3.24.19

Page 1

WIN. NOW.

The Cardinals made their big move in the offseason by trading for Paul Goldschmidt, then signed him to a long-term deal this spring. 40-PAGE SPECIAL SECTION INSIDE SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • $4.00 • EARLY EDITION

TIPPING POINT

THE NORTHSIDE GAMBLE

STUCK WITH EACH OTHER CITY DIVORCED McKEE, BUT HE STILL HOLDS SWAY OVER NEGLECTED NEIGHBORHOODS

Mueller delivers Russia report No new indictments as special counsel ends probe of potential election interference

Mueller His investigation lasted two years

Barr Will summarize Mueller’s findings

BY DEVLIN BARRETT, MATT ZAPOTOSKY AND JOSH DAWSEY Washington Post

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

The second floor of a two-family home at 1604 North 14th Street, owned by Paul McKee's NorthSide Regeneration, crumbles over downtown St. Louis on March 14.

BY JACOB BARKER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • It has been a messy divorce.

At City Hall, officials had lost faith that Paul McKee could finance the projects he promised, and allegations of state tax credit fraud, which surfaced last spring, were the final straw. From McKee’s perspective, Mayor Lyda Krewson’s administration was pushing him out just as the land assemblage he began in north St. Louis 15 years ago was about to bear fruit with the $1.75 billion National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency facility — a project even a top city official conceded would not have

St. Louis officials, who terminated McKee’s rights in June, pledge to do redevelopment differently in future Controversial developer still controls hundreds of properties near NGA, says he deserves credit for ‘remarkable results’

materialized without McKee’s making the initial pitch. The city made the breakup official in June, scrapping the 2009 agreement that gave McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration control over 1,500 acres of north St. Louis and rights to hundreds of millions of dollars in potential development subsidies. And yet, Paul McKee is not gone. The developer still owns more than 1,600 properties — more than 200 acres — surrounding the site of the future NGA campus. A lawsuit Bank of Washington filed after the city terminated McKee’s See TIPPING POINT • Page A8

‘TIPPING POINT’ IS A SERIES EXAMINING CRITICAL CHALLENGES FACING ST. LOUIS NEIGHBORHOODS

WASHINGTON • Special counsel Robert Mueller submitted a confidential report to Attorney General William Barr, marking the end of his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and potentital obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump. The submission of Mueller’s report ends his closely watched inquiry — a case that has engulfed President Donald Trump’s administration since its inception, leading to criminal charges against 34 people, including six former Trump associates and advisers. A senior Justice Department official said the special counsel had not recommended any further indictments. See MUELLER • Page A4

Amazing Grace Model with Down syndrome breaks down stereotypes STL LIFE • B1

NGA project on track for ’23

May budget deadline confronts lawmakers

Judge still tries to collect

Failing bridges, Medicaid, campus sexual assault are on Missouri’s busy agenda

Making new, relevant opera

BY JACK SUNTRUP AND KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • High-profile debates loom for Missouri legislators headed back to the capital city after their week-long spring break. The 163-member House and the 34-member Senate will return Monday to the Capitol for the second half of their annual legislative session, which ends in mid-May. On the schedule: a near-total ban on abortions in Missouri, a controversial proposal to change how colleges handle

sexual assault claims, a plan to require Medicaid recipients to work and a potentially spirited debate over charter school expansion. Gov. Mike Parson’s agenda also is on the front burner as he pushes a plan to borrow $350 million to pay for the repair or replacement of more than 200 bridges. Republicans who control the House have rejected the governor’s idea and instead want to tap into the state’s general checkbook for transportation funding, rather than take out a long-term loan. Parson’s fellow Republicans also have raised concerns about his plan to create

a $22 million scholarship program aimed at getting adults into high-demand jobs. School choice advocates in the Senate, including Republican Sens. Bill Eigel of Weldon Spring and Andrew Koenig of Manchester, have used the scholarship program as a bargaining chip to push for an expansion of charter schools and a voucher-like program that would create education savings accounts to allow students to attend out-of-district schools. Although neither idea has moved forward in either chamber, Senate President See LEGISLATURE • Page A7

TODAY

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62°/45° RAIN

TOMORROW

51°/32° CLOUDY

WEATHER D10 POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

1 M Vol. 141, No. 83 ©2019

BEGINS TUESDAY! MARCH 26 - April 7 FABULOUS FOX THEATRE MetroTix.com, 314-534-1111 The Fox Box Office


WIN. NOW.

The Cardinals made their big move in the offseason by trading for Paul Goldschmidt, then signed him to a long-term deal this spring. 40-PAGE SPECIAL SECTION INSIDE SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • $4.00 • FINAL EDITION

STILL IN BARR’S HANDS Attorney General William Barr He may release first summary of special counsel’s investigation to Congress as soon as Sunday.

Justice officials study report on Russia, Trump campaign

Mueller probe may be over, but Trump’s legal woes are not

BY ERIC TUCKER, MICHAEL BALSAMO AND CHAD DAY Associated Press

BY ROSALIND S. HELDERMAN AND DAVID A. FAHRENTHOLD Washington Post

WASHINGTON • Attorney General William Barr scoured

special counsel Robert Mueller’s confidential report on the Russia investigation with his advisers Saturday, deciding how much Congress and the American public will get to see about the two-year probe into President Donald Trump and Moscow’s efforts to elect him. Barr was on pace to release his first summary of Mueller’s findings on Sunday, people familiar with the process said. The attorney general’s decision on what to finally

The conclusion of the investigation by special counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign hardly spells the end of President Donald Trump’s legal woes. Nearly every organization Trump has run in the last decade remains under investigation by state or federal authorities, and he is mired in a variety of civil litigation, including a lawsuit filed in New York state by a former contestant on his reality television show that could force him to

See REPORT • Page A4

See TRUMP • Page A4

TIPPING POINT

THE NORTHSIDE GAMBLE

Stuck with each other CITY DIVORCED McKEE, BUT HE STILL HOLDS SWAY OVER NEGLECTED NEIGHBORHOODS

President Donald Trump State and federal authorities are looking into hush money, taking emoluments and more

May budget deadline confronts state lawmakers BY JACK SUNTRUP AND KURT ERICKSON St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • High-profile de-

bates loom for Missouri legislators headed back to the capital city after their week-long spring break. The 163-member House and the 34-member Senate will return Monday to the Capitol for the second half of their annual legislative session, which ends in mid-May. On the schedule: a near-total ban on abortions in Missouri, a controversial proposal to change how colleges handle sexual assault claims, a plan to require Medicaid recipients to work and a potentially spirited debate over charter school expansion. Gov. Mike Parson’s agenda also is on the front burner as he pushes a plan to borrow $350 million to pay for the repair or replacement of more than 200 bridges. See LEGISLATURE • Page A7

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

The second floor of a two-family home at 1604 North 14th Street, owned by Paul McKee's NorthSide Regeneration, crumbles over downtown St. Louis on March 14.

BY JACOB BARKER • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS • It has been a messy divorce.

At City Hall, officials had lost faith that Paul McKee could finance the projects he promised, and allegations of state tax credit fraud, which surfaced last spring, were the final straw. From McKee’s perspective, Mayor Lyda Krewson’s administration was pushing him out just as the land assemblage he began in north St. Louis 15 years ago was about to bear fruit with the $1.75 billion National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency facility — a project even a top city official conceded would not have materialized without McKee’s making

Blues beat Lightning, 4-3

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St. Louis officials, who terminated McKee’s rights in June, pledge to do redevelopment differently in future Controversial developer still controls hundreds of properties near NGA, says he deserves credit for ‘remarkable results’

NGA project on track for ’23

• C1

the initial pitch. The city made the breakup official in June, scrapping the 2009 agreement that gave McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration control over 1,500 acres of north St. Louis and rights to hundreds of millions of dollars in potential development subsidies. And yet, Paul McKee is not gone. The developer still owns more than 1,600 properties — more than 200 acres — surrounding the site of the future NGA campus. A lawsuit Bank of Washington filed after the city terminated McKee’s development rights,

Amazing Grace Model with Down syndrome breaks down stereotypes STL LIFE • B1 TODAY

Page turner

65°/41° THUNDERSTORMS

TOMORROW

51°/30° CLOUDY

See TIPPING POINT • Page A8

Judge still tries to collect

WEATHER D10

• A2

POST-DISPATCH WEATHERBIRD ®

2 M Vol. 141, No. 83 ©2019

BEGINS TUESDAY! MARCH 26 - April 7 FABULOUS FOX THEATRE MetroTix.com, 314-534-1111 The Fox Box Office


M 1 SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM FIND FINE FOOD

BATTLING DEMENTIA

UPCOMING CHATS

Primed for pasta? There are 11 Italian restaurants in this year’s STL100 of the best restaurants in St. Louis. Find one that tickles your taste buds. stltoday.com/stl100

Lonni Schicker shared with readers her story, taking us inside her struggles along with those of her family and friends. stltoday.com/dementia

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

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CONTACT US For news tips only, phone: 314-340-8222 Submit news tips: metro@post-dispatch.com Submit calendar events: events.stltoday.com Main number: 314-340-8000 Editor: Gilbert Bailon 314-340-8387 Features: Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 Local news: Marcia Koenig 314-340-8142 Business: Lisa Brown 314-340-8127 Online: Amanda St. Amand 314-340-8201 Projects: Jean Buchanan 314-340-8111 Sports: Roger Hensley 314-340-8301

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LOTTERY MULTISTATE GAMES MEGA MILLIONS Friday: 07-36-58-60-62 Mega ball: 10 Megaplier: 3 Estimated jackpot: $50 million POWERBALL Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $625 million

MISSOURI LOTTERIES LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $1.2 million SHOW ME CASH Friday: 01-13-15-33-36 Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $473,000 PICK-3 Friday Midday: 534 Evening: 885 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 1661 Evening: 3365

ILLINOIS LOTTERIES LUCKY DAY LOTTO Friday Midday: 22-24-31-34-40 Evening: 15-18-2128-43 LOTTO Saturday’s estimated jackpot: $13.75 million PICK-3 Friday Midday: 428 FB: 7 Evening: 767 FB: 7 PICK-4 Friday Midday: 8294 FB: 6 Evening: 2176 FB: 8

STLTODAY.COM/LOTTERY Current and past numbers, plus jackpots from state lotteries around the country.

Judge tries to collect after ruling on debtors prison TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KINGSTON, MO. • There has been a development, the judge said from his bench overlooking the second-floor courtroom in the Caldwell County seat. The defendant stood before him, the old wooden floor creaking beneath his shifting feet. The man was unable to make a payment on what he allegedly owed the court. It was two days after the Missouri Supreme Court had ruled unanimously that judges in the state could no longer hold “payment review hearings” in an attempt to collect “board bills” given to defendants for their time in the county jail. Those bills are often several thousand dollars, but, the state’s high court said, they are not court costs and cannot be collected by the criminal courts. Associate Circuit Court Judge Jason Kanoy held those hearings anyway on Thursday, under the watchful eye of Michael Barrett, head of the state public defender’s office, and Matthew Mueller, the senior bond litigation counsel for that office. Mueller is the lawyer who brought the appeals of two rural Missouri men that led to the Tuesday opinion being issued by the Missouri Supreme Court. “There are a pile of cases where people owe us money,” Kanoy told the defendant, a painter, who said he was having a hard time finding work these days, “and I have to review them all.” Money. That is what this is about. It’s a pay-to-stay system that has been ingrained in Missouri’s rural courts for decades. Pay the judge for your time in jail or he sends you to debtors prison. Last year, Kanoy collected $149,877 this way, by requiring defendants — most of them poor — to come to court month after month, to make a payment toward their board bills or explain why

The Caldwell County Courthouse

they can’t. Kanoy collected more money per capita — $16.47 for every one of the 9,100 people who live in this tiny northwest Missouri farming community — than any judge in any Missouri county. It was all done illegally, the Missouri Supreme Court said last week. Such “debts cannot be taxed as court costs and the failure to pay that debt cannot result in another incarceration,” Judge Mary Russell wrote for the unanimous court. The court said that unpaid jail board debts should be sent to the Office of State Courts Administrator, which could seek to collect them through income tax intercepts, and that there should be no more payment review hearings. Apparently, Kanoy didn’t get the message. All three defendants who appeared before him on Thursday were told to come back in May for another payment review hearing. Each of them had previously been jailed for failure to pay board bills. “It is going to take us a while to sift through things,” Kanoy told Jason Sharp, who has been attending such hearings since 2012 on a long-ago-disposed child support case. “Our little chats won’t be happening anymore,” Kanoy told Sharp, as a result of the Missouri Supreme Court decision. Sharp said he was happy that after May, it seems, he won’t have to come see

BELLEVILLE > St. Louis man charged in sex case involving minor • A man faces felony charges after allegedly going online to pursue a sexual relationship with a girl younger than 16, then traveling to St. Clair County to engage in sex acts with her. Joseph L. Hughes, 27, of Skyview Drive in St. Louis was charged Friday by the St. Clair County State’s Attorney’s Office with four counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse, one count of sexual exploitation of a minor and one count of traveling across state lines to meet a minor. Hughes talked with the girl online and eventually drove from St. Louis to meet her in Illinois and engaged in sexual behavior with her, officials said. Hughes is being held in lieu of $100,000 in bail. FRANKLIN COUNTY > Head-on crash near Union kills four • Four people, including two children, are dead after a head-on crash between a passenger vehicle and a tractortrailer outside Union. The passenger car was traveling south on Highway 47 at Forest View Drive about 1:27

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE

LAW & ORDER O’FALLON, ILL. > 15-year sentence for child porn • A man from O’Fallon was sentenced to 15 years in prison for distributing and receiving child pornography, federal prosecutors said Friday. William L. Isaac, 54, uploaded child porn to a chat room in 2014, prosecutors said. In September 2017, he told FBI agents that he’d uploaded images and videos containing child porn to chat rooms in the past and browsed child porn. A search of his computer found 67 child porn videos that had been downloaded between July and September 2017. Isaac pleaded guilty in January to two counts of distribution of child porn and one count of receiving child porn. He also agreed to pay $3,000 in restitution to one of the victims identified in his porn collection.

the judge again. “The judge can’t just keep putting people in these cycles where we’re back and back and back,” he said after the hearing. “I’m glad to see this is over and done.” But it’s not really, and that’s a problem, said Barrett. Most of the people who were scheduled for payment review hearings before Kanoy on Thursday didn’t show up. The way it works in Caldwell County and many other counties is that if you make a payment, you don’t have to go to court. So 26 people made payments to a court that has no legal right to collect them. Some of those people already have new hearings scheduled in May. If they owe any actual court costs, it is only because the court has been applying their previous payments to the board bills first, rather than the other court costs, which are generally minimal, such as a $10 fee for crime victims. Defendants were told they now owe their board bills to the Caldwell County Sheriff. None of that should be happening, Barrett said. “He should have canceled all of these hearings,” he said. On Friday, Barrett sent a letter to Kanoy urging the judge to comply with the state Supreme Court decision and “stop using your court to leverage the freedom of poor persons in exchange for revenue for Caldwell County.” Kanoy will likely get a chance soon to explain himself to the seven judges of the state’s high court. He is due there April 9 for arguments in a case brought by Mueller in which the public defender argues that Kanoy is violating constitutional protections against “double jeopardy” by jailing defendants more than once on contempt of court charges related to missing payment review hearings. Perhaps a little chat with the justices of the Missouri Supreme Court will help the judge sift through things.

p.m. Friday when it crossed over the center line and collided with an oncoming truck, according to a Missouri Highway Patrol crash report. The report identified the victims as Michael T. Declue, 58, of De Soto, Catherine A. Mesey, 78, of De Soto, and two children from Desloge: Alayah L. Pratt, 4, and Isaac D. Pratt, 5. Declue was driving the car; the four victims’ relationships were unclear. Their car, a 2010 Chevrolet Cobalt, spun around after colliding with the truck and struck a southbound vehicle, which traveled off the road. A third southbound vehicle was hit by debris from the tractor-trailer. Neither driver was injured. The truck driver, a 46-year-old man from Belle, Mo., was taken to a hospital with minor injuries, according to the report. Both lanes of Highway 47 were closed for several hours Friday afternoon as troopers investigated the crash. The crash report says it could not be determined whether Declue or Mesey were wearing seat belts, but both children were. COLUMBIA, Mo. > New charges in Planned Parenthood arson • A man accused of trying to burn down a Planned Parenthood clinic in February now faces new charges. Wesley Brian Kaster, 42, was originally charged March 4 with maliciously damaging a building owned by an organization that receives federal financial assistance. A grand jury indictment on Wednesday replaced that charge with two new counts — using explosive material to maliciously damage federal property and malicious use of explosive materials. An attorney for Kaster didn’t immediately respond to a message seeking comment. The Columbia clinic was empty when the pre-dawn fire broke out Feb. 10. Authorities said Kastser broke the glass front door and threw in a “Molotov cocktail-type device.”

Stormy wants to cut ‘pole tax’ Porn actress Stormy Daniels is protesting the Illinois surcharge on live adult entertainment centers. She read a short statement Friday beneath a statue of Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, Ill. The six-year-old surcharge is nicknamed the “pole tax.” It taxes strip clubs that serve alcohol $3 per patron or a share of the club’s gross receipts to fund battered women’s shelters. Daniels said that the tax unfairly tied nude dancing to violence against women and that it “takes money out of the g-strings of hardworking young dancers.” ‘Supernatural’ foresees end • “After more than 300 episodes, two demonic possessions, several trips to hell and back, two failed spinoff attempts, and a complete sea change in its attitude toward women, Supernatural’s 15th season will be its last,” Vox.com says. Some of the TV series’ stars posted the news to their social media accounts Friday. Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki, as brothers Dean and Sam Winchester, had learned some of their monster skills from their dad, played by Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Padalecki even married a guest he met on the show, Genevieve Cortese.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti is 100. Comedian Louie Anderson is 66. Actor Robert Carradine is 65. TV personality Star Jones is 57. Actress Lara Flynn Boyle is 49. Actor Jim Parsons is 46. Actress Jessica Chastain is 42. Dancer Val Chmerkovskiy is 33. Actress Keisha Castle-Hughes is 29. From wire services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Nadler; Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash.

FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Nadler; Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Reps. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y.; Brookings Institution President John Allen, former U.S. and NATO commander in Afghanistan.

THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) To be announced. Associated Press


M 2 SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • A2

WHAT’S ON STLTODAY.COM FIND FINE FOOD

BATTLING DEMENTIA

UPCOMING CHATS

Primed for pasta? There are 11 Italian restaurants in this year’s STL100 of the best restaurants in St. Louis. Find one that tickles your taste buds. stltoday.com/stl100

Lonni Schicker shared with readers her story, taking us inside her struggles along with those of her family and friends. stltoday.com/dementia

Monday Talk Cardinals baseball, 1 p.m. Tuesday Sports columnist Ben Frederickson, 11 a.m. Wednesday Ask the Road Crew, 1 p.m. Jim Thomas talks Blues, 1 p.m. Thursday MU sports with Dave Matter, 11 a.m. Friday Talk STL sports with Jeff Gordon, 1 p.m.

TONY’S TAKE

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Judge tries to collect after ruling on debtors prison TONY MESSENGER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

KINGSTON, MO. • There has been a development, the judge said from his bench overlooking the second-floor courtroom in the Caldwell County seat. The defendant stood before him, the old wooden floor creaking beneath his shifting feet. The man was unable to make a payment on what he allegedly owed the court. It was two days after the Missouri Supreme Court had ruled unanimously that judges in the state could no longer hold “payment review hearings” in an attempt to collect “board bills” given to defendants for their time in the county jail. Those bills are often several thousand dollars, but, the state’s high court said, they are not court costs and cannot be collected by the criminal courts. Associate Circuit Court Judge Jason Kanoy held those hearings anyway on Thursday, under the watchful eye of Michael Barrett, head of the state public defender’s office, and Matthew Mueller, the senior bond litigation counsel for that office. Mueller is the lawyer who brought the appeals of two rural Missouri men that led to the Tuesday opinion being issued by the Missouri Supreme Court. “There are a pile of cases where people owe us money,” Kanoy told the defendant, a painter, who said he was having a hard time finding work these days, “and I have to review them all.” Money. That is what this is about. It’s a pay-to-stay system that has been ingrained in Missouri’s rural courts for decades. Pay the judge for your time in jail or he sends you to debtors prison. Last year, Kanoy collected $149,877 this way, by requiring defendants — most of them poor — to come to court month after month, to make a payment toward their board bills or explain why

The Caldwell County Courthouse

they can’t. Kanoy collected more money per capita — $16.47 for every one of the 9,100 people who live in this tiny northwest Missouri farming community — than any judge in any Missouri county. It was all done illegally, the Missouri Supreme Court said last week. Such “debts cannot be taxed as court costs and the failure to pay that debt cannot result in another incarceration,” Judge Mary Russell wrote for the unanimous court. The court said that unpaid jail board debts should be sent to the Office of State Courts Administrator, which could seek to collect them through income tax intercepts, and that there should be no more payment review hearings. Apparently, Kanoy didn’t get the message. All three defendants who appeared before him on Thursday were told to come back in May for another payment review hearing. Each of them had previously been jailed for failure to pay board bills. “It is going to take us a while to sift through things,” Kanoy told Jason Sharp, who has been attending such hearings since 2012 on a long-ago-disposed child support case. “Our little chats won’t be happening anymore,” Kanoy told Sharp, as a result of the Missouri Supreme Court decision. Sharp said he was happy that after May, it seems, he won’t have to come see

FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS > Man lying on I-64 dies when struck by SUV • A 28-year-old St. Louis man who police say was lying in the road was struck by a SUV and killed along Interstate 64 in Fairview Heights about 1 a.m. Saturday. Illinois State Police said a woman driving a Chevy Tahoe was westbound near mile marker 10 when she spotted a man lying in the road. The woman, 34, of Mount Vernon, Ill., told police the man started rolling into her lane and she couldn’t avoid hitting him. An ambulance took him to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Police didn’t release the identities of the man and the driver. No charges have been filed in connection with the crash. ALTON > Man held in shooting death at gas station • Police have arrested a man, 22, in connection with the shooting death of Austin L. Pierson, 22, at a Shell station at 2500 Brown Street about 7:15 p.m. Friday. Charges are expected to be filed Monday. The victim lived in the 2600 block of Ida Street in Alton. Police said the men involved knew one another, had a fight and the suspect fled. Shortly after the shooting, there was a hitand-run crash in East Alton and then a second crash at Highways 159 and 140 in Madison County. The suspect was taken into custody at the second crash and identified as the man wanted in the shooting. It was unclear whether anyone was hurt in the crashes.

Tony Messenger • 314-340-8518 @tonymess on Twitter tmessenger@post-dispatch.com

PEOPLE

LAW & ORDER ST. LOUIS > Pedestrian struck, killed by vehicle; driver held • Police arrested a male driver shortly after a pedestrian was struck by a vehicle and killed about 4:45 p.m. Saturday near Fairground Park. The victim, a man, was pronounced dead at an area hospital. The incident took place at North Grand Boulevard and Kossuth Avenue, police said. A driver was arrested a few blocks from the crash scene, police said. Police did not release the victim’s identity.

the judge again. “The judge can’t just keep putting people in these cycles where we’re back and back and back,” he said after the hearing. “I’m glad to see this is over and done.” But it’s not really, and that’s a problem, said Barrett. Most of the people who were scheduled for payment review hearings before Kanoy on Thursday didn’t show up. The way it works in Caldwell County and many other counties is that if you make a payment, you don’t have to go to court. So 26 people made payments to a court that has no legal right to collect them. Some of those people already have new hearings scheduled in May. If they owe any actual court costs, it is only because the court has been applying their previous payments to the board bills first, rather than the other court costs, which are generally minimal, such as a $10 fee for crime victims. Defendants were told they now owe their board bills to the Caldwell County Sheriff. None of that should be happening, Barrett said. “He should have canceled all of these hearings,” he said. On Friday, Barrett sent a letter to Kanoy urging the judge to comply with the state Supreme Court decision and “stop using your court to leverage the freedom of poor persons in exchange for revenue for Caldwell County.” Kanoy will likely get a chance soon to explain himself to the seven judges of the state’s high court. He is due there April 9 for arguments in a case brought by Mueller in which the public defender argues that Kanoy is violating constitutional protections against “double jeopardy” by jailing defendants more than once on contempt of court charges related to missing payment review hearings. Perhaps a little chat with the justices of the Missouri Supreme Court will help the judge sift through things.

COLLINSVILLE > Pedestrian, 45, killed when hit by vehicle • Robert L. Powell, 45, of Collinsville, was hit by a vehicle and killed about 9:50 p.m. Friday near South Bluff Road and Columbus Plaza, Collinsville police said. Powell was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver was cooperating with police, and the incident appears to have been an accident, police said. PIKE COUNTY, MO. > Teen killed when car hits deer • Kaleo K. Dade, 18, of Bowling Green, Mo., was killed about 7:20 p.m. Friday when his car struck a deer and went off the road, hitting an embankment, the Missouri Highway Patrol said. The patrol said the crash took place on Route E north of Route MM. He was pronounced dead at the scene. A passenger, Kyle S. Horner, 17, of Curryville, Mo., was seriously hurt, the patrol said. Horner was wearing a seat belt and Dade was not, the patrol said. CLAYTON > Man gets probation for cemetery vandalism • Alzado M. Harris, who told police he toppled about 120 headstones at a Jewish cemetery in University City because he was drunk, on drugs and was mad at a friend, was sentenced Thursday to three years probation and a suspended sentence. Harris, 35, of Northwoods, pleaded guilty to felony institutional vandalism. His sentence, issued by St. Louis County Circuit Judge John Warner, also requires Harris to pay $5,000 restitution, take an angermanagement course and maintain full-time work . The crime captured the nation’s attention and came at a time when Jewish community centers nationwide got a string of bomb threats. However, the charges against Harris, issued more than a year later, contained no hint of any anti-Semitic motive.

Patriots’ Kraft apologizes New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft said Saturday that he was “truly sorry,” apologizing after being charged last month in a Florida massage parlor prostitution investigation. “I know I have hurt and disappointed my family, my close friends, my co-workers, our fans and many others who rightfully hold me to a higher standard,” Kraft said in a statement. He said he had “extraordinary respect for women,” adding that his morals were shaped by his late wife, Myra Kraft, who died in 2011. Kraft pleaded not guilty last month to two counts of misdemeanor solicitation of prostitution. ‘Supernatural’ foresees end • “After more than 300 episodes, two demonic possessions, several trips to hell and back, two failed spinoff attempts, and a complete sea change in its attitude toward women, Supernatural’s 15th season will be its last,” Vox.com says. Some of the TV series’ stars posted the news to their social media accounts Friday. Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki, as brothers Dean and Sam Winchester, had learned some of their monster skills from their dad, played by Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Padalecki even married a guest he met on the show, Genevieve Cortese.

CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti is 100. Comedian Louie Anderson is 66. Actor Robert Carradine is 65. TV personality Star Jones is 57. Actor Jim Parsons is 46. Actress Jessica Chastain is 42. Dancer Val Chmerkovskiy is 33. Actress Keisha Castle-Hughes is 29. From wire services

SUNDAY NEWS SHOWS MEET THE PRESS • 8 a.m., KSDK (5) Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y. STATE OF THE UNION • 8 a.m., CNN Nadler; Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash.

FOX NEWS SUNDAY • 9 a.m., KTVI (2) Nadler; Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga. FACE THE NATION • 9:30 a.m., KMOV (4) Reps. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, and Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y.; Brookings Institution President John Allen.

THIS WEEK • 10 a.m., KDNL (30) Schiff, Jordan. Associated Press


SATURDAY’S BEST

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

Arson suspected in Kutis Funeral Home fire

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

Inflammatory flyers have alderman questioning police

BY KIM BELL St. Louis Post-dispatch

BY JESSE BOGAN • St. Louis Post-dispatch

ST. LOUIS COUNTY • Firefighters

found at least two incendiary devices on the roof of Kutis Funeral Home in south St. Louis County after a blaze damaged the building early Friday. “It is arson,” Thomas Kutis IV, whose family owns the business, told the Post-Dispatch. “We have full confidence in the county police that they will find this guy.” Kutis said he didn’t want to talk about why someone would try to burn down his family’s funeral home, at 5255 Lemay Ferry Road. The fire was reported before 4:40 a.m. Friday. No one was injured. Kutis said he was busy planning for how to handle arrangements in the aftermath of the fire. “Everything was on time,” he said. “We’re open for business, and we will be taking care of all the families.” The St. Louis Regional Bomb and Arson Unit is investigating the blaze, which was spotted by passing officers on patrol. Police haven’t said if they have any suspects. They didn’t disclose a possible motive. St. Louis County Police Sgt. Shawn McGuire confirmed the presence of the devices investigators believe started or fueled the fire. They looked homemade from items that could be bought at a store, McGuire said. Among the suspicious items was a

LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

Firefighters and detectives with the St. Louis Regional Bomb and Arson Unit work Friday at the scene of a fire at Kutis Funeral Home in south St. Louis County. Firefighters found at least two incendiary devices on the roof.

can of paint thinner. Police say it appears someone tossed them onto the roof of the funeral home. One worker who was sleeping in the basement got out safely; two bodies that were in the building for upcoming funeral services were not affected by the predawn blaze, Kutis said. Fire training manuals say incendiary devices can include firebombs and Molotov cocktails. Firefighters are taught to leave a device alone and let trained personnel handle it or move it. Daniel LaFata, assistant chief of the Mehlville Fire Protection District, declined to say anything about the possible cause of the fire. He said firefighters turn to police when a fire is suspicious.

Kutis commended St. Louis County police Officer Christopher Straatmann with spotting the fire and reporting it. “His quick actions saved us from any further damage,” he said. Fire crews arrived within minutes. Flames were shooting through the roof. Firefighters struck a second alarm to get more equipment and crews to the funeral home as they were searching for a sprinkler connection. They soon had the blaze under control. The roof was left with a hole measuring about 2 feet by 30 feet. The building also suffered water damage from the firefighting effort. Kim Bell • 314-340-8115 @kbellpd on Twitter kbell@post-dispatch.com

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ST. LOUIS • The Democratic primary for president of the city’s Board of Aldermen is over, but exhaust from the contentious race continues to billow. Alderman Megan Ellyia Green, who came in third place with 31 percent of the vote running as a democratic socialist, has contacted city public safety director Jimmie Edwards over Patriot Front flyers that were put up in her Tower Grove South neighborhood last weekend. The flyers were illustrated with an arrow struck through a hammer and sickle and the phrase: “Better dead than red.” The Southern Poverty Law Center considers Patriot Front a white nationalist hate group. According to email correspondence, Green told Edwards she was concerned that the largest labor union that represents St. Louis police officers may have motivated the flyers’ being put up and the message they contained. “While it could be a coincidence, it’s entirely plausible that the actions of the St. Louis Police Officers Association have inspired, emboldened, or are connected to a hate group operating in our area,” wrote Green, 35, who represents Ward 15. In a 2018 federal lawsuit filed against the city and St. Louis police, Green alleged that police tear-gassed her, and others, without cause in the Central West End after former police Officer Jason Stockley was acquitted of a murder charge for the fatal shooting of Anthony Lamar Smith. In social media posts leading up to the March 5 board president race, the St. Louis Police Officers Association encouraged votes for “one of the pro-police Democrats on the ballot; not Communist Cop-Hater Megan Green!” The well-publicized post included a picture of Mao’s body with Green’s head on it. In a different post from the union, which was removed, the headline “BETTER DEAD THAN RED!” was accompanied by a splattered red circle and line across a hammer and sickle. “Our posts are working!” said the announcement. “In true form, the commies are red with anger. Megan Green and her friends deny their communist leanings but remind us how dangerous they are as they call for our members to be punished for exercising free speech. Welcome to Stalingrad!” Emotions cooled online after the election. Then the Patriot Front flyers showed up in Green’s neighborhood last weekend. In an interview Friday, she said she was aware of three of the flyers. “It’s concerning that they are popping up after the St. Louis Police Officers Association on their social media used the same verbiage that is also typically used by white supremacist groups, the better dead than red,” she said. Among her questions to Edwards, she asked what steps were being made to remove Jeff Roorda, the business manager of the police union who oversees social media posts, and for details on what’s being done to ensure St. Louis police officers aren’t affiliated with white nationalists or hate groups.

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LOCAL

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A3

A TRASH BASH For the annual Confluence Trash Bash, volunteers at Creve Coeur Lake Memorial Park combed the perimeter of the lake and its drainage for trash. The event was held at multiple locations in the greater St. Louis area.

ABOVE • Ashley McKenna catches a tennis ball retrieved from the lake shore by another volunteer.

RIGHT • Levi Sherman taps mud out of a can Saturday. The park is in Maryland Heights. PHOTOS BY COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

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ST. LOUIS > Hundreds march against abortion • Hundreds of people marched from the Planned Parenthood facility in the Central West End to the Gateway Arch Saturday afternoon to protest abortion. A national youth group, Crusaders for Life, organized the march, which began with a prayer and songs outside the Planned Parenthood in the 4200 block of Forest Park Avenue. The facility is now the only abortion provider in Missouri. Participants were from the St. Louis area, Chicago and Springfield, Ill., and included priests and many students. A police escort accompanied the protest, temporarily shutting down streets as the demonstration moved through downtown.

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A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

KEY PLAYERS Some of the people and entities prominently featured in the probe by special counsel Robert Mueller into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election:

FROM A1

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? BY AARON BLAKE Washington Post

THE PRESIDENT’S MEN MICHAEL COHEN Trump’s attorney He was Trump’s lawyer for a decade and remained his personal attorney after Trump took office. He pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about a proposed real estate development in Moscow and to campaign finance violations for coordinating hush money payments to women who claimed to have had affairs with Trump. MICHAEL FLYNN Former national security adviser An early supporter of candidate Trump, the former Army lieutenant general became the president’s first national security adviser. He pleaded guilty to having lied to the FBI just days after Trump took office by telling agents that he had never discussed sanctions with then-Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak. RICK GATES Manafort associate A key campaign aide and long-time associate of Manafort. He was indicted in 2017 alongside his mentor but months later split from Manafort by pleading guilty for unregistered foreign lobbying work and agreeing to cooperate with Mueller.

PAUL MANAFORT Trump campaign chair The former chairman of Trump’s campaign was convicted in Washington and Virginia of crimes related to years of Ukrainian political consulting work. He enjoys the continued sympathy of the president, who has left open the door for a pardon.

GEORGE PAPADOPOULOS Trump campaign adviser The former foreign policy adviser served 14 days in prison for lying to the FBI about a 2016 conversation with a Maltese professor who told him that Russia had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton in the form of stolen emails. That conversation was key to starting the entire investigation into Russia’s interference. ROGER STONE Informal Trump adviser The longtime Trump confidant, and selfproclaimed “dirty trickster” of Republican politics, Stone was arrested in a dramatic predawn raid in February. He pleaded not guilty to charges he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering. The charges stem from conversations he had during the campaign about WikiLeaks, the anti-secrecy group that released material stolen from Democratic groups, including Hillary Clinton’s campaign. DONALD TRUMP JR. President’s son The president’s eldest son is being scrutinized for his role in arranging a Trump Tower meeting in June 2016 — also attended by Manafort and Trump son-in-law Jared Kushner — at which he expected to receive damaging information on Clinton as part of a Russian effort to help his father.

RUSSIANS, HACKERS, LEAKERS, OTHERS 12 RUSSIAN MILITARY OFFICERS The military intelligence officers were charged with hacking into Democratic email accounts and then facilitating the release of tens of thousands of private communications. It remains perhaps the most direct example of what intelligence officials say was a broad conspiracy by the Kremlin to meddle in the 2016 election on Trump’s behalf. 13 RUSSIAN HACKERS AND 3 COMPANIES Thirteen Russians were charged with funding a covert social media propaganda campaign to sow discord among Americans in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election. JULIAN ASSANGE WikiLeaks founder Prosecutors inadvertently disclosed the existence of a sealed criminal complaint against him, though no details have been publicly announced. He has been under Justice Department scrutiny for years for WikiLeaks’ role in publishing government secrets and investigators also examined how WikiLeaks obtained stolen Democratic emails. KONSTANTIN KILIMNIK Manafort associate The Ukrainian native, who U.S. authorities say has ties to Russian intelligence, was indicted on witness tampering charges alongside Manafort. The men are accused of trying to persuade two witnesses to lie about the nature of political consulting and lobbying work they carried out for Ukrainian interests. SERGEI KISLYAK Former Russian ambassador to U.S. The diplomat was an early figure of intrigue in the investigation based on meetings and contacts he had in 2016 with Trump associates with including son-in-law Jared Kushner and thenAlabama Sen. Jeff Sessions, who later became attorney general. NATALIA VESELNITSKAYA Russian attorney The Russian lawyer whose Trump Tower meeting with campaign officials was key to Mueller’s investigation. Trump initially said the meeting was about adoption policy, but it was later revealed that Donald Trump Jr. was told she had “dirt” on Hillary Clinton. She has since been charged with obstruction of justice in an unrelated case.

M 1 • SUNDAY • 03.24.2019

WASHINGTON • Robert Mueller just delivered the long-awaited and highly anticipated report on his Russia investigation to Attorney General William Barr. Welcome to one of the most anti-climactic moments in modern American political history. The truth is we don’t really know anything we didn’t know a few minutes ago, and it’s still massively unclear what we’ll learn about Mueller’s findings. In his letter to Congress on Friday, Barr wrote that he remained “committed to as much transparency as possible, and I will keep you informed as to the status of my review.” He said he could deliver a summary as early as this weekend. But it’s unclear what that will actually look like. Barr said in his confirmation hearing in February that once he received the report, he would summarize the parts he could for Congress and the public within the constraints of the law and Justice Department guidelines. What does that mean? What happens next? Here’s a little primer to consult as we wait ... again.

WHAT CONSTRAINS BARR There are a few basic things Barr may have to withhold from public view, and even potentially from Congress. Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6 says that details of the investigation must be kept secret unless they are revealed as part of a court order related to an indictment or other proceeding. Grand jury rules prohibit the disclosure of information obtained via that method — a method Mueller has undoubtedly used extensively — unless actual charges are filed. And

Barr will also have to review the report for any classified information. It is expected that this review process could take days or even weeks.

THE CATCH-22 But this creates an unusual and problematic circumstance when it comes to President Donald Trump. The Justice Department has affirmed that its guidelines prohibit the indictment of a sitting president. If Trump can’t be indicted, and Barr can disclose only information related to actual charges, does that mean he can’t say much of anything about Trump’s conduct and potential obstruction of justice? Trump said Wednesday that he was fine with the full report’s going public, but does that even matter? In short, we don’t know what happens. But it’s difficult to believe Barr and the Justice Department won’t have to say something about whether Mueller believed Trump’s actions rose to the level of crimes, even if he can’t be charged. A ROAD MAP? SEPARATE REPORTS? RELEASING THE WHOLE THING? One option that has been floated for Barr is releasing separate reports. Former Justice Department officials have suggested he could deliver two reports to Congress: one with unclassified information that could be given to all lawmakers (and would presumably leak to the public), and a separate one that would be given to a much-smaller universe of congressional leaders, such as House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, DCalif., and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, DN.Y., who is in charge of any impeachment efforts. But even then, the rules de-

scribed above could get in the way. When confronting a somewhat similar set of circumstances during Watergate, special prosecutor Leon Jaworski used a workaround: Rather than make recommendations to Congress and pass along all his findings, he transmitted through a grand jury what became known as the Watergate “road map.” It was a bare-bones set of facts and guideposts for them to conduct their own inquiries and draw their own conclusions. The move was authorized by a federal judge and could provide an important legal precedent for Barr. A third eventual result would be that the full report, or something amounting to it, eventually finds its way out. House Democrats have said they will press for the whole thing. The House voted 420-0 to make the report public, and Trump said this week, “Let people see it.” But how Congress feels may not matter. They can’t simply pass a law to force the report’s release, given that would conflict with other federal laws. If they were to get extensive details of Mueller’s findings, it would likely have to come through the legal system in some fashion. They could seek a court order. They could subpoena Mueller’s documents. They could call Mueller to testify. They could do all of the above and more. In short, Mueller has conducted a highly secretive investigation, whose inner workings have often been revealed only months after key events took place. And just as we don’t really know what he’s found, we don’t know what the endgame will be even now that the report has been written and transmitted. This could go in a whole bunch of different directions, with a relatively new attorney general in charge of it all.

Mueller report sent to attorney general MUELLER • FROM A1

Justice Department officials notified Congress late Friday that they had received Mueller’s report, but did not describe its contents. Barr is expected to summarize the findings for lawmakers as early as this weekend. Immediately after the news of Mueller’s report broke, Democrats demanded that its contents be made public. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi , DCalif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., issued a joint statement, saying that “it is imperative for Mr. Barr to make the full report public and provide its underlying documentation and findings to Congress. ... The American people have a right to the truth.” The Senate Intelligence Committee, of which Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., is a member, has been simultaneously investigating Russian interference in the 2016 campaign. It has withheld its report in anticipation of Mueller’s finishing his work. “I’m glad the Mueller investigation has reached a conclusion and that we have an attorney general in place who has the background and experience to know what part of that report should be publicly available,” Blunt said in a statement released Friday. “I’m hopeful the Senate Intelligence Committee gets to look at all of the information Mueller has put together so we can finish our report as soon as possible.” Rep. William Lacy Clay, D-University City, echoed fellow Democrats’ calls for the entire report to be released. “The American people deserve to know the truth,” he said in a statement. “I expect a full version of special counsel Mueller’s report to be made public along with all the underlying facts. Absolute transparency is essential.” Trump’s supporters viewed the news as an optimistic indication that he was on the cusp of being vindicated. “The fact that there are no more indictments is a big deal,” said David Bossie, a Trump ally. “This president has had his entire twoyear presidency under a cloud of this fake, made-up Russian collusion story.” None of the Americans charged by Mueller is accused of conspiring with Russia to interfere in the election — the central question of Mueller’s work. Instead, they pleaded guilty to various crimes including lying to the FBI. Trump flew to his Florida resort Friday, accompanied by senior aides and White House lawyers. Trump did not immediately speak or tweet about the report’s delivery. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said that the next steps “are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course. The

JABIN BOTSFORD • Washington Post

President Donald Trump talk to reporters and members of the media Friday as he walks to Marine One to leave the White House for his resort in Florida.

White House has not received or been briefed on the special counsel’s report.” In a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate judiciary committees, Barr wrote that Mueller “has concluded his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election and related matters.” The attorney general wrote that he would consult with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Mueller “to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law, including the special counsel regulations, and the Department’s long-standing practices and policies.” Barr said there were no instances in the course of the investigation in which any of Mueller’s decisions were vetoed by his superiors at the Justice Department. “I remain committed to as much transparency as possible, and I will keep you informed as to the status of my review,” Barr wrote. After a week of growing expectation that Mueller’s long-awaited report would soon arrive, a security officer from Mueller’s office delivered it Friday afternoon to Rosenstein’s office at Justice Department headquarters, according to spokeswoman Kerri Kupec. Within minutes of that delivery, the report was transmitted upstairs to Barr. About 3:35 p.m. St. Louis time, White House lawyer Emmet Flood was notified that the Justice Department had received the report. About a half-hour after that notification, a senior department official delivered Barr’s letter to the relevant House and Senate committees and senior congressional leaders, officials said. One official described the report as “comprehensive” but added that very few people had seen it.

Even with the report’s filing, Mueller is expected to retain his role as special counsel for a winddown period, though it is unclear how long that may last, officials said. A small number of his staff will remain in the office to help shut down the operations. “The investigation is complete,” Kupec said. Earlier Friday, before the announcement of release of the report, Trump told Fox Business Network. “People will not stand for it.” The president, speaking to reporters on the White House lawn before leaving for Florida, again repeated his claim that “There was no collusion. There was no obstruction. Everybody knows it. It’s all a big hoax. It’s all a witch hunt.” The special counsel’s investigation was launched May 17, 2017, in a moment of crisis for the FBI, the Justice Department and the country. Days earlier, Trump had fired FBI Director James Comey. The purported reason was Comey’s handling of the 2016 investigation of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, but Trump said in an interview with NBC News shortly after the firing that he was thinking about the Russia inquiry when he decided to remove Comey. Because FBI directors are appointed to 10-year terms to ensure their political independence, the firing of Comey rattled Washington. It set off alarms in the Justice Department and in Congress, where lawmakers feared the president was determined to end the Russia investigation before it was completed.


FROM A1

A4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Democrats seek full release of Mueller report REPORT • FROM A1

disclose seems almost certain to set off a fight with congressional Democrats, who want access to all of Mueller’s findings — and supporting evidence — on whether Trump’s 2016 campaign coordinated with Russia to sway the election and whether the president later sought to obstruct the investigation. No announcement was expected Saturday as Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller and oversaw much of his work, analyzed the report and labored to condense it into a summary letter of main conclusions. Mueller delivered his full report to Barr on Friday. The Russia investigation has shadowed Trump for nearly two years and has ensnared his family and close advisers. And no matter the findings in Mueller’s report, the probe already has illuminated Russia’s assault on the American political system, painted the Trump campaign as eager to exploit the release of hacked Democratic emails to hurt Democrat Hillary Clinton and exposed lies by Trump aides aimed at covering up their Russia-related contacts. Barr has said he wants to release as much as he can under the law. That decision will require him to weigh the Justice Department’s longstanding protocol of not releasing negative information about people who aren’t indicted against the extraordinary public interest in a criminal investigation into the president and his campaign. Democrats are already citing the department’s recent precedent of norm-breaking disclosures, including during the Hillary Clinton email investigation, to argue that they’re entitled to Mueller’s entire report and the underlying evidence he collected. Even with the details still under wraps, Friday’s end to the 22-month probe without additional indictments by Mueller was welcome news to some in Trump’s orbit who had feared a final round of charges could target more Trump associates or members of the president’s family. The White House sought to keep its distance, saying Saturday it had not been briefed on the report. Trump, who has relentlessly criticized Mueller’s investigation as a “witch hunt,” went golfing and was uncharacteristically quiet on Twitter. Not so one of his guests, musician Kid Rock, who posted a picture with the president and the tweet, “Another great day on the links! Thank you to POTUS for having me and to EVERYONE at Trump International for being so wonderful. What a great man, so down to earth and so fun to be with!!” In a possible foreshadowing of expected clashes between the Justice Department and Congress, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said in a letter to members that Barr’s offer to provide a summary of principal conclusions was “insufficient.” Pelosi later told Democrats in a conference call that she would reject any kind of classified briefing on the report and that the information must be provided to Congress in a way that would allow lawmakers to discuss it publicly. As for Mueller, with no details released at this point, it was not known whether he concluded the campaign colluded with the Kremlin to tip the election in favor of the celebrity businessman. A Justice Department official did confirm that Mueller was not recommending any further indictments, meaning the investigation had ended without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy, or of obstruction of justice by the president. Across ideology, many Americans expressed relief Saturday that the investigation was finally over. Helen Jones, 72, a retired English professor in Salt Lake City, Utah, who is Republican but despises Trump, knows whatever comes out, her relatives who strongly back the president won’t budge — just as detractors such as she won’t be convinced he isn’t a crook. She sees no simple end. “I think it’s just the beginning,” said Jones, a political junkie who called the moment a historic one like Watergate. “I hope it’s a turning point in the Trump presidency.” “Now maybe we can move on to better things,” said Bubba Metts, 61, a conservative who is a financial adviser in Lexington, S.C. “Twenty million dollars spent — for nothing.” Dajah Harris, 21, a college senior at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., is a Democrat and no fan of Trump. But she saw the investigation as a distraction from more important things like homelessness, college debt and welfare programs. The country should never have elected someone whose background raises such questions, she said. “I don’t feel that where the country is right now that this is something we should even be discussing,” she said. In a conference call Saturday to strategize on next steps, Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, issued a warning for his fellow Democrats, some of whom have pinned high political hopes on Mueller’s findings: “Once we get the principal conclusions of the report, I think it’s entirely possible that that will be a good day for the president and his core supporters.” A handful of Trump associates and family members have been dogged by speculation of potential wrongdoing. They include Donald Trump Jr., who had a role in arranging a meeting with a Kremlinlinked lawyer at Trump Tower at the height of the 2016 campaign; and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller’s prosecutors. All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and three Russian companies. Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet. Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller, and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering. Peter Carr, spokesman for the special counsel, said Saturday that the case of former Trump campaign aide Rick Gates would be handed off to the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia. Gates was a key cooperator in Mueller’s probe, and court papers show he continues to help with several other federal investigations. Justice Department legal opinions have held that sitting presidents may not be indicted. But many Democrats say Trump should not be immune from a public accounting of his behavior.

M 2 • SUNDAY • 03.24.2019

MUELLER INVESTIGATION TIMELINE Some of the key events in the special counsel’s investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election, and the people and entities charged as a result:

NAME

2014 2015 Since 2014: Russia embarks on an effort to sow discord in the U.S. by trumpeting extreme positions on divisive political issues. A Russian “troll farm” known as the Internet Research Agency creates fake social media accounts to flood Americans with disinformation.

June 16, 2015: Donald Trump announces presidential bid.

March - May 2016: Russian hackers successfully compromise the Gmail account of Clinton campaign chair John Podesta and target more than 300 accounts at the Clinton campaign, DNC and Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), stealing documents.

September-October: Trump lawyer Michael Cohen begins to explore a Trump-branded hotel project in Moscow, which he would pursue well into 2016.

September: FBI first tells Democratic National Committee (DNC) its computers have been compromised by Russian hackers; DNC techs find no evidence of intrusion.

2016

March: Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos begins attempts to set up a meeting between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin. The campaign also hires Paul Manafort, who has lobbied for pro-Russian interests.

June 12: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange announces plan to release emails related to Hillary Clinton that he has obtained, reportedly from Russian hackers.

June 9: Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner, Manafort and others meet at Trump Tower with a Russian lawyer in hopes of getting damaging information on Clinton.

July 22: WikiLeaks releases 20,000 hacked DNC emails. July 30: FBI opens an investigation into Russian efforts to influence election.

December: Trump adviser Michael Flynn has contacts with a Russian diplomat over an upcoming U.N. resolution and sanctions imposed by the Obama administration. May 9: Trump fires FBI Director James Comey, who was investigating Flynn as part of the Russia meddling investigation.

Longtime Trump friend, adviser

Michael Cohen Former Trump attorney

Paul Manafort Former Trump campaign chair

STATUS

Lying to Congress, witness tampering, obstruction

Pleaded not guilty in federal court Jan. 29

Tax evasion, bank fraud, campaign finance violations, lying to Congress

Pleaded guilty Aug. 21 and Nov. 29, 2018; sentenced to 3 years in prison

Tax and bank fraud charges; conspiracy and witness tampering charges

Convicted Aug. 21, 2018 on 8 counts; pleaded guilty to others; sentenced to 7½ years

Lying to FBI George Papadopoulos Former Trump campaign aide

Michael Flynn

Lying to FBI

2017

July 18-21: Trump is officially nominated at the Republican convention. During the convention, the GOP platform is changed to soften support for Ukraine in its conflict with Russia. Also, Trump surrogate Jeff Sessions speaks with Russia’s U.S. ambassador at an event. Jan. 6, 2017: The NSA, CIA and FBI release their conclusion that Russia interfered in U.S. election. Feb. 13: Flynn resigns as national security adviser; White House says he made misleading statements about contacts with Russians. May 17: Robert Mueller takes over investigation.

Pleaded guilty Oct. 5, 2017; served 14 days in prison Pleaded guilty Dec. 1, 2017

Former national security adviser

Rick Gates Former Trump campaign aide

Alex van der Zwaan

Conspiracy against Pleaded guilty the U.S., lying to FBI Feb. 23, 2018 and special counsel’s office Lying to FBI

Pleaded guilty Feb. 20, 2018; sentenced to 30 days in prison

Identity fraud

Pleaded guilty Feb. 12, 2018; sentenced to six months in prison

Attorney

Sept. 1: Justice Dept. begins inquiry into Manafort’s foreign lobbying work. October: WikiLeaks releases hacked emails from John Podesta’s account at a time when WikiLeaks and Donald Trump Jr. are in communication with each other.

Roger Stone

CHARGES

Richard Pinedo Data broker

Konstantin Kilimnik Associate of Paul Manafort

Obstruction of justice, conspiracy to obstruct justice

12 intelligence agents for Russia’s GRU

Conspiracy to commit computer crimes, identity theft, money laundering

13 Russians and three affiliated companies

Conspiracy to defraud the U.S., conspiracy to commit wire/ bank fraud, identity theft

These individuals and entities reside outside the United States, presenting challenges to prosecuting their cases. One indicted company is fighting the charges.

SOURCES: AP reports; Court filings

President faces variety of legal issues TRUMP • FROM A1

answer questions under oath later this year about his treatment of women. Here’s a look at some of the legal issues still facing Trump .

CAMPAIGN HUSH MONEY PAYMENTS Trump’s former personal attorney Michael Cohen pleaded guilty in August to breaking campaign finance law by arranging pre-election payments to two women who said they had extramarital affairs with Trump. Cohen told a federal judge that his actions were intended to silence the women to help Trump win the election. Cohen said he had been directed by Trump. The status of the investigation is a bit murky. Cohen will next month begin serving a three-year prison term for his involvement in the scheme as well as various financial crimes and for lying to Congress about efforts to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. When Cohen was sentenced, prosecutors announced they had reached a settlement with American Media Inc., the company that publishes the National Enquirer, for its role in paying off one of the two women — a possible sign the investigation into the payments had been concluded. But Cohen told Congress recently that a number of other Trump Organization officials were aware of the hush-money arrangement, including longtime chief financial officer Allen Weisselberg. Weisselberg, who was granted immunity by federal prosecutors to provide information in the Cohen case, has not commented. Cohen, in his public testimony, also fueled additional speculation when he said he was aware of other potentially illegal behavior by Trump that he could not discuss because he believed it remained the subject of ongoing investigation by New York prosecutors. DEFAMATION LAWSUIT Summer Zervos, a former “Apprentice” contestant, was one of about a dozen women who accused Trump of sexual misconduct before the 2016 election. She filed suit against Trump in New York in 2017, arguing that Trump defamed her when he called his accusers “liars.” A New York appellate court earlier this month denied a request by Trump to dismiss the suit. Trump’s lawyers have said they plan to appeal, but if the ruling stands, it means Trump would likely have to sit for a deposition in the matter in coming months. He would face questions about Zervos’ allegations — she has said that Trump groped her and kissed her without consent during a 2007 encounter in a Los Angeles hotel room that she had believed was supposed to be a business meeting. Her lawyers would probably seek to ask the president questions about his treatment of other women. Trump could face serious consequences if he were to lie in the deposition. The im-

peachment of President Bill Clinton began after he was accused of lying in a deposition in a civil sexual harassment suit filed by Paula Jones.

EMOLUMENTS Trump is facing two federal lawsuits alleging that he has violated the Constitution because his private company continues to do business with foreign governments. Trump’s D.C. hotel, down the street from the White House, has already hosted parties put on by the Kuwaiti, Azerbaijani and Philippine embassies, and it rented more than 500 rooms to lobbyists for the Saudi government starting just after the 2016 election. Trump’s hotel in Chicago has also hosted a national day celebration by the Romanian consulate. The Trump Organization has said it made $191,000 in profit from foreign governments last year and donated that amount to the U.S. Treasury. But it has not specified who its foreign customers are and how much they paid in total. The Constitution prohibits presidents from taking “emoluments” from foreign states, or the government of individual U.S. states. One of the lawsuits was filed by the attorneys general from Maryland and the District of Columbia. A lower-court judge said that the attorneys general could ask the Trump International Hotel in Washington for information on its foreign clients — but that “discovery” process has been halted while a higher court considers Trump’s appeal. Another lawsuit, filed by congressional Democrats, is also proceeding — but is at an earlier stage of the legal process. If either succeeds, the plaintiffs could bring to light the Trump Organization’s list of foreign-government customers. TRUMP INAUGURATION Federal prosecutors in Manhattan sent a subpoena in February to the presidential inaugural committee, the entity that organized Trump’s $107 million festivities when he took office in January 2017. The request sought a broad range of records covering nearly every aspect of the committee’s activities, including records related to one specific donor, a California-based venture capital firm run by a major Democratic donor who switched sides after Trump’s victory and gave $900,000 to the Trump inaugural. That man, Imaad Zuberi, has denied any wrongdoing. In addition, the committee has also received subpoenas from state attorneys general offices in New Jersey and D.C., which are each investigating whether the not-for-profit committee’s spending fulfilled its charitable aims. NEW YORK STATE INVESTIGATIONS Trump and his company are facing a battery of investigations from state authorities in New York, where the

Trump Organization is headquartered. New York Attorney General Letitia James is suing Trump in state court because of what the state called “persistently illegal conduct” at Trump’s 30-year-old charity, the Donald J. Trump Foundation. The suit says that Trump used the charity’s money to buy paintings of himself, to pay off legal settlements for his for-profit businesses, and to give his own presidential campaign a boost during the 2016 Republican primaries. In that case, Trump has agreed to shutter the foundation, but the case is still pending. The attorney general is seeking millions in penalties and restitutions, and seeking to ban Trump from serving on the board of any New York charity for 10 years. In addition, Trump’s company appears to be the focus of two new state inquiries that followed the congressional testimony by Cohen. Cohen told a House committee in February that Trump had submitted inflated summaries of his assets to both insurers and would-be lenders, seeking to mislead them about the state of his net worth. After that, state authorities sent subpoenas to Deutsche Bank and another bank that loaned money to Trump, and to Aon, Trump’s longtime insurance broker.

USE OF IMMIGRANT LABOR State investigators in both New York and New Jersey have spoken to an attorney for undocumented immigrants who worked for years at Trump’s golf clubs, according to the attorney. In January, the company fired at least 18 workers — many of them longtime employees — after an audit found that their immigration documents were fraudulent. Neither the New York nor the New Jersey attorney general has commented on these cases or confirm that they had opened a formal investigation.

STONE CRIMINAL TRIAL Trump’s former political strategist Roger Stone is set to go to trial in November, accused of lying to Congress about his efforts to find out what material WikiLeaks held before the 2016 election. The anti-secrecy site upended the campaign in by publishing emails from the Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton campaign chairman, John Podesta, that prosecutors have said were stolen by Russian operatives. Stone was charged jointly by Mueller’s office and prosecutors in Washington. The special counsel has made no announcements about how his case will be handled now that his investigation has concluded, but the D.C. U.S. attorney’s office is expected to take the lead.A trial would showcase evidence of the Trump campaign’s eagerness to leverage WikiLeaks’ stolen documents for political benefit.


NATION

03.24.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A5

States ponder meds to ease withdrawal in lockups New York is latest to consider treatments such as methadone for all addicted inmates BY DAVID KLEPPER associated Press

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. • Laura Levine

says she never smoked a cigarette or touched a drink until age 35. Then she tried heroin, and she was hooked. After some brushes with the law — petty larceny to support her habit — Levine, a mother of five, was booked into the Nassau County jail, and withdrawal started kicking in. As the nausea, shaking and sweating grew worse, she began pleading with guards for help. “They kind of laughed and said, ‘You’ll be fine. Nobody dies from heroin withdrawal,’” said Levine, who is in recovery and now works to help others struggling with opioids. “I would rather give birth to all five of my children again without medication than go through withdrawal again.” More help for people like Levine could be on the way, as lawmakers in New York are considering a measure to make medicationassisted treatment such as methadone or Suboxone available to all prison and jail inmates struggling with opioid addiction. States across the country are considering similar approaches amid research that shows that the drugs, along with behavior therapy, can help people with addiction reduce the withdrawal symptoms and cravings that drive many to relapse. Federal statistics suggest more than half of all inmates in state prisons nationwide have a substance-use problem. New York officials say that percentage could be as high as 80 percent in state and local lockups, which at any given time have about 77,000 inmates. Drug policy experts point to the success of a similar program in Rhode Island, which has seen a sharp drop in the number of former inmates who died of overdoses, to nine last year from 26 in 2016. Other successes have been reported in jails in Louisville, Ky.; Sacramento, Calif.; and Massachusetts. “It makes no sense that people who have a public health issue don’t have access to medicine,” said Jasmine Budnella, drug policy coordinator at VOCAL-NY, a group that advocates on behalf of low-in-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Laura Levine meets on March 15 with patients at Vocal NY, an organization in the Brooklyn borough of New York that works with addicts. She is the group’s health educator and coordinator for the opioid reversal drug Narcan. New York is considering providing medicationassisted treatment to all prison and jail inmates struggling with opioid addiction.

come New Yorkers on such issues as criminal justice, drug policy and homelessness. “In the U.S., we talk about human rights, but we are literally torturing these people.” Two years ago, Matt Herring, 24, died of a drug overdose after years of struggling with addiction and bouncing in and out of correctional facilities. His mother, Patricia Herring, said Matt once tried to smuggle Suboxone into jail in order to avoid the horrors of withdrawal. Guards found the medication and took it away. Patricia Herring has now become a selfdescribed “mom on a mission” to push for greater resources for addiction treatment in correctional facilities. “If he had been given medication-assisted treatment when he entered, I don’t know, maybe things would have been dif-

Medicines to counter addiction to opioids are vastly underused BY MATTHEW PERRONE associated Press

WASHINGTON • Medicines proven to treat opioid addiction remain vastly underused in the U.S., the nation’s top medical advisers said Wednesday. Only a fraction of the estimated 2 million people addicted to opioids are getting the medications, according to a report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The influential group, which advises the federal government, called for increased prescribing of the drugs and other changes to reduce barriers to their use. Government-approved medications, which include methadone, buprenorphine and naltrexone, help control cravings and withdrawal symptoms like nausea, muscle aches and pain. The report concludes that patients taking the medicines fare better over the long term and are 50 percent less likely to die than if they weren’t on them. An “all hands on deck” response is needed — including doctors, law enforcement and family members — to expand access to treatment, it said. The 14-member panel, which included addiction and rehabilitation specialists, summed up several reasons behind the low use:

STIGMA Stigma and misunderstanding about the nature of addiction remains one of the biggest barriers to treatment in part be-

cause two of the medications used to treat opioid addiction — methadone and buprenorphine — are themselves opioids. The panel said this contributes to the mistaken belief that it’s “just substituting one drug for another.” Experts said the medications are given at doses big enough to fend off withdrawal, but too small to produce a euphoric high. Patients can drive, rebuild relationships and get back to work.

RULES The medicines are subject to restrictions that limit their use. For example, methadone can only be given at governmentregulated clinics, which can require patients to commute. Buprenorphine can only be prescribed by certified health professionals who must complete eight hours of training. Federal rules also cap the number of patients that these physicians can treat to 275. The authors also note that medications are often not available to prison inmates. The report concludes there’s no scientific basis for such limitations. LACK OF TRAINING Addiction treatment has long been separate from mainstream medical training, the report notes, which means many doctors, nurses and social workers don’t receive training on treating drug addiction. The report calls for combining addiction programs into standard medical education.

Living with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) or caring for someone who is?

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Location:

Date:

Balaban's

Saturday, April 6, 2019

1772 Clarkson Road

Check in:

Chesterfield, MO 63017

10:00 AM to 10:15 AM

Varadhachary,MD. M Peer Speaker: Tristan C. -Patient HCP Speaker: Arun Varadhachary, Food/Parking: Complimentary breakfast will be provided. Self Parking is available.

Register today at LivingWithSMA.IHJ or call 1-888-615-4343. Please keep in mind that your healthcare provider (HCP) is always your primary resource when it comes to your spinal muscular atrophy. ©2018 Biogen. All rights reserved. 0R/18 SMA-US-0370 SU 225 Binney Street, Cambridge, MA 02142 • 1-800-456-2255

ferent,” she said. With no organized opposition, the debate over supporting medication-assisted treatment in correctional settings comes down to dollars and cents. Some counties have paid for programs in their jails; others have not. A total of six state and local lockups in the New York City area, for example, have limited drug-assistance programs for people addicted to opioids. Albany County became the first county in the state outside of New York City to offer medication-assisted treatment. Sheriff Craig Apple said he had become a believer. “It took me a while to get on board with this, but we’re already seeing early success,” he said. A state budget proposal from Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, would spend

$3.75 million to expand access in county jails and use more than $1 million to expand its use in state prisons. Democratic leaders of the state Legislature have called for more, and advocates say they want to see at least $7 million in the annual budget. A spokesman for Cuomo’s budget office defended the governor’s proposed funding amount, saying it was part of a broader, “holistic” approach to fighting opioid addiction. “The medication-assisted treatment program is just one prong of New York State’s $200 million, nation-leading fight against opioid addiction that is implementing effective solutions to save lives,” spokesman Freeman Klopott said. A decision is expected by April 1.

Fentanyl-linked deaths are opioid epidemic’s third wave, experts say BY MARTHA BEBINGER WBuR

BOSTON • Men are dying after opioid

overdoses at nearly three times the rate of women in the United States. Overdose deaths are increasing faster among black and Latino Americans than among whites. And there’s an especially steep rise in the number of young adults ages 25 to 34 whose death certificates include some version of the drug fentanyl. These findings, published Thursday in a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, highlight the start of the third wave of the nation’s opioid epidemic. The first was prescription pain medications, such as OxyContin; then heroin, which replaced pills when they became too expensive; and now fentanyl. Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid that can shut down breathing in less than a minute, and its popularity in the U.S. began to surge at the end of 2013. For each of the next three years, fatal overdoses involving fentanyl doubled, “rising at an exponential rate,” said Merianne Rose Spencer, a statistician at the CDC and one of the study’s authors. Spencer’s research shows a 113 percent average annual increase from 2013 to 2016 (when adjusted for age). That total was first reported in late 2018, but Spencer looked deeper with this report into the demographic characteristics of those people dying from fentanyl overdoses. Increased trafficking of the drug and increased use are both fueling the spike in fentanyl deaths. For drug dealers, fentanyl is easier to produce than some other opioids. Unlike the poppies needed for heroin, which can be spoiled by weather or a bad harvest, fentanyl’s ingredients are easily supplied; it’s a synthetic combination of chemicals, often produced in China and packaged in Mexico, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. And because fentanyl can be 50 times more powerful than heroin, smaller amounts translate to bigger profits. Jon DeLena, assistant special agent in charge of the DEA’s New England Field Division, said 1 kilogram of fentanyl, driven across the southern U.S. border, could be mixed with fillers or other drugs to create 6 or 8 kilograms for sale. “I mean, imagine that business model,” DeLena said. “If you went to any small-business owner and said, ‘Hey, I have a way to make your product eight times the product that you have now,’ there’s a tremendous windfall in there.” For drug users, fentanyl is more likely to cause an overdose than heroin because it is so potent and because the high fades more quickly than with heroin. Drug users say they inject more frequently with fentanyl because the high doesn’t last as long — and more frequent injecting adds to the risk of overdose. There are several ways fentanyl can wind up in a dose of some other drug. The mixing may be intentional, as a per-

son seeks a more intense or different kind of high. It may happen as an accidental contamination, as dealers package their fentanyl and other drugs in the same place. Or dealers may be adding fentanyl to cocaine and meth on purpose, in an effort to expand their clientele of users hooked on fentanyl. “That’s something we have to consider,” said David Kelley, referring to the intentional addition of fentanyl to cocaine, heroin or other drugs by dealers. Kelley is deputy director of the New England High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area. “The fact that we’ve had instances where it’s been present with different drugs leads one to believe that could be a possibility.” The picture gets more complicated, Kelley said, as dealers develop new forms of fentanyl that are even more deadly. The new CDC report shows dozens of varieties of the drug now on the streets. The highest rates of fentanyl-involved overdose deaths were found in New England, according to the study, followed by states in the Mid-Atlantic and Upper Midwest. Fentanyl deaths had barely increased in the West — including in Hawaii and Alaska — as of the end of 2016. Researchers have no firm explanations for these geographic differences, but some experts watching the trends have theories. One is that it’s easier to mix a few white fentanyl crystals into the powdered form of heroin that is more common in Eastern states than into the black-tar heroin that is sold more routinely in the West. Another hypothesis holds that drug cartels used New England as a test market for fentanyl because the region has a strong, long-standing market for opioids. Spencer, the study’s main author, hopes that some of the other characteristics of the wave of fentanyl highlighted in this report will help shape the public response. Why, for example, did the influx of fentanyl increase the overdose death rate among men to nearly three times the rate of overdose deaths among women? Some research points to one factor: Men are more likely to use drugs alone. In the era of fentanyl, that increases a man’s chances of an overdose and death, said Ricky Bluthenthal, a professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine. “You have stigma around your drug use, so you hide it,” Bluthenthal said. “You use by yourself in an unsupervised setting. (If) there’s fentanyl in it, then you die.” Traci Green, deputy director of Boston Medical Center’s Injury Prevention Center, offers some other reasons. Women are more likely to buy and use drugs with a partner, Green said. And women are more likely to call for help — including 911 — and to seek help, including treatment.


NATION

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A5

Midwest may suffer second surge of flooding Water starts to recede in hard-hit places along Missouri River, but experts warn that plenty of snow farther north has yet to melt BY JIM SALTER associated Press

Even as floodwaters receded in hard-hit places in in the Midwest, experts warned Saturday that with plenty of snow still left to melt in northern states, the relief may only be temporary. Rainfall and some snowmelt spurred flooding in recent weeks that’s blamed in three deaths so far, with two men in Nebraska missing for more than a week. Thousands were forced from their homes in Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri, as water broke through or poured over levees in the region. The damage is estimated at $3 billion, and that figure is expected to rise. As temperatures start to warm, snowmelt in the Dakotas and Minnesota will escalate, sending more water down the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and their tributaries. Lt. Col. James Startzell, deputy commander of the Corps of Engineers’ Omaha, Nebraska, district, said even warmer temperatures are possible into next week.

He urged people living near rivers to be watchful. Bill Brinton, emergency management director for hard-hit Buchanan County in Missouri, which includes St. Joseph’s 76,000 residents, said his counties and surrounding ones have already been ravaged by flooding. “There’s a sense from the National Weather Service that we should expect it to continue to happen into May,” Brinton said. “With our levee breaches in Atchison and Holt and Buchanan counties, it’s kind of scary really.” A precautionary evacuation involving hundreds of homes in the St. Joseph area was lifted as the Missouri River began a swift decline after unofficially rising to a new all-time high, inches above the 1993 record. St. Joseph was largely spared, but Brinton said 250 homes were flooded in the southern part of Buchanan County. It wasn’t clear when residents would be able to get back. When they do, officials say they need to be careful. Contaminants that escaped from flooded farm fields, industrial operations

and sewage plants are part of the murky water now saturating homes. In Fremont County, Iowa, homes remain underwater, so it will be some time before residents can return, said county Supervisor Randy Hickey. “We don’t want them in that water, anyway,” Hickey said. Experts also warn that sharp objects — broken glass, pieces of metal, sticks and rocks — could lurk in muddy debris. Downed or broken power lines also may pose electrocution hazards. On Saturday, Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said President Donald Trump granted her request for an expedited disaster declaration for 56 counties with flooding damage. The move makes assistance available to homeowners, renters, businesses, public entities and some nonprofit organizations. The Missouri River had yet to crest further downstream in Missouri, but the flooding impact in those areas was expected to be far less severe.

ASHLAND COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE VIA AP

Sheriff’s deputies Dylan Wegner (left) and Zach Pierce hold up two bear cubs they rescued from a flooded culvert on the Bad River Indian Reservation near Ashland, Wis. The deputies said they decided to risk angering the mother because the cubs were soaked and cold and crying out. They put the baby bears in their squad car to warm up, and they were eventually placed in an open area for their mother to retrieve0.

Protesters rally in Pittsburgh after officer is cleared in fatal shooting

Majority of Americans favor stricter gun laws, poll indicates

BY MARK SCOLFORO associated Press

BY LISA MARIE PANE AND EMILY SWANSON associated Press

PITTSBURGH • The father of a slain

black teenager pleaded for peace Saturday after the acquittal of a white police officer triggered an apparent retaliatory shooting at the defense attorney’s office and touched off protests in the streets of Pittsburgh. Police put officers on 12-hour shifts until further notice. The verdict late Friday in the deadly shooting of 17-year-old Antwon Rose II angered his family and civic leaders and prompted hundreds of people to gather Saturday afternoon at an intersection called Freedom Corner in the Hill District neighborhood, the historic center of black cultural life in Pittsburgh. One man held a sign with the names of black men killed by police around the U.S. “It’s very painful to see what happened, to sit there and deal with it,” Rose’s father, Antwon Rose Sr., told the crowd. “I just don’t want it to happen to our city no more.” Afterward, he told reporters: “I want peace, period, all the way around. ... Just because there was violence doesn’t mean that we counter that with violence.” The mostly white crowd then marched through downtown Pittsburgh and other city neighborhoods, periodically blocking streets as they chanted, “Who did this? Police did this!” The protest soon moved onto the University of Pittsburgh campus. Police reported no immediate arrests or injuries. Early Saturday, five to eight shots were fired into the building where the officer’s attorney, Patrick Thomassey, works, police in nearby Monroeville said. No one was hurt. Police said they had been staking out the place as a precaution, and the gunfire erupted after they left to answer another call about midnight. Former East Pittsburgh police Officer Michael Rosfeld was charged with homicide for shooting Rose as the unarmed teenager ran away from a traffic stop in June. Rosfeld testified that he thought Rose or another suspect had a gun pointed at him and that he fired to protect himself and the community. “I hope that man never sleeps at night,” Rose’s mother, Michelle Kenney, said of Rosfeld after the verdict, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “I hope he gets as much sleep as I do, which is none.” Rose’s family is now pressing ahead with a federal civil rights lawsuit filed

ASSOCIATED PRESS

A protester makes statements with a fist and a sign as a group gathers Saturday near the University of Pittsburgh seeking justice for shooting victim Antwon Rose II.

against Rosfeld and East Pittsburgh, a small municipality about 10 miles from downtown Pittsburgh, where the trial was held. Thomassey told reporters after the verdict that Rosfeld was “a good man, he is.” The defense attorney said he hopes the city remains calm and “everybody takes a deep breath and gets on with their lives.” The leaders of two major Pittsburgh charities issued a statement expressing “shock and outrage” over the verdict. “Pittsburgh now sadly joins a disturbing and ever-growing catalogue of cases across the United States where law enforcement or security officials have walked free after the killings of young black men under questionable circumstances,” wrote Maxwell King, president and CEO of the Pittsburgh Foundation, and Grant Oliphant, president of the Heinz Endowments. “We have asked the question, ‘Would Antwon Rose be alive today if he had been white?’ We, his family and African American community leaders believe that more than likely he would be.” Pittsburgh was in the spotlight less than five months ago, when a gunman ranting about Jews killed 11 people at a synagogue.

Living with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) or caring for someone who is?

Hear from an expert and meet others living with SMA.

Register for an educational event about spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), where you’ll gain information and interact with caregivers and others living with SMA. It’s a free event sponsored by Biogen, a leader in neurology research.

Location:

Date:

Balaban's

Saturday, April 6, 2019

1772 Clarkson Road

Check in:

Chesterfield, MO 63017

10:00 AM to 10:15 AM

Varadhachary,MD. M Peer Speaker: Tristan C. -Patient HCP Speaker: Arun Varadhachary, Food/Parking: Complimentary breakfast will be provided. Self Parking is available.

Register today at LivingWithSMA.IHJ or call 1-888-615-4343. Please keep in mind that your healthcare provider (HCP) is always your primary resource when it comes to your spinal muscular atrophy. ©2018 Biogen. All rights reserved. 0R/18 SMA-US-0370 SU 225 Binney Street, Cambridge, MA 02142 • 1-800-456-2255

WASHINGTON • A majority of Americans favor stricter gun laws, and most believe places of worship and schools have become less safe over the last two decades, according to a new poll conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The survey was conducted both before and after this month’s mass shooting at two mosques in New Zealand. It found that 67 percent of Americans support making US gun laws stricter, while 22 percent say they should be left as they are and 10 percent think they should be made less strict. The New Zealand shooting on March 15 did not appear to have an impact on Americans’ support for new gun laws; support for tighter gun laws was the same before and after the shooting. While a majority of Americans have consistently said they support stronger gun laws, proposals have stalled repeatedly in Congress in recent years, a marked contrast to New Zealand and some other countries, such as Australia, that have acted swiftly after a mass shooting. Less than a week after the mosque shootings, New Zealand moved to ban “military-style” semi-automatic weapons and high-capacity magazines; similarly, after a mass shooting in 1996, Australia enacted sweeping gun bans within two weeks. The new poll suggests many Americans would support similar measures, but there’s a wide gulf between Democrats and Republicans on banning specific types of guns. Overall, 6 in 10 Americans support a ban on AR-15 rifles and similar semiautomatic weapons. Roughly 8 in 10 Democrats, but just about 4 in 10 Republicans, support that policy. Republicans are also far less likely than

Democrats to think that making it harder to buy a gun would prevent mass shootings, 36 percent to 81 percent. Overall, 58 percent of Americans think it would. Still, some gun restrictions get wide support across party lines. Wide shares of both Democrats and Republicans support a universal background check requirement, along with allowing courts to prevent some people from buying guns if they are considered dangerous to themselves or others, even if they have not committed crimes. Overall support for stricter gun laws is unchanged since an AP-NORC poll conducted one year ago, a month after the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., that left 17 people dead. The post-Parkland poll marked an increase in support for stricter gun laws, from 61 percent in October 2017. But the strength of that support appears to have ebbed. The percentage who say gun laws should be made much stricter, rather than just somewhat stricter, drifted down slightly after reaching a peak in the post-Parkland poll, from 45 percent then to 39 percent now. A large share of Americans say safety in churches, synagogues, mosques and other places of worship has worsened over the past two decades. Sixty-one percent say religious houses have grown less safe over the last two decades. Slightly more said so after the New Zealand shooting than before, 64 percent to 57 percent. Nearly 7 in 10 believe elementary and high schools have become less safe than they used to be. And 57 percent say the same about colleges and universities. The AP-NORC poll of 1,063 adults was conducted Mar. 14-18 using a sample drawn from NORC’s probabilitybased AmeriSpeak Panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 4.1 percentage points.

Politics is called motive behind water tossed in lawmaker’s face BY KATIE METTLER Washington Post

While eating lunch at the Mineral City Mill and Grill in Fort Dodge, Iowa, on Friday, Rep. Steve King — the Iowa Republican who has made a series of statements embracing white nationalism — got a face-full of water from another restaurant patron, authorities said. Blake Gibbins, 26, of Lafayette, Colo., was in Fort Dodge visiting family, according to a news release from the local police. Gibbins approached the table where King and others were eating and asked the congressman if he was the Steve King. When King said, “Yes,” Gibbins threw a glass of water on the representative, Fort Dodge police said. The act was politically motivated, authorities said, but did not elaborate. King and another man who was hit with the water, Burlyn Pecoy of Fort Dodge, were not injured. Gibbins was arrested after the 12:30 p.m. incident and charged with two counts of simple assault and one count of disorderly conduct, all misdemeanors, police said. Gibbins did not immediately return a request for comment. Neither did King’s office. King was sharply criticized the day before the incident, after he compared Iowans’ response to historic flooding to that of the victims of Hurricane Katrina. “We go to a place like New Orleans, and everybody’s looking around saying, ‘Who’s going to help me? Who’s going to help me?’” King said during a town hall Thursday in Iowa, observations he

Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa

claimed workers from the Federal Emergency Management Agency told him about relief efforts after Hurricane Katrina struck the city in 2005, resulting in at least 1,800 deaths. But when Iowans were recently confronted with historic flooding, King said they did not rely on government handouts as Katrina victims did — a comment that some say played into racist tropes about black Americans. “We go to a place like Iowa, and we go see, knock on the door at, say, I make up a name, John’s place, and say, ‘John, you got water in your basement, we can write you a check, we can help you,’ “ King said. “And John will say, ‘Well, wait a minute, let me get my boots. It’s Joe that needs help. Let’s go down to his place and help him.’ “ King was one of 11 members of Congress to oppose a bill providing federal aid to Katrina victims in 2005. In January, King was removed from his House committee assignments after he questioned in an interview with the New York Times why white supremacist terminology was “offensive.”


LOCAL

A6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

IAN FROEB’S

Carpenters union donates $125,000 to merger effort

STL 100 Critic Ian Froeb has revealed his picks for the 100 best restaurants in town for 2019. Sort by location, cuisine or price. stltoday.com/stl100

BY KURT ERICKSON • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

JEFFERSON CITY • The group campaigning to merge St. Louis and St. Louis County received its first big money contribution Thursday from a labor union representing carpenters in three Midwestern states. The Carpenters Help in the Political Process, or CHIPP, political account gave Better Together a $125,000 check a month after union brass from chapters in Missouri, Kansas and Southern Illinois unanimously voted to support the merger push. Unite STL was formed in January to accept contributions to help finance the plan to gather more than 160,000 signatures and place on the November 2020 statewide ballot a measure to merge the city and the county. “We are thrilled to have the financial support of the Carpenters union. With over 20,000 members statewide, they play a key role In our effort,” Unite STL spokesman Ed Rhode said. If approved, the merger would combine under one metro city the police departments, court systems, roadways, regional planning and zoning, and economic development arms of the city, county and the 88 county municipalities. County municipalities would become new political subdivisions, called “municipal districts,” with power over some services, such as parks and trash collection, but with otherwise severely restricted authority. Al Bond, the executive secretary-treasurer of the St. Louis-Kansas City Carpenters Regional Council, said a merger would stop communities from competing against each other, reduce government duplication and lead to growth in the region. “For too long, the St. Louis region has been fractured. Consolidating the City of St. Louis and St. Louis County will finally unify our economic development efforts into the collaborative, regional strategies that will again bring growth to St. Louis. Overnight, St. Louis would become the ninth-largest city in the United States,” Bond said. The union support for the merger comes as local officials have voiced strong opposition to the idea. Municipal leaders gathered this week in Des Peres to air their concerns about the effect of a merger on their constituents. Unions have been a potent force behind the passage of high-profile ballot issues in recent years. In 2018, labor groups were successful in persuading Missouri voters to dump a so-called “right to work” law approved by the Republican-led Legislature. Labor also backed a referendum to raise the minimum wage. The CHIPP account had more than $750,000 as of its January filing with the Missouri Ethics Commission. Kurt Erickson • 573-556-6181 @KurtEricksonPD on Twitter kerickson@post-dispatch.com

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FROM A1

03.24.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

Lagging revenue collections compound lawmakers’ concerns LEGISLATURE • FROM A1

Pro Tem Dave Schatz said negotiations were underway. “We believe we’re close to getting some compromise on those issues,” said Schatz, R-Sullivan. Parson, a former legislator, said he was working to keep his plan intact. “No matter what corner of the state we visit, individuals and businesses share the same concerns about the future of our workforce,” Parson said. “Businesses cannot find the workers that they need to help their businesses grow. At the same time, we have folks who need good paying jobs, but they don’t have the right skills.” The debates come against the backdrop of lagging revenue collections by the state. As of Wednesday, revenue collections compared with the same point last year were down $358.7 million, or 5.6 percent. The budget this fiscal year is based on the assumption that revenue will grow at 1.7 percent over last year’s levels. Because of the lagging collections, Parson could withhold money from this year’s budget. And, budget negotiators could be forced to rethink the entire $30 billion spending blueprint for next fiscal year, which starts July 1. That budget assumes 2 percent growth over this fiscal year. “That’s something we’re monitoring,” said House Speaker Elijah Haahr, R-Springfield, when asked before spring break whether he was confident the state would meet its financial goals. “We’ll continue to monitor that over spring break.” Rep. Kip Kendrick of Columbia, the ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee, sounded the alarm at a news conference following Haahr’s. “No,” he said when asked if he was confident the state

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (center), seen here in January with House Speaker Elijah Haahr (left) and Lt. Gov. Mike Kehoe, will join legislators Monday in tackling issues including abortion, campus sexual assault, Medicaid and charter schools.

would meet its targets. “I’m becoming less optimistic that we hit that 1.7” percent growth.

WHO GETS MEDICAID? Democrats and Republicans have criticized the way Parson’s administration has handled the implementation of President Donald Trump’s tax cuts, which will result in thousands of Missourians paying surprise tax bills because employers did not withhold enough from their

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paychecks, the result of an error by the Department of Revenue. The effects of a 2014 income tax cut also are coming into focus. The tax cuts are expected to cost the state $320 million in revenue next fiscal year. Republicans are hopeful the reduced tax bills will spur the economy and result in more revenue rolling in. Meantime, the Senate is expected to continue its efforts to reduce the number of people receiving state benefits. One proposal requires people to work in order to receive Medicaid. Sen. David Sater, R-Cassville, said requiring people to work, attend school or volunteer for 80 hours a month would break a cycle of dependency. “Medicaid was originally designed as a safety net for the truly vulnerable. Over time, the program grew to cover new groups, changing the original intent of the program,” Sater told senators in a debate last month. Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, blasted Sater. “Senator, you never cease to amaze. It seems to me you have a serious, serious problem with the poor,” Nasheed said. “All you seem to do is attack the most vulnerable in our communities.” Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, said the legislation would end up costing the state more than it saved because people who lost Medicaid coverage would seek health care at more expensive outlets, such as hospitals. The proposal is among a number of Republican attempts to reduce state spending on welfare programs, including one that would require people receiving food stamps to work. Sater said he was attempting to reduce the growth of the Medicaid program, which costs the state about $10 billion a year and accounts for about one-third of the state budget. The rising costs have sparked a planned overhaul of the program designed to save up to $1 billion annually. Of the more than 81,000 adults between the ages of 19 and 64 who receive Medicaid benefits, analysts say 6,580 will fall under the work requirement. Of those, the department estimates that 65 percent, or 4,277, will fail to comply, saving the state an estimated $2 million.

CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT Opposing factions also will be lining up to debate changes to how colleges and universities handle claims of sexual misconduct. As of last week, the dark-money group Kingdom Principles had hired nearly 30 lobbyists to advocate for the proposal, according to the Missouri Ethics Commission. “I’ve never seen this happen,” Kendrick said. “All of a sudden there are 20-plus lobbyists hired to silence victims of sexual assault?” Legislation pending in the House and the Senate would allow complainants and respondents to transfer their case from the university to the state Administrative Hearing Commission, an idea Kendrick railed against during the news conference. Colleges and universities, especially private schools, have said that because they are private, the state should not determine whom the college may enroll, similar to a business choosing whom to employ. Kendrick said business owners “should be concerned” that the Legislature would one day force businesses to allow cases of sexual misconduct to be heard before the Administrative Hearing Commission rather than internally. Dan Mehan, president of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry, said his group was monitoring the legislation but had not taken a position on it. Senate Majority Leader Caleb Rowden, a Republican who represents Columbia and the University of Missouri area, said he was keeping a careful eye on any changes to the Title IX process. “There’s no scenario in which we should swing the pendulum too far the other way. We’ve got to be hypersensitive to that,” Rowden said.


FROM A1

03.24.2019 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A7

Lagging revenue collections compound lawmakers’ concerns LEGISLATURE • FROM A1

Republicans who control the House have rejected the governor’s idea and instead want to tap into the state’s general checkbook for transportation funding, rather than take out a long-term loan. Parson’s fellow Republicans also have raised concerns about his plan to create a $22 million scholarship program aimed at getting adults into high-demand jobs. School choice advocates in the Senate, including Republican Sens. Bill Eigel of Weldon Spring and Andrew Koenig of Manchester, have used the scholarship program as a bargaining chip to push for an expansion of charter schools and a voucher-like program that would create education savings accounts to allow students to attend out-of-district schools. Although neither idea has moved forward in either chamber, Senate President Pro Tem Dave Schatz said negotiations were underway. “We believe we’re close to getting some compromise on those issues,” said Schatz, R-Sullivan. Parson, a former legislator, said he was working to keep his plan intact. “No matter what corner of the state we visit, individuals and businesses share the same concerns about the future of our workforce,” Parson said. “Businesses cannot find the workers that they need to help their businesses grow. At the same time, we have folks who need good paying jobs, but they don’t have the right skills.” The debates come against the backdrop of lagging revenue collections by the state. As of Wednesday, revenue collections compared with the same point last year were down $358.7 million, or 5.6 percent. The budget this fiscal year is based on the assumption

ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (center), seen here in January with House Speaker Elijah Haahr (left) and Lt. Gov. Mike Kehoe, will join legislators Monday in tackling issues including abortion, campus sexual assault, Medicaid and charter schools.

that revenue will grow at 1.7 percent over last year’s levels. Because of the lagging collections, Parson could withhold money from this year’s budget. And, budget negotiators could be forced to rethink the entire $30 billion spending blueprint for next fiscal year, which starts July 1. That budget assumes 2 percent growth over this fiscal year. “That’s something we’re monitoring,” said House Speaker Elijah Haahr, R-Springfield, when asked before spring break whether he was confident the state would meet its financial goals. “We’ll continue to monitor that over spring break.” Rep. Kip Kendrick of Columbia, the ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee, sounded the alarm at a news conference following Haahr’s. “No,” he said when asked if he was confident the state

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St. Louis Galleria outside Nordstrom & Breadco also featuring Children’s New Balance & Free Socks with Purchase

would meet its targets. “I’m becoming less optimistic that we hit that 1.7” percent growth.

WHO GETS MEDICAID? Democrats and Republicans have criticized the way Parson’s administration has handled the implementation of President Donald Trump’s tax cuts, which will result in thousands of Missourians paying surprise tax bills because employers did not withhold enough from their paychecks, the result of an error by the Department of Revenue. The effects of a 2014 income tax cut also are coming into focus. The tax cuts are expected to cost the state $320 million in revenue next fiscal year. Republicans are hopeful the reduced tax bills will spur the economy and result in more revenue rolling in. Meantime, the Senate is expected to continue its efforts to reduce the number of people receiving state benefits. One proposal requires people to work in order to receive Medicaid. Sen. David Sater, R-Cassville, said requiring people to work, attend school or volunteer for 80 hours a month would break a cycle of dependency. “Medicaid was originally designed as a safety net for the truly vulnerable. Over time, the program grew to cover new groups, changing the original intent of the program,” Sater told senators in a debate last month. Sen. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, blasted Sater. “Senator, you never cease to amaze. It seems to me you have a serious, serious problem with the poor,” Nasheed said. “All you seem to do is attack the most vulnerable in our communities.” Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Coeur, said the legislation would end up costing the state more than it saved because people who lost Medicaid coverage would seek health care at more expensive outlets, such as hospitals. The proposal is among a number of Republican attempts to reduce state spending on welfare programs, including one that would require people receiving food stamps to work. Sater said he was attempting to reduce the growth of the Medicaid program, which costs the state about $10 billion a year and accounts for about one-third of the state budget. The rising costs have sparked a planned overhaul of the program designed to save up to $1 billion annually. Of the more than 81,000 adults between the ages of 19 and 64 who receive Medicaid benefits, analysts say 6,580 will fall under the work requirement. Of those, the department estimates that 65 percent, or 4,277, will fail to comply, saving the state an estimated $2 million. CAMPUS SEXUAL ASSAULT Opposing factions also will be lining up to debate changes to how colleges and universities handle claims of sexual misconduct. As of last week, the dark-money group Kingdom Principles had hired nearly 30 lobbyists to advocate for the proposal, according to the Missouri Ethics Commission. “I’ve never seen this happen,” Kendrick said. “All of a sudden there are 20-plus lobbyists hired to silence victims of sexual assault?” Legislation pending in the House and the Senate would allow complainants and respondents to transfer their case from the university to the state Administrative Hearing Commission, an idea Kendrick railed against during the news conference. Colleges and universities, especially private schools, have said that because they are private, the state should not determine whom the college may enroll, similar to a business choosing whom to employ. Kendrick said business owners “should be concerned” that the Legislature would one day force businesses to allow cases of sexual misconduct to be heard before the Administrative Hearing Commission rather than internally. Dan Mehan, president of the Missouri Chamber of Commerce and Industry, said his group was monitoring the legislation but had not taken a position on it. Senate Majority Leader Caleb Rowden, a Republican who represents Columbia and the University of Missouri area, said he was keeping a careful eye on any changes to the Title IX process. “There’s no scenario in which we should swing the pendulum too far the other way. We’ve got to be hypersensitive to that,” Rowden said.


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 03.24.2019

TIPPING POINT

THE NORTHSIDE GAMBLE

PAUL McKEE REMAINS A PLAYER TIPPING POINT • FROM A1

Illinois scrappers cut a metal pipe from the remains of an unrecognizable four-family flat at 2629-31 Hebert Street on March 7. The property is owned by NorthSide Regeneration and sits in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood.

Paint peels from the wall of a house with a missing exterior wall at 2714 North Market Street in February. The crumbling home in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood is owned by NorthSide Regeneration.

ry

sbu

Sali

Palm

nt

ssa

STILL AROUND Paul McKee owns more than 1,600 properties around the planned NGA headquarters.

Parn ell

N. Gra nd

St. Lou is

Cass

N. Jefferson

70

Parcels owned by McKee SOURCE: City of St. Louis assessor’s office

NGA site

Dr. M

artin

Luthe r

King

cker

PruittIgoe site

N. Tu

‘GIANT VACUUM’ In 2009, when the city inked its development deal with McKee, no one else was proposing anything on that scale for north St. Louis. The city gave him a shot. The state gave him $43 million in tax credits through a special program his lawyers helped write. It’s hard to know how much NorthSide and the bank have invested in total. In a 2013 letter to state officials, McKee said he had advanced $20 million of his own funds into buying land for NorthSide and guaranteed another $45 million from lenders. Bank of Washington, in a letter to then-Mayor Francis Slay during the 2015 negotiations for the NGA land, said it and McKee had invested “well in excess of $50 million to establish site control” of the NorthSide area. Including debt on the property in the NGA area, an acre should sell for about $261,000, Eckelkamp wrote the city in 2015. There are other liens encumbering pieces of NorthSide’s land, too. In 2016, when McKee exercised his $1 million option to buy the 34-acre Pruitt-Igoe site from the city, two private companies — Jefferson & Cass Capital Investors LLC and Scarboro Services LLC — entered into financing arrangements with one of his companies. In real estate documents, Howard Smotkin, a lawyer with Stone, Leyton & Gershman, signed on behalf of Scarboro Services and Jefferson & Cass Capital Investors. The companies’ only addresses are a post office box and the firm’s office.

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Tim Farr gets ready in October to leave a homeless tent community inside an abandoned car and truck repair shop at 1514 North 13th Street and owned by NorthSide Regeneration. A fire last month gutted the interior of the building, and the city boarded it up. The building is next door to the old Sunshine Ministries.

lori N. F

development rights, accusing the city of not adhering to a subsequent agreement giving him more time to begin projects, is pending. Even if the city prevails in that lawsuit, NorthSide Regeneration, Bank of Washington and their team of lawyers from Stone, Leyton & Gershman will still hold considerable sway over the future of the neglected neighborhoods just north of downtown St. Louis. Except for the vacant Pruitt-Igoe site, which McKee owns, there are almost no large, contiguous parcels in the area surrounding the NGA. That means people who want to develop big projects near the NGA will almost certainly have to work with McKee and the bank. Meanwhile, most of the properties NorthSide owns continue to decay, dragging down the value and living conditions of the area even as the NGA holds the potential for a resurgence. Few of those structures are salvageable, a far cry from the 152 rehabs McKee promised in a 2013 plan submitted to the city. More than 200 of NorthSide’s properties have been condemned by the city; many, unsecured and abandoned, have simply crumbled. The historic Clemens House, which McKee once promised to renovate and turn into senior apartments, burned in the summer of 2017. McKee, in response, points to signs of new investment: the $19.6 million Zoom gas station and GreenLeaf Market grocery on North Tucker Boulevard, as well as a partnership with a builder constructing several energy-efficient houses in the St. Louis Place neighborhood. The gas station opened in October; the grocery opens next month. “I do think that NorthSide has already produced remarkable results ‘beyond GreenLeaf’ by bringing NGA to north St. Louis,” McKee said in a statement to the Post-Dispatch. “I can’t help but express some frustration that this extraordinary success seems to get lost in the discussion.” He said that the lawsuit limited what he could say but that he looked forward “to a future where the city’s litigation does not interfere with redevelopment of this long suffering area.” Bank of Washington CEO L.B. Eckelkamp Jr. said he’d “love to see the fences mended” between City Hall, his bank and NorthSide but maintained that the city improperly ended the development agreement. Going forward, he said, the bank is open to lending to other projects in the area depending on the proposal. “There’s nothing that prevents us from lending more.” There are few examples of large-scale investment in the city’s beleaguered north side, and McKee’s defenders say he’s been unfairly attacked for being the outlier who has actually tried to tackle such a difficult endeavor. But a top St. Louis development official said that as new information came out in a 2018 eminent domain trial that gave city attorneys access to some of NorthSide’s private records, it became clear that the developer did not have the money to make his dream a reality. There had been signs for years: Requests for more development incentives. A lender pulling out of the grocery store deal. A stalled logistics park in Hazelwood. A failed bank that lent to McKee. No progress on a housing development despite interest from a national developer and a union investment fund. “What we want to see is, and be able to talk to, are developers who can actually get the work done,” Otis Williams, director of the St. Louis Development Corp., said in an interview last month. “We realized there just wasn’t the amount of wherewithal — I call it wherewithal — financial capability there for the development to move ahead.”

1 000 FEET

Smotkin said the firm’s lawyers were not investors in the project but were not authorized to comment about the limited liability companies involved in the transaction. With debt piled onto the land and Bank of Washington looking to be repaid, the immense power the city granted to McKee by selling him more than 100 acres from its land bank in 2012 can’t just be taken away by canceling development rights. Williams said “it’s a work in progress” to make sure there was a way to assemble land and work with developers — including NorthSide — who had workable development proposals. “I think our lesson is that carving out and putting that much territory into one development agreement is probably a mistake,” Williams said. “The tools that are used in large devel-

Post-Dispatch

opments are good, but we understand now, and what we will do in the future, is have smaller areas and work with developments that are smaller in size, particularly with just a private developer. Where there are institutions and secured financing already in place, we might look at something like that. But with just an ordinary private developer who has visions, I think we would look at a smaller area.” Because of an underfunded planning department, and a comprehensive plan for St. Louis only now being drafted, critics point to the chapter as the epitome of reacting to developer proposals. “This is what happens after years of no planning,” said Sarah Coffin, professor of urban planning and development at St. Louis University. “There’s this giant vacuum that is open to anyone to step into, especially when there are no

guidelines for development.” At the state level, the Missouri Department of Economic Development has expressed concern at how McKee used some of the $43 million in tax credits he received. The Missouri attorney general’s office has a pending lawsuit accusing NorthSide of tax credit fraud. “The purpose for this was to redevelop it, was to provide an opportunity for redevelopment to occur, and that’s where the public gains benefit,” Sallie Hemenway, a former DED official, testified at the eminent domain trial in May. “The public gains no benefit from an individual private person gaining access to their tax dollars that could otherwise go to other places to just simply put land in his or her own name.” Michael Allen, an architectural historian who first revealed more than 12 years ago that McKee was behind the mystery companies buying up property in north St. Louis, gave credit to Krewson’s administration for taking the first steps to unwind the development agreement. But there’s still a long way to go. “In some ways, it’s better now,” Allen said. “But find three blocks in a row there that he doesn’t own property on. ... The capacity for the market to absorb McKee’s land at the price he wants to sell it is low, I think.” McKee said NorthSide “has never been about land speculation, and still is not.” He is “just getting started,” and future projects will be “even more groundbreaking.” But he expects the city will oppose the jobs and investment he proposes, so he declined to provide details. “Neither (NorthSide) nor Bank of Washington is or will be satisfied to sit on their laurels in the hope that those who long ignored north St. Louis will now invest,” McKee said in written response to questions. “We intend to move our redevelopment forward.”

‘BILLING HIM DAILY’ While it awaits that promised redevelopment, the city has begun liberally using one of the only tools it has to prod landowners into putting their real estate into productive use. Since last year, the city has billed NorthSide $154,000, mostly for vacant building fees but also for several demolitions, according to information from the Building Commissioner’s office. Vacant property fees can be added to the real estate’s tax bill. There’s thousands more billed for code violations. “We’re billing him daily,” said Deborah Williams, a manager who handles See TIPPING POINT • Page A9


A8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUNDAY • 03.24.2019

TIPPING POINT

THE NORTHSIDE GAMBLE

PAUL McKEE REMAINS A PLAYER TIPPING POINT • FROM A1

Illinois scrappers cut a metal pipe from the remains of an unrecognizable four-family flat at 2629-31 Hebert Street on March 7. The property is owned by NorthSide Regeneration and sits in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood.

Paint peels from the wall of a house with a missing exterior wall at 2714 North Market Street in February. The crumbling home in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood is owned by NorthSide Regeneration.

ry

sbu

Sali

Palm

nt

ssa

STILL AROUND Paul McKee owns more than 1,600 properties around the planned NGA headquarters.

Parn ell

N. Gra nd

St. Lou is

Cass

N. Jefferson

70

Parcels owned by McKee SOURCE: City of St. Louis assessor’s office

NGA site

Dr. M

artin

Luthe r

King

cker

PruittIgoe site

N. Tu

‘GIANT VACUUM’ In 2009, when the city inked its development deal with McKee, no one else was proposing anything on that scale for north St. Louis. The city gave him a shot. The state gave him $43 million in tax credits through a special program his lawyers helped write. It’s hard to know how much NorthSide and the bank have invested in total. In a 2013 letter to state officials, McKee said he had advanced $20 million of his own funds into buying land for NorthSide and guaranteed another $45 million from lenders. Bank of Washington, in a letter to then-Mayor Francis Slay during the 2015 negotiations for the NGA land, said it and McKee had invested “well in excess of $50 million to establish site control” of the NorthSide area. Including debt on the property in the NGA area, an acre should sell for about $261,000, Eckelkamp wrote the city in 2015. There are other liens encumbering pieces of NorthSide’s land, too. In 2016, when McKee exercised his $1 million option to buy the 34-acre Pruitt-Igoe site from the city, two private companies — Jefferson & Cass Capital Investors LLC and Scarboro Services LLC — entered into financing arrangements with one of his companies. In real estate documents, Howard Smotkin, a lawyer with Stone, Leyton & Gershman, signed on behalf of Scarboro Services and Jefferson & Cass Capital Investors. The companies’ only addresses are a post office box and the firm’s office. Smotkin said the firm’s lawyers were

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

Tim Farr gets ready in October to leave a homeless tent community inside an abandoned car and truck repair shop at 1514 North 13th Street and owned by NorthSide Regeneration. A fire last month gutted the interior of the building, and the city boarded it up. The building is next door to the old Sunshine Ministries.

lori N. F

accusing the city of not adhering to a subsequent agreement giving him more time to begin projects, is pending. Even if the city prevails in that lawsuit, NorthSide Regeneration, Bank of Washington and their team of lawyers from Stone, Leyton & Gershman will still hold considerable sway over the future of the neglected neighborhoods just north of downtown St. Louis. Except for the vacant Pruitt-Igoe site, which McKee owns, there are almost no large, contiguous parcels in the area surrounding the NGA. That means people who want to develop big projects near the NGA will almost certainly have to work with McKee and the bank. Meanwhile, most of the properties NorthSide owns continue to decay, dragging down the value and living conditions of the area even as the NGA holds the potential for a resurgence. Few of those structures are salvageable, a far cry from the 152 rehabs McKee promised in a 2013 plan submitted to the city. More than 200 of NorthSide’s properties have been condemned by the city; many, unsecured and abandoned, have simply crumbled. The historic Clemens House, which McKee once promised to renovate and turn into senior apartments, burned in the summer of 2017. McKee, in response, points to signs of new investment: the $19.6 million Zoom gas station and GreenLeaf Market grocery on North Tucker Boulevard, as well as a partnership with a builder constructing several energy-efficient houses in the St. Louis Place neighborhood. The gas station opened in October; the grocery opens next month. “I do think that NorthSide has already produced remarkable results ‘beyond GreenLeaf’ by bringing NGA to north St. Louis,” McKee said in a statement to the Post-Dispatch. “I can’t help but express some frustration that this extraordinary success seems to get lost in the discussion.” He said that the lawsuit limited what he could say but that he looked forward “to a future where the city’s litigation does not interfere with redevelopment of this long suffering area.” Bank of Washington CEO L.B. Eckelkamp Jr. said he’d “love to see the fences mended” between City Hall, his bank and NorthSide but maintained that the city improperly ended the development agreement. Going forward, he said, the bank is open to lending to other projects in the area depending on the proposal. “There’s nothing that prevents us from lending more.” There are few examples of large-scale investment in the city’s beleaguered north side, and McKee’s defenders say he’s been unfairly attacked for being the outlier who has actually tried to tackle such a difficult endeavor. But a top St. Louis development official said that as new information came out in a 2018 eminent domain trial that gave city attorneys access to some of NorthSide’s private records, it became clear that the developer did not have the money to make his dream a reality. There had been signs for years: Requests for more development incentives. A lender pulling out of the grocery store deal. A stalled logistics park in Hazelwood. A failed bank that lent to McKee. No progress on a housing development despite interest from a national developer and a union investment fund. “What we want to see is, and be able to talk to, are developers who can actually get the work done,” Otis Williams, director of the St. Louis Development Corp., said in an interview last month. “We realized there just wasn’t the amount of wherewithal — I call it wherewithal — financial capability there for the development to move ahead.”

