4.8.16

Page 1

S E RV I N G T H E P U B L I C S I N C E 1 878 • W I N N E R O F 1 8 P U L I TZ E R P R I Z E S

FRIDAY • 04.08.2016 • $1.50

SENATE ROLLS BACK CUTS House budget had targeted UM system after last year’s protests $27.2 billion budget is based on a projected 4.1 percent growth in state revenue

BY KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

$54.1 million for a 2 percent pay raise for state employees

JEFFERSON CITY • The Missouri

$5 million increase for K-12 transportation $4 million increase for the need-based scholarship Access Missouri No money for Planned Parenthood

Senate signed off on the major pieces of a $27.2 billion state budget Thursday, setting in motion a final push by Republican lawmakers to get the spending blueprint to Gov. Jay Nixon’s desk. The plan, which would go into efect July 1, restores funding cuts made in the House that had been

WHAT’S NEXT

targeted at the University of Missouri system after last year’s protests on the Columbia campus. And, it attempts to address rising costs of providing health care to poor Missourians, includes funds to give small raises to state workers and eliminates state funding for Planned Parenthood. “Cooler heads prevailed,” Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard

The Senate budget must be reconciled with the House version Lawmakers have until May 6 to complete budget

See BUDGET • Page A8

Jennings High School celebrates its in-house free medical clinic

A safe SPOT for students ‘I’m able to talk to somebody about my problems and get help with my chronic illness as well. It helps ... a lot to concentrate and focus on school.’ Payton Robinson Senior at Jennings High School

BY NANCY CAMBRIA St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JENNINGS • For many youths liv-

ing in poverty in Jennings, access to free health care and mental health services used to require a 10-mile journey to a row house in the Central West End called the SPOT. The free clinic, operated by the Washington University School of Medicine, connects at-risk youths, ages 13 to 24, with medical and behavioral health services. The SPOT, short for Supporting Positive Opportunities with Teens, also seeks to increase contraception use and reduce sexually transmitted diseases. See SPOT • Page A6

Did Ballpark Village kill Harry’s?

Busches make counterofer to buy Grant’s Farm

a n d m a n a ge r at the Market Street restaurant, blamed its death squarely ST. LOUIS • The on the sparkling demise of a ben ew co m p l ex loved downtown of sports bars, restaurant may restaurants and have had less nightclubs across to do with the the street from opening of the 122,000-squareROBERT COHEN • P-D Busch Stadium. “It was 100 foot Ballpark Harry’s Restaurant & Bar, on Market Street, percent Ballpark Village enter- had been caught serving alcohol to minors. Village,” Pieri retainment district — and more with underage drinking and peated this week. “When you’re doing years of dipping revenues, according to $18,000 on a Saturday and two weeks later, when they open up, you go down city records. Not two months ago, an auction house to $3,000 — I’d say that would be a good sold of the last of Harry’s Restaurant & indicator.” But Harry’s had bigger problems than Bar. Its white tablecloths, foie gras and Ballpark Village, according to records succession of top chefs had long disappeared. Still, Tim Pieri, co-owner See HARRY’S • Page A7 BY DAVID HUNN St. Louis PostDispatch

ST. LOUIS • The four Busch family

siblings who wanted to sell Grant’s Farm to the St. Louis Zoo have now offered to buy the rambling south St. Louis County animal park themselves, for $26 million. The four — Beatrice Busch von Gontard, Peter Busch, Trudy Busch Valentine and Andrew D. Busch — say they won’t change the farm, and plan to run it “for generations to come.” They believe their brother, Billy Busch, owner of William K. Busch Brewing Company, doesn’t have the means to run the park in perpetuity, as he has pitched, and would eventually sell to housing developers.

TODAY

Heir it out

PARTLY CLOUDY

Blues clinch home ice for 1st round

52°/41° MOSTLY SUNNY

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Lilian Mariita was listed as the winner of the 2015 Go! St. Louis women’s half marathon for nearly a year before her name vanished from the official results this week. The deletion came long after the Kenyan runner disappeared from the U.S. racing circuit and returned to her home country in the village of Nyaramba. Four days before running in St. Louis, Mariita had tested positive for a banned substance. She was notified immediately through an email to her agent and warned to stop competing, according to a story by The Associated Press. See MARATHON • Page A7

Shop owner faces child porn charges

56°/32° TOMORROW

Marathon here tries to weed out the cheaters

Restaurant had bigger problems, records suggest

BY DAVID HUNN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

See BUSCH • Page A8

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Dr. Sarah Garwood (right), examines Payton Robinson, a senior at Jennings High School on Thursday during an appointment at the SPOT clinic in the high school. The SPOT is an on-site health center that caters to students’ physical and psychological needs.

Americans are ‘numb’ to Zika alerts

• A3

• A9

Garcia, Martinez hope to fire up Cards

• C1

1 M

WEATHER A16

SPORTS • C1 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

SATURDAY

New film showcases St. Louis actors

• GO! Vol. 138, No. 99 ©2016

OP 24 E /7 N

BommaritoAudiWestCounty.com FULL SERVICE AVAILABLE 7am - 3pm-By Appt.Only


M 1 FRIDAY • 04.08.2016 • A2

If area, state leaders cooperate, city can thrive again Landing the NGA is only the irst step in revitalizing urban core TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The green, leafy weeds sprouting as high as 3 feet from the empty lot at 2710 Gamble Street in north St. Louis don’t inspire dreamy visions of greatness for a city in need of hope. But when the full story is written of how St. Louis persuaded the federal government to relocate the 3,000 well-paid jobs at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, or NGA, to the city’s long-neglected north side, remember that it all began here. It was June 11, 2003, and Paul McKee, a real estate developer whose biggest successes were in the suburbs and exurbs, staked his reputation on an idea that most would eventually consider crazy. In the crumbling red-brick facades on the oncethriving north side of St. Louis, where vacant lots pockmarked the landscape, McKee saw the future of the city he loves. One by one, starting with 2710 Gamble Street, he purchased thousands of lots disconnected and in disrepair and put together a footprint he called NorthSide Re-

generation. His plan was to lure the sort of big tenant that could provide the thousands of jobs the blighted area would need to recreate itself. NGA is that tenant. McKee didn’t know it at the time. Nobody did. But as politicians from Gov. Jay Nixon to Mayor Francis Slay took their victory laps over the past week after NGA Director Robert Cardillo announced his intention to build the new facility at the intersection of Jeferson and Cass Avenues — just north and east of 2710 Gamble — it is worth remembering that without NorthSide, it never would have happened. The process of creating the atmosphere that led to the NGA opportunity took more than a decade. Nixon was against it before he was for it. He pushed against the incentives passed by the Missouri Legislature that created the financial incentive for McKee to invest millions in a longforgotten landscape. Even Slay, a longtime McKee supporter, appeared soured on the developer for a time, perhaps worried about the political optics after the St. Louis Business Journal set its sights on the developer in a months-long crusade that included the Journal actually advocating for the NGA to take its jobs and billions of dollars in investment to Illinois. The point here isn’t to make sure McKee gets his credit — now that NGA is coming he has a chance to really make his NorthSide vision a reality — but to refocus St. Louis and Missouri leaders on the prize: rebuilding a city.

For big things to happen, it takes vision, time and the cooperation of rivals, like Sen. Roy Blunt, a Republican, and Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Democrat. Like Slay and Nixon, who often don’t see eye to eye; or Slay and St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger, whose relationship is, well, developing. The lesson of NGA is that for St. Louis to win, the victories have to be bigger than one politician, or one party, or one developer, or one consultant. This is an insular city where old rivalries die hard, and big thoughts are often jettisoned in favor of incremental progress. The events of the past week, particularly coming on the heels of the failure to keep the St. Louis Rams, should open some eyes. St. Louis kept a major employer, and secured a multibillion-dollar project in an area long neglected by developers because the NGA saw this as the best place to reach the employees of the future. City voters invested in their schools, in buildings and its fire department, and they overwhelmingly voted to keep a 1 percent earnings tax that provides a third of the city’s operating budget. Good things happened because civic leaders, voters and outsiders saw hope in a city some want to define as failing. “We face tough competition, and ofering an environment that appeals to these future generations is critical to our success. Studies point to a desire by today’s millennials to be in urban environments, and this trend is expected to continue,” Cardillo wrote to current NGA employees

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM

in announcing his intention to move to the city’s north side. Those same studies point to something else millennials want in a city: good mass transit. That’s why the work to keep NGA must be only the beginning. The next big move should be to build the longplanned north-south route of Metrolink that would connect existing housing on the city’s south side with the soon-to-bedeveloped north side and the employment centers downtown and in Cortex and the airport. Yes, the new Metrolink line is a billiondollar dream. But investing in NGA is only a home run if the area around it — the rest of McKee’s NorthSide, produces the promised retail and housing to lift the area from blighted to burgeoning. That doesn’t happen if there isn’t a way for residents and employees — new and old — to get from home to work. The south side of St. Louis still has row after row of the redbrick homes and bungalows that used to dot the north side, but they, too, will crumble without the sort of investment in the future that a modern mass transit system will bring. A seed of growth has been planted in the vacant lots of north St. Louis. Its health depends on the cooperation of rivals who are willing to dream big dreams for the sake of a region. Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

Find these features and exclusive subscriber content at stltoday.com/extra

PARTY WITH THE GO! LIST WINNERS

SCREAMIN’ EAGLE COASTER TURNS 40

BLUES READY FOR PLAYOFFS

Make plans now to attend Go! Magazine’s fourth annual Go! List party, April 21 at the Missouri History Museum. Tickets are just $10 in advance.

Find out how chief photographer J.B. Forbes got this picture as he explains in a video how he covered the debut of the coaster at Six Flags in 1976.

As the Blues’ regular season draws to an end, get your playof questions together for beat writer Jeremy Rutherford. The chat starts Friday at 1 p.m.

LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES POWERBALL Wednesday: 04-28-49-60-65 Powerball: 25 Power play: 2 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $168 million MEGA MILLIONS Friday’s estimated jackpot: $65 million LUCKY FOR LIFE Thursday: 03-05-27-28-38 Lucky ball: 14

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Wednesday: 08-12-20-24-26-34 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $2.2 million SHOW ME CASH Thursday: 18-23-24-26-37 Friday’s estimated jackpot: $252,000 PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 417 Evening: 042 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 5221 Evening: 3659

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Thursday Midday: 18-19-22-34-38 Evening: 01-11-15-18-36 LOTTO Thursday: 10-13-31-39-42-48 Extra shot: 06 Estimated jackpot: $4 million PICK-3 Thursday Midday: 543 FB: 7 Evening: 280 FB: 5 PICK-4 Thursday Midday: 6840 FB: 6 Evening: 1093 FB: 9

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

Renter starts ire, shoots repairman, kills himself BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • A renter up-

set over a maintenance problem at his north St. Louis County home set the house on fire Wednesday, then shot and critically wounded a 78-year-old repairman before killing himself, police say. St. Louis County police were called about 4:10 p.m. to the 800 block of Liberty Village Drive in unincorporated north St. Louis County near Florissant. They found a 78-year-old man inside a home sufering from gunshot wounds. The shooter had fled the block, which is part of the Liberty Green subdivision. St. Louis County police Sgt. Shawn McGuire said the victim is a maintenance worker for the owner of several rental properties on the street, including the home where the shooter, Triandos Sherrard, 56, lived. McGuire did not identify the victim. He remained hospitalized in critical condition Thursday. He’s expected to survive. Sherrard and the victim had argued

earlier Wednesday about a problem at Sherrard’s home that had not been fixed, McGuire said. Sherrard had also argued with his landlord about it Wednesday. McGuire did not know what issue the argument was about. After St. Louis County police responded to the shooting, oicers were called to another home on the same block for a report of a fire, McGuire said. That turned out to be Sherrard’s home. Police believe he started the fire before shooting the repairman. The home sustained smoke and water damage. About 30 minutes later, McGuire said, oicers were called to a home in the 2000 block of Mcmenamy Drive, about eight miles southeast of Liberty Green, for a report of an attempted suicide. One of Sherrard’s relatives lives at the home on Mcmenamy. Officers arrived to find Sherrard walking outside a home carrying a handgun. Before oicers could talk to him, Sherrard fatally shot himself in the head, McGuire said. Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

STLTODAY.COM/WEATHER • • • •

Current weather conditions 18-hour forecast The latest radar imagery Much more

THIS DAY IN 1910 FIRST IN FLIGHT The secretary of the Aero Club of St. Louis, E. Percy Noel, becomes the first resident of the city to fly in an airplane.

EVENTS HOME SHOW When • 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday Where • St. Charles Convention Center, One Convention Center Plaza, St. Charles How much • Free More info • historicstcharles.com/ includes/events/Builders-St-Charles-HomeShow/806/ The St. Charles Home Show, presented by the Home Builders Association of St. Louis and Eastern Missouri, will feature 350 booths with the latest products and services ofered by 250 companies. Celebrity speakers will be featured. ELECTRONICS RECYCLING When • 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday Where • Jeferson College Hillsboro campus, on parking lot near Field House How much • Mostly free More info • Matt Keeney at mkeeney@jefco.edu Jeferson College and Adonis Recycling of Festus are co-hosts of this community-wide electronics recycling day. Most items will be recycled free, including desktop and laptop computers, servers, flat screen monitors, VOIP equipment, networking equipment, any cords or cables, mobile devices and batteries. Box/tube televisions will not be accepted. Some items will incur a charge: $20 for each CRT computer monitor and $5 for each microwave. Cash only. The annual event is being organized by the college’s Environment/Safety Committee and Cultural Events/Community Outreach Committee. To list a community event or meeting, submit it online at events.stltoday.com.

CONTACT US

INSIDE Business ................ B1 Editorial .............. A12 Horoscopes ......... EV2 Letters to editor .. A12 Movies .................. Go! Obituaries ........... A14

WHAT’S UP

Puzzles ................ EV2 Sports calendar .... C2 Stocks ................... B3 Tony Messenger .... A2 TV listings ........... EV3 Weather .............. A16

For news tips only, phone ................................ 314-340-8222

MISSING YOUR PAPER? 314-340-8888

Submit news tips ..........................metro@post-dispatch.com

homedelivery@post-dispatch.com

Submit events for our calendar ............ events.stltoday.com

To get your paper redelivered, call or email us before 9 a.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday-Sunday and 9 a.m. on holidays, where redelivery is available.

Main number....................................................314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon.......................................314-340-8387

The Post-Dispatch is a Lee Enterprises Newspaper and is published daily. USPS:476-580. Postmaster send address changes to: St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101-1099. Periodical postage paid at St. Louis. Suggested average weekly retail prices for home delivery with full digital access are: Monday through Sunday $7.61, Sunday through Friday $7.42, Monday through Friday $6.00, Thursday through Sunday $5.93, Sat-Sun-Mon Only $5.12, Fri-Sat-Sun Only $5.11, Sun-Mon Only $4.42, Sat-Sun Only $4.42, Sunday Only $3.57. All prices include applicable sales tax, delivery and premium editions delivered on 04/24/16, 6/26/16, 7/17/16, 7/31/16, 9/18/16, 10/23/16, 11/24/16, 01/29/17 and may afect your subscription paid through date.

SUBSCRIBE

STLtoday.com/subscriberservices 888-785-3201

Features: Jody Mitori ...................................... 314-340-8240

PLACE DEATH NOTICES

STLtoday.com

800-365-0820 ext. 8600

Local news, Business: Adam Goodman...........314-340-8258

PLACE CLASSIFIED ADS

STLtoday.com

314-621-6666

News: Ron Wade ...............................................314-340-8229

ALL OTHER ADVERTISING STLtoday.com

314-340-8500

Online: Bob Rose............................................... 314-340-8333

FAX AD INFORMATION

314-340-8664

Projects: Jean Buchanan .................................. 314-340-8111

BUY REPRINTS

STLtoday.mycapture.com

Sports: Roger Hensley...................................... 314-340-8301


LOCAL

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

Of-duty oicer hits parked SUV BY JOEL CURRIER St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • An of-duty St. Louis oicer crashed into

a city-owned SUV that was parked in the driveway of a deputy fire chief’s home early Thursday and is being investigated for drunken driving, authorities say. The oicer, 37, struck the fire department SUV while driving his personal vehicle shortly after 5 a.m., police said. The crash was on McCausland Avenue near Wabash Avenue. The oicer’s vehicle came to rest on the lawn of a home, police say. Paramedics responded but determined the officer was not hurt. The SUV, a Chevrolet Tahoe that was parked in a deputy chief’s driveway, is an unmarked take-home vehicle owned by the fire department, according to Fire Capt. Garon Mosby. The department has five deputy chiefs. The police department’s internal afairs investigators responded to the scene and have begun an investigation, police say. A police spokeswoman would not say if the oicer was arrested or ticketed, only that the officer was released pending charges and that the investigation is ongoing. Police did not identify the officer but said he has worked for the department for just under 14 years. A diferent St. Louis oicer was drunk when he crashed a squad car after a shift in December, according to charges filed in January. Jason Flanery resigned from the force shortly after the crash on Dec. 19. He was charged with driving while intoxicated and leaving the scene of an accident. Joel Currier • 314-340-8256 @joelcurrier on Twitter jcurrier@post-dispatch.com

Shop owner faces child porn charges BY ROBERT PATRICK St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • The owner of a St. Louis pizzeria and martial arts studio was arrested Thursday on a federal charge of production of child pornography. Loren Copp, owner of DoJo Pizza, recorded sex acts with an underage girl twice, once when she was 12 and again three to four years later, according to FBI Special Agent Jennifer Lynch in an aidavit filed with the criminal complaint. DoJo Pizza, 4601 Morganford Road, had been raided by state and federal authorities Copp multiple times last fall, starting after a tipster told police that minors were working for Copp and were not being properly fed, cared for or paid, Lynch wrote. The minors were living with Copp because their parents were either homeless or behind bars, the tipster claimed. The tipster claimed that the girls had untreated lice, bed bug bites and sprains and were being touched inappropriately by Copp, Lynch wrote. Searches of Copp’s computer hard drive last month uncovered images containing sex acts between an adult and a young girl, Lynch wrote. On Wednesday, investigators spoke with a girl who said that she was in the pictures and was 12 in the first video, Lynch wrote. Lawyer Justin Meehan said that Copp was lured to St. Louis City Hall on Thursday afternoon with a ruse — a building inspector called Copp and said he was needed. St. Louis police and agents of the FBI and Homeland Security were waiting, Meehan said. Meehan said Thursday afternoon, before the charges were announced, that he did not know the details of the claims against Copp. DoJo’s website said that the restaurant supported free karate classes. The building once doubled as a sort of community center. But the former church was condemned by the St. Louis Building Division on Oct. 16 after inspectors found rodent and bug infestations, damage to the building, missing smoke detectors and electrical work done without a permit. The building is owned by the Ma-ji Ryu Christian Karate Association Inc., incorporated by Copp in 2007.

LAW & ORDER

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A3 from school Wednesday. Her husband, Jonathan S. Trexler, 36, who lives 10 miles from Godfrey, in Bunker Hill, was last seen that afternoon at his workplace in Roxana. Kallal said the FBI, Illinois State Police and other agencies assisted. He said interviews with neighbors of Tracie Trexler led oicers to property owned by one of Jonathan Trexler’s friends. He said oicers located the wife and eventually arrested her husband. Their children were safe with relatives. No other details were available.

ST. LOUIS > Fredericktown escapee caught here • Jason Mills, 38, who escaped from a jail in Fredericktown, Mo., on March 13, was arrested here Wednesday by deputy U.S. marshals. Mills was found at the home of an acquaintance in the 5100 block of Page Boulevard about 7:30 p.m., and surrendered without incident, said Supervisory Deputy Patrick James. He said it was the culmination of numerous Mills interviews with Mills’ relatives and acquaintances. Mills was last seen March 18 in Franklin County. He had led the jail with another inmate, convicted murderer Adam Moore, 21, who was arrested in Fredericktown the day of the escape. Mills had been jailed on charges of third-degree assault, unlawful use of a weapon, tampering and resisting arrest.

ST. LOUIS > Woman is killed in crash • The female driver of a vehicle that collided with another about noon Thursday later died at a hospital, police said. The second driver sufered injuries that were not considered life-threatening. The crash occurred at East Taylor Avenue and North Broadway near Bellefontaine Cemetery. One driver had to be extricated by ireighters. No other details were available.

JERSEY COUNTY > Missing couple found, husband arrested • Authorities took a man into custody and reported his wife safe Thursday, several hours after listing them as missing. Sherif Mike Kallal said oicers surrounded a mobile home in neighboring Calhoun County, where the man surrendered after a standof. Earlier Thursday, Kallal issued a missing-persons report because Tracie L. Trexler, 39, of the Godfrey area, never picked up their two children

ST. LOUIS > Dead man is identiied • A man found dead about 9:40 p.m. Sunday with cuts to his neck in the city’s Hill neighborhood has been identiied as Bastian McMahon, 19, of the Kansas City area, authorities said. McMahon was found in a parking lot on Elizabeth Avenue near January Avenue. Police called the death “suspicious” but released few details. Autopsy and toxicology results were not available Thursday. The medical examiner’s oice said McMahon lived

in Lee’s Summit, Mo. ST. CHARLES COUNTY > Driver escapes from dangling truck • A tractor-trailer driver was pulled to safety after a three-vehicle crash about noon Wednesday left his truck’s cab dangling of an Interstate 370 overpass, just west of the Discovery Bridge, the Missouri Highway Patrol said. It happened after two eastbound cars collided in the rain and the truck struck both and went of the right side of the highway. Nick Hargis, of Troy, Mo., said he and other motorists lowered towing straps to truck driver Michael R. Coleman as he emerged from the cab. Coleman, 50, of Kansas City, got one strap around his chest and Hargis and the two others helped pull him to safety. “When he got up to the ground, he was like, ‘Thank God I’m alive, thank you for helping, me, I thought I was going to die,’” said Hargis, 37. The others in the crash, Maurice A. Hines, 34, of St. Louis, and Delbert R. Traub, 62, of Eldridge, Iowa, were taken a hospital. Hines’ injuries were minor and Traub’s moderate, the patrol said. ST. LOUIS > Man stuck under train • A man was in stable condition at a hospital Wednesday night after becoming stuck under a train on elevated Union Paciic tracks at South Second Street and Chouteau Avenue, south of downtown, the ire department reported. The man was hit by the train about 11 p.m., and trapped underneath. Fireighters freed him within an hour.

Bonhomme Presbyterian will keep its property BY VALERIE SCHREMP HAHN St. Louis Post-dispatch

C H E ST E R F I E L D • Bonhomme Presbyterian Church will be able to hold on to its extensive Chesterfield grounds after reaching an agreement to settle a lawsuit filed by the church’s former governing body. The church settled this week with Giddings-Lovejoy Presbytery for $1.1 million. Even though the church’s leaders thought they had a strong case, they thought losing their land and property wasn’t worth the risk at trial, they said. The trial was supposed to start in St. Louis County Circuit Court on Monday. “We have never believed that the presbytery’s claim to the property

was valid,” the church’s pastor, the Rev. Tom Pfizenmaier, said Thursday night. “We think we made the right spiritual decision.” The church, which is the second-oldest Presbyterian church west of the Mississippi River, broke away from the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) in 2014, opting to join the newer, more conservative denomination of the Covenant Order of Evangelical Presbyterians, sometimes called ECO. Soon after, the local governing body of the Presbyterian Church, the Giddings-Lovejoy Presbytery, sued for the property. The church sits on more than eight acres between Conway Road and Highway 40 (Interstate 64) and in-

cludes two worship spaces. Though the property is tax-exempt, county records say the appraised value is $10.3 million. There are about 1,400 members. Presbytery of Giddings-Lovejoy representatives could not be immediately reached for comment Thursday night. Bonhomme Presbyterian had the money to pay for the settlement from an estate gift, and explained to members that the church may have to defer some building projects in the short term. “It is a bitter pill to secure this peace by giving Giddings-Lovejoy an undeserved windfall,” said an e-mail from church leaders to its members on Thursday.

ladies

men FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY!

COMFORT DAYS

“Damara Ankle” Black, 36-42. $120

“Harold” Cognac, 41-47. $150

Receive a

10

$

when you purchase

Dillard’s Reward Certiicate*

ONE PAIR

of regular-price ecco shoes

DIGEST ST. LOUIS > I-44 ramp to I-55 to be closed over weekend • The downtown ramp from eastbound Interstate 44 to northbound Interstate 55 will be closed beginning at 8 p.m. Friday for ramp renovation, said the Missouri Department of Transportation. The agency suggested that drivers who use I-44 to get downtown can use Highway 40 (Interstate 64) or Interstate 55. The ramp is scheduled to reopen by 5 a.m. Monday. The ramps from eastbound I-44 to Lafayette Avenue, and the ramp from Jeferson Avenue to eastbound I-44, also will be closed. The detour for the interstate ramp closure will be to take southbound I-55 to Arsenal Street, then turn around onto northbound I-55 and take it to eastbound I-44. The detour for the ramp from Jeferson to eastbound I-44 will be to take Russell Boulevard to Gravois Avenue, and get on eastbound I-44 at Gravois. And starting Monday, one lane on the ramp from eastbound I-44 to northbound I-55 will remain closed around the clock until mid-May. And the ramps from eastbound I-44 to Lafayette, and the ramp from Jeferson to eastbound I-44, will remain closed until mid-May. (Leah Thorsen) ELLISVILLE > Limits to be put on road used as cut-through • The Ellisville City Council approved on Wednesday prohibiting through traic on Macklin Drive and Covert Lane near Old State and Manchester roads. The traic changes are being done for safety reasons, oicials said. The changes limit vehicles to residential traic only. (Special to the Post-Dispatch) CLARKSON VALLEY > Changes to ‘family’ occupancy approved • Clarkson Valley’s newly adopted deinition of a “family” is designed to ward of legal disputes that usually stem from complaints growing out of neighborhood friction. The city’s residential areas are all zoned for single-family. Single-family occupancy now allows occupancy by two unrelated persons as well as the children of either or both. It also allows a resident domestic employee in the housekeeping unit. During a two-month study, city oicials found that the old deinition did not allow unmarried persons living together, except in a “group,” and did not address children or domestics. No controversial cases have been pending in Clarkson Valley; the unanimous vote by the Board of Aldermen on Tuesday night was proactive, oicials noted. (Special to the Post-Dispatch)

“Biom Fjuel” Coral, 36-42. $130

“Biom Fjuel” Black/orange, 41-47. $130

Receive a

40

$

when you purchase

Dillard’s Reward Certiicate*

TWO PAIRS

of regular-price ecco shoes

Buy 2 or more regular-price pairs and receive Dillard’s Reward Certiicates* valued at $20 for each pair purchased.

“Damara Strap” Cognac, 36-42. $120

*Reward certiicate valid throughout the store until 06/18/16. Limited to styles on hand, in-store only.

“Yucatan” Bison, 41-47. $130

Ugly Concrete?

OVER

25 YEARS

The beautiful and durable

EXPERIENCE!

Pebblestone/Epoxy System goes on top of your existing concrete! • Patio • Porch and Walkway • Pool Deck • Basement Floor • Driveway • Garage Floor • And More! Available in 15 Beautiful Colors!

FREE ESTIMATES!

Senior & Military Discounts

PRE-SEASON SPECIAL! ACT NOW!

SAVE $500 - $1,500 SAVINGS BASED ON JOB SIZE

St. Louis Resurfacing, Inc. ing

©

St 1990

Louis

rfac Resu

314-576-9220 1-800-283-6234

www.stlresurfacing.com

CHECK OUT OUR EXCELLENT RATING WITH THE BBB!


LOCAL

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MoDOT worker killed in Franklin County

St. Louis Real Estate at your ingertips Find your dream home on our new APP

Motorist struck man, 55, as he worked to clean bridge BY DOUG MOORE AND DENISE HOLLINSHED St. Louis Post-Dispatch

A Missouri Department of Transportation worker was struck and killed Thursday morning as he worked to clean a b r i d ge i n Fra n k l i n County. Lyndon D. E b ke r, Ebker 55, he had worked for MoDOT for more than 30 years, the agency said. “Our sympathy and prayers go out to Lyndon’s wife and family,” Greg Horn, MoDOT’s St. Louis District Engineer, said in a statement. “Our hearts are heavy, too. He has lots of friends here and will be

missed.” Ebker was part of a MoDOT crew cleaning road salt and other grime off a bridge on Highway 100 near Buchheit Road about 9:15 a.m. when the accident occurred, authorities said. The scene is west of Washington. Sgt. Al Nothum of the Missouri Highway Patrol said the crew had parked a dump truck in an eastbound lane of the highway. The crew had posted signs that work was underway on the bridge, Nothum said. A man driving a Volkswagen Passat station wagon came up on the dump truck, swerved to the left and struck the MoDOT employee, Nothum said. The man driving the Volkswagen stayed at the

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

scene after the crash. Police took him to a hospital, where he was questioned. “We’ll obviously do some readings on him to make sure he wasn’t intoxicated,” Nothum said. The driver was later identified by the Highway Patrol as Norman E. Haimila, 80, of Hermann. Highway Patrol Cpl. Juston Wheetley said an accident reconstruction report could take several weeks and no decision on charges had been made. “We ask when drivers are approaching a work zone to pay attention, slow down and take your time,” Wheetley said. “It’s extremely dangerous in that area. It’s important to take the responsibility to drive safely to protect your life and the lives of others as well.”

FIND THE CHEAPEST GAS IN TOWN Check gas prices and see real-time traic conditions.

STLTODAY.COM/ TRAFFIC

Begin your journey. Start new memories. Download our YOUR NEXT HOME mobile APP today! SPONSORED BY:

FIRST BANK WISDOM:

A good mortgage leaves room in your budget for furniture. Let’s get moving. firstbanks.com

Looking to save on

Medicare Part D? Choosing a preferred network pharmacy can lower your copays.

Walgreens participates as a preferred network pharmacy with many top plans*

Talk to our pharmacist today. *Based on December 2015 CMS enrollment data. Other pharmacies participate in the networks for these plans. The pharmacy network may change at any time. You will receive notice when necessary. Cost sharing for members who get “Extra Help” is the same at preferred and network pharmacies. Y0001_MULTIPLAN_4002_6989a accepted 12/2015

©2016 Walgreen Co. All rights reserved.


LOCAL

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

Restaurateurs admit to federal tax evasion Lotawata Creek Southern Grill owners face penalties much the brothers kept of of their reported receipts. Asked for comment, a worker at the restaurant hung up on a Post-Dispatch reporter several times. The Archer brothers face a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison, a $250,000 fine and up to three years supervised release, in addition to mandatory restitution. Their company faces a maximum penalty of a $500,000 fine, restitution and five years of probation. Sentencing is scheduled for July 15. The restaurant is located at 311 Salem Place. More than 500,000 people visited the restaurant last year, according to the restaurant’s website.

BY KRISTEN TAKETA St. Louis Post-dispatch

The owners of the popular Lotawata Creek Southern Grill in Fairview Heights have pleaded guilty to tax evasion and face up to five years in federal prison, the U.S. Department of Justice reported Thursday. The restaurant and its owners, Rodney Archer, 50, and Kenneth Archer, 52, admitted to manipulating the restaurant’s computer system to show lower cash sales, thus lowering how much in taxes they had to pay, acting U.S. Attorney James Porter of the Southern District of Illinois said in a press release. The Archer brothers did this from 2010 to July 2015, according to Porter. Porter said he doesn’t know how

Kristen Taketa @Kristen_Taketa on Twitter ktaketa@post-dispatch.com

IN THE UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF MISSOURI, SOUTHEASTERN DIVISION Case No.16-10083-399, Chapter 11, (Jointly Administered) Debtor: Noranda Aluminum, Inc. EIN: 36−2665285 NOTE:The case referenced on this page is the lead case of jointly administered cases. A list of associated cases and case numbers is at the end of this notice. When iling a Proof of Claim, you must identify the debtor against whom your claim is asserted. Date case iled for chapter 11:2/8/16 Notice of Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Case For the debtor listed above,a case has been iled under chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code.An order for relief has been entered. This notice has important information about the case for creditors, debtors, and trustees, including information about the meeting of creditors and deadlines. The iling of the case imposed an automatic stay against most collection activities (see Bankruptcy Code §362 for prohibited collection actions). This means that creditors generally may not take action to collect debts from the debtor,from the debtor’s property,or from certain codebtors.For example,while the stay is in effect, creditors cannot sue, assert a deiciency, repossess property, or otherwise try to collect from the debtor.Creditors cannot demand repayment from the debtor by mail,phone,or otherwise.Creditors who violate the stay can be required to pay actual and punitive damages and attorney’s fees.Under certain circumstances,the stay may be limited to 30 days or not exist at all,although debtors can ask the Court to extend or impose a stay. Conirmation of a chapter 11 plan may result in a discharge of debt.A creditor who wants to have a particular debt excepted from discharge may be required to ile a complaint in the Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice within the deadline speciied in this notice.(See section number 11 below for more information.) To protect your rights,consult an attorney. The staff of the Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice cannot give legal advice. Do not ile this notice with any Proof of Claim or other iling in the case. 1. Debtor’s full name: Noranda Aluminum,Inc. 2. All other names used in the last 8 years: None 3. Address: P.O.Box 70/391 St.Jude Industrial Park,New Madrid,MO 63869 4. Debtor’s attorney Name and address: Christopher J. Lawhorn, Carmody MacDonald P.C., 120 South Central Ave., Suite 1800, Clayton, MO 63105, Contact phone:(314) 854−8600,Email: cjl@carmodymacdonald.com 5. Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice: 111 South Tenth Street, Fourth Floor, St. Louis, MO 63102, Telephone number: (314) 244−4500, McVCIS: 1−866−222−8029, #87, Electronic Case Information/PACER: https://ecf.moeb. uscourts.gov,Ofice Hours:Monday − Friday 8:30 a.m.− 4:30 p.m.Documents in this case may be iled at this address.You may inspect all records iled in this case at this ofice or online at www.pacer.gov. 6. Meeting of creditors: April 13, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. Location:Thomas F. Eagleton U.S.Courthouse,111 South 10th Street,Suite 21.130,St.Louis,Missouri 63102. The debtor’s representative must attend the meeting to be questioned under oath. Creditors may attend, but are not required to do so. The meeting may be continued or adjourned to a later date.If so,the date will be on the Court docket. 7. Deadline for iling Proof of Claim: Not yet set. If a deadline is set, another notice will be published.A Proof of Claim is a signed statement describing a creditor’s claim. You can obtain a Proof of Claim form at any Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice, or by visiting www.uscourts.gov.Your claim will be allowed in the amount scheduled unless: • your claim is designated as disputed, contingent, or unliquidated; • you ile a Proof of Claim in a different amount; or • you receive another notice. If your claim is not scheduled or if your claim is designated as disputed,contingent,or unliquidated,you must ile a Proof of Claim or you might

open

not be paid on your claim and you might be unable to vote on a plan.You may ile a Proof of Claim even if your claim is scheduled.You may review the schedules at the Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice or online at www.pacer.gov. Secured creditors retain rights in their collateral regardless of whether they ile a Proof of Claim. Filing a Proof of Claim submits a creditor to the jurisdiction of the Bankruptcy Court, with consequences a lawyer can explain. For example, a secured creditor who iles a Proof of Claim may surrender important nonmonetary rights,including the right to a jury trial.Do not include this notice with any iling you make. Attention: All Proofs of Claims should be iled with the Claims Agent for this case not with the Court. Claims Agent Information: Noranda Aluminum, Inc., Claims Processing Center, c/o Prime Clerk, LLC, 830 3rd Avenue, 3rd Floor, New York,NY 10022,Hotline:855-410-7360,Email:norandainfo@primeclerk.com 8. Exception to discharge deadline: The Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice must receive a complaint and any required iling fee by the following deadline. Deadline for iling the complaint: 6/13/2016. You must start a judicial proceeding by iling a complaint if you want to have a debt excepted from discharge under 11 U.S.C. §1141(d)(6)(A).The deadline to ile such complaints for any creditor added to this case after the date of the initial Notice and Order of Commencement shall be the later of the original deadline or 60 days after the date on the certiicate of service of the notice given pursuant to L.R.1009. 9. Foreign Creditors: If you are a creditor receiving notice mailed to a foreign address,you may ile a motion asking the Court to extend the deadlines in this notice.Consult an attorney familiar with United States Bankruptcy Law if you have any questions about your rights in this case. 10. Filing a Chapter 11 bankruptcy case: Chapter 11 allows debtors to reorganize or liquidate according to a plan.A plan is not effective unless the Court conirms it.Notice of the date of the conirmation hearing will be published,and you may object to conirmation of the plan and attend the conirmation hearing. Unless a trustee is serving, the debtor will remain in possession of the property and may continue to operate its business. 11. Discharge of debts: Conirmation of a chapter 11 plan may result in a discharge of debts, which may include all or part of your debt. See 11 U.S.C. § 1141(d). However, unless the Court orders otherwise, the debts will not be discharged until all payments under the plan are made.A discharge means that creditors may never try to collect the debt from the debtor except as provided in the plan. If you want to have a particular debt owed to you excepted from the discharge under 11 U.S.C.§ 1141(d)(6)(A),you must ile a complaint and pay the iling fee by the deadline. Any paper that you ile in this bankruptcy case should be iled at the Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice at the address listed in section number 6 of this Order and Notice. Registered electronic users should ile through our Case Management/Electronic Case Files (CM/ECF) system at https://ecf.moeb.uscourts.gov. This Court requires all attorneys to ile electronically through CM/ECF. You may inspect all papers iled,including the list of the debtor’s property and debts and the list of the property claimed as exempt, at the Bankruptcy Clerk’s Ofice or via the Internet if you have a PACER subscription.You may register for PACER at www.pacer.gov.Case status information is available 24 hours a day by contacting McVCIS (Multi−Court Voice Case Information System) or via the Internet using PACER. Information about the meeting of creditors, certain forms, and other matters can be obtained from the Court’s website: http://www.moeb. uscourts.gov. List of associated cases and case numbers: Noranda Aluminum, Inc., Case No.16- 10083-399;Noranda Aluminum Holding Corporation,Case No.16-40739399; Noranda Aluminum Acquisition Corporation, Case No. 16-40740-399; NHB Capital,LLC,Case No.16-40741-399;Noranda Intermediate Holding Corporation, Case No. 16-40742-399; Norandal USA, Inc., Case No. 16-40743-399; Gramercy Alumina Holdings Inc., Case No. 16-40744-399; Gramercy Alumina Holdings II, Inc., Case No. 16-40745-399; Noranda Alumina LLC, Case No. 16-40746-399; Noranda Bauxite Holdings Ltd., Case No. 16-10083-399; Noranda Bauxite Limited,Case No.16-40748-399.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A5

Jury sides with tobacco company BY JENNIFER S. MANN St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS • A St. Louis jury delivered a defense verdict Thursday in a class-action suit that was seeking about $1.5 billion from tobacco giant Philip Morris. The jury deliberated less than an hour after a month-long trial, in which the plaintifs alleged the company had deceived customers into believing light cigarettes were safer than regular cigarettes when they weren’t. The outcome would have afected Missouri smokers who bought and consumed Marlboro Lights from Feb. 14, 1995, through Dec. 31, 2003. The class representative was Jefferson County resident Deborah Larsen, who smoked about a pack and a half of Marlboro Lights a day from 1979 until 2002, when she quit. In addition to the approximately $1.5 billion sought on behalf of the class, the plaintifs’ lawyers had asked for about $6,800 for Larsen individually. They sought both actual and punitive damages. This was the second time a St. Louis jury heard the case. In October 2011, jurors deliberated four days after another month-long trial before announcing they were deadlocked, 8-4, on the side of the plaintif. Nine votes are needed for a civil

DRESS FOR SUCCESS Saturday, April 9, 2016 The Salvation Army Mid-Town Family Store 4121 Forest Park Avenue St. Louis, MO 63108 • Men’s Suits • Shirts • Shoes • Belts

• Hats • Wallets • Polo Products

Call for Details: 314-535-0057

CONTRACTED BY ASHLEY, SYMBOL, BENCHCRAFT, SERTA AND AMERICAN FURNITURE FACTORIES FOR VIEWING IN OUR SHOWROOMS.

House

case verdict in Missouri. The lawsuit, first filed in 2000, claimed that light cigarette packages promised lower tar and nicotine but were made from the same tobacco as regular cigarettes, and were in fact more dangerous for consumers. Smokers might compensate for the lower nicotine by inhaling longer and more deeply, the plaintifs’ attorneys claimed. “They knew it was wrong ... they knew they were deceiving people,” one of those attorneys, Mark Bronson, said in closing arguments earlier Thursday. Jurors did not have to determine whether the class relied on the representations — just whether the deception occurred through “evil motive” or “reckless indiference to the rights of others.” Philip Morris attorneys argued that the cigarettes are diferent, that they contain less tobacco than Marlboro Reds, more ventilation and a longer filter. Inhalation compensation also had been known and publicized for years by the public health community, the cigarette maker’s lawyers said. Beth Wilkinson, an attorney for Philip Morris, noted the company took the label of “lower tar and nicotine” off packages in 2003 and eventually stopped using the term “lights” as well. No personal injury claims were included in the suit.

Ask About our No Credit CheCk PLAN

From BondedLeather From MicroiberSectional Bo QUANTITIES ARE LIMITED!!!

FREE LAYAWAY!!! Sectional

$199

$199

EA.PC.

EA.PC.

ONLY

ONLY

YOURCHOICE

CompleteQueenbed $199 Emperor Queen bed $499 Bar Height

ONLY 3PC ONLY 5PC DININGSET $199 DININGSET $99 TAKE IT HOME TODAY ONLY

$49 DOWN

ONLY

Bonded Leather Sofa $399 ONLY

ONLY

Burgundy Sofa $399 CocoaSofa

$429

FAMOUS POSTURE SERIES

QUEEN SIZE MATTRESS

CHIRO-EXTRA

SLEEP FIRM

$

29

299

$84 Ea. Pc. TWIN 84 $99 Ea. Pc. FULL

$

$29 Ea. Pc. TWIN $49 Ea. Pc. FULL

$129 Ea. Pc. QUEEN $109 Ea. Pc KING

CHIRO-PEDIC 25-Yr. Ltd. Warranty

10-Yr. Ltd. Warranty

$

$59 Ea. Pc. TWIN 59 $74 Ea. Pc. FULL

$

SLEEP ULTRA $69 Ea. Pc. TWIN 69 $89 Ea. Pc. FULL

$

$

199

99

$99 Ea. Pc. TWIN $129 Ea. Pc. FULL $145 Ea. Pc. QUEEN $126 Ea. Pc. KING

EURO-LUX PILLOWTOP

15-Yr. Ltd. Warranty

QUEEN PILLOWTOP CHIRO-EXTRA

Fleet Series

Stand-On Riders

Walk-Behinds

®

Ferris commercial mowers with patented suspension technology give professionals the edge they need to be more productive while getting a high-quality cut and smooth ride. We should know, because we introduced suspension to the commercial mowing industry. And nobody does it better.

20-Yr. Ltd. Warranty

5-Yr. Ltd. Warranty

SLEEP REST

$

IS® Series Zero-Turn Mowers

25-Yr. Ltd. Warranty

Visit your local dealer! Dorsey, IL • (618) 377-6321 Bertels Sales & Service

Arnold, MO • (636) 467-7333 Scott’s Power Equipment South, Inc.

Jerseryville, IL • (618) 498-2197 Prairie Land Power

Bridgeton, MO • (314) 429-3600 Scott’s Power Equipment, Inc.

Millstadt, IL • (618) 476-1145 Hartmann Farm Supply of Millstadt

Desoto, MO • (636) 589-9607 Caldwell Outdoor Equipment Co.

O’Fallon, IL • (618) 628-8014 Scott’s Power Equipment EXPRESS

Eureka, MO • (636) 938-5533 Eureka Rental, LLC

Steeleville, IL • (618) 965-3903 Colemans Lawn Equipment

Wentzville, MO • (636) 887-9040 Scott’s Power Equipment, Inc.

$

$105 Ea. Pc. QUEEN

Ea. Pc. TWIN 104 $104 $139 Ea. Pc. FULL

(sold in sets)

$149 Ea. Pc. QUEEN $133 Ea. Pc. KING

ST. LOUIS

HAZELWOOD FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS SOUTHCOUNTY 4650 LANSDOWNE 8780 PERSHALL RD PLAZA 100 COMMERCE LN 3839 lemay ferry rd 314-832-5300 314-522-8886 618-394-0833 314-892-8296 Mon & Fri 10-8 Tues, Wed, Thu 11-7 Sat 10-6 Sun 12-6 A H O M E D E C O R L I Q U I D AT O R S C O M PA N Y • N O C R E D I T C H E C K F I N A N C I N G • w w w . h d o u t l e t s . c o m

www.FerrisMowers.com


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

In-school clinic fosters relationships along with care Coordinator Chardial Samuel (left) shows Franda Thomas (center) and Maheen Bokhari of the St. Louis Department of Health the lab and supply closet on Thursday during an open house for the SPOT clinic at Jennings High School.

Friends, Fun and Laughter Await You Here With Us We Offer:

• 1 & 2 Bedroom • Dining Services • Full Service Amenities • Convenient Location

• Secure Setting • Our team of experts will help you make your move with ease

Call schedule a visit and and Call Stacey today forto our move in specials start enjoying living. start enjoying worry-free worry-free living.

3350 St. Catherine St. ~ Florissant, MO 63033

314.838.3877

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

FILLING A NEED Jennings High School sits in one of the poorest areas of north St. Louis County in a ZIP code that has the highest teen pregnancy rate in the region. When Garwood came up with the idea two years ago for a Jennings High clinic, she already had a connection. The high school’s athletic director is her brother-in-law, and her sister had previously taught in the district. That led to an introduction to Anderson. Anderson said the timing was perfect. The school district was already seeking a permanent on-campus health provider as part of Anderson’s plan to ofer a broad range of services for students and families in the district. At the time, students with serious illnesses were going untreated, sexually

CONFRONTING STRESS At first, the majority of the referrals to the Jennings SPOT location were for behavioral issues related to stress, depression and other mental health issues attributed to growing up in poverty. Students at Jennings typically come from households struggling with bills, loss of utilities, housing insecurity and neighborhood violence, Anderson said. The nearby unrest in Ferguson had created additional stress for students. The SPOT’s clinical case manager Rochelle Moore tracks students who come to the clinic and links them to health care providers, but she also works to connect parents and students with other services, including signing them up for Medicaid. “Just helping them navigate the medical health care system has been key,” Anderson said. Garwood said Moore is a key partner in the students’ everyday well-being. On Moore’s watch, it’s OK for teachers to refer students to the clinic for some time to cool down. There’s a sunny alcove in the SPOT where students are encouraged to destress. The staf views the SPOT as a safe space for students who have dealt with significant trauma in their lives. To that end, Garwood has obtained a three-year $60,000 grant from the Missouri Foundation for Health to make Jennings the first fully “trauma informed” school district in

the region. Last week, freshman Kayla Murphy, 16, came to the SPOT with a note from her English teacher. Murphy said she was having trouble with a peer that day and needed a place to settle down and work on a project involving “Romeo and Juliet.” Murphy had been coming to the SPOT on and of for most of the year. Staff members were helping her cope with grief after her mom died last year on the day of her eighth-grade graduation, she said. “It feels good to come here and get all that pressure off of you,” she said. “I wasn’t really expecting a place like this.” The clinic is further scaling up on the physical health side. Beyond basic checkups and vaccines, physicians also deal with chronic illnesses and medication management. Last fall, senior Payton Robinson, 17, said she made her way from the gym to the SPOT on the advice of her basketball coach. Despite being diagnosed with lupus years ago, she hadn’t had consistent medical care. Robinson said she’d been dealing with her condition with the best attitude she could, but it sometimes got her down. Now she has steady medical care to manage her condition. At the open house Thursday, visitors got a tour of the clinic. Design work for the space was donated by St. Louis architect Anna Ives after Garwood sought her help. The two exam tables came to the clinic via a U-Haul rented by Garwood after she procured them from a former WU pediatric facility with the help of two strong cousins. Anderson said she envisions the SPOT as a resource for much of North County. The school district has already opened it to students from Riverview Gardens and Normandy school districts for physicals and other basic services. Nancy Cambria • 314-340-8238 @nanecam on Twitter ncambria@post-dispatch.com

HOURS

But for many teens, the appeal is deeper: The SPOT helps them build relationships with a medical staff who know their names and understand they may have histories of trauma. For years, more teens from Jennings than anywhere else in the region were traveling to the clinic. Then, Dr. Sarah Garwood, one of SPOT’s pediatricians, came up with an ambitious idea to bring the clinic’s services directly to those youths at their own high school. On Thursday, administrators and physicians held an open house to mark the one-year anniversary of that project, which placed a SPOT clinic inside Jennings High School last March. So far, more than 200 student referrals have been made by staf for students to receive services from a pediatrician, a case manager and a therapist supported by the St. Louis County Children’s Service Fund. Now, clinic leaders say, students are coming on their own because of positive word-of-mouth among their peers. “We’ve seen more teens who are willing to be more open and involved about health care and their own health and well-being,” said Jennings schools Superintendent Tifany Anderson. And that also helps faculty and staf. “The message we want to give them is that we’re here with services to make their job with the students easier,” Garwood said.

transmitted diseases were an issue, and there was a need for accessible contraception given the high teen pregnancy rate in the area. All of those issues were affecting attendance, school behavior and graduation rates, Anderson said. In addition, student athletes had neither access nor money to get their required annual physicals. So Jennings was footing the bill to bus athletes to a Walgreens Take Care clinic to get the checkups. Now, those services are available at the SPOT. The clinic is only the second in the region to be embedded in a high school, and the first to offer full primary care and behavioral services on-site. The other clinic operates in Roosevelt High School in St. Louis in partnership with Mercy Health, and provides basic health care and referrals, but not contraception.

LATER

SPOT • FROM A1

A Non-Proit Retirement Housing Foundation Community

Come See us At the St. Charles Home & Garden Show

SpA & SWIM SPA BLOWOUT SALE

THIS WEEKEND April 8-10 • Fri & SAt 11A-8p • Sun 11A-5p

ST. CHARLES CONVENTION CENTER 1 CONVENTION CENTER PLAZA, ST. CHARLES

SAVE 30%-60%, PLUS: $

500 OFF ANY HOT TUB

Valid on floor models only. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Not Valid toward previous purchases. May not be combined with any other coupons. Good only at Spas & More Inc.’s huge tent adjacent to the St. Charles Convention Center, April 8-10, 2016.

1000 OFF ANY SWIM SPA

$

Valid on floor models only. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Not Valid toward previous purchases. May not be combined with any other coupons. Good only at Spas & More Inc.’s huge tent adjacent to the St. Charles Convention Center, April 8-10, 2016.

1-800-SPA-SALE

Mon-Thurs: 10am- 6:30pm

636 394 3005 DauFurniture.com

Fri and Sat: 10am- 5:30pm

Bradington Young Leather Swivel Glider Recliner SALE price starting at

Palliser Banf Leather Power Recliner SALE price starting at

$1,998

$1,298

TRUNK SHOW At Our Glendale Location Fri. & Sat., April 8th & 9th, 10am–3pm Meet the Rep! See the large selection of new Dansko product!

A FREE DANSKO WATER BOTTLE WITH PURCHASE (Value $15)

At Glendale, Chesterfield Mall & Birkenstock store - Creve Coeur 314.961.1642 • 9916 Manchester St. Louis, MO 63122 • www.lauriesshoes.com

Recliner Name

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF

TAX RELIEF SAVINGS! DAU FURNITURE

Dau Furniture is ofering a discount equal to the sales tax on all regularly priced orders placed in April including recliners from Bradington Young and Palliser. Come in today and enjoy comfortable tax savings!

15424 MANCHESTER ROAD, ELLISVILLE, MISSOURI 63011


LOCAL

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A7

Marathon oicials target cheaters GO! ST. LOUIS MARATHON AND HALF MARATHON ROUTES Union

70

MISSOURI

40

Chou

teau

M.L.King Bridge

1

Eads Bridge

Chest

Mark 7 et

h

9t

2

nut Arch

8

12

64

55

nd

Poplar St. Bridge

11 Mississippi River

ois Grav

3

9 Vict o

r

55

Arse nal

Full road closing details and schedule at gostlouis.org

10

Marathon and half marathon route Marathon route continues

X Mile markers S Starting line

AnheuserBusch Brewery

F Finish line Post-Dispatch

1/2 MILE

MARATHON • FROM A1

However, she continued to run and collect winnings until another positive drug test resulted in an eight-year ban from competition. Mariita collected $1,500 from Go! St. Louis, which will hold its annual marathon and half marathon Sunday morning as part of its annual Family Fitness Weekend. But the organization wasn’t alerted to the situation until early this year. “She came, ran and accepted prize money, knowing she’d been banned,” said Go! St. Louis president Nancy Lieberman. Mariita is one of many runners from Kenya who have tested positive while competing at small events in the U.S. and Mexico. Her agent, Larisa Mikhaylova, also has come under scrutiny for placing runners in events after they have failed tests, largely in Mexico. Mikhaylova said Thursday that’s where Mariita first tested positive and that she had no knowledge of that result. “I didn’t know about that be-

th 10

ri ou ss Mi

44

fayette

44

55

3

Busch Stadium

Russ ell

64

4

Half marathon ends here Lafayette Square Park La

2nd

1st Dome

Bo

MARATHON ROUTE • Beginning at 12:01 a.m. Sunday rolling closures are planned along the race route. They willMissouri continue along the route as the race Botanical progresses until about 3 p.m. Several interstate highwayGarden ramps will close for all or parts of the event, beginning at 5 a.m. They include: • Westbound 21st Street, Exit 39A TowerI-64 Groveat Park • Westbound I-64 at 3000 Market Street, Exit 38B • Westbound I-64 at Forest Park Parkway, Exit 38A • Eastbound Hwy. 40 at Market/Bernard, Exit 37A • Westbound I-44 at MLK/Riverfront, Exit 292A • Westbound I-44 at Broadway, Exit 292B

6

Broad way

r

14

ILLINOIS

5

14th

25

15

ROAD CLOSINGS SITE PREP • Friday to Sunday, from 7 a.m. to noon, crews will block sections of Chestnut Street (from Tucker Boulevard to 17th Street); and 13th Street (from Market to Pine). In addition, crews will block of much of 14th Street (from Market to Pine).

M.L.K ing Wash ingto n City Museum Olive 26 M arke t F S Union 13 64 Station

St. Louis University

ay dw oa Br

r

24

Tucke r

Park

20

Science Center

e Manchest

Fores t

Va nd ev en te

Hampto n

Planetarium

16

7th

Jewel Box

Zoo

19

70

23

Jefer son

21

FOREST PARK

on

Muny

Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge

Cass

Linde ll

Comp t

17

22

Grand

18

Kingshighw ay

History Museum

Races begin at 7 a.m. on Sunday.

MARATHON WEEKEND What • Go! St. Louis Marathon and Family Fitness Weekend When • Saturday and Sunday Events • 5K walk/run, Saturday at 8 a.m. in Forest Park with other events to follow; Marathon, half marathon, marathon relay, Mississippi 7K run/walk, Sunday at 7 a.m. downtown

cause I’m not working with races in Mexico,” she said. “She came to my place and requested to run in the U.S. and didn’t say anything. I didn’t get any information about doping in Mexico. I got a document but it was so late — I think the end of April. That’s why I cannot say that Lilian is honest.” Mikhaylova attempted to enter runners in this weekend’s St. Louis races, but she met with the same response she said she has received elsewhere. “She asked us to accept two of her runners, and we declined,” Lieberman said. “It is certainly an issue of trust on our part, knowing she knew and sent her

athlete anyway. Other races in the United States are now familiar with this person. Word like this spreads quickly through the community.” Word of Mariita’s tainted win was another odd twist for the 2015 St. Louis races. Days after the April races, it was discovered that Kendall Schler had cheated to win the women’s marathon by running only the start and finish of the race. Discrepancies in her performance were discovered on site, and she didn’t collect the winner’s share. Andrea Karl was named the winner and awarded $1,500. When Mariita was stripped of her title, Krista Arnold of Edwardsville moved to second place and Hilary Orf of Ballwin slipped into third, albeit too late to collect their deserved winnings. “It’s an affront to all runners and people who train hard and play by the rules,” Lieberman said. “How dare they mar the running industry because of what they’ve done. Of the people who run, 99.5 percent are com-

mon people who work hard and train and that medal is so important.” Kenya is one of three countries that has been placed on a watch list by the International Association of Athletics Federations for issues related to doping. If improvements are not made, the country risks longer-term penalties. Lieberman said Kenyan runners will compete in this year’s races. The events include participants from 13 countries and 48 states. She said the concern is not for Kenyan runners specifically, but cheating in general. Go! St. Louis reviews the list of banned athletes listed on the IAAF website before races. However, she said there is always a three- to four-month delay between a positive test and the ban being posted, which was the case with Mariita. “Sometimes the lack of timeliness effects an event,” she said. “There’s no way we could have known at that time because it was so new.” Mariita was finally caught at

a race in Frankfort, Ky., in July 2015 after finishing second at the Great Bufalo Chase 5K. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency was on hand because of a tip. She tested positive, but not before running in nine races last year, according to the AP story. She used the money she earned to build a home in her village, and Mikhaylova had collected 15 percent of the winnings from Mariita and other runners. Mariita returned home to what the AP described as a “muddy tea-plantation village,” where she cares for her 2-year-old daughter, who was born in Kentucky. She reportedly earned $24,000 in the U.S. in 2014 alone. Now, her career running in the states to support life back home appears to have ended. “I used to rely on this for money,” she told a reporter, “and I don’t know what is left for me.” Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

Years of problems at Harry’s piled up, records say HARRY’S • FROM A1

kept by the city’s excise division, which monitors liquor licenses. Sales had dropped precipitously. And then, last year, liquor control agents twice caught Harry’s serving minors — including at a 900-student Washington University event. On Jan. 5, Harry’s co-owner Harry Belli — the restaurant’s namesake — signed a settlement with the excise division to close the restaurant. Two weeks later, however, Pieri blamed Harry’s collapse on the market. “Downtown is just a dead area right now, unfortunately,” he told the Post-Dispatch then. “Obviously, the sad part is nobody is talking about it. Iconic places are going out of business, and nobody cares.” The perception and vitality of downtown St. Louis is of particular importance now. The federal government has just committed to building a $1.7 billion compound — two miles north of downtown — for its National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency. City leaders are banking on the ultra-high-tech facility attracting a workforce of millennials who want an urban lifestyle. They’re betting that such an investment will revitalize not only the city’s near north side, but its Washington Avenue downtown core, too. And yet a stubborn spike in crime is frustrating city oicials. Bars and restaurants are indeed closing — Joe Buck’s closed in October; the Dubliner in November; Prime 1000 in December; Harry’s and Mike Shannon’s Steaks & Seafood at the end of January. But few, outside of Pieri, blame Ballpark Village entirely. “I had 30 years downtown,” said Shannon’s owner, Mike Shannon. “I decided to go out on top. It has nothing to do with Ballpark Village.”

STEAKHOUSES, MILLENNIALS Shannon said the entertainment district’s opening hurt business at his outdoor patio bar

but brought traic to the steakhouse. And customers quickly returned outdoors, he continued. Now he’s renting the patio to his grandson, Justin VanMatre, who, with business partners, is opening a similar game-day bar outside. VanMatre promises local fare and isn’t worried about Ballpark Village. Seamus McGowan, who owns several bars on Washington Avenue with his brothers, said Ballpark Village’s first season was hard. “It definitely took a toll, when something that large opens,” he said. But losses varied. Flannery’s Pub, a sports bar, might have lost 20 percent of its business initially, he said. Rosalita’s Cantina, a Mexican restaurant, barely felt a thing. “Everybody wanted to go check it out, and, over the first few months, it had a dramatic impact,” he said. “We’re back to pre-Ballpark Village levels.” Downtown is, as a whole, gaining bars and restaurants, not losing them, said Missy Kelley, president and chief executive of the downtown booster a n d d eve l o p m e n t a ge n cy Downtown STL. Ninety-nine have opened since the end of 2013, Kelley said; 40 have closed. Ballpark Village opened at the end of March 2014, and Kelley said it’s adding business, not taking it away. Ballpark Village is jointly owned by the Cardinals and the Cordish Cos. Jim Watry, chief operating officer there, said they spent $1.8 million on marketing last year. They met with a national bus tour association. “We’re working to bring people from a larger geographical region than the city,” he said, “and to make downtown busy on non-game days.” Places such as Shannon’s and Harry’s were classics, Kelley said. But millennials, she said, “are probably not going to go to a steakhouse.” “I think it’s really easy to point to something that’s new and successful when a concept that worked for a very long time doesn’t work anymore,” Kel-

ley said. “I’m not sure if anyone went to Harry’s for food anymore.”

‘WE HUNG ON’ Harry’s was clearly struggling, according to excise division files. Food and drink sales steadily dropped from $2.3 million in 2008 to $1.3 million in 2014, the most recent year available. The restaurant added a nightclub and underage nights. Then, late one night last summer, nine liquor control and police officers raided Harry’s. Pieri, the co-owner, had contracted to host a Washington University event. He expected 200 students; 900 showed up, according to the city report. The officers quickly busted five minors for underage drinking, the report said. Several had recognizably fake identification, from Oklahoma, Connecticut or New York. One student presented a Rhode Island license. When agent Adam Shook told him it was fake, the student tried to hand him a business card and said, “My uncle is a police officer,” according to the report. “He said that if I run into any trouble, I should give you this.” Shook issued the student a summons. Other students, now aware of the liquor control agents, fled the restaurant, the report said. Within 20 minutes, there were 100 customers left. In January, Harry’s attorney, John Bouhasin, brokered a settlement with the city. The city agreed to reduce a $3,000 fine to $500. The restaurant agreed to close. Pieri said earlier this week that Harry’s was on its last ropes. “We hung on as long as we could,” he said. “It was time.” But he insisted: “You can keep asking the same question. I’m telling you, it was 100 percent Ballpark Village.” David Hunn • 314-340-8121 @davidhunn on Twitter dhunn@post-dispatch.com

PHOTO BY KATHERINE BISH

Food and drink sales at Harry’s downtown had steadily declined.

HARRY’S RESTAURANT & BAR YEARLY SALES $2.5 million

$2 million

$1.5 million

$1 million

$1.3 million $500,000

’08

’09

’10

’11

’12

’13

’14

SOURCE: St. Louis Excise Division | Post-Dispatch


LOCAL

A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

State Senate moves to hold 2 in contempt Planned Parenthood oicial, lab owner were called to testify about fetal tissue last year BY JACK SUNTRUP St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • Missouri

Republican senators moved forward with contempt proceedings against a Planned Parenthood oicial Thursday. The Senate Rules, Joint Rules, Resolutions and Ethics Committee voted along party lines 5-2 to advance a resolution that would compel a Planned Parenthood official to appear before the whole Senate. The resolution now moves to the full Senate for debate. Senate President Pro Tem Ron Richard, R-Joplin, issued a subpoena in November to Mary Kogut, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri. James Miller, owner of Brentwood-based Pathology Services Inc., was also issued a subpoena. He too faces con-

tempt proceedings. Senators sought from Planned Parenthood six years worth of documents pertaining to fetal tissue and other information about Planned Parenthood operations. Miller was supposed to testify before the interim Senate Sanctity of Life Committee in December but didn’t. On Dec. 23, after the two hadn’t complied with the subpoena, state Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia and committee chairman, recommended that the Senate interim committee move forward with contempt proceedings against Miller and Kogut. If the full Senate approves the resolutions, Kogut and Miller could be forced to appear before the full Senate to explain themselves. Chuck Hatfield, attorney for Planned Parenthood, says the organization already has ex-

plained itself. He said the Senate hasn’t listened. After the initial subpoena in November, Hatfield’s firm sent a letter on Dec. 4 to Richard outlining the group’s objections. The letter said that the subpoena was overly broad, onerous and would violate patient privacy laws. “We heard nothing from them — no phone call, no letter,” Hatfield said. “Instead, on Dec. 23, they issued a report initiating contempt proceedings.” According to a timeline from Hatfield, through February and March, Senate lawyers and Planned Parenthood representatives exchanged more calls and letters. Planned Parenthood again outlined its concerns. On March 15, a Senate lawyer, Todd Scott, said in a letter that Planned Parenthood wouldn’t have to include personally identifiable patient information

such as names and addresses. “Federal law covers more than just names and addresses,” Hatfield said. Federal HIPAA law covers 18 identifiers including Social Security numbers and medical record numbers, Hatfield said. The group has other objections. For example, the committee seeks records of when ambulances went to Planned Parenthood’s St. Louis location, which doesn’t have anything to do with fetal tissue, Hatfield said. On March 30, Schaefer filed his resolutions that would compel Kogut and Miller to appear before the Senate. At the Senate hearing Tuesday, Schaefer said he sought to assert Senate authority in the face of intransigence on the part of Planned Parenthood. “If we don’t have ability to issue subpoenas and actually

Four Busch siblings scrap zoo plan, make ofer to block brewing brother

enforce them, that is a severe disability to the Legislature to actually do its job,” Schaefer said. Both sides have accused the other of being uncooperative. If Miller and Kogut are found in contempt, they could face 10 days in jail, a $300 fine or both. Republican lawmakers began investigating Planned Parenthood this summer after videos were released elsewhere alleging the abortion and health care provider sold fetal tissue. Planned Parenthood has denied these allegations, and Attorney General Chris Koster, a Democrat running for governor this year, found no evidence of wrongdoing in Missouri. Schaefer’s resolutions are Senate Resolution 1793 and 1794. Jack Suntrup • 573-556-6184 @JackSuntrup on Twitter jsuntrup@post-dispatch.com

Senate approves $27 billion budget BUDGET • FROM A1

PHOTO BY ROBERT SRENCO

Grant’s Farm is pictured last fall in this view looking north. The Bauernhof is seen in the center. The Busch family mansion is lower right. Brewer Billy Busch sought to build a small brewery on-site and move his Kräftig beer business to the Bauernhof.

BUSCH • FROM A1

“Our brother Billy is still operating a startup, struggling company,” Valentine told the Post-Dispatch on Thursday. “And there will be many changes at Grant’s Farm if he operates it.” “Billy’s plan has a lot of risks, and assumptions we don’t think will work,” she continued. Billy Busch, however, said he’s not dropping his fight. “Their offer includes very few details and certainly no guarantees or assurances that they would not sell Grant’s Farm in the future to developers or other entities,” he said in a statement. “That said, I absolutely intend to continue pursuing the purchase of the property from our family trust, just as I have done since last November.” Billy said he’s going to petition Wells Fargo and his oldest brother, Adolphus Busch, co-trustees of the family trust, to seek financial assurances from his brothers and sisters, plus a “detailed, 10-year business plan.” He also wants a written guarantee that the siblings, if successful in their purchase, won’t sell any portion of the farm. Adolphus, who has publicly backed Billy’s plan, applauded the four siblings for “finally” acknowledging that their father wanted the farm to stay in the family. But he was skeptical about their intentions. The will doesn’t prevent them from selling the farm to the zoo in a few years, he said. “I think that’s absolutely what they’ll be looking to do,” he said. Zoo Association President Matt Geekie rejected the theory outright. “The St. Louis Zoo Association is not interested in acquiring Grant’s Farm, period,” he said on Thursday. Not now, he said. Not later. In November, news broke that the St. Louis Zoo had agreed to buy the farm for about $30 million from the six siblings, all heirs of beer baron August A. “Gussie” Busch Jr. But the deal was complicated. It required a judge’s approval to release the land from the family trust — and area residents to approve a new zoo tax to fund as much as $8.5 million in yearly park operation costs. The sale would have tripled the zoo’s acreage, added a third campus to its holdings and allowed it to build a “robust” breeding facility for endangered

POST-DISPATCH FILE PHOTO

The Busch mansion at Grant’s Farm. The property is controlled by the family trust.

animals, zoo leaders said then. But Billy Busch countered, asking his brothers and sisters to sell the 198 acres to him, instead, for $24 million. Billy Busch said he’d like to build a small brewery on-site and move his Kräftig beer business to the property’s red-roofed Bauernhof. Billy and Adolphus Busch argued that their father’s will made it clear that he wanted one of his children to buy the land. In March, Billy Busch delivered an inch-thick business plan to his brothers and sisters. Days later, the zoo backed out of its proposal. The siblings’ new offer essentially would have the four buying out Billy’s and Adolphus’s shares in the family trust that owns Grant’s Farm. It is unclear if the siblings would eventually allow the zoo to lease or buy space for animal husbandry, or if they might let Billy Busch add Kräftig beer taps, brewing equipment or oice space. But the move would put the four in clear control of the land. Valentine and Andrew Busch said in an interview on Thursday that all four liked the partnership with the zoo. “Now that’s of the table,” Valentine said. But the siblings still want the farm to “live on,” and still want to be involved, as they would have been under the zoo plan. The four have more managerial experience and deeper pockets than Billy Busch does by himself, Valentine

continued. And Anheuser-Busch will continue to run the farm, as it has for 62 years, they said. “We think they’ve been wonderful partners,” Andrew Busch said. “We believe they’re committed to operating the place.” A spokeswoman for AnheuserBusch did not return a call seeking comment. The two said the business model isn’t changing, and they didn’t expect to present a new one. “I think the public spoke clearly, that they wanted family ownership,” Valentine said. “We won’t make any substantial changes.” “Certainly,” Andrew Busch added, “there are some things we plan to do there to spruce the place up.” The four pledged, in a statement released Thursday, to make “significant investments” in the landscape and facilities, and to keep the complimentary beer. Andrew Busch and Valentine said the issue is now in the trustees’ hands. A judge may also weigh in — St. Louis Circuit Court Probate Commissioner Patrick Connaghan set a hearing for April 26 in the original case. “We don’t want this to turn into a family fight,” Valentine said. “We love Billy, and we want to do the right thing for Grant’s Farm.” The park opens for the summer on April 16. David Hunn • 314-340-8121 @davidhunn on Twitter dhunn@post-dispatch.com

said of restoring cuts to Mizzou. “I think some of the things that MU has done has helped defuse the situation.” The Republican-crafted proposal, spread across 13 separate budget bills, is based on a projected 4.1 percent increase in state revenue for the coming year. It calls for no tax increases. For the embattled University of Missouri system, senators erased most of the $8.7 million in cuts the House had inserted in its budget. Senators said those reductions would be punitive and more time should be given to the university system to improve itself after last year’s racially charged protests at its Columbia campus and the resignation of its system president. The proposal includes an additional $56 million in funding for universities, which amounts to an increase for the schools of about 6 percent. That could be enough to allow schools to freeze tuition. Nixon, during a visit to Crowder College in Neosho on Thursday, thanked the Senate and expressed hope that the added money is not cut during final negotiations between the House and Senate. “Missouri leads the nation in holding down tuition increases at public universities, helping to put a college education within reach for more students and their families,” the Democratic governor said. Both the House and the Senate must agree on the final budget before it is sent to the governor. The deadline for final passage is May 6. Problems at Mizzou have been a focal point of the 2016 legislative session, with lawmakers calling for audits, budget cuts and the ouster of former communications assistant professor Melissa Click. “It has overshadowed some of our other education issues in the state,” said Sen. David Pearce, R-Warrensburg. The higher education budget wasn’t universally supported. The Senate version would again bar universities from granting in-state tuition rates to an estimated 1,200 students in the country illegally. “I think we’re penalizing some of our brightest students,” said Sen. Gina Walsh, D-Bellefontaine Neighbors. “I think it’s the wrong decision,” added Pearce. “It has tremendous impact.” Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, said he doesn’t believe granting in-state tuition to students who are not in the U.S. legally is an appropriate use of taxpayer dollars. “I know there are passionate feelings on both sides of this issue,” said Schaefer, who is chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee. The budget plan also attempts to address rising health care costs for the state’s poorest residents. Medicaid costs, for example, are projected to increase 34 percent in the coming year. “We are trying to slow this train down,” Schaefer said. With prescription drug costs rising above $1.8 billion, the Senate version reduces projected spending by $56 million. Senators also asked the administration to find ways to pare an estimated $22 million by negotiating better drug prices and potentially limiting the amount of drugs prescribed to recipients. Republicans also used the budget to target Planned Parenthood. The plan bars Medicaid money from going to abortion service providers. State money already is prohibited from being spent on funding abortions. The net result: Missouri will lose $8 million in federal funds. “It’s pouring salt into an already really, really bad decision,” said Sen. Jason Holsman, D-Kansas City. Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, said it was wrong for Republicans to “sneak” the provision into the budget without having a full debate. The budget also calls for a $71 million increase for the education foundation formula, which funds K-12 public schools. Nixon recommended an $85 million increase. The formula, however, is still underfunded by about $490 million. Schaefer said the growth in Medicaid is keeping the state from paying more. “I would like to see it fully funded, but I understand that’s not going to happen,” said Schupp, a former school board member. “We’re still breaking our promise to our kids.” The bills are House Bills 1-12. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com


NATION

04.08.2016 • FriDay • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-DiSPaTCH • A9

Americans ‘numb’ and a little clueless about Zika, poll inds Mosquito season approaches; U.S. weighs options to limit outbreaks BY LAURAN NEERGAARD AND EMILY SWANSON associated Press

WASHINGTON • Americans don’t know a lot about the Zika virus that is linked to birth defects and creeping steadily closer to the U.S., according to a new poll that found about 4 in 10 say they’ve heard little to nothing about the mosquitoborne threat. Even among people who’ve been following the Zika saga at least a little, many aren’t sure whether there’s a vaccine or treatment — not yet — or if there’s any way the virus can spread other than through mosquito bites. Still, with mosquito season approaching, more than half of the population supports a variety of eforts to control summer swarms — from spraying pesticides to releasing genetically modified mosquitoes, says the poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Afairs Research. The government is considering a field trial in the Florida Keys of male mosquitoes, which don’t bite, that are genetically altered so that when they mate with wild females the ofspring quickly die. The poll found 56 percent of people would support introducing such mosquitoes into areas afected by Zika. “I think it’s kind of the wave of the future, to be honest,” said

Gridlock on court criticized

Janis Maney, 63, of Pensacola, Fla., who sees mosquitoes nearly year-round in her warm climate. She’s open to “anything that would control those little buggers.” The Zika virus has exploded throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. While adults typically suffer mild, if any, symptoms, there’s an increasingly strong link between infections in pregnant women and fetal death and babies born with small heads that signal a damaged brain. U.S. health oicials are warning pregnant women and those attempting to conceive to avoid traveling to Zika-affected areas. More than 300 cases of Zika have been diagnosed in the U.S., all so far associated with travel. But the mosquitoes capable of spreading Zika live in parts of the U.S. And while experts don’t expect an epidemic here, they worry that small clusters of cases are likely, particularly in Florida or Texas, if the insects bite returning travelers and then someone else. “We have only weeks to prepare before the mosquitoes, and perhaps the virus, get ahead of us,” said Dr. Edward McCabe of the March of Dimes. Leah Zeleski, 27, of Lincoln, Neb., said she won’t travel too far south this summer. A nursing student, Zeleski calls this a “very scary” time for women of childbearing age and won-

ders what scientists will discover next about Zika’s risks, unknown until the current outbreak began in Brazil last year. Zeleski said she’ll wear insect repellent and cover up during mosquito season. The AP-NORC Center poll found that among people who’ve heard about Zika, 90 percent know mosquitoes can spread it but there are some other key gaps in knowledge: • About 1 in 5 couldn’t say whether Zika was linked to birth defects. • Zika also can spread through sexual intercourse, but 14 percent wrongly thought it couldn’t, and another 29 percent said they didn’t know. That’s worrisome, because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says men who’ve traveled to Zika-affected areas either should use condoms with their pregnant partners or avoid sex until the baby’s birth. • More than half didn’t know if there was a vaccine or treatment for Zika — there is not — or a diagnostic test. There are tests but they’re not perfect, and they’re being used primarily with pregnant women. More public education is needed before there are any homegrown Zika infections, said Gillian SteelFisher of Harvard’s school of public health, whose own polling has found even more misconceptions about Zika.

“We have an opportunity, before there’s a case, to get people to worry where they need to and not where they don’t,” SteelFisher said. “With good information, people can take the right steps to protect themselves.” The poll found few people — 16 percent — are very worried that the U.S. will experience much Zika. “I’ve kind of grown numb” about outbreak warnings in recent years, said Valerie White, 24, of Montgomery County, Md., who doesn’t plan to travel during her pregnancy. “Once people realize it’s a problem, there’s usually a quick response, so I’m not worried.” Only a quarter of people said U.S. athletes should withdraw from the Olympics in Brazil this summer. When it comes to those genetically modified mosquitoes, some activists in Florida have argued against them — but the new poll found only 16 percent of Americans overall are opposed to the strategy to control Zika, and 26 percent are neutral. In previous surveys, genetically modified food ingredients have generated more public concern. The AP-NORC poll of 1,004 adults was conducted March 17-21 using a sample drawn from NORC’s probability-based AmeriSpeak panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 3.8 percent.

4 credible sources reportedly accuse Hastert of sexual abuse Former speaker to be sentenced this month in hush-money case

Obama makes case for his nominee ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHICAGO • President Barack

Obama accused Senate Republicans on Thursday of jeopardizing the “integrity of the judicial branch” by refusing to consider his “extraordinary” nominee to the Supreme Court. Holding court before Chicago law students, Obama argued that the treatment of Judge Merrick Garland will cause the public to lose confidence in the ability of courts at all levels of government to fairly judge cases and resolve controversies. “Our democracy can’t aford that,” Obama said. Obama introduced Garland, chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, three weeks ago, but the nomination had stalled long before. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., had announced hours after Justice Antonin Scalia’s death in February that the Senate would not hold hearings or vote on Obama’s nomination in an election year. Obama said that stance is jeopardizing democracy by leading to potential 4-4 ties on cases from the Supreme Court. He also said there potentially are two terms in which the high court will have to issue rulings without a tie-breaking justice. Obama said the courts have become a troubling extension of America’s broken politics. “That erodes the institutional integrity of the judicial branch,” Obama told about 300 students, faculty and judges at the University of Chicago Law School, where he once taught. On the Senate floor Thursday, McConnell said Obama would “be telling supporters a politically convenient fairy tale” by arguing that the Constitution requires a vote on his nominee. Garland has been meeting with Democratic and Republican senators on Capitol Hill, but there is no indication the sessions are influencing the Senate Republican leadership. In Chicago, Obama took questions from students, including one who asked about the diversity Garland, who is white, would add to the court. “Well, he’s from Skokie, (Illinois),” Obama joked. He noted that Garland follows his earlier nominations of Sonia Sotomayor, a Latina, and Elena Kagan, who is Jewish, to the high court. “When I look at Merrick Garland, yeah, he’s a white guy but he’s a really outstanding jurist. Sorry.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert arrives in July at the federal courthouse in Chicago for arraignment in a hush-money case, which led to allegations he sexually abused students he coached. ASSOCIATED PRESS CHICAGO • At least four peo-

ple have made “credible allegations of sexual abuse” against former House Speaker Dennis Hastert, the Chicago Tribune reported Thursday, citing unidentified law enforcement sources. The newspaper said all of the accusers are men whose allegations stem from when they were teenagers and Hastert was their high school coach in Yorkville, Ill., southwest of Chicago. One of the accusers is a relative of one of Hastert’s friends and was a student leader at the school in the 1970s, according to the paper. When that accuser, who has been identified in court documents only as Individual A, applied for his first job after college, he listed Hastert as a reference, the Tribune said. After landing the job in the mid1980s, he suffered from an anxiety disorder, and court records revealed serious financial problems, the paper reported. The Tribune said it had determined the identities of three accusers. One of them is dead. The other two are Individual A and a man referred to as Individual D. The Tribune did not name any of the men who are still alive, and it said it did not know the identity of the fourth accuser and ofered no details about that person. Individual A declined to make any comment when approached by the newspaper. Individual D spoke privately to the newspaper.

The now-deceased accuser named by the Tribune had been named previously by The Associated Press as Stephen Reinboldt, a team equipment manager at Yorkville High School, where Hastert was a teacher and wrestling coach from 1965 to 1981. Individual A and Individual D, the Tribune said, were popular standout athletes from well-known families, the Tribune reported. Reinboldt’s sister, Jolene Burdge of Billings, Mont., has told the AP that her brother told her his first homosexual experience was with Hastert. Reinboldt died in 1995. The abuse of Individual D would have occurred not long before Hastert left the Yorkville school in 1981 to take a seat in the Illinois Legislature. As an adult, Individual D became a successful businessman. Recent court documents indicated he is leaning toward testifying at the Republican’s sentencing for violating banking laws but has agonized over a final decision. The Tribune cited a source as saying Hastert recently asked a relative of Individual D to write a letter to the sentencing judge. After that, Individual D contacted authorities about possibly making a victim’s statement at Hastert’s sentencing, the Tribune said. Hastert, 74, is scheduled to be sentenced April 27. He entered the U.S. House in 1987 and his reputation for congeniality helped him ascend the ranks to become the longestserving Republican speaker. He retired from Congress in 2007

after running the chamber for eight years. He pleaded guilty last fall to violating banking laws while seeking to pay $3.5 million in hush money to ensure Individual A stayed quiet. According to court documents, Hastert managed to pay $1.7 million to Individual A in lump sums of $100,000 cash and abruptly stopped the payments in 2014 after the FBI questioned him. The case has been shrouded in secrecy, starting with the May 28, 2015, indictment. The seven-page document only hints at Hastert’s motivations for breaking banking law. Only two weeks ago — at an unannounced court hearing — did the judge and attorneys publicly broach sexual-abuse allegations in a mostly empty courtroom as they discussed Individual D testifying at sentencing. The Associated Press and other media outlets, citing unnamed sources, reported that Hastert wanted to hide claims he sexually molested someone. The agreement about the payments was regarded as an out-of-court settlement and not extortion, the newspaper reported. The Tribune did not say if both Hastert and Individual A, now a middle-aged husband and father, saw the deal that way. In papers filed Wednesday, Hastert’s lawyers asked Judge Thomas M. Durkin to spare Hastert prison time and give him probation instead, citing his deteriorating health and the steep price they say he has already paid in shame and disgrace.

DIGEST Toddler who had octopus in throat is on the mend A 2-year-old boy hospitalized after a small octopus became wedged in this throat showed signs of improvement Thursday as an investigation pressed on, Wichita, Kan., police said. The boy, who was brought in to the hospital Tuesday night, has been upgraded to good condition and shows no immediate symptoms of long-term injury caused by oxygen deprivation to the brain, police Lt. James Espinoza told the Wichita Eagle. Police have said the child’s mother, 21, returned home from work Tuesday and found her boyfriend performing CPR on her son. Espinoza said the couple took the boy to the hospital, where doctors removed the dead octopus — its head about 2 inches in diameter — from the boy’s throat. Police said the octopus was not a pet, but likely to be used for sushi. The hospital notiied police because the boyfriend’s account was inconsistent with evidence, Espinoza said. New York police commanders relieved from posts • Four top New York Police Department commanders were removed from their supervisory posts Thursday amid a joint federal-city investigation into possible illegal payments of cash and gifts to highranking police oicials by a pair of Brooklyn businessmen. “This is not a particularly good day for the department,” Commissioner William Bratton said. Bratton said Deputy Chief Michael Harrington and Deputy Inspector James Grant had been placed on modiied duty, and that Deputy Chief David Colon and Deputy Chief Eric Rodriguez had been transferred. None of the four has been charged with a crime. The probe has focused on allegations that police oicials received tickets for sporting events, vacations, cash or jewelry, according to sources. Psychiatric inmate on the loose in Seattle • A man accused of torturing a woman to death but found too mentally ill for trial was on the loose Thursday after crawling out a window in a locked, lower-security unit of a Washington state psychiatric hospital already facing federal scrutiny over safety problems. Anthony Garver, 28, escaped Wednesday night with Mark Alexander Adams, 58, a patient who had been accused of domestic assault in 2014 and was captured Thursday morning, oicials said. Spokane Sherif’s Capt. Dave Ellis told the Spokesman-Review that Garver was spotted in an area in the city’s East Valley and authorities were searching Thursday evening with police dogs, a SWAT team and helicopters. Garver was charged in 2013 with tying a woman, 20, to her bed, stabbing her 24 times in the chest and slashing her throat. IRS adds convenience to tax payments • The Internal Revenue Service announced this week that taxpayers who need to make a payment in cash can now do so at 7-Eleven convenience stores. While it may seem unusual to pay your taxes where you might otherwise pick up a Slurpee, it caters to a large number of Americans who do not have a bank account or credit card. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation estimates one in 13 households in the U.S. doesn’t have a bank account. The IRS said payments would be accepted at more than 7,000 7-Eleven stores nationwide. Individuals who want to use this option should visit the IRS. gov payments page, and follow instructions there for how to make cash payments. Because it is a multistep process, the IRS urges people to start it well ahead of this year’s April 18 tax deadline. Support swells for manatees • On the inal day for public comment on whether to downgrade the West Indian Manatee from “endangered” to “threatened,” the unoicial consensus was overwhelming. Over the last three months, virtually all of the 3,700-plus people who have weighed in on the matter with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service want the big sea cow to retain its current federal classiication. Population growth, improved habitat conditions and fewer direct threats to the manatee prompted the move to reclassify the sea mammal under the Endangered Species Act. But lawmakers and manatee supporters say the formula that led to the sea cows’ improved numbers, after years of decline, should not be tampered with. The Maitland, Fla.-based Save the Manatee Club delivered a 300-plus page petition to the wildlife service Wednesday with nearly 11,400 signatures from people opposing the “premature downlisting.” From news services


A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

LIQUIDATION SALE OUR BIGGEST SUPPLIER OF FINE HAND KNOTTED ORIENTAL RUGS IS RETIRING DUE TO HEALTH PROBLEMS, AND HAS ASKED US TO LIQUIDATE HIS ENTIRE INVENTORY, IN A SHORT PERIOD OF TIME.

60%~80%

EVERY RUG REDUCED

OFF THE RETAIL PRICE

China Savanery (10.3 x 13.10)

Nepal Wool (9.2 x 11.11)

Transitional Indian (9 x 12)

WAS 9,900 NOW 2,990

WAS 14,900 NOW 4,990

WAS 16,900 NOW 5,790

Persian Mashad (9.9 x 12.9)

Nepal Wool (8 x 10)

India Wool (6 x 8.11)

WAS 6,900 NOW 1,290

WAS 13,990 NOW 3,990

WAS 4,990 NOW 1,690

Thousands of the Finest Oriental Rugs, New and Antique, in every Shape and Size, Will Be Liquidated in the Building Next to Our Main Store. STORE HOURS: MON-FRI 10-8 SAT 10-6 SUN 12-6

17373 CHESTERFIELD AIRPORT RD., CHESTERFIELD, MO n 636.778.1838


ENTERTAINMENT

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A11

THEATER REVIEW

PEOPLE

Tender ‘Bridges of Madison County’ needs a smaller stage

Mississippi singer reigns as last ‘Idol’

BY JUDITH NEWMARK St. Louis Post-dispatch

“Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” the new show at Stray Dog Theatre, benefits from being performed in a small house. “The Bridges of Madison County,” another new musical in town, might benefit from exactly the same thing. But “Bridges” is not in a small theater. It’s playing the Fox, a huge venue by most standards (though not in St. Louis, home to the Muny). The proportions of the venue tend to dwarf the delicate love story of a farm wife (Elizabeth Stanley) and a photographer (Andrew Samonsky). Their four days of passion haunt them all their lives. That’s a lot longer than Romeo and Juliet had, but still just a shining sliver of time. On a big stage wellsuited to “The Phantom of the Opera” or “Jersey Boys” (coming in May), “Bridges” doesn’t quite grow into its setting. Jason Robert Brown’s Tony-winning, romantic songs and Michael Yeargan’s evocative, deliberately incomplete set make “Bridges” into a kind of dream musical, an efect enhanced by Donald Holder’s chiaroscuro lighting design. It’s not just a love story, though. It’s also a (remarkably detailed) account of Francesca’s life. That adds context. But it also makes the musical — which Marsha Norman adapted from Robert James Waller’s 1993 best-seller — lumber through its many, many scenes. “Bridges” may be the only romance, ever, to include a subplot about prize-winning cattle. It’s not hard to understand why Francesca is drawn to Robert. A war bride from Italy, after two decades she feels she has become in-

“American Idol” inales have always been a bloated, glitzy, star-studded afair full of musical surprises leading up to the reveal of the winner. Should the inal inale be any diferent? Thursday night’s series inale, with an intro by President Barack Obama, had the diicult task of not looking back at just the current season but the entire 15 years of the series. In one last shocker, Trent Harmon of Mississippi was named the winner over La’Porsha Renae, an announcement that felt like an afterthought to the celebration, probably itting considering the landmark show’s place in music and TV history. The confetti and tears that came with Harmon’s win was after producers squeezed 15 years into two hours that barely featured Harmon and Renae. The show was star-studded, but packed only with stars “Idol” made rather than the superstar drop-ins that typically make up the inale. (Kevin C. Johnson) Goldman family relieved again for end of ‘People v. O.J.’ • Kim Goldman, whose brother, Ron, was found stabbed to death alongside Nicole Brown Simpson in 1994, has long criticized the FX miniseries about the O.J. Simpson murder case. “Finally, it’s over. #PeoplevsOJSimpson @ACSFX,” Goldman tweeted Wednesday, one day after FX aired the inale to “American Crime Story: The People v. O.J. Simpson.” The 10-part series followed Simpson’s trial and acquittal of the murders of his ex-wife and Goldman, a waiter from Chicago. Kim Goldman, who was portrayed by Jessica Blair Herman, said the miniseries has reopened old wounds.

PHOTO BY MATTHEW MURPHY

Elizabeth Stanley and Andrew Samonsky in “The Bridges of Madison County.”

