 Gillaspie 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .444 G.Beckham 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Soto c 3 1 2 1 0 0 .400 b-Shuck ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Flowers c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 M.Johnson 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Totals 33 5 11 5 1 5 Minnesota 040 000 000 — 4 8 0 Chicago 021 100 01x — 5 11 2 a-grounded out for Arcia in the 8th. b-singled for Soto in the 8th. E: Soto (1), Gillaspie (2). LOB: Minnesota 5, Chicago 6. 2B: Dozier (1), Plouffe (1), A.Garcia (2), Gillaspie (2). 3B: Herrmann (1). HR: LaRoche (1), off Pelfrey; Soto (1), off Pelfrey. RBIs: D.Santana (1), Dozier (2), Herrmann (1), S.Robinson (1), LaRoche (1), A.Garcia (1), Gillaspie (1), Soto (1), Shuck (1). SB: D.Santana (1), S.Robinson (1). CS: J.Schafer (1). RLISP: Minnesota 2 (K.Vargas, Mauer); Chicago 2 (Eaton, Gillaspie). GIDP: Al.Ramirez. DP: Minnesota 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pelfrey 5 7 4 4 1 2 80 7.20 Graham 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 A.Thompson 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.70 2/ 3 3 1 1 0 0 10 9.00 Boyer L, 0-1 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija 7 8 4 4 0 6 113 6.23 Duke W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Robertson S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 0.00 HBP: by Pelfrey (Abreu). Umpires: Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Bill Welke; Third, James Hoye. T: 2:54. A: 22,317 .

Saturday Boston 8, N.Y. Yankees 4 Chicago (A) 5, Minnesota 4 Seattle 5, Oakland 4 (11) Detroit 9, Cleveland 6 Tampa Bay 2, Miami 0 Baltimore 7, Toronto 1 Houston at Texas, (n) Kansas City at LA Angels, (n) Friday Toronto 12, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Texas 1 Detroit 8, Cleveland 4 Minnesota 6, Chicago (A) 0 Boston 6, NY Yankees 5 (19) Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Kansas City 4, LA Angels 2 Oakland 12, Seattle 0

Sunday’s games pitching matchups

Rays 2, Marlins 0 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .353 Souza Jr. rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .133 A.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .286 Longoria 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .235 De.Jennings lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Dykstra 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-T.Beckham ph-2b 2 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Forsythe 2b-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .188 B.Wilson c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .333 c-Rivera ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Archer p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Jepsen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 6 2 3 5 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Yelich lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .316 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Morse 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Prado 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Ozuna cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .263 Saltalamacchia c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .056 Cosart p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-I.Suzuki ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Solano ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Totals 28 0 2 0 2 8 Tampa Bay 000 001 100 — 2 6 0 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 a-walked for Cosart in the 6th. b-homered for Dykstra in the 7th. c-lined out for B.Wilson in the 9th. d-grounded out for S.Dyson in the 9th. LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Miami 3. 2B: Kiermaier (2), Longoria (2), Yelich (1). 3B: A.Cabrera (1). HR: T.Beckham (1), off Dunn. RBIs: Longoria (2), T.Beckham (1). SB: T.Beckham (1). CS: I.Suzuki (1). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Longoria, Archer, De.Jennings, Rivera); Miami 3 (Morse, Hechavarria, Stanton). GIDP: A.Cabrera. DP: Miami 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer W, 1-1 7 1 0 0 1 5 84 2.13 Jepsen 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Boxberger S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 2.70 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cosart L, 0-1 6 3 1 1 3 1 86 1.50 1/ Dunn 1 3 1 1 1 0 2 29 2.70 2/ S.Dyson 1 3 2 0 0 0 2 25 6.75 WP: Jepsen. Umpires: Home, Gerry Davis; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Will Little. T: 2:32. A: 17,830 .

Orioles 7, Blue Jays 1 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .368 St.Tolleson ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Pompey cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Bautista rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Valencia rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Encarnacion dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .300 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 R.Martin c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Pillar lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Travis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .313 Totals 30 1 3 1 1 10 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza lf 5 2 2 1 0 2 .333 Pearce rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .200 C.Davis 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .286 A.Jones cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .333 Snider dh 2 1 0 0 2 1 .400 Machado 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 4 0 1 .286 E.Cabrera ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .308 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .154 Totals 32 7 9 6 6 8 Toronto 000 000 001 — 1 3 1 Baltimore 201 040 00x — 7 9 0 E: Donaldson (1). LOB: Toronto 4, Baltimore 8. 2B: St.Tolleson (1). HR: De Aza (2), off Aa.Sanchez; C.Davis (1), off Aa.Sanchez; Schoop (2), off Redmond. RBIs: Encarnacion (5), De Aza (3), C.Davis (1), Schoop 4 (5). SB: Reyes (1). RLISP: Toronto 2 (Encarnacion, Travis); Baltimore 3 (Machado, C.Davis 2). RISP: Toronto 1 for 7; Baltimore 2 for 7. Runners moved up: Pompey, Valencia, Pillar. GIDP: A.Jones, Joseph. DP: Toronto 2 (Reyes, Travis, Smoak), (Reyes, Travis, Smoak). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Aa.Sanchez L, 0-1 31/3 7 3 3 2 1 61 8.10 2/ Hynes 3 0 0 0 1 1 11 10.80 Redmond 2 2 4 4 3 2 53 18.00 Hendriks 2 0 0 0 0 4 28 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA U.Jimenez W, 1-0 7 1 0 0 1 8 96 0.00 Tom.Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Britton 1 2 1 1 0 1 15 3.00 Inherited runners-scored: Hynes 2-0. IBB: off Hynes (Pearce), off Aa.Sanchez (Snider). HBP: by Redmond (C.Davis), by Tom.Hunter (R.Martin). WP: Aa.Sanchez. Umpires: Home, Tim Welke; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Todd Tichenor. T: 2:34. A: 38,897 .

Braves 5, Mets 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .063 D.Wright 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Duda 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .313 Cuddyer lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .200 Dan.Murphy 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .111 Lagares cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .200 d’Arnaud c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .333 Flores ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .125 Gee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Mayberry ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 A.Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Nieuwenhuis ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Tejada ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Gilmartin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 3 3 2 4 5 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. E.Young cf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .200 Peterson 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .143 Markakis rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .250 Freeman 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .333 K.Johnson lf-3b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 d-C.Johnson ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Callaspo 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ji.Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bethancourt c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .200 A.Simmons ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cunniff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maybin cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 31 5 9 5 0 4 New York 000 000 300 — 3 3 0 Atlanta 010 040 00x — 5 9 1 a-lined out for Gee in the 6th. b-was announced for A.Torres in the 7th. c-grounded out for Nieuwenhuis in the 7th. d-flied out for K.Johnson in the 8th. E: Callaspo (1). LOB: New York 4, Atlanta 3. 2B: Duda (1), Callaspo (1), Bethancourt (2), A.Simmons (2). 3B: E.Young (1). HR: Freeman (1), off Gee. RBIs: Lagares (1), d’Arnaud (5), E.Young (2), Markakis (4), Freeman (3), Bethancourt (2), A.Simmons (3). S: Gee, Teheran. RLISP: New York 2 (Cuddyer, Tejada). RISP: New York 0 for 5; Atlanta 4 for 5. GIDP: Flores, Callaspo. DP: New York 1 (D.Wright, Dan.Murphy, Duda); Atlanta 2 (Peterson, Freeman), (A.Simmons, Peterson, Freeman). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gee L, 0-1 5 8 5 5 0 2 55 9.00 A.Torres 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 13.50 Gilmartin 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0.00 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Goeddel Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran W, 2-0 6 2 3 1 4 5 76 1.50 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Cunniff Avilan 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Ji.Johnson S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Teheran pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Cunniff 3-1, Avilan 1-0. HBP: by Teheran (d’Arnaud). Umpires: Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Paul Schrieber. T: 2:25. A: 36,056 .

(FRIDAY)

Braves 5, Mets 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .077 D.Wright 3b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .353 Mayberry lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .250 Cuddyer 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Dan.Murphy 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .133 Lagares cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .188 d’Arnaud c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .400 Flores ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 d-Duda ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Niese p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .500 Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Nieuwenhuis ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gilmartin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --R.Montero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blevins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 3 8 3 2 11 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Maybin cf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .182 Gosselin 2b 5 0 1 2 0 1 .200 Grilli p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Markakis rf 5 1 0 0 0 2 .188 Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .353 J.Gomes lf 2 1 1 1 2 1 .286 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .556 1-Peterson pr-2b 0 1 0 0 0 0 .200 Bethancourt c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .167 A.Simmons ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .235 Stults p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Co.Martin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-E.Young ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Cunniff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ji.Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Callaspo ph-3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .571 Totals 35 5 9 4 3 7 New York 000 300 000 — 3 8 2 Atlanta 201 000 02x — 5 9 0 a-grounded out for Co.Martin in the 6th. b-struck out for Goeddel in the 7th. c-was intentionally walked for Ji.Johnson in the 8th. d-struck out for Flores in the 9th. 1-ran for C.Johnson in the 8th. E: Flores 2 (3). LOB: New York 5, Atlanta 10. 2B: C.Johnson 2 (3), A.Simmons (1). HR: D.Wright (1), off Stults; Mayberry (1), off Stults; Maybin (1), off Niese. RBIs: D.Wright 2 (4), Mayberry (1), Maybin (3), Gosselin 2 (2), J.Gomes (1). SB: D.Wright (1), Maybin (1), Gosselin (1). S: Stults. RLISP: New York 2 (Flores, Cuddyer); Atlanta 8 (Bethancourt 2, Gosselin, A.Simmons 3, Markakis 2). GIDP: Granderson, Dan.Murphy. DP: Atlanta 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese 5 7 3 1 2 2 86 1.80 Goeddel 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 2/ Gilmartin 3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.00 R.Montero L, 0-1 1 2 2 2 1 3 40 6.00 1/ Blevins 3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stults 5 7 3 3 1 3 86 5.40 Co.Martin 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 2/ Cunniff 3 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 1/ Avilan 3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 Ji.Johnson W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 3 15 0.00 Grilli S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 1 1 28 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Blevins 2-0. IBB: off R.Montero (Callaspo). Umpires: Home, Paul Schrieber; First, Fieldin Culbreth; Second, Marvin Hudson; Third, Jim Reynolds. T: 3:01 (Delay: 1:09). A: 46,279 .

Athletics 12, Mariners 0 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Weeks lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .091 A.Jackson cf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .313 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .200 B.Miller ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .364 N.Cruz dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Seager 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .154 Ruggiano rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Bloomquist ss-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 0 3 0 2 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fuld cf-rf 5 2 3 1 0 0 .412 Canha lf 5 3 3 2 0 0 .500 Zobrist rf 3 2 2 1 1 1 .263 Ladendorf cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .400 B.Butler dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .300 a-C.Ross ph-dh 0 0 0 0 1 0 .200 I.Davis 1b 5 2 3 4 0 0 .286 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Vogt c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .357 Semien ss 5 1 2 2 0 1 .333 Sogard 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Totals 40 12 16 12 4 6 Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Oakland 320 600 01x — 12 16 0 E: Ruggiano (1). LOB: Seattle 4, Oakland 8. 2B: Zobrist 2 (3), I.Davis 2 (2), Semien (2). HR: Canha (1), off T.Walker. RBIs: Fuld (1), Canha 2 (6), Zobrist (3), B.Butler (2), I.Davis 4 (4), Vogt (4), Semien 2 (5). RLISP: Seattle 1 (Bloomquist); Oakland 8 (Semien 4, Sogard 2, I.Davis 2). GIDP: Cano. DP: Oakland 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Walker L, 0-1 3 1/3 9 9 9 2 3 77 24.30 2/ Wilhelmsen 1 3 5 2 2 1 1 38 6.75 Furbush 12/3 0 0 0 0 0 18 0.00 Medina 11/3 2 1 1 1 2 31 3.38 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz W, 1-0 7 2 0 0 0 6 92 0.00 Abad 1 1 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 R.Alvarez 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.00 Inherited runners-scored: Wilhelmsen 3-3. IBB: off Wilhelmsen (Vogt), off T.Walker (Zobrist). WP: T.Walker. Umpires: Home, Brian Gorman; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Tripp Gibson III. T: 2:44. A: 30,114 .

NL

Pitcher

StL

Martinez (R)

Cin

Iglesias (R)

Time W-L ERA 0-0 0.00 12:10

Was Scherzer (R) Phi

---

----

0-1 0.00

O’Sllivan (R)

12:35

---

----

NY

Colon (R)

12:35 1-0

1.50

Atl

Wood (L)

Pit

Sadler (R)

Mil

Lohse (R)

Chi

Hendricks (R)

Col

Lyles (R)

1-0 3.60 1:10

---

----

0-1 21.60 3:10

---

----

1-0 3.00

LA

Greinke (R)

0-0

1.50

Ari

Cllmenter (R)

3:10

0-1

7.71

SF

Peavy (R)

3:10

---

----

SD

Ross (R)

AL

Pitcher

Det Lobstein (L) Cle

Time W-L ERA 12:10

---

----

---

----

12:35 1-0

1.50

1-0

1.35

House (L)

Tor

Hutchison (R)

Bal

Tillman (R)

Min Hughes (R) Chi

0-0 3.00

1:10

0-1 6.00

2:05

1-0 0.00

Sale (L)

Hou Keuchel (L)

---

Tex Lewis (R) KC

Ventura (R)

LA

Wilson (L)

2:35

----

1-0

1.50

1-0

1.50

1-0 0.00

Sea Hernandez (R)

1-0

1.29

Oak Hahn (R)

3:05

0-1 4.50

Bos Buchholz (R)

7:05

1-0 0.00

NY

Tanaka (R)

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L ERA

0-1 9.00

TB

Karns (R)

12:10 0-1

9.53

0-1

2.57

Mia Alvarez (R)

Red Sox 6, Yankees 5 Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Betts cf 8 0 1 1 1 4 .190 Pedroia 2b 8 2 2 0 1 1 .250 Ortiz dh 8 1 2 1 1 3 .200 H.Ramirez lf 9 0 3 0 0 0 .318 Sandoval 3b 9 1 4 2 0 1 .286 Napoli 1b 8 1 0 0 1 4 .000 Nava rf 3 0 2 2 0 0 .286 c-Victorino ph-rf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .167 Bogaerts ss 8 1 4 0 1 1 .421 Leon c 4 0 0 0 1 1 .000 d-Craig ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Hanigan c 1 0 0 0 1 0 .111 Totals 71 6 18 6 8 15 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 9 0 2 0 0 1 .250 Gardner lf 7 1 2 0 2 0 .231 A.Rodriguez dh 5 0 2 1 0 3 .286 1-G.Jones pr-dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Teixeira 1b 6 1 1 1 2 1 .188 B.McCann c 6 0 2 1 0 2 .231 2-J.Murphy pr-c 0 1 0 0 0 0 .500 Headley 3b 7 1 1 1 1 1 .167 C.Young rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .200 a-Beltran ph-rf 6 0 1 1 0 1 .125 Drew ss-2b 8 0 1 0 0 1 .118 G.Petit 2b 1 1 0 0 1 1 .000 b-Gregorius ph-ss 6 0 1 0 0 1 .154 Totals 67 5 14 5 6 13 Bos. 100 002 000 000 000 101 1 — 6 18 1 NY 000 002 001 000 000 101 0 — 5 14 1 a-popped out for C.Young in the 7th. b-lined out for G.Petit in the 7th. c-walked for Nava in the 10th. d-grounded out for Leon in the 15th. 1-ran for A.Rodriguez in the 11th. 2-ran for B.McCann in the 18th. E: Bogaerts (1), G.Petit (1). LOB: Boston 20, New York 13. 2B: Betts (1), Gardner (1), A.Rodriguez (1), B.McCann (1), Beltran (2). HR: Ortiz (1), off Rogers; Headley (1), off Mujica; Teixeira (2), off S.Wright. RBIs: Betts (2), Ortiz (1), Sandoval 2 (3), Nava 2 (2), A.Rodriguez (2), Teixeira (2), B.McCann (2), Headley (2), Beltran (2). SB: Bogaerts (1). CS: Gardner (1). S: Leon. SF: Betts, B.McCann. RLISP: Boston 11 (Napoli, Ortiz, Pedroia 4, H.Ramirez 2, Leon, Betts 2); New York 6 (Teixeira, Headley 2, Gregorius 3). GIDP: H.Ramirez, Leon, G.Jones. DP: Boston 1, New York 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley 51/3 4 2 2 2 6 90 3.38 2/ Ross Jr. 3 0 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Ogando 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Tazawa 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Mujica 1 1 1 1 0 1 15 4.50 1/ Varvaro 1 3 1 0 0 1 0 26 0.00 2/ Layne 1 3 1 0 0 0 3 27 0.00 Breslow 2 0 0 0 0 1 26 0.00 S.Wright W, 1-0 5 6 2 2 3 1 78 3.60 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi 51/3 8 3 3 1 1 94 5.06 2/ Ch.Martin 3 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 J.Wilson 12/3 0 0 0 0 1 22 0.00 1/ Betances 1 3 0 0 0 2 2 25 0.00 A.Miller 1 0 0 0 2 2 21 0.00 D.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 1 0 17 0.00 1/ Shreve 3 3 3 0 0 0 4 56 1.93 2/ Rogers L, 0-1 4 3 6 3 2 1 4 81 3.68 Inherited runners-scored: Ross Jr. 3-1, Layne 2-0, Ch.Martin 1-0, Rogers 1-0. IBB: off Varvaro (Teixeira). HBP: by Breslow (B.McCann), by Rogers (Pedroia), by Eovaldi (Nava). WP: Eovaldi 2. PB: J.Murphy. Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 6:49. A: 41,292 . On this date

April 12 1906 — Johnny Bates of Boston became the first modern player to hit a home run in his first major league at bat. Irv Young allowed one hit as Boston beat Brooklyn 2-0. 1912 — The Chicago Cubs’ Tinker-EversChance double play combination played its final major league game together. 1955 — In their first game in Kansas City, the transplanted Athletics defeated the Detroit Tigers 6-2 at Municipal Stadium. The standing-room crowd of 32,147 was the largest paid crowd for any event in Kansas City. 1965 — The first National League home run in the Houston Astrodome was hit by Richie Allen of the Philadelphia Phillies off Bob Bruce in a 2-0 victory over the Astros. 1966 — A crowd of 50,671 welcomed the Braves to Atlanta, but Willie Stargell spoiled the occasion with a two-run homer in the 13th inning to give the Pirates a 3-2 victory. 1980 — In an awesome display of power, Cecil Cooper and Don Money each hit grand slams in the second inning of Milwaukee’s 18-1 rout of the Boston Red Sox.


basEball

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH national league

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M 3 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

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Saturday Cardinals 4, Cincinnati 1 Tampa Bay 2, Miami 0 Phila. 3, Washington 2 (10) Atlanta 5, NY Mets 3 Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0 Chicago Cubs 9, Colorado 5 Arizona 6, LA Dodgers 0 San Francisco at San Diego, (n) Friday Cincinnati 5, Cardinals 4 Colorado 5, Chicago Cubs 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 1 Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Atlanta 5, NY Mets 3 Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 2 Arizona 4, LA Dodgers 3 (10) San Diego 1, San Francisco 0

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WEST

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Brewers inally get in the win column

Tigers 9, Indians 6

Red Sox 8, Yankees 4

Phillies 3, Nationals 2

Braves 5, Mets 3

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gose cf 3 1 1 1 0 2 .450 b-R.Davis ph-cf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Kinsler 2b 5 3 4 2 0 1 .455 Mi.Cabrera 1b 5 1 4 1 0 0 .429 V.Martinez dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .316 1-H.Perez pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Martinez rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .217 Cespedes lf 5 0 1 2 0 1 .391 Castellanos 3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .167 2-J.Iglesias pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .600 Avila c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .308 a-J.McCann ph-c 2 1 1 1 1 0 .667 Romine ss-3b 2 2 1 0 3 1 .500 Totals 39 9 14 8 6 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Aviles lf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .333 Kipnis 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .333 C.Santana 1b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .313 Y.Gomes c 4 1 0 0 0 2 .150 R.Perez c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Raburn dh 2 0 0 1 0 1 .000 c-Moss ph-dh 0 1 0 0 1 0 .071 Sands rf 4 0 3 4 0 1 .750 Chisenhall 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .133 J.Ramirez ss 3 0 1 0 1 2 .235 Totals 34 6 8 6 5 8 Detroit 200 000 304 — 9 14 1 Cleveland 000 003 021 — 6 8 0 a-singled for Avila in the 7th. b-lined out for Gose in the 7th. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 7th. 2-ran for Castellanos in the 9th. E: Price (1). LOB: Detroit 9, Cleveland 7. 2B: Cespedes (3), Sands 2 (2). HR: Gose (1), off Kluber. RBIs: Gose (5), Kinsler 2 (7), Mi.Cabrera (4), V.Martinez (3), Cespedes 2 (3), J.McCann (2), Kipnis (2), Raburn (1), Sands 4 (4). SB: Romine 2 (2). CS: Romine (1). SF: Raburn. RLISP: Detroit 4 (Gose, J.Martinez, Romine 2); Cleveland 3 (Chisenhall 2, C.Santana). GIDP: V.Martinez, Aviles. DP: Detroit 1, Cleveland 1. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Detroit Price 52/3 4 3 0 3 6 104 0.00 Gorzelanny 12/3 1 0 0 0 1 18 0.00 Alburquerque 1/3 0 1 1 1 0 9 5.40 1/ 3 1 1 1 1 0 16 6.75 Krol W, 1-0 Soria 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 5.40 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Kluber 6 3 7 2 2 1 10 107 2.63 Rzepczynski 0 1 2 2 1 0 9 18.00 1/ 3 3 1 1 0 0 12 5.40 Shaw 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Atchison Swarzak 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.86 2/ 3 3 4 4 3 0 37 21.60 Allen L, 0-1 1/ 3 0 0 0 1 1 11 0.00 Crockett Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Gorzelanny 1-0, Krol 1-1, Shaw 2-2, Atchison 2-0, Crockett 3-1. IBB: off Allen (Castellanos). Umpires: Home, Dale Scott; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 4:16. A: 23,161 .

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Holt cf 5 1 4 3 0 0 .667 Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 2 0 0 .240 Ortiz dh 5 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Napoli 1b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Sandoval 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .269 Craig rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .143 Nava lf 3 1 2 2 1 0 .400 Bogaerts ss 4 2 1 0 0 0 .391 Hanigan c 2 2 0 1 2 0 .091 Totals 37 8 9 8 5 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 C.Young cf 4 1 1 3 0 0 .222 Beltran dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .100 A.Rodriguez 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .278 Headley 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .136 G.Jones rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .286 J.Murphy c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .286 Gregorius ss 2 0 0 1 0 1 .133 G.Petit 2b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .167 Totals 31 4 5 4 2 11 Boston 010 100 330 — 8 9 0 New York 010 000 030 — 4 5 3 E: A.Rodriguez (1), Headley (2), J.Murphy (1). LOB: Boston 7, New York 3. 2B: Holt (1), Pedroia (1), Nava (1), G.Jones (1). HR: C.Young (1), off Ogando. RBIs: Holt 3 (3), Pedroia 2 (4), Nava 2 (4), Hanigan (2), C.Young 3 (3), Gregorius (2). SB: Napoli (1), Bogaerts (2). SF: Gregorius. RLISP: Boston 6 (Bogaerts 2, Ortiz, Napoli, Pedroia, Craig); New York 2 (G.Petit, J.Murphy). GIDP: Pedroia 2. DP: New York 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Kelly W, 1-0 7 1 1 1 2 8 93 1.29 2/ Ogando 3 3 3 3 0 1 20 10.13 1/ Varvaro 3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Ross Jr. 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Warren L, 0-1 5 3 5 2 1 2 1 98 1.69 2/ 3 0 1 1 1 1 13 3.00 J.Wilson Ch.Martin 1 2 2 2 0 0 24 4.91 Tracy 2 2 3 0 2 1 39 0.00 J.Wilson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Ch.Martin 1-1. WP: J.Kelly. PB: J.Murphy. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Winters; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Marty Foster. T: 3:13. A: 46,678 .

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .286 Y.Escobar 3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .263 Harper rf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .278 Zimmerman 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .105 Roark p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Ramos c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .188 Desmond ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .167 R.Johnson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Espinosa 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Fister p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Thornton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-C.Robinson ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 1-den Dekker pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Treinen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-T.Moore ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 36 2 7 2 4 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Utley 2b-1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .111 Howard 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .188 2-C.Hernandez pr-2b 1 1 0 0 0 1 .250 Ruiz c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .385 Sizemore rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .200 O.Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 1 0 .111 A.Blanco 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .375 Hamels p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .333 a-Asche ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 b-Ruf ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Francoeur ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 41 3 13 3 2 5 Washington 000 100 010 0 — 2 7 1 Philadelphia 000 000 020 1 — 3 13 0 One out when winning run scored. a-was announced for Hamels in the 7th. b-fouled out for Asche in the 7th. c-singled for Thornton in the 8th. d-doubled for Papelbon in the 9th. e-flied out for Stammen in the 10th. 1-ran for C.Robinson in the 8th. 2-ran for Howard in the 8th. E: Desmond (4). LOB: Washington 8, Philadelphia 12. 2B: Espinosa (1), Howard 2 (3), Sizemore (1), O.Herrera (1), Francoeur (1). HR: W.Ramos (1), off Hamels. RBIs: W.Ramos (1), C.Robinson (1), Howard (1), Ruiz (1), O.Herrera (1). SB: M.Taylor (1). RLISP: Washington 3 (W.Ramos, Zimmerman 2); Philadelphia 4 (Howard, Utley, A.Blanco, C.Hernandez). RISP: Washington 2 for 8; Philadelphia 2 for 13. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister 61/3 6 0 0 1 1 95 0.00 2/ Thornton 3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Treinen 1 4 2 2 0 1 21 6.00 Stammen 1 1 0 0 1 3 22 0.00 1/ Roark L, 0-1 3 2 1 1 0 0 10 3.86 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels 7 2 1 1 2 5 104 3.75 1/ J.Gomez 3 3 1 1 0 0 20 4.50 2/ Diekman 3 0 0 0 0 2 10 18.00 Papelbon 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 McGowan W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 2 1 27 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Thornton 1-0, Diekman 2-0. IBB: off Stammen (Utley), off McGowan (Harper). WP: J.Gomez. Umpires: Home, Jerry Layne; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, David Rackley. T: 3:25. A: 23,740 .

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .063 D.Wright 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Duda 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .313 Cuddyer lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .200 Dan.Murphy 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .111 Lagares cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .200 d’Arnaud c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .333 Flores ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .125 Gee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Mayberry ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 A.Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Nieuwenhuis ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Tejada ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Gilmartin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 3 3 2 4 5 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. E.Young cf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .200 Peterson 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .143 Markakis rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .250 Freeman 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .333 K.Johnson lf-3b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 d-C.Johnson ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Callaspo 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ji.Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bethancourt c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .200 A.Simmons ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cunniff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maybin cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 31 5 9 5 0 4 New York 000 000 300 — 3 3 0 Atlanta 010 040 00x — 5 9 1 a-lined out for Gee in the 6th. b-was announced for A.Torres in the 7th. c-grounded out for Nieuwenhuis in the 7th. d-flied out for K.Johnson in the 8th. E: Callaspo (1). LOB: New York 4, Atlanta 3. 2B: Duda (1), Callaspo (1), Bethancourt (2), A.Simmons (2). 3B: E.Young (1). HR: Freeman (1), off Gee. RBIs: Lagares (1), d’Arnaud (5), E.Young (2), Markakis (4), Freeman (3), Bethancourt (2), A.Simmons (3). S: Gee, Teheran. RLISP: New York 2 (Cuddyer, Tejada). RISP: New York 0 for 5; Atlanta 4 for 5. GIDP: Flores, Callaspo. DP: New York 1 (D.Wright, Dan.Murphy, Duda); Atlanta 2 (Peterson, Freeman), (A.Simmons, Peterson, Freeman). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gee L, 0-1 5 8 5 5 0 2 55 9.00 A.Torres 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 13.50 Gilmartin 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0.00 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Goeddel Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran W, 2-0 6 2 3 1 4 5 76 1.50 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Cunniff Avilan 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Ji.Johnson S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Teheran pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Cunniff 3-1, Avilan 1-0. HBP: by Teheran (d’Arnaud). Umpires: Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Paul Schrieber. T: 2:25. A: 36,056 .

Jimmy Nelson struck out a career-high nine in seven innings, Jean Segura hit a two-run homer and the Milwaukee Brewers became the last team in the majors to win this season by beating the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-0 on Saturday. Milwaukee stopped a four-game losing streak by tagging Vance Worley (0-1) for six runs and seven hits. Braves 5, Mets 3 • Julio Teheran pitched efectively into the seventh inning and Atlanta stayed hot to beat visiting New York, which learned earlier that injured closer Jenrry Mejia was suspended 80 games for a positive drug test. D’Backs 6, Dodgers 0 • Archie Bradley made a dazzling major league debut, allowing one hit over six innings to outpitch Clayton Kershaw and lead Arizona to the win at home. Kershaw (0-1) lasted 6 1/3 innings and gave up 10 hits. Phillies 3, Nationals 2 • Odubel Herrera doubled home the winning run in the 10th inning with his irst major league hit, lifting Philadelphia over visiting Washington. Cubs 9, Rockies 5 • Chris Coghlan and Mike Olt hit consecutive homers in the third inning, Dexter Fowler had two triples and Chicago ended host Colorado’s bid for its best start in history.

aMeriCan league White Sox 5, Twins 4 • Pinch-hitter J.B. Shuck had a go-ahead RBI single in the eighth inning to give host Chicago its irst win. Shuck lined a 1-1 pitch from reliever Blaine Boyer (0-1) with two outs, scoring Alexei Ramirez. Mariners 5, A’s 4 • Nelson Cruz hit his irst home run for Seattle and Brad Miller threw out a runner at the plate in the 10th inning and doubled in the go-ahead run in the 11th to lift Seattle on the road. Cruz hit a threerun drive in the eighth of Dan Otero. Tigers 9, Indians 6 • Ian Kinsler hit an RBI single and Yoenis Cespedes doubled in two runs during Detroit’s four-run top of the ninth as the Tigers stayed unbeaten. Kinsler’s fourth hit snapped a 5-all tie and helped the Tigers improve to 5-0 for the irst time since 2006. Red Sox 8, Yankees 4 • Joe Kelly pitched one-hit ball for seven innings and visiting Boston ran over New York. The game started at 1:08 p.m. following Friday night’s 19-inning game. Matt Tracy (CBC) made his major league debut for New York. Orioles 7, Blue Jays 1 • Ubaldo Jimenez struck out eight and allowed one single over seven innings, and Jonathan Schoop hit a grand slam to lead host Baltimore. Rangers 6, Astros 2 • Yovani Gallardo won his home debut for his hometown team, pitching into the sixth inning for Texas in a win over Houston.

interleague Rays 2, Marlins 0 • Chris Archer pitched seven crisp innings, and visiting Tampa Bay beat Miami. Archer (1-1) allowed one hit and one walk, with the latter runner erased trying to steal, while throwing only 84 pitches. Associated Press

Mariners 5, Athletics 4 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 6 1 1 0 0 2 .273 S.Smith dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .833 c-Ruggiano ph-dh 2 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Cano 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .150 N.Cruz rf 5 1 3 3 0 1 .200 Seager 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Morrison 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .158 Ackley lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .300 B.Miller ss 4 0 1 1 1 1 .333 Sucre c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Weeks ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Zunino c 1 0 0 0 1 0 .071 Totals 42 5 10 5 3 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gentry cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Fuld ph-cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .350 Canha 1b-lf 6 1 1 0 0 1 .400 Zobrist lf-rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .292 B.Butler dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .348 1-Sogard pr-dh 1 1 0 0 0 1 .200 C.Ross rf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .250 d-I.Davis ph-1b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .313 Lawrie 3b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .261 Phegley c 3 0 2 1 0 0 .444 e-Vogt ph-c 0 0 0 0 2 0 .357 Semien ss 5 0 2 1 0 0 .348 Ladendorf 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Totals 42 4 12 4 3 6 Seattle 001 000 030 01 — 5 10 0 Oakland 000 000 220 00 — 4 12 1 a-popped out for Gentry in the 7th. b-flied out for Sucre in the 8th. d-struck out for C.Ross in the 8th. e-was intentionally walked for Phegley in the 8th. 1-ran for B.Butler in the 7th. E: Semien (2). LOB: Seattle 8, Oakland 10. 2B: B.Miller (1), Zobrist (4), I.Davis (3), Lawrie (2). HR: Ackley (2), off Gray; N.Cruz (1), off Otero. RBIs: N.Cruz 3 (3), Ackley (2), B.Miller (2), Zobrist (4), Lawrie (1), Phegley (1), Semien (6). SB: B.Miller (1). S: Ackley, Sogard, Lawrie. RLISP: Seattle 3 (B.Miller, A.Jackson 2); Oakland 6 (Ladendorf 2, Fuld, Semien 3). GIDP: Cano. DP: Oakland 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ 61/3 7 2 2 0 1 82 2.84 Farquhar 1 2 2 2 0 0 17 7.71 C.Smith 12/3 1 0 0 1 3 26 0.00 Olson W, 1-0 1 2 0 0 2 1 26 0.00 Rodney S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 71/3 6 2 1 1 4 96 0.59 1/ 3 0 1 0 0 0 7 0.00 O’Flaherty 1/ 3 1 1 1 0 0 6 6.75 Otero Clippard 1 0 0 0 2 1 32 0.00 Abad L, 0-1 11/3 3 1 1 0 2 27 3.00 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Chavez Inherited runners-scored: Farquhar 2-0, C.Smith 1-1, O’Flaherty 1-0, Otero 2-2, Chavez 1-0. IBB: off C.Smith (Vogt), off Olson (Lawrie). WP: Farquhar. Umpires: Home, Mark Carlson; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Tripp Gibson III; Third, Brian Gorman. T: 3:39. A: 24,355 .

White Sox 5, Twins 4 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Santana ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .125 Dozier 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .190 Mauer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 K.Vargas dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .176 Plouffe 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .133 Arcia lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 a-Tor.Hunter ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .118 Herrmann c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .200 S.Robinson rf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .200 J.Schafer cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Totals 35 4 8 4 1 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Me.Cabrera lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .150 Abreu dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .176 LaRoche 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .118 A.Garcia rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .333 Al.Ramirez ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .125 Gillaspie 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .444 G.Beckham 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Soto c 3 1 2 1 0 0 .400 b-Shuck ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Flowers c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 M.Johnson 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Totals 33 5 11 5 1 5 Minnesota 040 000 000 — 4 8 0 Chicago 021 100 01x — 5 11 2 a-grounded out for Arcia in the 8th. b-singled for Soto in the 8th. E: Soto (1), Gillaspie (2). LOB: Minnesota 5, Chicago 6. 2B: Dozier (1), Plouffe (1), A.Garcia (2), Gillaspie (2). 3B: Herrmann (1). HR: LaRoche (1), off Pelfrey; Soto (1), off Pelfrey. RBIs: D.Santana (1), Dozier (2), Herrmann (1), S.Robinson (1), LaRoche (1), A.Garcia (1), Gillaspie (1), Soto (1), Shuck (1). SB: D.Santana (1), S.Robinson (1). CS: J.Schafer (1). RLISP: Minnesota 2 (K.Vargas, Mauer); Chicago 2 (Eaton, Gillaspie). GIDP: Al.Ramirez. DP: Minnesota 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pelfrey 5 7 4 4 1 2 80 7.20 Graham 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 A.Thompson 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.70 2/ 3 3 1 1 0 0 10 9.00 Boyer L, 0-1 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija 7 8 4 4 0 6 113 6.23 Duke W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Robertson S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 0.00 HBP: by Pelfrey (Abreu). Umpires: Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Bill Welke; Third, James Hoye. T: 2:54. A: 22,317 .

Saturday Boston 8, N.Y. Yankees 4 Chicago (A) 5, Minnesota 4 Seattle 5, Oakland 4 (11) Detroit 9, Cleveland 6 Tampa Bay 2, Miami 0 Baltimore 7, Toronto 1 Texas 6, Houston 2 Kansas City 6, LA Angels 4 Friday Toronto 12, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Texas 1 Detroit 8, Cleveland 4 Minnesota 6, Chicago (A) 0 Boston 6, NY Yankees 5 (19) Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Kansas City 4, LA Angels 2 Oakland 12, Seattle 0

Sunday’s games pitching matchups

Rays 2, Marlins 0 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .353 Souza Jr. rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .133 A.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .286 Longoria 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .235 De.Jennings lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Dykstra 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-T.Beckham ph-2b 2 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Forsythe 2b-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .188 B.Wilson c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .333 c-Rivera ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Archer p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Jepsen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 6 2 3 5 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Yelich lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .316 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Morse 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Prado 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Ozuna cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .263 Saltalamacchia c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .056 Cosart p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-I.Suzuki ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Solano ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Totals 28 0 2 0 2 8 Tampa Bay 000 001 100 — 2 6 0 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 a-walked for Cosart in the 6th. b-homered for Dykstra in the 7th. c-lined out for B.Wilson in the 9th. d-grounded out for S.Dyson in the 9th. LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Miami 3. 2B: Kiermaier (2), Longoria (2), Yelich (1). 3B: A.Cabrera (1). HR: T.Beckham (1), off Dunn. RBIs: Longoria (2), T.Beckham (1). SB: T.Beckham (1). CS: I.Suzuki (1). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Longoria, Archer, De.Jennings, Rivera); Miami 3 (Morse, Hechavarria, Stanton). GIDP: A.Cabrera. DP: Miami 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer W, 1-1 7 1 0 0 1 5 84 2.13 Jepsen 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Boxberger S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 2.70 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cosart L, 0-1 6 3 1 1 3 1 86 1.50 1/ Dunn 1 3 1 1 1 0 2 29 2.70 2/ S.Dyson 1 3 2 0 0 0 2 25 6.75 WP: Jepsen. Umpires: Home, Gerry Davis; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Will Little. T: 2:32. A: 17,830 .

Orioles 7, Blue Jays 1 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .368 St.Tolleson ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Pompey cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Bautista rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Valencia rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Encarnacion dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .300 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 R.Martin c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Pillar lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Travis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .313 Totals 30 1 3 1 1 10 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza lf 5 2 2 1 0 2 .333 Pearce rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .200 C.Davis 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .286 A.Jones cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .333 Snider dh 2 1 0 0 2 1 .400 Machado 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 4 0 1 .286 E.Cabrera ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .308 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .154 Totals 32 7 9 6 6 8 Toronto 000 000 001 — 1 3 1 Baltimore 201 040 00x — 7 9 0 E: Donaldson (1). LOB: Toronto 4, Baltimore 8. 2B: St.Tolleson (1). HR: De Aza (2), off Aa.Sanchez; C.Davis (1), off Aa.Sanchez; Schoop (2), off Redmond. RBIs: Encarnacion (5), De Aza (3), C.Davis (1), Schoop 4 (5). SB: Reyes (1). RLISP: Toronto 2 (Encarnacion, Travis); Baltimore 3 (Machado, C.Davis 2). RISP: Toronto 1 for 7; Baltimore 2 for 7. Runners moved up: Pompey, Valencia, Pillar. GIDP: A.Jones, Joseph. DP: Toronto 2 (Reyes, Travis, Smoak), (Reyes, Travis, Smoak). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Aa.Sanchez L, 0-1 31/3 7 3 3 2 1 61 8.10 2/ Hynes 3 0 0 0 1 1 11 10.80 Redmond 2 2 4 4 3 2 53 18.00 Hendriks 2 0 0 0 0 4 28 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA U.Jimenez W, 1-0 7 1 0 0 1 8 96 0.00 Tom.Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Britton 1 2 1 1 0 1 15 3.00 Inherited runners-scored: Hynes 2-0. IBB: off Hynes (Pearce), off Aa.Sanchez (Snider). HBP: by Redmond (C.Davis), by Tom.Hunter (R.Martin). WP: Aa.Sanchez. Umpires: Home, Tim Welke; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Todd Tichenor. T: 2:34. A: 38,897 .

Royals 6, Angels 4 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Escobar ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .400 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .353 L.Cain cf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .400 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .318 K.Morales dh 4 1 3 1 1 0 .400 A.Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Rios rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .300 S.Perez c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .421 Infante 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .158 Totals 36 6 12 6 4 8 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 2 2 3 0 0 .200 Trout cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .389 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .105 Joyce lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235 E.Navarro dh 2 1 0 0 1 1 .400 Butera c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 a-Iannetta ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Giavotella 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Totals 32 4 6 4 1 3 Kansas City 000 510 000 — 6 12 0 Los Angeles 100 030 000 — 4 6 0 a-fouled out for Butera in the 7th. LOB: Kansas City 9, Los Angeles 2. 2B: K.Morales (3), Calhoun (2). HR: Moustakas (2), off Weaver; S.Perez (2), off Weaver; Calhoun (1), off Guthrie. RBIs: Moustakas (2), K.Morales (4), Rios 2 (5), S.Perez 2 (6), Calhoun 3 (4), Trout (3). SB: Moustakas (1). CS: L.Cain (1), Hosmer (1), Aybar (1). RLISP: Kansas City 4 (Hosmer, Moustakas, Rios, A.Gordon); Los Angeles 1 (Freese). GIDP: Rios. DP: Los Angeles 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie W, 1-0 7 6 4 4 1 2 94 5.14 W.Davis 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 G.Holland S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver L, 0-2 4 1/3 7 6 6 4 5 85 8.71 Rucinski 2 3 0 0 0 2 33 0.00 1/ C.Ramos 3 1 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Morin 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 J.Alvarez 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Rucinski 2-1, Morin 2-0. HBP: by C.Ramos (A.Gordon), by J.Alvarez (Hosmer). Umpires: Home, Doug Eddings; First, Jim Wolf; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Bill Miller. T: 2:41. A: 44,154 .

Rangers 6, Astros 2 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .200 Springer rf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .176 Lowrie dh 4 0 0 0 1 3 .235 Carter 1b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .053 Valbuena 3b 5 0 2 0 0 2 .133 J.Castro c 5 1 2 0 0 0 .308 Col.Rasmus lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Ma.Gonzalez ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .500 Marisnick cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .400 Totals 38 2 11 2 4 9 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. L.Martin cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .120 Peguero rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .400 Beltre 3b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .200 Fielder 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .364 Smolinski lf 2 2 0 0 2 1 .000 Moreland dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .235 1-DeShields pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Andrus ss 4 0 1 2 0 1 .167 Odor 2b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .176 Chirinos c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .100 Totals 33 6 9 4 4 4 Houston 001 001 000 — 2 11 3 Texas 110 030 01x — 6 9 0 1-ran for Moreland in the 7th. E: Col.Rasmus (1), Carter (1), Ma.Gonzalez (1). LOB: Houston 13, Texas 9. 2B: J.Castro (1), Col. Rasmus (1), Peguero (1), Beltre (2), Moreland (1), Odor (2). 3B: Beltre (1). HR: Ma.Gonzalez (1), off Gallardo. RBIs: Altuve (1), Ma.Gonzalez (1), Peguero (1), Andrus 2 (2), Odor (2). SB: DeShields (1). S: Chirinos. RLISP: Houston 7 (Carter 2, Marisnick 2, Springer 2, J.Castro); Texas 5 (Fielder, Chirinos, Odor 2, Andrus). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Hernandez L, 0-1 42/3 5 5 1 4 2 92 1.93 1/ 3 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Thatcher Harris 2 1 0 0 0 1 23 0.00 Sipp 1 2 1 1 0 0 19 4.50 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 1-1 52/3 8 2 2 1 7 90 5.59 Edwards 000 0 2 0 9 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 10.13 Klein Kela 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.00 Sh.Tolleson 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Feliz 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 6.75 Edwards pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Thatcher 3-3, Edwards 2-1, Klein 3-0. IBB: off R.Hernandez (Fielder). HBP: by Harris (Moreland). Umpires: Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 3:18. A: 36,833 .

Brewers 6, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Harrison 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Cervelli c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .357 N.Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Marte cf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .167 P.Alvarez 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .313 Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hart rf-1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Lambo lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Kang ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Worley p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 S.Rodriguez rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Totals 26 0 2 0 2 11 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Gomez cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .190 Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .050 Braun rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .200 Lind 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .529 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .200 L.Jimenez 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 K.Davis lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .300 Segura ss 2 2 1 2 1 1 .400 H.Gomez 2b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .667 Nelson p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 a-L.Schafer ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 W.Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Broxton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 6 7 6 2 6 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Milwaukee 030 200 10x — 6 7 0 a-sacrificed for Nelson in the 7th. LOB: Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 3. 2B: C.Gomez (2), Ar.Ramirez (1), K.Davis (3), H.Gomez 2 (2). HR: Segura (1), off Worley. RBIs: C.Gomez (3), K.Davis (1), Segura 2 (2), H.Gomez 2 (2). CS: Cervelli (1). S: L.Schafer. RLISP: Pittsburgh 1 (Lambo); Milwaukee 2 (C.Gomez, Braun). RISP: Pittsburgh 0 for 2; Milwaukee 3 for 8. Runners moved up: Lucroy, K.Davis. GIDP: N.Walker, Hart. DP: Milwaukee 2 (Nelson, Segura, Lind), (Ar. Ramirez, Lind). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley L, 0-1 61/3 7 6 6 2 4 89 8.53 2/ Scahill 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nelson W, 1-0 7 2 0 0 2 9 88 0.00 W.Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 6.00 Inherited runners-scored: Scahill 1-0. HBP: by Nelson (Cervelli). Umpires: Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Toby Basner; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Mike Estabrook. T: 2:26. A: 41,108 .