1 000 FEET

not investors in the project but were not authorized to comment about the limited liability companies involved in the transaction. With debt piled onto the land and Bank of Washington looking to be repaid, the immense power the city granted to McKee by selling him more than 100 acres from its land bank in 2012 can’t just be taken away by canceling development rights. Williams said “it’s a work in progress” to make sure there was a way to assemble land and work with developers — including NorthSide — who had workable development proposals. “I think our lesson is that carving out and putting that much territory into one development agreement is probably a mistake,” Williams said. “The tools that are used in large developments are good, but we understand now, and what we

Post-Dispatch

will do in the future, is have smaller areas and work with developments that are smaller in size, particularly with just a private developer. Where there are institutions and secured financing already in place, we might look at something like that. But with just an ordinary private developer who has visions, I think we would look at a smaller area.” Because of an underfunded planning department, and a comprehensive plan for St. Louis only now being drafted, critics point to the chapter as the epitome of reacting to developer proposals. “This is what happens after years of no planning,” said Sarah Coffin, professor of urban planning and development at St. Louis University. “There’s this giant vacuum that is open to anyone to step into, especially when there are no guidelines for development.” At the state level, the Missouri

Department of Economic Development has expressed concern at how McKee used some of the $43 million in tax credits he received. The Missouri attorney general’s office has a pending lawsuit accusing NorthSide of tax credit fraud. “The purpose for this was to redevelop it, was to provide an opportunity for redevelopment to occur, and that’s where the public gains benefit,” Sallie Hemenway, a former DED official, testified at the eminent domain trial in May. “The public gains no benefit from an individual private person gaining access to their tax dollars that could otherwise go to other places to just simply put land in his or her own name.” Michael Allen, an architectural historian who first revealed more than 12 years ago that McKee was behind the mystery companies buying up property in north St. Louis, gave credit to Krewson’s administration for taking the first steps to unwind the development agreement. But there’s still a long way to go. “In some ways, it’s better now,” Allen said. “But find three blocks in a row there that he doesn’t own property on. ... The capacity for the market to absorb McKee’s land at the price he wants to sell it is low, I think.” McKee said NorthSide “has never been about land speculation, and still is not.” He is “just getting started,” and future projects will be “even more groundbreaking.” But he expects the city will oppose the jobs and investment he proposes, so he declined to provide details. “Neither (NorthSide) nor Bank of Washington is or will be satisfied to sit on their laurels in the hope that those who long ignored north St. Louis will now invest,” McKee said in written response to questions. “We intend to move our redevelopment forward.”

‘BILLING HIM DAILY’ While it awaits that promised redevelopment, the city has begun liberally using one of the only tools it has to prod landowners into putting their real estate into productive use. Since last year, the city has billed NorthSide $154,000, mostly for vacant building fees but also for several demolitions, according to information from the Building Commissioner’s office. Vacant property fees can be added to the real estate’s tax bill. There’s thousands more billed for code violations. “We’re billing him daily,” said Deborah Williams, a manager who handles vacant property in the building commissioner’s office. “We’re not done.” See TIPPING POINT • Page A9


03.24.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

TIPPING POINT • FROM A8

vacant property in the building commissioner’s office. “We’re not done.” Until aldermen and Krewson acted to change it last year, an ordinance barred the city from fining properties within a development agreement area for code violations. Since the end of 2018, the St. Louis Building Division has filed six court actions seeking fines from NorthSide Regeneration for code violations on properties it owns. NorthSide has paid most of the fines, usually less than $1,000. Matt Moak, who handles problem properties in the city counselor’s office, said the city was treating McKee just like any other property owner now. “We are now seeing cases starting to come towards us,” Moak said. “They are just starting.” Whether that prods McKee into moving more quickly remains to be seen. But in the last nine months, at least one person has managed to reach a deal with him. In July, Dwight Arant purchased five lots from McKee on Montgomery Street for $100,000. “I don’t buy into any of these things about the land value being high that he’s asking,” Arant said. Arant’s NetZero company is building three model homes that he said would be so energy efficient that owners wouldgenerate enough electricity from solar panels to meet all their power needs. The St. Louis-Kansas City Carpenters Regional Council loaned his NetZero $500,000 in January to begin building the homes. McKee said that it was “only the beginning for the area” and that he had sold the land for less than the industry standard. McKee is “a really hard-nosed negotiator,” Arant said, but he contends that if “you went anywhere else and paid what I paid for a lot, you would be getting a steal.” Arant said he had options for 250 more lots to build out housing in the area around the NGA. “A little more for the land doesn’t matter if that’s what it takes to get a community started,” Arant said. “There are no comps (comparable sales). It’s like the Wild West.” But others have said they couldn’t reach deals with McKee. Gateway Greening, a nonprofit that promotes urban gardening, tried to buy two sites from NorthSide for a new headquarters, its executive director said, but couldn’t reach an agreement. The Missouri Department of Transportation had to initiate eminent domain action against NorthSide in 2010 to obtain right of way near the foot of the new Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. Old North residents, who have worked to stabilize a NorthSide neighborhood with scattered rehabs and block-by-block projects, have long complained that McKee won’t sell land he owns in their neighborhood despite the fact that it was never included in the NorthSide Regeneration redevelopment area approved by the city. “There’s been people who’ve been interested in different property and he won’t relinquish it,” Old North resident Paulette Sankofa said. “Once people find out McKee owns it, they just say ‘Forget it.’” Old North Saint Louis Restoration Group President Jessica Payne said the neighborhood was talking to McKee about putting together a land swap to gain control of some of the buildings he owned in Old North. They even had the city’s land bank, the Land Reutilization Authority, on board to help come up with properties to give McKee in exchange. She’s not sure why, but NorthSide representatives stopped communicating suddenly. McKee accused the LRA of torpedoing the agreement. “They were lived in when he bought them,” Payne said of the now vacant, deteriorating houses. “We’d love to see them preserved as he promised he’d do in the beginning.” Sunshine Ministries, a nonprofit that works with the homeless north of downtown, has managed to reach a deal with McKee over the years. He owned one of the parcels on the site where Sunshine built its new men’s shelter.

Andy Steiert of R.T. Construction builds a model home, one of three under construction for the new Saint Louis Park Place development at 20th and Montgomery streets on March 1. Developer Dwight Arant started work last month on the trio after buying several lots from NorthSide Regeneration.

People gather in front of the old Sunshine Ministries building at 1520 North 13th Street on March 11. Next door at 1514 is an abandoned car and truck repair business owned by NorthSide Regeneration that was used as a homeless tent community until the interior was gutted by fire last month.

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

A March 14 photograph shows a Zoom gas station and GreenLeaf grocery, two projects of Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration, that were built on Tucker Boulevard just south of the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. The gas station opened in October, and the grocery store opens in April.

“It was more than I paid for all the other parcels,” said Carol Clarkson, Sunshine Ministries director. “But I needed it.” Years ago, she was looking at another property he owned on North Florissant Avenue. The price he asked seemed well above market, and she didn’t go through with the deal. “I know it’s inflated,” she said McKee told her. “But I want to make sure I keep my comps up.” Now, he owns property all around Sunshine Ministries. It’s making it difficult for the nonprofit to sell a building it no longer needs. Next door to it, a McKee-owned property that has become a refuge for the homeless caught fire last month. “Everything around me is owned by McKee,” Clarkson said. “I’m this little island. ... He does nothing to secure his property to keep my property safe.” McKee said that nonprofits often had limited resources for real estate trans-

actions and that his land was available for purchase at “fair market value.” “I would be ill-advised to chill interest in north St. Louis by demanding inflated prices, and Bank of Washington would not tolerate such a reckless approach,” he said. St. Louis Place Community Association President Brian Krueger is still bullish on the area, even with McKee and City Hall at loggerheads. His land’s value has already jumped, he said. “I’m not counting Paul McKee out,” he said. “Don’t ever count him out.”

‘STILL TALKING ABOUT HIM’ Maybe, if McKee had started buying property 10 years earlier — long before the 2008 financial crisis helped tank the economy — his dream of turning around an old, struggling section of the city could have become a reality, said Allen, the architectural historian who has followed the saga. “It’s a beautiful dream,” Allen said.

“It’s hard not to want that.” But he doesn’t think McKee is going to let go. “Time has always served McKee pretty well,” Allen said. “He still owns the land. We’re still talking about him. He hasn’t given up.” The city says that it’s open to reaching a resolution on the lawsuits and that it would still work with NorthSide if the developer presented workable projects. In the meantime, officials are focusing on what they can control: infrastructure improvements along Jefferson and Cass avenues to prepare for the expected influx of 3,000-plus NGA workers. And that is still more than five years away. Janelle O’Dea and Andrew Nguyen of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Clothing hangs in front of an abandoned warehouse owned by NorthSide Regeneration at 1600 North 13th Street on Feb. 20. The Columbus Square neighborhood just north of downtown consists of several warehouses and the old Greyhound bus station that are frequently visited by homeless people.


03.24.2019 • SUNDAY • M 2

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A9

TIPPING POINT • FROM A8

Until aldermen and Krewson acted to change it last year, an ordinance barred the city from fining properties within a development agreement area for code violations. Since the end of 2018, the St. Louis Building Division has filed six court actions seeking fines from NorthSide Regeneration for code violations on properties it owns. NorthSide has paid most of the fines, usually less than $1,000. Matt Moak, who handles problem properties in the city counselor’s office, said the city was treating McKee just like any other property owner now. “We are now seeing cases starting to come towards us,” Moak said. “They are just starting.” Whether that prods McKee into moving more quickly remains to be seen. But in the last nine months, at least one person has managed to reach a deal with him. In July, Dwight Arant purchased five lots from McKee on Montgomery Street for $100,000. “I don’t buy into any of these things about the land value being high that he’s asking,” Arant said. Arant’s NetZero company is building three model homes that he said would be so energy efficient that owners wouldgenerate enough electricity from solar panels to meet all their power needs. The St. Louis-Kansas City Carpenters Regional Council loaned his NetZero $500,000 in January to begin building the homes. McKee said that it was “only the beginning for the area” and that he had sold the land for less than the industry standard. McKee is “a really hard-nosed negotiator,” Arant said, but he contends that if “you went anywhere else and paid what I paid for a lot, you would be getting a steal.” Arant said he had options for 250 more lots to build out housing in the area around the NGA. “A little more for the land doesn’t matter if that’s what it takes to get a community started,” Arant said. “There are no comps (comparable sales). It’s like the Wild West.” But others have said they couldn’t reach deals with McKee. Gateway Greening, a nonprofit that promotes urban gardening, tried to buy two sites from NorthSide for a new headquarters, its executive director said, but couldn’t reach an agreement. The Missouri Department of Transportation had to initiate eminent domain action against NorthSide in 2010 to obtain right of way near the foot of the new Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. Old North residents, who have worked to stabilize a NorthSide neighborhood with scattered rehabs and block-by-block projects, have long complained that McKee won’t sell land he owns in their neighborhood despite the fact that it was never included in the NorthSide Regeneration redevelopment area approved by the city. “There’s been people who’ve been interested in different property and he won’t relinquish it,” Old North resident Paulette Sankofa said. “Once people find out McKee owns it, they just say ‘Forget it.’” Old North Saint Louis Restoration Group President Jessica Payne said the neighborhood was talking to McKee about putting together a land swap to gain control of some of the buildings he owned in Old North. They even had the city’s land bank, the Land Reutilization Authority, on board to help come up with properties to give McKee in exchange. She’s not sure why, but NorthSide representatives stopped communicating suddenly. McKee accused the LRA of torpedoing the agreement. “They were lived in when he bought them,” Payne said of the now vacant, deteriorating houses. “We’d love to see them preserved as he promised he’d do in the beginning.” Sunshine Ministries, a nonprofit that works with the homeless north of downtown, has managed to reach a deal with McKee over the years. He owned one of the parcels on the site where Sunshine built its new men’s shelter. “It was more than I paid for all the other parcels,” said Carol Clarkson,

Andy Steiert of R.T. Construction builds a model home, one of three under construction for the new Saint Louis Park Place development at 20th and Montgomery streets on March 1. Developer Dwight Arant started work last month on the trio after buying several lots from NorthSide Regeneration.

People gather in front of the old Sunshine Ministries building at 1520 North 13th Street on March 11. Next door at 1514 is an abandoned car and truck repair business owned by NorthSide Regeneration that was used as a homeless tent community until the interior was gutted by fire last month.

PHOTOS BY ROBERT COHEN • rcohen@post-dispatch.com

A March 14 photograph shows a Zoom gas station and GreenLeaf grocery, two projects of Paul McKee’s NorthSide Regeneration, that were built on Tucker Boulevard just south of the Stan Musial Veterans Memorial Bridge. The gas station opened in October, and the grocery store opens in April.

Sunshine Ministries director. “But I needed it.” Years ago, she was looking at another property he owned on North Florissant Avenue. The price he asked seemed well above market, and she didn’t go through with the deal. “I know it’s inflated,” she said McKee told her. “But I want to make sure I keep my comps up.” Now, he owns property all around Sunshine Ministries. It’s making it difficult for the nonprofit to sell a building it no longer needs. Next door to it, a McKee-owned property that has become a refuge for the homeless caught fire last month. “Everything around me is owned by McKee,” Clarkson said. “I’m this little island. ... He does nothing to secure his property to keep my property safe.” McKee said that nonprofits often had limited resources for real estate transactions and that his land was available for purchase at “fair market value.”

“I would be ill-advised to chill interest in north St. Louis by demanding inflated prices, and Bank of Washington would not tolerate such a reckless approach,” he said. St. Louis Place Community Association President Brian Krueger is still bullish on the area, even with McKee and City Hall at loggerheads. His land’s value has already jumped, he said. “I’m not counting Paul McKee out,” he said. “Don’t ever count him out.”

‘STILL TALKING ABOUT HIM’ Maybe, if McKee had started buying property 10 years earlier — long before the 2008 financial crisis helped tank the economy — his dream of turning around an old, struggling section of the city could have become a reality, said Allen, the architectural historian who has followed the saga. “It’s a beautiful dream,” Allen said. “It’s hard not to want that.” But he doesn’t think McKee is going

to let go. “Time has always served McKee pretty well,” Allen said. “He still owns the land. We’re still talking about him. He hasn’t given up.” The city says that it’s open to reaching a resolution on the lawsuits and that it would still work with NorthSide if the developer presented workable projects. In the meantime, officials are focusing on what they can control: infrastructure improvements along Jefferson and Cass avenues to prepare for the expected influx of 3,000-plus NGA workers. And that is still more than five years away. Janelle O’Dea and Andrew Nguyen of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Jacob Barker • 314-340-8291 @jacobbarker on Twitter jbarker@post-dispatch.com

Clothing hangs in front of an abandoned warehouse owned by NorthSide Regeneration at 1600 North 13th Street on Feb. 20. The Columbus Square neighborhood just north of downtown consists of several warehouses and the old Greyhound bus station that are frequently visited by homeless people.


LOCAL

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

PUPPY LOVE St. Louis Children’s Hospital partnered with Purina and the APA to bring puppies for the children to pet Friday in honor of national Puppy Day, which is Saturday.

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com

Elliana Richards (left), 3, of St. Louis, and Liliana Neighbors, 4, of Shiloh enjoy playing with puppies brought Friday from the APA Adoption Center to the Purina Pet Center at St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

Tati Greenberg, 17, holds one of the four puppies brought Friday from the APA Adoption Center to the Purina Pet Center at St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

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LOCAL

A10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

CELEBRATING SPRING AT HOLI Participants gathered in Chesterfield Central Park for Holi, the Festival of Colors, a Hindu festival celebrating the beginning of spring. Anna Godara, the organizer, has plans to increase the size every year so more people, from every walk of life, can participate.

PHOTOS BY COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

Mayank Ayarwal (right) is mobbed by friends while he attempts to throw color at Josee Redpath (left) during the Holi celebration Saturday in Chesterfield Central Park.

Participants dance during Holi, or the Festival of Colors.

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03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

NEWS

‘Medieval’ diseases flare as unsanitary living conditions proliferate BY ANNA GORMAN Kaiser Health news

Jennifer Millar keeps trash bags and hand sanitizer near her tent, and she regularly pours water mixed with hydrogen peroxide on the sidewalk nearby. Keeping herself and the patch of concrete she calls home clean is a top priority. But this homeless encampment off a Hollywood freeway ramp is often littered with needles and trash, and soaked in urine. Rats occasionally scamper through, and Millar fears the consequences. “I worry about all those diseases,” said Millar, 43, who said she had been homeless most of her life. Infectious diseases — some that ravaged populations in the Middle Ages — are resurging in California and around the country, and are hitting homeless populations especially hard. Los Angeles recently experienced an outbreak of typhus — a disease spread by infected fleas on rats and other animals — in downtown streets. Officials briefly closed part of City Hall after reporting that rodents had invaded the building. People in Washington state have been infected with Shigella bacteria, which is spread through feces and causes the diarrheal disease shigellosis, as well as Bartonella quintana, which spreads through body lice and causes trench fever. Hepatitis A, also spread primarily through feces, infected more than 1,000 people in Southern California in the past two years. The disease also has erupted in New Mexico, Ohio and Kentucky, primarily among people who are homeless or use drugs. Public health officials and politicians are using terms such as “disaster” and “public health crisis” to describe the outbreaks, and they warn that these diseases can easily jump beyond the homeless population. “Our homeless crisis is increasingly becoming a public health crisis,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said in his State of the State speech in February, citing outbreaks of hepatitis A in San Diego County, syphilis in Sonoma County and typhus in Los Angeles County. “Typhus,” he said. “A medieval disease. In California. In 2019.” The diseases have flared as the nation’s homeless population has grown in the past two years: About 553,000 people were homeless at the end of 2018, and nearly one-quarter of homeless people live in California. The diseases spread quickly and widely among people living outside or in shelters, fed by sidewalks contaminated with human feces, crowded living conditions, weakened immune systems and limited access to health care. “The hygiene situation is just horrendous” for people living on the streets, said Dr. Glenn Lopez, a physician with

St. John’s Well Child & Family Center, who treats homeless patients in Los Angeles County. “It becomes just like a Third World environment where their human feces contaminate the areas where they are eating and sleeping.” Those infectious diseases are not limited to homeless populations, Lopez warned. “Even someone who believes they are protected from these infections is not.” At least one Los Angeles city staffer said she contracted typhus in City Hall last fall. And San Diego County officials warned in 2017 that diners at a well-known restaurant were at risk of hepatitis A. There were 167 cases of typhus from Jan. 1, 2018, through Feb. 1 of this year, up from 125 in 2013 and 13 in 2008, according to the California Public Health Department. Typhus is a bacterial infection that can cause a high fever, stomach pain and chills but can be treated with antibiotics. Outbreaks are more common in crowded and trash-filled areas that attract rats. The recent typhus outbreak began last fall, when health officials reported clusters of the flea-borne disease in downtown Los Angeles and Compton. They also have occurred in Pasadena, where the problems are probably due to people feeding stray cats carrying fleas. Last month, the county announced another outbreak in downtown Los Angeles that infected nine people, six of whom were homeless. After city workers said they saw rodent droppings in City Hall, Los Angeles City Council President Herb Wesson briefly shut down his office to rip up the rugs, and he also called for an investigation and more cleaning. Hepatitis A is caused by a virus usually transmitted when people come in contact with feces of infected people. Most people recover on their own, but the disease can be very serious for those with underlying liver conditions. There were 948 cases of hepatitis A in 2017 and 178 in 2018 and 2019, the state public health department said. Twenty-one people have died as a result of the 2017-18 outbreak. The infections around the country are not a surprise, given the lack of attention to housing and health care for the homeless and the dearth of bathrooms and places to wash hands, said Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, the health officer for Seattle and King County, Wash. “It’s a public health disaster,” he said. In his area, Duchin said, he has seen shigellosis, trench fever and skin infections among homeless populations. In New York City, where more of the homeless population lives in shelters rather than on the streets, there have not been the same outbreaks of hepatitis A and typhus, said Dr. Kelly Doran, an emergency medicine physician and assistant professor at NYU School of Medicine.

But Doran said different infections occured in shelters, including tuberculosis, a disease that spreads through the air and typically infects the lungs. The diseases sometimes get the “medieval” moniker because people in that era lived in squalid conditions without clean water or sewage treatment, said Dr. Jeffrey Klausner, a professor of medicine and public health at UCLA. People living on the streets or in homeless shelters are vulnerable to such outbreaks because their weakened immune systems are worsened by stress, malnutrition and sleep deprivation. Many also have mental illness and substance abuse disorders, which can make it harder for them to stay healthy or get health care. One recent February afternoon, Saban Community Clinic physician assistant Negeen Farmand walked through homeless encampments in Hollywood carrying a backpack with medical supplies. She stopped to talk to a man sweeping the sidewalks. He said he saw “everything and anything” in the gutters and hoped he didn’t get sick. She introduced herself to a few others and asked if they had any health issues that needed checking. When she saw M illar, Farmand checked her blood pressure, asked about her asthma and urged her to come see a doctor for treatment of her hepatitis C, a viral infection spread through contaminated blood that can lead to serious liver damage. “To get these people to come into a clinic is a big thing,” she said. “A lot of them are distrustful of the health care system.” On another day, Karen Mitchell, 53, waited to get treatment for a persistent cough by St. John’s Well Child & Family Center’s mobile health clinic. She also needed a tuberculosis test, as required by the shelter where she was living in Bellflower, Calif. Mitchell, who said she developed alcoholism after a career in pharmaceutical sales, said she had contracted pneumonia from germs from other shelter residents. “Everyone is always sick, no matter what precautions they take.” During the hepatitis A outbreak, public health officials administered widespread vaccinations, cleaned the streets with bleach and water, and installed hand-washing stations and portable toilets near high concentrations of homeless people. But health officials and homeless advocates said more needed to be done, including helping people access medical and behavioral health care and affordable housing. “It really is unconscionable,” said Bobby Watts, CEO of the National Health Care for the Homeless Council, a policy and advocacy organization. “These are all preventable diseases.”

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A11

Dolphins poisoned by algae also had Alzheimer’s-like damage to their brains BY JENNY STALETOVICH Miami Herald

MIAMI • Toxins produced by

blue-green algae that have increasingly polluted Florida waters have been found in dead dolphins that also showed signs of Alzheimer’s-like brain disease, according to a new study led by University of Miami researchers. The study, published Wednesday in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS One, is the first to show detectable levels of the toxin, commonly called BMAA, in dolphin brains that also displayed degenerative damage similar to Alzheimer’s, Lou Gehrig’s disease and Parkinson’s in humans. Though more work needs to be done to determine whether the toxins cause the disease, the study concludes dolphins and their complex brains could provide a key sentinel for the potential threat from toxic algae blooms to humans. “Not to be too political, but it goes to show the health of marine animals and water quality,” said David Davis, lead author and a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine neuropathologist. “Everything’s directly related.” The findings add to a growing body of research that focuses on the health threat from harmful algae blooms, which climate scientists warn could worsen as the planet warms. South Florida is particularly vulnerable with miles of coast, a lake that is a third of the size of Rhode Island, rivers and estuaries and an agricultural industry and swelling population that continue to feed blooms with pollution from fertilizer and sewage. This past year, nearly 150 dead dolphins turned up in Florida waters after a widespread red tide along the Gulf Coast coincided with freshwater bluegreen algae washing down the Caloosahatchee River. The carnage prompted the state’s new governor to order a task force assembled to tackle damaging blue-green algae blooms just after he took office. The task force is expected to be set up after a chief science officer, another position DeSantis established, is selected, Department of Environmental Protection spokeswoman Dee Ann Miller said in an email. The science officer should be named in the next few weeks, she said. Two years ago, UM researchers confirmed high levels of toxin from algae in sharks, concluding the ocean’s big, long-living predators accumulate the toxin in their brains over time, and warned against eating shark. The connection between the toxin and brain disease is still relatively new and not without controversy. Scientists first discovered the link after a botanist visiting Guam to research cancer took another look at a decades-old mystery surrounding a degenerative brain disease, Discover Magazine reported in 2011. The disease hit nearly every household in a small village, leading researchers to focus on the seed from cycads, a plant often confused with palms and a staple of villagers’ diet. The seeds contain BMAA, but researchers concluded villagers could never consume enough to make them sick. The botanist, Paul Cox, found the connection when he discovered the villagers

also ate fruit bats, which feasted on the seeds and had a much higher concentration of BMAA because it accumulated in their bodies over time, according to a 2012 Environmental Health Perspectives account. A decade later, UM’s Miami Brain Bank repeated Cox’s brain study found BMAA in the brains of people suffering from the degenerative diseases. She also showed the toxic can enter the brains of rats, EHP reported. “BMAA is more of a long-term toxin,” Davis said. “It integrates and causes proteins for misfold and that’s when you get chronic inflammation and that leads to degenerations.” Since then, more studies have looked at higher incidences of Lou Gehrig’s disease in people who live near lakes with frequent blooms, Wednesday’s study said. For this study, researchers looked at brains from 14 dead dolphins, including seven Florida bottlenose dolphins that beached themselves in 2005 along the Atlantic, the Indian River Lagoon, the Banana River and Gulf of Mexico where algae blooms frequently occur. They also looked at seven common dolphins that were found dead in Cape Cod Bay off Massachusetts in 2012. All but one dolphin, which died from a boat strike, had BMAA in their brains as well as signs of degenerative disease. Notably, the Florida dolphins had three times the amount of toxins. That’s likely because they swim closer to shore and into estuaries where blooms occur, Davis said, and eat smaller marine life, like shrimp, crabs and prey fish, that consume the algae. Making the connection in dolphins is significant because it provides a window into a more complex brain than a shark’s, and one with higher functions like a human’s. Researchers also focused on the part of the dolphin brain used for acoustic navigation because they believed problems would be more apparent. “It’s one of those regions where if you want to find something wrong with a dolphin, you would look there,” Davis said. “We thought it would be highly sensitive and vulnerable to a toxin.” Looking at dolphins in the wild gives scientists a more realistic model of how the toxin accumulates and may cause damage. “This isn’t animals being fed a certain dose over a certain amount of time. It’s naturalistic exposure,” he said. “If you have these … dolphins feeding in the same marine food web as humans, potentially eating the same things as humans, that’s why we say it serves as a sentinel.” Because this study involved such a small number of dolphins, the team was not able to definitively link a cause and effect. For that, the researchers have begun a second study using dolphins that died during last year’s prolonged algae blooms. Nearly 150 were found in Gulf waters, which prompted the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to launch an investigation. So far nothing suggests the toxin poisoning caused the beachings, which can be a complex event. But Davis said the larger sample will allow researchers to look at more brains. They also plan to examine more parts of the dolphins’ brains.

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03.24.2019 • SunDay • M 2

NATION

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A11

First-of-its-kind U.S. nuclear waste dump marks 20 years Remote stretch of New Mexico desert harbors experiment in underground disposal BY SUSAN MONTOYA BRYAN associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. • In a

remote stretch of New Mexico desert, the U.S. government put in motion an experiment aimed at proving to the world that radioactive waste could be safely disposed of deep underground, rendering it less of a threat to the environment. Twenty years and more than 12,380 shipments later, tons of Cold War-era waste from decades of bomb-making and nuclear research across the U.S. have been stashed in the salt caverns that make up the underground facility. Each week, several shipments of special boxes and barrels packed with lab coats, rubber gloves, tools and debris contaminated with plutonium and other radioactive elements are trucked to the site. But the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has not been without issues. A 2014 radiation leak forced an expensive, nearly three-year closure, delayed the federal government’s cleanup program and prompted policy changes at national laboratories and defenserelated sites across the U.S. More recently, the U.S. Department of Energy said it would investigate reports that workers may have been exposed last year to hazardous chemicals. Still, supporters consider the repository a success, saying it provides a viable option for dealing with a multibilliondollar mess that stretches from a decommissioned nuclear weapons production site in Washington state to one of the nation’s top nuclear research labs, in Idaho, and locations as far east as South Carolina. If it weren’t for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, many containers of low-level waste would be outside, exposed to the weather and susceptible to nat-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Don Hancock with the Southwest Research and Information Center, in his office in Albuquerque, N.M., this month, holds up a promotional flyswatter advertising the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as the solution to nuclear pollution.

ural disasters, said J.R. Stroble, head of business operations at the Department of Energy’s Carlsbad Field Office, which oversees the contractor that operates the repository. “The whole purpose of WIPP is to isolate this long-lived radioactive, hazardous waste from the accessible environment, from people and the things people need in order to live life on Earth,” he said. Stroble and others in the areas surrounding the repository are steadfast in their conviction that the facility is a success. They point to 22 sites around the nation that have been cleaned up as a result of having somewhere to put the waste — including Rocky Flats, a former nuclear weapons plant outside Denver that had a history of leaks, spills and other violations. For critics, that success is checkered at best since the repository is far from fulfilling its mission. “It’s 80 percent through its lifetime, and it has disposed of

less than 40 percent of the waste and has cost more than twice as much as it was supposed to,” said Don Hancock with the watchdog group Southwest Research and Information Center. “How great of a success is that?” Officials initially thought the facility would operate for about 25 years. Rather than wrapping up in the next few years, managers have bumped the timeline to 2050. The repository was carved out of an ancient salt formation about a half-mile below the surface, with the idea that the shifting salt would eventually entomb the radioactive waste. It was the National Academy of Sciences in the 1950s that first recommended disposing of atomic waste in deep geologic formations. Scientists began taking a hard look at the New Mexico site about two decades later. The scientists had to convince themselves and then federal regulators that it was safe. One of their tasks was determin-

ing that the ancient seawater trapped between the salt crystals and bound up in thin bands of clay within the salt deposit would pose no problems thousands of years later. “It was exciting to be working on what was then going to be the world’s first deep-geologic repository for that class of waste,” said Peter Swift, a senior scientist at Sandia National Laboratories. “Nothing that radioactive had been put that deep underground before. And that’s still true 20 years later.” While the real test will be what happens generations from now, Swift is confident in the science behind the project. But the wild card in whether the repository is ultimately deemed a success will be the human factor. After all, missteps by management were blamed for the 2014 radiation release. With some areas permanently sealed off due to contamination, more mining will have to be done to expand capacity. The federal government also is spending more than a half-billion dollars to install a new ventilation system, sink more shafts and make other upgrades aimed at returning to “normal business.” Hancock and some former elected leaders involved in early discussions about the facility worry about the subterranean landfill’s becoming a dumping ground for high-level waste or commercial nuclear waste. But it would take an act of Congress to expand the repository’s mission, and getting consent from New Mexico’s delegates would be a tall order because the federal government still has no long-term plan for dealing with such waste. Nevada’s proposed Yucca Mountain project is mothballed, and no other permanent disposal proposals are on the table.

Streisand apologizes, cites sympathy for Jackson accusers Singer comes under intense criticism for remarks about men who accuse late pop star BY JOCELYN NOVECK associated Press

NEW YORK • Barbra Streisand

apologized Saturday for her remarks about Michael Jackson and two men who have accused him of sexual abuse, saying that she should have chosen her words more carefully and that she admired the accusers for “speaking their truth.” Streisand had received bitter criticism online after she was quoted in The Times of London as saying that Jackson’s accusers were “thrilled to be there” during the alleged abuse, which “didn’t kill them.” After an initial statement Saturday to the Associated Press in which she sought to clarify her remarks, the superstar of song, stage and screen posted an apology online that went further. “I am profoundly sorry for any pain or misunderstanding I caused by not choosing my words more carefully about Mi-

chael Jackson and his victims,” she wrote. “I didn’t mean to dismiss the trauma these boys experienced in any way,” she wrote. “Like all survivors of sexual assault, they will have to carry this for the rest of their lives. I feel deep remorse and I hope that James and Wade know that I truly respect and admire Streisand them for speaking their truth.” The apology went far beyond the earlier statement to the AP, in which she elaborated on her published remarks, saying she felt “nothing but sympathy” for the men, Wade Robson and James Safechuck, who accuse the late star of molesting them as children. She wrote in that earlier statement: “To be crystal clear, there is no situation or circumstance where it is OK for the innocence

of children to be taken advantage of by anyone.” The remarks in question came deep into a wide-ranging interview with The Times. Asked about Jackson, Streisand was quoted as saying she “absolutely” believed Robson and Safechuck, who make their allegations in the recent HBO documentary “Leaving Neverland.” Jackson’s estate has condemned the HBO documentary. Jackson, who died in 2009, was found not guilty in 2005 of charges he molested a 13-yearold boy. Streisand was asked about the documentary, which she called “too painful.” She then said that Jackson, when she met him, was “very sweet, very childlike.” Asked how she reconciled that man with the one portrayed in the documentary, she replied: “His sexual needs were his sexual needs, coming from whatever childhood he has or whatever

DNA he has. You can say ‘molested,’ but those children, as you heard say, they were thrilled to be there. They both married and they both have children, so it didn’t kill them.” Among those firing back on social media was the director of “Leaving Neverland,” Dan Reed, who wrote of that last quote: “Did you really say that?!” Asked by The Times whether she was angry at Jackson, Streisand said: “It’s a combination of feelings. I feel bad for the children. I feel bad for him. I blame, I guess, the parents, who would allow their children to sleep with him.” Also attracting attention Saturday for remarks about Jackson was his close friend and mentor Diana Ross. “This is what’s on my heart this morning,” Ross wrote on Twitter. “I believe and trust that Michael Jackson was and is A magnificent incredible force to me and to many others.”

DIGEST Ship channel still closed Officials have no timetable for reopening a portion of the Houston Ship Channel, one of the busiest commercial waterways in the country, after another setback caused flammable chemicals to seep into the water near a fireravaged petrochemical tank farm, a Coast Guard commander said Saturday. Coast Guard Capt. Kevin Oditt said during a news conference that work was underway to contain and absorb benzene and other contaminants after a dike failed adjacent to the farm operated by the Intercontinental Terminals Company in Deer Park, southeast of Houston. The breach occurred Friday. As of early Saturday, more than 40 vessels — oil tankers, container ships and other crafts — were either trying to move south out of the channel or north toward awaiting terminals, according to Coast Guard petty officer Kelly Parker. The channel is a critical waterway that connects oil refineries between the Port of Houston and the Gulf of Mexico. U.S. casualties identified • The Pentagon has identified two U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan while involved in combat operations Friday in Kunduz Province. The men were identified Saturday as Spc. Joseph P. Collette, 29, of Lancaster, Ohio, and Sgt. 1st Class Will D. Lindsay, 33, of Cortez, Colo. Collette was assigned to the 242nd Ordnance Battalion, 71st Explosive Ordnance Disposal Group, and Lindsay was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Both were based at Fort Carson, Colo. The fatalities bring to four the number of U.S. soldiers killed so far this year in Afghanistan. Florida town moving statue • A statue of a Confederate soldier is being removed from a Florida park. The statue had stood at the center of Lakeland’s Munn Park for 109 years. City officials began dismantling the monument Friday. City commissioners voted in December 2017 to start the process to move the statue after receiving complaints from residents. In November, commissioners approved funding the $150,000 cost with citations issued as part of its red-light camera program. The Ledger reports the statue is being relocated to a different park where the city honors soldiers and first responders. Veterans Park is adjacent to a city-owned convention and entertainment complex. Beer develops film • Kodak says a new beer hitting the market can be used to develop its Super 8 movie film. Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Delaware created its SuperEIGHT beer after a conversation with people at Kodak, the upstate New York technology company most famous for its photographic roots. Dogfish learned from Kodak that heightened levels of acidity and vitamin C in certain beers could make them a processing agent for film. That inspired the brewery to design such a beer. Kodak helped by testing it. Dogfish founder Sam Calagione says he’ll document his summer travels on Super 8 film that will be developed in SuperEIGHT beer and turned into a short film. The beer, made with pear, mango, berries, kiwi, quinoa and salt, is set for national distribution next month. From wire services

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03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A13

While U.S. looks to border, more migrants arrive by sea der. On Tuesday, a Customs and Border Protection team on a highspeed coastal interceptor vessel stopped another group, disabling a boat with gunfire after it failed to stop, and detaining eight more migrants, Thompson said. Chief Patrol Agent Rodney Scott, who oversees CBP operations in San Diego, said that he expected smugglers to adjust their tactics as U.S. officials alter theirs, and he said the United States was taking away most of the “low-risk ways” to get into the country. “We’ve been busy out here,” Scott said. “Once the rhetoric started with the wall, it definitely picked up in the maritime.” The intercepts are carried out by both the Coast Guard and CBP, which has an Air and Marine Operations branch. They coordinate plans through a Joint Harbor Operations Center at

BY DAN LAMOTHE Washington Post

SAN DIEGO • The focus by

President Donald Trump’s administration on the southern border has closed some gaps in immigration enforcement but expanded a challenging problem, law enforcement officials here said Wednesday: undocumented immigrants sneaking into California by sea. The migrants enter in various ways, including on personal watercraft and small, open-top motorboats known as pangas that often arrive under cover of darkness, said Jeremy Thompson, Customs and Border Protection’s director of marine operations in San Diego. Last Sunday, the 87-foot Coast Guard patrol boat USCGC Petrel stopped a vessel with 12 migrants from Mexico aboard near California’s southern maritime bor-

PHOTO BY PETTY OFFICER 1ST CLASS PATRICK KELLEY

Fireman Patrick Saragoza ties off a fender aboard a Coast Guard Station San Diego 45-foot Response Boat-Medium during a patrol off the coast of Southern California in November.

Coast Guard Air Station San Diego, where personnel scan computer screens that display images from dozens of cameras, watching the coastline for watercraft that look out of place. Across Southern California, 1,022 migrants were intercepted at sea in the fiscal year ending

Sept. 30, Coast Guard officials have said. That was up from 213 in 2017 and 142 in 2016. Capt. Joseph Buzzella, the Coast Guard’s sector commander in San Diego, said that in the past year, 158 smuggling operations in the area had been stopped, leading to the arrest of more than 500

undocumented migrants, including 108 who are believed to have been organizing the smuggling efforts. Those numbers are small compared with the 521,090 apprehensions CBP reported at the southern border in 2018. But the practice at sea is lucrative for those who facilitate it. Smugglers charge about $10,000 per person to get into the United States, and even more for Chinese migrants, who fly to Tijuana first. “It’s all about money,” Scott said. “They’re never going to stop coming.” Adm. Karl Schultz, the Coast Guard commandant, said in an interview Tuesday that the Coast Guard patrols the region constantly, and he sees the situation as manageable. “Things kind of wax and wane out there,” he said. “I would tell you that right now, we’re paying attention, we’re actively patrolling and it’s part of the comprehensive border solution so it doesn’t become an end-around run.”

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M 1 Sunday • 03.24.2019 • a14

New Zealanders gather with Muslims for Friday prayers

UN chief attends prayers at NYC mosque in show of solidarity By EdITH M. LEdERER Associated Press

nEW yORK • U.N. Sec-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Injured victims from last week’s mosque shootings pray Friday at Hagley Park in Christchurch, New Zealand. People across New Zealand observed the call to prayer and held two minutes of silence to remember the 50 people killed.

WaSHInGTOn POST

CHRISTCHuRCH, nEW ZEaLand • At 1:30 on Friday afternoon, Mus-

lims in Christchurch began their weekly prayers. A week earlier, these same prayers were interrupted by a gunman who burst into the Al Noor Mosque and killed 42 people, then drove across town to kill eight more at another mosque. But this week, the Muslim population was joined by tens of thousands of other New Zealanders, who stood behind the rows of worshippers. They listened as the call to prayer rang out across Hagley Park, opposite the Al Noor Mosque, and across the country on national television and radio broadcasts. Then the country fell silent for two minutes to remember the tragedy, shaking New Zealand’s belief that it was an isolated utopia at the

bottom of the world. Many women — including Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, television newsreaders, nurses, students and police officers — donned headscarves in solidarity with Muslim women, some of whom had said they were scared to go out with such a recognizable symbol of their faith. They could be seen on the streets of Christchurch throughout the day, not just during the remembrance. In brief remarks before the silence in Hagley Park, Ardern cited the prophet Muhammad as saying that “the believers, in their mutual kindness, compassion and sympathy are just like one body.” “When any part of the body suffers, the whole body feels pain,” she said. “New Zealand mourns with you. We are one.” It was the first terrorist attack of its kind in New Zealand and the

worst mass shooting the country has ever seen. Fifty people were killed in the Friday attacks, the work of a lone gunman who distributed a manifesto full of anti-immigrant rhetoric and then live-streamed the shootings. A 28-year-old Australian man was arrested and charged with murder in the case. In an open-air ceremony in front of about 20,000 people, imams who had been in the Al Noor Mosque during the attack — including one who was featured, covered in blood, on the front page of the local paper the day after the attack — led the prayers. “We are brokenhearted, but we are not broken. We are alive, we are together, we are determined to not let anyone divide us,” Imam Gamal Fouda told the crowd gathered in Christchurch.

retary-General Antonio Guterres went to the first mosque built in New York City on Friday to show solidarity with Muslims, urging people everywhere “to reaffirm the sanctity of all places of worship and the safety of all worshippers.” Speaking a week after the terrorist attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, that killed 50 people, Guterres warned again that “around the world, we have seen ever-rising anti-Muslim hatred, anti-Semitism, hate speech and bigotry.” “We need to act against extremism in all its forms — whether it targets mosques, synagogues, churches or anywhere else,” he added. Guterres first spoke at Friday prayers in the mosque at the Islamic Cultural Center of New York and then addressed the media at its school. He was surrounded there by the imam and more than a dozen U.N. ambassadors from Muslim and non-Muslim countries including New Zealand and Australia, where the white supremacist who gunned down victims at the mosques was born. In remarks at the prayer service, Guterres recalled that a worshipper who saw a stranger walk into one of the Christchurch mosques

said “Hello, brother,” not knowing he was a terrorist. “This is the spirit deeply embedded in Islam, a religion I so much respect — the face of love, compassion, forgiveness, mercy and grace,” the U.N. chief said. But Guterres warned in his remarks afterward that “hate speech is spreading like wildfire,” that “social media is being exploited as a platform for bigotry,” and “many political movements are either openly admitting their neo-Nazi affiliation, or lip syncing their words, and cutting and pasting the symbols and images.” “That cancer is spreading,” the secretary-general said. “It is our duty to find the cure.” Guterres announced that he was asking Miguel Moratinos, head of the U.N. Alliance of Civilizations, to develop “an action plan” to ensure that all U.N. bodies are “fully engaged in support of safeguarding religious sites.” He said governments, faith-based organizations, religious leaders and others should be involved in discussing actions that can prevent attacks “and guarantee the sanctity of religious sites. “The reason is clear: Mosques and all places of prayer and contemplation should be safe havens, not sites of terror,” Guterres said.

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A14 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NEWS

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

States ponder meds to ease withdrawal in lockups New York is latest to consider treatments such as methadone for all addicted inmates BY DAVID KLEPPER Associated Press

POUGHKEEPSIE, N.Y. • Laura Levine

says she never smoked a cigarette or touched a drink until age 35. Then she tried heroin, and she was hooked. After some brushes with the law — petty larceny to support her habit — Levine, a mother of five, was booked into the Nassau County jail, and withdrawal started kicking in. As the nausea, shaking and sweating grew worse, she began pleading with guards for help. “They kind of laughed and said, ‘You’ll be fine. Nobody dies from heroin withdrawal,’” said Levine, who is in recovery and now works to help others struggling with opioids. “I would rather give birth to all five of my children again without medication than go through withdrawal again.” More help for people like Levine could be on the way, as lawmakers in New York are considering a measure to make medicationassisted treatment such as methadone or Suboxone available to all prison and jail inmates struggling with opioid addiction. States across the country are considering similar approaches amid research that shows that the drugs, along with behavior therapy, can help people with addiction reduce the withdrawal symptoms and cravings that drive many to relapse. Federal statistics suggest more than half of all inmates in state prisons nationwide have a substance-use problem. New York officials say that percentage could be as

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Laura Levine meets on March 15 with patients at Vocal NY, an organization in the Brooklyn borough of New York that works with addicts. She is the group’s health educator and coordinator for the opioid reversal drug Narcan. New York is considering providing medication-assisted treatment to all inmates struggling with opioid addiction.

high as 80 percent in state and local lockups, which at any given time have about 77,000 inmates. Drug policy experts point to the success of a similar program in Rhode Island, which has seen a sharp drop in the number of former inmates who died of overdoses, to nine last year from 26 in 2016. Other successes have been reported in jails in Louisville, Ky.; Sacramento, Calif.; and Massachusetts. “It makes no sense that people who have a public health issue don’t have access to medicine,” said Jasmine Budnella,

drug policy coordinator at VOCAL-NY, a group that advocates on behalf of low-income New Yorkers on such issues as criminal justice, drug policy and homelessness. “In the U.S., we talk about human rights, but we are literally torturing these people.” Two years ago, Matt Herring, 24, died of a drug overdose after years of struggling with addiction and bouncing in and out of correctional facilities. His mother, Patricia Herring, said Matt once tried to smuggle Suboxone into jail in order to avoid the horrors of withdrawal. Guards found the medication and took it away.

Patricia Herring has now become a selfdescribed “mom on a mission” to push for greater resources for addiction treatment in correctional facilities. “If he had been given medication-assisted treatment when he entered, I don’t know, maybe things would have been different,” she said. With no organized opposition, the debate over supporting medication-assisted treatment in correctional settings comes down to dollars and cents. Some counties have paid for programs in their jails; others have not. A total of six state and local lockups in the New York City area, for example, have limited drug-assistance programs for people addicted to opioids. Albany County became the first county in the state outside of New York City to offer medication-assisted treatment. Sheriff Craig Apple said he had become a believer. “It took me a while to get on board with this, but we’re already seeing early success,” he said. A state budget proposal from Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, would spend $3.75 million to expand access in county jails and use more than $1 million to expand its use in state prisons. Democratic leaders of the state Legislature have called for more, and advocates say they want to see at least $7 million in the annual budget. A spokesman for Cuomo’s budget office defended the governor’s proposed funding amount, saying it was part of a broader, “holistic” approach to fighting opioid addiction. “The medication-assisted treatment program is just one prong of New York State’s $200 million, nation-leading fight against opioid addiction that is implementing effective solutions to save lives,” spokesman Freeman Klopott said. A decision is expected by April 1.

Trump, Israeli leader Netanyahu have mutually beneficial relationship BY MATTHEW LEE AND CATHERINE LUCEY Associated Press

JERUSALEM • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was glowing as he stepped up to a podium in the backyard of his Jerusalem home to welcome U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to a holiday dinner. Less than an hour earlier, President Donald Trump had surprised the world by announcing that the U.S. would reverse policy and recognize Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights, a strategic plateau that Israel seized from Syria after the SixDay War of 1967. Senior U.S. and Israeli officials had been told privately that such an announcement was in the works, but that it wouldn’t come until Netanyahu visited Washington the following week. Instead, Trump abruptly tweeted the news, delaying the Thursday dinner cele-

brating the Jewish holiday of Purim so Netanyahu could call the president to thank him. “We have a miracle of Purim,” Netanyahu said, beaming broadly at his wife, Sarah, the secretary of state and U.S. Ambassador to Israel David Friedman, as they sat outside on a chilly evening. “President Trump has just made history.” The effusive praise of Trump by Netanyahu is characteristic of their mutually beneficial relationship, more pronounced than perhaps any previous alliance between leaders of the two countries. The surprise recognition of the Golan was just the most recent of many examples. “The Trump-Netanyahu relationship has no precedent,” said Alon Pinkas, a former Israeli consul-general in New York. “They see eye to eye.” Their unusual connection began as soon as Trump took office, when Netanyahu was among the first foreign leaders to visit

the White House. Trump appreciates the praise Netanyahu has lavished upon him compared with the more restrained reaction from other foreign leaders. And boosting Israel plays well with his political base, which is heavy with conservative Christians who see it as a top priority. Trump has deputized son-in-law Jared Kushner, whose family has longstanding personal ties to Netanyahu, to work on a Middle East peace plan, though details of that strategy remain unclear. Netanyahu will be in Washington for the American Israel Public Affairs Committee annual conference and will be hosted at the White House for a meeting and a dinner — his third trip there since Trump took over. Even before the Golan move, Trump has repeatedly and radically altered U.S. policies related to Israel, siding with Netanyahu at the expense of the Palestinians

and to the dismay of longtime U.S. allies in Europe and others. He recognized Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, moved the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv, eliminated hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to the Palestinians, closed their representative office in Washington, and ended the decades-long practice of opposing Israeli settlement activity in the West Bank in what would be the core of a future Palestinian state. Trump also withdrew from the landmark 2015 Iran nuclear deal, which Netanyahu had fiercely opposed, and reimposed stringent new sanctions on the country that Israel regards as an existential threat. And he pulled the U.S. out of several U.N. organizations, the U.N. Human Rights Council and UNESCO, citing antiIsrael bias in their agendas.

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A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

Africa’s booming cities are running out of water BY EKOW DONTOH AND MIKE COHEN Bloomberg

As water supplies in Ghana’s capital grew increasingly erratic, Beatrice Kabuki stopped customers from using her grocery store’s bathrooms and installed a plastic storage tank at her home. “The taps flow once a week and usually at night, so we stay awake to fetch what we can store,” Kabuki, 35, said in an interview in Accra. “We mostly augment by buying water from tankers.” Cities and towns in several other African nations including Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Ivory Coast have been plagued by similar water shortages, manifestations of a global supply squeeze brought on by drought, population growth, urbanization and insufficient investment in dams and other infrastructure. Water use has risen about 1 percent a year since the 1980s and more than 2 billion people now live in countries experiencing high water stress, the United Nations said in its World Water Development Report released in Geneva on Tuesday. It projects demand will grow as much as 30 percent by 2050. “Stress levels will continue to increase as demand for water grows and the effects of climate change intensify,” the UN said in the report. The scourge is set to become exponentially worse in Africa — the UN expects the population of the world’s poorest continent to almost double to 2.5 billion by 2050, and

that 59 percent will reside in urban areas by then, up from 43 percent now. A massive increase in agricultural production will be required to feed everyone, compounding the pressures caused by surging household demand for water. Even nations with plentiful water resources may be unable to build sufficient dams, pipelines, pumping stations and purification plants to ensure adequate supply. A study published by the African Development Bank last year found the continent needs to spend at least $130 billion to address an infrastructure backlog, including as much as $66 billion on providing universal access to water and sanitation, but faces a financing gap of $68 billion to $108 billion. Large up-front investments, short-term political considerations and government-borrowing constraints impede infrastructure construction, with the problem particularly acute in Africa, according to the Global Infrastructure Hub, which was set up by the Group of 20 developed nations to promote development. The benefits the projects deliver to society at large may also outstrip the returns operators earn on them, a likely deterrent to private investment, it said. Crumbling infrastructure has compounded the effect of a crippling drought in cash-strapped Zimbabwe, resulting in water rationing in its two largest cities, Harare and Bulawayo. In Maputo, Mozambique’s capital, supply has been cut off on

alternating days since January after dam levels fell to less than a quarter of their capacity. Taps in Cape Town, South Africa’s tourist mecca, came close to running dry last year before good winter rains brought respite from the region’s worst drought on record. The nightmare of running out of water became a reality last year in Bouake, Ivory Coast’s second-largest city, when rains failed. The government was forced to use tankers to truck in emergency supplies, while thousands of people temporarily relocated. Water shortages in Accra, which mostly gets regular rainfall, are mainly attributed to its inadequate and poorly maintained pipes, pumping stations and purification plants. About 4.9 million people live in and around the city Joyce Ayitey, 42, who sells plastic cups, tissues and sweets from a wooden stall in front of the home she shares with her husband and three daughters in Diabolo, has experienced the extremity of the problem. When her taps ran dry more than two years ago, the water utility company blamed road builders who destroyed its main pipelines and said the outage would be addressed within weeks, but nothing was done. “We don’t have the money to buy bulk water from tankers, so we walk almost every day to buy water and carry it on our heads for use,” she said. “The water fetching is so tiring. We always wish for rain so we can harvest every drop for storage. It gives us such huge respite.”

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A16 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

Kansas death penalty case has implications for mentally ill BY ROXANA HEGEMAN Associated Press

WICHITA, KAN. • The day after

Thanksgiving in 2009, James Kahler went to the home of his estranged wife’s grandmother, where he shot the two women, along with his two teenage daughters. No one — not even Kahler’s attorneys — disputes that he killed the four relatives. Instead, his attorneys argue that he was suffering from depression so severe that he experienced extreme emotional disturbance, dissociating him from Kahler reality. What had been an open-andshut death penalty case — Kahler was convicted and sentenced in 2011 — was upended when the U.S. Supreme Court said this past week that it would consider whether Kansas unconstitutionally abolished his right to use insanity as a defense. A ruling from the nation’s highest court could have far-reaching implications for mentally ill defendants across the nation. Kansas is one of five states where a traditional insanity defense (in which a person must understand the difference between right and wrong before being found guilty of a crime)

isn’t allowed. Instead, someone can cite “mental disease or defect” as a partial defense but must prove that he didn’t intend to commit the crime. The other states with similar laws are Alaska, Idaho, Montana and Utah. “A favorable decision in this case would make it clear that the Constitution requires that a defendant be able to understand the difference between right and wrong before being found guilty, and, in cases like Mr. Kahler’s, put to death,” his defense attorney, Meryle Carver-Allmond, said in an email. Kahler’s attorneys argued in their petition to the Supreme Court that his mental state was so disturbed that he was unable to control his actions. “We’re hopeful that, in taking Mr. Kahler’s case, the United States Supreme Court has indicated a desire to find that the Constitution requires better of us in our treatment of mentally ill defendants,” Carver-Allmond said. The state argues that it hasn’t abolished the insanity defense, just modified it. “We think the state’s approach, providing for an insanity defense based on mental disease or defect, satisfies constitutional requirements,” Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt said in an emailed statement. “We look forward to defending the statute and arguing our

case before the Justices in the fall.” Kahler was in the middle of a contentious divorce when he went to Dorothy Wight’s home in Burlingame, where his wife, Karen, and three children were spending the Thanksgiving holiday. He found Karen in the kitchen and shot her twice, then shot Wight and his daughter Emily in the living room. He found his daughter Lauren in an upstairs bedroom. His son, Sean, fled to a neighboring house. Sherrie Baughn, executive director of the Kansas chapter of the National Alliance for Mental Illness, said her organization opposed execution of people who have a serious mental illness or mental disability when committing a crime. “I am happy that they are looking at it and reviewing this,” Baughn said of the Supreme Court decision to take up the Kansas case. “Despite constitutional protections, the death penalty is still somewhat applied to people with mental illness or mental disabilities.” It is unclear how often an insanity defense would be used in Kansas, because the state hasn’t really had one for so many years now, CarverAllmond said. Without the option, seriously mentally ill defendants are often left to go to trial with little to no defense or forced to plead guilty on bad terms.

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WORLD

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A19

Secrecy surrounds successor in Iran Next supreme ruler may not come from a list of obvious candidates now circulating BY ERIN CUNNINGHAM AND MUSTAFA SALIM Washington Post

NAJAF, IRAQ • Wedged in the corner of a squat brick building in this holy Muslim city, Sheikh Aladdin al-Jazari’s cramped office belies his ties to a powerful patron: the supreme leader of Iran. The furniture is sparse, the rooms dimly lit. But Jazari is a key liaison to the office of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the Iranian leader, whom Jazari says he has met multiple times. As rumors swirl that Khamenei, 79, is laying the groundwork for his successor after three decades in power, clerics such as Jazari, from his perch next door in the spiritual heart of Shiite Islam, have rare visibility into a transition process known for its secrecy. He says Iran’s next supreme ruler may not come from a list of obvious candidates now circulating among analysts and insiders. He bases his assessment both on experience and, given his proximity to Khamenei’s inner circle, a degree of insight into the future. “The chosen one, the one who will replace Khamenei — his identity will not be revealed until the process is final,” said Jazari, who wears a black turban signifying his status as a direct descendant of the prophet Muhammad. He is a senior religious figure in Harakat al-Nujaba, an Iran-backed militia in Iraq that was designated by the U.S. government as a terrorist organization March 5. Jazari recalled the haphazard succession process that followed the death of Iran’s original supreme leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, in 1989. “Khamenei himself wasn’t in the spotlight” before he was chosen, the cleric noted over fresh orange juice and tea served by his young aides. Back then, more influential clerics saw Khamenei as weak and fudged his modest religious credentials to install a more pliable figure. But since that time,

EMILIENNE MALFATTO • Washington Post

Sheikh Khaled al-Baghdadi sits recently in his home in Najaf, Iraq.

Khamenei has outmaneuvered and outlasted his rivals, boosting Iran’s dominance in the region and keeping the Islamic Republic intact. The upcoming transition could remake Iran, the world’s only Shiite theocracy, and alter the geopolitics of the Middle East, where Iran has been projecting its influence in places such as Syria and Iraq. But the inner workings of Iran’s Islamic system — which is based on a contested Shiite doctrine known as wilayat al-faqih, or “guardianship of the jurist” — is notoriously opaque. And efforts to determine the next steps have become somewhat of a parlor game in both the Iranian capital Tehran and in Najaf. The names being bandied about to succeed the supreme leader include those of the chief of the judiciary, the head of a powerful advisory council and Khamenei’s own son. The clergy in Najaf, the primary center of Shiite theology in the world, are for the most part averse to the idea of a supreme religious and political author-

ity and operate independently of the clerical establishment in Iran. But this ancient city, where a maze of alleys rings the golddomed shrine of Imam Ali, a revered figure in Shiite Islam, is also a hub for Iranian students and clerics who come here to brush up on Shiite doctrine and graduate from its famed seminaries, and that traffic binds Najaf closely to the powerful neighbor. “Khamenei now is a very strong leader,” said Sheikh Khaled al-Baghdadi, a Najaf cleric clad in a white turban and loose brown robe, seated in an office surrounded on all sides by bookshelves heavy with religious texts. Baghdadi is among those who doubt the theological legitimacy of the supreme leader position but acknowledges that Khamenei has made effective use of the role. “It’s clear from the size of his rallies and the number of people who attend prayers in Iran that his leadership has been a success,” said Baghdadi, who is close to Iraq’s most senior cleric, and Khamenei rival, Ayatollah Ali

Sistani. But even as Khamenei has consolidated power — promoting allies and empowering the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which is tasked with safeguarding the Islamic system — Iran is facing an uncertain period as its economy falters and tensions with the United States rise. At home, rampant corruption and soaring inflation have stunted economic growth and have angered ordinary Iranians. Abroad, Iran is confronting a U.S. pressure campaign that seeks to isolate the Islamic Republic after the administration of President Donald Trump withdrew last year from the nuclear deal that Iran negotiated with world powers. Such instability, experts say, could undermine an otherwise smooth succession. And that has many Iranians ill at ease. In Iran, “some people are worried about a power vacuum” after Khamenei’s death, said Hadi, 39, an engineer at a construction firm in Tehran owned by the Revolutionary Guard. He requested that his full name not be used so he could speak freely about the

succession process. Hadi says he believes that latent rivalries will emerge among Iran’s political and military elite and that they will “fight for power” during any handover. According to Iran’s constitution, if Khamenei dies or is otherwise incapacitated, a leadership council would be formed to lead for an interim period. A separate body, known as the Assembly of Experts, is responsible for naming a successor. Iranian officials have denied rumors that Khamenei started the process to choose a successor, including a recent report in Iranian media that said he ordered the Assembly of Experts to nominate a suitable candidate within three years. Iran’s succession politics were upended in December, when top contender Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi died, reportedly because of complications from a brain tumor. Shahroudi, who was born and educated in Najaf, “was known for his deep religious knowledge,” said Emad al-Sharaa, a former clerical student and researcher at the Institute for War and Peace Reporting in Iraq. His religious bona fides eclipsed Khamenei’s. Now, a handful of other names are being floated. They include Ebrahim Raisi, the judiciary chief; Sadegh Larijani, head of the powerful Expediency Council; and even Khamenei’s son, Mojtaba Hosseini Khamenei. “The next leader should at least have experience leading the judicial, executive or legislative branch,” said Mohsen Kadivar, a former cleric and Iranian political dissident who teaches Islamic studies at Duke University. But because the stakes are so high, analysts say, it is likely that the formal process will be bypassed in favor of more covert negotiations. The Revolutionary Guard in particular will hold powerful sway over the process, experts say. “The person chosen by Khamenei will be announced ... after the candidate receives approval from Revolutionary Guard commanders,” Kadivar said.

BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

When your mess kit knife becomes your only weapon: A Marine’s survival story from Khe Sanh BY LORI ROSE, BRAND AVE. STUDIOS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

PHOTO PROVIDED BY GUY LEONARD

B

leeding from multiple shrapnel wounds from a grenade blast that knocked the weapon out of his hands and the helmet off his head, Pfc. Guy Leonard zigzagged blindly along a trench dug into a red dirt hilltop outside Khe Sanh in South Vietnam. As he ran and wiped blood from his eyes, Leonard suddenly encountered a North Vietnamese soldier, or NVA. From beneath his flak jacket, Leonard pulled an aluminum mess kit knife and fought his way past one enemy soldier, then another. It was Feb. 8, 1968, and 64 Marines from the 1st Battalion 9th Marines were hunkered down on a small outpost atop a hill about half the size of a football field, trying to fight off hundreds of North Vietnamese soldiers who launched a full-out attack in the hours before dawn.

Ba adly outnumbered, the Marines on a barrage of mortar rounds and rockets Hiill 64 were soon overrun by enemy and rocket-propelled grenades. soldiers swarming their trench lines to fig Leonard and another soldier were on ght in brutal hand-to-hand combat. the back slope of the hill when the asLeeona eonard,, along with most st every other sault began. Soon they were crawling survivor, was severely wounded. More across the rocky hilltop to fire down at than 20 Marines were killed before a re- the enemy. Visibility was so poor they lieef squad from base camp fought their were forced to wait for the illumination wa from explosions in order to see where to ay up the hill to help secure it. aim. Mortar rounds and rockets were so TH HE WALKING DEAD loud that both of Leonard’s ear drums Leeonard, now 70 and a resident of Sun- burst. sett Hills, had been working as a typesettter in St. Louis when he joined the “They were landing so close they would M Marines in 1967 at age 18. throw us off the ground 18 inches or 2 feet and then slam us back down to the Affter training, he was attached to the ground,” he said. 1/9 an infantry division nicknamed The 1/9, Walking Dead for its high casualty rate, A BIG, COLD SHOVEL and sent to Camp Evans in Vietnam. He As dawn broke, the two men moved into soon found himself boarding a Chinook the trench line on the other side of the helicopter headed to Khe Sanh, south hill and were hit by enemy grenades. of the demilitarized zone near the bor- Shrapnel struck nearly every part of his body not protected by his flak jacket, der with Laos. Leonard said. The Hill 64 Marines spent the first couple of weeks chopping out a 7-foot- “The second grenade blew my rifle away deep trench, lining bunkers with sand and blew my helmet off,” he said. “It felt bags filled with the hunks of the hard like being hit by a big, cold shovel.” earth they dug up, and surviving on little sleep, not enough water and two With blood streaming down his face, C-rations a day. Thousands of North Leonard reached into his flak jacket Vietnamese soldiers, meanwhile, had and took out the mess kit knife he had already begun a massive artillery bom- sharpened on rocks and fought his way bardment on Khe Sanh Base Camp and back to where he’d begun. He jumped the surrounding hillsides in a battle that into the bunker next to a fellow Marine, who stared at him in horror. would rage for 11 weeks.

Leonard and the other Marines on Hill “I guess I looked kind of spooky,” 64 were dodging artillery and sniper Leonard said. “I thought, man I guess I fire but it was nothing like what was to must be hurt pretty bad.” come. A medical corpsman gave him mor“I had just gotten up from my sleep,” In the foggy hours before dawn on Feb. phine and sent him on foot amid snipLeonard said. “Mortars and rockets 8, a reinforced battalion of an estimated er fire down a steep trail to a waiting and everything started coming in.” 600 NVA soldiers attacked Hill 64 with “mule,” a small f latbed vehicle that

STORIES OF HONOR IS PRESENTED BY:

would carry him to the aid station. From there he was shipped by helicopter to Da Nang Air Base. His wounds were so severe, he said, the crew put him in a basket on the outside of the chopper, usually reserved for fatalities. “They thought I was dead because I was on the outside of the chopper so they left me in the hall for a long time,” Leonard said. “Then I felt somebody messing around with my foot and I said, ‘hey!’ They were getting ready to put a toe tag on me.” Leonard spent eight months in hospitals and then finished out his military career as a corporal stationed in Cuba. After he returned to St. Louis in 1970, he worked again as a typesetter but spent most of his career in government jobs, including as a park ranger with the National Park Service. Vivid memories of Vietnam remain fresh more than 50 years later, Leonard said. He finds solace in the peacefulness of nature and enjoys spending time at a second home in Montana. He always carries a knife, though. “Because you never know when you might need it,” he said.

NOMINATE YOUR SOLDIER AT: STLtoday.com/StoriesOfHonor Stories are told from the nominee’s point of view. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.


WORLD

03.24.2019 • SunDay • M 2

French ‘yellow vest’ protests in Paris avoid last week’s riots Tighter security, ban on certain areas help demonstrations stay largely peaceful

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A19

Anti-Brexit marchers flood into London, demand new vote

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Protesters take part Saturday in a rally near the Sacre-Coeur Cathedral in Montmartre, Paris. Security was tight as as “yellow vest” protesters demonstrated for the 19th weekend. BY SYLVIE CORBET AND ANGELA CHARLTON associated Press

PARIS • Scattered “yellow vest”

protesters clashed with French police firing tear gas Saturday after a peaceful march through Paris, but tougher security measures and protest bans in highrisk neighborhoods prevented the kind of rioting that devastated the capital a week ago. The 4-month-old movement drew bigger crowds Saturday than in recent weeks, even though last weekend’s violence dented overall support for the cause. The protesters want more help for struggling French workers and retirees and say President Emmanuel Macron favors the elite. Thousands of demonstrators marched peacefully through Paris — their 19th straight weekend of protests — ending up at the Sacre-Coeur Cathedral overlooking the city from the historic Montmartre neighborhood. Protesters sprayed yellow flares and unfurled a neon banner from atop the cathedral’s white dome. In a relaxed mood, demonstrators and tourists alike took selfies as the march wound down. Later, however, tension

erupted as small clusters of masked protesters set garbage cans on fire and threw projectiles as they moved toward Republique Plaza in eastern Paris. Helmeted riot police fired volleys of tear gas in response. A police officer on the plaza suffered a heart problem, slumping to the ground before being hospitalized in what Paris police described as a “very serious” condition. Associated Press journalists at the scene saw no violence or incidents nearby when he collapsed. At least 2,000 people have been injured in protest violence since the yellow vest movement began in November, and 11 people have been killed in protestrelated road accidents. Elsewhere in France on Saturday, small groups of demonstrators and police clashed in the southern French cities of Nice and Montpellier. Nice was placed under high security measures as Chinese President Xi Jinping is expected to stay overnight on Sunday as part of his state visit to France. Overall though, Saturday’s protests were calmer than a week ago, when resurgent violence reminded France’s government that they’ve failed to quell public anger.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

An effigy of British Prime Minister Theresa May passes by Downing Street during a “Peoples Vote” antiBrexit march in London on Saturday. BY GREGORY KATZ associated Press

LONDON • Anti-Brexit protesters flooded into central London by the hundreds of thousands on Saturday, demanding that Britain’s Conservative-led government hold a new referendum on whether Britain should leave the European Union. The “People’s Vote March” snaked from Park Lane and other locations to converge on Parliament, where the fate of Brexit will be decided. Marchers carried European Union flags and signs praising the longstanding ties between Britain and continental Europe. The protest drew people from across Britain who are determined to force Prime Minister Theresa May’s government to alter its march toward Brexit. Liberal Democrat leader Vince Cable, invited to help lead the march, called the crowd impressive and unified. “There is a huge turnout of people here from all walks of life, of all ages and from all over the country,” he tweeted. “We are a Remain country now with 60 percent wanting to stop the Brexit mess.” Police did not provide a crowd estimate. Independent legisla-

tor Chuka Umunna and others supporting a second Brexit referendum estimated the crowd at 1 million. More than 4 million people endorsed an electronic petition this week in favor of revoking Article 50, the act that formally triggered the Brexit process. The march comes as May, who opposes a second referendum on Britain’s EU membership, is easing away from plans to hold a third vote on her troubled Brexit withdrawal plan, which has been strongly rejected twice by Parliament. In a letter to lawmakers on Friday night, May said she might not seek passage of her Brexit withdrawal plan in Parliament next week. The embattled leader said she would bring her EU divorce plan back to Parliament only if there seemed to be enough backing for it to pass. “If it appears that there is not sufficient support to bring the deal back next week, or the House rejects it again, we can ask for another extension before 12 April, but that will involve holding European Parliament elections,” she said. May’s changing stance reflects the plan’s dismal chances in the House of Commons after two prior defeats. She would need

the approval of House Speaker John Bercow to bring the plan back for a third time. Bercow has said a third vote would violate parliamentary rules against repeatedly voting on the same thing unless May’s Brexit divorce plan was altered. Almost three years after Britons voted to walk away from the EU, the bloc’s leaders this week seized control of the Brexit timetable from May to avert a chaotic departure on March 29 that would be disruptive for the world’s biggest trading bloc and deeply damaging for Britain. EU leaders at a summit in Brussels set two deadlines for Britain to leave the bloc of nearly half a billion people or to take an entirely new path in considering its EU future. They agreed to extend the Brexit date until May 22, on the eve of the EU Parliament elections, if May can persuade the British Parliament to endorse her Brexit divorce deal. Failing that, they gave May until April 12 to choose between leaving the bloc without a divorce deal or deciding on a radically new path, such as revoking Britain’s decision to leave, holding a new referendum on Brexit or finding a cross-party consensus for a very different kind of Brexit.

BR A N D AV E. ST U DIOS CON T EN T

When your mess kit knife becomes your only weapon: A Marine’s survival story from Khe Sanh BY LORI ROSE, BRAND AVE. STUDIOS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

PHOTO PROVIDED BY GUY LEONARD

B

leeding from multiple shrapnel wounds from a grenade blast that knocked the weapon out of his hands and the helmet off his head, Pfc. Guy Leonard zigzagged blindly along a trench dug into a red dirt hilltop outside Khe Sanh in South Vietnam. As he ran and wiped blood from his eyes, Leonard suddenly encountered a North Vietnamese soldier, or NVA. From beneath his flak jacket, Leonard pulled an aluminum mess kit knife and fought his way past one enemy soldier, then another. It was Feb. 8, 1968, and 64 Marines from the 1st Battalion 9th Marines were hunkered down on a small outpost atop a hill about half the size of a football field, trying to fight off hundreds of North Vietnamese soldiers who launched a full-out attack in the hours before dawn.

Ba adly outnumbered, the Marines on a barrage of mortar rounds and rockets Hiill 64 were soon overrun by enemy and rocket-propelled grenades. soldiers swarming their trench lines to fig Leonard and another soldier were on ght in brutal hand-to-hand combat. the back slope of the hill when the asLeeona eonard,, along with most st every other sault began. Soon they were crawling survivor, was severely wounded. More across the rocky hilltop to fire down at than 20 Marines were killed before a re- the enemy. Visibility was so poor they lieef squad from base camp fought their were forced to wait for the illumination wa from explosions in order to see where to ay up the hill to help secure it. aim. Mortar rounds and rockets were so TH HE WALKING DEAD loud that both of Leonard’s ear drums Leeonard, now 70 and a resident of Sun- burst. sett Hills, had been working as a typesettter in St. Louis when he joined the “They were landing so close they would M Marines in 1967 at age 18. throw us off the ground 18 inches or 2 feet and then slam us back down to the Affter training, he was attached to the ground,” he said. 1/9 an infantry division nicknamed The 1/9, Walking Dead for its high casualty rate, A BIG, COLD SHOVEL and sent to Camp Evans in Vietnam. He As dawn broke, the two men moved into soon found himself boarding a Chinook the trench line on the other side of the helicopter headed to Khe Sanh, south hill and were hit by enemy grenades. of the demilitarized zone near the bor- Shrapnel struck nearly every part of his body not protected by his flak jacket, der with Laos. Leonard said. The Hill 64 Marines spent the first couple of weeks chopping out a 7-foot- “The second grenade blew my rifle away deep trench, lining bunkers with sand and blew my helmet off,” he said. “It felt bags filled with the hunks of the hard like being hit by a big, cold shovel.” earth they dug up, and surviving on little sleep, not enough water and two With blood streaming down his face, C-rations a day. Thousands of North Leonard reached into his flak jacket Vietnamese soldiers, meanwhile, had and took out the mess kit knife he had already begun a massive artillery bom- sharpened on rocks and fought his way bardment on Khe Sanh Base Camp and back to where he’d begun. He jumped the surrounding hillsides in a battle that into the bunker next to a fellow Marine, who stared at him in horror. would rage for 11 weeks.

Leonard and the other Marines on Hill “I guess I looked kind of spooky,” 64 were dodging artillery and sniper Leonard said. “I thought, man I guess I fire but it was nothing like what was to must be hurt pretty bad.” come. A medical corpsman gave him mor“I had just gotten up from my sleep,” In the foggy hours before dawn on Feb. phine and sent him on foot amid snipLeonard said. “Mortars and rockets 8, a reinforced battalion of an estimated er fire down a steep trail to a waiting and everything started coming in.” 600 NVA soldiers attacked Hill 64 with “mule,” a small f latbed vehicle that

STORIES OF HONOR IS PRESENTED BY:

would carry him to the aid station. From there he was shipped by helicopter to Da Nang Air Base. His wounds were so severe, he said, the crew put him in a basket on the outside of the chopper, usually reserved for fatalities. “They thought I was dead because I was on the outside of the chopper so they left me in the hall for a long time,” Leonard said. “Then I felt somebody messing around with my foot and I said, ‘hey!’ They were getting ready to put a toe tag on me.” Leonard spent eight months in hospitals and then finished out his military career as a corporal stationed in Cuba. After he returned to St. Louis in 1970, he worked again as a typesetter but spent most of his career in government jobs, including as a park ranger with the National Park Service. Vivid memories of Vietnam remain fresh more than 50 years later, Leonard said. He finds solace in the peacefulness of nature and enjoys spending time at a second home in Montana. He always carries a knife, though. “Because you never know when you might need it,” he said.

NOMINATE YOUR SOLDIER AT: STLtoday.com/StoriesOfHonor Stories are told from the nominee’s point of view. This content was produced by Brand Ave. Studios. The news and editorial departments of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch had no role in its creation or display. For more information about Brand Ave. Studios, contact tgriffin@stltoday.com.


A L E E E N T E R P R I S E S N E W S PA P E R • F O U N D E D BY J O S E P H P U L I T Z E R D E C . 1 2 , 1 8 7 8

SUNDAy • 03.24.2019 • A20 RAY FARRIS PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER

• GILBERT BAILON EDITOR • TOD ROBBERSON EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR

Ebola is back Cases are mounting in Central Africa. Is Trump prepared to join the fight?

See editorial cartoons from around the country online at stltoday.com/opinion

yOUR VIEWS • LETTERS FROM OUR READERS BONNIE JO MOUNT • Washington Post

The Post-Dispatch should look at this easily attainable information, and get answers for the voting public. Greg Rybacki • St. Louis County

Red Cross workers take the temperature of people crossing the border from Congo into Uganda. Congo is battling a spreading Ebola outbreak.

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he Ebola scare of 2014-2016 served as America’s wake-up call about the consequences of ignoring serious and deadly epidemics in faraway places. Given the highly mobile nature of the global population, Ebola could be only a plane ride away from becoming America’s problem. That’s why an epidemic in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is too serious to dismiss as being too distant to worry about. More than 900 Ebola cases have been confirmed during the current outbreak, with 569 deaths attributed to the disease. The numbers will certainly grow because experts acknowledge it is not contained. Back in October, when the number of cases was closer to 300, the Trump administration responded by pulling back U.S. personnel, overruling a recommendation of Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to keep experts on the ground. A rebel war made it harder to justify the risk. As the epidemic grew, the administration reversed itself in December and began dispatching experts and aid. But the administration remains reluctant to fully engage in the fight. During the 2014 outbreak, the number of cases fluctuated in spikes and troughs for months until the virus migrated from rural Guinea, in West Africa, into urban areas. Travelers picked it up. Cases popped up in neighboring Liberia and Sierra Leone. Then it exploded.

The outbreak sickened more than 28,600 people and killed more than 11,300. Among those infected were an American doctor and two Dallas nurses who had cared for Thomas Eric Duncan, a Liberian man who had traveled to Dallas before his own Ebola symptoms had developed. He died, but the doctor and two nurses survived. The nation succumbed to full-blown Ebola hysteria. A 7-year-old girl was barred from her school because she had traveled to Nigeria, 1,100 miles from the outbreak. A North Carolina teacher had to stay home for three weeks because he had traveled to South Africa, 3,250 miles from the infection zone. A big problem with the last outbreak and the current one is that people from infected areas work hard to hide evidence that they might have been exposed to Ebola. As The New York Times reported March 7, families go to elaborate lengths, such as dressing up a young woman who had died from Ebola, applying makeup and propping her up in a car seat in hopes that they could pass undetected through a checkpoint established specifically to contain the disease. People who have touched infected patients — including Duncan before he traveled to Dallas — often tend to be reluctant to declare it, which can cost them their lives. Ignorance is the enemy. But so is the assumption that America stays safer by avoiding involvement. The smartest way to block the spread of Ebola here is to join the effort to fight it over there.

Preventive programs may help teens avoid obesity, surgery

LAURIE SKRIVAN • P-D

St. Louis Alderman Brandon Bosley, who represents Ward 3, shares his concerns about Better Together’s plan to merge St. Louis County and the city on Feb. 11.

Better Together also must toe the line on public funds The March 17 Post-Dispatch editorial “It’s only fair” was ironic. The editorial directly castigates Des Peres Mayor Mark Becker for allegedly using public funds to oppose Better Together — and indirectly warns the 88 St. Louis County municipalities not to engage in similar misconduct. Juxtaposed is the picture of the Better Together architects arm in arm with the unelected mayor-to-be of the proposed merged municipality, Steve Stenger, and St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson. Yet the editorial gave no similar warning to Stenger and Krewson and the Better Together crowd to stay away from public funding. Why not? Have Stenger and Krewson demonstrated they are above using public resources to advance their own political agenda? Bob Stewart • St. Louis County

Votes of city, county should matter most in merger plan

Fake ‘fake news’ Trump’s anti-press rhetoric is now codified in a scary new Russian law.

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nyone who wonders what would be the logical conclusion to President Donald Trump’s constant attacks on the free press were he unrestrained need only look to Russia. There, a new law signed by President Vladimir Putin gives him sweeping authority to limit Russian media and quash criticism. They claim it’s to address what Putin himself now calls “fake news” — which is Trump-speak for negative news. What a testament to Trump’s autocratic instincts: No longer is he merely taking his lead from foreign dictators; now they’re taking their leads from him. Fake news is a genuine problem on social media. But Trump has promoted a dangerous new definition for it: He cites the phrase any time journalists report something he doesn’t like. Period. He cried “fake news” to revelations about his porn star payoff. And his role in covering up the Trump Tower meeting with a Russian operative. And his communication of classified information to a Russian diplomat in the White House. That it was all borne out doesn’t matter to Trump and his base. There’s a tacit understanding that the “fake news” mantra has nothing to do with whether the information is true or false; it’s all about whether it’s good or bad for Trump. Trump’s cynical strategy is now official Kremlin policy. The law Putin signed would use fines and jail time to punish distribution of information that shows “blatant disrespect for the society,

government, official government symbols, constitution or governmental bodies of Russia.” Consider the problem with that wording: Information can be accurate and still express “disrespect” for the government; accusing the government of misdeeds is by definition disrespectful, even if true. Yet “disrespect” in itself, according to the Kremlin, is what Putin is calling “fake news.” He has, it seems, adopted the Trumpian definition of the phrase. Russia has never been a beacon of press freedom, but the new law is onerous even by Russian standards. For the crime of spreading “fake news” — which, again, the Russian government, like Trump, conflates with unpleasant news — one can be fined the equivalent of more than $20,000. Insulting an official (even, presumably, one who richly deserves it) can mean jail time. How envious Trump must be. Each time he tweets out “Fake news!” or complains about soft libel laws or whines about “Saturday Night Live” making fun of him, this is exactly the kind of solution he seems to yearn for. Sure, the U.S. Constitution would appear to prohibit it here. But the Constitution would also appear to prohibit profiting from the presidency, obstructing justice and spending money Congress refuses to appropriate — yet Trump’s Republican enablers have let him do it all. Any Americans who aren’t used to saying nice things about Trump might want to start practicing.

Better Together’s talking point is that we don’t have time for two votes on the merger. There is not time for St. Louis and St. Louis County residents to weigh in on their own choice of government, as this matter is too urgent. This position is repugnant to the basic tenet on which our country was founded — the right of self-determination. I think that Better Together could amend their petition and put in a contingency clause that the petition would only take effect if it was approved by the majority of St. Louis voters and county voters. So we would then have only one vote with everyone’s rights being protected. Kelly Hagan • Kirkwood

More scrutiny of candidates could be helpful to voters When does it become the duty of the press, in this case the Post-Dispatch, to present voters with an accurate and relevant personal history of people running for office? On a national level, the press is looking into people’s lives for any negative stories they can find. However, locally, it doesn’t seem as important. Some people have already announced their intention to run in the next election. Those that win will be making big decisions regarding our country, decisions that affect hundreds of millions. I think it’s important to know if these candidates are capable of managing their own money and lives before they start getting the benefits and perks of being a U.S. lawmaker. Do they have criminal records? Have they paid their taxes without being taken to court? Have they paid rent or been evicted? Do they live where they claim to live? This came up in a recent aldermanic race, and I think it should come up in other elections, too.

Regarding “As teen obesity worsens, doctors turn to surgery” (March 17): These sometimes necessary procedures involve increased health care costs to all. Along with the risk for premature death and chronic conditions, teen obesity may also affect employment and family issues. Why do we not consider preventive programs? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that pediatricians provide body mass index growth charts to parents during every annual exam from age 2 to 20. This takes seconds, and can be completed in a medical office. Based on trends, educational programming, counseling and family support can be effective means of prevention. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation published scientifically supported preventive policies and programs including: recess for students, community-based support for physical activity, fruit and vegetable incentives, multicomponent obesity interventions and physically active classrooms. Missouri requirements for health and physical education instruction are among the lowest in the United States. If teachers would be provided with the time necessary to conduct preventive programs that are based on the needs of all students, this could be an effective way to reduce obesity in children and future adults. Isn’t it time to invest in prevention? Thomas Loughrey • Kirkwood

Reader sends warm wishes to Post-Dispatch columnist Regarding “Ob-la-di, ob-la-da, life goes on” (March 17): I’m sending warm wishes and hope of good news to Post-Dispatch columnist Bill McClellan. I’ve read his columns for decades and it’s clear he’s intelligent, insightful, witty and resilient. I pray that resiliency provides him with many more enjoyable years to come. Scott Miller • St. Louis

McClellan’s column brings sunshine on dreary mornings As Gladys Knight sang: “Don’t leave me this way.” Post-Dispatch columnist Bill McClellan has been the cream in my coffee, my sunshine on dreary mornings, my first smile of the day. I always look forward to his column. Thursday evenings on KETC (Channel 9) won’t be the same without your mischievous grin, your beguiling smile and opinions on “Donnybrook,” which I always agreed with — or almost always. I even admired your rumpled sport coat and your ties. I bet your wife, Mary, never picked those out for you, or maybe she did. She sounds like a great person to have around, especially when it comes to planning rehearsal dinners. I hope you enjoy your son’s wedding; eat your salmon and “dance like no one’s watching.” Then get to the Mayo Clinic and fight like hell, get well and come back to those of us who miss you. With the love of family, the guiding hand of God and prayers from all who love you, we will hear from you soon. Bonnie Morse • Clayton Read more letters online at STLtoday.com/letters

TOD ROBBERSON Editorial Page Editor • trobberson@post-dispatch.com 314-340-8382

STLtoday.com/opinion Find us at facebook/PDPlatform • Follow us on twitter @PDEditorial I know that my retirement will make no difference in its cardinal principles, that it will always fight for progress and reform, never tolerate injustice or corruption, always fight demagogues of all parties, never belong to any party, always oppose privileged classes and public plunderers, never lack sympathy with the poor, always remain devoted to the public welfare, never be satisfied with merely printing news, always be drastically independent, never be afraid to attack wrong, whether by predatory plutocracy or predatory poverty • JOSEPH PULITZER • APRIL 10, 1907 PLATFORM •

MAIL Letters to the editor St. Louis Post-Dispatch, E-MAIL 900 N. Tucker Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63101 letters@post-dispatch.com Letters should be 250 words or fewer. Please include your name, address and phone number. All letters are subject to editing. Writers usually will not be published more than once every 60 days.


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03.24.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

75 YEARS AGO TODAY ON THE EDITORIAL PAGE

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • A21

AN OBSTACLE TO DISABLED VETERANS • A number of disabled veterans returning from the wars in Europe and the Pacific have been rejected by the examining physicians of insurance companies writing workmen’s compensation insurance. This prevents their employment unless the employing company should wish to assume the compensation risk, which it would be most unlikely to do. Access the full item at stltoday.com/opinion

Brexit mired in chaos, confusion and contradictions With ‘divorce’ in disarray, Britain’s economic outlook is looking grim. ROBERT J. SAMUELSON Washington Post

Those of us who have always thought that Brexit — Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union — was a bad idea should be feeling self-satisfied and vindicated now. Well, we’re not; at least this observer isn’t. The reason is obvious. Many of the things that we feared would happen have happened, or might still. Worse, the consequences aren’t confined to the United Kingdom. If you take a crude and unscientific survey of some of Washington’s major think tanks, you discover (no surprise) that they’re generally agreed that the

economic outlook for Britain is grim. Here’s a commentary by economist Desmond Lachman of the right-of-center American Enterprise Institute: “Since the Brexit referendum, the U.K.’s economic performance has deteriorated. It has done so as the U.K.’s future access to the European single market, which buys around 50 percent of the U.K.’s exports, has come into serious question. … At a time that the European economy is already stuttering, with Italy in recession and the German economy on the cusp of recession, the last thing that Europe now needs is a sclerotic U.K. economy.” A new study from the Peterson Institute for International Economics reviewed the forecasts of 12 economic models and

found that only two of them predicted gains from Brexit. Other studies forecast losses up to 8 percent of gross domestic product (GDP). The study also warns that “a no-deal ‘crash out’” — a reversion to higher tariffs rather than a “soft Brexit” of continuing the present notariff situation — “would have serious negative short-run impacts on the U.K., which are essentially impossible to model.” Although EU countries would also lose some exports to the U.K., these are much smaller than the U.K.’s export losses to the EU. Thus, they’re more easily made up by boosting exports to other countries, the report contends. The U.K.’s losses are not just theoretical. Already, some companies are announcing closures of U.K. manufacturing operations, a good example being Honda. Similarly, some banks are moving financial

assets (stocks, bonds, other securities) from their London offices to locations on the continent. There is much fear that London will lose its traditional position as Europe’s pre-eminent financial center. Meanwhile, the chaos, confusion and contradictions of Parliament’s efforts to find a tenable Brexit policy must seriously undermine confidence in Britain’s political system and its ability to attract investors, domestic and foreign. The prevailing political anarchy has been on public display this month. On March 12, Parliament rejected Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposed agreement with the EU for the second time. Then on March 13, it voted down a proposal for the U.K. to leave the EU without an agreement, failing to acknowledge “that this is precisely what will happen unless they reconcile

themselves to the very deal they rejected the day before,” as Douglas Rediker of The Brookings Institution noted in a blog post. The Brexit deadline has been March 29, though the EU in the past few days agreed to give Britain until April 12 to decide how to proceed. The larger and more significant issue floating over this controversy involves the future of the world trading system. There has been a loss of authority among the corporate executives, governmental officials and economists whose support is crucial if the system is to survive and flourish. It’s not that they have changed their minds about the value of open trade so much as the public has turned more skeptical and hostile to trade expansion. A less supportive public in turn alters the political climate, making governments more nationalistic and leading to more, not

fewer, trade barriers. Multinational firms become more cautious in making new investments, because they can’t know how much open trade will be tolerated. Brexit is one example of this break from the past. Others are well-known: the Trump administration’s renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) with Canada and Mexico; its bargaining with China over trade practices; and the imposition of U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. The fate of Brexit is just a small part of this much larger story. Is the postWorld War II global trading system, constructed gradually over the past half-century or so, breaking down? Or is it just in a state of temporary hiatus? History awaits an answer. Robert J. Samuelson Copyright The Washington Post

Shipwreck on horizon with older candidates Decline is inevitable; that’s a fact that Biden and Sanders must face. RICHARD COHEN Washington Post

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney (left) and President Barack Obama spar during the second presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., on Oct. 16, 2012.

‘A disaster for democracy’ Donald Trump’s 2012 assessment of the Electoral College was right. It still is. KEVIN McDERMOTT St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“The electoral college is a disaster for democracy.” So tweeted Manhattan businessman Donald Trump on election night 2012. There had been data to suggest (wrongly, it turned out) that Republican Mitt Romney might win the popular vote, while incumbent President Barack Obama got a second term anyway because of the Electoral College. Trump seemed to believe that would be a travesty. And it would have been. As it was when George W. Bush won (or lost, depending on how you look at it) that way in 2000. And as it was in 2016, when Hillary Clinton beat Trump by a popular vote margin bigger than the population of Chicago, yet was denied the office that a clear plurality of Americans wanted her to have. It’s surreal that more than two centuries after the founders concocted this convoluted, undemocratic way of choosing our president — based largely on the political imperative of coddling small slave states — we still live under that anachronism. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., last week became the first major presidential candidate to make elimination of the Electoral College a front-andcenter goal. Speaking in Mississippi, she noted that state is ignored by presidential candidates because, under the winner-take-all scheme that most states use to allocate their electoral votes, there’s no point in setting foot in any state you can’t win. Mississippi isn’t alone. All states that lean significantly left or right get ignored — which means most states, including reliably Republican Missouri

and reliably Democratic Illinois. The Electoral College narrows the campaign battlefield to a handful of states where voters happen to be evenly divided between the two parties. Florida has nice beaches, and you’ve got to love Wisconsin’s cheese. But why exactly should the nation’s campaign process wrap itself around the voters in those and a few other states while virtually ignoring the rest of us? The greater damage of the Electoral College, though, isn’t in how we’re courted by the candidates, but in which one ends up taking us down the aisle. Twice in recent times, it’s been someone other than the one the voters clearly chose. That’s in part because the Electoral College gives extra weight to votes cast in small-population states. That’s often invoked in its defense: Why (goes the argument) should smallstate rural residents, who constitute a geographic minority of the country, have to be subject to the whims of the majority who live in big urban states? It sounds like a semi-reasonable point until you consider what they’re defending: a system in which the minority who live in small rural states have outsized power to impose their whims on the majority who don’t. If there’s a rational defense for that stance other than,“Thanks to the Electoral College, we can,” I’ve yet to hear it. Warren didn’t provide details on how, exactly, she would get rid of that system. In fact, it’s probably not touchable any time soon. Changing it — either by amending the Constitution, or via a state-by-state workaround that some are promoting — would require the acquiescence of those rural small-staters who so indignantly insist that their votes should count for more than the votes of urban dwellers, because … well, because.

What should be a mostly geographic debate has become a hotly partisan one, because geography so affects our politics. Democrats today tend to cluster in big urban centers while Republicans tend to spread out over less-populated rural areas. You can debate the qualities of either lifestyle, but what’s undebatable is that the Electoral College tends to help the latter. It’s no coincidence, then, that both the modern presidents who have gotten into office with Electoral College asterisks have been Republicans. To find the last Republican president who initially got into office by actually getting more votes than the Democrat, you have to reach three decades back to George H.W. Bush, in 1988. Still, Republicans often claim their defense of the Electoral College is a matter of constitutional principle. It’ll be interesting to see if that principle holds should a Democrat become an asterisk president at some point. Defending a system that keeps a minority party in power is easy enough when you are that party, but maybe not so much when you’re on the other side of the equation. Unless and until that happens, we’re probably stuck with the system that gave us President Trump, over the objections of the majority of Americans who didn’t want him. Trump today is a big fan of the arcane and bizarre electoral system that allowed him to win after losing. The point here isn’t that he’s a selfserving hypocrite — anyone who still needs proof of that is unreachable — but to give credit where it’s due: Trump was right before he was wrong. The Electoral College is a disaster for democracy. kmcdermott@post-dispatch.com @kevinmcdermott (314) 340-8268

The joke among people my age is that every dinner party starts with an organ recital: Who’s lost a gall bladder, got a new kidney, or maybe just replaced a knee? What’s the pain of the day and who sleeps through the night? Charles de Gaulle said old age is a shipwreck, so the question for America is whether it should consider the age of likely presidential candidates who, statistics and experience tell us, stand a pretty good chance of foundering on the rocks of old age. I’m talking Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders. Sanders and Biden are about the same age. Sanders is 77 and Biden 76, and since the next president will be inaugurated in 2021, I can say without fear of persnickety fact-checkers that both men will be almost two years older by then. It is not unlikely, therefore, that the next president of the United States will be well into his 80s before his first term is up. That’s a shocking figure. Both men are now about the age when the indomitable Winston Churchill started to hit the wall. He was a mere 77 when King George thought of approaching him to suggest he step down. Churchill did not — until a stroke forced him to. The argument here, of course, is that neither Biden nor Sanders lives a Churchillian life — no cigars, no whiskey for breakfast. On the other hand, they are not nearly as articulate. Government statistics tell us that a man Biden’s age will live an average of 11 more years. He likely won’t, however, outlive Sanders, who is statistically scheduled to kick five months later. These, though, are statistical averages and neither Sanders nor Biden is anything of the sort. They are both white, middle class by birth, not likely to overdose on drugs, drive drunk or get into a bar fight with someone wearing a MAGA hat, the dunce cap of our times. I am not sure if Sanders works out, but Biden sure does. I have been to the gym with him. But while looking good may be the best revenge, it isn’t the whole story. The brain ages. It slows down. It forgets. I know men in their 90s — Henry Kissinger comes to mind

— who seem as sharp as they’ve ever been, but they are not the rule. It is not necessary to have great mental energy to get elected — Donald Trump is an intellectual sloth — but it helps. Old age can turn the delight in doing certain tasks into a plodding burden. The old seek their own comfort zones. I wouldn’t be surprised if Biden thinks Snapchat is a breakfast cereal. I wouldn’t be surprised if Sanders thinks Drake is the English pirate who defeated the Spanish Armada. (How’s that for being an influencer?) It’s fine not to know these things, but it suggests an unfamiliarity with a world that is ever-changing. The zeitgeist is forever on the move. When you’re over 70, it may well have passed you by. Of course, a president need not be intimately familiar with youth culture. But he ought to feel at home in the world and feel that the culture is his, that he need not have to pause to translate a thought into politically acceptable language. I don’t know if either Biden or Sanders feels that way, but if they don’t occasionally hanker for a Beatles’ tune, they already lack all memory. Most presidents were in their 50s when elected — mere youths, by today’s standards. Most lived many years after leaving office. (Jimmy Carter, at 94, has been out of office for almost 39 years, a record.) John F. Kennedy was the youngest ever elected at 43, and Trump the oldest to be elected to a first term at 70. The rule here is that there is no rule. Still,“September Song” has to precede “Hail to the Chief.” It is the lament of an old man for a young woman. It is about the passage of time, about how “the days dwindle down to a precious few.” It is about lost opportunities, about summer turning to autumn and “one hasn’t got time for the waiting game.” Biden and Sanders have waited too long. A pledge to serve only a single term will not reverse the clock. It will only hobble the president, making him a lame duck before his time. Of course, the ultimate decision is their own, but they have to know they will probably decline. If they don’t think so, they have gotten old without getting wise. Richard Cohen cohenr@washpost.com Copyright The Washington Post


NEWS

A22 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

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A Star-Spangled

MAKEOVER Spruce up a shed from a big-box store, trading minimal expense for maximum utility while turning it into a stellar backyard feature. written & produced by DEBRA WITTRUP • photography by MARTY BALDWIN

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n an ideal world, a potting shed would be a place to accomplish gardening tasks and stash supplies. But a friend’s storage-challenged shed had become a dumping ground for tools and a parking spot for the lawn mower. In addition, with a deteriorating exterior finish, it had become a shabby blot on a beautifully landscaped yard. That’s when I stepped in at my friend’s invitation and gave the shed purpose and polish without breaking the bank. I began by enhancing the Garden chores become a pleasure exterior of the shed with with this practical space a fresh coat of red paint for potting plants and storing trimmed in white. Then I tools. A brightened interior, took advantage of an adjacent ample work surfaces and fence to create an inviting practical yet pretty storage give the shed a new sitting area outfitted with a personality. lawn chair and side table. Inside the 10×10-foot shed, my first step was to banish the lawn mower to the garage and carve out work space. I added a salvaged window to allow natural light into the small area, then visually expanded the space by painting the walls and ceiling a warm white. For more warmth and finesse, I upgraded the floor with easyto-install teak deck tiles. To make the most of the small space, I divided the shed into work zones for seed starting, potting, and arranging flowers. I built a workbench along one wall, attaching it to the shed’s framing, and added a storage shelf underneath. A fold-down shelf under the window extends the work surface. The shelf lowers easily to make room for offseason storage of garden ornaments and container shrubs. The opposite wall is now home to a freestanding potting bench with a lower shelf for pots and soil, hooks for hand tools, and a narrow upper shelf for display. Above, I hung old beverage crates for instant shelving. Jazzed up with a new coat of paint, a gravel With everything in place, my friend has approach and a seating area, this garden shed is a budget-friendly yet efficient, durable, and ready to take on its new role as star attraction of the backyard. attractive garden house.

The fold-down shelf lowers easily to make room for off-season storage of garden ornaments and potted shrubs.

MAXIMIZE SPACE Create activity zones. Divide the space into distinct work zones: a seed-starting area for storing gathered seed as well as starting trays of seed pots, an area for arranging flowers, a potting bench for planting containers, and options that suit your gardening style. Add layers. Install shelves underneath and above work surfaces for additional storage. Beneath the built-in workbench, a full-length shelf holds baskets of supplies. Stay flexible. Include adjustable fixtures, such as the drop-down shelf, and freestanding elements. The movable potting bench can be relocated if desired. The potting bench also provides additional shelving and hooks for keeping tools accessible. Contain chaos. Baskets, buckets, and bins corral small items to keep a room neat and organized. They also make it easy to transport things to the garden. Use vertical space. Hang implements on walls and door interiors with magnetic strips and tool organizers. Old beverage boxes act as shelves hung high on the wall above the potting bench. Near the doors, organizers keep garden tools off the floor.

A freestanding potting bench offers another work surface and storage. A narrow shelf above supports hanging hooks for tools while the deep shelf beneath stores potting soil and pots.

Divide the shed into distinct work zones for seed starting, potting and arranging flowers.

STORE IT ALL Design your backyard shed with the beautiful and practical ideas in Garden Sheds & Retreats™ magazine. You’ll find it everywhere magazines are sold.

Continue their life’s story online. STLtoday.com/lifestory


NATION

03.24.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A23

Puerto Rico lures tech help as hurricane season nears Young tech developers are roving Puerto Rico with laptops, transmitters and drones to test new systems BY DANICA COTO associated Press

ISABELA, PUERTO RICO • In the dark and isolating days after Hurricane Maria, people across Puerto Rico invented new ways to communicate: Elderly couples in need of food or water would raise a flag at their home. Neighbors created amateur security systems, banging on pots for a minute each night to mark the start of a curfew after which any human noise would be considered a call for help. With telephone service blown away by the Category 4 hurricane, the governor took to the only radio station still operating and asked listeners to tell the mayors of all 78 municipalities to drive to the capital and update authorities about their needs in person. Access to devastated areas was impossible, and police, firefighters and emergency responders were unable to talk to each other for days. “The biggest crisis after Maria was communication,” said Nazario Lugo, president of Puerto Rico’s Association of Emergency Managers. “That unleashed an endless number of problems.” Now several groups of young tech developers are trying to prevent that from happening the next time a major disaster strikes. They are roving Puerto Rico with laptops, transmitters and drones to test new systems that could help survivors communicate with authorities and speed up response times to minimize the number of deaths. Puerto Rico is considered an ideal site to test and refine these inventions due to the Sept. 20, 2017, storm and its aftermath that claimed an estimated 2,975 lives. Technology is also lagging on an island where police and firefighters lack an interoperable system to communicate with each other. One team of developers backed by IBM is sticking transmitters to trees with Velcro as part of a hardware and software system they invented called Project OWL, which stands for Organization, Whereabouts, and Logistics. It won a $200,000 prize at a Call for Code competition late last year in which 100,000 de-

A transmitter that is part of the Clusterduck system that provides a low-frequency Wi-Fi connection is attached to a power pole during a field test this month in Isabela, Puerto Rico.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Project OWL team leader Bryan Knouse (right), aided by D.A. Koons of the Information Technology Disaster Resource Center, ties a U.S. flag to a helium-filled balloon carrying a tiny transmitter for a field test in Isabela, Puerto Rico, on March 13.

velopers from 156 nations participated — an event focused on natural disaster preparedness and relief. “We were thinking, ‘How can we make this in a way so stupidly simple to be used that you don’t even have to think about it?’” Project OWL team leader Bryan Knouse said. “It’s really hard to tell people who have been through a disaster, ‘Download this app or go to this website.’ Not gonna happen.” The tiny transmitter boxes emit a low-frequency Wi-Fi connection that users can link to via smartphones. Once connected, a pop-up box in English and Spanish automatically appears and people can enter information including name, location, number of pets, medical needs and hazards such as fallen trees, downed power lines, fires or blocked roads. The information is relayed back through the network and eventually to emergency officials. The team recently made its first large-area test of the system in the northwestern coastal town of Isabela. One group got into a car and stopped repeatedly

to affix transmitters around a 1 square-mile area while another group led by Knouse stayed at the home base, which that day consisted of the roof of a barbecue joint that provided enough height to collect the signals. Further boosting the signal were two large cream-colored balloons bought at Party City fitted with a transmitter. The transmitters are powered by batteries and maybe eventually solar power, and the team envisions the system working in places from the U.S. mainland to India to Japan. Every couple of minutes, Knouse’s computer dinged with messages that included names, location and details of the roving group that popped up on a map with messages such as “Help me please!” and “NEED WATER!!!” The team later met with members of a local Boys and Girls Club to introduce the technology to young users in hopes they could teach and share it with their neighbors. Isabela’s mayor, Carlos Delgado, said he was impressed by the project and wishes it was invented before Maria shredded

the island’s telecommunications system. He lamented how city officials had to walk to dozens of neighborhoods to learn about people’s needs after the hurricane, which delayed the delivery of food, water and medicine. “It was a bit like going back to the start of humanity: Everything was done on foot,” he said. Another project is led by Pedro Cruz, a self-taught Puerto Rican tech developer who recently won a local hackathon with a project called DroneAid. He recalled seeing messages such as “SOS” and “WE NEED FOOD” scrawled in big letters on roads so they could be seen from the air after Maria. He envisions before a storm giving people 5-foot-long mats with standardized symbols indicating needs — such as food, water or medical care — that could be spread out on flat surfaces. Programmed drones could fly overhead, read the symbols and process them into data about needs and locations for emergency responders. The idea came to him when he was physically unable to reach his grandmother after Maria. He could not communicate with her

and worried about her respiratory and heart conditions. So he flew his drone to her house, and she waved through the window. “She heard the drone and knew it was me,” Cruz said, adding that his grandmother died two months after Maria from respiratory and cardiac failure at an intensive care unit in a hospital hit by frequent blackouts. As he continued to fly his drone across Puerto Rico in the days and weeks after Maria, he noticed that sometimes food and water were being delivered to neighborhoods that already had been supplied, while others went begging: “There were a lot of duplicated efforts.” He said his system might help avoid that. Other tech companies have jumped at the opportunity to provide connectivity in the storm’s aftermath, including Google, which obtained an experimental license from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission to provide emergency cellular service through Loon balloons. The project helped connect more than 200,000 people and began winding down in March 2018. However, Lugo, a former emergency management director for Puerto Rico, warned the U.S. territory still needs to strengthen and update its communications system before the hurricane season starts on June 1. He also stressed that authorities should allow ordinary residents and amateur radio operators to participate in that system.

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TIME TO BRAG ILLINOIS 65, MIZZOU 64 > IN SPORTS • C1

VOTE NOW THROUGH MARCH 24 stltoday.com/contests SUNDAY • 12.22.2013 • $2.50 • FINAL EDITION

-food ood workers want raises. omer ers want cheap burgers.

SCHOOLS RETHINK GRADING

IINIMUM WAGE: ss, or a job killer?

Emphasis on learning Grades are more heavily based on subject mastery, rather than homework or participation. A tough transition Parents, teachers worry that kids won’t put in the work needed to succeed in school, life.

STEPHANIE S. CORDLE • scordle@post-dispatch.com PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

S

esser for hats and gloves for her children to wear to the bus stop on Thursday in living in an emergency shelter when she was making minimum wage.

R Rockwood South Middle School sixth-grader Kyle Stilwell, 12, works on his pre-algebra study guide at S home on Thursday in Fenton.