‘THE BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY’ When • Through April 17 Where • Fox Theatre, 527 North Grand Boulevard How much • $25-$80 More info • 314-534-1111; MetroTix.com

visible. “Look at me,” she sings to Robert — which, of course, is exactly what a photographer does best. Robert, who shoots for National Geographic, is a charmer. Robert shows up to shoot the Iowa county’s famous covered bridges, just when Francesca’s down-toearth husband, Bud (Cullen R. Titmas), and teenage kids are off to a cattle competition in Indiana. (The romance is a stroke of luck, or fate.) Played by Samonsky, he’s

a sensitive cowboy — tall, slim-hipped, and blessed with a beautiful voice. His song “The World in a Frame,” might be the show’s best number, rooted as it is in character and place. Stanley has a beautiful voice, too, a soprano that caresses every note. But when she sings, she’s close to unintelligible. (The Italian accent is not a plus.) Since Stanley sings the scene-setting opening song, “To Build a Home,” the show gets of to a slow start. Two of the brightest numbers strike different notes from most of Brown’s tender score. Francesca’s good-hearted neighbor Marge (Mary Callanan) delivers a delightful counterpoint to the lovers’ kitchen dance; with a headful of curlers, she takes the part of

STOR

a sultry singer on the radio, urging them to “Get Closer.” Also, Bud and Marge’s husband Charlie (David Hess) lead the ensemble in a country-style anthem, “When I’m Gone,” that has a great sound — and also addresses another kind of everlasting love. That’s unusual in a romance, but a point worth making nonetheless. A lot of people have loved “Bridges,” first as a novel and then as a 1995 movie starring Meryl Streep and Clint Eastwood. For them, another version may be welcome. But this small show on a big stage may leave the rest of us wondering what all the fuss was about. Judith Newmark • 314-340-8243 Theater critic @judithnewmark on Twitter jnewmark@post-dispatch.com

Big bucks expected for Gaga’s piano • Lady Gaga was only 5 when she wrote her irst song on an upright piano that her grandparents bought. Now the instrument that inspired the pop music sensation is going on the auction block at a pre-sale estimate of $100,000 to $200,000. The piano is being ofered at Julien’s Auctions’ “Music Icons” sale on May 21. A portion of proceeds from the sale will beneit the Born This Way Foundation, launched by Gaga in 2012 to aid youths. Memorabilia from Elvis Presley, Kurt Cobain, the Beatles, Johnny Cash, Michael Jackson and other music icons also are part of the sale. ‘Hamilton’ an immigrant’s tale • Lin-Manuel Miranda, creator of the Broadway smash “Hamilton,” says the real story of Alexander Hamilton is one that any immigrant can relate to. Miranda, who on Thursday was awarded the Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History, told of reading Ron Chernow’s biography of Hamilton and learning that he was raised in what was then the West Indies. Says Miranda: “When I found that out about Hamilton, I said, ‘I know this guy.’” Miranda is of Puerto Rican heritage.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Comedian Shecky Greene is 90. Original Mouseketeer Darlene Gillespie is 75. Singer-actor John Schneider is 56. Singer Julian Lennon is 53. Rapper Biz Markie is 52. Actress Robin Wright is 50. Actress Patricia Arquette is 48. From news services

! ! G N I S O L C E

GO! When it’s GONE it’sGONE! Everything Must

ALL FURNITURE and ACCESSORIES

%-

%

15off 75off CASH OR CREDIT CARD ONLY! ALL SALES FINAL! SORRY NO REFUNDS OR CANCELLATIONS. SORRY NO CHECKS.

HURRY! GOING FAST! Located at Intersection of 55 and Lindbergh FEATURING

Ask about Assembly & Delivery! 6915 S. LINDBERGH BLVD., ST. LOUIS MO 63125 314.416.4500

www.furnituresolutionsstl.com “Savings based on Sauder.com prices”

Store Hours: Monday thru Friday 10am to 8pm Saturday 10am to 6pm Sunday 11am to 6pm


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

Friday • 04.08.2016 • a12

TAKING AIM AT FINANCIAL PREDATORS Our view • Hooray for new rule requiring investment advisers to put customers irst. job hunting over worries that their comA new Labor Department rule requiring pensation will be slashed. financial services advisers to put the St. Louis-based Edward Jones is takinterests of retirement savers ahead of ing a commendable approach, tailored their own is the best thing to happen to retirees since tax-advantaged retirement to comply with the new rule. Instead of dropping smaller-account clients, the accounts were created. company is piloting a plan to offer lowThe rule, which took effect Wednescost accounts and charge an annual fee day, is a game-changer for retirement for clients with a minisavers. Before this change, mum of $5,000, similar financial advisers were to a brokerage account allowed to play with other Before this with a flat fee. Normally, people’s money for their customers must have own enrichment, without change, $50,000 in a fee-based having to act in their cliinancial account. ent’s best interests. advisers Supporters say the That was patently rule will promote transunethical and unfair, but were allowed parency and protect there was nothing in place to play investors from being sold to prevent it. The new rule with other unnecessary financial forces advisers to operate products whose real with the same sort of ethpeople’s purpose is to increase ical and legal standards as money for the adviser’s commisa family doctor, providing their own sions. Left unregulated, the best advice regardless the arrangement created of the impact on their enrichment. clear conflicts of interest. own finances. That was The new rules should Many consumers mispatently promote a shift from takenly thought advisers commissions for indialready operated under unethical vidual transactions to a such rules. Advisers were and unfair. greater reliance on flat generally required only Predatory annual fees. The idea to recommend suitable is to reduce incentives investments. They could inancial for advisers to churn promote products that advisers transactions for personal paid them higher comneed to hit financial gain. missions, instead of idenOne of the strongest tical products with lower the road. opponents of the new commissions. rule was U.S. Rep. Ann The issue is significant Wagner, R-Ballwin, who for the St. Louis region, sponsored legislation to block it. She said a national hub for the financial serin a statement Wednesday that the rule vices industry with more than 84,000 “will only hurt those it claims to protect, employees. jeopardizing the ability for millions of Many in the industry fought the rule low and middle-income Americans to vigorously, arguing it would force them receive sound investment advice.” to abandon clients with less lucrative If money managers aren’t already in accounts. Besides, it would be cumberthis business to provide sound advice, some to enforce, they argued. they should find another line of work. Now forced to adapt to it, investment advisers are cutting fees, relying more on This is a win for hard-working Americans. Predatory financial advisers need technology and reducing the minimum to hit the road. that clients can hold in their brokerage accounts. Some advisers reportedly are

Dues process Our view • Supreme Court punts on labor politics. Missouri should follow. On March 29, as the so-called “paycheck not including police officers or firefighters, to “opt-in” every year to allow their protection” bill passed by the Missouri unions to use a part of their dues for Legislature on March 3 sat in the Mispolitical activities. souri House clerk’s office with Gov. Jay This measure’s supporters appear to Nixon’s veto letter attached to it, the U.S. Supreme Court took action that left be targeting Democratic Party influence, the matter in considerable doubt. Rather since public employee and teachers unions form a key Democratic constituthan try to override a veto, the Legislaency. Interestingly, unions ture needs to drop this item representing firefighters and from its to-do list. police officers are exempted On a 4-4 vote, the shortfrom HB 1891. Their memstaffed Supreme Court left bers also lean more conserintact a ruling by the 9th vative. U.S. Court of Appeals in a Missouri public employees California case that upheld already have the right to the system that the Missouri opt out of having their dues Legislature wants to underused for political purposes, mine. An Orange County, though most don’t take the Calf., teacher named Rebecca Nixon option. Friedrichs was challenging In his veto message, Nixon said HB the California law that requires non1891 would add unnecessary burdens union teachers like her to pay “agency and “serves no purpose other than to fees” to unions that collectively bargain curtail the efforts of ‘public labor orgafor all teachers. nizations’” to speak with a unified voice For decades, conservatives have been on workplace-safety and wage issues. trying to get the court to overturn its Gutting the power of organized labor 1977 decision upholding agency fees. is a holy grail for business organizations The court heard the Friedrichs case on like the American Legislative Exchange Jan. 11 and, based on questions during oral arguments, seemed prepared to rule Council, which drafted the model for HB 1891. Unions that forgot their purpose in Friedrichs’ favor. But Justice Antonin and became enmeshed in corruption Scalia’s death on Feb. 13 left the court’s have helped undermine their own supconservative bloc without its anchor. port. The effect has been to enhance The 4-4 non-decision last week left the corporate power to the detriment of appellate court ruling against Friedrichs working-class Americans. intact. The court could agree to rehear The Legislature is expected to try to the case, but absent a replacement for override Nixon’s veto, which would be Scalia, the issue will not be resolved a short-sighted mistake. Regardless of anytime soon. party, any lawmaker who even pretends At issue in Missouri is something to give a damn about Missouri workers similar, though not identical. House Bill must vote no. 1891 would require members of public employee unions, including teachers but

RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

THE PLATFORM TM STLtoday.com/ThePlatform Find us at facebook/PDPlatform Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial

yOUr ViEWS • LETTErS FrOM OUr rEadErS Election mismanagement shows why public is so distrustful Regarding the editorial “Excuses not accepted” (April 6) about the mismanagement of the election: When the political class of talking heads wonders where all the anger from the electorate is coming from, we now have a perfect example to illustrate why the public is distrustful and disgusted with the political establishment. The entire St. Louis County Election Board should have turned in their resignation first thing Wednesday, if for no other reason than shame. There is no excuse, but is there any consequence? A salary of $125,132 is a lot of money to pay a person who cannot fulfill the duties of his position. County Elections Director Eric Fey needs to leave, and if he does not have the integrity to do it himself, then the powers that be should help him get a clue. Tom Doss • University City

Save money by having only two elections per year While St. Louis County Executive Steve Stenger is looking into the ballot problems with Tuesday’s election, he should look into the waste of money by having an election every couple of months. I’m guessing the great state of Missouri will save about $100,000 or more if we have only two elections per year: one in the spring (primary) and one in the fall (general). Election oicials would have more than enough time to get touch-screen machines ready. If any municipality wants to raise or lower taxes, or propose bond issues, and miss the deadline, there’s always next year. Enough is enough. Save the money. Christina Ann DeLuca • Brentwood

Voters repudiate Sinqueield’s campaign I want to credit and give special thanks to Rex Sinquefield for his recent efforts on behalf of our community. I speak specifically of the jobs he supported while spending $2 million on a campaign to defeat the earnings tax measure on the ballot in the city of St. Louis. Just imagine, thanks to Sinquefield, many people found work in creation and design of campaign mailers or wrote and produced the radio and television spots. Don’t forget the mail carriers. Never were jobs more secure than during this recent campaign. Looking forward, I’m sure we can anticipate similar eforts in campaigns such as right to work and public school teacher retirement issues Sinquefield is currently funding in the Legislature. Yes, the people heard Sinquefield and they voted. Jim Velten • St. Louis

‘No’ voters in Ferguson make statement to go backward I would like to congratulate my 1,317 fellow residents who voted not to increase property taxes by $10 or less per month (“Cuts loom in Ferguson,” April 6). You really showed them who’s boss. Take that $10 and save it because you will probably need it. Due to your shortsightedness, we can look for the following consequences: • Dodging the potholes that will go unrepaired in our neighborhoods. Front-end alignments cost around $80. Broken suspension parts will increase that cost substantially. Tires cost $50 to $100 each to be replaced. Wheels and rims even more. • Don’t worry about snow removal. The winters have been mild lately. If it does snow, all you have to tell yourself is “it will warm up and melt of the streets eventu-

GILBERT BAILON EDITOR

diference in its cardinal principles, that it will always ight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always ight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907

Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days. Additional letters are posted online at STLtoday.com/letters.

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101

Teach drivers not to lee from a ticket I read the tragic story of Keisha Redding, who was killed on her way to a job interview by someone running from the law (“Costly pursuits,” April 5). The article rightfully explores the chase/don’t chase debate. But the young woman wasn’t killed by the police; she was killed by the young man running from the police. Redding’s mother laments the fact that the police caused the crash and the tragic death of her daughter as they chased someone for a ticket. But why isn’t she asking why the young man who killed her ran? He ran. Why? From a ticket. This is the question that needs to be asked and taught in the schools and homes. Don’t run. It is just a ticket. Take the ticket. Don’t kill someone because you are running from a ticket. Redding’s mother’s statement is telling of the division and attitude by some in our society toward the police. But if the police don’t follow law breakers, that simply teaches the law breakers all they need to do is just get away. That isn’t the answer. The answer is don’t run. Take the ticket. Linnea O’Neal • Lake Saint Louis

Need simple courtesy on Forest Park paths I am an emergency physician and a bicyclist. My wife and I just moved to a home near Forest Park. The park has specially designated crushed gravel paths designed for walkers and runners, and a paved path for bicyclists, skaters and skateboarders. I have not yet seen any bikers riding on the crushed gravel path designated for runners and walkers. However, about one-third to one-half of the runners and walkers I encounter insist on using the paved paths, designed for use by people on wheels, even on dry days when the running paths lack puddles. It’s great that so many locals like to get out to walk or run. However, I am dismayed that they insist on doing this on the paved bike path with the line down the middle (especially if they are running or walking with headphones, which make it more difficult to hear me communicating that I am overtaking them). Perhaps these pedestrians and runners are unaware of how the diference of speed between cyclists and walkers/runners explains why separate paths enhance the safety of both groups. Finally, if one is using the paved path and needs to stop, please don’t stop in the middle of the path. Those who are at a stop should pull out of traic and of to the side — just like on a road. The park could be safer for everyone if everyone observed some simple rules and courtesies. Dr. Gary Gaddis • University City Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

PLATFORM • I know that my retirement will make no

WE WELCOME YOUR LETTERS AND E-MAIL

ally.” • Mosquito control probably also gone with budget cuts. Zika virus is heading to our area with warmer temperatures, so just stay indoors in the evening. • Code enforcement? Ask the absent property owners or the banks that own the empty houses to clean up their property. I’m sure they will pitch in and keep the grass mowed and paint as needed without any input from the city. These are just a few of the possible budget cuts we can look forward to. Did I mention the layofs that will have to occur? So all of you “no” voters can be proud that you stood up and made a statement to go backward. Great job! Congratulations and keep $100 or less a year handy. Steve Salamon • Ferguson

E-MAIL letters@post-dispatch.com FAX 314-340-3139

TOd rOBBErSON trobberson@post-dispatch.com Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8382 KEViN HOrriGaN khorrigan@post-dispatch.com Deputy Editorial Page Editor • 314-340-8135 FraNK rEUST freust@post-dispatch.com Letters Editor • 314-340-8356 dEBOraH PETErSON dpeterson@post-dispatch.com Editorial writer • 314-340-8276


04.08.2016 • FRIDAY • M 1 100 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

OTHER VIEWS

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A13

A LEARNED GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT • No department of the Government has sustained more ably and brilliantly the scientific traditions of the world and represented more successfully the true spirit of research than the Coast and Geodetic Survey, which has just completed a century of existence ... mapping shore lines and ... waterways and making safe the ships of all the world. Access the full item and more at stltoday.com/news/opinion

An option to the ‘Unigov’ example for St. Louis region Government • Indianapolis’ consolidation wasn’t always helpful. Let’s try a better approach. BY AARON M. RENN

Metropolitan governance has long been the conventional wisdom in planning circles. In a fragmented region like St. Louis, this prompts the obvious question as to whether consolidation could be an answer to some of its challenges. While consolidation undoubtedly has some benefits, it also brings its own set of problems. Expending precious community leadership time and energy on consolidation is dubious, though some form of consolidation might be useful for tiny, troubled municipalities. The arguments for regionalization, city-county consolidation, etc. are that they help equalize the fiscal base of the region, reduce harmful intra-regional competition, and save costs though economies of scale. The main traditionally observed downside is dilution of minority voting clout. One traditional example of the consolidated city is the so-called “Unigov” system of Indianapolis, in which the city of Indianapolis merged with Marion County in 1970. Unigov undoubtedly played a role in stabilizing that city during an era when urban America was under great pressure from deindustrialization and suburbanWhen ization. It also provided governments an expanding suburban merge, tax base to finance the rebuilding of downtown few if any and other key civic iniemployees tiatives. But it had major lose their limits. Unigov was less of a jobs, and pay consolidation than it and benefits may appear. Four cities can even be were almost completely excluded from merger, harmonized and a large number of to the hightowns retained their water mark. own legal existence and some powers. No school districts were consolidated, nor were police and fire services. It’s typically the case that consolidated cities are less consolidated than they appear. Consolidations also don’t save much money and can even raise costs. When companies merge, major restructuring and layoffs often follow. But when governments merge, few if any employees lose their jobs, and pay and benefits can even be harmonized to the high-water mark. The post-Unigov merger of the Lawrence Township Fire Department with the Indianapolis Fire Department is instructive. No firefighters lost their jobs, and the Lawrence Township firefighters saw pay and pension increases when they moved over to IFD. And today, 45 years after Unigov, more downsides are becoming evident. Unigov did not prevent the collapse of the city’s urban core. Between 1970 and 2010, Indianapolis’ Center Township, the best proxy for the old, pre-consolidated city we have today, lost 47.8 percent of its population. This is almost identical to St. Louis’ 48.7 percent population loss. Further, Unigov did not halt sprawl. The result is that today much of Marion County is now fully developed and the expanding suburbs are predominantly outside of the consolidated city itself. This happened at the same time many of the original consolidated suburbs themselves began falling into decline with age. The city of Indianapolis now contains regions with some similarities to Ferguson. While the acute fiscal problems that plague some St. Louis-area suburbs don’t affect these districts, the challenges of increasing poverty, navigating racial change and suburban decay are still present. And to the extent that Indy’s urban revival continues, it will now be weighed down by declining inner suburbs instead of being supported by them. Mayor John Cranley of Cincinnati thinks that in today’s world his city is in better shape than those who consolidated or annexed large territory, because he doesn’t have to share emerging urban tax revenues with these struggling outer areas. As he puts it,“We get the benefit of, on a per capita basis, being able to invest way more in these urban neighborhoods than any of our peers because we didn’t annex.” While Unigov hasn’t stopped inner suburban decline, it has prevented the formation of small “failed state” governments in these areas. But existing municipalities are often excluded from mergers in order to assemble the political coalition for passing merger. This was true in Louisville and Nashville as well as Indianapolis. Thus one real benefit of consolidation has in practice proven difficult to achieve. Rather than expending energy on consolidation in St. Louis, a better approach might be for the state government to put in place enhanced resolution mechanisms for particularly troubled or abusive suburban municipalities. This could include an option to disincorporate and reabsorb them into the larger county government. Politically difficult to be sure, but in these cases there is no easy answer. Aaron M. Renn is a Manhattan Institute senior fellow.

CONRAD PICCIRILLO FOR VISITINDY.COM

A nighttime view of downtown Indianapolis.

MATT ROURKE

Hillary Clinton, with former President Bill Clinton and their daughter Chelsea Clinton, campaigns in February.

he Clinton Broadway

REVIVAL Politics • Just like Bill in 1992, Hillary needs New York’s help now. E.J. DIONNE Washington Post

It will not be the first time that a Clinton relies on the tough-minded voters of New York to salvage a frontrunning presidential candidacy. On March 24, 1992, an insurgent candidate named Jerry Brown (yes, California’s current governor) upended Bill Clinton, the Democrats’ nominee-in-waiting, in the Connecticut primary. To re-establish his primacy, Clinton went to work in New York. A few days after his Connecticut defeat, Clinton spoke to reporters about “all this crap I’ve put up with” and how he had to deal with “attacks, attacks, attacks on me.” Of Brown, Clinton said: “I think he gives them easier answers to problems than I do. And a lot of people who are frustrated and angry want simple solutions.” Sound familiar? Bill Clinton routed Brown in New York’s primary and went on to win it all. Hillary Clinton is hoping for a revival of the same show. But with Donald Trump facing long-term free fall after his defeat by Ted Cruz in Wisconsin on Tuesday, she needs not only to win in New York, but also to use the coming weeks to begin dealing with political weaknesses that have been highlighted by Bernie Sanders’ continued electoral strength. Sanders’ own victory in Wisconsin was widely anticipated, but his 13-point margin was not. Yes, as Clinton’s campaign insisted, a state with a storied progressive tradition, an overwhelmingly white electorate

and rules that allow independents to vote in party primaries was naturally hospitable to Sanders. But the results underscored issues that have plagued Clinton from the beginning. Even among Democratic primary voters, only 58 percent saw Clinton as “honest and trustworthy” (89 percent thought this of Sanders) and only 14 percent said they would be “excited” by a Clinton presidency, compared with 33 percent who felt this about a Sanders administration. Once again, voters under 30 years old backed Sanders by better than 4-to-1. Clinton can argue that she (like her husband) has faced sustained, longterm attacks from Republicans that have spilled over into image problems among independents and even some Democrats. That’s true, but it doesn’t make her troubles go away. Above all, Clinton and her lieutenants need to ask why Sanders has done so well. It’s not simply that Sanders has become Mr. Authenticity, the proudly disheveled guy with the Brooklyn accent. He has also turned his campaign into a cause that goes well beyond himself. He has made big offers to voters — single-payer health care, free college tuition, breaking up the big banks, higher Social Security benefits. And Sanders’ trademark talk about the corruption wrought by big money in politics speaks to the electorate’s sense across party lines that something is badly defective in our political system. When he’s not busy selfdestructing, Trump appeals to this sentiment, too. On the particulars of the Sanders program, Clinton has legitimate grounds for challenging him. Even if you are for single-payer health care, it would never arrive all at once; we are more likely to get there through

the incremental changes Clinton proposes in Obamacare. In New York, Sanders will have to answer for his past votes on the gun lobby’s side. And he has real difficulties in explaining how his proposals to break up the big banks and providing universal college access would work. But Sanders is singularly skilled at transforming Clinton’s practical challenges to his proposals as a wholesale rejection of the idea of being visionary. In doing so, he casts Clinton as a practitioner of the old status-quo politics. The fact that it’s so easy to put her campaign in the context of her husband’s long-ago effort is a reminder that she’s been around a long time. It’s why a 74-year-old with a quartercentury of Washington experience is unexpectedly embraced as the next new and exciting thing. There have been moments — her victory speech after the South Carolina primary, her recent thoughtful address about the importance of the battle for the Supreme Court — when Clinton has been able to define the stakes of the election in larger terms. She emphasized “We” over “I.” But she needs to compete far more aggressively with Sanders, both rhetorically and substantively, as a purveyor of big ideas of her own (she is not short on policy proposals) and as the answer to the small-minded politics of this moment. Sanders could help Clinton find a path to victory, or he could expose her weaknesses again and again, one primary and caucus at a time. Which it will be is largely in her hands.

E.J. Dionne ejdionne@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post

he coming train wreck Politics • Republican Party suicide is a very real possibility. CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER Washington Post

Yes, the big Wisconsin story is Ted Cruz’s crushing 13-point victory. And yes, it greatly improves his chances of denying Donald Trump a first-ballot convention victory, which may turn out to be Trump’s only path to the nomination. Nonetheless, the most stunning result of Wisconsin is the solidity of Trump’s core constituency. Fundamentalist Trumpism remains resistant to every cosmic disturbance. He managed to get a full 35 percent in a state in which: • He was opposed by a very popular GOP governor (80 percent approval among Republicans) with a powerful state organization honed by winning three campaigns within four years (two gubernatorial, one recall). • He was opposed by popular, local, well-informed radio talk show hosts whose tough interviews left him in shambles. • Tons of money was dumped into negative ads not just from the Cruz campaign and the pro-Cruz super PACs but from two anti-Trump super PACs as well. And if that doesn’t leave a candidate flattened, consider that Trump was coming off two weeks of grievous self-inflicted wounds — and still got more than a third of the vote. Which definitively vindicated Trump’s boast that if he ever went out in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shot someone (most likely because his Twitter went down — he’d be apprehended in his pajamas), he wouldn’t lose any voters. The question for Trump has always

been how far he could reach beyond his solid core. His problem is that those who reject him are equally immovable. In Wisconsin, 58 percent of Republican voters said that the prospect of a Trump presidency left them concerned or even scared. Cruz scares a lot of people, too. But his fear number was 21 points lower. Moreover, 36 percent of Wisconsin Republicans, facing a general-election choice between Hillary Clinton and Trump, would either vote Clinton, go third party or stay home. Trump did not exactly advance his needed outreach with his reaction to the Wisconsin result: a nuclear strike on “Lyin’ Ted,” as “a puppet” and “a Trojan horse” illegally coordinating with his super PACs (evidence?) “who totally control him.” Not quite the kind of thing that gets you from 35 percent to 50 percent. Not needed, say the Trumpites. If we come to Cleveland with a mere plurality of delegates, fairness demands that our man be nominated. This is nonsense. If you cannot command or cobble together a majority, you haven’t earned the party leadership. John Kasich makes the opposite case. He’s hanging on in case a deadlocked convention eventually turns to him, possessor of the best polling numbers against Clinton. After all, didn’t Lincoln come to the 1860 convention trailing? Yes, and so what? The post1968 reforms abolished the system whereby governors, bosses and other party poo-bahs decided things. In the modern era, to reach down to the No. 3 candidate — a distant third who loses 55 of 56 contests — or to parachute in a party unicorn who never entered the race in the first place would be a radical affront to the

democratic spirit of the contemporary nominating process. A parachute maneuver might be legal, but it would be perceived as illegitimate and, coming amid the most intense anti-establishment sentiment in memory, imprudent to the point of suicide. Yet even without this eventuality, party suicide is a very real possibility. The nominee will be either Trump or Cruz. How do they reconcile in the end? It’s no longer business; it’s personal. Cruz has essentially declared that he couldn’t support someone who did what Trump did to Heidi Cruz. He might try to patch relations with some Trump supporters — is Chris Christie’s soul still for sale? — but how many could he peel away? Remember: Wisconsin has just demonstrated Trump’s unbreakable core. And if Trump loses out, a split is guaranteed. In Trump’s mind, he is a winner. Always. If he loses, it can only be because he was cheated. He constantly contends that he’s being treated unfairly. He is certain to declare any convention process that leaves him without the nomination irredeemably unfair. No need to go third party. A simple walkout with perhaps a thousand followers behind will doom the party in November. In a country where only 25 percent feel we’re on the right track and where the leading Democrat cannot shake the challenge of a once-obscure dairy-state socialist, you’d think the Republicans cannot lose. You’d be underestimating how hard they are trying. Charles Krauthammer letters@charleskrauthammer.com Copyright The Washington Post


A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

To Our Readers To place your loved one’s Funeral Notice, please call the St. Louis Post-Dispatch at 800-365-0820 Ext. 8600 or 314-340-8600 or e-mail us at deathnotices@post-dispatch.com. Please log on to STLtoday.com/obits to share your memories, upload photos and sign the online guest book. As a part of our services, all guest books remain online permanently.

Death Notice Index

Death Notice Index

Allen, Crump, Turnbow, Wanda - Hazelwood Bickel - see Schapp Bowe - see Platten Cruz, Luis Eduardo - Troy, IL Dowlin - see Meine Felt, David A. - Chesterfield

Meine, Robert E. - St. Louis Palumbo, Peter - St. Louis Platten, Jr., Howard A. - Florissant Radetic, Eveline I. - St. Louis Santos, Mario Cabalejo - St. Louis Schapp, Jacqueline Sue "Sis" - St. Louis Schrage, JoAnn - Florissant, MO Strohmeyer, Robert M. - St. Louis Tonge - see Palumbo Tussey, Janet L. - St. Charles, MO Uthoff, Frances Virginia Whissell - Osage Beach, MO Walcott, Ida Mae A. - St. Louis Whitledge, Claude H. "Whit" - St. Louis Wilfong - see Whitledge Wilson, James Max - Florissant

Graham, Mable Geraldine "Gerry" St. Louis Hulett, IV, Willey E. "Bill" - St. Louis Ketterer, Edward J. - Lake St. Louis, MO Lich, John Terry - Dixon, IL Long, John B. - St. Peters Maneke- see Platten McCann - see Palumbo McCoy, Carol "Kay" - St. Louis McIntyre - see Platten

314-352-7575 wkf.com

Allen, Crump, Turnbow, Wanda 76, Hazelwood, Mo. Memorial Service April 9 at 2:00. Community Christ Fellowship, 121 Williams, St. Louis, Mo. 63135.

Cruz, Luis Eduardo, Staff Sergeant E5 Retired, 36, of Troy, IL, born May 27, 1979 in Hoboken, New Jersey, passed suddenly April 1, 2016 in Belleville, IL. Visitation 12 noon to 2 pm Sat April 9, 2016 Memorial service 2 pm Sat at Richeson Funeral Home,Troy, IL For more information go to www.Richesonfh.com

Felt, David A.

January 28, 1931-April 5, 2016 Born Kansas City, MO, alumnus of University City High School and Washington University (BSEE 1953), US Army veteran. Chief Lab Engineer for Emerson Electric Motor Division more than three decades. Survived by wife and best friend of 61 years, Donna "Dee" Felt (née Dean), with whom he traveled the world. Also son Clayton and spouse, daughter Sarah "Sally", grandson Jeffrey, two step-grandchildren and two step-great-grandchildren. Dave's lifelong involvement with BSA reflects a fun-loving nature and deep desire to contribute. Ever-curious, passionate about jazz, cars, poetry, and bad jokes, he continued telling stories until the end. Services: Visitation and memorial tale-telling at Friendship Village Chesterfield, 15201 Olive Blvd, Saturday April 9, at 2pm. Memorials to Boy Scouts of America.

Graham, Mable Geraldine "Gerry"

To Remember Someone, Remember Flowers Floral Tributes of Sympathy and Comfort From Walter Knoll Lich, John Terry 72, of Dixon, Ill., passed on March 24, 2016, at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis. Born Jan. 3, 1944, in St. Louis, son of Vernon and Lucille Lich Kleinberg. Graduate of Hazelwood High School, St. Louis; bachelor's from SIU Edwardsville. Served as Captain in Army Corps of Engineers. He held several management positions during his 31 year career at Raynor Garage Doors, Dixon, Ill. where he built many enduring friendships and was known by hundreds of door dealers nationwide. Member of Kiwanis Club of Dixon, Ill., honored as 2015 Kiwanian of the Year. Loving husband of Kathryn R. Lich (nee Killian) of Dixon; beloved father of Anne (Ward) Lich, Chad Lich, and Michael Lich; dear grandfather of Jazmine Lich, Garrett Lich, and Cameron Lich; brother to Mary Ann Mathews, Trudy Panhorst, Sandra Ballard; brother-in-law to Rosalyn McKnight. Preceded in death by his parents. Arrangements handled by Schilling Funeral Home, 702 1st Ave., Sterling, Ill 61081. Services: Private interment with military rites followed by a gathering of friends and family on Sat., April 23, 2016. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Kiwanis Club of Dixon appreciated. Condolences may be sent to www.schillingfuneralhome.com.

Long, John B. On Thursday April 7, 2016. Beloved husband of Joanne Long (nee DiMatteo) of 58 yrs. Loving father of Jeff (Johna) Long, Janice (Kevin) Heuser, Julie (Warren) Sallade. Proud grandpa of Jake, Scott, Brendan, Emily and Ben. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, cousin and friend to many. John worked for GM Parts Dept in Hazelwood before retiring. Services: Funeral Mon. Apr. 11 at 10:30 A.M. at the STYGAR MID RIVERS Funeral Home & Crematory, 5987 Mid Rivers Mall Dr. (St. Charles). Interment Cemetery of Our Lady (Lake St. Louis). Visitation Sun. Apr. 10 from 4:00 until 8:00 P.M. Memorial donations to Humane Society of Missouri and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. www.stygar.com

McCoy, Carol "Kay"

(nee Dunn), passed away Wednesday, April 6, 2016 at age 85 in St. Louis, MO. She was born in Harrisburg, IL on March 15, 1931. Dear wife of Col. John "Jack" Graham. She worked at the Lerner's Dress in Belleville, IL and at Macy's Hechts Jewelry in Washington, DC. She spent many years with the Order of Eastern Star in Southern IL. She'll be sorely missed by her sister Sue Clarida and sons Rick (Mary Anne) Milburn and Terry Milburn and daughter Jeanine (Jim) Allsup and stepsons Steve (Debbie) Graham and Jeffrey (Shirley) Graham and stepdaughters Teresa (Stan) Forsythe and Kim (Ross) Wiegert. She has 10 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Sunday, April 10, 4-8 p.m., then to Good Shepherd Presbyterian Church, 6587 Telegraph Rd. (63129) Monday, April 11 for 10 a.m. service. Interment National Cemetery.

Hulett, IV, Willey E. "Bill" Wednesday, April 6, 2016. Memorial service Saturday April 9, 1pm at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois.

Ketterer, Edward J. March 25, 2016. Memorial service Friday, April 15, 2016, 11:00 a.m. at Living Lord Lutheran Church, Lake St. Louis. Memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society.

89, passed away on April 7, 2016 surrounded by the love of her family. Beloved wife of the late Robert K. McCoy; cherished mother of Linda, Cindy and Julia. Services: Visitation will be Sunday April 10, from 3-7 p.m. at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd., Florissant, MO 63031. A Funeral Mass will be held at Mother of Good Counsel Home on Monday April 11, 2016 at 9:30 a.m. For further datails please refer to www.hutchensmortuarty.com

Meine, Robert E. Monday, April 4, 2016. Beloved husband of Betty Meine (nee Dowlin) for over 65 years; dear father of Gayle (Don) Buchmann, Cindy (Paul) Hartwig and Steven (Lynne) Meine; loving grandfather of Michael (Shannon) Hartwig, Dr. Dan (Lauren) Hartwig, Dr. Robert (Dr. Neesha) Buchmann, Lt. Brian Hartwig U.S.N., Rebecca Buchmann (fiancé David Cooper), Scott Hartwig, Sarah Meine and Grant Meine; dear greatgrandfather of Isabel, Michael and Kaia; dear brother of Joyce (Victor) Nash, Larry (Marilyn) Meine and Jerilyn (Bud) Grindstaff; dear brother-in-law of William (Ruth) Dowlin; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation on Saturday, April 9 at Concord Trinity United Methodist Church (5275 South Lindbergh) from 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Funeral service to follow. Interment Sunset Cemetery. Mr. Meine enjoyed a long career in retail, finishing his career opening factory outlet stores for Florsheim Shoe Co. After retiring Mr. Meine was an active volunteer at Grace Hill/Patch Center, Feed My People and a Treasurer for the Affton Senior Center. Contributions to American Cancer Society or Affton Senior Center appreciated. A service of Kutis Affton Chapel.

Radetic, Eveline I.

Strohmeyer, Robert M.

(nee Corich), Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday April 5, 2016. Wife of the late Clarence J. Radetic; Preceded in death be her parents Daniel P. & Theresa E. Corich; Beloved mother of Mark (Nancy), Chris (Kristin), Marilyn (Dan Caito), Annette Signorelli-Sapienza & Raymond (Josephine) Radetic. Dear grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 18. Dear sister of Eleanor (Anthony) Anderhub and the late Daniel Corich. Our sister-in-law, aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend. She was a member of Novi Vinidol. Services: Funeral from JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS South County (4830 Lemay Ferry Road) 9:30am Monday to St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church for 10:00am Mass. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. VISITATION SUNDAY 3 to 9PM. If desired, donations to the American Diabetes Association or Masses may be offered.

81, passed away on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Bob was preceded in death by his parents Frank and Golda Graves Strohmeyer; brothers Frank, Jr., Lawrence, James and Richard; his sisters Lorraine Knoke Saputo and Doris Graham. Bob is survived by his sister Pat Allen; brother Gerry (Joan); his nieces, who were his caretakers, Lynn Friederich and Bev Nemec; and many additional nieces, nephews, great-nieces, great-nephews, greatgreat-nieces, and great-greatnephews, cousins and many friends. Services: No service will be held at this time. A memorial Mass will be celebrated at a later date. Masses or contributions to the Littler Sisters of the Poor are preferred.

Santos, Mario Cabalejo

84 of Hazelwood, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Wed., April 6, 2016. Beloved husband of Maura B. Santos (nee Benabaye); dear father of Marissa S. (late Jerry) Myers, Rinelda S. (Roberto B.) Zapa, Lorena B. Santos (Jons C. Francisco) and Mario B. (Karla Mae P.) Santos, Jr.; dear grandfather of Matthew Jacob Myers, Magic Kedrick and Kiara Mhaze Santos, Princess May Zapa, Lara Isabel and Laurice Mara Francisco, and Kween Morzell Santos; and special friends to the family of the late Jerry Myers, Levi and Dorothy Wheeler and family. Services: Visitation at Holy Spirit Catholic Church, 3130 Parkwood Lane, Maryland Heights, Saturday, April 9 from 10am until the Funeral Mass at 11am. www.ShepardFuneralChapel.com

Palumbo, Peter

Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection on Wed., April 6, 2016. Beloved husband of Kathleen M. Palumbo (nee McCann); dear father and father-in-law of Peter (Lauren) Palumbo and Maria (Richard) Tonge; loving grandfather of Ava Leigh Anne and Peter Thomas Palumbo and Grace and Luka McGuire; dear brother of Mary Ann (Ken) Sanders, Joan (Tom) Costello and Jim (Meg), Joe (Debbie) and Tony (Mary) Palumbo; our dear brother-inlaw, uncle, godfather, cousin and friend. Services: Visitation at the ORTMANN STIPANOVICH Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Fri., April 8 from 4-8 p.m. Mass of the Resurrection to be held at Christ Prince of Peace Church, 415 Weidman Rd., Manchester, on Sat., April 9 at 10 a.m. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Michael Palumbo Memorial Scholarship Fund benefiting Loyola Academy students to attend Saint Louis University High School; and to the Kathy and Pete Palumbo Scholarship Fund at Rosati-Kain High School.

Platten, Jr., Howard A. fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on April 5, 2016. Beloved husband of 64 years to the late Margaret (Peggy) Platten; loving father and father-inlaw of Anne McIntyre, Mary Lou (Carol) Platten, Bill (Rene') Platten, Patricia (Bill) Maneke, Jeanne (Walter) Bowe and John (Margie) Platten; cherished grandfather of 13; greatgrandfather of 15; and friend to many. Howard was a WW II Army Veteran serving in Europe. He was retired from Kroger Co. and an active and faithful member of St. Norbert Catholic Church. Services: Funeral procession Mon., April 11, 2016, 9:45 a.m. from HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd. to St. Norbert Catholic Church, 16455 New Halls Ferry Rd., for a 10:30 Mass. Visitation, Sun., April 10th, 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Norbert - St. Vincent dePaul Society. Interment JB National Cemetery with Military Honors. Online guestbook www.hutchensmortuary.com

Schapp, Jacqueline Sue "Sis"

Schrage, JoAnn 76, of Florissant MO, entered eternal peace on Tues., April 5, 2016. Loving wife to Paul. Dear mother to Michael (Jacie) Schrage, Donna (Billy) Boevingloh and Cathie (Brian) Beasley; caring grandmother to Vickie, Steve and Beckie Schrage, Karen (Brian) Randolph, Jessie (Robby) Lampe, Alec and Alyssa Beasley; and great-grandmother to Harper and Peyton Randolph and Baby Lampe. Services: Visitation Thurs., April 7, 4 - 8pm at HUTCHENS Mortuary, 675 Graham Rd, Florissant MO. Funeral Mass, Fri, 10am at Sacred Heart Catholic Church, 751 Jefferson St., Florissant, followed by interment at Sacred Heart Cemetery. In lieu of flowers memorials to COPDFoundation.org

85, died peacefully on April 6, 2016. Beloved husband of Janet; dear dad of Lisa Hawley, Brian (Kathy) Wilson; dear grandpa of five; dear great-grandpa of four; dear brother of Ina Wilson and Barbara Burnett. He served as an Army Sergeant in the Korean War. He spent most of his career in the savings and loan field. Services: Visitation will be held from 12 to 2 p.m., with a memorial service following at 2 p.m., on Saturday, April 9, at Fancher-Rekus Funeral Home in Iberia. Interment will be in Williams Cemetery near Iberia. Contributions are suggested to the Humane Society of MO, 1201 Macklind Ave, St. Louis, MO 63110. www.fancher-rekusfuneralhomes.com.

Tussey, Janet L. (nee: Schalk) of Saint Charles, MO died on Tuesday, April 5, 2016 at the age of 63. Loving wife of Tom Tussey, beloved daughter of the late Walter and Arlene Schalk; loving mother of Lauren Meredith Tussey and Erik Thomas Tussey; cherished sister of Robert (Donna) Schalk and David (Robin) Schalk; loving sister-in-law of Betsey (Tussey) Comfort and the late William Comfort, Nancy (Tussey) Russell, Mary (Tussey) and Christopher Morrell, Kathleen (Tussey) Webb; cherished aunt of Jennifer (Schalk) and Tim Bensing, Cindy (DeGonia) and Dedric Lee, Chris and Kristen DeGonia, Ryan Schalk, Bobby Schalk, John Schalk, Billy Schalk, William Comfort, Jr, Elizabeth (Comfort) and Eric Jacobsen, Andy and Brigette Russell, Amy (Russell) and Dave Zemper, Nicholas and Katherine Morrell, Jennifer (Webb) and Jeremy Brannon and Cindy (Webb) and John Kent. Jan was a deep spiritual thinker and lover of life. She enjoyed gardening, entertaining, cooking, dancing and making new friends. She always opened her arms and home to anyone in need. She will be remembered by all who knew her for her generosity, kindness, compassion, sense of humor and strength. Services: The family is being served by the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay Street, St. Charles, MO where visitation will be held Sunday, April 10, 2016 12:002:00 pm. Memorial Service Sunday, April 10, 2016 at 2:00pm at Baue Funeral and Memorial Center. Memorials to St. Charles County Humane Society or Children's Home Society. Visit Baue.com

Uthoff, Frances Virginia Whissell (nee Bickel), asleep in Jesus Saturday, April 2, 2016. Beloved wife of the late Robert L. Schapp, Sr.; loving mother of Robert L. (Amy) Schapp, Jr. and Thomas F. (Kimberly) Schapp; dear grandmother of Alliemarie Kathleen Schapp and Kristen Rhea Schapp; preceded in death by her parents, Frederick M. Bickel, Sr. and Kathleen Georgia Bickel (nee Sachse), and her brother, Frederick M. (Colleen) Bickel Jr.; our dear aunt, great-aunt, great-great aunt, cousin, teacher, mentor, coach, customer and friend. Mrs. Schapp was a 49-year member of Holy Cross Evangelical Lutheran Church (ELCA), Creve Coeur and a 73-year member of the Order of the Eastern Star. A proud alumna of Washington University, she was inducted into the Athletic Department Hall of Fame in 1994. She was honored many times for her accomplishments and contributions in education, athletics, and the advancement of girls' and women's sports. Services: Visitation Thursday, April 7, 4-8 p.m. at BUCHHOLZ Mortuary West, 2211 Clarkson Road (at Wilson), Chesterfield, MO. Eastern Star service 7 p.m. Then visitation Friday, April 8, 8:30 a.m. until time of funeral service 9:30 a.m. same day at Graham Chapel on the campus of Washington University. Interment National Cemetery. Memorials to Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 13014 Olive Blvd, Creve Coeur, MO 63141 or Lutheran Family and Children's Services of Missouri 1144 Olivette Executive Pkwy, St. Louis, MO 63132 appreciated. Online guestbook at www.buchholzmortuary.com.

Wilson, James Max

October 4, 1924 - April 5, 2016 91, "Ginny" was born to the late Richard and Esther (Kiess) Whissell. She graduated from Cleveland High School and in 1947 married Robert David Uthoff, Sr. Ginny is survived by her husband Bob; daughter Patricia Pemberton (William), Osage Beach, MO; son Robert Uthoff, Jr. (Patricia), Halfway, MO; two grandsons, a step granddaughter, five great-grandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by sisters Arline Bender and Joan Mueller. Services: A Celebration of Life will be held Tuesday, April 12, at 11:00 a.m. at Lake Presbyterian Church in Osage Beach. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her honor to Lake Presbyterian Church or a charity of the donor's choice. Expressions of sympathy www.hedgesscottfuneralhomes.com. A service of HedgesScott Funeral Home, Osage Beach, Missouri.

Walcott, Ida Mae A. Passed away Monday April 4, 2016. Wife of the late William T. Walcott. Beloved mother of Edward (Sharon), Pamela Lindsey, Donald (Kim) and the late Dickey Walcott. Dear grandmother of 5 and great-grandmother of 7. Dear sister of Edna Wimmer, Viola Mueller and the late Marvin Miller, Leroy Miller and Evelyn Stokes. Our aunt, great aunt, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral 12:00 Noon Monday at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS (South County - 4830 Lemay Ferry Road). Interment Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. VISITATION MONDAY 10am until time of service. In lieu of flowers, donations to the ALS Association.

Whitledge, Claude H. "Whit" on Tuesday, April 5, 2016. Beloved husband of Mildred L. Whitledge (nee Wilfong); dear father of Renee (Steve) DeMott and Sherry (Jim) Carpenter; beloved grandfather of Jennifer Hammond, Eric DeMott, Justin (Dawn) Sheppard and Kyle Sheppard; our dear great-grandfather, great-great-grandfather, brotherin-law, uncle and friend to many. Services: Memorial visitation at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois on Saturday, April 9, 1 p.m. until time of service at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the St. Anthony's Hospice program.

LOCAL 1 I.B.E.W. Please be advised of the death of Bro. Willey E. Hulett Sign Erector Member 65 Years April 6, 2016 Memorial Service Saturday, April 9 1:00 pm Kutis Funeral Home 10151 Gravois Frank D. Jacobs, B.M. James C. Douglas, F.S.

Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444 800-286-9557

3 Grave sites in St. Paul churchyard. Call 913-254-1490

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book.

Visit Us At: /obituaries

Beautiful Memorials At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our experienced staff of loral designers is dedicated to providing the highest level of personal service.

(314) 997-2444 or (800) 286-9557 Order 24 Hours

schnucksfloral.com

Honor ...your loved one with a condolence message in our online guest book. Visit Us At: /obituaries the #1 St. Louis website


NEWS

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • A15

EU outraged over tax havens; Britain’s Cameron in spotlight Data leak out of Panamanian irm raises lags on hidden holdings ASSOCIATED PRESS

BERLIN • A European Union

official threatened Thursday to sanction Panama and other nations if they don’t cooperate fully to fight money laundering and tax evasion, after a leak of data showed the small country remains a key destination for people who want to hide money. The 11.5 million documents from the Panama-based law firm Mossack Fonseca showed it helped thousands from around the world set up shell companies and offshore accounts in lowtax havens. Because such accounts often hide the owner of assets, they are a favored tool to evade taxes, launder money or pay bribes. So far, the scandal has brought down the leader of Iceland and raised questions about the dealings of the presidents of Argentina and Ukraine, senior Chinese politicians, famous actors, athletes and the circle of friends of Russian leader Vladimir Putin, who some allege has profited indirectly from such accounts. On Thursday, British Prime Minister David Cameron acknowledged he profited from his father’s investments in an ofshore tax haven before being elected. “People are fed up with these outrages,” said Pierre Moscovici, who heads financial affairs for the 28-nation EU. “The amounts of money, the jurisdictions and the names associated with this affair are frankly shocking,” he said. Panama is listed by the EU as a country that is not cooperative on tax issues, and Moscovici urged the country to “rethink its position in this regard.” The EU has to “be ready to hit them with appropriate sanctions if they refuse to change,” he said. The Central American country’s government is offering to

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Demonstrators protest Thursday against President Mauricio Macri outside government oices in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A prosecutor wants Macri investigated as part of the fallout from a inancial data leak.

cooperate more. On Wednesday, President Juan Carlos Varela announced the creation of an international committee of experts to recommend ways to boost transparency in Panama’s ofshore financial industry. Ramon Fonseca, a co-founder of the law firm at the center of the scandal and until recently an adviser to Varela, said Thursday the only law that has been broken so far is the right to his clients’ privacy. He said the biggest source of secretive shell companies is Europe and the U.S. Since the first reports based on Mossack Fonseca documents were published Sunday, prominent politicians, celebrities and businesspeople have had their ofshore business dealings dragged into the spotlight. On Thursday, the German news-

Belgian authorities seek leads on ‘man in a hat’ from attacks ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRUSSELS • Belgian prosecutors launched a public appeal Thursday seeking any information on “the man in a hat” seen before the Brussels Airport suicide bombings that killed 16 people. Belgian Federal Prosecutor Eric Van der Sypt said authorities were especially interested in any people who might have filmed or photographed him. The suspect was seen at the airport with two suicide bombers before they died in the March 22 attacks. A subsequent explosion at Brussels’ Maelbeek subway station killed another 16 people the same morning. Hundreds were injured in the attacks, and at least 90 remain hospitalized. Photos released by prosecutors showed the man, who was wearing a dark hat, leaving the airport on foot, walking to the nearby

town of Zaventem and then into Brussels, where all traces of him were reportedly lost. The suspect also wore a white jacket but discarded it at some point, prosecutors said. Belgian authorities hope that they or someone finds the discarded jacket, saying it could yield precious clues. The appeal for public assistance more than two weeks after the suicide bombings indicates that investigators are at a standstill. Three bombers, two at the airport and one in the subway, also died in the attacks, which wounded 270 people and were claimed by Islamic State extremists. According to a video reconstitution of the suspect’s itinerary presented to reporters, the man left the Brussels Airport terminal at 7:58 a.m. before the two other men he was with there detonated suitcases laden with explosives.

paper that first obtained what have been dubbed the “Panama Papers,” said it won’t publish all the files, arguing that not all are of public interest. Sueddeutsche Zeitung received the documents from an unidentified source more than a year ago and shared at least parts of them with dozens of other media outlets around the world. Sueddeutsche Zeitung and the Washington-based International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, which helped coordinate reporting on the leak, have said they won’t make the complete set of 11.5 million documents available to the public or law enforcement but rather mine the information for details of public interest. Responding to readers’ queries about the absence of promi-

nent German or American politicians in the reports, Sueddeutsche Zeitung said such names haven’t yet been found in the documents. Meanwhile, Britain’s Cameron looks to become the next European politician ensnared by the scandal. After four days fending of headlines about his family’s finances, he acknowledged Thursday that he and his wife, Samantha, sold shares worth about $44,300 in an offshore fund named Blairmore Holdings in January 2010 — five months before Cameron became prime minister. In Russia, Putin on Thursday denied having any links to offshore accounts and described the document leaks scandal as part of a U.S.-led plot to weaken Russia.

Michigan survivor of Brussels blasts is ready to ‘win the day’ ASSOCIATED PRESS

BRUSSELS • Sebastien Bellin, a 6-foot-9 giant once celebrated for his skills on a basketball court, is better known now as the man photographed lying bloody on the floor of Brussels Airport after the March 22 bombings. But as he recovers at the Erasmus Hospital in Brussels, Bellin says he’s grateful the picture was taken. It shows him how close to death he was and reminds him of all the people who helped save his life. “That picture set off an incredible amount of positivity ... that ultimately ended up with me keeping both my legs, being alive,” says Bellin, a former member of the Belgian national team who also played at Oakland University in Michigan. “So is that the determining factor? No, probably not. But is it one of the factors? Absolutely.” It’s almost as if he feels ev-

eryone who saw the photo pulling for him. Bellin, 37, of Battle Creek, Mich., works for a sports video company, and was in Belgium on business the day of the attack. He had just checked in for his flight when the first blast went of. “At one point, somebody came and dragged me to behind the column, where the famous picture was taken,” he says. He ended up losing 50 percent of his blood, but he remained conscious throughout and kept pushing for treatment. “It’s that survival instinct,” he says. “You want to push yourself in the front of the line.” Now Bellin is using that positive attitude to rebuild his life. Wearing a T-shirt with the slogan “win the day,” he says he’s focused on two things: rehabbing his legs and spending more time with his wife and two daughters.

JAMES J. HACKETT

Former assistant chief spent 42 years with St. Louis police BY TIM O’NEIL St. Louis Post-dispatch

Lt. Col. James J. Hackett, former chief of detectives and an assistant chief during a 42-year career with the St. Louis Police Department, died Sunday (April 3, 2016) from complications of cancer in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 84 and lived in Frontenac. Col. Hackett had been ill for about three months. He retired from the department at the rank of lieutenant colonel in 1997. During his second of three stints as chief of detectives, he organized a “priority squad” in 1988 that solved the murders of Sister Patricia Ann Kelley, founder of the Dollar Help utility-bill program, and three other women. His favorite lighthearted story was about dressing musician Elton John in a sergeant’s uniform to get him unnoticed through a mob of fans for a concert beneath the Gateway Arch. Col. Hackett, a son of Irish immigrants, grew up in north St. Louis near old Sportsman’s Park, the origi-

James J. Hackett

nal Busch Stadium, where he worked as an oice boy. He graduated from Chaminade College Preparatory School and served three years in the Coast Guard before joining the police department in 1955 as a foot patrolman in his old neighborhood. He soon became a district detective and served about two-thirds of his career in investigative work. He married Loretta Janisch of Belleville in 1957. Col. Hackett was back in uniform as head of the Central Patrol District when he retired. The crowd at his

retirement party included Stan Musial, Jack Buck and former AnheuserBusch executive Mike Roarty. Afterward, he became executive vice president of Hackett Security Co., founded by his son, Michael Hackett of Ladue. He held the title upon his death. Throughout his life, he carried the key he was issued as a rookie to open the department’s street-corner telephone call boxes. Back then, beat officers used the phones to communicate with district supervisors. In addition to his wife and son, he is survived by three daughters, Carrie Hackett Woolsey, of Ladue, Elizabeth Walsh, of Kirkwood, and Catherine Montgomery, of Paradise Valley, Ariz.; and 10 grandchildren. A funeral Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m. Saturday at Our Lady of the Pillar Catholic Church, 401 South Lindbergh Boulevard in Creve Coeur, followed by burial with police honors at Calvary Cemetery. Tim O’Neil • 314-340-8132 @timoneilpd on Twitter toneil@post-dispatch.com

WORLD DIGEST Three nations back Libyan unity government Britain, France and Russia say they are supporting a new United Nations-brokered unity government in Libya and urged international support for its eforts to reunite and stabilize the deeply divided country. Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin said creating a central authority that can work efectively throughout the country is especially important “in light of the terrorist threat” and the presence of Islamic State. France’s U.N. Ambassador Francois Delattre said the unity government has a “historic opportunity” to create the conditions for stability “and roll back the chaos” in which Islamic State has thrived. Britain’s U.N. Ambassador Matthew Rycroft stressed that there must be “a step-by-step process” supported by the international community. Colombia clears path for same-sex marriage • Colombia’s highest court is paving the way for same-sex couples to marry in the conservative Roman Catholic nation. Gay couples in Colombia have been allowed to form civil unions, with many beneits of marriage including inheritance, pensions and health beneits. But the right to wed was something that so far has been denied. On Thursday, the country’s Constitutional Court took a step in settling the controversy, rejecting 6-3 a justice’s opinion that would have stopped public notaries from registering unions as marriages. In the coming weeks, a ruling relecting the majority opinion that such practice is discriminatory is expected to be approved, legalizing same-sex marriage. Only a handful of nations in Latin America allow gay and lesbian couples to marry, including Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay. 130 nations warm to Paris climate treaty • The U.N. says a record number of more than 130 countries will sign the landmark agreement to tackle climate change at an April 22 ceremony at U.N. headquarters. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is hosting the ceremony on the irst day that the agreement reached in Paris in December opens for signature. The U.N. says the signing by over 130 countries, including more than 60 world leaders, would surpass the previous record of 119 signatures on the opening day for signing an international agreement, set by the Law of the Sea treaty in 1994. Signing is the irst step. The agreement will enter into force 30 days after at least 55 countries, accounting for 55 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, record their acceptance. Iceland has new leader • Iceland’s isheries minister emerged from the president’s residence Thursday and announced he has become the island nation’s new prime minister after days of political turmoil. Sigurdur Ingi Johannsson told reporters that he had secured President Olafur Ragnar Grimsson’s backing after his predecessor left because of embarrassing links to an ofshore account. “This is of course an exciting opportunity, but it’s under bizarre circumstances,” said Johannsson, 53. From news services

How to sell your valuable jewelry with conidence: Choose a buyer like T. Brian Hill who has over 30 years experience buying and selling. Then call for a free verbal estimate.

(314) 313-5804 USED JEWELRY BUYER

WWW.USEDJEWELRYBUYER.COM

122 N. Main in Historic Saint Charles

T. Brian Hill

Sell these valuables today —

• Certified diamonds & fine jewelry • Antique & estate jewelry • High grade wrist and pocket watches • Old gold & sterling silver • U.S. gold & silver coins • Private jewelry & coin collections

COPD? Volunteers are needed to participate in COPD research studies testing investigational medications for COPD.

To Qualify: Over 40 years of age COPD with shortness of breath upon exertion Current or Former smoking history Qualiied volunteers receive investigational study drug and related testing at no cost and compensation for time and travel. To learn more, please call (314) 514-8509 www.clinicalresearchcenter.com


NEWS

A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

WEATHER • LOW 40, HIGH 56 • WINDS NW 15-25 MPH

STLTODAY.COM/ WEATHER

Cooler than average Mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies along with gusty northwest winds and cooler than average temperatures can be expected across the region today. Highs this afternoon will be in the middle 50s. Saturday will be mostly sunny and cool. __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24-HOUR FORECAST

MORNING

LUNCH

DRIVE

BEDTIME

43°

51°

54°

44°

Generally partly cloudy

Becoming mostly clear

Mostly sunny Partly cloudy

M 1 • FRIDAY • 04.08.2016

• • • •

DONATE YOUR CAR x % Ta 100 tible c u Ded

Current conditions 18-hour forecast The latest radar imagery Much more

Wheels For Wishes Benefiting

Make-A-Wish® Missouri

4-DAY FORECAST

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

32°/52°

41°/65°

MONDAY

*Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE *We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not *We also accept Trucks, RVs, SUVs & Boats

TUESDAY

54°/62° 41°/56°

Call: (314) 499-1300

WheelsForWishes.org

Mostly sunny Slight chance Showers likely Becoming of showers mostly sunny

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

Your Hometown Community Event Shown are this morning’s lows and today’s highs

TODAY IN THE BI-STATE AREA L

H

40 39 37 38 37 39 40 34 37 38 35 38 38

65 59 58 58 59 65 62 52 56 63 60 57 62

Illinois Bloomington Carbondale Chicago Decatur Effingham Macomb Mount Vernon Peoria Quincy Rockford Springfield Urbana

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Missouri Branson Cape Girardeau Columbia Farmington Jefferson City Joplin Kansas City Kirksville Rolla Springfield St. Joseph Union West Plains

W

sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny

L

H

W

34 40 33 35 35 36 37 34 36 32 36 33

48 56 42 49 50 47 53 47 52 40 50 48

mostly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy

Chicago 33 / 42

Kirksville 34 / 52 Kansas City 40 / 62

Springfield 36 / 50

St. Louis 40 / 56 Carbondale 40 / 56

Joplin 39 / 65

Poplar Bluff 41 / 62

April 8-10, 2016

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ALMANAC Asof7P.M.atLambertField 59° 42° 65° 44° 88° 23° 73° 62°

PRECIPITATION Last 24 hrs Month (Total) Month (Normal) Year (Total) Year (Normal)

Trace 0.40” 0.84” 4.04” 8.80”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TEMPERATURES High (1:27 p.m.) Low (5:51 a.m.) Average High Average Low Record High (1948) Record Low (2007) High Last Year Low Last Year

TODAY’S AIR QUALITY Very unhealthy

Good

TODAY’S UV INDEX Min.

Very high The higher the UV index number, the greater the need for skin protection.

POLLEN COUNTS Thursday, April 7th Tree - 52 (moderate), Mold - 3,045 (low) HEATING DEGREE DAYS 14 Yesterday 87 Month (Total) 3290 Season 4414 Year Ago

SUN & MOON

First Apr 13 Sunrise

Full Apr 21

Flood Stage

Current Level

MISSOURI RIVER Kansas City 32 12.30 23 8.56 Jefferson City 21 8.76 Hermann 20 6.21 Washington 25 12.39 St. Charles MISSISSIPPI RIVER Hannibal 16 15.51 Louisiana 15 14.44 Dam 24 25 24.79 Dam 25 26 24.70 Grafton 18 17.17 M.Price, Pool 419 413.50 M.Price, Tail. 21 14.12 St Louis 30 18.10 Chester 27 20.72 Cape Girardeau 32 26.06

Flood Stage

24-Hr Change

Current Level

Last Apr 29

6:34 AM Sunset

New May 6 7:32 PM

Moonrise 7:34 AM Moonset 9:13 PM

Looking to the south around 5 a.m. in the morning you will see Mars just above the red star Antares. A year on Mars would last about 687 Earth days long.

ILLINOIS RIVER La Salle 20 16.24 18 13.76 Peoria 14 13.31 Beardstown MERAMEC RIVER 15 4.71 Sullivan 16 0.03 Valley Park 24 15.40 Arnold BOURBEUSE RIVER Union 15 2.54 OHIO RIVER Cairo 40 30.53

- 0.03 - 0.03 + 0.21 + 0.20 + 0.20 - 0.19 - 0.22 - 0.28 - 0.31 - 0.27 0.00 - 0.22 - 0.21 - 0.29 - 0.31

LAKE LEVELS

24-Hr Change

Kentucky Pool Wappapello Pool Clearwater Pool Lake Ozark Truman Lake Bull Shoals Table Rock Pomme de Terre Lake Shelbyville Rend Lake Mark Twain Lake Carlyle Lake

- 0.27 + 0.17 - 0.05 - 0.04 - 0.26 - 0.20 - 0.17

Current Level

24-Hr Change

357.59 360.15 495.34 655.87 705.30 658.98 915.09 840.45 595.92 409.03 604.92 443.45

- 0.07 - 0.33 - 0.13 + 0.17 - 0.23 - 0.01 - 0.14 + 0.06 + 0.06 + 0.02 + 0.03 - 0.04

- 0.70

Maps and weather data provided by:

Get more river & lake stage information at 636-441-8467

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

TODAY ACROSS THE U.S.

National Extremes High: 91° Death Valley, California

Low: 9° Mt. Washington, New Hampshire

60s Rain

80s 70s

40s

50s

60s

30s

60s

30s 40s

40s

50s

70s 50s

60s

50s

50s 70s

HOURS

Produced by

HONE

Friday 11 am - 8 pm Saturday 11 am - 8 pm Sunday 11 am - 5 pm

ü

DIRECTIONS I-70 to 5th Street Exit South. Right onto Veterans Memorial Parkway

ü ü ü

Outdo

Y DO LIST

or Liv ing S with S pace pa

Kitch

en R emod

New F loorin

New W indow

u Better Living Theater Informative gardening seminars from Charlie Nardozzi, horticulturist, writer and radio/TV personality

el

g

s/D oors

u 10th Annual St. Charles Sausage Festival & Wine Tasting u Walter Knoll Floral Seminars u Family Fun! - kids activities by The Magic House

FREE ADMISSION & FREE PARKING THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

MOM & ME 2016 LOOK-ALIKE CONTEST

Snow

60s

60s

60s

80s

T-storms

50s

60s 60s

50s

20s

50s

St. Charles Convention Center STLHomeShow.com

SOURCE: McDonnell Planetarium

RIVER STAGES

SM

70s 70s

Wintry Mix

80s

80s Jet Stream

Alaska Low: -6°

Hawaii High: 82°

Another clipper system will bring showers to parts of the Ohio Valley and a mix of rain and snow showers to the Great Lakes and parts of New England. Scattered showers along with some thunderstorms are expected throughout portions of the Desert Southwest and California in association an upper-level disturbance. Dry conditions are forecast across the Pacific Northwest and much of the Plains. Today L H

Albany, N.Y. 37 Albuquerque 50 Anchorage 34 Atlanta 48 Atlantic City 41 Baltimore 40 Billings 40 Biloxi, Ms. 56 Birmingham 47 Bismarck 25 Boise 47 Boston 45 Buffalo 28 Burlington, Vt. 38 Charleston, S.C. 53 Charleston, W.V. 35 Charlotte 47 Cheyenne 32 Chicago 33 Cincinnati 31 Cleveland 29 Colorado Spgs. 37 Concord, N.H. 41 Dallas 53 Daytona Beach 57 Denver 37 Des Moines 33 59 Destin, Fl. 28 Detroit 57 El Paso 37 Evansville 27 Fairbanks 25 Fargo 37 Flagstaff 63 Fort Myers 38 Great Falls 29 Green Bay 41 Hartford 71 Honolulu 56 Houston 31 Indianapolis 49 Jackson, Ms. 38 Juneau 72 Key West 60 Las Vegas 47 Little Rock 56 Los Angeles 38 Louisville

45 66 47 65 52 54 72 74 65 46 81 52 37 42 73 51 60 61 42 49 39 65 48 77 81 66 46 76 43 76 54 44 31 53 82 76 35 49 84 80 47 70 48 81 72 68 69 56

W

Tomorrow L H W

rain showers partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy snow showers showers partly cloudy showers partly cloudy sunny rain and snow showers snow showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny rain and snow mostly cloudy windy mostly cloudy partly cloudy showers sunny sunny snow showers mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers sunny rain partly cloudy thunderstorms sunny showers mostly cloudy

26 45 36 42 29 36 46 48 40 23 51 35 24 24 45 31 38 38 25 27 25 42 25 55 55 42 25 51 25 54 29 25 17 32 60 46 21 31 71 57 26 43 37 70 56 44 57 33

46 74 51 58 43 55 80 71 61 65 77 43 30 34 63 42 53 65 39 41 33 68 45 76 71 71 47 72 33 81 50 48 44 57 81 71 34 41 84 77 40 73 49 79 72 65 67 47

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

mostly cloudy partly cloudy cloudy sunny rain cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain snow showers mostly cloudy sunny rain and snow sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny snow showers sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy rain and snow showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy mostly cloudy showers partly cloudy showers sunny

City

Today L H

50 Macon 66 McAllen, Tx. 45 Memphis 67 Miami 32 Milwaukee Minneapolis 28 Missoula, Mt. 37 52 Mobile Montgomery 51 40 Nashville New Orleans 58 New York City 41 Norfolk, Va. 47 Oklahoma City 42 Omaha 34 Orlando 61 Palm Springs 62 Philadelphia 42 Phoenix 64 Pittsburgh 30 Portland, Me. 42 Portland, Or. 53 Providence 44 Raleigh 42 Rapid City 30 Reno 52 Richmond, Va. 43 Sacramento 53 St. Petersburg 67 Salt Lake City 47 San Antonio 56 San Diego 60 San Francisco 56 Santa Fe 44 Savannah 53 Seattle 52 51 Shreveport 27 Sioux Falls 31 Syracuse 56 Tallahassee 64 Tampa 58 Tucson 41 Tulsa 42 Wash D.C. W. Palm Beach 65 39 Wichita Wilmington, De. 41 63 Yuma

70 84 64 83 40 36 81 74 70 58 75 50 59 73 54 82 78 51 80 44 51 77 51 61 60 71 59 70 77 74 78 68 66 62 74 76 74 44 36 77 80 79 71 56 82 71 51 82

W

Tomorrow L H W

sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny rain and snow mostly cloudy sunny sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny showers mostly cloudy showers mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy sunny mostly cloudy sunny sunny mostly cloudy mostly cloudy

42 68 40 66 23 22 44 42 43 34 54 34 40 48 27 56 62 33 62 27 30 50 32 40 34 46 37 55 64 50 58 59 55 39 47 47 49 20 23 47 59 54 44 38 64 44 32 61

63 84 59 79 34 41 76 74 67 53 72 39 51 74 55 78 74 43 82 36 45 68 42 52 75 60 50 66 75 67 79 65 64 76 69 63 74 48 33 73 75 83 70 44 75 69 43 81

sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy snow mostly cloudy mostly cloudy partly cloudy sunny showers rain and snow mostly cloudy snow showers partly cloudy mostly cloudy rain and snow sunny partly cloudy showers mostly cloudy showers sunny showers mostly cloudy showers showers sunny sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly cloudy sunny sunny partly cloudy mostly cloudy showers sunny partly cloudy rain and snow mostly cloudy

Do the two of you demand double takes? We’re looking for the ultimate doppelgänging mom-and-kid duos in the St. Louis area! You could win great prizes and be featured in the Mother’s Day edition of The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

TODAY AROUND THE WORLD H

Acapulco Amsterdam Athens Baghdad Bangkok Barbados Beijing Berlin Budapest Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Cancun Cape Town Dublin Frankfurt

72 40 54 62 82 77 46 38 56 62 71 37 71 66 40 45

87 53 77 92 96 85 77 59 77 70 102 78 83 84 54 56

W

sunny showers sunny partly cloudy mostly sunny partly cloudy sunny partly cloudy showers showers sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny showers partly sunny

City

L

H

Geneva Hong Kong Istanbul Jakarta Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mecca Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nassau Nairobi New Delhi

43 66 55 75 59 44 46 40 39 74 54 36 36 73 57 72

57 73 75 91 84 69 59 57 63 100 84 38 60 84 82 95

W

partly sunny mostly cloudy partly cloudy thunderstorms partly cloudy partly cloudy showers showers mostly sunny sunny partly cloudy snow showers partly cloudy partly cloudy partly cloudy sunny

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

L

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City

City

L

H

W

Oslo Paris Prague Rio De Janeiro Rome San Juan Santiago Seoul Stockholm Sydney Taipei Tokyo Toronto Vancouver Vienna Warsaw

38 41 42 74 55 73 52 45 39 62 70 57 27 52 52 46

48 57 53 92 79 86 72 64 51 73 84 72 38 65 63 61

cloudy showers mostly cloudy partly cloudy partly sunny partly cloudy partly cloudy mostly sunny mostly cloudy showers showers partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy cloudy partly cloudy

Celebrate Mom Total Escape Package from Seasons Spa and Salon!

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS BY NOON, APRIL 19:

STLtoday.com/contests om/contests


NEWS

04.08.2016 • FRIDAY • M 1

Space station getting an inlatable room

HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT SPACE DOGS AND MARS ROVERS?

THE SPACE QUIZ HTTP://BIT.LY/SPACEQUIZ

Technology demo could pave way for space experiments, habitat for Mars exploration

WILSONLIGHTING.COM

item #422205

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A17

BY MARCIA DUNN Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA. • Forget blow-up air mat-

Save 30%-70% on select lamps, lighting, mirrors, artwork and furnishings.

tresses. Space station astronauts are getting their first inflatable room. It’s a technology demo meant to pave the way for moon bases and Mars expeditions, as well as orbiting outposts catering to scientists and tourists in just a few more years. Bigelow Aerospace is behind the experiment, which will get a ride to the International Space Station with another private space company.

Now through April 23 only!

S. BRENTWOOD BLVD.

S I N C E 19 7 5 N

909 S. Brentwood Blvd. 314-222-6300 Closed Sundays Easy access thru CVS off Clayton Rd.

CLAYTON ROAD

L I G H T I N G

TODAY

APRIL 8 9 AM-9 PM

SATURDAY, APRIL 9 9 AM-9 PM

DOORBUSTERS! DOORBUSTER!

DOORBUSTER!

DOORBUSTER!

An unmanned SpaceX Falcon rocket is set to launch late Friday afternoon, carrying a capsule full of supplies with the pioneering pod in its trunk. It will be SpaceX’s first station delivery since a launch accident halted shipments last June.

SPACE ‘BEDROOM’ Once attached to the station, the soft-sided Bigelow compartment will be inflated to the size of a small bedroom. The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, BEAM for short, will stay there for two years — with astronauts occasionally ducking in. It will be the first time an astronaut steps inside an expandable habitat structure in space. “It’s not just historic for our company, which obviously is the case, but I think it’s historic for the architecture,” said Robert Bigelow, founder and president of Bigelow Aerospace and owner of Budget Suites of America. As a precursor to larger systems, Bigelow said BEAM could “change the entire dynamic for human habitation” in space. He hopes to have a pair of private space stations ready for launch by 2020. In the meantime, companies— even countries — are clamoring to put their own experiments inside the empty BEAM, Bigelow said in an interview with The Associated Press on Thursday. If everything goes well, that next commercial step could happen in perhaps six months, he said. The North Las Vegasbased company won’t divulge the material used for BEAM’s outer layers — or even how many layers — just that the layers are spread out to absorb and break up any penetrating bits of space junk.

NASA BEGINNINGS

40

16.98

20

OFF

Any One Sale Item

%

OFF

Short Sleeve Knit Shirts now 11.98 to 20.98 compare at $40 & up

Ladies Sweaters compare at $58-$68

%

50

%

40

%

Friday & Saturday

OFF

7002001020545092 ONLINE USE PROMO CODE

SHOPSALE

One time use per transaction on one sale item. Cannot be combined with other coupon offers on this item. Excludes Clearance, Gift Cards, Fabulous Finds, BOGO, Specials, Mad Dash and Doorbuster merchandise. Not valid on previously purchased merchandise. May be used with Stein Mart Rewards certificates and coupons. Coupon must be surrendered at time of sale. Valid 4/8 & 4/9/2016 in participating stores. Reproductions will not be accepted. Not for use by Stein Mart associates.

OFF

Select Fashion Quilts now 19.98 to 29.98 compare at $99-$119

Entire Purchase of Red Dot Clearance

Friday & Saturday

7002001040613235 ONLINE USE PROMO CODE

SHOPCLR

Valid on all Red Dot Clearance items. Cannot be combined with other coupon offers on these items. Not valid on previously purchased merchandise. May be used with Stein Mart Rewards certificates and coupons. Coupon must be surrendered at time of sale. Valid 4/8 & 4/9/2016 in participating stores. Reproductions will not be accepted. Shoes at 25% off.

Prices so low, no coupons needed on Doorbusters. Savings off select items. Entire stocks not included unless specified. Some merchandise may not be available at every store or online. Prices valid 4/8 & 4/9/2016.

For your nearest Stein Mart store visit www.steinmart.com or call 1-888-steinmart. See Stein Mart fair pricing policy at steinmart.com or in-store.

Back when NASA was working on the technology in the 1990s, a combination of Nextel, Kevlar, foam and other fabric formed the multilayer shield. NASA called its project TransHab, for Transit Habitat. It never flew to space, despite elaborate blueprints and ground mock-ups. Designers envisioned an inflatable, four-level compartment, complete with dining, sleeping and exercising areas for station crews. C o n g re s s c a n c e l e d TransHab in 2000 and Bigelow Aerospace bought the patent from NASA. The company launched a pair of expandable spacecraft a decade ago from Russia as an experiment. Called Genesis I and II, they’re still orbiting. NASA, meanwhile, paid Bigelow Aerospace $17.8 million for the upcoming

test flight, making BEAM the most affordable module ever launched to the space station, said Michael Gold, director of operations and business growth for Bigelow Aerospace.

‘ANTIQUATED’ CANS Expandable habitats like BEAM, officials noted, need to be just as strong — or stronger — than the standard metal cylinders that make up the current space station. BEAM has proven to be equal or better against space debris than metal, said NASA project manager Rajib Dasgupta. Bigelow goes as far as to say: “The aluminum cans are antiquated.” Beyond low-Earth orbit, radiation poses increased health risks to crews living inside aluminum walls. So inflatable spacecraft, he said, are cheaper, bigger, safer and, potentially, longer lasting. Bigelow said BEAM is nothing like a balloon — “it’s not going to go bang” — or even a football. Think steel belts in a car tire. “It’s pretty novel.” The beauty of expandable habitats is their compactness for launch. BEAM will travel in the Dragon capsule’s unpressurized compartment; the space station’s big robot arm will grab the structure and attach it to a berthing port. BEAM will expand four times in volume when it is inflated in late May or early June, with a little station air at first, then special inflation tanks. The collapsed BEAM measures about 7 feet long and 8 feet in diameter. Inflated, it will be about 13 feet long and 10½ feet in diameter, and provide 565 cubic feet of space, about the size of a small bedroom. BEAM has been bundled up for more than a year — it should have flown last fall, but was delayed by the SpaceX rocket grounding. Bigelow stressed that the main purpose is testing and engineers don’t know now how well it will work after being compressed for so long. The chamber will stay put for two years, providing measurements on radiation, impact resistance and temperature. Astronauts will venture inside four times a year to inspect surfaces, collect air and microbial samples, and change out sensors. Otherwise, the hatch will stay sealed. After two years, BEAM will be cut loose, burning up on re-entry. Bigelow Aerospace has plans for a much larger expandable habitat B330, providing 11,654 cubic feet of internal space, the size of a couple of buses. The company hopes to launch two of the B330s around 2020.

APRIL 10

Coming this Sunday To subscribe or find a newsstand location visit: www.stltoday.com/services

ORTIZ ARRIVES Our new sports columnist Jose de Jesus Ortiz introduces himself to St. Louis readers in his first Post-Dispatch column.

SPORTS

McCLELLAN HIKES YELLOWSTONE Post-Dispatch columnist Bill McClellan writes about his time hiking the wonders — and dangers — of Yellowstone National Park. LIFESTYLE

UNBREAKABLE ELLIE

GOLF GUIDE

St. Louisan Ellie Kemper talks about her life since she became “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmitt,” back this week on Netflix.

Our annual special section takes a comprehensive look at the St. Louis golf scene, including a map to the area’s courses, greens fees and benefit tournaments.

A&E

SPECIAL SECTION


WORLD

A18 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

Dial-a-Swede? Hotline makes it happen Swedish tourist group invites callers worldwide to connect to a ‘random’ citizen there BY KARL RITTER Associated Press

STOCKHOLM • Ever felt like calling up a

complete stranger in Sweden? Now is your chance. The Swedish Tourist Association has set up a hotline that lets callers worldwide “get connected to a random Swede.” On its website, the nonprofit group says the idea is “to spark people’s curiosity about Sweden — our culture, nature and mindset. To help us do this, we have the people of Sweden.” It’s not completely random. The Swedes who take the calls have volunteered by downloading an app. But they are not vet-

ted or given any instructions about what to say. “It’s like when Swedes travel the world. You don’t know who they’re going to talk to and what they’re going to say,” said Magnus Ling, the head of the Swedish Tourism Association. About 3,000 people had dialed the “Swedish Number” by midday Thursday, a day after it was launched, and roughly the same number of Swedes had signed up to answer calls, Ling said. The website says the initiative honors the 250th anniversary of Sweden’s 1766 Freedom of the Press Act, believed to be the world’s first law supporting the freedom of expression.

APA OF MISSOURI

The world’s largest cooperative life-saving adoption event. Save a life today! Get Your Rescue On and adopt a new best friend!

1705 South Hanley Rd. St. Louis, MO SAT, APRIL 16 12 PM - 4 PM

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tourists take in a view of Stockholm in this July 2015 photo. “To spark people’s curiosity about Sweden,” the Swedish Tourist Association has set up a hotline that lets callers worldwide “get connected to a random Swede.” About 3,000 people had dialed the Swedish number by midday Thursday.

For more information visit: apamo.org

Visiting 53 Cities in 32 States, plus Washington, D.C.!

Participating Shelter:

Presenting Sponsor:

For more information and tour adoption event details visit animalleague.org

#TourForLife2016

Body of slain woman is found buried in Bolivian prison cell

25% OFF

ASSOCIATED PRESS

30% OFF

ARMSTRONg AlTERNA Sale expir expires es April 21, 2016

Bolivia, Ecuador and Paraguay. The maximum se-

curity facility holds about 3,500 prisoners.

LA PAZ, BOLIVIA • Oi-

ARMSTRONg lAMINATE suggested retail price

After signing up to test the service, this Stockholm-based AP reporter received four calls, about one an hour. The first was a woman from Turkey with limited English skills. The second hung up. The third was an engineering student from Britain. And the fourth was another journalist: Tim Nudd, creative editor at Adweek in New York. “I just wanted to call and see how this whole thing works,” said Nudd. He, too, was writing an article about it. The hotline follows a similar initiative on Twitter by the Swedish Institute, the government’s own PR agency. Since 2011 it lets a diferent Swedish citizen manage its oicial @Sweden account every week. Ling said the feedback he had received on the hotline was almost all positive, though he said a small number of callers were just trying to hook up with Swedish women. “I’ve heard of just one or two such calls,” Ling said.

Ling admitted there was another motive: recruiting members to the tourism association, which is funded through membership fees. Swedes who sign up to receive calls will receive an email inviting them to join the group, he said. The calls are not monitored but they are recorded, “so that if someone says I was threatened or harassed we can go back and see who it was and even block that number,” Ling said. The website didn’t say that calls are recorded when AP checked it Thursday. Ling said it was listed in the user terms, which those answering the calls — but not those making them — must agree to. He later called back saying the information would be added to the FAQ section of the website. The biggest number of incoming calls has come from Turkey. Ling said he didn’t know why, but thought it had to do with the initiative getting attention there both in traditional media and social media.

suggested retail price

Financing No-Interest for available ers. qualiied buy ls only y. ia er at Installed m r o b la Minimum rates apply. s ct New contra only.

TES* *Mileage restrictions apply.

Clark Floor Co. Family owned and operated for Over 35 years.

7525 S. Lindbergh

314-487-0151

HRS: M-W-F 9:00 to 7:30, Tues. & Thur. 9:00 to 5:00, Sat. 9:00 to 3:00

We are now

cials say an inmate apparently killed his ex-wife and buried her beneath his cell in Bolivia’s largest prison — with nobody taking notice for nearly a year. Chief prosecutor Gomer Padilla tells The Associated Press that the body was found after a fellow inmate confessed to helping bury Kenia Hidalgo Cespedes. The prosecutor says Marco Antonio Ramirez apparently failed to pay the conspirator an agreed-on $278 to keep silent. Padilla says all evidence points to the body being that of Hidalgo, though it hasn’t been formally confirmed. Ramirez is imprisoned for killing a former girlfriend. His ex-wife apparently visited to discuss the sale of a jointly owned apartment. Padilla says investigators are probing the responsibility of personnel at the Palmasola prison, which Pope Francis visited last year during his trip to

Senior Citizen Special Age 62 or older

Free Hair Cut (Reg.Price $12.00)

or

Free Shampoo & Set (Reg.Price $13.00) Offer valid for irst 15 Clients. No Purchase Necessary. Cannot be combined with any other coupon or offer.

e r a c r i a h Ray’s Appointment Required. New Clients Only.

2544 Lemay Ferry Rd. (Dierbergs Plaza)

314-892-9136

Sappington ”The Key To Outdoor Living”

Garden Shop

MON-FRI 8am-7pm SAT 8am-5pm SUN 9am-5pm

New Plants Arriving Daily!

NEW EXPANDED SHOWROOM

OPENING 4/15/16

Actual Spectrum Residents

OPEN

COME AND SHOP OUR LARGER SELECTION OF BEAUTIFUL BLOOMERS Weeds Got You Down? We Have the Answer! Ready to use Concentrate Hose End Spray

ZONE

WEED FREE

See Results in 24 Hours

ALL KENETIC WIND SPINNERS 20% OFF STAKED OR WALL MOUNT

Celebrating Mother Earth There’s an energy that comes with living in a new community. Join us! • 30 days of FREE care (for a limited time) • No second person fee

APRIL 23rd & 24th, 2016 Specials, Giveaways & Fun! HOOTIE'S & AMERICAN ESKIMO

Washer and dryer in every apartment!

GIRLS NIGHT OUT PLANTING PARTY

636.352.1897

APRIL 26th AND 28th

2929 Dougherty Ferry Road St. Louis, MO 63122 DoughertyFerryAssistedLiving.com Near the corner of Big Bend Road and Dougherty Ferry Road

ANIMAL PET ADOPTION

RESERVATIONS NEEDED, CALL FOR DETAILS

11530 Gravois Road • 843-4700 1¼ miles east of I-270 just one block east of Sappington Road on Gravois

A SPECTRUM RETIREMENT COMMUNITY

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Exp. 4/14/16 www.sappingtongardenshop.com


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

FRIDAY • 04.08.2016 • B

HOUSING BACK ON TRACK ‘Crazy busy’ • Brokers here relish the rebound Sellers’ market • Heavy demand raises prices BY TIM BRYANT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Multiple offers. First-day-onthe-market sales for over the asking price. A jump in the number of transactions. That’s a snapshot of the local housing market. Through the first three months of the year, the number of homes sold in St. Louis and St. Charles

counties, plus St. Louis, was up 8 percent — to 4,768 — from 4,405 in the first quarter of 2015, according to the Mid America Regional Information Systems. The quarterly figure is preliminary. In addition, the 4,402 homes and condos under contract indicate the likelihood of strong sales this month, given that 2,179 residences sold last April. “We are crazy busy with sales

and as I can see and hear, so is everyone else,” said Bob Bax, a broker and co-owner of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices in St. Louis. Some examples: • A house in Ladue hit the market last month at $1.275 million and within a day had two ofers. It sold for higher than the asking price. See HOUSING • Page B5

PHOTO BY ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ

The Politte family of Fenton, including Matt (right), Katrina and their children, and their real estate agent Pamela Higginbotham Tvedt of Town and Country visit a home for sale Sunday in Webster Groves.

New spin on the bottle

Summers details what’s ailing us Ex-Treasury chief espouses theory of secular stagnation DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Among celebrity economists, no one is more of a downer than Lawrence Summers. The former Treasury secretary is a leading exponent of secular stagnation theory, which says the world is stuck in a slowgrowth rut because of inadequate demand. On Wednesday, he brought that downbeat message to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. Summers set the tone with a chart comparing the Great PHOTOS BY DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

Freshly washed aluminum bottles move along the conveyor line Thursday at in the new expansion of Metal Container Corp. in Arnold.

A-B places bigger bet on resealable aluminum bottles

Transmission line requests get diferent reception

BY LISA BROWN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Buoyed by a 30 percent jump in resealable aluminum bottle sales last year, AnheuserBusch is investing more resources to expand Bud Light and Budweiser aluminum bottle production in the U.S. St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch, the U.S. unit of Belgium-based A-B InBev, just completed construction on its $160 million expansion of its Metal Container Corp. facility in Arnold that doubles production capacity to 1 billion aluminum bottles annually. The brewer plans to hold a ceremony Friday for its 100,000-square-foot expansion in Arnold, 17 miles south of A-B’s St. Louis brewery. With the expansion, the facility now totals 480,000 square feet of manufacturing space. Including 70 new hires to staff the expansion, the Arnold plant has grown to 300 employees, with two 12-hour shifts running around the clock. A-B’s Metal Container Corp. subsidiary operates five can plants and two lid plants nationwide, and Arnold is its largest. In addition to beer packaging, Metal Container Corp. makes cans and lids for PepsiCo and Monster Beverage Corp. See BOTTLES • Page B4

See NICKLAUS • Page B4

Rolls of aluminum are fed into the start of the conveyor line Thursday at the Metal Container Corp. plant in Arnold.

Mike Williamson puts ink in a machine that applies the printing to aluminum bottles at Metal Container Corp.

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Two transmission line projects that promoters say are needed to connect wind generation to the electric grid could get different treatment from Missouri regulators. Both are proposals to expand transmission infrastructure in order to prepare for coal power plant retirements and the growth of renewable energy. Both projects have spurred loud opposition from farmers and rural landowners along the routes who don’t want to sell easements for unsightly and inconvenient transmission line poles. But the projects have come from very diferent companies. One is from a traditional utility company: St. Louis-based Freshly printed aluminum bottles at Metal Container Corp. on Thursday.

See POWER • Page B4

BUSINESS

1 M

CD Specials – U.S. Bank Certiicate of Deposit Our CD specials are all FDIC1 insured with a guaranteed rate of return. For more information, or to apply for a Certiicate of Deposit, stop in any U.S. Bank ofice. More than 100 convenient St. Louis area locations!

1.75

% APY 2 59-Month Term

0.50

% APY 2 19-Month Term

visit a branch usbank.com 800.771.BANK (2265)

1. FDIC insured to the maximum allowed by law. 2. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) assumes principal and interest remain on deposit for the term of the certiicate. CD special rates are applicable for maximum deposit of $249,999.99 with a $1,000 minimum opening deposit. Penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal. Fees could reduce earnings. Offer only valid at St. Louis metro area U.S. Bank locations. Offer and same term apply for business CDs and Individual Retirement Accounts at U.S. Bank branches only. Not valid for brokerage deposits, institutional investors, Public Funds, or in conjunction with other promotional offers. APY accurate as of 10/8/15, is offered at the bank’s discretion, and is subject to change without prior notice. Member FDIC. ©2015 U.S. Bank 150915 10/15


BUSINESS

B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

Improvements in works at Atlanta airport will take light under leadership of HOK HOK is leading a team designing a $200 million improvement to the domestic passenger terminal at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Construction will begin later this year and include the addition of two large canopies over curbside pickup and drop-off areas and a redesigned central atrium space. The changes are part of a $6 billion, 20-year expansion and modernization program at the airport. Improvements to concourses, hospitality and retail services, runways, cargo, parking and support facilities are also planned. The HOK-led joint venture includes Stanley, Love-Stanley PC and Chasm Architecture LLC, both headquartered in Atlanta.

The HOK St. Louis oice is leading a joint venture team that is designing a $200 improvement at the Hartsield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport’s domestic passenger terminal.

IN THE LAB: ROUNDUP OF RESEARCH GRANTS

Bommarito

Following is a list of some of the medical research grants awarded to scientists in the area.

INFINITI

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Scientist • Dr. Ajay Jain, assistant professor of pediatrics Grant • $703,620 from the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Study • Studying the role of bile acid activated receptors FXR and TGR5 in parenteral nutrition (PN)-associated hepatic and gut disease.

PEOPLE IN BUSINESS

Winter named senior VP at NewGround Jeffrey Winter was named senior vice president of business development at NewGround. In his new role, Winter will lead national sales and marketing ef- Winter forts for the design/ build firm. Most recently, Winter served as senior vice president of sales and marketing for IPC Healthcare/TeamHealth. Previously, he served senior management positions at Correctional Medical Services Inc./Corizon Health and KPMG. Winter earned his bachelor’s degree in economics, business administration from Westminster College and his MBA in finance from Webster University.

Welker

Meehan

Starzyk

Eilers

Divine

Richardson

West

Welch

Tucker

Bush

Luna

Howren

Infiniti QX60

NEW 2016

ALL WHEEL DRIVE IN STOCK

READY FOR DELIVERY

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Scientist • Dr. Nathan Stitziel, assistant professor of medicine and of genetics Grant • $3.2 million, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Project • Using a human genetics approach to evaluate the likelihood that ANGPTL3 inhibitors will successfully reduce the risk of heart attack in addition to their cholesterol-lowering efects. Scientist • Andrey Anokhin, associate for psychiatry Grant • $3 million, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Project • Investigating adolescent brain development using modern neuroimaging methods to assess developmental trajectories of diferent brain regions such as those involved in reward and thrill seeking and those in charge of inhibitory control and willpower. Scientists • Dr. Jay Keener, associate professor of orthopaedic surgery, Dr. Sharlene Teefey, professor of radiology, and Dr. Ken Yamaguchi, professor of orthopaedic surgery Grant • $2.1 million, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Project • Studying why some age-related rotator cuf tears develop and become painful over time. Scientist • David DeNardo, assistant professor of medicine and of pathology and immunology Grant • $1.7 million, National Cancer Institute Project • Testing whether inhibiting a protein called focal adhesion kinase can improve responses to immune therapy against pancreatic cancer. Scientists • Sarah England, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, professor of medicine and professor of cell biology and physiology, and Dr. Celia Santi, assistant professor of neuroscience Grant • $1.5 million from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Project • Investigating how oxytocin elicits changes in uterine contractions during pregnancy in order to better understand both its risks and beneits. Scientist • Zhoufeng Chen, professor of anesthesiology, developmental biology and psychiatry Grant • $1.4 million, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Project • Studying the intractable disease of chronic itch, which is resistant to antihistamine treatments Scientist • Aimee James, associate professor of surgery Grant • $1.1 million, National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities Project • Working with patients and providers to discuss how patients cope with the high cost of medications and medical procedures in order to develop a pilot intervention to reduce the frequency with which patients skip or delay medications or medical care. Scientist • Kenneth Schechtman, associate professor of biostatistics and medicine Grant • $669,166 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Project • Enlisting family medical practices in four cities to recruit 528 families with an obese 6- to 12-year-old child in order to test the weight-loss efectiveness of family-based therapy that will be implemented at the family practices. — Staf reports

NEW EXTENDED 2016

Infiniti QX50 2 or More At This Price

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

348

$

*

0

$

DOWN

A MONTH

ALL WHEEL DRIVE

NEW 2015 2 or More At This Price

Infiniti Q50

PREMIUM PACKAGE w/NAVIGATION

378

$

*

A MONTH

0

$

DOWN

NEW 2015

Infiniti QX60 ALL WHEEL 2 or More At This Price

DRIVE

PREMIUM PACKAGE w/NAVIGATION

498

$

*

A MONTH

0

$

DOWN

*39 mo. lease -10,000 miles per year, (12,000 and 15,000 miles available) $0 cash down. Tax, title, license, Acquisition fee and dealer fee not included. $0 Security deposit. Offer expires 4/30/16.