Padres 10, Giants 2 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .400 Panik 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Pagan cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .304 Maxwell rf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Posey c-1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .286 McGehee 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Arias 3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .143 G.Blanco rf-cf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .167 M.Duffy 1b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 B.Crawford ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Vogelsong p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Kontos p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bumgarner p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 H.Sanchez c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Totals 33 2 5 2 2 9 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Myers cf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .250 Solarte 1b 4 1 3 1 1 0 .455 Kemp rf 5 1 4 1 0 1 .346 Spangenberg lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Upton lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .292 Garces p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maurer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --De.Norris c 5 1 2 1 0 1 .320 Middlebrooks 3b 5 0 3 2 0 1 .250 Gyorko 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .143 Barmes ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .286 Shields p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .200 a-Venable ph-rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals 42 10 20 10 1 8 San Francisco 000 100 010 — 2 5 1 San Diego 203 003 20x — 10 20 2 a-singled for Shields in the 7th. E: M.Duffy (1), Barmes (2), Solarte (1). LOB: San Francisco 7, San Diego 10. 2B: Maxwell (1), Myers (2), Kemp 2 (3), Middlebrooks (1). HR: Arias (1), off Shields. RBIs: Maxwell (2), Arias (1), Myers 2 (4), Solarte (2), Kemp (4), Upton 2 (5), De.Norris (3), Middlebrooks 2 (4), Gyorko (1). CS: Barmes (1). SF: Upton. RLISP: San Francisco 2 (McGehee, Arias); San Diego 7 (Gyorko, Shields, Upton 3, Middlebrooks, Barmes). GIDP: Posey, Upton. DP: San Francisco 1, San Diego 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner L, 1-1 3 10 5 5 0 4 79 5.40 Vogelsong 32/3 9 5 4 1 2 68 11.88 Kontos 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 32 0.00 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields W, 1-0 7 3 1 1 1 7 103 2.08 Garces 1 2 1 1 0 0 18 3.86 Maurer 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Kontos 2-0. HBP: by Shields (B.Crawford). Umpires: Home, Larry Vanover; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 3:14. A: 42,823 .

NL

Pitcher

StL

Martinez (R)

Cin

Iglesias (R)

Time W-L ERA 0-0 0.00 12:10

Was Scherzer (R) Phi

---

----

0-1 0.00

O’Sllivan (R)

12:35

---

----

NY

Colon (R)

12:35 1-0

1.50

Atl

Wood (L)

Pit

Sadler (R)

Mil

Lohse (R)

Chi

Hendricks (R)

Col

Lyles (R)

1-0 3.60 1:10

---

----

0-1 21.60 3:10

---

----

1-0 3.00

LA

Greinke (R)

0-0

1.50

Ari

Cllmenter (R)

3:10

0-1

7.71

SF

Peavy (R)

3:10

---

----

SD

Ross (R)

AL

Pitcher

Det Lobstein (L) Cle

Time W-L ERA 12:10

---

----

---

----

12:35 1-0

1.50

1-0

1.35

House (L)

Tor

Hutchison (R)

Bal

Tillman (R)

Min Hughes (R) Chi

0-0 3.00

1:10

0-1 6.00

2:05

1-0 0.00

Sale (L)

Hou Keuchel (L)

---

Tex Lewis (R) KC

Ventura (R)

LA

Wilson (L)

2:35

----

1-0

1.50

1-0

1.50

1-0 0.00

Sea Hernandez (R)

1-0

1.29

Oak Hahn (R)

3:05

0-1 4.50

Bos Buchholz (R)

7:05

1-0 0.00

NY

Tanaka (R)

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L ERA

0-1 9.00

TB

Karns (R)

12:10 0-1

9.53

0-1

2.57

Mia Alvarez (R)

Cubs 9, Rockies 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 3 2 2 2 2 0 .188 Soler rf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .200 M.Montero c 4 0 0 0 1 1 .000 S.Castro ss 5 1 3 2 0 1 .375 Coghlan lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .182 N.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Coke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-D.Ross ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 H.Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Olt 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .167 1-J.Herrera pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hammel p 3 1 2 0 0 0 .667 a-Szczur ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Alcantara 2b-3b 2 2 0 0 2 1 .000 Totals 36 9 12 9 5 8 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .150 C.Gonzalez rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Tulowitzki ss 4 2 1 0 1 2 .409 Morneau 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .200 Arenado 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .450 Dickerson lf 4 0 2 2 0 1 .400 Hundley c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .524 K.Kendrick p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .600 Friedrich p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ynoa ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Rosario ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 5 12 5 2 10 Chicago 122 013 000 — 9 12 1 Colorado 021 000 020 — 5 12 1 a-doubled for Hammel in the 7th. b-struck out for Friedrich in the 7th. c-struck out for Betancourt in the 8th. d-struck out for Strop in the 9th. 1-ran for Olt in the 9th. E: Alcantara (1), Blackmon (1). LOB: Chicago 8, Colorado 8. 2B: Szczur (1), Blackmon (2), Tulowitzki (6), Arenado (4). 3B: Fowler 2 (2). HR: Coghlan (1), off K.Kendrick; Olt (1), off K.Kendrick; S.Castro (1), off K.Kendrick; Arenado (2), off Hammel. RBIs: Fowler 2 (2), Soler 2 (2), Rizzo (1), S.Castro 2 (3), Coghlan (1), Olt (1), Morneau (2), Arenado 2 (7), Dickerson 2 (9). CS: S.Castro (1). SF: Soler. RLISP: Chicago 4 (Coghlan, Rizzo, M.Montero, Fowler); Colorado 3 (Blackmon, Rosario, Morneau). GIDP: Rizzo, Tulowitzki, Hundley. DP: Chicago 2, Colorado 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel W, 1-0 6 8 3 3 0 6 92 4.50 N.Ramirez 1 0 1 1 2 1 25 3.86 1/ Coke 3 2 1 1 0 0 6 6.75 2/ Strop 3 1 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 H.Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA K.Kendrick L, 1-1 5 8 8 8 5 3 102 6.00 Friedrich 2 3 1 0 0 2 35 0.00 Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Ottavino 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 0.00 K.Kendrick pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. N.Ramirez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Coke 1-1, Strop 1-0, Friedrich 2-2. HBP: by K.Kendrick (Rizzo), by Ottavino (Olt). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:19. A: 43,812 . (FRIDAY)

Athletics 12, Mariners 0 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Weeks lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .091 A.Jackson cf 3 0 2 0 1 1 .313 Cano 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .200 B.Miller ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .364 N.Cruz dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Seager 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .154 Ruggiano rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Morrison 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Zunino c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Bloomquist ss-2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 29 0 3 0 2 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fuld cf-rf 5 2 3 1 0 0 .412 Canha lf 5 3 3 2 0 0 .500 Zobrist rf 3 2 2 1 1 1 .263 Ladendorf cf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .400 B.Butler dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .300 a-C.Ross ph-dh 0 0 0 0 1 0 .200 I.Davis 1b 5 2 3 4 0 0 .286 Lawrie 3b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Vogt c 4 0 1 1 1 1 .357 Semien ss 5 1 2 2 0 1 .333 Sogard 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Totals 40 12 16 12 4 6 Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Oakland 320 600 01x — 12 16 0 E: Ruggiano (1). LOB: Seattle 4, Oakland 8. 2B: Zobrist 2 (3), I.Davis 2 (2), Semien (2). HR: Canha (1), off T.Walker. RBIs: Fuld (1), Canha 2 (6), Zobrist (3), B.Butler (2), I.Davis 4 (4), Vogt (4), Semien 2 (5). RLISP: Seattle 1 (Bloomquist); Oakland 8 (Semien 4, Sogard 2, I.Davis 2). GIDP: Cano. DP: Oakland 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Walker L, 0-1 3 1/3 9 9 9 2 3 77 24.30 Wilhelmsen 12/3 5 2 2 1 1 38 6.75 Furbush 12/3 0 0 0 0 0 18 0.00 Medina 11/3 2 1 1 1 2 31 3.38 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pomeranz W, 1-0 7 2 0 0 0 6 92 0.00 Abad 1 1 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 R.Alvarez 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.00 Inherited runners-scored: Wilhelmsen 3-3. IBB: off Wilhelmsen (Vogt), off T.Walker (Zobrist). WP: T.Walker. Umpires: Home, Brian Gorman; First, Mark Carlson; Second, Mike DiMuro; Third, Tripp Gibson III. T: 2:44. A: 30,114 .


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M 4 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

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Saturday Cardinals 4, Cincinnati 1 Tampa Bay 2, Miami 0 Phila. 3, Washington 2 (10) Atlanta 5, NY Mets 3 Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0 Chicago Cubs 9, Colorado 5 Arizona 6, LA Dodgers 0 San Diego 10, San Francisco 2 Friday Cincinnati 5, Cardinals 4 Colorado 5, Chicago Cubs 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 1 Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Atlanta 5, NY Mets 3 Pittsburgh 6, Milwaukee 2 Arizona 4, LA Dodgers 3 (10) San Diego 1, San Francisco 0

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WEST

ROUNDUP

BOX SCORES

Brewers inally get in the win column

Tigers 9, Indians 6

Red Sox 8, Yankees 4

Phillies 3, Nationals 2

Braves 5, Mets 3

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gose cf 3 1 1 1 0 2 .450 b-R.Davis ph-cf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Kinsler 2b 5 3 4 2 0 1 .455 Mi.Cabrera 1b 5 1 4 1 0 0 .429 V.Martinez dh 4 0 1 1 0 1 .316 1-H.Perez pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Martinez rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .217 Cespedes lf 5 0 1 2 0 1 .391 Castellanos 3b 4 0 0 0 1 2 .167 2-J.Iglesias pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .600 Avila c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .308 a-J.McCann ph-c 2 1 1 1 1 0 .667 Romine ss-3b 2 2 1 0 3 1 .500 Totals 39 9 14 8 6 11 Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Aviles lf 4 2 1 0 1 0 .333 Kipnis 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .333 C.Santana 1b 3 2 1 0 2 1 .313 Y.Gomes c 4 1 0 0 0 2 .150 R.Perez c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Raburn dh 2 0 0 1 0 1 .000 c-Moss ph-dh 0 1 0 0 1 0 .071 Sands rf 4 0 3 4 0 1 .750 Chisenhall 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .133 J.Ramirez ss 3 0 1 0 1 2 .235 Totals 34 6 8 6 5 8 Detroit 200 000 304 — 9 14 1 Cleveland 000 003 021 — 6 8 0 a-singled for Avila in the 7th. b-lined out for Gose in the 7th. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 7th. 2-ran for Castellanos in the 9th. E: Price (1). LOB: Detroit 9, Cleveland 7. 2B: Cespedes (3), Sands 2 (2). HR: Gose (1), off Kluber. RBIs: Gose (5), Kinsler 2 (7), Mi.Cabrera (4), V.Martinez (3), Cespedes 2 (3), J.McCann (2), Kipnis (2), Raburn (1), Sands 4 (4). SB: Romine 2 (2). CS: Romine (1). SF: Raburn. RLISP: Detroit 4 (Gose, J.Martinez, Romine 2); Cleveland 3 (Chisenhall 2, C.Santana). GIDP: V.Martinez, Aviles. DP: Detroit 1, Cleveland 1. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Detroit Price 52/3 4 3 0 3 6 104 0.00 Gorzelanny 12/3 1 0 0 0 1 18 0.00 Alburquerque 1/3 0 1 1 1 0 9 5.40 1/ 3 1 1 1 1 0 16 6.75 Krol W, 1-0 Soria 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 5.40 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Kluber 6 3 7 2 2 1 10 107 2.63 Rzepczynski 0 1 2 2 1 0 9 18.00 1/ 3 3 1 1 0 0 12 5.40 Shaw 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Atchison Swarzak 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.86 2/ 3 3 4 4 3 0 37 21.60 Allen L, 0-1 1/ 3 0 0 0 1 1 11 0.00 Crockett Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Gorzelanny 1-0, Krol 1-1, Shaw 2-2, Atchison 2-0, Crockett 3-1. IBB: off Allen (Castellanos). Umpires: Home, Dale Scott; First, Dan Iassogna; Second, CB Bucknor; Third, Lance Barrett. T: 4:16. A: 23,161 .

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Holt cf 5 1 4 3 0 0 .667 Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 2 0 0 .240 Ortiz dh 5 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Napoli 1b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Sandoval 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .269 Craig rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .143 Nava lf 3 1 2 2 1 0 .400 Bogaerts ss 4 2 1 0 0 0 .391 Hanigan c 2 2 0 1 2 0 .091 Totals 37 8 9 8 5 3 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .235 C.Young cf 4 1 1 3 0 0 .222 Beltran dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .100 A.Rodriguez 1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .278 Headley 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .136 G.Jones rf 3 0 1 0 1 2 .286 J.Murphy c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .286 Gregorius ss 2 0 0 1 0 1 .133 G.Petit 2b 3 1 1 0 0 2 .167 Totals 31 4 5 4 2 11 Boston 010 100 330 — 8 9 0 New York 010 000 030 — 4 5 3 E: A.Rodriguez (1), Headley (2), J.Murphy (1). LOB: Boston 7, New York 3. 2B: Holt (1), Pedroia (1), Nava (1), G.Jones (1). HR: C.Young (1), off Ogando. RBIs: Holt 3 (3), Pedroia 2 (4), Nava 2 (4), Hanigan (2), C.Young 3 (3), Gregorius (2). SB: Napoli (1), Bogaerts (2). SF: Gregorius. RLISP: Boston 6 (Bogaerts 2, Ortiz, Napoli, Pedroia, Craig); New York 2 (G.Petit, J.Murphy). GIDP: Pedroia 2. DP: New York 2. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Kelly W, 1-0 7 1 1 1 2 8 93 1.29 2/ 3 3 3 3 0 1 20 10.13 Ogando 1/ 3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Varvaro Ross Jr. 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 1/ Warren L, 0-1 5 3 5 2 1 2 1 98 1.69 2/ 3 0 1 1 1 1 13 3.00 J.Wilson Ch.Martin 1 2 2 2 0 0 24 4.91 Tracy 2 2 3 0 2 1 39 0.00 J.Wilson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Ch.Martin 1-1. WP: J.Kelly. PB: J.Murphy. Umpires: Home, Mike Muchlinski; First, Mike Winters; Second, Mark Wegner; Third, Marty Foster. T: 3:13. A: 46,678 .

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Taylor cf 4 0 1 0 1 3 .286 Y.Escobar 3b 5 0 2 0 0 0 .263 Harper rf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .278 Zimmerman 1b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .105 Roark p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Ramos c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .188 Desmond ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .167 R.Johnson lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Espinosa 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Fister p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Thornton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-C.Robinson ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .200 1-den Dekker pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Treinen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stammen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-T.Moore ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 36 2 7 2 4 9 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .150 Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Utley 2b-1b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .111 Howard 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .188 2-C.Hernandez pr-2b 1 1 0 0 0 1 .250 Ruiz c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .385 Sizemore rf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .200 O.Herrera cf 4 0 1 1 1 0 .111 A.Blanco 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .375 Hamels p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .333 a-Asche ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .300 b-Ruf ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Gomez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Diekman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Papelbon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Francoeur ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 McGowan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 41 3 13 3 2 5 Washington 000 100 010 0 — 2 7 1 Philadelphia 000 000 020 1 — 3 13 0 One out when winning run scored. a-was announced for Hamels in the 7th. b-fouled out for Asche in the 7th. c-singled for Thornton in the 8th. d-doubled for Papelbon in the 9th. e-flied out for Stammen in the 10th. 1-ran for C.Robinson in the 8th. 2-ran for Howard in the 8th. E: Desmond (4). LOB: Washington 8, Philadelphia 12. 2B: Espinosa (1), Howard 2 (3), Sizemore (1), O.Herrera (1), Francoeur (1). HR: W.Ramos (1), off Hamels. RBIs: W.Ramos (1), C.Robinson (1), Howard (1), Ruiz (1), O.Herrera (1). SB: M.Taylor (1). RLISP: Washington 3 (W.Ramos, Zimmerman 2); Philadelphia 4 (Howard, Utley, A.Blanco, C.Hernandez). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister 61/3 6 0 0 1 1 95 0.00 2/ Thornton 3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Treinen 1 4 2 2 0 1 21 6.00 Stammen 1 1 0 0 1 3 22 0.00 1/ Roark L, 0-1 3 2 1 1 0 0 10 3.86 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels 7 2 1 1 2 5 104 3.75 1/ J.Gomez 3 3 1 1 0 0 20 4.50 2/ Diekman 3 0 0 0 0 2 10 18.00 Papelbon 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 McGowan W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 2 1 27 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Thornton 1-0, Diekman 2-0. IBB: off Stammen (Utley), off McGowan (Harper). WP: J.Gomez. Umpires: Home, Jerry Layne; First, Hunter Wendelstedt; Second, Bob Davidson; Third, David Rackley. T: 3:25. A: 23,740 .

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Granderson rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .063 D.Wright 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Duda 1b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .313 Cuddyer lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .200 Dan.Murphy 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .111 Lagares cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .200 d’Arnaud c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .333 Flores ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .125 Gee p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Mayberry ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 A.Torres p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Nieuwenhuis ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Tejada ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Gilmartin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Goeddel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 3 3 2 4 5 Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. E.Young cf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .200 Peterson 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .143 Markakis rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .250 Freeman 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .333 K.Johnson lf-3b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .250 d-C.Johnson ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Callaspo 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Avilan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ji.Johnson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bethancourt c 3 1 1 1 0 0 .200 A.Simmons ss 3 1 1 1 0 0 .250 Teheran p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Cunniff p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maybin cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Totals 31 5 9 5 0 4 New York 000 000 300 — 3 3 0 Atlanta 010 040 00x — 5 9 1 a-lined out for Gee in the 6th. b-was announced for A.Torres in the 7th. c-grounded out for Nieuwenhuis in the 7th. d-flied out for K.Johnson in the 8th. E: Callaspo (1). LOB: New York 4, Atlanta 3. 2B: Duda (1), Callaspo (1), Bethancourt (2), A.Simmons (2). 3B: E.Young (1). HR: Freeman (1), off Gee. RBIs: Lagares (1), d’Arnaud (5), E.Young (2), Markakis (4), Freeman (3), Bethancourt (2), A.Simmons (3). S: Gee, Teheran. RLISP: New York 2 (Cuddyer, Tejada). GIDP: Flores, Callaspo. DP: New York 1; Atlanta 2. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gee L, 0-1 5 8 5 5 0 2 55 9.00 A.Torres 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 13.50 Gilmartin 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0.00 1/ Goeddel 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Teheran W, 2-0 6 2 3 1 4 5 76 1.50 2/ Cunniff 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Avilan 11/3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Ji.Johnson S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 Teheran pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: Cunniff 3-1, Avilan 1-0. HBP: by Teheran (d’Arnaud). Umpires: Home, Fieldin Culbreth; First, Marvin Hudson; Second, Jim Reynolds; Third, Paul Schrieber. T: 2:25. A: 36,056 .

Jimmy Nelson struck out a career-high nine in seven innings, Jean Segura hit a two-run homer and the Milwaukee Brewers became the last team in the majors to win this season by beating the Pittsburgh Pirates 6-0 on Saturday. Milwaukee stopped a four-game losing streak by tagging Vance Worley (0-1) for six runs and seven hits. Braves 5, Mets 3 • Julio Teheran pitched efectively into the seventh inning and Atlanta stayed hot to beat visiting New York, which learned earlier that injured closer Jenrry Mejia was suspended 80 games for a positive drug test. D’Backs 6, Dodgers 0 • Archie Bradley made a dazzling major league debut, allowing one hit over six innings to outpitch Clayton Kershaw and lead Arizona to the win at home. Kershaw (0-1) lasted 6 1/3 innings and gave up 10 hits. Phillies 3, Nationals 2 • Odubel Herrera doubled home the winning run in the 10th inning with his irst major league hit, lifting Philadelphia over visiting Washington. Cubs 9, Rockies 5 • Chris Coghlan and Mike Olt hit consecutive homers in the third inning, Dexter Fowler had two triples and Chicago ended host Colorado’s bid for its best start in history.

aMeriCan league White Sox 5, Twins 4 • Pinch-hitter J.B. Shuck had a go-ahead RBI single in the eighth inning to give host Chicago its irst win. Shuck lined a 1-1 pitch from reliever Blaine Boyer (0-1) with two outs, scoring Alexei Ramirez. Mariners 5, A’s 4 • Nelson Cruz hit his irst home run for Seattle and Brad Miller threw out a runner at the plate in the 10th inning and doubled in the go-ahead run in the 11th to lift Seattle on the road. Cruz hit a threerun drive in the eighth of Dan Otero. Tigers 9, Indians 6 • Ian Kinsler hit an RBI single and Yoenis Cespedes doubled in two runs during Detroit’s four-run top of the ninth as the Tigers stayed unbeaten. Kinsler’s fourth hit snapped a 5-all tie and helped the Tigers improve to 5-0 for the irst time since 2006. Red Sox 8, Yankees 4 • Joe Kelly pitched one-hit ball for seven innings and visiting Boston ran over New York. The game started at 1:08 p.m. following Friday night’s 19-inning game. Matt Tracy (CBC) made his major league debut for New York. Orioles 7, Blue Jays 1 • Ubaldo Jimenez struck out eight and allowed one single over seven innings, and Jonathan Schoop hit a grand slam to lead host Baltimore. Rangers 6, Astros 2 • Yovani Gallardo won his home debut for his hometown team, pitching into the sixth inning for Texas in a win over Houston.

interleague Rays 2, Marlins 0 • Chris Archer pitched seven crisp innings, and visiting Tampa Bay beat Miami. Archer (1-1) allowed one hit and one walk, with the latter runner erased trying to steal, while throwing only 84 pitches. Associated Press

Mariners 5, Athletics 4 Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 6 1 1 0 0 2 .273 S.Smith dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .833 c-Ruggiano ph-dh 2 1 0 0 0 1 .000 Cano 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .150 N.Cruz rf 5 1 3 3 0 1 .200 Seager 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Morrison 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .158 Ackley lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .300 B.Miller ss 4 0 1 1 1 1 .333 Sucre c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Weeks ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Zunino c 1 0 0 0 1 0 .071 Totals 42 5 10 5 3 7 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gentry cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Fuld ph-cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .350 Canha 1b-lf 6 1 1 0 0 1 .400 Zobrist lf-rf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .292 B.Butler dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .348 1-Sogard pr-dh 1 1 0 0 0 1 .200 C.Ross rf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .250 d-I.Davis ph-1b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .313 Lawrie 3b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .261 Phegley c 3 0 2 1 0 0 .444 e-Vogt ph-c 0 0 0 0 2 0 .357 Semien ss 5 0 2 1 0 0 .348 Ladendorf 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Totals 42 4 12 4 3 6 Seattle 001 000 030 01 — 5 10 0 Oakland 000 000 220 00 — 4 12 1 a-popped out for Gentry in the 7th. b-flied out for Sucre in the 8th. d-struck out for C.Ross in the 8th. e-was intentionally walked for Phegley in the 8th. 1-ran for B.Butler in the 7th. E: Semien (2). LOB: Seattle 8, Oakland 10. 2B: B.Miller (1), Zobrist (4), I.Davis (3), Lawrie (2). HR: Ackley (2), off Gray; N.Cruz (1), off Otero. RBIs: N.Cruz 3 (3), Ackley (2), B.Miller (2), Zobrist (4), Lawrie (1), Phegley (1), Semien (6). SB: B.Miller (1). S: Ackley, Sogard, Lawrie. RLISP: Seattle 3 (B.Miller, A.Jackson 2); Oakland 6 (Ladendorf 2, Fuld, Semien 3). GIDP: Cano. DP: Oakland 1. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ 61/3 7 2 2 0 1 82 2.84 Farquhar 1 2 2 2 0 0 17 7.71 C.Smith 12/3 1 0 0 1 3 26 0.00 Olson W, 1-0 1 2 0 0 2 1 26 0.00 Rodney S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gray 71/3 6 2 1 1 4 96 0.59 1/ 3 0 1 0 0 0 7 0.00 O’Flaherty 1/ 3 1 1 1 0 0 6 6.75 Otero Clippard 1 0 0 0 2 1 32 0.00 Abad L, 0-1 11/3 3 1 1 0 2 27 3.00 2/ 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Chavez Inherited runners-scored: Farquhar 2-0, C.Smith 1-1, O’Flaherty 1-0, Otero 2-2, Chavez 1-0. IBB: off C.Smith (Vogt), off Olson (Lawrie). WP: Farquhar. Umpires: Home, Mark Carlson; First, Mike DiMuro; Second, Tripp Gibson III; Third, Brian Gorman. T: 3:39. A: 24,355 .

White Sox 5, Twins 4 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Santana ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .125 Dozier 2b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .190 Mauer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .250 K.Vargas dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .176 Plouffe 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .133 Arcia lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .250 a-Tor.Hunter ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .118 Herrmann c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .200 S.Robinson rf-lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .200 J.Schafer cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .235 Totals 35 4 8 4 1 10 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Me.Cabrera lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .150 Abreu dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .176 LaRoche 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .118 A.Garcia rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .333 Al.Ramirez ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .125 Gillaspie 3b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .444 G.Beckham 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Soto c 3 1 2 1 0 0 .400 b-Shuck ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Flowers c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 M.Johnson 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Totals 33 5 11 5 1 5 Minnesota 040 000 000 — 4 8 0 Chicago 021 100 01x — 5 11 2 a-grounded out for Arcia in the 8th. b-singled for Soto in the 8th. E: Soto (1), Gillaspie (2). LOB: Minnesota 5, Chicago 6. 2B: Dozier (1), Plouffe (1), A.Garcia (2), Gillaspie (2). 3B: Herrmann (1). HR: LaRoche (1), off Pelfrey; Soto (1), off Pelfrey. RBIs: D.Santana (1), Dozier (2), Herrmann (1), S.Robinson (1), LaRoche (1), A.Garcia (1), Gillaspie (1), Soto (1), Shuck (1). SB: D.Santana (1), S.Robinson (1). CS: J.Schafer (1). RLISP: Minnesota 2 (K.Vargas, Mauer); Chicago 2 (Eaton, Gillaspie). GIDP: Al.Ramirez. DP: Minnesota 1. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pelfrey 5 7 4 4 1 2 80 7.20 Graham 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 A.Thompson 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.70 2/ 3 3 1 1 0 0 10 9.00 Boyer L, 0-1 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Samardzija 7 8 4 4 0 6 113 6.23 Duke W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 Robertson S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 0.00 HBP: by Pelfrey (Abreu). Umpires: Home, John Hirschbeck; First, Sam Holbrook; Second, Bill Welke; Third, James Hoye. T: 2:54. A: 22,317 .

Saturday Boston 8, NY Yankees 4 Chicago (A) 5, Minnesota 4 Seattle 5, Oakland 4 (11) Detroit 9, Cleveland 6 Tampa Bay 2, Miami 0 Baltimore 7, Toronto 1 Texas 6, Houston 2 Kansas City 6, LA Angels 4 Friday Toronto 12, Baltimore 5 Houston 5, Texas 1 Detroit 8, Cleveland 4 Minnesota 6, Chicago (A) 0 Boston 6, NY Yankees 5 (19) Miami 10, Tampa Bay 9 (10) Kansas City 4, LA Angels 2 Oakland 12, Seattle 0

Sunday’s games pitching matchups

Rays 2, Marlins 0 Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kiermaier cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .353 Souza Jr. rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .133 A.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .286 Longoria 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .235 De.Jennings lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .235 Dykstra 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-T.Beckham ph-2b 2 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Forsythe 2b-1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .188 B.Wilson c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .333 c-Rivera ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Archer p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Jepsen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Boxberger p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 2 6 2 3 5 Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Yelich lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .316 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Morse 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Prado 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Ozuna cf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .263 Saltalamacchia c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .077 Hechavarria ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .056 Cosart p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-I.Suzuki ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Dyson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Solano ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Totals 28 0 2 0 2 8 Tampa Bay 000 001 100 — 2 6 0 Miami 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 a-walked for Cosart in the 6th. b-homered for Dykstra in the 7th. c-lined out for B.Wilson in the 9th. d-grounded out for S.Dyson in the 9th. LOB: Tampa Bay 6, Miami 3. 2B: Kiermaier (2), Longoria (2), Yelich (1). 3B: A.Cabrera (1). HR: T.Beckham (1), off Dunn. RBIs: Longoria (2), T.Beckham (1). SB: T.Beckham (1). CS: I.Suzuki (1). RLISP: Tampa Bay 4 (Longoria, Archer, De.Jennings, Rivera); Miami 3 (Morse, Hechavarria, Stanton). GIDP: A.Cabrera. DP: Miami 1. Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Archer W, 1-1 7 1 0 0 1 5 84 2.13 Jepsen 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Boxberger S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 2.70 Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cosart L, 0-1 6 3 1 1 3 1 86 1.50 Dunn 11/3 1 1 1 0 2 29 2.70 S.Dyson 12/3 2 0 0 0 2 25 6.75 WP: Jepsen. Umpires: Home, Gerry Davis; First, Phil Cuzzi; Second, Tony Randazzo; Third, Will Little. T: 2:32. A: 17,830 .

Orioles 7, Blue Jays 1 Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Reyes ss 2 0 1 0 1 0 .368 St.Tolleson ss 1 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Pompey cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .111 Bautista rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Valencia rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .400 Encarnacion dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .300 Donaldson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 R.Martin c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Pillar lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Travis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .313 Totals 30 1 3 1 1 10 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. De Aza lf 5 2 2 1 0 2 .333 Pearce rf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .200 C.Davis 1b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .286 A.Jones cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .333 Snider dh 2 1 0 0 2 1 .400 Machado 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Schoop 2b 4 1 1 4 0 1 .286 E.Cabrera ss 4 0 2 0 0 1 .308 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .154 Totals 32 7 9 6 6 8 Toronto 000 000 001 — 1 3 1 Baltimore 201 040 00x — 7 9 0 E: Donaldson (1). LOB: Toronto 4, Baltimore 8. 2B: St.Tolleson (1). HR: De Aza (2), off Aa.Sanchez; C.Davis (1), off Aa.Sanchez; Schoop (2), off Redmond. RBIs: Encarnacion (5), De Aza (3), C.Davis (1), Schoop 4 (5). SB: Reyes (1). RLISP: Toronto 2 (Encarnacion, Travis); Baltimore 3 (Machado, C.Davis 2). GIDP: A.Jones, Joseph. DP: Toronto 2. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Aa.Sanchez L, 0-1 31/3 7 3 3 2 1 61 8.10 2/ 3 0 0 0 1 1 11 10.80 Hynes Redmond 2 2 4 4 3 2 53 18.00 Hendriks 2 0 0 0 0 4 28 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA U.Jimenez W, 1-0 7 1 0 0 1 8 96 0.00 Tom.Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Britton 1 2 1 1 0 1 15 3.00 Inherited runners-scored: Hynes 2-0. IBB: off Hynes (Pearce), off Aa.Sanchez (Snider). HBP: by Redmond (C.Davis), by Tom.Hunter (R.Martin). WP: Aa.Sanchez. Umpires: Home, Tim Welke; First, Mike Everitt; Second, Tim Timmons; Third, Todd Tichenor. T: 2:34. A: 38,897.

Royals 6, Angels 4 Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Escobar ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .400 Moustakas 3b 4 1 2 1 1 1 .353 L.Cain cf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .400 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .318 K.Morales dh 4 1 3 1 1 0 .400 A.Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .077 Rios rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .300 S.Perez c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .421 Infante 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .158 Totals 36 6 12 6 4 8 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Calhoun rf 4 2 2 3 0 0 .200 Trout cf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .389 Pujols 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .105 Joyce lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Freese 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .235 E.Navarro dh 2 1 0 0 1 1 .400 Butera c 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 a-Iannetta ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .067 Giavotella 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Totals 32 4 6 4 1 3 Kansas City 000 510 000 — 6 12 0 Los Angeles 100 030 000 — 4 6 0 a-fouled out for Butera in the 7th. LOB: Kansas City 9, Los Angeles 2. 2B: K.Morales (3), Calhoun (2). HR: Moustakas (2), off Weaver; S.Perez (2), off Weaver; Calhoun (1), off Guthrie. RBIs: Moustakas (2), K.Morales (4), Rios 2 (5), S.Perez 2 (6), Calhoun 3 (4), Trout (3). SB: Moustakas (1). CS: L.Cain (1), Hosmer (1), Aybar (1). RLISP: Kansas City 4 (Hosmer, Moustakas, Rios, A.Gordon); Los Angeles 1 (Freese). GIDP: Rios. DP: Los Angeles 1. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie W, 1-0 7 6 4 4 1 2 94 5.14 W.Davis 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 G.Holland S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver L, 0-2 4 1/3 7 6 6 4 5 85 8.71 Rucinski 2 3 0 0 0 2 33 0.00 1/ C.Ramos 3 1 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 1/ Morin 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 J.Alvarez 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Rucinski 2-1, Morin 2-0. HBP: by C.Ramos (A.Gordon), by J.Alvarez (Hosmer). Umpires: Home, Doug Eddings; First, Jim Wolf; Second, Adam Hamari; Third, Bill Miller. T: 2:41. A: 44,154 .

Rangers 6, Astros 2 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .200 Springer rf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .176 Lowrie dh 4 0 0 0 1 3 .235 Carter 1b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .053 Valbuena 3b 5 0 2 0 0 2 .133 J.Castro c 5 1 2 0 0 0 .308 Col.Rasmus lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Ma.Gonzalez ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .500 Marisnick cf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .400 Totals 38 2 11 2 4 9 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. L.Martin cf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .120 Peguero rf 5 1 2 1 0 1 .400 Beltre 3b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .200 Fielder 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .364 Smolinski lf 2 2 0 0 2 1 .000 Moreland dh 3 0 2 0 0 0 .235 1-DeShields pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Andrus ss 4 0 1 2 0 1 .167 Odor 2b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .176 Chirinos c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .100 Totals 33 6 9 4 4 4 Houston 001 001 000 — 2 11 3 Texas 110 030 01x — 6 9 0 1-ran for Moreland in the 7th. E: Col.Rasmus (1), Carter (1), Ma.Gonzalez (1). LOB: Houston 13, Texas 9. 2B: J.Castro (1), Col. Rasmus (1), Peguero (1), Beltre (2), Moreland (1), Odor (2). 3B: Beltre (1). HR: Ma.Gonzalez (1), off Gallardo. RBIs: Altuve (1), Ma.Gonzalez (1), Peguero (1), Andrus 2 (2), Odor (2). SB: DeShields (1). S: Chirinos. RLISP: Houston 7 (Carter 2, Marisnick 2, Springer 2, J.Castro); Texas 5 (Fielder, Chirinos, Odor 2, Andrus). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Hernandez L, 0-1 42/3 5 5 1 4 2 92 1.93 1/ Thatcher 3 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Harris 2 1 0 0 0 1 23 0.00 Sipp 1 2 1 1 0 0 19 4.50 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 1-1 52/3 8 2 2 1 7 90 5.59 Edwards 000 0 2 0 9 1/ Klein 3 0 0 0 0 0 6 10.13 Kela 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.00 Sh.Tolleson 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Feliz 1 1 0 0 1 1 18 6.75 Edwards pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored: Thatcher 3-3, Edwards 2-1, Klein 3-0. IBB: off R.Hernandez (Fielder). HBP: by Harris (Moreland). Umpires: Home, Jeff Nelson; First, Laz Diaz; Second, Chris Guccione; Third, Cory Blaser. T: 3:18. A: 36,833.

Brewers 6, Pirates 0 Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Harrison 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Cervelli c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .357 N.Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Marte cf 2 0 1 0 1 1 .167 P.Alvarez 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .313 Scahill p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Hart rf-1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Lambo lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Kang ss 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Worley p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 S.Rodriguez rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Totals 26 0 2 0 2 11 Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Gomez cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .190 Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .050 Braun rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .200 Lind 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .529 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .200 L.Jimenez 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 K.Davis lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .300 Segura ss 2 2 1 2 1 1 .400 H.Gomez 2b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .667 Nelson p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 a-L.Schafer ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 W.Smith p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Broxton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 6 7 6 2 6 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Milwaukee 030 200 10x — 6 7 0 a-sacrificed for Nelson in the 7th. LOB: Pittsburgh 2, Milwaukee 3. 2B: C.Gomez (2), Ar.Ramirez (1), K.Davis (3), H.Gomez 2 (2). HR: Segura (1), off Worley. RBIs: C.Gomez (3), K.Davis (1), Segura 2 (2), H.Gomez 2 (2). CS: Cervelli (1). S: L.Schafer. RLISP: Pittsburgh 1 (Lambo); Milwaukee 2 (C.Gomez, Braun). GIDP: N.Walker, Hart. DP: Milwaukee 2. Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley L, 0-1 61/3 7 6 6 2 4 89 8.53 2/ Scahill 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nelson W, 1-0 7 2 0 0 2 9 88 0.00 W.Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Broxton 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 6.00 Inherited runners-scored: Scahill 1-0. HBP: by Nelson (Cervelli). Umpires: Home, Dana DeMuth; First, Toby Basner; Second, Paul Nauert; Third, Mike Estabrook. T: 2:26. A: 41,108 .

Padres 10, Giants 2 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aoki lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .400 Panik 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 Pagan cf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .304 Maxwell rf 1 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Posey c-1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .286 McGehee 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Arias 3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .143 G.Blanco rf-cf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .167 M.Duffy 1b-ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 B.Crawford ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Vogelsong p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Kontos p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Bumgarner p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 H.Sanchez c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Totals 33 2 5 2 2 9 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Myers cf 5 2 2 2 0 1 .250 Solarte 1b 4 1 3 1 1 0 .455 Kemp rf 5 1 4 1 0 1 .346 Spangenberg lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Upton lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .292 Garces p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maurer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --De.Norris c 5 1 2 1 0 1 .320 Middlebrooks 3b 5 0 3 2 0 1 .250 Gyorko 2b 5 0 1 1 0 1 .143 Barmes ss 5 1 1 0 0 1 .286 Shields p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .200 a-Venable ph-rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Totals 42 10 20 10 1 8 San Francisco 000 100 010 — 2 5 1 San Diego 203 003 20x — 10 20 2 a-singled for Shields in the 7th. E: M.Duffy (1), Barmes (2), Solarte (1). LOB: San Francisco 7, San Diego 10. 2B: Maxwell (1), Myers (2), Kemp 2 (3), Middlebrooks (1). HR: Arias (1), off Shields. RBIs: Maxwell (2), Arias (1), Myers 2 (4), Solarte (2), Kemp (4), Upton 2 (5), De.Norris (3), Middlebrooks 2 (4), Gyorko (1). CS: Barmes (1). SF: Upton. RLISP: San Francisco 2 (McGehee, Arias); San Diego 7 (Gyorko, Shields, Upton 3, Middlebrooks, Barmes). GIDP: Posey, Upton. DP: San Francisco 1, San Diego 1. San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bumgarner L, 1-1 3 10 5 5 0 4 79 5.40 Vogelsong 32/3 9 5 4 1 2 68 11.88 Kontos 11/3 1 0 0 0 2 32 0.00 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shields W, 1-0 7 3 1 1 1 7 103 2.08 Garces 1 2 1 1 0 0 18 3.86 Maurer 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Kontos 2-0. HBP: by Shields (B.Crawford). Umpires: Home, Larry Vanover; First, Ron Kulpa; Second, Brian Knight; Third, Vic Carapazza. T: 3:14. A: 42,823 .

NL

Pitcher

StL

Martinez (R)

Cin

Iglesias (R)

Time W-L ERA 0-0 0.00 12:10

Was Scherzer (R) Phi

---

----

0-1 0.00

O’Sllivan (R)

12:35

---

----

NY

Colon (R)

12:35 1-0

1.50

Atl

Wood (L)

Pit

Sadler (R)

Mil

Lohse (R)

Chi

Hendricks (R)

Col

Lyles (R)

1-0 3.60 1:10

---

----

0-1 21.60 3:10

---

----

1-0 3.00

LA

Greinke (R)

0-0

1.50

Ari

Cllmenter (R)

3:10

0-1

7.71

SF

Peavy (R)

3:10

---

----

SD

Ross (R)

AL

Pitcher

Det Lobstein (L) Cle

Time W-L ERA 12:10

---

----

---

----

12:35 1-0

1.50

1-0

1.35

House (L)

Tor

Hutchison (R)

Bal

Tillman (R)

Min Hughes (R) Chi

0-0 3.00

1:10

0-1 6.00

2:05

1-0 0.00

Sale (L)

Hou Keuchel (L)

---

Tex Lewis (R) KC

Ventura (R)

LA

Wilson (L)

2:35

----

1-0

1.50

1-0

1.50

1-0 0.00

Sea Hernandez (R)

1-0

1.29

Oak Hahn (R)

3:05

0-1 4.50

Bos Buchholz (R)

7:05

1-0 0.00

NY

Tanaka (R)

IL

Pitcher

Time W-L ERA

TB

Karns (R)

12:10 0-1

9.53

0-1

2.57

Mia Alvarez (R)

0-1 9.00

Cubs 9, Rockies 5 Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 3 2 2 2 2 0 .188 Soler rf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .286 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 1 0 0 .200 M.Montero c 4 0 0 0 1 1 .000 S.Castro ss 5 1 3 2 0 1 .375 Coghlan lf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .182 N.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Coke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Strop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-D.Ross ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 H.Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Olt 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .167 1-J.Herrera pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hammel p 3 1 2 0 0 0 .667 a-Szczur ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Alcantara 2b-3b 2 2 0 0 2 1 .000 Totals 36 9 12 9 5 8 Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Blackmon cf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .150 C.Gonzalez rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Tulowitzki ss 4 2 1 0 1 2 .409 Morneau 1b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .200 Arenado 3b 4 2 2 2 0 0 .450 Dickerson lf 4 0 2 2 0 1 .400 Hundley c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 LeMahieu 2b 4 0 3 0 0 0 .524 K.Kendrick p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .600 Friedrich p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Ynoa ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Rosario ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Ottavino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 38 5 12 5 2 10 Chicago 122 013 000 — 9 12 1 Colorado 021 000 020 — 5 12 1 a-doubled for Hammel in the 7th. b-struck out for Friedrich in the 7th. c-struck out for Betancourt in the 8th. d-struck out for Strop in the 9th. 1-ran for Olt in the 9th. E: Alcantara (1), Blackmon (1). LOB: Chicago 8, Colorado 8. 2B: Szczur (1), Blackmon (2), Tulowitzki (6), Arenado (4). 3B: Fowler 2 (2). HR: Coghlan (1), off K.Kendrick; Olt (1), off K.Kendrick; S.Castro (1), off K.Kendrick; Arenado (2), off Hammel. RBIs: Fowler 2 (2), Soler 2 (2), Rizzo (1), S.Castro 2 (3), Coghlan (1), Olt (1), Morneau (2), Arenado 2 (7), Dickerson 2 (9). CS: S.Castro (1). SF: Soler. RLISP: Chicago 4 (Coghlan, Rizzo, M.Montero, Fowler); Colorado 3 (Blackmon, Rosario, Morneau). GIDP: Rizzo, Tulowitzki, Hundley. DP: Chicago 2, Colorado 1. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel W, 1-0 6 8 3 3 0 6 92 4.50 N.Ramirez 1 0 1 1 2 1 25 3.86 1/ 3 2 1 1 0 0 6 6.75 Coke 2/ 3 1 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Strop H.Rondon 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA K.Kendrick L, 1-1 5 8 8 8 5 3 102 6.00 Friedrich 2 3 1 0 0 2 35 0.00 Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Ottavino 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 0.00 K.Kendrick pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. N.Ramirez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Coke 1-1, Strop 1-0, Friedrich 2-2. HBP: by K.Kendrick (Rizzo), by Ottavino (Olt). Umpires: Home, Gary Cederstrom; First, Eric Cooper; Second, Rob Drake; Third, Quinn Wolcott. T: 3:19. A: 43,812 .

Diamondbacks 6, Dodgers 0 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227 C.Crawford lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .278 A.Gonzalez 1b 2 0 1 0 2 1 .667 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .316 Ethier rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Ju.Turner 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Uribe 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .231 a-Guerrero ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Nicasio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Pederson cf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .176 Ellis c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Kershaw p 1 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Barney 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 0 2 0 4 9 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pollock cf 3 2 3 1 1 0 .313 Inciarte lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .389 Goldschmidt 1b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .412 Trumbo rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .250 Hill 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Owings 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .000 Gosewisch c 4 1 1 0 0 2 .200 Ahmed ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .083 Bradley p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Delgado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 6 10 6 3 7 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Arizona 101 200 20x — 6 10 0 a-grounded out for Uribe in the 4th. E: Ju.Turner (1). LOB: Los Angeles 5, Arizona 5. 2B: H.Kendrick (2). HR: Goldschmidt (2), off Kershaw. RBIs: Pollock (1), Inciarte (2), Goldschmidt 3 (6), Trumbo (2). CS: Pollock (1), Bradley (1). RLISP: Los Angeles 2 (Guerrero 2); Arizona 4 (Owings, Hill, Goldschmidt 2). GIDP: Ju.Turner, Hill. DP: Los Angeles 1; Arizona 1. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw L, 0-1 61/3 10 6 5 3 5 99 5.84 Nicasio 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 19 0.00 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bradley W, 1-0 6 1 0 0 4 6 112 0.00 Ziegler 2 0 0 0 0 1 27 0.00 Delgado 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 Umpires: Home, Ted Barrett; First, Angel Hernandez; Second, Scott Barry; Third, Chris Conroy. T: 2:36. A: 37,636.


cardiNals

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

The

NOTEBOOK

BIG SCORE

Grichuk shows good eye with HR

Brought to you by:

St. Charles Nissan reDS 5, CArDiNAlS 4 Cardinals

AB

R

H BI BB SO Avg.