BY JESSICA BOCK jbock@post-dispatch.com > 314-340-8228

hour. She ed, and she work, she the Gatejust north of and you’re said. “My Mama?’” ed. ay. It’s not

The proud parents who attended Lincoln Elementary’s honor roll assemblies years ago assumed the school was a shining example of academic achievement. Kids by the dozens lined up to be celebrated for earning grades that put them on the honor roll. Then the school in St. Charles got state test results. Most of the students failed, casting doubt on the school’s success and challenging the validity of many of its students’ glowing report cards. Administrators knew they had a problem.

OPEN YOUR DOOR TO HISTORY IN OUR PAST EDITIONS AT: STLtoday.com/archives


WORLD

03.24.2019 • SunDay • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A23

Pope replaces Santiago bishop accused of sex abuse cover-up BY NICOLE WINFIELD AND PATRICIA LUNA associated Press

VATICAN CITY • Pope Francis re-

placed Cardinal Ricardo Ezzati on Saturday as archbishop of Santiago, Chile, after he was placed under criminal investigation in the country’s spiraling church sex abuse and cover-up scandal. Francis accepted Ezzati’s resignation and named a temporary replacement, Monsignor Celestino Aos Braco, to govern Chile’s most important archdiocese. Aos, a Spanish-born Capuchin friar, is currently bishop of Copiapo, Chile. In a statement asking for prayers for his new job, Aos acknowledged the difficulties ahead, noting the “light and darkness, success and shortcomings, wounds and sins” of the Santiago church. But Aos too faced accusations of cover-up after a former seminarian accused him of helping stall his case years ago. The Ezzati, 77, had submitted his resignation to Francis two years ago

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Archbishop Ricardo Ezzati celebrates Mass last year in Santiago, Chile.

when he reached the mandatory retirement age of 75. But Francis kept him on, and Ezzati became the flashpoint of abuse survivors’ ire for mishandling several cases of abuse. Just Friday, an appeals court in Chile allowed prosecutors to continue investigating Ezzati for an alleged cover-up, rejecting his motion to dismiss the case and remove himself from the probe, Chilean media reported. Ezzati has denied covering up any cases but has acknowledged the pain of abuse victims and vowed to promote

transparency. At a press conference Saturday, he said he was leaving “with my head held high.” He insisted that all complaints that were lodged with the archdiocesan office he created in 2011 “have been investigated or are being investigated.” Francis himself became embroiled in the Chilean scandal after initially discrediting victims during his 2018 trip to the country, sparking a crisis in confidence in the Chilean hierarchy and his own leadership. After realizing his error and apologizing to the victims, Francis summoned all of Chile’s 30-plus active bishops to the Vatican in May and told them to offer their resignations. With Ezzati’s resignation Saturday, Francis has accepted eight of them. Chilean abuse survivors have long accused Ezzati and his predecessor in Santiago, Cardinal Javier Errazuriz, of protecting predator priests and discrediting victims. Ezzati has been embroiled in a new scandal after a man sued him for allegedly covering up his rape inside the cathedral.

IS loses all territory, but shadowy leader is at large With $25 million bounty, al-Baghdadi is the world’s most-wanted man BY ZEINA KARAM associated Press

BEIRUT • The Islamic State group has

lost all the territory it once controlled in Iraq and Syria, but its shadowy leader and self-proclaimed “caliph” is still at large. With a $25 million U.S. bounty on his head, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi is the world’s most-wanted man, responsible for steering his chillingly violent organization into mass slaughter of opponents and directing and inspiring terrorist attacks across continents and in the heart of Europe. Despite numerous claims about his death in the past few years, al-Baghdadi’s whereabouts remain a mystery. He appeared in public only once, in 2014. Since then, many of his top aides have been killed, most of them in U.S.-led coalition airstrikes. He is among the few senior IS commanders still at large after two years of steady battlefield losses that saw the

self-styled “caliphate” shrink from an area the size of Britain to a tiny speck in the Euphrates River valley. Although largely seen as a symbolic figurehead of the global terrorist network — he was described as “irrelevant for a long time” by a coalition spokesman in 2017 — al-Baghdadi’s capture would be a coveted prize for the various players across both Syria and Iraq. But so far, he has eluded the Americans, Russians, Syrians, Iraqis and Kurds. In the last days of IS, as U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic Forces zoned in on the last slice of territory held by the militants in eastern Syria — a couple of villages and farmlands near the Iraqi border — the possibility remained that al-Baghdadi would turn up there. Several hundred IS leaders and hardcore fighters, many of them Iraqis, made a last stand in the enclave before surrendering. The last pocket, in the eastern village of Baghouz, was declared liberated on Saturday after weeks of fighting. Dur-

ing the siege, civilians streamed out of the pocket and surrendered — estimated at more than 30,000, mostly family of IS. But there has been no sign of al-Baghdadi. “The Coalition is not holding him nor do we know where he is,” U.S.-led coalition spokesman Col. Sean Ryan said. The coalition said the victory of the Syrian Democratic Forces did not mean that violent extremism was over. The 74-nation coalition said in a statement Saturday that since the beginning of operations in 2014, 7.7 million people have been liberated from IS control in an area measuring nearly 42,471 square miles. U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Paul LaCamera is the coalition commander. He said that “the end of the so-called physical caliphate is a historic military accomplishment.” But he warned that IS fighters “are preserving their force and are waiting for the right time to reemerge.”

DIGEST Training for 737 questioned The warning and training requirements set for the now-grounded 737 Max 8 aircraft may not have been adequate, in light of the Ethiopian plane crash that killed 157 people, the chief of Ethiopian Airlines said Saturday. After the Lion Air crash off Indonesia in October, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing “came up with contents that we incorporated in our working manuals and also briefed all our pilots. But today we believe that might not have been enough,” Tewolde Gebremariam said in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa. Ethiopian Airlines insists the carrier’s pilots went through all the extra training required by Boeing and the FAA to fly the 737 Max 8 jet. The March 10 crash killed people from 35 countries. FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford declined to comment, citing an open investigation. Extremists attack in Somalia • Gunmen set off a suicide car bombing and then stormed a government building in Somalia’s capital Mogadishu on Saturday, killing at least five people including the country’s deputy labor minister, police said. It was the latest attack by Islamic extremists in the troubled Horn of Africa nation. After an hours-long gunbattle, Somalia’s security forces took back control of the building in Mogadishu on Saturday afternoon from at least five attackers, a police official said. Saqar Ibrahim Abdalla, Somalia’s deputy minister of labor and social affairs, was killed in his ground-floor office shortly after gunmen entered the building. The official said at least 10 other people were wounded in the attack, for which the al-Qaidalinked al-Shabab extremist group has claimed responsibility. Dam collapse feared in Brazil • Brazilian mining giant Vale said Saturday that communities in the southeastern state of Minas Gerais have been ordered to evacuate after independent auditors found that one of its dams could collapse at any moment. On Friday, the company raised the level of risk at a mining waste dam in the city of Barao de Cocais to three, the highest grade. According to Brazil’s mining and energy secretary, level three means that “a rupture is imminent or already happening.” Residents in a 6.2 miles perimeter of the dam had already been told to leave by state authorities in February. Protesters oppose far-right party in Spain • Several hundred people have marched in Barcelona to protest the emergence of a far-right party in Spain ahead of next month’s national elections. The protesters gathered Saturday behind a banner that read “Stop Vox, for a world without racism and fascism” in reference to the upstart Vox party. Others carried handmade signs, including one that said “There aren’t too many immigrants, there are too many racists!” Spain hadn’t had a far-right party for years until Vox erupted onto the political scene by winning representation in regional elections in the country’s south in December. From wire services

140 YEARS

VOTE TODAY

AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

The

SEVENTH ANNUAL

OF HISTORY

List 2019

THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH ARCHIVES Find relatives, read about the St. Louis Browns and make new discoveries in historic newspapers. Just type in key words and the pages will appear on your computer screen. Get started today! Over 140 years is waiting to be explored.

T H E N O . 1 S T. L O U I S W E B S I T E A N D N E W S P A P E R

HELP US PICK st. Louis' BEST! VOTE NOW for your favorite hangouts, family destinations, arts institutions, artists, restaurants, bars and more in our seventh annual Go! List poll. We’ll publish the results of our reader poll (along with our critics’ selections) in The Go! List, a special issue of Go! Magazine, published in the Apr. 21 edition of the Sunday Post-Dispatch.

TIME TO BRAG ILLINOIS 65, MIZZOU 64 > IN SPORTS • C1

VOTE NOW THROUGH MARCH 24 stltoday.com/contests SUNDAY • 12.22.2013 • $2.50 • FINAL EDITION

-food ood workers want raises. omer ers want cheap burgers.

SCHOOLS RETHINK GRADING

IINIMUM WAGE: ss, or a job killer?

Emphasis on learning Grades are more heavily based on subject mastery, rather than homework or participation. A tough transition Parents, teachers worry that kids won’t put in the work needed to succeed in school, life.

STEPHANIE S. CORDLE • scordle@post-dispatch.com PHOTOS BY LAURIE SKRIVAN • lskrivan@post-dispatch.com

S

esser for hats and gloves for her children to wear to the bus stop on Thursday in living in an emergency shelter when she was making minimum wage.

R Rockwood South Middle School sixth-grader Kyle Stilwell, 12, works on his pre-algebra study guide at S home on Thursday in Fenton.

BY JESSICA BOCK jbock@post-dispatch.com > 314-340-8228

hour. She ed, and she work, she the Gatejust north of and you’re said. “My Mama?’” ed. ay. It’s not

The proud parents who attended Lincoln Elementary’s honor roll assemblies years ago assumed the school was a shining example of academic achievement. Kids by the dozens lined up to be celebrated for earning grades that put them on the honor roll. Then the school in St. Charles got state test results. Most of the students failed, casting doubt on the school’s success and challenging the validity of many of its students’ glowing report cards. Administrators knew they had a problem.

OPEN YOUR DOOR TO HISTORY IN OUR PAST EDITIONS AT: STLtoday.com/archives


NEWS

A24 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

Gene editing for human reproduction is ‘irresponsible,’ U.N. says BY JAMEY KEATEN AND MARIA CHENG Associated Press

GENEVA • A panel convened by the World Health Orga-

nization said it would be “irresponsible” for scientists to use gene editing for reproductive purposes, but stopped short of calling for a ban. The experts also called for the U.N. health agency to create a database of scientists working on gene editing. The recommendation was announced Tuesdayafter a two-day meeting in Geneva to examine the scientific, ethical, social and legal challenges of such research. “At this time, it is irresponsible for anyone to proceed” with making gene-edited babies since DNA changes could be passed down to future generations, the experts said in a statement. Last year, Chinese researcher He Jiankui rocked the scientific community with his announcement that he helped make the world’s first gene-edited babies, altering the DNA of twin girls to try to make them resistant to HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. WHO’s announcement comes after an international group of scientists and ethicists called recently in the journal Naturefor a temporary ban on gene-edited babies. Margaret Ann Hamburg, co-chair of the WHO panel, and her colleagues declined to call for a similar prohibition. “I don’t think a vague moratorium is the answer to what needs to be done,” she said. “What we’re trying to do is to look at the broader picture.” She said the experts envisioned a WHO-directed database where journal publishers and funders of gene editing research would require scientists to sign up — but acknowledged they had not yet worked out how to reprimand any scientists who refused to register. Earlier this year, Chinese investigators said He had dodged supervision of his work and broke research norms because he wanted to be famous. The report said He could face consequences, although it didn’t specify which regulations he may have violated. WHO’s director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus announced the formation of the panel in early December after He revealed his experiment. “We have to be very, very careful” about how to proceed, Tedros said at the time. “We have a big part of our population who say, ‘Don’t touch.’” Gene editing is intended as a more precise way to do gene therapy. Trying it in adults to treat diseases is not controversial and the DNA changes do not pass to future generations. But most scientists think gene editing to make babies is too risky to be tried at the moment because of the danger of damaging other genes and because unknown DNA alterations could be passed on.

A researcher installs a fine glass pipette into a microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China’s Guandong province in October. On Tuesday an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization called for the U.N. health agency to create a global registry of scientists working on gene editing. ASSOCIATED PRESS

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A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

OBITUARIES Bearden, Julia A. - St. Louis Bear, Karl Richard - O'Fallon, MO Bradley, Eugene "Geno" - Maryland Heights Bradley, Sharon Faye Payne - Branson, MO Brink, Marion Francis "Joe" - Wilmette, IL Brockhaus, Barbara Ann - St. Louis Brown, June V. - St. Louis Card, Burnette Lou Ann - Lake St. Louis Cooseman, Leo J. - St. Louis Crossley, Carol Marie - St. Louis Crump, Eugene G. - St. Louis Deeken, Martin "Marty" H. - St. Louis Dei Santi, Salvatore - St. Louis

Celebrations of Life

Duncan, Bruce James - Jefferson City, MO Erxleben, Stewart H. - St. Louis Green, Robert "Bob" Chapin - St. Louis Hallahan, Robert W. - St. Louis Huelscamp, Cynthia Rose - Troy, MO, formerly of St. Louis Jarvis, John R. - Arnold Johnson, Stewart Kenneth - St. Charles Jones, Maury - St. Louis Kubala, Olina "Lee" - St. Louis Martin, Daniel T. "RET. US MARSHAL" - St. Louis McCoy, Dolores Catherine "Dee Dee" - St. Louis McGavock, Michael - St. Louis Montgomery, Ellen C. - Florissant

Deeken, Martin "Marty" H.

Green, Robert "Bob" Chapin passed away March 16, 2019, at Laclede Groves Retirement Center, Webster Groves, Missouri at age 92. Mr. Green was born in Davenport, Iowa, on July 28, 1926. He and his fraternal twin, Richard, were the youngest of 6 children born to Irvin and Metta Green, and he was the last surviving member of his siblings. Mr. Green attended Roosevelt High School in St. Louis. After graduation and prior to being drafted into the US Army, he worked at a number of part-time jobs with the Burlington Northern and Frisco railroads and then the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team. After a short stint in the Army, he entered college and received a B.A. from Grinnell (IA) College. After graduation, he returned to his position with the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Louis and was soon promoted to business manager for the Pocatello, Idaho minor league affiliate. After serving with the Cardinals for 5 years, he took a position with Ralston Purina and remained there for 38 years, retiring in 1988 as Director of Meeting Planning and Corporate Travel. While at Ralston, he was founding member of Meeting Professionals International (MPI) and later served as interim CEO and International President. In retirement, Mr Green edited two books: "MPI, a 20 year review" the first history of the organization, and a comprehensive glossary of international meeting industry terms. Those who knew Mr. Green would describe him as reserved, kind, smart and hard working, with a cheerful humor and a deep sense of integrity instilled in him at a young age by his family and religious upbringing. Mr. Green also had an uncanny ability to put people at ease in almost any situation, and always considered the needs of others before his own. Mr. Green's family will remember him, especially, as a dedicated and loving caregiver to his wife, Georgia, during her ongoing battle with Parkinson's Disease. Mr . Green loved St. Louis, and supported many public organizations, including the St. Louis Symphony, KETC (Channel 9), and a number of veteran's organizations. His volunteer efforts included work on behalf of the Salvation Army and making voice recordings for the Society for the Blind. After he and his wife moved to Laclede Groves retirement community, Mr. Green remained active in a variety of social and volunteer activities on that campus. And of course, Mr. Green was a lifelong St. Louis Cardinals fan. He is survived by Georgia Kuhlmann Green, his wife of 63 years; son Mitchell Green (Vicky), grandsons Henry Green (Cori) and Dylan Green, great-grandchildren Gabriel Matczak and Raegan Jane Green. He is also survived by brother-in-law Henry (Donna) Kuhlmann, and many nephews, nieces, friends and neighbors. All will forever carry him in their hearts. Services: Funeral services and interment will be private. Memorials would be appreciated at the charity of your choice, the Salvation Army Auxiliary, P.O. Box 21781, St. Louis, MO 63109, the Parkinson's Disease Association, 1415 Elbridge Payne Blvd., Chesterfield MO 63107, or the LG Benefactor Fund.

Dei Santi, Salvatore

SEND YOUR CONDOLENCES

Card, Burnette Lou Ann March 18, 2019, age 78. Memorial service: April 27, 2019, 10:00 a.m. Baue Cave Springs. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com.

Cooseman, Leo J. STLtoday.com/obits

Crump, Eugene G. Passed away on Thursday, March 21, 2019 surrounded by family. Loving husband of 65 years to Marie Crump on April 3rd. Beloved father of Denise (Michael) Stelmacki; loving papaw to David (Lauren) Stelmacki and Dana (Michael) Eller; adoring great-grandpa to Bran Stelmacki; beloved brother of Judith (the late Pat) Kellenberger, Art (Debbie) Crump and Dennis (Peggy) Crump; caring uncle and amigo. Preceded in death by his parents Glenn and Alma Crump. Services: Memorial service at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, March 25, 1:00 p.m. Private interment at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Degreeff Hospice House.

“What we have once enjoyed, we can never lose. All that we love deeply becomes part of us.” HELEN KELLER

Hallahan, Robert W. died March 20, 2019. Beloved father, grandfather and great-grandfather. Proud Veteran of the US Air Force. Go to www.schrader.com for service information.

Huelscamp, Cynthia Rose (nee Luedde) June 19, 1959 - March 3, 2019. Wife of Jack Huelscamp; our dear daughter, sister, aunt, cousin and friend. Services have taken place at Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville.

Jarvis, John R. of Arnold, Missouri passed away on Friday, March 22, 2019 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of the late Betty K. Jarvis (nee Myers); loving father of Lynda (the late Charlie) Fisher, Karen (Daniel) Godbey, Dale (Shelly) Jarvis a n d J a n (P a t rick) M c E l y e a ; cherished grandfather of Laura (Marvin) Herrod and great-grandfather of Marvin and Charlotte Herrod; dearest brother of Ruthie (Joe) Whitaker and the late Juanita (Alfred) Rencehausen, Henry (Ruth) Jarvin, William "Bill" (Altafay) Jarvis and Randall "Nip" (Bonnie) Jarvis. Dear brother-in-law of Zuelah (the late Crawford) Yeager. Dear son of the late George and Arbelle Jarvis (nee Martin); our dear uncle, great uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral service to be held on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. at Heiligtag-Lang-Fendler Funeral Home, 1081 Jeffco Blvd., Arnold, Missouri. Interment St. Francois Memorial Park Cemetery, Bonne Terre, Missouri. Visitation Monday, March 25, 2019 from 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. Should friends desire, contributions to Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA) appreciated. Condolences may be offered at www.heiligtagfuneralhome.com.

Johnson, Stewart Kenneth 95, of St. Charles, March 7, 2019. Graveside Service at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Wednesday, April 10, 2019 at 12:30 pm. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit Baue.com

Jones, Maury

Crossley, Carol Marie (nee Brundick) Mon., March 18, 2019. Visitation at Kutis So. Co., 5255 Lemay Ferry, Wed., March 27, 4-9 p.m. Service Thurs., 10 a.m. Interment St. Bridget Cemetery, Pacific, MO

Murray, Timothy - Venice, FL Osterholt, Mary K . "Kay" - St. Peters Ploesser, Loretta J. - St. Louis Rapp, Shirley A. - St. Louis Roberts, Sylvia Claire - Eureka Schneider, Bert - Spring, TX Sekarski, Michael A. - St. Louis Seyer, Louis L. - St. Louis Switz, Patrick Joseph Jr. - formerly of St. Louis Telken, James W. - St. Louis Wilson, Laura A. - St. Louis Windish, Edward "Ed" R. - Ferguson Zeigler, Jerald Leo - St. Louis

passed away March 20, 2019. He was born on October 7, 1957 in St Louis, MO to Alex and Gloria Deeken. He worked as a Carpenter in the commercial and residential building trade. Surviving are his mother, Gloria, Amber Hatley, Sarah Hatley, three brothers: Clark Deeken, Walter Deeken, and Alex Deeken, lll. Preceding him in death was his father, Alex Deeken, and a son, Michael. Services: Visitation will be held on Wednesday, March 27 from 11-2 at Valhalla Chapel of Memories, with funeral ceremony to follow at 2 p.m., and private entombment at Valhalla's Indoor Mausoleum. www.valhallafunerals.net

79; Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection on Bearden, Julia A. Thursday March 21, 2019 ; (nee Lewellen), Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Visitation at KUTIS beloved husband of Virginia Dei SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, March Santi (nee Gerdes); Dear father to 25, 11 a.m. until Service at 1 p.m. Interment J.B. Nat'l Cemetery. Lisa (Tom) Roderick and Gianna (Ken) Dei Santi-Rosenbaum; dear step father to Sherry (Numan) Bear, Karl Richard Fikrat, Leslie (Rob) Cady, Brad Passed away at home on March 17, 2019 at the age of 84. (L a u ra ) , Ku rt (Kris t in a ) a n d Beloved husband of Carol Bear, adored father of Stephen Patrick Konersman. Dear grandfa(Linda) Bear, Lisa (Charles) Hill, Rick (Wendy) Bear and Leslie ther of 5, step grandfather to 12; (David) Ignotz, grandfather of nine and great-grandfather of youngest brother of 8; Survived five, brother of Loisjean O'Hara, uncle and cousin to many. by sister Pietrina Paschall. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, Preceded in death by parents Paul and Geraldine Bear, two great-uncle, and friend. sisters and two brothers-in-law. Services: Visitation Thursday, March 28, 2019 11 a.m. until Karl had a long career at McDonnell Douglas after attending service 1 p.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL Washington Univ. and Univ. of MO-Columbia. He was a member HOME (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity. He was an ordained elder of the Interment J.B. National Cemetery. Presbyterian Church, USA, a member in the Fergu s on Democratic Club and active in his community. Services: Memorial service and reception to be held June 1st, Duncan, Bruce James 2019 at Dardenne Presbyterian Church, details to follow. 63, of Jefferson City, passed away Thursday, March 21, 2019, at his residence. He was born on September 3, Bradley, Eugene "Geno" 1955, in Chicago, Illinois to the Mon., March 18, 2019. Vis. Wed., March 27, 4-8 p.m. at late James Albert and Norma VirColliers Funeral Home (St. Ann), svc. Thurs., March 28, 9:30 ginia (Oyen) Duncan. He was a.m. at Colliers Funeral Home. colliersfuneralhome.com united in marriage on May 1, 2004 in Chicago to Rachel Ann Stiesmeyer, who resides at the Bradley, Sharon Faye Payne home. A 1973 graduate of 76, of Branson, passed March 10, 2019. She was born Sept. 10, M o r g a n Park High School in 1942. Sharon is survived by her son, Dr. Jeff Bradley and his Chicago, he received a Bachelor wife Dr. Heidi Prather Bradley of Chesterfield, son, Jason of Science Degree in Business Bradley and his wife Carla Bradley of Hollister, and five grandAdministration from the University of Illinois. Bruce spent his children. Memorial Service 2:00 p.m. March 31 at Williams career from 1978-2014 in the food service industry.He ended Memorial Chapel, College of the Ozarks, Point Lookout, MO. his career as operating partner and regional vice-president for www.cremationsoftheozarks.com Noodles & Company and Jack in the Box. He was a member of Concord Baptist Church and a faithful member of his Sunday Brink, Marion Francis "Joe" School class where he received strength and comfort from March 20, 2019, age. 86. Services: Vis. Tue., March 26, many of his friends. 4-8 p.m., Service, Wed. March 27, 10 a.m., Baue 620 JefAn avid traveler, he took great care in planning a detailed ferson St. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com family vacation and he loved to ride his motorcycle on trips with his wife. He loved his two pets, Dina and Bob, sitting with his family on the back porch, and smoking cigars. He enjoyed Brockhaus, Barbara Ann dining in restaurants and loved planning and cooking holiday (nee Ceplecha), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother meals for his family. Church and entered into her heavenly reward on Thursday, Bruce is survived by his wife, Rachel Duncan, Jefferson City; March 21, 2019, at the age of 82. Married to Donald E. two children, James Anthony Duncan, St. Louis; Emily Anne Brockhaus on August 13, 1955; wonderful mother of 8 children, Duncan, St. Louis; and a sister, Lois Elaine Duncan (Rick White), Donald E. (Lori) Brockhaus Jr, Susan M. (David) Meyer, Sharon Chicago. He was preceded in death by his parents. M. (Michael) Pagano, Kathleen M. (David) Crumbaugh, Edward Services: Visitation will be 9-11 a.m., Tuesday, March 26, 2019 W. (Mary) Brockhaus, Joseph G. (Carrie) Brockhaus, Timothy P. at Concord Baptist Church. Funeral service will be 11 a.m., (Danielle) Brockhaus and Thomas F. (Tricia) Brockhaus; adoring grandmother of 23 and great-grandmother of 20; beautiful and Tuesday, March 26, 2019 at Concord Baptist Church with Pastor loving wife, our dearest mother, mother-in-law, aunt, and friend John Forsyth officiating. Memorials are suggested to Concord Baptist Church, 3724 W. Truman Blvd., Jefferson City, MO 65109. to many. Services: Funeral from HOFFMEISTER South County Chapel, Dulle-Trimble Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd., St Louis 63125, on Monday, March 25 at Those wishing to email tributes or condolences to the family 9:15 to St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. may do so at the www.dulletrimble.com website. Interment at Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, March 24th 3-7 p.m. Request for holy Mass cards in lieu of Erxleben, Stewart H. donations. on Sat., March 2, 2019. Funeral at Kutis South County, 5255 Lemay Ferry, on Saturday, March 30, 11 a.m. Interment Lakewood Park Cemetery. Visitation Friday 4-9 p.m. Brown, June V. (nee Valleroy), passed away on Thursday, March 21, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Robert James Brown; loving mother of Paul Brown and Patty (Michael) Murphy; adoring grandmother of Michael (Crystal), Cody and Brennden Murphy; dearest greatgrandma of Lucas Murphy; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND friend. June was a member of the Knights of Columbus. Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., Tuesday, March 26 at 11:30 a.m. Interment J.B. National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Alzheimer's Association. Visitation Monday, 6-8 p.m.

95, Friday, March 22, 2019. Received Last Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved husband of Patricia Drewett (nee Hillemeyer); stepfather of 10, Ann (Scott) Million, Robert Drewett, Kathy (Mike) Schlueter, Donald (Josephine) Drewett, Beth Drewett, Janet (Scott) Finke, Dorothy (Dan) Beetz, Charles (Cindy) Drewett, Jean (Pete) Minton, and Amy (David) Payne; grandfather and great-grandfather to many. Services: No visitation. Memorial Mass Thursday, March 28th, 11:00 a.m., St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church, 1414 S. Sappington Rd., Crestwood, MO, 63126. In lieu of flowers, donations to Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital.

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

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Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Son of the late Berkley and Abigail Jones (nee Gross); brother of Berkley Jones, Fairfax (Lynn) Jones, Courtney Jones, Daniel (Geraldine) Jones, L i n t o n (Na n cy) J on es , Cecil (Steve) Paul, and the late Curran Jones. Uncle to seven and greatuncle to twelve. Maury was employed by Killark Electric Manufacturing Co. for over 25 years and later by Carr Lane Manufacturing Co., where he retired in 2011. Maury was a longtime member of the Missouri Athletic Club. The family wishes to thank the staff of Mason Pointe for their exceptional care and compassion these last four years. Services: Funeral Mass Tuesday, March 26th, 10 a.m., St. Peter Catholic Church, Kirkwood. Interment Oak Hill Cemetery. Memorial contributions preferred to the Alzheimer's Association. Visitation Monday, March 25th, 4-8 p.m. at Bopp Chapel. www.boppchapel.com

“There is no remedy for love but to love more.” HENRY DAVID THOREAU


A26 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

OBITUARIES Bearden, Julia A. - St. Louis Bear, Karl Richard - O'Fallon, MO Bradley, Eugene "Geno" - Maryland Heights Bradley, Sharon Faye Payne - Branson, MO Brink, Marion Francis "Joe" - Wilmette, IL Brockhaus, Barbara Ann - St. Louis Brown, June V. - St. Louis Card, Burnette Lou Ann - Lake St. Louis Cooseman, Leo J. - St. Louis Crossley, Carol Marie - St. Louis Crump, Eugene G. - St. Louis Deeken, Martin "Marty" H. - St. Louis Dei Santi, Salvatore - St. Louis Driller, Carol - St. Charles Duncan, Bruce James - Jefferson City, MO Erxleben, Stewart H. - St. Louis Green, Robert "Bob" Chapin - St. Louis Hallahan, Robert W. - St. Louis Heida, Robert A. "Bob" - Wildwood, MO Huddleston - see Siebert

Celebrations of Life

Huelscamp, Cynthia Rose - Troy, MO, formerly of St. Louis Jarvis, John R. - Arnold Jesick, Edward - Imperial, MO Johnson, Stewart Kenneth - St. Charles Jones, Maury - St. Louis Klearman, Melvin B. - Tuscon, AZ Koberlein, Robert E. - Columbia, IL Lambotte, Richard L. - St. Louis Martin, Daniel T. "RET. US MARSHAL" - St. Louis McCoy, Dolores Catherine "Dee Dee" - St. Louis McGavock, Michael - St. Louis Montgomery, Ellen C. - Florissant Murray, Timothy - Venice, FL Niederbremer (nee Mues), Elaine Marie - St. Louis Olesnicki - see Siebert Osterholt, Mary K . "Kay" - St. Peters Pelfrey, Barbara A. "Bobbie" - O'Fallon, IL Ploesser, Loretta J. - St. Louis Podhorsky, Celeste - O'Fallon, MO Pope, John Richard - St. Louis

Card, Burnette Lou Ann March 18, 2019, age 78. Memorial service: April 27, 2019, 10:00 a.m. Baue Cave Springs. Contact (636) 946-7811 or visit baue.com.

Cooseman, Leo J. 95, Friday, March 22, 2019. Received Last Sacraments of Holy Mother Church. Beloved husband of Patricia Drewett (nee Hillemeyer); stepfather of 10, Ann (Scott) Million, Robert Drewett, Kathy (Mike) Schlueter, Donald (Josephine) Drewett, Beth Drewett, Janet (Scott) Finke, Dorothy (Dan) Beetz, Charles (Cindy) Drewett, Jean (Pete) Minton, and Amy (David) Payne; grandfather and great-grandfather to many. Services: No visitation. Memorial Mass Thursday, March 28th, 11:00 a.m., St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church, 1414 S. Sappington Rd., Crestwood, MO, 63126. In lieu of flowers, donations to Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital.

Bearden, Julia A. (nee Lewellen), Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Lemay Ferry Rd., Monday, March 25, 11 a.m. until Service at 1 p.m. Interment J.B. Nat'l Cemetery.

Bear, Karl Richard Passed away at home on March 17, 2019 at the age of 84. Beloved husband of Carol Bear, adored father of Stephen (Linda) Bear, Lisa (Charles) Hill, Rick (Wendy) Bear and Leslie (David) Ignotz, grandfather of nine and great-grandfather of five, brother of Loisjean O'Hara, uncle and cousin to many. Preceded in death by parents Paul and Geraldine Bear, two sisters and two brothers-in-law. Karl had a long career at McDonnell Douglas after attending Washington Univ. and Univ. of MO-Columbia. He was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity. He was an ordained elder of the Presbyterian Church, USA, a member in the Fergu s on Democratic Club and active in his community. Services: Memorial service and reception to be held June 1st, 2019 at Dardenne Presbyterian Church, details to follow.

Crossley, Carol Marie (nee Brundick) Mon., March 18, 2019. Visitation at Kutis So. Co., 5255 Lemay Ferry, Wed., March 27, 4-9 p.m. Service Thurs., 10 a.m. Interment St. Bridget Cemetery, Pacific, MO

Crump, Eugene G. Passed away on Thursday, March 21, 2019 surrounded by family. Loving husband of 65 years to Marie Crump on April 3rd. Beloved father of Denise (Michael) Stelmacki; loving papaw to David (Lauren) Stelmacki and Dana (Michael) Eller; adoring great-grandpa to Bran Stelmacki; beloved brother of Judith (the late Pat) Kellenberger, Art (Debbie) Crump and Dennis (Peggy) Crump; caring uncle and amigo. Preceded in death by his parents Glenn and Alma Crump. Services: Memorial service at KUTIS AFFTON CHAPEL, 10151 Gravois, Monday, March 25, 1:00 p.m. Private interment at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Degreeff Hospice House.

Deeken, Martin "Marty" H. passed away March 20, 2019. He was born on October 7, 1957 in Bradley, Eugene "Geno" St Louis, MO to Alex and Gloria Deeken. Mon., March 18, 2019. Vis. Wed., March 27, 4-8 p.m. at He worked as a Carpenter in the commercial and residential Colliers Funeral Home (St. Ann), svc. Thurs., March 28, 9:30 building trade. a.m. at Colliers Funeral Home. colliersfuneralhome.com Surviving are his mother, Gloria, Amber Hatley, Sarah Hatley, three brothers: Clark Deeken, Walter Deeken, and Alex Deeken, lll. Preceding him in death was his father, Alex Deeken, and a Bradley, Sharon Faye Payne son, Michael. 76, of Branson, passed March 10, 2019. She was born Sept. 10, Services: Visitation will be held on Wednesday, March 27 from 1942. Sharon is survived by her son, Dr. Jeff Bradley and his 11-2 at Valhalla Chapel of Memories, with funeral ceremony wife Dr. Heidi Prather Bradley of Chesterfield, son, Jason to follow at 2 p.m., and private entombment at Valhalla's Bradley and his wife Carla Bradley of Hollister, and five grand- Indoor Mausoleum. www.valhallafunerals.net children. Memorial Service 2:00 p.m. March 31 at Williams Memorial Chapel, College of the Ozarks, Point Lookout, MO. Dei Santi, Salvatore www.cremationsoftheozarks.com 79; Baptized into the hope of Christ's Brink, Marion Francis "Joe", PhD. Resurrection on March 20, 2019, age. 86. Services: Vis. Tue., March 26, Thursday March 21, 2019 ; 4-8 p.m., Service, Wed. March 27, 10 a.m., Baue 620 Jefbeloved husband of Virginia Dei ferson St. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit baue.com Santi (nee Gerdes); Dear father to Lisa (Tom) Roderick and Gianna (Ken) Dei Santi-Rosenbaum; dear Brockhaus, Barbara Ann (nee Ceplecha), fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother step father to Sherry (Numan) Church and entered into her heavenly reward on Thursday, Fikrat, Leslie (Rob) Cady, Brad March 21, 2019, at the age of 82. Married to Donald E. (L a u ra ) , Ku rt (Kris t in a ) a n d Brockhaus on August 13, 1955; wonderful mother of 8 children, Patrick Konersman. Dear grandfaDonald E. (Lori) Brockhaus Jr, Susan M. (David) Meyer, Sharon ther of 5, step grandfather to 12; M. (Michael) Pagano, Kathleen M. (David) Crumbaugh, Edward youngest brother of 8; Survived W. (Mary) Brockhaus, Joseph G. (Carrie) Brockhaus, Timothy P. by sister Pietrina Paschall. Our dear brother-in-law, uncle, (Danielle) Brockhaus and Thomas F. (Tricia) Brockhaus; adoring great-uncle, and friend. grandmother of 23 and great-grandmother of 20; beautiful and Services: Visitation Thursday, March 28, 2019 11 a.m. until loving wife, our dearest mother, mother-in-law, aunt, and friend service 1 p.m. at JOHN L. ZIEGENHEIN & SONS FUNERAL HOME (South County), 4830 Lemay Ferry Rd. (63129). to many. Services: Funeral from HOFFMEISTER South County Chapel, Interment J.B. National Cemetery. 1515 Lemay Ferry Rd., St Louis 63125, on Monday, March 25 at 9:15 to St. Martin of Tours Catholic Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Driller, Carol Interment at Sts. Peter and Paul Cemetery. Visitation Sunday, 79, Vis. Tues. March 26th, 4-8 pm, Baue, 620 Jefferson March 24th 3-7 p.m. Request for holy Mass cards in lieu of St.; Funeral Mass Wed. 10 am, St. Cletus Catholic Church donations. with vis. one hour prior to Mass. Visit baue.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Portnoy, Gloria Yawitz - Rockville, MD Rapp, Shirley A. - St. Louis Reel - see Siebert Rehm, Richard L. - St. Louis Roberts, Sylvia Claire - Eureka Schlarman, Marilyn J. - formerly of St. Peters, MO Schneider, Bert - Spring, TX Sekarski, Michael A. - St. Louis Selzer, Reverend Eugene Paul - St. Louis Seyer, Louis L. - St. Louis Siebert,Oliver Walter "Ollie" - Ballwin Switz, Patrick Joseph Jr. - formerly of St. Louis Telken, James W. - St. Louis Turner - see Siebert Von Gruben - see Siebert Williams, Jr., Clarence James - Florissant Wilpert, Sandra - St. Louis Wilson, Laura A. - St. Louis Windish, Edward "Ed" R. - Ferguson Zeigler, Jerald Leo - St. Louis

Green, Robert "Bob" Chapin passed away March 16, 2019, at Laclede Groves Retirement Center, Webster Groves, Missouri at age 92. Mr. Green was born in Davenport, Iowa, on July 28, 1926. He and his fraternal twin, Richard, were the youngest of 6 children born to Irvin and Metta Green, and he was the last surviving member of his siblings. Mr. Green attended Roosevelt High School in St. Louis. After graduation and prior to being drafted into the US Army, he worked at a number of part-time jobs with the Burlington Northern and Frisco railroads and then the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team. After a short stint in the Army, he entered college and received a B.A. from Grinnell (IA) College. After graduation, he returned to his position with the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Louis and was soon promoted to business manager for the Pocatello, Idaho minor league affiliate. After serving with the Cardinals for 5 years, he took a position with Ralston Purina and remained there for 38 years, retiring in 1988 as Director of Meeting Planning and Corporate Travel. While at Ralston, he was founding member of Meeting Professionals International (MPI) and later served as interim CEO and International President. In retirement, Mr Green edited two books: "MPI, a 20 year review" the first history of the organization, and a comprehensive glossary of international meeting industry terms. Those who knew Mr. Green would describe him as reserved, kind, smart and hard working, with a cheerful humor and a deep sense of integrity instilled in him at a young age by his family and religious upbringing. Mr. Green also had an uncanny ability to put people at ease in almost any situation, and always considered the needs of others before his own. Mr. Green's family will remember him, especially, as a dedicated and loving caregiver to his wife, Georgia, during her ongoing battle with Parkinson's Disease. Mr . Green loved St. Louis, and supported many public organizations, including the St. Louis Symphony, KETC (Channel 9), and a number of veteran's organizations. His volunteer efforts included work on behalf of the Salvation Army and making voice recordings for the Society for the Blind. After he and his wife moved to Laclede Groves retirement community, Mr. Green remained active in a variety of social and volunteer activities on that campus. And of course, Mr. Green was a lifelong St. Louis Cardinals fan. He is survived by Georgia Kuhlmann Green, his wife of 63 years; son Mitchell Green (Vicky), grandsons Henry Green (Cori) and Dylan Green, great-grandchildren Gabriel Matczak and Raegan Jane Green. He is also survived by brother-in-law Henry (Donna) Kuhlmann, and many nephews, nieces, friends and neighbors. All will forever carry him in their hearts. Services: Funeral services and interment will be private. Memorials would be appreciated at the charity of your choice, the Salvation Army Auxiliary, P.O. Box 21781, St. Louis, MO 63109, the Parkinson's Disease Association, 1415 Elbridge Payne Blvd., Chesterfield MO 63107, or the LG Benefactor Fund.

Hallahan, Robert W. died March 20, 2019. Beloved father, grandfather and great-grandfather. Proud Veteran of the US Air Force. Go to www.schrader.com for service information.

Heida, Robert A. "Bob"

passed away, Wednesday, March 20, 2019 at the age of 82. Preceded in death by his beloved wife of 62 years, the late Janet Heida (nee Horn); dearest father of Debra (Fred) Berghaus, Sherry Heida and Jennifer (Brian) Barfield; loving grandfather of Lucas and Jeff Berghaus, and Christina Heida; great grandfather of Baylie and Collin; step-grandfather of Heather (Tim) Stock and Meagan Barfield; Brown, June V. step-great- grandfather of Avery Duncan, Bruce James (nee Valleroy), passed away on Thursday, March 21, 2019. and Zoe; brother of Don (Pat) Heida; brother-in-law of Carolynn 63, of Jefferson City, passed Beloved wife of the late Robert James Brown; loving mother of (Todd) Boehmer, Linda (Joe) Silverman; uncle of Karen, Sue, away Thursday, March 21, 2019, Diane, Jim, Dan, Mike, Steve, Julie, Andy and the late Donna. A Paul Brown and Patty (Michael) Murphy; adoring grandmother at his residence. of Michael (Crystal), Cody and Brennden Murphy; dearest greatgreat nephew, cousin, mentor, club member and friend to He was born on September 3, many, and all humanity. grandma of Lucas Murphy; dear aunt, great-aunt, cousin and 1955, in Chicago, Illinois to the friend. June was a member of the Knights of Columbus. Services: Funeral service at the SCHRADER Funeral Home and late James Albert and Norma Vir- Crematory, 14960 Manchester Road at Holloway, Ballwin, Services: Funeral at KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois Rd., ginia (Oyen) Duncan. He was Tuesday, 1:00 p.m. Interment Bethel Cemetery. Visitation at Tuesday, March 26 at 11:30 a.m. Interment J.B. National united in marriage on May 1, Schrader Funeral Home on Monday 3-8 p.m. Friends may Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to 2004 in Chicago to Rachel Ann sign the family's on-line guestbook at Schrader.com. the Alzheimer's Association. Visitation Monday, 6-8 p.m. Stiesmeyer, who resides at the home. A 1973 graduate of M o r g a n Park High School in Huelscamp, Cynthia Rose Chicago, he received a Bachelor (nee Luedde) June 19, 1959 - March 3, 2019. Wife of Jack of Science Degree in Business Huelscamp; our dear daughter, sister, aunt, cousin and friend. Administration from the University of Illinois. Bruce spent his Services have taken place at Pitman Funeral Home, Wentzville. career from 1978-2014 in the food service industry.He ended his career as operating partner and regional vice-president for Jarvis, John R. Noodles & Company and Jack in the Box. He was a member of Concord Baptist Church and a faithful member of his Sunday of Arnold, Missouri, School class where he received strength and comfort from passed away on Friday, many of his friends. March 22, 2019 at the An avid traveler, he took great care in planning a detailed age of 90. Beloved husband of the family vacation and he loved to ride his motorcycle on trips with late Betty K. Jarvis (nee Myers); his wife. He loved his two pets, Dina and Bob, sitting with his loving father of Lynda (the late family on the back porch, and smoking cigars. He enjoyed Charlie) Fisher, Karen (Daniel) dining in restaurants and loved planning and cooking holiday Godbey, Dale (Shelly) Jarvis and meals for his family. Jan (Patrick) McElyea; cherished Bruce is survived by his wife, Rachel Duncan, Jefferson City; grandfather of Laura (Marvin) two children, James Anthony Duncan, St. Louis; Emily Anne Herrod and great-grandfather of At Schnucks Florist & Gifts, our Duncan, St. Louis; and a sister, Lois Elaine Duncan (Rick White), Marvin and Charlotte Herrod; experienced staff of floral designers Chicago. He was preceded in death by his parents. dearest brother of Ruthie (Joe) is dedicated to the highest level Services: Visitation will be 9-11 a.m., Tuesday, March 26, 2019 Whitaker and the late Juanita of personal service. at Concord Baptist Church. Funeral service will be 11 a.m., (Alfred) Rencehausen, Henry (Ruth) Jarvis, William "Bill" Tuesday, March 26, 2019 at Concord Baptist Church with Pastor (Altafay) Jarvis and Randall "Nip" (Bonnie) Jarvis. Dear brotherJohn Forsyth officiating. Memorials are suggested to Concord in-law of Zuelah (the late Crawford) Yeager. Dear son of the Order 24 Hours Baptist Church, 3724 W. Truman Blvd., Jefferson City, MO 65109. late George and Arbelle Jarvis (nee Martin); our dear uncle, schnucksfloral.com Dulle-Trimble Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. great uncle, cousin and friend. Those wishing to email tributes or condolences to the family Services: Funeral service to be held on Tuesday, March 26, (314) 997-2444 or may do so at the www.dulletrimble.com website. 2019 at 10:00 a.m. at Heiligtag-Lang-Fendler Funeral Home, (800) 286-9557 1081 Jeffco Blvd., Arnold, Missouri. Interment St. Francois Memorial Park Cemetery, Bonne Terre, Missouri. Visitation Erxleben, Stewart H. Monday, March 25, 2019 from 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. Should on Sat., March 2, 2019. Funeral at Kutis South County, 5255 friends desire, contributions to Korean War Veterans Lemay Ferry, on Saturday, March 30, 11 a.m. Interment Association (KWVA) appreciated. Condolences may be Lakewood Park Cemetery. Visitation Friday 4-9 p.m. offered at www.heiligtagfuneralhome.com.

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03.24.2019 • SunDay • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-DISPaTCH • A27

Romania’s exodus brings labor woes, long-term worries European Union nation that’s distant home to millions needs its workers back as economy, society are failing BY ANDRA TIMU AND IRINA VILCU Bloomberg

Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here. When teenage tennis star Bianca Andreescu won her first major title in California this week, two countries cheered her triumph. The 18-year-old is a Canadian citizen whose Romanian parents left in 1994. Though the family returned home years later and Romania is where Andreescu began playing tennis, the financial support in Canada for budding

athletes prompted them to eventually settle there. Romania, a former Eastern Bloc nation that’s now a European Union member, lost 3.4 million citizens to emigration in the 15 years through 2017 — more than anywhere else in the world that’s not at war, according to the United Nations. Forecasts released in March say the economic pain from the departures will only get worse. More Romanians reside in other EU states than any other nationality from the bloc — about 3 million, Eurostat data showed this month.

Most are lured to richer western members such as Germany and the U.K. where salaries are higher and diaspora communities have swelled. Even Brexit hasn’t dulled Britain’s appeal. Like most of eastern Europe, Romania’s exodus has resulted in labor shortages that are being worsened by longer-term demographic decline. And it needs its workers to return home, fast. “The pressure on the labor market is increasing,” the Concordia employers association said in a March report that predicts a dearth of more than half

OBITUARIES Kubala, Olina "Lee"

a million people by 2023. “The need for national policies to target the repatriation of Romanians working abroad has become essential.” On the surface, some government initiatives already appear favorable: The minimum wage has been repeatedly raised, as have public-sector workers’ salaries. But ruling-party efforts to ease penalties for corruption aren’t helping. Neither are increasing tension with the EU and sub-par health care and infrastructure. The fear, in fact, is that the stampede to leave will pick up.

Celebrations of Life

Ploesser, Loretta J.

The government said this month that it’s worried the offspring of Romanians already working abroad will follow in their footsteps once they’re old enough. “The number of children left behind by parents who went to find work abroad is alarmingly high and social security isn’t enough to help them,” President Klaus Iohannis said. “There’s a saying that it takes a village to raise a child. Indeed, we need the entire community to support these children.”

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Telken, James W.

Fortified with the Sacraments of (nee Frisch), 92, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Holy Mother Church, James W. Church, on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Telken passed on Wednesday, Herman H. Ploesser; dearest mother of Steve (Mary) Ploesser, March 20, 2019. James is the Susan (Ron) Beyer, Herm (Sandi) Ploesser, Sharon McKay, Jerry eldest son of the late Eugene and (Jenny) Ploesser, Carl (Sue) Ploesser, Debbie (Rob) Needy and Garnet Telken and was born in Mike (Meghan) Ploesser. 60 kids called her Grandma including St. Louis, MO on July 26, 1936. the late Zachary Ploesser; our dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, Beloved husband of Rita Telken cousin and friend to many. (nee Becker) for over 51 years; Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 Leproud and loving father of Steve may Ferry Rd. on Sunday, March 24 from 3-8 p.m. then taken to (Darla) and Mark (Julie) Telken, St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church Monday, March 25 for Lynn (Christopher) Quinlan and visitation from 10:15 a.m. until time of Mass 11 a.m. Interment Matthew (Stephanie) Telken; Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to adoring grandfather of Hannah, St. John Vianney High School or de Greeff Hospice House Maxwell, Chase, Jordan, Jared, Jaden, Avery, Maysen and Henry; appreciated. dear brother of Connie (Paul) Jung, Ralph (the late Suzanne), Telken, Rev. Paul Telken and the late Thomas (surviving Mollie) Martin, Daniel T. Rapp, Shirley A. Telken; our dearest brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection Shirley A. Rapp (nee Felders) and friend to many. James was a lifelong educator and Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Beloved husband of Linda Sun., March 17, 2019. Wife of late counselor in the St. Louis area. Martin (nee Gavach); loving father of Kelly and Gabe Burnell H. Rapp; daughter of late Services: Memorial visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Martin; dear son of James and the late Elizabeth Martin, dear Anna and Fred Felders; mother Gravois, Monday, March 25, 4-8 p.m. Memorial Mass at brother of Therese, James, Mary, Patricia, Kathleen and Sean; of Jeffrey B. (Darleen) Rapp; Immaculate Conception Catholic Church (Arnold) on Tuesday, our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle and friend. s i s t e r o f l a t e R a y (M a ria n ) March 26 at 10 a.m. James gifted his body to St. Louis Services: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Felders; grandmother of Lindsay U n ivers it y Sch ool of Medicine. In l ieu of flowers, Wed., March 27,11:30 a.m. to Assumption Catholic Church for 12 (Danny) Vogelsang and Bryan contributions to L ew y Body Dementia Association, Noon Mass. Interment JB National Cemetery. Visitation Tues., (Carrie) R a p p ; grea t -gra n d - www.lbda.org, appreciated. mother of Addison, Riley, Harper 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation Vogelsang and Adelaide Rapp; an to the National Alliance on Mental Illness at namistl.org. Wilson, Laura A. aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. A member of South Co. March 21, 2019. Visitation 3-8 p.m. Mon., 3/25 at Hutchens McCoy, Dolores Catherine "Dee Dee" YMCA, Lutheran Church of the Mortuary, Florissant. Mass 10 a.m. Tues., 3/26 at St. Rose Resting in The Arms of The Lord, Wed., Mar. 20, 2019. Resurrection and baptized and confirmed at Hope Lutheran Philippine Duchesne, Florissant. Beloved wife of the late Edward William McCoy, dear mother of Church. Memorials to STL Humane Society of MO or Stray Jan (William) Callison, dear Dee Dee of Jeff Stofiel, Megan Rescue of STL. Windish, Edward "Ed" R. (Bernard) Bartelli, and Sean (Emily) Callison, dear great-Dee Services: Visit. at Fey Funeral Home on Mon., March 25 Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church Dee of Sophie, Noah, Jack, Liam, Calli, and Brandt. from 4-8 p.m., then to Lutheran Church of the Resurrection on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Services: A private family gathering will be held at a future on Tues. from 9 a.m. until service at 10 a.m. Burial at J.B. Beloved husband of Marilou Windish (nee Hanlon) of date. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Pathways Hospice or National Cemetery. 63 years; dearest father of Mary (James) Bohn and the late Needy Paws appreciated. Margaret A. Windish; dear son of the late John A. and Anna KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS Roberts, Sylvia Claire Windish (nee Buechler); brother-in-law of John (Margaret) 81, March 21, 2019. Services: Vis. at Baue Cave Springs on Hanlon; our dear uncle, cousin and friend of many. McGavock, Michael Mon., Mar. 25, 4 to 8 pm.Vis. at Sacred Heart of Eureka, on Ed was a 28 year veteran of McDonnell Douglas. He was a 65, March 17, 2019. Tue., Mar. 26, 9:00-9:30 am Mass to follow. Visit baue.com Korean War veteran in the U.S. Army. Private services. Memorials to Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Services: Visitation Monday, March 25, 9:30 a.m. until Mass appreciated. www.hutchenfuneralhomes.com 11:00 a.m. at Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, 150 N. Elizabeth Ave. Schneider, Bert (Ferguson). Entombment Calvary Mausoleum. In lieu of passed at his home in Spring, Texas on Wednesday, February flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a charity of Montgomery, Ellen C. 13, 2019 at the age of 59, after a year-long battle with cancer. your choice. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com 91 years, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Daughter of Richard and Bert was preceded in death by his father Walter, survived by his Linnie Standley; beloved wife of the late Robert Duane mother Rosemary, and sister Barb, cousins and many friends. Montgomery; dear mother of Rick (Jeannie) Montgomery, loving Zeigler, Jerald Leo He followed his graduation from Kirkwood High School to grandmother of Eric Montgomery and great-grandmother of Missouri State in Springfield, where he was a Sigma Phi Epsilon Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Born July 19, 1954. Survived by John Christopher, Mari-Corinne, Jack and Caleb; dear sister of Oliver member. Bert had a successful sales career, spending his most Zeigler and Daniel Zeigler. and the late Bristol and Emmett Standley; dear sister-in-law, recent 30 years in Texas. Avid golfer, traveler and dog lover. His aunt, cousin and friend. generosity and friendship touched the lives of many. Florists Services: Funeral 10 a.m. Thursday, March 28 at Hutchens Services: A Memorial service is scheduled for Friday, March Mortuary & Cremation Center, Florissant. Interment J.B. 29th at 2 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, 100 E. National Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Wed., March 27. Adams, Kirkwood, MO 63122. Memorial donations in memory of Dierbergs Florist Order 24 Hours Memorials to Caris Hospice. Bert may be made to St. Jude Children's Hospital.

(nee Corradi) Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Tues., March 19, 2019, at age 98. Beloved wife of the late Woodrow "Woody" Kubala; dear mother of Kathy (Norris) McClintic and the late Kenny (Becky) Kubala; loving grandmother of Kerry (David) Townsend, Katie (Daniel) Salinas, Claire (James) Owen, Amy (Jerry) Lynch, Kelly (Paul) Mehan and Cassy (Ryan) Cook; dearest great-grandmother of Blair, Charlie, Paddy, Charlie, Bo, Nico, Cecile and Howie. Services: Funeral Mass at St. Monica Catholic Church, 12136 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Mo 63141 on Sat., April 6 at 11:30 a.m. with visitation at church one hour prior to service. Interment St. Monica Cemetery. The family asks that in lieu of flowers, spend time with someone you love and think of Lee. Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Murray, Timothy Richard Tim passed away away March 13, 2019. He is predeceased by son, Nicholas Murray and mother Wyvonda Brown (Bonnie) Murray. He is survived by his loving wife, Melody Guthrie Murray, sons Matthew Murray (Jamie) and Joel Murray (Rachel), grandchildren, Parker and Emma, father Harlan Murray, sisters, Vickie Koon s (Bill), Ellen Stelzer (Steve), sisterin-law Gayle Rector (John) and many beloved family and friends. Tim graduated from McCluer High School and attended Community College, excelling in baseball. He joined the Navy in 1976 and was awarded as "outstanding recruit". Tim loved being a parent to his sons and was a hands-on dad; fixing meals, helping with homework, cleaning scrapes, reading books and lots of playing! He coached their baseball teams from K through 8th grade. He taught failing was as important as practicing or winning: "life is tough, sports aren't easy and learning to fail is part of life." Tim began his 38-year electrical career as a member of IBEW Local #1 Union in 1981. He was elected Treasurer, Executive Board member and fought tirelessly to protect rights for IBEW and its workers. As a Union Business Representative, he used his remarkable mediation and negotiation talents to make positive differences for his fellow electricians. Tim and Melody married April 24th, 2000 and had recently retired to FL. Theirs was a true love affair; best friends, confidants and ardent supporters of one another. Tim loved the Lord and will be most remembered for treating others with respect and equality, his infectious smile and witty sense of humor. While his grandson Parker was the light of his life, another grandchild was due to be born. Tim was anticipating life with his new granddaughter, Emma Grace. Services: Please join us for a Celebration of Life March 30, 2019 at Teamsters Local 862 Hall, 5730 Elizabeth Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110, at 12:00 pm In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to BAA Tim Murray Memorial Scholarship Fund, PO Box 4106, Ballwin, MO 63022.

Osterholt, Mary K . "Kay" 90, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church passed away on March 20th, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Nick Osterholt Sr.; beloved Mother to Nick Osterholt, Jr. (Jody), Tom Osterholt, Jim Osterholt, Sr. (Sharon), Tim Osterholt, and Kathy Nix; a brother Mike Beatty Sr. (Mickey); 19 grandchildren; 36 great-grandchildren and a host of other family members and friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, John L. and Marie Beatty, brother, John "Jack" L. Beatty, Jr., sister, Audrey Demas. Loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, who always had time for everyone with a beautiful smile, kind words and warm heart. She will be greatly missed. Services: Visitation will be from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Monday, at Newcomer Funeral Home. Mass will be 10:30 a.m., Tuesday, March 26, 2019 at All Saints Catholic Church. Burial will be Friday, March 29, 2019 at Calvary Cemetery. Memorial Donations may be made to SSM Hospice 12312 Olive Boulevard, Suite 400, St. Louis, MO 63141, the All Saints St. Peters Funeral Luncheon fund, or to the Special Olympics of Missouri, 2945 S. Brentwood Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63144.

Sekarski, Michael A. 71, on 3/20/19. Visit Mon., 3/25/19 4 P.M. - 8 P.M. Service Tues., 3/26/19 11:30 A.M. at John L. Ziegenhein & Sons, 7027 Gravois, 63116. Burial at Jefferson Barracks.

314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 Dierbergs.com

Schnucks Florist 65 Metro Locations 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557

Seyer, Louis L. Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Fri., March 22, 2019. Beloved husband of Mary Louise Seyer (nee Reckamp); dear father and father-in-law of Christopher (Pamela) Seyer, Leslie (Joseph) Aiello, Julia (Thomas) Luning, Kurt (Barbara) Seyer and Bradley (Crystel) Seyer; dear brother of L o r e t t a (t h e l a t e C l a r e n c e ) Chapman and the late Sylvester (Geneva) Seyer, Clarence (Bernice) Seyer, Leona (Walter) Willhelm, Verneda (Milford) King, Vincent (Gloria) Seyer; dear grandfather of 14, great-grandfather of 10; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from the Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Mon., March 25, 9:30 a.m. to Incarnate Word Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Visitation from 4-8 p.m. Sunday Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Switz, Patrick Joseph Jr. Age 78, passed away Saturday, March 16, 2019, at Legacy Assisted Living Center. He was born August 26, 1940, in Ravenna, Ohio, the son of Patrick J. and Helen E. (Snyder) Switz, Sr. Patrick graduated from Newton Falls High School in Newton Falls, OH, in 1958. He served in the US Army, then earned his Bachelors Degree in City Planning and Urban Development from Ohio University in Athens, OH, graduating in 1963. He started his career involved in the urban renewal of Cleveland, OH. He then was the Director of Community Development of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Ames, Iowa and St. Charles, Missouri. Patrick was involved in Kiwanis in several communities. He was "the Lawn Ranger", and loved making his yard beautiful. Patrick was a "car guy" who kept his automobiles immaculate, shiny, and ready to roll. He enjoyed traveling in the USA and enjoying the beauty of this country. Patrick enjoyed making people laugh. On July 25, 1964, he married Marjorie Ann Klee, and she survives. Other survivors include his daughter, Kristin (Michael) Bloink of Carmel, Indiana; two sisters, Marla (Morris) Krigbaum of New Meadows, Idaho and Kathleen Harley of Richmond, Michigan, as well as two nieces, two nephews, one grandnephew, and a cousin, Richard Reeves of Newton Falls, Ohio. Services: A celebration of his life will be held Friday, April 12, 11:00 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 128 Park St, Chelsea, MI 48118, with Rev. Joy Barrett officiating. The family will greet people from 10-11 a.m., and there will be a luncheon following the service. Burial will be at Maple Grove Cemetery in Ravenna, Ohio. Memorial contributions may be made to the Arbor Day Foundation or the Alzheimer's Foundation of America. Arrangements were entrusted to Cole Funeral Chapel, Chelsea.

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03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 2

WORLD

OBITUARIES Jesick, Edward

Murray, Timothy Richard Tim passed away away March 13, 2019. He is predeceased by son, Nicholas Murray and mother Wyvonda Brown (Bonnie) Murray. He is survived by his loving wife, Melody Guthrie Murray, sons Matthew Murray (Jamie) and Joel Murray (Rachel), grandchildren, Parker and Emma, father Harlan Murray, sisters, Vickie Koon s (Bill), Ellen Stelzer (Steve), sisterin-law Gayle Rector (John) and many beloved family and friends. Tim graduated from McCluer High School and attended Community College, excelling in baseball. He joined the Navy in 1976 and was awarded as "outstanding recruit". Tim loved being a parent to his sons and was a hands-on dad; fixing meals, helping with homework, cleaning scrapes, reading books and lots of playing! He coached their baseball teams from K through 8th grade. He taught failing was as important as practicing or winning: "life is tough, sports aren't easy and learning to fail is part of life." Tim began his 38-year electrical career as a member of IBEW Local #1 Union in 1981. He was elected Treasurer, Executive Board member and fought tirelessly to protect rights for IBEW and its workers. As a Union Business Representative, he used his remarkable mediation and negotiation talents to make positive differences for his fellow electricians. Tim and Melody married April 24th, 2000 and had recently retired to FL. Theirs was a true love affair; best friends, confidants and ardent supporters of one another. Tim loved the Lord and will be most remembered for treating others with respect and equality, his infectious smile and witty sense of humor. While his grandson Parker was the light of his life, another grandchild was due to be born. Tim was anticipating life with his new granddaughter, Emma Grace.

Johnson, Stewart Kenneth

Jones, Maury F. Fortified with the sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Son of the late Berkley and Abigail Jones (nee Gross); brother of Berkley Jones, Fairfax (Lynn) Jones, Courtney Jones, Daniel (Geraldine) Jones, L i n t o n (Na n cy) J on es , Cecil (Steve) Paul, and the late Curran Jones. Uncle to seven and greatuncle to twelve. Maury was employed by Killark Electric Manufacturing Co. for over 25 years and later by Carr Lane Manufacturing Co., where he retired in 2011. Maury was a longtime member of the Missouri Athletic Club. The family wishes to thank the staff of Mason Pointe for their exceptional care and compassion these last four years. Services: Funeral Mass Tuesday, March 26th, 10 a.m., St. Peter Catholic Church, Kirkwood. Interment Oak Hill Cemetery. Memorial contributions preferred to the Alzheimer's Association. Visitation Monday, March 25th, 4-8 p.m. at Bopp Chapel. www.boppchapel.com

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Celebrations of Life

Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Visitation Tues., Mar 26, 4-8 p.m. at the Heiligtag-Lang-Fendler Funeral Home in Arnold. Funeral service Weds., Mar. 27, 11:00 a.m. Int. Shepherd Hills Cem.

95, of St. Charles, March 7, 2019. Graveside Service at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery, Wednesday, April 10, 2019 at 12:30 pm. Contact (636) 940-1000 or visit Baue.com

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A27

Klearman, Melvin B.

Services: Please join us for a Celebration of Life March 30, 2019 Melvin B. Klearman died peacefully at his home on March 16, at Teamsters Local 862 Hall, 5730 Elizabeth Avenue, St. Louis, 2019 in Tucson, Arizona at the age of 85. He was born on Janu- MO 63110, at 12:00 pm ary 4, 1934 in St. Louis, Missouri. He is survived by his loving In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to BAA Tim Murray wife, Lois Klearman (Dubinsky). Loving father of Steven Klear- Memorial Scholarship Fund, PO Box 4106, Ballwin, MO 63022. man (Laura), John (Sheryl) and William. Loving grandfather of Sydni, Maddi and Aubrey. Brother to Ray Wenneker, Mimi Baron Niederbremer (nee Mues), Elaine Marie and Barnett Klearman (deceased). Elaine Mues Niederbremer (78) passed away on March 22, 2019 from acute myeloid leukemia. Koberlein, Robert E. Beloved wife of the late Harry 83, Columbia, IL, died Mar. 22, 2019. Niederbremer and adored mothSurviving are sisters, Marylin Koberlein and LuAnn Phillips, er of Karen (Keith) Graves and brother, Donald (Mary Jane) Koberlein, nephews, Jeffrey Laurie (Keith) Kornfeld. Loving (Juliana) Phillips, Michael (Kathryn) Koberlein, and Kevin gra n d mot h er of Nicol e a n d (Shannon) Koberlein, great-nephews and niece, Benjamin, Megan Graves and Erin and Anna Jonathan, and Henry Koberlein, Alissa and James Phillips, and K o r n f e l d. Dearest sister of Elliot Hardin, and family friend, Elaine Purdue. Robert (Jane) Mues and Richard Our Bob, beloved brother, uncle, great-uncle, colleague, (Jane) Mues and a dear relative neighbor, and friend. Bob was a respected colleague at Harres and friend. Elaine felt fortunate Store (formerly Weilbacher's) in Columbia, IL, including being a to have been blessed with a wonvalued Maytag repairman. He was a loyal season ticket holder derful life. She enjoyed joking with her family and friends, but for his beloved St. Louis Blues. Being a dedicated weekly usher also sharing meaningful conversation. She appreciated that and volunteer at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church gave everyone has their own story to tell and was genuinely interestlife and service to his deep faith. This gentle, loving, generous ed in other people. She loved traveling with Harry and friends family member and neighbor will forever be missed and held all around the world, volunteering at the Butterfly House, lovingly in our hearts. exploring the botanical gardens, hiking the Shaw nature Services: Visitation Tues., Mar. 26, 2019, 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m., reserve, visiting the zoo, exercising at the gym with her friends Lawlor Funeral Home, Columbia, IL and Wed., Mar. 27, 9:00 and any activity that allowed her to spend time with her granda.m. - 9:45 a.m., Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, daughters. Life will not be the same without her. Elaine Columbia, IL. Mass will be held Wed., 10:00 am, at the church. requested no formal service. She was very grateful to have the Interment at the church cemetery. opportunity to say goodbye to all of those she loved and was Memorial contributions may be made to the Eugene Schorb - overwhelmed with their expressions of love for her. Special Immaculate Conception School Education Fund, 411 Palmer Rd., thanks to the wonderful staff at Evelyn's House, angels on Columbia, IL 62236, or, St. Vincent de Paul Society of earth. "What the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the Immaculate Conception Church. www.leesmanfuneralhome.com Master calls a butterfly."

Pope, John Richard John Richard Pope, 88, February 6, 2019. Memorial Gathering: Friday, March 29, 2019, 4 pm to 7:30 pm, Atrium of Paul Detrick Building, Christian Hospital, 11133 Dunn Rd., St. Louis, MO, 63136. Doors open 3:30. Service 4:00. Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Omega Service 6:30.

Portnoy, Gloria Yawitz March 23, 2019, in Rockville, MD. Beloved wife of the late Leslie E. Portnoy. Dear mother of Mary Jane (Dr. Robert) Karp, Barbara (the late Dr. Stephen) Straus and Joan van Berg (Dr. Joel) Schulman. Loving grandmother of Jennifer Karp (Edward) Adrian, Joel Karp, Kate Straus, Julie (Adam) Straus Harris, Benjamin (Rachel) Straus, Elizabeth (Ryan) Lacey and Allison van Berg. Beloved great-grandmother of Elsa and Henry Adrian, Eli and Sophie Straus, Stephen and Ruth Straus Harris and Livia Lacey. Dear aunt, cousin, and friend. Services: Funeral service Tuesday, March 26, 11:00 a.m. at New Mt. Sinai Cemetery Mausoleum, 8430 Gravois Road. Visitation with Mrs. Portnoy's family beginning at 10:30 a.m. until time of service. Contributions in her memory may be made to the Miriam Foundation, 501 Bacon Ave, Saint Louis, MO 63119, or to the charity of the donor's choice. A RINDSKOPF-ROTH SERVICE

Rapp, Shirley A. Shirley A. Rapp (nee Felders) Sun., March 17, 2019. Wife of late Burnell H. Rapp; daughter of late Anna and Fred Felders; mother of Jeffrey B. (Darleen) Rapp; s i s t e r o f l a t e R a y (M a ria n ) Felders; grandmother of Lindsay (Danny) Vogelsang and Bryan (Carrie) R a p p ; grea t -gra n d mother of Addison, Riley, Harper Vogelsang and Adelaide Rapp; an aunt, great-aunt, cousin and friend. A member of South Co. YMCA, Lutheran Church of the Resurrection and baptized and confirmed at Hope Lutheran Church. Memorials to STL Humane Society of MO or Stray Rescue of STL. Services: Visit. at Fey Funeral Home on Mon., March 25 from 4-8 p.m., then to Lutheran Church of the Resurrection on Tues. from 9 a.m. until service at 10 a.m. Burial at J.B. National Cemetery.

Rehm, Richard L. 82 yrs. Loving husband to Patricia (nee Holtzclaw) for 61 years on March 21, 2019. Father to Jeffry (Sharon), Pamela Steinkamp (Larry), Laura, Daniel (Beth). Grandfather, great grandfather, c o u s i n a n d f r i e n d t o m a n y . O n l i n e i n f o r ma t i o n a t http://www.stlouiscremation.com.

Roberts, Sylvia Claire 81, March 21, 2019. Services: Vis. at Baue Cave Springs on Mon., Mar. 25, 4 to 8 pm.Vis. at Sacred Heart of Eureka, on Tue., Mar. 26, 9:00-9:30 am Mass to follow. Visit baue.com

Schlarman, Marilyn J.

77, formerly of St. Peters, MO, born March 17, 1942 in Florala, AL died Saturday, March 23, 2019 at Memorial Hospital East after a brief respiratory illness. Lambotte, Richard L. Osterholt, Mary K . "Kay" She was a retired secretary from Boeing in St. Louis, MO. Friday, March 22, 2019. Visitation Wednesday, 90, Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church passed She is preceded in death by her parents, Ken and Mildred, nee March 27, 4-9 p.m. with funeral service Thursday, away on March 20th, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Nick Hanschmidt, Schlarman. March 28, 12 noon at Kutis South County Chapel, Osterholt Sr.; beloved Mother to Nick Osterholt, Jr. (Jody), Tom She is survived by a brother, George (Annie) Schlarman of St. 5255 Lemay Ferry. Osterholt, Jim Osterholt, Sr. (Sharon), Tim Osterholt, and Kathy Peters, MO; a sister, Joan (Ken) Sandheinrich of St. Libory, IL; Nix; a brother Mike Beatty Sr. (Mickey); 19 grandchildren; 36 four nieces and one nephew, Janine (Terry) Hohm, Christine great-grandchildren and a host of other family members and (John) Loveless, Jackie Nothstine, Lauren Sandheinrich, Kyle (JoMartin, Daniel T. friends. She was preceded in death by her parents, John L. and Baptized into the Hope of Christ's Resurrection Marie Beatty, brother, John "Jack" L. Beatty, Jr., sister, Audrey rdan) Sandheinrich; two great-nieces and two great-nephews, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Beloved husband of Linda Demas. Loving mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother, Jamie (Ryan) Brazier, Nandy Nothstine, Justin and Austin Hohm. Memorials in memory of Marilyn, may be made to any charity Martin (nee Gavach); loving father of Kelly and Gabe who always had time for everyone with a beautiful smile, kind of donor's choice. Condolences may be sent to the family by Martin; dear son of James and the late Elizabeth Martin, dear words and warm heart. She will be greatly missed. brother of Therese, James, Mary, Patricia, Kathleen and Sean; Services: Visitation will be from 4:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Mon- visiting mollfuneralhome.com. Services: There will be no visitation. There will be private our dear brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle and friend. day, at Newcomer Funeral Home. Mass will be 10:30 a.m., TuesServices: Funeral from KUTIS AFFTON Chapel, 10151 Gravois, day, March 26, 2019 at All Saints Catholic Church. Burial will be services. Wed., March 27,11:30 a.m. to Assumption Catholic Church for 12 Friday, March 29, 2019 at Calvary Cemetery. Memorial DonaNoon Mass. Interment JB National Cemetery. Visitation Tues., tions may be made to SSM Hospice 12312 Olive Boulevard, Suite Schneider, Bert 4-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation 400, St. Louis, MO 63141, the All Saints St. Peters Funeral Lun- passed at his home in Spring, Texas on Wednesday, February to the National Alliance on Mental Illness at namistl.org. cheon fund, or to the Special Olympics of Missouri, 2945 S. 13, 2019 at the age of 59, after a year-long battle with cancer. Brentwood Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63144. Bert was preceded in death by his father Walter, survived by his mother Rosemary, and sister Barb, cousins and many friends. McCoy, Dolores Catherine "Dee Dee" He followed his graduation from Kirkwood High School to Resting in The Arms of The Lord, Wed., Mar. 20, 2019. Pelfrey, Barbara A. "Bobbie" Beloved wife of the late Edward William McCoy, dear mother of (nee Zannini) March 22, 2019. Visitation 4-8 p.m., Wed., 3/27 at Missouri State in Springfield, where he was a Sigma Phi Epsilon member. Bert had a successful sales career, spending his most Jan (William) Callison, dear Dee Dee of Jeff Stofiel, Megan Wolfersberger Funeral Home, O'Fallon, IL, and again at 9 a.m., (Bernard) Bartelli, and Sean (Emily) Callison, dear great-Dee Thurs., 3/28 at St. Nicholas Catholic Church. Mass at 10 a.m., recent 30 years in Texas. Avid golfer, traveler and dog lover. His generosity and friendship touched the lives of many. Dee of Sophie, Noah, Jack, Liam, Calli, and Brandt. Thurs., 3/28 at St. Nicholas Catholic Church, O'Fallon, IL, with Services: A Memorial service is scheduled for Friday, March Services: A private family gathering will be held at a future burial to follow at Mount Calvary Cemetery in Shiloh, IL. 29th at 2 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church of Kirkwood, 100 E. date. In lieu of flowers, contributions to Pathways Hospice or Adams, Kirkwood, MO 63122. Memorial donations in memory of Needy Paws appreciated. Bert may be made to St. Jude Children's Hospital. Ploesser, Loretta J. KRIEGSHAUSER BROTHERS (nee Frisch), 92, fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Beloved wife of the late Sekarski, Michael A. McGavock, Michael Herman H. Ploesser; dearest mother of Steve (Mary) Ploesser, 71, on 3/20/19. Visit Mon., 3/25/19 4 P.M. - 8 P.M. 65, March 17, 2019. Susan (Ron) Beyer, Herm (Sandi) Ploesser, Sharon McKay, Jerry Service Tues., 3/26/19 11:30 A.M. at John L. Private services. Memorials to Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (Jenny) Ploesser, Carl (Sue) Ploesser, Debbie (Rob) Needy and Ziegenhein & Sons, 7027 Gravois, 63116. Burial at appreciated. www.hutchenfuneralhomes.com Mike (Meghan) Ploesser. 60 kids called her Grandma including Jefferson Barracks. the late Zachary Ploesser; our dear sister, sister-in-law, aunt, cousin and friend to many. Montgomery, Ellen C. Selzer, Reverend Eugene Paul 91 years, Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Daughter of Richard and Services: Visitation at KUTIS SOUTH COUNTY Chapel, 5255 LeFortified with the Sacraments of Linnie Standley; beloved wife of the late Robert Duane may Ferry Rd. on Sunday, March 24 from 3-8 p.m. then taken to Holy Mother Church, Friday, Montgomery; dear mother of Rick (Jeannie) Montgomery, loving St. Catherine Laboure Catholic Church Monday, March 25 for March 22, 2019. grandmother of Eric Montgomery and great-grandmother of visitation from 10:15 a.m. until time of Mass 11 a.m. Interment Beloved brother of Janet (the Christopher, Mari-Corinne, Jack and Caleb; dear sister of Oliver Resurrection Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, contributions to late Ernest) Velasco and Marie and the late Bristol and Emmett Standley; dear sister-in-law, St. John Vianney High School or de Greeff Hospice House (Ron) Peters. Our dear uncle, appreciated. aunt, cousin and friend. great-uncle, great-great uncle Services: Funeral 10 a.m. Thursday, March 28 at Hutchens and devoted friend to many. Mortuary & Cremation Center, Florissant. Interment J.B. Podhorsky, Celeste If desired, please make National Cemetery. Visitation 4-8 p.m. Wed., March 27. of St. Charles passed away at the expressions of sympathy in Rev. Memorials to Caris Hospice. age of 95 on Thursday, March 21, Selzer's memory t o Catholic 2019. Celeste was preceded in Charities, 4445 Lindell Blvd. St. death by her husband, E mil Louis, MO 63108 or Birthright Podhorsky; her parents, Ignatius Counseling of St. Louis, 2525 S. and Estella Regina Prouhet; and Brentwood, Suite 102, St. Louis, MO 63144 her siblings, Raymond, Vernon, Services: Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated on Clement, and Ignatius Prouhet, Wednesday, March 27, 2019 at St. Matthias Catholic Church, 796 B e r n i c e S c h r o e d e r , a n d B u c k l e y Roa d a t 10 :0 0 a . m. In t ermen t w il l follow in Bernadine Phillipps. Resurrection Cemetery. Visitation at St. Matthias She is survived by her children, Catholic Church on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 from 4-8 Karen (Greg) H a u b and Gary p.m. Please share memories and offer condolences at Podhorsky; her grandchildren, hoffmeistersouthcounty.com Danielle H a u b and Nicholas AND GIFTS, OR CREATE A (Christina) Haub; her great-grandchild, Sydney Haub; and her MEMORIAL WEBSITE sister, Adrienne Widrikis. Celeste was always active, even into her 90's, and she loved keeping up with her hobbies of reading, playing bingo, and exercising. She enjoyed traveling and hitting the road to see the country in her RV. Faith was important to Celeste and, as a devout Catholic, she often volunteered her time and energy to SIGN THE ONLINE GUEST BOOK AND help others. She will be dearly missed. Contributions in Celeste's memory can be made to the American Red Cross or to Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital. Services: There will be a visitation on Friday, March 29, from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Baue Funeral and Memorial Center, 3950 West Clay St. There will be a Funeral Service on Saturday, March 30, at 9:30 a.m. at the same location with interment at St. Mary's Cemetery.

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NEWS

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

Patients question how FDA approves medical devices Some get OK if they are similar to others on market; mechanical tests don’t preclude problems in human bodies BY BLAKE FARMER nashville Public Radio

NASHVILLE • There’s no doubt

that surgically implanted medical devices can improve lives. Hip and knee replacements can help people regain their mobility. Drug pumps can deliver doses of pain-relieving medicine on demand. And metal rods can stabilize spines and broken bones. But implanted devices can also do serious damage, as happened to Mechel Keel, who lives in Owosso, Mich. To fix her leaky bladder, an OB-GYN stitched a flexible mesh strap inside her pelvis in 2004. But within months, the mesh hardened and started cutting her. The pain kept her from returning to her job as a hairdresser. The injuries and scar tissue that developed required multiple surgeries to correct and also resulted in chronic infections. Keel said she understood why her doctor in Tennessee thought the high-tech mesh would help. But she also now feels she was treated as “a guinea pig.” “We were the testers,” she said. “There was no animal testing done. We were the animals.” Thousands of cases of complications from surgical mesh have been reported to the Food and Drug Administration. More and more ailments are being treated these days with medical devices, including implants. And most of these medical devices, unlike pills in a medicine cabinet, don’t go through human testing before being offered to patients. Some devices break down or malfunction in people’s bodies, and reports about sometimes debilitating injuries have led the FDA to rethink how it assesses medical devices before allowing them to be sold. For devices in which failure is obviously life-threatening, regulators have required some sort of human testing as part of the most stringent path — known as premarket approval. But most medical devices enter the market after manufacturers provide technical information and show that the devices are similar to others that have been legally sold previously. The FDA has acknowledged that some seemingly safe devices had caused major problems, and the agency has elevated the risk level of those products after reports of injuries, as it did with urogynecologic surgical mesh for some uses in 2016. “Unfortunately, the FDA cannot always know the full extent of the benefits and risks of a device before it reaches the market,” the agency said in a recent statement. “We have things like metal-

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Susan Harrison, 63, of Lawrenceville, Ga., describes complications from having surgical mesh placed in her pelvic cavity, during an interview in January in her attorney’s office in Athens, Ga. Harrison is one of the thousands of women nationwide who have sued manufacturers of the surgical mesh claiming severe complications and intense physical pain when the flexible plastic mesh hardened inside their bodies.

on-metal hips,” said health journalist Jeanne Lenzer about a kind of orthopedic implant. “Outside the body, (they) seem to function just fine. They put them in little machines, rock them back and forth — they don’t break. (But) put them inside people, and something very different happens.” There have been massive recalls of hip implants, for example, because of swelling and pain. And there have been problems with weakened bones in patients who received hip implants that contained plastic. Lenzer wrote a scathing book, “The Danger Within Us,” about the device industry and said she was “dumbfounded” to find out how many devices never went through human testing the way drugs do. That’s in part because of a regulatory review process known as 510(k) for a section of the FDA law covering medical devices. Manufacturers typically show their product has “substantial equivalence” to a “predicate device” that has already been legally marketed. That standard can perpetuate problems. “You just say your device is like an old device, and the old device was never tested, nor was your device,” Lenzer said. In practice, sometimes the basis for a whole family tree of de-

vices turns out to be defective. Pelvic mesh is a relevant example, with much of what’s on the market being based on mesh that was around prior to implementation of FDA regulations for medical devices in 1976. One study found that 16 percent of mesh on the market was designed like products that had been pulled from the market because of safety concerns. Thousands of women have filed suit — or reached settlements — with companies that manufacture pelvic mesh. “I would want nothing if you could just give me my life back,” said Gloria Jones of Hillsdale, Mich., who is one of thousands who have settled with device manufacturers over faulty mesh. “They could have given me millions, but all I needed was my life back.” Jones, who has struggled to continue working through crippling abdominal pain as a middle school special-education teaching assistant, has had four surgeries to remove pieces and continues to require intravenous drugs to control infections. “It seems like I get off one antibiotic, and three days later I have another one,” she said. “I would beg anybody who is even thinking of putting mesh in their bodies to stop and get a second opinion.”

In response to problems reported with mesh, the FDA started requiring human testing for some of these products in recent years. The agency held an advisory committee meeting on Feb. 12 to discuss the safety and effectiveness of mesh and how it should be regulated. Manufacturers by and large have said they don’t oppose what the FDA is trying to do, calling the changes reasonable. But they have pushed back against calls to bring regulation of medical devices in line with that of pharmaceuticals. “If you’re treating someone for high cholesterol, the testing that you go through to ensure safety and effectiveness on a chemical that’s going to be used in your body to control your cholesterol is just very different than it would be for the implantation of a heart valve,” said Scott Whitaker, CEO of AdvaMed, a trade association for medical device companies. “Honestly, it’s apples and oranges.” Whitaker dismisses the idea that devices, which range from tongue depressors to surgical robots, should all go through human trials. “Testing should be as complete and as thorough and as ethical and as appropriate as possible. But it doesn’t all fit the same and can’t all fit the same standard,”

Whitaker said. “And while we always strive for 100 percent, there are times when something might not go according to plan. It could also be because the surgery didn’t go as was planned.” The FDA declined NPR’s request for an interview. But the agency has released some written justification for the regulatory revamp. “We believe firmly in the merits of the 510(k) process,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a November statement, noting that applications have more than doubled in size to an average of 1,185 pages. “But we also believe that framework needs to be modernized to reflect advances in technology, safety and the capabilities of a new generation of medical devices.” In the same statement, the agency addressed some specific shortcomings and charted plans to make changes to the process over the next few months: • Pushing back on manufacturers that base any new device’s marketing application on one that’s more than 10 years old. • More actively watching how devices perform once they’re on the market, rather than relying on patients to report problems. • Scrapping the 510(k) name for something more descriptive, such as the “Safety and Performance Based Pathway.”

combined with the scream of a jaguar — and it becomes a roller coaster of sound,” he once told the Vancouver Sun.

a favorite of the preschool and early-elementary set.

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Bill Phelps • The former Missouri lieutenant governor has died. Officials at Ferry Funeral Home in Nevada, Mo., confirmed his death on Tuesday (March 19, 2019). He was 84. No cause of death was given. Lt. Gov. Phelps worked as a lawyer in Kansas City before being elected to the state House in 1960. He served as a state representative for 12 years until he was elected lieutenant governor in 1972. Voters re-elected him in 1976. He earned the nickname “full-time Phelps” because of a campaign promise to serve full time as lieutenant governor, a job with few official duties. He gave up his work as a lawyer after his election. He lost the Republican nomination for governor in 1980 and later lost a bid for Congress in 1996 against then-Rep. Ike Skelton, a Democrat. Bill Burlison • The former sixterm state congressman from southeastern Missouri has died. Officials at Morgan Funeral Home in Advance confirmed the death of Rep. Burlison. He was 88. No cause of death was given. The Southeast Missourian reported that Rep. Burlison died March 17 (2019) at his home in Wardell. Rep. Burlison, a Democrat, was first elected in 1968. He lost his bid for a seventh term in 1980 to Bill Emerson, a Republican. Rep. Burlison was a Marine Corps veteran who served as an assistant Missouri attorney general and Cape Girardeau County prosecutor before his election to Congress. Alan Krueger • The labor economist who advised two presidents and drew on empirical research, rather than abstract theories, to generate insights into the impact of minimum wage

Burlison

Krueger

increases, the origins of terrorists and the rising price of concert tickets, has died. He was 58. He died by suicide on March 16 (2019), this family said. The family did not provide additional information. Mr. Krueger was a professor of political economy at Princeton University, where he had taught since 1987, taking the occasional leave of absence to work for the federal government. He served for a year under President Bill Clinton as the Labor Department’s chief economist, and he was an assistant treasury secretary from 2009 to 2010 during President Barack Obama’s administration. In the wake of the global financial crisis, he tried to boost the economy through stimulus measures such as a credit fund for small businesses and the “cash for clunkers” program, which offered rebates for new-car buyers. After being named chairman of the president’s Council of Economic Advisers in 2011, he had to abandon the subject-hopping strategy he had long employed as a scholar, bounding from interest to interest while conducting studies that made him a leading empirical economist in a field known for its emphasis on abstract modeling. Bernie Torme • The guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne has died, a day before his 67th birthday. Drummer Mik Gaffney said that Mr. Torme died March 17 (2019) at a hospital in London. Gaffney said Mr. Torme had had pneumonia in both lungs and was on life support for

Williams

Dale

four weeks. Mr. Torme would have turned 67 on March 18. Andre Williams • The R&B singer and songwriter who co-wrote “Shake A Tail Feather” and performed across musical genres, has died. He was 82. Mr. Williams’ manager and musical director, Kenn Goodman, said that Mr. Williams was recently diagnosed with colon cancer and that he was receiving hospice care at a nursing home in Chicago when he died March 17 (2019). Mr. Williams moved as a young man from Alabama to Detroit, where he signed with Fortune Records and, later, with Motown Records. His early hits included “Bacon Fat,” “Jail Bait” and “Shake a Tail Feather,” which Ray Charles sang in “The Blues Brothers.” Mr. Williams also produced the recording of “Mustang Sally” by its composer, “Sir” Mack Rice. Dick Dale • The California-based musician and surfer whose rumbling and percussive guitar work drew inspiration from the thundering force of ocean waves, earning him the title king of surf guitar, died March 16 (2019) at 81. His former bassist Sam Bolle confirmed the death but did not say where or how he died. With his Fender Stratocaster guitar, Mr. Dale said he attempted to mimic the surging ocean sounds and the energy of the big cats he raised for more than three decades. “I try to get the feeling of coming off a 10-foot wave

Al Silverman • The onetime editor of Sport magazine and chief executive of the Book-of-the-Month Club who also was the co-author of football star Gale Sayers’ autobiography, which became the basis for the sentimental TV movie “Brian’s Song,” died March 10 (2019) at his home in New York City. He was 92. The death was confirmed by his son Brian Silverman, who did not cite a specific cause. Throughout the 1960s, Mr. Silverman became friendly with many sports stars and published several biographies and as-told-to memoirs. His most notable collaboration was with Sayers, a star running back for the Chicago Bears who had electrified the National Football League as a rookie in 1965 and in his next two seasons. After a serious knee injury in 1968, Sayers was encouraged and prodded throughout his recovery by a teammate and fellow running back, Brian Piccolo. Marjorie Weinman Sharmat • The writer, who helped children discover the joys of reading with more than two dozen books in her Nate the Great series about a pancake-eating boy detective, died March 12 (2019) at a hospital in Munster, Ind. She was 90. The cause was respiratory failure, said her son Andrew Sharmat. Ms. Sharmat wrote or co-wrote more than 130 books for young readers, her audiences ranging from children just learning to sound out words to adolescents peering into the grown-up world. Of all her characters, the best known was Nate the Great, who made his debut in 1972 and became

Bishop Francis A. Quinn • A widely beloved community leader who exerted moral authority with a gentle touch as the spiritual head of Catholics in the Sacramento, Calif., region, died Thursday (March 21, 2019). At 97, he was the oldest living bishop in the United States at the time of his death. Bishop Quinn served from 1980 to 1994 as bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Sacramento, which covers 42,000 square miles in 20 counties. He encouraged lay Catholics — especially women — to take active roles in church governance and ministries, and he supported ordination of deacons. Rachel Ingalls • The expatriate American author of “Mrs. Caliban” has died. Ms. Ingalls lived in London, where she died March 6 (2019) at 78. She remained largely anonymous for the first two decades of her writing career, but in 1986 came an event that Ms. Ingalls described as a “fluke.” The British Book Marketing Council ranked her 1982 book “Mrs. Caliban” — the story of a California housewife with a dead child, a dead dog and a dying marriage, who undertakes an affair with a 6-foot-long sea monster called Larry — among the 20 best novels by living American writers after World War II. “Mrs. Caliban” had until that point sold roughly 200 copies in the United States, according to the Los Angeles Times. With the recognition she received in Britain, Ms. Ingalls was thrust into relative fame among readers of serious fiction on both sides of the Atlantic. From news services


OBITUARIES

A28 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Bill Phelps • The former Missouri lieutenant governor has died at 84. Officials at Ferry Funeral Home in Nevada, Mo., confirmed his death on Tuesday (March 19, 2019). No cause of death was given. Lt. Gov. Phelps was elected to the state House in 1960 and was elected lieutenant governor in 1972. Voters re-elected him in 1976. He earned the nickname “full-time Phelps” because of a campaign promise to serve full time as lieutenant governor, a job with few official duties. He lost the Republican nomination for governor in 1980 and later lost a bid for Congress in 1996 against then-Rep. Ike Skelton, a Democrat.

Phelps

Bill Burlison • The former sixterm state congressman from southeastern Missouri has died. Rep. Burlison, a Democrat, died March 17 (2019) at his home in Wardell. He was 88. No cause of death was given. Rep. Burlison was a Marine Corps veteran who served as an assistant Missouri attorney general and Cape Girardeau County prosecutor before his election to Congress in 1968. He lost his bid for a seventh term in 1980 to Bill Emerson, a Republican. Alan Krueger • The labor economist who advised two presidents and drew on empirical research, rather than abstract theories, to generate insights into the impact of minimum wage increases, the origins of terrorists and the rising price of concert tickets, has died. He was 58. He died by suicide on March 16 (2019), this family said. The family did not provide additional information. Mr. Krueger was a professor of political economy at Princeton University, where he had taught since 1987, taking the occasional leave of absence to work for the federal government. He served for a year under President Bill Clinton as the Labor Department’s chief economist,

Burlison

Krueger

and he was an assistant treasury secretary from 2009 to 2010 during President Barack Obama’s administration. In the wake of the global financial crisis, he tried to boost the economy through stimulus measures such as a credit fund for small businesses and the “cash for clunkers” program, which offered rebates for new-car buyers. After being named chairman of the president’s Council of Economic Advisers in 2011, he had to abandon the subject-hopping strategy he had long employed as a scholar, bounding from interest to interest while conducting studies that made him a leading empirical economist in a field known for its emphasis on abstract modeling. Bernie Torme • The guitarist for Ozzy Osbourne has died, a day before his 67th birthday. Drummer Mik Gaffney said that Mr. Torme died March 17 (2019) at a hospital in London. Gaffney said Mr. Torme had had pneumonia in both lungs and was on life support for four weeks. Andre Williams • The R&B singer and songwriter who co-wrote “Shake A Tail Feather” and performed across musical genres, has died. He was 82. Mr. Williams’ manager and musical director, Kenn Goodman, said that Mr. Williams was recently diagnosed with colon cancer and that he was receiving hospice care at a nursing home in Chicago when he died March 17 (2019). Mr. Williams moved as a young man from Alabama to Detroit, where he signed with Fortune Records and, later, with Motown Records. His early hits included “Bacon Fat,” “Jail

Williams

Bait” and “Shake a Tail Feather,” which Ray Charles sang in “The Blues Brothers.” Mr. Williams also produced the recording of “Mustang Sally” by its composer, “Sir” Mack Rice. Dick Dale • The California-based musician and surfer whose rumbling and percussive guitar work drew inspiration from the thundering force of ocean waves, earning him the title king of surf guitar, died March 16 (2019) at 81. His former bassist Sam Bolle confirmed the death but did not say where or how he died. With his Fender Stratocaster guitar, Mr. Dale said he attempted to mimic the surging ocean sounds and the energy of the big cats he raised for more than three decades. “I try to get the feeling of coming off a 10-foot wave combined with the scream of a jaguar — and it becomes a roller coaster of sound,” he once told the Vancouver Sun. Marjorie Weinman Sharmat • The writer, who helped children discover the joys of reading with more than two dozen books in her Nate the Great series about a pancake-eating boy detective, died March 12 (2019) at a hospital in Munster, Ind. She was 90. The cause was respiratory failure, said her son Andrew Sharmat. Ms. Sharmat wrote or co-wrote more than 130 books for young readers, her audiences ranging from children just learning to sound out words to adolescents peering into the grown-up world. Of all her characters, the best known was Nate the Great, who made his debut in 1972 and became a

OBITUARIES

Dale

Eitan

favorite of the preschool and earlyelementary set. Rachel Ingalls • The expatriate American author of “Mrs. Caliban” has died. Ms. Ingalls, who lived in London, died there March 6 (2019) at 78. She remained largely anonymous for the first two decades of her writing career, but in 1986 came an event that Ms. Ingalls described as a “fluke.” The British Book Marketing Council ranked her 1982 book “Mrs. Caliban” — the story of a California housewife with a dead child, a dead dog and a dying marriage, who undertakes an affair with a 6-foot-long sea monster called Larry — among the 20 best novels by living American writers after World War II. “Mrs. Caliban” had until that point sold roughly 200 copies in the United States, according to the Los Angeles Times. With the recognition she received in Britain, Ms. Ingalls was thrust into relative fame among readers of serious fiction on both sides of the Atlantic. Rafi Eitan • The legendary Israeli Mossad spy who led the capture of Holocaust mastermind Adolf Eichmann, died Saturday at 92. Mr. Eitan was one of the founders of Israel’s vaunted intelligence agency and among its most prominent figures in Israel and abroad. The 1960 operation to capture Eichmann in Argentina and bring him to trial in Jerusalem was the Mossad’s most historic mission and remains one of the defining episodes in Israel’s history. His trial brought to life the horrors of the Nazi “Final Solution,” which followed Eichmann’s blueprint

Celebrations of Life

for liquidating the entire Jewish population of Europe. Eichmann was convicted in 1961 of war crimes and crimes against humanity. He was hanged the following year — the only time Israel has carried out a death sentence. Mossad Director Yossi Cohen said the majority of Mr. Eitan’s exploits remained unknown to the public. Mr. Eitan’s reputation took a hit in the 1980s for his handling of Jonathan Pollard, a civilian intelligence analyst for the U.S. Navy, who sold military secrets to Israel while working at the Pentagon. Pollard was arrested in 1985 and pleaded guilty, in an espionage affair that embarrassed Israel and severely tarnished its relations with the United States. Luis Ortiz Alfau • One of the last survivors of the carpet-bombing of the Basque town of Guernica on April 26, 1937, an event immortalized by Pablo Picasso’s monumental antiwar oil painting “Guernica,” has died. Mr. Ortiz, died March 8 (2019) at 102. Spain had been run by an elected moderate liberal coalition of Republicans, a government known as the Second Republic. But in July 1936, Nationalists staged a military coup that resulted in the civil war, with Gen. Francisco Franco eventually leading the Nationalist side. He had the support of Nazi Germany and fascist Italy, while the leftists were backed by the Soviet Union and Mexico. Other countries, including the United States and Great Britain declined to intervene. In the bombing of Guernica, in which as many as 1,600 civilians died, planes from Adolf Hitler’s Germany and his ally Benito Mussolini’s Italy dropped explosive bombs, then incendiary bombs, and the town burned. Hitler used the bombing to test his new tactic of blitzkrieg, or lightning war, used with horrifying success on London in World War II. From news services

STLtoday.com/obits 314-340-8600 obits@post-dispatch.com

Seyer, Louis L.

Switz, Patrick Joseph Jr.

Wilpert, Sandra

Baptized into the hope of Christ's Resurrection, Fri., March 22, 2019. Beloved husband of Mary Louise Seyer (nee Reckamp); dear father and father-in-law of Christopher (Pamela) Seyer, Leslie (Joseph) Aiello, Julia (Thomas) Luning, Kurt (Barbara) Seyer and Bradley (Crystel) Seyer; dear brother of L o r e t t a (t h e l a t e C l a r e n c e ) Chapman and the late Sylvester (Geneva) Seyer, Clarence (Bernice) Seyer, Leona (Walter) Willhelm, Verneda (Milford) King, Vincent (Gloria) Seyer; dear grandfather of 14, great-grandfather of 10; our dear uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend. Services: Funeral from the Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home, 12444 Olive Blvd., Creve Coeur, Mon., March 25, 9:30 a.m. to Incarnate Word Church for 10 a.m. Mass. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to Alzheimer's Association appreciated. Visitation from 4-8 p.m. Sunday Ortmann Stipanovich Funeral Home osfuneralhomes.com

Age 78, passed away Saturday, March 16, 2019, at Legacy Assisted Living Center. He was born August 26, 1940, in Ravenna, Ohio, the son of Patrick J. and Helen E. (Snyder) Switz, Sr. Patrick graduated from Newton Falls High School in Newton Falls, OH, in 1958. He served in the US Army, then earned his Bachelors Degree in City Planning and Urban Development from Ohio University in Athens, OH, graduating in 1963. He started his career involved in the urban renewal of Cleveland, OH. He then was the Director of Community Development of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio; Ames, Iowa and St. Charles, Missouri. Patrick was involved in Kiwanis in several communities. He was "the Lawn Ranger", and loved making his yard beautiful. Patrick was a "car guy" who kept his automobiles immaculate, shiny, and ready to roll. He enjoyed traveling in the USA and enjoying the beauty of this country. Patrick enjoyed making people laugh. On July 25, 1964, he married Marjorie Ann Klee, and she survives. Other survivors include his daughter, Kristin (Michael) Bloink of Carmel, Indiana; two sisters, Marla (Morris) Krigbaum of New Meadows, Idaho and Kathleen Harley of Richmond, Michigan, as well as two nieces, two nephews, one grandnephew, and a cousin, Richard Reeves of Newton Falls, Ohio. Services: A celebration of his life will be held Friday, April 12, 11:00 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church, 128 Park St, Chelsea, MI 48118, with Rev. Joy Barrett officiating. The family will greet people from 10-11 a.m., and there will be a luncheon following the service. Burial will be at Maple Grove Cemetery in Ravenna, Ohio. Memorial contributions may be made to the Arbor Day Foundation or the Alzheimer's Foundation of America. Arrangements were entrusted to Cole Funeral Chapel, Chelsea.

(57) Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Saturday, March 23, 2019. Beloved daughter of the late Carl and Gloria (nee Branson) Wilpert; Best friend and older sister of Nancy Wilpert. Special friend to Virginia Kelly and Anne Klein. Family sends a special thank you to all the staff at Sunset Hills Health and Rehabilitation for all the loving care given to Sandra. Donations to the Humane Society of Missouri or Oak Hill Animal Shelter appreciated. Service of John L. Ziegenhein & Sons South County Chapel.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Beloved husband of Marilou Windish (nee Hanlon) of 63 years; dearest father of Mary (James) Bohn and the late Margaret A. Windish; dear son of the late John A. and Anna Windish (nee Buechler); brother-in-law of John (Margaret) Hanlon; our dear uncle, cousin and friend of many. Ed was a 28 year veteran of McDonnell Douglas. He was a Korean War veteran in the U.S. Army. Services: Visitation Monday, March 25, 9:30 a.m. until Mass 11:00 a.m. at Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, 150 N. Elizabeth Ave. (Ferguson). Entombment Calvary Mausoleum. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a charity of your choice. www.hutchensfuneralhomes.com

Telken, James W.

Zeigler, Jerald Leo

Siebert, Oliver Walter "Ollie" Fortified with the Sacraments of Holy Mother Church, Thursday March 21, 2019. Born July 23, 1924.Preceded in death by his cherished wife of 69 years, Virginia; survived by his children, Jill (David) VonGruben, Lauren (Mark) Olesnicki, Marilyn "Lindy" (Jay) Huddleston, and Carrie (Mickey) Bernard; and grandchildren Kristen VonGruben, Tracy (Bob) Kaczmarczyk, Kelly (Shawn) Turner, William (Rachel) Huddleston, Lauramarie Olesnicki, John Oliver Huddleston, Alex, Margaret and Thomas Bernard: great grandchildren Carson Reel, and Nicholas Turner. Oliver was a proud WWll Purple Heart and French Legion of Honor Recipient, a Washington University teacher & alum, a Monsanto Fellow and President of Siebert Materials Engineering Inc., an engineer of numerous areas of Corrosion expertise, who loved his God, family, and country dearly. His family thanks everyone who tenderly took care of him, including many physicians at St. Luke's & St. Luke's Hospice. Services: Funeral Mass at Christ Prince of Peace Catholic Church, 415 Weidman Rd., Manchester, Friday, March 29, 2019 at 11:30 a.m. Visitation from 10:30 a.m. until time of service. Interment at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, Masses and memorial contributions preferred, Washington University McKelvey School of Engineering, 1 Brookings Drive, P.O Box 1202 St. Louis, MO 63130, or St. Luke's Hospice, 101 St. Luke's Center Drive, Chesterfield, MO 63017. A service of SCHRADER Funeral Home and Crematory. Friends may sign the family's online guest book at Schrader.com.

THEM GREAT STLtoday.com/obits

Windish, Edward "Ed" R.

Fortified with the Sacraments of Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Born July 19, 1954. Survived by John Holy Mother Church, James W. Zeigler and Daniel Zeigler. Telken passed on Wednesday, March 20, 2019. James is the Florists eldest son of the late Eugene and Garnet Telken and was born in Dierbergs Florist St. Louis, MO on July 26, 1936. Order 24 Hours Beloved husband of Rita Telken 314-692-2000 or 800-844-6007 (nee Becker) for over 51 years; Dierbergs.com proud and loving father of Steve (Darla) and Mark (Julie) Telken, Lynn (Christopher) Quinlan and Schnucks Florist Matthew (Stephanie) Telken; 65 Metro Locations adoring grandfather of Hannah, 314-997-2444; 800-286-9557 Maxwell, Chase, Jordan, Jared, Jaden, Avery, Maysen and Henry; dear brother of Connie (Paul) Jung, Ralph (the late Suzanne), Telken, Rev. Paul Telken and the late Thomas (surviving Mollie) Telken; our dearest brother-in-law, uncle, great-uncle, cousin and friend to many. James was a lifelong educator and counselor in the St. Louis area. Services: Memorial visitation at Kutis Affton Chapel, 10151 Gravois, Monday, March 25, 4-8 p.m. Memorial Mass at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church (Arnold) on Tuesday, March 26 at 10 a.m. James gifted his body to St. Louis U n ivers it y Sch ool of Medicine. In l ieu of flowers, contributions to L ew y Body Dementia Association, www.lbda.org, appreciated.

Williams, Jr., Clarence James

SHARE A MEMORY AND MAGNIFY WHAT MADE

Wilson, Laura A. March 21, 2019. Visitation 3-8 p.m. Mon., 3/25 at Hutchens Mortuary, Florissant. Mass 10 a.m. Tues., 3/26 at St. Rose Philippine Duchesne, Florissant.

was born on May 25, 1950 in St. Louis, Missouri to Minnie and Clarence Williams. He was the first born out of five children. Clarence worked at AT&T for over 40 years before his retirement in 2013. He enjoyed his work and frequently pointed out popular St. Louis buildings and landmarks where he installed phone lines. Clarence spent the prime of his life with the love of his life, Elinor Farrell Hancock, MD. The couple has been together for 13 years total. Clarence enjoyed motorcycle riding and traveling the world with his wife. Clarence succumb to his battle with prostate cancer on Thursday March 21, 2019. He is survived by his adoring wife, Elinor Hancock, MD, and a host of family and friends. Services: The funeral will be held at Wade Funeral Home on Sunday, March 31, 2019.


WORLD

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A29

After massacre in New Zealand, soul-searching over racism begins

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Students light candles Monday as they gather for a vigil to commemorate victims of the March 18 shooting, outside the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand. On Friday, thousands of non-Muslims attended prayers at mosques in support of their Muslim neighbors.