MISSOURI'S #1 AUTOMOTIVE GROUP Source, bureau of Missouri Automotive registration 2015.

Bommarito West County

INFINITI

15736 Manchester at Clarkson Rd. (636) 391-9400 SATURDAY

BommaritoInfiniti.com

FULL SERVICE AVAILABLE 7am-3pm by APPT. ONLY

Rebecca Welker was promoted to senior vice president at CHAN Healthcare. Ampliied Digital hired Tom Meehan as a senior digital marketing manager and Nicole Starzyk as a digital marketing manager. Switch promoted Gregg Eilers to vice president of business meetings and live events. Safety National Casualty Corp. appointed Steve Divine as senior vice president of inance. Infoplus Commerce hired Garret Richardson as vice president of client solutions. Nature’s Variety appointed Matt West as chief inancial oicer. Suresh Rudrappa joined RE/MAX Results. Cameron Welch joined McGrath and Associates as a project engineer. HOK added Eugene Tucker as a staf attorney. CBRE Group Inc. promoted Brian Bush to vice president. Jerry Luna was promoted to vice president, quality and technical services, at Precoat Metals. Sean Oliver was hired as talent acquisition manager at Alliance Technologies LLC. David Helms was named managing partner of the new St. Louis oice of German May PC, formerly Rouse Hendricks German May. UMB Bank hired Tracy Howren as vice president, commercial real estate lending oicer.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TUESDAY DEMOGRAPHICS • Olin Business School’s Executive MBA program hosts this presentation and panel discussion on using the Census Business Builder. • 7:15 a.m. — 9 a.m. (breakfast followed by presentation), Washington University, Charles F. Knight Executive Education Center, Room 200, St. Louis • Free, but register at bit.ly/1Me0QEJ TUESDAY LEADERSHIP • St. Louis chapter of Commercial Real Estate Women holds panel discussion on activating leadership potential. • 11:30 a.m. — 1 p.m., Sqwires Annex, 1415

South 18th Street, St. Louis •$30, members; $40, guests. Register: www. crewstl.org WEDNESDAY EMAIL • SCORE presents this workshop on successful email marketing campaigns. • 5:30 p.m. — 8:30 p.m., RESPONSE! Targeted Marketing, 1800 Lafayette Avenue, St. Louis • $35, prepaid. Register: www.stlscore.org or 314-539-6602 APRIL 20 SOCIAL MEDIA • Selsius Corporate and Career Training ofers this workshop on social media strategies for small businesses.

POST-DISPATCH BUSINESS STAFF ROLAND KLOSE

Business editor

314-340-8128

GREGORY CANCELADA

Assistant business editor

314-340-8330

JACOB BARKER

Energy and environment

314-340-8291

LISA BROWN

Retail, consumer products and marketing

314-340-8127

TIM BRYANT

Real estate and construction

314-340-8206

JIM GALLAGHER

Personal inance and corporate afairs

314-340-8390

SAMANTHA LISS

Business of health

314-340-8017

DAVID NICKLAUS

Business columnist

314-340-8213

To e-mail a staf member, use the irst initial and last name, followed by @post-dispatch.com

SUBMIT AN ITEM Bulletin Board and People in Business submissions should be sent to: biznetworking@ post-dispatch.com. Or you can mail a release to: Business News, 900 NorthTucker Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 63101

• 9 a.m. — 4 p.m., Southwestern Illinois College, 2500 Carlyle Avenue, Belleville, Ill. • $75; register by April 13: 618-222-5688 or selsiustraining.com. ARCH GROUNDS • The St. Louis chapter of the International Facility Management Association hosts this program and building tour of the Gateway Arch grounds redevelopment. • 5 p.m. — 7 p.m., The Laclede Group, 700 Market Street, St. Louis 63101 • Free, members; $35, nonmembers. Register by April 13 at bit.ly/1N8Rwgr

THE BOTTOM LINE hough the local jobless rate is under 5 percent, Jim Gallagher and David Nicklaus talk about why people are stilll struggling. stltoday.com/ watch


MARKET WATCH

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B3

TRACK YOUR STOCKS AND GET THE LATEST NEWS • STLTODAY.COM /BUSINESS Stocks slumped broadly Thursday, giving the Standard & Poor’s 500 index its biggest decline in six weeks. Stocks have gradually lost momentum over the last few weeks after a furious rally that wiped out most of their losses from early 2016.

Verizon Communications VZ

Goldman Sachs

Close: $52.00 -1.52 or -2.8% Telecommunications companies lagged the market for the second day in a row.

Close: $150.41 -4.78 or -3.1% Banks were among the worst-performing sectors of the market Thursday. $170 160

45

30

45

150

40

25

40

140

35

J

F M A 52-week range $54.49

Close: 17,541.96 Change: -174.09 (-1.0%)

17,600 17,360

$139.05

$35.98

Corn Soybeans

10 DAYS

Wheat

CLOSE

CHG

May 16 May 16 May 16

361.50 904.50 457

+3.50 -3.50 -6

2,160

CHICAGO MERC

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

17,500

2,080

Feeder cattle

17,000

2,000

Live cattle

16,500

1,920

16,000

1,840

Apr 16 Apr 16 Apr 16 Apr 16 Apr 16

154.15 132.42 67.12 13.72 207.45

+.98 +.35 -.38 +.02 -6.60

Hogs Milk Copper ICE

O

N

D

J

Vol. (in mil.) Pvs. Volume Advanced Declined New Highs New Lows

DOW DOW Trans. DOW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

NASD 1,824 1,702 742 2046 27 29

3,639 3,650 708 2378 76 15

M

1,760

A

O

N

D

J

F

M

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

May 16 May 16 May 16

59.03 119.80 27.50

+.28 -1.70 -.40

NEW YORK

DATE

CLOSE

CHG

Crude oil

May 16 May 16 May 16 May 16

37.26 1.3812 112.57 2.018

-.49 -.0135 -1.46 +.107

Cotton

A

Coffee

StocksRecap NYSE

F

HIGH 17687.28 7724.43 660.24 10117.16 4901.49 2063.01 1433.04 21178.36 1107.89

LOW 17484.23 7623.89 654.61 10004.77 4831.49 2033.80 1411.12 20927.61 1088.56

CLOSE 17541.96 7652.83 656.44 10045.15 4848.37 2041.91 1418.34 21014.61 1092.79

CHG. -174.09 -101.05 +0.28 -114.70 -72.35 -24.75 -18.44 -249.67 -16.02

%CHG. WK -0.98% t -1.30% t +0.04% t -1.13% t -1.47% t -1.20% t -1.28% t -1.17% t -1.44% t

MO QTR s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s s

YTD +0.67% +1.92% +13.61% -0.97% -3.18% -0.10% +1.41% -0.72% -3.79%

Sugar

Gas blend Heating oil Natural gas

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV NAME

TKR LMIA

8.06

... Laclede Group

LG

49.66

Lee Ent

LEE

1.15

Mallinckrodt

MNK

50.90 132.60 64.26

-.97 -1.5 -13.9 -47.4

Monsanto Co

MON

81.22 123.82 86.10

-.90 -1.0 -12.6 -23.9 24

2.16

OLN

12.29

-.22 -1.3

0.80

TKR AEGN

15.97

Allied Health

AHPI

0.63

Amdocs

DOX

50.06

61.46 57.90 -1.15 -1.9

Ameren

AEE

37.26

51.06 49.16

-.39 -0.8 +13.7 +20.7 19

1.70

American Railcar

ARII

33.02

60.42 39.74

-.65 -1.6 -14.1 -17.3

7

1.60

Belden Inc

BDC

36.51

95.56 61.45

-.67 -1.1 +28.9 -34.0 31

0.20

10.74

21.69 12.31

-.28 -2.2 -.90 -3.4

Build-A-Bear Wkshp BBW

22.41 20.45 1.85

.63

-.13 -0.6

+5.9 +12.0 17

-.02 -3.1 -43.6 -62.4 dd

+6.1 +11.3 20 0.78f

+0.6 -36.4 11

... Olin

12.61

8.51 +.03 +0.4 -15.5 -30.5 dd

3.55

1.72

32.56 16.93

CAL

23.22

33.83 25.68

-4.3 -15.9 13

0.28 Panera Bread

PNRA 162.07 220.44 210.30

CASS

43.78

59.09 49.26 -1.13 -2.2

-4.3

0.88 PeabdyE rs

BTU

2.00

84.00

Centene

CNC

47.36

83.00 61.92 +.46 +0.7

-5.9 -12.9 22

Peak Resorts

SKIS

2.60

7.73

Perficient

PRFT

14.90

Commerce Banc.

CBSH

37.44

Edgewell

EPC

67.94 107.38 81.03 -1.32 -1.6

Emerson

EMR

41.25

62.75 52.87

-.35 -0.7 +10.5

Energizer Holdings

ENR

28.86

44.52 42.70

-.27 -0.6 +25.4

Enterprise Financial EFSC

19.68

30.73 25.19

-.81 -3.1 -11.1 +24.2 15 0.36f ReinsGrp

Esco Technologies

ESE

31.50

39.98 38.16 +.10 +0.3

Express Scripts

ESRX

65.55

94.61 70.05 +.93 +1.3 -19.9 -18.6 20

First Clover Leaf

FCLF

8.50

9.89

Foresight Energy

FELP

1.07

15.73

FutureFuel

FF

9.11

16.08 10.23

Huttig Building Prod HBP Isle of Capri

ISLE

2.84 10.62

47.11 43.20 -1.21 -2.7

4.12

9.40 +.05 +0.5 1.18

-.81 -0.4

+2.4 -45.7

4

-1.9 -43.6 15

... ...

+8.0 +28.2 36

...

-.15 -6.7 -72.7 -97.0 dd

...

3.22 +.03 +0.9 -46.4 -40.7 dd

0.55

2.10

+5.6

-0.4 23

+1.2 +9.4

Post Holdings

1.00 Pulaski Financial

...

8

21.92 20.29

-.16 -0.8 +18.5

-1.9 30

...

0.32 Reliv ...

Stereotaxis

POST

41.63

72.64 69.00 -1.01 -1.4 +11.8 +44.0 dd

PULB

12.24

17.25 15.07

-.41 -2.6

-5.6 +27.7 13

0.38

RGA

76.96

98.70 93.08 -1.51 -1.6

+8.8 +2.7 11

1.48

RELV

0.37

1.40

-.02 -2.8 +32.8 -29.3 dd

...

STXS

0.54

2.53

1.65 +.02 +1.2 +122.1 -17.7 dd

...

.77

...

0.24 Stifel Financial

SF

SunEdison

SUNE

0.20

33.45

... SunEdison Semi

SEMI

3.24

26.20

... WldPntTm

WPT

11.79

25.00

59.93 27.75 -1.36 -4.7 -34.5 -47.9 12

...

.40 +.03 +8.4 -92.1 -98.5 dd

...

-.05 -4.1 -66.6 -85.9 dd 0.68m -.02 -0.2 -24.2

3.99 +.20 +5.3

21.43 14.00

-.04 -2.3

...

-3.3 14 1.90f

-.16 -1.1

-1.2 10

+5.0 +33.0 +0.5

4

-0.4 23

0.24

CHG

CLOSE

1236.20 15.16 953.80

Gold Silver

...

The yield on the 10-year Treasury fell to 1.69 percent Thursday. Yields affect rates on mortgages and other consumer loans.

+13.70 +.11 +10.90

5.75

18.90 14.37

-.10 -1.7 -26.7 -77.5 -.07 -0.5

+7.2

-9.4 15

... 1.20

Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months.

YEST 6 MO AGO 1 YR AGO

3.50 3.25 3.25

TREASURIES

LAST

NET CHG

1YR AGO

3-month T-bill 6-month T-bill 52-wk T-bill 2-year T-note 5-year T-note 10-year T-note 30-year T-bond

.20 .25 .52 .71 1.14 1.69 2.52

-0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.03 -0.06 -0.07 -0.06

.02 .09 .21 .54 1.35 1.91 2.53

NET 1YR LAST CHG AGO

BONDS

PRIME FED RATE FUNDS

+1.6 +12.3 16 0.90b +3.4 -19.2 20

.0684 .7596 .2744 1.4127 .7630 .1543 1.1410 .0150 .2635 .009123 .056657 .0147 .0659 .000864 1.0468

PreciousMetals

68.79 66.55 +.30 +0.5 +12.0 +30.2 21 1.96f

Caleres

...

PREV

.0692 .7506 .2708 1.4060 .7604 .1548 1.1377 .0150 .2637 .009239 .055796 .0147 .0656 .000861 1.0465

NEW YORK

YTD% 1YR% CLOSE CHG %CHG CHG RTN P/E DIV

CassInfo

-7.6 25

Argentina Australia Brazil Britain Canada China Euro India Israel Japan Mexico Russia So. Africa So. Korea Switzerland

Interestrates Interestrates

... LMI Aerospace

NAME

FOREIGN CURRENCY IN DOLLARS CLOSE

Platinum

52-WK LO HI

Aegion

$23.25

F M A 52-week range $34.78

Vol.: 6.0m (1.5x avg.) PE: 26.2 Mkt. Cap: $10.81 b Yield: 1.6%

Chicago BOT is in cents.

LocalStocks 52-WK LO HI

J

ExchangeRates

DATE

18,000

15,500

20

F M A 52-week range $46.64

Vol.: 4.9m (1.6x avg.) PE: ... Mkt. Cap: $20.01 b Yield: 2.2%

CHICAGO BOT

Close: 2,041.91 Change: -24.75 (-1.2%)

2,000

J

$35

Futures

S&P 500

2,040

10 DAYS

F M A 52-week range $218.77

Vol.: 4.8m (1.0x avg.) PE: 12.4 Mkt. Cap: $63.53 b Yield: 1.7%

2,080

Dow Jones industrials

J

HBI

Close: $27.87 0.77 or 2.8% The maker of underwear, t-shirts and socks said it will buy Champion Europe.

50

$38.06

17,840

Hanesbrands

CAG

Close: $46.09 0.66 or 1.5% The maker of Chef Boyardee canned pasta and Hebrew National hot dogs reported strong profit and sales in its third quarter. $50

$55

Vol.: 23.1m (1.3x avg.) PE: 11.9 Mkt. Cap: $212.16 b Yield: 4.3%

Charts show stocks that made the news yesterday.

ConAgra Foods

GS

.38 .13 .13

Barclays LongT-BdIdx

2.29 -0.06 2.39

Bond Buyer Muni Idx

3.94 -0.03 4.22

Barclays USAggregate

2.16 +0.02 2.03

Barclays US High Yield 8.13 -0.09 6.01 Moodys AAA Corp Idx

3.64 +0.01 3.47

Barclays CompT-BdIdx

1.22 -0.04 1.63

Barclays US Corp

3.18 +0.02 2.86

GlobalMarkets INDEX

LAST

S&P 500 Frankfurt DAX London FTSE 100 Hong Kong Hang Seng Paris CAC-40 Mexico City Bolsa Tokyo Nikkei 225 Sao Paolo Bovespa Toronto Zurich

2041.91 9530.62 6136.89 20266.05 4245.91 45052.16 15749.84 48513.11 13266.44 7761.35

CHG

CHG

YTD

-24.75 -93.89 -24.74 +59.38 -38.73 -229.81 +34.48 +231.11 -81.02 -6.88

-1.20% -0.98% -0.40% +0.29% -0.90% -0.51% +0.22% +0.48% -0.61% -0.09%

-0.10% -11.29% -1.69% -7.52% -9.22% +4.83% -17.25% +11.91% +1.97% -11.98%

Bommarito 10 YEAR/200,000 MILE A BOMMARITO EXCLUSIVE

NATIONWIDE WARRANTY WITH EVERY NEW VEHICLE PURCHASE!

AT THE BIG CORNER OF I-270 & NORTH LINDBERGH BLVD. AND NOW A SECOND NISSAN LOCATION IN WEST COUNTY

Local jobless rate lat at 4.7 percent in February BY JIM GALLAGHER • St. Louis Post-dispatch

The St. Louis area unemployment rate held at 4.7 percent in February for the third straight month, the government reported, matching a 14-year low. The area gained 6,900 jobs from January, a number adjusted for normal seasonal changes, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. That 0.5 percent gain brought the job total to 1.36 million.

Meanwhile, economists at PNC Bank predicted “slow but steady economic expansion” for St. Louis over the rest of this year. The Pittsburgh-based bank painted a fairly rosy picture in a new report on the region. The improved labor market provides “a new dynamic for job seekers,” giving them “some leverage in earning strong wage growth.” The bank noted that household income

in St. Louis is above the national average, while the cost of living is lower. “These conditions will allow household spending to keep local businesses hiring, and allow new businesses to enter the marketplace with some confidence in the local economy’s outlook,” the economists wrote. The metro area’s 4.7 percent unemployment rate, seasonally adjusted by the Federal Reserve, is below the 4.9 percent national rate for February. The bank noted

GM settles ignition suit • General Motors Co. on Thursday said it had agreed to settle a lawsuit that would have been the third case to go to trial over a faulty ignition switch linked to nearly 400 injuries and deaths. In a letter iled in federal court in Manhattan, GM’s lawyers said the automaker had entered into a conidential settlement with Nadia Yingling, whose lawsuit over her husband’s 2013 death following a car crash was set to go to trial May 2. It was unclear why GM decided to settle the case. GM conirmed the deal but ofered no further comment. A lawyer for Yingling did not respond to a request for comment. The deal came a week after GM scored a win in the irst case to reach a verdict in a series of six test trials scheduled over the ignition switch. The switch can slip out of place, causing engines to stall and cutting power to the brake, steering and air bag systems. Although GM succeeded in last week’s trial in convincing jurors that the ignition switch in question was not responsible for the accident in the case, the jury did conclude the switch was defective. A prior trial ended without a verdict in January following allegations that the plaintif gave misleading testimony.

GM has admitted that some of its employees knew about the problems for years, and it has already paid roughly $2 billion in settlement and penalties. It continues to face 235 injury and death lawsuits consolidated before a federal judge in Manhattan.

that more workers are seeking jobs as the market improves, and the growth in the labor force will make it difficult to drive the St. Louis jobless rate lower. The last year saw more of the region’s long transition from manufacturing to a service economy, as the region’s job count grew by 1.5 percent from February 2015. Jim Gallagher • 314-340-8390 jgallagher@post-dispatch.com

BUSINESS DIGEST Kaldi’s expands • Kaldi’s Cofee Roasting Co. is expanding its footprint with a total of four new stores in St. Louis and Atlanta this year. The St. Louis-based cofee chain said its seventh St. Louis area store will open in the Gerhart Lofts building at the corner of Laclede and Vandeventer avenues near St. Louis University. Kaldi’s eighth St. Louis area store will open at the Mid Campus Center building at 4590 Children’s Place, which is on Washington University’s medical school campus. Space Architects is the architect on the Gerhart store, and Christner is the architect on the store that will open in the Children’s Place building, which is under construction. “We’ve been looking to add a new location in St. Louis for the past couple years, and these two are perfect its,” Kaldi’s owner Tricia Zimmer-Ferguson said in a statement posted on the company’s website Thursday. In Atlanta, where Kaldi’s has one existing store, the chain plans to open two additional stores this year. Kaldi’s opened its irst location in 1994 in St. Louis’ DeMun neighborhood.

Pentagon worries over rail merger • The U.S. military on Thursday raised concerns with a federal rail regulator over the voting trust Canadian Paciic has proposed as part of its takeover bid for Norfolk Southern and said the deal could adversely afect the country’s national defense. In a letter to the U.S. Surface Transportation Board dated April 7, the Department of Defense said CP’s proposal to have its chief executive, Hunter Harrison, run Norfolk Southern as part of the voting trust “could prove to be untenable due to the appearance of common control” of the two railroads. CP, which is Canada’s second-largest railroad, disclosed a $28 billion ofer for Norfolk Southern in mid-November. Norfolk Southern has rebufed all advances from CP. The letter comes as a response to a March 2 petition from CP to the STB seeking a “declaratory order” on its voting trust

proposal. The idea would be to place both railroads in a trust — if they agreed to merge — pending a review by the STB. Under the STB’s merger rules, common control is not allowed. The Department of Defense said in the letter that “it is too early to determine” whether a merger would degrade national defense, but said “the potential certainly exists.” The U.S. military relies on rail networks to move defense-related cargo across the country, both during peace and times of war. Consumer debt rises modestly • U.S. consumers borrowed at a modest pace in February for the second month in a row, evidence of ongoing caution that has kept a lid on spending this year. Borrowing rose at a 5.8 percent annual rate, the Federal Reserve said Thursday, just above January’s 5 percent pace. The use of revolving credit — mostly credit cards — rose just 3.7 percent after slipping in January. Total outstanding credit increased $17.2 billion to $3.57 trillion. Americans barely increased their spending in February for the third straight month. From staf and wire reports


BUSINESS

B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BEST OF BUILDING BLOCKS

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

A-B’s Arnold expansion results in 70 new jobs BOTTLES • FROM B1

Highlights from our real estate and development blog. STLtoday.com/ buildingblocks Light displays coming to the Grove • As many as 10 overhead light displays are coming to the Grove entertainment area along Manchester Avenue in St. Louis. Spheres illuminated from within by LED lights will be strung across Manchester. The irst lights will go up at Manchester and Tower Grove Avenue. Brooks Goedeker, executive director of Park Central Development, the area’s development corporation, said funding is in place for ive of the planned light displays. Each display of poles and lights costs $35,000. Engraphix Architectural Signs, based in Brentwood, designed the displays, which will have changing light colors and spheres that will appear to move. Grove oicials irst looked at putting lights on building roolines along Manchester. Still too many streetscape gaps for that, Goedeker said. Oicials then considered overhead strings of white lights like those on Washington Avenue downtown. Nah. Goedeker said the Grove inally opted for a hipper display like some found in Europe or, believe it or not, in China. (04.08) Contractor to move to historic house • The Hicor Group, a construction contractor, plans to spend $1.1 million to renovate the historic Bronson house in St. Louis as its headquarters. Hicor, a minority contractor with a specialty in historic preservation work, said it will do the project’s carpentry and concrete work. The Bronson house, at 3201 Washington Boulevard, went up in 1885 for Dr. George Bronson and his family. The 7,000-square-foot building at the edge of Grand Center is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Late Victorian era house has Queen Anne and Romanesque design elements with Chateauesque inluences. Renovation plans include new interior walls, looring, ceilings, lighting and electrical systems, plus a new roof, said Hicor’s president, Andrew Staford. Move-in is scheduled for this fall. Hicor won’t move far. It’s currently at the former Central States Life Insurance Building, a 1920s Spanish Missionstyle building at 3207 Washington. (04.06) NAI Desco to relocate within Clayton • Commercial real estate irm NAI Desco is doing its own property deal. The company is relocating its headquarters across downtown Clayton, from 8235 Forsyth Boulevard to the 19th, and top, loor of the 101 South Hanley Building. “We have been growing across all business lines as a rebounding commercial real estate market fuels client demand for facilities that will help make their companies more eicient and productive,” Toby Martin, NAI Desco’s president and chief executive says in a statement. For now, the company employs 30 people who work in 7,300 square feet of space at 8235 Forsyth. The new HQ at 101 South Hanley will have 15,000 square feet of space. NAI DESCO is the St. Louis ailiate of NAI Global, a real estate network with 400 oices worldwide. (04.05)

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE NOTES Send items to bizrealestate @post-dispatch.com.

Plant manager Cheryl Rogers said the Arnold expansion is being used for 16-ounce Budweiser and Bud Light aluminum bottles with twist-of lids that have grown popular at baseball games. “It’s a great location to be in because of the proximity to the St. Louis brewery and its location in the Midwest,” she said of Arnold, adding the manufacturing lines are flexible and can accommodate diferent brands. Arnold was the first site where A-B began producing the resealable bottle, beginning in 2013. Last week, A-B broke ground on a new $175 million aluminum bottle line at its Metal Container Corp. facility in Jacksonville, Fla., which will add 75 jobs there. Both the Arnold and Jacksonville facility expansions are part of the brewer’s plans announced in mid-2015 to invest $1.5 billion in its U.S. operations through 2017. Bud Light and Budweiser continued to lose market share in the U.S. last year, but A-B remains the top seller of beer in the U.S., with 46.4 percent market share, based on sales to retailers. Bud Light is the country’s top-selling beer, followed by Coors Light and Budweiser. Both of A-B’s flagship U.S. brands recently revamped their label designs after years without a makeover. Budweiser debuted a new look last year that replaced gold detailing with platinum, and Bud Light rolled out a more extensive redesign Monday in blue and white that brought back the A-B crest and removed red as an accent color. Harry Schuhmacher, publisher of industry publication Beer Business Daily, said resealable aluminum bottles ofer A-B a way to stand apart from other beers, particularly in the light beer category. “In an increasingly commoditized light beer industry, A-B has a point of differentiation with their aluminum bottles,” Schuhmacher said. “They have the resources to ramp up alu-

DAVID CARSON • dcarson@post-dispatch.com

An automated forklift moves pallets of Bud Lite cans Thursday at Metal Container Corp. in Arnold.

minum bottle capacity quickly, whereas competitors must rely on suppliers which inevitably have shortages.” Other brewers have turned to aluminum bottles to woo beer drinkers, promising a container that keeps beer cold longer than glass. In 2004, Pittsburgh Brewing Co. was one of the first brewers to ship aluminum bottles for its Iron City Beer, but they came with traditional crown caps that were not resealable. After the brewery’s ownership changed, the bottles were discontinued. In 2008, A-B rival MillerCoors was the first brewer to bring a resealable aluminum bottle to the market, when the Chicago-based brewer launched pint-sized wide mouth aluminum Miller Lite bottles made by Ball Corp.

Summers says spending could counter malaise NICKLAUS • FROM B1

Depression with the recent Great Recession. The downturn after 1929 was sharper than the one of 2008 and 2009, but the recovery by 1940 was more vigorous than what we’re seeing today. “If you think the 1930s were a lost decade, we are having an equivalently lost decade now,” he said. Summers was an unusual choice for the annual Homer Jones lecture, which honors the St. Louis Fed’s research director of the 1960s and 1970s. Unlike past speakers, Summers is not especially sympathetic to Jones’ brand of monetarist economics. He said the monetarist research done in St. Louis was important but “ultimately wrong.” Mostly, though, Summers wasn’t here to debate the past. He criticized current Federal Reserve leaders’ desire to push interest rates back up to more normal levels. “Normalization is the wrong objective in abnormal times,” Summers said. He thinks, in fact, that the Fed is relatively powerless today. The central bank cuts interest rates an average of 5 percentage points when it sees a recession coming; overnight rates now are less than 0.5 percent. “It is highly unlikely that when the next recession comes there will be anything like enough room for the standard monetary policy response,” Summers said. Nor does he think quantitative easing, the bond-buying policy the Fed deployed between 2009 and 2013, will be efective against the forces of secular stagnation. “The way monetary policy works is by pulling spending forward,” Summers explained. “If you have a temporary demand shortfall, a reduction in interest rates is terrific. … But if you have a permanent demand shortfall, at some point that pull-forward catches up with you.” Inflation-adjusted interest rates have generally been falling since 1980. Summers sees that as evidence that the nation has had a shortage of investment, or a surplus of savings, for a long time. The causes are many, he says: growing inequality, an aging population and even technology. The success of Amazon means we need fewer shopping malls, and every Airbnb rental is a hotel room that doesn’t need to be built. These are deflationary trends. They help explain why inflation remains stubbornly below the Fed’s 2 percent target. And, most distressingly, none of these trends is expected to abate anytime soon. Other economists have alternative explanations for our slow-growth malaise, and none of them is particularly cheery. Robert Gordon, a professor at Northwestern University, says we’re doomed to slow growth because the inventions of recent decades — such as mobile phones and the Internet — are nowhere near as life-changing as the automobile and electricity were a century ago. Summers at least has a prescription for climbing out of the rut: He proposes a big increase in government spending. “Public investment, and policies to promote private investment, have been sorely lacking,” he said. “If this is not the moment to undertake infrastructure maintenance and renewal, I don’t know when that moment will come.” Congress, however, isn’t in any mood to fill Summers’ prescription. If his secular stagnation thesis is right, we are left to worry that the next recession may be worse than the last. David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

The company has since expanded the pint, or 16-ounce, aluminum bottles to three other brands: Miller Genuine Draft, Coors Light and Coors Banquet. This year, MillerCoors added its third aluminum bottle line at its Fort Worth, Texas, brewery, adding to two existing aluminum pint lines in other states, said MillerCoors’ senior director of revenue management Kevin Nitz. With aluminum bottles, brewers aren’t confined to using just the label space for design purposes, Nitz said. Miller Lite ofers a special release St. Patrick’s Day beer in an aluminum bottle, for example, with green shamrocks covering the bottle. “It provides a canvas to speak through design about our brands in a unique way,” he said.

Lines would tie wind power to grid POWER • FROM B1

Ameren Corp.’s transmission subsidiary. Ameren Transmission went through the traditional process and got the regional grid operator to say its 100-mile Mark Twain line was a necessary project. As a result, if it wins approval from local authorities, ratepayers across the region will reimburse Ameren for the costs of the Northeast Missouri line. At least three of five Missouri Public Service Commissioners indicated this week they thought the project met its criteria for a certificate of convenience and necessity, which would give the utility the right to use eminent domain if it has to. A final vote will be in the coming weeks. It was on a 3-2 vote last summer that the PSC derailed Clean Line Energy Partners’ Grain Belt Express transmission line. The transmission line would have spanned 780 miles and crossed Missouri in order to pipe wind energy from Kansas to customers further east. It won approval from Kansas, Illinois and Indiana regulators, but Missouri’s opposition halted the project. Clean Line, however, isn’t a traditional utility. Instead of going through a grid operator’s planning process, Clean Line says it will assume the risk of building the line and sign up customers and generators independently. And most of the 4,000 megawatts would be delivered to states east of Missouri, where electricity prices tend to be higher. Clean Line says its transmission line would still deliver up to 500 megawatts to Missouri customers, but that wasn’t enough to convince a majority of the PSC. Commissioners said they didn’t think the company demonstrated the project was needed in the state. Citing public outcry and property rights, the commissioners balked at giving it utility status that would let it use eminent domain to acquire easements. PSC Commissioner Bill Kenney, who voted against Grain Belt, noted the difference in a discussion of Ameren’s Mark Twain line during a webcast of a meeting Wednesday. “I was one of three commissioners here who voted against the Clean Line Grain Belt Express because I felt it did not benefit Missouri customers,” he said. “I think this does benefit the ratepayers.” Commissioner Stephen Stoll acknowledged opposition around Kirksville and Palmyra to Ameren’s 100-mile line. But Stoll, who opposed Grain Belt, said he saw the projects diferently. “I do feel for the property owners,” he said. “I know people don’t necessarily want these, but for the reasons I voted against Clean Line, I think in this case (Ameren) had gone through the requi-

site issues and came to us with a clear plan and that’s why I think they met the standards and I support it.”

CLEAN LINE TO TRY AGAIN Clean Line says it still plans to refile an application with the PSC sometime this year. Mark Lawlor, the company’s director of development, said the company will attempt to better define the benefits to Missouri. It is working to finalize commitments from Missouri utilities to buy power on the line, which he thinks may help convince the commission. “They want the benefits to Missouri to be plain, clear and easy to understand, and we get that, and that’s what we’ll do,” Lawlor said, adding: “I wouldn’t say they weren’t there the first time around.” Failing that, the company may be able to bypass Missouri. After Arkansas regulators blocked another Clean Line project connecting wind energy from Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle to the Southeast, the Department of Energy said last month it would partner with the company. That allows the project to bypass state regulators under a 2005 law. Lawlor said Clean Line hasn’t sought the same authority in Missouri, but a similar DOE arrangement “isn’t impossible” here. He noted that in developing its southern transmission line, it would follow the regulatory process in states that had already approved the project and asserted their jurisdiction. Missouri can likewise assert its authority, he said. “They have the ability to take jurisdiction and impose any provisions and protections that they see fit,” Lawlor said. The Ameren project, meanwhile, may win PSC approval but face a challenge in the courts. At issue is whether it and other transmission developers must obtain approval from each county commission. With pressure from landowners against the project high, Ameren hasn’t won the assent of all Northeast Missouri counties its Mark Twain crosses. PSC Chairman Daniel Hall said he thought state law indicates transmission lines do need county approval, but he felt the PSC could grant its approval on the condition that the utility ultimately win the assent of afected counties. Either way, he expects a judge will ultimately end up interpreting the rules. “The reality is it doesn’t really matter what the five of us say that statute means,” Hall said. “What really matters is what a court or an appellate court says that statute means. While I’ve got my opinion and maybe the commission will have its opinion, the reality is it’s going to go to a court.” Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Israeli tech company NRGene to open St. Louis oice BY LISA BROWN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Israeli tech company NRGene plans to open an oice in the Cortex innovation district that will serve as its U.S. base of operations. The analytics company develops computational tools and algorithmic models for trait discovery used by seed companies, animal breeders, and academia. Its office, which will open this spring at the CIC@CET in the Central West End, will initially

have one employee and ultimately grow to about six employees, said Paul Chomet, NRGene’s strategic consultant. “It makes a lot of sense to be in the heartland of the country with companies such as Monsanto and academic groups like the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center,” Chomet said. “St. Louis is really a cultural hub for this advanced ag genomics work.” NRGene is the fourth Israeli agritech business that has set up operations locally in the past 18

months. All four were recruited by GlobalSTL, an initiative of BioSTL to attract high growth international companies to St. Louis. The other three companies are Kaiima Agro-Biotech, Evogene and Forrest Innovations. The nonprofit BioSTL focuses on nurturing St. Louis biotechnology startups. GlobalSTL was formed in May 2014 to identify and attract more mature international companies that are looking to establish a U.S. presence. “The idea is that these compa-

nies, if they establish their U.S. base in St. Louis, as they continue to have success and grow, our hope is that growth is in St. Louis,” said BioSTL’s president and CEO Donn Rubin. NRGene has been offered $118,644 in state incentives through the Missouri Works program if it meets job creation goals. “Missouri is a world renowned hub of bioscience innovation and ... today’s announcement builds on this strong economic momentum,” Gov. Jay Nixon said in a statement.


BUSINESS

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • B5

SunEdison’s setbacks afect India’s politics BY KRISHNA N. DAS reuters

MUMBAI • The likely collapse of SunEdison Inc.’s solar project in India, the first of 32 planned “ultra mega” complexes, could delay Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s goal to increase renewable energy fivefold by several years and probably cost consumers more. As the Maryland Heightsbased solar giant fights to stave off bankruptcy, the 500 megawatt project in Andhra Pradesh state it won last November lies idle with ground yet to be broken. The other projects are still to be bid on. It’s doubtful any rival will pick up the project at the aggressive power pricing promised by SunEdison, which beat out 29 other bidders with a record-low tarif of 4.63 rupees, or about 7 cents, per kilowatt-hour. That will force Indian officials to tighten auction rules to ensure that only serious, bankable bidders show up, industry sources said. India plans to auction more of the “ultra mega” projects — those which generate at least 500 MW — in the current fiscal year

through to March 2017. “There is always a tradeoff,” Upendra Tripathy, secretary at the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, told Reuters of the renewable energy auctions. “There can be a relaxed condition so that more people can participate and there is another where you can make sure fly-by-night operators can’t come in. It’s an ongoing process, and we are open to suggestions.” Tightening auction rules could slow the pace at which projects are awarded and built, pushing back Modi’s goal of expanding solar capacity to 100 gigawatts by 2020 to the middle of the decade, say oicials and industry players. Tripathy, however, said India will for now stick to its goal, set by Modi soon after taking office in 2014, and that it has planned for SunEdison-like bumps in the road with a strong project pipeline. Modi is banking on India’s 300 days a year of sunshine to help fight climate change rather than committing to emission cuts like China. But he has also pushed firms to provide cheap power, which risks leaving too little

profit on the table. Heavily indebted SunEdison, which according to one of its publicly listed units could soon file for bankruptcy protection, drew criticism from analysts for its low winning bid for the Andhra project. The company is now exploring a sale of its Indian assets of around 1 GW or seeking partners for them, sources said, and has drawn preliminary interest from billionaire Gautam Adani’s fast-expanding Adani Group. Apart from the Andhra project, SunEdison has several other small plants under construction across India. A person close to Adani said the low tarif agreed for the Andhra plant will make any deal with SunEdison difficult for Indian firms, which have a relatively high cost of capital. If no buyer is found, the project could be re-bid, the industry sources said. SunEdison did not respond to multiple requests for comment. “The tarifs are a tad aggressive and that may not be healthy for developers themselves and also for others in the ecosystem ... manufacturers and finan-

ciers,” said Santosh Kamath, head of renewables at consultancy KPMG India. “That might be a warning signal for the industry.” SunEdison’s troubles notwithstanding, India has attracted deep-pocketed investors to its $100 billion solar energy program — the biggest in the world. Japan’s Softbank Corp., Taiwan’s Foxconn and India’s Bharti Enterprises have separately pledged to invest a total of about $20 billion in India’s renewable sector. Global solar giants like First Solar Inc., Trina Solar Ltd and Finland’s statecontrolled utility Fortum Oyj are also expanding their presence. India wants the share of non-fossil fuel in total installed power capacity to jump to 40 percent by 2030 from 30 percent currently. Challenges include the weak finances of state distribution companies forced to sell subsidized power, difficulties hooking up solar projects to grids, and access to affordable capital. Land acquisition is also an issue that Modi’s government has been unable to fix — a 500 MW solar project needs on average 2,000 acres.

St. Louis Swap Meet will ill vacant lots on Cherokee Street BY DEBRA D. BASS St. Louis Post-dispatch

Due to construction work starting at the Lemp Brewery, the St. Louis Swap Meet has to relocate. Instead of taking root in another neighborhood, the coordinators have made peace with their Antique Row neighbors and will instead occupy open lots along Cherokee Street. At its inception, the Swap Meet drew opposition from some Antique Row business owners who feared it would steal away customers. To the contrary, the Swap Meet proved itself by attracting crowds of shoppers on what would otherwise be a sleepy Sunday afternoon. The Swap Meet’s latest incarnation will debut at 10 a.m. April 24, and will meander along the streets outside historic Antique Row. Makeshift boutique stalls will stretch along Cherokee from Lemp Avenue to Jeferson Avenue. Temporary shops, set up in vacant lots and along side streets, will ofer vintage goods, crafts, services and food. Like last year, there will also be musical entertainment and children’s activities. Martin Casas, owner of the St. Louis Swap Meet, said in a press release: “We are working with Cherokee business owners to bring the market directly to Cherokee Street which will not only ensure vendors and customers continue to have a great experience but will also give customers an even greater opportunity to discover this incredible street.” The St. Louis Swap Meet will continue on the first and last Sunday of each month. For all new developments visit stlswapmeet.com or the event’s Facebook page under St. Louis Swap Meet.

Strong housing market extends to Metro East HOUSING • FROM B1

• In Webster Groves, first-time buyers hoping to purchase a house for $200,000 lost out to multiple ofers from other buyers. Also in Webster, a house sold sight unseen for its asking price of $219,900 the day before it oicially went on the market. Bax said sales are strong in all areas, including St. Charles County, the region’s leading submarket in house sales and construction. Is another housing bubble building in St. Louis? Probably not, Bax said. The bubble that began a decade ago was a result of easy mortgages and the unrealistic belief that houses would never decline in value, he said. “I think now that this is just pent-up demand over the last few years by buyers and now the sellers are realizing they can push the limit,” Bax said. Steve Breihan, an agent in Berkshire Hathaway’s Clayton oice, said much of the metro area has become a seller’s market. He provided the example of a buyer with a $450,000 budget and willingness to pay above the asking price for a house of Carman Road in west St. Louis County. He came in second to a buyer who ofered cash, thereby avoiding an appraisal, and even waived a home inspection. “This buyer pulled out all the stops and, consequently, got the house,” Breihan said. Homebuilding has slowed from the go-go days of a decade ago and is limited largely to St. Charles County, he said. Elsewhere in the region, building sites are limited, especially in inner-ring suburbs. The Metro East is part of the healthy market. February sales in St. Clair County grew by 23 percent — to 182 — from a year earlier, according to the Realtor Association of Southwestern Illinois. Median prices rose between 10 percent and 27 percent in St. Clair, Monroe and Clinton counties. March figures are not yet available. Doug Payne, the association’s president, said the mild winter and buyer demand are helping sales this year. “These positive factors coupled with the continuation of low interest rates provide a great time for current homeowners to think about moving up, listing their

PHOTO BY ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ

Rachel Herrman (left) and Kate Sherwood, both of Webster Groves, tour a home for sale Sunday in Webster Groves.

homes for sale and tapping into pent-up buyer demand,” he said. According to Freddie Mac, the average rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage was 3.59 percent this week — the lowest since February 2015.

CONSTRUCTION FLAT Home construction remains nearly flat, however. Permits for single-family homes rose 3 percent in February in the Missouri portion of the metro area, according to the Home Builders Association of St. Louis & Eastern Missouri. Kim Hibbs, the association’s president, said he expects the upward trend to continue this year. “This is good news because new homes contribute not only to the tax base and employment but new homeowners spend thousands in the local community after a purchase on furniture, landscaping and other items,” he said. Nationwide, pending home sales — in which a sales contract has been signed, but the deal has not yet closed — rose in February to their highest level in seven months and remained higher than a year ago, the National Association of Realtors reported this week. Regions led by the Midwest had increased contract activity, the association said. The group’s pending home sales index, a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, rose 3.5 percent in February

and was 0.7 percent above February 2015. Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said pending sales in February rose to the highest index reading since July. “Looking ahead, the key for sustained momentum and more sales than last spring is a continuous stream of new listings quickly replacing what’s being scooped up by a growing pool of buyers,” he said. “Without adequate supply, sales will likely plateau.” NAR forecast that U.S. existing-home sales this year will increase 2.4 percent, to about 5.38 million. In 2015, existing-home sales rose 6.3 percent and prices rose 6.8 percent. On the downside, existing-home sales fell 7.1 percent in February as a result of persistently low inventories and price rises in parts of the country, NAR said. Yun said the sales decline was tempered by price appreciation that lessened to 4.4 percent, which was still above wage growth but more favorable than the 8.1 percent annual increase in January. “Any further moderation in prices would be a welcome development this spring,” Yun said. “Particularly in the West, where it appears a segment of would-be buyers are becoming wary of high asking prices and stif competition.”

AFFORDABILITY HELPS AREA Afordability is a factor that put St. Louis on a top 10 list for 2016. In December, re-

altor.com ranked St. Louis second, behind Providence, R.I., as a top housing market to watch. Jonathan Smoke, realtor.com’s chief economist, said some top markets — San Diego and Boston — are also among the priciest. Some markets — including Providence, New Orleans and St. Louis — are experiencing real estate recoveries based on better economic conditions forecast for 2016, Smoke said. The St. Louis Association of Realtors cited his finding in reporting sales figures for February. Sandy Hancock, the group’s president, said factors in Smoke’s prediction are median sales price and the days a house remains on the market unsold. February Multiple Listing Service figures for St. Louis and St. Louis County showed that the year-over-year median home price rose 6 percent, to $148,000. Days on the market dropped from 170 in February 2015 to 114 this year. “These two indicators alone mean that whether you’re interested in buying or selling a home in St. Louis this year, you should know that homes are selling faster now, and prices continue to rise,” Hancock said. Mid America Regional Information Systems data for its St. Louis region, an area that includes St. Louis, St. Charles, Jefferson and Franklin counties and St. Louis, showed 6,102 homes for sale in February, compared with 6,052 the previous year. The value for homes sold in February breaks down to 62 percent sold for $199,900 or less, 25 percent sold between $200,000 and $499,999 and 13 percent sold for $500,000 or more. John Gormley, chief executive of the St. Louis Association of Realtors, said the area remains afordable, noting that more 60 percent of February sales were for less than $200,000. MARIS figures also showed the area’s housing inventory edged up in February to six months, compared with 5.9 months in February 2015. Economists consider 6.5 months of housing inventory healthy balance of supply and demand. “What we are seeing here is an uncommon combination of factors that give credence to St. Louis being designated as one of the hottest real estate markets in the country,” Gormley said. If the national economy remains strong and mortgage rates stay low, St. Louis could have one of the best years for home sales since 2007, he said. Tim Bryant • 314-340-8206 tbryant@post-dispatch.com


BUSINESS

B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

Mega deals are morphing into mega problems for Wall Street Canceled Pizer deal, Halliburton antitrust action emblematic

PacSun iles for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection REUTERS

BY CARL O’DONNELL AND PAMELA BARBAGLIA reuters

NEW YORK • If 2015 was a dream year

for Wall Street’s top dealmakers, 2016 is starting to take a nightmarish turn. Some of the mega transactions that had champagne corks popping in boardrooms are running into antitrust problems, and in the case of pharmaceutical firm Pfizer Inc.’s $160 billion takeover of rival Allergan PLC, political opposition to a deal that envisaged the biggest drug company in the United States moving to Ireland to lower its taxes. The U.S. Treasury unveiled new rules this week that, while they did not name Pfizer and Allergan, had provisions that targeted a specific feature of their agreement and prompted both parties to walk away from what would have been the second-largest deal on record. The move by the administration of President Barack Obama to change the rules has sent a chilling message to dealmakers and comes on top of a number of legal challenges to big transactions such as Halliburton Co.’s takeover of rival oil services company Baker Hughes Inc. on antitrust grounds. The political uncertainty and antitrust concerns mean that firms will think twice about future tie-ups that consolidate industries and move tax dollars ofshore. “As uncertainty increases on multiple fronts, companies are markedly more cautious and the number of transformational deals worth $10 billion or more has significantly dropped this quarter compared to last year,” said Luigi Rizzo, head of mergers and acquisitions for Europe, the Middle East and Africa at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. The new U.S. rules do not directly afect most inversion deals, in which an American company buys a foreign counterpart

and then moves abroad to lower its tax bill, but they have sent a message to company bosses about the risks of attempting to move their tax addresses overseas. Intercontinental Exchange Inc., the U.S. exchange considering a bid for the London Stock Exchange Group PLC, has ruled out structuring any possible deal for the LSE as an inversion, despite it being possible to do so, according to people familiar with the internal deliberations, who declined to be identified. Intercontinental Exchange declined to comment. Tax inversions have been a political hotbutton issue in Washington for years. The rules unveiled this week were the Obama administration’s third effort to stop U.S. companies renouncing their American citizenship but they are only a temporary stopgap. Formal legislation to overhaul U.S. tax rules would be needed to bring a permanent end to the practice. “We have succeeded in making it significantly harder for companies to strike inversion deals and redomicile overseas,” said U.S. Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt. “But we still need action in Congress.” With a U.S. presidential campaign looming later this year there is much uncertainty about what shape such legislation would take, making deals all the more diicult to strike.

UNIQUE CHALLENGES Last year was a record for mergers and acquisitions and a bumper year for mega matches. Out of the $4.6 trillion in deals inked, the number of individual transactions that exceeded $30 billion in value was 18, compared with seven deals worth more than $30 billion in 2014, Thomson Reuters data showed. But the consequence of greater consolidation is increased scrutiny by antitrust officials. That was exemplified on Wednesday by the U.S. government filing

Head of payday lender is indicted on federal racketeering charges BY MARYCLAIRE DALE Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA • The

head of a payday lending enterprise accused of charging more than 700 percent interest on shortterm loans was indicted Thursday on federal racketeering charges. Charles M. Hallinan, 75, led a group that preyed on customers while taking in nearly $700 million from 2008 to 2013, according to the indictment. Hallinan operated under a string of business names that included Easy Cash, My Payday Advance and Instant Cash USA. Lawyers for Hallinan said he surrendered to authorities Thursday, but they otherwise declined to comment. He was expected to appear in court Thursday afternoon for a brief hearing in Philadelphia. The group tried to evade state consumer protection laws by looping in Native American tribes as the supposed lender so they could claim tribal immunity from state regulations and deflect class-action lawsuits, the indictment said. Hallinan’s companies charged customers about $30 for every $100 they borrowed, but they compounded the interest and fees over time until customers were charged more than $700 for the original $100 loan, the indictment said. In Pennsylvania, the law typically caps interest to 6 percent on personal loans, though banks can charge up to 24 percent interest on loans below $25,000, federal authorities said. They said Hallinan, of Villanova, paid a tribal leader in British Columbia $10,000 a month to pretend that he owned the payday lending enterprise

and, amid a class-action lawsuit, to say it had no assets. Hallinan and Wheeler K. Neff, an agent of Hallinan’s companies, also steered at least one other payday lender into a similar tribal agreement, the indictment said. And Hal-

linan’s companies took control of various aspects of the payday lending business, owning firms that also generated leads and performed credit checks, authorities said. Neff’s lawyer did not immediately return a call for comment.

a lawsuit to stop Halliburton from buying Baker Hughes, arguing the combination of the No. 2 and No. 3 oil services companies would lead to higher prices in the sector. The Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission, which enforce antitrust law, have filed lawsuits to stop an unusually high number of deals in the past 18 months. FTC oicials are in court this week to block a merger between Staples Inc. and Oice Depot Inc. “It isn’t just the number of proposed deals that makes this a unique moment in antitrust enforcement; it’s their size and their complexity,” U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch said in a speech on Wednesday. “This represents a remarkable shift toward consolidation and it presents unique challenges to federal enforcers in our work to maintain markets that serve not just top executives and majority shareholders, but every American.” In Europe, meanwhile, talks between Orange SA and Bouygues SA to create a dominant French telecom operator collapsed last week, amid competition concerns and a stand-off between Martin Bouygues and French Economy Minister Emmanuel Macron about the clout the billionaire would have gained in the former state monopoly, according to people familiar with the matter. For bankers, scuttled deals cost money. Investment banks on the Pfizer and Allergan deal, including Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, Centerview and Moelis, lost more than $200 million in fees when the companies walked, showed data from consultancy Freeman & Co. Faced with greater hurdles to get deals through, some investment bankers are rethinking how they want to structure their payofs, including trying to get more cash up front rather than a big check after a deal closes, said a person familiar with the matter.

FIND THE CHEAPEST GAS IN TOWN Check gas prices and see real-time traic conditions.

STLTODAY.COM/TRAFFIC

Teen apparel retailer Pacific Sunwear of California Inc. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Thursday, succumbing to mounting losses and intense competition from fast-fashion retailers and online rivals. The company, which joins recent U.S. Chapter 11 filings by surfwear brand Quicksilver and teen retailer American Apparel, plans to be taken private by investment firm Golden Gate once it emerges from bankruptcy, it said in a statement on Thursday. Its shares fell 40 percent to close at 5.7 cents. Citing “significant and unusual trading,” lawyers for the retailer asked a judge to restrict trading on Thursday due to concerns that a significant change in ownership could impair its ability to use tax benefits on operating losses down the road. Founded in 1982 as a surf shop, PacSun has posted an annual net loss since the financial crisis hit in 2008. It had about $342.7 million of net operating losses as of Jan. 31, which can be used to reduce tax liabilities if it becomes profitable again. “The company believes that this is an extremely valuable asset of the bankruptcy estate,” Joseph Barry of Young Conaway Stargatt & Taylor said at an emergency hearing in Delaware. U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Laurie Silverstein approved the interim motion and holders of PacSun stock will be notified. Under the motion, the company can seek to block transfers of large stock positions. Pacific Sunwear said Golden Gate plans to convert more than 65 percent of its debt into equity and provide a minimum of $20 million in additional capital. Golden Gate had lent PacSun about $60 million in 2011. The Anaheim, Calif.-based retailer said it would continue to operate all of its 600 stores and does not expect the bankruptcy filing to have an immediate impact on employees. PacSun operates seven stores in the St. Louis area, according to the company’s website. Its stores are at West County Mall, South County Center, St. Clair Square, Chesterfield Mall, Mid Rivers Mall, Taubman Prestige Outlets Chesterfield and St. Louis Premium Outlets.

BUSINESSES OF HONOR RECOGNIZING AREA BUSINESSES THAT GIVE BACK TO OUR ARMED SERVICES, VETERANS AND RESERVISTS.

SAVE YOUR BUSINESS TIME AND MONEY Experience New Frontier Bank At New Frontier Bank your loan decisions and servicing all happen down the street by your neighbors Experience faster decisions, a relationship with your community banker, and custom products. Spend less time held back with red tape and more time growing your business.

www.newfb.com 636-940-8740

1771 Zumbehl Rd., St. Charles, MO 63303 3773 Elm St., St. Charles, MO 63301

We Specialize in Area Rugs! More Selection at Sale Prices!

Over 8,400 Rugs!

60-70% Off Suggested retail

Volume Rug Gallery St. Louis’ Best Kept Secret

8994 Manchester (2 blocks West of Brentwood) VolumeCarpet.com

314-963-7847

BarrelFish, a lead cultivation software as a service (SaaS) provider, is a member of a growing number of success stories from the vibrant St. Louis Start-Up community and a graduate of ITEN's Mock Angel program. Their software uses big data providers and custom lead scoring algorithms to get their clients' message heard by the right prospects at the right time. As civic-minded business owners, BarrelFish has created a version of their software, “DonorFish," designed speciically to support fundraising for nonproits. With a Navy veteran owner, BarrelFish has been recognized as a Business of Honor for partnering with area Veteran/Military nonproits to use their system to drive donorship and participation. This is a company with a great idea, great community spirit, and is a tremendous supporter of veterans and our military. Contact this outstanding Business of Honor by visiting their website at: www.reelqualityleads.com

reelqualityleads.com Post-Dispatch readers will be introduced to some outstanding individuals and businesses recognized for their contributions to our country and the individuals who have served in our military. Think about how you might support those organizations that are doing tremendous work to support those who gave the nation a blank check to be sent in harm's way when needed.

The Joshua Chamberlain Society ("JCS") is a grass roots, St. Louis-based, 501(c)(3) charity. JCS was formed with the mission of providing long term support to military veterans from the greater St. Louis area that sustained permanent combat injuries ighting the global war on terror as well as the families of local veterans who made the ultimate sacriice in the service to our country. The unique mission of JCS is that it adopts, in the truest meaning of that word, these veterans or the family of deceased veterans, and commits to provide support for the long term. This support is multi-faceted and comes in the form of gifts, tuition assistance, monetary donations, etc. – anything that JCS identiies as something that will improve the quality of life for these heroic Americans. The Joshua Chamberlain Society takes pride in low overhead; 94 cents of every dollar contributed goes directly to our Heroes. JCS is supported by a strong and committed Board, individuals, foundations and corporations in the St. Louis area. To learn how you may help The Joshua Chamberlain Society please visit their website at www.chamberlainsociety.org or contact Kathleen Winkler at 314.504.2702.

chamberlainsociety.org


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 04.08.2016 • C

HOME-ICE CLINCHER Blues lock up at least second place with OT win over Hawks

Cards need to loosen up a little bit Maddon’s circus approach seems to work for Cubs

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo pets a pair of bear cubs during spring training on March 25.

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Vladimir Tarasenko (91) celebrates with his Blues teammates after scoring late in regulation, and he also scored in overtime.

BLUES HAWKS

2 1

CENTRAL DIVISION Team Dallas BLUES Chicago

Points 107 107 102

SATURDAY’S FINALES > Blues vs. Washington, 7 p.m., FSM > Dallas vs. Colorado, 7 p.m., NHL Net. > Dallas has the tiebreaker over the Blues.

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO • Go figure: A team that allowed so many goals this season with the opponent’s goaltender pulled for an extra attacker scored the biggest goal of its season under opposite circumstances. With the Blues’ playoff predicament disintegrating, Blues goalie Brian Elliott headed to the bench for a 6-on-5 advantage with 1 minute, 20 seconds remaining in regulation, and four seconds later, Vladimir Tarasenko tied the score with his 38th goal of the season. Tarasenko’s goal sent the game to overtime, which along with Dallas’ win Thursday guaranteed

the Blues will host the first round of the playofs at Scottrade Center. Then, Tarasenko’s second of the game in OT capped a 2-1 come-from-behind win over the Blackhawks, leaving the Blues with a chance to still win the Central Division on the final day of their regular season Saturday. The Blues and Dallas remain tied with 107 points after Thursday’s game, including the Stars’ 4-2 win over Colorado. The Blues host Washington Saturday, while Dallas will welcome Nashville; the Blues will have to finish with one more point than Dallas to win the division because the Stars own the tie-breaker with more regulation/overtime wins (ROWs). The Blues were on the verge of

being shut out for the sixth time this season, after managing 15 goals in their last three games. That’s when Tarasenko, with Elliott on the bench, scored his 38th of the season, setting a new career high. Alexander Steen dumped the puck in the offensive zone and a few seconds later, Kevin Shattenkirk put a blast on net. The rebound off goalie Scott Darling went directly to Tarasenko, who tied the game 1-1. Then in overtime, Tarasenko finished of a superb passing sequence to also finish of Chicago. Paul Stastny brought possession into the zone, dropped a pass for Alex Pietrangelo, who left it for See BLUES • Page C6

Many of you struggle with this whole Cubs-as-a-juggernaut concept. It scrambles your universe, leaving you dizzy and disoriented. The Cubs were so bad for so long. In recent years they lost on purpose, swapping veterans for prospects while “earning” superior draft position. Now they have a powerful team that should contend for a long, long time. But look at the bright side: The Cubs are raising the competitive bar for the Cardinals, forcing them to measure up. This challenge should jolt the franchise into a more proactive stance for years to come. The Brewers and Reds bailed out in the face of the Cubs’ emergence, opting to See GORDON • Page C5

Garcia, Martinez due up for Cards Talented Nos. 4, 5 starters are not to be overlooked BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Spieth of to impressive lead at Masters Reigning champ looks as sharp as last year BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AUGUSTA, GA. • In case you wondered, as Jordan Spieth clearly demonstrated on Thursday, there is such a thing as time travel. Spieth hopped into Mr. Peabody’s WABAC machine, set the dial for April 2015 and off he went. Although wind gusted through Augusta throughout the day, making club selection and focus diicult, 22-year-old Spieth stepped onto the lawns and played as if nothing had changed. His opening 66 landed him in the same spot he has been for his last five trips around the golf course: leading the Masters Tournament. Spieth’s six strokes under par, combined with his record winning score of 19 under last year, brought his last five See MASTERS • Page C3

ATLANTA • Jaime Garcia and Carlos

Martinez will start the fourth and fifth games of the season for the Cardinals here Friday and Saturday nights, which should be a good thing, after the season-opening series went so badly awry in Pittsburgh. If you choose to call them fourth and fifth starters, though they combined for a 24-13 record last year and respective earned-run averages of 2.43 and 3.01, so be it. But an examination of the current Nos. 4 and 5 starters among National League teams unearths really nothing close to Garcia and Martinez, based on last year’s numbers. The closest might be the Chicago Cubs’ fourth and fifth starters, Kyle Hendricks and Jason Hammel, who combined for an See CARDINALS • Page C5

CHARLOTTE OBSERVER

Jordan Spieth (right) bumps fists with his caddie, Michael Greller, on Thursday.

LEADERS J. Spieth -6 D. Lee -4 S. Lowry -4 Notables R. McIlroy -2 P. Mickelson E J. Day E B. Watson +3 R. Fowler +8

> The Masters, second round, 2 p.m. Friday, ESPN > Fowler in danger of missing cut after poor start. C3 > Scores and tee times. C3

COMING SUNDAY

GOLF GUIDE Luring an annual big event here is a longshot.

> Brock to throw Monday’s first pitch. C5 > 6:35 p.m. Friday at Atlanta, FSM > Garcia (10-6, 2.43 in 2015) vs. Wisler (8-8, 4.71) > Previewing the weekend in Atlanta. C5

SPORTS

HON

ü ü ü ü

EY D O LI ST Outd oor with

Kitc

APRIL 8 -10 St. Charles Convention Center

New

Livin g Sp ace Spa

hen

Floor

Rem ing

New Wind ows Door & s

odel

SHOW HOURS Friday 11 am - 8 pm Saturday 11 am - 8 pm Sunday 11 am - 5 pm

1 M

Produced by

DIRECTIONS 1-70 to 5th Street Exit South. Right onto Veterans Memorial Parkway.

STLHomeShow.com FREE ADMISSION & FREE PARKING


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

FRIDAY • 04.08.2016 • C

HOME-ICE CLINCHER Blues lock up at least second place with OT win over Hawks

Cards need to loosen up a little bit Maddon’s circus approach seems to work for Cubs

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cubs’ Anthony Rizzo pets a pair of bear cubs during spring training on March 25.

JEFF GORDON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Vladimir Tarasenko celebrates his overtime goal, after also scoring late in regulation against the Blackhawks on Thursday night.

BLUES HAWKS

2 1

CENTRAL DIVISION Team Dallas BLUES Chicago

Points 107 107 102

SATURDAY’S FINALES > Blues vs. Washington, 7 p.m., FSM > Dallas vs. Nashville, 7 p.m., NHL Net. > Dallas has the tiebreaker over the Blues.

BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO • Go figure: A team that allowed so many goals this season with the opponent’s goaltender pulled for an extra attacker scored the biggest goal of its season under opposite circumstances. “It all evens out, that stuff,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock beamed afterwards. With the Blues’ playoff predicament disintegrating, Blues goalie Brian Elliott headed to the bench for a six-on-five advantage with 1 minute, 20 seconds remaining in regulation, and four seconds later, Vladimir Tarasenko tied the score with his 38th goal of the season.

Tarasenko’s goal sent the game to overtime, which guaranteed the Blues will host the first round of the playofs at Scottrade Center. Then, Tarasenko’s second of the game in OT capped a 2-1 come-from-behind win over the Blackhawks, leaving the Blues with a chance to still win the Central Division on the final day of their regular season Saturday. The Blues and Dallas remain tied with 107 points after Thursday’s game, including the Stars’ 4-2 win over Colorado. The Blues host Washington Saturday, while Dallas will welcome Nashville; the Blues will have to finish with one more point than Dallas to win the division because the Stars own the tie-breaker with more regulation/overtime wins

(ROWs). “We’ve got a lot to play for, both Dallas and us do,” Hitchcock said. “Home-ice, it’s not just home-ice for one series. It’s home-ice for a lot. So there’s lots at stake.” The Blues didn’t even know what Dallas had done when they met the media in the locker room afterwards. “No idea if Dallas won or not,” said Blues defenseman Alex Pietrangelo, who was told the Stars were victorious. “Well, there you go. Still one more game, (but) we had to win this game to give ourselves a chance on Saturday to pass them. We did just that.” The Blues were on the verge of See BLUES • Page C6

Many of you struggle with this whole Cubs-as-a-juggernaut concept. It scrambles your universe, leaving you dizzy and disoriented. The Cubs were so bad for so long. In recent years they lost on purpose, swapping veterans for prospects while “earning” superior draft position. Now they have a powerful team that should contend for a long, long time. But look at the bright side: The Cubs are raising the competitive bar for the Cardinals, forcing them to measure up. This challenge should jolt the franchise into a more proactive stance for years to come. The Brewers and Reds bailed out in the face of the Cubs’ emergence, opting to See GORDON • Page C5

Garcia, Martinez due up for Cards Talented Nos. 4, 5 starters are not to be overlooked BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Spieth of to impressive lead at Masters Reigning champ looks as sharp as last year BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

AUGUSTA, GA. • In case you wondered, as Jordan Spieth clearly demonstrated on Thursday, there is such a thing as time travel. Spieth hopped into Mr. Peabody’s WABAC machine, set the dial for April 2015 and off he went. Although wind gusted through Augusta throughout the day, making club selection and focus diicult, 22-year-old Spieth stepped onto the lawns and played as if nothing had changed. His opening 66 landed him in the same spot he has been for his last five trips around the golf course: leading the Masters Tournament. Spieth’s six strokes under par, combined with his record winning score of 19 under last year, brought his last five See MASTERS • Page C3

ATLANTA • Jaime Garcia and Carlos

Martinez will start the fourth and fifth games of the season for the Cardinals here Friday and Saturday nights, which should be a good thing, after the season-opening series went so badly awry in Pittsburgh. If you choose to call them fourth and fifth starters, though they combined for a 24-13 record last year and respective earned-run averages of 2.43 and 3.01, so be it. But an examination of the current Nos. 4 and 5 starters among National League teams unearths really nothing close to Garcia and Martinez, based on last year’s numbers. The closest might be the Chicago Cubs’ fourth and fifth starters, Kyle Hendricks and Jason Hammel, who combined for an See CARDINALS • Page C5

CHARLOTTE OBSERVER

Jordan Spieth (right) bumps fists with his caddie, Michael Greller, on Thursday.

LEADERS J. Spieth -6 D. Lee -4 S. Lowry -4 Notables R. McIlroy -2 P. Mickelson E J. Day E B. Watson +3 R. Fowler +8

> The Masters, second round, 2 p.m. Friday, ESPN > Fowler in danger of missing cut after poor start. C3 > Scores and tee times. C3

COMING SUNDAY

GOLF GUIDE Luring an annual big event here is a longshot.

> Brock to throw Monday’s first pitch. C5 > 6:35 p.m. Friday at Atlanta, FSM > Garcia (10-6, 2.43 in 2015) vs. Wisler (8-8, 4.71) > Previewing the weekend in Atlanta. C5

SPORTS

HON

ü ü ü ü

EY D O LI ST Outd oor with

Kitc

APRIL 8 -10 St. Charles Convention Center

New

Livin g Sp ace Spa

hen

Floor

Rem ing

New Wind ows Door & s

odel

SHOW HOURS Friday 11 am - 8 pm Saturday 11 am - 8 pm Sunday 11 am - 5 pm

2 M

Produced by

DIRECTIONS 1-70 to 5th Street Exit South. Right onto Veterans Memorial Parkway.

STLHomeShow.com FREE ADMISSION & FREE PARKING


SPORTS

C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 4/9 vs. Washington at 7 p.m. FSM

Saturday 4/9 at Atlanta 6:10 p.m. FSM Plus

MEDIA VIEWS

Another new partner for Buck

TBA Playof game (playofs begin Wed. 4/13)

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Friday 4/8 at Atlanta 6:35 p.m. FSM

M 1 • FRIDAY • 04.08.2016

Sunday 4/10 at Atlanta 12:35 p.m. FSM

Monday 4/11 vs. Milwaukee 3:15 p.m. FSM

OTHER EVENTS UNITED SOCCER LEAGUE • ST. LOUIS FC (home games: KTRS-550) Sat. 4/9: at Oklahoma City, 7 p.m. Saturday 4/16: vs. Tulsa, 7:30 p.m.

Smoltz set to join him Saturday in Fox booth DAN CAESAR St. Louis Post-Dispatch

FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. Sprint Cup: Duck Commander 500, qualifying, FS1 3:30 p.m. XFINITY: O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, qualifying, FS1 5:30 p.m. Sprint Cup: Duck Commander 500, final practice, FS1 7:30 p.m. XFINITY: O’Reilly Auto Parts 300, FS1 BASEBALL Noon Phillies at Mets, MLB 4:30 p.m. College: Ohio State at Maryland, BTN 6 p.m. Red Sox at Blue Jays, MLB 6:35 p.m. Cardinals at Braves, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7:30 p.m. College: Vanderbilt at LSU, ESPNU BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. NBA: Pacers at Raptors, FSM Plus 7:30 p.m. NBA: Grizzlies at Mavericks, NBA FOOTBALL 6 p.m. College: Florida spring game, SEC Network 4:30 a.m. (Sat.) AFL Premiership: West Coast vs. Fremantle, FS1 GOLF 2 p.m. The Masters, second round, ESPN HOCKEY 6 p.m. Blue Jackets at Sabres, NHL Network SOCCER 1:20 p.m. Bundesliga: Hertha Berlin vs. Hannover, FS2 SOFTBALL 5:30 p.m. College: Coastal Carolina at Winthrop, ESPNU 7:30 p.m. College: Michigan at Nebraska, BTN TENNIS Noon WTA: Volvo Car Open, quarterfinals, ESPN2 Noon ATP: U.S Men’s Clay Court Championship, Tennis Channel 6 p.m. ATP: U.S Men’s Clay Court Championship, Tennis Channel

DIGEST Broncos will draft quarterback, Kubiak says The choice for the San Francisco 49ers might come down to paying Colin Kaepernick $11.9 million to wear their uniform in 2016 or $4.9 million to wear Denver’s. Kaepernick wants out of Northern California. His only suitor is Denver, which lost Peyton Manning to retirement and Brock Osweiler to free agency a month after winning Super Bowl 50. Kaepernick, who lost his starting job to former Mizzou and Parkway West star Blaine Gabbert last season, met with Broncos GM John Elway at his Denver home last month. But trade talks stalled when Kaepernick balked at taking a pay cut in 2017 and the 49ers declined to pay a portion of his fully guaranteed salary. The Broncos are preparing to select a quarterback in the coming draft, coach Gary Kubiak said Thursday. Also, Kubiak has spoken with free-agent quarterback Johnny Manziel, ESPN.com reported, citing two sources connected to the team. Other NFL news • Rams tight end Cory Harkey won a Toyota pickup in a basketball skills competition at halftime of the Los Angeles Lakers’ game against the Clippers, the Rams confirmed Thursday. ... The first game for the Minnesota Vikings at U.S. Bank Stadium will be played Aug. 28 against the San Diego Chargers in preseason. Venus Williams loses in tourney • Venus Williams is out of the Volvo Car Open in Charleston, S.C., losing to Yulia Putintseva of Kazakstan 7-6 (5), 2-6, 6-4. Top-seeded Angelique Kerber, the defending champ, avoided an upset earlier in the day with a 6-2, 6-3 victory over Slovakia’s Kristina Kucova. Sock wins on clay court • Defending champion Jack Sock beat Australia’s Matthew Barton 6-2, 7-6 (5) on Thursday to reach the quarterfinals in the U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championship in Houston. He will face seventh-seeded Marcos Baghdatis of Cyprus, a 6-4, 6-3 winner over Spain’s Fernando Verdasco. Roundtree to leave Missouri State • Missouri State men’s basketball coach Paul Lusk announced Thursday a series of ofseason roster adjustments, including the departure of sophomore guard Shawn Roundtree, Jr. of Edwardsville. Roundtree played in just three games this season for the Bears before a hamstring injury on Nov. 27. He did not return. Baseball: Auburn 11, Missouri 9 • In the series opener at Taylor Stadium, Auburn overcame Mizzou’s seven-run fourth inning and rallied against the Tigers’ bullpen. Niko Beuntello’s home run in the eighth of Cole Bartlett (2-3) put Auburn ahead 10-9, followed by Anfernee Grier’s two-out RBI triple in the ninth. Auburn lefthanded reliever Ben Braymer (3-2) salvaged a rough start for the visitors with 11 strikeouts over five scoreless innings of relief. In the eighth, with Jake Ring at second base, Braymer stuck out Ryan Howard (Francis Howell Central) and Zach Lavy to escape the threat. He struck out the side in a perfect ninth to earn the win. Mizzou (18-14, 2-8 SEC) sent 11 hitters to the plate in the fourth inning and scored seven runs on seven hits, including consecutive RBI triples by Lavy and Trey Harris. Auburn (15-15, 3-7) battered Mizzou starter Reggie McClain for eight runs (six earned) on 12 hits in five innings. MU tagged Auburn’s Cole Lipscomb for nine runs on 10 hits. (Dave Matter) Judge rules NCAA must go to trial in football death • A Maryland judge is refusing to drop the NCAA from a wrongful death lawsuit involving a Frostburg State University football player who sufered a head injury during practice in 2011. Online court records show that Montgomery County Circuit Judge David Boynton denied the motion for summary judgment Wednesday in Rockville. The trial is set for June 20. Fullback Derek Sheely’s parents contended the NCAA deliberately played down risks associated with repeated head injuries before an earlier one has healed.

Joe Buck is entering his 21st season as Fox’s lead baseball play-by-play announcer, which means he is entering his 21st season as TV’s lead baseball play-by-play announcer. That’s because the network has had the sport’s marquee events, the World Series and All-Star Game, throughout his tenure. And there was remarkable stability in the booth for Buck’s first 18 seasons, as he worked with analyst Tim McCarver for all of them — a monumental run in the volatile TV business. But those days of durability are over, as for the second time in three seasons Fox has changed the analyst configuration. After McCarver stepped down at age 72 following the 2013 World Series to end his remarkable 34year network baseball broadcasting career, Fox brought in Tom Verducci and Harold Reynolds for the 2014 and ’15 seasons. But it’s changing again. John Smoltz is set to join Buck starting Saturday, when they call the Dodgers-Giants game at 3:05 p.m. (St. Louis time) on Fox Sports 1. They’ll be working together then for the first time for real and just the second occasion overall, after having a dry run three years ago when Smoltz was in the running to replace McCarver — who now in semi-retirement is a parttime analyst on Cardinals telecasts on Fox Sports Midwest. Buck says it shouldn’t take long for him and Smoltz, a Hall of Fame pitcher, to mesh. “I’ve know John better than I’ve known a lot of players in today’s game,’’ Buck said this week. “Over the years we’ve played some golf together and he’s been in the Fox family, doing some postseason games and he’s been in our seminars. I’ve gotten to know him and I really like the person. I’m anxious to develop some on-air chemistry with him, too.” How long will that take? “Probably an inning and a half,’’ Buck said. “That kind of stuff doesn’t worry me. I was more concerned about it when I was in a three-man football booth.” That was in 2002, when Buck along with analysts Troy Aikman and Cris Collinsworth became Fox’s lead NFL broadcasters by replacing the legendary Pat Summerall-John Madden team. “That was one of these ‘What are we launching into, how is it going to shake out and whose responsibilities are going to be what mainly between the analysts?’” recalled Buck, a St. Louisan. “It was similar to two years ago as we went to three in the baseball both. But a two-person booth in baseball is pretty simple to figure out, who is supposed to go where.When we did our practice game ... it was easy. It was comfortable. I think it’s going to start there Saturday and get better.”

ASSOCIATED PRESS (LEFT) AND FOX SPORTS

Analyst John Smoltz (left) joins play-by-play announcer Joe Buck (right) in Fox and Fox Sports 1’s lead baseball broadcast booth this season.

Blanket coverage of Cards’ home opener set In St. Louis, there are big party days. Mardi Gras. St. Patrick’s Day. Fourth of July. New Year’s Eve. But nothing tops the Cardinals’ home opener. That’s when people take of work and school to head downtown to hear the music blaring, see fans giddily milling about and soaking up the atmosphere — and suds, for many — before heading to Busch Stadium or a sports bar to watch the game on TV. And plenty of coverage of this year’s festivities and game Monday are planned for the team’s two local broadcast outlets. Fox Sports Midwest’s live television marathon begins at noon with a long pregame show. Scott Warmann then Pat Parris anchor it and work with analyst Al Hrabosky and reporter Jim Hayes. Among the features planned are a report on Bill DeWitt’s 20 years of owning the team and a retrospective on the opening of the current Busch Stadium 10 years ago. At 2:30 p.m. the focus shifts to the on-field hoopla — including the parade of Clydesdales around the stadium, Cards Hall of Famers being saluted, player introductions and Lou Brock throwing out the first pitch. This is to run commercial-free. Then the game, against Milwaukee, is to start at 3:15 with Dan McLaughlin on play-by-play, Tim McCarver providing analysis and Hayes reporting. The postgame show follows, with Parris, Hayes and Hrabosky. On radio, Cardinals network flagship station KMOX (1120 AM) has its annual “Kegs and Eggs” bash downtown, this time in Ballpark Village’s parking lot, and will broadcast from there starting at 5 a.m. with Debbie Monterrey, Michael Calhoun and Tom Ackerman. Charlie Brennan takes over at 8:30 and at 11 o’clock turns it over to Mark Reardon, Ackerman and Kyle McClellan. Next is the pregame show, which is hosted by Chris Hrabe starting at 1:40 p.m. and leads in to the on-field ceremonies that are to be carried in their entirely starting at 2:30. Then it’s on to Mike Shannon and John Rooney calling the game. Afterward, Hrabe anchors postgame programming until 10 o’clock. The weather forecast currently calls for a strong chance of storms, and if the events are postponed they would be rescheduled for Tuesday. The broadcast coverage plans also would move back a day.

McCARVER-LIKE Buck thinks Smoltz will bring insightful commentary, the way McCarver did when he not only analyzed what had happened but predicted — often accurately — what would occur next. Buck points to a conversation he had with Smoltz about Game 5 of last year’s World Series, when the Mets’ Matt Harvey talked his way into staying in the game after pitching eight shutout innings and allowing just four hits. New York’s standout closer Jeurys Familia was ready, thus creating a key decision for manager Terry Collins as the Mets led 2-0 in a contest they had to win to keep the Series going. But Harvey walked the first Kansas City batter in the ninth then gave up an RBI double before being pulled. The

Royals tied the contest then won the game — and Series — in extra innings. Buck recalls what Smoltz told him about Collins leaving Harvey in the game. “He said he would know in one or two pitches if it was the right move, because ‘Was Harvey still pitching or just throwing? Was he missing high?’ He did miss high and ended up walking the leadof guy. That to me is the foresight that Tim McCarver would bring.” Smoltz has that credibility, because he had a stellar career as both a starter and a closer that led to him being inducted into baseball’s Hall of Fame last year after a 21-season big-league career, mostly with the Braves. He made his final stop with the Cardinals in 2009 when he made seven starts, and is the only

major-leaguer with at least 200 wins (213) and 150 saves (154). Smoltz has been broadcasting for MLB Network as well as Fox, and the first Cardinals game he and Buck are scheduled to call is on June 4 — a home contest against San Francisco. So the arrival of Smoltz will be another experience for Buck. “I put all these partnerships in their own category,’’ Buck said. “I loved being with Harold and Tom. Harold bringing the kind of offthe-wall stuf, kind of a gut reaction and Tom brining an incredible amount of work and study, facts and data into every point he made. I thought it was comfortable, a good mix. This is just different, this is back to me and another guy and the other guy just happens to be a pitcher who just went into the Hall of Fame and has a real good sense of what’s going on in the game today. I’m going to miss the other guys, I enjoyed being with them. But I’m excited about starting on Saturday with John.”

FOR OPENERS The TV rating for the Cardinals’ opener Sunday was down over last season, but the circumstances were significantly diferent. Last season the Cards faced their biggest rival, the Cubs, and the game was played in prime time. It was shown on ESPN, and Nielsen says 17.7 percent of homes in the St. Louis market with a TV tuned in to the telecast. This year, the Cards played at noon on a Sunday, against Pittsburgh. The game was shown on Fox Sports Midwest (8.1 rating) and ESPN (4.2), for an overall rating of 12.3.

HOCKEY HOOPLA The Blues are headed back to the playofs, and the arrangement for broadcasts of their postseason journey that starts next week will be the same as in recent seasons. Fox Sports Midwest will show all their games in the first round that aren’t picked up by NBC (KSDK, Channel 5 locally) or its cable outlet, NBCSN. Those networks have the first choice. MSNBC and CNBC also carry first-round games nationally, but will be blacked out locally if they are showing the Blues. If the Blues win their opening series, FSM is done with them other than ancillary programming. NBC and NBCSN have exclusive game rights the rest of the way. FSM also carries most of the Cardinals’ games and when they and the Blues overlap, it will show hockey on its main channel and baseball on Fox Sports Plus — a secondary outlet that is available on all major area programming providers. This will be the case Saturday night, when the Blues play their regular-season finale and the Redbirds are in Atlanta. On radio, KMOX (1120 AM) also carries the Cards as well as the Blues and the station’s contracts give priority to the Redbirds when both play simultaneous — unless the Blues are in the Stanley Cup finals. So until then, when the games overlap the Cards will be on KMOX and the Blues go to KYKY (98.1 FM). The reverse would be the case if the Blues are in the finals. Dan Caesar • 314-340-8175 dcaesar@post-dispatch.com

Rams open preseason in LA vs. Dallas

From staf and wire reports

Kroenke’s squad on national TV against his buddy Jones’ team BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER FAX 314-340-3070 E-MAIL soundof@post-dispatch.com HOLE IN ONE Golf courses submit results to postsports@post-dispatch.com

Must include name, address for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

MAIL Sports Sound Of St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 North Tucker Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63101

CONTACT US

To e-mail editors, use first initial AND last name@post-dispatch.com For general information call 314-340-8222

Roger Hensley Cameron Hollway Don Reed Mike Smith Mike Reilly Chris Gove

Assistant Managing Editor | Sports Deputy Sports Editor Deputy Sports Editor | Nights Assistant Sports Editor | Online Assistant Sports Editor | Nights High School Sports

314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

In yet another example that the NFL is doing everything it can to get the Rams of on the right foot in Los Angeles, the Rams will open 2016 preseason play at home against the Dallas Cowboys. Yes, Stan Kroenke and pal Jerry Jones will be yukking it up together Aug. 13 at the Los Angeles Coliseum in a game that will be televised nationally on ESPN. (The Post-Dispatch reported during Super Bowl week that this matchup was a strong possibility.)

Jones, of course, played a major role in helping to steer the Rams back to LA. At one point even saying that the $158 million naming rights deal put together by the St. Louis stadium task force wouldn’t even build a lobby in Kroenke’s Inglewood stadium, which won’t open until 2019. Preseason games being what they are, there’s probably not a better draw for a team than a visit by the Cowboys. The league is also hyping the Rams’ return to Los Angeles by having coach Jeff Fisher’s squad as the subject of the Hard Knocks

training camp series on HBO. In the Rams’ second preseason game, which will take place sometime in the Aug. 18-22 time frame, Kansas City comes calling at the LA Coliseum. The Rams close on the road – at Denver (Aug. 25-29) and at Minnesota (Sept. 1). As always, complete information on preseason dates and starting times will be finalized later. The NFL regular-season schedule will be released later this month. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


THE MASTERS

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

Birdie

SCORECARD HOLE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

OUT

Yards

445

575

350

240

455

180

450

570

Par

4

5

4

3

4

3

4

5

4

36

Jordan Spieth

4

5

3

3

4

2

4

4

4

Danny Lee

4

4

5

3

3

3

5

4

Shane Lowry

4

4

3

2

3

3

4

4

10

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C3 Eagle

Bogey

Double bogey

12

13

14

15

16

17

505

155

510

440

530

170

440

4

4

3

5

4

5

3

4

4

36

72

33

3

4

3

4

4

5

3

4

3

33

66

-6

4

35

3

4

2

5

4

5

2

4

4

33

68

-4

4

31

4

4

4

5

4

5

3

4

4

37

68

-4

460 3,725 495

18

IN

TOTAL

Hole-in-one

11

465 3,710

Overall

7.435

Spieth’s 66 leads ield at Augusta

NOTEBOOK

SCORES

Triple bogey

Thursday at Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta, Ga. Purse: TBA (Last year: $10 million) Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 (36-36)

MASTERS • FROM C1

First Round a-denotes amateur Jordan Spieth

33-33 — 66

Danny Lee

35-33 — 68

Shane Lowry

31-37 — 68

Paul Casey

34-35 — 69

Justin Rose

34-35 — 69

Ian Poulter

34-35 — 69

Soren Kjeldsen

37-32 — 69

Sergio Garcia

37-32 — 69

Billy Horschel

36-34 — 70

Scott Piercy

33-37 — 70

Danny Willett

34-36 — 70

Rory McIlroy

34-36 — 70

Kevin Streelman

37-34 — 71

Charley Hofman

36-35 — 71

Lee Westwood

35-36 — 71

Emiliano Grillo

36-35 — 71

Hideki Matsuyama

34-37 — 71

Matthew Fitzpatrick

35-36 — 71

Brandt Snedeker

33-38 — 71

Jimmy Walker

34-37 — 71

Thongchai Jaidee

35-37 — 72

Chris Wood

36-36 — 72

Zach Johnson

35-37 — 72

Louis Oosthuizen

35-37 — 72

a-B. DeChambeau

35-37 — 72

Kevin Na

36-36 — 72

Phil Mickelson

36-36 — 72

Henrik Stenson

35-37 — 72

K. Aphibarnrat

40-32 — 72

Bernhard Langer

37-35 — 72

Jason Day

31-41 — 72

Graeme McDowell

37-35 — 72

J.B. Holmes

37-35 — 72

Victor Dubuisson

35-38 — 73

Bernd Wiesberger

34-39 — 73

Dustin Johnson

34-39 — 73

Daniel Berger

33-40— 73

Brooks Koepka

35-38 — 73

Davis Love III

37-36 — 73

Smylie Kaufman

37-36 — 73

Hunter Mahan

36-37 — 73

Angel Cabrera

36-37 — 73

Vaughn Taylor

37-37 — 74

Tom Watson

36-38 — 74

Harris English

37-37 — 74

Marc Leishman

37-37 — 74

Jamie Donaldson

37-37 — 74

Cameron Smith

38-36 — 74

Troy Merritt

37-37 — 74

Keegan Bradley

36-38 — 74

Rafa Cabrera-Bello

37-37 — 74

a-Romain Langasque 36-38 — 74 Martin Kaymer

36-38 — 74

Jim Herman

37-38 — 75

Branden Grace

36-39 — 75

Bubba Watson

34-41 — 75

Matt Kuchar

37-38 — 75

Bill Haas

39-36 — 75

a-Derek Bard

37-39 — 76

CHARLOTTE OBSERVER

Rickie Fowler hits his ball from a bunker along the 10th green on Thursday at Augusta National.

Fowler opens with 80 after a rough back nine BY DAN O’NEILL St. Louis Post-dispatch

AUGUSTA, GA. • Many thought Rickie Fowler could make this Masters his first major championship win. Maybe he can. But his opening-round 80 on Thursday didn’t exactly set the table. “No,” Fowler said. “Obviously, golf’s tough, it is a fine line, especially at this place. You see Jordan (Spieth) out there, I think he’s at five (under) or so right now. I mean, I go play a decent back nine and I’m 3-under par. “It can go either way and it can definitely go the other way, the high number way, a lot easier than it can the low.” Fowler made the turn at even-par 36, but by the time he got to the scoring table, he was 8 over. His decent round turned to disastrous with a 44 on the back, which included a triple-bogey 8 at No. 13. “I played Nos. 11 and 12 nice,” Fowler, 27, said. “And then just had a couple get away from me on 13. And 15 I hit a great shot, wind dies down, ball goes over the green. On 16, wind’s supposed to be off to the left and I tugged it a little bit, but end up in the water. And they add up quick.” The gusting wind was no one’s friend during the first round. Fowler said the key was to time it right. He timed it to his worst score in 21 rounds at Augusta. “It’s just, it’s coming up and laying down here and there,” he said. “So you got to judge it and time it right.”

Larry Mize

37-39 — 76

Sandy Lyle

39-37 — 76

GOING OUT IN STYLE

Jason Dufner

38-38 — 76

Patrick Reed

39-37 — 76

Tom Watson’s farewell is playing to rave reviews at Augusta this week. The 66-year-old Kansas City native and two-time Masters winner is teeing it up in a major for the last time. He played his final British Open last year and is no longer eligible to play in either the U.S. Open or PGA Championship. Thus, this figures to be the final major for a player who has won eight of them. Watson got loud applause and recognition at every stop on Thursday. He also carded a 2-over 74, suggesting he might like to stick around through the weekend. “Yeah, I’m still there,” he said. “I think 74 is not bad for old folks. I can’t complain. Every round of golf I’ve ever played, though, I’ve always said it could have been better. “It could have been worse, too, in some respects. I made a long putt at 3. I made some good putts that I was very happy with.” Watson’s bomb at No. 3 was some 45 feet. But he cost himself a stroke on the 7th green. He put his putter behind the ball and it moved. The wind was blowing throughout the day, but Watson was not looking for excuses. He said the wind did not cause the movement. “There’s nothing you can do,” he said. “You just move on. I learned a long time ago that if you start whining and crying about things that happened in the past out here, it’s going to make you a worse player. You’re not going to be much of a success. You’ve got to just

Justin Thomas

38-38 — 76

Chris Kirk

38-38 — 76

Adam Scott

38-38 — 76

Mike Weir

37-39 — 76

Darren Clarke

37-39 — 76

Charl Schwartzel

36-40— 76

Anirban Lahiri

36-40— 76

Trevor Immelman

37-40 — 77

Webb Simpson

39-38 — 77

Kevin Kisner

36-41 — 77

Byeong-Hun An

40-37 — 77

Mark O’Meara

39-38 — 77

Fabian Gomez

37-40 — 77

Steven Bowditch

39-40— 79

a-Cheng Jin

39-40— 79

David Lingmerth

36-43 — 79

Russell Knox

37-42 — 79

Rickie Fowler

36-44— 80

Vijay Singh

39-41 — 80

Andy Sullivan

41-39 — 80

Ernie Els

41-39 — 80

Ryan Moore

39-41 — 80

Robert Streb

40-41— 81

a-Sammy Schmitz

36-45 — 81

Ian Woosnam

40-42— 82

a-Paul Chaplet

42-41 — 83

ilable

ava Gift ates olidays! cCertiicates H ertiiAvailable e C h t t f i r G ct fo

FREE

Perfe

Fly Casting Lessons Our FFF Certiied instructors have been teaching ly casting and ly tying in the St. Louis area for over 35 year...FREE! Call to sign up. It’s just too much fun to miss out on!

8307 Manchester Rd.

314-963-7884 • www.feather-craft.com

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tom Watson, 66, examines his ball on the seventh green on Thursday on the way to a 74.

carry on.”

BIG BUT NOT EASY Ernie Els, who has never won the Masters, gave a strong indication he would not win this one on the first hole he played. Els, 46, needed six putts to get his ball in the hole on No. 1 and took a “Big Easy” score of nine. The first putt was from three feet and several of the comebacks he missed were from less. When he was all done, he was 5 over par with 71 holes to play. He finished with a score of 80.