Carpenter 3b

4

1

2

0

1

1

.333

Heyward rf

5

0

1

1

0

2

.357

Holliday lf

3

0

1

0

2

1 .364

Adams 1b

3

0

0

0

0

1 .000

b-Reynolds ph-1b

1

0

0

0

0

1 .000

Peralta ss

4

0

2

1

0

1 .308

Molina c

4

0

0

0

0

2 .000

Wong 2b

4

1

2

0

0

0 .200

Grichuk cf

4

1

1

2

0

1 .250

Lackey p

2

0

0

0

0

1 .000

a-Jay ph

1

1

1

0

0

0

.333

Maness p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Walden p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

d-Bourjos ph

1

0

0

0

0

1 .000

10

4

3

Totals

36

4

Cincinnati

AB

R

H BI BB SO Avg.

12

Hamilton cf

2

2

0

0

2

1 .286

Votto 1b

3

2

2

4

1

0

.412

Frazier 3b

2

0

0

1

1

0

.267

Mesoraco c

4

0

0

0

0

0 .063

Bruce rf

3

0

1

0

0

0 .250

Byrd lf

3

0

0

0

0

0

.125

Phillips 2b

3

0

0

0

0

0

.143

Cozart ss

3

0

0

0

0

1 .083

Marquis p

2

1

1

0

0

0 .500

Gregg p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Parra p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Hoover p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

c-Boesch ph

1

0

0

0

0

1 .000

0

0

0

0

0

0

26

5

4

5

4

3

CARDINALS

120 000 100

4 10

0

CINCINNATI

202 000 01x

5

0

Chapman p Totals

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

---

4

a-singled for Lackey in the 7th. b-struck out for Adams in the 7th. c-struck out for Hoover in the 8th. d-struck out for Walden in the 9th. LOB: Cardinals 8, Cincinnati 2. 2B: Peralta (2), Wong (1).

After starting in center ield, he hits Cards’ irst of the season in his irst at-bat By DerriCk GoolD St. Louis Post-dispatch

CINCINNATI • When Randal Grichuk was young his father George would take him to the batting cage, feed the pitching machine baseball after baseball, and instruct his son to stand in the batter’s box and watch. Swings could come later. Recognition came first. “I remember taking a bucket of balls before I’d even start swinging,” Grichuk said. “I’d get so frustrated having my dad make me take. But I kind of implemented that again this offseason so I could see the spin, slow it down. It’s just being able to train the eye.” Grichuk described the revisited drill when explaining how he tried to improve his feel for the strike zone over the winter. The result was on display throughout spring as he led the team in home runs and walked nearly as much as he struck out during Grapefruit League play. That success put him on the opening day roster, and a desire to keep his swing humming put Grichuk in the lineup Friday. The Cardinals’ youngest outfielder, Grichuk started in center and hit eighth. He drilled the first home run of the season for the Cardinals in his first at-bat. “He needs to play,” Matheny said. “A guy like Randal, who had a nice spring, is feeling good about his swing. We’re going to have to find ways and find days and today is one of them. … He’s the kind of player that he’s just versatile enough to play all three positions (in the outfield) and we’re probably going to need him to play all three, especially when you’re talking about the swing

continuing to look good and we’re trying to find ways.” Grichuk, a rookie, joined the Cardinals late last season as a threat against lefties. At Class AAA, Grichuk hit 15 homers in 185 at-bats and slugged .627 against lefties. Against righties, he hit .235 with 97 strikeouts in 361 at-bats. Grichuk reshaped the Cardinals’ view of him this spring by showing improvement against righties and that he had potential beyond a platoon fit in right field or center. He did so by returning to the hometown batting cage. The pitching machine he used could throw fastballs, sinkers, curves and even knuckleballs. He watched them all. He had the machine mimic breaking balls from righthanders and from lefthanders. As he watched, his feel for the strike zone improved. And he became the hitter to watch. It also proved good practice for the first week. There has been a lot of watching. Grichuk’s first at-bat Friday against Jason Marquis was his first at-bat in seven days, since the Cardinals’ exhibition game at Memphis. He homered in that game, too. Since then the swings have been few as the Cardinals had three of days in Chicago, and little access to the solitary cage at Wrigley Field. “I felt good at the end of spring,” Grichuk said, continuing facetiously, “Obviously with the 72 of days we’ve had and two games it feels like it’s been forever since I’ve been out there. I really tried to control the strike zone this spring. When the game starts I wanted to have that confidence in the box, have that little swagger, I guess you’d call it.”

CrUZ TAkeS PATerNiTy leAVe Backup catcher Tony Cruz left the team for the weekend so that he could attend the birth of his daughter. She was born Friday, the team confirmed. Cruz was placed on three-day paternity leave by the team so that they could replace him on the roster. He is expected return to the roster Monday for the home opener. The Cardinals replaced Cruz with Ed Easley, the Class AAA catcher whom the team added to the 40-man roster to maintain his rights. Easley, 29, has never appeared in the majors, and even with the short notice he was able to get his wife, parents, and other family members to Cincinnati for the series. “He was a big part of our organization and helping our players develop,” Matheny said. “He quietly goes about his business. All of that leads in the direction of him coming up here for a few days.”

eXTrA BASeS Major League Baseball overruled an error from Wednesday’s game and awarded Jason Heyward a base hit, upping his average from .333 to .444 entering Friday night’s game. The error was originally given to Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro. … In his opening night start at Class A Palm Beach, Cardinals prospect Alex Reyes struck out 10 batters and allowed four runs in a loss. His fastball hit 100 mph and 101 mph. … Jack Flaherty, a 2014 draft pick, was removed from his opening night start because of back stifness after throwing three innings for Class A Peoria. A Cardinals oicial played down the severity. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

HR: Grichuk (1), of Marquis; Votto 2 (3), of Lackey 2. RBIs: Heyward (1), Peralta (1), Grichuk 2 (2), Votto 4 (8), Frazier (5). SB: Hamilton (7), Votto (2). SF: Frazier. RLISP: Cardinals 5 (Molina 2, Wong, Reynolds, Grichuk); Cincinnati 1 (Mesoraco). GIDP: Byrd. DP: Cardinals 1. Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO

NP

ERA

67

6.00

1

8

0.00

1

23

4.50

IP H R ER BB SO

NP

ERA

7 103

4.50

Lackey

6.0 4 4

4

2

1

Maness

1.0 0 0

0

0

Walden L, 0-1

1.0 0

1

2

Cincinnati

1

Marquis

6.0

5

3

3

2

Gregg

0.1

2

Parra

0.1

1

1

0

0

1 0

0

1

0

Hoover W, 2-0

1.1

5

1 0

0

0

3

25

Chapman S, 2-2

1.1

0.00

1 0

0

0

2

12

0.00

15 27.00 0.00

Inherited runners-scored: Parra 2-1, Hoover 2-0. IBB: of Walden (Votto), of Parra (Holliday). WP: Walden, Marquis. Balk: Lackey. Umpires: Home, D.J. Reyburn; First, Joe West; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Lance Barksdale. T: 2:26. A: 30,808.

HoW THey SCoreD Cardinals irst • Carpenter walked on four pitches. On Marquis’s wild pitch, Carpenter to second. • With one out, Holliday walked on four pitches. • With two outs, Peralta doubled to left, Carpenter scored. One run. Cardinals led 1-0. Reds irst • Hamilton walked. On Lackey’s balk, Hamilton to second. • Votto homered to left on a 1-1 count. Two runs. Reds led 2-1. associated Press

Cardinals second

The Cardinals’ Matt Holliday is forced out at second as Cincinnati shortstop Zack Cozart throws to irst in the sixth inning Friday night. Matt Adams was safe at irst.

• Wong singled to right. • Grichuk homered to left on a 1-1 count.

Votto hits a pair of two-run homers as Reds beat Cards

Two runs. Cardinals led 3-2. Reds third • Marquis singled to center. • With one out, Votto homered to left on a 2-0 count.

CArdINAls • from C1

Two runs. Reds led 4-3. Cardinals seventh • With one out, pinch-hitter Jay singled to right. • Carpenter reached on an infield single to second, Jay to second. • Heyward singled to center, Jay scored. One run. Game tied 4-4. Reds eighth • With one out, Hamilton walked on four pitches, then stole second. • Votto was intentionally walked. • On Walden’s wild pitch, Hamilton to third. Votto stole second. • Frazier hit a sacrifice fly to right, Hamilton scored. One run. Reds won 5-4.

AVerAGeS Batters Heyward

avg ab

r

h 2b 3b hr rbi bb so sb

1

4

2

0

0

0

0

.375

8 0

3

0

0

0

2

1

1

1 0

.250

8

2

0

0

0

1

1

2

0 0

9

Holliday Carpenter Jay

.250

8 0

2

1

0

0

0

0

2

0 0

Peralta

.222

9 0

2

1

0

0

0

0

3

0 0

1

0

e

.444

1 0

Adams

.000

6 0

0

0

0

0

0

2

3

0 0

Molina

.000

6 0

0

0

0

0

0

2

3

0 0 0 0

Reynolds

.000

1 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Wong

.000

6

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

Totals

.209

67

3 14

4

0

0

3

7 19

Pitchers

w

l

Belisle

0

0 0.00

1

Martinez

0

0 0.00

1

Rosenthal

0

0 0.00

Siegrist

0

Wainwright

1

1

era g gs sv

1 0 4

1

ip

h

r er hr bb so

0

0 1.0

0

0 0 0

0

0

0 1.0

0

0 0 0

1

1

1

0

1 1.0

0

0 0 0

0

3

0 0.00

1

0

0 1.0

0

0 0 0

0

1

0 0.00

1

1

0 6.0

5

0 0 0

0 6

1

Walden

0

0 0.00

1

0

0 1.0

0

0 0 0

1

Lynn

0

1 1.50

1

1

0 6.0

2

2

1 0

1 9

Totals

1

1 0.53

2

2

1 17.0

7

2

1 0

3 23

• Prior to Friday’s game.

2

couldn’t locate at his feet. And then he completed his dash by scoring the winner on a routine fly ball to right-center field. Gold Glove-winning right fielder Jason Heyward’s throw to home plate was enough to get an average runner out. Hamilton laps average. “That guy is so fast,” Walden said. “Don’t want to walk him.” The Cardinals got the tying run on base in the ninth before closer Aroldis Chapman struck out Matt Holliday with a 101 mph fastball to end the game. While the Cardinals’ offense eases into April, Cincinnati continued its unbeaten start to the regular season with its fourth win in the final at-bat. No team has done that since 1912. Joey Votto hit two two-run homers in his first two at-bats, but the Cardinals answered each time. Rookie Randal Grichuk drilled the Cardinals’ first home run of the season for a one-run lead in the second inning. Heyward lashed a single in the seventh to knot the score at 4-4 and put it in the hands of the relievers. Walden allowed Hamilton’s feet to take over. The Reds’ leadoff hitter had a .292 on-base percentage last year, and his 2014 season began with four strikeouts in four at-bats on opening day against the Cardinals. He has improved as a hitter, but all batters look better when given first base. The only times Hamilton reached base Friday night was when the Cardinals walked him. He took sec-

ST CHARLES HYUNDAI

ond each time – once on a balk and, in the eighth, on a steal. He scored each time, too. “The way he runs, you’ve got to keep him of the bases,” starter John Lackey said. “He’s a big part of their offense,” manager Mike Matheny said. “Getting on base. Taking the walks. When he gets them it turns into a diferent game. Especially late.” With Votto on deck, Hamilton accepted the four-pitch walk from Walden. Rather than go to either Kevin Siegrist, who has struck Votto out in four of seven at-bats, or Randy Choate, Matheny stayed with Walden, the team’s new eighth-inning reliever. Matheny explained that they wanted the strapping righthander “in the big innings.” Walden misfired on three fastballs to Hamilton, and the second-year center fielder stood at first. But not for long. He stole second to allow Walden to pitch around Votto with an intentional walk. Hamilton improved to seven for seven in steal attempts against Molina. With Todd Frazier at the plate, Walden skipped a slider into the dirt. The moment Molina didn’t get a glove on it, Hamilton broke for third and didn’t draw a throw. Having Hamilton on first drew a balk from Lackey in the first inning, and in the eighth it altered how Walden threw. He left a pitch up to Frazier that he could lift for the game-winning fly ball. “I really tried to shorten up my delivery a little bit,” Walden said. “That guy is quick. I’ve got to be quicker. I made a

bad pitch to Frazier there. That’s what it is.” In his first start of the season, Lackey needed only 67 pitches to complete six innings. All four runs he allowed came on two swings, both by Votto in the 10th multi-homer game of his career. The second homer scored Reds starter Jason Marquis and gave him a 4-3 lead to protect, which he did to complete his six innings. The last time the Cardinals saw Marquis was also the last time Marquis saw the majors. On July 19, 2013, the former Cardinals righthander had his family come to St. Louis to watch him pitch for the Padres. He had been throwing several years with a torn ligament in his right elbow, and that day was its last. He allowed six runs on eight hits in 51/3 innings, and soon after had Tommy John surgery. Marquis did not appear in the majors in 2014, and he signed a minor-league deal to win a spot in the Reds’ rotation this spring. The team managed by his first catcher with the Cardinals and backstopped by his last catcher with the Cardinals took a 1-0 lead on him early. Matt Carpenter walked. Jhonny Peralta drove him home with a two-out double. In the second, Grichuk, making his first start of the season, sent a 1-1 pitch hurtling 431 feet to put the Cardinals ahead 3-2. Marquis retired the next 12 Cardinals he faced. He struck out seven total. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

BIG SCORES Brought to you by:


CARDINALS

04.12.2015 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C5

NOTEBOOK

Pitchers boosting pace to slow running game Cardinals hastening delivery time to plate

we’re trying to quicken guys up in general,” Matheny said Saturday. “So that they then know, ‘Hey, I’m 1.1 or 1.2. That’s as good as anybody can do. I’m like that all the time. I’ll mix up my holds. But when I go make my pitch, I’ve been practicing that.’ Instead of the guy who is typically a 1.4 or 1.5 to the plate, which you’re not going to throw a runner like Hamilton out.” The Cardinals worked with lefty Kevin Siegrist on hastening his delivery all spring. Matheny said Lance Lynn has been able to hit 1.2 consistently. Adam Wainwright has long been swift to the plate, and closer Trevor Rosenthal’s commitment to the stretch has added consistency to the speed of his delivery. The Reds have thrown a wrinkle in the National League Central this season by batting former MVP Joey Votto second, right behind Hamilton. The idea is that Hamilton commands a lot of attention with his speed, which

BY DErrICK gOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CinCinnaTi • With runners like Billy Hamilton quickening the pace of games on the bases, the Cardinals and manager Mike Matheny stressed this spring one way to slow opponents. Their pitchers had to be faster. The Cardinals wanted their pitchers to have a delivery time to home plate of 1.1 seconds or 1.2 seconds. The idea was to get the ball quicker to the plate and take away even a tenth of a second that a runner had to steal a base. The push was up from the 1.3 seconds that pitching coach Dave Duncan used to recite as a mantra for pitchers, and on Friday night, as Hamilton ran the Reds to a victory, the motivation for being faster was clear. “That’s part of the reason why

ond mattered. Yadier Molina has been known to throw in the 1.80s. The time left over has to be covered by the pitcher, and most steals are on them and a dawdling delivery.

means less attention will be paid to Votto. Sticking to the pitch plan and keeping a pitcher’s delivery crisp are elements of running-game defense that Matheny stressed as a catcher and now as a manager. “It’s obvious to the opposition and whoever is playing against these (Reds) that they’re sacrificing the best pitch at a particular time just to throw out a runner who is going to get his share of bags,” Matheny said. “Usually you get some diminished returns on that. It’s just not going to work out. When you start doing that bad things will happen.” The focus on getting to 1.2 seconds is simple math, a triangulation of the time it takes for the catcher to make a throw to second and the time it takes the runner to get there. As a catcher, Matheny wanted his “pop time” — the time it took to go from his mitt to the middle infielder’s glove at second — at less than 2 seconds. Hundredths of a sec-

FaN INJUrY DELaYs gaME In the seventh inning of Saturday’s game, Reds outfielder Marlon Byrd lashed a foul ball into the seats that smashed a fan in his face. The fan was attended to immediately and taken to a local hospital, according to a Reds official. The game was halted in the middle of Byrd’s at-bat by homeplate umpire Joe West while the stadium personnel attended the fan. It’s unusual that the play on the field would stop entirely, but West offered an explanation to starter Michael Wacha. The delay lasted more than three minutes. “Very unfortunate for that fan,” Wacha said. “We had too many people in the stands with

their back toward the field so it wasn’t smart continuing the game at that moment.”

EXTra BasEs Xavier Scruggs, a slugger who gives depth at first base and the outfield for the Cardinals, homered in Class AAA Memphis’ first two games. He and leading prospect Stephen Piscotty had home runs in the Triple-A Redbirds’ win Friday night. … Low-A starter Jack Flaherty, a 2014 draft pick, was checked by a doctor Friday after leaving his opening-night start with lower back soreness. He will go into a strength program and miss his next two scheduled starts. … The Cardinals’ first-round pick from 2014, righthanded pitcher Luke Weaver, has opened the season on the disabled list so that he can remain at extended spring training to improve arm strength. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

The

BIG SCORE Brought to you by:

St. Charles Nissan CarDINaLs 4, rEDs 1 Cardinals

AB

R

H BI BB SO

Carpenter 3b

3

0

0

0

1

0

Avg. .267

Heyward rf

4

0

0

0

0

0

.278

Holliday lf

4

0

1

0

0

1

.333

Reynolds 1b

0

0

0

0

0

0 .000

Adams 1b

4

1

2

1

0

0

1-Bourjos pr-cf

0

1

0

0

0

0 .000

Peralta ss

4

2

1

1

0

1

.294

Jay cf-lf

3

0

1

0

0

1

.333

Molina c

4

0

2

1

0

0

.143

Wong 2b

3

0

1

1

0

0

.231

Wacha p

2

0

0

0

0

1 .000

Maness p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Siegrist p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

b-Grichuk ph

1

0

0

0

0

0 .200

.154

Walden p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Choate p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Rosenthal p

1

0

0

0

0

1 .000

Totals

33

4

8

4

1

5

Cincinnati

AB

R

H BI BB SO

Avg.

Hamilton cf

4

0

0

0

0

1

.222

Votto 1b

4

0

1

0

0

0

.381

Frazier 3b

4

1

2

1

0

0

.316

Mesoraco c

4

0

1

0

0

1

.100

Bruce rf

4

0

0

0

0

2

.188

Byrd lf

4

0

0

0

0

0

.100

Phillips 2b

3

0

0

0

1

1

.118

Cozart ss

3

0

2

0

0

0 .200

Cueto p

1

0

0

0

0

0 .000

a-Boesch ph

1

0

0

0

0

1 .000

Badenhop p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Parra p

0

0

0

0

0

0

---

Totals

32

1

6

1

1

6

CARDINALS

010

100

002

4

8

1

CINCINNATI

100 000 000

1

6

2

a-struck out for Cueto in the 7th. b-reached on error for Siegrist in the 8th. 1-ran for Adams in the 9th. E: Carpenter (1), Frazier (1), Cozart (1). LOB: Cardinals 5, Cincinnati 6. 2B: Cozart (2). HR: Adams (1), of Cueto; Frazier (3), of Wacha. RBIs: Adams (1), Peralta (2), Molina (1), Wong (1), Frazier (6). SB: Bourjos (2), Mesoraco (1). S: Cueto. SF: Wong. RLISP: Cardinals 2 (Wacha, Rosenthal); Cincinnati 5 (Votto, Byrd, Hamilton, Bruce, Mesoraco). GIDP: Heyward, Peralta. DP: Cincinnati 2. Cardinals

IP H R ER BB SO NP

ERA

Wacha W, 1-0

6.1

1

1

1

2

1.42

Maness

0.1 0 0

0

0

0

7 0.00

5

76

Siegrist

0.1 0 0

0

0

1

4 0.00

Walden

0.1 0 0

0

0

1

3

3.86

Choate

0.0

1 0

0

0

0

2

-

Rosenthal S, 2-2

1.2 0 0

0

0

2

22 0.00

Cincinnati

IP H R ER BB SO NP

Cueto L, 0-1

7.0 4

2

Badenhop

1.1 4

2

Parra

0.2 0 0

1

ERA

1

4

89 0.64

2

0

0

24

0

0

1

6.75

5 0.00

Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Maness 1-0, Siegrist 1-0, Rosenthal 1-0, Parra 2-0. HBP: by Cueto (Jay). WP: Wacha, Rosenthal. Umpires: Home, Joe West; First, Kerwin Danley; Second, Lance Barksdale; Third, D.J. Reyburn. T: 2:36. A: 41,525.

HOW THEY sCOrED Reds first • With two outs, Frazier homered to left on a 3-0 count. One run. Reds 1, Cardinals 0. Cardinals second • Peralta safe at first on Frazier’s fielding error. • Jay was hit by a pitch, Peralta to second. • Molina singled to right, loading the bases. • Wong hit a sacrifice fly to right, Peralta scored. One run. Game tied 1-1. Cardinals fourth • Adams homered to right on a 0-1 count. One run. Cardinals led 2-1. Cardinals ninth • With one out, Adams singled to right. • Bourjos pinch-running for Adams. Bourjos stole second. • Peralta singled to left, Bourjos scored. • Jay singled to right, Peralta to second. • Molina singled to center, Peralta scored. Two runs. Cardinals won 4-1

AssociAted Press

The Cardinals’ Jhonny Peralta beats the tag at home from Reds catcher Devin Mesoraco in the ninth inning Saturday.

Bullpen backs up Wacha’s strong start Cardinals • from C1

entered the game with the Cardinals leading 2-1 and left with a win for Wacha, a five-out save for Trevor Rosenthal and a clear sense of the order Matheny intends to use until results dictate otherwise. Coming of Friday’s loss, which capsized in the late innings, Matheny wanted to clinch the win and assert his commitment in the bullpen. He did both. “I wasn’t searching for reasons,” Matheny said. “Just wasn’t afraid to.” Two Cardinals regulars entered Saturday’s game still looking for their first hit of the season, and both left the game with two hits and key RBIs. Matt Adams, hitless in his first 10 at-bats, landed a solo home run in the fourth inning to break a 1-1 tie and give the Cardinals the lead they wouldn’t misplace. Yadier Molina, still searching for his swing through a zero-for-10 start, singled in the ninth to score Jhonny Peralta and set the final score. Back in the rotation after October’s brief relief appearance, Wacha (1-0) became the first Cardinals starter to get an out in the seventh inning as he pitched 6 1/3 and struck out two. To complete Wacha’s game, Matheny turned to the bullpen with the tying run on base in the seventh inning. Cincinnati had built a 4-0 start to its year on bullpen wobbles. All four of the Reds’ winning runs came in their last at-bats, and all four of the opponents’ losses were tattooed on a reliever who faltered. On Friday, the Cardinals turned to the bullpen with a 4-4 tie and then watched as setup man Jordan Walden walked Billy Hamilton and let him run of with the winning run. The Cardinals’ bullpen had a loss this season before it allowed a hit. That’s partially why Matheny wanted to go back to Walden on Saturday. With one out in the seventh and the tying run at first, Matheny went to Seth Maness, the Cardinals’ designated double-play reliever. Maness retired his batter, Zack Cozart, but on a lineout. That presented Matheny a choice. He could aim to use the fewest relievers and double-switch lefty Kevin Siegrist into the game to face three consecutive lefthanded hitters, or he could set the eighth aside and show faith in Walden. It would take more pitchers and leave

ST CHARLES HYUNDAI

avEragEs Batting Holliday Heyward Carpenter Jay Peralta Grichuk Wong Adams Bourjos Molina Reynolds Totals Pitching Belisle Maness Martinez Rosenthal Siegrist Wainwright Lynn Walden Lackey Totals

avg ab r h 2b 3b hr rbi bb so sb e .364 11 0 4 0 0 0 2 3 2 1 0 .357 14 1 5 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 .333 12 2 4 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 .333 9 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 .308 13 0 4 2 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 .250 4 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 .200 10 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 .000 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 .000 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 .000 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 0 0 .000 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 .233 103 7 24 6 0 1 7 10 31 4 1 w 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

l 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

era 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.50 4.50 6.00 2.16

g 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 3

gs 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 3

sv 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

ip 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 6.0 6.0 2.0 6.0 25.0

h 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 0 4 11

r 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 4 7

er 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 4 6

hr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2

bb so 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 6 1 9 3 3 2 1 7 26

fewer for extra innings. Matheny and his staff discussed the double-switch and the benefit of putting Peter Bourjos in center field. Message and matchup won out. Siegrist got one batter — striking out pinch-hitter Brennan Boesch — and Walden started the eighth. A day after walking Hamilton on four pitches, Walden struck him out on three. “I do want to reinforce to Jordan what happened (Friday) night was not going to make us hesitate to bring him in,” Matheny said. “It’s something that he needs to know and needs to see from us. I also knew we had a lot of guys down there who were fresh. We could back up with Rosey. We had plenty of guys to get it done without doing a double-switch too soon.” Matheny has followed that feel before when making bullpen moves. He will look to use a reliever a day after a sour outing just to cleanse the palate. Veteran lefty Randy Choate contributed to a loss in Game 3 of the National League championship series, but was back on the mound the next night for Game 4. He has called that move by Matheny one of the most meaningful since he’s been a Cardinal. Matheny went to Choate on Saturday for his planned assignment, too. A lefty specialist, Choate didn’t draw Joey Votto on Friday, but did face the Reds’ best lefthanded hitter Saturday. Votto singled — the only hit allowed in 9 2/3 innings this season by the Cardinals’ bullpen — but only got as far as third base. Rosenthal completed his

second career 1 2/3-inning save by retiring all five batters he faced. Wacha spent spring training building trust and distancing himself from the shoulder injury that chewed apart last season. He had a 1.77 ERA in 20 1/3 innings during spring, pitching as effectively as any pitcher on staf. In the 12 days since his final spring start, Wacha threw bullpen sessions and focused on his feel for all of his pitches. That showed Saturday. Wacha’s first strikeout ended the first inning and it came on a curveball, his newest pitch. He allowed a solo homer to Todd Frazier in the first and then retired 11 of the next 13 batters. It took him four pitches to retire the side in the second inning, seven to complete the third. He had six first-pitch outs, including two from Votto. “They were very aggressive and I was able to make some pitches down in the zone and get some weak contact early on, early in the count,” Wacha said. “I think guys don’t want to get into deeper counts against him,” Matheny said. “Second time through (the order) they wanted to jump on something quick. When he’s got that downhill fastball it makes the changeup that much better. It’s hard to lay of.” The Cardinals tied the game, 1-1, with Kolten Wong’s sacrifice fly in the second inning, but couldn’t crack Reds ace Johnny Cueto (0-1) partially because of his defense. The Cardinals had three base hits stolen from them in the first three innings by diving Reds fielders. To lead off the fourth inning, Adams turned on a changeup and put it where no Reds’ glove could reach — safely into the netting above the visitors’ bullpen. Adams’ first home run of the season was his first hit and his first RBI and it gave the Cardinals their first lead of the day. Adams said he felt “jumpy” in the season-opening series at Wrigley Field, but when he came to the ballpark Saturday morning his batting practice felt comfortable, his timing right. “I felt like I was where I needed to be,” he said. He found in his swing what Matheny had in the bullpen. Trust. Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com

BIG SCORES Brought to you by:


BASEBALL

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

MLB INSIDER > BY RICK HUMMEL • rhummel@post-dispatch.com • @cmshhummel on Twitter

Braves, Reds, Rockies defying critics National League has topsy-turvy irst week as unsung teams get of to hot starts

B

y most estimates, the Atlanta Braves, Cincinnati Reds and Colorado Rockies portended to be fourth- or fifth-place teams in the National League East, Central and West, respectively. Surely enough, all were involved in sweeps in the first series of games this season. But, oddly enough, they were the ones doing the sweeping. Atlanta polished off a three-game dusting of trendy pick Miami in

Florida, the Reds took three from trendy pick Pittsburgh in Cincinnati and perennial road kill Colorado captured three at Milwaukee. Were the experts wrong? Well, there are 25 weeks and change left in the season, but for the moment, the early winners may have been underappreciated and the losers hyped a bit too much. In Miami, the Braves allowed three earned runs in 27 innings, didn’t need premier closer Craig

Kimbrel, whom they traded to San Diego hours before the start of the season, and hit .435 with runners in scoring position. They hit only one home run in the series, and that, surprisingly, came of the bat of catcher A.J. Pierzynski, who had just one for the Cardinals in the final two months of the 2014 season. “To come in here and play against a team that people are expecting really big things out of, and to play the way we did, hope-

fully carries over,” Pierzynski told Atlanta reporters. “It’s only three games. There’s a whole lot more games.” But, he added, “If we pitch like this, we’ll be fine.” Among the Braves’ pitching standouts the first series was former Cardinal Shelby Miller, who tossed five scoreless innings. The Braves have divested themselves of so much in the payroll department (Jason Heyward, Kimbrel, Melvin Upton

Jr., Justin Upton, etc.), that their highest-paid player on their opening-day roster was Washington second baseman Dan Uggla. The Braves released Uggla last season and are still responsible for his $13.2 million salary this season, minus the prorated portion of the major league minimum salary ($507,500). That’s nearly $12.7 million that the Braves are paying.

JOEY BALL

BREWERS FIND ROCKY ROAD

In Cincinnati, Joey Votto, who missed much of last season with a leg injury, hit his first homer since last May 10. And, prone to take a walk instead of going outside his strike zone, Votto is hitting second rather than third in a new-look Reds lineup that has former cleanup man Brandon Phillips hitting seventh and young stars Todd Frazier and Devin Mesoraco hitting third and fourth. Speedy Billy Hamilton, who tailed of in the second half last year, started the season with six stolen bases in three games. “He’s just a real pain in the butt for anyone who’s got to pitch with him on base,” said Cincinnati manager Bryan Price after Hamilton’s three-steal game on Wednesday.

Colorado won just 21 of 81 road games last year and lost six of seven overall to Milwaukee before taking all three games against the Brewers. “It’s great getting of to a start like this, particularly on the road, where we had some tough history — especially last year,” said Rockies manager Walt Weiss. “But this is a different year. It’s a diferent team.” Colorado stars Carlos Gonzalez and Troy Tulowitzki, who rarely have played together lately because of injuries, showed how devastating they can be when on the field at the same time. They were 11 for 27 with seven doubles and a home run in the three games. The final Rockies victory in the series was saved by former Cardinal John Axford, who mistakenly wasn’t introduced on the foul line before the first game of the series in Milwaukee even though he had been a successful closer for the Brewers. That wasn’t Axford’s biggest problem, though. His 2 ½ < Carlos year old son Jameson remains hospitalized in the Phoenix Gonzalez area after being bitten by a rattlesnake late in spring training. Axford, 31, said the prognosis was good for his son, who will not have to have his leg or any toes amputated. But the venom did damage tissue, and it could take another six weeks for Jameson to be released. “It’s just more infection than they thought in his foot,” Axford told a Colorado reporter. “He got bit twice. He released a lot of venom and possibly hit an artery in the foot. Things happened so quickly. They gave him six vials of anti-venom, thinking that was enough. He’s up to 26.”

Billy Hamilton >

PACE IS ALL RIGHT

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former Cardinals Steve Kline (left) and Albert Pujols horse around as Pujols signs autographs in January 2011.

San Francisco righthander rookie Chris Heston won his first start this season and credits none other than colorful former Cardinals reliever Steve Kline, a pitching coach in the Giants’ system. When Kline was pitching coach at low Class A Augusta, he taught Heston the hard sinker that Heston used to help beat Arizona. “I love Kline,” Heston told Bay Area reporters. “He’s a big part of what I’ve been able to do. He taught me a lot my first year when I was new

Of the first 45 games of the season, 24 of them were completed in under three hours, in part certainly because of the pace-of-game rules instituted before the season. The fastest was a 2 hour, 13 minute 2-0 victory by the Los Angeles Angels at Seattle.

Paul Molitor

FORM HOLDS TRUE There was one series between haves and have-nots that went something as expected. Detroit blanked visiting Minnesota, although the margin of victory was striking. The Tigers scored 22 runs. Minnesota, managed by Hall of Famer Paul Molitor who was making his skippering debut, scored one. The Twins don’t have Harmon Killebrew in their lineup anymore. Or Kirby Puckett. Or Molitor, who had 225 hits at age 40 for the Twins. Minnesota had 13 singles and a double in its first 27 innings of the year.

to professional ball. “ Kline this year is the pitching coach at Class AA Richmond. What is not known is if he also taught Heston his famed wrestling moves.

Troy Tulowitzki


BASEBALL

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

MLB INSIDER > BY RICK HUMMEL • rhummel@post-dispatch.com • @cmshhummel on Twitter

Braves, Reds, Rockies defying critics National League has topsy-turvy irst week as unsung teams get of to hot starts

B

y most estimates, the Atlanta Braves, Cincinnati Reds and Colorado Rockies portended to be fourth- or fifth-place teams in the National League East, Central and West, respectively. Surely enough, all were involved in sweeps in the first series of games this season. But, oddly enough, they were the ones doing the sweeping. Atlanta polished off a three-game dusting of trendy pick Miami in

Florida, the Reds took three from trendy pick Pittsburgh in Cincinnati and perennial road kill Colorado captured three at Milwaukee. Were the experts wrong? Well, there are 25 weeks and change left in the season, but for the moment, the early winners may have been underappreciated and the losers hyped a bit too much. In Miami, the Braves allowed three earned runs in 27 innings, didn’t need premier closer Craig

Kimbrel, whom they traded to San Diego hours before the start of the season, and hit .435 with runners in scoring position. They hit only one home run in the series, and that, surprisingly, came of the bat of catcher A.J. Pierzynski, who had just one for the Cardinals in the final two months of the 2014 season. “To come in here and play against a team that people are expecting really big things out of, and to play the way we did, hope-

fully carries over,” Pierzynski told Atlanta reporters. “It’s only three games. There’s a whole lot more games.” But, he added, “If we pitch like this, we’ll be fine.” Among the Braves’ pitching standouts the first series was former Cardinal Shelby Miller, who tossed five scoreless innings. The Braves have divested themselves of so much in the payroll department (Jason Heyward, Kimbrel, Melvin Upton

Jr., Justin Upton, etc.), that their highest-paid player on their opening-day roster was Washington second baseman Dan Uggla. The Braves released Uggla last season and are still responsible for his $13.2 million salary this season, minus the prorated portion of the major league minimum salary ($507,500). That’s nearly $12.7 million that the Braves are paying.

JOEY BALL

BREWERS FIND ROCKY ROAD

In Cincinnati, Joey Votto, who missed much of last season with a leg injury, hit his first homer since last May 10. And, prone to take a walk instead of going outside his strike zone, Votto is hitting second rather than third in a new-look Reds lineup that has former cleanup man Brandon Phillips hitting seventh and young stars Todd Frazier and Devin Mesoraco hitting third and fourth. Speedy Billy Hamilton, who tailed of in the second half last year, started the season with six stolen bases in three games. “He’s just a real pain in the butt for anyone who’s got to pitch with him on base,” said Cincinnati manager Bryan Price after Hamilton’s three-steal game on Wednesday. The Cardinals found that out Friday when Hamilton ran his way to the winning run against them. And Votto had two more home runs.

Colorado won just 21 of 81 road games last year and lost six of seven overall to Milwaukee before taking all three games against the Brewers. “It’s great getting of to a start like this, particularly on the road, where we had some tough history — especially last year,” said Rockies manager Walt Weiss. “But this is a different year. It’s a diferent team.” Colorado stars Carlos Gonzalez and Troy Tulowitzki, who rarely have played together lately because of injuries, showed how devastating they can be when on the field at the same time. They were 11 for 27 with seven doubles and a home run in the three games. The final Rockies victory in the series was saved by former Cardinal John Axford, who mistakenly wasn’t introduced on the foul line before the first game of the series in Milwaukee even though he had been a successful closer for the Brewers. That wasn’t Axford’s biggest problem, though. His 2 ½ < Carlos year old son Jameson remains hospitalized in the Phoenix Gonzalez area after being bitten by a rattlesnake late in spring training. Axford, 31, said the prognosis was good for his son, who will not have to have his leg or any toes amputated. But the venom did damage tissue, and it could take another six weeks for Jameson to be released. “It’s just more infection than they thought in his foot,” Axford told a Colorado reporter. “He got bit twice. He released a lot of venom and possibly hit an artery in the foot. Things happened so quickly. They gave him six vials of anti-venom, thinking that was enough. He’s up to 26.”

Billy Hamilton >

PACE IS ALL RIGHT

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former Cardinals Steve Kline (left) and Albert Pujols horse around as Pujols signs autographs in January 2011.

San Francisco righthander rookie Chris Heston won his first start this season and credits none other than colorful former Cardinals reliever Steve Kline, a pitching coach in the Giants’ system. When Kline was pitching coach at low Class A Augusta, he taught Heston the hard sinker that Heston used to help beat Arizona. “I love Kline,” Heston told Bay Area reporters. “He’s a big part of what I’ve been able to do. He taught me a lot my first year when I was new

Of the first 45 games of the season, 24 of them were completed in under three hours, in part certainly because of the pace-of-game rules instituted before the season. The fastest was a 2 hour, 13 minute 2-0 victory by the Los Angeles Angels at Seattle.

Paul Molitor

FORM HOLDS TRUE There was one series between haves and have-nots that went something as expected. Detroit blanked visiting Minnesota, although the margin of victory was striking. The Tigers scored 22 runs. Minnesota, managed by Hall of Famer Paul Molitor who was making his skippering debut, scored one. The Twins don’t have Harmon Killebrew in their lineup anymore. Or Kirby Puckett. Or Molitor, who had 225 hits at age 40 for the Twins. Minnesota had 13 singles and a double in its first 27 innings of the year.

to professional ball. “ Kline this year is the pitching coach at Class AA Richmond. What is not known is if he also taught Heston his famed wrestling moves.

NOTEBOOK

Mets reliever tests positive, gets suspended 80 games ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York Mets relief pitcher Jenrry Mejia was suspended 80 games by Major League Baseball on Saturday after testing positive for the performance-enhancing substance Stanozolol. This is the fourth penalty for a positive Stanozolol test reported by MLB in less than a month, following Minnesota pitcher Ervin Santana, Seattle pitcher David Rollins and Atlanta pitcher Arodys Vizcaino. Mejia began the season as New York’s closer, but he was placed on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday with posterior elbow inflammation, without having pitched in a game. The 25-year-old Mejia released a statement through the players’ union saying he knows the rules and accepts his punishment, but “can honestly say I have no idea how a banned substance ended up in my system.” Mejia apologized to the organization, his teammates, fans and family while also maintaining his innocence. “I have been through a lot in my young career and missed time due to injury,” Mejia said. “I have worked way too hard to come back and get to where I am, so I would never knowingly put anything in my body that I thought could hold me out further.” The Mets said in a statement that the team was disappointed when told of the positive test. Mejia began 2014 as a starter but moved to the closer role about six weeks after Bobby Parnell tore an elbow ligament in the first game of the season. The righthander from the Dominican Republic had 28 saves, 18 after the All-Star break to tie for second-most in the NL.

Holland on 60-day DL • The Texas Rangers will be without Derek Holland until at least midJune after the lefthander was put on the 60-day disabled list, a day after he went only one inning in the home opener because of a shoulder injury. Outfielder Ryan Rua went on the 15-day DL with a right ankle sprain. Texas recalled righthander Jon Edwards from Round Rock, and purchased the contract of outfielder Carlos Peguero from the Triple-A club. The Rangers also received righthander Stolmy Pimentel on a waiver claim from the Pittsburgh Pirates. To make room on the 40-man roster, righthander Lisalverto Bonilla (right elbow) was transferred from the 15-day to 60-day DL. Back plaguing Brantley • Michael Brantley’s back issue has sent him to the bench again. The Indians All-Star outfielder, who missed two games in Houston earlier this week with tightness in his lower back, sat out Saturday against the Detroit Tigers and will likely miss the series finale as well. Brantley’s back has bothered him for several weeks and acted up late in Friday’s home opener. The 27-year-old was examined by team doctors after the team returned home and he was cleared to be in the lineup. Wright on DL, Gamboa recalled • The Baltimore Orioles have placed lefthanded reliever Wesley Wright on the 15-day disabled list with a shoulder injury. Wright experienced discomfort in his shoulder Friday. Baltimore filled the void by recalling righthander Eddie Gamboa from Triple-A Norfolk.


THE MASTERS

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

Birdie

SCORECARD HOLE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Yards

445

575

350

240

455

180

450

570

9

OUT

Par

4

5

4

3

4

3

4

5

4

36

Jordan Spieth

4

4

4

3

3

3

4

4

4

Charley Hofman

4

4

4

3

3

3

4

5

4

10

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C7 Eagle

Bogey

Double bogey

Triple bogey

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

505

155

510

440

530

170

440

4

4

3

5

4

5

3

4

4

36

72

72

33

3

4

3

4

4

4

3

4

4

33

66

-14

34

4

4

2

4

3

5

3

4

5

34

68

-9

460 3,725 495

18

IN

Hole-in-one

465 3,710

TOTAL

Overall

7,435

NOTEBOOK SeCOnD ROUnD Jordan Spieth 64-66 — Charley Hoffman 67-68 — Justin Rose 67-70 — Dustin Johnson 70-67 — Paul Casey 69-68 — Phil Mickelson 70-68 — Ernie Els 67-72 — Kevin Na 74-66 — Kevin Streelman 70-70 — Bill Haas 69-71 — Ryan Moore 74-66 — Angel Cabrera 72-69 — Louis Oosthuizen 72-69 — Mark O’Meara 73-68 — Jason Day 67-74 — Adam Scott 72-69 — Hideki Matsuyama 71-70 — Charl Schwartzel 71-70 — Tiger Woods 73-69 — Sergio Garcia 68-74 — Danny Willett 71-71 — Russ Henley 68-74 — Jonas Blixt 72-70 — Patrick Reed 70-72 — Bubba Watson 71-71 — Rory McIlroy 71-71 — Ryan Palmer 69-74 — Keegan Bradley 71-72 — Seung-Yul Noh 70-74 — Geoff Ogilvy 74-70 — Zach Johnson 72-72 — Webb Simpson 69-75 — Erik Compton 73-72 — Bernd Wiesberger 75-70 — Chris Kirk 72-73 — Hunter Mahan 75-70 — Brooks Koepka 74-71 — Graeme McDowell 71-74 — Thongchai Jaidee 75-70 — John Senden 71-74 — Jamie Donaldson 74-71 — Jimmy Walker 73-72 — Rickie Fowler 73-72 — Vijay Singh 75-70 — Darren Clarke 74-71 — Ian Poulter 73-72 — Morgan Hoffmann 73-72 — Jason Dufner 74-71 — Sangmoon Bae 74-71 — Cameron Tringale 71-75 — Matt Kuchar 72-74 — Henrik Stenson 73-73 — Lee Westwood 73-73 — Anirban Lahiri 71-75 — Steve Stricker 73-73 — FAILED TO MAKE THE CUT Bernhard Langer 73-74 — Jim Furyk 74-73 — Shane Lowry 75-72 — James Hahn 73-74 — Mikko Ilonen 74-73 — Luke Donald 75-72 — Gary Woodland 71-76 — Stephen Gallacher 71-76 — Matt Every 73-74 — JB Holmes 76-71 — Brandt Snedeker 74-73 — Ben Martin 74-74 — Billy Horschel 70-78 — Branden Grace 75-73 — Brian Harman 76-72 — Camilo Villegas 72-76 — Joost Luiten 76-72 — Ian Woosnam 75-74 — Padraig Harrington 72-77 — Victor Dubuisson 74-75 — a-Corey Conners 80-69 — Sandy Lyle 74-76 — a-Byron Meth 74-76 — Jose Maria Olazabal 79-71 — Kevin Stadler 77-74 — Thomas Bjorn 72-79 — Larry Mize 78-73 — Brendon Todd 80-71 — Miguel A. Jimenez 78-73 — a-Antonio Murdaca 78-73 — Martin Kaymer 76-75 — a-Matias Dominguez 76-76 — Tom Watson 71-81 — Trevor Immelman 76-77 — Fred Couples 79-74 — Robert Streb 80-76 — Scott Harvey 76-81 — a-Bradley Neil 78-79 — Ben Crane 79-78 — a-Gunn Yang 85-74 — Mike Weir 82-81 — 91-85 — Ben Crenshaw

130 135 137 137 137 138 139 140 140 140 140 141 141 141 141 141 141 141 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 142 143 143 144 144 144 144 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 146 146

-14 -9 -7 -7 -7 -6 -5 -4 -4 -4 -4 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -3 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -2 -1 -1 E E E E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2 +2

147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 147 148 148 148 148 148 148 149 149 149 149 150 150 150 151 151 151 151 151 151 151 152 152 153 153 156 157 157 157 159 163 176

+3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +12 +13 +13 +13 +15 +19 +32

Johnson’s three eagles set record By Dan O’neill St. Louis Post-dispatch

AUGUSTA, GA. • The eagle flies

on Friday. No really, it does. Just ask Dustin Johnson. Playing one of the more mercurial rounds in recent Masters history, Johnson set a championship record by scoring three eagles on his way to a second-round 67. The long-bombing Johnson, who leads the championship in driving distance, an average of 318.25 yards, began the round with a double bogey at No. 1. At that point, Johnson was even par for the championship — soon to change. On the next hole, the par-5 No. 2, he made an eagle 3 and jumped to 2 under. He then birdied No. 5 and added a second eagle at the par-5 No. 8, moving to 5 under. A bogey at No. 10 set Johnson back another stroke, but he birdied the par-5 No. 13 and made his third eagle of the round at the par-5 No. 15. That gave Johnson a score of 7 under on the four par 5s alone. When he made birdie at No. 16, he moved to 8 under and appeared to be chasing down Charley Hofman for the second-place position behind Jordan Spieth. But a par-bogey finish left Johnson at 7 under. So, to wrap things up, that’s one double-bogey, two bogeys, three birdies and three eagles — just your average day at Augusta. “I drove it really well today and I hit the shots that I wanted to,” Johnson said. “And you know,

again, on 15, made another eagle. So I think that’s the first time I’ve ever made three eagles in a row. It was pretty special and it was a lot of fun, too.” Johnson already has a win this season, in his return from an extended layof. The down time has been reported to be a suspension for substance abuse, but Johnson has insisted otherwise. He came into the Masters as a favorite, in large part because of his dynamic length. Certainly the 30-year-old Johnson is in the mix, tied for third with Justin Rose and Paul Casey. But he trails Spieth by seven shots. “You never know,” said Johnson, who is looking for his first major. “I just need to go out and play two good, solid rounds. Tomorrow is an important day. Just need to play another good, solid round and put myself in a position to have a chance to win on Sunday.”