BY ANNA FIFIELD Washington Post

CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND • New Zealanders like to

think of themselves as an open, tolerant lot. And by many measures, they absolutely are. One in four New Zealand citizens was born outside the country. There are more than 200 ethnicities represented in a population of 4.8 million people — more ethnicities than the number of countries represented at the United Nations. As President Donald Trump was capping refugee numbers, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was increasing New Zealand’s refugee quota. In a world of growing anti-immigrant populism, many in New Zealand feel like they’re heading in the right direction. But last Friday’s attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, which left 50 people dead, has caused soul-searching as well as shock. “I think this is a really good opportunity for people to stop and say, ‘What do we need to do to become the country that we talk about ourselves as being?’” said Susan Devoy, who was the country’s race relations commissioner until last year. It would be easy for New Zealanders to distance themselves from the attacks, given that the alleged gunman was an Australian who had deliberately come here to increase the shock value of his actions. Australia has had a few such attacks, although nowhere near as huge, but New Zealand had had none. Indeed, the refrain that has been repeated constantly since the attacks, by everyone from the prime minister down, is: “This is not us.” Some New Zealanders are now standing up to say, err, it kind of is us. We are deluding ourselves, they say, to try to distance ourselves from the suspected shooter just because he’s Australian, a country that has. He lived here, he trained at a rifle club here, he was supported here. “We can’t pretend this was an aberration from overseas. The truth is it happened here and it began with hate speech allowed to grow online,” Golriz Ghahraman, a Green MP who came to New Zealand from Iran as a refugee when she was 9 years old, said in parliament Wednesday. New Zealand has had a race relations problem ever since it was colonized by Britain as a settler colony in the early 1800s. The Maori population continues to suffer even today. Maori make up 15 percent of the New Zealand population, but account for more than half the prison population. They are at the bottom of many health and economic statistical tables. Auckland is the biggest Polynesian city in the world. Historical issues and socio-economic

Students perform the Haka during a vigil Monday to commemorate victims of the March 18 shooting, outside the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand on Monday. New Zealand is proud of its diversity, counting more than 200 ethnic groups among its 4.8 million people. It has also had liberal immigration policies.

disparities between the indigenous Maori and the Pākehā — or New Zealanders of European descent — are slowly being addressed, although a lot remains to be done. “White supremacy is a black strand woven through our history as a nation,” acclaimed historian Anne Salmond wrote in the Christchurch newspaper The Press this week. The country has made great strides in its race relations over the 20 years since I left these shores, and Christchurch in particular has changed in extraordinary ways since I attended journalism school here in 1997. The Maori population in the South Island has increased and Maori language is now spoken much more widely and naturally in everyday life across the country. Students spontaneously performed the Maori haka, a dance showing unity and strength, at memorials to the dead this week. There are large and visible Chinese and Korean populations, thanks partly to the universities here, and many of them are thriving. Christchurch has also become home to increasing refugees and immigrants from other parts of the world, especially the Middle East and South Asia. Societal attitudes, however, haven’t quite kept up with this rapid change. For an illustration of the dichotomies that continue, look no further than the coalition government. While Ardern has won praise for her compassionate response to the attacks, which

included wearing a headscarf to see Muslim victims, her deputy prime minister Winston Peters and his party, New Zealand First, has concerns about immigration at its core. Peters has repeatedly suggested there is a link between Muslim immigration and terrorist attacks, and as recently as 2014 was making racist jokes about Chinese immigrants pushing up house prices. “As they say in Beijing, ‘Two Wongs don’t make a right’,” he said at a campaign event. Acclaimed filmmaker Taika Waititi caused a heated debate here when he said in an interview last year that New Zealand was racist. If an activist had said the same thing, it would have been easy to dismiss. But Waititi was able to garner attention because of who he is. Maori, famous for top-shelf entertainment, New Zealander of the Year in 2017. It caused a ruckus. “New Zealanders like to think that everyone gets a fair go and that we’re not a racist society,” said David Small, an academic at the University of Canterbury. “Even the racists don’t like to be called racist.” That may be true of the casual racism that the filmmaker Waititi was targeting. But New Zealand does have its white nationalist movements, and they have traditionally been concentrated in Christchurch, a city that has long been notably whiter than the other parts of the country, particularly the North Island.

Christchurch has long had an ugly underbelly of skinheads with swastika tattoos. They belong to groups with names like Right Wing Resistance and National Front, and occasionally hold rallies. Just last month some skinheads tried to rip hijabs of women in Dunedin, while on Saturday, the day after the shootings, there were reports of skinheads causing disturbances in the Christchurch suburb of New Brighton. New Zealand’s geographic isolation had helped keep the tiny group of white nationalists here isolated, too. But the emergence of extremist communities online has helped them feel connected to a larger movement and has endorsed their beliefs, experts like Small say. That has helped the groups such as white nationalists gather momentum. Muslim community leaders noticed this and had appealed to the government to protect them. “No one seemed to take the threats that Muslims were reporting to the government seriously,” Devoy said. Meanwhile, the authorities had been treating Muslim communities as a potential threat, heavily surveilling the Al Noor mosque — one of the sites of Friday’s massacre — while ignoring pleas for protection. In 2016, a group of men doing Hitler salutes delivered boxes of pigs heads and offal to the mosque and recorded themselves doing it. “White power …

Bring on the cull,” the leader of the group, Philip Arps, was seen saying in a video of the attack. He was convicted of offensive behavior and fined $800. Arps was back in court Wednesday, charged with sharing the video of the gunman took of Friday’s attacks. Most countries have fringe groups that are not representative of the main stream. But in New Zealand, the challenge of addressing these issues is made more difficult because there is no hate crime legislation. “Xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia, it’s all recorded as assault or property damage,” said Devoy, the former race relations commissioner. “So it’s really hard to understand the extent to which we have a problem.” Now, pointed questions being raised about the security agencies ignored warning signs, or put too much focus on the threat of Islamic extremism at the expense of protecting Muslims. Arden, the prime minister, has ordered an inquiry. In the wake of the Friday massacre, though, even the most critical voices think change is possible. “I’m actually really hopeful that this will act as a watershed moment for us because of the incredible numbers of people who have shown up every day with flowers and at vigils,” Ghahraman said in an interview. “The grief is really palpable among all the communities across New Zealand.”


WORLD

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • A29

Secrecy surrounds successor in Iran Next supreme ruler may not come from a list of obvious candidates now circulating BY ERIN CUNNINGHAM AND MUSTAFA SALIM Washington Post

NAJAF, IRAQ • Wedged in the corner of a squat brick building in this holy Muslim city, Sheikh Aladdin al-Jazari’s cramped office belies his ties to a powerful patron: the supreme leader of Iran. The furniture is sparse, the rooms dimly lit. But Jazari is a key liaison to the office of Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the Iranian leader, whom Jazari says he has met multiple times. As rumors swirl that Khamenei, 79, is laying the groundwork for his successor after three decades in power, clerics such as Jazari, from his perch next door in the spiritual heart of Shiite Islam, have rare visibility into a transition process known for its secrecy. He says Iran’s next supreme ruler may not come from a list of obvious candidates now circulating among analysts and insiders. He bases his assessment both on experience and, given his proximity to Khamenei’s inner circle, a degree of insight into the future. “The chosen one, the one who will replace Khamenei — his identity will not be revealed until the process is final,” said Jazari, who wears a black turban signifying his status as a direct descendant of the prophet Muhammad. He is a senior religious figure in Harakat al-Nujaba, an Iran-backed militia in Iraq that was designated by the U.S. government as a terrorist organization March 5. Jazari recalled the haphazard succession process that followed the death of Iran’s original supreme leader, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, in 1989. “Khamenei himself wasn’t in the spotlight” before he was chosen, the cleric noted over fresh orange juice and tea served by his young aides. Back then, more influential clerics saw Khamenei as weak and fudged his modest religious credentials to install a more pliable figure. But since that time, Khamenei has outmaneuvered and outlasted his rivals, boosting

EMILIENNE MALFATTO • Washington Post

Sheikh Khaled al-Baghdadi sits recently in his home in Najaf, Iraq.

Iran’s dominance in the region and keeping the Islamic Republic intact. The upcoming transition could remake Iran, the world’s only Shiite theocracy, and alter the geopolitics of the Middle East, where Iran has been projecting its influence in places such as Syria and Iraq. But the inner workings of Iran’s Islamic system — which is based on a contested Shiite doctrine known as wilayat al-faqih, or “guardianship of the jurist” — is notoriously opaque. And efforts to determine the next steps have become somewhat of a parlor game in both the Iranian capital Tehran and in Najaf. The names being bandied about to succeed the supreme leader include those of the chief of the judiciary, the head of a powerful advisory council and Khamenei’s own son. The clergy in Najaf, the primary center of Shiite theology in the world, are for the most part averse to the idea of a supreme religious and political authority and operate independently of the

clerical establishment in Iran. But this ancient city, where a maze of alleys rings the gold-domed shrine of Imam Ali, a revered figure in Shiite Islam, is also a hub for Iranian students and clerics who come here to brush up on Shiite doctrine and graduate from its famed seminaries, and that traffic binds Najaf closely to the powerful neighbor. “Khamenei now is a very strong leader,” said Sheikh Khaled al-Baghdadi, a Najaf cleric clad in a white turban and loose brown robe, seated in an office surrounded on all sides by bookshelves heavy with religious texts. Baghdadi is among those who doubt the theological legitimacy of the supreme leader position but acknowledges that Khamenei has made effective use of the role. “It’s clear from the size of his rallies and the number of people who attend prayers in Iran that his leadership has been a success,” said Baghdadi, who is close to Iraq’s most senior cleric, and Khamenei rival, Ayatollah Ali Sistani.

But even as Khamenei has consolidated power — promoting allies and empowering the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, which is tasked with safeguarding the Islamic system — Iran is facing an uncertain period as its economy falters and tensions with the United States rise. At home, rampant corruption and soaring inflation have stunted economic growth and have angered ordinary Iranians. Abroad, Iran is confronting a U.S. pressure campaign that seeks to isolate the Islamic Republic after the administration of President Donald Trump withdrew last year from the nuclear deal that Iran negotiated with world powers. Such instability, experts say, could undermine an otherwise smooth succession. And that has many Iranians ill at ease. In Iran, “some people are worried about a power vacuum” after Khamenei’s death, said Hadi, 39, an engineer at a construction firm in Tehran owned by the Revolutionary Guard. He requested that his full name not be used so

he could speak freely about the succession process. Hadi says he believes that latent rivalries will emerge among Iran’s political and military elite and that they will “fight for power” during any handover. According to Iran’s constitution, if Khamenei dies or is otherwise incapacitated, a leadership council would be formed to lead for an interim period. A separate body, known as the Assembly of Experts, is responsible for naming a successor. Iranian officials have denied rumors that Khamenei started the process to choose a successor, including a recent report in Iranian media that said he ordered the Assembly of Experts to nominate a suitable candidate within three years. Iran’s succession politics were upended in December, when top contender Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi died, reportedly because of complications from a brain tumor. Shahroudi, who was born and educated in Najaf, “was known for his deep religious knowledge,” said Emad al-Sharaa, a former clerical student and researcher at the Institute for War and Peace Reporting in Iraq. His religious bona fides eclipsed Khamenei’s. Now, a handful of other names are being floated. They include Ebrahim Raisi, the judiciary chief; Sadegh Larijani, head of the powerful Expediency Council; and even Khamenei’s son, Mojtaba Hosseini Khamenei. “The next leader should at least have experience leading the judicial, executive or legislative branch,” said Mohsen Kadivar, a former cleric and Iranian political dissident who teaches Islamic studies at Duke University. But because the stakes are so high, analysts say, it is likely that the formal process will be bypassed in favor of more covert negotiations. The Revolutionary Guard in particular will hold powerful sway over the process, experts say. “The person chosen by Khamenei will be announced ... after the candidate receives approval from Revolutionary Guard commanders,” Kadivar said.

Cruise ship passengers are rescued via helicopter Rescue workers off Norway’s coast rush to help 1,300 people amid high waves BY JARI TANNER associated Press

HELSINKI • Rescue workers off Norway’s western coast rushed to evacuate 1,300 passengers and crew by helicopter from a disabled cruise ship on Saturday, winching them one-byone to safety as heaving waves tossed the ship from side to side and high winds battered the operation. The Norwegian newspaper VG said the Viking Sky cruise ship issued a mayday call as bad weather hit Saturday and engine problems caused it to start drifting toward the rocky shore. Police in the western county of Moere og Romsdal said the crew, fearing the ship would run aground, managed to anchor in Hustadvika Bay, between the Norwegian cities of Alesund and Trondheim, so the evacuations could take place. Rescue teams with helicopters and boats were sent to evacuate the cruise ship under extremely difficult circumstances. Norwegian media reported gusts up to 38 knots (43 mph) and waves over 26 feet in an area known for its rough, frigid waters. Video and photos from people on the ship showed it heaving, with chairs and other furniture dangerously rolling from side to side. Passengers were suited up in orange life vests but the waves broke some ship windows and cold water flowed over the feet of some passengers. Norwegian public broadcaster NRK said the Viking Sky’s evacuation was a slow and dangerous process, as passengers needed to be hoisted one by one from the cruise ship to the five available helicopters. “I was afraid. I’ve never experienced anything so scary,” Janet Jacob, among the first group of passengers evacuated to the nearby town of Molde, told NRK. She said her helicopter ride to safety came amid strong wind “like a tornado,” prompting

her to pray “for the safety of all aboard.” American passenger John Curry told NRK that he was having lunch as the cruise ship started to shake. “It was just chaos. The helicopter ride from the ship to shore I would rather not think about. It wasn’t nice,” Curry told the broadcaster. NRK said one 90-year-oldman and his spouse, 70, on the ship were severely injured but did not say how that happened. Norwegian media said the majority of the cruise ship passengers were British and American tourists. By Saturday evening, about 180 people had been rescued and were being taken to a nearby sports hall. Later, reports emerged that a cargo ship with nine crew members was in trouble nearby, and the local Norwegian rescue service diverted two of the five helicopters working on the cruise ship to that rescue. Authorities told NRK that a strong storm with high waves was preventing rescue workers from using life boats or tug boats to take passengers ashore. “It’s a demanding exercise, because they (passengers) have to hang in the air under a helicopter and there’s a very, very strong wind,” witness Odd Roar Lange told NRK at the site. Norwegian authorities said the evacuation would proceed all through the night into Sunday. The Viking Sky was on a 12day trip that began March 14 in the western Norwegian city of Bergen, according to the cruisemapper.com website. The ship was visiting the Norwegian towns and cities of Narvik, Alta, Tromso, Bodo and Stavanger before its scheduled arrival Tuesday in the British port of Tilbury on the River Thames. The Viking Sky, a vessel with gross tonnage of 47,800, was delivered in 2017 to operator Viking Ocean Cruises.

PHOTOS BY ODD ROAR LANGE • nTB Scanpix via aP

Passengers rescued from the Viking Sky cruise ship are helped Saturday from a helicopter in Hustadvika, Norway. A cruise ship with engine problems sent a mayday call off Norway’s western coast amid stormy seas and strong wind.

The cruise ship Viking Sky drifts after sending a mayday signal Saturday because of engine failure in windy conditions. During the rescue, a cargo ship with nine crew members also required assistance.


A30 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

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STLTODAY.COM/LIFE • STLTODAY.COM/GO • SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • B

STLLIFE ARTS + HOME + TRAVEL

MODELING PHOTOS BY TRENNA TRAVIS

Grace Strobel had modeling photos (above and below) taken after seeing a story about a model with Down syndrome. She turned out to be a natural in front of a camera.

‘WHEN I LOOK AT GRACE, I SEE

COURAGE AND BEAUTY’ Wildwood model with Down syndrome breaks down stereotypes BY AISHA SULTAN • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

T CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Grace Strobel goes over the symptoms of scurvy with her mother, Linda, as she does homework at their Wildwood home earlier this month.

he lunchroom can get a little rowdy when the kindergarten through second-grade classes fill up the tables. Grace Strobel scans the room for little hands waving in the air. She spots a group of kids who frequently call for her to help open their condiment packets or juice boxes and walks over. Linda Strobel was closer to the table and checked in on the group. “Can I help you?” she said. “No, we want her to help us,” a boy said, pointing at Grace. Linda asked why. “Because we know she can’t do it,” he said, while the kids around him burst into laughter.

See GRACE • Page B4

On stage and in life, Clayton student blows past obstacles

Making a new opera — and keeping it relevant Opera Theatre previews ‘Fire Shut Up in My Bones’

AISHA SULTAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

On the opening night in 2013 of Terence Blanchard’s first opera, “Champion,” the folks at Opera Theatre of St. Louis immediately asked the six-time Grammywinning jazz trumpeter to write another one. Blanchard agreed. His second opera, “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” opens June 15 See OPERA • Page B6

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Grammy-winning jazz trumpeter Terence Blanchard performs Tuesday at Wells Fargo Advisors after an interview and panel discussion on race and the arts that was sponsored by Wells Fargo.

AT HOME UNIQUE ARTWORK, THRIFTY FINDS DOT ST. CHARLES HOME. PAGE B3 TRAVEL WHAT’S NEW, AND WHAT’S NOT, IN THE REAL-LIFE ROMA. PAGE B11

Holly Connor sang her solo with gusto in her middle school’s production of “Newsies” this month. She played a bigvoiced saloon singer, Medda Larkin, and when she bellowed the chorus to “That’s Rich,” the audience at Wydown Middle School in Clayton noticed. Her 14-year-old voice sounds like that of someone much older. She’s got range. There’s a polished timbre and control to it. “Everyone was blown away by my voice,” Holly said to me, matter-offactly. She isn’t being cocky. “I can hear See SULTAN • Page B2

STLLIFE

TUSCANY & THE ITALIAN

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B2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

AMY BERTRAND lifestyle and features editor abertrand@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8284

MORE AT STLTODAY.COM

ON OUR RADAR GABE HARTWIG deputy features editor ghartwig@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8353

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

JANE HENDERSON books editor jhenderson@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8107

DONNA BISCHOFF vice president of advertising dbischoff@post-dispatch.com • 314-340-8529

One-year-old Cleo is a “purrfect” patchwork of orange and black fur with striking green eyes. This little lady prefers to be the only cat, so she can have all the beds, blankets and laps to herself. Cleo would love a patient family who will give her time to come out of her shell and show her true self. This cute calico is an affectionate cat who will surely make a wonderful forever friend. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Best Buddy Pet Center in Maryland Heights.

Manny is an 11-year-old Toggenburg goat cross who is friendly and loves people. He was born at the Humane Society’s Longmeadow Rescue Ranch and was adopted when he was young, but unfortunately he was returned due to personal circumstances. As the lone goat on the ranch property, he currently resides with three donkeys, so he is good with sharing space and making friends with other farm animals. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Longmeadow Rescue Ranch in Union. Visit longmeadowrescueranch. org for hours, directions and more information.

PETS OF THE WEEK

PREP SCHOOL Our food writer Daniel Neman shows you how to make crispy breakfast potatoes. stltoday.com/food

MUSEUM MUST-SEES Don’t miss these 15 pieces of art at the St. Louis Art Museum. stltoday.com/go

NEW ON DVD MOVIES Coming Tuesday • “Aquaman”; “Second Act”; “If Beale Street Could Talk”; “Stan & Ollie”; “Columbus”; “King of Thieves” Coming April 2 • “Bumblebee”; “The Mule”; “Vice”; “Patrick”; “Rust Creek”; “Seven in Heaven”

TELEVISION Coming Tuesday • “Legion,” Season 2; “Midnight, Texas,” Season 2 Coming April 2 • “Archer: Danger Island,” Season 9

Po is a 3-year-old pointer mix with big brown eyes that no one can resist. He came to the Humane Society from a partner shelter in Louisiana hoping to find a forever home in St. Louis. This handsome hound would love an active home with a family who will include him on all of their adventures. If you’re looking for a funloving guy, Po is the pup for you. To adopt • Apply in person at the Humane Society’s Macklind Avenue headquarters in St. Louis.

GARDENING Q&A

Resources for edible flower gardens BY CHIP TYNAN Missouri Botanical Garden

Q • I want to plant a bunch of edible flowers in my vegetable garden this year, but I am having trouble finding a trusted source. Can you suggest a good book that might be helpful as well as an online source? A • Seeds for many varieties can be found for sale on seed racks at local botanical gardens, garden centers and independent nurseries. Baker Creek is an excellent mail order source of flower and vegetable seeds. Other seed vendors include Johnny’s Selected Seeds, Hudson Valley Seed Co. and Select Seeds, among others. If you wish to purchase live plants by mail, consider Annie’s Annuals and Perennials in Oakland, Calif. Otherwise, seek assurances from local retail vendors that their otherwise edible flowers for sale have not been sprayed with pesticides. Regarding resources, there seems to have been almost as many books written over the years on edible flowers as there are flowers that are edible. I’ll leave it to you to find “The” book that appeals most to your personal tastes and style. Nonetheless, Rosiland Creasy was a pioneering author in the modern field of edible landscaping, and her “The Edible Flower Garden” is considered a classic on the subject. Also find detailed information on edible flowers in this excellent online guide from North Carolina State Extension service: content.ces.ncsu.edu/ choosing-and-using-edible-flowersag-790 Write to Chip Tynan of the Missouri Botanical Garden at chip.tynan@mobot.org or Horticultural Answer Service, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, 63110.

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS WEEK • Plant cool-season spring bedding annuals such as pansies and toadflax outdoors now. • Apply sulfur to the soil around acid-loving plants such as azaleas, rhododendrons, hollies and dogwoods. • Sow beet, carrot, parsley and parsnip seeds outdoors in the vegetable garden now. • Set out broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower and Chinese cabbage transplants outdoors now. • Start seeds of tomatoes, eggplants and peppers indoors now to provide transplants later in spring after warm weather arrives. • Use season-extending devices such as cold frames, hot caps and floating row covers to provide extra shelter for young vegetable plants. • Propagate houseplants from stem tip cuttings any time now.

Last week’s featured pets • A rabbit named Alfie and dogs named Wilma and Bandit have been adopted. Hours and directions • hsmo.org

PARENT TO PARENT: JODIE LYNN

A divorced mom considers taking on a roommate to help cover expenses mandatory to ask for references from previous landlords. There are many icky situations that can be avoided if you call each one. Do your homework before letting someone into your household. — Grace M. in Evansville, Ind. Q • I am a recently divorced mom with two kids. Although I receive child support and work, it’s still hard to pay the bills. I’m thinking of getting a roommate to help with the mortgage and utilities. What are some things I need to do to be sure that it’s the right person and that she’ll be a good person to have around my kids? From a Reader • I rented out a room for a few years when my husband left. In my search for a responsible roommate, I learned a few hard lessons. The thing that worked best was to ask friends and family for names of people that they knew who might be interested. I quickly learned it was also

From Jodie • The first step you probably need to take is to check with the laws in your state on having a person rent a room in your house. Also check the rules in your neighborhood association. The last thing you need is to get in trouble with either one. You also need to decide on which room you’re willing to give up. It goes without saying that the larger the room and the more privacy that can be given will no doubt affect the amount a person is willing to pay. Sit down and decide what is important to you in a roommate. For example, are you willing to rent to another single mom with one or two kids or do you want a single

woman/man or perhaps a college student? You’ll need to write down rules for potential renters, how much rent to charge and when it’s due, how it’s paid, guests rules, pet rules, etc. You can find forms online that you can use as is or customize. As the previous reader suggested, meeting interested individuals several times, asking for references and following up on those references is a must-do. Running a background check on those that you’re really interested in might save a few headaches down the road. I’d also meet them away from your house during the daytime (at least until you’ve completed the preliminary investigations). People don’t need to know your exact address; an ad with a good description of the room, maybe with pictures, and a general location of the area is all they need in the beginning. Finding an ideal candidate

may take a little time but it’ll certainly be worth it to keep you and your family safe.

CAN YOU HELP? Our third-grader needs help in learning better reading skills. He seems to be slightly dyslexic. We’ve tried some of the learning facilities but he is reserved and gets embarrassed with the instructors. We’d like to find a private tutor who may have better one-on-one relationships with their students. What tips are there that might help us to find such an individual? To share parenting tips or submit questions, write to: Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040. Email direct2contact@ parenttoparent.com, or go to parenttoparent.com which provides a secure and easy way to submit tips or questions. All tips must have city, state and first and last name or initials to be included in the column. Jodie Lynn is an award-winning parenting columnist, author of five books and mother to three children. She and her family live in Wildwood.

No challenge too great for Clayton teen who is blind, autistic, musically gifted SULTAN • FROM B1

everything because I can’t see everything,” she explains. Holly was born blind because her optic nerve never fully developed. Although she can make out some movement and contrast several feet ahead of her, she relies on Braille to read and write. She’s also autistic, which can make performing on stage a lot trickier. It has taken time for her to adjust to the chaos and sensory overload that can be part of a stage production. But these challenges haven’t stopped her from participating in 12 shows last year. She’s performed in 21 different productions with various theater companies around St. Louis over the past three years. That’s on top of a full school day, playing piano in the school’s jazz band, and taking private acting, dancing and singing lessons. Her days start early and are jam-packed with rehearsals, auditions and lessons until evening. It’s quite a departure from a baby who cried constantly and a toddler who couldn’t leave her house until she was 3 years

ELIZABETH WISEMAN

Holly Connor is a student at Wydown Middle School.

old. Her parents didn’t take her to public places until she was 7 because she would get overwhelmed. Holly has a rare triad of blindness, autism and musical genius. The phenomenon has been written about in medical and anecdotal accounts. Her parents and voice coach describe her as a savant, who can play and sing songs by ear that she’s heard once and has an instant memory for music. She picks up new instruments

and languages easily. She has also started composing her own music. Her mother, Katie Sears, gave up her career running clinical trials for cancer research two years ago to manage her daughter’s activities and needs. She has spent hours converting scripts into Braille for her daughter, which sit in fat, bound copies on her bedroom bookshelf. She keeps an airtight schedule and packed calendar. “Her goal is to be on Broadway,” Katie Sears said. Just as important, music and performance has opened up a world of friendships to Holly that she had never experienced before. Her mother started an Instagram account a year ago and posted daily videos in which she documented Holly’s days. It gave students at school a way to get to know her and feel comfortable talking to her. Her stepfather, Titus Sears, relocated their family from Seattle for a job with Enterprise. The St. Louis region has embraced Holly with her special needs and gifts in a way the family never experienced before, her parents said.

“We are making as many open doors as possible for her,” he said. When Holly was 4 years old her parents took her to China for a seven-week experimental stem cell treatment that cost $75,000. Since then, Holly has gone to Panama for a similar stem cell therapy and will be returning again next year for a week. Her mother says she has seen a significant reduction in her daughter’s autism symptoms and improvement in her sight, although the treatment has not been scientifically proven to work. Her mother stays backstage with her for every production. There have been times when she has had to calm Holly down 30 seconds before she has to go on stage. Once Holly even fell off the stage because she didn’t have a buddy to guide her. To watch from the audience, though, it’s hard to tell that this young performer is any different from her peers. That is, until you hear that exceptional voice. Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 Home and family editor @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com


HOME

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B3

AT HOME WITH GARY AND LAVERNE BRITTAN

PHOTOS BY COLTER PETERSON • cpeterson@post-dispatch.com

The great room is seen from the main entryway of Gary and LaVerne Brittan’s home. At right is a ledge filled with animal artwork, sculptures and even a real zebra skin. But it all started with the giraffe statue, which they got as a wedding gift in 1979. “I have to talk her into most of this stuff,” says Gary.

The bar area sits adjacent to the large living room, making it perfect for hosting parties of any size.

In the seating area on the upstairs (main) floor of the house are some of Gary’s favorite thrifty finds. Hanging on the wall (at right) is a metal sculpture from Gringo Jones that cost about $100. Next to the chair is a carved wood horse head he got from Value City Furniture for about $150.

Thrifty finds, original artwork brighten home Open space with wall of windows creates perfect area for entertaining BY AMY BERTRAND St. Louis Post-dispatch

The back yard features a multilevel concrete patio with a fire pit, a large in-ground pool and a grassy area where the family used to play volleyball.

If you’ve looked at houses long enough in St. Charles County or other suburban areas, you’ve probably seen plenty of two-story great rooms. They let in light, provide for a dramatic entry and make the whole

house feel bigger. You’ve probably also seen plenty of atrium ranches, where the steps to the walkout lower level are open against a backdrop of windows. Well, when Gary and LaVerne Brittan built their “final” house, they designed it to contain the

best of both. In their St. Charles ranch, you enter into a small sitting area that looks down onto the great room below, which has a two-story wall of windows with amazing views of the woods and creek behind it (and on our visit, a deer ). “We thought we could be like most homes and have a living room up here and a living room down below, but why would I need two big TVs, and why would I need two sofas?” Gary says. “We like the open space,” LaVerne says. “We really just didn’t need two living rooms. So when we are entertaining, the upstairs and downstairs flow together.” And it really is a great house for entertaining, with a pool in the back and plenty of outdoor

furniture with a fire pit. In the past, they’ve had volleyball nets and other games set out for when guests come over. The kitchen upstairs is large, with a generous dining area overlooking the living area below. In that living area is a seating area with a big TV, fireplace, bar, billiards table and an area originally designed for table tennis. “We don’t play that anymore,” Gary says. Now, it’s an open space with a piano, perfect for mingling. The Brittans bought their 1-acre lot in 1996, and Gary set about designing their dream house. He designed it using cutouts from display homes. “When you go to display homes, they always have a one-page drawing/ simplistic blueprint of the home with dimensions for each room, layout of the house, where the stairs are — bathrooms, doors, closets, etc. ... I just cut out the rooms I liked with the dimensions and shapes I wanted from different display homes — and then (like a puzzle) put the pieces of paper back together, added my changes to whatever suited me and gave that to the architect.” The architect was Larry Spraul of O’Fallon, Mo., who happened to be the architect on last week’s “At Home” story as well. The couple has made a few updates over the past 23 years, mainly replacing carpeting and turning an upstairs porch into a threeseasons room, perfect for cozying up with a book or looking out into the woods. Also in that time, Gary has added his thrifty touches of artwork. “I’m cheap,” he says. “I didn’t pay a lot for any of this stuff.” Much of “this stuff” (the artwork), he created himself. For instance, a collage above the main windows in the living room was made from Styrofoam packing containers he glued together, affixed magazine photos to and painted. It is definitely a conversation piece. Other original works include two pieces downstairs that use masks on canvas. “My mom and sister are creative,” he says. “So I guess I got some of that from them.” He and LaVerne don’t always agree on artwork. Sometimes he likes something that she doesn’t, but it goes up anyway, and vice versa. “We compromise,” she says. But the unique design of the house is something they can both agree on. “We love it here.” Amy Bertrand 314-340-8284 @abertrand on Twitter abertrand@post-dispatch.com

GARY AND LAVERNE BRITTAN Ages • She’s 64; he’s 63. Home • St. Charles Occupations • She’s a receptionist; he’s a steel salesman. Family • Gary grew up in St. Louis, and LaVerne grew up in Trinidad, Colo.; they met in college in Colorado and have been married nearly 40 years. They have one daughter, Shannon, who lives in New York, and two Shih Tzu mixes, Cooper and Brady. Two pieces of original artwork created by Gary Brittan use paper masks he incorporated into the paintings.

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A large spacious kitchen features a center island in Gary and LaVerne Brittan’s home. The Brittans decided against a formal dining room so they could have a big kitchen and eat-in area. At right are stairs leading to the downstairs living area.

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B4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

STL LIFE

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

Wildwood woman works to educate others GRACE • FROM B1

Grace, then 20, heard the entire exchange and burst into tears. Linda told her to walk away and calm herself. Then Linda turned to the children, who had no idea that she was Grace’s mom. “Guys, would you laugh at someone in a wheelchair?” They shook their heads. Grace isn’t physically disabled. “What Grace is doing is really hard for her. She’s trying to help you. But what you are doing is kind of like laughing at someone in a wheelchair,” she explained. The children, some as old as 8, seemed chastened. Grace, who had worked as a volunteer in the lunchroom for about six months that school year, was inconsolable. She cried the entire way to their home in Wildwood. She’s an irrepressibly cheerful and positive young woman, but this moment hit her hard. She cried for four days. Linda had never seen her daughter like this. There had been times growing up when classmates made mean remarks or strangers stared at her. But under the wing of her protective younger sister and parents, Grace always shook it off. But this was her job. Where she was supposed to be in charge. Where she tried to help these children. Their laughter cut into the core of her self-esteem. For the first time ever, she seemed defeated. Grace said she felt sad and scared and alone. Linda knew they were going to have to do something to deal with this. What she came up with would change Grace’s life.

FROM BIRTH ONWARD Doctors whisked Grace from her parents the minute she was born to run tests on her. About four hours later a genetic counselor came to their hospital room to give them the news: Grace had Down syndrome, a genetic condition that impairs cognitive development and can cause a range of health issues. She would face a lifetime of challenges, the counselor warned them. Linda and Jeff Strobel, who had not yet even held their baby girl, listened in shock while she told them their daughter would never read or write. “There is no shame in this at all,” Jeff remembers her saying, “there are still institutions that will take her. Just take your time to think about it.” They each remember that day 22 years ago in California vividly. It lighted a fire in Linda. They would show this counselor and anyone else who thought their child wasn’t capable. They named her Grace Elizabeth. Linda started working with her the minute they got home. She put her on her belly to help her build muscle tone in her neck. She read everything she could on how to stimulate brain development in babies. They embarked on a lifelong journey in which she became her daughter’s teacher, coach and cheerleader. Jeff, a Navy veteran, appreciated the intensity of his wife’s training and joined in however he could. They set up an incline board, covered it with carpet and used her sippy cup as motivation to get Grace to crawl up it. They built obstacle courses in their living room to help her crawl, then walk. Linda focused on more than her baby’s gross motor skills; she researched ways to boost her nervous system and neurodevelopment. They moved to Wildwood shortly after their second daughter, Laine, was born. Linda ratcheted up the academic home schooling she did with Grace. By age 3, they would spend four to five hours daily on schoolwork — flashcards, short, small exercises. Grace started reading when she was 5 and had memorized a thousand words.

PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Grace Strobel gets a hug from her sister, Laine Strobel, at an afternoon breakfast at their Wildwood home. Laine was home from college on her spring break.

Grace Strobel (left) works out with her mother, Linda Strobel, at the Jewish Community Center in Chesterfield. Grace, who has Down syndrome, has recently begun modeling. Keeping fit is an important part of her life.

Grace Strobel leads the recession with the Rev. Richard Stoltz after Mass on March 10 at St. Alban Roe Catholic Church in Wildwood.

When she was about 8 years old, Linda decided it would be good for her to attend elementary school for half a day to work on social skills with other students. She discovered that a diet without sugar, gluten, dairy and wheat helped Grace with her digestive and sensory issues. “I was on a mission,” Linda said. “I didn’t care what other people said or did. I surrounded myself with like-minded people.” Several times that meant taking Grace out of a school that wasn’t challenging her and putting her in a different private school. One teacher had Grace coloring worksheets all day. Finally, Linda couldn’t take it anymore. “You’re going to end up getting a Ph.D. in coloring by the end of this,” she said to Grace. They transferred schools. And the rigorous schooling continued each day at home. Grace sat next to her mom on the sofa in their home while Linda described the years of training and work they’ve done together. She looked at her blond-haired, smiling daughter and said, “After all that, you still like

me?” “Oh yes, I do,” Grace said, and slipped her arm through her mom’s.

THE SPEECH Even Linda cried when they got home from the cafeteria where the children had laughed at her daughter in the spring of 2017. She held Grace and explained that sometimes people are afraid of what they don’t understand. Maybe Grace could help them understand. She had made presentations before. Maybe she could make one about Down syndrome. Grace was all in. This was a project they could tackle together. She started researching common questions. How did she get Down syndrome? Could anyone “catch it” from her? What did it feel like to live with it? They spent months going through research, with stacks of paper spread out over the dining room table and the living room floor. Linda reached out to Karen Hedrick, the principal at Rockwood Valley Middle School, which Grace had attended. Would they let her present it in front of the students

there? Hedrick realized how valuable it could be for the sixth-graders, who have two classmates with Down syndrome. They set a date for October, National Disabilities Awareness Month. Grace amped up her preparation. Her parents hired a speech coach. She came to the school weekly to practice using the technology she would need for her PowerPoint and rehearse. She would bring stuffed animals to sit in the audience, so she could practice making eye contact while she talked. On Sundays, they would go to her father’s office where they could use a conference room to run through the talk. Hundreds of hours of practice later, it was the big day. More than 120 students filed into the library to watch her hourlong presentation. Immediately they noticed that her speech pattern was different and a little harder for them to follow. Bewildered, some of them looked at their teachers. The teachers nodded back and told them to focus. Within five minutes, they settled in, and soon they were hanging on to

every word. Grace told them how doctors had said she would never be able to tie her own shoes when she was born. Her presentation has 72 slides. In one part of her talk, she has them put on bulky gloves and try to button a shirt to demonstrate what it feels like for her. She has them try on a weighted backpack to feel what it’s like to walk around with low muscle tone. By the end of the presentation, the students crowded around her, giving high-fives and hugs. The teachers had tears in their eyes. “Twenty-three years as an educator, this is absolutely one of the highlights of my career,” Hedrick said. The two sixth-grade boys with Down syndrome watched from the audience.

GOING VIRAL After the success of the talk at Rockwood Valley, Grace started booking talks at other schools. She was asked to be the keynote speaker at a Funding Futures event in Chicago, which raises money for cognition research for people with Down syndrome. She and her parents edited her 45-minute prepared talk down to five powerful minutes. The night of the event, they had been traveling. Grace was tired and worn out and had barely eaten lunch. The room was noisy. Her parents held their breath as she walked to the front of the room. “I was saying prayers like you can’t believe,” her father said. With the microphone in front of her, Grace told the story about how doctors told her parents when she was born that she wouldn’t achieve much in her life. “I’m here to tell you they were wrong,” she proclaimed. The nonprofit raised a record amount of money

that night. Linda has had to limit Grace’s presentations to once or twice a month because each one takes so much prep and mental and emotional work. But in the process of doing their research, Grace spotted a story about a model with Down syndrome. She asked her mother if that was possible for her. Anything is possible, her mom said. Last summer, she hired a photographer to take modeling photos. Grace comes alive in front of the camera. When Linda posted the images of Grace on Facebook, the photos went viral. People from around the world sent encouraging messages. Her sister, Laine, was so blown away by how the pictures from one of Grace’s photo shoots turned out, she kept them on her phone, posted them on her Instagram and showed anyone who walked by her at college. “Look at my sister,” she said. A friend gave Linda the contact information for Ola Hawatmeh, a St. Louis fashion designer. “My daughter has a dream to become a model,” Linda wrote to her, explaining her circumstances. “I’m going to make her dream come true,” Hawatmeh said. She gave her some runway lessons on how to walk. She gave her homework to practice. She designed a dress to fit Grace’s 4-foot-11, petite frame. Designers are not allowed to bring their own models for Fashion Week shows in Atlantic City, so she reached out to the organizers to get special permission. Grace strutted out as the finale in the show in a long, white dress. The audience erupted in the loudest applause of the show. Hawatmeh has invited her to walk in her fall show during New York City’s Fashion Week. “When I look at Grace, I see courage and beauty,” she said. Grace has been featured on the cover of Chesterfield Lifestyle Magazine. Other magazines have run inside editorial spreads about her. The local high school newspaper did a story on her. She’s been interviewed by several local TV stations. She continues to work with her occupational therapist to learn how to shop for groceries and cook for herself with the dream of living independently one day. Her father says he wishes he could buy the genetic counselor they met when she was born a plane ticket to New York to watch Grace walk the runway. When she’s not practicing her walk or her talk, Grace still volunteers in a preschool and kindergarten classroom. Aisha Sultan • 314-340-8300 @aishas on Twitter asultan@post-dispatch.com


03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

STL LIFE

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B5 STL BALLOONS Balloon artist • Wayne Canepa Age • 35 Home • Benton Park What he does • Canepa specializes in sculpting animals, characters and other fun things using balloons. He entertains while he sculpts, personalizing each encounter. STL Balloons also offers balloon décor and custom balloon sculptures as well as other entertainment such as face painting, magic shows and more. Where to buy • Canepa works by appointment. Contact him to book him for your event at stlballoons@ gmail.com or by phone at 314-319-7631. See examples of his designs on Facebook and on Instagram @ stlballoons How much • Balloon twisting on-site is $100 an hour with a $25 travel fee for any event outside St. Louis city limits. Balloon décor • Balloon arches start at $300, columns at $95, and balloon walls and photo frames start at $250. Contact Canepa for a quote and for pricing on other services.

PHOTOS BY HILLARY LEVIN • hlevin@post-dispatch.com.

MADE IN ST. LOUIS

He creates art out of thin air BY PAT EBY Special to the Post-dispatch

Artist and entertainer Wayne Canepa breathes life and a bit of wizardry into each of the colorful, complex balloon sculptures he creates. His unusual full-time career as a balloon artist and entertainer evolved over time as he recognized his talents, developed the right

connections and trusted his intuition. When Canepa was 17, he moved out his family home to live on his own. To make ends meet, he got jobs in the restaurant industry, took overnight shifts in nursing homes and worked at City Museum. He enrolled in college classes and learned that college wasn’t where he was meant to be.

Canepa realized that staying put and working hard at jobs that would never pay high dollars wasn’t going to fit his long-term plan either. However, the connections he made with people in the circus arts at City Museum opened his mind to new ideas. A chance encounter with a balloon artist in one of the restaurants where he worked piqued his interest in creating art from thin air. Take the open road • Canepa began a lifechanging journey. “I came to a point where the most economical thing for me to do was to get rid of my apartment, put everything I owned in storage, travel and work along the way,” he says. “I started working with the circus arts of mime, living statues and close magic, but I wanted to diversify. I picked up balloon art within a year

of working it full time between North Carolina and Maine.” Canepa knew his talents were transferable beyond circuses and sideshows. “As I got more into the circus arts as sources of income, I started to see a trajectory of work I could do myself that would lead to financial security.” Twists and turns • Canepa returned to St. Louis to work and perform. He’s been working as a balloon artist here since 2012. In 2014, he founded STL Balloons. Today, he’s booked every weekend for celebrations. Because of his connections to other entertainers, he can provide other artists for parties as well, such as face painters or mimes. In addition to private parties, Canepa works festivals and family fun days at churches and schools. He builds balloons for Sunday brunch

once a month at Pieces in Soulard and works the dinner hours twice a month at the Old Spaghetti Factory in Chesterfield. He’s a regular entertainer at the 4 Hands annual celebration of brewing, the Lupulin Carnival. This year, the carnival takes place May 18 at the Big Top, a circus tent venue in Grand Center. Build a bridge, build a wall to remember • In addition to balloon sculptures, STL Balloons makes site-specific balloon décor for individuals, schools, universities, institutions and companies, large or small. The arch sculptures can define an entry, adding a festive touch at the beginning of an event. Canepa works with people to determine the colors and the setup for arches, columns and walls of balloons. There’s magic in the air • Canepa admits he’s got a great job. “I’m a creative guy. I like to entertain and make people laugh. I like it when a kid challenges me to do something different. Can you make a monkey with wings, a monkey dragon? Yes, I can. ... One kid at a restaurant was obsessed with red doors. He asked for a red door,” Canepa says. Grown-ups at the table suggested maybe he would like a dog or a helmet. “The kid really wanted a red door. I made a red rectangle with a yellow circle inside for a doorknob and put a gray frame around it. I gave him his red door. ... Say yes. Try not to say no. Make the world a little more magical for kids any way you can to create positive memories they can revisit.” The mojo — staying true to oneself • Canepa’s unconventional path paid off for him. “I just did what works. What works for me doesn’t work for everyone else,” he says. His advice to would-be artists? “Don’t be afraid to take that unconventional avenue. Experiment, dabble and know your worth. Don’t get complacent and never settle for something that’s not going to help you better yourself.”


B6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

ARTS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Terence Blanchard acknowledges his fellow musicians on Tuesday after performing at Wells Fargo Advisors following an interview and panel discussion.

Blanchard tapped a ‘powerful story’ for ‘Fire’ OPERA • FROM B1

at OTSL. Blanchard came to town Tuesday to preview the new work and take part in a panel discussion on race and the arts and the need to broaden opera’s appeal. “All different types of people will come,” he says, “if you make it relevant to them.” “Fire Shut Up in My Bones” is based on the 2014 memoir of the same name by New York Times columnist Charles M. Blow, with a libretto by screenwriter Kasi Lemmons. It’s co-sponsored by Jazz St. Louis and will feature an entirely African-American cast. Heather Hunt-Ruddy is the head of client experience and growth for Wells Fargo Advisors. She’s been on the board of OTSL for the past five years. Wells Fargo is among the organizations providing financial support for the production, and she’ll be attending the opera with 150 of the company’s African-American financial advisers. “The stereotype of opera is not cutting-edge,” Hunt-Ruddy says, but she’s become enthusiastic about the art form. “I’m hoping to broaden the participation of people who might go to the opera.” She says that Wells Fargo is also “hoping we’ll encourage other corporate leaders to join us in helping to facilitate conversations that need to happen.” Wells Fargo has a regular series of “Courageous Conversations” on topics including race, gender and sexual orientation: “We believe that our team members need to be able to be themselves at work,” HuntRuddy says. On Tuesday afternoon at its downtown offices, a “Courageous Conversation” was opened up to nonemployees for the first time. A panel — Blanchard; hip-hop artist Bates; Gene Dobbs Bradford, the president and CEO of Jazz St. Louis; Wells Fargo senior vice president David Dawkins; and violist Joanna Mendoza of the Arianna String Quartet — discussed “Race and the Arts” in front of a big crowd. Mendoza noted that she’s seen more diverse audiences at performances by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra recently, along with more women and people of color in ensembles. In terms of musical styles, “We have a tendency to (pigeonhole) things. Ultimately, we’re sharing emotions that we find in all of these genres.” Bradford suggested that the norms of concertgoing can make people feel out of place. “We have to make people feel comfortable,” agreed Blanchard, noting that “Champion” has sparked diverse audiences wherever it’s been performed. “We have to make a mandate to do new works, and get audiences used to it.” Said Bates: “We have to meet kids where they’re at.” She also emphasized the importance of including women across the board, “in all genres of music. It’s important to include all kinds of people — all colors, men,

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

From left: Gene Dobbs Bradford, Bates, Terence Blanchard, Joanna Mendoza and David Dawkins participate in a panel discussion on race and the arts last week.

KEN HOWARD

“Champion,” by jazz legend Terence Blanchard and librettist Michael Cristofer, tells the true story of boxer Emile Griffith. It premiered in 2013 with Opera Theatre of St. Louis.

women, LGBT.” Blanchard spoke up for exposing kids to classical music. “I’m a product of corporate financial programming,” he said. “Those programs allowed me to have a passion, and act on that passion. That’s how I got to go to a symphony, through a corporate program. There was one black guy in the orchestra, and I watched him all through” the performance. With “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” there’s a lot to be excited about. “Champion” is probably the best thing so far to come out of OTSL’s successful “New Works, Bold Voices” initiative of world premieres; it’s had a halfdozen presentations since its St. Louis premiere. “Fire” marks the company debut of soprano Julia Bullock, a St. Louis native who’s taken the world of serious music by storm. It’s being shaped by artistic director James Robinson, who’s

one of the best when it comes to new opera. “I am very excited about this,” says OTSL general director Andrew Jorgensen. “Charles Blow’s story is meaningful, intimate and operatic.” The title comes from the Hebrew Bible’s book of Jeremiah, 20:9-11. It’s Blow’s account of growing up black and poor in the small town of Gibsland, La., the youngest of five boys. There’s violence in his tale; he was sexually abused, at the age of 7, by a family member, and his mother was known to pack a pistol. There’s also a deep well of love. “This story of Charles’ youth is deeply intimate and inspiring,” Jorgensen adds. “I take my hat off to him that he did it in such a public way; I admire him for telling his story and for letting us tell it.” The idea of using Blow’s memoir, Blanchard says, came from

CHRISTIAN GOODEN • cgooden@post-dispatch.com

Soprano Karen Slack (center) sings a song from “Fire Shut Up in My Bones,” with pianist Peter Martin and bassist Bob BeBoo after a recent panel discussion on race and the arts at Wells Fargo Advisors.

his wife and Robinson, who had both read the book. “I read it and thought about it and decided it was a powerful story to tackle.” He says he “didn’t want to write music that was indicative of the South. That was too easy.” Instead, he made use of a bluesy guitar “as spice. It’s melodic, with a blues essence.” As with “Champion,” “Fire” was workshopped, getting feedback from the singers. “Learning all the voices is still a big challenge for me,” Blanchard says. “I hadn’t had sopranos in ‘Champion.’” He fell into the common trap of writing a lot of high-flying music for them, which wears out voices; Robinson told him to rethink that. “I want to save singers’ ability to do it,” he says, noting that, much like playing the trumpet, “it’s about pacing yourself.” Soprano Karen Slack

appreciates that. Slack sang the role of Emelda Griffith when “Champion” was produced in San Francisco and was invited by Blanchard to take part in “Fire.” She will create the role of Billie, Blow’s mother. “She’s an amazing woman,” Slack says of her character, “strong, brilliant, familyoriented. She’s a fierce woman — fiercely brave, fiercely passionate — all the things most women have the capacity to be.” She read the book and libretto and realized “this is the blackest libretto I’ve ever read, but in a positive way. I’ve never seen a picture of African-American life (in the 1970s) so brilliantly done. It’s going to be an important work; it’s going to be produced.” Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 Classical music critic @sbmillermusic on Twitter sbmiller@post-dispatch.com


ARTS

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

What is ‘Us’ about? Winston Duke is ready to tell you BY HELENA ANDREWS-DYER Washington Post

NEW YORK • Winston

Duke is giving a 40-minute Ted Talk about the invisible strings of power to an audience of one. He’s inside the American Museum of Natural History’s basement cafeteria, a fluorescent-lighted cavern packed with clanking silverware and crying babies. This isn’t a non sequitur. In fact, this is the direct result of asking the 32-year-old actor one seemingly simple question about his new movie, “Us”: Uhhh, what the heck did I just see? “Give me a piece of paper for my gum,” Duke says. “Because we ’bouts to talk,” he adds, stamping a Joan Riversian emphasis on that last bit. Best known for his scene-stealing and thirst-trapping role as the “great gorilla” M’Baku in “Black Panther,” the Yaletrained actor is cerebral in a way that shouldn’t be surprising but is. He’s constantly thinking, analyzing, breaking it down, while punctuating each thought with a conspiratorial “right?” He speaks not in paragraphs but in dissertations, like a professor who really wants his kids to get it. “I relish this opportunity,” Duke says, halfway through his oral argument about what “Us” is trying to teach its audience about the world. The hotly anticipated follow-up to Jordan Peele’s Oscar-winning thriller “Get Out” is expected to be quite heady. Duke doesn’t just want to be a part of the inevitable think pieces, Twitter threads and round tables about the film, almost a modern-day take on the French Revolution but with crazy clones.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Winston Duke, who is best known for his role as M’Baku in “Black Panther,” is the dad in Jordan Peele’s new thriller “Us.”

“I want to potentially lead this discussion,” he says. And he does just that — launching into several informed treatises on American society, sins knocking at your door, sneaky power structures and privilege, always privilege. Duke’s Caribbean lilt bleeds through every time he says the word, drawing it out into three punctuated syllables — pri-vilege — that give the concept extra consideration. But, seriously, what is this movie about? On its surface, “Us” tells the tale of a well-off family on a beach vacation that goes violently wrong. The film follows the Wilsons, ostensibly led by Duke’s naive, sitcom dad, Gabe, but really by Lupita Nyong’o’s tough-mom

character, Adelaide, as they battle a group of doppelgängers who have come to take over. It’s not a popcorn flick. In two hours and 60 seconds, there are Bible verses, bunnies, scary amusement park rides, brass scissors and boat shoes. The chief concern of Duke’s character — who does most of his fighting in dad glasses, a Howard University sweatshirt and loafers — is whether his neighbors have a bigger boat and a better car. When the clones show up, it’s whether said neighbors would very much like to impale him. “The movie is strongly about cultures of power and what they look like and how you participate in them,” he says. “It’s also a commentary on the perils

of the American Dream.” That’s the very ambition Duke, who moved with his mother and sister to New York from the island of Tobago when he was 9, likes to dissect. He first came to this museum with his sister when he was a kid. He kept coming back again and again, enthralled by the planetarium permanent exhibit, which he says changed his life at 19. He was doing a big think then, as you do, about life and death and the meaning of it all when the vastness of the cosmos put everything into perspective. “Being an outsider by default gives you a place to view things from because you’re not perfectly in it. So you got to look at it with fresh new eyes and wonder why it works and why it

Now on view through June 9

British sculptor Rachel Whiteread casts the hidden spaces in-between, above, and beneath everyday objects, creating a range of monumental and evocative sculptures that make the invisible visible. Rachel Whiteread is the first comprehensive survey of the internationally acclaimed artist’s career.

does the things that it does,” he said. In 2016, Duke was working semiregular, one-off roles in TV when he got the call that would catapult his fame. At the time, the actor was unsure about his future. “Am I working enough to sustain a life, to build a family, buy a home in this country? Am I doing enough?” he recalls asking himself. “You mean achieving the American Dream?” I counter. “Girl!” Duke emphasizes. “Girl, you feel me.” Self-definition, another theme threaded throughout “Us,” is a big deal to Duke, who has been defined thus far by his superhero breakthrough as M’Baku. Vanity Fair dubbed him “a royal Wakandan thirst trap.” BuzzFeed recently made him read aloud a series of “thirst tweets” (like sexting a stranger in public), most of which are unprintable. His “Black Panther” co-star Daniel Kaluuya told E! News that Duke was a “star” in the making. “Look at him light up the screen. Look at him ascend,” praised Kaluuya, who starred in “Get Out.” In April, Duke stars in another blockbuster superhero movie, “Avengers: Endgame.” “I didn’t plan to break out,” Duke says. “I just planned to make really bold choices and lean into whatever it is that I do. And I’ll always do that. As prominent or as nuanced as a performance is, all I can tell you is that it’s

intentional.” In one of the most memorable lines in “Us,” the Wilsons ask their deranged doppelgängers who they are. “We’re Americans,” replies Nyong’o’s evil twin. So, basically, the film is about what happens when your chickens come home to roost and you had no idea you had a farm. “Us” is also about race, although it isn’t the central issue like in “Get Out.” “Anything that has to do with black people in a racially charged world is about race because our skin is politicized, right? And our experience is deeply defined by seeing the world through the experiences of our skin, right? So black people on vacation already is about race,” Duke says. It’s hard to respond with anything but an “umph” and “right, right” when listening to him go full professor-mode. “My brain explodes with everything,” he says. Duke emerges from the cafeteria. His first stop is a quaint, life-size diorama of Dutch settlers meeting Native Americans for the first time. Above the scene is a newly added dialogue box that reads, “The scene offers only stereotypical representations and ignores how complex and violent colonization was for native people.” Duke considers this for a moment before launching into a debate about Confederate statues. Do we wipe away history or just reimagine it? The museum was closing by the time Duke, who never got to the planetarium (it was closed for a private event), steps out onto Central Park West. He takes a look at a controversial statue of Theodore Roosevelt on horseback. Standing beneath Roosevelt is a half-naked Native American man and an African man. Duke is stunned but not surprised. It’s the 3D representation of everything he spent the last hour or more trying to explain. Earlier, he had described privilege as “not having to ask a question because it doesn’t occur to you as a problem.” The statue, an emblem of white supremacy that no one in Duke’s entourage noticed until, well, everyone did, has stood outside the museum since 1940. Duke’s photographer scrolls through details about the statue on his phone as the group heads to their car. Questions abound, and Duke, as always, is prepared to answer them.

Members always free. For ticket information, visit slam.org/RachelWhiteread. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Tate Britain, London, in association with the Saint Louis Art Museum. Support for the St. Louis presentation is provided by E. Desmond Lee Family Endowment for Exhibitions; the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency; and the National Endowment for the Arts.

M A RC H 2 9 - 3 1

Rachel Whiteread, English, born 1963; Line Up, 2007-2008; plaster, pigment, resin, wood and metal; overall: 6 11/16× 35 7/16×9 13/16 inches; Private collection, New York. Image courtesy the artist and Mike Bruce ©Rachel Whiteread

Slam.org/RachelWhiteread

#RachelWhiteread

TCHAIKOVSKY’S VIOLIN CONCERTO WITH KAREN GOMYO PRESENTED BY THE

THOMAS A. KOOYUMJIAN FAMILY FOUNDATION

“Gomyo is a first-rate artist of real musical command.” – Chicago Tribune

TICKETS START AT $25! A P R I L 5 -7

MOZART & STRAUSS PRESENTED BY

AON

A P R I L 2 7- 2 8

SLATKIN CONDUCTS BERNSTEIN PRESENTED BY THE

SILK FOUNDATION

M AY 3 - 4

TCHAIKOVSKY’S SIXTH PRESENTED BY

MARY PILLSBURY

314-534-1700 slso.org


ARTS

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B7

CONCERT REVIEW

CONCERT REVIEW

LaBelle carries a soulful torch

Bublé is grateful — and just plain great

BY KEVIN C. JOHNSON St. Louis Post-dispatch

Can we give R&B legend Patti LaBelle a pass for apparently forgetting more than two decades of concerts in St. Louis? That’s an easy yes, especially considering the exchange that followed during her sold-out concert Friday night at the J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts at Lindenwood University. LaBelle commented that she probably hadn’t performed in St. Louis in about 25 years. This triggered her local fans who’d seen her headline the Cedric the Entertainer and Friends fundraiser in 2015 at the former Peabody Opera House; at the former Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre in 2012 with Maze and Frankie Beverly in 2012; headlining Dinner with the Stars at the Chase Park Plaza in 2011; and with the O’Jays at the Fox Theatre in 2010. One fan stepped forward to try to jog her memory, taking her back even further, saying he attended her Fair St. Louis concert under the Gateway Arch (in 2001) where he landed a lifechanging dance on stage with her. He told her he was overweight and in the closet at the time and she’d given him the courage to lose weight and be himself. Not only did LaBelle remember him, but she also used him as her go-to all night, addressing him several times and letting him hold a pair of her glittery pumps. She reminded those struggling with their sexual orientation that they’re still “God’s children.” This visit from LaBelle should prove memorable for all involved as she continued carrying her lighted torch of soul. Making a point to say she’s 74 and still doing it, LaBelle continues to consummately entertain with her balance of still-buoyant vocals, natural charisma and fun-loving, chatty personality. Over the show’s near 90 minutes, LaBelle, accompanied by a 12-piece band, started off stage singing “Up Where We Belong” a capella as she made her way front and center where she officially kicked off the show

PHOTO BY MICHAEL THOMAS

Michael Bublé performs before a sold-out crowd at the Enterprise Center in St. Louis on Friday. BY DANIEL DURCHHOLZ Special to the Post-dispatch PHOTO BY JON GITCHOFF

Patti LaBelle performs for a sold-out crowd at the J. Scheidegger Center for the Arts in St. Charles on Friday.

with her signature “New Attitude.” A fan presented her with flowers during the song. Mostl of her concert staples were in place, and we don’t just mean the songs. There was her promise to “take my time tonight,” and her telling fans to take their pictures of her early on before her face dropped. There was her flinging her shoes off high into the air, bringing fans on stage to sing and dance during “Lady Marmalade” and flawlessly belting out songs such as “Somebody Loves You Baby (You Know Who It Is),” “Over the Rainbow” and “When You Talk About Love” with much of the same energy as always. Basically, it was a classic latter-day Patti LaBelle concert. The days of her falling to the floor and rolling across the stage are, of course, long gone. During “When You Talk About Love,” also affectionately known as the “Patti Patti” song, her threepiece horn section serenaded her before her MVP player, singer and musician B. Slade (formerly known as gospel artist Tonex) stepped from behind the congas to take the lead on the theme song to “The Jeffersons” of all things as she changed outfits. Slade, a powerhouse all his own, took over Michael McDonald’s role on the

power ballad “On My Own.” A fan herself of the occasional cover song including McDonald’s “I Keep Forgetting,” Chris Stapleton’s “Tennessee Whiskey” and Hezekiah Walker’s “Every Praise” all performed here, LaBelle is often covered herself, a fact she made light of. Before performing “If Only You Knew,” she mentioned that Celine Dion sang it as well but said, “Don’t get it twisted; I did it first.” The same was said as she introduced “Love, Need and Want You,” sampled by Nelly featuring Kelly Rowland on their Grammy-winning “Dilemma.” But when she got to Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes’ “If You Don’t Know Me By Now,” the song where the shoes came off, she reminded, “Don’t get it twisted; I did not do this first.” “You Are My Friend,” another classic ballad, ended the concert on a somber note as a lengthy slideshow behind her highlighted dozens of greats who have passed on including Aretha Franklin, Luther Vandross, Whitney Houston, Prince, Michael Jackson, Sylvester and Marvin Gaye, culminating in pictures of her departed family members.

Now on view through June 9

British sculptor Rachel Whiteread casts the hidden spaces in-between, above, and beneath everyday objects, creating a range of monumental and evocative sculptures that make the invisible visible. Rachel Whiteread is the first comprehensive survey of the internationally acclaimed artist’s career.

“It’s enough that you’re here,” Michael Bublé told a sellout crowd at Enterprise Center on Friday night. “You don’t have to give me any more than that.” These days, the famed pop crooner is full of gratitude toward his fans, who stuck with him through a years-long hiatus during which the oldest of his three young children underwent treatment for cancer, which is now in remission. Bublé last performed in St. Louis in 2013. “You are my family. I feel very close to you, and I’m grateful,” he said. It was a subject he would return to several times during his nearly two-hour concert, which featured pop standards and songs from the Great American Songbook as well as tracks from his 2018 album, “Love.” Backed by large band and orchestra — 37 pieces including backup singers and a locally sourced string section — Bublé could make his songs seem as intimate or as bombastic as he wanted. He started out in the latter fashion with a brassy, dramatic take on “Feeling Good” that could have doubled for a James Bond movie theme. Lightening things up immediately, he followed that with a breezy singalong of his 2009 hit, “Haven’t Met You Yet.” Bublé’s cheeky sense of humor came through time and again. Saying he wanted the show to be romantic, “like a date,” he told the crowd, “We’re gonna start slowly, we’re going to get to know each other, and by the end, if it works out, we’ll grind in our car. “I brought the class,” he added, deadpan. Musically, however, that was true. Bublé delivered a soaring “My Funny Valentine” before taking things down a notch on “I Only Have Eyes for You.” Bublé has always had a way of making a previous era’s pop music sound fresh and contemporary and not merely nostalgic, and he added plenty of sizzle and swing to old favorites such as Dean Martin’s “Sway,” Johnnie Ray’s “Such a Night” and Hoagy Carmichael’s (via Bobby Darin, Bublé’s idol) “(Up a) Lazy River.” Between songs, Bublé was charmingly self-deprecating, recalling a flight attendant who half-recognized him asking him, “Did you win ‘American Idol’ or were you just a finalist?” In the spirit of that show, Bublé gave an audience member a crack at the spotlight, asking her to sing a song she would sing in the shower. The woman went big, choosing Celine Dion’s “Because You Loved Me,” and pretty much nailed it. Relieved, Bublé quipped, “(Expletive), thanks, God.” Stacked up next to the classics that dominated his set, Bublé’s recent Charlie Puth-penned single, “Love You Anymore,” was lightweight fluff. His own tribute to his children, “Forever Now,” however, was heartfelt, and Bublé’s eyes seemed to well up a bit as he sang it. Moving to a satellite stage out on the arena floor, Bublé rocked up a couple of Luis Prima numbers, “Buona Sera Signorina” and “Just a Gigolo”/“I Ain’t Got Nobody,” then performed a perfect cover for a St. Louis crowd, Chuck Berry’s “You Never Can Tell.” Before wrapping up with “Always on My Mind,” Bublé once again restated his gratitude. “I’m blessed to have you in my life,” he said, and promised to return to perform again. Hopefully, this time the gap inbetween concerts won’t be as long or as fraught with worry.

Members always free. For ticket information, visit slam.org/RachelWhiteread. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and Tate Britain, London, in association with the Saint Louis Art Museum. Support for the St. Louis presentation is provided by E. Desmond Lee Family Endowment for Exhibitions; the Missouri Arts Council, a state agency; and the National Endowment for the Arts.

M A RC H 2 9 - 3 1

Rachel Whiteread, English, born 1963; Line Up, 2007-2008; plaster, pigment, resin, wood and metal; overall: 6 11/16× 35 7/16×9 13/16 inches; Private collection, New York. Image courtesy the artist and Mike Bruce ©Rachel Whiteread

Slam.org/RachelWhiteread

#RachelWhiteread

TCHAIKOVSKY’S VIOLIN CONCERTO WITH KAREN GOMYO PRESENTED BY THE

THOMAS A. KOOYUMJIAN FAMILY FOUNDATION

“Gomyo is a first-rate artist of real musical command.” – Chicago Tribune

TICKETS START AT $25! A P R I L 5 -7

MOZART & STRAUSS PRESENTED BY

AON

A P R I L 2 7- 2 8

SLATKIN CONDUCTS BERNSTEIN PRESENTED BY THE

SILK FOUNDATION

M AY 3 - 4

TCHAIKOVSKY’S SIXTH PRESENTED BY

MARY PILLSBURY

314-534-1700 slso.org


B8 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

BOOKS

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

BEST-SELLERS

FICTION

Here are the best-sellers from Publishers Weekly for the week that ended March 16.

Words hold the power in Leckie’s fantasy novel

HARDCOVER FICTION 1. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 2. “Wolf Pack” • C.J. Box 3. “Silent Night” • Danielle Steel 4. “The Persian Gamble” • Joel C. Rosenberg 5. “Cemetery Road” • Greg Iles 6. “The Chef” • Patterson/ DiLallo 7. “The Silent Patient” • Alex Michaelides 8. “Toxic Game” • Christine Feehan 9. “Daisy Jones & the Six” • Taylor Jenkins Reid 10. “The Last Romantics” • Tara Conklin

HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. “Girl, Stop Apologizing” • Rachel Hollis 2. “Becoming” • Michelle Obama 3. “The Case for Trump” • Victor Davis Hanson 4. “It’s Not Supposed to Be This Way” • Lysa TerKeurst 5. “Mostly Sunny” • Janice Dean 6. “Grateful American” • Gary Sinise 7. “Don’t Stop Believin’” • Olivia Newton-John 8. “Best Self” • Mike Bayer 9. “Spearhead” • Adam Makos 10. “Keto Diet” • Josh Axe

MASS MARKET 1. “The Fallen” • David Baldacci 2. “The Rising Sea” • Cussler/Brown 3. “Between You and Me” • Susan Wiggs 4. “Backlash” • Lisa Jackson 5. “I’ve Got My Eyes on You” • Mary Higgins Clark 6. “Tom Clancy: Line of Sight” • Mike Maden 7. “Slow Ride” • Lori Foster 8. “Stranglehold” • William W. Johnstone 9. “Live by the West, Die by the West” • William W Johnstone 10. “Devil’s Daughter” • Lisa Kleypas

TRADE PAPERBACK 1. “The Woman in the Window” • A.J. Finn 2. “The First Lady” • Patterson/DuBois 3. “The Tattooist of Auschwitz” • Heather Morris 4. “The Lost Girls of Paris” • Pam Jenoff 5. “The Huntress” • Kate Quinn 6. “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” • Gail Honeyman 7. “Cat and Nat’s Mom Truths” • Belknap/Telfer 8. “Juror #3” • Patterson/ Allen 9. “The Walking Dead, Vol. 31” • Kirkman, et al. 10. “Total Control” • David Baldacci Here are the best-sellers at area independent stores for the week that ended March 17. Stores reporting: The Book House, Left Bank Books, Main Street Books, the Novel Neighbor, Subterranean Books.

ADULT 1. “Where the Crawdads Sing” • Delia Owens 2. “The Immortalists” • Chloe Benjamin 3. “Madame Fourcade’s Secret War” • Lynne Olson 4. “I’ll be Gone in the Dark” • Michelle McNamara 5. “Becoming” • Michelle Obama 6. “Sissy: A Coming-ofGender Story” • Jacob Tobia 7. “Circe” • Madeleine Miller 8. “My Sister, the Serial Killer” • Oyinkan Braithwaite 9. “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” • Maria Kondo 10. “Beautiful Bad” • Annie Ward

CHILDREN/ YOUNG ADULTS 1. “On the Come Up” • Angie Thomas 2. “The 104-Story Treehouse” • Andy Griffiths 3. “Say Something” • Peter H. Reynolds 4. “Another” • Christian Robinson 5. “Ghost” • Jason Reynolds 6. “The Princess in Black and the Science Fair Scare” • Shannon & Dean Hale 7. “Killer Koalas From Outer Space and Lots of Other Very Bad Stuff That Will Make Your Brain Explode!” • Andy Griffiths 8. “I Want My Hat Back” • Jon Klassen 9. “A Tangle of Knots” • Lisa Graff 10. “King of Scars” • Leigh Bardugo

Human prayers, offerings feed gods in St. Louis author’s ‘Raven Tower’ BY SARAH BRYAN MILLER St. Louis Post-Dispatch

That St. Louis writer Ann Leckie has an ear for language, an eye for character and a gift for creating new worlds and cultures is not a surprise: Her first science fiction novel, “Ancillary Justice,” popped to the top of the charts when it was published in 2013, winning the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C. Clark and other prestigious awards. It was followed by two other volumes in that trilogy, “Ancillary Sword” (2014) and “Ancillary Mercy” (2015), along with another volume using those novels’ invented universe, “Provenance” (2017). Now Leckie is back with her first fantasy. “The Raven Tower” deals with gods and humans, with how they interact and, occasionally, how they betray one another. Gods receive power from human prayers and offerings; in return, a small god may do small favors, while a large god may protect a city from fire and invasion. No offering is more powerful than a human sacrifice, particularly a willing one. Gods can change the world with

their words and provide vivid examples of the importance of both thinking before speaking and phrasing one’s words in a carefully parsed manner. “Stories can be risky for someone like me,” says the book’s narrator, an ancient god called the Strength and Patience of the Hill, who inhabits a large black rock. It is deliberative and careful and once learned the hard way about the power of words. “What I say must be true, or it will be made true, and if it cannot be made true — if I don’t have the power, or if what I have said is an impossibility — then I will pay the price. ... It’s safer for me to speak of what I know. Or to speak only in the safest of generalities. Or else to say plainly at the beginning, ‘Here is a story I have heard,’ placing the burden of truth or not on the teller whose words I am merely accurately reporting.” Here is a story it has heard: It concerns the gods and people of a pair of twin cities called Vastai and Ard Vusktia. They face each other across a narrow strait that gives access to the Shoulder Sea from

the Northern Ocean. The people of Vastai, the Iradeni, are protected from their southerly enemies the Tel and the Xulahns by the Silent Forest, who speaks through the Mother of the Silent, and the Raven. The Raven speaks through a living bird, called the Instrument, to the Raven’s Lease, the human ruler of the region. The Lease has sworn to sacrifice his own life when the Instrument dies, giving the Raven great power. The Lease’s Heir is the next in line to serve as the Lease. Mawat, a hot-tempered warrior, returns to the front to find that the Instrument is dead, his father has disappeared and that his unpleasant uncle Hibal has taken his father’s place. With Mawat is his aide Eolo, a sensible, intelligent and curious individual who acts as a restraining influence on his master and makes it his business to investigate below the surface. Eolo, who has a secret of his own, makes and acts upon one particular discovery that changes the arc of the story — and of Vastai.

FICTION

AUTHOR Q&A

Oyeyemi’s readers follow ‘Gingerbread’ into disorienting world

Tom Clavin reveals facts, fiction about ‘Wild Bill’ Hickok

disease, Perdita almost died from gorging on gingerbread as a toddler. So years later when Harriet comes home one evening and finds Someone must have given Helen her teenager in a coma surrounded Oyeyemi a handful of magic beans by fresh gingerbread, she knows when she was born in Nigeria something is horribly wrong. because she’s been planting So far, most of this makes a them ever since. This fantastical certain kind of sense, or at least writer, who completed her first, enough sense to nervously ignore acclaimed novel at the age of 18, the nonsensical asides, obscure sows her modern-day stories in the fertile ground of ancient myths references and non sequiturs. But once Harriet’s sleeping beauty and fables. wakes up in the hospital and begs But Oyeyemi, now 34, isn’t her mother to reveal the secret of just goosing old fairy tales with their family’s past, the dimensions contemporary melodies. She’s of this novel start to bend in surdrawn to what’s most unsettling real ways. about these fables: their disoriGet ready for some heady enting logic, their blithe cruelty, tangles. their subtle encoding The bulk of the of race and gender. novel is Harriet, sitNor is she in any ting alongside her way beholden to the daughter’s hospital source material she bed, spinning the collects in the dark long story of her forest. No matter own childhood in what characters she’s an isolated nation dealing with, she’s called Druhástrana, willing to cut off their which, we’re told, tales with a carving many scholars do not knife. believe exists. Her new novel, Digging around on “Gingerbread,” is a my own, I discovered challenging, mindthat “druhá strana” bending exploration “Gingerbread” literally means “the of class and female A novel by other side” in Slovak, power heavily spiced Helen Oyeyemi with nutmeg and Published by Riverhead, and it’s also the name of a Slovakian rap sweetened with 258 pages, $27 group that released molasses. If you think an album called “Cinderella” in you know where you’re going in 2004, but you won’t learn any of this forest, you’ll soon be lost. Oyeyemi has built her house out of that from Oyeyemi. Harriet grew up in a poor something far more complex than Druhástrana village near a giant candy. shoe, “a relic from the days of The novel opens in contemgiants.” Her only entertainment porary London, where Harriet was reading the novels of Émile Lee, an immigrant, lives with her Zola, which, even in French, would teenage daughter, Perdita. They probably be easier for me to follow own a large apartment so high that “climbing the staircases takes than this story. Just to give you a taste: One more than just walking up; it’s also day, Harriet drops a package of necessary to spring, scramble and gingerbread down a well where a wriggle.” It’s such a challenge to girl named Gretel is hiding because reach them, in fact, that “princess in a tower syndrome sets in” — one she recently threw another girl farther down the well. Harriet and of many fairy-tale allusions that Gretel become fast friends, and should set off your inner Brothers Harriet is sent away to work at a Grimm. A few years ago, Oyeyemi told an gingerbread theme park owned by Gretel’s miserly mother. The interviewer, “I’m very interested in strange women, women who are theme park is staffed entirely by for some reason not able to express “100 percent genuine farmstead girls,” who are paid in fake money, emotion in a way that wins them fed gruel and kept in a state of friends.” perennial nausea. Harriet Lee is such a characTrained to excite male clients ter, kind and sympathetic, but with their untouchable pubescent guileless in the ways of social sexuality, the “Gingerbread Girls” competition. She’s desperate to are admonished to move as much ingratiate herself with the snobs of their product as they possibly on the parents’ advisory comcan — “like the Little Matchstick mittee at her daughter’s school. Girl,” Oyeyemi explains, “but with Her only special skill is making gingerbread.” gingerbread from a recipe passed Naturally, this relentless down through her family for gencompetition, combined with the erations. But don’t think of that effects of grueling privation, turns spice cake from a Pillsbury mix or some of these imprisoned girls those cookie-cutter men. One of against each other. “We’re going to Harriet’s addicted fans tells her that “eating her gingerbread is like start carrying gingerbread shivs,” Harriet says. eating revenge” — and who could Anyone who resists Oyeyemi’s resist that? Unfortunately, Harriet’s daugh- absurdism will find “Gingerbread” a very bitter meal, indeed. ter must resist. Born with celiac BY RON CHARLES Washington Post

“The Raven Tower” By Ann Leckie Published by Orbit, 432 pages, $26

“Tower,” which has distinctly Shakespearean elements, is narrated by the Strength and Patience of the Hill, in the first person when delivering (extensive) background material, and in the second person, directed at Eolo, when narrating the novel’s events. The second person can be a little off-putting at first, but Leckie uses the device skillfully. Parts of this book move slowly, but Leckie’s examination of power, politics and governance is fascinating and well-conceived. The conclusion comes in an explosion of events. As in the beginning of the story, words matter at the end. Sarah Bryan Miller • 314-340-8249 sbmiller@post-dispatch.com

BY MICHAEL SCHAUB newsday

He’s one of the most iconic figures of 19th-century American history, but how much do we really know about gunfighter “Wild Bill” Hickok, who famously won a quick-draw duel in Springfield, Mo.? The mythology surrounding him has long been fodder for dime-store novels and Western movies, but it turns out the real Wild Bill was more fascinating than the fiction that’s grown around him. Tom Clavin, author of “Dodge City,” spoke by telephone about his new book, “Wild Bill: The True Story of the American Frontier’s First Gunfighter,” which tells the true story of the legendary folk hero.

“Wild Bill” Hickok was only 39 years old when he was killed.

Q • I didn’t know much about Wild Bill Hickok besides the legends, so it was interesting to read the real story about him. A • Wild Bill Hickok is a name everybody knows, and they may have this vague image of who he was, but there really is quite a story behind him. He actually was a gunfighter, and he was also a sheriff, a federal marshal, a stage actor in New York, a spy during the Civil War. He married the love of his life, who was not Calamity Jane; it was a circus impresario. Q • How did you get interested in writing a book about him? A • The last Hickok biography for a mainstream audience that was done was by Joseph Rosa in 1964, and he did a revised paperback edition in ’74. So it seemed like it was certainly time to do a new one. There have been a couple of generations of people that have not had access to his life. Wild Bill was the natural progression, to find out what life was like on the frontier between the Civil War and the “Dodge City” days. Q • What do you think most people would be surprised to learn about him? A • One of the things that surprised me the most was that he was only 39 years old when he was killed. He packed a lot of life into 39 years. When he’s been

“Wild Bill: The True Story of the American Frontier’s First Gunfighter” By Tom Clavin Published by St. Martin’s Press, 336 pages, $29.99

TOM CLAVIN When • 7 p.m. Thursday Where • St. Louis Public Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard How much • Free More info • 314-994-3300

represented on screen, it’s by older men. In the series “Deadwood” on HBO, he was portrayed by Keith Carradine, who was in his 60s. Wild Bill was a young man when he was murdered, and he had already lived a life that was enough for five men. Another thing that surprises people is that you had a man who had a reputation as the No. 1 gunfighter on the frontier, and he was going blind. It’s a sad part of the story, but he kept pushing on. Q • One of the things I thought I knew about Wild Bill was this romance with Calamity Jane. A • Wild Bill did have a love of his life, and it was a woman who was a circus owner 11 years his senior, Agnes Lake, and she had a fascinating career of her own. She was a career woman, and she was raising her daughter to be an international equestrian star. And Wild Bill had his own life on the frontier. They led incompatible lives, and that’s what kept them apart. But the character of Agnes Lake is going to be a revelation to people, because nobody knows she existed, and she was the only Mrs. Hickok. And Calamity Jane is a fascinating character, but Wild Bill couldn’t stand her. Q • What were the challenges like for you in separating the myth from the fact about Wild Bill? A • It was difficult, but it was entertaining. Before there were Marvel comics, there were the dime-store novels, and these Wild West characters were our superheroes. Wild Bill didn’t have “Spidey sense,” he didn’t have the hammer of Thor. But he had two Colt .45 pistols and he had his Bowie knife, and those were his weapons to beat bad guys. What I had to do with the research was keep sifting through things, trying to corroborate, see what was in the original sources. The research really can’t be rushed, because it’s a process of sifting through, and at the end of each day, you hope that there’s some gold dust sprinkled at the bottom of the pan.


ARTS

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B9

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Supreme Court nominee Sandra Day O’Connor raises her right hand to be sworn in before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Sept. 9, 1981.

BIOGRAPHY

Supreme Court justice led way for women who would follow BY JULIE COHEN Special to The Washington Post

At a party at her Arizona home in 1981, Sandra Day O’Connor, ever the consummate hostess, served enchiladas poolside with good cheer. But when she greeted a friend of her son who was soon to begin a clerkship for Supreme Court Justice William Rehnquist, her mood shifted. As Evan Thomas

describes the scene in “First,” his illuminating and eminently readable biography of the Supreme Court’s first female justice, O’Connor “conveyed an almost palpable sense of longing” for past opportunities denied her because of gender. With her appointment to the court weeks away, she launched into a stream-of-consciousness monologue about her envy decades earlier when Rehnquist, her Stanford

Law School classmate (and former beau), had started his clerkship at the court, a steppingstone at that time reserved almost exclusively for men. Intelligent, ambitious women of O’Connor’s vintage were thwarted at every turn. A Stanford Law Review editor in the top 10 percent of her class, she couldn’t even get an interview with the big firms that recruited on campus in the 1950s. When she wangled a meeting in the Los Angeles offices of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, Thomas writes, a partner told her “our clients won’t stand for” being represented by a woman and suggested a secretarial job instead. By the time of the poolside chat, O’Connor had racked up an impressive series of achievements against the odds. She’d been the majority leader of the Republican-controlled Arizona state Senate and a state judge at the trial appellate level. But the doors slammed shut

A STANDING OVATION FOR

earlier in her career were not easily forgotten. Sexism stings. And it stung just as harshly for a Phoenix country club Republican like O’Connor as it did for a liberal Brooklynite like Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Only a few weeks after that pool party, President Ronald Reagan made good on a campaign promise to appoint a woman to the Supreme Court. O’Connor got the call and breezed through her confirmation with a 99-to-0 vote. That O’Connor found herself the highestranking woman ever in American government was no accident. Thomas vividly sketches the attributes she used to clear the high barriers to female ascendancy: a knack for brushing past insults, relentlessness belied by a pretty smile, an almost superhuman level of energy and, not least, a heroically supportive husband. John O’Connor was a successful lawyer in his own right but willing to take a back seat if it meant helping his wife achieve her lofty goals. This list of assets will sound familiar to Ginsburg aficionados. (Though unlike the kitchen-averse RBG, O’Connor could whip up a tasty salmon mousse when the need arose.) While Ginsburg in her pre-justice days distinguished herself by fighting to secure gender equality under the Constitution, O’Connor was no flaming feminist. If she had been, the Reaganites surely would have looked elsewhere. As a politician anxious to distance herself from women’s libbers, she addressed a Rotary Club with the evocative line: “I

come to you with my bra and my wedding ring on.” In the state Senate, O’Connor played a key role in striking down hundreds of Arizona laws discriminating against women, but she didn’t put her political weight behind passage of the Equal Rights Amendment. After the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade opinion, she voted against a resolution calling for an anti-abortion constitutional amendment but supported key measures restricting women’s access to abortions. It was the same style of compromise — some might say fence-straddling — that O’Connor would employ as a Supreme Court justice. Some legal scholars have criticized her for seeking to decide cases on narrow grounds, leaving larger constitutional issues unresolved. In Thomas’ more generous interpretation, O’Connor’s judicial “minimalism” flowed naturally from a realpolitik she’d honed as, well, a real politician. In Wygant v. Jackson Board of Education(1986), four justices wanted to throw out a Mississippi plan to lay off white teachers with seniority before their less-experienced black counterparts, and four favored preserving the plan, designed to redress the city’s clear history of racial discrimination. O’Connor, finding herself in the middle and undecided, initially proposed sending the case back to the lower court to be re-argued. Eventually she joined most of Justice Lewis Powell’s majority opinion striking down the layoff plan, but in her concurrence she left the door open to constitutionally permissible affirmative action. O’Connor went on to write key majority opinions on affirmative action herself. Adarand

“First: Sandra Day O’Connor” By Evan Thomas Published by Random House, 476 pages, $32

EVAN THOMAS When • 7 p.m. Monday Where • St. Louis County Library, 1640 South Lindbergh Boulevard How much • Free More info • 314-994-3300

Constructors, Inc. v. Pena (1995) ruled that affirmative action plans must be subjected to the most stringent level of judicial scrutiny, though O’Connor made clear that not all affirmative action is untenable. O’Connor was temperate on abortion rights cases, too, resisting numerous attempts by her conservative colleagues to strike down Roe but not issuing the ringing endorsement of reproductive freedom that liberals might have favored. Interspersed with the legal analysis in “First” is lighter fare: camaraderie and sniping among the justices, even a scene where two clerks come to fisticuffs in a Supreme Court fountain — over an abortion rights case. Some anecdotes are so juicy I found myself checking the footnotes to see where Thomas got them. Yes, as in most Supreme Court literature, there’s plenty from the clerks. But some of his best material comes from interviews with former and sitting justices. “First” gives us a real sense of Sandra Day O’Connor the human being. Cinematic scenes from her upbringing on the family ranch find young Sandra changing a tire all by herself as she struggles to get the chuck wagon to the cowboys before cattle-branding time. Thomas shows how well her flintiness served O’Connor in adulthood. She faces down Stage 2 cancer and a mastectomy with minimal self-pity, doing chemo on Fridays so she could be back on the bench for Monday oral arguments (a regimen passed on to the equally flinty Ginsburg when she, too, got cancer). The scenes of O’Connor retiring early to help care for her husband as he struggles with Alzheimer’s are poignant; the news of her own diagnosis with that same brutal disease even more so. Thomas gives O’Connor the credit she deserves. Even if her ruling with the majority to cut off the Florida recount in the 2000 Bush v. Gore case makes you nauseated, Thomas suggests, you owe her some respect. Without O’Connor’s crucial fifth votes, both legalized abortion and affirmative action could well have lost their protection under the Constitution. And her strong work through a quarter-century on the Supreme Court paved the way for Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and the others who will follow. Julie Cohen is the director of the Academy Award-nominated documentary “RBG,” along with her filmmaking partner Betsy West.

CLASSICAL MUSIC REVIEW

Varga leads SLSO in charming program featuring ‘The Sorcerer’s Apprentice’ BY JOHN HUXHOLD Special to the Post-dispatch

Celebrate Steve Woolf’s 32 years of leadership at The Rep as he retires at the end of our 2018–2019 season. The Rep’s legacy of artistic excellence and financial stability is due in large part to Steve’s leadership over the course of the past three decades. We hope you will join us to honor one of St. Louis’ most iconic directors and personalities!

WEDNESDAY APRIL 10 Edward Jones Headquarters South Campus 12555 Manchester Road Cocktails—6:15 PM Dinner—7:15 PM Show Celebrating Steve—8:30 PM

TICKETS START AT $100. TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT TICKET PACKAGES AND LEVELS OF SUPPORT, VISIT WWW.REPSTL.ORG OR CALL 314.687.4011

There is an old joke to the effect that a true musical sophisticate could listen to the “William Tell Overture” and never for a moment think of the Lone Ranger. A similar thought might apply to “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” from 1897 by Paul Dukas, which opened the program by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. The piece was made famous decades ago as the centerpiece of Disney’s groundbreaking cartoon extravaganza “Fantasia.” Its popularity has sometimes raised haughty eyebrows of those who deem it not worthy of subscription concert fare, but there it was Friday morning in Powell Hall. As the program notes rightly point out, considered on its musical merits alone, it is “imaginative and original,” similar to (without being, perhaps, the equal of) something by one of the Strausses. It is just under 15 minutes of charming, evocative

and interesting orchestral writing that the musicians seemed to enjoy, as did guest conductor Gilbert Varga, who had the entire bassoon section take a bow. And of course, no one in the audience thought of Mickey Mouse even once. “Charming” is a good description of Lalo’s “Cello Concerto” from 1876 as well. While some intense, serious themes arrive from time to time, it has a pastoral, dance-like quality overall, especially in the delightful second movement. Guest soloist Daniel Müller-Schott, in his St. Louis debut, seems incapable of making a rough sound, even in the most driven passages. His technique was impeccable, his phrasing remarkable, his communication with Varga and the orchestra locked in from beginning to end with obvious chemistry. Three enthusiastic curtain calls resulted in an encore (Ravel’s “Habanera” for solo cello) that was a slow, soft, exquisite and sensuous delight. Let’s hope he returns soon. Like Dukas and Lalo,

Cesar Franck, whose “Symphony in D” from 1888 ended the program, was also active in the last three decades of the 1800s. The typical symphony by Haydn or Mozart has four movements while some modern symphonies have more. Franck’s, however, has fewer — only three, none of which is particularly slow — an excellent fit for modern attention spans. With terrific solo work by Cally Banham on English horn and Roger Kaza on French horn, it’s music that is easy on the ear and warmly evocative. It’s also music that Varga seems to have in his musical DNA. Working without a score, he was in command of every single detail; from inner voices that always shined through appropriately and dynamics that impressed but never overwhelmed, especially in the cello concerto. He has an old-fashioned, elegant style that is engaging and interesting to observe. He’s conducted here many times; many more would not be enough.


TRAVEL

B10 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

A BACKCOUNTRY REFUGE Remote campground in Great Smoky Mountains National Park offers escape from city life IF YOU GO

BY MARY WINSTON NICKLIN Special To The Washington Post

Somewhere along the precipitous gravel road that leads to the Cataloochee Valley, a sign looms large. “No cellphone service.” For hyper-connected, news-addicted individuals such as ourselves, this could have caused panic. But on this humid summer day, we tried not to bat an eye. Our mission? Escape Parisian civilization for a few days ... on the densely populated East Coast of the United States. We planned a summer trip to Great Smoky Mountains National Park to introduce our young daughters to camping. Not that we urbanites didn’t try to immerse ourselves in nature at home. In Paris, where we live, we look for nests, collect odd pebbles and gather autumn leaves. We even keep composting worms on our apartment’s balcony. But our younger daughter usually ends up admiring snails and pigeons for lack of other critters. Like many Europeans obsessed with American national parks, my French husband was intrigued by the idea of exploring one such wild space. But was it possible? Could we find one close to the Virginia family we visit every summer? Was there even a vestige of untouched American wilderness left on the East Coast? The Great Smokies seemed to provide the answer. Veering off Highway 276 north of Waynesville in North Carolina, the access road to the remote Cataloochee Valley was empty of cars. Riddled with blind curves, the unpaved track ascends without guard rails, edged by steep drops. We didn’t pass a single vehicle. A fawn leaped out from the greenery, sunlight piercing the lush tree canopy in dramatic shafts of light. And when we finally reached an overlook, we were treated to panoramic vistas of what the Cherokees called the “land of the blue smoke.” Wave upon wave of mountains stretched to the horizon, mist coiling in threads above the valleys. When we pulled up at the campground, a tarp served as a lean-to protecting the friendly park ranger Buck and his wife from the drizzle. Here in the backcountry there are only 27 campsites, compared with the 200 sites that can be found at other Great Smokies campgrounds. We were surprised to see that a few RVs had braved the road, but rules regulate the timing of the generators. They must be shut off by 8 p.m. to combat noise pollution. In fact, Buck told us that one family had fled the park when their kids couldn’t watch movies at night. There’s no concession stand, nor gas station, nor motor lodge. The closest shower would be in Waynesville, almost 40 miles away. (Although the stream looked inviting.) Formed between 200 million and 300 million years ago, the Great Smokies are some of the oldest mountains in the world. The park’s 522,000 acres are dense with forest, fostering tremendous biodiversity beneath the canopies of ancient giants. The fertile land also bears witness to the generations of humans who have sought, since prehistoric times, to reap its bounty. The Cherokee hunted the woods and fished the streams, followed by European settlers in the 19th century, who pursued their trails as they pushed into the valleys. Preserved barns and homesteads showcase the Appalachian pioneer mountain culture. Great Smoky Mountains National Park was established in 1934 as the result of a local conservation movement. Unlike

Cataloochee Campground • 1-828-497-9270; wapo.st/ Cataloochee The only campground in the Cataloochee Valley offers 27 idyllic campsites next to a stream. There are bathrooms but no showers or hookups. Peak season runs from May 15 to Oct. 27. $25 per night. Great Smoky Mountains National Park • nps.gov/grsm/ index.htm; smokymountains. com/park/ Located in North Carolina and Tennessee, the national park is the most popular one in the United States. Check the website for seasonal road closures related to weather. Free.

BONNIE JO MOUNT • Washington Post

Fog settles near sunset in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee.

national parks in the West, developed on public lands, the territory that became the park had been in private ownership. It was a herculean effort to buy up private parcels with funding allocated by the states of North Carolina and Tennessee matched by private donations and the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Fund. A total of 6,600 tracts were purchased. The states later transferred deeds of ownership to the federal government, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt officially inaugurated the national park in September 1940. To this day, there is no entrance fee. Great Smoky Mountains National Park is the most popular one in the United States, having welcomed 11 million visitors in 2017. In comparison, the Grand Canyon attracted 6.2 million visitors. Areas such as Cades Cove in Tennessee and its Loop Road are notoriously clogged with cars and swarming with people. But a twist of fate preserved the Cataloochee Valley in its isolated splendor. In the 1970s, the National Park Service planned to pave Cove Creek Road to transform the area into a tourism hub. Local opposition, then budget cuts, ultimately prevented this from happening. So the gravel link to the outside world has kept the valley blissfully remote. As we made camp, our daughters didn’t see the tasks — collecting kindling wood for the fire, pumping water, setting up the tent, unrolling sleeping bags — as chores. Instead, there was a satisfied sense of accomplishment. (Plus, visions of firstever s’mores as rewards danced in their heads.) We gathered around the fire, drawn to the eternal, primitive appeal of flame. The evening calls of whippoorwills faded into the night, replaced by the sonorous stream crashing at the edge of the campsite. We breathed in the chilly mountain air, redolent with damp leaves and earthiness, then hit the hay. The delight of breakfast in the great outdoors: Pancakes sizzled in the pan and coffee brewed on the camp stove. Along with a rising mist, the morning brought a mission. Buck the ranger told us about black bear cub sightings, and we were going to make our own attempt. The cubs love climbing the gnarled apple trees, vestiges of the pioneers’ old orchards, next to the road that runs through the Cataloochee Valley. Derived from a Cherokee word thought to mean “standing up in ranks,” Cataloochee is in fact composed of three parallel valleys. We set out on a road flanked by flower-filled meadows where a herd of elk grazed in the sunshine. We craned our necks to look for the bears, but with no luck. Our daughters were more interested in the brilliantly colored butterflies known as pipevine swallowtails. There were so many of them — fluttering clouds of wings poised on plants — that we lost track of time doing nothing but watching them.

old-growth forest with majestic towering trees. Below, the woods are damp and lush with rhododendrons. Log footbridges cross streams, and the ruins of old homesteads peek out from the vegetation. These Cataloochee

The Cataloochee is threaded with excellent hiking trails like the Boogerman Loop, named for Robert Palmer (the “Boogerman”) who once owned the land and refused to allow logging companies to timber the property. The result is an

dwellings are haunting. We entered unlocked houses like trespassing time travelers, half expecting to walk in on a scene from the early 20th century. The Caldwell House, built in 1903, is a proud vision in white clapboard and blue trim. Across the footbridge over a rushing creek, an old barn stands sentry over fallow meadows. In the Beech Grove schoolhouse,

initials are carved on the desks. The Bible on the Palmer Chapel’s pulpit is left open to the last page of the Old Testament. Hiking a wooded hilltop, we discovered an old cemetery guarded by giant, mosscovered trees — a mystical place. Inside the Palmer House, an exhibition shows vintage photos of the valley before it was absorbed into Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On the road, we spotted an excited ranger waving for us to stop. He pointed into the meadows. Two black bear cubs were making their way through the high grasses. We stood in a trance, watching rippling paths advance toward the tree line. And then we counted a third! The girls had been keeping a running tally of all the animals we had seen — skittering chipmunks, snoozing elk — and the baby bears were a triumphant addition to the list.

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TRAVEL

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • B11

PHOTOS BY RAY MARK RINALDI • Chicago Tribune (TnS)

The massive Mercado Medellin in Roma Sur offers an old-school alternative to modern grocery stores.

THE REAL-LIFE ROMA What’s new, and what’s not, in Mexico City neighborhood seen in Oscar winner BY RAY MARK RINALDI Chicago Tribune (TnS)

Mexico City • You still see her there in Roma: Cleo, the silent and suffering indigenous housekeeper in director Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma.” I watch her from the window of my room in the afternoons. She tips a wave of water from her heavy bucket onto the tiled courtyard floor, then runs it down with a broom, scraping the soot and the mud and, yes, sometimes the piles of excrement the neighbors’ dogs leave behind. Cuarón didn’t spare any dirty details from his Oscarwinning masterpiece. That’s the sort of thing you never stop noticing when you’re an American staying for long periods of time in Mexico City. The class system is real, racebased, open and lasting; only now the roles are played by the children and grandchildren of the characters in the 1970s, blackand-white world of “Roma.” Pity it? Sure. Exploit it? Yes, I do, like everyone else, local or foreign, who is on the lucky side of the socioeconomic system here. I get my apartment cleaned and my clothes laundered for a couple of bucks a day. I tip, even though tipping is rarely required, just to assuage my guilt. The Roma neighborhood gets by this way, but it’s only part of the story. These days, you could fairly describe it as the hippest neighborhood in the entire metropolis of 21 million people. It houses the city’s trendiest bars and restaurants; its poshest parks, art galleries and theaters. Everyone wears skinny jeans and fluffy scarves. It’s as fashionable as Paris and one-third the price. And technically, there are two of them. Roma Norte: young, gentrifying, tourist-friendly. And Roma Sur: quiet, residential and spread out enough that you can step back to enjoy the amazing mix of neoclassical, art deco and ultra-modern low-rise architecture that defines this part of town. You go to Roma Norte to shop and party until 4 in the morning at places such as the renowned cocktail bar Licoreria Limantour, or the casual Pizza Felix, or the exclusive nightclub Departamento. In Roma Sur, you get a taste of how Mexicans of means really live, shopping from the stacks of oranges and avocados at the amazing Mercado Medellin or grabbing a beer and a movie at the homey Cine Tonala. Residents of the two colonias compete playfully for superiority, but the areas blend easily into each other, and both are welcoming to visitors. And because they are centrally located, they offer a handy launching point for any journey to CDMX, as the sprawling capital has been branded lately. A cab to the Zocalo, the city’s vibrant and historic downtown, with its baroque cathedrals, museums

Tortillas are a specialty in Roma Sur.

as I rarely do now that I live in that part of Mexico City about half the year.

Galeria OMR in Roma Norte is one of Mexico City’s leading art spaces.

Neon murals decorate Comedor de los Milagros, Roma Sur’s popular food court and bar serving international cuisines that show off Mexico City’s place as a center of Latin American culture.

and relics of the earliest civilizations in North America, takes 20 minutes and costs less than $5. Though Mexico City’s unpredictable traffic can get in the way of that convenience at any time. On their western edge, the two Romas border the massive, urban green space Chapultepec

Park, which hosts the famous National Anthropology Museum, probably the city’s most popular tourist spot. Just to the east of Roma is Arena Mexico, home to the lucha libre wrestlers, and surely the city’s most fun tourist spot. You can walk to all of it. Or you can never leave Roma,

GETTING AROUND There are a lot of reasons I went from frequent tourist in Mexico to part-time resident. Some more concrete than others. I’m a 5-foot, 6 ½-inch freelance art critic. In America, I’m short, financially stretched and overly talkative. None of that is true in Mexico, where my height is average, my income solidly middle class and my Spanish good enough to get by, but bad enough to just give up sometimes and shut my mouth. In Roma, I sit quietly, drinking coffee in the mornings at Plaza Rio de Janeiro, in the shadow of the oversized replica of Michelangelo’s David. Or at Fuente de Cibeles, the circular public fountain ringed by cafes and centered on an imposing sculpture that mimics a nearly identical one in Madrid, serving as a symbol of Mexico’s long-standing closeness to Spain. Then I wander to the busy commercial strip on Avenida Alvaro Obregon to browse the three stories of stacks at El Pendulo books, or grab a sugary snack at El Moro churros. I might check out my favorite art space, the wild and unpredictable Galeria OMR, or pop into the latest show at the MUCA Roma contemporary art museum. Then I work, and in the late afternoon, every afternoon, I cross Avenida Sonora into Parque Espana, where I watch the famous dog walkers do their magic. I count how many dogs — shepherds, Labs, terriers, hairless Mexican xolos — they can get to line up perfectly, untethered, without wandering away. One day I counted 43 in a row, all just sitting there like good friends

passing the day. Americans are welcome at all of it, and you see quite a few of them in Roma: tourists who can’t get enough of the $1 quesadillas, successful business people who are happy with NAFTA just the way it is, ex-pats who actually followed through on their threat to leave America if Trump was elected. They have their haunts — Cardinal Casa de Cafe, which specializes in local coffees; El Parnita eatery, where fish tacos are the house specialty; Rosetta Panaderia, with its renowned chocolate bread. At these places, you are almost as likely to hear people speaking English as you are Spanish. I send my guests to all of those spots — and I have quite a few visitors from the U.S. — because it’s an easy way to acclimate to a city that can be quite confusing to newcomers. I put people up in a spare room or suggest the posh Hotel La Casona or the bargain Hotel MX. But I always encourage them to use Airbnb for accommodations and Uber for getting around. The Mexican economy is built on microentrepreneurs; every tortillamaker, house cleaner and barber is essentially a small-business person, and the shared economy is the digital manifestation of that tradition. It’s efficient, safe and dependable. It’s easy to get past the tourist traps — the limos that harass you at the airport, the American hotel chains that charge way too much. Foreigners do need to be careful, but not too careful. Don’t drink the tap water, I always suggest, but do eat the street food (especially my favorite, the guajolota, a carb-y, tamale sandwich sold on nearly every corner). You protect your cellphone in the crowded markets and subways, but you can walk around at night feeling comfortable in Roma. Despite its reputation in some circles, Mexico City is no different than any major urban place; there are safe zones and dangerous zones, and you can usually tell them apart just by looking. When you get lost — and I still get lost all the time; Mexico City is a maze and sometimes entirely different streets have the exact same name — you simply ask. I’ve found Mexicans to be open and unsuspicious of “extranjeros” (foreigners, in English) in a way Americans aren’t known to be. That’s especially true in the two Romas, which director Cuarón captured with such precision. They are “romantic” as their names imply, but in a way that recognizes both extraordinary beauty and everyday struggle as equal parts of the human condition. You enjoy the wealth, you witness the inequality. You see it all. Ray Mark Rinaldi is a freelance writer who splits his time between Denver and Mexico City. He’s a former entertainment editor for the Post-Dispatch.


TRAVEL

B12 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

TRAVEL TROUBLESHOOTER

BRING IT ON HOME: UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

How do you fix common travel problems? Hang up the phone BY CHRISTOPHER ELLIOTT Special to The Washington Post

The phone — by which I mean voice communication — puts travelers at a significant disadvantage when it comes to problemsolving. But there’s a notable exception, a time when you should pick up the phone and then maybe hang up. If you understand the difference, you’re well on your way to resolving almost any travel problem. The phone is still the preferred contact method for most travelers. A report by Invoca, a call-tracking company, found that 65 percent of consumers would rather use a phone than email to contact a business. A survey by Google showed that on any big-ticket vacation expense, which it defines as a purchase for more than $320, consumers prefer contacting an airline, hotel or cruise line by phone. Attitudes are slowly shifting, but for many travelers, the phone is still the primary means of contact when there’s a problem. Travelers favor the phone because it’s convenient and fast. I know that’s true because almost every day, I receive voice messages from consumers who have called me to ask for help resolving their problems. My consumer advocacy site requires a paper trail like the one that Meg Aidekman, co-founder of District of Columbia tour operator Trip Tribe, advises her clients to keep. But many readers say they can’t do that, offering excuses like, “I’m not good with technology” or “I’m a senior.” Travel companies seem to like the status quo, too. When there’s no paper trail, it becomes much more difficult for you, the consumer, to resolve a travel complaint in your favor. That’s because when you contact a company about a service lapse or a delay, you have no evidence of your previous contact, no record of any response. It’s the company’s word against yours. Travel companies hold all the cards. Bigger travel businesses, such as airlines and online travel agencies, have sophisticated callcenter systems that record each customer service interaction. An employee can review the call, but unless you recorded it yourself, you have no access to it. A new federal law giving customers access to these recordings might tip the scales more toward travelers, but that seems unlikely. A quicker fix: Get everything in writing. “Whenever possible, get it in writing, and document everything,” Aidekman says. “We always advise customers to deal with issues in writing as it

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

leaves a paper trail. You can use it to follow up on and hold companies to their terms and conditions and promises made.” Customer service expert Chip Bell, author of “The 9½ Principles of Innovative Service,” says putting negotiations in writing can help retrieve facts that both parties can innocently and easily forget: “We all say things that fade from memory as other facts crowd them out. Think of a written record as your reference library of what was agreed.” A written record is possible even when you have an immediate request that would generally require a call. “Use private digital channels like Facebook Messenger and Twitter Direct Message to seek issue resolution,” advises Joshua March, CEO of Conversocial, a company that tracks airline performance on social media. “These channels are not only secure but offer a fast and convenient way to try to solve the issue while you’re on the go.” More important, you can store and retrieve Twitter DMs and Facebook messages when you need to remind a company what it promised. I just handled a case in which a consumer saved every online chat. When the company reneged on a promised refund, he showed it the chat transcript. It quickly offered the full refund. But there’s an exception

to the hang-up-the-phone rule, and it’s equally important. Sometimes, a phone call is the best way to reach a company. For example, when you’re planning a complicated cruise itinerary or trying to book an award seat. In both cases an agent can sometimes offer options. Of course, after an airline cancellation, passengers instinctively dial the carrier’s toll-free number to get a seat on the next flight. That’s unlikely to change even if every passenger has a smartphone with the airline’s app on it. The phone still rules. “When you have a travel problem, call the company, and if you don’t get it resolved, hang up,” says Greg Trosko, an office manager from Princeton, N.J. “Call back later, and speak with someone different. You’d be surprised how often you get a completely different answer.” Trosko has used this strategy when trying to book an award ticket. One phone agent said no to his request, so he politely ended the call and phoned back. The second agent said yes. “What’s the worst thing that could happen?” he asks. “The person says, ‘No.’”