BUBBA’S WORLD Bubba Watson was 2 under early in his opening round. But the two-time champ wound up with a 75, which included him playing 14, 15 and 16 at 5 over par. Watson finished the day nine shots behind Spieth, which may seem especially imposing to some. Not to Bubba. “No, I really don’t care who it is,” he said. “It’s the number we’re looking at. We don’t look at who it is, or I don’t. But I’m diferent. “I don’t think they would be scared if I was at 6 under. Even though I’ve won here twice, they would still be like, ‘Okay, it’s still going to be tough, I can still get him.’ But they’re not looking at who it is, they’re looking at the score they’re shooting.” Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com

FRIDAY’S TEE TIMES

rounds of Masters competition at 25 under par. His 66 matched the lowest opening round by a reigning champion, first achieved by Jose Maria Olazabal in 1995. To be picky, his opening-round 64 was two shots better in 2015. But Spieth was quick to rate the 66 higher. “Yeah, I definitely could make that argument,” Spieth said. “The round a year ago, in my opinion, wasn’t even an 8-under round. It was more like a 9- or 10-under round. I messed up 15, which should have been a birdie at the time, considering I only had really 4-iron into the green. “So the way I was playing, I would say, was better a year ago, but the score that came out of the round may have been more impressive today … I’m just very pleased with it, and yeah, I put it up there with one of the best rounds I’ve played, one of the best rounds I’ve scored.” Much is expected from this Masters because much has happened since the last. Spieth added a U.S. Open to his sensational start in 2015 and went on to a spectacular year. At the same time, players like Jason Day and Rickie Fowler stepped up, players like Rory McIlroy and Adam Scott stayed relevant, bombastic types like Bubba Watson made noise. This championship promises a clash of these titans, a major showdown to showcase a new group of dynamic stars. And after Day 1, it is not disappointing. A number of those “names” are in the hunt. Another young talent, Danny Lee, pulled up at 4-under 68, two strokes behind Spieth. Irishman Shane Lowry is there, as well. Six more are three shots back, including 2013 U.S. Open winner Justin Rose and international standouts Paul Casey, Ian Poulter and Sergio Garcia. McIlroy rode a roller coaster to a 70, while dignitaries like Day, Phil Mickelson, Henrik Stenson and Graeme McDowell patrol the perimeter at even-par 72. With 54 holes to play, this Masters is packing the kind of dynamite it was expected to bring, the kind that detonates over the back nine on Sunday, that breaks the sound barrier at Amen Corner. But what Spieth is doing, what he did and continues to do, is just plain warped. He has played all nine of his career rounds at the Masters at par or better, eight of them under. He is the first player to do something like that in 80 editions of this championship. There is an old expression in golf about “horses for courses,” but Spieth is painting with a wider brush. Fifteen of his last 17 rounds in major championships have been under par. The only over-par scar was a 1-over 71 in the third round of the U.S. Open last year. A 71; oh, the humanity. Casey, 38, tied for sixth here last year. He has played on numerous Ryder Cup teams, been in the heat of many battles, played among the best. He hasn’t seen many like Spieth. “Yeah, it’s a knowing, it’s a confidence,” he said of Spieth. “It’s the way he walks. It’s the way he stands. It goes all the way through from the way he speaks and the way he shakes your hand and the way he deals with people, as well. It’s wonderful.” Spieth wasted no time on Thursday, with a splendid up-and-down at No. 1. He added birdies at No. 3, No. 6 and the par-5 No. 8. He birdied Nos. 10 and 13 to start the back and get 5 under. He saved par with a long putt at No. 16, then knocked it close at 18 and made the six-footer. The closing birdie was his 34th over his last five Augusta rounds. Nothing seems to bother the young Jedi in this lavish green environment. He cracked his driver on the range on Wednesday and had to use a backup. His group was put on the clock on No. 17 for Bryson DeChambeau’s tardiness on Thursday. He missed six greens, missed six fairways, wasn’t as sharp as he might be. Doesn’t seem to matter. When it comes time to compete, he’s the same Jordan Spieth. “He loves the greens,” said DeChambeau, who finished with a 72. “We were walking up 18, and he said, ‘I don’t know what it is about this place, I just love putting here. I can see the break, I can see the lines …’ That’s what he said.” At Augusta, Spieth seems to say and do everything right. He did it last April and, at least for one more day, he’s doing it again. Dan O’Neill @wwdod on Twitter doneill@post-dispatch.com

a-amateur

7:20 a.m. • Mike Weir, Cameron Smith, a-Sammy Schmitz 7:31 a.m. • Ian Woosnam, Troy Merritt, Byeong-Hun An 7:42 a.m. • Darren Clarke, Billy Horschel, Matthew Fitzpatrick 7:53 a.m. • Mark O’Meara, David Lingmerth, a-Paul Chaplet 8:04 a.m. • Keegan Bradley, Brandt Snedeker, Kiradech Aphibarnrat 8:15 a.m. • Charl Schwarzel, Davis Love III, Rafael Cabrera-Bello 8:26 a.m. • Danny Lee, Russell Knox, Smylie Kaufman 8:37 a.m. • Bubba Watson, Branden Grace, Ian Poulter 8:48 a.m. • Bernhard Langer, Hunter Mahan, a-Romain Langasque 8:59 a.m. • Jason Day, Matt Kuchar, Ernie Els 9:21 a.m. • Graeme McDowell, Fabian Gomez, Scott Piercy 9:32 a.m. • Jimmy Walker, Soren Kjeldsen, Anirban Lahiri 9:43 a.m. • Danny Willett, Sergio Garcia, Ryan Moore 9:54 a.m. • Angel Cabrera, Shane Lowry, J.B. Holmes 10:05 a.m. • Martin Kaymer, Bill Haas, Rory McIlroy

10:16 a.m. • Jim Herman, Steven Bowditch 10:27 a.m. • Trevor Immelman, Robert Streb, a-Derek Bard 10:38 a.m. • Larry Mize, Victor Dubuisson, Kevin Streelman 10:49 a.m. • Sandy Lyle, Bernd Wiesberger, Vaughn Taylor 11 a.m. • Webb Simpson, Chris Wood, Thongchai Jaidee 11:22 a.m. • Tom Watson, Charley Hofman, Lee Westwood 11:33 a.m. • Zach Johnson, Rickie Fowler, a-Cheng Jin 11:44 a.m. • Louis Oosthuizen, Jason Dufner, Patrick Reed 11:55 a.m. • Jordan Spieth, Paul Casey, a-Bryson DeChambeau 12:06 p.m. • Justin Thomas, Emiliano Grillo, Dustin Johnson 12:17 p.m. • Vijay Singh, Hideki Matsuyama, Chris Kirk 12:27 p.m. • Harris English, Andy Sullivan, Kevin Na 12:39 p.m. • Phil Mickelson, Marc Leishman, Henrik Stenson 12:50 p.m. • Justin Rose, Jamie Donaldson, Daniel Berger 1:01 p.m. • Adam Scott, Kevin Kisner, Brooks Koepka


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE

M 1 • FRIDAY • 04.08.2016

AMERICAN LEAGUE

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Cincinnati

3

0

1.000

3-0

W-3

3-0

0-0

Pittsburgh

3

0

1.000

3-0

W-3

3-0

0-0

Chicago

2

0

1.000

½

2-0

W-2

0-0

2-0

Milwaukee

1

2

.333

2

1-2

W-1

1-2

0-0

Cardinals

0

3

.000

3

0-3

L-3

0-0

0-3

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Washington

2

1

.667

2-1

L-1

0-1

2-0

New York

1

1

.500

½

1-1

W-1

0-0

1-1

Miami

1

2

.333

1

1-2

W-1

0-2

1-0

Atlanta

0

2

.000

0-2

L-2

0-2

0-0

Philadelphia

0

3

.000

2

0-3

L-3

0-0

0-3

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Thursday Cincinnati 10, Philadelphia 6 Miami 6, Washington 4 San Francisco 12, LA Dodgers 6 Cubs at Arizona, (n) Wednesday Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3 Colorado 4, Arizona 3 Detroit 7, Miami 3 Pittsburgh 5, Cardinals 1 Cincinnati 3, Philadelphia 2 Washington 3, Atlanta 1 LA Dodgers 7, San Diego 0

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Detroit

2

0

1.000

2-0

W-2

0-0

2-0

Chicago

3

1

.750

3-1

W-1

0-0

3-1

Cleveland

1

1

.500

1

1-1

W-1

1-1

0-0 0-0

Kansas City

1

1

.500

1

1-1

L-1

1-1

Minnesota

0

3

.000

0-3

L-3

0-0

0-3

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Baltimore

3

0

1.000

3-0

W-3

3-0

0-0

New York

2

1

.667

1

2-1

W-2

2-1

0-0

Tampa Bay

2

2

.500

2-2

W-2

2-2

0-0

Toronto

2

2

.500

2-2

L-2

0-0

2-2

Boston

1

1

.500

1-1

L-1

0-0

1-1

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away 2-1

Los Angeles

3

1

.750

3-1

L-1

0-0

3-1

Seattle

2

1

.667

2-1

W-2

0-0

San Francisco

3

1

.750

3-1

W-1

1-0

2-1

Houston

1

2

.333

1

1-2

L-2

0-0

1-2

Colorado

2

1

.667

½

2-1

W-1

0-0

2-1

Texas

1

2

.333

1

1-2

L-2

1-2

0-0

Arizona

1

2

.333

1-2

L-1

1-2

0-0

Oakland

1

3

.250

1-3

L-1

1-3

0-0

San Diego

0

3

.000

0-3

L-3

0-3

0-0

Los Angeles

0

2

.000

0-2

L-2

0-2

0-0

ROUNDUP

NOTEBOOK

Pence’s slam lifts Giants past Dodgers

Cubs’ Schwarber injured

Hunter Pence hit a grand slam in the eighth, Joe Panik drove in three runs and keyed San Francisco’s comeback, and the Giants beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 12-6 in their home opener Thursday. The Dodgers pitchers’ 31-inning scoreless streak to start the season ended in the fifth, one inning shy of the 1963 Cardinals’ record. Chris Heston (1-0) worked the sixth in relief of Jake Peavy for the victory as San Francisco erased a 4-0 deficit to the delight of a sellout crowd announced at 41,940. Bruce Bochy bested his former outfielder and now-Dodgers manager Dave Roberts in their first matchup. Reds 10, Phillies 6 • Jay Bruce homered twice and matched a career high with five RBIs, and Cincinnati made a winner of top pitching prospect Robert Stephenson in his major league debut to complete a season-opening sweep. Eugenio Suarez hit his first career grand slam and Bruce connected for a three-run shot as the Reds scored eight times in the fourth inning, ruining the big league debut of reliever Daniel Stumpf. Bruce capped the 13-batter outburst with an RBI single. Marlins 6, Nationals 4 • Miami reliever David Phelps (Hazelwood West) entered after a rain delay and shut out Washington for four innings while delivering his first career RBI, and the Marlins spoiled the Nationals’ sloppy home opener. While Phelps (1-0) replaced Adam Conley following a 1-hour, 25-minute break because of a thunderstorm in the second with the score 3-3, Nationals starter Tanner Roark (0-1) surprisingly remained in the game. Roark allowed four runs — three earned, all in the first — and nine hits in four innings.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Yankees 8, Astros 5 • Mark Teixeira sliced a tiebreaking, three-run homer in the seventh and Starlin Castro connected again, lifting host New York. The Yankees took two of three in the season-opening series against the team that beat them in the AL wildcard game last October. Castro kept up his torrid start with a solo home run and a single of the wall, making him 7 for 12. The former Cubs infielder has eight RBIs, the most by any player in his first three games for the Yankees since the stat became oicial in 1920, STATS said. White Sox 6, A’s 1 • Mat Latos gave up one hit over six innings for his first win since last July, Jose Abreu hit a two-run homer and visiting Chicago gave manager Robin Ventura his 300th career win. Orioles 4, Twins 2 • Ubaldo Jimenez pitched seven sharp innings and host Baltimore rallied to complete a threegame sweep. Red Sox-Indians • The game between Boston and host Cleveland was postponed because of inclement weather. No makeup date was immediately announced. Associated Press

BROGLIO

’63 CARDS START STILL TOPS The 1963 Cardinals’ record of scoreless innings pitched to start the season stayed alive Thursday, barely, thanks to a fifthinning run scored by the Giants. A look: 1963 CARDINALS 32 innings vs. Mets and Phillies Best pitching performances • Complete game shutouts by Ernie Broglio, Ray Washburn and Curt Simmons. Ended by • Wes Covington doubled of Broglio, scoring Tony Gonzalez in the sixth inning of the season’s fourth game. 2016 DODGERS 31 1/3 innings vs. Padres and Giants Best pitching performances • Clayton Kershaw pitched seven scoreless, while Scott Kazmir and Kenta Maeda each threw six scoreless. Ended by • Brandon Crawford scored on a fifth-inning groundout by Denard Span of Dodgers pitcher Alex Wood.

Chicago Cubs left fielder Kyle Schwarber was carted of the field Thursday night with a left leg injury after colliding with center fielder Dexter Fowler on a play that resulted in an inside-thepark home run for Arizona’s Jean Segura. Segura, who also hit a leadof homer in the first, belted former Cardinal John Lackey’s pitch to deep left-center in the second inning with Schwarber and Fowler giving chase. They collided on the warning track in front of the 413foot sign at Chase Field. Schwarber stayed on the ground for several minutes before standing with some help and climbing on the cart. Red-hot rookie is eager to hit at Coors Field • Trevor Story is taking his long ball show to an unfamiliar place — home. Coors Field figures to be a suitable fit for the Colorado Rockies rookie shortstop, even if the team did raise the fences this spring to keep more baseballs from flying out of the yard. These days, it seems like nothing can prevent Story from

going deep. He made majorleague history in Arizona on Wednesday by becoming the first player to hit a homer in each of his first three games. Next stop, a hitter friendly park that’s regarded as a slugger’s Shangri-La. “I’m just ready to get there and see what it’s all about,” said Story, whose team is 2-1 heading into the home opener Friday against San Diego. “It will be special.” Story’s power surge may be somewhat of a surprise, given that he had 20 combined homers last season in stints with Double-A New Britain and Triple-A Albuquerque. His four hits this season have all been homers, which puts him on pace for 216 for the season. He leads the National League in home runs, RBIs (7) and total bases (16). “It’s just kind of surreal right now,” Story said. “I can’t really put words to it.” Baseball may have new founder • Coinciding with the start of the major league season, a set of game-changing documents went up for sale this week. Their authenticity and significance are verified by experts including John

Associated Press

Friday’s pitching matchups

Giants 12, Dodgers 6

White Sox 6, Athletics 1

Marlins 6, Nationals 4

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .316 C.Seager ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .316 Puig rf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .533 A.Gonzalez 1b 4 2 3 1 0 0 .500 Van Slyke lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .250 c-C.Crawford ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Thompson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Pederson cf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .313 K.Hernandez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 A.Barnes c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .125 A.Wood p 3 0 0 1 0 2 .000 Y.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Coleman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --P.Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 39 6 13 6 0 5 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .286 Panik 2b 5 3 3 3 0 0 .353 Posey c 5 0 3 2 0 1 .357 Pence rf 4 1 1 4 1 1 .294 Belt 1b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .357 M.Duffy 3b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .278 B.Crawford ss 4 2 1 0 1 2 .357 Peavy p 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 a-Tomlinson ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000 b-Adrianza ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 d-G.Blanco ph-lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Pagan lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .333 Strickland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 12 17 12 3 6 Los Angeles 021 010 020 — 6 13 1 San Francisco 000 034 05x — 12 17 0 a-singled for Peavy in the 5th. b-sacrificed for Heston in the 6th. c-grounded out for Van Slyke in the 8th. d-singled for Romo in the 8th. e-flied out for P.Baez in the 9th. E: Van Slyke (1). LOB: Los Angeles 6, San Francisco 7. 2B: A.Gonzalez 2 (3), Van Slyke (1), Posey (1), Belt (3). 3B: Panik (1). HR: Pederson (1), off Romo; Pence (1), off P.Baez. RBIs: A.Gonzalez (4), Van Slyke (1), Pederson 2 (5), K.Hernandez (1), A.Wood (1), Span (6), Panik 3 (4), Posey 2 (4), Pence 4 (4), Pagan 2 (2). S: Adrianza. RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Utley 2, Pederson 3); San Francisco 4 (B.Crawford, Panik, Belt, Pence). GIDP: Puig, M.Duffy. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Utley, C.Seager, A.Gonzalez); San Francisco 1 (M.Duffy, Panik, Belt). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Wood L, 0-1 5 8 5 5 2 3 85 9.00 2/ Y.Garcia 2 0 0 11 6.75 3 3 2 Coleman 11/3 0 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Howell 0 4 4 4 0 0 8 36.00 P.Baez 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 4.50 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy 5 10 4 4 0 3 79 7.20 Heston W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Lopez 1 1 1 1 0 0 9 9.00 Romo 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 4.50 Strickland 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. A.Wood pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Howell pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Y.Garcia 2-2, Coleman 1-0, P.Baez 3-3, Romo 1-1. WP: A.Wood. Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:07. A: 41,940 .

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf-rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .563 Me.Cabrera dh 4 1 2 1 1 0 .200 Abreu 1b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .313 Frazier 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .118 Av.Garcia rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .133 1-A.Jackson pr-cf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .300 Shuck lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Lawrie 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .200 Navarro c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .125 Saladino ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .500 Totals 38 6 10 6 1 9 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Burns cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Lowrie dh-ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Valencia 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .154 Vogt c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Coghlan 2b 4 0 2 1 0 2 .333 Alonso 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .100 a-Canha ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Semien ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .333 b-Lambo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-K.Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Crisp lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .125 Totals 32 1 4 1 3 6 Chicago 000 002 004 — 6 10 1 Oakland 000 000 001 — 1 4 2 a-popped out for Alonso in the 7th. b-grounded out for Semien in the 7th. c-lined out for Hendriks in the 9th. 1-ran for Av.Garcia in the 9th. E: Frazier (1), Valencia (1), Semien (1). LOB: Chicago 7, Oakland 7. 2B: Eaton (1). HR: Abreu (1), off Graveman. RBIs: Me.Cabrera (1), Abreu 3 (3), Navarro (1), Saladino (1), Coghlan (1). SB: A.Jackson (1). SF: Abreu. RLISP: Chicago 5 (Frazier 3, Abreu, Lawrie); Oakland 3 (Crisp, Lambo, K.Davis). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos W, 1-0 6 1 0 0 1 2 88 0.00 1/ Duke 1 1 12 13.50 3 1 0 0 2/ Albers 0 0 7 0.00 3 0 0 0 N.Jones 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.38 Putnam 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 9.00 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Graveman L, 0-1 51/3 3 2 2 1 4 84 3.38 Fe.Rodriguez 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 23 0.00 1/ Rzepczynski 0 0 6 0.00 3 1 0 0 2/ Dull 0 2 13 0.00 3 0 0 0 Hendriks 1 6 4 4 0 1 35 9.82 Inherited runners-scored: Albers 2-0, Dull 1-0. WP: Duke, Putnam, Dull. Umpires: Home, Gabe Morales; First, Tom Hallion; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 3:06. A: 12,577 .

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .400 Ozuna cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .143 Yelich lf 2 1 1 0 3 0 .333 Stanton rf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .308 Prado 3b 5 0 2 2 0 0 .308 Bour 1b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .333 Rojas 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Realmuto c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .214 Hechavarria ss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .364 Conley p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Phelps p 2 0 1 1 0 1 .500 Morris p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Breslow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 6 13 6 4 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Taylor cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Rendon 3b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .231 Harper rf 3 2 1 1 2 0 .300 Zimmerman 1b 3 1 1 0 2 0 .333 Werth lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .000 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-den Dekker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 D.Murphy 2b 4 0 2 3 1 2 .364 W.Ramos c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .308 Espinosa ss 2 0 0 0 2 0 .333 Roark p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Drew ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Petit p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Robinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O.Perez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Heisey lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 --Totals 32 4 6 4 9 10 Miami 301 010 100 — 6 13 1 Washington 300 000 100 — 4 6 1 a-lined out for Roark in the 4th. b-struck out for Petit in the 6th. c-fouled out for Kelley in the 9th. E: Phelps (1), W.Ramos (1). LOB: Miami 10, Washington 11. 2B: Bour 2 (2), Hechavarria (3), Rendon (1), Zimmerman (1). 3B: D.Murphy (1). HR: Harper (2), off Morris. RBIs: Prado 2 (2), Realmuto (1), Hechavarria 2 (3), Phelps (1), Harper (2), D.Murphy 3 (5). SB: Realmuto (1), D.Murphy (1). S: Roark. RLISP: Miami 5 (Hechavarria 2, Stanton, Prado, Morris); Washington 7 (W.Ramos 2, Rendon, D.Murphy 2, Werth, Taylor).

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Springer rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .385 Col.Rasmus lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .300 C.Gomez cf 4 1 2 0 0 2 .167 Valbuena 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .364 b-M.Duffy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 White 1b 4 1 3 4 0 1 .667 Tucker dh 2 1 1 1 0 1 .429 a-M.Gonzalez ph-dh 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Kratz c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Totals 36 5 9 5 0 14 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .214 Gardner lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .143 A.Rodriguez dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .200 Teixeira 1b 4 2 2 3 0 2 .364 B.McCann c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .455 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Headley 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .100 S.Castro 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .583 Gregorius ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .455 Totals 35 8 12 8 1 6 Houston 030 200 000 — 5 9 1 New York 011 210 30x — 8 12 0 b-struck out for Valbuena in the 9th. E: Valbuena (1). LOB: Houston 4, New York 5. 2B: C.Gomez (1), Valbuena (1), Ellsbury 2 (2). HR: White (1), off Eovaldi; Tucker (1), off Eovaldi; B.McCann (1), off Fiers; S.Castro (2), off Fiers; Teixeira (2), off Giles. RBIs: White 4 (4), Tucker (1), Ellsbury (1), A.Rodriguez (1), Teixeira 3 (7), B.McCann (3), Headley (2), S.Castro (8). SB: Gregorius (1). SF: Headley. RLISP: Houston 1 (Kratz); New York 2 (Teixeira, Ellsbury). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers 5 9 5 5 0 3 82 9.00 W.Harris L, 0-1 11/3 1 1 1 0 2 26 6.75 2/ Giles 2 0 1 14 16.20 3 2 2 Sipp 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 4.50 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi 5 6 5 5 0 7 94 9.00 Yates 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Shreve W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 Betances 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 A.Miller S, 1-1 1 2 0 0 0 3 23 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Giles 1-1. Umpires: Home, Ed Hickox; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Greg Gibson. T: 3:00. A: 30,003 .

Wednesday Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 3 Seattle 9, Texas 5 Detroit 7, Miami 3 Cleveland 7, Boston 6 NY Yankees 16, Houston 6 Baltimore 4, Minnesota 2 Oakland 2, White Sox 1 Oakland at Seattle, 3:10 NY Yankees at Detroit, 7:08

Thorn, Major League Baseball’s oicial historian. The 1857 documents titled “Laws of Base Ball” establish the essentials of the modern game: The distance of the base paths is 90 feet, the length of the game is nine innings and nine players are in the field. And they do it three years earlier than the 1860 birth date now recognized. The documents were authored by Daniel Lucius “Doc” Adams, making him the founding father of America’s pastime, not Alexander Cartwright, who now is credited. “He’s the true father of baseball and you’ve never heard of him,” Thorn, a consultant on the sale of the papers, told The Associated Press in a phone interview. Southern California-based SCP Auctions put the documents on sale Wednesday in an auction that lasts until April 23. There have been five bids and the current highest bid is $146,410, according to the auction house. Hall of Fame spokesman Brad Horn said there are no plans to change or remove Cartwright’s plaque.

BOX SCORES

Yankees 8, Astros 5

Thursday White Sox 6, Oakland 1 NY Yankees 8, Houston 5 Boston at Cleveland, ppd., rain Baltimore 4, Minnesota 2 Texas at LA Angels, (n)

Reds 10, Phillies 6 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .250 O.Herrera cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .091 Franco 3b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .300 Howard 1b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .333 A.Blanco 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 C.Hunter lf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .125 Ruiz c 3 1 2 2 1 0 .429 Bourjos rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .091 Morton p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Oberholtzer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 c-Ruf ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hinojosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 6 9 5 4 6 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler cf-lf 4 1 2 1 1 0 .444 Suarez 3b 5 1 2 4 0 1 .333 Votto 1b 4 2 1 0 1 1 .167 Duvall lf 4 1 1 0 1 3 .143 B.Hamilton cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bruce rf 4 2 3 5 0 0 .500 Pacheco 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 De Jesus Jr. ss 3 1 0 0 1 2 .000 Barnhart c 3 2 3 0 1 0 1.000 Stephenson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Mesoraco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Ju.Diaz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cingrani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-T.Holt ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Sampson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 10 12 10 5 9 Philadelphia 001 120 020 — 6 9 1 Cincinnati 001 800 10x — 10 12 1 a-popped out for Stephenson in the 5th. b-struck out for Cingrani in the 7th. c-fouled out for Oberholtzer in the 8th. E: O.Herrera (2), Bruce (1). LOB: Philadelphia 8, Cincinnati 6. 2B: Franco (1), Ruiz (1), Bourjos (1), Schebler (3). HR: C.Hunter (1), off Stephenson; Howard (1), off Stephenson; Ruiz (1), off Sampson; Bruce (1), off Morton; Suarez (2), off Stumpf; Bruce (2), off Oberholtzer. RBIs: Howard 2 (2), C.Hunter (1), Ruiz 2 (2), Schebler (3), Suarez 4 (5), Bruce 5 (7). SB: De Jesus Jr. (1). S: Stephenson. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Bourjos, A.Blanco, Howard, Galvis); Cincinnati 3 (Suarez, Pacheco 2). GIDP: Bourjos. DP: Cincinnati 1 (Votto, De Jesus Jr.). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton L, 0-1 32/3 5 6 6 2 3 67 14.73 Stumpf 0 1 3 3 2 0 16 Oberholtzer 31/3 4 1 1 1 5 64 2.70 Hinojosa 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 13.50 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stephenson W, 1-0 5 6 4 3 2 1 87 5.40 Ju.Diaz 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 0.00 Cingrani 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Sampson 1 2 2 2 1 1 24 18.00 Ohlendorf 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Stumpf pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Stumpf 2-2, Oberholtzer 1-1. HBP: by Ohlendorf (Franco), by Stephenson (A.Blanco). Umpires: Home, Brian Knight; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Tony Randazzo. T: 3:04. A: 10,784 .

GIDP: Bour. DP: Washington 1 (Roark, Espinosa, Zimmerman). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Conley 1 2 3 3 2 2 31 27.00 Phelps W, 1-0 4 2 0 0 2 3 59 0.00 Morris 12/3 1 1 1 3 3 48 10.13 Breslow 11/3 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.86 A.Ramos S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 0.00 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark L, 0-1 4 9 4 3 3 3 99 6.75 Petit 2 2 1 1 0 0 23 4.50 Belisle 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 9.00 2/ O.Perez 0 1 2 14 0.00 3 0 0 Kelley 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Breslow 1-0, Kelley 1-0. WP: Conley. Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Will Little; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Toby Basner. T: 3:32 (Delay: 1:25). A: 41,650 .

Orioles 4, Twins 2 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Da.Santana rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .500 Mauer 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .364 Sano dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .200 1-Nunez pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Plouffe 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167 E.Escobar ss 4 1 2 0 0 2 .417 J.Murphy c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Buxton cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .200 Totals 34 2 9 2 0 12 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rickard cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .455 Reimold lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .500 Machado 3b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .308 C.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Trumbo rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .455 J.Hardy ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .222 P.Alvarez dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Schoop 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .300 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 31 4 8 3 0 7 Minnesota 110 000 000 — 2 9 0 Baltimore 000 001 21x — 4 8 1 1-ran for Sano in the 8th. E: C.Davis (1). LOB: Minnesota 5, Baltimore 3. 2B: E.Escobar (4), J.Murphy (1), Reimold (1). HR: Mauer (1), off Jimenez; Machado (1), off P.Hughes; Rickard (1), off May. RBIs: Mauer (2), Buxton (1), Rickard (2), Machado (1), Schoop (2). SB: Da.Santana (1). CS: Da.Santana (1), Nunez (1). RLISP: Minnesota 4 (Dozier 2, Plouffe, Buxton); Baltimore 1 (J.Hardy). GIDP: Plouffe. DP: Minnesota 1 (Mauer); Baltimore 1 (Jimenez, Schoop, C.Davis). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes L, 0-1 6 6 3 3 0 4 93 4.50 May 2 2 1 1 0 3 31 2.25 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jimenez W, 1-0 7 8 2 1 0 9 107 1.29 Bundy 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 O’Day S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 0.00 P.Hughes pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: May 2-2. WP: May. Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 2:32 (Delay: 0:21). A: 11,142 .

Late Wednesday

Yankees 16, Astros 6 Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .286 M.Duffy 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Springer rf 4 1 1 4 1 0 .222 Correa ss 5 2 4 2 0 1 .556 Col.Rasmus lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .333 Marisnick lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 C.Gomez cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Valbuena 3b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .250 M.Gonzalez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 White 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .600 Tucker dh 3 1 1 0 0 0 .400 c-Kratz ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 J.Castro c 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 Totals 38 612 6 1 10 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 5 2 1 0 0 1 .111 Gardner lf 2 2 0 0 4 0 .000 A.Rodriguez dh 3 1 0 0 2 2 .000 d-Au.Romine ph-dh-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Teixeira 1b 4 2 2 4 0 1 .286 a-Ackley ph-1b-2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 B.McCann c-1b 4 3 2 2 1 0 .429 Beltran rf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .375 Hicks rf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Headley 3b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .143 b-Torreyes ph-3b 1 1 1 2 0 0 1.000 S.Castro 2b 5 1 4 5 0 0 .625 Nova p 000 0 0 0 --Gregorius ss 5 0 3 0 0 0 .500 Totals 411617 16 7 7 Houston 140 010 000 — 6 12 1 New York 633 001 30x — 16 17 0 a-flied out for Teixeira in the 7th. b-tripled for Headley in the 7th. E: J.Castro (1). LOB: Houston 7, New York 9. 2B: Col.Rasmus (1), White (1), Tucker (2), B.McCann (1), S.Castro (2). 3B: Torreyes (1). HR: Correa 2 (3), off Pineda 2; Springer (1), off Pineda; S.Castro (1), off M.Feliz; Teixeira (1), off M.Feliz; Beltran (1), off Sipp. RBIs: Springer 4 (4), Correa 2 (4), Teixeira 4 (4), B.McCann 2 (2), Beltran 2 (2), Headley (1), Torreyes 2 (2), S.Castro 5 (7). SB: Ellsbury (1), Headley (1). RLISP: Houston 5 (C.Gomez, Tucker, Springer, Valbuena, Marisnick); New York 4 (A.Rodriguez 4). GIDP: C.Gomez. DP: New York 1 (Headley, Teixeira). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McHugh L, 0-1 1/3 3 6 5 2 043135.00 M.Feliz 41/3 7 6 6 4 4 107 12.46 Sipp 1 3 1 1 1 2 30 9.00 Fields 11/3 4 3 3 0 1 43 20.25 Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineda W, 1-0 5 8 6 6 0 5 87 10.80 Nova S, 1-1 4 4 0 0 1 5 56 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: M.Feliz 1-1, Sipp 1-0, Fields 3-0. HBP: by Pineda (Altuve). WP: Nova. Catchers’ interference: J.Castro. Umpires: Home, Greg Gibson; First, Ed Hickox; Second, Mike Estabrook; Third, Dana DeMuth. T: 3:45. A: 37,493 .

Dodgers 7, Padres 0 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .286 C.Seager ss 5 0 1 0 0 1 .357 Turner 3b 4 1 2 2 0 2 .308 A.Gonzalez 1b 2 1 0 0 3 0 .400 Puig rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .600 C.Crawford lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .300 Thompson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Pederson cf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .250 Ellis c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Maeda p 3 1 1 1 0 1 .333 Y.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-K.Hernandez ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .333 Blanton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 7 11 7 3 9 San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jay cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Spangenberg 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Kemp rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .200 Myers 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .182 Solarte 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .200 De.Norris c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 A.Ramirez ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blash lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Cashner p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Buchter p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Jankowski ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 Ca.Villanueva p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Upton Jr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 32 0 5 0 0 7 Los Angeles 400 100 011 — 7 11 1 San Diego 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 a-struck out for Buchter in the 5th. b-grounded out for Ca.Villanueva in the 8th. c-singled for Howell in the 9th. E: Maeda (1). LOB: Los Angeles 6, San Diego 5. 2B: C.Crawford (1). 3B: Utley (1). HR: Maeda (1), off Cashner; Puig (1), off Ca.Villanueva. RBIs: Turner 2 (2), Puig (4), C.Crawford (2), Pederson 2 (3), Maeda (1). SF: Turner. RLISP: Los Angeles 3 (Pederson 3); San Diego 4 (A.Ramirez, De.Norris 2, Solarte). GIDP: A.Gonzalez. DP: San Diego 1 (Spangenberg, A.Ramirez, Myers). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maeda W, 1-0 6 5 0 0 0 4 84 0.00 Y.Garcia 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Howell 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Blanton 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 0.00 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner L, 0-1 4 6 5 5 2 5 94 11.25 Buchter 1 1 0 0 1 2 23 0.00 Ca.Villanueva 3 2 1 1 0 1 38 3.00 Perdomo 1 2 1 1 0 1 16 31.50 T: 2:57. A: 30,054 .

NL

Pitcher

StL Atl

Garcia (L) Wisler (R)

Time W-L

ERA

0-0 0-0

6:35

-------

Phi NY

Eickhoff (R) deGrom (R)

0-0 12:10 0-0

-------

SD Col

Rea (R) Lyles (R)

3:10

0-0 0-0

9.00 ----

Pit Cin

Liriano (L) Simon (R)

6:10

1-0 0.00 0-0 ----

Chi Ari

Hammel (R) Ray (L)

0-0 8:40 0-0

-------

LA SF

Stripling (R) Cain (R)

9:15

0-0 0-0

-------

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

NY Severino (R) 0-0 Det Zimmermann(R) 12:08 0-0

-------

Cle Chi

Salazar (R) Danks (L)

3:10

-------

TB Bal

Archer (R) Tillman (R)

0-1 3.60 6:05 0-0 0.00

0-0 0-0

Bos Kelly (R) Tor Stroman (R)

6:07

0-0 1-0

---3.38

Min Santana (R) KC Ventura (R)

7:15

0-0 0.00 0-0 ----

Tex Griffin (R) 0-0 LA Shoemaker (R) 9:05 0-0

-------

Oak Surkamp (L) Sea Walker (R)

9:10

0-0 0-0

-------

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Pitcher

Hou Feldman (R) Mil Anderson (R) 7:10

0-0 0-0

-------

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.<killtag> TEAM REC-Team’s Record in games started by today’s pitcher. VS OPP-Pitcher’s record versus this opponent, 2015 statistics.

Orioles 4, Twins 2 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 1-Da.Santana pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mauer 1b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .286 Sano rf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .000 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .250 Rosario lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Park dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .167 E.Escobar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .375 K.Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Buxton cf 4 1 2 0 0 2 .286 Totals 30 2 5 2 6 13 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Machado 3b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .222 A.Jones cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 C.Davis 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Trumbo rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .500 Wieters c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .250 P.Alvarez dh 2 0 0 0 2 1 .000 J.Hardy ss 3 2 1 0 1 1 .167 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Rickard lf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .571 Totals 31 4 9 4 6 6 Minnesota 001 001 000 — 2 5 0 Baltimore 011 110 00x — 4 9 0 1-ran for Dozier in the 9th. LOB: Minnesota 9, Baltimore 10. 2B: E.Escobar (3), Buxton 2 (2), Wieters (1), J.Hardy (1), Schoop (2). HR: Plouffe (1), off Givens; C.Davis (1), off Gibson. RBIs: Mauer (1), Plouffe (1), C.Davis (1), Wieters (2), Schoop (1), Rickard (1). S: Dozier. SF: Mauer, Rickard. RLISP: Minnesota 3 (Mauer 2, Sano); Baltimore 3 (Trumbo, Machado, Schoop). GIDP: Trumbo. DP: Minnesota 1 (E.Escobar, Dozier, Mauer). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson L, 0-1 5 7 4 4 5 3 105 7.20 Abad 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Fien 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 10.80 Pressly 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 1-0 5 2 1 1 3 4 89 1.80 2/ Givens 1 0 1 13 13.50 3 2 1 Brach 11/3 0 0 0 2 3 32 0.00 O’Day 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Britton S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 1 3 26 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Brach 1-0. PB: off Gibson (P.Alvarez). WP: Britton. Umpires: Home, Mark Wegner; First, Marty Foster; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Mike Winters. T: 3:11. A: 12,622 .


BASEBALL

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH NATIONAL LEAGUE CENTRAL Chicago

M 2 • FRIDAY • 04.08.2016

AMERICAN LEAGUE

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

3

0

1.000

3-0

W-3

0-0

3-0

Cincinnati

3

0

1.000

3-0

W-3

3-0

0-0

Pittsburgh

3

0

1.000

3-0

W-3

3-0

0-0

Milwaukee

1

2

.333

2

1-2

W-1

1-2

0-0

Cardinals

0

3

.000

3

0-3

L-3

0-0

0-3

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Washington

2

1

.667

2-1

L-1

0-1

2-0

New York

1

1

.500

½

1-1

W-1

0-0

1-1

Miami

1

2

.333

1

1-2

W-1

0-2

1-0

Atlanta

0

2

.000

0-2

L-2

0-2

0-0

Philadelphia

0

3

.000

2

0-3

L-3

0-0

0-3

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Thursday Cincinnati 10, Philadelphia 6 Miami 6, Washington 4 San Francisco 12, LA Dodgers 6 Cubs 14, Arizona 6 Wednesday Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3 Colorado 4, Arizona 3 Detroit 7, Miami 3 Pittsburgh 5, Cardinals 1 Cincinnati 3, Philadelphia 2 Washington 3, Atlanta 1 LA Dodgers 7, San Diego 0

CENTRAL

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Detroit

2

0

1.000

2-0

W-2

0-0

2-0

Chicago

3

1

.750

3-1

W-1

0-0

3-1

Cleveland

1

1

.500

1

1-1

W-1

1-1

0-0 0-0

Kansas City

1

1

.500

1

1-1

L-1

1-1

Minnesota

0

3

.000

0-3

L-3

0-0

0-3

EAST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away

Baltimore

3

0

1.000

3-0

W-3

3-0

0-0

New York

2

1

.667

1

2-1

W-2

2-1

0-0

Tampa Bay

2

2

.500

2-2

W-2

2-2

0-0

Toronto

2

2

.500

2-2

L-2

0-0

2-2

Boston

1

1

.500

1-1

L-1

0-0

1-1

WEST

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str

Home

Away 2-1

Los Angeles

3

1

.750

3-1

L-1

0-0

3-1

Seattle

2

1

.667

2-1

W-2

0-0

San Francisco

3

1

.750

3-1

W-1

1-0

2-1

Houston

1

2

.333

1

1-2

L-2

0-0

1-2

Colorado

2

1

.667

½

2-1

W-1

0-0

2-1

Los Angeles

1

2

.333

1

1-2

W-1

1-2

0-0

Arizona

1

3

.250

2

1-3

L-2

1-3

0-0

Texas

1

3

.250

1-3

L-3

1-2

0-1

San Diego

0

3

.000

0-3

L-3

0-3

0-0

Oakland

1

3

.250

1-3

L-1

1-3

0-0

ROUNDUP

NOTEBOOK

Rizzo, Cubs rally past Diamondbacks

Cubs’ Schwarber injured

Anthony Rizzo matched his career high with six RBIs and the visiting Chicago Cubs beat the Arizona Diamondbacks 14-6 on Thursday night but lost Kyle Schwarber with a sprained ankle in an outfield collision. John Lackey (1-0) gave up six runs on eight hits over six innings in his Cubs debut, but got the win thanks to a five-run Chicago fourth inning. The D’backs were up 3-0, 4-2 and 6-4 but starter Rubby De La Rosa (0-1) couldn’t hold the leads. Giants 12, Dodgers 6 • Hunter Pence hit a grand slam in the eighth, Joe Panik drove in three runs and keyed San Francisco’s comeback, and the Giants beat the Los Angeles Dodgers 12-6 in their home opener Thursday. The Dodgers pitchers’ 31-inning scoreless streak to start the season ended in the fifth, one inning shy of the 1963 Cardinals’ record. Reds 10, Phillies 6 • Jay Bruce homered twice and matched a career high with five RBIs, and Cincinnati made a winner of top pitching prospect Robert Stephenson in his major league debut to complete a season-opening sweep. Eugenio Suarez hit his first career grand slam and Bruce connected for a threerun shot as the Reds scored eight times in the fourth inning. Marlins 6, Nationals 4 • Miami reliever David Phelps (Hazelwood West) entered after a rain delay and shut out Washington for four innings while delivering his first career RBI, and the Marlins spoiled the Nationals’ sloppy home opener. While Phelps (1-0) replaced Adam Conley following a 1-hour, 25-minute break because of a thunderstorm in the second with the score 3-3, Nationals starter Tanner Roark (0-1) surprisingly remained in the game. Roark allowed four runs and nine hits in four innings.

AMERICAN LEAGUE Yankees 8, Astros 5 • Mark Teixeira sliced a tiebreaking, three-run homer in the seventh and Starlin Castro connected again, lifting host New York. The Yankees took two of three in the season-opening series against the team that beat them in the AL wildcard game last October. Castro kept up his torrid start with a solo home run and a single of the wall, making him 7 for 12. Angels 4, Rangers 3 • Albert Pujols’ single brought home Johnny Giavotella for the game-winning run, and Los Angeles edged visiting Texas for its first win of the season. White Sox 6, A’s 1 • Mat Latos gave up one hit over six innings for his first win since last July, Jose Abreu hit a two-run homer and visiting Chicago gave manager Robin Ventura his 300th career win. Orioles 4, Twins 2 • Ubaldo Jimenez pitched seven sharp innings and host Baltimore rallied to complete a threegame sweep. Red Sox-Indians • The game between Boston and host Cleveland was postponed because of inclement weather. No makeup date was immediately announced. Associated Press

BROGLIO

’63 CARDS START STILL TOPS The 1963 Cardinals’ record of scoreless innings pitched to start the season stayed alive Thursday, barely, thanks to a fifthinning run scored by the Giants. A look: 1963 CARDINALS 32 innings vs. Mets and Phillies Best pitching performances • Complete game shutouts by Ernie Broglio, Ray Washburn and Curt Simmons. Ended by • Wes Covington doubled of Broglio, scoring Tony Gonzalez in the sixth inning of the season’s fourth game. 2016 DODGERS 31 1/3 innings vs. Padres and Giants Best pitching performances • Clayton Kershaw pitched seven scoreless, while Scott Kazmir and Kenta Maeda each threw six scoreless. Ended by • Brandon Crawford scored on a fifth-inning groundout by Denard Span of Dodgers pitcher Alex Wood.

Chicago Cubs left fielder Kyle Schwarber was carted of the field Thursday night with a left leg injury after colliding with center fielder Dexter Fowler on a play that resulted in an inside-the-park homer for Arizona’s Jean Segura. The Cubs said Schwarber had a left-ankle sprain. Initial X-rays were negative and an MRI was scheduled for Friday. Segura, who also hit a leadof homer in the first, hit John Lackey’s pitch to deep leftcenter in the second inning with Schwarber and Fowler giving chase. They collided on the warning track in front of the 413foot sign at Chase Field. Schwarber stayed on the ground for several minutes before standing with some help and climbing on the cart. Schwarber, the fourth overall pick in the 2014 draft, also is the Cubs’ backup catcher.

Rockies rookie shortstop, even if the team did raise the fences this spring to keep more baseballs from flying out of the yard. These days, it seems like nothing can prevent Story from going deep. He made major-league history in Arizona on Wednesday by becoming the first player to hit a homer in each of his first three games. Next stop, a hitter friendly park that’s regarded as a slugger’s Shangri-La. “I’m just ready to get there and see what it’s all about,” said Story, whose team is 2-1 heading into the home opener Friday against San Diego. Story’s power surge may be somewhat of a surprise, given that he had 20 combined homers last season in stints with Double-A New Britain and Triple-A Albuquerque. His four hits this season have all been homers, which puts him on pace for 216 for the season. He leads the National League in home runs, RBIs (7) and total bases (16).

Red-hot rookie is eager to hit at Coors Field • Trevor Story is taking his long ball show to an unfamiliar place — home. Coors Field figures to be a suitable fit for the Colorado

Baseball may have new founder • Coinciding with the start of the major league season, a set of game-changing documents went up for sale this week. Their authenticity and significance are

Associated Press

Friday’s pitching matchups

Giants 12, Dodgers 6

White Sox 6, Athletics 1

Marlins 6, Nationals 4

Cubs 14, Diamondbacks 6

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Utley 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .316 C.Seager ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .316 Puig rf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .533 A.Gonzalez 1b 4 2 3 1 0 0 .500 Van Slyke lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .250 c-C.Crawford ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Thompson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Pederson cf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .313 K.Hernandez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 A.Barnes c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .125 A.Wood p 3 0 0 1 0 2 .000 Y.Garcia p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Coleman p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Howell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --P.Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Culberson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 39 6 13 6 0 5 San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 1 1 1 0 0 .286 Panik 2b 5 3 3 3 0 0 .353 Posey c 5 0 3 2 0 1 .357 Pence rf 4 1 1 4 1 1 .294 Belt 1b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .357 M.Duffy 3b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .278 B.Crawford ss 4 2 1 0 1 2 .357 Peavy p 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 a-Tomlinson ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 1.000 b-Adrianza ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 d-G.Blanco ph-lf 1 1 1 0 0 0 .286 Pagan lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .333 Strickland p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 12 17 12 3 6 Los Angeles 021 010 020 — 6 13 1 San Francisco 000 034 05x — 12 17 0 a-singled for Peavy in the 5th. b-sacrificed for Heston in the 6th. c-grounded out for Van Slyke in the 8th. d-singled for Romo in the 8th. e-flied out for P.Baez in the 9th. E: Van Slyke (1). LOB: Los Angeles 6, San Francisco 7. 2B: A.Gonzalez 2 (3), Van Slyke (1), Posey (1), Belt (3). 3B: Panik (1). HR: Pederson (1), off Romo; Pence (1), off P.Baez. RBIs: A.Gonzalez (4), Van Slyke (1), Pederson 2 (5), K.Hernandez (1), A.Wood (1), Span (6), Panik 3 (4), Posey 2 (4), Pence 4 (4), Pagan 2 (2). S: Adrianza. RLISP: Los Angeles 5 (Utley 2, Pederson 3); San Francisco 4 (B.Crawford, Panik, Belt, Pence). GIDP: Puig, M.Duffy. DP: Los Angeles 1 (Utley, C.Seager, A.Gonzalez); San Francisco 1 (M.Duffy, Panik, Belt). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Wood L, 0-1 5 8 5 5 2 3 85 9.00 2/ Y.Garcia 2 0 0 11 6.75 3 3 2 Coleman 11/3 0 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Howell 0 4 4 4 0 0 8 36.00 P.Baez 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 4.50 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy 5 10 4 4 0 3 79 7.20 Heston W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Lopez 1 1 1 1 0 0 9 9.00 Romo 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 4.50 Strickland 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. A.Wood pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Howell pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored: Y.Garcia 2-2, Coleman 1-0, P.Baez 3-3, Romo 1-1. WP: A.Wood. Umpires: Home, John Tumpane; First, Jeff Kellogg; Second, Brian O’Nora; Third, Alan Porter. T: 3:07. A: 41,940 .

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Eaton cf-rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .563 Me.Cabrera dh 4 1 2 1 1 0 .200 Abreu 1b 4 1 1 3 0 1 .313 Frazier 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .118 Av.Garcia rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .133 1-A.Jackson pr-cf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .300 Shuck lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Lawrie 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .200 Navarro c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .125 Saladino ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .500 Totals 38 6 10 6 1 9 Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Burns cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Lowrie dh-ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Valencia 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .154 Vogt c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Coghlan 2b 4 0 2 1 0 2 .333 Alonso 1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .100 a-Canha ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Semien ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .333 b-Lambo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-K.Davis ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Crisp lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .125 Totals 32 1 4 1 3 6 Chicago 000 002 004 — 6 10 1 Oakland 000 000 001 — 1 4 2 a-popped out for Alonso in the 7th. b-grounded out for Semien in the 7th. c-lined out for Hendriks in the 9th. 1-ran for Av.Garcia in the 9th. E: Frazier (1), Valencia (1), Semien (1). LOB: Chicago 7, Oakland 7. 2B: Eaton (1). HR: Abreu (1), off Graveman. RBIs: Me.Cabrera (1), Abreu 3 (3), Navarro (1), Saladino (1), Coghlan (1). SB: A.Jackson (1). SF: Abreu. RLISP: Chicago 5 (Frazier 3, Abreu, Lawrie); Oakland 3 (Crisp, Lambo, K.Davis). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos W, 1-0 6 1 0 0 1 2 88 0.00 1/ Duke 1 1 12 13.50 3 1 0 0 2/ Albers 0 0 7 0.00 3 0 0 0 N.Jones 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.38 Putnam 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 9.00 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Graveman L, 0-1 51/3 3 2 2 1 4 84 3.38 Fe.Rodriguez 12/3 0 0 0 0 2 23 0.00 1/ Rzepczynski 0 0 6 0.00 3 1 0 0 2/ Dull 0 2 13 0.00 3 0 0 0 Hendriks 1 6 4 4 0 1 35 9.82 Inherited runners-scored: Albers 2-0, Dull 1-0. WP: Duke, Putnam, Dull. Umpires: Home, Gabe Morales; First, Tom Hallion; Second, Phil Cuzzi; Third, Dan Bellino. T: 3:06. A: 12,577 .

Miami AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .400 Ozuna cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .143 Yelich lf 2 1 1 0 3 0 .333 Stanton rf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .308 Prado 3b 5 0 2 2 0 0 .308 Bour 1b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .333 Rojas 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Realmuto c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .214 Hechavarria ss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .364 Conley p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Phelps p 2 0 1 1 0 1 .500 Morris p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Breslow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Ramos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 39 6 13 6 4 7 Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Taylor cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Rendon 3b 5 1 2 0 0 2 .231 Harper rf 3 2 1 1 2 0 .300 Zimmerman 1b 3 1 1 0 2 0 .333 Werth lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .000 Kelley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-den Dekker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 D.Murphy 2b 4 0 2 3 1 2 .364 W.Ramos c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .308 Espinosa ss 2 0 0 0 2 0 .333 Roark p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Drew ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Petit p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Robinson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O.Perez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Heisey lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 --Totals 32 4 6 4 9 10 Miami 301 010 100 — 6 13 1 Washington 300 000 100 — 4 6 1 a-lined out for Roark in the 4th. b-struck out for Petit in the 6th. c-fouled out for Kelley in the 9th. E: Phelps (1), W.Ramos (1). LOB: Miami 10, Washington 11. 2B: Bour 2 (2), Hechavarria (3), Rendon (1), Zimmerman (1). 3B: D.Murphy (1). HR: Harper (2), off Morris. RBIs: Prado 2 (2), Realmuto (1), Hechavarria 2 (3), Phelps (1), Harper (2), D.Murphy 3 (5). SB: Realmuto (1), D.Murphy (1). S: Roark. RLISP: Miami 5 (Hechavarria 2, Stanton, Prado, Morris); Washington 7 (W.Ramos 2, Rendon, D.Murphy 2, Werth, Taylor).

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 2 2 2 2 0 .583 Heyward rf 4 3 2 0 2 0 .231 Zobrist 2b 3 3 1 1 3 0 .417 Rizzo 1b 4 3 3 6 1 1 .455 Bryant 3b-lf-3b 6 1 3 0 0 1 .231 Schwarber lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000 La Stella 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Strop p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 T.Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Soler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Rondon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Montero c 6 0 0 0 0 1 .182 A.Russell ss 4 2 2 2 1 1 .182 Lackey p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 b-Szczur ph-lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .571 Totals 41 14 14 11 10 5 Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Segura 2b 4 2 2 2 0 1 .444 Ahmed ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .400 Goldschmidt 1b 3 2 1 0 1 1 .231 D.Peralta rf 3 2 3 1 1 0 .471 W.Castillo c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Ja.Lamb 3b 3 0 2 3 0 0 .286 Tomas lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .273 Owings cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .200 R.De La Rosa p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 J.Barrett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Brito ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Drabek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Chafin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Drury ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Delgado p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Weeks Jr. ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Totals 33 6 8 6 2 10 Chicago 022 500 104 — 14 14 0 Arizona 312 000 000 — 6 8 2 a-flied out for J.Barrett in the 4th. b-singled for Lackey in the 7th. c-struck out for Chafin in the 7th. d-flied out for T.Wood in the 9th. e-flied out for Delgado in the 9th. E: W.Castillo (1), Ja.Lamb (1). LOB: Chicago 11, Arizona 3. 2B: Zobrist (1), Bryant (1), A.Russell (1), D.Peralta 2 (3). 3B: Fowler (1), Rizzo (1), D.Peralta (1). HR: Rizzo (2), off Delgado; Segura 2 (3), off Lackey 2. RBIs: Fowler 2 (4), Zobrist (1), Rizzo 6 (9), A.Russell 2 (2), Segura 2 (5), D.Peralta (2), Ja.Lamb 3 (5). SB: Heyward (1). SF: Ja.Lamb. RLISP: Chicago 7 (Fowler, Montero 2, Rizzo 2, Bryant 2); Arizona 1 (W.Castillo). GIDP: Tomas. DP: Chicago 1 (La Stella, Zobrist, Rizzo). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lackey W, 1-0 6 8 6 6 1 4 84 9.00 Strop 11/3 0 0 0 0 3 17 0.00 2/ T.Wood 1 1 10 0.00 3 00 0 Rondon 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.De La Rosa L, 0-1 31/3 6 7 6 3 2 70 16.20 2/ J.Barrett 1 0 20 6.75 3 2 2 2 Drabek 2 1 1 1 4 2 52 4.50 Chafin 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 9.00 Delgado 2 4 4 4 1 0 34 7.71 Drabek pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: J.Barrett 2-2, Chafin 2-1. HBP: by R.De La Rosa (Rizzo). WP: J.Barrett. T: 3:29. A: 24,656 .

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Springer rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .154 Correa ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .385 Col.Rasmus lf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .300 C.Gomez cf 4 1 2 0 0 2 .167 Valbuena 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .364 b-M.Duffy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 White 1b 4 1 3 4 0 1 .667 Tucker dh 2 1 1 1 0 1 .429 a-M.Gonzalez ph-dh 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Kratz c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Totals 36 5 9 5 0 14 New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .214 Gardner lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .143 A.Rodriguez dh 4 1 2 1 0 1 .200 Teixeira 1b 4 2 2 3 0 2 .364 B.McCann c 4 1 2 1 0 1 .455 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Headley 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .100 S.Castro 2b 4 1 2 1 0 1 .583 Gregorius ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .455 Totals 35 8 12 8 1 6 Houston 030 200 000 — 5 9 1 New York 011 210 30x — 8 12 0 b-struck out for Valbuena in the 9th. E: Valbuena (1). LOB: Houston 4, New York 5. 2B: C.Gomez (1), Valbuena (1), Ellsbury 2 (2). HR: White (1), off Eovaldi; Tucker (1), off Eovaldi; B.McCann (1), off Fiers; S.Castro (2), off Fiers; Teixeira (2), off Giles. RBIs: White 4 (4), Tucker (1), Ellsbury (1), A.Rodriguez (1), Teixeira 3 (7), B.McCann (3), Headley (2), S.Castro (8). SB: Gregorius (1). SF: Headley. RLISP: Houston 1 (Kratz); New York 2 (Teixeira, Ellsbury). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fiers 5 9 5 5 0 3 82 9.00 W.Harris L, 0-1 11/3 1 1 1 0 2 26 6.75 2/ Giles 2 0 1 14 16.20 3 2 2 Sipp 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 4.50 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eovaldi 5 6 5 5 0 7 94 9.00 Yates 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Shreve W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 Betances 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 A.Miller S, 1-1 1 2 0 0 0 3 23 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Giles 1-1. Umpires: Home, Ed Hickox; First, Mike Estabrook; Second, Dana DeMuth; Third, Greg Gibson. T: 3:00. A: 30,003 .

Wednesday Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 3 Seattle 9, Texas 5 Detroit 7, Miami 3 Cleveland 7, Boston 6 NY Yankees 16, Houston 6 Baltimore 4, Minnesota 2 Oakland 2, White Sox 1 Oakland at Seattle, 3:10 NY Yankees at Detroit, 7:08

verified by experts including John Thorn, Major League Baseball’s oicial historian. The 1857 documents titled “Laws of Base Ball” establish the essentials of the modern game: The distance of the base paths is 90 feet, the length of the game is nine innings and nine players are in the field. And they do it three years earlier than the 1860 birth date now recognized. The documents were authored by Daniel Lucius “Doc” Adams, making him the founding father of America’s pastime, not Alexander Cartwright, who now is credited. “He’s the true father of baseball and you’ve never heard of him,” Thorn, a consultant on the sale of the papers, told The Associated Press in a phone interview. Southern California-based SCP Auctions put the documents on sale Wednesday in an auction that lasts until April 23. There have been five bids and the current highest bid is $146,410, according to the auction house. Hall of Fame spokesman Brad Horn said there are no plans to change or remove Cartwright’s plaque.

BOX SCORES

Yankees 8, Astros 5

Thursday White Sox 6, Oakland 1 NY Yankees 8, Houston 5 Boston at Cleveland, ppd., rain Baltimore 4, Minnesota 2 LA Angels 4, Texas 3

Reds 10, Phillies 6 Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Galvis ss 5 0 1 0 0 0 .250 O.Herrera cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .091 Franco 3b 2 1 1 0 2 0 .300 Howard 1b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .333 A.Blanco 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .000 C.Hunter lf 3 2 1 1 1 0 .125 Ruiz c 3 1 2 2 1 0 .429 Bourjos rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .091 Morton p 2 1 1 0 0 0 .500 Oberholtzer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 c-Ruf ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hinojosa p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 6 9 5 4 6 Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schebler cf-lf 4 1 2 1 1 0 .444 Suarez 3b 5 1 2 4 0 1 .333 Votto 1b 4 2 1 0 1 1 .167 Duvall lf 4 1 1 0 1 3 .143 B.Hamilton cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bruce rf 4 2 3 5 0 0 .500 Pacheco 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 De Jesus Jr. ss 3 1 0 0 1 2 .000 Barnhart c 3 2 3 0 1 0 1.000 Stephenson p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-Mesoraco ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Ju.Diaz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cingrani p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-T.Holt ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Sampson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 10 12 10 5 9 Philadelphia 001 120 020 — 6 9 1 Cincinnati 001 800 10x — 10 12 1 a-popped out for Stephenson in the 5th. b-struck out for Cingrani in the 7th. c-fouled out for Oberholtzer in the 8th. E: O.Herrera (2), Bruce (1). LOB: Philadelphia 8, Cincinnati 6. 2B: Franco (1), Ruiz (1), Bourjos (1), Schebler (3). HR: C.Hunter (1), off Stephenson; Howard (1), off Stephenson; Ruiz (1), off Sampson; Bruce (1), off Morton; Suarez (2), off Stumpf; Bruce (2), off Oberholtzer. RBIs: Howard 2 (2), C.Hunter (1), Ruiz 2 (2), Schebler (3), Suarez 4 (5), Bruce 5 (7). SB: De Jesus Jr. (1). S: Stephenson. RLISP: Philadelphia 4 (Bourjos, A.Blanco, Howard, Galvis); Cincinnati 3 (Suarez, Pacheco 2). GIDP: Bourjos. DP: Cincinnati 1 (Votto, De Jesus Jr.). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morton L, 0-1 32/3 5 6 6 2 3 67 14.73 Stumpf 0 1 3 3 2 0 16 Oberholtzer 31/3 4 1 1 1 5 64 2.70 Hinojosa 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 13.50 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stephenson W, 1-0 5 6 4 3 2 1 87 5.40 Ju.Diaz 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 0.00 Cingrani 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Sampson 1 2 2 2 1 1 24 18.00 Ohlendorf 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Stumpf pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored: Stumpf 2-2, Oberholtzer 1-1. HBP: by Ohlendorf (Franco), by Stephenson (A.Blanco). Umpires: Home, Brian Knight; First, Todd Tichenor; Second, Bill Miller; Third, Tony Randazzo. T: 3:04. A: 10,784 .

GIDP: Bour. DP: Washington 1 (Roark, Espinosa, Zimmerman). Miami IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Conley 1 2 3 3 2 2 31 27.00 Phelps W, 1-0 4 2 0 0 2 3 59 0.00 Morris 12/3 1 1 1 3 3 48 10.13 Breslow 11/3 1 0 0 1 1 23 3.86 A.Ramos S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 0.00 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Roark L, 0-1 4 9 4 3 3 3 99 6.75 Petit 2 2 1 1 0 0 23 4.50 Belisle 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 9.00 2/ O.Perez 0 1 2 14 0.00 3 0 0 Kelley 11/3 0 0 0 0 1 19 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Breslow 1-0, Kelley 1-0. WP: Conley. Umpires: Home, Lance Barksdale; First, Will Little; Second, Ted Barrett; Third, Toby Basner. T: 3:32 (Delay: 1:25). A: 41,650 .

Orioles 4, Twins 2 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Da.Santana rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .500 Mauer 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .364 Sano dh 4 0 2 0 0 1 .200 1-Nunez pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Plouffe 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .167 Rosario lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .167 E.Escobar ss 4 1 2 0 0 2 .417 J.Murphy c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .333 Buxton cf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .200 Totals 34 2 9 2 0 12 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rickard cf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .455 Reimold lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .500 Machado 3b 4 1 2 1 0 2 .308 C.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Trumbo rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .455 J.Hardy ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .222 P.Alvarez dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Schoop 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .300 Joseph c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 31 4 8 3 0 7 Minnesota 110 000 000 — 2 9 0 Baltimore 000 001 21x — 4 8 1 1-ran for Sano in the 8th. E: C.Davis (1). LOB: Minnesota 5, Baltimore 3. 2B: E.Escobar (4), J.Murphy (1), Reimold (1). HR: Mauer (1), off Jimenez; Machado (1), off P.Hughes; Rickard (1), off May. RBIs: Mauer (2), Buxton (1), Rickard (2), Machado (1), Schoop (2). SB: Da.Santana (1). CS: Da.Santana (1), Nunez (1). RLISP: Minnesota 4 (Dozier 2, Plouffe, Buxton); Baltimore 1 (J.Hardy). GIDP: Plouffe. DP: Minnesota 1 (Mauer); Baltimore 1 (Jimenez, Schoop, C.Davis). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes L, 0-1 6 6 3 3 0 4 93 4.50 May 2 2 1 1 0 3 31 2.25 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jimenez W, 1-0 7 8 2 1 0 9 107 1.29 Bundy 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 O’Day S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 0.00 P.Hughes pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored: May 2-2. WP: May. Umpires: Home, Marty Foster; First, Mike Muchlinski; Second, Mike Winters; Third, Mark Wegner. T: 2:32 (Delay: 0:21). A: 11,142 .

Angels 4, Rangers 3 Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeShields cf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .000 Choo rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Beltre 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Fielder dh 3 0 0 1 0 2 .143 Desmond lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .188 Moreland 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .182 Odor 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Andrus ss 1 0 0 1 1 0 .286 Chirinos c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .300 Totals 29 3 4 3 2 8 Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar 3b 4 1 2 2 1 1 .250 Gentry lf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .250 b-Nava ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 c-C.Perez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Trout cf 4 0 2 0 1 2 .167 Pujols dh 5 0 2 1 0 0 .167 Cron 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .182 Calhoun rf 3 1 1 0 1 2 .222 A.Simmons ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .100 Soto c 2 1 0 0 1 0 .000 a-Choi ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Giavotella 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .200 Totals 36 4 11 4 4 7 Texas 101 000 100 — 3 4 0 Los Angeles 001 020 001 — 4 11 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Soto in the 9th. b-was announced for Gentry in the 9th. c-grounded out for Nava in the 9th. E: Y.Escobar (2). LOB: Texas 4, Los Angeles 10. 2B: Gentry (1), A.Simmons (1). HR: Chirinos (1), off Santiago; Y.Escobar (1), off Holland. RBIs: Fielder (5), Andrus (2), Chirinos (2), Y.Escobar 2 (2), Gentry (2), Pujols (1). CS: Andrus (2). SF: Fielder, Andrus. RLISP: Texas 1 (Desmond); Los Angeles 6 (Trout 2, Soto 2, A.Simmons 2). GIDP: A.Simmons. DP: Texas 1 (Beltre, Odor, Moreland). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland 5 4 3 3 2 5 92 5.40 Wilhelmsen 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 45.00 Kela 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 5.40 S.Dyson L, 0-1 11/3 3 1 1 1 1 23 3.38 1/ Faulkner 0 1 0 5 3.86 3 0 0 Tolleson 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 45.00 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santiago 6 4 3 2 2 7 95 3.00 1/ J.Alvarez 0 0 0 4 0.00 3 0 0 2/ Salas 0 0 0 8 10.80 3 0 0 J.Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 20 0.00 Street W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Santiago pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Kela pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.

NL

Pitcher

StL Atl

Garcia (L) Wisler (R)

Time W-L

ERA

0-0 0-0

6:35

-------

Phi NY

Eickhoff (R) deGrom (R)

0-0 12:10 0-0

-------

SD Col

Rea (R) Lyles (R)

3:10

0-0 0-0

9.00 ----

Pit Cin

Liriano (L) Simon (R)

6:10

1-0 0.00 0-0 ----

Chi Ari

Hammel (R) Ray (L)

0-0 8:40 0-0

-------

LA SF

Stripling (R) Cain (R)

9:15

0-0 0-0

-------

AL

Pitcher

Time W-L

ERA

NY Severino (R) 0-0 Det Zimmermann(R) 12:08 0-0

-------

Cle Chi

Salazar (R) Danks (L)

3:10

-------

TB Bal

Archer (R) Tillman (R)

0-1 3.60 6:05 0-0 0.00

0-0 0-0

Bos Kelly (R) Tor Stroman (R)

6:07

0-0 1-0

---3.38

Min Santana (R) KC Ventura (R)

7:15

0-0 0.00 0-0 ----

Tex Griffin (R) 0-0 LA Shoemaker (R) 9:05 0-0

-------

Oak Surkamp (L) Sea Walker (R)

9:10

0-0 0-0

-------

IL

Time W-L

ERA

Pitcher

Hou Feldman (R) Mil Anderson (R) 7:10

0-0 0-0

-------

Visit STLtoday.com/cards for the latest baseball news and updates.<killtag> TEAM REC-Team’s Record in games started by today’s pitcher. VS OPP-Pitcher’s record versus this opponent, 2015 statistics.

Tolleson pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored: S.Dyson 1-0, Faulkner 2-0, Tolleson 3-1, J.Alvarez 2-0, Salas 2-1. PB: off Faulkner (Trout). HBP: by J.Smith (Choo). Balk: Santiago. T: 3:11. A: 39,089 . Late Wednesday

Orioles 4, Twins 2 Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Dozier 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 1-Da.Santana pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mauer 1b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .286 Sano rf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .000 Plouffe 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .250 Rosario lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .250 Park dh 3 0 0 0 1 3 .167 E.Escobar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .375 K.Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Buxton cf 4 1 2 0 0 2 .286 Totals 30 2 5 2 6 13 Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Machado 3b 4 0 1 0 1 2 .222 A.Jones cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 C.Davis 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .286 Trumbo rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .500 Wieters c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .250 P.Alvarez dh 2 0 0 0 2 1 .000 J.Hardy ss 3 2 1 0 1 1 .167 Schoop 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Rickard lf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .571 Totals 31 4 9 4 6 6 Minnesota 001 001 000 — 2 5 0 Baltimore 011 110 00x — 4 9 0 1-ran for Dozier in the 9th. LOB: Minnesota 9, Baltimore 10. 2B: E.Escobar (3), Buxton 2 (2), Wieters (1), J.Hardy (1), Schoop (2). HR: Plouffe (1), off Givens; C.Davis (1), off Gibson. RBIs: Mauer (1), Plouffe (1), C.Davis (1), Wieters (2), Schoop (1), Rickard (1). S: Dozier. SF: Mauer, Rickard. RLISP: Minnesota 3 (Mauer 2, Sano); Baltimore 3 (Trumbo, Machado, Schoop). GIDP: Trumbo. DP: Minnesota 1 (E.Escobar, Dozier, Mauer). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gibson L, 0-1 5 7 4 4 5 3 105 7.20 Abad 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Fien 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 10.80 Pressly 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 1-0 5 2 1 1 3 4 89 1.80 2/ Givens 1 0 1 13 13.50 3 2 1 Brach 11/3 0 0 0 2 3 32 0.00 O’Day 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Britton S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 1 3 26 0.00 Inherited runners-scored: Brach 1-0. PB: off Gibson (P.Alvarez). WP: Britton. Umpires: Home, Mark Wegner; First, Marty Foster; Second, Mike Muchlinski; Third, Mike Winters. T: 3:11. A: 12,622 .


CARDINALS

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C5

SERIES PREVIEW • CARDINALS AT ATLANTA SCOUTING REPORT • The Cardinals will be making their inal visit to Turner Field, which is housing the Braves for the inal season before moving to the suburbs in 2017. The last time the Cardinals were here, they closed the 2015 campaign and were blanked in every game after they already had clinched the National League Central Division title. This dropped their career mark at Turner Field to 24-43. One of those starting pitchers who lummoxed them at the end of last season was righthander Matt Wisler, 23. Wisler, who will pitch Friday night, held the Cardinals to two runs in 15 2/3 innings over two starts in 2015, winning both of them. The Braves, who not that long ago won 14 consecutive division titles, have gone from the elite to the rebuilding. They have the lowest payroll in the National League at $69 million, ahead of only Tampa Bay ($57

Spring meetings were a bad sign GORDON • FROM C1

start over from scratch. But that’s not the Cardinal Way. Winning is good business for Bill DeWitt Jr.’s ownership, so you can expect the organization to dig deeper while trying to catch up to the NL Central’s new standard setter. The Cardinals felt this prod last fall, while losing to the Cubs in a lopsided NLDS. They couldn’t help but notice the Cubs opening this season by bludgeoning the Los Angeles Angels 9-0 and 6-1. Meanwhile in Pittsburgh, Jeremy Hazelbaker and Co. lost three times while striking out 37 times. The Cardinals fell 2½ games of the division lead in just four days. Welcome to the new world order! You could see this start coming miles away. The Cubs yukked it up during spring training as manager Joe Maddon added some lawn party elements to their workday. He kept his guys loose amid the soaring expectations and heavy media attention. One day he started off their day with strength coach Tim Buss dressed like a clown. Maddon dressed like a hippie that day, booming some Earth, Wind and Fire music through the speakers of his vintage party van. Another day he had a mime join the team for stretching. Another day a martial arts expert gave a pep talk, then used a sledgehammer to smash a cinder block placed on Maddon’s chest. There were karaoke competitions, dance circles and, ultimately, real life bear cubs coming to camp to frolic with the players and pose for cute pictures. On Maddon’s watch, spring training did not become tedious. The Cubs stayed fresh and their fast start reflected that. Meanwhile in the Cardinals camp, manager Mike Matheny bristled at his team’s sloppy and lethargic play. As Derrick Goold reported for the Post-Dispatch, there were lots and lots and lots of meetings down in Jupiter, with team leaders, individual players and the group as a whole. After all of this angst-filled dialogue, the team looked somewhat better near the end of spring training. But then they opened the real season with a resounding thud. Are the hitters pressing at the plate? Are pitchers aiming on the mound? Maybe it’s time for Matheny to borrow from Maddon and bring in some chainsaw-juggling chimps or unicycle-riding sword swallowers. Poor Carlos Martinez can’t go it alone on the tomfoolery front. Matheny’s immediate challenge is to coax more from his young hitters while cobbling together more ofense to support his pitchers. He knows the drill. He has had good teams since replacing Tony La Russa as manager, but he hasn’t been blessed with a Cubs-like lineup of sluggers. His teams have overachieved the last few years, outperforming their underlying statistics. First the Cardinals hit abnormally well with runners in scoring position (.330 in 2013), then last season they became freakishly successful at stranding runners and preventing runs. What they are facing now, besides debilitating injuries, is the dreaded reversion to mean. Various purveyors of fancy stats posted dire victory projections for this team even before key players started to fall. At some point the Cardinals are going to quit winning more than their talent should allow. So it’s up to DeWitt and general manager John Mozeliak to answer the Cubs’ challenge with a greater personnel commitment. They took a stab at that with their uncharacteristic bid for David Price, offering a franchise-record contract to the free agent hurler. They did that despite possessing ample pitching, even with Lance Lynn shelved for 2016 with Tommy John surgery and John Lackey gone through free agency. Had the Red Sox not been committed to outbidding all ofers, Price likely would have signed here. After missing on Price and failing to retain outfielder Jason Heyward, the Cardinals made a more typical and sensible signing with Mike Leake. Passing on the Justin Upton sweepstakes to give Stephen Piscotty and Randal Grichuk their shot was also a sensible decision, especially with Matt Holliday pulling major coin for one more season. Why pay premium dollars to address a need that might not exist? But once this ofense defines itself for better or worse this season, management must move aggressively to fill whatever holes exist. This franchise has the profits to take on major salary and at least a few pitching prospects (besides untouchable Alex Reyes) teams with surplus hitting would covet. The Cubs will only improve as they mature. While the Cardinals have some good young hitters, Chicago has some great young hitters. The diference is glaring. “Like we said last year, sky is the limit,” Cubs hitting consultant Manny Ramirez told ESPN. “We saw what they could do a little bit last year. I think this year is going to be way better than last year. They have an unbelievable ofense.” So the Cardinals must become more aggressive (as repeatedly promised) in the international market and select more long-range, high-ceiling hitting prospects in the draft, as they did last summer with Nick Plummer and Bryce Denton. The Cardinals backed into some of their playof opportunities since 1996 due to a lack of immediate competition. But those days are gone, thanks to these Not-So-Small Bears, and they won’t come back any time soon. The Cubs will either make the Cardinals better or make them watch a lot celebrations on the North Side of Chicago. The histories of DeWitt and Mozeliak suggest they won’t sit idly by. Jef Gordon • 314-340-8175 @gordoszone on Twitter jgordon@post-dispatch.com

million) in the majors. Despite his winning eight games last year, Wisler still is making the major league minimum of $507,500. First baseman Freddie Freeman ($12.4 million) and outielder Nick Markakis are at $23 million between them, representing one-third of the Braves’ payroll. Jaime Garcia, who will pitch on Friday for the Cardinals, has had only two starts in Turner Field, one a loss and the other a no-decision. Adam Wainwright, who will pitch Sunday for the Cardinals, was a Braves irstround selection in the June draft in 2000. Not to worry: Bud Norris, who tormented the Cardinals early in his career when he pitched for Houston, pitched Wednesday for Atlanta and will not be seen in this series. Rick Hummel

PITCHING MATCHUPS: Friday, 6:35 p.m. LH Jaime Garcia (10-6, 2.43 ERA in 2015) vs. RH Matt Wisler (8-8, 4.71 in 2015). Saturday, 6:10 p.m. RH Carlos Martinez (14-7, 3.01 in 2015) vs. RH Julio Teheran (0-0, 3.00) Sunday, 12:35 p.m. RH Adam Wainwright (0-1, 4.50 in 2016) vs. RH Williams Perez (7-6, 4.78 in 2015).

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Brock to throw out irst pitch Cards legend practicing for toss at home opener BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

ATLANTA • Lou Brock’s throwing

arm wasn’t necessarily the best part of his game during his Hall of Fame career with the Cardinals. Strong, yes. Accurate, not always. But Brock will throw one of the most important pitches of his life on Monday, just before the Cardinals’ home opener when he throws the ceremonial first pitch before a sellout Busch Stadium house while standing on two legs, one of which isn’t entirely his. “I will attempt to throw out the first pitch,” said Brock, chuckling, by telephone from St. Louis. Last October, Brock had to have his left leg amputated several inches below the left knee after contracting a dangerous infection. He was either in the hospital or a rehab center until late January but now he is moving around with the use of a prosthetic device and, often, without the use of a cane, he said. “A little scary at first,” said the 76-year-old Hall of Famer about his ambulatory manner. But, gradually, he said he gained confidence and Monday will be his coming-out party, of a sort. “I’m feeling good,” he said. Good enough, in fact, that when the Cardinals called him this week to ask him to make the ceremonial toss, Brock agreed. Conditionally. “I told them I needed a couple of stunt men to grab me just in case,” joked Brock. For the last few days, Brock has been simulating a toss and trying to achieve it without falling down. He’s got it down, he thinks, although he said he would not be going all the way to the

LAURIE SKRIVAN • Post-dispatch

Hall of Famer Lou Brock had part of his left leg amputated last October.

mound. “I’m going to do it from the ‘girly position,’” Brock quipped.“About 25 to 30 feet.”

IT’S HAPPENED BEFORE The Cardinals have lost their first three games before, most recently in 2007 when, as defending World Series champions, they were outscored 20-2 by the New York Mets. In 2001, they lost their first three games — and Albert Pujols’ first three games — in Colorado, being outscored 32-11. And they also have had three consecutive games of 10 or more strikeouts, doing it twice last year. From May 12-14 at Cleveland, they whifed 40 times, including 19 in a game in which Corey Kluber fanned 18 and gave up just one hit in eight innings. Later, the Cardinals had 36 strikeouts in three consecutive games against the Chicago White Sox and

San Diego, going up against All-Star lefthander Chris Sale in the process. Now, they’re working on 37 in three games, with all games in double-figure whifs. “It’s always alarming when you strike out that much,” said hitting coach John Mabry. “But Pittsburgh has a good staf.” Manager Mike Matheny said that “early in the year, it’s hard to get excited about anything. I think we’ll figure it out and fix it. But right now it’s something that stands out. You’re not putting the ball in play. You’re not putting pressure on the defense.” Randal Grichuk, the cleanup hitter in just his second season, has fanned six times in 10 at-bats and sat out a start on Wednesday. He isn’t the only flailer, though. “There’s some young guys who are going to have to grow,” said Mabry, “and continue to learn and continue to work on things and understand what (teams) are trying to do to them, make the adjustments and then go. “As an offense we need to get our plan together, keep our plan together and keep working.”

OH SO GOOD Korean righthander Seung Hwan Oh has struck out five batters in his first two innings, covering two outings. Matheny said he didn’t plan to use Oh more than one inning very often because his history suggested he hadn’t done much of that. But Oh, through his translator, said that he pitched four consecutive days as a closer in Korea and Japan and there were times when he would appear in seven consecutive games if an of day was sprinkled in on the schedule. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

Cards’ Nos. 4, 5 starters more successful than most CARDINALS • FROM C1

18-14 mark last year. San Francisco’s Jake Peavy and Matt Cain both have been Nos. 1 in their day but, given their sketchy health, they can’t be counted on at that level any more. They were a combined 10-10 for the Giants last year. The National League champion New York Mets have a new/old version for their fourth and fifth starters. Lefthander Steven Matz, 24, was 4-0 last year, and Bartolo Colon, 42, was 14-13 for a combined 18-13. It is diicult to believe, though, that Colon again will be a double-figures win man. Washington, which has a stout top three in Max Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg and Gio Gonzalez, drops off a bit to Joe Ross and Tanner Roark at 4 and 5. That tandem was only 9-12 last year. Because of injuries and Zack Greinke’s defection to Arizona, the Western Division champion Los Angeles Dodgers have Alex Wood and Ross Stripling as their fourth and fifth starters. Wood won a combined 12 games with Atlanta and the Dodgers and Stripling, recovering from Tommy John elbow surgery from the year before, won three in the minors. Arizona’s Rubby De La Rosa and Robbie Ray were 19-21 between them, with De La Rosa winning 14 but losing his staff ace label when Greinke and Shelby Miller showed up. Miami’s Tom Koehler and Jarrod Cozart won a total of 13 games, 11 by Koehler. No other combination of 4s and 5s won a total last season that reached double figures. Among other Central Division teams, Pittsburgh will have a 4-5 of Jeff Locke and Juan Nicasio, who pitched in the third slot against the Cardinals on Wednesday but only because ace Gerrit Cole was set back by a rib injury. Locke and Nicasio accounted for nine wins between them last year, eight by Locke while Nicasio was found in the Los Angeles bullpen, where the Cardinals wish he had stayed this week, given Nicasio’s domination of them on Wednesday. The fourth and fifth starters for Milwaukee and Cincinnati promise to be a fluid situation. Elsewhere, the Philadelphia tandem of Vincent Velasquez and Jerad Eickhof as fourth and fifth starters totaled four big-league wins and Colin Rea and Drew Pomeranz of San Diego had only seven between them last year. The point of this is that the Cardinals will roll over their rotation with

CARDINALS AVERAGES BATTERS AVG OBA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI BB SO SB CS E Garcia .500 .500 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Hazelbaker .400 .400 5 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 Diaz .333 .333 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Molina .273 .385 11 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 Wong .222 .364 9 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 Gyorko .200 .273 10 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 3 0 0 0 Piscotty .182 .308 11 1 2 0 1 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 Moss .125 .222 8 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 Grichuk .100 .100 10 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 Holliday .100 .308 10 0 1 0 0 0 2 3 3 0 0 0 Carpenter .091 .231 11 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 4 0 0 0 Adams .000 .000 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 Pham .000 .000 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Team .168 .263 101 7 17 3 1 2 6 10 37 0 0 4 PITCHERS Bowman Broxton Oh Rosenthal Siegrist Wainwright Lyons Maness Leake Wacha Team

W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

L 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 3

ERA 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.50 5.40 7.71 8.31 8.31 4.78

G 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 3

GS 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 3

SV 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

IP 2.0 1.2 2.0 1.0 1.0 6.0 1.2 2.1 4.1 4.1 26.1

H 1 0 0 0 0 6 1 5 7 10 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 4 5 15

ER HR BB SO 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 3 0 0 2 5 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 3 0 3 3 1 0 2 0 2 0 1 1 4 0 3 1 4 0 1 3 14 0 14 22

very few second thoughts, if any, and not really have to worry about matchups all that much because they have a reliable starter every day. Any kind of ofense and they should be fine. The rest of the rotation consists of Adam Wainwright, Michael Wacha and Mike Leake and, though those three were only average in the first series, pitching coach Derek Lilliquist said his rotation is “pretty good — all five of them.” Referencing Garcia and Martinez, Lilliquist said, “They’re not really fourth and fifth guys. They’re OUR fourth and fifth guys but that has nothing to do with their abilities.” Longtime staf ace Wainwright said he thought Martinez was ready for a “monster” season because the young righthander’s mental grasp of his job had caught up with the physical side. “And we just need to keep Jaime healthy,” said Wainwright. Garcia said, “I don’t really pay attention to a lot of teams. But all I can say is that I’m extremely confident in these guys in what they’re capable of doing and what they’ve done in the past. “The physical ability. The mental ability. There’s no doubt in my mind that we can be as good as anybody or better than anybody out there. “You don’t have to skip the fifth (starter). Or skip the fourth. Here, anybody can go out there and keep us in the ball game and give us a chance to win.” In the last two years at this time, Garcia has been on the disabled list

either after shoulder surgery or thoracic outlet syndrome surgery. Also having had to rebound from elbow surgery earlier in his career, the 29-year-old enjoyed a rare ofseason last year when he could work out normally rather than rehab. This spring, he took his normal turn although he took it a couple of times on a back field in a minor-league outing as he tried to fine-tune his game. He said, actually, he was “feeling too good. I needed to simplify things as far as timing, pitching and mechanics. I was able to catch that right away and I was able to make all the adjustments I wanted to make. I’m ready to go.” The Cardinals are hoping Garcia can make 30 starts rather than the 20 he made last year. Only once in his career, 2011, has he made 30 or more and that year he had 32 in the regular season and five more in the postseason as the lefthander was part of a World Series champion. Before the Cardinals came here, they spent nearly a week in Pittsburgh although Garcia got to miss two nights of that as he pitched in a minor-league game in Jupiter and then didn’t fly in until Saturday night. Still, there was plenty of down time for everybody as the Cardinals played only three games in that span, had two workout days and one complete day of. Garcia said he filled part of his time by reading — either sports psychology tomes or the Bible. Finally, on Friday, he will take the mound in a game that counts for the first time since last year’s division series when he was ill and lasted just two innings, making a key fielding mistake in the process against the Chicago Cubs. Given the many ebbs and flows of Garcia’s career, it might seem that he constantly has to try to prove himself although he says he doesn’t see it that way. “Every game is like my last,” he said. “And I try to compete with what I have. Without looking ahead and without looking behind. “At the same time, I’m never content where I am. I’m always striving for better.” But, though he hasn’t pitched as often in April, he will have to go some to better his production in April, which has been his best month historically. Garcia is 10-3 with a 2.17 career earned-run average in the first month of the season. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Ott remains optimistic he can play Was close to return but now has colitis BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO • Blues forward Steve Ott voiced some optimism via Twitter Thursday about returning to the lineup, one day after the club announced that he has been diagnosed with colitis, an inflammation of the lining of the colon. “Thanks for all the good vibes!” Ott tweeted Thursday. “Hamstring is feeling great, hope to be back on the ice soon so I can be a pain in the (rear end)!” Ott, 33, was on the verge of returning to the lineup after sitting out the past four months with a hamstring injury that required surgery. His latest setback will sideline him at least two weeks, at which point he’ll be re-evaluated. “It’s tough,” Reaves said. “For the last four or five months, he’s worked really hard to get back, itching to help out the boys and be part of the team again. When you see a guy work that hard and then all of the sudden he gets hit with news like that, that is going to keep him out another two weeks before he can even be reevaluated, it’s tough.”

BOUWMEESTER BACK Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester was back in the lineup Thursday, after missing six games with a suspected concussion. He had said earlier in the day that he was ready to play, but needed clearance. “It’s not something you can really push or anything like that,” Bouwmeester said before the game. “I’ve been working pretty hard and trying to test things out. I’ve been going pretty good.” Rookie forward Robby Fabbri, meanwhile, did not return Thursday, sitting out his fourth straight game with a lower-body injury. They were not the only players who were questionable. “Some guys that we thought maybe were in yesterday might not be in today,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. Defensemen Alex Pietrangelo and Carl Gunnarsson, along with forward Scottie Upshall, did not participate in Thursday’s morning skate, but they were in the lineup. The healthy scratches were defensemen Robert Bortuzzo and Petteri Lindbohm.

NILSSON NO. 1? When the severity of Brian Elliott’s wrist injury suffered in Wednesday’s practice still was unknown, Anders Nilsson nearly went from being the Blues’ No. 3 goalie behind Elliott and Jake Allen to their No. 1. “I’ve seen that before with the Islanders,” said Nilsson, who was a third-round pick in New York in 2009 and played two seasons with the Isles. “They played I don’t know how many goalies my first year there. At one point, there were three main goalies injured at the same time. It’s unfortunate when someone gets injured, but that’s how it is in this business.” Fortunately for the Blues, Elliott’s wrist turned out to be fine, and he was able to start Thursday’s game, and Nilsson remained the backup. He has made two appearances with the Blues, his most recent coming in Colorado last Sunday, when he stopped 19 of 20 shots after not playing for three weeks. “The things that were maybe elements of his game that had deteriorated just over time, they got back and you could see it in his game,” Hitchcock said. “You could see how structurally sound he was and how compact he was, how positionally sound he was. It was real good to see.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

The Blues’ Ryan Reaves (left) and the Blackhawks’ Brandon Mashinter ight in the second period at the United Center in Chicago on Thursday.

Tarasenko scores late goal, then again in OT BLUES • FROM C1

Tarasenko. He had the easy tap in and the Blues had an improbable win. The two-goal rally ofset what appeared would be a Chicago win on a goal by Jonathan Toews in the second period. Toews scored Chicago’s goal four on four after the Blues failed on back-to-back secondperiod power plays, in which their unit combined for just one shot on goal. The Blackhawks’ Richard Panik went to the penalty box for hooking just 4:55 into the frame, and over the next two minutes, the Blues only managed a 50-foot slap shot by defenseman Colton Parayko that was turned aside. But less than 30 seconds after Panik came back onto the ice, Chicago’s Viktor Svedberg followed his trail to the box, also whistled for hooking. This time, they had no shots on goal. When the game returned to full strength, the Blues made a

Blues Chicago

0 0

0 1

1 0

1 0

— —

First period None. Penalties: Jaskin, StL (tripping), 17:55. Second period C: Toews 28 (Kane, van Riemsdyk), 12:40. Penalties: Panik, Chi (hooking), 4:55; Svedberg, Chi (hooking), 7:24; Tarasenko, StL (hooking), 12:13; Panik, Chi (embellishment), 12:13; Upshall, StL, misconduct, 15:34; Reaves, StL, major (fighting), 15:34; Mashinter, Chi, major (fighting), 15:34; Berglund, StL (hooking), 18:09. Third period B: Tarasenko 38 (Shattenkirk, Steen), 18:44. Penalties: None. Overtime B: Tarasenko 39 (Pietrangelo, Stastny), 3:37. Penalties: None. Missed Penalty Shot: Ladd, Chi, 15:02 third. Shots on goal Blues 7 12 10 6 Chicago 9 7 6 3 Power-plays Blues 0 of 2; Chicago 0 of 2. Goaltenders Blues, Elliott 23-7-6 (25 shots-24 saves). Chicago, Darling 12-8-4 (35-33). A: 22,075. Referees: Chris Rooney, Frederick L’Ecuyer. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Trent Knorr.

2 1

35 25

change to their forward combinations, moving Jaden Schwartz up with Stastny and Troy Brouwer and dropping Magnus Paajarvi down with Patrik Berglund and Dmitrij Jaskin. The Blues, though, couldn’t manufacture any offense playing five on five, and with coin-

cidental penalties on Tarasenko (hooking) and Panik (embellishment), the teams went to four on four with 7:47 left in the period. The Blues sent out Berglund, Paajarvi, Jay Bouwmeester and Shattenkirk, while the Hawks put Toews, Patrick Kane, Trevor van Riemsdyk and Brent Seabrook. Berglund won the ensuing faceof against Toews, but Toews would get the best of Berglund by the end of the shift. Chicago reset the play with van Riemsdyk holding the puck behind his own net. He came out the left side and sent a saucer to Toews, who carried the puck into the zone with little pressure from Berglund. Toews sent the puck across the ice to Kane, who sized up the situation. He then spotted Toews skating to the net, leaving Berglund long behind, and hit him with a return pass. Toews took advantage, burying a 20-foot wrist shot through the legs of Elliott.