WOODS PlayS BeTTeR After opening with a 73, Tiger Woods played even better Friday. He carded a 3-under 69, moved to 2 under for the championship and made the cut with room to spare. “Well, very proud of what I’ve done, to be able to dig it out the way I have,” Woods said. “All the hard work … I told you guys on Tuesday, I was at a pretty low one in my career. But to basically change an entire pattern like that and put it together and put it in a position where I can compete in a major championship like this is

something I’m very proud.” As always, Woods was not about to wave a white flag. He is behind 12 strokes and 18 people going into the third round. “I’d be right there,” Woods said, “and I’m still right there. I’m 12 back, but there’s not a lot of guys ahead of me. And with 36 holes here to go, anything can happen, you know … There’s so many holes to play and so many diferent things can happen. And as I say, we don’t know what the conditions are going to be tomorrow, what the committee is going to do.”

FUn PaiRinGS By the way, if you’re looking for interesting viewing, Woods is paired with long-time adversary Sergio Garcia at 12:15 (St. Louis time) Saturday. As has been documented, the two are not big fans of each other. Other dynamic pairings included Bubba Watson with Rory McIlroy at 11:45 a.m, Jason Day and Adam Scott at 12:45 p.m. and Phil Mickelson with Paul Casey at 1:35 p.m. In the shadow of Spieth, Mickelson has had a fine start, shooting 70-68, and is eight shots back.

O’MeaRa TOPS TiGeR After practicing with Woods this week, 58-year-old Mark O’Meara is outplaying his longtime friend. O’Meara carded a 68 on Friday and sits 3 under for the championship, one shot better than Woods. O’Meara has seen Woods bring

the golf world to its knees, win 14 majors, win a career Grand Slam, win four Masters. He feels like watching Spieth is a rewind. “I do,” O’Meara said. “Jordan is just such a great individual, too, on top of what he’s performed on the golf course … But 14 under is very, very, very impressive around this golf course.”

CRenSHaW FaReWell The Masters specializes in romance and emotion. Another memorable moment came Friday as Ben Crenshaw completed his final round at Augusta. Crenshaw played in 36 Masters and won two — 1984 and 1995. At age 63, he simply can’t compete on a golf course that exceeds 7,400 yards. He shot scores of 9185 and finished 32 over, 46 shots behind fellow Texan Spieth. There were lots of hugs, kisses and tears as Crenshaw walked of the 18th green to a rousing ovation. “I feel like I won the tournament,” Crenshaw said.

T. WaTSOn FalTeRS The week did not end so enjoyably for 65-year-old Tom Watson. After shooting a remarkable 71 on Thursday, Watson struggled to an 81 on Friday and missed the cut. The No. 1 player in the world and prohibitive favorite, Rory McIlroy, rallied with three birdies over his final four holes to pull to 2 under and stick around. Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Jordan Spieth hits out of the pine straw on the 14th hole during the second round of the Masters on Friday. Spieth managed a par 4 on the hole.

SaTURDay’S Tee TiMeS 9:05 a.m. Steve Stricker 9:15 a.m. Lee Westwood, Anirban Lahiri

Hofman sits in second place, ive shots behind red-hot Spieth

9:25 a.m. Matt Kuchar, Henrik Stenson 9:35 a.m. Sangmoon Bae, Cameron Tringale 9:45 a.m. Morgan Hoffmann, Jason Dufner 9:55 a.m. Darren Clarke, Ian Poulter 10:05 a.m. Rickie Fowler, Vijay Singh 10:15 a.m. Jamie Donaldson, Jimmy Walker 10:25 a.m. Thongchai Jaidee, John Senden 10:35 a.m. Brooks Koepka, Graeme McDowell 10:55 a.m. Chris Kirk, Hunter Mahan 11:05 a.m. Erik Compton, Bernd Wiesberger 11:15 a.m. Zach Johnson, Webb Simpson 11:25 a.m. Seung-Yul Noh, Geoff Ogilvy 11:35 a.m. Ryan Palmer, Keegan Bradley 11:45 a.m. Bubba Watson, Rory McIlroy 11:55 a.m. Jonas Blixt, Patrick Reed 12:05 p.m. Dan Willett, Russell Henley 12:15 p.m. Tiger Woods, Sergio Garcia 12:35 p.m. Hideki Matsuyama, Charl Schwartzel 12:45 p.m. Jason Day, Adam Scott 12:55 p.m. Louis Oosthuizen, Mark O’Meara 1:05 p.m. Ryan Moore, Angel Cabrera 1:15 p.m. Kevin Streelman, Bill Haas 1:25 p.m. Ernie Els, Kevin Na 1:35 p.m. Paul Casey, Phil Mickelson 1:45 p.m. Justin Rose, Dustin Johnson 1:55 p.m. Jordan Spieth, Charley Hoffman > a-amateur

mASTerS • from C1

two rounds. He added scores of 70-70 to the account over the weekend and finished with a 17-under score of 271. Ben Crenshaw finished second at 8 under par, nine strokes back. To show you how time changes things, the 63-year-old Crenshaw was still playing in the Masters on Friday, his last appearance. The two-time winner missed the cut on Friday. He was 46 shots behind Spieth as he departed. And frankly, he’d just as soon not chase him. “(When) I met him for the first time, he looks right at you,” Crenshaw said. “And I felt like I met Wyatt Earp. He looks like he’s going to gun you down.” Like Floyd, Spieth has a fiveshot lead heading into the weekend. Journeyman Charley Hoffman slapped together rounds of 67-68 that include 10 birdies and an eagle. Most Aprils, he might have a significant lead after 36 holes. This year, he’s got a sizable gap to close. Hofman doesn’t compare and contrast. He’s in the here and now, playing with Spieth in the final pairing. “It’s this year, it’s not any other year,” he said. “He’s not going to go away. I’m going to have to go out and catch him.”

Two strokes farther back are Justin Rose (70), Dustin Johnson (67) and Paul Casey (68) at 7 under. Last year, Spieth threatened to become the youngest winner of the championship, taking a third-round lead into Sunday. He couldn’t hold off Bubba Watson and settled into a tie for second, three shots back. If he is able to hold serve this time, he still will not be the youngest. Tiger Woods was 21 years, 3 months and 14 days when he slamdunked the 1997 Masters by 12 strokes. Spieth turns 22 on July 27, so a Diaper Dandy label is out. But at this point, he’s played six rounds of golf at Augusta and gone to bed with the lead three times. Ernie Els was around in ’97, trying to keep pace with Woods. For “Big Easy,” this Masters is a Yogi Berra moment, deja vu all over again. “Well, (Spieth) obviously is playing great golf,”’ said Els, 45, a distant nine shots behind at 5 under. “It’s not that easy. (Spieth’s position) is a great place to be at. You’ve (still) got to hit the shots and make the putts. But it’s similar.” Spieth’s peers watched him win twice late last year, then saw him get a win and two seconds in his past three starts this year. Geoff Ogilvy, the 2006 U.S.

Open winner, is trailing by two touchdowns at even par. And he’s getting used to seeing Spieth’s backside. “It’s just kind of business as usual for him,” Ogilvy said. “It’s every single week that he seems to be on top of the leaderboard, playing well. He’s obviously aware of his skills at the moment and he’s loving it.” What’s not to love? The willowy Spieth, 6 feet 1 and 185 pounds, leads the tournament in putting, needing 50 to complete 36 holes. He has landed 28 of 36 greens in regulation, 20 of 28 fairways. He has made but one bogey in two days and has nary a threeputt. He is not a walking billboard for body-sculpting, like Woods and Rory McIlroy. He doesn’t overpower a course the way Johnson and Bubba Watson might. He is averaging 283 yards off the tee, some 35 yards shorter than Johnson. What Spieth does best is a conceptual throwback. He golfs his ball. “He’s definitely an old head on young shoulders, isn’t he?” said the world’s No. 2-ranked player, Henrik Stenson. “He’s playing strategically. He’s playing very mature. “The strongest part of his

game, over the time that I’ve known him these past couple of years, is his putting, his pitching and wedge game. When he’s playing as he is, he’s hitting a lot of fairways and greens and sticking the other ones in there close, as well. “He’s made so many great putts. That’s why he’s so far ahead of everyone else.” Augusta National has not put up its best fight, not yet. During the first two days, the average score was around 1½ strokes over par. Conditions have been relatively docile and 28 players will start the weekend in red numbers. The hole locations will be more difficult, the greens less accommodating. But when you Spieth softly and carry a big lead, you have no trouble sleeping. “I felt good (today),” Spieth said. “I slept well last night. I’m going to be just hanging with friends and family and taking it easy, hopefully just acting like nothing’s going on and just get ready for tomorrow, understanding that this is just the halfway point.” Hard to believe it, but the best might be yet to come. Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com


THE MASTERS

04.12.2015 • SUNDAY • M 2

Birdie

SCORECARD HOLE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Yards

445

575

350

240

455

180

450

570

Par

4

5

4

3

4

3

4

5

4

36

Jordan Spieth

4

4

4

4

4

2

5

5

3

Justin Rose

5

5

4

3

5

3

3

5

Phil Mickelson

4

4

3

2

4

3

4

5

THIRD ROUND Jordan Spieth

67-70-67 — 204 12

Phil Mickelson

70-68-67 — 205 11

Charley Hoffman

67-68-71 — 206 10

Rory McIlroy

71-71-68 — 210 6

Tiger Woods

73-69-68 — 210 6

Kevin Streelman

70-70-70 — 210 6

Kevin Na

74-66-70 — 210 6

Dustin Johnson

70-67-73 — 210 6

Hideki Matsuyama 71-70-70 — 211 5

Double bogey

Triple bogey

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

505

155

510

440

530

170

440

4

4

3

5

4

5

3

4

4

36

72

72

35

4

4

2

4

5

4

2

6

4

35

70

-16

3

36

4

4

3

4

3

4

2

4

3

31

67

-12

3

32

4

5

3

4

4

4

2

5

4

35

67

-11

460 3,725 495

18

IN

Hole-in-one

465 3,710

TOTAL

Overall

7,435

Woods, McIlroy stall after hot starts Some late bogeys leave them tied in 5th

69-68-74 — 211 5

aUGUsta, Ga. • Rory McIlroy

73-72-67 — 212 4

and Tiger Woods made moves at Augusta National on Saturday. They just weren’t big enough. McIlroy is the No. 1-ranked player in the world and winner of the last two major championships. He was the favorite to complete his career Grand Slam this week at Augusta. Woods is the former No. 1-ranked player in the world, already in possession of a career slam and looking to re-establish his credibility. To a large extent, both have held up their ends, particularly Woods. No one knew what to expect from Woods, who took nine weeks of to get his act together. Safe to say no one expected him to play as well as he has. After opening with a 1-over 73, Woods had a second-round 69 to move to 2 under for the championship. On Saturday, he birdied three of his first four and shot a bogey-less 32 on the front to get to 6 under. Woods then birdied the par-5 13th to get as low as 7 under while Jordan Spieth was dropping back to 14 under. It seemed possible Woods could be in the thick of it before the afternoon was over. “And I missed a couple shorties on 6 and 7, and I had my chances to make this a really special round today,” Woods said. “I had, man, I had it going there for a little bit. And I made a stupidly-good birdie at 13, and then a stupidly-bad bogey at 14. “It all evens out. If I made a couple more putts the score realistically should have been six or seven (under) today.” But the momentum stalled as Woods began to spray the ball a bit of the tee. He traded a bogey

Zach Johnson

72-72-68 — 212 4

Jonas Blixt

72-70-70 — 212 4

Jason Day

67-74-71 — 212 4

Louis Oosthuizen

72-69-71 — 212 4

Bill Haas

69-71-72 — 212 4

Hunter Mahan

75-70-68 — 213 3

Sergio Garcia

68-74-71 — 213 3

Ryan Moore

74-66-73 — 213 3

Russ Henley

68-74-72 — 214 2

Charl Schwartzel

71-70-73 — 214 2

Angel Cabrera

72-69-73 — 214 2

Ernie Els

67-72-75 — 214 2

Cameron Tringale 71-75-69 — 215 1 73-72-70 — 215 1

Bernd Wiesberger 75-70-70 — 215 1 71-71-73 — 215 1 72-69-74 — 215 1

Lee Westwood

73-73-70 — 216 E

Henrik Stenson

73-73-70 — 216 E

Brooks Koepka

74-71-71 — 216 E

Webb Simpson

69-75-72 — 216 E

Seung-Yul Noh

70-74-72 — 216 E

Patrick Reed

70-72-74 — 216 E

Sangmoon Bae

74-71-72 — 217 +1

Morgan Hoffmann 73-72-72 — 217 +1 John Senden

71-74-72 — 217 +1

Chris Kirk

72-73-72 — 217 +1

Geoff Ogilvy

74-70-73 — 217 +1

Ryan Palmer

69-74-74 — 217 +1

Matt Kuchar

72-74-72 — 218 +2

Keegan Bradley

71-72-75 — 218 +2

Danny Willett

71-71-76 — 218 +2

Mark O’Meara

73-68-77 — 218 +2

Steve Stricker

73-73-73 — 219 +3

Jason Dufner

74-71-74 — 219 +3

Jimmy Walker

73-72-74 — 219 +3

Erik Compton

73-72-74 — 219 +3

Anirban Lahiri

71-75-74 — 220 +4

Jamie Donaldson

74-71-76 — 221 +5

tial gap between himself and the rest of the field. But you just never know. That’s the thing about this golf course. “And we don’t know what the committee is going to do. If they’re going to give us some accessible, easy eagle pins or tuck them and make this golf course diicult.”

BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Ian Poulter

Adam Scott

10

Bogey

NOTEBOOK

Paul Casey

Bubba Watson

OUT

Eagle

64-66-70 — 200 16

Justin Rose

Rickie Fowler

9

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • C7

GOOD START FOR STRICKER

AssociAted Press

Tiger Woods reacts after a birdie on the 13th hole Saturday in Augusta, Ga. Woods finished the day tied for fifth at 6 under par.

for a birdie on the next two holes — 14 and 15 — then bogeyed No. 18 to finished at 6 under. Nonetheless, a 68 and second straight day in the 60s was a Tiger Woods the golf world recognizes. McIlroy had a similar day. At one point on Friday, before he birdied the last two holes, he was in danger of missing the cut. On Saturday, McIlroy roared from the gates with an eagle 3 at No. 2, then birdied Nos. 8 and 9 to get to 6 under. He kept going, making birdies on both of the backside par 5s to move to 8 under. But that consistency came to a crashing halt. McIlroy sufered bogeys at two of the last three holes, including No. 18, and fell back to 6 under after a 68, tied for fifth with Woods. “Yeah, I got of to a good start, sort of the way I wanted to play the front nine,” McIlroy, 25, said. “I had not really played the front nine too well the last couple days, so to play them under par is nice.” But … “Got it to 8 under par through 15, and then a disap-

pointing finish.” Both will be giving away 10 shots to Spieth’s record-setting lead when they show up for the final round. What’s more, they have the likes of Phil Mickelson and Justin Rose — both major championship winners — ahead as well. It’s a tall order, McIlroy acknowledges. But with Sunday speeds and hole locations at the Masters, fireworks can happen. “We all know pretty much where the pin positions are going to be tomorrow,” McIlroy said. “And there’s some holes that you can get close to and be aggressive and there’s some holes that you can’t. So again, try and get of to a good start like I did today, and if I can do that, you know, it really depends on what the guys do the back nine. “I’m going to need something basically around 61, 62 to have a real chance. I’m not sure that’s going to happen, but we’ll see.” Woods agreed: “It’s in Jordan’s hands right now,” he said. “He can run of and … put a substan-

Former Illinois standout Steve Stricker hasn’t been in contention this week. But he’s quite pleased with where he is. Stricker, 48, has scaled back his competitive schedule over the last three years. He played in only six events last year and had not played this year coming into the week. But he shot consecutive rounds of 73 to make the cut. He was first of the tee on Saturday, playing with a marker, and shot a third consecutive 73. After three rounds of major championship golf — his first three rounds of the season — he is 3 over for the championship. “That was my goal, it really was,” said Stricker, who played “maybe five” practice rounds leading up to the Masters. “My goal was just to play here on the weekend so I could get four rounds in and kind of build some momentum and see what I have with my game. “It gives you a good barometer of things to work on, it shows you your faults and your tendencies the more times you can play. And then you can work through them during the course of the round, too. So more rounds, the merrier and I’m glad I was able to make it through to the weekend.” Stricker indicated he would take the next week off to see where he is, then possibly play in the PGA Tour event in New Orleans. Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com

Graeme McDowell 71-74-76 — 221 +5 Darren Clarke

74-71-77 — 222 +6

Vijay Singh

75-70-79 — 224 +8

Thongchai Jaidee 75-70-80 — 225 +9

Spieth soars to record 16 under but isn’t home free

SUNDAY’S TEE TIMES

Masters • froM C1

9:05 a.m. Thongchai Jaidee 9:20 a.m. Jamie Donaldson, Graeme McDowell 9:30 a.m. Erik Compton, Anirban Lahiri 9:40 a.m. Jason Dufner, Jimmy Walker 9:50 a.m. Mark O’Meara, Steve Stricker 10 a.m. Keegan Bradley, Danny Willett 10:10 a.m. Ryan Palmer, Matt Kuchar 10:20 a.m. Chris Kirk, Geoff Ogilvy 10:30 a.m. Morgan Hoffmann, John Senden 10:50 a.m. Patrick Reed, Sangmoon Bae 11 a.m. Webb Simpson, Seung-Yul Noh 11:10 a.m. Henrik Stenson, Brooks Koepka 11:20 a.m. Adam Scott, Lee Westwood 11:30 a.m. Bernd Wiesberger, Bubba Watson 11:40 a.m. Cameron Tringale, Rickie Fowler 11:50 a.m. Angel Cabrera, Ernie Els Noon Russell Henley, Charl Schwartzel 12:10 p.m. Sergio Garcia, Ryan Moore 12:30 p.m. Bill Haas, Hunter Mahan 12:40 p.m. Jason Day, Louis Oosthuizen 12:50 p.m. Zach Johnson, Jonas Blixt 1 p.m. Paul Casey, Ian Poulter 1:10 p.m. Dustin Johnson, Hideki Matsuyama 1:20 p.m. Kevin Streelman, Kevin Na 1:30 p.m. Rory McIlroy, Tiger Woods 1:40 p.m. Phil Mickelson, Charley Hoffman 1:50 p.m. Jordan Spieth, Justin Rose

Still doing the un-Spieth-able, the Dallas native soared to 18 under par and six shots clear with his birdie at No. 16. The previous 54-hole best was 15 under, established by Raymond Floyd in 1976, matched by Tiger Woods in 1997. Spieth wasn’t just bettering it, he was battering it. But ahead of him, Phil Mickelson and Justin Rose were doing wondrous things as well. Mickelson birdied the par-5 No. 15, then made a Hail Mary putt for birdie at 16, going 12 under. The thrills from Phil had the grounds buzzing when Spieth hit his first big pot hole, a double bogey at 17. Mickelson had given one back by bogeying 17, but Rose was in the process of holing a bunker shot at 16 and making birdie at 18 to get to 12 under. Meanwhile, Spieth’s iron to the 18th green sailed wildly into the crowd. The wheels weren’t off, but the rims were rattling. That’s when Spieth showed he is 21 years old going on something like 41. From a diicult position of the 18th green, he used a gunslinger’s gumption to hit a flop shot that died 9 feet from the flag. He then curled in the tricky putt, saving par, saving his record 16-under score and, perhaps, saving his Masters. “Obviously, I would have liked to have finished the round a little bit better, but it also could have been worse,” Spieth said. “I’m very pleased with that up-anddown on 18, that may have been a one in five (chance). That just took some guts, and having been in this scenario or having been in contention enough, having been on tour for a few years, I felt comfortable enough playing that full flop. “If you caught me a year and a half ago, I probably never would have played that shot in that scenario. So it was nice to have seen that go that way, to play the aggressive play, and to close it out with a nice putt.” This isn’t over, of course. There are 18 more holes to play and there will be pressure — oh yes, there will be pressure. Spieth will be joined in the final tee time by

AssociAted Press

Jordan Spieth hits a chip shot out of the gallery to help save his par on the 18th hole Saturday at the Masters.

Rose, whose third-round 67 concluded with the aforementioned fireworks. Rose, 34, has majorchampionship pedigree, having captured the 2013 U.S. Open. He’s looking forward to the chase. “Given the choice, you’d want to be in the last group,” Rose said. “You want to be seeing what you’re up against; you want to feel the atmosphere. You want to get a look at how the guys play next to you, especially when you get to Nos. 12, 13, 14, 15 on the back nine. “If you’re within one or two, you know if you have to chase or if you can still be patient, whereas if you’re in the group in front, you don’t know what the leader is going to do … So I think it’s always an advantage to be in the final group.” One group ahead will be Mickelson, who torpedoed his thirdround 67 with the late bogey. But he will try to erase a five-shot deficit bolstered by the experience of winning five majors, three of them Masters. Mickelson is paired with Charley Hofman (71), who is six shots back. Mickelson knows this is what might take place on Sunday: It is Spieth’s world and he’s just glad to be a part of it. “I don’t think it matters who is

close to him,” Mickelson said. “I think he’s playing very good golf and I think he’ll have a good round tomorrow. I think that if he were to come out on top … He’s just a classy guy. He just represents the game very well and at a very young age and he’s just got a lot of game. “So if he were to come out on top, it would be wonderful for the tournament, wonderful for the game. I’m going to try to stop him, but we’ll see how it goes.” Oh, and lest we forget, one more group ahead will include fellows named Rory McIlroy and Tiger Woods. Both shot 68s on Saturday to reach 6 under. They are 10 shots in the distance, but they have combined for 18 majors, including four green jackets for Woods. For the record, Kevin Streelman, Kevin Na and Dustin Johnson also are 6 under; it just won’t seem like it. The galleries for Woods and McIlroy will be as enormous as they get, and Spieth is fully prepared for what it all means. “There’s going to be roars,” he said. “Phil is going to have a lot of roars in front. Obviously, a few groups up I think is Tiger and Rory … you’re going to hear

something there. But especially in the group in front of us, everyone loves Phil. Why wouldn’t you love Phil? And he’s going to make some noise and he’s going to make a run. “Justin is going to do the same, and Charley is going to do the same. It’s about just throwing those out of my mind, not worrying about it, not caring, setting a goal and being patient with the opportunities that are going to come my way.” As young as he is, Spieth has a reference point. He was in this same position, in the final pairing and leading the 2014 championship coming into the final round. His 72 wasn’t good enough to fend of Bubba Watson. So yes, he set another scoring record on Saturday. But he may have set a precedent that’s more important, that will help him over that final-round hurdle. “I mean, that gives me a lot of confidence going into tomorrow,” he said. “I think it was a new position for me and I feel like tomorrow … it’s not like Saturday versus Sunday should make any difference to me.” Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com


sPorts

C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NHL StANdiNGS WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT y-Blues 81 50 24 7 x-Nashville 81 47 24 10 x-Chicago 81 48 27 6 x-Minnesota 81 46 27 8 x-Winnipeg 81 42 26 13 Dallas 81 40 31 10 Colorado 81 38 31 12 Paciic GP W L OT y-Anaheim 81 50 24 7 x-Vancouver 81 47 29 5 x-Calgary 81 45 29 7 Los Angeles 81 39 27 15 San Jose 81 40 32 9 Edmonton 81 24 44 13 Arizona 81 24 49 8 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT x-Montreal 81 49 22 10 x-Tampa Bay 81 49 24 8 x-Detroit 81 42 25 14 Ottawa 81 42 26 13 Boston 81 41 27 13 Florida 81 37 29 15 Toronto 81 30 44 7 Bufalo 81 23 50 8 Metropolitan GP W L OT z-NY Rangers 81 52 22 7 x-Washington 81 45 25 11 x-NY Islanders 81 47 28 6 Pittsburgh 81 42 27 12 Columbus 81 41 35 5 Philadelphia 81 33 30 18 New Jersey 81 32 35 14 Carolina 81 30 40 11

Pts GF GA Home Away Div 107 244 199 26-12-2 24-12-5 16-11-1 104 231 204 28-9-4 19-15-6 15-8-5 102 227 186 24-12-5 24-15-1 15-13-0 100 229 197 22-13-6 24-14-2 17-7-4 97 225 209 22-13-5 20-13-8 16-8-5 90 257 259 16-16-8 24-15-2 7-14-7 88 216 225 22-15-3 16-16-9 13-12-4 Pts GF GA Home Away Div 107 234 225 26-12-3 24-12-4 17-6-5 99 236 217 23-15-2 24-14-3 16-9-3 97 240 211 23-13-5 22-16-2 22-6-1 93 216 204 24-9-7 15-18-8 13-7-8 89 227 228 19-17-5 21-15-4 15-10-4 61 193 277 15-23-3 9-21-10 4-21-3 56 169 270 11-24-5 13-25-3 12-16-0 Pts 108 106 98 97 95 89 67 54 Pts 111 101 100 96 87 84 78 71

GF 217 259 233 235 211 203 208 161 GF 248 240 248 219 231 214 179 188

GA 186 209 221 214 208 221 258 272 GA 190 199 225 210 246 231 213 224

Home 26-9-6 31-8-1 22-10-9 23-13-5 24-10-7 20-13-7 22-17-1 14-21-5 Home 25-11-5 23-12-5 25-14-1 23-14-4 19-20-2 23-10-7 19-14-8 18-15-7

Away 23-13-4 18-16-7 20-15-5 19-13-8 17-17-6 17-16-8 8-27-6 9-29-3 Away 27-11-2 22-13-6 22-14-5 19-13-8 22-15-3 10-20-11 13-21-6 12-25-4

Div 17-9-3 20-5-4 10-12-8 17-9-4 15-9-5 16-9-5 13-13-3 10-16-4 Div 22-6-1 17-8-4 21-6-2 9-17-4 14-11-4 12-13-5 10-13-7 13-12-5

x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

Friday NY Islanders 3, Pittsburgh 1 Columbus 4, Buffalo 2 Thursday Blues 2, Chicago 1 Colorado 1, Winnipeg 0 (so) Ottawa 3, NY Rangers 0 Carolina 3, Philadelphia 1 Montreal 4, Detroit 3 (ot) Tampa 4, New Jersey 3 (ot) Florida 4, Boston 2 Minnesota 4, Nashville 2 Calgary 3, Los Angeles 1 San Jose 3, Edmonton 1 Vancouver 5, Arizona 0 Saturday Minnesota at St. Louis, 2 Ottawa at Phi., 11:30 a.m. Rangers at Was., 11:30 a.m. Calgary at Winnipeg, 2 San Jose at Los Angeles, 2 Pittsburgh at Buffalo, 6 Montreal at Toronto, 6 New Jersey at Florida, 6 Columbus at NY Islanders, 6 Detroit at Carolina, 6 Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:30 Nashville at Dallas, 7 Chicago at Colorado, 8 Anaheim at Arizona, 8 Edmonton at Vancouver, 9 • End of regular season

Leaders Goals gp Ovechkin, Was 80 Stamkos, TB 81 Nash, NYR 79 Pacioretty, Mon 80 Pavelski, SJ 81 Seguin, Dal 71 Tarasenko, Blues 76 Tavares, NYI 80 Perry, Ana 66 J. Benn, Dal 81 Parise, Min 73 Hudler, Cal 78 Monahan, Cal 81 Vrbata, Van 78 Foligno, Cls 77 Johnson, TB 76 Tatar, Det 81 • Through Thursday

g 52 43 42 37 37 37 36 36 33 32 32 31 31 31 30 29 29

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Halak, Islanders stop Penguins ASSoCiAted PreSS

John Tavares broke a tie with his 37th goal of the season early in the third period and the visiting New York Islanders pulled away in beating the reeling Pittsburgh Penguins 3-1 on Friday night. Tavares beat Marc-Andre Fleury on a rebound 2:46 into the third and Michael Grabner added his eighth of the season with less than 4 minutes remaining to help the Islanders bolster their playoff position. New York can finish no worse than third in the Metropolitan Division. Former Blues goalie Jaroslav Halak made

37 saves for the Islanders. Rob Scuderi scored his first goal in more than two years for Pittsburgh, but the Penguins failed to lock down a ninth straight postseason berth. Pittsburgh still has several ways it can make the playofs, the only certain way coming with a victory in Bufalo on Saturday.

NoteBooK Coyotes • Arizona signed forward Ryan MacInnis to a three-year, entry-level contract Friday. MacInnis, 19, is the son of Hall of Fame defenseman Al MacInnis, a Blues executive.

NHL SUmmArieS Islanders 3, Penguins 1

Blue Jackets 4, Sabres 2

(THURSDAY)

NY Islanders 1 0 2 — 3 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Cizikas 9 (Clutterbuck, Leddy), 8:00 (sh). Penalties: Hickey, NYI (slashing), 7:30. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Scuderi 1 (Crosby, P.Martin), 19:54. Penalties: Boulton, NYI (interference), 5:46; Downie, Pit (clipping), 14:39. Third period: 3, NY Islanders, Tavares 37 (Okposo, Strait), 2:46. 4, NY Islanders, Grabner 8 (Bailey), 16:20. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Islanders 5-8-13: 26. Pittsburgh 17-11-10: 38. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Pittsburgh 0 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Halak 38-17-3 (38 shots-37 saves). Pittsburgh, Fleury 33-20-9 (26-23). Referees: Jean Hebert, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Andy McElman. A: 18,673.

Buffalo 1 1 0 — 2 Columbus 2 0 2 — 4 First period: 1, Columbus, N.Foligno 31 (Dubinsky, Savard), :14. 2, Buffalo, Grigorenko 3 (Gionta, M.Foligno), 2:25. 3, Columbus, Calvert 13 (Savard, J.Johnson), 9:35. Penalties: Bogosian, Buf (hooking), 12:58. Second period: 4, Buffalo, Gionta 13 (Ennis, Bogosian), 19:01 (pp). Penalties: Dubinsky, Clm (charging), 10:46; Johansen, Clm (tripping), 18:44. Third period: 5, Columbus, Atkinson 21 (Prout, Johansen), 10:35. 6, Columbus, Jenner 9 (Calvert, J.Johnson), 19:50 (en). Penalties: N.Foligno, Clm (kneeing), 8:10. Shots: Buffalo 10-7-8: 25. Columbus 17-13-10: 40. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 3; Columbus 0 of 1. Goalies: Buffalo, Lindback 6-15-2 (39 shots-36 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 30-17-3 (25-23). Referees: Ian Walsh, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Brian Mach, John Grandt. A: 17,855.

Flames 3, Kings 1 Los Angeles 0 0 1 — 1 Calgary 2 0 1 — 3 First period: 1, Calgary, Gaudreau 24 (Hudler, Wideman), 12:15. 2, Calgary, Hudler 30 (Raymond, Wideman), 14:28. Penalties: Lewis, LA (hooking), 15:14. Second period: None. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Los Angeles, Nolan 6 (Martinez, Richards), 5:00. 4, Calgary, Hudler 31 (Monahan, Gaudreau), 19:10 (en). Penalties: None. Shots: Los Angeles 8-12-14: 34. Calgary 15-4-6: 25. Power-plays: Los Angeles 0 of 0; Calgary 0 of 1. Goalies: Los Angeles, Quick 35-22-13 (24 shots-22 saves). Calgary, Hiller 26-19-4 (34-33). Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Mike Cvik, Don Henderson. A: 19,289.

NBA StANdiNGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L y-Toronto 47 32 Boston 37 42 Brooklyn 37 42 Philadelphia 18 61 New York 15 64 Southeast W L z-Atlanta 60 19 x-Washington 45 34 Miami 35 44 Charlotte 33 46 Orlando 25 54 Central W L y-Cleveland 51 28 x-Chicago 47 32 Milwaukee 39 40 Indiana 36 43 Detroit 30 49 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L x-Memphis 54 25 x-San Antonio 54 26 x-Houston 53 26 x-Dallas 48 31 New Orleans 43 36 Northwest W L y-Portland 51 28 Oklahoma City 43 36 Utah 36 43 Denver 29 50 Minnesota 16 63 Paciic W L z-Golden State 64 15 x-LA Clippers 53 26 Phoenix 39 41 Sacramento 27 52 LA Lakers 21 58

Pct .595 .468 .468 .228 .190 Pct .759 .570 .443 .418 .316 Pct .646 .595 .494 .456 .380

GB — 10 10 29 32 GB — 15 25 27 35 GB — 4 12 15 21

L10 6-4 7-3 8-2 1-9 1-9 L10 7-3 5-5 3-7 3-7 4-6 L10 8-2 6-4 5-5 6-4 5-5

Str W-2 W-3 W-1 L-7 L-2 Str W-4 L-1 L-1 L-3 L-1 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-4 L-2

Pct .684 .675 .671 .608 .544 Pct .646 .544 .456 .367 .203 Pct .810 .671 .488 .342 .266

GB — ½ 1 6 11 GB — 8 15 22 35 GB — 11 25½ 37 43

L10 6-4 10-0 7-3 4-6 6-4 L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 3-7 1-9 L10 8-2 9-1 2-8 3-7 3-7

Str W-2 W-10 L-2 W-2 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-9 Str W-1 W-4 L-3 L-2 W-1

Home 26-14 19-20 18-21 12-27 10-30 Home 35-5 28-12 19-20 19-21 13-27 Home 29-10 25-14 22-17 21-18 17-23 Home 30-10 32-8 28-11 26-14 27-13 Home 32-8 28-12 20-20 18-22 9-30 Home 36-2 28-11 22-18 17-23 12-27

Away 21-18 18-22 19-21 6-34 5-34 Away 25-14 17-22 16-24 14-25 12-27 Away 22-18 22-18 17-23 15-25 13-26

Conf 31-18 25-24 23-26 12-37 9-40 Conf 38-11 29-20 23-26 25-25 15-34 Conf 33-16 30-19 28-21 27-24 21-28

Away 24-15 22-18 25-15 22-17 16-23 Away 19-20 15-24 16-23 11-28 7-33 Away 28-13 25-15 17-23 10-29 9-31

Conf 35-15 31-19 31-19 27-22 27-22 Conf 31-18 23-27 21-28 18-31 7-42 Conf 39-10 34-15 21-29 16-33 9-40

x-clinched playoff spot, y-clinched division, z-clinched conference

Friday Toronto 101, Orlando 99 Atlanta 104, Charlotte 80 Indiana 107, Detroit 103 Boston 99, Cleveland 90 Brooklyn 117, Was. 80 Milwaukee 99, New York 91 New Orleans 90, Phoenix 75 Okla. City 116, Sac. 103 S. Antonio 104, Houston 103 Dallas 144, Den. 143 (2 ots) Memphis 89, Utah 88 Lakers 106, Minnesota 98 Thursday Chicago 89, Miami 78 Golden St. 116, Portland 105 Saturday New York at Orlando, 6 Toronto at Miami, 6:30 Philadelphia at Chicago, 7 Memphis at LA Clippers, 9 Utah at Portland, 9 Min. at Golden St., 9:30

Duncan powers Spurs to 10th consecutive win

Leaders Scoring pts Harden, Hou 2126 Westbrook, Okc 1732 James, Cle 1708 Davis, NO 1555 Cousins, Sac 1421 Curry, Gol 1841 Aldridge, Por 1642 Griffin, LAC 1409 Irving, Cle 1607 Thompson, Gol 1578 Wade, Mia 1279 Lillard, Por 1665 Gay, Sac 1432 Butler, Chi 1248 Derozan, Tor 1135 Vucevic, Orl 1371 Ellis, Dal 1475 Hayward, Uta 1436 Paul, LAC 1510 Gasol, Chi 1382 • Through Thursday

avg 27.6 27.5 25.5 24.3 24.1 23.9 23.5 22.0 22.0 21.3 21.3 21.1 21.1 20.1 19.9 19.6 19.2 19.1 19.1 18.4

NBA SUmmArieS Hawks 104, Hornets 80

Raptors 101, Magic 99

Spurs 104, Rockets 103

Charlotte: Taylor 2-9 0-0 4, Ma.Williams 1-7 1-2 3, Biyombo 0-3 1-2 1, Walker 4-12 1-1 11, Henderson 4-11 2-4 10, Vonleh 2-5 0-0 4, Roberts 2-9 4-4 9, M. Williams 1-3 0-0 3, Maxiell 6-7 1-2 13, Hairston 3-7 0-0 7, Daniels 5-10 2-3 15. Totals 30-83 12-18 80. Atlanta: Carroll 3-8 1-2 7, Horford 6-11 3-4 15, Muscala 8-9 0-0 17, Teague 3-8 0-0 6, Korver 4-10 5-6 16, Scott 4-8 0-0 8, Bazemore 1-5 0-0 2, Antic 1-3 3-4 5, Schroder 6-10 0-0 14, Mack 2-5 0-0 5, Jenkins 2-4 0-0 6, Daye 1-1 0-0 3, Brand 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-82 12-16 104. Charlotte 15 33 12 20 — 80 Atlanta 15 32 23 34 — 104 3-point goals: Cha. 8-30 (Daniels 3-3, Walker 2-7, M. Williams 1-2, Hairston 1-4, Roberts 1-4, Vonleh 0-1, Henderson 0-2, Taylor 0-3, Ma.Williams 0-4), Atl. 10-28 (Korver 3-7, Schroder 2-2, Jenkins 2-4, Daye 1-1, Muscala 1-1, Mack 1-3, Carroll 0-1, Antic 0-2, Scott 0-2, Teague 0-2, Bazemore 0-3). Rebounds: Cha. 56 (Biyombo 11), Atl. 48 (Horford 8). Assists: Cha. 21 (Walker 6), Atl. 31 (Teague 8). Total fouls: Cha. 15, Atl. 18. A: 18,462.

Toronto: Ross 3-8 0-0 7, Hansbrough 7-12 2-3 16, Valanciunas 3-7 2-2 8, Lowry 4-12 1-1 10, DeRozan 10-21 6-6 29, Patterson 3-9 0-0 7, Vasquez 3-9 3-3 9, Williams 5-15 0-0 13, Hayes 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 39-94 14-15 101. Orlando: Harris 8-15 0-0 16, Dedmon 1-3 0-0 2, Vucevic 7-18 2-2 16, Payton 2-7 2-2 6, Oladipo 8-18 0-0 19, A.Gordon 5-8 3-3 13, Fournier 6-10 3-3 18, Green 2-6 0-0 5, Nicholson 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 41-89 10-10 99. Toronto 29 20 27 25 — 101 Orlando 19 32 25 23 — 99 3-point goals: Tor. 9-30 (DeRozan 3-5, Williams 3-7, Lowry 1-5, Ross 1-5, Patterson 1-6, Vasquez 0-2), Orl. 7-20 (Oladipo 3-4, Fournier 3-6, Green 1-3, Nicholson 0-1, Payton 0-1, A.Gordon 0-2, Harris 0-3). Rebounds: Tor. 52 (Valanciunas 13), Orl. 52 (Dedmon, Harris 8). Assists: Tor. 22 (Lowry 7), Orl. 21 (Payton 8). Total fouls: Tor. 15, Orl. 19. Technicals: Lowry, Valanciunas, Dedmon, Fournier. A: 16,227.

San Antonio: Leonard 7-17 4-4 18, Duncan 12-15 5-8 29, Baynes 5-6 3-4 13, Parker 1-7 0-0 2, Green 0-7 0-0 0, Diaw 4-13 2-2 10, Ginobili 3-7 0-0 6, Ayres 2-3 0-0 4, Joseph 1-1 1-2 3, Belinelli 2-4 0-0 5, Bonner 0-1 0-0 0, Mills 4-4 3-4 14. Totals 41-85 18-24 104. Houston: Ariza 7-8 1-1 19, Jones 5-9 3-4 14, Howard 3-5 6-9 12, Terry 3-8 1-1 9, Harden 5-19 4-6 16, Prigioni 1-1 0-0 2, Smith 4-9 12-26 20, Brewer 3-6 5-6 11, Johnson 0-1 0-0 0, Dorsey 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-66 32-53 103. San Antonio 23 23 34 24 — 104 Houston 30 18 27 28 — 103 3-point goals:S.A.4-17 (Mills 3-3, Belinelli 1-3, Bonner 0-1, Diaw 0-1, Ginobili 0-2, Leonard 0-2, Green 0-5), Hou. 9-21 (Ariza 4-5, Harden 2-5, Terry 2-5, Jones 1-1, Johnson 0-1, Brewer 0-1, Smith 0-3). Fouled out: Baynes. Rebounds:S.A.49 (Duncan 10), Hou. 57 (Howard 14). Assists:S.A.23 (Green, Diaw, Ginobili 4), Hou. 19 (Harden 10). Total fouls:S.A.35, Hou. 26. Technicals: Baynes. A: 18,457.

Celtics 99, Cavaliers 90 Boston: Turner 2-8 0-0 4, Bass 6-8 0-0 12, Zeller 5-9 3-4 13, Smart 7-10 2-5 19, Bradley 7-12 0-0 15, Thomas 4-12 7-8 17, Crowder 2-9 3-4 7, Jerebko 2-5 0-0 5, Olynyk 1-4 0-0 2, Sullinger 2-7 0-0 5. Totals 38-84 15-21 99. Cleveland: James 5-14 4-9 14, Love 6-12 3-3 19, Mozgov 6-10 1-2 13, Dellavedova 4-8 0-0 9, Smith 0-4 0-0 0, Marion 2-6 0-0 4, Miller 3-7 2-2 11, Thompson 1-2 0-0 2, Jones 1-7 7-9 9, Perkins 2-4 0-0 4, Harris 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 32-77 17-25 90. Boston 28 26 25 20 — 99 Cleveland 17 23 37 13 — 90 3-point goals: Bos. 8-22 (Smart 3-5, Thomas 2-6, Jerebko 1-2, Bradley 1-2, Sullinger 1-3, Crowder 0-2, Olynyk 0-2), Cle. 9-34 (Love 4-8, Miller 3-6, Harris 1-2, Dellavedova 1-3, Smith 0-4, James 0-5, Jones 0-6). Rebounds: Bos. 54 (Sullinger 8), Cle. 51 (Thompson 12). Assists: Bos. 30 (Turner 13), Cle. 25 (Dellavedova 8). Total fouls: Bos. 24, Cle. 21. A: 20,562.

Thunder 116, Kings 103 Sacramento: Casspi 4-9 5-8 15, Landry 2-5 2-2 6, Thompson 2-7 1-2 5, McCallum 8-11 0-0 17, McLemore 8-17 0-0 20, Williams 5-15 7-9 17, Stauskas 3-5 1-1 9, Evans 0-3 0-0 0, Miller 2-4 4-6 8, Hollins 3-5 0-0 6, Bhullar 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-81 20-28 103. Oklahoma City: Roberson 1-5 0-0 2, Kanter 9-14 6-8 25, Adams 2-6 2-4 6, Westbrook 11-19 4-4 27, Waiters 9-19 2-4 22, N.Collison 2-5 1-1 5, Morrow 7-17 0-0 19, Augustin 2-7 3-3 8, Singler 0-2 0-0 0, Jones 0-1 0-0 0, McGary 1-2 0-0 2, Lamb 0-0 0-0 0, Novak 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-97 18-24 116. Sacramento 24 25 27 27 — 103 Oklahoma City 34 23 25 34 — 116 3-point goals: Sac. 9-24 (McLemore 4-10, Stauskas 2-3, Casspi 2-4, McCallum 1-2, Miller 0-1, Williams 0-4), Okla. City 10-31 (Morrow 5-10, Waiters 2-5, Kanter 1-1, Westbrook 1-4, Augustin 1-6, Singler 0-1, Roberson 0-4). Rebounds: Sac. 59 (Thompson 14), Okla. City 52 (Adams 11). Assists: Sac. 19 (Miller 8), Okla. City 21 (Westbrook 10). Total fouls: Sac. 23, Okla. City 22. A: 18,203.