Who and where • Sam Goldstein of Creve Coeur on a tour of the Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. The trip • He spent three weeks touring India and the United Arab Emirates. Travel tip • Do not be afraid of traveling to the UAE or to India. The weather was warm in both countries in late December and early January. Contribute • Email your photo to stlpost@gmail. com. Include the full names of everyone in the photo, including where they are from and where you are standing in the photo. Also include your address and phone number. Please also tell us a little about the trip and a travel tip. We’re looking for interesting, well-composed, well-lighted photos.

Christopher Elliott is a consumer advocate, journalist and co-founder of the advocacy group Travelers United. Email him at chris@elliott.org.

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / B U S I N E S S

SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • C

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com.

Sabrina Westfall (right), owner of J. West Electric, goes over project details with Sylvester Taylor, a foreman, at Washington University’s Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on Monday.

MENTORS BOOST ENTREPRENEURS Regional effort gives sometimes-tough business advice to women- and minority-led contractors in the area

Ameren’s plan for wind farm in northwestern Missouri stirs unexpected alarm

DAVID NICKLAUS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Sabrina Westfall was both excited and nervous last year when her small electrical firm was selected to work on Ballpark Village. She remembers being in a room with 13 men in suits, all representatives of bigger contractors, urging her to sign the con-

NGA project here is still on schedule for 2023 Feds reassure St. Louis despite Trump’s threat to redirect military construction funds to border wall

tract. Instead she took it to her advisory board, which told her not to sign – and Westfall says it’s one of the best decisions she has made in five years as a business owner. The six advisers, with years of experience in construction, law and accounting, said the proposed contract would expose her to risks that could sink her eight-person firm. After months of negotiation, she was able to land the same business on much more favorable terms. See NICKLAUS • Page C4

U.S. Steel and other companies are expanding paid benefits for family leave

Flawed tax policy stints rural areas, critics say

Tight labor market makes perks important

BY BRYCE GRAY St. Louis Post-Dispatch

BY JENA MCGREGOR Washington Post

Wind energy projects are often touted for the job creation and tax revenue boost they can bring to rural areas. So it may come as a surprise to see that, in recent legal filings, local counties voiced opposition and alarm over Ameren’s plans for a wind farm in northwestern Missouri. Their stance didn’t have to do with opposition to wind energy, but rather with what they see as a flawed tax policy in Missouri for revenue from utilityowned energy projects such as wind farms. Under Missouri law, experts say those types of facilities currently send revenue to the state level for eventual redistribution across entire utility service territories, instead of pumping it directly to the county where they sit. As Missouri electric utilities turn to owning in-state wind production for the first time, that question of where the ensuing tax revenue ends up is new to the state — one that, unless addressed by proposed legislation in Jefferson City, could remain a key stumbling block for the technology if it is to gain broader support and momentum. For places such as Atchison County in the far northwest corner of the state — the wind-swept home of 5,000 people wedged between Nebraska and Iowa

struction is expected to begin this year after the Department of Defense announced that a joint venture of Rock Hill-based McCarthy Building Companies and HITT Contracting was given a $712 million contract to build the NGA’s new western headquarters. That’s only part of the construction costs and does not include “smallbusiness set asides” — essentially local subcontractors who will be hired as part of the overall project’s construction, Corps of Engineers spokeswoman Amy Snively said.

United States Steel Corp. said Thursday that it was expanding its paid leave benefits for nonunion employees and rolling out a slew of new benefits such as gender reassignment surgery coverage and adoption assistance, a sign that the swift expansion of work-life perks across corporate America in recent years has been adopted among even some of the most traditional companies. The suite of new benefits — which adds eight weeks of paid leave for new fathers or adoptive parents for the first time and expands the amount of paid leave for birth mothers to between 14 and 16 weeks — may not be the most generous program out there for new parents. But experts on paid leave say it signals that the benefit has morphed from a featured perk to table stakes in a labor market where companies are approaching near-full employment. “We’re seeing old-world manufacturing — organizations that traditionally have had a more paternalistic view — that are no longer just relying on the traditional recruiting methods,” said Carol Sladek, who leads work-life consulting at Aon. Companies also don’t want to be behind the curve if a federal paid leave

See NGA • Page C3

See LEAVE • Page C4

See WIND • Page C4

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

The area of north St. Louis that will be home to the new NGA site is shown in August.

BY CHUCK RAASCH St. Louis Post-Dispatch

WASHINGTON • The federal agencies

overseeing construction and operation of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency’s planned new $1.7 billion headquarters in north St. Louis are assuring contractors that there is no expected break in future funding of the project because of potential fund diversions to President Donald Trump’s border wall. The project is on pace for an expected April 2023 completion, Army Corps of Engineers officials say. Con-

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C2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUNDAY • 03.24.2019

Keep ‘subscription creep’ from taking a big bite out of budget BY GREGORY KARP NerdWallet

From Netflix, Spotify and Amazon Prime to Blue Apron, Birchbox and beer of the month, your debit or credit card statements are probably littered with subscriptions that are costing you dearly. Not that all subscriptions are bad. You might be happy to pay a monthly fee to work out at the gym or type in Microsoft Office 365. But maybe the benefits of subscribing to credit monitoring or razors by mail were, uh, more fleeting. Recurring charges can be insidious, some eating away at your wealth when you don’t value the subscription anymore. Three $30-per-month subscriptions don’t sound like much until you realize they total nearly $1,100 per year. Inertia leads to a dozen free trials’ morphing into mainstays on your Mastercard. (Maybe not much longer, though. Mastercard has said it will require merchants to get your approval to proceed with charges after a free trial ends, although it applies only to physical-product subscriptions, such as home-delivered sampler boxes.) “The situation with subscriptions could end up being death by a thousand cuts when it comes to your budget,” said Bruce McClary, spokesman for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Adding to the problem are so-called gray charges, deceptive and unwanted credit and debit card charges that stem from misleading sales and billing practices. They total more than $14 billion a year among U.S. cardholders, or $215 each, per a 2013 study by industry research firm Aite Group. Here’s how to spring-clean recurring charges so you can spend on things that matter to you more.

Decline in interest rates has been a big boost for homebuyers BY CONOR SEN Bloomberg Opinion

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A person displays Netflix on a tablet in North Andover, Mass. Recurring charges for online subscriptions can be insidious, some eating away at your wealth when you don’t value the subscription anymore.

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SUBSCRIPTION AUDIT Job No. 1 is to identify recurring charges. Scan recent payment statements, including credit cards, debit cards or online accounts, like PayPal. Go back 12 months to catch auto-renew annual subscriptions. Don’t ignore the analog world: lawn mowing, home security monitoring, pest-control service and memberships in social and professional organizations. Some credit card issuers, such as Citi, identify recurring charges in your online account. MULTIPLY BY 12 A frog in a stovetop pot of water will complacently boil to death if you raise the temperature slowly, the saying goes. Accumulating monthly subscriptions is similar. To feel the full impact, multiply monthly charges by 12 to get an annualized idea of what you’re spending. If you see yourself keeping the subscription five years, do that math too. Then, a seemingly insignificant $30-per-month expense becomes $1,800. “On the surface, subscription costs may seem minimal, but when you add them up it can really pinch your monthly budget,” said Paul Golden, spokesman for the National Endowment for Financial Education. “If you’re putting subscriptions on your credit card, is that hindering your ability to pay off your balance each month? If so, this is a red flag.”

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REASSESS VALUE Do you use and value the subscription? A gym membership is perhaps the best example of a noble subscription gone wrong — when you quit going but continue paying. Ask yourself if a subscription saves you money or time. Has it lived up to its promise? Does a delivered subscription box bring you joy or guilt? “It’s a good idea to do a subscription evaluation on a regular basis — perhaps a couple of times a year,” Golden says.

IS IT REDUNDANT? If you have cable or satellite TV, plus Netflix, YouTube TV and Amazon Prime Video, you have overlap. “There are so many redundancies across those platforms that you’re more or less paying for the same service over and over again,” McClary says. The same assessment goes for streaming music services, cloud storage and phone services. Are you hanging on to a landline for no reason? OPT TO SHARE Can you legitimately share a subscription? “Some of these subscriptions offer a buddy pass,” McClary noted. YouTube TV allows family groups to share subscriptions, and certain New York Times subscriptions come with a bonus subscription to share. Some families choose to group their wireless phones on a single plan to lower costs. Don’t forget about freebies at your local public library, which can substitute for subscriptions: digital access to books, audiobooks, movies, music and magazines. DOWNGRADE Downgrading or subscribing seasonally can work, too. Can you downgrade from the premium to free version of software or website access? Are you getting value from your credit card’s annual fee? You can probably downgrade to a fee-free card with the same issuer and keep your long credit history. CANCEL Liberally pause or cancel services. You can always restart and resubscribe later. You might even receive a discount offer to return.

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Investors have been so focused on how the Fed’s dovish stance on interest rates led to a rebound in stock prices that they haven’t yet digested how much this development could stimulate the housing market, particularly in the back half of the year. Friday’s strong numbers on existing home sales — up nearly 12 percent last month compared to January — might get their attention. With the decline in interest rates over the past three months, the housing market now has three tailwinds all lined up for the first time in this cycle. The first is demographics. After declining for 12 years from 2004 through 2016, the homeownership rate has been increasing ever since, as the hangover from the housing bust wears off and the job market has improved to the point where workers are buying houses again. This is particularly true for younger households, who largely couldn’t or wouldn’t buy houses in the years after the housing bust. The biggest birth cohorts of the millennial generation were born between the late 1980s and early 1990s, and they’re now entering their 30s, prime homebuying years. Entrylevel housing demand should be robust for years as these buyers start to shift from renting to owning. The second is the labor market. On just about any measure — from the unemployment rate, labor market sentiment, the percentage of prime-age people who are employed, and increasingly wage growth — the labor market is as good as it’s been in a generation. As mortgage underwriting standards have tightened after the mortgage fraud in the last cycle, this is particularly important. Given the high employment rate of recent years, a growing number of Americans have solid income history to qualify for a mortgage. And the third, thanks to the recent drop in interest rates, is affordability. The 10-year Treasury rate has fallen around 0.7 percent from its highs in October and November. Mortgage rates have followed suit. Last autumn there were fears that the rise in interest rates would take 30-year fixed-rate mortgages above 5 percent, but after the recent drop in rates we might be talking about mortgage rates below 4 percent pretty soon. On a $300,000 house with a 20 percent down payment, a one percentage point drop in mortgage rates would reduce a monthly payment by about $140 per month. There are a couple of other reasons the decline in interest rates could lead to a housing-related economic boost. Anyone who bought a house and took out a mortgage when mortgage rates peaked in the fall will become eligible to refinance their mortgage over the next few months. This could make it advantageous for hundreds of billions of dollars’ worth of mortgages to refinance, meaning new fees for bankers and cost savings for homeowners. Additionally, given the rise in home values that has gone on for years now, homeowners increasingly have home equity they can tap, which they are increasingly choosing to do. This doesn’t mean homeowners will get crazy buying boats and vacations with home equity the way some might having during the peak of the housing boom, but it represents another pool of wealth for households to tap. If people are looking for a comparison to the last cycle, they shouldn’t think about the later years of the boom, but perhaps the earlier ones. The busting of the dot-com boom led to a large decline in interest rates and an economic growth handoff from the tech sector to housing. Though we probably aren’t looking at a shift as extreme as that, people worried about a slowdown in overall economic growth should think about the boost that lower rates could give to the housing market.

STLTODAY.COM/WEATHER Current weather conditions 18-hour forecast

THE BOTTOM LINE David Nicklaus and Jim Gallagher explain current economic issues and discuss how those issues could impact the business community. Catch up on past episodes at stltoday.com/watch

MARKETS • WEEK IN REVIEW Dow Jones

Nasdaq

-346.55

-45.86

-21.77

25,502.32

7,642.67

2,800.71

SOURCE: Reuters

S&P 500

MARKET WATCH: Page C5

Latest radar imagery


BUSINESS

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

Construction remains on target for NGA site in north St. Louis NGA • FROM C1

Those costs, plus the costs in procuring land for the site and for post-construction outfitting of the building, are expected to drive the total bill of the project to roughly $1.7 billion, authorized by Congress in spending over several budget cycles. Congress has appropriated just under $408 million so far to design and to begin construction, according to the Department of Defense announcement of the building contract. Congress will have to approve future appropriations. Trump has asked for an additional $218 million for the NGA in his 2020 budget request. Money for this project is appropriated through the Pentagon’s military construction budget. Those funds are the ones Trump has identified as potential sources of money for border construction that has

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C3

been denied by Congress. That request has caused a political and legal tempest, with Democrats accusing Trump of weakening other areas of the defense establishment in order to fulfill a campaign promise. Republicans, including Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., support the declaration and say Trump is responding to a bona fide national emergency and national security threat by trying to curb illegal immigration across the border. Several states have sued to stop Trump’s emergency declaration. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., who lauded the construction contract award, also voted for a resolution of disapproval, arguing that Trump was stepping on Congress’ constitutional authority to appropriate funds by proposing to take border money from other projects. And Democrats have seized on reports by the Marine Corps commandant that

allege Trump is eroding preparedness by proposing to move funding from military construction to the border wall. The Los Angeles Times reported Thursday that Marine Corps General Robert Neller has warned the Pentagon that by moving troops to the southwest border and proposing fund transfers for the border wall, Trump’s emergency declaration is an “unacceptable risk to Marine Corps combat readiness and solvency.” “If the president won’t listen to the American people or Congress, then listen to the commandant of the Marine Corps,” Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., said, in continuing Democrats’ arguments against any potential fund transfers. But spokespeople for both the Corps of Engineers and the NGA have said they have received no notice from the White House that could affect future funding toward the new NGA building in St. Louis, the biggest federal project in the city’s history. “We at this time are not aware of any plans or attempts to take funding away from this program,” said Snively, an out-

MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

12-month percent change

Seasonally adjusted

reach program specialist for the Corps of Engineers in the Kansas City District. The Kansas City District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will oversee the project’s construction. The McCarthy-HITT team also includes Herndon, Va.-based Akima, which provides construction services; San Francisco-based architecture firm Gensler; and Kansas City-based engineering firm Black & Veatch. HITT is based in Falls Church, Va. The 97-acre NGA site is in the St. Louis Place neighborhood at Jefferson and Cass avenues. The project features a 712,000-square-foot office building, parking garages, visitor center, remote inspection facility and access control points. It replaces the NGA’s current aging facility south of downtown. Jacob Barker of the Post-Dispatch contributed to this report. Chuck Raasch • 202-298-6880 @craasch on Twitter craasch@post-dispatch.com

MOUND CITY MONEY From David Nicklaus’ blog about St. Louis business. stltoday.com/moundcitymoney Hiring platform takes top prize in UMSL student entrepreneur competition • A hiring platform for people with disabilities, a coffee shop and a construction automation firm won a student entrepreneur competition this week at the University of Missouri at St. Louis. HireMe, founded by student Letisha Wexstten, won the Entrepreneur Quest top prize of $15,000. It’s an online platform that helps people showcase their skills while educating employers about their disabilities. Second place and $10,000 went to Seize the Bean, founded by Alexander Zvibleman. He wants to open a coffee shop and gathering space on Natural Bridge Road and told judges it would improve UMSL’s campus culture. Third place and $5,000 went to Singular Construction Automation, which plans to produce remote-controlled machines for concrete cleaning, sealing and painting. Its founders are Tim Bragg and Bailee Warsing. UMSL’s winners, which were announced Tuesday, go on to compete April 6 against winners from University of Missouri campuses in Columbia, Kansas City and Rolla. The top three systemwide winners will get an additional $15,000, $10,000 and $5,000. St. Louis’ January job gain is largely lost in February • The St. Louis area lost 6,500 jobs in February, reversing much of an unusually large January gain. The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ latest seasonally adjusted data have the area adding 7,600 jobs in January, down from a preliminary estimate of 8,700.

St. Louis

U.S.

6% 4 2 0 -2 -4 -6 -8 -10 -12 -14 -16 -18

Feb. 2019 3.5%

St. Louis

companies were making pitches to investors Wednesday at the annual InvestMidwest Venture Capital Forum in Kansas City. The three are Lean Media, a Chesterfieldbased online marketing platform for agribusiness; Pluton Biosciences, a St. Louis startup looking for beneficial soil microbes; and Wellbeing Brewing, a Maryland Heights brewer of nonalcoholic beer. They were among 36 companies chosen to present at InvestMidwest, which was predicting about 300 attendees. The event, in its 20th year, alternates between St. Louis and Kansas City. InvestMidwest selected more companies than usual from outside its two host cities. Three is the smallest number of firms chosen from the St. Louis area, and the Kansas City area has just five representatives. Other presenters come from as close as Columbia, Mo., and Wichita, Kan., and as far away as Atlanta and Baltimore. About 140 companies applied for the 36 slots at InvestMidwest. Presenters typically make a 10-minute public pitch and then can arrange meetings with potential investors. InvestMidwest says past presenters have raised more than $1 billion.

U.S.

11% 10 9

1.9%

8 7

Jan. 2019 4%

6 5 4 3

3.7%

2 ’09 ’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18

’09 ’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14 ’15 ’16 ’17 ’18

SOURCE: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Post-Dispatch

SOURCE: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis | Post-Dispatch

The new figures leave the area with a gain of 10,000 jobs, or 0.7 percent, between February 2018 and February 2019. Payroll employment nationally grew 1.7 percent in the same 12-month period. One remarkable aspect of the recent numbers is that St. Louis’ job growth is being led by goods-producing industries. Manufacturing employment is up by 4,100 in the latest 12 months while construction and mining firms have added 2,000 jobs. Services employment, which for years accounted for most of St. Louis’ job gains, has turned mixed. Financial services firms have added 1,900 jobs and health care employers have added 1,700, but retail employment has shrunk by 3,300. Professional and business services firms, often a leading growth

engine, have added just 300 jobs. Figures for specific industries are not seasonally adjusted.

St. Louis’s Most Affordable Office Space

Site ranks St. Louis No. 5 for first-time homebuyers • St. Louis is the fifth-best place in the country to be a first-time homebuyer, consumer website Bankrate.com calculates. The site ranks St. Louis second in affordability, after Pittsburgh, among the 100 largest U.S. metro areas. Its overall ranking also considers the job market, safety and cultural factors like restaurant and recreation choices. The only metro areas ranking higher than St. Louis are Pittsburgh, Raleigh, N.C., Oklahoma City and Hartford, Conn. This is at least the second statistical ranking in recent months to highlight the Gateway City’s starter-home affordability: The American Enterprise Institute looked at house prices and incomes in December and ranked St. Louis fourth for first-time buyers. Pricey San Francisco was listed by BankRate as the worst place to buy a first home. The next four metros at the bottom of the list were also on the West Coast: Los Angeles, Sacramento and San Jose, Calif., and Seattle.

St. Louis unemployment rises slightly to 3.7 percent • The St. Louis area’s unemployment rate ticked up to 3.7 percent in January, the highest rate in six months according to figures seasonally adjusted by the St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank. The rate is up a tenth of a percentage point since December and six-tenths since it hit a record low of 3.1 percent in September. Still, unemployment in metro St. Louis remains below the national rate, which was 4.0 percent in January. The Bureau of Labor Statistics listed 58,435 metro-area residents as unemployed in January, an increase of 2,895 since January 2018. The area’s labor force — everyone who is working or looking for a job — grew by 6,144 people, or 0.4 percent, in the same 12 months. The unemployment and workforce numbers are calculated from a BLS survey of households. A separate survey of employers shows that metro St. Louis added 7,600 jobs in January.

Three St. Louis firms court investors at Kansas City event • Three St. Louis-area

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Deposit & Loan Guide

Institution

Synchrony Bank

Int Chking Money Acct Mkt Acct Min Min

NA

1.20

NA

0

3 mo CD Min

6 mo CD Min

0.75

1.00

12 mo CD Min

18 mo CD Min

2.80

2,000 2,000 2,000

24 mo CD Min

36 mo CD Min

60 mo CD Min

2.75

2.90

2.90

3.10

2,000

2,000

2,000 2,000

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Phone / Website

800-869-3813 www.synchronybank.com

TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS FEATURE, CALL SALES DEPARTMENT @ 773-320-8492

Savings Update

How safe are my bank deposits? By Sabrina Karl For anyone stashing money in savings, nothing beats the safety of depositing it in the bank. In fact, with a small amount of homework, you can ensure that what you sock away will earn interest virtually risk-free.

For those with substantial savings, it’s also important to consider how much you’re depositing. That’s because the FDIC and NCUA insure up to $250,000 for any one depositor at any one institution. If your savings fall below this threshold, you can ignore this. But note that all funds you’ve deposited with an institution – no matter the number of accounts – will apply towards the $250,000 limit.

The key to holding risk at near-zero is two-fold. First, the financial institution you choose matters. Banks insured by the FDIC and credit unions with NCUA insurance will protect you if the institution fails, is seized, or otherwise ceases to operate. So if an FDIC So what to do if you have more than that on bank goes under, the U.S. government will deposit? Fortunately, it’s as simple as diverreturn your funds in full. sifying across multiple banks or credit unions. As long as you stay below $250,000 per Fortunately, the vast majority of institutions institution, your deposits will be fully insured. carry federal insurance, as evidenced by an FDIC or NCUA logo on their website and Money deposited in a bank or credit union print materials. But it’s important to verify, as won’t earn as much as you might be able to a small minority of institutions instead carry in the stock market, but achieving a steady private insurance. Though some argue this return with no risk to keep you up at night can equally protects you, most contend that no be a worthwhile trade-off. private insurer is as reliable as the federal government. Rate Criteria: Rates effective as of 03/19/19 and may change without notice. RateSeeker, LLC. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information appearing above or the availability of rates in this table. Banks, Thrifts and credit unions pay to advertise in this guide. NA means rates are not available or not offered at the time rates were surveyed. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. To appear in this table, call 773-320-8492.


BUSINESS

C4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Market forces better benefits

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

Mentors give minority contractors big hand

LEAVE • FROM C1

policy finally gains traction, adding a national mandate to a growing number of states or municipalities that require paid leave. “There’s absolutely an appetite to not want to be the last one standing,” she said. The new benefits at U.S. Steel, which apply to its roughly 3,200 employees who are not union members, also include coverage for infertility treatments, a matched contribution to dependent care spending accounts, longer bereavement leave, domestic partner coverage, and reimbursement of some adoption expenses, among others. “In the past, we always tried to be right at median — we tried to be competitive, but didn’t want to pay too much,” said Mike Williams, general manager for compensation and benefits at U.S. Steel, which operates a plant in Granite City. “Now, the company is thinking about reinvesting in its workforce more like it does reinvesting in its blast furnaces or other facilities. “Part of our strategic initiative is to move up the talent curve,” he said. “We want to go after a larger group of individuals that are diverse in thought and diverse in background and make this a better place for working mothers.” In October, tobacco company Reynolds American said it would offer 16 weeks of paid leave to new parents, as well as a flexible work arrangement for up to eight months after a return to work. Effective in January, General Mills expanded its paid parental leave benefits for salaried and nonunion employees from six weeks to 18 to 20 weeks for birth mothers; other parents now receive 12 weeks, up from two weeks before. Even the Army has expanded its benefits, doubling the leave granted to new fathers or secondary caregivers, among other changes. And this month, apparel maker VF Corp., owner of the brands Wrangler, Lee and Timberland, said it was introducing eight weeks of paid leave for new parents. Of course, many U.S. employees still lack access to paid parental leave. Just 40 percent of employers, according to a 2018 survey by the consultancy Mercer, offer the benefit; another 2018 survey by the Society for Human Resource Management found that just one in three employers offered more paid maternity leave than what’s required by law. But both of those numbers have jumped substantially in recent years: Mercer’s survey put the number at just 25 percent in 2015, and SHRM at one in six in 2011. “We have reached a tipping point,” said Brianna Cayo Cotter, chief of staff for Paid Leave for the United States, an advocacy group. She said Walmart’s expansion of hourly workers’ paid leave benefits in early 2018 was a wake-up call that prompted many employers to compare their plans with the retail behemoth’s, no longer able to shrug off more generous leave as a lush perk reserved for Silicon Valley engineers or management consultants. U.S. Steel’s Williams said state legislation or the possibility of federal action on the issue had no influence on its decision to overhaul the company’s work-life benefits. Rather, it came from a shift in thinking about investing in its workforce, reducing attrition and attracting new workers as the business started growing again. As the company struggled with oversupply and falling oil prices and launched a cost-cutting initiative that led to deep job cuts in recent years, U.S. Steel also faced higher attrition as unnerved employees looked elsewhere. Even when business started coming back, Williams said, turnover has improved but remained higher than desired. While its nonunion headcount has remained steady, the company has been hiring about 450 employees a year to backfill people who’ve left because of attrition. That isn’t always easy, especially among employees who might “still see the steel industry as an industry that’s on a downward slope,” Williams said. “That really sometimes can be a challenge for attracting the right recruits. It’s a tough industry to work in — I’ve heard folks say there’s an easier way to make money than working for U.S. Steel.” But new benefits, as well as added compensation and facility investments, have been “a bit of a morale boost,” Williams said. “It goes a long way to changing the mindset, that we’re going to be here for the long haul.”

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Sabrina Westfall (right), owner of J. West Electric, heads to Washington University’s Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum with foreman Sylvester Taylor on Monday to evaluate progress. Westfall founded J. West Electric in 2014.

NICKLAUS • FROM C1

It’s unusual for a small business to have any kind of a board, let alone one that is on call whenever an issue comes up. Westfall’s board operates as part of the Regional Union Construction Center, or RUCC, a 13-year-old effort to improve the success rate of women- and minority-owned contractors in St. Louis. Construction startups face long odds: Only 36 percent of firms in the industry will last five years. The pitfalls are many, from underestimating costs to failing to collect on invoices. The labor-management group PRIDE, now known as the St. Louis Construction Cooperative, noticed in the early 2000s that women- and minority-owned firms were failing at a high rate. They were landing business as a result of set-aside requirements on public projects, but they weren’t making money. “The history of St. Louis is not very pretty in regard to these companies,” said Alan Richter, the RUCC’s executive director since it opened in 2006. Richter decided to equip the startups with the same kind of support network that an ex-

Sabrina Westfall reviews drawings for Washington University’s Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum on Monday. Westfall participates in the Regional Union Construction Center, a 13-year-old effort to improve the success rate of women- and minority-owned contractors.

ecutive at a big company might have. He recruited volunteers, including executives from some of the area’s largest construction firms, to form an advisory board for each RUCC participant. Richter chairs each board. “My job is to make sure the meetings are meaningful; they’re not love-ins,” he said. “We come prepared so we can really address whatever problems are holding them back.”

Tax policy for wind farms is issue for Ameren plan WIND • FROM C1

— the tax arrangement for local wind projects makes a world of difference, particularly when it comes to funding schools and emergency services including ambulance and fire districts. “It’s mostly agricultural land, and there’s very little commercial or industrial development of any kind,” said Ivan Schraeder, a lawyer who represented Atchison County in its recent legal challenge of Ameren’s push to own the Brickyard Hills wind project planned for the area. “Wind power is their economic development. They are prowind power and pro-green energy. ... This could change their life drastically.” Plans for Ameren to own and operate the not-yet-constructed, 157-megawatt Brickyard Hill project breezed unanimously past regulators at a Missouri Public Service Commission meeting earlier this month. “I am in support of the order and would love to see more wind generation in Missouri,” PSC Commissioner Scott Rupp said at the March 6 meeting. But as shown in Atchison County, Missouri’s current tax policies are not exactly leading local communities to roll out the welcome mat for utility-owned wind farms. “There was a lot at stake,” Schraeder explained, when Ameren entered the picture there. Had the Brickyard Hills project remained under private ownership — as is the case with current wind farms in northern Missouri — the developers would have paid a “reasonably good” property tax on each tower situated in the county, he said. But that would not be the case under an investor-owned utility such as Ameren. “It effectively was a tax transfer from local control to state distribution to where Ameren

operates — not from where it’s gaining its power,” Schraeder said. Nearby DeKalb County also intervened in the challenge, aiming “to protect its wind farms if Ameren wanted to move in,” Schraeder said. The counties reached settlements with Ameren that included agreements for the St. Louis-based utility to pay to cover some county and school district services, if proposed legislation does not succeed in altering where wind project tax revenue goes. Even though the Atchison County settlement resolved the issue for the Brickyard Hills project, the emerging question about how to tax wind farms still applies for the rest of the state. “The legislature has just not kept up with green energy in terms of its tax consequences,” said Schraeder. “Particularly for local government.” He said different states used their own methods of taxing wind, but most do it based on the rate of power generation. “Iowa and Kansas tax on the amount of energy generated,” Schraeder said. “Those taxes are then distributed in some fashion back to the locals, from where the power comes.” He said things were “way behind the curve” in the Show-Me State. “Missouri has not provided updating of some of its power laws to reflect modernization and new methods of delivery,” he said. Questioning the matter of wind farm taxation in Atchison County, he added, “is the first time that it’s been confronted here in Missouri. It’s not going to be the last.” That’s because advances in wind turbine technology are expanding the territory where projects can be cost effective, elevating Missouri’s appeal for wind farm developers.

Westfall, 38, joined the program two years ago. She started her company, J West Electrical Contracting, in 2014 after a dozen years as an electrician. Her RUCC board quickly showed her that her accounting was a mess. “Just because you’re a good electrician doesn’t mean you’re a good businessperson,” she jokes. “It probably took a year to get an accurate balance sheet and profit-and-loss statement.”

Although Missouri is nearly encircled by leading states for wind power — Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas and Illinois all rank in the top six of installed capacity, according to the American Wind Energy Association — it does not have the same overall wind resources. But northern reaches of the state have growing potential, as shown by the recent interest from some of the major in-state energy utilities. That’s a new development. Traditionally, Kansas City Power and Light has looked to out-of-state locations, such as Kansas, for its wind power. And only since late 2017 have Ameren and Empire District Electric Co. — a southwestern Missouri utility that serves customers around Joplin and Springfield — launched their own big pushes for wind energy. The local taxation issue, though, has caught the attention of some in other parts of northern Missouri where Ameren is targeting wind projects. State Sen. Cindy O’Laughlin, R-Shelbina, represents a district that includes Schuyler and Adair counties, where Ameren has plans for an even larger, 400-megawatt wind farm that it would own. O’Laughlin introduced Senate Bill 72, currently before the legislature, that would ensure that revenue from wind projects stayed local. “Our rural counties are fairly destitute,” O’Laughlin said. “We’re losing our tax base, we’re losing our population. I think I could make an argument that it’s because there’s been almost no investment.” O’Laughlin expressed hope that, if passed, her bill could help change that. She said such a measure also seemed fair financially, because it would provide compensation for area residents who have their surroundings changed visually by wind turbines. “There are various types of people who want green energy but they don’t want it on their land,” O’Laughlin said. “It’s my feeling that if you’re willing to change your landscape forevermore, you should also be the

The RUCC program is a small one, with just eight contractors currently enrolled. Some joined a few months ago, while BAM Contracting has participated for a decade. “They kicked my tail about collecting money,” BAM owner Brian Murphy said of his advisory board. “That’s one of the things I wasn’t doing well.” Ten years later, the group’s counsel remains valuable. “They keep me from stepping in holes, and give me advice that sometimes I didn’t want to hear,” he added. For Westfall, the board has progressed from getting the books in order to helping her with marketing, and she’s busy juggling jobs at such places as Ballpark Village, Washington University and Union Station. She hopes to honor her mentors’ contributions by becoming a role model for other construction entrepreneurs. “A good minority contractor can make a difference for St. Louis,” she said. “It impacts employment, and it impacts how we grow economically as a city.” David Nicklaus • 314-340-8213 @dnickbiz on Twitter dnicklaus@post-dispatch.com

ones to profit from it.” Some renewable energy advocates believe the current tax structure is, to some extent, “an obstacle” to the adoption of more wind power in Missouri. “We just want to make sure that the laws are going to be encouraging these kind of projects,” said James Owen, the executive director of Renew Missouri, which pushes for increased use of renewables. He added that the issue of countyversus state-level taxation “is relatively new” and probably hadn’t cost Missouri the development of renewable energy projects in recent years. “I’m from a rural county, I know that we are hurting right now,” he said. “(If this bill passes) I think that will put some of these local communities at ease.” Owen said such a measure could potentially be contested by broader swaths of county governments leery of losing out on revenue that would become focused within select windproducing counties. O’Laughlin’s bill in the legislature has passed the senate but has sat in the house for multiple weeks without formal action. O’Laughlin said she had not detected pushback, perhaps because the redirected revenue that would become concentrated in certain counties does not exist yet and therefore isn’t a current stream of funding that would be taken away. But with or without the bill’s passage, the wind projects in northern Missouri are moving forward. Others will surely follow, given the competitiveness of wind energy prices and renewable energy goals from Ameren and other utilities. O’Laughlin, at least, thinks some tax reform will eventually need to click into place to facilitate their growth. “I imagine if they want to have more wind farms, they’re going to have to consider something similar,” she said. Bryce Gray • 314-340-8307 @_BryceGray on Twitter bgray@post-dispatch.com


MARKET WATCH

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

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YLD

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$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

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BIIB ... DXCM ... RF .56 KEY .56 SIVB ... FITB .88 CMA 2.40f CFG 1.78f MNST ... ZION 1.20

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12 dd 10 9 18 9 10 9 30 12

388.67 224.60 156.16 64.24 19.99 12.39 21.91 13.66 333.74 177.70 34.67 22.12 101.05 63.69 45.56 27.62 66.38 47.61 59.19 38.08

TICKER

Biogen Inc DexCom Inc Regions Fncl Keycorp SVB Financial Group Fifth Third Bcp Comerica Inc Citizens Fincl Grp Monster Beverage Cp Zions Bancorp

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 216.71 129.03 13.53 14.97 212.19 24.62 72.07 31.77 53.51 43.64

... ... ... ... ... 3.6 ... ... 5.9 ... ... ... ... ... ...

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

dd 94.34 dd 29.62 dd 41.35 ... 154.74 dd 24.17 18 9.20 ... 82.24 33 4.49 ... 14.21 ... 85.68 ... 125.84 dd 10.94 cc 39.10 ... 6.95 cc 76.45

34.75 14.00 22.95 32.35 5.32 2.43 26.75 1.47 9.90 30.45 74.25 3.58 20.78 3.99 37.11

15 BEST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

FRIDAY $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR 62.05 21.68 32.59 152.76 24.46 3.32 80.10 2.66 13.69 81.97 117.98 10.70 34.35 6.75 52.05

18.36 2.82 4.21 18.53 2.80 0.35 7.86 0.26 1.09 7.60 10.73 0.87 2.78 0.53 4.09

42.0 15.0 14.8 13.8 12.9 11.8 10.9 10.8 8.7 10.2 10.0 8.9 8.8 8.5 8.5

44.3 8762| -28.3 -21.7 632| -4.8 20.6 |965 38.0 43.8 |9996 285.4 24.3 9 | 996 292.9 10.7 985| -50.1 16.7 |9996 133.5 7.3 |98652 54.3 9.9 |95421 35.4 11.3 |9996 126.9 5.4 9 | 74 41.0 19.6 9 | 996 181.6 9.9 8| 7632 28.8 17.6 8| 65 22.0 -6.6 9 | 73 40.6

COMPANY

TICKER

Sorrento Therapeut Dermira Inc Catalyst Pharm Conformis Inc Electromecanica Veh Tanzanian Roy Expl Amer Midstream Ptrs Pfenex Inc Neos Therapeutics Assertio Therapeut Dasan Zhone Solut Axsome Therapeutics Protagonist Thera XBiotech Inc Vitamin Shoppe Inc

-34.3 -14.5 -14.0 -13.9 -13.8 -13.1 -12.4 -11.4 -11.2 -11.2

-33.4 -5.7 -16.7 -15.2 -13.7 -11.5 -18.2 -14.7 -8.4 -14.7

COMPANY

86532| -18.2 |9998764 110.0 876421| -23.5 8752| -21.0 8421| -13.9 8762| -22.6 8754| -21.6 876421| -23.5 721| -6.7 85| -14.4

TICKER

Synaptics Inc Denali Therapeutics DSW Inc Canadian Solar Guess Inc PPDAI Group Nu Skin Enterp Esperion Therap Tenneco Inc Steelcase Inc

DIV

SYNA DNLI DSW CSIQ GES PPDF NUS ESPR TEN SCS

... ... 1.00 ... .90 .19p 1.47 ... 1.00 .58f

YLD P/E

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK

... ... 4.9 ... 4.9 ... 3.0 ... 4.4 3.9

55.25 25.05 34.63 25.89 26.95 8.45 88.68 79.30 60.20 19.35

32.72 -10.51 -24.3 -21.0 9865321| -29.3 19.45 -4.97 -20.4 -9.5 76| -6.4 20.32 -5.08 -20.0 -28.2 4| 31 0.9 18.75 -4.54 -19.5 -22.9 |86542 12.4 18.37 -4.44 -19.5 -13.0 |98731 30.2 4.00 -0.90 -18.4 -9.7 99871| -47.0 49.28 -10.41 -17.4 -23.1 9864| -28.3 41.39 -8.48 -17.0 -11.1 9976421| -41.3 22.55 -4.56 -16.8 -37.8 999642| -54.0 14.77 -2.75 -15.7 -15.8 |751 5.4

32.54 12.32 20.30 11.37 14.42 2.85 51.62 33.06 24.20 13.10

YLD P/E

52-WEEK FRIDAY HIGH LOW CLOSE

$CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1WK 1MO 1YR

... ... ... ... ... ... 8.0 ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

8.45 14.91 4.31 2.95 7.48 .68 11.88 8.42 9.20 9.48 15.59 14.24 21.26 11.74 13.95

3.61 154.9 182.9 95421| -35.4 6.15 89.9 62.2 |98531 50.7 1.04 34.9 38.1 |98643 53.5 0.61 34.3 74.5 |99543 67.6 1.13 33.9 18.3 9853| -50.6 0.18 29.8 27.1 | 9652 70.3 9 1.15 28.8 29.1 976531| -46.7 1.36 27.5 50.0 |761 12.2 0.60 22.4 32.3 987654| -63.1 0.84 20.8 14.3 875321| -26.9 1.98 19.5 -16.8 |6542 7.3 2.10 19.3 44.3 |9996 390.4 2.22 19.3 71.1 9532| -34.8 1.77 19.3 28.6 |9996 147.2 1.27 19.2 43.0 |998654 87.0

dd dd dd dd ... ... dd dd dd dd 68 dd dd ... 8

1.80 6.00 1.85 .36 .90 .25 2.75 3.13 1.40 3.37 9.10 1.94 5.49 2.13 3.80

5.94 12.99 4.02 2.39 4.46 0.78 5.15 6.30 3.28 4.87 12.15 13.00 13.74 10.94 7.88

10 WORST SMALL-CAP STOCKS

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

17 ... 14 5 dd ... 23 dd 4 ...

DIV

SRNE ... DERM ... CPRX ... CFMS ... SOLO ... TRX ... AMID .41 PFNX ... NEOS ... ASRT ... DZSI ... AXSM ... PTGX ... XBIT ... VSI ...

10 WORST MID-CAP STOCKS

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

-113.16 -21.97 -2.21 -2.41 -34.02 -3.70 -10.20 -4.10 -6.76 -5.52

YLD P/E

NVRO ... REV ... BCOR ... MDB ... VCYT ... CPG .12 GKOS ... NOG ... TERP .81f AYX ... WIX ... GLUU ... CATM ... TAC .23 AAXN ...

10 WORST LARGE-CAP STOCKS 52-WEEK HIGH LOW

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • C5

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR

COMPANY

TICKER

Amyris Inc Globus Maritime Ltd NII Holdings Inc Global Eagle Ent BioScrip Inc Greenpro Capital Cp FutureFuel Corp resTORbio Inc RigNet Inc Ascena Retail Grp

DIV

AMRS ... GLBS ... NIHD ... ENT ... BIOS ... GRNQ ... FF .24a TORC ... RNET ... ASNA ...

YLD P/E ... ... ... ... ... ... 1.8 ... ... ...

dd ... dd dd dd ... 16 dd dd dd

52-WEEK HIGH LOW 9.29 10.19 8.51 3.16 4.14 22.70 19.31 20.60 24.05 5.29

2.60 2.83 1.67 .87 2.05 2.20 11.32 6.21 10.03 1.05

FRIDAY $CHG CLOSE 1WK 2.26 3.26 2.04 1.15 1.90 1.99 13.19 6.47 11.15 1.07

-1.67 -2.36 -1.15 -0.64 -0.88 -0.76 -4.66 -2.29 -3.05 -0.29

%CHG %CHG %RTN 1WK 1MO 1YR -42.5 -42.0 -36.1 -35.8 -31.7 -27.6 -26.1 -26.1 -21.5 -21.3

-54.2 999962| -58.8 -37.5 99997421| -61.1 -49.4 7| 52 4.6 -56.6 9975321| -33.3 -44.8 96521| -17.1 -40.9 999976432| -63.0 -31.3 |8631 9.2 -19.7 999876521| -56.2 -26.1 8653| -10.0 -52.4 9997652| -49.0

Note: Stocks classified by market capitalization, the product of the current stock price and total shares outstanding. Ranges are $100 million to $1 billion (small); $1 billion to $8 billion (mid); greater than $8 billion (large).

S&P 500

NAME

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Dividend: Expected cash payment to shareholders. PE ratio: Multiple of stock price to company earnings. 52-week high/low: Trading range over the past year. Last: Selling price at end of week. Net change: Dollar change in price of stock from previous week. Percent change: From the previous week.

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

AES Corp AFLAC s AT&T Inc AbbottLab AbbVie Abiomed Accenture ActivsBliz Acuity AdobeInc AdvAuto AMD AffilMgrs Agilent AirProd AkamaiT AlaskaAir Albemarle AlexREE Alexion lf AlignTech Allegion Allergan AlliData AlliantEg s Allstate Alphabet C Alphabet A Altria Amazon Ameren AmAirlines AEP AmExp AmIntlGrp AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen Amphenol Anadarko AnalogDev Ansys Anthem Aon plc Apache Apple Inc ApldMatl ArchDan Arconic AristaNetw Assurant ATMOS Autodesk AutoData AutoZone AvalonBay AveryD BB&T Cp

.55f 1.08f 2.04f 1.28 4.28

14 18.39 10.63 18.06 -.25 -1.4 15 50.66 41.45 49.46 -.49 -1.0 6 37.10 26.80 31.07 +.40 +1.3 47 80.49 56.81 77.97 -1.89 -2.4 13 114.98 75.77 79.76 -1.58 -1.9 cc 459.75 274.02 323.21 -10.02 -3.0 25 175.64 132.63 165.24 -1.15 -.7 20 84.68 39.85 46.87 +2.24 +5.0 14 173.01 103.48 118.95 -11.80 -9.0 54 277.61 204.95 259.69 +2.60 +1.0 29 186.15 102.15 164.84+10.06 +6.5 82 34.14 9.04 26.37 +3.08 +13.2 8 194.90 88.47 99.16 -10.19 -9.3 81 82.27 60.42 78.99 -2.11 -2.6 26 187.48 148.44 186.30 +1.45 +.8 39 83.08 57.18 71.23 -1.24 -1.7 15 74.83 53.70 54.25 -1.51 -2.7 13 108.74 71.89 82.72 -2.70 -3.2 31 143.01 109.04 141.72 +1.20 +.9 51 140.77 92.56 130.21 -5.88 -4.3 56 398.88 177.93 269.62+17.29 +6.9 ... 94.30 73.85 87.22 -1.19 -1.3 23 197.00 125.84 149.30 -1.95 -1.3 9 250.27 142.58 164.56 -7.85 -4.6 24 47.48 37.85 47.55 +.15 +.3 14 102.73 77.00 94.17 -.67 -.7 28 1273.89 970.11 1205.50+21.04 +1.8 36 1291.44 977.66 1207.65+17.35 +1.5 18 66.04 42.40 55.92 -.03 -.1 cc 2050.501307.00 1764.77+52.41 +3.1 26 73.43 53.91 73.75 +.71 +1.0 10 55.70 28.81 30.57 -.86 -2.7 22 84.34 62.71 85.14 +1.33 +1.6 15 114.55 89.05 109.46 -4.06 -3.6 dd 56.79 36.16 42.62 -1.42 -3.2 73 194.75 133.53 193.65 +4.68 +2.5 46 106.35 77.73 106.78 +.97 +.9 10 159.95 95.69 124.13 -4.92 -3.8 9 96.34 69.36 78.77 -1.41 -1.8 33 82.32 63.14 79.41 -1.40 -1.7 16 210.19 163.31 186.70 -4.54 -2.4 25 97.56 74.95 94.54 -.65 -.7 15 76.70 40.40 43.23 -1.32 -3.0 27 111.12 76.62 107.40 -1.99 -1.8 36 190.45 136.80 177.18 -3.20 -1.8 21 317.99 215.52 301.51 -1.49 -.5 54 173.53 134.82 166.31 -3.69 -2.2 22 50.03 24.56 34.82 +.37 +1.1 20 233.47 142.00 191.05 +4.93 +2.6 11 61.57 28.79 39.86 -.53 -1.3 18 52.06 39.16 42.62 -.56 -1.3 14 24.55 15.63 18.72 -.27 -1.4 31 316.67 187.08 300.16 +3.40 +1.1 47 111.43 82.31 94.56 -4.17 -4.2 19 102.78 79.49 102.81 +1.30 +1.3 dd 169.05 117.72 154.22 +.94 +.6 41 156.04 109.14 153.81 -1.50 -1.0 20 1003.74 590.76 981.27+19.04 +2.0 33 200.40 156.40 199.59 +.62 +.3 31 116.35 82.89 108.99 -1.22 -1.1 12 56.03 40.68 45.09 -4.89 -9.8

2.92 .37f .52 .24 1.28f .66 4.64f 1.40f 1.47f 3.88 1.08 2.96f 2.52f 1.34 2.00f 3.20 1.90 .40 2.68 1.56 1.28 3.60f 1.82 3.60 1.60 .56 5.80 .92 1.20 2.16f 3.00 1.60 1.00 2.92 .84f 1.40f .08m 2.40 2.10f 3.16 6.08f 2.26 1.62

rt Right to buy security at a specified price. s Split increased shares by at least 20% in last year. t Paid in stock. Approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt Warrant, allowing a purchase of stock. un Unit, including more than one security. v Trading halted on primary market. vj In bankruptcy or receivership. x Ex-dividend.

j Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent omitted or deferred. k Declared or paid this year. Cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. lf Late filing with SEC. m Current annual rate, decreased by most recent dividend announcement. n New issue in the last year. p Initial dividend. Annual rate not known. Yield not shown. pf Preferred-stock issue. pr Preferences. r Declared or paid in last 12 months plus stock dividend. rs Reverse split decreased outstanding shares by at least 50% in last year.

FOOTNOTES a Extra dividends paid but not included. b Annual rate plus stock dividend. c Liquidating dividend. cc P/E greater than 99 cld Issue recalled for redemption by company. dd loss in last 12 months e Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f Annual rate, increased on most recent dividend announcement. g Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h Doesn’t meet continued-listing standards. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split.

NAME

DIV

PE

BallCorp s BkofAm BkNYMel Baxter s BectDck BerkH B BestBuy Biogen BlackRock BlockHR Boeing BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BrghtFn n BrMySq BrownFB s CBOE Glb CBRE Grp CBS B CF Inds s CH Robins CME Grp CMS Eng CSX CVS Health CabotO&G Cadence CampSp CapOne CardnlHlth CarMax Carnival Caterpillar Celanese Celgene Centene s CenterPnt CntryLink Cerner ChartCm n Chevron Chipotle ChubbLtd ChurchDwt s Cimarex CinnFin Cintas Cisco Citigroup CitizFincl CitrixSy s Clorox CocaCola CognizTch ColgPalm Comcast s Comerica ConAgra ConchoRes ConocoPhil

.40 .60 1.12 .76 3.08

30 10 13 36 97 27 22 12 15 9 34 10 39 29 cc 16 33 39 19 10 dd 20 36 34 19 10 35 59 14 7 dd 14 13 12 9 18 16 22 5 30 78 25 cc 17 ... 10 14 30 23 9 9 26 26 87 20 24 19 10 14 16 53

2.00f 13.20f 1.00 8.22f .68 3.80 1.64 .66f 1.24 .20 .72 1.20 2.00 3.00f 1.54f .96f 2.00 .28f 1.40 1.60 1.90 2.00 3.44 2.16 1.11 1.00m 4.76f 2.92e .91f .80f 2.24f 2.05f 1.40f 1.80 1.78f 1.40 3.84 1.60f .80 1.72f .84f 2.40f .85 .13p 1.22

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

58.95 32.45 58.22 78.46 265.87 224.07 84.37 388.67 573.47 29.81 446.01 54.35 136.22 41.00 54.88 67.16 59.58 115.11 51.46 59.59 56.51 101.20 197.08 55.68 76.24 82.15 27.40 63.19 44.47 101.26 71.10 81.67 69.11 161.60 119.29 95.30 74.49 31.42 24.20 67.57 368.02 131.08 680.00 142.03 69.49 103.91 87.46 217.34 54.23 75.24 45.56 116.82 167.70 50.84 84.76 72.61 40.52 101.05 39.43 163.11 80.24

34.71 22.66 43.67 61.05 208.62 184.75 47.72 224.60 360.79 22.45 292.47 32.46 107.84 26.27 28.52 44.30 44.57 87.87 37.45 41.38 35.70 78.83 153.90 42.52 53.53 51.93 20.95 35.49 32.04 69.90 42.17 55.24 45.64 112.06 82.91 58.59 50.00 24.81 11.52 48.78 250.10 100.22 307.70 119.54 44.87 55.62 66.33 155.98 40.19 48.42 27.62 90.32 113.57 41.45 59.47 57.41 30.43 63.69 20.22 93.31 53.38

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

57.94 +.44 +.8 27.01 -2.29 -7.8 50.50 -2.62 -4.9 77.24 +.30 +.4 240.12 -13.80 -5.4 200.55 -3.76 -1.8 70.11 +.98 +1.4 216.71-113.16 -34.3 417.36 -16.19 -3.7 24.13 -.22 -.9 362.17 -16.82 -4.4 36.24 -1.57 -4.2 131.51 -1.23 -.9 37.30 -2.91 -7.2 35.54 -4.03 -10.2 48.16 -1.80 -3.6 51.74 +1.04 +2.1 95.44 -1.62 -1.7 48.25 -2.39 -4.7 45.06 -2.64 -5.5 39.01 -4.04 -9.4 84.68 -4.32 -4.9 163.32 -6.82 -4.0 55.64 +.11 +.2 72.51 -.30 -.4 56.04 +.44 +.8 25.96 +.03 +.1 61.76 +.77 +1.3 38.24 +2.23 +6.2 80.00 -4.33 -5.1 48.64 -1.63 -3.2 61.63 +.57 +.9 56.42 -.19 -.3 129.77 -2.90 -2.2 98.14 -3.09 -3.1 88.15 -.31 -.4 57.14 -2.01 -3.4 30.72 -.09 -.3 12.17 +.08 +.7 56.96 -.95 -1.6 360.78 +4.86 +1.4 123.09 -2.22 -1.8 671.46+32.46 +5.1 136.62 +1.00 +.7 67.10 -.30 -.4 67.90 -2.16 -3.1 84.64 -.42 -.5 194.55 -11.00 -5.4 52.74 -.46 -.9 60.98 -4.21 -6.5 31.77 -4.10 -11.4 100.46 -.42 -.4 158.13 -2.54 -1.6 45.93 +.63 +1.4 70.89 -1.24 -1.7 66.00 -1.20 -1.8 39.46 -1.01 -2.5 72.07 -10.20 -12.4 26.45 +3.36 +14.6 104.51 +.96 +.9 66.07 -1.52 -2.2

Mutual funds GL: Long Government GR: Global Real Estate GS: Short Government HM: High-Yield Muni HY: High-Yield Bond IB: World Bond IC: Trading-Inverse Commodities ID: Industrials IE: Trading-Inverse Equity IH: World Allocation IP: Inflation-Protected Bond IS: Trading-Miscellaneous JS: Japan Stock LB: Large Blend LC: Trading-Leveraged Commodities LE: Trading-Leveraged Equity LG: Large Growth LO: Long-Short Equity LP: Energy Limited Partnership LS: Latin America Stock LV: Large Value MA: Allocation - 50-70% Equity MB: Mid-Cap Blend MG: Mid-Cap Growth MI: Muni National Intermediate ML: Muni National Long MQ: Miscellaneous Region MR: Miscellaneous Sector MS: Muni National Short MU: Multisector Bond MV: Mid-Cap Value ND: Trading-Inverse Debt NE: Market Neutral NT: Nontraditional Bond PJ: Pacific/Asia ex-Japan Stock RI: Target-Date Retirement RR: Preferred Stock SB: Small Blend SC: Communications SF: Financial SG: Small Growth SH: Health SI: Muni Single State Intermediate SL: Muni Single State Long SN: Natural Resources SP: Equity Precious Metals

HOW TO READ THE TABLES Friday value: Price at which shares can be sold. Year-to-date return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Three-year and five-year annualized return: Figures don’t reflect sales charges and assume reinvestment of dividends. Objective: Fund’s investment category. 1-yr Rank: On a 1-to-5 scale, with 1 meaning the fund ranks in the top 20% of its category. FUND OBJECTIVES: AL: Allocation - 70-85% Equity AM: Multialternative BB: Commodities Broad Basket BL: Bank Loan BM: Bear Market CA: Allocation - 30-50% Equity CC: Consumer Defense CD: Consumer Cyclical CH: China Region CI: Intermediate-Term Bond CL: Long-Term Bond CR: Multicurrency CS: Short-Term Bond CV: Convertibles DP: Diversified Pacific/Asia EB: Emerging-Markets Bond EE: Equity Energy EI: India Equity EM: Diversified Emerging Markets ES: Europe Stock FA: Foreign Small/Mid-Value FB: Foreign Large-Blend FF: Managed Futures FG: Foreign Large-Growth FQ: Foreign Small/Mid-Blend FR: Foreign Small/Mid-Growth FV: Foreign Large-Value FX: Single Currency GI: Intermediate Government NAME

FRI NAV

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

AB DiversMunicipal 14.35 +.05 ReltvValA m 5.21 -.10 AMG YacktmanI 20.44 +.03 Akre FocRetail m 39.51 +.04 AllianzGI NFJDivValA m 11.66 -.30 American Beacon SmCpValInstl 21.97 -.92 American Century EqIncInv 8.60 -.12 GrInv 32.60 -.13 HeritageA m 18.07 +.04 IntlGrA m 11.24 -.16 SelA m 69.22 -.66 UltraInv 46.64 -.37 American Funds AMCpA m 31.03 -.13 AmrcnBalA m 26.57 -.05 AmrcnHiIncA m 10.10 AmrcnMutA m 40.24 -.22 BdfAmrcA m 12.84 +.10 CptWldGrIncA m 47.26 -.25 CptlIncBldrA m 60.09 -.03 CptlWldBdA x 19.68 +.07 EuroPacGrA m 50.29 -.48 FdmtlInvsA m 57.76 -.62 GlbBalA x 32.05 -.17 GrfAmrcA m 48.08 -.26 IncAmrcA m 21.94 -.08 IntlGrIncA x 32.07 -.44 IntrmBdfAmrA m13.38 +.06 InvCAmrcA m 37.17 -.10 NewWldA m 64.35 -.41 NwPrspctvA m 42.35 -.38 SmCpWldA m 53.33 -.71 TheNewEcoA m 44.00 -.31 TxExBdA m 12.99 +.08 WAMtInvsA m 44.57 -.39 Angel Oak MltStratIncIns 11.03 -.01 Artisan IntlInstl 29.57 -.70 IntlSmMdInv 12.85 -.29 IntlValueInstl 34.11 -.51 SmCpInvs 31.61 -.92 Baird AggrgateBdInstl 10.79 +.09 CorPlusBdInstl 11.12 +.09 ShrtTrmBdInstl 9.67 +.03 BlackRock AlCpEngyRsInvA m10.03 -.01 EqDivInstl 20.49 -.27 GlbAllcIncInstl 18.65 GlbAllcIncInvA m18.53 HYBdInstl 7.53 +.01 StrIncOpIns 9.74 +.02 StratMuOpIns 11.53 +.03 TtlRetInstl 11.47 +.09 CGM Rlty 27.40 -.86 Calamos MktNetrlIncIns 12.98

+2.1 +9.0 +7.3 +16.4

+1.6 +10.7 +11.9

+2.1 MS 1 +8.4 LV 2 +8.9 LV

1

+20.1 +14.0 LG

1

+9.6

+8.6

+5.5 LV

4

+9.5

+7.9

+4.4 SV

3

+9.3 +17.2 +17.3 +11.6 +14.2 +15.4

+10.3 +9.4 LV 1 +16.9 +12.3 LG +13.0 +7.8 MG 3 +6.7 +2.3 FG 5 +15.0 +12.0 LG 3 +17.8 +13.1 LG 1

+11.2 +7.1 +6.8 +7.8 +2.7 +10.9 +7.6 +2.7 +11.6 +10.8 +7.8 +12.4 +7.1 +10.4 +1.6 +10.1 +12.2 +12.4 +13.7 +13.3 +2.4 +9.0

+13.2 +9.7 LG +8.9 +7.5 MA +8.0 +3.4 HY +11.2 +9.0 LV +2.2 +2.5 CI +9.7 +6.1 WS +5.8 +4.7 IH +2.0 +1.1 IB +8.5 +4.1 FG +12.8 +10.1 LB +6.1 +4.0 IH +15.5 +11.1 LG +7.6 +6.1 AL +7.1 +1.7 FB +1.2 +1.3 CS +11.1 +9.0 LB +10.8 +4.6 EM +12.7 +8.8 WS +12.8 +7.2 SW +15.7 +9.7 LG +2.6 +3.7 MI +12.4 +9.6 LB

+1.2

+5.9

+8.4 +13.8 +9.9 +21.3

+6.7 +5.9 +6.7 +21.9

+2.4 +3.3 +1.4

+2.5 +3.3 +1.9

+16.4 +11.4 +7.9 +7.9 +7.0 +2.2 +2.3 +2.6

+4.5 +11.7 +5.9 +5.6 +7.7 +3.6 +3.7 +2.5

4 1 1 1 2 4 1 3 4 4 2 4 1 3 1 4 1 2 1 5 3 1

+3.9 MU +2.7 +1.3 +4.0 +9.7

FG FR FB SG

3 2 2 1

+3.0 CI +3.3 CI +1.7 CS

1 2

-5.5 +8.9 +3.8 +3.5 +4.3 +2.4 +4.2 +3.0

EE LV IH IH HY NT MI CI

1

4

+8.3

+8.7

+6.1 LB

5

+2.7

+4.7

+3.5 NE

1

NAME

FRI NAV

Causeway IntlValInstl d 15.37 ClearBridge AggresivGrA m 173.91 LgCpGrI 49.44 Cohen & Steers PrfrdScInc,IncI 13.46 Columbia DivIncIns 21.66 GlbDivOppA m 17.65 SelM/CValA m 10.13 DFA EMktCorEqI 20.77 EMktSCInstl 20.29 EmMktsInstl 27.72 EmMktsValInstl 28.68 FvYrGlbFIIns 10.72 GlbEqInstl 22.30 GlbRlEsttSec 11.39 InflProtSecIns 11.74 IntlCorEqIns 12.83 IntlRlEsttScIns 5.08 IntlSmCoInstl 17.49 IntlSmCpValIns 18.16 IntlValInstl 17.23 ItmGovtFIIns 12.46 LgCpIntlInstl 21.94 OneYearFIInstl 10.31 RlEsttSecInstl 37.74 ShTrmExQtyI 10.74 TAUSCorEq2Instl 17.91 TMdUSMktwdVl 29.06 TMdUSTrgtedVal 32.67 TwYrGlbFIIns 9.94 USCorEq1Instl 23.01 USCorEqIIInstl 21.17 USLgCo 21.68 USLgCpValInstl 35.22 USMicroCpInstl 20.14 USSmCpInstl 32.63 USSmCpValInstl 32.67 USTrgtedValIns 21.71 USVectorEqInstl 17.66 Davis NYVentureA m 27.70 Delaware Inv ValInstl x 21.28 Dodge & Cox Bal 100.06 GlbStk 12.04 Inc 13.71 IntlStk 40.28 Stk 189.43 DoubleLine CorFII 10.85 LowDurBdI 9.99 TtlRetBdI 10.55 TtlRetBdN b 10.54 Eaton Vance AtlntCptSMIDCI 33.77 FltngRtInstl 8.91 Edgewood GrInstl 33.05 FPA Crescent d 32.52 NewInc 9.93 USVal 10.11

SR: Real Estate SS: Muni Single State Short ST: Technology SU: Utilities SV: Small Value TA: Target-Date 2000-2010 TD: Target-Date 2015 TE: Target-Date 2020 TG: Target-Date 2025 TH: Target-Date 2030 TI: Target-Date 2035 TJ: Target-Date 2040 TK: Target-Date 2045 TL: Target-Date 2055 TN: Target-Date 2050 TW: Corporate Bond TV: Tactical Allocation UB: Ultrashort Bond VD: Trading-Leveraged Debt VL: Stable Value VO: Volatility WS: World Stock XM: Allocation - 85+% Equity XO: Infrastructure XQ: Target-Date 2060+ XR: Option Writing XS: Long-Short Credit XP: Emerging-Markets LocalCurrency Bond XY: Allocation - 15-30% Equity. FOOTNOTES b -Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d -Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f -front load (sales charges). m -Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee and either a sales or redemption fee. NA-not available. p -previous day´s net asset value. s -fund split shares during the week. x - fund paid a distribution during the week. WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR +.01 +12.9 -8.13 +9.1 -.46 +14.0 -.01 +6.3 -.35 +10.7 -.23 +10.5 -.21 +14.1 -.18 -.22 -.19 -.31 +.03 -.31 +.07 +.09 -.13 +.03 -.17 -.14 -.23 +.12 -.24 +.01 +.27 +.03 -.33 -.64 -1.26 +.02 -.33 -.37 -.16 -.66 -.74 -1.13 -1.24 -.85 -.52

+10.3 +10.5 +9.9 +9.4 +1.4 +13.5 +14.5 +3.3 +11.5 +11.6 +11.4 +10.7 +10.4 +1.6 +11.7 +.6 +16.2 +1.4 +14.3 +13.2 +13.2 +.8 +14.7 +14.3 +14.4 +12.1 +13.0 +13.7 +13.1 +13.6 +13.7

+7.3

+1.7 FV

+7.4 +4.5 LG +16.1 +13.3 LG +5.8

+6.0 RR

5 2 2

+12.2 +10.2 LV 1 +6.2 +2.5 WS 3 +8.4 +5.3 MV 2 +10.5 +4.8 EM +9.5 +5.1 EM +10.8 +4.9 EM +12.7 +5.0 EM +1.8 +2.1 IB +11.1 +7.0 WS +6.8 +8.3 GR +2.0 +2.0 IP +7.9 +3.3 FB +4.6 +5.5 GR +7.4 +3.9 FQ +5.7 +2.5 FA +8.6 +2.0 FV +1.1 +2.3 GI +8.0 +3.1 FB +1.3 +0.9 UB +7.8 +9.9 SR +1.9 +1.8 CS +12.3 +8.4 MB +11.6 +8.1 LV +8.9 +5.3 SV +1.4 +1.0 IB +13.3 +9.4 LB +12.3 +8.3 MB +13.9 +11.1 LB +11.7 +8.0 LV +11.8 +6.3 SB +10.5 +6.2 SB +9.2 +4.3 SV +9.2 +4.7 SV +10.7 +6.3 MV

-.42 +13.1

+12.5

+7.6 LB

5

-.21 +9.2

+10.8

+9.2 LV

1

-1.24 -.28 +.10 -.92 -4.40

+7.3 +9.2 +3.4 +9.1 +9.6

+10.2 +11.0 +3.8 +7.4 +13.7

+6.9 +5.7 +3.1 +1.4 +8.7

MA WS CI FV LV

3 4 2 3 3

+.08 +.02 +.07 +.07

+2.5 +1.7 +1.9 +1.8

+3.1 +2.7 +2.8 +2.5

+3.3 +2.1 +3.3 +3.0

CI CS CI CI

2 2 3

-.57 +13.2 -.01 +3.7 -.08 +14.8 -.42 +10.1 +.04 +1.1 -.09 +14.4

+13.2 +11.8 MG 3 +6.1 +3.6 BL 1 +19.7 +15.5 LG +7.4 +2.7 +3.9

3

+5.1 MA 4 +1.9 CS 3 +3.4 LB 4

ConEd ConstellA CooperCo Corning Costco Coty CrwnCstle Cummins DR Horton DTE DXC Tch n Danaher Darden DaVita Inc Deere DeltaAir Dentsply DevonE DiambkEn DigitalRlt Discover DiscIncA DiscIncC DishNetw h Disney DollarGen DollarTree DomEngy Dover DukeEngy DukeRlty E-Trade eBay s EOG Rescs EastChem Eaton Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElectArts EliLilly EmersonEl Entergy Equifax Equinix EqtyRsd EssexPT EsteeLdr EverestRe EversrceE Exelon Expedia h ExpdIntl ExtraSpce ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp Facebook Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FidNatInfo FifthThird FstRepBk FirstEngy Fiserv s Flowserve Fluor FootLockr FordM Fortinet Fortive n FBHmSec FrankRes FrptMcM Gallaghr Gap Garmin Gartner GenDynam GenElec GenMills GenMotors GenuPrt GileadSci GlobPay s GoldmanS Graingr HCA Hldg HCP Inc HP Inc Hallibrtn Hanesbds s HarleyD HarrisCorp

DIV

2.96f 2.96f .06 .80f 2.28 .50 4.50 4.56 .50 3.78f .76 .68f 3.00 3.04 1.40 .35 .32 .50 4.32f 1.60

1.76f 1.28f 3.67f 1.92 3.71 .86 .56 .14p .88 2.48f 2.84f 1.84 2.45 2.58f 1.96f 3.64 1.56 9.84f 2.27f 7.80f 1.72f 5.60 2.14 1.45f 1.28 .90f 3.44 3.28 .68f 1.60 1.72f 2.60 4.08 1.40f .88 .72 1.52 .76 .84 1.52f .60a .28 .88f 1.04 .20 1.72f .97 2.12 4.08f .04 1.96 1.52 2.88 2.52f .04 3.20f 5.44 1.60f 1.48 .64 .72 .60 1.50f 2.74

PE

17 11 92 dd 36 ... 94 43 10 22 71 33 22 13 16 9 dd 19 15 57 9 14 13 10 15 17 14 15 18 22 24 16 8 dd 10 18 37 14 63 23 dd 22 42 19 cc 47 51 53 8 23 20 56 22 24 15 20 26 14 31 23 9 23 21 9 21 9 37 cc 26 31 7 49 ... 16 11 8 30 10 23 44 17 dd 15 dd 23 10 45 7 21 20 18 6 15 9 12 28

FRI NAME NAV Federated InsHYBdIns d 9.69 StratValDivIns 5.75 TtlRetBdInstl 10.72 Fidelity 500IdxInsPrm 97.79 AsstMgr20% 13.16 AsstMgr50% 17.63 AsstMgr70% 21.27 BCGrowth 96.83 BCGrowth 14.61 BCGrowthK 96.97 Balanced 22.68 BalancedK 22.69 Cap&Inc 9.84 ChinaRegion 34.27 Contrafund 12.41 ContrafundK 12.41 ConvertibleSecs 27.98 CptlApprec 33.22 DivGro 28.01 DiversIntl 34.86 EmergMketsOpps18.30 EmergingAsia 42.15 EqDividendInc 24.22 EqIncome 56.01 ExMktIdxInPr 60.44 FltngRtHiInc 9.48 FourinOneIdx 44.50 Frdm 2015 12.61 Frdm 2020 15.73 Frdm 2025 13.75 Frdm 2030 17.07 Frdm 2035 14.30 Frdm 2040 9.99 GlbexUSIdxInsPr 12.44 GlobalexUSIdx 12.14 GrDiscv 35.64 GroCo 16.66 GroCo 18.88 GroCoK 18.90 Growth&Inc 37.36 IntlDiscv 40.22 IntlGr 14.96 IntlIdxInstlPrm 39.76 IntlVal 9.28 InvmGradeBd 11.16 InvmGradeBd 7.88 LowPrStk 47.35 LowPrStkK 47.31 Magellan 10.10 MidCapStock 33.59 NasdCmpIdx 99.45 NewMktsInc 15.07 OTCPortfolio 11.58 OTCPortfolioK 11.76 Overseas 45.11 Puritan 21.29 PuritanK 21.28 SCValue 14.22 ShTrmBd 8.61 SmCpOpps 13.11 StkSelorAllCp 43.66 TotalBond 10.54 TtlMktIdxF 79.45 TtlMktIdxInsPrm 79.43 USBdIdxF 11.50 USBdIdxInsPrm 11.50 Value 9.99 Worldwide 25.93 Fidelity Advisor NewInsA m 30.00 NewInsC m 25.66 NewInsI 30.74 StgInc 12.21 StgIncC m 12.01 StgIncI 12.21 TotalBondI 10.52 Fidelity Select Biotechnology 20.63 ConsumerStaples79.24 Energy 37.68 HealthCare 24.21 MedTech&Devcs 52.92 NaturalRes 25.80 Swre&ITSvcs 19.07 Technology 16.07 First Eagle GlbA m 55.61 Franklin Templeton CATxFrIncA1 m 7.40 FdrTFIncA1 m 11.77 GlbBdA m 11.39 GlbBdAdv 11.34 Gr,IncA m 22.42 GrA m 102.11 IncA1 m 2.31 IncAdv 2.29 IncC m 2.34 MsrTxFrIncA1 m 11.56 MutBeaconA m 15.03 MutBeaconC m 15.03 MutBeaconZ 15.18 MutEuropeanC m19.00 MutGlbDiscvA m28.97 MutGlbDiscvZ 29.58 MutZ 26.39 RisingDivsA m 62.26 UtlsA1 m 20.40 GE RSPUSEq 51.61 Gabelli SmCpGrAAA m 52.52 Goldman Sachs SmCpValA m 46.82 Guggenheim MgdFutsStratP b18.26 Harbor CptlApprecInstl 71.83 IntlInstl 36.93 Harding Loevner IntlEqInstl d 21.76

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

2.28 26 8 .12 69 1.76 20 .20 dd .64 7 9 1.60 23 cc .92 dd .56 26 .20 dd .20 ... 5.00f 14 .80 36 1.40 dd .88 63 .44 dd 1.48a 18 3.44f 19 2.40f 15 4.80 28 13 1.60 11 .64 31 25 3.12 50 2.60f 15 3.44f 50 .96f 54 3.80 11 1.92 19 1.65f 14 .15 12 1.28f 11 3.16 12 3.04 20 2.24 30 65 .72 13 .70 12 3.71 14 .28 36 .76 23 1.44f 17 4.56 22 3.20 8 2.95f 22 .64f cc 3.04f 18 2.16 10 2.12f 25 2.87 23 .10e 29 4.00f 9 1.80 21 6.80 24 .44f 15 44 2.48 dd .04p 25 2.12 17 2.50 17 .08 12 .88f 12 3.77f 26 2.71f 41 cc 2.34f 24 18 .56 10 1.88f 36 1.48f 31 1.24f 23 3.88 25 41 1.85 31 1.02f 22 2.80 15 2.28f 30 cc 3.40 34 18 cc 2.00 26 .52 17 2.52 9 .64 23 3.87f 20 4.52f 32 8.20f 24 1.52 13 .88 26 3.40 15 3.80 14 2.40 24

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

NAME

DIV

PE

52-WEEK HIGH LOW

WK WK LAST CHG %CHG

144.94 42.50 43.50 96.84 49.08 15.03 109.09 88.08 423.21 29.55 41.98 16.65 17.10 192.28 28.42 34.86 88.59 37.76 67.75 186.91 115.61 360.88 58.09 68.84 292.76 394.42 87.67 78.75 71.99 54.38 160.94 116.73 32.88 169.22 72.89 124.70 193.19 79.79 104.56 72.96 19.83 122.00 98.33 84.94 46.47 103.55 123.97 96.43 213.40 127.43 62.99 72.82 102.91 73.78 110.23 59.95 234.90 33.04 86.50 76.50 37.95 116.49 147.79 18.60 102.17 229.75 72.51 183.54 67.10 442.00 19.99 79.42 118.50 79.91 198.23 42.95 334.99 104.35 133.60 217.31 196.27 106.54 333.74 166.99 75.43 60.22 62.70 46.21 127.22 479.64 191.49 110.98 66.48 127.93 189.46 51.95

138.64 -2.00 28.69 +.60 42.49 +.52 83.89 +.34 26.63 +.15 11.59 -.44 32.17 -3.36 66.84 -1.22 361.01 -.45 15.00 -.56 34.50 +1.36 12.63 -.01 12.64 -.10 193.93 +2.69 28.61 +.72 26.86 -.09 82.19 -4.61 23.97 +.87 42.93 -.81 177.94 -1.58 88.59 -6.33 268.36 -2.85 55.62 +.07 57.00 -1.53 177.50 +7.69 376.30 +6.28 65.24 -.23 73.07 -2.40 69.01 +2.16 52.77 -.17 119.18 -10.68 106.69 -3.34 32.19 -.55 107.21 -3.30 67.03 -.62 95.13 -1.05 163.39 -7.38 78.44 -.79 101.27 +.54 42.26 -.36 15.89 -1.47 120.72 +5.06 93.71 -.33 47.25 -.90 41.85 +.07 91.17 +.32 95.98 -2.54 96.72 +.57 140.56 +4.89 98.76 -3.68 49.45 -2.72 71.07 -.57 101.66 -.78 72.78 -.83 89.96 -6.02 59.63 -.10 222.12 +4.50 26.58 -.29 71.67 +2.01 56.82 +.22 36.69 -.66 89.24 +.79 120.23 -.55 10.87 +.35 76.76 -5.13 179.99 +2.04 72.60 +1.36 181.70 -.08 66.11 +1.35 391.80 -22.67 13.53 -2.21 78.90 +.27 100.14 -.23 63.73 -2.20 169.93 -9.40 40.38 -.08 329.47 +3.26 89.53 -.37 115.58 -1.60 205.49 +2.31 197.12 +6.17 89.72 -.66 212.19 -34.02 161.50 -.01 42.47 +.08 41.80 -3.65 46.93 -.12 45.04 -.26 126.07 +2.42 420.72 -10.31 177.60 +1.51 82.59 -1.17 51.74 +.42 114.30 +8.72 149.96 -5.72 51.88 +.02

SwstAirl StanBlkDk Starbucks s StateStr Stryker SunTrst Symantec Synchrony Synopsys Sysco TE Connect TJX TakeTwo Tapestry Target Technip Teleflex TexInst Textron ThermoFis 3M Co Tiffany Torchmark TotalSys TractSupp TransDigm Travelers TripAdvis Twitter Tyson UDR UltaBeauty UndrArm s UnAr C wi UnionPac UtdContl UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp UtdTech UtdhlthGp UnivHlthS UnumGrp VF Corp ValeroE VarianMed Ventas Verisign Verisk VerizonCm VertxPh ViacomB Visa s Vornado VulcanM WEC Engy Wabtec WalMart WalgBoots WsteMInc Waters Wellcare WellsFargo Welltower WDigital WstnUnion WestRck Weyerhsr Whrlpl WmsCos WillisTwW Wynn XcelEngy Xilinx Xylem YumBrnds ZimmerBio ZionsBcp Zoetis

.64 2.64 1.44 1.88 2.08 2.00 .30 .84

11 29 33 10 33 10 11 8 38 26 10 12 cc 19 13 13 37 20 10 33 28 29 6 24 25 30 15 66 85 12 52 33 36 dd 20 9 18 8 12 19 20 17 1 24 23 35 57 40 40 8 27 5 51 41 24 25 22 56 11 22 32 28 11 18 18 10 11 20 dd 11 41 15 25 64 32 35 24 12 45

64.02 161.91 72.44 108.41 198.75 75.08 29.20 36.32 112.93 75.98 106.00 113.28 139.91 55.50 90.39 34.39 305.92 118.48 72.87 271.70 237.22 141.64 89.62 100.39 98.03 455.72 142.64 69.00 47.79 75.15 45.38 345.24 24.96 23.28 172.44 97.85 125.09 190.30 55.56 144.15 287.94 142.22 51.17 97.00 126.98 138.35 65.70 185.75 129.92 61.58 195.81 34.44 156.82 77.59 133.59 78.91 115.40 106.21 86.31 102.10 250.54 324.99 59.53 78.24 106.39 21.37 67.01 38.39 167.54 32.22 187.91 202.48 56.89 130.57 82.44 101.39 134.55 59.19 99.91

49.32 130.90 71.96 65.00 194.44 57.40 22.86 31.83 110.31 65.56 81.69 52.34 96.02 30.93 78.32 22.66 301.69 109.68 49.97 263.81 204.66 103.21 80.31 93.33 92.68 444.71 134.90 50.75 33.02 66.61 44.98 330.52 20.72 18.41 160.62 79.63 107.35 110.96 48.28 125.15 247.09 135.31 33.37 83.72 84.63 138.59 64.23 181.67 128.89 59.76 181.53 25.34 153.07 66.82 113.45 79.33 70.05 98.28 62.41 101.90 245.37 241.84 48.31 77.82 48.39 18.25 36.75 25.76 129.04 28.47 174.61 116.91 57.07 126.89 77.06 98.97 126.68 43.64 97.93

+.1 -.5 -1.2 -2.0 +1.7 +3.0 +.4 -1.1 +.4 +.7 -2.1 +.8 +6.1 +1.0 -1.4 -2.8 +.3 +2.4 -1.0 +3.4 -3.8 -2.8 -1.7 -4.0 -5.9 +3.1 +1.6 -2.0 -.4 +.1 +.3 -8.2 +1.0 +5.4 -4.5 -1.9 -.4 +1.2 +5.1 +3.4 +3.5 -.7 +1.5 +1.7 +2.2 +.3 +.5 -2.0 -1.9 -.1 +.6 +.1 -2.5 +.8 +.4 -.9 -5.2 -2.9 -1.0 -.9 -2.2 +1.4 +1.4 -13.1 -5.3 +1.3 -.8 -1.7 -5.7 -3.5 +1.3 +2.3 -.4 -2.0 -3.7 -1.4 -1.7 -3.0 +.4 +.6 -2.3 +.2 +6.8 -4.3 +.4 -2.8 -.1 -4.7 -1.6 +1.6 +1.7 -3.0 +2.7 -4.0 -7.5 -.9

HartfdFn 1.20 17 55.16 40.54 48.53 -.29 -.6 Hasbro 2.72f 49 109.60 76.84 83.51 -3.21 -3.7 HelmPayne 2.80f dd 74.36 44.56 54.48 -.07 -.1 HSchein s 17 71.61 50.41 59.80 +.51 +.9 Hershey 2.89 24 112.45 89.10 112.00 +1.21 +1.1 Hess 1.00 dd 74.81 35.59 58.75 +.50 +.9 HP Ent n .45e 36 18.93 12.09 15.29 -.78 -4.9 Hilton .60 42 87.09 63.76 84.57 -1.19 -1.4 Hologic dd 48.11 35.10 46.85 -.78 -1.6 HomeDp 5.44f 21 215.43 158.09 188.75 +6.52 +3.6 HonwllIntl 3.28 45 167.72 123.48 155.83 +.48 +.3 Hormel s .84f 23 46.26 32.42 43.59 +1.03 +2.4 HostHotls 1.00a 46 22.47 15.94 18.80 -.36 -1.9 Humana 2.20f 23 355.88 261.35 272.60 -7.54 -2.7 HuntJB 1.04f 21 131.74 88.38 97.54 -5.76 -5.6 HuntBncsh .56 12 16.53 11.12 12.25 -1.50 -10.9 HuntgtnIng 3.44 19 267.73 173.80 203.13 -1.28 -.6 IdexxLab s 55 256.22 176.11 219.43 +3.22 +1.5 IHS Mark 32 55.99 44.52 54.54 +.02 IPG Photon 22 261.77 104.64 144.77 -8.84 -5.8 ITW 4.00 26 170.65 117.75 141.65 -1.53 -1.1 Illumina 62 372.61 225.82 308.79 -1.05 -.3 Incyte dd 89.75 57.00 85.34 +.54 +.6 IngerRd 2.12 24 107.75 79.63 104.23 -1.87 -1.8 Intel 1.26 20 57.60 42.36 53.26 -1.07 -2.0 IntcntlExc s 1.10f 17 82.65 67.70 72.76 -1.87 -2.5 IBM 6.28 14 162.00 105.94 139.45 +.02 IntFlav 2.92 34 150.57 121.85 124.69 +.83 +.7 IntPap 1.90 15 59.57 37.55 44.40 -1.11 -2.4 Interpublic .94f 14 25.77 19.61 21.13 -1.21 -5.4 Intuit 1.88 46 260.71 166.52 252.68 -5.45 -2.1 IntSurg s 82 581.12 393.57 561.26 +3.05 +.5 Invesco 1.16 8 33.55 15.38 19.06 -.72 -3.6 IronMtn 2.44 31 37.32 30.22 35.12 +.19 +.5 JPMorgCh 3.20 11 119.24 91.11 99.76 -6.79 -6.4 JackHenry 1.60f 38 163.68 116.79 135.77 -1.47 -1.1 JacobsEng .68f 27 82.24 55.17 73.07 -.74 -1.0 JohnJn 3.60 23 148.99 118.62 136.91 -.69 -.5 JohnContl n 1.04 25 40.33 28.30 36.13 +.30 +.8 JnprNtwk .76f 14 30.80 23.61 26.32 -.52 -1.9 KLA Tnc 3.00 14 124.68 80.65 120.53 +.91 +.8 KC Southn 1.44f 18 120.34 90.55 112.46 -2.04 -1.8 Kellogg 2.24 14 74.98 53.14 56.74 +2.47 +4.6 Keycorp .56 9 21.91 13.66 14.97 -2.41 -13.9 Keysight 88 88.00 50.25 84.76 -1.22 -1.4 KimbClk 4.12 30 121.60 97.10 122.05 +1.86 +1.5 Kimco 1.12 19 18.20 13.16 18.13 +.47 +2.7 KindMorg .80 20 20.44 14.62 19.90 +.03 +.2 Kohls 2.68f 11 83.28 57.89 67.03 -.28 -.4 KraftHnz n 1.60m 9 65.36 31.53 32.29 +.20 +.6 Kroger s .56f 9 32.74 23.05 24.34 -.02 -.1 L Brands 1.20f 10 40.65 23.71 26.67 +.09 +.3 L-3 Tch 3.40f 20 223.73 158.76 205.30 -1.77 -.9 LKQ Corp 16 39.81 22.74 28.36 +.50 +1.8 LabCp 18 190.36 119.38 154.32 -.04 LamResrch 4.40 17 227.82 122.64 179.45 -1.84 -1.0 LambWst n .80 23 83.86 54.04 71.66 +2.15 +3.1 LeggPlat 1.52 19 46.71 33.48 40.77 -2.23 -5.2 LennarA .16 9 64.90 37.29 47.84 +.11 +.2 LincNat 1.48 8 78.35 48.07 57.68 -5.04 -8.0 LockhdM 8.80f 36 361.99 241.18 294.01 -2.14 -.7 Loews .25 13 53.04 42.06 47.33 -.45 -.9 Lowes 1.92 23 117.70 81.16 104.95 +4.81 +4.8 LyonBas A 4.00 7 119.39 77.52 85.07 -1.93 -2.2 M&T Bk 4.00 12 192.15 133.78 153.79 -18.73 -10.9 MGM Rsts .48 7 36.81 21.62 26.09 +.07 +.3 MSCI Inc 2.32 34 195.99 134.28 191.86 +2.28 +1.2 Macerich 3.00 24 60.95 40.90 43.78 +1.15 +2.7 Macys 1.51 7 41.99 22.73 23.31 -.40 -1.7 MarathnO .20 dd 24.20 12.57 16.68 -.59 -3.4 MarathPt s 2.12 9 88.45 54.29 61.30 +.85 +1.4 MarIntA 1.64 28 142.19 100.62 124.50 +2.18 +1.8 MarshM 1.66 26 94.96 74.30 92.07 -1.22 -1.3 MartMM 1.92 28 232.88 150.75 192.11 -1.39 -.7 Masco .48 19 42.27 27.03 38.25 -.73 -1.9 MasterCrd 1.32 54 237.08 167.94 230.76 -.41 -.2 Mattel .60 94 17.98 9.09 13.21 -1.26 -8.7 MaximIntg 1.84 22 63.68 46.64 54.21 +.07 +.1 McCorm 2.28f 20 156.00 99.53 142.37 +2.38 +1.7 McDnlds 4.64 28 190.88 153.13 186.81 +1.48 +.8 McKesson 1.56 10 160.84 106.11 118.54 -.72 -.6 Medtrnic 2.00 55 100.15 76.41 90.39 -2.90 -3.1 Merck 2.20 31 83.17 52.83 82.29 +.72 +.9 MetLife 1.68 9 48.92 37.76 41.79 -3.52 -7.8 MettlerT 48 732.46 500.74 702.07 -6.51 -.9 Microchp 1.46f 46 104.20 60.70 85.42 -.68 -.8 MicronT 3 64.66 28.39 41.62 +2.08 +5.3 Microsoft 1.84 27 120.82 87.08 117.05 +1.14 +1.0 MidAApt 3.84 20 108.45 86.61 107.94 +.27 +.3 Mohawk 9 249.65 109.35 124.86 -3.71 -2.9 MolsCoorB 1.64 9 80.27 54.17 59.45 -1.37 -2.3 Mondelez 1.04 13 48.99 37.42 49.13 +1.33 +2.8 MonstrBv s 30 66.38 47.61 53.51 -6.76 -11.2 Moodys 2.00f 26 187.98 129.26 177.89 +1.20 +.7 MorgStan 1.20 9 58.17 36.74 41.72 -1.61 -3.7 Mosaic .10 42 37.37 22.90 26.85 -1.86 -6.5

MotrlaSolu Mylan NV NRG Egy Nasdaq NOilVarco Navient NektarTh NetApp Netflix s NewellBr NewmtM NewsCpA NewsCpB NextEraEn NiSource s Nielsen plc NikeB s NobleEngy Nordstrm NorflkSo NorTrst NorthropG NorwCruis Nucor Nvidia OReillyAu OcciPet Omnicom ONEOK Oracle PNC PPG s PPL Corp PVH Corp Paccar PackAmer ParkerHan Paychex PayPal n Pentair PeopUtdF PepsiCo PerkElm Perrigo Pfizer PhilipMor Phillips66 PinWst PioNtrl PriceTR PrinFncl ProLogis ProctGam ProgsvCp Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp Qorvo Qualcom QuantaSvc QstDiag RLauren RangeRs RJamesFn Raytheon RltyInco RedHat RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegionsFn RepubSvc ResMed RobtHalf RockwlAut Rollins s Roper RossStrs s RylCarb S&P Glbl SBA Com SLGreen SVB FnGp Salesforce Schlmbrg Schwab SeagateT SealAir SempraEn Sherwin SimonProp SkywksSol SmithAO s Smucker SnapOn SouthnCo

WK - PCT RETURN RNK CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR Hartford CptlApprecA m 34.28 -.29 +13.8 +12.2 +8.3 LB 3 Heartland SelValInv m 24.80 -.45 +9.3 +11.7 +6.8 MV 1 Hodges Retail m 37.41 -.41 +25.9 +7.0 +3.5 MG 5 INVESCO ComStkA m 23.79 -.68 +11.0 +11.1 +6.5 LV 4 DiversDivA m 19.16 -.31 +10.3 +6.4 +7.0 LV 2 EqandIncA m 9.88 -.18 +8.8 +8.1 +5.4 MA 5 HYMuniA m 10.03 +.08 +3.3 +4.6 +6.4 HM 2 IntlGrA m 31.45 -.32 +12.4 +4.7 +2.9 FG 2 IVA WldwideI d 16.94 -.20 +6.3 +5.7 +3.6 IH 4 Ivy GlbGrA m 42.47 -.49 +11.3 +9.6 +5.7 WS 3 JPMorgan CPBondR6 8.23 +.07 +3.1 +3.2 +3.2 CI 1 CoreBondI 11.51 +.11 +2.6 +2.3 +2.6 CI 2 CoreBondR6 11.53 +.11 +2.7 +2.5 +2.8 CI 1 EqIncI 17.29 -.24 +9.4 +11.4 +9.0 LV 1 MCapValA m 36.30 -.61 +12.6 +7.5 +6.6 MB 2 MCapValL 37.17 -.62 +12.7 +8.0 +7.2 MB 2 USLCpCrPlsI 26.57 -.13 +11.8 +12.4 +9.2 LB 4 USRsrchEnhEqR6 26.41 -.22 +12.1 +12.7 +9.4 LB 2 Janus Henderson BalancedT 33.28 -.14 +7.6 +10.6 +7.5 MA 1 EnterpriseT 126.31 -2.00 +16.0 +17.2 +12.7 MG 2 FlexibleBondT 10.14 +.07 +2.8 +2.0 +2.1 CI 4 GlobalLifeSciT 56.50 -.90 +12.5 +13.5 +10.6 SH 2 John Hancock BdR6 15.65 +.12 +3.8 +3.8 +3.5 CI 1 DiscpValI 19.35 -.43 +8.0 +9.9 +6.5 LV 5 DiscpValMCI 19.61 -.45 +11.9 +8.6 +7.3 MB 5 DiscpValR6 19.38 -.43 +8.0 +10.0 +6.6 LV 5 FdmtlLgCpCorA m42.71 -.69 +15.4 +11.4 +8.4 LB 5 IntlGrI 26.35 -.21 +13.2 +10.4 +7.4 FG MltMgLsBlA b 14.07 -.07 +8.6 +7.8 +5.0 MA 4 MltmgrLsGr1 b 14.49 -.12 +10.1 +9.2 +5.7 AL 4 Lazard EMEqInstl 17.26 -.17 +7.5 +7.8 +2.1 EM 5 GlbLtdInfrsIns 14.65 -.11 +9.0 +9.8 +10.9 XO 1 IntlStratEqIns 14.22 -.18 +10.3 +6.6 +3.4 FG 2 Leuthold CorInvmRetail d 18.06 -.05 +3.7 +5.1 +4.1 TV 4 Loomis Sayles BdInstl 13.44 +.05 +5.0 +5.1 +2.6 MU 4 GrY 16.28 -.13 +13.8 +16.5 +13.8 LG 2 Lord Abbett AffiliatedA m 14.37 -.27 +9.0 +10.3 +7.9 LV 3 FltngRtF b 8.88 -.02 +3.5 +5.2 +3.5 BL 4 ShrtDurIncA m 4.19 +.01 +2.1 +2.9 +2.2 CS 1 ShrtDurIncC m 4.21 +.01 +1.7 +2.2 +1.5 CS 4 ShrtDurIncF b 4.18 +.01 +1.9 +2.9 +2.3 CS 1 ShrtDurIncI 4.18 +.01 +1.9 +3.0 +2.4 CS 1 MFS GrA m 102.31 -.15 +15.9 +17.7 +12.7 LG 1 GrI 109.05 -.15 +15.9 +18.0 +13.0 LG 1 InstlIntlEq 24.70 -.32 +10.3 +9.3 +4.8 FG 1 TtlRetA m 18.43 -.11 +7.6 +6.7 +5.7 MA 3 ValA m 39.20 -.66 +11.0 +9.5 +7.9 LV 3 ValI 39.44 -.66 +11.1 +9.7 +8.1 LV 3 Mairs & Power BalInv 93.40 -.60 +7.6 +7.9 +6.4 MA 1 GrInv 118.24 -1.85 +11.1 +10.3 +8.3 LB 1 MassMutual SelectMdCpGrI 21.81 -.11 +15.5 +14.6 +11.1 MG 2 Matthews AsianGrIncInv 15.21 -.03 +9.3 +5.1 +3.3 PJ 1 ChinaInv 17.32 -.10 +20.5 +16.6 +9.3 CH 4 Meridian ContrarianLgcy d 34.93 -.78 +13.0 +15.4 +9.1 MG 5 GrLegacy d 38.31 -.82 +15.5 +16.1 +10.3 SG 3 Metropolitan West TtlRetBdI 10.61 +.08 +2.8 +2.4 +2.7 CI 1 TtlRetBdM b 10.62 +.09 +2.9 +2.2 +2.5 CI 1 TtlRetBdPlan 9.99 +.08 +2.9 +2.4 +2.8 CI 1 Northeast Investors NorthstInvTrust 4.33 -.01 +2.3 +10.7 -1.8 HY 5 Northern IntlEqIdx d 11.78 -.14 +9.5 +7.1 +2.7 FB 2 StkIdx 32.50 -.24 +12.3 +13.1 +10.6 LB 1 Nuveen HYMuniBdA m 17.38 +.16 +4.2 +5.6 +7.0 HM 1 HYMuniBdI 17.38 +.16 +4.2 +5.8 +7.3 HM 1 IntermDrMnBdI 9.29 +.05 +2.5 +2.8 +3.5 MI 1 Oakmark EqAndIncInv 29.04 -.38 +8.0 +7.6 +4.9 MA 5 IntlInv 22.34 -.48 +9.2 +6.5 +1.7 FB 5 Inv 76.33 -1.47 +11.8 +12.1 +8.2 LB 5 SelInv 38.59 -.85 +12.8 +6.1 +3.9 LB 5 Old Westbury GlbSmMdCpStrat14.58 -.16 +13.5 +9.1 +5.9 SW LgCpStrats 13.98 -.08 +10.5 +8.3 +5.9 WS 3 StratOpps 7.34 -.03 +8.6 +6.6 +4.0 IH 3 Oppenheimer CptlIncA m 10.03 -.05 +6.1 +4.9 +3.6 CA DevMktsA m 42.28 -.46 +13.0 +11.6 +4.5 EM DevMktsY 41.67 -.44 +13.1 +11.9 +4.8 EM GlbA m 85.19 -1.19 +17.9 +14.1 +8.2 WS GlbAllcA m 17.41 +7.7 +5.4 +3.3 IH GoldSpecMnralA m15.89 +.09 +11.9 +6.6 -0.6 SP IntlGrY 38.39 -.65 +10.7 +3.7 +1.6 FG 5 LtdTrmGvtA m 4.35 +.02 +.9 +1.0 +1.0 GS MnStrA m 44.89 -.32 +13.3 +10.6 +8.9 LB 2 Osterweis StrInc 11.03 +.01 +3.4 +6.4 +3.5 HY 5 PGIM Investments TtlRetBdZ 14.30 +.14 +3.1 +3.8 +3.7 CI PIMCO AlAstInstl 11.48 +6.0 +7.6 +3.6 TV HYInstl 8.76 +.02 +7.1 +6.9 +4.5 HY 1 IBdUSDHI 10.90 +.05 +2.6 +4.3 +5.0 IB IncA m 12.00 +.01 +2.9 +6.0 +5.1 MU IncC m 12.00 +.01 +2.7 +5.2 +4.4 MU IncI2 12.00 +.01 +2.9 +6.3 +5.5 MU IncInstl 12.00 +.01 +3.0 +6.4 +5.6 MU InvtGrdCdtBdI 10.31 +.08 +4.6 +4.9 +4.7 TW LowDrInstl 9.76 +.02 +1.4 +1.8 +1.3 CS 5 RlRetInstl 10.91 +.09 +3.1 +2.3 +1.7 IP

FRI WK - PCT RETURN RNK NAME NAV CHG YTD 3YR 5YR OBJ 1YR ShrtTrmIns 9.80 -.01 +1.0 +2.6 +1.9 UB 4 TtlRetA m 10.11 +.07 +2.5 +2.7 +2.5 CI 4 TtlRetIns 10.11 +.07 +2.6 +3.0 +2.8 CI 4 PRIMECAP Odyssey AgrsGr 43.27 -1.19 +13.0 +17.8 +12.3 MG 5 Gr 38.79 -.92 +11.7 +16.8 +11.8 LG 5 Stk 31.59 -.75 +9.8 +13.3 +10.3 LB 5 Parnassus CorEqInv 43.42 -.46 +11.4 +11.8 +10.2 LB 1 Pioneer Am 27.24 -.09 +10.3 +12.8 +9.4 LB 1 CorEqA m 17.99 -.07 +12.9 +12.3 +8.3 LB 5 Principal DiversIntlIns 11.78 -.12 +11.9 +6.8 +3.3 FB Putnam DiversIncA m 6.85 +4.5 +6.5 +2.1 NT 3 EqIncA m 23.42 -.32 +10.7 +11.0 +7.9 LV 3 GlbUtlsA m 13.14 +.10 +11.6 +8.8 +6.1 SU 4 IncA m 6.87 +.03 +3.0 +4.2 +2.4 CI 3 SustLeadersA m 86.48 -.42 +16.1 +18.0 +11.8 LG 2 Royce LowPricedStkSvc m6.92 -.23 +9.3 +8.7 +1.2 SB 3 SmlrCoGrSvc m 7.64 -.18 +14.2 +12.1 +5.0 SG 5 SpecEqInvm d 18.35 -.48 +5.3 +9.1 +3.7 SV 1 Schwab FdmtlUSLgCIdx 16.16 -.17 +11.1 +10.8 +8.6 LV 2 HC 24.28 -.40 +5.8 +10.7 +9.7 SH 3 IntlIdx 19.16 -.22 +9.3 +7.2 +2.8 FB 2 SP500Idx 43.00 -.33 +12.2 +13.2 +10.6 LB 1 Schwab1000Idx 62.77 -.54 +12.5 +13.1 +10.2 LB 2 TtlStkMktIdx 49.03 -.50 +12.5 +13.1 +10.0 LB 2 Segall Bryant & Hami PlusBdRtl 10.57 +.10 +3.0 +3.0 +3.0 CI 2 State Farm Gr 79.62 -.59 +9.3 +10.5 +8.4 LB 1 T. Rowe Price BCGr 110.31 -.49 +14.9 +19.9 +14.1 LG 3 Comm&TeInv 110.81 +.31 +18.4 +19.4 +14.1 SC 1 CptlAprc 29.44 -.05 +11.0 +11.2 +9.9 MA 1 DivGr 46.21 -.35 +11.4 +13.2 +10.8 LB 1 EMBd d 11.70 +.05 +7.5 +5.8 +5.0 EB 3 EMStk d 41.95 -.37 +12.0 +12.6 +7.3 EM 2 EmergEurope d 14.32 +.03 +10.4 +8.4 +0.1 MQ 4 EqIdx500 d 74.96 -.57 +12.2 +13.0 +10.5 LB 2 EqInc 30.01 -.49 +9.9 +10.3 +6.7 LV 3 FinclSvcs 24.38 -1.05 +8.1 +13.4 +7.7 SF 1 GrStk 65.51 -.21 +14.7 +17.8 +12.9 LG 3 HY d 6.47 +.01 +6.4 +7.1 +4.0 HY 3 HlthSci 76.30 -1.82 +13.9 +14.6 +12.6 SH 2 InsLgCpGr 40.60 -.23 +13.7 +21.7 +14.4 LG 2 InsMdCpEqGr 55.58 -.30 +15.1 +15.4 +12.0 MG 2 InsSmCpStk 23.34 -.56 +15.0 +15.8 +9.0 SG 2 IntlDiscv d 61.61 -.37 +11.0 +9.7 +6.8 FR 3 IntlStk d 16.71 -.18 +11.6 +8.2 +4.8 FG 2 IntlValEq d 13.09 -.18 +8.5 +2.8 0.0 FV 4 LatinAmerica d 23.78 -1.21 +8.1 +11.5 +2.8 LS 3 MdCpGr 87.42 -.46 +14.5 +14.8 +11.4 MG 3 MdCpVal 26.60 -.32 +9.0 +8.5 +7.0 MV 3 NewHorizons 57.14 -.40 +18.5 +23.0 +13.0 MG 1 NewInc 9.36 +.08 +3.0 +2.4 +2.6 CI 3 OverseasStk d 10.17 -.14 +9.4 +7.2 +3.0 FB 3 QMUSSmCpGrEq d35.64 -.59 +14.4 +14.6 +9.1 SG 3 RlEstt d 28.40 -.02 +14.6 +4.3 +7.6 SR 5 Rtr2015 13.93 -.01 +7.2 +7.2 +5.3 TD 3 Rtr2020 21.10 -.05 +8.0 +8.1 +5.9 TE 3 Rtr2025 16.79 -.06 +8.8 +8.9 +6.3 TG 3 Rtr2030 24.45 -.11 +9.6 +9.6 +6.8 TH 3 Rtr2035 17.92 -.10 +10.2 +10.1 +7.0 TI 3 Rtr2040 25.51 -.16 +10.8 +10.5 +7.3 TJ 3 Rtr2045 17.38 -.13 +11.1 +10.7 +7.4 TK 3 Rtr2050 14.66 -.10 +11.1 +10.7 +7.4 TN 3 SciandTech 38.01 -.14 +21.1 +21.8 +15.6 ST 4 ShrtTrmBd 4.69 +.02 +1.4 +1.8 +1.3 CS 3 SmCpStk 47.46 -1.12 +15.0 +15.6 +8.7 SG 2 SmCpVal d 43.88 -1.52 +10.1 +11.8 +6.0 SB 2 SpectrumInc 12.29 +.04 +4.4 +4.5 +3.3 MU 4 SummitMnIntrInv11.89 +.06 +2.4 +2.1 +2.9 MI 3 TFInc 10.02 +.06 +2.2 +2.4 +3.7 ML 5 Val 34.01 -.25 +11.3 +9.7 +7.5 LV 3 TCW EMIncIns 8.18 +.05 +7.5 +7.1 +4.6 EB 2 TtlRetBdI 9.81 +.09 +2.2 +2.2 +2.7 CI 1 TIAA-CREF BdIdxIns 10.74 +.10 +2.6 +2.1 +2.6 CI 1 EqIdxIns 20.47 -.21 +12.5 +13.2 +10.1 LB 2 IntlEqIdxIns 18.50 -.21 +9.3 +7.3 +3.0 FB 2 LgCpGrIdxIns 31.31 -.05 +14.6 +16.3 +13.0 LG 2 LgCpValIdxIns 19.03 -.29 +10.6 +10.0 +7.6 LV 2 Thornburg LtdTrmMnI 14.33 +.03 +1.5 +1.4 +1.8 MS 1 Thrivent LgCpStkA m 24.93 -.29 +12.7 +10.0 +6.6 WS MidCpStkA m 22.74 -.36 +15.5 +16.2 +10.7 MB MnBdA m 11.20 +.08 +1.9 +1.9 +3.2 ML Torray Torray 47.31 -1.08 +8.9 +6.8 +6.4 LV 4 Tweedy, Browne GlbVal d 26.72 -.25 +7.4 +7.7 +4.2 FV 1 USAA Gr 29.40 -.28 +13.9 +14.7 +12.2 LG 3 Inc 12.92 +.12 +3.7 +3.8 +3.2 CI 2 PrcMtlsMnral 13.00 +.25 +11.5 +2.8 -2.9 SP 1 TEIntermTrm 13.33 +.07 +2.3 +2.6 +3.2 MI 2 VALIC Co I StkIdx 39.81 -.30 +12.2 +12.9 +10.3 LB 2 Vanguard 500IdxAdmrl 258.37 -3.40 +12.3 +13.2 +10.7 LB 1 500IdxInv 258.38 -3.34 +12.2 +13.1 +10.6 LB 2 BalIdxAdmrl 35.81 -.08 +8.5 +8.9 +7.2 MA 1 BalIdxIns 35.81 -.09 +8.5 +8.9 +7.2 MA 1 CAITTxExAdm 11.80 +.06 +2.2 +2.4 +3.3 MF 1 CptlOppAdmrl 146.18 -4.12 +10.7 +16.5 +11.9 LG 5 DevMIdxAdmrl 13.11 -.13 +9.6 +7.4 +3.2 FB 2 DevMIdxIns 13.12 -.14 +9.6 +7.4 +3.3 FB 2 DivGrInv 27.30 -.17 +11.6 +12.0 +10.4 LB 1 EMStkIdxInAdm x34.89 -.34 +10.1 +9.6 +4.5 EM 2 EMStkIdxIns x 26.53 -.26 +10.1 +9.7 +4.6 EM 2 EngyAdmrl 92.73 +.05 +14.2 +6.2 -2.6 EE 1 EqIncAdmrl 72.52 -1.52 +9.9 +11.0 +9.5 LV 1 EqIncInv 34.60 -.72 +9.9 +10.9 +9.4 LV 1 ExplorerAdmrl 89.65 -1.87 +15.3 +17.0 +8.7 SG 2 ExtMktIdxAdmrl 86.14 -1.95 +13.8 +13.0 +7.3 MB 2

85.57 236.62 299.00 36.56 245.16 19.01 127.13 172.08 47.00 124.82 96.75 132.43 124.00 79.11 167.82 61.32 56.71 46.54 140.78 125.10 80.36 34.89 31.55 40.64 120.20 121.27 104.49 77.22 104.74 91.35 31.00 66.46 43.00 133.53 110.17 89.46 182.19 71.00 197.86 151.26 130.75 79.70 95.63 138.69 458.41 75.65 291.23 163.79 264.88 71.96 50.20 139.77 78.16 101.96 87.36 199.71 63.88 80.55 218.62 63.97 266.67 136.91 112.17 34.67 106.75 41.78 87.26 56.86 62.08 68.00 12.15 94.37 88.34 61.90 39.24 19.70 81.09 34.21 85.50 161.21 229.74 15.59 50.83 45.00 112.18 79.61 137.13 267.50 372.06 147.42 31.88 27.08 54.91 22.57 46.79 175.50

71.12 150.37 216.47 26.11 180.83 5.91 98.85 124.40 32.39 94.25 49.19 94.59 82.38 48.25 128.32 45.08 33.93 20.37 85.19 100.05 54.36 20.60 19.08 23.22 97.68 86.87 78.78 61.53 65.83 71.96 24.67 40.41 26.01 82.04 67.40 64.46 132.25 45.50 123.00 73.91 74.51 55.39 75.45 88.68 335.29 57.96 226.22 121.47 201.09 52.76 37.45 104.16 60.80 82.80 64.65 138.67 40.52 60.10 123.02 47.37 150.94 110.66 93.71 22.12 79.42 32.93 68.43 35.88 29.78 40.02 7.41 51.97 62.89 35.27 27.34 9.60 64.54 24.25 57.01 114.40 143.87 6.66 36.42 30.56 85.80 60.32 94.81 151.70 265.00 93.03 21.80 18.46 24.70 11.57 31.36 123.24

+.01 +7.3 -.01 +10.7 +.08 +3.5

84.91 169.53 291.76 33.83 237.56 11.22 125.50 155.63 40.93 124.89 64.34 129.69 117.44 54.05 155.94 49.76 49.24 30.34 101.37 119.12 70.35 26.67 25.45 31.27 108.23 117.47 101.43 75.52 90.30 90.70 30.67 45.02 36.65 93.68 75.14 79.02 173.38 64.69 188.99 102.34 128.30 66.86 96.12 112.88 451.50 74.40 290.71 159.50 214.99 71.69 50.28 121.64 74.12 100.61 80.48 152.24 47.54 74.98 164.34 61.70 173.99 134.52 110.41 24.62 98.10 41.77 85.58 43.51 35.59 56.91 8.54 85.19 82.23 45.01 32.10 12.18 78.88 24.52 83.58 145.91 165.85 9.98 50.74 36.44 107.48 63.77 134.00 188.96 292.51 134.44 31.65 19.34 28.73 16.92 33.84 159.28

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+4.7 HY +8.0 LV +3.0 CI

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LB XY CA MA LG LG LG MA MA HY CH LG LG CV LG LB FG EM PJ LV LV MB BL AL TD TE TG TH TI TJ FB FB LG LG LG LG LB FG FG FB FV CI CI MV MV LG MG LG EB LG LG FG MA MA SV CS SB LG CI LB LB CI CI MV WS

1 1 2

SH CC EE SH SH EE ST ST

+4.8 IH

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1 3 4 5 2 1 2 2 2 4 2 4 4 1 5 3 3 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 5 4 5 5 5 5 2 2 3 4 5 4 3 4 1 2 2 1 1 3 3 5 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 1 5 2 2 2 1 1 3 2

5 1 3 3 1 2 1 5 2 1 4 2 2 5 3 1 1 1 1

1 1

-.48 +12.1

+13.4

+9.4 LB

2

-.82 +11.4

+9.2

+5.3 SB

3

-1.74 +9.7

+9.6

+5.0 SB

4

+.30 +3.0

-3.9

-.16 +18.9 -.39 +11.2 +.12 +12.7

0.0

+19.3 +13.6 LG +3.8 +0.6 FB +9.9

+6.1 FG

4

103.18 26.00 29.74 75.49 24.27 8.23 29.22 54.50 231.23 15.12 29.06 10.65 10.85 155.06 23.04 20.53 63.21 17.11 42.54 127.79 75.96 223.63 39.36 49.79 124.46 217.64 56.83 65.85 50.26 42.40 108.45 94.37 25.30 86.46 53.43 77.90 140.82 59.36 70.22 35.30 13.66 95.94 70.83 36.28 34.32 64.67 78.44 73.41 119.08 84.59 40.42 55.21 70.73 56.71 75.61 47.84 192.02 20.64 54.74 48.56 27.90 78.95 95.63 9.22 69.11 144.27 48.80 115.31 55.38 281.89 12.39 64.13 90.64 52.79 141.46 32.08 245.59 74.53 89.48 156.68 146.13 76.77 177.70 111.34 34.99 37.83 35.38 30.22 100.49 355.28 145.78 60.12 40.34 91.32 135.29 42.42

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1.56 1.76 .78 1.35 2.56 .13 1.36 3.08 .08 .76f 5.76f 2.20 .64 .52 1.24 24.00 3.08f

1.50 1.29

3.52f 3.84f 1.48 2.94 3.60 .40 1.04 2.04 3.60f 3.17 .25p 2.41 .80 1.00 2.64f 1.24f 2.21 .48 2.12f 1.76 2.05f

1.80f 1.68e 2.00 .80f 1.82 1.36 4.60 1.52f 2.60f 3.00 1.62f 1.44 .96f 1.68 .96 1.20 .66

44.28 106.41 47.37 57.87 144.75 46.05 17.43 21.78 79.14 58.12 69.84 41.49 84.41 31.58 60.15 18.20 226.02 87.70 43.27 199.85 176.87 73.04 69.68 75.58 58.27 298.15 111.08 36.75 26.19 49.77 34.03 199.15 15.60 13.62 126.37 64.80 89.89 94.28 43.14 100.48 212.50 109.37 26.77 67.18 68.81 101.42 46.55 114.01 95.21 46.09 144.07 23.31 116.03 59.48 82.52 58.48 65.09 81.78 59.07 79.96 167.94 188.32 43.02 49.58 33.83 16.42 35.20 20.52 99.40 20.36 134.50 90.06 41.99 62.54 60.65 77.09 96.99 38.08 77.00

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J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • D

BAD START DOOMS SLU Virginia Tech ousts Billikens in NCAA tourney

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Virginia Tech guard Nickeil Alexander-Walker gets past St. Louis U. forward D.J. Foreman (right) during the first half of Friday night’s first-round NCAA Tournament game.