That goal ended a stalemate that was nearly 33 minutes old. The Blackhawks had the best of the chances in a scoreless first period. With the benefit of the game’s only power play to that point, they outshot the Blues 9-7 in the period and nearly came away with the lead on a shot by Teuvo Teravainen on the man-advantage. But making his presence felt in his first game back in the lineup, Bouwmeester got in front of Teravainen’s attempt, deflecting it out of play. Chicago got its goal in the second period and the Blues answered with their late in the third and then in OT — both from Tarasenko. The Blackhawks’ loss was their 11 straight against Western Conference playoff teams, including Thursday night’s loss to the Blues and a 3-2 shootout loss to the Blues on March 9. Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

FROZEN FOUR

Goalie helps Quinnipiac advance Bobcats will play for irst national title ASSOCIATED PRESS

TAMPA, FLA. • Quinnipiac goalie

Michael Garteig raised his arms in triumph and bounced on his skates in front of the Bobcats’ net. The 3-2 victory over Boston College on Thursday night sent the tiny school located in Hamden, Conn., to the NCAA hockey title game for the second time in four years. And it

took every one of Garteig’s 34 saves for the Bobcats to advance. “Garzie is a winner. All year long he has been going up head to head with the top goalies in the country, and he finds a way to win,” Quinnipiac coach Rand Pecknold said. “That’s what he does.” Kevin McKernan and Andrew Taverner scored in the opening period and Landon Smith added a power-play goal that made it 3-1 in the second period, setting the stage for Garteig to shine when the Bobcats needed him. Ryan Fitzgerald’s power-play goal

trimmed Boston College’s deficit to 3-2 with 4:16 remaining. Garteig had four more saves, including a glove deflection on Ian McCoshen’s shot from the high slot in the closing seconds. “He made a terrific save,” said coach Jerry York of Boston College (28-8-5) “It ended our season “ Quinnipiac (32-3-7) will try to win its first national championship Saturday night, facing North Dakota (33-6-4). The Fighting Hawks defeated Denver 4-2 in the other semifinal Thursday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quinnipiac goalie Michael Garteig makes one of his 34 saves in a 3-2 victory over Boston College.


HOCKEY

C6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Ott remains optimistic he can play Was close to return but now has colitis BY JEREMY RUTHERFORD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CHICAGO • Blues forward Steve Ott voiced some optimism via Twitter Thursday about returning to the lineup, one day after the club announced that he has been diagnosed with colitis, an inflammation of the lining of the colon. “Thanks for all the good vibes!” Ott tweeted Thursday. “Hamstring is feeling great, hope to be back on the ice soon so I can be a pain in the (rear end)!” Ott, 33, was on the verge of returning to the lineup after sitting out the past four months with a hamstring injury that required surgery. His latest setback will sideline him at least two weeks, at which point he’ll be re-evaluated. “It’s tough,” Reaves said. “For the last four or five months, he’s worked really hard to get back, itching to help out the boys and be part of the team again. When you see a guy work that hard and then all of the sudden he gets hit with news like that, that is going to keep him out another two weeks before he can even be reevaluated, it’s tough.”

BOUWMEESTER BACK Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester was back in the lineup Thursday, after missing six games with a suspected concussion. He had said earlier in the day that he was ready to play, but needed clearance. “It’s not something you can really push or anything like that,” Bouwmeester said before the game. “I’ve been working pretty hard and trying to test things out. I’ve been going pretty good.” Rookie forward Robby Fabbri, meanwhile, did not return Thursday, sitting out his fourth straight game with a lower-body injury. They were not the only players who were questionable. “Some guys that we thought maybe were in yesterday might not be in today,” Blues coach Ken Hitchcock said. Defensemen Alex Pietrangelo and Carl Gunnarsson, along with forward Scottie Upshall, did not participate in Thursday’s morning skate, but they were in the lineup. The healthy scratches were defensemen Robert Bortuzzo and Petteri Lindbohm.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE

The Blues’ Ryan Reaves (left) and the Blackhawks’ Brandon Mashinter ight in the second period at the United Center in Chicago on Thursday.

NILSSON NO. 1? When the severity of Brian Elliott’s wrist injury suffered in Wednesday’s practice still was unknown, Anders Nilsson nearly went from being the Blues’ No. 3 goalie behind Elliott and Jake Allen to their No. 1. “I’ve seen that before with the Islanders,” said Nilsson, who was a third-round pick in New York in 2009 and played two seasons with the Isles. “They played I don’t know how many goalies my first year there. At one point, there were three main goalies injured at the same time. It’s unfortunate when someone gets injured, but that’s how it is in this business.” Fortunately for the Blues, Elliott’s wrist turned out to be fine, and he was able to start Thursday’s game, and Nilsson remained the backup. He has made two appearances with the Blues, his most recent coming in Colorado last Sunday, when he stopped 19 of 20 shots after not playing for three weeks. “The things that were maybe elements of his game that had deteriorated just over time, they got back and you could see it in his game,” Hitchcock said. “You could see how structurally sound he was and how compact he was, how positionally sound he was. It was real good to see.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

Tarasenko scores late goal, then again in OT BLUES • FROM C1

being shut out for the sixth time this season, after managing 15 goals in their last three games. That’s when Tarasenko, with Elliott on the bench, scored his 38th of the season, setting a new career high. Kevin Shattenkirk put a blast on net and the rebound off goalie Scott Darling went directly to Tarasenko, who tied the game 1-1. Then in overtime, Tarasenko finished off a superb passing sequence to finish of Chicago. Paul Stastny brought possession into the zone, dropped a pass for Pietrangelo, who left it for Tarasenko. “I was thinking about changing, but Paul gave me that look like he was going to hit me,” Pietrangelo said. “When 91 is calling for it, you give it to him.” Tarasenko had the easy tap in and the Blues had an improbable win. “I was calling for it and thanks for ‘Petro’ to give it to me,” he said. “It was good plays on my two goals by my linemates and teammates.” Elliott made three saves in overtime, including a breakaway on Patrick Kane. He finished

Blues Chicago

0 0

0 1

1 0

1 0

— —

First period None. Penalties: Jaskin, StL (tripping), 17:55. Second period C: Toews 28 (Kane, van Riemsdyk), 12:40. Penalties: Panik, Chi (hooking), 4:55; Svedberg, Chi (hooking), 7:24; Tarasenko, StL (hooking), 12:13; Panik, Chi (embellishment), 12:13; Upshall, StL, misconduct, 15:34; Reaves, StL, major (fighting), 15:34; Mashinter, Chi, major (fighting), 15:34; Berglund, StL (hooking), 18:09. Third period B: Tarasenko 38 (Shattenkirk, Steen), 18:44. Penalties: None. Overtime B: Tarasenko 39 (Pietrangelo, Stastny), 3:37. Penalties: None. Missed Penalty Shot: Ladd, Chi, 15:02 third. Shots on goal Blues 7 12 10 6 Chicago 9 7 6 3 Power-plays Blues 0 of 2; Chicago 0 of 2. Goaltenders Blues, Elliott 23-7-6 (25 shots-24 saves). Chicago, Darling 12-8-4 (35-33). A: 22,075. Referees: Chris Rooney, Frederick L’Ecuyer. Linesmen: Greg Devorski, Trent Knorr.

2 1

35 25

with 24 to win his 11th straight decision, including seven on the road. “We had a tough time generating stuf, but they did a good job, you’ve got to tip your hat to them,” Elliott said. “But we stuck with it and whenever you do that, you always give yourselves a chance.” The two-goal rally ofset what appeared would be a Chicago win on a goal by Jonathan Toews in the second period.

Toews scored Chicago’s goal four on four after the Blues failed on back-to-back secondperiod power plays, in which their unit combined for just one shot on goal. When the game returned to full strength, the Blues made a change to their forward combinations, moving Jaden Schwartz up with Stastny and Troy Brouwer and dropping Magnus Paajarvi down with Patrik Berglund and Dmitrij Jaskin. The Blues, though, couldn’t manufacture any offense playing five on five, and with coincidental penalties on Tarasenko (hooking) and Richard Panik (embellishment), the teams went to four on four with 7:47 left in the period. The Blues sent out Berglund, Paajarvi, Jay Bouwmeester and Shattenkirk, while the Hawks put out Toews, Kane, Trevor van Riemsdyk and Brent Seabrook. Berglund won the ensuing faceof against Toews, but Toews would get the best of Berglund by the end of the shift. Chicago reset the play with van Riemsdyk holding the puck behind his own net. He came out the left side and sent a saucer to Toews, who carried the

puck into the zone with little pressure from Berglund. Toews sent the puck across the ice to Kane, who sized up the situation. He then spotted Toews skating to the net, leaving Berglund long behind, and hit him with a return pass. Toews took advantage, burying a 20-foot wrist shot through the legs of Elliott. That goal ended a stalemate that was nearly 33 minutes old. Chicago had its goal and the Blues answered with their two, late in the third and then in OT — both from Tarasenko. His first was his 11th of the year tying the score, and his second was his 16th giving the Blues a lead, meaning 27 of his 39 have happened in that fashion. The Blues now possess homeice advantage and a chance to win the division, but in Tarasenko’s mind they should be dreaming about much more. “I think we need to think more about winning the Stanley Cup,” he said. “We just need to win every game. So just go and do what you can do.” Jeremy Rutherford @jprutherford on Twitter jrutherford@post-dispatch.com

FROZEN FOUR

Goalie helps Quinnipiac advance Bobcats seek irst title, against North Dakota ASSOCIATED PRESS

TAMPA, FLA. • Quinnipiac goalie

Michael Garteig raised his arms in triumph and bounced on his skates in front of the Bobcats’ net. The 3-2 victory over Boston College on Thursday night sent the tiny school located in Hamden, Conn., to the NCAA hockey title game for the second time in four years. And it

took every one of Garteig’s 34 saves for the Bobcats to advance. “Garzie is a winner. All year long he has been going up head to head with the top goalies in the country, and he finds a way to win,” Quinnipiac coach Rand Pecknold said. “That’s what he does.” Kevin McKernan and Andrew Taverner scored in the opening period and Landon Smith added a power-play goal that made it 3-1 in the second period, setting the stage for Garteig to shine when the Bobcats needed him. Ryan Fitzgerald’s power-play goal

trimmed Boston College’s deficit to 3-2 with 4:16 remaining. Garteig had four more saves, including a glove deflection on Ian McCoshen’s shot from the high slot in the closing seconds. “He made a terrific save,” said coach Jerry York of Boston College (28-8-5) “It ended our season “ Quinnipiac (32-3-7) will try to win its first national championship Saturday night, facing North Dakota (33-6-4). The Fighting Hawks defeated Denver 4-2 in the other semifinal Thursday night.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quinnipiac goalie Michael Garteig makes one of his 34 saves in a 3-2 victory over Boston College.


SPORTS

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

Stars roll to victory over Avs

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L y-Toronto 52 26 x-Boston 46 32 New York 31 48 Brooklyn 21 57 Philadelphia 10 68 Southeast W L x-Atlanta 47 32 x-Miami 46 32 x-Charlotte 45 33 Washington 38 40 Orlando 33 45 Central W L y-Cleveland 56 23 Indiana 42 36 Detroit 42 37 Chicago 39 40 Milwaukee 32 46

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Avalanche goalie Calvin Pickard makes a glove save on a shot by the Stars on Thursday in Dallas.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NHL STANDINGS

Jason Dickinson scored in his first NHL game, and the host Dallas Stars beat the Colorado Avalanche 4-2 on Thursday night to move closer to the Central Division and Western Conference titles. With one game remaining for each team, the Stars and the Blues are tied with 107 points, but Dallas holds the tiebreaker. Dallas hosts Nashville and the Blues host Washington, both on Saturday night. Dickinson was recalled from Texas of the AHL earlier Thursday because of injuries to Stars forwards, including 30-goal scorers Tyler Seguin and Jason Spezza. The game was scoreless until Dickinson backhanded a shot past Calvin Pickard from short range at 15:13 of the first period.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W y-Florida 81 46 x-Tampa Bay 81 46 Detroit 81 41 Boston 81 42 Ottawa 81 37 Montreal 81 37 Bufalo 80 34 Toronto 81 29 Metropolitan GP W z-Washington 80 55 x-Pittsburgh 81 48 x-NY Islanders 80 45 x-NY Rangers 81 45 Philadelphia 80 39 Carolina 81 35 New Jersey 81 37 Columbus 80 32

NOTEBOOK Demers in hospital • Former Montreal Canadiens and Blues coach Jacques Demers was in a Montreal hospital Thursday, a day after having a stroke. The 71-year-old Demers is now a Canadian senator. Claude Carignan, the Conservative leader in the senate, said he spoke with an assistant to Demers and was told he was conscious Thursday morning. Demers, who coached the Canadiens to the 1993 Stanley Cup title, is a patient of the team’s current doctor, David Mulder. Demers also coached Quebec, Detroit, St. Louis and Tampa Bay in the NHL. Other news • Struggling Tampa Bay recalled forward Jonathan Drouin from the American Hockey League before Thursday’s game. ... The Oilers signed defenseman Caleb Jones to a three-year entry level contract Thursday.

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 26 9 101 234 201 24-11-5 22-15-4 20-9-1 30 5 97 225 196 25-13-3 21-17-2 15-11-3 29 11 93 209 221 22-13-6 19-16-5 17-10-3 30 9 93 239 224 17-17-6 25-13-3 18-9-2 35 9 83 230 246 21-14-6 16-21-3 15-12-2 38 6 80 216 234 21-16-3 16-22-3 17-11-1 35 11 79 196 215 16-18-6 18-17-5 11-14-5 41 11 69 197 241 14-18-9 15-23-2 5-18-7 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 8 118 247 190 29-7-4 26-10-4 20-5-5 25 8 104 244 200 26-11-4 22-14-4 19-8-2 26 9 99 227 207 25-10-4 20-16-5 18-7-4 27 9 99 233 215 26-10-4 19-17-5 14-11-5 27 14 92 206 215 22-10-8 17-17-6 12-10-6 30 16 86 196 221 19-15-7 16-15-9 13-10-7 36 8 82 179 207 18-17-5 19-19-3 11-16-3 40 8 72 210 247 17-17-6 15-23-2 11-16-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L x-Dallas 81 49 23 x-Blues 81 49 23 x-Chicago 81 47 26 x-Nashville 81 41 26 x-Minnesota 81 38 32 Colorado 81 39 38 Winnipeg 80 33 39 Paciic GP W L x-Anaheim 79 44 24 x-Los Angeles80 47 28 x-San Jose 80 45 29 Arizona 81 35 38 Calgary 80 33 40 Vancouver 80 30 37 Edmonton 81 31 43

OT 9 9 8 14 11 4 8 OT 11 5 6 8 7 13 7

Pts 107 107 102 96 87 82 74 Pts 99 99 96 78 73 73 69

GF 264 223 231 226 215 213 206 GF 210 220 236 209 222 184 200

GA Home Away 228 27-11-2 22-12-7 196 24-12-4 25-11-5 204 26-11-4 21-15-4 212 23-11-7 18-15-7 204 21-15-4 17-17-7 235 17-19-4 22-19-0 232 18-19-4 15-20-4 GA Home Away 187 25-10-6 19-14-5 190 25-12-2 22-16-3 205 17-19-3 28-10-3 244 22-15-4 13-23-4 256 20-16-4 13-24-3 233 14-21-5 16-16-8 241 19-20-2 12-23-5

Div 18-7-3 19-7-3 13-12-4 12-13-3 14-10-5 13-13-2 11-16-2 Div 19-5-4 17-11-0 15-9-3 16-9-3 9-15-4 12-12-3 9-15-4

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Thursday Blues 2, Chicago 1, OT Boston 5, Detroit 2 Tampa Bay 4, New Jersey 2 NY Islanders 4, NY Rangers 1 Toronto 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Pittsburgh 4, Washington 3, OT Montreal 4, Carolina 2 Ottawa 3, Florida 1 Nashville 3, Arizona 2, OT Dallas 4, Colorado 2 Vancouver at Calgary, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late Winnipeg at San Jose, late

Wednesday Columbus 5, Toronto 1 Edmonton 6, Vancouver 2 Detroit 3, Philadelphia 0 Friday Columbus at Buffalo, 6 p.m.

Saturday Ottawa at Boston, 11:30 a.m. Detroit at NY Rangers, 11:30 a.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Anaheim at Colorado, 4:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Montreal, 6 p.m. Carolina at Florida, 6 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 6 p.m. Calgary at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Buffalo at NY Islanders, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Blues, 7 p.m. Nashville at Dallas, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Arizona at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L y-San Antonio 65 12 Memphis 42 36 Dallas 40 38 Houston 38 41 New Orleans 29 49 Northwest W L y-Oklahoma City 54 25 x-Portland 43 37 Utah 39 39 Denver 32 47 Minnesota 26 52 Paciic W L y-Golden State 69 9 x-LA Clippers 50 28 Sacramento 31 47 Phoenix 21 58 LA Lakers 16 62 x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division

Pct .667 .590 .392 .269 .128 Pct .595 .590 .577 .487 .423 Pct .709 .538 .532 .494 .410

Pct .844 .538 .513 .481 .372 Pct .684 .538 .500 .405 .333 Pct .885 .641 .397 .266 .205

GB — 6 21½ 31 42 GB — ½ 1½ 8½ 13½ GB — 13½ 14 17 23½

GB — 23½ 25½ 28 36½ GB — 11½ 14½ 22 27½ GB — 19 38 48½ 53

Thursday Phoenix 124, Houston 115 Miami 106, Chicago 98 Atlanta 95, Toronto 87 Minnesota at Sacramento, late San Antonio at Golden State, late Wednesday Indiana 123, Cleveland 109 Detroit 108, Orlando 104 Washington 121, Brooklyn 103 Boston 104, New Orleans 97 Charlotte 111, New York 97 Dallas 88, Houston 86 Portland 120, Oklahoma City 115 LA Clippers 91, LA Lakers 81

Lightning 4, Devils 2

Canadiens 4, Hurricanes 2

Stars 4, Avalanche 2

Tampa Bay 1 1 2 — 4 New Jersey 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Condra 6 (Sustr, Boyle), 5:45. Penalties: Sustr, TB (hooking), :37; New Jersey bench, served by Blandisi (too many men), 3:10; Blunden, TB, minor-major (roughing, fighting), 10:16; Farnham, NJ, major (fighting), 10:16; Blandisi, NJ (roughing), 10:16. Second period: 2, New Jersey, Kalinin 7 (Moore, Gionta), 7:16. 3, Tampa Bay, Paquette 6 (Filppula, Carle), 14:45. Penalties: Blandisi, NJ (roughing), 3:58. Third period: 4, Tampa Bay, Drouin 3 (Namestnikov), 3:50. 5, New Jersey, Kalinin 8 (Farnham, Gionta), 9:26. 6, Tampa Bay, Filppula 8 (Kucherov, Carle), 19:13 (en). Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (roughing), 14:07; Blandisi, NJ (roughing), 14:07. Shots: Tampa Bay 10-7-5: 22. New Jersey 3-11-8: 22. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 2; New Jersey 0 of 1. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Bishop 35-21-4 (22 shots-20 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 9-9-1 (21-18). A: 15,536. Referees: Marc Joannette, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Derek Amell, David Brisebois.

Montreal 1 2 1 — 4 Carolina 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Carolina, Nash 9 (Skinner, Rask), 1:34. 2, Montreal, Dietz 1 (Pacioretty, Gallagher), 19:50. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Carolina, Hanifin 4 (Staal, Nordstrom), 5:11. 4, Montreal, Pacioretty 28 (Markov), 13:12. 5, Montreal, Carr 6 (Plekanec), 16:51. Penalties: None. Third period: 6, Montreal, Eller 13 (Dietz, Plekanec), 15:59. Penalties: Markov, Mon (high-sticking), 16:12. Shots: Montreal 9-14-8: 31. Carolina 8-10-10: 28. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 0; Carolina 0 of 1. Goalies: Montreal, Lindgren 1-0-0 (28 shots-26 saves). Carolina, Ward 23-17-10 (31-27). A: 15,120. Referees: Francois St. Laurent, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Tony Sericolo.

Colorado 0 0 2 — Dallas 1 2 1 — First period: 1, Dallas, Dickinson 1 (Nichushkin), 15:13. Penalties: Barrie, Col (cross-checking), 3:26; Hemsky, Dal (tripping), 15:27. Second period: 2, Dallas, Sceviour 11 (Sharp, Klingberg), 3:43 (pp). 3, Dallas, Jo.Benn 3 (Hemsky, Faksa), 8:05 (pp). Penalties: Johnson, Col, served by Skille, major-game misconduct (boarding), 3:07; Grigorenko, Col (hooking), 7:03; Sharp, Dal (goaltender interference), 19:27. Third period: 4, Colorado, Beauchemin 8 (Landeskog, Mitchell), 10:54. 5, Dallas, Roussel 13 (Hemsky, Faksa), 16:54 (en). 6, Colorado, Matthias 12 (Iginla, Mitchell), 19:00. Penalties: Klingberg, Dal (tripping), 1:43; Zadorov, Col (tripping), 6:31; Johns, Dal (high-sticking), 8:52. Shots: Colorado 4-3-12: 19. Dallas 15-11-5: 31. Power-plays: Colorado 0 of 4; Dallas 2 of 5. Goalies: Colorado, Pickard 7-6-1 (30 shots-27 saves). Dallas, Lehtonen 25-10-2 (19-17). A: 18,532. Referees: Justin St. Pierre, Steve Kozari. Linesmen: Vaughan Rody, Mark Wheler.

Senators 3, Panthers 1 Florida 0 0 1 — Ottawa 1 1 1 — First period: 1, Ottawa, Zibanejad 20 (C.Wideman, Karlsson), 18:20 (pp). Penalties: Hudler, Fla (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:03; C.Wideman, Ott (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:03; Grimaldi, Fla (hooking), 12:40; Ekblad, Fla (high-sticking), 17:07. Second period: 2, Ottawa, Robinson 1 (Ceci, Neil), 10:12. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Florida, Jagr 27 (Barkov, Petrovic), 4:49. 4, Ottawa, Ceci 10, 14:14. Penalties: Z.Smith, Ott (roughing), 7:39. Shots: Florida 9-6-19: 34. Ottawa 9-9-5: 23. Power-plays: Florida 0 of 1; Ottawa 1 of 2. Goalies: Florida, Montoya 12-7-3 (23 shots-20 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 31-23-5 (34-33). A: 19,165. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Matt MacPherson.

1 3

Bruins 5, Red Wings 2 Detroit 0 1 1 — 2 Boston 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, Boston, Pastrnak 14 (Liles, C.Miller), 1:25. 2, Boston, Marchand 37 (Krug, Bergeron), 2:44. Penalties: McQuaid, Bos (interference), 5:20; DeKeyser, Det (holding), 11:39; McQuaid, Bos (delay of game), 14:06; Sheahan, Det (hooking), 17:37. Second period: 3, Boston, Krug 4 (Eriksson, Krejci), 5:02 (pp). 4, Detroit, Marchenko 2 (Zetterberg, Nyquist), 6:59. Penalties: Beleskey, Bos (crosschecking), 1:37; Ericsson, Det (holding), 4:16. Third period: 5, Boston, Stempniak 19 (Krug, Marchand), :20. 6, Boston, Eriksson 30 (Krejci, Spooner), :45. 7, Detroit, Athanasiou 9 (Marchenko, Quincey), 18:37. Penalties: Krug, Bos (holding), 2:42; Zetterberg, Det (slashing), 4:57. Shots: Detroit 8-5-2: 15. Boston 11-12-11: 34. Power-plays: Detroit 0 of 4; Boston 1 of 4. Goalies: Detroit, Howard 14-13-5 (26 shots-21 saves), Mrazek (0:45 third, 8-8). Boston, Rask 31-22-8 (15-13). A: 17,565. Referees: Chris Lee, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Steve Miller.

Maple Leafs 4, Flyers 3

Islanders 4, Rangers 1

Toronto 2 1 0 1 — 4 Philadelphia 0 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Nylander 6 (Marincin, Greening), 5:28. 2, Toronto, Greening 7 (Nylander, Lindberg), 15:03. Penalties: S.Carrick, Tor (interference), 16:44. Second period: 3, Philadelphia, Schenn 26 (Couturier, Gagner), :29. 4, Toronto, Grabner 9, 9:17. Penalties: Lindberg, Tor, double minor (high-sticking), 1:26; Voracek, Phi (hooking), 12:04; Marincin, Tor (high-sticking), 18:34. Third period: 5, Philadelphia, MacDonald 1 (Bellemare, VandeVelde), 8:33. 6, Philadelphia, Simmonds 30 (Streit, Gostisbehere), 19:02. Penalties: None. Overtime: 7, Toronto, Gardiner 7 (Parenteau, Nylander), 2:51 (pp). Penalties: MacDonald, Phi (tripping), 1:35. Shots: Toronto 11-5-8-2: 26. Philadelphia 11-15-18-0: 44. Power-plays: Toronto 1 of 2; Philadelphia 0 of 4. Goalies: Toronto, Bernier 12-21-3 (44 shots-41 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 22-19-10 (26-22). A: 19,674. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Mark Shewchyk, Tim Nowak.

NY Islanders 0 3 1 — 4 NY Rangers 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Skjei, NYR (tripping), 13:12; Kulemin, NYI (interference), 16:47. Second period: 1, NY Islanders, Prince 6 (Zidlicky, Bernier), 13:28. 2, NY Islanders, Cizikas 8 (Prince, Nelson), 18:38. 3, NY Islanders, Nielsen 20 (Tavares, Okposo), 19:45 (pp). Penalties: Bernier, NYI (hooking), 7:54; McIlrath, NYR (tripping), 10:45; Yandle, NYR (tripping), 18:55. Third period: 4, NY Rangers, Klein 9 (Stepan, Yandle), 17:12. 5, NY Islanders, Tavares 32 (Okposo), 19:28 (en). Penalties: Tavares, NYI (interference), 6:43; de Haan, NYI (interference), 9:21; Boychuk, NYI (slashing), 14:27; Nash, NYR (roughing), 14:27. Shots: NY Islanders 7-9-7: 23. NY Rangers 12-16-9: 37. Power-plays: NY Islanders 1 of 3; NY Rangers 0 of 4. Goalies: NY Islanders, Greiss 23-11-4 (37 shots-36 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 35-21-7 (16-13), Raanta (0:00 third, 6-6). A: 18,006. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Brad Kovachik.

Penguins 4, Capitals 3

Predators 3, Coyotes 2 (OT)

Pittsburgh 1 2 0 1 — 4 Washington 0 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Cullen 15 (Kuhnhackl), :44. Penalties: Cole, Pit (delay of game), 3:41; Letang, Pit (slashing), 19:02. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Cullen 16, :28 (sh). 3, Pittsburgh, Sheary 7 (Sundqvist, Sestito), 9:03. 4, Washington, Johansson 16 (J.Carlson, Burakovsky), 17:19. Penalties: T.Wilson, Was, major (boarding), 2:27; Cole, Pit (holding stick), 11:10; Williams, Was (tripping), 13:27; Daley, Pit (holding), 13:52; Letang, Pit (cross-checking), 18:00; Ovechkin, Was (embellishment), 18:00. Third period: 5, Washington, Johansson 17 (Niskanen, Kuznetsov), 10:05. 6, Washington, Burakovsky 17 (J.Carlson, Williams), 13:26. Penalties: Winnik, Was (high-sticking), 3:14; Niskanen, Was (cross-checking), 5:49. Overtime: 7, Pittsburgh, Crosby 36 (Letang), 4:00. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 7-9-16-3: 35. Washington 8-11-9-2: 30. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 4; Washington 0 of 4. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 9-2-1 (30 shots-27 saves). Washington, Holtby 47-9-7 (35-31). A: 18,506. Referees: Dave Jackson, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Derek Nansen, Brian Murphy.

Arizona 1 1 0 0 — Nashville 0 0 2 1 — First period: 1, Arizona, Vermette 17 (Michalek, Ekman-Larsson), 6:26. Penalties: Connauton, Ari (holding), 11:30; Johansen, Nas (slashing), 11:30; Chipchura, Ari (hooking), 16:03. Second period: 2, Arizona, Doan 28 (Richardson, Ekman-Larsson), 9:42. Penalties: Jarnkrok, Nas (interference), 5:35; Ekman-Larsson, Ari (interference), 6:00; Connauton, Ari (interference), 10:17; Forsberg, Nas (hooking), 12:33. Third period: 3, Nashville, Weber 20 (C.Smith, Forsberg), 7:26 (pp). 4, Nashville, Forsberg 33 (Josi, Johansen), 19:41. Penalties: C.Murphy, Ari (elbowing), 7:13; M.Smith, Ari, served by Duclair (delay of game), 9:48. Overtime: 5, Nashville, Josi 14 (Neal, Johansen), :20. Penalties: None. Shots: Arizona 4-7-7-0: 18. Nashville 8-10-12-1: 31. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 2; Nashville 1 of 5. Goalies: Arizona, M.Smith 15-12-2 (31 shots-28 saves). Nashville, Rinne 34-21-10 (18-16). A: 17,113. Referees: TJ Luxmore, Jean Hebert. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Darren Gibbs.

2 3

2 4

Str W-4 W-1 W-5 L-2 L-2 Str L-1 W-2 L-1 L-3 W-1 Str L-1 W-3 L-1 W-1 L-3

Home 30-9 26-12 18-22 14-25 7-32 Home 26-14 27-13 28-11 20-19 21-18 Home 32-7 24-15 25-14 24-15 23-17

Away 22-17 20-20 13-26 7-32 3-36 Away 21-18 19-19 17-22 18-21 12-27 Away 24-16 18-21 17-23 15-25 9-29

Conf 35-13 29-19 20-29 12-36 3-45 Conf 28-21 29-19 30-18 27-21 19-29 Conf 34-15 27-21 27-22 23-27 20-28

Away 26-12 16-22 18-21 17-23 9-31 Away 23-16 16-25 15-24 15-25 13-26 Away 32-7 23-16 14-25 8-32 5-33

Conf 41-6 25-23 25-23 25-24 19-30 Conf 36-13 28-22 23-25 17-32 15-33 Conf 42-6 28-20 17-31 15-34 7-41

Home 39-0 26-14 22-17 21-18 20-18 Home 31-9 27-12 24-15 17-22 13-26 Home 37-2 27-12 17-22 13-26 11-29

Friday New York at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Miami at Orlando, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Memphis at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 8 p.m. LA Clippers at Utah, 8 p.m. Saturday Phoenix at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 9:30 p.m.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dwyane Wade scored 21 points, Joe Johnson added 17 and the host Miami Heat shook off a slow first half to beat the Chicago Bulls 106-98 on Thursday night, clamping down in the final minutes for their ninth win in the last 10 home games. Goran Dragic and Hassan Whiteside each had 16 points and 12 rebounds for Miami, which has 14 consecutive games of scoring 100 or more at home — the second-longest such streak in franchise history. Jimmy Butler scored 25 points for the Bulls (39-40), who now need a series of miracles to get into the postseason. Pau Gasol finished with 21 points and 12 rebounds, and Derrick Rose scored 17 for Chicago. 76ers move on without Hinkie • Sam Hinkie quit on The Process. The Philadelphia 76ers are prepared to move ahead in their painful rebuild without the general manager who methodically turned the organization into one of the worst in professional sports.

A day after Hinkie informed the team via a 13-page manifesto that he was out, the Sixers were ready to start yet another new era. The NBA-worst Sixers on Thursday were set to hire former NBA executive of the year Bryan Colangelo as their general manager, according to a person with knowledge of the decision. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because Colangelo’s hiring was not oicial. Coach Brett Brown said after practice Thursday he found out Hinkie quit through the team’s media relations department. Hinkie lasted less than three full seasons and left the Sixers with the worst record in the league at 10-68. Grizzlies sign Munford • The Memphis Grizzlies have signed guard Xavier Munford to a multi-year contract and have waived center Ryan Hollins. Munford, 23, has appeared in 10 games with the Grizzlies and averaged 5.6 points. Hollins, who is 31, averaged 3.6 points and 2.7 rebounds in 32 games with the Grizzlies this season. The 7-footer made nine starts for Memphis.

NBA SUMMARIES Hawks 95, Raptors 87

LATE WEDNESDAY

Red Wings 3, Flyers 0 Philadelphia 0 0 0 — 0 Detroit 1 1 1 — 3 First period: 1, Detroit, Helm 13, 7:57. Penalties: Voracek, Phi (tripping), 11:30; Jurco, Det (tripping), 16:32; Giroux, Phi (roughing), 19:34; Abdelkader, Det (roughing), 19:34. Second period: 2, Detroit, Athanasiou 8, 3:15 (sh). Penalties: Abdelkader, Det (interference), 2:06; Gudas, Phi (slashing), 7:28; Datsyuk, Det (tripping), 12:13; Raffl, Phi (slashing), 17:54. Third period: 3, Detroit, Quincey 4 (Howard), 18:17 (en). Penalties: DeKeyser, Det (high-sticking), 8:06; Simmonds, Phi (roughing), 10:45; DeKeyser, Det (roughing), 10:45; Simmonds, Phi (elbowing), 14:45; Raffl, Phi (roughing), 14:45; Abdelkader, Det (holding), 14:45. Shots: Philadelphia 6-12-12: 30. Detroit 9-10-7: 26. Power-plays: Philadelphia 0 of 4; Detroit 0 of 4. Goalies: Philadelphia, Mason 22-19-9 (25 shots-23 saves). Detroit, Howard 14-12-5 (30-30). A: 20,027. Referees: Kevin Pollock, Chris Lee. Linesmen: Mark Shewchyk, Ryan Gibbons.

Oilers 6, Canucks 2 Vancouver 0 0 2 — 2 Edmonton 0 3 3 — 6 First period: None. Penalties: McDavid, Edm (hooking), 7:52; Granlund, Van (slashing), 10:05; Fayne, Edm (tripping), 14:27; Dorsett, Van (roughing), 17:00; Kassian, Edm (roughing), 17:00; Tanev, Van (hooking), 18:04. Second period: 1, Edmonton, Yakupov 8 (Fayne), 8:27. 2, Edmonton, Maroon 10, 13:16. 3, Edmonton, McDavid 16 (Eberle, Hall), 17:26 (pp). Penalties: Yakupov, Edm (tripping), 10:50; Tryamkin, Van (holding), 16:21. Third period: 4, Vancouver, Bartkowski 6 (Biega, McCann), 5:21. 5, Edmonton, Maroon 11 (Eberle, McDavid), 9:08. 6, Edmonton, Hall 26 (Pardy, Pakarinen), 9:26. 7, Vancouver, Horvat 15 (Etem, Dorsett), 12:09. 8, Edmonton, Draisaitl 19 (Hall, McDavid), 18:03 (pp). Penalties: Hendricks, Edm (holding), 3:02; Hamhuis, Van (slashing), 16:51; McCann, Van (roughing), 19:49; Pardy, Edm (roughing), 19:49. Shots: Vancouver 8-5-14: 27. Edmonton 7-12-19: 38. Power-plays: Vancouver 0 of 4; Edmonton 2 of 4. Goalies: Vancouver, Markstrom 12-14-4 (38 shots-32 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 21-27-4 (27-25). A: 16,839. Referees: Jake Brenk, Tom Kowal. Linesmen: Brian Mach, John Grandt.

Blue Jackets 5, Maple Leafs 1 Columbus 0 2 3 — Toronto 0 1 0 — First period: None. Penalties: Murray, Clm (holding), 10:10. Second period: 1, Toronto, Rielly 9 (Gauthier, Laich), 1:43 (sh). 2, Columbus, Saad 29 (Bjorkstrand), 11:13. 3, Columbus, Dubinsky 16 (Atkinson, Calvert), 17:31. Penalties: Parenteau, Tor (delay of game), :44; Jenner, Clm (tripping), 13:46. Third period: 4, Columbus, Bjorkstrand 4 (Saad, Wennberg), 8:43. 5, Columbus, Calvert 9 (Atkinson), 9:39. 6, Columbus, Dubinsky 17 (Calvert, Murray), 12:50. Penalties: S.Carrick, Tor (tripping), 5:13. Shots: Columbus 6-12-14: 32. Toronto 9-8-10: 27. Power-plays: Columbus 0 of 2; Toronto 0 of 2. Goalies: Columbus, Bobrovsky 14-19-1 (27 shots-26 saves). Toronto, Sparks 6-8-1 (32-27). A: 18,837.

L10 8-2 3-7 6-4 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 2-8 2-8

Str L-1 W-3 L-2 L-6 W-1 Str W-2 W-2 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 W-3 W-1 L-2 L-2

Heat hand Bulls critical loss

NOTEBOOK NHL SUMMARIES

L10 5-5 7-3 3-7 2-8 1-9 L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 3-7 3-7

5 1

LATE WEDNESDAY

Clippers 91, Lakers 81

Toronto: Powell 4-8 0-0 10, Scola 1-4 0-0 2, Valanciunas 3-6 7-8 13, Lowry 6-15 2-5 16, DeRozan 7-24 2-2 16, Biyombo 3-8 4-5 10, P.Patterson 1-3 0-0 3, Ross 2-5 0-0 6, Joseph 3-6 0-0 6, Carroll 2-4 0-0 5, Thompson 0-0 0-0 0, Nogueira 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-84 15-20 87. Atlanta: Sefolosha 4-6 1-2 10, Millsap 4-11 5-6 13, Horford 4-9 2-2 11, Teague 7-13 7-9 23, Korver 5-11 0-0 14, Hardaway Jr. 4-7 0-0 11, Schroder 0-7 0-0 0, Humphries 0-1 0-0 0, Scott 4-7 2-2 11, Hinrich 0-1 0-0 0, Muscala 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 33-76 17-21 95. Toronto 20 23 20 24 — 87 Atlanta 28 19 23 25 — 95 3-point goals: Toronto 8-21 (Ross 2-3, Powell 2-4, Lowry 2-6, Carroll 1-1, P.Patterson 1-2, DeRozan 0-2, Scola 0-3), Atlanta 12-32 (Korver 4-8, Hardaway Jr. 3-5, Teague 2-3, Sefolosha 1-2, Scott 1-3, Horford 1-3, Muscala 0-1, Humphries 0-1, Schroder 0-3, Millsap 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 56 (Biyombo 9), Atlanta 48 (Millsap 14). Assists: Toronto 16 (Lowry 6), Atlanta 23 (Horford 6). Total fouls: Toronto 16, Atlanta 19. A: 17,864 (18,729).

L.A. Clippers: Mbah a Moute 2-4 0-0 4, Griffin 5-10 3-4 13, Jordan 7-9 1-2 15, Paul 5-10 2-2 13, Redick 6-14 0-0 15, Green 1-5 1-2 3, Wilcox 2-9 0-0 6, Prigioni 2-7 0-0 4, Pierce 4-8 0-0 9, Aldrich 2-3 3-4 7, Ayres 1-4 0-0 2, Dawson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-83 10-14 91. L.A. Lakers: Bryant 6-19 4-4 17, Randle 3-11 1-2 7, Hibbert 1-4 2-2 4, Russell 5-13 1-2 13, Clarkson 5-15 2-2 13, Huertas 3-8 0-0 6, World Peace 0-2 0-0 0, Black 4-5 3-4 11, Nance Jr. 1-4 0-0 2, Kelly 2-3 0-1 4, Sacre 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 32-90 13-17 81. L.A. Clippers 29 25 19 18 — 91 L.A. Lakers 25 17 19 20 — 81 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 7-25 (Redick 3-7, Wilcox 2-5, Pierce 1-3, Paul 1-3, Ayres 0-1, Green 0-2, Prigioni 0-4), L.A. Lakers 4-19 (Russell 2-5, Bryant 1-6, Clarkson 1-7, Huertas 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 54 (Jordan 11), L.A. Lakers 58 (Randle 20). Assists: L.A. Clippers 23 (Paul 8), L.A. Lakers 12 (Huertas 5). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 17, L.A. Lakers 16. Technicals: Jordan. A: 18,997 (18,997).

Suns 124, Rockets 115

Trail Blazers 120, Thunder 115

Phoenix: Tucker 9-17 4-5 24, Len 2-5 2-2 6, Chandler 8-11 5-6 21, Booker 4-15 6-6 15, Price 3-7 0-0 9, Goodwin 6-11 3-5 16, Teletovic 10-20 2-3 26, Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Leuer 1-5 2-2 4, Jenkins 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 44-94 24-29 124. Houston: Ariza 8-11 1-2 22, Motiejunas 2-3 2-2 6, Howard 4-7 2-2 10, Harden 10-14 5-7 30, Beverley 3-9 1-2 9, Smith 2-4 0-2 6, Capela 3-3 1-4 7, Brewer 2-3 1-1 5, Terry 4-9 0-0 8, Beasley 4-8 1-2 9, Goudelock 0-2 3-4 3, McDaniels 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 42-74 17-28 115. Phoenix 27 30 32 35 — 124 Houston 39 21 30 25 — 115 3-point goals: Phoenix 12-31 (Teletovic 4-9, Price 3-6, Tucker 2-5, Jenkins 1-1, Goodwin 1-4, Booker 1-6), Houston 14-33 (Harden 5-6, Ariza 5-8, Smith 2-2, Beverley 2-8, McDaniels 0-1, Howard 0-1, Brewer 0-1, Motiejunas 0-1, Goudelock 0-2, Terry 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 60 (Tucker 12), Houston 38 (Howard 7). Assists: Phoenix 31 (Len 7), Houston 26 (Beverley 9). Total fouls: Phoenix 24, Houston 24. Technicals: Houston Coach Bickerstaff. A: 18,227 (18,023).

Oklahoma City: Morrow 7-15 2-4 19, Kanter 13-18 6-7 33, Adams 4-7 1-2 9, Foye 3-13 4-4 11, Waiters 10-19 4-6 25, Payne 4-14 1-2 10, Singler 0-1 1-2 1, Huestis 2-3 0-2 6, Collison 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 43-91 20-31 115. Portland: Aminu 10-17 4-6 27, Harkless 6-13 1-1 14, Plumlee 3-4 4-6 10, Lillard 2-13 5-5 11, McCollum 10-18 2-2 26, Crabbe 6-9 0-0 16, Henderson 1-4 2-2 4, Davis 4-5 1-2 9, Roberts 1-1 0-0 3, Vonleh 0-0 0-0 0, Montero 0-0 0-0 0, Connaughton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-84 19-24 120. Oklahoma City 26 33 24 32 — 115 Portland 33 39 27 21 — 120 3-point goals: Oklahoma City 9-22 (Morrow 3-8, Huestis 2-2, Kanter 1-1, Foye 1-2, Payne 1-4, Waiters 1-5), Portland 15-33 (Crabbe 4-5, McCollum 4-8, Aminu 3-8, Lillard 2-7, Roberts 1-1, Harkless 1-3, Henderson 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Oklahoma City 61 (Kanter 20), Portland 44 (Davis 8). Assists: Oklahoma City 18 (Payne 6), Portland 32 (Lillard 9). Total fouls: Oklahoma City 20, Portland 23. Technicals: Oklahoma City Coach Donovan, Aminu. A: 19,393 (19,980).

Heat 106, Bulls 98

Mavericks 88, Rockets 86

Chicago: Dunleavy 0-2 2-2 2, Mirotic 2-6 0-0 4, Gasol 7-11 7-8 21, Rose 7-16 3-4 17, Butler 7-17 10-10 25, Holiday 4-8 0-0 9, Felicio 3-4 2-3 8, McDermott 2-5 1-1 6, Portis 3-9 0-0 6. Totals 35-78 25-28 98. Miami: J.Johnson 7-10 0-0 17, Deng 6-12 1-2 13, Stoudemire 5-8 0-1 10, Dragic 7-16 2-2 16, Wade 9-18 3-3 21, Winslow 1-8 0-0 2, Richardson 4-9 2-2 11, Whiteside 5-11 6-7 16, Haslem 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-92 14-17 106. Chicago 22 24 23 29 — 98 Miami 21 19 35 31 — 106 3-point goals: Chicago 3-14 (McDermott 1-2, Holiday 1-3, Butler 1-4, Portis 0-1, Gasol 0-1, Dunleavy 0-1, Mirotic 0-2), Miami 4-14 (J.Johnson 3-4, Richardson 1-3, Deng 0-2, Winslow 0-2, Dragic 0-3). Fouled out: Mirotic, Whiteside. Rebounds: Chicago 46 (Gasol 12), Miami 51 (Whiteside, Dragic 12). Assists: Chicago 18 (Butler 6), Miami 16 (J.Johnson, Wade, Dragic 4). Total fouls: Chicago 12, Miami 20. Technicals: Miami defensive three second. Flagrant fouls: McDermott. A: 19,771 (19,600).

Houston: Ariza 4-10 0-0 9, McDaniels 2-2 0-0 4, Howard 7-9 0-4 14, Beverley 4-8 0-0 9, Harden 8-22 6-7 26, Brewer 1-9 2-2 4, Terry 1-6 1-2 3, Capela 1-2 0-0 2, Beasley 6-10 3-3 15, Goudelock 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-78 12-18 86. Dallas: Anderson 2-5 1-2 5, Nowitzki 2-8 3-3 7, Pachulia 3-6 2-2 8, Barea 10-16 3-3 27, Matthews 6-18 0-0 16, Harris 3-12 2-2 10, Lee 4-6 0-0 8, Felton 1-7 1-2 3, Villanueva 0-0 0-0 0, Mejri 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 33-80 12-14 88. Houston 22 22 27 15 — 86 Dallas 18 34 18 18 — 88 3-point goals: Houston 6-20 (Harden 4-10, Beverley 1-2, Ariza 1-3, Brewer 0-2, Terry 0-3), Dallas 10-33 (Barea 4-7, Matthews 4-12, Harris 2-9, Anderson 0-1, Felton 0-2, Nowitzki 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Houston 49 (Howard 16), Dallas 50 (Lee 8). Assists: Houston 19 (Ariza 5), Dallas 19 (Barea 8). Total fouls: Houston 17, Dallas 20. Technicals: Harden, Houston defensive three second, Mejri. A: 20,108 (19,200).


SPORTS

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 2

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C7

Stars roll to victory over Avs

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L y-Toronto 52 26 x-Boston 46 32 New York 31 48 Brooklyn 21 57 Philadelphia 10 68 Southeast W L x-Atlanta 47 32 x-Miami 46 32 x-Charlotte 45 33 Washington 38 40 Orlando 33 45 Central W L y-Cleveland 56 23 Indiana 42 36 Detroit 42 37 Chicago 39 40 Milwaukee 32 46

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Avalanche goalie Calvin Pickard makes a glove save on a shot by the Stars on Thursday in Dallas.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

NHL STANDINGS

Jason Dickinson scored in his first NHL game, and the host Dallas Stars beat the Colorado Avalanche 4-2 on Thursday night to move closer to the Central Division and Western Conference titles. With one game remaining for each team, the Stars and the Blues are tied with 107 points, but Dallas holds the tiebreaker. Dallas hosts Nashville and the Blues host Washington, both on Saturday night. Dickinson was recalled from Texas of the AHL earlier Thursday because of injuries to Stars forwards, including 30-goal scorers Tyler Seguin and Jason Spezza. The game was scoreless until Dickinson backhanded a shot past Calvin Pickard from short range at 15:13 of the first period.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W y-Florida 81 46 x-Tampa Bay 81 46 Detroit 81 41 Boston 81 42 Ottawa 81 37 Montreal 81 37 Bufalo 80 34 Toronto 81 29 Metropolitan GP W z-Washington 80 55 x-Pittsburgh 81 48 x-NY Islanders 80 45 x-NY Rangers 81 45 Philadelphia 80 39 Carolina 81 35 New Jersey 81 37 Columbus 80 32

NOTEBOOK Demers in hospital • Former Montreal Canadiens and Blues coach Jacques Demers was in a Montreal hospital Thursday, a day after having a stroke. The 71-year-old Demers is now a Canadian senator. Claude Carignan, the Conservative leader in the senate, said he spoke with an assistant to Demers and was told he was conscious Thursday morning. Demers, who coached the Canadiens to the 1993 Stanley Cup title, is a patient of the team’s current doctor, David Mulder. Demers also coached Quebec, Detroit, St. Louis and Tampa Bay in the NHL. Other news • Struggling Tampa Bay recalled forward Jonathan Drouin from the American Hockey League before Thursday’s game. ... The Oilers signed defenseman Caleb Jones to a three-year entry level contract Thursday.

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 26 9 101 234 201 24-11-5 22-15-4 20-9-1 30 5 97 225 196 25-13-3 21-17-2 15-11-3 29 11 93 209 221 22-13-6 19-16-5 17-10-3 30 9 93 239 224 17-17-6 25-13-3 18-9-2 35 9 83 230 246 21-14-6 16-21-3 15-12-2 38 6 80 216 234 21-16-3 16-22-3 17-11-1 35 11 79 196 215 16-18-6 18-17-5 11-14-5 41 11 69 197 241 14-18-9 15-23-2 5-18-7 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 17 8 118 247 190 29-7-4 26-10-4 20-5-5 25 8 104 244 200 26-11-4 22-14-4 19-8-2 26 9 99 227 207 25-10-4 20-16-5 18-7-4 27 9 99 233 215 26-10-4 19-17-5 14-11-5 27 14 92 206 215 22-10-8 17-17-6 12-10-6 30 16 86 196 221 19-15-7 16-15-9 13-10-7 36 8 82 179 207 18-17-5 19-19-3 11-16-3 40 8 72 210 247 17-17-6 15-23-2 11-16-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L x-Dallas 81 49 23 x-Blues 81 49 23 x-Chicago 81 47 26 x-Nashville 81 41 26 x-Minnesota 81 38 32 Colorado 81 39 38 Winnipeg 81 34 39 Paciic GP W L x-Los Angeles81 48 28 x-Anaheim 80 44 25 x-San Jose 81 45 30 Arizona 81 35 38 Calgary 81 34 40 Vancouver 81 30 38 Edmonton 81 31 43

OT 9 9 8 14 11 4 8 OT 5 11 6 8 7 13 7

Pts 107 107 102 96 87 82 76 Pts 101 99 96 78 75 73 69

GF 264 223 231 226 215 213 211 GF 222 211 240 209 229 187 200

GA 228 196 204 212 204 235 236 GA 191 189 210 244 259 240 241

Home 27-11-2 24-12-4 26-11-4 23-11-7 21-15-4 17-19-4 18-19-4 Home 26-12-2 25-10-6 17-20-3 22-15-4 21-16-4 14-21-5 19-20-2

Away Div 22-12-7 18-7-3 25-11-5 19-7-3 21-15-4 13-12-4 18-15-7 12-13-3 17-17-7 14-10-5 22-19-0 13-13-2 16-20-4 11-16-2 Away Div 22-16-3 18-11-0 19-15-5 19-6-4 28-10-3 15-9-3 13-23-4 16-9-3 13-24-3 10-15-4 16-17-8 12-13-3 12-23-5 9-15-4

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Thursday Boston 5, Detroit 2 Tampa Bay 4, New Jersey 2 NY Islanders 4, NY Rangers 1 Toronto 4, Philadelphia 3, OT Pittsburgh 4, Washington 3, OT Montreal 4, Carolina 2 Ottawa 3, Florida 1 Nashville 3, Arizona 2, OT Blues 2, Chicago 1, OT Dallas 4, Colorado 2 Calgary 7, Vancouver 3 Los Angeles 2, Anaheim 1 Winnipeg 5, San Jose 4

Wednesday Columbus 5, Toronto 1 Edmonton 6, Vancouver 2 Detroit 3, Philadelphia 0 Friday Columbus at Buffalo, 6 p.m.

Saturday Ottawa at Boston, 11:30 a.m. Detroit at NY Rangers, 11:30 a.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Anaheim at Colorado, 4:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Montreal, 6 p.m. Carolina at Florida, 6 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Chicago at Columbus, 6 p.m. Calgary at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Buffalo at NY Islanders, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Blues, 7 p.m. Nashville at Dallas, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Winnipeg at Los Angeles, 9 p.m. Arizona at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L y-San Antonio 65 13 x-Memphis 42 36 Dallas 40 38 Houston 38 41 New Orleans 29 49 Northwest W L y-Oklahoma City 54 25 x-Portland 43 37 Utah 39 39 Denver 32 47 Minnesota 27 52 Paciic W L y-Golden State 70 9 x-LA Clippers 50 28 Sacramento 31 48 Phoenix 21 58 LA Lakers 16 62 x-clinched playof spot y-clinched division

Pct .667 .590 .392 .269 .128 Pct .595 .590 .577 .487 .423 Pct .709 .538 .532 .494 .410

Pct .833 .538 .513 .481 .372 Pct .684 .538 .500 .405 .342 Pct .886 .641 .392 .266 .205

GB — 6 21½ 31 42 GB — ½ 1½ 8½ 13½ GB — 13½ 14 17 23½

L10 5-5 7-3 3-7 2-8 1-9 L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 7-3 3-7 3-7

Str L-1 W-3 L-2 L-6 W-1 Str W-2 W-2 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 W-3 W-1 L-2 L-2

Home 30-9 26-12 18-22 14-25 7-32 Home 26-14 27-13 28-11 20-19 21-18 Home 32-7 24-15 25-14 24-15 23-17

Away 22-17 20-20 13-26 7-32 3-36 Away 21-18 19-19 17-22 18-21 12-27 Away 24-16 18-21 17-23 15-25 9-29

Conf 35-13 29-19 20-29 12-36 3-45 Conf 28-21 29-19 30-18 27-21 19-29 Conf 34-15 27-21 27-22 23-27 20-28

GB — 23 25 27½ 36 GB — 11½ 14½ 22 27 GB — 19½ 39 49 53½

L10 7-3 3-7 6-4 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 4-6 5-5 L10 8-2 7-3 4-6 2-8 2-8

Str L-1 W-1 W-5 L-2 L-2 Str L-1 W-2 L-1 L-3 W-2 Str W-1 W-3 L-2 W-1 L-3

Home 39-0 26-14 22-17 21-18 20-18 Home 31-9 27-12 24-15 17-22 13-26 Home 38-2 27-12 17-23 13-26 11-29

Away 26-13 16-22 18-21 17-23 9-31 Away 23-16 16-25 15-24 15-25 14-26 Away 32-7 23-16 14-25 8-32 5-33

Conf 41-7 25-23 25-23 25-24 19-30 Conf 36-13 28-22 23-25 17-32 16-33 Conf 43-6 28-20 17-32 15-34 7-41

Thursday Phoenix 124, Houston 115 Miami 106, Chicago 98 Atlanta 95, Toronto 87 Minnesota 105, Sacramento 97 Golden State 112, San Antonio 101 Wednesday Indiana 123, Cleveland 109 Detroit 108, Orlando 104 Washington 121, Brooklyn 103 Boston 104, New Orleans 97 Charlotte 111, New York 97 Dallas 88, Houston 86 Portland 120, Oklahoma City 115 LA Clippers 91, LA Lakers 81

Lightning 4, Devils 2

Canadiens 4, Hurricanes 2

Stars 4, Avalanche 2

Tampa Bay 1 1 2 — 4 New Jersey 0 1 1 — 2 First period: 1, Tampa Bay, Condra 6 (Sustr, Boyle), 5:45. Penalties: Sustr, TB (hooking), :37; New Jersey bench, served by Blandisi (too many men), 3:10; Blunden, TB, minor-major (roughing, fighting), 10:16; Farnham, NJ, major (fighting), 10:16; Blandisi, NJ (roughing), 10:16. Second period: 2, New Jersey, Kalinin 7 (Moore, Gionta), 7:16. 3, Tampa Bay, Paquette 6 (Filppula, Carle), 14:45. Penalties: Blandisi, NJ (roughing), 3:58. Third period: 4, Tampa Bay, Drouin 3 (Namestnikov), 3:50. 5, New Jersey, Kalinin 8 (Farnham, Gionta), 9:26. 6, Tampa Bay, Filppula 8 (Kucherov, Carle), 19:13 (en). Penalties: Namestnikov, TB (roughing), 14:07; Blandisi, NJ (roughing), 14:07. Shots: Tampa Bay 10-7-5: 22. New Jersey 3-11-8: 22. Power-plays: Tampa Bay 0 of 2; New Jersey 0 of 1. Goalies: Tampa Bay, Bishop 35-21-4 (22 shots-20 saves). New Jersey, Kinkaid 9-9-1 (21-18). A: 15,536. Referees: Marc Joannette, Tim Peel. Linesmen: Derek Amell, David Brisebois.

Montreal 1 2 1 — 4 Carolina 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Carolina, Nash 9 (Skinner, Rask), 1:34. 2, Montreal, Dietz 1 (Pacioretty, Gallagher), 19:50. Penalties: None. Second period: 3, Carolina, Hanifin 4 (Staal, Nordstrom), 5:11. 4, Montreal, Pacioretty 28 (Markov), 13:12. 5, Montreal, Carr 6 (Plekanec), 16:51. Penalties: None. Third period: 6, Montreal, Eller 13 (Dietz, Plekanec), 15:59. Penalties: Markov, Mon (high-sticking), 16:12. Shots: Montreal 9-14-8: 31. Carolina 8-10-10: 28. Power-plays: Montreal 0 of 0; Carolina 0 of 1. Goalies: Montreal, Lindgren 1-0-0 (28 shots-26 saves). Carolina, Ward 23-17-10 (31-27). A: 15,120. Referees: Francois St. Laurent, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Devin Berg, Tony Sericolo.

Colorado 0 0 2 — Dallas 1 2 1 — First period: 1, Dallas, Dickinson 1 (Nichushkin), 15:13. Penalties: Barrie, Col (cross-checking), 3:26; Hemsky, Dal (tripping), 15:27. Second period: 2, Dallas, Sceviour 11 (Sharp, Klingberg), 3:43 (pp). 3, Dallas, Jo.Benn 3 (Hemsky, Faksa), 8:05 (pp). Penalties: Johnson, Col, served by Skille, major-game misconduct (boarding), 3:07; Grigorenko, Col (hooking), 7:03; Sharp, Dal (goaltender interference), 19:27. Third period: 4, Colorado, Beauchemin 8 (Landeskog, Mitchell), 10:54. 5, Dallas, Roussel 13 (Hemsky, Faksa), 16:54 (en). 6, Colorado, Matthias 12 (Iginla, Mitchell), 19:00. Penalties: Klingberg, Dal (tripping), 1:43; Zadorov, Col (tripping), 6:31; Johns, Dal (high-sticking), 8:52. Shots: Colorado 4-3-12: 19. Dallas 15-11-5: 31. Power-plays: Colorado 0 of 4; Dallas 2 of 5. Goalies: Colorado, Pickard 7-6-1 (30 shots-27 saves). Dallas, Lehtonen 25-10-2 (19-17). A: 18,532. Referees: Justin St. Pierre, Steve Kozari. Linesmen: Vaughan Rody, Mark Wheler.

Senators 3, Panthers 1 Florida 0 0 1 — Ottawa 1 1 1 — First period: 1, Ottawa, Zibanejad 20 (C.Wideman, Karlsson), 18:20 (pp). Penalties: Hudler, Fla (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:03; C.Wideman, Ott (unsportsmanlike conduct), 5:03; Grimaldi, Fla (hooking), 12:40; Ekblad, Fla (high-sticking), 17:07. Second period: 2, Ottawa, Robinson 1 (Ceci, Neil), 10:12. Penalties: None. Third period: 3, Florida, Jagr 27 (Barkov, Petrovic), 4:49. 4, Ottawa, Ceci 10, 14:14. Penalties: Z.Smith, Ott (roughing), 7:39. Shots: Florida 9-6-19: 34. Ottawa 9-9-5: 23. Power-plays: Florida 0 of 1; Ottawa 1 of 2. Goalies: Florida, Montoya 12-7-3 (23 shots-20 saves). Ottawa, Anderson 31-23-5 (34-33). A: 19,165. Referees: Ghislain Hebert, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Steve Barton, Matt MacPherson.

1 3

Bruins 5, Red Wings 2 Detroit 0 1 1 — 2 Boston 2 1 2 — 5 First period: 1, Boston, Pastrnak 14 (Liles, C.Miller), 1:25. 2, Boston, Marchand 37 (Krug, Bergeron), 2:44. Penalties: McQuaid, Bos (interference), 5:20; DeKeyser, Det (holding), 11:39; McQuaid, Bos (delay of game), 14:06; Sheahan, Det (hooking), 17:37. Second period: 3, Boston, Krug 4 (Eriksson, Krejci), 5:02 (pp). 4, Detroit, Marchenko 2 (Zetterberg, Nyquist), 6:59. Penalties: Beleskey, Bos (crosschecking), 1:37; Ericsson, Det (holding), 4:16. Third period: 5, Boston, Stempniak 19 (Krug, Marchand), :20. 6, Boston, Eriksson 30 (Krejci, Spooner), :45. 7, Detroit, Athanasiou 9 (Marchenko, Quincey), 18:37. Penalties: Krug, Bos (holding), 2:42; Zetterberg, Det (slashing), 4:57. Shots: Detroit 8-5-2: 15. Boston 11-12-11: 34. Power-plays: Detroit 0 of 4; Boston 1 of 4. Goalies: Detroit, Howard 14-13-5 (26 shots-21 saves), Mrazek (0:45 third, 8-8). Boston, Rask 31-22-8 (15-13). A: 17,565. Referees: Chris Lee, Eric Furlatt. Linesmen: Michel Cormier, Steve Miller.

Maple Leafs 4, Flyers 3

Islanders 4, Rangers 1

Toronto 2 1 0 1 — 4 Philadelphia 0 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, Toronto, Nylander 6 (Marincin, Greening), 5:28. 2, Toronto, Greening 7 (Nylander, Lindberg), 15:03. Penalties: S.Carrick, Tor (interference), 16:44. Second period: 3, Philadelphia, Schenn 26 (Couturier, Gagner), :29. 4, Toronto, Grabner 9, 9:17. Penalties: Lindberg, Tor, double minor (high-sticking), 1:26; Voracek, Phi (hooking), 12:04; Marincin, Tor (high-sticking), 18:34. Third period: 5, Philadelphia, MacDonald 1 (Bellemare, VandeVelde), 8:33. 6, Philadelphia, Simmonds 30 (Streit, Gostisbehere), 19:02. Penalties: None. Overtime: 7, Toronto, Gardiner 7 (Parenteau, Nylander), 2:51 (pp). Penalties: MacDonald, Phi (tripping), 1:35. Shots: Toronto 11-5-8-2: 26. Philadelphia 11-15-18-0: 44. Power-plays: Toronto 1 of 2; Philadelphia 0 of 4. Goalies: Toronto, Bernier 12-21-3 (44 shots-41 saves). Philadelphia, Mason 22-19-10 (26-22). A: 19,674. Referees: Kyle Rehman, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Mark Shewchyk, Tim Nowak.

NY Islanders 0 3 1 — 4 NY Rangers 0 0 1 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Skjei, NYR (tripping), 13:12; Kulemin, NYI (interference), 16:47. Second period: 1, NY Islanders, Prince 6 (Zidlicky, Bernier), 13:28. 2, NY Islanders, Cizikas 8 (Prince, Nelson), 18:38. 3, NY Islanders, Nielsen 20 (Tavares, Okposo), 19:45 (pp). Penalties: Bernier, NYI (hooking), 7:54; McIlrath, NYR (tripping), 10:45; Yandle, NYR (tripping), 18:55. Third period: 4, NY Rangers, Klein 9 (Stepan, Yandle), 17:12. 5, NY Islanders, Tavares 32 (Okposo), 19:28 (en). Penalties: Tavares, NYI (interference), 6:43; de Haan, NYI (interference), 9:21; Boychuk, NYI (slashing), 14:27; Nash, NYR (roughing), 14:27. Shots: NY Islanders 7-9-7: 23. NY Rangers 12-16-9: 37. Power-plays: NY Islanders 1 of 3; NY Rangers 0 of 4. Goalies: NY Islanders, Greiss 23-11-4 (37 shots-36 saves). NY Rangers, Lundqvist 35-21-7 (16-13), Raanta (0:00 third, 6-6). A: 18,006. Referees: Gord Dwyer, Dan O’Rourke. Linesmen: Scott Driscoll, Brad Kovachik.

Penguins 4, Capitals 3

Predators 3, Coyotes 2 (OT)

Pittsburgh 1 2 0 1 — 4 Washington 0 1 2 0 — 3 First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Cullen 15 (Kuhnhackl), :44. Penalties: Cole, Pit (delay of game), 3:41; Letang, Pit (slashing), 19:02. Second period: 2, Pittsburgh, Cullen 16, :28 (sh). 3, Pittsburgh, Sheary 7 (Sundqvist, Sestito), 9:03. 4, Washington, Johansson 16 (J.Carlson, Burakovsky), 17:19. Penalties: T.Wilson, Was, major (boarding), 2:27; Cole, Pit (holding stick), 11:10; Williams, Was (tripping), 13:27; Daley, Pit (holding), 13:52; Letang, Pit (cross-checking), 18:00; Ovechkin, Was (embellishment), 18:00. Third period: 5, Washington, Johansson 17 (Niskanen, Kuznetsov), 10:05. 6, Washington, Burakovsky 17 (J.Carlson, Williams), 13:26. Penalties: Winnik, Was (high-sticking), 3:14; Niskanen, Was (cross-checking), 5:49. Overtime: 7, Pittsburgh, Crosby 36 (Letang), 4:00. Penalties: None. Shots: Pittsburgh 7-9-16-3: 35. Washington 8-11-9-2: 30. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 0 of 4; Washington 0 of 4. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 9-2-1 (30 shots-27 saves). Washington, Holtby 47-9-7 (35-31). A: 18,506. Referees: Dave Jackson, Brad Watson. Linesmen: Derek Nansen, Brian Murphy.

Arizona 1 1 0 0 — Nashville 0 0 2 1 — First period: 1, Arizona, Vermette 17 (Michalek, Ekman-Larsson), 6:26. Penalties: Connauton, Ari (holding), 11:30; Johansen, Nas (slashing), 11:30; Chipchura, Ari (hooking), 16:03. Second period: 2, Arizona, Doan 28 (Richardson, Ekman-Larsson), 9:42. Penalties: Jarnkrok, Nas (interference), 5:35; Ekman-Larsson, Ari (interference), 6:00; Connauton, Ari (interference), 10:17; Forsberg, Nas (hooking), 12:33. Third period: 3, Nashville, Weber 20 (C.Smith, Forsberg), 7:26 (pp). 4, Nashville, Forsberg 33 (Josi, Johansen), 19:41. Penalties: C.Murphy, Ari (elbowing), 7:13; M.Smith, Ari, served by Duclair (delay of game), 9:48. Overtime: 5, Nashville, Josi 14 (Neal, Johansen), :20. Penalties: None. Shots: Arizona 4-7-7-0: 18. Nashville 8-10-12-1: 31. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 2; Nashville 1 of 5. Goalies: Arizona, M.Smith 15-12-2 (31 shots-28 saves). Nashville, Rinne 34-21-10 (18-16). A: 17,113. Referees: TJ Luxmore, Jean Hebert. Linesmen: Jonny Murray, Darren Gibbs.

2 3

2 4

Flames 7, Canucks 3 Vancouver 2 1 0 — 3 Calgary 2 3 2 — 7 First period: 1, Calgary, Backlund 19 (Nakladal, Brodie), 2:47 (pp). 2, Vancouver, Tryamkin 1 (H.Sedin, Hutton), 6:23. 3, Vancouver, Horvat 16 (Tanev, Hamhuis), 17:36 (pp). 4, Calgary, D.Hamilton 12 (Ferland, Jokipakka), 18:08. Penalties: Hansen, Van, double minor (highsticking), 1:04; Gaudreau, Cal (goaltender interference), 9:25; Monahan, Cal (holding), 16:06; Dorsett, Van, major (fighting), 18:08; Bollig, Cal, major (fighting), 18:08. Second period: 5, Calgary, Backlund 20 (Stajan, Colborne), 1:18. 6, Vancouver, Etem 6 (Hutton, Horvat), 6:54. 7, Calgary, Colborne 19 (D.Hamilton, Gaudreau), 11:54 (pp). 8, Calgary, Backlund 21 (Stajan, Giordano), 19:08 (sh). Penalties: Shinkaruk, Cal (roughing), 7:30; Pedan, Van (tripping), 10:52; Kenins, Van (goaltender interference), 12:11; Shore, Cal (broken stick), 18:29. Third period: 9, Calgary, Engelland 3 (Stajan, Colborne), 15:08. 10, Calgary, Bennett 18 (Jooris), 16:23. Penalties: Jokipakka, Cal (hooking), 6:58. Shots: Vancouver 11-8-8: 27. Calgary 18-12-13: 43. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 5; Calgary 2 of 4. Goalies: Vancouver, Miller 17-24-9 (43 shots-36 saves). Calgary, Ortio 7-9-5 (27-24). A: 19,289. Referees: Jake Brenk, Brad Meier. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Brian Mach.

Jets 5, Sharks 4 Winnipeg 0 3 2 — 5 San Jose 1 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, San Jose, Pavelski 37 (Thornton, Hertl), 11:16. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Winnipeg, Scheifele 28 (Wheeler, Byfuglien), 9:03 (pp). 3, San Jose, Thornton 19 (Marleau, Couture), 11:42 (pp). 4, San Jose, P.Martin 3 (Ward), 15:34 (pp). 5, Winnipeg, Copp 6 (Byfuglien, Petan), 17:59. 6, Winnipeg, Wheeler 25 (Scheifele, Byfuglien), 19:01. Penalties: Braun, SJ (tripping), 1:42; Spaling, SJ (slashing), 8:33; Byfuglien, Wpg (holding), 11:05; Stuart, Wpg (slashing), 14:44. Third period: 7, San Jose, Marleau 25 (Karlsson, Spaling), 7:03. 8, Winnipeg, Scheifele 29 (Ehlers, Petan), 12:02 (pp). 9, Winnipeg, Byfuglien 19 (Stafford, Dano), 19:50. Penalties: Dillon, SJ (hooking), 3:28; Scheifele, Wpg (holding), 3:45; P.Martin, SJ (kneeing), 10:45; Tanev, Wpg (holding), 16:20. Shots: Winnipeg 6-10-10: 26. San Jose 6-9-10: 25. Power-plays: Winnipeg 2 of 4; San Jose 2 of 4. Goalies: Winnipeg, Pavelec 12-13-4 (25 shots-21 saves). San Jose, Jones 36-23-4 (26-21). A: 15,900. Referees: Ian Walsh, Trevor Hanson. Linesmen: Ryan Galloway, Bryan Pancich.

Saturday Phoenix at New Orleans, 6 p.m. Boston at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Golden State at Memphis, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 7:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 9:30 p.m. Minnesota at Portland, 9:30 p.m.

Heat hand Bulls critical loss ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dwyane Wade scored 21 points, Joe Johnson added 17 and the host Miami Heat shook off a slow first half to beat the Chicago Bulls 106-98 on Thursday night, clamping down in the final minutes for their ninth win in the last 10 home games. Goran Dragic and Hassan Whiteside each had 16 points and 12 rebounds for Miami, which has 14 consecutive games of scoring 100 or more at home — the second-longest such streak in franchise history. Jimmy Butler scored 25 points for the Bulls (39-40), who now need a series of miracles to get into the postseason. Pau Gasol finished with 21 points and 12 rebounds, and Derrick Rose scored 17 for Chicago.

NOTEBOOK NHL SUMMARIES

Friday New York at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Miami at Orlando, 6 p.m. Brooklyn at Charlotte, 6 p.m. Indiana at Toronto, 6:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Washington at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. LA Lakers at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Memphis at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 8 p.m. LA Clippers at Utah, 8 p.m.

76ers move on without Hinkie • Sam Hinkie quit on The Process. The Philadelphia 76ers are prepared to move ahead in their painful rebuild without the general manager who methodically turned the organization into one of the worst in professional sports.

A day after Hinkie informed the team via a 13-page manifesto that he was out, the Sixers were ready to start yet another new era. The NBA-worst Sixers on Thursday were set to hire former NBA executive of the year Bryan Colangelo as their general manager, according to a person with knowledge of the decision. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because Colangelo’s hiring was not oicial. Coach Brett Brown said after practice Thursday he found out Hinkie quit through the team’s media relations department. Hinkie lasted less than three full seasons and left the Sixers with the worst record in the league at 10-68. Grizzlies sign Munford • The Memphis Grizzlies have signed guard Xavier Munford to a multi-year contract and have waived center Ryan Hollins. Munford, 23, has appeared in 10 games with the Grizzlies and averaged 5.6 points. Hollins, who is 31, averaged 3.6 points and 2.7 rebounds in 32 games with the Grizzlies this season. The 7-footer made nine starts for Memphis.

NBA SUMMARIES Hawks 95, Raptors 87

T’Wolves 105, Kings 97

Toronto: Powell 4-8 0-0 10, Scola 1-4 0-0 2, Valanciunas 3-6 7-8 13, Lowry 6-15 2-5 16, DeRozan 7-24 2-2 16, Biyombo 3-8 4-5 10, P.Patterson 1-3 0-0 3, Ross 2-5 0-0 6, Joseph 3-6 0-0 6, Carroll 2-4 0-0 5, Thompson 0-0 0-0 0, Nogueira 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-84 15-20 87. Atlanta: Sefolosha 4-6 1-2 10, Millsap 4-11 5-6 13, Horford 4-9 2-2 11, Teague 7-13 7-9 23, Korver 5-11 0-0 14, Hardaway Jr. 4-7 0-0 11, Schroder 0-7 0-0 0, Humphries 0-1 0-0 0, Scott 4-7 2-2 11, Hinrich 0-1 0-0 0, Muscala 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 33-76 17-21 95. Toronto 20 23 20 24 — 87 Atlanta 28 19 23 25 — 95 3-point goals: Toronto 8-21 (Ross 2-3, Powell 2-4, Lowry 2-6, Carroll 1-1, P.Patterson 1-2, DeRozan 0-2, Scola 0-3), Atlanta 12-32 (Korver 4-8, Hardaway Jr. 3-5, Teague 2-3, Sefolosha 1-2, Scott 1-3, Horford 1-3, Muscala 0-1, Humphries 0-1, Schroder 0-3, Millsap 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Toronto 56 (Biyombo 9), Atlanta 48 (Millsap 14). Assists: Toronto 16 (Lowry 6), Atlanta 23 (Horford 6). Total fouls: Toronto 16, Atlanta 19. A: 17,864 (18,729).

Minnesota: Wiggins 5-12 4-5 15, Dieng 7-15 4-6 18, Towns 6-16 4-6 17, Rubio 0-0 2-4 2, LaVine 6-10 2-2 18, Bjelica 6-7 2-2 18, Jones 2-3 0-0 5, Muhammad 3-10 4-6 10, Payne 0-4 0-0 0, Prince 1-3 0-0 2, Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Rudez 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-80 22-31 105. Sacramento: Gay 4-15 4-4 13, Cauley-Stein 6-12 3-3 15, Koufos 1-7 0-0 2, Collison 7-12 4-4 19, Curry 3-8 2-2 10, Acy 7-12 2-2 17, Moreland 1-2 2-2 4, Anderson 4-8 1-2 9, McLemore 3-9 1-2 8. Totals 36-85 19-21 97. Minnesota 31 27 25 22 — 105 Sacramento 27 24 25 21 — 97 3-point goals: Minnesota 11-21 (Bjelica 4-5, LaVine 4-7, Towns 1-1, Jones 1-2, Wiggins 1-2, Dieng 0-1, Payne 0-1, Muhammad 0-2), Sacramento 6-17 (Curry 2-3, Gay 1-1, Collison 1-3, Acy 1-3, McLemore 1-5, Anderson 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 53 (Dieng 13), Sacramento 51 (Gay 13). Assists: Minnesota 25 (Rubio 7), Sacramento 19 (Collison 6). Total fouls: Minnesota 17, Sacramento 23. Flagrant fouls: Acy. A: 17,317 (17,317).

Suns 124, Rockets 115

San Antonio: Leonard 8-12 5-8 23, Aldridge 5-16 1-1 11, Duncan 2-6 0-0 4, Parker 4-10 2-4 10, Da.Green 3-7 0-0 9, Mills 3-8 0-0 7, Ginobili 3-6 0-0 6, West 4-5 3-4 11, Anderson 3-4 2-3 8, Martin 3-5 3-3 10, Bonner 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 39-80 16-23 101. Golden State: Barnes 8-13 2-2 21, Dr.Green 7-12 2-2 18, Bogut 3-3 0-0 6, Curry 11-19 2-2 27, Thompson 5-13 2-2 14, Iguodala 2-4 0-0 4, Barbosa 1-4 0-0 3, Ezeli 2-5 0-1 4, Rush 1-1 0-0 3, Livingston 3-5 0-0 6, Speights 2-4 2-2 6, Clark 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-83 10-11 112. San Antonio 15 25 29 32 — 101 Golden State 20 32 35 25 — 112 3-point goals: San Antonio 7-16 (Da.Green 3-6, Leonard 2-3, Martin 1-2, Mills 1-4, Ginobili 0-1), Golden State 12-25 (Curry 3-7, Barnes 3-7, Dr.Green 2-3, Thompson 2-5, Rush 1-1, Barbosa 1-1, Speights 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: San Antonio 40 (Anderson 11), Golden State 47 (Bogut 11). Assists: San Antonio 28 (West 7), Golden State 33 (Curry 9). Total fouls: San Antonio 11, Golden State 22. Technicals: Dr.Green. A: 19,596 (19,596).

Phoenix: Tucker 9-17 4-5 24, Len 2-5 2-2 6, Chandler 8-11 5-6 21, Booker 4-15 6-6 15, Price 3-7 0-0 9, Goodwin 6-11 3-5 16, Teletovic 10-20 2-3 26, Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Leuer 1-5 2-2 4, Jenkins 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 44-94 24-29 124. Houston: Ariza 8-11 1-2 22, Motiejunas 2-3 2-2 6, Howard 4-7 2-2 10, Harden 10-14 5-7 30, Beverley 3-9 1-2 9, Smith 2-4 0-2 6, Capela 3-3 1-4 7, Brewer 2-3 1-1 5, Terry 4-9 0-0 8, Beasley 4-8 1-2 9, Goudelock 0-2 3-4 3, McDaniels 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 42-74 17-28 115. Phoenix 27 30 32 35 — 124 Houston 39 21 30 25 — 115 3-point goals: Phoenix 12-31 (Teletovic 4-9, Price 3-6, Tucker 2-5, Jenkins 1-1, Goodwin 1-4, Booker 1-6), Houston 14-33 (Harden 5-6, Ariza 5-8, Smith 2-2, Beverley 2-8, McDaniels 0-1, Howard 0-1, Brewer 0-1, Motiejunas 0-1, Goudelock 0-2, Terry 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 60 (Tucker 12), Houston 38 (Howard 7). Assists: Phoenix 31 (Len 7), Houston 26 (Beverley 9). Total fouls: Phoenix 24, Houston 24. Technicals: Houston Coach Bickerstaff. A: 18,227 (18,023).

Warriors 112, Spurs 101

LATE WEDNESDAY

Heat 106, Bulls 98

Clippers 91, Lakers 81

Chicago: Dunleavy 0-2 2-2 2, Mirotic 2-6 0-0 4, Gasol 7-11 7-8 21, Rose 7-16 3-4 17, Butler 7-17 10-10 25, Holiday 4-8 0-0 9, Felicio 3-4 2-3 8, McDermott 2-5 1-1 6, Portis 3-9 0-0 6. Totals 35-78 25-28 98. Miami: J.Johnson 7-10 0-0 17, Deng 6-12 1-2 13, Stoudemire 5-8 0-1 10, Dragic 7-16 2-2 16, Wade 9-18 3-3 21, Winslow 1-8 0-0 2, Richardson 4-9 2-2 11, Whiteside 5-11 6-7 16, Haslem 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-92 14-17 106. Chicago 22 24 23 29 — 98 Miami 21 19 35 31 — 106 3-point goals: Chicago 3-14 (McDermott 1-2, Holiday 1-3, Butler 1-4, Portis 0-1, Gasol 0-1, Dunleavy 0-1, Mirotic 0-2), Miami 4-14 (J.Johnson 3-4, Richardson 1-3, Deng 0-2, Winslow 0-2, Dragic 0-3). Fouled out: Mirotic, Whiteside. Rebounds: Chicago 46 (Gasol 12), Miami 51 (Whiteside, Dragic 12). Assists: Chicago 18 (Butler 6), Miami 16 (J.Johnson, Wade, Dragic 4). Total fouls: Chicago 12, Miami 20. Technicals: Miami defensive three second. Flagrant fouls: McDermott. A: 19,771 (19,600).

L.A. Clippers: Mbah a Moute 2-4 0-0 4, Griffin 5-10 3-4 13, Jordan 7-9 1-2 15, Paul 5-10 2-2 13, Redick 6-14 0-0 15, Green 1-5 1-2 3, Wilcox 2-9 0-0 6, Prigioni 2-7 0-0 4, Pierce 4-8 0-0 9, Aldrich 2-3 3-4 7, Ayres 1-4 0-0 2, Dawson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-83 10-14 91. L.A. Lakers: Bryant 6-19 4-4 17, Randle 3-11 1-2 7, Hibbert 1-4 2-2 4, Russell 5-13 1-2 13, Clarkson 5-15 2-2 13, Huertas 3-8 0-0 6, World Peace 0-2 0-0 0, Black 4-5 3-4 11, Nance Jr. 1-4 0-0 2, Kelly 2-3 0-1 4, Sacre 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 32-90 13-17 81. L.A. Clippers 29 25 19 18 — 91 L.A. Lakers 25 17 19 20 — 81 3-point goals: L.A. Clippers 7-25 (Redick 3-7, Wilcox 2-5, Pierce 1-3, Paul 1-3, Ayres 0-1, Green 0-2, Prigioni 0-4), L.A. Lakers 4-19 (Russell 2-5, Bryant 1-6, Clarkson 1-7, Huertas 0-1). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: L.A. Clippers 54 (Jordan 11), L.A. Lakers 58 (Randle 20). Assists: L.A. Clippers 23 (Paul 8), L.A. Lakers 12 (Huertas 5). Total fouls: L.A. Clippers 17, L.A. Lakers 16. Technicals: Jordan. A: 18,997 (18,997).


C8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

SPORTS

M 1 • FRIDAY • 04.08.2016

Area wrestlers eye Olympics Decisive trials will be this weekend at University of Iowa

ILLINOIS FOOTBALL • 10 QUESTIONS

Illini coaches likely to ind answers soon BY MARK TUPPER Decatur Herald & Review

CHAMPAIGN, ILL • As a new coaching staff gets a crash course in its new Illini football team, spring practice continues Friday evening on the grass fields adjacent to Memorial Stadium. Coach Lovie Smith and his staff are playing from behind, trying to make up ground due Smith’s late hiring and delays in the start of spring ball forced by the unusual coaching transition. Coaches are learning about the team. The team is learning about the coaches. And all of us have unanswered questions. Here are 10 of them:

DUDEK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Missouri’s J’Den Cox (top) competes in a 197-pound match during the NCAA Division I wrestling championships in New York.

BY JOE LYONS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Last month at Madison Square Garden, the University of Missouri’s J’den Cox put the finishing touch on a brilliant wrestling season. With a late takedown, Cox defeated top-seeded and undefeated Morgan McIntosh of Penn State 4-2 for the NCAA title at 197 pounds, his second in three seasons. With that championship, Cox also earned a spot in the U.S. Olympic Trials, which will be held Saturday and Sunday at the University of Iowa’s Carver-Hawkeye Arena. This weekend’s winners will represent the United States in the Olympic Games this summer in Rio de Janeiro. “It would mean the world to me,” Cox said of the Trials just a few days after winning in New York City. “That’s something I’ve always wanted. As a kid, you know, you dream of that ... The thing about wrestlers is, there is no professional, there’s no national wrestling league or anything like that. You go to college and then your time’s kind of up, so this is really it. “Just knowing that makes it even that much more precious and I know it’s going to bring out the best in everybody.” He continued: “To have the opportunity to do the sport

that I love, something I’ve been working so hard to get better at, and to be able to put what I have against the best not only in the country but in the world, that would be mind-blowing.” Cox, who struggled with weight issues while placing fifth nationally as a sophomore, rededicated himself to his sport and dominated last season. He finished 33-1, with the lone loss coming on a controversial disqualification. He was able to avenge that loss with an exclamation point, posting a 9-1 major decision over Ohio’s Phillip Wellington in the finals at the Mid-American Conference tournament. Cox, who recently celebrated his 21st birthday, has been working to adjust from folkstyle wrestling to international freestyle wrestling. Previously, he competed at the World Team Trials in 2014 and placed fourth at the U.S. Open in 2015. But this time, he plans to compete at 86 kilograms (189.5), down from 97 kilograms (214 pounds). “I don’t think it’s going to be difficult at all to make weight,’’ he said. “When we wrestled Nebraska, I weighed 193. And I didn’t feel bad. Is it going to be diferent? Yeah, it’ll be a little different, but those are just challenges to look forward to. Like I said,

this is an opportunity that I want to take advantage of. It’s just something I’m going to have to embrace.’’ Cox will be joined in Iowa City by ex-Mizzou wrestlers Alan Waters (57 kg.), Nick Marable (74 kg.) and Dom Bradley (125 kg). All three were two-time All-Americans — Waters placed fourth in 2013 and third in 2015, Marable was third in 2008 and seventh in 2009 and Bradley took third in 2011 and fourth in 2013. Marable and Bradley also competed at the 2012 Trials. Illinois’ Isaiah Martinez, the two-time defending NCAA champion at 157 pounds, earned a berth in the Olympic Trials but is not expected to compete this weekend. But the Illini will be represented in Iowa City by three-time AllAmerican Jimmy Kennedy (fourth in 2008, fifth in 2009 and seventh in 2011) and twotimer B.J. Futrell (eighth in 2011 and sixth in 2012). Both will compete at 65kg. In addition, Wynn Michalek, a volunteer assistant coach at Illinois, will be competing at 97 kg. Michalek, who competed at the Trials in 2012, was a three-time All-American at Central Michigan.

OH BROTHER Competing in Greco-Roman at 59 kg will be brothers Spenser and Ryan Mango.

Spenser, a CBC graduate, qualified for the Olympics in 2009 and 2012, finishing eighth and ninth, respectively. He was a two-time state champion in high school, attended Northern Michigan and has represented the U.S. in numerous international competitions. Ryan, the Post-Dispatch All-Metro wrestler of the year in 2009, was a threetime champion who helped Whitfield to its first two team titles. He went on to Stanford, earning All-American honors twice (sixth in 2011, fifth in 2012). The Mango brothers are part of the U.S. Army World Class Athlete Program. The women’s freestyle bracket at 58 kg features a pair of top wrestlers from the region. Carbondale’s Alli Ragan has been a member of the U.S. World Team in each of the last three years. She was a twotime college champion at King University in Tennessee and placed fifth at Worlds in 2014. Also in the bracket is St. Clair Mo.’s Randi Beltz, the first female to win a state high school wrestling medal in Missouri; she placed fifth as a freshman and third as a senior. She also competed at the 2012 Trials. Joe Lyons jlyons@post-dispatch.com

McRoberts puts on show for NFL SEMO receiver is projected as a late-round pick BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO. • It

wasn’t exactly a case of saving the best for last. But the last of dozens of NFL pro days held across the country this year took place Thursday at Southeast Missouri State University. The featured attraction? None other than wide receiver Paul McRoberts, the former football and basketball star at Soldan High. The timing wasn’t a coincidence. Just a day earlier in Memphis, the league was out in force to watch highlytouted quarterback Paxton Lynch throw at his pro day. The folks at SEMO wanted to make it as convenient as possible for the NFL to check out McRoberts, a Post-Dispatch All-Metro selection and Super 30 recruit during the 2011-12 school year. It turned out to be a good strategy. Representatives from 18 NFL teams made the trek north on I-55 from Memphis to watch McRoberts work on a cool, windy day. The roll call: 49ers, Bears, Bengals, Bills, Broncos, Chiefs, Colts, Eagles, Giants, Jets, Lions, Packers, Patriots, Raiders, Ravens, Redskins, Seahawks, Titans. The Rams, McRoberts’ hometown team until the relocation vote Jan. 12, were a last-minute cancellation. But McRoberts has a top 30 visit scheduled with them April 12 in Los Angeles, one of about a half-dozen team trips he has planned.