Nets 117, Wizards 80 Washington: Pierce 1-4 0-0 3, Nene 3-9 0-0 6, Gortat 9-11 3-3 21, Sessions 1-7 0-2 2, Beal 10-19 1-2 24, Gooden 0-8 1-2 1, Porter 4-7 0-0 9, Butler 0-1 0-0 0, Bynum 0-3 1-2 1, Seraphin 1-4 2-2 4, Humphries 3-6 0-0 6, Webster 0-2 3-4 3, Blair 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-82 11-17 80. Brooklyn: Johnson 3-5 0-0 7, Young 5-8 0-2 10, Lopez 12-22 2-3 26, Williams 3-11 1-2 9, Brown 3-10 1-1 7, Bogdanovic 7-12 2-2 22, Jack 5-6 2-2 14, Jefferson 2-4 3-4 7, Plumlee 3-7 2-5 8, Morris 1-2 0-0 2, Jordan 0-1 2-2 2, Clark 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 45-89 15-23 117. Washington 14 24 24 18 — 80 Brooklyn 31 23 21 42 — 117 3-point goals: Was. 5-15 (Beal 3-4, Pierce 1-2, Porter 1-4, Gooden 0-1, Bynum 0-1, Sessions 0-1, Webster 0-2), Bro. 12-20 (Bogdanovic 6-6, Jack 2-2, Williams 2-4, Clark 1-1, Johnson 1-2, Jefferson 0-1, Young 0-1, Brown 0-3). Rebounds: Was. 56 (Gortat 16), Bro. 52 (Lopez 9). Assists: Was. 23 (Sessions 10), Bro. 29 (Williams, Johnson 9). Total fouls: Was. 21, Bro. 20. A: 17,732.

Pelicans 90, Suns 75 Phoenix: Marc.Morris 3-14 0-0 8, Mark. Morris 5-12 2-2 12, Wright 3-5 0-0 6, Bledsoe 7-19 3-4 19, Tucker 4-10 2-2 12, Warren 4-11 0-0 8, Goodwin 1-4 0-0 2, Green 2-6 0-0 5, Barron 1-2 0-0 2, Bullock 0-1 1-2 1, McNeal 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 30-85 8-10 75. New Orleans: Pondexter 1-7 0-0 3, Davis 7-12 5-11 19, Asik 1-5 1-2 3, Evans 6-14 2-2 14, Gordon 6-14 1-1 15, Cunningham 6-8 0-0 12, Cole 5-6 1-1 12, Holiday 1-7 0-0 2, Ajinca 3-4 1-2 7, Anderson 1-7 0-0 3, Babbitt 0-0 0-0 0, Douglas 0-0 0-0 0, Fredette 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-84 11-19 90. Phoenix 21 20 19 15 — 75 New Orleans 27 20 23 20 — 90 3-point goals: Pho. 7-25 (Tucker 2-4, Marc. Morris 2-6, Bledsoe 2-6, Green 1-3, Bullock 0-1, Wright 0-1, Goodwin 0-2, Warren 0-2), N.O. 5-19 (Gordon 2-5, Cole 1-2, Anderson 1-3, Pondexter 1-5, Evans 0-1, Holiday 0-3). Rebounds: Pho. 50 (Mark.Morris 11), N.O. 62 (Asik 18). Assists: Pho. 18 (Bledsoe 7), N.O. 29 (Evans, Cole 6). Total fouls: Pho. 18, N.O. 12. Technicals: Pho. Coach Hornacek. A: 17,954.

Pacers 107, Pistons 103 Indiana: S.Hill 1-4 0-0 2, West 3-9 4-5 10, Hibbert 5-7 0-0 10, G.Hill 2-6 8-8 13, Miles 9-17 1-2 24, Mahinmi 3-6 0-0 6, Stuckey 10-17 1-1 24, George 3-6 2-2 10, Scola 2-6 4-4 8, Allen 0-0 0-0 0, Sloan 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 38-79 20-22 107. Detroit: Butler 3-5 0-0 8, Monroe 8-17 1-1 17, Drummond 5-12 1-5 11, Jackson 6-15 8-12 21, Caldwell-Pope 6-10 1-4 16, Tolliver 2-9 0-0 6, Prince 1-5 0-0 2, Meeks 6-8 1-1 15, Lucas III 3-8 0-0 7, Anthony 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-89 12-23 103. Indiana 23 28 28 28 — 107 Detroit 21 26 32 24 — 103 3-point goals: Ind. 11-19 (Miles 5-9, Stuckey 3-4, George 2-3, G.Hill 1-2, S.Hill 0-1), Det. 11-23 (Caldwell-Pope 3-5, Butler 2-2, Meeks 2-3, Tolliver 2-8, Jackson 1-2, Lucas III 1-3). Fouled out: Jackson. Rebounds: Ind. 45 (Hibbert 11), Det. 58 (Drummond 15). Assists: Ind. 29 (West, G.Hill 9), Det. 25 (Jackson 9). Total fouls: Ind. 21, Det. 20. A: 18,561.

Bucks 99, Knicks 91 Milwaukee: Antetokounmpo 7-14 9-11 23, Ilyasova 2-7 1-1 6, Pachulia 4-5 1-1 9, Middleton 9-16 1-1 22, Carter-Williams 8-13 3-5 19, Henson 1-1 1-2 3, Mayo 3-7 2-4 9, Dudley 2-5 1-2 5, Ennis 0-3 0-0 0, Plumlee 0-1 0-0 0, Bayless 1-3 0-0 3, O’Bryant 0-1 0-2 0. Totals 37-76 19-29 99. New York: Acy 2-10 3-3 7, Thomas 6-6 2-2 16, Aldrich 2-3 0-1 4, Hardaway Jr. 2-7 2-3 7, Galloway 8-16 2-2 20, Amundson 4-8 2-5 10, Larkin 5-6 4-4 14, Smith 4-10 3-4 11, Ledo 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 34-72 18-24 91. Milwaukee 28 24 29 18 — 99 New York 21 28 16 26 — 91 3-point goals: Mil. 6-17 (Middleton 3-6, Bayless 1-1, Mayo 1-2, Ilyasova 1-3, Ennis 0-1, Carter-Williams 0-1, Antetokounmpo 0-1, Dudley 0-2), NY 5-13 (Thomas 2-2, Galloway 2-6, Hardaway Jr. 1-3, Ledo 0-1, Acy 0-1). Rebounds: Mil. 45 (Antetokounmpo 9), NY 48 (Amundson 11). Assists: Mil. 18 (CarterWilliams 7), NY22 (Larkin 5). Total fouls: Mil. 22, NY26. Technicals: Mayo, Smith. A: 19,812.

Mavericks 144, Nuggets 143 Dallas: Jefferson 8-15 4-4 24, Nowitzki 10-19 5-5 25, T.Chandler 2-3 2-2 6, Felton 6-12 0-1 13, Ellis 9-17 1-2 19, Aminu 5-11 0-0 10, D.Harris 7-9 4-6 21, Villanueva 2-10 0-0 6, Stoudemire 6-8 3-4 15, Barea 2-5 0-0 5, James 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 57-109 19-24 144. Denver: W.Chandler 9-22 0-0 20, Gallinari 15-23 10-10 47, Faried 6-12 2-3 14, Lawson 8-21 2-2 19, Foye 6-18 0-0 17, Hickson 5-10 4-6 14, Barton 1-4 0-0 2, G.Harris 0-2 0-0 0, Nurkic 2-8 4-4 8, Green 1-5 0-0 2, Lauvergne 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 53-125 22-25 143. Dallas 35 38 20 28 13 10 — 144 Denver 27 25 37 32 13 9 — 143 3-point goals: Dal. 11-29 (Jefferson 4-8, D.Harris 3-3, Villanueva 2-8, Barea 1-3, Felton 1-3, Ellis 0-1, Nowitzki 0-3), Den. 15-43 (Gallinari 7-12, Foye 5-13, W.Chandler 2-9, Lawson 1-3, G.Harris 0-1, Barton 0-2, Green 0-3). Rebounds: Dal. 61 (T.Chandler 11), Den. 71 (Hickson 12). Assists: Dal. 39 (Barea, D.Harris 9), Den. 29 (Lawson 18). Total fouls: Dal. 23, Den. 26. Technicals: Faried. Flagrant fouls: Nurkic. A: 14,041 .

Grizzlies 89, Jazz 88 Memphis: Je.Green 5-11 2-4 12, Randolph 5-13 4-6 14, Gasol 9-18 4-6 22, Udrih 9-13 0-0 20, Lee 6-10 1-1 15, Calathes 0-1 0-0 0, Koufos 1-1 0-0 2, Carter 1-6 1-2 4, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Adams 0-2 0-0 0, Leuer 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-76 12-19 89. Utah: Hayward 8-16 9-12 27, Favors 2-10 1-2 5, Gobert 7-11 0-0 14, Exum 1-4 0-0 3, Hood 6-14 3-3 18, Booker 0-4 0-0 0, Ingles 2-5 0-0 6, Cooley 0-0 0-0 0, Cotton 4-5 1-3 11, Millsap 0-0 1-2 1, Evans 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 31-71 15-22 88. Memphis 29 20 24 16 — 89 Utah 23 26 23 16 — 88 3-point goals: Mem. 5-15 (Udrih 2-2, Lee 2-3, Carter 1-4, Adams 0-1, Gasol 0-1, Smith 0-1, Je.Green 0-3), Utah 11-23 (Hood 3-7, Cotton 2-2, Ingles 2-3, Hayward 2-4, Evans 1-1, Exum 1-4, Booker 0-2). Rebounds: Mem. 46 (Randolph 10), Utah 48 (Gobert 14). Assists: Mem. 22 (Gasol 6), Utah 16 (Exum 5). Total fouls: Mem. 22, Utah 22. Technicals: Randolph, Booker. A: 18,873.

Lakers 106, T’Wolves 98 Minnesota: Wiggins 7-15 15-16 29, Payne 5-8 4-6 14, Hamilton 2-4 2-2 6, LaVine 6-12 4-4 18, Martin 2-8 2-2 6, Budinger 3-10 2-2 8, Hummel 3-6 0-0 7, L.Brown 4-11 2-2 10, Onuaku 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-74 31-34 98. L.A. Lakers: Johnson 4-11 0-0 10, Kelly 7-12 2-2 21, Black 8-9 2-4 18, Clarkson 8-18 1-2 18, J.Brown 6-14 8-12 20, Buycks 2-7 0-0 5, Davis 3-5 1-2 7, Sacre 3-7 1-2 7. Totals 41-83 15-24 106. Minnesota 21 26 24 27 — 98 L.A. Lakers 30 22 28 26 — 106 3-point goals: Minnesota 3-15 (LaVine 2-5, Hummel 1-3, Payne 0-1, Budinger 0-2, L.Brown 0-4), L.A. Lakers 9-23 (Kelly 5-6, Johnson 2-8, Buycks 1-2, Clarkson 1-3, J.Brown 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 43 (Wiggins 10), L.A. Lakers 53 (Black 10). Assists: Minnesota 17 (Wiggins 6), L.A. Lakers 35 (Clarkson 9). Total fouls: Minnesota 20, L.A. Lakers 22. A: 17,880.

AssociAted Press

Houston’s Dwight Howard shoots over San Antonio’s Jef Ayres in the irst half Friday night. The visiting Spurs won 104-103 behind Tim Duncan’s 29 points.

from NewS ServiCeS

Tim Duncan had 29 points and blocked James Harden’s layup with 2.9 seconds left to give the San Antonio Spurs their 10th straight victory, 104-103 over the host Houston Rockets on Friday night. San Antonio jumped into the third spot in the Western Conference and Houston dropped from third to sixth. The Spurs had a four-point lead after Harden made a layup for his first points of the half with less than 90 seconds remaining. Duncan missed a layup before Harden made a 3-pointer with 28.9 seconds left to get Houston to 104-103. Tony Parker turned it over to give Houston one last shot. But Duncan blocked Harden’s shot and grabbed the rebound to secure the victory. Hawks reach milestone • Mike Muscala scored 17 points, and the host Atlanta Hawks beat the Charlotte Hornets 10480 to reach 60 wins for the first time in franchise history. Kyle Korver had 16 points for Atlanta (60-19). The Hawks played in St. Louis from 1955-1968 before moving to Atlanta. The team began as the Tri-Cities Blackhawks in 1946 and moved to Milwaukee in 1951, shortening its name to the Hawks. “It’s definitely special for the Atlanta Hawks organization and our fans,” said center Al Horford, who had 15 points and eight rebounds. “First time in history and I’m very proud to be a part of that.” Celtics get key win • Marcus Smart scored 19 points, and the visiting Boston Celtics maintained their grip on a playof spot by holding of the short-handed Cleveland Cavaliers 99-90. The Cavs played without injured All-Star Kyrie Irving and used their reserves extensively after clinching the No. 2 seed in the East on Wednesday. Bucks close in • Giannis Antetokounmpo returned to the lineup with 23 points and

moved the visiting Milwaukee Bucks to the verge of a playof spot with a 99-91 victory over the New York Knicks. The Bucks lowered their magic number to one for clinching a playof berth. That would complete a remarkable turnaround from an NBA-worst 15-67 last season. Pacers stay alive • Rodney Stuckey scored 24 points, including three straight jumpers down the stretch, and the visiting Indiana Pacers kept up their playoff push with a 107-103 victory over the Detroit Pistons. Indiana (36-43) is one game behind Brooklyn and Boston for the last two Eastern Conference playof spots.

NoteBooK Hawks players discuss arrest • Pero Antic said he and Atlanta Hawks teammate Thabo Sefolosha were not with Indiana Pacers forward Chris Copeland when Copeland was stabbed outside a Manhattan nightclub. Antic and Sefolosha were at the scene early Wednesday. They were charged with obstructing authorities and disorderly conduct and were released without bail. On Friday, Antic, speaking for the first time about the scene at the arrest, said he and Sefolosha were not part of Copeland’s group. “We don’t have nothing to do with what happened with that,” Antic said. “We weren’t together. We didn’t even see the guy and whatever happened, happened way before.” Copeland, Copeland’s girlfriend and another woman were stabbed. A 22-yearold suspect is in custody. Antic, a 6-foot-11 backup center, said he and Sefolosha were not trying to shield police or onlookers from Copeland. “I would say that it’s a pure example of being in the wrong place at the wrong time,” Antic said. “I mean, people know Thabo for so many years in the league. He’s probably one of the greatest guys. The reporters who are here know me. ... It’s just a pure example of being in the wrong place at the wrong time.”


C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES

M 2 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

photos by Chris Lee • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Chris Porter dives to try to get the puck that he is battling for with Wild defenseman Nate Prosser in irst period Saturday afternoon.

Steen, Tarasenko return and spark the ofense Blues • from C1

of them playing Chicago, narrowing the field to Minnesota and Winnipeg. It was to be decided by the outcome of a play late Saturday night. Blues coach Ken Hitchcock acknowledged that Minnesota and Winnipeg play different styles and have separate strengths, creating unique challenges. “Huge (differences), but very deep,” Hitchcock said. “What’s ‘Minny,’ the hottest team in the National Hockey League? I don’t think Winnipeg is far of it. Both teams can go deep into games, both teams have a lot of firepower. “To me, both teams are really, really well coached. They don’t beat themselves. If we expect to beat either team in a series, we’re going to have to beat them. They’re not going to give us anything.” Hitchcock perhaps surprised many when he said that he would not be keeping an eye on the Ducks-Coyotes’ game. “Check the score later,” Hitchcock said of his plans for the evening. “I’m tired of watching hockey.” So the Blues couldn’t settle everything Saturday in front of 19,155, which was the 23rd sellout of the season. But the Central Division champions did take

care of their business on a day when they played without defensemen Alex Pietrangelo and Kevin Shattenkirk, along with forwards T.J. Oshie, David Backes and Steve Ott. Those were the players whom Hitchcock indicated Friday were “banged up” and could use the rest. But it wasn’t a case of lopsided lineups Saturday, as Minnesota elected to sit defensemen Ryan Suter and Jared Spurgeon and forwards Mikko Koivu and Justin Fontaine. The game marked the return of Blues forwards Alexander Steen and Vladimir Tarasenko and watching them Saturday, one would have never known they were sidelined for a couple of weeks because of lower-body injuries. Tarasenko netted his 37th goal of the season and added an assist, while Steen accounted for two highlight-reel assists. Tarasenko said he felt “good. I didn’t expect nothing. I just wanted to play this game and try to be ready for playofs.” On how he felt, Steen replied: “Not bad. I was a little antsy, I wanted to get back in. It was nice to have a game.” The two factored heavily in Saturday’s outcome, doing most of their damage late in the second period. After an almost unwatchable first pe-

riod, in which the Blues had just one shot on goal, four of the game’s six goals came in the middle frame. Dmitrij Jaskin put the Blues ahead 1-0 with 6:33 minutes to play. Patrik Berglund made a nice play to put the club on a three-on-two rush, and Jaskin worked the give-and-go with Olli Jokinen before whipping a wrist shot past Minnesota goalie Devan Dubnyk. Then Steen and Tarasenko went to work. Steen gave Tarasenko a cross-ice feed, finding him wide open in the slot where Tarasenko put a quick wrist shot by Dubnyk for a 2-0 lead with two minutes remaining. “(Steen’s) a great player and I’m happy to play with him,” Tarasenko said. Minnesota answered with a point shot from defenseman Marco Scandella that got by Elliott, cutting the Blues’ lead to 2-1 with 1:09 left to play in the period. But instead of clinging to a one-goal lead at the second intermission, Lehtera regained the Blues’ two-goal advantage with the first of his two goals. Lehtera, taking a brilliant backhanded dish from Steen, pushed the puck past Dubnyk for his 13th goal of the season, handing the Blues a 3-1 lead with 28 seconds left.

his time, Blues on upswing as playofs loom strauss • from C1

by a team that sat center David Backes, defensemen Kevin Shattenkirk and Alex Pietrangelo and forwards T.J. Oshie and Jaden Schwartz in a suite. Coach Ken Hitchcock also gave Brian Elliott a game in net and was rewarded with a scoreless draw while the Minnesota Wild took 10 of the 11 shots through the game’s first 25 minutes. Rather than take a last-game-of-spring-training approach, the Blues instead answered with two assists from returning Alex Steen and a goal from forward Vladimir Tarasenko. Injuries eroded the Blues last April. This year they’re the improbable team that appears to be getting well at precisely the right time. The Blues (51-24-7) rallied to outshoot the Wild until the visitors pulled backup Darcy Kuemper from net late in the third period, manufacturing a six-on-three rush with a power play’s additional assist. The Wild, whose failsafe in net, Devan Dubnyk, failed to return for the third period, scored a meaningless second goal with under a minute remaining. Elliott allowed his first score on a late deflection with the Blues up 2-0 and in the midst of his team scoring three times in barely a seven-minute second-period window. Remembering the finish to last season’s punishing schedule still creates a migraine. The Blues lost 10 of 12 in April, four straight to the Blackhawks after winning the first two in the conference quarterfinal series. Count this diferences now: Tarasenko and Steen, the team’s leading two scorers, are back after each missing a handful of games. Rather than take Hitchcock’s word for their health, performance ofered proof. Steen made two glitzy passes — one on a give-and-go, the second between a defender’s legs — to assist on two of the Blues’ first three scores. It was his first action since staying on ice for barely three minutes against Columbus two weeks

Chris Lee • clee@post-dispatch.com

Vladimir Tarasenko (front) and Alexander Steen (back) returned for the Blues’ regular-season inale, a playof tune-up.

earlier. Tarasenko snapped home the second goal, his first since March 28 and a lower body injury. After driving the first period, the Wild (46-28-8) exhibited little stomach for it after falling behind. The Wild wanted to avoid injury; the Blues looked committed to avoiding complacency. Winning 50 games in a season can leave a bitter aftertaste or create a thirst for more. These Blues appear parched and are divining more. Chris Butler finished plus-3 in more than 19 minutes. Center Jori Lehtera had two goals in little more than 15 minutes. No forward played more. Breaks are folding their way. The Los Angeles Kings and Jonathan Quick are not around after evicting the Blues from two of the last three tournaments. The Blues gained home ice through at least the second round, provided they last that long. The Note’s questions owe more to excess than several dilemmas. Hitchcock sounds confident in two goalies rather than queasy about both. Somebody on the back line with a legitimate beef is going to get his nose out of joint over playing time. “This,” Backes said wearing the suit he donned to take in the game upstairs, “is

the best situation we’ve had going in (the playofs).” Coincidence or not, the Blues bridged March and April with a three-game losing streak, but have responded with four wins in five games since Hitchcock made public his preference to return for a fifth season behind the team’s bench. The only loss is 1-0 to Winnipeg. Rookie goaltender Jake Allen has become a league phenomenon. Elliott, who won Saturday for the third time since March 14, must settle for being an AllStar. “That feeling’s back,” Backes emphasized. “... We know we’re going to get the puck deep when we need it. We know we’re going to get the puck deep. It doesn’t matter if it’s 2-1, 4-2, or 7-5. We’re able to deal with the situation.” Sometimes perceived as incessantly demanding, grinding and allowing a loss to leave a more lasting impression than a victory, Hitchcock took the floor moments after his club’s win Saturday to congratulate his team on a massive regular-season accomplishment capped by overtaking up-and-comer Nashville and battle-tested Chicago for the division title. Doubling down on a sense of heaviness has yet to translate for what’s next. Hitch’ promises this time to alleviate as much pressure as possible. “We just want to go in on the right schedule. We’re not going to throw much pressure at them,” Hitchcock said. Noted Backes, injured and all but neutralized during last year’s playofs series, “Our trajectory is going up in terms of play as well. Last year we lost our last six. It was a very different direction. I think we’ve peaked here at the end this year. ... I don’t know what else you would be asking for.” Well, a deep run if anyone is taking orders. Joe Strauss @joestrauss on Twitter jstrauss@post-dispatch.com

Tarasenko also assisted, as he and Steen accounted for four of the team’s 10 points. “I think both him and Steen needed to play,” Hitchcock said. “You don’t want to find out about yourself sitting in the playoffs. That’s not a good feeling because you’re trying to feel your way back into the season and the game’s at this furious pace. Having them play today, giving them a lot of minutes, playing them in a lot of diferent situations, they were comfortable.” Steen had 19 minutes of ice time and Tarasenko played 17:18. The Wild replaced Dubnyk at the start of the third period with Darcy Kuemper. Just 5:03 into the final period, Lehtera scored on the power play for a 4-1 lead. Late in regulation, Minnesota wrapped up the scoring with a power-play goal by Zach Parise. After three consecutive starts by Jake Allen, Elliott won his second straight decision, separated by nine days. His 26th win of the season is the second-most in his career. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

minnesota Blues

0 0

1 3

1 1

— —

2 4

FIRST PERIOD No scoring. Penalties: Dumba, Min (roughing), 13:12; Jaskin, Blues (roughing), 13:12. SECOND PERIOD B: Jaskin 13 (Jokinen, Berglund), 13:27. B: Tarasenko 37 (Steen, Butler), 18:00. M: Scandella 11 (Haula, Cooke), 18:51. B: Lehtera 13 (Steen, Tarasenko), 19:31. Penalties: Jaskin, Blues (tripping), 2:55; Dumba, Min (roughing), 8:07. THIRD PERIOD B: Lehtera (unassisted), 5:03 (pp). M: Parise 33 (Granlund, Vanek), 19:22 (pp). Penalties: Lehtera, Blues (slashing), 1:35; Folin, Min (delay of game), 4:48; Bouwmeester, Blues (interference), 16:54; Bortuzzo, Blues (cross-checking), 18:00. SHOTS ON GOAL Minnesota 7 8 10 25 Blues 1 13 9 23 Power-plays Minnesota 1 of 4; Blues 1 of 2. Goaltenders Minnesota: Dubnyk 36-14-4 (14 shots-11 saves), Kuemper (0:00 third, 9-8). Blues: Elliott 26-14-3 (25-23). Referees: Brad Watson, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Tony Sericolo, Bryan Pancich. A: 19,155.

final statistiCs Scoring gp g a p +/- pim pp sh gw Tarasenko 77 37 36 73 27 31 8 0 6 Steen 74 24 40 64 8 33 8 0 5 Schwartz 75 28 35 63 13 16 8 0 4 Backes 80 26 32 58 7 104 10 0 3 Oshie 72 19 36 55 17 51 3 0 4 Stastny 74 16 30 46 5 40 7 0 7 Pietrangelo 81 7 39 46 -2 28 1 0 2 Shattenkirk 56 8 36 44 19 52 4 0 1 Lehtera 75 14 30 44 21 48 2 1 2 Berglund 77 12 15 27 -2 26 0 0 0 Jaskin 54 13 5 18 7 16 3 0 4 Jackman 80 2 13 15 3 47 0 0 1 Bouwmeester 72 2 11 13 7 24 0 0 0 Ott 78 3 9 12 -8 86 0 0 0 Reaves 81 6 6 12 -3 116 0 0 1 Gunnarsson 61 2 10 12 10 2 0 0 0 Butler 33 3 6 9 8 23 0 1 0 Michalek 15 2 2 4 3 6 0 0 0 Jokinen 8 1 2 3 3 0 0 0 1 Goc 31 1 2 3 -1 4 0 0 0 Lindbohm 23 2 1 3 -1 26 0 0 0 Porter 24 1 1 2 -3 6 0 0 1 Bortuzzo 13 1 1 2 -3 25 0 0 0 Rattie 11 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 Paajarvi 10 0 1 1 -2 6 0 0 0 Fraser 1 0 0 0 -1 0 0 0 0 Goalie gp gs min gaa w l ot so sa Elliott 46 45 2546 2.26 26 14 3 5 1150 Allen 37 32 2077 2.28 22 7 4 4 909 • Assists: Elliott 3, Allen 2

s s% 264 14 223 10.8 184 15.2 183 14.2 162 11.7 143 11.2 195 3.6 135 5.9 103 13.6 145 8.3 108 12 86 2.3 92 2.2 49 6.1 55 10.9 54 3.7 54 5.6 19 10.5 17 5.9 34 2.9 32 6.3 24 4.2 19 5.3 8 0 9 0 1 0 ga sv% 96 .917 79 .913


C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BLUES

M 3 • SUNDAY • 04.12.2015

photos by Chris Lee • clee@post-dispatch.com

The Blues’ Chris Porter dives to try to get the puck that he is battling for with Wild defenseman Nate Prosser in irst period Saturday afternoon.

Steen, Tarasenko return and spark the ofense Blues • from C1

It will be the first playoff meeting between the Blues and the Wild, an expansion team that began play in the NHL in 20002001. But of course fans in St. Louis and the Twin Cities have plenty of playoff history together, going back to the days of the Minnesota North Stars and the Norris Division. The current edition of Minnesota’s franchise has qualified for the playoffs for the sixth time in the club’s 15-year existence and for the third straight season. The Wild finished with 100 points and tied the NHL record with 12 consecutive road wins before Saturday’s loss to the Blues. “They’re a team that has some very dangerous skilled forwards that like to work hard,” Blues defenseman Barret Jackman said. “Ryan Suter is one of the best defenseman in the league. He controls the back end and he has a calming influence over their whole team. You’re going to have to get on him and not let him be a diference maker. (Goalie Devan) Dubnyk has been one of the ‘feel-good’ stories of the NHL this year. He’s put them on a great run and put them in great position to be in the playofs.” The Blues got to Dubnyk on Saturday, touching him for three goals on 14 shots before Minnesota replaced him with Darcy Kuemper.

In front of 19,155 at Scottrade Center, the Central Division champions picked up two goals from Jori Lehtera and received 23 saves from Brian Elliott, evening the season series between the teams 2-2. “We had a bad first period today and then we played good hockey,” Lehtera said. “I think it’s good to end the game like this. We’re ready for playofs.” The Blues played without Alex Pietrangelo, Kevin Shattenkirk, T.J. Oshie, David Backes and Steve Ott. Those were the players Hitchcock indicated Friday were “banged up” and could use the rest. But it wasn’t a case of lopsided lineups Saturday, as Minnesota elected to sit Suter, Jared Spurgeon, Mikko Koivu and Justin Fontaine. The game marked the return of Blues forwards Alexander Steen and Vladimir Tarasenko and watching them Saturday, one would have never known they missed a couple of weeks because of lower-body injuries. Tarasenko netted his 37th goal of the season and added an assist, while Steen accounted for two highlight-reel helpers. Tarasenko, who missed six games, said that he felt “good. I didn’t expect nothing. I just wanted to play this game and try to be ready for (the) playofs.” Steen, who was out for seven games, felt: “Not bad. I was a little antsy, I wanted to get back in. It was nice to have a game.”

The two factored heavily in Saturday’s outcome, doing most of their damage late in the second period. After an almost unwatchable first period, in which the Blues had just one shot on goal, four of the game’s six goals came in the middle frame. Dmitrij Jaskin put the Blues ahead 1-0 with 6:33 minutes to play. Patrik Berglund made a nice play to put the club on a threeon-two rush, and Jaskin worked the giveand-go with Olli Jokinen before whipping a wrist shot past Dubnyk. Then Steen and Tarasenko, who were playing with Lehtera, went to work. Steen found Tarasenko wide open in the slot, from where Tarasenko put a quick wrist shot by Dubnyk for a 2-0 lead. Minnesota answered with a goal that made it 2-1 with 1:09 left to play in the period, a point shot from defenseman Marco Scandella that got by Elliott. But instead of clinging to a one-goal lead at the second intermission, Lehtera regained the Blues’ twogoal advantage with the first of his two goals. Lehtera took a brilliant backhanded dish from Steen and knocked it past Dubnyk for his 13th goal of the season,handing the Blues a 3-1 lead with 28 seconds left. Tarasenko also assisted, as he and Steen accounted for four of the team’s 10 points. “I think both him and Steen needed to

his time, Blues on upswing as playofs loom strauss • from C1

by a team that sat center David Backes, defensemen Kevin Shattenkirk and Alex Pietrangelo and forwards T.J. Oshie and Jaden Schwartz in a suite. Coach Ken Hitchcock also gave Brian Elliott a game in net and was rewarded with a scoreless draw while the Minnesota Wild took 10 of the 11 shots through the game’s first 25 minutes. Rather than take a last-game-of-spring-training approach, the Blues instead answered with two assists from returning Alex Steen and a goal from forward Vladimir Tarasenko. Injuries eroded the Blues last April. This year they’re the improbable team that appears to be getting well at precisely the right time. The Blues (51-24-7) rallied to outshoot the Wild until the visitors pulled backup Darcy Kuemper from net late in the third period, manufacturing a six-on-three rush with a power play’s additional assist. The Wild, whose failsafe in net, Devan Dubnyk, failed to return for the third period, scored a meaningless second goal with under a minute remaining. Elliott allowed his first score on a late deflection with the Blues up 2-0 and in the midst of his team scoring three times in barely a seven-minute second-period window. Remembering the finish to last season’s punishing schedule still creates a migraine. The Blues lost 10 of 12 in April, four straight to the Blackhawks after winning the first two in the conference quarterfinal series. Count this diferences now: Tarasenko and Steen, the team’s leading two scorers, are back after each missing a handful of games. Rather than take Hitchcock’s word for their health, performance ofered proof. Steen made two glitzy passes — one on a give-and-go, the second between a defender’s legs — to assist on two of the Blues’ first three scores. It was his first action since staying on ice for barely three minutes against Columbus two weeks

Chris Lee • clee@post-dispatch.com

Vladimir Tarasenko (front) and Alexander Steen (back) returned for the Blues’ regular-season inale, a playof tune-up.

earlier. Tarasenko snapped home the second goal, his first since March 28 and a lower body injury. After driving the first period, the Wild (46-28-8) exhibited little stomach for it after falling behind. The Wild wanted to avoid injury; the Blues looked committed to avoiding complacency. Winning 50 games in a season can leave a bitter aftertaste or create a thirst for more. These Blues appear parched and are divining more. Chris Butler finished plus-3 in more than 19 minutes. Center Jori Lehtera had two goals in little more than 15 minutes. No forward played more. Breaks are folding their way. The Los Angeles Kings and Jonathan Quick are not around after evicting the Blues from two of the last three tournaments. The Blues gained home ice through at least the second round, provided they last that long. The Note’s questions owe more to excess than several dilemmas. Hitchcock sounds confident in two goalies rather than queasy about both. Somebody on the back line with a legitimate beef is going to get his nose out of joint over playing time. “This,” Backes said wearing the suit he donned to take in the game upstairs, “is

the best situation we’ve had going in (the playofs).” Coincidence or not, the Blues bridged March and April with a three-game losing streak, but have responded with four wins in five games since Hitchcock made public his preference to return for a fifth season behind the team’s bench. The only loss is 1-0 to Winnipeg. Rookie goaltender Jake Allen has become a league phenomenon. Elliott, who won Saturday for the third time since March 14, must settle for being an AllStar. “That feeling’s back,” Backes emphasized. “... We know we’re going to get the puck deep when we need it. We know we’re going to get the puck deep. It doesn’t matter if it’s 2-1, 4-2, or 7-5. We’re able to deal with the situation.” Sometimes perceived as incessantly demanding, grinding and allowing a loss to leave a more lasting impression than a victory, Hitchcock took the floor moments after his club’s win Saturday to congratulate his team on a massive regular-season accomplishment capped by overtaking up-and-comer Nashville and battle-tested Chicago for the division title. Doubling down on a sense of heaviness has yet to translate for what’s next. Hitch’ promises this time to alleviate as much pressure as possible. “We just want to go in on the right schedule. We’re not going to throw much pressure at them,” Hitchcock said. Noted Backes, injured and all but neutralized during last year’s playofs series, “Our trajectory is going up in terms of play as well. Last year we lost our last six. It was a very different direction. I think we’ve peaked here at the end this year. ... I don’t know what else you would be asking for.” Well, a deep run if anyone is taking orders. Joe Strauss @joestrauss on Twitter jstrauss@post-dispatch.com

play,” Hitchcock said. “You don’t want to find out about yourself sitting in the playofs. That’s not a good feeling.” Steen had 19 minutes of ice time and Tarasenko played 17:18. The Wild replaced Dubnyk with Kuemper at the start of the third. Just 5:03 into the final period, Lehtera netted his second of the game on the power play for a 4-1 lead. Late in regulation, Minnesota wrapped up the scoring with a power-play goal by Zach Parise. After three consecutive starts by Jake Allen, Elliott won his second straight decision, separated by nine days. His 26th win of the season is the second-most in his career. The Blues finished the regular season with a record of 51-24-7 for 109 points, tying for the third-most in franchise history in an 82-game season. “This is the team we want to take on the journey,” Hitchcock said. “We’ll be 100 percent (healthy) going into the playoffs, which is completely different from last year. We’re going to have (an opponent) who is just as good as us. There’s probably going to be fivesix points diference in eight months of hockey, which is not much.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

minnesota Blues

0 0

1 3

1 1

— —

2 4

FIRST PERIOD No scoring. Penalties: Dumba, Min (roughing), 13:12; Jaskin, Blues (roughing), 13:12. SECOND PERIOD B: Jaskin 13 (Jokinen, Berglund), 13:27. B: Tarasenko 37 (Steen, Butler), 18:00. M: Scandella 11 (Haula, Cooke), 18:51. B: Lehtera 13 (Steen, Tarasenko), 19:31. Penalties: Jaskin, Blues (tripping), 2:55; Dumba, Min (roughing), 8:07. THIRD PERIOD B: Lehtera (unassisted), 5:03 (pp). M: Parise 33 (Granlund, Vanek), 19:22 (pp). Penalties: Lehtera, Blues (slashing), 1:35; Folin, Min (delay of game), 4:48; Bouwmeester, Blues (interference), 16:54; Bortuzzo, Blues (cross-checking), 18:00. SHOTS ON GOAL Minnesota 7 8 10 25 Blues 1 13 9 23 Power-plays Minnesota 1 of 4; Blues 1 of 2. Goaltenders Minnesota: Dubnyk 36-14-4 (14 shots-11 saves), Kuemper (0:00 third, 9-8). Blues: Elliott 26-14-3 (25-23). Referees: Brad Watson, Dean Morton. Linesmen: Tony Sericolo, Bryan Pancich. A: 19,155.

final statistiCs Scoring gp g a p +/- pim pp sh gw Tarasenko 77 37 36 73 27 31 8 0 6 Steen 74 24 40 64 8 33 8 0 5 Schwartz 75 28 35 63 13 16 8 0 4 Backes 80 26 32 58 7 104 10 0 3 Oshie 72 19 36 55 17 51 3 0 4 Stastny 74 16 30 46 5 40 7 0 7 Pietrangelo 81 7 39 46 -2 28 1 0 2 Shattenkirk 56 8 36 44 19 52 4 0 1 Lehtera 75 14 30 44 21 48 2 1 2 Berglund 77 12 15 27 -2 26 0 0 0 Jaskin 54 13 5 18 7 16 3 0 4 Jackman 80 2 13 15 3 47 0 0 1 Bouwmeester 72 2 11 13 7 24 0 0 0 Ott 78 3 9 12 -8 86 0 0 0 Reaves 81 6 6 12 -3 116 0 0 1 Gunnarsson 61 2 10 12 10 2 0 0 0 Butler 33 3 6 9 8 23 0 1 0 Michalek 15 2 2 4 3 6 0 0 0 Jokinen 8 1 2 3 3 0 0 0 1 Goc 31 1 2 3 -1 4 0 0 0 Lindbohm 23 2 1 3 -1 26 0 0 0 Porter 24 1 1 2 -3 6 0 0 1 Bortuzzo 13 1 1 2 -3 25 0 0 0 Rattie 11 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 Paajarvi 10 0 1 1 -2 6 0 0 0 Fraser 1 0 0 0 -1 0 0 0 0 Goalie gp gs min gaa w l ot so sa Elliott 46 45 2546 2.26 26 14 3 5 1150 Allen 37 32 2077 2.28 22 7 4 4 909 • Assists: Elliott 3, Allen 2

s s% 264 14 223 10.8 184 15.2 183 14.2 162 11.7 143 11.2 195 3.6 135 5.9 103 13.6 145 8.3 108 12 86 2.3 92 2.2 49 6.1 55 10.9 54 3.7 54 5.6 19 10.5 17 5.9 34 2.9 32 6.3 24 4.2 19 5.3 8 0 9 0 1 0 ga sv% 96 .917 79 .913


spOrts

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 1

More injuries at receiver dampen Illini scrimmage Turner, Grant join Dudek on the sideline By MArK tUPPer decatur Herald & Review

SPRINGFIELD, ILL. • The

sight of Mike Dudek leaning on aluminum crutches was bad enough for the Illini football fans who turned out Friday night to watch the team’s intrasquad scrimmage. Dudek, Illinois’ leading receiver as a freshman in 2014, tore his ACL Wednesday at practice and will soon be undergoing surgery. That robs the team of one of its most exciting players and it remains to be seen whether he can return this season. But the visual image grew worse as Friday’s scrimmage went on. Before long, Dudek was joined by another projected starting wideout when Malik Turner left with a limp and was soon standing next to Dudek wearing a protective boot. “We think he just twisted his ankle,” said coach Tim Beckman. “We hope it’s nothing more than that.” Before the night was over, another wide receiver, walk-on Zach Grant, was sidelined with a broken hand that will require surgery. Turner and Grant are both Springfield natives, and local fans were disappointed to see both of them relegated to the sideline. “If anyone else gets hurt I might have to find my old jersey,” said ofensive coordinator Bill Cubit without much of a smile. A couple of hundred people turned out to watch the scrimmage. For the second week in a row, the Illini defense dominated early until the ofense finally got going late. The first offensive spark

came when quarterback Wes Lunt threw a perfect strike to new tight end Andrew Davis, who played last season at Iowa Western Community College. Then Lunt fired another touchdown pass, this one to Turner before his injury. And when Lunt connected on a short touchdown pass to Justin Hardee, the offense had pumped out three touchdowns in about five minutes. But then it was the defense’s turn again when linebacker Mike Svetina, who missed all of last season with a foot injury, intercepted Lunt and raced into the end zone. The defense continues to look a step ahead of the ofense, a theme that has continued throughout the spring. It figures to stay that way through the April 18 spring game now that the offense has lost two starting wide receivers. Despite the latest round of injuries, Cubit found a silver lining in the emergence of freshman running back Dre Brown of DeKalb. Illinois went into spring needing to identify a backup to starting tailback Josh Ferguson. At this point, Brown seems to be the man. “I’d say more than anyone tonight, Dre Brown’s play was encouraging,” Cubit said. “He’s running hard and he’s getting his pads lower. I like what he’s doing.” Dudek said he’s uncertain when his surgery will be performed but said he’s trying to face it with a good attitude. “I have 100 guys on this team who have my back,” he said. “I don’t have a timetable for when I might be back, but I’m just trying to stay positive.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Mike Dudek was the leading receiver for the Illini last season but sufered a torn ACL on Wednesday in practice.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C9

Kurt Busch grabs pole beside teammate Harvick

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kurt Busch was all smiles after taking the pole at Texas Motor Speedway for his second top spot of the year.

Keselowski, Kahne in second row for the Duck Commander 500 race ASSOCiAteD PreSS

FORT WORTH, TExaS •

Kurt Busch is on the pole for the second time in four races since his reinstatement from a suspension for allegedly assaulting his former girlfriend. Stewart-Haas Racing teammate Kevin Harvick is right there again as well. Busch took the top qualifying spot for the NASCAR Sprint Cup race in Texas on Friday, edging past the defending series champion late in the final round to set up the same 1-2 start they had in Fontana, Calif., three weeks ago. The Duck Commander 500 is Saturday night on the high-banked 1 1/2mile track. It’s the first night race of the season. “A pole’s a pole,” Busch said after taking the top spot for the 18th time in 511 career races and the first time in Texas. “We now have to settle in to 500 miles and to be there at the end of the race tomorrow night.” Busch turned a lap of 193.847 mph in his No. 41 Chevrolet a few moments after Harvick had taken the lead at 193.722. Brad Keselowski took the inside of the second row in the final seconds of qualifying at 193.195. Kasey Kahne (192.933) was fourth. The 36-year-old Busch finished third after starting up front in Fontana, a week after making his season debut in the fourth race by qualifying eighth and finishing fifth in Phoenix. Busch missed the first three races after he was

suspended two days before the season-opening Daytona 500 when a Delaware judge ruled he probably assaulted Patricia Driscoll in his motorhome in September at Dover International Speedway. Last month, the Delaware attorney general declined to charge Busch for the incident, and Busch was quickly reinstated. Harvick won the last race that Busch missed in Las Vegas and was on top again in Phoenix the week when his teammate returned. “He’s got a couple of wins, so we’ve still got our work cut out for us to keep up with his pace,” Busch said. “But in short runs, qualifying sessions and things like that, it’s great to push each other. And it’s an exciting time to try to continue to make StewartHaas stronger.” It’s the fourth time in seven races this season that Harvick has been on the front row — but the first time in Texas. He won from the pole in his No. 4 Chevrolet at Phoenix. “I’m just really proud of everyone at Stewart-Haas Racing, on the 41 team for getting a pole and my team for doing a solid job every week,” said Harvick, the series points leader. “I’m really excited for tomorrow.” For Keselowski, the No. 3 starting spot is a season high. He won in Fontana after qualifying eighth. “You can always be a little bit better, but the 4 and the 41 have been fast week in and week out and they’re fast here again,” Keselowski said.

MOTORS ROUNDUP Jones, 18, wins in Xinity race Teenager Erik Jones pulled away to his irst career Xinity Series victory Friday night, outrunning Sprint Cup stars Brad Keselowski and Dale Earnhardt Jr. at the same Fort Worth, Texas track where he picked up his high school diploma a year ago. The 18-year-old Jones turned away a strong bid from Keselowski on a restart with 28 laps remaining, winning by 1.6 seconds as he was never seriously challenged again. A year earlier, Jones ran a Camping World Truck race at Texas Motor Speedway rather than attend his high school graduation in Michigan, and track president Eddie Gossage presented him his diploma during introductions. Jones, who won from the pole, became the youngest winner in the truck series in 2013 at Phoenix. He won three truck races last year. Keselowski was second, and Earnhardt Jr. was third. Hagan tops Funny Car qualifying • Matt Hagan raced to the Funny Car qualifying lead in the SummitRacing.com NHRA Nationals at The Strip at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. Hagan had a 4.007-second pass at 318.02 mph in his Dodge Charger. Hagan opened the season with victories in California and Arizona. J.R. Todd led the Top Fuel ield, and Jason Line topped the Pro Stock lineup. Todd had a 3.758-second run at 324.83 mph, and Line had a 6.606 at 208.75 in his Chevy Camaro. Kanaan strong in IndyCar practice • Tony Kanaan’s strong early form continued when he turned a lap at 125.058 mph to top practice for the inaugural Indy Grand Prix of Louisiana in Avondale, La. The 40-year-old Kanaan is coming of a third-place inish in IndyCar’s opening race two weeks ago in St. Petersburg, Fla., where he was the only driver in the top ive not racing for Team Penske. Scott Dixon was third-fastest, giving Chip Ganassi Racing two of the top three cars, split by Penske driver and defending series champion Will Power. Hamilton fastest in China • Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton topped the leaderboard as expected during both practice sessions at the Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai. Hamilton set the fastest time at 1 minute, 37.219 seconds. Associated Press

AREA COLLEGE ATHLETES NOTEBOOK

Deane plays through bad knee injury Lacrosse goaltender who starred at Ladue High declined to have another operation By Steve eighinger Special to the Post-dispatch

Thomas Deane has no regrets about the decision. A Ladue High product and senior goaltender for the Guilford (N.C.) College lacrosse team, Deane has played with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee since his sophomore season. The torn ACL was the second of Deane’s collegiate career, wh i c h b e ga n in 2011 at Ohio Deane Wesleyan. When Deane tore the ACL a second time, he opted to keep playing rather than go through another surgery and rehabilitation. “I was scheduled for surgery and didn’t want to sit on the sidelines, so I went to go coach at a local high school,” Deane said. “As I started running around, the swelling on my knee went down and I figured, ‘Why can’t I play lacrosse?’ I felt fine. “Of course, the doctors didn’t want to clear me and they talked about the negative repercussions of playing with a torn ACL. I un-

derstood what was going on in my knee, and I understood the dangers and risks involved with playing with a torn ACL, but lacrosse is a game I love. I wasn’t ready to give it up for a second time.” Guilford coach Tom Carmean has nothing but praise for Deane. “We thought we lost him for the season,” Carmean said. “He incredibly came back, maybe five weeks later without having had the surgery. He’s used a brace, but never favored it, never had a problem with it. “He’s the voice of the defense.” Deane is 9-2 in goal this season, 28-22 for his career. He ranks second in the Old Dominion Athletic Conference in goals-against average (7.02) and recently set the school record for career minutes by a goalie. Deane will graduate with the lowest career GAA in Guilford history. In high school, Deane helped Ladue to the 2010 Class 2 state title and was a two-time allSuburban East selection. He graduated as Ladue’s leader in wins, saves and shutouts.

neW tUrF At MCKenDree McKendree University’s football team will have a new synthetic playing surface in the fall.