KANSAS STATE SENT PACKING PAGE D5

BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

NCAA TOURNAMENT

SAN JOSE, CALIF. • The day started

VIRGINIA TECH 66 ...............ST. LOUIS U. 52

MIZZOU WOMEN ADVANCE IN NCAA UPDATED BRACKET

PAGE D2

PAGE D5

at SAP Center the way St. Louis University wanted it to end. The Billikens were still going through their shootaround Friday at Santa Clara University when a No. 13 seed with an unconventional mascot beat a No. 4 seed in the NCAA Tournament. UC Irvine’s win over Kansas State on the court where SLU would play Virginia Tech was inspiring. But could lightning strike twice on the same day, in the same venue? Could the Billikens follow in the Anteaters’ footsteps? No. 12 Oregon did by beating No. 5 Wisconsin. And No. 12 Liberty followed suit by beating Mississippi State. But there was never an indication that SLU, the No. 13 seed in the See SLU • Page D3

Steen finds home on Blues’ 4th line Veteran is enjoying his time with Sanford and Barbashev BY TOM TIMMERMANN • St. Louis Post-Dispatch

In the past week, the Blues have gotten two of their top six forwards back into action from injuries in David Perron and Vladimir Tarasenko. Those returns have inevitably led to the movement of some players down in the lineup to make room for the team’s highend offensive talent. Welcome to the fourth line, Alexander Steen. In a season of ups and downs and sideways moves for the Steen Blues, Steen has been a full participant in all of that. He missed games after a concussion, missed games with a shoulder injury, missed games when he became a father — he was taking pictures of baby-sized

Goldschmidt felt at home in a hurry Welcome has been great ‘top to bottom’

O’Neill gets a spot, now can earn one Outfielder could be playing for a starting job next season

baseball,” Goldschmidt said. “But it was really our first time even meeting, besides a hello on the phone. He and I held off talking about baseball for a good bit. But of course you

PORT ST. LUCIE, FLA. • Mr. Canada, 1975, was the first to know. Tyler O’Neill told his dad he was headed north. For the O’Neill family, that might actually mean south. But definitely north from Florida, where the 23-year-old outfielder arrived at camp earlier this spring determined to convince the Cardinals he belonged in the majors. O’Neill got the word Thursday evening. He informed his parents of an accomplished BEN mission. Another starts now. FREDERICKSON O’Neill, you have most likely St. Louis heard, is the son of an accom- Post-Dispatch plished body builder. It shows. The sculpted slugger knows his way around a bench. But can he thrive coming off of one?

See CARDINALS • Page D7

See FREDERICKSON • Page D7

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PORT ST. LUCIE, FLA. •

See BLUES • Page D6

One of the first long conversations Paul Goldschmidt had about St. Louis and the Cardinals happened over the course of several hours and several plates of Italian food at Dominic’s on the Hill. He and his wife, Amy, met Cardinals manager Mike Shildt for the meal in January, and it didn’t take long to realize they had the same taste in conversation. The seams that tie also bind, quickly. “If my wife wasn’t there, it probably would have been all

> 7 p.m. Saturday vs. Lightning, FSM

IN THIS EDITION: Cardinals season preview section | INSIDE: Cards let Shreve go and keep Wieters, D7 | UP NEXT: 12:05 p.m. Sat. at Nationals, FSM

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Paul Goldschmidt figures to be at first base for years to come.

SPORTS

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1 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • D

Finally, it’s a done deal

Extensions work for player, team

Goldschmidt puts ink to new contract

JUPITER, FLA. • Gathered toward the back of a press conference that was Paul Goldschmidt, personified, stood a bunch of Cardinals. “Y’all go ahead with questions, I guess,” said Goldschmidt in his first public comments since his record-setting contract. I’ve got one, but it’s for the guys at the back. BEN Who’s next? FREDERICKSON Let’s take some presSt. Louis sure off Goldschmidt Post-Dispatch for a moment, considering he seems as uncomfortable behind a podium as he is elite at first base. The guy is here to play baseball and win championships. Press conferences are not his deal. If it was fake, it would be tiresome. It’s not. He’s real. The guy had to be pulled from the batting cage for the announcement of his

IN THIS NEWSPAPER: MLB PREVIEW

OFFSEASON SHOWS CARDINALS READY TO CLOSE A GAP

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Goldschmidt deal reflects the Cardinals’ hunger to win now.

JUPITER, FLA. • Previous attempts to

offer or acquire the largest contract in club history had sent John Mozeliak to Nashville for a foody dinner, to Los Angeles to stump for the Cardinals, or just back and forth, pacing in a suite at a hotel snug against a Dallas highway. This time he didn’t have to leave the clubhouse. With about two weeks remaining in spring training, Mozeliak, coffee cup in hand, walked up to first baseman Paul Goldschmidt at his locker. The president

Hochman: Goldschmidt will make the difference for Cards. BenFred: Fowler confident this season will be different. Cards feel well-positioned with evolution of the bullpen.

See CARDINALS • Page D3

Shildt has dedicated his life to the game he loves.

> Exhibition • 12:05 p.m. Sunday vs. Marlins, FSM > Hudson pitches six scoreless innings. D3

SECTION S

See FREDERICKSON • Page D3

BLUES BEAT THE BEST Race out to 3-0 lead and hold on to beat NHL-leading Lightning

Ford proud despite end of the story Poor first half led to Bills’ run concluding

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Guard Dion Wiley leaves the court Friday, after his final game for SLU. BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Blues players celebrate after right winger Vladimir Tarasenko scored in the first period to give them a 3-0- lead Saturday night.

BLUES 4 LIGHTNING 3 > 7 p.m. Monday vs. Golden Knights, FSM > Del Zotto likes playoff chase. D4 > Avalanche win fourth in a row, holding off Blackhawks. D5 > 17-5-1 • The Blues’ record when Tarasenko scores a goal.

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Needing five victories over the remainder of the season to set an NHL record for most wins in a season, the Tampa Bay Lightning came to Enterprise Center knocking on history’s door. They’ve already clinched a playoff berth, already won their division title, already clinched the President’s Trophy for the best record in the 2018-19 season. But they left Enterprise Center still five wins short of the record books. To a large degree, the Blues were hanging on for dear life at the end. But they prevailed 4-3, handing Tampa Bay (58-14-4) just its See BLUES • Page D4

SAN JOSE, CALIF. • Solemn, tired and a little choked up, Travis Ford didn’t want to talk about the details of St. Louis University’s season-ending loss in the NCAA Tournament as much as he did the guys who were involved. It was midnight central time after being ousted by Virginia Tech, and Ford was not thinking about the previous three hours as much as he was the entire season. The previous three years. “I just told them they have made me a better person, a better coach,” Ford said. “And it’s not about winning. They’ve made me better through all the things that we’ve been through. They’ve tested me on many occasions, and it’s made me a better person and coach hopefully going forward. “I took over a program that was dead last out of 14 (Atlantic 10 Conference) teams. We were See SLU • Page D8

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington makes a save in the second period against the Lightning at the Enterprise Center.

NCAA TOURNAMENT

A year later, Barnett agonizes over ‘dumb decision’

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One year later, the story sticks with me. I’ve been around a lot of athletes, and few cared more about his or her team than this guy did. Jordan Barnett was the leader of the resurgent Missouri Tigers basketball team. He was averaging the second-most points and the second-most rebounds, too. He was a feel-good lo-

cal story — a kid from St. Louis now playing for his state school. And he’d never played on a team that made the NCAA Tournament — until his senior year, when Mizzou got in, one March ago. And he watched the first and only game from a hotel room. “I was sick to my stomach when they lost, I felt so bad ...”

Barnett said by phone recently. “I didn’t even want to speak for a while. I didn’t even want to talk.” How can someone care so much and yet do something that could jeopardize the thing they care for? That’s what happened on a

BLOWOUTS GALORE Michigan’s Jordan Poole

Barnett

See HOCHMAN • Page D8

> Favorites dominate most Saturday games. D6-D7 > Updated bracket. D7

SPORTS

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2 M


J O I N U S O N L I N E S T L T O D A Y. C O M / S P O R T S

SUNDAY • 03.24.2019 • D

Finally, it’s a done deal

Extensions work for player, team

Goldschmidt puts ink to new contract

JUPITER, FLA. • Gathered toward the back of a press conference that was Paul Goldschmidt, personified, stood a bunch of Cardinals. “Y’all go ahead with questions, I guess,” said Goldschmidt in his first public comments since his record-setting contract. I’ve got one, but it’s for the guys at the back. BEN Who’s next? FREDERICKSON Let’s take some presSt. Louis sure off Goldschmidt Post-Dispatch for a moment, considering he seems as uncomfortable behind a podium as he is elite at first base. The guy is here to play baseball and win championships. Press conferences are not his deal. If it was fake, it would be tiresome. It’s not. He’s real. The guy had to be pulled from the batting cage for the announcement of his

IN THIS NEWSPAPER: MLB PREVIEW

OFFSEASON SHOWS CARDINALS READY TO CLOSE A GAP

BY DERRICK GOOLD St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Goldschmidt deal reflects the Cardinals’ hunger to win now.

JUPITER, FLA. • Previous attempts to

offer or acquire the largest contract in club history had sent John Mozeliak to Nashville for a foody dinner, to Los Angeles to stump for the Cardinals, or just back and forth, pacing in a suite at a hotel snug against a Dallas highway. This time he didn’t have to leave the clubhouse. With about two weeks remaining in spring training, Mozeliak, coffee cup in hand, walked up to first baseman Paul Goldschmidt at his locker. The president

Hochman: Goldschmidt will make the difference for Cards. BenFred: Fowler confident this season will be different. Cards feel well-positioned with evolution of the bullpen.

See CARDINALS • Page D3

Shildt has dedicated his life to the game he loves.

> Exhibition • 12:05 p.m. Sunday vs. Marlins, FSM > Hudson pitches six scoreless innings. D3

SECTION S

See FREDERICKSON • Page D3

BLUES BEAT THE BEST Race out to 3-0 lead and hold on to beat NHL-leading Lightning

Ford proud despite end of the story Poor first half led to Bills’ run concluding

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Guard Dion Wiley leaves the court Friday, after his final game for SLU. BY STU DURANDO St. Louis Post-Dispatch

PHOTOS BY CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Blues players celebrate after right winger Vladimir Tarasenko scored in the first period to give them a 3-0- lead Saturday night.

BLUES 4 LIGHTNING 3 > 7 p.m. Monday vs. Golden Knights, FSM > Del Zotto likes playoff chase. D4 > Avalanche win fourth in a row, holding off Blackhawks. D5 > 17-5-1 • The Blues’ record when Tarasenko scores a goal.

BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Needing five victories over the remainder of the season to set an NHL record for most wins in a season, the Tampa Bay Lightning came to Enterprise Center knocking on history’s door. They’ve already clinched a playoff berth, already won their division title, already clinched the President’s Trophy for best record in the 2018-19 season. But they left Enterprise Center still five wins short of the record books. To a large degree, the Blues were hanging on for dear life at the end. In terms of total attempts, they were outshot 74-48. They needed See BLUES • Page D4

SAN JOSE, CALIF. • Solemn, tired and a little choked up, Travis Ford didn’t want to talk about the details of St. Louis University’s season-ending loss in the NCAA Tournament as much as he did the guys who were involved. It was midnight central time after being ousted by Virginia Tech, and Ford was not thinking about the previous three hours as much as he was the entire season. The previous three years. “I just told them they have made me a better person, a better coach,” Ford said. “And it’s not about winning. They’ve made me better through all the things that we’ve been through. They’ve tested me on many occasions, and it’s made me a better person and coach hopefully going forward. “I took over a program that was dead last out of 14 (Atlantic 10 Conference) teams. We were See SLU • Page D8

Blues goalie Jordan Binnington makes a save in the second period against the Lightning at the Enterprise Center.

NCAA TOURNAMENT

A year later, Barnett agonizes over ‘dumb decision’

BENJAMIN HOCHMAN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

One year later, the story sticks with me. I’ve been around a lot of athletes, and few cared more about his or her team than this guy did. Jordan Barnett was the leader of the resurgent Missouri Tigers basketball team. He was averaging the second-most points and the second-most rebounds, too. He was a feel-good lo-

cal story — a kid from St. Louis now playing for his state school. And he’d never played on a team that made the NCAA Tournament — until his senior year, when Mizzou got in, one March ago. And he watched the first and only game from a hotel room. “I was sick to my stomach when they lost, I felt so bad ...”

Barnett said by phone recently. “I didn’t even want to speak for a while. I didn’t even want to talk.” How can someone care so much and yet do something that could jeopardize the thing they care for? That’s what happened on a

BLOWOUTS GALORE Michigan’s Jordan Poole

Barnett

See HOCHMAN • Page D8

> Favorites dominate most Saturday games. D6-D7 > Updated bracket. D7

SPORTS

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SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Saturday 3/23 at Nationals* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Sunday 3/24 vs. Marlins* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Monday 3/25 at Memphis* 6:05 p.m.

*Exhibition game Thursday 3/28 at Brewers 1:10 p.m. FSM

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Saturday 3/23 vs. Lightning 7 p.m. FSM

Monday 3/25 vs. Golden Knights 7 p.m., FSM

Friday 3/29 at Rangers 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/30 at Devils 6 p.m. FSM

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT

headline

MU survives in overtime Roundtree hits free throw for the winning margin

UPDATE

Mizzou women’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Sunday 3/24 NCAA Tourn. vs. Iowa, 1 p.m., ESPN2

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/23 vs. Tampa Bay 1 p.m.

Saturday 3/30 vs. Charlotte 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/6 at Atlanta 6:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/13 vs. Birmingham 7:30 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 3/29: vs. Milwaukee, 7:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STLFC 636-680-0997

Rascals 636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 Illinois 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 SIUE 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 Fairmount 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

CAPTION_JUMP

GOLF ROUNDUP

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ON THE AIR

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS ASSOCIATED PRESS

AUTO RACING SATURDAY AUTO RACING 12:30 p.m. IndyCar: IndyCar Classic: Circuit of the Americas, NBCSN 8:30 1, FS1 1 p.m.a.m. NASCAR: NASCAR: STP STP 500, 500, practice FS1 9:30 a.m. NASCAR trucks: Race at Martinsville, qualifying, FS1 BASEBALL 11:30 a.m. NASCAR: STP 500, final practice, FS1 11 a.m. Exhibition: Nationals (ss) at Mets, MLB Network 111p.m. NASCAR NASCARSEC trucks: Race at Martinsville, KTVI (2) a.m. College: trucks: LSU at Georgia, Network 212:05 p.m.p.m. IndyCar: Circuit of thevs. Americas: Exhibition: Cardinals Marlins,qualifying, FSM, KMOXNBCSN (1120 AM) 42 p.m. p.m. NASCAR: STP 500, qualifying, FS1SEC Network College: Mississippi at Missouri, BASEBALL 7 p.m. Exhibition: Dodgers at Angels, MLB Network Noon College: LSU at Georgia, SEC Network Noon Exhibition: Blue Jays (ss) at Yankees, MLB Network 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals at Nationals, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 7 p.m. College: Mississippi at Missouri, SEC Network 7:30 p.m. College: Texas at TCU, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. Exhibition: Cubs at Rockies, MLB Network BASKETBALL 10 a.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 11 a.m. NCAA Tournament: LSU vs. Maryland, KMOV (4) 11 a.m. NIT: Arkansas at Indiana, ESPN 11 a.m. Women’s JUCO final: New Mexico JC vs. Gulf Coast, CBSSN 12:30 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 1 p.m. NIT: Lipscomb at UNC-Greensboro, ESPN 1 p.m. Men’s JUCO final: Ranger vs. Vincennes, CBSSN 1:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Kentucky vs. Wofford, KMOV (4) 2:30 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Missouri State vs. DePaul, ESPN2 4 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Michigan vs. Florida, KMOV (4) 5 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Florida State vs. Murray State, TNT 5 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 6 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Gonzaga vs. Baylor, TBS 6:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Michigan State vs. Minnesota, KMOV (4) BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. NBA: 76ers at Hawks, NBA a.m. NCAATimberwolves Tournament:at Iowa vs. Tennessee, 711p.m. NBA: Grizzlies, FSM PlusKMOV (4) 11 a.m. Women’s Tournament: Coverage, ESPN2 7:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Purdue vs.Whiparound Villanova, TNT 1 p.m.p.m. NCAA NIT: Wichita State atKansas Clemson, 8:30 Tournament: vs.ESPN Auburn, TBS NCAAPistons Women’s Tournament: Missouri vs. Iowa, ESPN2 91 p.m. NBA: at Trail Blazers, NBA 1:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: North Carolina vs. Washington, KMOV (4) BOXING NIT: Xavier at Texas, ESPN 93 p.m. Heavyweights: Kubrat Pulev vs. Bogdan Dinu, ESPN 4 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Duke vs. Central Florida, KMOV (4) FOOTBALL 14p.m. AAF: p.m. NBA:Orlando Nuggetsat atAtlanta, Pacers, TNT FSM Plus 75 p.m. AAF: Lake at SanTexas Antonio, NCAASalt Tournament: TechNFL vs. Network Buffalo, TNT GOLF 6 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN Noon PGA: Championship, third round, GOLF 6 p.m. NCAAValspar Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 26 p.m. PGA: Championship, round, KSDK (5) p.m. NCAAValspar Tournament: Virginia third Tech vs. Liberty, TBS 56:30 p.m.p.m. LPGA: Founders Cup, third round, GOLF NIT: Harvard at North Carolina State, ESPNU GYMNASTICS 6:30 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Celtics, NBA 11 a.m. women: Big Ten Championship, BTNTRUTV 6:30 p.m. College NCAA Tournament: Virginia vs. Oklahoma, 17:30 p.m.p.m. College women: Big 12 Championships, ESPNU NCAA Tournament: Houston vs. Ohio State, TNT 1:30 p.m. College: Michigan at Nebraska,Whiparound BTN 8 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Coverage, ESPN 38 p.m. College women:Tournament: SEC Championship, SEC Network p.m. NCAA Women’s Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 48:30 p.m.p.m. College women: Championship, BTN NIT: Nebraska at Big TCU,Ten ESPNU 78:30 p.m.p.m. College women: SECOregon Championship, ESPN2TBS NCAA Tournament: vs. UC Irvine, HOCKEY BOXING Noon Islanders at Flyers, NHLvs. Network 5 p.m. PBC: Lamont Peterson Sergey Lipinets — Prelims, FS1 67 p.m. p.m. Rangers at Maple Leafs, NHL Network PBC: Lamont Peterson vs. Sergey Lipinets, FS1 7FOOTBALL p.m. Blues vs. Lightning, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 73 p.m. Big Penn State at Notre Dame, BTN p.m. AAF:Ten SanChampionship: Diego Fleet at Arizona Hotshots, CBSSN 7:30 p.m. NCHC Frozen Faceoff St. Cloud State vs. 7 p.m. AAF: Birmingham Ironfinal: at Memphis Express, NFL Network Minnesota Duluth, CBSSN GOLF HORSE RACING 12 p.m. PGA: Valspar Championship, final round, GOLF 4:30 p.m. Thoroughbreds: Louisiana Derby, NBCSN 2 p.m. PGA: Valspar Championship: final round, KSDK (5) LACROSSE 5 p.m. LPGA: Founders Cup, final round, GOLF 3 p.m. College women: North Carolina at Maryland, ESPNU GYMNASTICS MOTORCYCLE RACING 4 p.m. College: Illinois at Ohio State, BTN 9 p.m. Monster Energy Supercross from Seattle, NBCSN HOCKEY RUGBY 11:30 a.m. Flyers at Capitals, KSDK (5) 10 a.m. Premiership: Saracens vs. Harlequins, NBCSN 1:30 p.m. Women’s NCAA championship: Teams TBA, BTN SOCCER 4 p.m. AHL: Rochester Americans at Toronto Marlies, NHL Network 1 p.m. USL: St. Louis FC vs. Tampa Bay, KTRS (550 AM) 7 p.m. Avalanche at Blackhawks, NBCSN 2:30 p.m. UEFA Euro qualifying: Spain vs. Norway, ESPNews LACROSSE SOFTBALL 1 p.m. College: Duke at Syracuse, ESPNU 3 p.m. College: Washington at Oregon, ESPN RUGBY 5 p.m. College: Arkansas at Tennessee, SEC Network 1 p.m. Major League: New York at Glendale, CBSSN TENNIS SOCCER 10 a.m. Miami Open: ATP 2nd round, WTA 3rd round, Tennis Channel 11:50 a.m. UEFA Euro qualifying: Hungary vs. Croatia, ESPNews 6 p.m. Miami Open: ATP 2nd round, WTA 3rd round, Tennis Channel SOFTBALL WRESTLING 11 a.m. College: LSU at Georgia, ESPN 10 a.m. NCAA championship, ESPNU 11 a.m. College: Arkansas at Tennessee, ESPNU 6 p.m. NCAA championship, ESPN 3 p.m. College: Oklahoma State at Baylor, ESPN2 3 p.m. College: South Carolina Upstate at Longwood, ESPNU SUNDAY HIGHLIGHTS 5 p.m. College: Mississippi at South Carolina, SEC Network BASEBALL TENNIS 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals vs. Marlins, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 210p.m. Mississippi atround, Missouri, SEC a.m. College: Miami Open: ATP 3rd WTA 3rdNetwork round, Tennis Channel HOCKEY 6 p.m. Miami Open: ATP 3rd round, WTA 3rd round, Tennis Channel 11:30 a.m. Flyers at Capitals, KSDK (5) TRACK AND FIELD 79 p.m. Avalanche Blackhawks, NBCSN a.m. Los AngelesatMarathon, WGN

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Missouri forward Cierra Porter drives to the basket past Drake forward Sara Rhine (left) during a first-round ASSOCIATED PRESS game in the women’s NCAA Tournament on Friday. BY ANNE ROGERS Special to the Post-Dispatch

IOWA CITY, IOWA • Missouri junior guard Jordan Roundtree stepped up to the free throw line, took a few deep breaths and tried not to think about the fact that the Tigers’ season was on the line. With 1.1 seconds left in overtime of the first round of the NCAA Tournament, Missouri was tied with Drake, and Roundtree had three chances for the lead. Missouri’s star seniors Sophie Cunningham and Cierra Porter had combined for half of the Tigers’ points at that time, but they fouled out and were on the bench for the final play. Roundtree took a prayer of a 3-point shot and was answered … with a foul. It was a moment that Roundtree said she had dreamed about. Now, she had to make at least one free throw. She missed the first one. Made the second. Missed the third. It was enough for No. 7-seeded Missouri to survive an overtime thriller Friday, beating No. 10 Drake 77-76 in a March Madness classic. “With people like Sophie and Cierra on the team, you don’t always get those plays drawn for you, and that’s fine, but you got to be ready when the time comes,” Roundtree said. “When the ball is in your hands when the time comes, you have to make something happen.” Roundtree also made two buzzer-beater layups at the end of the second and third quarters, showing her growth from a player with spotted minutes last year to a starter with the ball in her hands in clutch moments. Mizzou moves on to face host team and No. 2 seed Iowa on Sunday in the second round. Earlier in the day, the Hawkeyes avoided an upset from No. 15 Mercer to win 66-61. Senior forward Megan Gustafson, the Big 10 player of the year, had 30 points. In the NCAA field for the fourth straight year, Mizzou will attempt to get past DIGEST the second round for the first time since 2000. In the second game at Carver ASSOCIATED PRESS Hawkeye Arena, the opening of overtime featured four straight 3-pointers from both teams to keep the score tied. Then they traded free throws, and Cunningham and Porter fouled out. Cunningham

Missouri guard Sophie Cunningham (right) is fouled by Drake guard Maddy Dean. MISSOURI 77, DRAKE 76, OT FG FT Reb DRAKE Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Rhine 28 6-10 5-8 0-4 0 4 18 Bachrodt 35 1-9 0-0 0-2 5 2 3 Dean 30 3-4 2-2 1-6 4 3 10 Hittner 31 7-21 1-1 2-9 4 4 19 Monahan 25 2-3 0-0 0-0 4 0 5 Burich 15 0-2 0-0 4-5 1 4 0 Jonas 7 1-2 0-0 0-0 0 0 2 Wooldridge 3 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Miller 29 5-8 0-0 1-1 3 1 12 Rose 22 3-6 0-0 1-1 2 1 7 Totals 225 28-65 8-11 13-34 23 20 76 Percentages: FG , FT. 3-point goals: 12-26, (Hittner 4-8, Dean 2-3, Miller 2-3, Rhine 1-2, Bachrodt 1-4, Monahan 1-2, Rose 1-2, Burich 0-1, Jonas 0-1) Blocked shots: 3 (Rhine 3) Turnovers: 16 (Rhine 4, Rose 4, Dean 3, Hittner 2, Monahan 1, Jonas 1, Miller 1) Steals: 8 (Burich 2, Miller 2, Rhine 1, Bachrodt 1, Hittner 1, Rose 1) Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb MISSOURI Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Porter 29 7-9 3-3 2-4 0 5 18 Aldridge 40 4-10 0-0 1-2 2 0 12 Cunningham 40 5-10 10-10 0-3 4 5 21 Roundtree 31 3-5 1-3 0-4 2 1 7 Smith 26 5-14 0-0 1-4 4 2 11 Schuchts 8 0-0 0-0 0-2 0 1 0 Tahane 30 1-1 0-0 3-7 2 1 2 Chavis 9 0-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Troup 12 2-6 0-0 0-3 1 1 6 Totals 225 27-58 14-16 11-37 15 16 77 Percentages: FG , FT. 3-point goals: 9-25, (Aldridge 4-9, Troup 2-5, Porter 1-1, Cunningham 1-4, Smith 1-2, Roundtree 0-1, Chavis 0-3) Blocked shots: 5 (Porter 3, Aldridge 1, Smith 1) Turnovers: 19 (Aldridge 4, Cunningham 4, Roundtree 4, Tahane 4, Smith 1, Troup 1) Steals: 10 (Tahane 3, Aldridge 2, Roundtree 2, Cunningham 1, Smith 1, Schuchts 1) Technical fouls: None. Drake 16 14 24 10 12 — 76 Missouri 21 12 19 12 13 — 77 A: 10,720.

finished with game-high 21 points, and Porter finished with 18. With 15.9 seconds left and the score tied, Missouri took a timeout. The plan was to get the ball inside to Amber Smith, who finished with 11 points and four rebounds, for a layup or a foul. Missouri’s timeout was filled with encouragement from Cunningham and Porter, who both said they never thought that it could be their final game while they were on the bench. “I was just telling all of (the players), ‘You guys got this. You’re

made for this,’” Cunningham said. “They might not be in the paper as much, but they work their tail off every single day, and they’re built for it. I tried to encourage them and feed them confidence. “Don’t turn the ball over, I did say that, but go out there and do what you do.” The play didn’t develop exactly as planned: Missouri inbounded the ball and went around the perimeter until finally getting it to Roundtree, the St. Louis native from Kirkwood High, with 1.1 seconds left. Drake junior guard Becca Hittner fouled on Roundtree’s shot. Then it was Drake who got the last shot – but Hittner missed an open 3-pointer at the buzzer. “The refs called it, so they called it,” Hittner said about the foul. “We still got a good look at the end.” In regulation, Drake started with three quick 3-pointers to build a small lead, but Smith willed the Tigers back with seven straight points, including finishing an offensive rebound with a layup and a 3-pointer of her own. Smith sparked a 14-0 run for the Tigers in the first quarter, who led 21-16 at the end. It included two 3-pointers from Lauren Aldridge and one from Haley Troup, who went down with an ankle injury with 2:37 left in regulation. She was in a walking boot and on crutches after the game but isn’t ruled out yet for Sunday. Drake took back the lead on a 3-pointer from Hittner, who finished with 19 points and nine rebounds. But Porter beat out Drake forward Sara Rhine inside to give the Tigers the lead at halftime. Drake picked up its tempo and led by as much as six near the end of the third quarter. Turnovers continued to plague the Tigers – who had 19 by the end of the game – but Mizzou only trailed by two heading into the fourth quarter. The Bulldogs held a slight lead throughout the fourth, but Cunningham made two free throws to tie it. Then Porter made a huge MLB NOTEBOOK defensive stop on Rhine’s final layup in regulation to get the game toASSOCIATED overtime, where PRESS the madness ensued. “That’s what it’s all about, survive and advance,” Pingeton said. “We’re looking forward to an opportunity to continue to go battle together as a team.”

DIGEST MU wrestlers in fifth place Missouri wrestlers Jaydin Eierman and Daniel Lewis clinched AllAmerican honors with trips to the semifinals at the NCAA Championships in Pittsburgh. Missouri sat in fifth place heading into Saturday’s final round of action with Penn State in the lead over Ohio State, Oklahoma State and Iowa in the top four spots. Eierman (141 pounds) and Lewis (174) both lost in the semifinals to slip to the consolation bracket on Friday, but for Lewis, the senior became just the third wrestler in team history to earn All-American honors all four years at MU, joining former Tigers Ben Askren and J’den Cox. MU’s John Erneste (133) and Brock Mauller (149) pulled off victories Friday night in the consolation bracket to secure at least sixthplace finishes in their respective weight classes. (Dave Matter) STLFC hosts Tampa Bay • Two of the four teams in the USL Championship with 2-0 records, St. Louis FC and the Tampa Bay Rowdies, will face off on Saturday at 1 p.m. at Soccer Park. STLFC is coming off a road win in

Nashville with Caleb Calvert heading in the goal in the 84th minute off a corner kick from Joaquin Rivas. Rivas will miss Saturday’s game after being called up for national team duty by El Salvador. Forward Kyle Greig is questionable for the game with a groin injury and if he plays will probably come off the bench. (Tom Timmermann) France, England win openers • Big wins for France and England. Not even a goal for Portugal. Even with Cristiano Ronaldo returning to the Portugal side for the first time since last year’s World Cup, the European champions could only begin their title defense with a 0-0 result at home against Ukraine. The goals were flowing elsewhere in Euro 2020 qualifying. World champion France opened with a 4-1 victory at Moldova while Raheem Sterling scored his first international hat trick as host England routed the Czech Republic 5-0. (AP) Messi back but Argentina loses • Captain Lionel Messi made his Argentina return on Friday but couldn’t stop his team from losing 3-1 to Venezuela in a friendly in

Madrid. Salomon Rondon, John Murillo and Josef Martinez scored for Venezuela, while Lautaro Martinez replied for Argentina. Messi hadn’t played an international match since the 4-3 loss to France in the round of 16 at last year’s World Cup. (AP) Raiders sign Glennon, Riley • Oakland signed unrestricted free agent quarterback Mike Glennon and safety Curtis Riley. The additions give the Raiders a second backup to Derek Carr along with Nathan Peterman and depth in the secondary. (AP) Other NFL news • Buffalo signed free-agent tackle and tight end Jake Fisher to a one-year contract. ... Detroit re-signed offensive lineman Andrew Donnal. (AP) S. Williams, Osaka win • Eight-time champion Serena Williams won her opening match at the Miami Open by beating Rebecca Peterson 6-3, 1-6, 6-1 in Miami Gardens, Fla. No. 1-ranked Naomi Osaka beat qualifier Yanina Wickmayer 6-0, 6-7 (3), 6-1. (AP)


SPORTS

D2 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

CALENDAR

ROAD

Cardinals • cardinals.com | 314-345-9000 Sunday 3/24 vs. Marlins* 12:05 p.m. FSM

Monday 3/25 at Memphis* 6:05 p.m.

Thursday 3/28 at Brewers 1:10 p.m. FSM

*Exhibition game Friday 3/29 at Brewers 7:10 p.m. FSM

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

Johnson is on Casey’s heels

Blues • blues.nhl.com | 314-622-2583 Monday 3/25 vs. Golden Knights 7 p.m., FSM

Friday 3/29 at Rangers 6 p.m. FSM

Saturday 3/30 at Devils 6 p.m. FSM

Monday 4/1 vs. Avalanche 7 p.m. FSM

Mizzou women’s basketball • mutigers.com | 800-228-7297 Sunday 3/24 NCAA Tourn. at Iowa, 1 p.m., ESPN2

St. Louis FC • saintlouisfc.com | 636-680-0997 Saturday 3/30 vs. Charlotte 1 p.m.

Saturday 4/6 at Atlanta 6:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/13 vs. Birmingham 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 4/20 at Pittsburgh 6 p.m.

OTHER EVENTS INDOOR SOCCER • St. Louis Ambush home games Fri. 3/29: vs. Milwaukee, 7:35 p.m. FAIRMOUNT PARK HORSE RACING • Simulcasting: 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m. daily.

TICKET INFORMATION Cardinals 314-345-9000 Blues 314-622-2583 SLU 314-977-4758 STLFC 636-680-0997

Rascals Illinois SIUE Fairmount

636-240-2287 Grizzlies 618-337-3000 217-333-3470 Mizzou 800-228-7297 855-748-3849 Ambush 636-477-6363 314-436-1516 • 618-345-4300

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Nacho Elvira of Spain plays from the bunker on the 18th hole at the Maybank Championship in Malaysia.

Top-ranked player trails by one

ON THE AIR AUTO RACING 12:30 p.m. IndyCar: IndyCar Classic: Circuit of the Americas, NBCSN 1 p.m. NASCAR: STP 500, FS1 BASEBALL 11 a.m. Exhibition: Nationals (ss) at Mets, MLB Network 11 a.m. College: LSU at Georgia, SEC Network 12:05 p.m. Exhibition: Cardinals vs. Marlins, FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) 2 p.m. College: Mississippi at Missouri, SEC Network 7 p.m. Exhibition: Dodgers at Angels, MLB Network

BASKETBALL 11 a.m. NCAA Tournament: Iowa vs. Tennessee, KMOV (4) 11 a.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 1 p.m. NIT: Wichita State at Clemson, ESPN 1 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Missouri vs. Iowa, ESPN2 1:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: North Carolina vs. Washington, KMOV (4) 3 p.m. NIT: Xavier at Texas, ESPN 4 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Duke vs. Central Florida, KMOV (4) 4 p.m. NBA: Nuggets at Pacers, FSM Plus 5 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Texas Tech vs. Buffalo, TNT 6 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN 6 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 6 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Virginia Tech vs. Liberty, TBS 6:30 p.m. NIT: Harvard at North Carolina State, ESPNU 6:30 p.m. NBA: Spurs at Celtics, NBA 6:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Virginia vs. Oklahoma, TRUTV 7:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Houston vs. Ohio State, TNT 8 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN 8 p.m. NCAA Women’s Tournament: Whiparound Coverage, ESPN2 8:30 p.m. NIT: Nebraska at TCU, ESPNU 8:30 p.m. NCAA Tournament: Oregon vs. UC Irvine, TBS BOXING 5 p.m. PBC: Lamont Peterson vs. Sergey Lipinets — Prelims, FS1 7 p.m. PBC: Lamont Peterson vs. Sergey Lipinets, FS1 FOOTBALL 3 p.m. AAF: San Diego Fleet at Arizona Hotshots, CBSSN 7 p.m. AAF: Birmingham Iron at Memphis Express, NFL Network GOLF 12 p.m. PGA: Valspar Championship, final round, GOLF 2 p.m. PGA: Valspar Championship: final round, KSDK (5) 5 p.m. LPGA: Founders Cup, final round, GOLF GYMNASTICS 4 p.m. College: Illinois at Ohio State, BTN HOCKEY 11:30 a.m. Flyers at Capitals, KSDK (5) 1:30 p.m. Women’s NCAA championship: Teams TBA, BTN 4 p.m. AHL: Rochester Americans at Toronto Marlies, NHL Network 7 p.m. Avalanche at Blackhawks, NBCSN LACROSSE 1 p.m. College: Duke at Syracuse, ESPNU RUGBY 1 p.m. Major League: New York at Glendale, CBSSN SOCCER 11:50 a.m. UEFA Euro qualifying: Hungary vs. Croatia, ESPNews SOFTBALL 11 a.m. College: LSU at Georgia, ESPN 11 a.m. College: Arkansas at Tennessee, ESPNU 3 p.m. College: Oklahoma State at Baylor, ESPN2 3 p.m. College: South Carolina Upstate at Longwood, ESPNU 5 p.m. College: Mississippi at South Carolina, SEC Network TENNIS 10 a.m. Miami Open: ATP 3rd round, WTA 3rd round, Tennis Channel 6 p.m. Miami Open: ATP 3rd round, WTA 3rd round, Tennis Channel TRACK AND FIELD 9 a.m. Los Angeles Marathon, WGN

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314-340-8301 314-340-8392 314-340-8313 314-340-8137 314-340-8178 314-744-5725

ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALM HARBOR, FLA. • The final hour changed the dynamics of the Valspar Championship, just not the lead. That still belongs to defending champion Paul Casey, and he saw only the upside of having his three-shot margin shrink to one, and going from a final-round pairing with a player who is 0 for 195 on the PGA Tour to playing alongside the No. 1 player in the world. On a Saturday at Innisbrook that began with all 70 players who made the cut still very much in the mix, Casey surged to a threeshot lead until a bogey on the 18th hole left him with a 3-under 68, and one shot ahead of Dustin Johnson. At stake for Casey is a chance to become the first back-to-back winner of the Valspar Championship since this PGA Tour event began in 2000. Behind him is Johnson, who is going for his second victory in three starts. “Of the guys on the leaderboard, he’s the one I would want to be paired with, so it doesn’t bother me,” Casey said. “Obviously, two shots would have been nicer than one, but one is better than level, or one behind.” Johnson had something say about that final margin with one of his best shots of the day, a

9-iron from a bunker a few paces in front of a steep lip to the front shelf of the 18th green, 10 feet behind the hole. He made that for a 67 to get into the final group. And that was good news for Casey? “He’s the best player in the world. That’s why I work and I do what I do, because I want to play against the best in the world,” Casey said. He also pointed to Johnson being the favorite, at least in the eyes of thousands of fans on a warm, sun-filled day at Innisbrook, the kind of buzz it had last year when Tiger Woods played. “I actually feel very little pressure,” Casey said. “You look at my results versus Dustin’s. He’s the better player, so it’s pretty simple. If I go out tomorrow and beat him, I actually might win, plain and simple. Great scenario.” Casey is at 8-under 205. Eight players had a share of the lead in the third round, and 10 players finished within four shots of the lead. That starts with Jason Kokrak, winless in his 195 starts as a pro over the better part of eight years. He showed how quickly fortunes can change when he made three birdies in five holes to start the back nine, and then smashed an 8-iron with a breeze at his back. The ball rolled across the 15th green and into the cup for a holein-one.

GOLF ROUNDUP Liu finishes strong, leads Ciganda by one shot Yu Liu played the final four holes in 4 under Saturday for a 7-under 65 and the third-round lead in the LPGA Tour’s Founders Cup in Phoenix. The 23-year-old Chinese player eagled the par-5 15th and birdied the par-3 17th and par-4 18th to reach 19-under 197 at Desert Ridge. Tied for the lead with top-ranked Sung Hyun Park entering the round, Liu has a one-stroke lead over Carlota Ciganda. Elvira leads by two • Nacho Elvira of Spain took a big step toward clinching a first European Tour title after he fired a 6-under-par 66 for a two-shot advantage over American David Lipsky after the third round at the Maybank Championship in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Elvira is 13 under par, with Ernie Els in sixth place four shots behind. Associated Press

“You can be three, four, five shots out at this golf course and really make some noise if you get it going early,” Kokrak said. Kokrak shot 30 on the back for a 66 and was poised to play in the final group until Johnson made his birdie at 18. Luke Donald grinded his way to a 70 and joined Scott Stallings (70) three back. Louis Oosthuizen (66) and Jim Furyk (68) were among those four behind.

DIGEST

MLB NOTEBOOK

Mizzou wrestlers finish in sixth place

Reds’ Gennett will miss a few months

Junior wrestler Jaydin Eierman had Missouri’s best finish at the NCAA Championships on Saturday in Pittsburgh, outlasting Oklahoma’s Dom Demas 2-0 in the third-place match at 141 pounds to clinch his best finish at the national meet. Mizzou teammate Daniel Lewis earned his fourth All-American honor but lost 4-3 in the 174-pound third-place match to Michigan’s Myles Amine. Two more Tigers finished sixth to give the team four AllAmericans: senior John Erneste at 133 pounds and freshman Brock Mauller at 149. Mizzou finished in sixth place overall with 62 points, half a point behind fifth-place Michigan. It was MU’s fifth consecutive top-10 finish and ninth overall under coach Brian Smith. Penn State won the team competition with 133.5 points, ahead of Ohio State (96.5), Oklahoma State (84), Iowa (76), Michigan (62.5) and Missouri. (Dave Matter)

All-Star second baseman Scooter Gennett will miss the opening months of the season with a severe groin strain, costing the Cincinnati Reds their most productive hitter less than a week before opening day. Gennett injured the right side of his groin Friday while making a play on a ground ball hit by Milwaukee’s Yasmani Grandal. He had an MRI, and the Reds said Saturday that he’s expected to miss two to three months. “He is in a lot of pain,” said manager David Bell, who was with Gennett when the medical staff read his MRI. “He wants to play so bad. That makes it tough, but he’s already thinking positive.” The injury forces the Reds to rearrange their infield — which had been one set area of the team — heading into the season opener Thursday against Pittsburgh at Great American Ball Park. Bell plans to move shortstop Jose Peraza to second base and use newcomer Jose Iglesias at shortstop.

By My Standards wins Louisiana Derby • By My Standards passed three horses down the stretch to win the $1 million Louisiana Derby at the Fair Grounds Race course Saturday in New Orleans. The winner went off at 22-1 in what is one of the major prep races for the Kentucky Derby, and galloped past Todd-Pletcher-trained Spinoff to win by nearly a length. Trained by W. Bret Calhoun, By My Standards earned 100 points in the Road to the Kentucky Derby, assuring qualification for the Triple Crown opener. Jockey Gabriel Saez steered By My Standards into fourth entering the final turn and finished the 1 1/8-mile race in 1:49.2. He paid $47, $16.60 and $9.40. With John Velazquez aboard, Spinoff earned 40 points with a second place finish and paid $6.80 and $5.40. Sueno finished third and paid $6. Favorite War of Will faded and finished ninth. (AP) Osaka loses, S. Williams withdraws • Top-ranked Naomi Osaka lost Saturday to tour veteran Hsieh Su-Wei of Taiwan in the third round of the Miami Open, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3 in Miami Gardens, Fla. The upset came shortly after eight-time champion Serena Williams withdrew, blaming a left knee injury. Roger Federer briefly seemed headed for the exit but instead advanced to the third round by rallying past qualifier Radu Albot 4-6, 7-5, 6-3. (AP) Chen wins gold again • Defending champion Nathan Chen delivered a spectacular free skate to win the gold medal again at the figure skating world championships in Saitama, Japan. It was the first time an American man captured consecutive world titles since Scott Hamilton won his fourth in a row in 1984. Two-time Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu of Japan was second and American Vincent Zhou was third on a big day for U.S. skating. It was the first time since 1996 two U.S. men medaled at the worlds. Earlier, defending champions Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron of France won the free dance to take gold in the ice dance. (AP)

Sale gets big deal • After winning a World Series with the Red Sox, Chris Sale preferred to stay in Boston rather than be a free agent after this season. “When half the league isn’t trying to win anything, and we have a team that’s trying to win every year? That says a lot. As players, you can’t not respect it,” Sale said after Boston announced a deal that guarantees $145 million from 2020 to 2024. Verlander has extension • Justin Verlander and the Houston Astros have agreed to a contract adding an additional $66 million in guaranteed money for 2020 and ‘21, a person with direct knowledge of the situation told The Associated Press. A 36-year-old righthander, Verlander is due $28 million in 2019. Cubs send Happ down • The Chicago Cubs optioned versatile youngster Ian Happ to the minor leagues. The 24-year-old Happ appeared in 142 games with Chicago last season, hitting .233 with 15 homers and a .761 OPS while playing second base, third base and all three outfield spots. Hammel decides to retire • Veteran righthander Jason Hammel, 36, is retiring to spend time with his family even though he had been told by the Texas Rangers that he had made the team. He was 96-114 with a 4.62 ERA over 13 seasons for six teams. Other news • The Chicago White Sox and 22-year-old outfielder Eloy Jimenez is finalized a $43 million, six-year contract. ... Baltimore claimed catcher Pedro Severino off waivers from Washington. ... Atlanta purchased outfielder Matt Joyce from San Francisco, bringing in another option for their fourth outfielder spot. ... The New York Yankees acquired outfielder Mike Tauchman from Colorado in exchange for lefthander Phillip Diehl. ... San Francisco acquired outfielder Michael Reed from Minnesota for outfielder John Andreoli and cash. Associated Press


NCAA TOURNAMENT

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 1

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

SLU fights back but loses to Hokies SLU • FROM B1 D1

East Region, would complete the upset sweep as Virginia Tech pounced early and went on to post a 66-52 win to end the Billikens’ season with a 23-13 record. The Billikens were led by a trio of seniors as Javon Bess had 14 points and 11 rebounds, D.J. Foreman scored 12 points and Tramaine Isabell Jr. scored 11. “I told them over the last three or four weeks, I’d go to war with these guys any day of the week,” coach Travis Ford said. “I wouldn’t trade them for anybody. I thought the second half was the true definition of who we are, and I can go out that way. I can sleep good tonight because this is a team that doesn’t give up.” SLU fell behind by 22 points at halftime. Despite a spirited push in the second half, the Billikens could only get as close as 10 with 10 minutes, 22 seconds remaining. SLU tried to respond to Virginia Tech’s big first half by scoring the first eight points of the second. But that only got the Billikens to 40-26. Nickeil Alexander-Walker, who scored 20 points, responded with seven points of his own to restore order for the Hokies. The Billikens continued to chip away, and when Isabell hit consecutive 3-pointers they were down 51-41. That was as close as it got. SLU loses four seniors from this team — Bess, Isabell, Foreman and Dion Wiley. “It was a good way to go out with guys I love and this coach who loves me,” Bess said. “He gave me an opportunity to play at the next level. I had a great experience at SLU.” Ford figured his team had been given a break by playing the late game. Any opportunity to get more rest. And the Billikens got accustomed to playing late at the Atlantic 10 tournament in New York, where they had 8:30 starts for a couple of nights. Ford gave his players some down time after the tournament before returning to practice, but even then the workouts were fairly short. The Billikens’ final practice in preparation for the game was shorter than 90 minutes. But SLU was out of sync from the start, and ineffective offense seemed to impact the defense. The Billikens had trouble getting any penetration in the first nine minutes, leading to poor shots and turnovers.

ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTOS

Virginia Tech guard Nickeil Alexander-Walker passes the ball around St. Louis U. forward Hasahn French during the first half of Friday night’s game. SLU trailed 40-18 at halftime. VIRGINIA TECH 66, ST. LOUIS U. 52 FG FT Reb ST. LOUIS U. Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Foreman 25 4-5 4-7 1-4 0 5 12 French 35 4-6 1-2 3-8 3 4 9 Bess 38 4-13 5-6 3-11 1 3 14 Goodwin 36 3-9 0-1 4-9 0 3 6 Isabell 38 4-12 0-0 0-2 1 3 11 Thatch 12 0-2 0-0 0-0 1 5 0 Wiley 9 0-3 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Hankton 5 0-2 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Jacobs 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Raboin -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Welmer -0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 200 19-52 10-16 11-35 6 23 52 Percentages: FG.365, FT.625. 3-point goals: 4-23, .174 (Isabell 3-9, Bess 1-7, Hankton 0-1, Goodwin 0-2, Thatch 0-2, Wiley 0-2). Team rebounds: 1. Team Turnovers: 18 (13 PTS). Blocked shots: 3 (Foreman 2, Bess). Turnovers: 18 (Isabell 5, Bess 3, Foreman 3, French 3, Goodwin 3, Thatch). Steals: 6 (Bess 2, Goodwin 2, Foreman, Isabell). Technical fouls: None. FG FT Reb VIRGINIA TECH Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Blackshear 36 2-6 11-12 0-3 2 2 15 Alexander-Walker 36 8-14 3-4 3-7 1 4 20 Bede 23 0-3 1-2 0-3 2 1 1 Hill 32 4-9 1-2 0-4 1 2 10 Outlaw 28 2-3 2-2 1-6 0 3 7 Robinson 27 2-7 4-5 1-3 3 1 9 Wilkins 12 1-3 0-0 0-0 1 0 2 Horne 7 1-3 0-0 0-0 0 1 2 Kabongo -- 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0 0 Totals 200 20-48 22-27 5-27 10 14 66 Percentages: FG.417, FT.815. 3-point goals: 4-10, .400 (Hill 1-1, Alexander-Walker 1-2, Outlaw 1-2, Robinson 1-3, Blackshear 0-1, Wilkins 0-1). Team rebounds: 3. Team Turnovers: 11 (25 PTS). Blocked shots: 0. Turnovers: 11 (Robinson 4, Alexander-Walker 2, Blackshear 2, Hill 2, Bede). Steals: 9 (Alexander-Walker 3, Hill 2, Robinson 2, Bede, Blackshear). Technical fouls: None. St. Louis U. 18 34 — 52 Virginia Tech 40 26 — 66

“We came out and wanted them to get long, contested 3s and didn’t want them to get paint touches,” Virginia Tech guard Ahmed Hill said.

Billikens guard Tramaine Isabell Jr. drives to the basket around Virginia Tech forward P.J. Horne during the first half.

Virginia Tech went on an early 22-4 run and built a 26-8 lead. Jordan Goodwin picked up his second foul and went to the bench during the run. However, Ford couldn’t keep him there as the game was slipping away. Ford even turned to freshman KC Hankton, who has played very little of late, for five minutes in the first half possibly looking for a hot hand from the perimeter. But there were no answers to stop the bleeding.

“I thought we were really sluggish,” Ford said. “I saw that before. We’ve been on such a roller coaster, such a high.” The Billikens went more than six minutes without a field goal and missed their first eight 3-pointers. And they had eight turnovers in the first 11 minutes and 12 for the half. Virginia Tech turned SLU’s first-half turnovers into 19 points and led 40-18 at the intermission. The Hokies picked apart the

SLU defense to shoot 55 percent in the first half as they made nine layups among their 16 field goals. Virginia Tech even neutralized SLU’s usual rebounding advantage, and the Billikens had just two offensive boards in the first 20 minutes. The game was a rematch of a SLU’s win over Virginia Tech last season at Madison Square Garden. Both teams had several players who participated in that game with varying degrees of production. But the Hokies had separated themselves this season by finishing fifth in the Atlantic Coast Conference, which has three No. 1 seeds in the NCAA field, with a win over Duke along the way. They became one of the most dangerous 3-point shooting teams in the country, ranking ninth at 39.4 percent with three players who had made more than 50. The Hokies didn’t really need 3s to build their early lead, but they made three of five in the first half. Stu Durando @studurando on Twitter sdurando@post-dispatch.com

WOMEN’S NCAA TOURNAMENT

BASKETBALL NOTEBOOK

Iowa avoids big upset in opener

Kentucky’s Washington still out

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Megan Gustafson scored 30 points with 16 rebounds and second-seeded Iowa narrowly avoided a monumental upset, holding off No. 15 Mercer 66-61 on Friday for its first NCAA Tournament win in four years. A No 15 seed has never won a women’s tournament game and was 0-101 after this one. Makenzie Meyer added 16 for the Hawkeyes (27-6), who survived the opening round at home despite committing 24 turnovers and will play Missouri on Sunday. “We personally liked our seed. We didn’t love our opponent,” Iowa coach Lisa Bluder said. “We played against somebody that was much more difficult than a 15 seed. Everybody can recognize and understand that.”

PJ Washington remains out for Kentucky’s second-round game Saturday against Wofford in the Midwest Regional in Jacksonville, Fla. The sophomore forward sprained his left foot in the Southeastern Conference tournament last weekend, and it hasn’t healed as quickly as the Wildcats were hoping. Washington missed their opener against Abilene Christian, but No. 2-seeded Kentucky (28-6) had more than enough talent to make up for his absence. The Wildcats romped to a 79-44 victory. Seventh-seeded Wofford (30-4) is expected to present a much tougher challenge, especially with Washington again watching from the bench. He is Kentucky’s leading scorer and rebounder. The ailing foot was placed in a hard cast that probably will come off early next week. Then, coach John Calipari said, it’s just a matter of making sure Washington is fully recovered. If Kentucky beats Wofford, Washington might be able to return for the round of 16.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

UConn 110, Towson 61 • Napheesa Collier scored 23 points and Connecticut, in the unusual position of being a No. 2 seed, got off to its usual tournament start with a rout of 15th-seeded Towson in Storrs, Conn. Collier (Incarnate Word) added 14 rebounds in putting up her fourth straight double-double and 21st this season. Freshman Christyn Williams scored 21 points and Crystal Dangerfield added 20 for Connecticut (32-2), which had five players in double figures and scored more than 100 points for the fourth time this season. Kionna Jeter had 20 points for Towson, which was making its first NCAA Tournament appearance and finishes the season at 20-13. Louisville 69, Robert Morris 34 • Asia Durr and Sam Fuehring each had 19 points, and top-seeded Louisville scored 27 straight points in the first half to overwhelm 16th-seeded Robert Morris in Louisville. The absences of suspended coach Jeff Walz — who was disciplined one game for a profane sideline tirade during last year’s Final Four — and injured point guard Arica Carter didn’t affect the Cardinals (303). Robert Morris (22-11) missed 17 consecutive shots during that drought before making three of five entering halftime, but the game was out of reach by then. South Carolina 74, Belmont 52 • Te’a Cooper scored 13 points, Alexis Jennings added

Iowa forward Megan Gustafson walks off the court after a 66-61 victory against Mercer in Iowa City, Iowa. Gustafson had 30 points and 16 rebounds to help Iowa avoid becoming the first No. 2 seed to lose in the opening round.

12 points and nine rebounds, and fourthseeded South Carolina (22-9) shook off a sluggish start to pull away from No. 13 seed Belmont (26-7) in Charlotte, N.C. Marquette 58, Rice 54 • Natisha Hiedeman scored 13 points, Allazia Blockton had 12 and five-seed Marquette (27-7) overcame a nine-point fourth quarter deficit to beat No. 12 Rice (28-4) in overtime in College Station, Texas. Indiana 69, Texas 65 • Jaelynn Penn had 24 points and Bendu Yeaney added 17 to help 10th-seeded Indiana surprise No. 7 Texas in Eugene, Ore. Brenna Wise and Ali Patberg contributed 10 points apiece for the Hoosiers (2112), who were making their first appearance in the tournament since the 2015-16 season. Texas (23-10) was led by Danni Williams with 15 points. Michigan 85, K-State 54 • Naz Hillmon scored 17 points off the bench, Nicole Munger and Kayla Robbins each added 13 and eighth-seeded Michigan (22-11) shot a season-high 56 percent to run away from No. 9 seed Kansas State (21-12) in Louisville, Ky.

Vanderbilt fires Drew • The worst season in the history of Vanderbilt men’s basketball has cost coach Bryce Drew his job. Vanderbilt went 9-23 and was the first team in 65 years to go winless in the Southeastern Conference. Drew had a 40-59 record in three seasons with the Commodores. The announcement Friday by new athletics director Malcolm Turner comes a week after the Commodores’ season ended. Vanderbilt said Turner will head a coaching search with support from Chancellor Nicholas S. Zeppos. Drew came into this season with big expectations after signing the highestrated recruiting class ever at Vanderbilt. Then five-star point guard and potential NBA lottery pick Darius Garland hurt his knee Nov. 23 in a home loss to Kent State. Garland later announced his decision to withdraw from Vanderbilt to prepare himself for the NBA draft in June. Even with another five-star recruit in Simisola Shittu, Drew and the Commodores never recovered from losing Garland. Vanderbilt beat Arizona State on Dec. 17 and went into SEC play with a 9-3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kentucky’s PJ Washington, wearing a cast on his left foot, and Reid Travis cheer for the Wildcats during the second half of a 79-44 victory against Abilene Christian in a first-round game on Thursday in Jacksonville, Fla.

record, but the Commodores wouldn’t win another game the rest of the year as they closed with a school-record 20game skid. Vanderbilt went 0-18 in SEC competition during the regular season before losing 69-52 to Texas A&M in the first round of the SEC tournament. Manning back for Wake Forest • Danny Manning will return for a sixth season at Wake Forest despite his third 20-loss season in five years. Retiring athletics director Ron Wellman announced the decision Friday, 10 days after the Demon Deacons ended an 11-20 season with a loss to Miami in the first round of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. The 52-year-old former Kansas star and No. 1 NBA draft pick is 65-93 with one NCAA Tournament appearance in five seasons with the Demon Deacons. Wellman said in a statement the two had an “extensive set of meetings” about the program’s future. He added that he expects Manning will “take the steps needed to show improvement on the court next season.”


BASEBALL

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 2

Why more players are staying put FREDERICKSON • FROM D1

five-year, $130 million extension. He asked to be in the lineup for the Grapefruit League road game that followed a press conference that was not televised. He doesn’t Tweet or Instagram. What he does do is play baseball exceptionally well, and now he will be paid handsomely to do it for the Cardinals through 2024. That one of the best players in the National League does not see the point in analyzing the impact of his extension does not mean there isn’t one. Especially when it significantly brightens the future for an organization that could have some more intriguing extension candidates soon. Especially when Goldschmidt’s decision to extend was one of many in a recent trend across the sport that is painting free agency as a cold, cruel gauntlet. If you are an up-and-coming Cardinals star — like, say, Jack Flaherty or Jordan Hicks — has considering or maybe even pursuing an extension with the Cardinals ever appeared more appealing? And if you are the Cardinals, has a triedand-true approach that prioritizes keeping the talent you know best ever seemed to exist in such a sweet spot on the Venn diagram of wise and trendy? Baseball has fallen in love with extensions this spring. The Cardinals, with three under their belt since the start of Grapefruit League play, are not new to the party. Still, they’re celebrating. ESPN baseball columnist Buster Olney pointed out this week that baseball is in the midst of an extension binge that, since the start of spring training, has rewarded more than $1 billion to players who were not free agents. Mike Trout, Nolan Arenado, Alex Bregman and Chris Sale have joined Goldschmidt, Jose Martinez and Miles Mikolas in their decisions to re-up with current teams instead of prepare for the grind free agency has become. Olney, citing the MLB Trade Rumors extension tracker, produced a stunning stat. Between 2015 and 2018, 21 spring-training extensions were signed across baseball. This spring alone? Seventeen, and counting. You better believe the next wave of players are watching. You better believe the Cardinals approve of this trend. “There are a lot of players who are extending because they are happy where they are, and the dollars in extensions are fairly high,” Cardinals chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. said. “(The extensions) reflect the quality of the players. There is no reason for them to move, unless they are not happy with the team, not happy with the future the team might have, or not happy with the contract. “For those who are on top teams and like playing there, it makes a lot of sense. The contracts are guaranteed money, and they don’t have to think about interviewing 10, 12 teams. ‘Who really wants me? Who is going to pay the most?’ It may not be the team you want to play for. “Over the years, those who have hit free agency — it’s highlighted now because some of the older free agents aren’t doing as well as they hoped — but it’s always been a tough experience for players. And teams, for that matter. Because you don’t know what other teams are bidding, whether you have a shot or don’t have a shot. It’s a market-based system. With 30 teams out there, you never know who is laying in the weeds to sign a player. It can be difficult.” Goldschmidt just joined a long list of players the Cardinals traded for, then convinced to stay. His commitment was the positive reinforcement the team needed after Jason Heyward sidestepped an approach that suited Matt Holliday, Jim Edmonds, Mark McGwire and more. Goldschmidt proved trade-and-extend can still work for the Cards. The Cardinals can also point to an impressive number of home-grown prospects they smartly persuaded to sign extensions that offered increased pay for the elimination and/or delay of free agency. Yadier Molina, Matt Carpenter, Carlos Martinez, Kolten Wong and Paul DeJong come to mind. There is a pretty good track record of performance among these names. Sure, there were some foul tips. But Stephen Piscotty was a unique circumstance who netted Yairo Munoz and Max Schrock in a trade, and the Cardinals turned their deal with Allen Craig into 44 starts from John Lackey. Impressive, all things considered. Now, let’s look at recent returns on free agency. Mikolas? Winner. Dexter Fowler? To be determined. Brett Cecil and Luke Gregerson? Not looking good. Mike Leake and Greg Holland? Ouch. “You are always better off knowing what you know than what you don’t know,” president of baseball operations John Mozeliak said. “Being able to extend somebody within your organization, you are more confident in that decision.” There are different ways to build a contending team, and one of the few ways the Cardinals have had more whiffs than hits as of late seems to be turning off a growing number of good players. Players, as a whole, should be concerned about the fall of free agency. The individual player, however, tends to worry about what is best for him. Former free agents Manny Machado and Bryce Harper made big money, but did they land with the teams they most wanted? The still-ongoing free agencies of Dallas Keuchel and Craig Kimbrel get more frightening by the day. Meanwhile, Trout, Arenado, Sale and Goldschmidt got rich(er) by staying put. “We are always open for business,” DeWitt said. “That’s our standard line, and it’s true. It’s not a company line. It’s a true line.” Security now has never seemed sexier. Few teams sell it to the right internal candidates like the Cardinals.

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D3

CARDINALS NOTEBOOK

Hudson has scoreless outing Fifth starter goes six innings in relief of Mikolas against Nats BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-dispatch

WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. • If Dakota

Hudson already hadn’t clinched the fifth starting job with a five-inning, eightstrikeout scoreless outing last Monday, he would have cemented it, oddly, with an even longer relief outing on Saturday in a 4-4 exhibition tie with the Washington Nationals. Hudson, relieving Miles Mikolas, who came out after 63 pitches (Mikolas’ limit was 65), permitted just three hits and no runs while inducing 10 ground-ball outs over the final six innings. “I’m just starting to iron out some things in my timing,” said the 24-yearold Hudson. “There were some things ‘Mad Dog’ (pitching coach Mike Maddux) and I worked on with my hand break. I think it’s starting to make me more consistent. I feel like I’m in the same spot every time.” Manager Mike Shildt said, “I think he wanted to show (Saturday) that that’s who he is. Very efficient. The guy’s got really good stuff.” Shildt wouldn’t reveal yet which game Hudson will be starting in the first five games, four of which will be at Milwaukee and the other in Pittsburgh. But the fact he has one — it will be his first big-league start after 26 relief appearances last year with the Cardinals — is “a dream,” he said. “I feel very comfortable going into it. I feel like I’ve been working on the right things,” said Hudson. “And I’ve some leadership and guys to talk to and ‘spitball’ ideas off.” A winner of 13 games last year as a starter at Class AAA Memphis, where he was the Pacific Coast League pitcher of the year, Hudson said his timing in the majors had been as “here and there. Now I know how to pitch a little more and I have a little better relationship with my catchers.” One of the consistency issues to which Hudson referred was the fact he walked 18 in 27 1/3 big-league innings last year. He has passed just three in his last 11 scoreless innings. “The sky’s the limit,” said Shildt.

MIKOLAS GOES DEEP, SO DO THE NATIONALS Mikolas was tuning up for his first regular season-opening start as a Cardinal next week. The intent certainly was to refine his repertoire but Mikolas added a little something to the mix. Hitting against Nationals ace Stephen Strasburg, Mikolas mashed a two-run homer off a fastball in the second inning. Mikolas had two homers as he won 18 games in his first season with the Cardinals in 2018. But, on Saturday, he allowed third-inning homers to Anthony Rendon and former Cardinal Matt Adams, as some sliders betrayed him. The other Cardinals’ players, of which there were many, erupted in the dugout

ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Cardinals’ Miles Mikolas is congratulated by third-base coach Ron ‘Pop’ Warner after hitting a home run in the second inning Saturday against the Nationals. Cardinals 4, Nationals 4 St. Louis ab r h bi Washington ab r h bi Rbinson ss 5 1 0 0 T.Trner ss 1 0 0 0 D.Fwler rf 4 0 0 0 Sanchez 3b 3 0 0 0 Carlson rf 0 0 0 0 Ju.Soto lf 2 0 1 0 Gldhmdt 1b 2 0 0 0 Kieboom ss 1 0 0 0 Mendoza 1b 2 0 0 0 A.Rndon 3b 2 1 1 1 O’Neill lf 5 1 4 1 Hrnndez lf 2 0 0 0 Wieters c 3 0 1 0 M.Adams dh 3 1 1 1 Fr.Pena c 1 0 0 0 A.Upshw ph 1 0 0 0 Y.Munoz cf 4 0 1 0 K.Szuki c 3 0 1 0 T.Edman 2b 3 0 0 0 Kieboom ph 1 0 1 0 Schrock 3b 3 1 2 1 Stvnson rf 3 0 0 0 Mikolas sp 1 1 1 2 Ja.Noll 1b 4 1 1 0 S.Hurst ph 1 0 0 0 Wi.Difo 2b 3 1 0 0 N.Grman ph 1 0 0 0 V.Rbles cf 2 0 2 2 Mrtinez ph 1 0 0 0 Collier cf 2 0 1 0 Totals 36 4 9 4 Totals 33 4 9 4 St. Louis 120 001 000 — 4 Washington 022 000 000 — 4 E: Stevenson (1). DP: St. Louis 0, Washington 2. LOB: St. Louis 10, Washington 6. 2B: O’Neill (4), Schrock (2), Soto (4), Suzuki (2), Robles (2). HR: Mikolas (1), Rendon (4), Adams (4). SB: Carlson (1), Mendoza (1), Turner (3). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Mikolas 3 6 4 4 2 2 Hudson 6 3 0 0 2 3 Washington IP H R ER BB SO Strasburg 5 2/3 8 4 3 0 9 Williams 1 1/3 0 0 0 0 3 Rosenthal 1 1 0 0 2 0 Miller 1 0 0 0 1 2 HBP: by: Miller (Carlson). WP: Mikolas. Umpires: Home, CB Bucknor; First, Paul Nauert; Second, Greg Gibson; Third, Angel Hernandez. T: 2:47. A: 6,195

after Mikolas’ blast. “Legend has it,” said Mikolas, “that Yadi (catcher Yadier Molina) called it and they were all excited about that.” On his scale of things to do Saturday, Mikolas said his hitting ranked “at the bottom. I’d have rather put together a quick three or four innings. (He pitched three). “It seems that every game I’ve hit a home run, I’ve also given up some, so that seems to be the way the universe works with me.” Mikolas, attempting to incorporate another pitch into his arsenal, was happy he got several swings and misses

from his split-fingered pitch he uses as a changeup. “That’s one of things I set out to go for this spring was working on that fourth pitch,” he said. Counting an outing in Class AAA, Mikolas has given up 14 runs in his last 14 1/3 innings after throwing five scoreless innings in his first two starts. He gave up six hits and four runs on Saturday but he said, “Overall, I’m not really worried about the start today. A few little mistakes (with his slider) here and there, but physically I felt very good.”

CARPENTER ‘POSSIBLE’ SUNDAY, GYORKO MAKING PROGRESS Third baseman Matt Carpenter, who has been out more than a week with lower back tightness, said he would play Sunday although Shildt said that wasn’t necessarily the case. “I don’t want to push,”said Shildt. “If we were opening today, he’d be in there. We’re not. There’s a possibility of him getting an at-bat or two. If not, I’ve got no worries about it either way.” Sunday will be the day infielder Jedd Gyorko, recovering from a right calf strain, resumes hitting in minor league games. Gyorko hit four times on Friday. Asked if he had run hard during his at-bats, Gyorko, smiling, responded that he hadn’t. “I struck out three times,” he said. “I didn’t run very hard back to the dugout. “But it was better than last year when I was back there. I struck out seven times.” Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

A casual talk evolved into Goldschmidt deal CARDINALS • FROM D1

of baseball operations, sipping between sentences, wanted to take the temperature of Goldschmidt’s interest in a contract extension, one that both sides knew would be the largest ever finalized for a Cardinal. Goldschmidt said he welcomed that idea. On Saturday, what began as a casual conversation about 14 days earlier became history as the team and their new tent-pole hitter inked a five-year, $130 million deal that makes Goldschmidt the highest-paid Cardinal ever. “It was subtle, it was, yes, casual, but a productive conversation,” Mozeliak said. “What it comes down to there was a mutual desire to get something done, and not missing that window was the most important thing.” During a sun-baked press conference Saturday outside that clubhouse, the Cardinals announced the contract that will rivet Goldschmidt, 31, as a face of the franchise through 2024. His wife, Amy, and their two kids, Jacob (3) and Emma (1), stood nearby. His teammates, including some of the young pitching talent that enticed Goldschmidt, stood as a group, toward the back watching the presser. The deal had been struck Thursday, finalized Friday, and the event Saturday was scheduled because Goldschmidt was not expected to play. But he asked into the lineup to get two at-bats because he wanted to keep his timing after a threehit Friday. He was late for the presser because, no joke, the Cardinals had to pull him out of the batting cage. Goldschmidt had not prepared any statement and just offered to take questions. “I wanted the focus to be on baseball,” he said. The contract includes a $20 million signing bonus spread over the life of the contract, and his annual salary will be $26 million starting in 2020, when the contract starts, a source confirmed. That will surpass Yadier Molina’s $20 million salary as the largest in club history. The contract includes a no-trade clause and the usual bonuses for awards, such as National League MVP and AllStar. Goldschmidt has twice finished

runner-up in the MVP voting, and he’s coming off a season with a sixth-place finish after hitting 33 homers with 83 RBIs and a .533 slugging percentage for Arizona. The swift, friendly negotiations mirror Goldschmidt’s immediate comfort with the Cardinals, many of his teammates and officials — all before he plays his first official game, let alone calls St. Louis home for a day. Shortly after he was traded to the Cardinals in a four-player swap with Arizona in early December, he asked the team for a local children’s hospital that he could, quietly, do something for before Christmas. On his first day in camp, more than a week early, he joined his teammates in drills — and hitched a ride home from Matt Carpenter. He’s approached relievers with pointers, asked pitchers to give him pointers, and received texts from former players telling him what a fit the Cardinals would be for him. He and Matt Holliday talked about St. Louis schools. “This is someone to build a team around, a pillar of a leader, of a man, of a man in the community, and a pillar of the lineup,” said former Cardinals outfielder Holliday on Saturday. He became friends with Goldschmidt after the newest Cardinal reached out to learn about a program Holliday had established for Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital. “That is what they have in him. Guys like being around people like that. Guys like being around other guys who are steady, who you know are going to be there and you know their numbers are going to be there. That’s especially big for the young pitchers they have who could be stars. You have a humble superstar who is still super-hungry to be great.” Goldschmidt kept his thoughts on the extension and any possible negotiations private throughout spring training, even apologizing at times to reporters who asked. He allowed Saturday that he thought it would be “beneficial” to complete a deal before opening day. Mozeliak never felt there was a “harddeadline mentality,” but he conceded Saturday he didn’t think a deal could be done in spring training. The Cardinals’ approach had been

based on getting Goldschmidt to St. Louis, before the home crowd, and his family into their new home. (“Let the fans be a part of the talks,” said one official.) Goldschmidt suggested Saturday he didn’t have a “hard deadline” either, just a wish to avoid contract thoughts trampling on his preferred summer focus, baseball. “You don’t want any distractions for the team or for the individual or the organization,” he said. “I was just looking forward to getting ready for opening day and trying to help us win. I think the most exciting thing for me is to be a part of the Cardinals and to be here for six years. It’s pretty rare to get to know where you’re going to play. There are a lot of great things about this game, but a lot of times families are moving around, guys are going to different cities and different teams more out of necessity than want. So, to have the opportunity to stay in one place was a high priority.” Added Mozeliak: “It was very organic. ... Really the strategy was hope, which is sometimes dangerous. But it worked out.” The Cardinals did not want to leave spring training without at least approaching Goldschmidt, to get a feel for his interest in an extension, his preference for their approach. The conversation could have ended with Mozeliak’s coffee still hot and the cup still full, but it didn’t. That informal chat around 8 a.m. one recent morning spilled into negotiations with Goldschmidt’s agent, Casey Close, and first $100-million for the Cardinals since January 2010 when they signed Holliday. All because when Mozeliak asked, this time he heard yes. DeWitt congratulated Goldschmidt on the extension and quickly said he wanted to “thank him for believing in the Cardinals and for what he will do for our franchise as we move into the future.” “I’m glad the feeling was mutual,” Goldschmidt said. “It’s great to be a part of this tradition, and I hope we’ll do some great things here.” Derrick Goold @dgoold on Twitter dgoold@post-dispatch.com


NCAA TOURNAMENT

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

WEST REGIONAL

EAST REGIONAL

Texas Tech makes return to win column

Liberty rallies past Mississippi St. Victory is first in NCAA tourney for the 12th-seeded Flames

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Texas Tech’s Jarrett Culver puts up a shot under pressure from Northern Kentucky’s Dantez Walton during the second half of Friday’s first-round game. ASSOCIATED PRESS

TULSA, OKLA. • Texas Tech had won nine straight games, tied for the Big 12’s regular-season championship and was flying high before a deflating loss in the conference tournament to lowly West Virginia. The Red Raiders hadn’t played in eight days and were desperate to put the disappointment behind them. They finally did Friday. Jarrett Culver had 29 points, eight rebounds and seven assists, leading the No. 3 seed in the West Region to a 72-57 victory over Northern Kentucky in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. “We just wanted to focus on us and put that behind us, learned and burned,” said Culver, the Big 12 player of the year. “We just focused on us, details, how we got so far and how we made a run in the Big 12 and how we got to the March Madness tournament.” Tariq Owens added 12 points and Davide Moretti had 10 for Texas Tech (276), which is trying to reach the Elite Eight in back-to-back seasons for the first time. “The first game of the tournament is always the toughest,” said Red Raiders coach Chris Beard. “Just really proud of our guys tonight and our team effort. I thought we won this game as a team.” Tyler Sharpe scored 23 points and Dantez Walton had 11 points and seven rebounds for Northern Kentucky (26-9), the champions of the Horizon League. “They’re everything they’re contracted up to be in terms of defensively,” Northern Kentucky coach John Brannen said. “I did have concerns on our ability to score and that showed up today. “Their physicality, I was hoping we’d get to the foul line more in terms of driving the basketball,” Brannen said. “We weren’t able to do that at all. Their physicality just kind of put us in situations that we weren’t comfortable with.” Norse leading scorer Drew McDonald, the Horizon League’s player of the year, was held to just five points on two-of-13 shooting. He also had six rebounds and blocked two shots. “We rely on Drew a lot. He’s led us this whole season,” Sharpe said. “I didn’t feel like I had to necessarily take his role because we trust him. Even if he’s missed every shot, we trust he’s going to make the next one. I took what the defense gave me.” Limiting McDonald’s effectiveness was a key to the Red Raiders’ game plan. “He was definitely one of the main focal points,” Beard said. “He has the ability to score inside and out, and he’s a great passer.”

Buffalo 91, Arizona State 74 • Looking like a No. 6 seed no one wants to play, high-scoring Buffalo breezed into the second round for the second straight year. Jeremy Harris and Nick Perkins each had 21 points and 10 rebounds, and Buffalo was hardly bothered by 11th-seeded Arizona State. Coach Nate Oats has pushed the Buffalo program to new heights since he took over for Bobby Hurley, who now coaches the Sun Devils and got thoroughly schooled by his former assistant. The Bulls (32-3) have won 13 straight. It was a bounce-back performance for Perkins, who had just five points in 22 minutes in the MAC tournament final, an 87-73 win over Bowling Green. CJ Massinburg, Buffalo’s leading scorer, had 18 points. Zylan Cheatham had 22 points and eight rebounds before fouling out with 2:06 remaining for Arizona State (2311), which defeated St. John’s 74-65 on Wednesday in the First Four. Romello White and Luguentz Dort each scored 12. The Sun Devils led 14-10 early, but then Buffalo reeled off a 14-2 run over a three-minute span. The Bulls outscored Arizona State 10-5 over another threeminute stretch to push their advantage into double digits. Arizona State trailed 44-31 at halftime and pulled within 46-37 early in the second half before Buffalo’s 7-0 run pushed its lead to 16 with 16:13 remaining. The Bulls’ advantage never fell below 14 the rest of the way.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Liberty guard Caleb Homesley celebrates after scoring against Mississippi State in the second half Friday night in San Jose, Calif. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Down by 10 points with less than seven minutes to play against a more accomplished opponent, Liberty didn’t give in a bit. Instead, the Flames just kept getting the ball to Caleb Homesley. Homesley scored 22 of his 30 points in the second half, and Lovell Cabbil hit a go-ahead 3-pointer with 1:16 to play to send 12th-seeded Liberty to its first NCAA Tournament win, 80-76 over fifth-seeded Mississippi State on Friday night in San Jose, Calif. “Everybody on the team believed we were going to come back,” Homesley said. “It was just a matter of time that we were going to make a run.” The Flames (29-6) were making their fourth tournament trip in school history, after losing twice as a No. 16 seed and once in a play-in game. This year’s team had a higher seeding and capitalized on the opportunity. Liberty advanced to the second round of the East Regional to play Virginia Tech. Homesley helped rally Liberty in the second half by scoring 14 points in a span of less than five minutes. “He took over. He’s done that on occasion for us. He’s had spurts,” coach Ritchie McKay said. “When he starts to feel good about his shot, he’s such a dangerous of-

fensive player.” Cabbil then hit from long range to make it 72-70. Liberty did the rest at the foul line to spoil the first tournament trip for Mississippi State (23-11) in a decade. “It’s just a tough, tough pill, tough one to swallow, especially the way we had that lead late in the game,” coach Ben Howland said. Duke 85, North Dakota State 62 • Zion Williamson scored 25 points in an explosive performance to lead the top-seeded Blue Devils to victory in Columbia, S.C. RJ Barrett led Duke with 26 points and 14 rebounds and combined with Williamson for an unstoppable 1-2 freshman punch. But it was Williamson who could not be contained in the second half, and he turned a tight early contest into a Duke runaway in the first round of the East Regional. Williamson was disappointed in the Blue Devils’ sluggish first half as Duke led just 31-27 at the break. Teammates were in his ear, he said, telling the star to “be me.” Duke opened the second half with a 9-0 run and was cruising. The Bison (1916) never recovered. “In the second half, we played beautiful basketball,” Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said.

Barrett said Duke, which starts four freshmen, may have been overly excited about the NCAAs. When they settled down, Barrett said, things came easier. The Blue Devils (31-5) will face No. 9 seed Central Florida on Sunday for a spot in the Sweet 16. North Dakota State coach David Richman knew Duke had the potential for a back-breaking run that would put his team on its heels. He was as awed by Williamson as everyone else. “Probably one of the best athletes I’ve seen with my own eyes,” he said. Central Florida 73, Virginia Commonwealth 58 • Tacko Fall had 10 points, 18 rebounds and five blocks as ninth-seeded UCF won its first NCAA Tournament game, a victory over No. 8 seed VCU in Columbia, S.C. The 7-foot-6 Fall, a senior from Senegal, barely left his feet to haul in some rebounds as the Rams helplessly swiped at missed shots and struggled to find open space on drives to their baskets when the Knights’ towering center was nearby. UCF (24-8) built a 21-point lead in the second half. The Rams (25-8) narrowed the margin to 62-55 on De’Riante Jenkins’ 3-pointer with 4:53 to go, but they could get no closer.

MIDWEST REGIONAL

Davis helps third-seeded Houston romp ASSOCIATED PRESS

It’s beginning to look like old times for Houston in the NCAA Tournament. Corey Davis scored 26 points to help the third-seeded Cougars beat Georgia State 84-55 on Friday night in Tulsa, Okla. After reaching the national final in 1984, Houston went more than three decades without winning an NCAA Tournament game. Now, the Cougars have tourney wins in back-to-back seasons and are starting to resemble the program that has five Final Four appearances and produced stars including Elvin Hayes, Clyde Drexler and Hakeem Olajuwon. Houston coach Kelvin Sampson said it’s too early to worry about his team’s place in history. “We just want to advance,” he said. “I think, looking back at something means it’s over. We’re not done. We’ve got another game Sunday. This is such a special group of kids in terms of their preparation and leadership. We know what we’re accomplishing. We’re moving toward our goal. Our focus is just to live to fight another day.” Fabian White had 14 points and 11 rebounds and Breaon Brady added 13 points for Houston (32-3), which will Ohio State. Houston rolled out to a 15-3 lead in the first five minutes, and the rout was on. The Cougars shot 52 percent to lead 40-31 at halftime, and then opened the second half on a 10-2 run to put the game out of reach. Houston outrebounded Georgia State 51-27. D’Marcus Simonds scored 18 points for No. 14 seed Georgia State (24-10), which received an automatic bid as the Sun Belt Conference tournament champion. North Carolina 88, Iona 73 • North Carolina completed a perfect first round for top seeds in this NCAA Tournament, but not before Iona became the latest No. 16 seed to show these matchups are no sure thing. Cameron Johnson scored 21 points, and North Carolina quickly erased a fivepoint halftime deficit to win in Columbus. The Tar Heels (28-6), who came into the tournament as a top seed for a record 17th time, advanced to play Washington. They’re hoping to reach their 11th Final Four. Ricky McGill made all four of his

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Houston’s Corey Davis Jr. goes up for a shot as Georgia State’s Devin Mitchell defends during the second half Friday.

3-point attempts in the opening half as the Gaels (17-16) led by as many as eight and took a 38-33 lead into halftime. Washington 78, Utah State 61 • Noah Dickerson had 20 points and 12 rebounds, and ninth-seeded Washington made a successful return to the tournament for the first time in eight years, beating Utah State in Columbus. Jaylen Nowell, the Pac-12 player of the year, had 19 points and five assists for Washington (27-8). Top defender Matisse Thybulle helped the Huskies surge ahead to stay late in the first half but was limited by foul trouble the rest of the way. He finished with 10 points, five steals and three blocks. Eighth-seeded Utah State (28-7) had won 10 in a row and 17 of 18 while taking the Mountain West title.

Ohio State 62, Iowa State 59 • Ohio State went from barely making the tournament to a spot in the second round with an upset of sixth-seeded Iowa State in Tulsa, Okla. Kaleb Wesson had 21 points and 12 rebounds to lead the 11th-seeded Buckeyes (20-14). Keyshawn Woods added 19 points for Ohio State, which will play No. 3 seed Houston on Sunday. Musa Jallow chipped in 11 points for the Buckeyes. Iowa State (23-12) led just once in the second half but had a chance to send the game into overtime when Nick WeilerBabb had an open attempt at a game-tying 3. His shot missed and ended the season for the Cyclones, who won the Big 12 tournament to earn a spot in the NCAAs. Marial Shayok scored 23 points for Iowa State.


HOCKEY

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Logano has pole as Ford dominates Driver won huge race at Martinsville last fall ASSOCIATED PRESS

MARTINSVILLE, VA. • Joey Logano led a Ford sweep at Martinsville Speedway with another pole-winning run for Team Penske. Logano turned a lap at 97.830 mph in Saturday qualifying to earn the top starting spot. His pole-winning run came roughly 90 minutes after Team Penske teammate Will Power won the pole for the IndyCar race in Austin, Texas. Logano, who won at Martinsville last fall in a critical victory for his Cup Series title, will start Sunday from the pole for the fifth time in the last nine races. “You just have to be so precise, and you’re pushing yourself so hard down into the corners, and a mistake has such a big penalty when you get loose,” Logano said. “And you’re right on the edge of these tires, and if you go over that edge a little bit, it’s the difference between qualifying first or eighth or ninth because the field is so close. “It’s awesome to get another pole here at Martinsville, and hopefully we can top it off with another win.” Aric Almirola qualified second for Stewart-Haas Racing, Penske driver Brad Keselowski was third and Kevin Harvick was fourth as Ford drivers took the top four qualifying positions. Five-time Martinsville winner Denny Hamlin qualified fifth in a Toyota for Sunday’s race at the shortest track on the NASCAR circuit. William Byron was sixth and the highest-qualifying Chevrolet driver. Clint Bowyer, winner of the spring race at Martinsville last year, qualified 11th and was disappointed after pacing Saturday morning’s practice session. “That was not very good. We need to be better,” he said. “I’m not very good at qualifying here.” Kyle Busch won the Truck Series race — his third win in three truck events this season — before the qualifying session began, but the success did not carry into his Cup lap. The winner of the last two Cup races will start 14th at Martinsville as he attempts to sweep the weekend. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. was the first driver to fall afoul of NASCAR’s new policy of enforcing speeding on pit road during qualifying. His time was disallowed for speeding on pit road and he will start 25th. Corey LaJoie and Cody Ware did not make qualifying attempts after wrecking their primary cars in earlier practice sessions. Logano won at Martinsville last fall when he used his bumper to move Martin Truex Jr. out of his way in the final turn. The aggressive move earned Logano a spot in NASCAR’s championship race. He claimed his first Cup title three weeks later. Truex was angered by the move, but Logano and most of his competitors understand that being aggressive at Martinsville is typically the only way to victory lane. “I gave the old bump-and-run,” Logano said. “I think there’s a fine line. You don’t want to straight out bump somebody on purpose, but when it comes down to the end of the race like that and there’s that much on the line — that was our shot to win a championship — I think every driver has a line that they are OK with and that you can go to sleep at the end of the night and say, ‘I did what I had to do and I’m all right with it.’”

MOTORS ROUNDUP Busch wins in Truck Series Kyle Busch remained undefeated in the Truck Series this season with yet another victory Saturday at Martinsville Speedway. Busch has won all three Truck Series races he’s entered this year, and his latest victory is the 201st national series win of his career. He’s off to an unbelievable start to the season with seven wins — including back-to-back victories in the Cup Series — and his lowest finish in any race is sixth. Ben Rhodes finished second and was followed by Brett Moffitt, Ross Chastain and Stewart Friesen. Power wins pole • Will Power topped qualifying at the inaugural IndyCar Classic by edging Alexander Rossi at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. The Team Penske driver earned his second pole position in two races this season and 56th of his career with a lap of 1 minute, 46.0177 seconds. Power was followed by Andretti Autosport teammates Rossi and Ryan Hunter-Reay. Sixteen of Power’s 35 career victories have come from the pole position. The top three had to dig deep for the final laps to knock rookies Colton Herta of Harding Steinbrenner Racing and Felix Rosenqvist of Chip Ganassi Racing from the top spots. Herta will start fourth and Rosenqvist fifth. Associated Press

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Del Zotto likes playoff chase Team’s newest defenseman has been key contributor lately BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It has been a while since Blues defenseman Michael Del Zotto has been in the playoffs, or even in a playoff race. “I want to say three or four years ago in Philly,” Del Zotto said. “The unfortunate part at that time, I had season-ending surgery so I didn’t get to play in the playoffs when I was in Philly. So the last time I played would’ve been my last year in New York (with the Rangers), which was six, seven years ago maybe.” But after a trade deadline deal that sent him to St. Louis from Anaheim, not only is Del Zotto in the playoff race with the Blues, he’s been in the lineup. “Playing meaningful hockey this time of year is incredible,” Del Zotto said. “That joy you have coming every day to the rink. It wears on you when you get into January, February and you know you’re not making the playoffs. It’s tough. “So now, knowing you’re right in the thick of things, fighting for position, trying to get home ice right now, obviously catching the teams ahead of us — it makes the game that much more enjoyable. You’re coming to the rink every day with a purpose, knowing you got a shot at the Stanley Cup.” After being acquired for a sixth-round

draft pick Feb. 25, Del Zotto was a healthy scratch in six of his first seven games with the Blues. But then Joel Edmundson suffered a lower-body injury March 12 against Arizona. Del Zotto was called into action, with Saturday’s game against Tampa Bay his sixth consecutive game — all with Robert Bortuzzo on the Blues’ third pairing. “This game is so unpredictable and so many things can happen with injuries and what-not,” Del Zotto said. “It’s just a matter of staying ready each game, doing the little things.” Del Zotto has done more than just the little things filling in for Edmundson. Known as a puck mover and an offensiveminded defensemen when he came into the league, Del Zotto has shown he hasn’t lost the knack, with assists in three consecutive games entering the Tampa contest. “When I first came into this league, I was definitely more so a power play guy, offensive guy,” he said. “As you gain experience and as you become older and play more years in this league you understand what it takes to win on a nightly basis. “It’s not always gonna be a goal or an assist. Maybe a blocked shot, or a big hit, or taking the hit to make the play.”

BINNINGTON’S NUMBER IS 26 Turns out the magic number for Jordan Binnington is 26 games, not 28, in terms of

whether he becomes a restricted vs. unrestricted free agent after this season. Under terms of Group VI free agency in the NHL’s collective bargaining agreement, goaltenders are eligible for unrestricted free agency if they are age 25 or older, have played three or more professional seasons, and have played 30 minutes or more in fewer than 28 games. Binnington is 25 and in his sixth full season of pro hockey. But since he was under contract during the 2012-13 season, a lockout year in the NHL in which only 48 games were played, the number of games played to determine his free agency status was pro-rated down to 26. Thursday’s 5-2 victory over the Detroit Red Wings, marked Binnington’s 26th game with at least 30 minutes of action. (He is 194-1 as a starter — 24 games — but played more than 30 minutes in two other games in December in relief of Jake Allen.) So Binnington no longer is eligible for unrestricted free agency. He will be a restricted free agent once this season ends. And that’s an important distinction because as a restricted free agent, the Blues can pretty much control where Binnington plays next season. As an unrestricted free agent, they can’t. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Blues center Brayden Schenn reaches for the puck before making a nifty play to score in the second period Saturday night.

Binnington comes up big in win vs. Lightning BLUES • FROM D1

third regulation loss since Feb. 7. The Blues (40-27-8) for 88 points, moved six points ahead of Dallas, which lost to Pittsburgh on Saturday, solidifying their hold on third place in the Central Division. And they’re just two points behind second-place Nashville, which lost to Winnipeg, with a game in hand on the Predators. Brayden Schenn’s 15th goal, scored in the second period, turned out to be the game winner. Even before the opening puck drop, you could sense more energy in the crowd at Enterprise Center. You could also sense more energy in the Blues as well, and it showed in a big way midway through the opening period. After Ryan McDonagh went off for hooking Vladimir Tarasenko 10 minutes into the period, the Blues took the lead on a powerplay goal by Robert Thomas. Tyler Bozak took a shot at Tampa Bay goalie Andrei Vasilevskiy from left wing. The rebound went to Vince Dunn near the left front, and the rebound from Dunn’s shot went to Thomas at the right front for a tap-in goal for the 19-year-old rookie. It was Thomas’ eighth goal of the season and his first in nine games — since scoring twice on March 6 in Anaheim. The crowd went nuts. Then they really went crazy. Thirty-eight seconds after the Thomas goal, Alexander Steen made a diving lunge at a rebound of a Zach Sanford shot and got enough of his stick on the puck to get it past Vasilevskiy. Earlier in the period, Steen got a warm ovation from the crowd after being recognized for topping 600 career points Thursday against Detroit, and joining father Thomas Steen as the fourth father-son duo in NHL history to both reach 600 career points. Steen snapped an 11-game point-less streak with three assists against the Red Wings. He got much more than a warm ovation after snapping a 12-game goal drought with his eighth goal of the season Saturday against Tampa Bay.

Tampa Bay Blues

0 3

2 1

1 0

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First period B: Thomas 8 (Bozak, Dunn), 11:30 (pp). B: Steen 8 (Sanford), 12:08. B: Tarasenko 29 (Schenn, O’Reilly), 12:45. Penalties: McDonagh, TB, (hooking), 10:00; Bortuzzo, STL, (tripping), 16:30; McDonagh, TB, (interference), 19:57. Second period T: Killorn 17 (Cirelli), 0:27 (sh). T: Point 40 (McDonagh), 7:24. B: Schenn 15 (Tarasenko, Barbashev), 14:24. Penalties: Sanford, STL, (high sticking), 8:56. Third period T: Stamkos 39 (Miller), 4:46. Penalties: Perron, STL, (tripping), 13:28. Shots on goal Tampa Bay 12 19 11 Blues 13 8 5 Power-plays Tampa Bay 0 of 3; Blues 1 of 2. Goaltenders Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 36-9-4 (26 shots-22 saves). Blues, Binnington 20-4-1 (42-39). A: 18,127. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Brandon Gawryletz, Bryan Pancich.

3 4

42 26

The crowd had yet to settle down when Tarasenko got a room-service pass from Ryan O’Reilly — right on his stick and right in front of the Tampa Bay net. Tarasenko closed out the 2-on-1 rush with his 29th goal of the season and his first since returning to the line Tuesday against Edmonton from what was believed to be an elbow injury. That goal came at the 12:45 mark of the period and made it three goals in one minute 15 seconds for St. Louis. All three goals came from in close, none further away than 17 feet according to the official stat sheet. But you didn’t think the Lightning would just lay down, did you? Even though the Blues began the second period on the power play, Tampa Bay scored a shorthanded goal just 27 seconds in. After a faceoff win by the Lightning, Alex Killorn was left alone in front of the crease. He went backhand/forehand to beat Jordan Binnington and make it a 3-1 game with his 17th goal of the season. The Lightning were just warming up. While the Blues tried to make the fancy pass, instead of taking the more direct approach — and shooting — Tampa Bay peppered Binnington with shot after shot. It was 11 shots to one in the period when Brayden Point scored his 40th of the sea-

son to make it a 3-2 game at the 7:24 mark of the second. Point beat O’Reilly back down the ice on the play for a tap-in goal after a great pass from McDonagh. By the time the period ended, Binnington had faced 19 shots from Tampa Bay, the most he has faced in a period all season. But the Blues managed to get a muchneeded goal, and get out of the second period with a 4-2 lead. Ivan Barbashev, fresh off his hat trick against Detroit, came up with the puck along the sideboards. He checked McDonagh from behind and fed Tarasenko cruising down the slot. Vasilevskiy saved Tarasenko’s shot, but the rebound went Brayden Schenn’s way. Schenn went through his own legs with the shot as he drifted right to left, lifting the puck over Vasilevkiy’s stick for his 15th goal of the season with 5:36 left in the period. On Feb. 7, it was Schenn who beat Vasilevkiy and the Lightning with an overtime goal in a 1-0 Blues victory. The breathing room provided by Schenn’s goal Saturday was short-lived in the third period. The Blues couldn’t clear the puck during some extended zone time by the Lightning, and the Blues paid for is when Steven Stamkos — once a little league teammate in Toronto with Alex Pietrangelo and Michael Del Zotto — scored his 39th goal of the season just 4:46 into the third. So it was a 4-3 game and fasten-yourseat belt time at Enterprise. After a marginal, at best, tripping call against David Perron, Stamkos tied the game at 4-4 with 5:43 left to play. But hold on. The Blues’ challenged the call for offsides. And sure enough, Barbashev got a stick on a pass from Point at the blue line intended for Ondrej Palat on right wing. That caused the play to be offsides, the goal was erased, and the Blues had their 4-3 lead back. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


HOCKEY

D4 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

Logano has pole as Ford dominates Driver won huge race at Martinsville last fall ASSOCIATED PRESS

MARTINSVILLE, VA. • Joey Logano led a Ford sweep at Martinsville Speedway with another pole-winning run for Team Penske. Logano turned a lap at 97.830 mph in Saturday qualifying to earn the top starting spot. His pole-winning run came roughly 90 minutes after Team Penske teammate Will Power won the pole for the IndyCar race in Austin, Texas. Logano, who won at Martinsville last fall in a critical victory for his Cup Series title, will start Sunday from the pole for the fifth time in the last nine races. “You just have to be so precise, and you’re pushing yourself so hard down into the corners, and a mistake has such a big penalty when you get loose,” Logano said. “And you’re right on the edge of these tires, and if you go over that edge a little bit, it’s the difference between qualifying first or eighth or ninth because the field is so close. “It’s awesome to get another pole here at Martinsville, and hopefully we can top it off with another win.” Aric Almirola qualified second for Stewart-Haas Racing, Penske driver Brad Keselowski was third and Kevin Harvick was fourth as Ford drivers took the top four qualifying positions. Five-time Martinsville winner Denny Hamlin qualified fifth in a Toyota for Sunday’s race at the shortest track on the NASCAR circuit. William Byron was sixth and the highest-qualifying Chevrolet driver. Clint Bowyer, winner of the spring race at Martinsville last year, qualified 11th and was disappointed after pacing Saturday morning’s practice session. “That was not very good. We need to be better,” he said. “I’m not very good at qualifying here.” Kyle Busch won the Truck Series race — his third win in three truck events this season — before the qualifying session began, but the success did not carry into his Cup lap. The winner of the last two Cup races will start 14th at Martinsville as he attempts to sweep the weekend. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. was the first driver to fall afoul of NASCAR’s new policy of enforcing speeding on pit road during qualifying. His time was disallowed for speeding on pit road and he will start 25th. Corey LaJoie and Cody Ware did not make qualifying attempts after wrecking their primary cars in earlier practice sessions. Logano won at Martinsville last fall when he used his bumper to move Martin Truex Jr. out of his way in the final turn. The aggressive move earned Logano a spot in NASCAR’s championship race. He claimed his first Cup title three weeks later. Truex was angered by the move, but Logano and most of his competitors understand that being aggressive at Martinsville is typically the only way to victory lane. “I gave the old bump-and-run,” Logano said. “I think there’s a fine line. You don’t want to straight out bump somebody on purpose, but when it comes down to the end of the race like that and there’s that much on the line — that was our shot to win a championship — I think every driver has a line that they are OK with and that you can go to sleep at the end of the night and say, ‘I did what I had to do and I’m all right with it.’”

MOTORS ROUNDUP Busch wins in Truck Series Kyle Busch remained undefeated in the Truck Series this season with yet another victory Saturday at Martinsville Speedway. Busch has won all three Truck Series races he’s entered this year, and his latest victory is the 201st national series win of his career. He’s off to an unbelievable start to the season with seven wins — including back-to-back victories in the Cup Series — and his lowest finish in any race is sixth. Ben Rhodes finished second and was followed by Brett Moffitt, Ross Chastain and Stewart Friesen. Power wins pole • Will Power topped qualifying at the inaugural IndyCar Classic by edging Alexander Rossi at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas. The Team Penske driver earned his second pole position in two races this season and 56th of his career with a lap of 1 minute, 46.0177 seconds. Power was followed by Andretti Autosport teammates Rossi and Ryan Hunter-Reay. Sixteen of Power’s 35 career victories have come from the pole position. The top three had to dig deep for the final laps to knock rookies Colton Herta of Harding Steinbrenner Racing and Felix Rosenqvist of Chip Ganassi Racing from the top spots. Herta will start fourth and Rosenqvist fifth. Associated Press

M 4 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

BLUES NOTEBOOK

Del Zotto likes playoff chase Team’s newest defenseman has been key contributor lately BY JIM THOMAS St. Louis Post-Dispatch

It has been a while since Blues defenseman Michael Del Zotto has been in the playoffs, or even in a playoff race. “I want to say three or four years ago in Philly,” Del Zotto said. “The unfortunate part at that time, I had season-ending surgery so I didn’t get to play in the playoffs when I was in Philly. So the last time I played would’ve been my last year in New York (with the Rangers), which was six, seven years ago maybe.” But after a trade deadline deal that sent him to St. Louis from Anaheim, not only is Del Zotto in the playoff race with the Blues, he’s been in the lineup. “Playing meaningful hockey this time of year is incredible,” Del Zotto said. “That joy you have coming every day to the rink. It wears on you when you get into January, February and you know you’re not making the playoffs. It’s tough. “So now, knowing you’re right in the thick of things, fighting for position, trying to get home ice right now, obviously catching the teams ahead of us — it makes the game that much more enjoyable. You’re coming to the rink every day with a purpose, knowing you got a shot at the Stanley Cup.” After being acquired for a sixth-round

draft pick Feb. 25, Del Zotto was a healthy scratch in six of his first seven games with the Blues. But then Joel Edmundson suffered a lower-body injury March 12 against Arizona. Del Zotto was called into action, with Saturday’s game against Tampa Bay his sixth consecutive game — all with Robert Bortuzzo on the Blues’ third pairing. “This game is so unpredictable and so many things can happen with injuries and what-not,” Del Zotto said. “It’s just a matter of staying ready each game, doing the little things.” Del Zotto has done more than just the little things filling in for Edmundson. Known as a puck mover and an offensiveminded defensemen when he came into the league, Del Zotto has shown he hasn’t lost the knack, with assists in three consecutive games entering the Tampa contest. “When I first came into this league, I was definitely more so a power play guy, offensive guy,” he said. “As you gain experience and as you become older and play more years in this league you understand what it takes to win on a nightly basis. “It’s not always gonna be a goal or an assist. Maybe a blocked shot, or a big hit, or taking the hit to make the play.”