As for what took place Thursday, a smiling McRoberts said: “I think it went well. I loved the support in the crowd. All the NFL coaches (and scouts) were amazing, and they cheered me on.” At least half of the SEMO football team was on hand, cheering him on from the stands and along the sidelines at Houck Stadium. So was his Dallas-based agent, Scott Casterline, whose client list includes Michael Brockers of the Rams. About a dozen friends and family members came down from the St. Louis area to watch, including McRoberts’ mother — Sherry Triplett. Even McRoberts’ dog, a Chihuahua mix named Zee, was there to, uh, cheer him on. “It’s a blessing,” McRoberts said. “It’s good to see SEMO recognized overall. This school needs a little bit more publicity. I love this school and I’m thankful for everything.” Southeast Missouri State hasn’t had a player drafted since offensive lineman Eugene Amano was taken in the seventh round by Tennessee in 2007. And when longtime New England guard/center Dan Connolly (Marquette High) retired last summer, SEMO was left with no players in the NFL. That figures to change this year. Projected as a late-round pick, McRoberts was a threeyear starter at SEMO, finishing with career totals of 175 catches for 2,435 yards and a school-record 29 receiving touchdowns. He subsequently became the first player in school history to get invited to the Reese’s Senior Bowl. He caught

four passes for 46 yards and a touchdown in that game, and returned a punt 27 yards. Surprisingly, McRoberts did not earn an invitation to the NFL Scouting Combine, making his pro day all the more important. Among the highlights was a broad jump of 10 feet 5 inches, and a vertical leap of 35½ inches. Had he gotten the invitation to Indianapolis, those numbers would have tied him for 11th among wide receivers in both categories. “I was hoping for that 38 that I normally jump,” McRoberts said of his vertical. “But just didn’t get it today.” Not to worry. By way of example, Cincinnati’s perennial Pro Bowl receiver, A.J. Green, had a vertical of 34½ inches at the 2011 combine. But in part because he wasn’t at the combine, there was some curiosity coming in about McRoberts’ 40 time. Running into the wind, McRoberts was timed in the high 4.6s. Running with the wind at his back, he was in the low 4.5s to low 4.6s — it would’ve been quicker but he stumbled some at the start. The consensus seemed to be that McRoberts neither helped nor hurt himself with those times. At just a shade under 6-2 and weighing 200 pounds, he’s a long strider with long arms and big hands known for catching the contested ball at its highest point. (For a couple of good examples, check out his work against Murray State and Indiana State on YouTube.) “If you just said what is it that makes him special, it’s how strong he is at the reception point,” said SEMO coach

Tom Matukewicz, aka Coach Tuke. “He has baskets for hands. Like when he shakes your hands he’ll shake your elbow.” McRoberts caught everything thrown his way Thursday, but ended the day a little early when he tweaked a hamstring. It seemed precautionary — McRoberts was moving around freely and smiling afterwards. And unless he has private workouts scheduled, it shouldn’t afect his draft status because workouts aren’t permitted on top 30 visits. As it is, McRoberts has had to overcome bigger hurdles over the years. His father died of a heart attack when McRoberts was 9. “I think about him a lot,” McRoberts said. Low tests scores resulted in SEMO being his only offer even though he caught 64 passes for 1,607 yards and 23 TDs as a senior at Soldan. Last summer he was on his way to lift weights at school when he learned a close friend had been shot and killed in St. Louis. There was even a late curveball Thursday, because NFL rules prohibited Southeast Missouri quarterback Jesse Hosket from throwing because he’s not draft eligible. So instead of having a familiar arm throwing to McRoberts, Oakland Raiders scout Trey Scott, once a quarterback at Kansas State, was pressed into action. Two other Redhawks, safety David Coley and fullback Lewis Washington, also participated in the pro day. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

1. How serious is the knee injury that sidelined WR Mike Dudek on Tuesday? • For now, only the team’s medical staf, coaches and Dudek know for sure. But after missing the entire 2015 season due to an ACL tear that occurred exactly one year ago today, any knee issue to the team’s most dynamic pass-catcher is a major concern. 2. What does ofensive coordinator Garrick McGee think of his quarterbacking group? • Sure, senior Wes Lunt is the incumbent starter. He has the most experience and the best arm. But Lunt is immobile and it’s likely McGee will be recruiting QBs who can run as well as throw. A depth chart that ranks Lunt, Chayce Crouch, Jimmy Fitzgerald, Jef George Jr., and early enrollee freshman Eli Peters would be interesting to see. 3. If Lunt is the current starter, who is Lunt’s backup? • Under Bill Cubit, the answer was Crouch, whom he recruited out of Granville, Ohio. But even though Crouch can run the ball, few outsiders saw Crouch’s potential as a passer that Cubit seemed to see. McGee’s analysis is all that matters now. 4. When will Lovie Smith decide it’s time to see how the team looks in a scrimmage setting? • Defensive coordinator Hardy Nickerson was asked that question and he claimed not to know. “At some point, coach will say we’re going live and that’s when we’ll do it,” he said. Since the meaningful parts of practice are off-limits to media and the public, it would be nice if Smith scrimmages for at least a portion of the “open” practice on Saturday, April 16. 5. When will Smith reveal the makeup of his new recruiting staf? • Word is he withheld enough money in coaching salaries to aford a substantial group that will coordinate recruiting. That’s a change in philosophy from past Illini regimes, who named an assistant coach as the recruiting coordinator. Smith has a diferent approach and appears ready to properly staf that aspect of his operation. 6. How will this coaching staff deploy its “difference makers?” And who do they see as “difference makers?” • Defensively, a fast, athletic pass-rusher like Carroll Phillips is an intriguing guy. How Nickerson uses him with be intriguing as well. Offensively, expect someone other than Dudek to emerge as a pass-catching threat. Desmond Cain, Justin Hardee, Malik Turner and Sam Mayes are candidates. 7. What will the offensive line look like with Gabe Megginson and Nick Allegretti expected to take on bigger roles? • Both were highly ranked in-state recruits who have waited for a chance and should get it now under this coaching staf including ofensive line coach Luke Butkus. 8. Is there a tight end who can block and catch? • Sounds simple, but it hasn’t been lately. Senior Andrew Davis looks the part at 6-foot-6 but he’s still a bit thin and not a forceful blocker. The answer might not arrive until this summer, when freshman Andrew Trainer, a 6-7, 245-pounder from Alexandria, Va., arrives. 9. Can something special be created on special teams? • That’s been an underperforming area at Illinois for some time. New special teams coordinator Bob Ligashesky ran special teams for the Houston Texans and will have a chance to ignite a new level of performance that might give Illinois an edge. 10. Does anyone transfer after spring practice ends? • It’s hard to imagine all of the quarterbacks hanging around, especially if they believe McGee is pursuing recruits with a diferent skill set.


04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM

THURSDAY’S RESULTS BASEBALL McCluer North 000 10 1 7 0 Haz. West 405 80 17 11 0 W-Christian Shelton. L-Jordan Gholston.

Breese C. 005 001 3 9 7 0 Freeburg 201 300 1 7 11 5 L-Miranda Schulte. HR-F Miranda Schulte -

U. City 000 00 John Burroughs 535 00 W-Henry Abbott.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL

0 0 0 13 14 0

Haz. Central 9(12)2 (12)4 39 20 0 Haz. East 000 00 0 0 0 W-Mark Haire. L-Lonnell Jackson. Westminster 000 151 0 7 8 1 Summit 002 000 0 2 4 0 W-Benjamin Sems. HR-W Jake Matheny 2-; Mehlville 000 000 0 0 4 0 Marquette 203 400 0 9 13 1 W-Will Bausinger. HR-Ma Spencer Chien -Dylan Dix -

Pky. Central def. Summit 28-26, 25-15 Marquette def. Mehlville 26-24, 25-9 FH Central def. Westminster 25-10, 25-18 Afton def. Kirkwood 25-21, 25-22 Eureka def. Lindbergh 25-22, 25-17 Northwest-CH def. Fox 25-15, 25-20 E. St. Louis def. Granite City 25-13, 25-23 Lafayette def. Pky. South 25-8, 25-10 St. Mary’s def. O’F Christian 15-25, 25-12, 25-20 DuBourg def. Borgia 25-9, 25-12

BOYS TENNIS Howell North 3, St. Charles West 0 St. Dominic 9, St. Mary’s 0

Winield 201 000 0 St.Chas. West 100 001 0 L-Sam Diekemper.

3 6 0 2 3 0

WATER POLO

Kirkwood 000 000 0 Pattonville 212 040 0 W-Max Spitzmiller. L-Tyler Lien. HR-P Matt Mellring -

0 12 0 9 12 0

GIRLS LACROSSE

Webster 022 040 00 8 10 5 Pky. North 340 000 11 9 13 6 W-Clayton Weber. L-Gage Lanouette. Liberty 200 205 2 11 11 4 Orchard Farm 101 000 1 3 6 4 W-Dalton Nilges. L-Mark Cooley. HR-L Chase Krogman -; Crossroads 001 000 0 Brentwood 113 002 2 W-Seth Winkleman.

1 2 9 7

1 1

Eureka 000 100 0 Lindbergh 000 005 0 W-Dennis Yingling.

1 4 0 5 7 0

Seckman 000 000 0 Oakville 010 000 0 W-Bailey Vuylsteke. L-Josh Ray.

0 2 0 1 2 0

John Burroughs 6, Summit 5 Parkway North 14, Kirkwood 6

MICDS 13, St. Joseph’s 11 (Mollie Schmid 3, Brooke Wright 3, Katie O’Hara 2, Olivia Proctor 2, Peggy Rianhard, Lilly Thiemann) Barat 15, Haz. East 8 (Alleigh Fine 7, Hailey Schlueter 3, Mariana Flores 2, Katie Habiger, Natalie Barr, Courtney Borich, Lizzie Johnson; Kaela Finnie 4, Raela Finnie 2, Vae Casson, Taylor Harmon)

GIRLS SOCCER Howell 2, FZ West 1 (Fr: Kristen Epperly, Natalie Jostes) U. City 2, Jennings 1 (U: Justice Corn, Hannah Fuller) Haz. Central 9, McCluer 0 (H: Jada Harvey 2, Riley Janvrin 2, Alexis Turner 2, Jazmin Harvey 2, I’Lysa Walker ; shutout by Alexis Cushshon)

1 6 0 10 14 0

Brentwood 4, Gtwy Snce Ac. 0 (B: Maddie Dorenbusch 2, Gabby Gombas, Amanda Ingersoll ; shutout by Rachel Walthall)

Chaminade 011 000 2 4 7 0 De Smet 110 010 0 3 5 0 W-Hunter Becker. HR-C Peter Zimmermann

McCluer North 8, Haz. East 1 (M: Maggie McGrellis 4, Nicole Dufour, Celeste Dufour, Jayda Jones, Sicily Stanley ;H: A’Lena Gaines)

Zumwalt East 000 010 0 Pky. Central 422 101 0 W-Mac Rogers. L-Jef Beiter.

Barat 040 002 0 Valley Park 203 012 0 W-Austin Schmitt.

6 8 0 8 7 1

Carlyle 013 040 4 12 14 2 Wesclin 110 001 0 3 7 2 W-Maverick Taylor. L-Jarad Steenbergen. Breese C. 000 00 Freeburg 250 30 W-Elias Czech. L-Mitchell Rule. HR-F Ty Dill -

0 1 4 10 8 0

Vianney 140 000 1 CBC 400 000 0 W-Jack Eppy.

6 7 0 4 8 0

Edwardsville 010 200 04 Bellvl. West 010 000 20 W-Andrew Yancik. L-Cal Kossina.

7 10 1 3 5 7

Okawville 000 200 0 Mater Dei 001 020 0 W-Austin Winter.

2 4 0 3 7 0

Alton (11)21 15 Granite City 000 00 W-Gary Volz.

20 12 1 0 1 3

E. St. Louis 000 00 Collinsville 2(10)1 00 W-Bryce Peek.

0 1 0 13 6 0

Valmeyer 520 031 0 11 10 0 Lebanon 000 100 0 1 1 0 W-Andrew Whipple. HR-V Erickson Wallace 3 10 0 7 9 0

Centralia, Il 300 3 4 2 Triad 018 15 14 0 W-Mack Langdon. L-Nolan Beggs.

SOFTBALL Mater Dei 000 118 1 11 17 0 MulberryGrove 000 003 1 4 9 5 W-Aften Richter. HR-Ma Abby Braundmeier -Kelcey Gerdes -; Granite City 000 001 0 1 5 0 Alton 102 201 0 6 6 1 W-Brittany Roady. HR-A Bronte Fencel Carlyle 000 002 20 4 7 0 Wesclin 020 020 01 5 10 3 W-Aspen Lohman. L-Hannah Hofmann. O’Fallon 004 140 0 9 11 0 Bellvl. East 102 001 3 7 14 4 W-Addison Barnouski. L-Angela Vanderpluym. Marissa 000 00 0 1 2 Dupo 055 00 10 14 0 W-Jessica Stansch. L-Alaina Fett. Bellvl. West 160 024 13 13 3 Edwardsville 435 056 23 17 0 W-Jordan Garella. L-Paige Cates. HR-B Morgan Hinkle -Olivia Young -; E Sarah Hangsleben 2-Taryn Brown -Allison Loehr Carlinville 100 400 0 5 8 2 Gillespie 311 410 3 13 19 2 W-Addison Bryant. L-Alyssa DeSpain. HR-G Mackenzie Kasarda 2-Sydney Henrichs Staunton 001 041 1 7 9 1 ME Lutheran 100 000 0 0 3 4 W-Maddie Nichols. L-Amber Keplar. HR-S Maddie Nichols -; Collinsville 263 50 E. St. Louis 000 21 W-Sidney Bost.

Liberty 4, Warrenton 0 (L: Kaitlyn Helland, Natalie Ray, Peyton Carroll, Kylie Seaton ; shutout by Amy Carnahan) MICDS 6, Whitield 2 (W: Brooke Berry, Kelsey Chadwick)

Bellvl. East 000 000 0 0 1 3 O’Fallon 400 000 0 4 3 0 W-Bradley Harrison. L-Ben Cruikshank.

Althof 000 120 Marion 004 030 L-Jake Frazier.

Rosati-Kain 2, Notre Dame 0 (R: Meghan Delaney 2 ; shutout by Libby Modde)

16 7 0 3 3 0

Althof 10, Centralia, Il 0 (A: Jessica Hofman 3, Shannon Maitland 2, Madison Eghigian, Halle Ames, Amanda Kaltwasser, Jackie Minor, Andersyn Foster ; shutout by Rachel Monken) Maplewood-RH 10, North Tech 0 (M: Sophia Roy 2, Emma Bright 2, Emma Sabath 2, Caroline Barron, Maggie Pole, Brooklyn Shatto, Jade Stemmler ; shutout by Brooklyn ShattoJeda Murphy; shutout by Brooklyn Shatto, Jeda Murphy) V. Duchesne 4, Luth. South 0 (V: Kacie Frost, Allison Edmonds, Lauren Gast, Clara Wolf ; shutout by Mimi Anthon, Geena Novelly) Westminster 10, Luth. North 0 (W: Kirsten Davis 7, Sydney Walker 2, Sarah Ragsdale ; shutout by Taylor French) Freeburg 4, ME Lutheran 0 (F: Emilie Blomenkamp 2, Morgan Jetton, Emily Schaller ; shutout by Jenna Rodriguez, Nadia Velasquez) St. Clair 3, St. James 0 (SC: Anna Merseal 2, Amanda Baumruk ; shutout by Katelyn Guehne) Waterloo 10, Mascoutah 0 (W: Mollie Zeisset 4, Sydney Luedeman 3, Alexis Wheeler, Sydney Bockhorn, Bailey Huebner ; shutout by Bailey Bosler, Hillary Kaniecki) Triad 7, Civic Mem. 0 (T: Jody Ellis 3, Maddie Keller 2, Sam Bassler, Katie Rogers ; shutout by Gabby Kayser, Skye Clark) Highland 2, Jerseyville 0 (H: Jaqlyn Ferguson, Katelyn Marti ; shutout by Morgan Zorbrist) Zumwalt East 2, FZ North 1 (FE: Caroline Canoy, Morgan Weller) St. Charles 1, St.Chas. West 0 (S: Brooke Schneider ; shutout by Riley Beerman) Kirkwood 2, Clayton 0 (K: Emilee Autry 2 ; shutout by Kaylee Williams) FH Central 1, FH North 0 (FC: Emma Farley ; shutout by Sydney Chalcraft) DuBourg 1, Trinity 0 (D: Amanda Debarry ; shutout by Julia Reiter)

BOYS GOLF Troy 175, Timberland 175 Woods Fort (36) Tr: Kyle Sachs; and Max Conner, 42 Tim: Carter Wolfe, 41 CBC 241, Chaminade 245 at Normandie, par 36 CBC: Clayton Cissell, 35 CCP: Joe Teschluse, 37 De Smet 240, Vianney 245 at Tapawingo, par 36 V: Alex Heib, 34

MORE ON AT STLHIGHSCHOOLSPORTS.COM Watch our weekly video show where we discuss high school sports.

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • C9

TRACK AND FIELD NOTEBOOK

GREAT OUTDOORS Flyers brave the weather, hoping to regain championship form BY DAVID KVIDAHL STLhighschoolsports.com

EAST ST. LOUIS • Fat rain drops sprinkled Clyde C. Jordan Stadium. Eventually the faucet opened into a downpour. The wind blew hard and fast. Old Glory crackled and snapped on the flag pole. As Mother Nature raged around it, the East St. Louis boys track and field team went about its work. Coach Barry Malloyed has a plan and it calls for the Flyers to weather whatever weather may come their way no matter how wicked. After previous trips to the Penn Relays and the Texas Relays, Malloyed found a common denominator in the highly successful programs. “We learned those people are always outdoors. To compete with them all of our practices, even when it’s 35-40 degrees, we have to practice outdoors,” Malloyed said. The early-season results are proving the plan to be on point. East St. Louis litters the state’s early-season leader board. One of the Flyers or another has the top time in the 200-, 400- and 800-meter races as well as the 300 hurdles. East St. Louis has the top times in the 400-,800- and 3,200-relays. Only Cahokia’s performance on Friday at the Mobile Challenge of Champions usurped the Flyers’ 1,600-relay. Cahokia’s team finished that relay in 3 minutes and 20 seconds. East St. Louis is second at 3:21. To be fair, many of the teams in the northern part of the state and Chicago haven’t had ideal conditions to get out and compete. Meets have been canceled due to snow. East St. Louis will get to see where it stands head-to-head with some of Chicago’s best when it hosts the Al Joyner Track and Field Classic on Friday under the lights at Clyde C. Jordan Stadium on the campus of East St. Louis High. Field events start at 4 p.m. and the 3,200-relay opens the races at 5 p.m. Marian Catholic, Thornton and De La Salle will make the trek down to compete at East Side. Local teams participating include University City, St. Louis U. High, Normandy, Madison, Belleville East, Althof and Lift for Life. Al Joyner, the man who the meet is named in honor of, will be in attendance as well. A gold medalist in the triple jump at the 1984 Olympics, Joyner is an alltime figure in American track and field and an East St. Louis-Lincoln graduate. In an attempt to avoid the cold, Malloyed took the team to New Orleans for the Sugar Bowl Track Classic on March 19. The warmer weather and stif competition provided a perfect environment for the Flyers to run some hot times. “It was a confidence booster,” senior hurdler

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

Track hurdles stacked at Clyde Jordan Stadium in East St. Louis.

Kevin Johnson said. Johnson ran the 300 hurdles in New Orleans in 39.96. It’s the fourthfastest time in Illinois behind sophomore teammate Delano Anderson (38.93), Edwardsville junior Travis Anderson (38.94) and Belleville East senior William Session (39.24). Senior Sanchez Rhodes finished the 800 in 2:01 in New Orleans. It’s currently the best time in Illinois. “That was a good way to start the season,” Rhodes said. Rhodes runs on the 1,600- and 3,200-relay teams. He said the Flyers are unified in their goal of chasing down a state championship. The Flyers haven’t won the state’s top prize since they captured the AA title in 2008. They were the Class 2A runnerup in 2013. “The goal is to get everyone to come together and work together,” Johnson said. “If we can do that, no one can stop us.” One of the biggest pieces is senior sprinter Roosevelt Davis. The man with the fastest 200 time in Illinois at 21.95, Davis is still getting the hang of that race. In the past he’s primarily raced in the 400 and has high hopes for how his career ends. He wants to break the 400 record of 46.24 seconds that was set last year by Plainfield Central’s Kahmari Montgomery. “We’ve been working hard this year for sure,” Davis said. “We’ve been putting in the work, everybody coming to practice and doing what they’re supposed to be doing at practice and on the track.”

WEBSTER’S WEALTH OF THROWERS Webster Groves girls track coach Heather Kelley didn’t mince words when freshman thrower Nia Lyles unleashed a monster throw at the Lindbergh Girls Invitational last Friday. “Those were my exact words, ‘She shattered the school record,’” Kelley said. Lyles won the event and etched her name into the Webster Groves record book with a put of 42 feet, 11.5 inches. It broke the previous school record by more than four feet. Lyles also won the discus with a throw of 109-3. Those two performances

PAUL BAILLARGEON • Special to STLhighschoolsports.com

The Flyers Jessie Brewer works on his hurdling skills at Clyde Jordan stadium in East St. Louis.

alone would make the Statesmen a happy bunch. However, junior teammate Mahalia Wade-Fluker was the runner-up in the shot (35-11) and the disc (9410). That’s 36 points that helped the Statesmen to a runner-up finish with 121.5 points. Lindbergh won the meet with 180. But it gets better for Webster Groves. Both Lyles and Wade-Fluker had to beat out sophomore Jamie Tabron in a throw-off at practice. Tabron was the varsity’s No. 2 thrower as a freshman. Tabron will get to compete at Saturday’s Northwest Invitational. Lyles will miss the meet as she travels out of town with a choir group. The following week all three throwers are expected to compete at practice to see which two will throw at the ultra-competitive Henle Holmes Invitational at Parkway Central. The day-to-day competition can only help the Statesmen as they try to defend their district crown and move forward in the state series. “Having Nia is pushing them to do better,” Kelley said.

CAHOKIA, WARD IMPRESS AGAIN Another week, another eye-catching performance for Cahokia star senior jumper Ja’Mari Ward. The Mizzou recruit leaped 50 feet, 11.5 inches in the triple jump last Friday at the Mobile Challenge of Champions in Mobile, Ala. It’s the best jump in Illinois and the second-best outdoor tri-

ple jump in the nation this year. Ward also went 24-6 in the long jump to claim the top spot in Illinois and tie for the fifth-best leap in the nation according to Milesplit.com. Not to be outdone, the Comanches put together a monster performance in the 1,600-relay. Cahokia finished in 3:21 — good enough for third place and the fastest time in Illinois. The Comanches are back in action Saturday at the Belleville West Invitational. Cahokia, the 2A state champ, will compete against defending 3A champion Edwardsville. Among the individuals expected to compete are Triad sprinter Adam Nelson, Belleville East standout hurdler William Session and Edwardsville’s phenom thrower AJ Epenesa.

BRENTWOOD’S RIVERA DEBUTS Sophia Rivera competed in her first meet of the spring last week at the Centre Invitational at Centre College in Danville, Ky. A Brentwood senior, Rivera is a three-time defending state champion in the shot put and discus. She threw the javelin 160 feet, 6 inches. It’s the best javelin toss in the nation according to Milesplit.com but well short of her personal record of 175-10 she set last season at the Brentwood Invitational. A Wisconsin recruit, Rivera has yet to compete in the discus or shot put this season.

FRIDAY’S SCHEDULE BASEBALL Normandy at Hazelwood Central, 4 p.m. Parkway North at McCluer North, 4 p.m. Hancock at Bayless, 4 p.m. Normandy at Maplewood-RH, 4 p.m. Sullivan at Kingston, 4 p.m. Herculaneum at Afton, 4 p.m. O’Fallon vs. Civic Mem., at Bethalto Spor, 4:15 p.m. Summit at Hazelwood West, 4:15 p.m. Duchesne at St. Dominic, 4:15 p.m. Mount Vernon at Belleville East, 4:15 p.m. Wright City at Orchard Farm, 4:15 p.m. Westminster at Priory, 4:15 p.m. Howell North at Zumwalt South, 4:15 p.m. DuBourgvs.Brentwood,atBrentwoodPar,4:15p.m. North Tech at Gateway STEM, 4:15 p.m. De Smet at Timberland, 4:15 p.m. Riverview Gardens at Lutheran North, 4:15 p.m. MICDS at Clayton, 4:15 p.m. Staunton at Piasa Southwestern, 4:30 p.m. Carlyle at South Central, 4:30 p.m. Gillespie at Roxana, 4:30 p.m. SacredHeart vs.Edwardsville,atTomPileFiel,4:30p.m. Wood River at Hardin Calhoun, 4:30 p.m.

Mascoutah at Carbondale, 4:30 p.m. Waterloo vs. Wesclin, at Trenton C. Pa, 4:30 p.m. Okawville at Red Bud, 4:30 p.m. Warrenton at St. Clair, 4:30 p.m. Windsor at Hillsboro, 4:30 p.m. Mount Olive at Pawnee, 4:30 p.m. Woodlawn at Marissa, 4:30 p.m. CBC at St. Louis U. High, 4:30 p.m. Mater Dei at Salem, 4:30 p.m. East St.L vs. Carnahan, at Minnie Wood , 4:30 p.m. Carlinville at Greenville, 4:45 p.m. Collinsville at Riverton, 5 p.m. Luth. St. C. vs. Blair Oaks, at Vivion Field, 5 p.m. Ste. Genevieve at St. Pius X, 6:30 p.m. Staggvs.GraniteCity,atBabeChampion,6:30p.m. Columbia vs. Gibault, at GCS Ballpark, 7 p.m. Union vs. Sullivan, at Trojan Rec Co, 8 p.m.

SOFTBALL Waterloo at Dupo, 4:15 p.m. Mascoutah at Wood River, 4:15 p.m. Edwardsville at Triad, 4:15 p.m. Gillespie at Roxana, 4:30 p.m. Normal Comm at O’Fallon, 4:30 p.m.

Woodlawn at Marissa, 4:30 p.m. Okawville at Red Bud, 4:30 p.m. Columbia at Belleville East, 4:30 p.m. Staunton at Piasa Southwestern, 4:30 p.m. Collinsville at Breese Central, 4:30 p.m. ME Lutheran at Nokomis, 4:30 p.m. Valmeyer at Freeburg, 4:30 p.m. Mount Olive at Pawnee, 4:30 p.m. Nashville at Lebanon, 4:30 p.m. Carlinville at Greenville, 4:45 p.m. Quincy Notre Dame at Mater Dei, 5 p.m.

TRACK AND FIELD St. Dominic Crusader Invitational

BOYS LACROSSE Francis Howell at Parkway South, 5 p.m. Memphis U. High at St. Louis U. High, 7 p.m. Marquette at De Smet, 7 p.m.

GIRLS SOCCER Lafayette vs. Incarnate, at St. Joseph’s, 2:30 p.m. Collinsville vs. Cor Jesu, at St. Joseph’s, 2:30 p.m.

McCluer North at Pattonville, 4 p.m. Villa Duchesne at Notre Dame, 4 p.m. Barat vs. Valley Park, at Soccer Park, 4 p.m. Bayless at Hancock, 4 p.m. Blue Valley NW at St. Joseph’s, 4 p.m. Nerinx Hall vs. Bartlett, at St. Joseph’s, 4 p.m. Kennedy at Visitation, 4 p.m. Ritenour at Riverview Gardens, 4 p.m. Hazelwood Central at Trinity, 4 p.m. Metrovs.TowerGroveChr,atGatewayMid.,4p.m. John Burroughs at Westminster, 4:15 p.m. Ladue at Whitield, 4:30 p.m. Althof at Alton, 4:30 p.m. Columbia at Wesclin, 4:30 p.m. Belleville East at Freeburg, 4:30 p.m. Lutheran South at Lutheran North, 4:30 p.m. Gillespie at ME Lutheran, 4:30 p.m. Wood River at Litchield, 5 p.m. Jackson at Union, 5 p.m. Hazelwood West at Summit, 5 p.m. St. Louis Patriots at Sullivan, 5 p.m. Carlinville at Williamsville, 5 p.m. Winield at Luth. St. Charles, 5 p.m. Quincy ND at Alton Marquette, 5 p.m. St. Charles West at Liberty, 5:30 p.m.

DuBourg at O’Fallon Christian, 5:30 p.m. FZ East vs. Granite City, at St. Joseph’s, 5:30 p.m. ParkwaySouthvs.Helias,atSt.Joseph’s,5:30p.m. Fox at Parkway West, 6 p.m. Zumwalt South at Howell North, 6 p.m. Timberland at Howell Central, 6 p.m. Lindbergh at Hickman, 7 p.m.

BOYS VOLLEYBALL

Pattonville vs. Ladue, at Haz. West, 4:15 p.m. Whitield at Hazelwood East, 4:30 p.m. Parkway West at Webster Groves, 5 p.m. Notre Dame at Parkway North, 5:30 p.m. Summit at Kirkwood, 5:45 p.m. Clayton at Hazelwood West, 5:45 p.m.

BOYS TENNIS

DuBourg at Lindbergh, 5 p.m. Parkway South at St. Louis U. High, 5 p.m. Eureka at Parkway Central, 5:15 p.m. Marquette at Parkway West, 5:15 p.m. Parkway North at Oakville, 5:15 p.m. De Smet at Lafayette, 5:30 p.m.

Holt Tournament at Holt, 3 p.m. Hazelwood West at St. Charles, 3:30 p.m. Summit at Mehlville, 4 p.m. University City at McCluer, 4 p.m. Lindbergh at Poplar Bluf, 4 p.m. CBC at Hazelwood Central, 4 p.m. Ritenour vs. Metro, at Tower Grove P, 4 p.m.

BOYS GOLF

WATER POLO

Sullivan Invitational, 9 a.m. MICDSvs.JohnBurroughsatForestPark,3:30p.m.

MICDS vs. Hinsdale South, at Lafayette, 4:15 p.m. Marquettevs.ParkwayWest,atLafayette,5:10p.m. Ladue at Chaminade, 5:30 p.m. Oakville vs. Mehlville, at Lafayette, 6:05 p.m. Hinsdale South vs. Lindbergh, at Lafayette, 7 p.m. MICDS at Lafayette, 7:55 p.m. Marquette vs. Mehlville, at Lafayette, 8:50 p.m.

GIRLS LACROSSE Nerinx Hall at John Burroughs, 4 p.m. ParkwaySouthvs.Marquette,atHaz.West,4:15p.m.


FOR THE RECORD

C10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH AMERICA’S LINE

SOCCER

BASEBALL Favorite American League TIGERS Indians ORIOLES BLUE JAYS ROYALS ANGELS MARINERS National League METS ROCKIES Pirates Cards Cubs GIANTS InterLeague Astros

Major League Soccer EASTERN W L T Pts GF GA Orlando City 2 0 2 8 8 4 Montreal 2 2 0 6 6 5 Philadelphia 2 2 0 6 5 4 New England 1 1 3 6 5 7 New York City FC 1 1 2 5 7 7 Chicago 1 1 2 5 5 5 Toronto FC 1 2 1 4 4 4 New York 1 3 0 3 4 9 D.C. United 0 2 3 3 3 9 Columbus 0 2 2 2 3 5 WESTERN W L T Pts GF GA FC Dallas 3 1 1 10 8 6 Sporting K.C. 3 1 0 9 5 3 Real Salt Lake 2 0 2 8 8 6 Los Angeles 2 1 1 7 7 3 Colorado 2 1 1 7 3 2 Vancouver 2 2 1 7 6 6 San Jose 2 1 1 7 5 5 Houston 1 2 1 4 11 8 Portland 1 2 1 4 6 9 Seattle 1 3 0 3 3 5 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Sunday’s Games Orlando City 4, Portland 1 Friday Orlando City at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. Saturday Columbus at Montreal, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at New England, 3 p.m. Vancouver at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Sporting K.C. at New York, 6 p.m. San Jose at FC Dallas, 8 p.m. Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 8:30 p.m. Sunday Seattle at Houston, 3 p.m. Chicago at New York City FC, 6 p.m. Portland at Los Angeles, 8:30 p.m.

Odds

Underdog

-$118 -$120 -$125 -$140 -$148 -$130 -$170

Yankees WHITE SOX Rays Red Sox Twins Rangers A’s

-$240 -$155 -$155 -$148 -$135 -$118

Phillies Padres REDS BRAVES D’BACKS Dodgers

-$130

BREWERS

NBA Favorite Points Underdog HORNETS 15.5 Nets Knicks 3 76ERS MAGIC [PK] Heat PISTONS [2] Wizards RAPTORS [4] Pacers CELTICS [8] Bucks PELICANS 2 Lakers MAVERICKS 6 Grizzlies Spurs [7] NUGGETS JAZZ 8 Clippers []-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a variety of reasons, with the prime factor being an injury. When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wagering. The line could move a few points in either direction, depending on the severity of the injury. NHL Favorite SABRES

Odds -$120/even

Underdog Blue Jackets

BASKETBALL

Home team in CAPS © 2016 Benjamin Eckstein

NBA leaders

TRANSACTIONS

Through Wednesday SCORING AVERAGE

BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended free agent OF Henry Charles 76 games and free agent RHP Adam Reifer and San Diego OF Jose Urena (Fort Wayne-MWL) 80 games for violations of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON RED SOX — Sent C Christian Vasquez to Pawtucket (IL) for a rehab assignment. HOUSTON ASTROS — Optioned RHP Michael Feliz to Fresno (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Chris Devenski from Fresno. Designated RHP Danny Reynolds for assignment. LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Placed LHP Andrew Heaney on the 15-day DL. National League CARDINALS — Traded LHP Jayson Aquino to Baltimore for cash. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES — Waived C Ryan Hollins. Signed G Xavier Munford to a multi-year contract. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS — Announced the resignation of general manager Sam Hinkie. Signed F Christian Wood for the remainder of the season. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS — LB A.J. Tarpley announced his retirement. Signed C Fernando Velasco. DENVER BRONCOS — Signed LS Casey Kreiter to a one-year contract. HOUSTON TEXANS — Re-signed S Quintin Demps. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Waived G Ben Heenan. Signed WRs Josh Boyce and Brian Tyms. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed DL Markus Kuhn. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed S Reggie Nelson. HOCKEY National Hockey League ARIZONA COYOTES — Announced G Adin Hill, F Christian Fischer and D Dysin Mayo will join Springfield (AHL) upon completion of their junior hockey seasons. BUFFALO SABRES — Called up Fs Evan Rodrigues and Cole Schneider from Rochester (AHL). CAROLINA HURRICANES — Recalled F Derek Ryan from Charlotte (AHL). DALLAS STARS — Recalled C Jason Dickinson from Texas (AHL). EDMONTON OILERS — Signed D Caleb Jones to a three-year entry level contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Recalled F Jonathan Drouin and D Matt Taormina from Syracuse (AHL). Assigned D Slater Koekkoek to Syracuse. COLLEGE MEDAL OF HONOR BOWL — Named Lt. Gen. William M. Steele to the national board of directors. EMORY & HENRY — Removed interim designation from men’s and women’s tennis coach Steve Brooks. GONZAGA — Sophomore C Domantas Sabonis will enter the NBA draft. LOUISIANA TECH — Announced the resignation of women’s basketball coach Tyler Summitt. MARYLAND — Announced junior F Robert Carter Jr. will enter the NBA draft. OKLAHOMA STATE — Named Mike Boynton Jr. and Danny Henderson men’s assistant basketball coaches. PRINCETON — Fired men’s lacrosse coach Chris Bates. Promoted offensive coordinator Matt Madalon to men’s interim lacrosse coach. RUTGERS — Named David VanDyke assistant athletic director-strength and conditioning. SMU — Named Travis Mays basketball coach. SYRACUSE — Announced junior men’s basketball C Chinonso Obokoh will transfer. VALPARAISO — Named Matt Lotich men’s basketball coach. VIRGINIA TECH — Released sophomore G Jalen Hudson from the men’s basketball program.

AREA COLLEGES THURSDAY RESULTS Baseball SW Illinois 16, Shawnee 5 WEDNESDAY LATE RESULTS Men’s volleyball Lindenwood def. McKendree 26-24, 25-20, 19-25, 25-18

Curry, GOL Harden, HOU Durant, OKC Cousins, SAC James, CLE Lillard, POR Davis, NOR DeRozan, TOR Westbrook, OKC George, IND Thompson, GOL Thomas, BOS Anthony, NYK Lowry, TOR Walker, CHA Leonard, SAN Butler, CHI McCollum, POR Wiggins, MIN Lopez, Bro Wall, WAS Paul, LAC Hayward, UTA Wade, MIA Jackson, DET Nowitzki, DAL Towns, MIN Middleton, MIL Aldridge, SAN Vucevic, ORL Gay, SAC Millsap, ATL Anderson, NOR

G FG FT PTS AVG 75 759 348 2248 30.0 78 661 697 2234 28.6 70 676 436 1964 28.1 64 594 475 1733 27.1 74 711 351 1853 25.0 73 599 407 1827 25.0 61 560 326 1481 24.3 75 591 548 1777 23.7 78 644 453 1841 23.6 78 590 440 1826 23.4 76 627 187 1707 22.5 78 568 451 1749 22.4 70 552 325 1532 21.9 74 497 395 1592 21.5 77 550 356 1631 21.2 69 526 276 1454 21.1 63 444 372 1320 21.0 78 627 179 1628 20.9 77 569 411 1604 20.8 73 591 317 1501 20.6 77 572 272 1531 19.9 72 509 291 1429 19.8 76 488 378 1489 19.6 69 504 308 1323 19.2 78 526 284 1450 18.6 71 476 226 1296 18.3 78 588 216 1419 18.2 76 487 265 1381 18.2 71 518 252 1288 18.1 62 504 106 1116 18.0 67 447 187 1152 17.2 77 477 296 1319 17.1 66 397 199 1124 17.0

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE FG Jordan, LAC 350 Howard, HOU 349 Whiteside, MIA 386 Kanter, OKC 404 Gortat, WAS 414 Faried, DEN 345 Lopez, NYK 340 Towns, MIN 588 Dieng, MIN 289 Drummond, DET 545 Monroe, MIL 476 Favors, UTA 408 Aldridge, SAN 518 James, CLE 711 Young, Bro 495 Lopez, Bro 591 Okafor, PHL 397 Leonard, SAN 526 Jokic, DEN 290 Durant, OKC 676 Antetokounmpo, MIL 489 Vucevic, ORL 504 Horford, ATL 504 Griffin, LAC 289 Curry, GOL 759 Parker, SAN 336 Parker, MIL 414 Davis, NOR 560 Parsons, DAL 320 Ibaka, OKC 410

FGA 499 566 631 696 737 617 627 1085 545 1039 917 790 1006 1383 963 1157 781 1036 572 1334 965 996 999 575 1511 679 837 1136 651 848

PCT .701 .617 .612 .580 .562 .559 .542 .542 .530 .525 .519 .516 .515 .514 .514 .511 .508 .508 .507 .507 .507 .506 .505 .503 .502 .495 .495 .493 .492 .483

3-POINT FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 3FG 3FGA Redick, LAC 193 411 Curry, GOL 382 837 Leonard, SAN 126 280 Bayless, MIL 101 231 Thompson, GOL 266 621 McDermott, CHI 108 254 McCollum, POR 195 464 Dudley, WAS 97 231 Dellavedova, CLE 96 230 Parsons, DAL 104 251 Calderon, NYK 84 203 Casspi, SAC 112 274 Olynyk, BOS 82 201 Beverley, HOU 117 289 Middleton, MIL 142 353 Smith, CLE 197 493 Korver, ATL 151 378 G. Hill, IND 120 301 Williams, CHA 143 359 Fournier, ORL 147 372 Barea, DAL 99 251 Collison, SAC 82 208 Teague, ATL 102 259 Teletovic, PHX 167 426 Mills, SAN 118 302 Frye, CLE 87 223 Crabbe, POR 109 280 LaVine, MIN 112 289

PCT .470 .456 .450 .437 .428 .425 .420 .420 .417 .414 .414 .409 .408 .405 .402 .400 .399 .399 .398 .395 .394 .394 .394 .392 .391 .390 .389 .388

FREE THROW PERCENTAGE FT Crawford, LAC 233 Curry, GOL 348 Durant, OKC 436 Paul, LAC 291 Nowitzki, DAL 226 Lillard, POR 407 Redick, LAC 182 Leonard, SAN 276 Middleton, MIL 265 Irving, CLE 166 Martin, SAN 140 Thomas, BOS 451 Anderson, NOR 199 Williams, DAL 170 Thompson, GOL 187 Gallinari, DEN 375 Hood, UTA 168 Harden, HOU 697 Jackson, DET 284 Aldridge, SAN 252 George, IND 440 Matthews, DAL 120 Rubio, MIN 260 Collison, SAC 187 Knight, PHX 156 DeRozan, TOR 548 Walker, CHA 356

PCT .917 .904 .897 .895 .893 .891 .888 .887 .883 .883 .881 .874 .873 .872 .870 .868 .866 .864 .861 .860 .859 .857 .855 .854 .852 .848 .848

FTA 254 385 486 325 253 457 205 311 300 188 159 516 228 195 215 432 194 807 330 293 512 140 304 219 183 646 420

REBOUNDS PER GAME G OFF Drummond, DET 79 385 Jordan, LAC 75 264 Howard, HOU 67 231 Whiteside, MIA 68 217 Cousins, SAC 64 155 Gobert, UTA 58 196 Gasol, CHI 70 149 Towns, MIN 78 220 Randle, LAL 77 169 Davis, NOR 61 130 Gortat, WAS 72 218 Love, CLE 75 145 Green, GOL 77 128 Pachulia, DAL 72 238 Valanciunas, TOR 56 173 Thompson, CLE 79 263 Young, Bro 73 176 Vucevic, ORL 62 170 Monroe, MIL 76 212 Millsap, ATL 77 184 Chandler, PHX 64 169 Faried, DEN 66 230 Aldridge, SAN 71 169 Sullinger, BOS 77 190 Durant, OKC 70 43 Favors, UTA 60 165 Biyombo, TOR 77 172 Kanter, OKC 79 240 Noel, PHL 63 143 Randolph, MEM 64 167

DEF 789 773 566 587 585 445 620 599 627 497 499 590 611 451 344 457 484 388 467 499 392 343 445 471 535 324 450 398 360 339

TOT 1174 1037 797 804 740 641 769 819 796 627 717 735 739 689 517 720 660 558 679 683 561 573 614 661 578 489 622 638 503 506

AVG 14.9 13.8 11.9 11.8 11.6 11.1 11.0 10.5 10.3 10.3 10.0 9.8 9.6 9.6 9.2 9.1 9.0 9.0 8.9 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.6 8.3 8.2 8.1 8.1 8.0 7.9

ASSISTS PER GAME G 72 78 77 72 72 77 78 73 74 75 73 74 69 78 78 56 65 75 67 62 67 65 69 77 70 78 64 69 63 73

Rondo, SAC Westbrook, OKC Wall, WAS Paul, LAC Rubio, MIN Green, GOL Harden, HOU Lillard, POR James, CLE Curry, GOL Smith, PHL Lowry, TOR Payton, ORL Thomas, BOS Jackson, DET Conley, MEM Holiday, NOR Teague, ATL Dragic, MIA Williams, DAL Batum, CHA Mudiay, DEN Parker, SAN Walker, CHA Durant, OKC Ellis, IND Rose, CHI Wade, MIA Butler, CHI Dellavedova, CLE

AST 839 810 789 714 625 576 582 500 505 499 475 477 435 490 483 342 391 444 396 362 388 356 369 396 350 373 305 324 288 329

AVG 11.7 10.4 10.2 9.9 8.7 7.5 7.5 6.8 6.8 6.7 6.5 6.4 6.3 6.3 6.2 6.1 6.0 5.9 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.5 5.3 5.1 5.0 4.8 4.8 4.7 4.6 4.5

STL 162 150 149 153 161 154 141 148 145 144 142 124 123 133 107 107 107 125 116 123 100 113 99 88 112 116 114 88 106 100

AVG 2.16 2.08 2.07 2.07 2.06 2.00 1.96 1.90 1.88 1.85 1.84 1.80 1.78 1.71 1.70 1.70 1.70 1.64 1.63 1.60 1.59 1.57 1.55 1.54 1.53 1.51 1.44 1.44 1.43 1.41

BLK 255 174 129 125 141 145 134 124 132 129 110 119 123 124 104 118 93 86 91 79 111 108 106 103 74 95 76 84 85 90

AVG 3.75 2.32 2.22 2.05 2.01 1.91 1.86 1.70 1.69 1.68 1.64 1.63 1.60 1.57 1.55 1.51 1.48 1.43 1.42 1.41 1.41 1.40 1.38 1.36 1.32 1.32 1.31 1.20 1.16 1.15

STEALS PER GAME Curry, GOL Rubio, MIN Paul, LAC Lowry, TOR Westbrook, OKC Ariza, HOU Rondo, SAC George, IND Wall, WAS Ellis, IND Millsap, ATL Crowder, BOS Leonard, SAN Harden, HOU Noel, PHL Allen, MEM Butler, CHI Middleton, MIL Oladipo, ORL Walker, CHA Covington, PHL Bradley, BOS Cousins, SAC Smart, BOS Young, Bro Green, GOL Drummond, DET , MEM Caldwell-Pope, DET Porter, WAS

G 75 72 72 74 78 77 72 78 77 78 77 69 69 78 63 63 63 76 71 77 63 72 64 57 73 77 79 61 74 71

BLOCKED SHOTS PER GAME G Whiteside, MIA 68 Jordan, LAC 75 Gobert, UTA 58 Davis, NOR 61 Gasol, CHI 70 Ibaka, OKC 76 Porzingis, NYK 72 Lopez, Bro 73 Towns, MIN 78 Biyombo, TOR 77 Bogut, GOL 67 Grant, PHL 73 Millsap, ATL 77 Lopez, NYK 79 Howard, HOU 67 Horford, ATL 78 Noel, PHL 63 Favors, UTA 60 Cousins, SAC 64 Turner, IND 56 Drummond, DET 79 Green, GOL 77 Hibbert, LAL 77 Antetokounmpo, MIL 76 Valanciunas, TOR 56 Gortat, WAS 72 Duncan, SAN 58 Durant, OKC 70 Capela, HOU 73 Dieng, MIN 78

HOCKEY NHL Leaders Through Wednesday Goal Scoring Name Team Alex Ovechkin Washington Patrick Kane Chicago Jamie Benn Dallas Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Brad Marchand Boston Joe Pavelski San Jose Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Corey Perry Anaheim Tyler Seguin Dallas Patrice Bergeron Boston Filip Forsberg Nashville James Neal Nashville John Tavares NY Islanders Matt Duchene Colorado Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Boone Jenner Columbus Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Jason Spezza Dallas Tyler Toffoli Los Angeles

GP 77 80 80 78 75 80 77 79 79 72 78 80 80 76 74 77 80 76 74 80

G 47 44 41 37 36 36 36 35 33 33 32 32 31 31 30 30 30 30 30 30

Assists Name Team Erik Karlsson Ottawa Joe Thornton San Jose Patrick Kane Chicago Evgeny Kuznetsov Washington Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim Kris Letang Pittsburgh Blake Wheeler Winnipeg Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Nicklas Backstrom Washington Jamie Benn Dallas Brent Burns San Jose Johnny Gaudreau Calgary Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Roman Josi Nashville John Klingberg Dallas

GP 80 80 80 79 74 70 80 79 73 80 80 77 79 80 74

A 64 61 58 55 50 50 50 49 47 47 47 47 47 46 46

Power Play Goals Name Team Alex Ovechkin Washington Jamie Benn Dallas Patrick Kane Chicago Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Jarome Iginla Colorado Wayne Simmonds Philadelphia Shea Weber Nashville Patrice Bergeron Boston Shane Doan Arizona Oliver Ekman-Larss Arizona Justin Faulk Carolina Corey Perry Anaheim Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Patrick Marleau San Jose T.J. Oshie Washington Kyle Palmieri New Jersey Joe Pavelski San Jose Brayden Schenn Philadelphia

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

GP 77 80 80 77 80 79 77 78 70 73 62 79 78 57 80 77 80 80 77

PP 19 17 17 14 13 13 13 12 12 12 12 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11

Short Handed Goals Name Team Jean-Gabriel Pagea Ottawa Eric Fehr Pittsburgh Brad Marchand Boston Zack Smith Ottawa Jonathan Toews Chicago Artem Anisimov Chicago Kyle Brodziak St Louis Paul Byron Montreal Cody Eakin Dallas Marian Hossa Chicago Derek Stepan NY Rangers

GP 80 53 75 79 79 77 74 60 80 64 70

SH 6 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

Power Play Assists Name Team Nicklas Backstrom Washington Erik Karlsson Ottawa Brent Burns San Jose Kris Letang Pittsburgh P.K. Subban Montreal Claude Giroux Philadelphia Jakub Voracek Philadelphia Kevin Shattenkirk St Louis Joe Thornton San Jose Keith Yandle NY Rangers Henrik Zetterberg Detroit Patrick Kane Chicago John Klingberg Dallas Alexander Steen St Louis Tyson Barrie Colorado Ryan Johansen CBJ-NAS Roman Josi Nashville Torey Krug Boston Brent Seabrook Chicago Ryan Suter Minnesota

GP 73 80 80 70 68 76 70 70 80 80 80 80 74 65 76 78 80 79 79 81

PPA 27 24 22 22 22 21 21 20 20 20 20 19 19 19 18 18 18 18 18 18

Short Handed Assists Name Team Jamie Benn Dallas Matt Cullen Pittsburgh Niklas Hjalmarsson Chicago David Krejci Boston Curtis Lazar Ottawa Kris Letang Pittsburgh Jeff Petry Montreal Jared Spurgeon Minnesota Jonathan Toews Chicago Scottie Upshall St Louis Joel Armia Winnipeg Francois Beauchemi Colorado Patrice Bergeron Boston Lance Bouma Calgary T.J. Brodie Calgary J.T. Brown Tampa Bay Paul Byron Montreal Zdeno Chara Boston Casey Cizikas NY Islanders Vernon Fiddler Dallas Michael Frolik Calgary Carl Hagelin ANA-PIT Erik Haula Minnesota Josh Jooris Calgary Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Gabriel Landeskog Colorado Brad Marchand Boston Torrey Mitchell Montreal Dion Phaneuf TOR-OTT

GP 80 80 80 70 75 70 51 76 79 68 41 80 78 44 68 76 60 78 78 80 64 78 75 57 79 73 75 69 71

SHA 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Power Play Points Name Team Patrick Kane Chicago Nicklas Backstrom Washington Jamie Benn Dallas Brent Burns San Jose Oliver Ekman-Larss Arizona Claude Giroux Philadelphia Kris Letang Pittsburgh Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh Joe Pavelski San Jose Joe Thornton San Jose Kevin Shattenkirk St Louis Patrice Bergeron Boston Erik Karlsson Ottawa Nikita Kucherov Tampa Bay Shea Weber Nashville

GP 80 73 80 80 73 76 70 57 80 80 70 78 80 76 77

PPP 36 30 29 29 27 27 27 27 27 27 26 25 25 25 25

Short Handed Points Name Team Jean-Gabriel Pagea Ottawa Jonathan Toews Chicago Brad Marchand Boston Jamie Benn Dallas Paul Byron Montreal Matt Cullen Pittsburgh Zack Smith Ottawa Game Winning Goals Name Team Joe Pavelski San Jose Patrick Kane Chicago Aleksander Barkov Florida Sidney Crosby Pittsburgh Oliver Ekman-Larss Arizona Anze Kopitar Los Angeles Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay Jonathan Toews Chicago Adam Henrique New Jersey Marcus Johansson Washington Tyler Johnson Tampa Bay Alex Ovechkin Washington Artemi Panarin Chicago Zach Parise Minnesota Rickard Rakell Anaheim Brandon Saad Columbus Jeff Skinner Carolina Mika Zibanejad Ottawa Shots Name Team Alex Ovechkin Washington Brent Burns San Jose Max Pacioretty Montreal Taylor Hall Edmonton Vladimir Tarasenko St Louis Patrick Kane Chicago Tyler Seguin Dallas Patrice Bergeron Boston Evander Kane Buffalo Phil Kessel Pittsburgh Nazem Kadri Toronto James Neal Nashville Daniel Sedin Vancouver Jeff Skinner Carolina Blake Wheeler Winnipeg

GP 80 79 75 80 60 80 79 GP 80 80 64 79 73 79 77 79 78 71 67 77 78 70 72 76 80 79 GP 77 80 80 81 78 80 72 78 65 80 76 80 80 80 80

SHP 7 7 6 5 5 5 5 GW 10 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

FISHING REPORT Baldwin • Fishing is generally slow. Catfish are slow, crappie are starting to bite, as are bass. Busch Area • Lake 33: Water temperature is 62 degrees, normal and clear; Bluegill fair using worms or crickets; catfish fair using dough baits, blood baits or livers; black bass fair using spinnerbaits, plastic worms and crankbaits; crappie fair. Lakes 3, 4, 5, 7 and 23: Water temperature is 61 degrees, normal and clear. Catfish fair using doughbaits, livers or blood baits. Bull Shoals • East: Water temperature is 56 degrees, normal and dingy. Black bass good; white bass fair using minnows or jigs. West: Water temperature is 49 degrees, normal and dingy. White bass good using live minnows, white sliders, blue bucktail jigs and white or black 1/8-ounce jigs; black bass fair using soft plastics and jigs; walleye good using Rogues, jigs and live baits below Powersite Dam and in the Beaver Creek area; crappie good using live minnows, soft plastics and jigs around submerged timber and closer to the bank. Carlyle Lake • Crappie fair and being caught on top of structure and in brush piles. Most fish are holding in 3-5 feet, with minnows and jigs as the primary bait. White bass good on tube jigs, minnows and curlytails. Catfish improving on shad guts and nightcrawlers. Saugers good on curlytails tipped with minnows or nightcrawlers. Catfish are being caught on minnows and stinkbait. Clearwater • Water temperature is 55 degrees, high and dingy. All species are slow. Lake is 1 ½ feet high. Coffeen • Water is normal and clear. Crappie and bass are good using minnows and jigs. Catfish are good on shrimp, worms, Sonny’s stinkbait and Geno’s stinkbait. Council Bluff • Water temperature is 60 degrees, normal and clear. Largemouth bass fair on dark-colored soft plastics. All other species — redear sunfish, bluegill, crappie and channel catfish — are slow. Hunnewell • Water temperature is 56 degrees, normal and dingy. Largemouth bass fair using plastic worms; crappie fair using jigs; all other species slow. Kinkaid • Bluegill are being caught in 3-5 feet on wigglers and waxworms. Crappies are in 5-10 feet and have been good on minnows and jigs. Bass fair on plastics and spinners. Catfish on stinkbaits and worms. Muskie have picked up and should be plentiful this spring. Lake of the Ozarks • Bagnell Tailwater section: Water temperature is 52 degrees, rising and clear. Catfish fair using worms or cutbaits; crappie slow using minnows and crappie jigs; black bass fair using buzzbaits or dark-colored soft plastics; white bass are slow using light-colored soft plastics or spoons. Glaize section: Water temperature is 52 degrees, rising and dingy. Catfish slow using stinkbaits, cut baits and chicken livers; crappie fair using minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow using light, soft plastics, spoons and Rooster tails; white bass slow using light-colored soft plastics, spoons and Rooster tails. Gravois section: Water temperature is 52 degrees, rising and dingy. Catfish slow using cut baits; crappie fair using jigs; black bass slow; white bass slow. Niangua section: Water temperature is 52 degrees, rising and dingy. Catfish slow using cut baits and chicken livers; crappie fair using minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow using soft dark plastics and buzz baits; white bass slow using light soft plastics, spoons and Rooster tails. Osage section: Water temperature is 52 degrees, normal and clear. Catfish slow using stinkbaits, cut baits and chicken livers; crappie slow using minnows and crappie jigs; black bass slow using dark soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow using light soft plastics, spoons and Rooster tails. Lake Shelbyville • Crappie are biting in deeper water on minnows. White bass fair. Saugers good in deep areas and below the spillway. Muskies caught have been small to medium. Lake Taneycomo • Water temperature is 48 degrees, normal and dingy. Upper portion: Trout good using 1/16-oz. olive, white and black marabou jigs and chrome or white and chrome Rooster tails, scud-pattern flies and San Juan worms. Lower portion: Trout good using chartreuse, orange, white and pink Gulp nuggets, nightcrawlers and corn. Long Branch • No report provided. Mark Twain • Water temperature is 53 degrees. All species slow. Mississippi River (St. Louis region) • Water temperature is 52 degrees, rising and muddy. Channel catfish and blue catfish slow using cut baits; freshwater drum are slow on worms; all other species slow. Newton • Recent rain and wind have the water temperature down to 47 degrees and muddy after some very good fishing last week. Bass and catfish are being caught along the bottom of the lake. Norfork • Water temperature is 57 degrees, normal and dingy. Black bass good using a variety of lures; white bass good using minnows and jigs; walleye fair using minnows and worms. Pomme de Terre • Water temperature is 53 degrees, normal and dingy. Black bass good on crankbaits along bluffs; walleye fair along the dam and upper end of the lake; white bass fair, catfish fair on cut baits, crappie fair on minnows in 15-20 feet. Rend Lake • Water temperature is 52 degrees and 1.18 feet above average pool (407.81) for this date. Largemouth bass good using worms, black and blue jigs, minnows and spinnerbaits in shallow bays near brush cover and bushes, around bridges and along the rocks. Fish are being caught at Jackie Branch, Sandusky Cove and below the dam; crappie good using jigs, ¼-oz. pink and white tub jigs, small and medium minnows and meal worms fishing the main lake drop-off areas around the Gun Creek area. From shore, fish near structures with hot spots around Jackie Branch, Sandusky, Sailboat Harbor and Marcum coves and the Ina boat ramp; bluegill good using crickets, worms, wax worms, meal worms and small jigs in the back of necks, on flat shallow banks and on the rocks. Try fishing shallow with crickets, worms or small jigs. From shore, try Sailboat Harbor; channel catfish good using Sonny’s stinkbait, Hoss’s Hawg bait, leeches, nightcrawlers and large minnows around Waltonville Dam, Turnip Patch, Jackie Branch and North Sandusky Day use area. Set the line 3-4 feet from shore over rocks. Also try leeches in moving water and drift-fish the flats; white bass fair using jig and curly tail grubs and inline spinners in shallow bays near brush cover and bushes. Fish along the rocks and dropoffs. Fish are also being caught around the Highway 154 bridges. Stockton • Water temperature is 50 degrees, normal and clear. Walleye good using crankbaits and swimbaits on rocky shallows at dusk and fair while trolling deep during the day; white bass good using crankbaits and swimbaits on rocky, wind-swept shallows; all other species slow. Table Rock • Main Lake: Water temperature is 49 degrees, normal and dingy. Black bass good using Wiggle Warts and spinnerbaits; white bass good using crankbaits, pearl and chartreuse swimming minnows and minnows; crappie good on small jigs in white and chartreuse, purple and black or all chartreuse, using 1/16- or 1/8-ounce jig heads; all other species slow. James River Arm: Water temperature is 54 degrees, normal and clear. Black bass good using jerkbaits, purple rock shad, crankbaits, Wiggle Wart in crayfish colors and purple spinnerbaits; crappie good using minnows and shad baits; bluegill good using worms, crickets and small jigs; catfish slow, best using worms or minnows. Thomas Hill • Water temperature is 59 degrees, normal and dingy. All species slow. Truman • Water temperature is 52 degrees, low and clear. Catfish good using cut shad; crappie fair using jigs and minnows, crappie are staging; white bass fair; all other species are fair. Wappapello • Water is normal and dingy. Crappie good using minnows and jigs; channel catfish fair using live bait and worms on jug lines and trotlines at night; bluegill fair using crickets and worms; black bass fair using soft plastics and crankbaits. Information for this report was provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Compiled by Joe Lyons

S 383 347 292 285 283 278 278 275 271 269 260 259 255 253 252

Shooting Percentage Name Team GP G SPCTG Zack Smith Ottawa 79 23 117 19.7 Adam Henrique New Jersey 78 28 143 19.6 Anthony Duclair Arizona 79 20 104 19.2 Cal Clutterbuck NY Islanders 76 15 80 18.8 Jaromir Jagr Florida 77 26 139 18.7 Jannik Hansen Vancouver 65 21 113 18.6 Joe Colborne Calgary 71 18 97 18.6 Jamie Benn Dallas 80 41 243 16.9 J.T. Miller NY Rangers 80 22 131 16.8 Aleksander Barkov Florida 64 28 167 16.8 Evgeni Malkin Pittsburgh 57 27 162 16.7 Steven Stamkos Tampa Bay 77 36 216 16.7 Artem Anisimov Chicago 77 20 121 16.5 Joe Pavelski San Jose 80 36 218 16.5 Brock Nelson NY Islanders 78 26 159 16.4

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW IN ONE PACKAGE Published once a year, our 2016 Golf Guide is your local resource to everything golf in St. Louis and Metro East . Exclusive to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, pick up your copy

SUNDAY, APRIL 10.

FIND A NEWSSTAND NEAR YOU: STLTODAY.COM/NEWSSTAND OR BETTER YET, BE A SUBSCRIBER!


FRIDAY

04.08.2016

Open Houses Every Weekend INNSBROOK-RESORT.COM

Plantation shutters have always been one of the most stylish and upgraded looks a home owner can give their windows. The introduction of composite and vinyl shutters has made them more afordable. “Shutters are a treatment you buy once and love forever,” says Julie Tolmais, owner of Windo Van Go. “While they are more expensive than custom blinds, shutters add so much warmth and style to your home and are quickly becoming our top-selling window treatment.” Windo Van Go sells vinyl/composite shutters as well as wood shutters. Vinyl/ composite shutters are practically maintenance free and indistinguishable from wood. Plantation shutters ofer flexibility with privacy at the bottom while allowing light in at the top and provide excellent insulation. Shutters come in 2-1/2", 3-1/2" and 4-1/2" louver sizes and are available in a variety of paint and stain colors. “Plantation shutters are a great investment,” says Philippe Tolmais. “They enhance the beauty of your home and provide the extra edge needed when selling your home in this competitive market.”

R E YOU T A R O DEC WITH E M O H ERS T T U H S

Installing shutters requires skill and experience and the professionals at Windo Van Go have what it takes. Julie and Philippe Tolmais have been selling and installing shutters in the St. Louis area for over 21 years. The shutters are produced in the US and can usually be installed in 3-4 weeks. Windo Van Go makes choosing window coverings, shades, shutters, blinds and draperies easy and eicient. Their experts will visit your home to discuss your window covering choices, take measurements, show samples and follow up with a price quote. “Making a selection from home is convenient, and it allows the customer to see how the treatments will really look in their space,” Julie says. Windo Van Go sells major brands such as Hunter Douglas, Skandia and Kathy Ireland Home with deeply discounted prices. Julie and Philippe take great pride in their personal, service, expert installation and client satisfaction. Call (636) 926-8171 to schedule an in-home consultation and visit their website at www.windovangostl.com.

636-394-3411 — Order Now & Pay ZERO Sales Tax — 8% Value!

FREE Measuring — FREE Installation — WindoVanGoSTL.com

Advertise Your Listing HERE! ✔ ✔

Full color ✔ Premium Placement Available Friday & Sunday in the Post-Dispatch and Wednesday in the Suburban Journal

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-3pm 104 Eiger Ct., St. Paul, MO 63366 Appraised

00 for $675,0

3 Acres, Ft. Zumwalt school district, 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 5800 sq. ft. of living space. 6 car heated garage.

$624,900

Shari Wynn

Call Mandy Loyet for more details! 314-340-8601 or mloyet@post-dispatch.com

NMLS# 260167 • 314-889-0680 swynn@gershman.com

Jennifer Smerek NMLS# 260971 • 314-889-0667 jsmerek@gershman.com

Nickolas A. Dalba, Jr.

Cell: 314-574-8304

Nick@NickDalba.com www.stcharlesrealestatesearch.com

Call Terra Ritchie 314-456-9951 www.investors-title.com.

Relax and Renew with a Cabin Retreat Vacation homes aren’t just for summer anymore. More and more families continue to discover the yearround beauty at Innsbrook, a vacation home community less than an hour west of St. Louis. Explore several open houses this weekend at Innsbrook. Experience the blooming season in the chalet at 2099 Meadow Valley Dr. — it’s the stuff your cabin dreams are made of. Conveniently located near one of the community’s secure gated entrances, you’ll be ready to let the good times roll in this charming cabin. The warm and inviting cedar throughout the cabin welcome you as you enter. Your eyes will be immediately drawn across the great room to the beauty beyond the floor-to-ceiling windows, into the vast forest. The enlarged kitchen isn’t lacking in conveniences and feels cozy enough for cooking-for-two. The large breakfast bar is spacious enough to prepare for a weekend of hearty breakfasts, brunches and barbecues. Head upstairs to the cabin’s extended sleeping loft — a flexible space that overlooks the lower level and remains open to the natural views. A private bedroom and additional bathroom carve out a space for family and guests. Whether you’re entertaining friends and family or enjoying a quiet morning, this cabin has plenty of space to relax and unwind. Just over 1.5 acres of woodlands assures you’ll feel safely tucked away in the serenity of the forest with the abundant wildlife as your only neighbors. You can spend the afternoon in the shade of the screened-in porch overlooking the beautiful valley. Listed by Innsbrook Properties, Inc., for $279,900, the 2-bed, 2-bath A-frame chalet at 2099 Meadow Valley Dr. is open for viewing from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 10. Explore another style of Innsbrook living by touring two lakefront condominiums this Saturday, April

activities to keep your family active and entertained. This one-of-a-kind community also offers nature trails, outdoor concerts, a golf course, kids’ camps, stables, equestrian trails and more. Coming this summer, Innsbrook will open its stateof-the-art amenity complex that includes a concert field, swimming pool with lazy river, children’s playground and fitness center. With all-season and vacation/second homes, recreational A-frame chalets, resort-style condominiums, low-maintenance villas and luxury cottages, you can choose an Innsbrook home tailor-made to your desires. Innsbrook offers a rustic, family-friendly style of luxury; discover your perfect getaway at Innsbrook. Explore Innsbrook’s available properties and open houses online at www.innsbrook-resort.com or drive 9. 51 South Lionshead Dr. is a 3-bed, 2.5-bath condo listed for $269,900 and is open from noon to 2 p.m. 43 out and discover for yourself why St. Louisians have been falling in love with Innsbrook for more South Lionshead Dr. is a 2-bed, 1.5-bath condo listed 40 years. for $225,000 and is open from 2 to 4 p.m. Both are For directions or more information, call 636-928located just steps from beautiful 150-acre Lake Aspen. 3366, ext. 9199, or email property@innsbrook-resort. Innsbrook is by no means only a haven for lake com. lovers. There are more than enough amenities and

discover your getaway Less than 45 minutes from St. Louis

INNSBROOK-RESORT.COM/100-LAKES


D2

Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY

APRIL 8, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

St. Louis Post Dispatch Check rates daily at http://stltoday.interest.com Institution

30 yr APR

30 yr Fixed

Product

Rate

Points

Fees % Down

APR

Phone Number / Website

NMLS # / License

Rate: 3.625

3.701%

Jefferson Bank & Trust

Points: 0.000

3.390% LenderCity Home Loans

30yr Fixed APR

3.684% Sebonic Financial

30yr Fixed APR

2.950 0.000

$593

5%

3.021

Professional service - low costs.

Fees: $593 30yr Fixed APR

15 yr fixed

877-385-0847 www.JBTHomeLoans.com

% Down: 5% Rate: 3.375

20 yr fixed

3.250 0.000

$300

5%

3.270

Points: 0.000

15 yr fixed

2.625 0.000

$300

5%

2.651

877-385-6586

Fees: $300

5/1 ARM

2.500 0.000

$300

5%

3.143

www.LenderCity.com

% Down: 5%

10 Year Fixed, 2.75%/0 points. Low closing costs.

Rate: 3.625

20 yr fixed

3.500 0.000

$895 20%

3.561

Points: 0.000

15 yr fixed

3.000 0.000

$795 20%

3.069

Fees: $995

10 yr fixed

2.875 0.000

$495 20%

3.876 http://bankrate.sebonic.com

% Down: 20%

5/1 ARM

3.125 0.000

$495 20%

3.238

NMLS# 193390 MC.0002150

NMLS# 66247

866-419-2845

LIC# 15-2210

Legend: The rate and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 4/6/16. © 2016 Bankrate, Inc. http://www.interest.com. The APR may increase after consummation and may vary. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and insurance. The fees set forth for each advertisement above may be charged to open the plan (A) Mortgage Banker, (B) Mortgage Broker, (C) Bank, (D) S & L, (E) Credit Union, (BA) indicates Licensed Mortgage Banker, NYS Banking Dept., (BR) indicates Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Dept., (loans arranged through third parties). “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. All rates are quoted on a minimum FICO score of 740. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $435,000. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Lock Days: 30-60. Annual percentage rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used. Fees reflect charges relative to the APR. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Bankrate, Inc. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates and fees in this table. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. Bankrate, Inc. does not own any financial institutions. Some or all of the companies appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. If you are seeking a mortgage in excess of $417,000, recent legislation may enable lenders in certain locations to provide rates that are different from those shown in the table above. Sample Repayment Terms – ex. 360 monthly payments of $5.29 per $1,000 borrowed ex. 180 monthly payments of $7.56 per $1,000 borrowed. We recommend that you contact your lender directly to determine what rates may be available to you. To appear in this table, call 800-509-4636. To report any inaccuracies, call 888-509-4636. • http://stltoday.interest.com

You’e Invited

Illinois Resort, Lake and River Resort, Lake and River 0100 Property For Sale 0100 Harrisburg, Property For Sale F S B O : La ke O z a r k 1 7 8 8 s q f t 4 B / 2 B Lake Access S easonal View Full Remodel In/Out All New-Paint-Kitchen-FloorsEtc-Everything Must See $ 6 9 7 Taxes Great Deal O nly $ 1 2 9 , 5 0 0 , (573)216-5977

to Tour one of Sunset Hil ’s Premier Luxury Homes! Join us on Sunday, April 10, 2-4 p.m. 12931 Sunset Bluff ,Sunset Hills 63127

Farms/Acreage Illinois 1145 adowl 10187Country but close to town/Rend Lake. 7/8 acres, 2 ponds, 3/2 ranch, 2 gas fireplaces, 2 car carport and 3 barns for your toys, all with elec, one with 1/2 bath. Many amenities/updates. 618-218-4024

Cocktails, horsd’oeuvres, drawings & prizes!

Farms/Acreage Missouri

Magniicent Langeneckert luxury home. 8,000+ sq. ft. of living featuring a 2 story grand foyer, gourmet granite kitchen, breathtaking hearth room featuring loorto-ceiling windows.A screened in porch that overlooks the backyard oasis. Main loor features library/den, formal dining room, & beautiful Master BR suite. Upstairs 3 junior bedroom suites with full baths. Lower level offers 1800 + sq. ft. of additional living space. Wet bar, game and media rooms. Oversized 4 car heated garage. Offered at $1,995,000

IRENE PAPPAS-EDWARDS COLDWELL BANKER PREMIER GROUP 2203 S. Big Bend Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63117

314.517.4458 IPE@ColdwellBankerPremier.com

CHALET 1223 This spectacular 3BR/3BA Santa Barbara-style cabin on Powderhorn Lake has all the upgrades. The property offers a wooded lot, large deck and recreation room for entertaining. Some furniture and boats are available for a turn-key option!$449,900

Clark Co., MO - 42 acres 1 hr from STL, via I-55 +/- Large cabin with 4 Lake Lou Yaegeracre lake. All timber. 1400 Acre Lake. Must see! $189,500 4 Lakefront Homes. Century 21 Reid Baugher Clark County, MO - 71ac Realty: 800-490-5286 +/- w/approx. 30ac being farmed. Nice recreAS IS properties 0269 ational tract. $2,950/ac. 63136 - Home for sale Lewis Co., MO - 146 (10K) "AS IS", 10246 acres +/- Approx. 95 Count Dr., St Louis MO. acres tillable with ba63136. Fixer upper. Call lance timber. $3,200/ac. 301-535-6219. We invite you to visit our website Brentwood 0425 greatmidwestland.com to see many more listings. 9121 MADGE, St. Louis, 63144, 2 Bedrooms, 1 bath, basement. C/A. Big lot, $150,000. 314-968-4888

CHALET 2099 Find the cabin of your dreams with warm cedar throughout and a spacious great room with a stone fireplace and floor-to-ceiling windows. This 2BR/2BA chalet sits on 1.6 acres. Open house 4/10, 12-4 pm. $279,900

Clayton

Normandy

0490

0855

PERRY COUNTY IL 160 ACRES — TAMAROA Beautiful 3-bed, 4-bath home, outbuildings, 2 large lakes, woods and cropland. Relaxing or entertaining, hunting or fishing, business or pleasure; this property has it all!

MONTGOMERY COUNTY IL 193 ACRES — IRVING ST. CLAIR COUNTY IL 27.86 ACRES — BELLEVILLE Great development investment or home site.

ST. CLAIR COUNTY IL 39.66 ACRES — BELLEVILLE Nice building site or future investment.

buyafarm.com / 800-443-1998 Specializing in Rural Real Estate Sales & Auctions All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968, as amended which makes it illegal to advertise 'any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.' This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate whichh is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertising in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/homes

INNSBROOK Properties, Inc. (636) 928-3366 ext. 9199 www.innsbrookresort.com

2 & 3 Bedroom Mobile Homes off Hwy W at Mansion Road Estates AND Farmview Est. on Hwy Y. Both located between Troy & Winfield 636-566-6456

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

Assistance available for units in Hillsboro Senior Citizens Disabled Handicapped

2313 McKelvey Rd. Maryland Heights Commercial use. Approx. 740 sf. $750/mo 6 3 6 -2 3 4 -5 1 4 8, 5 7 3 -7 7 5 -

West Ofice/Retail Space Rent/Lease

DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN! We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer Rent Apts/Flats Unfurnished South

Rent Illinois

2450

2105

Skyline Towers Senior Living Apartments BEVO AREA- Large (1100 sq ft) 1st flr 1 BR apt w/lge dining room, family room & eat-in kitchen, nice back porch. On major bus lines. $525/mo. Garage avail $25/mo. Call 314-706-1960 Lg 3 br, central air, w&d hookups, $25 app fee, $725/mo 314 221 9568

Rent Apts/Flats Furnished Downtown

Applicants must be 62 or older. Rent based on income. All 1 bdrm units, great location & located on bus route. Call 877-390-0454, Mon-Fri 9-5, sky022@ metroplexinc.com Apply online at: skylinetowersapts.com 3113 Washington, Alton

Rent Suburban West

Rent St. Ann

2600

1BR DUPLEX w/ bsmt., stove, fridge, A/C, W/D hkups. Clean! $565/mo. + deposit. 314-275-7878

Rent University City

2630

2640

Completely renovated, 3BR, 2 full BA house for rent. Garage & basement. 1310 Sheridan Dr 314973-7748

Got stuff to sell? We’ve got buyers.

2245

2325

314-447-1800 nhba.com

Basement Apt. All utilities included. W/D included. $750 mo. Sunset Hills area. Very private. 314-393-8813.

2120

Westport/Lindbergh/Page 1 MONTH FREE Near I-64, 270, 170 or 70 Clean, safe, quiet building, great landlord. 2BR $565 special. 1BR $525 special. w/d, storage locker, off-street prkg. Q 314-995-1912Q

For more information call or go online at

Rent Sunset Hills

********* MARK TWAIN HOTEL Short Term Rentals from $110.50/wk Call 314-421-2980 *********

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

TRYTV WEEKLY MAGAZINE America’s guide to “the good stuff” on TV.

Heart of Clayton 1 bedroom ($700 a mo.) 2 bedrooms, ($800 a mo.) Call for more info 314-423-9200

1226 Rent Florissant

Westport Office Building 1845 Borman Court, Recently a Data/Call Center; 31,104 SF Divisible at $13.75/SF full service, exclude janitorial howertonproperties.com (573) 690-4986

Rent Richmond Heights 2570

314-878-0086

1221 Rent Clayton

BY OWNER-- Meadow1227 book Lake Estates. 492 Space Sale Brookfield Dr. One of a Westport Office Building for kind, 11 year old custom Sale; brick ranch w/3 car ga1845 Borman Court, rage & walkout. 2800 sq. 31,104 SF with major ft. includes 4 BDs,4 1 /2 upgrades; BA, open floor plan, walkin pantry in s pacious Recently a Data/Call Center; kitchen, silestone tops & $2,900,000 custom cabine ts flows howertonproperties.com into vaulted hearthroom w / c u s t o m s tone FP. Hardwood & ceramic flrs Rent Apts/Flats abound as well as stained 2080 wood 6 panel doors, trim Unfurnished North & crown molding. Many electric & mechanical up- Beautiful remodeled 2 famigrades as well as a 9' full ly flat, 1+BD, W/D hookbasement waiting for your u p s . S t o v e & F r i g . finishing touch. This beau- Fenced yard. Balcony on both units, Down $675 w/ ty is located on a 5 acre professionally maintained water. Up $630. 314-520peaceful wooded lot at 4224 or 314-210-7444 end of quiet cul-de-sac. Please call for an appt. This home is offered for Rent Apts/Flats $488,900. 2105 314-581-5107 Unfurnished South

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

ATTENTION SENIORS

Manufactured/Mobile 1210 Homes For Rent

Ofice/Retail

CONDO 43 This 2BR/1.5BA property is centrally located to the Innsbrook golf course, horse stables, recreation complex, and tennis courts. Perfect for year-round or recreational lake living on the shores of 150-acre Lake Aspen! Open house 4/9, 24pm. $225,000

1185

542.35 ACRESMadison County, MO. Excellent hunting. See at http: madison.villagis.net. Parcel #08-8.0-33-000000-.001. $850 per acre. By owner. Call 319-850-0541

0690 Ofice/Retail Space Rent/Lease

72 BELLERIEVE ACRES, Lge. Corporations Near By, 1 .5 Story, 2600 sq. ft., 4 B R , 2 . 5 B A , Updates/Move-in Cond., $225,950. Broker/Owner Call To View (314)706-0231

Washington

Great Midwest Land & More, LLC John W. Bates, Broker 641-895-1613 (cell)

Hunting & Fishing 0450 Land Lease/Sale

DAVIS PLACE ESTATE AUCTION May 1st, 2PM 4Bdrm brick Colonial 937 South Bemiston Ave Clayton MO 63105 Minimum bid $300,000 OPEN 4-17 & 24 1-4PM Bill Fair and Company www.billfair.com 800-887-6929

DeSoto/Hillsboro

CONDO 51 New to the market, this 3BR/2.5BA end unit features a kitchen with granite countertops and excellent views of Innsbrook's 150-acre Lake Aspen. Walk to the beach or enjoy the nearby restaurant! Open house 4/9, 12-2pm. $269,900

1155

LAKEFRONT HOMES

Roughly 3,400 sqft total on 4+/- park-like acres. Lrg patio w/ in- gr ou nd, htd pool & waterfall. 30'x40' detached garage w/800 sqft above w/Ktchn, LR, 1BD/1BA, laundry, deck. $429,900 314-210-4980

2 homes and outbuilding plus 130 acres tillable. A mix of tillable, timber and ponds with a creek.

0901

IL, $289,000: Perfect Lodge or B&B on 7.5 acres, 6 bedrm, 3.5 baths; also smaller log cabin and barn w/loft. Motivated seller, will consider offer. 618-252-7518

2385

DON'T RENT! RENT TO OWN! We specialize in home ownership for the creditchallenged as well as those who don't have enough money for their down payment & closing costs.

SPECIAL OFFER!

13 Issues

9

$ 75

For more information call or go online at

314-447-1800 nhba.com Rent Hillsdale

SAVE UP TO 75% OFF THE COVER PRICE.

2435

Rent-to-own - For Sell by 5200 Jamieson, 63109 O wner , 3 B R house in 1 BR, $600/ mo . G a s Hillsdale Ar ea. $1500 Stove, Frig., Upgraded Kitchen, Garage Space, Down & $500/ Month. Call W/D Hookups, Storage, 314-363-4447 Near Francis Park. Call (314)351-0485 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/jobs

online: www.iwantmytvmagazine.com phone: 1-866-788-0454

STLtoday.com/contests

C | ENTER TODAY | YOU COULD BE THE ONE

ORDER NOW!


Classified

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY

APRIL 8, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

D3

OF

EX FER TE NO ND W ED !

Take advantage of

8,900

$

in options and upgrades. Ask the sales representative in the Consort community of your choice for details. Offer valid on options and upgrades on contracts written February 1 – April 30, 2016 only. Some exclusions apply. Offer cannot be combined and cannot be exchanged for cash equivalent or closing costs. See Sales Manager for details.

MyConsortHome.com

Checklist for keeping your home healthy Kim Hibbs 2016 HBA PRESIDENT

A home is often the biggest investment you will make in your lifetime. It is also the place where families will raise children and spend many hours making lifelong memories. So it’s important to maintain your home in good condition and make sure it offers a clean, comfortable and safe environment for many years to come. This checklist contains tasks you should complete at least on an annual basis to keep your home operating efficiently and to protect your investment. Anytime during the year: • Check all connections to your electrical system for possible hazards. Check cords and plugs of all electrical appliances for fraying or signs of wear. Repair or replace as necessary. Do not overload extension cords. • Test your smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detector and radon detector

for proper operation. Clean the units with a vacuum or cotton swab and replace batteries and light bulbs if needed. • Have your heating and air conditioning system(s) inspected and cleaned. If your system(s) has a filter, replace it every three months to keep your unit working efficiently. • Inspect all doors and windows for proper operation and a tight fit. Clean the window tracks, clean and adjust the door thresholds and check that the weatherstripping hasn’t cracked or torn. Preventing unwanted outside air from leaking into your home will reduce your energy bills. • Check interior paint and touch up or repaint as needed. • Inspect the attic insulation. Make sure the entire ceiling area is covered. Check that the insulation has not blocked vents in the eaves to prevent buildup of condensation and to allow

FOR SALE OR LEASE

proper air circulation. Insulation should also not be touching the underside of the roof sheathing. • Oil motors of appliances as directed in instruction manuals. • Periodically check storage areas, closets and the basement to make sure no oily rags, gas cans, painting supplies or flammable cleaning materials have been stored and forgotten. These items could be a fire hazard and should be discarded. • Check that the alarm and circuits of your security system are in working order, inspect the sensors one by one and check primary and backup batteries monthly. • Inspect your stairs, steps and ladders for damage or broken pieces that could cause someone to fall. Make sure handrails and railings are sturdy and securely attached. In the spring: • Check the condition of glazing compound, caulking and exterior paint.

Prime Ofice, Medical, Retail Space

16111 Manchester Rd., Ellisville, Missouri 63011

AGE SIGN RE HE

Two blocks west of Clarkson Road. 5,440 Sq. Ft. Building Designed and Equipped for Dental/Medical Ofice Each loor 2,720 Sq. Ft. Divisible to 1,360 Sq. Ft. 41,780 Trafic Count on Manchester Rd. Average Income $133,747 (3 Miles)

• • • •

Replace or paint as needed. • Exchange glass and screens in storm doors and/or windows (also in autumn). • Inspect the roof for snow damage. • Check for evidence of termites such as sagging floors and ceilings or dry, brown tunnels in the ground near the home’s foundation. • Seed and feed the lawn and plant annuals. Cut back perennials that need pre-growth pruning. In the autumn: • Mulch perennials that need protection from winter weather and prune those that should be cut back in the fall. • Rake and compost leaves. • Remove hose connections and store hoses to avoid freezing. There are many more tasks you can complete throughout the year to keep your home in good working order. If you would like to make the move to a new home, start shopping at www.stlhba.com.

Separate parking lot for each loor Major renovation 0.94 Acre Site Building and Monument signage

$1.1 Million

$

952,000

or call for lease information

For information, contact JADCO PROPERTIES, LLC

314-503-4500

featured properties Discover the lake community that St. Louis families have been falling in love with for more than 44 years. Located just 30 minutes west of Chesterield, drive out and explore today! No appointment needed. OPEN HOUSE | SAT, APRIL 9, 12-2 PM

51 SOUTH LIONSHEAD DRIVE

$269,900

OPEN HOUSE | SUN, APRIL 10, 12-4 PM

2099 MEADOW VALLEY DRIVE

$279,900

3-bed, 2.5-bath lakeside condo with rental income options

2-bed, 2-bath chalet nestled in the woods

Easy access to beach | Spacious deck | Granite countertops

Screened porch | Stone ireplace | Two-level deck | Enlarged kitchen

OPEN HOUSE | SAT, APRIL 9, 2-4 PM

43 SOUTH LIONSHEAD DRIVE

$225,000

469 GREENSIDE VIEW

$449,900

2-bed, 1.5-bath lakeview condo with rental income options

4-bed, 4.5-bath home on the golf course

Panoramic views from deck and balcony | Woodburning ireplace

Custom-designed kitchen | Four-season room | Walkout lower level

100 LAKES | OPEN HOUSES EVERY WEEKEND | RESIDENTIAL & VACATION HOMES | A-FRAME CHALETS | CONDOMINIUMS & VILLAS

contact our sales team (636)928-3366 ext. 9199 – view more listings INNSBROOK-RESORT.COM All properties ofered through Innsbrook Properties, Inc.


D4

Classified

Antique/Classic Special Interest

4020

Chevrolet

WE BUY CARS Cash Paid Today 636-940-9969 fastlanecars.com

Acura

4025

'08 Acura TL 3.2: Black, Leather, Loaded, Power, $13,821 #38665A

'07 Acura TSX: Base, Sedan, Heated Leather Front Seats, Navigation, One Owner Clean Carfax, $8,990 #94946A

Audi

4040

'15 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium, AWD, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof, Call Today, $29,990 #P8297

'15 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Call Today $30,790 #P8296

'09 Audi A4 2.0T: Premium, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $12,990 #26350A

M 1

4065 Dodge

4085 Honda

'14 Chevy Sonic LT: '15 Dodge Challenger SXT: 5 Door, 37K Miles, V6, 28K Miles, One OwnGM Certified, $12,995 er, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 314-772-1400 '15 Chevy Camaro LT: '08 Dodge Avenger SE: Convertible, V6, 19K 2.4L, 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, Miles, GM Certified, Power Windows & Locks, $24,995 Remote Keyless Entry, Don Brown Chevrolet Call Today, 314-772-1400 $8,990 #P8346B '15 Camaro LT: Coupe Sunroof, V6, 26K Miles, GM Certified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet '14 Dodge Charger SE: 314-772-1400 4 Dr, Alloys, 39K Miles, '13 Chevy Camaro 2LT: Local Trade, $18,995 RS, Sunroof, V6, Lthr, Don Brown Chevrolet 5K Miles, GM Certified, 314-772-1400 $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet Fiat 4105 314-772-1400 '09 Chevy Cobalt LT '14 500L Pop, only 7k 33 mpg hwy and 24 mpg miles! remote keyless city, cd player, stk# entry, bluetooth, UH4459EP $5,997 stk# M412167XP $12,621 Lou Fusz Economy Lot LOU FUSZ SUBARU West (855) 972-9758 (888) 681-8298 '10 Chevy Cobalt 2LT: 4 Door, Alloy Wheels, Ford 4110 65K Miles, Local Trade, $8,995 Don Brown Chevrolet '14 Ford Fiesta S: 314-772-1400

'10 Chevy Cobalt LS: Coupe, 4 Cyl, FWD, Spoiler, $8,212 #36088A

FWD, Only 32K Miles, Warranty, $9,772 #31677A

'13 Focus, 1500 miles, stk# T303-1, $16,990

'15 Chevy Corvette: Convertible, Loaded, Call!