The renovation of Leemon Field is scheduled to begin in May with the removal of the current 10-year-old turf, followed by site preparation and the installation of the new surface. The project is scheduled to be completed by August. The new playing surface is manufactured by Shaw Sports Turf of Calhoun, Ga., which has provided playing fields at M&T Bank Stadium (home of the Baltimore Ravens), Georgia Tech, Arkansas and Vanderbilt. Among high schools in the St. Louis area, Westminster Christian and Vianney use the Shaw Sports product.

COUgArS eArning nAtiOnAL nOtiCe SIU Edwardsville is threatening to crack the softball Division I poll. The Cougars were among 10 teams outside the top 25 receiving votes this week. SIUE entered the weekend with a 29-9 record that includes 12 wins in its last 15 games. The Cougars, who play at Austin Peay today in an Ohio Valley Conference game, are on pace to break the school record for wins since becoming a Division I program in 2009 — the year SIUE finished 40-10. SIUE’s top mark since becoming OVC eligible in

2011 was 35-13 in 2013. Junior infielder Rachel Keller (Civic Memoral) is hitting .305 with two homers and 21 RBIs.

hOWArD iS 3-0 At tCU Texas Christian sophomore righthander Brian Howard (St. Louis U. High) continues to work his way into the nationally ranked Horned Frogs’ pitching plans. The 6-foot-9 Howard is 3-0 with a 3.05 earned-run average through 31 games. The No. 2 Horned Frogs are 25-6 overall, 6-3 in the Big 12. Howard, who has struck out 22 in 20 2/3 innings, posted a 2.77 ERA in limited duty as a freshman for TCU, which was 48-18 in 2014 en route to earning a berth in the College World Series.

StiPAnOviCh AgAin Sydney Stipanovich (St. Joseph’s) was named the Ivy League basketball defensive player of the year a second straight season. The 6-foot-3 sophomore helped Penn (21-9) to a second straight 20-victory season. Stipanovich, also a unanimous first-team AllIvy pick, averaged 11.4 points and 7.1 rebounds while leading the league in blocked shots the second year in a row. Cousin Sadie Stipanovich

(Westminster) of St. Louis University was a third-team All-Atlantic 10 choice. The 6-3 sophomore led the Billikens (15-15) in scoring (15.1) and rebounding (5.9).

ArOUnD the AreA Washington University junior Jamie Silverberg became the 22nd tennis player in school history to surpass 100 victories. • Southeast Missouri senior righthander Travis Hayes (Crystal City) is the Ohio Valley Conference pitcher of the week. Hayes struck out a career-high 12 in eight scoreless innings in a 3-2 win over Austin Peay. Hayes (5-3) is tied for the OVC lead in wins and is third in strikeouts (46). • Maryville sophomore Justin Wrozier (Lutheran St. Charles) was named the Great Lakes Valley Conference golfer of the month for March. He had two top-five tournament finishes. • Webster freshman Josh Fleming (Columbia) is the St. Louis Intercollegiate Athletic Conference pitcher of the week. Fleming threw a four-hit, 5-0 shutout against Westminster College that included matching the school record for strikeouts (14). Fleming leads the SLIAC in strikeouts (45) and has a 2.89 ERA.


NHL

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C9

BLUES NOTEBOOK

nhl SummArIeS

Goalie situation remains in lux Elliott wins in return, but it’s not known if he or Allen starts playofs By Tom TImmermAnn St. Louis Post-dispatch

Brian Elliott, who’s gone from No. 1 goalie to backup in about two weeks, showed he remains a viable option as the team’s playof goaltender. His coach agrees. Elliott stopped 23 of the 25 shots he faced in the Blues’ 4-2 regular-season ending win over Minnesota on Saturday afternoon at Scottrade Center. It looked as if he might pitch a shutout before Minnesota got a deflected goal with just over a minute to go in the second period, and then it looked as if the Blues might have their fourth straight game in which they allowed just one goal. That was before Minnesota scored on a sixon-four situation in the final minute. It was Elliott’s first start after three games of, the longest break he’s had when healthy this season. And the play of Jake Allen has made the rookie the assumed starter come playoff time. “I just tried to play my game,” Elliott said. “That’s all you can do. I tried to stop every shot out there. ... I just wanted to play a game and be the best I could for the guys.” Hitchcock said after the game, before it was known if the Blues’ playof opponent would be Minnesota or Winnipeg, that no decision had been made on who the Game 1 starter will be and, throughout the postseason, situations could determine who’s in goal. “I said this before,” Hitchcock said. “You’ve got one guy that’s got a heck of a season in Elliott and another guy that’s had a heck of a month in Allen. We’ve got no problems. “Whatever guy we go to, it might depend on the opponent. Elliott’s played well against Minny, Jake’s played well against Winnipeg. We’ll see. But we’ll base it on what we think is best. But if we’ve got to change, we’ll change. We won’t hesitate.” Elliott finished the season with 26 wins, the second most in his career. He had 29 in 2009-10.

Chris Lee • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Brian Elliott stops a shot by Minnesota’ Jason Pominville in the second period Saturday afternoon. Elliott stopped 23 of the Wild’s 25 shots.

noBoDy’S PerfeCT

Three Down

Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo was among the players that Hitchcock rested on Saturday, costing him his perfect attendance record. Pietrangelo hadn’t missed a game this season, and for the second straight year the final game of the season was the only one he missed. It’s the fourth straight season he’s missed just one game. With center David Backes, who had played 80 of the first 81 games, also getting the day off, it left Pietrangelo and forward Ryan Reaves as the team’s ironmen this year. Reaves also missed just one game, on Nov. 11 vs. Bufalo, after a puck hit on of his ankles in practice the day before. Of course, there’s a diference between the 81 games for Pietrangelo and Reaves’. Pietrangelo averaged 25 minutes, 24 seconds per game, while Reaves, playing on the fourth line, averaged 8:28. So while they played the same number of games, Pietrangelo played three times as many minutes. Going into the game, Pietrangelo was fifth in the league in minutes played. “Well, he’s a defenseman,” Reaves said.

With 3:06 to go in the game, the Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester was called for interference. One minute, six seconds later, Robert Bortuzzo was called for cross checking. Then Minnesota coach Mike Yeo pulled goalie Darcy Kuemper, meaning that for almost a minute, the Wild had a seldom-seen sixon-three advantage in skaters. The Blues, with Alexander Steen, Barret Jackman and Zbynek Michalek on the ice, killed the three-man disadvantage. But Minnesota scored during the subsequent six-on-four. Hitchcock second-guessed himself. “Probably looking back on it, I had the wrong players on the ice,” he said. “I was disappointed (when Minnesota scored), especially for Jackman and Michalek and Steen. They did such a great job. We screwed up coming out of the box and gave them a pretty easy opportunity. “That was disappointing. Those two defensemen especially did an unbelievable job in keeping the puck out of the net.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

nhl STAnDInGS

Brandon Sutter scored twice and MarcAndre Fleury made 28 saves in the visiting Pittsburgh Penguins’ playof-clinching 2-0 win over the last-place Buffalo Sabres on Saturday, the final day of the NHL regular season. The Penguins snapped a 0-4-1 skid to secure the only playoff spot that remained Saturday night, a wild-card slot in the Eastern Conference, and eliminated Boston from contention in the process. The Penguins, who will face the New York Rangers in the first round, limped into the playofs by going 4-9-2 over their final 15 games. Senators reach playofs • Needing just one point in the season finale to clinch a playof spot, Ottawa wrapped up its sizzling second-half rally with a 3-1 win Saturday afternoon in Philadelphia as Mark Stone scored twice. Jets reach milestone • Former Blue Lee Stempniak had a goal and assist to help playoff-bound Winnipeg set a franchise record for points in a 5-1 victory over visiting Calgary. The Jets finish with 99 points, two more than the Atlanta Thrashers earned in 2006-’07. Wings get No. 3 seed • Petr Mrazek made 35 saves in his third shutout of the season, leading visiting Detroit by Carolina 2-0 to clinch the Atlantic Division’s No. 3 seed.

noTeBooK Regehr calls it quits • Kings defenseman Robyn Regehr said he intends to retire after a 15-year NHL career. Regehr, who turns 35 next week, had three goals and 10 assists in 67 games this season. The Kings failed to make the postseason.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT y-Blues 82 51 24 7 x-Nashville 82 47 25 10 x-Chicago 81 48 27 6 x-Minnesota 82 46 28 8 x-Winnipeg 82 43 26 13 Dallas 82 41 31 10 Colorado 81 38 31 12 Paciic GP W L OT y-Anaheim 81 50 24 7 x-Vancouver 81 47 29 5 x-Calgary 82 45 30 7 Los Angeles 82 40 27 15 San Jose 82 40 33 9 Edmonton 81 24 44 13 Arizona 81 24 49 8 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT y-Montreal 82 50 22 10 x-Tampa Bay 82 50 24 8 x-Detroit 82 43 25 14 x-Ottawa 82 43 26 13 Boston 82 41 27 14 Florida 82 38 29 15 Toronto 82 30 44 8 Bufalo 82 23 51 8 Metropolitan GP W L OT z-NY Rangers 82 53 22 7 x-Washington 82 45 26 11 x-NY Islanders 82 47 28 7 x-Pittsburgh 82 43 27 12 Columbus 82 42 35 5 Philadelphia 82 33 31 18 New Jersey 82 32 36 14 Carolina 82 30 41 11

Pts GF GA Home Away Div 109 248 201 27-12-2 24-12-5 17-11-1 104 232 208 28-9-4 19-16-6 15-9-5 102 227 186 24-12-5 24-15-1 15-13-0 100 231 201 22-13-6 24-15-2 17-8-4 99 230 210 23-13-5 20-13-8 16-8-5 92 261 260 17-16-8 24-15-2 8-14-7 88 216 225 22-15-3 16-16-9 13-12-4 Pts GF GA Home Away Div 107 234 225 26-12-3 24-12-4 17-6-5 99 236 217 23-15-2 24-14-3 16-9-3 97 241 216 23-13-5 22-17-2 22-6-1 95 220 205 25-9-7 15-18-8 14-7-8 89 228 232 19-17-5 21-16-4 15-11-4 61 193 277 15-23-3 9-21-10 4-21-3 56 169 270 11-24-5 13-25-3 12-16-0 Pts 110 108 100 99 96 91 68 54 Pts 113 101 101 98 89 84 78 71

GF 221 262 235 238 213 206 211 161 GF 252 242 252 221 236 215 181 188

GA 189 211 221 215 211 223 262 274 GA 192 203 230 210 250 234 216 226

Home Away Div 26-9-6 24-13-4 18-9-3 32-8-1 18-16-7 21-5-4 22-10-9 21-15-5 10-12-8 23-13-5 20-13-8 17-9-4 24-10-7 17-17-7 15-9-6 21-13-7 17-16-8 16-9-5 22-17-2 8-27-6 13-13-4 14-22-5 9-29-3 10-16-4 Home Away Div 25-11-5 28-11-2 23-6-1 23-13-5 22-13-6 17-9-4 25-14-2 22-14-5 21-6-3 23-14-4 20-13-8 9-17-4 19-20-2 23-15-3 15-11-4 23-11-7 10-20-11 12-13-5 19-14-8 13-22-6 10-13-7 18-16-7 12-25-4 13-12-5

x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

Blue Jackets 5, Islanders 4 Columbus 1 0 3 0 — 5 NY Islanders 0 1 3 0 — 4 Columbus won shootout 2-1 First period: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 22 (Jenner, Savard), 19:50 (pp). Penalties: Johnson, Clm (roughing), 5:12; Boulton, NYI, served by Tavares, double minor (roughing), 5:12; Johansen, Clm (roughing), 6:23; Clutterbuck, NYI (roughing), 6:23; Savard, Clm (roughing), 10:47; Hartnell, Clm (roughing), 14:43; Prout, Clm, major (fighting), 19:14; Boulton, NYI, major (fighting), 19:14; Cizikas, NYI (hooking), 19:38. Second period: 2, N.Y. Islanders, Okposo 18 (Bailey, Kulemin), 11:02. Penalties: Okposo, NYI (hooking), 4:05; Savard, Clm (crosschecking), 14:52. Third period: 3, N.Y. Islanders, Boulton 2 (Kennedy, Leddy), 2:52. 4, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 38 (Okposo, Leddy), 3:47. 5, Columbus, Dubinsky 13 (Connauton, Goloubef), 9:37. 6, Columbus, Wennberg 4 (Dano, Hartnell), 11:11. 7, N.Y. Islanders, Kulemin 15 (Tavares, Visnovsky), 15:36. 8, Columbus, Hartnell 28 (Anisimov, Johnson), 18:25. Penalties: Dubinsky, Clm (roughing), 4:21; Nelson, NYI (roughing), 4:21. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Columbus 2 (Letestu NG, Johansen NG, Wennberg G, Atkinson G), N.Y. Islanders 1 (Tavares G, Okposo NG, Kulemin NG, Clutterbuck NG). Shots: Columbus 10-10-12-5: 37. N.Y. Islanders 20-11-16-5: 52. Power-plays: Columbus 1 of 3; N.Y. Islanders 0 of 3. Goalies: Columbus, McElhinney 12-14-2 (52 shots-48 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 38-17-4 (37-33). Referees: Eric Furlatt, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Andy McElman. A: 16,170.

Panthers 3, Devils 2 New Jersey 0 1 1 — 2 Florida 0 1 2 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Fraser, NJ (cross-checking), 9:42. Second period: 1, New Jersey, Tootoo 10 (T.Zajac, Gelinas), 1:50. 2, Florida, Bolland 6 (Boyes, Jokinen), 11:08. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Florida, Huberdeau 15 (Jagr, Barkov), 7:59. 4, New Jersey, Severson 5 (Cammalleri, Harrold), 11:01. 5, Florida, Jagr 17 (Kulikov, Ekblad), 12:23 (pp). Penalties: Bolland, Fla (hooking), 9:23; Bernier, NJ, served by Ruutu, major-game misconduct (kneeing), 10:28; Henrique, NJ, minor-misconduct (tripping), 10:28; Petrovic, Fla, minor-misconduct (roughing), 10:28. Shots: New Jersey 5-14-14: 33. Florida 11-7-9: 27. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 1; Florida 1 of 3. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 26-31-9 (27 shots-24 saves). Florida, Montoya 6-7-2 (33-31). Referees: Rob Martell, Ghislain Hebert. Linesmen: Brad Lazarowich, Tim Nowak. A: 12,236.

Canadiens 4, Maple Leafs 3 Montreal 1 2 0 0 — 4 Toronto 2 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Kessel 25 (Bozak, MacWilliam), 3:58. 2, Montreal, Desharnais 14, 4:14. 3, Toronto, Bailey 1 (Phaneuf, Holland), 14:04. Penalties: Galchenyuk, Mon (hooking), 18:39. Second period: 4, Montreal, Plekanec 26 (Markov, Smith-Pelly), :59. 5, Toronto, Bozak 23 (van Riemsdyk, Kessel), 5:11. 6, Montreal, De La Rose 4, 19:51. Penalties: Emelin, Mon (holding), 5:40; Bailey, Tor (interference), 8:13; Emelin, Mon (clipping), 17:36; Brewer, Tor, served by Sill (roughing), 17:36. Third period: None. Penalties: Petry, Mon (slashing), 3:40; Phaneuf, Tor (crosschecking), 3:40; van Riemsdyk, Tor (crosschecking), 3:40; Gardiner, Tor (hooking), 7:34; Weise, Mon (high-sticking), 13:38. Overtime: None. Penalties: Subban, Mon (high-sticking), :30; Markov, Mon, game misconduct, 4:22; Parenteau, Mon, game misconduct, 4:22; Subban, Mon (slashing), 4:56. Shootout: Montreal 2 (Galchenyuk G, Desharnais G), Toronto 0 (Bozak NG, Lupul NG). Shots: Montreal 6-10-13-4: 33. Toronto 6-6-8-2: 22. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 3; Toronto 0 of 5. Goalies: Montreal, Price 44-16-6 (22 shots-19 saves). Toronto, Bernier 21-28-7 (33-30). Referees: Greg Kimmerly, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, John Grandt. A: 19,308.

Senators 3, Flyers 1 Saturday Blues 4, Minnesota 2 Montreal 4, Toronto 3 (so) Columbus 5, N.Y. Islanders 4 (so) Ottawa 3, Philadelphia 1 NY Rangers 4, Washington 2 Winnipeg 5, Calgary 1 Los Angeles 4, San Jose 1 Pittsburgh 2, Buffalo 0 Florida 3, New Jersey 2 Detroit 2, Carolina 0 Tampa Bay 3, Boston 2 (so)

Dallas 4, Nashville 1 Chicago at Colorado (n) Anaheim at Arizona (n) Edmonton at Vancouver (n) • End of regular season Friday NY Islanders 3, Pittsburgh 1 Columbus 4, Buffalo 2

nhl leADerS Max Pacioretty

Montreal

80 37

Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia 75 28

Claude Giroux

Philadelphia80 48

Joe Pavelski

San Jose

81 37

Jonathan Toews

81 28

Anze Kopitar

Los Angeles 78 48

Tyler Seguin

Dallas

71 37

John Tavares

NY Islanders 81 37

Scoring

GP G

John Tavares, NYI

81 37 47 84

Sidney Crosby, Pit

76 28 56 84

Jamie Benn, Dal

81 32 51

83

Jakub Voracek, Phi

81 22 59

81

Vlad. Tarasenko

Blues

Alex Ovechkin, Was

80 52 28 80

Corey Perry

Anaheim

Tyler Seguin, Dal

81 32

Chicago

Michael Cammalleri New Jersey67 27

Joe Thornton

San Jose

Logan Couture

San Jose

81 27

Ondrej Palat

Tampa Bay 74 47

77 48

76 36

Scott Hartnell

Columbus

76 27

John Tavares

NY Islanders 81 47

66 33

Mike Hoffman

Ottawa

78 27

Mike Ribeiro

Nashville

81 46

71 37 40

77

Jamie Benn

Dallas

Jarome Iginla

Colorado

81 27

Keith Yandle

ARI-NYR

83 46

Nicklas Backstrom, Was81 18 59

77

Zach Parise

Minnesota 73 32

Patrick Kane

Chicago

61 27

Jiri Hudler

Calgary

78 45

Jiri Hudler, Cgy

78 31 45

76

Nick Foligno

Columbus

78 31

Gustav Nyquist

Detroit

81 27

Ryan Johansen

Columbus

81 45

Daniel Sedin, Van

81 19 55

74

Jiri Hudler

Calgary

78 31

James van Riemsdyk Toronto

81 27

Erik Karlsson

Ottawa

81 45

81 31

Assists

81 45

GP

Nick Foligno, Cls

78 31 42

73

Sean Monahan

Calgary

Jason Spezza

Dallas

Claude Giroux, Phi

80 25 48

73

Radim Vrbata

Vancouver 78 31

Name

A

P.K. Subban

Montreal

81 45

Steven Stamkos, TB

81 43 29

72

Tyler Johnson

Tampa Bay 76 29

Nicklas Backstrom Washington 81 59

Ryan Getzlaf

Anaheim

76 44

Tyler Johnson, TB

76 29 43

72

Tomas Tatar

Detroit

81 29

Jakub Voracek

Philadelphia 81 59

Brent Burns

San Jose

81 43

Jeff Carter

Los Angeles 81 28

Sidney Crosby

Pittsburgh 76 56

Tyler Johnson

Tampa Bay 76 43

Team

Goals

Team

Sidney Crosby

Pittsburgh 76 28

Daniel Sedin

Vancouver 81 55

Kris Letang

Pittsburgh 69 43

Alex Ovechkin

Washington 80 52

Nikita Kucherov

Tampa Bay 81 28

Henrik Sedin

Vancouver 81 53

Mark Streit

Philadelphia80 43

Steven Stamkos

Tampa Bay 81 43

Evgeni Malkin

Pittsburgh 68 28

Jamie Benn

Dallas

81 51

John Carlson

Washington 81 42

Rick Nash

NY Rangers 79 42

Jaden Schwartz

Blues

Henrik Zetterberg Detroit

77 49

Nick Foligno

Columbus

G

Boston 0 1 1 0 — 2 Tampa Bay 0 1 1 0 — 3 Tampa Bay won shootout 1-0 First period: None. Penalties: Nesterov, TB (holding), 2:40; McQuaid, Bos (illegal check to head minor), 13:13; Tampa Bay bench, served by Callahan (too many men), 15:39. Second period: 1, Tampa Bay, Marchessault 1, 5:08. 2, Boston, Eriksson 22 (Kelly, Seidenberg), 6:00. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Tampa Bay, Nesterov 3 (Carle, Marchessault), 5:12. 4, Boston, Marchand 24 (Krug, Krejci), 18:54. Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (tripping), 2:10; Lucic, Bos (roughing), 14:57; Witkowski, TB (roughing), 14:57. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Boston 0 (Bergeron NG, Krejci NG, Eriksson NG), Tampa Bay 1 (B.Morrow NG, Hedman G, Callahan NG). Shots: Boston 10-10-13-5: 38. Tampa Bay 6-11-7-1: 25. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Rask 34-21-13 (25 shots-23 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 40-13-5 (38-36). Referees: Steve Kozari, Chris Lee. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Brian Murphy. A: 0.

Detroit 1 0 1 — 2 Carolina 0 0 0 — 0 First period: 1, Detroit, Ferraro 1 (Glendening), :48. Penalties: None. Second period: None. Penalties: Tatar, Det (hooking), 19:01. Third period: 2, Detroit, Andersson 3 (Tatar, Helm), 17:40 (en). Penalties: Faulk, Car (slashing), 6:48; Kindl, Det (tripping), 14:47. Shots: Detroit 12-9-8: 29. Carolina 11-14-10: 35. Power-plays: Detroit 0 of 1; Carolina 0 of 2. Goalies: Detroit, Mrazek 16-9-2 (35 shots-35 saves). Carolina, Ward 22-24-5 (28-27). Referees: TJ Luxmore, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Brian Mach, Matt MacPherson. A: 16,680.

ASSoCIATeD PreSS

GP

Lightning 3, Bruins 2

Pittsburgh 0 1 1 — 2 Buffalo 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Crosby, Pit (roughing), 13:22; Lindback, Buf, served by Hodgson (roughing), 13:22. Second period: 1, Pittsburgh, Sutter 20 (Comeau, Spaling), 14:23. Penalties: None. Third period: 2, Pittsburgh, Sutter 21 (Winnik, Hornqvist), 8:26. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 14-16-8: 38. Buffalo 10-7-11: 28. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 0; Buffalo 0 of 0. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Fleury 34-20-9 (28 shots28 saves). Buffalo, Lindback 6-16-2 (38-36). Referees: Jean Hebert, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Scott Cherrey. A: 19,070.

Red Wings 2, Hurricanes 0

Penguins win, get last playof spot

A PTS

Penguins 2, Sabres 0

74 28

78 42

Ottawa 1 1 1 — 3 Philadelphia 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Ottawa, Stone 25 (MacArthur, Turris), 6:06 (pp). Penalties: Raffl, Phi (high-sticking), 5:14; Borowiecki, Ott (crosschecking), 14:29; Grossmann, Phi (holding), 18:24. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Read 8 (B.Schenn, Couturier), 1:23. 3, Ottawa, Pageau 10 (Lazar, Methot), 16:18. Penalties: Turris, Ott (holding), 5:06; B.Schenn, Phi (roughing), 14:06. Third period: 4, Ottawa, Stone 26, 11:49. Penalties: Akeson, Phi (holding), 16:52. Shots: Ottawa 5-8-9: 22. Philadelphia 14-16-5: 35. Power-plays: Ottawa 1 of 4; Philadelphia 0 of 2. Goalies: Ottawa, Hammond 20-1-2 (35 shots-34 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 18-18-11 (22-19). Referees: Francis Charron, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, David Brisebois. A: 17,027.

Jets 5, Flames 1 Calgary 1 0 0 — 1 Winnipeg 1 0 4 — 5 First period: 1, Calgary, Ferland 2 (Bennett), :33. 2, Winnipeg, Stafford 18 (Pardy), :48. Penalties: Kulak, Cal (hooking), 9:39. Second period: None. Penalties: Schlemko, Cal (high-sticking), 4:04; Jooris, Cal (interference), 13:56. Third period: 3, Winnipeg, Frolik 19 (Scheifele), :47. 4, Winnipeg, Stempniak 15 (Copp), 6:48. 5, Winnipeg, Lowry 11, 7:46. 6, Winnipeg, Halischuk 3 (Stempniak, Ellerby), 18:59. Penalties: Schlemko, Cal (hooking), 3:04; Enstrom, Wpg (interference), 3:46; Byfuglien, Wpg (slashing), 19:39. Shots: Calgary 8-10-7: 25. Winnipeg 10-5-7: 22. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 2; Winnipeg 0 of 4. Goalies: Calgary, Ortio 4-2-0 (22 shots-17 saves). Winnipeg, Hutchinson 21-10-5 (25-24). Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Derek Nansen, Mark Shewchyk. A: 15,016.

Stars 4, Predators 1 Nashville 1 0 0 — 1 Dallas 2 0 2 — 4 First period: 1, Dallas, Ja.Benn 33 (Eakin, Eaves), 7:35. 2, Nashville, Forsberg 26 (Ellis, Ribeiro), 11:33. 3, Dallas, Ja.Benn 34 (Klingberg), 13:33 (pp). Penalties: Stalberg, Nas (tripping), 13:29. Second period: None. Penalties: Demers, Dal (tripping), 5:38; Stalberg, Nas (highsticking), 19:24. Third period: 4, Dallas, Ja.Benn 35, 17:55 (en). 5, Dallas, Eakin 19 (Daley, Ja.Benn), 19:51. Penalties: Piskula, Nas (delay of game), 8:28; Spezza, Dal (slashing), 8:58. Shots: Nashville 7-11-7: 25. Dallas 9-8-8: 25. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 2; Dallas 1 of 3. Goalies: Nashville, Hutton 6-7-4 (24 shots-21 saves). Dallas, Enroth 18-26-2 (25-24). Referees: Gord Dwyer, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Pierre Racicot. A: 18,532.

Rangers 4, Capitals 2 N.Y. Rangers 2 1 1 — 4 Washington 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Hayes 17 (McDonagh, St. Louis), 12:36. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Brassard 19 (Hayes, Boyle), 15:50 (pp). Penalties: Green, Was (holding), 14:04. Second period: 3, N.Y. Rangers, D.Moore 10 (St. Louis), 2:30. 4, Washington, Ovechkin 53 (Carlson, Backstrom), 6:31 (pp). Penalties: Sheppard, NYR (tripping), 5:36. Third period: 5, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 6 (D.Moore, Glass), 18:06 (en). 6, Washington, Galiev 1 (M.Latta, Orpik), 19:31. Penalties: Ward, Was (elbowing), 1:25; Sheppard, NYR (roughing), 3:55; Gleason, Was (roughing), 3:55; Glass, NYR, major (fighting), 10:24; Gleason, Was, served by Burakovsky, minor-major (cross-checking, fighting), 10:24; Ovechkin, Was (high-sticking), 12:55; M.Latta, Was, misconduct, 19:31. Shots: N.Y. Rangers 9-10-15: 34. Washington 8-9-7: 24. Power-plays: N.Y. Rangers 1 of 4; Washington 1 of 1. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 30-13-3 (24 shots-22 saves). Washington, Holtby 41-20-10 (33-30). Referees: Marc Joannette, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Michel Cormier. A: 18,506.

Kings 4, Sharks 1 San Jose 1 0 0 — 1 Los Angeles 0 1 3 — 4 First period: 1, San Jose, Burns 17 (Pavelski, Thornton), 1:38 (pp). Penalties: Regehr, LA (interference), 1:25; Scott, SJ (boarding), 5:54; Martinez, LA (hooking), 8:33. Second period: 2, Los Angeles, Toffoli 23 (Stoll, Andreoff), 10:47. Penalties: M.Brown, SJ (roughing), 7:19; Clifford, LA (roughing), 7:19; D.Brown, LA (tripping), 11:36; Tierney, SJ (holding stick), 16:16. Third period: 3, Los Angeles, McNabb 2 (Doughty, Carter), 6:03. 4, Los Angeles, Gaborik 27 (Muzzin, Williams), 9:27. 5, Los Angeles, Andreoff 2 (Toffoli), 19:16 (en). Penalties: Dillon, SJ (hooking), 4:02. Shots: San Jose 8-8-5: 21. Los Angeles 8-11-17: 36. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 3; Los Angeles 0 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Stalock 8-9-2 (35 shots-32 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 36-22-13 (21-20). Referees: Dave Jackson, Francois St. Laurent. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Vaughan Rody. A: 18,230. (FRIDAY)

Islanders 3, Penguins 1 NY Islanders 1 0 2 — 3 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Cizikas 9 (Clutterbuck, Leddy), 8:00 (sh). Penalties: Hickey, NYI (slashing), 7:30. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Scuderi 1 (Crosby, P.Martin), 19:54. Penalties: Boulton, NYI (interference), 5:46; Downie, Pit (clipping), 14:39. Third period: 3, NY Islanders, Tavares 37 (Okposo, Strait), 2:46. 4, NY Islanders, Grabner 8 (Bailey), 16:20. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Islanders 5-8-13: 26. Pittsburgh 17-11-10: 38. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Pittsburgh 0 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Halak 38-17-3 (38 shots-37 saves). Pittsburgh, Fleury 33-20-9 (26-23). Referees: Jean Hebert, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Andy McElman. A: 18,673.

Blue Jackets 4, Sabres 2 Buffalo 1 1 0 — 2 Columbus 2 0 2 — 4 First period: 1, Columbus, N.Foligno 31 (Dubinsky, Savard), :14. 2, Buffalo, Grigorenko 3 (Gionta, M.Foligno), 2:25. 3, Columbus, Calvert 13 (Savard, J.Johnson), 9:35. Penalties: Bogosian, Buf (hooking), 12:58. Second period: 4, Buffalo, Gionta 13 (Ennis, Bogosian), 19:01 (pp). Penalties: Dubinsky, Clm (charging), 10:46; Johansen, Clm (tripping), 18:44. Third period: 5, Columbus, Atkinson 21 (Prout, Johansen), 10:35. 6, Columbus, Jenner 9 (Calvert, J.Johnson), 19:50 (en). Penalties: N.Foligno, Clm (kneeing), 8:10. Shots: Buffalo 10-7-8: 25. Columbus 17-13-10: 40. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 3; Columbus 0 of 1. Goalies: Buffalo, Lindback 6-15-2 (39 shots-36 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 30-17-3 (25-23). Referees: Ian Walsh, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Brian Mach, John Grandt. A: 17,855.

Calendar Wednesday: Stanley Cup playoffs begin. April 16-26: IIHF Under-18 World Championship, Zug and Lucerne, Switzerland May 1-17: IIHF World Championship, Prague and Ostrava, Czech Republic. June 17: Last possible day for Stanley Cup finals. June 26-27: NHL draft, Sunrise, Fla. July 1: Free agency begins.


NHL

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 3

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C9

BLUES NOTEBOOK

nhl SummArIeS

Goalie situation remains in lux Elliott wins in return, but it’s not known if he or Allen starts playofs By Tom TImmermAnn St. Louis Post-dispatch

Brian Elliott, who’s gone from No. 1 goalie to backup in about two weeks, showed he remains a viable option as the team’s playof goaltender. His coach agrees. Elliott stopped 23 of the 25 shots he faced in the Blues’ 4-2 regular-season ending win over Minnesota on Saturday afternoon at Scottrade Center. It looked as if he might pitch a shutout before Minnesota got a deflected goal with just over a minute to go in the second period, and then it looked as if the Blues might have their fourth straight game in which they allowed just one goal. That was before Minnesota scored on a sixon-four situation in the final minute. It was Elliott’s first start after three games of, the longest break he’s had when healthy this season. And the play of Jake Allen has made the rookie the assumed starter come playoff time. “I just tried to play my game,” Elliott said. “That’s all you can do. I tried to stop every shot out there. ... I just wanted to play a game and be the best I could for the guys.” Hitchcock said after the game, before it was known that the Blues’ playof opponent would be Minnesota rather than Winnipeg, that no decision had been made on who the Game 1 starter will be. He added that throughout the postseason, situations could determine who’s in goal. “I said this before,” Hitchcock said. “You’ve got one guy that’s got a heck of a season in Elliott and another guy that’s had a heck of a month in Allen. We’ve got no problems. “Whatever guy we go to, it might depend on the opponent. Elliott’s played well against ‘Minny,’ Jake’s played well against Winnipeg. We’ll see. But we’ll base it on what we think is best. But if we’ve got to change, we’ll change. We won’t hesitate.” Elliott finished the season with 26 wins, the second most in his career. He had 29 in 2009-10.

Blue Jackets 5, Islanders 4

Chris Lee • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Brian Elliott stops a shot by Minnesota’ Jason Pominville in the second period Saturday afternoon. Elliott stopped 23 of the Wild’s 25 shots.

noBoDy’S PerfeCT

Three Down

Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo was among the players that Hitchcock rested on Saturday, costing him his perfect attendance record. Pietrangelo hadn’t missed a game this season, and for the second straight year the final game of the season was the only one he missed. It’s the fourth straight season he’s missed just one game. With center David Backes, who had played 80 of the first 81 games, also getting the day off, it left Pietrangelo and forward Ryan Reaves as the team’s ironmen this year. Reaves also missed just one game, on Nov. 11 vs. Bufalo, after a puck hit on of his ankles in practice the day before. Of course, there’s a diference between the 81 games for Pietrangelo and Reaves’. Pietrangelo averaged 25 minutes, 24 seconds per game, while Reaves, playing on the fourth line, averaged 8:28. So while they played the same number of games, Pietrangelo played three times as many minutes. Going into the game, Pietrangelo was fifth in the league in minutes played. “Well, he’s a defenseman,” Reaves said.

With 3:06 to go in the game, the Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester was called for interference. One minute, six seconds later, Robert Bortuzzo was called for cross checking. Then Minnesota coach Mike Yeo pulled goalie Darcy Kuemper, meaning that for almost a minute, the Wild had a seldom-seen sixon-three advantage in skaters. The Blues, with Alexander Steen, Barret Jackman and Zbynek Michalek on the ice, killed the three-man disadvantage. But Minnesota scored during the subsequent six-on-four. Hitchcock second-guessed himself. “Probably looking back on it, I had the wrong players on the ice,” he said. “I was disappointed (when Minnesota scored), especially for Jackman and Michalek and Steen. They did such a great job. We screwed up coming out of the box and gave them a pretty easy opportunity. “That was disappointing. Those two defensemen especially did an unbelievable job in keeping the puck out of the net.” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

nhl STAnDInGS

Ryan Getzlaf and Jakob Silfverberg scored to lead Anaheim to a 2-1 victory Saturday on the road over Arizona on the final day of the NHL regular season, clinching the top seed in the Western Conference playofs for the Ducks. They set an NHL record with their 33rd one-goal victory, surpassing the previous mark of 32 set by New Jersey in 200607. They finished with 107 points, the same as the Blues, and got the top seed via tiebreaker — Anaheim had more victories in regulation or overtime. Pittsburgh in postseason • Brandon Sutter scored twice and Marc-Andre Fleury made 28 saves in visiting Pittsburgh’s playoffclinching 2-0 win over Buffalo. The Penguins snapped a 0-4-1 skid to secure the only playof spot left Saturday night, a wildcard slot in the Eastern Conference, and eliminated Boston from contention. Senators reach playoffs • Needing just one point to clinch a playof spot, Ottawa wrapped up its sizzling second-half rally with a 3-1 win earlier Saturday in Philadelphia as Mark Stone scored twice. The Senators were 23-4-4 in their final 31 games. Jets reach milestone • Former Blue Lee Stempniak had a goal and assist to help playof-bound Winnipeg set a franchise record for points in a 5-1 victory over visiting Calgary. The Jets finish with 99, two more than the Atlanta Thrashers had in 2006-’07. Scoring title to Benn • Jamie Benn had three goals and an assist to lift Dallas by visiting Nashville 4-1. He had 13 points in the final five games to finish with 87 to edge the Islanders’ John Tavares by one point for the NHL scoring title. He had 35 goals and 52 assists.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT y-Blues 82 51 24 7 x-Nashville 82 47 25 10 x-Chicago 82 48 28 6 x-Minnesota 82 46 28 8 x-Winnipeg 82 43 26 13 Dallas 82 41 31 10 Colorado 82 39 31 12 Paciic GP W L OT z-Anaheim 82 51 24 7 x-Vancouver 81 47 29 5 x-Calgary 82 45 30 7 Los Angeles 82 40 27 15 San Jose 82 40 33 9 Edmonton 81 24 44 13 Arizona 82 24 50 8 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT y-Montreal 82 50 22 10 x-Tampa Bay 82 50 24 8 x-Detroit 82 43 25 14 x-Ottawa 82 43 26 13 Boston 82 41 27 14 Florida 82 38 29 15 Toronto 82 30 44 8 Bufalo 82 23 51 8 Metropolitan GP W L OT z-NY Rangers 82 53 22 7 x-Washington 82 45 26 11 x-NY Islanders 82 47 28 7 x-Pittsburgh 82 43 27 12 Columbus 82 42 35 5 Philadelphia 82 33 31 18 New Jersey 82 32 36 14 Carolina 82 30 41 11

Pts 109 104 102 100 99 92 90 Pts 109 99 97 95 89 61 56

GF GA Home Away Div 248 201 27-12-2 24-12-5 17-11-1 232 208 28-9-4 19-16-6 15-9-5 229 189 24-12-5 24-16-1 15-14-0 231 201 22-13-6 24-15-2 17-8-4 230 210 23-13-5 20-13-8 16-8-5 261 260 17-16-8 24-15-2 8-14-7 219 227 23-15-3 16-16-9 14-12-4 GF GA Home Away Div 236 226 26-12-3 25-12-4 18-6-5 236 217 23-15-2 24-14-3 16-9-3 241 216 23-13-5 22-17-2 22-6-1 220 205 25-9-7 15-18-8 14-7-8 228 232 19-17-5 21-16-4 15-11-4 193 277 15-23-3 9-21-10 4-21-3 170 272 11-25-5 13-25-3 12-17-0

Pts 110 108 100 99 96 91 68 54 Pts 113 101 101 98 89 84 78 71

GF 221 262 235 238 213 206 211 161 GF 252 242 252 221 236 215 181 188

GA 189 211 221 215 211 223 262 274 GA 192 203 230 210 250 234 216 226

Home Away Div 26-9-6 24-13-4 18-9-3 32-8-1 18-16-7 21-5-4 22-10-9 21-15-5 10-12-8 23-13-5 20-13-8 17-9-4 24-10-7 17-17-7 15-9-6 21-13-7 17-16-8 16-9-5 22-17-2 8-27-6 13-13-4 14-22-5 9-29-3 10-16-4 Home Away Div 25-11-5 28-11-2 23-6-1 23-13-5 22-13-6 17-9-4 25-14-2 22-14-5 21-6-3 23-14-4 20-13-8 9-17-4 19-20-2 23-15-3 15-11-4 23-11-7 10-20-11 12-13-5 19-14-8 13-22-6 10-13-7 18-16-7 12-25-4 13-12-5

x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

Columbus 1 0 3 0 — 5 NY Islanders 0 1 3 0 — 4 Columbus won shootout 2-1 First period: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 22 (Jenner, Savard), 19:50 (pp). Penalties: Johnson, Clm (roughing), 5:12; Boulton, NYI, served by Tavares, double minor (roughing), 5:12; Johansen, Clm (roughing), 6:23; Clutterbuck, NYI (roughing), 6:23; Savard, Clm (roughing), 10:47; Hartnell, Clm (roughing), 14:43; Prout, Clm, major (fighting), 19:14; Boulton, NYI, major (fighting), 19:14; Cizikas, NYI (hooking), 19:38. Second period: 2, N.Y. Islanders, Okposo 18 (Bailey, Kulemin), 11:02. Penalties: Okposo, NYI (hooking), 4:05; Savard, Clm (crosschecking), 14:52. Third period: 3, N.Y. Islanders, Boulton 2 (Kennedy, Leddy), 2:52. 4, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 38 (Okposo, Leddy), 3:47. 5, Columbus, Dubinsky 13 (Connauton, Goloubef), 9:37. 6, Columbus, Wennberg 4 (Dano, Hartnell), 11:11. 7, N.Y. Islanders, Kulemin 15 (Tavares, Visnovsky), 15:36. 8, Columbus, Hartnell 28 (Anisimov, Johnson), 18:25. Penalties: Dubinsky, Clm (roughing), 4:21; Nelson, NYI (roughing), 4:21. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Columbus 2 (Letestu NG, Johansen NG, Wennberg G, Atkinson G), N.Y. Islanders 1 (Tavares G, Okposo NG, Kulemin NG, Clutterbuck NG). Shots: Columbus 10-10-12-5: 37. N.Y. Islanders 20-11-16-5: 52. Power-plays: Columbus 1 of 3; N.Y. Islanders 0 of 3. Goalies: Columbus, McElhinney 12-14-2 (52 shots-48 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 38-17-4 (37-33). Referees: Eric Furlatt, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Andy McElman. A: 16,170.

Panthers 3, Devils 2 New Jersey 0 1 1 — 2 Florida 0 1 2 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Fraser, NJ (cross-checking), 9:42. Second period: 1, New Jersey, Tootoo 10 (T.Zajac, Gelinas), 1:50. 2, Florida, Bolland 6 (Boyes, Jokinen), 11:08. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Florida, Huberdeau 15 (Jagr, Barkov), 7:59. 4, New Jersey, Severson 5 (Cammalleri, Harrold), 11:01. 5, Florida, Jagr 17 (Kulikov, Ekblad), 12:23 (pp). Penalties: Bolland, Fla (hooking), 9:23; Bernier, NJ, served by Ruutu, major-game misconduct (kneeing), 10:28; Henrique, NJ, minor-misconduct (tripping), 10:28; Petrovic, Fla, minor-misconduct (roughing), 10:28. Shots: New Jersey 5-14-14: 33. Florida 11-7-9: 27. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 1; Florida 1 of 3. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 26-31-9 (27 shots-24 saves). Florida, Montoya 6-7-2 (33-31). Referees: Rob Martell, Ghislain Hebert. Linesmen: Brad Lazarowich, Tim Nowak. A: 12,236.

Kings 4, Sharks 1 San Jose 1 0 0 — 1 Los Angeles 0 1 3 — 4 First period: 1, San Jose, Burns 17 (Pavelski, Thornton), 1:38 (pp). Penalties: Regehr, LA (interference), 1:25; Scott, SJ (boarding), 5:54; Martinez, LA (hooking), 8:33. Second period: 2, Los Angeles, Toffoli 23 (Stoll, Andreoff), 10:47. Penalties: M.Brown, SJ (roughing), 7:19; Clifford, LA (roughing), 7:19; D.Brown, LA (tripping), 11:36; Tierney, SJ (holding stick), 16:16. Third period: 3, Los Angeles, McNabb 2 (Doughty, Carter), 6:03. 4, Los Angeles, Gaborik 27 (Muzzin, Williams), 9:27. 5, Los Angeles, Andreoff 2 (Toffoli), 19:16 (en). Penalties: Dillon, SJ (hooking), 4:02. Shots: San Jose 8-8-5: 21. Los Angeles 8-11-17: 36. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 3; Los Angeles 0 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Stalock 8-9-2 (35 shots-32 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 36-22-13 (21-20). Referees: Dave Jackson, Francois St. Laurent. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Vaughan Rody. A: 18,230.