BINNINGTON’S NUMBER IS 26 Turns out the magic number for Jordan Binnington is 26 games, not 28, in terms of

whether he becomes a restricted vs. unrestricted free agent after this season. Under terms of Group VI free agency in the NHL’s collective bargaining agreement, goaltenders are eligible for unrestricted free agency if they are age 25 or older, have played three or more professional seasons, and have played 30 minutes or more in fewer than 28 games. Binnington is 25 and in his sixth full season of pro hockey. But since he was under contract during the 2012-13 season, a lockout year in the NHL in which only 48 games were played, the number of games played to determine his free agency status was pro-rated down to 26. Thursday’s 5-2 victory over the Detroit Red Wings, marked Binnington’s 26th game with at least 30 minutes of action. (He is 194-1 as a starter — 24 games — but played more than 30 minutes in two other games in December in relief of Jake Allen.) So Binnington no longer is eligible for unrestricted free agency. He will be a restricted free agent once this season ends. And that’s an important distinction because as a restricted free agent, the Blues can pretty much control where Binnington plays next season. As an unrestricted free agent, they can’t. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com

CRISTINA M. FLETES • cfletes@post-dispatch.com

Blues center Brayden Schenn reaches for the puck before making a nifty play to score in the second period Saturday night.

Binnington comes up big in win vs. Lightning BLUES • FROM D1

a coach’s challenge to wipe out the tying goal by Steven Stamkos with 5 minutes 43 seconds to play. But they prevailed nonetheless, winning 4-3 in an intense, highly-entertaining contest Saturday and handing Tampa Bay (58-14-4) just its third regulation loss in 1 1/2 months. “Obviously, they’re an offensively gifted team,” goalie Jordan Binnington said. “There’s a lot of momentum changes in that game. Our fans helped us out a couple times. It was just a battle from the start of the second period on. Thankfully, we had a good first period and kind of built off that and just competed right till the end.” The Blues scored three goals in 75 seconds in the first period to take a 3-0 lead, then watched Tampa Bay storm back to score three of the game’s next four goals. But Brayden Schenn, who has been a Lightning killer this season, scored what proved to be the game winner with a behind-the-back, through-his-legs goal that trickled past Tampa Bay goalie Andrei Vasilevkskiy with 5:36 left in the second period. “I was just hoping for the best,” said Schenn, who was drifting right-to-left on the play. His momentum heading in that direction was such that a conventional shot wouldn’t have worked. So unconventional worked for Schenn’s 15th goal of the season. He had scored the game winner Feb. 7 in a 1-0 overtime victory at Tampa. “A couple games we have some chances and puck doesn’t go in,” Vladimir Tarasenko said. “It was good we can score today and help the team win. Obviously happy for Schenner. It’s a great gamewinning goal.” After going two games without a goal, and one game without even a point, the Schenn-Ryan O’Reilly-Tarasenko line was riding high again Saturday. Tarasenko got his 29th of the season to make it 3-0 Blues less than 13 minutes into the game. For the night, the trio accounted for five points (two goals, three assists). Rookie Robert Thomas and veteran Alexander Steen, the youngest and second-

Tampa Bay Blues

0 3

2 1

1 0

— —

First period B: Thomas 8 (Bozak, Dunn), 11:30 (pp). B: Steen 8 (Sanford), 12:08. B: Tarasenko 29 (Schenn, O’Reilly), 12:45. Penalties: McDonagh, TB, (hooking), 10:00; Bortuzzo, STL, (tripping), 16:30; McDonagh, TB, (interference), 19:57. Second period T: Killorn 17 (Cirelli), 0:27 (sh). T: Point 40 (McDonagh), 7:24. B: Schenn 15 (Tarasenko, Barbashev), 14:24. Penalties: Sanford, STL, (high sticking), 8:56. Third period T: Stamkos 39 (Miller), 4:46. Penalties: Perron, STL, (tripping), 13:28. Shots on goal Tampa Bay 12 19 11 Blues 13 8 5 Power-plays Tampa Bay 0 of 3; Blues 1 of 2. Goaltenders Tampa Bay, Vasilevskiy 36-9-4 (26 shots-22 saves). Blues, Binnington 20-4-1 (42-39). A: 18,127. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Kyle Rehman. Linesmen: Brandon Gawryletz, Bryan Pancich.

3 4

42 26

oldest Blues at ages 19 and 35 respectively, had given the Blues a 2-0 lead earlier, each scoring his eighth goal of the season. The crowd of 18,127 was so loud during that three-goal spree, a fourth quick score might have blown the roof off the place. But you didn’t think Tampa was going to lay down and concede, did you? Schenn didn’t. “It wasn’t over,” he said. “They score too many goals for them not to make a game of it. They’re dangerous, all lines can score, their ‘D’ are active. They play hard, they make plays, we probably made their job a little easier, letting them back in with the power play to start the second.” Alex Killorn’s shorthanded goal just 27 seconds into the second period got Tampa Bay back in the game. Not surprisingly, interim coach Craig Berube was not happy with that goal, which came right off a faceoff, and wasn’t happy overall with his team’s play to start the period. “You can’t feed into that team or teams like that by turning the puck over and making soft plays,” Berube said. “They’re going to capitalize and go the other way and it’s hard. ... We were on our heels for a while.” The Blues looked to be back on their heels in the third period, when what looked like Stamkos’ 40th goal of the season occurred after a marginal tripping call against David Perron put the Lightning on

the power play. But Blues’ video coach Sean Ferrell, who watches the game at press box level, alerted Berube and the bench almost immediately that the play was offside. The review didn’t long: Ivan Barbashev had gotten his stick on Brayden Point’s pass to Ondrej Palat, causing the play to be offside. No one was more relieved than Binnington. “Shout out to Sean Ferrell ... that’s huge,” Binnington said. “It was kind of a sigh of relief for me. That was pretty frustrating. We really wanted this win.” They got it, even though Binnington at times resembled a duck in a shooting gallery. The league’s highest-scoring team — with three of the league’s top 10 scorers in its lineup — peppered him with 42 shots, the most Binnington has faced in his career. But by game’s end, he had improved to 20-4-1 and remained unbeaten at 12-0-1. Binnington and Nashville’s Pekka Rinne are the only goalies who have beaten the Lightning twice this season. In the big picture, the Blues (40-278) solidified their hold on third place in the Central Division, six points ahead of fourth-place Dallas, and are moving ever closer to clinching a playoff spot. And don’t look now, but the Blues are just two points behind Nashville for second place in the Central with a game in hand on the Predators. While the Blues gave credit to Tampa before and after Saturday’s game, the interesting thing was they didn’t give the Lightning too much credit. “I told the guys before the game, ‘That’s a good team over there. We’re a good team. You should go out and play like you’re a good team against a good team,’” Berube said. “And we did. We went out in the first period and we went after them.” The Blues are now 16-8-3 against the top 10 teams in the NHL. And that could bode well in a couple of weeks. Come playoff time. Jim Thomas @jthom1 on Twitter jthomas@post-dispatch.com


NCAA TOURNAMENT

03.24.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1 NBA STANDINGS SOUTH REGIONAL

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D5

headline

UC Irvine sends Kansas State home Fourth-seeded Wildcats are out; top seed Virginia has to rally to avoid another upset 12th-seeded Oregon extended its surprising March run by beating No. 5 seed Wisconsin in San Jose. The Ducks (24-12) won four games in four days to win the Pac-12 tournament last week just to make the NCAAs then followed it with an impressive victory over a higher-seeded opponent. Louis King added 17 points, Paul White scored all 14 points of his points in the second half and Wooten had nine points, six rebounds and the tone-setting blocks to give the Ducks their ninth straight win. Ethan Happ and Khalil Iverson each scored 14 points to lead the Badgers (2311).

ASSOCIATED PRESS

When it comes to college basketball in California, UC Irvine is low on the totem pole. Now the program that sometimes feels like a little brother to Pac-12 powers like UCLA and USC is the only school from the state still standing in the NCAA Tournament after pulling off a stunner in San Jose. The 13th-seeded Anteaters got backto-back 3-pointers from Evan Leonard to spark the deciding run in a 70-64 upset Friday over No. 4 seed Kansas State for the first tournament win in school history. “Well, little brother has been in the weight room, getting better, getting ready for a chance like this,” coach Russell Turner said. “So I’m really happy for these players to be able to work so hard for something everybody can see and then accomplish it. But I’m also really excited for the fans of our program who also seem to have endured feeling like little brothers. “You know, we need to stick our chests out a little bit right now.” UC Irvine (31-5) had lost its only previous tournament game, 57-55 to Louisville in 2015. But the Anteaters got a longer stay this time after taking control of the game with a 12-0 run midway through the second and then holding off the regular season co-champions of the Big 12 to earn their 17th straight victory. Leonard and Max Hazzard each scored 19 points for UC Irvine. “We’ve had three goals all year, and that was to win the regular season championship, the tournament championship and advance in the NCAA Tournament,” Hazzard said. “And that doesn’t just mean one game. We have another game on Sunday, and we’re planning to put ourselves in position to win again, and hopefully we can do that and play into next weekend.” One year after making a run to the Elite Eight, the fourth-seeded Wildcats (25-9) ASSOCIATED PRESS had a short stay in the tournament as they struggled to decipher the Anteaters’ zone defense and missed star forward Dean Wade, who was sidelined by a foot injury. Kamau Stokes led Kansas State with 18 points.

Tennessee 77, Colgate 70 • Admiral Schofield had 19 points and No. 2 seed Tennessee held off a second-half rally by No. 15 seed Colgate in Columbus, Ohio. Jordan Bone added 16 and Jordan Bowden 14 for Tennessee ASSOCIATED PRESS(30-5). The Raiders (24-11) erased Tennessee’s 42-30 halftime lead with an 11-2 run, tied the score midway through the second half, and kept the game close after that. Schofield hit back-to-back 3-pointers to give Tennessee a cushion with 45 seconds left, and Bone and Schofield followed with a pair of foul shots each to extend the lead as Colgate ran out of time.

wild_art

NHL STANDINGS

Iowa 79, Cincinnati 72 • Earlier in Columbus, Luka Garza scored 20 points, Jordan Bohannon made a three-point play during Iowa’s closing surge, and the 10th-seeded Hawkeyes kept the Big Ten temporarily perfect in the NCAA Tournament. The Hawkeyes (23-11) got their first NCAA Tournament win in four years despite what amounted to a home crowd for the seventh-seeded Bearcats (28-7), who couldn’t overcome a subpar game by Jarron Cumberland.

headline

Virginia 71, Gardner-Webb 56 • No. 1 seed Virginia this time avoided the biggest upset in NCAA Tournament history. The Cavaliers rallied from 14 points down to beat No. 16 seed Gardner-Webb in Columbia, S.C. Virginia was the top overall seed last

Oregon 72, Wisconsin 54 • Payton Pritchard scored 19 points, Kenny Wooten protected the rim with four blocks, and

30-5

Virginia

Sunday 4:15 p.m., KMOV (4)

8 VCU 9 Central Fla.

24-8

Oklahoma

Grizzlies 112, Pacers 103 Friday

SAN JOSE, CALIF. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

72 8

Oklahoma

95 9

Wisconsin

54 5

Oregon

72 12

Kansas St.

64 4

UC Irvine

70 13

DES MOINES, IOWA HARTFORD, CONN.

scorey score

15:25. Penalties: H.Sedin, Van (hooking), 5:35; Tanev, Van (roughing), 11:02; Demers, Dal (roughing), 11:02; Roussel, Louisville, Ky. Mar.Dal 30 (roughing), 11:02. Overtime: 7, Dallas, Ja.Benn 9 (Seguin), KFC Yum! Center 2:28. Penalties: None. Shots: Vancouver 10-12-10-0: 32. Dallas 13-5-9-2: 29. Power-plays: Vancouver 1 of 2; Dallas 0 of 3. Goalies: Vancouver, Miller 4-2-4 (29 shots-25 saves). Dallas, Niemi 5-1-0 (32-29). A: 17,664. Referees: Brian Pochmara, Trevor Hanson. Linesmen: Brian Murphy, Ryan Gibbons.

scorey score

SOUTH

Montreal 3 0 0 — 3 Edmonton 0 1 3 — 4 First period: 1, Montreal, Gallagher 5 (Subban, Plekanec), 9:27 (pp). 2, Montreal, Mitchell 5 (SmithPelly), 16:56. 3, Montreal, Galchenyuk 2 (Markov, Flynn), 17:51. Penalties: Emelin, Mon (hooking), :27; Pouliot, Edm (holding), 8:36; Subban, Mon (interference), 18:40. Second period: 4, Edmonton, Draisaitl 1 (Hall, Klefbom), 19:08 (pp). Penalties: Gryba, Edm (holding), 14:55; Fleischmann, Mon (high-sticking), 18:31; Pacioretty, Mon (tripping), 20:00. Third period: 5, Edmonton, Davidson 1 (Nurse, McDavid), 6:15. 6, Edmonton, Pouliot 3 (McDavid, Yakupov), 10:43. 7, Edmonton, Draisaitl 2 (Nugent-Hopkins), 18:58. Penalties: Subban, Mon (roughing), 4:13; Pouliot, Edm (roughing), 4:13. Shots: Montreal 11-5-5: 21. Edmonton 5-11-11: 27. Power-plays: Montreal 1 of 2; Edmonton 1 of 4. Goalies: Montreal, Price 7-2-0 (27 shots-23 saves). Edmonton, Talbot 3-5-0 (21-18). A: 16,839. Referees: Jean Hebert, TJ Luxmore. Linesmen: Ryan Galloway, Steve Miller.

Colorado 1 1 0 — 2 Tampa Bay 0 1 0 — 1 Villanova 61 6 First period: 1, Colorado, Tanguay 1 (Iginla, MacKinnon), 15:57. Penalties: Colorado bench, served by Grigorenko Villanova (too many men), 26-9 2:11; Zadorov, Col (interference), 4:50; Carle, TB (holding), 12:10; TB (hooking), St.Boyle, Mary’s 5718:10. 11 Second period: 2, Colorado, MacKinnon 4 Saturday (Iginla, 7:40Tanguay), p.m., TNT13:04. 3, Tampa Bay, Killorn 2 (Hedman, Filppula), 15:46 (pp). Penalties:61 3 Purdue Tampa Bay bench, served by Marchessault (too many men), 1:37;24-9 Landeskog, Col (slashing), Purdue 15:09; Hedman, TB (holding), 18:51. Old Domin. 14 Third period: None. Penalties: Filppula, TB48 (holding), :35; Soderberg, Col (cross-checking), :58; T.Johnson, TB (goaltender interference), :58; Stralman, TB Cincinnati 72 713:18. (interference), 4:27; Duchene, Col (delay of game), Shots: Colorado 10-11-5: 26. Tampa Bay 9-13-13: 35. Iowa 23-11 Power-plays: Colorado 0 of 6; Tampa Bay 1 of 4. Goalies: Colorado, Varlamov Iowa2-3-1 (35 shots-34 79 10 saves).Sunday Tampa Bay, Bishop 5-4-1 (26-24). A: 19,092. 11:10 a.m.,Referees: KMOV (4) Eric Furlatt, Justin St. Pierre. Linesmen: Derek Amell,Tennessee Pierre Racicot. 77 2

Thursday

Tennessee 30-5 scorey score

70— 15 4 New Jersey 0 Colgate 1 3 Philadelphia 0 1 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Philadelphia bench, served by B.Schenn (too many men), 6:10; Greene, NJ (hooking), 11:38; VandeVelde, Phi (high-sticking), 17:06. Second period: 1, Philadelphia, L.Schenn 1 (Lecavalier, B.Schenn), 15:04. 2, New Jersey, Zajac 3 (Palmieri, Josefson), 18:12 (pp). Penalties: N. Carolina Schultz, Phi (hooking), 9:39; Laughton, Phi 88 1 N.(interference), Carolina 17:33; 28-6Merrill, NJ (hooking), 19:12. Third period: 3, New Jersey, Palmieri 3, 1:28. 4, New 16 Jersey, Zajac 4 (Palmieri,Iona Gelinas), 2:32 (pp).73 5, New Jersey,Sunday Greene 1, 19:53 (en). Penalties: Philadelphia 1:40 p.m., KMOV bench, served by (4) B.Schenn (too many men), 2:16. Shots: New Jersey 13-10-10: Philadelphia61 7-12-9: Utah33.State 8 28. Power-plays: New Jersey 2 of 5; Philadelphia 0 of 2. Washington 27-8Schneider 5-2-1 (28 shots-27 Goalies: New Jersey, saves). Philadelphia, Mason 2-3-2 (32-29). 78 9 Washington A: 19,241. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Wes McCauley. Linesmen: Kiel Murchison, Bryan Pancich.

1 2

Blues 0 1 1 — First period None. Penalties: Rattie, StL (high-sticking), 4:56; Kesler, Ana (holding stick), 5:38. Second period A: Lindholm 2 (Perry, Bieksa), 2:33 (pp). Saturday, April 6, 5:10 and 7:50 p.m., B: Tarasenko 6 (Lehtera, Ott), 6:18. Penalties: Pietrangelo,KMOV StL (holding), (4) :49; Maroon, Ana (roughing), 8:31; Holzer, Ana (roughing), 8:31; Ott, StL (roughing), 8:31; Kesler, Ana (hooking), 11:24; Perry, Ana, served by Santorelli, minor-major (holding, StL, major Monday, Aprilfighting), 8, 8:20 16:20; p.m.,Ott, KMOV (4) (fighting), 16:20; Backes, StL (tripping), 17:16. Third period U.S. Bank Stadium B: Parayko 4 (Rattie,Minneapolis Gomez), 10:31. Penalties: Cogliano, Ana (hooking), 7:51; Lehtera, StL (interference), 16:49. Shots on goal Anaheim 12 7 4 23 Blues 10 9 15 34 Power-plays Anaheim 1 of 4; Blues 0 of 5. Goaltenders Anaheim, Andersen 0-5-2 (34 shots-32 saves). Blues, Allen 3-2-0 (23-22). A: 16,904. Referees: Steve Kozari, Mike Leggo. Linesmen: Andy McElman, Jay Sharrers.

SWEET 16 REGIONALS 2ND ROUND

SEMIFINALS

CHAMPIONSHIP

Friday

scorey score 27-9

Mar. 31 1 3

Kansas City Sprint Center

82

11 Belmont

81 11 Temple

FIRST FOUR

Auburn

78 5

Carolina 1 0 1 1 — 3 NY Islanders 1 N.1Mexico 0 St. 0 77 —12 2 Saturday First period: 1, NY Islanders, Martin 1 (Leddy, Cizikas), 8:40 p.m., TBSMcGinn 2 (McClement, Gerbe), 8:56. 2, Carolina, 15:00. Penalties: Gerbe,Kansas Car (hooking), 18:08. 87 4 Second period: 3, NY Islanders, Nielsen 4 (Leddy, Kansas 26-9 Greiss), 12:50 (pp). Penalties: Terry, Car (highsticking), 12:22; Hamonic, NYI (tripping), 13:47. N'eastern 53 13 Third period: 4, Carolina, Terry 2 (J.Staal, E.Staal), 14:56. Penalties: Tavares, NYI (hooking), 1:36. Overtime: 5, Carolina, Hainsey 2 Iowa State 59 6 (J.Staal), 2:21. Penalties: None. Shots: 4-8-13-4: 29. NY Islanders 8-6-4-1: 19. Ohio St.Carolina20-14 Power-plays: Carolina 0 of 2; NY Islanders 1 of 2. Ohio(19 St.shots-17 62 11 Goalies: Carolina, Lack 1-2-0 saves).Sunday NY Islanders, Greiss 3-0-2 (29-26). 7:40 p.m., TNT Tim Peel, Chris Rooney. A: 11,494. Referees: Houston Linesmen: David Brisebois, Greg Devorski. 84 3

Houston

32-3

scorey score

Friday

scorey score Vancouver 1 1 1 0 — 3 Dallas 1 0 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Vancouver, Burrows 2 (penalty shot), 11:52. 2, Dallas, Sharp 2 (Jokipakka, Spezza), 15:05. Penalties: Bartkowski, Van (tripping), 1:42; Dorsett, Van (hooking), 9:44. Second period: 3, Vancouver, Edler 2 (Weber, D.Sedin), 5:38 70 (pp). Penalties: Roussel, Dal (tripping), 4:44.16 N. Dakota St. Third period: 4, Vancouver, Vrbata 3 (D.Sedin, DAYTON, H.Sedin), :10. 5, Dallas, DemersOHIO 2 (Oduya, Hemsky), 10:06. 6, Dallas, Sharp 3 (Klingberg, Ja.Benn),

1ST ROUND

Auburn

MIDWEST

scorey score Chicago 1 0 0 — Winnipeg 1 1 1 — First period: 1, Chicago, Kane 6 (Panarin, Seabrook), 1:26 (pp). 2, Winnipeg, Wheeler 5 (Little), 8:12. Penalties: Enstrom, Wpg (holding), :18; Trouba, Wpg (tripping), 8:19; Toews, Chi (hooking), 8:32; Garbutt, Chi (tripping), 17:04. Second period: 3, Winnipeg, Ladd 3 (Little, Perreault), 5:09 (pp). Penalties: Toews, Chi (holding), 4:03; Trouba, Wpg (tripping), 19:41. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Scheifele 4 (Ehlers, Myers), 8:04. Penalties: None. Shots: Chicago 14-18-14: 46. Winnipeg 9-13-9: 31. Power-plays: Chicago 1 of 3; Winnipeg 1 of 3. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 5-3-0 (31 shots-28 saves). Winnipeg, Hutchinson 4-0-0 (46-45). A: 15,294. Referees: Dave Jackson, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Brad Kovachik, Mark Wheler.

31-5

78 16 N.C. Central

74

11

Georgia St.

55 14

Buffalo 2 0 1 — Pittsburgh 2 2 0 — First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Dupuis 1 (Crosby,84 7 Wofford Lovejoy), :56. 2, Pittsburgh, Hornqvist 1 (Crosby, Maatta), 7:16. 3, Buffalo, Wofford 30-4 McGinn 2 (Schaller, Ristolainen), 14:25. 4, Buffalo, Deslauriers 2 Hall 68 10 (R.O’Reilly, Ristolainen),Seton 16:40. Penalties: None. Saturday Second period: 5, Pittsburgh, Lovejoy 1 (Malkin), 1:40 p.m., KMOV (4)Malkin 4 (Hornqvist, Kessel), 8:18. 6, Pittsburgh, Kentucky 14:57 (pp). Penalties: Lovejoy, Pit (hooking),79 2 6:06; Weber, Buf (tripping), 14:08. Kentucky 28-6 Third period: 7, Buffalo, Moulson 3 (R.O’Reilly, Legwand), 17:34. Penalties: Abilene Chr. 44 15 Letang, Pit (delay of game), 18:09. Shots: Buffalo 11-18-24: 53. Pittsburgh 11-14-4: 29. Power-plays: Buffalo 0 of 2; Pittsburgh 1 of 1. Goalies: Buffalo, Johnson 3-6-0 (29 shots-25 Arizona St. 74 111-0-0 St. (53-50). John's 65 saves). Pittsburgh, Zatkoff A: 18,415. Referees: Chris Lee, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: John Grandt, Trent Knorr.

3 4 JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

DES MOINES, IOWA

Thursday

UC Irvine

TULSA, OKLA.

72

Atlanta: Bazemore 2-6 0-0 5, Millsap 3-11 4-8 11, Texas Tech 27-6 Horford 9-18 1-2 21, Teague 7-12 9-10 23, Korver 6-8 0-0 Splitter 4-6 2-2 10, 57 Holiday 1-2 0-0 2, 14 15,No. Kentucky Schroder 6-11 0-0 13, Patterson 3-5 1-2 9, Scott 1-4 0-0 2, Tavares 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 42-83 18-26 112. New York: Anthony 10-27 5-5 25, Porzingis 4-10 Nevada 61 0-5 2-2 2, Vujacic 2-2 10,7Lopez 8-11 2-2 18, Calderon 2-8 0-0 6, O’Quinn 5-9 0-0 10, Galloway 2-4 2-2 Florida 20-15 8, Williams 3-9 3-4 9, Grant 2-4 1-2 5, Thomas 2-6 70 19-21 101. 2-2 8,10 EarlyFlorida 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-93 Atlanta 30 31 23 28 — Saturday 112 New York 20 25 27 29 4:15 — p.m., 101 KMOV (4) 3-point Atlanta 10-24 (Korver 2 goals: Michigan 74 3-5, Patterson 2-3, Horford 2-5, Bazemore 1-2, Millsap 1-2, Schroder Michigan 29-6 1-3, Holiday 0-1, Scott 0-1, Teague 0-2), New York 6-29 15 (Thomas 2-3, Galloway 2-4, Montana 55Vujacic 2-6, Calderon 0-2, Williams 0-3, Porzingis 0-4, Anthony 0-7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 49 (Millsap 11), New York 57 (O’Quinn 10). Assists: Atlanta 26 (Teague 8), New York 21 (Grant 7). Total16 fouls: P. Atlanta V. A&M18, New York 76 24. 16Technicals: Fairl. D’son New York Coach Fisher. A: 19,812 (19,763).

Sunday 7:40 p.m., TBS

NHL SUMMARIES

NCAA BASKETBALL DIVISION I MEN’S scorey score CHAMPIONSHIP Anaheim 0 1 0 —

24-12

SALT LAKE CITY

WEST

Oregon

COLUMBUS, OHIO

SALT LAKE CITY

2ND ROUND SWEET 16 REGIONALS

Thursday

COLUMBUS, OHIO

Minnesota: Prince 0-0 2-4 2, Garnett 2-4 0-0 4, TownsFriday 6-10 2-2 14, Rubio 10-17 6-7 28, Wiggins 2-10 5-6 9, Bjelica 3-6 0-0 8, Martin Memphis: T.Allen 4-11 1-2 9, Randolph 3-11 7 Louisville 76 6-15 11-12 23, Muhammad 3-5 3-4 10, LaVine 5-6 11, Gasol 7-13 6-7 20, Conley 5-11 2-2 13, 22-13 4-10 0-0 8, Dieng 1-4 2-2 4, Payne 0-1 0-0 0, Lee 4-9 2-2 10, Je.Green 5-6 0-0 12,Minnesota Udrih Rudez 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 38-83 31-37 112. 5-6 2-2 13,Minnesota Barnes 3-7 1-2 10, Wright 4-4 1-2 9, 10 86 L.A. Lakers: Bryant 8-24 5-5 24, Randle 5-13 Ja.Green 1-4 3-4 5. Totals 41-82 23-29 112. Saturday Indiana: George 5-15 6-6 18, J.Hill 2-6 0-0 4, Mahinmi 5-6 15, Hibbert 1-4 10-10 12, Russell 2-7 0-0 6:45 p.m., KMOV (4) 4, Clarkson 5-12 4-6 14, Williams 6-14 7-7 21, 5-7 1-2 11, G.Hill 6-15 5-6 20, Ellis 3-12 2-3 9, Budinger 2 6, Mich. 76 4-6 0-2 8, Miles Young 5-8 0-0 14, Kelly 1-5 1-1 3, Bass 1-4 0-0 2-3 0-0 StuckeySt. 4-6 1-2 9, Turner 2, Huertas 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 35-93 32-35 111. 6-8 2-3 18, L.Allen 0-0 0-0 0. TotalsMich. 37-78 17-24 103. St. 29-6 Minnesota 22 29 37 24 — 112 Memphis 29 21 23 39 — 112 15 Bradley L.A. Lakers 31 29 35 16 — 111 Indiana 20 29 26 65 28 — 103 3-point goals: Minnesota 5-20 (Bjelica 2-4, 3-point goals: Memphis 7-16 (Barnes 3-6, Je.Green Rubio 2-4, Muhammad 1-2, Towns 0-1, LaVine 2-2, Conley 1-1, Udrih 1-2, T.Allen 0-1, Lee 0-4), 0-2, Wiggins 0-2, Martin 0-5), L.A. Lakers 9-35 Indiana 12-30 (Miles 4-6, G.Hill 3-8, Budinger (Young 4-7, Bryant 3-13, Williams 2-7, Huertas 2-3, George 2-8, Ellis 1-4, Stuckey 0-1). Fouled 0-1, Clarkson 0-2, Kelly 0-2, Russell 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 49 (Randolph, out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 48 (Towns 12), Gasol 8), Indiana 46 (Mahinmi 9). Assists: L.A. Lakers 64 (Randle 11). Assists: Minnesota Memphis 26 (Conley 10), Indiana 23 (Stuckey, 1 5).Gonzaga 87 25, Indiana 22. 24 (Rubio 14), L.A. Lakers 18 (Hibbert 4). Total George Total fouls: Memphis fouls: Minnesota 26, L.A. Lakers 29. Technicals: Technicals: George, G.Hill. A: 18,165 (18,165). Gonzaga 31-3 Garnett, Minnesota Coach Mitchell, L.A. Lakers defensive three second. A: 18,997 (18,997). 16 Fairl. D’son 49 Saturday T’Wolves 112, Lakers 111 6:10 p.m., TBS Minnesota: Prince 0-0 2-4 2, 69 Garnett 2-4 8 Syracuse 0-0 4, Towns 6-10 2-2 14, Rubio 10-17 6-7 28, Wiggins 2-10 5-6 9, Bjelica 3-6 0-0 Baylor 8, Martin 20-13 6-15 11-12 23, Muhammad 3-5 3-4 10, LaVine 9 Baylor 78 4-10 0-0 8, Dieng 1-4 2-2 4, Payne 0-1 0-0 0, Rudez 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 38-83 31-37 112. Thursday L.A. Lakers: Bryant 8-24 5-5 24, Randle 5-13 Marquette 64 2-7 0-0 5-6 15,5Hibbert 1-4 10-10 12, Russell 4, Clarkson 5-12 4-6 14, Williams 6-14 7-7 21, Murray State 28-4 Young 5-8 0-0 14, Kelly 1-5 1-1 3, Bass 1-4 0-0 2, Huertas 1-2 0-0 2.State Totals 35-93 12 Murray 83 32-35 111. Minnesota 22 29 37 24 — Saturday 112 L.A. Lakers 31 29 35 16 —5:10111 p.m., TNT 3-point goals: Minnesota 5-20 (Bjelica 2-4, 4 Florida St. 76 Rubio 2-4, Muhammad 1-2, Towns 0-1, LaVine Florida St. 28-7 0-2, Wiggins 0-2, Martin 0-5), L.A. Lakers 9-35 (Young 4-7, Bryant 3-13, Williams 2-7, Huertas 13 Vermont 69 0-3). Fouled 0-1, Clarkson 0-2, Kelly 0-2, Russell out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 48 (Towns 12), Mar. 30 Anaheim, Calif. L.A. Lakers 64 (Randle 11). Assists: Minnesota Honda Center 6 Buffalo 91 4). Total 24 (Rubio 14), L.A. Lakers 18 (Hibbert fouls: Minnesota 26, L.A. Lakers 29. Technicals: Buffalo 32-3 Garnett, Minnesota Coach Mitchell, L.A. Lakers defensive three second. 11 Arizona St. A: 18,997 74 (18,997). Sunday Hawks 112, Knicks 101 5:10 p.m., TNT

3 Texas Tech

Mississippi

HARTFORD, CONN.

T’Wolves 112, Lakers 111

Grizzlies 112, Pacers 103

1ST ROUND

56 16

SAN JOSE, CALIF.

EAST

74

Gard.-Webb

20-13

73

Atlanta: Millsap 3-11 4-8 11, Memphis: T.Allen 4-11 1-2 9, Randolph 3-11 5 Bazemore Miss. St.2-6 0-0 5, 76 Horford 9-18 1-2 21, Teague 7-12 9-10 23, Korver 5-6 11, Gasol 7-13 6-7 20, Conley 5-11 2-2 13, Liberty 29-6 6-8 0-0 15, Splitter 4-6 2-2 10, Holiday 1-2 0-0 2, Lee 4-9 2-2 10, Je.Green 5-6 0-0 12, Udrih Schroder 6-11 0-0 13, Patterson 3-5 1-2 9, Scott 1-4 5-6 2-2 13, Barnes 3-7 1-2 10, Wright 4-4 1-2 9, Liberty 0-0 2,12 Tavares 0-0 1-2 1. Totals80 42-83 18-26 112. Ja.Green 1-4 3-4 5. Totals 41-82 23-29 112. New York: Anthony 10-27 5-5 25, PorzingisSunday 4-10 Indiana: George 5-15 6-6 18, J.Hill 2-6 0-0 4, Mahinmi 6:10 p.m., TBS 2-2 10, Lopez 8-11 2-2 18, Calderon 0-5 2-2 2, Vujacic 5-7 1-2 11, G.Hill 6-15 5-6 20, Ellis 3-12 2-3 9, Budinger 4 6,Va. Tech5-9 0-0 10,66 2-8 0-0 O’Quinn Galloway 2-4 2-2 2-3 0-0 6, Stuckey 4-6 1-2 9, Turner 4-6 0-2 8, Miles 8, Williams 3-9 3-4 9, Grant 2-4 1-2 Va. 5, Thomas 2-6 6-8 2-3 18, L.Allen 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 17-24 103. Tech 25-8 2-2 8, Early 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-93 19-21 101. Memphis 29 21 23 39 — 112 Atlanta 28 — 112 Indiana 20 29 26 28 — 103 13 St. 30 Louis31U. 23 52 New York 20 25 27 29 — 101 3-point goals: Memphis 7-16 (Barnes 3-6, Je.Green Mar.0-4), 31 3-point goals: Atlanta 10-24 (Korver 3-5, Patterson 2-2, Conley 1-1, UdrihD.C. 1-2, T.Allen 0-1, Lee Washington, 2-3, Horford 2-5, Bazemore 1-2,79 Millsap 1-2, Schroder Indiana 12-30One (Miles 4-6, G.Hill 3-8, Budinger Capital Arena 6 Maryland 1-3, Holiday 0-1, Scott 0-1, Teague 0-2), New York 2-3, George 2-8, Ellis 1-4, Stuckey 0-1). Fouled Maryland 23-10 6-29 (Thomas 2-3, Galloway 2-4, Vujacic 2-6, out: None. Rebounds: Memphis 49 (Randolph, Calderon 0-2, Williams 0-3, Porzingis 0-4, Anthony Gasol 8), Indiana 46 (Mahinmi 9). Assists: 11 Belmont 77 0-7). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Atlanta 49 Memphis 26 (Conley 10), Indiana 23 (Stuckey, Saturday (Millsap 11), New York 57 (O’Quinn 10). Assists: George 5). Total fouls: Memphis 25, Indiana 22. 11:10 a.m., Atlanta 26 (Teague 8), New York 21 (Grant 7). KMOV (4) Technicals: George, G.Hill. A: 18,165 (18,165). LSU 79 24. Technicals: Total3fouls: Atlanta 18, New York New York Coach Fisher. A: 19,812 (19,763). LSU 27-6

14 Yale

71 1

Sunday 6:45 p.m., truTV

58

Hawks 112, Knicks 101

Virginia 30-3

62

NBA SUMMARIESCentral Fla.

TULSA, OKLA.

half with a 25-5 run that ended any ideas of another one-and-done. “Don’t you dare leave anything in this locker room,” Virginia coach Tony Bennett said he told his players at halftime. “But you don’t panic.”

PLAY BRACKETBALL 2019 • STLTODAY.COM/CONTESTS

85 Duke

16 N. Dakota St.

year but lost 74-54 to 16th seeded Maryland-Baltimore County. It was the first — and still the only — time in 35 years one of the top four teams in the tournament has fallen in its opening game. The Cavaliers trailed 30-16 with 6:42 left in the first half of the South Region opener but rallied and cut the Runnin’ Bulldogs’ (23-12) lead to six at halftime. Virginia (30-3) then opened the second

COLUMBIA, S.C.

COLUMBIA, S.C.

1 Duke

ASSOCIATED PRESS

UC Irvine guard Evan Leonard drives past Kansas State guard Barry Brown Jr. during the first half Friday. The Anteaters upset the Wildcats to advance to the second round.

Oklahoma 95, Mississippi 72 • Rashard Odomes and Christian James scored 20 points apiece, Kristian Doolittle had 19 points and matched a career-high with 15 rebounds and No. 9 seed Oklahoma blitzed Mississippi in Columbia. It was a start more often seen by Oklahoma’s high-octane football team. The Sooners (20-13) scored on eight of their first nine possessions — the only miss was an alley-oop — and led 12-0 less than three minutes in. Oklahoma didn’t let up. The Sooners led by 17 at halftime, and their 95 points were the most they’ve scored this season.


SPORTS

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 2

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Avalanche win fourth in a row

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 51 22 x-Philadelphia 47 26 Boston 43 30 Brooklyn 38 36 New York 14 59 Southeast W L Miami 36 37 Orlando 35 38 Charlotte 33 39 Washington 30 44 Atlanta 26 48 Central W L y-Milwaukee 54 19 x-Indiana 44 29 Detroit 37 34 Chicago 21 53 Cleveland 19 54

Pct .699 .644 .589 .514 .192 Pct .493 .479 .458 .405 .351 Pct .740 .603 .521 .284 .260

GB — 4 8 13½ 37 GB — 1 2½ 6½ 10½ GB — 10 16 33½ 35

L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 6-4 1-9 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6 L10 6-4 3-7 7-3 3-7 4-6

Str L-1 L-1 L-3 W-2 L-3 Str W-1 W-4 W-2 L-4 W-2 Str W-1 L-4 W-1 L-1 L-1

Home 29-8 29-9 26-11 21-16 7-28 Home 17-20 22-16 23-15 22-16 15-22 Home 29-6 27-9 23-13 9-28 13-25

Away 22-14 18-17 17-19 17-20 7-31 Away 19-17 13-22 10-24 8-28 11-26 Away 25-13 17-20 14-21 12-25 6-29

Conf 30-14 28-17 29-15 25-20 8-37 Conf 21-24 23-20 25-22 19-30 14-33 Conf 36-10 30-15 25-22 15-30 15-34

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Houston 46 27 San Antonio 42 31 New Orleans 31 43 Memphis 29 44 Dallas 28 44 Northwest W L x-Denver 49 22 Portland 44 27 Oklahoma City 43 30 Utah 43 30 Minnesota 33 40 Pacific W L x-Golden State 49 22 LA Clippers 43 30 Sacramento 35 36 LA Lakers 31 41 Phoenix 17 56

Pct .630 .575 .419 .397 .389 Pct .690 .620 .589 .589 .452 Pct .690 .589 .493 .431 .233

GB — 4 15½ 17 17½ GB — 5 7 7 17 GB — 7 14 18½ 33

L10 8-2 8-2 3-7 5-5 1-9 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 7-3 4-6 L10 6-4 9-1 4-6 1-9 5-5

Str W-1 L-2 L-1 L-2 L-3 Str W-6 W-2 W-1 W-1 W-1 Str W-2 W-4 W-1 L-5 L-2

Home 27-10 29-8 18-17 19-18 22-14 Home 30-6 27-9 23-12 23-12 23-11 Home 25-10 23-13 22-15 18-17 10-26

Away 19-17 13-23 13-26 10-26 6-30 Away 19-16 17-18 20-18 20-18 10-29 Away 24-12 20-17 13-21 13-24 7-30

Conf 26-19 29-20 21-25 20-24 14-30 Conf 30-14 24-22 25-21 25-20 20-26 Conf 30-14 25-21 18-24 21-23 10-35

x-clinched playoff spot | y-clinched division

Saturday Charlotte 124, Boston 117 Miami 113, Washington 108 Atlanta 129, Philadelphia 127 Minnesota 112, Memphis 99 Utah 114, Chicago 83 Dallas at Golden State, late Detroit at Portland, late Phoenix at Sacramento, late Friday Orlando 123, Memphis 119, OT Denver 111, New York 93 LA Clippers 110, Cleveland 108 Oklahoma City 116, Toronto 109 Houston 111, San Antonio 105 Milwaukee 116, Miami 87

Brooklyn 111, LA Lakers 106 Sunday LA Clippers at New York, 11 a.m. Cleveland at Milwaukee, 3:30 p.m. Denver at Indiana, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Toronto, 5 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 6 p.m. San Antonio at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Monday Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Utah, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Portland, 9 p.m.

Hornets rally to beat Celtics ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kemba Walker scored 18 of his game-high 36 points in the fourth quarter and the host Charlotte Hornets rallied to beat the Boston Celtics 124-117 Saturday night. It was Walker’s 23rd game of 30 or more points this season. He added 11 rebounds and nine assists. Rookie Miles Bridges scored a career-high 20 points. Charlotte won its second straight, improved to 33-39 and kept its faint postseason hopes alive. Kyrie Irving led Boston with 31 points. Jaylen Brown added 29 points and Marcus Morris

15 as the Celtics lost their third straight game.

NOTEBOOK Rose has elbow surgery • Minnesota guard Derrick Rose had arthroscopic surgery to remove bone chips from his right elbow. The Timberwolves previously said Rose was unlikely to play again this season. Bulls update injuries • The Chicago Bulls have ruled out injured rookies Wendell Carter Jr. (left thumb surgery) and Chandler Hutchison (right toe injury) for the remainder of the season, and might soon do the same with Otto Porter Jr (strained right rotator cuff).

NBA SUMMARIES Heat 113, Wizards 108

Hawks 129, 76ers 127

Miami: Jones Jr. 1-5 0-0 2, Olynyk 6-9 0-0 14, Adebayo 6-11 4-4 16, Richardson 6-12 4-4 18, Waiters 7-13 1-1 19, J.Johnson 5-11 2-4 13, Whiteside 1-2 0-0 2, Dragic 3-9 2-4 9, Wade 9-16 0-2 20. Totals 44-88 13-19 113. Washington: Brown Jr. 2-9 3-4 7, Portis 6-15 1-2 14, Bryant 8-13 0-0 17, Satoransky 5-13 1-2 12, Beal 6-14 2-4 16, Green 9-12 4-4 25, Parker 2-10 2-2 6, McRae 2-6 1-1 5, Randle 1-4 3-4 6. Totals 41-96 17-23 108. Miami 25 27 26 35 — 113 Washington 27 26 26 29 — 108 3-point goals: Miami 12-39 (Waiters 4-9, Olynyk 2-5, Wade 2-6, Richardson 2-7, J.Johnson 1-4, Dragic 1-5, Adebayo 0-1, Jones Jr. 0-2), Washington 9-30 (Green 3-5, Beal 2-8, Randle 1-1, Portis 1-2, Bryant 1-3, Satoransky 1-4, Parker 0-3, Brown Jr. 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 44 (Adebayo 11), Washington 53 (Portis, Bryant 11). Assists: Miami 29 (Adebayo 8), Washington 25 (Satoransky 8). Total fouls: Miami 23, Washington 20. Technicals: Olynyk, Bryant. A: 20,409 (20,356).

Philadelphia: Butler 6-13 13-13 25, Harris 6-17 0-1 13, Embiid 7-11 11-14 27, B.Simmons 9-16 3-4 21, Redick 5-13 2-2 14, Ennis III 2-5 3-4 8, Scott 3-7 0-0 9, Marjanovic 2-5 0-0 5, McConnell 2-4 1-1 5. Totals 42-91 33-39 127. Atlanta: Prince 8-15 3-3 23, Collins 4-10 4-4 13, Dedmon 7-11 1-2 17, Young 11-20 6-7 32, Huerter 3-7 0-0 7, Bembry 3-6 0-0 6, Len 6-13 1-1 14, Adams 2-3 0-1 5, Bazemore 1-7 1-3 3, Anderson 3-6 0-0 6, Carter 1-8 0-0 3. Totals 49-106 16-21 129. Philadelphia 41 27 32 27 — 127 Atlanta 34 40 26 29 — 129 3-point goals: Philadelphia 10-23 (Scott 3-6, Embiid 2-3, Redick 2-6, Marjanovic 1-1, Ennis III 1-3, Harris 1-4), Atlanta 15-47 (Young 4-9, Prince 4-10, Dedmon 2-5, Collins 1-1, Adams 1-2, Huerter 1-3, Len 1-5, Carter 1-6, Anderson 0-2, Bazemore 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 52 (Embiid 12), Atlanta 49 (Collins 9). Assists: Philadelphia 21 (B.Simmons 9), Atlanta 28 (Young 11). Total fouls: Philadelphia 15, Atlanta 25. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second), Bembry, Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three second). A: 16,640 (18,118).

Hornets 124, Celtics 117 Boston: Tatum 5-17 0-0 12, Morris 6-13 0-0 15, Williams III 1-2 0-0 2, Irving 12-23 3-4 31, Smart 2-10 0-0 6, Ojeleye 1-3 2-2 5, Brown 10-13 4-7 29, Theis 2-3 1-2 5, Yabusele 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 5-8 0-0 12. Totals 44-93 10-15 117. Charlotte: Bridges 8-13 1-2 20, Williams 4-9 4-4 13, Biyombo 2-3 0-2 4, Walker 11-25 8-8 36, Bacon 4-10 2-4 11, Kaminsky 2-4 2-2 7, Hernangomez 4-8 0-0 8, Graham 1-6 1-2 4, Lamb 3-11 0-0 8, Monk 3-6 4-4 13. Totals 42-95 22-28 124. Boston 35 29 34 19 — 117 Charlotte 29 34 26 35 — 124 3-point goals: Boston 19-43 (Brown 5-6, Irving 4-11, Morris 3-5, Rozier 2-5, Smart 2-7, Tatum 2-7, Ojeleye 1-2), Charlotte 18-38 (Walker 6-13, Monk 3-4, Bridges 3-6, Lamb 2-5, Bacon 1-1, Kaminsky 1-2, Graham 1-3, Williams 1-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 42 (Morris 9), Charlotte 53 (Walker 11). Assists: Boston 31 (Smart 8), Charlotte 26 (Walker 9). Total fouls: Boston 23, Charlotte 15. A: 19,438 (19,077).

T’Wolves 112, Grizzlies 99 Minnesota: Wiggins 9-15 3-3 22, Saric 3-9 2-2 11, Towns 12-20 5-5 33, Jones 4-8 3-3 12, Okogie 5-11 6-6 17, Bates-Diop 4-6 0-0 8, Tolliver 2-6 0-0 6, Dieng 1-6 1-2 3, Bayless 0-1 0-0 0, Reynolds 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 40-83 20-21 112. Memphis: Holiday 3-8 0-0 7, Caboclo 1-7 0-0 3, Valanciunas 7-15 5-7 20, Conley 7-17 7-8 23, Dorsey 3-13 1-1 8, Washburn 1-1 0-0 3, Parsons 4-8 0-0 9, Rabb 3-6 1-2 7, Noah 1-4 3-4 5, Carter 1-5 0-0 2, Wright 5-10 0-0 12, Watanabe 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-96 17-22 99. Minnesota 25 24 35 28 — 112 Memphis 25 25 18 31 — 99 3-point goals: Minnesota 12-26 (Towns 4-7, Saric 3-6, Tolliver 2-6, Jones 1-1, Okogie 1-3, Wiggins 1-3), Memphis 10-33 (Wright 2-4, Conley 2-6, Washburn 1-1, Valanciunas 1-1, Holiday 1-3, Caboclo 1-4, Parsons 1-4, Dorsey 1-6, Watanabe 0-1, Carter 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 49 (Towns 23), Memphis 47 (Valanciunas 14). Assists: Minnesota 25 (Jones 9), Memphis 22 (Wright 6). Total fouls: Minnesota 20, Memphis 22. Technicals: Minnesota coach Timberwolves (Defensive three second), Memphis coach Grizzlies (Defensive three second). A: 16,977 (18,119).

Jazz 114, Bulls 83 Utah: Ingles 5-14 1-1 13, Favors 6-10 1-1 13, Gobert 9-11 3-7 21, Rubio 6-11 0-0 12, Mitchell 5-8 4-4 16, O’Neale 1-4 0-0 3, Sefolosha 1-3 0-0 2, Crowder 4-12 0-0 11, Udoh 1-2 0-0 2, Niang 2-4 0-0 4, Neto 3-5 2-2 10, Korver 2-8 0-0 5, Mitrou-Long 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 46-95 11-15 114. Chicago: Harrison 2-9 2-2 6, Markkanen 6-20 5-5 18, Lopez 5-11 0-2 10, Dunn 1-8 2-2 4, Blakeney 5-11 0-0 10, Felicio 5-8 0-0 10, Arcidiacono 0-6 4-4 4, Luwawu-Cabarrot 2-2 1-2 7, Selden 4-10 1-3 9, Sampson 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 33-91 15-20 83. Utah 33 37 21 23 — 114 Chicago 18 18 25 22 — 83 3-point goals: Utah 11-32 (Crowder 3-9, Mitchell 2-2, Neto 2-3, Ingles 2-7, O’Neale 1-3, Korver 1-4, Niang 0-1, Mitrou-Long 0-1, Rubio 0-2), Chicago 2-16 (Sampson 1-4, Markkanen 1-6, Lopez 0-1, Arcidiacono 0-1, Blakeney 0-2, Selden 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 58 (Gobert 14), Chicago 43 (Markkanen 10). Assists: Utah 27 (Ingles 5), Chicago 16 (Dunn 5). Total fouls: Utah 17, Chicago 16. Technicals: Crowder. A: 20,506 (20,917).

NBA LEADERS THROUGH SATURDAY’S GAMES Scoring G FG Harden, HOU 69 751 George, OKC 69 631 Curry, GOL 60 561 Embiid, PHL 59 532 Antetokounmpo, MIL 66 661 James, LAL 52 527 Leonard, TOR 53 503 Durant, GOL 68 648 Lillard, POR 70 606 Davis, NOR 55 524 Beal, WAS 73 689 Booker, PHX 58 508 Walker, CHA 71 619 Griffin, DET 68 565 Towns, MIN 69 616 Irving, BOS 60 545 Mitchell, UTA 68 591 LaVine, CHI 63 530 Westbrook, OKC 64 556 Thompson, GOL 68 592 FG Percentage FG Gobert, UTA 409 Jordan, NYK 279 Capela, HOU 411 McGee, LAL 330 Harrell, LAC 483 Adams, OKC 430 Allen, BRO 308 Sabonis, IND 361 Ayton, PHX 483 Antetokounmpo, MIL 661 Rebounds G OFF Drummond, DET 68 361 Embiid, PHL 59 150 Jordan, NYK 67 220 Gobert, UTA 72 276 Antetokounmpo, MIL 66 149 Capela, HOU 58 261 Towns, MIN 69 241 Vucevic, ORL 72 201 Davis, NOR 55 169 Whiteside, MIA 63 238 Assists G Westbrook, OKC 64 Lowry, TOR 57 James, LAL 52 Young, ATL 73 Simmons, PHL 71 Holiday, NOR 67 Harden, HOU 69 Jokic, DEN 70 Fox, SAC 70 Irving, BOS 60

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Avalanche center Colin Wilson (left) and Blackhawks defenseman Carl Dahlstrom chase the puck during the second period of Colorado’s 4-2 victory Saturday in Denver.

NHL STANDINGS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT z-Tampa Bay 76 58 14 4 x-Boston 75 46 20 9 Toronto 75 44 25 6 Montreal 75 40 28 7 Florida 75 33 30 12 Buffalo 74 31 34 9 Detroit 74 26 38 10 Ottawa 75 26 43 6 MetropolitanGP W L OT Washington 75 43 24 8 N.Y. Islanders 75 43 25 7 Pittsburgh 76 41 24 11 Carolina 74 41 26 7 Columbus 74 40 30 4 Philadelphia 75 36 31 8 N.Y. Rangers 74 29 32 13 New Jersey 76 28 39 9 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT x-Winnipeg 75 45 26 4 Nashville 76 42 28 6 Blues 75 40 27 8 Dallas 75 38 31 6 Colorado 75 34 29 12 Minnesota 76 35 32 9 Chicago 74 32 32 10 Pacific GP W L OT x-Calgary 74 46 21 7 x-San Jose 75 43 23 9 74 42 27 5 Vegas Arizona 75 36 32 7 Vancouver 74 32 32 10 Edmonton 75 33 34 8 Anaheim 76 31 36 9 Los Angeles 73 26 39 8

Pts GF 120 301 101 233 94 264 87 226 78 243 71 206 62 200 58 222 Pts GF 94 257 93 210 93 256 89 223 84 223 80 228 71 206 65 208

GA Home 202 31-6-2 189 28-7-3 223 22-14-2 217 22-12-4 255 19-13-6 244 20-13-4 254 14-18-5 278 16-16-4 GA Home 233 21-10-6 184 22-12-4 226 21-13-3 205 21-12-4 218 20-16-2 249 18-16-4 245 17-12-8 259 18-14-6

Away 27-8-2 18-13-6 22-11-4 18-16-3 14-17-6 11-21-5 12-20-5 10-27-2 Away 22-14-2 21-13-3 20-11-8 20-14-3 20-14-2 18-15-4 12-20-5 10-25-3

Pts 94 90 88 82 80 79 74 Pts 99 95 89 79 74 74 71 60

GA 218 202 205 186 227 223 270 GA 209 237 203 210 229 249 233 232

Away Div 20-17-0 12-10-0 19-15-4 12-11-1 20-12-6 11-9-4 16-17-3 12-9-2 17-15-6 11-9-3 20-16-2 11-8-4 16-18-3 11-7-3 Away Div 21-14-2 12-8-2 20-15-4 15-6-4 19-17-1 17-6-2 18-17-3 15-9-3 15-19-5 9-12-4 16-17-5 10-12-2 14-22-1 8-12-3 12-19-5 10-9-2

PTS 2517 1943 1669 1621 1812 1426 1442 1838 1839 1440 1899 1478 1775 1675 1694 1436 1615 1492 1480 1525

FGA 619 434 643 534 788 718 523 614 823 1138

AVG 36.5 28.2 27.8 27.5 27.5 27.4 27.2 27.0 26.3 26.2 26.0 25.5 25.0 24.6 24.6 23.9 23.8 23.7 23.1 22.4 PCT .661 .643 .639 .618 .613 .599 .589 .588 .587 .581

DEF TOT AVG 692 1053 15.5 663 813 13.8 662 882 13.2 651 927 12.9 683 832 12.6 463 724 12.5 613 854 12.4 669 870 12.1 493 662 12.0 502 740 11.7 AST 667 515 420 572 553 518 522 529 506 422

AVG 10.4 9.0 8.1 7.8 7.8 7.7 7.6 7.6 7.2 7.0

Home 25-9-4 23-13-2 20-15-2 22-14-3 17-14-6 15-16-7 16-14-7 Home 25-7-5 23-8-5 23-10-4 18-15-4 17-13-5 17-17-3 17-14-8 14-20-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot | z-clinched conference Saturday Blues 4, Tampa Bay 3 New Jersey 2, Arizona 1, SO N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 2 Colorado 4, Chicago 2 Ottawa 4, Edmonton 3, OT N.Y. Rangers 2, Toronto 1, OT Boston 7, Florida 3 Carolina 5, Minnesota 1 Winnipeg 5, Nashville 0 Montreal 7, Buffalo 4 Pittsburgh 3, Dallas 2 Calgary at Vancouver, late Detroit at Vegas, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late Friday Minnesota 2, Washington 1 Anaheim 4, San Jose 3, OT

Sunday Philadelphia at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Arizona vs. NY Islanders at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 2 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 6 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 7 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Monday Pittsburgh at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Vegas at Blues, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8 p.m. Detroit at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Tuesday NY Islanders at Columbus, 6 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Florida at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Chicago at Arizona, 9 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

Colin Wilson scored his first goal in more than a month, Philipp Grubauer stopped 29 shots and the playoff-chasing Colorado Avalanche earned their fourth straight win by holding off the Chicago Blackhawks 4-2 on Saturday in Denver. J.T. Compher and Sven Andrighetto also scored. Derick Brassard added an empty-netter for an Avalanche team in the thick of the Western Conference wild-card hunt with seven games remaining. Colorado had an array of forwards step up with All-Star Mikko Rantanen missing the game with an upper-body injury. Wilson came through with his first goal since Feb. 7. Grubauer kept up his torrid play by winning his fourth straight start. He’s allowed four goals over stretch. Jonathan Toews and Erik Gustafsson had goals for Chicago, while Corey Crawford stopped 21 shots. The loss was a blow for the Blackhawks, who are making a late charge but are now six points behind Colorado. Devils 2, Coyotes 1 • Coleman and Pavel Zacha scored in the fifth and sixth rounds of the shootout and the host New Jersey Devils hurt Arizona’s playoff chances by sending the Coyotes to their fourth straight loss.

NOTEBOOK Chara gets extension • The Boston Bruins have signed 42-year-old defenseman Zdeno Chara to a oneyear, $2 million contract extension. General manager Don Sweeney made the announcement Saturday, adding the deal through the 201920 season includes an additional $1.75 million in performance bonuses.

NHL SUMMARIES Avalanche 4, Blackhawks 2

Devils 2, Coyotes 1, SO

Bruins 7, Panthers 3

Chicago 0 1 1 — 2 Colorado 0 2 2 — 4 First period: None. Penalties: Saad, CHI, (tripping), 1:10; Colorado bench, served by Brassard (too many men on the ice), 5:36; Saad, CHI, (tripping), 17:39. Second period: 1, Colorado, Compher 16 (Kerfoot, Nemeth), 3:07. 2, Chicago, Toews 32 (Sikura), 5:20. 3, Colorado, Wilson 11 (Kerfoot, Girard), 13:57 (pp). Penalties: Gustafsson, CHI, (holding), 12:29; Kampf, CHI, major (high sticking), 12:58; Jost, COL, (cross checking), 17:42. Third period: 4, Colorado, Andrighetto 6 (Johnson, Wilson), 1:26. 5, Chicago, Gustafsson 16 (Keith, Saad), 12:04. 6, Colorado, Brassard 13, 17:40. Penalties: Kerfoot, COL, (tripping), 3:53. Shots: Chicago 8-11-12: 31. Colorado 7-12-6: 25. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 3; Colorado 1 of 5. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 12-17-3 (24 shots-21 saves). Colorado, Grubauer 15-9-3 (31-29). A: 17,099.

Arizona 1 0 0 0 — 1 New Jersey 1 0 0 0 — 2 New Jersey won shootout 2-1. First period: 1, Arizona, Ekman-Larsson 12 (Garland, Galchenyuk), 2:31. 2, New Jersey, Stafford 4 (Wood, Zacha), 17:01. Penalties: New Jersey bench, served by Agostino (too many men on the ice), 13:42. Second period: None. Penalties: Cousins, ARI, (high sticking), 2:05; Hinostroza, ARI, (tripping), 4:51; Cousins, ARI, (delay of game), 9:55; McLeod, NJ, (interference), 12:22; Ekman-Larsson, ARI, (tripping), 13:58. Third period: None. Penalties: Kuemper, ARI, served by Garland, (delay of game), 13:17. Overtime: None. Penalties: Palmieri, NJ, (cross checking), 0:55. Shootout: Arizona 1 (Cousins NG, Galchenyuk NG, Hinostroza NG, Keller NG, Garland G, Panik NG), New Jersey 2 (Palmieri NG, Stafford NG, Severson NG, Hischier NG, Coleman G, Zacha G). Shots: Arizona 11-7-5-1: 24. New Jersey 8-10-12-2: 32. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 3; New Jersey 0 of 5. Goalies: Arizona, Kuemper 24-18-7 (32 shots-31 saves). New Jersey, Blackwood 8-9-0 (24-23). A: 16,514.

Boston 1 5 1 — 7 Florida 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Boston, Acciari 5 (Clifton, Backes), 2:23. Penalties: Hoffman, FLA, (roughing), 3:53. Second period: 2, Boston, Marchand 32 (Bergeron), 0:28. 3, Florida, Hawryluk 5 (Hoffman), 0:52. 4, Boston, Chara 5 (Coyle, Heinen), 5:05. 5, Boston, Kuhlman 2, 6:38. 6, Florida, Hoffman 35 (Weegar), 10:04. 7, Boston, Kampfer 3 (Moore, Heinen), 15:48 (pp). 8, Boston, Pastrnak 33 (Chara, Halak), 16:36. Penalties: Hoffman, FLA, (slashing), 11:09; Hawryluk, FLA, (tripping), 14:06; Acciari, BOS, Major (fighting), 15:51; Weegar, FLA, Major (fighting), 15:51. Third period: 9, Florida, Trocheck 8 (Borgstrom, Ekblad), 3:57 (pp). 10, Boston, Bergeron 31 (Pastrnak, Marchand), 19:33. Penalties: Clifton, BOS, (interference), 2:06; Trocheck, FLA, (cross checking), 7:02; McAvoy, BOS, (roughing), 7:02; Matheson, FLA, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:33. Shots: Boston 16-13-10: 39. Florida 12-11-11: 34. Power-plays: Boston 1 of 3; Florida 1 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Halak 20-10-4 (34 shots-31 saves). Florida, Montembeault 4-3-1 (38-32). A: 17,129.

Islanders 4, Flyers 2 FT 681 420 239 487 446 269 335 417 421 344 330 342 310 378 328 193 270 312 266 126

GF 254 223 223 188 239 203 246 GF 265 266 232 199 206 213 177 174

Div 19-4-0 16-6-2 13-8-3 12-8-5 12-9-3 9-11-4 7-14-4 8-13-2 Div 16-6-2 17-8-1 13-8-4 10-10-2 16-9-1 10-12-2 8-10-5 8-15-3

NY Islanders 1 1 2 — 4 Philadelphia 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Philadelphia, Hagg 5 (Hartman, Gudas), 6:39. 2, NY Islanders, Nelson 23 (Toews, Mayfield), 14:27. Penalties: Gudas, PHI, (hooking), 0:26; Hagg, PHI, major (high sticking), 1:45; NY Islanders bench, served by Martin (too many men on the ice), 2:38. Second period: 3, NY Islanders, Leddy 4 (Boychuk, Barzal), 10:58. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 8 (Giroux, Couturier), 6:16 (pp). 5, NY Islanders, Jo.Bailey 15 (Nelson, Ladd), 16:03. 6, NY Islanders, Jo.Bailey 16 (Pelech, Komarov), 17:26. Penalties: Hartman, PHI, (interference), 2:16; Voracek, PHI, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:16; Mayfield, NYI, (hooking), 6:12; Pelech, NYI, (tripping), 9:08. Shots: NY Islanders 14-15-11: 40. Philadelphia 10-5-9: 24. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 5; Philadelphia 1 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Lehner 21-12-5 (24 shots-22 saves). Philadelphia, Hart 15-11-1 (40-36). A: 19,668.

Senators 4, Oilers 3, OT Ottawa 2 0 1 1 — 4 Edmonton 1 1 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, Ottawa, Tkachuk 18 (Wolanin, DeMelo), 4:37 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Chiasson 21 (Nurse), 8:12. 3, Ottawa, Ryan 14 (Chabot, White), 15:28 (pp). Penalties: Lucic, EDM, (holding), 3:51; Nurse, EDM, (high sticking), 13:34; Harpur, OTT, (roughing), 19:06; Chiasson, EDM, (roughing), 19:06. Second period: 4, Edmonton, McDavid 38 (Draisaitl, Kassian), 2:54. Penalties: None. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Gibbons 6 (Lindberg, Paajarvi), 7:37. 6, Edmonton, Cave 3 (Gagner, Gambardella), 8:33. Penalties: Jaros, OTT, (high sticking), 13:00. Overtime: 7, Ottawa, Tkachuk 19 (Anderson, Balcers), 2:09. Penalties: None. Shots: Ottawa 12-13-8-2: 35. Edmonton 7-11-11: 29. Power-plays: Ottawa 2 of 2; Edmonton 0 of 1. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 15-25-4 (29 shots-26 saves). Edmonton, Koskinen 23-18-5 (35-31). A: 18,347.

Hurricanes 5, Wild 1 Minnesota 0 1 0 — 1 Carolina 0 2 3 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Foegele, CAR, (delay of game), 6:56; Bitetto, MIN, (interference), 10:03. Second period: 1, Carolina, J.Staal 9 (Teravainen, Faulk), 3:06. 2, Carolina, Pesce 7 (Williams, Aho), 5:32. 3, Minnesota, E.Staal 21 (Spurgeon, Fiala), 8:57 (pp). Penalties: Ferland, CAR, major (high sticking), 5:56; Martinook, CAR, (slashing), 12:59. Third period: 4, Carolina, Svechnikov 19 (Teravainen, J.Staal), 3:27. 5, Carolina, Wallmark 10 (Ferland, Martinook), 9:09. 6, Carolina, Teravainen 19, 11:12. Penalties: Suter, MIN, (tripping), 3:59; Pesce, CAR, (cross checking), 17:22; Kunin, MIN, (cross checking), 17:22; Martinook, CAR, (slashing), 20:00. Shots: Minnesota 7-11-7: 25. Carolina 11-13-9: 33. Power-plays: Minnesota 1 of 4; Carolina 0 of 2. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 29-26-6 (33 shots-28 saves). Carolina, Mrazek 20-13-3 (25-24). A: 16,751.

Canadiens 7, Sabres 4 Buffalo 1 2 1 — 4 Montreal 0 4 3 — 7 First period: 1, Buffalo, Reinhart 19 (Mittelstadt, Montour), 12:26. Penalties: Okposo, BUF, (slashing), 12:42; Lehkonen, MTL, (holding), 16:09. Second period: 2, Montreal, Lehkonen 9 (Shaw, Domi), 5:09. 3, Montreal, Gallagher 32 (Danault), 9:12. 4, Montreal, Shaw 18 (Kulak, Domi), 14:23. 5, Buffalo, Nylander 2 (Eichel, Dahlin), 14:53 (pp). 6, Buffalo, Scandella 5 (Larsson), 16:08. 7, Montreal, Byron 14 (Weal, Thompson), 18:03. Penalties: Folin, MTL, (delay of game), 14:43. Third period: 8, Montreal, Gallagher 33 (Tatar, Weber), 8:35. 9, Buffalo, Eichel 26, 13:13. 10, Montreal, Domi 26 (Tatar, Petry), 15:30 (pp). 11, Montreal, Tatar 23 (Danault, Gallagher), 17:47. Penalties: Shaw, MTL, (charging), 9:06; Shaw, MTL, (roughing), 9:06; Girgensons, BUF, (holding), 14:26. Shots: Buffalo 8-7-12: 27. Montreal 12-20-12: 44. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 4; Montreal 1 of 2. Goalies: Buffalo, Hutton 17-22-5 (43 shots-37 saves). Montreal, Price 32-22-5 (27-23). A: 21,302.

Jets 5, Predators 0 Nashville 0 0 0 — 0 Winnipeg 0 3 2 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Subban, NSH, (tripping), 6:19. Second period: 1, Winnipeg, Connor 30 (Myers, Hayes), 4:42. 2, Winnipeg, Copp 11 (Perreault, Hendricks), 14:16. 3, Winnipeg, Hayes 18 (Connor, Trouba), 15:41. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Connor 31 (Hayes), 15:22. 5, Winnipeg, Connor 32 (Laine, Hayes), 19:51. Penalties: Jarnkrok, NSH, (tripping), 10:03. Shots: Nashville 12-9-12: 33. Winnipeg 8-19-16: 43. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 0; Winnipeg 0 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 26-19-4 (43 shots-38 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 32-20-2 (33-33). A: 15,321.

Rangers 2, Maple Leafs 1, OT NY Rangers 0 0 1 1 — 2 Toronto 0 0 1 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Kapanen, TOR, (tripping), 1:49; NY Rangers bench, served by Chytil (too many men on the ice), 3:09; Howden, NYR, (cross checking), 18:42. Second period: None. Penalties: Ozhiganov, TOR, (tripping), 7:28; Brown, TOR, (hooking), 13:11. Third period: 1, NY Rangers, Buchnevich 18 (Shattenkirk, Skjei), 0:19. 2, Toronto, Hyman 19 (Tavares, Marner), 8:33. Penalties: Staal, NYR, (cross checking), 11:15. Overtime: 3, NY Rangers, Strome 15 (Nieves), 1:48. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Rangers 11-7-7-3: 28. Toronto 13-10-20-2: 45. Power-plays: NY Rangers 0 of 3; Toronto 0 of 3. Goalies: NY Rangers, Georgiev 11-12-3 (45 shots-44 saves). Toronto, Andersen 34-15-5 (28-26). A: 19,251.

NHL LEADERS THROUGH FRIDAY’S GAMES Goal Scoring Name Team Alex Ovechkin, WAS Leon Draisaitl, EDM Patrick Kane, CHI John Tavares, TOR Brayden Point, TAM Cam Atkinson, CBJ Alex DeBrincat, CHI Steven Stamkos, TAM Jake Guentzel, PIT Nikita Kucherov, TAM Nathan MacKinnon, COL Connor McDavid, EDM Joe Pavelski, SAN Jeff Skinner, BUF Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Auston Matthews, TOR Mark Scheifele, WPG Aleksander Barkov, FLA Mike Hoffman, FLA Matthew Tkachuk, CGY Assists Name Team Nikita Kucherov, TAM Connor McDavid, EDM Blake Wheeler, WPG Brent Burns, SAN Mitchell Marner, TOR Sidney Crosby, PIT Patrick Kane, CHI Claude Giroux, PHI Jonathan Huberdeau, FLA Brad Marchand, BOS Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Mikko Rantanen, COL Mark Giordano, CGY Nathan MacKinnon, COL Aleksander Barkov, FLA John Carlson, WAS Nicklas Backstrom, WAS Leon Draisaitl, EDM Artemi Panarin, CBJ Elias Lindholm, CGY Power Play Goals Name Team Brayden Point, TAM Steven Stamkos, TAM Mike Hoffman, FLA Alex Ovechkin, WAS Leon Draisaitl, EDM Mikko Rantanen, COL David Pastrnak, BOS Nikita Kucherov, TAM Patrik Laine, WPG Aleksander Barkov, FLA Alex DeBrincat, CHI Sean Monahan, CGY Sidney Crosby, PIT Phil Kessel, PIT Auston Matthews, TOR Kyle Palmieri, NJD Joe Pavelski, SAN

GP 74 74 72 74 73 72 73 75 75 75 74 70 72 73 74 60 74 74 74 74 GP 75 70 74 75 74 72 72 74 74 73 74 74 72 74 74 74 74 74 71 74 GP 73 75 74 74 74 74 58 75 74 74 73 72 72 75 60 70 72

G 48 43 41 41 39 38 38 38 37 37 37 37 37 37 35 35 35 34 34 34 A 83 70 68 64 61 60 60 59 59 59 57 56 54 54 53 53 51 51 51 50 PP 20 19 17 17 16 16 15 14 14 13 12 12 11 11 11 11 11


SPORTS

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 3

Avalanche win fourth in a row

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 51 22 x-Philadelphia 47 26 Boston 43 30 Brooklyn 38 36 New York 14 59 Southeast W L Miami 36 37 Orlando 35 38 Charlotte 33 39 Washington 30 44 Atlanta 26 48 Central W L y-Milwaukee 54 19 x-Indiana 44 29 Detroit 37 34 Chicago 21 53 Cleveland 19 54 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Houston 46 27 San Antonio 42 31 New Orleans 31 43 Memphis 29 44 Dallas 29 44 Northwest W L x-Denver 49 22 Portland 44 27 Oklahoma City 43 30 Utah 43 30 Minnesota 33 40 Pacific W L x-Golden State 49 23 LA Clippers 43 30 Sacramento 35 36 LA Lakers 31 41 Phoenix 17 56

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Pct .699 .644 .589 .514 .192 Pct .493 .479 .458 .405 .351 Pct .740 .603 .521 .284 .260

GB — 4 8 13½ 37 GB — 1 2½ 6½ 10½ GB — 10 16 33½ 35

Pct GB .630 — .575 4 .419 15½ .397 17 .397 17 Pct GB .690 — .620 5 .589 7 .589 7 .452 17 Pct GB .681 — .589 6½ .493 13½ .431 18 .233 32½

L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 6-4 1-9 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6 L10 6-4 3-7 7-3 3-7 4-6

L10 8-2 8-2 3-7 5-5 2-8 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 7-3 4-6 L10 6-4 9-1 4-6 1-9 5-5

Str L-1 L-1 L-3 W-2 L-3 Str W-1 W-4 W-2 L-4 W-2 Str W-1 L-4 W-1 L-1 L-1

Str W-1 L-2 L-1 L-2 W-1 Str W-6 W-2 W-1 W-1 W-1 Str L-1 W-4 W-1 L-5 L-2

Home 29-8 29-9 26-11 21-16 7-28 Home 17-20 22-16 23-15 22-16 15-22 Home 29-6 27-9 23-13 9-28 13-25

Home 27-10 29-8 18-17 19-18 22-14 Home 30-6 27-9 23-12 23-12 23-11 Home 25-11 23-13 22-15 18-17 10-26

Away 22-14 18-17 17-19 17-20 7-31 Away 19-17 13-22 10-24 8-28 11-26 Away 25-13 17-20 14-21 12-25 6-29

Conf 30-14 28-17 29-15 25-20 8-37 Conf 21-24 23-20 25-22 19-30 14-33 Conf 36-10 30-15 25-22 15-30 15-34

Away 19-17 13-23 13-26 10-26 7-30 Away 19-16 17-18 20-18 20-18 10-29 Away 24-12 20-17 13-21 13-24 7-30

Conf 26-19 29-20 21-25 20-24 15-30 Conf 30-14 24-22 25-21 25-20 20-26 Conf 30-15 25-21 18-24 21-23 10-35

x-clinched playoff spot | y-clinched division

Saturday Charlotte 124, Boston 117 Miami 113, Washington 108 Atlanta 129, Philadelphia 127 Minnesota 112, Memphis 99 Utah 114, Chicago 83 Dallas 126, Golden State 91 Detroit at Portland, late Phoenix at Sacramento, late Friday Orlando 123, Memphis 119, OT Denver 111, New York 93 LA Clippers 110, Cleveland 108 Oklahoma City 116, Toronto 109 Houston 111, San Antonio 105 Milwaukee 116, Miami 87

Brooklyn 111, LA Lakers 106 Sunday LA Clippers at New York, 11 a.m. Cleveland at Milwaukee, 3:30 p.m. Denver at Indiana, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Toronto, 5 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 6 p.m. San Antonio at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Monday Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Utah, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Portland, 9 p.m.

Hornets rally to beat Celtics ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kemba Walker scored 18 of his game-high 36 points in the fourth quarter and the host Charlotte Hornets rallied to beat the Boston Celtics 124-117 Saturday night. It was Walker’s 23rd game of 30 or more points this season. He added 11 rebounds and nine assists. Rookie Miles Bridges scored a career-high 20 points. Charlotte won its second straight, improved to 33-39 and kept its faint postseason hopes alive. Kyrie Irving led Boston with 31 points. Jaylen Brown added 29 points and Marcus Morris

15 as the Celtics lost their third straight game.

NOTEBOOK Rose has elbow surgery • Minnesota guard Derrick Rose had arthroscopic surgery to remove bone chips from his right elbow. The Timberwolves previously said Rose was unlikely to play again this season. Bulls update injuries • The Chicago Bulls have ruled out injured rookies Wendell Carter Jr. (left thumb surgery) and Chandler Hutchison (right toe injury) for the remainder of the season, and might soon do the same with Otto Porter Jr (strained right rotator cuff).

NBA SUMMARIES Heat 113, Wizards 108

Hawks 129, 76ers 127

Miami: Jones Jr. 1-5 0-0 2, Olynyk 6-9 0-0 14, Adebayo 6-11 4-4 16, Richardson 6-12 4-4 18, Waiters 7-13 1-1 19, J.Johnson 5-11 2-4 13, Whiteside 1-2 0-0 2, Dragic 3-9 2-4 9, Wade 9-16 0-2 20. Totals 44-88 13-19 113. Washington: Brown Jr. 2-9 3-4 7, Portis 6-15 1-2 14, Bryant 8-13 0-0 17, Satoransky 5-13 1-2 12, Beal 6-14 2-4 16, Green 9-12 4-4 25, Parker 2-10 2-2 6, McRae 2-6 1-1 5, Randle 1-4 3-4 6. Totals 41-96 17-23 108. Miami 25 27 26 35 — 113 Washington 27 26 26 29 — 108 3-point goals: Miami 12-39 (Waiters 4-9, Olynyk 2-5, Wade 2-6, Richardson 2-7, J.Johnson 1-4, Dragic 1-5, Adebayo 0-1, Jones Jr. 0-2), Washington 9-30 (Green 3-5, Beal 2-8, Randle 1-1, Portis 1-2, Bryant 1-3, Satoransky 1-4, Parker 0-3, Brown Jr. 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 44 (Adebayo 11), Washington 53 (Portis, Bryant 11). Assists: Miami 29 (Adebayo 8), Washington 25 (Satoransky 8). Total fouls: Miami 23, Washington 20. Technicals: Olynyk, Bryant. A: 20,409 (20,356).

Philadelphia: Butler 6-13 13-13 25, Harris 6-17 0-1 13, Embiid 7-11 11-14 27, B.Simmons 9-16 3-4 21, Redick 5-13 2-2 14, Ennis III 2-5 3-4 8, Scott 3-7 0-0 9, Marjanovic 2-5 0-0 5, McConnell 2-4 1-1 5. Totals 42-91 33-39 127. Atlanta: Prince 8-15 3-3 23, Collins 4-10 4-4 13, Dedmon 7-11 1-2 17, Young 11-20 6-7 32, Huerter 3-7 0-0 7, Bembry 3-6 0-0 6, Len 6-13 1-1 14, Adams 2-3 0-1 5, Bazemore 1-7 1-3 3, Anderson 3-6 0-0 6, Carter 1-8 0-0 3. Totals 49-106 16-21 129. Philadelphia 41 27 32 27 — 127 Atlanta 34 40 26 29 — 129 3-point goals: Philadelphia 10-23 (Scott 3-6, Embiid 2-3, Redick 2-6, Marjanovic 1-1, Ennis III 1-3, Harris 1-4), Atlanta 15-47 (Young 4-9, Prince 4-10, Dedmon 2-5, Collins 1-1, Adams 1-2, Huerter 1-3, Len 1-5, Carter 1-6, Anderson 0-2, Bazemore 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 52 (Embiid 12), Atlanta 49 (Collins 9). Assists: Philadelphia 21 (B.Simmons 9), Atlanta 28 (Young 11). Total fouls: Philadelphia 15, Atlanta 25. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second), Bembry, Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three second). A: 16,640 (18,118).

Hornets 124, Celtics 117 Boston: Tatum 5-17 0-0 12, Morris 6-13 0-0 15, Williams III 1-2 0-0 2, Irving 12-23 3-4 31, Smart 2-10 0-0 6, Ojeleye 1-3 2-2 5, Brown 10-13 4-7 29, Theis 2-3 1-2 5, Yabusele 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 5-8 0-0 12. Totals 44-93 10-15 117. Charlotte: Bridges 8-13 1-2 20, Williams 4-9 4-4 13, Biyombo 2-3 0-2 4, Walker 11-25 8-8 36, Bacon 4-10 2-4 11, Kaminsky 2-4 2-2 7, Hernangomez 4-8 0-0 8, Graham 1-6 1-2 4, Lamb 3-11 0-0 8, Monk 3-6 4-4 13. Totals 42-95 22-28 124. Boston 35 29 34 19 — 117 Charlotte 29 34 26 35 — 124 3-point goals: Boston 19-43 (Brown 5-6, Irving 4-11, Morris 3-5, Rozier 2-5, Smart 2-7, Tatum 2-7, Ojeleye 1-2), Charlotte 18-38 (Walker 6-13, Monk 3-4, Bridges 3-6, Lamb 2-5, Bacon 1-1, Kaminsky 1-2, Graham 1-3, Williams 1-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 42 (Morris 9), Charlotte 53 (Walker 11). Assists: Boston 31 (Smart 8), Charlotte 26 (Walker 9). Total fouls: Boston 23, Charlotte 15. A: 19,438 (19,077).

T’Wolves 112, Grizzlies 99 Minnesota: Wiggins 9-15 3-3 22, Saric 3-9 2-2 11, Towns 12-20 5-5 33, Jones 4-8 3-3 12, Okogie 5-11 6-6 17, Bates-Diop 4-6 0-0 8, Tolliver 2-6 0-0 6, Dieng 1-6 1-2 3, Bayless 0-1 0-0 0, Reynolds 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 40-83 20-21 112. Memphis: Holiday 3-8 0-0 7, Caboclo 1-7 0-0 3, Valanciunas 7-15 5-7 20, Conley 7-17 7-8 23, Dorsey 3-13 1-1 8, Washburn 1-1 0-0 3, Parsons 4-8 0-0 9, Rabb 3-6 1-2 7, Noah 1-4 3-4 5, Carter 1-5 0-0 2, Wright 5-10 0-0 12, Watanabe 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-96 17-22 99. Minnesota 25 24 35 28 — 112 Memphis 25 25 18 31 — 99 3-point goals: Minnesota 12-26 (Towns 4-7, Saric 3-6, Tolliver 2-6, Jones 1-1, Okogie 1-3, Wiggins 1-3), Memphis 10-33 (Wright 2-4, Conley 2-6, Washburn 1-1, Valanciunas 1-1, Holiday 1-3, Caboclo 1-4, Parsons 1-4, Dorsey 1-6, Watanabe 0-1, Carter 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 49 (Towns 23), Memphis 47 (Valanciunas 14). Assists: Minnesota 25 (Jones 9), Memphis 22 (Wright 6). Total fouls: Minnesota 20, Memphis 22. Technicals: Minnesota coach Timberwolves (Defensive three second), Memphis coach Grizzlies (Defensive three second). A: 16,977 (18,119).

Jazz 114, Bulls 83 Utah: Ingles 5-14 1-1 13, Favors 6-10 1-1 13, Gobert 9-11 3-7 21, Rubio 6-11 0-0 12, Mitchell 5-8 4-4 16, O’Neale 1-4 0-0 3, Sefolosha 1-3 0-0 2, Crowder 4-12 0-0 11, Udoh 1-2 0-0 2, Niang 2-4 0-0 4, Neto 3-5 2-2 10, Korver 2-8 0-0 5, Mitrou-Long 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 46-95 11-15 114. Chicago: Harrison 2-9 2-2 6, Markkanen 6-20 5-5 18, Lopez 5-11 0-2 10, Dunn 1-8 2-2 4, Blakeney 5-11 0-0 10, Felicio 5-8 0-0 10, Arcidiacono 0-6 4-4 4, Luwawu-Cabarrot 2-2 1-2 7, Selden 4-10 1-3 9, Sampson 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 33-91 15-20 83. Utah 33 37 21 23 — 114 Chicago 18 18 25 22 — 83 3-point goals: Utah 11-32 (Crowder 3-9, Mitchell 2-2, Neto 2-3, Ingles 2-7, O’Neale 1-3, Korver 1-4, Niang 0-1, Mitrou-Long 0-1, Rubio 0-2), Chicago 2-16 (Sampson 1-4, Markkanen 1-6, Lopez 0-1, Arcidiacono 0-1, Blakeney 0-2, Selden 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 58 (Gobert 14), Chicago 43 (Markkanen 10). Assists: Utah 27 (Ingles 5), Chicago 16 (Dunn 5). Total fouls: Utah 17, Chicago 16. Technicals: Crowder. A: 20,506 (20,917).

Mavericks 126, Warriors 91 Dallas: Jackson 4-8 0-0 9, Nowitzki 8-14 0-0 21, Powell 2-3 0-0 4, Doncic 6-14 7-11 23, Brunson 5-9 0-0 11, Antetokounmpo 0-1 1-2 1, Finney-Smith 2-3 1-1 5, Kleber 6-9 0-0 16, Burke 3-7 5-5 13, Macon 0-1 0-0 0, Harris 2-5 0-0 6, Broekhoff 6-8 3-3 17, C.Lee 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-83 17-22 126. Golden State: Durant 9-25 7-7 25, Green 2-4 1-2 6, Cousins 8-11 2-4 19, Cook 3-10 0-0 7, Thompson 4-13 0-0 8, McKinnie 1-2 3-4 5, Looney 5-6 2-2 12, Jerebko 1-3 0-0 3, Bell 1-5 0-2 2, Iguodala 0-3 0-0 0, Evans 0-3 0-0 0, D.Lee 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 36-90 15-21 91. Dallas 37 37 34 18 — 126 Golden State 22 24 24 21 — 91 3-point goals: Dallas 21-49 (Nowitzki 5-8, Kleber 4-6, Doncic 4-11, Burke 2-4, Broekhoff 2-4, Harris 2-5, Brunson 1-4, Jackson 1-5, Finney-Smith 0-1, Powell 0-1), Golden State 4-30 (Cousins 1-1, Green 1-2, Jerebko 1-3, Cook 1-5, McKinnie 0-1, D.Lee 0-1, Evans 0-2, Iguodala 0-3, Thompson 0-4, Durant 0-8). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 49 (Doncic 11), Golden State 36 (Cousins, Cook 6). Assists: Dallas 33 (Doncic 10), Golden State 22 (Cook 7). Total fouls: Dallas 22, Golden State 22. Technicals: Durant. A: 19,596 (19,596).

NBA LEADERS THROUGH SATURDAY’S GAMES Scoring G FG Harden, HOU 69 751 George, OKC 69 631 Curry, GOL 60 561 Embiid, PHL 59 532 Antetokounmpo, MIL 66 661 James, LAL 52 527 Leonard, TOR 53 503 Durant, GOL 68 648 Lillard, POR 70 606 Davis, NOR 55 524 Beal, WAS 73 689 Booker, PHX 58 508 Walker, CHA 71 619 Griffin, DET 68 565 Towns, MIN 69 616 Irving, BOS 60 545 Mitchell, UTA 68 591 LaVine, CHI 63 530 Westbrook, OKC 64 556 Thompson, GOL 68 592 FG Percentage FG Gobert, UTA 409 Jordan, NYK 279 Capela, HOU 411 McGee, LAL 330 Harrell, LAC 483 Adams, OKC 430 Allen, BRO 308 Sabonis, IND 361 Ayton, PHX 483 Antetokounmpo, MIL 661 Rebounds G OFF Drummond, DET 68 361 Embiid, PHL 59 150 Jordan, NYK 67 220 Gobert, UTA 72 276 Antetokounmpo, MIL 66 149 Capela, HOU 58 261 Towns, MIN 69 241 Vucevic, ORL 72 201 Davis, NOR 55 169 Whiteside, MIA 63 238

FT 681 420 239 487 446 269 335 417 421 344 330 342 310 378 328 193 270 312 266 126

PTS 2517 1943 1669 1621 1812 1426 1442 1838 1839 1440 1899 1478 1775 1675 1694 1436 1615 1492 1480 1525

FGA 619 434 643 534 788 718 523 614 823 1138

AVG 36.5 28.2 27.8 27.5 27.5 27.4 27.2 27.0 26.3 26.2 26.0 25.5 25.0 24.6 24.6 23.9 23.8 23.7 23.1 22.4 PCT .661 .643 .639 .618 .613 .599 .589 .588 .587 .581

DEF TOT AVG 692 1053 15.5 663 813 13.8 662 882 13.2 651 927 12.9 683 832 12.6 463 724 12.5 613 854 12.4 669 870 12.1 493 662 12.0 502 740 11.7

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Avalanche center Colin Wilson (left) and Blackhawks defenseman Carl Dahlstrom chase the puck during the second period of Colorado’s 4-2 victory Saturday in Denver.

NHL STANDINGS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic GP W L OT z-Tampa Bay 76 58 14 4 x-Boston 75 46 20 9 Toronto 75 44 25 6 Montreal 75 40 28 7 Florida 75 33 30 12 Buffalo 74 31 34 9 Detroit 74 26 38 10 Ottawa 75 26 43 6 MetropolitanGP W L OT Washington 75 43 24 8 N.Y. Islanders 75 43 25 7 Pittsburgh 76 41 24 11 Carolina 74 41 26 7 Columbus 74 40 30 4 Philadelphia 75 36 31 8 N.Y. Rangers 74 29 32 13 New Jersey 76 28 39 9 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP W L OT x-Winnipeg 75 45 26 4 Nashville 76 42 28 6 Blues 75 40 27 8 Dallas 75 38 31 6 Colorado 75 34 29 12 Minnesota 76 35 32 9 Chicago 74 32 32 10 Pacific GP W L OT x-Calgary 74 46 21 7 x-San Jose 75 43 23 9 74 42 27 5 Vegas Arizona 75 36 32 7 Vancouver 74 32 32 10 Edmonton 75 33 34 8 Anaheim 76 31 36 9 Los Angeles 73 26 39 8

Pts GF 120 301 101 233 94 264 87 226 78 243 71 206 62 200 58 222 Pts GF 94 257 93 210 93 256 89 223 84 223 80 228 71 206 65 208

GA Home 202 31-6-2 189 28-7-3 223 22-14-2 217 22-12-4 255 19-13-6 244 20-13-4 254 14-18-5 278 16-16-4 GA Home 233 21-10-6 184 22-12-4 226 21-13-3 205 21-12-4 218 20-16-2 249 18-16-4 245 17-12-8 259 18-14-6

Away 27-8-2 18-13-6 22-11-4 18-16-3 14-17-6 11-21-5 12-20-5 10-27-2 Away 22-14-2 21-13-3 20-11-8 20-14-3 20-14-2 18-15-4 12-20-5 10-25-3

Pts 94 90 88 82 80 79 74 Pts 99 95 89 79 74 74 71 60

GA 218 202 205 186 227 223 270 GA 209 237 203 210 229 249 233 232

Away Div 20-17-0 12-10-0 19-15-4 12-11-1 20-12-6 11-9-4 16-17-3 12-9-2 17-15-6 11-9-3 20-16-2 11-8-4 16-18-3 11-7-3 Away Div 21-14-2 12-8-2 20-15-4 15-6-4 19-17-1 17-6-2 18-17-3 15-9-3 15-19-5 9-12-4 16-17-5 10-12-2 14-22-1 8-12-3 12-19-5 10-9-2

GF 254 223 223 188 239 203 246 GF 265 266 232 199 206 213 177 174

Home 25-9-4 23-13-2 20-15-2 22-14-3 17-14-6 15-16-7 16-14-7 Home 25-7-5 23-8-5 23-10-4 18-15-4 17-13-5 17-17-3 17-14-8 14-20-3

Div 19-4-0 16-6-2 13-8-3 12-8-5 12-9-3 9-11-4 7-14-4 8-13-2 Div 16-6-2 17-8-1 13-8-4 10-10-2 16-9-1 10-12-2 8-10-5 8-15-3

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot | z-clinched conference Saturday Blues 4, Tampa Bay 3 New Jersey 2, Arizona 1, SO N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 2 Colorado 4, Chicago 2 Ottawa 4, Edmonton 3, OT N.Y. Rangers 2, Toronto 1, OT Boston 7, Florida 3 Carolina 5, Minnesota 1 Winnipeg 5, Nashville 0 Montreal 7, Buffalo 4 Pittsburgh 3, Dallas 2 Calgary at Vancouver, late Detroit at Vegas, late Anaheim at Los Angeles, late Friday Minnesota 2, Washington 1 Anaheim 4, San Jose 3, OT

Sunday Philadelphia at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Arizona vs. NY Islanders at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 2 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 6 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 7 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Monday Pittsburgh at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Vegas at Blues, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8 p.m. Detroit at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Tuesday NY Islanders at Columbus, 6 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Florida at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Chicago at Arizona, 9 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

Colin Wilson scored his first goal in more than a month, Philipp Grubauer stopped 29 shots and the playoff-chasing Colorado Avalanche earned their fourth straight win by holding off the Chicago Blackhawks 4-2 on Saturday in Denver. J.T. Compher and Sven Andrighetto also scored. Derick Brassard added an empty-netter for an Avalanche team in the thick of the Western Conference wild-card hunt with seven games remaining. Colorado had an array of forwards step up with All-Star Mikko Rantanen missing the game with an upper-body injury. Wilson came through with his first goal since Feb. 7. Grubauer kept up his torrid play by winning his fourth straight start. He’s allowed four goals over stretch. Jonathan Toews and Erik Gustafsson had goals for Chicago, while Corey Crawford stopped 21 shots. The loss was a blow for the Blackhawks, who are making a late charge but are now six points behind Colorado. Devils 2, Coyotes 1 • Coleman and Pavel Zacha scored in the fifth and sixth rounds of the shootout and the host New Jersey Devils hurt Arizona’s playoff chances by sending the Coyotes to their fourth straight loss.

NOTEBOOK Chara gets extension • The Boston Bruins have signed 42-year-old defenseman Zdeno Chara to a oneyear, $2 million contract extension. General manager Don Sweeney made the announcement Saturday, adding the deal through the 201920 season includes an additional $1.75 million in performance bonuses.

NHL SUMMARIES Avalanche 4, Blackhawks 2

Devils 2, Coyotes 1, SO

Bruins 7, Panthers 3

Chicago 0 1 1 — 2 Colorado 0 2 2 — 4 First period: None. Penalties: Saad, CHI, (tripping), 1:10; Colorado bench, served by Brassard (too many men on the ice), 5:36; Saad, CHI, (tripping), 17:39. Second period: 1, Colorado, Compher 16 (Kerfoot, Nemeth), 3:07. 2, Chicago, Toews 32 (Sikura), 5:20. 3, Colorado, Wilson 11 (Kerfoot, Girard), 13:57 (pp). Penalties: Gustafsson, CHI, (holding), 12:29; Kampf, CHI, major (high sticking), 12:58; Jost, COL, (cross checking), 17:42. Third period: 4, Colorado, Andrighetto 6 (Johnson, Wilson), 1:26. 5, Chicago, Gustafsson 16 (Keith, Saad), 12:04. 6, Colorado, Brassard 13, 17:40. Penalties: Kerfoot, COL, (tripping), 3:53. Shots: Chicago 8-11-12: 31. Colorado 7-12-6: 25. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 3; Colorado 1 of 5. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 12-17-3 (24 shots-21 saves). Colorado, Grubauer 15-9-3 (31-29). A: 17,099.

Arizona 1 0 0 0 — 1 New Jersey 1 0 0 0 — 2 New Jersey won shootout 2-1. First period: 1, Arizona, Ekman-Larsson 12 (Garland, Galchenyuk), 2:31. 2, New Jersey, Stafford 4 (Wood, Zacha), 17:01. Penalties: New Jersey bench, served by Agostino (too many men on the ice), 13:42. Second period: None. Penalties: Cousins, ARI, (high sticking), 2:05; Hinostroza, ARI, (tripping), 4:51; Cousins, ARI, (delay of game), 9:55; McLeod, NJ, (interference), 12:22; Ekman-Larsson, ARI, (tripping), 13:58. Third period: None. Penalties: Kuemper, ARI, served by Garland, (delay of game), 13:17. Overtime: None. Penalties: Palmieri, NJ, (cross checking), 0:55. Shootout: Arizona 1 (Cousins NG, Galchenyuk NG, Hinostroza NG, Keller NG, Garland G, Panik NG), New Jersey 2 (Palmieri NG, Stafford NG, Severson NG, Hischier NG, Coleman G, Zacha G). Shots: Arizona 11-7-5-1: 24. New Jersey 8-10-12-2: 32. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 3; New Jersey 0 of 5. Goalies: Arizona, Kuemper 24-18-7 (32 shots-31 saves). New Jersey, Blackwood 8-9-0 (24-23). A: 16,514.

Boston 1 5 1 — 7 Florida 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Boston, Acciari 5 (Clifton, Backes), 2:23. Penalties: Hoffman, FLA, (roughing), 3:53. Second period: 2, Boston, Marchand 32 (Bergeron), 0:28. 3, Florida, Hawryluk 5 (Hoffman), 0:52. 4, Boston, Chara 5 (Coyle, Heinen), 5:05. 5, Boston, Kuhlman 2, 6:38. 6, Florida, Hoffman 35 (Weegar), 10:04. 7, Boston, Kampfer 3 (Moore, Heinen), 15:48 (pp). 8, Boston, Pastrnak 33 (Chara, Halak), 16:36. Penalties: Hoffman, FLA, (slashing), 11:09; Hawryluk, FLA, (tripping), 14:06; Acciari, BOS, Major (fighting), 15:51; Weegar, FLA, Major (fighting), 15:51. Third period: 9, Florida, Trocheck 8 (Borgstrom, Ekblad), 3:57 (pp). 10, Boston, Bergeron 31 (Pastrnak, Marchand), 19:33. Penalties: Clifton, BOS, (interference), 2:06; Trocheck, FLA, (cross checking), 7:02; McAvoy, BOS, (roughing), 7:02; Matheson, FLA, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:33. Shots: Boston 16-13-10: 39. Florida 12-11-11: 34. Power-plays: Boston 1 of 3; Florida 1 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Halak 20-10-4 (34 shots-31 saves). Florida, Montembeault 4-3-1 (38-32). A: 17,129.

Islanders 4, Flyers 2 NY Islanders 1 1 2 — 4 Philadelphia 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Philadelphia, Hagg 5 (Hartman, Gudas), 6:39. 2, NY Islanders, Nelson 23 (Toews, Mayfield), 14:27. Penalties: Gudas, PHI, (hooking), 0:26; Hagg, PHI, major (high sticking), 1:45; NY Islanders bench, served by Martin (too many men on the ice), 2:38. Second period: 3, NY Islanders, Leddy 4 (Boychuk, Barzal), 10:58. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 8 (Giroux, Couturier), 6:16 (pp). 5, NY Islanders, Jo.Bailey 15 (Nelson, Ladd), 16:03. 6, NY Islanders, Jo.Bailey 16 (Pelech, Komarov), 17:26. Penalties: Hartman, PHI, (interference), 2:16; Voracek, PHI, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:16; Mayfield, NYI, (hooking), 6:12; Pelech, NYI, (tripping), 9:08. Shots: NY Islanders 14-15-11: 40. Philadelphia 10-5-9: 24. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 5; Philadelphia 1 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Lehner 21-12-5 (24 shots-22 saves). Philadelphia, Hart 15-11-1 (40-36). A: 19,668.

Senators 4, Oilers 3, OT Ottawa 2 0 1 1 — 4 Edmonton 1 1 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, Ottawa, Tkachuk 18 (Wolanin, DeMelo), 4:37 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Chiasson 21 (Nurse), 8:12. 3, Ottawa, Ryan 14 (Chabot, White), 15:28 (pp). Penalties: Lucic, EDM, (holding), 3:51; Nurse, EDM, (high sticking), 13:34; Harpur, OTT, (roughing), 19:06; Chiasson, EDM, (roughing), 19:06. Second period: 4, Edmonton, McDavid 38 (Draisaitl, Kassian), 2:54. Penalties: None. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Gibbons 6 (Lindberg, Paajarvi), 7:37. 6, Edmonton, Cave 3 (Gagner, Gambardella), 8:33. Penalties: Jaros, OTT, (high sticking), 13:00. Overtime: 7, Ottawa, Tkachuk 19 (Anderson, Balcers), 2:09. Penalties: None. Shots: Ottawa 12-13-8-2: 35. Edmonton 7-11-11: 29. Power-plays: Ottawa 2 of 2; Edmonton 0 of 1. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 15-25-4 (29 shots-26 saves). Edmonton, Koskinen 23-18-5 (35-31). A: 18,347.

Hurricanes 5, Wild 1 Minnesota 0 1 0 — 1 Carolina 0 2 3 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Foegele, CAR, (delay of game), 6:56; Bitetto, MIN, (interference), 10:03. Second period: 1, Carolina, J.Staal 9 (Teravainen, Faulk), 3:06. 2, Carolina, Pesce 7 (Williams, Aho), 5:32. 3, Minnesota, E.Staal 21 (Spurgeon, Fiala), 8:57 (pp). Penalties: Ferland, CAR, major (high sticking), 5:56; Martinook, CAR, (slashing), 12:59. Third period: 4, Carolina, Svechnikov 19 (Teravainen, J.Staal), 3:27. 5, Carolina, Wallmark 10 (Ferland, Martinook), 9:09. 6, Carolina, Teravainen 19, 11:12. Penalties: Suter, MIN, (tripping), 3:59; Pesce, CAR, (cross checking), 17:22; Kunin, MIN, (cross checking), 17:22; Martinook, CAR, (slashing), 20:00. Shots: Minnesota 7-11-7: 25. Carolina 11-13-9: 33. Power-plays: Minnesota 1 of 4; Carolina 0 of 2. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 29-26-6 (33 shots-28 saves). Carolina, Mrazek 20-13-3 (25-24). A: 16,751.

Canadiens 7, Sabres 4 Buffalo 1 2 1 — 4 Montreal 0 4 3 — 7 First period: 1, Buffalo, Reinhart 19 (Mittelstadt, Montour), 12:26. Penalties: Okposo, BUF, (slashing), 12:42; Lehkonen, MTL, (holding), 16:09. Second period: 2, Montreal, Lehkonen 9 (Shaw, Domi), 5:09. 3, Montreal, Gallagher 32 (Danault), 9:12. 4, Montreal, Shaw 18 (Kulak, Domi), 14:23. 5, Buffalo, Nylander 2 (Eichel, Dahlin), 14:53 (pp). 6, Buffalo, Scandella 5 (Larsson), 16:08. 7, Montreal, Byron 14 (Weal, Thompson), 18:03. Penalties: Folin, MTL, (delay of game), 14:43. Third period: 8, Montreal, Gallagher 33 (Tatar, Weber), 8:35. 9, Buffalo, Eichel 26, 13:13. 10, Montreal, Domi 26 (Tatar, Petry), 15:30 (pp). 11, Montreal, Tatar 23 (Danault, Gallagher), 17:47. Penalties: Shaw, MTL, (charging), 9:06; Shaw, MTL, (roughing), 9:06; Girgensons, BUF, (holding), 14:26. Shots: Buffalo 8-7-12: 27. Montreal 12-20-12: 44. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 4; Montreal 1 of 2. Goalies: Buffalo, Hutton 17-22-5 (43 shots-37 saves). Montreal, Price 32-22-5 (27-23). A: 21,302.

Jets 5, Predators 0 Nashville 0 0 0 — 0 Winnipeg 0 3 2 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Subban, NSH, (tripping), 6:19. Second period: 1, Winnipeg, Connor 30 (Myers, Hayes), 4:42. 2, Winnipeg, Copp 11 (Perreault, Hendricks), 14:16. 3, Winnipeg, Hayes 18 (Connor, Trouba), 15:41. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Connor 31 (Hayes), 15:22. 5, Winnipeg, Connor 32 (Laine, Hayes), 19:51. Penalties: Jarnkrok, NSH, (tripping), 10:03. Shots: Nashville 12-9-12: 33. Winnipeg 8-19-16: 43. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 0; Winnipeg 0 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 26-19-4 (43 shots-38 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 32-20-2 (33-33). A: 15,321.

Rangers 2, Maple Leafs 1, OT NY Rangers 0 0 1 1 — 2 Toronto 0 0 1 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Kapanen, TOR, (tripping), 1:49; NY Rangers bench, served by Chytil (too many men on the ice), 3:09; Howden, NYR, (cross checking), 18:42. Second period: None. Penalties: Ozhiganov, TOR, (tripping), 7:28; Brown, TOR, (hooking), 13:11. Third period: 1, NY Rangers, Buchnevich 18 (Shattenkirk, Skjei), 0:19. 2, Toronto, Hyman 19 (Tavares, Marner), 8:33. Penalties: Staal, NYR, (cross checking), 11:15. Overtime: 3, NY Rangers, Strome 15 (Nieves), 1:48. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Rangers 11-7-7-3: 28. Toronto 13-10-20-2: 45. Power-plays: NY Rangers 0 of 3; Toronto 0 of 3. Goalies: NY Rangers, Georgiev 11-12-3 (45 shots-44 saves). Toronto, Andersen 34-15-5 (28-26). A: 19,251.

Penguins 3, Stars 2 Pittsburgh 1 1 1 — Dallas 0 2 0 — First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 38 (Letang, Kessel), 15:25 (pp). Penalties: Radulov, DAL, (slashing), 14:34. Second period: 2, Dallas, Seguin 29 (Hintz, Radulov), 1:03. 3, Pittsburgh, McCann 18 (Kessel), 14:41. 4, Dallas, Cogliano 5 (Nichushkin, Klingberg), 18:40. Penalties: Letang, PIT, (tripping), 6:43. Third period: 5, Pittsburgh, McCann 19 (Blueger, Gudbranson), 4:20 (sh). Penalties: J.Johnson, PIT, (holding), 3:34; Rust, PIT, (holding), 18:40. Shots: Pittsburgh 12-9-9: 30. Dallas 10-6-15: 31. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 1 of 1; Dallas 0 of 3. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 26-12-5 (31 shots-29 saves). Dallas, Khudobin 13-16-4 (30-27). A: 18,532.