'13 Chevy Cruze LS: Auto, One Owner Clean Carfax, OnStar, Tinted Windows, Call Today! $9,790 #75882A

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 2005 Ford Focus Stk #93998-1 $4,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '08 Ford Focus SES: Clean Carfax, Leather, FWD, Nice Car, Call Today, $5,990 #75949A

BMW

4050

'03 3 Series 330 CI, only 87k mi., 28/20 mpg., stk# UH4541EP $9,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '04 X5 3.0i, Sharp-looking BMW for under $9,000! Stk #UH4225R, $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '12 BMW 750, less than 40k miles, Stk #T337 $34,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '12 BMW 750Li: 36K Miles, AWD, DVD, Black, $40,890

'11 328i xDrive, front dual zone a/c, rear a/c, only 46xxx miles! Stk# M16487A $19,325 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '12 BMW 325: 4 Door, Sunroof, Navigation, 31K Miles, Loaded, Sharp! $24,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 2008 BMW X5 4.8i Stk #66538-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Buick

'15 Chevy Cruze 2LT: Leather, 15K Miles, GM Certified, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'14 Chevy Cruze LS: 1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, $13,882 #360925A

2006 Chevy HHR LT Stk #42418-2 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '05 Impala, 32 mpg hwy, low miles for a 2005, stk# U4385Q $6,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '15 Impala LS Pkg., 2xxx miles, stk# C151323L $18,999 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '06 Chevy Impala LT: FWD, Auto, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Remote Start, Call Today! $6,990 #36526B

'06 Chevy Impala LS: Automatic, FWD, Clean Carfax, Flex Fuel, Spoiler, Tinted Glass, Call! $6,990 #P8450A

4055

'09 Buick Lucerne CXL: Loaded, Full Power, Very Clean, 66K Miles, $12,221 #38566B '08 Buick LaCrosse CXL: 3.8L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, $6,990 #38046A

'15 Buick LaCrosse: V6, Leather, 16K Miles, GM Certified, $23,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '12 Buick Lacrosse: 4 Dr, White Diamond Pearl, Only 44K Miles, Balance of Factory Warranty, $15,999 #H160760A

'05 Buick Lesabre Custom, 56K Mi., Just Arrived, $8,990

'11 Buick Regal CXL: Loaded, Htd Power Lthr, Moonroof, Clean Carfax, Carbon Black, Metallic, 102K Miles, $11,299 #H160266A

'15 Buick Verano: Convenience, 4 Door, 4 Cyl, 20K Miles, GM Certified, $16,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '13 Buick Verano: 4 Door, 4 Cyl, Alloy Wheels, 32K Miles, One Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

Cadillac

4060

'04 CAD CTS-V 65K Mi., Black, Roof, Nav, Rare, $20,990

'15 Escalade, 13K miles, stk# T355, $73,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Bommarito St. Peters Cadillac 1-866-2449085 '07 CTS: Black/Black, Roof, Auto, 76K Mi., $11,990 '13 Escalade: Hybrid, 4WD, 65K Miles, One Owner, $44,990 '04 CTS-V: 65K, Black, Hard to Find, $20,990 '13 XTS: Premium, AWD, 29K Miles, Loaded, Certified, $34,490 '11 DTS Premium 1 Owner, 38K, Loaded, $26,490 '13 SRX: Performance: AWD, 30K Miles, Navigation, $34,490 '13 SRX: Lux, AWD, Nav, White, 32K Miles, $33,490 '11 Escalade ESV: Premium, 4WD, Local Trade, Call For Price '13 CTS Coupe: Premium, AWD, White, 21K Miles, $34,890 '14 XTS: Luxury, 5K Miles, Sunroof, Navigation, Certified, $38,490 '13 CTS: Coupe, Premium, AWD, 21K Miles Certified, $34,990 '11 SRX: Luxury Collection, AWD, Mocha, Local Trade, $21,490 '12 CTS-V: Coupe, Every Option, 13K Miles, Certified, #C7716 '13 Cadillac XTS: 4 Dr, 3.6L, Leather, 26K Miles, $28,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '13 Cadillac ATS: 4 Door, AWD, Turbo, 23K Miles, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'15 Chevy Impala LTZ: Limited, sunroof, Black, 19K Miles, GM Certified, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '15 Impala LS: 4 Cyl, 16K Miles, GM Certified, One Owner, $18,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'11 Chevy Impala LT: 3.5L 6 Cyl, FWD, Alloy Wheels, Spoiler, $9,229 #P5613B

'08 Chevy Impala LT: 3.5L 6 Cyl, FWD, Alloys, $7,744 #34498A

'06 Malibu 2LT 3.5 V6, 83xxx Miles, Stk #C161236B $7,340 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Malibu LT 22xxx Miles, Gm Certified, Warranty, Stk #C10431P $15,163 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Malibu LS, bluetooth, ESC, 26K Mi., 34 Mpg Hwy, Stk# C10521P $14,602 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Malibu LS , black ext. & black int! Only 21k mi., stk# C10412P $13,766 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Malibu 4 door, 4ci, power equipment, 9xxx miles, stk# C151925L $16,499 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '14 Malibu LT, bluetooth, backup came ra, 36 mpg hwy! stk# C161052A $16,454 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Malibu LS: 4 Cyl, 14K Miles, GMCertified, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '15 Chevy Malibu LT: 15K Miles, GM Certified, Black, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '15 Chevy Malibu LT: 4 Cyl, 14K Miles, GMCertified, One Owner, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'08 Malibu LS: Auto, Full Power, Very Clean, #P5631A $6,555

'04 Monte Carlo SS, FWD, V6, auto, 16" wheels, stk# UH4468EP $6,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '13 Chevy Volt: One Owner Clean Carfax, GM Certified Pre-Owned, Nice, Call Today, $13,990 #26148A

'04 Chevy Classic: Sedan, Auto, FWD, Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels, $5,490 #8678A

'13 Chevy Spark LS: FWD, 4 Cyl, 44K Miles, Alloys, $8,881 #36653A

Chrysler

4070

'14 Chrysler 200 LX: FWD, Remote Keyless Entry, Power Windows & Locks, Call Today, $12,490 #P8474

'05 Chrysler 300: Touring, 3.5L V6, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Leathr Trimmed Seats, $7,990 #26299A

'10 Chrysler Sebring: Limited, Loaded, Black, One Owner, $11,991 #P5671A

Corvette

4080

'13 Ford Focus ST: Leather, Sunroof, Navigation, 11K Miles, $22,990

'14 Fusion SE, 34 mpg hwy, wireless phone connectivity & remote keyless entry, mp3 decoder, stk# M412208XQ $18,157 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '07 Ford Fusion SE: FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $5,990 #P8522A

'13 Ford Fusion: 4 Dr, Titanium Edition, Pearl White, 50K Mi, 19" Alloy Wheels, Htd, Power Lthr Interior, $17,990 #H160809A

'07 Ford Fusion SE: 4 Dr, White, 136K Miles, Passed State Safety + Emissions, Call Now, Won't Last, $6,499 #X2876

'12 Ford Fusion Hybrid: Clean Carfax, Navigation/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $12,990 #27009B

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes

'06 Honda Civic Sedan, 19K Mi., Auto, 1 Owner, $11,990

BOMMARITO HONDA SUPERSTORE 1-888-204-9202

SPRING BLOWOUT SALE! REDUCED PRICES! LARGEST HONDA CERTIFIED SELECTION IN MIDWEST! 7 Year/100K Mile Warranty '13 Accord LX's: 11 To Choose From! All Colors Available, Bluetooth, Camera, Alloys, #X2847 Starting At $17,399 '15 Odyssey EXL, Silver, 25K Miles Heated Leather, Bluetooth, Camera, $31,599 #H160715A '14 Accord: V6, Touring Sedan, Touring, Pearl White, 23K Miles, $25,999 #X2839 '13 Accord EX: Sedan, Alloys, Moonroof, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, Modern Steel, 5 To Choose From Starting at $18,299 #X2808 '13 Civic LX's: 5 To Choose From, Starting at $13,799 #X2871 Black Largest Selection of Certified Civic's in the Midwest!! '13 Odyssey EXL: Smoky Topaz w/Truffle Leather, Sharp, Clean, 27K Mi, $27,999 #H160783A

'14 CRV EXL: AWD, Crystal Black, Heated Power Leather, Moonroof, Smart Key, Loaded, Reduced $21,499 #H160609A '13 Civic EX: Alloys, Sunroof, Bluetooth, BackUp Camera, Only 21K Mi, Crimson Pearl, $16,499 #X2833 '15 Accord EXL: Coupe, 2 To Choose, Htd Pwr Lthr, Smart Key, 2 Camera, Crystal Black, 4K Mi, Bluetooth $24,999 #X2859 '15 Odyssey: Touring Elite! Crystal Black, 8K Mi, DVD, Navigation, Absolutely Loaded, $38,499 #X2863 '11 Accord EXL: V6, 4 Dr, 63K Miles, Dual Pwr Heated Leather Seats, Moonroof, Loaded, $15,499 #H160959A

2004 Ford Mustang Convertible #45435-2 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Civic EXL: Crimson Pearl Metallic, Only 27K Miles, $17,999 #H160600A

'14 Ford Mustang: Convertible, V6, Auto, Sterling Gray, 43k Miles, Ready for Spring! $16,999 #H160815A

4125

2013 Hyundai Veloster #66295-1 $11,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Tuscon Stk #66017-2 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Honda

4120

'09 Honda Accord EX-L: Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, Call Today, $12,990 #94784C

'10 Honda Accord: Coupe, 2.4L 4 Cyl, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $12,990 #10551A

'13 Honda Accord LX: Obsidian Blue, 38K Mi, Alloys, Bluetooth, Certified, 7Yr/100K Powertrain Warranty, $17,299 #X2831

'15 Honda Accord EXL: Coupe, (2) To Choose, 1 4 Cyl, 1 6 Cyl, Both Crystal Black Pearl, 4K Mi, Honda Certified, $24,999 #X2859

'10 Honda Accord EXL: 4 Cyl, Dual Pwr Htd Lthr, M/Roof, Loaded, 93K Mi, Bommarito Powertrain Wrnty,

'05 Honda Accord: Auto, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Only 78K Miles, $9,222 #38288A

'08 Honda Accord EX: Auto, Loaded, Full Power, 42K Miles, $13,441 #340695A

'13 Honda Accord EX: Sedans, (5) To Choose, Pwr Seat, Moonroof, Smart Key Entry, Push Button Start, 2 Camera, $18,299 #X2808

2012 Honda Civic EX Stk #66355-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'00 Honda Civic: 4 Dr, Auto, State Safety + Emissions Passed, Only 131K Miles, Value Priced To Sell At $4,499 #H152165A

'15 Civic LX: Coupe's, (3) To Choose, 1-White, 15K Mi, 1-Silver, 1-Black, Both 2K Miles, Bal of 7Yr/100K Ptrain Wrnty, #X2866 Silver #X2867 Black $17,499

'13 Honda Civic LX: Crystal Black, 37K Mi, Honda Certified, Balance of 7 Yr/100K Powertrain Warranty, $14,599 #X2874

'06 Honda Civic LX: 1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, $7,422 #31877A

'06 Honda Civic DX: Coupe, Silver, Loaded, $6,441 #31717A

2012 Hyundai Sonata Stk #65671-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata #66336-1 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE #94222 $16,497 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata #65012-1 $16,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata GLS Stk #66035-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866) 672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata Stk #65974-1 $10,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Hyundai Sonata: 2.4L, 4 Cyl, Low Miles, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Nav/GPS, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof $12,990 #93647M

'11 Hyundai Sonata SE: Limited, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Navigation/GPS, Heated Front Seats, $12,990 #93647M

'15 Hyundai Sonata SE: 4 Door, Alloys, One Owner, $15,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '12 Hyundai Sonata GLS: Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Moonroof, $14,490 #26432A

Ininiti

'13 Hyundai Veloster: 3 Door Coupe, Manual, Blue, 41K Miles, Hard To Find Used Car, Will Sell Fast At $14,699 #X2857A

'14 Hyundai Accent GLS: 4 Dr, 35K Miles, One Owner, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 2013 Hyundai Elantra GT #66506-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Elantra #94376 $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra #94369 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Elantra GLS #66243-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Elantra GLS Stk #66282-1 $10,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk #66309-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk #94405 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra Coupe Stk #94403 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Elantra Stk #94405 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 Hyundai Elantra GLS: Limited, Navigation/GPS, Leather Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $10,990 #10580A

'15 Hyundai Elantra GT: 5 Door, Hatchback, Red, Only 27K Miles, Will Sell Fast, One Owner Clean Carfax, $14,575 #AT1178

'10 Sonata GLS, traction control system with ESC, 32 mpg hwy, stk# U15127A $9,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

2013 Hyundai Sonata #65974-1 $11,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2012 Hyundai Sonata Stk #94381 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE Stk #65896-1 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

2013 Hyundai Sonata #94344 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata SE Stk #94102 $14,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Hyundai Sonata Limited #65966-1 $16,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/jobs

4130

'06 Infiniti M35x: Clean Carfax, AWD, Navigation, Heated/ Cooled Leather Seats, Call Today, $9,490 #94472A

'07 Infiniti G35x: 3.5L 6 Cyl, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Front Seats, Sunroof, $9,990 #95110A

'06 Infiniti G35: One Owner Clean Carfax, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $7,990 #26392B

'07 Infiniti G35: 1 Owner, Clean Carfax, Sunroof, Low Miles, Leather Trim Seats, $10,490 #10576A

'07 Infiniti G35: Coupe, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $12,990 #P8600

Jaguar Hyundai

4125 Lincoln

2013 Hyundai Sonata Limited #41252-1 $16,597 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Pilot LX: 8 Pass, 4WD, Crystal Black, 32K Mi, Bluetooth, Back Up Camera, $24,999 #H160257A

'96 Mustang, V6, Auto, CD/Aux input, low miles, stk# U4450Q $4,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

'14 Corvette 3LT Two Tops, 1k Miles, Auto Call for Price '10 Honda Civic LX: Chevrolet 4065 Coupe, Auto, 50K '15 Chevy Sonic LTZ: Mi, $12,790 5 Dr, Leather, 15K Miles, GM Certified, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

4120 Hyundai

'13 Civic SI Local Trade, Well Maintained. $17,990

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '97 Town Car, cream colored, a/c, power windows & locks, stk# T374

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 4185

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '12 Jaguar XF: Portfolio, White, Navigation, Chromes, $33,890

'08 Mazda3: Loaded, Auto, One Owner, Clean Carfax, $8,811 #31860A

2010 Nissan Altima 3.5 SR #65863-1 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'11 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo, Priced Below Average, MultiZone AC, Keyless Start Stk #M16578A $19,674 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '10 Jeep Liberty: Sport, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, 4WD, Call Today!

$9,490 #10294A

'05 Jeep Liberty: Sport, 3.7L 6 Cyl, 4x4, Clean Carfax, $8,844 #P5632A '14 Jeep Patriot: Sport, FWD, Black, 23K Mi, One Owner, $14,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '09 Wrangler Rubicon 4X4, Accident-Free CarFax, Low Miles, ESC, Priced Below Average, Stk#M16630A $18,713 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '91 Jeep Wrangler with snow plow, Sharp! stk# T358 $6,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'12 Jeep Wrangler: Sport, 21K Miles, Local Trade, $24,990

'14 Mazda Mazda3 i: Touring, Hatchback, 1 Owner Clean Carfax, Mazda Certified, Motortrend Certified, $16,490 #10152A

'08 Mazda Mazda6 i: 2.3L, 4 Cyl, Auto, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, CALL TODAY! $7,990 #77083A

'09 Mazda 5 Touring, 47xxx Miles, Auto, Leather, Stk #M7743 $11,990 '12 Mazda 3i Touring Hatchback, 30K Miles, Certified, Stk #M7732 $14,990

4155 2014 Kia Forte EX Stk #66479 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'14 Kia Optima, Silver, Stk# T362 $13,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '14 Kia Rio EX: H/Back, Silver, One Ownr, Clean Carfax, 3K Miles, $13,991 #38571A

'11 Kia Soul: Hatchback, 2.0L 4 Cyl, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, Call Today, $11,490 #75135B

'13 Kia Soul: 5 Door Plus, Alloys, Black, $12,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

Lexus

4165

'08 Lexus EX 350: Clean Carfax, FWD, Low Miles, Heated Leathr Seats, Sunroof/ Moonroof, Call Today, $11,990 #10447A

'00 Lexus ES300: Loaded, Clean Carfax, Must See, $4,444 #38296B

Lincoln

'13 Mazda CX-5: Grand Touring, MnRoof, Loaded, Mazda Certified, $20,881 #31449A

'14 Mazda 3 S Touring, Sedan, 4xxx Miles, Local Trade, Stk #V16074B $22,990

Mercedes Benz

4190

'06 Mercedes E350: Navigation/GPS, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $10,990 #94563A

'14 Mercedes C300: 4MATIC, Steel Gray, Only 19K Miles, JUST ARRIVED... CALL TODAY, $26,999 #SC1004

'10 Mercedes C300: 4MATIC, 60K Miles, Sunroof, $18,990 '02 Mercedes C L K 3 2 0 Convert., 48K mi ., exc cond, $9300; 314-2212014 SLK 250: Convertible, Black, 5K Miles, 1 Owner, $34,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

Mercury

4195

'00 Cougar, low price, 29 mpg hwy, green exterior, stk# U4483P $4,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '00 Grand Marquis, white, 4.6L V8, 23 mpg hwy, stk# T366, $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Mini Cooper

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5S: Sedan, Tuscan Sun Metallic, 55K Miles, Only $14,799 #H160318A

'11 Nissan Altima SL: 4 Dr, Sunroof, Leather, Only 66K Miles, White, One Owner Clean Carfax, Sharp! $12,999 #H160991A

'12 Nissan Altima SR: Coupe, Silver, Leathr, One Ownr Clean Carfax, $14,442 #38293A

'06 Altima 2.5S: Silver, Loaded, Full Power, $8,842 #360505C

'09 Nissan Maxima: 3.5 SV, 6 Cyl, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $13,490 #94941A

'05 MINI Cooper S: Convertible, Red, Loaded, Power, Clean Carfax, 50K Miles, $10,991 #38425A

'12 Mini Cooper: 32K Miles, Motor Trend Certified, 4 New Tires, $15,990 #C7665A

Misc. Autos

2013 Nissan Sentra #41668-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Nissan Sentra S Stk #41815-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2013 Nissan Sentra Stk#42154-1 $12,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Sentra SR Stk #41841-1 $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2014 Nissan Sentra SV #41978-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Sentra SR Stk #41841-1 $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'10 Nissan Sentra 2.0: 4 Cyl, Auto, Blue Onyx, One Owner Clean Carfax, FWD, Call Today! $7,990 #8786A

Suzuki 2015 NIssan Versa Note #94047SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 NIssan Versa Note #94047SL $14,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 2015 Nissan Versa Note SL Stk #94035SL $15,997 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'15 Nissan Versa Note: Hatchback, 4 Cyl, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $13,490 #P8574

'08 Nissan Versa

4210

Bommarito St. Peters

Auto, 1 Owner, $10,990

Pontiac

4300

'14 Prius Two, 48 mpg! carfax 1-owner vehicle, bluetooth, stk# X2556P $14,997 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 Toyota Camry SE: Magnetic Gray, High Quality, One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Price, $15,999 #H160818A

'08 Toyota Camry XLE: V6, Navigation, 159K Miles, Moonroof, State Safety + Emissions Passed, Value Priced, $8,999 #X2822A

'14 Ford Explorer: Quad Seats, 4WD, Leather, Call For Price

'07 Toyota Camry LE, Auto, 65K Mi., 1 Owner, $11,490

'08 Pontiac G5: Coupe, Auto, Loaded, Clean, $6,456 #31724A

'09 Pontiac G6: Auto, Loaded, Full Power, $8,992 #38327A

2004 Pontiac Grand Am SE #66398-1 $3,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'07 Toyota Camry: Hybrid, 2.4L 4 Cyl, FWD, Alloys Wheels, Low Miles, Call Today, $9,990 #10734A

'09 Toyota Camry LE: Alloys, Power Seat, High Quality, Low Price, 69K Miles, Blue Ribbon Metallic, $10,999 #H160204A

Volkswagen

4310

'13 EOS 17xxx Miles, Local Trade, Salsa Red, Certified, Stk #M16160A $23,990

'01 Grand Prix, stk# T311-2 $5,990

'12 Honda Pilot: Touring RES & Navigation, 4WD, $29,990 '13 GMC Acadia SLT: AWD, Sunroof, FWD, Call For Price '15 GMC Canyon: Crew Cab, 5K Miles, Local Trade, $29,990 '13 VW EOS: 17K Miles, Local Trade, VW Certified, $23,990 '10 Honda Accord EX: 64k Miles, Well Maintained, $15,490 '08 Ford Mustang: Premium, 57K Miles, Manual, $13,990 '11 Jaguar XK-R: Convertible, "Black Pack Edition", Rare, Call for price '15 Corvette: Convertible, Auto, 2K Miles, Chrome Whls, Call For Price '14 Chevy Corvette 3LT: Two-Tops, Chromes, 1K Miles, Call for Price

Rafferty Auto '13 VW Golf "R": 866-494-4102 H/Back, 15K Miles, Range Rover/Land Rover

VW Certified, Rare, $31,490

4260

'13 Land Rover, Range Rover, Stk# T322 $69,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 Saturn

4280

'03 Ion 1, popular color, 32 mpg hwy, low miles, stk# UH4545EP $4,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

Scion

4283

'12 Scion XD: 5 Door Hatchback, 33K Miles, High Quality, Low Payment Car, will Sell Fast At Only $11,999! #H160752B...Call Today

'09 Scion T/C: Auto, Black, Local Trade, $8,990

'13 Cadillac CTS: Coupe Premium Collection, AWD, $34,990

Sell your stuff with Classified.

Subaru

314-621-6666 stltoday.com/classifieds

4215

'04 Endeavor XLS AWD, 3.8V6, Stk #C160746A $6,834 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

4330

'15 Chevy 1500 LT: Crew Cab, V8, 4x4, 23K Miles, GM Certified, $31,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '15 Chevy 2500 LTZ: HD, Crew Cab, Nav, Diesel, 4x4, 37K Miles, GM Certified, $50,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '14 Chevy 1500 3LZ: Crew Cab, High Country, 4x4, 26K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $38,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '14 Chevy 1500 LT: Extended Cab, 4x4, V8, 22K Miles, One Owner, GMCertified, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '13 Chevy 1500 LT: Extended Cab, 4x4, 5.3L, 22K Miles, GMCertified, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'04 Chevy Avalanche: 4WD, Chromes, Leathr, 34K Miles, $22,490 '05 Colorado, only 82k mi., Stk# T335 $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '07 Chevy Silverado 1500 Work Truck, desert brown metallic ext., 124k mi., stk# U4429EQ, $8,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '11 Chevy Silverado 2500 LTZ: Crew Cab, 4x4, Z71 Off Road, Loaded, Only 26K Mi, Victory Red, Now $41,999 #H152218A

'12 Silverado LT: Crew Cab, 4WD, 44K Mi., $28,900

Dodge Plymouth Trucks 4335

'12 Dodge Ram R/T: 45K Miles, Rare Truck! $24,,490

'11 Dodge Ram Laramie: Crew Cab, 4WD, $28,590

Ford Trucks

4340

'07 F-150 Super Crew FX4, Silver, 99K miles, loaded, stk# T382 $14,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '01 Ford F-150, 112k mi, low miles for it's age, auto, Red, $5,990 #T316

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '14 Ford F-150 XLT: Crew Cab, 4x4, V8, 32K Mi, One Owner, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '11 Ford F150: Super Crew, Only 87K Miles, Clean Carfax CALL TODAY, $18,999 #H160775A

'06 Ford F250 Crew Cab, 4WD, 90K Mi., 1 Owner, Diesel, CALL

'01 Ranger XLT Off-Rd 4x4, extended cab with tow hitch, stk# UH4460EP $7,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

'08 Ford Ranger XL: Loaded, Clean Carfax, Only 67K Miles, $11,222 #38425AA

Nissan/Datsun Trucks 4380 '06 Frontier SE, CarFax 1-Owner, Priced Below Average, Stk# UH4699XP, $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

Toyota Trucks

4385

2002 Toyota 4Runner Limited Stk #41152-2 $8,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Sport Utilitiy

4390

'03 Tahoe Z71, Low Miles, Leather Seats, Priced Below Average Stk # U1582B, $7,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

'03 Suburban Z71 3rd Row, White, Leather, $12,490

4250

2008 Pontiac Solstice Convertible Stk #65373-2 $10,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

NEW ARRIVALS!!

Mitsubishi

4295

2008 Suzuki XL7 Stk #42576-2 $6,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

Toyota

STLTODAY.COM

4290 Chevrolet Trucks

'16 Forester 2.5i Prem, priced below market! Bluetooth, steering wheel controls, stk# X2603L, $24,988 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '11 Forester 2.5X Limited, Leather, Auto Temp Control, Heated Front Seats, Moonroof, Only 22xxx Miles, Stk #X2621MP $19,659 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Forester 2.5i, bluetooth, back-up camera, awd, only 13k mi., stk# X16470A $22,888 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Forester 2.5i Premium, power moonroof, cd player, stk# M412175P $23,104 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Forester 2.5i, wireless phone connectivity, 32 mpg hwy, stk# M412177P $22,952 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '16 Forester 2.5i Premium, ESC, bluetooth, backup camera, only 4K miles, stk# MS412213P $26,102 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '16 Forester 2.5i Premium, ESC, backup camera & only 1K miles! Stk# MS412212P $25,429 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '10 Forester 2.5X Premium, panoramic sunroof, low miles, awd, stk# MS16808A $14,678 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Impreza Sedan Premium, priced below market! backup camera, bluetooth, 37 mpg hwy, stk# X2562P $18,045 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '15 Impreza Sedan Prem., heated front seats, backup camera, bluetooth, 37 mpg hwy, stk# X2564P $18,630 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Impreza Wagon 2.0i, new rear brakes, brake assist, 36 mpg hwy, stk# X2574P $16,628 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Impreza Sedan Limited, low miles, keyless start, heated leather front seats, 36 mpg hwy, stk# X2573P $17,731 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 Impreza 2.0i Premium, 10K miles, 36 mpg hwy, heated front seats, stk# MS16483A $18,755 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Impreza Premium, front & rear anti-roll bar, 37 mpg hwy, stk# M412176P $17,730 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '13 Legacy 3.6R front dual zone, a/c, leather upholstery, stk# X2567P $21,104 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Limited, Leather, Heated Front Seats, Bluetooth, CarFax 1-Owner, 32 MPG Hwy Stk # X2629P, $18,768 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '12 Legacy 2.5I, low miles, 31 mpg hwy, $276 monthly payment, stk# X2563P $15,988 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '13 Legacy 2.5i Premium, 2.6L, 173 HP, 32 Mpg Hwy, stk# M412257DP $18,755 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '15 Outback 2.5i Prem., priced below market! front dual zone a/c, backup camera, stk# X16607A $26,226 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 Outback 2.5i Ltd., lthr, front dual zone a/c, htd. front seats, stk# X2568P $25,817 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 Outback 2.5i Prem., htd front seats, ESC, 30 mpg hwy, stk# X16577A $25,879 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701

4207 Hatchback, 24K Mi.,

4170

'99 Continental, beige, loaded, 99k miles, stk# T381 $4,990

$12,990 #94710B

'10 Sentra 2.0, Carfax 1-owner, fwd, 34 mpg hwy, Sharp Car! Stk# U1553A $8,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758

1-866-2449085 Kia

'12 Nissan Altima 2.5: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Motor Trend Certified,

'10 Mazda Mazda3 i: 2.0L 4 Cyl, FWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $9,990 #10416A

4145

'15 Jeep Renegade: Preferred Pkg, Alpine White, Only 11K Miles, Just Arrived!!! Hurry In!!! $19,499 #H160873N

2015 Nissan LEAF S Stk #42509-1 $16,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '10 Nissan Cube: Wagon, 1.8L 4 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, Motor Trend Certified, Low Miles, $10,990 #26175C

'08 MAZDA 5, light green, power everything, stk #T325 $7,990

APRIL 8, 2016

4220 Subaru

'13 Chevy Equinox LS: Loaded, 1 Owner, GM Certified, Clean Carfax, $17,441 #P5723

'09 Mazda5: Loaded, Clean Carfax, Full Pwr, Very Clean, $9,669 #38362B

4140

'03 S-Type, green, 80k miles, stk# T379 $7,990

Jeep

4170 Nissan/Datsun

'98 Continental, only 50k mi., white, stk# T380, $5,990

Mazda

FRIDAY

4290

'13 BRZ Limited Leather, Front Dual Zone A/C, Bluetooth & Heated Front Seats, Stk #X2608P $19,914 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 347-0701 '14 XV Crosstrek Limited, outside temp display, heated front seats, more! Stk# M412215DP $22,451 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds

2006 VW Jetta GLI Stk#45393-1 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'11 VW Jetta SEL: One Owner Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Nav/GPS, Heated Leather Seats, Nice, $12,990 #26240A

'14 VW Jetta Wagon TDI, Roof, Nav, Auto, $23,990

Volvo

4315

'09 Volvo S60 2.5T: Leather, Sunroof, Auto, 43K Miles, Call For Price

'13 Volvo XC90: 7 Passenger, Sunroof, Black Metallic, 54K Mi, Clean Carfax, 11 Service Records, $23,999 #H160562A

Chevrolet Trucks

4330

'14 Chevy 1500 LT: Double Cab, 4x4, Z71, 17K Mi, GM Certified, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'11 Buick Enclave CXL: Sunroof, Rear DVD, Leather, Sharp! $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'06 Buick Rendezvous CXL: Black, Loaded, One Owner Clean Carfax, $6,414 #38486A

'15 ChevyTraverse 2LT: FWD, Buckets, 22K Mi, GM Certified, $27,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '04 Chevy Blazer LS: 4x4, Auto, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Tinted Glass - Deep, Call Today! $5,990 #36265A

'14 Chevy Captiva LT: Sport, Silver, 32K Miles, Priced Below Market, $14,999 #AT1081

'14 Chevy Captiva LT: Sport, Alloys Wheels, FWD, 4 Cyl, OnStar, Call Today! $16,890 #P8473

'13 Chevy Equinox LT, low mile s , backup ca me ra , 32 mpg hwy! Stk# C10451P $18,365 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '15 Chevy Equinox LS FWD, 4ci, power equipment, 23xx miles, stk# C160604L $21,999 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '12 Chevy Equinox LT, FWD, 16xxx mi., stk# C10099P $19,311 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '05 Chevy Equinox LS: 3.4L V6, Auto, FWD, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Spoiler, CALL TODAY! $6,490 #75870A

'15 Chevy Equinox LT: 4 Cyl, 15K Miles, GMCertified, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

'08 Chev Equinox: Sport, 6 Cyl, FWD, Clean Carfax, $10,554 #38618A


Classified Sport Utilitiy

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'09 Chevy Equinox LT: Loaded, One Owner, Clean Carfax, Power, $11,552 #38656A

'08 Chevy Equinox LT: Full Power, Clean Carfax, $10,442 #P5605B '07 Chevy HHR LT: FWD, One Owner Clean CARFAX, Low Miles, Leather Trimmed Seats, $6,990 #8785A

'13 Malibu, Leather, FWD, GM Certified, 16xxx Miles, Stk #C160953B $33,466 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'07 Chevy Suburban LT: Loaded, Leather, 2nd Row Buckets, $15,414 #P5650A

4390 Sport Utilitiy

'16 Kia Sedona LX: Passenger Van, Only 12K Miles, READY FOR VACATION, $23,499 #AT1125

'08 GMC Envoy SLE: One Owner Clean Carfax, Loaded, Clean, $9,449 #38593A

'10 Subaru Forester 2.5XT: Premium, AWD, One Owner Clean Carfax, AWD, Low Mi, Sunroof/Moonroof, $14,990 #10433A

'09 Nissan Quest SL: Loaded, Full Power, Clean, $10,449 #38610A

'15 GMC Terrain SLT, heated leather front seats, pus h button s ta rt, stk# C160576A $25.439 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

'13 Subaru Outback LT: AWD, High Quality At Affordable Price, 103K Miles, Venetian Red, Moonroof, Htd Lthr, Bluetooth, $16,999 #H160613A

2011 GMC Terrain SEL-2 Stk# 41799-1 $13,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'05 Toyota Highlander: FWD, 3.3L V6, Spoiler, Leather Seats,

2005 Honda CR-V SE #41806-3 $7,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Honda CRV EXL: 4WD, Crystal Black, Heated Leather, Moonroof, 67K Miles, #H160368B Call Now!Only $17,999

'02 Chevy Tahoe: 4x4, Loaded, Very Clean, Full Power, $8,912 #P5696A

'07 Hyundai Santa Fe: 3.3L V-6 Cyl, Auto, One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof, $6,490 #94858A

'10 Chevy Traverse LT: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Loaded, $14,912 #38569A

'13 Ford Edge SE, Single Owner, Priced Below Average, 27 MPG Hwy, Stk #M42285XP $19,058 LOU FUSZ SUBARU (888) 681-8298 '07 Ford Edge SEL Plus Dual Front AC, Power Seat, Keyless Entry, FWD, Auto, 6Cyl. $10,990 #76032C

'14 Ford Escape SE: Eco, Black, 32K Miles, One Owner, $17,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '11 Ford Escape: 4WD, Limited, Toreador Red Metallic, Loaded, 94K Miles, Won't Last Long, Priced At $13,299 #H152222A

'15 Hyundai Santa Fe: Sport, FWD, Silver, Only 33K Miles, 4 To Choose From! $18,499 #AT1113

'13 Infiniti JX35: Sunroof, Bluetooth, BU Camera, 3rd Row Seat, Heated Lthr Seats, One Owner Clean Carfax, $32,990 #94386A

'07 Infiniti FX35: AWD, Leather Trimmed Seats, Heated Front Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $12,990 #10681A

'15 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited, Hard Top, Leather, Nav, White, CALL

2013 Kia Sorento LX Stk# 42365-1 $15,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020 '16 Kia Sorento LX: AWD, 3rd Row Seating, Silver, Only 9K Miles, Call Today, $23,999 #H152226A

'06 Nissan Murano: 3.5L 6 Cyl, AWD, Keyless Entry, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Call Today, $9,990 #P8564A

'08 Nissan Rogue SL: Auto, Loaded, Very Clean, Full Power, $11,212 #31778A

Sport Vans. Conversions

4425

'15 Chevy City Express, 4 dr., cargo van, 45xx miles, stk# C151292L $20,999 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770

General Bus. Opps.

4870

Est. Bulk Vending & Crane Business in Illinois for S a l e . Owner Ret ir ing. Min. Net after Taxes & Expenses $120K. Sale Includes Equip., Parts, Ve'08 Rav4, Priced Below hicles, Inventory, & ConAverage, NHTSA 5-Star tracts. Priced at Rating, 25 MPG Hwy, $844,000. 4x4, Stk #UH4645EP Call (309)338-9448 $8,995 Lou Fusz Economy Lot Furniture, Draperies 6110 West (855) 972-9758 '10 Toyota RAV4: 7 PC Rattan King BR Set, Clean Carfax, Low Miles, Exc. Cond., Call Today, Call (636)327-5162 $12,990 #93342C Call Today! $10,490 #10425A

Mini vans

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

4420 Legal Notices

'09 Subaru Forester LTD, 1 Owner, AWD, Leather, $10,990

2009 Suzuki SX4 Touring #45121-2 $4,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'13 Traverse LT FWD, Captain Chairs, GM Certified, 27xxx Miles, Stk #C10437P $23,524 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Traverse LT, backup camera, push button start, 3rd row seating, stk# C10421P $23,998 LOU FUSZ CHEVY (866) 602-1770 '13 Chevy Traverse LS: FWD, V6, 28K Miles, One Owner, 3rd Row, GM Certified, $21,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '15 Chevy Traverse LT: AWD, 19K Miles, GM Certified, $29,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400

4390 Mini vans

'05 GMC Yukon Denali: AWD, Chrome Wheels, Sharp! $12,990

'15 Chevy Tahoe LT: Sunroof, Navigation, 4x4, 20's, DVD, 20K Mi, GM Certified, $50,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 1-314-772-1400

'05 Chevy Trailblazer EXT LS: Sunroof/Moonroof, Bose System, Running Boards, Call Today! $6,490 #26171B

M 1

4420

'15 Chrysler Town & Country: Touring, Navigation/GPS, DVD, 29K Miles, One Owner, $22,995 Don Brown Chevrolet 314-772-1400 '08 Chrysler Town & Cntry, blue, 126k mi, loaded, stk# T361 $8,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102 '06 Chrysler Town & Country LWB Touring, 3rd row seating, power lift gate, sunroof, 25 mpg hwy, clean, stk# UH4603EP $6,997 Lou Fusz Economy Lot West (855) 972-9758 '05 Chrysler Town & Country, low miles, green, loaded, stk# T375 $5,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'93 Dodge Caravan, blue, only 98k miles, sharp! stk# T377 $3,990

Rafferty Auto 866-494-4102

'03 Dodge Grand Caravan: AWD, Loaded, Clean Carfax, $6,776 #31829A

'13 Dodge Grand Caravan: One Owner, Clean Carfax, Only 20K Miles, $17,421 #360111A

9000 Legal Notices

CITY OF ST. CHARLES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that the City of St .Charles, Missouri will conduct a public hearing before the Planning and Zoning Commission on Monday, April 25, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. and before the City Cou ncil o n Tuesd ay, May 3, 2016, at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth floor of City Hall, 200 North Second Street in the City of St. Charles, Missouri for the purpose of giving interested parties and citizens an opportunity to be heard on the following matters: 1.Case No. CU-2016-7. (Bax Engineering) An application for a Conditional Use Permit from §400.220(C)(1)(k) for a Motor Vehicle Sales Business within the C-2 General Business District, specifically to convert the building and lot into a Motorsports Sales facility at 2020 South Old Highway 94. The subject property is 0.51 acres and is located in Ward 4. 2.Case No. CU-2016-9. (Robert Schowengerdt) A n applicat ion f o r a Conditional Use Permit from §400.230(C)(1)(a) for a M i c r o b r e w e r y within the C-3 Highway Business District, specifically to open a microbrewery with taproom and vintage videogame arcade at 2236 1st Capitol Drive. The subject property is 1.03 acres and is located in Ward 2. The applications, maps and plans for the above items, as received from t he applicants, ar e available in the offices of the Department of C o m m u n i t y Development, 200 North Second Street, Suite 303, St. Charles, Missouri during regular business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. If you have any questions r e g a r d i n g t h e above items scheduled for the public hearing, please contact the Department of Community Development at (636) 949-3222. The City of St. Charles offers all interested citizens the opportunity to attend public meetings and comment on public matters. If you wish to attend this public meeting and require an accommodation due to a disability, please contact the Office of the City Clerk to coordinate an accommodation at least two (2) business days in advance of the scheduled meeting at 636949-3282 or 636-9493 2 8 9 ( T T Y - f o r t he hearing impaired). The City of St. Charles, Missouri fully complies with Tit le VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and related statutes and regulations in all programs and activities. For more information or to obtain a Title VI Complaint For m, please call the City Cler k's Office at 636-949-3282 or visit City Hall located at 200 North Second Street, St. Charles, Missouri, 63301.

2010 Dodge Journey SE #94107-1 $9,995 St. Charles Nissan/ Hyundai (866)672-4020

'07 Honda Odyssey EX-L: One Owner Clean Carfax, Heated Leather Seats, Sunroof/Moonroof, $7,990 #94641B

FRIDAY 9000

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT Windsor Unit FAMILY DIVISION Dk. No. 99-5-14 Wrjv

APRIL 8, 2016

STLTODAY.COM

Notice of Public Hearing City of St. Peters Board of Adjustment The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at City Hall located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard at Mexico Road. The following petition will be considered at that time. PETITION 16-G

In re: G.C, NOTICE OF HEARING TO: Kevin Coonce, father of G.C. ( dob 3/11/07). You are hereby notified that a hearing to consider the termination of all of your parent al rights to G.C. will be held commencing on May 2, 2016 at 1:30 PM, at the Superior Court of Vermont, Family Division, Windsor Circuit, 82 Railroad Row, White River Junction, Vermont. You are notified to appear in connection with this case. Your failure to appear and defend will result in a judgment being entered against you and your parental rights with respect to G.C. will be terminated. Other parties to this case is the child, G.C.., his guardian ad litem, and the Vermont Department for Children and Families ( " D C F " ) . D C F is represented by the Attorney General's Office, HC 2 North, 280 State Drive, Waterbury VT 05671-2080. Dated April 6th, 2016 ——————————— Hon. M. Kathleen Manley Superior Court Judge, Family Division

Red Skye Wireless, LLC requests a variance to allow a wall sign on a side of a building that is not oriented to or parallel to a street or access drive. The property is located on St. Peters Village Plat 12 as recorded in plat book 22 page 22 at the St. Charles Recorder of Deeds Ofice, more commonly known as 318 Mid Rivers Mall Drive. All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, Missouri 63376; 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, extension 1670. LOCATION MAP

LEGAL DESCRIPTION A legal description of the subject property is on ile at the City of St. Peters Planning Department

Notice of Public Hearing City of St. Peters Board of Adjustment The Board of Adjustment of the City of St. Peters, Missouri, will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 at City Hall, located on St. Peters Centre Boulevard on Mexico Road. PETITION 16-H

Bids/Proposals

9005

Abigail Lorenze and Schon Kohnen request a variance to permit a reduction of the twenty (20) foot front building setback to permit the installation of an accessory structure (deck). The property is located on Lot 19F of Ohmes Farm subdivision, as recorded in Book 45 Page 122 at the St. Charles Recorder’s Ofice, more commonly known as 102 Scenic Drive.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice to Bidders: Qualified bidders may submit bids for project as de scribed in this Document. Submit bids according to All interested citizens will have the opportunity to give written and oral the Instructions to Bidders. BIDDING A. Regu- comment. Persons with disabilities needing assistance should contact the latory Requirements: Bid and contract requirements City before the meeting by calling or writing to the City Administrator at shall be governed by P.O. Box 9, St. Peters, Missouri 63376; 636-477-6600 or 636-278-2244, CFR - Part 200, Appendix II (contract provisions for extension 1670. non-federal entity contracts under federal LOCATION MAP awards). B. Project Identification: 2016 site security upgrade. C. Project Description: Campus security improvements including inst all of CCTV indoor and outdoor cameras, upgraded door controls and site access. D. Project Location: Missouri Tor ah Institute: 1809 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield MO 63017. E. Owner's Representative and Construction contact: Mr. Yigal Sasportas, Administrator. F. Bid Submittal: All prospective bids shall LEGAL DESCRIPTION be submit t ed t o 1809 Clarkson Road, Chesterfield MO, 63017 A legal description of the subject property is on ile at the City of St. Peters Attn: N P S G - Site Planning Department Security Project . Bids must be submitted before April 30th, 2016. Prospec9005 Bids/Proposals 9005 Bids/Proposals 9005 tive Bidders are highly Bids/Proposals recommended to visit the sit e before submitting NOTICE TO BIDDERS: S e a l e d bids f or P A R K their bid, by contacting INVITATION TO BID KELLISON ELEMENTARY RENOV A TI ON, DON owner's representative #16-026 TEMPORARY SCHOOL ROOFING ROBINSON STATE PARK, and scheduling a visit. STAFFING SERVICES PROJECT FY16 (BI-15) CEDAR HILL, MISSSOURI, Successful bidders shall CITY OF O’FALLON, Project No. X1605-01 will begin the work on receipt MISSOURI The Rockwood School be received by FMDC, of the Notice to Proceed and shall complete the The City of O’Fallon, Mis- District invites you to State of MO, UNTIL 1:30 submit a bid according PM, 5/5/2016. For spework within the Contract souri is soliciting sealed Time. BIDDER'S QUALI- bids for temporary staff- to Rockwood School cific project information and ordering plans, go to: FICATIONS A. Bidders ing services. S pecifica- Di s t r i c t ' s K E L L I S O N ELEMENTARY SCHOOL http://oa.mo.gov/ facilities must be properly licensed tions are available at under the laws governing www. ofallon.mo.us under ROOFING PROJECT FY16 (BI-15) specifications. their respective trades Bid Opportunities. For further project details and be able t o obt ain and information regarding insurance and bonds re- Interested vendors should quired for the Work. Insur- submit sealed bids clearly the mandatory Pre-Bid meeting, etc., please visit S e ale d bids for Rock ance in a form marked ìTemporary Staffacceptable to Owner will ing Services“ to the City ht t p: / / f indr f p.c o m , or Is land Trail - Phase 2 , www .rsdmo.org or call Pleasant Hill to Windsor, be required of the suc- of O’Fallon attn, Julie Matt Wilhelm, Foresight Mo, Project No. X1601-01 cessful Bidder. Moellering 100 North Main Services will b e re c e ive d by at 877.759.9740 S tre e t, O ’ F a l l o n , MO FMDC, State of MO, UN6 3 3 6 6 by 1 0 : 0 0 A. M. TIL 1:3 0 PM, 4 /2 8 /2 0 1 6 . CDT, Monday, April 1 8 , Fo r s p e c ific proje c t 2016. Bids will be publicly information and ordering opened at that time in the plans , go to: h t t p : / / o Councilman’s Conference NOTICE TO a.mo.gov/ facilities Room. CONTRACTORS

'12 Honda Odyssey EX-L: DVD, One Owner, 34K Miles, Call For Price

Th e C ity o f O ’ F a l l o n OWNER: The Board of re s e rve s the right to G o v e rn o rs f o r th e reject any and all bids and Missouri State University "Notice is hereby given that the following property; In accordance with the pro- waive any informality. O’Fallon also The City of $1,000.00 U.S. Currency, visions of STATE LAW, S e ale d bids for the re s e rve s the right to REMOVE ASBESTOS FOR s e iz e d on October 7 , being due and select the lowest and/or RENOVATION, 2 0 1 5 , at 3 1 7 S . 1 6 th payments ELLIS HALL unpaid for which the comb e s t b id d e r a s d e Street, St. Louis, Missouri, pany owner is entitled to will be received at the Oftermined by the City in its fice of Planning, Design is available for return. satisfy an owner's lien of sole discretion. The property should be '07 Ford Escape: & Construction, Missouri the goods stored at the claimed within 3 0 days State University, 901 S. MyWay Mobile Storage Lmtd, Loaded, Lthr, fro m Ap ril 8 , 2 0 1 6 . National, Springfield, MO St. Louis location below. Contact DEA - St. Louis 65897, until 2:00 p.m. on One Owner Clean And due notice having Division by mail/in person APRIL 21, 2016 and then '06 Nissan Xterra given to the owner Carfax, at 317 South 16th Street, been publicly opened and read such property and all Auto, Power Pkg., St. Louis, Missouri 63103, of aloud. With each propos$9,772 #36557B known to claim an or by phone at 314-538- parties al, a certified check or bid 53K Mi., $12,990 interest therein, and the INVITATION TO BID bond properly executed 4 8 5 0 . Otherwise, it will time specified in such no#16-027 WWTP be deemed abandoned tice for payment having by the bidde r in the CLARIFIERS a n d d is p o s e d o f in amount of five percent expired, the goods will be REHABILITATION a c c o rd a n c e with 4 1 (5 %) of the bid shall be sold at public auction at '13 Ford Explorer CITY OF O’FALLON, C.F.R. 128-48." submitted. the below location to the '12 Subaru Tribeca: MISSOURI XLT, Leather, highest bidder for cash or To place your ad, call 314-621-6666 or and specifications Leather, Sunroof, otherwise disposed of on The City of O’Fallon, Mis- Plans Roof, Nav, can be obtained from the MONDAY, APRIL 18TH, souri is soliciting sealed Office 800-365-0820, ext. 6666. Navigation, 33K of Planning, Design Quads' II $31,990 2016 @ 10: 00 a.m. bids for the wastewater & Construction upon reNOTICE OF Miles, $26,990 4769 EARTH CITY treatment plant clarifiers ceipt of a $25.00 refundaPUBLIC HEARING E X P R E S S W A Y , ble deposit for documents BRIDGETON, MO 63044 r ehabilit at ion p r o j e c t. returned within thirty days Specifications are availis hereby given that (314) 291-0924 Antiques 6285 Antiques Wanted 6290 Notice from date of bid. All sets a b l e a t w w w . '12 GMC Acadia SLT1: the City of Cottleville will ofallon.mo.us under Bid of specifications required DVD, Moonroof, Crystal '11 Forester 2.5X conduct a Public Hearing other than in person will Opportunities. Red Metallic, 74K Mi, Bal Limited, Leather, Historian will pay top $$ before the Board of be mailed at bidder's exof Fact 5Yr/ 100K Moonroof, Heated Selling 30 yr. Collection of for German-Japanese Alderman on Wednesday pense. Electronic sets of Interested vendors should PwrTrain Wrnty, Front Seats, Automatic Quality Clean Antiques, WW II relics April 20, 2016 at 7:00 submit sealed bids clearly plans and specifications Temp Control, Stk Oak & Walnut Furniture, 314-438-8665 p.m. or as soon thereafter marked “WWTP Clarifiers are als o available at #X2620MP $16,445 Large Clock Collections. as same may be heard in INVITATION TO BID Rehabilitation“ to the www.plans.missouristate. LOU FUSZ SUBARU Items Ready for Home or the City Hall Board Room, City of O’Fallon attn, Julie edu. (888) 347-0701 #16-024 VIDEO FLAT 6307 5490 Fifth Street in CotShop. Call for Appt. & Estate Sale Moellering 100 North Main PANEL DISPLAY SYSTEM more info. Dealer Prices tleville, Missouri for inAttention of bidders is St r eet , O’Fallo n, M O CITY OF O’FALLON, to all. (636) 933-3521 or N&M SALES 314-621-6666 formation regarding the particularly called to the 6 3 3 6 6 b y 1 0 : 0 0 A. M. MISSOURI (314) 623-0629 6330 Waterman- 63130 following: requirements as to the CDT, Friday, Apr il 29, stltoday.com/homes 4 /9 , 9 : 3 0 - 3 , 4 /1 0 1 0 -2 Desks, BR furniture, rugs. NEW AMPHITHEATER AND The City of O’Fallon, Mis- 2016. Bids will be publicly conditions of employment estatesales.net. BATHROOM FACILITY IN souri is soliciting sealed opened at that time in the to be observed. Bidders bids for a video flat panel Councilman’s Conference must agree to comply with LEGACY PARK the prevailing wage rate display system for council Room. provis ions and othe r chambers. Specifications ________________ statutory regulations as are available at w w w . T h e C i t y o f O ’ F a l l o n Amy Lewis, City Clerk referred to in the specifiofallon.mo.us under Bid r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o City of Cottleville, reject any and all bids and cations. Opportunities. Missouri waive any informality. The City of O’Fallon also M S U is a n A A / E O Interested vendors should institution. submit sealed bids clearly r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o To place your ad, call at 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820, ext. 6666. marked ìVideo Flat Panel select the lowest and/or best bidder as Display System“ to the City of O’Fallon attn, Julie determined by the City in Moellering 100 North Main its sole discretion. Dogs 5005 Dogs 5005 Dogs 5005 Dogs 5005 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS S tre e t, O’Fallon, MO #57816097, Audio-Visual 6 3 3 6 6 by 1 0 : 0 0 A. M. Services CDT, Tuesday, April 19, Goldendoodles, F1 & F1B Labradoodles, F1 & F1B LAB PUPS-AKC, OFA 2016. Bids will be publicly series. All colors, & all series. All colors, & all Black, Choc. & Yellow, Harris-Stowe State opened at that time in the sizes. Shots wormed, sizes. Shots wormed, see parents, calm. shots, University (HSSU) is reCouncilman’s Conference guar., bred for looks, disguar., bred for looks, diswormed, health guar. questing sealed Room. position/ hunting ability. position/ hunting ability. 618.883.2137 INVITATION TO BID proposals for Audio-Visual Ready now thru Summer. www.sieverskennels.com Ready now & thru winter. #16-025 RSC WINDOW Services to be provided to Th e C ity o f O ’ F a l l o n 1st Goldendoodles 618.396.2494 618.396.2494 The Board of Estimate and LEAK REPAIR PROJECT third party individuals and re s e rve s the right to Mini & Standard, sieversretrievers.com sieversretrievers.com Lab pups, black, yellow Apportionment will hold a CITY OF O’FALLON, organizations using the reject any and all bids and Golden Retrievers, , & chocolate: AKC, public hearing on the on campus facilities. A waive any informality. MISSOURI Dachshunds, Shorkies OFA, blocky, Golden P ro p o s e d An n u a l YORKIE PUPPIES - Males copy of the RFP is avail- The City of O’Fallon also GOLDEN RETRIEVER PUPS Cockapoos, & Others Retriever Pups, AKC, Operating Plan for FY & Females, AKC Reg., 2 able by calling (314) 340AKC, OFA, Selectively The City of O’Fallon, MisA 636-240-3647 A re s e rve s the right to OFA, blocky, LabraBred. Shots, wormed, m o s . , Parents on 3325, emailing: barskys@ select the lowest and/or souri is soliciting sealed 2 0 1 7 in Room 2 0 8 City LoveNCarePets.org doodles & Golden dooHall, 1200 Market Street, health guar. See parents. Premises. hssu.edu or faxing a writ- b e s t bids for a window leak rebidde r a s dles, mini sizes. Shots 618.883.2137 Call (314)243-1575 ten request to: (314) 340- determined by the City in pair project at the Renaud at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, wormed, guar., bred April 26, 2016. www.sieverskennels.com 3322. Bids must be S p irit C e n te r. its sole discretion. GERMAN SHEPHERD for looks, disposition/ submitted to Room 105 in Specifications are availhunting ability. Ready PUPS, AKC, Beautiful, a b l e a t w w w . City residents may submit the Dr. Henry Givens, Jr. now & thru Winter. show & working line, exc. ofallon.mo.us under Bid oral and/or written comAdministration Building 618.396.2494 q u a l i t y , Re a s o n a b l e . ments on the Plan and no later than 10:00 a.m. Opportunities. sieversretrievers.com (314) 605-6216 may submit comments/ on Wednesday , April 20, q u e s tio n s o n th e Interested vendors should 2016 and will be opened submit sealed bids clearly propos e d Plan at that at 10:15 a.m. in Room marked “ RSC Window time. 123 in the Dr. Henry Givens, Jr., Administration Leak Repair Project“ to Building. the City of O’Fallon attn, Accessible parking is availJulie Moellering 100 North able on the City Hall lot. Copies of the Proposed Main S treet, O’Fallon, MO 6 3 3 6 6 by 2 :0 0 P.M. Plan are available April 2 0 th after 4 p.m. in the Call 314-621-6666 or 800-365-0820 for our Garage Sale Package. CDT, Tuesday, April 26, Budget Division, Room 2016. 419 City Hall. Bid s will b e p u b lic ly opened at that time in the Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales CITYOF ST. LOUIS Councilman’s Conference PROPOSED 2017 6325 MISSOURI 6325 MISSOURI 6325 ILLINOIS 6330 Room. MISSOURI BUDGET SUMMARY in Classified Th e C ity o f O ’ F a l l o n 63011 - 415 Mayfair Dr., 63141 Antiques, f u r n., QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ 62040. Boy Scouts Sale. General Fund re s e rve s the right to 4/9, 7-2, Mens, Womens, toys & games. Garden63376- Dardenne Lake Sat 4/9, 8am-1pm. Holy $510.6 million reject any and all bids and baby/toddler clothes, toys, i n g e q u i p & m u c h Estates Annual SubFamily Comm. Ctr, waive any informality. more. 8am. 111 Runnyhome goods division Sale. Sat. 4/9, 2600 Washington Ave The City of O’Fallon also Special/Other Funds mede 7a-1p. Furn. Incl. Ice 63124 Huge RUMMAGE $530.1 million reserves the right to seCream Parlor Chairs SALE! McKnight lect the lowest and/or best 63146 -April 9: 7a-3p/1153 Tripod, Camera Bag, Crossings Church of bidder as determined by TOTAL BUDGET Dunston Dr. Huge Sale: Books, Luggage, Yard Christ, 2515 S. 314-621-6666 $1,040.7 billion the City in its sole discreTools, Jewelry, Furs. McKnight at Litzsinger. f u r n i t u r e , b o o k s , tion. Halloween, crafts LOTS OF TREASURES Sat. 4/9. 7am-1 pm. Payne Paul W. QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQQ Furn., baby items, stltoday.com/ Budget Director electronics & more! 314-621-6666 H U G E S A L E- - E x t r e m e Rain or shine. 314-621-6666 classiieds a m o u n t of it ems 1233 stltoday.com/classifieds Sandst one Terrance, 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/classifieds stltoday.com/classifieds 314-621-6666 • stltoday.com/homes Lake St. Louis, Saturday 4/9, 7:30 to 2, No early birds. '05 Nissan Xterra S: 4WD, 4.0L 6 Cyl, Low Miles, Roof Rack, Tire Pressure Monitors, Call Today, #77385A $8,990

Auctions, Estate Sales & Antiques

Pets & Stuff

PUBLIC NOTICE

Garage Sales

Pet listings they’re the cat’s meow.

Search St. Louis area jobs and find the one that’s right for you at STLtoday.com/monster

D5

The C ity of W e b s t e r Groves is accepting sealed bids for aquatic center painting and repairs. The bid opening will be held at 4 E Lockwood Ave on April 2 0 , 2 0 1 6 at 1 0 :0 0 a.m. A pre bid meeting will be held at 33 E Glendale on April 11, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. Bid packages can be found by going to w w w . webstergroves.org/bids. Q u e s tio n s c a n b e directed to Miki McKee Koelsch at 314-963-5656 or m c k e e m @ webst ergroves.org. All rights reserved.


Classified

D6

M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

FRIDAY

APRIL 8, 2016 FRIDAY

STLTODAY.COM ●

04.08.2016

Gateway Buick GMC transforms appearance, keeps customers irst Beth Wade

leather seating featuring flip-top writing surfaces. Complimentary beverages and snacks are always available. Lewis Gateway Buick GMC has undergone describes it as a lively space, noting it is a grand remodel bringing a new dimennot uncommon to see guests engaged in conversations and playing cards. sion of customer comfort and service to this longtime dealership address. “Now people want to stay and wait for their vehicle,” she said. According to dealer principal and Another favorite: a new digital billco-owner Don Davis, this complete board (replaces a former outdoor sign), makeover represents the Michael Marxer photos located in the south lot and highly first-ever renovation of The signature Buick GMC arch welcomes guests to Gateway’s newly renovated, but highly visible to drivers traveling on I-270. the 24-year-old facility, familiar, Hazelwood address. Because giving back to the community 820 McDonnell Bouthat supports it has always been central levard at I-270. Davis to Gateway’s business philosophy, the and business partner dealership shares the billboard’s changMike Shanahan, Jr. acquired the dealership ing message with the city of Hazelwood, and franchise rights in to alert the public to important local January 2014. The stuninformation. Davis said he is pleased the entire community can benefit from ning transformation, Kelley Lewis, the sign’s prime location. To further which took just five director of support the community, Gateway also months, updated and marketing donates a portion of every new and prereconfigured interior owned vehicle sale to local non-profit spaces, while leaving agencies. the original footprint intact. The $1.6 The point could be made Gateway’s million project was capped off last week fresh look is mirroring Buick’s updated when the Gateway name was added to model lineup. the building’s façade. Last week, just as the finishing “Our customers are just as excited as we are, because they went touches were being applied to dealership through (construction) with us,” Davis remodel, Gateway took delivery on its said. first 2016 Buick Cascada convertible, Top up, or top down, the brand new 2016 Buick Cascada, is a head turner. Featuring a plethora the halo car that is drawing fresh — and To allow business at this busy of amenities, including luxurious leather-appointed 8-way power-adjustable seats, electronic notably younger — eyes to the brand. dealership to run as usual, even dursafety belt presenters and a power roof that is operable at speeds up to 31 miles per hour, the Brimming with technology, premium ing the height of construction, the 4-seat ragtop is changing perceptions of the Buick brand. finishes and the quality driving experi15,000-square-foot showroom was posts and face-to-face comments, Davis ence legendary of Buick, the company’s remodeled one half at a time and a sec- contests and ticket giveaways. first convertible in 25 years is at the “Each month, we provided something and Lewis say clients are thrilled with ondary reception area was temporarily the customer-friendly space. forefront of brand’s perception-changnew and fun for our fans,” she said, pressed into service as the customer One of the most popular: the spaing marketing campaign. noting the dealership boasts more than waiting room. cious and inviting customer lounge. The steadily increasing number of “Our guests were very patient during 12,000 Facebook fans. Situated between the showroom and first-time Buick buyers is proof the Sporting General Motors’ silver and the process,” said Kelley Lewis, director service department and open to all, brand’s marketing strategy is working, black archway, the signature entry for of marketing. the room is divided into two areas. One Lewis said. Buick and GMC franchised retail sales To keep interest high and customers section is appointed with comfortand service facilities, the completely engaged, Lewis chronicled construc“Just like Buick, we’ve revamped, but able leather chairs and multiple flat updated and redesigned dealership not tion progress on the dealership’s varikept true to our traditions,” she said. only features GM’s modern classic color screen TVs; the other is highlighted by To learn more about Buick or GMC’s ous social media channels and posted work spaces — equipped with charging special service promotions — including scheme, but updates every customer model lineup, visit in person or online at stations for electronic devices — and construction discounts — augmented by touchpoint. Citing numerous online www.stlouisbuickgmc.com. Contributing writer

stlouisbuickgmc.com • 314-895-1600

Spring Sales Event

Going On NOW! *see dealer for complete details, prices, models and selection may vary.

2016 BUICK CASCADA PREMIUM ULTRA LOW MILEAGE LEASE FOR WELL-QUALIFIED LESSEES WITH A NON-GM LEASE

369

$

PER MO. FOR 39 MOS.* $2,839 DUE AT LEASE SIGNING AFTER ALL OFFERS

No security deposit required. Tax, title, license and dealer fees extra. Mileage charge of $0.25/ mile over 32,500 miles. See dealer for details.


COMPOSER STEVEN LUTVAK MOONLIGHTS WITH CABARET

801 FISH IN CLAYTON REELS IN SEAFOOD EXCELLENCE

Y IF

ro b dr lem ivi o ng f i in mp ou air r c ed om an mu d d nit ist y. rac te d

ep

Th

WITH FLYING COLORS

IT

A NEW FILM UNITES THE ST. LOUIS STAGE AND SCREEN COMMUNITIES

JU ST

ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO 04.08.16–04.14.16 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

ROB DELANEY’S ‘CATASTROPHE’ IS BRUTALLY HONEST ABOUT MARRIAGE

See Inside for Details


22 An ideal fit In “Demolition,” Jake Gyllenhaal plays a widower struggling to keep it all together. BY CALVIN WILSON

04.08.16–04.14.16

23 Delightfully weird As a film, “The Boss” doesn’t stand up to Melissa McCarthy’s talents, but we get to watch a comedic performer at the top of her game.

JUSTIN BIEBER

TUESDAY, APRIL 19

23 Way out there “Midnight Special” writerdirector Jef Nichols takes his time answering all the weird questions his movie raises.

MONDAY, MAY 2

24 You’re the star Trippy “Hardcore Henry” was filmed with Go-Pro cameras, 100 percent from the protagonist’s point of view. SUNDAY, JUNE 26

FRIDAY, AUG. 5

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit

MONDAY, OCT. 3

FUEL

ScottradeCenter.com .com

28 A big catch 801 Fish, from the same owners as 801 Chophouse, features a wide variety of quality seafood. BY IAN FROEB

SATURDAY, OCT. 1

PHOTO CREDIT: ALAN SILFEN

SATURDAY, APRIL 16

ON SALE TODAY AT 10 AM

RON WHITE APRIL 18-19

FRIDAY, APRIL 22

SATURDAY, APRIL 23

To see our complete upcoming events schedule, please visit PeabodyOperaHouse.com

20 Back to school “Boyhood” director Richard Linklater explores campus life in the ’80s in “Everybody Wants Some!!” BY CALVIN WILSON

SCOTTRADE CENTER GROUP SALES 314.622.5454

2

TICKETMASTER 800.745.3000

PEABODY OPERA HOUSE GROUP SALES 314.499.7676

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

WITH FLYING COLORS

IT

6 Marking 30 years Lucero of Memphis, Tenn., will play its hits at a twonight celebration of Of Broadway’s anniversary.

A NEW FILM UNITES THE ST. LOUIS STAGE AND SCREEN COMMUNITIES

ed

THE BIG SCREEN

801 FISH IN CLAYTON REELS IN SEAFOOD EXCELLENCE

FY

MUSIC+CLUBS

SEE+DO

COMPOSER STEVEN LUTVAK MOONLIGHTS WITH CABARET

ct

12 A full career Still hard at work at age 83, Broadway legend Chita Rivera says it’s all about “getting up and doing it.” BY CALVIN WILSON

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

ScottradeCenter.com · PeabodyOperaHouse.com

KEVIN C. JOHNSON

ROB DELANEY’S ‘CATASTROPHE’ IS BRUTALLY HONEST ABOUT MARRIAGE

TI

24•7 4 Best Bets Our critics pick the best events in the week ahead, including Willie Nelson at the Peabody, the Italian Film Festival, “E.T.” at the SLSO, Jazz for Justice in Ferguson and more. Plus, what to look forward to in the coming weeks.

ON THE COVER

JU S

BY JUDITH NEWMARK

11 Getting away To write its latest album, “Dealer,” indie group Foxing went into isolation in a Vermont cabin. BY

ob dr lem ivin of g in im ou paire r co d mm and un dist ity ra .

UPCOMING EVENTS CALENDAR presented by

7 His own stories Steven Lutvak, composer for Broadway’s “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder,” moonlights with a cabaret act featuring his own songs. BY CALVIN WILSON

e pr

PEABODY OPERA HOUSE

13 Family project Filmmakers involve the theater community — and the Contini family — in “Four Color Eulogy,” a project that makes its debut at Ronnies Cine.

Th

COVER STORY

stlouisblues.com | 314-622-BLUE

ST. LOUIS’ GUIDE TO THINGS TO DO

ON SALE NOW!

STAYING IN 31 Love is a battlefield Rob Delaney’s “Catastrophe,” about “the horror of a marriage,” returns for a second season Friday on Amazon. BY GAIL PENNINGTON

04.08.16–01.14.16 • STLTODAY.COM/GO •

Jason Contini and Jessica Laney in “Four Color Eulogy”

2016 PLAYOFF TICKETS

See Inside for Details

From left: John Contini, Wyatt Weed and Jason Contini of “Four Color Eulogy” at New Castle Comics and Games in Maryland Heights. PHOTO BY ROBERT COHEN, POST-DISPATCH

COPYRIGHT 2016 • Go! Magazine is published Fridays by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Lee Enterprises. No part of Go! Magazine may be reproduced without prior written consent. For permissions requests, reprints, back issues and more information, call 314-340-8000, or visit STLTODAY.COM/CONTACT. For distribution information, call STL Distribution Services at 314-556-6404.

stltoday.com/go


Here’s what we’re looking forward to in the coming week

“Putting together our fourth annual issue of The Go! List. Find it April 24 in the Sunday Post-Dispatch!” •

OUR TEAM Gabe Hartwig / editor 314-340-8353 / ghartwig@post-dispatch.com Hillary Levin / photo editor 314-340-8118 / hlevin@post-dispatch.com

“Shopping for new patio furniture to replace the table that got damaged by wind last week.” •

Elaine Vydra / digital marketing manager 314-340-8917 / evydra@post-dispatch.com “Home-opener week for the Cardinals! Going to the game on Thursday!” •

Emily Tintera / Post-Dispatch event and sponsorship manager 314-340-8510 / etintera@post-dispatch.com Donna Bischof / Post-Dispatch vice president of advertising 314-340-8529 / dbischof@post-dispatch.com WRITERS AND CRITICS Ian Froeb / restaurant critic, beer writer Jane Henderson / book editor Kevin C. Johnson / pop music critic Sarah Bryan Miller / classical music critic Daniel Neman / food writer Judith Newmark / theater critic Gail Pennington / television critic Alex Siegman / arts writer Calvin Wilson / arts writer

“I’m looking forward to hearing the late Steven Stucky’s final composition at the St. Louis Chamber Chorus concert on Sunday.” •

CONTACT US Get your events listed events.stltoday.com Advertise with us 314-340-8500 / stltoday.com/advertise “The red-carpet opening of ‘Four Color Eulogy’ at Ronnies Cine!” •

Subscribe to us 314-340-8888 / stltoday.com/subscribe Write to us Go! Magazine, St. Louis Post-Dispatch 900 N. Tucker Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63101

“Monday is a holiday for me: the Cardinals’ home opener. Baseball, beer and hot dogs!” •

OVERHEARD ONLINE On the National Blues Museum JOE JENNINGS, VIA FACEBOOK: “This is a really cool thing the city should be proud of. Kudos to those who put in years of work to make this happen.” ➙ On our ranking of “American Idol” winners JENNIFER CUMBO, VIA FACEBOOK: “The only winners worth noting as successful are Carrie Underwood, Kelly Clarkson, Jordin Sparks and Phillip Phillips. The end.” ➙ MEL BRASHEAR, VIA FACEBOOK: “Keep in mind, without ‘American Idol,’ you probably would never have heard of any of these singers who did not come in first. ‘A.I.’ is only a door opener. I couldn’t name a single ‘Voice’ winner.” stltoday.com/apps

@gostl

@gostlouis

@gostl

Get our free app for daily Best Bets, reviews and more ➙ stltoday.com/apps

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

3


protest music, you might want to check out this concert by the Liberation Jazz Collective from Bloomington, Ind. The event is sponsored by the Center for Social Empowerment and Justice. There’ll also be a musicians’ workshop, conducted by LJC members, from 2 to 4 p.m.; it’s open to the public. BY CALVIN WILSON Artist Presentation Society auditions

BETS

CALVIN WILSON

FRIDAY Italian Film Festival USA of St. Louis WHEN AND WHERE Friday through April 30; various times and locations • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314422-3102; italianfilmfests.org

Twelve recent, award-winning Italian films will be showcased in the 12th annual Italian Film Festival USA of St. Louis, beginning this weekend at Washington University. “The Legendary Giulia,” a comedy about a rural B&B and mobsters, screens at 8 p.m. Friday. “Wondrous Boccaccio,” a drama inspired by “The Decameron,” is at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, and the romantic comedy “What a Beautiful Surprise” is at 8 p.m. Saturday. The three screenings will be held in the university’s Lab Sciences 300 classroom. Upcoming screenings will be held at Washington University, St. Louis Community College-

events are ✔ These Editor’s Picks

Willie Nelson performs in Spicewood, Texas.

Krista Tippett WHEN 7 p.m. Friday • WHERE Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road • HOW MUCH $31-$36; includes 1-2 tickets plus book • MORE INFO brownpapertickets. com or left-bank.com

For Sunday morning radio listeners, Krista Tippett is a familiar voice, interviewing interesting people about their spirituality, ethics and, as her NPR show is called, “On Being.” In her new book “Becoming Wise,” Tippett writes about her own life and what’s she’s learned from her ecumenical inquiries. She will not pose for photos at the book event, although a bookseller is allowed to take candid photos during the signing. She will sign up to two backlist books per person. BY JANE HENDERSON

‘Richard III’ WHEN Friday through April 17; 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 2 p.m. Sundays • WHERE Ivory Theatre, 7620 Michigan Avenue • HOW MUCH $15-$20 • MORE INFO stlshakespeare.org

SATURDAY Willie Nelson & Family WHEN 7:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Peabody Opera House • HOW MUCH $56.50-$122 • MORE INFO Ticketmaster.com

canceling many of his appearances — including with Willie ✔ After Nelson this weekend at the Peabody — because of an ongoing battle with double pneumonia, 79-year-old country star Merle Haggard has died. Filling in for him at the St. Louis show with Nelson are Jamey Johnson and Ryan Bingham. KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Barron ✔ Charlie plays one of Shakespeare’s most charming and duplicitous characters, a man who lets nothing stop him on his way to a much-contested throne. Suki Peters directs St. Louis Shakespeare’s production of the entertaining drama. BY

St. Louis premiere of Lee Blessings’ play about a troubled man traveling west with his ex-wife’s daughter, a young woman with plenty of issues of her own. Isaiah DiLorenzo and Shannon Lampkin star; Tom Kopp directs. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

JUDITH NEWMARK

Monica, Chante Moore

‘Great Falls’

WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Ambassador, 9800 Halls Ferry Road • HOW MUCH $35-$55 • MORE INFO MetroTix.com

WHEN Friday through April 17; 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays • WHERE Union Avenue Christian Church, 733 Union Boulevard • HOW MUCH $20-$25 • MORE INFO 314667-5686; westendplayers.org

The West End Players Guild presents the

R&B singers Monica and Chante Moore are teaming up for a show coming to the Ambassador this weekend, with each

singer guaranteed to deliver a bonanza of hits. Monica’s new album is “Code Red”; Moore’s is “Moore is More.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

Choir of St. John’s College, Cambridge WHEN 8 p.m. Friday • WHERE Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, 4431 Lindell Boulevard • HOW MUCH $19-$42 • MORE INFO 314-533-7662; cathedralconcerts.org

Choir of St. ✔ The John’s College, Cambridge, isn’t the oldest choir at the university — it wasn’t founded until the 1670s — but it’s got one of the higher profiles, singing daily Evensongs,

making recordings and touring around the world. On Friday, director Andrew Nethsingha and the choir will return to the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis and Cathedral Concerts on their first U.S. tour since 2011. They’ll sing a program of English music dating from the 16th century to the present, all selected with the spacious acoustic of the building in mind. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

‘E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial’ WHEN 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Powell Symphony Hall, 718 North Grand Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$68 • MORE INFO 314-534-1700; stlsymphony.org

In its first life, Powell Symphony Hall was a movie palace. These days, the building occasionally returns to that original function, but with an important diference: The St. Louis Symphony Orchestra is onstage beneath the big screen, providing

FAST FORWARD Justin Bieber, April 19 at Chaifetz Arena: The 22-year-old singer is on tour with his latest album, “Purpose” ➙ The Go! List Party, April 21 at the Missouri History Museum: Celebrate with the winners of our fourth annual critics’ and readers’ awards ➙ “WWE Raw,” May 2 at Scottrade Center: Roman Reigns, Chris Jericho, Dean Ambrose and more enter the ring for “Monday Night Raw” ➙ “Captain America: Civil War,” opens in theaters May 6: Superheroes Captain America (Chris Evans) and Ironman (Robert Downey Jr.) clash in the latest Marvel movie

4

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

a live reading of the soundtrack. This weekend, you have three opportunities to take the family to see (and hear) Steven Spielberg’s endearing 1982 classic “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial,” as a young boy helps a lost alien go home. There’s more: Moon Pies will be available in the lobby — and you have a chance to win a bike and basket that looks just like Elliott’s. Just head to the Grand Tier level before or during the performance to enter. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

SATURDAY Jazz for Justice WHEN 6-8 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Wellspring Church, 33 South Florissant Road, Ferguson • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO fueledtochange.com

you’re into big✔ Ifband jazz or

The Artist Presentation Society was formed in 1947 to encourage and promote exceptional young musicians, giving winners public performance opportunities and cash prizes. There have been more than 180 winners to date, many of whom — including pianists Malcolm Frager, Barbara Liberman, Peter Henderson and Vera Parkin — have gone on to significant careers as soloists, teachers, and orchestral or operatic performers. This year, the judges are pianist Nina Ferrigno, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra principal double bass Erik Harris, soprano Stella Markou — and you. For the 70th anniversary, APS will have its first audience choice award. The auditions begin at 10 with a welcome, break for lunch from 11:45 to 12:45, and conclude at 4:15 with the announcement of the winners. It’s a great chance to hear some promising young performers. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Repeal of Prohibition Party WHEN 5-10 -1 p.m. Saturday aturday • WHERE Anheuser-Busch garten, 1200 Lynch Street Biergarten, $33 • MORE • HOW MUCH $3 com INFO homeofbud.com

Roman Reigns

Find more events, and get your own events listed for free ➙ events.stltoday.com stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( N E L S O N ) ; H A N D O U T ( R E I G N S )

BEST

WHEN 10 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Ethical Society, 9001 Clayton Road • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-5659194; apsmusic.org

Meramec, St. Louis Community CollegeFlorissant Valley and Southwestern Illinois College-Belleville. The films are in Italian with English subtitles. For a complete schedule, visit italianfilmfests.org. BY


Join Anheuser-Busch to mark an important anniversary for the company — and for the whole beer industry. Dress in 1930s attire and enjoy live music, samples of A-B beers that survived Prohibition (Budweiser, Faust and Michelob) and a parade by the Budweiser Clydesdales to commemorate the horses’ famous irst beer delivery. A selection of ’30s-style foods will be available for purchase. BY GABE HARTWIG

Yonder Mountain String Band, Horseshoes and Hand Grenades WHEN 7:30 p.m. Saturday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH $25-$30 • MORE INFO Ticketmaster.com

Yonder Mountain String Band returns to St. Louis to do bluegrass its own way, redeining and expanding upon the genre. The group’s latest album is “Black Sheep.” BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

SUNDAY Peter Brown WHEN 4 p.m. Sunday • WHERE St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314-994-3300

Illustrator Peter Brown has been celebrated for his picture books, winning a Caldecott Honor for “Creepy Carrots!” Now he presents his irst novel for young readers, “The Wild Robot.” On his blog, he writes that he once sketched a picture of a robot in a tree and wondered, “What would an intelligent robot do in the wilderness?” Apparently we’ll ind out. BY JANE HENDERSON ‘All Manner of Gods’ WHEN 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE 560 Music Center, 560 Trinity Avenue, University City • HOW MUCH $35; $10 for students • MORE INFO 636-4584343; chamberchorus.org

stltoday.com/go

Barnes, ✔ Philip artistic director of the St. Louis Chamber Chorus, tries to choose venues appropriate for the music his a cappella choir sings: a Hungarian church for Hungarian music, a synagogue for a program of Jewish music. This season’s Concert V, “All Manner of Gods,” though, includes music evoking gods from Pan to Egyptian deities to the Greek and Roman pantheons, as well as more current religions such as Hinduism and Judaism. There’s an important world premiere on the program, too: The late Steven Stucky, who died Feb. 14, spent his inal months composing “The Music of Light,” an SLCC commission, while sufering from brain cancer. Barnes speculates that what listeners “will ind thought-provoking is probably not a work that supports your own faith, but rather the realization that many quests for life’s meaning may be supported through music.” BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Artists-in-Training Recital WHEN 3 p.m. Sunday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH Free • MORE INFO 314961-0171; opera-stl.org

Opera Theatre of St. Louis’ Monsanto Artists-in-Training Program, now in its 26th year, is a musical success story. Recognized as one of 10 model American programs for at-risk youth, the program provides voice lessons for high school students; it’s helped to turn around lives while providing educational beneits. It’s produced some serious operatic success stories, too, including tenor Jermaine Smith and soprano Julia Bullock. On Sunday afternoon,

the 23 members of the class of 201516 will show what they’ve learned while competing for $12,000 in scholarships. Another American operatic success story, mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves, will serve as adjudicator. BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER

Underoath, Caspian WHEN 7:30 p.m. Sunday • WHERE The Pageant, 6161 Delmar Boulevard • HOW MUCH Sold out • MORE INFO Ticketmaster.com

Metal band Underoath hung it up in 2013, but you know how these things can go in rock ’n’ roll. The band is back for its “Rebirth” tour, performing its albums “They’re Only Chasing Safety” and “Deine the Great Line.” The reunited lineup features Aaron Gillespie, Grant Brandell, Spencer Chamberlain, Chris Dudley, James Smith and Tim McQue. BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

WEDNESDAY David Sanborn WHEN 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday through April 16 • WHERE Ferring Jazz Bistro, 3536 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $50 and up • MORE INFO jazzstl.org

Saxophonist David Sanborn, St. Louis’ own, returns home for a fast-selling four-night stand at Ferring Jazz Bistro (several shows are sold out; check for availability). He’s touring with a new album in tow, “Time and the River,” his irst collaboration in the studio with producer/ bassist Marcus Miller in more than 15 years. The pair has always made magic together.

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON

James McBride WHEN 7 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE National Blues Museum, 615 Washington Avenue • HOW MUCH Free, but RSVP requested • MORE INFO brownpapertickets. com or left-bank.com

for his ✔ Known memoir “The Color of Water” and the National Book Award-winning novel “The Good Lord Bird,” James McBride now takes on a diferent genre, a biographical thinkpiece about singer James Brown. With “Kill ’Em and Leave: Searching for James Brown and the American Soul,” McBride interviews some of Brown’s closest friends, looking for the truth behind the legend, and argues that Brown’s music and life were intertwined with the history of the American South. BY JANE HENDERSON

Wild Kratts WHEN 6:30 p.m. Wednesday • WHERE Peabody Opera House, 1400 Market Street • HOW MUCH $25-$100 • MORE INFO 800-7453000; Ticketmaster.com

“Wild Kratts,” the celebrated PBS Kids TV show, brings its stage show to St. Louis. Martin and Chris come alive to activate their Creature Power Suits to battle a comic villain. Full of fun animal facts and endless humor, the Kratt brothers journey to recover their favorite invention and save the animals of the world. BY ALEX SIEGMAN ‘A Night with the Buddy Holly Boys’ WHEN 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday • WHERE Sheldon Concert Hall, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $30-$50 • MORE INFO muny. org; MetroTix.com

summer, ✔ Last “Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story” was the big hit of the Muny season, packed with rock classics and big, exciting performances. Now Andy Christopher, who played Holly, and the rest of the gang return for a special performance, the second concert in the “Muny Magic at the Sheldon” series. Rave on. BY JUDITH NEWMARK

Remembrance, Resilience, and Rebuilding SUN APRIL 10

1pm | FREE

Presented by the Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

Susan Winchester (pictured), who lost her sister Dr. Peggy Clark in the Oklahoma City bombing, discusses the hope and resilience that helped residents move forward after the tragedy.

Missouri History Museum Forest Park | 314.746.4599 | mohistory.org

Your Hometown Community Event HONE

ü

April 8-10 St. Charles Convention Center HOURS Friday 11 am - 8 pm Saturday 11 am - 8 pm Sunday 11 am - 5 pm

Produced by

ü ü ü

SM

Y DO LIST

Outdo

or Liv ing Sp with S ace pa

Kitch

en Re mode

New F looring

New W indows

l

/ Do ors

DIRECTIONS I-70 to 5th Street Exit South. Right onto Veterans Memorial Parkway

STLHomeShow.com

u Better Living Theater - Informative gardening seminars from Charlie Nardozzi, horticulturist, writer and radio/TV personality u 10th Annual St. Charles Sausage Festival & Wine Tasting u Walter Knoll Floral Seminars u Family Fun! - kids activities by The Magic House

FREE ADMISSION & FREE PARKING 04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

5


SHAZAM ST. LOUIS TOP 10

MOST-SHAZAMED SONGS FOR MARCH 5 “Permission” (Ro James) “Panda” (Desiigner) “Might Not” (Belly feat. The Weeknd) “Low Life” (Future feat. The Weeknd) “Needed Me” (Rihanna) “Law” (Yo Gotti) “Might Be” (Luke Nasty) “Oui” (Jeremih) “Body” (Dreezy feat. Jeremih) “Moolah” (Young Greatness)

Rihanna

The ‘Lucero jukebox’ he Memphis band will play its hits at a two-night celebration of Of Broadway’s anniversary BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

ucero easily could have played a St. Louis venue larger than Of Broadway next week, but the alt-country/ punk band from Memphis, Tenn., decided to stick with what it knows. “We’ve been working with them for a while now, and rather than move to the next spot, we wanted to help the promoters and the owners make as much money as they can,” says bassist John C. Stubblefield. “They’ve been nothing but nice to us from the get-go. It’s a cool spot, and it continually promotes good people and good music.

L 6

“They’ve been great to us, and we’re honored to do their anniversary.” Of Broadway, which has been a St. Louis mainstay for 30 years, is celebrating 10 years under its current owners, Steve Pohlman and Kit Kellison. Stubblefield says Lucero will perform two diferent shows Wednesday and Thursday that will include the necessary staples, along with songs on the band’s latest album, “All a Man Should Do,” the follow-up to “Texas & Tennessee” (2013). “We’ve been around for 18 years,” he says. “We have a couple hundred songs to draw from. We’re pretty stoked.” The “Lucero jukebox,” as he calls it,

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

will be activated as well, meaning the band will be wide open to requests. Stubblefield says “All a Man Should Do” is a more reflective album for Lucero. “The last couple of records were more so party anthems,” he says. “Now we’re more inward thinking, calming down a little bit. Sometimes you gotta sit back and reflect and meditate — take account of what’s going on.” He also says the album represents a love letter to the city of Memphis in its instrumentation and in its cover of “I’m in Love With a Girl,” by Memphis band Big Star. It’s the first time Lucero has put a cover tune on one of its albums. “We put our own spin on it,” Stubblefield says. “On the original recording, it’s just Alex Chilton and an acoustic guitar. We have a whole band behind it with bass and drums, and it’s

definitely more groovin’. We put it together kind of quickly. The second time we played it, it was, ‘That’s it. That’s what we’re doing.’” Lucero just finished a three-part video, which includes visuals for “All a Man Should Do” tracks “Can’t You Hear Them Howl,” “The Man I Was” and “Baby Don’t You Want Me.” The video series follows the parallel journeys of a man and woman through the Alaskan tundra. The clips were filmed by Endless Endless (Adam and Sarah Heathcott). Stubblefield says the project is awesome, and that the concept didn’t even require the band to be on camera. “Our ugly mugs don’t have to be in it,” he says. WHAT Of Broadway 10 Year (30 Year?) Anniversary Show/Young Outlaws Tour with Lucero, John Moreland • WHEN 8 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday • WHERE Of Broadway, 3509 Lemp Avenue • HOW MUCH $25-$35 • MORE INFO Ticketfly.com

Find more music events, photos and concert news ➙ stltoday.com/music stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : H A N D O U T ( L U C E R O ) ; A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( R I H A N N A )

Lucero


IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

the gaslight cabaret festival

Playwright Robert L. Freedman (left) and composer Steven Lutvak

Composer Steven Lutvak moonlights with a cabaret act BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

inger-songwriter Steven Lutvak compares his 11-year struggle to get a musical on Broadway to the classic tale of Sisyphus, who kept pushing a boulder up a mountain only to see it roll down again. But unlike Sisyphus, Lutvak has been rewarded for his perseverance. “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder,” which he co-wrote with Robert L. Freedman, opened at the Walter Kerr Theater in 2013 to critical raves and commercial success. A touring company of the comic musical is scheduled to take the stage at the Fox Theatre in September. Theatergoers can hear some of the songs from the show when Lutvak brings his cabaret act, “A Gentleman’s Guide to a Gentleman’s Guide,” to the Gaslight Theater this weekend in a Presenters Dolan show. The act also includes other selections from his

PHOTO: MARK KENNEDY

S

stltoday.com/go

songbook, says Lutvak, who considers cabaret another way of expressing himself musically. “I woke up one day and realized that, while waiting for my musicals to happen, I was missing an opportunity to be performing my songs,” he says. Lutvak’s not alone in being a notable Broadway composer who also sings. Adam Guettel (“The Light in the Piazza”) and Jason Robert Brown (“Parade”) have also pursued cabaret as a sideline. But Lutvak hastens to add that some of their predecessors in the field have also taken to the stage. “There’s always been a link there,” he says, citing Johnny Mercer and Harold Arlen as songwriters who were also performers. “I’d like to think that perhaps I stand as part of a real tradition.” Still, Lutvak is best known for his hit musical. With music by Lutvak,

a book by Freedman and lyrics by both, “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder” is based on Roy Horniman’s 1907 novel “Israel Rank: The Autobiography of a Criminal,” which also provided the inspiration for the 1949 British film, “Kind Hearts and Coronets.” The novel, film and musical revolve around an heir to a family fortune who has no qualms about dispensing with the relatives blocking his way. In its review, the New York Times praised “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder” as being representative of “what sometimes seems a lost art form: musicals that match streams of memorable melody with fizzily witty turns of phrase.” The Broadway production closed in January after running more than two years and winning four Tony Awards, including best musical. Because it’s a period piece about a killer and set in London, “Gentleman’s Guide” has drawn comparisons to “Sweeney Todd.” But while “Sweeney” is mostly dark with some comic moments, Lutvak says, “Gentlemen’s Guide” is basically lighthearted. “In the days when I was pitching the show,” he says, “I used to say, it’s ‘Little Shop of Horrors’ meets ‘My Fair Lady.’”

Co-Presented by The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis

Tony Award Winner

Steven Lutvak ork ew Y N m o In Fr Composer of “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder,” Tony Award for Best Musical 2014

Fri/Sat • April 8/9 • 8 p.m. he Gaslight heater 358 N. Boyle Avenue

Tickets GaslightCabaretFestival.com & Info: 314.725.4200 SEASON SPONSORS:

r o f e t a n o D

F F O 1/ 2 ets! Tick

Goodwill gladly accepts your clothing, housewares, home decor, electronics, furniture and even cars! Donations are tax deductible.

WHAT Steven Lutvak: “A

Gentleman’s Guide to a Gentleman’s Guide” • WHEN 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday • WHERE The Gaslight Theater, 358 North Boyle Avenue • HOW MUCH $35-$40 • MORE INFO presentersdolan.com

mersgoodwill.org

Give Hope. Give Local. Give Goodwill. 04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

7


Join us for TONS of family-friendly FUN! •

5 Food Trucks

DJ Big Papa G

Aunt Amy’s Balloons

Clowns

Face Painting

Kids Crafts

Pet Adoption

Fredbird

Team Photos

More!

Thank you for helping babies & kids like us!

April 30 - Forest Park marchforbabies.org

jazz at the bistro summer series The Joey Alexander Trio June 18

Exclusively Sponsored by the Ferring Family Foundation

Chick Corea Trio with Christian McBride & Brian Blade June 21-22 Exclusively Sponsored by World Wide Technology and the Steward Family Foundation photo: Chick Corea Productions

And Many More! Tickets On Sale April 13 at 10am full summer lineup and info: jazzstl.org | 314.571.6000

April 18 & 19 80 0-745-30 0 0 | Ticketmaster.com | Scottrade Center Box Off ice 8

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

the harold & dorothy steward center for jazz 3536 washington ave. st.louis, mo 63103 Presenting Sponsor of the 2015-16 Jazz at the Bistro Season

stltoday.com/go


April 15 & 16

THE SHELDON CONCERT HALL 2015 • 2016 SEASON

! !

Chita: A Legendary Celebration Starring Chita Rivera

!

! !

April 9 at 8:15 p.m.

"

Underwritten by The Steward Family Foundation and World Wide Technology, Inc.

"

Ustad Imrat Khan & The Fifty Fingers of Imrat Khan April 15 at 8 p.m. Sponsored by Bull Moose Industries, Anantha N. and Jothika N. Manepalli, Sadshiv Santosh, Qurrat-Ul-Ann Rathore and Sangeetha.

Taj Mahal & The Trio Friends of The Sheldon Beneit

April 17 at 7:30 p.m. Part of The Legends Series, made possible by The Steward Family Foundation and World Wide Technology, Inc.

Call MetroTix at 314.534.1111 or visit TheSheldon.org Visit the Sheldon Art Galleries one hour before each concert!

stltoday.com/go

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

9


The Ambassador MetroTix.com • Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards, 7 p.m. June 29, $35-$55. Busch Stadium cardinals.com/ mccartney • Paul McCartney, 8 p.m. Aug. 13, tickets start at $19.50, on sale at 10 a.m. April 15. Ballpark Village Busch II Infield Ticketfly.com • Old School 95.5 District Rhythms Series with Mint Condition, 6 p.m. May 27, $9.95 for first 100 ticket buyers, $15-$20 with reserved VIP available. • Old School 95.5 District Rhythms Series with Dru Hill, 6 p.m. July 29, $9.95 for first 100 ticket buyers, $15$20 with reserved VIP available. Chaifetz Arena Ticketmaster.com • Needtobreathe’s “Tour De Compadres” tour with Mat Kearney, Parachute, Welshly Arms, 7 p.m. Oct. 29, $23-$43. The Firebird Ticketfly.com • Lukas Graham, 8 p.m. April 20, sold out. • Fivefold, Robby Kallery, 8 p.m. May 14, $10. Fox Theatre MetroTix.com • Wilco’s “Star Wars” tour with William Tyler, Aug. 17, $30-$75, on sale at 11 a.m. Friday.

10

• Snoop Dogg and Wiz Khalifa’s “High Road Summer Tour with Kevin Gates, Jhene Aiko, Casey Veggies, DJ Drama, Aug. 17, $26-$99.95 with four lawn tickets available for $78, on sale at noon Friday.

iPARTY STYX • APRIL 3 • PEABODY OPERA HOUSE Devon and David Simmons of Woodlawn, Ill. From left: Lexi, Heather and Eric Christ of O’Fallon, Mo. Susan McClenahan and Troy Phillips, both of St. Charles Liz King (left) and Lily Johnson, both of Troy, Mo. Amy and Jaime Chier of Bridgeton Kelli Davidson (left) of St. Louis and Sue Henson of Farmington, Mo. From left: Sheri Sintzel, Linda Valentin and Donna Hucke, all of Belleville Gina and Todd Bunner of Jacksonville, Ill. Denise and Jim Sanderson of O’Fallon, Mo. Dale Strom and Samantha Dehart, both of Belleville Karen and Mark Lampe of O’Fallon, Mo. Barb and Michael Murphy of Ballwin

• Rascal Flatts’ “Roots and Rhythm” tour with Kelsea Ballerini, Chris Lane, July 28, $30.50-$50.50 with four lawn tickets available for $74, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, no service fees at the box oice the first week of sales. The Pageant Ticketmaster.com • Haim, 8 p.m. May 25, $28.50-$35. • Lake Street Dive, 8 p.m. Aug. 4, $25$27.50, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Kurt Vile and the Violators, 8 p.m. Aug. 23, $22.50-$25, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. Peabody Opera House Ticketmaster.com • Wanda Sykes, 8 p.m. Oct. 1, $39.75$75, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. Pop’s Ticketweb.com • (hed) pe, Veer Union, 6:30 p.m. May 6, $15. • Prozak, AZ the Fallen, Ryda Click, Cannibal Crew, Krayzie K, 7:30 p.m. June 2, $12-$15. The Ready Room Ticketfly.com • Cash’d Out, 8 p.m. May 4, $15. • Brian Fallon & the Crowes, 8 p.m. July 6, $22, on sale at 10 a.m. Friday. • Femi Kuti and the Positive Force, 8 p.m. July 9, $25.