Senators 3, Flyers 1 Ottawa 1 1 1 — 3 Philadelphia 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Ottawa, Stone 25 (MacArthur, Turris), 6:06 (pp). Penalties: Raffl, Phi (high-sticking), 5:14; Borowiecki, Ott (crosschecking), 14:29; Grossmann, Phi (holding), 18:24. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Read 8 (B.Schenn, Couturier), 1:23. 3, Ottawa, Pageau 10 (Lazar, Methot), 16:18. Penalties: Turris, Ott (holding), 5:06; B.Schenn, Phi (roughing), 14:06. Third period: 4, Ottawa, Stone 26, 11:49. Penalties: Akeson, Phi (holding), 16:52. Shots: Ottawa 5-8-9: 22. Philadelphia 14-16-5: 35. Power-plays: Ottawa 1 of 4; Philadelphia 0 of 2. Goalies: Ottawa, Hammond 20-1-2 (35 shots-34 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 18-18-11 (22-19). Referees: Francis Charron, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, David Brisebois. A: 17,027.

Jets 5, Flames 1 Saturday Blues 4, Minnesota 2 Montreal 4, Toronto 3 (so) Columbus 5, N.Y. Islanders 4 (so) Ottawa 3, Philadelphia 1 NY Rangers 4, Washington 2 Winnipeg 5, Calgary 1 Los Angeles 4, San Jose 1 Pittsburgh 2, Buffalo 0 Florida 3, New Jersey 2 Detroit 2, Carolina 0 Tampa Bay 3, Boston 2 (so)

Calgary 1 0 0 — 1 Winnipeg 1 0 4 — 5 First period: 1, Calgary, Ferland 2 (Bennett), :33. 2, Winnipeg, Stafford 18 (Pardy), :48. Penalties: Kulak, Cal (hooking), 9:39. Second period: None. Penalties: Schlemko, Cal (high-sticking), 4:04; Jooris, Cal (interference), 13:56. Third period: 3, Winnipeg, Frolik 19 (Scheifele), :47. 4, Winnipeg, Stempniak 15 (Copp), 6:48. 5, Winnipeg, Lowry 11, 7:46. 6, Winnipeg, Halischuk 3 (Stempniak, Ellerby), 18:59. Penalties: Schlemko, Cal (hooking), 3:04; Enstrom, Wpg (interference), 3:46; Byfuglien, Wpg (slashing), 19:39. Shots: Calgary 8-10-7: 25. Winnipeg 10-5-7: 22. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 2; Winnipeg 0 of 4. Goalies: Calgary, Ortio 4-2-0 (22 shots-17 saves). Winnipeg, Hutchinson 21-10-5 (25-24). Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Derek Nansen, Mark Shewchyk. A: 15,016.

Dallas 4, Nashville 1 Colorado 3, Chicago 2 Anaheim 2, Arizona 1 Edmonton at Vancouver (n) • End of regular season Friday NY Islanders 3, Pittsburgh 1 Columbus 4, Buffalo 2

nhl leADerS Max Pacioretty

Montreal

80 37

Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia 75 28

Claude Giroux

Philadelphia80 48

Ducks 2, Coyotes 1

Joe Pavelski

San Jose

81 37

Jonathan Toews

81 28

Anze Kopitar

Los Angeles 78 48

Tyler Seguin

Dallas

71 37

John Tavares

NY Islanders 81 37

Anaheim 1 1 0 — 2 Arizona 0 0 1 — 1 First period: 1, Anaheim, Getzlaf 25 (Fleischmann, Perry), 5:41. Penalties: Fleischmann, Ana (roughing), 3:30; Murphy, Ari (high-sticking), 8:59; Murphy, Ari (tripping), 13:39; Getzlaf, Ana (hooking), 17:59. Second period: 2, Anaheim, Silfverberg 13 (Cogliano, Getzlaf), 19:23. Penalties: Dahlbeck, Ari (tripping), 13:01. Third period: 3, Arizona, Gagner 15 (Erat, Moss), 13:59. Penalties: Jackman, Ana (roughing), 2:57; Crombeen, Ari (roughing), 2:57; Getzlaf, Ana (tripping), 19:43. Shots: Anaheim 14-16-8: 38. Arizona 4-9-11: 24. Power-plays: Anaheim 0 of 3; Arizona 0 of 3. Goalies: Anaheim, Andersen 35-12-5 (24 shots-23 saves). Arizona, Smith 14-42-5 (38-36). Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Mike Leggo. Linesmen: Mike Cvik, Jay Sharrers. A: 15,733.

Scoring

GP G

John Tavares, NYI

81 37 47 84

Sidney Crosby, Pit

76 28 56 84

Jamie Benn, Dal

81 32 51

83

Jakub Voracek, Phi

81 22 59

81

Vlad. Tarasenko

Blues

Alex Ovechkin, Was

80 52 28 80

Corey Perry

Anaheim

Tyler Seguin, Dal

71 37 40

77

Jamie Benn

Dallas

81 32

Chicago

Michael Cammalleri New Jersey67 27

Joe Thornton

San Jose

Logan Couture

San Jose

81 27

Ondrej Palat

Tampa Bay 74 47

77 48

76 36

Scott Hartnell

Columbus

76 27

John Tavares

NY Islanders 81 47

66 33

Mike Hoffman

Ottawa

78 27

Mike Ribeiro

Nashville

81 46

Jarome Iginla

Colorado

81 27

Keith Yandle

ARI-NYR

83 46 78 45

Nicklas Backstrom, Was81 18 59

77

Zach Parise

Minnesota 73 32

Patrick Kane

Chicago

61 27

Jiri Hudler

Calgary

Jiri Hudler, Cgy

78 31 45

76

Nick Foligno

Columbus

78 31

Gustav Nyquist

Detroit

81 27

Ryan Johansen

Columbus

81 45

Daniel Sedin, Van

81 19 55

74

Jiri Hudler

Calgary

78 31

James van Riemsdyk Toronto

81 27

Erik Karlsson

Ottawa

81 45

Nick Foligno, Cls

78 31 42

73

Sean Monahan

Calgary

81 31

Assists

Jason Spezza

Dallas

81 45

Claude Giroux, Phi

80 25 48

73

Radim Vrbata

Vancouver 78 31

Name

A

P.K. Subban

Montreal

81 45

Team

GP

Steven Stamkos, TB

81 43 29

72

Tyler Johnson

Tampa Bay 76 29

Nicklas Backstrom Washington 81 59

Ryan Getzlaf

Anaheim

76 44

Tyler Johnson, TB

76 29 43

72

Tomas Tatar

Detroit

81 29

Jakub Voracek

Philadelphia 81 59

Brent Burns

San Jose

81 43

Jeff Carter

Los Angeles 81 28

Sidney Crosby

Pittsburgh 76 56

Tyler Johnson

Tampa Bay 76 43

Goals

Team

Sidney Crosby

Pittsburgh 76 28

Daniel Sedin

Vancouver 81 55

Kris Letang

Pittsburgh 69 43

Alex Ovechkin

Washington 80 52

Nikita Kucherov

Tampa Bay 81 28

Henrik Sedin

Vancouver 81 53

Mark Streit

Philadelphia80 43

Steven Stamkos

Tampa Bay 81 43

Evgeni Malkin

Pittsburgh 68 28

Jamie Benn

Dallas

81 51

John Carlson

Washington 81 42

Rick Nash

NY Rangers 79 42

Jaden Schwartz

Blues

Henrik Zetterberg Detroit

77 49

Nick Foligno

Columbus

G

Boston 0 1 1 0 — 2 Tampa Bay 0 1 1 0 — 3 Tampa Bay won shootout 1-0 First period: None. Penalties: Nesterov, TB (holding), 2:40; McQuaid, Bos (illegal check to head minor), 13:13; Tampa Bay bench, served by Callahan (too many men), 15:39. Second period: 1, Tampa Bay, Marchessault 1, 5:08. 2, Boston, Eriksson 22 (Kelly, Seidenberg), 6:00. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Tampa Bay, Nesterov 3 (Carle, Marchessault), 5:12. 4, Boston, Marchand 24 (Krug, Krejci), 18:54. Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (tripping), 2:10; Lucic, Bos (roughing), 14:57; Witkowski, TB (roughing), 14:57. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Boston 0 (Bergeron NG, Krejci NG, Eriksson NG), Tampa Bay 1 (B.Morrow NG, Hedman G, Callahan NG). Shots: Boston 10-10-13-5: 38. Tampa Bay 6-11-7-1: 25. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Rask 34-21-13 (25 shots-23 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 40-13-5 (38-36). Referees: Steve Kozari, Chris Lee. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Brian Murphy. A: 0.

Detroit 1 0 1 — 2 Carolina 0 0 0 — 0 First period: 1, Detroit, Ferraro 1 (Glendening), :48. Penalties: None. Second period: None. Penalties: Tatar, Det (hooking), 19:01. Third period: 2, Detroit, Andersson 3 (Tatar, Helm), 17:40 (en). Penalties: Faulk, Car (slashing), 6:48; Kindl, Det (tripping), 14:47. Shots: Detroit 12-9-8: 29. Carolina 11-14-10: 35. Power-plays: Detroit 0 of 1; Carolina 0 of 2. Goalies: Detroit, Mrazek 16-9-2 (35 shots-35 saves). Carolina, Ward 22-24-5 (28-27). Referees: TJ Luxmore, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Brian Mach, Matt MacPherson. A: 16,680.

ASSoCIATeD PreSS

GP

Lightning 3, Bruins 2

Pittsburgh 0 1 1 — 2 Buffalo 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Crosby, Pit (roughing), 13:22; Lindback, Buf, served by Hodgson (roughing), 13:22. Second period: 1, Pittsburgh, Sutter 20 (Comeau, Spaling), 14:23. Penalties: None. Third period: 2, Pittsburgh, Sutter 21 (Winnik, Hornqvist), 8:26. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 14-16-8: 38. Buffalo 10-7-11: 28. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 0; Buffalo 0 of 0. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Fleury 34-20-9 (28 shots28 saves). Buffalo, Lindback 6-16-2 (38-36). Referees: Jean Hebert, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Scott Cherrey. A: 19,070.

Red Wings 2, Hurricanes 0

Ducks get top seed; Pens make playofs

A PTS

Penguins 2, Sabres 0

74 28

78 42

Stars 4, Predators 1 Nashville 1 0 0 — 1 Dallas 2 0 2 — 4 First period: 1, Dallas, Ja.Benn 33 (Eakin, Eaves), 7:35. 2, Nashville, Forsberg 26 (Ellis, Ribeiro), 11:33. 3, Dallas, Ja.Benn 34 (Klingberg), 13:33 (pp). Penalties: Stalberg, Nas (tripping), 13:29. Second period: None. Penalties: Demers, Dal (tripping), 5:38; Stalberg, Nas (highsticking), 19:24. Third period: 4, Dallas, Ja.Benn 35, 17:55 (en). 5, Dallas, Eakin 19 (Daley, Ja.Benn), 19:51. Penalties: Piskula, Nas (delay of game), 8:28; Spezza, Dal (slashing), 8:58. Shots: Nashville 7-11-7: 25. Dallas 9-8-8: 25. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 2; Dallas 1 of 3. Goalies: Nashville, Hutton 6-7-4 (24 shots-21 saves). Dallas, Enroth 18-26-2 (25-24). Referees: Gord Dwyer, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Pierre Racicot. A: 18,532.

Avalanche 3, Blackhawks 2 Chicago 0 1 1 — 2 Colorado 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Colorado, McLeod 7 (Barrie, Hishon), 10:01. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Chicago, Sharp 16 (Bickell, Paliotta), 8:03. 3, Colorado, Iginla 28 (Redmond, Duchene), 14:21 (pp). Penalties: Bickell, Chi (hooking), 13:55. Third period: 4, Chicago, Saad 23 (Hossa, Rozsival), 15:20. 5, Colorado, Iginla 29 (Tanguay, Landeskog), 19:26 (pp). Penalties: Shaw, Chi (roughing), 10:27; McLeod, Col (roughing), 10:27; Kruger, Chi (tripping), 17:59. Shots: Chicago 6-14-10: 30. Colorado 7-8-9: 24. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 0; Colorado 2 of 2. Goalies: Chicago, Darling 9-4-0 (24 shots-21 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 28-20-8 (30-28). Referees: Tom Kowal, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Don Henderson, Ryan Galloway. A: 18,049.

Rangers 4, Capitals 2 N.Y. Rangers 2 1 1 — 4 Washington 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Hayes 17 (McDonagh, St. Louis), 12:36. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Brassard 19 (Hayes, Boyle), 15:50 (pp). Penalties: Green, Was (holding), 14:04. Second period: 3, N.Y. Rangers, D.Moore 10 (St. Louis), 2:30. 4, Washington, Ovechkin 53 (Carlson, Backstrom), 6:31 (pp). Penalties: Sheppard, NYR (tripping), 5:36. Third period: 5, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 6 (D.Moore, Glass), 18:06 (en). 6, Washington, Galiev 1 (M.Latta, Orpik), 19:31. Penalties: Ward, Was (elbowing), 1:25; Sheppard, NYR (roughing), 3:55; Gleason, Was (roughing), 3:55; Glass, NYR, major (fighting), 10:24; Gleason, Was, served by Burakovsky, minor-major (cross-checking, fighting), 10:24; Ovechkin, Was (high-sticking), 12:55; M.Latta, Was, misconduct, 19:31. Shots: N.Y. Rangers 9-10-15: 34. Washington 8-9-7: 24. Power-plays: N.Y. Rangers 1 of 4; Washington 1 of 1. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 30-13-3 (24 shots-22 saves). Washington, Holtby 41-20-10 (33-30). Referees: Marc Joannette, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Michel Cormier. A: 18,506.

Canadiens 4, Maple Leafs 3 Montreal 1 2 0 0 — 4 Toronto 2 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Kessel 25 (Bozak, MacWilliam), 3:58. 2, Montreal, Desharnais 14, 4:14. 3, Toronto, Bailey 1 (Phaneuf, Holland), 14:04. Penalties: Galchenyuk, Mon (hooking), 18:39. Second period: 4, Montreal, Plekanec 26 (Markov, Smith-Pelly), :59. 5, Toronto, Bozak 23 (van Riemsdyk, Kessel), 5:11. 6, Montreal, De La Rose 4, 19:51. Penalties: Emelin, Mon (holding), 5:40; Bailey, Tor (interference), 8:13; Emelin, Mon (clipping), 17:36; Brewer, Tor, served by Sill (roughing), 17:36. Third period: None. Penalties: Petry, Mon (slashing), 3:40; Phaneuf, Tor (crosschecking), 3:40; van Riemsdyk, Tor (crosschecking), 3:40; Gardiner, Tor (hooking), 7:34; Weise, Mon (high-sticking), 13:38. Overtime: None. Penalties: Subban, Mon (high-sticking), :30; Markov, Mon, game misconduct, 4:22; Parenteau, Mon, game misconduct, 4:22; Subban, Mon (slashing), 4:56. Shootout: Montreal 2 (Galchenyuk G, Desharnais G), Toronto 0 (Bozak NG, Lupul NG). Shots: Montreal 6-10-13-4: 33. Toronto 6-6-8-2: 22. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 3; Toronto 0 of 5. Goalies: Montreal, Price 44-16-6 (22 shots-19 saves). Toronto, Bernier 21-28-7 (33-30). Referees: Greg Kimmerly, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, John Grandt. A: 19,308. (FRIDAY)

Islanders 3, Penguins 1 NY Islanders 1 0 2 — 3 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Cizikas 9 (Clutterbuck, Leddy), 8:00 (sh). Penalties: Hickey, NYI (slashing), 7:30. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Scuderi 1 (Crosby, P.Martin), 19:54. Penalties: Boulton, NYI (interference), 5:46; Downie, Pit (clipping), 14:39. Third period: 3, NY Islanders, Tavares 37 (Okposo, Strait), 2:46. 4, NY Islanders, Grabner 8 (Bailey), 16:20. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Islanders 5-8-13: 26. Pittsburgh 17-11-10: 38. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Pittsburgh 0 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Halak 38-17-3 (38 shots-37 saves). Pittsburgh, Fleury 33-20-9 (26-23). Referees: Jean Hebert, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Andy McElman. A: 18,673.

Blue Jackets 4, Sabres 2 Buffalo 1 1 0 — 2 Columbus 2 0 2 — 4 First period: 1, Columbus, N.Foligno 31 (Dubinsky, Savard), :14. 2, Buffalo, Grigorenko 3 (Gionta, M.Foligno), 2:25. 3, Columbus, Calvert 13 (Savard, J.Johnson), 9:35. Penalties: Bogosian, Buf (hooking), 12:58. Second period: 4, Buffalo, Gionta 13 (Ennis, Bogosian), 19:01 (pp). Penalties: Dubinsky, Clm (charging), 10:46; Johansen, Clm (tripping), 18:44. Third period: 5, Columbus, Atkinson 21 (Prout, Johansen), 10:35. 6, Columbus, Jenner 9 (Calvert, J.Johnson), 19:50 (en). Penalties: N.Foligno, Clm (kneeing), 8:10. Shots: Buffalo 10-7-8: 25. Columbus 17-13-10: 40. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 3; Columbus 0 of 1. Goalies: Buffalo, Lindback 6-15-2 (39 shots-36 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 30-17-3 (25-23). Referees: Ian Walsh, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Brian Mach, John Grandt. A: 17,855.

Calendar Wednesday: Stanley Cup playoffs begin. April 16-26: IIHF Under-18 World Championship, Zug and Lucerne, Switzerland May 1-17: IIHF World Championship, Prague and Ostrava, Czech Republic. June 17: Last possible day for Stanley Cup finals. June 26-27: NHL draft, Sunrise, Fla. July 1: Free agency begins.


nhL

04.12.2015 • Sunday • M 4

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C9

BLUES NOTEBOOK

nhl SummArIeS

Goalie situation remains in lux Elliott wins in return, but it’s not known if he or Allen starts playofs By Tom TImmermAnn St. Louis Post-dispatch

Penguins 2, Sabres 0

Lightning 3, Bruins 2

Pittsburgh 0 1 1 — 2 Buffalo 0 0 0 — 0 First period: None. Penalties: Crosby, Pit (roughing), 13:22; Lindback, Buf, served by Hodgson (roughing), 13:22. Second period: 1, Pittsburgh, Sutter 20 (Comeau, Spaling), 14:23. Penalties: None. Third period: 2, Pittsburgh, Sutter 21 (Winnik, Hornqvist), 8:26. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 14-16-8: 38. Buffalo 10-7-11: 28. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 0; Buffalo 0 of 0. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Fleury 34-20-9 (28 shots28 saves). Buffalo, Lindback 6-16-2 (38-36). Referees: Jean Hebert, Ian Walsh. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Scott Cherrey. A: 19,070.

Boston 0 1 1 0 — 2 Tampa Bay 0 1 1 0 — 3 Tampa Bay won shootout 1-0 First period: None. Penalties: Nesterov, TB (holding), 2:40; McQuaid, Bos (illegal check to head minor), 13:13; Tampa Bay bench, served by Callahan (too many men), 15:39. Second period: 1, Tampa Bay, Marchessault 1, 5:08. 2, Boston, Eriksson 22 (Kelly, Seidenberg), 6:00. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Tampa Bay, Nesterov 3 (Carle, Marchessault), 5:12. 4, Boston, Marchand 24 (Krug, Krejci), 18:54. Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (tripping), 2:10; Lucic, Bos (roughing), 14:57; Witkowski, TB (roughing), 14:57. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Boston 0 (Bergeron NG, Krejci NG, Eriksson NG), Tampa Bay 1 (B.Morrow NG, Hedman G, Callahan NG). Shots: Boston 10-10-13-5: 38. Tampa Bay 6-11-7-1: 25. Power-plays: Boston 0 of 3; Tampa Bay 0 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Rask 34-21-13 (25 shots-23 saves). Tampa Bay, Bishop 40-13-5 (38-36). Referees: Steve Kozari, Chris Lee. Linesmen: Steve Miller, Brian Murphy. A: 0.

Red Wings 2, Hurricanes 0

Brian Elliott, who’s gone from No. 1 goalie to backup in about two weeks, showed he remains a viable option as the team’s playof goaltender. His coach agrees. Elliott stopped 23 of the 25 shots he faced in the Blues’ 4-2 regular-season ending win over Minnesota on Saturday afternoon at Scottrade Center. It looked as if he might pitch a shutout before Minnesota got a deflected goal with just over a minute to go in the second period, and then it looked as if the Blues might have their fourth straight game in which they allowed just one goal. That was before Minnesota scored on a sixon-four situation in the final minute. It was Elliott’s first start after three games of, the longest break he’s had when healthy this season. And the play of Jake Allen has made the rookie the assumed starter come playoff time. “I just tried to play my game,” Elliott said. “That’s all you can do. I tried to stop every shot out there. ... I just wanted to play a game and be the best I could for the guys.” Hitchcock said after the game, before it was known that the Blues’ playof opponent would be Minnesota rather than Winnipeg, that no decision had been made on who the Game 1 starter will be. He added that throughout the postseason, situations could determine who’s in goal. “I said this before,” Hitchcock said. “You’ve got one guy that’s got a heck of a season in Elliott and another guy that’s had a heck of a month in Allen. We’ve got no problems. “Whatever guy we go to, it might depend on the opponent. Elliott’s played well against ‘Minny,’ Jake’s played well against Winnipeg. We’ll see. But we’ll base it on what we think is best. But if we’ve got to change, we’ll change. We won’t hesitate.” Elliott finished the season with 26 wins, the second most in his career. He had 29 in 2009-10.

Detroit 1 0 1 — 2 Carolina 0 0 0 — 0 First period: 1, Detroit, Ferraro 1 (Glendening), :48. Penalties: None. Second period: None. Penalties: Tatar, Det (hooking), 19:01. Third period: 2, Detroit, Andersson 3 (Tatar, Helm), 17:40 (en). Penalties: Faulk, Car (slashing), 6:48; Kindl, Det (tripping), 14:47. Shots: Detroit 12-9-8: 29. Carolina 11-14-10: 35. Power-plays: Detroit 0 of 1; Carolina 0 of 2. Goalies: Detroit, Mrazek 16-9-2 (35 shots-35 saves). Carolina, Ward 22-24-5 (28-27). Referees: TJ Luxmore, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Brian Mach, Matt MacPherson. A: 16,680.

Blue Jackets 5, Islanders 4

Chris Lee • clee@post-dispatch.com

Blues goalie Brian Elliott stops a shot by Minnesota’ Jason Pominville in the second period Saturday afternoon. Elliott stopped 23 of the Wild’s 25 shots.

noBoDy’S PerfeCT

Three Down

Defenseman Alex Pietrangelo was among the players that Hitchcock rested on Saturday, costing him his perfect attendance record. Pietrangelo hadn’t missed a game this season, and for the second straight year the final game of the season was the only one he missed. It’s the fourth straight season he’s missed just one game. With center David Backes, who had played 80 of the first 81 games, also getting the day off, it left Pietrangelo and forward Ryan Reaves as the team’s ironmen this year. Reaves also missed just one game, on Nov. 11 vs. Bufalo, after a puck hit on of his ankles in practice the day before. Of course, there’s a diference between the 81 games for Pietrangelo and Reaves’. Pietrangelo averaged 25 minutes, 24 seconds per game, while Reaves, playing on the fourth line, averaged 8:28. So while they played the same number of games, Pietrangelo played three times as many minutes. Going into the game, Pietrangelo was fifth in the league in minutes played. “Well, he’s a defenseman,” Reaves said.

With 3:06 to go in the game, the Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester was called for interference. One minute, six seconds later, Robert Bortuzzo was called for cross checking. Then Minnesota coach Mike Yeo pulled goalie Darcy Kuemper, meaning that for almost a minute, the Wild had a seldom-seen sixon-three advantage in skaters. The Blues, with Alexander Steen, Barret Jackman and Zbynek Michalek on the ice, killed the three-man disadvantage. But Minnesota scored during the subsequent six-on-four. Hitchcock second-guessed himself. “Probably looking back on it, I had the wrong players on the ice,” he said. “I was disappointed (when Minnesota scored), especially for Jackman and Michalek and Steen. They did such a great job. We screwed up coming out of the box and gave them a pretty easy opportunity. “That was disappointing. Those two defensemen especially did an unbelievable job in keeping the puck out of the net.”

Ducks get top seed; Pens make playofs

Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT y-Blues 82 51 24 7 x-Nashville 82 47 25 10 x-Chicago 82 48 28 6 x-Minnesota 82 46 28 8 x-Winnipeg 82 43 26 13 Dallas 82 41 31 10 Colorado 82 39 31 12 Paciic GP W L OT z-Anaheim 82 51 24 7 x-Vancouver 82 48 29 5 x-Calgary 82 45 30 7 Los Angeles 82 40 27 15 San Jose 82 40 33 9 Edmonton 82 24 44 14 Arizona 82 24 50 8 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT y-Montreal 82 50 22 10 x-Tampa Bay 82 50 24 8 x-Detroit 82 43 25 14 x-Ottawa 82 43 26 13 Boston 82 41 27 14 Florida 82 38 29 15 Toronto 82 30 44 8 Bufalo 82 23 51 8 Metropolitan GP W L OT z-NY Rangers 82 53 22 7 x-Washington 82 45 26 11 x-NY Islanders 82 47 28 7 x-Pittsburgh 82 43 27 12 Columbus 82 42 35 5 Philadelphia 82 33 31 18 New Jersey 82 32 36 14 Carolina 82 30 41 11

Ryan Getzlaf and Jakob Silfverberg scored to lead Anaheim to a 2-1 victory Saturday on the road over Arizona on the final day of the NHL regular season, clinching the top seed in the Western Conference playofs for the Ducks. They set an NHL record with their 33rd one-goal victory, surpassing the previous mark of 32 set by New Jersey in 200607. They finished with 107 points, the same as the Blues, and got the top seed via tiebreaker — Anaheim had more victories in regulation or overtime. Pittsburgh in postseason • Brandon Sutter scored twice and Marc-Andre Fleury made 28 saves in visiting Pittsburgh’s playoffclinching 2-0 win over Buffalo. The Penguins snapped a 0-4-1 skid to secure the only playof spot left Saturday night, a wildcard slot in the Eastern Conference, and eliminated Boston from contention. Senators reach playoffs • Needing just one point to clinch a playof spot, Ottawa wrapped up its sizzling second-half rally with a 3-1 win earlier Saturday in Philadelphia as Mark Stone scored twice. The Senators were 23-4-4 in their final 31 games. Jets reach milestone • Former Blue Lee Stempniak had a goal and assist to help playof-bound Winnipeg set a franchise record for points in a 5-1 victory over visiting Calgary. The Jets finish with 99, two more than the Atlanta Thrashers had in 2006-’07.

Pts 109 104 102 100 99 92 90 Pts 109 101 97 95 89 62 56 Pts 110 108 100 99 96 91 68 54 Pts 113 101 101 98 89 84 78 71

GF GA Home Away Div 248 201 27-12-2 24-12-5 17-11-1 232 208 28-9-4 19-16-6 15-9-5 229 189 24-12-5 24-16-1 15-14-0 231 201 22-13-6 24-15-2 17-8-4 230 210 23-13-5 20-13-8 16-8-5 261 260 17-16-8 24-15-2 8-14-7 219 227 23-15-3 16-16-9 14-12-4 GF GA Home Away Div 236 226 26-12-3 25-12-4 18-6-5 242 212 24-15-2 24-14-3 17-9-3 241 216 23-13-5 22-17-2 22-6-1 220 205 25-9-7 15-18-8 14-7-8 228 232 19-17-5 21-16-4 15-11-4 198 283 15-23-3 9-21-11 4-21-4 170 272 11-25-5 13-25-3 12-17-0 GF 221 262 235 238 213 206 211 161 GF 252 242 252 221 236 215 181 188

GA 189 211 221 215 211 223 262 274 GA 192 203 230 210 250 234 216 226

Home Away Div 26-9-6 24-13-4 18-9-3 32-8-1 18-16-7 21-5-4 22-10-9 21-15-5 10-12-8 23-13-5 20-13-8 17-9-4 24-10-7 17-17-7 15-9-6 21-13-7 17-16-8 16-9-5 22-17-2 8-27-6 13-13-4 14-22-5 9-29-3 10-16-4 Home Away Div 25-11-5 28-11-2 23-6-1 23-13-5 22-13-6 17-9-4 25-14-2 22-14-5 21-6-3 23-14-4 20-13-8 9-17-4 19-20-2 23-15-3 15-11-4 23-11-7 10-20-11 12-13-5 19-14-8 13-22-6 10-13-7 18-16-7 12-25-4 13-12-5

x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Saturday Blues 4, Minnesota 2 Montreal 4, Toronto 3 (so) Columbus 5, N.Y. Islanders 4 (so) Ottawa 3, Philadelphia 1 NY Rangers 4, Washington 2 Winnipeg 5, Calgary 1 Los Angeles 4, San Jose 1 Pittsburgh 2, Buffalo 0 Florida 3, New Jersey 2 Detroit 2, Carolina 0 Tampa Bay 3, Boston 2 (so)

Scoring title to Benn • Jamie Benn had three goals and an assist to lift Dallas by visiting Nashville 4-1. He had 13 points in the final five games to finish with 87 to edge the Islanders’ John Tavares by one point for the NHL scoring title. He had 35 goals and 52 assists.

Panthers 3, Devils 2 New Jersey 0 1 1 — 2 Florida 0 1 2 — 3 First period: None. Penalties: Fraser, NJ (cross-checking), 9:42. Second period: 1, New Jersey, Tootoo 10 (T.Zajac, Gelinas), 1:50. 2, Florida, Bolland 6 (Boyes, Jokinen), 11:08. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Florida, Huberdeau 15 (Jagr, Barkov), 7:59. 4, New Jersey, Severson 5 (Cammalleri, Harrold), 11:01. 5, Florida, Jagr 17 (Kulikov, Ekblad), 12:23 (pp). Penalties: Bolland, Fla (hooking), 9:23; Bernier, NJ, served by Ruutu, major-game misconduct (kneeing), 10:28; Henrique, NJ, minor-misconduct (tripping), 10:28; Petrovic, Fla, minor-misconduct (roughing), 10:28. Shots: New Jersey 5-14-14: 33. Florida 11-7-9: 27. Power-plays: New Jersey 0 of 1; Florida 1 of 3. Goalies: New Jersey, Schneider 26-31-9 (27 shots-24 saves). Florida, Montoya 6-7-2 (33-31). Referees: Rob Martell, Ghislain Hebert. Linesmen: Brad Lazarowich, Tim Nowak. A: 12,236.

Kings 4, Sharks 1

nhl STAnDInGS

ASSoCIATeD PreSS

Columbus 1 0 3 0 — 5 NY Islanders 0 1 3 0 — 4 Columbus won shootout 2-1 First period: 1, Columbus, Atkinson 22 (Jenner, Savard), 19:50 (pp). Penalties: Johnson, Clm (roughing), 5:12; Boulton, NYI, served by Tavares, double minor (roughing), 5:12; Johansen, Clm (roughing), 6:23; Clutterbuck, NYI (roughing), 6:23; Savard, Clm (roughing), 10:47; Hartnell, Clm (roughing), 14:43; Prout, Clm, major (fighting), 19:14; Boulton, NYI, major (fighting), 19:14; Cizikas, NYI (hooking), 19:38. Second period: 2, N.Y. Islanders, Okposo 18 (Bailey, Kulemin), 11:02. Penalties: Okposo, NYI (hooking), 4:05; Savard, Clm (crosschecking), 14:52. Third period: 3, N.Y. Islanders, Boulton 2 (Kennedy, Leddy), 2:52. 4, N.Y. Islanders, Tavares 38 (Okposo, Leddy), 3:47. 5, Columbus, Dubinsky 13 (Connauton, Goloubef), 9:37. 6, Columbus, Wennberg 4 (Dano, Hartnell), 11:11. 7, N.Y. Islanders, Kulemin 15 (Tavares, Visnovsky), 15:36. 8, Columbus, Hartnell 28 (Anisimov, Johnson), 18:25. Penalties: Dubinsky, Clm (roughing), 4:21; Nelson, NYI (roughing), 4:21. Overtime: None. Penalties: None. Shootout: Columbus 2 (Letestu NG, Johansen NG, Wennberg G, Atkinson G), N.Y. Islanders 1 (Tavares G, Okposo NG, Kulemin NG, Clutterbuck NG). Shots: Columbus 10-10-12-5: 37. N.Y. Islanders 20-11-16-5: 52. Power-plays: Columbus 1 of 3; N.Y. Islanders 0 of 3. Goalies: Columbus, McElhinney 12-14-2 (52 shots-48 saves). N.Y. Islanders, Halak 38-17-4 (37-33). Referees: Eric Furlatt, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Andy McElman. A: 16,170.

Dallas 4, Nashville 1 Colorado 3, Chicago 2 Anaheim 2, Arizona 1 Vancouver 6, Edmonton 5 (ot) • End of regular season Friday NY Islanders 3, Pittsburgh 1 Columbus 4, Buffalo 2

San Jose 1 0 0 — 1 Los Angeles 0 1 3 — 4 First period: 1, San Jose, Burns 17 (Pavelski, Thornton), 1:38 (pp). Penalties: Regehr, LA (interference), 1:25; Scott, SJ (boarding), 5:54; Martinez, LA (hooking), 8:33. Second period: 2, Los Angeles, Toffoli 23 (Stoll, Andreoff), 10:47. Penalties: M.Brown, SJ (roughing), 7:19; Clifford, LA (roughing), 7:19; D.Brown, LA (tripping), 11:36; Tierney, SJ (holding stick), 16:16. Third period: 3, Los Angeles, McNabb 2 (Doughty, Carter), 6:03. 4, Los Angeles, Gaborik 27 (Muzzin, Williams), 9:27. 5, Los Angeles, Andreoff 2 (Toffoli), 19:16 (en). Penalties: Dillon, SJ (hooking), 4:02. Shots: San Jose 8-8-5: 21. Los Angeles 8-11-17: 36. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 3; Los Angeles 0 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Stalock 8-9-2 (35 shots-32 saves). Los Angeles, Quick 36-22-13 (21-20). Referees: Dave Jackson, Francois St. Laurent. Linesmen: Shane Heyer, Vaughan Rody. A: 18,230.

Senators 3, Flyers 1 Ottawa 1 1 1 — 3 Philadelphia 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Ottawa, Stone 25 (MacArthur, Turris), 6:06 (pp). Penalties: Raffl, Phi (high-sticking), 5:14; Borowiecki, Ott (crosschecking), 14:29; Grossmann, Phi (holding), 18:24. Second period: 2, Philadelphia, Read 8 (B.Schenn, Couturier), 1:23. 3, Ottawa, Pageau 10 (Lazar, Methot), 16:18. Penalties: Turris, Ott (holding), 5:06; B.Schenn, Phi (roughing), 14:06. Third period: 4, Ottawa, Stone 26, 11:49. Penalties: Akeson, Phi (holding), 16:52. Shots: Ottawa 5-8-9: 22. Philadelphia 14-16-5: 35. Power-plays: Ottawa 1 of 4; Philadelphia 0 of 2. Goalies: Ottawa, Hammond 20-1-2 (35 shots-34 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 18-18-11 (22-19). Referees: Francis Charron, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, David Brisebois. A: 17,027.

Ducks 2, Coyotes 1 Anaheim 1 1 0 — 2 Arizona 0 0 1 — 1 First period: 1, Anaheim, Getzlaf 25 (Fleischmann, Perry), 5:41. Penalties: Fleischmann, Ana (roughing), 3:30; Murphy, Ari (high-sticking), 8:59; Murphy, Ari (tripping), 13:39; Getzlaf, Ana (hooking), 17:59. Second period: 2, Anaheim, Silfverberg 13 (Cogliano, Getzlaf), 19:23. Penalties: Dahlbeck, Ari (tripping), 13:01. Third period: 3, Arizona, Gagner 15 (Erat, Moss), 13:59. Penalties: Jackman, Ana (roughing), 2:57; Crombeen, Ari (roughing), 2:57; Getzlaf, Ana (tripping), 19:43. Shots: Anaheim 14-16-8: 38. Arizona 4-9-11: 24. Power-plays: Anaheim 0 of 3; Arizona 0 of 3. Goalies: Anaheim, Andersen 35-12-5 (24 shots-23 saves). Arizona, Smith 14-42-5 (38-36). Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Mike Leggo. Linesmen: Mike Cvik, Jay Sharrers. A: 15,733.

Canadiens 4, Maple Leafs 3

nhl playoff matchups • full schedule released sunday Blues vs. Minnesota Nashville vs. Chicago

WESTERN CONFERENCE Anaheim vs. Winnipeg Vancouver vs. Calgary

Montreal vs. Ottawa Tampa Bay vs. Detroit

EASTERN CONFERENCE N.Y. Rangers vs. Pittsburgh Washington vs. N.Y. Islanders

nhl leADerS Scoring

GP G

John Tavares, NYI

81 37 47 84

A PTS

Sidney Crosby, Pit

76 28 56 84

Jamie Benn, Dal

81 32 51

83

Goals

Team

Jakub Voracek, Phi

81 22 59

81

Alex Ovechkin

Washington 80 52

Alex Ovechkin, Was

80 52 28 80

Steven Stamkos

Tyler Seguin, Dal

71 37 40

77

Rick Nash

Nicklas Backstrom, Was81 18 59

77

Jiri Hudler, Cgy

78 31 45

76

Daniel Sedin, Van

81 19 55

Nick Foligno, Cls Claude Giroux, Phi * Through Friday

Steven Stamkos, TB

81 43 29

72

Corey Perry

Anaheim

66 33

Evgeni Malkin

Pittsburgh 68 28

Tyler Johnson, TB

76 29 43

72

Jamie Benn

Dallas

81 32

Jaden Schwartz

Blues

Zach Parise

Minnesota 73 32

Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia 75 28

Nick Foligno

Columbus

78 31

Jonathan Toews

Jiri Hudler

Calgary

78 31

Michael Cammalleri New Jersey67 27

Tampa Bay 81 43

Sean Monahan

Calgary

81 31

Logan Couture

San Jose

81 27

NY Rangers 79 42

Radim Vrbata

Vancouver 78 31

Scott Hartnell

Columbus

76 27

Max Pacioretty

Montreal

80 37

Tyler Johnson

Tampa Bay 76 29

Mike Hoffman

Ottawa

78 27

Joe Pavelski

San Jose

81 37

Tomas Tatar

Detroit

Jarome Iginla

Colorado

81 27

74

Tyler Seguin

Dallas

71 37

Jeff Carter

Los Angeles 81 28

Patrick Kane

Chicago

61 27

78 31 42

73

John Tavares

NY Islanders 81 37

Sidney Crosby

Pittsburgh 76 28

Gustav Nyquist

Detroit

80 25 48

73

Vlad. Tarasenko

Blues

Nikita Kucherov

Tampa Bay 81 28

James van Riemsdyk Toronto

GP

G

76 36

81 29

Chicago

74 28 81 28

81 27 81 27

Montreal 1 2 0 0 — 4 Toronto 2 1 0 0 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Kessel 25 (Bozak, MacWilliam), 3:58. 2, Montreal, Desharnais 14, 4:14. 3, Toronto, Bailey 1 (Phaneuf, Holland), 14:04. Penalties: Galchenyuk, Mon (hooking), 18:39. Second period: 4, Montreal, Plekanec 26 (Markov, Smith-Pelly), :59. 5, Toronto, Bozak 23 (van Riemsdyk, Kessel), 5:11. 6, Montreal, De La Rose 4, 19:51. Penalties: Emelin, Mon (holding), 5:40; Bailey, Tor (interference), 8:13; Emelin, Mon (clipping), 17:36; Brewer, Tor, served by Sill (roughing), 17:36. Third period: None. Penalties: Petry, Mon (slashing), 3:40; Phaneuf, Tor (crosschecking), 3:40; van Riemsdyk, Tor (crosschecking), 3:40; Gardiner, Tor (hooking), 7:34; Weise, Mon (high-sticking), 13:38. Overtime: None. Penalties: Subban, Mon (high-sticking), :30; Markov, Mon, game misconduct, 4:22; Parenteau, Mon, game misconduct, 4:22; Subban, Mon (slashing), 4:56. Shootout: Montreal 2 (Galchenyuk G, Desharnais G), Toronto 0 (Bozak NG, Lupul NG). Shots: Montreal 6-10-13-4: 33. Toronto 6-6-8-2: 22. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 3; Toronto 0 of 5. Goalies: Montreal, Price 44-16-6 (22 shots-19 saves). Toronto, Bernier 21-28-7 (33-30). Referees: Greg Kimmerly, Kevin Pollock. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, John Grandt. A: 19,308.

Stars 4, Predators 1 Nashville 1 0 0 — 1 Dallas 2 0 2 — 4 First period: 1, Dallas, Ja.Benn 33 (Eakin, Eaves), 7:35. 2, Nashville, Forsberg 26 (Ellis, Ribeiro), 11:33. 3, Dallas, Ja.Benn 34 (Klingberg), 13:33 (pp). Penalties: Stalberg, Nas (tripping), 13:29. Second period: None. Penalties: Demers, Dal (tripping), 5:38; Stalberg, Nas (highsticking), 19:24. Third period: 4, Dallas, Ja.Benn 35, 17:55 (en). 5, Dallas, Eakin 19 (Daley, Ja.Benn), 19:51. Penalties: Piskula, Nas (delay of game), 8:28; Spezza, Dal (slashing), 8:58. Shots: Nashville 7-11-7: 25. Dallas 9-8-8: 25. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 2; Dallas 1 of 3. Goalies: Nashville, Hutton 6-7-4 (24 shots-21 saves). Dallas, Enroth 18-26-2 (25-24). Referees: Gord Dwyer, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Darren Gibbs, Pierre Racicot. A: 18,532.

Avalanche 3, Blackhawks 2 Chicago 0 1 1 — 2 Colorado 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Colorado, McLeod 7 (Barrie, Hishon), 10:01. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Chicago, Sharp 16 (Bickell, Paliotta), 8:03. 3, Colorado, Iginla 28 (Redmond, Duchene), 14:21 (pp). Penalties: Bickell, Chi (hooking), 13:55. Third period: 4, Chicago, Saad 23 (Hossa, Rozsival), 15:20. 5, Colorado, Iginla 29 (Tanguay, Landeskog), 19:26 (pp). Penalties: Shaw, Chi (roughing), 10:27; McLeod, Col (roughing), 10:27; Kruger, Chi (tripping), 17:59. Shots: Chicago 6-14-10: 30. Colorado 7-8-9: 24. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 0; Colorado 2 of 2. Goalies: Chicago, Darling 9-4-0 (24 shots-21 saves). Colorado, Varlamov 28-20-8 (30-28). Referees: Tom Kowal, Brian Pochmara. Linesmen: Don Henderson, Ryan Galloway. A: 18,049.

Rangers 4, Capitals 2 N.Y. Rangers 2 1 1 — 4 Washington 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, N.Y. Rangers, Hayes 17 (McDonagh, St. Louis), 12:36. 2, N.Y. Rangers, Brassard 19 (Hayes, Boyle), 15:50 (pp). Penalties: Green, Was (holding), 14:04. Second period: 3, N.Y. Rangers, D.Moore 10 (St. Louis), 2:30. 4, Washington, Ovechkin 53 (Carlson, Backstrom), 6:31 (pp). Penalties: Sheppard, NYR (tripping), 5:36. Third period: 5, N.Y. Rangers, Fast 6 (D.Moore, Glass), 18:06 (en). 6, Washington, Galiev 1 (M.Latta, Orpik), 19:31. Penalties: Ward, Was (elbowing), 1:25; Sheppard, NYR (roughing), 3:55; Gleason, Was (roughing), 3:55; Glass, NYR, major (fighting), 10:24; Gleason, Was, served by Burakovsky, minor-major (cross-checking, fighting), 10:24; Ovechkin, Was (high-sticking), 12:55; M.Latta, Was, misconduct, 19:31. Shots: N.Y. Rangers 9-10-15: 34. Washington 8-9-7: 24. Power-plays: N.Y. Rangers 1 of 4; Washington 1 of 1. Goalies: N.Y. Rangers, Lundqvist 30-13-3 (24 shots-22 saves). Washington, Holtby 41-20-10 (33-30). Referees: Marc Joannette, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Michel Cormier. A: 18,506.

Jets 5, Flames 1 Calgary 1 0 0 — 1 Winnipeg 1 0 4 — 5 First period: 1, Calgary, Ferland 2 (Bennett), :33. 2, Winnipeg, Stafford 18 (Pardy), :48. Penalties: Kulak, Cal (hooking), 9:39. Second period: None. Penalties: Schlemko, Cal (high-sticking), 4:04; Jooris, Cal (interference), 13:56. Third period: 3, Winnipeg, Frolik 19 (Scheifele), :47. 4, Winnipeg, Stempniak 15 (Copp), 6:48. 5, Winnipeg, Lowry 11, 7:46. 6, Winnipeg, Halischuk 3 (Stempniak, Ellerby), 18:59. Penalties: Schlemko, Cal (hooking), 3:04; Enstrom, Wpg (interference), 3:46; Byfuglien, Wpg (slashing), 19:39. Shots: Calgary 8-10-7: 25. Winnipeg 10-5-7: 22. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 2; Winnipeg 0 of 4. Goalies: Calgary, Ortio 4-2-0 (22 shots-17 saves). Winnipeg, Hutchinson 21-10-5 (25-24). Referees: Dan O’Halloran, Chris Rooney. Linesmen: Derek Nansen, Mark Shewchyk. A: 15,016.