3 2

NHL LEADERS THROUGH FRIDAY’S GAMES Goal Scoring Name Team Alex Ovechkin, WAS Leon Draisaitl, EDM Patrick Kane, CHI John Tavares, TOR Brayden Point, TAM Cam Atkinson, CBJ Alex DeBrincat, CHI Steven Stamkos, TAM Jake Guentzel, PIT Nikita Kucherov, TAM Nathan MacKinnon, COL Connor McDavid, EDM Joe Pavelski, SAN Jeff Skinner, BUF Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Auston Matthews, TOR Mark Scheifele, WPG Aleksander Barkov, FLA Mike Hoffman, FLA Matthew Tkachuk, CGY Assists Name Team Nikita Kucherov, TAM Connor McDavid, EDM Blake Wheeler, WPG Brent Burns, SAN Mitchell Marner, TOR Sidney Crosby, PIT Patrick Kane, CHI Claude Giroux, PHI Jonathan Huberdeau, FLA Brad Marchand, BOS Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Mikko Rantanen, COL Mark Giordano, CGY Nathan MacKinnon, COL Aleksander Barkov, FLA John Carlson, WAS Nicklas Backstrom, WAS Leon Draisaitl, EDM Artemi Panarin, CBJ Elias Lindholm, CGY

GP 74 74 72 74 73 72 73 75 75 75 74 70 72 73 74 60 74 74 74 74 GP 75 70 74 75 74 72 72 74 74 73 74 74 72 74 74 74 74 74 71 74

G 48 43 41 41 39 38 38 38 37 37 37 37 37 37 35 35 35 34 34 34 A 83 70 68 64 61 60 60 59 59 59 57 56 54 54 53 53 51 51 51 50


SPORTS

03.24.2019 • Sunday • M 4

Avalanche win fourth in a row

NBA STANDINGS EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic W L x-Toronto 51 22 x-Philadelphia 47 26 Boston 43 30 Brooklyn 38 36 New York 14 59 Southeast W L Miami 36 37 Orlando 35 38 Charlotte 33 39 Washington 30 44 Atlanta 26 48 Central W L y-Milwaukee 54 19 x-Indiana 44 29 Detroit 37 35 Chicago 21 53 Cleveland 19 54 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest W L Houston 46 27 San Antonio 42 31 New Orleans 31 43 Memphis 29 44 Dallas 29 44 Northwest W L x-Denver 49 22 Portland 45 27 Oklahoma City 43 30 Utah 43 30 Minnesota 33 40 Pacific W L x-Golden State 49 23 LA Clippers 43 30 Sacramento 36 36 LA Lakers 31 41 Phoenix 17 57

ST. LOuIS POST-dISPaTCH • D5

Pct .699 .644 .589 .514 .192 Pct .493 .479 .458 .405 .351 Pct .740 .603 .514 .284 .260

GB — 4 8 13½ 37 GB — 1 2½ 6½ 10½ GB — 10 16½ 33½ 35

Pct GB .630 — .575 4 .419 15½ .397 17 .397 17 Pct GB .690 — .625 4½ .589 7 .589 7 .452 17 Pct GB .681 — .589 6½ .500 13 .431 18 .230 33

L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 6-4 1-9 L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6 L10 6-4 3-7 6-4 3-7 4-6

L10 8-2 8-2 3-7 5-5 2-8 L10 7-3 7-3 4-6 7-3 4-6 L10 6-4 9-1 5-5 1-9 4-6

Str L-1 L-1 L-3 W-2 L-3 Str W-1 W-4 W-2 L-4 W-2 Str W-1 L-4 L-1 L-1 L-1

Str W-1 L-2 L-1 L-2 W-1 Str W-6 W-3 W-1 W-1 W-1 Str L-1 W-4 W-2 L-5 L-3

Home 29-8 29-9 26-11 21-16 7-28 Home 17-20 22-16 23-15 22-16 15-22 Home 29-6 27-9 23-13 9-28 13-25

Home 27-10 29-8 18-17 19-18 22-14 Home 30-6 28-9 23-12 23-12 23-11 Home 25-11 23-13 23-15 18-17 10-26

Away 22-14 18-17 17-19 17-20 7-31 Away 19-17 13-22 10-24 8-28 11-26 Away 25-13 17-20 14-22 12-25 6-29

Conf 30-14 28-17 29-15 25-20 8-37 Conf 21-24 23-20 25-22 19-30 14-33 Conf 36-10 30-15 25-22 15-30 15-34

Away 19-17 13-23 13-26 10-26 7-30 Away 19-16 17-18 20-18 20-18 10-29 Away 24-12 20-17 13-21 13-24 7-31

Conf 26-19 29-20 21-25 20-24 15-30 Conf 30-14 24-22 25-21 25-20 20-26 Conf 30-15 25-21 19-24 21-23 10-36

x-clinched playoff spot | y-clinched division

Saturday Charlotte 124, Boston 117 Miami 113, Washington 108 Atlanta 129, Philadelphia 127 Minnesota 112, Memphis 99 Utah 114, Chicago 83 Dallas 126, Golden State 91 Portland 117, Detroit 112 Sacramento 112, Phoenix 103 Friday Orlando 123, Memphis 119, OT Denver 111, New York 93 LA Clippers 110, Cleveland 108 Oklahoma City 116, Toronto 109 Houston 111, San Antonio 105 Milwaukee 116, Miami 87

Brooklyn 111, LA Lakers 106 Sunday LA Clippers at New York, 11 a.m. Cleveland at Milwaukee, 3:30 p.m. Denver at Indiana, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Toronto, 5 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 6 p.m. San Antonio at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Detroit at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at LA Lakers, 8:30 p.m. Monday Philadelphia at Orlando, 6 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Utah, 8 p.m. Brooklyn at Portland, 9 p.m.

Hornets rally to beat Celtics ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kemba Walker scored 18 of his game-high 36 points in the fourth quarter and the host Charlotte Hornets rallied to beat the Boston Celtics 124-117 Saturday night. It was Walker’s 23rd game of 30 or more points this season. He added 11 rebounds and nine assists. Rookie Miles Bridges scored a career-high 20 points. Charlotte won its second straight, improved to 33-39 and kept its faint postseason hopes alive. Kyrie Irving led Boston with 31 points. Jaylen Brown added 29 points and Marcus Morris

15 as the Celtics lost their third straight game.

NOTEBOOK Rose has elbow surgery • Minnesota guard Derrick Rose had arthroscopic surgery to remove bone chips from his right elbow. The Timberwolves previously said Rose was unlikely to play again this season. Bulls update injuries • The Chicago Bulls have ruled out injured rookies Wendell Carter Jr. (left thumb surgery) and Chandler Hutchison (right toe injury) for the remainder of the season, and might soon do the same with Otto Porter Jr (strained right rotator cuff).

NBA SUMMARIES

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Avalanche center Colin Wilson (left) and Blackhawks defenseman Carl Dahlstrom chase the puck during the second period of Colorado’s 4-2 victory Saturday in Denver.

NHL STANDINGS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic z-Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Montreal Florida Buffalo Detroit Ottawa Metropolitan Washington NY Islanders Pittsburgh Carolina Columbus Philadelphia NY Rangers New Jersey

GP 76 75 75 75 75 74 75 75 GP 75 75 76 74 74 75 74 76

W 58 46 44 40 33 31 27 26 W 43 43 41 41 40 36 29 28

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 14 4 120 301 202 31-6-2 27-8-2 19-4-0 20 9 101 233 189 28-7-3 18-13-6 16-6-2 25 6 94 264 223 22-14-2 22-11-4 13-8-3 28 7 87 226 217 22-12-4 18-16-3 12-8-5 30 12 78 243 255 19-13-6 14-17-6 12-9-3 34 9 71 206 244 20-13-4 11-21-5 9-11-4 38 10 64 203 256 14-18-5 13-20-5 7-14-4 43 6 58 222 278 16-16-4 10-27-2 8-13-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 24 8 94 257 233 21-10-6 22-14-2 16-6-2 25 7 93 210 184 22-12-4 21-13-3 17-8-1 24 11 93 256 226 21-13-3 20-11-8 13-8-4 26 7 89 223 205 21-12-4 20-14-3 10-10-2 30 4 84 223 218 20-16-2 20-14-2 16-9-1 31 8 80 228 249 18-16-4 18-15-4 10-12-2 32 13 71 206 245 17-12-8 12-20-5 8-10-5 39 9 65 208 259 18-14-6 10-25-3 8-15-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central GP Winnipeg 75 Nashville 76 Blues 75 Dallas 75 Colorado 75 Minnesota 76 Chicago 74 Pacific GP x-Calgary 75 x-San Jose 75 Vegas 75 Arizona 75 Edmonton 75 Vancouver 75 Anaheim 77 Los Angeles 74

W 45 42 40 38 34 35 32 W 47 43 42 36 33 32 31 27

L 26 28 27 31 29 32 32 L 21 23 27 32 34 33 36 39

OT 4 6 8 6 12 9 10 OT 7 9 6 7 8 10 10 8

Pts 94 90 88 82 80 79 74 Pts 101 95 90 79 74 74 72 62

GF 254 223 223 188 239 203 246 GF 268 266 234 199 213 207 180 178

GA 218 202 205 186 227 223 270 GA 210 237 206 210 249 232 237 235

Home 25-9-4 23-13-2 20-15-2 22-14-3 17-14-6 15-16-7 16-14-7 Home 25-7-5 23-8-5 23-10-5 18-15-4 17-17-3 17-14-5 17-14-8 15-20-3

Away 20-17-0 19-15-4 20-12-6 16-17-3 17-15-6 20-16-2 16-18-3 Away 22-14-2 20-15-4 19-17-1 18-17-3 16-17-5 15-19-5 14-22-2 12-19-5

Div 12-10-0 12-11-1 11-9-4 12-9-2 11-9-3 11-8-4 11-7-3 Div 13-8-2 15-6-4 17-6-2 15-9-3 10-12-2 9-13-4 8-12-4 11-9-2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot | z-clinched conference Saturday Blues 4, Tampa Bay 3 New Jersey 2, Arizona 1, SO NY Islanders 4, Philadelphia 2 Colorado 4, Chicago 2 Ottawa 4, Edmonton 3, OT NY Rangers 2, Toronto 1, OT Boston 7, Florida 3 Carolina 5, Minnesota 1 Winnipeg 5, Nashville 0 Montreal 7, Buffalo 4 Pittsburgh 3, Dallas 2 Calgary 3, Vancouver 1 Detroit 3, Vegas 2, OT Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 3, SO

Friday Minnesota 2, Washington 1 Anaheim 4, San Jose 3, OT Sunday Philadelphia at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Arizona vs. NY Islanders at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 2 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 6 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 7 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

Monday Pittsburgh at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Vegas at Blues, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8 p.m. Detroit at San Jose, 9:30 p.m. Tuesday NY Islanders at Columbus, 6 p.m. Carolina at Washington, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Florida at Montreal, 6:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Edmonton, 8 p.m. Chicago at Arizona, 9 p.m. Anaheim at Vancouver, 9 p.m.

Colin Wilson scored his first goal in more than a month, Philipp Grubauer stopped 29 shots and the playoff-chasing Colorado Avalanche earned their fourth straight win by holding off the Chicago Blackhawks 4-2 on Saturday in Denver. J.T. Compher and Sven Andrighetto also scored. Derick Brassard added an empty-netter for an Avalanche team in the thick of the Western Conference wild-card hunt with seven games remaining. Colorado had an array of forwards step up with All-Star Mikko Rantanen missing the game with an upper-body injury. Wilson came through with his first goal since Feb. 7. Grubauer kept up his torrid play by winning his fourth straight start. He’s allowed four goals over stretch. Jonathan Toews and Erik Gustafsson had goals for Chicago, while Corey Crawford stopped 21 shots. The loss was a blow for the Blackhawks, who are making a late charge but are now six points behind Colorado. Devils 2, Coyotes 1 • Coleman and Pavel Zacha scored in the fifth and sixth rounds of the shootout and the host New Jersey Devils hurt Arizona’s playoff chances by sending the Coyotes to their fourth straight loss.

NOTEBOOK Chara gets extension • The Boston Bruins have signed 42-year-old defenseman Zdeno Chara to a oneyear, $2 million contract extension. General manager Don Sweeney made the announcement Saturday, adding the deal through the 201920 season includes an additional $1.75 million in performance bonuses.

NHL SUMMARIES

Heat 113, Wizards 108

Jazz 114, Bulls 83

Avalanche 4, Blackhawks 2

Devils 2, Coyotes 1, SO

Rangers 2, Maple Leafs 1, OT

Miami: Jones Jr. 1-5 0-0 2, Olynyk 6-9 0-0 14, Adebayo 6-11 4-4 16, Richardson 6-12 4-4 18, Waiters 7-13 1-1 19, J.Johnson 5-11 2-4 13, Whiteside 1-2 0-0 2, Dragic 3-9 2-4 9, Wade 9-16 0-2 20. Totals 44-88 13-19 113. Washington: Brown Jr. 2-9 3-4 7, Portis 6-15 1-2 14, Bryant 8-13 0-0 17, Satoransky 5-13 1-2 12, Beal 6-14 2-4 16, Green 9-12 4-4 25, Parker 2-10 2-2 6, McRae 2-6 1-1 5, Randle 1-4 3-4 6. Totals 41-96 17-23 108. Miami 25 27 26 35 — 113 Washington 27 26 26 29 — 108 3-point goals: Miami 12-39 (Waiters 4-9, Olynyk 2-5, Wade 2-6, Richardson 2-7, J.Johnson 1-4, Dragic 1-5, Adebayo 0-1, Jones Jr. 0-2), Washington 9-30 (Green 3-5, Beal 2-8, Randle 1-1, Portis 1-2, Bryant 1-3, Satoransky 1-4, Parker 0-3, Brown Jr. 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Miami 44 (Adebayo 11), Washington 53 (Portis, Bryant 11). Assists: Miami 29 (Adebayo 8), Washington 25 (Satoransky 8). Total fouls: Miami 23, Washington 20. Technicals: Olynyk, Bryant. A: 20,409 (20,356).

Utah: Ingles 5-14 1-1 13, Favors 6-10 1-1 13, Gobert 9-11 3-7 21, Rubio 6-11 0-0 12, Mitchell 5-8 4-4 16, O’Neale 1-4 0-0 3, Sefolosha 1-3 0-0 2, Crowder 4-12 0-0 11, Udoh 1-2 0-0 2, Niang 2-4 0-0 4, Neto 3-5 2-2 10, Korver 2-8 0-0 5, Mitrou-Long 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 46-95 11-15 114. Chicago: Harrison 2-9 2-2 6, Markkanen 6-20 5-5 18, Lopez 5-11 0-2 10, Dunn 1-8 2-2 4, Blakeney 5-11 0-0 10, Felicio 5-8 0-0 10, Arcidiacono 0-6 4-4 4, Luwawu-Cabarrot 2-2 1-2 7, Selden 4-10 1-3 9, Sampson 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 33-91 15-20 83. Utah 33 37 21 23 — 114 Chicago 18 18 25 22 — 83 3-point goals: Utah 11-32 (Crowder 3-9, Mitchell 2-2, Neto 2-3, Ingles 2-7, O’Neale 1-3, Korver 1-4, Niang 0-1, Mitrou-Long 0-1, Rubio 0-2), Chicago 2-16 (Sampson 1-4, Markkanen 1-6, Lopez 0-1, Arcidiacono 0-1, Blakeney 0-2, Selden 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Utah 58 (Gobert 14), Chicago 43 (Markkanen 10). Assists: Utah 27 (Ingles 5), Chicago 16 (Dunn 5). Total fouls: Utah 17, Chicago 16. Technicals: Crowder. A: 20,506 (20,917).

Chicago 0 1 1 — 2 Colorado 0 2 2 — 4 First period: None. Penalties: Saad, CHI, (tripping), 1:10; Colorado bench, served by Brassard (too many men on the ice), 5:36; Saad, CHI, (tripping), 17:39. Second period: 1, Colorado, Compher 16 (Kerfoot, Nemeth), 3:07. 2, Chicago, Toews 32 (Sikura), 5:20. 3, Colorado, Wilson 11 (Kerfoot, Girard), 13:57 (pp). Penalties: Gustafsson, CHI, (holding), 12:29; Kampf, CHI, major (high sticking), 12:58; Jost, COL, (cross checking), 17:42. Third period: 4, Colorado, Andrighetto 6 (Johnson, Wilson), 1:26. 5, Chicago, Gustafsson 16 (Keith, Saad), 12:04. 6, Colorado, Brassard 13, 17:40. Penalties: Kerfoot, COL, (tripping), 3:53. Shots: Chicago 8-11-12: 31. Colorado 7-12-6: 25. Power-plays: Chicago 0 of 3; Colorado 1 of 5. Goalies: Chicago, Crawford 12-17-3 (24 shots-21 saves). Colorado, Grubauer 15-9-3 (31-29). A: 17,099.

Arizona 1 0 0 0 — 1 New Jersey 1 0 0 0 — 2 New Jersey won shootout 2-1. First period: 1, Arizona, Ekman-Larsson 12 (Garland, Galchenyuk), 2:31. 2, New Jersey, Stafford 4 (Wood, Zacha), 17:01. Penalties: New Jersey bench, served by Agostino (too many men on the ice), 13:42. Second period: None. Penalties: Cousins, ARI, (high sticking), 2:05; Hinostroza, ARI, (tripping), 4:51; Cousins, ARI, (delay of game), 9:55; McLeod, NJ, (interference), 12:22; Ekman-Larsson, ARI, (tripping), 13:58. Third period: None. Penalties: Kuemper, ARI, served by Garland, (delay of game), 13:17. Overtime: None. Penalties: Palmieri, NJ, (cross checking), 0:55. Shootout: Arizona 1 (Cousins NG, Galchenyuk NG, Hinostroza NG, Keller NG, Garland G, Panik NG), New Jersey 2 (Palmieri NG, Stafford NG, Severson NG, Hischier NG, Coleman G, Zacha G). Shots: Arizona 11-7-5-1: 24. New Jersey 8-10-12-2: 32. Power-plays: Arizona 0 of 3; New Jersey 0 of 5. Goalies: Arizona, Kuemper 24-18-7 (32 shots-31 saves). New Jersey, Blackwood 8-9-0 (24-23). A: 16,514.

NY Rangers 0 0 1 1 — 2 Toronto 0 0 1 0 — 1 First period: None. Penalties: Kapanen, TOR, (tripping), 1:49; NY Rangers bench, served by Chytil (too many men on the ice), 3:09; Howden, NYR, (cross checking), 18:42. Second period: None. Penalties: Ozhiganov, TOR, (tripping), 7:28; Brown, TOR, (hooking), 13:11. Third period: 1, NY Rangers, Buchnevich 18 (Shattenkirk, Skjei), 0:19. 2, Toronto, Hyman 19 (Tavares, Marner), 8:33. Penalties: Staal, NYR, (cross checking), 11:15. Overtime: 3, NY Rangers, Strome 15 (Nieves), 1:48. Penalties: None. Shots: NY Rangers 11-7-7-3: 28. Toronto 13-10-20-2: 45. Power-plays: NY Rangers 0 of 3; Toronto 0 of 3. Goalies: NY Rangers, Georgiev 11-12-3 (45 shots-44 saves). Toronto, Andersen 34-15-5 (28-26). A: 19,251.

Hawks 129, 76ers 127 Philadelphia: Butler 6-13 13-13 25, Harris 6-17 0-1 13, Embiid 7-11 11-14 27, B.Simmons 9-16 3-4 21, Redick 5-13 2-2 14, Ennis III 2-5 3-4 8, Scott 3-7 0-0 9, Marjanovic 2-5 0-0 5, McConnell 2-4 1-1 5. Totals 42-91 33-39 127. Atlanta: Prince 8-15 3-3 23, Collins 4-10 4-4 13, Dedmon 7-11 1-2 17, Young 11-20 6-7 32, Huerter 3-7 0-0 7, Bembry 3-6 0-0 6, Len 6-13 1-1 14, Adams 2-3 0-1 5, Bazemore 1-7 1-3 3, Anderson 3-6 0-0 6, Carter 1-8 0-0 3. Totals 49-106 16-21 129. Philadelphia 41 27 32 27 — 127 Atlanta 34 40 26 29 — 129 3-point goals: Philadelphia 10-23 (Scott 3-6, Embiid 2-3, Redick 2-6, Marjanovic 1-1, Ennis III 1-3, Harris 1-4), Atlanta 15-47 (Young 4-9, Prince 4-10, Dedmon 2-5, Collins 1-1, Adams 1-2, Huerter 1-3, Len 1-5, Carter 1-6, Anderson 0-2, Bazemore 0-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Philadelphia 52 (Embiid 12), Atlanta 49 (Collins 9). Assists: Philadelphia 21 (B.Simmons 9), Atlanta 28 (Young 11). Total fouls: Philadelphia 15, Atlanta 25. Technicals: Philadelphia coach 76ers (Defensive three second), Bembry, Atlanta coach Hawks (Defensive three second). A: 16,640 (18,118).

Boston: Tatum 5-17 0-0 12, Morris 6-13 0-0 15, Williams III 1-2 0-0 2, Irving 12-23 3-4 31, Smart 2-10 0-0 6, Ojeleye 1-3 2-2 5, Brown 10-13 4-7 29, Theis 2-3 1-2 5, Yabusele 0-1 0-0 0, Rozier 5-8 0-0 12. Totals 44-93 10-15 117. Charlotte: Bridges 8-13 1-2 20, Williams 4-9 4-4 13, Biyombo 2-3 0-2 4, Walker 11-25 8-8 36, Bacon 4-10 2-4 11, Kaminsky 2-4 2-2 7, Hernangomez 4-8 0-0 8, Graham 1-6 1-2 4, Lamb 3-11 0-0 8, Monk 3-6 4-4 13. Totals 42-95 22-28 124. Boston 35 29 34 19 — 117 Charlotte 29 34 26 35 — 124 3-point goals: Boston 19-43 (Brown 5-6, Irving 4-11, Morris 3-5, Rozier 2-5, Smart 2-7, Tatum 2-7, Ojeleye 1-2), Charlotte 18-38 (Walker 6-13, Monk 3-4, Bridges 3-6, Lamb 2-5, Bacon 1-1, Kaminsky 1-2, Graham 1-3, Williams 1-4). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Boston 42 (Morris 9), Charlotte 53 (Walker 11). Assists: Boston 31 (Smart 8), Charlotte 26 (Walker 9). Total fouls: Boston 23, Charlotte 15. A: 19,438 (19,077).

T’Wolves 112, Grizzlies 99

Mavericks 126, Warriors 91

Minnesota: Wiggins 9-15 3-3 22, Saric 3-9 2-2 11, Towns 12-20 5-5 33, Jones 4-8 3-3 12, Okogie 5-11 6-6 17, Bates-Diop 4-6 0-0 8, Tolliver 2-6 0-0 6, Dieng 1-6 1-2 3, Bayless 0-1 0-0 0, Reynolds 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 40-83 20-21 112. Memphis: Holiday 3-8 0-0 7, Caboclo 1-7 0-0 3, Valanciunas 7-15 5-7 20, Conley 7-17 7-8 23, Dorsey 3-13 1-1 8, Washburn 1-1 0-0 3, Parsons 4-8 0-0 9, Rabb 3-6 1-2 7, Noah 1-4 3-4 5, Carter 1-5 0-0 2, Wright 5-10 0-0 12, Watanabe 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-96 17-22 99. Minnesota 25 24 35 28 — 112 Memphis 25 25 18 31 — 99 3-point goals: Minnesota 12-26 (Towns 4-7, Saric 3-6, Tolliver 2-6, Jones 1-1, Okogie 1-3, Wiggins 1-3), Memphis 10-33 (Wright 2-4, Conley 2-6, Washburn 1-1, Valanciunas 1-1, Holiday 1-3, Caboclo 1-4, Parsons 1-4, Dorsey 1-6, Watanabe 0-1, Carter 0-3). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Minnesota 49 (Towns 23), Memphis 47 (Valanciunas 14). Assists: Minnesota 25 (Jones 9), Memphis 22 (Wright 6). Total fouls: Minnesota 20, Memphis 22. Technicals: Minnesota coach Timberwolves (Defensive three second), Memphis coach Grizzlies (Defensive three second). A: 16,977 (18,119).

Dallas: Jackson 4-8 0-0 9, Nowitzki 8-14 0-0 21, Powell 2-3 0-0 4, Doncic 6-14 7-11 23, Brunson 5-9 0-0 11, Antetokounmpo 0-1 1-2 1, Finney-Smith 2-3 1-1 5, Kleber 6-9 0-0 16, Burke 3-7 5-5 13, Macon 0-1 0-0 0, Harris 2-5 0-0 6, Broekhoff 6-8 3-3 17, C.Lee 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-83 17-22 126. Golden State: Durant 9-25 7-7 25, Green 2-4 1-2 6, Cousins 8-11 2-4 19, Cook 3-10 0-0 7, Thompson 4-13 0-0 8, McKinnie 1-2 3-4 5, Looney 5-6 2-2 12, Jerebko 1-3 0-0 3, Bell 1-5 0-2 2, Iguodala 0-3 0-0 0, Evans 0-3 0-0 0, D.Lee 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 36-90 15-21 91. Dallas 37 37 34 18 — 126 Golden State 22 24 24 21 — 91 3-point goals: Dallas 21-49 (Nowitzki 5-8, Kleber 4-6, Doncic 4-11, Burke 2-4, Broekhoff 2-4, Harris 2-5, Brunson 1-4, Jackson 1-5, Finney-Smith 0-1, Powell 0-1), Golden State 4-30 (Cousins 1-1, Green 1-2, Jerebko 1-3, Cook 1-5, McKinnie 0-1, D.Lee 0-1, Evans 0-2, Iguodala 0-3, Thompson 0-4, Durant 0-8). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Dallas 49 (Doncic 11), Golden State 36 (Cousins, Cook 6). Assists: Dallas 33 (Doncic 10), Golden State 22 (Cook 7). Total fouls: Dallas 22, Golden State 22. Technicals: Durant. A: 19,596 (19,596).

Trail Blazers 117, Pistons 112

Kings 112, Suns 103

Detroit: Brown 0-0 0-0 0, Griffin 10-18 4-4 27, Drummond 6-11 7-7 19, Jackson 9-16 2-2 24, Ellington 2-5 1-1 5, Maker 2-3 0-0 6, Pachulia 0-1 0-0 0, Galloway 3-10 0-0 9, Smith 4-9 0-0 9, Kennard 6-11 0-0 13. Totals 42-84 14-14 112. Portland: Harkless 4-7 1-1 10, Aminu 8-13 4-5 22, Nurkic 6-12 3-4 15, Lillard 9-16 4-5 28, Layman 0-1 2-4 2, Collins 4-6 0-1 9, Kanter 5-9 0-0 10, Curry 5-9 5-5 16, Hood 2-6 1-2 5, Turner 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-79 20-27 117. Detroit 28 28 36 20 — 112 Portland 32 27 30 28 — 117 3-point goals: Detroit 14-34 (Jackson 4-8, Galloway 3-8, Griffin 3-8, Maker 2-3, Smith 1-2, Kennard 1-2, Ellington 0-3), Portland 11-26 (Lillard 6-10, Aminu 2-5, Harkless 1-2, Curry 1-3, Collins 1-3, Layman 0-1, Hood 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Detroit 29 (Drummond 11), Portland 42 (Kanter, Aminu 7). Assists: Detroit 24 (Griffin 6), Portland 22 (Lillard 9). Total fouls: Detroit 21, Portland 14. Technicals: Detroit coach Pistons (Defensive three second), Portland coach Trail Blazers (Defensive three second). A: 19,815 (19,393).

Phoenix: Bridges 5-9 0-0 11, Bender 2-6 0-0 4, Ayton 9-16 1-4 19, Booker 10-27 10-10 32, Melton 1-2 0-0 3, Spalding 0-2 1-2 1, Holmes 3-9 8-8 14, Okobo 1-5 0-0 3, Fredette 0-1 0-0 0, Daniels 5-11 2-2 16. Totals 36-88 22-26 103. Sacramento: Barnes 10-17 0-0 25, Bjelica 5-10 1-2 13, Cauley-Stein 1-1 1-2 3, Fox 3-12 7-8 13, Hield 9-20 0-0 25, Brewer 2-3 2-3 7, Bagley III 5-13 6-7 16, Koufos 2-5 0-0 4, Ferrell 0-0 0-0 0, Bogdanovic 2-11 0-0 6. Totals 39-92 17-22 112. Phoenix 32 21 22 28 — 103 Sacramento 19 28 32 33 — 112 3-point goals: Phoenix 9-34 (Daniels 4-10, Booker 2-11, Melton 1-2, Bridges 1-3, Okobo 1-4, Fredette 0-1, Bender 0-3), Sacramento 17-38 (Hield 7-14, Barnes 5-8, Bjelica 2-5, Bogdanovic 2-7, Brewer 1-1, Bagley III 0-1, Fox 0-2). Fouled out: None. Rebounds: Phoenix 43 (Ayton 11), Sacramento 51 (Bjelica 17). Assists: Phoenix 25 (Booker 10), Sacramento 25 (Fox 9). Total fouls: Phoenix 21, Sacramento 19. Technicals: Sacramento coach Kings (Delay of game). A: 17,583 (17,608).

Hornets 124, Celtics 117

Senators 4, Oilers 3, OT Ottawa 2 0 1 1 — 4 Edmonton 1 1 1 0 — 3 First period: 1, Ottawa, Tkachuk 18 (Wolanin, DeMelo), 4:37 (pp). 2, Edmonton, Chiasson 21 (Nurse), 8:12. 3, Ottawa, Ryan 14 (Chabot, White), 15:28 (pp). Penalties: Lucic, EDM, (holding), 3:51; Nurse, EDM, (high sticking), 13:34; Harpur, OTT, (roughing), 19:06; Chiasson, EDM, (roughing), 19:06. Second period: 4, Edmonton, McDavid 38 (Draisaitl, Kassian), 2:54. Penalties: None. Third period: 5, Ottawa, Gibbons 6 (Lindberg, Paajarvi), 7:37. 6, Edmonton, Cave 3 (Gagner, Gambardella), 8:33. Penalties: Jaros, OTT, (high sticking), 13:00. Overtime: 7, Ottawa, Tkachuk 19 (Anderson, Balcers), 2:09. Penalties: None. Shots: Ottawa 12-13-8-2: 35. Edmonton 7-11-11: 29. Power-plays: Ottawa 2 of 2; Edmonton 0 of 1. Goalies: Ottawa, Anderson 15-25-4 (29 shots-26 saves). Edmonton, Koskinen 23-18-5 (35-31). A: 18,347.

Hurricanes 5, Wild 1 Minnesota 0 1 0 — 1 Carolina 0 2 3 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Foegele, CAR, (delay of game), 6:56; Bitetto, MIN, (interference), 10:03. Second period: 1, Carolina, J.Staal 9 (Teravainen, Faulk), 3:06. 2, Carolina, Pesce 7 (Williams, Aho), 5:32. 3, Minnesota, E.Staal 21 (Spurgeon, Fiala), 8:57 (pp). Penalties: Ferland, CAR, major (high sticking), 5:56; Martinook, CAR, (slashing), 12:59. Third period: 4, Carolina, Svechnikov 19 (Teravainen, J.Staal), 3:27. 5, Carolina, Wallmark 10 (Ferland, Martinook), 9:09. 6, Carolina, Teravainen 19, 11:12. Penalties: Suter, MIN, (tripping), 3:59; Pesce, CAR, (cross checking), 17:22; Kunin, MIN, (cross checking), 17:22; Martinook, CAR, (slashing), 20:00. Shots: Minnesota 7-11-7: 25. Carolina 11-13-9: 33. Power-plays: Minnesota 1 of 4; Carolina 0 of 2. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 29-26-6 (33 shots-28 saves). Carolina, Mrazek 20-13-3 (25-24). A: 16,751.

Jets 5, Predators 0 Nashville 0 0 0 — 0 Winnipeg 0 3 2 — 5 First period: None. Penalties: Subban, NSH, (tripping), 6:19. Second period: 1, Winnipeg, Connor 30 (Myers, Hayes), 4:42. 2, Winnipeg, Copp 11 (Perreault, Hendricks), 14:16. 3, Winnipeg, Hayes 18 (Connor, Trouba), 15:41. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Winnipeg, Connor 31 (Hayes), 15:22. 5, Winnipeg, Connor 32 (Laine, Hayes), 19:51. Penalties: Jarnkrok, NSH, (tripping), 10:03. Shots: Nashville 12-9-12: 33. Winnipeg 8-19-16: 43. Power-plays: Nashville 0 of 0; Winnipeg 0 of 2. Goalies: Nashville, Rinne 26-19-4 (43 shots-38 saves). Winnipeg, Hellebuyck 32-20-2 (33-33). A: 15,321.

Penguins 3, Stars 2 Pittsburgh 1 1 1 — Dallas 0 2 0 — First period: 1, Pittsburgh, Guentzel 38 (Letang, Kessel), 15:25 (pp). Penalties: Radulov, DAL, (slashing), 14:34. Second period: 2, Dallas, Seguin 29 (Hintz, Radulov), 1:03. 3, Pittsburgh, McCann 18 (Kessel), 14:41. 4, Dallas, Cogliano 5 (Nichushkin, Klingberg), 18:40. Penalties: Letang, PIT, (tripping), 6:43. Third period: 5, Pittsburgh, McCann 19 (Blueger, Gudbranson), 4:20 (sh). Penalties: J.Johnson, PIT, (holding), 3:34; Rust, PIT, (holding), 18:40. Shots: Pittsburgh 12-9-9: 30. Dallas 10-6-15: 31. Power-plays: Pittsburgh 1 of 1; Dallas 0 of 3. Goalies: Pittsburgh, Murray 26-12-5 (31 shots-29 saves). Dallas, Khudobin 13-16-4 (30-27). A: 18,532.

3 2

Canadiens 7, Sabres 4 Buffalo 1 2 1 — 4 Montreal 0 4 3 — 7 First period: 1, Buffalo, Reinhart 19 (Mittelstadt, Montour), 12:26. Penalties: Okposo, BUF, (slashing), 12:42; Lehkonen, MTL, (holding), 16:09. Second period: 2, Montreal, Lehkonen 9 (Shaw, Domi), 5:09. 3, Montreal, Gallagher 32 (Danault), 9:12. 4, Montreal, Shaw 18 (Kulak, Domi), 14:23. 5, Buffalo, Nylander 2 (Eichel, Dahlin), 14:53 (pp). 6, Buffalo, Scandella 5 (Larsson), 16:08. 7, Montreal, Byron 14 (Weal, Thompson), 18:03. Penalties: Folin, MTL, (delay of game), 14:43. Third period: 8, Montreal, Gallagher 33 (Tatar, Weber), 8:35. 9, Buffalo, Eichel 26, 13:13. 10, Montreal, Domi 26 (Tatar, Petry), 15:30 (pp). 11, Montreal, Tatar 23 (Danault, Gallagher), 17:47. Penalties: Shaw, MTL, (charging), 9:06; Shaw, MTL, (roughing), 9:06; Girgensons, BUF, (holding), 14:26. Shots: Buffalo 8-7-12: 27. Montreal 12-20-12: 44. Power-plays: Buffalo 1 of 4; Montreal 1 of 2. Goalies: Buffalo, Hutton 17-22-5 (43 shots-37 saves). Montreal, Price 32-22-5 (27-23). A: 21,302.

Islanders 4, Flyers 2 NY Islanders 1 1 2 — 4 Philadelphia 1 0 1 — 2 First period: 1, Philadelphia, Hagg 5 (Hartman, Gudas), 6:39. 2, NY Islanders, Nelson 23 (Toews, Mayfield), 14:27. Penalties: Gudas, PHI, (hooking), 0:26; Hagg, PHI, major (high sticking), 1:45; NY Islanders bench, served by Martin (too many men on the ice), 2:38. Second period: 3, NY Islanders, Leddy 4 (Boychuk, Barzal), 10:58. Penalties: None. Third period: 4, Philadelphia, Gostisbehere 8 (Giroux, Couturier), 6:16 (pp). 5, NY Islanders, Jo.Bailey 15 (Nelson, Ladd), 16:03. 6, NY Islanders, Jo.Bailey 16 (Pelech, Komarov), 17:26. Penalties: Hartman, PHI, (interference), 2:16; Voracek, PHI, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 2:16; Mayfield, NYI, (hooking), 6:12; Pelech, NYI, (tripping), 9:08. Shots: NY Islanders 14-15-11: 40. Philadelphia 10-5-9: 24. Power-plays: NY Islanders 0 of 5; Philadelphia 1 of 2. Goalies: NY Islanders, Lehner 21-12-5 (24 shots-22 saves). Philadelphia, Hart 15-11-1 (40-36). A: 19,668.

Bruins 7, Panthers 3 Boston 1 5 1 — 7 Florida 0 2 1 — 3 First period: 1, Boston, Acciari 5 (Clifton, Backes), 2:23. Penalties: Hoffman, FLA, (roughing), 3:53. Second period: 2, Boston, Marchand 32 (Bergeron), 0:28. 3, Florida, Hawryluk 5 (Hoffman), 0:52. 4, Boston, Chara 5 (Coyle, Heinen), 5:05. 5, Boston, Kuhlman 2, 6:38. 6, Florida, Hoffman 35 (Weegar), 10:04. 7, Boston, Kampfer 3 (Moore, Heinen), 15:48 (pp). 8, Boston, Pastrnak 33 (Chara, Halak), 16:36. Penalties: Hoffman, FLA, (slashing), 11:09; Hawryluk, FLA, (tripping), 14:06; Acciari, BOS, Major (fighting), 15:51; Weegar, FLA, Major (fighting), 15:51. Third period: 9, Florida, Trocheck 8 (Borgstrom, Ekblad), 3:57 (pp). 10, Boston, Bergeron 31 (Pastrnak, Marchand), 19:33. Penalties: Clifton, BOS, (interference), 2:06; Trocheck, FLA, (cross checking), 7:02; McAvoy, BOS, (roughing), 7:02; Matheson, FLA, Misconduct (misconduct), 19:33. Shots: Boston 16-13-10: 39. Florida 12-11-11: 34. Power-plays: Boston 1 of 3; Florida 1 of 1. Goalies: Boston, Halak 20-10-4 (34 shots-31 saves). Florida, Montembeault 4-3-1 (38-32). A: 17,129.

Flames 3, Canucks 1 Calgary 1 1 1 — 3 Vancouver 0 0 1 — 1 First period: 1, Calgary, Giordano 16 (Hathaway, Ryan), 9:44. Penalties: Edler, VAN, (tripping), 14:31. Second period: 2, Calgary, Hathaway 10 (Giordano), 17:08. Penalties: Hamonic, CGY, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 7:46; Motte, VAN, (unsportsmanlike conduct), 7:46; Backlund, CGY, (cross checking), 19:23; Granlund, VAN, (boarding), 19:23. Third period: 3, Vancouver, Boeser 25 (Pettersson, Edler), 0:38 (pp). 4, Calgary, Mangiapane 7 (Giordano), 7:25. Penalties: Gaudreau, CGY, (tripping), 0:29; Pettersson, VAN, (hooking), 9:19; Giordano, CGY, (interference), 9:39; Edler, VAN, (interference), 18:24; Markstrom, VAN, served by Boeser, (slashing), 19:47. Shots: Calgary 12-10-9: 31. Vancouver 6-9-13: 28. Power-plays: Calgary 0 of 4; Vancouver 1 of 2. Goalies: Calgary, Smith 21-14-2 (28 shots-27 saves). Vancouver, Markstrom 27-21-9 (31-28). A: 18,685.

Red Wings 3, Knights 2, OT Detroit 1 0 1 1 — 3 Vegas 0 1 1 0 — 2 First period: 1, Detroit, Glendening 10 (Hirose, Athanasiou), 3:06. Penalties: None. Second period: 2, Vegas, Eakin 20 (Schmidt, Reaves), 14:43. Penalties: Bowey, DET, (interference), 12:33; Holden, VGK, (holding), 15:43; Larkin, DET, (roughing), 16:09. Third period: 3, Vegas, Smith 18, 10:12 (sh). 4, Detroit, Mantha 18 (Kronwall, Athanasiou), 11:17 (pp). Penalties: Larkin, DET, (tripping), 6:45; Carpenter, VGK, (hooking), 9:40. Overtime: 5, Detroit, Mantha 19 (Larkin), 0:19. Penalties: None. Shots: Detroit 9-10-10-1: 30. Vegas 10-8-12: 30. Power-plays: Detroit 1 of 2; Vegas 0 of 3. Goalies: Detroit, Howard 20-20-5 (30 shots-28 saves). Vegas, Subban 7-7-1 (30-27). A: 18,437. Referees: Frederick L’Ecuyer, Kelly Sutherland. Linesmen: Lonnie Cameron, Tony Sericolo.

NHL LEADERS THROUGH FRIDAY’S GAMES Goal Scoring Name Team Alex Ovechkin, WAS Leon Draisaitl, EDM Patrick Kane, CHI John Tavares, TOR Brayden Point, TAM Cam Atkinson, CBJ Alex DeBrincat, CHI Steven Stamkos, TAM Jake Guentzel, PIT Nikita Kucherov, TAM Nathan MacKinnon, COL Connor McDavid, EDM Joe Pavelski, SAN Jeff Skinner, BUF Johnny Gaudreau, CGY Auston Matthews, TOR Mark Scheifele, WPG Aleksander Barkov, FLA Mike Hoffman, FLA Matthew Tkachuk, CGY Assists Name Team Nikita Kucherov, TAM Connor McDavid, EDM Blake Wheeler, WPG Brent Burns, SAN Mitchell Marner, TOR Sidney Crosby, PIT Patrick Kane, CHI Claude Giroux, PHI Jonathan Huberdeau, FLA Brad Marchand, BOS

GP 74 74 72 74 73 72 73 75 75 75 74 70 72 73 74 60 74 74 74 74 GP 75 70 74 75 74 72 72 74 74 73

G 48 43 41 41 39 38 38 38 37 37 37 37 37 37 35 35 35 34 34 34 A 83 70 68 64 61 60 60 59 59 59


HOCKEY

D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

M 1 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

BLUES NOTEBOOK

NHL XXXSTANDINGS REGION EASTERN CONFERENCE

XXX REGION

headline

headline Blues face tough opponents

subhed

It starts with a visit from Tampa Bay, owner of NHL’s best record

Atlantic z-Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Montreal Florida Buffalo Detroit Ottawa Metropolitan Washington NY Islanders Pittsburgh Carolina Columbus Philadelphia NY Rangers New Jersey

GP 75 74 74 74 74 73 74 74 GP 75 74 75 73 74 74 73 75

W 58 45 44 39 33 31 26 25 W 43 42 40 40 40 36 28 27

L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 13 4 120 298 198 31-6-2 27-7-2 19-4-0 20 9 99 226 186 28-7-3 17-13-6 15-6-2 25 5 93 263 221 22-14-1 22-11-4 13-8-3 28 7 85 219 213 21-12-4 18-16-3 11-8-5 29 12 78 240 248 19-12-6 14-17-6 12-8-3 33 9 71 202 237 20-13-4 11-20-5 9-10-4 38 10 62 200 254 14-18-5 12-20-5 7-14-4 43 6 56 218 275 16-16-4 9-27-2 8-13-2 L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 24 8 94 257 233 21-10-6 22-14-2 16-6-2 25 7 91 206 182 22-12-4 20-13-3 16-8-1 24 11 91 253 224 21-13-3 19-11-8 13-8-4 26 7 87 218 204 20-12-4 20-14-3 10-10-2 30 4 84 223 218 20-16-2 20-14-2 16-9-1 30 8 80 226 245 18-15-4 18-15-4 10-11-2 32 13 69 204 244 17-12-8 11-20-5 8-10-5 39 9 63 206 258 17-14-6 10-25-3 8-15-3

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Winnipeg Nashville Blues Dallas Minnesota Colorado Chicago Pacific x-Calgary x-San Jose Vegas Arizona Vancouver Edmonton Anaheim Los Angeles

GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 74 44 26 4 92 249 218 24-9-4 20-17-0 11-10-0 75 42 27 6 90 223 197 23-13-2 19-14-4 12-10-1 74 39 27 8 86 219 202 19-15-2 20-12-6 11-9-4 74 38 30 6 82 186 183 22-13-3 16-17-3 12-9-2 75 35 31 9 79 202 218 15-16-7 20-15-2 11-8-4 74 33 29 12 78 235 225 16-14-6 17-15-6 10-9-3 73 32 31 10 74 244 266 16-14-7 16-17-3 11-6-3 GP W L OT Pts GF GA Home Away Div 74 46 21 7 99 265 209 25-7-5 21-14-2 12-8-2 75 43 23 9 95 266 237 23-8-5 20-15-4 15-6-4 74 42 27 5 89 232 203 23-10-4 19-17-1 17-6-2 74 36 32 6 78 198 208 18-15-4 18-17-2 15-9-3 74 32 32 10 74 206 229 17-13-5 15-19-5 9-12-4 74 33 34 7 73 210 245 17-17-2 16-17-5 10-12-2 76 31 36 9 71 177 233 17-14-8 14-22-1 8-12-3 73 26 39 8 60 174 232 14-20-3 12-19-5 10-9-2

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for OT loss. x-clinched playoffs. z-clinched conference

Friday Minnesota 2, Washington 1 Anaheim 4, San Jose 3, OT Thursday Tampa Bay 6, Carolina 3 Boston 5, New Jersey 1 Florida 4, Arizona 2 Montreal 4, NY Islanders 0 Blues 5, Detroit 2 Pittsburgh 2, Nashville 1, SO Colorado 3, Dallas 1 Philadelphia 3, Chicago 1 Edmonton 4, Columbus 1 Calgary 5, Ottawa 1 Vegas 5, Winnipeg 0 Los Angeles 4, San Jose 2

Saturday Arizona at New Jersey, noon NY Islanders at Philadelphia, noon Chicago at Colorado, 2 p.m. Ottawa at Edmonton, 3 p.m. NY Rangers at Toronto, 6 p.m. Boston at Florida, 6 p.m. Minnesota at Carolina, 6 p.m. Nashville at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Montreal, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh at Dallas, 7 p.m. Tampa Bay at Blues, 7 p.m. Calgary at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Detroit at Vegas, 9 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

Sunday Philadelphia at Washington, 11:30 a.m. Arizona at NY Islanders, 2 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 6 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 7 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Monday Pittsburgh at NY Rangers, 6 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Florida at Toronto, 6 p.m. Boston at Tampa Bay, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Nashville at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Vegas at Blues, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Calgary, 8 p.m. Detroit at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.

Wild defeat Caps, move into wild-card position xx

BY TOM TIMMERMANN St. Louis Post-Dispatch

The flip side of the Blues’ struggles against teams at the bottom of the NHL standings is how well they have played against teams at the top. Look no further than the last trip, when they beat Pittsburgh while losing to Ottawa. While the Blues have shown a knack for making things hard on themselves, their next two games will be their toughest of the regular season’s closing stretch, at least in terms of the level of play of the opponents. On Saturday at Enterprise Center, the Blues face Tampa Bay, whose 120 points are 21 more than anyone else in the league and which has already clinched the Presidents’ Trophy for having the league’s best record. And then on Monday, the Blues host Vegas, which is the hottest team in the league right now, winning 10 of its past 11 going into a game Saturday vs. Detroit. “That’s been our season in a nutshell,” forward Robert Thomas said. “All the top-end teams we’ve been playing really well. We haven’t been playing well against the other teams. I think it will be a great test for us. These are really important points for us.” Tampa Bay scored four goals in the third period Thursday to beat Carolina 6-3. That win allowed them to join the 1983-84 Edmonton Oilers as the only NHL teams to have four separate win streaks of seven or more games in a season. The Lightning need five wins in their final seven games to set the NHL record for wins in a season. If they win their final five road games, they will set an NHL record for road wins in a season. “That team’s focused, for sure,” coach Craig Berube said. “Their coach does a good job of

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tampa Bay’s Ryan McDonagh and the Blues’ Brayden Schenn race for the puck during a game Feb. 7.

Jaden Schwartz and Ivan Barbashev. That matches the most the Blues have had in one season since the 1984-85 team had eight players with hat tricks. The Blues also had five players record hat tricks in 2014-15: Tarasenko, Schwartz, David Backes, T.J. Oshie and Jori Lehtera. In addition to having a hat trick Thursday, Barbashev was credited with six hits in the game. That’s the second most hits in a game this season for a player scoring three or more goals. Brian Boyle of New Jersey had eight hits in his hat trick vs. Pittsburgh on Nov. 5. Nobody else who has scored three or more goals in a game this season has had more than three hits. Curiously, of the five Blues to have hat tricks this season, it was the first for O’Reilly and Barbashev and the fourth for Perron, Tarasenko and Schwartz. WILD_ART

doing that and keeping them focused. They’ve got good veterans on that team that have been around. They’ve won a lot of games. They know they have to stay playing and stay focused, so it’s going to be a tough game.” The Blues know they can beat them. They won the meeting in BLUENOTES Florida on Feb. 7, a 1-0 win in Zach Sanford was a career-high overtime on a goal by Brayden plus-3 against Detroit. … Joel EdSchenn that was the fourth win mundson didn’t take part in the ASSOCIATED PRESS in their 11-game streak. Blues’ optional skate Friday, and “I thought we were extremely Berube said the defenseman felt competitive in that game,” Ber- some discomfort after skating ube said. “We knew it was go- Thursday morning and decided to ing to be a hard game. We were take a day off. Berube still expects heavy in our puck battles, we did him back before the season is over. all the little things right, and you Carl Gunnarsson is making proghave to get good goaltending, too. ress, though. “It’s getting close They’re going to get chances. I for him for sure,” Berube said. thought we did a real good job. I “He had a real good day today, so thought our puck checking and we’ll see. If he has another real our penalty kill did a good job. I’m good day tomorrow, that’s real sure it gave us quite a bit of confi- good progress for him and good dence. You go up against the best news for us.” … The Blues signed team in the league and you beat goalie Joel Hofer, their fourththem in their building in a game round pick in the 2018 draft, to an like that, that’s a good game.” entry-level contract. He split the season between two teams in the HAT TRICK MANIA Western Hockey League this seaThe Blues have had five play- son, going 6-21-1 with a .904 save ASSOCIATED PRESS ers record hat tricks this season: percentage for Swift Current and in order, David Perron, Ryan then 9-8 with a .911 save percentO’Reilly, Vladimir Tarasenko, age for Portland.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Steen lends experience to fourth line BLUES • FROM B1 D1

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Minnesota’s Jordan Greenway celebrates his goal Friday night against Washington. At left is Wild defenseman Brad Hunt.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Luke Kunin scored the goahead goal with 7:35 left, Devan XXX REGION Dubnyk made 21 saves and the visiting Minnesota Wild moved into playoff position by beating the Washington Capitals 2-1 on Friday night. Jordan Greenway also scored for Minnesota, which snapped ASSOCIATED PRESS a two-game skid and leapfrogged the Arizona Coyotes and Colorado Avalanche to move into the second wild-card spot in a competitive Western Conference race. Ryan Donato assisted on the goals by Kunin and Greenway and was the Wild’s best forward in a game dominated by that second line. Dubnyk did not have to make too many high-danger saves but was dependable in Minnesota’s net. Brett Connolly scored his 21st goal of the season and Braden Holtby made 25 saves for Washington, which has lost four of six.

headline

Ducks 4, Sharks 3 • Jakob Sil-

NHL SUMMARIES

fverberg scored the winning goal 38 seconds into overtime to give Anaheim the victory over visiting San Jose. Silfverberg, who had a goal and two assists, had his fifth multi-point game of the season and second against the Sharks. The goal, which beat San Jose’s Aaron Dell on his stick side, was his 23rd of the season.

NOTEBOOK Capitals lose defenseman • Washington coach Todd Reirden said Friday that defenseman Michal Kempny is out indefinitely with a lower-body injury. Kempny appeared to injure his left leg in an overtime loss to Tampa Bay on Wednesday. Holtby won’t visit White House • Washington goaltender Braden Holtby says he will not join his teammates Monday for a White House celebration of their Stanley Cup championship. Holtby is the second player on the Capitals’ active roster to decline. xx xx

Wild 2, Capitals 1

Ducks 4, Sharks 3, OT

Minnesota 1 0 1 — 2 Washington 0 1 0 — 1 First period: 1, Minnesota, Greenway 12 (Dubnyk, Donato), 16:33. Penalties: Fiala, MIN, (high sticking), 4:52; Foligno, MIN, (tripping), 18:46. Second period: 2, Washington, Connolly 21 (Jensen, Oshie), 10:42. Penalties: Hunt, MIN, (slashing), 4:18; Orpik, WSH, (roughing), 8:00; Zucker, MIN, (roughing), 8:00; Wilson, WSH, (hooking), 19:51. Third period: 3, Minnesota, Kunin 6 (Parise, Donato), 12:25. Penalties: None. Shots: Minnesota 6-15-6: 27. Washington 6-9-7: 22. Power-plays: Minnesota 0 of 1; Washington 0 of 3. Goalies: Minnesota, Dubnyk 29-25-6 (22 shots-21 saves). Washington, Holtby 27-19-5 (27-25). A: 18,506. Referees: Tom Chmielewski, Jon Mclsaac. Linesmen: Derek Amell, Brian Murphy.

San Jose 0 1 2 0 — 3 Anaheim 1 0 2 1 — 4 First period: 1, Anaheim, Rakell 12 (Silfverberg, Getzlaf), 7:58. Penalties: Manson, ANA, (interference), 9:40; Ritchie, ANA, (hooking), 15:46; Burns, SJ, (tripping), 19:39. Second period: 2, San Jose, Labanc 14 (Vlasic, Sorensen), 2:29. Penalties: Holzer, ANA, (slashing), 12:34. Third period: 3, Anaheim, Henrique 18 (Terry, Silfverberg), 2:41 (pp). 4, San Jose, Meier 28 (Thornton, Burns), 6:29 (pp). 5, Anaheim, Rakell 13 (Terry, Fowler), 15:05 (pp). 6, San Jose, Braun 2 (Vlasic, Nyquist), 17:20. Penalties: Ryan, SJ, (holding), 1:05; Shore, ANA, (slashing), 4:36; Lindholm, ANA, (interference), 8:19; Karlsson, SJ, (holding), 14:14. Overtime: 7, Anaheim, Silfverberg 23 (Rakell, Fowler), 0:38. Penalties: None. Shots: San Jose 9-11-6: 26. Anaheim 8-4-8-1: 21. Power-plays: San Jose 1 of 5; Anaheim 2 of 3. Goalies: San Jose, Dell 9-7-4 (21 shots-17 saves). Anaheim, Gibson 23-22-8 (26-23). A: 17,174. Referees: Brad Meier, Graham Skilliter. Linesmen: Pierre Racicot, Tony Sericolo.

pink hockey gloves in his dressing room stall earlier this week — and missed a game with the flu. He has gone long stretches without a goal, scoring just one since the beginning of December, but coach Craig Berube uses him on the power play and the penalty kill, and he wears the A as an alternate captain. As recently as early January he was on the team’s top line with Ryan O’Reilly and Perron. Now, he’s on the fourth line, playing alongside Ivan Barbashev and Zach Sanford, two guys who weren’t even teenagers yet when Steen broke into the league in 2005. And judging by Steen’s smile after Thursday’s win over Detroit, in which that line accounted for three of the five goals, he’s enjoying it. “It’s always worthwhile,” Steen said. “The team is playing well, there’s good mojo, our goaltending has been awesome, so just keep it rolling.” It’s a different role, and one Berube thinks Steen has accepted. “It’s not easy but he understands the situation,” he said. “And he’s the type of player that is gonna be up and down the lineup and used in a lot of different roles. … I try to talk to players as much as possible beforehand and tell them the situation and what we need.” The reality is, it’s tough to find any other place for Steen right now. The Blues’ top three lines are well-stocked, so wellstocked that in the past two games, the Blues have scored 12 goals and the top line of O’Reilly, Tarasenko and Brayden Schenn has provided just one assist (by Schenn, on a power play) in that time. The Blues have not only been getting secondary scoring, but tertiary and quaternary scoring as well. After the Detroit game, Barbashev, who had a hat trick, was asked if it was an honor to play with Steen. He took the question very seriously. “Oh yeah, for sure,” he said. “He’s a veteran. It’s actually great to play with him. He’s been in the league for a long time. He just makes it it easy to play with him. He helps me and Sanny; it’s just awesome. He got his 600th point tonight in the league and it’s a pretty cool moment.” “It’s great,” said Sanford. “To hear different things from him on and off the ice, how he sees the game and how he thinks it,

J.B. FORBES • jforbes@post-dispatch.com

Darnell Nurse of Edmonton and the Blues’ Alexander Steen collide near center ice during a game Tuesday night.

BLUES VS. LIGHTNING When, where • 7 p.m. Saturday, Enterprise Center TV, radio • FSM, KMOX (1120 AM) About the Lightning • Tampa Bay is 19-2-1 since Feb. 7, garnering 39 of a possible 44 points. One of those lost points came against the visiting Blues in a 1-0 overtime loss. Tampa Bay (58-13-4) leads the league in scoring (3.89 goals a game), power play (29.5 percent) and penalty killing (85.8 percent). Their power play is even more lethal on the road, converting 35.3 percent of their opportunities. Brayden Point (20) and Steven Stamkos (19) rank first and second in the NHL in power-play goals. Their combined total of 39 powerplay goals was more than the team totals of 11 NHL squads entering the weekend. Yanni Gourde, a 20-goal scorer, will serve game one of a two-game suspension for an illegal check to the head. Jim Thomas

it’s pretty cool for a young guy to be able to take that in. … He’s a pretty vocal linemate, he’s always saying what he thinks and what he sees and asking what we see, too. It’s pretty easy and fun to play with a guy like that.” Steen returned the praise. “It’s been an honor to play with ASSOCIATED (those two),” PRESShe said. “They’ve been lights out hard workers. … I think our conversation on our line has been good. I think right off the hop when they put us together we chatted about how we wanted to play and how we wanted to be effective for our group.” Being on the fourth line may be the best thing for Steen down the stretch. It will keep his minutes down, which will keep the 35-year-old fresher and more effective. He played 12:12 against Detroit, three minutes less than he played two games before when he was on the third line with Jaden Schwartz and Oskar Sundqvist and seven minutes less than he was playing in some games early in the season.

It’s also a fourth line that isn’t like classic fourth lines. While all three players can be physical, it’s more than just a pound-’em, energy group. “I think that line can do a lot of things,” Berube said. “It showed last night with the goals. They’re all working hard together, they’ve had some chemistry so far, which is good. There is skill out there in the fourth line, for sure. All three guys have skill.” And by putting Steen on the fourth line, Berube feels the group has stability and an identity. “He’s a 200-foot player,” Berube said. “I just wanted a little more identity with that line and what they should be. So far, we’re seeing it. Two games, and they’re producing, too, and they’re doing a good job, just forechecking, being physical, just hounding pucks and being hard to play against.” “It’s not your typical grind away and hammer fourth line,” said Sanford, “and we’re just trying to play our game and play the right way.” “I think (it’s a fourth line),” Steen said. “I don’t know if I label it. That’s our line.” It is their line, and it’s likely to stay together as the Blues come down the stretch as long as everyone stays healthy. Pat Maroon has found a place on the line with Tyler Bozak and Robert Thomas, scoring goals in four straight games. The top six seems anchored in place. Steen was having a productive offensive season, with five goals in the first 14 games, before the injuries started to take their toll on him this season, but beyond scoring Berube likes what Steen brings to the team. Having young guys learn from Steen is no small part of it. “He’s a veteran guy that’s had a great career, been around a long time, real good leader,” Berube said. “Why wouldn’t you look up to him?” Tom Timmermann • 314-340-8190 @tomtimm on Twitter ttimmermann@post-dispatch.com


D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NCAA TOURNAMENT

M 2 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

MIDWEST REGIONAL

EAST REGIONAL

Kentucky stymies Wofford

Michigan St. soars past Minnesota

Terriers’ Magee, NCAA’s career 3-point leader, goes 0 for 12

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan State’s Nick Ward shoots over Minnesota’s Jordan Murphy on Saturday.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kentucky’s Reid Travis shoots as Wofford’s Keve Aluma tries to block the ball on Saturday afternoon in Jacksonville, Fla.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

JACKSONVILLE, FLA. • Everywhere

Fletcher Magee turned, there was a hand in his face, a body in his way, a relentless wave of blue that was intent on making sure he never found any alone time. Kentucky completely shut down the most prolific 3-point scorer in Division I history, and thanks to that stifling defensive effort, the Wildcats are moving on in the NCAA Tournament. Magee missed all 12 of his attempts from long range in his final college game Saturday, and Kentucky held off Wofford 62-56 in the second round of the Midwest Regional. “We wanted to make him put the ball on the floor and make a basketball play,” said freshman guard Ashton Hagans, one of the players tasked with shutting down the Wofford gunner. Mission accomplished. Reid Travis scored 14 points, grabbed 11 rebounds and made two huge free throws with 17.8 seconds left to help seal the victory for second-seeded Kentucky (29-6). But coach John Calipari knew the key to this game was at the defensive end. “If they hit a normal amount of 3s, they probably beat us,” the coach said, savoring his eighth trip to the Sweet 16 in a decade as

the Wildcats’ coach. Kentucky next plays on Friday, in Kansas City against the winner of Sunday’s Houston-Ohio State game that will be played in Tulsa, Okla. Wofford (30-5) certainly had its chances, limiting the Wildcats to 40 percent shooting (21 of 52) and holding its own on the boards. But Magee simply couldn’t make a shot, which was even more stunning because he had hit seven less than 48 hours earlier in a victory over Seton Hall — on the night he eclipsed the Division I record for career 3-pointers. After his 12th and final attempt ricocheted wildly off the rim, skipping out of bounds in front of a stunned Terriers section, Magee rubbed his head in seeming disbelief. A dirty dozen, indeed. “I’m still kind of in shock,” Magee said. He insisted that his looks weren’t that much harder than what he normally gets in the Southern Conference. But something was a little off, and Kentucky’s defensive pressure appeared to wear him down by the final horn. It was only the second time all season that Magee failed to make at least one shot from long range, following an 0-for-nine performance at Kansas in early December. “It just doesn’t seem right to end on a

game going 0 for 12 from 3,” Magee said. “If I go 3 for 12, we win the game. I’m not sure how that happens. I’m sure I won’t get over it for a while.” The rest of the Wofford players went eight of 15 from 3-point range. Nathan Hoover made four to finish with 19 points and Cameron Jackson chipped in with 11 points. Magee finished with 8 points on 4-of-17 shooting overall. Kentucky’s length, athleticism and effort certainly had something to do with Magee’s dismal showing. Tyler Herro had a tough shooting game himself, but he did a yeoman’s job on the Wofford gunner. Hagans and Jemari Baker Jr. also stepped up at times to keep an eye on Magee. “It was the effort and energy, and my hope is they got a little worn down because these guys did not stop,” Calipari said, looking over at his players. “They just chased, and they knew they couldn’t let up in this game or they were going to score baskets.” The Wildcats managed to win twice in Jacksonville without their leading scorer and rebounder, sophomore PJ Washington, who watched the games from the bench wearing a hard cast on his sprained left foot. He hopes to be back for their next game.

SOUTH REGIONAL

Purdue ousts defending champ ’Nova ASSOCIATED PRESS

It was the most lopsided NCAA Tournament loss for a defending champion in nearly three decades. Carsen Edwards had a career night, scoring 42 points as Purdue knocked reigning national champion Villanova out of the NCAA Tournament Saturday night in an 87-61 rout in Hartford, Conn. The last time a defending champ was beaten that badly was when Loyola-Marymount ran past Michigan 149-115 in 1990. Matt Haarms added 18 points and nine rebounds for the Boilermakers (25-9), seeded third in the East Regional who advanced to their third straight Sweet 16. They’ll play on Thursday in Louisville, Ky. against the winner of Sunday’s Tennessee-Iowa game. Eric Paschall had 19 for Villanova (2610), which saw its quest for a third national title in the last four seasons end during the tournament’s first weekend. Fellow senior Phil Booth scored 15 points, putting him over 1,500 for his career. Edwards has battled a sore back and had been in a recent shooting slump, making just 7 of 23 shots from the field in Purdue’s first-round win over Old Dominion. He found the bottom of the net early and often against ’Nova, making 12 of his 21 shots, including nine of 16 from behind the arc. Purdue shot 54 percent while holding Villanova to just 20 baskets on 58 shots (34 percent). Purdue jumped out early, building a 13-point lead thanks to Edwards’ outside shooting and Haarms’ work down low. The 7-foot-3 Dutchman towered over the shorter Wildcats, who didn’t start anyone over 6-8. He had Purdue’s first four points, on a dunk and a put-back. Edwards hit five of his nine first-half shots, all of which came

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Purdue’s Matt Haarms (center) and Nojel Eastern (right) celebrate after Haarms hit a basket in the Boilermakers’ blowout of Villanova on Saturday night

from 3-point range. Purdue had nine 3-point baskets in the first half and a dunk by Haarms put the Boilermakers up 43-24 at intermission. Some other recent tournament blowouts suffered by defending champs: 1998 • Utah beat Arizona 76-51. 2001 • Arizona beat Michigan State 80-61. 2011 • Arizona beat Duke 93-77. 2018 • Texas A&M beat North Carolina 86-65. Tennessee-Iowa matchup looms • A trip to the Sweet 16 is up for grabs in game in Columbus, Ohio, that is set to begin at 11:10 a.m. (St. Louis time) Sunday. In the first round of the tournament, No. 2 seed Tennessee beat Colgate 77-70

and No. 10 Iowa ousted Cincinnati 79-72. Tennessee’s Grant Williams has averaged 18.7 points and 7.5 rebounds while Admiral Schofield has put up 16.3 points and 6.1 rebounds. Williams has made 56.6 percent of his shots this season. For the Hawkeyes, Tyler Cook has averaged 14.6 points and 7.8 rebounds while Luka Garza has put up 13.1 points and 4.5 rebounds. There are some interesting trends for the teams. Iowa is 0-6 when scoring fewer than 68 points and 23-5 when scoring at least 68. Tennessee is 27-0 when it holds an opponent to 81 points or fewer. The Volunteers are 3-5 when opponents score more than 81 points.

Michigan State is back in the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2015 after rolling past Minnesota 70-50 in the second round of the NCAA Tournament on Saturday night in Des Moines, Iowa. The Spartans (30-6) came out making shots at a blistering pace and were never seriously threatened, a stark contrast to their nerve-wracking first-round win over Bradley on Thursday. The win in the battle of Big Ten teams sends the second-seeded Spartans to an East Regional semifinal Friday against Louisiana State in Washington, D.C. The Spartans made nine of their first 10 shots on their way to building a 20-point lead in the first 14 minutes. Minnesota managed to pull within single digits briefly in the second half before Big Ten player of the year Cassius Winston took matters into his hands. Xavier Tillman had 14 points, Winston added 13 with nine assists, and the Spartans shot 57.1 percent. Amir Coffey had 25 points to lead the 10th-seeded Gophers, who shot a season-worst 30.5 percent and made only 2 of 22 3-pointers. Minnesota (23-14) had played its best game of the season in beating Louisville in the first round, but it struggled shooting early and was hamstrung by the absence of forward Jordan Murphy. The Gophers’ No. 1 career rebounder and No. 2 scorer spent most of the first half behind the bench stretching his tight back. He was limited to four minutes, his fewest since his freshman year. The Gophers’ problems went beyond Murphy’s absence. Gabe Kalscheur, who had 24 points against Louisville, had foul trouble and didn’t score until making two free throws with 15 minutes left in the game. Still, Minnesota tried to make it interesting, running off eight straight points to pull to 40-31. Then Winston took over for a spell. He got a rebound and made a shot from the wing at the other end, made a steal and another jumper, and swiped the ball again and buried a 3-pointer to make it 4731. The lead swelled to as many as 22 points from there. LSU 69, Maryland 67 •It probably is the same play suspended Louisiana State coach Will Wade would have called. After all, it worked several times during the regular season. And now it has sent the Tigers to the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2006. Tremont Waters drove by three defenders and scooped in a banking layup with 1.6 seconds remaining to give thirdseeded LSU a victory in a second-round game, in Jacksonville, Fla. “Great players make great plays, and he made a great play,” interim coach Tony Benford said. After Maryland’s Eric Ayala failed to get off a shot from midcourt before the final buzzer, LSU players mobbed Waters under the basket. They could have done the same to Skylar Mays, who scored 16 points and hit a huge 3-pointer with 40 seconds left that put the Tigers (28-6) up 67-64. Jalen Smith answered on the other end fo the sixth-seeed Terrapins, sending the packed crowd into a frenzy and prompting LSU to call timeout. His 15 points led the team. Benford dialed up the final play for Waters, a dynamic sophomore who has been terrific all season. “The players knew exactly what was coming,” Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said. “We all knew what was coming. It was whether we were going to be able to stop it or not.” Waters drove into the lane and somehow got off the winner. “Just the feeling, it feels amazing,” Waters said. Wade could only celebrate from afar. The coach was banished indefinitely after details or alleged recruiting violations emerged. The Tigers advanced anyway. The Terrapins (23-11) rallied from a 15-point deficit in the second half to make it a nail-biter down the stretch. Turgeon switched to a zone defense, which slowed Waters, and the team had a three-point lead with 5 minutes to go. “I never thought we were going to lose until the kid made the lay-up, to be honest with you,” Turgeon said.


D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NCAA TOURNAMENT

M 3 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

MIDWEST REGIONAL

EAST REGIONAL

Auburn rolls over Kansas

Michigan St. soars past Minnesota

Kentucky stymies Wofford; Magee 0 for 12 on 3-point tries

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan State’s Nick Ward shoots over Minnesota’s Jordan Murphy on Saturday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Auburn’s Horace Spencer (right) soars to defend against Kansas’ Devon Dotson in the first half Saturday night in his team’s lopsided victory.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Auburn opened with a barrage of 3-pointers, then started going inside. The Tigers were relentless in building a 51-25 halftime lead en route to a 89-75 victory over Kansas in a second-round game in the Midwest Regional, in Salt Lake City. Auburn led by 17 in the opening eight minutes and made 20 of 36 shots. Bryce Brown finished with 25 points to pace the Tigers (28-9). Dedric Lawson had 25 for the Jayhawks, who finished at 23-9. Auburn earned its first Sweet 16 berth since 2003 and on Friday will play in Kansas City against the winner of Sunday’s North Carolina-Washington contest. Kentucky 62, Wofford 56 • Everywhere Fletcher Magee turned, there was a hand in his face, a body in his way, a relentless wave of blue that was intent on making sure he never found any alone time. Kentucky completely shut down the most prolific 3-point scorer in Division I history, and thanks to that stifling defensive effort, the Wildcats are moving on in the NCAA Tournament. Magee missed all 12 of his attempts from long range in his final college game Saturday, and Kentucky held off Wofford 62-56 in the second round of the

Midwest Regional, in Jacksonville, Fla. “We wanted to make him put the ball on the floor and make a basketball play,” said freshman guard Ashton Hagans, one of the players tasked with shutting down the Wofford gunner. Mission accomplished. Reid Travis scored 14 points, grabbed 11 rebounds and made two huge free throws with 17.8 seconds left to help seal the victory for second-seeded Kentucky (29-6). But coach John Calipari knew the key to this game was at the defensive end. “If they hit a normal amount of 3s, they probably beat us,” the coach said, savoring his eighth trip to the Sweet 16 in a decade as the Wildcats’ coach. Kentucky next plays on Friday, in Kansas City against the winner of Sunday’s Houston-Ohio State game that will be played in Tulsa, Okla. Wofford (30-5) certainly had its chances, limiting the Wildcats to 40 percent shooting (21 of 52) and holding its own on the boards. But Magee simply couldn’t make a shot, which was even more stunning because he had hit seven less than 48 hours earlier in a victory over Seton Hall — on the night he eclipsed the Division I record for career 3-pointers. After his 12th and final attempt ricocheted wildly off the rim, skipping out of

bounds in front of a stunned Terriers section, Magee rubbed his head in seeming disbelief. A dirty dozen, indeed. “I’m still kind of in shock,” Magee said. He insisted that his looks weren’t that much harder than what he normally gets in the Southern Conference. But something was a little off, and Kentucky’s defensive pressure appeared to wear him down by the final horn. It was only the second time all season that Magee failed to make at least one shot from long range, following an 0-for-nine performance at Kansas in early December. “It just doesn’t seem right to end on a game going 0 for 12 from 3,” Magee said. “If I go 3 for 12, we win the game. I’m not sure how that happens. I’m sure I won’t get over it for a while.” The rest of the Wofford players went eight of 15 from 3-point range. Nathan Hoover made four to finish with 19 points and Cameron Jackson chipped in with 11 points. Magee finished with 8 points on 4-of-17 shooting overall. Kentucky’s length, athleticism and effort certainly had something to do with Magee’s dismal showing. Tyler Herro had a tough shooting game himself, but he did a yeoman’s job on the Wofford gunner.

SOUTH REGIONAL

Purdue ousts defending champ ’Nova ASSOCIATED PRESS

It was the most lopsided NCAA Tournament loss for a defending champion in nearly three decades. Carsen Edwards had a career night, scoring 42 points as Purdue knocked reigning national champion Villanova out of the NCAA Tournament Saturday night in an 87-61 rout in Hartford, Conn. The last time a defending champ was beaten that badly was when Loyola-Marymount ran past Michigan 149-115 in 1990. Matt Haarms added 18 points and nine rebounds for the Boilermakers (25-9), seeded third in the East Regional who advanced to their third straight Sweet 16. They’ll play on Thursday in Louisville, Ky. against the winner of Sunday’s Tennessee-Iowa game. Eric Paschall had 19 for Villanova (2610), which saw its quest for a third national title in the last four seasons end during the tournament’s first weekend. Fellow senior Phil Booth scored 15 points, putting him over 1,500 for his career. Edwards has battled a sore back and had been in a recent shooting slump, making just 7 of 23 shots from the field in Purdue’s first-round win over Old Dominion. He found the bottom of the net early and often against ’Nova, making 12 of his 21 shots, including nine of 16 from behind the arc. Purdue shot 54 percent while holding Villanova to just 20 baskets on 58 shots (34 percent). Purdue jumped out early, building a 13-point lead thanks to Edwards’ outside shooting and Haarms’ work down low. The 7-foot-3 Dutchman towered over the shorter Wildcats, who didn’t start anyone over 6-8. He had Purdue’s first four points, on a dunk and a put-back. Edwards hit five of his nine first-half shots, all of which came

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Purdue’s Matt Haarms (center) and Nojel Eastern (right) celebrate after Haarms hit a basket in the Boilermakers’ blowout of Villanova on Saturday night

from 3-point range. Purdue had nine 3-point baskets in the first half and a dunk by Haarms put the Boilermakers up 43-24 at intermission. Some other recent tournament blowouts suffered by defending champs: 1998 • Utah beat Arizona 76-51. 2001 • Arizona beat Michigan State 80-61. 2011 • Arizona beat Duke 93-77. 2018 • Texas A&M beat North Carolina 86-65. Tennessee-Iowa matchup looms • A trip to the Sweet 16 is up for grabs in game in Columbus, Ohio, that is set to begin at 11:10 a.m. (St. Louis time) Sunday. In the first round of the tournament, No. 2 seed Tennessee beat Colgate 77-70

and No. 10 Iowa ousted Cincinnati 79-72. Tennessee’s Grant Williams has averaged 18.7 points and 7.5 rebounds while Admiral Schofield has put up 16.3 points and 6.1 rebounds. Williams has made 56.6 percent of his shots this season. For the Hawkeyes, Tyler Cook has averaged 14.6 points and 7.8 rebounds while Luka Garza has put up 13.1 points and 4.5 rebounds. There are some interesting trends for the teams. Iowa is 0-6 when scoring fewer than 68 points and 23-5 when scoring at least 68. Tennessee is 27-0 when it holds an opponent to 81 points or fewer. The Volunteers are 3-5 when opponents score more than 81 points.

Michigan State is back in the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2015 after rolling past Minnesota 70-50 in the second round of the NCAA Tournament on Saturday night in Des Moines, Iowa. The Spartans (30-6) came out making shots at a blistering pace and were never seriously threatened, a stark contrast to their nerve-wracking first-round win over Bradley on Thursday. The win in the battle of Big Ten teams sends the second-seeded Spartans to an East Regional semifinal Friday against Louisiana State in Washington, D.C. The Spartans made nine of their first 10 shots on their way to building a 20-point lead in the first 14 minutes. Minnesota managed to pull within single digits briefly in the second half before Big Ten player of the year Cassius Winston took matters into his hands. Xavier Tillman had 14 points, Winston added 13 with nine assists, and the Spartans shot 57.1 percent. Amir Coffey had 25 points to lead the 10th-seeded Gophers, who shot a season-worst 30.5 percent and made only 2 of 22 3-pointers. Minnesota (23-14) had played its best game of the season in beating Louisville in the first round, but it struggled shooting early and was hamstrung by the absence of forward Jordan Murphy. The Gophers’ No. 1 career rebounder and No. 2 scorer spent most of the first half behind the bench stretching his tight back. He was limited to four minutes, his fewest since his freshman year. The Gophers’ problems went beyond Murphy’s absence. Gabe Kalscheur, who had 24 points against Louisville, had foul trouble and didn’t score until making two free throws with 15 minutes left in the game. Still, Minnesota tried to make it interesting, running off eight straight points to pull to 40-31. Then Winston took over for a spell. He got a rebound and made a shot from the wing at the other end, made a steal and another jumper, and swiped the ball again and buried a 3-pointer to make it 4731. The lead swelled to as many as 22 points from there. LSU 69, Maryland 67 •It probably is the same play suspended Louisiana State coach Will Wade would have called. After all, it worked several times during the regular season. And now it has sent the Tigers to the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2006. Tremont Waters drove by three defenders and scooped in a banking layup with 1.6 seconds remaining to give thirdseeded LSU a victory in a second-round game, in Jacksonville, Fla. “Great players make great plays, and he made a great play,” interim coach Tony Benford said. After Maryland’s Eric Ayala failed to get off a shot from midcourt before the final buzzer, LSU players mobbed Waters under the basket. They could have done the same to Skylar Mays, who scored 16 points and hit a huge 3-pointer with 40 seconds left that put the Tigers (28-6) up 67-64. Jalen Smith answered on the other end fo the sixth-seeed Terrapins, sending the packed crowd into a frenzy and prompting LSU to call timeout. His 15 points led the team. Benford dialed up the final play for Waters, a dynamic sophomore who has been terrific all season. “The players knew exactly what was coming,” Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said. “We all knew what was coming. It was whether we were going to be able to stop it or not.” Waters drove into the lane and somehow got off the winner. “Just the feeling, it feels amazing,” Waters said. Wade could only celebrate from afar. The coach was banished indefinitely after details or alleged recruiting violations emerged. The Tigers advanced anyway. The Terrapins (23-11) rallied from a 15-point deficit in the second half to make it a nail-biter down the stretch. Turgeon switched to a zone defense, which slowed Waters, and the team had a three-point lead with 5 minutes to go. “I never thought we were going to lose until the kid made the lay-up, to be honest with you,” Turgeon said.


D6 • ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH

NCAA TOURNAMENT

M 4 • SUnDAy • 03.24.2019

MIDWEST REGIONAL

EAST REGIONAL

Auburn rolls over Kansas

Michigan St. soars past Minnesota

Kentucky stymies Wofford; Magee 0 for 12 on 3-point tries

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Michigan State’s Nick Ward shoots over Minnesota’s Jordan Murphy on Saturday. ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Auburn’s Horace Spencer (right) soars to defend against Kansas’ Devon Dotson in the first half Saturday night in his team’s lopsided victory.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bruce Pearl and Auburn made another unexpected leap in its rebuilding process Saturday night, putting on a dazzling offensive display to take down a college basketball blue blood. A year after an unexpected Southeastern Conference title and one NCAA Tournament game victory, the Tigers are headed to the Sweet 16 for the first time in 16 years. Poised under college basketball’s brightest spotlight, Auburn ran over Kansas 89-75 in the Midwest Regional, in Salt Lake City, to earn one of the biggest wins in program history. The Tigers will play Friday in Kansas City against the winner of Sunday’s North Carolina-Washington matchup. “It’s a big step,” Pearl said. “I know the SEC is proud of us. That means a lot to me.” Auburn (28-9) had to overcome lategame blunders to hold off New Mexico State in its NCAA Tournament opener. The fifth-seeded Tigers had no such trouble against Kansas, pouncing on the undermanned Jayhawks and not letting them up. Auburn had a 17-point lead before the midpoint of the first half and kept pouring in shots, hitting 13 3-pointers while shooting 53 percent. Bryce Brown scored 25 points and hit seven 3-pointers, and Jared Harper had 18

points to send Auburn to the Sweet 16 for the fourth time — first since 2003. The Jayhawks (26-10) hoped they would get the ticket to KC, where they would essentially play Sweet 16 home games as the No. 4 seed. Coach Bill Self’s bunch got gut punched early and never climbed off the canvas, bounced from the NCAA Tournament in the second round after reaching the Final Four a year ago. Dedric Lawson had 25 points and 10 rebounds in what could be his final game in KU red and blue. “We hadn’t seen an onslaught like that all year, the first 10 minutes of the game,” Self said. “They rattled us and we didn’t respond very well.” Kentucky 62, Wofford 56 • Everywhere Fletcher Magee turned, there was a hand in his face, a body in his way, a relentless wave of blue that was intent on making sure he never found any alone time. Kentucky completely shut down the most prolific 3-point scorer in Division I history, and thanks to that stifling defensive effort, the Wildcats are moving on in the NCAA Tournament. Magee missed all 12 of his attempts from long range in his final college game, and Kentucky held off Wofford 62-56 in the second round of the Midwest Regional, in Jacksonville, Fla. “We wanted to make him put the ball

on the floor and make a basketball play,” said freshman guard Ashton Hagans, one of the players tasked with shutting down the Wofford gunner. Mission accomplished. Reid Travis scored 14 points, grabbed 11 rebounds and made two huge free throws with 17.8 seconds left to help seal the victory for second-seeded Kentucky (29-6). But coach John Calipari knew the key to this game was at the defensive end. “If they hit a normal amount of 3s, they probably beat us,” the coach said. Kentucky next plays on Friday, in Kansas City against the winner of Sunday’s HoustonOhio State game. Wofford (30-5) certainly had its chances, limiting the Wildcats to 40 percent shooting (21 of 52) and holding its own on the boards. But Magee simply couldn’t make a shot, which was even more stunning because he had hit seven less than 48 hours earlier in a victory over Seton Hall — on the night he eclipsed the Division I record for career 3-pointers. “I’m still kind of in shock,” Magee said. Kentucky’s length, athleticism and effort certainly had something to do with Magee’s dismal showing. Tyler Herro had a tough shooting game himself, but he did a yeoman’s job on the Wofford gunner.

SOUTH REGIONAL

Purdue ousts defending champ ’Nova ASSOCIATED PRESS

HARTFORD, CONN. • Purdue’s Carsen

Edwards says he was getting tired of answering questions about his shooting slump. The Boilermakers’ junior star had all the answers Saturday night. He scored a career-high 42 points as Purdue knocked reigning national champion Villanova out of the NCAA Tournament in an 87-61 rout in a South Regional second-round contest. It was the worst tournament loss in Villanova’s storied NCAA Tournament history and the largest blowout of a defending champion in nearly three decades, dating to Loyola-Marymount’s 149-115 dismantling of Michigan in 1990. “This game is a humbling game,” Villanova coach Jay Wright said. “We didn’t get up on Edwards early, didn’t get up on (Ryan) Cline early and when great shooters get hot, you’re in trouble.” Matt Haarms added 18 points and nine rebounds and Cline added 12 points, all on 3-pointers, for the third-seeded Boilermakers (25-9), who advanced to their third straight Sweet 16. They’ll play on Thursday in Louisville, Ky. against the winner of Sunday’s Tennessee-Iowa game. Eric Paschall had 19 for Villanova (2610), which saw its quest for a third national title in the last four seasons end during the tournament’s first weekend. Fellow senior Phil Booth scored 15 points, putting him over 1,500 for his career. Edwards has battled a sore back and coming into the tournament had hit just 32 percent from the floor in his previous 11 games. Against Old Dominion in the first round he was not much better, scoring 26 points but on 7 for 23 from the floor and four for 12 from behind the arc. He found the bottom of the net early and often against ’Nova, making 12 of his

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Purdue’s Matt Haarms (center) and Nojel Eastern (right) celebrate after Haarms hit a basket in the Boilermakers’ blowout of Villanova on Saturday night.

21 shots — and nine 3-pointers, on 16 attempts. “I wouldn’t say I knew I had a career night until the game was over,” he said. “I was just so focused on trying to get the win, especially in games like this where you value every possession.” Purdue shot 54 percent while holding Villanova to just 20 baskets on 58 shots (34 percent). Purdue jumped out early, building a 13-point lead thanks to Edwards’ outside shooting and Haarms’ work down low. The 7-foot-3 Dutchman towered over the shorter Wildcats, who didn’t start anyone over 6-8. Purdue had nine 3-point baskets in the first half and a dunk by Haarms put the

Boilermakers up 43-24 at intermission. Another dunk from Haarms extended the lead to 35 in the second half. Villanova chipped away but the sixth seeded Big East champions did not have weapons to make it a game. Purdue coach Matt Painter said as proud as he is of the consistency it takes to make it to the regional semifinals three years in a row, he’s not looking at that as a great accomplishment. “You know you’re greedy as a coach,” he said. “You look at it like you didn’t advance further; you should have played better in conference play. We’re excited about going to the Sweet 16, but we want to do better. We want to do better for ourselves and our fans.”

Michigan State is back in the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2015 after rolling past Minnesota 70-50 in the second round of the NCAA Tournament on Saturday night in Des Moines, Iowa. The Spartans (30-6) came out making shots at a blistering pace and were never seriously threatened, a stark contrast to their nerve-wracking first-round win over Bradley on Thursday. The win in the battle of Big Ten teams sends the second-seeded Spartans to an East Regional semifinal Friday against Louisiana State in Washington, D.C. The Spartans made nine of their first 10 shots on their way to building a 20-point lead in the first 14 minutes. Minnesota managed to pull within single digits briefly in the second half before Big Ten player of the year Cassius Winston took matters into his hands. Xavier Tillman had 14 points, Winston added 13 with nine assists, and the Spartans shot 57.1 percent. Amir Coffey had 25 points to lead the 10th-seeded Gophers, who shot a season-worst 30.5 percent and made only 2 of 22 3-pointers. Minnesota (23-14) had played its best game of the season in beating Louisville in the first round, but it struggled shooting early and was hamstrung by the absence of forward Jordan Murphy. The Gophers’ No. 1 career rebounder and No. 2 scorer spent most of the first half behind the bench stretching his tight back. He was limited to four minutes, his fewest since his freshman year. The Gophers’ problems went beyond Murphy’s absence. Gabe Kalscheur, who had 24 points against Louisville, had foul trouble and didn’t score until making two free throws with 15 minutes left in the game. Still, Minnesota tried to make it interesting, running off eight straight points to pull to 40-31. Then Winston took over for a spell. He got a rebound and made a shot from the wing at the other end, made a steal and another jumper, and swiped the ball again and buried a 3-pointer to make it 4731. The lead swelled to as many as 22 points from there. LSU 69, Maryland 67 •It probably is the same play suspended Louisiana State coach Will Wade would have called. After all, it worked several times during the regular season. And now it has sent the Tigers to the Sweet 16 for the first time since 2006. Tremont Waters drove by three defenders and scooped in a banking layup with 1.6 seconds remaining to give thirdseeded LSU a victory in a second-round game, in Jacksonville, Fla. “Great players make great plays, and he made a great play,” interim coach Tony Benford said. After Maryland’s Eric Ayala failed to get off a shot from midcourt before the final buzzer, LSU players mobbed Waters under the basket. They could have done the same to Skylar Mays, who scored 16 points and hit a huge 3-pointer with 40 seconds left that put the Tigers (28-6) up 67-64. Jalen Smith answered on the other end fo the sixth-seeed Terrapins, sending the packed crowd into a frenzy and prompting LSU to call timeout. His 15 points led the team. Benford dialed up the final play for Waters, a dynamic sophomore who has been terrific all season. “The players knew exactly what was coming,” Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said. “We all knew what was coming. It was whether we were going to be able to stop it or not.” Waters drove into the lane and somehow got off the winner. “Just the feeling, it feels amazing,” Waters said. Wade could only celebrate from afar. The coach was banished indefinitely after details or alleged recruiting violations emerged. The Tigers advanced anyway. The Terrapins (23-11) rallied from a 15-point deficit in the second half to make it a nail-biter down the stretch. Turgeon switched to a zone defense, which slowed Waters, and the team had a three-point lead with 5 minutes to go. “I never thought we were going to lose until the kid made the lay-up, to be honest with you,” Turgeon said.


BASEBALL

03.24.2019 • SUNDAY • M 1

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH • D7

CARDINALS XXX REGIONNOTEBOOK

Cards let Shreve go and keep Wieters headline Pitcher struggled subhed with his command in exhibition ASSOCIATED PRESS games BY RICK HUMMEL St. Louis Post-Dispatch

P O R T ST. LU C I E , F L A . •

Lefthanded reliever Chasen Shreve was apt to surrender home runs last year, both with the New York Yankees and the Cardinals, who acquired him in the Luke Voit deal. In 522/3 innings, Shreve offered up 11 homers, including three in 142/3 innings with the Cardinals. His control also had been somewhat an issue, but not like it was this spring. The 27-yearold walked nine in those 142/3 innings last year and this spring he also walked nine — in nine innings. And that is the main reason Shreve was designated for assignment Friday by the Cardinals, making room on the 40-man roster for catcher Matt Wieters, who gained the backup catcher’s job over Francisco Pena. John Mozeliak, president of baseball operations, said Shreve had “a great opportunity. Unfortunately, it was a very competitive camp for him. Command definitely was an issue.” The Cardinals would prefer to have several relievers who have options remaining so they can mix and match as needed from Class AAA Memphis. For in-

stance, next week when they play the Milwaukee Brewers, who have several prominent lefthanded hitters, including 2018 league MVP Christian Yelich, they might have two lefthanders in the bullpen rather than just Andrew Miller. And that could change, said manager Mike Shildt, depending on the opponent. Lefthander Tyler Webb and righthander John Brebbia, both of whom have options remaining, are the favorites for the final spot in the bullpen. Non-roster pitcher Tommy Layne, a native St. Louisan and more of a lefthanded specialist, is still around, too. Shildt confirmed that Mike Mayers, who is out of options, will be on the opening-day roster and Alex Reyes, who finished Friday’s 15-5 romp over the New York Mets, previously had been named as a reliever, as was John Gant, who started and got the win over the Mets.

WIETERS WINS IT Pena, who hit .278 in 18 at-bats this spring but missed more than a week with a strained oblique, will remain with the club for the final couple of days of spring as he and his agent try to find another home. There is a chance he still could go to Memphis, and he didn’t reject that. “If nobody’s interested, I’ll be open to go,” the son of former big league star Tony Pena said. Wieters is just three for 24

(.125) and nothing for his last 13. But Shildt said, “We’re excited to have his experience, his presence and his ability.” Wieters was a four-time All-Star in Baltimore and also played two years in Washington. Mozeliak said, “One played. And one didn’t. The other part of it is having a lefthanded bat (Wieters is a switch-hitter).” That Wieters hadn’t done much at the plate this spring didn’t dissuade Mozeliak. “His résumé speaks differently,” said Mozeliak. Wieters is a lifetime .251 batter who has 135 homers. Pena took the news gracefully and was complimentary of Wieters whom he used to back up in Baltimore. “(Wieters) is a great guy to have there. I have nothing bad to say about him. Congratulations to him,” said Pena. Pena is a popular player in the clubhouse and he said, “To be honest, everybody’s going to be sad. The coaching staff is probably going to be sad as well. The pitching staff and I have some good communication with each other here. But it’s baseball. That’s the way the game is and you have to move on. You have to get something good going.” Pena said he couldn’t project what would have happened if he hadn’t been hurt swinging at a pitch in early March. “I think I would have had a chance,” he said. No. 1 catcher Yadier Molina, who was close with Pena, said,

Goldschmidt has big day at plate

“Obviously you don’t want to lose a guy like that, but it’s part of the game. He knows it and I know it.” But Molina also has respect for Wieters. “I’ve played against him for many years,” Molina said. “I’m looking forward to working with him. Right now, he’s learning about the staff and I will be there for him to help him out.”

GREGERSON, MARTINEZ, CECIL ON INJURED LIST In other roster moves, righthanders Luke Gregerson (shoulder) and Carlos Martinez (shoulder) will start the season on the 10-day injured list, as well as lefthander Brett Cecil (possible nerve issue). First baseman Rangel Ravelo, one of the stories of camp for the Cardinals, was hitting .333 on May 15 when he made a diving stab to end the game and hurt his rib-cage area. He hasn’t played since and will be sent to Memphis. “He’s done everything you could ask,” said Mozeliak. “I would not be surprised if he would end up in the big leagues at some point.” CARDS PASTE METS Gant was strong over his last four innings, going unscored on from the third through two outs in the sixth when he came out after throwing 86 pitches. “He had a really good identity that I’d like our team to have,”

Cardinals 15, Mets 5 St. Louis ab r h bi New York ab r h bi H.Bader cf 5 0 2 0 J.McNil 3b 5 2 3 1 Mrtinez rf 5 0 0 0 P.Alnso 1b 5 1 2 1 O’Neill rf 1 1 1 0 Ro.Cano 2b 4 0 2 0 Gldhmdt 1b 4 2 3 1 J.Frnco 2b 1 0 0 0 Mendoza 1b 2 0 0 0 d’Arnud c 2 0 1 0 M.Ozuna lf 2 2 1 2 To.Nido c 3 0 0 0 J.Meses ph 1 0 0 0 Rosario ss 5 0 1 1 P.DJong ss 4 2 2 0 Broxton cf 3 1 1 0 Carlson ph 1 2 1 0 C.Gomez lf 4 1 2 0 Y.Mlina c 4 2 2 3 R.Davis rf 2 0 1 0 Knizner c 1 0 1 2 Muricio dh 3 0 1 1 Ko.Wong 2b 3 2 2 1 Rbinson pr 0 10 0 T.Edman 3b 6 1 4 3 Jo.Gant sp 2 0 1 0 Y.Munoz ss 1 0 1 3 Totals 42 1521 15 Totals 37 5 14 4 St. Louis 023 021 142 — 15 New York 120 000 200 — 5 E: McNeil (1), Alonso (1), Davis (1). DP: St. Louis 3, New York 2. LOB: St. Louis 11, New York 9. 2B: Bader (1), O’Neill (3), Goldschmidt (1), DeJong 2 (2), Molina (1), Knizner (3), Wong (1). 3B: Goldschmidt (1). HR: Goldschmidt (1), Ozuna (1), McNeil (1). CS: Mauricio (1). SF: Ozuna (1), Wong (1), Munoz (2), Mauricio (1). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO 8 3 3 2 4 Gant W, 2-1 5 2/3 1/ 4 2 2 1 0 Leone 1 3 Mayers 1 2 0 0 0 1 Reyes 1 0 0 0 0 0 New York IP H R ER BB SO Santiago L, 1-2 3 7 5 5 3 1 O’Rourke 1 1 0 0 0 0 Conlon 1 4 2 2 1 0 Uceta 2 2 2 1 0 0 Cavallaro 1 5 4 3 0 0 Burnett 1 2 2 2 1 0 HBP: by: Santiago (Ozuna), Burnett (Robinson). WP: Conlon. Umpires: Home, Larry Vanover; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Roberto Ortiz; Third, Greg Gibson. T: 3:22. A: 6,935

Shildt said. “If it’s not going well for you, how do you figure out a way to get it going? That was John Gant today.” Molina homered, singled and walked — and also threw out a runner trying to steal. Marcell Ozuna homered for the second day in succession after having one extra-base hit before Thursday. Rick Hummel @cmshhummel on Twitter rhummel@post-dispatch.com

O’Neill has power, needs consistency

man, there’s a little bit of a turnover CAPTION_JUMP where it went from a little older team get going on that. I mean, that’s what to a lot of really young guys. This team we’re passionate about — trying to has the opportunity to be good for the next five or six years.” find ways to get better.” His new contract will cover those That early connection for Goldschmidt strengthened and expanded years, till 2024. “The organization has potential from the manager to the clubhouse to the organization through spring to set itself up to be successful,” he training. It will climax Saturday with continued. “I step in to see those guys the announcement of his club-record on a daily basis, like Kolten Wong extension, details of which the Post- and Paul DeJong or Dakota Hudson Dispatch first reported Thursday. or a lot of these guys in the bullpen. I Goldschmidt had his physical Fri- thought they had a lot of talent, were day, and sources confirmed the team really great players, and now to see it and player were finalizing a five-year, confirms that. Now being part of the team, we have to go out there and def$130 million extension. The contract is expected to be of- initely earn that. It’s good for the guys ficially announced at a news confer- or an outsider to have those thoughts, ence at the team’s spring training but you have to go out there and earn facility in Jupiter, Fla. Goldschmidt it and play and win.” Goldschmidt suggested the regudeclined to discuss specifics, adding: PLAY BRACKETBALL 2019 • STLTODAY.COM/CONTESTS 1 Duke is pretty 85 close. Hopefully Virginia 71 1 lar playing time in the past week has “Something 30-5 Virginia 30-3 helped synch his swing. Headed into will happen soon.” Duke 16 N.first Dakota St. 62 Gard.-Webb 56 16 His comments since agree- Friday’s game vs. the Mets, he had 6:45 Sunday 4:15 Sunday had two hits in his previous 19 at-bats ing to terms with the Cardinals came ASSOCIATED PRESS truTV KMOV (4) 8 he VCUhad three58extra-base hits in 72 game 8 and he had struck out eight times. after The Cardinals’ Tyler O’Neill talks in the dugout with Paul Goldschmidt duringMississippi an exhibition Central Fla. 24-8 Oklahoma 20-13 a 15-5 victory over the Mets at their Friday was his fifth consecutive game against the Washington Nationals last month. 9 Central Fla. 73 Oklahoma 95 9 spring ballpark. Goldschmidt dou- played, and he powered the CarFriday 21-hit jamboree. He hit four 306 at-bats ber Martinez exists. Martibled to left field in his first at-bat, dinals’ FREDERICKSON FREDERICKSON •• FROM FROM B1 D1 hit 21 homers inThursday 5 Miss. to St. deep 76 54 5hita righthanded last season. Ranking first on nez, also Wisconsin homered right-center in his balls squarely to four different parts Oregon ter, has 24-12 spent the past two 29-6off of the field. All that kept him from second at-bat andLiberty hit a triple With nothing left for him to the list is former Cardinals 12 Liberty Oregon he is72one 12 of showing a glove near the 80 right-field wall in adding a single was a running catch prove in the minors, it’s time first baseman turned Yan- 8:40seasons Sunday 6:10 Sunday team’s most steady perhis fourth at-bat. He thenTBStalked to on a sinking liner in shallow center by to find out. The answer could kee Luke Voit, who cranked the TBS 4 Va. Tech getting 24-8 two at-bats SatSt. 64 4 Mets outfielder Keon Broxton. the plate. Shildt about impact much more than this 15 homers in 143 at-bats. Voit formers atKansas Late UC Irvine 31-5 But O’Neill has his After four at-bats, Goldschmidt might be the power producer urday because he wants to maintain season. St. Louis as U. 23-12 UCand Irvinethey 70 are13not did not lobby for a crack at a single. let get away, strengths, his13timing Thursday’s opening EAST O’Neill’s elite power pro- the CardinalsSOUTH Louisville, Ky. once Mar. 31 Mar. 30 just strength-based. He “A D.C. spring training cycle is not as then again, many day approaches. What is true for his Washington, pelled him to this point. but KFC Yum! Center Capital One Arena Villanova 61 6as a 6 Maryland 79career. called upon cool as a real one,” he said. swing is true for his What he can build around it thought that about Adams, hopes to be Villanova 26-9 23-10 to pinch-runner to maximize A Diamondback his entire career He finds the right Maryland feel and wants as an X-factor reserve could who tends to surge, fade, St. defies Mary’s his57frame. 11 11there. Belmont 77 speed that until the four-player trade that sent then repeat. stay influence how the Cardinals 7:40 Saturday 11:10 a.m. Saturday He can play any outfield pohim to the Cardinals, Goldschmidt Among that group of 400TNT “It’s been great here — the whole see him as a potential starter KMOV (4) Purdue 61 3and 3 LSU 79 top to bottom,” confidence, said one of the things that intrigued plus major league hitters who sition with organization, from in 2020. No pressure. Purdue he is probably 24-9 the team’s best said Goldschmidt, LSU whom the27-6 Car- him most about a new organization O’Neill’s Friday afternoon had more than 130 MLB atDomin. fielder 48 14 if 14 Yale 74 Arizona in Dewas the chance to get “a lot more sets dinals acquired from played out like a regular- bats in 2018, O’Neill finished defensiveOldcenter Friday eyes, new sets of eyes” on his game. in plate ap- Harrison Bader is out. cember. “It’s kind of what I expected of season game soon might. second-to-lastThursday Cincinnati 72 7 7 Louisville “Playing as a defensive coming in. Heard76 from other players He has said throughout spring trainHe entered the seventh in- pearances per strikeout. His Iowa replacement 23-11 Minnesota 22-13the here or there,” ing that he feels his career — six-time PA/K of 2.49 trailed only who played here and know how ning as a defensive replaceNCAA Iowaas he described 79 10 10 Minnesota runs. 86 They welcomed All-Star, two-time NL MVP runO’Neill said Brett Phillips. You probably organization ment in right field for the 11:10 a.m. Sunday 6:45 Saturday his(4)role with enthusiasm. ner-up, three-time Gold Glove win-BASKETBALL me pretty quickly, whether day’s starter, Jose Martinez. don’t know that name. Phil- KMOV KMOV (4) it was Tennessee Getting 77 2 a 2 Mich. St. 76 “Pinch-hitting. ner — is the sum of his coaches DIVISION and lips was sent to the minors Shildt or the other players.” He handled a line drive single I MEN’S Tennessee 30-5 Mich. St. 29-6 Several players admitted that re- teammates, and thus he’s the sum of that inning, then hit a double earlier this month. By the spot start once in a while. I’m CHAMPIONSHIP 70 than 15 15 Bradley 65 to stick around ready for Colgate it, a lot more those conversations. Teammates have cruiting Goldschmidt against lefthanded reliever Royals. O’Neill’s plate appear- I was last year. I’m looking past the 2019 season began shortly described how Goldschmidt hasn’t Sean Burnett in the ninth. encountered a baseball talk that he ances per walk also slotted after trade happened. Matt Car-SWEET “He’s got a chance to put a SWEET 2ND ROUND 16 REGIONALS 2ND forward ROUNDto it.”1ST ROUND 1STthe ROUND 16 REGIONALS It should be noticed — penter and Adam Wainwright were won’t join. swing on the ball and drive it among the 50 least impresShildt said he doesn’t put a stop- SEMIFINALS among the first to text him notes of out of the ballpark,” manager sive on the list. He averaged and it is in the clubhouse N. Carolina 88 who 1 1 Gonzaga Saturday, April 6, 5:10 and 7:50said. p.m., “If time Cardinals, 20.3 plate appearances per — that the welcome. Andrew87Miller, who signed watch on his talks about baseball but Mike Shildt KMOVfor (4)it, we can use it. And N. Carolina 28-6 Gonzaga 31-3 rushed to extend Paul Goldfigures he’s had a handful of 15- to free pass. For a reference shortly after Goldschmidt’s trade, calls 16 Fairl.first D’sonbaseman 49 schmidt Iona before he 73 played and16the talked about 20-minute talks with Goldschmidt CHAMPIONSHIP I’m not saying that’s the only point, Matt Carpenter, one of1:40 p.m. Sunday 6:10 Saturday one game that counted, have about anything from bunt defense the best walkers in the game, where to live in St. Louis. thing he’s capable of doing. KMOV (4) TBS GoldMonday, April 8, 8:20 p.m., KMOV (4) Utah State 61 8 8 Syracuse 69 an extension schmidt said he received a text mes- to baserunning. Some of those talks, U.S.There will be spots for him, averaged 6.6 plate appear- not pursued Bank Stadium Washington 27-8 with starting left fielder and Minneapolis ances per walk. And Carpensage from former Baylor Cardinals20-13 first Shildt said, have shifted his thinking for sure.” Washington 78 9The 9 BaylorAlbert Pujols 78 Ozuna. baseman asking if he on a play. O’Neill’s 113 minor league ter slugged .526 to O’Neill’s cleanup hitter Friday The contract extension comes bemost pending free agent is playwanted to buy his house. (The Gold- Thursday home runs since 2015 rank .500. Now, comparing 78 there 5 5 Marquette 64 contract, but schmidts had already chosen one.) fore Goldschmidt and his family have first among all players during hitters to Carpenter is unfair, ing for a Auburn Au