Find iParty photos from this event and more around town, and order photo reprints and keepsake merchandise: stltoday.com/iparty

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

Find more concert announcements, music events and party pix ➙ stltoday.com/music stltoday.com/go

PHOTOS: JON GITCHOFF

TICKET TRACKER

Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre Livenation.com


No pressure The Blender To write its latest album, indie rockers Foxing went into isolation in a Vermont cabin BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON / POP MUSIC CRITIC / KJOHNSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

St. Louis indierock band Foxing has scored some pretty big notices in conjunction with its latest album “Dealer.” The Wall Street Journal highlighted its song “Weave,” Pitchfork.com described its new music as an artistic triumph and NPR featured its song “The Magdalene” on “All Things Considered.” “I’d be lying if I said we didn’t like good press, but there are people who are the tastemakers of music and they’re all rushing to stay fresh on the next new thing,” says bassist Josh Coll. “If you allow yourself to get wrapped up in it, it can be demanding. Press can be fickle.” He says Foxing has had “fairly decent press” so far, an understatement, and found the session with NPR especially mind-blowing. “We sent it to all of them (the media) and they didn’t want it,” Coll says of the band’s music. “The kids listened to it and championed it and put it up online on their tiny blogs. That’s why those press outlets started talking about us. Those kids wouldn’t shut up.” stltoday.com/blender

S E RV I N G U P S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

@kevincjohnson

Foxing is making the rounds with its sophomore album “Dealer,” the followup to “The Albatross” (2013). The album follows two solid years of touring with little time of. “As a band and as friends, we were a little bit strained being on the road for that amount of time with little downtime,” he says. “It was tiresome being in close proximity for so long. “There was lots of interviews and meeting a lot of people in diferent cities who love our music, and they’re really nice and wonderful, but there’s the feeling that nobody knows you and you feel boxed in.” Because of all of that, it took a while to get into the writing process for “Dealer.” In fact, it took a year and a half just to write one song — and they ended up not even liking the song. So the band went into isolation. They holed up in a cabin in Vermont in February 2015 to write “Dealer,” with no pressure. “We went away to block ourselves from the outside world,” Coll says. “The criticism, positive and negative, can alter how you work. The pressure to follow up a record that meant a lot to people can kill a band.” In Vermont, he says the band wrote daily. @blenderpd

“Basically, we were snowed in,” he says. “There was nowhere we could go. I think that was the first time all of us came together and actually wrote a record I think not only represented the five as us as individuals but as friends moving with each other rather than against each other, and we feel really good about it.” “Dealer” is the record Foxing wanted to make rather than one it was told to make, Coll says. The new music has been called more constrained and more reserved that in the past. “It’s not as bombastic,” he says. “None of us really listen to extreme music. It’s more honest and blunt and real and less focused on trying to convey and more focused on just doing. ... Tonally, it’s a lot more beautiful — raw.” He also says “Dealer” is a transitional record that allowed the band to expand its palette. “It’s hard to pick apart our own music because I tend to hear less of the actual sound and more so the shared experiences of all of us,” he says. “It’s hard to analyze. But what I hear is a lot of ambient texturing and layering — a real visceral emotional outpouring of sounds and ideas.”

Celebrating 21 years in the LOOP

Hippie Boutique

WHAT Foxing, o’brother, Tancred, Adjy • WHEN 8:30 p.m. Friday • WHERE The Luminary, 2701 Cherokee Street • HOW MUCH $11-$14 • MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com

WATCH THE BLENDER Don’t miss Kevin’s video reports on concert news and local music buzz, every Tuesday. stltoday.com/blender

@kevincjohnson

Leather SOLE SURVIVOR

REAL Leather hasMakers a distinct of aroma. Fine REAL Leather does not split, crack or peel! Leather Goods

SOLE SURVIVOR

Check out our large selection of Himalayan Salt Lamps Cleanses and puriies the air while treating a variety of illnesses

Makers of Fine Leather Goods A P R O G R A M O F S T. L O U I S E A RT H D AY w w w. g r e e n d i n i n g a l l i a n c e . o r g

#EatGreenSTL

7312 Manchester Rd. Maplewood, MO 314-932-1475 Mon-Fri 10-6 & Sat 10-5

stltoday.com/go

April Special: Select Casual Belts $50 Each (Reg up to $68)

2016

6606 Delmar Blvd, St Louis, MO 63130 314 727 9043 www.SunshinedayDreamLoop.com

University City Loop 04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

11


The

CHECK OUT THESE COMIC CON COSTUMES CO See who stopped by our Fish Eye Fun photobooth last weekend at Wizard World Comic Con.

CELEBRATE WITH US AT THE GO! LIST PARTY List

stltoday.com/comiccon

2016

Get an early look at the results of our annual Go! List at a party April 21 at the Missouri History Museum. Tickets are on sale now. stltoday.com/thegolist

Not slowing down At age 83, Broadway legend Chita Rivera says it’s all about ‘getting up and doing it’ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

I

n an era in which the phrase “living legend” is thrown around much too frequently, singer-dancer-actress Chita Rivera lives up to it. A Broadway legend who turned 83 in January, Rivera shows no signs of slowing down. Last year, she won critical raves for her performance on the Great White Way in the musical “The Visit.” And on Saturday evening, Rivera will take the Sheldon stage for its annual gala concert (replacing Ben Vereen). “It’s all about still getting up and doing it,” says Rivera,who describes“Chita: A

12

Legendary Celebration”as“a theatrical, memory lane piece of theater.” Those memories include her work with some of the pre-eminent figures in American theater, from dancer Gwen Verdon to composer Leonard Bernstein (“West Side Story”). Verdon played murderess Roxie Hart opposite Rivera as the competitively homicidal Velma Kelly in the original 1970s Broadway production of “Chicago.” “Gwen was a great gal, and she was somebody that I highly respected,” Rivera says. “To be able to sing and dance

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

and act with her was extraordinary. And to be in the same room with Bernstein was quite a wonderful thing.” A native of Washington, D.C., Rivera began taking dancing lessons as a child — her first step into showbiz. She received a Kennedy Center Honors Award in 2002 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. Rivera has performed in some of Broadway’s most memorable shows, including not only “Chicago” and “West Side Story” but also “Bye Bye Birdie,” “Guys and Dolls” and “Sweet Charity.” She won Tony Awards for her lead roles in the musicals “The Rink” and “Kiss of the Spider Woman.” Rivera received her most recent Tony nomination for “The Visit,” in which she portrayed a wealthy woman who returns to her hometown with revenge on her mind. In its review, the New

York Times observed that “the woman who stands so regally before us may appear as glacial as Siberia. But longtime theatergoers know that beneath the frost, this ice queen is hot stuf.” Indeed, the Sheldon show promises to deliver theatrical fireworks. Fans can expect a wide-ranging show that draws upon her long and distinguished career, Rivera says. She’ll perform selections from the musicals with which she’s been involved, as well as other songs. “It’ll be four musicians and myself,” she says. “And stories that have been a great part of my life, and that I consider interesting and fun.” WHAT “Chita: A Legendary Celebration” • WHEN 8:15 p.m. Saturday • WHERE Sheldon

Concert Hall, 3648 Washington Boulevard • HOW MUCH $45-$50; gala patron tickets and sponsorships also available • MORE INFO 314-533-9900; thesheldon.org

Find more events, reviews and blogs by our critics ➙ stltoday.com/arts

P H O T O S : C H A R L E S S Y K E S /A S S O C I AT E D P R E S S ( R I V E R A ) ; F I S H E Y E F U N ( C O M I C C O N )

Chita Rivera and the cast of “The Visit” perform at the 69th annual Tony Awards in 2015.


From left: Jason Contini, Nicholas J. Hearne and Jessica Laney in “Four Color Eulogy”

ST. LOUIS ACTORS BRIDGE THE STAGE-SCREEN DIVIDE WITH

FLYING COLORS PHOTO: HANDOUT

‘Four Color Eulogy’ turns veteran stage actor John Contini’s passion for comic books into a family drama showcasing work by St. Louis’ theater and ilm communities — and some of Contini’s own comic creations. BY JUDITH NEWMARK / THEATER CRITIC / JNEWMARK@POST-DISPATCH.COM

stltoday.com/go

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

13


Jason Contini accepts the St. Louis Theater Circle Award for outstanding supporting actor in a drama for his role in “Death of a Salesman” in 2015.

J

Comic-book characters that John Contini and his brother dreamed up years ago play a role in “Four Color Eulogy.” “That makes the movie more personal,” Contini says.

Amy Loui as his mother. Taylor Pietz, Jason Contini’s real-life girlfriend, not only appears but composed and performs the film’s theme song. If those names sound familiar to you, perhaps that’s because you’ve seen them onstage. All the actors in “Four Color Eulogy” — and there are lots of them — are, or used to be, stage actors in St. Louis. That was the whole idea. “There’s a divide between the St. Louis stage community and the St. Louis film community,” says Jason Contini, who opens this month in “The Glass Menagerie” at Upstream Theater. (He got his own Circle Award for his performance as Willy Loman’s son Happy in “Salesman.”) “I wanted

to bridge that divide. “My brother Nick and I started Archlight Studios to bring quality film-making to St. Louis on a regular basis. The more we do this kind of stuf, the more of it will happen.” “Four Color Eulogy” takes its title from a comic book printing process. It grew out of an idea that Jason, who has self-published comics, had for a movie about a comic-book illustrator, and his father’s idea for a play set at a south St. Louis bar. They melded them together to create a family drama about a young writer who comes home to St. Louis with his girlfriend, Anne, an artist, to take care of his sick mother. The young couple create their comic book here.

“THERE’S A DIVIDE BETWEEN THE ST. LOUIS STAGE COMMUNITY AND THE ST. LOUIS FILM COMMUNITY. I WANTED TO BRIDGE THAT DIVIDE.” JASON CONTINI

14

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : R O B E R T C O H E N / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( PA N E L S F R O M C O M I C B O O K S , W E E D ) ; C R I S T I N A M . F L E T E S / P O S T- D I S PAT C H ( J A S O N C O N T I N I ) ; H A N D O U T ( M O V I E S T I L L ) ; P O S T- D I S PAT C H F I L E ( J O H N C O N T I N I )

ohn Contini didn’t always dream of a life in the theater. In fact, it’s worked out pretty well for the tall, versatile actor, a veteran of most St. Louis stages and plenty of others elsewhere. Last year, he received a St. Louis Theater Circle Award for his portrayal of Willy Loman in “Death of a Salesman” at Insight, and he received another in March for his direction of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” at the St. Louis Actors’ Studio. But when he was in high school at St. Mary’s in south St. Louis, Contini just wanted to illustrate comic books. He and his older brother, Rich, invented their own superheroes. Rich wrote the stores; John drew copious illustrations of them for future use. That future is now. Those characters populate the comic book at the heart of “Four Color Eulogy,” a feature film opening Friday with a red-carpet premier at Wehrenberg’s Ronnies 20 Cine. The audience at Ronnies — where the movie will run for a week, maybe longer — may recognize some of the settings, from Uncle Bill’s Pancake House to Melrose Club on the Hill to the Compton Water Tower. They’re apt to recognize some of the faces, too. The movie co-stars Contini as Rich, who runs a bar, and his son, Jason Contini, as Chris, an aspiring comic book writer. The Continis wrote the screenplay with the director, Wyatt Weed, and Nicholas J. Hearne. Hearne also stars as Chris’ best friend, along with Jessica Winningham as Chris’ girlfriend, and


{

The problem of impaired and distracted driving in our community.

SPONSORED BY:

Sponsored by The Professional Fireighters of Eastern Missouri Local 2665.

Part 61 of 10

TEXTING AND DRIVING ...

JUSTIFY IT? stltoday.com/go

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

15


Texting while driving. Since text messaging is a relatively new issue in the world of driving laws, the ramiications of doing so are not yet universal. Texting while driving is banned for all drivers in 45 states and the District of Columbia, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Additionally, novice drivers are banned from the activity in Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas. Some drivers are still legally allowed to text while driving according to their state law, under speciic circumstances. In Texas, for example, drivers in school crossing zones and on public school property during the time reduced speed limit applies are banned from texting while driving. Drivers over 18 not in these areas,however, are allowed to text while driving. But many localities within Texas have enacted their own bans on using cell phones to text while driving. You can see how this non-uniform approach could be confusing. Check out the IIHS color-coded map on the organization’ website (wwww.iihs.org) to ind out where your state stands.Contact your local Secretary of State to ind out how any related laws impact your city or county. A Dangerous Activity Even though we can’t all seem to agree on the legality of texting while driving, we all should pay attention to the statistics. According to the National Highway Trafic Safety Administration and its “Stop the Texts, Stop the Wrecks” advertising campaign: • You are three times more likely to crash your vehicle if you text while driving; • 49 percent of adults say they have been passengers in a car when the driver was sending or reading text messages on their cell phone; • 68 percent of teens and young adults disagreed that it is easy to text while driving and still pay attention to the road; and • 78 percent of teens and young adults say they have read a text message while driving, while 71 percent say they have composed and sent one.¤

FREE FAMILY EVENT Now on Stage thru April 17 16

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

April 23, 2016 www.foxpacf.org stltoday.com/go


PREVENTABLE RISK! Texting while driving involves all three types of distracted driving: cognitive, manual, and visual impairment – in all three instances every part of you is unfocused on the road Texting while driving is six times more dangerous than driving while intoxicated. Texting while driving is leading cause of death among teen drivers According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration, distracted driving caused over 1.6 million accidents in the US in 2012.

TEXTING AND DRIVING With some state laws focusing on handheld bans and carmakers putting hands-free technology in vehicles, it’s no wonder people are confused. However, while many drivers honestly believe they are making the safe choice by using a hands-free device, it’s far from the truth. Your brain remains distracted by the conversation rather than focused on the road ahead. Operating A motor vehicle requires your complete attention at all times.

Forms of Distraction

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that over 3,000 distracted drivers crash and die every year. Texting while driving makes you 23 times more likely to get in a car accident than a non-distracted driver. The Virginia Tech Transportation Institute found the minimal amount of time your attention is taken away from the road while texting and driving is 5 seconds. A crash usually happens within an average of 3 seconds of a driver being distracted.

✔ Visual: taking your eyes off the road; ✔ Manual: taking your hands off the wheel; and ✔ Cognitive: taking your mind off of driving.

Information provided by NHTSA.gov and Distraction.gov

A PUBLIC SAFETY CAMPAIGN BY THE FIRE FIGHTERS OF EASTERN MO, LOCAL 2665. Visit Fabulousfox.com

“SPARKLING, FRESH AND LIVELY.” -Los Angeles Times

Fox Box Office 314-534-1111 MetroTix.com

APRIL 26 - MAY 8 stltoday.com/go

May 18-22 04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

17


FOTOLIA

GPS Devices What’s the point of knowing exactly where you’re going if you’re not going to make it there safely? GPS navigation units help us traverse parts unknown. If you keep your unit map updated, it can help you circumvent high-construction zones or even major traffic jams. Can you imagine making a crosscountry trip without one? Although GPS units are invaluable to today’s drivers, tinkering with them is one of the leading roadway 18

distractions today. It takes time to program the right address or business name into the unit — time that can take away from you paying attention to the road. While GPS devices are covered under many distracted-driving laws, how you use them may not be. If you’re depending on your smartphone to run a map application, police officers may pull you over if it looks like you’re using your phone for a conversation.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

WHEN TO PROGRAM YOUR GPS UNIT If you depend on your GPS to find your destination, program your target address before you leave the house or have a passenger help. If you plan to make multiple stops along the way, plan your route and program all possible stops. MOUNT THE GPS If you keep your device mounted securely to your dash, you may be less apt to use it while driving. Always pull

over safely to a gas station or rest stop to program your unit if you’re driving by yourself. This gives you the opportunity to fully focus on inputting the correct destination address, without the added stress of dealing with traffic signs and other drivers. Many new cars offer on-board GPS units that allow you to speak your directions aloud. This can help you keep your eyes on the road while your unit handles your travel logistics for you. stltoday.com/go


Weed — whose company Pirate Pictures makes commercials, industrials and short films — thought it sounded promising. (Pirate and Archlight produced the movie.) Jason Contini and Weed have been friends for about 10 years, ever since they worked together on a vampire movie that was made here, “Shadowland.” They remain close.

Amy Loui and Jason Contini in “Four Color Eulogy”

CUTTING COSTS, NOT CORNERS

“Making a film is hard — making a good film is harder,” Weed says. “But if the studios do something, we found a way to do it. Sometimes we borrowed things, or doubled up on jobs. But we didn’t cut any corners, and that paid of.” At first, Weed and Contini thought they could make “Four Color Eulogy” for about $70,000 — a fraction of the cost of a Hollywood production. Their online funding campaigns raised a little under $15,000. A disappointment? Sure. But they didn’t give up. Instead, they trimmed their sails. They gave up the idea of getting a Hollywood actress to play Carol, the mother. “I was supposed to be somebody else,” says Amy Loui with a laugh. She won her Circle Award for “The Amish Project” at Mustard Seed Theatre. Her father, Wayne Loui, was the Circle-winning director of “Salesman.” (A lot of these people share long, entwined roots, mainly along the St. Louis University theater axis. Rich Contini, a director, was part of it, too. He died 20 years ago, and John Contini’s movie character is named for him.) Casting Loui ofered an unexpected plus. Long ago, she baby-sat the Contini boys: Jason, Nick and Sean. (Sean died in a climbing accident in 2008.) The photos of Carol and her little boy, Chris, are actual photos of Loui and Jason Contini. Cooperation from local businesses and others enabled them to shoot as economically as possible, in terms of both time and money. Wehrenberg, of

course, took the movie on. And there were lots of others as well. Scenes at Carol’s house were shot at Michelle Bolin’s house in south St. Louis, where Jason and her son Billy used to play ball in the yard. Uncle Bill’s let them shoot while the restaurant was open. The Melrose Club welcomed the cameras, too. About half a dozen local bands play on the soundtrack. Kevin Koehler, of the iLLPHONiCS, arranged and produced Pietz’s song, “Color Me.” “He made it sound fantastic,” she says. “I was just amazed.” St. Stephen’s Parish let the filmmakers use a shuttered chapel near Carondelet Park. MoDOT (“the best people ever,” according to Weed) let them shoot on the sides of highways and overpasses as long as they kept the agency updated. And New Castle Comics and Games, in Maryland Heights, stayed open all night to provide the perfect backdrop for all the comic book scenes. Obviously, they needed a comic series to focus on. Not only are there significant licensing considerations (especially in this age of franchise movies), but it’s supposed to be the

work of Chris and Anne. That’s where the old Contini originals fit in. After years in John and Sharon Contini’s basement, the drawings were in pretty bad shape, stained and wrinkled. “My dad started to throw them out more than once, but Mom and I wouldn’t let him,” Jason says. At the time, he admits, they would have been hard-pressed to explain why. “My drawing style looks old-fashioned now,” said John Contini, who’s still a comic-book collector. Nick Contini — another artist in the family — and Aaron Allen, also an artist, updated the designs to look “more streamlined and cinematic,” their originator says. But they’re still the characters he and his brother dreamed up years ago.“That makes the movie more personal.” The producers hope the movie will do well here and go on to play throughout the region. They’re already starting on their next project, a Western. But at Friday night’s opening, they intend just to savor the moment. “We’re all pretty proud of this,” Jason Contini says. “It’s almost exactly 100 percent what I saw in my head when we started.”

JOHN CONTINI

WYATT WEED WHAT “Four Color Eulogy” • RATING Not rated • RUN TIME 2:00 • WHERE Ronnies 20 Cine, 5320

South Lindbergh Boulevard

“MAKING A FILM IS HARD — MAKING A GOOD FILM IS HARDER. BUT IF THE STUDIOS DO SOMETHING, WE FOUND A WAY TO DO IT. SOMETIMES WE BORROWED THINGS, OR DOUBLED UP ON JOBS. BUT WE DIDN’T CUT ANY CORNERS, AND THAT PAID OFF.” WYATT WEED

stltoday.com/go

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

19


RENT

THIS!

TOP REDBOX RENTALS FOR MARCH 28-APRIL 3 “Daddy’s Home” (Paramount) “Creed” (Warner) “The Hateful Eight” (Weinstein) “Concussion (Sony) “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2” (Lionsgate) “The Good Dinosaur” (Disney) “Secret in Their Eyes” (Universal) “The Big Short” (Paramount) “Legend” (Universal) “The Night Before” (Sony)

OUR MOVIE RATINGS ★ Skip it ★★ So-so ★★★ Good ★★★★ Excellent

College daze ‘Boyhood’ director Richard Linklater explores campus life in the ’80s in ‘Everybody Wants Some!!’ ★★★½ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

N

o sooner has freshman and baseball recruit Jake (Blake Jenner) arrived on a Texas campus in the 1980s to the booming strains of “My Sharona” than he realizes just what he’s gotten himself into. The house he’ll share with his teammates is in danger of collapsing, and the testosterone is so thick in the air that

20

it’s a wonder anybody can breathe. In short, it’s a world of guys, and it’s all Jake can do to conceal the fact that he’s maybe just a bit more intellectual than he lets on. Fortunately, there’s at least one thing they can agree on: the vital need to identify, pursue and achieve intimacy with as many college girls as possible. And if that means violating house rules restricting alcohol consumption and female guests —

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

well, rules are made to be broken. Bonding with fellow ballplayers including the philosophical Finnegan (Glen Powell) and the none-too-shy Dale (J. Quinton Johnson), Jake throws himself into club-hopping — from disco to country to punk. But there’s one girl he can’t get out of his mind: an auburn-haired beauty (Zoey Deutch) who noticed him when the guys cruised around town, being kind of obnoxious in their attempts to hit on mostly unimpressed women. “Everybody Wants Some!!” is an engagingly episodic portrait of college life from writer-director Richard Linklater. As a follow-up to his epic, Oscar-winning “Boyhood,” the new

film might at first come across as far less ambitious. But the tale of Jake and his pals is something of a time capsule — and the kind of film from which sociologists decades from now might glean extremely useful information about American culture. Jenner (“Glee”) makes a likable guide to the exhilarating wackiness, and Powell (“Ride Along 2”), Johnson and Deutch are just as charismatic. If you’re the least bit nostalgic about college life, the ’80s or both, “Everybody Wants Some!!” deserves to be on your must-see list. WHAT “Everybody Wants Some!!” • RUN TIME 1:57 • RATING R • CONTENT Language,

sexual content, drug use, nudity

Find more reviews, theaters and movie news ➙ stltoday.com/movies stltoday.com/go

P H O T O S : PA R A M O U N T P I C T U R E S

Blake Jenner (left) and Zoey Deutch in “Everybody Wants Some!!”


IGC Supper Club - Where you want to be. Join the exclusive In Good Company Supper Club today and get “in-the-know” on the best dinner events in St. Louis & St. Charles. Plus, it’s free of charge to join!

www.InGoodCompanySTL.com/Supper-Club Sanctuaria Wild Tapas | Hendricks BBQ | Café Ventana | Diablitos Cantina SanctuariaSTL.com | HendricksBBQ.com | CafeVentana.com | DiablitosCantina.com

stltoday.com/go

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

21


Breakdown ahead In ‘Demolition,’ Jake Gyllenhaal is a widower struggling to keep it all together ★★★ BY CALVIN WILSON / CALVINWILSON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

right young investment banker Davis Mitchell (Jake Gyllenhaal) lives in a glassy, airy, state-of-the-art home that he hates. His wife, Julia (Heather Lind), was crazy about it, but she’s no longer around to enjoy it. And Davis just can’t get his mind around her untimely death. Perhaps he loved Julia so deeply that life without her is unimaginable. That

B 22

would be the romantic take on the situation — but Davis is anything but romantic. And when he’s honest with himself, he has to admit that his future might have included signing over the house to her in a room with battling lawyers. But he does grieve her loss, and he’s incapable of keeping it to himself. Before long he’s acting out, with a particular interest in smashing stuf.

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

That doesn’t go unnoticed by his boss, Phil (Chris Cooper) — who happens to be his father-in-law. The two have never really gotten along, and Davis’ meltdown isn’t helping. It’s left to a single mom named Karen (Naomi Watts) to lend Davis the sympathetic ear he so desperately needs. But he still has at least one worry: Who’s following him around town in, of all things, a station wagon? “Demolition” is an ideal fit for Gyllenhaal, who’s at his best when playing quirky characters who are out of sync with society. That goes a long way toward getting us past some of the comedy-drama’s improbabilities. Working from a screenplay by

Bryan Sipe, director Jean-Marc Vallée (“Dallas Buyers Club”) injects the proceedings with an unrelenting sense of impending danger. If the ending is a bit too tidy, it’s not entirely inappropriate. And in Gyllenhaal, who deserved an Oscar nod for his performance in “Nightcrawler,” Vallée has an actor who’s not afraid to go out on an emotional ledge. Also fine is Cooper, operating in full righteous-indignation mode. Ofbeat and unpredictable, “Demolition” takes a wrecking ball to audience expectations. WHAT “Demolition” • RUN TIME 1:40 • RATING R • CONTENT Language, sexual references, drug use, disturbing behavior

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★stltoday.com/go ★ ★ ★ Excellent

PHOTO: FOX SEARCHLIGHT

Jake Gyllenhaal in “Demolition”


Melissa McCarthy in “The Boss”

Jaeden Lieberher in “Midnight Special”

Some nuggets of hilarity in Melissa McCarthy’s weird ‘Boss’ ★★½ BY KATIE WALSH / TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

elissa McCarthy is a two-man woman when it comes to her career. With writer/ director Paul Feig, she’s found some of her greatest success, from her breakout in “Bridesmaids,” to the runaway hit of “The Heat,” to last year’s surprise, “Spy.” Then there’s her husband, Ben Falcone, a fellow alum of the Groundlings Comedy theater, with whom she co-wrote, and he directed “Tammy,” and now “The Boss.” While the Feig films are more tightly and traditionally structured, with a high joke density, they have proven to be loose and profoundly weird, with room to indulge in strange bits and rifs. That’s not necessarily a bad thing if you’re in the tank for McCarthy’s specific brand of characterdriven physical humor.

P H O T O : U N I V E R S A L P I C T U R E S ( “ T H E B O S S ” ) ; WA R N E R B R O S . E N T E R TA I N M E N T ( “ M I D N I G H T S P E C I A L” )

M

In “The Boss,” McCarthy plays Michelle Darnelle, a cold-blooded wheeler-and-dealer and the “47th wealthiest woman in America.” She has a penchant for high turtlenecks, flowing tunics and dirty-mouthed smack-talk honed in the halls of Wall Street. She gets popped for insider trading by her lover-turned-nemesis Ron/Renault (Peter Dinklage), and after her time in the clink, ends up on the couch of her former assistant, Claire (Kristen Bell). It’s there that she cooks up her new business venture with the help of Claire’s daughter Rachel (Ella Anderson): starting a girls’ troop, the Darnelle Darlings, selling brownies and giving the girls a cut of the profits. High jinks ensue. The structure of “The Boss” doesn’t quite work, and the transitions are wonky. But there are

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent stltoday.com/go

nuggets of hilarity to be found. One of the funniest comes before the opening titles, when Michelle raps her version of DJ Khaled’s “All I Do Is Win” (complete with T-Pain cameo) during a pyrotechnic-infused financial motivational speech. It’s absurd and perfect. Similarly, the troop vs. troop street fight is inappropriately funny and ridiculous. The way McCarthy articulates “Do-ri-to” like a foreign delicacy, or a rif in which she razzes Claire’s date-night sweater are hilarious. While the film allows for these moments, those bits are just bits, and don’t necessarily fit into a larger whole. As a film, “The Boss” isn’t so boss. The writing doesn’t stand up to McCarthy’s talents, and the humor relies on her delivery and physical commitment. But it’s an opportunity to watch a comedic performer at the top of her game revel boldly in her own confident weirdness. WHAT “The Boss” • RUN TIME 1:39 • RATING R • CONTENT Sexuality,

language and brief drug use

Cast shines in wayout-there sci-fi thriller ‘Midnight Special’ ★★★½ BY SOREN ANDERSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

hey ride by night on back roads through the South in “Midnight Special,” two grim-faced men in the front seat of a battered old car. Men with guns, watching warily. In the back seat is a strange, quiet boy of 8, wearing goggles. How strange becomes apparent eventually. The goggles are a clue. When they’re removed, weirdness happens. Unearthly weirdness. The weirdness is the reason these three are on the run, through the night, pursued by formidable forces. What, exactly, is going on here? Who are these people? Who’s pursuing them, and why? Questions writerdirector Jef Nichols takes his time answering. The three in the car are in a hurry, but Nichols (“Mud”) sets a deliberate pace. Keeping

T

his narrative cards close to the vest, he carefully conjures up a mood of paranoia, of a world where events are closing in and paths of escape are being closed of. The picture is a long tease, artfully constructed. Mood is all-important, and it’s a mood designed to keep the audience of balance and on edge until the very end. The acting is first-rate, with Michael Shannon giving a standout performance as the haunted, protective and much-mystified dad, Roy. The mysterious abilities of his son bale him, but his determination to shield young Alton from harm is fierce. Joel Edgerton plays the other man in the car, the father’s longtime best friend who is good with a gun. He’s worried Roy’s single-minded dedication to his son’s safety may

actually be causing the boy harm. The longer they’re on the run, the sicker Alton becomes. In the role of the kid, Jaeden Lieberher again displays the poise and sense of preternatural calm and intelligence that made him so compellingly watchable in 2014’s “St. Vincent” and the recently released “The Confirmation.” Fine work is also done by Kirsten Dunst as Alton’s anxious mother, Adam Driver as a government agent intrigued by the boy’s abilities and Sam Shepard as the leader of a fundamentalist cult from whom Roy and Alton have escaped. The picture is reminiscent of “The X-Files” in its heyday. Although there’s no overt connection between that sci-fi series and this movie, they’re spiritual soul mates. The truth, gradually revealed, is out there. Way out there. WHAT “Midnight Special” • RUN TIME 1:51 • RATING PG-13 • CONTENT Some violence and action • WHERE Plaza Frontenac

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

23


6350 Delmar Blvd. in The Loop St. Louis, MO 63130 (314) 995-6270

A scene from “Hardcore Henry”

FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS AT MIDNIGHT! APRIL 8 & 9 AT THE TIVOLI! · ALL ROCKY SHOWS $10

WITH LIVE SHADOW CAST SAMUR AI ELECTRICIANS!

APRIL 15 & 16* *PLUS SATURDAY NOON MATINEE!

BY EVAN RODRIGUEZ / AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

BUY ADVANCE TICKETS ONLINE tickets.landmarktheatres.com • All Midnight Shows $8

24

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

“H

ardcore Henry” is a front-row type of film. It should be seen and experienced in a theater. However, no matter where you sit or how you see it, you will still be Henry, or at least under the illusion that you’re him. “Hardcore Henry” is the first of its kind: a film completely shot with a Go-Pro — dozens of the cameras, actually — making it filmed 100 percent from the protagonist’s point of view. So, if you would like to be dropped from a freeway overpass, want to know what it feels like to shoot at someone from the back of an incredibly fast-moving motorcycle or fall from a helicopter all while eating popcorn and sipping a beer, this is the film for you. First-time, full-length

feature director/writer Ilya Naishuller makes the man-child id of senseless violence a pseudoreality, a kind of first-person, gaming-esque hyperviolent fantasy. But never fear, the film is not all smash-’emup testosterone, adrenaline and bloodshed. Its viscera is comiclike camp. Naishuller has a sense of humor through the fisticufs and doesn’t take himself too seriously. Henry is a superhero whose voice activation has yet to be turned on. We become superheroes for around 90 minutes — and that is appealing. Henry was once a man, who is now a souped-

up hyperathletic killing machine who can execute the most dexterous of Parkour moves and kick everyone’s butt creatively. You, or Henry, awaken, with absolutely no authentic memory, to your wife screwing your robotic leg back on in some type of laboratory when security is breached and the evil radioactive villain with gravitational radiation powers, Akan, comes to capture you and your wife. The chase is on, and it truly does not stop until the credits roll. Good luck. WHAT “Hardcore Henry” • RUN TIME 1:36 • RATING R • CONTENT Nonstop violence

and mayhem, language, sexuality, nudity, drug use

A scene from “Hardcore Henry”

★ Skip it ★ ★ So-so ★ ★ ★ Good ★ ★ ★ ★ Excellent

P H O T O : S T X E N T E R TA I N M E N T

‘Hardcore Henry’ turns the viewer into a superhero ★★★


TOM HIDDLESTON

ELIZABETH OLSEN

CHERRY JONES

BRADLEY WHITFORD

MADDIE HASSON

WRENN SCHMIDT

CRITICS’ PICK - A RIVETING THRILLER THE NEW YORK TIMES

“SEE IT FOR THE MAGNIFICENT TOM HIDDLESTON, WHO HONORS HANK WILLIAMS’ GREATNESS.” -Stephanie Zacharek, TIME

I SAW THE LIGHT WRITTENANDDIRECTEDBY MARCABRAHAM

NOW PLAYING

ARNOLD WEHRENBERG ARNOLD 14 CINE 1912 Richardson Rd (636) 461-0200 CHESTERFIELD WEHRENBERG CHESTERFIELD GALAXY 14 CINE 450 THF Blvd (636) 532-8141

WELCOME TO THE NEW FRONT LINE

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

ST. PETERS WEHRENBERG MID RIVERS 14 CINE 1220 Mid Rivers Mall Dr (636) 279-2734 ST. LOUIS WEHRENBERG RONNIES 20 CINE & IMAX 5320 S Lindbergh Blvd (314) 843-4336

EyeInTheSkyTheMovie.com FENTON REGAL GRAVOIS BLUFFS STADIUM 12 754 Gravois Bluffs Blvd (844) 462-7342 #1785 ST. LOUIS LANDMARK PLAZA FRONTENAC CINEMA 210 Plaza Frontenac (314) 994-3733

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.ISAWTHELIGHTFILM.COM

ARTWORK © 2015 BLEECKER STREET MEDIA LLC. MOTION PICTURE © 2015 EONE FILMS (EITS) LIMITED. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

NOW PLAYING IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATER LOCATIONS AND SHOWTIMES

“OFFBEAT AND EXUBERANT.” – JORDAN MINTZER, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

91%

JAKE GYLLENHAAL

ROTTEN TOMATOES SCORE ®

STARTS TODAY IN THEATRES EVERYWHERE CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES AND SHOWTIMES

INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO SEE FOR YOUR CHANCE TO RECEIVE A PASS GOOD FOR TWO, EMAIL: CONSTESTSTLOUIS@ ALLIEDIM.COM THE ANSWER TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTION: WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE KEVIN COSTNER FILM? NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Supplies are limited. One pass per winner. Each pass admits two. Seating is not guaranteed and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Employees of all promotional partners and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch are not eligible. All decisions are final. This film is rated R for strong violence and language throughout.

NOW PLAYING stltoday.com/go

CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

IN THEATERS APRIL 15 /Criminal •

@Criminal_Movie •

@Criminal • Criminal.Movie • #CriminalMovie

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

25


040816

() ! CC DVS OC DP

Showtimes and movies change daily and are provided by the theaters.

Friday, April 8, 2016

Central

St. Charles / O’Fallon

St. Charles / O’Fallon

All Showtimes are p.m. unless otherwise noted

St. Charles / O’Fallon

Chase Park Plaza (St. Louis Cinemas)

St. Charles Stadium 18 Cine

Mid Rivers 14 Cine

O’Fallon Stadium 14 (Regal)

Kingshighway & Lindell ! The Boss (R) DP

(Wehrenberg)

(Wehrenberg)

40 & Winghaven Blvd.

1830 First Capitol Dr.

1220 Mid Rivers Mall Dr.

The Boss (R) DVS,CC

www.wehrenberg.com

www.wehrenberg.com

314-367-0101

(11:00 AM 1:05 3:15) 5:25 7:40 9:50 ! Demolition (R) DP (12:00 2:30 5:00) 7:20 9:40 Eye in the Sky (R) DP (11:40 AM 2:00 4:20) 6:50 9:05

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) DP

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM

(11:30 AM 2:45) 6:00 9:15

11:45 AM 12:30 2:15 4:45 7:15 8:15 9:45

636-300-9900

(11:00 AM 1:30) 4:20 7:20 10:00

! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM

Galleria 6 (St. Louis Cinemas) 314-725-0808

9:05 10:00 11:30

(12:25 2:40 5:00) 7:20 9:40 God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) DP (11:00 AM 1:35 4:15) 6:55 9:30

! Hardcore Henry (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 11:45 AM 2:10 4:35 7:00 9:25 9:45 11:30

(11:10 AM 2:20) 5:30 9:00

! God’s Not Dead

Miracles from Heaven (PG) DP (10:55 AM 1:20 3:50) 6:20 8:45 Zootopia (PG) DP (11:30 AM 1:55 4:20) 6:50 9:20

2 (PG) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 4:00 6:55

10:00 AM 12:25 2:50 5:15 7:40 10:05

! Sardar Gabbar Singh (NR) No VIP after 6PM 10:30 AM 2:00 5:30 9:00

! God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) No VIP after 6PM

Justice (PG-13) DVS,CC

(2:30) 5:00 7:30 9:45

Hi-Pointe Backlot 314-995-6273

10:10 AM 1:05 4:05 7:05 10:05

! I Saw the Light (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:30 AM 2:30 5:30

Batman v Superman: Dawn of

314-995-6273 Batman v Superman: Dawn of

Midnight Special (PG-13) DP

Hardcore Henry (R) CC (11:35 AM 2:20) 4:50 7:50 10:55

God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) CC (10:50 AM 1:40) 4:40 7:40 10:35

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:00 3:30) 7:00 9:45

Justice (PG-13) 11:45 AM 1:25 3:15 5:00 7:00 10:30

10:35 AM 11:55 AM 1:30 3:25 4:55 6:40 8:15

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

10:00 11:05

3D (PG-13)

! Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

3D (PG-13) CC (12:30) 4:00 7:30 10:15

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) CC (11:40 AM 2:05) 5:10 8:00 10:20

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13) CC (11:20 AM 2:15) 5:05 7:55 10:45

Miracles from Heaven (PG) CC

Eye in the Sky (R) DP Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

Moolah Theatre & Lounge (St. Louis Cinemas) 314-446-6868

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) DP

3D (PG-13) DVS,CC 12:30 4:00 7:15 10:30

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) DVS,CC

10:00 AM 8:30

11:10 AM 1:40 4:05 6:25 8:45

Rolling Thunder (R)

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13)

Omnimax St. Louis Science Center 314-289-4400

Tornado Alley (NR) 11:00 AM

Living in the Age of Airplanes (NR) 1:00 3:00

National Parks Adventure (America Wild) (NR) 10:00 AM 12:00 2:00 4:00

The Divergent Series:

! God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) No VIP after 6PM 1:35 4:30 7:25 10:15

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) 1:35 3:40 5:05 7:00 8:30 10:15

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3D (PG-13) My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) 2:10 4:40 7:10 9:30

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13) 1:30 4:20 7:10 10:00

Miracles from Heaven (PG) 1:45 4:30 7:20 10:00

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13) 2:05 4:50 7:30 10:00

Zootopia (PG) 1:40 4:15 6:50 9:25

Deadpool (R)

11:30 AM 2:00 4:30 7:10 9:30

! Oopiri (NR) 8:30 PM

11:00 AM 1:50 4:40 7:30 10:20

(11:55 AM 2:40) 5:20 8:05 10:50

London Has Fallen (R) CC

Zootopia (PG) DVS,CC 10:45 AM 11:45 AM 1:20 2:15 4:45 7:15 9:45

(11:25 AM 2:00) 4:45 7:25 10:40

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (R) CC

10:20 AM 1:20 4:20 7:20 10:20

Miracles from Heaven (PG)

(11:05 AM 1:45) 4:25 7:05 10:25

Zootopia (PG) CC

10:50 AM 1:35 4:25 7:10 9:50

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13)

(1:50) 7:10

! Zootopia in Disney Digital 3D (PG) CC

11:15 AM 2:00 4:45 7:30 10:15

London Has Fallen (R)

3:00 5:25 7:55 10:20

10:00 AM 3:00 5:30

Zootopia (PG)

(11:15 AM) 4:30 11:05

Risen (PG-13) DVS,CC (10:55 AM) 5:00 11:00

Deadpool (R) CC

(12:05) 2:15 4:25 7:05 9:25

(1:40) 4:15 6:50 9:20

4572 Lemay Ferry Rd.

314-845-2900

Mr. Right (R) (11:30 AM 1:50 4:30) 7:10 9:30

Get a Job (R) Eddie the Eagle (PG-13) (2:00) 6:45 (11:00 AM 1:40 4:00) 6:40 9:15

Kung Fu Panda 3 (PG) (11:10 AM 1:50 4:20) 7:00 9:10

WEHRENBERG

(1:45) 4:20 7:00 9:15

! My Golden Days (Trois souvenirs de ma jeunesse) (R)

Keller Plaza Cine 8

Race (PG-13)

6350 Delmar in the Loop 314-727-7271 ! The Boss (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM ! Everybody Wants Some!! (R) DVS

! Born to Be Blue (R)

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13)

South

(11:10 AM 4:20) 9:10

Allegiant (PG-13) DVS,CC

Tivoli Theatre (Landmark)

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) DVS,CC

10:30 AM 1:10 3:50 6:30 9:10

Deadpool (R)

(11:30 AM 2:10) 4:55 7:45 10:30

The Revenant (R) DVS,CC

! The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R)

26

1:45 4:35 7:25 10:15

! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13) DVS,CC

11:55 PM

11:55 PM

2:05 4:45 7:35

(11:10 AM 1:55) 4:35 7:15 10:10

(4:45) 8:00

5050 Oakland Ave.

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM

10:15 PM

(1:45) 4:15 6:45

Lindell & Vandeventer

7805 Hwy N. www.wehrenberg.com

1:05 4:25 7:45

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) DP

1002 Hi-Pointe Place

! The Boss (R) DVS,CC,No VIP after 6PM 11:00 AM 11:55 AM 1:50 2:30 4:15 5:00 6:40 7:30

(11:50 AM 2:15 4:40) 7:00 9:25

! Hardcore Henry (R) DP

Clayton & Skinker

Town Square 12 Cine (Wehrenberg)

2:05 4:40 7:15 9:45

(11:20 AM 1:50 4:30) 7:00 9:30

Hi-Pointe Theatre

St. Charles / O’Fallon

! Demolition (R) No VIP after 6PM

! Midnight Special (PG-13) DP

St. Louis Galleria ! The Boss (R) DP

Bargain Shows No Passes Allowed Closed Captioning Descriptive Video Service Open Captioning Digital Projection

2:20 6:00 9:15

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

11:00 AM 1:40 4:20 7:05 9:45

(1:35) 7:35

Daddy’s Home (PG-13) (11:20 AM 4:30) 9:40

The Revenant (R) (11:30 AM 3:00) 6:30 9:10

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (PG-13) (11:00 AM 1:30 4:10) 6:40 9:35

Spotlight (R) (10:45 AM 1:30 4:10) 7:00 9:40

Brooklyn (PG-13) (1:40) 6:30

stltoday.com/go


040816

() ! CC DVS OC DP

Showtimes and movies change daily and are provided by the theaters. All Showtimes are p.m. unless otherwise noted

South

South

West

Ronnies 20 Cine (Wehrenberg) Arnold 14 Cine (Wehrenberg) 5320 S Lindbergh Blvd. www.wehrenberg.com

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice The IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) 3:30 7:00 10:30

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice The IMAX Experience (PG-13) 12:05 PM

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:45 AM 12:45 2:20 3:20 5:00 6:05 7:30 8:35 10:15 11:20 ! Demolition (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:55 AM 2:30 5:10 7:45 10:20 ! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:20 AM 1:50 4:30 7:00 9:30 10:15 ! Eye in the Sky (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:50 AM 2:30 5:10 7:45 10:30 ! God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) No VIP after 6PM 12:25 3:25 6:30 9:25 ! I Saw the Light (R) No VIP after 6PM 1:10 4:10 7:10 ! Meet the Blacks (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:40 AM 2:10 4:40 7:15 9:45

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) 11:40 AM 12:20 3:15 3:45 6:45 7:20 10:15 11:00

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) 11:40 AM 2:10 4:35 7:00 9:25

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13) 11:30 AM 2:30 5:30 8:30 11:20

1912 Richardson Rd. www.wehrenberg.com ! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM

12701 Manchester Rd.

1:00 2:30 3:35 5:00 6:45 7:30 9:15 10:00

! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM ! God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) No VIP after 6PM 1:00 4:05 7:00 10:00

! I Saw the Light (R) No VIP after 6PM 1:00 6:50

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13)

12:30 3:10 5:45 8:30 11:15 11:35 AM 2:05 4:35 7:15

London Has Fallen (R) 9:45 PM

Zootopia (PG) 11:00 AM 11:45 AM 2:25 5:05 7:45 10:30 10:45

Deadpool (R) 12:40 3:25 6:10 8:55 11:30

! Four Color Eulogy (NR) No VIP after 6PM 2:00 7:30

Gravois Bluffs Stadium 12(Regal) Hwy 30 @ Gravois Bluff by JC Penny 636-326-2862

The Boss (R) DVS,CC (11:30 AM 2:10) 4:50 7:30 8:00 10:15 10:45 Hardcore Henry (R) CC (11:50 AM 2:30) 5:10 7:45 10:25 God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) CC (12:20) 4:00 7:20 10:20 I Saw the Light (R) CC (12:40 3:45)

! Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:00 AM 2:45) 6:30 10:00

! Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3D (PG-13) CC (11:40 AM 3:15) 7:00 10:30

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) CC (11:45 AM 2:20) 5:00 7:40 10:10

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13) CC (12:30 3:30) 7:10 10:05

Miracles from Heaven (PG) CC (10:50 AM 1:40) 4:20 7:05 9:40

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13) DVS,CC (11:10 AM 1:50) 4:30 7:15 9:50 Zootopia (PG) CC (10:45 AM 1:30) 4:10 6:45 9:20 Deadpool (R) CC (11:20 AM 2:00) 5:05 7:50 10:40

stltoday.com/go

11:30 AM 2:00 3:45 4:30 7:00 8:40 9:45

2:30 6:05 9:30

11:45 AM 2:30 5:00 7:30 10:00

! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13) 1:05 3:55 6:50 9:50

! Eye in the Sky (R) No VIP after 6PM

Miracles from Heaven (PG)

Chesterfield Galaxy 14 Cine (Wehrenberg) 450 THF Blvd. www.wehrenberg.com

1:45 4:25 7:05 9:45

11:40 AM 2:15 4:55 7:30 10:05

1:25 4:05 6:50 9:30

! God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) No VIP after 6PM

London Has Fallen (R) 3:55 9:50

1:20 4:10 7:00

Zootopia (PG) 1:45 4:30 7:10 9:45

Batman v Superman: Dawn of

Deadpool (R) 1:50 4:30 7:30 10:10

Justice (PG-13)

North

11:45 AM 3:15 5:00 6:45 8:30 10:05

St. Louis Mills Stadium 18 (Regal) (314)227-5503

The Boss (R) DVS,CC (11:55 AM 2:30 5:20) 7:20 8:10 10:00 10:55

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13)

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13)

1:25 4:55 7:15 9:30 1:20 4:20 7:25 10:25

! Demolition (R) No VIP after 6PM

How to Be Single (R)

1:45 4:35 7:20 10:10

! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM

(12:00 2:35 5:05) 7:40 10:15 God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) CC (12:55 4:05) 7:05 10:10 Meet the Blacks (R) CC (2:10 5:00) 7:45 10:20

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) DVS,CC (12:30 1:05 4:00) 7:30 8:00 11:00

! Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3D (PG-13) CC (3:00 4:30) 6:30 10:05

! Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice The IMAX 3D Experience (PG-13) CC 12:05 3:30 7:00

! Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice The IMAX Experience (PG-13) CC

9:50 PM

! Sardar Gabbar Singh (NR) No VIP after 6PM

Hello, My Name Is Doris (R) 11:00 AM 1:20 6:15

Zootopia (PG) 11:15 AM 1:00 2:15 3:45 6:30 9:10

! God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) No VIP after 6PM

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) CC

11:10 AM 1:50 4:30 7:45 10:20 WEHRENBERG

(1:25 4:20) 7:25 10:25

Miracles from Heaven (PG) CC

The Perfect Match (R) (2:55 5:25) 7:55 10:40

London Has Fallen (R) CC (1:30 4:15) 6:55 9:40

Zootopia (PG) CC (1:40 4:25) 7:15 9:55

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM 2:00 4:40 7:20 9:30

! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM 10:00 PM

! Zootopia in Disney Digital 3D (PG) CC

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13) 2:35 6:00

1:40 7:05

Ride Along 2 (PG-13) 1:35 4:15 6:55 9:45

The Hateful Eight (R) 1:10 4:50 8:30

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13)

The Revenant (R) 1:15 3:30 7:00 9:35

1:00 9:15

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice: Mega Screen (PG-13)

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (PG-13) 1:45 3:40 6:50 10:00

Star Wars: The Force Awakens 3D (PG-13)

7:00 PM

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3D: Mega Screen (PG-13) My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) 2:15 4:45 7:15 9:45

1:00 4:10 7:20 10:30

O’Fallon 15 Cine (Wehrenberg) 1320 Central Park Dr. O’Fallon www.wehrenberg.com

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:55 AM 1:00 2:30 3:30 5:00 6:00 7:30 8:30 10:00 11:00

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13)

! Hardcore Henry (R) No VIP after 6PM 11:55 AM 2:25 5:10 7:35 10:00

Hello, My Name Is Doris (R)

! Eye in the Sky (R) No VIP after 6PM

2:00 4:30 7:00

11:50 AM 2:20 4:50 7:20 9:50

Zootopia (PG)

! God’s Not Dead 2 (PG) No VIP after 6PM

1:00 3:45 6:30 9:30

11:00 AM 1:45 4:30 7:15 10:00

Deadpool (R)

! Meet the Blacks (R) No VIP after 6PM

2:00 7:30

11:55 AM 2:30 5:15 7:45 10:05 11:15

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (PG-13)

WEHRENBERG

11:00 AM 12:30 1:30 3:45 4:45 7:00 8:00 10:15

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3D (PG-13)

Plaza Frontenac (Landmark) Lindbergh & Clayton

(12:45 3:45) 6:40 9:25 (2:20 5:15) 7:50 10:50

2:00 5:00

3:00 6:00 9:00

(1:50 4:40) 7:10 9:45

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13) CC

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13) DVS,CC

! I Saw the Light (R) No VIP after 6PM

Deadpool (R)

10:30 PM

1:30 4:30 7:30 10:15

The Boy (PG-13)

1:40 4:30 7:10 10:00

4:45 10:25 1:00 3:40 6:20 9:00

1:05 4:45 7:10 10:30

The 5th Wave (PG-13)

2:15 6:00 9:15

4:25 7:25 10:25

Miracles from Heaven (PG)

4:25 9:40

Kung Fu Panda 3 (PG)

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13)

Hardcore Henry (R) CC

50 Ludwig Dr. Fairview Heights www.wehrenberg.com

Gods of Egypt (PG-13)

1:30 4:15 7:00 8:00 9:40

3:15 10:30 11:45 AM 2:10 4:35 7:15 9:35

St. Clair 10 Cine (Wehrenberg)

The Brothers Grimsby (R)

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM

1:20 4:15 7:10 10:05

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13)

(12:50 3:50) 6:45 9:35 Race (PG-13) CC (1:00 4:10) Deadpool (R) CC (2:00 4:50) 7:35 10:35

Illinois

! Eye in the Sky (R) No VIP after 6PM 12:35 3:00 5:25 7:50 10:20

2:20 4:45 7:10 9:40

5555 St. Louis Mills Blvd.

West

1:45 4:30 7:05 9:45

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice 3D (PG-13)

Miracles from Heaven (PG)

Hello, My Name Is Doris (R)

! The Boss (R) No VIP after 6PM

! Demolition (R) No VIP after 6PM

1:50 3:15 5:30 7:00 9:00 10:30

1:00 3:50 6:45 9:35

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13)

www.wehrenberg.com

2:40 5:10 7:40 10:05

! Midnight Special (PG-13) No VIP after 6PM 11:30 AM 2:15 5:00 7:45 10:30

Des Peres 14 Cine (Wehrenberg)

Bargain Shows No Passes Allowed Closed Captioning Descriptive Video Service Open Captioning Digital Projection

314-994-3733

! Demolition (R) DVS (11:10 AM) 1:10 1:50 3:50 4:30 6:45 7:20 9:15

! Eye in the Sky (R) (11:00 AM) 1:25 4:00 6:50 9:25

! I Saw the Light (R) DVS (1:00) 6:40 9:20

! Midnight Special (PG-13) DVS (11:05 AM) 1:40 3:45 4:20 7:00 9:30

! Hello, My Name Is Doris (R) DVS (11:15 AM) 1:30 4:10 7:10 9:35

11:30 AM 2:45 6:00 9:15

My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2 (PG-13) 11:45 AM 2:30 4:50 7:10 9:30

The Divergent Series: Allegiant (PG-13) 11:00 AM 1:50 4:40 7:30 10:20

Miracles from Heaven (PG) 11:05 AM 1:45 4:25 7:05 9:45

10 Cloverfield Lane (PG-13) 11:40 AM 2:15 4:50 7:25 10:00

Zootopia (PG) 11:00 AM 2:15 4:45 7:20 9:55

Deadpool (R) 11:55 AM 2:30 5:05 7:40 10:15

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

27


OFF THE

MENU

Ocean to table 801 Fish, the sibling of 801 Chophouse, ofers a polished seafood experience ★★★ BY IAN FROEB / RESTAURANT CRITIC / IFROEB@POST-DISPATCH.COM

M

any years ago, as an undergraduate keen on university-sponsored cultural events and the array of cheese cubes and other free snacks they ofered, I attended a reading by the poet William Matthews. Introducing a poem — I’d like to think it was his great “Mingus at the Showplace,” but I can’t recall for sure — Matthews said something that has stuck with me ever since. How fortunate we are to live in the era stltoday.com/ofthemenu

28

of recorded music. I thought of it again, though maybe now with a soupçon of cynicism, as a friend and I finished our excellent dinner at 801 Fish. We’d slurped oysters from both coasts: fat, briny Island Creeks ($4.50 each) from Massachusetts and delicate, melon-sweet Kumamotos ($6) from the Pacific Northwest. We’d eaten calamari from Rhode Island, halibut from Alaska and Chilean sea bass from the waters of Antarctica. How fortunate we are to live in the

stltoday.com/stl100

@ianfroeb

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

OUR FOOD RATINGS ★ Fair ★★ Good ★★★ Excellent ★★★★ Extraordinary

churning water. Why, yes, that is a giant fiberglass tuna hanging from the ceiling. The raw bar, with a counter for dining, stands between the dining room and the open kitchen, and even before you look at the menu, the oysters and other specimens displayed there will direct your decisions. You can go old-school with a jumbo-shrimp cocktail ($18) or extravagant iced-shellfish platters ($38, $89 or $179), but the raw bar also keeps abreast of current trends. In other words, of course, there’s a hamachi crudo ($12), smartly accented with basil, a relish of finely diced jalapeño and pear, and a splash of olive oil spiked with lime juice. The menu as a whole, Ahi Tuna at 801 Fish overseen by executive chef Michael Sullivan, takes a similar approach, with both unimera of FedEx. peachable classics (lobster bisque, 801 Fish opened in November in linguine and clams, Alaskan king-crab Clayton’s Carondelet Plaza, two years legs) and more modern dishes. I found after its steakhouse sibling 801 Chopthe most flavorful fare among the aphouse debuted across the street. 801 petizers and a la carte sides — none Restaurant Group premiered 801 Fish more so than the Portuguese-inspired in 2013 in the Kansas City suburb of littleneck clams ($17) served in a brilLeawood, Kan., and if there were any liant, fiery tomato sauce with andouflaws in the concept, the Des Moines, ille. Under their crisp fried breading, Iowa, company fixed them before the Judith Point calamari ($13) were the opening this second location. 801 Fish most tender squid I’d ever eaten. On is as polished as any new restaurant the side, for dipping, is a wonderfully I’ve visited in St. Louis — as it should pungent garlic remoulade. (There’s also be, considering it’s also as expensive a soy vinaigrette, but the remoulade is as any. so potent the vinaigrette might as well If you’ve dined at 801 Chophouse, be water.) it won’t surprise you to learn that 801 Fish features exceptional hospitality, sharp service and a wine list on which OUR CRITIC DISHES you could drop several hundred dollars Learn more about Ian’s visits to 801 Fish without trying. The design is sleeker — in his Of the Menu video commentary. or, if you like, less timeless — than 801 stltoday.com/ofthemenu Chophouse’s. The light fixtures evoke

Find more restaurant news and reviews ➙ stltoday.com/dining

PHOTO: SID HASTINGS

THE LATEST FROM STLTODAY.COM/OFFTHEMENU Gioia’s Deli is open at 903 Pine Street downtown. This is the second location for the Hill institution, which opened in 1918 and is renowned for its salam de testa, or hot salami. Owner Alex Donley told Of the Menu in January that plans for the downtown location followed the success of the Gioia’s Deli food truck, which launched in 2014. “We realized that we are an institution, but it’s not about the location,” Donley said. “It’s about the food. It’s about the customer service, that Gioia’s experience.” The downtown Gioia’s is open 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. It shares a phone number with the Hill original: 314-776-9410. BY IAN FROEB


The dining room at 801 Fish

25% OFF SUSHI Only valid for dinner menu, cannot combine with any other coupon, discount, special or promotion items. Valid Sunday - Thursday, Dine-In Only

PHOTO: SID HASTINGS

Must Present Paper Coupon. Expires: May 8, 2016

The lobster fried rice ($15) is a scenestealing side dish, the claw meat’s buttery sweetness rounded out with a sweet-chile sauce and sharpened with the heat of togarashi. You might pass over the sides entirely, though, because unlike at 801 Chophouse, where the steaks are a la carte, 801 Fish’s entrees are composed dishes. These compositions are sensible and well executed, if not as exciting as those appetizers. The kitchen pan-seared red snapper ($38, though taken of the menu by my final visit) and then butter-roasted it for a succulent piece of fish. It was served atop a polenta cake, crunchy and then molten, and baconbraised greens, both of which neither distracted from or greatly enhanced the snapper. King-crab meat slicked with brown butter cloaks pan-seared Alaskan halibut ($42) over a ho-hum potato-leek puree in an aura of indulgence. A miso glaze and the sweet-sharp flavor of black garlic are complex enough to make pan-roasted Chilean sea bass ($42) cool again.The kimchee served atop the bass needs more fire and funk,though,while the asparagus on which the fish sits doesn’t jibe with the rest of that dish.

stltoday.com/go

Of course, Chilean sea bass is the poster child for how a species can rapidly go from unknown to trendy to overfished. Sullivan told me that many of 801 Fish’s vendors are certified as sustainable through the Marine Stewardship Council. Maybe you don’t care about issues of sustainability or the carbon footprint of a restaurant dependent on international shipping. Maybe these concerns will keep you away from 801 Fish entirely, no matter how excellent I tell you it is. Either way, while there was a time when diners didn’t have to consider such issues, today we’re not so fortunate. WHERE 801 Fish, 172 Carondelet Plaza, Clayton • MORE INFO 314-875-9636; 801fish. com/st-louis • MENU A wide variety of upscale seafood dishes • HOURS Dinner daily, lunch Monday-Friday, brunch Sunday

SHOGUN - South County 10550 Baptist Church Rd St Louis, Mo 63128 Tel: 314-842-8889 Lindbergh & Baptist Church Rd

SHOGUN - Fairview Heights, IL 314 Fountain Parkway, Fairview Heights, IL 62208 Tel: 618-628-3500 159 & Fountain Parkway.

presents

An evening to benefit local children with special needs

featuring

GET OUR FREE APP! Get easy access to Ian Froeb’s STL 100 and more reviews in our new app, free in the App Store at Google Play. stltoday. com/apps proud sponsor

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

29


PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTERS OF EASTERN MISSOURI present

Ready to Roll? SUMMER LEAGUES

NOW FORMING EVENING LEAGUES r

ut Ou

Abo Ask HDAY BIRT RTY PA IALS SPEC

Starting at 7:00 pm Week of May 15th

MEN’S: Monday & Thursday WOMEN’S: Wednesday MIXED: Tuesday (2 Ball Challenge), Wednesday & Friday

• ADULT/CHILD LEAGUE • MIXED DAYTIME LEAGUE Starts May 18th Starts May 17th Wed. 7:00 pm 9 Pin League Tues. 9:30 am

Now you can get the power of Go! Magazine on your smartphone, with the latest STL entertainment news, plus features like Ian Froeb’s STL 100 and The Go! List. It’s free!

Singles 2-Ball Challenge Starts March 17th BOFWRLEE ING! Tuesdays For 14 Weeks Ask Us

#GoPledge #GoPledge now to share your motivation, inspiration, plan or promise – to not drive while drunk or distracted. A selection of pledges will be published in a special issue of GO! Magazine. All pledgers receive a FREE movie ticket from STL Cinemas.

How.

DuBowl Lanes, Inc. 2711 LEMAY FERRY RD. 314-892-3900 www.dubowllanes.net

SHRINE SOUP & SALAD BAR With All-You-Can-Eat Fried Chicken TUESDAY – SUNDAY 4 – 7 P.M. SOUP & SALAD BAR $8.99 w/4 soups and 32 salad toppings OR

SOUP & SALAD BAR

Reserve NOW!

Plus fried chicken, green beans, corn & mashed potatoes

$13.99

THE SHRINE RESTAURANT

YOU CAN SUBMIT A PHOTO, A SENTIMENT OR BOTH:

TAG a Tweet with #GoPledge TAG an Instagram #GoPledge STLtoday.com/GoPledge

Belleville, IL 618-394-6237 Snow.org/Rest

30

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

stltoday.com/go


D HEAR OVER

T ON

V

“Last night was Major League Baseball’s opening night. I think some of the games from last year just ended. I’m just saying, our national pastime rewards the patient.”

“I did not. I could not. I would not commit this crime.” O.J. Simpson (CUBA GOODING JR.) in finale the fi nale of “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story”

STEPHEN COLBERT, “Late Show”

Rob Delaney and Sharon Horgan in “Catastrophe”

Love is pain Tube Talk ‘Catastrophe,’ about ‘the horror of

a marriage,’ returns Friday on Amazon ★★★★

P H O T O S : A M A Z O N S T U D I O S ( “ C ATA S T R O P H E ” ) ; C B S ( C O L B E R T ) ; F X ( G O O D I N G )

BY GAIL PENNINGTON / TV CRITIC / GPENNINGTON@POST-DISPATCH.COM

Rob Delaney was ready for the question. People who recognize him from “Catastrophe,” returning for a second season Friday on Amazon, typically say exactly what I said when I interrupted Delaney’s breakfast at a Los Angeles hotel in January. “Can’t you make more episodes?” The short answer is no; no, they can’t. Delaney and Sharon Horgan created “Catastrophe” two years ago for Britain’s Channel 4; they also write every word, and they star as Rob and Sharon, virtual strangers brought together in Season 1 by an accidental pregnancy after a weekend fling. stltoday.com/tubetalk

@gailpennington

When Amazon introduced “Catastrophe” to the United States in June, it quickly became both a critical darling and a favorite of subscribers who devoured the six episodes. Six episodes. Only six! And now, only six more. “It’s just a spine-crushing amount of work,” Delaney said during an Amazon panel when asked about writing the show. “It’s just two of us,” Horgan echoed. “It takes a long time to write.” Many half-hour comedies have a team with dozens of writers, not just two. “The pluses are, we can look at each other like with laser sharp-focus and see if the other person is laughing or @tubetalkpd

Find daily TV picks, live chats and celeb news ➙ stltoday.com/tv

not laughing,” he said. “So there’s nowhere to hide.” On the other hand, “There’s nobody to share the blame with.” Writing the show themselves is necessary, no matter how hard it is, Delaney and Horgan say. Because “it’s so specific to us and our personal experience, it would feel a bit disingenuous to take other people’s stories, as real or as true as they might be,” Horgan said. “We can be very honest with the audience, and we can feel a comfort about what we are saying because we know that it comes from a place of honesty and truth.” Delaney, an actor and comedian from Boston who now lives in London with his wife and three kids, may be best known outside of “Catastrophe” for his scathing humor on Twitter. He is a recovered alcoholic who has been sober since 2002, a storyline that he wrote into the show. Horgan, who is Irish, co-wrote the British comedy “Pulling” and is currently writing HBO’s “Divorce,” marking Sarah Jessica Parker’s return to TV. She is married, with two daughters. “We have over 20 years of marriage between the two of us to our respective spouses,” Delaney said, explaining that the original concept of the series was “to show the horror of a marriage in progress.” Season 1, in which the two meet and prepare for the arrival of their child, functioned as a prelude to this season, which is about a marriage that works almost in spite of itself. Rob and Sharon love each other, are committed, and sometimes want to kill each other. “Catastrophe” is as poignant as it is hilarious, and always, beneath the humor, are veins of anger and pain. “We never try and dial back the pain,” Horgan said. “We never look at an episode after we’ve written it and go, ‘Oh, there’s too much pain in this

one.’ We probably would try and put a bit more back in.” Pain, Delaney said, “is so critical. It’s such a critical ingredient, because it makes the love shine brighter.” Returning after a time jump, “Catastrophe” finds Sharon, no longer working, trying to make “mommy friends” and Rob reeling from temptation at the oice. Carrie Fisher is back, this time not just on the phone, as Rob’s eccentric mother. A romantic trip to Paris is fraught with language diiculties and an inappropriate masseur. “I love this show so much, I wish I could marry Sharon and Rob,” Amazon Studios comedy boss Joe Lewis said before the “Catastrophe” panel. “We’ve all been in relationships, and we are all sensitive to false portrayals of them,” he said. “As relationship shows are a cornerstone of TV itself, it becomes even harder to make something that stands out and feels new and different, yet that is exactly what ‘Catastrophe’ has done.” Horgan and Delaney, though, admit they had one concern about Season 2. “We were worried that there wasn’t enough sex in it,” Horgan said. “And then we watched it,” Delaney said. “And then we watched it,” Horgan continued, “and we were, like, ‘Oh, no. I think we’ve maybe put too much sex in it because people that have been married that long don’t have that much sex.’” Viewers will have to judge, if they can stop laughing long enough. WHAT “Catastrophe” • WHEN Season 2 streaming Friday • WHERE Amazon • MORE INFO amazon.com/catastrophe

GET MORE GAIL Gail talks TV Monday mornings with McGraw Milhaven on KTRS-AM and at stltoday.com/mcgraw — and with readers at 1 p.m. Thursdays at stltoday.com/chats.

04.08.16-04.14.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • GO! MAGAZINE

31


32

GO! MAGAZINE • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 04.08.16-04.14.16

stltoday.com/go


Pick a Pair and Save!

• 700 Fabrics & Leathers • Custom Order < 3 Weeks • American Made 11182-B South Towne Square St. Louis, MO 63123 314-894-9922 Behind Denny's In South County

• Best Selection • Best Price • Best Service

World's Largest Chair Manufacturer

53 Years Building The "Best" Chair 9 Years Selling To St. Louis Direct To The Public

MON. - SAT. 10-7 • SUN. 12-5

E ! E E S ID S IN

J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / C O M I C S

FridaY • 04.08.2016 • EV DUSTIN • By Steve Kelley and Jeff Parker

DILBERT • By Scott Adams

SALLY FORTH • By Francesco Marciuliano and Jim Keefe

BABY BLUES • By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE • By Stephan Pastis GARFIELD • By Jim Davis

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM • By Mike Peters MUTTS • By Patrick McDonnell

DEFLOCKED • By Jeff Corriveau PRICKLY CITY • By Scott Stantis

PICKLES • By Brian Crane

HI AND LOIS • By Brian and Greg Walker and Chance Browne

RHYMES WITH ORANGE • By Hilary B. Price

BEETLE BAILEY • By Mort and Greg Walker

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE • By Lynn Johnston

SUDOKU

THE PAJAMA DIARIES • By Terri Libenson

EVERYDAY


EVERYDAY

EV2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

BRIDGE TIPS • BOB JONES Both vulnerable. South deals. NORTH ♠K ♥A J 8 7 3 ♦8 7 3 ♣10 7 4 3 WEST EAST ♠Q J 10 6 3 ♠8 7 5 4 2 ♥Q 4 ♥9 6 2 ♦K 10 4 ♦6 5 2 ♣Q 8 6 ♣9 2 SOUTH ♠A 9 ♥K 10 5 ♦A Q J 9 ♣A K J 5 The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♣* 1♠ 2♥** 3♠*** Dbl Pass 4♣ Pass 6♣ All pass *Strong and artiicial, 16 or more points **At least ive hearts, at least eight points, game forcing ***Pre-emptive Opening lead: Queen of ♠ Today’s deal was played in a top-flight women’s competition some years ago. South was Chinese expert Ling Gu. East, with a classic Yarborough, threw in a weak jump raise. We agree that she was weak. The Chinese Precision auction landed them in six clubs. The contract was a field of landmines, with four possible finesses — one in each minor

and two in hearts. Gu played the hand like she had X-ray vision. She won the opening spade lead with dummy’s king and disdained the club finesse, leading to her ace of clubs and then cashing the king. The ace of spades was cashed, discarding a diamond from dummy. Gu made her next key play by starting hearts with the king. She continued with the 10 of hearts and was relieved to see the queen appear from West. Gu ran dummy’s heart suit. West saw that, if she rufed, she would have to yield a ruf-sluf or lead a diamond away from her king. West discarded three spades, but that just postponed the pain. Gu exited with a club to West’s queen and West was forced to lead a diamond into the acequeen. All of the other declarers in six clubs failed when they took either a club finesse or a diamond finesse early in the play. Well done to Ms. Gu! (04/08/16)

Across 1 King or queen 4 Record six-time NBA MVP 15 Northeast sch. in the Liberty League 16 Rather caricatured 17 Understanding responses 18 One involved in a pyramid scheme? 19 Broke down, say 21 End of a Hemingway title 22 Fleck on the banjo 23 Atlanta train system 25 Drink often served chilled 27 Bert’s sister in children’s literature 28 Dandy headpieces 31 Catch

33 Excessively harsh 35 Philadelphia train system 39 Trio in Greek myth 40 New Deal org. 41 Pope John Paul II’s first name 42 Was out 43 Aida in “Aida,” e.g. 45 Go preceder 47 Unsightly spots 48 Country music’s ___ Brown Band 51 Digs 53 Early customer of Boeing 54 Old Testament kingdom 56 Like the cities Yazd and Shiraz 59 Transport method usually used in the winter 61 One who can see right through you?

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE

tcaeditors@tribune.com

CRYPTOQUIP

WORD GAME April 8 WORD — TITILLATING (TITILLATING: TIT-ih-lay-ting: Exciting pleasurably.) Average mark 30 words. Time limit 50 minutes. Can you find 41 or more words in TITILLATING? The list will be published tomorrow. YESTERDAY’S WORD — FLANGED gland lead fade glean leaf fang glen lean fend elan lend flag eland aged flan dale angel flea dangle angle fled deaf gale lade deal geld laden dean glad land glade lane RULES OF THE GAME: 1. Words must be of four or more letters. 2. Words that acquire four letters by the addition of “s,” such as “bats” or “dies,” are not allowed. 3. Additional words made by adding a “d” or an “s” may not be used. For example, if “bake” is used, “baked” or “bakes” are not allowed, but “bake” and “baking” are admissible. 4. Proper nouns, slang words, or vulgar or sexually explicit words are not allowed.

64 Author Chinua Achebe, by birth 65 Back-to-back hits 66 “Kate Plus 8” airer 67 Harmless slitherer 68 See 63-Down

Down 1 Something that’s knitted 2 Here today, gone tomorrow 3 Quite different 4 Latin grammar case: Abbr. 5 Country with the King Hamad Highway 6 Trio abroad 7 Shoshone relatives 8 Player of Cleopatra in “Two Nights With Cleopatra” 9 Who had a #1 hit with “Toot Toot Tootsie (Goo’bye)” 10 Suffix with meth11 Spill everything 12 Politico with the 2007 autobiography “Promises to Keep” 13 “The Jungle Book” wolf 14 Put back on 20 Muscle used in bench-pressing 24 Simple dance 26 Things that may be blown 28 Some email pics

HOROSCOPE • JACQUELINE BIGAR Note: Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. The stars show the kind of day you’ll have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Diicult.

CROSSWORD

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

If April 8 is your birthday • This year you often exhibit a possessive or envious quality. Build up your self-conidence by doing whatever it takes. If you are single, you are likely to meet someone special when you’re out and about. If you are attached, the two of you connect on a very deep level and often know each other’s thoughts without having to say a word. Taurus can be very quiet. ARIES (March 21-April 19) ★★★ Be aware of what you have to ofer. You might have a sense that you would like to join several friends later today to celebrate that it is Friday night. Count on going overboard. Tonight: You don’t have to treat everyone all the time. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) ★★★★★ You’ll perk up and give of a lot of energy. A friend or an associate might let you know that there is more to his or her feelings for you than what he or she has revealed. Tonight: Follow the music. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) ★★★ If you don’t feel like joining a friend later, don’t hem and haw — just say so. You might want some personal time without having to deal with anyone else. Tonight: Not to be found. CANCER (June 21-July 22) ★★★★ Tap into your imagination, and ind out what it is you want. Perhaps you are too fearful to really visualize a longterm dream or desire. Friends surround you and encourage you to think positively. Tonight: Make the most of the moment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) ★★★ Take charge of a situation before it gets too out of hand. You might feel as though a good friend can handle what seems like a bit of a risk. Doublecheck the facts, as mistakes easily could be made. Tonight: Someone will be observing you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Find more free games, or subscribe to get access to more than 50 others, at STLtoday.com/games, where you’ll also find a link to the Puzzle Society.

Puzzle by Evans Clinchy

29 Photographic memory or perfect pitch, e.g. 30 Master 32 Cincinnati athlete 34 NASA part: Abbr. 36 Outlaws 37 Not too awful 38 Consumables often described with a percentage

44 Comic who said “I open my eyes, remember who I am, what I’m like, and I just go ‘Ugh’” 46 Worker on London’s Savile Row 48 Weightlessness 49 1943 Churchill conference site 50 Computer programmer

52 Dives 55 Useful thing to keep on hand? 57 “Janie’s Got ___” (1989 Aerosmith hit) 58 First in a historical trio 60 Almond ___ (candy) 62 Be short 63 With 68-Across, end of a Hemingway title

Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/puzzleforum. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords. No. 0304

WORD SCRIMMAGE

★★★★ Reach out to someone at a distance who has diferent views of what is going on around you. Remember, this person is not seeing the situation as it is, but rather through your perception of it. Tonight: You don’t need to pinch yourself; this is real.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ★★★★ You inspire many people around you, but a loved one can’t seem to do enough to make you feel good and secure. Know that this person is a wizard with money management. Listen to his or her ideas. Tonight: All smiles. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) ★★★★★ You might not be very realistic right now. You can’t seem to see a person or a situation clearly, or perhaps you’d just prefer not to. Tonight: Be efusive about your feelings anyway.

Solutions at bottom of page

WONDERWORD

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) ★★★★ You could be getting an earful of information or gossip. The question remains: What are you going to believe? Asking key questions will be important. Still, you might feel as if someone is trying to pull the wool over your eyes. Tonight: Pace yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) ★★★★★ You could be at the point where change is necessary. You have been holding your position, but what is the cost of carrying on like that? Tonight: Let your imagination color the scene. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) ★★★★ Deal with a domestic matter directly. For some of you, the issue could revolve around a property or real-estate investment. Tonight: Mosey on home.

WORDY GURDY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) ★★★★ You might not be realistic right now. A close friend or associate could politely decide not to go along with your suggestion or idea. Perhaps you won’t notice this person backing of at irst. Tonight: Celebrate the weekend. STLtoday.com/horoscopes Get expanded horoscope information: star charts, peak times, outlooks and Chinese Zodiac data.

JUMBLE


EVERYDAY

04.08.2016 • Friday • M 1

ST. LOUiS POST-diSPaTCH • EV3

DEAR ABBY

WHAT’S THE DIFF? Find six diferences between the panels.

Smoker has tried everything to quit

Dear Sick Of It • I’ll try. As a former smoker, I’ll share what worked for me. Cold turkey. First, clean house. Get rid of all the cigarettes you have stashed at home, in your car and at your workplace. Yes, even the pack you “forgot” in your jacket pocket. Realize that your body is saturated with nicotine and it must be flushed out. Drinking LOTS

of water for the first month will help you accomplish that. Then, choose one day when you will go entirely smoke-free. Understand going in that you will crave your “fix.” When that craving hits, if you must put something in your mouth, chew (nonnicotine) gum, go brush your teeth or eat a crunchy vegetable (carrot sticks, celery). If you can manage to do this for just ONE DAY, you can do it for another one. And then another, etc. Accept that you are an addict and that your “sobriety” is something you will have to cling to with determination. Eventually the impulse to grab a cigarette will fade, but every now and then you may have an urge to smoke that comes out of left field. When that happens, get up and walk out of the room. By the time you return, the urge will have subsided. Mine did. And one more thing — if you fall of the wagon (and you may), think about watching your child graduate from high school or college, getting married and play-

ing with your grandchildren. Your chances of doing those things will be better if you’re not a smoker. Then get back on that wagon and start over again. That’s how I quit, and the third time I did it, it worked. (Clearly, I do not have willpower of cast iron.) If I can do it, believe me, so can you. Please write again in six months and let me know you’re tobacco-free, too. I’m rooting for you. Dear Abby • Can you really learn to love someone you don’t find physically attractive? — TWITTER FAN OF ABBY Dear Twitter Fan • You may learn to love the person for his or her finer qualities, but I don’t think you can “learn” to find someone physically attractive if the chemistry simply isn’t there. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, Calif. 90069.

Diferences: 1. Feather is larger. 2. Hat is diferent. 3. Man has less hair. 4. Woman’s hair is diferent. 5. Mouth is open. 6. Socks are missing.

Dear Abby • I need some advice about quitting smoking. I am the father of an only child and husband to a wonderful wife. But for some reason, I have not been able to find the motivation to quit. I know smoking is bad for my health, and I don’t want to endanger my child’s health any longer. I have tried the gum, the patch and even prescription meds. My willpower just isn’t strong and I can’t quit, no matter what I try. I need the right inspiration. Can you help me stop this nasty habit? — SICK OF IT IN MISSOURI

MISS MANNERS

TV FRIDAY

Humor is best response to ‘friend’s’ gibe

For complete channels and 24-hour program information, customize your own TV listings at STLtoday.com/tv.

Dear Miss Manners • Ten years ago — yes, 10 years ago — my son applied for a job at HotShot University. He did not get it. However, my husband was so sure he would get it that he told a friend about the application, which meant that my husband had to tell the friend later that our son did not get the job. This friend’s wife, who is sort of a “frenemy,” has latched onto this information, and every time my son comes up in conversation, she manages to bring it up, saying things like, “Gee, it’s a shame he didn’t get that job at HotShot he wanted” — as if everything he has accomplished has been for naught because of that. I am really tired of this and have started pretending I don’t know what she’s talking about. What to do? Gentle Reader • Tempting as it is to fight back — “You know, it

seemed like a disappointment at the time, but only imagine if he had gotten it. He would not have run for Congress, and he wouldn’t be president today” — the best course is to laugh. Your friend’s wife either means to hurt you or she is stunningly thoughtless. In either case, your finding it humorous that she still remembers it after 10 years is not the response she is looking for — and should therefore discourage further repetitions. Dear Miss Manners • When I am at a restaurant and spot a professional acquaintance (and they notice me), is there a “status” to be observed when deciding whether to approach their table or waiting until they approach me? Gentle Reader • In the days before cellular telephones introduced the notion of total accessibility, the desirability of separating one’s

personal and professional lives was better understood. One must recognize an acquaintance, but, in the situation you describe, that acknowledgment should be brief. The standing party approaches the sitting party, says a few words and departs. If both parties are sitting, a nod of the head is suicient. The salesman or the politician who sees an “opportunity” proceeds without Miss Manners’ support. And the boss who thinks he is bestowing a favor by inviting an employee to join his table — instead of proceeding with his daughter’s birthday dinner — needs to reread his own statements about how family-friendly his company is. Send questions to Miss Manners, aka Judith Martin, on her website, missmanners.com; to her email, dearmissmanners@gmail.com; or through postal mail to Miss Manners, Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, Mo. 64106.

4/8/16

7:00

7:30

FOX Sleepy Hollow: Ragn2 arok. (N) (cc)

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Hell’s Kitchen The remaining chefs must make Branzino. (N)

Fox 2 News at 9:00pm (N) (cc)

Hawaii Five-0 A danCBS The Amazing Race: Welcome to Bloody Fin- gerous mob targets 4 gers 101. (N) (cc) Grover. (N) (cc)

Blue Bloods: Blast From the Past. (N) (cc)

NBC Caught on Camera With Grimm: The Believer. A Dateline NBC (N) (cc) Nick Cannon: High En- Wesen preacher targets 5 ergy. (cc) his flock. (N) PBS Stay Tuned Washing9 ton Week CW 11

Father Brown: The Laws of Motion. Driver’s death. (cc)

Masterpiece Mystery! Professor dies after a fall. (cc)

News 11 at 7:00PM/The The Vampire Diaries The Originals Freya is Pulse (N) (cc) Stefan begins a life-or- kidnapped by a new death journey. (N) threat. (N) (cc)

IND Judge 24 Mablean

LAND OF FURY (’54) HH (Jack Hawkins) A British naval officer in 17th-century New Zealand.

Larry Rice Forensic Files: Bad Blood.

ABC Last Man 30 Standing (N) (cc)

Dr. Ken (7:31) (N) (cc)

20/20 (9:01) (cc)

Shark Tank A cure for cellphone addiction. (N) (cc)

MYTV Criminal Minds Popular Criminal Minds A prom- Criminal Minds The 46 social media members inent Boston attorney BAU tracks a remorseful are slain. disappears. killer.

Go to the Source for American Made Chairs! 258 SEATS ON DISPLAY! Rockers or Wall Savers (Power Available for a Little More)

PICK

Wingbacks

A

PAIR 2 for

$

499

AND SAVE!

W/COUPON

$

2 for

$

399 W/COUPON

Swivel Rockers or Club Chairs

50OFF ANY PAIR OR

2 for

$

599 W/COUPON

FREE FABRIC UPGRADE PRIOR SALE EXC. EXPIRES 4/15/16

2 for

$

399 W/COUPON

Glider Rockers

Power Lift Recliners

ON SALE!

19 Styles 700 Fabrics & Leathers

$ GENUINE LEATHER 2 for

Petite - Big Mans, Even "LAY-FLATS"

699

2 for

W/COUPON

$

499 W/COUPON

(NOT THE FAKE STUFF)

$

W/COUPON

W/COUPON

BUY AMERICAN by AMERICANS! World’s Largest Chair Manufacturer

314-894-9922 Mon-Sat 10-7, Sun 12-5

499

2 for

$

599

W/COUPON

*700 FABRICS & LEATHERS *CUSTOM BUILT WITHIN 3 WEEKS BEST ★HOME

11182-B South Towne Sq., St. Louis, MO 63123

Behind Denny's in South County www.besthfstl.com

FURNISHINGS

S. L

DENNY'S RESTAURANT

IND

BE R

AMERICAN MADE

GH

Y5 5

899

2 for

HW

2 for

$


EVERYDAY

EV4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

THE FAMILY CIRCUS • By Bil Keane

M 1 • FrIDAy • 04.08.2016

DR. KEITH ROACH

ZITS • By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Modest cancer efects of red meat Dear Dr. Roach • I have lost two cousins in the past three years (a married couple) who both ate a lot of red/rare meat most of their lives. He got Parkinson’s first, and she got cancer throughout her body and passed away yesterday. I can’t help but wonder if their almost-daily consumption of red meat had anything to do with their demise. — J.V.H.

FUNKY WINKERBEAN • By Tom Batiuk

SPEED BUMP • By Dave Coverly

Answer • “Cancer” is a large and diverse group of related diseases. The underlying cause is not always clear, and although there often are genetic or behavioral risks, development of cancer has some degree of randomness, such that blaming an individual’s cancer on some behavior is likely to oversimplify the situation, and unlikely to be welcome, in any event. Smoking dramatically increases the risk of many cancers, whereas the effect of red meat is modest. Red meat intake has been shown in studies to increase the risk of colon and lung cancers and, in one recent study, to increase risk of cancers of the esophagus and lung. The group that had least red meat intake (about five servings per week) had about a 20 percent reduced risk compared with the group eating the highest amount of red meat. This doesn’t mean that red meat causes cancer, as those who eat little meat often have other healthy behaviors that may reduce cancer risk. A 2003 study on Parkinson’s disease showed that reducing meat intake improved some function in people with Parkinson’s. However, I can’t say that meat intake is causal in any way for Parkinson’s disease.

BIZARRO • By Dan Piraro

CORNERED • By Mike Baldwin NON SEQUITUR • By Wiley Miller

DUPLEX • By Glenn McCoy

MARMADUKE • By Brad Anderson

Dear Dr. Roach • I read advice by health professionals on the advantage of the Mediterranean-style diet for warding off ailments, as you recently wrote in an article relative to dementia. These recommendations seem to imply that the people who live around the Mediterranean Sea, on average, have a longer, healthier life than those people who live in Northern Europe based on their local diets. Are there statistics that back this up? — R.

TINA’S GROOVE • By Rina Piccolo

DRABBLE • By Kevin Fagan

MARK TRAIL • By James Allen Answer • The reason I and many other health professionals have recommended a Mediterranean-style diet is that there was a very well-done interventional study randomizing participants to a diet consisting of high amounts of olive oil, nuts, fresh fruits, vegetables, seafood (especially fatty fish), legumes, sofrito (a tomato and vegetable sauce), white meat and optional wine. Compared with a control group that was recommended a lowfat diet, participants in the Mediterranean-diet group had a lower rate of the combined endpoint heart attack, stroke or death from cardiovascular causes.

LOLA • By Todd Clark ZIGGY • By Tom Wilson

Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med. cornell.edu.

OTHER COAST • By Adrian Raeside

TAKE IT FROM THE TINKERSONS • By Bill Bettwy

THE ARGYLE SWEATER • By Scott Hilburn

BLONDIE • By Dean Young and John Marshall

See more comics and play interactive games at STLtoday.com/comics


VARIETY WEEK | APRIL 9-16, 2016

HELPAVARIETYKID.ORG Variety is St. Louis’ best resource for kids with disabilities and their families. Variety assists with medical equipment, the therapy to use it, and the chance to explore and learn. All kids need help, Variety kids need a little more.

A DV E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T


A DV E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T

ERS OF PROUD SUPPORT

2 • VARIETY THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 4.8.16


A DV E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T

NICK’S STORY If being the subject of this year’s Variety kid proile gets Nick more attention, well, he’s used to it. Ater all, this is a kid who, ater playing Flounder in Variety Children heatre’s production of “he Little Mermaid” two years ago, was named “Best New Stage Actor” by GO Magazine. But the recognition didn’t stop there. One day at Fairmount Park, a man came up to his mother and asked if Nick had played Flounder, because his daughter wanted to meet him. And Nick’s mom says he gets recognized on the street all the time. Of course, Nick’s also had high-proile roles in Variety’s Dinner with the Stars,

Variety’s trivia nights, the Help a Variety kid call-a-thon, even a soon-to-beunveiled public service announcement playing before every movie at every Wehrenberg heatre. So if you see Nick out and about, be sure to say hello. Because besides a wheelchair, a reverse walker, a car seat, a foldable ramp, and a bike, Variety’s also helped him develop tremendous self-conidence and an easy rapport with people. And if you run into Nick, you might want to wish him good luck with the spinal fusion surgery he’s going to have in New York later this year. And if you have any rubber chickens you can spare, well, Nick goes through them pretty fast.

Helping Nick, and 9,500 other special needs kids, reach their full potential through medical equipment, therapy, education, and recreation is Variety’s reason for being. But we can’t do any of it without your support. And we can’t thank you enough. 4.8.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • VARIETY THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY • 3


A DV E R T I S I N G S U PP L E M E N T

A DV E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T

RUNWAY LIGHTS FASHION SHOW

IMO’S FOR KIDS DAY

APRIL 9TH

APRIL 13TH

he only New York-style fashion show in St. Louis. Featured the amazing designs of Carmen Marc Valvo, including his 2016 Spring/Summer collection; dresses designed for Ameren PowerKids to model on the runway; and fabulous dresses he’s designed for celebrities like Beyonce and Vanessa Williams. hanks to everybody who made this a sell out, including sponsors the Steward Family Foundation, World Wide Technology, Inc., and Neiman Marcus.

Place an order with any Imo’s location on Wednesday and Variety gets a slice: at least 10% of your bill goes straight to kids with special needs. Over the years, Imo’s has donated more than $1.7 million to Variety, making them “he Care Beyond Compare.”

HELP A VARIETY KID CHALLENGE APRIL 12TH Can we raise $10,000 in one day for local kids with special needs? hat’s what we’ll try to do with help from KTVI Fox 2, KPLR 11, and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Every dollar raised stays in St. Louis. And every donation of $65 or more gets a ticket to Lionel Richie’s Dinner with the Stars performance. Variety kids, your favorite news personalities, and volunteers from Edward Jones will be manning the phones. Give them a call, and a contribution.

DINNER WITH THE STARS APRIL 16TH Our signature event celebrates its Golden Anniversary with Lionel Richie headlining. Ken Page returns as host. Marilyn Fox returns as chair for the 20th consecutive year. And we’ll honor this year’s Man and Woman of the Year (Ken Kranzberg and Judy Jones), along with past honorees. hanks to generous underwriting from World Wide Technology, Centene Charitable Foundation, and Steward Family Foundation, all proceeds from the night go straight to Variety kids. Tickets to the black-tie dinner gala start at $600. Visit www.varietystl.org or call 314-720-7710 for more information. Tickets for just the Variety show and Lionel Richie performance are $65 and available from ticketmaster.com

MAJOR PARTNERS MAJOR PARTNERS

SUPPORTING PARTNERS SUPPORTING PARTNERS

MEDIA PARTNERS MEDIA PARTNERS THE ONES

THE ONES

4 • VARIETY THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 4.8.16

WHO CARE

WHO CARE

4.8.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • VARIETY THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY • 5


A DV E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T

HOW WE HELP The Programs We Do

The Impact We Make

Therapy

Improving:

Recreation

•Skills

Equipment

•Socializtion

Education

•Self-Esteem

Sunshine Coach Vans

•Independence

The Results We Get 78% of Variety Adventure Campers displayed increased independence. 100% of Variety kids in speech therapy improved their socialization skills. 96.7% of Variety kids with adaptive bikes increased muscle strength. Self-esteem scores of kids in Variety Children’s Theatre increased by 80%!

6 • VARIETY THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • 4.8.16


A DV E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T

HOW YOU CAN HELP When you visit helpavarietykid.org, and make a donation, you make possible these valuable services:

TherHappy

Variety Adventure Camp

Medical Equipment Variety Children’s Theatre 4.8.16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • VARIETY THE CHILDREN’S CHARITY • 7


A DV E R T I S I N G S U P P L E M E N T

IT’S ABOUT COMMUNITY, FOR ALL OF US. com·mu·ni·ty [kuh-myoo-ni-tee] – noun, plural 1. a uniied body of individuals: • people with common interests living in a particular area • a body of persons having a common history or common social, economic and political interests 2. society at large As the oldest news organization in the area, we take our responsibility seriously. We care about our community and are committed to making a difference through our stories, commentary, photos and video. Each day, we strive towards the highest of standards – a tradition of excellence we have embodied for more than 137 years. We know our reputation is built on trust, engagement and public service. It’s about community, for all of us.