Canucks 6, Oilers 5 Edmonton 2 3 0 0 — 5 Vancouver 1 2 2 1 — 6 First period: 1, Edmonton, Yakupov 14 (D.Roy), 9:45. 2, Edmonton, Eberle 24 (Pouliot), 9:56. 3, Vancouver, D.Sedin 20 (Edler, H.Sedin), 13:10. Penalties: D.Roy, Edm (hooking), 11:00; Lander, Edm (tripping), 16:26. Second period: 4, Vancouver, Bieksa 4 (Vey, McMillan), 2:15. 5, Edmonton, Hall 14 (Pouliot, Klefbom), 3:44. 6, Edmonton, Pouliot 19 (Marincin, Hall), 7:47. 7, Vancouver, Baertschi 1 (Vrbata), 8:01. 8, Edmonton, Purcell 12 (Musil), 19:30. Penalties: Stanton, Van (hooking), 4:54; Musil, Edm (interference), 19:50. Third period: 9, Vancouver, Hansen 16 (Horvat, Edler), 5:56. 10, Vancouver, Baertschi 2 (Bonino, Vrbata), 9:53. Penalties: None. Overtime: 11, Vancouver, Edler 8 (D.Sedin, H.Sedin), 2:29. Penalties: None. Shots: Edmonton 10-10-5-3: 28. Vancouver 6-9-7-1: 23. Power-plays: Edmonton 0 of 1; Vancouver 0 of 3. Goalies: Edmonton, Scrivens 15-26-11 (23 shots-17 saves). Vancouver, R.Miller 29-15-1 (28-23). Referees: Brad Meier, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Mark Wheler. A: 18,870. (FRIDAY)

Islanders 3, Penguins 1 NY Islanders 1 0 2 — 3 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, NY Islanders, Cizikas 9 (Clutterbuck, Leddy), 8:00 (sh). Penalties: Hickey, NYI (slashing), 7:30. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Scuderi 1 (Crosby, P.Martin), 19:54. Penalties: Boulton, NYI (interference), 5:46; Downie, Pit (clipping), 14:39. Third period: 3, NY Islanders, Tavares 37 (Okposo, Strait), 2:46. 4, NY Islanders, Grabner 8 (Bailey), 16:20. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Islanders 5-8-13: 26. Pittsburgh 17-11-10: 38. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 1; Pittsburgh 0 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Halak 38-17-3 (38 shots-37 saves). Pittsburgh, Fleury 33-20-9 (26-23). Referees: Jean Hebert, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Andy McElman. A: 18,673.

Blue Jackets 4, Sabres 2 Buffalo 1 1 0 — 2 Columbus 2 0 2 — 4 First period: 1, Columbus, N.Foligno 31 (Dubinsky, Savard), :14. 2, Buffalo, Grigorenko 3 (Gionta, M.Foligno), 2:25. 3, Columbus, Calvert 13 (Savard, J.Johnson), 9:35. Penalties: Bogosian, Buf (hooking), 12:58. Second period: 4, Buffalo, Gionta 13 (Ennis, Bogosian), 19:01 (pp). Penalties: Dubinsky, Clm (charging), 10:46; Johansen, Clm (tripping), 18:44. Third period: 5, Columbus, Atkinson 21 (Prout, Johansen), 10:35. 6, Columbus, Jenner 9 (Calvert, J.Johnson), 19:50 (en). Penalties: N.Foligno, Clm (kneeing), 8:10. Shots: Buffalo 10-7-8: 25. Columbus 17-13-10: 40. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 3; Columbus 0 of 1. Goalies: Buffalo, Lindback 6-15-2 (39 shots-36 saves). Columbus, Bobrovsky 30-17-3 (25-23). Referees: Ian Walsh, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Brian Mach, John Grandt. A: 17,855.


spOrts

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Divided loyalty in NCAA hockey inal Boston U. coach wants to spoil night for friends and fans back in Providence ASSoCiAted PreSS

BOSTON • Boston University

coach David Quinn has a chance to become a hero on campus and a pariah at the country club all at the same time. The Rhode Island native and former BU player will be on the bench when the Terriers face Providence in the NCAA hockey championship Saturday night. It would be BU’s sixth men’s hockey title; Providence is look-

ing for its first. “I know it’s been a long time coming for Providence. It’s been a great program for a long time,” Quinn said Friday, a day after the Terriers advanced to the title game with a 5-3 victory over North Dakota in the Frozen Four semifinals. “I’m happy for the team. I’m happy for the school. But I will be happier to beat them.” Quinn’s divided loyalty is symbolic of the local flavor at this year’s Frozen Four, where two Hockey East teams about an hour’s drive apart will compete for the national championship at Boston’s TD Garden. With Hobey Baker Award win-

CyCLiNg

AMeriCA’S LiNe

Tour of Basque Country

BASEBALL Favorite Odds Underdog Red Sox ..................-$118 ................YANKEES WHITE SOX.............-$175 ..................... Twins A’S...........................-$150 ................Mariners INDIANS .................-$108.....................Tigers ORIOLES.................-$115.................Blue Jays RANGERS ...............-$145 .................... Astros ANGELS ..................-$155 ....................Royals REDS.......................-$125 ..................... Cards Nationals................-$115.................PHILLIES BRAVES ..................-$125 .......................Mets BREWERS...............-$110 ................... Pirates ROCKIES.................-$120 .......................Cubs Dodgers..................-$195 .................D’BACKS Giants.....................-$110 ..................PADRES MARLINS................-$127 .......................Rays NBA Favorite Points Underdog MAGIC.......................9.5 ...................... Knicks HEAT.........................2.5 ....................Raptors BULLS......................13.5........................76ers CLIPPERS .................7.5....................Grizzlies BLAZERS ................... 8............................Jazz WARRIORS ............... 20................... T’Wolves NHL Favorite Odds Underdog Senators...........-$140/+$120 .............FLYERS CAPITALS .................NL.................... Rangers KINGS ...............-$140/+$120 ..............Sharks JETS..................-$125/+$105..............Flames Penguins ..................NL.....................SABRES PANTHERS .......-$165/+$145 ...............Devils Canadiens ........-$185/+$165...MAPLE LEAFS Red Wings .........-$120/even.....HURRICANES ISLANDERS ..............NL............. Blue Jackets LIGHTNING...............NL....................... Bruins BLUES...............-$160/+$140 ..................Wild STARS...............-$130/+$110......... Predators Ducks................-$245/+$205..........COYOTES Blackhawks...... -$135/+$115......AVALANCHE CANUCKS..................NL........................ Oilers NCAA Championship In Boston BOSTON U ........-$185/+$165....... Providence Home team in CAPS © 2015 Benjamin Eckstein

Friday | In Aia, Spain Stage 5: 96.6 miles from Eibar to Aia 1. Mikel Landa, Astana, 4:06:01 2. Tim Wellens, Lotto Soudal, :03 3. Tom Danielson, Cannon-Garmin, :16 4. Rein Taaramae, Astana, :28 5. Tony Gallopin, Lotto Soudal, :38 6. Simon Yates, Orica GreenEdge, :53 7. Sergio Luis Henao, Sky, :56 8. Joaquim Rodriguez, Katusha, same 9. Tom Jelte Slagter, Cannon-Garmin, 1:05 10. Alexis Vuillermoz, AG2R, 1:06 11. Michal Kwiatkowski, Etixx, 1:08 12. Simon Spilak, Katusha, st 13. Nairo Quintana, Movistar, st 14. Michele Scarponi, Astana, 1:11 15. Ilnur Zakarin, Katusha, 1:14 16. Ion Izagirre, Movistar, st 17. Thibaut Pinot, FDJ, st 18. Rui Costa, Lampre-Merida, st 19. Tejay Van Garderen, BMC, 1:22 20. Rafal Majka, Tinkoff-Saxo, st 21. Samuel Sanchez, BMC, 1:26 22. Darwin Atapuma, BMC, 1:37 23. Romain Hardy, Cofidis, 1:44 24. David Lopez, Sky, 1:51 25. Daniel Moreno, Katusha, 1:58 Other riders 26. Jean-Christophe Peraud, AG2R, 2:07 27. Bauke Mollema, Trek, 2:11 38. Luis Leon Sanchez, Astana, 2:59 39. Esteban Chaves, Orica, st 40. Philippe Gilbert, BMC, 3:05

GENERAL CLASSIFICATION 1. Sergio Luis Henao, Sky, 9:20:48 2. Joaquim Rodriguez, Katusha, st 3. Simon Yates, Orica GreenEdge, :07 4. Nairo Quintana, Movistar, :12 5. Michele Scarponi, Astana, :22 6. Simon Spilak, Katusha, st 7. Ilnur Zakarin, Katusha, :28 8. Ion Izagirre, Movistar, :36 9. Tejay Van Garderen, BMC, :36 10. Thibaut Pinot, FDJ, st 11. Michal Kwiatkowski, Etixx, :42 12. Rui Costa, Lampre-Merida, :44 13. Rafal Majka, Tinkoff-Saxo, :56 14. Samuel Sanchez, BMC, 1:00 15. Bauke Mollema, Trek, 1:25 16. Alexis Vuillermoz, AG2R, 1:28 17. Daniel Moreno, Katusha, 1:59 18. Darwin Atapuma, BMC, 2:26 19. Jean-Christophe Peraud, AG2R, 2:32 20. David Lopez, Sky, 3:19 21. Luis Leon Sanchez, Astana, 3:22 22. Esteban Chaves, Orica, 4:09 23. Mikel Landa, Astana, 4:12 24. Jan Polanc, Lampre-Merida, 4:41 25. Rudy Molard, Cofidis, 5:48 Other riders 26. Philippe Gilbert, BMC, 6:09 27. Davide Formolo, Cannon-Garmin, 6:23 30. Tony Gallopin, Lotto Soudal, 9:07 32. Tom Danielson, Cannon-Garmin, 11:50 34. Tom Dumoulin, Giant-Alpecin, 12:14

SATURDAY’S STAGE • Aia - 18.3 km (11.4 mi.) ITT The final stage is not your usual time trial. It begins with a 10km descent before the riders climb to Aia, twice. The first climb is 3.5km with an average grade of 8.7%, with parts hitting 20%. The descent is fast and technical. The last climb uses the same route the riders saw on stage 5. The climb begins with 1.7km remaining and goes up in 3 brutal 500m steps: 12%, 15% and 17%. Some sections will kick up to near 25%. The final 200 meters to the line are pretty much flat and straight. Climbing specialists who descend well should pick up time on the leaders.

trANSACtioNS BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE: Traded C Brian Ward and RHP Ryan Webb to the L.A. Dodgers for RHP Ben Rowen and C Chris O’Brien. BOSTON: Sent RHP Koji Uehara to Greenville (SAL) for a rehab assignment. CLEVELAND: Transferred RHP Josh Tomlin to the 60-day DL. Optioned RHP Austin Adams to Columbus (IL). Selected the contract of 1B/OF Jerry Sands from Columbus. DETROIT: Placed RHP Joe Nathan on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Recalled LHP Blaine Hardy from Toledo (IL). KANSAS CITY: Sent RHP Luke Hochevar to Omaha (PCL) for a rehab assignment. TAMPA BAY: Placed C John Jaso on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Recalled OF Mikie Mahtook from Durham (IL). Agreed to terms with 2B Alexi Casilla on a minor league contract. TEXAS: Sent RHP Tanner Scheppers to Frisco (TL) for a rehab assignment. TORONTO: Sent OF Michael Saunders to Dunedin (FSL) for a rehab assignment. National League CHICAGO: Placed RHP Justin Grimm on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 2. Recalled RHP Brian Schlitter from Iowa (PCL). COLORADO: Sent LHP Jorge De La Rosa to Albuquerque (PCL) for a rehab assignment. LOS ANGELES: Agreed to terms with RHPs Scott Baker and Jorge De Leon and C Matt Koch on minor league contracts. PHILADELPHIA: Agreed to terms with RHP Adam Reifer on a minor league contract. Sent OF Domonic Brown to Clearwater (FSL) and RHP Chad Billingsley to Lehigh Valley (IL) for rehab assignments. PITTSBURGH: Sent OF Jaff Decker to Indianapolis (IL) and C Chris Stewart to Altoona (EL) for rehab assignments. SAN DIEGO: Placed RHP Ian Kennedy on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of LHP Chris Rearick from El Paso (PCL). Recalled RHP Brandon Maurer from El Paso. Optioned RHP Nick Vincent to El Paso. Transferred LHP Cory Luebke from the 15-day to the 60-day DL. WASHINGTON: Sent OF Jayson Werth to Potomac (Carolina) for a rehab assignment. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL: Suspended N.Y. Giants LB Victor Butler four games for violating the league’s policy on performance enhancing substances. MIAMI: Agree to terms with OL Mike Pouncey on a multi-year contract extension. NEW ORLEANS: Signed DE Anthony Spencer. PITTSBURGH: Announced the retirement of S Troy Polamalu. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL: Fined Chicago F Andrew Shaw $2,000 for diving/embellishment. ARIZONA: Signed F Ryan MacInnis to a three-year contract. BUFFALO: Recalled D Chad Ruhwedel from Rochester (AHL). DETROIT: Recalled D Alexey Marchenko from Grand Rapids (AHL). NEW JERSEY: Assigned D Raman Hrabarenka and Seth Helgeson to Albany (AHL). PITTSBURGH: Assigned G Eric Hartzell from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton (AHL) to Wheeling (ECHL). WASHINGTON: Recalled G Brandon Anderson from Tulsa (ECHL) to Hershey (AHL). WINNIPEG: Recalled G Connor Hellebuyck from St. John’s (AHL). COLLEGE ALABAMA: Announced men’s basketball G Ricky Tarrant will transfer. BUFFALO: Promoted men’s assistant basketball coach Nate Oats to interim head coach. DUKE: Announced C Jahlil Okafor will enter the NBA draft. HAWAII: Named Eran Ganot men’s basketball coach. ILLINOIS: Named Ryan Cubit quarterbacks coach and recruiting coordinator. KENTUCKY: Announced C Dakari Johnson, Gs Devin Booker and Aaron and Andrew Harrison and Fs Willie Cauley-Stein, KarlAnthony Towns and Trey Lyles will enter the NBA draft. MICHIGAN: Announced graduate QB Jake Rudock is transferring from Iowa. WASHINGTON: Announced men’s basketball Gs Nigel Williams-Goss and Dustin Johnson and C Gilles Dierickx will transfer. WEST ALABAMA: Named Lamont Seward associate head football coach, passing game coordinator and wide receivers coach. WISCONSIN: Announced F Sam Dekker will enter the NBA draft and men’s hockey F Morgan Zulinick is leaving school at the end of the semester.

teNNiS

job from Jack Parker when he retired after 40 years in 2013. The Terriers went 10-21-4 in his first season. A year later, they have a chance at the national championship. But to get it, the native of Cranston, R.I., and member of the Wannamoisett Country Club in East Providence will have to go through the Friars. “I’ve been engaged in a lot of fun text exchanges since last night,” Quinn said, adding that he couldn’t share any without cleaning up the language. “A lot of guys loved me going into last night’s game and a lot of them don’t like me now.”

road in the fall. The 4-1 loss to BU on Oct. 31 dropped the Friars to 1-3-1. “They took it to us that first night. But the second night we rebounded, and that’s been our philosophy all year,” Providence forward Shane Luke said. “We’re a pretty tight-knit group. When things don’t go the right way, you have to stick together. This year we had a lot of ups and downs, and during the times we were down we came together.” For the Terriers, the rebound has been two years in the making. A BU player from 1984-88 and an assistant on the BU team that won the school’s last title, in 2009, Quinn took over the BU

ner Jack Eichel, a freshman who led the nation in scoring, BU (287-5) finished atop the conference in the regular season and won its postseason tournament; Providence (25-13-2) finished second before losing in the quarterfinals and waiting for an invitation to the NCAAs. “We felt like we had a second life,” Providence coach Nate Leaman said. “We had a near miss. I think it was probably a good thing for us, because it increased our level of desperation, it brought us together, I think, as a group, and we’ve been playing our best hockey.” The teams met twice in the season — each winning on the

FAirMouNt PArk

hOckey • BlueS STaTiSTicS Scoring

gp

g

a

p

+/-

pim

pp

sh

gw

s

Vladimir Tarasenko

76

36

35

71

25

31

8

0

6

260

Jaden Schwartz

74

28

35 63

14

16

8

0

4

183

Alexander Steen

73

24

38 62

6

33

8

0

5

221

David Backes

80

26

32 58

7

104

10

0

3

183

T.J. Oshie

72

19

36 55

17

51

3

0

4

162

Paul Stastny

73

16

30 46

6

40

7

0

7

143 195

Alex Pietrangelo

81

7

39 46

-2

28

1

0

2

Kevin Shattenkirk

56

8

36 44

19

52

4

0

1

135

Jori Lehtera

74

12

30 42

19

46

1

1

1

102

14 26

Patrik Berglund

76

12

Dmitrij Jaskin

53

12

5

-3

26

0

0

0

145

17

6

12

3

0

4

107 85

Barret Jackman

79

2

13

15

4

47

0

0

1

Jay Bouwmeester

71

2

11

13

7

22

0

0

0

91

Steve Ott

78

3

9

12

-8

86

0

0

0

49

Ryan Reaves

80

6

6

12

-3

116

0

0

1

55

Carl Gunnarsson

60

2

10

12

7

2

0

0

0

54 52

Chris Butler

32

3

5

8

5

23

0

1

0

Zbynek Michalek

14

2

2

4

3

6

0

0

0

16

Marcel Goc

30

1

2

3

-1

4

0

0

0

33

Petteri Lindbohm

32

23

2

1

3

-1

26

0

0

0

Olli Jokinen

7

1

1

2

2

0

0

0

1

16

Chris Porter

23

1

1

2

-3

6

0

0

1

22

Robert Bortuzzo

12

1

1

2

-2

23

0

0

0

18

Ty Rattie

10

0

2

2

1

2

0

0

0

6

Magnus Paajarvi

10

0

1

1

-2

6

0

0

0

9

1

0

0

0

-1

0

0

0

0

1

Goaltending

gp

min

gaa

w

l

ot

so

sa

Brian Elliott

45 2486 2.27 25

14

3

5 1125

94

.916

Jake Allen

37 2077 2.28 22

7

4

4 909

79

.913

Colin Fraser

ga sv%

• Assists: Elliott 3, Allen 2.

Motor SPortS

U.S. Men’s Clay Court Friday | In Houston Purse: $549,230 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles quarterfinals Kevin Anderson def. Jeremy Chardy, 7-5, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (3). Jack Sock def. Santiago Giraldo, 6-4, 6-4. Fernando Verdasco def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, 6-2, 6-3.

Family Circle Cup Friday | In Charleston, S.C. Purse: $731,000 (Premier) Surface: Green Clay-Outdoor Singles quarterfinals Madison Keys (7) def. Lauren Davis, 6-2, 6-2. Lucie Hradecka, def. Sara Errani (4), 6-2, 6-4. Andrea Petkovic (3) def. Danka Kovinic, 2-6, 6-3, 6-1. Angelique Kerber (5) def. Irina-Camelia Begu (13), 7-6 (3), 7-6 (4).

Katowice Open Friday | In Katowice, Poland Purse: $250,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles quarterfinals Anna Karolina Schmiedlova (8) def. Alize Cornet (2), 6-2, 6-0. Alison Van Uytvanck def. Kirsten Flipkens (7), 6-2, 6-4. Camila Giorgi (3) def. Elizaveta Kulichkova, 6-3, 6-4. Agnieszka Radwanska (1) def. Klara Koukalova, 6-1, 6-1. Doubles semifinal Gioia Barbieri and Karin Knapp def. Lyudmyla and Nadiya Kichenok (3), 6-3, 6-1

Grand Prix Hassan II Friday | In Casablanca, Morocco Purse: $542,075 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles quarterfinals Jiri Vesely (3) def. Aljaz Bedene, 6-1, 6-4. Daniel Gimeno-Traver def. Lamine Ouahab, 6-4, 6-3. Martin Klizan (2) def. Nicolas Almagro, 6-4, 7-6 (3). Damir Dzumhur def. Andreas HaiderMaurer (6), 6-3, 6-3. Doubles semifinals Rohan Bopanna and Florin Mergea (1) def. Pablo Andujar and Oliver Marach, 5-7, 6-3, 10-8. Rameez Junaid and Adil Shamasdin def. Lamine Ouahab and Younes Rachidi, 6-1, 7-5.

Duck Commander 500 lineup

O’Reilly Auto Parts 300

Friday qualifying | In Fort Worth, Texas Series: Sprint Cup Race: Saturday Track: Texas Motor Speedway Lap length: 1.5 miles • Car number in parentheses 1. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 193.847 mph 2. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 193.722 3. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 193.195 4. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 192.933 5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 192.424 6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 192.369 7. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 192.253 8. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 192.109 9. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 192.048 10. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 191.721 11. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 191.489 12. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 189.547 13. (21) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 192.273 14. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 192.267 15. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 192.232 16. (19) Carl Edwards, Toyota, 191.973 17. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 191.918 18. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 191.884 19. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 191.768 20. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 191.421 21. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 191.096 22. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 190.88 23. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 190.523 24. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 190.483 25. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevy, 192.068 26. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevy, 191.966 27. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 191.639 28. (46) Michael Annett, Chevrolet, 191.53 29. (9) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 191.483 30. (18) David Ragan, Toyota, 191.455 31. (35) Cole Whitt, Ford, 191.367 32. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 191.34 33. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 191.34 34. (7) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 191.245 35. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, 190.988 36. (55) Brett Moffitt, Toyota, 190.894 37. (32) Mike Bliss, Ford, owner pts 38. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, owner pts 39. (95) Michael McDowell, Ford, owner pts 40. (34) Chris Buescher, Ford, owner pts 41. (23) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, owner pts 42. (83) Matt DiBenedetto, Toyota, own. pts 43. (33) Alex Kennedy, Chevrolet, owner pts

Friday | In Fort WorthTexas Series: Xfinity Track: Texas Motor Speedway Lap length: 1.5 miles Reason out: (c) crash (e) engine (t) transmission (v) vibration driver

car

laps

pts

money

1. (1)

(sp)

Erik Jones

(T)

200

0

$88,579

2. (2)

Brad Keselowski

(F)

200

0

$57,338

3. (5)

Dale Earnhardt Jr.

(C)

200

0

$46,614

4. (6)

Regan Smith

(C)

200

40

$45,220

5. (3)

Austin Dillon

(C)

200

0

$33,945

6. (8)

Darrell Wallace Jr.

(F)

200

39

$39,631

7. (11)

Denny Hamlin

(T)

200

0

$27,864

8. (9)

Chase Elliott

(C)

200

36

$33,478

9. (10)

Chris Buescher

(F)

200

35

$32,186

10. (7)

Brian Scott

(C)

200

35

$32,521

11. (13) Elliott Sadler

(F)

200

33

$31,319

12. (16) Ty Dillon

(C)

200

32

$31,068

13. (22) Brennan Poole

(C)

200

31

$30,815

14. (17) Sam Hornish Jr.

(F)

200

0

$24,452

15. (14) Ryan Reed

(F)

200

29

$30,739

16. (18) Dakoda Armstrong

(F)

200

29

$29,927

17. (15)

John Wes Townley

(C)

200

0

$29,615

18. (4)

Daniel Suarez

(T)

199

26

$29,227

(T)

199

25

$29,091

19. (20) J.J. Yeley 20. (19) Ryan Sieg

(C)

199

24

$29,480

21. (21) Ross Chastain

(C)

199

23

$28,869

22. (25) Jeremy Clements

(C)

198

22

$28,753

23. (31) David Starr

(T)

198

21

$28,566

24. (23) Mike Bliss

(T)

197

20

$28,455

25. (30) Landon Cassill

(C)

197

19

$28,469

26. (29) Brandon Gdovic

(C)

196

18

$28,208

27. (26) Harrison Rhodes

(C)

195

17

$28,097

28. (34) Mario Gosselin

(C)

195

16

$27,976

29. (27) Eric McClure

(T)

192

15

$27,800

30. (38) Peyton Sellers

(C)

190

14

$21,989

31. (37) Joey Gase

(C)

186

13

$27,558

32. (24) Blake Koch

(T)

182

12

$27,447

33. (12) Brendan Gaughan

(C)

167

12

$27,331 (c)

34. (28) Cale Conley

(T)

165

10

$27,220 (c)

35. (32) Timmy Hill

(D)

150

0

$27,089

36. (36) Derrike Cope

(C)

79

8

$18,799 (e)

37. (33) Stanton Barrett

(F)

11

7

$17,799 (e)

38. (35) Jeff Green

(T)

10

6

$16,799 (v)

39. (39) Derek White

(D)

7

5

$15,799 (t)

40. (40) Mike Harmon

(D)

2

4

$20,799 (e)

Winner’s avg. speed 132.989 mph Time of race 2 hours, 15 minutes, 21 seconds Margin of victory 1.624 seconds Caution flags 6 for 30 laps Lead changes 15 among 8 drivers Lap leaders Jones 1-4 Earnhardt Jr. 5-13 Jones 14 Earnhardt Jr. 15-17 Jones 18 Gaughan 19-21 Scott 22-47 Keselowski 48-65 Jones 66-82 Keselowski 83-120 D. Wallace Jr. 121-123 Armstrong 124-130 Dillon 131 Jones 132-137 Earnhardt Jr. 138-150 Jones 151-200 Point leaders Dillon, 219 C. Buescher, 217 Elliott, 208 D. Wallace Jr., 204 Reed, 197 Smith, 197 Sadler, 181 Gaughan, 176 Scott, 169 Suarez, 160

SoCCer MLS

NHRA qualifying

EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA D.C. United .............3 1 0 9 3 2 New York................2 0 1 7 5 2 New England..........2 2 1 7 4 6 Chicago ..................2 3 0 6 5 7 New York City FC.... 1 1 2 5 3 2 Orlando City........... 1 2 2 5 4 5 Columbus............... 1 2 1 4 5 5 Toronto FC.............. 1 3 0 3 6 8 Montreal ............... 0 1 2 2 2 3 Philadelphia.......... 0 3 2 2 5 9 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA Vancouver..............4 1 1 13 9 6 FC Dallas ................3 2 1 10 7 8 Real Salt Lake........2 0 2 8 6 4 Sporting K.C...........2 1 2 8 6 6 Seattle....................2 1 1 7 6 3 San Jose .................2 3 0 6 6 7 Colorado................. 1 1 3 6 4 2 Portland................. 1 1 3 6 6 5 Los Angeles............ 1 2 2 5 5 6 Houston ................. 1 2 2 5 2 3 • Three points for victory, one point for tie. Friday Colorado 4, FC Dallas 0 Saturday Columbus at New England, 2 p.m. New York City FC at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. New York at D.C. United, 6 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Sporting K.C., 7:30 p.m. Montreal at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

FIFA World rankings ZURICH (AP) — FIFA world rankings published Thursday (March position in parentheses): 1. Germany (1) 2. Argentina (2) 3. Belgium (4) 4. Colombia (3) 5. Brazil (6) 6. Netherlands (5) 7. Portugal (7) 8. Uruguay (9) 9. Switzerland (12) 10. Spain (11) 11. France (8)

12. Romania (14) 13. Italy (10) 14. England (17) 15. Costa Rica (13) 16. Chile (15) 17. Croatia (19) 18. Mexico (21) 19. Czech Rep.(16) 20. Slovakia (22). Also 27. USA (32)

Friday | In Las Vegas Track: Las Vegas Motor Speedway. Qualifying will continue Saturday for Sunday’s final eliminations. Top Fuel 1. J.R. Todd, 3.758 seconds, 324.83 mph. 2. Tony Schumacher, 3.779, 325.45. 3. Shawn Langdon, 3.782, 315.93. 4. Steve Torrence, 3.783, 323.89. 5. Richie Crampton, 3.787, 318.02. 6. Doug Kalitta, 3.793, 317.94. 7. Brittany Force, 3.801, 310.77. 8. Dom Lagana, 3.805, 300.66. 9. Dave Connolly, 3.817, 320.66. 10. Clay Millican, 3.847, 315.86. 11. Spencer Massey, 3.867, 316.67. 12. Troy Buff, 3.879, 307.02. Not Qualified: 13. Terry McMillen, 3.997, 307.51. 14. Steve Faria, 4.166, 217.70. 15. Antron Brown, 4.220, 202.27. 16. Steven Chrisman, 4.353, 214.62. 17. Jenna Haddock, 4.399, 190.40. 18. Larry Dixon, 6.088, 110.86.

Funny Car 1. Matt Hagan, 4.007, 318.02. 2. Jack Beckman, 4.014, 315.64. 3. Tommy Johnson Jr., 4.020, 313.07. 4. Alexis DeJoria, 4.037, 308.78. 5. Del Worsham, 4.048, 316.52. 6. Tim Wilkerson, 4.065, 314.31. 7. Ron Capps, 4.075, 316.15. 8. John Force, 4.086, 317.19. 9. Chad Head, 4.090, 303.84. 10. Robert Hight, 4.091, 314.97. 11. John Hale, 4.091, 311.92. 12. Tony Pedregon, 4.129, 303.98. Not Qualified: 13. Cruz Pedregon, 4.140, 295.27. 14. Courtney Force, 4.190, 289.57. 15. Jeff Arend, 5.029, 162.35. 16. Gary Densham, 5.388, 137.25.

CoLLegeS

BOxiNg • fighT Schedule

Baseball Missouri-St. Louis 4, William Jewell 3 SWIC 8, Shawnee 0 Southeast Missouri 21, Eastern Illinois 1 Missouri Baptist 4-14, Williams Baptist 2-2 SIU Edwardsville 4, Eastern Kentucky 3 Softball Coffeyville 3-3, St. Louis C.C. 0-0 Webster 12-20, Principia 0-9 Missouri 3, Mississippi State 2 Men’s tennis McKendree 7, Illinois-Springfield 2 Eastern Kentucky 4, SIU Edwardsville 3 Washington U. 5, Texas-Tyler 4 Women’s tennis McKendree 8, Illinois-Springfield 1 Washington U. 9, Texas-Tyler 0 Men’s volleyball Lewis def. Lindenwood 25-14, 25-14, 25-12

April 11 At San Juan (PPV), Orlando Salido vs. Rocky Martinez, 12, for Salido’s WBO junior lightweight title; Jose Gonzalez vs. Sharif Bogere, 10, lightweights; McWilliams Arroyo vs. Ismael Garnica, 10, flyweights. At Barclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. (NBC), Danny Garcia vs. Lamont Peterson, 12, welterweights; Andy Lee vs. Peter Quillin, 12, for Lee’s WBO middleweight title; Felix Diaz vs. Gabriel Bracero, 10, welterweights; Viktor Psotol vs. Jake Guiriceo, 10, super lightweights; Errol Spence, Jr. vs. Samuelo Vargas, 10, welterweights. At Sinaloa, Mexico, Pedro Guevara vs. Richard Claveres, 12, for Guevara’s WBC light flyweight title. April 16 At Osaka, Japan, Shinsuke Yamanaka vs. Diego Santillan, 12, for Yamanaka’s WBC bantamweight title. April 17 At Mohegan Sun Casino, Uncasville, Conn. (ESPN2), Tony Harrison vs. Pablo Munguia, 10, junior middleweights. At Foxwoods, Mashantucket, Conn. (FS1), Murat Gassiev vs. Felix Cora Jr., 12, for Gassiev’s IBF Inter-Continental cruiserweight title. At Grand Casino, Hinkley, Minn. (CBSSN), Dennis Hogan vs. Tyrone Brunson, 10, junior middleweights; Tony Luis vs. Ira Terry, 10, lightweights.

Pro Stock 1. Jason Line, 6.606, 208.75. 2. Erica Enders-Stevens, 6.617, 208.94. 3. Greg Anderson, 6.621, 208.81. 4. Chris McGaha, 6.624, 208.36. 5. Rodger Brogdon, 6.630, 208.49. 6. Shane Gray, 6.631, 208.71. 7. Larry Morgan, 6.641, 208.30. 8. Allen Johnson, 6.645, 208.59. 9. Jimmy Alund, 6.647, 210.93. 10. Drew Skillman, 6.651, 208.36. 11. V. Gaines, 6.682, 207.91. 12. Deric Kramer, 6.691, 206.51. Not Qualified: 13. Matt Hartford, 6.739, 204.85. 14. Jeff Isbell, 6.869, 196.85. 15. Joey Grose, 8.110, 127.50. 16. Vincent Nobile, 16.668, 40.49. 17. Jonathan Gray, 20.566, 25.71.

Saturday’s graded entries • by John Scully Post time: 1: p.m.

First: 5½ furlongs, $4,000 claiming, nw 3 races, f-m, purse $5,000 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 1 Shomor Sanchez 1-1-0-0 5-1 3 PrincesHonybee Molina 1-0-1-0 9-2 6 Dontputmenhld Lopez 1-1-0-0 5-1 2 Restortheearth Bielby 0-0-0-0 5-2 5 Acapelacatrella Santiago 0-0-0-0 9-5 4 Diabolo Mabee Velazquz 2-0-0-0 15-1 SHOMOR impressive in winning her seasonal debut, can win right back; PRINCESS HONEYBEE even second in her first start of the season, and should be ready for her best; DON’TPUTMEONHOLD had a front running score, two weeks ago, for trainer, Gail Macari, who is having her best ever start of the year. Second: 5 furlongs, $3,200 claiming, nw in 2015, f-m, purse $5,000 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 1 Apretyundrstdy Bielby 0-0-0-0 5-2 4 Honor Graeme Santiago 0-0-0-0 8-5 6 Smittnbutspitn Molina 1-0-1-0 5-2 2 Fleece DeLeon 1-0-0-1 6-1 5 Swift Melba Chen 1-0-0-0 15-1 3 Royalrenasance Artieda 0-0-0-0 15-1 APRETTYUNDERSTUDY speedy runner reeled off four straight wins, last year; HONOR GRAEME top trainer, from the past several years, Scott Becker, is off to a slow start this year, but this one could break the ice; SMITTENBUTSPITTIN consistently good, and figures to run another nice race. Third: 5 furlongs, $4,000 maiden-claiming, f-m, purse $5,000 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 7 All That Jazil Bielby 2-0-0-0 3-1 6 Little Honey Molina 1-0-0-1 7-2 3 Princess Put Santiago 1-0-1-0 9-5 5 WeeeWeeeWe DeLeon 0-0-0-0 8-1 1 Kerrycannsudy Lopez 3-0-0-0 10-1 4 Blushingoutlaw Velazquz 4-0-0-0 12-1 2 Carol’s a Case Sanchez 0-0-0-0 15-1 ALL THAT JAZIL flashed speed in both of her races in Chicago, and will like this shorter distance; LITTLE HONEY trainer, Jerry Hammond, as usual is sending out fit runners, and this one can improve off of her third place start, two weeks ago; PRINCESS PUT has the gas to go with the top one from the get go. Fourth: 6 furlongs, $10,000 claiming, or allowance nw 2 races, purse $8,600 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 2 Scrappyvanwnkl Santiago 1-0-1-0 2-1 3 Looknatcountry Molina 0-0-0-0 4-1 4 More Honey Velazquz 2-0-1-1 7-5 1 Bonita’s Gift Lopez 2-0-0-0 8-1 6 ArkansasValor Artieda 1-0-0-0 10-1 5 Catchtheoutlaw Chen 0-0-0-0 12-1 SCRAPPY VANWINKLE was second best to a nice winner, two weeks ago, now he can go to the winners circle; LOOKIN AT COUNTRY is taking on much less than he has in the past; MORE HONEY has been in the money in 11 of his 14 races. Fifth: 5 furlongs, $3,200 claiming, nw in 2014-15, or nw 2 races, f-m, purse $5,000 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 4 Here’s Denton Lopez 0-0-0-0 5-2 1 Batriesambition Sanchez 3-1-0-1 9-2 3 Ladiesdrinkfree Santiago 0-0-0-0 7-2 8 Havre de place DeLeon 0-0-0-0 6-1 2 Hard Truth Molina 1-0-0-0 8-1 5 Susie’s Faith Bielby 0-0-0-0 5-1 7 Msheavnlyhash Velazquz 0-0-0-0 15-1 6 Bella Baby Chen 0-0-0-0 20-1 HERE’S DENTON holds a class edge over these, and can overcome the short distance; BATRIES AMBITION this one is much better this year, then she has every shown in her life; LADIES DRINK FREE doesn’t make too many starts in a year, but is in good hands. Sixth: 5 ½ furlongs, $8,000 claiming, or allowance, nw other than mdn, clm, str, f-m, purse $8,600 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 1 Baba Lucy Sanchez 3-1-1-0 3-1 5 Foxie’sBeauty Molina 4-1-0-0 5-2 6 SingKittySing Bielby 3-1-0-1 8-5 4 Swift Closer Velazquz 1-0-0-1 8-1 3 Ciara for Three Artieda 0-0-0-0 12-1 2 Alaskanparadox Chen 1-0-0-0 10-1 BABA LUCY was claimed back by a trainer that has done well with this horse in the past, and won her only start for him, at Hawthorne, three weeks ago; FOXIE’S BEAUTY was claimed out of a winning race in Chicago, two weeks ago; SING KITTY SING has always been a consistent force, and is the one to beat. Seventh: 1 mile, $5,000 claiming, nw 2 races, purse $5,400 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 1 High Diver Sanchez 3-0-0-0 2-1 2 Wholdiferntgig Bielby 4-1-0-0 4-1 3 OrientationDay Santiago 1-0-0-0 6-1 5 Noble Leader Molina 4-0-1-1 7-2 4 Document Lopez 3-0-0-1 9-2 7 Sgt. Bilko DeLeon 1-0-0-0 12-1 6 Bullet Bob Velazquz 1-0-0-0 20-1 HIGH DIVER was competitive against better in Hot Springs, and should win, today; WHOLEDIFFERENTGIG broke his maiden in fine fashion in his local debut, and figures highly, with these; ORIENTATION DAY chance to lead all the way at this longer distance. Eighth: 6 furlongs, $3,200 claiming, nw in 2014-15, or nw 2 races, purse $5,000 PP Horse Jockey Record Odds 1 Garlands Spirit Santiago 1-0-1-0 4-5 6 My Fever Velazquz 3-0-0-0 3-1 5 Turn n Fire Lopez 2-0-0-1 6-1 7 Rojo Peligro Molina 0-0-0-0 10-1 8 Come on Love Chen 1-0-0-0 12-1 4 Foolishcoment DeLeon 1-0-0-0 20-1 3 Crafty Kirt Bielby 1-0-0-0 20-1 2 Vow to Wager Sanchez 0-0-0-0 30-1 GARLAND’S SPIRIT is taking a huge drop in class, which should make him a winner; MY FEVER comes down from Chicago to take on less, and is, except for the top one; TURN N FIRE showed a nice improvement, three weeks ago, when finishing third.

Best Bet: Garland’s Spirit (8th) Long Shot: Shomor (1st)

Saturday’s intertrack Tampa Bay 11:25 a.m. Freehold (H) 11:30 Keeneland 11:35 Mahoning 11:45 a.m. Parx 11:55 a.m. Gulfstream noon Pimlico 12:10 p.m. Aqueduct 12:20 p.m. Oaklawn 12:30 p.m. Fonner 1:30 p.m. Hawthorne 1:50 Sunland 1:55 p.m. Santa Anita 2 p.m. Golden Gate 2:45 Turf Paradise 3:25 Will Rogers 3:30 Hoosier (H) 4:15 Penn National 5 p.m. Miami Valley (H) 5:30 p.m.

Pocono (H) 5:30 Buffalo (H) 5:35 p.m. Evangeline 5:40 Rosecroft (H) 5:40 Saratoga (H) 5:45 Mountaineer 6 p.m. Northville (H) 6 p.m. Remington 6 p.m. Charlestown 6:05 Sam Houston 6:10 Yonkers (H) 6:10 Meadowlands (H) 6:15 p.m. Mohawk (H) 6:25 Pompano (H) 6:30 Lone Star 6:35 p.m. Balmoral (H) 7:10 Australia 8 p.m. Los Al (Q) 8 p.m. Cal Expo (H) 8:15


spOrts

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 04.12.2015

Providence grabs its irst hockey title Victory over Boston University marks third year in a row for a irst-time champion aSSoCIaTeD PreSS

BOSTON • Boston University

goalie Matt O’Connor gave up a tying own goal in the third period, then Brandon Tanev scored with 6:17 left and Providence beat the Terriers 4-3 on Saturday night for its first NCAA hockey title. It was the third straight year that the NCAA has crowned a first-time champion in hockey. BU was seeking its sixth championship in a virtual home game at TD Garden when O’Connor easily gloved a puck that was lofted in by Kyle McKenzie from the red line. But he then lost track of the puck, dropping it and allowing it to fall underneath him. He slid backward to protect the net and wound up knocking it in with 8:36 to play. Tanev scored off a faceoff to give the Friars the lead, and Jon Gillies helped protect it with a diving save against Nick Roberto in the final minutes. Gillies, selected the Most Outstanding Player of the Frozen Four, stopped 49 saves for PC (26-132). Anthony Florentino and Mark Jankowski also scored for the Friars, who were the last school to be given an at-large berth in 16team NCAA Tournament. Freshman defenseman Jake Walman of the Friars was drafted by the Blues in the third round in 2014, and junior forward Nick Saracino played for CBC. The PC fans who made the one-hour drive from the Rhode Island capital drowned out the sound of the final buzzer, and the players stormed over the boards to celebrate after the school’s second trip to the Frozen Four, its first since 1985. BU players skated slowly over to O’Connor to console him after the loss. Ahti Oksanen and Danny O’Regan scored an NCAA Tournament-record 4 seconds apart for the Terriers (28-8-5) to over-

AssociAted Press

Boston U. forward Matt Lane (21) knocks Providence forward Nick Saracino (18) to the ice.

AssociAted Press

Providence forward Mark Jankowski (10) is grabbed from behind by a teammate as they celebrate his goal during the second period Saturday.

come an early deficit, and Cason Hohmann gave BU a 3-2 lead in the second period. O’Connor stopped 39 shots. But his gafe cost BU the lead in a building where it had won so many times in the Beanpot and Hockey East tournaments — including both events this season. In all, the Terriers came into

Saturday night with a 42-22-0 record at the TD Garden since it opened in 1995. Oksanen tied it at 1 midway through the first period, then Hobey Baker Award winner Jack Eichel won the ensuing faceoff and skated into the Friars’ zone before sliding the puck over to O’Regan for another goal. The

Knicks beat Magic as teams set record for low-scoring quarter

AssociAted Press

New York Knicks center Cole Aldrich (45) and Orlando forward Andrew Nicholson (44) battle for a rebound during the second half of their low-scoring afair.

aSSoCIaTeD PreSS

ORLANDO, FLA. • Cole Aldrich had a

career-high 19 points and the New York Knicks beat the Orlando Magic 80-79 on Saturday night in a game that had the lowest-scoring quarter in NBA history. The teams combined to score only 15 points in the second quarter, breaking the mark of 18. Aldrich also had 14 rebounds to help the Knicks win for the second time in 13 games. Tim Hardaway Jr. added 13 points, including a late 3-pointer that proved to the winner. Victor Oladipo had 21 points to lead a Magic team that has lost two straight and dropped their final home game of the season. Tobias Harris added 15 points. The Knicks scored eight points in the second quarter, shooting 3 for 20 from the field with a pair of turnovers. The Magic had seven points and were 3 for 19 from the field, with seven turnovers. Orlando went the better part of 10 minutes in the second quarter with just one field goal and a free throw before getting two late baskets by Victor Oladipo. The previous NBA mark was accomplished three times, the last by Utah and Detroit on March 13, 2005. The seven points scored by Orlando in the period tied a team record for fewest points in a quarter. It also set a Magic record for fewest points in a second quarter. Orlando overcame its early scoring woes, erased an 11-point fourth-quarter deficit and took a 69-68 lead on a 3-pointer by Willie Green with 5:08 to play in the game. The score was tied at 73 when Elfrid Payton put the Magic back in front 75-73 with a short jumper. But the Knicks tied it right back up on their next possession on Tim Hardaway,

Jr.’s long jumper from the wing. Oladipo missed a layup coming out of a timeout and Hardaway was fouled going to basket by Nik Vucevic. He converted on his ensuing free throws to nudge New York back in front 77-75 with 41.6 seconds remaining. After nearly losing the ball on their first attempt to inbound, the Magic got the ball into Oladipo’s hands, who tied it again on a driving layup. The Knicks ran down the clock and Langston Galloway lost the ball on a drive. But the ball eventually found its way to Hardaway, who drilled a 3 to make it 80-77. Oladipo missed a jumper, and the ball wound up in a tie up between Cleanthony Early and Channing Frye with 6.9 left. Frye won the ensuing jump and after a long 3-pointer missed for Oladipo, Vucevic had to settle for a layup with only .9 showing on the clock.

noTebook Cousins, Gay shut down • Sacramento Kings center DeMarcus Cousins and forward Rudy Gay are being shut down for the final three games of the season. The Kings said Saturday that Cousins is sitting out to rest and begin rehabilitating his nagging right ankle and other leg injuries. Gay is out after continuing to experience symptoms related to a concussion he sustained March 30. Gay missed three games before playing in Sacramento’s win over Minnesota on Tuesday night. The symptoms returned, and he sat out two more games. Cousins averaged 24.1 points, 12.7 rebounds and 3.6 assists this season, making the All-Star team for the first time. Gay averaged a career-high 21.1 points to go with 5.9 rebounds and a career-best 3.7 assists.

previous record for fastest goals was 5 seconds apart, set by Michigan in the 1948 championship game against Dartmouth